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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "model year light-duty" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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1

An Analysis of the Relationship between Casualty Risk Per Crash and Vehicle Mass and Footprint for Model Year 2000-2007 Light-Duty Vehicles-Preliminary report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

variables, on 13-state casualty risk per crash, lightvariables, on 13-state casualty risk per crash, lighton crashes with heavier light-duty trucks, by case vehicle

Wenzel, Tom

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

Federal Alternative Fuel Program Light Duty Vehicle Operations. Second annual report to Congress for fiscal year 1992  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This annual report to Congress details the second year of the Federal light duty vehicle operations as required by Section 400AA(b)(1)(B) of the Energy Policy and Conservation Act as amended by the Alternative Motor Fuels Act of 1988, Public Law 100-494. In 1992, the Federal alternative fuel vehicle fleet expanded significantly, from the 65 M85 (85 percent methanol and 15 percent unleaded gasoline) vehicles acquired in 1991 to an anticipated total of 3,267 light duty vehicles. Operating data are being collected from slightly over 20 percent, or 666, of these vehicles. The 601 additional vehicles that were added to the data collection program in 1992 include 75 compressed natural gas Dodge full-size (8-passenger) vans, 25 E85 (85 percent denatured ethanol and 15 percent unleaded gasoline) Chevrolet Lumina sedans, 250 M85 Dodge Spirit sedans (planned to begin operation in fiscal year 1993), and 251 compressed natural gas Chevrolet C-20 pickup trucks. Figure ES-1 illustrates the locations where the Federal light duty alternative fuel vehicles that are participating in the data collection program are operating. The primary criteria for placement of vehicles will continue to include air quality attainment status and the availability of an alternative fuel infrastructure to support the vehicles. This report details the second year of the Federal light duty vehicle operations, from October 1991 through September 1992.

Not Available

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

ORNL light-duty vehicles PC system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This data system, designed by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and funded by the US Department of Energy (DOE), monitors information on every light-duty vehicle (automobiles and light-duty trucks) sold in the United States since model year 1976. The data are specified in two days. One way is on a model basis (i.e, engine and transmission combinations) and includes data on city, highway, and combined fuel economies; engine size; drive-train; fuel type (gasoline or diesel); interior volume; body type; and other vehicle attributes. The other way is on a make basis (e.g., Ford Escort, Oldsmobile 98) and includes data on sales; Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) size class; the sales-weighted fuel economy; sales-weighted interior volume; sales-weighted engine displacement (cid); curb weight; and other attributes. A unique identification number is assigned to a specific vehicle category. This identification number contains information on the manufacturer, the location of the manufacturer (domestic or import), and the sponsorship of the vehicle (domestic or import). Fuel economies, model year sales and various vehicle characteristics for every make of the 164 million light-duty vehicles sold in the US since model year 1976 can be obtained from this data system. 2 figs., 4 tabs.

Hu, P.S.; Patterson, P.D. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA))

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Light Duty Vehicle Pathways  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

in 2030 0 5 10 15 20 25 30 Million BarrelsDay IMPORTS DOMESTIC OIL SUPPLY OIL DEMAND ELECTRICITY RES. & COM. INDUSTRY MISC. TRANSPORT AIR TRUCKS LIGHT DUTY VEHICLES ETHANOL...

5

Probabilistic evaluation of mobile source air pollution: Volume 1 -- Probabilistic modeling of exhaust emissions from light duty gasoline vehicles. Final report, 1 August 1994--31 May 1997  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Emission factors for light duty gasoline vehicles (LDGV) are typically developed based upon laboratory testing of vehicles for prescribed driving cycles. In this project, selected LDGV data sets and modeling assumptions used to develop Mobile5a were revisited. Probabilistic estimates of the inter-vehicle variability in emissions and the uncertainty in fleet average emissions for selected vehicle types and driving cycles were made. Case studies focused upon probabilistic analysis of base emission rate and speed correction estimates used in Mobile5a for throttle body and port fuel injected vehicles. Based upon inter-vehicle variability in the data sets and a probabilistic model in which the standard error terms of regression models employed in Mobile5a are also considered, the uncertainty was estimated for average emission factors for the selected fleets of light duty gasoline vehicles. The 90 percent confidence interval for the average emission factor varied in range with pollutant and driving cycle.

Frey, H.C.; Kini, M.D.

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Overview of Light-Duty Vehicle Studies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Overview of Light-Duty Vehicle Studies Overview of Light-Duty Vehicle Studies Washington, DC Workshop Sponsored by EERE Transportation Cluster July 26, 2010 Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy eere.energy.gov 2 * This workshop is intended to be a working meeting for analysts to discuss findings and assumptions because a number of key studies on light-duty vehicles (LDVs) and biofuels have been completed in the past 5 years and the insight gained from their findings would be valuable. * Outcomes: - common understanding of the effects of differing assumptions (today); - agreement on standard assumptions for future studies, where applicable (agreement on some assumptions today, follow-up discussions/meeting may be needed for others); - list of data/information gaps and needed research and studies (a

7

Procedures for Passenger Cars, Light-Duty Trucks and Medium-Duty  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2001 and subsequent model-year passenger cars, light-duty trucks, and medium-duty trucks for which non-methane organic gas (NMOG) exhaust emission reduction credit is requested as a result of the use of a DOR technology on a motor vehicle radiator, air conditioning assembly, or other appropriate substrate. REFERENCES:

unknown authors

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

DOE Hydrogen Analysis Repository: Biofuels in Light-Duty Vehicles  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Biofuels in Light-Duty Vehicles Biofuels in Light-Duty Vehicles Project Summary Full Title: Mobility Chains Analysis of Technologies for Passenger Cars and Light-Duty Vehicles Fueled with Biofuels: Application of the GREET Model to the Role of Biomass in America's Energy Future (RBAEF) Project Project ID: 82 Principal Investigator: Michael Wang Brief Description: The mobility chains analysis estimated the energy consumption and emissions associated with the use of various biofuels in light-duty vehicles. Keywords: Well-to-wheels (WTW); ethanol; biofuels; Fischer Tropsch diesel; hybrid electric vehicles (HEV) Purpose The project was a multi-organization, multi-sponsor project to examine the potential of biofuels in the U.S. Argonne was responsible for the well-to-wheels analysis of biofuel production and use.

9

TTRDC - Light Duty E-Drive Vehicles Monthly Sales Updates  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Light Duty Electric Drive Vehicles Monthly Sales Updates Currently available electric-drive vehicles (EDV) in the U.S market include hybrid electric vehicles (HEV), plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEV), and all electric vehicles (AEV). Plug-in Vehicles (PEV) include both PHEV and AEV. HEVs debuted in the U.S. market in December 1999 with 17 sales of the first-generation Honda Insight, while the first PHEV (Chevrolet Volt) and AEV (Nissan Leaf) most recently debuted in December 2010. Electric drive vehicles are offered in several car and SUV models, and a few pickup and van models. Historical sales of HEV, PHEV, and AEV are compiled by Argonne's Center for Transportation Research and reported to the U.S. Department of Energy's Vehicle Technology Program Office each month. These sales are shown in Figures 1, 2 and 3. Figure 1 shows monthly new PHEV and AEV sales by model. Figure 2 shows yearly new HEV sales by model. Figure 3 shows electric drive vehicles sales share of total light-duty vehicle (LDV) sales since 1999. Figure 4 shows HEV and PEV sales change with gasoline price..

10

Light Duty Efficient, Clean Combustion  

SciTech Connect

Cummins has successfully completed the Light Duty Efficient Clean Combustion (LDECC) cooperative program with DoE. This program was established in 2007 in support of the Department of Energy's Vehicles Technologies Advanced Combustion and Emissions Control initiative to remove critical barriers to the commercialization of advanced, high efficiency, emissions compliant internal combustion (IC) engines for light duty vehicles. Work in this area expanded the fundamental knowledge of engine combustion to new regimes and advanced the knowledge of fuel requirements for these diesel engines to realize their full potential. All of the following objectives were met with fuel efficiency improvement targets exceeded: (1) Improve light duty vehicle (5000 lb. test weight) fuel efficiency by 10.5% over today's state-of-the-art diesel engine on the FTP city drive cycle; (2) Develop and design an advanced combustion system plus aftertreatment system that synergistically meets Tier 2 Bin 5 NOx and PM emissions standards while demonstrating the efficiency improvements; (3) Maintain power density comparable to that of current conventional engines for the applicable vehicle class; and (4) Evaluate different fuel components and ensure combustion system compatibility with commercially available biofuels. Key accomplishments include: (1) A 25% improvement in fuel efficiency was achieved with the advanced LDECC engine equipped with a novel SCR aftertreatment system compared to the 10.5% target; (2) An 11% improvement in fuel efficiency was achieved with the advanced LDECC engine and no NOx aftertreamtent system; (3) Tier 2 Bin 5 and SFTP II emissions regulations were met with the advanced LDECC engine equipped with a novel SCR aftertreatment system; (4) Tier 2 Bin 5 emissions regulations were met with the advanced LDECC engine and no NOx aftertreatment, but SFTP II emissions regulations were not met for the US06 test cycle - Additional technical barriers exist for the no NOx aftertreatment engine; (5) Emissions and efficiency targets were reached with the use of biodiesel. A variety of biofuel feedstocks (soy, rapeseed, etc.) was investigated; (6) The advanced LDECC engine with low temperature combustion was compatible with commercially available biofuels as evaluated by engine performance testing and not durability testing; (7) The advanced LDECC engine equipped with a novel SCR aftertreatment system is the engine system architecture that is being further developed by the Cummins product development organization. Cost reduction and system robustness activities have been identified for future deployment; (8) The new engine and aftertreatment component technologies are being developed by the Cummins Component Business units (e.g. fuel system, turbomachinery, aftertreatment, electronics, etc.) to ensure commercial viability and deployment; (9) Cummins has demonstrated that the technologies developed for this program are scalable across the complete light duty engine product offerings (2.8L to 6.7L engines); and (10) Key subsystems developed include - sequential two stage turbo, combustions system for low temperature combustion, novel SCR aftertreatment system with feedback control, and high pressure common rail fuel system. An important element of the success of this project was leveraging Cummins engine component technologies. Innovation in component technology coupled with system integration is enabling Cummins to move forward with the development of high efficiency clean diesel products with a long term goal of reaching a 40% improvement in thermal efficiency for the engine plus aftertreatment system. The 40% improvement is in-line with the current light duty vehicle efficiency targets set by the 2010 DoE Vehicle Technologies MYPP and supported through co-operative projects such as the Cummins Advanced Technology Powertrains for Light-Duty Vehicles (ATP-LD) started in 2010.

