Sample records for modeling coupled processes

  1. Modeling Coupled Processes in Clay Formations for Radioactive Waste Disposal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Hui-Hai; Rutqvist, Jonny; Zheng, Liange; Sonnenthal, Eric; Houseworth, Jim; Birkholzer, Jens

    2010-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    As a result of the termination of the Yucca Mountain Project, the United States Department of Energy (DOE) has started to explore various alternative avenues for the disposition of used nuclear fuel and nuclear waste. The overall scope of the investigation includes temporary storage, transportation issues, permanent disposal, various nuclear fuel types, processing alternatives, and resulting waste streams. Although geologic disposal is not the only alternative, it is still the leading candidate for permanent disposal. The realm of geologic disposal also offers a range of geologic environments that may be considered, among those clay shale formations. Figure 1-1 presents the distribution of clay/shale formations within the USA. Clay rock/shale has been considered as potential host rock for geological disposal of high-level nuclear waste throughout the world, because of its low permeability, low diffusion coefficient, high retention capacity for radionuclides, and capability to self-seal fractures induced by tunnel excavation. For example, Callovo-Oxfordian argillites at the Bure site, France (Fouche et al., 2004), Toarcian argillites at the Tournemire site, France (Patriarche et al., 2004), Opalinus clay at the Mont Terri site, Switzerland (Meier et al., 2000), and Boom clay at Mol site, Belgium (Barnichon et al., 2005) have all been under intensive scientific investigations (at both field and laboratory scales) for understanding a variety of rock properties and their relations with flow and transport processes associated with geological disposal of nuclear waste. Clay/shale formations may be generally classified as indurated and plastic clays (Tsang et al., 2005). The latter (including Boom clay) is a softer material without high cohesion; its deformation is dominantly plastic. For both clay rocks, coupled thermal, hydrological, mechanical and chemical (THMC) processes are expected to have a significant impact on the long-term safety of a clay repository. For example, the excavation-damaged zone (EDZ) near repository tunnels can modify local permeability (resulting from induced fractures), potentially leading to less confinement capability (Tsang et al., 2005). Because of clay's swelling and shrinkage behavior (depending on whether the clay is in imbibition or drainage processes), fracture properties in the EDZ are quite dynamic and evolve over time as hydromechanical conditions change. To understand and model the coupled processes and their impact on repository performance is critical for the defensible performance assessment of a clay repository. Within the Natural Barrier System (NBS) group of the Used Fuel Disposition (UFD) Campaign at DOE's Office of Nuclear Energy, LBNL's research activities have focused on understanding and modeling such coupled processes. LBNL provided a report in this April on literature survey of studies on coupled processes in clay repositories and identification of technical issues and knowledge gaps (Tsang et al., 2010). This report will document other LBNL research activities within the natural system work package, including the development of constitutive relationships for elastic deformation of clay rock (Section 2), a THM modeling study (Section 3) and a THC modeling study (Section 4). The purpose of the THM and THC modeling studies is to demonstrate the current modeling capabilities in dealing with coupled processes in a potential clay repository. In Section 5, we discuss potential future R&D work based on the identified knowledge gaps. The linkage between these activities and related FEPs is presented in Section 6.

  2. Modeling Coupled Processes in Clay Formations for Radioactive Waste Disposal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Hui-Hai

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    International Workshop on Geomechanics, hydromechanical andflow, heat transport and geomechanics, by linking the twotransport modeling and geomechanics using the reactive

  3. Modeling Coupled Processes in Clay Formations for Radioactive Waste Disposal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Hui-Hai

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and the future path of diagenesis have important effects onthe basic basin model for diagenesis. Therefore, some method

  4. Coupled process modelling with applications to radionuclide storage and disposal 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    English, Myles

    2013-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Radioactive waste repositories, designed in accordance with the current UK concept, would be required to provide containment for thousands of years beneath hundreds of metres of rock. The physical processes, both geological ...

  5. Hybrid models for the simulation of microstructural evolution influenced by coupled, multiple physical processes.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tikare, Veena; Hernandez-Rivera, Efrain; Madison, Jonathan D.; Holm, Elizabeth Ann [Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, PA; Patterson, Burton R. [University of Florida, Gainesville, FL; Homer, Eric R. [Brigham Young University, Provo, UT

    2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Most materials microstructural evolution processes progress with multiple processes occurring simultaneously. In this work, we have concentrated on the processes that are active in nuclear materials, in particular, nuclear fuels. These processes are coarsening, nucleation, differential diffusion, phase transformation, radiation-induced defect formation and swelling, often with temperature gradients present. All these couple and contribute to evolution that is unique to nuclear fuels and materials. Hybrid model that combines elements from the Potts Monte Carlo, phase-field models and others have been developed to address these multiple physical processes. These models are described and applied to several processes in this report. An important feature of the models developed are that they are coded as applications within SPPARKS, a Sandiadeveloped framework for simulation at the mesoscale of microstructural evolution processes by kinetic Monte Carlo methods. This makes these codes readily accessible and adaptable for future applications.

  6. Modeling Coupled THMC Processes and Brine Migration in Salt at High Temperatures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rutqvist, Jonny; Blanco Martin, Laura; Mukhopadhyay, Sumit; Houseworth, Jim; Birkholzer, Jens

    2014-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

    In this report, we present FY2014 progress by Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) related to modeling of coupled thermal-hydrological-mechanical-chemical (THMC) processes in salt and their effect on brine migration at high temperatures. LBNL’s work on the modeling of coupled THMC processes in salt was initiated in FY2012, focusing on exploring and demonstrating the capabilities of an existing LBNL modeling tool (TOUGH-FLAC) for simulating temperature-driven coupled flow and geomechanical processes in salt. This work includes development related to, and implementation of, essential capabilities, as well as testing the model against relevant information and published experimental data related to the fate and transport of water. we provide more details on the FY2014 work, first presenting updated tools and improvements made to the TOUGH-FLAC simulator, and the use of this updated tool in a new model simulation of long-term THM behavior within a generic repository in a salt formation. This is followed by the description of current benchmarking and validations efforts, including the TSDE experiment. We then present the current status in the development of constitutive relationships and the dual-continuum model for brine migration. We conclude with an outlook for FY2015, which will be much focused on model validation against field experiments and on the use of the model for the design studies related to a proposed heater experiment.

  7. MODELING COUPLED PROCESSES OF MULTIPHASE FLOW AND HEAT TRANSFER IN UNSATURATED FRACTURED ROCK

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Y. Wu; S. Mukhopadhyay; K. Zhang; G.S. Bodvarsson

    2006-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

    A mountain-scale, thermal-hydrologic (TH) numerical model is developed for investigating unsaturated flow behavior in response to decay heat from the radioactive waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, USA. The TH model, consisting of three-dimensional (3-D) representations of the unsaturated zone, is based on the current repository design, drift layout, and thermal loading scenario under estimated current and future climate conditions. More specifically, the TH model implements the current geological framework and hydrogeological conceptual models, and incorporates the most updated, best-estimated input parameters. This mountain-scale TH model simulates the coupled TH processes related to mountain-scale multiphase fluid flow, and evaluates the impact of radioactive waste heat on the hydrogeological system, including thermally perturbed liquid saturation, gas- and liquid-phase fluxes, and water and rock temperature elevations, as well as the changes in water flux driven by evaporation/condensation processes and drainage between drifts. For a better description of the ambient geothermal condition of the unsaturated zone system, the TH model is first calibrated against measured borehole temperature data. The ambient temperature calibration provides the necessary surface and water table boundary as well as initial conditions. Then, the TH model is used to obtain scientific understanding of TH processes in the Yucca Mountain unsaturated zone under the designed schedule of repository thermal load.

  8. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Coupled Hierarchical Models for Thermal, Mechanical, Electrical and Electrochemical Processes

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by [company name] at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about coupled hierarchical models...

  9. Coupled modeling of groundwater flow solute transport, chemical reactions and microbial processes in the 'SP' island

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Samper, Javier; Molinero, Jorg; Changbing, Yang; Zhang, Guoxiang

    2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Redox Zone Experiment was carried out at the Aespoe HRL in order to study the redox behavior and the hydrochemistry of an isolated vertical fracture zone disturbed by the excavation of an access tunnel. Overall results and interpretation of the Redox Zone Project were reported by /Banwart et al, 1995/. Later, /Banwart et al, 1999/ presented a summary of the hydrochemistry of the Redox Zone Experiment. Coupled groundwater flow and reactive transport models of this experiment were carried out by /Molinero, 2000/ who proposed a revised conceptual model for the hydrogeology of the Redox Zone Experiment which could explain simultaneously measured drawdown and salinity data. The numerical model was found useful to understand the natural system. Several conclusions were drawn about the redox conditions of recharge waters, cation exchange capacity of the fracture zone and the role of mineral phases such as pyrite, calcite, hematite and goethite. This model could reproduce the measured trends of dissolved species, except for bicarbonate and sulfate which are affected by microbially-mediated processes. In order to explore the role of microbial processes, a coupled numerical model has been constructed which accounts for water flow, reactive transport and microbial processes. The results of this model is presented in this report. This model accounts for groundwater flow and reactive transport in a manner similar to that of /Molinero, 2000/ and extends the preliminary microbial model of /Zhang, 2001/ by accounting for microbially-driven organic matter fermentation and organic matter oxidation. This updated microbial model considers simultaneously the fermentation of particulate organic matter by yeast and the oxidation of dissolved organic matter, a product of fermentation. Dissolved organic matter is produced by yeast and serves also as a substrate for iron-reducing bacteria. Model results reproduce the observed increase in bicarbonate and sulfate concentration, thus adding additional evidence for the possibility of organic matter oxidation as the main source of bicarbonate. Model results indicate that pH and Eh are relatively stable. The dissolution-precipitation trends of hematite, pyrite and calcite also coincide with those indicated by the conceptual model. A thorough sensitivity analysis has been performed for the most relevant microbial parameters as well as for initial and boundary POC and DOC concentrations. The results of such analysis indicate that computed concentrations of bicarbonate, sulfate and DOC are sensitive to most of the microbial parameters, including specific growth rates, half-saturation constants, proportionality coefficients and yield coefficients. Model results, however, are less sensitive to the yield coefficient of DOC to iron-reducer bacteria. The sensitivity analysis indicates that changes in fermentation microbial parameters affect the growth of the iron-reducer, thus confirming the interconnection of both microbial processes. Computed concentrations of bicarbonate and sulfate are found to be sensitive to changes in the initial concentration of POC and the boundary concentration of DOC, but they lack sensitivity to the initial concentration of DOC and the boundary concentration of POC. The explanation for such result is related to the fact that POC has a low mobility due to its large molecular weight. DOC, however, can migrate downwards. Although a coupled hydro-bio-geochemical 1-D model can reproduce the observed ''unexpected'' increase of concentrations of bicarbonate and sulfate at a depth of 70 m, further modeling work is required in order to obtain a similar conclusion under the more realistic two dimensional conditions of the fracture zone.

  10. 3D Modeling of Coupled Rock Deformation and Thermo-Poro-Mechanical Processes in Fractures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rawal, Chakra

    2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    and failure of weak planes of the formation with creation of new fractures, which impacts reservoir response. Incorporation of geomechanical factor into engineering analyses using fully coupled geomechanics-reservoir flow modeling exhibits computational...

  11. Information processing by a controlled coupling process

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. W. Wei; Shan Zhao

    2001-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

    This Letter proposes a controlled coupling process for information processing. The net effect of conventional coupling is isolated from the dynamical system and is analyzed in depth. The stability of the process is studied. We show that the proposed process can locally minimize the smoothness and the fidelity of dynamical data. A digital filter expression of the controlled coupling process is derived and the connection is made to the Hanning filter. The utility and robustness of proposed approach is demonstrated by both the restoration of the contaminated solution of the nonlinear Schr\\"{o}dinger equation and the estimation of the trend of a time series.

  12. Modeling shear failure and permeability enhancement due to coupled Thermal-Hydrological-Mechanical processes in Enhanced Geothermal Reservoirs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kelkar, Sharad [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The connectivity and accessible surface area of flowing fractures, whether natural or man-made, is possibly the single most important factor, after temperature, which determines the feasibility of an Enhanced Geothermal System (EGS). Rock deformation and in-situ stress changes induced by injected fluids can lead to shear failure on preexisting fractures which can generate microseismic events, and also enhance the permeability and accessible surface area of the geothermal formation. Hence, the ability to accurately model the coupled thermal-hydrologic-mechanical (THM) processes in fractured geological formations is critical in effective EGS reservoir development and management strategies. The locations of the microseismic events can serve as indicators of the zones of enhanced permeability, thus providing vital information for verification of the coupled THM models. We will describe a general purpose computational code, FEHM, developed for this purpose, that models coupled THM processes during multiphase fluid flow and transport in fractured porous media. The code incorporates several models of fracture aperture and stress behavior combined with permeability relationships. We provide field scale examples of applications to geothermal systems to demonstrate the utility of the method.

  13. The model coupling toolkit.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Larson, J. W.; Jacob, R. L.; Foster, I.; Guo, J.

    2001-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The advent of coupled earth system models has raised an important question in parallel computing: What is the most effective method for coupling many parallel models to form a high-performance coupled modeling system? We present our solution to this problem--The Model Coupling Toolkit (MCT). We explain how our effort to construct the Next-Generation Coupler for NCAR Community Climate System Model motivated us to create this toolkit. We describe in detail the conceptual design of the MCT and explain its usage in constructing parallel coupled models. We present preliminary performance results for the toolkit's parallel data transfer facilities. Finally, we outline an agenda for future development of the MCT.

  14. An experimental study and modeling of Transformer-Coupled Toroidal Plasma processing of materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bai, Bo, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Transformer Coupled Toroidal Plasma (TCTP) source uses a high power density plasma formed in a toroidal-shaped chamber by transformer coupling using a magnetic core. The objectives of the thesis are (1) to characterize ...

  15. The Los Alamos coupled climate model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jones, P.W.; Malone, R.C.; Lai, C.A.

    1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    To gain a full understanding of the Earth`s climate system, it is necessary to understand physical processes in the ocean, atmosphere, land and sea ice. In addition, interactions between components are very important and models which couple all of the components into a single coupled climate model are required. A climate model which couples ocean, sea ice, atmosphere and land components is described. The component models are run as autonomous processes coupled to a flux coupler through a flexible communications library. Performance considerations of the model are examined, particularly for running the model on distributed-shared-memory machine architectures.

  16. advanced processes coupled: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Rules Computer Technologies and Information Sciences Websites Summary: Coupling Process Models and Business Rules Peter M c . Brien King's College London Strand, London systems...

  17. Prediction of the Tool Displacement by Coupled Models of the Compliant Industrial Robot and the Milling Process

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stryk, Oskar von

    Prediction of the Tool Displacement by Coupled Models of the Compliant Industrial Robot@sim.tu-darmstadt.de Abstract Using an industrial robot for machining parts provides a cost-saving and flexible alternative for industrial robots is automated pre-machining (deburring and fettling) of cast parts. There, industrial robots

  18. Coupling a branching process to an infinite dimensional epidemic process

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barbour, Andrew

    Coupling a branching process to an infinite dimensional epidemic process A. D. Barbour Universit¨at Z¨urich To Cindy Greenwood, for her 70th. Abstract Branching process approximation to the initial stages of an epi- demic process has been used since the 1950's as a technique for pro- viding stochastic

  19. Model building for flavor changing Higgs couplings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Avital Dery; Aielet Efrati; Yosef Nir; Yotam Soreq; Vasja Susi?

    2014-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

    If $t\\rightarrow hq$ ($q=c,u$) or $h\\rightarrow\\tau\\ell$ ($\\ell=\\mu,e$) decays are observed, it will be a clear signal of new physics. We investigate whether natural and viable flavor models can saturate the present direct upper bounds without violating the indirect constraints from low energy loop processes. We carry out our analysis in two theoretical frameworks: minimal flavor violation (MFV) and Froggatt-Nielsen symmetry (FN). The simplest models in either framework predict flavor changing couplings that are too small to be directly observed. Yet, in the MFV framework, it is possible to have lepton flavor changing Higgs couplings close to the bound if spurions related to heavy singlet neutrinos play a role. In the FN framework, it is possible to have large flavor changing couplings in both the up and the charged lepton sectors if supersymmetry plays a role.

  20. Bayesian Model comparison of Higgs couplings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johannes Bergstrom; Stella Riad

    2014-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the possibility of contributions from physics beyond the Standard Model (SM) to the Higgs couplings, in the light of the LHC data. The work is performed within an interim framework where the magnitude of the Higgs production and decay rates are rescaled though Higgs coupling scale factors. We perform Bayesian parameter inference on these scale factors, concluding that there is good compatibility with the SM. Furthermore, we carry out Bayesian model comparison on all models where any combination of scale factors can differ from their SM values and find that typically models with fewer free couplings are strongly favoured. We consider the evidence that each coupling individually equals the SM value, making the minimal assumptions on the other couplings. Finally, we make a comparison of the SM against a single "not-SM" model, and find that there is moderate to strong evidence for the SM.

  1. Coupled Biogeochemical Process Evaluation for Conceptualizing Trichloroethylene Co-Metabolism

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Colwell, Frederick; Radtke, Corey; Newby, Deborah; Delwiche, Mark; Crawf, Ronald L.; Paszczynski, Andrzej; Strap, Janice; Conrad, Mark; Brodic, Eoin; Starr, Robert; Lee, Hope

    2006-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Chlorinated solvent wastes (e.g., trichloroethene or TCE) often occur as diffuse subsurface plumes in complex geological environments where coupled processes must be understood in order to implement remediation strategies. Monitored natural attenuation (MNA) warrants study as a remediation technology because it minimizes worker and environment exposure to the wastes and because it costs less than other technologies. However, to be accepted MNA requires 'lines of evidence' indicating that the wastes are effectively destroyed. Our research will study the coupled biogeochemical processes that dictate the rate of TCE co-metabolism in contaminated aquifers first at the Idaho National Laboratory and then at Paducah or the Savannah River Site, where natural attenuation of TCE is occurring. We will use flow-through in situ reactors to investigate the rate of methanotrophic co-metabolism of TCE and the coupling of the responsible biological processes with the dissolved methane flux and groundwater flow velocity. We will use new approaches (e.g., stable isotope probing, enzyme activity probes, real-time reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction, proteomics) to assay the TCE co-metabolic rates, and interpret these rates in the context of enzyme activity, gene expression, and cellular inactivation related to intermediates of TCE co-metabolism. By determining the rate of TCE co-metabolism at different methane concentrations and groundwater flow velocities, we will derive key modeling parameters for the computational simulations that describe the attenuation, and thereby refine such models while assessing the contribution of microbial relative to other natural attenuation processes. This research will strengthen our ability to forecast the viability of MNA at DOE and other sites that are contaminated with chlorinated hydrocarbons.

  2. Coupled Biogeochemical Process Evaluation for Conceptualizing Trichloroethylene Co-Metabolism

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rick Colwell; Corey Radtke; Mark Delwiche; Deborah Newby; Lynn Petzke; Mark Conrad; Eoin Brodie; Hope Lee; Bob Starr; Dana Dettmers; Ron Crawford; Andrzej Paszczynski; Nick Bernardini; Ravi Paidisetti; Tonia Green

    2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Chlorinated solvent wastes (e.g., trichloroethene or TCE) often occur as diffuse subsurface plumes in complex geological environments where coupled processes must be understood in order to implement remediation strategies. Monitored natural attenuation (MNA) warrants study as a remediation technology because it minimizes worker and environment exposure to the wastes and because it costs less than other technologies. However, to be accepted MNA requires different ?lines of evidence? indicating that the wastes are effectively destroyed. We are studying the coupled biogeochemical processes that dictate the rate of TCE co-metabolism first in the medial zone (TCE concentration: 1,000 to 20,000 ?g/L) of a plume at the Idaho National Laboratory?s Test Area North (TAN) site and then at Paducah or the Savannah River Site. We will use flow-through in situ reactors (FTISR) to investigate the rate of methanotrophic co-metabolism of TCE and the coupling of the responsible biological processes with the dissolved methane flux and groundwater flow velocity. TCE co-metabolic rates at TAN are being assessed and interpreted in the context of enzyme activity, gene expression, and cellular inactivation related to intermediates of TCE co-metabolism. By determining the rate of TCE co-metabolism at different groundwater flow velocities, we will derive key modeling parameters for the computational simulations that describe the attenuation, and thereby refine such models while assessing the contribution of microbial co-metabolism relative to other natural attenuation processes. This research will strengthen our ability to forecast the viability of MNA at DOE and other sites contaminated with chlorinated hydrocarbons.

  3. Process Modeling for Process Improvement A Process Conformance Approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Process Modeling for Process Improvement - A Process Conformance Approach Sigurd Thunem September processes. In order to improve these processes, knowledge about them is necessary. To support process improve- ment the organization should collect process data, transform process data into knowledge

  4. Modeling the steady-state ISV (in situ vitrification) process: A 3-D finite element analysis of coupled thermal-electric fields

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Langerman, M.A.

    1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Steady-state modeling considerations for simulating the in situ vitrification (ISV) process are documented based upon the finite element numerical approach. Recommendations regarding boundary condition specifications and mesh discretization are presented. The effects of several parameters on the ISV process response are calculated and the results discussed. The parameters investigated include: (1) electrode depth, (2) ambient temperature, (3) supplied current, (4) electrical conductivity, (5) electrode separation, and (6) soil/waste characterization. 13 refs., 29 figs., 1 tab.

  5. A model for coupling within-host and between-host dynamics in an ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2011-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Abstract Studies on the modeling of the coupled dy- namics of infectious diseases at both the population level (the epidemic process or between-host dynamics).

  6. Modeling Quality Information within Business Process Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paech, Barbara

    Modeling Quality Information within Business Process Models Robert Heinrich, Alexander Kappe. Business process models are a useful means to document information about structure and behavior literature and tool survey on modeling quality information within business process models. Keywords: Business

  7. Quantum Information Processing by NMR using strongly coupled spins

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. S. Mahesh; Neeraj Sinha; Arindam Ghosh; Ranabir Das; N. Suryaprakash; Malcom H. Levitt; K. V. Ramanathan; Anil Kumar

    2003-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The enormous theoretical potential of Quantum Information Processing (QIP) is driving the pursuit for its practical realization by various physical techniques. Currently Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) has been the forerunner by demonstrating a majority of quantum algorithms. In NMR, spin systems consisting of coupled nuclear spins are utilized as qubits. In order to carry out QIP, a spin system has to meet two major requirements: (i) qubit addressability and (ii) mutual coupling among the qubits. It has been demonstrated that the magnitude of the mutual coupling among qubits can be increased by orienting the spin-systems in a liquid crystal matrix and utilizing the residual dipolar couplings. While utilizing residual dipolar couplings may be useful to increase the number of qubits, nuclei of same species (homonuclei) might become strongly coupled. In strongly coupled spin-systems, spins loose their individual identity of being qubits. We propose that even such strongly coupled spin-systems can be used for QIP and the qubit-manipulation can be achieved by transition-selective pulses. We demonstrate experimental preparation of pseudopure states, creation of maximally entangled states, implementation logic gates and implementation of Deutsch-Jozsa (DJ) algorithm in strongly coupled 2,3 and 4 spin systems. The energy levels of the strongly coupled 3 and 4 spin systems were obtained by using a Z-COSY experiment.

  8. Process for fabricating a charge coupled device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Conder, Alan D. (Tracy, CA); Young, Bruce K. F. (Livermore, CA)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A monolithic three dimensional charged coupled device (3D-CCD) which utilizes the entire bulk of the semiconductor for charge generation, storage, and transfer. The 3D-CCD provides a vast improvement of current CCD architectures that use only the surface of the semiconductor substrate. The 3D-CCD is capable of developing a strong E-field throughout the depth of the semiconductor by using deep (buried) parallel (bulk) electrodes in the substrate material. Using backside illumination, the 3D-CCD architecture enables a single device to image photon energies from the visible, to the ultra-violet and soft x-ray, and out to higher energy x-rays of 30 keV and beyond. The buried or bulk electrodes are electrically connected to the surface electrodes, and an E-field parallel to the surface is established with the pixel in which the bulk electrodes are located. This E-field attracts charge to the bulk electrodes independent of depth and confines it within the pixel in which it is generated. Charge diffusion is greatly reduced because the E-field is strong due to the proximity of the bulk electrodes.

  9. Evolutionary games of condensates in coupled birth-death processes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Knebel, Johannes; Krueger, Torben; Frey, Erwin

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Condensation phenomena arise through a collective behaviour of particles. They are observed in both classical and quantum systems, ranging from the formation of traffic jams in mass transport models to the macroscopic occupation of the energetic ground state in ultra-cold bosonic gases (Bose-Einstein condensation). Recently, it has been shown that a driven and dissipative system of bosons may form multiple condensates. Which states become the condensates has, however, remained elusive thus far. The dynamics of this condensation are described by coupled birth-death processes, which also occur in evolutionary game theory. Here, we apply concepts from evolutionary game theory to explain the formation of multiple condensates in such driven-dissipative bosonic systems. We show that vanishing of relative entropy production determines their selection. The condensation proceeds exponentially fast, but the system never comes to rest. Instead, the occupation numbers of condensates may oscillate, as we demonstrate for a...

  10. Coupled hydro-mechanical processes in crytalline rock and in induratedand plastic clays: A comparative discussion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsang, Chin-Fu; Blumling, Peter; Bernier, Frederic

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    at Grimsel. In Coupled Thermo-Hydro- Mechanical-ChemicalCOUPLED HYDRO-MECHANICAL PROCESSES IN CRYTALLINE ROCK AND IN

  11. 2, 333397, 2005 A coupled model of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    . The sensitivity of calculated canopy energy and CO2 fluxes to the uncertainty of individual parameter values is assessed. In the companion paper, the predicted seasonal exchange of energy, CO2, ozone and isopreneBGD 2, 333­397, 2005 A coupled model of carbon-water exchange of the Amazon rain forest E. Simon et

  12. Foam process models.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moffat, Harry K.; Noble, David R.; Baer, Thomas A. (Procter & Gamble Co., West Chester, OH); Adolf, Douglas Brian; Rao, Rekha Ranjana; Mondy, Lisa Ann

    2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this report, we summarize our work on developing a production level foam processing computational model suitable for predicting the self-expansion of foam in complex geometries. The model is based on a finite element representation of the equations of motion, with the movement of the free surface represented using the level set method, and has been implemented in SIERRA/ARIA. An empirically based time- and temperature-dependent density model is used to encapsulate the complex physics of foam nucleation and growth in a numerically tractable model. The change in density with time is at the heart of the foam self-expansion as it creates the motion of the foam. This continuum-level model uses an homogenized description of foam, which does not include the gas explicitly. Results from the model are compared to temperature-instrumented flow visualization experiments giving the location of the foam front as a function of time for our EFAR model system.

  13. Population and Climate Change:Population and Climate Change: Coupling Population Models withCoupling Population Models with

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kalnay, Eugenia

    Coupling Population Models with Earth System ModelsEarth System Models Eugenia Kalnay, Safa Motesharrei, Jorge Rivas Change: Fully Coupling Population and Earth System Models" My research at the U. of Maryland #12

  14. Development of a coupled thermo-hydro-mechanical model in discontinuous media for carbon sequestration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fang, Yilin; Nguyen, Ba Nghiep; Carroll, Kenneth C.; Xu, Zhijie; Yabusaki, Steven B.; Scheibe, Timothy D.; Bonneville, Alain

    2013-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Geomechanical alteration of porous media is generally ignored for most shallow subsurface applications, whereas CO2 injection, migration, and trapping in deep saline aquifers will be controlled by coupled multifluid flow, energy transfer, and geomechanical processes. The accurate assessment of the risks associated with potential leakage of injected CO2 and the design of effective injection systems requires that we represent these coupled processes within numerical simulators. The objectives of this study were to develop a coupled thermal-hydro-mechanical model into a single software, and to examine the coupling of thermal, hydrological, and geomechanical processes for simulation of CO2 injection into the subsurface for carbon sequestration. A numerical model is developed to couple nonisothermal multiphase hydrological and geomechanical processes for prediction of multiple interconnected processes for carbon sequestration in deep saline aquifers. The geomechanics model was based on Rigid Body-Spring Model (RBSM), one of the discrete methods to model discontinuous rock system. Poisson’s effect that was often ignored by RBSM was considered in the model. The simulation of large-scale and long-term coupled processes in carbon capture and storage projects requires large memory and computational performance. Global Array Toolkit was used to build the model to permit the high performance simulations of the coupled processes. The model was used to simulate a case study with several scenarios to demonstrate the impacts of considering coupled processes and Poisson’s effect for the prediction of CO2 sequestration.

  15. Coupled Thermal-Hydrological-Mechanical-Chemical Model and Experiments...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Coupled Thermal-Hydrological-Mechanical-Chemical Model and Experiments for Optimization of Enhanced Geothermal System Development and Production Coupled Thermal-Hydrological-Mechan...

  16. This Ph.D thesis encompasses a global numerical simulation of the needleeye float zone process, used to grow silicon single crystals. The numerical models includes coupled electro

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and free surface models and a global heat transfer model, with moving boundaries. An axisymmetric fluid to determine flow field, after the phase boundaries have been determined, by the heat transfer model. A finite field, from which temperature gradients are determined. The heat transfer model is furthermore expanded

  17. Final Project Report - Coupled Biogeochemical Process Evaluation for Conceptualizing Trichloriethylene Co-Metabolism: Co-Metabolic Enzyme Activity Probes and Modeling Co-Metabolism and Attenuation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Starr, Robert C; Orr, Brennon R; Lee, M Hope; Delwiche, Mark

    2010-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Trichloroethene (TCE) (also known as trichloroethylene) is a common contaminant in groundwater. TCE is regulated in drinking water at a concentration of 5 µg/L, and a small mass of TCE has the potential to contaminant large volumes of water. The physical and chemical characteristics of TCE allow it to migrate quickly in most subsurface environments, and thus large plumes of contaminated groundwater can form from a single release. The migration and persistence of TCE in groundwater can be limited by biodegradation. TCE can be biodegraded via different processes under either anaerobic or aerobic conditions. Anaerobic biodegradation is widely recognized, but aerobic degradation is less well recognized. Under aerobic conditions, TCE can be oxidized to non hazardous conditions via cometabolic pathways. This study applied enzyme activity probes to demonstrate that cometabolic degradation of TCE occurs in aerobic groundwater at several locations, used laboratory microcosm studies to determine aerobic degradation rates, and extrapolated lab-measured rates to in situ rates based on concentrations of microorganisms with active enzymes involved in cometabolic TCE degradation. Microcosms were constructed using basalt chips that were inoculated with microorganisms to groundwater at the Idaho National Laboratory Test Area North TCE plume by filling a set of Flow-Through In Situ Reactors (FTISRs) with chips and placing the FTISRs into the open interval of a well for several months. A parametric study was performed to evaluate predicted degradation rates and concentration trends using a competitive inhibition kinetic model, which accounts for competition for enzyme active sites by both a growth substrate and a cometabolic substrate. The competitive inhibition kinetic expression was programmed for use in the RT3D reactive transport package. Simulations of TCE plume evolution using both competitive inhibition kinetics and first order decay were performed.

  18. Post-processing coupled with OASIS Eric Maisonnave

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    PoCO Post-processing coupled with OASIS Eric Maisonnave TR/CMGC/13/70 #12;"Lo bueno, si breve, dos)....................................................................... 6 OASIS namcouple.........................................................................................................................9 #12;Abstract Taking benefit of OASIS3-MCT interpolation facilities, an new output system called Po

  19. Modeling of coupled heat transfer and reactive transport processes in porous media: Application to seepage studies at Yucca Mountain, Nevad a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mukhopadhyay, Sumit; Sonnenthal, Eric L.; Spycher, Nicolas

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1941) in this paper. Rock Properties Except for the fracturethe hydrological properties of the rock. A model based onthe hydraulic properties of the rock (such as porosity,

  20. A Full Stochastic Model of Coupled Nanomechanical Electron Shuttles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mo Zhao; Robert H. Blick

    2014-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss operation of nanomechanical electron shuttles as a ratchet for radiofrequency current rectification based on a fully stochastic model. In such devices, the mechanical motion of coupled nanopillars and the incoherent electronic tunneling can be modeled as a Markov chain. By treating the process in a correlated stochastic fashion, we present a stochastic model represented by a linear master equation. This is crucial for analyzing symmetry breaking, which is in turn responsible for the observed rectification mechanism. For full device simulation, we propose deterministic equations assuming the multivariate Gaussian distributions.

  1. Sensitivity of an Ocean-Atmosphere Coupled Model to the Coupling Method : Study of Tropical Cyclone

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Recanati, Catherine

    Sensitivity of an Ocean-Atmosphere Coupled Model to the Coupling Method : Study of Tropical Cyclone) in a realistic configuration aiming at simulating the genesis and propagation of tropical cyclone Erica and Oceanic Coupled Models (AOCMs) which account for important air-sea feedbacks. Separate integrations

  2. Method of processing materials using an inductively coupled plasma

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hull, D.E.; Bieniewski, T.M.

    1987-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of processing materials. The invention enables ultrafine, ultrapure powders to be formed from solid ingots in a gas free environment. A plasma is formed directly from an ingot which insures purity. The vaporized material is expanded through a nozzle and the resultant powder settles on a cold surface. An inductively coupled plasma may also be used to process waste chemicals. Noxious chemicals are directed through a series of plasma tubes, breaking molecular bonds and resulting in relatively harmless atomic constituents. 3 figs.

  3. PHYSICAL REVIEW E 83, 046405 (2011) Dynamic model of streamer coupling for the homogeneity of glowlike dielectric barrier discharges

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Economou, Demetre J.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    PHYSICAL REVIEW E 83, 046405 (2011) Dynamic model of streamer coupling for the homogeneity. Economou Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, Plasma Processing Laboratory, University 2011; published 18 April 2011) A streamer coupling theory is developed to describe the formation

  4. Sensitivity of Ocean-Atmosphere Coupled Models to the Coupling Method : Example of Tropical Cyclone

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sensitivity of Ocean-Atmosphere Coupled Models to the Coupling Method : Example of Tropical Cyclone and propagation of tropical cyclone Erica. Sensitiv- ity tests to the coupling method are carried out-sea feedbacks. Separate integrations of the Corresponding author. Phone: +33 (0)4 76 51 48 60 Fax: +33 (0)4 76

  5. Characterization of Coupled Hydrologic-Biogeochemical Processes Using Geophysical Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hubbard, Susan

    2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Biogeochemical and hydrological processes are naturally coupled and variable over a wide range of spatial and temporal scales. Many remediation approaches also induce dynamic transformations in natural systems, such as the generation of gases, precipitates and biofilms. These dynamic transformations are often coupled and can reduce the hydraulic conductivity of the geologic materials, making it difficult to introduce amendments or to perform targeted remediation. Because it is difficult to predict these transformations, our ability to develop effective and sustainable remediation conditions at contaminated sites is often limited. Further complicating the problem is the inability to collect the necessary measurements at a high enough spatial resolution yet over a large enough volume for understanding field-scale transformations.

  6. Coupling an icosahedral model with OASIS E . Maisonnave

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coupling an icosahedral model with OASIS E . Maisonnave WN/CMGC/14/8 #12;Abstract An icosahedral grid atmosphere (NICAM) was coupled to NEMO ocean using OASIS3-MCT. The implemented interface..........................................................................................................................4 OASIS auxiliary files

  7. A preferential vibration dissociation coupling model for nonequilibrium hypersonic flowfields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McGough, David Earl

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A preferential vibration-dissociation coupling model is incorporated into a radiatively coupled viscous shock layer code that also includes chemical, radiative, and thermal nonequilibrium. Stagnation point flow profiles are obtained for several...

  8. Studies of climate variability in a simple coupled model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abiven, Claude

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The mechanisms of variability of a coupled atmosphere-ocean model are investigated through the study of two coupled configurations: an aquaplanet in which gyres are absent, and an aquaplanet in which a ridge extending from ...

  9. Fully coupled thermal-mechanical-fluid flow model for nonliner geologic systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hart, R.D.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A single model is presented which describes fully coupled thermal-mechanical-fluid flow behavior of highly nonlinear, dynamic or quasistatic, porous geologic systems. The mathematical formulation for the model utilizes the continuum theory of mixtures to describe the multiphase nature of the system, and incremental linear constitutive theory to describe the path dependency of nonlinear material behavior. The model, incorporated in an explicit finite difference numerical procedure, was implemented in two different computer codes. A special-purpose one-dimensional code, SNEAKY, was written for initial validation of the coupling mechanisms and testing of the coupled model logic. A general purpose commercially available code, STEALTH, developed for modeling dynamic nonlinear thermomechanical processes, was modified to include fluid flow behavior and the coupling constitutive model. The fully explicit approach in the coupled calculation facilitated the inclusion of the coupling mechanisms and complex constitutive behavior. Analytical solutions pertaining to consolidation theory for soils, thermoelasticity for solids, and hydrothermal convection theory provided verification of stress and fluid flow, stress and conductive heat transfer, and heat transfer and fluid flow couplings, respectively, in the coupled model. A limited validation of the adequacy of the coupling constitutive assumptions was also performed by comparison with the physical response from two laboratory tests. Finally, the full potential of the coupled model is illustrated for geotechnical applications in energy-resource related areas. Examples in the areas of nuclear waste isolation and cut-and-fill mining are cited.

  10. Coupling control and human factors in mathematical models of complex systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Melnik, Roderick

    dynamic systems Coupled field theory Systems science and cybernetics Markov chains and decision analysis process of the models for other complex dynamic systems. & 2008 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. 1 systems between themselves and with dynamically changing environment, coupled effects and phenomena

  11. Allene and pentatetraene cations as models for intramolecular charge transfer: Vibronic coupling Hamiltonian and conical intersections

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Markmann, Andreas

    and pentatetraene. Our aim is to simulate dynamically the charge transfer process when one component is artificiallyAllene and pentatetraene cations as models for intramolecular charge transfer: Vibronic coupling online 13 April 2005 We consider the vibronic coupling effects involving cationic states with degenerate

  12. Coupled Thermal-Hydrological-Mechanical-Chemical Model And Experiments...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Model And Experiments For Optimization Of Enhanced Geothermal System Development And Production: Evaluation of Stimulation at the Newberry Volcano EGS Demonstration Site Coupled...

  13. Coupled Thermal-Hydrological-Mechanical-Chemical Model And Experiments...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Coupled Thermal-Hydrological-Mechanical-Chemical Model And Experiments For Optimization Of Enhanced Geothermal System Development And Production: Evaluation of Stimulation at the...

  14. Coupled Thermal-Hydrological-Mechanical-Chemical Model and Experiments...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Coupled Thermal-Hydrological-Mechanical-Chemical Model and Experiments for Optimization of Enhanced Geothermal System Development and Production Eric Sonnenthal (PI) Jonny...

  15. Community Ecology Processes, Models,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kleyer, Michael

    3 Modelling the dynamics of complex food webs 37 Ulrich Brose and Jennifer A. Dunne 3.1 Introduction

  16. Modeling of ultrasonic processing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhao, Wenguang, S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents a finite element analysis (FEA) of ultrasonic processing of an aerospace-grade carbon-epoxy composite laminate. An ultrasonic (approximately 30 kHz) loading horn is applied to a small region at the ...

  17. A regional model coupling with OASIS3-MCT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A regional model coupling with OASIS3-MCT Eric Maisonnave WN/CMGC/13/34 #12;Table of Contents of an OASIS3-MCT based coupled model must be set up providing input informations (grid definition.base.define_clm_limits ), reducing to 1 the number of sub-domain dedicated to DATM, OASIS interpolates the COSMO domain limits

  18. 3457, Page, 1 Coupled CFD/Building Envelope Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gugercin, Serkan

    ) for the building thermal network. The final form of the state-space building envelope system is: x(t) = A x(t) + Bw3457, Page, 1 Coupled CFD/Building Envelope Model for the Purdue Living Lab Donghun KIM (kim1077 features. In the present case we develop a procedure for coupling a building envelope model to a CFD

  19. Sandia National Laboratories: model chemical processes

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Sandia received funding for its "Mechanistic Modeling Framework for Predicting Extreme Battery Response: Coupled Hierarchical Models for Thermal, Mechanical, Electrical and...

  20. Documenting Organizational Process Flow Modeling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schweik, Charles M.

    1 Documenting Organizational Processes or Process Flow Modeling Analysis Phase ­ Three Steps that describes (1) the current, and (2) the future structure of an organizational process ·"Natural language ­ An overview of an organizational system showing · system boundaries, · external entities that interact

  1. MODELING COUPLED FLUID FLOW AND GEOMECHANICAL AND GEOPHYSICAL PHENOMENA WITHIN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MODELING COUPLED FLUID FLOW AND GEOMECHANICAL AND GEOPHYSICAL PHENOMENA WITHIN A FINITE ELEMENT for the modeling of geomechanical effects induced by reservoir production/injection and the cyclic dependence

  2. Coupling Groundwater Modeling with Biology to Identify Strategic Water Resources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Coupling Groundwater Modeling with Biology to Identify Strategic Water Resources Didier Graillot 1 ABSTRACT The identification of hydraulic interactions between rivers and groundwater is part and parcel hinders groundwater modeling everywhere and simulating water management scenarios in every place

  3. Radiolysis Process Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buck, Edgar C.; Wittman, Richard S.; Skomurski, Frances N.; Cantrell, Kirk J.; McNamara, Bruce K.; Soderquist, Chuck Z.

    2012-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Assessing the performance of spent (used) nuclear fuel in geological repository requires quantification of time-dependent phenomena that may influence its behavior on a time-scale up to millions of years. A high-level waste repository environment will be a dynamic redox system because of the time-dependent generation of radiolytic oxidants and reductants and the corrosion of Fe-bearing canister materials. One major difference between used fuel and natural analogues, including unirradiated UO2, is the intense radiolytic field. The radiation emitted by used fuel can produce radiolysis products in the presence of water vapor or a thin-film of water (including OH• and H• radicals, O2-, eaq, H2O2, H2, and O2) that may increase the waste form degradation rate and change radionuclide behavior. H2O2 is the dominant oxidant for spent nuclear fuel in an O2 depleted water environment, the most sensitive parameters have been identified with respect to predictions of a radiolysis model under typical conditions. As compared with the full model with about 100 reactions it was found that only 30-40 of the reactions are required to determine [H2O2] to one part in 10–5 and to preserve most of the predictions for major species. This allows a systematic approach for model simplification and offers guidance in designing experiments for validation.

  4. Computational modeling of materials processing and processes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lowe, T.C.; Zhu, Yuntian; Bingert, J.F. [and others

    1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). Anisotropic mechanical properties of densified BSCCO powders are of paramount importance during thermo-mechanical processing of superconducting tapes and wires. Maximum current transport requires high relative density and a high degree of alignment of the single crystal planes of the BSCCO. Unfortunately this configuration causes high stresses that can lead to cracking, and thus reduce the density, and the conductive properties of the tape. The current work develops a micromechanical material mode to model is calibrated and compared to experimental results, and then employed to analyze the effects of initial texture and confinement pressure and shear strains in the core of oxide powder-in-tube (OPIT) processed tapes are calculated by finite-element analysis. The calculated deformations were then applied as boundary conditions to the micromechanical model. Our calculated results were used to interpret a set of prototypical rolling experiments. 11 refs., 5 figs.

  5. Exact solutions for a coupled nonlocal model of nanobeams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marotti de Sciarra, Francesco, E-mail: marotti@unina.it, E-mail: raffaele.barretta@unina.it; Barretta, Raffaele, E-mail: marotti@unina.it, E-mail: raffaele.barretta@unina.it [Department of Structures for Engineering and Architecture, via Claudio 21, 80125 Naples (Italy)

    2014-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

    BERNOULLI-EULER nanobeams under concentrated forces/couples with the nonlocal constitutive behavior proposed by ERINGEN do not exhibit small-scale effects. A new model obtained by coupling the ERINGEN and gradient models is formulated in the present note. A variational treatment is developed by imposing suitable thermodynamic restrictions for nonlocal models and the ensuing differential and boundary conditions of elastic equilibrium are provided. The nonlocal elastostatic problem is solved in a closed-form for nanocantilever and clamped nanobeams.

