Sample records for modeled estimates increase

  1. TECHNICAL ADVANCE EVE (external variance estimation) increases statistical power

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Buehlmann, Peter

    TECHNICAL ADVANCE EVE (external variance estimation) increases statistical power for detecting Institute of Plant Sciences & Zurich­Basel Plant Science Center, ETH Zurich, CH-8092 Zurich, Switzerland, our simulation studies suggest that even limited numbers of replicates will usually result in good

  2. Cost Model and Cost Estimating Software

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1997-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

    This chapter discusses a formalized methodology is basically a cost model, which forms the basis for estimating software.

  3. Updating MIT's cost estimation model for shipbuilding

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Matthew B., Lieutenant, junior grade

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis project will update the MIT ship cost estimation model by combining the two existing models (the Basic Military Training School (BMTS) Cost Model and the MIT Math Model) in order to develop a program that can ...

  4. Increasing Temporal Resolution in Greenland Ablation Estimation Using Passive and Active Microwave Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Long, David G.

    Increasing Temporal Resolution in Greenland Ablation Estimation Using Passive and Active Microwave of these measurements provides an increased understanding of the diurnal melt cycle over Greenland and estimation of the melt profile. I. INTRODUCTION Accurate estimation of the mass balance of the Greenland ice sheet

  5. Consumer Surplus in the Digital Economy: Estimating the Value of Increased Product Variety at Online Booksellers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brynjolfsson, Erik

    2003-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a framework and empirical estimates that quantify the economic impact of increased product variety made available through electronic markets. While efficiency ...

  6. PARAMETER ESTIMATION IN PETROLEUM AND GROUNDWATER MODELING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ewing, Richard E.

    on grand challenge problems. In today's petroleum industry, reservoir simulators are routinely usedPARAMETER ESTIMATION IN PETROLEUM AND GROUNDWATER MODELING R.E. Ewing, M.S. Pilant, J.G. Wade in the model, the numerical discretization used, and the solution algorithms employed. Parameter identification

  7. Modeling and Parameter Estimation of Interpenetrating

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grossmann, Ignacio E.

    Modeling and Parameter Estimation of Interpenetrating Polymer Network ProcessPolymer Network, PA 15213 #12;Interpenetrating Polymer Network Processp g y Monomer Initiator P l i ti tPolymerization reactor Seed particle Monomer droplet Aqueous mediaq Seed Polymer A Monomer B Seed Polymer A 2Fig 1. Seed

  8. Retrofit Energy Savings Estimation Model Reference Manual

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Retrofit Energy Savings Estimation Model Reference Manual #12;#12;Retrofit Energy Savings commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise, does from the Department of Energy. Any conclusions or opinions expressed in this manual represent solely

  9. Parameter estimation for energy balance models with memory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Parameter estimation for energy balance models with memory By Lionel Roques1,*, Micka¨el D parameter estimation for one-dimensional energy balance models with mem- ory (EBMMs) given localized estimate is still possible in certain cases. Keywords: age dating; Bayesian inference; energy balance model

  10. INCREASE

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2013-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The Interdisciplinary Consortium for Research and Educational Access in Science and Engineering (INCREASE), assists minority-serving institutions in gaining access to world-class research facilities.

  11. Nonmarket Valuation under Preference Uncertainty: Econometric Models and Estimation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hanemann, W. Michael; Kristrom, Bengt; Li, Chuan-Zhong

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    3 The EconometricUNCERTAINTY: ECONOMETRIC MODELS AND ESTIMATION bY W. MichaelSection 3 introduces ihe econometric model. Section 4

  12. Estimation of Two Popular Econometric Models: Random Effects Panel Data Model and Simultaneous Equations Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Yue

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1994. [9] Greene, W. B. , Econometric Analysis, Pearson /and Semiparametric Panel Econometric Models: Estimation andDEPendent models. This econometric software package was

  13. Time-to-Compromise Model for Cyber Risk Reduction Estimation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miles A. McQueen; Wayne F. Boyer; Mark A. Flynn; George A. Beitel

    2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose a new model for estimating the time to compromise a system component that is visible to an attacker. The model provides an estimate of the expected value of the time-to-compromise as a function of known and visible vulnerabilities, and attacker skill level. The time-to-compromise random process model is a composite of three subprocesses associated with attacker actions aimed at the exploitation of vulnerabilities. In a case study, the model was used to aid in a risk reduction estimate between a baseline Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition (SCADA) system and the baseline system enhanced through a specific set of control system security remedial actions. For our case study, the total number of system vulnerabilities was reduced by 86% but the dominant attack path was through a component where the number of vulnerabilities was reduced by only 42% and the time-to-compromise of that component was increased by only 13% to 30% depending on attacker skill level.

  14. On the Energy Increase in Space-Collapse Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Angelo Bassi; Emiliano Ippoliti; Bassano Vacchini

    2005-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

    A typical feature of spontaneous collapse models which aim at localizing wavefunctions in space is the violation of the principle of energy conservation. In the models proposed in the literature the stochastic field which is responsible for the localization mechanism causes the momentum to behave like a Brownian motion, whose larger and larger fluctuations show up as a steady increase of the energy of the system. In spite of the fact that, in all situations, such an increase is small and practically undetectable, it is an undesirable feature that the energy of physical systems is not conserved but increases constantly in time, diverging for $t \\to \\infty$. In this paper we show that this property of collapse models can be modified: we propose a model of spontaneous wavefunction collapse sharing all most important features of usual models but such that the energy of isolated systems reaches an asymptotic finite value instead of increasing with a steady rate.

  15. Standard errors of parameter estimates in the ETAS model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schoenberg, Frederic Paik (Rick)

    1 Standard errors of parameter estimates in the ETAS model Abstract Point process models of seismic catalogs and in short- term earthquake forecasting. The standard errors of parameter estimates of conventional standard error estimates based on the Hessian matrix of the log- likelihood function of the ETAS

  16. Increased

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsingFun withconfinementEtching.348 270 300AptamersstabilityIncreased confinement

  17. Does increasing model stratospheric resolution improve extended range forecast skill?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Does increasing model stratospheric resolution improve extended range forecast skill? Greg Roff,1 forecast skill at high Southern latitudes is explored. Ensemble forecasts are made for two model configurations that differ only in vertical resolution above 100 hPa. An ensemble of twelve 30day forecasts

  18. Cost Model and Cost Estimating Software - DOE Directives, Delegations...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    is basically a cost model, which forms the basis for estimating software. g4301-1chp22.pdf -- PDF Document, 190 KB Writer: John Makepeace Subjects: Administration...

  19. FUNCTIONAL ESTIMATION FOR A MULTICOMPONENT AGE REPLACEMENT MODEL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    L'Ecuyer, Pierre

    1 FUNCTIONAL ESTIMATION FOR A MULTICOMPONENT AGE REPLACEMENT MODEL Pierre L'Ecuyer, Benoit Martin, controlled by a replacement rule based on age thresholds. We show how to estimate the expected cost­ generative simulation, maintenance models, age replacement policies. #12; 2 L'ECUYER, MARTIN, AND V ' AZQUEZ

  20. FUNCTIONAL ESTIMATION FOR A MULTICOMPONENT AGE REPLACEMENT MODEL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vázquez-Abad, Felisa J.

    FUNCTIONAL ESTIMATION FOR A MULTICOMPONENT AGE REPLACEMENT MODEL Pierre L'Ecuyer, Benoit Martin, controlled by a replacement rule based on age thresholds. We show how to estimate the expected cost­ generative simulation, maintenance models, age replacement policies. #12; L'ECUYER, MARTIN, AND V ' AZQUEZ

  1. Estimation of Parameters in Carbon Sequestration Models from Net Ecosystem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    White, Luther

    Estimation of Parameters in Carbon Sequestration Models from Net Ecosystem Exchange Data Luther in the context of a deterministic com- partmental carbon sequestration system. Sensitivity and approximation usefulness in the estimation of parameters within a compartmental carbon sequestration model. Previously we

  2. Spatial Spectral Estimation forSpatial Spectral Estimation for Reactor Modeling and ControlReactor Modeling and Control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scarrott, Carl

    Spatial Spectral Estimation forSpatial Spectral Estimation for Reactor Modeling and ControlReactor in Magnox nuclear reactors l Establish safe operating limits l Issues: ­ Subset of measurements ­ Control Modeling and Control Carl Scarrott Granville Tunnicliffe-Wilson Lancaster University, UK c

  3. Battery Calendar Life Estimator Manual Modeling and Simulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jon P. Christophersen; Ira Bloom; Ed Thomas; Vince Battaglia

    2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Battery Life Estimator (BLE) Manual has been prepared to assist developers in their efforts to estimate the calendar life of advanced batteries for automotive applications. Testing requirements and procedures are defined by the various manuals previously published under the United States Advanced Battery Consortium (USABC). The purpose of this manual is to describe and standardize a method for estimating calendar life based on statistical models and degradation data acquired from typical USABC battery testing.

  4. Estimating Emissions in Latin America: An Alternative to Traffic Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richner, Heinz

    Estimating Emissions in Latin America: An Alternative to Traffic Models Margarita Ossés de Eicker; Hans Hurni, Centre for Development and Environment (CDE), University of Bern, Switzerland Emissions allow precise estimations of these emissions but are too expensive for a broad application. A simplifed

  5. Estimation and prediction in spatial models with block composite likelihoods

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reich, Brian J.

    Estimation and prediction in spatial models with block composite likelihoods Jo Eidsvik1 , Benjamin, IA 50011, U.S.A. (niemi@iastate.edu) 1 #12;Abstract A block composite likelihood is developed for estimation and prediction in large spatial datasets. The composite likelihood is constructed from the joint

  6. On Parameter Estimation of Urban Storm-Water Runoff Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    On Parameter Estimation of Urban Storm-Water Runoff Model Pedro Avellaneda1 ; Thomas P. Ballestero2 of these parameters are provided for modeling purposes and other urban storm-water quality applications. A normal runoff models are commonly used for urban storm-water quality applications DeCoursey 1985; Tsi- hrintzis

  7. PARAMETER ESTIMATION BASED MODELS OF WATER SOURCE HEAT PUMPS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    PARAMETER ESTIMATION BASED MODELS OF WATER SOURCE HEAT PUMPS By HUI JIN Bachelor of Science validation of the water-to-air heat pump model. It's hard to find any words to express the thanks to my BASED MODELS OF WATER SLOURCE HEAT PUMPS Thesis Approved: Thesis Adviser Dean of the Graduate College ii

  8. Accelerated gravitational-wave parameter estimation with reduced order modeling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Priscilla Canizares; Scott E. Field; Jonathan Gair; Vivien Raymond; Rory Smith; Manuel Tiglio

    2015-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Inferring the astrophysical parameters of coalescing compact binaries is a key science goal of the upcoming advanced LIGO-Virgo gravitational-wave detector network and, more generally, gravitational-wave astronomy. However, current parameter estimation approaches for such scenarios can lead to computationally intractable problems in practice. Therefore there is a pressing need for new, fast and accurate Bayesian inference techniques. In this letter we demonstrate that a reduced order modeling approach enables rapid parameter estimation studies. By implementing a reduced order quadrature scheme within the LIGO Algorithm Library, we show that Bayesian inference on the 9-dimensional parameter space of non-spinning binary neutron star inspirals can be sped up by a factor of 30 for the early advanced detectors' configurations. This speed-up will increase to about $150$ as the detectors improve their low-frequency limit to 10Hz, reducing to hours analyses which would otherwise take months to complete. Although these results focus on gravitational detectors, the techniques are broadly applicable to any experiment where fast Bayesian analysis is desirable.

  9. Parameter estimation of a linear vehicle model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Helin, Franz

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    (1987) . It has already been seen that the discrete-time vehicle model can be described by equation 5. 1 as Y(kr) = Md CdY((k 1)r) Md Rdr((k 2)Y) +ldd SldU((k 1)Y) + Md 82dU((k 1)Y) + N(kr) + Md CdN((k-1)Y) + ldd RdN((k ? 2) Y) A discrete state...-space representation of the model of the form T(k+1) = [F ]T(k) + [G ]U? X(k) = [HQT(k) Y(k) = X(k) + N(k) is now sought. If the state vector I (k) is given by (5. 28) x(k) 1(k) = X(k+1) Md SldU(k) then the state-space model can be described as follows: (5...

  10. PART 2. MATHEMATICAL MODELS IN POLLUTION CHAPTER V. MATHEMATICAL MODELS TO ESTIMATE THE ENERGY -

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baica, Malvina

    of the methodology introduced in a section 5.1, which was used to estimate the atmospheric pollution by the fuelPART 2. MATHEMATICAL MODELS IN POLLUTION CHAPTER V. MATHEMATICAL MODELS TO ESTIMATE THE ENERGY the necessary analysis from the point of view of estimating all the pollution effects in correlation

  11. On the empirical statistics of parameter estimates in parametric modeling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhu, Yao

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    FOR ESTIMATING HIGHLY DAMPED SINUSOIDAL SIGNALS IN ADDTIVE NOISE Page 4. 1 Introduction 4. 2 Eigenvector Method 4. 3 Weighted Least Squares Estimation of Damped Sinusoids Based on. Noise-Reduced Data 4. 3. 1 Noise Reduction with SVD 4. 3. 2 Weighted Least... Squares Method 4. 3. 3 Experimental Results 55 59 63 63 65 68 V CONCLUSIONS AND POSSIBLE EXTENSIONS REFERENCES 72 VITA 77 LIST OF TABLES Table 2. 1 The sample biases of the parameter estimates using Burg lattice method, in model one...

  12. A Comparative Study of Estimation Models for Satellite Relative Motion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Desai, Uri

    2013-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

    increases, the linear models begin to diverge greatly from the true response. The additional two models (the biased CW equations, and the linear STM) show decent performance under specific conditions. The former accounts for some of the unaccounted...

  13. Impact of transport model errors on the global and regional methane emissions estimated by inverse modelling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Locatelli, R.

    A modelling experiment has been conceived to assess the impact of transport model errors on methane emissions estimated in an atmospheric inversion system. Synthetic methane observations, obtained from 10 different model ...

  14. Model independent foreground power spectrum estimation using WMAP 5-year data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ghosh, Tuhin; Souradeep, Tarun [IUCAA, Post Bag 4, Ganeshkhind, Pune-411007 (India); Saha, Rajib [IUCAA, Post Bag 4, Ganeshkhind, Pune-411007 (India); Jet Propulsion Laboratory, M/S 169-327, 4800 Oak Grove Drive, Pasadena, California 91109 (United States); California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California 91125 (United States); Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology, Kanpur, U.P, 208016 (India); Jain, Pankaj [Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology, Kanpur, U.P, 208016 (India)

    2009-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, we propose and implement on WMAP 5 yr data a model independent approach of foreground power spectrum estimation for multifrequency observations of the CMB experiments. Recently, a model independent approach of CMB power spectrum estimation was proposed by Saha et al. 2006. This methodology demonstrates that the CMB power spectrum can be reliably estimated solely from WMAP data without assuming any template models for the foreground components. In the current paper, we extend this work to estimate the galactic foreground power spectrum using the WMAP 5 yr maps following a self-contained analysis. We apply the model independent method in harmonic basis to estimate the foreground power spectrum and frequency dependence of combined foregrounds. We also study the behavior of synchrotron spectral index variation over different regions of the sky. We use the full sky Haslam map as an external template to increase the degrees of freedom, while computing the synchrotron spectral index over the frequency range from 408 MHz to 94 GHz. We compare our results with those obtained from maximum entropy method foreground maps, which are formed in pixel space. We find that relative to our model independent estimates maximum entropy method maps overestimate the foreground power close to galactic plane and underestimates it at high latitudes.

  15. The Lithium-Ion Cell: Model, State Of Charge Estimation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schenato, Luca

    The Lithium-Ion Cell: Model, State Of Charge Estimation and Battery Management System Tutor degradation mechanisms of a Li-ion cell based on LiCoO2", Journal of Power Sources #12;Lithium ions and e and Y. Fuentes. Computer simulations of a lithium-ion polymer battery and implications for higher

  16. A Hierarchical Model for Estimating the Reliability of Complex Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reese, Shane

    an approximation to the joint posterior distribution on the total system reliability was obtained. Many reliability or bounding moments of the system reliability posterior distribution (Cole (1975), Mastran (1976), DostalA Hierarchical Model for Estimating the Reliability of Complex Systems Valen E. Johnson, Todd L

  17. AIAA-2001-0047 PARAMETRIC MODELS FOR ESTIMATING WIND TURBINE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sweetman, Bert

    . INTRODUCTION Design constraints for wind turbine structures fall into either extreme load or fatigue categoriesAIAA-2001-0047 1 PARAMETRIC MODELS FOR ESTIMATING WIND TURBINE FATIGUE LOADS FOR DESIGN Lance at Austin, Austin, TX 78712 2 Sandia National Laboratories, Wind Energy Technology Department, Albuquerque

  18. PARAMETRIC MODELS FOR ESTIMATING WIND TURBINE FATIGUE LOADS FOR DESIGN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sweetman, Bert

    loads. #12;2 INTRODUCTION Design constraints for wind turbine structures fall into either extreme load1 PARAMETRIC MODELS FOR ESTIMATING WIND TURBINE FATIGUE LOADS FOR DESIGN Lance Manuel1 Paul S, TX 78712 2 Sandia National Laboratories, Wind Energy Technology Department, Albuquerque, NM 87185

  19. Statistical testing and estimation in continuous time interest rate models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Myung Suk

    2006-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

    . In such a case, the power of the test does not tend to one in spite of large sample sizes. On the other hand, the consistent nonparametric tests avoid this problem. To test the correctness of a parametric model, say, Yi = l(xti ;?) + ei, we can consider.... In practice, we use ^i in lieu of ei, where ^i = Yi ? l(xti ; ^) is a residual, and ^ is 11 an OLS estimator of ? and Yi is a response variable. Using the leave one out kernel estimator 1nh Pnj6=i ^jk(xtj ?xtih ), the test statistic stems from the following...

  20. Models for estimation of car fuel consumption in urban traffic

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Biggs, D.C.; Akcelik

    1986-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This article describes four fuel-consumption models. The models are interrelated and form part of the same modeling framework. A simpler model is derived from a more complicated model keeping the vehicle characteristic such as mass, drag function, and energy efficiency as explicit parameters at all model levels. Because vehicle characteristics are likely to change over time and from country to country, this is a particularly useful model property. For simplicity here, only the instantaneous fuel-consumption model is described in any detail. However, because of the derivation procedure, many of the features and properties of this model are present in the more aggregate models. Easy-to-use functions and graphs are given for the more aggregate models based on a ''default car'' in urban driving conditions. All parameters related to the speed profile and driving environment were calibrated using on-road data collected in Sydney, Australia. Use of the models is illustrated by estimating the fuel consumption for the microtrip.

  1. Increasing NOAA's computational capacity to improve global forecast modeling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hamill, Tom

    Systems Division Stephen J. Lord Director, NWS NCEP Environmental Modeling Center 19 July 2010 (303) 4973060 tom.hamill@noaa.gov #12; 2 Executive Summary The accuracy of many

  2. Example: the Mediterranean basin Statistical Model Estimation Hypothesis testing Estimation and joint testing of temporal and spatial

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and joint testing of temporal and spatial patterns in Climate Change Jean-Marc Azaïs, Aurélien Ribes, Journées climat, Orsay 28 et 29 Janvier 2010 #12;Example: the Mediterranean basin Statistical ModelExample: the Mediterranean basin Statistical Model Estimation Hypothesis testing Estimation

  3. Integrating Photovoltaic Inverter Reliability into Energy Yield Estimation with Markov Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liberzon, Daniel

    Integrating Photovoltaic Inverter Reliability into Energy Yield Estimation with Markov Models@illinois.edu Abstract-- Markov reliability models to estimate Photovoltaic (PV) inverter reliability of the inverters. Keywords-Photovoltaic energy conversion, Markov reliability models, utility-interactive inverters

  4. Local Estimation of Modeling Error in Multi-Scale Modeling of Heterogeneous Elastic Solids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moody, Tristan

    2008-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Global Enhancement . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24 3.3.3 The Adaptive Process . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24 Chapter 4. Modeling Error Estimation 30 4.1 Residual-Based Error Estimation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30 4.2 Error... with effectivity indices . 80 ix 5.18 Average estimates of enhancement errors in quantity of interest Qx(u) using three enhancements with effectivity indices . . . . 80 x List of Figures 1.1 Examples of composite failure modes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 2...

  5. RSMASS: A simple model for estimating reactor and shield masses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marshall, A.C.; Aragon, J.; Gallup, D.

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A simple mathematical model (RSMASS) has been developed to provide rapid estimates of reactor and shield masses for space-based reactor power systems. Approximations are used rather than correlations or detailed calculations to estimate the reactor fuel mass and the masses of the moderator, structure, reflector, pressure vessel, miscellaneous components, and the reactor shield. The fuel mass is determined either by neutronics limits, thermal/hydraulic limits, or fuel damage limits, whichever yields the largest mass. RSMASS requires the reactor power and energy, 24 reactor parameters, and 20 shield parameters to be specified. This parametric approach should be applicable to a very broad range of reactor types. Reactor and shield masses calculated by RSMASS were found to be in good agreement with the masses obtained from detailed calculations.

  6. Attempt to estimate measurement uncertainty in the Air Force Toxic Chemical Dispersion (AFTOX) model. Master's thesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zettlemoyer, M.D.

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Air Force Toxic Chemical Dispersion (AFTOX) model is a Gaussian puff dispersion model that predicts plumes, concentrations, and hazard distances of toxic chemical spills. A measurement uncertainty propagation formula derived by Freeman et al. (1986) is used within AFTOX to estimate resulting concentration uncertainties due to the effects of data input uncertainties in wind speed, spill height, emission rate, and the horizontal and vertical Gaussian dispersion parameters, and the results are compared to true uncertainties as estimated by standard deviations computed by Monte Carlo simulations. The measurement uncertainty uncertainty propagation formula was found to overestimate measurement uncertainty in AFTOX-calculated concentrations by at least 350 percent, with overestimates worsening with increasing stability and/or increasing measurement uncertainty.

  7. A comparison of land surface model soil hydraulic properties estimated by inverse modeling and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Small, Eric

    of water in the soil. This in turn plays an important role in the water and energy cycles at the land depths in the soil column controls the partitioning of two key energy fluxes of concern in climate modelsA comparison of land surface model soil hydraulic properties estimated by inverse modeling

  8. EKF BASED ESTIMATOR FOR FDI IN THE MODEL IV FCCU Yuanjie Huang, Sourabh Dash

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Venkatasubramanian, Venkat

    EKF BASED ESTIMATOR FOR FDI IN THE MODEL IV FCCU Yuanjie Huang, Sourabh Dash G. V. Reklaitis study, a EKF based estimator for the Model IV FCCU is investigated. This model is multivariable variables. Performance of the estimator's application to the AmocoModel IV FCCU case study in terms of early

  9. Application of Autoregressive Models to In-Service Estimation of Transient Response for LMFBR Process Instrumentation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ueda, Masashi; Tomobe, Katsuma; Setoguchi, Keiichi; Endou, Akira [Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Institute (Japan)

    2002-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The response of a sensor depends on its operating conditions, and thus it is desirable to develop an in-service method for response time estimation. The applicability of the autoregressive (AR) model for this purpose was examined in the case of the fuel subassembly outlet coolant thermocouples and the primary circuit electromagnetic flowmeter (EMF) of Monju, the prototype fast breeder reactor in Japan.The use of an AR model with exogenous input (ARX model) is possible when the physical variable to be sensed can be observed by an alternative means with a faster response time than that of the sensor in question. In the case of the subassembly outlet thermocouple, the temperature output from an eddy-current sensor, during pseudorandom reactor power variation, served as the exogenous input.In respect to the thermocouple response, AR and ARX modeling were shown to be applicable, and the transient responses thus derived agreed well with each other and with the results measured by means of a step change in sodium temperature. However, the primary circuit EMF response time, estimated using the AR model, decreased with increasing flow rate even when approaching the rated flow, demonstrating that the method was not completely applicable. Nevertheless, it can be concluded that the response is faster than that estimated in the rated condition.

  10. Techno-Economic Models for Carbon Dioxide Compression, Transport, and Storage & Correlations for Estimating Carbon Dioxide Density and Viscosity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCollum, David L; Ogden, Joan M

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ogden models use capital cost estimates from Skovholts 1993are below average but estimate capital costs that are abovediameter, it estimates capital cost below the average.

  11. HERITABILITY ESTIMATION IN HIGH DIMENSIONAL LINEAR MIXED MODELS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gassiat, Elisabeth

    estimator. Our approach is implemented in the R package HiLMM which is available from the web page) the "dark matter" of the genome or the "dark matter" of heritability. To estimate this lacking heritability

  12. Accuracy of Contemporary Parametric Software Estimation Models: A Comparative Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tomkins, Andrew

    with delays and being costly and error- prone. Inaccurate estimation of project resources is considered as one the costs, schedule and the resources for IT projects. Software estimation is the process of predicting the effort, duration and cost required to develop a software system [2]. Estimators often rely on one or more

  13. Mass Flow Estimation with Model Bias Correction for a Turbocharged Diesel Engine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johansen, Tor Arne

    Mass Flow Estimation with Model Bias Correction for a Turbocharged Diesel Engine Toms Polni. Based on an augmented observable Mean Value En- gine Model (MVEM) of a turbocharged Diesel engine in the intake duct. Keywords: Diesel engine, Mass flow estimation, Bias estimation, Kalman filtering, Mean value

  14. Parameter estimation of coupled water and energy balance models based on stationary constraints of surface states

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sun, Jian

    [1] We use a conditional averaging approach to estimate the parameters of a land surface water and energy balance model and then use the estimated parameters to partition net radiation into latent, sensible, and ground ...

  15. Atomistic Modeling of Macromolecular Crowding Predicts Modest Increases in Protein Folding and Binding Stability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weston, Ken

    Atomistic Modeling of Macromolecular Crowding Predicts Modest Increases in Protein Folding that macromolecular crowding can increase protein folding stability, but depending on details of the models (e.g., how on the effects of macro- molecular crowding on protein folding and binding stability has been reached. Crowders

  16. Model Test Setup and Program for Experimental Estimation of Surface Loads of the SSG Kvitsy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Model Test Setup and Program for Experimental Estimation of Surface Loads of the SSG Kvitsøy Pilot Engineering No. 32 ISSN: 1603-9874 Model Test Setup and Program for Experimental Estimation of Surface Loads University October, 2005 #12;#12;Preface This report presents the preparations done prior to model tests

  17. Can a more realistic model error structure improve the parameter estimation in modelling the dynamics of sh populations?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Yong

    or applying an estimation method that is robust to the error structure assumption in modelling the dynamicsCan a more realistic model error structure improve the parameter estimation in modelling the dynamics of sh populations? Y. Chena,* , J.E. Paloheimob a Fisheries Conservation Chair Program, Fisheries

  18. Estimation of Parameterized Spatio-Temporal Dynamic Models Ke Xu and Christopher K. Wikle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Estimation of Parameterized Spatio-Temporal Dynamic Models Ke Xu and Christopher K. Wikle: Christopher K. Wikle, Department of Statistics, University of Missouri, 146 Math Science Building, Columbia

  19. The complementary relationship in estimation of regional evapotranspiration: An enhanced Advection-Aridity model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ramírez, Jorge A.

    Collins, Colorado Abstract. Long-term monthly evapotranspiration estimates from Brutsaert and Stricker and Stricker's [1979] Advection- Aridity (AA) model, exhibit two very different approaches to parameterizing

  20. Los Alamos Waste Management Cost Estimation Model; Final report: Documentation of waste management process, development of Cost Estimation Model, and model reference manual

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matysiak, L.M.; Burns, M.L.

    1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This final report completes the Los Alamos Waste Management Cost Estimation Project, and includes the documentation of the waste management processes at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) for hazardous, mixed, low-level radioactive solid and transuranic waste, development of the cost estimation model and a user reference manual. The ultimate goal of this effort was to develop an estimate of the life cycle costs for the aforementioned waste types. The Cost Estimation Model is a tool that can be used to calculate the costs of waste management at LANL for the aforementioned waste types, under several different scenarios. Each waste category at LANL is managed in a separate fashion, according to Department of Energy requirements and state and federal regulations. The cost of the waste management process for each waste category has not previously been well documented. In particular, the costs associated with the handling, treatment and storage of the waste have not been well understood. It is anticipated that greater knowledge of these costs will encourage waste generators at the Laboratory to apply waste minimization techniques to current operations. Expected benefits of waste minimization are a reduction in waste volume, decrease in liability and lower waste management costs.

  1. Comparing Local and Global Software Effort Estimation Models Reflections on a Systematic Review

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    protocols. Keywords: D.2.9.b Cost estimation, project effort prediction, systematic review, empirical of practice in the form of benchmarking, assessment of current activities, estimation of future tasksComparing Local and Global Software Effort Estimation Models Reflections on a Systematic Review

  2. Elmore Model for Energy Estimation in RC Trees Quming Zhou and Kartik Mohanram

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohanram, Kartik

    Elmore Model for Energy Estimation in RC Trees Quming Zhou and Kartik Mohanram Department This paper presents analysis methods for energy estimation in RC trees driven by time-varying voltage sources]: Design aids--simulation General Terms: Algorithms Keywords: Energy estimation, RC trees, interconnect. 1

  3. Improving estimates of African woodland biomass by fusing radar data, models and ground observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Improving estimates of African woodland biomass by fusing radar data, models and ground management of savannahs and woodlands requires accurate estimates of the woody biomass. For these reasons, developing new methods to accurately estimate woody biomass and its changes is high on the political

  4. Speech enhancement using super-Gaussian speech models and noncausal a priori SNR estimation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cohen, Israel

    Speech enhancement using super-Gaussian speech models and noncausal a priori SNR estimation Israel that the performance of noncausal estimation, when applied to the problem of speech enhancement, is better under has a smaller effect on the enhanced speech signal when using the noncausal a priori SNR estimator

  5. Modeling, estimation, and control of robot-soil interactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hong, Won, 1971-

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis presents the development of hardware, theory, and experimental methods to enable a robotic manipulator arm to interact with soils and estimate soil properties from interaction forces. Unlike the majority of ...

  6. Estimation of linear autoregressive models with Markov-switching, the E.M. algorithm revisited

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rynkiewicz, Joseph

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This work concerns estimation of linear autoregressive models with Markov-switching using expectation maximisation (E.M.) algorithm. Our method generalise the method introduced by Elliot for general hidden Markov models and avoid to use backward recursion.

  7. A quantitative framework For large-scale model estimation and discrimination In systems biology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eydgahi, Hoda

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Using models to simulate and analyze biological networks requires principled approaches to parameter estimation and model discrimination. We use Bayesian and Monte Carlo methods to recover the full probability distributions ...

  8. Integrated Estimation and Tracking of Performance Model Parameters with Autoregressive Trends

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Woodside, C. Murray

    1 Integrated Estimation and Tracking of Performance Model Parameters with Autoregressive Trends Tao the model parameters can be tracked by an estimator such as a Kalman Filter, so that decisions can excessive cost (as is usually the case for the CPU time of a service). Because there may be significant

  9. CONTINUOUS INVERTIBILITY AND STABLE QML ESTIMATION OF THE EGARCH(1,1) MODEL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    CONTINUOUS INVERTIBILITY AND STABLE QML ESTIMATION OF THE EGARCH(1,1) MODEL OLIVIER WINTENBERGER Abstract. We introduce the notion of continuous invertibility on a compact set for volatility models driven Estimator (QMLE) when the optimization procedure is done on a continuously invertible domain. This approach

  10. Online Center of Gravity Estimation in Automotive Vehicles using Multiple Models and Switching

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duffy, Ken

    Online Center of Gravity Estimation in Automotive Vehicles using Multiple Models and Switching and switching for realtime estimation of center of gravity (CG) position in automotive vehicles. The method utilizes simple linear vehicle models and assumes availability of standard stock automotive sensors. We

  11. OnLine IPA Gradient Estimators in Stochastic Continuous Fluid Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    On­Line IPA Gradient Estimators in Stochastic Continuous Fluid Models Yorai Wardi # School Perturbation Analysis (IPA) to loss­related and workload­ related metrics in a class of Stochastic Flow Models parameters of interest, such as bu#er size, service rate and inflow rate. The IPA estimators derived

  12. A climate sensitivity estimate using Bayesian fusion of instrumental observations and an Earth System model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    sensitivity estimate using Bayesian fusion of instrumental observations and an Earth System model, J. Geophys System model Roman Olson,1 Ryan Sriver,1 Marlos Goes,2,3 Nathan M. Urban,4,5 H. Damon Matthews,6 MuraliA climate sensitivity estimate using Bayesian fusion of instrumental observations and an Earth

  13. Noise-contrastive estimation of unnormalized statistical models, and its application to natural image statistics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gutmann, Michael

    to discriminate between the observed data and some artificially generated noise. With this approach, the partition favorably to other estimation methods for unnormalized models. As an application to real data, we estimate (pdf) pd. The data pdf pd is modeled by a parameterized family of functions {pm(.; )} where

  14. Parameter Estimation in Groundwater Flow Models with Distributed and Pointwise Observations*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Parameter Estimation in Groundwater Flow Models with Distributed and Pointwise Observations* Ben G concerning the least sqaures estimation of parameters in a groundwater flow model. As is typically the case­93­1­0153. #12; 1 Introduction Understanding the flow of groundwater is an important scientific and engineering

  15. Development of Property-Transfer Models for Estimating the Hydraulic Properties of Deep

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Development of Property-Transfer Models for Estimating the Hydraulic Properties of Deep Sediments. #12;Development of Property-Transfer Models for Estimating the Hydraulic Properties of Deep Sediments-USGS World Wide Web: http://www.usgs.gov/ Any use of trade, product, or firm names in this publication

  16. Downscaling CMIP5 climate models shows increased tropical cyclone activity over the 21st century

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rothman, Daniel

    of historical and future climate states simulated by six Coupled Model Intercomparison Project 5 (CMIP5) global energy of the subcloud layer. On time scales larger than that characterizing the thermal equilibration of greater intensity. Calculations with a single-column model (4) confirm that increasing greenhouse gas

  17. Increasing the Scalability of PISM for High Resolution Ice Sheet Models Phillip Dickens

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dickens, Phillip M.

    Increasing the Scalability of PISM for High Resolution Ice Sheet Models Phillip Dickens School at large. One important piece of the climate puzzle is how the dynamics of large-scale ice sheets developed several simulation models to predict and understand the behavior of large-scale ice sheets

  18. Modeling of PM Synchronous Motors for Control and Estimation Tasks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stankoviæ, Aleksandar

    is to introduce and explain gen- eral, detailed PMSM models that are used in electric drives community commonly used transformations of original PMSM model. Finally, in Section 4 we present three applications sensor. 2 A Complete PMSM Model in the abc Frame The model presented in this section includes nonsinu

  19. ESTIMATION OF FLOW DISTRIBUTION FOR HYDROLOGICAL MODELLING Petter Pilesj

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harrie, Lars

    .hkbu.edu.hk Lars Harrie Department of Surveying. University of Lund. Box 118, ht 54. S ­ 221 00 Lund, Sweden. E-mail: Lars.Harrie@lantm.lth.se Abstract: This paper discusses a new approach to estimate flow direction. Holmgren (1994) summarises some of the algorithms as, #12;( ) ( )= = 8 1 tan tan j x j x i

  20. Wavelet Based Density Estimators for Modeling Multidimensional Data Sets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shahabi, Cyrus

    the distribution of this random variable. We exhibit an estimator for the wavelet coe?cients of this density and ionospheric data. After three levels of o#11;-line pre-processing, observations of temperature, water vapor agreement nr. F30602-99-1-0524, and unrestricted cash/equipment gifts from NCR, IBM, Intel and SUN. #12; 1

  1. Nonparametric estimation of econometric models with categorical variables

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ouyang, Desheng

    2006-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

    -validated smoothing parameters differ in their asymptotic behavior depending on whether a variable is uniformly distributed or not. In chapter IV, we consider a k-n-n estimation of regression function with k selected by a cross validation method. We consider both...

  2. Coupling Quantitative Precipitation Estimate and Great Lakes Hydrologic Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rationale The ability to provide accurate runoff estimates not only impacts forecasting of the water levels of the Seaway, but can help business such as commercial shippers, marinas, and hydropower and nuclear plants environment, the Great Lakes basin, and GLERL will improve its LBRM to hourly computations and its AHPS

  3. Model estimates food-versus-biofuel trade-off

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rajagapol, Deepak; Sexton, Steven; Hochman, Gal; Roland-Holst, David; Zilberman, David D

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    D. 2007. Challenge of biofuel: Filling the tank withoutaddition to policies such as biofuel subsidies and mandates.Whereas biofuel subsidies and man- dates increase the

  4. Estimating optimal doses in random coefficient assay models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rosenthal, Anna

    2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Y, = 1 , and Y = ? g Y;. The OLS estimate of s, from (4) is G(al?P7) = z, l, . The second method is generalized least squares (GLS) (Seber, 1977, pp. 60- 62). Denote the GLS estimates of n and P by ng and P~. Then = (XrV-'X)-'X V-'Y Pg where...[ru[q [sz&uag aqua fiq 'u[z8v, aaup ([; x[puadd~ aas) sr Og' Pun Ov yo x[zr sur aaumzvxoa aqL ?Ized g ~XUX = (~)cog = g axaqm se afioqv pau[[ap san apsru[psa Sqg aqL (X~X) zo+ U = Z~ azaqm ( zo)x 'urasoaqL p[ru[q [sspuag aq[ fiq 'uaqL (g) fiq uarr...

  5. Three Essays on Estimation and Testing of Nonparametric Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ma, Guangyi

    2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    they are useful when the researcher does not have a theory specifying the exact relationship between economic variables. However, in many cases, economic theory indicates that the functional relationship between two vari- ables X and Y , say, Y = m (X), should... results that are smooth functions, and reduces the dimensions of numerical optimization from sample size n to the number of restrictions. Moreover, the procedure estimates the function Y = m (X) and its rst and second derivative simultaneously, so...

  6. An evaluation of risk simulation models for reserve estimates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Judah, Janeen Sue

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in estimating reserves for petroleum economic evaluations is an 1mportant everyday problem encountered by practicing petroleum engineers. This study addresses the problem of est1mating reserves for petroleum evaluations with little available data. The risk... to reserve est1mates. Latin Hypercube sampling is a relatively recent statistical development and has never before been applied to petroleum economic evaluations or petroleum risk simulators. The results show that simple random sampling is adequate...