Donald Stanton

2010-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

11

Light Duty Efficient, Clean Combustion  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Cummins has successfully completed the Light Duty Efficient Clean Combustion (LDECC) cooperative program with DoE. This program was established in 2007 in support of the Department of Energy's Vehicles Technologies Advanced Combustion and Emissions Control initiative to remove critical barriers to the commercialization of advanced, high efficiency, emissions compliant internal combustion (IC) engines for light duty vehicles. Work in this area expanded the fundamental knowledge of engine combustion to new regimes and advanced the knowledge of fuel requirements for these diesel engines to realize their full potential. All of the following objectives were met with fuel efficiency improvement targets exceeded: (1) Improve light duty vehicle (5000 lb. test weight) fuel efficiency by 10.5% over today's state-of-the-art diesel engine on the FTP city drive cycle; (2) Develop and design an advanced combustion system plus aftertreatment system that synergistically meets Tier 2 Bin 5 NOx and PM emissions standards while demonstrating the efficiency improvements; (3) Maintain power density comparable to that of current conventional engines for the applicable vehicle class; and (4) Evaluate different fuel components and ensure combustion system compatibility with commercially available biofuels. Key accomplishments include: (1) A 25% improvement in fuel efficiency was achieved with the advanced LDECC engine equipped with a novel SCR aftertreatment system compared to the 10.5% target; (2) An 11% improvement in fuel efficiency was achieved with the advanced LDECC engine and no NOx aftertreamtent system; (3) Tier 2 Bin 5 and SFTP II emissions regulations were met with the advanced LDECC engine equipped with a novel SCR aftertreatment system; (4) Tier 2 Bin 5 emissions regulations were met with the advanced LDECC engine and no NOx aftertreatment, but SFTP II emissions regulations were not met for the US06 test cycle - Additional technical barriers exist for the no NOx aftertreatment engine; (5) Emissions and efficiency targets were reached with the use of biodiesel. A variety of biofuel feedstocks (soy, rapeseed, etc.) was investigated; (6) The advanced LDECC engine with low temperature combustion was compatible with commercially available biofuels as evaluated by engine performance testing and not durability testing; (7) The advanced LDECC engine equipped with a novel SCR aftertreatment system is the engine system architecture that is being further developed by the Cummins product development organization. Cost reduction and system robustness activities have been identified for future deployment; (8) The new engine and aftertreatment component technologies are being developed by the Cummins Component Business units (e.g. fuel system, turbomachinery, aftertreatment, electronics, etc.) to ensure commercial viability and deployment; (9) Cummins has demonstrated that the technologies developed for this program are scalable across the complete light duty engine product offerings (2.8L to 6.7L engines); and (10) Key subsystems developed include - sequential two stage turbo, combustions system for low temperature combustion, novel SCR aftertreatment system with feedback control, and high pressure common rail fuel system. An important element of the success of this project was leveraging Cummins engine component technologies. Innovation in component technology coupled with system integration is enabling Cummins to move forward with the development of high efficiency clean diesel products with a long term goal of reaching a 40% improvement in thermal efficiency for the engine plus aftertreatment system. The 40% improvement is in-line with the current light duty vehicle efficiency targets set by the 2010 DoE Vehicle Technologies MYPP and supported through co-operative projects such as the Cummins Advanced Technology Powertrains for Light-Duty Vehicles (ATP-LD) started in 2010.

Donald Stanton

2010-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

12

Light Duty Efficient, Clean Combustion  

SciTech Connect

Cummins has successfully completed the Light Duty Efficient Clean Combustion (LDECC) cooperative program with DoE. This program was established in 2007 in support of the Department of Energy’s Vehicles Technologies Advanced Combustion and Emissions Control initiative to remove critical barriers to the commercialization of advanced, high efficiency, emissions compliant internal combustion (IC) engines for light duty vehicles. Work in this area expanded the fundamental knowledge of engine combustion to new regimes and advanced the knowledge of fuel requirements for these diesel engines to realize their full potential. All of the following objectives were met with fuel efficiency improvement targets exceeded: 1. Improve light duty vehicle (5000 lb. test weight) fuel efficiency by 10.5% over today’s state-ofthe- art diesel engine on the FTP city drive cycle 2. Develop & design an advanced combustion system plus aftertreatment system that synergistically meets Tier 2 Bin 5 NOx and PM emissions standards while demonstrating the efficiency improvements. 3. Maintain power density comparable to that of current conventional engines for the applicable vehicle class. 4. Evaluate different fuel components and ensure combustion system compatibility with commercially available biofuels. Key accomplishments include: ? A 25% improvement in fuel efficiency was achieved with the advanced LDECC engine equipped with a novel SCR aftertreatment system compared to the 10.5% target ? An 11% improvement in fuel efficiency was achieved with the advanced LDECC engine and no NOx aftertreamtent system ? Tier 2 Bin 5 and SFTP II emissions regulations were met with the advanced LDECC engine equipped with a novel SCR aftertreatment system ? Tier 2 Bin 5 emissions regulations were met with the advanced LDECC engine and no NOx aftertreatment, but SFTP II emissions regulations were not met for the US06 test cycle – Additional technical barriers exist for the no NOx aftertreatment engine ? Emissions and efficiency targets were reached with the use of biodiesel. A variety of biofuel feedstocks (soy, rapeseed, etc.) was investigated. ? The advanced LDECC engine with low temperature combustion was compatible with commercially available biofuels as evaluated by engine performance testing and not durability testing. ? The advanced LDECC engine equipped with a novel SCR aftertreatment system is the engine system architecture that is being further developed by the Cummins product development organization. Cost reduction and system robustness activities have been identified for future deployment. ? The new engine and aftertreatment component technologies are being developed by the Cummins Component Business units (e.g. fuel system, turbomachinery, aftertreatment, electronics, etc.) to ensure commercial viability and deployment ? Cummins has demonstrated that the technologies developed for this program are scalable across the complete light duty engine product offerings (2.8L to 6.7L engines) ? Key subsystems developed include – sequential two stage turbo, combustions system for low temperature combustion, novel SCR aftertreatment system with feedback control, and high pressure common rail fuel system An important element of the success of this project was leveraging Cummins engine component technologies. Innovation in component technology coupled with system integration is enabling Cummins to move forward with the development of high efficiency clean diesel products with a long term goal of reaching a 40% improvement in thermal efficiency for the engine plus aftertreatment system. The 40% improvement is in-line with the current light duty vehicle efficiency targets set by the 2010 DoE Vehicle Technologies MYPP and supported through co-operative projects such as the Cummins Advanced Technology Powertrains for Light- Duty Vehicles (ATP-LD) started in 2010.

Stanton, Donald W

2011-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

13

light-duty | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Login | Sign Up Wiki Apps Datasets Browse Upload data GDR Community Linked Data Search Share this page on Facebook icon Twitter icon light-duty Dataset Summary Description...

14

Light Duty Truck Aftertreatment - Experience and Challenges  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Detroit Diesel's test experience on light duty truck PM aftertreatment technology development will be presented. The Tier-II extremely low emissions standards combined with the light-duty test cycle impose a significant challenge for the development of production-viable emissions technologies. A robust general path to achieve these emissions targets will be outlined.

Redon, Fabien

2000-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

15

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: DOE Light Duty Vehicle Workshop  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Light Duty Vehicle Light Duty Vehicle Workshop to someone by E-mail Share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: DOE Light Duty Vehicle Workshop on Facebook Tweet about Fuel Cell Technologies Office: DOE Light Duty Vehicle Workshop on Twitter Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: DOE Light Duty Vehicle Workshop on Google Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: DOE Light Duty Vehicle Workshop on Delicious Rank Fuel Cell Technologies Office: DOE Light Duty Vehicle Workshop on Digg Find More places to share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: DOE Light Duty Vehicle Workshop on AddThis.com... Publications Program Publications Technical Publications Educational Publications Newsletter Program Presentations Multimedia Conferences & Meetings Annual Merit Review Proceedings Workshop & Meeting Proceedings

16

Table 37. Light-Duty Vehicle Energy Consumption by Technology ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Table 37. Light-Duty Vehicle Energy Consumption by Technology Type and Fuel Type (trillion Btu) Light-Duty Consumption by Technology Type Conventional Vehicles 1/

17

Mobility chains analysis of technologies for passenger cars and light duty vehicles fueled with biofuels : application of the Greet model to project the role of biomass in America's energy future (RBAEF) project.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Role of Biomass in America's Energy Future (RBAEF) is a multi-institution, multiple-sponsor research project. The primary focus of the project is to analyze and assess the potential of transportation fuels derived from cellulosic biomass in the years 2015 to 2030. For this project, researchers at Dartmouth College and Princeton University designed and simulated an advanced fermentation process to produce fuel ethanol/protein, a thermochemical process to produce Fischer-Tropsch diesel (FTD) and dimethyl ether (DME), and a combined heat and power plant to co-produce steam and electricity using the ASPEN Plus{trademark} model. With support from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) conducted, for the RBAEF project, a mobility chains or well-to-wheels (WTW) analysis using the Greenhouse gases, Regulated Emissions, and Energy use in Transportation (GREET) model developed at ANL. The mobility chains analysis was intended to estimate the energy consumption and emissions associated with the use of different production biofuels in light-duty vehicle technologies.