  6. Inflationary models with non-minimally derivative coupling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Nan; Gong, Yungui

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We derive the second order correction to the scalar and tensor spectral tilts for the inflationary models with non-minimally derivative coupling. The non-minimally kinetic coupling to Einstein tensor brings the energy scale in the inflationary models down to be sub-Planckian. In the high friction limit, the Lyth bound is modified with an extra suppression factor, so that the field excursion of the inflaton is sub-Planckian. The inflationary models with non-minimally derivative coupling are more consistent with observations.

  7. Inflationary models with non-minimally derivative coupling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nan Yang; Qing Gao; Yungui Gong

    2015-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

    We derive the second order correction to the scalar and tensor spectral tilts for the inflationary models with non-minimally derivative coupling. The non-minimally kinetic coupling to Einstein tensor brings the energy scale in the inflationary models down to be sub-Planckian. In the high friction limit, the Lyth bound is modified with an extra suppression factor, so that the field excursion of the inflaton is sub-Planckian. The inflationary models with non-minimally derivative coupling are more consistent with observations.

  8. Coupled-channel scattering in 1 + 1 dimensional lattice model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guo, Peng [JLAB

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Based on the Lippmann-Schwinger equation approach, a generalized Lüscher’s formula in 1+1 dimensions for two particles scattering in both the elastic and coupled-channel cases in moving frames is derived. A two-dimensional coupled-channel scattering lattice model is presented, which represents a two-coupled-channel resonant scattering scalars system. The Monte Carlo simulation is performed on finite lattices and in various moving frames. The two-dimensional generalized Lüscher’s formula is used to extract the scattering amplitudes for the coupled-channel system from the discrete finite-volume spectrum.

  9. Fully Coupled Well Models for Fluid Injection and Production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    White, Mark D.; Bacon, Diana H.; White, Signe K.; Zhang, Z. F.

    2013-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Wells are the primary engineered component of geologic sequestration systems with deep subsurface reservoirs. Wells provide a conduit for injecting greenhouse gases and producing reservoirs fluids, such as brines, natural gas, and crude oil, depending on the target reservoir. Well trajectories, well pressures, and fluid flow rates are parameters over which well engineers and operators have control during the geologic sequestration process. Current drilling practices provided well engineers flexibility in designing well trajectories and controlling screened intervals. Injection pressures and fluids can be used to purposely fracture the reservoir formation or to purposely prevent fracturing. Numerical simulation of geologic sequestration processes involves the solution of multifluid transport equations within heterogeneous geologic media. These equations that mathematically describe the flow of fluid through the reservoir formation are nonlinear in form, requiring linearization techniques to resolve. In actual geologic settings fluid exchange between a well and reservoir is a function of local pressure gradients, fluid saturations, and formation characteristics. In numerical simulators fluid exchange between a well and reservoir can be specified using a spectrum of approaches that vary from totally ignoring the reservoir conditions to fully considering reservoir conditions and well processes. Well models are a numerical simulation approach that account for local conditions and gradients in the exchange of fluids between the well and reservoir. As with the mathematical equations that describe fluid flow in the reservoir, variation in fluid properties with temperature and pressure yield nonlinearities in the mathematical equations that describe fluid flow within the well. To numerically simulate the fluid exchange between a well and reservoir the two systems of nonlinear multifluid flow equations must be resolved. The spectrum of numerical approaches for resolving these equations varies from zero coupling to full coupling. In this paper we describe a fully coupled solution approach for well model that allows for a flexible well trajectory and screened interval within a structured hexahedral computational grid. In this scheme the nonlinear well equations have been fully integrated into the Jacobian matrix for the reservoir conservation equations, minimizing the matrix bandwidth.

  10. Conservation Laws for Coupled Hydro-mechanical Processes in Unsaturated Porous Media: Theory and Implementation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Borja, R I; White, J A

    2010-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

    We develop conservation laws for coupled hydro-mechanical processes in unsaturated porous media using three-phase continuum mixture theory. From the first law of thermodynamics, we identify energy-conjugate variables for constitutive modeling at macroscopic scale. Energy conjugate expressions identified relate a certain measure of effective stress to the deformation of the solid matrix, the degree of saturation to the matrix suction, the pressure in each constituent phase to the corresponding intrinsic volume change of this phase, and the seepage forces to the corresponding pressure gradients. We then develop strong and weak forms of boundary-value problems relevant for 3D finite element modeling of coupled hydro-mechanical processes in unsaturated porous media. The paper highlights a 3D numerical example illustrating the advances in the solution of large-scale coupled finite element systems, as well as the challenges in developing more predictive tools satisfying the basic conservation laws and the observed constitutive responses for unsaturated porous materials.

  11. Coupling upland watershed and downstream waterbody hydrodynamic and water quality models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Such models lack the capacity to simulate the hydrodynamics and water quality processes of larger waterCoupling upland watershed and downstream waterbody hydrodynamic and water quality models (SWAT and CE-QUAL-W2) for better water resources management in complex river basins B. Debele & R. Srinivasan

  12. Dynamic and Thermodynamic AirSea Coupling Associated with the Indian Ocean Dipole Diagnosed from 23 WCRP CMIP3 Models*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Tim

    Dynamic and Thermodynamic Air­Sea Coupling Associated with the Indian Ocean Dipole Diagnosed from and the thermodynamic air­sea coupling in shaping the different model behaviors. The Bjerknes feedback processes include of the dynamic and ther- modynamic feedback processes. The distinctive features in the dynamic and thermodynamic

  13. A Coupled THMC model of FEBEX mock-up test

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zheng, Liange

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Samper, J. , Zheng, L. , Montenegro, L. , 2006c. CoupledSamper, J. , Zheng, L. , Montenegro, L. , Fernández, A.M. ,A.M. Fernández and L. Montenegro, 2008b, Inverse modeling of

  14. Constraints on the axion-electron coupling for solar axions produced by Compton process and bremsstrahlung

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. V. Derbin; A. S. Kayunov; V. N. Muratova; D. A. Semenov; E. V. Unzhakov

    2011-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The search for solar axions produced by Compton ($\\gamma+e^-\\rightarrow e^-+A$) and bremsstrahlung-like ($e^-+Z \\rightarrow Z+e^-+A$) processes has been performed. The axion flux in the both cases depends on the axion-electron coupling constant. The resonant excitation of low-lying nuclear level of $^{169}\\rm{Tm}$ was looked for: $A+^{169}$Tm $\\rightarrow ^{169}$Tm$^*$ $\\rightarrow ^{169}$Tm $+ \\gamma$ (8.41 keV). The Si(Li) detector and $^{169}$Tm target installed inside the low-background setup were used to detect 8.41 keV $\\gamma$-rays. As a result, a new model independent restriction on the axion-electron and the axion-nucleon couplings was obtained: $g_{Ae}\\times|g^0_{AN}+ g^3_{AN}|\\leq 2.1\\times10^{-14}$. In model of hadronic axion this restriction corresponds to the upper limit on the axion-electron coupling and on the axion mass $g_{Ae}\\times m_A\\leq3.1\\times10^{-7}$ eV (90% c.l.). The limits on axion mass are $m_A\\leq$ 105 eV and $m_A\\leq$ 1.3 keV for DFSZ- and KSVZ-axion models, correspondingly (90% c.l.).

  15. A Coupled THMC model of FEBEX mock-up test

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zheng, Liange; Samper, Javier

    2008-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    FEBEX (Full-scale Engineered Barrier EXperiment) is a demonstration and research project for the engineered barrier system (EBS) of a radioactive waste repository in granite. It includes two full-scale heating and hydration tests: the in situ test performed at Grimsel (Switzerland) and a mock-up test operating at CIEMAT facilities in Madrid (Spain). The mock-up test provides valuable insight on thermal, hydrodynamic, mechanical and chemical (THMC) behavior of EBS because its hydration is controlled better than that of in situ test in which the buffer is saturated with water from the surrounding granitic rock. Here we present a coupled THMC model of the mock-up test which accounts for thermal and chemical osmosis and bentonite swelling with a state-surface approach. The THMC model reproduces measured temperature and cumulative water inflow data. It fits also relative humidity data at the outer part of the buffer, but underestimates relative humidities near the heater. Dilution due to hydration and evaporation near the heater are the main processes controlling the concentration of conservative species while surface complexation, mineral dissolution/precipitation and cation exchanges affect significantly reactive species as well. Results of sensitivity analyses to chemical processes show that pH is mostly controlled by surface complexation while dissolved cations concentrations are controlled by cation exchange reactions.

  16. Using Process Modeling for Process Understanding Dewayne E. Perry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Perry, Dewayne E.

    Using Process Modeling for Process Understanding Dewayne E. Perry Systems and Software Research to improving processes is first understanding them. I report here a case study in process understanding using the process modeling language Interact. I illustrate both the language and the process iteratively, somewhat

  17. Nuclear Hybrid Energy System Modeling: RELAP5 Dynamic Coupling Capabilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Piyush Sabharwall; Nolan Anderson; Haihua Zhao; Shannon Bragg-Sitton; George Mesina

    2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The nuclear hybrid energy systems (NHES) research team is currently developing a dynamic simulation of an integrated hybrid energy system. A detailed simulation of proposed NHES architectures will allow initial computational demonstration of a tightly coupled NHES to identify key reactor subsystem requirements, identify candidate reactor technologies for a hybrid system, and identify key challenges to operation of the coupled system. This work will provide a baseline for later coupling of design-specific reactor models through industry collaboration. The modeling capability addressed in this report focuses on the reactor subsystem simulation.

  18. Updatable Process Views for Adapting Large Process Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ulm, Universität

    Updatable Process Views for Adapting Large Process Models: The proView Demonstrator Jens Kolb. The increasing adoption of process-aware information sys- tems (PAISs) has resulted in large process model collections. To support users having different perspectives on these processes and related data, a PAIS should

  19. Standard Model-like D-brane models and gauge couplings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yuta Hamada; Tatsuo Kobayashi; Shohei Uemura

    2014-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

    We systematically search intersecting D-brane models, which just realize the Standard Model chiral matter contents and gauge symmetry. We construct new classes of non-supersymmetric Standard Model-like models. We also study gauge coupling constants of these models. The tree level gauge coupling is a function of compactification moduli, string scale, string coupling and winding number of D-branes. By tuning them, we examine whether the models can explain the experimental values of gauge couplings. As a result, we find that the string scale should be greater than $10^{14-15}$GeV if the compactification scale and the string scale are the same order.

  20. Calculating the running coupling in strong electroweak models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zoltan Fodor; Kieran Holland; Julius Kuti; Daniel Nogradi; Chris Schroeder

    2009-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

    One possibility for Beyond Standard Model physics is a new strongly-interacting gauge theory. One way to determine if a non-abelian gauge theory is QCD-like or conformal is to measure the running of the renormalized gauge coupling. We define the renormalized coupling from Wilson loop ratios, and measure these ratios via lattice simulations. We test this method in SU(3) pure gauge theory and show some first results for simulations with dynamical fermions in the fundamental representation.

  1. High ethylene to ethane processes for oxidative coupling

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chafin, Richard B. (Hurricane, WV); Warren, Barbara K. (Charleston, WV)

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Oxidative coupling of lower alkane to higher hydrocarbon is conducted using catalyst comprising barium and/or strontium component and a metal oxide combustion promoter in the presence of vapor phase halogen component. High ethylene to ethane mole ratios in the product can be obtained over extended operating periods.

  2. High ethylene to ethane processes for oxidative coupling

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chafin, R.B.; Warren, B.K.

    1991-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Oxidative coupling of lower alkane to higher hydrocarbon is conducted using a catalyst comprising barium and/or strontium component and a metal oxide combustion promoter in the presence of vapor phase halogen component. High ethylene to ethane mole ratios in the product can be obtained over extended operating periods.

  3. A COUPLED STRUCTURALMAGNETIC STRAIN AND STRESS MODEL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of Aerospace Engineering and Engineering Mechanics Iowa State University 2019 Black Engineering Building Ames of Aerospace Engineering and Engineering Mechanics Iowa State University Ames, IA 50011 Abstract This paper: Magnetostriction, rare earth­iron alloys, Terfenol­D, magnetomechanical model, transducers 1 #12; 1 Introduction We

  4. The Kuramoto model of coupled oscillators with a bi-harmonic coupling function

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Komarov; A. Pikovsky

    2014-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

    We study synchronization in a Kuramoto model of globally coupled phase oscillators with a bi-harmonic coupling function, in the thermodynamic limit of large populations. We develop a method for an analytic solution of self-consistent equations describing uniformly rotating complex order parameters, both for single-branch (one possible state of locked oscillators) and multi-branch (two possible values of locked phases) entrainment. We show that synchronous states coexist with the neutrally linearly stable asynchronous regime. The latter has a finite life time for finite ensembles, this time grows with the ensemble size as a power law.

  5. Simulation of Coupled Processes of Flow, Transport, and Storage of CO2 in Saline Aquifers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, Yu-Shu; Chen, Zizhong; Kazemi, Hossein; Yin, Xiaolong; Pruess, Karsten; Oldenburg, Curt; Winterfeld, Philip; Zhang, Ronglei

    2014-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is the final scientific one for the award DE- FE0000988 entitled “Simulation of Coupled Processes of Flow, Transport, and Storage of CO2 in Saline Aquifers.” The work has been divided into six tasks. In task, “Development of a Three-Phase Non-Isothermal CO2 Flow Module,” we developed a fluid property module for brine-CO2 mixtures designed to handle all possible phase combinations of aqueous phase, sub-critical liquid and gaseous CO2, supercritical CO2, and solid salt. The thermodynamic and thermophysical properties of brine-CO2 mixtures (density, viscosity, and specific enthalpy of fluid phases; partitioning of mass components among the different phases) use the same correlations as an earlier fluid property module that does not distinguish between gaseous and liquid CO2-rich phases. We verified the fluid property module using two leakage scenarios, one that involves CO2 migration up a blind fault and subsequent accumulation in a secondary “parasitic” reservoir at shallower depth, and another investigating leakage of CO2 from a deep storage reservoir along a vertical fault zone. In task, “Development of a Rock Mechanical Module,” we developed a massively parallel reservoir simulator for modeling THM processes in porous media brine aquifers. We derived, from the fundamental equations describing deformation of porous elastic media, a momentum conservation equation relating mean stress, pressure, and temperature, and incorporated it alongside the mass and energy conservation equations from the TOUGH2 formulation, the starting point for the simulator. In addition, rock properties, namely permeability and porosity, are functions of effective stress and other variables that are obtained from the literature. We verified the simulator formulation and numerical implementation using analytical solutions and example problems from the literature. For the former, we matched a one-dimensional consolidation problem and a two-dimensional simulation of the Mandel-Cryer effect. For the latter, we obtained a good match of temperature and gas saturation profiles, and surface uplift, after injection of hot fluid into a model of a caldera structure. In task, “Incorporation of Geochemical Reactions of Selected Important Species,” we developed a novel mathematical model of THMC processes in porous and fractured saline aquifers, simulating geo-chemical reactions associated with CO2 sequestration in saline aquifers. Two computational frameworks, sequentially coupled and fully coupled, were used to simulate the reactions and transport. We verified capabilities of the THMC model to treat complex THMC processes during CO2 sequestration by analytical solutions and we constructed reactive transport models to analyze the THMC process quantitatively. Three of these are 1D reactive transport under chemical equilibrium, a batch reaction model with equilibrium chemical reactions, and a THMC model with CO2 dissolution. In task “Study of Instability in CO2 Dissolution-Diffusion-Convection Processes,” We reviewed literature related to the study of density driven convective flows and on the instability of CO2 dissolution-diffusion-convection processes. We ran simulations that model the density-driven flow instability that would occur during CO2 sequestration. CO2 diffused through the top of the system and dissolved in the aqueous phase there, increasing its density. Density fingers formed along the top boundary, and coalesced into a few prominent ones, causing convective flow that forced the fluid to the system bottom. These simulations were in two and three dimensions. We ran additional simulations of convective mixing with density contrast caused by variable dissolved CO2 concentration in saline water, modeled after laboratory experiments in which supercritical CO2 was circulated in the headspace above a brine saturated packed sand in a pressure vessel. As CO2 dissolved into the upper part of the saturated sand, liquid phase density increases causing instability and setting off convective mixing. We obtained good agreement

  6. Business Process Modeling for developing Process Oriented IT Systems Track: Business Process Management Tools and Technologies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Business Process Modeling for developing Process Oriented IT Systems Track: Business Process should be like. Therefore, business process modeling becomes a pre-requisite for system requirements, the paradigm of Business Process Management contrasts with traditional information system development, which

  7. A COUPLED APPROACH FOR THE MODELLING OF ARC WELDING Christel Pequet1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    A COUPLED APPROACH FOR THE MODELLING OF ARC WELDING PROCESSES Christel Pequet1 , Patrice Lasne1 ; email : michel.bellet@ensmp.fr Keywords: welding, finite elements, thermal arising in arc welding as well as their interaction: heat input, metal deposit, solidification, phase

  8. Coupled Deterministic-Monte Carlo Transport for Radiation Portal Modeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, Leon E.; Miller, Erin A.; Wittman, Richard S.; Shaver, Mark W.

    2008-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Radiation portal monitors are being deployed, both domestically and internationally, to detect illicit movement of radiological materials concealed in cargo. Evaluation of the current and next generations of these radiation portal monitor (RPM) technologies is an ongoing process. 'Injection studies' that superimpose, computationally, the signature from threat materials onto empirical vehicle profiles collected at ports of entry, are often a component of the RPM evaluation process. However, measurement of realistic threat devices can be both expensive and time-consuming. Radiation transport methods that can predict the response of radiation detection sensors with high fidelity, and do so rapidly enough to allow the modeling of many different threat-source configurations, are a cornerstone of reliable evaluation results. Monte Carlo methods have been the primary tool of the detection community for these kinds of calculations, in no small part because they are particularly effective for calculating pulse-height spectra in gamma-ray spectrometers. However, computational times for problems with a high degree of scattering and absorption can be extremely long. Deterministic codes that discretize the transport in space, angle, and energy offer potential advantages in computational efficiency for these same kinds of problems, but the pulse-height calculations needed to predict gamma-ray spectrometer response are not readily accessible. These complementary strengths for radiation detection scenarios suggest that coupling Monte Carlo and deterministic methods could be beneficial in terms of computational efficiency. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and its collaborators are developing a RAdiation Detection Scenario Analysis Toolbox (RADSAT) founded on this coupling approach. The deterministic core of RADSAT is Attila, a three-dimensional, tetrahedral-mesh code originally developed by Los Alamos National Laboratory, and since expanded and refined by Transpire, Inc. [1]. MCNP5 is used to calculate sensor pulse-height tallies. RADSAT methods, including adaptive, problem-specific energy-group creation, ray-effect mitigation strategies and the porting of deterministic angular flux to MCNP for individual particle creation are described in [2][3][4]. This paper discusses the application of RADSAT to the modeling of gamma-ray spectrometers in RPMs.

  9. Electromagnetically induced transparency from two-phonon processes in quadratically coupled membranes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huang, Sumei; Agarwal, G. S. [Department of Physics, Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, Oklahoma 74078 (United States)

    2011-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We describe how electromagnetically induced transparency can arise in quadratically coupled optomechanical systems. Due to quadratic coupling, the underlying optical process involves a two-phonon process in an optomechanical system, and this two-phonon process makes the mean displacement, which plays the role of atomic coherence in traditional electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT), zero. We show how the fluctuation in displacement can play a role similar to atomic coherence and can lead to EIT-like effects in quadratically coupled optomechanical systems. We show how such effects can be studied using the existing optomechanical systems.

  10. Modelling and Control of Activated Sludge Processes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Skogestad, Sigurd

    Modelling and Control of Activated Sludge Processes Michela Mulas Dottorato di Ricerca of Activated Sludge Processes Michela Mulas Supervisors: Prof. Roberto Baratti Ing. Stefania Tronci Dottorato . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 2 ASP Models and Simulations 7 2.1 The Activated Sludge Process

  11. Lightweight Process Modeling for Virtual Enterprise Process Collaboration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Lightweight Process Modeling for Virtual Enterprise Process Collaboration Lai Xu1 , Paul de Vrieze1 of mashups are often more data related than process related. In this paper, we explore the differences between data-oriented mashups and process-oriented enterprise mashups and consider how process mashups can

  12. Coupling Multi-Component Models with MPH on Distributed Memory Computer Architectures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    He, Yun; Ding, Chris

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Among these, NASA’s Earth System Models Framework (ESMF) [to facilitate coupling earth system model components and to

  13. Coupling schemes for modeling hydraulic fracture propagation using the XFEM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peirce, Anthony

    Coupling schemes for modeling hydraulic fracture propagation using the XFEM Elizaveta Gordeliy of hydraulic fractures in an elastic medium. With appropriate enrichment, the XFEM resolves the Neumann(h) accuracy. For hydraulic fracture problems with a lag separating the uid front from the fracture front, we

  14. Model coupling friction and adhesion for steel-concrete interfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Model coupling friction and adhesion for steel- concrete interfaces Michel Raous Laboratoire de: In this paper the interface behaviour between steel and concrete, during pull out tests, is numerically a variable friction coefficient in order to simulate the behaviour of the steel-concrete interface during

  15. A Dynamic Model coupling Photoacclimation and Photoinhibition in Microalgae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    A Dynamic Model coupling Photoacclimation and Photoinhibition in Microalgae Philipp Hartmann1, Andreas Nikolaou2, Beno^it Chachuat2, Olivier Bernard1 Abstract-- Microalgae are often considered a promising al- ternative for production of renewable energy, particularly as a potential producer

  16. Coupled Thermal-Hydrological-Mechanical Processes in Salt, Hot...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Design, and Operation Summary Results for Brine Migration Modeling Performed by LANL, LBNL and SNL for the Used Fuel Disposition Program Establishing the Technical Basis for...

  17. Coupled cavity model based on the mode matching technique

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ayzatsky, M I

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have developed the mode matching technique that is based on the using the eigenmodes of circular cavities and the eigenwaves of circular waveguides as the basic functions for calculation the properties of nonuniform disc-loaded waveguides. We have obtained exact infinite systems of coupled equations which can be reduced by making some assumptions. Under such procedure we can receive more exact parameters of nonuniform equivalent circuits by solving the appropriative algebraic systems. These parameters of equivalent circuits are functions both geometric sizes and frequency. Moreover, under such approach all used values have interpretation. We called this approach as coupled cavity model.

  18. Theoretical Modeling of Mechanical-Electrical Coupling of Carbon Nanotubes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lu, Jun-Qiang [ORNL; Jiang, Hanqiang [Arizona State University

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Carbon nanotubes have been studied extensively due to their unique properties, ranging from electrical, mechanical, optical, to thermal properties. The coupling between the electrical and mechanical properties of carbon nanotubes has emerged as a new field, which raises both interesting fundamental problems and huge application potentials. In this article, we will review our recently work on the theoretical modeling on mechanical-electrical coupling of carbon nanotubes subject to various loading conditions, including tension/compression, torsion, and squashing. Some related work by other groups will be also mentioned.

  19. A literature review of coupled thermal-hydrologic-mechanical-chemical processes pertinent to the proposed high-level nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Manteufel, R.D.; Ahola, M.P.; Turner, D.R.; Chowdhury, A.H. [Southwest Research Inst., San Antonio, TX (United States). Center for Nuclear Waste Regulatory Analyses

    1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A literature review has been conducted to determine the state of knowledge available in the modeling of coupled thermal (T), hydrologic (H), mechanical (M), and chemical (C) processes relevant to the design and/or performance of the proposed high-level waste (HLW) repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. The review focuses on identifying coupling mechanisms between individual processes and assessing their importance (i.e., if the coupling is either important, potentially important, or negligible). The significance of considering THMC-coupled processes lies in whether or not the processes impact the design and/or performance objectives of the repository. A review, such as reported here, is useful in identifying which coupled effects will be important, hence which coupled effects will need to be investigated by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission in order to assess the assumptions, data, analyses, and conclusions in the design and performance assessment of a geologic reposit``. Although this work stems from regulatory interest in the design of the geologic repository, it should be emphasized that the repository design implicitly considers all of the repository performance objectives, including those associated with the time after permanent closure. The scope of this review is considered beyond previous assessments in that it attempts with the current state-of-knowledge) to determine which couplings are important, and identify which computer codes are currently available to model coupled processes.

  20. Topic Models: A Novel Method for Modeling Couple and Family David C. Atkins

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Steyvers, Mark

    of California, Los Angeles Couple and family researchers often collect open-ended linguistic data participants' responses are not forced into a set number of categories, text-based data can be very richTopic Models: A Novel Method for Modeling Couple and Family Text Data David C. Atkins University

  1. Coupling the high-complexity land surface model ACASA to the mesoscale model WRF

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pyles, R. D.

    In this study, the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model is coupled with the Advanced Canopy–Atmosphere–Soil Algorithm (ACASA), a high-complexity land surface model. Although WRF is a state-of-the-art regional ...

  2. Coupling the High Complexity Land Surface Model ACASA to the Mesoscale Model WRF

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xu, L.

    In this study, the Weather Research and Forecasting Model (WRF) is coupled with the Advanced Canopy-Atmosphere-Soil Algorithm (ACASA), a high complexity land surface model. Although WRF is a state-of-the-art regional ...

  3. Coupled wake boundary layer model of wind-farms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stevens, Richard J A M; Meneveau, Charles

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present and test a coupled wake boundary layer (CWBL) model that describes the distribution of the power output in a wind-farm. The model couples the traditional, industry-standard wake expansion/superposition approach with a top-down model for the overall wind-farm boundary layer structure. The wake expansion/superposition model captures the effect of turbine positioning, while the top-down portion adds the interaction between the wind-turbine wakes and the atmospheric boundary layer. Each portion of the model requires specification of a parameter that is not known a-priori. For the wake model the wake expansion coefficient is required, while the top-down model requires an effective span-wise turbine spacing within which the model's momentum balance is relevant. The wake expansion coefficient is obtained by matching the predicted mean velocity at the turbine from both approaches, while the effective span-wise turbine spacing depends on turbine positioning and thus can be determined from the wake expansion...

  4. Dynamics of an Economics Model for Generation Coupled to the OPA Power Transmission Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dobson, Ian

    Dynamics of an Economics Model for Generation Coupled to the OPA Power Transmission Model B. A a dynamic model of the power transmission system (OPA) and a simple economic model of power generation development. Despite the simplicity of this economic model, complex dynamics both in the economics (prices

  5. Development of a Comprehensive Weld Process Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Radhakrishnan, B.; Zacharia, T.

    1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This cooperative research and development agreement (CRADA) between Concurrent Technologies Corporation (CTC) and Lockheed Martin Energy Systems (LMES) combines CTC's expertise in the welding area and that of LMES to develop computer models and simulation software for welding processes. This development is of significant impact to the industry, including materials producers and fabricators. The main thrust of the research effort was to develop a comprehensive welding simulation methodology. A substantial amount of work has been done by several researchers to numerically model several welding processes. The primary drawback of most of the existing models is the lack of sound linkages between the mechanistic aspects (e.g., heat transfer, fluid flow, and residual stress) and the metallurgical aspects (e.g., microstructure development and control). A comprehensive numerical model which can be used to elucidate the effect of welding parameters/conditions on the temperature distribution, weld pool shape and size, solidification behavior, and microstructure development, as well as stresses and distortion, does not exist. It was therefore imperative to develop a comprehensive model which would predict all of the above phenomena during welding. The CRADA built upon an already existing three- dimensional (3-D) welding simulation model which was developed by LMES which is capable of predicting weld pool shape and the temperature history in 3-d single-pass welds. However, the model does not account for multipass welds, microstructural evolution, distortion and residual stresses. Additionally, the model requires large resources of computing time, which limits its use for practical applications. To overcome this, CTC and LMES have developed through this CRADA the comprehensive welding simulation model described above. The following technical tasks have been accomplished as part of the CRADA. 1. The LMES welding code has been ported to the Intel Paragon parallel computer at ORNL. The timing results illustrate the potential of the modified computer model for the analysis of large-scale welding simulations. 2. The kinetics of grain structure evolution in the weld heat affected zone (HAZ) has been simulated with reasonable accuracy by coupling an improved MC grain growth algorithm with a methodology for converting the MC parameters of grain size and time to real parameters. The simulations effectively captured the thermal pinning phenomenon that has been reported in the weld HAZ. 3. A cellular automaton (CA) code has been developed to simulate the solidification microstructure in the weld fusion zone. The simulations effectively captured the epitaxial growth of the HAZ grains, the grain selection mechanism, and the formation of typical grain structures observed in the weld t%sion zone. 4. The point heat source used in the LMES welding code has ben replaced with a distributed heat source to better capture the thermal characteristics and energy distributions in a commercial welding heat source. 5. Coupled thermal-mechanical and metallurgical models have been developed to accurately predict the weld residual stresses, and 6. Attempts have been made to integrate the newly developed computational capabilities into a comprehensive weld design tool.

  6. Please cite this article in press as: Penny WD, et al. Dynamic Causal Models for phase coupling. J Neurosci Methods (2009), doi:10.1016/j.jneumeth.2009.06.029

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Penny, Will

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Please cite this article in press as: Penny WD, et al. Dynamic Causal Models for phase coupling. J of the Dynamic Causal Modelling (DCM) framework to the analysis of phase-coupled data. A weakly coupled synchronization processes, measured with brain imaging data, can be described using weakly coupled oscillator (WCO

  7. Solvable model for chimera states of coupled oscillators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daniel M. Abrams; Renato E. Mirollo; Steven H. Strogatz; Daniel A. Wiley

    2008-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Networks of identical, symmetrically coupled oscillators can spontaneously split into synchronized and desynchronized sub-populations. Such chimera states were discovered in 2002, but are not well understood theoretically. Here we obtain the first exact results about the stability, dynamics, and bifurcations of chimera states by analyzing a minimal model consisting of two interacting populations of oscillators. Along with a completely synchronous state, the system displays stable chimeras, breathing chimeras, and saddle-node, Hopf and homoclinic bifurcations of chimeras.

  8. Determination of the controlling process in coupled heat and mass transfer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bell, B.; Kakavas, T.; Herold, K.E. [Univ. of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States). Center for Environmental Energy Engineering

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The influence of non-condensable gases on condensation is well known going back to Nusselt. The non-condensables tend to form a blanket around the cooled surface which can significantly slow condensation rates by introducing a controlling mass transfer resistance. The coupled heat and mass transfer process that results has a significant impact on the optimum design of compact condenser bundles. One of the questions that arises in analyzing such a coupled process is which of the two processes is controlling the overall transfer process? One way to quantify a solution to this problem is to take a thermodynamic perspective and to compute the entropy generation associated with each of the individual processes. Then, the process that contributes the largest entropy generation is viewed as the controlling process. The result of such a determination provides insight as to how to augment the overall transfer process. The approach taken in this study is to use available CFD (computational fluid dynamics) codes to formulate and solve the condenser problem to gain insight into the coupled process. The resulting temperature, velocity and concentration data can then be analyzed to determine the entropy generation associated with each of the processes. Results are presented for a series of simplified geometries that define the magnitude of the effects contributed by each of the transfer processes.

  9. Relativistic Point Coupling Model for Vibrational Excitations in the Continuum

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ring, P.; Daoutidis, J. [Physics Department Technical University Munich, 85748 Garching (Germany); Litvinova, E. [Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung mbH, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Niksic, T.; Paar, N.; Vretenar, D. [Physics Department, Faculty of Science, University of Zagreb (Croatia)

    2009-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

    An implementation of the relativistic random phase approximation with the proper treatment of the continuum has been developed for the relativistic point coupling model and applied to investigate collective excitations in spherical nuclei. The results are compared with the spectral implementation of the same model. In heavy nuclei, where the escape width is negligible, we find an excellent agreement between both methods in the region of giant resonance and some discrepancies in the region of low-lying pygmy resonance. The differences are more pronounced in light nuclei due to the larger values of the escape widths.

  10. Entanglement generation in the ultra-strongly coupled Rabi model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Matteo Bina; Stefano Maffezzoli Felis; Stefano Olivares

    2014-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

    We analyze the dynamics of the quantum Rabi model for two qubits interacting through a common bosonic field mode (resonator), focusing on the generation and detection of maximally entangled Bell states. We obtain analytical results for the unitary dynamics of this system in the slow-qubit (or degenerate) regime, considering ultra-strong coupling between qubits and resonator mode, for which the rotating wave approximation is no longer applicable. We also numerically investigate the dynamics beyond the slow-qubit condition in order to study the validity of the model in the presence of less strict conditions.

  11. Towards a Security Engineering Process Model for Electronic Business Processes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eichler, Jörn

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Business process management (BPM) and accompanying systems aim at enabling enterprises to become adaptive. In spite of the dependency of enterprises on secure business processes, BPM languages and techniques provide only little support for security. Several complementary approaches have been proposed for security in the domain of BPM. Nevertheless, support for a systematic procedure for the development of secure electronic business processes is still missing. In this paper, we pinpoint the need for a security engineering process model in the domain of BPM and identify key requirements for such process model.

  12. BUSINESS PROCESS MODELING WITH UML Nuno Castela

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    BUSINESS PROCESS MODELING WITH UML Nuno Castela Escola Superior de Tecnologia de Castelo Branco@est.ipcb.pt Key words: Modeling, Business processes, UML Abstract: This paper focuses the reasons and advantages and description of the methodology to apply business modeling is made, namely, the organization of the modeling

  13. Cupola Furnace Computer Process Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seymour Katz

    2004-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The cupola furnace generates more than 50% of the liquid iron used to produce the 9+ million tons of castings annually. The cupola converts iron and steel into cast iron. The main advantages of the cupola furnace are lower energy costs than those of competing furnaces (electric) and the ability to melt less expensive metallic scrap than the competing furnaces. However the chemical and physical processes that take place in the cupola furnace are highly complex making it difficult to operate the furnace in optimal fashion. The results are low energy efficiency and poor recovery of important and expensive alloy elements due to oxidation. Between 1990 and 2004 under the auspices of the Department of Energy, the American Foundry Society and General Motors Corp. a computer simulation of the cupola furnace was developed that accurately describes the complex behavior of the furnace. When provided with the furnace input conditions the model provides accurate values of the output conditions in a matter of seconds. It also provides key diagnostics. Using clues from the diagnostics a trained specialist can infer changes in the operation that will move the system toward higher efficiency. Repeating the process in an iterative fashion leads to near optimum operating conditions with just a few iterations. More advanced uses of the program have been examined. The program is currently being combined with an ''Expert System'' to permit optimization in real time. The program has been combined with ''neural network'' programs to affect very easy scanning of a wide range of furnace operation. Rudimentary efforts were successfully made to operate the furnace using a computer. References to these more advanced systems will be found in the ''Cupola Handbook''. Chapter 27, American Foundry Society, Des Plaines, IL (1999).

  14. Framework for Coupling Room Air Models to Heat Balance Model Load and Energy Calculations (RP-1222)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Qingyan "Yan"

    1 Framework for Coupling Room Air Models to Heat Balance Model Load and Energy Calculations (RP in a program for hourly load calculations of a single thermal zone. The heat balance model for load and energy to heat balance model load and energy calculations," HVAC&R Research, 10(2), 91-111. #12;2 · Mixed

  15. Numerical Modeling of Thermal EOR: Comprehensive Coupling of an AMR-Based Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Flow and Geomechanics N. Guy*, G. Enchéry and G. Renard IFP Energies nouvelles, 1-4 avenue de Bois of Thermal EOR: Comprehensive Coupling of an AMR-Based Model of Thermal Fluid Flow and Geomechanics when both thermal fluid flow and geomechanics are coupled in order to take into account variations

  16. APPLYING BUSINESS PROCESS MODELING TO ORGANIZATIONAL CHANGE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 APPLYING BUSINESS PROCESS MODELING TO ORGANIZATIONAL CHANGE Ricardo Mendes, João Mateus, Eduardo.mendes}@ceo.inesc.pt {jgm ,ejms}@mega.ist.utl.pt {jose.tribolet}@ceo.inesc.pt Abstract Organizational change can be regarded Modeling, Organizational Change, UML, Process Re-engineering, Process Improvement, Business Strategy

  17. Evergreening Peer Review Business Process Modeling (BPM)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rau, Don C.

    Evergreening Peer Review Business Process Modeling (BPM) On behalf of the Peer Review Subject of the BPM process undertaken to model the current business process of peer review from the perspective. Sheryl K. Brining, Ph.D. Michael Rennolds Paul Sheehy, Ph.D. #12;Peer Review BPM White Paper-Dec1_FINAL

  18. Developing Great Lakes Ice Model (GLIM) using CIOM (Coupled Ice-Ocean Model) in Lake Erie

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Developing Great Lakes Ice Model (GLIM) using CIOM (Coupled Ice- Ocean Model) in Lake Erie Primary of the ice-ocean models, assistance with development of project reports and scientific presentations will first start the implementation of the CIOM in Lake Erie, assemble satellite observations of ice cover

  19. Model for a transformer-coupled toroidal plasma source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rauf, Shahid; Balakrishna, Ajit; Chen Zhigang; Collins, Ken [Applied Materials, Inc., 974 E. Arques Avenue, Sunnyvale, California 94085 (United States)

    2012-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A two-dimensional fluid plasma model for a transformer-coupled toroidal plasma source is described. Ferrites are used in this device to improve the electromagnetic coupling between the primary coils carrying radio frequency (rf) current and a secondary plasma loop. Appropriate components of the Maxwell equations are solved to determine the electromagnetic fields and electron power deposition in the model. The effect of gas flow on species transport is also considered. The model is applied to 1 Torr Ar/NH{sub 3} plasma in this article. Rf electric field lines form a loop in the vacuum chamber and generate a plasma ring. Due to rapid dissociation of NH{sub 3}, NH{sub x}{sup +} ions are more prevalent near the gas inlet and Ar{sup +} ions are the dominant ions farther downstream. NH{sub 3} and its by-products rapidly dissociate into small fragments as the gas flows through the plasma. With increasing source power, NH{sub 3} dissociates more readily and NH{sub x}{sup +} ions are more tightly confined near the gas inlet. Gas flow rate significantly influences the plasma characteristics. With increasing gas flow rate, NH{sub 3} dissociation occurs farther from the gas inlet in regions with higher electron density. Consequently, more NH{sub 4}{sup +} ions are produced and dissociation by-products have higher concentrations near the outlet.

  20. Analysis of badlands: coupling of tectonic and land surface processes in the Pyrenees of Spain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baer, Christian

    Analysis of badlands: coupling of tectonic and land surface processes in the Pyrenees of Spain MSc to rainstorms. In north-east Spain, sediment from rapidly eroding badlands has significantly reduced reservoir-funded research consortium (SESAM II) with partners at the University of Lleida, Spain

  1. Bio-Optical Response and Coupling with Physical Processes in the Lombok Strait Region

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boss, Emmanuel S.

    Bio-Optical Response and Coupling with Physical Processes in the Lombok Strait Region Burton H.boss@maine.edu ABSTRACT The optical structure and variability of the Lombok Straits region is poorly understood, but available remotely sensed ocean color indicates that there is a strong optical response and signal

  2. The Influence of Seasonal and Decadal Trends in Coastal Ocean Processes on the Population Biology of the Krill Species Euphausia pacifica: Results of a Coupled Ecosystem and Individual Based Modeling Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dorman, Jeffrey G.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    allows parameters for bioenergetics (ingestion, respiration,robust set of data on the bioenergetics and physiology of E.time in the model. Bioenergetics. The bioenergetics of the

  3. The Influence of Seasonal and Decadal Trends in Coastal Ocean Processes on the Population Biology of the krill species Euphausia pacifica: Results of a coupled ecosystem and individual based modeling study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dorman, Jeffrey

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    allows parameters for bioenergetics (ingestion, respiration,robust set of data on the bioenergetics and physiology of E.time in the model. Bioenergetics. The bioenergetics of the

  4. Modeling of Geothermal Reservoirs: Fundamental Processes, Computer...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Reservoirs: Fundamental Processes, Computer Simulation and Field Applications Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: Modeling of...

  5. Initial design for a fish bioenergetics model of Pacific saury coupled to a lower trophic ecosystem model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Initial design for a fish bioenergetics model of Pacific saury coupled to a lower trophic ecosystem-0001, Japan ABSTRACT A fish bioenergetics model coupled with an ecosystem model was developed to reproduce ecosystem model were input to the bioenergetics model of saury as the prey densities. Although certain model

  6. Panel - Generic Longitudinal Business Process Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barkow, Ingo; Block, William C.; Greenfield, Jay; Hebing, Marcel; Hoyle, Larry; Thomas, Wendy

    2013-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

    This presentation described a model for the processes involved in a longitudinal study. The model was developed at a symposium-style workshop held at Dagstuhl in September of 2011 (http://www.dagstuhl.de/11382). The Generic Longitudinal Business...

  7. On the boundary coupling of topological Landau-Ginzburg models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. I. Lazaroiu

    2003-12-24T23:59:59.000Z

    I propose a general form for the boundary coupling of B-type topological Landau-Ginzburg models. In particular, I show that the relevant background in the open string sector is a (generally non-Abelian) superconnection of type (0,1) living in a complex superbundle defined on the target space, which I allow to be a non-compact Calabi-Yau manifold. This extends and clarifies previous proposals. Generalizing an argument due to Witten, I show that BRST invariance of the partition function on the worldsheet amounts to the condition that the (0,superconnection's curvature equals a constant endomorphism plus the Landau-Ginzburg potential times the identity section of the underlying superbundle. This provides the target space equations of motion for the open topological model.

  8. Models of radiofrequency coupling for negative ion sources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cavenago, M.; Petrenko, S. [INFN-LNL, viale dell'Universita n.2, 35020 Legnaro (Italy)

    2012-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Radiofrequency heating for ICP (inductively coupled plasma) ion sources depends on the source operating pressure, the presence or absence of a Faraday shield, the driver coil geometry, the frequency used, and the magnetic field configuration: in negative ion source a magnetic filter seems necessary for H{sup -} survival. The result of single particle simulations showing the possibility of electron acceleration in the preglow regime and for reasonable driver chamber radius (15 cm) is reported, also as a function of the static external magnetic field. An effective plasma conductivity, depending not only from electron density, temperature, and rf field but also on static magnetic field is here presented and compared to previous models. Use of this conductivity and of multiphysics tools for a plasma transport and heating model is shown and discussed for a small source.

  9. Spatial model coupling -an efficient scheme to combine hydraulic and geomechanic simulations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cirpka, Olaf Arie

    Spatial model coupling - an efficient scheme to combine hydraulic and geomechanic simulations present a spatial coupling approach with two subdomains [1]: Hydro-geomechanical model full model approach-field (geomechanics are neglected) hydro-geomechanical subdomain el2p model hydraulic subdomain 2p model hydraulic

  10. Mathematical Formulation Requirements and Specifications for the Process Models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steefel, C.; Moulton, D.; Pau, G.; Lipnikov, K.; Meza, J.; Lichtner, P.; Wolery, T.; Bacon, D.; Spycher, N.; Bell, J.; Moridis, G.; Yabusaki, S.; Sonnenthal, E.; Zyvoloski, G.; Andre, B.; Zheng, L.; Davis, J.

    2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Advanced Simulation Capability for Environmental Management (ASCEM) is intended to be a state-of-the-art scientific tool and approach for understanding and predicting contaminant fate and transport in natural and engineered systems. The ASCEM program is aimed at addressing critical EM program needs to better understand and quantify flow and contaminant transport behavior in complex geological systems. It will also address the long-term performance of engineered components including cementitious materials in nuclear waste disposal facilities, in order to reduce uncertainties and risks associated with DOE EM's environmental cleanup and closure activities. Building upon national capabilities developed from decades of Research and Development in subsurface geosciences, computational and computer science, modeling and applied mathematics, and environmental remediation, the ASCEM initiative will develop an integrated, open-source, high-performance computer modeling system for multiphase, multicomponent, multiscale subsurface flow and contaminant transport. This integrated modeling system will incorporate capabilities for predicting releases from various waste forms, identifying exposure pathways and performing dose calculations, and conducting systematic uncertainty quantification. The ASCEM approach will be demonstrated on selected sites, and then applied to support the next generation of performance assessments of nuclear waste disposal and facility decommissioning across the EM complex. The Multi-Process High Performance Computing (HPC) Simulator is one of three thrust areas in ASCEM. The other two are the Platform and Integrated Toolsets (dubbed the Platform) and Site Applications. The primary objective of the HPC Simulator is to provide a flexible and extensible computational engine to simulate the coupled processes and flow scenarios described by the conceptual models developed using the ASCEM Platform. The graded and iterative approach to assessments naturally generates a suite of conceptual models that span a range of process complexity, potentially coupling hydrological, biogeochemical, geomechanical, and thermal processes. The Platform will use ensembles of these simulations to quantify the associated uncertainty, sensitivity, and risk. The Process Models task within the HPC Simulator focuses on the mathematical descriptions of the relevant physical processes.

