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1

Distant origins of Arctic black carbon: A Goddard Institute for Space Studies ModelE experiment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

[Wallace and Thompson, 2002]. The Arctic climate is especially sensitive to changes in the hydrological005296. 1. Introduction [2] The Arctic is a particularly sensitive region to global climate change. Observations and models indicate that as the climate warms, the Arctic warms most and fastest [e.g., Manabe et

2

arXiv:1408.2487v2[physics.ao-ph]22Aug2014 Ising model for melt ponds on Arctic sea ice  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

arXiv:1408.2487v2[physics.ao-ph]22Aug2014 Ising model for melt ponds on Arctic sea ice Yi-Ping Ma,1, USA The albedo of melting Arctic sea ice, a key parameter in climate modeling, is determined by pools of water on the ice surface. Recent observations show an onset of pond complexity at a critical area

Golden, Kenneth M.

3

Arctic sea ice modeling with the material-point method.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Arctic sea ice plays an important role in global climate by reflecting solar radiation and insulating the ocean from the atmosphere. Due to feedback effects, the Arctic sea ice cover is changing rapidly. To accurately model this change, high-resolution calculations must incorporate: (1) annual cycle of growth and melt due to radiative forcing; (2) mechanical deformation due to surface winds, ocean currents and Coriolis forces; and (3) localized effects of leads and ridges. We have demonstrated a new mathematical algorithm for solving the sea ice governing equations using the material-point method with an elastic-decohesive constitutive model. An initial comparison with the LANL CICE code indicates that the ice edge is sharper using Materials-Point Method (MPM), but that many of the overall features are similar.

Peterson, Kara J.; Bochev, Pavel Blagoveston

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

A Sensitivity Study on Modeling Black Carbon in Snow and its Radiative Forcing over the Arctic and Northern China  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Black carbon in snow (BCS) simulated in the Community Atmosphere Model (CAM5) is evaluated against measurements over Northern China and the Arctic, and its sensitivity to atmospheric deposition and two parameters that affect post-depositional enrichment is explored. The BCS concentration is overestimated (underestimated) by a factor of two in Northern China (Arctic) in the default model, but agreement with observations is good over both regions in the simulation with improvements in BC transport and deposition. Sensitivity studies indicate that uncertainty in the melt-water scavenging efficiency (MSE) parameter substantially affects BCS and its radiative forcing (by a factor of 2-7) in the Arctic through post-depositional enrichment. The MSE parameter has a relatively small effect on the magnitude of BCS seasonal cycle but can alter its phase in Northern China. The impact of the snow aging scaling factor (SAF) on BCS, partly through the post-depositional enrichment effect, shows more complex latitudinal and seasonal dependence. Similar to MSE, SAF affects more significantly the magnitude (phase) of BCS season cycle over the Arctic (Northern China). While uncertainty associated with the representation of BC transport and deposition processes in CAM5 is more important than that associated with the two snow model parameters in Northern China, the two uncertainties have comparable effect in the Arctic.

Qian, Yun; Wang, Hailong; Zhang, Rudong; Flanner, M. G.; Rasch, Philip J.

2014-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

5

Mesoscale Modeling During Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Mixed-phase arctic stratus clouds are the predominant cloud type in the Arctic (Curry et al. 2000) and through various feedback mechanisms exert a strong influence on the Arctic climate. Perhaps one of the most intriguing of their features is that they tend to have liquid tops that precipitate ice. Despite the fact that this situation is colloidally unstable, these cloud systems are quite long lived - from a few days to over a couple of weeks. It has been hypothesized that mixed-phase clouds are maintained through a balance between liquid water condensation resulting from the cloud-top radiative cooling and ice removal by precipitation (Pinto 1998; Harrington et al. 1999). In their modeling study Harrington et al. (1999) found that the maintenance of this balance depends strongly on the ambient concentration of ice forming nucleus (IFN). In a follow-up study, Jiang et al. (2002), using only 30% of IFN concentration predicted by Meyers et al. (1992) IFN parameterization were able to obtain results similar to the observations reported by Pinto (1998). The IFN concentration measurements collected during the Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment (M-PACE), conducted in October 2004 over the North Slope of Alaska and the Beaufort Sea (Verlinde et al. 2005), also showed much lower values then those predicted (Prenne, pers. comm.) by currently accepted ice nucleation parameterizations (e.g. Meyers et al. 1992). The goal of this study is to use the extensive IFN data taken during M-PACE to examine what effects low IFN concentrations have on mesoscale cloud structure and coastal dynamics.

Avramov, A.; Harringston, J.Y.; Verlinde, J.

2005-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

6

Collaborative Research: Towards Advanced Understanding and Predictive Capability of Climate Change in the Arctic using a High-Resolution Regional Arctic Climate System Model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Primary activities are reported in these areas: climate system component studies via one-way coupling experiments; development of the Regional Arctic Climate System Model (RACM); and physical feedback studies focusing on changes in Arctic sea ice using the fully coupled model.

Lettenmaier, Dennis P

2013-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

7

A model of the threedimensional evolution of Arctic melt ponds on firstyear and multiyear sea ice  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ice. In the summer the upper layers of sea ice and snow melts producing meltwater that accumulatesA model of the threedimensional evolution of Arctic melt ponds on firstyear and multiyear sea ice F in Arctic melt ponds on the surface of sea ice. An accurate estimate of the fraction of the sea ice surface

Feltham, Daniel

8

An energy-diagnostics intercomparison of coupled ice-ocean Arctic models  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An energy-diagnostics intercomparison of coupled ice-ocean Arctic models Petteri Uotila a,*, David. Understanding the Arctic Ocean energy balance is important because it can strengthen our understanding for Atmosphere-Ocean Science, Courant Institute of Mathematical Sciences, New York University, NYU, 200 Water

Zhang, Jinlun

9

Recent Changes in Arctic Vegetation: Satellite Observations and Simulation Model Predictions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chapter 2 Recent Changes in Arctic Vegetation: Satellite Observations and Simulation Model with a combination of satellite observations (Fig. 2.1) and field mea- surements, as projected by simulation modeling

Bhatt, Uma

10

2012 Changing Arctic Ocean 506E/497E -Lecture 17 -Woodgate Global models in the Arctic  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

;2 2012 Changing Arctic Ocean 506E/497E - Lecture 17 - Woodgate Deep waters of the Atlantic from http://sam://iodp.tamu.edu/publications/PR/303PR/images/Fig01.jpg Dickson et al, refs Denmark Strait ~ 650m deep Iceland Scotland Ridge ~ 400

Washington at Seattle, University of

11

Development, sensitivity analysis, and uncertainty quantification of high-fidelity arctic sea ice models.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Arctic sea ice is an important component of the global climate system and due to feedback effects the Arctic ice cover is changing rapidly. Predictive mathematical models are of paramount importance for accurate estimates of the future ice trajectory. However, the sea ice components of Global Climate Models (GCMs) vary significantly in their prediction of the future state of Arctic sea ice and have generally underestimated the rate of decline in minimum sea ice extent seen over the past thirty years. One of the contributing factors to this variability is the sensitivity of the sea ice to model physical parameters. A new sea ice model that has the potential to improve sea ice predictions incorporates an anisotropic elastic-decohesive rheology and dynamics solved using the material-point method (MPM), which combines Lagrangian particles for advection with a background grid for gradient computations. We evaluate the variability of the Los Alamos National Laboratory CICE code and the MPM sea ice code for a single year simulation of the Arctic basin using consistent ocean and atmospheric forcing. Sensitivities of ice volume, ice area, ice extent, root mean square (RMS) ice speed, central Arctic ice thickness, and central Arctic ice speed with respect to ten different dynamic and thermodynamic parameters are evaluated both individually and in combination using the Design Analysis Kit for Optimization and Terascale Applications (DAKOTA). We find similar responses for the two codes and some interesting seasonal variability in the strength of the parameters on the solution.

Peterson, Kara J.; Bochev, Pavel Blagoveston; Paskaleva, Biliana S.

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Arctic cryosphere response in the Geoengineering Model Intercomparison Project G3  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Arctic cryosphere response in the Geoengineering Model Intercomparison Project G3 and G4 scenarios output from the Geoengineering Model Intercomparison Project for the two most "realistic" scenarios, G4, injects 5 Tg SO2 per year. We ask whether geoengineering by injection of sulfate aerosols

Robock, Alan

13

Modelling the impact of superimposed ice on the mass balance of an Arctic glacier under scenarios of future climate change  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

). A consequence of climatic warming in the high Arctic will be an increase in surface melting of glaciers and ice component of the mass accumulation of many glaciers and ice caps in thModelling the impact of superimposed ice on the mass balance of an Arctic glacier under scenarios

14

Fundamental problems of modeling the dynamics of internal gravity waves with applications to the Arctic Basin  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this paper, we consider fundamental problems of the dynamics of internal gravity waves. We present analytical and numerical algorithms for calculating the wave fields for a set of values of the parameters, as observed in the ocean. We show that our mathematical models can describe the wave dynamics of the Arctic Basin, taking into account the actual physical characteristics of sea water, topography of its floor, etc. The numerical and analytical results show that the internal gravity waves have a significant effect on underwater sea objects in the Arctic Basin.

Vitaly V. Bulatov; Yuriy V. Vladimirov

2012-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

15

Collaborative Research: Towards Advanced Understanding and Predictive Capability of Climate Change in the Arctic Using a High-Resolution Regional Arctic Climate Model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The primary research task completed for this project was the development of the Regional Arctic Climate Model (RACM). This involved coupling existing atmosphere, ocean, sea ice, and land models using the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) Community Climate System Model (CCSM) coupler (CPL7). RACM is based on the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) atmospheric model, the Parallel Ocean Program (POP) ocean model, the CICE sea ice model, and the Variable Infiltration Capacity (VIC) land model. A secondary research task for this project was testing and evaluation of WRF for climate-scale simulations on the large pan-Arctic model domain used in RACM. This involved identification of a preferred set of model physical parameterizations for use in our coupled RACM simulations and documenting any atmospheric biases present in RACM.

Cassano, John [Principal Investigator

2013-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

16

Intercomparison of cloud model simulations of Arctic mixed-phase boundary layer clouds observed during  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

/crystal concentration also suggests the need for improved understanding of ice nucleation and its parameterizationIntercomparison of cloud model simulations of Arctic mixed-phase boundary layer clouds observed is presented. This case study is based on observations of a persistent mixed-phase boundary layer cloud

Zuidema, Paquita

17

COLLABORATIVE RESEARCH: TOWARDS ADVANCED UNDERSTANDING AND PREDICTIVE CAPABILITY OF CLIMATE CHANGE IN THE ARCTIC USING A HIGH-RESOLUTION REGIONAL ARCTIC CLIMATE SYSTEM MODEL  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The motivation for this project was to advance the science of climate change and prediction in the Arctic region. Its primary goals were to (i) develop a state-of-the-art Regional Arctic Climate system Model (RACM) including high-resolution atmosphere, land, ocean, sea ice and land hydrology components and (ii) to perform extended numerical experiments using high performance computers to minimize uncertainties and fundamentally improve current predictions of climate change in the northern polar regions. These goals were realized first through evaluation studies of climate system components via one-way coupling experiments. Simulations were then used to examine the effects of advancements in climate component systems on their representation of main physics, time-mean fields and to understand variability signals at scales over many years. As such this research directly addressed some of the major science objectives of the BER Climate Change Research Division (CCRD) regarding the advancement of long-term climate prediction.

Gutowski, William J.

2013-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

18

Modeling the formation and fate of the nearsurface temperature maximum in the Canadian Basin of the Arctic Ocean  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

at the end of summer 2007, using both model output (described in section 2) and observed data. [3] Jackson et of the Arctic Ocean over the years 2000≠2009. The NSTM is formed from local summertime absorption of solar., 2008; Nghiem et al., 2007]. This allowed 500% more solar energy into the surface layers of the Beaufort

Zhang, Jinlun

19

Next-Generation Ecosystem Experiments NGEE Arctic Quarterly Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to improve representation of the Arctic in Earth System Models Topography influences snow cover, thermal

20

Arctic Landscapes --Complex, Connected and Vulnerable to a Changing Climate Geophysical Dynamics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and reliability of climate projections. Earth System Models Models serve as tools for integration and synthesis-atmosphere interactions and their representation in Earth Systems Models. Land-Atmosphere Interactions Land surface for projections of future climate. Representation of heterogene- ity in Earth System Models will be advanced

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "modeling complex arctic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

A New Double-Moment Microphysics Parameterization for Application in Cloud and Climate Models. Part II: Single-Column Modeling of Arctic Clouds  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the arctic bound- ary layer, the presence of leads (cracks) in the sea ice surface, the persistence of mixed-phaseA New Double-Moment Microphysics Parameterization for Application in Cloud and Climate Models. Part- dicted cloud boundaries and total cloud fraction compare reasonably well with observations. Cloud phase

Shupe, Matthew

22

Time varying arctic climate change amplification  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During the past 130 years the global mean surface air temperature has risen by about 0.75 K. Due to feedbacks -- including the snow/ice albedo feedback -- the warming in the Arctic is expected to proceed at a faster rate than the global average. Climate model simulations suggest that this Arctic amplification produces warming that is two to three times larger than the global mean. Understanding the Arctic amplification is essential for projections of future Arctic climate including sea ice extent and melting of the Greenland ice sheet. We use the temperature records from the Arctic stations to show that (a) the Arctic amplification is larger at latitudes above 700 N compared to those within 64-70oN belt, and that, surprisingly; (b) the ratio of the Arctic to global rate of temperature change is not constant but varies on the decadal timescale. This time dependence will affect future projections of climate changes in the Arctic.

Chylek, Petr [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Dubey, Manvendra K [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Lesins, Glen [DALLHOUSIE U; Wang, Muyin [NOAA/JISAO

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Process-model Simulations of Cloud Albedo Enhancement by Aerosols in the Arctic  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A cloud-resolving model is used to simulate the effectiveness of Arctic marine cloud brightening via injection of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN). An updated cloud microphysical scheme is employed, with prognostic CCN and cloud particle numbers in both liquid and mixed-phase marine low clouds. Injection of CCN into the marine boundary layer can delay the collapse of the boundary layer and increase low-cloud albedo. Because nearly all of the albedo effects are in the liquid phase due to the removal of ice water by snowfall when ice processes are involved, albedo increases are stronger for pure liquid clouds than mixed-phase clouds. Liquid precipitation can be suppressed by CCN injection, whereas ice precipitation (snow) is affected less; thus the effectiveness of brightening mixed-phase clouds is lower than for liquid-only clouds. CCN injection into a clean regime results in a greater albedo increase than injection into a polluted regime, consistent with current knowledge about aerosol-cloud interactions. Unlike previous studies investigating warm clouds, dynamical changes in circulation due to precipitation changes are small.

Kravitz, Benjamin S.; Wang, Hailong; Rasch, Philip J.; Morrison, H.; Solomon, Amy

2014-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

24

Arctic house  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Currently available housing in the Arctic is limited to solutions that have been adapted from designs for less severe climates. This thesis has developed a new manner of residential construction designed specifically for ...

Turkel, Joel A. (Joel Abram), 1969-

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Model-data Fusion Approaches for Retrospective and Predictive Assessment of the Pan-Arctic Scale Permafrost Carbon Feedback to Global Climate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

representation of the Arctic system carbon cycle in Earth System Modeling frameworks. This proposed study of permafrost carbon processes in terrestrial biogeochemistry models, to operate within coupled Earth system modeling frameworks. PROJECT SIGNIFICANCE This work will provide a critical bridge between the abundant

26

Models of organometallic complexes for optoelectronic applications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Organometallic complexes have potential applications as the optically active components of organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs) and organic photovoltaics (OPV). Development of more effective complexes may be aided by understanding their excited state properties. Here we discuss two key theoretical approaches to investigate these complexes: first principles atomistic models and effective Hamiltonian models. We review applications of these methods, such as, determining the nature of the emitting state, predicting the fraction of injected charges that form triplet excitations, and explaining the sensitivity of device performance to small changes in the molecular structure of the organometallic complexes.

A. C. Jacko; Ross H. McKenzie; B. J. Powell

2010-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

27

Investigation of Microphysical Parameterizations of Snow and Ice in Arctic Clouds during M-PACE through ModelObservation Comparisons  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Investigation of Microphysical Parameterizations of Snow and Ice in Arctic Clouds during M the microphysical properties of Arctic mixed-phase stratocumulus. Intensive measurements taken during the Department of Energy Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment (M

Solomon, Amy

28

A Climatology of the Arctic on Mid-Tropospheric Temperature Regulation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Arctic is a unique and complex environment. Many factors play a role in determining the long-term climate of the Arctic, including mesoscale weather systems and many complex ice-albedo feedback mechanisms. Previous studies determined using real...

Anthony, Jeremy Patrick

2014-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

29

arctic ocean experiment: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Arctic Geosciences Websites Summary: Model predicted warming per century, Bitz et al In a global warming scenario, the Poles warm faster1 2012 Changing Arctic Ocean 506E497E -...

30

Refiners Switch to RFG Complex Model  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

On January 1, 1998, domestic and foreign refineries and importers must stop using the "simple" model and begin using the "complex" model to calculate emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOC), toxic air pollutants (TAP), and nitrogen oxides (NOx) from motor gasoline. The primary differences between application of the two models is that some refineries may have to meet stricter standards for the sulfur and olefin content of the reformulated gasoline (RFG) they produce and all refineries will now be held accountable for NOx emissions. Requirements for calculating emissions from conventional gasoline under the anti-dumping rule similarly change for exhaust TAP and NOx. However, the change to the complex model is not expected to result in an increase in the price premium for RFG or constrain supplies.

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Intercomparison of model simulations of mixed-phase clouds observed during the ARM Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment. Part II: Multi-layered cloud  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Results are presented from an intercomparison of single-column and cloud-resolving model simulations of a deep, multi-layered, mixed-phase cloud system observed during the ARM Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment. This cloud system was associated with strong surface turbulent sensible and latent heat fluxes as cold air flowed over the open Arctic Ocean, combined with a low pressure system that supplied moisture at mid-level. The simulations, performed by 13 single-column and 4 cloud-resolving models, generally overestimate the liquid water path and strongly underestimate the ice water path, although there is a large spread among the models. This finding is in contrast with results for the single-layer, low-level mixed-phase stratocumulus case in Part I of this study, as well as previous studies of shallow mixed-phase Arctic clouds, that showed an underprediction of liquid water path. The overestimate of liquid water path and underestimate of ice water path occur primarily when deeper mixed-phase clouds extending into the mid-troposphere were observed. These results suggest important differences in the ability of models to simulate Arctic mixed-phase clouds that are deep and multi-layered versus shallow and single-layered. In general, models with a more sophisticated, two-moment treatment of the cloud microphysics produce a somewhat smaller liquid water path that is closer to observations. The cloud-resolving models tend to produce a larger cloud fraction than the single-column models. The liquid water path and especially the cloud fraction have a large impact on the cloud radiative forcing at the surface, which is dominated by the longwave flux for this case.

Morrison, H; McCoy, R B; Klein, S A; Xie, S; Luo, Y; Avramov, A; Chen, M; Cole, J; Falk, M; Foster, M; Genio, A D; Harrington, J; Hoose, C; Khairoutdinov, M; Larson, V; Liu, X; McFarquhar, G; Poellot, M; Shipway, B; Shupe, M; Sud, Y; Turner, D; Veron, D; Walker, G; Wang, Z; Wolf, A; Xu, K; Yang, F; Zhang, G

2008-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

32

THE SHRINKING ARCTIC ICE CAP From the IPCC* Summary For Policymakers...  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

THE SHRINKING ARCTIC ICE CAP From the IPCC* Summary For Policymakers... "Sea ice is projected] - a phenomenon sometimes referred to as "Arctic amplification". As Arctic temperatures rise, sea ice melts for the 20th century. The rate at which the modeled 21st century Arctic warming and sea ice melting occurs

33

Intrinsic Uncertainties in Modeling Complex Systems.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Models are built to understand and predict the behaviors of both natural and artificial systems. Because it is always necessary to abstract away aspects of any non-trivial system being modeled, we know models can potentially leave out important, even critical elements. This reality of the modeling enterprise forces us to consider the prospective impacts of those effects completely left out of a model - either intentionally or unconsidered. Insensitivity to new structure is an indication of diminishing returns. In this work, we represent a hypothetical unknown effect on a validated model as a finite perturba- tion whose amplitude is constrained within a control region. We find robustly that without further constraints, no meaningful bounds can be placed on the amplitude of a perturbation outside of the control region. Thus, forecasting into unsampled regions is a very risky proposition. We also present inherent difficulties with proper time discretization of models and representing in- herently discrete quantities. We point out potentially worrisome uncertainties, arising from math- ematical formulation alone, which modelers can inadvertently introduce into models of complex systems. Acknowledgements This work has been funded under early-career LDRD project %23170979, entitled %22Quantify- ing Confidence in Complex Systems Models Having Structural Uncertainties%22, which ran from 04/2013 to 09/2014. We wish to express our gratitude to the many researchers at Sandia who con- tributed ideas to this work, as well as feedback on the manuscript. In particular, we would like to mention George Barr, Alexander Outkin, Walt Beyeler, Eric Vugrin, and Laura Swiler for provid- ing invaluable advice and guidance through the course of the project. We would also like to thank Steven Kleban, Amanda Gonzales, Trevor Manzanares, and Sarah Burwell for their assistance in managing project tasks and resources.

Cooper, Curtis S; Bramson, Aaron L.; Ames, Arlo L.

2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Intercomparison of cloud model simulations of Arctic mixed-phase boundary layer clouds observed during SHEBA/FIRE-ACE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An intercomparison of six cloud-resolving and large-eddy simulation models is presented. This case study is based on observations of a persistent mixed-phase boundary layer cloud gathered on 7 May, 1998 from the Surface Heat Budget of Arctic Ocean (SHEBA) and First ISCCP Regional Experiment - Arctic Cloud Experiment (FIRE-ACE). Ice nucleation is constrained in the simulations in a way that holds the ice crystal concentration approximately fixed, with two sets of sensitivity runs in addition to the baseline simulations utilizing different specified ice nucleus (IN) concentrations. All of the baseline and sensitivity simulations group into two distinct quasi-steady states associated with either persistent mixed-phase clouds or all-ice clouds after the first few hours of integration, implying the existence of multiple equilibria. These two states are associated with distinctly different microphysical, thermodynamic, and radiative characteristics. Most but not all of the models produce a persistent mixed-phase cloud qualitatively similar to observations using the baseline IN/crystal concentration, while small increases in the IN/crystal concentration generally lead to rapid glaciation and conversion to the all-ice state. Budget analysis indicates that larger ice deposition rates associated with increased IN/crystal concentrations have a limited direct impact on dissipation of liquid in these simulations. However, the impact of increased ice deposition is greatly enhanced by several interaction pathways that lead to an increased surface precipitation flux, weaker cloud top radiative cooling and cloud dynamics, and reduced vertical mixing, promoting rapid glaciation of the mixed-phase cloud for deposition rates in the cloud layer greater than about 1-2x10-5 g kg-1 s-1. These results indicate the critical importance of precipitation-radiative-dynamical interactions in simulating cloud phase, which have been neglected in previous fixed-dynamical parcel studies of the cloud phase parameter space. Large sensitivity to the IN/crystal concentration also suggests the need for improved understanding of ice nucleation and its parameterization in models.

Morrison, H.; Zuidema, Paquita; Ackerman, Andrew; Avramov, Alexander; de Boer, Gijs; Fan, Jiwen; Fridlind, Ann; Hashino, Tempei; Harrington, Jerry Y.; Luo, Yali; Ovchinnikov, Mikhail; Shipway, Ben

2011-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

35

Traffic flow models and service rules for complex production systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Traffic flow models and service rules for complex production systems C. Ringhofer Abstract We emphasis is given to the implementation of service rules for complex systems, involving multiple product flow type models for complex production systems. Traffic flow models represent, in some sense

Ringhofer, Christian

36

An Energy Complexity Model for Algorithms Swapnoneel Roy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An Energy Complexity Model for Algorithms Swapnoneel Roy Department of CSE University at Buffalo by the importance of energy and algorithmic complexity models do not capture the energy consumed by an algorithm. In this paper, we propose a new complexity model to ac- count for the energy used by an algorithm. Based

Rudra,, Atri

37

NREL's System Advisor Model Simplifies Complex Energy Analysis...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

NREL's System Advisor Model Simplifies Complex Energy Analysis (Fact Sheet) Re-direct Destination: NREL has developed a tool -- the System Advisor Model (SAM) -- that can help...

38

Interactive Distributed Ray Tracing of Highly Complex Models  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

projects dealing with entire cars, ships, buildings, and processing plants. The complexity of such modelsInteractive Distributed Ray Tracing of Highly Complex Models Ingo Wald, Philipp Slusallek, Carsten- ulation of huge and complex 3D environments. Examples include large structural and mechanical engineering

Wald, Ingo

39

Eos, Vol. 89, No. 9, 26 February 2008 Arctic system model and to develop a suite of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for future conditions in the Arctic. 20­22 May 2008N Seventh Annual Environmen- tal Protection Agency (EPA, participants will learn about the role of technology in environmental protection as well as in the United) are located in this area. Preliminary geophysical stud- ies suggest that the mantle transition between

Gao, Stephen Shangxing

40

Carbon dynamics in arctic vegetation†  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Rapid climate change in Arctic regions is of concern due to important feedbacks between the Arctic land surface and the global climate system. A large amount of organic carbon (C) is currently stored in Arctic soils; if ...

Street, Lorna Elizabeth

2011-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "modeling complex arctic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Probing a Paleoclimate Model-Data Misfit in Arctic Alaska from the Cretaceous Greenhouse World  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

results of Ufnar et al. (2004b), but do not match those predicted by the Earth System modeling of Poulsen et al. (2007). These new data clearly emphasize the need for much more additional sampling in order to adequately characterize the hydrologic cycle...

Lollar, Joseph Chad

2011-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

42

Modeling the impact of complexity on transportation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis aimed to understand the drivers of total transportation costs during supply chain complexity events, in particular new product launches, in a fast moving consumer goods company in the United States. The research ...

Fernandez, Jose A. (Jose Antonio Fernandez Chavira)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Mechanistic kinetic modeling of the hydrocracking of complex feedstocks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Two separate mechanistic kinetic models have been developed for the hydrocracking of complex feedstocks. The first model is targeted for the hydrocracking of vacuum gas oil. The second one addresses specifically the hydrocracking of long...

Kumar, Hans

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

44

Robust nite-di erence modelling of complex structures1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

with the 1Proc. of HIGH PERFORMANCE COMPUTING IN SEISMIC MODELLING, An International Sympo- sium, Zaragoza-difference modelling of complex structures Paper No. 15 in Proc. of Int. Symposium on High Performance Computing

Oprsal, Ivo

45

Model-Data Fusion Studies of Pacific Arctic Climate and Ice-Ocean Processes Jia Wang1, Hajo Eicken2, Yanling Yu3, X. Bai4, Jinlun Zhang3, H. Hu4, Moto Ikeda5, Kohei  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Ecosystems Research (CILER), School of Natural Resources and Environment, University of Michigan, 4840 South1 Model-Data Fusion Studies of Pacific Arctic Climate and Ice-Ocean Processes Jia Wang1, Hajo. Tel: 734-741-2281; Email: Jia.Wang@noaa.gov 2. University of Alaska Fairbanks, Geophysical Institute

Zhang, Jinlun

46

Trends in modeling Biomedical Complex Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

contributed to the understand- ing of specific aspects of the disease process and to the development of diagnostic and prognostic clinical applications. Cardiovascular obesity, diabetes, autoim- mune diseases, and neurodegenerative disorders are some... intelligence, are inherently multifactor- ial, and also many common diseases, such as type-2 diabetes, obesity, asthma, cancers, mental retardation aging related diseases, cardiovascular diseases and obesity, tend to be multifactorial. As an example of complex...

2009-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

47

Bayesian Networks and Evidence Theory to Model Complex Systems Reliability  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Bayesian Networks and Evidence Theory to Model Complex Systems Reliability Ch. SIMON, Ph. WEBER, E.levrat}@cran.uhp-nancy.fr Abstract-- This paper deals with the use of Bayesian Net- works to compute system reliability of complex systems un- der epistemic uncertainty. In the context of incompleteness of reliability data

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

48

FIRST PRINCIPLES MODELING FOR LIDAR SENSING OF COMPLEX ICE SURFACES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

FIRST PRINCIPLES MODELING FOR LIDAR SENSING OF COMPLEX ICE SURFACES J. Kerekes, A. Goodenough, S of monitoring the dynamics and mass balance of glaciers, ice caps, and ice sheets. However, it is also known that ice surfaces can have complex 3-dimensional structure, which can challenge their accurate retrieval

Kerekes, John

49

Arctic energy resources  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Arctic is a vulnerable region with immense resources. These range from the replenishable (tidal energy, hydroelectricity, wood, biomass, fish, game, and geothermal energy) to the non-replenishable (coal, minerals, natural gas, hydrocarbon deposits). But the problems of exploiting such resources without damaging the environment of the Arctic are formidable. In this book all aspects are considered: occurrence of energy resources; the technological and economic aspects of exploration and exploitation; the environmental and social impact of technological development.

Rey, L.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Completeness and Complexity of Bounded Model Checking #  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of an exponent between this procedure and standard LTL model checking. We discuss ways to bridge this gap by the Semiconductor Research Corporation (SRC) under contract no. 99≠TJ≠684, the National Science Foundation (NSF

Ouaknine, JoŽl

51

Completeness and Complexity of Bounded Model Checking  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of an exponent between this procedure and standard LTL model checking. We discuss ways to bridge this gap reaches some pre-computed threshold, which indicates that This research is supported by the Semiconductor

Ouaknine, JoŽl

52

Energy-aware scheduling: models and complexity results  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Energy-aware scheduling: models and complexity results Guillaume Aupy (1st year PhD student) LIP several energy-aware scheduling algorithms whose design is optimized for different speed models. Dynamic plans. I. INTRODUCTION Energy-aware scheduling has proven an important issue in the past decade, both

Paris-Sud XI, Universitť de

53

Single-Step Stereolithography of Complex Anatomical Models  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Single-Step Stereolithography of Complex Anatomical Models for Optical Flow Measurements Diane de of Technology & Emory University School of Medicine, Room 2119 U.A. Whitaker Building, 313 Ferst Dr., Atlanta demonstrated in literature to be a practical model construction tool for optical flow measurements

Pekkan, Kerem

54

Intercomparison of model simulations of mixed-phase clouds observed during the ARM Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment. Part I: Single layer cloud  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Results are presented from an intercomparison of single-column and cloud-resolving model simulations of a cold-air outbreak mixed-phase stratocumulus cloud observed during the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program's Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment. The observed cloud occurred in a well-mixed boundary layer with a cloud top temperature of -15 C. The observed liquid water path of around 160 g m{sup -2} was about two-thirds of the adiabatic value and much greater than the mass of ice crystal precipitation which when integrated from the surface to cloud top was around 15 g m{sup -2}. The simulations were performed by seventeen single-column models (SCMs) and nine cloud-resolving models (CRMs). While the simulated ice water path is generally consistent with the observed values, the median SCM and CRM liquid water path is a factor of three smaller than observed. Results from a sensitivity study in which models removed ice microphysics indicate that in many models the interaction between liquid and ice-phase microphysics is responsible for the large model underestimate of liquid water path. Despite this general underestimate, the simulated liquid and ice water paths of several models are consistent with the observed values. Furthermore, there is some evidence that models with more sophisticated microphysics simulate liquid and ice water paths that are in better agreement with the observed values, although considerable scatter is also present. Although no single factor guarantees a good simulation, these results emphasize the need for improvement in the model representation of mixed-phase microphysics. This case study, which has been well observed from both aircraft and ground-based remote sensors, could be a benchmark for model simulations of mixed-phase clouds.

Klein, S A; McCoy, R B; Morrison, H; Ackerman, A; Avramov, A; deBoer, G; Chen, M; Cole, J; DelGenio, A; Golaz, J; Hashino, T; Harrington, J; Hoose, C; Khairoutdinov, M; Larson, V; Liu, X; Luo, Y; McFarquhar, G; Menon, S; Neggers, R; Park, S; Poellot, M; von Salzen, K; Schmidt, J; Sednev, I; Shipway, B; Shupe, M; Spangenberg, D; Sud, Y; Turner, D; Veron, D; Falk, M; Foster, M; Fridlind, A; Walker, G; Wang, Z; Wolf, A; Xie, S; Xu, K; Yang, F; Zhang, G

2008-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

55

6, 96559722, 2006 Arctic smoke  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Discussions Arctic smoke ­ record high air pollution levels in the European Arctic due to agricultural fires into the European Arctic and caused the most severe air pollution episodes ever recorded there. This paper confirms that biomass burning (BB) was in-5 deed the source of the observed air pollution, studies the transport

Boyer, Edmond

56

Intercomparison of model simulations of mixed-phase clouds observed during the ARM Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment. Part I: Single layer cloud  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Results are presented from an intercomparison of single-column and cloud-resolving model simulations of a cold-air outbreak mixed-phase stratocumulus cloud observed during the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program's Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment. The observed cloud occurred in a well-mixed boundary layer with a cloud top temperature of -15 C. The observed average liquid water path of around 160 g m{sup -2} was about two-thirds of the adiabatic value and much greater than the average mass of ice crystal precipitation which when integrated from the surface to cloud top was around 15 g m{sup -2}. The simulations were performed by seventeen single-column models (SCMs) and nine cloud-resolving models (CRMs). While the simulated ice water path is generally consistent with the observed values, the median SCM and CRM liquid water path is a factor of three smaller than observed. Results from a sensitivity study in which models removed ice microphysics suggest that in many models the interaction between liquid and ice-phase microphysics is responsible for the large model underestimate of liquid water path. Despite this general underestimate, the simulated liquid and ice water paths of several models are consistent with the observed values. Furthermore, there is evidence that models with more sophisticated microphysics simulate liquid and ice water paths that are in better agreement with the observed values, although considerable scatter is also present. Although no single factor guarantees a good simulation, these results emphasize the need for improvement in the model representation of mixed-phase microphysics.

Klein, Stephen A.; McCoy, Renata B.; Morrison, Hugh; Ackerman, Andrew S.; Avramov, Alexander; de Boer, Gijs; Chen, Mingxuan; Cole, Jason N.S.; Del Genio, Anthony D.; Falk, Michael; Foster, Michael J.; Fridlind, Ann; Golaz, Jean-Christophe; Hashino, Tempei; Harrington, Jerry Y.; Hoose, Corinna; Khairoutdinov, Marat F.; Larson, Vincent E.; Liu, Xiaohong; Luo, Yali; McFarquhar, Greg M.; Menon, Surabi; Neggers, Roel A. J.; Park, Sungsu; Poellot, Michael R.; Schmidt, Jerome M.; Sednev, Igor; Shipway, Ben J.; Shupe, Matthew D.; Spangenberg, Douglas A.; Sud, Yogesh C.; Turner, David D.; Veron, Dana E.; von Salzen, Knut; Walker, Gregory K.; Wang, Zhien; Wolf, Audrey B.; Xie, Shaocheng; Xu, Kuan-Man; Yang, Fanglin; Zhang, Gong

2009-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

57

arctic cloud experiment: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

low-level Arctic clouds in cold seasons and have a significant impact on the surface energy budget. However, the treatment of mixed-phase clouds in most current climate models...

58

arctic ocean freshwater: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Geosciences Websites Summary: Model predicted warming per century, Bitz et al In a global warming scenario, the Poles warm faster1 2012 Changing Arctic Ocean 506E497E -...