  7. AN EMG-DRIVEN MUSCULOSKELETAL MODEL FOR THE ESTIMATION OF BIOMECHANICAL PARAMETERS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sóbester, András

    AN EMG-DRIVEN MUSCULOSKELETAL MODEL FOR THE ESTIMATION OF BIOMECHANICAL PARAMETERS OF WRIST FLEXORS function fmincon was used for the minimization ABSTRACT A musculoskeletal model of wrist flexors are in agreement with previously published data. WRIST MODEL · Hill-type musculotendon model (Zajac ,1989) · Muscle

  8. Noise-contrastive estimation: A new estimation principle for unnormalized statistical models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hyvärinen, Aapo

    nonlinear logistic regression to discriminate between the observed data and some artificially generated(.). The data pdf pd(.) is modeled by a parameterized family of functions {pm(.; )} where is a vector(.; ^) with pm(u; ^)du = 1. (1) This defines essentially a constraint in the optimiza- tion problem.1

  9. Estimating sandstone permeability using network models with pore size distributions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mathews, Alan Ronald

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in appearance to empirical data. A network model is developed to simulate the pore geometry of a clean, well-sorted sandstone. Pores were modeled as straight capillaries connected in various lattice configurations. Complex lattice configurations produce more... properties and can be closely monitored, allowing for study of their effects on flow in the network lattice. Various parameter variation techniques are introduced in the literature. These techniques induce flow property changes in the model allowing rock...

  10. Modeling, Estimation, and Control of Waste Heat Recovery Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Luong, David

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Steam Turbine . . . . . .and A. Ghaffari. Steam Turbine Model. Simulation= m ? v (h in ? h out ) Steam Turbine As with the pump, the

  11. Modeling and estimation techniques for understanding heterogeneous traffic behavior

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhao, Zhili

    2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The majority of current internet traffic is based on TCP. With the emergence of new applications, especially new multimedia applications, however, UDP-based traffic is expected to increase. Furthermore, multimedia applications have sparkled...

  12. A categorical model for traffic incident likelihood estimation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kuchangi, Shamanth

    2007-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    In this thesis an incident prediction model is formulated and calibrated. The primary idea of the model developed is to correlate the expected number of crashes on any section of a freeway to a set of traffic stream characteristics, so that a...

  13. Efficient estimation of thermodynamic state incorporating Bayesian model order selection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lanterman, Aaron

    , infrared, FLIR 1. INTRODUCTION In 1993, our group began an effort to apply Grenander's pattern theory 1­looking infrared (FLIR) camera. 3--6 Three­dimensional, CAD shape­models represented the objects of interest; a likelihood function, modeling the physics of FLIR cameras, encapsulated the way the objects were seen

  14. Hybrid Model of Existing Buildings for Transient Thermal Performance Estimation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xu, X.; Wang, S.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Building level energy models are important to provide accurate prediction of energy consumption for building performance diagnosis and energy efficiency assessment of retrofitting alternatives for building performance upgrading. Simplified...

  15. Modeling and Estimating Current Harmonics of Variable Electronic Loads

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wichakool, Warit

    This paper develops a model for relating input current harmonic content to real power consumption for variable electronic loads, specifically for loads' actively controlled inverters energized by an uncontrolled rectification ...

  16. Logit Models for Estimating Urban Area Through Travel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Talbot, Eric

    2011-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    of all trips at an external station that are through trips. The second model distributes those through trips at one external station to the other external stations. The models produce separate results for commercial and non- commercial vehicles...-side interview technique at locations (called external stations) where traffic enters and exits the study area. During the daylight hours of a certain day, survey personnel would direct all vehicles or a sample of vehicles leaving the urban area to stop...

  17. INVENTORY OF SOLAR RADIATION/SOLAR ENERGY SYSTEMS ESTIMATORS, MODELS, SITE-SPECIFIC DATA, AND PUBLICATIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    INVENTORY OF SOLAR RADIATION/SOLAR ENERGY SYSTEMS ESTIMATORS, MODELS, SITE-SPECIFIC DATA, and Buildings Systems Integration Center National Renewable Energy Laboratory 8 July 2009 SOLAR SYSTEM POTENTIAL/calculators/PVWATTS/version1/ http://rredc.nrel.gov/solar/calculators/PVWATTS/version2/ Estimates the electrical energy

  18. Parameter Estimation and Capacity Fade Analysis of Lithium-Ion Batteries Using Reformulated Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Subramanian, Venkat

    Parameter Estimation and Capacity Fade Analysis of Lithium-Ion Batteries Using Reformulated Models and characterize capacity fade in lithium-ion batteries. As a comple- ment to approaches to mathematically model been made in developing lithium-ion battery models that incor- porate transport phenomena

  19. Estimating Heat and Mass Transfer Processes in Green Roof Systems: Current Modeling Capabilities and Limitations (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tabares Velasco, P. C.

    2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This presentation discusses estimating heat and mass transfer processes in green roof systems: current modeling capabilities and limitations. Green roofs are 'specialized roofing systems that support vegetation growth on rooftops.'

  20. Estimation of OTEC Global Resources with an Ocean General Circulation Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frandsen, Jannette B.

    Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) relies on the availability of temperature differencesEstimation of OTEC Global Resources with an Ocean General Circulation Model Krishnakumar Rajagopalan Postdoctoral Fellow Department of Ocean and Resources Engineering University of Hawai'i Abstract

  1. Estimating home energy decision parameters for a hybrid energyYeconomy policy model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    home building structures and choosing a space heating and conditioning system. Based on a discreteEstimating home energy decision parameters for a hybrid energyYeconomy policy model Mark Jaccard

  2. Estimating the Market Penetration of Residential Cool Storage Technology Using Economic Cost Modeling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weijo, R. O.; and Brown, D. R.

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study estimated the market penetration for residential cool storage technology using economic cost modeling. Residential cool storage units produce and store chill during off-peak periods of the day to be used during times of peak electric...

  3. Model estimates of the mass balance of the Greenland and Antartic ice sheets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bugnion, Vronique.

    The six possible combinations of two climate models and three methods for calculating the melting of snow and ice are used to estimate current values of accumulation and ablation on the Greenland and Antarctic ice sheets. ...

  4. Impact of aerothermal modeling on the estimation of turbine blade life

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collin, Jean E., 1978-

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The impact of aerothermal modeling on estimates of turbine blade heat transfer and life was assessed for three high pressure turbine blades. The work was conducted as part of a project aimed at the evaluation of the effect ...

  5. MODELING AND PARAMETER ESTIMATION FOR AN IMPERFECTLY CLAMPED PLATE \\Lambda

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of accounting for the energy loss when this assumption is not appropriate, it is necessary to provide a more techniques are out­ lined. Finally, under natural assumptions for this model and approximation scheme displacements and slopes are maintained at the boundaries. For example, this can be an appro­ priate assumption

  6. Evaluation of Clear Sky Models for Satellite-Based Irradiance Estimates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sengupta, M.; Gotseff, P.

    2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes an intercomparison of three popular broadband clear sky solar irradiance model results with measured data, as well as satellite-based model clear sky results compared to measured clear sky data. The authors conclude that one of the popular clear sky models (the Bird clear sky model developed by Richard Bird and Roland Hulstrom) could serve as a more accurate replacement for current satellite-model clear sky estimations. Additionally, the analysis of the model results with respect to model input parameters indicates that rather than climatological, annual, or monthly mean input data, higher-time-resolution input parameters improve the general clear sky model performance.

  7. Efficient Estimation in a Regression Model with Missing Responses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crawford, Scott

    2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    function for the linear regression model where r#(X) = #>X is b( i; Xi; i) = E h fX E(Xj = 1)gl( ) + E(Xj = 1) 2 i n [X E(Xj = 1)]l( ) + E(Xj = 1) 2 o> 1 i n [Xi E(Xj = 1)]l( i) + E(Xj = 1) i 2 o : Proof: Assuming r#(X...) = #>X then _r#(X) = X, and Equation 2.2 becomes ( i; Xi; i) = fX E[Xj = 1]g l( i) + E[Xj = 1] i 2 : The e cient in uence function from Equation 2.3 is b( i; Xi; i) = E n [X E(Xj = 1)]l( ) + E(Xj = 1) 2 o n [X E(Xj = 1)]l( ) + E...

  8. Exact Maximum Likelihood estimator for the BL-GARCH model under elliptical distributed

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Universit de

    Exact Maximum Likelihood estimator for the BL-GARCH model under elliptical distributed innovations, Brisbane QLD 4001, Australia Abstract We are interested in the parametric class of Bilinear GARCH (BL-GARCH examine, in this paper, the BL-GARCH model in a general setting under some non-normal distributions. We

  9. Data-driven Techniques to Estimate Parameters in the Homogenized Energy Model for Shape Memory Alloys

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , ferroelectric, and ferromagnetic materials. The energy origin of the model was originally investigated for SMA]. The original mod- els determined the equilibrium phase using the Gibbs energy to predict the mesoscopic (orData-driven Techniques to Estimate Parameters in the Homogenized Energy Model for Shape Memory

  10. ASYMPTOTIC DISTRIBUTION OF ESTIMATES FOR A TIME-VARYING PARAMETER IN A HARMONIC MODEL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Irizarry, Rafael A.

    ASYMPTOTIC DISTRIBUTION OF ESTIMATES FOR A TIME-VARYING PARAMETER IN A HARMONIC MODEL WITH MULTIPLE harmonic regression models are useful for cases where harmonic parameters appear to be time-varying. Least, harmonic regression, signal processing, sound analysis, time-varying parameters, weighted least squares

  11. Parameter estimation from flowing fluid temperature logging data in unsaturated fractured rock using multiphase inverse modeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mukhopadhyay, S.; Tsang, Y.; Finsterle, S.

    2009-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A simple conceptual model has been recently developed for analyzing pressure and temperature data from flowing fluid temperature logging (FFTL) in unsaturated fractured rock. Using this conceptual model, we developed an analytical solution for FFTL pressure response, and a semianalytical solution for FFTL temperature response. We also proposed a method for estimating fracture permeability from FFTL temperature data. The conceptual model was based on some simplifying assumptions, particularly that a single-phase airflow model was used. In this paper, we develop a more comprehensive numerical model of multiphase flow and heat transfer associated with FFTL. Using this numerical model, we perform a number of forward simulations to determine the parameters that have the strongest influence on the pressure and temperature response from FFTL. We then use the iTOUGH2 optimization code to estimate these most sensitive parameters through inverse modeling and to quantify the uncertainties associated with these estimated parameters. We conclude that FFTL can be utilized to determine permeability, porosity, and thermal conductivity of the fracture rock. Two other parameters, which are not properties of the fractured rock, have strong influence on FFTL response. These are pressure and temperature in the borehole that were at equilibrium with the fractured rock formation at the beginning of FFTL. We illustrate how these parameters can also be estimated from FFTL data.

  12. CLIMATE MODELING BEST ESTIMATE DATASET (CMBE) -NEW ADDITIONS Renata McCoy, Shaocheng Xie, Stephen Klein, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CLIMATE MODELING BEST ESTIMATE DATASET (CMBE) - NEW ADDITIONS Renata McCoy, Shaocheng Xie, Stephen ARM product, the Climate Modeling Best Estimate (CMBE) dataset, is being augmented with the additional observational and model data. The CMBE dataset was created to serve the needs of climate model developers

  13. Estimating present climate in a warming world: a model-based approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Raeisaenen, J.; Ruokolainen, L. [University of Helsinki (Finland). Division of Atmospheric Sciences and Geophysics

    2008-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Weather services base their operational definitions of 'present' climate on past observations, using a 30-year normal period such as 1961-1990 or 1971-2000. In a world with ongoing global warming, however, past data give a biased estimate of the actual present-day climate. Here we propose to correct this bias with a 'delta change' method, in which model-simulated climate changes and observed global mean temperature changes are used to extrapolate past observations forward in time, to make them representative of present or future climate conditions. In a hindcast test for the years 1991-2002, the method works well for temperature, with a clear improvement in verification statistics compared to the case in which the hindcast is formed directly from the observations for 1961-1990. However, no improvement is found for precipitation, for which the signal-to-noise ratio between expected anthropogenic changes and interannual variability is much lower than for temperature. An application of the method to the present (around the year 2007) climate suggests that, as a geographical average over land areas excluding Antarctica, 8-9 months per year and 8-9 years per decade can be expected to be warmer than the median for 1971-2000. Along with the overall warming, a substantial increase in the frequency of warm extremes at the expense of cold extremes of monthly-to-annual temperature is expected.

  14. Modeling and identification of parallel nonlinear systems: Structural classification and parameter estimation methods

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, H.W. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States). Biophysics Group M715)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Structural classification and parameter estimation (SCPE) methods are used for studying single-input single-output (SISO) parallel linear-nonlinear-linear (LNL), linear-nonlinear (LN), and nonlinear-linear (NL) system models from input-output (I-O) measurements. The uniqueness of the I-O mappings (see the definition of the I-O mapping in Section 3-A) of some model structures is discussed. The uniqueness of the I-O mappings (see the definition of the I-O mapping in Section 3-A) of some model structures is discussed. The uniqueness of I-O mappings of different models tells them in what conditions different model structures can be differentiated from one another. Parameter uniqueness of the I-O mapping of a given structural model is also discussed, which tells the authors in what conditions a given model's parameters can be uniquely estimated from I-O measurements. These methods are then generalized so that they can be used to study single-input multi-output (SIMO), multi-input single-output (MISO), as well as multi-input multi-output (MIMO) nonlinear system models. Parameter estimation of the two-input single-output nonlinear system model (denoted as the 2f-structure in 2 cited references), which was left unsolved previously, can now be obtained using the newly derived algorithms. Applications of SCPE methods for modeling visual cortical neurons, system fault detection, modeling and identification of communication networks, biological systems, and natural and artificial neural networks are also discussed. The feasibility of these methods is demonstrated using simulated examples. SCPE methods presented in this paper can be further developed to study more complicated block-structures models, and will therefore have future potential for modeling and identifying highly complex multi-input multi-output nonlinear systems.

  15. MRI based diffusion and perfusion predictive model to estimate stroke Stephen E. Rosea,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McLachlan, Geoff

    MRI based diffusion and perfusion predictive model to estimate stroke evolution Stephen E. Rosea and perfusion images acquired in the acute stage of stroke. The validity of this methodology was tested on novel patient data including data acquired from an independent stroke clinic. Regions-of-interest (ROIs

  16. SO2 emissions and lifetimes: Estimates from inverse modeling using in situ and global, spacebased

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martin, Randall

    SO2 emissions and lifetimes: Estimates from inverse modeling using in situ and global, spacebased 18 March 2011. [1] Topdown constraints on global sulfur dioxide (SO2) emissions are inferred through of GEOSChem for inversion of SO2 columns to emissions. The seasonal mean SO2 lifetime calculated with the GEOS

  17. MODEL-BASED VEHICLE STATE ESTIMATION USING PREVIEWED ROAD GEOMETRY AND NOISY SENSORS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brennan, Sean

    to the automotive world. Unfortunately for the designers of vehicle driver assist systems, however, most low- cost states from low-cost sensors remains [2]. In the case of autonomous vehicle guidance or in modeling another sen- sor input to estimate vehicle state. This is a particularly low-cost data source, especially

  18. Error estimation of bathymetric grid models derived from historic and contemporary datasets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Hampshire, University of

    1 Error estimation of bathymetric grid models derived from historic and contemporary datasets and rapidly collecting dense bathymetric datasets. Sextants were replaced by radio navigation, then transit, to digitized contours; the test dataset shows examples of all of these types. From this database, we assign

  19. SPACETIME BLOCK CODING : JOINT DETECTION AND CHANNEL ESTIMATION USING MULTIPLE MODEL THEORY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Imperial College, London

    SPACE­TIME BLOCK CODING : JOINT DETECTION AND CHANNEL ESTIMATION USING MULTIPLE MODEL THEORY Harini of Sheffield, Mappin Street, Sheffield S1 3JD. Email: visakan@sheffield.ac.uk ABSTRACT A joint decoding method for space­time block codes [1, 2] is pre­ sented. The space­time coded signals can be viewed as a first

  20. SPACE-TIME BLOCK CODING : JOINT DETECTION AND CHANNEL ESTIMATION USING MULTIPLE MODEL THEORY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Imperial College, London

    SPACE-TIME BLOCK CODING : JOINT DETECTION AND CHANNEL ESTIMATION USING MULTIPLE MODEL THEORY Harini of Sheffield, Mappin Street, Sheffield S1 3JD. Email: visakan@sheffield.ac.uk ABSTRACT A joint decoding method for space-time block codes [1, 2] is pre- sented. The space-time coded signals can be viewed as a first

  1. Application of mark-recapture models to estimation of the population size of plants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alexander, Helen M.; Slade, Norman A.; Kettle, W. Dean

    1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    observed in a particular year may greatly underestimate the true population size, just as a count of animals in traps does not adequately estimate the total number of animals in an area. Using a family of closed population models (CAPTURE), we applied mark...

  2. COMPARISON OF SEISMIC RISK ESTIMATES USING DIFFERENT METHODS TO MODEL FRAGILITY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 COMPARISON OF SEISMIC RISK ESTIMATES USING DIFFERENT METHODS TO MODEL FRAGILITY Pierre Gehl1 , Ariane Ducellier2 , Caterina Negulescu3 , Jaime Abad4 and John Douglas5 Seismic risk evaluations play of decades hundreds of such studies have been conducted. However, the assessment of seismic risk is always

  3. Estimating Water Quality Pollution Impacts Based on Economic Loss Models in Urbanization Process

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu, Qian

    Estimating Water Quality Pollution Impacts Based on Economic Loss Models in Urbanization Process Abstract: The study investigates water quality pollution impacts on urbanization by analyzing temporal, more populations were moved from rural area into urban area, and more costs were input in water quality

  4. Estimating Use of Non-Motorized Infrastructure: Models of Bicycle and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    Estimating Use of Non-Motorized Infrastructure: Models of Bicycle and Pedestrian Traffic · Transportation managers lack data about use of bicycle and pedestrian facilities. · Federal, state, & local of Day Bicycle: Loop Detector Bicycle: Manual Count Pedestrian: Manual Count #12;Scaling factors

  5. Towards Model-Based Estimation of the Cardiac Electro-Mechanical Activity from ECG Signals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coudière, Yves

    Towards Model-Based Estimation of the Cardiac Electro-Mechanical Activity from ECG Signals by comparing the actual patient's ECG with computational results and the deformation of the biomechani- cal-to-access measurements on a patient: the ECG (Electrocardiogram), and a time sequence of volumetric ultrasound images

  6. New methods for estimation, modeling and validation of dynamical systems using automatic differentiation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Griffith, Daniel Todd

    2005-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

    equations, for a class of nonlinear dynamical systems. In the area of trajectory optimization some new ideas are presented for automating the process of deriving co- state differential equations. Additionally, higher-order algorithms for computing... midcourse corrections are introduced. In Chapter IV, some new insights into modeling of dynamical systems are presented. Producing dynamical models in the form of coupled nonlinear differential equations is a frequent first step for analysis, estimation...

  7. Estimation of Saturation of Permanent-Magnet Synchronous Motors Through an Energy-Based Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jebai, AlKassem; Martin, Philippe; Rouchon, Pierre

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose a parametric model of the saturated Permanent-Magnet Synchronous Motor (PMSM) together with an estimation method of the magnetic parameters. The model is based on an energy function which simply encompasses the saturation effects. Injection of fast-varying pulsating voltages and measurements of the resulting current ripples then permit to identify the magnetic parameters by linear least squares. Experimental results on a surface-mounted PMSM and an interoir magnet PMSM illustrate the relevance of the approach.

  8. Parameter Estimation and Capacity Fade Analysis of Lithium-Ion Batteries Using First-Principles-Based Efficient Reformulated Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Subramanian, Venkat

    Parameter Estimation and Capacity Fade Analysis of Lithium-Ion Batteries Using First parameters of lithium-ion batteries are estimated using a first-principles electrochemical engineering model and understanding of lithium-ion batteries using physics-based first-principles models. These models are based

  9. Efficient Semiparametric Estimators for Nonlinear Regressions and Models under Sample Selection Bias

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Mi Jeong

    2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    simulations. : : : : 68 VIII Five estimates of and and their estimated standard deviation for the ambulatory expenditures data, under two weighting func- tion models. The rst weighting function is w(x; ) = e e x , the second weighting function is w...(X; ) + ; where Y 2 R is the response variable, X 2 Rk is the predictor variable, 2 Rp is the unknown regression parameter and is the random error satisfying E( jX) = 0 and E( 2jX) = 2. Y and are assumed to have nite fourth moments. The parameter vector...

  10. Estimation of a supply and demand model for the hired farm labor market in Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Turley, Keith Pool

    1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ESTIMATION OF A SUPPLY AND DEMAND MODEL FOR THE HIRED FARM LABOR MARKET IN TEXAS A Thesis by KEITH POOL TURLEY Submitted to the Craduate College of Texas ARM University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER... Or SCIENCI. December 1977 Major Subject: Agricultural Economics ESTIMATION OF A SUPPLY AND DEMAND NODEL FOR THE HIRED FARM LABOR MARKET IN TEXAS A Thesis by KEITH POOL TURLEY Approved as to style and content by: Ch rman of Comm' tee) Member Mem r...

  11. A Bayesian Approach for Parameter Estimation and Prediction using a Computationally Intensive Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dave Higdon; Jordan D. McDonnell; Nicolas Schunck; Jason Sarich; Stefan M. Wild

    2014-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Bayesian methods have been very successful in quantifying uncertainty in physics-based problems in parameter estimation and prediction. In these cases, physical measurements y are modeled as the best fit of a physics-based model $\\eta(\\theta)$ where $\\theta$ denotes the uncertain, best input setting. Hence the statistical model is of the form $y = \\eta(\\theta) + \\epsilon$, where $\\epsilon$ accounts for measurement, and possibly other error sources. When non-linearity is present in $\\eta(\\cdot)$, the resulting posterior distribution for the unknown parameters in the Bayesian formulation is typically complex and non-standard, requiring computationally demanding computational approaches such as Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) to produce multivariate draws from the posterior. While quite generally applicable, MCMC requires thousands, or even millions of evaluations of the physics model $\\eta(\\cdot)$. This is problematic if the model takes hours or days to evaluate. To overcome this computational bottleneck, we present an approach adapted from Bayesian model calibration. This approach combines output from an ensemble of computational model runs with physical measurements, within a statistical formulation, to carry out inference. A key component of this approach is a statistical response surface, or emulator, estimated from the ensemble of model runs. We demonstrate this approach with a case study in estimating parameters for a density functional theory (DFT) model, using experimental mass/binding energy measurements from a collection of atomic nuclei. We also demonstrate how this approach produces uncertainties in predictions for recent mass measurements obtained at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL).

  12. Method for estimation of gravitational-wave transient model parameters in frequency-time maps

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michael Coughlin; Nelson Christensen; Jonathan Gair; Shivaraj Kandhasamy; Eric Thrane

    2014-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

    A common technique for detection of gravitational-wave signals is searching for excess power in frequency-time maps of gravitational-wave detector data. In the event of a detection, model selection and parameter estimation will be performed in order to explore the properties of the source. In this paper, we develop a Bayesian statistical method for extracting model-dependent parameters from observed gravitational-wave signals in frequency-time maps. We demonstrate the method by recovering the parameters of model gravitational-wave signals added to simulated advanced LIGO noise. We also characterize the performance of the method and discuss prospects for future work.

  13. EFFECT OF UNCERTAINTIES IN STELLAR MODEL PARAMETERS ON ESTIMATED MASSES AND RADII OF SINGLE STARS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Basu, Sarbani [Department of Astronomy, Yale University, P.O. Box 208101, New Haven, CT 06520-8101 (United States); Verner, Graham A.; Chaplin, William J.; Elsworth, Yvonne, E-mail: sarbani.basu@yale.edu, E-mail: gav@bison.ph.bham.ac.uk, E-mail: w.j.chaplin@bham.ac.uk, E-mail: y.p.elsworth@bham.ac.uk [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham B15 2TT (United Kingdom)

    2012-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Accurate and precise values of radii and masses of stars are needed to correctly estimate properties of extrasolar planets. We examine the effect of uncertainties in stellar model parameters on estimates of the masses, radii, and average densities of solar-type stars. We find that in the absence of seismic data on solar-like oscillations, stellar masses can be determined to a greater accuracy than either stellar radii or densities; but to get reasonably accurate results the effective temperature, log g, and metallicity must be measured to high precision. When seismic data are available, stellar density is the most well-determined property, followed by radius, with mass the least well-determined property. Uncertainties in stellar convection, quantified in terms of uncertainties in the value of the mixing length parameter, cause the most significant errors in the estimates of stellar properties.

  14. An ensemble Kalman filter for statistical estimation of physics constrained nonlinear regression models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harlim, John, E-mail: jharlim@psu.edu [Department of Mathematics and Department of Meteorology, the Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802, Unites States (United States)] [Department of Mathematics and Department of Meteorology, the Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802, Unites States (United States); Mahdi, Adam, E-mail: amahdi@ncsu.edu [Department of Mathematics, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27695 (United States)] [Department of Mathematics, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27695 (United States); Majda, Andrew J., E-mail: jonjon@cims.nyu.edu [Department of Mathematics and Center for Atmosphere and Ocean Science, Courant Institute of Mathematical Sciences, New York University, New York, NY 10012 (United States)

    2014-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A central issue in contemporary science is the development of nonlinear data driven statisticaldynamical models for time series of noisy partial observations from nature or a complex model. It has been established recently that ad-hoc quadratic multi-level regression models can have finite-time blow-up of statistical solutions and/or pathological behavior of their invariant measure. Recently, a new class of physics constrained nonlinear regression models were developed to ameliorate this pathological behavior. Here a new finite ensemble Kalman filtering algorithm is developed for estimating the state, the linear and nonlinear model coefficients, the model and the observation noise covariances from available partial noisy observations of the state. Several stringent tests and applications of the method are developed here. In the most complex application, the perfect model has 57 degrees of freedom involving a zonal (eastwest) jet, two topographic Rossby waves, and 54 nonlinearly interacting Rossby waves; the perfect model has significant non-Gaussian statistics in the zonal jet with blocked and unblocked regimes and a non-Gaussian skewed distribution due to interaction with the other 56 modes. We only observe the zonal jet contaminated by noise and apply the ensemble filter algorithm for estimation. Numerically, we find that a three dimensional nonlinear stochastic model with one level of memory mimics the statistical effect of the other 56 modes on the zonal jet in an accurate fashion, including the skew non-Gaussian distribution and autocorrelation decay. On the other hand, a similar stochastic model with zero memory levels fails to capture the crucial non-Gaussian behavior of the zonal jet from the perfect 57-mode model.

  15. Increase of Carbon Cycle Feedback with Climate Sensitivity: Results from a coupled Climate and Carbon Cycle Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Govindasamy, B; Thompson, S; Mirin, A; Wickett, M; Caldeira, K; Delire, C

    2004-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Coupled climate and carbon cycle modeling studies have shown that the feedback between global warming and the carbon cycle, in particular the terrestrial carbon cycle, could accelerate climate change and result in larger warming. In this paper, we investigate the sensitivity of this feedback for year-2100 global warming in the range of 0 K to 8 K. Differing climate sensitivities to increased CO{sub 2} content are imposed on the carbon cycle models for the same emissions. Emissions from the SRES A2 scenario are used. We use a fully-coupled climate and carbon cycle model, the INtegrated Climate and CArbon model (INCCA) the NCAR/DOE Parallel Coupled Model coupled to the IBIS terrestrial biosphere model and a modified-OCMIP ocean biogeochemistry model. In our model, for scenarios with year-2100 global warming increasing from 0 to 8 K, land uptake decreases from 47% to 29% of total CO{sub 2} emissions. Due to competing effects, ocean uptake (16%) shows almost no change at all. Atmospheric CO{sub 2} concentration increases were 48% higher in the run with 8 K global climate warming than in the case with no warming. Our results indicate that carbon cycle amplification of climate warming will be greater if there is higher climate sensitivity to increased atmospheric CO{sub 2} content; the carbon cycle feedback factor increases from 1.13 to 1.48 when global warming increases from 3.2 to 8 K.

  16. Glass Property Data and Models for Estimating High-Level Waste Glass Volume

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vienna, John D.; Fluegel, Alexander; Kim, Dong-Sang; Hrma, Pavel R.

    2009-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes recent efforts to develop glass property models that can be used to help estimate the volume of high-level waste (HLW) glass that will result from vitrification of Hanford tank waste. The compositions of acceptable and processable HLW glasses need to be optimized to minimize the waste-form volume and, hence, to save cost. A database of properties and associated compositions for simulated waste glasses was collected for developing property-composition models. This database, although not comprehensive, represents a large fraction of data on waste-glass compositions and properties that were available at the time of this report. Glass property-composition models were fit to subsets of the database for several key glass properties. These models apply to a significantly broader composition space than those previously publised. These models should be considered for interim use in calculating properties of Hanford waste glasses.

  17. A comparison of two heat transfer models for estimating thermal drawdown in Hot Dry Rock reservoirs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robinson, Bruce A.; Kruger, Paul

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Estimates of thermal drawdown in Hot Dry Rock geothermal systems have been made with two different models of heat transfer from hydraulically fractured reservoir rock blocks to water circulated through the fracture permeability. One model is based on deconvolution of experimental tracer response curves into a network of flowpaths connected in parallel with heat transfer calculated individually in each flowpath. The second model is based on one-dimensional flow through the rock with a block size distribution described as a group of equivalent-radius spheres for which the heat transfer equations can be solved analytically. The two models were applied to the planned Phase II long-term thermal drawdown experiment at Fenton Hill, NM. The results show good agreement between the two models, with estimates of temperature cooldown from 240C to 150C in a few years depending on selected operation parameters, but with somewhat differing cooldown curve characteristic shapes. Data from the long-term experiment will be helpful in improving the two models.

  18. Estimation of errors in the inverse modeling of accidental release of atmospheric pollutant: Application to the reconstruction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Estimation of errors in the inverse modeling of accidental release of atmospheric pollutant difficulty when inverting the source term of an atmospheric tracer dispersion problem is the estimation of the prior errors: those of the atmospheric transport model, those ascribed to the representativity

  19. Enhance accuracy in Software cost and schedule estimation by using "Uncertainty Analysis and Assessment" in the system modeling process

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vasantrao, Kardile Vilas

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Accurate software cost and schedule estimation are essential for software project success. Often it referred to as the "black art" because of its complexity and uncertainty, software estimation is not as difficult or puzzling as people think. In fact, generating accurate estimates is straightforward-once you understand the intensity of uncertainty and framework for the modeling process. The mystery to successful software estimation-distilling academic information and real-world experience into a practical guide for working software professionals. Instead of arcane treatises and rigid modeling techniques, this will guide highlights a proven set of procedures, understandable formulas, and heuristics that individuals and development teams can apply to their projects to help achieve estimation proficiency with choose appropriate development approaches In the early stage of software life cycle project manager are inefficient to estimate the effort, schedule, cost estimation and its development approach .This in tu...

  20. Effects of improved modeling on best estimate BWR severe accident analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hyman, C.R.; Ott, L.J.

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Since 1981, ORNL has completed best estimate studies analyzing several dominant BWR accident scenarios. These scenarios were identified by early Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA) studies and detailed ORNL analysis complements such studies. In performing these studies, ORNL has used the MARCH code extensively. ORNL investigators have identified several deficiencies in early versions of MARCH with regard to BWR modeling. Some of these deficiencies appear to have been remedied by the most recent release of the code. It is the purpose of this paper to identify several of these deficiencies. All the information presented concerns the degraded core thermal/hydraulic analysis associated with each of the ORNL studies. This includes calculations of the containment response. The period of interest is from the time of permanent core uncovery to the end of the transient. Specific objectives include the determination of the extent of core damage and timing of major events (i.e., onset of Zr/H/sub 2/O reaction, initial clad/fuel melting, loss of control blade structure, etc.). As mentioned previously the major analysis tool used thus far was derived from an early version of MARCH. BWRs have unique features which must be modeled for best estimate severe accident analysis. ORNL has developed and incorporated into its version of MARCH several improved models. These include (1) channel boxes and control blades, (2) SRV actuations, (3) vessel water level, (4) multi-node analysis of in-vessel water inventory, (5) comprehensive hydrogen and water properties package, (6) first order correction to the ideal gas law, and (7) separation of fuel and cladding. Ongoing and future modeling efforts are required. These include (1) detailed modeling for the pressure suppression pool, (2) incorporation of B/sub 4/C/steam reaction models, (3) phenomenological model of corium mass transport, and (4) advanced corium/concrete interaction modeling. 10 references, 17 figures, 1 table.

  1. Biophysical modelling of the effects of inhaled radon progeny on the bronchial epithelium for the estimation of the relationships applied in the two stage clonal expansion model of carcinogenesis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Madas, Balzs G

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    There is a considerable debate between research groups applying the two stage clonal expansion model for lung cancer risk estimation, whether radon exposure affects initiation and transformation or promotion. The objective of the present study is to quantify the effects of radon progeny on these stages with biophysical models. For this purpose, numerical models of mutation induction and clonal growth were applied in order to estimate how initiation, transformation and promotion rates depend on tissue dose rate. It was found that rates of initiation and transformation increase monotonically with dose rate, while effective promotion rate decreases with time, but increases in a supralinear fashion with dose rate. Despite the uncertainty of the results due to the lack of experimental data, present study suggests that effects of radon exposure on both mutational events and clonal growth are significant, and should be considered in epidemiological analyses applying mathematical models of carcinogenesis.

  2. A Biomass-based Model to Estimate the Plausibility of Exoplanet Biosignature Gases

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seager, S; Hu, R

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Biosignature gas detection is one of the ultimate future goals for exoplanet atmosphere studies. We have created a framework for linking biosignature gas detectability to biomass estimates, including atmospheric photochemistry and biological thermodynamics. The new framework is intended to liberate predictive atmosphere models from requiring fixed, Earth-like biosignature gas source fluxes. New biosignature gases can be considered with a check that the biomass estimate is physically plausible. We have validated the models on terrestrial production of NO, H2S, CH4, CH3Cl, and DMS. We have applied the models to propose NH3 as a biosignature gas on a "cold Haber World," a planet with a N2-H2 atmosphere, and to demonstrate why gases such as CH3Cl must have too large of a biomass to be a plausible biosignature gas on planets with Earth or early-Earth-like atmospheres orbiting a Sun-like star. To construct the biomass models, we developed a functional classification of biosignature gases, and found that gases (such...

  3. Developing a Cost Model and Methodology to Estimate Capital Costs for Thermal Energy Storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Glatzmaier, G.

    2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report provides an update on the previous cost model for thermal energy storage (TES) systems. The update allows NREL to estimate the costs of such systems that are compatible with the higher operating temperatures associated with advanced power cycles. The goal of the Department of Energy (DOE) Solar Energy Technology Program is to develop solar technologies that can make a significant contribution to the United States domestic energy supply. The recent DOE SunShot Initiative sets a very aggressive cost goal to reach a Levelized Cost of Energy (LCOE) of 6 cents/kWh by 2020 with no incentives or credits for all solar-to-electricity technologies.1 As this goal is reached, the share of utility power generation that is provided by renewable energy sources is expected to increase dramatically. Because Concentrating Solar Power (CSP) is currently the only renewable technology that is capable of integrating cost-effective energy storage, it is positioned to play a key role in providing renewable, dispatchable power to utilities as the share of power generation from renewable sources increases. Because of this role, future CSP plants will likely have as much as 15 hours of Thermal Energy Storage (TES) included in their design and operation. As such, the cost and performance of the TES system is critical to meeting the SunShot goal for solar technologies. The cost of electricity from a CSP plant depends strongly on its overall efficiency, which is a product of two components - the collection and conversion efficiencies. The collection efficiency determines the portion of incident solar energy that is captured as high-temperature thermal energy. The conversion efficiency determines the portion of thermal energy that is converted to electricity. The operating temperature at which the overall efficiency reaches its maximum depends on many factors, including material properties of the CSP plant components. Increasing the operating temperature of the power generation system leads to higher thermal-to-electric conversion efficiency. However, in a CSP system, higher operating temperature also leads to greater thermal losses. These two effects combine to give an optimal system-level operating temperature that may be less than the upper operating temperature limit of system components. The overall efficiency may be improved by developing materials, power cycles, and system-integration strategies that enable operation at elevated temperature while limiting thermal losses. This is particularly true for the TES system and its components. Meeting the SunShot cost target will require cost and performance improvements in all systems and components within a CSP plant. Solar collector field hardware will need to decrease significantly in cost with no loss in performance and possibly with performance improvements. As higher temperatures are considered for the power block, new working fluids, heat-transfer fluids (HTFs), and storage fluids will all need to be identified to meet these new operating conditions. Figure 1 shows thermodynamic conversion efficiency as a function of temperature for the ideal Carnot cycle and 75% Carnot, which is considered to be the practical efficiency attainable by current power cycles. Current conversion efficiencies for the parabolic trough steam cycle, power tower steam cycle, parabolic dish/Stirling, Ericsson, and air-Brayton/steam Rankine combined cycles are shown at their corresponding operating temperatures. Efficiencies for supercritical steam and carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) are also shown for their operating temperature ranges.