  11. Modeling of the oxygen transfer in the respiratory process Sebastien Martin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    in the acinar periphery. Introduction The respiratory system is designed to achieve two main functions: oxygenModeling of the oxygen transfer in the respiratory process S´ebastien Martin Laboratoire de Math, coupled with a lumped mechanical model for the ventilation process. Objectives. We aim at investigating

  12. Proton-coupled electron transfer reactions in solution: Molecular dynamics with quantum transitions for model systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hammes-Schiffer, Sharon

    Proton-coupled electron transfer reactions in solution: Molecular dynamics with quantum transitions A general minimal model for proton-coupled electron transfer PCET reactions in solution is presented. This model consists of three coupled degrees of freedom that represent an electron, a proton, and a solvent

  13. Duration of the Process of Complete Synchronizationof Two Coupled Identical Chaotic Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. A. Koronovskii; A. E. Hramov; I. A. Khromova

    2006-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider the time required for complete synchronization of two identical one-way coupled vander Pol-Duffing oscillators occurring in the regime of dynamic chaos. The influence of the initial phase differ-ence between oscillators on the duration of the process of complete synchronization has been studied. At a fixedphase of chaotic oscillations of the self-excited drive oscillator, the period of time (past the coupling onset) during which the complete synchronization regime is established depends on the phase of the self-excited responseoscillator

  14. Coupled hydro-mechanical processes in crytalline rock and in induratedand plastic clays: A comparative discussion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsang, Chin-Fu; Blumling, Peter; Bernier, Frederic

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    healing and self-sealing processes in clays. Applied ClayScience, Clays in Natural and Engineered Barriers forsurface model for cohesive clays. Soils and Foundations,

  15. Multiscale/Multiphysics Modeling of Biomass Thermochemical Processes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pannala, Sreekanth [ORNL; Simunovic, Srdjan [ORNL; Frantziskonis, G. [University of Arizona

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Computational problems in simulating biomass thermochemical processes involve coupling processes that span several orders of magnitude in space and time. Computational difficulties arise from the multitude of the problem governing equations, each typically applying over a narrow range of spatiotemporal scales, thus making it necessary to represent the processes as the result of the interaction of multiple physics modules, termed here as multiscale/multiphysics (MSMP) coupling. Predictive simulations for such processes require algorithms that can efficiently integrate the underlying MSMP methods across the scales in order to achieve prescribed accuracy and control the computational cost. In addition, MSMP algorithms must scale to one hundred thousand processors or more in order to effectively harness the new computational resources and accelerate the scientific advances. In this chapter, we discuss the state-of-the-art in modeling the macro-scale phenomena in a biomass pyrolysis reactor along with details of the shortcomings and prospects in improving predictability. We also introduce the various multiphysics modules needed to model thermochemical conversion at lower spatiotemporal scales. Furthermore, we illustrate the need for MSMP coupling for thermochemical processes in biomass and provide an overview of the wavelet-based coupling techniques we have developed recently. In particular, we provide details about the compound wavelet matrix (CWM) and the dynamic CWM (dCWM) methods and show they are highly efficient in transferring information among multiphysics models across multiple temporal and spatial scales. The algorithmic gain is in addition to the parallel spatial scalability from traditional domain decomposition methods. The CWM algorithms are serial in time and limited by the smallest-system time-scales. In order to relax this algorithmic constraint, we have recently coupled time parallel (TP) algorithms to CWM, thus yielding a novel approach termed tpCWM. We present preliminary results from the tpCWM technique, indicating that we can accelerate time-to-solution by 2 to 3-orders of magnitude even on 20-processors and this can potentially constitute a new paradigm for MSMP simulations. If such improvements in simulation capability can be generalized, the tpCWM approach can lead the way to predictive simulations of biomass thermochemical processes.

  16. Coupling a transient solvent extraction module with the separations and safeguards performance model.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DePaoli, David W. (Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN); Birdwell, Joseph F. (Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN); Gauld, Ian C. (Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN); Cipiti, Benjamin B.; de Almeida, Valmor F. (Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN)

    2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A number of codes have been developed in the past for safeguards analysis, but many are dated, and no single code is able to cover all aspects of materials accountancy, process monitoring, and diversion scenario analysis. The purpose of this work was to integrate a transient solvent extraction simulation module developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, with the Separations and Safeguards Performance Model (SSPM), developed at Sandia National Laboratory, as a first step toward creating a more versatile design and evaluation tool. The SSPM was designed for materials accountancy and process monitoring analyses, but previous versions of the code have included limited detail on the chemical processes, including chemical separations. The transient solvent extraction model is based on the ORNL SEPHIS code approach to consider solute build up in a bank of contactors in the PUREX process. Combined, these capabilities yield a more robust transient separations and safeguards model for evaluating safeguards system design. This coupling and initial results are presented. In addition, some observations toward further enhancement of separations and safeguards modeling based on this effort are provided, including: items to be addressed in integrating legacy codes, additional improvements needed for a fully functional solvent extraction module, and recommendations for future integration of other chemical process modules.

  17. Modeling Business Objectives for Business Process Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ulm, Universität

    Modeling Business Objectives for Business Process Management Matthias Lohrmann and Manfred Reichert quality, business objective models assume the role of formal requirements definitions as in software engi a refined business objective modeling approach. Our approach builds on use case-based effectiveness criteria

  18. Modelling and Dynamic Simulation for Process Control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Skogestad, Sigurd

    principles for model development are outlined, and these principles are applied to a simple ash tank (which. In this paper we consider dynamic process models obtained using fundamental principles (eg. based reactor, a simple trend analysis using temperature measurements may be suÆcient. Dynamic models

  19. Modeling of ecosystem processes on the Oregon shelf during the 2001 summer upwelling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gan, Jian-Ping

    Modeling of ecosystem processes on the Oregon shelf during the 2001 summer upwelling Y. H. Spitz 2005; accepted 19 August 2005; published 22 October 2005. [1] Three-dimensional ecosystem response-based ecosystem model coupled to a high-resolution circulation model. We investigate, in particular, the influence

  20. Transport Processes in a Salt-Dome Environment We consider coupled subsurface flow and transport within a vertical cross section of a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kornhuber, Ralf

    Transport Processes in a Salt-Dome Environment ­ B ­ We consider coupled subsurface flow). (1) How is the conductive temperature distribution affected by the thermal conductivity of the salt in the simulation? In particular, compare the flow direction along the salt flanks. #12;Model domain No vertical

  1. Exploring chaos to model the design process

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sharkawy, Ahmed

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of design as a sequence of three rational processes (14) 10 Jansson's tsvo space model (15) 4 The different types of constraints within the design process The major processes occuring in Jansson's concept space. 19 6 Figure 6a depicts the skeleton upon... model and how it fits within March's depiction 9 Reduced two variable model and how it fits within Jansson's scheme . . 45 10 Map of case: 3=2. 0, /=50, d=0. 15 47 11 Map of case: %=2. 2, y=50, d=0. 15 48 12 Map of' case: 4=2. 6, @=50, d=0. 15 49...

  2. Exploring chaos to model the design process 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sharkawy, Ahmed

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of design as a sequence of three rational processes (14) 10 Jansson's tsvo space model (15) 4 The different types of constraints within the design process The major processes occuring in Jansson's concept space. 19 6 Figure 6a depicts the skeleton upon... model and how it fits within March's depiction 9 Reduced two variable model and how it fits within Jansson's scheme . . 45 10 Map of case: 3=2. 0, /=50, d=0. 15 47 11 Map of case: %=2. 2, y=50, d=0. 15 48 12 Map of' case: 4=2. 6, @=50, d=0. 15 49...

  3. Development of a scalable model for predicting arsenic transport coupled with oxidation and adsorption reactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clement, Prabhakar

    modeling; Contaminant transport; Scaling; Numerical modeling 1. Introduction Management of groundwaterDevelopment of a scalable model for predicting arsenic transport coupled with oxidation is critical for predicting its transport dynamics in groundwater systems. We completed batch experiments

  4. Modelling of Depletion-Induced Microseismic Events by Coupled Reservoir Simulation: Application to Valhall Field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    fractures/faults. A flow-deformation coupled reservoir geomechanical modelling approach has been applied. Coupled 3D geomechanical (deformation and fluid flow) simulations for Valhall field were conducted. Well in flow rate correlations in the field). The coupled 3D geomechanical simulation provides a tool

  5. Coupled Environmental Processes and Long-term Performance of Landfill Covers in the northern Mojave Desert

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David Shafer; Michael Young; Stephen Zitzer; Eric McDonald; Todd Caldwell

    2004-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Evapotransiration (ET) covers have gained widespread acceptance as a closure feature for waste disposal sites, particularly in the arid and semi-arid regions of the southwestern U.S. But as landforms, ET covers are subject to change over time because of processes such as pedogenesis, hydrologic processes, vegetation establishment and change, and biological processes. To better understand the effects of coupled process changes to ET covers, a series of four primary analog sites in Yucca Flat on the Nevada Test Site, along with measurements and observations from other locations in the Mojave Desert, were selected to evaluate changes in ET covers over time. The analog sites, of varying ages, were selected to address changes in the early post-institutional control period, the 1,000-year compliance period for disposal of low-level and mixed low-level waste, and the 10,000-year compliance period for transuranic waste sites.

  6. Process-Based Cost Modeling to Support Target Value Design

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nguyen, Hung Viet

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Costing as a Tool for Process Improvement Evaluation. ”A. (2005). “Determination of Process Durations on VirtualR.G. (1987). “Cost Modeling: a Process-Modeling Approach”.

  7. A Conceptual Approach to Two-Scale Constitutive Modelling For Hydro-Mechanical Coupling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giang D. Nguyen; Abbas El-Zein; Terry Bennett

    2014-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Large scale modelling of fluid flow coupled with solid failure in geothermal reservoirs or hydrocarbon extraction from reservoir rocks usually involves behaviours at two scales: lower scale of the inelastic localization zone, and larger scale of the bulk continuum where elastic behaviour can be reasonably assumed. The hydraulic conductivities corresponding to the mechanical properties at these two scales are different. In the bulk elastic host rock, the hydraulic conductivity does not vary much with the deformation, while it significantly changes in the lower scale of the localization zone due to inelastic deformation. Increase of permeability due to fracture and/or dilation, or reduction of permeability due to material compaction can take place inside this zone. The challenge is to predict the evolution of hydraulic conductivities coupled with the mechanical behaviour of the material in all stages of the deformation process. In the early stage of diffuse deformation, the permeability of the material can be reasonably assumed to be homogenous over the whole Representative Volume Element (RVE) However, localized failure results in distinctly different conductivities in different parts of the RVE. This paper establishes a general framework and corresponding field equations to describe the hydro-mechanical coupling in both diffuse and localized stages of deformation in rocks. In particular, embedding the lower scale hydro-mechanical behaviour of the localization zone inside an elastic bulk, together with their corresponding effective sizes, helps effectively deal with scaling issues in large-scale modelling. Preliminary results are presented which demonstrate the promising features of this new approach.

  8. Computational Modeling of Conventionally Reinforced Concrete Coupling Beams 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shastri, Ajay Seshadri

    2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    .20. Stress Distribution Showing the Formation of the Compression Strut.........99 Fig. 6.1. Section and Reinforcement Details for Specimen NR4 (Bristowe 2000)...101 Fig. 6.2. Test Setup for the Coupling Beams (Bristowe 2000... research on reinforced concrete coupling beams. Various types of failures observed in coupling beam tests are discussed in this section including the following: 14 ? Shear compression (SC): This failure is usually seen in conventionally...

  9. SURVEY, ANALYSIS AND VALIDATION OF INFORMATION FOR BUSINESS PROCESS MODELING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    SURVEY, ANALYSIS AND VALIDATION OF INFORMATION FOR BUSINESS PROCESS MODELING Nuno Castela Escola, Business Processes, Informational Resources, Activities, UML Abstract: Business processes modeling became a fundamental task for organizations. To model business processes is necessary to know all the activities

  10. Coupling of a regional atmospheric model (RegCM3) and a regional oceanic model (FVCOM) over the maritime continent

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wei, Jun

    Climatological high resolution coupled climate model simulations for the maritime continent have been carried out using the regional climate model (RegCM) version 3 and the finite volume coastal ocean model (FVCOM) ...

  11. Modeling Coupled Processes in Clay Formations for Radioactive Waste Disposal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Hui-Hai

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) used nuclear fuel. The firstrepository tunnels, the PWR type of used fuel is typicallyby the length of individual PWR fuel elements and the number

  12. Modeling Coupled Processes in Clay Formations for Radioactive Waste Disposal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Hui-Hai

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    I. Reservoir Engineering in Coal Seams: Part 1—The PhysicalStorage and Movement in Coal Seams. SPE Reserv. Eng. , 2 (swelling stress for coal seams that can involve swelling or

  13. Modeling Coupled Processes in Clay Formations for Radioactive Waste Disposal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Hui-Hai

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    sorption including waste heat, hyperalkaline solutions frome.g. , heat production from the decay of the waste, re-waste packages along the tunnels, to achieve a distributed heat

  14. Modeling Coupled Processes in Clay Formations for Radioactive Waste Disposal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Hui-Hai

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2010). 4. Impact of rock-property heterogeneity as well asa variety of rock properties and their relations with flowwill use clay host rock properties derived from the Opalinus

  15. A coupled THMC model of a heating and hydration laboratory experiment in unsaturated compacted FEBEX bentonite

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zheng, L.; Samper, J.; Montenegro, L.; Fernandez, A.M.

    2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Unsaturated compacted bentonite is foreseen by several countries as a backfill and sealing material in high-level radioactive waste repositories. The strong interplays between thermal (T), hydrodynamic (H), mechanical (M) and chemical (C) processes during the hydration stage of a repository call for fully coupled THMC models. Validation of such THMC models is prevented by the lack of comprehensive THMC experiments and the difficulties of experimental methods to measure accurately the chemical composition of bentonite porewater. We present here a non-isothermal multiphase flow and multicomponent reactive solute transport model for a deformable medium of a heating and hydration experiment performed on a sample of compacted FEBEX bentonite. Besides standard solute transport and geochemical processes, the model accounts for solute cross diffusion and thermal and chemical osmosis. Bentonite swelling is solved with a state-surface approach. The THM model is calibrated with transient temperature, water content and porosity data measured at the end of the experiment. The reactive transport model is calibrated with porewater chemical data derived from aqueous extract data. Model results confirm that thermal osmosis is relevant for the hydration of FEBEX bentonite while chemical osmosis can be safely neglected. Dilution and evaporation are the main processes controlling the concentration of conservative species. Dissolved cations are mostly affected by calcite dissolution-precipitation and cation exchange reactions. Dissolved sulphate is controlled by gypsum/anhydrite dissolution-precipitation. pH is mostly buffered by protonation/deprotonation via surface complexation. Computed concentrations agree well with inferred aqueous extract data at all sections except near the hydration boundary where cation data are affected by a sampling artifact. The fit of Cl{sup -} data is excellent except for the data near the heater. The largest deviations of the model from inferred aqueous extract data occur for dissolved SO{sub 4}{sup 2-} which is underpredicted by the model. There are uncertainties on the amount of gypsum available for dissolution and its dissolution mechanism (kinetics or local equilibrium).

  16. Cosmological Perturbations in Models of Coupled Dark Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sirichai Chongchitnan

    2009-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Models in which dark energy interacts with dark matter have been proposed in the literature to help explain why dark energy should only come to dominate in recent times. In this paper, we present a dynamical framework to calculate cosmological perturbations for a general quintessence potential and interaction term. Our formalism is built upon the powerful phase-space approach often used to analyse the dynamical attractors in the background. We obtain a set of coupled differential equations purely in terms of dimensionless, bounded variables and apply these equations to calculate perturbations in a number of scenarios. Interestingly, in the presence of dark-sector interactions, we find that dark energy perturbations do not redshift away at late times, but can cluster even on small scales. We also clarify the initial conditions for the perturbations in the dark sector, showing that adiabaticity is no longer conserved in the presence of dark-sector interactions, even on large scales. Some issues of instability in the perturbations are also discussed.

  17. A modeling study of benthic detritus flux's impacts on heterotrophic processes in Lake Michigan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Changsheng

    A modeling study of benthic detritus flux's impacts on heterotrophic processes in Lake Michigan food web in Lake Michigan were examined using a three- dimensional (3-D) coupled biological to simulate the heterotrophic process in southern Lake Michigan. INDEX TERMS: 4815 Oceanography: Biological

  18. Constraints on the axion-electron coupling for solar axions produced by a Compton process and bremsstrahlung

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Derbin, A. V.; Kayunov, A. S.; Muratova, V. V.; Semenov, D. A.; Unzhakov, E. V. [St. Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute, Gatchina, 188300 (Russian Federation)

    2011-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The search for solar axions produced by Compton ({gamma}+e{sup -}{yields}e{sup -}+A) and bremsstrahlunglike (e{sup -}+Z{yields}Z+e{sup -}+A) processes has been performed. The axion flux in both cases depends on the axion-electron coupling constant. The resonant excitation of the low-lying nuclear level of {sup 169}Tm was looked for: A+{sup 169}Tm{yields}{sup 169}Tm{sup *}{yields}{sup 169}Tm+{gamma} (8.41 keV). The Si(Li) detector and {sup 169}Tm target installed inside the low-background setup were used to detect 8.41 keV {gamma} rays. As a result, a new model-independent restriction on the axion-electron and the axion-nucleon couplings was obtained: g{sub Ae}x|g{sub AN}{sup 0}+g{sub AN}{sup 3}|{<=}2.1x10{sup -14}. In the model of the hadronic axion this restriction corresponds to the upper limit on the axion-electron coupling and on the axion mass g{sub Ae}xm{sub A{<=}}3.1x10{sup -7} eV (90% C.L.). The limits on the axion mass are m{sub A{<=}}105 eV and m{sub A{<=}}1.3 keV for the Dine-Fischler-Srednicki-Zhitnitskii- and Kim-Shifman-Vainstein-Zakharov-axion models, correspondingly (90% C.L.).

  19. Gas Distribution Modeling using Sparse Gaussian Process Mixture Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stachniss, Cyrill

    Gas Distribution Modeling using Sparse Gaussian Process Mixture Models Cyrill Stachniss1 Christian-- In this paper, we consider the problem of learning a two dimensional spatial model of a gas distribution with a mobile robot. Building maps that can be used to accurately predict the gas concentration at query

  20. Estimation of landfill emission lifespan using process oriented modeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ustohalova, Veronika [Institute of Waste Management, University of Duisburg-Essen, Universitaetsstrasse 15, 45141 Essen (Germany)]. E-mail: veronika.ustohalova@uni-essen.de; Ricken, Tim [Institute of Mechanics, University of Duisburg-Essen, Universitaetsstrasse 15, 45141 Essen (Germany); Widmann, Renatus [Institute of Waste Management, University of Duisburg-Essen, Universitaetsstrasse 15, 45141 Essen (Germany)

    2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Depending on the particular pollutants emitted, landfills may require service activities lasting from hundreds to thousands of years. Flexible tools allowing long-term predictions of emissions are of key importance to determine the nature and expected duration of maintenance and post-closure activities. A highly capable option represents predictions based on models and verified by experiments that are fast, flexible and allow for the comparison of various possible operation scenarios in order to find the most appropriate one. The intention of the presented work was to develop a experimentally verified multi-dimensional predictive model capable of quantifying and estimating processes taking place in landfill sites where coupled process description allows precise time and space resolution. This constitutive 2-dimensional model is based on the macromechanical theory of porous media (TPM) for a saturated thermo-elastic porous body. The model was used to simulate simultaneously occurring processes: organic phase transition, gas emissions, heat transport, and settlement behavior on a long time scale for municipal solid waste deposited in a landfill. The relationships between the properties (composition, pore structure) of a landfill and the conversion and multi-phase transport phenomena inside it were experimentally determined. In this paper, we present both the theoretical background of the model and the results of the simulations at one single point as well as in a vertical landfill cross section.

  1. Method and apparatus for measuring coupled flow, transport, and reaction processes under liquid unsaturated flow conditions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McGrail, Bernard P. (Pasco, WA); Martin, Paul F. (Richland, WA); Lindenmeier, Clark W. (Richland, WA)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention is a method and apparatus for measuring coupled flow, transport and reaction processes under liquid unsaturated flow conditions. The method and apparatus of the present invention permit distinguishing individual precipitation events and their effect on dissolution behavior isolated to the specific event. The present invention is especially useful for dynamically measuring hydraulic parameters when a chemical reaction occurs between a particulate material and either liquid or gas (e.g. air) or both, causing precipitation that changes the pore structure of the test material.

  2. AN ADAPTIVE FINITE ELEMENT METHOD FOR THE EDDY CURRENT MODEL WITH CIRCUIT/FIELD COUPLINGS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    AN ADAPTIVE FINITE ELEMENT METHOD FOR THE EDDY CURRENT MODEL WITH CIRCUIT/FIELD COUPLINGS JUNQING for solving the eddy current model with voltage excitations for complicated three dimensional structures of the proposed method. Key words. Eddy current, circuit/field coupling, adaptivity, a posteriori error analysis

  3. Coupled optical and electrical modeling of solar cell based on conical pore silicon photonic crystals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    John, Sajeev

    a significant part of silicon solar cell cost. Thin film technology is a promising way to avoid these costCoupled optical and electrical modeling of solar cell based on conical pore silicon photonic://jap.aip.org/authors #12;Coupled optical and electrical modeling of solar cell based on conical pore silicon photonic

  4. Coupling of Integrated Biosphere Simulator to Regional Climate Model version 3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Winter, Jonathan (Jonathan Mark)

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Presented in this thesis is a description of the coupling of Integrated Biosphere Simulator (IBIS) to Regional Climate Model version 3 (RegCM3), and an assessment of the coupled model (RegCM3-IBIS). RegCM3 is a 3-dimensional, ...

  5. Impact of Agricultural Practice on Regional Climate in a Coupled Land Surface Mesoscale Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cooley, H.S.; Riley, W.J.; Torn, M.S.; He, Y.

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    winter wheat belt on the mesoscale environment, Monthlygeneration Penn State/NCAR mesoscale model (MM5), NCAR,in a Coupled Land Surface Mesoscale Model H.S. Cooley Energy

  6. Coupled Model for Heat and Water Transport in a High Level Waste...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Model for Heat and Water Transport in a High Level Waste Repository in Salt Coupled Model for Heat and Water Transport in a High Level Waste Repository in Salt This report...

  7. Gas Metal Arc Welding Process Modeling and Prediction of Weld Microstructure in MIL A46100 Armor-Grade

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grujicic, Mica

    Gas Metal Arc Welding Process Modeling and Prediction of Weld Microstructure in MIL A46100 Armor metal arc welding (GMAW) butt-joining process has been modeled using a two-way fully coupled, transient in the form of heat, and the mechanical material model of the workpiece and the weld is made temperature

  8. Hydrothermal processing of Hanford tank wastes: Process modeling and control

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Currier, R.P. [comp.

    1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) hydrothermal process, waste streams are first pressurized and heated as they pass through a continuous flow tubular reactor vessel. The waste is maintained at reaction temperature of 300--550 C where organic destruction and sludge reformation occur. This report documents LANL activities in process modeling and control undertaken in FY94 to support hydrothermal process development. Key issues discussed include non-ideal flow patterns (e.g. axial dispersion) and their effect on reactor performance, the use and interpretation of inert tracer experiments, and the use of computational fluid mechanics to evaluate novel hydrothermal reactor designs. In addition, the effects of axial dispersion (and simplifications to rate expressions) on the estimated kinetic parameters are explored by non-linear regression to experimental data. Safety-related calculations are reported which estimate the explosion limits of effluent gases and the fate of hydrogen as it passes through the reactor. Development and numerical solution of a generalized one-dimensional mathematical model is also summarized. The difficulties encountered in using commercially available software to correlate the behavior of high temperature, high pressure aqueous electrolyte mixtures are summarized. Finally, details of the control system and experiments conducted to empirically determine the system response are reported.

  9. A Generalized Model of Nonlinear Diffusive Shock Acceleration Coupled to an Evolving Supernova Remnant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Shiu-Hang; Nagataki, Shigehiro

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To better model the efficient production of cosmic rays (CRs) in supernova remnants (SNRs) with the associated coupling between CR production and SNR dynamics, we have generalized an existing cr-hydro-NEI code (i.e., Ellison et al. 2012) to include the following processes: (1) an explicit calculation of the upstream precursor structure including the position dependent flow speed, density, temperature, and magnetic field strength; (2) a momentum and space dependent CR diffusion coefficient; (3) an explicit calculation of magnetic field amplification (MFA); (4) calculation of the maximum CR momentum using the amplified magnetic field; (5) a finite Alfven speed for the particle scattering centers; and (6) the ability to accelerate a superthermal seed population of CRs as well as the ambient thermal plasma. While a great deal of work has been done modeling SNRs, most work has concentrated on either the continuum emission from relativistic electrons or ions, or the thermal emission from the shock heated plasma. Ou...

  10. Assessing the Vulnerability of Large Critical Infrastructure Using Fully-Coupled Blast Effects Modeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McMichael, L D; Noble, C R; Margraf, J D; Glascoe, L G

    2009-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Structural failures, such as the MacArthur Maze I-880 overpass in Oakland, California and the I-35 bridge in Minneapolis, Minnesota, are recent examples of our national infrastructure's fragility and serve as an important reminder of such infrastructure in our everyday lives. These two failures, as well as the World Trade Center's collapse and the levee failures in New Orleans, highlight the national importance of protecting our infrastructure as much as possible against acts of terrorism and natural hazards. This paper describes a process for evaluating the vulnerability of critical infrastructure to large blast loads using a fully-coupled finite element approach. A description of the finite element software and modeling technique is discussed along with the experimental validation of the numerical tools. We discuss how such an approach can be used for specific problems such as modeling the progressive collapse of a building.

  11. A Signal Processing Model of Quantum Mechanics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chris Thron; Johnny Watts

    2012-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper develops a deterministic model of quantum mechanics as an accumulation-and-threshold process. The model arises from an analogy with signal processing in wireless communications. Complex wavefunctions are interpreted as expressing the amplitude and phase information of a modulated carrier wave. Particle transmission events are modeled as the outcome of a process of signal accumulation that occurs in an extra (non-spacetime) dimension. Besides giving a natural interpretation of the wavefunction and the Born rule, the model accommodates the collapse of the wave packet and other quantum paradoxes such as EPR and the Ahanorov-Bohm effect. The model also gives a new perspective on the 'relational' nature of quantum mechanics: that is, whether the wave function of a physical system is "real" or simply reflects the observer's partial knowledge of the system. We simulate the model for a 2-slit experiment, and indicate possible deviations of the model's predictions from conventional quantum mechanics. We also indicate how the theory may be extended to a field theory.

  12. A Process Model of Quantum Mechanics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    William Sulis

    2014-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

    A process model of quantum mechanics utilizes a combinatorial game to generate a discrete and finite causal space upon which can be defined a self-consistent quantum mechanics. An emergent space-time M and continuous wave function arise through a non-uniform interpolation process. Standard non-relativistic quantum mechanics emerges under the limit of infinite information (the causal space grows to infinity) and infinitesimal scale (the separation between points goes to zero). The model has the potential to address several paradoxes in quantum mechanics while remaining computationally powerful.

  13. Numerical modeling of a thermohydrochemical (T-H-C) coupling and the implications to radionuclide transport.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Esh, D. W.; Scheetz, B. E.

    1999-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Thermohydrochemical (T-H-C) processes result from the placement of heat-generating radioactive materials in unsaturated, fractured geologic materials. The placement of materials in the proposed Yucca Mountain repository will result in complex environmental conditions. Simple models are developed liking the thermohydrological effects simulated with TOUGHZ to system chemistry, with an example presented for chloride. Perturbations to near-field chemistry could have a significant impact on the migration of actinides and fission products in geologic materials. Various conceptual models to represent fractures are utilized in TOUGHZ simulations of thermohydrological processes. The simulated moisture redistribution is then coupled to simple chemical models to demonstrate the potential magnitude of T-H-C processes. The concentration of chloride in solution (returning to the engineered barrier system) is demonstrated, in extreme cases, to exceed 100,000 mg/L. The implication is that the system (typically ambient chemical and hydrological conditions) in which radionuclide transport is typically simulated and measured may be significantly different from the perturbed system.

  14. Attrition and abrasion models for oil shale process modeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aldis, D.F.

    1991-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

    As oil shale is processed, fine particles, much smaller than the original shale are created. This process is called attrition or more accurately abrasion. In this paper, models of abrasion are presented for oil shale being processed in several unit operations. Two of these unit operations, a fluidized bed and a lift pipe are used in the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Hot-Recycle-Solid (HRS) process being developed for the above ground processing of oil shale. In two reports, studies were conducted on the attrition of oil shale in unit operations which are used in the HRS process. Carley reported results for attrition in a lift pipe for oil shale which had been pre-processed either by retorting or by retorting then burning. The second paper, by Taylor and Beavers, reported results for a fluidized bed processing of oil shale. Taylor and Beavers studied raw, retorted, and shale which had been retorted and then burned. In this paper, empirical models are derived, from the experimental studies conducted on oil shale for the process occurring in the HRS process. The derived models are presented along with comparisons with experimental results.

  15. Simulated evolution of fractures and fracture networks subject to thermal cooling: A coupled discrete element and heat conduction model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huang, Hai; Plummer, Mitchell; Podgorney, Robert

    2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Advancement of EGS requires improved prediction of fracture development and growth during reservoir stimulation and long-term operation. This, in turn, requires better understanding of the dynamics of the strongly coupled thermo-hydro-mechanical (THM) processes within fractured rocks. We have developed a physically based rock deformation and fracture propagation simulator by using a quasi-static discrete element model (DEM) to model mechanical rock deformation and fracture propagation induced by thermal stress and fluid pressure changes. We also developed a network model to simulate fluid flow and heat transport in both fractures and porous rock. In this paper, we describe results of simulations in which the DEM model and network flow & heat transport model are coupled together to provide realistic simulation of the changes of apertures and permeability of fractures and fracture networks induced by thermal cooling and fluid pressure changes within fractures. Various processes, such as Stokes flow in low velocity pores, convection-dominated heat transport in fractures, heat exchange between fluid-filled fractures and solid rock, heat conduction through low-permeability matrices and associated mechanical deformations are all incorporated into the coupled model. The effects of confining stresses, developing thermal stress and injection pressure on the permeability evolution of fracture and fracture networks are systematically investigated. Results are summarized in terms of implications for the development and evolution of fracture distribution during hydrofracturing and thermal stimulation for EGS.

  16. Supporting Flexible Business Processes with a Progression Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schneider, Kevin A.

    Supporting Flexible Business Processes with a Progression Model Nicole Stavness Department with information systems to contend with changing business processes, and to support diverse workflow. Model that support flexible business processes. The progression model tracks a user's interaction when using

  17. Author's personal copy Two-way coupling of an ENSO model to the global climate model CLIMBER-3a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levermann, Anders

    it is possible to introduce ENSO variability to an Earth system Model of Intermediate Complexity (EMIC we are using here. In this study we couple the Earth system model of intermediate complexity (EMIC

  18. Synchronizing Coupled Semiconductor Lasers under General Coupling Shuai Li, Yi Guo, and Yehuda Braiman

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guo, Yi

    coupling between the lasers [1]­[4]. General coupling topology has not been explored. The dynamics of each]. In the case of global coupling, the process of synchronization shows analogy to the process found tools in- spired by recent cooperative control advances. Examining the dynamic model of coupled

  19. Do Coupled Climate Models Correctly SImulate the Upward Branch of the Deept Ocean Global Conveyor?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sarmiento, Jorge L; Downes, Stephanie; Bianchi, Daniele

    2013-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The large-scale meridional overturning circulation (MOC) connects the deep ocean, a major reservoir of carbon, to the other components of the climate system and must therefore be accurately represented in Earth System Models. Our project aims to address the specific question of the pathways and mechanisms controlling the upwelling branch of the MOC, a subject of significant disagreement between models and observational syntheses, and among general circulation models. Observations of these pathways are limited, particularly in regions of complex hydrography such as the Southern Ocean. As such, we rely on models to examine theories of the overturning circulation, both physically and biogeochemically. This grant focused on a particular aspect of the meridional overturning circulation (MOC) where there is currently significant disagreement between models and observationally based analyses of the MOC, and amongst general circulation models. In particular, the research focused on addressing the following questions: 1. Where does the deep water that sinks in the polar regions rise to the surface? 2. What processes are responsible for this rise? 3. Do state-of-the-art coupled GCMs capture these processes? Our research had three key components: observational synthesis, model development and model analysis. In this final report we outline the key results from these areas of research for the 2007 to 2012 grant period. The research described here was carried out primarily by graduate student, Daniele Bianchi (now a Postdoc at McGill University, Canada), and Postdoc Stephanie Downes (now a Research Fellow at The Australian national University, Australia). Additional support was provided for programmers Jennifer Simeon as well as Rick Slater.

  20. Ab-initio modeling of electromechanical coupling at Si surfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoppe, Sandra; Müller, Stefan, E-mail: stefan.mueller@tuhh.de [Institute of Advanced Ceramics, Hamburg University of Technology, 21073 Hamburg (Germany); Michl, Anja [Institute of Advanced Ceramics, Hamburg University of Technology, 21073 Hamburg (Germany); Institute of Materials Research, Materials Mechanics, Helmholtz-Zentrum Geesthacht, 21502 Geesthacht (Germany); Weissmüller, Jörg [Institute of Materials Research, Materials Mechanics, Helmholtz-Zentrum Geesthacht, 21502 Geesthacht (Germany); Institute of Materials Physics and Technology, Hamburg University of Technology, 21073 Hamburg (Germany)

    2014-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The electromechanical coupling at the silicon (100) and (111) surfaces was studied via density functional theory by calculating the response of the ionization potential and the electron affinity to different types of strain. We find a branched strain response of those two quantities with different coupling coefficients for negative and positive strain values. This can be attributed to the reduced crystal symmetry due to anisotropic strain, which partially lifts the degeneracy of the valence and conduction bands. Only the Si(111) electron affinity exhibits a monotonously linear strain response, as the conduction band valleys remain degenerate under strain. The strain response of the surface dipole is linear and seems to be dominated by volume changes. Our results may help to understand the mechanisms behind electromechanical coupling at an atomic level in greater detail and for different electronic and atomic structures.

  1. Modeling the Process of Mining Silicon Through a Single Displacement...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Modeling the Process of Mining Silicon Through a Single DisplacementRedox Reaction Modeling the Process of Mining Silicon Through a Single DisplacementRedox Reaction Below is...

  2. Evaluation of Generic EBS Design Concepts and Process Models...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Generic EBS Design Concepts and Process Models Implications to EBS Design Optimization Evaluation of Generic EBS Design Concepts and Process Models Implications to EBS Design...

  3. Hot blast stove process model and model-based controller

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Muske, K.R. [Villanova Univ., PA (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering; Howse, J.W.; Hansen, G.A.; Cagliostro, D.J. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States). Computational Science Methods Group; Chaubal, P.C. [Inland Steel Industries, Inc., East Chicago, IN (United States). Research Labs.

    1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes the process model and model-based control techniques implemented on the hot blast stoves for the No. 7 Blast Furnace at the Inland Steel facility in East Chicago, Indiana. A detailed heat transfer model of the stoves is developed and verified using plant data. This model is used as part of a predictive control scheme to determine the minimum amount of fuel necessary to achieve the blast air requirements. The model is also used to predict maximum and minimum temperature constraint violations within the stove so that the controller can take corrective actions while still achieving the required stove performance.

  4. A turbulent transport network model in MULTIFLUX coupled with TOUGH2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Danko, G.; Bahrami, D.; Birkholzer, J.T.

    2011-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A new numerical method is described for the fully iterated, conjugate solution of two discrete submodels, involving (a) a transport network model for heat, moisture, and airflows in a high-permeability, air-filled cavity; and (b) a variably saturated fractured porous medium. The transport network submodel is an integrated-parameter, computational fluid dynamics solver, describing the thermal-hydrologic transport processes in the flow channel system of the cavity with laminar or turbulent flow and convective heat and mass transport, using MULTIFLUX. The porous medium submodel, using TOUGH2, is a solver for the heat and mass transport in the fractured rock mass. The new model solution extends the application fields of TOUGH2 by integrating it with turbulent flow and transport in a discrete flow network system. We present demonstrational results for a nuclear waste repository application at Yucca Mountain with the most realistic model assumptions and input parameters including the geometrical layout of the nuclear spent fuel and waste with variable heat load for the individual containers. The MULTIFLUX and TOUGH2 model elements are fully iterated, applying a programmed reprocessing of the Numerical Transport Code Functionalization model-element in an automated Outside Balance Iteration loop. The natural, convective airflow field and the heat and mass transport in a representative emplacement drift during postclosure are explicitly solved in the new model. The results demonstrate that the direction and magnitude of the air circulation patterns and all transport modes are strongly affected by the heat and moisture transport processes in the surrounding rock, justifying the need for a coupled, fully iterated model solution such as the one presented in the paper.

  5. Accelerating the spin-up of the coupled carbon and nitrogen cycle model in CLM4

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Fang, Yilin; Liu, Chongxuan; Leung, Lai-Yung R.

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The commonly adopted biogeochemistry spin-up process in an Earth system model (ESM) is to run the model for hundreds to thousands of years subject to periodic atmospheric forcing to reach dynamic steady state of the carbon–nitrogen (CN) models. A variety of approaches have been proposed to reduce the computation time of the spin-up process. Significant improvement in computational efficiency has been made recently. However, a long simulation time is still required to reach the common convergence criteria of the coupled carbon–nitrogen model. A gradient projection method was proposed and used to further reduce the computation time after examining the trendmore »of the dominant carbon pools. The Community Land Model version 4 (CLM4) with a carbon and nitrogen component was used in this study. From point-scale simulations, we found that the method can reduce the computation time by 20–69% compared to one of the fastest approaches in the literature. We also found that the cyclic stability of total carbon for some cases differs from that of the periodic atmospheric forcing, and some cases even showed instability. Close examination showed that one case has a carbon periodicity much longer than that of the atmospheric forcing due to the annual fire disturbance that is longer than half a year. The rest was caused by the instability of water table calculation in the hydrology model of CLM4. The instability issue is resolved after we replaced the hydrology scheme in CLM4 with a flow model for variably saturated porous media.« less

  6. Iron and steel industry process model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sparrow, F.T.; Pilati, D.; Dougherty, T.; McBreen, E.; Juang, L.L.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The iron and steel industry process model depicts expected energy-consumption characteristics of the iron and steel industry and ancillary industries for the next 25 years by means of a process model of the major steps in steelmaking, from ore mining and scrap recycling to the final finishing of carbon, alloy, and stainless steel into steel products such as structural steel, slabs, plates, tubes, and bars. Two plant types are modeled: fully integrated mills and mini-mills. User-determined inputs into the model are as follows: projected energy and materials prices; projected costs of capacity expansion and replacement; energy-conserving options, both operating modes and investments; the internal rate of return required on investment; and projected demand for finished steel. Nominal input choices in the model for the inputs listed above are as follows: National Academy of Sciences Committee on Nuclear and Alternative Energy Systems Demand Panel nominal energy-price projections for oil, gas, distillates, residuals, and electricity and 1975 actual prices for materials; actual 1975 costs; new technologies added; 15% after taxes; and 1975 actual demand with 1.5%/y growth. The model reproduces the base-year (1975) actual performance of the industry; then, given the above nominal input choices, it projects modes of operation and capacity expansion that minimize the cost of meeting the given final demands for each of 5 years, each year being the midpoint of a 5-year interval. The output of the model includes the following: total energy use and intensity (Btu/ton) by type, by process, and by time period; energy conservation options chosen; utilization rates for existing capacity; capital-investment decisions for capacity expansion.

  7. Development of a comprehensive weld process model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Radhakrishnan, B.; Zacharia, T.; Paul, A.

    1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This cooperative research and development agreement (CRADA) between Concurrent Technologies Corporation (CTC) and Lockheed Martin Energy Systems (LMES) combines CTC`s expertise in the welding area and that of LMES to develop computer models and simulation software for welding processes. This development is of significant impact to the industry, including materials producers and fabricators. The main thrust of the research effort was to develop a comprehensive welding simulation methodology. A substantial amount of work has been done by several researchers to numerically model several welding processes. The primary drawback of most of the existing models is the lack of sound linkages between the mechanistic aspects (e.g., heat transfer, fluid flow, and residual stress) and the metallurgical aspects (e.g., microstructure development and control). A comprehensive numerical model which can be used to elucidate the effect of welding parameters/conditions on the temperature distribution, weld pool shape and size, solidification behavior, and microstructure development, as well as stresses and distortion, does not exist. It was therefore imperative to develop a comprehensive model which would predict all of the above phenomena during welding. The CRADA built upon an already existing three-dimensional (3-D) welding simulation model which was developed by LMES which is capable of predicting weld pool shape and the temperature history in 3-d single-pass welds. However, the model does not account for multipass welds, microstructural evolution, distortion and residual stresses. Additionally, the model requires large resources of computing time, which limits its use for practical applications. To overcome this, CTC and LMES have developed through this CRADA the comprehensive welding simulation model described above.

  8. Right on time: Measuring Kuramoto model coupling from a survey of wristwatches

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reginald D. Smith

    2010-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Using a survey of wristwatch synchronization from a randomly selected group of independent volunteers, one can model the system as a Kuramoto-type coupled oscillator network. Based on the phase data, both the order parameter and an estimated value of the coupling is derived and the possibilities for similar research to deduce topology from dynamics are discussed.

  9. SELF-HEATING IN A COUPLED THERMO-ELECTRIC CIRCUIT-DEVICE MODEL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jüngel, Ansgar

    SELF-HEATING IN A COUPLED THERMO-ELECTRIC CIRCUIT-DEVICE MODEL MARKUS BRUNK AND ANSGAR J¨UNGEL Abstract. The self-heating of a coupled thermo-electric circuit-semiconductor system is mod- eled. Introduction. Due to growing package densities, self-heating becomes more and more important in modern

  10. Torsion gravity with non-minimally coupled fermionic field: some cosmological models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vignolo, Stefano; Fabbri, Luca

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate some cosmological models arising from a non-minimal coupling of a fermionic field to gravity in the geometrical setting of Einstein-Cartan-Sciama-Kibble gravity. The role played by the non-minimal coupling together with torsion in facing problems such as cosmological singularity, inflation and dark energy is discussed.