59

Ice Formation in Arctic Mixed-Phase Clouds: Insights from a 3-D Cloud-Resolving Model with Size-Resolved Aerosol and Cloud Microphysics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The single-layer mixed-phase clouds observed during the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) programís Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment (MPACE) are simulated with a 3-dimensional cloud-resolving model the System for Atmospheric Modeling (SAM) coupled with an explicit bin microphysics scheme and a radar-lidar simulator. Two possible ice enhancement mechanisms Ė activation of droplet evaporation residues by condensation-followed-by-freezing and droplet freezing by contact freezing inside-out, are scrutinized by extensive comparisons with aircraft and radar and lidar measurements. The locations of ice initiation associated with each mechanism and the role of ice nuclei (IN) in the evolution of mixed-phase clouds are mainly addressed. Simulations with either mechanism agree well with the in-situ and remote sensing measurements on ice microphysical properties but liquid water content is slightly underpredicted. These two mechanisms give very similar cloud microphysical, macrophysical, dynamical, and radiative properties, although the ice nucleation properties (rate, frequency and location) are completely different. Ice nucleation from activation of evaporation nuclei is most efficient near cloud top areas concentrated on the edges of updrafts, while ice initiation from the drop freezing process has no significant location preference (occurs anywhere that droplet evaporation is significant). Both enhanced nucleation mechanisms contribute dramatically to ice formation with ice particle concentration of 10-15 times higher relative to the simulation without either of them. The contribution of ice nuclei (IN) recycling from ice particle evaporation to IN and ice particle concentration is found to be very significant in this case. Cloud can be very sensitive to IN initially and form a nonquilibrium transition condition, but become much less sensitive as cloud evolves to a steady mixed-phase condition. The parameterization of Meyers et al. [1992] with the observed MPACE IN concentration is able to predict the observed mixed-phase clouds reasonably well. This validation may facilitate the application of this parameterization in the cloud and climate models to simulate Arctic clouds.

Fan, Jiwen; Ovtchinnikov, Mikhail; Comstock, Jennifer M.; McFarlane, Sally A.; Khain, Alexander

2009-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

60

Mathematical approaches for complexity/predictivity trade-offs in complex system models : LDRD final report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The goal of this research was to examine foundational methods, both computational and theoretical, that can improve the veracity of entity-based complex system models and increase confidence in their predictions for emergent behavior. The strategy was to seek insight and guidance from simplified yet realistic models, such as cellular automata and Boolean networks, whose properties can be generalized to production entity-based simulations. We have explored the usefulness of renormalization-group methods for finding reduced models of such idealized complex systems. We have prototyped representative models that are both tractable and relevant to Sandia mission applications, and quantified the effect of computational renormalization on the predictive accuracy of these models, finding good predictivity from renormalized versions of cellular automata and Boolean networks. Furthermore, we have theoretically analyzed the robustness properties of certain Boolean networks, relevant for characterizing organic behavior, and obtained precise mathematical constraints on systems that are robust to failures. In combination, our results provide important guidance for more rigorous construction of entity-based models, which currently are often devised in an ad-hoc manner. Our results can also help in designing complex systems with the goal of predictable behavior, e.g., for cybersecurity.

Goldsby, Michael E.; Mayo, Jackson R.; Bhattacharyya, Arnab (Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA); Armstrong, Robert C.; Vanderveen, Keith

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "modeling complex arctic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Free energy and complexity of spherical bipartite models  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We investigate both free energy and complexity of the spherical bipartite spin glass model. We first prove a variational formula in high temperature for the limiting free energy based on the well-known Crisanti-Sommers representation of the mixed p-spin spherical model. Next, we show that the mean number of local minima at low levels of energy is exponentially large in the size of the system and we derive a bound on the location of the ground state energy.

Antonio Auffinger; Wei-Kuo Chen

2014-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

62

Collaborative Creativity: A Complex Systems Model with Distributed Affect  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Collaborative Creativity: A Complex Systems Model with Distributed Affect Cecilia R. Aragon E16 2RD UK alisonwilliams62@googlemail.com ABSTRACT The study of creativity has received significant attention over the past century, with a recent increase in interest in collaborative, distributed creativity

Anderson, Richard

63

A Hierarchical Model for Estimating the Reliability of Complex Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

an approximation to the joint posterior distribution on the total system reliability was obtained. Many reliability or bounding moments of the system reliability posterior distribution (Cole (1975), Mastran (1976), DostalA Hierarchical Model for Estimating the Reliability of Complex Systems Valen E. Johnson, Todd L

Reese, Shane

64

Coupling the High Complexity Land Surface Model ACASA to the Mesoscale Model WRF  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this study, the Weather Research and Forecasting Model (WRF) is coupled with the Advanced Canopy-Atmosphere-Soil Algorithm (ACASA), a high complexity land surface model. Although WRF is a state-of-the-art regional ...

Xu, L.

65

Historical and idealized climate model experiments: an intercomparison of Earth system models of intermediate complexity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Both historical and idealized climate model experiments are performed with a variety of Earth system models of intermediate complexity (EMICs) as part of a community contribution to the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate ...

Monier, Erwan

66

Arctic ice islands  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The development of offshore oil and gas resources in the Arctic waters of Alaska requires offshore structures which successfully resist the lateral forces due to moving, drifting ice. Ice islands are floating, a tabular icebergs, up to 60 meters thick, of solid ice throughout their thickness. The ice islands are thus regarded as the strongest ice features in the Arctic; fixed offshore structures which can directly withstand the impact of ice islands are possible but in some locations may be so expensive as to make oilfield development uneconomic. The resolution of the ice island problem requires two research steps: (1) calculation of the probability of interaction between an ice island and an offshore structure in a given region; and (2) if the probability if sufficiently large, then the study of possible interactions between ice island and structure, to discover mitigative measures to deal with the moving ice island. The ice island research conducted during the 1983-1988 interval, which is summarized in this report, was concerned with the first step. Monte Carlo simulations of ice island generation and movement suggest that ice island lifetimes range from 0 to 70 years, and that 85% of the lifetimes are less then 35 years. The simulation shows a mean value of 18 ice islands present at any time in the Arctic Ocean, with a 90% probability of less than 30 ice islands. At this time, approximately 34 ice islands are known, from observations, to exist in the Arctic Ocean, not including the 10-meter thick class of ice islands. Return interval plots from the simulation show that coastal zones of the Beaufort and Chukchi Seas, already leased for oil development, have ice island recurrences of 10 to 100 years. This implies that the ice island hazard must be considered thoroughly, and appropriate safety measures adopted, when offshore oil production plans are formulated for the Alaskan Arctic offshore. 132 refs., 161 figs., 17 tabs.

Sackinger, W.M.; Jeffries, M.O.; Lu, M.C.; Li, F.C.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Modeling and Algorithmic Approaches to Constitutively-Complex, Microstructured Fluids  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present a new multiscale model for complex uids based on three scales: microscopic, kinetic, and continuum. We choose the microscopic level as Kramers' bead-rod model for polymers, which we describe as a system of stochastic di#11;erential equations with an implicit constraint formulation. The associated Fokker-Planck equation is then derived, and adiabatic elimination removes the fast momentum coordinates. Approached in this way, the kinetic level reduces to a dispersive drift equation. The continuum level is modeled with a #12;nite volume Godunov-projection algorithm. We demonstrate computation of viscoelastic stress divergence using this multiscale approach.

Miller, Gregory H.; Forest, Gregory

2011-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

68

Long-Range Atmospheric Transport of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons: A Global 3-D Model Analysis Including Evaluation of Arctic Sources  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We use the global 3-D chemical transport model GEOS-Chem to simulate long-range atmospheric transport of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). To evaluate the modelís ability to simulate PAHs with different volatilities, ...

Friedman, Carey

69

RHIC injector complex online model status and plans  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An online modeling system is being developed for the RHIC injector complex, which consists of the Booster, the AGS and the transfer lines connecting the Booster to the AGS and the AGS to RHIC. Historically the injectors have been operated using static values from design specifications or offline model runs, but tighter beam optics constraints required by polarized proton operations (e.g, accelerating with near-integer tunes) have necessitated a more dynamic system. An online model server for the AGS has been implemented using MAD-X [1] as the model engine, with plans to extend the system to the Booster and the injector transfer lines and to add the option of calculating optics using the Polymorphic Tracking Code (PTC [2]) as the model engine.

Schoefer,V.; Ahrens, L.; Brown, K.; Morris, J.; Nemesure, S.

2009-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

70

Defining and Model Checking Abstractions of Complex Railway Models using CSP||B  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Defining and Model Checking Abstractions of Complex Railway Models using CSP||B Faron Moller1. In [11, 10] we propose a new modelling approach for railway interlockings. We use CSP||B [13], which involves events such as train movements and, in the interlocking, state based reasoning. In this sense, CSP

Doran, Simon J.

71

Data-flow graphs as a model of parallel complexity  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A new model of parallel computation based on data-flow graphs is introduced, which is specifically oriented towards complexity theory. Data-flow graphs are capable of illustrating properties of synchronous, asynchronous, and nondeterministic computations. Sufficient conditions are derived for asynchronous data-flow graphs to be determinate, i.e., all possible computations are finite and yield the same result. For determinate graphs, it is shown that the synchronous computation is as fast as any asynchronous computation. An algorithm is presented that transforms a nondeterminate data-flow graphs into a synchronous determinate one. The basic data-flow graph idea is extended into a model with greater potential parallelism, called the Uniform Data Flow Graph Family (UDFGF) Model. It is proved that time and space for the UDFGF model are polynomially related to reversal and space for the Turing Machine model, in both the deterministic and nondeterministic cases. In addition to forming an abstract computational model, data-flow graphs are parallel programs for real multiprocessors. Given a data flow graph program and a multiprocessor, each node of the graph must be assigned to one of the processors. It is proved that this problem is intractable, and a practical algorithm to find approximate solutions for it is presented.

Campbell, M.L.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

E-Print Network 3.0 - alpha model complex Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

model complex Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: alpha model complex Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 BRST Quantization of String Theories...

73

1Earth System Models of Intermediate Complexity: Closing the Gap in the Spectrum of Climate System  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

system models of intermediate complexity (EMICs) is discussed. It be-comes apparent that there exists a

Martin Claussen; Michel Crucifix; Thierry Fichefet; Andrey Ganopolski; Huges Goosse; Vladimir Petoukhov; Thomas Stocker; Peter Stone; Zhaoming Wang; Andrew Weaver; Susanne L. Weber

74

ERS SAR characterization of coastal polynyas in the Arctic and comparison with SSM/I and numerical model investigations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

), and a numerical polynya model (NPM) forced by National Center for Environmental Predictions (NCEP) wind fields increases to .83. The NPM computes offshore coastal polynya widths, heat exchange, and ice production is that SAR images processed through the SAR polynya algorithm in combination with the NPM is a powerful tool

Winsor, Peter

75

Can dive cycle models predict patterns of foraging behaviour? Diving by common eiders in an Arctic polynya  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

account for the capabilities and limitations of their respiratory system when making foraging decisions. Therefore, while static modelling ap- proaches are an important heuristic tool for elucidating mechanisms), obtaining oxygen (or exchang- ing other respiratory gases; Halsey et al. 2003a; Green et al. 2005

76

Engineering complex topological memories from simple Abelian models  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In three spatial dimensions, particles are limited to either bosonic or fermionic statistics. Two-dimensional systems, on the other hand, can support anyonic quasiparticles exhibiting richer statistical behaviors. An exciting proposal for quantum computation is to employ anyonic statistics to manipulate information. Since such statistical evolutions depend only on topological characteristics, the resulting computation is intrinsically resilient to errors. The so-called non-Abelian anyons are most promising for quantum computation, but their physical realization may prove to be complex. Abelian anyons, however, are easier to understand theoretically and realize experimentally. Here we show that complex topological memories inspired by non-Abelian anyons can be engineered in Abelian models. We explicitly demonstrate the control procedures for the encoding and manipulation of quantum information in specific lattice models that can be implemented in the laboratory. This bridges the gap between requirements for anyonic quantum computation and the potential of state-of-the-art technology. - Highlights: > A novel quantum memory using Abelian anyons is developed. > This uses an advanced encoding, inspired by non-Abelian anyons. > Errors are suppressed topologically, by means of single spin interactions. > An implementation with current Josephson junction technology is proposed.

Wootton, James R., E-mail: phyjrw@leeds.ac.uk [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Leeds, Woodhouse Lane, Leeds LS2 9JT (United Kingdom); Lahtinen, Ville [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Leeds, Woodhouse Lane, Leeds LS2 9JT (United Kingdom); Doucot, Benoit [Laboratoire de Physique Theorique et Hautes Energies, Universite Paris 6 et 7, Paris (France); Pachos, Jiannis K. [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Leeds, Woodhouse Lane, Leeds LS2 9JT (United Kingdom)

2011-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

77

Recent Arctic Sea Ice Variability: Connections to the Arctic Oscillation and the ENSO  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Nin~o- Southern Oscillation (ENSO) produce similar ice changes in the western Arctic, but opposite iceRecent Arctic Sea Ice Variability: Connections to the Arctic Oscillation and the ENSO Jiping Liu; accepted 20 April 2004; published 13 May 2004. [1] Trends in the satellite-derived Arctic sea ice

78

Assessing complexity by means of maximum entropy models  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We discuss a characterization of complexity based on successive approximations of the probability density describing a system by means of maximum entropy methods, thereby quantifying the respective role played by different orders of interaction. This characterization is applied on simple cellular automata in order to put it in perspective with the usual notion of complexity for such systems based on Wolfram classes. The overlap is shown to be good, but not perfect. This suggests that complexity in the sense of Wolfram emerges as an intermediate regime of maximum entropy-based complexity, but also gives insights regarding the role of initial conditions in complexity-related issues.

Chliamovitch, Gregor; Velasquez, Lino

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Long-term effects of anthropogenic CO2 emissions simulated with a complex earth system model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Long-term effects of anthropogenic CO2 emissions simulated with a complex earth system model Uwe earth system model con- sisting of an atmospheric general circulation model, an ocean general

Winguth, Arne

80

2005: Table of EMICs (Earth System Models of Intermediate Complexity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

apparent that Earth system modelling has to rely on a hierarchy of models in which models of intermediate

Martin Claussen

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "modeling complex arctic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Canada's Arctic Gateway: Discussion Paper Summary  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Canada's Arctic Gateway: Discussion Paper Summary September 2010 The following summarizes key Canada's Arctic Gateway a reality in terms of both national public policy and international presence the Government of Canada's national gateway policy framework. This discussion paper's use of the term "Arctic

Martin, Jeff

82

NREL's System Advisor Model Simplifies Complex Energy Analysis...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

diversifying. In addition to fossil fuel- based power, decision makers can choose among solar, wind, and geothermal technologies as well. Each of these technologies has complex...

83

arctic mixed-phase clouds: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

low-level Arctic clouds in cold seasons and have a significant impact on the surface energy budget. However, the treatment of mixed-phase clouds in most current climate models...

84

Modeling Complex Organic Molecules in dense regions: Eley-Rideal and complex induced reaction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Recent observations have revealed the existence of Complex Organic Molecules (COMs) in cold dense cores and prestellar cores. The presence of these molecules in such cold conditions is not well understood and remains a matter of debate since the previously proposed "warm- up" scenario cannot explain these observations. In this article, we study the effect of Eley- Rideal and complex induced reaction mechanisms of gas-phase carbon atoms with the main ice components of dust grains on the formation of COMs in cold and dense regions. Based on recent experiments we use a low value for the chemical desorption efficiency (which was previously invoked to explain the observed COM abundances). We show that our introduced mechanisms are efficient enough to produce a large amount of complex organic molecules in the gas-phase at temperatures as low as 10K.

Ruaud, M; Hickson, K M; Gratier, P; Hersant, F; Wakelam, V

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Ice Mass Balance Buoys: A tool for measuring and attributing changes in the thickness of the Arctic sea ice cover  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ice Mass Balance Buoys: A tool for measuring and attributing changes in the thickness of the Arctic sea ice cover Jacqueline A. Richter-Menge1 , Donald K. Perovich1 , Bruce C. Elder1 , Keran Claffey1 Abstract Recent observational and modeling studies indicate that the Arctic sea ice cover is undergoing

Rigor, Ignatius G.

86

Refinery fuel oxygenates in view of the complex model for reformulated gasline  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The final version of the Complex Model for reformulated gasoline (RFG) has now been issued with some surprising features that will significantly affect refinery fuel oxygenates planning. These include the following: (1) The only oxygenates included in the model are MTBE, ETBE, TAME, and Ethanol. (2) The Complex Model calculates that MTBE and TAME are significantly more effective for reduction of air toxics emissions than Ethanol and ETBE. (3) The Complex Model calculates that MTBE and TAME typically produce about equal reduction in air toxics emissions at the same RFG oxygen content. Although gasoline certification by the Complex Model is optional prior to 1998, after 1998 it will be mandatory for both reformulated and conventional gasolines. This paper considers refinery oxygenates production in view of these features of the Complex Model for RFG, basing the discussion on 2.0 weight percent oxygen content for RFG.

Crawford, C.D.; Haelsig, C.P. [Fluor Daniel, Irvine, CA (United States)

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

87

Modelling the transition to complex, culturally transmitted communication†  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Human language is undoubtedly one of the most complex and powerful communication systems to have evolved on Earth. Study of the evolution of this behaviour is made difficult by the lack of comparable communication systems ...

Ritchie, Graham R S

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Modeling complex biological flows in multi-scale systems using the APDEC framework  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Modeling complex biological flows in multi-scale systems using the APDEC framework David Trebotich methods are based on higher-order finite difference methods in complex geometry with adaptivity-mail: trebotich1@llnl.gov Abstract. We have developed advanced numerical algorithms to model biological fluids

89

MODELING AND MEASUREMENT OF OPTICAL POLARIMETRIC IMAGE PHENOMENOLOGY IN A COMPLEX URBAN ENVIRONMENT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MODELING AND MEASUREMENT OF OPTICAL POLARIMETRIC IMAGE PHENOMENOLOGY IN A COMPLEX URBAN ENVIRONMENT be modeled and placed above a complex synthetic urban scene to create spectrally varying Stokes vector output, Simulation Software 1. INTRODUCTION Urban environments typically include an assortment of man- made objects

Kerekes, John

90

Biodiesel Sim: Crowdsourcing Simulations for Complex Model Analysis Derek Riley, Xiaowei Zhang, Xenofon Koutsoukos  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Biodiesel Sim: Crowdsourcing Simulations for Complex Model Analysis Derek Riley, Xiaowei Zhang Computation, Biodiesel Abstract Biodiesel is an alternative fuel source that can be easily made by novices of the proces- sor. A biodiesel processor is a complex system that can be modeled and simulated using formal

Koutsoukos, Xenofon D.

91

Complex-Energy Shell-Model Description of Alpha Decay  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In his pioneering work of alpha decay, Gamow assumed that the alpha particle formed inside the nucleus tunnels through the barrier of the alpha-daughter potential. The corresponding metastable state can be viewed as a complex-energy solution of the time-independent Schroedinger equation with the outgoing boundary condition. The formation of the alpha cluster, missing in the original Gamow formulation, can be described within the R-matrix theory in terms of the formation amplitude. In this work, the alpha decay process is described by computing the formation amplitude and barrier penetrability in a large complex-energy configuration space spanned by the complex-energy eigenstates of the finite Woods-Saxon (WS) potential. The proper normalization of the decay channel is essential as it strongly modifies the alpha-decay spectroscopic factor. The test calculations are carried out for the ^{212}Po alpha decay.

Id Betan, R. [Rosario Physics Institute, Rosario, Argentina] [Rosario Physics Institute, Rosario, Argentina; Nazarewicz, Witold [ORNL] [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Information geometric complexity of a trivariate Gaussian statistical model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We evaluate the information geometric complexity of entropic motion on low-dimensional Gaussian statistical manifolds in order to quantify how difficult is making macroscopic predictions about a systems in the presence of limited information. Specifically, we observe that the complexity of such entropic inferences not only depends on the amount of available pieces of information but also on the manner in which such pieces are correlated. Finally, we uncover that for certain correlational structures, the impossibility of reaching the most favorable configuration from an entropic inference viewpoint, seems to lead to an information geometric analog of the well-known frustration effect that occurs in statistical physics.

D. Felice; C. Cafaro; S. Mancini

2014-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

93

NREL's System Advisor Model Simplifies Complex Energy Analysis (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The energy market is diversifying. In addition to traditional power sources, decision makers can choose among solar, wind, and geothermal technologies as well. Each of these technologies has complex performance characteristics and economics that vary with location and other project specifics, making it difficult to analyze the viability of such projects. But that analysis is easier now, thanks to the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL).

Not Available

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

arctic ecosystems dominated: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

by: Arctic Institute of North America Stable URL: http Vermont, University of 7 Improved Climate Prediction through a System Level Understanding of Arctic Terrestrial Ecosystems...

95

arctic ice islands: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

analogous to the effects of the Arctic region; KEYWORDS: Arctic Ocean, ice rafting, climate change Citation: Darby, D. A., and J. F. Bischof (2004), A Holocene record of...

96

airborne arctic stratospheric: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

the Arctic System Reanalysis Natalia Tilinina1 , Sergey, Vienna MOTIVATION Key role of cyclone activity in the Arctic energy and hydrological cycles Cyclones impact on sea ice...

97

arctic cloudy boundary: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

the Arctic System Reanalysis Natalia Tilinina1 , Sergey, Vienna MOTIVATION Key role of cyclone activity in the Arctic energy and hydrological cycles Cyclones impact on sea ice...

98

arctic ground squirrel: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

the Arctic System Reanalysis Natalia Tilinina1 , Sergey, Vienna MOTIVATION Key role of cyclone activity in the Arctic energy and hydrological cycles Cyclones impact on sea ice...

99

alesund arctic base: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

the Arctic System Reanalysis Natalia Tilinina1 , Sergey, Vienna MOTIVATION Key role of cyclone activity in the Arctic energy and hydrological cycles Cyclones impact on sea ice...

100

arctic stratospheric expedition: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

the Arctic System Reanalysis Natalia Tilinina1 , Sergey, Vienna MOTIVATION Key role of cyclone activity in the Arctic energy and hydrological cycles Cyclones impact on sea ice...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "modeling complex arctic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

arctic ground squirrels: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

the Arctic System Reanalysis Natalia Tilinina1 , Sergey, Vienna MOTIVATION Key role of cyclone activity in the Arctic energy and hydrological cycles Cyclones impact on sea ice...

102

Arctic sea ice extent small as never before Alerting message from the Arctic: The extent the the Arctic sea ice has reached on Sep. 8  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Arctic sea ice extent small as never before Alerting message from the Arctic: The extent the the Arctic sea ice has reached on Sep. 8 with 4.240 million km2 a new historic minimum (Figure 1). Physicists of the University of Bremen now confirm the apprehension existing since July 2011 that the ice melt in the Arctic

Bremen, Universitšt

103

Comparison of the EXAFS Spectra of Heteronuclear MnCa/Sr Model Complexes to the Oxygen-Evolving Mn(4)Ca Complex of Photosystem II  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Heterometallic Mn-Ca and Mn-Sr complexes have been prepared and employed as model complexes for Ca and Sr EXAFS spectral comparisons with the Oxygen-Evolving Complex (OEC) of Photosystem II (PS II); these have revealed similarities that support the presence of at least one O atom bridge between the Mn and Ca/Sr in the OEC.

Mishra, A.; Yano, J.; Pushkar, Y.; Abboud, K.A.; Yachandra, V.K.; Christou, G.

2009-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

104

A 2D Pseudodynamic Rupture Model Generator for Earthquakes on Geometrically Complex Faults  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A 2D Pseudodynamic Rupture Model Generator for Earthquakes on Geometrically Complex Faults complexity in the rupture process and resulting ground motion. We present a 2D kinematic rupture generator that emulates the strong dependence of earthquake source parameters on local fault geometry observed in dynamic

Dunham, Eric M.

105

Graph-based simulated annealing: A hybrid approach to stochastic modeling of complex  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the system, where the energy is associated with its surface area. The advantage is that for model fittingGraph-based simulated annealing: A hybrid approach to stochastic modeling of complex is based on a hybrid approach, where in a first step a graph model is developed using ideas from stochastic

Kroese, Dirk P.

106

Critical enhancements of a dynamic traffic assignment model for highly congested, complex urban network  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

To accurately replicate the highly congested traffic situation of a complex urban network, significant challenges are posed to current simulation-based dynamic traffic assignment (DTA) models. This thesis discusses these ...

Wei, Zheng, S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Modelling of wind turbine wakes in complex terrain using computational fluid dynamics†  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis focuses on modelling of wind turbine wakes when they are affected by real complex terrain features, such as hills and forests, and also examines the effect of the rotational momentum imparted to the downstream ...

Makridis, Alexandros

2012-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

108

Description of the Earth system model of intermediate complexity LOVECLIM version 1.2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The main characteristics of the new version 1.2 of the three-dimensional Earth system model of intermediate complexity LOVECLIM are briefly described. LOVECLIM 1.2 includes representations of the atmosphere, the ocean and ...

Goosse, H.

109

Climate Determinism Revisited: Multiple Equilibria in a Complex Climate Model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Multiple equilibria in a coupled oceanĖatmosphereĖsea ice general circulation model (GCM) of an aquaplanet with many degrees of freedom are studied. Three different stable states are found for exactly the same set of ...

Ferreira, David

110

SCANNING ACOUSTIC MICROSCOPY MODELING FOR MICROMECHANICAL MEASUREMENTS OF COMPLEX SUBSTRATES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

function of the substrate-fluid interface form the two key problems of effective SAM modeling. In the SAM modeling literature, a variety of approaches have been proposed for evaluating Eq 2.1. The approaches most frequently adopted are founded either... 1973). As seen from Eq 2.1, the evaluation of the reflected pressure field requires the computation of the angular spectrum and reflectance function. In general, these quantities can be computed independently. For angular spectrum calculation we...

Marangos, Orestes

2010-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

111

Gaussian Process Model for Collision Dynamics of Complex Molecules  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We show that a Gaussian Process model can be combined with a small number of scattering calculations to provide an accurate multi-dimensional dependence of scattering observables on the experimentally controllable parameters (such as the collision energy, temperature or external fields) as well as the potential energy surface parameters. This can be used for solving the inverse scattering problem, the prediction of collision properties of a specific molecular system based on the information for another molecule, the efficient calculation of thermally averaged observables and for reducing the error of the molecular dynamics calculations by averaging over the potential energy surface variations. We show that, trained by a combination of classical and quantum dynamics calculations, the model provides an accurate description of the scattering cross sections, even near scattering resonances. In this case, the classical calculations stabilize the model against uncertainties arising from wildly varying correlations ...

Cui, Jie

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Climate determinism revisited: multiple equilibria in a complex climate model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

by incoming solar radiation at the top of the atmosphere. We demonstrate that the multiple equilibria owe `snowball' state. Although low-order energy balance models of the climate are known to exhibit-640 Ma ago, e.g. Hoffmann et al. 1998), to a warm-house (no-ice) in the Cretaceous (e.g. Zachos et al

Marshall, John

113

E-Print Network 3.0 - arctic animals-a review Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

ROTHROCK... and the intensification of the cyclonic circulation in the eastern Arctic Ocean. The response of Arctic sea ice... into the eastern Arctic from the Canada Basin,...

114

NREL's System Advisor Model Simplifies Complex Energy Analysis (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

NREL has developed a tool -- the System Advisor Model (SAM) -- that can help decision makers analyze cost, performance, and financing of any size grid-connected solar, wind, or geothermal power project. Manufacturers, engineering and consulting firms, research and development firms, utilities, developers, venture capital firms, and international organizations use SAM for end-to-end analysis that helps determine whether and how to make investments in renewable energy projects.

Not Available

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Development of an Adjoint for a Complex Atmospheric Model, the ARPS, using TAF  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, such as operational weather predictions models, pose challenges on the applicability of AD tools. We report- ational weather prediction models are much more complex, and the problem sizes tend to be much larger as a system for mesoscale and storm-scale numerical weather prediction as well as a wide range of idealized

Gao, Jidong

116

Real-time Rendering of Complex Vector Data on 3d Terrain Models  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Real-time Rendering of Complex Vector Data on 3d Terrain Models M. Schneider, M. Guthe, and R of buildings, streets and runway (from left to right). Abstract. In this paper we present a hybrid technique model. The first part of this hybrid technique is a texture-based approach that is especially suited

Behnke, Sven

117

AIP/123-QED Fuzzy structure theory modeling of sound-insulation layers in complex  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

AIP/123-QED Fuzzy structure theory modeling of sound-insulation layers in complex vibroacoustic France (Dated: September 11, 2008) Fuzzy structure theory for sound-insulation layers 1 hal-00684495 is proposed in developing an elas- toacoustic element useful to model sound-insulation layers for compu

Paris-Sud XI, Universitť de

118

Surface Complexation Model for Strontium Sorption to Amorphous Silica and Goethite  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Strontium sorption to amorphous silica and goethite was measured as a function of pH and dissolved strontium and carbonate concentrations at 25 C. Strontium sorption gradually increases from 0 to 100% from pH 6 to 10 for both phases and requires multiple outer-sphere surface complexes to fit the data. All data are modeled using the triple layer model and the site-occupancy standard state; unless stated otherwise all strontium complexes are mononuclear. Strontium sorption to amorphous silica in the presence and absence of dissolved carbonate can be fit with tetradentate Sr{sup 2+} and SrOH{sup +} complexes on the {beta}-plane and a monodentate Sr{sup 2+} complex on the diffuse plane to account for strontium sorption at low ionic strength. Strontium sorption to goethite in the absence of dissolved carbonate can be fit with monodentate and tetradentate SrOH{sup +} complexes and a tetradentate binuclear Sr{sup 2+} species on the {beta}-plane. The binuclear complex is needed to account for enhanced sorption at high strontium surface loadings. In the presence of dissolved carbonate additional monodentate Sr{sup 2+} and SrOH{sup +} carbonate surface complexes on the {beta}-plane are needed to fit strontium sorption to goethite. Modeling strontium sorption as outer-sphere complexes is consistent with quantitative analysis of extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) on selected sorption samples that show a single first shell of oxygen atoms around strontium indicating hydrated surface complexes at the amorphous silica and goethite surfaces. Strontium surface complexation equilibrium constants determined in this study combined with other alkaline earth surface complexation constants are used to recalibrate a predictive model based on Born solvation and crystal-chemistry theory. The model is accurate to about 0.7 log K units. More studies are needed to determine the dependence of alkaline earth sorption on ionic strength and dissolved carbonate and sulfate concentrations for the development of a robust surface complexation database to estimate alkaline earth sorption in the environment.

Carroll, S; Robers, S; Criscenti, L; O'Day, P

2007-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

119

Planning the Next Generation of Arctic Ecosystem Experiments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Climate Change Experiments in High-Latitude Ecosystems; Fairbanks, Alaska, 13-14 October 2010; A 2-day climate change workshop was held at the International Arctic Research Center, University of Alaska Fairbanks. The workshop, sponsored by Biological and Environmental Research, Office of Science, U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), was attended by 45 subject matter experts from universities, DOE national laboratories, and other federal and nongovernmental organizations. The workshop sought to engage the Arctic science community in planning for a proposed Next-Generation Ecosystem Experiments (NGEE-Arctic) project in Alaska (http:// ngee.ornl.gov/). The goal of this activity is to provide data, theory, and models to improve representations of high-latitude terrestrial processes in Earth system models. In particular, there is a need to better understand the processes by which warming may drive increased plant productivity and atmospheric carbon uptake and storage in biomass and soils, as well as those processes that may drive an increase in the release of methane (CH{sub 4}) and carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) through microbial decomposition of soil carbon stored in thawing permafrost. This understanding is required to quantify the important feedback mechanisms that define the role of terrestrial processes in regional and global climate.

Hinzman, Larry D [International Arctic Research Center; Wilson, Cathy [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Arctic Solar | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160 East 300AlgoilEnergy InformationArcata, California: EnergyArco EnergyArctic Solar

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "modeling complex arctic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

ARM - Arctic Meetings of Interest  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinanInformation Desert SouthwestTechnologies |NovemberARMContactsARM Engineering andPlansAmountResearchArctic

122

Evaluation of Arctic Broadband Surface Radiation Measurements  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Arctic is a challenging environment for making in-situ radiation measurements. A standard suite of radiation sensors is typically designed to measure the total, direct and diffuse components of incoming and outgoing broadband shortwave (SW) and broadband thermal infrared, or longwave (LW) radiation. Enhancements can include various sensors for measuring irradiance in various narrower bandwidths. Many solar radiation/thermal infrared flux sensors utilize protective glass domes and some are mounted on complex mechanical platforms (solar trackers) that rotate sensors and shading devices that track the sun. High quality measurements require striking a balance between locating sensors in a pristine undisturbed location free of artificial blockage (such as buildings and towers) and providing accessibility to allow operators to clean and maintain the instruments. Three significant sources of erroneous data include solar tracker malfunctions, rime/frost/snow deposition on the instruments and operational problems due to limited operator access in extreme weather conditions. In this study, a comparison is made between the global and component sum (direct [vertical component] + diffuse) shortwave measurements. The difference between these two quantities (that theoretically should be zero) is used to illustrate the magnitude and seasonality of radiation flux measurement problems. The problem of rime/frost/snow deposition is investigated in more detail for one case study utilizing both shortwave and longwave measurements. Solutions to these operational problems are proposed that utilize measurement redundancy, more sophisticated heating and ventilation strategies and a more systematic program of operational support and subsequent data quality protocols.

Matsui, N.; Long, Charles N.; Augustine, J. A.; Halliwell, D.; Uttal, Taneil; Longenecker, D.; Niebergale, J.; Wendell, J.; Albee, R.

2012-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

123

Springtime Arctic haze contributions of submicron organic particles from European and Asian combustion sources  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The composition of Arctic aerosol, especially during the springtime Arctic haze, may play an important role in the radiative balance of the Arctic. The contribution of organic components to Arctic haze has only recently ...

Kroll, Jesse

124

E-Print Network 3.0 - arctic environmental change Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Service for Hydrometeorology and Environmental Monitoring (Roshydomet) and, Arctic... Ocean Currents in the Arctic Basin International ... Source: Washington at Seattle,...

125

Greenland's Island Rule and the Arctic Ocean circulation by Terrence M. Joyce1,2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Greenland's Island Rule and the Arctic Ocean circulation by Terrence M. Joyce1,2 and Andrey made for the flow around Greenland. Godfrey's theory has been extended to permit inclusion of Bering Archipelago in the modeled flow west of Greenland. In both models, the forcing has been applied in a quasi

Joyce, Terrence M.

126

Heavy Metal Contamination in the Taimyr Peninsula, Siberian Arctic  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Taimyr Peninsula is directly north of the world's largest heavy metal smelting complex (Norilsk, Russia). Despite this proximity, there has been little research to examine the extent of contamination of the Taimyr Peninsula. We analyzed heavy metal concentrations in lichen (Cetraria cucullata), moss (Hylocomium splendens), soils, lake sediment, freshwater fish (Salvelinus alpinus, Lota lota, and Coregonus spp.) and collared lemming (Dicrostonyx torquatus) from 13 sites between 30 and 300 km from Norilsk. Element concentrations were low in both C. cucullata and H. splendens, although concentrations of Al, Fe, Cu, Ni, and Pb were significantly higher than those in Arctic Alaska, probably due to natural differences in the geochemical environments. Inorganic surface soils had significantly higher concentrations of Cd, Zn, Pb, and Mg than inorganic soils at depth, although a lake sediment core from the eastern Taimyr Peninsula indicated no recent enrichment by atmospherically transported elements. Tissue concentrations of heavy metals in fish and lemming were not elevated relative to other Arctic sites. Our results show that the impact of the Norilsk smelting complex is primarily localized rather than regional, and does not extend northward beyond 100 km.

Allen-Gil, Susan M.; Ford, Jesse; Lasorsa, Brenda K.; Monetti, Matthew; Vlasova, Tamara; Landers, Dixon H.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Long-term ice sheetclimate interactions under anthropogenic greenhouse forcing simulated with a complex Earth System Model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

with a complex Earth System Model Miren Vizcai¬īno √? Uwe Mikolajewicz √? Matthias Gro¬®ger √? Ernst Maier-Reimer √?-millennia simulations have been performed with a complex Earth System Model (ESM) for different anthropogenic climate climate change √Ā Meridional overturning circulation √Ā Earth system modelling √Ā Sea level 1 Introduction

Winguth, Arne

128

New probabilistic modeling and simulation methods for complex time-dependent systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper is a tutorial that presents a new method of modeling the probabilistic description of failure mechanisms in complex, time-dependent systems. The method of modeling employs a state vector differential equation representation of cumulative failure probabilities derived from Markov models associated with certain generic fault trees, and the method automatically includes common cause/common mode statistical dependencies, as well as time-related dependencies not considered in the literature previously. Simulations of these models employ a population dynamics representation of a probability space involving probability particle transitions among the Markov disjoint states. The particle transitions are governed by a random, Monte Carlo selection process.