  4. Multi-model Estimates of Intercontinental Source-Receptor Relationships for Ozone Pollution

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fiore, A M; Dentener, F J; Wild, O; Cuvelier, C; Schultz, M G; Hess, P; Textor, C; Schulz, M; Doherty, R; Horowitz, L W; MacKenzie, I A; Sanderson, M G; Shindell, D T; Stevenson, D S; Szopa, S; Van Dingenen, R; Zeng, G; Atherton, C; Bergmann, D; Bey, I; Carmichael, G; Collins, W J; Duncan, B N; Faluvegi, G; Folberth, G; Gauss, M; Gong, S; Hauglustaine, D; Holloway, T; Isaksen, I A; Jacob, D J; Jonson, J E; Kaminski, J W; Keating, T J; Lupu, A; Marmer, E; Montanaro, V; Park, R; Pitari, G; Pringle, K J; Pyle, J A; Schroeder, S; Vivanco, M G; Wind, P; Wojcik, G; Wu, S; Zuber, A

    2008-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Understanding the surface O{sub 3} response over a 'receptor' region to emission changes over a foreign 'source' region is key to evaluating the potential gains from an international approach to abate ozone (O{sub 3}) pollution. We apply an ensemble of 21 global and hemispheric chemical transport models to estimate the spatial average surface O{sub 3} response over East Asia (EA), Europe (EU), North America (NA) and South Asia (SA) to 20% decreases in anthropogenic emissions of the O{sub 3} precursors, NO{sub x}, NMVOC, and CO (individually and combined), from each of these regions. We find that the ensemble mean surface O{sub 3} concentrations in the base case (year 2001) simulation matches available observations throughout the year over EU but overestimates them by >10 ppb during summer and early fall over the eastern U.S. and Japan. The sum of the O{sub 3} responses to NO{sub x}, CO, and NMVOC decreases separately is approximately equal to that from a simultaneous reduction of all precursors. We define a continental-scale 'import sensitivity' as the ratio of the O{sub 3} response to the 20% reductions in foreign versus 'domestic' (i.e., over the source region itself) emissions. For example, the combined reduction of emissions from the 3 foreign regions produces an ensemble spatial mean decrease of 0.6 ppb over EU (0.4 ppb from NA), less than the 0.8 ppb from the reduction of EU emissions, leading to an import sensitivity ratio of 0.7. The ensemble mean surface O{sub 3} response to foreign emissions is largest in spring and late fall (0.7-0.9 ppb decrease in all regions from the combined precursor reductions in the 3 foreign regions), with import sensitivities ranging from 0.5 to 1.1 (responses to domestic emission reductions are 0.8-1.6 ppb). High O{sub 3} values are much more sensitive to domestic emissions than to foreign emissions, as indicated by lower import sensitivities of 0.2 to 0.3 during July in EA, EU, and NA when O{sub 3} levels are typically highest, and by the weaker relative response of annual incidences of daily maximum 8-hour average O{sub 3} above 60 ppb to emission reductions in a foreign region (<10-20% of that to domestic) as compared to the annual mean response (up to 50% of that to domestic). Applying the ensemble annual mean results to changes in anthropogenic emissions from 1996 to 2002, we estimate a Northern Hemispheric increase in background surface O{sub 3} of about 0.1 ppb yr{sup -1}, at the low end of the 0.1-0.5 ppb yr{sup -1} derived from observations. From an additional simulation in which global atmospheric methane was reduced, we infer that 20% reductions in anthropogenic methane emissions from a foreign source region would yield an O{sub 3} response in a receptor region that roughly equals that produced by combined 20% reductions of anthropogenic NO{sub x}, NMVOC and CO emissions from the foreign source region.

  5. Off-Highway Gasoline Consuption Estimation Models Used in the Federal Highway Administration Attribution Process: 2008 Updates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hwang, Ho-Ling [ORNL; Davis, Stacy Cagle [ORNL

    2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is designed to document the analysis process and estimation models currently used by the Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) to estimate the off-highway gasoline consumption and public sector fuel consumption. An overview of the entire FHWA attribution process is provided along with specifics related to the latest update (2008) on the Off-Highway Gasoline Use Model and the Public Use of Gasoline Model. The Off-Highway Gasoline Use Model is made up of five individual modules, one for each of the off-highway categories: agricultural, industrial and commercial, construction, aviation, and marine. This 2008 update of the off-highway models was the second major update (the first model update was conducted during 2002-2003) after they were originally developed in mid-1990. The agricultural model methodology, specifically, underwent a significant revision because of changes in data availability since 2003. Some revision to the model was necessary due to removal of certain data elements used in the original estimation method. The revised agricultural model also made use of some newly available information, published by the data source agency in recent years. The other model methodologies were not drastically changed, though many data elements were updated to improve the accuracy of these models. Note that components in the Public Use of Gasoline Model were not updated in 2008. A major challenge in updating estimation methods applied by the public-use model is that they would have to rely on significant new data collection efforts. In addition, due to resource limitation, several components of the models (both off-highway and public-us models) that utilized regression modeling approaches were not recalibrated under the 2008 study. An investigation of the Environmental Protection Agency's NONROAD2005 model was also carried out under the 2008 model update. Results generated from the NONROAD2005 model were analyzed, examined, and compared, to the extent that is possible on the overall totals, to the current FHWA estimates. Because NONROAD2005 model was designed for emission estimation purposes (i.e., not for measuring fuel consumption), it covers different equipment populations from those the FHWA models were based on. Thus, a direct comparison generally was not possible in most sectors. As a result, NONROAD2005 data were not used in the 2008 update of the FHWA off-highway models. The quality of fuel use estimates directly affect the data quality in many tables published in the Highway Statistics. Although updates have been made to the Off-Highway Gasoline Use Model and the Public Use Gasoline Model, some challenges remain due to aging model equations and discontinuation of data sources.

  6. Improving the representation of terrestrial ecosystem processes in Earth system models to increase the quality of climate model projections and inform DOE's energy decisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Improving the representation of terrestrial ecosystem processes in Earth system models to increase results are incorporated into Earth system models to improve climate projections. e overarching goal of TES is to improve the representation of terrestrial ecosystem processes in Earth system models

  7. Glass Property Models and Constraints for Estimating the Glass to be Produced at Hanford by Implementing Current Advanced Glass Formulation Efforts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vienna, John D.; Kim, Dong-Sang; Skorski, Daniel C.; Matyas, Josef

    2013-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent glass formulation and melter testing data have suggested that significant increases in waste loading in HLW and LAW glasses are possible over current system planning estimates. The data (although limited in some cases) were evaluated to determine a set of constraints and models that could be used to estimate the maximum loading of specific waste compositions in glass. It is recommended that these models and constraints be used to estimate the likely HLW and LAW glass volumes that would result if the current glass formulation studies are successfully completed. It is recognized that some of the models are preliminary in nature and will change in the coming years. Plus the models do not currently address the prediction uncertainties that would be needed before they could be used in plant operations. The models and constraints are only meant to give an indication of rough glass volumes and are not intended to be used in plant operation or waste form qualification activities. A current research program is in place to develop the data, models, and uncertainty descriptions for that purpose. A fundamental tenet underlying the research reported in this document is to try to be less conservative than previous studies when developing constraints for estimating the glass to be produced by implementing current advanced glass formulation efforts. The less conservative approach documented herein should allow for the estimate of glass masses that may be realized if the current efforts in advanced glass formulations are completed over the coming years and are as successful as early indications suggest they may be. Because of this approach there is an unquantifiable uncertainty in the ultimate glass volume projections due to model prediction uncertainties that has to be considered along with other system uncertainties such as waste compositions and amounts to be immobilized, split factors between LAW and HLW, etc.

  8. Evolution of Meteorological Base Models for Estimating Hourly Global Solar Radiation in Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, H.; Baltazar, J.C.; Haberl, J.S

    ESL-PA-13-11-01 Available online at www.sciencedirect.com Energy Procedia 00 (2013) 000000 www.elsevier.com/locate/procedia 2013 ISES Solar World Congress Evaluation of Meteorological Base Models... for Estimating Hourly Global Solar Radiation in Texas Kee Han Kima,b*, Juan-Carlos Baltazarb, and Jeff S. Haberla,b aDepartment of Architecture, Texas A&M University, 3137 TAMU, College Station, TX 77843-3137, U.S.A. bEnergy Systems Laboratory, Texas A...

  9. 654 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON CONTROL SYSTEMS TECHNOLOGY, VOL. 18, NO. 3, MAY 2010 Model-Based Electrochemical Estimation and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in the literature. Accurate estimation of the battery's internal electrochemical state enables an expanded range governor, state-of-charge (SOC) estimation. I. INTRODUCTION MODEL-BASED battery monitoring algorithms theories, captures relevant solid-state and electrolyte diffusion dynamics and accurately predicts current

  10. Wind Bias from Sub-optimal Estimation Due to Geophysical Modeling Error Paul E. Johnson and David G . Long

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Long, David G.

    Wind Bias from Sub-optimal Estimation Due to Geophysical Modeling Error -Wind I Paul E. Johnson (which relates the wind to the normalized radar cross section, NRCS, of the ocean surface) is uncertainty in the NRCS for given wind conditions. When the estimated variability is in- cluded in the maximum likelihood

  11. Simultaneous state and unknown inputs estimation with PI and PMI observers for Takagi Sugeno model with unmeasurable premise

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Universit de

    Simultaneous state and unknown inputs estimation with PI and PMI observers for Takagi Sugeno model-- In this paper, a proportional integral (PI) and a proportional multiple integral observer (PMI) are proposed and PMI observers developed for linear systems. The state estimation error is written as a perturbed

  12. Modeling Mud-Filtrate Invasion Effects on Resistivity Logs to Estimate Permeability of Vuggy and Fractured Carbonate Formations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Torres-Verdín, Carlos

    SPE 121136 Modeling Mud-Filtrate Invasion Effects on Resistivity Logs to Estimate Permeability to diagnose and estimate secondary porosity and absolute permeability of fractured and vuggy carbonate-connected) and fractured porosity, all embedded in a tight matrix. Rock-core data and wellbore resistivity images indicate

  13. Development of a weighted-average estimator from a maximum-likelihood estimator and an instrumental-variable estimator in a structural model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gruben, David Christopher

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , is written as mx y Ab Sou 1hl zz mx x ? Ab?' S?? (3. 2) and we will now spend some time explaining its form. Write a = (1, ? P&) and assume an independent estimator of Z, S?, is avail- able. Fuller (1981) shows that maximizing the likelihood equations... ? z, + u? t = 1, 2, . . . , a?s' = 1, 2, 3, . . . , b? (2. 1c) The total number of observations, n, is equal to a?b?. The experimenter has available an instrumental variable for the unobservable ze =&a+sr&W, +re, t=1, 2, . . . , a?. (2. 1d...

  14. Blood lead concentrations in marine mammals validate estimates of 10{sup 2}- to 10{sup 3}-fold increase in human blood lead concentrations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Owen, B.D.; Flegal, A.R. [Univ. of California, Santa Cruz, CA (United States)] [Univ. of California, Santa Cruz, CA (United States)

    1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Measurements of ultra-low ambient blood lead (PbB) concentrations (mean {+-} SD = 0.13 {+-} 0.06 {micro}g/dL) in Northern elephant seals (Mirounga angustirostris) validate previous estimates of ultra-low PbB levels in preindustrial humans. These estimates had been unsubstituted, since PbB levels in this range had never been measured in any organisms prior to this study. Similarities in PbB levels among these contemporary and preindustrial mammals are consistent with similarities in their measured and estimated lead exposures, respectively. The marginally higher PbB levels and rates of lead exposure in contemporary marine mammals are, also, consistent with lead isotopic composition analyses that indicate their PbB levels have been elevated from exposure to industrial lead. Consequently, these analyses substantiate concerns that current baseline PbB levels in humans, which are estimated to be two to three orders of magnitude above natural levels, may still constitute public health risks.

  15. Nonlinear harmonic modeling of phemt devices for increased power amplifier efficiencies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Strassner, Bernd Herbert

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis is a comprehensive study of how harmonic terminations can greatly increase a power amplifier's efficiency (PAE). To show this improvement, the PHEMT amplifier is biased in the low noise region of operation (L, = 20 mA, Vd, = 3 V...

  16. Impacts of increased bioenergy demand on global food markets: an AgMIP economic model intercomparison

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lotze-Campen, Hermann; von Lampe, Martin; Kyle, G. Page; Fujimori, Shinichiro; Havlik, Petr; van Meijl, Hans; Hasegawa, Tomoko; Popp, Alexander; Schmitz, Christoph; Tabeau, Andrzej; Valin, Hugo; Willenbockel, Dirk; Wise, Marshall A.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Integrated Assessment studies have shown that meeting ambitious greenhouse gas mitigation targets will require substantial amounts of bioenergy as part of the future energy mix. In the course of the Agricultural Model Comparison and Improvement Project (AgMIP), five global agro-economic models were used to analyze a future scenario with global demand for ligno-cellulosic bioenergy rising to about 100 ExaJoule in 2050. From this exercise a tentative conclusion can be drawn that ambitious climate change mitigation need not drive up global food prices much, if the extra land required for bioenergy production is accessible or if the feedstock, e.g. from forests, does not directly compete for agricultural land. Agricultural price effects across models by the year 2050 from high bioenergy demand in an RCP2.6-type scenario appear to be much smaller (+5% average across models) than from direct climate impacts on crop yields in an RCP8.5-type scenario (+25% average across models). However, potential future scarcities of water and nutrients, policy-induced restrictions on agricultural land expansion, as well as potential welfare losses have not been specifically looked at in this exercise.

  17. Comparison of Statistically Modeled Contaminated Soil Volume Estimates and Actual Excavation Volumes at the Maywood FUSRAP Site - 13555

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moore, James [U.S. Army Corps of Engineers - New York District 26 Federal Plaza, New York, New York 10278 (United States)] [U.S. Army Corps of Engineers - New York District 26 Federal Plaza, New York, New York 10278 (United States); Hays, David [U.S. Army Corps of Engineers - Kansas City District 601 E. 12th Street, Kansas City, Missouri 64106 (United States)] [U.S. Army Corps of Engineers - Kansas City District 601 E. 12th Street, Kansas City, Missouri 64106 (United States); Quinn, John; Johnson, Robert; Durham, Lisa [Argonne National Laboratory, Environmental Science Division 9700 S. Cass Ave., Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States)] [Argonne National Laboratory, Environmental Science Division 9700 S. Cass Ave., Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As part of the ongoing remediation process at the Maywood Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP) properties, Argonne National Laboratory (Argonne) assisted the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) New York District by providing contaminated soil volume estimates for the main site area, much of which is fully or partially remediated. As part of the volume estimation process, an initial conceptual site model (ICSM) was prepared for the entire site that captured existing information (with the exception of soil sampling results) pertinent to the possible location of surface and subsurface contamination above cleanup requirements. This ICSM was based on historical anecdotal information, aerial photographs, and the logs from several hundred soil cores that identified the depth of fill material and the depth to bedrock under the site. Specialized geostatistical software developed by Argonne was used to update the ICSM with historical sampling results and down-hole gamma survey information for hundreds of soil core locations. The updating process yielded both a best guess estimate of contamination volumes and a conservative upper bound on the volume estimate that reflected the estimate's uncertainty. Comparison of model results to actual removed soil volumes was conducted on a parcel-by-parcel basis. Where sampling data density was adequate, the actual volume matched the model's average or best guess results. Where contamination was un-characterized and unknown to the model, the actual volume exceeded the model's conservative estimate. Factors affecting volume estimation were identified to assist in planning further excavations. (authors)

  18. Techno-Economic Models for Carbon Dioxide Compression, Transport, and Storage & Correlations for Estimating Carbon Dioxide Density and Viscosity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCollum, David L; Ogden, Joan M

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Costs to Estimate Hydrogen Pipeline Costs, UCD-ITS-RR-04-predict the costs of hydrogen pipelines, all of the modelspredict the costs of hydrogen pipelines, all of the models

  19. A mathematical model for the estimation of flue temperature in a coke oven

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Choi, K.I.; Kim, S.Y.; Suo, J.S.; Hur, N.S.; Kang, I.S.; Lee, W.J.

    1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The coke plants at the Kwangyang works has adopted an Automatic Battery Control (ABC) system which consists of four main parts, battery heating control, underfiring heat and waste gas oxygen control, pushing and charging schedule and Autotherm-S that measures heating wall temperature during pushing. The measured heating wall temperature is used for calculating Mean Battery Temperature (MBT) which is average temperature of flues for a battery, but the Autotherm-S system can not provide the flue temperatures of an oven. This work attempted to develop mathematical models for the estimation of the flue temperature using the measured heating wall temperature and to examine fitness of the mathematical model for the coke plant operation by analysis of raw gas temperature at the stand pipe. Through this work it is possible to reflect heating wall temperature in calculating MBT for battery heating control without the interruption caused by a maintenance break.

  20. Increasing the chemical content of turbulent flame models through the use of parallel computing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yam, C.G.; Armstrong, R.; Koszykowski, M.L. [Sandia National Labs., Livermore, CA (United States); Chen, J.Y. [California Univ., Berkeley, CA (United States); Bui-Pham, M.N. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States)

    1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report outlines the effort to model a time-dependent, 2- dimensional, turbulent, nonpremixed flame with full chemistry with the aid of parallel computing tools. In this study, the mixing process and the chemical reactions occurring in the flow field are described in terms of the single-point probability density function (PDF), while the turbulent viscosity is determined by the standard kappa-epsilon model. The initial problem solved is a H[sub 2]/Air flame whose chemistry is described by 28 elementary reactions involving 9 chemical species.

  1. A model for determining shelf life, estimating terminal body composition, yield grade and quality grade of feedlot cattle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Perry, Richard Jay

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    as to style and content by: F. M. Byers (Chairman of Co m ttee) James McGrann (Member) ~&~& G. T. Schelling (Member) December 1986 ABSRACT A Model for Determining Shelf Life, Estimating Terminal Body Composition, Yield Grade and Quality Grade... of Feedlot Cattle. (December 1985) Richard Jay Perry, B, S. , Texas AlkM University Chairman of Advisory Committee: Dr. F, M. Byers A model for determining shelf life and estimating carcass fat (kg), yield grade and quality grade was developed. Shelf...

  2. A Monte Carlo study of the distribution of parameter estimators in a dual exponential decay model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garcia, Raul

    1969-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    inspired me to overcome several problems in preparing this paper. TABLE OF CONTENTS Chapter I. INTRODUCTION II, PROCEDURE Selecting Representative Parameters Generating Sample Curves Obtaining the Parameter Estimates 3 3 4 III, ANALYSIS... Type I Parameter Estimates 3. Set-3 Type I Parameter Estimates 4. Set-3A Type I Parameter Estimates 5. Summary of Chi-square Goodness of Fit Test 6. Set-1 Type II Parameter Estimates 7. Set-2 Type II Parameter Estimates 8. Set-3 Type II Parameter...

  3. Modelling the stratospheric polar vortex and its changes for GHGs increase and ozone depletion.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greatbatch, Richard

    general circulation model (Manzini et al JGR 1997). Top: 0.01 hPa (80 km) Parameterization of a gravity boundary conditions, specified SSTs and ICE. 20 (or 30)-year simulations. The focus is on the Arctic. #12-HadGISS-HadGISS-HadSST & ICE 3.7 ppbv3.4 ppbv0.8 ppbvOrg. CL m. r. 372 ppmv353 ppmv317 ppmvCO2 m. r. 320 ppbv310 ppbv295 ppbvN2

  4. Random Utility/Multinomial Logit Model Literature Amemiya, Takeshi. 1977. "On a Two-Step Estimation of a Multivariate Logit Model." Journal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Random Utility/Multinomial Logit Model Literature Amemiya, Takeshi. 1977. "On a Two-Step Estimation,-I.-E. "Random Utility Model for Sportfishing: Some Preliminary Results for Florida." Marine extensive use of the random utility (or discrete choice) model in recent years, but few applications appear

  5. CLEAR (Calculates Logical Evacuation And Response): A Generic Transportation Network Model for the Calculation of Evacuation Time Estimates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moeller, M. P.; Urbanik, II, T.; Desrosiers, A. E.

    1982-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes the methodology and application of the computer model CLEAR (Calculates Logical Evacuation And Response) which estimates the time required for a specific population density and distribution to evacuate an area using a specific transportation network. The CLEAR model simulates vehicle departure and movement on a transportation network according to the conditions and consequences of traffic flow. These include handling vehicles at intersecting road segments, calculating the velocity of travel on a road segment as a function of its vehicle density, and accounting for the delay of vehicles in traffic queues. The program also models the distribution of times required by individuals to prepare for an evacuation. In order to test its accuracy, the CLEAR model was used to estimate evacuatlon tlmes for the emergency planning zone surrounding the Beaver Valley Nuclear Power Plant. The Beaver Valley site was selected because evacuation time estimates had previously been prepared by the licensee, Duquesne Light, as well as by the Federal Emergency Management Agency and the Pennsylvania Emergency Management Agency. A lack of documentation prevented a detailed comparison of the estimates based on the CLEAR model and those obtained by Duquesne Light. However, the CLEAR model results compared favorably with the estimates prepared by the other two agencies.

  6. Estimation of the mean depth of boreal lakes for use in numerical weather prediction and climate modelling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    in the numerical weather prediction (NWP) and climate models through parameterisation. For parameterisation, data. The effect of lakes should be parameterised in numerical weather prediction (NWP) and climate modellingEstimation of the mean depth of boreal lakes for use in numerical weather prediction and climate

  7. Variation in Estimated Ozone-Related Health Impacts of Climate Change due to Modeling Choices and Assumptions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Post, Ellen S.; Grambsch, A.; Weaver, C. P.; Morefield, Philip; Huang, Jin; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Nolte, Christopher G.; Adams, P. J.; Liang, Xin-Zhong; Zhu, J.; Mahoney, Hardee

    2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Future climate change may cause air quality degradation via climate-induced changes in meteorology, atmospheric chemistry, and emissions into the air. Few studies have explicitly modeled the potential relationships between climate change, air quality, and human health, and fewer still have investigated the sensitivity of estimates to the underlying modeling choices.

  8. COMPARISON OF MOBILE5A, MOBILE6, VT-MICRO, AND CMEM MODELS FOR ESTIMATING HOT-STABILIZED LIGHT-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rakha, Hesham A.

    COMPARISON OF MOBILE5A, MOBILE6, VT-MICRO, AND CMEM MODELS FOR ESTIMATING HOT-STABILIZED LIGHT hot-stabilized, light-duty vehicle emissions. Specifically, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL comparisons. The comparisons demonstrate that the CMEM model exhibits some abnormal behaviors when compared

  9. Joint inversion of seismic AVO and EM data for gas saturation estimation using a sampling-based stochastic model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Jinsong

    hypothesis using a sampling-based stochastic model, based on a typical situation of gas explorationJoint inversion of seismic AVO and EM data for gas saturation estimation using a sampling- based stochastic model Jinsong Chen*, G. Michael Hoversten, and D. W. Vasco, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

  10. An activity-based-parametric hybrid cost model to estimate the unit cost of a novel gas turbine component

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sóbester, András

    An activity-based-parametric hybrid cost model to estimate the unit cost of a novel gas turbine in gas turbine compressors. However, the model disc (blisk) designs which are used by the aerospace industry in gas turbine compressors. The tool

  11. RSMASS-D models: An improved method for estimating reactor and shield mass for space reactor applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marshall, A.C.

    1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Three relatively simple mathematical models have been developed to estimate minimum reactor and radiation shield masses for liquid-metal-cooled reactors (LMRs), in-core thermionic fuel element (TFE) reactors, and out-of-core thermionic reactors (OTRs). The approach was based on much of the methodology developed for the Reactor/Shield Mass (RSMASS) model. Like the original RSMASS models, the new RSMASS-derivative (RSMASS-D) models use a combination of simple equations derived from reactor physics and other fundamental considerations, along with tabulations of data from more detailed neutron and gamma transport theory computations. All three models vary basic design parameters within a range specified by the user to achieve a parameter choice that yields a minimum mass for the power level and operational time of interest. The impact of critical mass, fuel damage, and thermal limitations are accounted for to determine the required fuel mass. The effect of thermionic limitations are also taken into account for the thermionic reactor models. All major reactor component masses are estimated, as well as instrumentation and control (I&C), boom, and safety system masses. A new shield model was developed and incorporated into all three reactor concept models. The new shield model is more accurate and simpler to use than the approach used in the original RSMASS model. The estimated reactor and shield masses agree with the mass predictions from separate detailed calculations within 15 percent for all three models.

  12. Complexity penalized hydraulic fracture localization and moment tensor estimation under limited model information

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ely, Gregory

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper we present a novel technique for micro-seismic localization using a group sparse penalization that is robust to the focal mechanism of the source and requires only a velocity model of the stratigraphy rather than a full Green's function model of the earth's response. In this technique we construct a set of perfect delta detector responses, one for each detector in the array, to a seismic event at a given location and impose a group sparsity across the array. This scheme is independent of the moment tensor and exploits the time compactness of the incident seismic signal. Furthermore we present a method for improving the inversion of the moment tensor and Green's function when the geometry of seismic array is limited. In particular we demonstrate that both Tikhonov regularization and truncated SVD can improve the recovery of the moment tensor and be robust to noise. We evaluate our algorithm on synthetic data and present error bounds for both estimation of the moment tensor as well as localization...

  13. Comparing cropland net primary production estimates from inventory, a satellite-based model, and a process-based model in the Midwest of the United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Zhengpeng; Liu, Shuguang; Tan, Zhengxi; Bliss, N.; Young, Claudia J.; West, Tristram O.; Ogle, Stephen

    2014-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Accurately quantifying the spatial and temporal variability of net primary production (NPP) for croplands is essential to understand regional cropland carbon dynamics. We compared three NPP estimates for croplands in the Midwestern United States: inventory-based estimates using crop yield data from the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) National Agricultural Statistics Service (NASS); estimates from the satellite-based Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) NPP product; and estimates from the General Ensemble biogeochemical Modeling System (GEMS) process-based model. The three methods estimated mean NPP in the range of 469687 g C m?2 yr?1 and total NPP in the range of 318490 Tg C yr?1 for croplands in the Midwest in 2007 and 2008. The NPP estimates from crop yield data and the GEMS model showed the mean NPP for croplands was over 650 g C m?2 yr?1 while the MODIS NPP product estimated the mean NPP was less than 500 g C m?2 yr?1. MODIS NPP also showed very different spatial variability of the cropland NPP from the other two methods. We found these differences were mainly caused by the difference in the land cover data and the crop specific information used in the methods. Our study demonstrated that the detailed mapping of the temporal and spatial change of crop species is critical for estimating the spatial and temporal variability of cropland NPP. We suggest that high resolution land cover data with speciesspecific crop information should be used in satellite-based and process-based models to improve carbon estimates for croplands.

  14. Machine learning techniques for astrophysical modelling and photometric redshift estimation of quasars in optical sky surveys

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    N. Daniel Kumar

    2008-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Machine learning techniques are utilised in several areas of astrophysical research today. This dissertation addresses the application of ML techniques to two classes of problems in astrophysics, namely, the analysis of individual astronomical phenomena over time and the automated, simultaneous analysis of thousands of objects in large optical sky surveys. Specifically investigated are (1) techniques to approximate the precise orbits of the satellites of Jupiter and Saturn given Earth-based observations as well as (2) techniques to quickly estimate the distances of quasars observed in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. Learning methods considered include genetic algorithms, particle swarm optimisation, artificial neural networks, and radial basis function networks. The first part of this dissertation demonstrates that GAs and PSO can both be efficiently used to model functions that are highly non-linear in several dimensions. It is subsequently demonstrated in the second part that ANNs and RBFNs can be used as effective predictors of spectroscopic redshift given accurate photometry, especially in combination with other learning-based approaches described in the literature. Careful application of these and other ML techniques to problems in astronomy and astrophysics will contribute to a better understanding of stellar evolution, binary star systems, cosmology, and the large-scale structure of the universe.

  15. A simplified model for estimating population-scale energy impacts of building envelope air-tightening and mechanical ventilation retrofits

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Logue, J. M.; Turner, W. J.N.; Walker, I. S.; Singer, B. C.

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Changing the air exchange rate of a home (the sum of the infiltration and mechanical ventilation airflow rates) affects the annual thermal conditioning energy. Large-scale changes to air exchange rates of the housing stock can significantly alter the residential sector's energy consumption. However, the complexity of existing residential energy models is a barrier to the accurate quantification of the impact of policy changes on a state or national level. The Incremental Ventilation Energy (IVE) model developed in this study combines the output of simple air exchange models with a limited set of housing characteristics to estimate the associated change in energy demand of homes. The IVE model was designed specifically to enable modellers to use existing databases of housing characteristics to determine the impact of ventilation policy change on a population scale. The IVE model estimates of energy change when applied to US homes with limited parameterisation are shown to be comparable to the estimates of a well-validated, complex residential energy model.

  16. Unbiased Estimation of Reliability in StressStrength Model and Similar Problems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Petersburg, Russia VASSILY G. VOINOV Kazakhstan Institute of Management, Economics and Strategic Research, Almaty, Kazakhstan Abstract: Some problems related to an application of the unbiased estimators

  17. Model comparisons for estimating carbon emissions from North American wildland fire

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Hirsch (2001), Direct carbon emissions from Canadian forestin estimating carbon emissions from boreal forest fires, J.Law (2007), Pyrogenic carbon emission from a large wildfire

  18. Lithium-Ion battery State of Charge estimation with a Kalman Filter based on a electrochemical model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stefanopoulou, Anna

    Lithium-Ion battery State of Charge estimation with a Kalman Filter based on a electrochemical state of charge (SOC). In this paper an averaged electrochemical Lithium-ion battery model suitable-Volmer current and the solid concentration at the interface with the electrolyte and (ii) the battery current

  19. Modelling downstream change in river flood power: a novel approach based on the UK Flood Estimation Handbook

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Birmingham, University of

    Modelling downstream change in river flood power: a novel approach based on the UK Flood Estimation" (McEwen, 1994: 359). Lawler (1992) recognised that little was known about the downstream change. It is suggested that downstream change in discharge is best represented as a power function in terms of channel

  20. 3D Model Based Pose Estimation For Omnidirectional Stereovision Guillaume Caron, Eric Marchand and El Mustapha Mouaddib

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    3D Model Based Pose Estimation For Omnidirectional Stereovision Guillaume Caron, Eric Marchand, FRANCE; e-mail {guillaume.caron, mouaddib}@u-picardie.fr Eric Marchand is with INRIA, IRISA, Lagadic, 35000 Rennes, France; e-mail {Eric.Marchand}@irisa.fr Fig. 1. Our sensor: orthographic camera, parabolic

  1. Global estimation of evapotranspiration using a leaf area index-based surface energy and water balance model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martin, Timothy

    using Advanced Very High Res- olution Radiometer Lai data, Climate Research Unit climate dataGlobal estimation of evapotranspiration using a leaf area index-based surface energy and water-relative-humidity-based two-source (ARTS) E model that simulates the surface energy balance, soil water balance

  2. Speech Enhancement of Spectral Magnitude Bin Trajectories using Gaussian Mixture-Model based Minimum Mean-Square Error Estimators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Speech Enhancement of Spectral Magnitude Bin Trajectories using Gaussian Mixture-Model based mean-square error es- timators have been applied to speech enhancement in the tem- poral, transform (e estimator for 8 kHz telephone-quality speech. Index Terms: Speech enhancement, minimum mean-square er- ror

  3. Groundwater recharge estimates using a soil-water-balance model for the Powder River and Williston structural basins

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Torgersen, Christian

    Groundwater recharge estimates using a soil-water-balance model for the Powder River and Williston for the lower Tertiary and Upper Cretaceous aquifer system in the Powder River and Williston structural basins in the Williston structural basin will require trillions of gallons of water from this aquifer system over the next

  4. Estimating suspended sediment concentrations in areas with limited hydrological data using a mixed-effects model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Venditti, Jeremy G.

    Estimating suspended sediment concentrations in areas with limited hydrological data using a mixed of Geography, Simon Fraser University, Burnaby, British Columbia, Canada Abstract: Sediment rating curves are commonly used to estimate the suspended sediment load in rivers and streams under the assumption

  5. Biometrics 000, 124 DOI: 000 A Bayesian localised conditional autoregressive model for estimating the health

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sahu, Sujit K

    for estimating the health effects of air pollution Duncan Lee1, , Alastair Rushworth1 and Sujit K. Sahu2 . 1.Lee@glasgow.ac.uk Summary: Estimation of the long-term health effects of air pollution is a challenging task, especially, and are then illustrated with our motivating study on air pollution and respiratory ill health in Greater Glasgow, Scotland

  6. Modeling spatial patterns in soil arsenic to estimate natural baseline concentrations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Venteris, Erik R.; Basta, Nicolas T.; Bigham, Jerry M.; Rea, Ron

    2014-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

    ABSTRACT Arsenic in soil is an important public health concern. Toxicity guidelines and models based on laboratory studies (i.e., U.S. EPAs Integrated Risk Information System) should consider natural soil As concentrations to avoid unnecessary remediation burdens on society. We used soil and stream sediment samples from the USGS National Geochemical Survey database to assess the spatial distribution of natural As in a 1.16E+5 km2 area. Samples were collected at 348 soil and 144 stream locations, providing approximately one sample for every 290 km2. Sample sites were selected to minimize the potential influence of anthropogenic inputs. Samples were processed using acid digestion of whole samples (concentrated HCl and ascorbic acid) and concentrations were measured using hydride-generation atomic absorption spectrometry. Soil As ranged from 2.0 to 45.6 mg kg-1. Geostatistical techniques were used to model and map the spatial variability of As. The mean and variance at unsampled locations were estimated using sequential Gaussian simulation. Five areas of elevated concentration (> the median of 10 mg kg-1) were identified and the relationships to geologic parent materials, glacial sedimentation patterns, and soil conditions interpreted. Our results showed As concentrations >10 mg kg-1 were common, and >20 mg kg-1 were not unusual for the central and west central portions of Ohio (USA). In contrast, concentrations <4 mg kg-1 were rare. Measured concentrations typically exceeded the soil As human generic screening levels of 0.39 mg/kg (1); the calculated value that corresponds to a cancer risk level of 1 in 1,000,000 for soil ingestion. Because the As content of Ohio soils is similar to many world soils, the USEPA generic soil screening level of 0.39 mg/kg is of little utility. A more useful and practical approach would be the uses of natural background levels. Regional soil As patterns based on geology and biogeochemistry and not political boundaries should be used for soil screening and other risk assessment determinations.

  7. A Closed-Form Model for Valuing Real Options Using Managerial Cash-Flow Estimates- Draft Abstract for ROC2013 ?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yuri Lawryshyn

    In this work, we build on a previous real options approach that utilizes managerial cash-flow estimates to value early stage project investments. Through a simplifying assumption, where we assume that the managerial cash-flow estimates are normally distributed, we derive a closedform solution to the real option problem. The model is developed through the introduction of a market sector indicator, which is assumed to be correlated to a tradeable market index, which drives the projects sales estimates. Another indicator, assumed partially correlated to the sales indicator drives the gross margin percent estimates. In this way we can model a cash-flow process that is partially correlated to a traded market index. This provides the mechanism for valuing real options of the cash-flow in a financially consistent manner under the risk-neutral minimum martingale measure. The method requires minimal subjective input of model parameters and is very easy to implement. We also investigate the sensitivity of the normal distribution assumption by comparing the approach developed here to our previous approach.

  8. A BIOMASS-BASED MODEL TO ESTIMATE THE PLAUSIBILITY OF EXOPLANET BIOSIGNATURE GASES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seager, Sara

    Biosignature gas detection is one of the ultimate future goals for exoplanet atmosphere studies. We have created a framework for linking biosignature gas detectability to biomass estimates, including atmospheric photochemistry ...

  9. Efficient Hydraulic State Estimation Technique Using Reduced Models of Urban Water Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Preis, Ami

    This paper describes and demonstrates an efficient method for online hydraulic state estimation in urban water networks. The proposed method employs an online predictor-corrector (PC) procedure for forecasting future water ...

  10. Empirical likelihood analysis of the rank estimator for the censored accelerated failure time model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Mai

    with censored data, including Tsiatis (1990), Wei et al. (1990), Ritov (1991), Lai & Ying (1991) and Ying (1993 of the rank-based estimator is given by Lai & Ying (1991), Ying (1993) and several subsequent papers including

  11. ARM Climate Modeling Best Estimate from Nauru (ARMBE-CLDRAD TWPC2)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    McCoy, Renata; Xie, Shaocheng

    The ARM CMBE-ATM [Xie, McCoy, Klein et al.] data file contains a best estimate of several selected atmospheric quantities from ACRF observations and NWP analysis data.

  12. ARM Climate Modeling Best Estimate from Nauru (ARMBE-CLDRAD TWPC2 V2.1)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    McCoy, Renata; Xie, Shaocheng

    The ARM CMBE-ATM [Xie, McCoy, Klein et al.] data file contains a best estimate of several selected atmospheric quantities from ACRF observations and NWP analysis data.

  13. ARM Climate Modeling Best Estimate Lamont, OK (ARMBE-CLDRAD SGPC1)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    McCoy, Renata; Xie, Shaocheng

    The ARM CMBE-CLDRAD [Xie, McCoy, Klein et al.] data file contains a best estimate of several selected cloud and radiation relevant quantities from ACRF observations

  14. ARM Climate Modeling Best Estimate from Nauru (ARMBE-CLDRAD TWPC3)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    McCoy, Renata; Xie, Shaocheng

    The ARM CMBE-ATM [Xie, McCoy, Klein et al.] data file contains a best estimate of several selected atmospheric quantities from ACRF observations and NWP analysis data.

  15. ARM Climate Modeling Best Estimate Barrow, AK (ARMBE-CLDRAD NSAC1)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    McCoy, Renata; Xie, Shaocheng

    The ARM CMBE-ATM [Xie, McCoy, Klein et al.] data file contains a best estimate of several selected atmospheric quantities from ACRF observations and NWP analysis data.

  16. ARM Climate Modeling Best Estimate Lamont, OK (ARMBE-CLDRAD SGPC1)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    McCoy, Renata; Xie, Shaocheng

    The ARM CMBE-ATM [Xie, McCoy, Klein et al.] data file contains a best estimate of several selected atmospheric quantities from ACRF observations and NWP analysis data.

  17. ARM Climate Modeling Best Estimate from Nauru (ARMBE-CLDRAD TWPC1)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    McCoy, Renata; Xie, Shaocheng

    The ARM CMBE-ATM [Xie, McCoy, Klein et al.] data file contains a best estimate of several selected atmospheric quantities from ACRF observations and NWP analysis data.

  18. ARM Climate Modeling Best Estimate Barrow, AK (ARMBE-CLDRAD NSAC1 V2.1)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    McCoy, Renata; Xie, Shaocheng

    The ARM CMBE-ATM [Xie, McCoy, Klein et al.] data file contains a best estimate of several selected atmospheric quantities from ACRF observations and NWP analysis data.

  19. ARM Climate Modeling Best Estimate From Darwin, AU (ARMBE-ATM TWPC3)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCoy, Renata; Xie, Shaocheng

    2013-12-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The ARM CMBE-ATM [Xie, McCoy, Klein et al.] data file contains a best estimate of several selected atmospheric quantities from ACRF observations and NWP analysis data.

  20. ARM Climate Modeling Best Estimate Lamont, OK (ARMBE-ATM SGPC1)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCoy, Renata; Xie, Shaocheng

    2013-12-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The ARM CMBE-ATM [Xie, McCoy, Klein et al.] data file contains a best estimate of several selected atmospheric quantities from ACRF observations and NWP analysis data.

  1. ARM Climate Modeling Best Estimate Barrow, AK (ARMBE-ATM NSAC1 V4)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCoy, Renata; Xie, Shaocheng

    2013-12-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The ARM CMBE-ATM [Xie, McCoy, Klein et al.] data file contains a best estimate of several selected atmospheric quantities from ACRF observations and NWP analysis data.