Wu, M.; Wu, Y.; Wang, M; Energy Systems

2008-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

18

Mobility chains analysis of technologies for passenger cars and light duty vehicles fueled with biofuels : application of the Greet model to project the role of biomass in America's energy future (RBAEF) project.  

SciTech Connect

The Role of Biomass in America's Energy Future (RBAEF) is a multi-institution, multiple-sponsor research project. The primary focus of the project is to analyze and assess the potential of transportation fuels derived from cellulosic biomass in the years 2015 to 2030. For this project, researchers at Dartmouth College and Princeton University designed and simulated an advanced fermentation process to produce fuel ethanol/protein, a thermochemical process to produce Fischer-Tropsch diesel (FTD) and dimethyl ether (DME), and a combined heat and power plant to co-produce steam and electricity using the ASPEN Plus{trademark} model. With support from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) conducted, for the RBAEF project, a mobility chains or well-to-wheels (WTW) analysis using the Greenhouse gases, Regulated Emissions, and Energy use in Transportation (GREET) model developed at ANL. The mobility chains analysis was intended to estimate the energy consumption and emissions associated with the use of different production biofuels in light-duty vehicle technologies.

Wu, M.; Wu, Y.; Wang, M; Energy Systems

2008-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

19

alternative fuel light-duty vehicles  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Fuel Light-Duty Vehicles Fuel Light-Duty Vehicles T O F E N E R G Y D E P A R T M E N U E N I T E D S T A T S O F A E R I C A M SUMMARY OF RESULTS FROM THE NATIONAL RENEWABLE ENERGY LABORATORY'S VEHICLE EVALUATION DATA COLLECTION EFFORTS Alternative Fuel Light-Duty Vehicles SUMMARY OF RESULTS FROM THE NATIONAL RENEWABLE ENERGY LABORATORY'S VEHICLE EVALUATION DATA COLLECTION EFFORTS PEG WHALEN KENNETH KELLY ROB MOTTA JOHN BRODERICK MAY 1996 N T Y A U E O F E N E R G D E P A R T M E N I T E D S T A T S O F A E R I C M Summary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 Light-Duty Vehicles in the Program . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2

20

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Light-Duty Vehicle Search  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Light-Duty Vehicle Light-Duty Vehicle Search to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Light-Duty Vehicle Search on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Light-Duty Vehicle Search on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Light-Duty Vehicle Search on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Light-Duty Vehicle Search on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Light-Duty Vehicle Search on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Light-Duty Vehicle Search on AddThis.com... Light-Duty Vehicle Search Search our light-duty alternative fuel vehicle database to find and compare alternative fuel vehicles and generate printable reports to aid in decision-making. These vehicles might not qualify for vehicle-acquisition

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "model year light-duty" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity: Light-Duty Vehicles  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Light-Duty Light-Duty Vehicles to someone by E-mail Share Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity: Light-Duty Vehicles on Facebook Tweet about Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity: Light-Duty Vehicles on Twitter Bookmark Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity: Light-Duty Vehicles on Google Bookmark Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity: Light-Duty Vehicles on Delicious Rank Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity: Light-Duty Vehicles on Digg Find More places to share Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity: Light-Duty Vehicles on AddThis.com... Home Overview Light-Duty Vehicles Alternative Fuel Vehicles Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicles Hybrid Electric Vehicles Micro Hybrid Vehicles ARRA Vehicle and Infrastructure Projects EVSE Testing Energy Storage Testing Hydrogen Internal Combustion Engine Vehicles Other ICE

22

Light duty utility arm startup plan  

SciTech Connect

This plan details the methods and procedures necessary to ensure a safe transition in the operation of the Light Duty Utility Arm (LDUA) System. The steps identified here outline the work scope and identify responsibilities to complete startup, and turnover of the LDUA to Characterization Project Operations (CPO).

Barnes, G.A.

1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Future Potential of Hybrid and Diesel Powertrains in the U.S. Light-duty Vehicle Market  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Diesel and hybrid technologies each have the potential to increase light-duty vehicle fuel economy by a third or more without loss of performance, yet these technologies have typically been excluded from technical assessments of fuel economy potential on the grounds that hybrids are too expensive and diesels cannot meet Tier 2 emissions standards. Recently, hybrid costs have come down and the few hybrid makes available are selling well. Diesels have made great strides in reducing particulate and nitrogen oxide emissions, and are likely though not certain to meet future standards. In light of these developments, this study takes a detailed look at the market potential of these two powertrain technologies and their possible impacts on light-duty vehicle fuel economy. A nested multinomial logit model of vehicle choice was calibrated to 2002 model year sales of 930 makes, models and engine-transmission configurations. Based on an assessment of the status and outlook for the two technologies, market shares were predicted for 2008, 2012 and beyond, assuming no additional increase in fuel economy standards or other new policy initiatives. Current tax incentives for hybrids are assumed to be phased out by 2008. Given announced and likely introductions by 2008, hybrids could capture 4-7% and diesels 2-4% of the light-duty market. Based on our best guesses for further introductions, these shares could increase to 10-15% for hybrids and 4-7% for diesels by 2012. The resulting impacts on fleet average fuel economy would be about +2% in 2008 and +4% in 2012. If diesels and hybrids were widely available across vehicle classes, makes, and models, they could capture 40% or more of the light-duty vehicle market.

Greene, D.L.

2004-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

24

American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) - Light-Duty Electric...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) Light-Duty Electric Drive Vehicle and Charging Infrastructure Testing What's New Chevrolet Volt Vehicle Demonstration: Project to...

25

American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) - Light-Duty Electric...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) Light-Duty Electric Drive Vehicle and Charging Infrastructure Testing What's New EV Project Overview Report: Project to date...

26

The Road Ahead for Light Duty Vehicle Fuel Demand  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

The Road Ahead for Light Duty Vehicle Fuel Demand Joanne Shore Energy Information Administration July 7, 2005 Refining Capacity Surplus Shrank As Demand Grew ...

27

Advanced Technologies for Light-Duty Vehicles (released in AEO2006)  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

A fundamental concern in projecting the future attributes of light-duty vehiclespassenger cars, sport utility vehicles, pickup trucks, and minivans is how to represent technological change and the market forces that drive it. There is always considerable uncertainty about the evolution of existing technologies, what new technologies might emerge, and how consumer preferences might influence the direction of change. Most of the new and emerging technologies expected to affect the performance and fuel use of light-duty vehicles over the next 25 years are represented in NEMS; however, the potential emergence of new, unforeseen technologies makes it impossible to address all the technology options that could come into play. The previous section of Issues in Focus discussed several potential technologies that currently are not represented in NEMS. This section discusses some of the key technologies represented in NEMS that are expected to be implemented in light-duty vehicles over the next 25 years.

Information Center

2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Assessing deployment strategies for ethanol and flex fuel vehicles in the U.S. light-duty vehicle fleet  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Within the next 3-7 years the US light duty fleet and fuel supply will encounter what is commonly referred to as the "blend wall". This phenomenon describes the situation when more ethanol production has been mandated than ...

McAulay, Jeffrey L. (Jeffrey Lewis)

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: DOE Light Duty Vehicle Workshop  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Light Duty Vehicle Workshop Light Duty Vehicle Workshop On July 26, 2010, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) sponsored a Light Duty Vehicle Workshop in Washington, D.C. Presentations from this workshop appear below as Adobe Acrobat PDFs. Download Adobe Reader. Presentations Overview of Light-Duty Vehicle Studies (PDF 562 KB), Sam Baldwin, Chief Technology Officer, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), DOE Light Duty Vehicle Pathways (PDF 404 KB), Tien Nguyen, Fuel Cell Technologies Office, EERE, DOE Hydrogen Transition Study (PDF 2.6 MB), Paul N. Leiby, David Greene, Zhenhong Lin, David Bowman, and Sujit Das, Oak Ridge National Laboratory Alternative Transportation Technologies: Hydrogen, Biofuels, Advanced Efficiency, and Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicles (PDF 123 KB), Joan Ogden and Mike Ramage, National Research Council

30

NGV and FCV Light Duty Transportation Perspective  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

G G presentation slides: Natural Gas and Fuel Cell Vehicle Light-Duty transportation perspectives Matt Fronk, Matt Fronk & Associates, LLC 1 OctOber 2011 | ArgOnne nAtiOnAl lAbOrAtOry NG Workshop summary report - appeNDIX G 2 OctOber 2011 | ArgOnne nAtiOnAl lAbOrAtOry NG Workshop summary report - appeNDIX G 3 OctOber 2011 | ArgOnne nAtiOnAl lAbOrAtOry NG Workshop summary report - appeNDIX G 4 OctOber 2011 | ArgOnne nAtiOnAl lAbOrAtOry NG Workshop summary report - appeNDIX G 5 OctOber 2011 | ArgOnne nAtiOnAl lAbOrAtOry NG Workshop summary report - appeNDIX G 6 OctOber 2011 | ArgOnne nAtiOnAl lAbOrAtOry NG Workshop summary report - appeNDIX G 7 OctOber 2011 | ArgOnne nAtiOnAl lAbOrAtOry NG Workshop summary report - appeNDIX G

31

Hybrid options for light-duty vehicles.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs) offer great promise in improving fuel economy. In this paper, we analyze why, how, and by how much vehicle hybridization can reduce energy consumption and improve fuel economy. Our analysis focuses on efficiency gains associated solely with vehicle hybridization. We do not consider such other measures as vehicle weight reduction or air- and tire-resistance reduction, because such measures would also benefit conventional technology vehicles. The analysis starts with understanding the energy inefficiencies of light-duty vehicles associated with different operation modes in US and Japanese urban and highway driving cycles, with the corresponding energy-saving potentials. The potential for fuel economy gains due to vehicle hybridization can be estimated almost exclusively on the basis of three elements: the reducibility of engine idling operation, the recoverability of braking energy losses, and the capability of improving engine load profiles to gain efficiency associated with specific HEV configurations and control strategies. Specifically, we evaluate the energy efficiencies and fuel economies of a baseline MY97 Corolla-like conventional vehicle (CV), a hypothetical Corolla-based minimal hybrid vehicle (MHV), and a MY98 Prius-like full hybrid vehicle (FHV). We then estimate energy benefits of both MHVs and FHVs over CVs on a performance-equivalent basis. We conclude that the energy benefits of hybridization vary not only with test cycles, but also with performance requirements. The hybrid benefits are greater for ''Corolla (high) performance-equivalent'' vehicles than for ''Prius (low) performance-equivalent'' vehicles. An increasing acceleration requirement would result in larger fuel economy benefits from vehicle hybridization.