Bartholomew, R.J.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

HIDDEN MARKOV TREE MODELING OF COMPLEX WAVELET TRANSFORMS Hyeokho Choi,Justin Romberg, Richard Baraniuk  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

are statistically dependent along the branches of the wavelet tree. The energy compaction implied by the 2HIDDEN MARKOV TREE MODELING OF COMPLEX WAVELET TRANSFORMS Hyeokho Choi,Justin Romberg, Richard Baraniuk Dept. of Electrical and Computer Engineering Rice University Houston, TX 77005,USA ABSTRACT

130

Energy and Uncertainty: Models and Algorithms for Complex Energy Systems Warren B. Powell  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, using a simple energy storage problem as a case application. Using this setting, we describe a common umbrella. The challenge of creating an efficient, sustainable energy system requires solvingEnergy and Uncertainty: Models and Algorithms for Complex Energy Systems Warren B. Powell

Powell, Warren B.

131

MICROELECTRONIC ENGINEERING RESEARCH CONFERENCE 2003 1 Low Complexity Gaussian Mixture Model-based Block  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

is jointly Gaussian, hence Lloyd- Max non-uniform scalar quantisers are used in traditional block quan-based Block Quantisation of Images Stephen So and Kuldip K. Paliwal Abstract--In this paper, we present a low complexity version of Gaus- sian mixture model-based block quantisation for images. The latter coding method

132

Modeling Complex Control Systems to Identify Remotely Accessible Devices Vulnerable to Cyber Attack1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and SCADA systems such as: "Which is the most vulnerable device of our power substation under an attack to remote power substations and control centers comes with the added risk of cyber attack by hackers andModeling Complex Control Systems to Identify Remotely Accessible Devices Vulnerable to Cyber Attack

Krings, Axel W.

133

Bayesian Emulation of Complex Multi-Output and Dynamic Computer Models  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Bayesian Emulation of Complex Multi-Output and Dynamic Computer Models Stefano Conti Anthony O the case). In particular, standard Monte Carlo-based methods of sensitivity analysis (extensively reviewed'Hagan, 2002), offering substantial efficiency gains over standard Monte Carlo-based meth- ods. These authors

Oakley, Jeremy

134

Path Analysis Models of an Autonomous Agent in a Complex Environment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

25 Path Analysis Models of an Autonomous Agent in a Complex Environment Paul R. Cohen, David M populated by autonomous agents. It is a simulation of forest fires in Yellowstone National Park in unpredictable ways due to wind speed and direction, terrain and elevation, fuel type and moisture content

135

Hybrid Car-Parrinello/Molecular Mechanics Modelling of Transition Metal Complexes: Structure, Dynamics and Reactivity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hybrid Car-Parrinello/Molecular Mechanics Modelling of Transition Metal Complexes: Structure). We have recently developed a QM/MM extension of a Car-Parrinello scheme [5]. These hybrid Car functional theory embedded in a classical force field description. The power of such a combined Car

Guidoni, Leonardo

136

Topology and current ribbons: A model for current, reconnection and flaring in a complex, evolving corona  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(MCC), for the build≠up of magnetic energy in a three≠dimensional corona of arbitrary geometry. The MCCTopology and current ribbons: A model for current, reconnection and flaring in a complex, evolving of energy from the Sun's chromosphere and corona. The build≠up and release of energy in a flare has been

Longcope, Dana

137

New Logic Modeling Paradigms for Complex System Reliability and Risk Analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

New Logic Modeling Paradigms for Complex System Reliability and Risk Analysis Antoine Rauzy Chair ground ... is a mature technology ... is a great tool for decision making So, what's next? ∑ More://www.lgi.ecp.fr/pmwiki.php/PagesPerso/ARauzy *Sponsored by SAFRAN group #12;Probabilistic Risk Assessment ... ... is now established on a solid scientific

Bernstein, Joseph B.

138

Modeling and Algorithmic Approaches to Constitutively-Complex, Micro-structured Fluids  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The team for this Project made significant progress on modeling and algorithmic approaches to hydrodynamics of fluids with complex microstructure. Our advances are broken down into modeling and algorithmic approaches. In experiments a driven magnetic bead in a complex fluid accelerates out of the Stokes regime and settles into another apparent linear response regime. The modeling explains the take-off as a deformation of entanglements, and the longtime behavior is a nonlinear, far-from-equilibrium property. Furthermore, the model has predictive value, as we can tune microstructural properties relative to the magnetic force applied to the bead to exhibit all possible behaviors. Wave-theoretic probes of complex fluids have been extended in two significant directions, to small volumes and the nonlinear regime. Heterogeneous stress and strain features that lie beyond experimental capability were studied. It was shown that nonlinear penetration of boundary stress in confined viscoelastic fluids is not monotone, indicating the possibility of interlacing layers of linear and nonlinear behavior, and thus layers of variable viscosity. Models, algorithms, and codes were developed and simulations performed leading to phase diagrams of nanorod dispersion hydrodynamics in parallel shear cells and confined cavities representative of film and membrane processing conditions. Hydrodynamic codes for polymeric fluids are extended to include coupling between microscopic and macroscopic models, and to the strongly nonlinear regime.

Forest, Mark Gregory [University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill] [University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

2014-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

139

Pluton-dyke relationships in a Variscan granitic complex from AMS and gravity modelling. Inception of the extensional tectonics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Pluton-dyke relationships in a Variscan granitic complex from AMS and gravity modelling. Inception Orléans cedex 2, France Abstract The Carnac granitic Complex (South Armorican Domain, Western France zones in the western part of the complex, interpreted as the pluton feeder zones. The internal granitic

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

140

Woodgate, Arctic Ocean Circulation Page 1:13 February 2012 ARCTIC OCEAN CIRCULATION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

deep) Bering Strait, through which about 0.8Sv (1Sv=106 m3 s-1 ) of water enters the Arctic. Properties: 206-221-3268 Accepted for Nature Education Knowledge Project, May 2012 Welcome to the Arctic Ocean Circle, contains deep (~ 4500m) basins, the slowest spreading ridges in the world, and about 15

Washington at Seattle, University of

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "modeling complex arctic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Simulation of complex glazing products; from optical data measurements to model based predictive controls  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Complex glazing systems such as venetian blinds, fritted glass and woven shades require more detailed optical and thermal input data for their components than specular non light-redirecting glazing systems. Various methods for measuring these data sets are described in this paper. These data sets are used in multiple simulation tools to model the thermal and optical properties of complex glazing systems. The output from these tools can be used to generate simplified rating values or as an input to other simulation tools such as whole building annual energy programs, or lighting analysis tools. I also describe some of the challenges of creating a rating system for these products and which factors affect this rating. A potential future direction of simulation and building operations is model based predictive controls, where detailed computer models are run in real-time, receiving data for an actual building and providing control input to building elements such as shades.

Kohler, Christian

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Generative model selection using a scalable and size-independent complex network classifier  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Real networks exhibit nontrivial topological features, such as heavy-tailed degree distribution, high clustering, and small-worldness. Researchers have developed several generative models for synthesizing artificial networks that are structurally similar to real networks. An important research problem is to identify the generative model that best fits to a target network. In this paper, we investigate this problem and our goal is to select the model that is able to generate graphs similar to a given network instance. By the means of generating synthetic networks with seven outstanding generative models, we have utilized machine learning methods to develop a decision tree for model selection. Our proposed method, which is named ďGenerative Model Selection for Complex Networks,Ē outperforms existing methods with respect to accuracy, scalability, and size-independence.

Motallebi, Sadegh, E-mail: motallebi@ce.sharif.edu; Aliakbary, Sadegh, E-mail: aliakbary@ce.sharif.edu; Habibi, Jafar, E-mail: jhabibi@sharif.edu [Department of Computer Engineering, Sharif University of Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)] [Department of Computer Engineering, Sharif University of Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

2013-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

143

Annotated bibliography of the Northwest Territories action on water component of the Arctic environmental strategy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Water-related research conducted under the 1991--97 Arctic Environmental Strategy resulted in the production of 215 publications listed in this bibliography. The main section sorts citations by author and then by title. All citations are annotated and are keyed to the database of the Arctic Science and Technology Information System (ASTIS). The bibliography has three indexes that refer back to the main section: Subject, geographic area, and title. Topics covered include Northwest Territories hydrology, environmental fate of contaminants, water quality, snow, the water cycle, modelling, and limnology.

Goodwin, R.

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Economic feasibility of shipping containers through the Arctic  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

As the Arctic ice cover continues to retreat, the possibility of regular transit through the Arctic becomes an increasing reality. Liner companies could take advantage of distance savings (up to 4000 nautical miles less ...

Pollock, Russell (Russell Clayton)

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Tuktoyaktuk : responsive strategies for a new Arctic urbanism  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Canadian Arctic is facing a set of compounding crises that will drastically impact the future of its coastal frontier. At a time when climate change is having a detrimental impact on the Arctic landscape, Northern ...

Ritchot, Pamela (Pamela Rae)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Anthropogenic Impacts on Polar Bear Biology and the Arctic Ecosystem.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Despite its relative distance from most populated regions of the world, the Arctic has been significantly impacted by anthropogenic contamination and climate change. The entire Arctic ecosystem has been affected, with upper trophic level predators...

Jordan, John E.

2013-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

147

QMU as an approach to strengthening the predictive capabilities of complex models.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Complex systems are made up of multiple interdependent parts, and the behavior of the entire system cannot always be directly inferred from the behavior of the individual parts. They are nonlinear and system responses are not necessarily additive. Examples of complex systems include energy, cyber and telecommunication infrastructures, human and animal social structures, and biological structures such as cells. To meet the goals of infrastructure development, maintenance, and protection for cyber-related complex systems, novel modeling and simulation technology is needed. Sandia has shown success using M&S in the nuclear weapons (NW) program. However, complex systems represent a significant challenge and relative departure from the classical M&S exercises, and many of the scientific and mathematical M&S processes must be re-envisioned. Specifically, in the NW program, requirements and acceptable margins for performance, resilience, and security are well-defined and given quantitatively from the start. The Quantification of Margins and Uncertainties (QMU) process helps to assess whether or not these safety, reliability and performance requirements have been met after a system has been developed. In this sense, QMU is used as a sort of check that requirements have been met once the development process is completed. In contrast, performance requirements and margins may not have been defined a priori for many complex systems, (i.e. the Internet, electrical distribution grids, etc.), particularly not in quantitative terms. This project addresses this fundamental difference by investigating the use of QMU at the start of the design process for complex systems. Three major tasks were completed. First, the characteristics of the cyber infrastructure problem were collected and considered in the context of QMU-based tools. Second, UQ methodologies for the quantification of model discrepancies were considered in the context of statistical models of cyber activity. Third, Bayesian methods for optimal testing in the QMU framework were developed. This completion of this project represent an increased understanding of how to apply and use the QMU process as a means for improving model predictions of the behavior of complex systems. 4

Gray, Genetha Anne; Boggs, Paul T.; Grace, Matthew D.

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

The Arctic as a test case for an assessment of climate impacts on national security.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Arctic region is rapidly changing in a way that will affect the rest of the world. Parts of Alaska, western Canada, and Siberia are currently warming at twice the global rate. This warming trend is accelerating permafrost deterioration, coastal erosion, snow and ice loss, and other changes that are a direct consequence of climate change. Climatologists have long understood that changes in the Arctic would be faster and more intense than elsewhere on the planet, but the degree and speed of the changes were underestimated compared to recent observations. Policy makers have not yet had time to examine the latest evidence or appreciate the nature of the consequences. Thus, the abruptness and severity of an unfolding Arctic climate crisis has not been incorporated into long-range planning. The purpose of this report is to briefly review the physical basis for global climate change and Arctic amplification, summarize the ongoing observations, discuss the potential consequences, explain the need for an objective risk assessment, develop scenarios for future change, review existing modeling capabilities and the need for better regional models, and finally to make recommendations for Sandia's future role in preparing our leaders to deal with impacts of Arctic climate change on national security. Accurate and credible regional-scale climate models are still several years in the future, and those models are essential for estimating climate impacts around the globe. This study demonstrates how a scenario-based method may be used to give insights into climate impacts on a regional scale and possible mitigation. Because of our experience in the Arctic and widespread recognition of the Arctic's importance in the Earth climate system we chose the Arctic as a test case for an assessment of climate impacts on national security. Sandia can make a swift and significant contribution by applying modeling and simulation tools with internal collaborations as well as with outside organizations. Because changes in the Arctic environment are happening so rapidly, a successful program will be one that can adapt very quickly to new information as it becomes available, and can provide decision makers with projections on the 1-5 year time scale over which the most disruptive, high-consequence changes are likely to occur. The greatest short-term impact would be to initiate exploratory simulations to discover new emergent and robust phenomena associated with one or more of the following changing systems: Arctic hydrological cycle, sea ice extent, ocean and atmospheric circulation, permafrost deterioration, carbon mobilization, Greenland ice sheet stability, and coastal erosion. Sandia can also contribute to new technology solutions for improved observations in the Arctic, which is currently a data-sparse region. Sensitivity analyses have the potential to identify thresholds which would enable the collaborative development of 'early warning' sensor systems to seek predicted phenomena that might be precursory to major, high-consequence changes. Much of this work will require improved regional climate models and advanced computing capabilities. Socio-economic modeling tools can help define human and national security consequences. Formal uncertainty quantification must be an integral part of any results that emerge from this work.

Taylor, Mark A.; Zak, Bernard Daniel; Backus, George A.; Ivey, Mark D.; Boslough, Mark Bruce Elrick

2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

NGEE Arctic Webcam Photographs, Barrow Environmental Observatory, Barrow, Alaska  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

The NGEE Arctic Webcam (PTZ Camera) captures two views of seasonal transitions from its generally south-facing position on a tower located at the Barrow Environmental Observatory near Barrow, Alaska. Images are captured every 30 minutes. Historical images are available for download. The camera is operated by the U.S. DOE sponsored Next Generation Ecosystem Experiments - Arctic (NGEE Arctic) project.

Bob Busey; Larry Hinzman

150

Lesson Summary Students will learn about the Arctic Beaufort Sea  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Lesson Summary Students will learn about the Arctic Beaufort Sea and research the adaptations of people and animals in the arctic regions. They will also learn about how their actions can affect the Arctic and learn about the International Polar Year. Prior Knowledge & Skills · Research skills

Mojzsis, Stephen J.

151

Simulating Arctic Climate Warmth and Icefield Retreat in the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Devon, and Meighen ice caps in the Canadian Arctic, and possibly in Camp Century (northwest Greenland the entire western Arctic from 57-N to 85-N, including Greenland and smaller scale ice caps in Iceland Project members In the future, Arctic warming and the melting of polar glaciers will be considerable

Ingůlfsson, ”lafur

152

NAO influence on net sea ice production and exchanges in the Arctic region  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NAO influence on net sea ice production and exchanges in the Arctic region Aixue Hu, Claes Rooth and Rainer Bleck February 18, 2003 Abstract The variability of the net sea ice production and the sea ice circulation model. The wind driven divergence (or ice flux export) is the major factor controlling the net sea

Hu, Aixue

153

Although both the Arctic and Antarctic are subject to a similar annual cycle of solar  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Although both the Arctic and Antarctic are subject to a similar annual cycle of solar radiation influence is emerging. Model simulations provided to the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC. In the Antarctic, the attribution story is different. A poleward contraction and increase in circumpolar westerly

Francis, Jennifer

154

Although both the Arctic and Antarctic are subject to a similar annual cycle of solar  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

177 Although both the Arctic and Antarctic are subject to a similar annual cycle of solar radiation influence is emerging. Model sim- ulations provided to the Intergovernmen- tal Panel on Climate Change (IPCC. In the Antarctic, the attribution story is different. A poleward contraction and increase in circumpolar westerly

155

Status of Wind-Diesel Applications in Arctic Climates: Preprint  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The rising cost of diesel fuel and the environmental regulation for its transportation, use, and storage, combined with the clear impacts of increased arctic temperatures, is driving remote communities to examine alternative methods of providing power. Over the past few years, wind energy has been increasingly used to reduce diesel fuel consumption, providing economic, environmental, and security benefits to the energy supply of communities from Alaska to Antarctica. This summary paper describes the current state of wind-diesel systems, reviews the operation of wind-diesel plants in cold climates, discusses current research activities pertaining to these systems, and addresses their technical and commercial challenges. System architectures, dispatch strategies, and operating experience from a variety of wind-diesel systems in Alaska will be reviewed. Specific focus will also be given to the control of power systems with large amounts of wind generation and the complexities of replacing diesel engine waste heat with excess wind energy, a key factor in assessing power plants for retrofit. A brief overview of steps for assessing the viability of retrofitting diesel power systems with wind technologies will also be provided. Because of the large number of isolated diesel minigrids, the market for adding wind to these systems is substantial, specifically in arctic climates and on islands that rely on diesel-only power generation.

Baring-Gould, I.; Corbus, D.

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Building of a conceptual model at UE25-c hole complex  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

US Geological Survey and Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory are attempting to construct a conceptual model of the UE25-c hole complex. An interdisciplinary approach is discussed where all the available data are integrated. Site geology, borehole geophysics and hydraulic test results at UE25-c hole complex suggest that groundwater flow may be controlled by fractures and faults. Significant clusters of fractures in the C-holes are perpendicular to bedding and may be cooling cracks or may be tectonically induced. Unresolved evidence indicates that a fault may intersect the C-holes. For these reasons a porous medium approximation of the rock in the saturated zone at the scale of a well test may be inappropriate. Instead, an Equivalent Discontinuum Model is proposed to model the UE25-c complex hydrology. EDM does not reproduce every geometrical detail of the real system, but instead, attempts to reproduce the observed behavior of the fracture system while preserving the inherent discontinuous nature of the system. 6 refs., 7 figs.

Karasaki, K.; Landsfeld, M. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (USA); Grossenbacher, K. [Johns Hopkins Univ., Baltimore, MD (USA). Dept. of Earth and Planetary Sciences

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Computationally Efficient Use of Derivatives in Emulation of Complex Computational Models  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We will investigate the use of derivative information in complex computer model emulation when the correlation function is of the compactly supported Bohman class. To this end, a Gaussian process model similar to that used by Kaufman et al. (2011) is extended to a situation where first partial derivatives in each dimension are calculated at each input site (i.e. using gradients). A simulation study in the ten-dimensional case is conducted to assess the utility of the Bohman correlation function against strictly positive correlation functions when a high degree of sparsity is induced.

Williams, Brian J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Marcy, Peter W. [University of Wyoming

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

158

Age characteristics in a multidecadal Arctic sea ice simulation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Results from adding a tracer for age of sea ice to a sophisticated sea ice model that is widely used for climate studies are presented. The consistent simulation of ice age, dynamics, and thermodynamics in the model shows explicitly that the loss of Arctic perennial ice has accelerated in the past three decades, as has been seen in satellite-derived observations. Our model shows that the September ice age average across the Northern Hemisphere varies from about 5 to 8 years, and the ice is much younger (about 2--3 years) in late winter because of the expansion of first-year ice. We find seasonal ice on average comprises about 5% of the total ice area in September, but as much as 1.34 x 10{sup 6} km{sup 2} survives in some years. Our simulated ice age in the late 1980s and early 1990s declined markedly in agreement with other studies. After this period of decline, the ice age began to recover, but in the final years of the simulation very little young ice remains after the melt season, a strong indication that the age of the pack will again decline in the future as older ice classes fail to be replenished. The Arctic ice pack has fluctuated between older and younger ice types over the past 30 years, while ice area, thickness, and volume all declined over the same period, with an apparent acceleration in the last decade.

Hunke, Elizabeth C [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Bitz, Cecllia M [UNIV. OF WASHINGTON

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Determining Wind Turbine Gearbox Model Complexity Using Measurement Validation and Cost Comparison: Preprint  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Gearbox Reliability Collaborative (GRC) has conducted extensive field and dynamometer test campaigns on two heavily instrumented wind turbine gearboxes. In this paper, data from the planetary stage is used to evaluate the accuracy and computation time of numerical models of the gearbox. First, planet-bearing load and motion data is analyzed to characterize planetary stage behavior in different environments and to derive requirements for gearbox models and life calculations. Second, a set of models are constructed that represent different levels of fidelity. Simulations of the test conditions are compared to the test data and the computational cost of the models are compared. The test data suggests that the planet-bearing life calculations should be made separately for each bearing on a row due to unequal load distribution. It also shows that tilting of the gear axes is related to planet load share. The modeling study concluded that fully flexible models were needed to predict planet-bearing loading in some cases, although less complex models were able to achieve good correlation in the field-loading case. Significant differences in planet load share were found in simulation and were dependent on the scope of the model and the bearing stiffness model used.

LaCava, W.; Xing, Y.; Guo, Y.; Moan, T.

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Final Technical Report for Project "Improving the Simulation of Arctic Clouds in CCSM3"  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project has focused on the simulation of Arctic clouds in CCSM3 and how the modeled cloud amount (and climate) can be improved substantially by altering the parameterized low cloud fraction. The new formula, dubbed 'freeezedry', alleviates the bias of excessive low clouds during polar winter by reducing the cloud amount under very dry conditions. During winter, freezedry decreases the low cloud amount over the coldest regions in high latitudes by over 50% locally and more than 30% averaged across the Arctic (Fig. 1). The cloud reduction causes an Arctic-wide drop of 15 W m{sup -2} in surface cloud radiative forcing (CRF) during winter and about a 50% decrease in mean annual Arctic CRF. Consequently, wintertime surface temperatures fall by up to 4 K on land and 2-8 K over the Arctic Ocean, thus significantly reducing the model's pronounced warm bias (Fig. 1). While improving the polar climate simulation in CCSM3, freezedry has virtually no influence outside of very cold regions (Fig. 2) or during summer (Fig. 3), which are space and time domains that were not targeted. Furthermore, the simplicity of this parameterization allows it to be readily incorporated into other GCMs, many of which also suffer from excessive wintertime polar cloudiness, based on the results from the CMIP3 archive (Vavrus et al., 2008). Freezedry also affects CCSM3's sensitivity to greenhouse forcing. In a transient-CO{sub 2} experiment, the model version with freezedry warms up to 20% less in the North Polar and South Polar regions (1.5 K and 0.5 K smaller warming, respectively) (Fig. 4). Paradoxically, the muted high-latitude response occurs despite a much larger increase in cloud amount with freezedry during non-summer months (when clouds warm the surface), apparently because of the colder modern reference climate. These results of the freezedry parameterization have recently been published (Vavrus and D. Waliser, 2008: An improved parameterization for simulating Arctic cloud amount in the CCSM3 climate model. J. Climate, 21, 5673-5687.). The article also provides a novel synthesis of surface- and satellite-based Arctic cloud observations that show how much the new freezedry parameterization improves the simulated cloud amount in high latitudes (Fig. 3). Freezedry has been incorporated into the CCSM3.5 version, in which it successfully limits the excessive polar clouds, and may be used in CCSM4. Material from this work is also appearing in a synthesis article on future Arctic cloud changes (Vavrus, D. Waliser, J. Francis, and A. Schweiger, 'Simulations of 20th and 21st century Arctic cloud amount in the global climate models assessed in the IPCC AR4', accepted in Climate Dynamics) and was used in a collaborative paper on Arctic cloud-sea ice coupling (Schweiger, A., R. Lindsay, S. Vavrus, and J. Francis, 2008: Relationships between Arctic sea ice and clouds during autumn. J. Climate, 21, 4799-4810.). This research was presented at the 2007 CCSM Annual Workshop, as well as the CCSM's 2007 Atmospheric Model Working Group and Polar Working Group Meetings. The findings were also shown at the 2007 Climate Change Prediction Program's Science Team Meeting. In addition, I served as an instructor at the International Arctic Research Center's (IARC) Summer School on Arctic Climate Modeling in Fairbanks this summer, where I presented on the challenges and techniques used in simulating polar clouds. I also contributed to the development of a new Arctic System Model by attending a workshop in Colorado this summer on this fledgling project. Finally, an outreach activity for the general public has been the development of an interactive web site (model/visualization/ipcc/>) that displays Arctic cloud amount in the CMIP3 climate model archive under present and future scenarios. This site allows users to make polar and global maps of a variety of climate variables to investigate the individual and ensemble-mean GCM response to greenhouse warming and the extent to which models adequately represent Arctic clouds in the modern clima

Stephen J. Vavrus

2008-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "modeling complex arctic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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161

Isomerization of methyl linoleate on ruthenium(III) alkoxide complex; Mathematical modeling  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The isomerization of methyl linoleate using ruthenium alkoxide complexes is described. With alcohols, such as isopropyl alcohol (IPA), 1-butanol, 1-hexanol, and 1-octanol, isomerization of double bonds to produce a conjugated system is the main reaction, with hydrogenation being the side reaction. The latter is formed via the conjugated product. Based on kinetic and infrared spectroscopic data, it is concluded that the active catalytic species is a ruthenium hydride complex formed by the decomposition of the unstable alkoxide. The reaction is mathematically modeled, and the rate parameters are obtained by fitting the simulation to experimental data. These values are compared with data obtained from reactions carried out with supported ruthenium-nickel heterogeneous catalyst.

Mukesh, D.; Narasimhan, C.S.; Ramnarayan, K.; Deshpande, V.M

1989-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Arctic Energy Technology Development Laboratory  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Arctic Energy Technology Development Laboratory was created by the University of Alaska Fairbanks in response to a congressionally mandated funding opportunity through the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), specifically to encourage research partnerships between the university, the Alaskan energy industry, and the DOE. The enabling legislation permitted research in a broad variety of topics particularly of interest to Alaska, including providing more efficient and economical electrical power generation in rural villages, as well as research in coal, oil, and gas. The contract was managed as a cooperative research agreement, with active project monitoring and management from the DOE. In the eight years of this partnership, approximately 30 projects were funded and completed. These projects, which were selected using an industry panel of Alaskan energy industry engineers and managers, cover a wide range of topics, such as diesel engine efficiency, fuel cells, coal combustion, methane gas hydrates, heavy oil recovery, and water issues associated with ice road construction in the oil fields of the North Slope. Each project was managed as a separate DOE contract, and the final technical report for each completed project is included with this final report. The intent of this process was to address the energy research needs of Alaska and to develop research capability at the university. As such, the intent from the beginning of this process was to encourage development of partnerships and skills that would permit a transition to direct competitive funding opportunities managed from funding sources. This project has succeeded at both the individual project level and at the institutional development level, as many of the researchers at the university are currently submitting proposals to funding agencies, with some success.

Sukumar Bandopadhyay; Charles Chamberlin; Robert Chaney; Gang Chen; Godwin Chukwu; James Clough; Steve Colt; Anthony Covescek; Robert Crosby; Abhijit Dandekar; Paul Decker; Brandon Galloway; Rajive Ganguli; Catherine Hanks; Rich Haut; Kristie Hilton; Larry Hinzman; Gwen Holdman; Kristie Holland; Robert Hunter; Ron Johnson; Thomas Johnson; Doug Kame; Mikhail Kaneveskly; Tristan Kenny; Santanu Khataniar; Abhijeet Kulkami; Peter Lehman; Mary Beth Leigh; Jenn-Tai Liang; Michael Lilly; Chuen-Sen Lin; Paul Martin; Pete McGrail; Dan Miller; Debasmita Misra; Nagendra Nagabhushana; David Ogbe; Amanda Osborne; Antoinette Owen; Sharish Patil; Rocky Reifenstuhl; Doug Reynolds; Eric Robertson; Todd Schaef; Jack Schmid; Yuri Shur; Arion Tussing; Jack Walker; Katey Walter; Shannon Watson; Daniel White; Gregory White; Mark White; Richard Wies; Tom Williams; Dennis Witmer; Craig Wollard; Tao Zhu

2008-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

163

Dynamics of Arctic and Sub-Arctic Climate and Atmospheric Circulation: Diagnosis of Mechanisms and Biases Using Data Assimilation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The overall goal of work performed under this grant is to enhance understanding of simulations of present-day climate and greenhouse gas-induced climate change. The examination of present-day climate also includes diagnostic intercomparison of model simulations and observed mean climate and climate variability using reanalysis and satellite datasets. Enhanced understanding is desirable 1) as a prerequisite for improving simulations; 2) for assessing the credibility of model simulations and their usefulness as tools for decision support; and 3) as a means to identify robust behaviors which commonly occur over a wide range of models, and may yield insights regarding the dominant physical mechanisms which determine mean climate and produce climate change. A further objective is to investigate the use of data assimilation as a means for examining and correcting model biases. Our primary focus is on the Arctic, but the scope of the work was expanded to include the global climate system.

Eric T. DeWeaver

2010-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

164

Dynamics of Arctic and Sub-Arctic Climate and Atmospheric Circulation: Diagnosis of Mechanisms and Biases Using Data Assimilation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is the final report for DOE grant DE-FG02-07ER64434 to Eric DeWeaver at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. The overall goal of work performed under this grant is to enhance understanding of simulations of present-day climate and greenhouse gas-induced climate change. Enhanced understanding is desirable 1) as a prerequisite for improving simulations; 2) for assessing the credibility of model simulations and their usefulness as tools for decision support; and 3) as a means to identify robust behaviors which commonly occur over a wide range of models, and may yield insights regarding the dominant physical mechanisms which determine mean climate and produce climate change. A furthe objective is to investigate the use of data assimilation as a means for examining and correcting model biases. Our primary focus is on the Arctic, but the scope of the work was expanded to include the global climate system to the extent that research targets of opportunity present themselves. Research performed under the grant falls into five main research areas: 1) a study of data assimilation using an ensemble filter with the atmospheric circulation model of the National Center for Atmospheric Research, in which both conventional observations and observations of the refraction of radio waves from GPS satellites were used to constrain the atmospheric state of the model; 2) research on the likely future status of polar bears, in which climate model simluations were used to assess the effectiveness of climate change mitigation efforts in preserving the habitat of polar bears, now considered a threatened species under global warming; 3) as assessment of the credibility of Arctic sea ice thickness simulations from climate models; 4) An examination of the persistence and reemergence of Northern Hemisphere sea ice area anomalies in climate model simulations and in observations; 5) An examination of the roles played by changes in net radiation and surface relative humidity in determine the response of the hydrological cycle to global warming.

Eric T. DeWeaver

2010-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

165

MODELING THE GENERATION AND DISSOCIATION OF THE BORON-OXYGEN COMPLEX IN B-DOPED CZ-SI  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MODELING THE GENERATION AND DISSOCIATION OF THE BORON-OXYGEN COMPLEX IN B-DOPED CZ-SI Bianca Lim Emmerthal, Germany ABSTRACT We demonstrate that the boron-oxygen (BsO2i) re- combination center responsible of this complex with the oxygen dimer O2i into XO2i, thereby reducing the concen- tration of unbound O2i

166

Evaluating Model Parameterizations of Arctic Processes  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsing ZirconiaPolicy and Assistance100 ton StanatAccepted|the Effect of

167

Circumpolar Arctic Tundra Vegetation Change Is Linked  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Plant Biology, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan Received 7 December 2009; accepted 4Circumpolar Arctic Tundra Vegetation Change Is Linked to Sea Ice Decline Uma S. Bhatt*,1 Donald A Institute, and Department of Atmospheric Sciences, University of Alaska Fairbanks, Fairbanks, Alaska

Bhatt, Uma

168

The Evolutionary Design Model (EDM) for the design of complex engineered systems : Masdar City as a case study  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis develops a framework for constructing an Evolutionary Design Model (EDM) that would enhance the design of complex systems through an efficient process. The framework proposed is generic and suggests a group of ...

Alfaris, Anas (Anas Faris)

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Numerical simulation of swirling flow in complex hydroturbine draft tube using unsteady statistical turbulence models  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A numerical method is developed for carrying out unsteady Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (URANS) simulations and detached-eddy simulations (DESs) in complex 3D geometries. The method is applied to simulate incompressible swirling flow in a typical hydroturbine draft tube, which consists of a strongly curved 90 degree elbow and two piers. The governing equations are solved with a second-order-accurate, finite-volume, dual-time-stepping artificial compressibility approach for a Reynolds number of 1.1 million on a mesh with 1.8 million nodes. The geometrical complexities of the draft tube are handled using domain decomposition with overset (chimera) grids. Numerical simulations show that unsteady statistical turbulence models can capture very complex 3D flow phenomena dominated by geometry-induced, large-scale instabilities and unsteady coherent structures such as the onset of vortex breakdown and the formation of the unsteady rope vortex downstream of the turbine runner. Both URANS and DES appear to yield the general shape and magnitude of mean velocity profiles in reasonable agreement with measurements. Significant discrepancies among the DES and URANS predictions of the turbulence statistics are also observed in the straight downstream diffuser.

Paik, Joongcheol [University of Minnesota; Sotiropoulos, Fotis [University of Minnesota; Sale, Michael J [ORNL

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Intercomparison and Evaluation of Global Aerosol Microphysical Properties among AeroCom Models of a Range of Complexity  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Many of the next generation of global climate models will include aerosol schemes which explicitly simulate the microphysical processes that determine the particle size distribution. These models enable aerosol optical properties and cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) concentrations to be determined by fundamental aerosol processes, which should lead to a more physically based simulation of aerosol direct and indirect radiative forcings. This study examines the global variation in particle size distribution simulated by twelve global aerosol microphysics models to quantify model diversity and to identify any common biases against observations. Evaluation against size distribution measurements from a new European network of aerosol supersites shows that the mean model agrees quite well with the observations at many sites on the annual mean, but there are some seasonal biases common to many sites. In particular, at many of these European sites, the accumulation mode number concentration is biased low during winter and Aitken mode concentrations tend to be overestimated in winter and underestimated in summer. At high northern latitudes, the models strongly underpredict Aitken and accumulation particle concentrations compared to the measurements, consistent with previous studies that have highlighted the poor performance of global aerosol models in the Arctic. In the marine boundary layer, the models capture the observed meridional variation in the size distribution, which is dominated by the Aitken mode at high latitudes, with an increasing concentration of accumulation particles with decreasing latitude. Considering vertical profiles, the models reproduce the observed peak in total particle concentrations in the upper troposphere due to new particle formation, although modelled peak concentrations tend to be biased high over Europe. Overall, the results suggest that most global aerosol microphysics models simulate the global variation of the particle size distribution with a good degree of skill, but some models are in poor agreement with the observations. Further work is required to better constrain size-resolved primary and secondary particle number sources, and an improved understanding of nucleation and growth (e.g. the role of nitrate and secondary organics) will improve the fidelity of simulated particle size distributions.

Mann, G. W.; Carslaw, K. S.; Reddington, C. L.; Pringle, K. J.; Schulz, M.; Asmi, A.; Spracklen, D. V.; Ridley, D. A.; Woodhouse, M. T.; Lee, L. A.; Zhang, Kai; Ghan, Steven J.; Easter, Richard C.; Liu, Xiaohong; Stier, P.; Lee, Y. H.; Adams, P. J.; Tost, H.; Lelieveld, J.; Bauer, S.; Tsigaridis, Kostas; van Noije, T.; Strunk, A.; Vignati, E.; Bellouin, N.; Dalvi, M.; Johnson, C. E.; Bergman, T.; Kokkola, H.; Von Salzen, Knut; Yu, Fangqun; Luo, Gan; Petzold, A.; Heintzenberg, J.; Clarke, A. D.; Ogren, J. A.; Gras, J.; Baltensperger, Urs; Kaminski, U.; Jennings, S. G.; O'Dowd, C. D.; Harrison, R. M.; Beddows, D. C.; Kulmala, M.; Viisanen, Y.; Ulevicius, V.; Mihalopoulos, Nikos; Zdimal, V.; Fiebig, M.; Hansson, H. C.; Swietlicki, E.; Henzing, J. S.

2014-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

171

E-Print Network 3.0 - arctic ocean expedition Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Arctic will lead to a better understanding of how the Summary: between the U.S. and Russia began with the expedition of the Bering and Chukchi Seas ( Arctic Ocean... . Arctic...

172

E-Print Network 3.0 - arctic wind technology Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

arctic wind technology Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: arctic wind technology Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 NOAA's Arctic VisiON &...

173

APPLICATION OF CARBOHYDRATES AND PHENOLS AS BIOMARKERS TO STUDY DISSOLVED ORGANIC MATTER RESERVOIRS IN ARCTIC RIVERS.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Arctic rivers are the dominant pathways for the transport of terrestrial dissolved organic carbon to the Arctic Ocean, but knowledge of sources, transformations and transfer of organic carbon and nitrogen in Arctic river watersheds is extremely...