  2. ARM Climate Modeling Best Estimate From Darwin, AU (ARMBE-ATM TWPC3)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCoy, Renata; Xie, Shaocheng

    2013-12-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The ARM CMBE-ATM [Xie, McCoy, Klein et al.] data file contains a best estimate of several selected atmospheric quantities from ACRF observations and NWP analysis data.

  3. ARM Climate Modeling Best Estimate From Darwin, AU (ARMBE-ATM TWPC2)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCoy, Renata; Xie, Shaocheng

    2013-12-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The ARM CMBE-ATM [Xie, McCoy, Klein et al.] data file contains a best estimate of several selected atmospheric quantities from ACRF observations and NWP analysis data.

  4. ARM Climate Modeling Best Estimate From Manus Island, PNG (ARMBE-ATM TWPC1)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCoy, Renata; Xie, Shaocheng

    2013-12-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The ARM CMBE-ATM [Xie, McCoy, Klein et al.] data file contains a best estimate of several selected atmospheric quantities from ACRF observations and NWP analysis data.

  5. ARM Climate Modeling Best Estimate From Darwin, AU (ARMBE-ATM TWPC2)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    McCoy, Renata; Xie, Shaocheng

    The ARM CMBE-ATM [Xie, McCoy, Klein et al.] data file contains a best estimate of several selected atmospheric quantities from ACRF observations and NWP analysis data.

  6. ARM Climate Modeling Best Estimate From Darwin, AU (ARMBE-ATM TWPC3)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    McCoy, Renata; Xie, Shaocheng

    The ARM CMBE-ATM [Xie, McCoy, Klein et al.] data file contains a best estimate of several selected atmospheric quantities from ACRF observations and NWP analysis data.

  7. ARM Climate Modeling Best Estimate From Manus Island, PNG (ARMBE-ATM TWPC1)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    McCoy, Renata; Xie, Shaocheng

    The ARM CMBE-ATM [Xie, McCoy, Klein et al.] data file contains a best estimate of several selected atmospheric quantities from ACRF observations and NWP analysis data.

  8. ARM Climate Modeling Best Estimate From Nauru (ARMBE-ATM TWPC2)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    McCoy, Renata; Xie, Shaocheng

    The ARM CMBE-ATM [Xie, McCoy, Klein et al.] data file contains a best estimate of several selected atmospheric quantities from ACRF observations and NWP analysis data.

  9. ARM Climate Modeling Best Estimate Barrow, AK (ARMBE-ATM NSAC1)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    McCoy, Renata; Xie, Shaocheng

    The ARM CMBE-ATM [Xie, McCoy, Klein et al.] data file contains a best estimate of several selected atmospheric quantities from ACRF observations and NWP analysis data.

  10. ARM Climate Modeling Best Estimate Lamont, OK (ARMBE-ATM SGPC1)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    McCoy, Renata; Xie, Shaocheng

    The ARM CMBE-ATM [Xie, McCoy, Klein et al.] data file contains a best estimate of several selected atmospheric quantities from ACRF observations and NWP analysis data.

  11. ARM Climate Modeling Best Estimate Barrow, AK (ARMBE-ATM NSAC1 V4)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    McCoy, Renata; Xie, Shaocheng

    The ARM CMBE-ATM [Xie, McCoy, Klein et al.] data file contains a best estimate of several selected atmospheric quantities from ACRF observations and NWP analysis data.

  12. A Minimum Model Error Approach for Attitude Estimation John L. Crassidis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crassidis, John L.

    , star trackers, etc). The functional form of the optimal estimation approach involves a gradient search anomalous periods, such as solar eclipse and/or sensor co-alignment. The most commonly used technique

  13. Analysis of forest environmental measurements to estimate parameters of microclimate and air-pollution deposition-velocity models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Murphy, Jr, C E; Lorenz, R

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method is described for estimating flux densities and deposition of gaseous pollutants for a period of a year or more, using data collected for a period of a few days. The estimates are based on models which characterize the transfer of gases from the atmosphere to the vegetation as a series of resistances and then use linear statistical submodels based on experimental data to relate the resistances to the surrounding environment. The models are shown to fit the experimental data reasonably well. Annual values calculated for a young loblolly pine plantation were: evaporation 63.2 cm, carbon dioxide exchange 31.5 t/ha, and sulfur dioxide exchange 120 gm/ha. 17 references.

  14. USING BOX-JENKINS MODELS TO FORECAST FISHERY DYNAMICS: IDENTIFICATION, ESTIMATION, AND CHECKING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ~ is illustrated by developing a model that makes monthly forecasts of skipjack tuna, Katsuwonus pelamis, catches

  15. Statistical Simulation to Estimate Uncertain Behavioral Parameters of Hybrid Energy-Economy Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2011 # Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2011 Abstract In energy-economy modeling, new hybrid models of the most energy-efficient or lowest emission technologies. Optimization models with technological detail disaggregated models. Where they cover all M. Jaccard (*) School of Resource and Environmental Management, Simon

  16. OptIC project: An intercomparison of optimization techniques for parameter estimation in terrestrial biogeochemical models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richardson, Andrew D.

    and earth system models, especially for long-term (multian- nual and greater) simulations. Data assimilation

  17. WAXS fat subtraction model to estimate differential linear scattering coefficients of fatless breast tissue: Phantom materials evaluation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tang, Robert Y., E-mail: rx-tang@laurentian.ca [Biomolecular Sciences Program, Laurentian University, 935 Ramsey Lake Road, Sudbury, Ontario P3E 2C6 (Canada); Laamanen, Curtis, E-mail: cx-laamanen@laurentian.ca; McDonald, Nancy, E-mail: mcdnancye@gmail.com [Department of Physics, Laurentian University, 935 Ramsey Lake Road, Sudbury, Ontario P3E 2C6 (Canada)] [Department of Physics, Laurentian University, 935 Ramsey Lake Road, Sudbury, Ontario P3E 2C6 (Canada); LeClair, Robert J., E-mail: rleclair@laurentian.ca [Department of Physics, Laurentian University, 935 Ramsey Lake Road, Sudbury, Ontario P3E 2C6, Canada and Biomolecular Sciences Program, Laurentian University, 935 Ramsey Lake Road, Sudbury, Ontario P3E 2C6 (Canada)

    2014-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Develop a method to subtract fat tissue contributions to wide-angle x-ray scatter (WAXS) signals of breast biopsies in order to estimate the differential linear scattering coefficients ?{sub s} of fatless tissue. Cancerous and fibroglandular tissue can then be compared independent of fat content. In this work phantom materials with known compositions were used to test the efficacy of the WAXS subtraction model. Methods: Each sample 5 mm in diameter and 5 mm thick was interrogated by a 50 kV 2.7 mm diameter beam for 3 min. A 25 mm{sup 2} by 1 mm thick CdTe detector allowed measurements of a portion of the ? = 6 scattered field. A scatter technique provided means to estimate the incident spectrum N{sub 0}(E) needed in the calculations of ?{sub s}[x(E, ?)] where x is the momentum transfer argument. Values of ?{sup }{sub s} for composite phantoms consisting of three plastic layers were estimated and compared to the values obtained via the sum ?{sup }{sub s}{sup ?}(x)=?{sub 1}?{sub s1}(x)+?{sub 2}?{sub s2}(x)+?{sub 3}?{sub s3}(x), where ?{sub i} is the fractional volume of the ith plastic component. Water, polystyrene, and a volume mixture of 0.6 water + 0.4 polystyrene labelled as fibphan were chosen to mimic cancer, fat, and fibroglandular tissue, respectively. A WAXS subtraction model was used to remove the polystyrene signal from tissue composite phantoms so that the ?{sub s} of water and fibphan could be estimated. Although the composite samples were layered, simulations were performed to test the models under nonlayered conditions. Results: The well known ?{sub s} signal of water was reproduced effectively between 0.5 < x < 1.6 nm{sup ?1}. The ?{sup }{sub s} obtained for the heterogeneous samples agreed with ?{sup }{sub s}{sup ?}. Polystyrene signals were subtracted successfully from composite phantoms. The simulations validated the usefulness of the WAXS models for nonlayered biopsies. Conclusions: The methodology to measure ?{sub s} of homogeneous samples was quantitatively accurate. Simple WAXS models predicted the probabilities for specific x-ray scattering to occur from heterogeneous biopsies. The fat subtraction model can allow ?{sub s} signals of breast cancer and fibroglandular tissue to be compared without the effects of fat provided there is an independent measurement of the fat volume fraction ?{sub f}. Future work will consist of devising a quantitative x-ray digital imaging method to estimate ?{sub f} in ex vivo breast samples.

  18. Estimating the Partition Function of Graphical Models Using Langevin Importance Sampling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xu, Jinbo

    equation and estimates the partition function using all the samples generated during the random walk at all long time for MCMC sampling to reach the detailed balance equilib- rium. Further, no simple methods, inspired by the obser- vation that if a liquid material cools very quickly, the material will solidify

  19. A Robust Nonparametric Estimation Framework for Implicit Image Models Himanshu Arora Maneesh Singh Narendra Ahuja

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ahuja, Narendra

    Narendra Ahuja University of Illinois Siemens Corporate Research University of Illinois Urbana, IL61801, USA Princeton, NJ08540, USA Urbana, IL61801, USA harora1@uiuc.edu msingh@scr.siemens.com n- clidian, affine, or projective transformations; surface normal and curvature estimation for 3D structure

  20. A Model for Human Interruptability: Experimental Evaluation and Automatic Estimation from Wearable Sensors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sensors Nicky Kern, Stavros Antifakos, Bernt Schiele Perceptual Computing and Computer Vision ETH Zurich sensors. It is scalable for a large number of sensors, contexts, and situations and allows for online the data from a microphone, 12 body-worn 3D acceler- ation sensors, and a location estimation. We have

  1. PEAS: A toolbox to assess the accuracy of estimated parameters in environmental models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Checchi, Elisabetta Giusti, Stefano Marsili-Libelli* Department of Systems and Computers, University, in addition to parameter estimation, such as error function plotting, trajectory sensitivity, Monte Carlo regions are computed and a confidence test is pro- duced. The Monte Carlo analysis is available

  2. Evaluation of the Effective Moisture Penetration Depth Model for Estimating Moisture Buffering in Buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Woods, J.; Winkler, J.; Christensen, D.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study examines the effective moisture penetration depth (EMPD) model, and its suitability for building simulations. The EMPD model is a compromise between the simple, inaccurate effective capacitance approach and the complex, yet accurate, finite-difference approach. Two formulations of the EMPD model were examined, including the model used in the EnergyPlus building simulation software. An error in the EMPD model we uncovered was fixed with the release of EnergyPlus version 7.2, and the EMPD model in earlier versions of EnergyPlus should not be used.

  3. Improving parameter estimation and water table depth simulation in a land surface model using GRACE water storage and estimated base flow data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lo, Min-Hui; Famiglietti, James S; Yeh, P. J.-F.; Syed, T. H

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2007), Estimating ground water storage changes in thestorage (i.e. , all of the snow, ice, surface water, soil moisture, and ground-

  4. Bayesian Estimation of a Continuous-Time Model for Discretely-Observed Panel Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boulton, Aaron Jacob

    2014-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Continuous-time models are used in many areas of science. However, in psychology and related fields, continuous-time models are often difficult to apply because only a small number of repeated observations are typically ...

  5. Estimates of Radioxenon Released from Southern Hemisphere Medical isotope Production Facilities Using Measured Air Concentrations and Atmospheric Transport Modeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eslinger, Paul W.; Friese, Judah I.; Lowrey, Justin D.; McIntyre, Justin I.; Miley, Harry S.; Schrom, Brian T.

    2014-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Abstract The International Monitoring System (IMS) of the Comprehensive-Nuclear-Test-Ban-Treaty monitors the atmosphere for radioactive xenon leaking from underground nuclear explosions. Emissions from medical isotope production represent a challenging background signal when determining whether measured radioxenon in the atmosphere is associated with a nuclear explosion prohibited by the treaty. The Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation (ANSTO) operates a reactor and medical isotope production facility in Lucas Heights, Australia. This study uses two years of release data from the ANSTO medical isotope production facility and Xe-133 data from three IMS sampling locations to estimate the annual releases of Xe-133 from medical isotope production facilities in Argentina, South Africa, and Indonesia. Atmospheric dilution factors derived from a global atmospheric transport model were used in an optimization scheme to estimate annual release values by facility. The annual releases of about 6.81014 Bq from the ANSTO medical isotope production facility are in good agreement with the sampled concentrations at these three IMS sampling locations. Annual release estimates for the facility in South Africa vary from 1.21016 to 2.51016 Bq and estimates for the facility in Indonesia vary from 6.11013 to 3.61014 Bq. Although some releases from the facility in Argentina may reach these IMS sampling locations, the solution to the objective function is insensitive to the magnitude of those releases.

  6. Estimates for temperature in projectile like fragment in geometric and transport models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mallik, S; Chaudhuri, G

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Projectile like fragments emerging from heavy ion collision have an excitation energy which is often labeled by a temperature. This temperature was recently calculated using a geometric model. We expand the geometric model to include also dynamic effects using a transport model. The temperatures so deduced agree quite well with values of temperature needed to fit experimental data.

  7. Special Section --Marine Controlled-Source Electromagnetic Methods A Bayesian model for gas saturation estimation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Jinsong

    Special Section -- Marine Controlled-Source Electromagnetic Methods A Bayesian model for gas Vasco1 , Yoram Rubin2 , and Zhangshuan Hou2 ABSTRACT We develop a Bayesian model to jointly invert reservoir model. We consid- er the porosity and fluid saturation of each layer in the reservoir, the bulk

  8. GISbased modeling approach to estimate nitrogen loading and load reduction in lakes/ reservoirs with

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Zong-Liang

    , crop cultivation areas, livestock populations, and atmospheric deposition. Nitrogen sources in Texas led to increases in energy and food production, use of fertilizer and animal manure, atmospheric

  9. Fractal model for estimating fracture toughness of carbon nanotube reinforced aluminum oxide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rishabh, Abhishek; Joshi, Milind R.; Balani, Kantesh [Department of Materials and Metallurgical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Kanpur, Kanpur 208016 (India)

    2010-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The current work focuses on predicting the fracture toughness of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} ceramic matrix composites using a modified Mandelbrot's fractal approach. The first step confirms that the experimental fracture toughness values fluctuate within the fracture toughness range predicted as per the modified fractal approach. Additionally, the secondary reinforcements [such as carbon nanotubes (CNTs)] have shown to enhance the fracture toughness of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}. Conventional fractural toughness evaluation via fractal approach underestimates the fracture toughness by considering the shortest crack path. Hence, the modified Mandelbrot's fractal approach considers the crack propagation along the CNT semicircumferential surface (three-dimensional crack path propagation) for achieving an improved fracture toughness estimation of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-CNT composite. The estimations obtained in the current approach range within 4% error regime of the experimentally measured fracture toughness values of the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-CNT composite.

  10. Estimation of Inflation parameters for Perturbed Power Law model using recent CMB measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Suvodip Mukherjee; Santanu Das; Minu Joy; Tarun Souradeep

    2015-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) is an important probe for understanding the inflationary era of the Universe. We consider the Perturbed Power Law (PPL) model of inflation which is a soft deviation from Power Law (PL) inflationary model. This model captures the effect of higher order derivative of Hubble parameter during inflation, which in turn leads to a non-zero effective mass $m_{\\rm eff}$ for the inflaton field. The higher order derivatives of Hubble parameter at leading order sources constant difference in the spectral index for scalar and tensor perturbation going beyond PL model of inflation. PPL model have two observable independent parameters, namely spectral index for tensor perturbation $\

  11. Estimation of Inflation parameters for Perturbed Power Law model using recent CMB measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mukherjee, Suvodip; Joy, Minu; Souradeep, Tarun

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) is an important probe for understanding the inflationary era of the Universe. We consider the Perturbed Power Law (PPL) model of inflation which is a soft deviation from Power Law (PL) inflationary model. This model captures the effect of higher order derivative of Hubble parameter during inflation, which in turn leads to a non-zero effective mass $m_{\\rm eff}$ for the inflaton field. The higher order derivatives of Hubble parameter at leading order sources constant difference in the spectral index for scalar and tensor perturbation going beyond PL model of inflation. PPL model have two observable independent parameters, namely spectral index for tensor perturbation $\

  12. Estimating market power in homogeneous product markets using a composed error model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Orea, Luis; Steinbuks, Jevgenijs

    2012-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    (frequent). In other markets all firms might be involved in perfect cartel scheme. In such a cartel-equilibrium, firms usually agree to sell target quantities, and the resulting market price is the monopoly price, which is associated with the maximum... ) and Clay and Troesken (2003) for applications to the sugar and whiskey industries respectively. EPRG WP 1210 7 correlation between Lerner indices and estimated conduct parameters for 3 out of 4 firms during the first period of our sample (before entry...

  13. Evaluation of Blade-Strike Models for Estimating the Biological Performance of Kaplan Turbines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deng, Zhiqun; Carlson, Thomas J.; Ploskey, Gene R.; Richmond, Marshall C.; Dauble, Dennis D.

    2007-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Bio-indexing of hydroturbines is an important means to optimize passage conditions for fish by identifying operations for existing and new design turbines that minimize the probability of injury. Cost-effective implementation of bio-indexing requires the use of tools such as numerical and physical turbine models to generate hypotheses for turbine operations that can be tested at prototype scales using live fish. Numerical deterministic and stochastic blade strike models were developed for a 1:25-scale physical turbine model built by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers for the original design turbine at McNary Dam and for prototype-scale original design and replacement minimum gap runner (MGR) turbines at Bonneville Dam's first powerhouse. Blade strike probabilities predicted by both models were comparable with the overall trends in blade strike probability observed in both prototype-scale live fish survival studies and physical turbine model using neutrally buoyant beads. The predictions from the stochastic model were closer to the experimental data than the predictions from the deterministic model because the stochastic model included more realistic consideration of the aspect of fish approaching to the leading edges of turbine runner blades. Therefore, the stochastic model should be the preferred method for the prediction of blade strike and injury probability for juvenile salmon and steelhead using numerical blade-strike models.

  14. A Simple Model for Estimating Water Balance and Salinity of Reservoirs and Outflow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miyamoto, S; Yuan, F; Anand, Shilpa

    2010-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

    on flow and salinity of the stream and the floodplains. The first part deals with water and salt balance in reservoirs. The primary purpose of the model is to predict outflow salinity from the reservoir storage and inflow information in advance... management strategy, yet the method to predict outflow salinity has not been adequately examined. The study reported here examined the water and salt balance in a reservoir using a two-layer model. This model assumes that inflow blends with the storage...

  15. Comparative Analysis of the Cost Models Used for Estimating Renovation Costs of Universities in Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Faquih, Yaquta Fakhruddin

    2010-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

    the cost of renovation, ease of use and speed of the model are some of the other factors that practitioners look for in a cost model (Yokum and Armstrong. 1995). This research aims to identify the merits and demerits of the cost models based on not only... Researchers believe that accuracy is the main criterion for selecting the best cost model; however, a survey done by Yokum and Armstrong in 1995 shows that ease of interpretation, ease of use, ease in getting data, credibility, and speed top the list...

  16. Precise estimation of shell model energy by second order extrapolation method

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Takahiro Mizusaki; Masatoshi Imada

    2003-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

    A second order extrapolation method is presented for shell model calculations, where shell model energies of truncated spaces are well described as a function of energy variance by quadratic curves and exact shell model energies can be obtained by the extrapolation. This new extrapolation can give more precise energy than those of first order extrapolation method. It is also clarified that first order extrapolation gives a lower limit of shell model energy. In addition to the energy, we derive the second order extrapolation formula for expectation values of other observables.

  17. Estimating Probability Distributions from Complex Models with Bifurcations: The Case of Ocean Circulation Collapse

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Webster, Mort David.

    Studying the uncertainty in computationally expensive models has required the development of specialized methods, including alternative sampling techniques and response surface approaches. However, existing techniques for ...

  18. Topics in Statistical Modeling and Estimation of Extremes and Their Dependence.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hamidieh, Kamal

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ??The main goal of this thesis is to use concepts and tools from extreme value theory (EVT) to model, make inference and develop prediction tools (more)

  19. Estimation of circadian parameters and investigation in cyanobacteria via semiparametric varying coefficient periodic models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Yingxue

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    the local linear approach to update ??0i(t) and ??1i(t) separately with bandwidths h0 and h1. The estimates are ??[k]0i (t0) = (1,0)(XT0 W0X0)?1XT0 W0Yi, 17 ??[k]1i (t0) = (1,0)(XT1 W1X1)?1XT1 W1Yi, (2.4) where X0 = ? ?? ?? ? 1 t1 ?t0 ... ... 1 tn ?t0...

  20. Agricultural Water Management xxx (2003) xxxxxx A GIS-based model to estimate the regionally

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and landscape features that affect patterns in water available to plants, soil drainage, and aeration (Jaynes. Recent advances in GIS technology fa- cilitate the seamless integration of GIS and computer-based modeling. Multiple approaches exist to integrate GIS and hydrological models (Maidment, 1993; Abel et al

  1. An estimation-free, robust CVaR portfolio allocation model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2007-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Mar 27, 2007 ... of these models have produced great theoretical impact, their practical ... the riskfree interest rate, and the asset returns, for dynamic portfolio models (cf. [12]). ...... Therefore, all the analysis and results presented through out the paper will ... [8] J. ?Cerbkov, Worst-case Var and CVaR, Operations Research...

  2. Estimation of net primary productivity using a process-based model in Gansu Province, Northwest China

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Peijuan; Xie, Donghui; Zhou, Yuyu; E, Youhao; Zhu, Qijiang

    2014-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The ecological structure in the arid and semi-arid region of Northwest China with forest, grassland, agriculture, Gobi, and desert, is complex, vulnerable, and unstable. It is a challenging and sustaining job to keep the ecological structure and improve its ecological function. Net primary productivity (NPP) modeling can help to improve the understanding of the ecosystem, and therefore, improve ecological efficiency. The boreal ecosystem productivity simulator (BEPS) model provides the possibility of NPP modeling in terrestrial ecosystem, but it has some limitations for application in arid and semi-arid regions. In this paper we improve the BEPS model, in terms of its water cycle by adding the processes of infiltration and surface runoff, to be applicable in arid and semi-arid regions. We model the NPP of forest, grass, and crop in Gansu Province as an experimental area in Northwest China in 2003 using the improved BEPS model, parameterized with moderate resolution remote sensing imageries and meteorological data. The modeled NPP using improved BEPS agrees better with the ground measurements in Qilian Mountain than that with original BEPS, with a higher R2 of 0.746 and lower root mean square error (RMSE) of 46.53 gC/m2 compared to R2 of 0.662 and RMSE of 60.19 gC/m2 from original BEPS. The modeled NPP of three vegetation types using improved BEPS show evident differences compared to that using original BEPS, with the highest difference ratio of 9.21% in forest and the lowest value of 4.29% in crop. The difference ratios between different vegetation types lie on the dependence on natural water sources. The modeled NPP in five geographic zones using improved BEPS are higher than those with original BEPS, with higher difference ratio in dry zones and lower value in wet zones.

  3. Optimization-based Design of Plant-Friendly Input Signals for Model-on-Demand Estimation and Model Predictive Control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mittelmann, Hans D.

    is shown by applying it to a case study involving composition control of a binary distillation column. I is demonstrated in a binary high-purity distillation column case study by Weischedel and McAvoy [7], a demanding nonlinear and strongly interactive process application. A Model-on-Demand Model Predictive Control (MoD-MPC

  4. Testing of a model to estimate vapor concentration of various organic chemicals. Master's thesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bakalyar, S.M.

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A model developed by Dr. Parker C. Reist to predict the build-up and decay rates of vapor concentrations following a chemical spill and clean-up was tested. The chemicals tested were: acetone, butyl acetate, ethyl acetate, hexane, methylene chloride, methyl ethyl ketone, and toluene. The evaporation rates of these chemicals were determined both by prediction, using a model developed by I. Kawamura and D. Mackay, and empirically and these rates were used in the Reist model. Chamber experiments were done to measure actual building-up and decay of vapor concentrations for simulated spills and simulated clean-up.

  5. Reconciling estimates of the contemporary North American carbon balance among terrestrial biosphere models, atmospheric inversions and a new approach for estimating net ecosystem exchange from inventory-based data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hayes, Daniel J [ORNL; Turner, David P [Oregon State University, Corvallis; Stinson, Graham [Pacific Forestry Centre, Canadian Forest Service; Mcguire, David [University of Alaska; Wei, Yaxing [ORNL; West, Tristram O. [Joint Global Change Research Institute, PNNL; Heath, Linda S. [USDA Forest Service; De Jong, Bernardus [ECOSUR; McConkey, Brian G. [Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada; Birdsey, Richard A. [U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service; Kurz, Werner [Canadian Forest Service; Jacobson, Andrew [NOAA ESRL and CIRES; Huntzinger, Deborah [University of Michigan; Pan, Yude [U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service; Post, Wilfred M [ORNL; Cook, Robert B [ORNL

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We develop an approach for estimating net ecosystem exchange (NEE) using inventory-based information over North America (NA) for a recent 7-year period (ca. 2000 2006). The approach notably retains information on the spatial distribution of NEE, or the vertical exchange between land and atmosphere of all non-fossil fuel sources and sinks of CO2, while accounting for lateral transfers of forest and crop products as well as their eventual emissions. The total NEE estimate of a 327 252 TgC yr1 sink for NA was driven primarily by CO2 uptake in the Forest Lands sector (248 TgC yr1), largely in the Northwest and Southeast regions of the US, and in the Crop Lands sector (297 TgC yr1), predominantly in the Midwest US states. These sinks are counteracted by the carbon source estimated for the Other Lands sector (+218 TgC yr1), where much of the forest and crop products are assumed to be returned to the atmosphere (through livestock and human consumption). The ecosystems of Mexico are estimated tobe a small net source (+18 TgC yr1) due to land use change between 1993 and 2002. We compare these inventorybased estimates with results from a suite of terrestrial biosphere and atmospheric inversion models, where the mean continental-scale NEE estimate for each ensemble is 511 TgC yr1 and 931 TgC yr1, respectively. In the modeling approaches, all sectors, including Other Lands, were generally estimated to be a carbon sink, driven in part by assumed CO2 fertilization and/or lack of consideration of carbon sources from disturbances and product emissions. Additional fluxes not measured by the inventories, although highly uncertain, could add an additional 239 TgC yr1 to the inventory-based NA sink estimate, thus suggesting some convergence with the modeling approaches.

  6. On-line Hydraulic State Estimation in Urban Water Networks Using Reduced Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Preis, Ami

    A Predictor-Corrector (PC) approach for on-line forecasting of water usage in an urban water system is presented and demonstrated. The M5 Model-Trees algorithm is used to predict water demands and Genetic Algorithms (GAs) ...

  7. Mode Estimation of Model-based Programs: Monitoring Systems with Complex Behavior

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Williams, Brian C.

    - active programming constructs with probabilistic, constraint-based modeling, and that offers a sim- ple controllers, have simple behaviors. However, the above trajectory spends most of its time wend- ing its way

  8. Mode Estimation of Model-based Programs: Monitoring Systems with Complex Behavior

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Williams, Brian C.

    that combines reactive programming constructs with probabilistic, constraint-based modeling, and that offers wending its way through software functions. DS-1 is an instance of modern embedded systems whose

  9. Probabilistic Seismic Demand Model and Fragility Estimates for Symmetric Rigid Blocks Subject to Rocking Motions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bakhtiary, Esmaeel

    2013-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis presents a probability model to predict the maximum rotation of rocking bodies exposed to seismic excitations given specific earthquake intensity measures. After obtaining the nonlinear equations of motion and clarification...

  10. Parameter Estimation and Capacity Fade Analysis of Lithium-Ion Batteries Using Reformulated Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Braatz, Richard D.

    Many researchers have worked to develop methods to analyze and characterize capacity fade in lithium-ion batteries. As a complement to approaches to mathematically model capacity fade that require detailed understanding ...

  11. Ecological Modelling 187 (2005) 281296 Estimating estuarine gross production, community respiration and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vallino, Joseph J.

    observations and model predictions. The spatially resolving solution shows maximum instantaneous GPP of 1030 approach. Most DO inverse methods are based on the follow- ing observation. During daylight hours, oxygen

  12. Modeling and parameter estimation for point-actuated continuous-facesheet

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stress focusing for controlled fracture in microelectromechanical systems Matthew A. Meitl,a Xue in microelectromechanical systems MEMSs based on the control of corner sharpness. Studies of model MEMS structures

  13. Stochastic Modeling of the Rainfall Runoff-Process for Nonpoint Source Pollutant Load Estimation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collins, Michael A.; Dickey, Roger O.

    . The methodology was developed based on simulating individual rainfall-runoff events. A simulation model employed a rainfall simulator to stochastically generate rainfall event characteristics for input into basin hydrologic transformation functions which...

  14. Application of the Green-Ampt infiltration equation to watershed modeling with estimated parameters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Warinner, John Storrs

    2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

    1988) John Storrs Warinner, B. S. , Oregon State University Chair of Advisory Committee: Dr. Wesley P. James A computer model was developed, based upon the Green-Ampt infiltration equation, to compute cumulative rainfall excess for a single, given...

  15. The use of comparative {sup 137}Cs body burden estimates from environmental data/models and whole body counting to evaluate diet models for the ingestion pathway

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robison, W.L. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Sun, C. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)

    1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Rongelap and Utirik Atolls were contaminated on 1 March 1954, by a U.S. nuclear test at Bikini Atoll code named BRAVO. The people at both atolls were removed from their atolls in the first few days after the detonation and were returned to their atolls at different times. Detailed studies have been carried out over the years by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) to determine the radiological conditions at the atolls and estimate the doses to the populations. The contribution of each exposure pathway and radionuclide have been evaluated. All dose assessments show that the major potential contribution to the estimated dose is {sup 137}Cs uptake via the terrestrial food chain. Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) has carried out an extensive whole body counting program at both atolls over several years to directly measure the {sup 137}Cs body burden. Here we compare the estimates of the body burdens from the LLNL environmental method with body burdens measured by the BNL whole body counting method. The combination of the results from both methods is used to evaluate proposed diet models to establish more realistic dose assessments. Very good agreement is achieved between the two methods with a diet model that includes both local and imported foods. Other diet models greatly overestimate the body burdens (i.e., dose) observed by whole body counting. The upper 95% confidence limit of interindividual variability around the population mean value based on the environmental method is similar to that calculated from direct measurement by whole body counting. Moreover, the uncertainty in the population mean value based on the environmental method is in very good agreement with the whole body counting data. This provides additional confidence in extrapolating the estimated doses calculated by the environmental method to other islands and atolls. 46 refs., 8 figs., 5 tabs.

  16. A comparative study of analytical models to estimate the LNAPL mound formation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ahmed, Ashfaq

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    is constant for the duration of the spreading. Secondly, the model does not consider the organic phase which is held up as residual saturation in the unsaturated zone above the water table. Holzer [1976] used the saltwater/freshwater analogy to study... hydrocarbon. Reible et al. , [1991] developed a model to describe the one-dimensional infiltra- tion of a NAPL through an unsaturated zone initially at residual water saturation. tion of a NAPL through an unsaturated zone initially at residual water...

  17. Assessing Invariance of Factor Structures and Polytomous Item Response Model Parameter Estimates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reyes, Jennifer McGee

    2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    .e., identical items, different people) for the homogenous graded response model (Samejima, 1969) and the partial credit model (Masters, 1982)? To evaluate measurement invariance using IRT methods, the item discrimination and item difficulty parameters... obtained from the GRM need to be equivalent across datasets. The YFCY02 and YFCY03 GRM item discrimination parameters (slope) correlation was 0.828. The YFCY02 and YFCY03 GRM item difficulty parameters (location) correlation was 0...

  18. Does Beta React to Market Conditions?: Estimates of Bull and Bear Betas using a Nonlinear Market Model with Endogenous Threshold Parameter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kearns, Michael

    Does Beta React to Market Conditions?: Estimates of Bull and Bear Betas using a Nonlinear Market Model with Endogenous Threshold Parameter by George Woodward and Heather Anderson Department transition between bull and bear states and allows the data to determine the threshold value. The estimated

  19. A Model for Estimating Demand for Irrigation Water on the Texas High Plains

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Condra, G. D.; Lacewell, R. D.; Sprott, J. M.; Adams, B. M.

    of crops that shift to dryland production as the price of water was increased. However, the shifts occurred at much lower water prices; i.e., at $24.47 per acre foot plus current pumping costs, all land had shifted to dryland production. This suggests...

  20. Uncertainty propagation in a model for the estimation of the1 ground level concentration of dioxin/furans emitted from a waste2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Uncertainty propagation in a model for the estimation of the1 ground level concentration of dioxin concentration of dioxin/furans emitted from a waste gasification plant. Under the17 condition of insufficient

  1. TransCom N[subscript 2]O model inter-comparison Part 2: Atmospheric inversion estimates of N[subscript 2]O emissions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thompson, R. L.

    This study examines N[subscript 2]O emission estimates from five different atmospheric inversion frameworks based on chemistry transport models (CTMs). The five frameworks differ in the choice of CTM, meteorological data, ...

  2. Estimating Demand Response Load Impacts: Evaluation of BaselineLoad Models for Non-Residential Buildings in California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coughlin, Katie; Piette, Mary Ann; Goldman, Charles; Kiliccote,Sila

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Both Federal and California state policymakers areincreasingly interested in developing more standardized and consistentapproaches to estimate and verify the load impacts of demand responseprograms and dynamic pricing tariffs. This study describes a statisticalanalysis of the performance of different models used to calculate thebaseline electric load for commercial buildings participating in ademand-response (DR) program, with emphasis onthe importance of weathereffects. During a DR event, a variety of adjustments may be made tobuilding operation, with the goal of reducing the building peak electricload. In order to determine the actual peak load reduction, an estimateof what the load would have been on the day of the event without any DRactions is needed. This baseline load profile (BLP) is key to accuratelyassessing the load impacts from event-based DR programs and may alsoimpact payment settlements for certain types of DR programs. We testedseven baseline models on a sample of 33 buildings located in California.These models can be loosely categorized into two groups: (1) averagingmethods, which use some linear combination of hourly load values fromprevious days to predict the load on the event, and (2) explicit weathermodels, which use a formula based on local hourly temperature to predictthe load. The models were tested both with and without morningadjustments, which use data from the day of the event to adjust theestimated BLP up or down.Key findings from this study are: - The accuracyof the BLP model currently used by California utilities to estimate loadreductions in several DR programs (i.e., hourly usage in highest 3 out of10 previous days) could be improved substantially if a morning adjustmentfactor were applied for weather-sensitive commercial and institutionalbuildings. - Applying a morning adjustment factor significantly reducesthe bias and improves the accuracy of all BLP models examined in oursample of buildings. - For buildings with low load variability, all BLPmodels perform reasonably well in accuracy. - For customer accounts withhighly variable loads, we found that no BLP model produced satisfactoryresults, although averaging methods perform best in accuracy (but notbias). These types of customers are difficult to characterize withstandard BLP models that rely on historic loads and weather data.Implications of these results for DR program administrators andpolicymakersare: - Most DR programs apply similar DR BLP methods tocommercial and industrial sector customers. The results of our study whencombined with other recent studies (Quantum 2004 and 2006, Buege et al.,2006) suggests that DR program administrators should have flexibility andmultiple options for suggesting the most appropriate BLP method forspecific types of customers.

  3. Control of Airborne Wind Energy Systems Based on Nonlinear Model Predictive Control & Moving Horizon Estimation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    tethered to the ground at a high velocity across the wind direction. Power can be generated by a, the first option is considered. Because it involves a much lighter structure, a major advantage of powerControl of Airborne Wind Energy Systems Based on Nonlinear Model Predictive Control & Moving

  4. Effect of One-Dimensional Field Data Assimilation on Land Surface Model Flux Estimates with Implications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walker, Jeff

    .W. Western1 1 Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, The University of Melbourne, Victoria, Australia 2 CSIRO Marine and Atmospheric Research, Aspendale, Victoria, Australia Email: r Model (CBM) represent the exchange of energy and water between the earth's surface and lower atmosphere

  5. Estimating Methods

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1997-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Based on the project's scope, the purpose of the estimate, and the availability of estimating resources, the estimator can choose one or a combination of techniques when estimating an activity or project. Estimating methods, estimating indirect and direct costs, and other estimating considerations are discussed in this chapter.

  6. Measuring and Modeling Fault Density for Plume-Fault Encounter Probability Estimation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jordan, P.D.; Oldenburg, C.M.; Nicot, J.-P.

    2011-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Emission of carbon dioxide from fossil-fueled power generation stations contributes to global climate change. Storage of this carbon dioxide within the pores of geologic strata (geologic carbon storage) is one approach to mitigating the climate change that would otherwise occur. The large storage volume needed for this mitigation requires injection into brine-filled pore space in reservoir strata overlain by cap rocks. One of the main concerns of storage in such rocks is leakage via faults. In the early stages of site selection, site-specific fault coverages are often not available. This necessitates a method for using available fault data to develop an estimate of the likelihood of injected carbon dioxide encountering and migrating up a fault, primarily due to buoyancy. Fault population statistics provide one of the main inputs to calculate the encounter probability. Previous fault population statistics work is shown to be applicable to areal fault density statistics. This result is applied to a case study in the southern portion of the San Joaquin Basin with the result that the probability of a carbon dioxide plume from a previously planned injection had a 3% chance of encountering a fully seal offsetting fault.

  7. Experimental Measurement of a Model Pipeline Dredge Entrance Loss Coefficient and Modification of a Spreadsheet for Estimating Model Dredge Performance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Girani, Joseph

    2014-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

    for Dredging Studies model cutter suction dredge. Testing was completed over the spectrum of specific gravities (SG) and flow rates achievable in the laboratory. The results show that the minor loss coefficient of the screen is a function of specific gravity...

  8. Evaluation of Blade-Strike Models for Estimating the Biological Performance of Large Kaplan Hydro Turbines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deng, Zhiqun; Carlson, Thomas J.; Ploskey, Gene R.; Richmond, Marshall C.

    2005-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

    BioIndex testing of hydro-turbines is sought as an analog to the hydraulic index testing conducted on hydro-turbines to optimize their power production efficiency. In BioIndex testing the goal is to identify those operations within the range identified by Index testing where the survival of fish passing through the turbine is maximized. BioIndex testing includes the immediate tailrace region as well as the turbine environment between a turbine's intake trashracks and the exit of its draft tube. The US Army Corps of Engineers and the Department of Energy have been evaluating a variety of means, such as numerical and physical turbine models, to investigate the quality of flow through a hydro-turbine and other aspects of the turbine environment that determine its safety for fish. The goal is to use these tools to develop hypotheses identifying turbine operations and predictions of their biological performance that can be tested at prototype scales. Acceptance of hypotheses would be the means for validation of new operating rules for the turbine tested that would be in place when fish were passing through the turbines. The overall goal of this project is to evaluate the performance of numerical blade strike models as a tool to aid development of testable hypotheses for bioIndexing. Evaluation of the performance of numerical blade strike models is accomplished by comparing predictions of fish mortality resulting from strike by turbine runner blades with observations made using live test fish at mainstem Columbia River Dams and with other predictions of blade strike made using observations of beads passing through a 1:25 scale physical turbine model.