An, F., Stodolsky, F.; Santini, D.

1999-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

32

Light duty utility arm walkdown report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document is a report of the Light Duty Utility Arm (LDUA) drawing walkdown. The purpose of this walkdown was to validate the essential configuration of the LDUA in preparation of deploying the equipment in a Hanford waste tank. The LDUA system has, over the course of its development, caused the generation of a considerable number of design drawings. The number of drawings is estimated to be well over 1,000. A large number consist of vendor type drawings, furnished by both Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and SPAR Aerospace Limited (SPAR). A smaller number, approximately 200, are H-6 type drawing sheets in the Project Hanford Management Contract (PHMC) document control system. A preliminary inspection of the drawings showed that the physical configuration of the LDUA did not match the documented configuration. As a result of these findings, a scoping walkdown of 20 critical drawing sheets was performed to determine if a problem existed in configuration management of the LDUA system. The results of this activity showed that 18 of the 20 drawing sheets were found to contain errors or omissions of varying concern. Given this, Characterization Engineering determined that a walkdown of the drawings necessary and sufficient to enable safe operation and maintenance of the LDUA should be performed. A review team was assembled to perform a review of all of the drawings and determine the set which would need to be verified through an engineering walkdown. The team determined that approximately 150 H-6 type drawing sheets would need to be verified, 12 SPAR/PNNL drawing sheets would need to be verified and converted to H-6 drawings, and three to six new drawings would be created (see Appendix A). This report documents the results of that walkdown.

Smalley, J.L.

1998-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

33

The Road Ahead for Light Duty Vehicle Fuel Demand  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Energy Information Administration Logo. If you need assistance viewing this page, please call (202) 586-8800 The Road Ahead for Light Duty Vehicle Fuel Demand Click here to start...

34

Light Duty Fuel Cell Electric Vehicle Hydrogen Fueling Protocol  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

DOE Webinar Light Duty Fuel Cell Electric Vehicle Hydrogen Fueling Protocol U.S. DOE WEBINAR ON H2 FUELING PROTOCOLS: PARTICIPANTS Rob Burgess Moderator Jesse Schneider TIR J2601,...

35

Light-Duty Vehicle Energy Consumption by Technology Type from...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Light-Duty Vehicle Energy Consumption by Technology Type from EIA AEO 2011 Early Release Supplemental Table 47 of EIA AEO 2011 Early Release
2011-02-23T15:57:46Z...

36

Light-duty diesel engine development status and engine needs  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report reviews, assesses, and summarizes the research and development status of diesel engine technology applicable to light-duty vehicles. In addition, it identifies specific basic and applied research and development needs in light-duty diesel technology and related health areas where initial or increased participation by the US Government would be desirable. The material presented in this report updates information provided in the first diesel engine status report prepared by the Aerospace Corporation for the Department of Energy in September, 1978.

Not Available

1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Road Ahead for Light Duty Vehicle Fuel Demand, The  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Explores some potential variations in light-duty vehicle demand to illustrate both the magnitude of demand changes and the length of time that it can take to affect demand when different levels of new-vehicle efficiencies and penetrations are assumed

Information Center

2005-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

38

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Light-Duty Vehicle Data Collection Methods  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Data Collection Methods to someone by E-mail Data Collection Methods to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Light-Duty Vehicle Data Collection Methods on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Light-Duty Vehicle Data Collection Methods on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Light-Duty Vehicle Data Collection Methods on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Light-Duty Vehicle Data Collection Methods on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Light-Duty Vehicle Data Collection Methods on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Light-Duty Vehicle Data Collection Methods on AddThis.com... Light-Duty Vehicle Data Collection Methods To maintain the Light-Duty Vehicle Search tool, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) gathers vehicle specifications, photos, and

39

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Light-Duty Vehicle Idle Reduction Strategies  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Light-Duty Vehicle Light-Duty Vehicle Idle Reduction Strategies to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Light-Duty Vehicle Idle Reduction Strategies on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Light-Duty Vehicle Idle Reduction Strategies on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Light-Duty Vehicle Idle Reduction Strategies on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Light-Duty Vehicle Idle Reduction Strategies on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Light-Duty Vehicle Idle Reduction Strategies on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Light-Duty Vehicle Idle Reduction Strategies on AddThis.com... More in this section... Idle Reduction Benefits & Considerations Heavy-Duty Vehicles Medium-Duty Vehicles

40

Light Duty Vehicle Pathways July 26, 2010  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

) Association for the Study of Peak Oil; (Figure 3) David Greene, ORNL. 0 100 200 300 400 500 1900 1910 1920 Efficiency and Renewable Energy U.S. Department of Energy #12;2 Conventional Oil International Energy Agency, 2008 · Across 798 of world's largest oil fields, average production decline of 6.7%/year. · Of 798

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "model year light-duty" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

DOE/VTP Light-Duty Diesel Engine Commercialization  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

VTP Light-Duty Diesel Engine Commercialization VTP Light-Duty Diesel Engine Commercialization Vehicle Technologies Program (VTP) spearheaded the development of clean diesel engine technologies for passenger vehicles in the 1990s, spurring the current reintroduction of highly efficient diesel vehicles into the passenger market. Cummins partnered with VTP to develop a diesel engine that meets the 50-state 2010 emissions standards while boosting vehicle fuel economy by 30% over comparable gasoline-powered vehicles. The Cummins engine is scheduled to debut in 2010 Chrysler sport utility vehicles and pickup trucks. VTP-sponsored research demonstrated the ability of diesel passenger vehicles with advanced aftertreatment to meet EPA's stringent Tier II Bin 5 standards, representing an 83% reduction in NOx and more than 87% reduction in

42

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Plug-In Hybrid and Zero Emission Light-Duty  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Plug-In Hybrid and Plug-In Hybrid and Zero Emission Light-Duty Vehicle Rebates to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Plug-In Hybrid and Zero Emission Light-Duty Vehicle Rebates on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Plug-In Hybrid and Zero Emission Light-Duty Vehicle Rebates on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Plug-In Hybrid and Zero Emission Light-Duty Vehicle Rebates on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Plug-In Hybrid and Zero Emission Light-Duty Vehicle Rebates on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Plug-In Hybrid and Zero Emission Light-Duty Vehicle Rebates on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Plug-In Hybrid and Zero Emission Light-Duty Vehicle Rebates on AddThis.com...

43

Tank selection for Light Duty Utility Arm (LDUA) system hot testing in a single shell tank  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this report is to recommend a single shell tank in which to hot test the Light Duty Utility Arm (LDUA) for the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) in Fiscal Year 1996. The LDUA is designed to utilize a 12 inch riser. During hot testing, the LDUA will deploy two end effectors (a High Resolution Stereoscopic Video Camera System and a Still/Stereo Photography System mounted on the end of the arm`s tool interface plate). In addition, three other systems (an Overview Video System, an Overview Stereo Video System, and a Topographic Mapping System) will be independently deployed and tested through 4 inch risers.

Bhatia, P.K.

1995-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

44

Desulfurization Effects on a Light-Duty Diesel Vehicle NOx Adsorber Exhaust Emission Control System  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Analyzes the effects on gaseous emissions, before and after desulfurization, on a light-duty diesel vehicle with a NOx adsorber catalyst.

Tatur, M.; Tomazic, D.; Tyrer, H.; Thornton, M.; Kubsh, J.

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Can U.S. Supply Accommodate Shifts to Diesel-Fueled Light-Duty ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Can U.S. Supply Accommodate Shifts to Diesel-Fueled Light-Duty Vehicles? ... the automobile manufacturers probably face the largest diesel-vehicle challenges in the ...

46

Light-Duty Vehicle Energy Consumption by Fuel Type from EIA AEO...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Linked Data Search Share this page on Facebook icon Twitter icon Light-Duty Vehicle Energy Consumption by Fuel Type from EIA AEO 2011 Early Release Dataset Summary...

47

An Analysis of the Relationship between Casualty Risk Per Crash and Vehicle Mass and Footprint for Model Year 2000-2007 Light-Duty Vehicles-Preliminary report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Vehicle manufacturer control variables for vehicle manufacturer results in massAccounting for vehicle manufacturer causes a reduction in

Wenzel, Tom

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

An Analysis of the Relationship between Casualty Risk Per Crash and Vehicle Mass and Footprint for Model Year 2000-2007 Light-Duty Vehicles-Preliminary report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Draft final report prepared for EERE, US DOE, November.Final report prepared for EERE, US DOE, March. LBNL-4897E.

Wenzel, Tom

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Non-Cost Barriers to Consumer Adoption of New Light-Duty Vehicle Technologies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

LIGHT-DUTY VEHICLES LIGHT-DUTY VEHICLES Non-Cost Barriers to Consumer Adoption of New Light-Duty Vehicle Technologies TRANSPORTATION ENERGY FUTURES SERIES: Non-Cost Barriers to Consumer Adoption of New Light-Duty Vehicle Technologies A Study Sponsored by U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy March 2013 Prepared by ARGONNE NATIONAL LABORATORY Argonne, Illinois 60439 managed by U Chicago Argonne, LLC for the U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY under contract DE-AC02-06CH11357 This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, expressed or implied, or assumes any legal liability or

50

Figure 71. Average fuel economy of new light-duty vehicles, 1980 ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Sheet3 Sheet2 Sheet1 Figure 71. Average fuel economy of new light-duty vehicles, 1980-2040 (miles per gallon, CAFE compliance values) History Reference case

51

Increasing the Fuel Economy and Safety of New Light-Duty Vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Automotive Technology and Fuel Economy Trends: 1975 Through2004. “The effect of fuel economy on automobile safety: aM. , 2002. “Near-term fuel economy potential for light-duty

Wenzel, Tom; Ross, Marc

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Can U.S. Supply Accommodate Shifts to Diesel-Fueled Light-Duty Vehicles?  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

The presentation explores if diesel-fueled light-duty vehicle growth in the U.S. might be large enough to create refinery constraints that would hinder that growth.