  11. Y. Tang W.W. Hsieh Hybrid coupled models of the tropical Pacific: II ENSO prediction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hsieh, William

    skills shifted eastward in the 1990s. A nonlinear canonical correlation analysis of the zonal wind stress have to be parameterized; (3) proper initialization of the coupled model is difficult; and (4) the cost understanding of the coupled mechanisms and lower computing cost than a full CGCM (Blanke et al. 1997), and (3

  12. Interactive Feedback between ENSO and the Indian Ocean in an Interactive Ensemble Coupled Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kang, In-Sik

    . In turn, the anomalous easterlies generate oceanic- upwelling Kelvin waves over the western Pacific, which ensemble coupled model. From a long-term simulation of the coupled GCM, it is shown that El Niño events waves off of the equator. The downwelling Rossby waves, which result in SST warming, propagate slowly

  13. Mortar finite element discretization of a model coupling Darcy and Stokes equations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Mortar finite element discretization of a model coupling Darcy and Stokes equations by C. Bernardi1 flowing on a homogeneous porous ground, we consider a system where the Darcy and Stokes equations´erons un syst`eme o`u les ´equations de Darcy et de Stokes sont coupl´ees par des conditions de raccord

  14. Multi-scale Characterization and Prediction of Coupled Subsurface Biogeochemical-Hydrological Processes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hubbard, Susan; Williams, Ken; Steefel, Carl; Banfield, Jill; Long, Phil; Slater, Lee; Pride, Steve; Jinsong Chen

    2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To advance solutions needed for remediation of DOE contaminated sites, approaches are needed that can elucidate and predict reactions associated with coupled biological, geochemical, and hydrological processes over a variety of spatial scales and in heterogeneous environments. Our previous laboratory experimental experiments, which were conducted under controlled and homogeneous conditions, suggest that geophysical methods have the potential for elucidating system transformations that often occur during remediation. Examples include tracking the onset and aggregation of precipitates associated with sulfate reduction using seismic and complex resistivity methods (Williams et al., 2005; Ntarlagiannis et al., 2005) as well as estimating the volume of evolved gas associated with denitrification using radar velocity. These exciting studies illustrated that geophysical responses correlated with biogeochemical changes, but also that multiple factors could impact the geophysical signature and thus a better understanding as well as integration tools were needed to advance the techniques to the point where they can be used to provide quantitative estimates of system transformations.

  15. Business Process Modeling and Agility Nancy Alexopoulou1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kouroupetroglou, Georgios

    Business Process Modeling and Agility Nancy Alexopoulou1 Abstract. The objective of this thesis was to investigate business process agility and develop modeling approaches that ensure agility in business process-driven business process modeling approach that promotes agility in business process execution. This approach

  16. Configurable Process Models: Experiences from a Municipality Case Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van der Aalst, Wil

    Configurable Process Models: Experiences from a Municipality Case Study Florian Gottschalk1 , Teun.larosa@qut.edu.au Abstract. Configurable process models integrate different variants of a business process into a single model. Through configuration users of such models can then combine the variants to derive a process

  17. Coupled Dynamic Modeling of Floating Wind Turbine Systems: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wayman, E. N.; Sclavounos, P. D.; Butterfield, S.; Jonkman, J.; Musial, W.

    2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This article presents a collaborative research program that the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) have undertaken to develop innovative and cost-effective floating and mooring systems for offshore wind turbines in water depths of 10-200 m. Methods for the coupled structural, hydrodynamic, and aerodynamic analysis of floating wind turbine systems are presented in the frequency domain. This analysis was conducted by coupling the aerodynamics and structural dynamics code FAST [4] developed at NREL with the wave load and response simulation code WAMIT (Wave Analysis at MIT) [15] developed at MIT. Analysis tools were developed to consider coupled interactions between the wind turbine and the floating system. These include the gyroscopic loads of the wind turbine rotor on the tower and floater, the aerodynamic damping introduced by the wind turbine rotor, the hydrodynamic damping introduced by wave-body interactions, and the hydrodynamic forces caused by wave excitation. Analyses were conducted for two floater concepts coupled with the NREL 5-MW Offshore Baseline wind turbine in water depths of 10-200 m: the MIT/NREL Shallow Drafted Barge (SDB) and the MIT/NREL Tension Leg Platform (TLP). These concepts were chosen to represent two different methods of achieving stability to identify differences in performance and cost of the different stability methods. The static and dynamic analyses of these structures evaluate the systems' responses to wave excitation at a range of frequencies, the systems' natural frequencies, and the standard deviations of the systems' motions in each degree of freedom in various wind and wave environments. This article in various wind and wave environments. This article explores the effects of coupling the wind turbine with the floating platform, the effects of water depth, and the effects of wind speed on the systems' performance. An economic feasibility analysis of the two concepts was also performed. Key cost components included the material and construction costs of the buoy; material and installation costs of the tethers, mooring lines, and anchor technologies; costs of transporting and installing the system at the chosen site; and the cost of mounting the wind turbine to the platform. The two systems were evaluated based on their static and dynamic performance and the total system installed cost. Both systems demonstrated acceptable motions, and have estimated costs of $1.4-$1.8 million, not including the cost of the wind turbine, the power electronics, or the electrical transmission.

  18. Multiscale modeling of spatially variable water and energy balance processes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Famiglietti, J. S; Wood, E. F

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    MULTISCALE WATER AND ENERGY BALANCE MODELING Wood, E. F. ,spatially variable water and energy balance processes J. S.modeling. Water and energy balance models are developed at

  19. Coupled fluid flow and geomechanical deformation modeling Susan E. Minkoff a,*, C. Mike Stoneb,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minkoff, Susan E.

    Coupled fluid flow and geomechanical deformation modeling Susan E. Minkoff a,*, C. Mike Stoneb,1 reservoir properties. Pore pressures from flow are used as loads for the geomechanics code

  20. A coupled model study of the remote influence of enso on tropical Atlantic sst variability 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fang, Yue

    2006-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

    To investigate the tropical Atlantic response to the remote El Nino-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) forcing, a Reduced Physics Â? Coupled Global Circulation Model (RP-CGCM) is developed, and four experiments are carried out. ...

  1. Process models Process in science is a natural phenomenon made up

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Edward A.

    Process models Process in science is a natural phenomenon made up of a series of operations often scaled so as to preserve certain process(es) that occur in the real-world analog. Conceptual models are just narrative or visual descriptions of forms, process(es), and/or their interactions

  2. Thermal Modeling of A Friction Bonding Process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John Dixon; Douglas Burkes; Pavel Medvedev

    2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A COMSOL model capable of predicting temperature evolution during nuclear fuel fabrication is being developed at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). Fuel plates are fabricated by friction bonding (FB) uranium-molybdenum (U-Mo) alloy foils positioned between two aluminum plates. The ability to predict temperature distribution during fabrication is imperative to ensure good quality bonding without inducing an undesirable chemical reaction between U-Mo and aluminum. A three-dimensional heat transfer model of the FB process implementing shallow pin penetration for cladding monolithic nuclear fuel foils is presented. Temperature distribution during the FB process as a function of fabrication parameters such as weld speed, tool load, and tool rotational frequency are predicted. Model assumptions, settings, and equations are described in relation to standard friction stir welding. Current experimental design for validation and calibration of the model is also demonstrated. Resulting experimental data reveal the accuracy in describing asymmetrical temperature distributions about the tool face. Temperature of the bonded plate drops beneath the pin and is higher on the advancing side than the retreating side of the tool.

  3. Fully Coupled Well Models for Fluid Injection and Production...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    engineers and operators have control during the geologic sequestration process. Current drilling practices provided well engineers flexibility in designing well trajectories and...

  4. Enhanced energy relaxation process of quantum memory coupled with a superconducting qubit

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yuichiro Matsuzaki; Hayato Nakano

    2012-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

    For quantum information processing, each physical system has different advantage for the implementation and so hybrid systems to benefit from several systems would be able to provide a promising approach. One of the common hybrid approach is to combine a superconducting qubit as a controllable qubit and the other quantum system with a long coherence time as a memory qubit. The superconducting qubit allows us to have an excellent controllability of the quantum states and the memory qubit is capable of storing the information for a long time. By tuning the energy splitting between the superconducting qubit and the memory qubit, it is believed that one can realize a selective coupling between them. However, we have shown that this approach has a fundamental drawback concerning energy leakage from the memory qubit. The detuned superconducting qubit is usually affected by severe decoherence, and this causes an incoherent energy relaxation from the memory qubit to the superconducting qubit via the imperfect decoupling. We have also found that this energy transport can be interpreted as an appearance of anti quantum Zeno effect induced by the fluctuation in the superconducting qubit. We also discuss a possible solution to avoid such energy relaxation process, which is feasible with existing technology.

  5. Neural Modeling of Non-Linear Processes: Relevance of the Takens-Ma~ne Theorem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Masulli, Francesco

    coupled to a 150 MW steam turbine. 1 Introduction The problem of controlling systems characterized by non to be managed (on a typical steam turbine they are about 576,000/hour). Moreover, so far, there are no availableNeural Modeling of Non-Linear Processes: Relevance of the Takens-Ma~n´e Theorem Francesco Masulli

  6. Mathematical Modelling of Glass Forming Processes J. A. W. M. Groot

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eindhoven, Technische Universiteit

    deformations. The process can be modelled as a coupled thermodynamical/mechanical problem with corresponding] external force on plunger Fg [N] force of glass on plunger L [m] characteristic length T [K] temperature Tg ] plunger velocity cp [J kg-1 K-1 ] specific heat g [m s-2 ] gravitational acceleration p [Pa] pressure rp

  7. Sandia Energy - Coupling Local to Nonlocal Continuum Models

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's PossibleRadiation Protection245C Unlimited ReleaseWelcomeLong LifetimeConcentrating SolarCoupling

  8. Developing Fully Coupled Subchannel Model in RELAP-7

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hongbin Zhang; Ling Zou; Haihua Zhao; Richard Martineau

    2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This is a DOE milestone report documenting the implementation of the subchannel model into the RELAP-7 code.

  9. The infrared behaviour in Nelson's model of a quantum particle coupled to a massless scalar field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The infrared behaviour in Nelson's model of a quantum particle coupled to a massless scalar field J, Russia minl@iitp.ru Abstract We prove that Nelson's massless field model is infrared divergent in three. KEYWORDS: Nelson's scalar field model, infrared divergence, ground state, Gibbs measure #12; 1 Introduction

  10. Coupling from the Past in Hybrid Models for File Sharing Peer to Peer Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Coupling from the Past in Hybrid Models for File Sharing Peer to Peer Systems Bruno Gaujal1 systems can be modeled by hybrid systems with a continuous part corresponding to a fluid limit of files of sto- chastic hybrid systems. 1 Introduction Hybrid systems are very useful to model discrete systems

  11. Ice-ocean boundary conditions for coupled models Gavin A. Schmidt

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bitz, Cecilia

    that must be simulated in any comprehensive earth system model incorporating ocean, atmosphere, sea ice different groups (a central fo- cus in the ongoing PRogramme for Integrated earth System Modelling (PRISM) and Earth System Modeling Framework (ESMF) projects). This paper addresses developments in coupling at sea

  12. Bond Graph Model of a Vertical U-Tube Steam Condenser Coupled with a Heat Exchanger

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    turbines, distillation industries using water as a solvent, etc. System-level modeling of steam condensersBond Graph Model of a Vertical U-Tube Steam Condenser Coupled with a Heat Exchanger K. Medjaher1+ A A simulation model for a vertical U-tube steam condenser in which the condensate is stored at the bottom well

  13. Coupled Mesoscale-Large-Eddy Modeling of Realistic Stable Boundary Layer Turbulence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Yao; Manuel, Lance

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Site-specific flow and turbulence information are needed for various practical applications, ranging from aerodynamic/aeroelastic modeling for wind turbine design to optical diffraction calculations. Even though highly desirable, collecting on-site meteorological measurements can be an expensive, time-consuming, and sometimes a challenging task. In this work, we propose a coupled mesoscale-large-eddy modeling framework to synthetically generate site-specific flow and turbulence data. The workhorses behind our framework are a state-of-the-art, open-source atmospheric model called the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model and a tuning-free large-eddy simulation (LES) model. Using this coupled framework, we simulate a nighttime stable boundary layer (SBL) case from the well-known CASES-99 field campaign. One of the unique aspects of this work is the usage of a diverse range of observations for characterization and validation. The coupled models reproduce certain characteristics of observed low-level jets....

  14. Coupled modeling of non-isothermal multiphase flow, solutetransport and reactive chemistry in porous and fractured media: 1. ModelDevelopment and Validation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xu, Tianfu; Pruess, Karsten

    1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Coupled modeling of subsurface multiphase fluid and heat flow, solute transport and chemical reactions can be used for the assessment of acid mine drainage remediation, mineral deposition, waste disposal sites, hydrothermal convection, contaminant transport, and groundwater quality. Here they present a numerical simulation model, TOUGHREACT, which considers non-isothermal multi-component chemical transport in both liquid and gas phases. A wide range of subsurface thermo-physical-chemical processes is considered. The model can be applied to one-, two- or three-dimensional porous and fractured media with physical and chemical heterogeneity. The model can accommodate any number of chemical species present in liquid, gas and solid phases. A variety of equilibrium chemical reactions is considered, such as aqueous complexation, gas dissolution/exsolution, cation exchange, and surface complexation. Mineral dissolution/precipitation can proceed either subject to local equilibrium or kinetic conditions. The coupled model employs a sequential iteration approach with reasonable computing efficiency. The development of the governing equations and numerical approach is presented along with the discussion of the model implementation and capabilities. The model is verified for a wide range of subsurface physical and chemical processes. The model is well suited for flow and reactive transport in variably saturated porous and fractured media. In the second of this two-part paper, three applications covering a variety of problems are presented to illustrate the capabilities of the model.

  15. Multiphase Flow Modeling of Biofuel Production Processes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D. Gaston; D. P. Guillen; J. Tester

    2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As part of the Idaho National Laboratory's (INL's) Secure Energy Initiative, the INL is performing research in areas that are vital to ensuring clean, secure energy supplies for the future. The INL Hybrid Energy Systems Testing (HYTEST) Laboratory is being established to develop and test hybrid energy systems with the principal objective to safeguard U.S. Energy Security by reducing dependence on foreign petroleum. HYTEST involves producing liquid fuels in a Hybrid Energy System (HES) by integrating carbon-based (i.e., bio-mass, oil-shale, etc.) with non-carbon based energy sources (i.e., wind energy, hydro, geothermal, nuclear, etc.). Advances in process development, control and modeling are the unifying vision for HES. This paper describes new modeling tools and methodologies to simulate advanced energy processes. Needs are emerging that require advanced computational modeling of multiphase reacting systems in the energy arena, driven by the 2007 Energy Independence and Security Act, which requires production of 36 billion gal/yr of biofuels by 2022, with 21 billion gal of this as advanced biofuels. Advanced biofuels derived from microalgal biomass have the potential to help achieve the 21 billion gal mandate, as well as reduce greenhouse gas emissions. Production of biofuels from microalgae is receiving considerable interest due to their potentially high oil yields (around 600 gal/acre). Microalgae have a high lipid content (up to 50%) and grow 10 to 100 times faster than terrestrial plants. The use of environmentally friendly alternatives to solvents and reagents commonly employed in reaction and phase separation processes is being explored. This is accomplished through the use of hydrothermal technologies, which are chemical and physical transformations in high-temperature (200-600 C), high-pressure (5-40 MPa) liquid or supercritical water. Figure 1 shows a simplified diagram of the production of biofuels from algae. Hydrothermal processing has significant advantages over other biomass processing methods with respect to separations. These 'green' alternatives employ a hybrid medium that, when operated supercritically, offers the prospect of tunable physicochemical properties. Solubility can be rapidly altered and phases partitioned selectively to precipitate or dissolve certain components by altering temperature or pressure in the near-critical region. The ability to tune the solvation properties of water in the highly compressible near-critical region facilitates partitioning of products or by-products into separate phases to separate and purify products. Since most challenges related to lipid extraction are associated with the industrial scale-up of integrated extraction systems, the new modeling capability offers the prospect of addressing previously untenable scaling issues.

  16. The Carbon-Land Model Intercomparison Project (C-LAMP): A Model-Data Comparison System for Evaluation of Coupled Biosphere-Atmosphere Models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoffman, Forrest M [ORNL; Randerson, Jim [University of California, Irvine; Thornton, Peter E [ORNL; Mahowald, Natalie [Cornell University; Bonan, Gordon [National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR); Running, Steven [University of Montana, Missoula; Fung, Inez [University of California, Berkeley

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The need to capture important climate feebacks in general circulation models (GCMs) has resulted in new efforts to include atmospheric chemistry and land and ocean biogeochemistry into the next generation of production climate models, now often referred to as Earth System Models (ESMs). While many terrestrial and ocean carbon models have been coupled to GCMs, recent work has shown that such models can yield a wide range of results, suggesting that a more rigorous set of offline and partially coupled experiments, along with detailed analyses of processes and comparisons with measurements, are warranted. The Carbon-Land Model Intercomparison Project (C-LAMP) provides a simulation protocol and model performance metrics based upon comparisons against best-available satellite- and ground-based measurements (Hoffman et al., 2007). C-LAMP provides feedback to the modeling community regarding model improvements and to the measurement community by suggesting new observational campaigns. C-LAMP Experiment 1 consists of a set of uncoupled simulations of terrestrial carbon models specifically designed to examine the ability of the models to reproduce surface carbon and energy fluxes at multiple sites and to exhibit the influence of climate variability, prescribed atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}), nitrogen (N) deposition, and land cover change on projections of terrestrial carbon fluxes during the 20th century. Experiment 2 consists of partially coupled simulations of the terrestrial carbon model with an active atmosphere model exchanging energy and moisture fluxes. In all experiments, atmospheric CO{sub 2} follows the prescribed historical trajectory from C{sup 4}MIP. In Experiment 2, the atmosphere model is forced with prescribed sea surface temperatures (SSTs) and corresponding sea ice concentrations from the Hadley Centre; prescribed CO{sub 2} is radiatively active; and land, fossil fuel, and ocean CO{sub 2} fluxes are advected by the model. Both sets of experiments have been performed using two different terrestrial biogeochemistry modules coupled to the Community Land Model version 3 (CLM3) in the Community Climate System Model version 3 (CCSM3): The CASA model of Fung, et al., and the carbon-nitrogen (CN) model of Thornton. Comparisons against Ameriflus site measurements, MODIS satellite observations, NOAA flask records, TRANSCOM inversions, and Free Air CO{sub 2} Enrichment (FACE) site measurements, and other datasets have been performed and are described in Randerson et al. (2009). The C-LAMP diagnostics package was used to validate improvements to CASA and CN for use in the next generation model, CLM4. It is hoped that this effort will serve as a prototype for an international carbon-cycle model benchmarking activity for models being used for the Inter-governmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) Fifth Assessment Report. More information about C-LAMP, the experimental protocol, performance metrics, output standards, and model-data comparisons from the CLM3-CASA and CLM3-CN models are available at http://www.climatemodeling.org/c-lamp.

  17. Extending a Business Process Modeling Tool with Process Configuration Facilities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ulm, Universität

    is maintained; e.g., oil and wiper fluid are checked. The process ends when handing over the vehicle back

  18. A Three-Dimensional Ocean-Seaice-Carbon Cycle Model and its Coupling to a Two-Dimensional Atmospheric Model: Uses in Climate Change Studies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dutkiewicz, Stephanie.

    We describe the coupling of a three-dimensional ocean circulation model, with explicit thermodynamic seaice and ocean carbon cycle representations, to a two-dimensional atmospheric/land model. This coupled system has been ...

  19. Coupled-channels study of the $\\pi^{-}p \\to \\eta n$ process

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Durand, J; Lee, T -S H; Saghai, B; Sato, T

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The reaction $\\pi^{-}p \\to \\eta n$ is investigated within a dynamical coupled-channels model of meson production reactions in the nucleon resonance region. The meson baryon channels included are $\\pi N$, $\\eta N$, $\\pi \\Delta$, $\\sigma N$, and $\\rho N$. The non-resonant meson-baryon interactions of the model are derived from a set of Lagrangians by using a unitary transformation method. One or two excited nucleon states in each of $S$, $P$, $D$, and $F$ partial waves are included to generate the resonant amplitudes. Data of $\\pi^{-}p \\to \\eta n$ reaction from threshold up to a total center-of-mass energy of about 2 GeV are satisfactorily reproduced and the roles played by the following nine nucleon resonances are investigated: $S_{11}(1535)$, $S_{11}(1650)$, $P_{11}(1440)$, $P_{11}(1710)$, $P_{13}(1720)$, $D_{13}(1520)$, $D_{13}(1700)$, $D_{15}(1675)$, and $F_{15}(1680)$. The reaction mechanism as well as the predicted $\\eta N$ scattering length are discussed.

  20. Modeling the effect of glacier recession on streamflow response using a coupled glacio-hydrological model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Naz, Bibi S [ORNL] [ORNL; Frans, Chris [University of Washington, Seattle] [University of Washington, Seattle; Clarke, Garry [University of British Columbia, Vancouver] [University of British Columbia, Vancouver; Burns, [Watershed Sciences Inc. (WSI), Portland] [Watershed Sciences Inc. (WSI), Portland; Lettenmaier, Dennis [University of Washington, Seattle] [University of Washington, Seattle

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We describe an integrated spatially distributed hydrologic and glacier dynamic model, and use it to investigate the effect of glacier recession on streamflow variations for the Upper Bow River basin, a tributary of the South Saskatchewan River. Several recent studies have suggested that observed decreases in summer flows in the South Saskatchewan River are partly due to the retreat of glaciers in the river's headwaters. Modeling the effect of glacier changes on streamflow response in river basins such as the South Saskatchewan is complicated due to the inability of most existing physically-based distributed hydrologic models to represent glacier dynamics. We compare predicted variations in glacier extent, snow water equivalent and streamflow discharge made with the integrated model with satellite estimates of glacier area and terminus position, observed streamflow and snow water equivalent measurements over the period of 1980 2007. Simulations with the coupled hydrology-glacier model reduce the uncertainty in streamflow predictions. Our results suggested that on average, the glacier melt contribution to the Bow River flow upstream of Lake Louise is about 30% in summer. For warm and dry years, however, the glacier melt contribution can be as large as 50% in August, whereas for cold years, it can be as small as 20% and the timing of glacier melt signature can be delayed by a month.

  1. Effective Collaboration and Consistency Management in Business Process Modeling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Czarnecki, Krzysztof

    Effective Collaboration and Consistency Management in Business Process Modeling Co-Chairs: Moises they are lost. Business Process Modeling (BPM) is a promising approach to enable agility in business process of experts. Business analysts gather requirements and create high-level process models. Solution architects

  2. Formalizing Concepts for Efficacy-aware Business Process Modeling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ulm, Universität

    Formalizing Concepts for Efficacy-aware Business Process Modeling Matthias Lohrmann and Manfred.lohrmann,manfred.reichert}@uni-ulm.de Abstract. In business process design, business objective models can ful- fill the role of formal business process management concepts yet. Moreover, process models are currently not sufficiently

  3. Final Progress Report: Coupled Biogeochemical Process Evaluation for Conceptualizing Trichloroethylene Cometabolism

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crawford, Ronald L; Paszczynski, Andrzej J

    2010-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Our goal within the overall project is to demonstrate the presence and abundance of methane monooxygenases (MMOs) enzymes and their genes within the microbial community of the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Test Area North (TAN) site. MMOs are thought to be the primary catalysts of natural attenuation of trichloroethylene (TCE) in contaminated groundwater at this location. The actual presence of the proteins making up MMO complexes would provide direct evidence for its participation in TCE degradation. The quantitative estimation of MMO genes and their translation products (sMMO and pMMO proteins) and the knowledge about kinetics and substrate specificity of MMOs will be used to develop mathematical models of the natural attenuation process in the TAN aquifer. The model will be particularly useful in prediction of TCE degradation rate in TAN and possibly in the other DOE sites. Bacteria known as methanotrophs produce a set of proteins that assemble to form methane monooxygenase complexes (MMOs), enzymes that oxidize methane as their natural substrate, thereby providing a carbon and energy source for the organisms. MMOs are also capable of co-metabolically transforming chlorinated solvents like TCE into nontoxic end products such as carbon dioxide and chloride. There are two known forms of methane monooxygenase, a membrane-bound particulate form (pMMO) and a cytoplasmic soluble form (sMMO). pMMO consists of two components, pMMOH (a hydroxylase comprised of 47-, 27-, and 24-kDa subunits) and pMMOR (a reductase comprised of 63 and 8-kDa subunits). sMMO consists of three components: a hydroxylase (protein A-250 kDa), a dimer of three subunits (?2?2?2), a regulatory protein (protein B-15.8 kDa), and a reductase (protein C-38.6 kDa). All methanotrophs will produce a methanol dehydrogenase to channel the product of methane oxidation (methanol) into the central metabolite formaldehyde. University of Idaho (UI) efforts focused on proteomic analyses using mass spectrometry and genomic analyses using RT-PCR to characterize these enzyme systems. UI’s specific objectives were to develop the proteomics and genomic tools to assess the presence of the methane monooxygenase (MMO) proteins in the aquifers under study and relate this to the enumeration of methanotrophic microorganisms. We targeted the identification of both sMMO and pMMO. We believe that the copper level in the TAN aquifer is most likely suppressing the expression of sMMO and mediates the higher levels of pMMO expression. Hence our investigations included the identification of both forms of MMOs, and we expected a higher concentration of pMMO proteins in TAN samples. The amounts of these proteins present were correlated with numbers of methanotrophs determined by us and other members of the research team using PCR-based methods. In summary, to accomplish our objectives we applied environmental proteomics techniques to monitor proteins that are involved in the co-metabolic degradation of trichloroethylene (TCE) in groundwater of the INL TAN site on Department of Energy ands of near Idaho Falls, ID USA. To acquire peptides sequences information we used an ultra performance chromatography (UPLC) system coupled with QToF Premiere nano-electrospray tandem quadropole-time of flight mass spectrometer. Our goal was to identify signature peptides of methane monooxygenases (MMOs) within methanotrophic bacteria that are active in cometabolic degradation of TCE. We developed a new method for extracting total proteins from environmental planktonic and/or biofilm samples that involve a new time course cell lysis and protein extraction method in combination with chromatographic separation of peptide and tandem mass spectrometry sequencing. The techniques resulted in successful extraction and identification of MMO-based peptides from both pure cultures and TAN site samples. The work confirmed the importance of mathonotrophs in the co-metabolic removal of TCE from the TAN site aquifer.

  4. Dynamical coupled-channels model of $K^- p$ reactions (I): Determination of partial-wave amplitudes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H. Kamano; S. X. Nakamura; T. -S. H. Lee; T. Sato

    2014-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

    We develop a dynamical coupled-channels model of K^- p reactions, aiming at extracting the parameters associated with hyperon resonances and providing the elementary antikaon-nucleon scattering amplitudes that can be used for investigating various phenomena in the strangeness sector such as the production of hypernuclei from kaon-nucleus reactions. The model consists of (a) meson-baryon (MB) potentials v_{M'B',MB} derived from the phenomenological SU(3) Lagrangian, and (b) vertex interactions Gamma_{MB,Y*} for describing the decays of the bare excited hyperon states (Y*) into MB states. The model is defined in a channel space spanned by the two-body barK N, pi Sigma, pi Lambda, eta Lambda, and K Xi states and also the three-body pi pi Lambda and pi barK N states that have the resonant pi Sigma* and barK* N components, respectively. The resulting coupled-channels scattering equations satisfy the multichannel unitarity conditions and account for the dynamical effects arising from the off-shell rescattering processes. The model parameters are determined by fitting the available data of the unpolarized and polarized observables of the K^- p --> barK N, pi Sigma, pi Lambda, eta Lambda, K Xi reactions in the energy region from the threshold to invariant mass W=2.1 GeV. Two models with equally good chi^2 fits to the data have been constructed. The partial-wave amplitudes obtained from the constructed models are compared with the results from a recent partial-wave analysis by the Kent State University group. We discuss the differences between these three analysis results. Our results at energies near the threshold suggest that the higher partial waves should be treated on the same footing as the S wave if one wants to understand the nature of Lambda(1405)1/2^- using the data below the barK N threshold, as will be provided by the J-PARC E31 experiment.

  5. Coupling the Mixed Potential and Radiolysis Models for Used Fuel Degradation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buck, Edgar C.; Jerden, James L.; Ebert, William L.; Wittman, Richard S.

    2013-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The primary purpose of this report is to describe the strategy for coupling three process level models to produce an integrated Used Fuel Degradation Model (FDM). The FDM, which is based on fundamental chemical and physical principals, provides direct calculation of radionuclide source terms for use in repository performance assessments. The G-value for H2O2 production (Gcond) to be used in the Mixed Potential Model (MPM) (H2O2 is the only radiolytic product presently included but others will be added as appropriate) needs to account for intermediate spur reactions. The effects of these intermediate reactions on [H2O2] are accounted for in the Radiolysis Model (RM). This report details methods for applying RM calculations that encompass the effects of these fast interactions on [H2O2] as the solution composition evolves during successive MPM iterations and then represent the steady-state [H2O2] in terms of an “effective instantaneous or conditional” generation value (Gcond). It is anticipated that the value of Gcond will change slowly as the reaction progresses through several iterations of the MPM as changes in the nature of fuel surface occur. The Gcond values will be calculated with the RM either after several iterations or when concentrations of key reactants reach threshold values determined from previous sensitivity runs. Sensitivity runs with RM indicate significant changes in G-value can occur over narrow composition ranges. The objective of the mixed potential model (MPM) is to calculate the used fuel degradation rates for a wide range of disposal environments to provide the source term radionuclide release rates for generic repository concepts. The fuel degradation rate is calculated for chemical and oxidative dissolution mechanisms using mixed potential theory to account for all relevant redox reactions at the fuel surface, including those involving oxidants produced by solution radiolysis and provided by the radiolysis model (RM). The RM calculates the concentration of species generated at any specific time and location from the surface of the fuel. Several options being considered for coupling the RM and MPM are described in the report. Different options have advantages and disadvantages based on the extent of coding that would be required and the ease of use of the final product.

  6. A Framework for Modeling Strategy, Business Processes and Information Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A Framework for Modeling Strategy, Business Processes and Information Systems André Vasconcelos, an organization requires modeling its business processes. Business process modeling comprises the description is used not only in the business but also in the software domain. To represent the goal model, we propose

  7. BUSINESS PROCESSES EXTENSIONS TO UML PROFILE FOR BUSINESS MODELING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    BUSINESS PROCESSES EXTENSIONS TO UML PROFILE FOR BUSINESS MODELING Pedro Sinogas, André Vasconcelos@ceo.inesc.pt, jneves@ieee.org, rmendes@ceo.inesc.pt, jmt@inesc.pt Key words: Business Modeling, Business Process modeling business processes. This paper proposes an extension to UML Profile for Business Modeling

  8. TSPA Model Development and Sensitivity Analysis of Processes...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Analysis of Processes Affecting Performance of a Salt Repository for Disposal of Heat-Generating Nuclear Waste TSPA Model Development and Sensitivity Analysis of Processes...

  9. Density-fitted singles and doubles coupled cluster on graphics processing units

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sherrill, David [Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta] [Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta; Sumpter, Bobby G [ORNL] [ORNL; DePrince, III, A. Eugene [Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We adapt an algorithm for singles and doubles coupled cluster (CCSD) that uses density fitting (DF) or Cholesky decomposition (CD) in the construction and contraction of all electron repulsion integrals (ERI s) for use on heterogeneous compute nodes consisting of a multicore CPU and at least one graphics processing unit (GPU). The use of approximate 3-index ERI s ameliorates two of the major difficulties in designing scientific algorithms for GPU s: (i) the extremely limited global memory on the devices and (ii) the overhead associated with data motion across the PCI bus. For the benzene trimer described by an aug-cc-pVDZ basis set, the use of a single NVIDIA Tesla C2070 (Fermi) GPU accelerates a CD-CCSD computation by a factor of 2.1, relative to the multicore CPU-only algorithm that uses 6 highly efficient Intel core i7-3930K CPU cores. The use of two Fermis provides an acceleration of 2.89, which is comparable to that observed when using a single NVIDIA Kepler K20c GPU (2.73).

  10. COPE -Automating Coupled Evolution of Metamodels and Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , 85748 Garching b. M¨unchen, Germany {herrmama, juergens}@in.tum.de 2 BMW Car IT GmbH Petuelring 116, 80809 M¨unchen, Germany sebastian.benz@bmw-carit.de Abstract. Model-based development promises

  11. Measurement and modeling of transfer functions for lightning coupling into the Sago mine.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morris, Marvin E.; Higgins, Matthew B.

    2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents measurements and analytical modeling of electromagnetic transfer functions to quantify the ability of cloud-to-ground lightning strokes (including horizontal arc-channel components) to couple electromagnetic energy into the Sago mine located near Buckhannon, WV. Two coupling mechanisms were measured: direct and indirect drive. These transfer functions are then used to predict electric fields within the mine and induced voltages on conductors that were left abandoned in the sealed area of the Sago mine.

  12. Nonadiabatic dynamics for processes involving multiple avoided curve crossings: Double proton transfer and proton-coupled electron transfer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hammes-Schiffer, Sharon

    Nonadiabatic dynamics for processes involving multiple avoided curve crossings: Double proton transfer and proton-coupled electron transfer reactions Jian-Yun Fang and Sharon Hammes June 1997; accepted 26 August 1997 The extension of the surface hopping method ``molecular dynamics

  13. STOCHASTIC COMPUTATIONAL DYNAMICAL MODEL OF UNCERTAIN STRUCTURE COUPLED WITH AN INSULATION LAYER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    STOCHASTIC COMPUTATIONAL DYNAMICAL MODEL OF UNCERTAIN STRUCTURE COUPLED WITH AN INSULATION LAYER the effect of insulation layers in complex dynamical systems for low- and medium-frequency ranges such as car booming noise analysis, one introduces a sim- plified stochastic model of insulation layers based

  14. A multicomponent coupled model of glacier hydrology 1. Theory and synthetic examples

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Flowers, Gwenn

    A multicomponent coupled model of glacier hydrology 1. Theory and synthetic examples Gwenn E; published 12 November 2002. [1] Basal hydrology is acknowledged as a fundamental control on glacier dynamics of existing basal hydrology models is the treatment of the glacier bed as an isolated system. We present

  15. Towards new model systems for the study of proton-coupled electron transfer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Jay Lee

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Two new model systems for the study of orthogonal proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) have been developed. The first model system is based on Ru"(HzO)(tpy)(bpy) (tpy = 2,2';6',2"terpyridine, bpy = 2,2'-bipyridine) where ...

  16. Outline for the next couple of lectures -Magnetism and the Ising Model (today's lecture)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ceder, Gerbrand

    Outline for the next couple of lectures -Magnetism and the Ising Model (today's lecture) -Liquid-field solution to magnetism are equivalent. -Thermodynamic results in magnetism, such as the critical (or Curie) temperature below which spontaneous magnetization occurs. #12;Magnetism: The Ising Model 1) Spins can be only

  17. Surface Wave Effects in the NEMO Ocean Model: Forced and Coupled Experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Breivik, Øyvind; Bidlot, Jean-Raymond; Balmaseda, Magdalena Alonso; Janssen, Peter A E M

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The NEMO general circulation ocean model is extended to incorporate three physical processes related to ocean surface waves, namely the surface stress (modified by growth and dissipation of the oceanic wave field), the turbulent kinetic energy flux from breaking waves, and the Stokes-Coriolis force. Experiments are done with NEMO in ocean-only (forced) mode and coupled to the ECMWF atmospheric and wave models. Ocean-only integrations are forced with fields from the ERA-Interim reanalysis. All three effects are noticeable in the extra-tropics, but the sea-state dependent turbulent kinetic energy flux yields by far the largest difference. This is partly because the control run has too vigorous deep mixing due to an empirical mixing term in NEMO. We investigate the relation between this ad hoc mixing and Langmuir turbulence and find that it is much more effective than the Langmuir parameterization used in NEMO. The biases in sea surface temperature as well as subsurface temperature are reduced, and the total oce...

  18. Shifts in ENSO coupling processes under global warming Sjoukje Philip1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haak, Hein

    state of the Pacific Ocean between the current climate and a high CO2 climate. Next, shifts in ENSO warming may shift the properties and dynamics of El Nin~o. We study the shifts in ENSO couplings in IPCC couplings between sea surface temperature (SST), thermocline depth and wind stress are discussed. Although

  19. The Model Morphing Approach -Horizontal Transformations between Business Process

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Model Morphing Approach - Horizontal Transformations between Business Process Models Marion and business to busi- ness interoperability, there is a need for model transformations in the area of business this paper concentrates on transformations of models between different business process modeling languages

  20. Coupled thermodynamic-dynamic semi-analytical model of Free Piston Stirling engines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Formosa, Fabien

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The study of free piston Stirling engine (FPSE) requires both accurate thermodynamic and dynamic modelling to predict its performances. The steady state behaviour of the engine partly relies on non linear dissipative phenomena such as pressure drop loss within heat exchangers which is dependant on the temperature within the associated components. An analytical thermodynamic model which encompasses the effectiveness and the flaws of the heat exchangers and the regenerator has been previously developed and validated. A semi-analytical dynamic model of FPSE is developed and presented in this paper. The thermodynamic model is used to define the thermal variables that are used in the dynamic model which evaluates the kinematic results. Thus, a coupled iterative strategy has been used to perform a global simulation. The global modelling approach has been validated using the experimental data available from the NASA RE-1000 Stirling engine prototype. The resulting coupled thermodynamic-dynamic model using a standard...

  1. Atmospheric Horizontal Resolution Affects Tropical Climate Variability in Coupled Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guilyardi, Eric

    di Geofisica e Vulcanologia, Bologna, Italy S. BEHERA, J.-J. LUO, AND S. MASSON Frontier Research model, SINTEX-Frontier (SINTEX-F), developed jointly at Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia that the Corresponding author address: A. Navarra, Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia, Via Donato Creti 12

  2. Automatability of Coupled Evolution of Metamodels and Models in Practice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ¨unchen Boltzmannstr. 3, 85748 Garching b. M¨unchen, Germany {herrmama, juergens}@in.tum.de 2 BMW Car IT GmbH Petuelring 116, 80809 M¨unchen, Germany sebastian.benz@bmw-carit.de Abstract. Model-based software years. In response, DSLs are receiving increased attention in industry. BMW Car IT for instance applies

  3. Tavis-Cummings model beyond the rotating wave approximation: Inhomogeneous coupling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lijun Mao; Sainan Huai; Yunbo Zhang

    2014-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the analytical solution of the Tavis-Cummings (TC) model for more than one qubit inhomogeneously coupled to a single mode radiation field beyond the rotating-wave approximation (RWA). The significant advantage of the displaced oscillator basis enables us to apply the same truncation techniques adopted in the single qubit Jaynes-Cummings (JC) model to the multiple qubits system. The derived analytical spectrum match perfectly the exact diagonalization numerical solutions of the inhomogeneous TC model in the parameter regime where the qubits transition frequencies are far off-resonance with the field frequency and the interaction strengths reach the ultra-strong coupling regime. The two-qubit TC model is quasi-exactly solvable because part of the spectra can be determined exactly in the homogeneous coupling case with two identical qubits or with symmetric(asymmetric) detuning. By means of the fidelity of quantum states we identify several nontrivial level crossing points in the same parity subspace, which implies that homogeneous coupled two-qubit TC model with $\\omega_1=\\omega_2$ or $\\omega_1\\pm\\omega_2=2\\omega_c$ is integrable. We further explore the time evolution of the qubit's population inversion and the entanglement behavior taking two qubits as an example. The analytical methods provide unexpectedly accurate results in describing the dynamics of the qubit in the present experimentally accessible coupling regime, showing that the collapse-revival phenomena emerge, survive, and are finally destroyed when the coupling strength increases beyond the ultra-strong coupling regime. The suggested procedure applies readily to the multiple qubits system such as the GHZ state entanglement evolution and quantum entanglement between a single photon and superconducting qubits of particular experiment interest.

  4. Representing Cloud Processing of Aerosol in Numerical Models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mechem, D.B.; Kogan, Y.L.

    2005-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The satellite imagery in Figure 1 provides dramatic examples of how aerosol influences the cloud field. Aerosol from ship exhaust can serve as nucleation centers in otherwise cloud-free regions, forming ship tracks (top image), or can enhance the reflectance/albedo in already cloudy regions. This image is a demonstration of the first indirect effect, in which changes in aerosol modulate cloud droplet radius and concentration, which influences albedo. It is thought that, through the effects it has on precipitation (drizzle), aerosol can also affect the structure and persistence of planetary boundary layer (PBL) clouds. Regions of cellular convection, or open pockets of cloudiness (bottom image) are thought to be remnants of strongly drizzling PBL clouds. Pockets of Open Cloudiness (POCs) (Stevens et al. 2005) or Albrecht's ''rifts'' are low cloud fraction regions characterized by anomalously low aerosol concentrations, implying they result from precipitation. These features may in fact be a demonstration of the second indirect effect. To accurately represent these clouds in numerical models, we have to treat the coupled cloud-aerosol system. We present the following series of mesoscale and large eddy simulation (LES) experiments to evaluate the important aspects of treating the coupled cloud-aerosol problem. 1. Drizzling and nondrizzling simulations demonstrate the effect of drizzle on a mesoscale forecast off the California coast. 2. LES experiments with explicit (bin) microphysics gauge the relative importance of the shape of the aerosol spectrum on the 3D dynamics and cloud structure. 3. Idealized mesoscale model simulations evaluate the relative roles of various processes, sources, and sinks.

  5. A phase-field model coupled with lattice kinetics solver for modeling crystal growth in furnaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lin, Guang; Bao, Jie; Xu, Zhijie; Tartakovsky, Alexandre M.; Henager, Charles H.

    2014-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

    In this study, we present a new numerical model for crystal growth in a vertical solidification system. This model takes into account the buoyancy induced convective flow and its effect on the crystal growth process. The evolution of the crystal growth interface is simulated using the phase-field method. Two novel phase-field models are developed to model the crystal growth interface in vertical gradient furnaces with two temperature profile setups: 1) fixed wall temperature profile setup and 2) time-dependent temperature profile setup. A semi-implicit lattice kinetics solver based on the Boltzmann equation is employed to model the unsteady incompressible flow. This model is used to investigate the effect of furnace operational conditions on crystal growth interface profiles and growth velocities. For a simple case of macroscopic radial growth, the phase-field model is validated against an analytical solution. Crystal growth in vertical gradient furnaces with two temperature profile setups have been also investigated using the developed model. The numerical simulations reveal that for a certain set of temperature boundary conditions, the heat transport in the melt near the phase interface is diffusion dominant and advection is suppressed.

  6. Online Modeling in the Process Industry for Energy Optimization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alexander, J.

    "This paper discusses how steady state models are being used in the process industry to perform online energy optimization of steam and electrical systems. It presents process demands commonly found in the processing industry in terms of steam...

  7. APPLYING ACTIVITY PATTERNS FOR DEVELOPING AN INTELLIGENT PROCESS MODELING TOOL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ulm, Universität

    attracting the interest of both BPM researchers and BPM tool vendors. Frequently, process models can Process Management (BPM) tools as well as emerging patterns for process modeling and change. BPM processes of an enterprise. Moreover, through Web service technology, the benefits of BPM can be created

  8. Correctness-Preserving Configuration of Business Process Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van der Aalst, Wil

    supported by SAP's Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP) system. Reference process models in commercial use or projects, leading to individualized process models that are subsequently used for domain analysis to support the development of software systems. To avoid the effort of creating process models from scratch

  9. Capturing Variability in Business Process Models: The Provop Approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ulm, Universität

    Capturing Variability in Business Process Models: The Provop Approach Alena Hallerbach1 , Thomas be transferred to cross-organizational business processes as well [4]. A business process model captures models there exists a multitude of tools like ARIS Business Architect [5], ADONIS [6], and Web

  10. Modeling, Safely Advertising and Verifying Time-aware Business Processes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Modeling, Safely Advertising and Verifying Time-aware Business Processes : Towards a holistic. Nowadays, the business process model and notation BPMN standard is gaining widspread use in the business, we propose a BPMN extension for capturing temporal requirements during the business process modelling

  11. A Goal-Directed Modeling Technique towards Business Process

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Perry, Dewayne E.

    A Goal-Directed Modeling Technique towards Business Process Yuqun Zhang, Dewayne E. Perry Center--The modeling techniques for business process are mostly graphics-based, that is argued to be simplified when- plore the properties of the business processes under this modeling technique, we define a set of metrics

  12. New Model of Inflation with Non-minimal Derivative Coupling of Standard Model Higgs Boson to Gravity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cristiano Germani; Alex Kehagias

    2010-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

    In this letter we show that there is a unique non-minimal derivative coupling of the Standard Model Higgs boson to gravity such that: it propagates no more degrees of freedom than General Relativity sourced by a scalar field, reproduces a successful inflating background within the Standard Model Higgs parameters and, finally, does not suffer from dangerous quantum corrections.