  9. Increasing accuracy in image-guided robotic surgery through tip tracking and model-based flexion correction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beasley, Ryan A.

    Robot assistance can enhance minimally invasive image-guided surgery, but flexion of the thin surgical instrument shaft impairs accurate control by creating errors in the kinematic model. Two controller enhancements that ...

  10. A conceptual model to estimate cost effectiveness of the indoor environment improvements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seppanen, Olli; Fisk, William J.

    2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Macroeconomic analyses indicate a high cost to society of a deteriorated indoor climate. The few example calculations performed to date indicate that measures taken to improve IEQ are highly cost-effective when health and productivity benefits are considered. We believe that cost-benefit analyses of building designs and operations should routinely incorporate health and productivity impacts. As an initial step, we developed a conceptual model that shows the links between improvements in IEQ and the financial gains from reductions in medical care and sick leave, improved work performance, lower employee turn over, and reduced maintenance due to fewer complaints.

  11. Common Correlated Effects Estimation of Heterogeneous Dynamic Panel Data Models with Weakly Exogenous Regressors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pesaran, Hashem; Chudik, Alexander

    2013-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

    ; , xi` = x` + #17;i; x`, #17;i; x` #24; IIDN #0; 0; #27;2 x` #1; , gi` = g` + #17;i; g`, #17;i; g` #24; IIDN #0; 0; #27;2 g` #1; for ` = 1; 2; ::;m; and i = 1; 2; :::; N . Also, without loss of generality, the factor loadings are calibrated so that V... , are generated to be heteroskedastic and weakly cross- sectionally dependent. Speci?cally, we adopt the following spatial autoregressive model (SAR) to generate "t = ("1t; "2t; :::; "Nt)0: "t = a"S""t + e"t, (39) 19 where the elements of e"t are drawn as IIDN #0...

  12. A Model for the Estimation of Residual Stresses in Soft Tissues

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Joshi, Sunnie

    2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    , and then an idealized model for the IVUS interrogation is constructed by superimposing small amplitude time har- monic in nitesimal vibrations on large deformations via an asymptotic construction iv of its solution. We then use a semi-inverse approach to study...) = Div (J0)F T 0 + DivF0 = (J0)DivF T 0 + F T 0 r (J0) + Div F0 : (2.44) We deduce the following from (2.41): DivF0 = 000e1 + 00 0X2e2 + 00 0X3e3 (2.45) DivF T0 = 1 00 0 00 0 00 00 0 00 e1 (2...

  13. Estimating Policy-Driven Greenhouse Gas Emissions Trajectories in California: The California Greenhouse Gas Inventory Spreadsheet (GHGIS) Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greenblatt, Jeffery B.

    2013-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    A California Greenhouse Gas Inventory Spreadsheet (GHGIS) model was developed to explore the impact of combinations of state policies on state greenhouse gas (GHG) and regional criteria pollutant emissions. The model included representations of all GHG- emitting sectors of the California economy (including those outside the energy sector, such as high global warming potential gases, waste treatment, agriculture and forestry) in varying degrees of detail, and was carefully calibrated using available data and projections from multiple state agencies and other sources. Starting from basic drivers such as population, numbers of households, gross state product, numbers of vehicles, etc., the model calculated energy demands by type (various types of liquid and gaseous hydrocarbon fuels, electricity and hydrogen), and finally calculated emissions of GHGs and three criteria pollutants: reactive organic gases (ROG), nitrogen oxides (NOx), and fine (2.5 ?m) particulate matter (PM2.5). Calculations were generally statewide, but in some sectors, criteria pollutants were also calculated for two regional air basins: the South Coast Air Basin (SCAB) and the San Joaquin Valley (SJV). Three scenarios were developed that attempt to model: (1) all committed policies, (2) additional, uncommitted policy targets and (3) potential technology and market futures. Each scenario received extensive input from state energy planning agencies, in particular the California Air Resources Board. Results indicate that all three scenarios are able to meet the 2020 statewide GHG targets, and by 2030, statewide GHG emissions range from between 208 and 396 MtCO2/yr. However, none of the scenarios are able to meet the 2050 GHG target of 85 MtCO2/yr, with emissions ranging from 188 to 444 MtCO2/yr, so additional policies will need to be developed for California to meet this stringent future target. A full sensitivity study of major scenario assumptions was also performed. In terms of criteria pollutants, targets were less well-defined, but while all three scenarios were able to make significant reductions in ROG, NOx and PM2.5 both statewide and in the two regional air basins, they may nonetheless fall short of what will be required by future federal standards. Specifically, in Scenario 1, regional NOx emissions are approximately three times the estimated targets for both 2023 and 2032, and in Scenarios 2 and 3, NOx emissions are approximately twice the estimated targets. Further work is required in this area, including detailed regional air quality modeling, in order to determine likely pathways for attaining these stringent targets.

  14. Application of a Rule-Based Model to Estimate Mercury Exchange for Three Background Biomes in the Continental United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hartman, Jelena S. [University of Nevada, Reno; Weisberg, Peter J [University of Nevada, Reno; Pillai, Rekha [University of Nevada, Reno; Ericksen, Joey A. [University of Nevada, Reno; Gustin, Mae S. [University of Nevada, Reno; Kuiken, Todd [Tennessee Technological University; Zhang, Hong [Tennessee Technological University; Lindberg, Steven Eric [ORNL; Rytuba, J. J. [U.S. Geological Survey, Menlo Park, CA

    2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ecosystems that have low mercury (Hg) concentrations (i.e., not enriched or impacted by geologic or anthropogenic processes) cover most of the terrestrial surface area of the earth yet their role as a net source or sink for atmospheric Hg is uncertain. Here we use empirical data to develop a rule-based model implemented within a geographic information system framework to estimate the spatial and temporal patterns of Hg flux for semiarid deserts, grasslands, and deciduous forests representing 45% of the continental United States. This exercise provides an indication of whether these ecosystems are a net source or sink for atmospheric Hg as well as a basis for recommendation of data to collect in future field sampling campaigns. Results indicated that soil alone was a small net source of atmospheric Hg and that emitted Hg could be accounted for based on Hg input by wet deposition. When foliar assimilation and wet deposition are added to the area estimate of soil Hg flux these biomes are a sink for atmospheric Hg.

  15. Combined Estimation of Hydrogeologic Conceptual Model, Parameter, and Scenario Uncertainty with Application to Uranium Transport at the Hanford Site 300 Area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meyer, Philip D.; Ye, Ming; Rockhold, Mark L.; Neuman, Shlomo P.; Cantrell, Kirk J.

    2007-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This report to the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) describes the development and application of a methodology to systematically and quantitatively assess predictive uncertainty in groundwater flow and transport modeling that considers the combined impact of hydrogeologic uncertainties associated with the conceptual-mathematical basis of a model, model parameters, and the scenario to which the model is applied. The methodology is based on a n extension of a Maximum Likelihood implementation of Bayesian Model Averaging. Model uncertainty is represented by postulating a discrete set of alternative conceptual models for a site with associated prior model probabilities that reflect a belief about the relative plausibility of each model based on its apparent consistency with available knowledge and data. Posterior model probabilities are computed and parameter uncertainty is estimated by calibrating each model to observed system behavior; prior parameter estimates are optionally included. Scenario uncertainty is represented as a discrete set of alternative future conditions affecting boundary conditions, source/sink terms, or other aspects of the models, with associated prior scenario probabilities. A joint assessment of uncertainty results from combining model predictions computed under each scenario using as weight the posterior model and prior scenario probabilities. The uncertainty methodology was applied to modeling of groundwater flow and uranium transport at the Hanford Site 300 Area. Eight alternative models representing uncertainty in the hydrogeologic and geochemical properties as well as the temporal variability were considered. Two scenarios represent alternative future behavior of the Columbia River adjacent to the site were considered. The scenario alternatives were implemented in the models through the boundary conditions. Results demonstrate the feasibility of applying a comprehensive uncertainty assessment to large-scale, detailed groundwater flow and transport modeling and illustrate the benefits of the methodology I providing better estimates of predictive uncertiay8, quantitative results for use in assessing risk, and an improved understanding of the system behavior and the limitations of the models.

  16. Primate polonium metabolic models and their use in estimation of systemic radiation doses from bioassay data. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cohen, N. [New York Univ. Medical Center, Tuxedo, NY (United States). Dept. of Environmental Medicine

    1989-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A Polonium metabolic model was derived and incorporated into a Fortran algorithm which estimates the systemic radiation dose from {sup 210}Po when applied to occupational urine bioassay data. The significance of the doses estimated are examined by defining the degree of uncertainty attached to them through comprehensive statistical testing procedures. Many parameters necessary for dosimetry calculations (such as organ partition coefficients and excretion fractions), were evaluated from metabolic studies of {sup 210}Po in non-human primates. Two tamarins and six baboons were injected intravenously with {sup 210}Po citrate. Excreta and blood samples were collected. Five of the baboons were sacrificed at times ranging from 1 day to 3 months post exposure. Complete necropsies were performed and all excreta and the majority of all skeletal and tissue samples were analyzed radiochemically for their {sup 210}Po content. The {sup 210}Po excretion rate in the baboon was more rapid than in the tamarin. The biological half-time of {sup 210}Po excretion in the baboon was approximately 15 days while in the tamarin, the {sup 210}Po excretion rate was in close agreement with the 50 day biological half-time predicted by ICRP 30. Excretion fractions of {sup 210}Po in the non-human primates were found to be markedly different from data reported elsewhere in other species, including man. A thorough review of the Po urinalysis procedure showed that significant recovery losses resulted when metabolized {sup 210}Po was deposited out of raw urine. Polonium-210 was found throughout the soft tissues of the baboon but not with the partition coefficients for liver, kidneys, and spleen that are predicted by the ICRP 30 metabolic model. A fractional distribution of 0.29 for liver, 0.07 for kidneys, and 0.006 for spleen was determined. Retention times for {sup 210}Po in tissues are described by single exponential functions with biological half-times ranging from 15 to 50 days.

  17. The common inhaled anesthetic isoflurane increases aggregation of huntingtin and alters calcium homeostasis in a cell model of Huntington's disease

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang Qiujun [Department of Anesthesiology and Critical Care, University of Pennsylvania, 305 John Morgan Building, 3620 Hamilton Walk, Pennsylvania, PA 19104 (United States); Department of Anesthesiology, The Third Clinical Hospital, Hebei Medical University, Shijiazhuang, Hebei 050051 (China); Liang Ge [Department of Anesthesiology and Critical Care, University of Pennsylvania, 305 John Morgan Building, 3620 Hamilton Walk, Pennsylvania, PA 19104 (United States); Yang Hui [Department of Anesthesiology and Critical Care, University of Pennsylvania, 305 John Morgan Building, 3620 Hamilton Walk, Pennsylvania, PA 19104 (United States); Department of Anesthesiology, Tongji Hospital, Tongji Medical College, HuaZhong Science and Technology University, Wuhan 430030 (China); Wang Shouping [Department of Anesthesiology and Critical Care, University of Pennsylvania, 305 John Morgan Building, 3620 Hamilton Walk, Pennsylvania, PA 19104 (United States); Department of Anesthesia, Second Affiliated Hospital of Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou 510120 (China); Eckenhoff, Maryellen F. [Department of Anesthesiology and Critical Care, University of Pennsylvania, 305 John Morgan Building, 3620 Hamilton Walk, Pennsylvania, PA 19104 (United States); Wei Huafeng, E-mail: weih@uphs.upenn.edu [Department of Anesthesiology and Critical Care, University of Pennsylvania, 305 John Morgan Building, 3620 Hamilton Walk, Pennsylvania, PA 19104 (United States)

    2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Isoflurane is known to increase {beta}-amyloid aggregation and neuronal damage. We hypothesized that isoflurane will have similar effects on the polyglutamine huntingtin protein and will cause alterations in intracellular calcium homeostasis. We tested this hypothesis in striatal cells from the expanded glutamine huntingtin knock-in mouse (STHdh{sup Q111/Q111}) and wild type (STHdh{sup Q7/Q7}) striatal neurons. The primary cultured neurons were exposed for 24 h to equipotent concentrations of isoflurane, sevoflurane, and desflurane in the presence or absence of extracellular calcium and with or without xestospongin C, a potent endoplasmic reticulum inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (InsP{sub 3}) receptor antagonist. Aggregation of huntingtin protein, cell viability, and calcium concentrations were measured. Isoflurane, sevoflurane, and desflurane all increased the aggregation of huntingtin in STHdh{sup Q111/Q111} cells, with isoflurane having the largest effect. Isoflurane induced greater calcium release from the ER and relatively more cell damage in the STHdh{sup Q111/Q111} huntingtin cells than in the wild type STHdh{sup Q7/Q7} striatal cells. However, sevoflurane and desflurane caused less calcium release from the ER and less cell damage. Xestospongin C inhibited the isoflurane-induced calcium release from the ER, aggregation of huntingtin, and cell damage in the STHdh{sup Q111/Q111} cells. In summary, the Q111 form of huntingtin increases the vulnerability of striatal neurons to isoflurane neurotoxicity through combined actions on the ER IP{sub 3} receptors. Calcium release from the ER contributes to the anesthetic induced huntingtin aggregation in STHdh{sup Q111/Q111} striatal cells.

  18. LBNL-XXXXX | Logue et al., Evaluation of an Incremental Ventilation Energy Model for Estimating Impacts of Air Sealing and Mechanical Ventilation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    LBNL-XXXXX | Logue et al., Evaluation of an Incremental Ventilation Energy Model for Estimating. Turner, Iain S. Walker, and Brett C. Singer Environmental Energy Technologies Division June 2012 LBNL-5796E #12;LBNL-XXXXX | Logue et al., Evaluation of an Incremental Ventilation Energy Model

  19. Inferring Latent States and Refining Force Estimates via Hierarchical Dirichlet Process Modeling in Single Particle Tracking Experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christopher P. Calderon; Kerry S. Bloom

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Optical microscopy provides rich spatio-temporal information characterizing in vivo molecular motion. However, effective forces and other parameters used to summarize molecular motion change over time in live cells due to latent state changes, e.g., changes induced by dynamic micro-environments, photobleaching, and other heterogeneity inherent in biological processes. This study focuses on techniques for analyzing Single Particle Tracking (SPT) data experiencing abrupt state changes. We demonstrate the approach on GFP tagged chromatids experiencing metaphase in yeast cells and probe the effective forces resulting from dynamic interactions that reflect the sum of a number of physical phenomena. State changes are induced by factors such as microtubule dynamics exerting force through the centromere, thermal polymer fluctuations, etc. Simulations are used to demonstrate the relevance of the approach in more general SPT data analyses. Refined force estimates are obtained by adopting and modifying a nonparametric Bayesian modeling technique, the Hierarchical Dirichlet Process Switching Linear Dynamical System (HDP-SLDS), for SPT applications. The HDP-SLDS method shows promise in systematically identifying dynamical regime changes induced by unobserved state changes when the number of underlying states is unknown in advance (a common problem in SPT applications). We expand on the relevance of the HDP-SLDS approach, review the relevant background of Hierarchical Dirichlet Processes, show how to map discrete time HDP-SLDS models to classic SPT models, and discuss limitations of the approach. In addition, we demonstrate new computational techniques for tuning hyperparameters and for checking the statistical consistency of model assumptions directly against individual experimental trajectories; the techniques circumvent the need for "ground-truth" and subjective information.

  20. Journal of Machine Learning Research 13 (2012) 307-361 Submitted 12/10; Revised 11/11; Published 2/12 Noise-Contrastive Estimation of Unnormalized Statistical Models,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hyvärinen, Aapo

    of estimating, from observed data, a probabilistic model that is parameterized by a finite number of parameters is to perform nonlinear logistic regression to discriminate between the observed data and some artificially estimation methods for unnormalized models. As an application to real data, we estimate novel two

  1. Lightweighting Automotive Materials for Increased Fuel Efficiency and Delivering Advanced Modeling and Simulation Capabilities to U.S. Manufacturers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hale, Steve

    2013-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Abstract The National Center for Manufacturing Sciences (NCMS) worked with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), to bring together research and development (R&D) collaborations to develop and accelerate the knowledgebase and infrastructure for lightweighting materials and manufacturing processes for their use in structural and applications in the automotive sector. The purpose/importance of this DOE program: 2016 CAF standards. Automotive industry technology that shall adopt the insertion of lightweighting material concepts towards manufacturing of production vehicles. Development and manufacture of advanced research tools for modeling and simulation (M&S) applications to reduce manufacturing and material costs. U.S. competitiveness that will help drive the development and manufacture of the next generation of materials. NCMS established a focused portfolio of applied R&D projects utilizing lightweighting materials for manufacture into automotive structures and components. Areas that were targeted in this program: Functionality of new lightweighting materials to meet present safety requirements. Manufacturability using new lightweighting materials. Cost reduction for the development and use of new lightweighting materials. The automotive industrys future continuously evolves through innovation, and lightweight materials are key in achieving a new era of lighter, more efficient vehicles. Lightweight materials are among the technical advances needed to achieve fuel/energy efficiency and reduce carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions: Establish design criteria methodology to identify the best materials for lightweighting. Employ state-of-the-art design tools for optimum material development for their specific applications. Match new manufacturing technology to production volume. Address new process variability with new production-ready processes.

  2. Estimation of unsaturated zone traveltimes for Rainier Mesa and Shoshone Mountain, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, using a source-responsive preferential-flow model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brian A. Ebel; John R. Nimmo

    2009-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Traveltimes for contaminant transport by water from a point in the unsaturated zone to the saturated zone are a concern at Rainier Mesa and Shoshone Mountain in the Nevada Test Site, Nevada. Where nuclear tests were conducted in the unsaturated zone, contaminants must traverse hundreds of meters of variably saturated rock before they enter the saturated zone in the carbonate rock, where the regional groundwater system has the potential to carry them substantial distances to a location of concern. The unsaturated-zone portion of the contaminant transport path may cause a significant delay, in addition to the time required to travel within the saturated zone, and thus may be important in the overall evaluation of the potential hazard from contamination. Downward contaminant transport through the unsaturated zone occurs through various processes and pathways; this can lead to a broad distribution of contaminant traveltimes, including exceedingly slow and unexpectedly fast extremes. Though the bulk of mobile contaminant arrives between the time-scale end members, the fastest contaminant transport speed, in other words the speed determined by the combination of possible processes and pathways that would bring a measureable quantity of contaminant to the aquifer in the shortest time, carries particular regulatory significance because of its relevance in formulating the most conservative hazard-prevention scenarios. Unsaturated-zone flow is usually modeled as a diffusive process responding to gravity and pressure gradients as mediated by the unsaturated hydraulic properties of the materials traversed. The mathematical formulation of the diffuse-flow concept is known as Richards' equation, which when coupled to a solute transport equation, such as the advection-dispersion equation, provides a framework to simulate contaminant migration in the unsaturated zone. In recent decades awareness has increased that much fluid flow and contaminant transport within the unsaturated zone takes place as preferential flow, faster than would be predicted by the coupled Richards' and advection-dispersion equations with hydraulic properties estimated by traditional means. At present the hydrologic community has not achieved consensus as to whether a modification of Richards' equation, or a fundamentally different formulation, would best quantify preferential flow. Where the fastest contaminant transport speed is what needs to be estimated, there is the possibility of simplification of the evaluation process. One way of doing so is by a two-step process in which the first step is to evaluate whether significant preferential flow and solute transport is possible for the media and conditions of concern. The second step is to carry out (a) a basic Richards' and advection-dispersion equation analysis if it is concluded that preferential flow is not possible or (b) an analysis that considers only the fastest possible preferential-flow processes, if preferential flow is possible. For the preferential-flow situation, a recently published model describable as a Source-Responsive Preferential-Flow (SRPF) model is an easily applied option. This report documents the application of this two-step process to flow through the thick unsaturated zones of Rainier Mesa and Shoshone Mountain in the Nevada Test Site. Application of the SRPF model involves distinguishing between continuous and intermittent water supply to preferential flow paths. At Rainier Mesa and Shoshone Mountain this issue is complicated by the fact that contaminant travel begins at a location deep in the subsurface, where there may be perched water that may or may not act like a continuous supply, depending on such features as the connectedness of fractures and the nature of impeding layers. We have treated this situation by hypothesizing both continuous and intermittent scenarios for contaminant transport to the carbonate aquifer and reporting estimation of the fastest speed for both of these end members.

  3. Top-down estimate of anthropogenic emission inventories and their interannual variability in Houston using a mesoscale inverse modeling technique

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brioude, J.; Kim, S. W.; Angevine, Wayne M.; Frost, G. J.; Lee, S. H.; McKeen, S. A.; Trainer, Michael; Fehsenfeld, Fred C.; Holloway, J. S.; Ryerson, T. B.; Williams, E. J.; Petron, Gabrielle; Fast, Jerome D.

    2011-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The 2000 and 2006 Texas Air Quality Study (TexAQS 2000 and 2006) field campaigns took place in eastern Texas in August-October of 2000 and 2006. Several flights of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) and National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) research aircraft were dedicated to characterizing anthropogenic emissions over Houston. Houston is known for having serious problems with non-attainment of air quality standards. We present a method that uses three models and aircraft observations to assess and improve existing emission inventories using an inverse modeling technique. We used 3-dimensional and 4-dimensional variational (3D-VAR and 4D-VAR) inverse modeling techniques based on a least-squares method to improve the spatial and temporal distribution of CO, NOy (sum of all reactive nitrogen compounds), and SO2 emissions predicted by the 4-km-resolution U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) National Emission Inventory (NEI) for 2005. Differences between the prior and posterior inventories are discussed in detail. We found that in 2006 the prior daytime emissions in the urban area of Houston have to be reduced by 40% {+-} 12% for CO and 7% {+-} 13% for NOy. Over the Houston Ship Channel, where industrial emissions are predominant, the prior emissions have to be reduced by 41% {+-} 15% for CO and 51% {+-} 9% for NOy. Major ports around Houston have their NOy emissions reduced as well, probably due to uncertainties in near-shore ship emissions in the EPA NEI inventory. Using the measurements from the two field campaigns, we assessed the interannual emission variability between 2000 and 2006. Daytime CO emissions from the Houston urban area have been reduced by 8% {+-} 20%, while the NOy emissions have increased by 20% {+-} 12% from 2000 to 2006. In the Houston Ship Channel, the daytime NOy emissions have increased by 13% {+-} 17%. Our results show qualitative consistencies with known changes in Houston emissions sources.

  4. Source Term Estimation of Radioxenon Released from the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Reactors Using Measured Air Concentrations and Atmospheric Transport Modeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eslinger, Paul W. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Biegalski, S. [Univ. of Texas at Austin, TX (United States); Bowyer, Ted W. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Cooper, Matthew W. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Haas, Derek A. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Hayes, James C. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Hoffman, Ian [Radiation Protection Bureau, Health Canada, Ottawa, ON (Canada); Korpach, E. [Radiation Protection Bureau, Health Canada, Ottawa, ON (Canada); Yi, Jing [Radiation Protection Bureau, Health Canada, Ottawa, ON (Canada); Miley, Harry S. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Rishel, Jeremy P. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Ungar, R. Kurt [Radiation Protection Bureau, Health Canada, Ottawa, ON (Canada); White, Brian [Radiation Protection Bureau, Health Canada, Ottawa, ON (Canada); Woods, Vincent T. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Systems designed to monitor airborne radionuclides released from underground nuclear explosions detected radioactive fallout from the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear accident in March 2011. Atmospheric transport modeling (ATM) of plumes of noble gases and particulates were performed soon after the accident to determine plausible detection locations of any radioactive releases to the atmosphere. We combine sampling data from multiple International Modeling System (IMS) locations in a new way to estimate the magnitude and time sequence of the releases. Dilution factors from the modeled plume at five different detection locations were combined with 57 atmospheric concentration measurements of 133-Xe taken from March 18 to March 23 to estimate the source term. This approach estimates that 59% of the 1.241019 Bq of 133-Xe present in the reactors at the time of the earthquake was released to the atmosphere over a three day period. Source term estimates from combinations of detection sites have lower spread than estimates based on measurements at single detection sites. Sensitivity cases based on data from four or more detection locations bound the source term between 35% and 255% of available xenon inventory.

  5. Multi-scale geospatial agroecosystem modeling: a case study on the influence of soil data resolution on carbon budget estimates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Xuesong; Sahajpal, Ritvik; Manowitz, D.; Zhao, Kaiguang; LeDuc, Stephen D.; Xu, Min; Xiong, Wei; Zhang, Aiping; Izaurralde, Roberto C.; Thomson, Allison M.; West, Tristram O.; Post, W. M.

    2014-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The development of effective measures to stabilize atmospheric CO2 concentration and mitigate negative impacts of climate change requires accurate quantification of the spatial variation and magnitude of the terrestrial carbon (C) flux. However, the spatial pattern and strength of terrestrial C sinks and sources remain uncertain. In this study, we designed a spatially-explicit agroecosystem modeling system by integrating the Environmental Policy Integrated Climate (EPIC) model with multiple sources of geospatial and surveyed datasets (including crop type map, elevation, climate forcing, fertilizer application, tillage type and distribution, and crop planting and harvesting date), and applied it to examine the sensitivity of cropland C flux simulations to two widely used soil databases (i.e. State Soil Geographic-STATSGO of a scale of 1:250,000 and Soil Survey Geographic-SSURGO of a scale of 1:24,000) in Iowa, USA. To efficiently execute numerous EPIC runs resulting from the use of high resolution spatial data (56m), we developed a parallelized version of EPIC. Both STATSGO and SSURGO led to similar simulations of crop yields and Net Ecosystem Production (NEP) estimates at the State level. However, substantial differences were observed at the county and sub-county (grid) levels. In general, the fine resolution SSURGO data outperformed the coarse resolution STATSGO data for county-scale crop-yield simulation, and within STATSGO, the area-weighted approach provided more accurate results. Further analysis showed that spatial distribution and magnitude of simulated NEP were more sensitive to the resolution difference between SSURGO and STATSGO at the county or grid scale. For over 60% of the cropland areas in Iowa, the deviations between STATSGO- and SSURGO-derived NEP were larger than 1MgCha(-1)yr(-1), or about half of the average cropland NEP, highlighting the significant uncertainty in spatial distribution and magnitude of simulated C fluxes resulting from differences in soil data resolution.

  6. Estimating extinction risk under climate change: next-generation models simultaneously incorporate demography, dispersal, and biotic interactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kissling, W. Daniel

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    interactions Estimating species-level extinction risk underin predicting species-level extinction risk under climateto assess extinction risk of select species under climate

  7. INCREASING STORAGE CAPAPCITY OF DREDGED MATERIAL MANAGEMENT AREAS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    INCREASING STORAGE CAPAPCITY OF DREDGED MATERIAL MANAGEMENT AREAS Timothy D. Stark, Ph.D., P. The Craney Island Dredged Material Management Area near Norfolk, Virginia is used to illustrate the use of the model in estimating the long-term storage capacity of confined dredged material management facilities

  8. A Stochastic Unit-Commitment Model to Estimate the Costs of Changing Power Plant Operation under High Amounts of Intermittent Wind Power

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ) a market for district heating and process heat. Time series for the wind power production rely on timeA Stochastic Unit-Commitment Model to Estimate the Costs of Changing Power Plant Operation under High Amounts of Intermittent Wind Power Integration Meibom, P.1 , Brand, H.2 , Barth, R.2 and Weber, C

  9. CONTRIBUTED to ASA/Q&P, ASA/SPES, and IMS JRC 2000 Spatial Spectral Estimation for Reactor Modelling and Control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scarrott, Carl

    and reactor control. Carl J. Scarrott, Mathematics and Statistics Dept., Lancaster University, Lancaster, LA1CONTRIBUTED to ASA/Q&P, ASA/SPES, and IMS JRC 2000 Spatial Spectral Estimation for Reactor Modelling and Control C.J. Scarrott G. Tunnicli e-Wilson Lancaster University, Lancaster, UK. Two

  10. DEWEK Wind Energy Conference 2012 Category: 4. Simulation models BACKWARD EXTRAPOLATION OF SHORT-TIME MEASUREMENT DATA FOR A REMAINING SERVICE LIFE ESTIMATION OF WIND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berlin,Technische Universität

    DEWEK Wind Energy Conference 2012 Category: 4. Simulation models 1 BACKWARD EXTRAPOLATION OF SHORT-TIME MEASUREMENT DATA FOR A REMAINING SERVICE LIFE ESTIMATION OF WIND TURBINES Dipl.-Ing. René Kamieth, Prof. Dr, Germany, Tel.: +49-(0)30-314-23603, Fax: +49-(0)30-314-26131 Summary Wind turbines built in the last

  11. Recession-based hydrological models for estimating low flows in ungauged catchments in the Himalayas Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 8(5), 891902 (2004) EGU

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Recession-based hydrological models for estimating low flows in ungauged catchments in the Himalayas 891 Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 8(5), 891902 (2004) © EGU Recession-based hydrological.R. Young1 and S.R. Kansakar2 1 Centre for Ecology and Hydrology,Wallingford, Oxfordshire, OX10 8BB, UK 2

  12. A Unified Open-Circuit-Voltage Model of Lithium-ion Batteries for State-of-Charge Estimation and State-of-Health Monitoring $

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peng, Huei

    A Unified Open-Circuit-Voltage Model of Lithium-ion Batteries for State-of-Charge Estimation. Keywords: Electric vehicles, Lithium-ion batteries, Open-Circuit-Voltage, State-of-Charge, State is widely used for characterizing battery properties under different conditions. It contains important

  13. Supervised learning of a regression model based on latent process. Application to the estimation of fuel cell life time

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chamroukhi, Faicel

    of fuel cell life time Rassa Onanena(1) , Faicel Chamroukhi(1) , Latifa Oukhellou(1)(2) , Denis Candusso to estimate fuel cell duration time from electrochemical impedance spectroscopy measurements. It consists for the estimation of fuel cell time duration. The performances of the proposed approach are evaluated

  14. Model Selection and Health Effect Estimation in Environmental Epidemiology Francesca Dominici, Chi Wang, Ciprian Crainiceanu, Giovanni Parmigiani

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dominici, Francesca

    Abstract In air pollution epidemiology, improvements in statistical analysis tools can translate for confounding. In studies of air pollution and health, the focus should ideally be on estimating health effects estimate the association between prenatal and lifetime exposures to air pollutants and pulmonary function

  15. ESTIMATION OF ETHANOL CONTENT IN FLEX-FUEL VEHICLES USING AN EXHAUST GAS OXYGEN SENSOR: MODEL, TUNING AND SENSITIVITY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stefanopoulou, Anna

    derivatives. Currently available flexible fuel vehicles (FFVs) can operate on a blend of gasoline and ethanol Estimated stoichiometric air-to-fuel ratio e Volume fraction of ethanol in gasoline-ethanol blend e Estimated volume fraction of ethanol in gasoline-ethanol blend Address all correspondence to annastef

  16. ARM Climate Modeling Best Estimate from Darwin, AU (ARMBE-CLDRAD TWPC3 V2.1)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    McCoy, Renata; Xie, Shaocheng

    The ARM CMBE-ATM [Xie, McCoy, Klein et al.] data file contains a best estimate of several selected atmospheric quantities from ACRF observations and NWP analysis data.

  17. ARM Climate Modeling Best Estimate from Manus Island, PNG (ARMBE-CLDRAD TWPC1 V2.1)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    McCoy, Renata; Xie, Shaocheng

    The ARM CMBE-ATM [Xie, McCoy, Klein et al.] data file contains a best estimate of several selected atmospheric quantities from ACRF observations and NWP analysis data.

  18. Operator-adapted finite element wavelets : theory and applications to a posteriori error estimation and adaptive computational modeling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sudarshan, Raghunathan, 1978-

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose a simple and unified approach for a posteriori error estimation and adaptive mesh refinement in finite element analysis using multiresolution signal processing principles. Given a sequence of nested discretizations ...

  19. Estimation of methane and carbon dioxide surface fluxes using a 3-D global atmospheric chemical transport model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Yu-Han, 1973-

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Methane (CH?) and carbon dioxide (CO?) are the two most radiatively important greenhouse gases attributable to human activity. Large uncertainties in their source and sink magnitudes currently exist. We estimate global ...

  20. Cost Estimator

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A successful candidate in this position will serve as a senior cost and schedule estimator who is responsible for preparing life-cycle cost and schedule estimates and analyses associated with the...

  1. Estimation of two-parameter multilevel item response models with predictor variables: simulation and substantiation for an urban school district

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Natesan, Prathiba

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    IRT models. However, models such as 2-PL MLIRT models have not been studied yet. This dissertation consists of two studies, a simulation and a substantiation for an urban school district dataset. The simulation study tested the performance...

  2. A combined method to estimate parameters of the thalamocortical model from a heavily noise-corrupted time series of action potential

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Ruofan; Wang, Jiang; Deng, Bin, E-mail: dengbin@tju.edu.cn; Liu, Chen; Wei, Xile [Department of Electrical and Automation Engineering, Tianjin University, Tianjin (China)] [Department of Electrical and Automation Engineering, Tianjin University, Tianjin (China); Tsang, K. M.; Chan, W. L. [Department of Electrical Engineering, The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Kowloon (Hong Kong)] [Department of Electrical Engineering, The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Kowloon (Hong Kong)

    2014-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A combined method composing of the unscented Kalman filter (UKF) and the synchronization-based method is proposed for estimating electrophysiological variables and parameters of a thalamocortical (TC) neuron model, which is commonly used for studying Parkinson's disease for its relay role of connecting the basal ganglia and the cortex. In this work, we take into account the condition when only the time series of action potential with heavy noise are available. Numerical results demonstrate that not only this method can estimate model parameters from the extracted time series of action potential successfully but also the effect of its estimation is much better than the only use of the UKF or synchronization-based method, with a higher accuracy and a better robustness against noise, especially under the severe noise conditions. Considering the rather important role of TC neuron in the normal and pathological brain functions, the exploration of the method to estimate the critical parameters could have important implications for the study of its nonlinear dynamics and further treatment of Parkinson's disease.

  3. Can reductions in logging damage increase carbon storage over time? Evaluation of a simulation model for a pilot carbon offset project in Malaysia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pinard, M.A. [Univ. of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States)

    1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Selective timber harvesting operations, if uncontrolled, can severely degrade a forest. Although techniques for reducing logging damage are well-known and inexpensive to apply, incentives to adopt these techniques are generally lacking. Power companies and other emitters of {open_quotes}greenhouse{close_quotes} gases soon may be forced to reduce or otherwise offset their net emissions; one offset option is to fund programs aimed at reducing logging damage. To investigate the consequences of reductions in logging damage for ecosystem carbon storage, I constructed a model to simulate changes in biomass and carbon pools following logging of primary dipterocarp forests in southeast Asia. I adapted a physiologically-driven, tree-based model of natural forest gap dynamics (FORMIX) to simulate forest recovery following logging. Input variables included stand structure, volume extracted, stand damage (% stems), and soil disturbance (% area compacted). Output variables included total biomass, tree density, and total carbon storage over time. Assumptions of the model included the following: (1) areas with soil disturbances have elevated probabilities of vine colonization and reduced rates of tree establishment, (2) areas with broken canopy but no soil disturbance are colonized initially by pioneer tree species and 20 yr later by persistent forest species, (3) damaged trees have reduced growth and increased mortality rates. Simulation results for two logging techniques, conventional and reduced-impact logging, are compared with data from field studies conducted within a pilot carbon offset project in Sabah, Malaysia.

  4. Estimation of Absolute Free Energies of Hydration using Continuum Methods: Accuracy of Partial Charge Models and Optimization of Nonpolar Contributions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rizzo, Robert C.

    Estimation of Absolute Free Energies of Hydration using Continuum Methods: Accuracy of Partial, and Irwin D. Kuntz Supporting Information Table S1. Experimental Free Energies of Hydration (Ghyd) in kcal,2-dimethylcyclohexane 1.58 36 trans-1,4-dimethylcyclohexane 2.11 37 ethene 1.28 38 propene 1.32 39 but-1-ene 1.38 40

  5. HOTSPOTS OF CLIMATEDRIVEN INCREASES IN RESIDENTIAL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . This paper provides reduced form estimates of changes in electricity consumption due to increased use to higher projections of electricity consumption. These increases in projected electricity consumption were: climate change, vulnerability, electricity consumption, heating, cooling Please use the following citation

  6. Estimating consumption rates of juvenile sandbar sharks (Carcharhinus plumbeus) in Chesapeake Bay, Virginia, using a bioenergetics model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dowd, William Wesley; Brill, R W; Bushnell, P G; Musick, J A

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    error analy- sis of fish bioenergetics models. Can J. Fish.importance of activity in bioenergetics models applied toA. C. Cockcroft. 1990. Bioenergetics of fishes in a high-

  7. Technology for Increasing Geothermal Energy Productivity. Computer Models to Characterize the Chemical Interactions of Goethermal Fluids and Injectates with Reservoir Rocks, Wells, Surface Equiptment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nancy Moller Weare

    2006-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

    This final report describes the results of a research program we carried out over a five-year (3/1999-9/2004) period with funding from a Department of Energy geothermal FDP grant (DE-FG07-99ID13745) and from other agencies. The goal of research projects in this program were to develop modeling technologies that can increase the understanding of geothermal reservoir chemistry and chemistry-related energy production processes. The ability of computer models to handle many chemical variables and complex interactions makes them an essential tool for building a fundamental understanding of a wide variety of complex geothermal resource and production chemistry. With careful choice of methodology and parameterization, research objectives were to show that chemical models can correctly simulate behavior for the ranges of fluid compositions, formation minerals, temperature and pressure associated with present and near future geothermal systems as well as for the very high PT chemistry of deep resources that is intractable with traditional experimental methods. Our research results successfully met these objectives. We demonstrated that advances in physical chemistry theory can be used to accurately describe the thermodynamics of solid-liquid-gas systems via their free energies for wide ranges of composition (X), temperature and pressure. Eight articles on this work were published in peer-reviewed journals and in conference proceedings. Four are in preparation. Our work has been presented at many workshops and conferences. We also considerably improved our interactive web site (geotherm.ucsd.edu), which was in preliminary form prior to the grant. This site, which includes several model codes treating different XPT conditions, is an effective means to transfer our technologies and is used by the geothermal community and other researchers worldwide. Our models have wide application to many energy related and other important problems (e.g., scaling prediction in petroleum production systems, stripping towers for mineral production processes, nuclear waste storage, CO2 sequestration strategies, global warming). Although funding decreases cut short completion of several research activities, we made significant progress on these abbreviated projects.