Information Center

2005-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

53

Can U.S. Supply Accommodate Shifts to Diesel-Fueled Light-Duty ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

The presentation explores if diesel-fueled light-duty vehicle growth in the U.S. might be large enough to create refinery constraints that would hinder that growth.

54

Investigating potential light-duty efficiency improvements through simulation of turbo-compounding and waste-heat recovery systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Modern diesel engines used in light-duty transportation applications have peak brake thermal efficiencies in the range of 40-42% for high-load operation with substantially lower efficiencies at realistic road-load conditions. Thermodynamic energy and exergy analysis reveals that the largest losses from these engines are due to combustion irreversibility and heat loss to the coolant, through the exhaust, and by direct convection and radiation to the environment. Substantial improvement in overall engine efficiency requires reducing or recovering these losses. Unfortunately, much of the heat transfer either occurs at relatively low temperatures resulting in large entropy generation (such as in the air-charge cooler), is transferred to low-exergy flow streams (such as the oil and engine coolant), or is radiated or convected directly to the environment. While there are significant opportunities for recovery from the exhaust and EGR cooler for heavy-duty applications, achieving similar benefits for light-duty applications is complicated by transient, low-load operation at typical driving conditions and competition with the turbocharger and aftertreatment system for the limited thermal resources. We have developed an organic Rankine cycle model using GT-Suite to investigate the potential for efficiency improvement through waste-heat recovery from the exhaust and EGR cooler of a light-duty diesel engine. The model is used to examine the effects of efficiency-improvement strategies such as cylinder deactivation, use of advanced materials and improved insulation to limit ambient heat loss, and turbo-compounding on the steady-state performance of the ORC system and the availability of thermal energy for downstream aftertreatment systems. Results from transient drive-cycle simulations are also presented, and we discuss strategies to address operational difficulties associated with transient drive cycles and balancing the thermal requirements of waste-heat recovery, turbocharging or turbo-compounding, and exhaust aftertreatment.

Edwards, Kevin Dean [ORNL; Wagner, Robert M [ORNL; Briggs, Thomas E [ORNL

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Diesel Exhaust Emissions Control for Light-Duty Vehicles  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this paper is to present the results of diesel exhaust aftertreatment testing and analysis done under the FreedomCAR program. Nitrogen Oxides (NOx) adsorber technology was selected based on a previous investigation of various NOx aftertreatment technologies including non-thermal plasma, NOx adsorber and active lean NOx. Particulate Matter (PM) emissions were addressed by developing a catalyzed particulate filter. After various iterations of the catalyst formulation, the aftertreatment components were integrated and optimized for a light duty vehicle application. This compact exhaust aftertreatment system is dual leg and consists of a sulfur trap, NOx adsorbers, and catalyzed particulate filters (CPF). During regeneration, supplementary ARCO ECD low-sulfur diesel fuel is injected upstream of the adsorber and CPF in the exhaust. Steady state and transient emission test results with and without the exhaust aftertreatment system (EAS) are presented. Results of soot filter regeneration by injecting low-sulfur diesel fuel and slip of unregulated emissions, such as NH3, are discussed. Effects of adsorber size and bypass strategy on NOx conversion efficiency and fuel economy penalty are also presented in this paper. The results indicate that if the supplementary fuel injection is optimized, NH3 slip is negligible. During the FTP cycle, injection of low sulfur diesel fuel can create temperature exotherms high enough to regenerate a loaded CPF. With the optimized NOx adsorber regeneration strategies the fuel injection penalty can be reduced by 40 to 50%. Results for various other issues like low temperature light off, reductant optimization, exhaust sulfur management, system integration and design trade-off, are also presented and discussed in this paper. (SAE Paper SAE-2003-01-0041 © 2003 SAE International. This paper is published on this website with permission from SAE International. As a user of this website, you are permitted to view this paper on-line, download this pdf file and print one copy of this paper at no cost for your use only. The downloaded pdf file and printout of this SAE paper may not be copied, distributed or forwarded to others or for the use of others.)

Mital, R.; Li, J.; Huang, S. C.; Stroia, B. J.; Yu, R. C. (Cummins, Inc.); Anderson, J.A. (Argonne National Laboratory); Howden, Kenneth C. (U.S. Department of Energy)

2003-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Predicting Light-Duty Vehicle Fuel Economy as a Function of Highway Speed  

SciTech Connect

The www.fueleconomy.gov website offers information such as window label fuel economy for city, highway, and combined driving for all U.S.-legal light-duty vehicles from 1984 to the present. The site is jointly maintained by the U.S. Department of Energy and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), and also offers a considerable amount of consumer information and advice pertaining to vehicle fuel economy and energy related issues. Included with advice pertaining to driving styles and habits is information concerning the trend that as highway cruising speed is increased, fuel economy will degrade. An effort was undertaken to quantify this conventional wisdom through analysis of dynamometer testing results for 74 vehicles at steady state speeds from 50 to 80 mph. Using this experimental data, several simple models were developed to predict individual vehicle fuel economy and its rate of change over the 50-80 mph speed range interval. The models presented require a minimal number of vehicle attributes. The simplest model requires only the EPA window label highway mpg value (based on the EPA specified estimation method for 2008 and beyond). The most complex of these simple model uses vehicle coast-down test coefficients (from testing prescribed by SAE Standard J2263) known as the vehicle Target Coefficients, and the raw fuel economy result from the federal highway test. Statistical comparisons of these models and discussions of their expected usefulness and limitations are offered.

Thomas, John F [ORNL; Hwang, Ho-Ling [ORNL; West, Brian H [ORNL; Huff, Shean P [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

An Emission Saved is an Emission Earned: An Empirical Study of Emission Banking for Light-Duty Vehicle Manufacturers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

costs across vehicles and manufacturers are equal. In thefor individual vehicles and manufacturers differ from thefor Light-Duty Vehicle Manufacturers Jonathan D. Rubin

Rubin, Jonathan D.; Kling, Catherine

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Electric Technologies for Light-duty Vehicles in the United States Abstract  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper is concerned with the present status and future projections for emerging technologies that can be utilized in light-duty vehicles in the next five to ten years to significantly reduce their CO2 emissions. The emerging technologies considered are modern clean diesel engines and hybrid-electric powertrains using batteries and/or ultracapacitors for energy storage. Throughout the study, six classes of vehicles –compact passenger cars to large SUVs-were considered. For each vehicle class, computer simulations (Advisor 2002) and cost analyses were performed for conventional ICE and mild and full parallel hybrids using port-fuel injected and lean burn gasoline engines and direct-injection turbo-charged diesel engines to determine the fuel economy and differential costs for the various vehicle designs using the conventional gasoline PFI engine vehicle as the baseline. CO2 emissions (gmCO2/mi) for each driveline and vehicle case were calculated from the fuel economy values. On a percentage or ratio basis, the analyses indicated that the fuel economy gains, CO2 emissions reductions, and cost/price increases due to the use of the advanced engines and hybrid-electric drivelines were essentially independent of vehicle class. This means that a regulation specifying the same fractional

United States; Andrew Burke; Ethan Abeles; Andrew Burke; Ethan Abeles

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Reactivity Controlled Compression Ignition (RCCI) Combustion on a Multi-Cylinder Light-Duty Diesel Engine  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Reactivity controlled compression ignition is a low-temperature combustion technique that has been shown, both in computational fluid dynamics modeling and single-cylinder experiments, to obtain diesel-like efficiency or better with ultra-low nitrogen oxide and soot emissions, while operating primarily on gasoline-like fuels. This paper investigates reactivity controlled compression ignition operation on a four-cylinder light-duty diesel engine with production-viable hardware using conventional gasoline and diesel fuel. Experimental results are presented over a wide speed and load range using a systematic approach for achieving successful steady-state reactivity controlled compression ignition combustion. The results demonstrated diesel-like efficiency or better over the operating range explored with low engine-out nitrogen oxide and soot emissions. A peak brake thermal efficiency of 39.0% was demonstrated for 2600 r/min and 6.9 bar brake mean effective pressure with nitrogen oxide emissions reduced by an order of magnitude compared to conventional diesel combustion operation. Reactivity controlled compression ignition emissions and efficiency results are compared to conventional diesel combustion operation on the same engine.

Curran, Scott [ORNL; Hanson, Reed M [ORNL; Wagner, Robert M [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Fuel Economy of the Light-Duty Vehicle Fleet (released in AEO2005)  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

The U.S. fleet of light-duty vehicles consists of cars and light trucks, including minivans, sport utility vehicles (SUVs) and trucks with gross vehicle weight less than 8,500 pounds. The fuel economy of light-duty vehicles is regulated by the CAFE standards set by NHTSA. Currently, the CAFE standard is 27.5 miles per gallon (mpg) for cars and 20.7 mpg for light trucks. The most recent increase in the CAFE standard for cars was in 1990, and the most recent increase in the CAFE standard for light trucks was in 1996.

Information Center

2005-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "model year light-duty" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

California Greenhouse Gas Emissions Standards for Light-Duty Vehicles (Update) (released in AEO2006)  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

The State of California was given authority under CAAA90 to set emissions standards for light-duty vehicles that exceed Federal standards. In addition, other States that do not comply with the National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS) set by the EPA under CAAA90 were given the option to adopt Californias light-duty vehicle emissions standards in order to achieve air quality compliance. CAAA90 specifically identifies hydrocarbon, carbon monoxide, and NOx as vehicle-related air pollutants that can be regulated. California has led the Nation in developing stricter vehicle emissions standards, and other States have adopted the California standards.