  13. Modeling the effect of glacier recession on streamflow1 response using a coupled glacio-hydrological model2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Washington at Seattle, University of

    1 Modeling the effect of glacier recession on streamflow1 response using a coupled glacio an integrated spatially distributed hydrologic and glacier dynamic model,14 and use it to investigate the effect of glacier recession on streamflow variations for the Upper15 Bow River basin, a tributary of the South

  14. Low-frequency variability and heat transport in a low-order nonlinear coupled ocean-atmosphere model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stéphane Vannitsem; Jonathan Demaeyer; Lesley De Cruz; Michael Ghil

    2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We formulate and study a low-order nonlinear coupled ocean-atmosphere model with an emphasis on the impact of radiative and heat fluxes and of the frictional coupling between the two components. This model version extends a previous 24-variable version by adding a dynamical equation for the passive advection of temperature in the ocean, together with an energy balance model. The bifurcation analysis and the numerical integration of the model reveal the presence of low-frequency variability (LFV) concentrated on and near a long-periodic, attracting orbit. This orbit combines atmospheric and oceanic modes, and it arises for large values of the meridional gradient of radiative input and of frictional coupling. Chaotic behavior develops around this orbit as it loses its stability; this behavior is still dominated by the LFV on decadal and multi-decadal time scales that is typical of oceanic processes. Atmospheric diagnostics also reveals the presence of predominant low- and high-pressure zones, as well as of a subtropical jet; these features recall realistic climatological properties of the oceanic atmosphere. Finally, a predictability analysis is performed. Once the decadal-scale periodic orbits develop, the coupled system's short-term instabilities --- as measured by its Lyapunov exponents --- are drastically reduced, indicating the ocean's stabilizing role on the atmospheric dynamics. On decadal time scales, the recurrence of the solution in a certain region of the invariant subspace associated with slow modes displays some extended predictability, as reflected by the oscillatory behavior of the error for the atmospheric variables at long lead times.

  15. Final Report on Hierarchical Coupled Modeling and Prediction of Regional Climate Change in the Atlantic Sector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saravanan, Ramalingam [Texas A& M University

    2011-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

    During the course of this project, we have accomplished the following: a) Carried out studies of climate changes in the past using a hierarchy of intermediate coupled models (Chang et al., 2008; Wan et al 2009; Wen et al., 2010a,b) b) Completed the development of a Coupled Regional Climate Model (CRCM; Patricola et al., 2011a,b) c) Carried out studies testing hypotheses testing the origin of systematic errors in the CRCM (Patricola et al., 2011a,b) d) Carried out studies of the impact of air-sea interaction on hurricanes, in the context of barrier layer interactions (Balaguru et al)

  16. Application of an exact model matching technique to coupled-core nuclear reactor control

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tzafestas, S.G.; Chrysochoides, N.G.; Rokkos, K.

    1984-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this Note the control problem of linearized coupled-core multivariable nuclear reactors is treated by using a recent exact model matching technique in the frequency domain. The case of state feedback control is first considered and then the results are used where only the output variables of the reactor are available for feedback. A numerical example of a three coupled-core nuclear reactor model with one delayed neutron group for each core and short neutron travel time between cores is included.

  17. PROCESS MODEL FOR THE PRODUCTION OF SYNGAS VIA HIGH TEMPERATURE CO-ELECTROLYSIS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    M. G. McKellar; J. E. O'Brien; C. M. Stoots; G. L. Hawkes

    2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A process model has been developed to evaluate the potential performance of a large-scale high-temperature coelectrolysis plant for the production of syngas from steam and carbon dioxide. The coelectrolysis process allows for direct electrochemical reduction of the steam – carbon dioxide gas mixture, yielding hydrogen and carbon monoxide, or syngas. The process model has been developed using the HYSYS systems analysis code. Using this code, a detailed process flowsheet has been defined that includes all the components that would be present in an actual plant such as pumps, compressors, heat exchangers, turbines, and the electrolyzer. Since the electrolyzer is not a standard HYSYS component, a custom one-dimensional coelectrolysis model was developed for incorporation into the overall HYSYS process flowsheet. The 1-D coelectrolysis model assumes local chemical equilibrium among the four process-gas species via the shift reaction. The electrolyzer model allows for the determination of coelectrolysis outlet temperature, composition (anode and cathode sides), mean Nernst potential, operating voltage and electrolyzer power based on specified inlet gas flow rates, heat loss or gain, current density, and cell area-specific resistance. The one-dimensional electrolyzer model was validated by comparison with results obtained from a fully 3-D computational fluid dynamics model developed using FLUENT, and by comparison to experimental data. This paper provides representative results obtained from the HYSYS flowsheet model for a 300 MW coelectrolysis plant, coupled to a high-temperature gas-cooled nuclear reactor. The coelectrolysis process, coupled to a nuclear reactor, provides a means of recycling carbon dioxide back into a useful liquid fuel. If the carbon dioxide source is based on biomass, the entire process would be climate neutral.

  18. A Process/Machine coupling approach: application to1 Robotized Incremental Sheet Forming2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    . For example, Meier et al. [2009a] have coupled two industrial robots to perform26 Corresponding author Email Bigras et al. [2007] have shown that its implementation is difficult39 in actual industrial robots where

  19. Graphical modelling of process algebras with Stephen Gilmore

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilmore, Stephen

    Graphical modelling of process algebras with DrawNET Stephen Gilmore Laboratory for Foundations languages of process algebras and other state-based modelling formalisms. We have extended the DrawNET modelling tool to facilitate the design of PEPA net models [1] in addition to its existing support for Petri

  20. Hidden Process Models Tom M. Mitchell1,2,3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    introduce the Hidden Process Model (HPM), a probabilistic model for multivariate time series data intended 2 #12;1 Introduction In this paper, we propose the Hidden Process Model (HPM), a probabilistic model the set of assumptions captured in the HPM format requires a complex DBN. For instance, we must inflate

  1. Canonical Gauge Coupling Unification in the Standard Model with High-Scale Supersymmetry Breaking

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yun-Jie Huo; Tianjun Li; Dimitri V. Nanopoulos

    2011-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Inspired by the string landscape and the unified gauge coupling relation in the F-theory Grand Unified Theories (GUTs) and GUTs with suitable high-dimensional operators, we study the canonical gauge coupling unification and Higgs boson mass in the Standard Model (SM) with high-scale supersymmetry breaking. In the SM with GUT-scale supersymmetry breaking, we achieve the gauge coupling unification at about 5.3 x 10^{13} GeV, and the Higgs boson mass is predicted to range from 130 GeV to 147 GeV. In the SM with supersymmetry breaking scale from 10^4 GeV to 5.3 x 10^{13} GeV, gauge coupling unification can always be realized and the corresponding GUT scale M_U is from 10^{16} GeV to 5.3 x 10^{13} GeV, respectively. Also, we obtain the Higgs boson mass from 114.4 GeV to 147 GeV. Moreover, the discrepancies among the SM gauge couplings at the GUT scale are less than about 4-6%. Furthermore, we present the SU(5) and SO(10) models from the F-theory model building and orbifold constructions, and show that we do not have the dimension-five and dimension-six proton decay problems even if M_U \\le 5 x 10^{15} GeV.

  2. Modeling of Laser Cutting and Related Processes A considerable proportion of laser processing modeling work in the academic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berlin,Technische Universität

    1 Modeling of Laser Cutting and Related Processes A considerable proportion of laser processing. Modeling laser cutting and its features Recent modeling work has concentrated on the implementation and numerical evaluation of a transient three-dimensional computer simulation of the CO2 laser cutting process

  3. A coupled THC model of the FEBEX in situ test with bentonite swelling and chemical and thermal osmosis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zheng, L.; Samper, J.; Montenegro, L.

    2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The performance assessment of a geological repository for radioactive waste requires quantifying the geochemical evolution of the bentonite engineered barrier. This barrier will be exposed to coupled thermal (T), hydrodynamic (H), mechanical (M) and chemical (C) processes. This paper presents a coupled THC model of the FEBEX (Full-scale Engineered Barrier EXperiment) in situ test which accounts for bentonite swelling and chemical and thermal osmosis. Model results attest the relevance of thermal osmosis and bentonite swelling for the geochemical evolution of the bentonite barrier while chemical osmosis is found to be almost irrelevant. The model has been tested with data collected after the dismantling of heater 1 of the in situ test. The model reproduces reasonably well the measured temperature, relative humidity, water content and inferred geochemical data. However, it fails to mimic the solute concentrations at the heater-bentonite and bentonite-granite interfaces because the model does not account for the volume change of bentonite, the CO{sub 2}(g) degassing and the transport of vapor from the bentonite into the granite. The inferred HCO{sub 3}{sup -} and pH data cannot be explained solely by solute transport, calcite dissolution and protonation/deprotonation by surface complexation, suggesting that such data may be affected also by other reactions.

  4. Three-dimensional analytic probabilities of coupled vibrational-rotational-translational energy transfer for DSMC modeling of nonequilibrium flows

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adamovich, Igor V. [Nonequilibrium Thermodynamics Laboratory, Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States)] [Nonequilibrium Thermodynamics Laboratory, Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States)

    2014-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A three-dimensional, nonperturbative, semiclassical analytic model of vibrational energy transfer in collisions between a rotating diatomic molecule and an atom, and between two rotating diatomic molecules (Forced Harmonic Oscillator–Free Rotation model) has been extended to incorporate rotational relaxation and coupling between vibrational, translational, and rotational energy transfer. The model is based on analysis of semiclassical trajectories of rotating molecules interacting by a repulsive exponential atom-to-atom potential. The model predictions are compared with the results of three-dimensional close-coupled semiclassical trajectory calculations using the same potential energy surface. The comparison demonstrates good agreement between analytic and numerical probabilities of rotational and vibrational energy transfer processes, over a wide range of total collision energies, rotational energies, and impact parameter. The model predicts probabilities of single-quantum and multi-quantum vibrational-rotational transitions and is applicable up to very high collision energies and quantum numbers. Closed-form analytic expressions for these transition probabilities lend themselves to straightforward incorporation into DSMC nonequilibrium flow codes.

  5. Hydro-Mechanical Coupling in Damaged Porous Media Containing Isolated Cracks or/and Vugs: Model and Computations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Hydro-Mechanical Coupling in Damaged Porous Media Containing Isolated Cracks or/and Vugs: Model In this paper we present the development of the macroscopic model describing the hydro-mechanical coupling) In this paper we present the macroscopic model describing the hydro-mechanical behaviour of such class

  6. Dark Matter and Gauge Coupling Unification in Non-supersymmetric SO(10) Grand Unified Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mambrini, Yann; Olive, Keith A; Quevillon, Jeremie; Zheng, Jiaming

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Unlike minimal SU(5), SO(10) provides a straightforward path towards gauge coupling unification by modifying the renormalization group evolution of the gauge couplings above some intermediate scale which may also be related to the seesaw mechanism for neutrino masses. Unification can be achieved for several different choices of the intermediate gauge group below the SO(10) breaking scale. In this work, we consider in detail the possibility that SO(10) unification may also provide a natural dark matter candidate, stability being guaranteed by a left over $Z_2$ symmetry. We systematically examine the possible intermediate gauge groups which allow a non-degenerate, fermionic, Standard Model singlet dark matter candidate while at the same time respecting gauge coupling unification. Our analysis is done at the two-loop level. Surprisingly, despite the richness of SO(10), we find that only two models survive the analysis of phenomenological constraints, which include suitable neutrino masses, proton decay, and rehe...

  7. Coupled Oscillator Model of the Business Cycle with Fluctuating Goods Markets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ikeda, Y; Fujiwara, Y; Iyetomi, H; Ogimoto, K; Souma, W; Yoshikawa, H

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The sectoral synchronization observed for the Japanese business cycle in the Indices of Industrial Production data is an example of synchronization. The stability of this synchronization under a shock, e.g., fluctuation of supply or demand, is a matter of interest in physics and economics. We consider an economic system made up of industry sectors and goods markets in order to analyze the sectoral synchronization observed for the Japanese business cycle. A coupled oscillator model that exhibits synchronization is developed based on the Kuramoto model with inertia by adding goods markets, and analytic solutions of the stationary state and the coupling strength are obtained. We simulate the effects on synchronization of a sectoral shock for systems with different price elasticities and the coupling strengths. Synchronization is reproduced as an equilibrium solution in a nearest neighbor graph. Analysis of the order parameters shows that the synchronization is stable for a finite elasticity, whereas the synchron...

  8. Chimera states in networks of nonlocally coupled Hindmarsh-Rose neuron models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johanne Hizanidis; Vasilis Kanas; Anastasios Bezerianos; Tassos Bountis

    2013-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We have identified the occurrence of chimera states for various coupling schemes in networks of two-dimensional and three-dimensional Hindmarsh-Rose oscillators, which represent realistic models of neuronal ensembles. This result, together with recent studies on multiple chimera states in nonlocally coupled FitzHugh-Nagumo oscillators, provide strong evidence that the phenomenon of chimeras may indeed be relevant in neuroscience applications. Moreover, our work verifies the existence of chimera states in coupled bistable elements, whereas to date chimeras were known to arise in models possessing a single stable limit cycle. Finally, we have identified an interesting class of mixed oscillatory states, in which desynchronized neurons are uniformly interspersed among the remaining ones that are either stationary or oscillate in synchronized motion.

  9. Optimizing the anaerobic digestion of microalgae in a coupled process Terence Bayen1,4 and Francis Mairet2 and Pierre Martinon3 and Matthieu Sebbah4

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    microalgae biomass into biogas [4]. This process not only recovers the energy stored in biomass, but alsoOptimizing the anaerobic digestion of microalgae in a coupled process Terence Bayen1,4 and Francis the production of methane in a bioreactor coupling an anaerobic digester and a culture of micro-algae limited

  10. Soil Carbon Modeling (Mac Post) A. Rothamsted model carbon pools and processes. Their approximate equivalents for the EBIS sample processing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Soil Carbon Modeling (Mac Post) A. Rothamsted model carbon pools and processes. Their approximate' soil horizon show that model improvements need to be made to capture observed soil carbon cycling and transport processes. Testing and improvement of soil carbon cycling models is a key anticipated output

  11. Ground state of the asymmetric Rabi model in the ultrastrong coupling regime

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li-Tuo Shen; Zhen-Biao Yang; Mei Lu; Rong-Xin Chen; Huai-Zhi Wu

    2014-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the ground states of the single- and two-qubit asymmetric Rabi models, in which the qubit-oscillator coupling strengths for the counterrotating-wave and corotating-wave interactions are unequal. We take the transformation method to obtain the approximately analytical ground states for both models and numerically verify its validity for a wide range of parameters under the near-resonance condition. We find that the ground-state energy in either the single- or two-qubit asymmetric Rabi model has an approximately quadratic dependence on the coupling strengths stemming from different contributions of the counterrotating-wave and corotating-wave interactions. For both models, we show that the ground-state energy is mainly contributed by the counterrotating-wave interaction. Interestingly, for the two-qubit asymmetric Rabi model, we find that, with the increase of the coupling strength in the counterrotating-wave or corotating-wave interaction, the two-qubit entanglement first reaches its maximum then drops to zero. Furthermore, the maximum of the two-qubit entanglement in the two-qubit asymmetric Rabi model can be much larger than that in the two-qubit symmetric Rabi model.

  12. Proton Stability, Gauge Coupling Unification and a Light $Z^\\prime$ in Heterotic-string Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alon E. Faraggi; Viraf M. Mehta

    2013-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

    We explore the phenomenological viability of a light Z' in heterotic-string models, whose existence has been motivated by proton stability arguments. A class of quasi-realistic string models that produce such a viable Z' are the Left-Right Symmetric (LRS) heterotic-string models in the free fermionic formulation. A key feature of these models is that the matter charges under U(1)_Z' do not admit an E6 embedding. The light Z' in the LRS heterotic-string models forbids baryon number violating operators, while allowing lepton number violating operators, hence suppressing proton decay yet allowing for sufficiently small neutrino masses via a seesaw mechanism. We show that the constraints imposed by the gauge coupling data and heterotic-string coupling unification nullify the viability of a light Z' in these models. We further argue that agreement with the gauge coupling data necessitates that the U(1)_Z' charges admit an E6 embedding. We discuss how viable string models with this property may be constructed.

  13. Prediction of the tool displacement for robot milling applications using coupled models of an industrial

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stryk, Oskar von

    . INTRODUCTION The major fields of machining applications for industrial robots are automated pre- machining an industrial robot for milling applications inaccuracies of the serial robot kinematic, the low structuralPrediction of the tool displacement for robot milling applications using coupled models

  14. Waves and propagation failure in discrete space models with nonlinear coupling and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Waves and propagation failure in discrete space models with nonlinear coupling and feedback Markus by the linearisation ahead of the wave front. Wave propagation (and failure) is studied when the homogeneous dynamics are bistable. Simulations show that waves may propagate in either direction, or may be pinned. A Lyapunov

  15. Title of dissertation: SCATTERING FROM CHAOTIC CAVITIES: EXPLORING THE RANDOM COUPLING MODEL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anlage, Steven

    ABSTRACT Title of dissertation: SCATTERING FROM CHAOTIC CAVITIES: EXPLORING THE RANDOM COUPLING MODEL IN THE TIME AND FREQUENCY DOMAINS James Hart, Doctor of Philosophy, 2009 Dissertation directed by in the frequency do- main. In the first part of this dissertation, we explore the implications of the Random

  16. Intraseasonal Eastern Pacific Precipitation and SST Variations in a GCM Coupled to a Slab Ocean Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maloney, Eric

    Intraseasonal Eastern Pacific Precipitation and SST Variations in a GCM Coupled to a Slab Ocean-Schubert convection to a slab ocean model (SOM) improves the simulation of eastern Pacific convection during and ocean make eastern Pacific low-level circulation anomalies more complex in the SOM simulation than

  17. Coupled Damage and Plasticity Modelling in Transient Dynamic Analysis of Concrete

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coupled Damage and Plasticity Modelling in Transient Dynamic Analysis of Concrete F. Gatuingt Abstract In a concrete structure subjected to an explosion, for example a concrete slab, the material on the same concrete. Computations of split Hopkinson tests on confined concrete, a tensile test with scabbing

  18. MODELLING OF CONCRETE STRUCTURES AFFECTED BY INTERNAL SWELLING REACTIONS: COUPLINGS BETWEEN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Page 1 MODELLING OF CONCRETE STRUCTURES AFFECTED BY INTERNAL SWELLING REACTIONS: COUPLINGS BETWEEN of the affected concrete that generally leads to cracking and decrease of its mechanical properties of the concrete works and structural integrity. To manage with considered suffering structures, it is necessary

  19. A Coupled Model for Radiative Transfer: Doppler Effects, Equilibrium and Non-Equilibrium Diffusion Asymptotics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goudon, Thierry

    A Coupled Model for Radiative Transfer: Doppler Effects, Equilibrium and Non-Equilibrium Diffusion. The interaction terms take into account both scattering and absorption/emission phenomena, as well as Doppler-diffusion equations. Key words. Hydrodynamic limits. Diffusion approximation. Radiative transfer. Doppler correction

  20. Efficiency and Fluctuation in Tight-Coupling Model of Molecular Motor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hidetsugu Sakaguchi

    2006-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

    A simple tight-coupling model of a molecular chemical engine is proposed. The efficiency of the chemical engine and its average velocity can be explicitly calculated. The diffusion constant is evaluated approximately using the fluctuation theorem. Langevin simulations with stochastic boundary conditions are performed and the numerical results are compared with theoretical calculations.

  1. Coupling time decoding and trajectory decoding using a target-included model in the motor cortex

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Wei

    Coupling time decoding and trajectory decoding using a target-included model in the motor cortex Communicated by D. Erdogmus Available online 27 December 2011 Keywords: Neural decoding Motor cortex Target made within the last decade in motor cortical decoding that predicts movement behaviors from population

  2. Gurson's plasticity coupled to damage as a CAP model for concrete compaction in dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Gurson's plasticity coupled to damage as a CAP model for concrete compaction in dynamics Fabrice (compaction) but also the plastic strains in compression and cracking in tension. Recently, new dynamic is generally described by means of the plasticity theory where the spherical and the deviatoric responses

  3. The Effect of the Galpagos Islands on ENSO in Forced Ocean and Hybrid Coupled Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karnauskas, Kristopher

    The Effect of the Galápagos Islands on ENSO in Forced Ocean and Hybrid Coupled Models KRISTOPHER B. KARNAUSKAS, RAGHU MURTUGUDDE, AND ANTONIO J. BUSALACCHI Earth System Science Interdisciplinary Center perturbation. Mixed layer heat budget calculations implicate the entrainment mixing term, which confirms

  4. An energy-diagnostics intercomparison of coupled ice-ocean Arctic models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Jinlun

    An energy-diagnostics intercomparison of coupled ice-ocean Arctic models Petteri Uotila a,*, David. Understanding the Arctic Ocean energy balance is important because it can strengthen our understanding for Atmosphere-Ocean Science, Courant Institute of Mathematical Sciences, New York University, NYU, 200 Water

  5. Semiclassical analysis of the electron-nuclear coupling in electronic non-adiabatic processes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Agostini, Federica; Gross, E K U

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the context of the exact factorization of the electron-nuclear wave function, the coupling between electrons and nuclei beyond the adiabatic regime is encoded (i) in the time-dependent vector and scalar potentials and (ii) in the electron-nuclear coupling operator. The former appear in the Schroedinger-like equation that drives the evolution of the nuclear degrees of freedom, whereas the latter is responsible for inducing non-adiabatic effects in the electronic evolution equation. As we have devoted previous studies to the analysis of the vector and scalar potentials, in this paper we focus on the properties of the electron-nuclear coupling operator, with the aim of describing a numerical procedure to approximate it within a semiclassical treatment of the nuclear dynamics.

  6. Development of Fully Coupled Aeroelastic and Hydrodynamic Models for Offshore Wind Turbines: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jonkman, J. M.; Sclavounos, P. D.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Aeroelastic simulation tools are routinely used to design and analyze onshore wind turbines, in order to obtain cost effective machines that achieve favorable performance while maintaining structural integrity. These tools employ sophisticated models of wind-inflow; aerodynamic, gravitational, and inertial loading of the rotor, nacelle, and tower; elastic effects within and between components; and mechanical actuation and electrical responses of the generator and of control and protection systems. For offshore wind turbines, additional models of the hydrodynamic loading in regular and irregular seas, the dynamic coupling between the support platform motions and wind turbine motions, and the dynamic characterization of mooring systems for compliant floating platforms are also important. Hydrodynamic loading includes contributions from hydrostatics, wave radiation, and wave scattering, including free surface memory effects. The integration of all of these models into comprehensive simulation tools, capable of modeling the fully coupled aeroelastic and hydrodynamic responses of floating offshore wind turbines, is presented.

  7. Phase synchronization of coupled bursting neurons and the generalized Kuramoto model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fabiano A. S. Ferrari; Ricardo L. Viana; Sérgio R. Lopes; Ruedi Stoop

    2015-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Bursting neurons fire rapid sequences of action potential spikes followed by a quiescent period. The basic dynamical mechanism of bursting is the slow currents that modulate a fast spiking activity caused by rapid ionic currents. Minimal models of bursting neurons must include both effects. We considered one of these models and its relation with a generalized Kuramoto model, thanks to the definition of a geometrical phase for bursting and a corresponding frequency. We considered neuronal networks with different connection topologies and investigated the transition from a non-synchronized to a partially phase-synchronized state as the coupling strength is varied. The numerically determined critical coupling strength value for this transition to occur is compared with theoretical results valid for the generalized Kuramoto model.

  8. Final Report Coupling in silico microbial models with reactive transport models to predict the fate of contaminants in the subsurface.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lovley, Derek R.

    2012-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This project successfully accomplished its goal of coupling genome-scale metabolic models with hydrological and geochemical models to predict the activity of subsurface microorganisms during uranium bioremediation. Furthermore, it was demonstrated how this modeling approach can be used to develop new strategies to optimize bioremediation. The approach of coupling genome-scale metabolic models with reactive transport modeling is now well enough established that it has been adopted by other DOE investigators studying uranium bioremediation. Furthermore, the basic principles developed during our studies will be applicable to much broader investigations of microbial activities, not only for other types of bioremediation, but microbial metabolism in diversity of environments. This approach has the potential to make an important contribution to predicting the impact of environmental perturbations on the cycling of carbon and other biogeochemical cycles.

  9. Fractional Dynamical Model for the Generation of ECG like Signals from Filtered Coupled Van-der Pol Oscillators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saptarshi Das; Koushik Maharatna

    2014-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, an incommensurate fractional order (FO) model has been proposed to generate ECG like waveforms. Earlier investigation of ECG like waveform generation is based on two identical Van-der Pol (VdP) family of oscillators which are coupled by time delays and gains. In this paper, we suitably modify the three state equations corresponding to the nonlinear cross-product of states, time delay coupling of the two oscillators and low-pass filtering, using the concept of fractional derivatives. Our results show that a wide variety of ECG like waveforms can be simulated from the proposed generalized models, characterizing heart conditions under different physiological conditions. Such generalization of the modelling of ECG waveforms may be useful to understand the physiological process behind ECG signal generation in normal and abnormal heart conditions. Along with the proposed FO models, an optimization based approach is also presented to estimate the VdP oscillator parameters for representing a realistic ECG like signal.

  10. Sensitivity of Optimal Operation of an Activated Sludge Process Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Skogestad, Sigurd

    Sensitivity of Optimal Operation of an Activated Sludge Process Model Antonio Araujo, Simone sensitivity analysis of optimal operation conducted on an activated sludge process model based on the test.[7] applied a systematic procedure for control structure design of an activated sludge process

  11. Quantifying the Parallelism in BPMN Processes using Model Checking

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    a valuable guide for the problem of resource allocation in business processes. In this paper, we investigate . time and space, with a beginning and an end [5]. Business process modelling is an important area process efficiency and quality. More precisely, it is a stage to model activities, their causal

  12. Dynamical Coupled-Channel Model of Meson Production Reactions in the Nucleon Resonance Region

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    T.-S. H. Lee; A. Matsuyama; T. Sato

    2006-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A dynamical coupled-channel model is presented for investigating the nucleon resonances (N*) in the meson production reactions induced by pions and photons. Our objective is to extract the N* parameters and to investigate the meson production reaction mechanisms for mapping out the quark-gluon substructure of N* from the data. The model is based on an energy-independent Hamiltonian which is derived from a set of Lagrangians by using a unitary transformation method.

  13. Critical analysis of quark-meson coupling models for nuclear matter and finite nuclei

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Horst Mueller; Byron K. Jennings

    1998-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Three versions of the quark-meson coupling (QMC) model are applied to describe properties of nuclear matter and finite nuclei. The models differ in the treatment of the bag constant and in terms of nonlinear scalar self-interactions. As a consequence opposite predictions for the medium modifications of the internal nucleon structure arise. After calibrating the model parameters at equilibrium nuclear matter density, binding energies, charge radii, single-particle spectra and density distributions of spherical nuclei are analyzed and compared with QHD calculations. For the models which predict a decreasing size of the nucleon in the nuclear environment, unrealistic features of the nuclear shapes arise.

  14. Modeling of thermally driven hydrological processes in partially saturated fractured rock

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tsang, Yvonne; Birkholzer, Jens; Mukhopadhyay, Sumit

    2009-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper is a review of the research that led to an in-depth understanding of flow and transport processes under strong heat stimulation in fractured, porous rock. It first describes the anticipated multiple processes that come into play in a partially saturated, fractured porous volcanic tuff geological formation, when it is subject to a heat source such as that originating from the decay of radionuclides. The rationale is then given for numerical modeling being a key element in the study of multiple processes that are coupled. The paper outlines how the conceptualization and the numerical modeling of the problem evolved, progressing from the simplified to the more realistic. Examples of numerical models are presented so as to illustrate the advancement and maturation of the research over the last two decades. The most recent model applied to in situ field thermal tests is characterized by (1) incorporation of a full set of thermal-hydrological processes into a numerical simulator, (2) realistic representation of the field test geometry, in three dimensions, and (3) use of site-specific characterization data for model inputs. Model predictions were carried out prior to initiation of data collection, and the model results were compared to diverse sets of measurements. The approach of close integration between modeling and field measurements has yielded a better understanding of how coupled thermal hydrological processes produce redistribution of moisture within the rock, which affects local permeability values and subsequently the flow of liquid and gases. The fluid flow in turn will change the temperature field. We end with a note on future research opportunities, specifically those incorporating chemical, mechanical, and microbiological factors into the study of thermal and hydrological processes.

  15. An Ontology-enabled Approach for Modelling Business Processes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    An Ontology-enabled Approach for Modelling Business Processes Thi-Hoa-Hue Nguyen and Nhan Le problem regard- ing business processes modelled with CPNs sharing and subsequently their reuse need for representing business models in a meta-knowledge base. Firstly, the CPN ontology is defined to represent CPNs

  16. Semantic Lifting of Business Process models Mario Lezoche1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Semantic Lifting of Business Process models Mario Lezoche1 , Antonio De Nicola1 , Tania Di Mascio1, Italy tania@ing.univaq.it Abstract. Business Process modeling is constantly acquiring attention in modern enterprises. Today, BP editor tools support modelers in building correct diagrams only from

  17. Model-Driven Business Process Recovery , Terence C. Lau2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zou, Ying

    Model-Driven Business Process Recovery Ying Zou1 , Terence C. Lau2 , Kostas Kontogiannis3 , Tack. In this paper, we propose a model-driven business process recovery framework that captures the essential-to-date linkage between business tasks and their implementation in source code, we propose a model-driven business

  18. An information modeling framework for process planning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Atreya, Dinesh S.

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and manufacture and thus plays an important role in achieving CIM. Process Planning has been defined by the Society of Manufacturing Engineers as the systematic de- termination of methods by which a product is to be manufactured economically and competitively... Planning As defined earlier, process planning is the systematic determination of the methods by which a product is to be manufactured economically and competitively. Usually, process planning as well as operation planning involves a series of tasks...

  19. PI CONTROLLERS PERFORMANCES FOR A PROCESS MODEL WITH VARYING DELAY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the obtained performances on a simplified hy- drodesulfurization process model we use as test case. 2 PI by a relay feedback as shown in [1]. Ziegler and Nichols then studied on a simple real process

  20. Synchronization of organ pipes by means of air flow coupling: experimental observations and modeling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abel, M; Gerhard-Multhaupt, R

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report measurements on two organ pipes positioned side by side. We investigate two different questions. First, the mutual influence of two pipes with different pitch. In analogy to the coupling of two nonlinear oscillators with feedback, one observes a frequency locking, which can be explained by synchronization theory. Second, we measure the dependence of the frequency of the signals emitted by two mutually detuned pipes with varying distance between the pipes. The spectrum shows a broad ``hump'' structure, not found for coupled oscillators. This indicates a complicated hydrodynamical coupling of the two jets creating the acoustic field when exiting from the pipe mouth. We interpret our acoustic measurements with a model for the flow which exits from the flues of the pipes.

  1. Gaussian Process Product Models for Nonparametric Nonstationarity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adams, Ryan Prescott

    .ac.uk Oliver Stegle os252@cam.ac.uk Cavendish Laboratory, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB3 0HE, UK- dictive distributions. 1. Introduction The Gaussian process (Rasmussen & Williams, 2006) is a useful approaches involve Gaussian process mix- tures (Rasmussen, 2000), augmentation of the input space (Pfingsten

  2. Modeling and analysis of dual hydroforming process 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jain, Nishant

    2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Effect of Strain Hardening Exponent, n................................ 69 Effect of Anisotropy, r .......................................................... 71 Effect of Friction... of Friction on Dual Hydroforming Process ..................................... 75 5-6 Effect of Different Materials on Dual Hydroforming Process................... 77 xi LIST OF TABLES TABLE Page 2-1 Material Properties for Copper...

  3. Restructuring of colloidal aggregates in shear flow: Coupling interparticle contact models with Stokesian dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seto, Ryohei; Auernhammer, Günter K; Briesen, Heiko

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method to couple interparticle contact models with Stokesian dynamics (SD) is introduced to simulate colloidal aggregates under flow conditions. The contact model mimics both the elastic and plastic behavior of the cohesive connections between particles within clusters. Owing to this, clusters can maintain their structures under low stress while restructuring or even breakage may occur under sufficiently high stress conditions. SD is an efficient method to deal with the long-ranged and many-body nature of hydrodynamic interactions for low Reynolds number flows. By using such a coupled model, the restructuring of colloidal aggregates under stepwise increasing shear flows was studied. Irreversible compaction occurs due to the increase of hydrodynamic stress on clusters. Results show that the greater part of the fractal clusters are compacted to rod-shaped packed structures, while the others show isotropic compaction.

  4. A phase-field model for systems with coupled large deformation and mass Wei Hong1,2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hong, Wei

    1 A phase-field model for systems with coupled large deformation and mass transport Wei Hong1 to introduce phase-field modeling to the field of soft materials, especially for studying polymeric gels-field methodology, and reveal some interesting phenomena due to the coupling. For example, the composition

  5. Coupled Operation of a Wind Farm and Pumped Storage Facility: Techno-Economic Modelling and Stochastic Optimization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Victoria, University of

    Coupled Operation of a Wind Farm and Pumped Storage Facility: Techno-Economic Modelling Operation of a Wind Farm and Pumped Storage Facility: Techno-Economic Modelling and Stochastic Optimization a stochastic programming approach to the techno-economic analysis of a wind farm coupled with a pumped storage

  6. A coupled-trajectory quantum-classical approach to decoherence in non-adiabatic processes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Min, Seung Kyu; Gross, E K U

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a novel quantum-classical approach to non-adiabatic dynamics, deduced from the coupled electronic and nuclear equations in the framework of the exact factorization of the electron-nuclear wave function. The method is based on the quasi-classical interpretation of the nuclear wave function, whose phase is related to the classical momentum and whose density is represented in terms of classical trajectories. In this approximation, electronic decoherence is naturally induced as effect of the coupling to the nuclei and correctly reproduces the expected quantum behaviour. Moreover, the splitting of the nuclear wave packet is captured as consequence of the correct approximation of the time-dependent potential of the theory. This new approach offers a clear improvement over Ehrenfest-like dynamics. The theoretical derivation presented in the Letter is supported by numerical results that are compared to quantum mechanical calculations.

  7. "Big Picture" Process Modeling Tools |GE Global Research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    downstream advantages as costs are reduced thanks to lower power requirements for distillation and even reduced liquid waste generation. In the second case, process modeling...

  8. On the modeling and control of delamination processes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michal Kocvara

    2004-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Jan 20, 2004 ... On the modeling and control of delamination processes. Michal Kocvara (kocvara ***at*** utia.cas.cz) Jiri V. Outrata (outrata ***at*** utia.cas.cz).

  9. Reversible computation as a model for the quantum measurement process

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karl Svozil

    2009-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    One-to-one reversible automata are introduced. Their applicability to a modelling of the quantum mechanical measurement process is discussed.

  10. The long-term change of El Niño Southern Oscillation in an ensemble reanalysis and climate coupled models 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Chunxue 1984-

    2012-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

    from pre-industrial control integrations. The near term integrations, also called decadal prediction experiments, are initialized with observations. It is also the first time that Earth System Models (ESMs) were incorporated into coupled model...

  11. The long-term change of El Niño Southern Oscillation in an ensemble reanalysis and climate coupled models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Chunxue 1984-

    2012-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

    from pre-industrial control integrations. The near term integrations, also called decadal prediction experiments, are initialized with observations. It is also the first time that Earth System Models (ESMs) were incorporated into coupled model...

  12. Achieving Process modeling and Execution through the Combination of Aspect and Model-Driven Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Achieving Process modeling and Execution through the Combination of Aspect and Model. One major advantage of executable software process models is that once defined, they can be simulated for important process improvement decisions such as resource allocation, deadlock identification and process

  13. Predicting Coupled Ocean-Atmosphere Modes with a Climate Modeling Hierarchy -- Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michael Ghil, UCLA; Andrew W. Robertson, IRI, Columbia Univ.; Sergey Kravtsov, U. of Wisconsin, Milwaukee; Padhraic Smyth, UC Irvine

    2006-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of the project was to determine midlatitude climate predictability associated with tropical-extratropical interactions on interannual-to-interdecadal time scales. Our strategy was to develop and test a hierarchy of climate models, bringing together large GCM-based climate models with simple fluid-dynamical coupled ocean-ice-atmosphere models, through the use of advanced probabilistic network (PN) models. PN models were used to develop a new diagnostic methodology for analyzing coupled ocean-atmosphere interactions in large climate simulations made with the NCAR Parallel Climate Model (PCM), and to make these tools user-friendly and available to other researchers. We focused on interactions between the tropics and extratropics through atmospheric teleconnections (the Hadley cell, Rossby waves and nonlinear circulation regimes) over both the North Atlantic and North Pacific, and the ocean’s thermohaline circulation (THC) in the Atlantic. We tested the hypothesis that variations in the strength of the THC alter sea surface temperatures in the tropical Atlantic, and that the latter influence the atmosphere in high latitudes through an atmospheric teleconnection, feeding back onto the THC. The PN model framework was used to mediate between the understanding gained with simplified primitive equations models and multi-century simulations made with the PCM. The project team is interdisciplinary and built on an existing synergy between atmospheric and ocean scientists at UCLA, computer scientists at UCI, and climate researchers at the IRI.

  14. Bayesian variable selection in clustering via dirichlet process mixture models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Sinae

    2007-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

    simultane- ously. I use Dirichlet process mixture models to define the cluster structure and to introduce in the model a latent binary vector to identify discriminating variables. I update the variable selection index using a Metropolis algorithm and obtain...

  15. Determining Greenland Ice Sheet sensitivity to regional climate change: one-way coupling of a 3-D thermo-mechanical ice sheet model with a mesoscale climate model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schlegel, Nicole-Jeanne

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in running RCM’s over Greenland to produce high-qualityoutlet glaciers. For Greenland, this detail is specificallyCurrently, no coupled Greenland Ice Sheet model experiment

  16. AMFIBIA: A Meta-Model for the Integration of Business Process Modelling Aspects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kindler, Ekkart

    AMFIBIA: A Meta-Model for the Integration of Business Process Modelling Aspects Bj¨orn Axenath that formalizes the essential as- pects and concepts of business process modelling. Though AMFIBIA is not the first approach to formalizing the aspects and concepts of busi- ness process modelling, it is more

  17. Gaussian Process Topic Models Amrudin Agovic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Banerjee, Arindam

    ) [Blei et al.(2003)] and its variants have proven useful and effective. Such topic models allow mixed) [Blei and Lafferty(2006)] were proposed to address this issue. Instead of a Dirichlet prior, CTMs use link struc- ture among documents [Chang and Blei(2009)], exist- ing topic models, including CTM

  18. Building Qualitative Models of Thermodynamic Processes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Forbus, Kenneth D.

    of typical fluid and thermal systems, such as refrigerators and power plants . We use explicit modeling simplified versions of a refrigerator, a steam plant, and a thermal control system . Finally, we describe a Refrigerator 66 5 .5 Modeling a shipboard propulsion plant 70 5 .6 Summary of Examples 70 6 Discussion 72 7

  19. Couple Control Model Implementation on Antagonistic Mono- and Bi-Articular Actuators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prattico, Flavio; Yamamoto, Shin-ichiroh

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recently, robot assisted therapy devices are increasingly used for spinal cord injury (SCI) rehabilitation in assisting handicapped patients to regain their impaired movements. Assistive robotic systems may not be able to cure or fully compensate impairments, but it should be able to assist certain impaired functions and ease movements. In this study, a couple control model for lower-limb orthosis of a body weight support gait training system is proposed. The developed leg orthosis implements the use of pneumatic artificial muscle as an actuation system. The pneumatic muscle was arranged antagonistically to form two pair of mono-articular muscles (i.e., hip and knee joints), and a pair of bi-articular actuators (i.e., rectus femoris and hamstring). The results of the proposed couple control model showed that, it was able to simultaneously control the antagonistic mono- and bi-articular actuators and sufficiently performed walking motion of the leg orthosis.

  20. A Coupled System of Integrodifferential Equations Arising in Liquidity Risk Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pham, Huyen, E-mail: pham@math.jussieu.fr; Tankov, Peter [Universites Paris 6-Paris 7, Laboratoire de Probabilites et Modeles Aleatoires, CNRS, UMR 7599 (France)], E-mail: tankov@math.jussieu.fr

    2009-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the mathematical aspects of the portfolio/consumption choice problem in a market model with liquidity risk introduced in (Pham and Tankov, Math. Finance, 2006, to appear). In this model, the investor can trade and observe stock prices only at exogenous Poisson arrival times. He may also consume continuously from his cash holdings, and his goal is to maximize his expected utility from consumption. This is a mixed discrete/continuous time stochastic control problem, nonstandard in the literature. We show how the dynamic programming principle leads to a coupled system of Integro-Differential Equations (IDE), and we prove an analytic characterization of this control problem by adapting the concept of viscosity solutions. This coupled system of IDE may be numerically solved by a decoupling algorithm, and this is the topic of a companion paper (Pham and Tankov, Math. Finance, 2006, to appear)

  1. Computer modeling of the spallation process

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walker, Wayne Claire

    1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ) de. (62) Note here that S(E) is the entropy of a nucleus with an energy between E andE+ dE. An allowance must be made at this point for the affect that the Coulomb field will have on the cross section of the reverse process. If we assume... that classically the particle hitting the nucleus is ab- sorbed, thon the cross section for the roverse process becomes c(EA, e) = ao(l ? V/c) for c & V (63) 0 fore &V where uo = sr and V = zz, e /r. The Coulomb field is expressed in terms of. the charge, ze...

  2. Removal of hydrophobic Volatile Organic Compounds1 in an integrated process coupling Absorption and2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    is an interesting method, owing to the low pressure drop generated and68 the low maintenance needed, contrarily to membrane processes that require high working pressures to69 treat low gas flow rates (Fig. 1). An emerging of the process, hydrophobic VOC27 absorption in a gas-liquid contactor, and biodegradation in the TPPB. VOC

  3. Solutions of coupled BPS equations for two-family Calogero and matrix models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bardek, Velimir; Meljanac, Stjepan; Meljanac, Daniel [Institute Rudjer Boskovic, Bijenicka cesta 54, HR-10002 Zagreb (Croatia)

    2009-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider a large N, two-family Calogero and matrix model in the Hamiltonian, collective-field approach. The Bogomol'nyi limit appears and the solutions to the coupled Bogomol'nyi-Prasad-Sommerfeld equations are given by the static soliton configurations. We find all solutions close to constant and construct exact one-parameter solutions in the strong-weak dual case. Full classification of these solutions is presented.

  4. A Time Varying Strong Coupling Constant as a Model of Inflationary Universe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    N. Chamoun; S. J. Landau; H. Vucetich

    2004-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider a scenario where the strong coupling constant was changing in the early universe. We attribute this change to a variation in the colour charge within a Bekenstein-like model. Treating the vacuum gluon condensate $$ as a free paramete r, we could generate inflation with the required properties to solve the fluctuation and other standard cosmology problems. A possible approach to end the inflation is suggested.

  5. String solutions in Chern-Simons-Higgs model coupled to an axion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Lopez-Sarrion; E. F. Moreno; F. A. Schaposnik; D. Slobinsky

    2006-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

    We study a d=2+1 dimensional Chern-Simons gauge theory coupled to a Higgs scalar and an axion field, finding the form of the potential that allows the existence of selfdual equations and the corresponding Bogomolny bound for the energy of static configurations. We show that the same conditions allow for the N=2 supersymmetric extension of the model, reobtaining the BPS equations from the supersymmetry requirement. Explicit electrically charged vortex-like solutions to these equations are presented.

  6. An explication of the reactance processing model 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Quick, Brian Lee

    2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Model (RPM). Specifically, the RPM conceptualizes reactance as a motivational state, investigates the degree of reactance arousal elicited by threat-tochoice, vivid, and explicit language (along with an additive effect of the aforementioned message...

  7. Scalable analysis of stochastic process algebra models 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tribastone, Mirco

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The performance modelling of large-scale systems using discrete-state approaches is fundamentally hampered by the well-known problem of state-space explosion, which causes exponential growth of the reachable state space ...