  8. Uncertainties of isoprene emissions in the MEGAN model estimated for a coniferous and broad-leaved mixed forest in Southern China

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Situ, S.; Wang, Xuemei; Guenther, Alex B.; Zhang, Yanli; Wang, Xinming; Huang, Minjuan; Fan, Qi; Xiong, Zhe

    2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Using local observed emission factor, meteorological data, vegetation 5 information and dynamic MODIS LAI, MEGANv2.1 was constrained to predict the isoprene emission from Dinghushan forest in the Pearl River Delta region during a field campaign in November 2008, and the uncertainties in isoprene emission estimates were quantified by the Monte Carlo approach. The results indicate that MEGAN can predict the isoprene emission reasonably during the campaign, and the mean value of isoprene emission is 2.35 mg m-2 h-1 in daytime. There are high uncertainties associated with the MEGAN inputs and calculated parameters, and the relative error can be as high as -89 to 111% for a 95% confidence interval. The emission factor of broadleaf trees and the activity factor accounting for light and temperature dependence are the most important contributors to the uncertainties in isoprene emission estimated for the Dinghushan forest during the campaign. The results also emphasize the importance of accurate observed PAR and temperature to reduce the uncertainties in isoprene emission estimated by model, because the MEGAN model activity factor accounting for light and temperature dependence is highly sensitive to PAR and temperature.

  9. Linearity of Climate Response to Increases in Black Carbon Aerosols

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mahajan, Salil [ORNL; Evans, Katherine J [ORNL; Hack, James J [ORNL; Truesdale, John [National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR)

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The impact of absorbing aerosols on global climate are not completely understood. Here, we present results of idealized experiments conducted with the Community Atmosphere Model (CAM4) coupled to a slab ocean model (CAM4-SOM) to simulate the climate response to increases in tropospheric black carbon aerosols (BC) by direct and semi-direct effects. CAM4-SOM was forced with 0, 1x, 2x, 5x and 10x an estimate of the present day concentration of BC while maintaining their estimated present day global spatial and vertical distribution. The top of the atmosphere (TOA) radiative forcing of BC in these experiments is positive (warming) and increases linearly as the BC burden increases. The total semi-direct effect for the 1x experiment is positive but becomes increasingly negative for higher BC concentrations. The global average surface temperature response is found to be a linear function of the TOA radiative forcing. The climate sensitivity to BC from these experiments is estimated to be 0.42 K $\\textnormal W^{-1} m^{2}$ when the semi-direct effects are accounted for and 0.22 K $\\textnormal W^{-1} m^{2}$ with only the direct effects considered. Global average precipitation decreases linearly as BC increases, with a precipitation sensitivity to atmospheric absorption of 0.4 $\\%$ $\\textnormal W^{-1} \\textnormal m^{2}$ . The hemispheric asymmetry of BC also causes an increase in southward cross-equatorial heat transport and a resulting northward shift of the inter-tropical convergence zone in the simulations at a rate of 4$^{\\circ}$N $\\textnormal PW^{-1}$. Global average mid- and high-level clouds decrease, whereas the low-level clouds increase linearly with BC. The increase in marine stratocumulus cloud fraction over the south tropical Atlantic is caused by increased BC-induced diabatic heating of the free troposphere.

  10. Development and use of the GREET model to estimate fuel-cycle energy use and emissions of various transportation technologies and fuels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, M.Q.

    1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents the development and use of the Greenhouse Gases, Regulated Emissions, and Energy Use in Transportation (GREET) model. The model, developed in a spreadsheet format, estimates the full fuel- cycle emissions and energy use associated with various transportation fuels for light-duty vehicles. The model calculates fuel-cycle emissions of five criteria pollutants (volatile organic compounds, carbon monoxide, nitrogen oxides, sulfur oxides, and particulate matter measuring 10 microns or less) and three greenhouse gases (carbon dioxide, methane, and nitrous oxide). The model also calculates the total fuel-cycle energy consumption, fossil fuel consumption, and petroleum consumption using various transportation fuels. The GREET model includes 17 fuel cycles: petroleum to conventional gasoline, reformulated gasoline, clean diesel, liquefied petroleum gas, and electricity via residual oil; natural gas to compressed natural gas, liquefied petroleum gas, methanol, hydrogen, and electricity; coal to electricity; uranium to electricity; renewable energy (hydrogen, solar energy, and wind) to electricity; corn, woody biomass, and herbaceous biomass to ethanol; and landfill gases to methanol. This report presents fuel-cycle energy use and emissions for a 2000 model-year car powered by each of the fuels that are produced from the primary energy sources considered in the study.

  11. A general model for estimating the economic and production effects of specified pesticide withdrawals: a cotton application

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Casey, James Elmer

    1973-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    available does not have quantitative esti- mates of social costs of present levels of pesticide use. However, the economists have developed several hypothetical models whereby an evaluation could be done. Unfortunately, many of the variables...

  12. Comparison of mean retention time (MRT) of markers in the reticulorumen (RR) estimated by modelling their faecal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    -EDTA) were injected via the rumen cannula through the reticulo-omasal orifice prior to duodenal sampling (9 by modelling and algebraic methods were close. Markers (digesta phases) had an effect on accuracy of MRTRR

  13. Concentrating Solar Deployment System (CSDS) -- A New Model for Estimating U.S. Concentrating Solar Power (CSP) Market Potential: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blair, N.; Mehos, M.; Short, W.; Heimiller, D.

    2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents the Concentrating Solar Deployment System Model (CSDS). CSDS is a multiregional, multitime-period, Geographic Information System (GIS), and linear programming model of capacity expansion in the electric sector of the United States. CSDS is designed to address the principal market and policy issues related to the penetration of concentrating solar power (CSP) electric-sector technologies. This paper discusses the current structure, capabilities, and assumptions of the model. Additionally, results are presented for the impact of continued research and development (R&D) spending, an extension to the investment tax credit (ITC), and use of a production tax credit (PTC). CSDS is an extension of the Wind Deployment System (WinDS) model created at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL). While WinDS examines issues related to wind, CSDS is an extension to analyze similar issues for CSP applications. Specifically, a detailed representation of parabolic trough systems with thermal storage has been developed within the existing structure.

  14. SimHydro 2012: Hydraulic modeling and uncertainty, 12-14 September 2012, Sophia Antipolis N. Jean-Baptiste, C. Dore, P-O. Malaterre, J. Sau -Data assimilation for hydraulic state estimation of a development project

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Universit de

    SimHydro 2012: Hydraulic modeling and uncertainty, 12-14 September 2012, Sophia Antipolis N. Jean-Baptiste, C. Dore, P-O. Malaterre, J. Sau - Data assimilation for hydraulic state estimation of a development project Data assimilation for hydraulic state estimation of a development project Assimilation de donnes

  15. Two dose-estimation models CSA-N288.1 and Nureg 1.109, 1.113 - compared for chronic aquatic releases from nuclear facilities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheppard, S C; Peterson, S R

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Both the Canadian Standards Association (CSA) and the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (US-NRC) have published guidelines for the calculation of doses to the public due to emissions from nuclear facilities. In the sale of CANDU reactors overseas, either of these guidelines may be used as part of the approval process in the recipient country. This study compares the aquatic exposure pathways described in the guidelines. These include direct consumption of contaminated water and food, and exposure to contaminated sediments. The CSA and US-NRC guidelines for estimating dilution of aquatic emissions are of a general nature and the choice of model used to quantify dilution is left to the user. The models prescribed for the different exposure pathways by these two regulatory guides are similar in many attributes. Many of the recommended parameter values are identical and many of the formulations are either identical, or become identical under general conditions. However, despite these similarities, there...

  16. Robust UAV Coordination for Target Tracking using Output-Feedback Model Predictive Control with Moving Horizon Estimation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hespanha, João Pedro

    Robust UAV Coordination for Target Tracking using Output-Feedback Model Predictive Control consider the control of two UAVs tracking an evasive moving ground vehicle. The UAVs are small fixed to maintain visibility. The control inputs to the UAVs are computed based on noisy measurements of the UAVs

  17. Increasing fMRI Sampling Rate Improves Granger Causality Estimates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ' adherence to PLOS ONE policies on sharing data and materials. * Email: fhlin@ntu.edu.tw Introduction measures of effective connectivity [1­3]. Previously, effective connectivity analyses of human PET [4

  18. An increased estimate of the merger rate of double neutron

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sarkissian, John M.

    -star merger rate in the Galaxy is crucial in order to predict whether current gravity wave detectors of only a few double-neutron-star binaries with merger times less than the age of the Universe. Here we position and flux density for the pulsar. Knowledge of the pulsar position with subarcsecond precision

  19. Cost Estimating, Analysis, and Standardization

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1984-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

    To establish policy and responsibilities for: (a) developing and reviewing project cost estimates; (b) preparing independent cost estimates and analysis; (c) standardizing cost estimating procedures; and (d) improving overall cost estimating and analytical techniques, cost data bases, cost and economic escalation models, and cost estimating systems. Cancels DOE O 5700.2B, dated 8-5-1983; DOE O 5700.8, dated 5-27-1981; and HQ 1130.1A, dated 12-30-1981. Canceled by DOE O 5700.2D, dated 6-12-1992

  20. The influence of naturally-occurring organic acids on model estimates of lakewater acidification using the model of acidification of groundwater in catchments (MAGIC)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sullivan, T.J.; Eilers, J.M. (E and S Environmental Chemistry, Inc., Corvallis, OR (United States)); Cosby, B.J. (Virginia Univ., Charlottesville, VA (United States). Dept. of Environmental Sciences); Driscoll, C.T. (Syracuse Univ., NY (United States). Dept. of Civil Engineering); Hemond, H.F. (Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge, MA (United States). Dept. of Civil Engineering); Charles, D.F.

    1993-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

    A project for the US Department of Energy, entitled Incorporation of an organic acid representation into MAGIC (Model of Acidification of Groundwater in Catchments) and Testing of the Revised Model UsingIndependent Data Sources'' was initiated by E S Environmental Chemistry, Inc. in March, 1992. Major components of the project include: improving the MAGIC model by incorporating a rigorous organic acid representation, based on empirical data and geochemical considerations, and testing the revised model using data from paleolimnological hindcasts of preindustrial chemistry for 33 Adirondack Mountain lakes, and the results of whole-catchment artificial acidification projects in Maine and Norway. The ongoing research in this project involves development of an organic acid representation to be incorporated into the MAGIC modeland testing of the improved model using three independent data sources. The research during Year 1 has included conducting two workshops to agree on an approach for the organic acid modeling, developing the organic subroutine and incorporating it into MAGIC (Task 1), conducing MAGIC hindcasts for Adirondack lakes and comparing the results with paleolimnological reconstructions (Task 2), and conducting site visits to the manipulation project sites in Maine and Norway. The purpose of this report is to provide a summary of the work that has been conducted on this project during Year 1. Tasks 1 and 2 have now been completed.

  1. Measurement enhancement for state estimation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Jian

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    of a few phasor measurement units (PMU) in the system can significantly increase measurement redundancy, which in turn can improve the capability of state estimation to detect and identify bad data, even during loss of measurements. Meanwhile, strategic...

  2. Best Linear Unbiased Estimate Motivation for BLUE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fowler, Mark

    1 Chapter 6 Best Linear Unbiased Estimate (BLUE) #12;2 Motivation for BLUE Except for Linear Model to a sub-optimal estimate BLUE is one such sub-optimal estimate Idea for BLUE: 1. Restrict estimate) Advantage of BLUE:Needs only 1st and 2nd moments of PDF Mean & Covariance Disadvantages of BLUE: 1. Sub

  3. Linear Constrained Moving Horizon Estimator With Pre-Estimating Observer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johansen, Tor Arne

    in the literature, e.g. Rao et al. (2001, 2003); Alessandri et al. (2003, 2004). The idea of MHE is to estimate of robustness in the presence of uncertainties such as noise, disturbances and modeling errors, see Alessandri in the literature, e.g. Rao et al. (2001, 2003); Alessandri et al. (2003, 2004). The pre-estimator leads

  4. ABSTRACT: Using a regional climate model (RegCM2.5), the potential impacts on the climate of California of increasing atmo-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Snyder, Mark A.

    and of up to 5°C on a monthly basis. Temperature increases were greatest in the central and northern regions of the American Water Resources Association (JAWRA) 40(3):591-601. INTRODUCTION The anthropogenic input consis- tent with the GCM, especially in this study, where the GCM and RCM use the same solar radiation

  5. A Monte Carlo Investigation of Three Different Estimation Methods in Multilevel Structural Equation Modeling Under Conditions of Data Nonnormality and Varied Sample Sizes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Byrd, Jimmy

    2010-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

    various sample sizes and differing estimators (maximum likelihood, generalized least squares, and weighted least squares). The finding revealed that the regression coefficients were estimated with little to no bias among the study design conditions...

  6. Incoporating rubble mound jetties in elliptic harbor wave models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Jianfeng

    2007-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Simulation models based on the elliptic mild or steep slope wave equation are frequently used to estimate wave properties needed for the engineering calculations of harbors. To increase the practical applicability of such models, a method...

  7. Finite-Difference Modeling of Noise Coupling between Power/Ground Planes in Multilayered Packages and Boards

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Swaminathan, Madhavan

    system become increasingly more critical regarding the signal integrity and electromagnetic interference electromagnetic interference. Hence, accurate modeling of power/ground planes is critical to estimate the noise

  8. Enhancing e-waste estimates: Improving data quality by multivariate InputOutput Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Feng, E-mail: fwang@unu.edu [Institute for Sustainability and Peace, United Nations University, Hermann-Ehler-Str. 10, 53113 Bonn (Germany); Design for Sustainability Lab, Faculty of Industrial Design Engineering, Delft University of Technology, Landbergstraat 15, 2628CE Delft (Netherlands); Huisman, Jaco [Institute for Sustainability and Peace, United Nations University, Hermann-Ehler-Str. 10, 53113 Bonn (Germany); Design for Sustainability Lab, Faculty of Industrial Design Engineering, Delft University of Technology, Landbergstraat 15, 2628CE Delft (Netherlands); Stevels, Ab [Design for Sustainability Lab, Faculty of Industrial Design Engineering, Delft University of Technology, Landbergstraat 15, 2628CE Delft (Netherlands); Bald, Cornelis Peter [Institute for Sustainability and Peace, United Nations University, Hermann-Ehler-Str. 10, 53113 Bonn (Germany); Statistics Netherlands, Henri Faasdreef 312, 2492 JP Den Haag (Netherlands)

    2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Highlights: A multivariate InputOutput Analysis method for e-waste estimates is proposed. Applying multivariate analysis to consolidate data can enhance e-waste estimates. We examine the influence of model selection and data quality on e-waste estimates. Datasets of all e-waste related variables in a Dutch case study have been provided. Accurate modeling of time-variant lifespan distributions is critical for estimate. - Abstract: Waste electrical and electronic equipment (or e-waste) is one of the fastest growing waste streams, which encompasses a wide and increasing spectrum of products. Accurate estimation of e-waste generation is difficult, mainly due to lack of high quality data referred to market and socio-economic dynamics. This paper addresses how to enhance e-waste estimates by providing techniques to increase data quality. An advanced, flexible and multivariate InputOutput Analysis (IOA) method is proposed. It links all three pillars in IOA (product sales, stock and lifespan profiles) to construct mathematical relationships between various data points. By applying this method, the data consolidation steps can generate more accurate time-series datasets from available data pool. This can consequently increase the reliability of e-waste estimates compared to the approach without data processing. A case study in the Netherlands is used to apply the advanced IOA model. As a result, for the first time ever, complete datasets of all three variables for estimating all types of e-waste have been obtained. The result of this study also demonstrates significant disparity between various estimation models, arising from the use of data under different conditions. It shows the importance of applying multivariate approach and multiple sources to improve data quality for modelling, specifically using appropriate time-varying lifespan parameters. Following the case study, a roadmap with a procedural guideline is provided to enhance e-waste estimation studies.

  9. Estimating radiogenic cancer risks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document presents a revised methodology for EPA`s estimation of cancer risks due to low-LET radiation exposures in light of information that has become available since the publication of BIER III, especially new information on the Japanese atomic bomb survivors. For most cancer sites, the risk model is one in which the age-specific relative risk coefficients are obtained by taking the geometric mean of coefficients derived from the atomic bomb survivor data employing two different methods for transporting risks from Japan to the U.S. (multiplicative and NIH projection methods). Using 1980 U.S. vital statistics, the risk models are applied to estimate organ-specific risks, per unit dose, for a stationary population.

  10. Econometric Analysis on Efficiency of Estimator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Khoshnevisan; F. Kaymram; Housila P. Singh; Rajesh Singh; Florentin Smarandache

    2003-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper investigates the efficiency of an alternative to ratio estimator under the super population model with uncorrelated errors and a gamma-distributed auxiliary variable. Comparisons with usual ratio and unbiased estimators are also made.

  11. Bayesian estimation of resistivities from seismic velocities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Werthmller, Dieter

    2014-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    I address the problem of finding a background model for the estimation of resistivities in the earth from controlled-source electromagnetic (CSEM) data by using seismic data and well logs as constraints. Estimation of ...

  12. Estimate of the scatter component in SPECT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ivanovic, M.; Weber, D.A. [Univ. of California, Sacramento, CA (United States); Loncaric, S. [Univ. of Zagreb (Croatia)

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Analytical expressions that describe the dependence of slopes and amplitudes of the scatter distribution functions (SDF) on source depth and media density are used to estimate a scatter component in SPECT projection data. Since the ratio of detected scattered to total photons (S/T), SDF amplitude and slope depend strongly on line source length (SL) used to obtain SDFs, we compared estimated scattered components using SDFs, obtained for lengths of 2-21 cm. At 10 cm source depth, S/T changes from 0.19 to 0.36 when SL changes from 2 to 21 cm. Scatter amplitude`s dependence on source depth (d) in water was described by 6.38e{sup -0.186d} for a 2 cm and 16.15e{sup -0.129d} for a 21 cm SL. Slope was described by 0.292d{sup -0.601} for a cm SL and by 0.396d{sup -0.82} for a 21 cm SL. The estimated scatter components are compared with simulated SPECT projection data obtained with Monte Carlo modeling of six hot spheres placed in a cylindrical water filled phantom. The comparison of estimated with simulated total counts/projection shows very good agreement when approaching SDF for a point source (the % difference varied from 2 to 13% for 2 cm SL). Significant overestimate is seen when source length increases.

  13. Flux recovery and a posteriori error estimators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2010-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

    bility and the local efficiency bounds for this estimator are established provided that the ... For simple model problems, the energy norm of the true error is equal.

  14. Contribution to the development of DOE ARM Climate Modeling Best Estimate Data (CMBE) products: Satellite data over the ARM permanent and AMF sites: Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xie, B; Dong, X; Xie, S

    2012-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

    To support the LLNL ARM infrastructure team Climate Modeling Best Estimate (CMBE) data development, the University of North Dakota (UND)'s group will provide the LLNL team the NASA CERES and ISCCP satellite retrieved cloud and radiative properties for the periods when they are available over the ARM permanent research sites. The current available datasets, to date, are as follows: the CERES/TERRA during 200003-200812; the CERES/AQUA during 200207-200712; and the ISCCP during 199601-200806. The detailed parameters list below: (1) CERES Shortwave radiative fluxes (net and downwelling); (2) CERES Longwave radiative fluxes (upwelling) - (items 1 & 2 include both all-sky and clear-sky fluxes); (3) CERES Layered clouds (total, high, middle, and low); (4) CERES Cloud thickness; (5) CERES Effective cloud height; (6) CERES cloud microphysical/optical properties; (7) ISCCP optical depth cloud top pressure matrix; (8) ISCCP derived cloud types (r.g., cirrus, stratus, etc.); and (9) ISCCP infrared derived cloud top pressures. (10) The UND group shall apply necessary quality checks to the original CERES and ISCCP data to remove suspicious data points. The temporal resolution for CERES data should be all available satellite overpasses over the ARM sites; for ISCCP data, it should be 3-hourly. The spatial resolution is the closest satellite field of view observations to the ARM surface sites. All the provided satellite data should be in a format that is consistent with the current ARM CMBE dataset so that the satellite data can be easily merged into the CMBE dataset.

  15. Modelling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Spdtke, P

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Modeling of technical machines became a standard technique since computer became powerful enough to handle the amount of data relevant to the specific system. Simulation of an existing physical device requires the knowledge of all relevant quantities. Electric fields given by the surrounding boundary as well as magnetic fields caused by coils or permanent magnets have to be known. Internal sources for both fields are sometimes taken into account, such as space charge forces or the internal magnetic field of a moving bunch of charged particles. Used solver routines are briefly described and some bench-marking is shown to estimate necessary computing times for different problems. Different types of charged particle sources will be shown together with a suitable model to describe the physical model. Electron guns are covered as well as different ion sources (volume ion sources, laser ion sources, Penning ion sources, electron resonance ion sources, and H$^-$-sources) together with some remarks on beam transport.

  16. ARM Climate Modeling Best Estimate from Manus Island, PNG with additional satellite product (ARMBE-CLDRAD TWPC1 V2.1a)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    McCoy, Renata; Xie, Shaocheng

    The ARM CMBE-ATM [Xie, McCoy, Klein et al.] data file contains a best estimate of several selected atmospheric quantities from ACRF observations and NWP analysis data.

  17. ARM Climate Modeling Best Estimate from Nauru with additional satellite product (ARMBE-CLDRAD TWPC2 V2.1a)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    McCoy, Renata; Xie, Shaocheng

    The ARM CMBE-ATM [Xie, McCoy, Klein et al.] data file contains a best estimate of several selected atmospheric quantities from ACRF observations and NWP analysis data.

  18. ARM Climate Modeling Best Estimate Barrow, AK with additional satellite product (ARMBE-CLDRAD NSAC1 V2.1a)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    McCoy, Renata; Xie, Shaocheng

    The ARM CMBE-ATM [Xie, McCoy, Klein et al.] data file contains a best estimate of several selected atmospheric quantities from ACRF observations and NWP analysis data.

  19. ARM Climate Modeling Best Estimate from Darwin, AU with additional satellite product (ARMBE-CLDRAD TWPC3 V2.1a)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    McCoy, Renata; Xie, Shaocheng

    The ARM CMBE-ATM [Xie, McCoy, Klein et al.] data file contains a best estimate of several selected atmospheric quantities from ACRF observations and NWP analysis data.

  20. Productivity increases in science

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Danko, J.E. [ed.; Young, J.K.; Molton, P.M.; Dirks, J.A.

    1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The study quantifies the impact on the cost of experimentation of synergistic advancements in instrumentation, theory, and computation over the last two decades. The study finds that the productivity of experimental investigation (experimental results/$) is increasing as science is transformed from a linear, isolated approach to a hierarchical, multidisciplinary approach. Developments such as massively parallel processors coupled with instrumental systems with multiple probes and diverse data analysis capabilities will further this transformation and increase the productivity of scientific studies. The complexities and scale of today`s scientific challenges are much greater than in the past, however, so that the costs of research are increasing. Even though science is much more productive in terms of the experimental results, the challenges facing scientific investigators are increasing at an even faster pace. New approaches to infrastructure investments must capitalize on the changing dynamics of research and allow the scientific community to maximize gains in productivity so that complex problems can be attacked cost-effectively. Research strategies that include user facilities and coordinated experimental, computational, and theoretical research are needed.

  1. Productivity increases in science

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Danko, J.E. (ed.); Young, J.K.; Molton, P.M.; Dirks, J.A.

    1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The study quantifies the impact on the cost of experimentation of synergistic advancements in instrumentation, theory, and computation over the last two decades. The study finds that the productivity of experimental investigation (experimental results/$) is increasing as science is transformed from a linear, isolated approach to a hierarchical, multidisciplinary approach. Developments such as massively parallel processors coupled with instrumental systems with multiple probes and diverse data analysis capabilities will further this transformation and increase the productivity of scientific studies. The complexities and scale of today's scientific challenges are much greater than in the past, however, so that the costs of research are increasing. Even though science is much more productive in terms of the experimental results, the challenges facing scientific investigators are increasing at an even faster pace. New approaches to infrastructure investments must capitalize on the changing dynamics of research and allow the scientific community to maximize gains in productivity so that complex problems can be attacked cost-effectively. Research strategies that include user facilities and coordinated experimental, computational, and theoretical research are needed.

  2. Indirect Estimation of Radioactivity in Containerized Cargo

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jarman, Kenneth D.; Scherrer, Chad; Smith, Eric L.; Chilton, Lawrence; Anderson, K. K.; Ressler, Jennifer J.; Trease, Lynn L.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Detecting illicit nuclear and radiological material in containerized cargo challenges the state of the art in detection systems. Current systems are being evaluated and new systems envisioned to address the need for the high probability of detection and extremely low false alarm rates necessary to thwart potential threats and extremely low nuisance and false alarm rates while maintaining necessary to maintain the flow of commerce impacted by the enormous volume of commodities imported in shipping containers. Maintaining flow of commerce also means that primary inspection must be rapid, requiring relatively indirect measurements of cargo from outside the containers. With increasing information content in such indirect measurements, it is natural to ask how the information might be combined to improved detection. Toward this end, we present an approach to estimating isotopic activity of naturally occurring radioactive material in cargo grouped by commodity type, combining container manifest data with radiography and gamma spectroscopy aligned to location along the container. The heart of this approach is our statistical model of gamma counts within peak regions of interest, which captures the effects of background suppression, counting noise, convolution of neighboring cargo contributions, and down-scattered photons to provide physically constrained estimates of counts due to decay of specific radioisotopes in cargo alone. Coupled to that model, we use a mechanistic model of self-attenuated radiation flux to estimate the isotopic activity within cargo, segmented by location within each container, that produces those counts. We demonstrate our approach by applying it to a set of measurements taken at the Port of Seattle in 2006. This approach to synthesizing disparate available data streams and extraction of cargo characteristics holds the potential to improve primary inspection using current detection capabilities and to enable simulation-based evaluation of new candidate detection systems.

  3. DREAM tool increases space weather predictions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    - 1 - DREAM tool increases space weather predictions April 13, 2012 Predicting space weather improved by new DREAM modeling tool Earth's radiation belts can now be studied with a new modeling tool DREAM comes into play. Radiation belt structure and dynamics revealed DREAM is a modeling tool

  4. Residential propane prices increase

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas ConchasPassive Solar HomePromisingStories »Submitter Apropane prices increase The average

  5. Residential propane prices increase

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas ConchasPassive Solar HomePromisingStories »Submitter Apropane prices increase The

  6. Residential propane prices increase

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas ConchasPassive Solar HomePromisingStories »Submitter Apropane prices increase Thepropane

  7. Residential propane prices increase

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas ConchasPassive Solar HomePromisingStories »Submitter Apropane prices increase

  8. 8th International Conference on Probability Methods Applied to Power Systems, Ames Iowa, September 2004 Estimating Failure Propagation in Models of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reliability Technology Solutions and funding in part by the Assistant Secretary for Energy Efficiency Vickie E. Lynch Bertrand Nkei David E. Newman Abstract-- We compare and test statistical estimates and Renewable Energy, Office of Power Technologies, Transmission Reliability Program of the U.S. Department

  9. PSM: Lithium-Ion Battery State of Charge (SOC) and Critical Surface Charge (CSC) Estimation using an Electrochemical Model-driven

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stefanopoulou, Anna

    PSM: Lithium-Ion Battery State of Charge (SOC) and Critical Surface Charge (CSC) Estimation using Abstract-- This paper presents a numerical calculation of the evolution of the spatially-resolved solid concentration in the two electrodes of a lithium-ion cell. The microscopic solid con- centration is driven

  10. Remaining useful life estimates of a PEM fuel cell stack by including characterization-induced disturbances in a particle filter model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Remaining useful life estimates of a PEM fuel cell stack by including characterization- induced Besançon, France rgourive@ens2m.fr ABSTRACT: Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells (PEMFC) are available, Prognostics, Remaining Useful life, Particle filter 1. Introduction Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells

  11. Cost Estimation Package

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1997-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

    This chapter focuses on the components (or elements) of the cost estimation package and their documentation.

  12. Brady 1D seismic velocity model ambient noise prelim

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Mellors, Robert J.

    Preliminary 1D seismic velocity model derived from ambient noise correlation. 28 Green's functions filtered between 4-10 Hz for Vp, Vs, and Qs were calculated. 1D model estimated for each path. The final model is a median of the individual models. Resolution is best for the top 1 km. Poorly constrained with increasing depth.

  13. Brady 1D seismic velocity model ambient noise prelim

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mellors, Robert J.

    2013-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Preliminary 1D seismic velocity model derived from ambient noise correlation. 28 Green's functions filtered between 4-10 Hz for Vp, Vs, and Qs were calculated. 1D model estimated for each path. The final model is a median of the individual models. Resolution is best for the top 1 km. Poorly constrained with increasing depth.

  14. Parameter estimation of quantum processes using convex optimization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gbor Ball; Katalin M. Hangos

    2010-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

    A convex optimization based method is proposed for quantum process tomography, in the case of known channel model structure, but unknown channel parameters. The main idea is to select an affine parametrization of the Choi matrix as a set of optimization variables, and formulate a semidefinite programming problem with a least squares objective function. Possible convex relations between the optimization variables are also taken into account to improve the estimation. Simulation case studies show, that the proposed method can significantly increase the accuracy of the parameter estimation, if the channel model structure is known. Beside the convex part, the determination of the channel parameters from the optimization variables is a nonconvex step in general. In the case of Pauli channels however, the method reduces to a purely convex optimization problem, allowing to obtain a globally optimal solution.

  15. Check Estimates and Independent Costs

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1997-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Check estimates and independent cost estimates (ICEs) are tools that can be used to validate a cost estimate. Estimate validation entails an objective review of the estimate to ensure that estimate criteria and requirements have been met and well documented, defensible estimate has been developed. This chapter describes check estimates and their procedures and various types of independent cost estimates.

  16. State energy data report 1994: Consumption estimates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document provides annual time series estimates of State-level energy consumption by major economic sector. The estimates are developed in the State Energy Data System (SEDS), operated by EIA. SEDS provides State energy consumption estimates to members of Congress, Federal and State agencies, and the general public, and provides the historical series needed for EIA`s energy models. Division is made for each energy type and end use sector. Nuclear electric power is included.

  17. Types of Cost Estimates

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1997-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The chapter describes the estimates required on government-managed projects for both general construction and environmental management.

  18. Systems Engineering Cost Estimation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bryson, Joanna J.

    on project, human capital impact. 7 How to estimate Cost? Difficult to know what we are building early on1 Systems Engineering Lecture 3 Cost Estimation Dr. Joanna Bryson Dr. Leon Watts University of Bath: Contrast approaches for estimating software project cost, and identify the main sources of cost

  19. Density Estimation Trees in High Energy Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anderlini, Lucio

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Density Estimation Trees can play an important role in exploratory data analysis for multidimensional, multi-modal data models of large samples. I briefly discuss the algorithm, a self-optimization technique based on kernel density estimation, and some applications in High Energy Physics.

  20. STATE ESTIMATION FOR WASTEWATER TREATMENT PROCESSES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bernard, Olivier

    CHAPTER 1 STATE ESTIMATION FOR WASTEWATER TREATMENT PROCESSES O. Bernard1 , B. Chachuat2 , and J sensors (also called observers) for wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs). We give an overview model description (e.g., the 1 #12;2 STATE ESTIMATION FOR WASTEWATER TREATMENT PROCESSES extended Kalman

  1. Satellite-based estimates of net radiation and modeling the role of topography and vegetation on inter-annual hydro-climatology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bisht, Gautam

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Fourth Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change acknowledged that the lack of relevant observations in various regions of the world is a crucial gap in understanding and modeling impacts of ...

  2. A semi-analytical model for heat and mass transfer in geothermal reservoirs to estimate fracture surface-are-to-volume ratios and thermal breakthrough using thermally-decaying and diffusing tracers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reimus, Paul W [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

    A semi-analytical model was developed to conduct rapid scoping calculations of responses of thermally degrading and diffusing tracers in multi-well tracer tests in enhanced geothermal systems (EGS). The model is based on an existing Laplace transform inversion model for solute transport in dual-porosity media. The heat- and mass-transfer calculations are decoupled and conducted sequentially, taking advantage of the fact that heat transfer between fractures and the rock matrix is much more rapid than mass transfer and therefore mass transfer will effectively occur in a locally isothermal system (although the system will be nonisothermal along fracture flow pathways, which is accounted for by discretizing the flow pathways into multiple segments that have different temperature histories). The model takes advantage of the analogies between heat and mass transfer, solving the same governing equations with k{sub m}/({rho}C{sub p}){sub w} being substituted for {phi}D{sub m} in the equation for fracture transport and k{sub m}/({rho}C{sub p}){sub m} being subsituted for D{sub m} in the equation for matrix transport; where k = thermal conductivity (cal/cm-s-K), {rho} = density (g/cm{sup 3}), C{sub p} = heat capacity (at constant pressure) (cal/g-K), {phi} = matrix porosity, and D = tracer diffusion coefficient (cm{sup 2}/s), with the subscripts w and m referring to water and matrix, respectively. A significant advantage of the model is that it executes in a fraction of second on a single-CPU personal computer, making it very amenable for parameter estimation algorithms that involve repeated runs to find global minima. The combined thermal-mass transport model was used to evaluate the ability to estimate when thermal breakthrough would occur in a multi-well EGS configuration using thermally degrading tracers. Calculations were conducted to evaluate the range of values of Arrhenius parameters, A and E{sub {alpha}} (pre-exponential factor, 1/s, and activation energy, cal/mol) required to obtain interpretable responses of thermally-degrading tracers that decay according to the rate constant k{sub d} = Ae{sup -E{sub {alpha}}/RT}, where k{sub d} = decay rate constant (1/s), R = ideal gas constant (1.987 cal/mol-K), and T = absolute temperature (K). It is shown that there are relatively narrow ranges of A and E{sub {alpha}} that will result in readily interpretable tracer responses for any given combination of ambient reservoir temperature and working fluid residence time in a reservoir. The combined model was also used to simulate the responses of conservative tracers with different diffusion coefficients as a way of estimating fracture surface-area-to-volume ratios (SA/V) in multi-well EGS systems. This method takes advantage of the fact that the differences in breakthrough curves of tracers with different matrix diffusion coefficients are a function of SA/V. The model accounts for differences in diffusion coefficients as a function of temperature so that tracer responses obtained at different times can be used to obtain consistent estimates of SA/V as the reservoir cools down. Some single-well applications of this approach are simulated with a numerical model to demonstrate the potential to evaluate the effectiveness of EGS stimulations before a second well is drilled.

  3. Parameter estimation in ordinary differential equations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ng, Chee Loong

    2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The parameter estimation problem or the inverse problem of ordinary differential equations is prevalent in many process models in chemistry, molecular biology, control system design and many other engineering applications. It concerns the re...

  4. Fracture compliance estimation using borehole tube waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bakku, Sudhish Kumar

    We tested two models, one for tube-wave generation and the other for tube-wave attenuation at a fracture intersecting a borehole that can be used to estimate fracture compliance, fracture aperture, and lateral extent. In ...

  5. gtp_flow_power_estimator.xlsx

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This simple spreadsheet model estimates either the flow rate required to produce a specified level of power output, or the power output that can be produced from a specified flow rate.

  6. Statistical estimation of water distribution system pipe break risk

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yamijala, Shridhar

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    and maintenance decisions. A number of statistical methods have been proposed for this estimation problem. This thesis focuses on comparing these statistical models on the basis of short time histories. The goals of this research are to estimate the likelihood...

  7. ONLINE TRAFFIC LIGHT CONTROL THROUGH GRADIENT ESTIMATION USING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Panayiotou, Christos

    Infinitesimal Perturbation and Analysis (IPA) but the model we use to derive the #12;IPA estimates developed which is based on IPA (Cassandras et al., 2002). In this approach, we derive estimators

  8. MODELING OF PLANE-WAVE INCIDENCE ON A TWISTED-WIRE PAIR BUNDLE FOR RF INGRESS ESTIMATION IN DIGITAL SUBSCRIBER LINE SYSTEMS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    is electromagnetic interference (EMI) caused by external radio sources that operate in the same frequency band) system consisting of a bundle of twisted-wire pairs (TWPs) in the presence of electromagnetic interference (EMI) is presented. The objective of such a model is to analyze the susceptibility of TWP bundles

  9. A numerical soil-water-balance (SWB) model was used to estimate groundwater recharge in the Williston and Powder River structural basins in the Northern Great Plains.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Torgersen, Christian

    in the Williston and Powder River structural basins in the Northern Great Plains. The SWB model consisted of 1 km2 to 2011. Average calculated recharge in the Williston basin was 0.190 in/yr (1,281 ft3 /sec) and ranged.1 percent of precipitation in the Williston basin. Average recharge in the Powder River basin was 0.136 in

  10. Estimating Specialty Costs

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1997-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Specialty costs are those nonstandard, unusual costs that are not typically estimated. Costs for research and development (R&D) projects involving new technologies, costs associated with future regulations, and specialty equipment costs are examples of specialty costs. This chapter discusses those factors that are significant contributors to project specialty costs and methods of estimating costs for specialty projects.

  11. Cooling load estimation methods

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McFarland, R.D.

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ongoing research on quantifying the cooling loads in residential buildings, particularly buildings with passive solar heating systems, is described. Correlations are described that permit auxiliary cooling estimates from monthly average insolation and weather data. The objective of the research is to develop a simple analysis method, useful early in design, to estimate the annual cooling energy required of a given building.

  12. Multi-element stochastic spectral projection for high quantile estimation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ko, Jordan, E-mail: jordan.ko@mac.com; Garnier, Josselin

    2013-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate quantile estimation by multi-element generalized Polynomial Chaos (gPC) metamodel where the exact numerical model is approximated by complementary metamodels in overlapping domains that mimic the models exact response. The gPC metamodel is constructed by the non-intrusive stochastic spectral projection approach and function evaluation on the gPC metamodel can be considered as essentially free. Thus, large number of Monte Carlo samples from the metamodel can be used to estimate ?-quantile, for moderate values of ?. As the gPC metamodel is an expansion about the means of the inputs, its accuracy may worsen away from these mean values where the extreme events may occur. By increasing the approximation accuracy of the metamodel, we may eventually improve accuracy of quantile estimation but it is very expensive. A multi-element approach is therefore proposed by combining a global metamodel in the standard normal space with supplementary local metamodels constructed in bounded domains about the design points corresponding to the extreme events. To improve the accuracy and to minimize the sampling cost, sparse-tensor and anisotropic-tensor quadratures are tested in addition to the full-tensor Gauss quadrature in the construction of local metamodels; different bounds of the gPC expansion are also examined. The global and local metamodels are combined in the multi-element gPC (MEgPC) approach and it is shown that MEgPC can be more accurate than Monte Carlo or importance sampling methods for high quantile estimations for input dimensions roughly below N=8, a limit that is very much case- and ?-dependent.