Information Center

2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Figure 73. Sales of light-duty vehicles using non-gasoline ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Sales of light-duty vehicles using non-gasoline technologies by type, 2011, 2025, ... Hybrid electric Flex-fuel Micro Total 2011.00 0.06 5.38E-03 0.54 0.25 1.61 0.01 2.49

63

Technical System Targets: Onboard Hydrogen Storage for Light-Duty Fuel Cell Vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

is to be determined. e Onboard efficiency is the energy efficiency for delivering hydrogen from the storage systemTechnical System Targets: Onboard Hydrogen Storage for Light-Duty Fuel Cell Vehicles a Storage to the powerplant divided by the total mass/volume of the complete storage system, including all stored hydrogen

64

Light-Duty Vehicle Energy Consumption by Fuel Type from EIA AEO...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Light-Duty Vehicle Energy Consumption by Fuel Type from EIA AEO 2011 Early Release Supplemental Table 47 of EIA AEO 2011 Early Release
2011-02-23T16:04:28Z 2011-03-31T19:33:44Z...

65

Electric Energy and Power Consumption by Light-Duty Plug-in Electric Vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.S. roads alone by 2015. PEVs-- either plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs) or pure electric vehicles (EVs)--adopt similar drivetrain configurations as hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs) [21 Electric Energy and Power Consumption by Light-Duty Plug-in Electric Vehicles Di Wu, Student

Tesfatsion, Leigh

66

Detroit Diesel Engine Technology for Light Duty Truck Applications - DELTA Engine Update  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The early generation of the DELTA engine has been thoroughly tested and characterized in the virtual lab, during engine dynamometer testing, and on light duty trucks for personal transportation. This paper provides an up-to-date account of program findings. Further, the next generation engine design and future program plans will be briefly presented.

Freese, Charlie

2000-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

67

Investigating potential efficiency improvement for light-duty transportation applications through simulation of an organic Rankine cycle for waste-heat recovery  

SciTech Connect

Modern diesel engines used in light-duty transportation applications have peak brake thermal efficiencies in the range of 40-42% for high-load operation with substantially lower efficiencies at realistic road-load conditions. Thermodynamic energy and exergy analysis reveals that the largest losses from these engines are due to heat loss and combustion irreversibility. Substantial improvement in overall engine efficiency requires reducing or recovering these losses. Unfortunately, much of the heat transfer either occurs at relatively low temperatures resulting in large entropy generation (such as in the air-charge cooler), is transferred to low-exergy flow streams (such as the oil and engine coolant), or is radiated or convected directly to the environment. While there are significant opportunities for recovery from the exhaust and EGR cooler for heavy-duty applications, the potential benefits of such a strategy for light-duty applications are unknown due to transient operation, low-load operation at typical driving conditions, and the added mass of the system. We have developed an organic Rankine cycle model using GT-Suite to investigate the potential for efficiency improvement through waste-heat recovery from the exhaust and EGR cooler of a light-duty diesel engine. Results from steady-state and drive-cycle simulations are presented, and we discuss strategies to address operational difficulties associated with transient drive cycles and competition between waste-heat recovery systems, turbochargers, aftertreatment devices, and other systems for the limited thermal resources.

Edwards, Kevin Dean [ORNL; Wagner, Robert M [ORNL

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Transportation Energy Futures Series: Potential for Energy Efficiency Improvement Beyond the Light-Duty-Vehicle Sector  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Considerable research has focused on energy efficiency and fuel substitution options for light-duty vehicles, while much less attention has been given to medium- and heavy-duty trucks, buses, aircraft, marine vessels, trains, pipeline, and off-road equipment. This report brings together the salient findings from an extensive review of literature on future energy efficiency options for these non-light-duty modes. Projected activity increases to 2050 are combined with forecasts of overall fuel efficiency improvement potential to estimate the future total petroleum and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions relative to current levels. This is one of a series of reports produced as a result of the Transportation Energy Futures (TEF) project, a Department of Energy-sponsored multi-agency project initiated to pinpoint underexplored strategies for abating GHGs and reducing petroleum dependence related to transportation.

Vyas, A. D.; Patel, D. M.; Bertram, K. M.

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Transportation Energy Futures Series: Potential for Energy Efficiency Improvement Beyond the Light-Duty-Vehilce Sector  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

COMMERCIAL TRUCKS COMMERCIAL TRUCKS AVIATION MARINE MODES RAILROADS PIPELINES OFF-ROAD EQUIPMENT Potential for Energy Efficiency Improvement Beyond the Light-Duty-Vehicle Sector TRANSPORTATION ENERGY FUTURES SERIES: Potential for Energy Efficiency Improvement Beyond the Light-Duty-Vehicle Sector A Study Sponsored by U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy February 2013 Prepared by ARGONNE NATIONAL LABORATORY Argonne, IL 60439 managed by U Chicago Argonne, LLC for the U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY under contract DE-AC02-06CH11357 This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, expressed or implied, or assumes any legal liability or

70

California Greenhouse Gas Emissions Standards for Light-Duty Vehicles (released in AEO2005)  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

In July 2002, California Assembly Bill 1493 (A.B. 1493) was signed into law. The law requires that the California Air Resources Board (CARB) develop and adopt, by January 1, 2005, greenhouse gas emission standards for light-duty vehicles that provide the maximum feasible reduction in emissions. In estimating the feasibility of the standard, CARB is required to consider cost-effectiveness, technological capability, economic impacts, and flexibility for manufacturers in meeting the standard.

Information Center

2005-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Light-Duty Alternative Fuel Vehicles: Federal Test Procedure Emissions Results  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In support of the U.S. Department of Energy's development and deployment of alternative fuels for environmental and national security reasons, NREL has managed a series of light-duty vehicle emissions tests on alternative fuel vehicles (AFVs). The purpose of this report is to give a detailed evaluation of the final emissions test results on vehicles tested on methanol, ethanol, and compressed natural gas.

Kelly, K.; Eudy, L.; Coburn, T.

1999-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

72

Reduced energy consumption by massive thermoelectric waste heat recovery in light duty trucks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The main objective of the EC funded HEATRECAR project is to reduce the energy consumption and curb CO2 emissions of vehicles by massively harvesting electrical energy from the exhaust system and re-use this energy to supply electrical components within the vehicle or to feed the power train of hybrid electrical vehicles. HEATRECAR is targeting light duty trucks and focuses on the development and the optimization of a Thermo Electric Generator (TEG) including heat exchanger

D. Magnetto; G. Vidiella

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Evaluating the impact of advanced vehicle and fuel technologies in U.S. light duty vehicle fleet  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The unrelenting increase in oil use by the U.S. light-duty vehicle (LDV) fleet presents an extremely challenging energy and environmental problem. A variety of propulsion technologies and fuels have the promise to reduce ...

Bandivadekar, Anup P

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Assessment of Fuel Economy Technologies for Light-Duty Vehicles  

SciTech Connect

An analysis of the number of stations and vehicles necessary to achieve future goals for sales of ethanol fuel (E85) is presented. Issues related to the supply of ethanol, which may turn out to be of even greater concern, are not analyzed here. A model of consumers decisions to purchase E85 versus gasoline based on prices, availability, and refueling frequency is derived, and preliminary results for 2010, 2017, and 2030 consistent with the president s 2007 biofuels program goals are presented. A limited sensitivity analysis is carried out to indicate key uncertainties in the trade-off between the number of stations and fuels. The analysis indicates that to meet a 2017 goal of 26 billion gallons of E85 sold, on the order of 30% to 80% of all stations may need to offer E85 and that 125 to 200 million flexible-fuel vehicles (FFVs) may need to be on the road, even if oil prices remain high. These conclusions are tentative for three reasons: there is considerable uncertainty about key parameter values, such as the price elasticity of choice between E85 and gasoline; the future prices of E85 and gasoline are uncertain; and the method of analysis used is highly aggregated it does not consider the potential benefits of regional strategies or the possible existence of market segments predisposed to purchase E85. Nonetheless, the preliminary results indicate that the 2017 biofuels program goals are ambitious and will require a massive effort to produce enough FFVs and ensure widespread availability of E85.

Greene, David L [ORNL

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Plasma Catalysis for NOx Reduction from Light-Duty Diesel Vehicles  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

On behalf of the Department of Energy's Office of FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies, we are pleased to introduce the Fiscal Year (FY) 2004 Annual Progress Report for the Advanced Combustion Engine R&D Sub-Program. The mission of the FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies Program is to develop more energy efficient and environmentally friendly highway transportation technologies that enable Americans to use less petroleum for their vehicles. The Advanced Combustion Engine R&D Sub-Program supports this mission by removing the critical technical barriers to commercialization of advanced internal combustion engines for light-, medium-, and heavy-duty highway vehicles that meet future Federal and state emissions regulations. The primary objective of the Advanced Combustion Engine R&D Sub-Program is to improve the brake thermal efficiency of internal combustion engines from 30 to 45 percent for light-duty applications by 2010; and 40 to 55 percent for heavy-duty applications by 2012; while meeting cost, durability, and emissions constraints. R&D activities include work on combustion technologies that increase efficiency and minimize in-cylinder formation of emissions, as well as aftertreatment technologies that further reduce exhaust emissions. Work is also being conducted on ways to reduce parasitic and heat transfer losses through the development and application of thermoelectrics and turbochargers that include electricity generating capability, and conversion of mechanically driven engine components to be driven via electric motors. This introduction serves to outline the nature, current progress, and future directions of the Advanced Combustion Engine R&D Sub-Program. The research activities of this Sub-Program are planned in conjunction with the FreedomCAR Partnership and the 21st Century Truck Partnership and are carried out in collaboration with industry, national laboratories, and universities. Because of the importance of clean fuels in achieving low emissions, R&D activities are closely coordinated with the relevant activities of the Fuel Technologies Sub-Program, also within the Office of FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies. Research is also being undertaken on hydrogen-fueled internal combustion engines to provide an interim hydrogen-based powertrain technology that promotes the longer-range FreedomCAR Partnership goal of transitioning to a hydrogen-fueled transportation system. Hydrogen engine technologies being developed have the potential to provide diesel-like engine efficiencies with near-zero emissions.