McMahon, Rachel

2014-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

174

U.S. Geological Survery Oil and Gas Resource Assessment of the Russian Arctic  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) recently completed a study of undiscovered petroleum resources in the Russian Arctic as a part of its Circum-Arctic Resource Appraisal (CARA), which comprised three broad areas of work: geological mapping, basin analysis, and quantitative assessment. The CARA was a probabilistic, geologically based study that used existing USGS methodology, modified somewhat for the circumstances of the Arctic. New map compilation was used to identify assessment units. The CARA relied heavily on geological analysis and analog modeling, with numerical input consisting of lognormal distributions of sizes and numbers of undiscovered accumulations. Probabilistic results for individual assessment units were statistically aggregated, taking geological dependencies into account. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) funds were used to support the purchase of crucial seismic data collected in the Barents Sea, East Siberian Sea, and Chukchi Sea for use by USGS in its assessment of the Russian Arctic. DOE funds were also used to purchase a commercial study, which interpreted seismic data from the northern Kara Sea, and for geographic information system (GIS) support of USGS mapping of geological features, province boundaries, total petroleum systems, and assessment units used in the USGS assessment.

Donald Gautier; Timothy Klett

2008-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

175

The Complex Spherical 2+4 Spin Glass Model: application to optics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A disordered mean field model for multimode laser in open and irregular cavities is proposed and discussed within the replica analysis. The model includes the dynamics of the mode intensity and accounts also for the possible presence of a linear coupling between the modes, due, e.g., to the leakages from an open cavity. The complete phase diagram, in terms of disorder strength, source pumping and non-linearity, consists of four different optical regimes: incoherent fluorescence, standard mode locking, random lasing and the novel spontaneous phase locking. A replica symmetry breaking phase transition is predicted at the random lasing threshold. For a high enough strength of non-linearity, a whole region with nonvanishing complexity anticipates the transition, and the light modes in the disordered medium display typical discontinuous glassy behavior, i.e., the photonic glass has a multitude of metastable states that corresponds to different mode-locking processes in random lasers. The lasing regime is still pre...

Antenucci, Fabrizio; Leuzzi, Luca

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

E-Print Network 3.0 - arctic marine mammals Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Summary: of Arctic ships include ship strikes on marine mammals, the introduction of alien species, disruption... . G. Addressing Impacts on Marine Mammals: That the Arctic...

177

E-Print Network 3.0 - arctic sediments implies Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Luminescence dating supports central Arctic Ocean cm-scale sedimentation rates... sediment cores from the central Arctic Ocean and by using an independent absolute dating...

178

Indirect and Semi-Direct Aerosol Campaign: The Impact of Arctic...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Aerosol Campaign: The Impact of Arctic Aerosols on Clouds . Abstract: A comprehensive dataset of microphysical and radiative properties of aerosols and clouds in the arctic...

179

E-Print Network 3.0 - arctic marine food Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Assessment Summary: long term effects from these changes on the Arctic marine ecosystem. Concerned over potential effects... change in the Arctic region, and determined...

180

E-Print Network 3.0 - arctic springtail megaphorura Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

for Fish Resources of the Arctic Management Area... (Arctic FMP) and Amendment 29 to the Fishery Management Plan for Bering Sea Aleutian Islands King Source: NOAA Marine...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "modeling complex arctic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
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to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

E-Print Network 3.0 - arctic marine environment Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Assessment Summary: long term effects from these changes on the Arctic marine ecosystem. Concerned over potential effects... change in the Arctic region, and determined...

182

E-Print Network 3.0 - arctic slope annual Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

& Permafrost Salinity Vegetation Arctic... Storage Change P + Gin -(Q + ET + Gout) S Rn - G Le + H 12;Arctic Land Water Cycle: key features Source: Houser, Paul R....

183

E-Print Network 3.0 - arctic cooling silentium Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

12;Abstract The Arctic is melting ...fast. 12;IMPACTS OF A WARMING ARCTIC... 's Greenhouse Effect Thesur face cools by radiating heat energyupward. ... Source: Zender, Charles -...

184

E-Print Network 3.0 - arctic ocean archaeal Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Andy Casper... : eukaryotic flagellates as a major component of the Arctic Ocean food web Sebastien Roy: Life in the dark... AND IN THE ARCTIC OCEAN CATHERINE VALLIRES ......

185

Soil carbon sensitivity to temperature and carbon use efficiency compared across microbial-ecosystem models of varying complexity  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Global ecosystem models may require microbial components to accurately predict feedbacks between climate warming and soil decomposition, but it is unclear what parameters and levels of complexity are ideal for scaling up to the globe. Here we conducted a model comparison using a conventional model with first-order decay and three microbial models of increasing complexity that simulate short- to long-term soil carbon dynamics. We focused on soil carbon responses to microbial carbon use efficiency (CUE) and temperature. Three scenarios were implemented in all models: constant CUE (held at 0.31), varied CUE ( 0.016 C 1), and 50 % acclimated CUE ( 0.008 C 1). Whereas the conventional model always showed soil carbon losses with increasing temperature, the microbial models each predicted a temperature threshold above which warming led to soil carbon gain. The location of this threshold depended on CUE scenario, with higher temperature thresholds under the acclimated and constant scenarios. This result suggests that the temperature sensitivity of CUE and the structure of the soil carbon model together regulate the long-term soil carbon response to warming. Equilibrium soil carbon stocks predicted by the microbial models were much less sensitive to changing inputs compared to the conventional model. Although many soil carbon dynamics were similar across microbial models, the most complex model showed less pronounced oscillations. Thus, adding model complexity (i.e. including enzyme pools) could improve the mechanistic representation of soil carbon dynamics during the transient phase in certain ecosystems. This study suggests that model structure and CUE parameterization should be carefully evaluated when scaling up microbial models to ecosystems and the globe.

Li, Jianwei [University of Oklahoma] [University of Oklahoma; Wang, Gangsheng [ORNL] [ORNL; Allison, Steven D. [University of California, Irvine] [University of California, Irvine; Mayes, Melanie [ORNL] [ORNL; Luo, Yiqi [University of Oklahoma] [University of Oklahoma

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Relative importance of multiple factors on terrestrial loading of DOC to Arctic river networks  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Terrestrial carbon dynamics influence the contribution of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) to river networks in addition to controlling carbon fluxes between the land surface and the atmosphere. In this study, we use a biogeochemical process model to simulate the lateral transfer of DOC from land to the Arctic Ocean via riverine transport. We estimate that the pan-arctic watershed has contributed, on average, 32 Tg C/yr of DOC to the Arctic Ocean over the 20th century with most coming from the extensive area of boreal deciduous needle-leaved forests and forested wetlands in Eurasian watersheds. We also estimate that the rate of terrestrial DOC loading has been increasing by 0.037 Tg C/yr2 over the 20th century primarily as a result of increases in air temperatures and precipitation. These increases have been partially compensated by decreases in terrestrial DOC loading caused by wildfires. Other environmental factors (CO2 fertilization, ozone pollution, atmospheric nitrogen deposition, timber harvest, agriculture) are estimated to have relatively small effects on terrestrial DOC loading to arctic rivers. The effects of the various environmental factors on terrestrial carbon dynamics have both compensated and enhanced concurrent effects on hydrology to influence terrestrial DOC loading. Future increases in riverine DOC concentrations and export may occur from warming-induced increases in terrestrial DOC production associated with enhanced microbial metabolism and the exposure of additional organic matter from permafrost degradation along with decreases in water yield associated with warming-induced increases in evapotranspiration. Improvements in simulating terrestrial DOC loading to pan-arctic rivers in the future will require better information on the spatial distribution of precipitation and its temporal trends, carbon dynamics of larch-dominated ecosystems in eastern Siberia, and the role of industrial organic effluents on carbon budgets of rivers in western Russia.

Kicklighter, David W. [Ecosystem Center, The] [Ecosystem Center, The; Hayes, Daniel J [ORNL] [ORNL; Mcclelland, James W [University of Texas] [University of Texas; Peterson, Bruce [Marine Biological Laboratory] [Marine Biological Laboratory; Mcguire, David [University of Alaska] [University of Alaska; Melillo, Jerry [Marine Biological Laboratory] [Marine Biological Laboratory

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

arctic flora origins: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

combustion of fossil fuels and biomass, may have a severe impact on the sensitive Arctic climate, possibly altering the temperature profile, cloud temperature and amount, the...

188

arctic marine ecosystem: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

the Bamboung marine protected area social-ecosystem. Key words Social-ecological system, climate Paris-Sud XI, Universit de 6 Perfluoroalkyl Contaminants in an Arctic Marine...

189

alaskan arctic tundra: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Alaskan arctic lake Sally MacIntyre,a,b* Geosciences Websites Summary: . In summers with cold surface temperatures, the surface energy fluxes which induce mixing by heat loss...

190

arctic charr salvelinus: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

have raised concern over potential responses of Arctic charr, Salvelinus alpinus, a cold-adapted freshwateranadromous fish species in (more) Sinnatamby, Ramila Niloshini...

191

arctic char salvelinus: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

have raised concern over potential responses of Arctic charr, Salvelinus alpinus, a cold-adapted freshwateranadromous fish species in (more) Sinnatamby, Ramila Niloshini...

192

arctic research station: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

The Rocky Mountain Research Sta- tion is one of five 19 Z .Atmospheric Research 51 1999 4575 Cloud resolving simulations of Arctic stratus Geosciences Websites Summary: Z...

193

arctic climate system: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Alaskan arctic lake Sally MacIntyre,a,b* Geosciences Websites Summary: . In summers with cold surface temperatures, the surface energy fluxes which induce mixing by heat loss...

194

alaskan arctic coastal: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Alaskan arctic lake Sally MacIntyre,a,b* Geosciences Websites Summary: . In summers with cold surface temperatures, the surface energy fluxes which induce mixing by heat loss...

195

Potential Oil Production from the Coastal Plain of the Arctic...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of Analysis ANWR Coastal Plain Assessment 3. Summary Glossary References Potential Oil Production from the Coastal Plain of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge: Updated...

196

Potential Oil Production from the Coastal Plain of the Arctic...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Potential Oil Production from the Coastal Plain of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge: Updated Assessment Executive Summary This Service Report, Potential Oil Production from the...

197

arctic ocean sediments: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Is the central Arctic Ocean a sediment starved basin, University of Bergen, Norway d Byrd Polar Research Center, Ohio State University, USA Abstract Numerous short...

198

arctic ocean sediment: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Is the central Arctic Ocean a sediment starved basin, University of Bergen, Norway d Byrd Polar Research Center, Ohio State University, USA Abstract Numerous short...

199

arctic populations differential: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

climate connection, total solar irradiance, Atlantic meridional overturning circulation, climate variability. Willie W. -h. Soon 2009-01-01 168 Arctic catastrophes in an idealized...

200

ALUMINUM DISTRIBUTIONSIN THE EURASIAN BASIN OF THE ARCTIC OCEAN  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ALUMINUM DISTRIBUTIONSIN THE EURASIAN BASIN OF THE ARCTIC OCEAN A THESISSUBMITTEDTO THE GRADUATE Section(1994)cruiseswere analyzed for their aluminum (Al) content; these two data setswere then combined

Luther, Douglas S.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "modeling complex arctic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

arctas arctic research: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Arctic. It often serves as the measuring stick for global climate change. It is where warming has been strongest in the past century, Environmental Sciences and Ecology Websites...

202

arctic study area: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Explosion At The Polar Arctic Sunrise Physics (arXiv) Summary: We attempt is to provide accumulated evidence and qualitative understanding of the associated atmospheric phenomena...

203

arctic polar vortex: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Explosion At The Polar Arctic Sunrise Physics (arXiv) Summary: We attempt is to provide accumulated evidence and qualitative understanding of the associated atmospheric phenomena...

204

Climate response to tropical cyclone-induced ocean mixing in an1 Earth system model of intermediate complexity2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Climate response to tropical cyclone-induced ocean mixing in an1 Earth system model of intermediate system model of intermediate complexity. The parameterization is based on21 previously published global. Abstract19 We introduce a parameterization of ocean mixing by tropical cyclones (TCs) into20 an Earth

205

Systems Modeling and Analysis Industrial Engineers are interested in optimizing the design and operation of complex systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Systems Modeling and Analysis Industrial Engineers are interested in optimizing the design and operation of complex systems composed of people and machines using information, materials and energy to produce goods and services. Analyzing such systems with information-driven models is an essential step

Dyer, Bill

206

Efficiency of attack strategies on complex model and real-world networks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We investigated the efficiency of attack strategies to network nodes when targeting several complex model and real-world networks. We tested 5 attack strategies, 3 of which were introduced in this work for the first time, to attack 3 model (Erdos and Renyi, Barabasi and Albert preferential attachment network, and scale-free network configuration models) and 3 real networks (Gnutella peer-to-peer network, email network of the University of Rovira i Virgili, and immunoglobulin interaction network). Nodes were removed sequentially according to the importance criterion defined by the attack strategy. We used the size of the largest connected component (LCC) as a measure of network damage. We found that the efficiency of attack strategies (fraction of nodes to be deleted for a given reduction of LCC size) depends on the topology of the network, although attacks based on the number of connections of a node and betweenness centrality were often the most efficient strategies. Sequential deletion of nodes in decreasin...

Bellingeri, Michele; Vincenzi, Simone

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Climate-derived tensions in Arctic security.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Globally, there is no lack of security threats. Many of them demand priority engagement and there can never be adequate resources to address all threats. In this context, climate is just another aspect of global security and the Arctic just another region. In light of physical and budgetary constraints, new security needs must be integrated and prioritized with existing ones. This discussion approaches the security impacts of climate from that perspective, starting with the broad security picture and establishing how climate may affect it. This method provides a different view from one that starts with climate and projects it, in isolation, as the source of a hypothetical security burden. That said, the Arctic does appear to present high-priority security challenges. Uncertainty in the timing of an ice-free Arctic affects how quickly it will become a security priority. Uncertainty in the emergent extreme and variable weather conditions will determine the difficulty (cost) of maintaining adequate security (order) in the area. The resolution of sovereignty boundaries affects the ability to enforce security measures, and the U.S. will most probably need a military presence to back-up negotiated sovereignty agreements. Without additional global warming, technology already allows the Arctic to become a strategic link in the global supply chain, possibly with northern Russia as its main hub. Additionally, the multinational corporations reaping the economic bounty may affect security tensions more than nation-states themselves. Countries will depend ever more heavily on the global supply chains. China has particular needs to protect its trade flows. In matters of security, nation-state and multinational-corporate interests will become heavily intertwined.

Backus, George A.; Strickland, James Hassler

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

BLM Arctic Field Office | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating SolarElectricEnergyCT BiomassArnprior,Aurantia SACitas Jump Logo: BLM Arctic Field

209

Model complexes for active sites of diiron metalloproteins, dioxygen reactivity and water effects  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(cont.) tetrairon(II) cubane complex was identified and structurally characterized. Chapter 4: Synthesis and Characterization of [Fe?...CR)]≥? and [Fe?...CR)]≥? Complexes with Carboxylate-Rich Metal Coordination Environment ...

Yoon, Sungho, 1971-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Genetic dissection of a model complex trait using the Drosophila Synthetic Population Resource  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Genetic dissection of complex, polygenic trait variation is a key goal of medical and evolutionary genetics. Attempts to identify genetic variants underlying complex traits have been plagued by low mapping resolution in ...

King, Elizabeth G.; Merkes, Chris M.; McNeil, Casey Lee; Hoofer, Steven R.; Sen, Saunak; Long, Anthony D.; Macdonald, Stuart J.

2012-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

211

Analysis of two independent methods for retrieving liquid water profiles in spring and summer Arctic boundary clouds  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-based remote sensing, optimal estimation, LES model with explicit microphysics, cloud liquid water algorithms Heat Budget of the Arctic Ocean (SHEBA) project. An algorithm developed by Frisch et al. [1995, 1998 matrix of the LWC profile is calculated, an optimal estimation method is applied to the SHEBA data

Shupe, Matthew

212

Probabilities in Quantum Cosmological Models: A Decoherent Histories Analysis Using a Complex Potential  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In the quantization of simple cosmological models (minisuperspace models) described by the Wheeler-DeWitt equation, an important step is the construction, from the wave function, of a probability distribution answering various questions of physical interest, such as the probability of the system entering a given region of configuration space at any stage in its entire history. A standard but heuristic procedure is to use the flux of (components of) the wave function in a WKB approximation. This gives sensible semiclassical results but lacks an underlying operator formalism. In this paper, we address the issue of constructing probability distributions linked to the Wheeler-DeWitt equation using the decoherent histories approach to quantum theory. We show that the appropriate class operators (the generalization of strings of projectors) in quantum cosmology are readily constructed using a complex potential. We derive the class operator for entering or not entering one or more regions in configuration space. They commute with the Hamiltonian, have a sensible classical limit and are closely related to intersection number operators. We show that oscillatory WKB solutions to the Wheeler-DeWitt equation give approximate decoherence of histories, as do superpositions of WKB solutions, as long as the regions of configuration space are sufficiently large. The corresponding probabilities coincide, in a semiclassical approximation, with standard heuristic procedures. In brief, we exhibit the well-defined operator formalism underlying the usual heuristic interpretational methods in quantum cosmology.

J. J. Halliwell

2009-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

213

Next-Generation Ecosystem Experiments NGEE Arctic Quarterly Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

net C uptake by terrestrial Arctic ecosystems. Predicting the fate of permafrost- sequestered carbon of these changes in the carbon cycle will depend on climate-driven changes in Arctic biogeochemical, vegetation, and hydrological processes, creating a critical feedback loop. A goal of the NGEE project is to assess the CO2

214

Tourism: A Growing Presence in an Ice Diminishing Arctic  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Tourism: A Growing Presence in an Ice Diminishing Arctic Dr. John Snyder Strategic Studies, Inc. Centennial, Colorado #12;The Significance of Arctic Tourism · Tourism is the single largest human presence economies rely on tourism for revenue, jobs, personal income, and public finance. It's future is thus

Kuligowski, Bob

215

E-Print Network 3.0 - arctic fjord sediment Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

sediment Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: arctic fjord sediment...

216

International Snow Science Workshop Grenoble Chamonix Mont-Blanc -2013 Why don't avalanche-dynamics models of higher complexity necessarily  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-dynamics models of higher complexity necessarily lead to better predictions? Christophe Ancey …cole Polytechnique worldwide. Paradoxically, the substantial increase in model complexity can lead us to lose sight of the empirical nature of the assumptions used to build the models. Human expertise should still be of paramount

Lenstra, Arjen K.

217

Simplicity versus complexity in modelling groundwater recharge in Chalk catchments Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 6(5), 927937 (2002) EGS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

rainfall. Keywords: Chalk, modelling, groundwater recharge Introduction The Chalk is the main aquiferSimplicity versus complexity in modelling groundwater recharge in Chalk catchments 927 Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 6(5), 927­937 (2002) © EGS Simplicity versus complexity in modelling groundwater

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

218

Existence of patchiness in constricted lungs : from experiments to complex system modeling  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Understanding asthma pathophysiology can directly help researchers and physicians pinpoint mechanisms that govern airway hyperresponsiveness and effectively treat complex respiratory diseases such as asthma. The advancement ...

Wongviriyawong, Chanikarn Mint

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

11.1 DEVELOPMENT OF AN IMMERSED BOUNDARY METHOD TO RESOLVE COMPLEX TERRAIN IN THE WEATHER RESEARCH AND FORECASTING MODEL  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

11.1 DEVELOPMENT OF AN IMMERSED BOUNDARY METHOD TO RESOLVE COMPLEX TERRAIN IN THE WEATHER RESEARCH AND FORECASTING MODEL Katherine A. Lundquist1 , Fotini K. Chow 2 , Julie K. Lundquist 3 , and Jeffery D. Mirocha 3 in urban areas are profoundly influenced by the presence of build- ings which divert mean flow, affect

Chow, Fotini Katopodes

220

Winner-Take-All Correlation-Based Complex Networks for Modeling Stock Market and Degree-Based Indexes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Winner-Take-All Correlation-Based Complex Networks for Modeling Stock Market and Degree are constructed to study corre- lations between the closing prices for all US stocks that were traded from July 1, 2005 to August 30, 2007. The nodes are the stocks, and the connections are determined by cross

Tse, Chi K. "Michael"

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "modeling complex arctic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Arctic Energy Summit | Department of Energy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of Energy Power Systems EngineeringDepartment of4 Federal RegisterPowerPA00133 -Archer Daniels MidlandArctic

222

Modeling Single Well Injection-Withdrawal (SWIW) Tests for Characterization of Complex Fracture-Matrix Systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The ability to reliably predict flow and transport in fractured porous rock is an essential condition for performance evaluation of geologic (underground) nuclear waste repositories. In this report, a suite of programs (TRIPOLY code) for calculating and analyzing flow and transport in two-dimensional fracture-matrix systems is used to model single-well injection-withdrawal (SWIW) tracer tests. The SWIW test, a tracer test using one well, is proposed as a useful means of collecting data for site characterization, as well as estimating parameters relevant to tracer diffusion and sorption. After some specific code adaptations, we numerically generated a complex fracture-matrix system for computation of steady-state flow and tracer advection and dispersion in the fracture network, along with solute exchange processes between the fractures and the porous matrix. We then conducted simulations for a hypothetical but workable SWIW test design and completed parameter sensitivity studies on three physical parameters of the rock matrix - namely porosity, diffusion coefficient, and retardation coefficient - in order to investigate their impact on the fracture-matrix solute exchange process. Hydraulic fracturing, or hydrofracking, is also modeled in this study, in two different ways: (1) by increasing the hydraulic aperture for flow in existing fractures and (2) by adding a new set of fractures to the field. The results of all these different tests are analyzed by studying the population of matrix blocks, the tracer spatial distribution, and the breakthrough curves (BTCs) obtained, while performing mass-balance checks and being careful to avoid some numerical mistakes that could occur. This study clearly demonstrates the importance of matrix effects in the solute transport process, with the sensitivity studies illustrating the increased importance of the matrix in providing a retardation mechanism for radionuclides as matrix porosity, diffusion coefficient, or retardation coefficient increase. Interestingly, model results before and after hydrofracking are insensitive to adding more fractures, while slightly more sensitive to aperture increase, making SWIW tests a possible means of discriminating between these two potential hydrofracking effects. Finally, we investigate the possibility of inferring relevant information regarding the fracture-matrix system physical parameters from the BTCs obtained during SWIW testing.

Cotte, F.P.; Doughty, C.; Birkholzer, J.

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Space Complexity Algorithms & Complexity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Space Complexity Algorithms & Complexity Space Complexity Nicolas Stroppa Patrik Lambert - plambert@computing.dcu.ie CA313@Dublin City University. 2008-2009. December 4, 2008 #12;Space Complexity Hierarchy of problems #12;Space Complexity NP-intermediate Languages If P = NP, then are there languages which neither in P

Way, Andy

224

Application of the Software as a Service Model to the Control of Complex Building Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

cell and PV, electricity in and out of the battery as welloriginal battery specifications are used. Given that the PVPV system and fuel cell, describes the complex optimization applied to the battery

Stadler, Michael

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Understanding, modeling and improving the development of complex products : method and study  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Development of new aerostructure designs frequently occurs through a complex process that is difficult to understand and control. Tight requirements for weight, cost, strength, and aerodynamic behavior create many ...

Rogers, Bradley W. (Bradley Warren)

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Engineering Systems Matrix: An organizing framework for modeling large-scale complex systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The scope and complexity of engineered systems are ever-increasing as burgeoning global markets, unprecedented technological capabilities, rising consumer expectations, and ever-changing social requirements present difficult ...

Bartolomei, Jason E.

227

The Impact of Global Warming on the Carbon Cycle of Arctic Permafrost: An Experimental and Field Based Study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Our results to date indicate that CO2 and CH4 fluxes from organic poor, Arctic cryosols on Axel Heiberg Island are net CH4 sinks and CO2 emitters in contrast to organic-rich peat deposits at sub-Arctic latitudes. This is based upon field observations and a 1.5 year long thawing experiment performed upon one meter long intact cores. The results of the core thawing experiments are in good agreement with field measurements. Metagenomic, metatranscriptomic and metaproteomic analyses indicate that high affinity aerobic methanotrophs belong to the uncultivated USCalpha are present in <1% abundance in these cryosols are are active in the field during the summer and in the core thawing experiments. The methanotrophs are 100 times more abundant than the methanogens. As a result mineral cryosols, which comprise 87% of Arctic tundra, are net methane sinks. Their presence and activity may account for the discrepancies observed between the atmospheric methane concentrations observed in the Arctic predicted by climate models and the observed seasonal fluctuations and decadal trends. This has not been done yet.

Onstott, Tullis C [Princeton University; Pffifner, Susan M; Chourey, Karuna [Oak Ridge National Laboratory

2014-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

228

National Strategy for the Arctic Region Stakeholder Outreach...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

energy deployment in the Arctic Region. The purpose of this round is to give feedback on the elements of the draft plan. DOE encourages stakeholders to provide comments on...

229

National Strategy for the Arctic Tribal Consultation Session: Fairbanks  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

DOE is seeking input from federally recognized Alaska Native Tribes and Alaska Native corporations on a 10-year implementation plan as part of the National Strategy for the Arctic Region, as well...

230

National Strategy for the Arctic Region Stakeholder Outreach Meeting: Kotzebue  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

DOE is seeking input from federally recognized Alaska Native Tribes and Alaska Native corporations on a 10-year implementation plan as part of the National Strategy for the Arctic Region, as well...

231

National Strategy for the Arctic Region Tribal Consultation Session: Bethel  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

DOE is seeking input from federally recognized Alaska Native Tribes and Alaska Native corporations on a 10-year implementation plan as part of the National Strategy for the Arctic Region, as well...

232

National Strategy for the Arctic Region Stakeholder Outreach Meeting: Barrow  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

DOE is seeking input from federally recognized Alaska Native Tribes and Alaska Native corporations on a 10-year implementation plan as part of the National Strategy for the Arctic Region, as well...

233

National Strategy for the Arctic Region Stakeholder Outreach Meeting: Nome  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

DOE is seeking input from federally recognized Alaska Native Tribes and Alaska Native corporations on a 10-year implementation plan as part of the National Strategy for the Arctic Region, as well...

234

National Strategy for the Arctic Region Stakeholder Outreach Meeting: Bethel  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

DOE is seeking input from federally recognized Alaska Native Tribes and Alaska Native corporations on a 10-year implementation plan as part of the National Strategy for the Arctic Region, as well...

235

arctic haze: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Srinivas 7 NASA ARCTAS PROJECT The Arctic. It often serves as the measuring stick for global climate change. It is where warming has been strongest in the past century,...

236

The Development and Use of Conceptual Models of Complex Earth Systems for Environmental Managment and Earth Science Education  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

THE DEVELOPMENT AND USE OF CONCEPTUAL MODELS OF COMPLEX EARTH SYSTEMS FOR ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT AND EARTH SCIENCE EDUCATION A Dissertation by HEATHER RENE MILLER Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M... AND EARTH SCIENCE EDUCATION A Dissertation by HEATHER RENE MILLER Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY Approved by: Chair...

Miller, Heather

2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

237

Model--Based 3D Scene Analysis from Stereoscopic Image Sequences An approach for the modelling of complex 3D scenes like outdoor street views from a sequence of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the problems stated above for building a true 3D model of a complex scene from a sequence of stereoscopic image for the modelling of complex 3D scenes like outdoor street views from a sequence of stereoscopic image pairs geometry is generated. Not only the scene geometry but also surface texture is stored within the model. 3D

238

A computational methodology for learning low-complexity surrogate models of process from experiments or simulations. (Paper 679a)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Costly and/or insufficiently robust simulations or experiments can often pose difficulties when their use extends well beyond a single evaluation. This is case with the numerous evaluations of uncertainty quantification, when an algebraic model is needed for optimization, as well as numerous other areas. To overcome these difficulties, we generate an accurate set of algebraic surrogate models of disaggregated process blocks of the experiment or simulation. We developed a method that uses derivative-based and derivative-free optimization alongside machine learning and statistical techniques to generate the set of surrogate models using data sampled from experiments or detailed simulations. Our method begins by building a low-complexity surrogate model for each block from an initial sample set. The model is built using a best subset technique that leverages a mixed-integer linear problem formulation to allow for very large initial basis sets. The models are then tested, exploited, and improved through the use of derivative-free solvers to adaptively sample new simulation or experimental points. The sets of surrogate models from each disaggregated process block are then combined with heat and mass balances around each disaggregated block to generate a full algebraic model of the process. The full model can be used for cheap and accurate evaluations of the original simulation or experiment or combined with design specifications and an objective for nonlinear optimization.

Cozad, A.; Sahinidis, N.; Miller, D.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

The new WAsP flow model: a fast, linearized Mixed Spectral-Integration model applicable to complex terrain  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. There is interest in placing wind turbines in hilly and mountainous areas, due to the potentially high speed commercial PC-based tool to estimate wind resources at a potential wind turbine site, given a set of wind challenge for the wind energy industry is the prediction of the wind resource in complex terrain

240

Turbulent Flow Analysis and Coherent Structure Identification in Experimental Models with Complex Geometries  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

through the core of an annular pebble bed VHTR. The complex geometry of the core and the highly turbulent nature of the coolant flow passing through the gaps of fuel pebbles make this case quite challenging. In this experiment, a high frequency Hot Wire...

Amini, Noushin

2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "modeling complex arctic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

The First Example of a Nitrile Hydratase Model Complex that Reversibly Binds Nitriles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

with both methanol and acetonitrile to afford a six-coordinate solvent-bound complex. Competitive binding for acetonitrile (H ) -6.2((0.2) kcal/mol, S ) -29.4((0.8) eu), benzonitrile (-4.2((0.6) kcal/mol, S ) -18((3) eu-temperature electronic absorption spectroscopy. Ligand exchange kinetics were examined for acetonitrile, iso

Kaminsky, Werner

242

Modeling conically scanning lidar error in complex terrain with WAsP  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the vertical wind speed W changes linearly with the downwind position x. This could crudely mimic the flow over to be homogeneous in order to deduce the horizontal wind speed. However, in mountainous or complex terrain this assumption is not valid implying an erroneous wind speed. The magnitude of this error is measured

243

Next-Generation Ecosystem Experiments NGEE Arctic Quarterly Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Clips 10 Appendix 11 #12;2 Can Microbial Community Composition be Incorporated into Earth System Models? Accurate projections of greenhouse gas fluxes by Earth System Models require that they contain process and to mechanistically represent the complex plant-microbe-soil system in Earth System Models. Xu et al. (2011) Feedback

244

Discovery of Novel Complex Metal Hydrides for Hydrogen Storage through Molecular Modeling and Combinatorial Methods  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

UOP LLC, a Honeywell Company, Ford Motor Company, and Striatus, Inc., collaborated with Professor Craig Jensen of the University of Hawaii and Professor Vidvuds Ozolins of University of California, Los Angeles on a multi-year cost-shared program to discover novel complex metal hydrides for hydrogen storage. This innovative program combined sophisticated molecular modeling with high throughput combinatorial experiments to maximize the probability of identifying commercially relevant, economical hydrogen storage materials with broad application. A set of tools was developed to pursue the medium throughput (MT) and high throughput (HT) combinatorial exploratory investigation of novel complex metal hydrides for hydrogen storage. The assay programs consisted of monitoring hydrogen evolution as a function of temperature. This project also incorporated theoretical methods to help select candidate materials families for testing. The Virtual High Throughput Screening served as a virtual laboratory, calculating structures and their properties. First Principles calculations were applied to various systems to examine hydrogen storage reaction pathways and the associated thermodynamics. The experimental program began with the validation of the MT assay tool with NaAlH4/0.02 mole Ti, the state of the art hydrogen storage system given by decomposition of sodium alanate to sodium hydride, aluminum metal, and hydrogen. Once certified, a combinatorial 21-point study of the NaAlH4 ‚?? LiAlH4 ‚??Mg(AlH4)2 phase diagram was investigated with the MT assay. Stability proved to be a problem as many of the materials decomposed during synthesis, altering the expected assay results. This resulted in repeating the entire experiment with a mild milling approach, which only temporarily increased capacity. NaAlH4 was the best performer in both studies and no new mixed alanates were observed, a result consistent with the VHTS. Powder XRD suggested that the reverse reaction, the regeneration of the alanate from alkali hydride, Al and hydrogen, was hampering reversibility. The reverse reaction was then studied for the same phase diagram, starting with LiH, NaH, and MgH2, and Al. The study was extended to phase diagrams including KH and CaH2 as well. The observed hydrogen storage capacity in the Al hexahydrides was less than 4 wt. %, well short of DOE targets. The HT assay came on line and after certification with studies on NaAlH4, was first applied to the LiNH2 - LiBH4 - MgH2 phase diagram. The 60-point study elucidated trends within the system locating an optimum material of 0.6 LiNH2 ‚?? 0.3 MgH2 ‚?? 0.1 LiBH4 that stored about 4 wt. % H2 reversibly and operated below 220 ¬įC. Also present was the phase Li4(NH2)3BH4, which had been discovered in the LiNH2 -LiBH4 system. This new ternary formulation performed much better than the well-known 2 LiNH2 ‚?? MgH2 system by 50 ¬įC in the HT assay. The Li4(NH2)3BH4 is a low melting ionic liquid under our test conditions and facilitates the phase transformations required in the hydrogen storage reaction, which no longer relies on a higher energy solid state reaction pathway. Further study showed that the 0.6 LiNH2 ‚?? 0.3 MgH2 ‚?? 0.1 LiBH4 formulation was very stable with respect to ammonia and diborane desorption, the observed desorption was from hydrogen. This result could not have been anticipated and was made possible by the efficiency of HT combinatorial methods. Investigation of the analogous LiNH2 ‚?? LiBH4 ‚?? CaH2 phase diagram revealed new reversible hydrogen storage materials 0.625 LiBH4 + 0.375 CaH2 and 0.375 LiNH2 + 0.25 LiBH4 + 0.375 CaH2 operating at 1 wt. % reversible hydrogen below 175 ¬įC. Powder x-ray diffraction revealed a new structure for the spent materials which had not been previously observed. While the storage capacity was not impressive, an important aspect is that it boron appears to participate in a low temperature reversible reaction. The last major area of study also focused

Lesch, David A; Adriaan Sachtler, J.W. J.; Low, John J; Jensen, Craig M; Ozolins, Vidvuds; Siegel, Don

2011-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

245

RIS-M-2349 A MODEL OF HUMAN DECISION MAKING IN COMPLEX SYSTEMS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the operator is to design a INIS Descriptors BEHAVIOR; CONTROL ROOMS; CONTROL SYSTEMS; FLOW MODELS; HUMAN

246

Application of the Software as a Service Model to the Control of Complex Building Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Modeling with Combined Heat and Power ApplicationsĒ,DG) equipment, combined heat and power (CHP), and electrical

Stadler, Michael

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Application of Aspect-based Modeling and Weaving for Complexity Reduction in Development of Automotive  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Automotive Distributed Real-time Embedded System Andrey Nechypurenko, Egon Wuchner Siemens AG, Corporate the stringent resource and costs constraints in de- veloping modern automotive embedded electronic systems collaboration model, and timing models. An emerging trend in automotive sys- tems is to apply Model

Schmidt, Douglas C.

248

E-Print Network 3.0 - arctic european russia Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

european russia Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: arctic european russia Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 NOAA's Arctic VisiON & strAtegy...

249

E-Print Network 3.0 - arctic freshwater sediments Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

12;2 Holocene sedimentation in the deep Arctic Ocean... prominently in the overall sediment budget of the Arctic Ocean. While a detailed analysis of the processes... with these...

250

E-Print Network 3.0 - arctic alaska r4d Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

for: arctic alaska r4d Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 revised 122010 Alaska Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Unit Summary: . 1966. The recreational potential of the Arctic...

251

E-Print Network 3.0 - arctic tundra vegetation Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

in arctic tundra reduced by long-term nutrient fertilization Michelle C. Mack1... in soil compared with temperate and tropical ecosystems14 . In arctic tundra, as much as 90%...

252

Small Thaw Ponds: An Unaccounted Source of Methane in the Canadian High Arctic  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

other Archaea in high Arctic peat. ISME J 2: 37Ė48. 38. HÝjmethanogenic pathways in a peat from subarctic permafrost.Canadian Arctic tundra leads to peat erosion and slumping in

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

E-Print Network 3.0 - arctic reduces root Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

surface albedo, leading to amplified ice melting. The Arctic... , the total ice production over the Arctic Ocean is reduced (Figure 3e). In summer, a decrease in ice... What...