  13. Kalman Filter Constraint Switching for Turbofan Engine Health Estimation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simon, Dan

    , Estimation, Quadratic Pro- gramming, Residuals, Gas Turbine Engines. 1 Introduction For linear dynamic. However, in the application of Kalman filters there is often known model or signal information

  14. Sub-Second Parallel State Estimation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Yousu; Rice, Mark J.; Glaesemann, Kurt R.; Wang, Shaobu; Huang, Zhenyu

    2014-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the performance of Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) sub-second parallel state estimation (PSE) tool using the utility data from the Bonneville Power Administrative (BPA) and discusses the benefits of the fast computational speed for power system applications. The test data were provided by BPA. They are two-days worth of hourly snapshots that include power system data and measurement sets in a commercial tool format. These data are extracted out from the commercial tool box and fed into the PSE tool. With the help of advanced solvers, the PSE tool is able to solve each BPA hourly state estimation problem within one second, which is more than 10 times faster than todays commercial tool. This improved computational performance can help increase the reliability value of state estimation in many aspects: (1) the shorter the time required for execution of state estimation, the more time remains for operators to take appropriate actions, and/or to apply automatic or manual corrective control actions. This increases the chances of arresting or mitigating the impact of cascading failures; (2) the SE can be executed multiple times within time allowance. Therefore, the robustness of SE can be enhanced by repeating the execution of the SE with adaptive adjustments, including removing bad data and/or adjusting different initial conditions to compute a better estimate within the same time as a traditional state estimators single estimate. There are other benefits with the sub-second SE, such as that the PSE results can potentially be used in local and/or wide-area automatic corrective control actions that are currently dependent on raw measurements to minimize the impact of bad measurements, and provides opportunities to enhance the power grid reliability and efficiency. PSE also can enable other advanced tools that rely on SE outputs and could be used to further improve operators actions and automated controls to mitigate effects of severe events on the grid. The power grid continues to grow and the number of measurements is increasing at an accelerated rate due to the variety of smart grid devices being introduced. A parallel state estimation implementation will have better performance than traditional, sequential state estimation by utilizing the power of high performance computing (HPC). This increased performance positions parallel state estimators as valuable tools for operating the increasingly more complex power grid.

  15. A conceptual model and preliminary estimate of potential tritium migration from the Benham (U-20c) site, Pahute Mesa, Nevada Test Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brikowski, T.; Mahin, G. [Nevada Univ., Reno, NV (United States). Water Resources Center

    1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    U-20c is the site of a large below-water-table nuclear test near the Nevada Test Site boundary. A conceptual model of potential groundwater migration of tritium from U-20c is constructed and quantitatively evaluated in this report. The lower portion of the collapse chimney at Benham is expected to intersect 200 m of permeable rhyolite lava, overlain by similar thicknesses of low-permeability zeolitized bedded tuff, then permeable welded tuff. Vertical groundwater flow through the chimney is predicted to be minimal, horizontal transport should be controlled by the regional groundwater flow. Analytic solutions treating only advective transport indicate 1 to 2 km of tritium movement (95% confidence interval 0.7--2.5 km) within 5 years after test-related pressure-temperature transients have dissipated. This point lies at the axis of a potentiometric surface trough along the west edge of Area 20, Nevada Test Site. Within 25 years, movement is predicted to extend to 3 km (95% confidence interval 2--5 km) approximately to the intersection of the trough and the Nevada Test Site boundary. Considering the effects of radioactive decay, but not dispersion, plume concentration would fall below Safe Drinking Water Act standards by 204 years, at a predicted distance of 11 km (95% confidence interval 7--31 km). This point is located in the eastern portion of the Timber Mountain Caldera moat within the Nellis Air Force Range (military bombing range).

  16. Estimating exposure of terrestrial wildlife to contaminants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sample, B.E.; Suter, G.W. II

    1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes generalized models for the estimation of contaminant exposure experienced by wildlife on the Oak Ridge Reservation. The primary exposure pathway considered is oral ingestion, e.g. the consumption of contaminated food, water, or soil. Exposure through dermal absorption and inhalation are special cases and are not considered hereIN. Because wildlife mobile and generally consume diverse diets and because environmental contamination is not spatial homogeneous, factors to account for variation in diet, movement, and contaminant distribution have been incorporated into the models. To facilitate the use and application of the models, life history parameters necessary to estimate exposure are summarized for 15 common wildlife species. Finally, to display the application of the models, exposure estimates were calculated for four species using data from a source operable unit on the Oak Ridge Reservation.

  17. Effects of Seasonality on the Estimation of Environmental Extremes: A Study of Non-Homogeneous Methods for Estimating Environmental Extremes:.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Trahan, A.C.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ??Extreme value theory is commonly applied in ocean engineering to estimate extreme environmental conditions (e.g. wave height and wind speed). Extreme value models generally assume (more)

  18. Rank-Based Estimation for GARCH Processes Beth Andrews

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andrews, Beth

    Rank-Based Estimation for GARCH Processes Beth Andrews Northwestern University September 7, 2011 Abstract We consider a rank-based technique for estimating GARCH model parameters, some of which are scale transformations of conventional GARCH parameters. The estimators are obtained by minimizing a rank-based residual

  19. Hybrid Systems State estimation for hybrid systems: applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tomlin, Claire

    Hybrid Systems State estimation for hybrid systems: applications to aircraft tracking I. Hwang, H of a stochastic linear hybrid system, given only the continuous system output data, is studied. Well established techniques for hybrid estimation, known as the multiple model adaptive estimation algorithm

  20. A simple method to estimate interwell autocorrelation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pizarro, J.O.S.; Lake, L.W. [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States)

    1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The estimation of autocorrelation in the lateral or interwell direction is important when performing reservoir characterization studies using stochastic modeling. This paper presents a new method to estimate the interwell autocorrelation based on parameters, such as the vertical range and the variance, that can be estimated with commonly available data. We used synthetic fields that were generated from stochastic simulations to provide data to construct the estimation charts. These charts relate the ratio of areal to vertical variance and the autocorrelation range (expressed variously) in two directions. Three different semivariogram models were considered: spherical, exponential and truncated fractal. The overall procedure is demonstrated using field data. We find that the approach gives the most self-consistent results when it is applied to previously identified facies. Moreover, the autocorrelation trends follow the depositional pattern of the reservoir, which gives confidence in the validity of the approach.

  1. Cost Estimating Handbook for Environmental Restoration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Environmental restoration (ER) projects have presented the DOE and cost estimators with a number of properties that are not comparable to the normal estimating climate within DOE. These properties include: An entirely new set of specialized expressions and terminology. A higher than normal exposure to cost and schedule risk, as compared to most other DOE projects, due to changing regulations, public involvement, resource shortages, and scope of work. A higher than normal percentage of indirect costs to the total estimated cost due primarily to record keeping, special training, liability, and indemnification. More than one estimate for a project, particularly in the assessment phase, in order to provide input into the evaluation of alternatives for the cleanup action. While some aspects of existing guidance for cost estimators will be applicable to environmental restoration projects, some components of the present guidelines will have to be modified to reflect the unique elements of these projects. The purpose of this Handbook is to assist cost estimators in the preparation of environmental restoration estimates for Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (EM) projects undertaken by DOE. The DOE has, in recent years, seen a significant increase in the number, size, and frequency of environmental restoration projects that must be costed by the various DOE offices. The coming years will show the EM program to be the largest non-weapons program undertaken by DOE. These projects create new and unique estimating requirements since historical cost and estimating precedents are meager at best. It is anticipated that this Handbook will enhance the quality of cost data within DOE in several ways by providing: The basis for accurate, consistent, and traceable baselines. Sound methodologies, guidelines, and estimating formats. Sources of cost data/databases and estimating tools and techniques available at DOE cost professionals.

  2. Actual and Estimated Energy Savings Comparison for Deep Energy Retrofits in the Pacific Northwest

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blanchard, Jeremy; Widder, Sarah H.; Giever, Elisabeth L.; Baechler, Michael C.

    2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Seven homes from the Pacific Northwest were selected to evaluate the differences between estimated and actual energy savings achieved from deep energy retrofits. The energy savings resulting from these retrofits were estimated, using energy modeling software, to save at least 30% on a whole-house basis. The modeled pre-retrofit energy use was trued against monthly utility bills. After the retrofits were completed, each of the homes was extensively monitored, with the exception of one home which was monitored pre-retrofit. This work is being conducted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for the U.S. Department of Energy Building Technologies Program as part of the Building America Program. This work found many discrepancies between actual and estimated energy savings and identified the potential causes for the discrepancies. The differences between actual energy use and modeled energy use also suggest improvements to improve model accuracy. The difference between monthly whole-house actual and estimated energy savings ranged from 75% more energy saved than predicted by the model to 16% less energy saved for all the monitored homes. Similarly, the annual energy savings difference was between 36% and -14%, which was estimated based on existing monitored savings because an entire year of data is not available. Thus, on average, for all six monitored homes the actual energy use is consistently less than estimates, indicating home owners are saving more energy than estimated. The average estimated savings for the eight month monitoring period is 43%, compared to an estimated savings average of 31%. Though this average difference is only 12%, the range of inaccuracies found for specific end-uses is far greater and are the values used to directly estimate energy savings from specific retrofits. Specifically, the monthly post-retrofit energy use differences for specific end-uses (i.e., heating, cooling, hot water, appliances, etc.) ranged from 131% under-predicted to 77% over-predicted by the model with respect to monitored energy use. Many of the discrepancies were associated with occupant behavior which influences energy use, dramatically in some cases, actual versus modeled weather differences, modeling input limitations, and complex homes that are difficult to model. The discrepancy between actual and estimated energy use indicates a need for better modeling tools and assumptions. Despite the best efforts of researchers, the estimated energy savings are too inaccurate to determine reliable paybacks for retrofit projects. While the monitored data allows researchers to understand why these differences exist, it is not cost effective to monitor each home with the level of detail presented here. Therefore an appropriate balance between modeling and monitoring must be determined for more widespread application in retrofit programs and the home performance industry. Recommendations to address these deficiencies include: (1) improved tuning process for pre-retrofit energy use, which currently utilized broad-based monthly utility bills; (2) developing simple occupant-based energy models that better address the many different occupant types and their impact on energy use; (3) incorporating actual weather inputs to increase accuracy of the tuning process, which uses utility bills from specific time period; and (4) developing simple, cost-effective monitoring solutions for improved model tuning.

  3. : Helmholtz machine estimation .

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    : Helmholtz machine density estimation . . : . . . (supervised learning) , (active learning) (query learning) [1, 3]. . (unsupervised learning), . , [5]. . Helmholtz machine , . Helmholtz machine : Helmholtz machine [2] . Helmholtz machine (generative network) (recognition network) . , , . Helmholtz machine (self

  4. Operated device estimation framework

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rengarajan, Janarthanan

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Protective device estimation is a challenging task because there are numerous protective devices present in a typical distribution system. Among various protective devices, auto-reclosers and fuses are the main overcurrent protection on distribution...

  5. Estimation of food consumption

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Callaway, J.M. Jr.

    1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The research reported in this document was conducted as a part of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project. The objective of the HEDR Project is to estimate the radiation doses that people could have received from operations at the Hanford Site. Information required to estimate these doses includes estimates of the amounts of potentially contaminated foods that individuals in the region consumed during the study period. In that general framework, the objective of the Food Consumption Task was to develop a capability to provide information about the parameters of the distribution(s) of daily food consumption for representative groups in the population for selected years during the study period. This report describes the methods and data used to estimate food consumption and presents the results developed for Phase I of the HEDR Project.

  6. Cost Estimating Guide

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2011-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

    This Guide provides uniform guidance and best practices that describe the methods and procedures that could be used in all programs and projects at DOE for preparing cost estimates. No cancellations.

  7. EXPLORATION Actual Estimate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    FY 2015 FY 2016 FY 2017 FY 2013 President's Budget Request 3,821.2 3,712.8 3,932.8 4,076.5 4,076.5 4 Estimate Budget Authority (in $ millions) FY 2011 FY 2012 FY 2013 FY 2014 FY 2015 FY 2016 FY 2017 FY 2013EXPLORATION EXP-1 Actual Estimate Budget Authority (in $ millions) FY 2011 FY 2012 FY 2013 FY 2014

  8. Quantum risk-sensitive estimation and robustness

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Naoki Yamamoto; Luc Bouten

    2008-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper studies a quantum risk-sensitive estimation problem and investigates robustness properties of the filter. This is a direct extension to the quantum case of analogous classical results. All investigations are based on a discrete approximation model of the quantum system under consideration. This allows us to study the problem in a simple mathematical setting. We close the paper with some examples that demonstrate the robustness of the risk-sensitive estimator.

  9. State energy data report 1993: Consumption estimates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The State Energy Data Report (SEDR) provides annual time series estimates of State-level energy consumption by major economic sector. The estimates are developed in the State Energy Data System (SEDS), which is maintained and operated by the Energy Information Administration (EIA). The goal in maintaining SEDS is to create historical time series of energy consumption by State that are defined as consistently as possible over time and across sectors. SEDS exists for two principal reasons: (1) to provide State energy consumption estimates to Members of Congress, Federal and State agencies, and the general public; and (2) to provide the historical series necessary for EIA`s energy models.

  10. State energy data report 1995 - consumption estimates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The State Energy Data Report (SEDR) provides annual time series estimates of State-level energy consumption by major economic sectors. The estimates are developed in the State Energy Data System (SEDS), which is maintained and operated by the Energy Information Administration (EIA). The goal in maintaining SEDS exists for two principal reasons: (1) to provide State energy consumption estimates to Members of Congress, Federal and State agencies, and the general public, and (2) to provide the historical series necessary for EIA`s energy models.

  11. State Energy Data Report, 1991: Consumption estimates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The State Energy Data Report (SEDR) provides annual time series estimates of State-level energy consumption by major economic sector. The estimates are developed in the State Energy Data System (SEDS), which is maintained and operated by the Energy Information Administration (EIA). The goal in maintaining SEDS is to create historical time series of energy consumption by State that are defined as consistently as possible over time and across sectors. SEDS exists for two principal reasons: (1) to provide State energy consumption estimates to the Government, policy makers, and the public; and (2) to provide the historical series necessary for EIA`s energy models.

  12. Estimating Power System Dynamic States Using Extended Kalman Filter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huang, Zhenyu; Schneider, Kevin P.; Nieplocha, Jaroslaw; Zhou, Ning

    2014-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

    AbstractThe state estimation tools which are currently deployed in power system control rooms are based on a steady state assumption. As a result, the suite of operational tools that rely on state estimation results as inputs do not have dynamic information available and their accuracy is compromised. This paper investigates the application of Extended Kalman Filtering techniques for estimating dynamic states in the state estimation process. The new formulated dynamic state estimation includes true system dynamics reflected in differential equations, not like previously proposed dynamic state estimation which only considers the time-variant snapshots based on steady state modeling. This new dynamic state estimation using Extended Kalman Filter has been successfully tested on a multi-machine system. Sensitivity studies with respect to noise levels, sampling rates, model errors, and parameter errors are presented as well to illustrate the robust performance of the developed dynamic state estimation process.

  13. The influence of naturally-occurring organic acids on model estimates of lakewater acidification using the model of acidification of groundwater in catchments (MAGIC). Summary of research conducted during year 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sullivan, T.J.; Eilers, J.M. [E and S Environmental Chemistry, Inc., Corvallis, OR (United States)] [E and S Environmental Chemistry, Inc., Corvallis, OR (United States); Cosby, B.J. [Virginia Univ., Charlottesville, VA (United States). Dept. of Environmental Sciences] [Virginia Univ., Charlottesville, VA (United States). Dept. of Environmental Sciences; Driscoll, C.T. [Syracuse Univ., NY (United States). Dept. of Civil Engineering] [Syracuse Univ., NY (United States). Dept. of Civil Engineering; Hemond, H.F. [Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge, MA (United States). Dept. of Civil Engineering] [Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge, MA (United States). Dept. of Civil Engineering; Charles, D.F. [Academy of Natural Sciences of Philadelphia, PA (United States). Patrick Center for Environmental Research] [Academy of Natural Sciences of Philadelphia, PA (United States). Patrick Center for Environmental Research; Norton, S.A. [Maine Univ., Orono, ME (United States). Dept. of Geological Sciences] [Maine Univ., Orono, ME (United States). Dept. of Geological Sciences

    1993-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

    A project for the US Department of Energy, entitled ``Incorporation of an organic acid representation into MAGIC (Model of Acidification of Groundwater in Catchments) and Testing of the Revised Model UsingIndependent Data Sources`` was initiated by E&S Environmental Chemistry, Inc. in March, 1992. Major components of the project include: improving the MAGIC model by incorporating a rigorous organic acid representation, based on empirical data and geochemical considerations, and testing the revised model using data from paleolimnological hindcasts of preindustrial chemistry for 33 Adirondack Mountain lakes, and the results of whole-catchment artificial acidification projects in Maine and Norway. The ongoing research in this project involves development of an organic acid representation to be incorporated into the MAGIC modeland testing of the improved model using three independent data sources. The research during Year 1 has included conducting two workshops to agree on an approach for the organic acid modeling, developing the organic subroutine and incorporating it into MAGIC (Task 1), conducing MAGIC hindcasts for Adirondack lakes and comparing the results with paleolimnological reconstructions (Task 2), and conducting site visits to the manipulation project sites in Maine and Norway. The purpose of this report is to provide a summary of the work that has been conducted on this project during Year 1. Tasks 1 and 2 have now been completed.

  14. Benefits to the United States of Increasing Global Uptake of Clean Energy Technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kline, D.

    2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A previous report describes an opportunity for the United States to take leadership in efforts to transform the global energy system toward clean energy technologies (CET). An accompanying analysis to that report provides estimates of the economic benefits to the United States of such a global transformation on the order of several hundred billion dollars per year by 2050. This report describes the methods and assumptions used in developing those benefit estimates. It begins with a summary of the results of the analysis based on an updated and refined model completed since the publication of the previous report. The framework described can be used to estimate the economic benefits to the U.S. of coordinated global action to increase the uptake of CETs worldwide. Together with a Monte Carlo simulation engine, the framework can be used to develop plausible ranges for benefits, taking into account the large uncertainty in the driving variables and economic parameters. The resulting estimates illustrate that larger global clean energy markets offer significant opportunities to the United States economy.

  15. Estimating Traveler Populations at Airport and Cruise Terminals for Population Distribution and Dynamics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jochem, Warren C [ORNL; Sims, Kelly M [ORNL; Bright, Eddie A [ORNL; Urban, Marie L [ORNL; Rose, Amy N [ORNL; Coleman, Phil R [ORNL; Bhaduri, Budhendra L [ORNL

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In recent years, uses of high-resolution population distribution databases are increasing steadily for environmental, socioeconomic, public health, and disaster-related research and operations. With the development of daytime population distribution, temporal resolution of such databases has been improved. However, the lack of incorporation of transitional population, namely business and leisure travelers, leaves a significant population unaccounted for within the critical infrastructure networks, such as at transportation hubs. This paper presents two general methodologies for estimating passenger populations in airport and cruise port terminals at a high temporal resolution which can be incorporated into existing population distribution models. The methodologies are geographically scalable and are based on, and demonstrate how, two different transportation hubs with disparate temporal population dynamics can be modeled utilizing publicly available databases including novel data sources of flight activity from the Internet which are updated in near-real time. The airport population estimation model shows great potential for rapid implementation for a large collection of airports on a national scale, and the results suggest reasonable accuracy in the estimated passenger traffic. By incorporating population dynamics at high temporal resolutions into population distribution models, we hope to improve the estimates of populations exposed to or at risk to disasters, thereby improving emergency planning and response, and leading to more informed policy decisions.

  16. activation increases inhibitory: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Reeder, DeeAnn M. 106 Downscaling CMIP5 climate models shows increased tropical cyclone activity over the 21st century Geosciences Websites Summary: locations. The inten-...

  17. Design of Optimal Experiments for Parameter Estimation of Microalgae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Universit de

    . Keywords: biofuel, microalgae, model calibration, optimal control, optimal experiment design 1 candidate for biofuel production in large scale cultivation is a difficult task since microalgae growthDesign of Optimal Experiments for Parameter Estimation of Microalgae Growth Models Rafael Mu

  18. Estimation of GMRFs by Recursive Cavity Jason K. Johnson

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Willsky, Alan S.

    Estimation of GMRFs by Recursive Cavity Modeling by Jason K. Johnson Submitted to the Department by Recursive Cavity Modeling by Jason K. Johnson Submitted to the Department of Electrical Engineering

  19. Seismic fragility estimates for reinforced concrete framed buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ramamoorthy, Sathish Kumar

    2007-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    story drift given the spectral acceleration at the fundamental period of the building. The unknown parameters of the demand models are estimated using the simulated response data obtained from nonlinear time history analyses of the structural models...

  20. Unintended Impacts of Increased Truck Loads on Pavement Supply-Chain Emissions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley, University of

    Unintended Impacts of Increased Truck Loads on Pavement Supply-Chain Emissions Nakul Sathaye, Arpad emissions, raising the question of whether increased vehicle weights may cause unintended environmental consequences. This paper presents scenarios with estimated emissions resulting from load consolidation

  1. Local Harmonic Estimation in Musical Sound Rafael A. IRIZARRY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Irizarry, Rafael A.

    Local Harmonic Estimation in Musical Sound Signals Rafael A. IRIZARRY Statistical modeling so a local harmonic model that tracks changes in pitch and in the amplitudes of the harmonics is fit estimates of the harmonic signal and of the noise signal. Different musical composition applications may

  2. Kalman Filtering with Inequality Constraints for Turbofan Engine Health Estimation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simon, Dan

    Constraints, Estimation, Quadratic Pro- gramming, Gas Turbine Engines. 1 Introduction For linear dynamic simulation of a turbofan engine to estimate health parameters. The turbofan engine model con- tains 16 state. However, in the application of Kalman ¯lters there is often known model or signal information

  3. Cardiovascular parameter estimation using a computational model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Samar, Zaid

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Modern intensive care units are equipped with a wide range of patient monitoring devices, each continuously recording signals produced by the human body. Currently, these signals need to be interpreted by a clinician in ...

  4. MELE: Maximum Entropy Leuven Estimators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris, Quirino

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of the Generalized Maximum Entropy Estimator of the Generaland Douglas Miller, Maximum Entropy Econometrics, Wiley andCalifornia Davis MELE: Maximum Entropy Leuven Estimators by

  5. External Dose Estimates from

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ; - calculated separately for the most important radionuclides produced in nuclear weapons tests. Those would averages for all tests. 2. Provide a list of references regarding: (1) the history of nuclear weapons to the Population of the Continental U.S. from Nevada Weapons Tests and Estimates of Deposition Density

  6. Radiation Dose Estimates from

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Summary: Radiation Dose Estimates from Hanford Radioactive Material Releases to the Air and the Columbia River April 21,1994 TheTechnid Steering Panel of the Hanford - Environmental Dose Reconstruction than 40years, the U.S. Government made plutonium for nuclear weapons at the Hanford

  7. Estimation of hydrologic properties of an unsaturated, fractured rock mass

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Klavetter, E.A.; Peters, R.R.

    1986-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this document, two distinctly different approaches are used to develop continuum models to evaluate water movement in a fractured rock mass. Both models provide methods for estimating rock-mass hydrologic properties. Comparisons made over a range of different tuff properties show good qualitative and quantitative agreement between estimates of rock-mass hydrologic properties made by the two models. This document presents a general discussion of: (1) the hydrology of Yucca Mountain, and the conceptual hydrological model currently being used for the Yucca Mountain site, (2) the development of two models that may be used to estimate the hydrologic properties of a fractured, porous rock mass, and (3) a comparison of the hydrologic properties estimated by these two models. Although the models were developed in response to hydrologic characterization requirements at Yucca Mountain, they can be applied to water movement in any fractured rock mass that satisfies the given assumptions.

  8. Figure 9. Conceptual model for regionally divergent responses of the air-land fluxes to CO2 fertilization, which increases the water-use efficiency of photosynthesis. In dry regions where

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krakauer, Nir Y.

    parameterizations of these processes in models of Mediterranean- climate lands and obtaining a baseline for assessing changes. Acknowledgments NYK is supported by a NOAA Climate and Global Change postdoctoral.1 (2006). I. Y. Fung, S. C. Doney, K. Lindsay, J. John, Evolution of carbon sinks in a changing climate

  9. Increasing Kolmogorov Complexity Harry Buhrman

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fortnow, Lance

    Increasing Kolmogorov Complexity Harry Buhrman Lance Fortnow Ilan Newman Nikolai Vereshchagin b(n, l) denote the binomial sum: b(n, l) = n 0 + n 1 + · · · + n l . Theorem 2 (Harper). Let J 2n . Take all the strings with less than l ones and take J - l first strings with l ones

  10. 3, 871894, 2006 FACE increased

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    BGD 3, 871­894, 2006 FACE increased physical protection of soil C M. R. Hoosbeek et al. Title Page-friendly Version Interactive Discussion EGU Biogeosciences Discuss., 3, 871­894, 2006 www.biogeosciences-discuss.net/3/871/2006/ © Author(s) 2006. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons License. Biogeosciences

  11. Increasing Thermoelectric Generation Water Use

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keller, Arturo A.

    rights reserved. Water Is a Critical Resource · Fast growing demand for clean, fresh water · Increased and energy planning · More watershed/regional planning · New science and technology to support planning. Solving the problem Requires Science and Technology Monitoring & Measurement Science &Technology

  12. Use of Cost Estimating Relationships

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1997-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Cost Estimating Relationships (CERs) are an important tool in an estimator's kit, and in many cases, they are the only tool. Thus, it is important to understand their limitations and characteristics. This chapter discusses considerations of which the estimator must be aware so the Cost Estimating Relationships can be properly used.

  13. An Estimation and Simulation Framework for Energy Efficient Design using Platform FPGAs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prasanna, Viktor K.

    An Estimation and Simulation Framework for Energy Efficient Design using Platform FPGAs Sumit modeling technique, domain specific modeling, and a methodology for energy-efficient design of application

  14. Los Alamos PC estimating system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stutz, R.A.; Lemon, G.D.

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Los Alamos Cost Estimating System (QUEST) is being converted to run on IBM personal computers. This very extensive estimating system is capable of supporting cost estimators from many different and varied fields. QUEST does not dictate any fixed method for estimating. QUEST supports many styles and levels of detail estimating. QUEST can be used with or without data bases. This system allows the estimator to provide reports based on levels of detail defined by combining work breakdown structures. QUEST provides a set of tools for doing any type of estimate without forcing the estimator to use any given method. The level of detail in the estimate can be mixed based on the amount of information known about different parts of the project. The system can support many different data bases simultaneously. Estimators can modify any cost in any data base.

  15. Ensemble Forecast of Analyses With Uncertainty Estimation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Ensemble Forecast of Analyses With Uncertainty Estimation Vivien Mallet1,2, Gilles Stoltz3 2012 Mallet, Stoltz, Zhuk, Nakonechniy Ensemble Forecast of Analyses November 2012 1 / 14 hal-00947755,version1-21Feb2014 #12;Objective To produce the best forecast of a model state using a data assimilation

  16. SWOT Satellite Mission: Combined State Parameter Estimation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Washington at Seattle, University of

    river basins LISFLOOD-FP, a raster- based inundation model Based on a 1-D kinematic wave equation, 27 February 2008 #12;2 Outline Surface Water Ocean Topography (SWOT) satellite mission The state-parameter estimation problem Data assimilation experiments ­ Water depth ­ Discharge ­ Channel width ­ Roughness

  17. Modeling

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    an implementation of a single-fluid inter- face model in the ALE-AMR code to simulate surface tension effects. The model does not require explicit information on the physical...

  18. Temperature-associated increases in the global soil respiration record

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bond-Lamberty, Benjamin; Thomson, Allison M.

    2010-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Soil respiration (RS), the flux of CO2 from the soil surface to the atmosphere, comprises the second-largest terrestrial carbon flux, but its dynamics are incompletely understood, and the global flux remains poorly constrained. Ecosystem warming experiments, modelling analyses, and biokinetics all suggest that RS should change with climate. This has been difficult to confirm observationally because of the high spatial variability of RS, inaccessibility of the soil medium, and inability of remote sensing instruments to measure large-scale RS fluxes. Given these constraints, is it possible to discern climate-driven changes in regional or global RS fluxes in the extant four-decade record of RS chamber measurements? Here we use a database of worldwide RS observations, matched with high-resolution historical climate data, to show a previously unknown temporal trend in the RS record after accounting for mean annual climate, leaf area, nitrogen deposition, and changes in CO2 measurement technique. Air temperature anomaly (deviation from the 1961-1990 mean) is significantly and positively correlated with changes in RS fluxes; both temperature and precipitation anomalies exert effects in specific biomes. We estimate that the current (2008) annual global RS flux is 9812 Pg and has increased 0.1 Pg yr-1 over the last 20 years, implying a global RS temperature response (Q10) of 1.5. An increasing global RS flux does not necessarily constitute a positive feedback loop to the atmosphere; nonetheless, the available data are consistent with an acceleration of the terrestrial carbon cycle in response to global climate change.

  19. Estimating Corn Grain Yields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blumenthal, Jurg M.; Thompson, Wayne

    2009-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

    can collect samples from a corn field and use this data to calculate the yield estimate. An interactive grain yield calculator is provided in the Appendix of the pdf version of this publication. The calculator is also located in the publication.... Plan and prepare for sample and data collection. 2. Collect field samples and record data. 3. Analyze the data using the interactive grain yield calculator in the Appendix. Plan and prepare for sample and data collection Predetermine sample locations...

  20. On estimating avalanche danger from simulated snow profiles Sascha Bellaire

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jamieson, Bruce

    that coupled snow cover and numerical weather prediction models can provide such information on the snow cover high-resolution numeric weather prediction model GEM-LAM. Experienced forecasters estimated. Forcing snow cover models with forecasted weather data from numerical models has been shown

  1. Consumer Vehicle Choice Model Documentation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Changzheng [ORNL] [ORNL; Greene, David L [ORNL] [ORNL

    2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In response to the Fuel Economy and Greenhouse Gas (GHG) emissions standards, automobile manufacturers will need to adopt new technologies to improve the fuel economy of their vehicles and to reduce the overall GHG emissions of their fleets. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has developed the Optimization Model for reducing GHGs from Automobiles (OMEGA) to estimate the costs and benefits of meeting GHG emission standards through different technology packages. However, the model does not simulate the impact that increased technology costs will have on vehicle sales or on consumer surplus. As the model documentation states, While OMEGA incorporates functions which generally minimize the cost of meeting a specified carbon dioxide (CO2) target, it is not an economic simulation model which adjusts vehicle sales in response to the cost of the technology added to each vehicle. Changes in the mix of vehicles sold, caused by the costs and benefits of added fuel economy technologies, could make it easier or more difficult for manufacturers to meet fuel economy and emissions standards, and impacts on consumer surplus could raise the costs or augment the benefits of the standards. Because the OMEGA model does not presently estimate such impacts, the EPA is investigating the feasibility of developing an adjunct to the OMEGA model to make such estimates. This project is an effort to develop and test a candidate model. The project statement of work spells out the key functional requirements for the new model.

  2. Using distributed magnetometers to increase IMU-based velocity estimation into perturbed area

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    weight (less than 100 g) and low size (less than 3 cm2 ) IMUs have spurred a broad interest pour l'Armement (DGA) of the French Department of Defense. He is a PhD candidate in Mathematics'Armement (DGA) of the French Department of Defense. N. Petit is with the Centre Automatique et Systèmes, ?cole

  3. Diesel prices continue to increase

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-Series to UserProduct: CrudeOfficeNERSC HelpsDiesel prices continue to increase

  4. Reservoir environment of the Onuma geothermal power plant, northeast Japan, estimated by forward analysis of long-term artificial-tracer concentration change, using single-box-model simulator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shigeno, Hiroshi; Takahashi, Masaaki; Tetsuro, Noda

    1993-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

    A single-box-model numerical simulator for personal computer analysis was developed in order to estimate macroscopic parameter values for exploited geothermal reservoirs and essential fluids coming from the depth. The simulator was designed to compute history data concerning total production and reinjection fluids at geothermal power plants from the assumed parameter values, based on conservation laws for water mass, heat energy and masses of conservative chemical constituents of geothermal fluids. Using two kinds of forward analysis techniques, i.e. the cast-net and pursuit methods, programs containing the simulator can semiautomatically select the optimum combination of the unknown parameter values by minimizing the differences between the simulated and measured history data for specific enthalpy and chemical compositions of the production fluids. The forward analysis programs were applied to the history data from the Onuma geothermal power plant (production capacity, 10MWe) where waste hot water reinjection, chemical monitoring and artificial tracer tests have been conducted since 1970, almost the beginning of the geothermal exploitation. Using the history data, enthalpy and iodine concentrations of the total production fluids with the amounts of KI tracer injected as spikes, the macroscopic parameter values for the exploited reservoir and the essential hot water from the depth were uniquely determined as follows: mass of the hot water convecting in the exploited reservoir (M0), 3.23x109kg; recycling fraction of the reinjected waste hot water to the reservoir (R), 0.74; specific enthalpy of the essential water from the depth (H1), 385kcalkg; iodine concentration of the water (I1), 0.086mg/kg with chlorine concentration (C1), 259mg/kg. These results support the conceptual model that the exploited Onuma reservoir mainly in the Tertiary volcanics is supplied with the neutral Na-Cl type hot water of abnormally high B/CI mole ratio of around 1.0 by a large essential reservoir distributed at depth in the Paleozoic to Mesozoic detrital marine sedimentary rocks.

  5. SPACE TECHNOLOGY Actual Estimate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    SPACE TECHNOLOGY TECH-1 Actual Estimate Budget Authority (in $ millions) FY 2011 FY 2012 FY 2013 FY.6 29.5 29.5 29.5 29.5 29.5 29.5 Crosscutting Space Tech Development 120.4 187.7 293.8 272.1 266.6 259.7 247.0 Exploration Technology Development 144.6 189.9 202.0 215.5 215.7 214.5 216.5 Notional SPACE

  6. Using Photogrammetry to Estimate Tank Waste Volumes from Video

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Field, Jim G. [Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC, Richland, WA (United States)

    2013-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Washington River Protection Solutions (WRPS) contracted with HiLine Engineering & Fabrication, Inc. to assess the accuracy of photogrammetry tools as compared to video Camera/CAD Modeling System (CCMS) estimates. This test report documents the results of using photogrammetry to estimate the volume of waste in tank 241-C-I04 from post-retrieval videos and results using photogrammetry to estimate the volume of waste piles in the CCMS test video.

  7. Geothermal Electricity Technology Evaluation Model (GETEM) Development...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Electricity Technology Evaluation Model (GETEM) Development Geothermal Electricity Technology Evaluation Model (GETEM) Development Project objective: Provide a tool for estimating...

  8. State energy data report 1996: Consumption estimates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1999-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The State Energy Data Report (SEDR) provides annual time series estimates of State-level energy consumption by major economic sectors. The estimates are developed in the Combined State Energy Data System (CSEDS), which is maintained and operated by the Energy Information Administration (EIA). The goal in maintaining CSEDS is to create historical time series of energy consumption by State that are defined as consistently as possible over time and across sectors. CSEDS exists for two principal reasons: (1) to provide State energy consumption estimates to Members of Congress, Federal and State agencies, and the general public and (2) to provide the historical series necessary for EIA`s energy models. To the degree possible, energy consumption has been assigned to five sectors: residential, commercial, industrial, transportation, and electric utility sectors. Fuels covered are coal, natural gas, petroleum, nuclear electric power, hydroelectric power, biomass, and other, defined as electric power generated from geothermal, wind, photovoltaic, and solar thermal energy. 322 tabs.

  9. Energy Expenditure Estimation DEMO Application

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lu?trek, Mitja

    and against the SenseWear, a dedicated commercial product for energy expenditure estimation. Keywords: humanEnergy Expenditure Estimation DEMO Application Bozidara Cvetkovic1,2 , Simon Kozina1,2 , Bostjan://www.mps.si Abstract. The paper presents two prototypes for the estimation of hu- man energy expenditure during normal

  10. Value of storage with increased renewable penetration.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brainard, James Robert; Roach, Jesse Dillon

    2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The problem statement for this project is: (1) Renewable energy portfolio standards - (a) high penetration of intermittent and variable renewable generation on the grid, (b) utilities constrained by NERC Control Performance Standards, (c) requires additional resources to match generation with load; and (2) mitigation of impacts with energy storage - at what level of renewable penetration does energy storage become an attractive value proposition. Use a simplified, yet robust dispatch model that: (a) incorporates New Mexico Balance Area load and wind generation data, (b) distributes the load among a suite of generators, (c) quantifies increased generation costs with increased penetration of intermittent and variable renewable generation - fuel, startup, shut down, ramping, standby, etc., (d) tracks and quantifies NERC pentalties and violations, and (e) quantifies storage costs. Dispatch model has been constructed and it: (a) accurately distributes a load among a suite of generators, (b) quantifies duty cycle metrics for each of the generators - cumulative energy production, ramping and non ramping duration, spinning reserves, number of start-ups, and shut down durations, etc., (c) quantifies energy exchanges - cumulative exchanges, duration, and number of exchanges, (d) tracks ACE violations.

  11. Nitrogen trifluoride global emissions estimated from updated atmospheric measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Severinghaus, Jeffrey P.

    Nitrogen trifluoride global emissions estimated from updated atmospheric measurements Tim Arnolda,1's radiative budget; however, our understand- ing of its atmospheric burden and emission rates has been limited together with an atmo- spheric model and inverse method, we estimate that the global emissions of NF3

  12. Parameter Estimation from an Optimal Projection in a Local Environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Bijaoui; A. Recio-Blanco; P. de Laverny

    2008-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The parameter fit from a model grid is limited by our capability to reduce the number of models, taking into account the number of parameters and the non linear variation of the models with the parameters. The Local MultiLinear Regression (LMLR) algorithms allow one to fit linearly the data in a local environment. The MATISSE algorithm, developed in the context of the estimation of stellar parameters from the Gaia RVS spectra, is connected to this class of estimators. A two-steps procedure was introduced. A raw parameter estimation is first done in order to localize the parameter environment. The parameters are then estimated by projection on specific vectors computed for an optimal estimation. The MATISSE method is compared to the estimation using the objective analysis. In this framework, the kernel choice plays an important role. The environment needed for the parameter estimation can result from it. The determination of a first parameter set can be also avoided for this analysis. These procedures based on a local projection can be fruitfully applied to non linear parameter estimation if the number of data sets to be fitted is greater than the number of models.