None

2005-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

76

Impacts of ethanol fuel level on emissions of regulated and unregulated pollutants from a fleet of gasoline light-duty vehicles  

SciTech Connect

The study investigated the impact of ethanol blends on criteria emissions (THC, NMHC, CO, NOx), greenhouse gas (CO2), and a suite of unregulated pollutants in a fleet of gasoline-powered light-duty vehicles. The vehicles ranged in model year from 1984 to 2007 and included one Flexible Fuel Vehicle (FFV). Emission and fuel consumption measurements were performed in duplicate or triplicate over the Federal Test Procedure (FTP) driving cycle using a chassis dynamometer for four fuels in each of seven vehicles. The test fuels included a CARB phase 2 certification fuel with 11% MTBE content, a CARB phase 3 certification fuel with a 5.7% ethanol content, and E10, E20, E50, and E85 fuels. In most cases, THC and NMHC emissions were lower with the ethanol blends, while the use of E85 resulted in increases of THC and NMHC for the FFV. CO emissions were lower with ethanol blends for all vehicles and significantly decreased for earlier model vehicles. Results for NOx emissions were mixed, with some older vehicles showing increases with increasing ethanol level, while other vehicles showed either no impact or a slight, but not statistically significant, decrease. CO2 emissions did not show any significant trends. Fuel economy showed decreasing trends with increasing ethanol content in later model vehicles. There was also a consistent trend of increasing acetaldehyde emissions with increasing ethanol level, but other carbonyls did not show strong trends. The use of E85 resulted in significantly higher formaldehyde and acetaldehyde emissions than the specification fuels or other ethanol blends. BTEX and 1,3-butadiene emissions were lower with ethanol blends compared to the CARB 2 fuel, and were almost undetectable from the E85 fuel. The largest contribution to total carbonyls and other toxics was during the cold-start phase of FTP.

Karavalakis, Georgios; Durbin, Thomas; Shrivastava, ManishKumar B.; Zheng, Zhongqing; Villella, Phillip M.; Jung, Hee-Jung

2012-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

77

Light-Duty Diesel Vehicles: Market Issues and Potential Energy and Emissions Impacts  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 Light-Duty Diesel Vehicles: Market Issues and Potential Energy and Emissions Impacts January 2009 Energy Information Administration Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the Department of Energy. Unless referenced otherwise, the information contained herein should be attributed to the Energy Information Administration and should not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy position of the Department of Energy or any other organization. Service Reports are prepared by the Energy Information Administration upon special request and are based on assumptions specified by the requester.

78

Selection of Light Duty Truck Engine Air Systems Using Virtual Lab Tests  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An integrated development approach using seasoned engine technology methodologies, virtual lab parametric investigations, and selected hardware verification tests reflects today's state-of-the-art R&D trends. This presentation will outline such a strategy. The use of this ''Wired'' approach results in substantial reduction in the development cycle time and hardware iterations. An example showing the virtual lab application for a viable design of the air-exhaust-turbocharger system of a light duty truck engine for personal transportation will be presented.

Zhang, Houshun

2000-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

79

Transportation Sector Model of the National Energy Modeling System. Volume 2 -- Appendices: Part 1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This volume contains input data and parameters used in the model of the transportation sector of the National Energy Modeling System. The list of Transportation Sector Model variables includes parameters for the following: Light duty vehicle modules (fuel economy, regional sales, alternative fuel vehicles); Light duty vehicle stock modules; Light duty vehicle fleet module; Air travel module (demand model and fleet efficiency model); Freight transport module; Miscellaneous energy demand module; and Transportation emissions module. Also included in these appendices are: Light duty vehicle market classes; Maximum light duty vehicle market penetration parameters; Aircraft fleet efficiency model adjustment factors; and List of expected aircraft technology improvements.

NONE

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Feebates and Fuel Economy Standards: Impacts on Fuel Use in Light-Duty Vehicles and Greenhouse Gas Emissions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study evaluates the potential impacts of a national feebate system, a market-based policy that consists of graduated fees on low-fuel-economy (or high-emitting) vehicles and rebates for high-fuel-economy (or lowemitting) vehicles. In their simplest form, feebate systems operate under three conditions: a benchmark divides all vehicles into two categories-those charged fees and those eligible for rebates; the sizes of the fees and rebates are a function of a vehicle's deviation from its benchmark; and placement of the benchmark ensures revenue neutrality or a desired level of subsidy or revenue. A model developed by the University of California for the California Air Resources Board was revised and used to estimate the effects of six feebate structures on fuel economy and sales of new light-duty vehicles, given existing and anticipated future fuel economy and emission standards. These estimates for new vehicles were then entered into a vehicle stock model that simulated the evolution of the entire vehicle stock. The results indicate that feebates could produce large, additional reductions in emissions and fuel consumption, in large part by encouraging market acceptance of technologies with advanced fuel economy, such as hybrid electric vehicles.

Greene, David L [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "model year light-duty" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Tier 2 Useful Life (120,000 miles) Exhaust Emission Results for a NOx Adsorber and Diesel Particle Filter Equipped Light-Duty Diesel Vehicle  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Investigates the emission control system performance and system desulfurization effects on regulated and unregulated emissions in a light-duty diesel engine.

Tatur, M.; Tomazic, D.; Thornton, M.; Orban, J.; Slone, E.

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Simulating Study of Premixed Charge Compression Ignition on Light-Duty Diesel Fuel Economy and Emissions Control  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We utilize the Powertrain Systems Analysis Toolkit (PSAT) combined with transient engine and aftertreatment component models to simulate the impact of premixed charge compression ignition (PCCI) on the fuel economy and emissions of light-duty (LD) diesel-powered conventional and hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs). Our simulated aftertreatment train consists of a diesel oxidation catalyst (DOC), lean NOx trap (LNT), and catalyzed diesel particulate filter (DPF). The results indicate that utilizing PCCI combustion significantly reduces fuel consumption and tailpipe emissions for the conventional diesel-powered vehicle with NOx and particulate emissions controls. These benefits result from a favorable engine speed-load distribution over the cycle combined with a corresponding reduction in the need to regenerate the LNT and DPF. However, the current PCCI technology appears to offer less potential benefit for diesel HEVs equipped with similar emissions controls. This is because PCCI can only be activated over a relatively small part of the drive cycle. Thus we conclude that future utilization of PCCI in diesel HEVs will require significant extension of the available speed-load range for PCCI and revision of current HEV engine management strategies before significant benefits can be realized.

Gao, Zhiming [ORNL; Daw, C Stuart [ORNL; Wagner, Robert M [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Hydrocarbon and Electrical Requirements in the Plasma During Treatment of NOx in Light-Duty Diesel Engine Exhaust  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper examines the hydrocarbon (C{sub 1}/NO{sub x} ratio) and electrical energy density (ratio of power to exhaust flow rate) requirements in the plasma during plasma-assisted catalytic reduction of NO{sub x}. The requirements for treatment of NO{sub x} in heavy-duty and light-duty diesel engines are compared. It is shown that, for light-duty applications, the plasma can significantly enhance the catalytic reduction of NO{sub x} with little fuel penalty incurred in the plasma process.

Penetrante, B.; Brusasco,R.M.; Merritt, B.T.; Vogtlin, G.E.

1999-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

84

Microsoft Word - EXT-12-27320_Idle-Stop_Light_Duty_Passenger_Vehicles.docx  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

7320 7320 Quantifying the Effects of Idle-Stop Systems on Fuel Economy in Light- Duty Passenger Vehicles Jeffrey Wishart Matthew Shirk Contract No. DE-FC26-05NT42486 December 2012 DISCLAIMER This information was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the U.S. Government. Neither the U.S. Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, expressed or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness, of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. References herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trade mark, manufacturer, or otherwise,

85

Efficiency Improvement Opportunities for Light-Duty Natural-Gas-Fueled Vehicles  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this report is to evaluate and make recommendations concerning technologies that promise to improve the efilciency of compressed natural gas (CNG) light-duty vehicles. Technical targets for CNG automotive technology given in the March 1998 OffIce of Advanced Automotive Technologies research and development plan were used as guidance for this effort. The technical target that necessitates this current study is to validate technologies that enable CNG light vehicles to have at least 10% greater - fuel economy (on a miles per gallon equivalent basis) than equivalent gasoline vehicles by 2006. Other tar- gets important to natural gas (NG) automotive technology and this study are to: (1) increase CNG vehicle range to 380 miles, (2) reduce the incremental vehicle cost (CNG vs gasoline) to $1500, and (3) meet the California ultra low-emission vehicle (ULEV) and Federal Tier 2 emission standards expected to be in effect in 2004.

Staunton, R.H.; Thomas, J.F.

1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Fuel savings and emissions reductions from light duty fuel cell vehicles  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Fuel cell vehicles (FCVs) operate efficiently, emit few pollutants, and run on nonpetroleum fuels. Because of these characteristics, the large-scale deployment of FCVs has the potential to lessen US dependence on foreign oil and improve air quality. This study characterizes the benefits of large-scale FCV deployment in the light duty vehicle market. Specifically, the study assesses the potential fuel savings and emissions reductions resulting from large-scale use of these FCVs and identifies the key parameters that affect the scope of the benefits from FCV use. The analysis scenario assumes that FCVs will compete with gasoline-powered light trucks and cars in the new vehicle market for replacement of retired vehicles and will compete for growth in the total market. Analysts concluded that the potential benefits from FCVs, measured in terms of consumer outlays for motor fuel and the value of reduced air emissions, are substantial.

Mark, J.; Ohi, J.M.; Hudson, D.V. Jr.