  8. Author's personal copy Fuzzy modelling of the composting process

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Author's personal copy Fuzzy modelling of the composting process E. Giusti, S. Marsili May 2009 Available online 18 June 2009 Keywords: Composting Fuzzy models Fuzzy identification Fuzzy clustering a b s t r a c t Composting is a solid waste treatment process consisting of the biochemical

  9. Adaptive Methods for Modelling Transport Processes in Fractured Subsurface Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cirpka, Olaf Arie

    ­ discrete Galerkin method applying finite differences for the discretization in time and the StreamlineAdaptive Methods for Modelling Transport Processes in Fractured Subsurface Systems 3rd­adaptive methods for modelling transport processes in fractured rock. As a simplification, ideal tracers

  10. Fluid-particle flow modelling and validation using two-way-coupled mesoscale SPH-DEM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robinson, Martin; Ramaioli, Marco

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a meshless simulation method for multiphase fluid-particle flows coupling Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) and the Discrete Element Method (DEM). Rather than fully resolving the interstitial fluid, which is often infeasible, the unresolved fluid model is based on the locally averaged Navier Stokes equations, which are coupled with a DEM model for the solid phase. In contrast to similar mesh-based Discrete Particle Methods (DPMs), this is a purely particle-based method and enjoys the flexibility that comes from the lack of a prescribed mesh. It is suitable for problems such as free surface flow or flow around complex, moving and/or intermeshed geometries. It can be used for both one and two-way coupling and is applicable to both dilute and dense particle flows. A comprehensive validation procedure for fluid-particle simulations is presented and applied to the SPH-DEM method, using simulations of single and multiple particle sedimentation in a 3D fluid column and comparison with analytical model...

  11. Model-based experimental analysis for inter-polymer process

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grossmann, Ignacio E.

    ) + Polyethylene (PE) ARCEL TOUGH FLEXIBLE Advanced packaging material Interpenetrating polymer network productModel-based experimental analysis for inter-polymer process CMU: Weijie Lin, Lorenz T. Biegler processed in a sequential way Polymer A Polymer B Project overview Inter-polymer process #12;Project

  12. Process modeling for the Integrated Nonthermal Treatment System (INTS) study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, B.W.

    1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the process modeling done in support of the Integrated Nonthermal Treatment System (INTS) study. This study was performed to supplement the Integrated Thermal Treatment System (ITTS) study and comprises five conceptual treatment systems that treat DOE contract-handled mixed low-level wastes (MLLW) at temperatures of less than 350{degrees}F. ASPEN PLUS, a chemical process simulator, was used to model the systems. Nonthermal treatment systems were developed as part of the INTS study and include sufficient processing steps to treat the entire inventory of MLLW. The final result of the modeling is a process flowsheet with a detailed mass and energy balance. In contrast to the ITTS study, which modeled only the main treatment system, the INTS study modeled each of the various processing steps with ASPEN PLUS, release 9.1-1. Trace constituents, such as radionuclides and minor pollutant species, were not included in the calculations.

  13. Process modeling of hydrogen production from municipal solid waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thorsness, C.B.

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The ASPEN PLUS commercial simulation software has been used to develop a process model for a conceptual process to convert municipal solid waste (MSW) to hydrogen. The process consists of hydrothermal treatment of the MSW in water to create a slurry suitable as feedstock for an oxygen blown Texaco gasifier. A method of reducing the complicated MSW feed material to a manageable set of components is outlined along with a framework for modeling the stoichiometric changes associated with the hydrothermal treatment process. Model results indicate that 0.672 kmol/s of hydrogen can be produced from the processing of 30 kg/s (2600 tonne/day) of raw MSW. A number of variations on the basic processing parameters are explored and indicate that there is a clear incentive to reduce the inert fraction in the processed slurry feed and that cofeeding a low value heavy oil may be economically attractive.

  14. Climate effects of anthropogenic sulfate: Simulations from a coupled chemistry/climate model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chuang, C.C.; Penner, J.E.; Taylor, K.E.; Walton, J.J.

    1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, we use a more comprehensive approach by coupling a climate model with a 3-D global chemistry model to investigate the forcing by anthropogenic aerosol sulfate. The chemistry model treats the global-scale transport, transformation, and removal of SO{sub 2}, DMS and H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} species in the atmosphere. The mass concentration of anthropogenic sulfate from fossil fuel combustion and biomass burning is calculated in the chemistry model and provided to the climate model where it affects the shortwave radiation. We also investigate the effect, with cloud nucleation parameterized in terms of local aerosol number, sulfate mass concentration and updraft velocity. Our simulations indicate that anthropogenic sulfate may result in important increases in reflected solar radiation, which would mask locally the radiative forcing from increased greenhouse gases. Uncertainties in these results will be discussed.

  15. The development of a cognitive process-oriented correlation model 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kneuven, Richard James

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Chair of Advisory Committee: Dr. Patricia A. Alexander This study was undertaken to discover what underlying cognitive processes could provide a basis for a cognitive process-oriented correlation model and to examine how this cognitive information... examined interpretations of information-processing as articulated by selected cognitive theorists, assorted approaches to interdisciplinary instruction, as well as various approaches to curriculum design. Ultimately, a curricular model was developed...

  16. Modeling and analysis of dual hydroforming process

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jain, Nishant

    2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    economic product with the best performance, it is important to choose proper material and process 11 parameters [28]. The experiments were conducted on various steel grades ranging from high strength to low strength steels. The material parameters... pressure and axial feeding. There are many applications of tube hydroforming in the automotive industry and in household uses. This technology uses clamping devices such as mechanical presses, pressure intensifiers, hydraulic punches and control systems...

  17. Quark-Meson Coupling Model, Nuclear Matter Constraints and Neutron Star Properties

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Whittenbury, D L; Thomas, A W; Tsushima, K; Stone, J R

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We explore the equation of state for nuclear matter in the quark-meson coupling model, including full Fock terms. The comparison with phenomenological constraints can be used to restrict the few additional parameters appearing in the Fock terms which are not present at Hartree level. Because the model is based upon the in-medium modification of the quark structure of the bound hadrons, it can be applied without additional parameters to include hyperons and to calculate the equation of state of dense matter in beta-equilibrium. This leads naturally to a study of the properties of neutron stars, including their maximum mass, their radii and density profiles.

  18. Possibility of n-type and p-type carrier coupling in the excitonic enhancement model of superconducting mechanism

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wong, K.W. (Kansas Univ., Lawrence, KS (USA). Dept. of Physics and Astronomy); Ching, W.Y. (Missouri Univ., Kansas City, MO (USA). Dept. of Physics)

    1990-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The authors discuss the possibility of both n-type and p-type carrier coupling in the excitonic enhancement model (EEM) for high temperature superconductivity. It is argued that p-type quasi-particles will generally lead to a higher T{sub c} than the n-type. The differences between EEM model and other exciton-related models are illuminated by the corresponding Feynman diagrams for the carrier coupling.

  19. Analyzing Critical Process Models through Behavior Model Synthesis Christophe Damas1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bonaventure, Olivier

    be verified on Little-JIL process models [17], after task conversion into LTS, using LTSA [18]. LTSA was also

  20. On the connection between continental-scale land surface processes and the tropical climate in a coupled ocean-atmosphere-land system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ma, Hsi-Yen; Mechoso, C. R.; Xue, Yongkang; Xiao, Heng; Neelin, David; Ji, Xuan

    2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The impact of global tropical climate to perturbations in land surface processes (LSP) are evaluated using perturbations given by different LSP representations of continental-scale in a global climate model that includes atmosphere-ocean interactions. One representation is a simple land scheme, which specifies climatological albedos and soil moisture availability. The other representation is the more comprehensive Simplified Simple Biosphere Model, which allows for interactive soil moisture and vegetation biophysical processes. The results demonstrate that LSP processes such as interactive soil moisture and vegetation biophysical processes have strong impacts on the seasonal mean states and seasonal cycles of global precipitation, clouds, and surface air temperature. The impact is especially significant over the tropical Pacific. To explore the mechanisms for such impact, different LSP representations are confined to selected continental-scale regions where strong interactions of climate-vegetation biophysical processes are present. We find that the largest impact is mainly from LSP perturbations over the tropical African continent. The impact is through anomalous convective heating in tropical Africa due to changes in the surface heat fluxes, which in turn affect basinwide teleconnections in the Pacific through equatorial wave dynamics. The modifications in the equatorial Pacific climate are further enhanced by strong air-sea coupling between surface wind stress and upwelling, as well as effect of ocean memory. Our results further suggest that correct representations of land surface processes, land use change and the associated changes in the deep convection over tropical Africa are crucial to reducing the uncertainty when performing future climate projections under different climate change scenarios.

  1. Coupling traffic models on networks and urban dispersion models for simulating sustainable

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ceragioli, Francesca

    models for modeling and testing different traffic scenarios, in order to define the impact on air quality it with the urban dispersion model Sirane. Keywords: urban air quality, macroscopic traffic models, road networks, pollutant dispersion models, traffic emissions control. AMS subject classification: 35L65, 35L67, 60K30, 90B

  2. On the possibility of the multiple inductively coupled plasma and helicon plasma sources for large-area processes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, Jin-Won; Lee, Yun-Seong, E-mail: leeeeys@kaist.ac.kr; Chang, Hong-Young [Low-temperature Plasma Laboratory, Department of Physics, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of); An, Sang-Hyuk [Agency of Defense Development, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-151 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In this study, we attempted to determine the possibility of multiple inductively coupled plasma (ICP) and helicon plasma sources for large-area processes. Experiments were performed with the one and two coils to measure plasma and electrical parameters, and a circuit simulation was performed to measure the current at each coil in the 2-coil experiment. Based on the result, we could determine the possibility of multiple ICP sources due to a direct change of impedance due to current and saturation of impedance due to the skin-depth effect. However, a helicon plasma source is difficult to adapt to the multiple sources due to the consistent change of real impedance due to mode transition and the low uniformity of the B-field confinement. As a result, it is expected that ICP can be adapted to multiple sources for large-area processes.

  3. Coupled Reactor Kinetics and Heat Transfer Model for Heat Pipe Cooled Reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    WRIGHT,STEVEN A.; HOUTS,MICHAEL

    2000-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Heat pipes are often proposed as cooling system components for small fission reactors. SAFE-300 and STAR-C are two reactor concepts that use heat pipes as an integral part of the cooling system. Heat pipes have been used in reactors to cool components within radiation tests (Deverall, 1973); however, no reactor has been built or tested that uses heat pipes solely as the primary cooling system. Heat pipe cooled reactors will likely require the development of a test reactor to determine the main differences in operational behavior from forced cooled reactors. The purpose of this paper is to describe the results of a systems code capable of modeling the coupling between the reactor kinetics and heat pipe controlled heat transport. Heat transport in heat pipe reactors is complex and highly system dependent. Nevertheless, in general terms it relies on heat flowing from the fuel pins through the heat pipe, to the heat exchanger, and then ultimately into the power conversion system and heat sink. A system model is described that is capable of modeling coupled reactor kinetics phenomena, heat transfer dynamics within the fuel pins, and the transient behavior of heat pipes (including the melting of the working fluid). The paper focuses primarily on the coupling effects caused by reactor feedback and compares the observations with forced cooled reactors. A number of reactor startup transients have been modeled, and issues such as power peaking, and power-to-flow mismatches, and loading transients were examined, including the possibility of heat flow from the heat exchanger back into the reactor. This system model is envisioned as a tool to be used for screening various heat pipe cooled reactor concepts, for designing and developing test facility requirements, for use in safety evaluations, and for developing test criteria for in-pile and out-of-pile test facilities.

  4. Modeling of multilayer ion etching processes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sherwin, S.J.; Barouch, E.; Karniadakis, G.E. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States)] [and others] [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States); and others

    1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Numerical simulation is used to model ion etching in trilayer lithography. The simulations are capable of capturing the evolution of the boundary between two materials as well as the physically observed phonemena reactive ion etching lag and undercutting. Numerical results are compared with experimental data and a good agreement is found except close to the material interface where the slope of the surface is large. This error is attributed to a purely energy dependent yield used in the simulations. 6 refs., 6 figs.

  5. Dynamic Bayesian Networks model to estimate process availability.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Dynamic Bayesian Networks model to estimate process availability. Weber P. Centre de Recherche en reported here explores a new methodology to develop Dynamic Bayesian Network-based Availability of the system availability estimation comparing DBN model with the classical Markov chain model. Keywords

  6. Model Proton-Coupled Electron Transfer Reactions in Solution: Predictions of Rates, Mechanisms, and Kinetic Isotope Effects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hammes-Schiffer, Sharon

    Model Proton-Coupled Electron Transfer Reactions in Solution: Predictions of Rates, Mechanisms isotope effects for proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) reactions. These studies are based, the solvent is represented as a dielectric continuum, and the active electrons and transferring protons

  7. Modeling the coupling between free and forced convection in a vertical permeable slot: implications for the heat

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1 Modeling the coupling between free and forced convection in a vertical permeable slot numerical study of the coupling between forced and free convective flows has been performed by considering: implications for the heat production of an Enhanced Geothermal System Arnaud Batailléa , Pierre Genthona

  8. Stability of the Zagreb realization of the Carnegie-Mellon-Berkeley coupled-channels unitary model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Osmanovic, H.; Hadzimehmedovic, M.; Stahov, J. [University of Tuzla, Faculty of Science, Univerzitetska 4, 75000 Tuzla (Bosnia and Herzegowina); Ceci, S.; Svarc, A. [Rudjer Boskovic Institute, Bijenicka cesta 54, P.O. Box 180, 10002 Zagreb (Croatia)

    2011-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In Hadzimehmedovicet al.[Phys. Rev. C 84, 035204 (2011)] we have used the Zagreb realization of Carnegie-Melon-Berkeley coupled-channel, unitary model as a tool for extracting pole positions from the world collection of partial-wave data, with the aim of eliminating model dependence in pole-search procedures. In order that the method is sensible, we in this paper discuss the stability of the method with respect to the strong variation of different model ingredients. We show that the Zagreb CMB procedure is very stable with strong variation of the model assumptions and that it can reliably predict the pole positions of the fitted partial-wave amplitudes.

  9. The shallow shelf approximation as a "sliding law" in a thermomechanically coupled ice sheet model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bueler, Ed

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The shallow shelf approximation is a better ``sliding law'' for ice sheet modeling than those sliding laws in which basal velocity is a function of driving stress. The shallow shelf approximation as formulated by \\emph{Schoof} [2006a] is well-suited to this use. Our new thermomechanically coupled sliding scheme is based on a plasticity assumption about the strength of the saturated till underlying the ice sheet in which the till yield stress is given by a Mohr-Coulomb formula using a modeled pore water pressure. Using this scheme, our prognostic whole ice sheet model has convincing ice streams. Driving stress is balanced in part by membrane stresses, the model is computable at high spatial resolution in parallel, it is stable with respect to parameter changes, and it produces surface velocities seen in actual ice streams.

  10. Positivity of Lyapunov exponents for Anderson-type models on two coupled strings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hakim Boumaza; Günter Stolz

    2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We study two models of Anderson-type random operators on two deterministically coupled continuous strings. Each model is associated with independent, identically distributed four-by-four symplectic transfer matrices, which describe the asymptotics of solutions. In each case we use a criterion by Gol'dsheid and Margulis (i.e. Zariski denseness of the group generated by the transfer matrices in the group of symplectic matrices) to prove positivity of both leading Lyapunov exponents for most energies. In each case this implies almost sure absence of absolutely continuous spectrum (at all energies in the first model and for sufficiently large energies in the second model). The methods used allow for singularly distributed random parameters, including Bernoulli distributions.

  11. Discontinuous finite volume element discretization for coupled flowtransport problems arising in models of sedimentation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bürger, Raimund

    in models of sedimentation Raimund B¨urgera , Sarvesh Kumarb , Ricardo Ruiz-Baierc aCI2MA and Departamento The sedimentation-consolidation and flow processes of a mixture of small particles dispersed in a vis- cous fluid discontinuous finite volume element (DFVE) discretization for this model is pro- posed. The numerical method

  12. Close-coupled Catalytic Two-Stage Liquefaction (CTSL{trademark}) process bench studies. Final report, [October 1, 1988--July 31, 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Comolli, A.G.; Johanson, E.S.; Karolkiewicz, W.F.; Lee, L.K.; Popper, G.A.; Stalzer, R.H.; Smith, T.O.

    1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This is the final report of a four year and ten month contract starting on October 1, 1988 to July 31, 1993 with the US Department of Energy to study and improve Close-Coupled Catalytic Two-Stage Direct Liquefaction of coal by producing high yields of distillate with improved quality at lower capital and production costs in comparison to existing technologies. Laboratory, Bench and PDU scale studies on sub-bituminous and bituminous coals are summarized and referenced in this volume. Details are presented in the three topical reports of this contract; CTSL Process Bench Studies and PDU Scale-Up with Sub-Bituminous Coal-DE-88818-TOP-1, CTSL Process Bench Studies with Bituminous Coal-DE-88818-TOP-2, and CTSL Process Laboratory Scale Studies, Modelling and Technical Assessment-DE-88818-TOP-3. Results are summarized on experiments and studies covering several process configurations, cleaned coals, solid separation methods, additives and catalysts both dispersed and supported. Laboratory microautoclave scale experiments, economic analysis and modelling studies are also included along with the PDU-Scale-Up of the CTSL processing of sub-bituminous Black Thunder Mine Wyoming coal. During this DOE/HRI effort, high distillate yields were maintained at higher throughput rates while quality was markedly improved using on-line hydrotreating and cleaned coals. Solid separations options of filtration and delayed coking were evaluated on a Bench-Scale with filtration successfully scaled to a PDU demonstration. Directions for future direct coal liquefaction related work are outlined herein based on the results from this and previous programs.

  13. Seismic transient deconvolution with model-based signal processing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tague, J.A.; Schutz, K.D. [Ohio Univ., Athens, OH (United States). Dept. of Electrical and Computer Engineering] [Ohio Univ., Athens, OH (United States). Dept. of Electrical and Computer Engineering

    1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Short duration seismic disturbances, obscured by earth noise and distorted by the seismometers used to measure them, can be reconstructed using model-based signal processing. Model based means that mathematical models of the seismic transient, earth noise, and seismometer dynamics are infused into the signal processor that estimates the disturbance. The processor imposes no predetermined structure on the transient and the earth noise need not be white. Model-based processors produce good quality estimates for a broad class of transient waveforms.

  14. Mechanistic studies of photo-induced proton-coupled electron transfer and oxygen atom transfer reactions in model systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hodgkiss, Justin M. (Justin Mark), 1978-

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Time-resolved optical spectroscopy has been employed for mechanistic studies in model systems designed to undergo photo-induced proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) and oxygen atom transfer (OAT) reactions, both of which ...

  15. Numerical Modeling of Fracture Permeability Change in Naturally Fractured Reservoirs Using a Fully Coupled Displacement Discontinuity Method.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tao, Qingfeng

    2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    finite difference method to solve the fluid flow in fractures, a fully coupled displacement discontinuity method to build the global relation of fracture deformation, and the Barton-Bandis model of fracture deformation to build the local relation...

  16. Whole-Building Energy Simulation with a Three-Dimensional Ground-Coupled Heat Transfer Model: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deru, M.; Judkoff, R.; Neymark, J.

    2002-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A three-dimensional, finite-element, heat-transfer computer program was developed to study ground-coupled heat transfer from buildings. It was used in conjunction with the SUNREL whole-building energy simulation program to analyze ground-coupled heat transfer from buildings, and the results were compared with the simple ground-coupled heat transfer models used in whole-building energy simulation programs. The detailed model provides another method of testing and refining the simple models and analyzing complex problems. This work is part of an effort to improve the analysis of the ground-coupled heat transfer in building energy simulation programs. The output from this detailed model and several others will form a set of reference results for use with the BESTEST diagnostic procedure. We anticipate that the results from the work will be incorporated into ANSI/ASHRAE 140-2001, Standard Method of Test for the Evaluation of Building Energy Analysis Computer Programs.

  17. Rapid Oscillatory quintessence with variable equation of state parameter in non minimal derivative coupling model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H. Mohseni Sadjadi

    2014-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The rapid oscillating scalar field is considered as the quintessence in the framework of nonminimal kinetic coupling model. The scalar field behaves like a perfect fluid with a variable equation of state parameter which can be expressed as a function of the Hubble parameter. This feature enables us to study its evolution via continuity equation. The scalar field may behave as dark energy in the present epoch, while it behaves like dark matter in the future. This characteristic allows the occurrence of a decelerated expansion after the present acceleration, without invoking any interaction. The model is also studied in the presence of an interaction between dark sectors alleviating the coincidence problem. The stability of the model is investigated and the stable attractor solutions are studied.

  18. Cost modeling in the integrated supply chain strategic decision process

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robinson, Todd (Todd Christopher)

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis is based on an internship at Honeywell Aerospace's Integrated Supply Chain (ISC) Leadership division. This work focuses on the role and use of analytical cost models in the strategy development process. The ...

  19. Hierarchical Bayesian Models for Predicting The Spread of Ecological Processes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hierarchical Bayesian Models for Predicting The Spread of Ecological Processes Christopher K. Wikle Department of Statistics, University of Missouri To appear: Ecology June 10, 2002 Key Words: Bayesian, Diffusion, Forecast, Hierarchical, House Finch, Invasive, Malthu- sian, State Space, Uncertainty Abstract

  20. Digital neural network-based modeling technique for extrusion processes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jang, Won-Hyouk

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and market conditions. In order to develop reliable and well-performing advanced process monitoring and diagnostic systems for achieving improved product quality and cost-effective operation, the neural network-based modeling technique for the extrusion...

  1. A comparative study of reaction rate, species, and vibration-dissociation coupling models for an AOTV flowfield

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bobskill, Glenn James

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A COMPARATIVE STUDY OF REACTION RATE, SPECIES, AND VIBRATION DISSOCIATION COUPLING MODELS FOR AN AOTV FLOWFIELD A Thesis by GLENN JAMES BOBSKILL Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M UniversitY in partial fulfillment... of the requirements for the degree of MASTER GF SC. BNCH August 1938 Major Subject: Aerospace Engineering A COMPARATIVE STUDY OF REACTION RATE, SPECIES, AND VIBRATION -DISSOCIATION COUPLING MODELS FOR AN AOTV FLOWFIELD A Thesis by GLENN JAMES BOBSKILL...

  2. Experimental characterization and modeling of non-linear coupling of the LHCD power on Tore Supra

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Preynas, M. [Max Planck Institut für Plasmaphysik, EURATOM Association, D-17491 Greifswald (Germany); Goniche, M.; Hillairet, J.; Litaudon, X.; Ekedahl, A. [CEA, IRFM, F-13108 Saint Paul lez Durance (France)

    2014-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

    To achieve steady state operation on future tokamaks, in particular on ITER, the unique capability of a LHCD system to efficiently drive off-axis non-inductive current is needed. In this context, it is of prime importance to study and master the coupling of LH wave to the core plasma at high power density (tens of MW/m{sup 2}). In some specific conditions, deleterious effects on the LHCD coupling are sometimes observed on Tore Supra. At high power the waves may modify the edge parameters that change the wave coupling properties in a non-linear manner. In this way, dedicated LHCD experiments have been performed using the LHCD system of Tore Supra, composed of two different conceptual designs of launcher: the Fully Active Multijunction (FAM) and the new Passive Active Multijunction (PAM) antennas. A nonlinear interaction between the electron density and the electric field has been characterized in a thin plasma layer in front of the two LHCD antennas. The resulting dependence of the power reflection coefficient with the LHCD power, leading occasionally to trips in the output power, is not predicted by the standard linear theory of the LH wave coupling. Therefore, it is important to investigate and understand the possible origin of such non-linear effects in order to avoid their possible deleterious consequences. The PICCOLO-2D code, which self-consistently treats the wave propagation in the antenna vicinity and its interaction with the local edge plasma density, is used to simulate Tore Supra discharges. The simulation reproduces very well the occurrence of a non-linear behavior in the coupling observed in the LHCD experiments. The important differences and trends between the FAM and the PAM antennas, especially a larger increase in RC for the FAM, are also reproduced by the PICCOLO-2D simulation. The working hypothesis of the contribution of the ponderomotive effect in the non-linear observations of LHCD coupling is therefore validated through this comprehensive modeling for the first time on the FAM and PAM antennas on Tore Supra.

  3. Computational model for high-energy laser-cutting process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, M.J.; Majumdar, P. [Northern Illinois Univ., DeKalb, IL (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

    1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A computational model for the simulation of a laser-cutting process has been developed using a finite element method. A transient heat transfer model is considered that deals with the material-cutting process using a Gaussian continuous wave laser beam. Numerical experimentation is carried out for mesh refinements and the rate of convergence in terms of groove shape and temperature. Results are also presented for the prediction of groove depth with different moving speeds.

  4. Noise-induced cooperative dynamics and its control in coupled neuron models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. Hauschildt; N. B. Janson; A. Balanov; E. Schoell

    2006-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate feedback control of the cooperative dynamics of two coupled neural oscillators that is induced merely by external noise. The interacting neurons are modelled as FitzHugh-Nagumo systems with parameter values at which no autonomous oscillations occur, and each unit is forced by its own source of random fluctuations. Application of delayed feedback to only one of two subsystems is shown to be able to change coherence and timescales of noise induced oscillations either in the given subsystem, or globally. It is also able to induce or to suppress stochastic synchronization under certain conditions.

  5. On the Role of the Running Coupling Constant in a Quark Model Analysis of T-odd TMDs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Courtoy

    2011-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

    We revisit the standard procedure to match non-perturbative models to perturbative QCD, using experimental data. The strong coupling constant plays a central role in the QCD evolution of parton densities. We will extend this procedure with a non-perturbative generalization of the QCD running coupling and use this new development to understand why perturbative treatments are working reasonably well in the context of hadronic models. Vice versa, this new procedure broadens the ways of analyzing the freezing of the running coupling constant.

  6. MULTISCALE MODELING OF DIFFUSION-INDUCED DEFORMATION PROCESSES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ponce, V. Miguel

    MULTISCALE MODELING OF DIFFUSION- INDUCED DEFORMATION PROCESSES Dr. Eugene Olevsky Friday, February 19, 2010 Engineering Bldg. Room E 300 Sintering is a high temperature process of bonding together of matter transport by different diffusion mechanisms driven by the high surface energy of aggregates

  7. Modelling and Simulation of a Polluted Water Pumping Process

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tradacete, Pedro

    Modelling and Simulation of a Polluted Water Pumping Process Chitra Alavani1 , Roland Glowinski2 concentration when a polluted water pumping ship follows a pre­assigned trajectory to remove the pollutant. We, sea currents and pumping process and the reaction due to the extraction of oil, implying

  8. Searching for PMIPS: Process Model Instructions Per Second

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baldi, Mario

    management system (DBMS), process engine (PrE), and user interface (UI) service. The PrE interprets and executes process mod­ els. The DBMS stores and manages both software products and process models machines ranging from terminals to mainframes. tools DBMS C DPP DCS C C ID D A1 A2 A3 A4 PrE A5 DCS DPP Fig

  9. Using a multiphase flow code to model the coupled effects of repository consolidation and multiphase brine and gas flow at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Freeze, G.A. [INTERA Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Larson, K.W.; Davies, P.B.; Webb, S.W. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Long-term repository assessment must consider the processes of (1) gas generation, (2) room closure and expansions due to salt creep, and (3) multiphase (brine and gas) fluid flow, as well as the complex coupling between these three processes. The mechanical creep closure code SANCHO was used to simulate the closure of a single, perfectly sealed disposal room filled with water and backfill. SANCHO uses constitutive models to describe salt creep, waste consolidation, and backfill consolidation, Five different gas-generation rate histories were simulated, differentiated by a rate multiplier, f, which ranged from 0.0 (no gas generation) to 1.0 (expected gas generation under brine-dominated conditions). The results of the SANCHO f-series simulations provide a relationship between gas generation, room closure, and room pressure for a perfectly sealed room. Several methods for coupling this relationship with multiphase fluid flow into and out of a room were examined. Two of the methods are described.

  10. Direct coupling of a genome-scale microbial in silico model and a groundwater reactive transport model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fang, Yilin; Scheibe, Timothy D.; Mahadevan, Radhakrishnan; Garg, Srinath; Long, Philip E.; Lovley, Derek R.

    2011-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The activity of microorganisms often plays an important role in dynamic natural attenuation or engineered bioremediation of subsurface contaminants, such as chlorinated solvents, metals, and radionuclides. To evaluate and/or design bioremediated systems, quantitative reactive transport models are needed. State-of-the-art reactive transport models often ignore the microbial effects or simulate the microbial effects with static growth yield and constant reaction rate parameters over simulated conditions, while in reality microorganisms can dynamically modify their functionality (such as utilization of alternative respiratory pathways) in response to spatial and temporal variations in environmental conditions. Constraint-based genome-scale microbial in silico models, using genomic data and multiple-pathway reaction networks, have been shown to be able to simulate transient metabolism of some well studied microorganisms and identify growth rate, substrate uptake rates, and byproduct rates under different growth conditions. These rates can be identified and used to replace specific microbially-mediated reaction rates in a reactive transport model using local geochemical conditions as constraints. We previously demonstrated the potential utility of integrating a constraint based microbial metabolism model with a reactive transport simulator as applied to bioremediation of uranium in groundwater. However, that work relied on an indirect coupling approach that was effective for initial demonstration but may not be extensible to more complex problems that are of significant interest (e.g., communities of microbial species, multiple constraining variables). Here, we extend that work by presenting and demonstrating a method of directly integrating a reactive transport model (FORTRAN code) with constraint-based in silico models solved with IBM ILOG CPLEX linear optimizer base system (C library). The models were integrated with BABEL, a language interoperability tool. The modeling system is designed in such a way that constraint-based models targeting different microorganisms or competing organism communities can be easily plugged into the system. Constraint-based modeling is very costly given the size of a genome-scale reaction network. To save computation time, a binary tree is traversed to examine the concentration and solution pool generated during the simulation in order to decide whether the constraint-based model should be called. We also show preliminary results from the integrated model including a comparison of the direct and indirect coupling approaches.

  11. The PERC{trademark} process: Existing and potential applications for induction coupled plasma technology in hazardous and radioactive waste treatment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blutke, A.S.; Vavruska, J.S.; Serino, J.F. [Plasma Technology, Inc., Santa Fe, NM (United States)

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Plasma Technology, Inc. (PTI), a Santa Fe, New Mexico corporation has developed the Plasma Energy Recycle and Conversion (PERC){trademark} treatment process as a safe and environmentally clean alternative to conventional thermal destruction technologies. The PERC{trademark} treatment process uses as its heat source an advanced Induction Coupled Plasma (ICP) torch connected to a reaction chamber system with an additional emission control system. For example, organic-based gas, liquid, slurry, and/or solid waste streams can be converted into usable or even salable products while residual emissions are reduced to an absolute minimum. In applications for treatment of hazardous and radioactive waste streams, the PERC system could be used for destruction of the hazardous organic constituents and/or significant waste volume reduction while capturing the radioactive fraction in a non-leachable form. Like Direct Current (DC) and Alternating Current (AC) arc plasma systems, ICP torches offer sufficient energy to decompose, melt and/or vitrify any waste stream. The decision for an arc plasma or an IC plasma system has to be made on a case by case evaluation and is highly dependent on the specific waste stream`s form and composition. Induction coupled plasma technology offers one simple, but significant difference compared to DC or AC arc plasma systems: the ICP torch is electrodeless. To date, enormous research effort has been spent to improve the lifetime of electrodes and the effectiveness of related cooling systems. Arc plasma systems are established in research laboratories worldwide and are approaching a broad use in commercial applications. ICP technology has been improved relatively recently, but nowadays offers complete new and beneficial approaches in the field of waste conversion and treatment.

  12. A Spatio-Temporal Point Process Model for Ambulance Demand

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Woodard, Dawn B.

    (EMS) managers need accurate demand estimates to mini- mize response times to emergencies and keep. Several studies have modeled aggregate ambulance demand as a temporal process. Channouf et al. (2007) use by combining a dynamic latent factor structure with integer time series models. Other aggregate demand studies

  13. Modeling Lake Erie ice dynamics: Process studies , Haoguo Hu2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Modeling Lake Erie ice dynamics: Process studies Jia Wang1 , Haoguo Hu2 , and Xuezhi Bai2 1 NOAA of Michigan 4840 S. State Road, Ann Arbor, MI 48108 Abstract. A Great Lakes Ice-circulation Model (GLIM derived from meteorological measurements. After the seasonal cycles of ice concentration, thickness

  14. Model-Driven Process Configuration of Enterprise Systems*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van der Aalst, Wil

    have been funded by SAP Research and Queensland University of Technology with the project "ModellingModel-Driven Process Configuration of Enterprise Systems* Alexander Dreiling, Michael Rosemann Queensland University of Technology Wil van der Aalst Eindhoven University of Technology Wasim Sadiq SAP

  15. PROCESS MODELING AND CONTROL The Department of Chemical Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lightsey, Glenn

    economic performance · MIMO (vs. SISO) models · Nonlinear (vs. linear) models · Stochastic variables.D. Graduates (2005 - 2008) Student/Supervisor Destination E. Hale (JQ) Ph.D. (8/05) NREL R. Chong (TFE) M.S. (8 (Emerson Process Management) · J. Lee (postdoc) ­ Various topics in multivariable control (e.g., multiloop

  16. PASI 2011: Process Modeling and Optimization for Energy and Sustainability Mineral Process Design for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grossmann, Ignacio E.

    in Asia. Asia will have a strong impact on the global trends in key metals consumption Takashi NishiyamaPASI 2011 PASI 2011: Process Modeling and Optimization for Energy and Sustainability Mineral;Balance between global consumption and the available production Motivation PSE at CICITEM Models

  17. Meson spectroscopy with unitary coupled-channels model for heavy-meson decay into three mesons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Satoshi Nakamura

    2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We develop a model for describing excited mesons decay into three mesons. The properties of the excited mesons can be extracted with this model. The model maintains the three-body unitarity that has been missed in previous data analyses based on the conventional isobar models. We study an importance of the three-body unitarity in extracting hadron properties from data. For this purpose, we use the unitary and isobar models to analyze the same pseudo data of {gamma}p {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}n, and extract the properties of excited mesons. We find a significant difference between the unitary and isobar models in the extracted properties of excited mesons, such as the mass, width and coupling strength to decay channels. Hadron properties such as quantum numbers (spin, parity, etc.), mass and (partial) width have been long studied as a subject called hadron spectroscopy. The hadron properties provide important information for understanding internal structure of the hadron and dynamics which governs it. The dynamics here is of course QCD in its nonperturbative regime. The hadron properties can be extracted from data through a careful analysis, in many cases, partial wave analysis (PWA). Thus it is essential for hadron spectroscopy to have a reliable theoretical analysis tool.

  18. Geophysical Monitoring of Coupled Microbial and Geochemical Processes During Stimulated Subsurface Bioremediation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, Kenneth H.; Kemna, Andreas; Wilkins, Michael J.; Druhan, Jennifer L.; Arntzen, Evan V.; N'Guessan, A. Lucie; Long, Philip E.; Hubbard, Susan S.; Banfield, Jillian F.

    2009-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Understanding how microorganisms alter their physical and chemical environment during bioremediation is hindered by our inability to resolve subsurface microbial activity with high spatial resolution. Here we demonstrate the use of a minimally invasive geophysical technique to monitor stimulated microbial activity during acetate amendment in an aquifer near Rifle, Colorado. During electrical induced polarization (IP) measurements, spatiotemporal variations in the phase response between imposed electric current and the resultant electric field correlated with changes in groundwater geochemistry accompanying stimulated iron and sulfate reduction and sulfide mineral precipitation. The magnitude of the phase response varied with measurement frequency (0.125 and 1 Hz) andwasdependent upon the dominant metabolic process. The spectral effect was corroborated using a biostimulated column experiment containing Rifle sediments and groundwater. Fluids and sediments recovered from regions exhibiting an anomalous phase response were enriched in Fe(II), dissolved sulfide, and cell-associated FeS nanoparticles. The accumulation of mineral precipitates and electroactive ions altered the ability of pore fluids to conduct electrical charge, accounting for the anomalous IP response and revealing the usefulness of multifrequency IP measurements for monitoring mineralogical and geochemical changes accompanying stimulated subsurface bioremediation.

  19. Desert dust and anthropogenic aerosol interactions in the Community Climate System Model coupled-carbon-climate model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mahowald, Natalie [Cornell University; Rothenberg, D. [Cornell University; Lindsay, Keith [National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR); Doney, Scott C. [Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution; Moore, Jefferson Keith [University of California, Irvine; Randerson, James T. [University of California, Irvine; Thornton, Peter E [ORNL; Jones, C. D. [Hadley Center, Devon, England

    2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Coupled-carbon-climate simulations are an essential tool for predicting the impact of human activity onto the climate and biogeochemistry. Here we incorporate prognostic desert dust and anthropogenic aerosols into the CCSM3.1 coupled carbon-climate model and explore the resulting interactions with climate and biogeochemical dynamics through a series of transient anthropogenic simulations (20th and 21st centuries) and sensitivity studies. The inclusion of prognostic aerosols into this model has a small net global cooling effect on climate but does not significantly impact the globally averaged carbon cycle; we argue that this is likely to be because the CCSM3.1 model has a small climate feedback onto the carbon cycle. We propose a mechanism for including desert dust and anthropogenic aerosols into a simple carbon-climate feedback analysis to explain the results of our and previous studies. Inclusion of aerosols has statistically significant impacts on regional climate and biogeochemistry, in particular through the effects on the ocean nitrogen cycle and primary productivity of altered iron inputs from desert dust deposition.

  20. Applying Model Transformation By-Example on Business Process Modeling Languages

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    By Example (MTBE) approaches have been proposed as user-friendly alternative that simplifies the definition of model transformations. Up to now, MTBE ap- proaches have been applied to structural models, only. In this work we apply MTBE to the domain of business process modeling languages, i.e., Event-driven Process

  1. Statistical post processing of model output from the air quality model LOTOS-EUROS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stoffelen, Ad

    are calculated with R, a language for statistical computing. The routine STEP in R is used to remove variablesStatistical post processing of model output from the air quality model LOTOS-EUROS Annemiek Pijnappel De Bilt, 2011 | Stageverslag #12;#12;Statistical post processing of model output from the air

  2. Preliminary results of a dynamic system model for a closed-loop Brayton cycle coupled to a nuclear reactor.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wright, Steven Alan

    2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes preliminary results of a dynamic system model for a closed-loop Brayton-cycle that is coupled to a nuclear reactor. The current model assumes direct coupling between the reactor and the Brayton-cycle, however only minor additions are required to couple the Brayton-cycle through a heat exchanger to either a heat pipe reactor or a liquid metal cooled reactor. Few reactors have ever been coupled to closed Brayton-cycle systems. As such their behavior under dynamically varying loads, startup and shut down conditions, and requirements for safe and autonomous operation are largely unknown. Sandia National Laboratories has developed steady-state and dynamic models for closed-loop turbo-compressor systems (for space and terrestrial applications). These models are expected to provide a basic understanding of the dynamic behavior and stability of the coupled reactor and power generation loop. The model described in this paper is a lumped parameter model of the reactor, turbine, compressor, recuperator, radiator/waste-heat-rejection system and generator. More detailed models that remove the lumped parameter simplifications are also being developed but are not presented here. The initial results of the model indicate stable operation of the reactor-driven Brayton-cycle system and its ability to load-follow. However, the model also indicates some counter-intuitive behavior for the complete coupled system. This behavior will require the use of a reactor control system to select an appropriate reactor operating temperature that will optimize the performance of the complete spacecraft system. We expect this model and subsequent versions of it to provide crucial information in developing procedures for safe start up, shut down, safe-standby, and other autonomous operating modes. Ultimately, Sandia hopes to validate these models and to perform nuclear ground tests of reactor-driven closed Brayton-cycle systems in our nuclear research facilities.

  3. A new compact model coupling rainfall-runoff and routing model to support

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    proposes a model for integrated management of a regulated water- shed. In such systems, it is important and guarantee flow at certain critical points. When these points are distant from the reservoir, the managers. For the reservoir manager, it is

  4. Life cycle assessment of hydrogen production from S-I thermochemical process coupled to a high temperature gas reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Giraldi, M. R.; Francois, J. L.; Castro-Uriegas, D. [Departamento de Sistemas Energeticos, Facultad de Ingenieria, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Paseo Cuauhnahuac No. 8532, Col. Progreso, C.P. 62550, Jiutepec, Morelos (Mexico)

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this paper is to quantify the greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions associated to the hydrogen produced by the sulfur-iodine thermochemical process, coupled to a high temperature nuclear reactor, and to compare the results with other life cycle analysis (LCA) studies on hydrogen production technologies, both conventional and emerging. The LCA tool was used to quantify the impacts associated with climate change. The product system was defined by the following steps: (i) extraction and manufacturing of raw materials (upstream flows), (U) external energy supplied to the system, (iii) nuclear power plant, and (iv) hydrogen production plant. Particular attention was focused to those processes where there was limited information from literature about inventory data, as the TRISO fuel manufacture, and the production of iodine. The results show that the electric power, supplied to the hydrogen plant, is a sensitive parameter for GHG emissions. When the nuclear power plant supplied the electrical power, low GHG emissions were obtained. These results improve those reported by conventional hydrogen production methods, such as steam reforming. (authors)

  5. Learning Business Process Models: A case study Johny Ghattas, Pnina Soffer, Mor Peleg

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peleg, Mor

    Learning Business Process Models: A case study Johny Ghattas, Pnina Soffer, Mor Peleg Management the application of LPM to a vaccination process. Keywords: Learning, business process model, generic process model the currently defined process model and the actual business process are detected. This forms the basis

  6. Bridging the Gap Between BusinessBridging the Gap Between BusinessBridging the Gap Between BusinessBridging the Gap Between Business Process Models and ServiceProcess Models and ServiceProcess Models and ServiceProcess Models and Service

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ulm, Universität

    Bridging the Gap Between Business Process Models and ServiceProcess Models and ServiceProcess Models and Service of the major reasons for this deficiency is the gap that exists between business process models on the one hand a flexible approach for aligning business process models with workflow specifications. In order to maintain

  7. Web Services-Enhanced Agile Modeling and Integrating Business Processes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Belouadha, Fatima-Zahra; Roudiès, Ounsa

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In a global business context with continuous changes, the enterprises have to enhance their operational efficiency, to react more quickly, to ensure the flexibility of their business processes, and to build new collaboration pathways with external partners. To achieve this goal, they must use e-business methods, mechanisms and techniques while capitalizing on the potential of new information and communication technologies. In this context, we propose a standards, model and Web services-based approach for modeling and integrating agile enterprise business processes. The purpose is to benefit from Web services characteristics to enhance the processes design and realize their dynamic integration. The choice of focusing on Web services is essentially justified by their broad adoption by enterprises as well as their capability to warranty interoperability between both intra and inter-enterprises systems. Thereby, we propose in this chapter a metamodel for describing business processes, and discuss their dynamic in...

  8. MODELING THE DYNAMICAL COUPLING OF SOLAR CONVECTION WITH THE RADIATIVE INTERIOR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brun, Allan Sacha [Laboratoire AIM Paris-Saclay, CEA/Irfu Universite Paris-Diderot CNRS/INSU, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Miesch, Mark S. [High Altitude Observatory, NCAR, Boulder, CO 80307-3000 (United States); Toomre, Juri [JILA and Department of Astrophysical and Planetary Sciences, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO 80309-0440 (United States)

    2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The global dynamics of a rotating star like the Sun involves the coupling of a highly turbulent convective envelope overlying a seemingly benign radiative interior. We use the anelastic spherical harmonic code to develop a new class of three-dimensional models that nonlinearly couple the convective envelope to a deep stable radiative interior. The numerical simulation assumes a realistic solar stratification from r = 0.07 up to 0.97R (with R the solar radius), thus encompassing part of the nuclear core up through most of the convection zone. We find that a tachocline naturally establishes itself between the differentially rotating convective envelope and the solid body rotation of the interior, with a slow spreading that is here diffusively controlled. The rapid angular momentum redistribution in the convective envelope leads to a fast equator and slow poles, with a conical differential rotation achieved at mid-latitudes, much as has been deduced by helioseismology. The convective motions are able to overshoot downward about 0.04R into the radiative interior. However, the convective meridional circulation there is confined to a smaller penetration depth and is directed mostly equatorward at the base of the convection zone. Thermal wind balance is established in the lower convection zone and tachocline but departures are evident in the upper convection zone. Internal gravity waves are excited by the convective overshooting, yielding a complex wave field throughout the radiative interior.