254

E-Print Network 3.0 - arctic regions Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

et G... in some Arctic regions in the late 1980s and early 1990s during the decline of industrial activity... of Representatives October 18, 2007 Arctic Climate Effects of Black...

255

E-Print Network 3.0 - arctic food web Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

food web Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: arctic food web Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Lesson Plan Arctic Biome Summary: in the...

256

UPb and geochemical evidence for a Cryogenian magmatic arc in central Novaya Zemlya, Arctic Russia  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

U­Pb and geochemical evidence for a Cryogenian magmatic arc in central Novaya Zemlya, Arctic Russia-0349 Oslo, Norway Introduction The High Arctic of Scandinavia and Russia consists of a collage

Svensen, Henrik

257

Network Analysis in the Legal Domain: A complex model for European Union legal sources  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Legislators, designers of legal information systems, as well as citizens face often problems due to the interdependence of the laws and the growing number of references needed to interpret them. Quantifying this complexity is not an easy task. In this paper, we introduce the "Legislation Network" as a novel approach to address related problems. We have collected an extensive data set of a more than 60-year old legislation corpus, as published in the Official Journal of the European Union, and we further analysed it as a complex network, thus gaining insight into its topological structure. Among other issues, we have performed a temporal analysis of the evolution of the Legislation Network, as well as a robust resilience test to assess its vulnerability under specific cases that may lead to possible breakdowns. Results are quite promising, showing that our approach can lead towards an enhanced explanation in respect to the structure and evolution of legislation properties.

Koniaris, Marios; Vassiliou, Yannis

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Reduction of U(VI) Complexes by Anthraquinone Disulfonate: Experiment and Molecular Modeling  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Past studies demonstrate that complexation will limit abiotic and biotic U(VI) reduction rates and the overall extent of reduction. However, the underlying basis for this behavior is not understood and presently unpredictable across species and ligand structure. The central tenets of these investigations are: (1) reduction of U(VI) follows the electron-transfer (ET) mechanism developed by Marcus; (2) the ET rate is the rate-limiting step in U(VI) reduction and is the step that is most affected by complexation; and (3) Marcus theory can be used to unify the apparently disparate U(VI) reduction rate data and as a computational tool to construct a predictive relationship.

Ainsworth, C.C.; Wang, Z.; Rosso, K.M.; Wagnon, K.; Fredrickson, J.K.

2004-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

259

Modeling the behavior of Cm and Am during separation by complexing extraction chromatography  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Certain heavy rare earths (REE), Cm, and Am are separated by complexing extraction chromatography using solutions of DTPA and DTPA-citric acid as eluents. The separation coefficients of REE from Cm and Am are calculated. Tracers are proposed for the Cm and Am separations. These are Tm for Cm elution using 0.025 M DTPA and Ho for Cm elution using 0.025 M DTPA with 0.025 citric acid. The tracer for Am in both instances is Tb.

Chuveleva, E.A.; Kharitonov, O.V.; Firsova, L.A.

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Review of technology for Arctic offshore oil and gas recovery. Appendices  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This volume contains appendices of the following: US Geological Survey Arctic operating orders, 1979; Det Noske Vertas', rules for the design, construction and inspection of offshore technology, 1977; Alaska Oil and Gas Association, industry research projects, March 1980; Arctic Petroleum Operator's Association, industry research projects, January 1980; selected additional Arctic offshore bibliography on sea ice, icebreakers, Arctic seafloor conditions, ice-structures, frost heave and structure icing.

Sackinger, W. M.

1980-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "modeling complex arctic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

E-Print Network 3.0 - arctic petroleum operators Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Conferences Covered Petroleum Abstracts, HH 101 Summary: PETROLEUM PRODUCTION & EXPLORATION ASSOCIATION LTD. (APPEA) ARCTIC AND MARINE OILSPILL PROGRAM (AMOP... GEOLOGICAL...

262

Surface Complexation of Neptunium(V) onto Whole Cells and Cell Components of Shewanella alga: Modeling and Experimental Study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We systematically quantified surface complexation of Np(V) onto whole cells, cell wall, and extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) of Shewanella alga strain BrY. We first performed acid and base titrations and used the mathematical model FITEQL to estimate the concentrations and deprotonation constants of specific surface functional groups. Deprotonation constants most likely corresponded to a carboxyl group not associated with amino acids (pK{sub a} {approx} 5), a phosphoryl site (pK{sub a} {approx} 7.2), and an amine site (pK{sub a} > 10). We then carried out batch sorption experiments with Np(V) and each of the S. alga components as a function of pH. Since significant Np(V) sorption was observed on S. alga whole cells and its components in the pH range 2-5, we assumed the existence of a fourth site: a low-pK{sub a} carboxyl site (pK{sub a} {approx} 2.4) that is associated with amino acids. We used the SPECIATE submodel of the biogeochemical model CCBATCH to compute the stability constants for Np(V) complexation to each surface functional group. The stability constants were similar for each functional group on S. alga bacterial whole cells, cell walls, and EPS, and they explain the complicated sorption patterns when they are combined with the aqueous-phase speciation of Np(V). For pH < 8, the aquo NpO{sub 2}{sup +} species was the dominant form of Np(V), and its log K values for the low-pK{sub a} carboxyl, mid-pK{sub a} carboxyl, and phosphoryl groups were 1.8, 1.8, and 2.5-3.1, respectively. For pH greater than 8, the key surface ligand was amine > XNH{sub 3}{sup +}, which complexed with NpO{sub 2}(CO{sub 3}){sub 3}{sup 5-}. The log K for NpO{sub 2}(CO{sub 3}){sub 3}{sup 5-} complexed onto the amine groups was 3.1-3.9. All of the log K values are similar to those of Np(V) complexes with aqueous carboxyl and N-containing carboxyl ligands. These results help quantify the role of surface complexation in defining actinide-microbiological interactions in the subsurface.

Deo, Randhir P.; Songkasiri, Warinthorn; Rittmann, Bruce E.; Reed, Donald T. (King Mongkut); (AZU); (LANL)

2012-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

263

Comprehensive Thermodynamics of Nickel Hydride Bis(Diphosphine) Complexes: A Predictive Model through Computations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Prediction of thermodynamic quantities such as redox potentials and homolytic and heterolytic metal hydrogen bond energies is critical to the a priori design of molecular catalysts. In this paper we expound upon a density functional theory (DFT)-based isodesmic methodology for the accurate computation of the above quantities across a series of Ni(diphosphine)2 complexes compounds that are potential catalysts for production of H2 from protons and electrons, or oxidation of H2 to electrons and protons. Isodesmic schemes give relative free energies between the complex of interest and a reference system. A natural choice is to use as a reference a compound that shares similarities with the chemical species under study and for which the properties of interest have been measured with accuracy. However, this is not always possible as in the case of the Ni complexes considered here where data are experimentally available for only some species. To overcome this difficulty we employed a theoretical reference compound, Ni(PH3)4, which is amenable to highly accurate electron-correlated calculations, which allows one to explore thermodynamics properties even when no experimental input is accessible. The reliability of this reference is validated against the available thermodynamics data in acetonitrile solution. Overall the proposed protocol yields excellent accuracy for redox potentials (~ 0.10 eV of accuracy), for acidities (~1.5 pKa units of accuracy), for hydricities (~2 kcal/mol of accuracy), and for homolytic bond dissociation free energies (~ 1-2 kcal/mol of accuracy). The calculated thermodynamic properties are then analyzed for a broad set of Ni complexes. The power of the approach is demonstrated through the validation of previously reported linear correlations among properties. New correlations are revealed. It emerges that only two quantities, the Ni(II)/Ni(I) and Ni(I)/Ni(0) redox potentials (which are easily accessible experimentally), suffice to predict with high confidence the energetics of all relevant species involved in the catalytic cycles for H2 oxidation and production. The approach is extendable to other transition metal complexes. This material is based upon work supported as part of the Center for Molecular Electrocatalysis, an Energy Frontier Research Center funded by the US Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences.

Chen, Shentan; Rousseau, Roger J.; Raugei, Simone; Dupuis, Michel; DuBois, Daniel L.; Bullock, R. Morris

2011-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

264

ORIGINAL PAPER Arctic fisheries catches in Russia, USA, and Canada: baselines  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ORIGINAL PAPER Arctic fisheries catches in Russia, USA, and Canada: baselines for neglected northern Siberia (Russia), Arctic Alaska (USA), and the Canadian Arctic, extends over seven coastal Large.e., 770,000, 89,000, and 94,000 t by Russia, USA, and Canada, respectively for the same time period

Pauly, Daniel

265

NAO influence on net sea ice production and exchanges in the Arctic region  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NAO influence on net sea ice production and exchanges in the Arctic region Aixue Hu National Center of the net sea ice production and the sea ice exchanges between the Arctic and its adjacent seas are studied) is the major factor controlling the net sea ice production in the Arctic region since a thinning ice cover

Hu, Aixue

266

NAO influence on net sea ice production and exchanges in the Arctic region: a numerical study  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NAO influence on net sea ice production and exchanges in the Arctic region: a numerical study Aixue The variability of net sea ice production and sea ice exchange between the Arctic and its adjacent seas export) is the major factor controlling the net sea ice production in the Arctic region since a thinning

Hu, Aixue

267

This Page Intentionally Left Blank Next-Generation Ecosystem Experiments (NGEE Arctic)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Lincoln #12;This Page Intentionally Left Blank #12;#12;Next-Generation Ecosystem Experiments--Arctic iv#12;This Page Intentionally Left Blank #12;Next-Generation Ecosystem Experiments (NGEE Arctic This Page Intentionally Left Blank #12;Next-Generation Ecosystem Experiments--Arctic Contents v CONTENTS

268

Estimating sea ice area flux across the Canadian Arctic Archipelago using enhanced AMSR-E  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. This produced a net loss of sea ice area of about 122 √? 103 km2 or roughly 174 km3 a√?1 which is presumedEstimating sea ice area flux across the Canadian Arctic Archipelago using enhanced AMSR-E T. Agnew is used to estimate daily sea ice area fluxes between the Canadian Arctic Archipelago and the Arctic Ocean

Long, David G.

269

Surface salinity fields in the Arctic Ocean and statistical approaches to predicting anomalies and patterns  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to changing environmental conditions. Its surface layer is a key component of the Arctic climate system, which. In this context, the Arctic Ocean surface layer is a critical indicator of climate change in the Arctic [Zaharov. Petersburg, Russia. Ivan Sudakov, Department of Mathematics, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah, USA

Golden, Kenneth M.

270

September Arctic sea ice predicted to disappear near 2 warming above present  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

September Arctic sea ice predicted to disappear near 2 C global warming above present Irina; published 24 March 2012. [1] The decline of Arctic sea ice is one of the most visible signs of climate change over the past several decades. Arctic sea ice area shows large interannual variability due

Fischlin, Andreas

271

Arctic sea ice velocity field: General circulation and turbulent-like fluctuations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Arctic sea ice velocity field: General circulation and turbulent-like fluctuations P. Rampal,1,2 J the Arctic sea ice velocity field as the superposition of a mean field and fluctuations. We study how subtracting the mean field, are analyzed in terms of diffusion properties. Although the Arctic sea ice cover

Boyer, Edmond

272

Estimating Probability Distributions from Complex Models with Bifurcations: The Case of Ocean Circulation Collapse  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Studying the uncertainty in computationally expensive models has required the development of specialized methods, including alternative sampling techniques and response surface approaches. However, existing techniques for ...

Webster, Mort David.

273

Arctic Sea Ice Retreat in 2007 Follows Thinning Trend R. W. LINDSAY, J. ZHANG, A. SCHWEIGER, M. STEELE, AND H. STERN  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Arctic Sea Ice Retreat in 2007 Follows Thinning Trend R. W. LINDSAY, J. ZHANG, A. SCHWEIGER, M ice extent in the summer of 2007 was unprecedented in the historical record. A coupled ice≠ocean model is used to determine the state of the ice and ocean over the past 29 yr to investigate the causes

Zhang, Jinlun

274

Preliminary Geospatial Analysis of Arctic Ocean Hydrocarbon Resources  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ice coverage of the Arctic Ocean is predicted to become thinner and to cover less area with time. The combination of more ice-free waters for exploration and navigation, along with increasing demand for hydrocarbons and improvements in technologies for the discovery and exploitation of new hydrocarbon resources have focused attention on the hydrocarbon potential of the Arctic Basin and its margins. The purpose of this document is to 1) summarize results of a review of published hydrocarbon resources in the Arctic, including both conventional oil and gas and methane hydrates and 2) develop a set of digital maps of the hydrocarbon potential of the Arctic Ocean. These maps can be combined with predictions of ice-free areas to enable estimates of the likely regions and sequence of hydrocarbon production development in the Arctic. In this report, conventional oil and gas resources are explicitly linked with potential gas hydrate resources. This has not been attempted previously and is particularly powerful as the likelihood of gas production from marine gas hydrates increases. Available or planned infrastructure, such as pipelines, combined with the geospatial distribution of hydrocarbons is a very strong determinant of the temporal-spatial development of Arctic hydrocarbon resources. Significant unknowns decrease the certainty of predictions for development of hydrocarbon resources. These include: 1) Areas in the Russian Arctic that are poorly mapped, 2) Disputed ownership: primarily the Lomonosov Ridge, 3) Lack of detailed information on gas hydrate distribution, and 4) Technical risk associated with the ability to extract methane gas from gas hydrates. Logistics may control areas of exploration more than hydrocarbon potential. Accessibility, established ownership, and leasing of exploration blocks may trump quality of source rock, reservoir, and size of target. With this in mind, the main areas that are likely to be explored first are the Bering Strait and Chukchi Sea, in spite of the fact that these areas do not have highest potential for future hydrocarbon reserves. Opportunities for improving the mapping and assessment of Arctic hydrocarbon resources include: 1) Refining hydrocarbon potential on a basin-by-basin basis, 2) Developing more realistic and detailed distribution of gas hydrate, and 3) Assessing the likely future scenarios for development of infrastructure and their interaction with hydrocarbon potential. It would also be useful to develop a more sophisticated approach to merging conventional and gas hydrate resource potential that considers the technical uncertainty associated with exploitation of gas hydrate resources. Taken together, additional work in these areas could significantly improve our understanding of the exploitation of Arctic hydrocarbons as ice-free areas increase in the future.

Long, Philip E.; Wurstner, Signe K.; Sullivan, E. C.; Schaef, Herbert T.; Bradley, Donald J.

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Computer aided modeling and simulation of complex physical systems, using components from multiple  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.g., Modelica[1], gPROMS[2], and VHDL-AMS[3]) based on acausal modeling using Differential Algebraic Equations units (e.g., newton, meter, and ampere). Separately Compiled Components In for example Modelica Modelica models collected from industry to MKL. Perform experiments on a prototype implementation of MKL

Zhao, Yuxiao

276

A Transformation Approach for Modeling and Analysis of Complex UML Statecharts: A Case Study  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

transformation Petri nets model analysis 1.0 Introduction The Object Management Group (OMG) adopted a new. Entry transition. The basic form of the intermediate model for entry transitions of a composite state is a fork transition as shown in Fig. 1. A fork transition has one source state and multiple target states

Shatz, Sol M.

277

Critical Infrastructure Modeling: An Approach to Characterizing Interdependencies of Complex Networks & Control Systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Critical infrastructure control systems face many challenges entering the 21st century, including natural disasters, cyber attacks, and terrorist attacks. Revolutionary change is required to solve many existing issues, including gaining greater situational awareness and resiliency through embedding modeling and advanced control algorithms in smart sensors and control devices instead of in a central controller. To support design, testing, and component analysis, a flexible simulation and modeling capability is needed. Researchers at Idaho National Laboratory are developing and evaluating such a capability through their CIPRsim modeling and simulation framework.

Stuart Walsh; Shane Cherry; Lyle Roybal

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Remote Sensing and In-Situ Observations of Arctic Mixed-Phase and Cirrus Clouds Acquired During Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment: Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Uninhabited Aerospace Vehicle Participation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Atmospheric Radiation Monitor (ARM) uninhabited aerospace vehicle (UAV) program aims to develop measurement techniques and instruments suitable for a new class of high altitude, long endurance UAVs while supporting the climate community with valuable data sets. Using the Scaled Composites Proteus aircraft, ARM UAV participated in Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment (M-PACE), obtaining unique data to help understand the interaction of clouds with solar and infrared radiation. Many measurements obtained using the Proteus were coincident with in-situ observations made by the UND Citation. Data from M-PACE are needed to understand interactions between clouds, the atmosphere and ocean in the Arctic, critical interactions given large-scale models suggest enhanced warming compared to lower latitudes is occurring.

McFarquhar, G.M.; Freer, M.; Um, J.; McCoy, R.; Bolton, W.

2005-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

279

Current Challenges for Modeling Enzyme Active Sites by Biomimetic Synthetic Diiron Complexes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This tutorial review describes recent progress in modeling the active sites of carboxylate-rich non-heme diiron enzymes that activate dioxygen to carry out several key reactions in Nature. The chemistry of soluble methane ...

Friedle, Simone

280

Mode Estimation of Model-based Programs: Monitoring Systems with Complex Behavior  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

- active programming constructs with probabilistic, constraint-based modeling, and that offers a sim- ple controllers, have simple behaviors. However, the above trajectory spends most of its time wend- ing its way

Williams, Brian C.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "modeling complex arctic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Mode Estimation of Model-based Programs: Monitoring Systems with Complex Behavior  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

that combines reactive programming constructs with probabilistic, constraint-based modeling, and that offers wending its way through software functions. DS-1 is an instance of modern embedded systems whose

Williams, Brian C.

282

Incorporating daily flood control objectives into a monthly stochastic dynamic programming model for a hydroelectric complex  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A monthly stochastic dynamic programing model was recently developed and implemented at British Columbia (B.C.) Hydro to provide decision support for short-term energy exports and, if necessary, for flood control on the Peace River in northern British Columbia. The model established the marginal cost of supplying energy from the B.C. Hydro system, as well as a monthly operating policy for the G.M. Shrum and Peace Canyon hydroelectric plants and the Williston Lake storage reservoir. A simulation model capable of following the operating policy then determines the probability of refilling Williston Lake and possible spill rates and volumes. Reservoir inflows are input to both models in daily and monthly formats. The results indicate that flood control can be accommodated without sacrificing significant export revenue.

Druce, D.J. (British Columbia Hydro and Power Authority, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada))

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Improving capabilities for dealing with key complexities of water availability modeling  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SYSTEM MANAGEMENT STRATEGIES AND MODELING PREMISES....................... 55 4.1 Single Reservoir Yield-Reliability Tables for Each BRA Reservoir..... 57 4.2 Yield-Reliability Tables for System Diversion at Cameron, Glen Rose, High Banks, and Gulf... management strategies and modeling premises for the Brazos River Authority System ? Evaluate the impact of the beginning storage adopted for the WRAP simulation on reliabilities and firm yields for reservoirs in the Brazos River Authority System...

Olmos Alejo, Hector Elias

2005-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

284

Neptunium (V) Adsorption to a Halophilic Bacterium Under High Ionic Strength Conditions: A Surface Complexation Modeling Approach  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Rationale for experimental design: Np(V) -- important as analog for Pu(V) and for HLW scenarios; High ionic strength -- relevant to salt-based repositories such as the WIPP; Halophilic microorganisms -- representative of high ionic strength environments. For the first time showed: Significant adsorbant to halophilic microorganisms over entire pH range under high ionic strength conditions; Strong influence of ionic strength with increasing adsorption with increasing ionic strength (in contrast to trends of previous low ionic strength studies); Effect of aqueous Np(V) and bacterial surface site speciation on adsorption; and Developed thermodynamic models that can be incorporated into geochemical speciation models to aid in the prediction of the fate and transport of Np(V) in more complex systems.

Ams, David A [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

285

Modeling SF{sub 6} plume dispersion in complex terrain and meteorology with a limited data set  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Early actions of emergency responders during hazardous material releases are intended to assess contamination and potential public exposure. As measurements are collected, an integration of model calculations and measurements can assist to better understand the situation. This study applied a high resolution version of the operational 3-D numerical models used by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory to a limited meteorological and tracer data set to assist in the interpretation of the dispersion pattern on a 140 km scale. The data set was collected from a tracer release during the morning surface inversion and transition period in the complex terrain of the Snake River Plain near Idaho Falls, Idaho in November 1993 by the United States Air Force. Sensitivity studies were conducted to determine model input parameters that best represented the study environment. These studies showed that mixing and boundary layer heights, atmospheric stability, and rawinsonde data are the most important model input parameters affecting wind field generation and tracer dispersion. Numerical models and limited measurement data were used to interpret dispersion patterns through the use of data analysis, model input determination, and sensitivity studies. Comparison of the best-estimate calculation to measurement data showed that model results compared well with the aircraft data, but had moderate success with the few surface measurements taken. The moderate success of the surface measurement comparison, may be due to limited downward mixing of the tracer as a result of the model resolution determined by the domain size selected to study the overall plume dispersion. 8 refs., 40 figs., 7 tabs.

Schalk, W.W. III

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Thermally Induced Chemistry of Meteoritic Complex Organic Molecules: A New Heat-Diffusion Model for the Atmospheric Entry of Meteorites  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Research over the past four decades has shown a rich variety of complex organic molecular content in some meteorites. This current study is an attempt to gain a better insight into the thermal conditions experienced by these molecules inside meteorites during atmospheric entry. In particular, we wish to understand possible chemical processes that can occur during entry and that might have had an effect on complex organic or prebiotic species that were delivered in this way to the early Earth. A simulation was written in Fortran to model heating by the shock generated during entry and the subsequent thermal diffusion inside the body of a meteorite. Experimental data was used for the thermal parameters of several types of meteorites, including iron-nickel and several classes of chondrites. A Sutton-Graves model of stagnation-point heating was used to calculate peak surface temperatures and an explicit difference formula was used to generate thermal diffusion profiles for both chondrites and iron-nickel type met...

Shingledecker, Christopher N

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Application of the Software as a Service Model to the Control of Complex Building Systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In an effort to create broad access to its optimization software, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), in collaboration with the University of California at Davis (UC Davis) and OSISoft, has recently developed a Software as a Service (SaaS) Model for reducing energy costs, cutting peak power demand, and reducing carbon emissions for multipurpose buildings. UC Davis currently collects and stores energy usage data from buildings on its campus. Researchers at LBNL sought to demonstrate that a SaaS application architecture could be built on top of this data system to optimize the scheduling of electricity and heat delivery in the building. The SaaS interface, known as WebOpt, consists of two major parts: a) the investment& planning and b) the operations module, which builds on the investment& planning module. The operational scheduling and load shifting optimization models within the operations module use data from load prediction and electrical grid emissions models to create an optimal operating schedule for the next week, reducing peak electricity consumption while maintaining quality of energy services. LBNL's application also provides facility managers with suggested energy infrastructure investments for achieving their energy cost and emission goals based on historical data collected with OSISoft's system. This paper describes these models as well as the SaaS architecture employed by LBNL researchers to provide asset scheduling services to UC Davis. The peak demand, emissions, and cost implications of the asset operation schedule and investments suggested by this optimization model are analysed.

Stadler, Michael; Donadee, Jonathan; Marnay, Chris; Mendes, Goncalo; Appen, Jan von; Megel, Oliver; Bhattacharya, Prajesh; DeForest, Nicholas; Lai, Judy

2011-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

288

Inference-based Geometric Modeling for the Generation of Complex Cluttered Virtual Environments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

obtained from these prior models. We demonstrate the application of this algorithm on several synthetic and real-world datasets containing heavy clutter iv and occlusion. The second method we present is a generative modeling-based approach that can... Engineering Extension Service who provided the Disaster City R datasets and photographs that inspired my work. I would also like to thank Ann Mc- Namara for the use of her NextEngine 3D Scanner HD and lab space which supported my results. Finally, I would...

Biggers, Keith Edward

2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

289

The Arctic Lower Troposphere Observed Structure (ALTOS) Campaign  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The ALTOS campaign focuses on operating a tethered observing system for routine in situ sampling of low-level (< 2 km) Arctic clouds. It has been a long-term hope to fly tethered systems at Barrow, Alaska, but it is clear that the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) will not permit in-cloud tether systems at Barrow, even if unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) operations are allowed in the future. We have provided the scientific rationale for long-term, routine in situ measurements of cloud and aerosol properties in the Arctic. The existing restricted air space at Oliktok offers an opportunity to do so.

Verlinde, J

2010-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

290

Sulfur Versus Iron Oxidation in an Iron-Thiolate Model Complex  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the absence of base, the reaction of [Fe{sup II}(TMCS)]PF{sub 6} (1, TMCS = 1-(2-mercaptoethyl)-4,8,11-trimethyl-1,4,8,11-tetraazacyclotetradecane) with peracid in methanol at -20 C did not yield the oxoiron(IV) complex (2, [Fe{sup IV}(O)(TMCS)]PF{sub 6}), as previously observed in the presence of strong base (KO{sup t}Bu). Instead, the addition of 1 equiv of peracid resulted in 50% consumption of 1. The addition of a second equivalent of peracid resulted in the complete consumption of 1 and the formation of a new species 3, as monitored by UV-vis, ESI-MS, and Moessbauer spectroscopies. ESI-MS showed 3 to be formulated as [Fe{sup II}(TMCS) + 2O]{sup +}, while EXAFS analysis suggested that 3 was an O-bound iron(II)-sulfinate complex (Fe-O = 1.95 {angstrom}, Fe-S = 3.26 {angstrom}). The addition of a third equivalent of peracid resulted in the formation of yet another compound, 4, which showed electronic absorption properties typical of an oxoiron(IV) species. Moessbauer spectroscopy confirmed 4 to be a novel iron(IV) compound, different from 2, and EXAFS (Fe{double_bond}O = 1.64 {angstrom}) and resonance Raman ({nu}{sub Fe{double_bond}O} = 831 cm{sup -1}) showed that indeed an oxoiron(IV) unit had been generated in 4. Furthermore, both infrared and Raman spectroscopy gave indications that 4 contains a metal-bound sulfinate moiety ({nu}{sub s}(SO{sub 2}) {approx} 1000 cm{sup -1}, {nu}{sub as}(SO{sub 2}) {approx} 1150 cm{sup -1}). Investigations into the reactivity of 1 and 2 toward H{sup +} and oxygen atom transfer reagents have led to a mechanism for sulfur oxidation in which 2 could form even in the absence of base but is rapidly protonated to yield an oxoiron(IV) species with an uncoordinated thiol moiety that acts as both oxidant and substrate in the conversion of 2 to 3.

A McDonald; M Bukowski; E Farquhar; T Jackson; K Koehntop; M Seo; R De Hont; A Stubna; J Halfen; E Munck

2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

291

Universality Class of the Fiber Bundle Model on Complex Networks Dong-Hee Kim,1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

is broken if the load v is larger than the threshold value th v assigned to the fiber following a given is shared among intact fibers following a load sharing rule. The two most frequently studied rules networks within the framework of the fiber bundle model subject to the local load sharing rule in which

Jeong, Hawoong

292

Researchers at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) develop a new complex modeling and analysis tool  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and analysis tool capable of analyzing floating platform concepts for offshore wind turbines. The new modeling tool combines the computational methodologies used to analyze land-based wind turbines dynamic simulation tool will enable the development of cost-effective offshore technologies capable

293

Modeling of the interaction of an acoustic wave with immersed targets for telemetry of complex structures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

are being followed: the core monitoring where transducers are directly immersed in sodium near the reactor reactors, which consists in locating various reactor structures using an ultrasonic inspection performed and applicability domains. A theoretical comparison of these models is carried out to define the more adequate one

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

294

Organometallic Complexes that Model the Active Sites of the [FeFe]- and [Fe]-Hydrogenases  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

My research primarily focuses on biomimetics of the active sites of the [FeFe]- and [Fe]-hydrogenases (H2ase) and is classified into three parts. Part A: The one-electron oxidation of asymmetrically disubstituted FeIFeI models of the active site...

Liu, Tianbiao

2011-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

295

Simulating mixed-phase Arctic stratus clouds: sensitivity to ice initiation mechanisms  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The importance of Arctic mixed-phase clouds on radiation and the Arctic climate is well known. However, the development of mixed-phase cloud parameterization for use in large scale models is limited by lack of both related observations and numerical studies using multidimensional models with advanced microphysics that provide the basis for understanding the relative importance of different microphysical processes that take place in mixed-phase clouds. To improve the representation of mixed-phase cloud processes in the GISS GCM we use the GISS single-column model coupled to a bin resolved microphysics (BRM) scheme that was specially designed to simulate mixed-phase clouds and aerosol-cloud interactions. Using this model with the microphysical measurements obtained from the DOE ARM Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment (MPACE) campaign in October 2004 at the North Slope of Alaska, we investigate the effect of ice initiation processes and Bergeron-Findeisen process (BFP) on glaciation time and longevity of single-layer stratiform mixed-phase clouds. We focus on observations taken during 9th-10th October, which indicated the presence of a single-layer mixed-phase clouds. We performed several sets of 12-h simulations to examine model sensitivity to different ice initiation mechanisms and evaluate model output (hydrometeors concentrations, contents, effective radii, precipitation fluxes, and radar reflectivity) against measurements from the MPACE Intensive Observing Period. Overall, the model qualitatively simulates ice crystal concentration and hydrometeors content, but it fails to predict quantitatively the effective radii of ice particles and their vertical profiles. In particular, the ice effective radii are overestimated by at least 50%. However, using the same definition as used for observations, the effective radii simulated and that observed were more comparable. We find that for the single-layer stratiform mixed-phase clouds simulated, process of ice phase initiation due to freezing of supercooled water in both saturated and undersaturated (w.r.t. water) environments is as important as primary ice crystal origination from water vapor. We also find that the BFP is a process mainly responsible for the rates of glaciation of simulated clouds. These glaciation rates cannot be adequately represented by a water-ice saturation adjustment scheme that only depends on temperature and liquid and solid hydrometeors contents as is widely used in bulk microphysics schemes and are better represented by processes that also account for supersaturation changes as the hydrometeors grow.

Sednev, Igor; Sednev, I.; Menon, S.; McFarquhar, G.

2008-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

296

Simulating mixed-phase Arctic stratus clouds: Sensitivity to ice initiationmechanisms  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The importance of Arctic mixed-phase clouds on radiation and the Arctic climate is well known. However, the development of mixed-phase cloud parameterization for use in large scale models is limited by lack of both related observations and numerical studies using multidimensional models with advanced microphysics that provide the basis for understanding the relative importance of different microphysical processes that take place in mixed-phase clouds. To improve the representation of mixed-phase cloud processes in the GISS GCM we use the GISS single-column model coupled to a bin resolved microphysics (BRM) scheme that was specially designed to simulate mixed-phase clouds and aerosol-cloud interactions. Using this model with the microphysical measurements obtained from the DOE ARM Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment (MPACE) campaign in October 2004 at the North Slope of Alaska, we investigate the effect of ice initiation processes and Bergeron-Findeisen process (BFP) on glaciation time and longevity of single-layer stratiform mixed-phase clouds. We focus on observations taken during October 9th-10th, which indicated the presence of a single-layer mixed-phase clouds. We performed several sets of 12-hour simulations to examine model sensitivity to different ice initiation mechanisms and evaluate model output (hydrometeors concentrations, contents, effective radii, precipitation fluxes, and radar reflectivity) against measurements from the MPACE Intensive Observing Period. Overall, the model qualitatively simulates ice crystal concentration and hydrometeors content, but it fails to predict quantitatively the effective radii of ice particles and their vertical profiles. In particular, the ice effective radii are overestimated by at least 50%. However, using the same definition as used for observations, the effective radii simulated and that observed were more comparable. We find that for the single-layer stratiform mixed-phase clouds simulated, process of ice phase initiation due to freezing of supercooled water in both saturated and subsaturated (w.r.t. water) environments is as important as primary ice crystal origination from water vapor. We also find that the BFP is a process mainly responsible for the rates of glaciation of simulated clouds. These glaciation rates cannot be adequately represented by a water-ice saturation adjustment scheme that only depends on temperature and liquid and solid hydrometeors contents as is widely used in bulk microphysics schemes and are better represented by processes that also account for supersaturation changes as the hydrometeors grow.

Sednev, I.; Menon, S.; McFarquhar, G.

2009-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

297

Modeling the heat transfer in geometrically complex media with a volume source  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Fuel elements produced from spent fuel are porous media with spatially varying characteristics. A hierarchical discrete structure for the numerical modeling of heat-transfer processes in media with an anisotropic geometry that is characterized by both the microscopic voids and macroscopic changes in the parameters is proposed. The basic unit of the structure at its lower level is a cell that represents the local properties of the medium. The cells have a standard interface that allows one to form three-dimensional networks of such cells. Different types of cells in the network represent macroscopic changes. The potential for parallel processing is analyzed.

Gurevich, M. I., E-mail: gur.m@mail.ru; Telíkovskaya, O. V.; Chukbar, B. K.; Shkarovskiy, D. A. [National Research Center Kurchatov Institute (Russian Federation)

2014-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

298

Complexity penalized hydraulic fracture localization and moment tensor estimation under limited model information  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this paper we present a novel technique for micro-seismic localization using a group sparse penalization that is robust to the focal mechanism of the source and requires only a velocity model of the stratigraphy rather than a full Green's function model of the earth's response. In this technique we construct a set of perfect delta detector responses, one for each detector in the array, to a seismic event at a given location and impose a group sparsity across the array. This scheme is independent of the moment tensor and exploits the time compactness of the incident seismic signal. Furthermore we present a method for improving the inversion of the moment tensor and Green's function when the geometry of seismic array is limited. In particular we demonstrate that both Tikhonov regularization and truncated SVD can improve the recovery of the moment tensor and be robust to noise. We evaluate our algorithm on synthetic data and present error bounds for both estimation of the moment tensor as well as localization...

Ely, Gregory

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

arctic van test: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

arctic van test First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Action Refinement in Testing with uioco...

300

Arctic EnginEEring College of Engineering and Mines  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Arctic EnginEEring College of Engineering and Mines Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering Management. See Environmental Engineering and Environmental Quality Science. See Science Engineering 907-474-7241 http://cem.uaf.edu/cee/ MS Degree Minimum Requirements for Degree: 30 credits

Hartman, Chris

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "modeling complex arctic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

National Strategy for the Arctic Region Tribal Consultation Session: Unalaska  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

DOE is seeking input from federally recognized Alaska Native Tribes and Alaska Native corporations on a 10-year implementation plan as part of the National Strategy for the Arctic Region, as well as other DOE-related activities in the region. DOE, in conjunction with several other federal agencies, will host seven consultation sessions between October and December 2014.

302

A new way to study the changing Arctic ecosystem  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Berkeley Lab scientists Susan Hubbard and Margaret Torn discuss the proposed Next Generation Ecosystem Experiment, which is designed to answer one of the most urgent questions facing researchers today: How will a changing climate impact the Arctic, and how will this in turn impact the planet's climate? More info: http://newscenter.lbl.gov/feature-stories/2011/09/14/alaska-climate-change/

Hubbard, Susan

2013-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

303

National Strategy for the Arctic Region Tribal Consultation Session: Barrow  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

DOE is seeking input from federally recognized Alaska Native Tribes and Alaska Native corporations on a 10-year implementation plan as part of the National Strategy for the Arctic Region, as well as other DOE-related activities in the region. DOE, in conjunction with several other federal agencies, will host seven consultation sessions between October and December 2014.

304

National Strategy for the Arctic Region Tribal Consultation Session: Nome  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

DOE is seeking input from federally recognized Alaska Native Tribes and Alaska Native corporations on a 10-year implementation plan as part of the National Strategy for the Arctic Region, as well as other DOE-related activities in the region. DOE, in conjunction with several other federal agencies, will host seven consultation sessions between October and December 2014.

305

Global warming and Arctic climate. Raymond S. Bradley  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Global warming and Arctic climate. Raymond S. Bradley Climate System Research Center University of Massachusetts Amherst #12;How have global temperatures changed & why? 1. Average instrumental records from around the world; express all as anomalies from 1961-90 average #12;#12;Overall trend is upward ("global

Mountziaris, T. J.