  13. Terrain Based Vehicle Orientation Estimation Combining Vision and Inertial Measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brennan, Sean

    and yaw. A kinematic Kalman filter modeling an inertial navigation system then uses the scene matching/IMU system, the roll, pitch and yaw estimates from vision/IMU Kalman filter show an agreement with a (2 Park, PA, 16802 sbrennan@psu.edu Abstract A novel method for estimating vehicle roll, pitch and yaw

  14. Statistical Methods for Estimating the Minimum Thickness Along a Pipeline

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    along the pipeline can be used to estimate corrosion levels. The traditional parametric model method for this problem is to estimate parameters of a specified corrosion distribution and then to use these parameters companies use pipelines to transfer oil, gas and other materials from one place to another. Manufactures

  15. Budget estimates fiscal year 1995: Volume 10

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report contains the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) fiscal year budget justification to Congress. The budget provides estimates for salaries and expenses and for the Office of the Inspector General for fiscal year 1995. The NRC 1995 budget request is $546,497,000. This is an increase of $11,497,000 above the proposed level for FY 1994. The NRC FY 1995 budget request is 3,218 FTEs. This is a decrease of 75 FTEs below the 1994 proposed level.

  16. Commentary: Air-conditioning as a risk for increased use of healthservices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mendell, Mark J.

    2004-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this issue of the journal, Preziosi et al. [2004] report the first study to assess differences in the utilization of health care related to the presence of air-conditioning in office workplaces. Although the study was simple and cross-sectional, the data variables from questionnaires, and the findings subject to a variety of questions, the findings are striking enough to deserve clarification. The study used a large random national sample of French women assembled for another purpose (to study antioxidant nutrients and prevention of cancer and cardiovascular disease). Participants reported health services and health events in monthly questionnaires over 1 year, and in one questionnaire in the middle of that period also reported whether air-conditioning was in use at their workplace. Fifteen percent of participants reported air-conditioning at work. Analyses adjusting for age and smoking status of participants found increases in most outcomes assessed: use of specific kinds of physicians, sickness absence, and hospital stays. While the increases in odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were statistically significant for only otorhinolaryngology [OR (95% CI) = 2.33 (1.35-4.04)] and sickness absence [1.70 (1.13-2.58)], other increases were notable--dermatology [1.6 (0.98-2.65)]; hospital stay [1.51 (0.92-2.45)], and pneumonology [2.10 (0.65-6.82)]. The least elevated outcomes were for general practice medicine [0.99 (0.65-1.48)] and global medical visits [1.18 (0.67-2.07)]. [Preziosi et al., 2004 ,(Table 2)] Odds ratios for relatively common health outcomes often lie farther from the null than the risk ratios most useful for quantifying the increase in risk. Risk ratios, or prevalence ratios (PRs, the equivalent measure of effect for cross-sectional data), have seldom been used because of the convenience and availability of logistic regression models that estimate odds ratios. With baseline prevalences ranging up to 85.7% in the data from Preziosi et al. [2004], PRs allow a more appropriate estimate of the increase in each outcome associated with the risk factor of air-conditioning. The increase in prevalence was roughly estimated as [100* (crude PR * adjusted OR/crude OR)-100] %. Based on the data in Table 2 of Preziosi et al. [ 2004], estimates for the increased prevalence associated with air-conditioned offices include increases of 120% in otorhinolaryngology visits, and 40% in sickness absence. If these associated increases represented valid causal relationships, it would indicate enormous costs for employers and for society associated with air-conditioning systems, from increased health care and for reduced workplace productivity from sickness absence, in addition to a large burden of disease on workers.

  17. Modeling

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    a single-fluid diffuse interface model in the ALE-AMR hydrodynamics code to simulate surface tension effects. We show simula- tions and compare them to other surface tension...

  18. Modeling

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    sion effects. We show the result of a test case, and compare it to the result without surface tension. The model describes droplet formation nicely. Application The ARRA-funded...

  19. Security enhanced with increased vehicle inspections

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Security enhanced with increased vehicle inspections Security measures increase as of March: vehicle inspections won't delay traffic New increased security procedures meet LANL's...

  20. Rate Estimates In order to estimate the time needed to obtain a complete data set for one combination

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Appendix C Rate Estimates In order to estimate the time needed to obtain a complete data set for one combination of colliding beams at one energy the following requirements were defined to obtain the model predictions. Also, since emphasis is put on the most central collisions, a 5% trigger is employed

  1. Nonparametric function estimation with infinite-order kernels and applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berg, Arthur Steven

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2.5.3 GARCH Model . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.5.4N = 2000. . . estimates on garch data for N = 200 and N =data. . Histograms based on garch data. . Histograms based

  2. Production and analysis of a Southern Ocean state estimate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mazloff, Matthew R

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A modern general circulation model of the Southern Ocean with one-sixth of a degree resolution is optimized to the observed ocean in a weighted least squares sense. Convergence toward the state estimate solution is carried ...

  3. The effects of incorporating dynamic data on estimates of uncertainty

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mulla, Shahebaz Hisamuddin

    2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    that incorporating dynamic data in a reservoir model will result in lower estimates of uncertainty than considering only static data. However, incorporation of dynamic data does not guarantee that the forecasted ranges will encompass the true value. Reliability...

  4. An uncertainty principle, Wegner estimates and localization near fluctuation boundaries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anne Boutet de Monvel; Daniel Lenz; Peter Stollmann

    2009-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

    We prove a simple uncertainty principle and show that it can be applied to prove Wegner estimates near fluctuation boundaries. This gives new classes of models for which localization at low energies can be proven.

  5. In silico estimates of cell electroporation by electrical incapacitation waveforms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weaver, James C.

    We use a system model of a cell and approximate magnitudes of electrical incapacitation (EI) device waveforms to estimate conditions that lead to responses with or without electroporation (EP) of cell membranes near ...

  6. 3D pose estimation and segmentation using specular cues

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raskar, Ramesh

    We present a system for fast model-based segmentation and 3D pose estimation of specular objects using appearance based specular features. We use observed (a) specular reflection and (b) specular flow as cues, which are ...

  7. Deriving Atmospheric Density Estimates Using Satellite Precision Orbit Ephemerides

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hiatt, Andrew Timothy

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Model regardless of solar and geomagnetic activity levels. The POE density estimates were obtained with the desired accuracy for a 10% variation in the ballistic coefficient used to initialize the process. Fit span length showed little influence...

  8. Estimating Geometric Dislocation Densities in Polycrystalline Materialsfrom Orientation Imaging Microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Man, Chi-Sing [University of Kentucky; Gao, Xiang [University of Kentucky; Godefroy, Scott [University of Kentucky; Kenik, Edward A [ORNL

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Herein we consider polycrystalline materials which can be taken as statistically homogeneous and whose grains can be adequately modeled as rigid-plastic. Our objective is to obtain, from orientation imaging microscopy (OIM), estimates of geometrically necessary dislocation (GND) densities.

  9. Estimation Strategies for Constrained and Hybrid Dynamical Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Parish, Julie Marie Jones

    2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The estimation approaches examined in this dissertation focus on manipulating system dynamical models to allow the well-known form of the continuous-discrete extended Kalman filter (CDEKF) to accommodate constrained and hybrid systems...

  10. Of fishes and birthdays: Efficient estimation of polymer configurational entropies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nemenman, Ilya; Strauss, Charlie E

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present an algorithm to estimate the configurational entropy $S$ of a polymer. The algorithm uses the statistics of coincidences among random samples of configurations and is related to the catch-tag-release method for estimation of population sizes, and to the classic "birthday paradox". Bias in the entropy estimation is decreased by grouping configurations in nearly equiprobable partitions based on their energies, and estimating entropies separately within each partition. Whereas most entropy estimation algorithms require $N\\sim 2^{S}$ samples to achieve small bias, our approach typically needs only $N\\sim \\sqrt{2^{S}}$. Thus the algorithm can be applied to estimate protein free energies with increased accuracy and decreased computational cost.

  11. Projecting the climatic effects of increasing carbon dioxide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MacCracken, M C; Luther, F M [eds.

    1985-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents the current knowns, unknowns, and uncertainties regarding the projected climate changes that might occur as a result of an increasing atmospheric CO/sub 2/ concentration. Further, the volume describes what research is required to estimate the magnitude and rate of a CO/sub 2/-induced clamate change with regional and seasonal resolution. Separate abstracts have been prepared for the individual papers. (ACR)

  12. Robust quantum parameter estimation: Coherent magnetometry with feedback

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stockton, John K.; Geremia, J.M.; Doherty, Andrew C.; Mabuchi, Hideo [Norman Bridge Laboratory of Physics, Mail Code 12-33, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California 91125 (United States)

    2004-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We describe the formalism for optimally estimating and controlling both the state of a spin ensemble and a scalar magnetic field with information obtained from a continuous quantum limited measurement of the spin precession due to the field. The full quantum parameter estimation model is reduced to a simplified equivalent representation to which classical estimation and control theory is applied. We consider both the tracking of static and fluctuating fields in the transient and steady-state regimes. By using feedback control, the field estimation can be made robust to uncertainty about the total spin number.

  13. Estimation and specification tests of count data recreation demand functions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gomez, Irma Adriana

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    addressed this issue by employing various estimators which are based on a count distribution. Although researchers have recognized the need to model recreation demand as stemming from a count data generating process, there is little guidance in selecting... a stochastic model for this type of data, Previous research in this area has so far engaged only in heuristic comparisons of various count data estimators. Hence, as in standard regression analysis, it is desirable to test whether the fitted count...

  14. A PRACTICAL SCHEME FOR ARTERIAL TRAVEL TIME ESTIMATION BASED ON VEHICLE RE-IDENTIFICATION USING WIRELESS SENSORS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Varaiya, Pravin

    applicable kinematic wave model to construct a link travel time estimate from 30-second flow and occupancy the kinematic wave model (with known or estimated congestion wave speed and jam density), it is straightforward

  15. A Global Interactive Chemistry and Climate Model Chien Wang, Ronald G. Prinn and Andrei P. Sokolov

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    with calculated or estimated trace gas emissions from both anthropogenic and natural sources, it is designed to the chemistry sub-model. Model predictions of the surface trends of several key species are close, if the current increasing trends of anthropogenic emissions of climate-relevant gases are continued over the next

  16. Weatherization Assistance Program: Spurring Innovation, Increasing...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Weatherization Assistance Program: Spurring Innovation, Increasing Home Energy Efficiency Weatherization Assistance Program: Spurring Innovation, Increasing Home Energy Efficiency...

  17. Performance bounds on matched-field methods for source localization and estimation of ocean environmental parameters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xu, Wen, 1967-

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Matched-field methods concern estimation of source location and/or ocean environmental parameters by exploiting full wave modeling of acoustic waveguide propagation. Typical estimation performance demonstrates two fundamental ...

  18. New Results in Stability, Control, and Estimation of Fractional Order Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Koh, Bong Su

    2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    of control and estimation, even for systems where fractional order models do not arise naturally. This dissertation is aimed at further building of the base methodology with a focus on robust feedback control and state estimation. By setting...

  19. alternative factor models: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and estimation of dynamic unobserved component models. After introducing the general model, two methods for estimating the unknown parameters are presented. Both are algorithms...

  20. Harvesting can increase severity of wildlife disease epidemics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harvesting can increase severity of wildlife disease epidemics Marc Choisy1,* and Pejman Rohani1 extinction. Surprisingly, infectious diseases have not been accounted for in harvest models, which is a major and harvesting can substantially increase both disease prevalence and the absolute number of infectious

  1. Estimating Energy Savings in Compressed Air Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schmidt, C.; Kissock, J. K.

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    are frequently overestimated because the methods used to estimate savings neglect to consider important factors such as compressor control and type, storage, and multiple compressor operation. In this paper, a methodology is presented for modeling air... compressor performance and calculating projected energy savings from easily obtainable performance data such as full-load power, no-load power, rated capacity, average fraction full-load power or average fraction rated capacity. The methodology...

  2. Parameter estimation of vector controlled induction machine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rahman, Tahmid Ur

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    that this method can be employed for sensorless speed estimation and can be applied to motors like synchronous reluctance machine. CHAPTER II DYNAMIC MODELING OF INDUCTION MACHINE The well-known steady state equivalent circuit of induction motor sometimes... response without updating. . . . . , Rotor time constant converging with the actual value. . . . . . 78 79 CHAPTER I INTRODUCTION The growth of industrial motor drives over the past 10 years has exceeded 25% which is an unprecedented leap if one...

  3. K-minus Estimator Approach to Large Scale Structure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Martinis; M. Sosic

    2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Self similar 3D distributions of point-particles, with a given quasifractal dimension D, were generated on a Menger sponge model and then compared with \\textit{2dfGRS} and \\textit{Virgo project} data \\footnote{http://www.mso.anu.edu.au/2dFGRS/, http://www.mpa-garching.mpg.de/Virgo/}. Using the principle of local knowledge, it is argued that in a finite volume of space only the two-point minus estimator is acceptable in the correlation analysis of self similar spatial distributions. In this sense, we have simplified the Pietronero-Labini correlative analysis by defining a K-minus estimator, which when applied to 2dfGRS data revealed the quasifractal dimension $D\\approx 2$ as expected. In our approach the K-minus estimator is used only locally. Dimensions between D = 1 and D = 1.7, as suggested by the standard $\\xi (r)$ analysis, were found to be fallacy of the method. In order to visualize spatial quasifractal objects, we created a small software program called \\textit{RoPo} (''Rotate Points''). This program illustrates and manifests local correlative analysis in which the visual inspection emerged as a first step and a key part of the method. Finally, we discuss importance and perspective of the visual inspection on available real and simulated distributions. It is also argued that results of contemporary cosmological simulations do not faithfully represent real data, as they show a formation of ever increasing collapsars. We consent that 2dfGRS data are reminiscent of some kind of underlying turbulence like effects in action.

  4. A Two-Stage Kalman Filter Approach for Robust and Real-Time Power System State Estimation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Jinghe; Welch, Greg; Bishop, Gary; Huang, Zhenyu

    2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As electricity demand continues to grow and renewable energy increases its penetration in the power grid, realtime state estimation becomes essential for system monitoring and control. Recent development in phasor technology makes it possible with high-speed time-synchronized data provided by Phasor Measurement Units (PMU). In this paper we present a two-stage Kalman filter approach to estimate the static state of voltage magnitudes and phase angles, as well as the dynamic state of generator rotor angles and speeds. Kalman filters achieve optimal performance only when the system noise characteristics have known statistical properties (zero-mean, Gaussian, and spectrally white). However in practice the process and measurement noise models are usually difficult to obtain. Thus we have developed the Adaptive Kalman Filter with Inflatable Noise Variances (AKF with InNoVa), an algorithm that can efficiently identify and reduce the impact of incorrect system modeling and/or erroneous measurements. In stage one, we estimate the static state from raw PMU measurements using the AKF with InNoVa; then in stage two, the estimated static state is fed into an extended Kalman filter to estimate the dynamic state. Simulations demonstrate its robustness to sudden changes of system dynamics and erroneous measurements.

  5. Increased Radiation Dose to Overweight and Obese Patients from Radiographic Examinations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yanch, Jacquelyn C.

    Purpose: To estimate the increase in effective dose from diagnostic x-rays for overweight and obese adult patients compared with lean? reference phantoms. Materials and Methods: Relative effective doses, E/E[subscript 0], ...

  6. AN OVERVIEW OF TOOL FOR RESPONSE ACTION COST ESTIMATING (TRACE)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    FERRIES SR; KLINK KL; OSTAPKOWICZ B

    2012-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Tools and techniques that provide improved performance and reduced costs are important to government programs, particularly in current times. An opportunity for improvement was identified for preparation of cost estimates used to support the evaluation of response action alternatives. As a result, CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company has developed Tool for Response Action Cost Estimating (TRACE). TRACE is a multi-page Microsoft Excel{reg_sign} workbook developed to introduce efficiencies into the timely and consistent production of cost estimates for response action alternatives. This tool combines costs derived from extensive site-specific runs of commercially available remediation cost models with site-specific and estimator-researched and derived costs, providing the best estimating sources available. TRACE also provides for common quantity and key parameter links across multiple alternatives, maximizing ease of updating estimates and performing sensitivity analyses, and ensuring consistency.

  7. Increased Levels of Inosine in a Mouse Model of Inflammation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prestwich, Erin

    One possible mechanism linking inflammation with cancer involves the generation of reactive oxygen, nitrogen, and halogen species by activated macrophages and neutrophils infiltrating sites of infection or tissue damage, ...

  8. umerical simulation and modeling are increasingly essential to basic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    De Zeeuw, Darren L.

    on first- principles mathematical physics descriptions are es- sential to understanding the solar system's plasma phenomena, including the large-scale solar corona, the solar wind's interaction with planetary magnetos- pheres, comets, and interstellar medium, and the ini- tiation, structure, and evolution of solar

  9. Increased Efficiency with Model Based Calibration | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-UpHeatMulti-Dimensionalthe U.S. Improving Fan SystemIna Shaw InaFederal ProjectEfficiency

  10. IDC RP2 & 3 US Industry Standard Cost Estimate Summary.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harris, James M.; Huelskamp, Robert M.

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sandia National Laboratories has prepared a ROM cost estimate for budgetary planning for the IDC Reengineering Phase 2 & 3 effort, using a commercial software cost estimation tool calibrated to US industry performance parameters. This is not a cost estimate for Sandia to perform the project. This report provides the ROM cost estimate and describes the methodology, assumptions, and cost model details used to create the ROM cost estimate. ROM Cost Estimate Disclaimer Contained herein is a Rough Order of Magnitude (ROM) cost estimate that has been provided to enable initial planning for this proposed project. This ROM cost estimate is submitted to facilitate informal discussions in relation to this project and is NOT intended to commit Sandia National Laboratories (Sandia) or its resources. Furthermore, as a Federally Funded Research and Development Center (FFRDC), Sandia must be compliant with the Anti-Deficiency Act and operate on a full-cost recovery basis. Therefore, while Sandia, in conjunction with the Sponsor, will use best judgment to execute work and to address the highest risks and most important issues in order to effectively manage within cost constraints, this ROM estimate and any subsequent approved cost estimates are on a 'full-cost recovery' basis. Thus, work can neither commence nor continue unless adequate funding has been accepted and certified by DOE.

  11. Quantitative Cyber Risk Reduction Estimation Methodology for a Small Scada Control System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miles A. McQueen; Wayne F. Boyer; Mark A. Flynn; George A. Beitel

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose a new methodology for obtaining a quick quantitative measurement of the risk reduction achieved when a control system is modified with the intent to improve cyber security defense against external attackers. The proposed methodology employs a directed graph called a compromise graph, where the nodes represent stages of a potential attack and the edges represent the expected time-to-compromise for differing attacker skill levels. Time-to-compromise is modeled as a function of known vulnerabilities and attacker skill level. The methodology was used to calculate risk reduction estimates for a specific SCADA system and for a specific set of control system security remedial actions. Despite an 86% reduction in the total number of vulnerabilities, the estimated time-to-compromise was increased only by about 3 to 30% depending on target and attacker skill level.

  12. Research subjects for analytical estimation of core degradation at Fukushima-Daiichi nuclear power plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nagase, F.; Ishikawa, J.; Kurata, M.; Yoshida, H.; Kaji, Y.; Shibamoto, Y.; Amaya, M; Okumura, K.; Katsuyama, J. [Fukushima Project Team, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai-mura, Naka-gun, Ibaraki-ken 319-1195 (Japan)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Estimation of the accident progress and status inside the pressure vessels (RPV) and primary containment vessels (PCV) is required for appropriate conductance of decommissioning in the Fukushima-Daiichi NPP. For that, it is necessary to obtain additional experimental data and revised models for the estimation using computer codes with increased accuracies. The Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) has selected phenomena to be reviewed and developed, considering previously obtained information, conditions specific to the Fukushima-Daiichi NPP accident, and recent progress of experimental and analytical technologies. As a result, research and development items have been picked up in terms of thermal-hydraulic behavior in the RPV and PCV, progression of fuel bundle degradation, failure of the lower head of RPV, and analysis of the accident. This paper introduces the selected phenomena to be reviewed and developed, research plans and recent results from the JAEA's corresponding research programs. (authors)

  13. Development and Clinical Evaluation of a Three-Dimensional Cone-Beam Computed Tomography Estimation Method Using a Deformation Field Map

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ren, Lei, E-mail: lren1@hfhs.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Henry Ford Health System, Detroit, MI (United States); Chetty, Indrin J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Henry Ford Health System, Detroit, MI (United States); Zhang Junan [Department of Radiation Oncology, Oregon Health and Science University, Portland, OR (United States); Jin Jianyue [Department of Radiation Oncology, Henry Ford Health System, Detroit, MI (United States); Wu, Q. Jackie; Yan Hui; Brizel, David M.; Lee, W. Robert [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Movsas, Benjamin [Department of Radiation Oncology, Henry Ford Health System, Detroit, MI (United States); Yin Fangfang [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States)

    2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To develop a three-dimensional (3D) cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) estimation method using a deformation field map, and to evaluate and optimize the efficiency and accuracy of the method for use in the clinical setting. Methods and Materials: We propose a method to estimate patient CBCT images using prior information and a deformation model. Patients' previous CBCT data are used as the prior information, and the new CBCT volume to be estimated is considered as a deformation of the prior image volume. The deformation field map is solved by minimizing deformation energy and maintaining new projection data fidelity using a nonlinear conjugate gradient method. This method was implemented in 3D form using hardware acceleration and multi-resolution scheme, and it was evaluated for different scan angles, projection numbers, and scan directions using liver, lung, and prostate cancer patient data. The accuracy of the estimation was evaluated by comparing the organ volume difference and the similarity between estimated CBCT and the CBCT reconstructed from fully sampled projections. Results: Results showed that scan direction and number of projections do not have significant effects on the CBCT estimation accuracy. The total scan angle is the dominant factor affecting the accuracy of the CBCT estimation algorithm. Larger scan angles yield better estimation accuracy than smaller scan angles. Lung cancer patient data showed that the estimation error of the 3D lung tumor volume was reduced from 13.3% to 4.3% when the scan angle was increased from 60 Degree-Sign to 360 Degree-Sign using 57 projections. Conclusions: The proposed estimation method is applicable for 3D DTS, 3D CBCT, four-dimensional CBCT, and four-dimensional DTS image estimation. This method has the potential for significantly reducing the imaging dose and improving the image quality by removing the organ distortion artifacts and streak artifacts shown in images reconstructed by the conventional Feldkamp-Davis-Kress (FDK) algorithm.

  14. POINTWISE ESTIMATES AND MONOTONICITY FORMULAS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    POINTWISE ESTIMATES AND MONOTONICITY FORMULAS WITHOUT MAXIMUM PRINCIPLE MARCELO MONTENEGRO;2 MARCELO MONTENEGRO AND ENRICO VALDINOCI In this paper, a central role will be played by the following

  15. Frequency tracking and parameter estimation for robust quantum state estimation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ralph, Jason F. [Department of Electrical Engineering and Electronics, University of Liverpool, Brownlow Hill, Liverpool L69 3GJ (United Kingdom); Jacobs, Kurt [Department of Physics, University of Massachusetts at Boston, 100 Morrissey Blvd, Boston, Massachusetts 02125 (United States); Hill, Charles D. [Centre for Quantum Computation and Communication Technology, School of Physics, University of Melbourne, Victoria 3010 (Australia)

    2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper we consider the problem of tracking the state of a quantum system via a continuous weak measurement. If the system Hamiltonian is known precisely, this merely requires integrating the appropriate stochastic master equation. However, even a small error in the assumed Hamiltonian can render this approach useless. The natural answer to this problem is to include the parameters of the Hamiltonian as part of the estimation problem, and the full Bayesian solution to this task provides a state estimate that is robust against uncertainties. However, this approach requires considerable computational overhead. Here we consider a single qubit in which the Hamiltonian contains a single unknown parameter. We show that classical frequency estimation techniques greatly reduce the computational overhead associated with Bayesian estimation and provide accurate estimates for the qubit frequency.

  16. Developing a tool to estimate water withdrawal and consumption in electricity generation in the United States.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, M.; Peng, J. (Energy Systems); ( NE)

    2011-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Freshwater consumption for electricity generation is projected to increase dramatically in the next couple of decades in the United States. The increased demand is likely to further strain freshwater resources in regions where water has already become scarce. Meanwhile, the automotive industry has stepped up its research, development, and deployment efforts on electric vehicles (EVs) and plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs). Large-scale, escalated production of EVs and PHEVs nationwide would require increased electricity production, and so meeting the water demand becomes an even greater challenge. The goal of this study is to provide a baseline assessment of freshwater use in electricity generation in the United States and at the state level. Freshwater withdrawal and consumption requirements for power generated from fossil, nonfossil, and renewable sources via various technologies and by use of different cooling systems are examined. A data inventory has been developed that compiles data from government statistics, reports, and literature issued by major research institutes. A spreadsheet-based model has been developed to conduct the estimates by means of a transparent and interactive process. The model further allows us to project future water withdrawal and consumption in electricity production under the forecasted increases in demand. This tool is intended to provide decision makers with the means to make a quick comparison among various fuel, technology, and cooling system options. The model output can be used to address water resource sustainability when considering new projects or expansion of existing plants.

  17. Examples of Cost Estimation Packages

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1997-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Estimates can be performed in a variety of ways. Some of these are for projects for an undefined scope, a conventional construction project, or where there is a level of effort required to complete the work. Examples of cost estimation packages for these types of projects are described in this appendix.

  18. Trade-offs between inductive loops and GPS probe vehicles for travel time estimation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    using a velocity model equivalent to the Cell Transmission Model, and a traffic state estimation equivalent to the Cell Transmission Model [1, 2], using an estimation technique known as ensemble Kalman, 11], including data generated from cell phone towers, which produces less accurate vehicle position

  19. Proceedings of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission fifteenth water reactor safety information meeting: Volume 1, Plenary sessions, reactor licensing topics, NUREG-1150, risk analysis/PRA applications, innovative concepts for increased safety of advanced power reactors, severe accident modeling and analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weiss, A.J. (comp.)

    1988-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This six-volume report contains 140 papers out of the 164 that were presented at the Fifteenth Water Reactor Safety Information Meeting held at the National Bureau of Standards, Gaithersburg, Maryland, during the week of October 26-29, 1987. The papers are printed in the order of their presentation in each session and describe progress and results of programs in nuclear safety research conducted in this country and abroad. This report, Volume 1, discusses the following: plenary sessions; reactor licensing; NUREG-1150; risk analysis; innovative concepts for increased safety of advanced power reactors; and severe accident modeling and analysis. Thirty-two reports have been cataloged separately.

  20. Environmental Impacts of Increased Hydroelectric Development...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Impacts of Increased Hydroelectric Development at Existing Dams Environmental Impacts of Increased Hydroelectric Development at Existing Dams This report describes the...

  1. Increasing Scientific Productivity by Tracking Data

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Data Tracking Increases Scientific Productivity Data Tracking Increases Scientific Productivity July 20, 2011 | Tags: HPSS, NERSC Linda Vu, lvu@lbl.gov, +1 510 486 2402 HPSS...

  2. Recent increases in global HFC-23 emissions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of U.S. greenhouse gas emissions and sinks: 1990-2007, Rep.A. Lindley (2007), Global emissions of HFC-23 estimated to2009), Greenhouse Gas Emissions Data, http://unfccc.int/ghg_

  3. A BIM-based system for demolition and renovation waste estimation and planning

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cheng, Jack C.P., E-mail: cejcheng@ust.hk [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, The Hong Kong University of Science and Technology (Hong Kong); Ma, Lauren Y.H., E-mail: yingzi@ust.hk [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, The Hong Kong University of Science and Technology (Hong Kong)

    2013-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Highlights: ? We developed a waste estimation system leveraging the BIM technology. ? The system can calculate waste disposal charging fee and pick-up truck demand. ? We presented an example scenario demonstrating this system. ? Automatic, time-saving and wide applicability are the features of the system. - Abstract: Due to the rising worldwide awareness of green environment, both government and contractors have to consider effective construction and demolition (C and D) waste management practices. The last two decades have witnessed the growing importance of demolition and renovation (D and R) works and the growing amount of D and R waste disposed to landfills every day, especially in developed cities like Hong Kong. Quantitative waste prediction is crucial for waste management. It can enable contractors to pinpoint critical waste generation processes and to plan waste control strategies. In addition, waste estimation could also facilitate some government waste management policies, such as the waste disposal charging scheme in Hong Kong. Currently, tools that can accurately and conveniently estimate the amount of waste from construction, renovation, and demolition projects are lacking. In the light of this research gap, this paper presents a building information modeling (BIM) based system that we have developed for estimation and planning of D and R waste. BIM allows multi-disciplinary information to be superimposed within one digital building model. Our system can extract material and volume information through the BIM model and integrate the information for detailed waste estimation and planning. Waste recycling and reuse are also considered in our system. Extracted material information can be provided to recyclers before demolition or renovation to make recycling stage more cooperative and more efficient. Pick-up truck requirements and waste disposal charging fee for different waste facilities will also be predicted through our system. The results could provide alerts to contractors ahead of time at project planning stage. This paper also presents an example scenario with a 47-floor residential building in Hong Kong to demonstrate our D and R waste estimation and planning system. As the BIM technology has been increasingly adopted in the architectural, engineering and construction industry and digital building information models will likely to be available for most buildings (including historical buildings) in the future, our system can be used in various demolition and renovation projects and be extended to facilitate project control.

  4. Estimate steam-turbine losses to justify maintenance funds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1982-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A procedure to estimate steam-turbine losses is described. The estimates are based on analytical calculations and field inspections of turbines with known performance deterioration resulting from their environment, not their construction. They are, therefore, applicable to many types of steam turbines. Common causes of deterioration are the following: solid particle erosion, deposits, increased clearances, and peening or damage from foreign material. Performance losses due to these factors are analyzed. An example of application is given.

  5. A holographic superconductor model in a spatially anisotropic background

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jun-ichirou Koga; Kengo Maeda; Kentaro Tomoda

    2014-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate an anisotropic model of superconductors in the Einstein-Maxwell-dilaton theory with a charged scalar field. It is found that the critical temperature decreases as the anisotropy becomes large. We then estimate the energy gap of the superconductor, and find that the ratio of the energy gap to the critical temperature increases as the anisotropy increases and so it is larger than that in the isotropic case. We also find that peudogap appears due to the anisotropy.

  6. Estimation of 1945 to 1957 food consumption

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anderson, D.M.; Bates, D.J.; Marsh, T.L.

    1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report details the methods used and the results of the study on the estimated historic levels of food consumption by individuals in the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) study area from 1945--1957. This period includes the time of highest releases from Hanford and is the period for which data are being collected in the Hanford Thyroid Disease Study. These estimates provide the food-consumption inputs for the HEDR database of individual diets. This database will be an input file in the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Integrated Code (HEDRIC) computer model that will be used to calculate the radiation dose. The report focuses on fresh milk, eggs, lettuce, and spinach. These foods were chosen because they have been found to be significant contributors to radiation dose based on the Technical Steering Panel dose decision level.

  7. Distributed Dynamic State Estimation with Extended Kalman Filter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Du, Pengwei; Huang, Zhenyu; Sun, Yannan; Diao, Ruisheng; Kalsi, Karanjit; Anderson, Kevin K.; Li, Yulan; Lee, Barry

    2011-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Increasing complexity associated with large-scale renewable resources and novel smart-grid technologies necessitates real-time monitoring and control. Our previous work applied the extended Kalman filter (EKF) with the use of phasor measurement data (PMU) for dynamic state estimation. However, high computation complexity creates significant challenges for real-time applications. In this paper, the problem of distributed dynamic state estimation is investigated. One domain decomposition method is proposed to utilize decentralized computing resources. The performance of distributed dynamic state estimation is tested on a 16-machine, 68-bus test system.

  8. EE 527 1: Introduction to Detection and Estimation Theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dogandzic, Aleksandar

    2 Applications and Examples 4 Radar 4 Sonar & ultrasound 5 Seismology 6 Detection: Binary coherent: DC level in white Gaussian noise 13 Bayesian estimation of DC level in white Gaussian noise 14 processing: Measurement, modeling and inference. INGREDIENTS: · is measurement that we collect, modeled

  9. Need to understand "Uncertainty Assessment" in the system development modeling process

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kardile, Vilas Vasantrao

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the early stage of software life cycle project manager are inefficient to estimate the effort, schedule, cost estimation and its development approach .This in turn, confuses the manager to bid effectively on software project and choose incorrect development approach. That will directly effect on productivity cycle and increase level of uncertainty. This becomes a strong cause of project failure. So to avoid such problem if we know level and sources of uncertainty in model design, It will directive the developer to design accurate software cost and schedule estimation. Which are essential for software project success . However once the required efforts have estimated, little is done to recalibrate and reduce the uncertainty of the initial estimates. This paper demonstrates terminology and typology of uncertainty is presented together with a framework for the modeling process, Brief reviews have been made of 14 different (partly complementary) methods commonly used in uncertainty assessment its interaction w...

  10. Software Reliability Estimation under Uncertainty: Generalization of the Method of Moments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goseva-Popstojanova, Katerina

    Software Reliability Estimation under Uncertainty: Generalization of the Method of Moments Katerina Traditionally, reliability models of component-based software systems compute the point estimate of system reli affect the estimates of system reliability. In this paper we focus on uncertainty analysis in software

  11. Submitted to the Annals of Statistics FLEXIBLE COVARIANCE ESTIMATION IN GRAPHICAL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    West, Mike

    models have proven to be excellent tools for the analysis of complex high-dimensional data where examples where we explore frequentist risk prop- erties and the efficacy of graphs in the estimation of these estimators give substantial risk reductions compared to the sample covariance estimator S in small sample

  12. Estimation of resources and reserves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Energy Laboratory.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report analyzes the economics of resource and reserve estimation. Current concern about energy problems has focused attention on how we measure available energy resources. One reads that we have an eight-year oil ...

  13. Cosmological parameter estimation: impact of CMB aberration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Catena, Riccardo [Institut fr Theoretische Physik, Friedrich-Hund-Platz 1, 37077 Gttingen (Germany); Notari, Alessio, E-mail: riccardo.catena@theorie.physik.uni-goettingen.de, E-mail: notari@ffn.ub.es [Departament de Fsica Fondamental i Institut de Cincies del Cosmos, Universitat de Barcelona, Mart i Franqus 1, 08028 Barcelona (Spain)

    2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The peculiar motion of an observer with respect to the CMB rest frame induces an apparent deflection of the observed CMB photons, i.e. aberration, and a shift in their frequency, i.e. Doppler effect. Both effects distort the temperature multipoles a{sub lm}'s via a mixing matrix at any l. The common lore when performing a CMB based cosmological parameter estimation is to consider that Doppler affects only the l = 1 multipole, and neglect any other corrections. In this paper we reconsider the validity of this assumption, showing that it is actually not robust when sky cuts are included to model CMB foreground contaminations. Assuming a simple fiducial cosmological model with five parameters, we simulated CMB temperature maps of the sky in a WMAP-like and in a Planck-like experiment and added aberration and Doppler effects to the maps. We then analyzed with a MCMC in a Bayesian framework the maps with and without aberration and Doppler effects in order to assess the ability of reconstructing the parameters of the fiducial model. We find that, depending on the specific realization of the simulated data, the parameters can be biased up to one standard deviation for WMAP and almost two standard deviations for Planck. Therefore we conclude that in general it is not a solid assumption to neglect aberration in a CMB based cosmological parameter estimation.

  14. Optimized replica gas estimation of absolute integrals and partition functions.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Minh, D. (Biosciences Division)

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In contrast with most Monte Carlo integration algorithms, which are used to estimate ratios, the replica gas identities recently introduced by Adib enable the estimation of absolute integrals and partition functions using multiple copies of a system and normalized transition functions. Here, an optimized form is presented. After generalizing a replica gas identity with an arbitrary weighting function, we obtain a functional form that has the minimal asymptotic variance for samples from two replicas and is provably good for a larger number. This equation is demonstrated to improve the convergence of partition function estimates in a two-dimensional Ising model.

  15. Method and system to estimate variables in an integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) plant

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kumar, Aditya; Shi, Ruijie; Dokucu, Mustafa

    2013-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

    System and method to estimate variables in an integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) plant are provided. The system includes a sensor suite to measure respective plant input and output variables. An extended Kalman filter (EKF) receives sensed plant input variables and includes a dynamic model to generate a plurality of plant state estimates and a covariance matrix for the state estimates. A preemptive-constraining processor is configured to preemptively constrain the state estimates and covariance matrix to be free of constraint violations. A measurement-correction processor may be configured to correct constrained state estimates and a constrained covariance matrix based on processing of sensed plant output variables. The measurement-correction processor is coupled to update the dynamic model with corrected state estimates and a corrected covariance matrix. The updated dynamic model may be configured to estimate values for at least one plant variable not originally sensed by the sensor suite.

  16. Increased Upstream Ionization due to Formation of a Double Layer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thakur, S. Chakraborty; Harvey, Z.; Biloiu, I. A.; Hansen, A.; Hardin, R. A.; Przybysz, W. S.; Scime, E. E. [Department of Physics, West Virginia University, Morgantown, West Virginia 26506-6315 (United States)

    2009-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

    We report observations that confirm a theoretical prediction that formation of a current-free double layer in a plasma expanding into a chamber of larger diameter is accompanied by an increase in ionization upstream of the double layer. The theoretical model argues that the increased ionization is needed to balance the difference in diffusive losses upstream and downstream of the expansion region. In our expanding helicon source experiments, we find that the upstream plasma density increases sharply at the same antenna frequency at which the double layer appears.

  17. Colorado Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves Revision Increases ...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Increases (Billion Cubic Feet) Colorado Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves Revision Increases (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7...

  18. Pennsylvania Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves Revision Increases...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Increases (Billion Cubic Feet) Pennsylvania Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves Revision Increases (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7...

  19. Arkansas Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves Revision Increases ...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Increases (Billion Cubic Feet) Arkansas Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves Revision Increases (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7...

  20. Oklahoma Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves Revision Increases ...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Increases (Billion Cubic Feet) Oklahoma Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves Revision Increases (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7...