  9. A subliminal manipulation of the Extended Parallel Process Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stephenson, Michael Taylor

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the context of skin cancer. The goals of this study were to (1) assess the effects of subliminal embeds as fear appeals (2) within the framework of the Extended Parallel Process Model, the EPPM (Witte, 1992a). While this study demonstrated that subliminal... go unnoticed by individuals (Dixon, 1981). To extend the inquiry into subliminal message processing, this project places embedded pictures (a form of subliminal research) in the context of skin cancer This thesis uses the style of mm ni ' n...

  10. Increase of Carbon Cycle Feedback with Climate Sensitivity: Results from a coupled Climate and Carbon Cycle Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Govindasamy, B; Thompson, S; Mirin, A; Wickett, M; Caldeira, K; Delire, C

    2004-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Coupled climate and carbon cycle modeling studies have shown that the feedback between global warming and the carbon cycle, in particular the terrestrial carbon cycle, could accelerate climate change and result in larger warming. In this paper, we investigate the sensitivity of this feedback for year-2100 global warming in the range of 0 K to 8 K. Differing climate sensitivities to increased CO{sub 2} content are imposed on the carbon cycle models for the same emissions. Emissions from the SRES A2 scenario are used. We use a fully-coupled climate and carbon cycle model, the INtegrated Climate and CArbon model (INCCA) the NCAR/DOE Parallel Coupled Model coupled to the IBIS terrestrial biosphere model and a modified-OCMIP ocean biogeochemistry model. In our model, for scenarios with year-2100 global warming increasing from 0 to 8 K, land uptake decreases from 47% to 29% of total CO{sub 2} emissions. Due to competing effects, ocean uptake (16%) shows almost no change at all. Atmospheric CO{sub 2} concentration increases were 48% higher in the run with 8 K global climate warming than in the case with no warming. Our results indicate that carbon cycle amplification of climate warming will be greater if there is higher climate sensitivity to increased atmospheric CO{sub 2} content; the carbon cycle feedback factor increases from 1.13 to 1.48 when global warming increases from 3.2 to 8 K.

  11. Analysis of the cyanobacterial hydrogen photoproduction process via model identification and process simulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Dongda; Dechatiwongse, Pongsathorn; Del-Rio-Chanona, Ehecatl Antonio; Hellgardt, Klaus; Maitland, Geoffrey C.; Vassiliadis, Vassilios S.

    2015-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

    February 2015 Keywords: Biohydrogen Cyanobacteria Photoproduction Kinetic models Process simulation Bioreactor design a b s t r a c t Cyanothece sp. ATCC 51142 is considered a microorganism with the potential to generate sustainable hydrogen in the future... the direction of culture movement, the overall hydrogen production rate in a PFR may be lower than that in a CSTR. Finally, in this study fed-batch photoproduction processes are proposed containing only one photo- bioreactor based on the current simulation...

  12. Monte Carlo based toy model for fission process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kurniadi, R., E-mail: rijalk@fi.itb.ac.id; Waris, A., E-mail: rijalk@fi.itb.ac.id; Viridi, S., E-mail: rijalk@fi.itb.ac.id [Department of Physics, Nuclear Physics and Biophysics Research Division, Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Sciences, Institut Teknologi Bandung (Indonesia)

    2014-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    There are many models and calculation techniques to obtain visible image of fission yield process. In particular, fission yield can be calculated by using two calculations approach, namely macroscopic approach and microscopic approach. This work proposes another calculation approach in which the nucleus is treated as a toy model. Hence, the fission process does not represent real fission process in nature completely. The toy model is formed by Gaussian distribution of random number that randomizes distance like the distance between particle and central point. The scission process is started by smashing compound nucleus central point into two parts that are left central and right central points. These three points have different Gaussian distribution parameters such as mean (?{sub CN}, ?{sub L}, ?{sub R}), and standard deviation (?{sub CN}, ?{sub L}, ?{sub R}). By overlaying of three distributions, the number of particles (N{sub L}, N{sub R}) that are trapped by central points can be obtained. This process is iterated until (N{sub L}, N{sub R}) become constant numbers. Smashing process is repeated by changing ?{sub L} and ?{sub R}, randomly.

  13. Coupled models and parallel simulations for three-dimensional full-Stokes ice sheet modeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Huai [Graduate University of Chinese Academy of Sciences; Ju, Lili [University of South Carolina; Gunzburger, Max [Florida State University; Ringler, Todd [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Price, Stephen [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A three-dimensional full-Stokes computational model is considered for determining the dynamics, temperature, and thickness of ice sheets. The governing thermomechanical equations consist of the three-dimensional full-Stokes system with nonlinear rheology for the momentum, an advective-diffusion energy equation for temperature evolution, and a mass conservation equation for icethickness changes. Here, we discuss the variable resolution meshes, the finite element discretizations, and the parallel algorithms employed by the model components. The solvers are integrated through a well-designed coupler for the exchange of parametric data between components. The discretization utilizes high-quality, variable-resolution centroidal Voronoi Delaunay triangulation meshing and existing parallel solvers. We demonstrate the gridding technology, discretization schemes, and the efficiency and scalability of the parallel solvers through computational experiments using both simplified geometries arising from benchmark test problems and a realistic Greenland ice sheet geometry.

  14. Diode laser welding of ABS: Experiments and process modeling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ilie, Mariana; Mattei, Simone; Cicala, Eugen; Stoica, Virgil; 10.1016/j.optlastec.2008.10.005

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The laser beam weldability of acrylonitrile/butadiene/styrene (ABS) plates is determined by combining both experimental and theoretical aspects. In modeling the process, an optical model is used to determine how the laser beam is attenuated by the first material and to obtain the laser beam profile at the interface. Using this information as the input data to a thermal model, the evolution of the temperature field within the two components can be estimated. The thermal model is based on the first principles of heat transfer and utilizes the temperature variation laws of material properties. Corroborating the numerical results with the experimental results, some important insights concerning the fundamental phenomena that govern the process could be extracted. This approach proved to be an efficient tool in determining the weldability of polimeric materials and assures a significant reduction of time and costs with the experimental exploration.

  15. Testing and Modeling of a 3-MW Wind Turbine Using Fully Coupled Simulation Codes (Poster)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LaCava, W.; Guo, Y.; Van Dam, J.; Bergua, R.; Casanovas, C.; Cugat, C.

    2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This poster describes the NREL/Alstom Wind testing and model verification of the Alstom 3-MW wind turbine located at NREL's National Wind Technology Center. NREL,in collaboration with ALSTOM Wind, is studying a 3-MW wind turbine installed at the National Wind Technology Center(NWTC). The project analyzes the turbine design using a state-of-the-art simulation code validated with detailed test data. This poster describes the testing and the model validation effort, and provides conclusions about the performance of the unique drive train configuration used in this wind turbine. The 3-MW machine has been operating at the NWTC since March 2011, and drive train measurements will be collected through the spring of 2012. The NWTC testing site has particularly turbulent wind patterns that allow for the measurement of large transient loads and the resulting turbine response. This poster describes the 3-MW turbine test project, the instrumentation installed, and the load cases captured. The design of a reliable wind turbine drive train increasingly relies on the use of advanced simulation to predict structural responses in a varying wind field. This poster presents a fully coupled, aero-elastic and dynamic model of the wind turbine. It also shows the methodology used to validate the model, including the use of measured tower modes, model-to-model comparisons of the power curve, and mainshaft bending predictions for various load cases. The drivetrain is designed to only transmit torque to the gearbox, eliminating non-torque moments that are known to cause gear misalignment. Preliminary results show that the drivetrain is able to divert bending loads in extreme loading cases, and that a significantly smaller bending moment is induced on the mainshaft compared to a three-point mounting design.

  16. Physical Origin of Density Dependent Force of the Skyrme Type within the Quark Meson Coupling Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pierre Guichon; Hrayr Matevosyan; N. Sandulescu; Anthony Thomas

    2006-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

    A density dependent, effective nucleon-nucleon force of the Skyrme type is derived from the quark-meson coupling model--a self-consistent, relativistic quark level description of nuclear matter. This new formulation requires no assumption that the mean scalar field is small and hence constitutes a significant advance over earlier work. The similarity of the effective interaction to the widely used SkM* force encourages us to apply it to a wide range of nuclear problems, beginning with the binding energies and charge distributions of doubly magic nuclei. Finding impressive results in this conventional arena, we apply the same effective interaction, within the Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov approach, to the properties of nuclei far from stability. The resulting two neutron drip lines and shell quenching are quite satisfactory. Finally, we apply the relativistic formulation to the properties of dense nuclear matter in anticipation of future application to the properties of neutron stars.

  17. Scaling considerations for modeling the in situ vitrification process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Langerman, M.A.; MacKinnon, R.J.

    1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Scaling relationships for modeling the in situ vitrification waste remediation process are documented based upon similarity considerations derived from fundamental principles. Requirements for maintaining temperature and electric potential field similarity between the model and the prototype are determined as well as requirements for maintaining similarity in off-gas generation rates. A scaling rationale for designing reduced-scale experiments is presented and the results are assessed numerically. 9 refs., 6 figs.

  18. Metal coupled emission process

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport(FactDepartment3311, 3312), OctoberMayEnergy Metal Organic Heat Carrierscom,

  19. A Survey on Time-aware Business Process Modeling Saoussen Cheikhrouhou1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    A Survey on Time-aware Business Process Modeling Saoussen Cheikhrouhou1 , Slim Kallel1 , Nawal : Business Process Modeling (BPM) : Workflow : Web service composition : Inter-Organisational Business suites. Consequently, modeling and managing temporal requirements in the business process field

  20. Fully Coupled Geomechanics and Discrete Flow Network Modeling of Hydraulic Fracturing for Geothermal Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fu, P; Johnson, S M; Hao, Y; Carrigan, C R

    2011-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The primary objective of our current research is to develop a computational test bed for evaluating borehole techniques to enhance fluid flow and heat transfer in enhanced geothermal systems (EGS). Simulating processes resulting in hydraulic fracturing and/or the remobilization of existing fractures, especially the interaction between propagating fractures and existing fractures, represents a critical goal of our project. To this end, we are continuing to develop a hydraulic fracturing simulation capability within the Livermore Distinct Element Code (LDEC), a combined FEM/DEM analysis code with explicit solid-fluid mechanics coupling. LDEC simulations start from an initial fracture distribution which can be stochastically generated or upscaled from the statistics of an actual fracture distribution. During the hydraulic stimulation process, LDEC tracks the propagation of fractures and other modifications to the fracture system. The output is transferred to the Non-isothermal Unsaturated Flow and Transport (NUFT) code to capture heat transfer and flow at the reservoir scale. This approach is intended to offer flexibility in the types of analyses we can perform, including evaluating the effects of different system heterogeneities on the heat extraction rate as well as seismicity associated with geothermal operations. This paper details the basic methodology of our approach. Two numerical examples showing the capability and effectiveness of our simulator are also presented.

  1. Experimental investigation and modeling of a direct-coupled PV/T air collector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shahsavar, A.; Ameri, M. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Shahid Bahonar University, Kerman (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Energy and Environmental Engineering Research Center, Shahid Bahonar University, Kerman (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2010-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Photovoltaic/thermal (PV/T) systems refer to the integration of photovoltaic and solar thermal technologies into one single system, in that both useful heat energy and electricity are produced. The impetus of this paper is to model a direct-coupled PV/T air collector which is designed, built, and tested at a geographic location of Kerman, Iran. In this system, a thin aluminum sheet suspended at the middle of air channel is used to increase the heat exchange surface and consequently improve heat extraction from PV panels. This PV/T system is tested in natural convection and forced convection (with two, four and eight fans operating) and its unsteady results are presented in with and without glass cover cases. A theoretical model is developed and validated against experimental data, where good agreement between the measured values and those calculated by the simulation model were achieved. Comparisons are made between electrical performance of the different modes of operation, and it is concluded that there is an optimum number of fans for achieving maximum electrical efficiency. Also, results show that setting glass cover on photovoltaic panels leads to an increase in thermal efficiency and decrease in electrical efficiency of the system. (author)

  2. Chemical Process Modeling in Modelica Ali Baharev Arnold Neumaier

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neumaier, Arnold

    Chemical Process Modeling in Modelica Ali Baharev Arnold Neumaier Fakultät für Mathematik an important role in the development of our novel optimization methods. Foundations of a Modelica library-product distillation were computed as a proof of concept. The Modelica source code is available at the project homepage

  3. Interpreting Eye Movements with Process Models Dario D. Salvucci

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Salvucci, Dario D.

    Interpreting Eye Movements with Process Models Dario D. Salvucci Department of Computer Science Carnegie Mellon University Pittsburgh, PA 15213 +1 412 268 8102 dario+@cs.cmu.edu ABSTRACT Though eye movements provide a wealth of information about how humans interact with computers, the analysis of eye

  4. Supporting Generic Cost Models for Wide-Area Stream Processing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cetintemel, Ugur

    Supporting Generic Cost Models for Wide-Area Stream Processing Olga Papaemmanouil #1 , Ugur C¸ etintemel 2 , John Jannotti 2 # Deparment of Computer Science, Brandeis University, Waltham, MA, USA 1 olga and increased availability of receptors that report physical or software events has led to the emergence

  5. Process modeling for the Integrated Thermal Treatment System (ITTS) study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liebelt, K.H.; Brown, B.W.; Quapp, W.J.

    1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the process modeling done in support of the integrated thermal treatment system (ITTS) study, Phases 1 and 2. ITTS consists of an integrated systems engineering approach for uniform comparison of widely varying thermal treatment technologies proposed for treatment of the contact-handled mixed low-level wastes (MLLW) currently stored in the U.S. Department of Energy complex. In the overall study, 19 systems were evaluated. Preconceptual designs were developed that included all of the various subsystems necessary for a complete installation, from waste receiving through to primary and secondary stabilization and disposal of the processed wastes. Each system included the necessary auxiliary treatment subsystems so that all of the waste categories in the complex were fully processed. The objective of the modeling task was to perform mass and energy balances of the major material components in each system. Modeling of trace materials, such as pollutants and radioactive isotopes, were beyond the present scope. The modeling of the main and secondary thermal treatment, air pollution control, and metal melting subsystems was done using the ASPEN PLUS process simulation code, Version 9.1-3. These results were combined with calculations for the remainder of the subsystems to achieve the final results, which included offgas volumes, and mass and volume waste reduction ratios.

  6. A Process Model of Applicant Faking on Overt Integrity Tests

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu, Janie

    2010-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

    To better understand the cognitive processes associated with faking behaviors, Ajzen?s Theory of Planned Behavior was adapted to the study of faking on overt integrity tests. This decision-based model is then expanded through the inclusion of a key...

  7. Development of Mechanistic Modeling Capabilities for Local Neutronically-Coupled Flow-Induced Instabilities in Advanced Water-Cooled Reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michael Podowski

    2009-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The major research objectives of this project included the formulation of flow and heat transfer modeling framework for the analysis of flow-induced instabilities in advanced light water nuclear reactors such as boiling water reactors. General multifield model of two-phase flow, including the necessary closure laws. Development of neurton kinetics models compatible with the proposed models of heated channel dynamics. Formulation and encoding of complete coupled neutronics/thermal-hydraulics models for the analysis of spatially-dependent local core instabilities. Computer simulations aimed at testing and validating the new models of reactor dynamics.

  8. Measurement and modeling of advanced coal conversion processes, Volume III

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ghani, M.U.; Hobbs, M.L.; Hamblen, D.G. [and others

    1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A generalized one-dimensional, heterogeneous, steady-state, fixed-bed model for coal gasification and combustion is presented. The model, FBED-1, is a design and analysis tool that can be used to simulate a variety of gasification, devolatilization, and combustion processes. The model considers separate gas and solid temperatures, axially variable solid and gas flow rates, variable bed void fraction, coal drying, devolatilization based on chemical functional group composition, depolymerization, vaporization and crosslinking, oxidation, and gasification of char, and partial equilibrium in the gas phase.

  9. A dimensionless parameter model for arc welding processes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fuerschbach, P.W.

    1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    A dimensionless parameter model previously developed for C0{sub 2} laser beam welding has been shown to be applicable to GTAW and PAW autogenous arc welding processes. The model facilitates estimates of weld size, power, and speed based on knowledge of the material`s thermal properties. The dimensionless parameters can also be used to estimate the melting efficiency, which eases development of weld schedules with lower heat input to the weldment. The mathematical relationship between the dimensionless parameters in the model has been shown to be dependent on the heat flow geometry in the weldment.

  10. Bessel process, Schramm-Loewner evolution, and Dyson model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Makoto Katori

    2011-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Bessel process is defined as the radial part of the Brownian motion (BM) in the $D$-dimensional space, and is considered as a one-parameter family of one-dimensional diffusion processes indexed by $D$, BES$^{(D)}$. It is well-known that $D_{\\rm c}=2$ is the critical dimension. Bessel flow is a notion such that we regard BES$^{(D)}$ with a fixed $D$ as a one-parameter family of initial value. There is another critical dimension $\\bar{D}_{\\rm c}=3/2$ and, in the intermediate values of $D$, $\\bar{D}_{\\rm c} multivariate extension of BES$^{(3)}$. We explain the 'parenthood' of BES$^{(D)}$ and SLE$^{(D)}$, and that of BES$^{(3)}$ and the Dyson model. It is shown that complex analysis is effectively applied to study stochastic processes and statistical mechanics models in equilibrium and nonequilibrium states.

  11. Dynamics of coupled electron-nucleon motion in a laser field

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hartmann, F.X.; Garcia, K.K.; Munro, J.K. Jr.; Noid, D.W.

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Energy transfer processes in single particle coupled nucleon-electron models interacting with an intense laser field are studied using semi-classical quantization of the coupled classical Hamiltonian. 11 refs., 2 figs.

  12. World Climate Research Programme (WCRP) Coupled Model Intercomparison Project phase 3 (CMIP3): Multi-Model Dataset Archive at PCMDI (Program for Climate Model Diagnosis and Intercomparison)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    In response to a proposed activity of the WCRP's Working Group on Coupled Modelling (WGCM),PCMDI volunteered to collect model output contributed by leading modeling centers around the world. Climate model output from simulations of the past, present and future climate was collected by PCMDI mostly during the years 2005 and 2006, and this archived data constitutes phase 3 of the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP3). In part, the WGCM organized this activity to enable those outside the major modeling centers to perform research of relevance to climate scientists preparing the Fourth Asssessment Report (AR4) of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC). The IPCC was established by the World Meteorological Organization and the United Nations Environmental Program to assess scientific information on climate change. The IPCC publishes reports that summarize the state of the science. This unprecedented collection of recent model output is officially known as the WCRP CMIP3 multi-model dataset. It is meant to serve IPCC's Working Group 1, which focuses on the physical climate system - atmosphere, land surface, ocean and sea ice - and the choice of variables archived at the PCMDI reflects this focus. A more comprehensive set of output for a given model may be available from the modeling center that produced it. As of November 2007, over 35 terabytes of data were in the archive and over 303 terabytes of data had been downloaded among the more than 1200 registered users. Over 250 journal articles, based at least in part on the dataset, have been published or have been accepted for peer-reviewed publication. Countries from which models have been gathered include Australia, Canada, China, France, Germany and Korea, Italy, Japan, Norway, Russia, Great Britain and the United States. Models, variables, and documentation are collected and stored. Check http://www-pcmdi.llnl.gov/ipcc/data_status_tables.htm to see at a glance the output that is available. (Description taken from http://www-pcmdi.llnl.gov/ipcc/about_ipcc.php)

  13. Modeling veterans healthcare administration disclosure processes : CY 2012 summary.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beyeler, Walter Eugene; DeMenno, Mercy B.; Finley, Patrick D.

    2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As with other large healthcare organizations, medical adverse events at the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) facilities can expose patients to unforeseen negative risks. VHA leadership recognizes that properly handled disclosure of adverse events can minimize potential harm to patients and negative consequences for the effective functioning of the organization. The work documented here seeks to help improve the disclosure process by situating it within the broader theoretical framework of issues management, and to identify opportunities for process improvement through modeling disclosure and reactions to disclosure. The computational model will allow a variety of disclosure actions to be tested across a range of incident scenarios. Our conceptual model will be refined in collaboration with domain experts, especially by continuing to draw on insights from VA Study of the Communication of Adverse Large-Scale Events (SCALE) project researchers.

  14. Zangerl, C., Eberhardt, E., Loew, S., Evans, K., Coupled hydromechanical modelling of surface subsidence in crystalline rock masses due to tunnel drainage. ISRM 2003Technology roadmap for rock mechanics, South African Institute of Mining and Metallurgy, 2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , South African Institute of Mining and Metallurgy, 2003. Coupled hydromechanical modelling of surface

  15. The response of a capacitively coupled discharge to the formation of dust particles: Experiments and modeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Denysenko, I.; Berndt, J.; Kovacevic, E.; Stefanovic, I.; Selenin, V.; Winter, J. [School of Physics and Technology, V. N. Karazin Kharkiv National University, Svobody sq. 4, 61077 Kharkiv (Ukraine); Institute of Experimental Physics II, Ruhr-University Bochum, D-44780 Bochum (Germany); Institute of Experimental Physics II, Ruhr-University Bochum, D-44780 Bochum, Germany and Institute of Physics, POB 57, 11001 Belgrade (Serbia and Montenegro); Institute of Experimental Physics II, Ruhr-University Bochum, D-44780 Bochum (Germany)

    2006-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The influence of dust particles on the properties of a capacitively coupled Ar-C{sub 2}H{sub 2} discharge is studied both experimentally and theoretically. The results of measurements of the intensity and spatial distribution of the emitted light, the line width of the fast component of H{sub {alpha}} line and of the electron density during the particle growth are presented. To analyze the experimental results a one-dimensional discharge model is developed. Using the model the effects of dust grains on the power absorption (taking into account stochastic and Ohmic heating in the plasma sheaths), the optical emission intensity profile, the sheath size, the rf electric field and on the energy of positive ions bombarding the electrodes are investigated. In particular, it is shown that the decrease of the power absorption in the sheaths of complex plasmas is due to the dependence of the stochastic and Ohmic heating in the plasma sheaths on the electron temperature and the current flowing across the discharge plates. The results of the calculations are compared with the available experimental data and found to be in good agreement.

  16. Quantum mechanical Hamiltonian models of the computation process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Benioff, P.

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As noted in the proceedings of this conference it is of importance to determine if quantum mechanics imposes fundamental limits on the computation process. Some aspects of this problem have been examined by the development of different types of quantum mechanical Hamiltonian models of Turing machines. (Benioff 1980, 1982a, 1982b, 1982c). Turing machines were considered because they provide a standard representation of all digital computers. Thus, showing the existence of quantum mechanical models of all Turing machines is equivalent to showing the existence of quantum mechanical models of all digital computers. The types of models considered all had different properties. Some were constructed on two-dimensional lattices of quantum spin systems of spin 1/2 (Benioff 1982b, 1982c) or higher spins (Benioff 1980). All the models considered Turing machine computations which were made reversible by addition of a history tape. Quantum mechanical models of Bennett's reversible machines (Bennett 1973) in which the model makes a copy of the computation result and then erases the history and undoes the computation in lockstep to recover the input were also developed (Benioff 1982a). To avoid technical complications all the types of models were restricted to modelling an arbitrary but finite number of computation steps.

  17. Spatialtemporal modelling of fMRI data through spatially regularized mixture of hidden process models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tino, Peter

    . As the key ingredient of our temporal model, the Hidden Process Model (HPM) framework proposed in Hutchinson the original HPM framework, we use a parametric model of Haemodynamic Response Function (HRF) so that bi regions, the frontal ones are less homogeneous, requiring two HPM prototypes per region. Despite the rapid

  18. OASIS4: A Coupling Software for Next Generation Earth System Modelling Ren Redler (1), Sophie Valcke (2) and Hubert Ritzdorf (3)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    OASIS4: A Coupling Software for Next Generation Earth System Modelling René Redler (1), Sophie system modelling, Geosci. Model. Dev., 3, 87 ­ 104 Link ­ https://oasistrac.cerfacs.fr Financial support ­ R. Redler, S. Valcke and H. Ritzdorf, 2010: OASIS4 ­ a coupling software for next generation earth

  19. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2015: Coupling Mechanical with Electrochemical-Thermal Models Batteries Under Abuse

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by National Renewable Energy Laboratory at 2015 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about coupling...

  20. 2D Axisymmetric Coupled CFD-kinetics Modeling of a Nonthermal Arc Plasma Torch for Diesel Fuel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    1 2D Axisymmetric Coupled CFD-kinetics Modeling of a Nonthermal Arc Plasma Torch for Diesel Fuel-assisted diesel fuel reformer developed for two different applications: (i) onboard H2 production for fuel cell. In the first case, diesel fuel reacts with air while in the second case it reacts with diesel engine exhaust

  1. A thermo-hydro-mechanical coupled model in local thermal non-equilibrium for fractured HDR reservoir

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    artificially fractured hot dry rock (HDR) reservoirs requires three main ingredients: (1) a proper thermoA thermo-hydro-mechanical coupled model in local thermal non-equilibrium for fractured HDR reservoir Rachel Geleta,b , Benjamin Loreta, , Nasser Khalilib aLaboratoire Sols, Solides, Structures, B

  2. Ocean Water Clarity and the Ocean General Circulation in a Coupled Climate Model ANAND GNANADESIKAN AND WHIT G. ANDERSON

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gnanadesikan, Anand

    shortwave penetration in the high-latitude Southern Ocean causes an increase in the formation of mode waterOcean Water Clarity and the Ocean General Circulation in a Coupled Climate Model ANAND GNANADESIKAN Jersey (Manuscript received 11 October 2007, in final form 17 July 2008) ABSTRACT Ocean water clarity

  3. Unification of gauge coupling constants in the minimal supersymmtric model with $?_s\\approx0.11$

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. K. Chaudhuri

    1997-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

    We have studied the gauge unification with the recent electroweak data as a function of the higgsino mass. It was shown that if the strong coupling constant is small $\\approx 0.11$, consistent picture of gauge unification is not possible in the minimal supersymmetric standard model.

  4. Fundamental studies of the plasma extraction and ion beam formation processes in inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Niu, Hongsen

    1995-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The fundamental and practical aspects are described for extracting ions from atmospheric pressure plasma sources into an analytical mass spectrometer. Methodologies and basic concepts of inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) are emphasized in the discussion, including ion source, sampling interface, supersonic expansion, slumming process, ion optics and beam focusing, and vacuum considerations. Some new developments and innovative designs are introduced. The plasma extraction process in ICP-MS was investigated by Langmuir measurements in the region between the skimmer and first ion lens. Electron temperature (T{sub e}) is in the range 2000--11000 K and changes with probe position inside an aerosol gas flow. Electron density (n{sub e}) is in the range 10{sup 8}--10{sup 10} {sup {minus}cm }at the skimmer tip and drops abruptly to 10{sup 6}--10{sup 8} cm{sup {minus}3} near the skimmer tip and drops abruptly to 10{sup 6}--10{sup 8} cm{sup {minus}3} downstream further behind the skimmer. Electron density in the beam leaving the skimmer also depends on water loading and on the presence and mass of matrix elements. Axially resolved distributions of electron number-density and electron temperature were obtained to characterize the ion beam at a variety of plasma operating conditions. The electron density dropped by a factor of 101 along the centerline between the sampler and skimmer cones in the first stage and continued to drop by factors of 10{sup 4}--10{sup 5} downstream of skimmer to the entrance of ion lens. The electron density in the beam expansion behind sampler cone exhibited a 1/z{sup 2} intensity fall-off (z is the axial position). An second beam expansion originated from the skimmer entrance, and the beam flow underwent with another 1/z{sup 2} fall-off behind the skimmer. Skimmer interactions play an important role in plasma extraction in the ICP-MS instrument.

  5. Carbon sequestration by patch fertilization: A comprehensive assessment using coupled physical-ecological-biogeochemical models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jorge L. Sarmiento - Princeton PI, Anand Gnanadesikan - Princeton Co-I, Nicolas Gruber - UCLA PI, Xin Jin - UCLA PostDoc, Robert Armstrong - SUNY /Stony Brook Consultant

    2007-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

    This final report summarizes research undertaken collaboratively between Princeton University, the NOAA Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory on the Princeton University campus, the State University of New York at Stony Brook, and the University of California, Los Angeles between September 1, 2000, and November 30, 2006, to do fundamental research on ocean iron fertilization as a means to enhance the net oceanic uptake of CO2 from the atmosphere. The approach we proposed was to develop and apply a suite of coupled physical-ecological-biogeochemical models in order to (i) determine to what extent enhanced carbon fixation from iron fertilization will lead to an increase in the oceanic uptake of atmospheric CO2 and how long this carbon will remain sequestered (efficiency), and (ii) examine the changes in ocean ecology and natural biogeochemical cycles resulting from iron fertilization (consequences). The award was funded in two separate three-year installments: • September 1, 2000 to November 30, 2003, for a project entitled “Ocean carbon sequestration by fertilization: An integrated biogeochemical assessment.” A final report was submitted for this at the end of 2003 and is included here as Appendix 1. • December 1, 2003 to November 30, 2006, for a follow-on project under the same grant number entitled “Carbon sequestration by patch fertilization: A comprehensive assessment using coupled physical-ecological-biogeochemical models.” This report focuses primarily on the progress we made during the second period of funding subsequent to the work reported on in Appendix 1. When we began this project, we were thinking almost exclusively in terms of long-term fertilization over large regions of the ocean such as the Southern Ocean, with much of our focus being on how ocean circulation and biogeochemical cycling would interact to control the response to a given fertilization scenario. Our research on these types of scenarios, which was carried out largely during the first three years of our project, led to several major new insights on the interaction between ocean biogeochemistry and circulation. This work, which is described in the following Section II on “Large scale fertilization,” has continued to appear in the literature over the past few years, including two high visibility papers in Nature. Early on in the first three years of our project, it became clear that small "patch-scale" fertilizations over limited regions of order 100 km diameter were much more likely than large scale fertilization, and we carried out a series of idealized patch fertilization simulations reported on in Gnanadesikan et al. (2003). Based on this paper and other results we had obtained by the end of our first three-year grant, we identified a number of important issues that needed to be addressed in the second three-year period of this grant. Section III on “patch fertilization” discusses the major findings of this phase of our research, which is described in two major manuscripts that will be submitted for publication in the near future. This research makes use of new more realistic ocean ecosystem and iron cycling models than our first paper on this topic. We have several major new insights into what controls the efficiency of iron fertilization in the ocean. Section IV on “model development” summarizes a set of papers describing the progress that we made on improving the ecosystem models we use for our iron fertilization simulations.

  6. ACTINIDE REMOVAL PROCESS SAMPLE ANALYSIS, CHEMICAL MODELING, AND FILTRATION EVALUATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martino, C.; Herman, D.; Pike, J.; Peters, T.

    2014-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Filtration within the Actinide Removal Process (ARP) currently limits the throughput in interim salt processing at the Savannah River Site. In this process, batches of salt solution with Monosodium Titanate (MST) sorbent are concentrated by crossflow filtration. The filtrate is subsequently processed to remove cesium in the Modular Caustic Side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU) followed by disposal in saltstone grout. The concentrated MST slurry is washed and sent to the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) for vitrification. During recent ARP processing, there has been a degradation of filter performance manifested as the inability to maintain high filtrate flux throughout a multi-batch cycle. The objectives of this effort were to characterize the feed streams, to determine if solids (in addition to MST) are precipitating and causing the degraded performance of the filters, and to assess the particle size and rheological data to address potential filtration impacts. Equilibrium modelling with OLI Analyzer{sup TM} and OLI ESP{sup TM} was performed to determine chemical components at risk of precipitation and to simulate the ARP process. The performance of ARP filtration was evaluated to review potential causes of the observed filter behavior. Task activities for this study included extensive physical and chemical analysis of samples from the Late Wash Pump Tank (LWPT) and the Late Wash Hold Tank (LWHT) within ARP as well as samples of the tank farm feed from Tank 49H. The samples from the LWPT and LWHT were obtained from several stages of processing of Salt Batch 6D, Cycle 6, Batch 16.

  7. Process integrated modelling for steelmaking Life Cycle Inventory analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Iosif, Ana-Maria [Arcelor Research, Voie Romaine, BP30320, Maizieres-les-Metz, 57283 (France)], E-mail: ana-maria.iosif@arcelormittal.com; Hanrot, Francois [Arcelor Research, Voie Romaine, BP30320, Maizieres-les-Metz, 57283 (France)], E-mail: francois.hanrot@arcelormittal.com; Ablitzer, Denis [LSG2M, Ecole des Mines de Nancy, Parc de Saurupt, F-54042 Nancy cedex (France)], E-mail: denis.ablitzer@mines.inpl-nancy.fr

    2008-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    During recent years, strict environmental regulations have been implemented by governments for the steelmaking industry in order to reduce their environmental impact. In the frame of the ULCOS project, we have developed a new methodological framework which combines the process integrated modelling approach with Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) method in order to carry out the Life Cycle Inventory of steelmaking. In the current paper, this new concept has been applied to the sinter plant which is the most polluting steelmaking process. It has been shown that this approach is a powerful tool to make the collection of data easier, to save time and to provide reliable information concerning the environmental diagnostic of the steelmaking processes.

  8. Climate Forcings and Climate Sensitivities Diagnosed from Coupled Climate Model Integrations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Forster, P M A F; Taylor, K E

    2006-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

    A simple technique is proposed for calculating global mean climate forcing from transient integrations of coupled Atmosphere Ocean General Circulation Models (AOGCMs). This 'climate forcing' differs from the conventionally defined radiative forcing as it includes semi-direct effects that account for certain short timescale responses in the troposphere. Firstly, we calculate a climate feedback term from reported values of 2 x CO{sub 2} radiative forcing and surface temperature time series from 70-year simulations by twenty AOGCMs. In these simulations carbon dioxide is increased by 1%/year. The derived climate feedback agrees well with values that we diagnose from equilibrium climate change experiments of slab-ocean versions of the same models. These climate feedback terms are associated with the fast, quasi-linear response of lapse rate, clouds, water vapor and albedo to global surface temperature changes. The importance of the feedbacks is gauged by their impact on the radiative fluxes at the top of the atmosphere. We find partial compensation between longwave and shortwave feedback terms that lessens the inter-model differences in the equilibrium climate sensitivity. There is also some indication that the AOGCMs overestimate the strength of the positive longwave feedback. These feedback terms are then used to infer the shortwave and longwave time series of climate forcing in 20th and 21st Century simulations in the AOGCMs. We validate the technique using conventionally calculated forcing time series from four AOGCMs. In these AOGCMs the shortwave and longwave climate forcings we diagnose agree with the conventional forcing time series within {approx}10%. The shortwave forcing time series exhibit order of magnitude variations between the AOGCMs, differences likely related to how both natural forcings and/or anthropogenic aerosol effects are included. There are also factor of two differences in the longwave climate forcing time series, which may indicate problems with the modeling of well-mixed-greenhouse-gas changes. The simple diagnoses we present provide an important and useful first step for understanding differences in AOGCM integrations, indicating that some of the differences in model projections can be attributed to different prescribed climate forcing, even for so-called standard climate change scenarios.

  9. A simple segregated flow model for a WAG process

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hopkins, Christopher Wright

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    integration, a volumetric balance of the injectants and the initial reservoir fluids is obtained. The model was developed with several simplifying assumptions including immiscible water and gas phases, incompressible fluid f'low, no trapped oil volumes... with the process are the relatively higher sweep efficiencies of water floods and the low residual oil saturations of miscible gas injection. The mechanism oP water flooding is generally well understood. Many Pields have been and still are being waterflooded...

  10. Use of artificial intelligence for process modeling and control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    You, Yong

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , recurrent neural networks constitute a simple and effective general method for static and dynmnic input-output mocleling of nonlinear systems. Design of a fuzzy logic control system for a biochemical system is also conducted, Fuzzification membership... method for input-output modeling of static and dynamic nonlinear systems vis, recurrent neural nctvvorks (RNNs) and design of a fuzzy logic control svstem for a biochcnzical process system. Simulation results show tha. t RNNs can learn nonlinear ste...

  11. Super-allowed beta-decay rates in 1d5/2 shell in Coriolis coupling model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Sultan Parvez; F. Bary Malik

    2009-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The expression for super-allowed beta-decay transition rates have been derived within the context of Coriolis coupling model. The derived expressions, valid for the beta-decay between any two mirror nuclei, has been applied to calculate super-allowed beta-decay transition rates of 21Na, 21Mg, 21Al, and 21Si. The calculated rates agree well with the data and the calculations done using the shell model with configuration admixture.

  12. Geant4 Model Validation of Compton Suppressed System for Process monitoring of Spent Fuel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bender, Sarah; Unlu, Kenan; Orton, Christopher R.; Schwantes, Jon M.

    2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Nuclear material accountancy is of continuous concern for the regulatory, safeguards, and verification communities. In particular, spent nuclear fuel reprocessing facilities pose one of the most difficult accountancy challenges: monitoring highly radioactive, fluid sample streams in near real-time. The Multi-Isotope Process monitor will allow for near-real-time indication of process alterations using passive gamma-ray detection coupled with multivariate analysis techniques to guard against potential material diversion or to enhance domestic process monitoring. The Compton continuum from the dominant 661.7 keV 137Cs fission product peak obscures lower energy lines which could be used for spectral and multivariate analysis. Compton suppression may be able to mitigate the challenges posed by the high continuum caused by scattering. A Monte Carlo simulation using the Geant4 toolkit is being developed to predict the expected suppressed spectrum from spent fuel samples to estimate the reduction in the Compton continuum. Despite the lack of timing information between decay events in the particle management of Geant4, encouraging results were recorded utilizing only the information within individual decays without accounting for accidental coincidences. The model has been validated with single and cascade decay emitters in two steps: as an unsuppressed system and with suppression activated. Results of the Geant4 model validation will be presented.

  13. Impact of Agricultural Practice on Regional Climate in a CoupledLand Surface Mesoscale Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cooley, H.S.; Riley, W.J.; Torn, M.S.; He, Y.

    2004-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The land surface has been shown to form strong feedbacks with climate due to linkages between atmospheric conditions and terrestrial ecosystem exchanges of energy, momentum, water, and trace gases. Although often ignored in modeling studies, land management itself may form significant feedbacks. Because crops are harvested earlier under drier conditions, regional air temperature, precipitation, and soil moisture, for example, affect harvest timing, particularly of rain-fed crops. This removal of vegetation alters the land surface characteristics and may, in turn, affect regional climate. We applied a coupled climate(MM5) and land-surface (LSM1) model to examine the effects of early and late winter wheat harvest on regional climate in the Department of Energy Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility in the Southern Great Plains, where winter wheat accounts for 20 percent of the land area. Within the winter wheat region, simulated 2 m air temperature was 1.3 C warmer in the Early Harvest scenario at mid-day averaged over the two weeks following harvest. Soils in the harvested area were drier and warmer in the top 10 cm and wetter in the 10-20 cm layer. Midday soils were 2.5 C warmer in the harvested area at mid-day averaged over the two weeks following harvest. Harvest also dramatically altered latent and sensible heat fluxes. Although differences between scenarios diminished once both scenarios were harvested, the short-term impacts of land management on climate were comparable to those from land cover change demonstrated in other studies.

  14. Gaussian Process Model for Collision Dynamics of Complex Molecules

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cui, Jie

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We show that a Gaussian Process model can be combined with a small number of scattering calculations to provide an accurate multi-dimensional dependence of scattering observables on the experimentally controllable parameters (such as the collision energy, temperature or external fields) as well as the potential energy surface parameters. This can be used for solving the inverse scattering problem, the prediction of collision properties of a specific molecular system based on the information for another molecule, the efficient calculation of thermally averaged observables and for reducing the error of the molecular dynamics calculations by averaging over the potential energy surface variations. We show that, trained by a combination of classical and quantum dynamics calculations, the model provides an accurate description of the scattering cross sections, even near scattering resonances. In this case, the classical calculations stabilize the model against uncertainties arising from wildly varying correlations ...

  15. Exploring the effects of a double reconstruction on the geometrical parameters of coupled models, using observational data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Solano, Freddy Cueva

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this work we study the effects of the non-gravitational exchange energy (Q) between dark matter (DM) fluid and dark energy (DE) fluid on the background evolution of the cosmological parameters. A varying equation of state (EOS) parameter, {\\omega}, for DE is proposed. Considering an universe spatially flat, two distinct coupled models were examined to explore the main cosmological effects generated by the simultaneous reconstruction of Q and {\\omega} on the shape of the jerk parameter, j, through a slight enhancement or suppression of their amplitudes with respect to noncoupled scenarios, during its evolution from the past to the near future. In consequence, j could be used to distinguish any coupled DE models. Otherwise, the observational data were used to put stringent constraints on Q and {\\omega}, respectively. In such a way, we used our results as evidences to search possible deviations from the standard concordance model ({\\Lambda}CDM), examining their predictions and improving our knowledge of the c...

  16. Modelling floods in theAmmer catchment:limitations and challenges with a coupled meteo-hydrological model approach Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 7(6), 833847 (2003) EGU

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Modelling floods in theAmmer catchment:limitations and challenges with a coupled meteo-hydrological model approach 833 Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 7(6), 833847 (2003) © EGU Modelling floods in the Ammer catchment: limitations and challenges with a coupled meteo-hydrological model approach R. Ludwig1

  17. Application of Gamma code coupled with turbomachinery models for high temperature gas-cooled reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chang Oh

    2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The very high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (VHTR) is envisioned as a single- or dual-purpose reactor for electricity and hydrogen generation. The concept has average coolant temperatures above 9000C and operational fuel temperatures above 12500C. The concept provides the potential for increased energy conversion efficiency and for high-temperature process heat application in addition to power generation. While all the High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactor (HTGR) concepts have sufficiently high temperature to support process heat applications, such as coal gasification, desalination or cogenerative processes, the VHTR’s higher temperatures allow broader applications, including thermochemical hydrogen production. However, the very high temperatures of this reactor concept can be detrimental to safety if a loss-ofcoolant accident (LOCA) occurs. Following the loss of coolant through the break and coolant depressurization, air will enter the core through the break by molecular diffusion and ultimately by natural convection, leading to oxidation of the in-core graphite structure and fuel. The oxidation will accelerate heatup of the reactor core and the release of a toxic gas, CO, and fission products. Thus, without any effective countermeasures, a pipe break may lead to significant fuel damage and fission product release. Prior to the start of this Korean/United States collaboration, no computer codes were available that had been sufficiently developed and validated to reliably simulate a LOCA in the VHTR. Therefore, we have worked for the past three years on developing and validating advanced computational methods for simulating LOCAs in a VHTR. GAMMA code is being developed to implement turbomachinery models in the power conversion unit (PCU) and ultimately models associated with the hydrogen plant. Some preliminary results will be described in this paper.

  18. Model and Analytic Processes for Export License Assessments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thompson, Sandra E.; Whitney, Paul D.; Weimar, Mark R.; Wood, Thomas W.; Daly, Don S.; Brothers, Alan J.; Sanfilippo, Antonio P.; Cook, Diane; Holder, Larry

    2011-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper represents the Department of Energy Office of Nonproliferation Research and Development (NA-22) Simulations, Algorithms and Modeling (SAM) Program's first effort to identify and frame analytical methods and tools to aid export control professionals in effectively predicting proliferation intent; a complex, multi-step and multi-agency process. The report focuses on analytical modeling methodologies that alone, or combined, may improve the proliferation export control license approval process. It is a follow-up to an earlier paper describing information sources and environments related to international nuclear technology transfer. This report describes the decision criteria used to evaluate modeling techniques and tools to determine which approaches will be investigated during the final 2 years of the project. The report also details the motivation for why new modeling techniques and tools are needed. The analytical modeling methodologies will enable analysts to evaluate the information environment for relevance to detecting proliferation intent, with specific focus on assessing risks associated with transferring dual-use technologies. Dual-use technologies can be used in both weapons and commercial enterprises. A decision-framework was developed to evaluate which of the different analytical modeling methodologies would be most appropriate conditional on the uniqueness of the approach, data availability, laboratory capabilities, relevance to NA-22 and Office of Arms Control and Nonproliferation (NA-24) research needs and the impact if successful. Modeling methodologies were divided into whether they could help micro-level assessments (e.g., help improve individual license assessments) or macro-level assessment. Macro-level assessment focuses on suppliers, technology, consumers, economies, and proliferation context. Macro-level assessment technologies scored higher in the area of uniqueness because less work has been done at the macro level. An approach to developing testable hypotheses for the macro-level assessment methodologies is provided. The outcome of this works suggests that we should develop a Bayes Net for micro-level analysis and continue to focus on Bayes Net, System Dynamics and Economic Input/Output models for assessing macro-level problems. Simultaneously, we need to develop metrics for assessing intent in export control, including the risks and consequences associated with all aspects of export control.