306

Scaling StudieS in arctic SyStem Science  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Science (jgrebmei@umces.edu) *Lawrence Hamilton, university of new hampshire (lawrence during the april 2006 u.S. fish and Wildlife Service (uSfWS) Walrus Survey (photo by uSfWS/brad benter in 1984 by the arctic research and Policy act (Public law 98-373, July 31, 1984; amended as Public law 101

Wagner, Diane

307

arctic energy technology: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

arctic energy technology First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Energy distribution in an...

308

UnderSea Solutions, Inc. Arctic AUV Proposal  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the conceptual design and analysis of an AUV, Autonomous Underwater Vehicle, for Arctic under-ice water sampling Electrical Design: ? Power Consumption ? Battery Requirements & Selection ? Thrust Motor Requirements for nose cone Lift points Hull Form The hydrodynamic form of the AUV determines the propulsion energy

Wood, Stephen L.

309

Adsorption desorption processes on mesoscopic pores conected to microscopic pores of complex geometry using the Ising model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this work we report studies of nitrogen adsorption and desorption onto solid surfaces using computer simulations of the three dimensional Ising model, for systems with complex porous structures at the mesoscopic and microscopic levels. A hysteresis cycle between the adsorption and desorption processes appears and we find that its characteristics are dependent on the geometry of the pore and on the strength of the surface fluid interaction. We obtained also an average adsorption isotherm, which represents a combination of differently shaped pores, and shows robust jumps at certain values of the chemical potential as a consequence of the structures of the pores. Lastly, we compare our results with experimental data and also report the filling process of microscopic pores connected with mesopores. It is argued that these predictions are useful for researchers working on the enhanced recovery of oil and for the design of new nanomaterials, among others.

M. A. Balderas Altamirano; S. Cordero; G. Roman; A. Gama Goicochea

2015-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

310

Complex particle and light fragment emission in the cascade-excitation model of nuclear reactions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A brief description of our improvements and refinements that led from the CEM95 version of the Cascade-Exciton Model (CEM) code to CEM97 and to CEM2k is given. The increased accuracy and predictive power of the code CEM2k are shown by several examples. To describe fission and light-fragment (heavier than {sup 4}He) production, the CEM2k code has been merged with the GEM2 code of Furihata. We present some results on proton-induced fragmentation and fission reactios predicted by this extended version of CEM2k. We show that merging CEM2k with GEM2 allows us to describe many fission and fragmentation reactions in addition to the spallation reactions which are already relatively well described.

Mashnik, S. G. (Stepan G.); Sierk, A. J. (Arnold J.); Gudima, K. K. (Konstantin K.)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Review of technology for Arctic offshore oil and gas recovery  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The technical background briefing report is the first step in the preparation of a plan for engineering research oriented toward Arctic offshore oil and gas recovery. A five-year leasing schedule for the ice-prone waters of the Arctic offshore is presented, which also shows the projected dates of the lease sale for each area. The estimated peak production rates for these areas are given. There is considerable uncertainty for all these production estimates, since no exploratory drilling has yet taken place. A flow chart is presented which relates the special Arctic factors, such as ice and permafrost, to the normal petroleum production sequence. Some highlights from the chart and from the technical review are: (1) in many Arctic offshore locations the movement of sea ice causes major lateral forces on offshore structures, which are much greater than wave forces; (2) spray ice buildup on structures, ships and aircraft will be considerable, and must be prevented or accommodated with special designs; (3) the time available for summer exploratory drilling, and for deployment of permanent production structures, is limited by the return of the pack ice. This time may be extended by ice-breaking vessels in some cases; (4) during production, icebreaking workboats will service the offshore platforms in most areas throughout the year; (5) transportation of petroleum by icebreaking tankers from offshore tanker loading points is a highly probable situation, except in the Alaskan Beaufort; and (6) Arctic pipelines must contend with permafrost, making instrumentation necessary to detect subtle changes of the pipe before rupture occurs.

Sackinger, W. M.

1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Good morning, everyone. I'm Martin Jeffries, Principal Editor of the Arctic Report Card and a science advisor to the U.S. Arctic  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the University of Virginia, and Dr. Don Perovich of Dartmouth College. They will talk about vegetation and sea to independent peer-review organized by the Arctic Monitoring and Assessment Programme (AMAP) of the Arctic Council. Key highlights from the essays are presented on the front page of the Web site, where you'll also

313

Stability and Complexity in  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and complexity of a commu- nity of interacting plants and animals, following the food web as a clue. Contrary in power. Stability and Complexity in Model Ecosystems played a key role in introducing nonlinear thinking, and current threats to biodiversity have made questions about the role of ecosystem complexity

Landweber, Laura

314

Development of Surface Complexation Models of Cr(VI) Adsorption on Soils, Sediments and Model Mixtures of Kaolinite, Montmorillonite, ?-Alumina, Hydrous Manganese and Ferric Oxides and Goethite  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Hexavalent chromium is a highly toxic contaminant that has been introduced into aquifers and shallow sediments and soils via many anthropogenic activities. Hexavalent chromium contamination is a problem or potential problem in the shallow subsurface at several DOE sites, including Hanford, Idaho National Laboratory, Los Alamos National Laboratory and the Oak Ridge Reservation (DOE, 2008). To accurately quantify the fate and transport of hexavalent chromium at DOE and other contaminated sites, robust geochemical models, capable of correctly predicting changes in chromium chemical form resulting from chemical reactions occurring in subsurface environments are needed. One important chemical reaction that may greatly impact the bioavailability and mobility of hexavalent chromium in the subsurface is chemical binding to the surfaces of particulates, termed adsorption or surface complexation. Quantitative thermodynamic surface complexation models have been derived that can correctly calculate hexavalent chromium adsorption on well-characterized materials over ranges in subsurface conditions, such pH and salinity. However, models have not yet been developed for hexavalent chromium adsorption on many important constituents of natural soils and sediments, such as clay minerals. Furthermore, most of the existing thermodynamic models have been developed for relatively simple, single solid systems and have rarely been tested for the complex mixtures of solids present in real sediments and soils. In this study, the adsorption of hexavalent chromium was measured as a function of pH (3-10), salinity (0.001 to 0.1 M NaNO3), and partial pressure of carbon dioxide(0-5%) on a suite of naturally-occurring solids including goethite (FeOOH), hydrous manganese oxide (MnOOH), hydrous ferric oxide (Fe(OH)3), ?-alumina (Al2O3), kaolinite (Al2Si2O5(OH)4), and montmorillonite (Na3(Al, Mg)2Si4O10(OH)2?nH2O). The results show that all of these materials can bind substantial quantities of hexavalent chromium, especially at low pH. Unexpectedly, experiments with the clay minerals kaolinite and montmorillonite suggest that hexavalent chromium may interact with these solids over much longer periods of time than expected. Furthermore, hexavalent chromium may irreversibly bind to these solids, perhaps because of oxidation-reduction reactions occurring on the surfaces of the clay minerals. More work should be done to investigate and quantify these chemical reactions. Experiments conducted with mixtures of goethite, hydrous manganese oxide, hydrous ferric oxide, ?-alumina, montmorillonite and kaolinite demonstrate that it is possible to correctly predict hexavalent chromium binding in the presence of multiple minerals using thermodynamic models derived for the simpler systems. Further, these models suggest that of the six solid considered in this study, goethite is typically the solid to which most of the hexavalent chromium will bind. Experiments completed with organic-rich and organic-poor natural sediments demonstrate that in organic-rich substrates, organic matter is likely to control uptake of the hexavalent chromium. The models derived and tested in this study for hexavalent chromium binding to ?-alumina, hydrous manganese oxide, goethite, hydrous ferric oxide and clay minerals can be used to better predict changes in hexavalent chromium bioavailability and mobility in contaminated sediments and soils.

Koretsky, Carla [Western Michigan University] [Western Michigan University

2013-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

315

Polar amplification of climate change in coupled models Received: 21 November 2002 / Accepted: 11 March 2003 / Published online: 17 June 2003  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the models. The range of simulated polar warming in the Arctic is from 1.5 to 4.5 times the global mean among models that the Arctic warms more than subpolar regions when subject to increasing levels hemispheres the range of warming across global climate models is considerable, with the range of warm- ing

Bitz, Cecilia

316

E-Print Network 3.0 - arctic russia sedimentology Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

russia sedimentology Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: arctic russia sedimentology Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 CURRICULUM VITAE Julie...

317

Plant Root Characteristics and Dynamics in Arctic Tundra Ecosystems, 1960-2012  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

A synthesis of the available literature on tundra root distribution and dynamics, and their role in key ecosystem processes in the Arctic.

Sullivan, Paddy; Sloan, Victoria; Warren, Jeff; McGuire, Dave; Euskirchen, Eugenie; Norby, Richard; Iversen, Colleen; Walker, Anthony; Wullschleger, Stan

318

Radiocarbon Content of CO 2 Respired from High Arctic Tundra in Northwest Greenland  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

J. E. , 2002: Survey of Greenland instrumental temperaturetypes in northwestern Greenland. Arctic, Antarctic, andfen ecosystem in NE-Greenland. Theoretical and Applied

Czimczik, Claudia I; Welker, Jeffrey M

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

E-Print Network 3.0 - arctic ozone loss Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Chemistry Summary: stratospheric ozone losses during cold Arctic Januaries, M. Rex, R. J. Salaw- itch, M. L. Santee, J. W. Waters... , and UARS MLS to demonstrate that the...

320

E-Print Network 3.0 - arctic marine sediments Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Carbon Cycle in Summary: through the Arctic system, with implications for the marine sediment record. Quantitatively, sea... account for a major fraction of the 12;2 Holocene...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "modeling complex arctic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

E-Print Network 3.0 - arctic shorebird system Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Plan for Fish Resources of the Arctic Management ... Source: NOAA Marine Fisheries Review Collection: Environmental Sciences and Ecology 29 Bulletin 112 April 2007 45Jorgensen et...

322

E-Print Network 3.0 - arctic ocean supplementary Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

November 3, 2009 Rules and Regulations DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE Summary: . Global climate change is reducing the extent of sea ice in the Arctic Ocean, providing greater...

323

E-Print Network 3.0 - arctic wind energy Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: arctic wind energy Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 OLA PERSSON PRINCIPAL RESEARCH TOPICS Summary:...

324

E-Print Network 3.0 - arctic endemic brown Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

results for: arctic endemic brown Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Southeast Alaska Conservation Assessment -Chapter 6.7 Page 1 Endemic Mammals of the Alexander Archipelago...

325

E-Print Network 3.0 - arctic mutant peptides Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

mutant peptides Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: arctic mutant peptides Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Discrete Molecular Dynamics...

326

arctic-breeding glaucous gulls: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

stress. Norwegian Polar Institute, Polar Environmental Centre, NO-9296 Troms, Norway. Tel.: 47 7775 0500; fax: 47 Bech, Claus 8 ARCTIC Sabines Gull (Xema...

327

E-Print Network 3.0 - arctic spring site Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Faculty Office: 109 Steele Hall. Arctic Studies Office: 147 Haldeman Center ORC Source: Lotko, William - Thayer School of Engineering, Dartmouth College Collection:...

328

E-Print Network 3.0 - arctic fox alopex Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Owl ( Nyctea scandiaca ) Repr oduction in Relation to Lemming Summary: . Competition for food between snowy owls , Nyctea scandiaca, and arctic foxes, Alopex lagopus. Zoological...

329

E-Print Network 3.0 - arctic foxes alopex Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Owl ( Nyctea scandiaca ) Repr oduction in Relation to Lemming Summary: . Competition for food between snowy owls , Nyctea scandiaca, and arctic foxes, Alopex lagopus. Zoological...

330

E-Print Network 3.0 - arctic seabird colony Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Environmental Sciences and Ecology 5 Latitudinal gradients in sea ice and primary production determine Arctic seabird colony Summary: Latitudinal gradients in sea ice and...

331

E-Print Network 3.0 - arctic valley findings Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Weingartner Summary: The 2007 Bering Strait Oceanic Heat Flux and anomalous Arctic Sea-ice Retreat Rebecca A. Woodgate... Abstract: To illuminate the role of Pacific Waters in...

332

E-Print Network 3.0 - arctic sponge haliclona Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Sample search results for: arctic sponge haliclona Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 MARINE ECOLOGY PROGRESS SERIES Mar Ecol Prog Ser Summary: ). The sponges Clathrina canariensis,...

333

E-Print Network 3.0 - arctic populations affects Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

prohibit, commercial fishing for Arctic fish and to ensure subsistence fishing is not affected... and uncertain population dynamics and abundance. Under the ... Source: NOAA Marine...

334

E-Print Network 3.0 - arctic ocean ice Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Will) This chart shows the drop in ... Source: Strayer, David L. - Cary Institute of Ecosystem Studies Collection: Environmental Sciences and Ecology 14 Rapid reduction of Arctic...

335

E-Print Network 3.0 - arctic levels sources Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AGENCY: National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), National... rule that implements the Fishery Management Plan for Fish Resources of the Arctic ... Source: NOAA Marine Fisheries...

336

E-Print Network 3.0 - arctic marine oil Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Management Area are likely to occur from oil, gas, and mineral exploration... marine ecosystem. Concerned over potential effects on fish populations in the Arctic region, the...

337

E-Print Network 3.0 - arctic fox pups Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

. Mortality of arctic ... Source: Hayssen, Virginia - Department of Biological Sciences, Smith College Collection: Environmental Sciences and Ecology 2 Leashing the AlphaWolves:...

338

E-Print Network 3.0 - arctic troposphere northeast Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

the arctic front then produced an incipient surface low. Next a jet streak in the middle troposphere crossed... January-February 1991 Published by Sigma Xi ... Source:...

339

E-Print Network 3.0 - arctic fisheries working Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Co-Editor AMSA 2009 Report Managing Director, Institute of the North Summary: Marine Tourism Key Fisheries 12;Today's Arctic Marine Use High Grade Iron Ore?? Zinc & Coal...

340

E-Print Network 3.0 - arctic offshore oil Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

damage assessment. As the Arctic Ocean becomes seasonally passable and tourism, oil and gas... forecasting of ocean storms which have serious potential to threaten marine ......

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "modeling complex arctic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

E-Print Network 3.0 - arctic mammalian carnivore Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Summary: locality Arctic Ocean, Si- Ur.w polaris Shaw, 1792:7. Renaming of marinus Pallas. Thallassnrctos... (Manning, 1971). Presumably the cline is similar across the Soviet...

342

Arctic daily temperature and precipitation extremes: Observed and simulated physical behavior.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??ARCTIC DAILY TEMPERATURE AND PRECIPITATION EXTREMES: OBSERVED AND SIMULATED PHYSICAL BEHAVIOR Justin M. Glisan Department of Geological and Atmospheric Sciences, Iowa State University, Ames, IowaÖ (more)

Glisan, Justin Michael

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Reformulated Gasoline Complex Model  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines AboutDecember 2005 (Thousand9,0,InformationU.S.Feet)1,576 1,608

344

National Strategy for the Arctic Region Stakeholder Outreach Meeting: Unalaska  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

DOE is seeking input from federally recognized Alaska Native Tribes and Alaska Native corporations on a 10-year implementation plan as part of the National Strategy for the Arctic Region, as well as other DOE-related activities in the region. DOE, in conjunction with several other federal agencies, will host seven tribal consultation sessions and seven stakeholder outreach meetings between October and December 2014.

345

National Strategy for the Arctic Region Stakeholder Outreach Meeting: Fairbanks  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

DOE is seeking input from federally recognized Alaska Native Tribes and Alaska Native corporations on a 10-year implementation plan as part of the National Strategy for the Arctic Region, as well as other DOE-related activities in the region. DOE, in conjunction with several other federal agencies, will host seven tribal consultation sessions and seven stakeholder outreach meetings between October and December 2014.

346

Arctic catastrophes in an idealized sea ice model Ian Eisenman  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

thermodynamics, varying open water fraction, an energy balance atmosphere, and scalable CO2. We find that summer.e., reflectiveness) between sea ice and the open water that is exposed when it melts. Bare or snow-covered sea ice reflects most sunlight back to space, while the dark ocean surface absorbs most incident light. Global

Eisenman, Ian

347

Complex Dynamics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Complex Dynamics Bernardo Da Costa, Koushik Ramachandran, Jingjing Qu, and I had a two semester learning seminar in complex analysis and potential†...

348

Dr. William J. Gutowski will be hosting a science-team meeting of a DOE-sponsored project, "Towards Advanced Understanding and Predictive Capability of Climate Change in the Arctic using a High-  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Dr. William J. Gutowski will be hosting a science-team meeting of a DOE-sponsored project, "Towards Regional Arctic Climate System Model". This is a collaborative project to: (i) develop a state change in the northern polar regions. The project involves PIs from four institutions: Naval Postgraduate

Debinski, Diane M.

349

Exponential Random Simplicial Complexes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Exponential random graph models have attracted significant research attention over the past decades. These models are maximum-entropy ensembles under the constraints that the expected values of a set of graph observables are equal to given values. Here we extend these maximum-entropy ensembles to random simplicial complexes, which are more adequate and versatile constructions to model complex systems in many applications. We show that many random simplicial complex models considered in the literature can be casted as maximum-entropy ensembles under certain constraints. We introduce and analyze the most general random simplicial complex ensemble $\\mathbf{\\Delta}$ with statistically independent simplices. Our analysis is simplified by the observation that any distribution $\\mathbb{P}(O)$ on any collection of objects $\\mathcal{O}=\\{O\\}$, including graphs and simplicial complexes, is maximum-entropy under the constraint that the expected value of $-\\ln \\mathbb{P}(O)$ is equal to the entropy of the distribution. W...

Zuev, Konstantin; Krioukov, Dmitri

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Retrieval of Cloud Phase Using the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer Data during the Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Improving climate model predictions over Earth's polar regions requires a comprehensive knowledge of polar cloud microphysics. Over the Arctic, there is minimal contrast between the clouds and background snow surface, making it difficult to detect clouds and retrieve their phase from space. Snow and ice cover, temperature inversions, and the predominance of mixed-phase clouds make it even more difficult to determine cloud phase. Also, since determining cloud phase is the first step toward analyzing cloud optical depth, particle size, and water content, it is vital that the phase be correct in order to obtain accurate microphysical and bulk properties. Changes in these cloud properties will, in turn, affect the Arctic climate since clouds are expected to play a critical role in the sea ice albedo feedback. In this paper, the IR trispectral technique (IRTST) is used as a starting point for a WV and 11-{micro}m brightness temperature (T11) parameterization (WVT11P) of cloud phase using MODIS data. In addition to its ability to detect mixed-phase clouds, the WVT11P also has the capability to identify thin cirrus clouds overlying mixed or liquid phase clouds (multiphase ice). Results from the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) MODIS phase model (AMPHM) are compared to the surface-based cloud phase retrievals over the ARM North Slope of Alaska (NSA) Barrow site and to in-situ data taken from University of North Dakota Citation (CIT) aircraft which flew during the Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment (MPACE). It will be shown that the IRTST and WVT11P combined to form the AMPHM can achieve a relative high accuracy of phase discrimination compared to the surface-based retrievals. Since it only uses MODIS WV and IR channels, the AMPHM is robust in the sense that it can be applied to daytime, twilight, and nighttime scenes with no discontinuities in the output phase.

Spangenberg, D.; Minnis, P.; Shupe, M.; Uttal, T.; Poellot, M.

2005-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

351

2012 Changing Arctic Ocean 506E/497E -Lecture 1 -Woodgate What makes the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

"? Decreasing Ice cover Local communities subsistence Arctic Shipping Routes? Oil/Gas Exploration Links - follows slopes and ridges - quite weak (strongest flows=eddies) - separates from slopes .. somehow - cools penetration into Arctic except through North Atlantic due to fairly zonal steering and blocking by land masses

Washington at Seattle, University of

352

Duffy et al.: Arctic Tern migration over Patagonia 155 Marine Ornithology 41: 155159 (2013)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Duffy et al.: Arctic Tern migration over Patagonia 155 Marine Ornithology 41: 155­159 (2013 productive offshore waters of Argentinian Patagonia. We then explore possible reasons for this behavior-ANDEAN PASSAGE OF MIGRATING ARCTIC TERNS OVER PATAGONIA DAVID CAMERON DUFFY1 , ALY MCKNIGHT2 & DAVID B. IRONS2 1

Duffy, David Cameron

353

The Arctic Ocean carbon sink G.A. MacGilchrist a,n  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Carbon sequestration Biological pump a b s t r a c t We present observation based estimatesThe Arctic Ocean carbon sink G.A. MacGilchrist a,n , A.C. Naveira Garabato a , T. Tsubouchi b , S January 2014 Keywords: Arctic Ocean Dissolved inorganic carbon Carbon budget Air­sea carbon dioxide flux

Naveira Garabato, Alberto

354

Interannual variability of Arctic sea ice export into the East Greenland Current  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Interannual variability of Arctic sea ice export into the East Greenland Current K. A. Cox,1 J. D cycle, Arctic sea ice decline, and increasing Greenland glacial melt. Here we use new d18 O data from the East Greenland Current system at Cape Farewell and Denmark Strait to determine the relative proportions

Rohling, Eelco

355

Simulated Arctic atmospheric feedbacks associated with late summer sea ice anomalies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Simulated Arctic atmospheric feedbacks associated with late summer sea ice anomalies A. Rinke,1,2 K depend on regional and decadal variations in the coupled atmosphere-ocean-sea ice system. Citation: Rinke to investigate feedbacks between September sea ice anomalies in the Arctic and atmospheric conditions in autumn

Moore, John

356

NOAA Atlas NESDIS 58 CLIMATIC ATLAS OF THE ARCTIC SEAS 2004  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NOAA Atlas NESDIS 58 CLIMATIC ATLAS OF THE ARCTIC SEAS 2004: Part I. Database of the Barents, Kara and Information Series, Volume 9 NOAA Atlas NESDIS 58 CLIMATIC ATLAS OF THE ARCTIC SEAS 2004: Part I. Database. INTRODUCTION................................................................................. 33 2. HISTORY

357

The Atmospheric Response to Realistic Reduced Summer Arctic Sea Ice Anomalies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for the continued ice melt [Polyakov et al., 2005], and recent work shows that heat from the Atlantic layer can91 The Atmospheric Response to Realistic Reduced Summer Arctic Sea Ice Anomalies Uma S. Bhatt,1 and Robert A. Tomas3 The impact of reduced Arctic summer sea ice on the atmosphere is investigated by forcing

Bhatt, Uma

358

Arctic sea ice declined rapidly to unprec-edented low extents in the summer of 2007,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

cooling, ice extent remains far below normal. Understanding Sea Ice Loss Key factors behind this recordArctic sea ice declined rapidly to unprec- edented low extents in the summer of 2007, raising concern that the Arctic may be on the verge of a fundamental transition toward a seasonal ice cover

Clements, Craig

359

Impact of underwater-ice evolution on Arctic summer sea ice  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Impact of underwater-ice evolution on Arctic summer sea ice Dirk Notz,1,4 Miles G. McPhee,2 M. Grae the simultaneous growth and ablation of a layer of ice between an under-ice melt pond and the underlying ocean. Such ``false bottoms'' are the only significant source of ice formation in the Arctic during summer. Analytical

Worster, M. Grae

360

ORIGINAL PAPER Sedimentary pellets as an ice-cover proxy in a High Arctic  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ORIGINAL PAPER Sedimentary pellets as an ice-cover proxy in a High Arctic ice-covered lake Jessica-cover extent and dynamics on this perennially ice-covered, High Arctic lake. These pellets are interpreted growth. The pellets remain frozen in the ice until a summer or series of summers with reduced ice cover

Vincent, Warwick F.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "modeling complex arctic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

REGULAR ARTICLE Soil nitrogen cycling rates in low arctic shrub tundra  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the soil microbial community in both ecosystems indicat- ed similar fungal dominance (epifluorescence landscape. Keywords 15 Nitrogen . Gross N mineralization . Arctic tundra . Litter. Soil microbial community). For example, remote sensing studies have characterized an increase in peak-season biomass across the Arctic

Grogan, Paul

362

Be production-rate calibration for the Arctic NICOLA S E. YOUNG,1,2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A 10 Be production-rate calibration for the Arctic NICOLA¬ī S E. YOUNG,1,2 * JOERG M. SCHAEFER,1 2013; Accepted 18 April 2013 ABSTRACT: We present a Baffin Bay 10 Be production-rate calibration published 10 Be calibration datasets to develop an Arctic 10 Be production rate. Our calibration comprises

Briner, Jason P.

363

Scale Dependence and Localization of the Deformation of Arctic Sea Ice David Marsan  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, and internal stress gradients, producing spatial gradients in the ice velocity that we refer to as deformationScale Dependence and Localization of the Deformation of Arctic Sea Ice David Marsan Laboratoire de of Arctic sea ice over a 3-day time period is performed for scales of 10 to 1000 km. The deformation field

364

Seasonal predictions of ice extent in the Arctic Ocean R. W. Lindsay,1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Service and the U. S. National Ice Center) produces summer outlooks of ice conditions for specific regionsSeasonal predictions of ice extent in the Arctic Ocean R. W. Lindsay,1 J. Zhang,1 A. J. Schweiger,1 29 February 2008. [1] How well can the extent of arctic sea ice be predicted for lead periods of up

Zhang, Jinlun

365

Multiple equilibria and abrupt transitions in Arctic summer sea ice extent  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, version 3 (CCSM3). The resulting nonlinear equations produce abrupt sea ice transitions resembling thoseMultiple equilibria and abrupt transitions in Arctic summer sea ice extent William J. Merryfield monograph "Arctic Sea Ice Decline", 19 October 2007 Corresponding author address: Dr. William Merryfield

Monahan, Adam Hugh

366

On the Microphysical Representation of Observed Arctic Mixed-Phase Clouds  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

On the Microphysical Representation of Observed Arctic Mixed-Phase Clouds Paquita Zuidema, Paul Lawson, Hugh Morrison U of Miami/SPEC, Inc. Boulder CO/NCAR #12;Arctic clouds are often: mixed-phase (ie. both ice + supercooled water) yet long-lasting (despite disequilibrium) #12;why? - are ice nuclei over

Zuidema, Paquita

367

Moisture budget of the Arctic atmosphere from TOVS satellite data David G. Groves  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and radiative heating of the atmosphere. These, in turn, affect surface temperature, ice growth and melt and hemispheric atmospheric processes affect the Arctic Ocean. The lack of humidity data over the Arctic Ocean. Our method yields an average annual net precipitation of 15.1 cm yrņ1 over the polar cap (poleward

Francis, Jennifer

368

Melting of small Arctic ice caps observed from ERS scatterometer time series  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Melting of small Arctic ice caps observed from ERS scatterometer time series Laurence C. Smith,1 of melt onset can be observed over small ice caps, as well as the major ice sheets and multi-year sea ice for 14 small Arctic ice caps from 1992≠2000. Interannual and regional variability in the timing of melt

Smith, Laurence C.

369

The Arctic Oscillation, climate change and the effects on precipitation in Israel  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in the Mediterranean basin. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved. Keywords: Climate change Arctic Oscillation) investigated the effect of climate change on water resources of Eastern Mediterranean and Middle East regionThe Arctic Oscillation, climate change and the effects on precipitation in Israel Amir Givati b

Daniel, Rosenfeld

370

JP2.3 CLOUD RADIATIVE HEATING RATE FORCING FROM PROFILES OF RETRIEVED ARCTIC CLOUD MICROPHYSICS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

JP2.3 CLOUD RADIATIVE HEATING RATE FORCING FROM PROFILES OF RETRIEVED ARCTIC CLOUD MICROPHYSICS surface. In 1997-1998, a large multi-agency effort made the Surface Heat Budget of the Arctic (SHEBA with the ice pack in the Beaufort and Chukchi Seas for one year. Surface-based remote sensors generated

Shupe, Matthew

371

U.S. Arctic Research Policy: What do we need to know now?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

;11 September 2007 Arctic ice retreat ­ minimum coverage and thickness #12;Carbon dioxide climbs #12;Methane: mitigation, adaptation, Arctic feedbacks, alternative energy, sequestration, Black Carbon Task Force · Involve indigenous communities in decisions · Enhance scientific monitoring and research into local

Kuligowski, Bob

372

Understanding complex Earth systems: volatile metabolites as microbial ecosystem proxies and student conceptual model development of coastal eutrophication  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

research strands which contribute to the scientific and pedagogical understanding of complex Earth systems. In the first strand, a method that characterizes volatile organic compounds (VOCs) as ecological proxies of soil microbial ecosystems was validated...

McNeal, Karen Sue

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

373

Simulations of Arctic Mixed-Phase Clouds in Forecasts with CAM3 and AM2 for M-PACE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Simulations of mixed-phase clouds in short-range forecasts with the National Center for Atmospheric Research Community Atmosphere Model version 3 (CAM3) and the Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory (GFDL) climate model (AM2) for the Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment (M-PACE) are performed under the DOE CCPP-ARM Parameterization Testbed (CAPT), which initializes the climate models with analysis data produced from numerical weather prediction (NWP) centers. It is shown that CAM3 significantly underestimates the observed boundary layer mixed-phase clouds and cannot realistically simulate the variations with temperature and cloud height of liquid water fraction in the total cloud condensate based an oversimplified cloud microphysical scheme. In contrast, AM2 reasonably reproduces the observed boundary layer clouds while its clouds contain much less cloud condensate than CAM3 and the observations. Both models underestimate the observed cloud top and base for the boundary layer clouds. The simulation of the boundary layer mixed-phase clouds and their microphysical properties is considerably improved in CAM3 when a new physically based cloud microphysical scheme is used. The new scheme also leads to an improved simulation of the surface and top of the atmosphere longwave radiative fluxes in CAM3. It is shown that the Bergeron-Findeisen process, i.e., the ice crystal growth by vapor deposition at the expense of coexisting liquid water, is important for the models to correctly simulate the characteristics of the observed microphysical properties in mixed-phase clouds. Sensitivity tests show that these results are not sensitive to the analysis data used for model initializations. Increasing model horizontal resolution helps capture the subgrid-scale features in Arctic frontal clouds but does not help improve the simulation of the single-layer boundary layer clouds. Ice crystal number density has large impact on the model simulated mixed-phase clouds and their microphysical properties and needs to be accurately represented in climate models.

Xie, Shaocheng; Boyle, James; Klein, Stephen A.; Liu, Xiaohong; Ghan, Steven J.

2008-02-29T23:59:59.000Z

374

4, 50455074, 2004 Arctic ozone loss in  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Germany 4 Central Aerological Observatory (CAO), Moscow, Russia 5 Institute of Atmospheric Sciences and Climate (ISAC), Italian National Research Council, Bologna, Italy 6 Alfred Wegener Institute, Potsdam changes to the CTM have improved the model's ability to reproduce polar chemical and dynamical processes.5

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

375

The 2004 North Slope of Alaska Arctic Winter Radiometric Experiment  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched Ferromagnetism in Layered NbS2 and NbSe2 .2004 North Slope of Alaska Arctic Winter

376

ARM - Field Campaign - FIRE-Arctic Cloud Experiment/SHEBA  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLasDelivered¬ČPNGExperience4AJ01)3,Cloud ODgovCampaignsFIRE-Arctic Cloud Experiment/SHEBA ARM

377

A Micro-Grid Simulator Tool (SGridSim) using Effective Node-to-Node Complex Impedance (EN2NCI) Models  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper presents a micro-grid simulator tool useful for implementing and testing multi-agent controllers (SGridSim). As a common engineering practice it is important to have a tool that simplifies the modeling of the salient features of a desired system. In electric micro-grids, these salient features are the voltage and power distributions within the micro-grid. Current simplified electric power grid simulator tools such as PowerWorld, PowerSim, Gridlab, etc, model only the power distribution features of a desired micro-grid. Other power grid simulators such as Simulink, Modelica, etc, use detailed modeling to accommodate the voltage distribution features. This paper presents a SGridSim micro-grid simulator tool that simplifies the modeling of both the voltage and power distribution features in a desired micro-grid. The SGridSim tool accomplishes this simplified modeling by using Effective Node-to-Node Complex Impedance (EN2NCI) models of components that typically make-up a micro-grid. The term EN2NCI models means that the impedance based components of a micro-grid are modeled as single impedances tied between their respective voltage nodes on the micro-grid. Hence the benefit of the presented SGridSim tool are 1) simulation of a micro-grid is performed strictly in the complex-domain; 2) faster simulation of a micro-grid by avoiding the simulation of detailed transients. An example micro-grid model was built using the SGridSim tool and tested to simulate both the voltage and power distribution features with a total absolute relative error of less than 6%.

Udhay Ravishankar; Milos manic

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

JOURNAL OF INFORMATION SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING 28, 689-704 (2012) The Complexity of GARCH Option Pricing Models  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

JOURNAL OF INFORMATION SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING 28, 689-704 (2012) 689 The Complexity of GARCH computational over- head. In fact, raising n makes the popular Ritchken-Trevor tree under non-linear GARCH that LGARCH, AGARCH, GJR-GARCH, TS-GARCH and TGARCH share the same properties as NGARCH. The theoretical

Lyuu, Yuh-Dauh

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Generating Structurally Complex Test Cases by Data Mutation: A Case Study of Testing an Automated Modelling Tool  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

- 1 - Generating Structurally Complex Test Cases by Data Mutation: A Case Study of Testing Brookes University, Oxford OX33 1HX, UK Email: hzhu@brookes.ac.uk ABSTRACT Generation of adequate test cases is difficult and expensive, especially for testing software systems whose input is structurally

Zhu, Hong

380

Computational Study of Copper(II) Complexation and Hydrolysis in Aqueous Solutions Using Mixed Cluster/Continuum Models  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Computational Study of Copper(II) Complexation and Hydrolysis in Aqueous Solutions Using Mixed and thermodynamic properties of Cu(II) species in aqueous solution. 1. Introduction Copper is a key component evidence that copper may be involved in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis, Alzheimer's diseases

Goddard III, William A.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "modeling complex arctic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

A systems-theoretic security model for large scale, complex systems applied to the US air transportation system  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Classical risk-based or game-theoretic security models rely on assumptions from reliability theory and rational expectations economics that are not applicable to security threats. Additionally, these models suffer from ...

Laracy, Joseph R. (Joseph Raymond)

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Intercomparison and evaluation of global aerosol microphysical properties among AeroCom models of a range of complexity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Many of the next generation of global climate models will include aerosol schemes which explicitly simulate the microphysical processes that determine the particle size distribution. These models enable aerosol optical ...

Ridley, David Andrew

383

Arctic Energy Technology Development Laboratory (Part 2)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Methane (CH{sub 4}) in natural gas is a major energy source in the U.S., and is used extensively on Alaska's North Slope, including the oilfields in Prudhoe Bay, the community of Barrow, and the National Petroleum Reserve, Alaska (NPRA). Smaller villages, however, are dependent on imported diesel fuel for both power and heating, resulting in some of the highest energy costs in the U.S. and crippling local economies. Numerous CH{sub 4} gas seeps have been observed on wetlands near Atqasuk, Alaska (in the NPRA), and initial measurements have indicated flow rates of 3,000-5,000 ft{sup 3} day{sup -1} (60-100 kg CH{sub 4} day{sup -1}). Gas samples collected in 1996 indicated biogenic origin, although more recent sampling indicated a mixture of biogenic and thermogenic gas. In this study, we (1) quantified the amount of CH{sub 4} generated by several seeps and evaluated their potential use as an unconventional gas source for the village of Atqasuk; (2) collected gas and analyzed its composition from multiple seeps several miles apart to see if the source is the same, or if gas is being generated locally from isolated biogenic sources; and (3) assessed the potential magnitude of natural CH{sub 4} gas seeps for future use in climate change modeling.

See OSTI ID Number 960443

2008-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

384

E-Print Network 3.0 - arctic science conference Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

science conference Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: arctic science conference Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 RECIEL 17 (1) 2008. ISSN...

385

E-Print Network 3.0 - arctic offshore drilling Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: arctic offshore drilling Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Free & open to the public For more information,...

386

Assessing the Predictability of the Beaufort Sea Minimum Ice Extent in a Changing Arctic Climate Regime  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Understanding the climatic drivers of changes in sea ice extent in the Arctic has become increasingly important as record minima in the September sea ice extent continue to be reached. This research therefore addresses the question of which synoptic...

Quirk, Laura Marie

2014-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

387

E-Print Network 3.0 - arctic foxes vulpes Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

2 the american naturalist february 2008 Spatial Patterns and Dynamic Responses of Arctic Food Webs Summary: ) and the red fox (Vulpes vulpes) are present in low numbers. The most...