  19. Modeling coupled blast/structure interaction with Zapotec, benchmark calculations for the Conventional Weapon Effects Backfill (CONWEB) tests.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bessette, Gregory Carl

    2004-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Modeling the response of buried reinforced concrete structures subjected to close-in detonations of conventional high explosives poses a challenge for a number of reasons. Foremost, there is the potential for coupled interaction between the blast and structure. Coupling enters the problem whenever the structure deformation affects the stress state in the neighboring soil, which in turn, affects the loading on the structure. Additional challenges for numerical modeling include handling disparate degrees of material deformation encountered in the structure and surrounding soil, modeling the structure details (e.g., modeling the concrete with embedded reinforcement, jointed connections, etc.), providing adequate mesh resolution, and characterizing the soil response under blast loading. There are numerous numerical approaches for modeling this class of problem (e.g., coupled finite element/smooth particle hydrodynamics, arbitrary Lagrange-Eulerian methods, etc.). The focus of this work will be the use of a coupled Euler-Lagrange (CEL) solution approach. In particular, the development and application of a CEL capability within the Zapotec code is described. Zapotec links two production codes, CTH and Pronto3D. CTH, an Eulerian shock physics code, performs the Eulerian portion of the calculation, while Pronto3D, an explicit finite element code, performs the Lagrangian portion. The two codes are run concurrently with the appropriate portions of a problem solved on their respective computational domains. Zapotec handles the coupling between the two domains. The application of the CEL methodology within Zapotec for modeling coupled blast/structure interaction will be investigated by a series of benchmark calculations. These benchmarks rely on data from the Conventional Weapons Effects Backfill (CONWEB) test series. In these tests, a 15.4-lb pipe-encased C-4 charge was detonated in soil at a 5-foot standoff from a buried test structure. The test structure was composed of a reinforced concrete slab bolted to a reaction structure. Both the slab thickness and soil media were varied in the test series. The wealth of data obtained from these tests along with the variations in experimental setups provide ample opportunity to assess the robustness of the Zapotec CEL methodology.

  20. A Review of Ground Coupled Heat Pump Models Used in Whole-Building Computer Simulation Programs 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Do, S. L.; Haberl, J. S.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Increasingly, building owners are turning to ground source heat pump (GSHP) systems to improve energy efficiency. Ground-coupled heat pump (GCHP) systems with a vertical closed ground loop heat exchanger are one of the more widely used systems. Over...

  1. Modeling and characterization of strongly coupled silicon- on-insulator nanophotonic devices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cooper, Michael Lawrence

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Y. Y. Huang, and A. Yariv, “Matrix analysis of microringScheuer, Y. Xu, and A. Yariv, “Designing coupled-resonatorY. Y. Huang, and A. Yariv, “Matrix analysis of microring

  2. A coupled THMC model of a heating and hydration laboratory experiment in unsaturated compacted FEBEX bentonite

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zheng, L.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    R. , Delgado, J. and Montenegro, L. , 2000. CORE 2D : A code5. Samper, J. , Zhang, G. , Montenegro, L. , 2006. CoupledSamper J. , L. Zheng, L. Montenegro, A.M. Fernández, & P.

  3. State estimation of the Labrador Sea with a coupled sea ice-ocean adjoint model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fenty, Ian Gouverneur

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sea ice (SI) and ocean variability in marginal polar and subpolar seas are closely coupled. SI variability in the Labrador Sea is of climatic interest because of its relationship to deep convection/mode water formation, ...

  4. Coupling a Mesoscale Numerical Weather Prediction Model with Large-Eddy Simulation for Realistic Wind Plant Aerodynamics Simulations (Poster)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Draxl, C.; Churchfield, M.; Mirocha, J.; Lee, S.; Lundquist, J.; Michalakes, J.; Moriarty, P.; Purkayastha, A.; Sprague, M.; Vanderwende, B.

    2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Wind plant aerodynamics are influenced by a combination of microscale and mesoscale phenomena. Incorporating mesoscale atmospheric forcing (e.g., diurnal cycles and frontal passages) into wind plant simulations can lead to a more accurate representation of microscale flows, aerodynamics, and wind turbine/plant performance. Our goal is to couple a numerical weather prediction model that can represent mesoscale flow [specifically the Weather Research and Forecasting model] with a microscale LES model (OpenFOAM) that can predict microscale turbulence and wake losses.

  5. Modeling land surface processes of the midwestern United States : predicting soil moisture under a warmer climate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Winter, Jonathan (Jonathan Mark)

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This dissertation seeks to quantify the response of soil moisture to climate change in the midwestern United States. To assess this response, a dynamic global vegetation model, Integrated Biosphere Simulator, was coupled ...

  6. Efficacy-aware Business Process Modeling Matthias Lohrmann and Manfred Reichert

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ulm, Universität

    Efficacy-aware Business Process Modeling Matthias Lohrmann and Manfred Reichert Ulm University. In business process design, business objective models can ful- fill the role of formal requirement definitions for progressive appli- cations like automated process optimization. Key words: Business Process Modeling

  7. Investigating the Correspondence Between Transcriptomic and Proteomic Expression Profiles Using Coupled Cluster Models.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rogers, Simon; Girolami, Mark; Kolch, Walter; Waters, Katrina M.; Liu, Tao; Thrall, Brian D.; Wiley, H. S.

    2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Modern transcriptomics and proteomics enable us to survey the expression of RNAs and proteins at large scales. While these data are usually generated and analysed separately, there is an increasing interest in comparing and co-analysing transcriptome and proteome expression data. A major open question is whether transcriptome and proteome expression is linked and how it is coordinated. Results: Here we have developed a probabilistic clustering model that permits analysis of the links between transcriptomic and proteomic profiles in a sensible and flexible manner. Our coupled mixture model defines a prior probability distribution over the component to which a protein profile should be assigned conditioned on which component the associated mRNA profile belongs to. By providing probabilistic assignments this approach sits between the two extremes of concatenating the data on the assumption that mRNA and protein clusters would have a one-to-one relationship, and independent clustering where the mRNA profile provides no information on the protein profile and vice-versa. We apply this approach to a large dataset of quantitative transcriptomic and proteomic expression data obtained from a human breast epithelial cell line (HMEC) stimulated by epidermal growth factor (EGF) over a series of timepoints corresponding to one cell cycle. The results reveal a complex relationship between transcriptome and proteome with most mRNA clusters linked to at least two protein clusters, and vice versa. A more detailed analysis incorporating information on gene function from the gene ontology database shows that a high correlation of mRNA and protein expression is limited to the components of some molecular machines, such as the ribosome, cell adhesion complexes and the TCP-1 chaperonin involved in protein folding. Conclusions: The dynamic regulation of the transcriptome and proteome in mammalian cells in response to an acute mitogenic stimulus appears largely independent with very little correspondence between mRNA and protein expression. The exceptions involve a few selected multi-protein complexes that require the stoichiometric expression of components for correct function. This finding has wide ramifications regarding the understanding of gene and protein expression including its control and evolution. It also shows that transcriptomic and proteomic expression analysis are complementary and non-redundant.

  8. Business Modelling is not Process Modelling Jaap Gordijn12, Hans Akkermans13, and Hans van Vliet1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Vliet, Hans

    Business Modelling is not Process Modelling Jaap Gordijn12, Hans Akkermans13, and Hans van Vliet1 1 with a design of the e-business model. We often encounter the view, in research as well as industry practice, that an e-business model is similar to a business process model, and so can be specified using UML activity

  9. Coupled Geochemical and Hydrological Processes Governing the Fate and Transport of Radionuclides and Toxic Metals Beneath the Hanford Tank Farms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scott Fendorf; Phil Jardine

    2006-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of this research was to provide an improved understanding and predictive capability of coupled hydrological and geochemical mechanisms that are responsible for the accelerated migration and immobilization of radionuclides and toxic metals in the badose zone beneath the Hanford Tank Farms.

  10. A Quality Based Approach for the Analysis and Design of Business Process Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    A Quality Based Approach for the Analysis and Design of Business Process Models Sarah Ayad1 CEDRIC in modeling and improving Business Process (BP) models quality. This problem is of growing interest exploiting domain knowledge. Keywords-component: Business Process Models, Quality metrics, Quality

  11. Report on Modeling Coupled Processes in the Near Field of a Clay Repository

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, H.-H.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    J-C. (2002) Geological and hydraulic characterization of thegeological, hydrogeological, geochemical, and geotechnical characterization

  12. Report on Modeling Coupled Processes in the Near Field of a Clay Repository

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn April 23, 2014, an OHASeptemberAssessments | Department ofSouthernof theServiceJunean|

  13. Model operating permits for natural gas processing plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arend, C. [Hydro-Search, Inc., Houston, TX (United States)

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Major sources as defined in Title V of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 that are required to submit an operating permit application will need to: Evaluate their compliance status; Determine a strategic method of presenting the general and specific conditions of their Model Operating Permit (MOP); Maintain compliance with air quality regulations. A MOP is prepared to assist permitting agencies and affected facilities in the development of operating permits for a specific source category. This paper includes a brief discussion of example permit conditions that may be applicable to various types of Title V sources. A MOP for a generic natural gas processing plant is provided as an example. The MOP should include a general description of the production process and identify emission sources. The two primary elements that comprise a MOP are: Provisions of all existing state and/or local air permits; Identification of general and specific conditions for the Title V permit. The general provisions will include overall compliance with all Clean Air Act Titles. The specific provisions include monitoring, record keeping, and reporting. Although Title V MOPs are prepared on a case-by-case basis, this paper will provide a general guideline of the requirements for preparation of a MOP. Regulatory agencies have indicated that a MOP included in the Title V application will assist in preparation of the final permit provisions, minimize delays in securing a permit, and provide support during the public notification process.

  14. Modeling the overcharge process of VRLA batteries , G.Q. Wang, C.Y. Wang*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -phase, electrochemical and thermal coupled model is developed for valve-regulated lead±acid (VRLA) batteries. Physical; Mathematical model 1. Introduction Valve-regulated lead±acid (VRLA) batteries are being used to power electric evolution and recom- bination in a lead±acid battery. This model, however, assumes in®nitely rapid transport

  15. Coupling GIS and LCA for biodiversity assessments of land use: Part 1: Inventory modeling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Geyer, Roland; Stoms, David M.; Lindner, Jan P.; Davis, Frank W.; Wittstock, Bastian

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of land use Part 1: Inventory modeling Roland Geyer & Davidthe use of GIS-based inventory modeling to generatedemonstrated that GIS-based inventory modeling of land use

  16. Measurement and modeling of advanced coal conversion processes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Solomon, P.R.; Serio, M.A.; Hamblen, D.G. (Advanced Fuel Research, Inc., East Hartford, CT (United States)); Smoot, L.D.; Brewster, B.S. (Brigham Young Univ., Provo, UT (United States))

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The overall objective of this program is the development of predictive capability for the design, scale up, simulation, control and feedstock evaluation in advanced coal conversion devices. This technology is important to reduce the technical and economic risks inherent in utilizing coal, a feedstock whose variable and often unexpected behavior presents a significant challenge. This program will merge significant advances made at Advanced Fuel Research, Inc. (AFR) in measuring and quantitatively describing the mechanisms in coal conversion behavior, with technology being developed at Brigham Young University (BYU) in comprehensive computer codes for mechanistic modeling of entrained-bed gasification. Additional capabilities in predicting pollutant formation will be implemented and the technology will be expanded to fixed-bed reactors. The foundation to describe coal-specific conversion behavior is AFR's Functional Group (FG) and Devolatilization, Vaporization and Crosslinking (DVC) models, developed under previous and on-going METC sponsored programs. These models have demonstrated the capability to describe the time dependent evolution of individual gas species, and the amount and characteristics of tar and char. The combined FG-DVC model will be integrated with BYU's comprehensive two-dimensional reactor model, PCGC-2, which is currently the most widely used reactor simulation for combustion or gasification. The program includes: (i) validation of the submodels by comparison with laboratory data obtained in this program, (ii) extensive validation of the modified comprehensive code by comparison of predicted results with data from bench-scale and process scale investigations of gasification, mild gasification and combustion of coal or coal-derived products in heat engines, and (iii) development of well documented user friendly software applicable to a workstation'' environment.

  17. Measurement and modeling of advanced coal conversion processes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Solomon, P.R.; Serio, M.A.; Hamblen, D.G. (Advanced Fuel Research, Inc., East Hartford, CT (United States)) [Advanced Fuel Research, Inc., East Hartford, CT (United States); Smoot, L.D.; Brewster, B.S. (Brigham Young Univ., Provo, UT (United States)) [Brigham Young Univ., Provo, UT (United States)

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The overall objective of this program is the development of predictive capability for the design, scale up, simulation, control and feedstock evaluation in advanced coal conversion devices. This technology is important to reduce the technical and economic risks inherent in utilizing coal, a feedstock whose variable and often unexpected behavior presents a significant challenge. This program will merge significant advances made at Advanced Fuel Research, Inc. (AFR) in measuring and quantitatively describing the mechanisms in coal conversion behavior, with technology being developed at Brigham Young University (BYU) in comprehensive computer codes for mechanistic modeling of entrained-bed gasification. Additional capabilities in predicting pollutant formation will be implemented and the technology will be expanded to fixed-bed reactors. The foundation to describe coal-specified conversion behavior is ARF's Functional Group (FG) and Devolatilization, Vaporization, and Crosslinking (DVC) models, developed under previous and on-going METC sponsored programs. These models have demonstrated the capability to describe the time dependent evolution of individual gas species, and the amount and characteristics of tar and char. The combined FG-DVC model will be integrated with BYU's comprehensive two-dimensional reactor model, PCGC-2, which is currently the most widely used reactor simulation for combustion or gasification. The program includes: (1) validation of the submodels by comparison with laboratory data obtained in this program, (2) extensive validation of the modified comprehensive code by comparison of predicted results with data from bench-scale and process scale investigations of gasification, mild gasification and combustion of coal or coal-derived products in heat engines, and (3) development of well documented user friendly software applicable to a workstation'' environment.

  18. Modeling Dispersive Coupling and Losses of Localized Optical and Mechanical Modes in Optomechanical Crystals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eichenfield, Matt; Safavi-Naeini, Amir H; Vahala, Kerry J; Painter, Oskar

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Periodically structured materials can sustain both optical and mechanical excitations which are tailored by the geometry. Here we analyze the properties of dispersively coupled planar photonic and phononic crystals: optomechanical crystals. In particular, the properties of co-resonant optical and mechanical cavities in quasi-1D (patterned nanobeam) and quasi-2D (patterned membrane) geometries are studied. It is shown that the mechanical Q and optomechanical coupling in these structures can vary by many orders of magnitude with modest changes in geometry. An intuitive picture is developed based upon a perturbation theory for shifting material boundaries that allows the optomechanical properties to be designed and optimized. Several designs are presented with mechanical frequency ~ 1-10 GHz, optical Q-factor Qo > 10^7, motional masses meff 100 femtograms, optomechanical coupling length LOM 10^7.

  19. Statistical Modeling of Marked Point Processes and (Ultra-)High Frequency Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wen, Musen

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the ACD model with a GARCH model for prices, Engle [25]these, the Generalized ARCH (GARCH) model by Bollerslev [11]in practice. Definition 3.7 (GARCH(r, s) model) A process {z

  20. Diagnostics and modeling of plasma processes in ion sources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vertes, Akos

    radiation (inductively coupled plasma (ICI'), microwave-induced plasma (MU'), pulsed laser). The present-8), radiofrequency (9) and microwave ion sources (10-12) are under intense investigation. Diligent research

  1. Modeling of inductively coupled plasma SF{sub 6}/O{sub 2}/Ar plasma discharge: Effect of O{sub 2} on the plasma kinetic properties

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pateau, Amand [Institut des Matériaux Jean Rouxel, Université de Nantes, 2 rue de la Houssiniére 44322 Nantes, France and ST Microelectronics, 10 rue Thals de Milet, 37071 Tours (France); Rhallabi, Ahmed, E-mail: ahmed.rhallabi@univ-nantes.fr; Fernandez, Marie-Claude [Institut des Matériaux Jean Rouxel, Université de Nantes, 2 rue de la Houssiniére 44322 Nantes (France); Boufnichel, Mohamed; Roqueta, Fabrice [ST Microelectronics, 10 rue Thales de Milet, 37071 Tours (France)

    2014-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A global model has been developed for low-pressure, inductively coupled plasma (ICP) SF{sub 6}/O{sub 2}/Ar mixtures. This model is based on a set of mass balance equations for all the considered species, coupled with the discharge power balance equation and the charge neutrality condition. The present study is an extension of the kinetic global model previously developed for SF{sub 6}/Ar ICP plasma discharges [Lallement et al., Plasma Sources Sci. Technol. 18, 025001 (2009)]. It is focused on the study of the impact of the O{sub 2} addition to the SF{sub 6}/Ar gas mixture on the plasma kinetic properties. The simulation results show that the electron density increases with the %O{sub 2}, which is due to the decrease of the plasma electronegativity, while the electron temperature is almost constant in our pressure range. The density evolutions of atomic fluorine and oxygen versus %O{sub 2} have been analyzed. Those atomic radicals play an important role in the silicon etching process. The atomic fluorine density increases from 0 up to 40% O{sub 2} where it reaches a maximum. This is due to the enhancement of the SF{sub 6} dissociation processes and the production of fluorine through the reactions between SF{sub x} and O. This trend is experimentally confirmed. On the other hand, the simulation results show that O(3p) is the preponderant atomic oxygen. Its density increases with %O{sub 2} until reaching a maximum at almost 40% O{sub 2}. Over this value, its diminution with O{sub 2}% can be justified by the high increase in the loss frequency of O(3p) by electronic impact in comparison to its production frequency by electronic impact with O{sub 2}.

  2. NEUTRINO-COOLED ACCRETION MODEL WITH MAGNETIC COUPLING FOR X-RAY FLARES IN GAMMA-RAY BURSTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Luo Yang; Gu Weimin; Liu Tong; Lu Jufu, E-mail: guwm@xmu.edu.cn [Department of Astronomy and Institute of Theoretical Physics and Astrophysics, Xiamen University, Xiamen, Fujian 361005 (China)

    2013-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The neutrino-cooled accretion disk, which was proposed to work as the central engine of gamma-ray bursts, encounters difficulty in interpreting the X-ray flares after the prompt gamma-ray emission. In this paper, the magnetic coupling (MC) between the inner disk and the central black hole (BH) is taken into consideration. For mass accretion rates around 0.001 {approx} 0.1 M{sub Sun} s{sup -1}, our results show that the luminosity of neutrino annihilation can be significantly enhanced due to the coupling effects. As a consequence, after the gamma-ray emission, a remnant disk with mass M{sub disk} {approx}< 0.5 M{sub Sun} may power most of the observed X-ray flares with the rest frame duration less than 100 s. In addition, a comparison between the MC process and the Blandford-Znajek mechanism is shown on the extraction of BH rotational energy.

  3. A coupled THMC model of a heating and hydration laboratory experiment in unsaturated compacted FEBEX bentonite

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zheng, L.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    processes taking place during aqueous extraction. Identification of GM requires knowing: 1) Aqueous complexes, 2) Mineral

  4. Viscosity of hadron matter within relativistic mean-field based model with scaled hadron masses and couplings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. S. Khvorostukhin; V. D. Toneev; D. N. Voskresensky

    2009-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The shear ($\\eta$) and bulk ($\\zeta$) viscosities are calculated in a quasiparticle relaxation time approximation for a hadron matter described within the relativistic mean-field based model with scaled hadron masses and couplings. Comparison with results of other models is presented. We demonstrate that a small value of the shear viscosity to entropy density ratio required for explaining a large elliptic flow observed at RHIC may be reached in the hadron phase. Large values of the bulk viscosity are noted in case of the baryon enriched matter.

  5. Modeling Wettability Alteration using Chemical EOR Processes in Naturally Fractured Reservoirs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mojdeh Delshad; Gary A. Pope; Kamy Sepehrnoori

    2007-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of our search is to develop a mechanistic simulation tool by adapting UTCHEM to model the wettability alteration in both conventional and naturally fractured reservoirs. This will be a unique simulator that can model surfactant floods in naturally fractured reservoir with coupling of wettability effects on relative permeabilities, capillary pressure, and capillary desaturation curves. The capability of wettability alteration will help us and others to better understand and predict the oil recovery mechanisms as a function of wettability in naturally fractured reservoirs. The lack of a reliable simulator for wettability alteration means that either the concept that has already been proven to be effective in the laboratory scale may never be applied commercially to increase oil production or the process must be tested in the field by trial and error and at large expense in time and money. The objective of Task 1 is to perform a literature survey to compile published data on relative permeability, capillary pressure, dispersion, interfacial tension, and capillary desaturation curve as a function of wettability to aid in the development of petrophysical property models as a function of wettability. The new models and correlations will be tested against published data. The models will then be implemented in the compositional chemical flooding reservoir simulator, UTCHEM. The objective of Task 2 is to understand the mechanisms and develop a correlation for the degree of wettability alteration based on published data. The objective of Task 3 is to validate the models and implementation against published data and to perform 3-D field-scale simulations to evaluate the impact of uncertainties in the fracture and matrix properties on surfactant alkaline and hot water floods.

  6. SIMULATING THE FEASIBILITY AND PERFORMANCE OF A REALTIME WATER MARKET BY COUPLING AN AGENTBASED MODEL AND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Zong-Liang

    without artificial irrigation (bushel/acre) : maximum yield without water shortage(bushel/acre) : maximumSIMULATING THE FEASIBILITY AND PERFORMANCE OF A REALTIME WATER MARKET BY COUPLING AN AGENTBASED Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana­Champaign Erhu Du1, Barbara Minsker1 and Ximing Cai1, Water

  7. Modeling of diffusion of injected electron spins in spin-orbit coupled microchannels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zarbo, Liviu P.; Sinova, Jairo; Knezevic, I.; Wunderlich, J.; Jungwirth, T.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on a theoretical study of spin dynamics of an ensemble of spin-polarized electrons injected in a diffusive microchannel with linear Rashba and Dresselhaus spin-orbit coupling. We explore the dependence of the spin-precession and spin...

  8. A Parallel Training Algorithm for Hierarchical Pitman-Yor Process Language Models 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Songfang; Renals, Steve

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Hierarchical Pitman Yor Process Language Model (HPYLM) is a Bayesian language model based on a non-parametric prior, the Pitman-Yor Process. It has been demonstrated, both theoretically and practically, that the HPYLM can provide better...

  9. Adaptive model predictive process control using neural networks

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Buescher, Kevin L. (Los Alamos, NM); Baum, Christopher C. (Mazomanie, WI); Jones, Roger D. (Espanola, NM)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A control system for controlling the output of at least one plant process output parameter is implemented by adaptive model predictive control using a neural network. An improved method and apparatus provides for sampling plant output and control input at a first sampling rate to provide control inputs at the fast rate. The MPC system is, however, provided with a network state vector that is constructed at a second, slower rate so that the input control values used by the MPC system are averaged over a gapped time period. Another improvement is a provision for on-line training that may include difference training, curvature training, and basis center adjustment to maintain the weights and basis centers of the neural in an updated state that can follow changes in the plant operation apart from initial off-line training data.

  10. Air pollution modelling using a graphics processing unit with CUDA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Molnar, Ferenc; Meszaros, Robert; Lagzi, Istvan; 10.1016/j.cpc.2009.09.008

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Graphics Processing Unit (GPU) is a powerful tool for parallel computing. In the past years the performance and capabilities of GPUs have increased, and the Compute Unified Device Architecture (CUDA) - a parallel computing architecture - has been developed by NVIDIA to utilize this performance in general purpose computations. Here we show for the first time a possible application of GPU for environmental studies serving as a basement for decision making strategies. A stochastic Lagrangian particle model has been developed on CUDA to estimate the transport and the transformation of the radionuclides from a single point source during an accidental release. Our results show that parallel implementation achieves typical acceleration values in the order of 80-120 times compared to CPU using a single-threaded implementation on a 2.33 GHz desktop computer. Only very small differences have been found between the results obtained from GPU and CPU simulations, which are comparable with the effect of stochastic tran...

  11. Adaptive model predictive process control using neural networks

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Buescher, K.L.; Baum, C.C.; Jones, R.D.

    1997-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

    A control system for controlling the output of at least one plant process output parameter is implemented by adaptive model predictive control using a neural network. An improved method and apparatus provides for sampling plant output and control input at a first sampling rate to provide control inputs at the fast rate. The MPC system is, however, provided with a network state vector that is constructed at a second, slower rate so that the input control values used by the MPC system are averaged over a gapped time period. Another improvement is a provision for on-line training that may include difference training, curvature training, and basis center adjustment to maintain the weights and basis centers of the neural in an updated state that can follow changes in the plant operation apart from initial off-line training data. 46 figs.

  12. FINGERPRINTING INORGANIC ARSENIC AND ORGANOARSENIC COMPOUNDS IN IN SITU OIL SHALE RETORT AND PROCESS VOTERS USING A LIQUID CHROMATOGRAPH COUPLED WITH AN ATOMIC ABSORPTION SPECTROMETER AS A DETECTOR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fish, Richard H.; Brinckman, Frederick E.; Jewett, Kenneth L.

    1981-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Inorganic arsenic and organoarsenic compounds were speciated in seven oil shale retort and process waters, including samples from simulated, true and modified in situ processes, using a high performance liquid chromatograph automatically coupled to a graphite furnace atomic absorption detector. The molecular forms of arsenic at ppm levels (({micro}g/mL) in these waters are identified for the first time, and shown to include arsenate, methylarsonic acid and phenylarsonic acid. An arsenic-specific fingerprint chromatogram of each retort or process water studied has significant impliestions regarding those arsenical species found and those marginally detected, such as dimethylarsinic acid and the suspected carcinogen arsenite. The method demonstrated suggests future means for quantifying environmental impacts of bioactive organometal species involved in oil shale retorting technology.

  13. Pajarito Plateau Groundwater Flow and Transport Modeling Process-Level and Systems Models of Groundwater Flow and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lu, Zhiming

    Pajarito Plateau Groundwater Flow and Transport Modeling 1 Process-Level and Systems Models of Groundwater Flow and Transport Beneath the Pajarito Plateau: Migration of High Explosives from Technical Area Groundwater Modeling Project Systems Model Vadose Zone Model Regional Aquifer Model #12;Pajarito Plateau

  14. From land use to land cover: Restoring the afforestation signal in a coupled integrated assessment - earth system model and the implications for CMIP5 RCP simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Di Vittorio, Alan; Chini, Louise M.; Bond-Lamberty, Benjamin; Mao, Jiafu; Shi, Xiaoying; Truesdale, John E.; Craig, Anthony P.; Calvin, Katherine V.; Jones, Andrew D.; Collins, William D.; Edmonds, James A.; Hurtt, George; Thornton, Peter E.; Thomson, Allison M.

    2014-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Climate projections depend on scenarios of fossil fuel emissions and land use change, and the IPCC AR5 parallel process assumes consistent climate scenarios across Integrated Assessment and Earth System Models (IAMs and ESMs). To facilitate consistency, CMIP5 used a novel land use harmonization to provide ESMs with seamless, 1500-2100 land use trajectories generated by historical data and four IAMs. However, we have identified and partially addressed a major gap in the CMIP5 land coupling design. The CMIP5 Community ESM (CESM) global afforestation is only 22% of RCP4.5 afforestation from 2005 to 2100. Likewise, only 17% of the Global Change Assessment Model’s (GCAM’s) 2040 RCP4.5 afforestation signal, and none of the pasture loss, were transmitted to CESM within a newly integrated model. This is a critical problem because afforestation is necessary for achieving the RCP4.5 climate stabilization. We attempted to rectify this problem by modifying only the ESM component of the integrated model, enabling CESM to simulate 66% of GCAM’s afforestation in 2040, and 94% of GCAM’s pasture loss as grassland and shrubland losses. This additional afforestation increases vegetation carbon gain by 19 PgC and decreases atmospheric CO2 gain by 8 ppmv from 2005 to 2040, implying different climate scenarios between CMIP5 GCAM and CESM. Similar inconsistencies likely exist in other CMIP5 model results, primarily because land cover information is not shared between models, with possible contributions from afforestation exceeding model-specific, potentially viable forest area. Further work to harmonize land cover among models will be required to adequately rectify this problem.

  15. Uranium Removal from Groundwater via In Situ Biostimulation: Field-Scale Modeling of Transport and Biological Processes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yabusaki, Steven B.; Fang, Yilin; Long, Philip E.; Resch, Charles T.; Peacock, Aaron D.; Komlos, John; Jaffe, Peter R.; Morrison, Stan J.; Dayvault, Richard; White, David C.; Anderson, Robert T.

    2007-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

    During 2002 and 2003, bioremediation experiments in the unconfined aquifer of the Old Rifle UMTRA field site in western Colorado provided evidence for the immobilization of hexavalent uranium in groundwater by iron-reducing Geobacter sp. stimulated by acetate amendment. As the bioavailable Fe(III) terminal electron acceptor was depleted in the zone just downgradient of the acetate injection gallery, sulfate-reducing organisms came to dominate the microbial community. In the present study, we use multicomponent reactive transport modeling to analyze data from the 2002 field experiment to 1) identify the dominant transport and biological processes controlling uranium mobility during biostimulation, 2) determine field-scale parameters for these modeled processes, and 3) apply the calibrated process models to history match observations during the 2003 field experiment. In spite of temporally and spatially variable observations during the field-scale biostimulation experiments, the coupled process simulation approach was able to establish a quantitative characterization of the principal flow, transport, and reaction processes that could be applied without modification to describe the 2003 field experiment. Insights gained from this analysis include field-scale estimates of bioavailable Fe(III) mineral, and the magnitude of uranium bioreduction during biostimulated growth of the iron-reducing and sulfate-reducing microorganisms.

  16. Toward a Time-centric modeling of Business Processes in BPMN 2.0

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Toward a Time-centric modeling of Business Processes in BPMN 2.0 Saoussen Cheikhrouhou Re, regulatory, and managerial rules. One of the most promising standards for business process model- ing, namely the Business process Model and notation BPMN poorly addresses the time dimension so far. In this paper, we

  17. A Role-Based Framework for Business Process Modeling Artur Caetano1,2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A Role-Based Framework for Business Process Modeling Artur Caetano1,2 , Marielba Zacarias2 to business process modeling do not separate the collaborative aspects of a business object from its internal increasing the understandability and reusability of business process models. This approach makes use

  18. Business Excellence '03 A Supporting Tool for Business Process Modeling Castela, Tribolet, Guerra, Lopes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Business Excellence '03 A Supporting Tool for Business Process Modeling Castela, Tribolet, Guerra, Lopes A SUPPORTING TOOL FOR BUSINESS PROCESS MODELING Nuno Castela* INESC-CEO / Instituto Politécnico de It is largely recognized that Business Process Modeling it is an increasingly task for nowadays organizations

  19. A Model-driven Approach to Designing Cross-enterprise Business Processes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bauer, Bernhard

    A Model-driven Approach to Designing Cross- enterprise Business Processes Bernhard Bauer1, Jörg P.p.mueller@siemens.com Abstract. Modeling and managing business processes that span multiple or- ganizations involves new for interoperability. In this paper, we present an approach to modeling cross-enterprise business processes based

  20. A Pattern-based Approach to Business Process Modeling and Implementation in Web Services

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bordbar, Behzad

    A Pattern-based Approach to Business Process Modeling and Implementation in Web Services Steen are used for tool based model transformations of the business processes. To support our approach, we shall effort of different groups of experts; business analysts model the process at a high conceptual level

  1. MODELING RESULTS FROM CESIUM ION EXCHANGE PROCESSING WITH SPHERICAL RESINS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nash, C.; Hang, T.; Aleman, S.

    2011-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Ion exchange modeling was conducted at the Savannah River National Laboratory to compare the performance of two organic resins in support of Small Column Ion Exchange (SCIX). In-tank ion exchange (IX) columns are being considered for cesium removal at Hanford and the Savannah River Site (SRS). The spherical forms of resorcinol formaldehyde ion exchange resin (sRF) as well as a hypothetical spherical SuperLig{reg_sign} 644 (SL644) are evaluated for decontamination of dissolved saltcake wastes (supernates). Both SuperLig{reg_sign} and resorcinol formaldehyde resin beds can exhibit hydraulic problems in their granular (nonspherical) forms. SRS waste is generally lower in potassium and organic components than Hanford waste. Using VERSE-LC Version 7.8 along with the cesium Freundlich/Langmuir isotherms to simulate the waste decontamination in ion exchange columns, spherical SL644 was found to reduce column cycling by 50% for high-potassium supernates, but sRF performed equally well for the lowest-potassium feeds. Reduced cycling results in reduction of nitric acid (resin elution) and sodium addition (resin regeneration), therefore, significantly reducing life-cycle operational costs. These findings motivate the development of a spherical form of SL644. This work demonstrates the versatility of the ion exchange modeling to study the effects of resin characteristics on processing cycles, rates, and cold chemical consumption. The value of a resin with increased selectivity for cesium over potassium can be assessed for further development.

  2. THE CARBON-LAND MODEL INTERCOMPARISON PROJECT (C-LAMP): A PROTOTYPE FOR COUPLED BIOSPHERE-ATMOSPHERE MODEL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hoffman, Forrest M.

    often referred to as Earth System Models (ESMs). While a number of terrestrial and ocean carbon models

  3. Application of Gaussian Process Modeling to Analysis of Functional Unreliability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R. Youngblood

    2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper applies Gaussian Process (GP) modeling to analysis of the functional unreliability of a “passive system.” GPs have been used widely in many ways [1]. The present application uses a GP for emulation of a system simulation code. Such an emulator can be applied in several distinct ways, discussed below. All applications illustrated in this paper have precedents in the literature; the present paper is an application of GP technology to a problem that was originally analyzed [2] using neural networks (NN), and later [3, 4] by a method called “Alternating Conditional Expectations” (ACE). This exercise enables a multifaceted comparison of both the processes and the results. Given knowledge of the range of possible values of key system variables, one could, in principle, quantify functional unreliability by sampling from their joint probability distribution, and performing a system simulation for each sample to determine whether the function succeeded for that particular setting of the variables. Using previously available system simulation codes, such an approach is generally impractical for a plant-scale problem. It has long been recognized, however, that a well-trained code emulator or surrogate could be used in a sampling process to quantify certain performance metrics, even for plant-scale problems. “Response surfaces” were used for this many years ago. But response surfaces are at their best for smoothly varying functions; in regions of parameter space where key system performance metrics may behave in complex ways, or even exhibit discontinuities, response surfaces are not the best available tool. This consideration was one of several that drove the work in [2]. In the present paper, (1) the original quantification of functional unreliability using NN [2], and later ACE [3], is reprised using GP; (2) additional information provided by the GP about uncertainty in the limit surface, generally unavailable in other representations, is discussed; (3) a simple forensic exercise is performed, analogous to the inverse problem of code calibration, but with an accident management spin: given an observation about containment pressure, what can we say about the system variables? References 1. For an introduction to GPs, see (for example) Gaussian Processes for Machine Learning, C. E. Rasmussen and C. K. I. Williams (MIT, 2006). 2. Reliability Quantification of Advanced Reactor Passive Safety Systems, J. J. Vandenkieboom, PhD Thesis (University of Michigan, 1996). 3. Z. Cui, J. C. Lee, J. J. Vandenkieboom, and R. W. Youngblood, “Unreliability Quantification of a Containment Cooling System through ACE and ANN Algorithms,” Trans. Am. Nucl. Soc. 85, 178 (2001). 4. Risk and Safety Analysis of Nuclear Systems, J. C. Lee and N. J. McCormick (Wiley, 2011). See especially §11.2.4.

  4. Reducing Computational Cost and Allowing Automatic Remeshing in FEM Models of Metal Forming Coupled With

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    are validated against experiment by considering compression of a textured aluminium alloy (AA7175). The model

  5. Enabling a User-Friendly Visualization of Business Process Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ulm, Universität

    complex business pro- cesses. Engineering processes in the automotive domain, for example, may comprise processes [1]. Engineering processes in the automotive domain [2], for example, may comprise hundreds engineering process from the automotive domain. Note that the example only serves for illustration purposes

  6. Sensitivity Analysis of Optimal Operation of an Activated Sludge Process Model for Economic Controlled Variable Selection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Skogestad, Sigurd

    Sensitivity Analysis of Optimal Operation of an Activated Sludge Process Model for Economic operation conducted on an activated sludge process model based on the test-bed benchmark simulation model no. 1 (BSM1) and the activated sludge model no. 1 (ASM1). The objective is to search for a control

  7. A Categorization of Collaborative Business Process Modeling Techniques Stephan Roser, Bernhard Bauer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bauer, Bernhard

    A Categorization of Collaborative Business Process Modeling Techniques Stephan Roser, Bernhard [roser, bauer]@informatik.uni-augsburg.de Abstract Business Process Modeling (BPM) is one of the key a categorization for the classification of modeling languages and ap- proaches used to model collaborative business

  8. Chapter 4: Refrigeration Process Control: Simulation Model 64 44.. RREEFFRRIIGGEERRAATTIIOONN PPRROOCCEESSSS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Skogestad, Sigurd

    Chapter 4: Refrigeration Process Control: Simulation Model 64 44.. RREEFFRRIIGGEERRAATTIIOONN of the simulation model for the two-stage refrigeration system is presented. The model is based on the mathematical, it is #12;Chapter 4: Refrigeration Process Control: Simulation Model 65 translated into FORTRAN or C

  9. A comparative simulation study of coupled THM processes and their effect on fractured rock permeability around nuclear waste repositories

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rutqvist, Jonny

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    European countries. The initial rock properties for the twoinduced changes in rock properties. The purpose of the model3. Some basic THM rock properties Parameter Bulk Density, [

  10. Kinetics and radiative processes in Xe/I{sub 2} inductively coupled rf discharges at low pressure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barnes, P.N.; Verdeyen, J.T.; Kushner, M.J. [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana, IL (United States). Dept. of Electrical and Computer Engineering

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The environmental concern over the presence of mercury in conventional fluorescent lamps has motivated research into alternative electrically efficient near UV plasma lighting sources. One such candidate is multi-wavelength UV emission from Xe/I{sub 2} mixtures, including excimer radiation from XeI at 253 nm. Previous studies of the XeI system were performed at high pressures and were intended for laser applications. Practical Xe/I{sub 2} lamps will likely operate in the 0.5--10 torr regime and use electrodeless excitation to avoid issues related to electrode erosion by the halogen. In this paper, the authors report on an experimental investigation of low pressure, inductively coupled plasmas sustained in Xe/I{sub 2} mixtures. The goals of this work are to characterize the UV emission and determine excitation mechanisms in a parameter space of interest to lighting applications.

  11. Modeling of Glass Making Processes for Improved Efficiency

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomas P. Seward III

    2003-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The overall goal of this project was to develop a high-temperature melt properties database with sufficient reliability to allow mathematical modeling of glass melting and forming processes for improved product quality, improved efficiency and lessened environmental impact. It was initiated by the United States glass industry through the NSF Industry/University Center for Glass Research (CGR) at Alfred University [1]. Because of their important commercial value, six different types/families of glass were studied: container, float, fiberglass (E- and wool-types), low-expansion borosilicate, and color TV panel glasses. CGR member companies supplied production-quality glass from all six families upon which we measured, as a function of temperature in the molten state, density, surface tension, viscosity, electrical resistivity, infrared transmittance (to determine high temperature radiative conductivity), non-Newtonian flow behavior, and oxygen partial pres sure. With CGR cost sharing, we also studied gas solubility and diffusivity in each of these glasses. Because knowledge of the compositional dependencies of melt viscosity and electrical resistivity are extremely important for glass melting furnace design and operation, these properties were studied more fully. Composition variations were statistically designed for all six types/families of glass. About 140 different glasses were then melted on a laboratory scale and their viscosity and electrical resistivity measured as a function of temperature. The measurements were completed in February 2003 and are reported on here. The next steps will be (1) to statistically analyze the compositional dependencies of viscosity and electrical resistivity and develop composition-property response surfaces, (2) submit all the data to CGR member companies to evaluate the usefulness in their models, and (3) publish the results in technical journals and most likely in book form.

  12. Nuclear $\\beta$-decay half-lives in the relativistic point-coupling model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Z Y; Niu, Y F; Guo, J Y

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The self-consistent proton-neutron quasiparticle random phase approximation approach is employed to calculate $\\beta$-decay half-lives of neutron-rich even-even nuclei with $8\\leqslant Z \\leqslant 30$. A newly proposed nonlinear point-coupling effective interaction PC-PK1 is used in the calculations. It is found that the isoscalar proton-neutron pairing interaction can significantly reduce $\\beta$-decay half-lives. With an isospin-dependent isoscalar proton-neutron pairing strength, our results well reproduce the experimental $\\beta$-decay half-lives, although the pairing strength is not adjusted using the half-lives calculated in this study.

  13. A Multiscale Model for Coupled Heat Conduction and Deformations of Viscoelastic Composites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Khan, Kamran Ahmed

    2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    This study introduces a multiscale model for analyzing nonlinear thermo-viscoelastic responses of particulate composites. A simplified micromechanical model consisting of four sub-cells, i.e., one particle and three matrix sub-cells is formulated...

  14. ORIGINAL ARTICLE A Constitutive Model For the Warp-Weft Coupled Non-linear

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reddy, Batmanathan Dayanand "Daya"

    ) on the development of airship fabrics. However, the first real model for fabric forces was presented by Peirce (1937

  15. A numerical model for the coupled long-term evolution of salt marshes and tidal flats

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fagherazzi, Sergio

    -shore mudflat model that takes into account tidal effects; Waeles et al. [2004] incor- porated in the same

  16. RIS-M-2357 MULTILEVEL FLOW MODELLING OF PROCESS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of complex systems. A model of a nuclear power plant (PWR) is presented in the paper for illustration. Due SPECIFICATIONS 19 A MULTILEVEL FLOW MODEL OF A PWR 22 APPLICATIONS OF MULTILEVEL FLOW MODELS 24 ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

  17. Materials Science & Metallurgy Master of Philosophy, Materials Modelling, Course MP10, Process Modelling, H. K. D. H. Bhadeshia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cambridge, University of

    Materials Science & Metallurgy Master of Philosophy, Materials Modelling, Course MP10, Process.­E. Svensson. The metallurgy of the welded joint can be categorised into two major regions, the fusion zone

  18. Modeling a Dry Etch Process for Large-Area Devices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buss, R.J.; Hebner, G.A.; Ruby, D.S.; Yang, P.

    1999-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

    There has been considerable interest in developing dry processes which can effectively replace wet processing in the manufacture of large area photovoltaic devices. Environmental and health issues are a driver for this activity because wet processes generally increase worker exposure to toxic and hazardous chemicals and generate large volumes of liquid hazardous waste. Our work has been directed toward improving the performance of screen-printed solar cells while using plasma processing to reduce hazardous chemical usage.

  19. Paper Number -1-Simulation model of dispersions in turning process

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    -francois.rigal@insa-lyon.fr Abstract: To control and to optimise the product/process pair, manufacturing companies are more and more production from the design to the manufacturing process. The control of geometrical specifications inside important aim of the virtual or numerical simulation of process planning is to study and take into account

  20. Study of the digital camera acquisition process and statistical modeling of the sensor raw data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Study of the digital camera acquisition process and statistical modeling of the sensor raw data C. In the present report we present a detailed analysis of the digital image acquisition process which allows us. Aguerrebere, J. Delon, Y. Gousseau, P. Mus´e 1 Introduction The accurate modeling of the acquisition process