388

E-Print Network 3.0 - arctic fox vulpes Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

2 the american naturalist february 2008 Spatial Patterns and Dynamic Responses of Arctic Food Webs Summary: ) and the red fox (Vulpes vulpes) are present in low numbers. The most...

389

Building skills : a construction trades training facility for the eastern Canadian Arctic  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

On April 1, 1999, the Inuit of the Eastern Canadian Arctic achieved sovereignty over a new territory, Nunavut, envisioning economic self-reliance, political self-determination, and renewal of confidence in Inuit community. ...

Roszler, Sarah Katherine, 1977-

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Black carbon in Arctic snow and its effect on surface albedo  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

large areas of snow are exposed to significant solar energy (snow albedo is less important in winter Sheet in both spring and summer Non-Arctic snow - Great Plains of North America - Steppes of Asia

391

Kinetic Modeling of Halogen-Based Plasma Etching of Complex Oxide Films and its Application to Predictive Feature Profile Simulation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

model for Si etching by fluorocarbon plasmas." Journal Ofwith inductively coupled fluorocarbon plasmas." Journal ofwith inductively coupled fluorocarbon plasmas." Journal of

Marchack, Nathan

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Lger A., Duval C., Weber P., Levrat E., Farret R. "BAYESIAN NETWORK MODELLING THE RISK ANALYSIS OF COMPLEX SOCIO TECHNICAL SYSTEMS". Submitted to: 4th Workshop on Advanced Control and Diagnosis, Nancy -France, 16 et 17 nov., 2006.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Probabilistic risk assessment. 1. INTRODUCTION In classified installations1 (nuclear power plants, chemical OF COMPLEX SOCIO TECHNICAL SYSTEMS". Submitted to: 4th Workshop on Advanced Control and Diagnosis, Nancy - France, 16 et 17 nov., 2006. BAYESIAN NETWORK MODELLING THE RISK ANALYSIS OF COMPLEX SOCIO TECHNICAL

Boyer, Edmond

393

Real-time processing of remote sensor data as applied to Arctic ice classification  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

REAL-TIME PROCESSING OF REMOTE SENSOR DATA AS APPLIED TO ARCTIC ICE CLASSIFICATION A Thesis by JAMES AUSTIN PERMENTER partial ! Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A)M University in fulfillment of the requirement for the degree... of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1973 Major Subject: Electrical Engineering REAL-TIME PROCESSING OF REMOTE SENSOR DATA AS APPLIED TO ARCTIC ICE CLASSIFICATION A Thesis by James Austin Permenter Approved as to style and content by: ] ( rman of Commi...

Permenter, James Austin

1973-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

THE GREEN ALGA CHLAMYDOMONAS REINHARDTII: A NEW MODEL SYSTEM TO UNRAVEL THE ASSEMBLY PROCESS OF RESPIRATORY COMPLEXES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

THE GREEN ALGA CHLAMYDOMONAS REINHARDTII: A NEW MODEL SYSTEM TO UNRAVEL THE ASSEMBLY PROCESS process. I propose to use the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii as a novel model system to carry out thoughts with a warm cup of tea (I should also extend my gratitude to Birgit Alber, our scientific tea chat

Hamel, Patrice

395

Abstract--Modelling and control of gas turbines (GTs) have always been a controversial issue because of the complex  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Abstract--Modelling and control of gas turbines (GTs) have always been a controversial issue that there is no end to the efforts for performance optimization of gas turbines. A variety of analytical and experimental models as well as control systems has been built so far for gas turbines. However, the need

Sainudiin, Raazesh

396

Magnetic properties of a diferrous-water complex and ligands for modeling the active site of MMOH  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chapter 1: The Importance of Modeling Diiron Sites in Nature.There are a variety of metalloenzymes that have nearly identical carboxylate-bridged diiron active sites. An example is sMMOH, an enzyme that catalyzes the ...

Kelly, Amy E. (Amy Elizabeth), 1980-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Kinetics of Yttrium-Ligand Complexation Monitored Using Hyperpolarized 89 as a Model for Gadolinium in Contrast Agents  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(a model for uranium and other actinide storage materials) by 89 Y magic-angle spinning (MAS) NMR.8 The radioisotope 90 Y can be used for cancer therapy.9 Golman et al.10 demonstrated that the metabolic conversion

398

90 4,000 Meters under the Ice The Arctic is one of the habitats undergoing the most  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PlanckResearch 89 RUSSIA Special RUSSIA Special #12;#12;TEXT MAREN EMMERICH The Arctic is one of the habitats

399

Renewable Resources: a national catalog of model projects. Volume 2. Mid-American Solar Energy Complex Region  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This compilation of diverse conservation and renewable energy projects across the United States was prepared through the enthusiastic participation of solar and alternate energy groups from every state and region. Compiled and edited by the Center for Renewable Resources, these projects reflect many levels of innovation and technical expertise. In many cases, a critique analysis is presented of how projects performed and of the institutional conditions associated with their success or failure. Some 2000 projects are included in this compilation; most have worked, some have not. Information about all is presented to aid learning from these experiences. The four volumes in this set are arranged in state sections by geographic region, coinciding with the four Regional Solar Energy Centers. The table of contents is organized by project category so that maximum cross-referencing may be obtained. This volume includes information on the Mid-American Solar Energy Complex Region. (WHK)

None

1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Evaluation of Mixed-Phase Cloud Parameterizations in Short-Range Weather Forecasts with CAM3 and AM2 for Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

By making use of the in-situ data collected from the recent Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment, we have tested the mixed-phase cloud parameterizations used in the two major U.S. climate models, the National Center for Atmospheric Research Community Atmosphere Model version 3 (CAM3) and the Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory climate model (AM2), under both the single-column modeling framework and the U.S. Department of Energy Climate Change Prediction Program-Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Parameterization Testbed. An improved and more physically based cloud microphysical scheme for CAM3 has been also tested. The single-column modeling tests were summarized in the second quarter 2007 Atmospheric Radiation Measurement metric report. In the current report, we document the performance of these microphysical schemes in short-range weather forecasts using the Climate Chagne Prediction Program Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Parameterizaiton Testbest strategy, in which we initialize CAM3 and AM2 with realistic atmospheric states from numerical weather prediction analyses for the period when Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment was conducted.

Xie, S; Boyle, J; Klein, S; Liu, X; Ghan, S

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "modeling complex arctic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Use of Probabilistic Relational Model (PRM) for Dependability Analysis of Complex G. Medina Oliva, P. Weber, E. Levrat, B. Iung  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.uhp-nancy.fr,{philippe.weber}@esstin.uhp-nancy.fr Abstract: This paper proposes a methodology to develop a decision-making aid tool which purpose related to risk analysis and dependability which allow to forecast the gaps between nominal and non of an approach to formalize a model required to evaluate risk analysis, maintenance and dependability

Paris-Sud XI, Universitť de

402

Geohydrology and groundwater geochemistry at a sub-arctic landfill, Fairbanks, Alaska  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Fairbanks-North Star Borough, Alaska, landfill is located on silt, sand, and gravel deposits of the Tanana River flood plain, about 3 miles south of the city of Fairbanks water supply wells. The landfill has been in operation for about 25 years in this sub-arctic region of discontinuous permafrost. The cold climate limits biological activity within the landfill with corresponding low gas and leachate production. Chloride concentrations, specific conductance, water temperature, and earth conductivity measurements indicate a small plume of leachate flowing to the northwest from the landfill. The leachate remains near the water table as it flows northwestward toward a drainage ditch. Results of computer modeling of this local hydrologic system indicate that some of the leachate may be discharging to the ditch. Chemical data show that higher-than-background concentrations of several ions are present in the plume. However, the concentrations appear to be reduced to background levels within a short distance along the path of groundwater flow from the landfill, and thus the leachate is not expected to affect the water supply wells. 11 refs., 21 figs., 2 tabs.

Downey, J.S.; Sinton, P.O.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Dynamics of Arctic and Sub-Arctic Climate and Atmospheric Circulation: Diagnosis of Mechanisms and Model Biases Using data Assimilation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

These five publications are summarized: Key role of the Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation in 20th century drought and wet periods over the Great Plains; A Sub-Seasonal Teleconnection Analysis: PNA Development and Its Relationship to the NAO; AMO's Structure and Climate Footprint in Observations and IPCC AR5 Climate Simulations; The Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation in 20th Century Climate Simulations: Uneven Progress from CMIP3 to CMIP5; and Tropical Atlantic Biases in CCSM4.

Sumant Nigam

2013-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

404

An experimental investigation of a simple model simulation of a complex non-uniform beam (aircraft) vibration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CPM OR 205. 146 RAD. /SEC. . 08 NODES . 06 e 04 '0 O 02 0 z . 02 O z IP ?. 04 EX CI TER LOCA TI ON -. 06 -. 08 Station 10 FIGURE 12. SECOND MODE SHAPE CURVE OF THE MODEL BEAM 5. 0 4. 0 3. 0 PROTOTYPE Q MODEL 2. 0 1, 0 n 0 -1... obtained by utilizing the Buckingham "Pi Theorem" (8) is: ?. ER(-~J L- (x)j F'L T = IT j IFL 3 IFT L j ~L J [2] Equating exponents of the three dimensions produces: F. O = a+b L:0 = Za-2b+c T:0 = -1+Zb. Solving yields a = -s, b=z, and c=Z...

Hardin, William David

1966-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Published by the Arctic Research Consortium of the United States 3535 College Road Suite 101 Fairbanks, AK 99709 Arctic Research at the University of Northern British Columbia  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

· Fairbanks, AK 99709 Arctic Research at the University of Northern British Columbia Establishedin1994 Columbia Prince George Campus 3333 University Way Prince George, BC V2N 4Z9 Canada 250-960-5555 sderywithconsiderablepublicendorsementandenthusiasm,theUniver- sity of Northern British Columbia (UNBC) has grown into one of Canada's premier

Dery, Stephen

406

Concept Study: Exploration and Production in Environmentally Sensitive Arctic Areas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Alaska North Slope offers one of the best prospects for increasing U.S. domestic oil and gas production. However, this region faces some of the greatest environmental and logistical challenges to oil and gas production in the world. A number of studies have shown that weather patterns in this region are warming, and the number of days the tundra surface is adequately frozen for tundra travel each year has declined. Operators are not allowed to explore in undeveloped areas until the tundra is sufficiently frozen and adequate snow cover is present. Spring breakup then forces rapid evacuation of the area prior to snowmelt. Using the best available methods, exploration in remote arctic areas can take up to three years to identify a commercial discovery, and then years to build the infrastructure to develop and produce. This makes new exploration costly. It also increases the costs of maintaining field infrastructure, pipeline inspections, and environmental restoration efforts. New technologies are needed, or oil and gas resources may never be developed outside limited exploration stepouts from existing infrastructure. Industry has identified certain low-impact technologies suitable for operations, and has made improvements to reduce the footprint and impact on the environment. Additional improvements are needed for exploration and economic field development and end-of-field restoration. One operator-Anadarko Petroleum Corporation-built a prototype platform for drilling wells in the Arctic that is elevated, modular, and mobile. The system was tested while drilling one of the first hydrate exploration wells in Alaska during 2003-2004. This technology was identified as a potentially enabling technology by the ongoing Joint Industry Program (JIP) Environmentally Friendly Drilling (EFD) program. The EFD is headed by Texas A&M University and the Houston Advanced Research Center (HARC), and is co-funded by the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL). The EFD participants believe that the platform concept could have far-reaching applications in the Arctic as a drilling and production platform, as originally intended, and as a possible staging area. The overall objective of this project was to document various potential applications, locations, and conceptual designs for the inland platform serving oil and gas operations on the Alaska North Slope. The University of Alaska Fairbanks assisted the HARC/TerraPlatforms team with the characterization of potential resource areas, geotechnical conditions associated with continuous permafrost terrain, and the potential end-user evaluation process. The team discussed the various potential applications with industry, governmental agencies, and environmental organizations. The benefits and concerns associated with industry's use of the technology were identified. In this discussion process, meetings were held with five operating companies (22 people), including asset team leaders, drilling managers, HSE managers, and production and completion managers. Three other operating companies and two service companies were contacted by phone to discuss the project. A questionnaire was distributed and responses were provided, which will be included in the report. Meetings were also held with State of Alaska Department of Natural Resources officials and U.S. Bureau of Land Management regulators. The companies met with included ConcoPhillips, Chevron, Pioneer Natural Resources, Fairweather E&P, BP America, and the Alaska Oil and Gas Association.

Shirish Patil; Rich Haut; Tom Williams; Yuri Shur; Mikhail Kanevskiy; Cathy Hanks; Michael Lilly

2008-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

407

ArcticN O A A ' s A r c t i c A c t i O N P l A N Supporting the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Service Kate Clark National Ocean Service Pablo Clemente-Colon National Environmental Satellite directly supports the National Strategy. Advancing U.s. security interests in the Arctic requires improvedArcticN O A A ' s A r c t i c A c t i O N P l A N Supporting the national Strategy for the arctic

408

Final Technical Report: Development of the DUSTRAN GIS-Based Complex Terrain Model for Atmospheric Dust Dispersion  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Activities at U.S. Department of Defense (DoD) training and testing ranges can be sources of dust in local and regional airsheds governed by air-quality regulations. The U.S. Department of Energyís Pacific Northwest National Laboratory just completed a multi-year project to develop a fully tested and documented atmospheric dispersion modeling system (DUST TRANsport or DUSTRAN) to assist the DoD in addressing particulate air-quality issues at military training and testing ranges.

Allwine, K Jerry; Rutz, Frederick C.; Shaw, William J.; Rishel, Jeremy P.; Fritz, Brad G.; Chapman, Elaine G.; Hoopes, Bonnie L.; Seiple, Timothy E.

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Air monitoring in the Arctic: Results for selected persistent organic pollutants for 1992  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Arctic is generally considered to be a pristine environment and has few direct inputs of organochlorine compounds (OCs), including pesticides, herbicides, polychlorinated biphenyls, or polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). In spite of this, airborne concentrations of persistent organic pollutants (POPs) are comparable to those in more populated and industrialized regions of North America and Europe. Atmospheric transport and condensation of compounds at low temperature conditions are important factors contributing to the presence of contaminants in the Arctic. A long-term program has been established to measure the airborne concentrations of POPs in the Arctic. The first station at Alert was established in January 1992. The concentrations measured in the first year of monitoring for 18 compounds that are representative of different compound classes are presented. Seasonal variations for PAHs are similar to those for Arctic haze and peak during winter. For example, in the coldest period, october to April, benzo[a]pyrene concentrations were found to average 20 pg/m{sup 3}, whereas, in contrast, during the relatively warm May to September period, average levels were 1.0 pg/m{sup 3}. For OCs, the seasonal cycle was not as pronounced as that for PAH compounds. For example, {alpha}-hexachlorocyclohexane was found at Alert at average concentrations of 62 and 57 pg/m{sup 3}, respectively, during cold and warm periods. It is postulated that air concentrations are influenced by advection from distant source regions as well as exchange with local (Arctic Ocean) surfaces.

Fellin, P.; Dougherty, D. [BOVAR Environmental, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Barrie, L.A.; Toom, D. [Environment Canada, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Muir, D.; Grift, N.; Lockhart, L.; Billeck, B. [Freshwater Inst., Winnipeg, Manitoba (Canada)

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

A transitioning Arctic surface energy budget: the impacts of solar zenith angle, surface albedo and cloud radiative forcing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A transitioning Arctic surface energy budget: the impacts of solar zenith angle, surface albedo surface and sea-ice energy budgets were measured near 87.5¬įN during the Arctic Summer Cloud Ocean Study regimes, characterized by varying cloud, thermody- namic and solar properties. An initial warm, melt

Brooks, Ian M.

411

Warming of the arctic ice-ocean system is faster than the global average since the 1960s  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, downward longwave radiation, and therefore net heat flux. The faster warming of the arctic ice­ocean systemWarming of the arctic ice-ocean system is faster than the global average since the 1960s Jinlun Zhang Polar Science Center, Applied Physics Laboratory, College of Ocean and Fishery Sciences

Zhang, Jinlun

412

UiT The Arctic University of Norway Fakultet for biovitenskap, fiskeri og konomi -Inst. for arktisk og marin biologi  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

UiT The Arctic University of Norway Fakultet for biovitenskap, fiskeri og √łkonomi - Inst/616 The Faculty of Biosciences, Fishery and Economics, UiT The Arctic University of Norway has a PhD position and participate in field work in Norway and Russia. The candidate must have a god command of written and spoken

Uppsala Universitet

413

Effects of Changes in Arctic Lake and River Ice Terry Prowse, Knut Alfredsen, Spyros Beltaos, Barrie R. Bonsal,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ice in the Arctic are projected to produce a variety of effects on hydrologic, ecological, and socio impacts that are directly produced by changes in freshwater ice. The details and diversityEffects of Changes in Arctic Lake and River Ice Terry Prowse, Knut Alfredsen, Spyros Beltaos

Vincent, Warwick F.

414

Atmospheric Circulation and Its Effect on Arctic Sea Ice in CCSM3 Simulations at Medium and High Resolution*  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the Canadian archipelago, where the T85 winds produce thicker ice than their T42 counterparts. Seasonal forcingAtmospheric Circulation and Its Effect on Arctic Sea Ice in CCSM3 Simulations at Medium and High) ABSTRACT The simulation of Arctic sea ice and surface winds changes significantly when Community Climate

Bitz, Cecilia

415

RHP: HOW CLIMATE MODELS GAIN AND EXERCISE How Climate Models Gain and Exercise Authority  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-dimensional models, intermediate complexity models, general circulation models, and Earth system models. 2 www

Hulme, Mike

416

Synthesis and Characterization of Metal Complexes to be Employed in the Catalytic Depolymerization of Lignin Model Compounds  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Lignin is an earth-abundant biopolymer that is grossly underutilized as a value stream in current biomass conversion technologies because there exist no economic and technically feasible routes for lignin depolymerization and upgrading to fuels and chemicals. The development of new mild and selective catalytic routes to depolymerize this recalcitrant biopolymer is required to more effectively utilize lignin. To that end, our group aims to synthesize and characterize a collection of organometallic catalysts to promote atom-economical catalytic lignin deconstruction. These catalysts have been screened against dimeric lignin model compounds in order to gain mechanistic insights into their modes of action. In addition, experimental efforts have been coupled with quantum mechanical calculations to elucidate solution behavior of the catalysts as well as the mechanisms of lignin depolymerization. Detailed synthetic procedures, as well as spectroscopic and crystallographic characterization and DFT calculations will be presented.

Chmely, S. C.; Kim, S.; Beckham, G. T.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Decadal to seasonal variability of Arctic sea ice albedo  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A controlling factor in the seasonal and climatological evolution of the sea ice cover is its albedo $\\alpha$. Here we analyze Arctic data from the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) Polar Pathfinder and assess the seasonality and variability of broadband albedo from a 23 year daily record. We produce a histogram of daily albedo over ice covered regions in which the principal albedo transitions are seen; high albedo in late winter and spring, the onset of snow melt and melt pond formation in the summer, and fall freeze up. The bimodal late summer distribution demonstrates the combination of the poleward progression of the onset of melt with the coexistence of perennial bare ice with melt ponds and open water, which then merge to a broad peak at $\\alpha \\gtrsim $ 0.5. We find the interannual variability to be dominated by the low end of the $\\alpha$ distribution, highlighting the controlling influence of the ice thickness distribution and large-scale ice edge dynamics. The statistics obtained pro...

Agarwal, S; Wettlaufer, J S

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Modeling methane emissions from the Alaskan Yukon River basin, 19862005, by coupling a large-scale hydrological model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Modeling methane emissions from the Alaskan Yukon River basin, 1986­2005, by coupling a large-scale hydrological model and a process-based methane model Xiaoliang Lu1 and Qianlai Zhuang1,2 Received 25 August has been made in methane modeling for the Arctic. However, there is still large uncertainty

419

Soil moisture in complex terrain: quantifying effects on atmospheric boundary layer flow and providing improved surface boundary conditions for mesoscale models  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

compressible numerical weather prediction model incompressible numerical weather prediction model withcompressible numerical weather prediction model in

Daniels, Megan Hanako

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Non-nuclear submarine tankers could cost-effectively move Arctic oil and gas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Before the advent of nuclear propulsion for U.S. Navy submarines, fuel cells were considered to be the next logical step forward from battery powered submarines which required recharging. But with the launching of the USS Nautilus (SSN-571) in 1954, the development of fuel-cell propulsion was sidelined by the naval community. Nearly 30 years later fuel-cell propulsion on board submarines is actually more cost-effective than the use of nuclear propulsion. In the Artic Ocean, the use of the submarine tanker has long been considered commercially appropriate because of the presence of the polar ice cap, which inhibits surface ship transport. The technical difficulty and high operating cost of Arctic icebreaking tankers are strong arguments in favor of the cheaper, more efficient submarine tanker. Transiting under the polar ice cap, the submarine tanker is not an ''Arctic'' system, but merely a submerged system. It is a system usable in any ocean around the globe where sufficient depth exists (about 65% of the global surface). Ice breakers are another story; their design only makes them useful for transit through heavy sea ice in coastal environments. Used anywhere else, such as in the open ocean or at the Arctic ice cap, they are not a cost-effective means of transport. Arctic sea ice conditions require the Arctic peculiar icebreaking tanker system to do the job the hard way-on the surface. But on the other hand, Arctic sea ice conditions are neatly set aside by the submarine tanker, which does it the energy-efficient, elegant way submerged. The submarine tanker is less expensive to build, far less expensive to operate, and does not need to be nuclear propelled.

Kumm, W.H.

1984-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "modeling complex arctic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

arctic vegetation damage: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

gradient. Here we examine the complex interrelationships between patterned ground, climate, vegetation and soil along a north-south transect through all five bioclimate...

422

Theories of phosphorescence in organo-transition metal complexes - from relativistic effects to simple models and design principles for organic light-emitting diodes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We review theories of phosphorescence in cyclometalated complexes. We focus primarily on pseudooctahedrally coordinated $t_{2g}^6$ metals (e.g., [Os(II)(bpy)$_3$]$^{2+}$, Ir(III)(ppy)$_3$ and Ir(III)(ptz)$_3$) as, for reasons that are explored in detail, these show particularly strong phosphorescence. We discuss both first principles approaches and semi-empirical models, e.g., ligand field theory. We show that together these provide a clear understanding of the photophysics and in particular the lowest energy triplet excitation, T$_1$. In order to build a good model relativistic effects need to be included. The role of spin-orbit coupling is well-known, but scalar relativistic effects are also large - and are therefore also introduced and discussed. No expertise in special relativity or relativistic quantum mechanics is assumed and a pedagogical introduction to these subjects is given. It is shown that, once both scalar relativistic effects and spin-orbit coupling are included, time dependent density function...

Powell, B J

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Conceptual Models for Migration of Key Groundwater Contaminants Through the Vadose Zone and Into the Upper Unconfined Aquifer Below the B-Complex  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The B-Complex contains 3 major crib and trench disposal sites and 3 SST farms that have released nearly 346 mega-liters of waste liquids containing the following high groundwater risk drivers: ~14,000 kg of CN, 29,000 kg of Cr, 12,000 kg of U and 145 Ci of Tc-99. After a thorough review of available vadose zone sediment and pore water, groundwater plume, field gamma logging, field electrical resistivity studies, we developed conceptual models for which facilities have been the significant sources of the contaminants in the groundwater and estimated the masses of these contaminants remaining in the vadose zone and currently present in the groundwater in comparison to the totals released. This allowed us to make mass balance calculations on how consistent our knowledge is on the current deep vadose zone and groundwater distribution of contaminants. Strengths and weaknesses of the conceptual models are discussed as well as implications on future groundwater and deep vadose zone remediation alternatives. Our hypothesized conceptual models attribute the source of all of the cyanide and most of the Tc-99 currently in the groundwater to the BY cribs. The source of the uranium is the BX-102 tank overfill event and the source of most of the chromium is the B-7-A&B and B-8 cribs. Our mass balance estimates suggest that there are much larger masses of U, CN, and Tc remaining in the deep vadose zone within ~20 ft of the water table than is currently in the groundwater plumes below the B-Complex. This hypothesis needs to be carefully considered before future remediation efforts are chosen. The masses of these groundwater risk drivers in the the groundwater plumes have been increasing over the last decade and the groundwater plumes are migrating to the northwest towards the Gable Gap. The groundwater flow rate appears to flucuate in response to seasonal changes in hydraulic gradient. The flux of contaminants out of the deep vadose zone from the three proposed sources also appears to be transient such that the evolution of the contaminant plumes is transient.

Serne, R. Jeffrey; Bjornstad, Bruce N.; Keller, Jason M.; Thorne, Paul D.; Lanigan, David C.; Christensen, J. N.; Thomas, Gregory S.

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Managing Complexity  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Physical analogs have shown considerable promise for understanding the behavior of complex adaptive systems, including macroeconomics, biological systems, social networks, and electric power markets. Many of todayís most challenging technical and policy questions can be reduced to a distributed economic control problem. Indeed, economically-based control of large-scale systems is founded on the conjecture that the price-based regulation (e.g., auctions, markets) results in an optimal allocation of resources and emergent optimal system control. This paper explores the state of the art in the use physical analogs for understanding the behavior of some econophysical systems and to deriving stable and robust control strategies for them. In particular we review and discussion applications of some analytic methods based on the thermodynamic metaphor according to which the interplay between system entropy and conservation laws gives rise to intuitive and governing global properties of complex systems that cannot be otherwise understood.

Chassin, David P.; Posse, Christian; Malard, Joel M.

2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

LES Simulations of Roll Clouds Observed During Mixed- Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Roll clouds, and associated roll convection, are fairly common features of the atmospheric boundary layer. While these organized cumuliform clouds are found over many regions of the planet, they are quite ubiquitous near the edge of the polar ice sheets. In particular, during periods of off-ice flow, when cold polar air flows from the ice pack over the relatively warm ocean water, strong boundary layer convection develops along with frequent rolls. According to Bruemmer and Pohlman (2000), most of the total cloud cover in the Arctic is due to roll clouds. In an effort to examine the influences of mixed-phase microphysics on the boundary layer evolution of roll clouds during off-ice flow, Olsson and Harrington (2000) used a 2D mesoscale model coupled to a bulk microphysical scheme (see Section 2). Their results showed that mixed-phase clouds produced more shallow boundary layers with weaker turbulence than liquid-phase cases. Furthermore, their results showed that because of th e reduced turbulent drag on the atmosphere in the mixed-phase case, regions of mesoscale divergence in the marginal ice-zone were significantly affected. A follow-up 2D study (Harrington and Olsson 2001) showed that the reduced turbulent intensity in mixed-phase cases was due to precipitation. Ice precipitation caused downdraft stabilization which fed back and caused a reduction in the surface heat fluxes. In this work, we extend the work of Olsson and Harrington (2000) and Harrington and Olsson (2001) by examining the impacts of ice microphysics on roll convection. We will present results that illustrate how microphysics alters roll cloud structure and dynamics.

Greenberg, S.D.; Harrington, J.Y.; Prenni, A.; DeMott, P.

2005-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

426

Next-Generation Ecosystem Experiments NGEE Arctic Quarterly Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

land model for inclusion in Earth system models. #12;3 Details at a Glance Activities during the April

427

Carbonaceous species and humic like substances (HULIS) in Arctic snowpack during OASIS field campaign in Barrow  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on snow albedo and arctic atmospheric chemistry. During the OASIS field campaign, in March and April 2009, Elemental Carbon (EC), Water insoluble Organic Carbon (WinOC) and Dissolved Organic Carbon (DOC) were hoar layers due to specific wind related formation mechanisms in the early season. Apart from

Sheldon, Nathan D.

428

Topographic Controls on LAI in Arctic Tundra Luke Spadavecchia -54 -2008  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and surface energy balance, which can vary by an order of magnitude among Arctic tundra communities. We Spadavecchia - 55 - 2008 4.1 Declaration The following chapter was submitted to the Journal of Ecology and plant functional type of a tundra ecosystem'. Journal of Ecology 96(6): 1238-1251) we correct

429

Response of the Greenland-Scotland overflow to changing deep water supply from the Arctic Mediterranean  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Response of the Greenland-Scotland overflow to changing deep water supply from the Arctic with a topographic barrier is used to study the response of the overflows across the Greenland-Scotland Ridge of the exchanges across the ridge is seen when the supply decreases. Transport variations in the East-Greenland

430

Arctic sea ice and atmospheric circulation under the GeoMIP G1 scenario  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Arctic sea ice and atmospheric circulation under the GeoMIP G1 scenario John C. Moore1 , Annette Rinke1,2 , Xiaoyong Yu1 , Duoying Ji1 , Xuefeng Cui1 , Yan Li3 , Kari Alterskjær4 , Jón Egill Centre, Danish Meteorological Institute, Copenhagen, Denmark Abstract We analyze simulated sea ice

Robock, Alan

431

NOAA's Arctic Science Days Day 1: Science, Weather and Sea Ice, and International Partnerships  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NOAA's Arctic Science Days 1 Day 1: Science, Weather and Sea Ice, and International Partnerships 1 Observing Networks [IASOA, RUSALCA, PAG, CBMP & SAON] 2. Ed Farley (NOAA/AFSC, remote): Implications of sea ice loss on NOAA trust resources: NOAA's Loss of Sea Ice (LOSI) Program 3. Sue Moore (NOAA

432

Regional climate responses to geoengineering with tropical and Arctic SO2 injections  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Regional climate responses to geoengineering with tropical and Arctic SO2 injections Alan Robock,1 insolation and cool Earth, has been suggested as an emergency response to geoengineer the planet in response aerosols cooling the planet, the volcano analog actually argues against geoengineering because of ozone

Robock, Alan

433

Arctic Region Evaluation of the Hydro-Thermodynamic Soil Vegetation Scheme (HTSVS)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Arctic Region Evaluation of the Hydro-Thermodynamic Soil Vegetation Scheme (HTSVS) Pamela Spier, University of Alaska, Fairbanks, AK Abstract This paper presents an evaluation of the Hydro. Introduction and Motivation The Hydro-Thermodynamic Soil Vegetation Scheme (HTSVS, Kramm et al. 1996, Mölders

Moelders, Nicole

434

Latitudinal gradients in sea ice and primary production determine Arctic seabird colony  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

will indirectly alter energy transfer through the pelagic food web and ultimately impact apex predators. We-based observations of sea ice concentration from the Nimbus-7 scanning multichannel microwave radiometer (SMMR, 1979 recession of high Arctic seasonal ice cover created a temporally predictable primary production bloom

Laidre, Kristin L.

435

NOAA Atlas NESDIS 58 CLIMATIC ATLAS OF THE ARCTIC SEAS 2004  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NOAA Atlas NESDIS 58 CLIMATIC ATLAS OF THE ARCTIC SEAS 2004: Part I. Database of the Barents, Kara, and Information Service #12;World Data Center for Oceanography, Silver Spring International Ocean Atlas and Information Series, Volume 9 NOAA Atlas NESDIS 58 2004: I

436

Autonomous buoy for seismic reflection data acquisition in the inaccessible parts of the Arctic Ocean  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Autonomous buoy for seismic reflection data acquisition in the inaccessible parts of the Arctic Instrumentation, Bergen, Norway An autonomous buoy which collects seismic reflection data and transmits to shore of the seismic buoy (thick red, green and black lines). - we have successfully developed an autonomous buoy

Kristoffersen, Yngve

437

Atlantic meridional overturning and climate response to Arctic Ocean W. R. Peltier,1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Atlantic meridional overturning and climate response to Arctic Ocean freshening W. R. Peltier,1 G to the response to North Atlantic freshening. Citation: Peltier, W. R., G. Vettoretti, and M. Stastna (2006 of the Atlantic by Heinrich Event 1 [Peltier, 2005]. Simi- larly, the onset of the Younger Dryas (Y-D) cold

Peltier, W. Richard

438

Megatides in the Arctic Ocean under glacial conditions Stephen D. Griffiths,1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Megatides in the Arctic Ocean under glacial conditions Stephen D. Griffiths,1 and W. R. Peltier1's climate and ocean circulation. Citation: Griffiths, S. D., and W. R. Peltier (2008), Megatides occurred approx- imately 26,000 years ago, since the bathymetric changes are now well constrained [Peltier

Peltier, W. Richard

439

Tracer studies of pathways and rates of meltwater transport through Arctic summer sea ice  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Tracer studies of pathways and rates of meltwater transport through Arctic summer sea ice H. Eicken) program's field site in the northern Chukchi Sea, snow and ice meltwater flow was found to have a strong impact on the heat and mass balance of sea ice during the summer of 1998. Pathways and rates of meltwater

Eicken, Hajo

440

255FEBRUARY 2002AMERICAN METEOROLOGICAL SOCIETY | he Surface Heat Budget of the Arctic Ocean  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

that determine the surface energy budget and the sea≠ice mass balance in the Arctic (Moritz et al. 1993; Perovich of the vertical and horizontal energy exchanges within the ocean≠ice≠atmosphere system. The SHEBA pro- gram for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, Colorado; TURENNE--Canadian Coast Guard, Quebec City, Quebec, Canada; SERREZE

Shupe, Matthew

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "modeling complex arctic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

This chapter describes observations of continuing change in the Arctic environmental system. It is or-  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for the longest period and largest area of ice sheet melt since at least 1978, and the highest melt rate since in the Canadian Arctic, where the rate of mass loss from small glaciers and ice caps continued to increase system. It is or- ganized into five broad sections: atmosphere, ocean, sea ice cover, land, and Greenland

Bhatt, Uma

442

Author's personal copy Latest Pleistocene and Holocene glaciation of Baffin Island, Arctic Canada: key  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

t Melting glaciers and ice caps on Baffin Island contribute roughly half of the sea-level rise from all ice future response of arctic glaciers and ice caps to climate change motivates the use of paleodata throughout the Holocene to its present margin (Barnes Ice Cap) except for two periods of rapid retreat

Briner, Jason P.

443

On the Relationship between Thermodynamic Structure and Cloud Top, and Its Climate Significance in the Arctic  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

inside inversion (CII)] was frequently observed at central Arctic Ocean sites, while observations from- nitudes of surface cloud warming and cooling are de- pendent upon the solar zenith angle, surface albedo-D-11-00186.1 √? 2012 American Meteor

Shupe, Matthew

444

Short-lived pollutants in the Arctic: their climate impact and possible mitigation strategies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Several short-lived pollutants known to impact Arctic climate may be contributing to the accelerated rates of warming observed in this region relative to the global annually averaged temperature increase. Here, we present a summary of the short-lived pollutants that impact Arctic climate including methane, tropospheric ozone, and tropospheric aerosols. For each pollutant, we provide a description of the major sources and the mechanism of forcing. We also provide the first seasonally averaged forcing and corresponding temperature response estimates focused specifically on the Arctic. The calculations indicate that the forcings due to black carbon, methane, and tropospheric ozone lead to a positive surface temperature response indicating the need to reduce emissions of these species within and outside the Arctic. Additional aerosol species may also lead to surface warming if the aerosol is coincident with thin, low lying clouds. We suggest strategies for reducing the warming based on current knowledge and discuss directions for future research to address the large remaining uncertainties.

Menon, Surabi; Quinn, P.K.; Bates, T.S.; Baum, E.; Doubleday, N.; Fiore, A.M.; Flanner, M.; Fridlind, A.; Garrett, T.J.; Koch, D.; Menon, S.; Shindell, D.; Stohl, A.; Warren, S.G.

2007-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

445

Hydraulic controls of summer Arctic pack ice albedo H. Eicken,1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

that feedback processes involving the input of solar energy and subsequent changes in Arctic pack-ice albedo, and properties of first-year and multiyear sea ice have been studied at two field sites in the North American variability in pond fraction varying by more than a factor of 2 and hence area-averaged albedo (varying

Eicken, Hajo

446

Influence of transport and ocean ice extent on biogenic aerosol sulfur in the Arctic atmosphere  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Influence of transport and ocean ice extent on biogenic aerosol sulfur in the Arctic atmosphere S, such as methanesulfonic acid (MSA). This study examines relationships between changes in total sea ice extent north of 70. These results suggest that a decrease in seasonal ice cover influencing other mechanisms of DMS production could

447

Comparison of surface radiative flux data sets over the Arctic Ocean Jiping Liu,1,2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. The reduced surface heat loss is partly offset by the reduction of solar heating due to much higher snow of these surface parameters was compared to the high-quality in situ measurements from the Surface Heat Budget; Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, 2001]. However, physical processes in the Arctic are not well understood

448

Migratory connectivity in Arctic geese: spring stopovers are the weak links in meeting targets for breeding  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

makes geese particularly vul- nerable to the impact of climate change. There is an increasing mismatch trends in the Arctic target areas. Keywords Capital breeding √Ā Climate change √Ā Energetic costs 119313, Russia J. Stahl Landscape Ecology Group, University of Oldenburg, 26111 Oldenburg, Germany 123 J

Kleyer, Michael

449

SHAPE-CONSTRAINED SEGMENTATION APPROACH FOR ARCTIC MULTIYEAR SEA ICE FLOE ANALYSIS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SHAPE-CONSTRAINED SEGMENTATION APPROACH FOR ARCTIC MULTIYEAR SEA ICE FLOE ANALYSIS Yuliya Tarabalka Research Association, MD, USA. e-mail: yuliya.tarabalka@inria.fr ABSTRACT The melting of sea ice, it is important to investigate how rapidly sea ice floes melt. For this purpose, a new TempoSeg method

Boyer, Edmond

450

Quaternary Science Reviews 21 (2002) 9971021 Responses of an arctic landscape to Lateglacial and early Holocene  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ltd. All rights reserved. 1. Introduction The Arctic is important to global climate because its Earth Observatory, Palisades, NY 10964, USA c Reanier and Associates, 1807 Thirty Second Avenue, Seattle to the YD are rare, suggesting that rates of paludification slowed. Immediately after 10,000 14 C yr BP

451

Complexity and Productivity Differentiation Models of Metallogenic Indicator Elements in Rocks and Supergene Media Around Daijiazhuang Pb-Zn Deposit in Dangchang County, Gansu Province  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

With the help of complexity indices, we quantitatively studied multifractals, frequency distributions, and linear and nonlinear characteristics of geochemical data for exploration of the Daijiazhuang Pb-Zn deposit. Furthermore, we derived productivity differentiation models of elements from thermodynamics and self-organized criticality of metallogenic systems. With respect to frequency distributions and multifractals, only Zn in rocks and most elements except Sb in secondary media, which had been derived mainly from weathering and alluviation, exhibit nonlinear distributions. The relations of productivity to concentrations of metallogenic elements and paragenic elements in rocks and those of elements strongly leached in secondary media can be seen as linear addition of exponential functions with a characteristic weak chaos. The relations of associated elements such as Mo, Sb, and Hg in rocks and other elements in secondary media can be expressed as an exponential function, and the relations of one-phase self-organized geological or metallogenic processes can be represented by a power function, each representing secondary chaos or strong chaos. For secondary media, exploration data of most elements should be processed using nonlinear mathematical methods or should be transformed to linear distributions before processing using linear mathematical methods.

He, Jin-zhong, E-mail: viewsino@163.com; Yao, Shu-zhen [China University of Geosciences, State Key Laboratory of Geological Processes and Mineral Resources (China)] [China University of Geosciences, State Key Laboratory of Geological Processes and Mineral Resources (China); Zhang, Zhong-ping; You, Guan-jin [Geological Surveying Institute of Gansu Province (China)] [Geological Surveying Institute of Gansu Province (China)

2013-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

452

Breaking the Ice: Navigation in the Arctic Grace Xingxin Gao, Liang Heng, Todd Walter, and Per Enge  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Breaking the Ice: Navigation in the Arctic Grace Xingxin Gao, Liang Heng, Todd Walter, and Per Enge (ION) Early Achievement Award. Liang Heng is a Ph.D. candidate under the guidance of Professor Per Enge

Gao, Grace Xingxin

453

A Comparison of Atmospheric Reanalysis Products for the Arctic Ocean and Implications for Uncertainties in AirĖSea Fluxes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The uncertainties related to atmospheric fields in the Arctic Ocean from commonly used and recently available reanalysis products are investigated. Fields from the 1) ECMWF Interim Re-Analysis (ERA-Interim), 2) Common ...

Chaudhuri, Ayan H.

454

Phylogenetic relationships, host affinity, and geographic structure of boreal and arctic endophytes from three major plant lineages  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Phylogenetic relationships, host affinity, and geographic structure of boreal and arctic endophytes Although associated with all plants, fungal endophytes (microfungi that live within healthy plant tissues, or phylogenetic relationships. We surveyed endophytic Ascomycota from healthy photosyn- thetic tissues of three

Arnold, A. Elizabeth

455

Simulating the Daylight Performance of Complex Fenestration Systems Using  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

LBNL-4414E Simulating the Daylight Performance of Complex Fenestration Systems Using Bidirectional, January 21, 2011. 1 Simulating the Daylight Performance of Complex Fenestration Systems Using (BSDFs) to model the daylighting performance of complex fenestration systems (CFS), enabling greater

456

The development of a signal processing network for a real-time Arctic sea ice classification system  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

THE DEVELOPMENT OF A SIGNAL PROCESSING NETWORK FOR A REAL-TIME ARCTIC SEA ICE CLASSIFICATION SYSTEM A Thesis by WILLIAM DOUGLAS NORDHAUS Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A)M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement... for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1973 Major Subject: Electrical Engineering THE DEVELOPMENT OF A SIGNAL PROCESSING NETWORK FOR A REAL-TIME ARCTIC SEA ICE CLASSIFICATION SYSTEM A Thesis by William Douglas Nordhaus Approved as to style...

Nordhaus, William D

1973-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

Determination of marine migratory behavior and its relationship to selected physical traits for least cisco (Coregonus sardinella) of the western Arctic coastal plain, Alaska.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??With increased resource development on the western Arctic coastal plain of Alaska (especially within the oil extraction industry) it is important to understand the basicÖ (more)

Seigle, John C.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

Geohydrology and ground-water geochemistry at a sub-Arctic Landfill, Fairbanks, Alaska. Water resources investigation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Fairbanks-North Star Borough landfill is located on silt, sand, and gravel deposits of the Tanana River flood plain, about 3 miles south of the city of Fairbanks water-supply wells. The landfill has been in operation for about 25 years in this sub-arctic region of discontinuous permafrost. The cold climate limits biological activity within the landfill with corresponding low gas and leachate production. Chloride concentrations, specific conductance, water temperatures, and earth conductivity measurements indicate a small plume of leachate flowing to the northwest from the landfill. The leachate remains near the water table as it flows northwestward toward a drainage ditch. Results of computer modeling of this local hydrologic system indicate that some of the leachate may be discharging to the ditch. Chemical data show that higher-than-background concentrations of several ions are present in the plume. However, the concentrations appear to be reduced to background levels within a short distance along the path of ground-water flow from the landfill, and thus the leachate is not expected to affect the water-supply wells.

Downey, J.S.; Sinton, P.O.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

arctic sea ice: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AD of transient model simulations and a new type of sen- sitivity experiments with artificial sea ice growth Born, Andreas 388 Sedimentation and particle dynamics in the...

460

arctic ice dynamics: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

W. F. Vincent (2008), Seasonal dynamics of bacterial Vincent, Warwick F. 168 Dynamics of artificial spin ice: a continuous honeycomb network MIT - DSpace Summary: We model the...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "modeling complex arctic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

arctic coastline eroding: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of spatial long-range correlations in the lithology of coastal landscapes on the fractal behavior of the corresponding coastlines. In the model, the resistance of a coast...

462

An Analysis of Past and Future Changes in the Ice Cover of Two High-Arctic Lakes Based on Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) and Landsat Imagery  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and heat energy between a lake and its surroundings (Adams, 1981). In high-arctic lakes, changes in ice climate data are limited, remote sensing of lake-ice conditions can provide valuable insight into climaticAn Analysis of Past and Future Changes in the Ice Cover of Two High-Arctic Lakes Based on Synthetic

Bradley, Raymond S.

463

Sea ice loss and the changing atmospheric CO2 uptake capacity of the Arctic Ocean: Insights1 from the southeastern Canada Basin2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sea ice loss and the changing atmospheric CO2 uptake capacity of the Arctic Ocean: Insights1 from (Arctic Ocean) to act as an atmospheric CO2 sink under the summertime ice-free conditions12 expected in the near future. Beneath a heavily decayed ice cover, we found surprisingly high13 pCO2sw (~290-320 atm

Paris-Sud XI, Universitť de

464

Restricted Complexity Framework for Nonlinear Adaptive Control in Complex Systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Control law adaptation that includes implicit or explicit adaptive state estimation, can be a fundamental underpinning for the success of intelligent control in complex systems, particularly during subsystem failures, where vital system states and parameters can be impractical or impossible to measure directly. A practical algorithm is proposed for adaptive state filtering and control in nonlinear dynamic systems when the state equations are unknown or are too complex to model analytically. The state equations and inverse plant model are approximated by using neural networks. A framework for a neural network based nonlinear dynamic inversion control law is proposed, as an extrapolation of prior developed restricted complexity methodology used to formulate the adaptive state filter. Examples of adaptive filter performance are presented for an SSME simulation with high pressure turbine failure to support extrapolations to adaptive control problems.

Williams, Rube B. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1663, MS K575, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States)

2004-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

465

Population Size Does Not Predict Artifact Complexity: Analysis of Data from Tasmania, Arctic Hunter-Gatherers, and Oceania Fishing Groups  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Australia. Canberra: Department of Prehistory, Australiain eastern Australia. Canberra: Australian National

Read, Dwight

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

466

Complexity in Big History  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Spier, Fred. ďHow Big History Works: Energy Flows and RiseSmil, Vaclav. Energy in World History. Boulder, CO: Westviewkg) Energy and complexity Spier: Complexity in Big History.

Spier, Fred

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

467

Variable Infiltration Capacity model (VIC) is a macro-scale energy and water balance model with lake and wetland  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of surface storage in a low- gradient Arctic watershed, Water Resour. Res., 39(4), 1087, doi: 10.1029/2002WR (VIC) Cold Land Process Model Updates, Global and Planetary Change, 38, 151-159, 2003. Sathulur, K., L drainage, and expanding industrial and urban areas. The water table position usually acts as the dominant

Cherkauer, Keith

468

Effects of simulated natural variability on Arctic temperature projections  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

- sea ice-ocean model is used to examine the effects of natural variability on climate projections starting from different strengths and phases of the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation and cryosphere give rise to a variety of climate feedbacks as such as ice- albedo and cloud feedbacks. The direct

Drange, Helge

469

Eighth International Congress of Arctic Social Sciences (ICASS VIII)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

conglomerations, requires new models of food and energy security, and of access to employment, health care to sustainability. Appropriate governance regimes for renewable and non-renewable resources underpin sustainable website). You will need to provide a rough budget of your estimated travel expenses. We anticipate

Northern British Columbia, University of

470

Microphysical Properties of Single and Mixed-Phase Arctic Clouds Derived from AERI Observations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A novel new approach to retrieve cloud microphysical properties from mixed-phase clouds is presented. This algorithm retrieves cloud optical depth, ice fraction, and the effective size of the water and ice particles from ground-based, high-resolution infrared radiance observations. The theoretical basis is that the absorption coefficient of ice is stronger than that of liquid water from 10-13 mm, whereas liquid water is more absorbing than ice from 16-25 um. However, due to strong absorption in the rotational water vapor absorption band, the 16-25 um spectral region becomes opaque for significant water vapor burdens (i.e., for precipitable water vapor amounts over approximately 1 cm). The Arctic is characterized by its dry and cold atmosphere, as well as a preponderance of mixed-phase clouds, and thus this approach is applicable to Arctic clouds. Since this approach uses infrared observations, cloud properties are retrieved at night and during the long polar wintertime period. The analysis of the cloud properties retrieved during a 7 month period during the Surface Heat Budget of the Arctic (SHEBA) experiment demonstrates many interesting features. These results show a dependence of the optical depth on cloud phase, differences in the mode radius of the water droplets in liquid-only and mid-phase clouds, a lack of temperature dependence in the ice fraction for temperatures above 240 K, seasonal trends in the optical depth with the clouds being thinner in winter and becoming more optically thick in the late spring, and a seasonal trend in the effective size of the water droplets in liquid-only and mixed-phase clouds that is most likely related to aerosol concentration.

Turner, David D.

2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

471

Source Characterization and Temporal Variation of Methane Seepage from Thermokarst Lakes on the Alaska North Slope in Response to Arctic Climate Change  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The goals of this research were to characterize the source, magnitude and temporal variability of methane seepage from thermokarst lakes (TKL) within the Alaska North Slope gas hydrate province, assess the vulnerability of these areas to ongoing and future arctic climate change and determine if gas hydrate dissociation resulting from permafrost melting is contributing to the current lake emissions. Analyses were focused on four main lake locations referred to in this report: Lake Qalluuraq (referred to as Lake Q) and Lake Teshekpuk (both on Alaska?s North Slope) and Lake Killarney and Goldstream Bill Lake (both in Alaska?s interior). From analyses of gases coming from lakes in Alaska, we showed that ecological seeps are common in Alaska and they account for a larger source of atmospheric methane today than geologic subcap seeps. Emissions from the geologic source could increase with potential implications for climate warming feedbacks. Our analyses of TKL sites showing gas ebullition were complemented with geophysical surveys, providing important insight about the distribution of shallow gas in the sediments and the lake bottom manifestation of seepage (e.g., pockmarks). In Lake Q, Chirp data were limited in their capacity to image deeper sediments and did not capture the thaw bulb. The failure to capture the thaw bulb at Lake Q may in part be related to the fact that the present day lake is a remnant of an older, larger, and now-partially drained lake. These suggestions are consistent with our analyses of a dated core of sediment from the lake that shows that a wetland has been present at the site of Lake Q since approximately 12,000 thousand years ago. Chemical analyses of the core indicate that the availability of methane at the site has changed during the past and is correlated with past environmental changes (i.e. temperature and hydrology) in the Arctic. Discovery of methane seeps in Lake Teshekpuk in the northernmost part of the lake during 2009 reconnaissance surveys provided a strong impetus to visit this area in 2010. The seismic methods applied in Lake Teshekpuk were able to image pockmarks, widespread shallow gas in the sediments, and the relationship among different sediment packages on the lake?s bottom, but even boomer seismics did not detect permafrost beneath the northern part of the lake. By characterizing the biogeochemistry of shallow TKL with methane seeps we showed that the radical seasonal shifts in ice cover and temperature. These seasonal environmental differences result in distinct consumption and production processes of biologically-relevant compounds. The combined effects of temperature, ice-volume and other lithological factors linked to seepage from the lake are manifest in the distribution of sedimentary methane in Lake Q during icecovered and ice-free conditions. The biogeochemistry results illustrated very active methanotrophy in TKLs. Substantial effort was subsequently made to characterize the nature of methanotrophic communities in TKLs. We applied stable isotope probing approaches to genetically characterize the methanotrophs most active in utilizing methane in TKLs. Our study is the first to identify methane oxidizing organisms active in arctic TKLs, and revealing that type I methanotrophs and type II methanotrophs are abundant and active in assimilating methane in TKLs. These organisms play an important role in limiting the flux of methane from these sites. Our investigations indicate that as temperatures increase in the Arctic, oxidation rates and active methanotrophic populations will also shift. Whether these changes can offset predicted increases in methanogenesis is an important question underlying models of future methane flux and resultant climate change. Overall our findings indicate that TKLs and their ability to act as both source and sink of methane are exceedingly sensitive to environmental change.

None

2012-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

472

Hyper Space Complex Number  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A new kind of numbers called Hyper Space Complex Numbers and its algebras are defined and proved. It is with good properties as the classic Complex Numbers, such as expressed in coordinates, triangular and exponent forms and following the associative and commutative laws of addition and multiplication. So the classic Complex Number is developed from in complex plane with two dimensions to in complex space with N dimensions and the number system is enlarged also.

Shanguang Tan

2007-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

473

DOE/SC-ARM-10-034 The Arctic Lower Troposphere Observed  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-Series to UserProduct: CrudeOffice ofINL is a U.S. Department of4 The Arctic

474

Constructing Simplicial Complexes over Topological Spaces Milka Doktorova  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

complex to model relationships between entities. Graphs and hyper- graphs have been used traditionally complexes, in turn, may be used as a model of recursive relation- ships that extend down to subsets. WeConstructing Simplicial Complexes over Topological Spaces Milka Doktorova Afra Zomorodian

Zomorodian, Afra

475

Interactive Visualization of Complex Plant Ecosystems Oliver Deussen1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

a method for interactive rendering of large outdoor scenes. Complex polygonal plant models and whole plant most of the geometry drastically. With our system, we are able to interactively render very complex naturally. The importance of interactive yet realistic rendering of these very complex ecosystem models

Reiterer, Harald

476

Persistence of complex food webs in metacommunities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Persistence of complex food webs in metacommunities Gesa A. B¨ohme 1 and Thilo Gross 2 1 Max of Engineering Mathematics, Bristol, UK Keywords: metacommunities, food webs, predator-prey interactions, geo diversity and food web complexity. Recently Pillai et al. proposed a simple modeling framework

477

ďCovalent HydrationĒ Reactions in Model Monomeric Ru 2,2'-Bipyridine Complexes: Thermodynamic Favorability as a Function of Metal Oxidation and Overall Spin States  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Density functional theory (DFT) has been used to investigate the plausibility of water addition to the simple mononuclear ruthenium complexes, [(NH{sub 3}){sub 3}(bpy)Ru=O]{sup 2+}/{sup 3+} and [(NH{sub 3}){sub 3}(bpy)RuOH]{sup 3+}, in which the OH fragment adds to the 2,2{prime}-bipyridine (bpy) ligand. Activation of bpy toward water addition has frequently been postulated within the literature, although there exists little definitive experimental evidence for this type of 'covalent hydration'. In this study, we examine the energetic dependence of the reaction upon metal oxidation state, overall spin state of the complex, as well as selectivity for various positions on the bipyridine ring. The thermodynamic favorability is found to be highly dependent upon all three parameters, with free energies of reaction that span favorable and unfavorable regimes. Aqueous addition to [(NH{sub 3}){sub 3}(bpy)Ru=O]{sup 3+} was found to be highly favorable for the S = 1/2 state, while reduction of the formal oxidation state on the metal center makes the reaction highly unfavorable. Examination of both facial and meridional isomers reveals that when bipyridine occupies the position trans to the ruthenyl oxo atom, reactivity toward OH addition decreases and the site preferences are altered. The electronic structure and spectroscopic signatures (EPR parameters and simulated spectra) have been determined to aid in recognition of 'covalent hydration' in experimental systems. EPR parameters are found to uniquely characterize the position of the OH addition to the bpy as well as the overall spin state of the system.

Ozkanlar, Abdullah; Cape, Jonathan L.; Hurst, James K.; Clark, Aurora E.

2011-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

478

Reconstruction of a high-resolution late holocene arctic paleoclimate record from Colville River delta sediments.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This work was partially supported by the Sandia National Laboratories,Laboratory Directed Research and Development' (LDRD) fellowship program in conjunction with Texas A&M University (TAMU). The research described herein is the work of Kathryn M. Schreiner (Katie') and her advisor, Thomas S. Bianchi and represents a concise description of Katie's dissertation that was submitted to the TAMU Office of Graduate Studies in May 2013 in partial fulfillment of her doctorate of philosophy degree. High Arctic permafrost soils contain a massive amount of organic carbon, accounting for twice as much carbon as what is currently stored as carbon dioxide in the atmosphere. However, with current warming trends this sink is in danger of thawing and potentially releasing large amounts of carbon as both carbon dioxide and methane into the atmosphere. It is difficult to make predictions about the future of this sink without knowing how it has reacted to past temperature and climate changes. This project investigated long term, fine scale particulate organic carbon (POC) delivery by the high-Arctic Colville River into Simpson's Lagoon in the near-shore Beaufort Sea. Modern POC was determined to be a mixture of three sources (riverine soils, coastal erosion, and marine). Downcore POC measurements were performed in a core close to the Colville River output and a core close to intense coastal erosion. Inputs of the three major sources were found to vary throughout the last two millennia, and in the Colville River core covary significantly with Alaskan temperature reconstructions.

Schreiner, Kathryn Melissa; Lowry, Thomas Stephen

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

479

Remote arctic drilling operations in Russia, case history of Ardalin field operations, Timan Pechora Basin  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In developing the Ardalin field, the Polar Lights Company merged Russian and western expertise to conduct drilling operations in a hostile and ecologically sensitive arctic tundra environment. The field is located above the Arctic Circle in northern Russia. The nearest Russian road system is over 60km away and the nearest railhead is 240 km from the field. Three Russian rigs were constructed with selected western upgrades, twelve development wells were drilled, and three existing Russian wells were worked over within a 24 month period. Operations were supported with a snow road in the winter season and Russian helicopter in the summer season. All materials for one year`s worth of drilling had to be transported to the field prior to break-up (end of trucking activities on the snow roads). Services and equipment were sourced from both inside and outside of the Commonwealth of Independent States (CIS). Temperatures in winter reached -45{degrees}C. The field is located in one of the most ecologically sensitive areas in the world, and numerous precautions were taken for the protection of the environment. Russian operating philosophies were successfully merged with western practices. This paper will focus on the operational criteria initiated and infrastructure system that evolved to support this project.

Reyna, E.M.; Nicholson, S.; Brady, S.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

480

Brown snow: A long-range transport event in the Canadian Arctic  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The authors document the occurrence of a long-range transport event that deposited thousands of tons of fine particulates on the District of Keewatin, central Canadian Arctic, {approximately}63 N. Air mass trajectories, clay mineral composition, soot particles, and visible organic remains point to Asian sources for the brown snow material, probably western China. Semivolatile organic pollutants detected in the brown snow included polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons ({Sigma}PAH), PCB congeners, and DDT-related compounds ({Sigma}DDT), polychlorinated camphenes (PCCs), as well as the herbicide trifuluralin and insecticides methoxychlor, endosulfan, and hexachlorocyclohexane (HCH). {Sigma}PAH, PCB, and PCC concentrations were within the range reported in other studies of Arctic snow but {Sigma}DDT levels were 2-10 times higher than previous reports. High molecular weight PAH may have been associated with soot particles in the brown snow but evidence for Asian sources of the pesticides was not strong because of unknown source signal strengths and possible atmospheric transformations of the compounds. Fluxes of these pollutants were also determined by analyzing sediment cores from two small headwater lakes near the sampling site. The quantities of pollutants deposited in this single event may have comprised a significant fraction (>10%) of total annual input {Sigma}PAH and {Sigma}DDT, as determined from lake sedimentation records.

Welch, H.E.; Muir, D.C.G.; Billeck, B.N.; Lockhart, W.L.; Brunskill, G.J.; Kling, H.J. (Freshwater Inst., Winnipeg (Canada)); Olson, M.P. (Atmospheric Environment Service, Downsview, Ontario (Canada)); Lemoine, R.M. (Hardy BBT Ltd., Winnipeg, Manitoba (Canada))

1991-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

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481

Fine-scale Horizontal Structure of Arctic Mixed-Phase Clouds.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Recent in situ observations in stratiform clouds suggest that mixed phase regimes, here defined as limited cloud volumes containing both liquid and solid water, are constrained to narrow layers (order 100 m) separating all-liquid and fully glaciated volumes (Hallett and Viddaurre, 2005). The Department of Energy Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program's (DOE-ARM, Ackerman and Stokes, 2003) North Slope of Alaska (NSA) ARM Climate Research Facility (ACRF) recently started collecting routine measurement of radar Doppler velocity power spectra from the Millimeter Cloud Radar (MMCR). Shupe et al. (2004) showed that Doppler spectra has potential to separate the contributions to the total reflectivity of the liquid and solid water in the radar volume, and thus to investigate further Hallett and Viddaurre's findings. The Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment (MPACE) was conducted along the NSA to investigate the properties of Arctic mixed phase clouds (Verlinde et al., 2006). We present surface based remote sensing data from MPACE to discuss the fine-scale structure of the mixed-phase clouds observed during this experiment.

Rambukkange,M.; Verlinde, J.; Elorante, E.; Luke, E.; Kollias, P.; Shupe, M.

2006-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

482

PERFORMANCE OF A POLYMER SEALANT COATING IN AN ARCTIC MARINE ENVIRONMENT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The feasibility of using a polymer-based coating, Polibrid 705, to seal concrete and steel surfaces from permanent radioactive contamination in an Arctic marine environment has been successfully demonstrated using a combination of field and laboratory testing. A mobile, self-sufficient spraying device was developed to specifications provided by the Russian Northern Navy and deployed at the RTP Atomflot site, Murmansk, Russia. Demonstration coatings were applied to concrete surfaces exposed to conditions ranging from indoor pedestrian usage to heavy vehicle passage and container handling in a loading dock. A large steel container was also coated with the polymer, filled with solid radwaste, sealed, and left out of doors, exposed to the full annual Arctic weather cycle. The 12 months of field testing gave rise to little degradation of the sealant coating, except for a few chips and gouge marks on the loading bay surface that were readily repaired. Contamination resulting from radwaste handling was easily removed and the surface was not degraded by contact with the decontamination agents. The field tests were accompanied by a series of laboratory qualification tests carried out at a research laboratory in St. Petersburg. The laboratory tests examined a variety of properties, including bond strength between the coating and the substrate, thermal cycling resistance, wear resistance, flammability, and ease of decontamination. The Polibrid 705 coating met all the Russian Navy qualification requirements with the exception of flammability. In this last instance, it was decided to restrict application of the coating to land-based facilities.

MOSKOWITZ,P.; COWGILL,M.; GRIFFITH,A.; CHERNAENKO,L.; DIASHEV,A.; NAZARIAN,A.

2001-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

483

PERFORMANCE OF A POLYMER SEALANT COATING IN AN ARCTIC MARINE ENVIRONMENT.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The feasibility of using a polymer-based coating, Polibrid 705, to seal concrete and steel surfaces from permanent radioactive contamination in an Arctic marine environment has been successfully demonstrated using a combination of field and laboratory testing. A mobile, self-sufficient spraying device was developed to specifications provided by the Russian Northern Navy and deployed at the RTP Atomflot site, Murmansk, Russia. Demonstration coatings were applied to concrete surfaces exposed to conditions ranging from indoor pedestrian usage to heavy vehicle passage and container handling in a loading dock. A large steel container was also coated with the polymer, filled with solid radwaste, sealed, and left out of doors, exposed to the full annual Arctic weather cycle. The 12 months of field testing gave rise to little degradation of the sealant coating, except for a few chips and gouge marks on the loading bay surface that were readily repaired. Contamination resulting from radwaste handling was easily removed and the surface was not degraded by contact with the decontamination agents. The field tests were accompanied by a series of laboratory qualification tests carried out at a research laboratory in St. Petersburg. The laboratory tests examined a variety of properties, including bond strength between the coating and the substrate, thermal cycling resistance, wear resistance, flammability, and ease of decontamination. The Polibrid 705 coating met all the Russian Navy qualification requirements with the exception of flammability. In this last instance, it was decided to restrict application of the coating to land-based facilities.

MOSKOWITZ,P.; COWGILL,M.; GRIFFITH,A.; CHERNAENKO,L.; DIASHEV,A.; NAZARIAN,A.

2001-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

484

20th-Century Industrial Black Carbon Emissions Altered Arctic Climate Forcing Joseph R. McConnell,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in ice cores indicate that sources and concentrations of BC in Greenland precipitation varied greatly, industrial emissions resulted in a seven-fold increase in ice core BC concentrations with most change to 1910, estimated surface climate forcing in early summer from BC in Arctic snow was about 3 W m­2

Saltzman, Eric

485

A transitioning Arctic surface energy budget: the impacts of solar zenith angle, surface albedo and cloud radiative forcing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A transitioning Arctic surface energy budget: the impacts of solar zenith angle, surface albedo Springer-Verlag 2010 Abstract Snow surface and sea-ice energy budgets were measured near 87.5¬įN during indicated four distinct tempera- ture regimes, characterized by varying cloud, thermody- namic and solar

Shupe, Matthew

486

The area and volume of sea ice in the Arc-tic Ocean is decreasing, with some predict-  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, while loss of sea ice could cause stress for polar bears. Moreover, global climate may be affected ice forms in winter,which melts and/or gets exported out of the Arctic. The recent decrease in summer of this community is evi- dence that the sea ice cap has not disap- peared during the Quaternary. The remains

Long, Bernard

487

The Arctic Ocean--a Canadian perspective from IPY H. Melling & R. Francois & P. G. Myers & W. Perrie &  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

resulting from ice melt. Careful experiments have revealed that Arctic phytoplankton growth is constrained with the atmosphere is dramatically reduced by its ice cap. Sea ice inhibits transfers of vapour and heat reflectivity and latent heat reduce the ocean's absorption of sunshine, and slow ice melting until insolation

Long, Bernard

488

Temperature and precipitation history of the Arctic G.H. Miller a,*, J. Brigham-Grette b  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sciences, Rutgers University, 14 College Farm Road, New Brunswich, NJ 08901, USA q Cooperative Institute. During the penultimate interglaciation, w130 to w120 ka ago, solar energy in summer in the Arctic ice sheets had melted by 6 ka ago. Solar energy reached a summer maximum (9% higher than at present) w

Robock, Alan

489

Quantum Complex Minkowski Space  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The complex Minkowski phase space has the physical interpretation of the phase space of the scalar massive conformal particle. The aim of the paper is the construction and investigation of the quantum complex Minkowski space.

Grzegorz Jakimowicz; Anatol Odzijewicz

2005-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

490

Complexity, Ecology, Finance  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Morris Worm Complexity, Ecology, Finance The Pre-HistorySystemic Risk Complexity, Ecology, Finance Andrew Haldane,has called for more ecology in the study of finance ( read

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

491

Complexity of Counting CSP with Complex Weights  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We give a complexity dichotomy theorem for the counting Constraint Satisfaction Problem (#CSP in short) with complex weights. To this end, we give three conditions for its tractability. Let F be any finite set of complex-valued functions, then we prove that #CSP(F) is solvable in polynomial time if all three conditions are satisfied; and is #P-hard otherwise. Our complexity dichotomy generalizes a long series of important results on counting problems: (a) the problem of counting graph homomorphisms is the special case when there is a single symmetric binary function in F; (b) the problem of counting directed graph homomorphisms is the special case when there is a single not-necessarily-symmetric binary function in F; and (c) the standard form of #CSP is when all functions in F take values in {0,1}.

Cai, Jin-Yi

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

492

MESOSCALENUMERICAL MODELING OF POLLUTANT TRANSPORT IN COMPLEX TERRAIN R. A. Pielke1j2, R..W. Arritt2, M. Segall, M. D. Moranl, and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-case impacts of power plant plumes on U.S. National Park lands in south Florida is presented based that synoptic baroclinicity, mesoscale thermal circulations, and boundary-layer turbulence can separately of the polluted air. Both a mathematical description and examples of numerical model simulations are used

Pielke, Roger A.

493

Using A-Train Arctic cloud observations to constrain and improve climate models  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched Ferromagnetism inS-4500II Field Emission SEMUsedUser ServicesUsers June radiation

494

Characterizing and Modeling Arctic Shrub Expansion on the North Slope of Alaska, USA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

plain of ANWR .................................................................... 279 Figure A-29 Location of the flightlines for the 1984/1985 ANWR images... ....................................................................................... 280 Figure A-30 Location of the flightlines for the 1984/1985 ANWR images, subsection 1 ................................................................. 281 Figure A-31 Location of the flightlines for the 1984/1985 ANWR...

Naito, Adam Takashi

2014-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

495

Discrete Quantum Gravity: II. Simplicial complexes, irreps of SL(2,C), and a Lorentz invariant weight in a state sum model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In part I of [1] we have developed the tensor and spin representation of SO(4) in order to apply it to the simplicial decomposition of the Barrett-Crane model. We attach to each face of a triangle the spherical function constructed from the Dolginov-Biedenharn function. In part II we apply the same technique to the Lorentz invariant state sum model. We need three new ingredients: the classification of the edges and the corresponding subspaces that arises in the simplicial decomposition, the irreps of SL(2,C) and its isomorphism to the bivectors appearing in the 4-simplices, the need of a zonal spherical function from the intertwining condition of the tensor product for the simple representations attached to the faces of the simplicial decomposition.

P. Kramer; M. Lorente

2008-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

496

Radiocarbon in particulate matter from the eastern sub-arctic Pacific Ocean; evidence of a source of terrestrial carbon to the deep sea.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

THE EASTERN SUB-ARCTIC PACIFIC OCEAN: EVIDENCE OF A SOURCEfrom the deep Northeast Pacific Ocean. Due to the largeMap of the North Pacific Ocean (after Favorite, Dodimead &

Druffel, Ellen R M; Honju, Susumu; Griffin, Sheila; Wong, C S

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

497

Web: http://dust.ess.uci.edu/prp/prp_ans/prp_ans.pdf NSF Arctic Natural Sciences (ANS) Proposal ARC-0714088 Submitted: December 8, 2006  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Web: http://dust.ess.uci.edu/prp/prp_ans/prp_ans.pdf NSF Arctic Natural Sciences (ANS) Proposal ARC dissemination of LGGE snow measurements as http://dust.ess.uci.edu/snw. Identified IPY sub-disciplines as Snow

Zender, Charles

498

Radionuclides in the Arctic seas from the former Soviet Union: Potential health and ecological risks  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The primary goal of the assessment reported here is to evaluate the health and environmental threat to coastal Alaska posed by radioactive-waste dumping in the Arctic and Northwest Pacific Oceans by the FSU. In particular, the FSU discarded 16 nuclear reactors from submarines and an icebreaker in the Kara Sea near the island of Novaya Zemlya, of which 6 contained spent nuclear fuel (SNF); disposed of liquid and solid wastes in the Sea of Japan; lost a {sup 90}Sr-powered radioisotope thermoelectric generator at sea in the Sea of Okhotsk; and disposed of liquid wastes at several sites in the Pacific Ocean, east of the Kamchatka Peninsula. In addition to these known sources in the oceans, the RAIG evaluated FSU waste-disposal practices at inland weapons-development sites that have contaminated major rivers flowing into the Arctic Ocean. The RAIG evaluated these sources for the potential for release to the environment, transport, and impact to Alaskan ecosystems and peoples through a variety of scenarios, including a worst-case total instantaneous and simultaneous release of the sources under investigation. The risk-assessment process described in this report is applicable to and can be used by other circumpolar countries, with the addition of information about specific ecosystems and human life-styles. They can use the ANWAP risk-assessment framework and approach used by ONR to establish potential doses for Alaska, but add their own specific data sets about human and ecological factors. The ANWAP risk assessment addresses the following Russian wastes, media, and receptors: dumped nuclear submarines and icebreaker in Kara Sea--marine pathways; solid reactor parts in Sea of Japan and Pacific Ocean--marine pathways; thermoelectric generator in Sea of Okhotsk--marine pathways; current known aqueous wastes in Mayak reservoirs and Asanov Marshes--riverine to marine pathways; and Alaska as receptor. For these waste and source terms addressed, other pathways, such as atmospheric transport, could be considered under future-funded research efforts for impacts to Alaska. The ANWAP risk assessment does not address the following wastes, media, and receptors: radioactive sources in Alaska (except to add perspective for Russian source term); radioactive wastes associated with Russian naval military operations and decommissioning; Russian production reactor and spent-fuel reprocessing facilities nonaqueous source terms; atmospheric, terrestrial and nonaqueous pathways; and dose calculations for any circumpolar locality other than Alaska. These other, potentially serious sources of radioactivity to the Arctic environment, while outside the scope of the current ANWAP mandate, should be considered for future funding research efforts.

Layton, D W; Edson, R; Varela, M; Napier, B

1999-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

499

Decline in ice thickness from sub data 1 10/16/07 The decline in arctic sea-ice thickness: separating the spatial, annual, and1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Decline in ice thickness from sub data 1 10/16/07 The decline in arctic sea-ice thickness/14/07 & 10/16/079 10 11 #12;Decline in ice thickness from sub data 2 10/16/07 Abstract11 Naval submarines have collected operational data of sea-ice draft (90% of thickness) in the12 Arctic Ocean since 1958

Percival, Don

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Variations in the age of Arctic sea-ice and summer sea-ice extent Ignatius G. Rigor1,2  

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. On time scales of days to weeks, wind stresses from storms produce ridges of sea-ice and areas of openVariations in the age of Arctic sea-ice and summer sea-ice extent Ignatius G. Rigor1,2 and John M] Three of the past six summers have exhibited record low sea-ice extent on the Arctic Ocean. These minima

Rigor, Ignatius G.