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Piston Bowl Optimization for RCCI Combustion in a Light-Duty Multi-Cylinder Engine  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Reactivity Controlled Compression Ignition (RCCI) is an engine combustion strategy that that produces low NO{sub x} and PM emissions with high thermal efficiency. Previous RCCI research has been investigated in single-cylinder heavy-duty engines. The current study investigates RCCI operation in a light-duty multi-cylinder engine at 3 operating points. These operating points were chosen to cover a range of conditions seen in the US EPA light-duty FTP test. The operating points were chosen by the Ad Hoc working group to simulate operation in the FTP test. The fueling strategy for the engine experiments consisted of in-cylinder fuel blending using port fuel-injection (PFI) of gasoline and early-cycle, direct-injection (DI) of diesel fuel. At these 3 points, the stock engine configuration is compared to operation with both the original equipment manufacturer (OEM) and custom machined pistons designed for RCCI operation. The pistons were designed with assistance from the KIVA 3V computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code. By using a genetic algorithm optimization, in conjunction with KIVA, the piston bowl profile was optimized for dedicated RCCI operation to reduce unburned fuel emissions and piston bowl surface area. By reducing these parameters, the thermal efficiency of the engine was improved while maintaining low NOx and PM emissions. Results show that with the new piston bowl profile and an optimized injection schedule, RCCI brake thermal efficiency was increased from 37%, with the stock EURO IV configuration, to 40% at the 2,600 rev/min, 6.9 bar BMEP condition, and NOx and PM emissions targets were met without the need for exhaust after-treatment.

Hanson, Reed M [ORNL; Curran, Scott [ORNL; Wagner, Robert M [ORNL; Reitz, Rolf [University of Wisconsin; Kokjohn, Sage [University of Wisconsin, Madison

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Reduce growth rate of light-duty vehicle travel to meet 2050 global climate goals This article has been downloaded from IOPscience. Please scroll down to see the full text article.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.iop.org/ERL/6/024018 Abstract Strong policies to constrain increasing global use of light-duty vehicles (cars reductions may be sought in sectors such as electricity generation and light-duty vehicle (LDV

Kammen, Daniel M.

89

Demonstration of oxygen-enriched combustion system on a light-duty vehicle to reduce cold-start emissions  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The oxygen content in the ambient air drawn by combustion engines can be increased by polymer membranes. The authors have previously demonstrated that 23 to 25% (concentration by volume) oxygen-enriched intake air can reduce hydrocarbons (HC), carbon monoxide (CO), air toxics, and ozone-forming potential (OFP) from flexible-fueled vehicles (FFVs) that use gasoline or M85. When oxygen-enriched air was used only during the initial start-up and warm-up periods, the emission levels of all three regulated pollutants [CO, nonmethane hydrocarbons (NMHC), and NO{sub x}] were lower than the U.S. EPA Tier II (year 2004) standards (without adjusting for catalyst deterioration factors). In the present work, an air separation membrane module was installed on the intake of a 2.5-L FFV and tested at idle and free acceleration to demonstrate the oxygen-enrichment concept for initial start-up and warm-up periods. A bench-scale, test set-up was developed to evaluate the air separation membrane characteristics for engine applications. On the basis of prototype bench tests and from vehicle tests, the additional power requirements and module size for operation of the membrane during the initial period of the cold-phase, FTP-75 cycle were evaluated. A prototype membrane module (27 in. long, 3 in. in diameter) supplying about 23% oxygen-enriched air in the engine intake only during the initial start-up and warm-up periods of a 2.5-L FFV requires additional power (blower) of less than one horsepower. With advances in air separation membranes to develop compact modules, oxygen enrichment of combustion air has the potential of becoming a more practical technique for controlling exhaust emissions from light-duty vehicles.

Sekar, R.; Poola, R.B.

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

APBF-DEC NOx Adsorber/DPF Project: Light-Duty Passenger Car Platform  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A 1.9L turbo direct injection (TDI) diesel engine was modified to achieve the upcoming Tier 2 Bin 5 emission standard in combination with a NOx adsorber catalyst (NAC) and a diesel particulate filter (DPF). The primary objective for developing this test bed is to investigating the effects of different fuel sulfur contents on the performance of an advanced emission control system (ECS) in a light-duty application. During the development process, the engine-out emissions were minimized by applying a state-of-the-art combustion system in combination with cooled exhaust gas recirculation (EGR). The subsequent calibration effort resulted in emission levels requiring 80-90 percent nitrogen-oxide (NOx) and particulate matter (PM) conversion rates by the corresponding ECS. The strategy development included ean/rich modulation for NAC regeneration, as well as, the desulfurization of the NAC and the regeneration of the DPF. Two slightly different ECS were investigated and calibrated. The initial vehicle results in an Audi A4 station wagon over the federal test procedure (FTP), US 06, and the highway fuel economy test (HFET) cycle indicate the potential of these configuration to meet the future Tier 2 emission standard.

Tomazic, D; Tatur, M; Thornton, M

2003-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

91

Comparative urban drive cycle simulations of light-duty hybrid vehicles with gasoline or diesel engines and emissions controls  

SciTech Connect

Electric hybridization is a very effective approach for reducing fuel consumption in light-duty vehicles. Lean combustion engines (including diesels) have also been shown to be significantly more fuel efficient than stoichiometric gasoline engines. Ideally, the combination of these two technologies would result in even more fuel efficient vehicles. However, one major barrier to achieving this goal is the implementation of lean-exhaust aftertreatment that can meet increasingly stringent emissions regulations without heavily penalizing fuel efficiency. We summarize results from comparative simulations of hybrid electric vehicles with either stoichiometric gasoline or diesel engines that include state-of-the-art aftertreatment emissions controls for both stoichiometric and lean exhaust. Fuel consumption and emissions for comparable gasoline and diesel light-duty hybrid electric vehicles were compared over a standard urban drive cycle and potential benefits for utilizing diesel hybrids were identified. Technical barriers and opportunities for improving the efficiency of diesel hybrids were identified.

Gao, Zhiming [ORNL; Daw, C Stuart [ORNL; Smith, David E [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Plasma Catalysis for NOx Reduction from Light-Duty Diesel Vehicles  

SciTech Connect

The control of NOx (NO and NO2) emissions from so-called ‘lean-burn’ vehicle engines remains a challenge. In this program, we have been developing a novel plasma/catalyst technology for the remediation of NOx under lean (excess oxygen) conditions, specifically for compression ignition direct injection (CIDI) diesel engines that have significant fuel economy benefits over conventional stoichiometric gasoline engines. Program efforts included: (1) improving the catalyst and plasma reactor efficiencies for NOx reduction; (2) studies to reveal important details of the reaction mechanism(s) that can then guide our catalyst and reactor development efforts; (3) evaluating the performance of prototype systems on real engine exhaust; and (4) studies of the effects of the plasma on particulate matter (PM) in real diesel engine exhaust. Figure 1 is a conceptual schematic of a plasma/catalyst device, which also shows our current best understanding of the role of the various components of the overall device for reducing NOx from the exhaust of a CIDI engine. When this program was initiated, it was not at all clear what the plasma was doing and, as such, what class of catalyst materials might be expected to produce good results. With the understanding of the role of the plasma (as depicted in Figure 1) obtained in this program, faujasite zeolite-based catalysts were developed and shown to produce high activity for NOx reduction of plasma-treated exhaust in a temperature range expected for light-duty diesel engines. These materials are the subject of a pending patent application, and were recognized with a prestigious R&D100 Award in 2002. In addition, PNNL staff were awarded a Federal Laboratory Consortium (FLC) Award in 2003 “For Excellence in Technology Transfer”. The program also received the DOE’s 2001 CIDI Combustion and Emission Control Program Special Recognition Award and 2004 Advanced Combustion Engine R&D Special Recognition Award.

Barlow, Stephan E.; Kwak, Ja Hun; Peden, Charles HF; Szanyi, Janos; Tonkyn, Russell G.; Howden, Ken; Hoard, John W.; Cho, Byong; Schmieg, Steven J.; Brooks, David J.; Nunn, Steven; Davis, Patrick

2004-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

93

Putting policy in drive : coordinating measures to reduce fuel use and greenhouse gas emissions from U.S. light-duty vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The challenges of energy security and climate change have prompted efforts to reduce fuel use and greenhouse gas emissions in light-duty vehicles within the United States. Failures in the market for lower rates of fuel ...

Evans, Christopher W. (Christopher William)

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Membrane-Based Air Composition Control for Light-Duty Diesel Vehicles: A Benefit and Cost Assessment  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report presents the methodologies and results of a study conducted by Argonne National Laboratory (Argonne) to assess the benefits and costs of several membrane-based technologies. The technologies evaluated will be used in automotive emissions-control and performance-enhancement systems incorporated into light-duty diesel vehicle engines. Such engines are among the technologies that are being considered to power vehicles developed under the government-industry Partnership for a New Generation of Vehicles (PNGV). Emissions of nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}) from diesel engines have long been considered a barrier to use of diesels in urban areas. Recently, particulate matter (PM) emissions have also become an area of increased concern because of new regulations regarding emissions of particulate matter measuring 2.5 micrometers or less (PM{sub 2.5}). Particulates are of special concern for diesel engines in the PNGV program; the program has a research goal of 0.01 gram per mile (g/mi) of particulate matter emissions under the Federal Test Procedure (FTP) cycle. This extremely low level (one-fourth the level of the Tier II standard) could threaten the viability of using diesel engines as stand-alone powerplants or in hybrid-electric vehicles. The techniques analyzed in this study can reduce NO{sub x} and particulate emissions and even increase the power density of the diesel engines used in light-duty diesel vehicles.

K. Stork; R. Poola

1998-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Simulating the Impact of Premixed Charge Compression Ignition on Light-Duty Diesel Fuel Economy and Emissions of Particulates and NOx  

SciTech Connect

We utilize the Powertrain Systems Analysis Toolkit (PSAT) combined with transient engine and aftertreatment component models implemented in Matlab/Simulink to simulate the effect of premixed charge compression ignition (PCCI) on the fuel economy and emissions of light-duty diesel-powered conventional and hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs). Our simulated engine is capable of both conventional diesel combustion (CDC) and premixed charge compression ignition (PCCI) over real transient driving cycles. Our simulated aftertreatment train consists of a diesel oxidation catalyst (DOC), lean NOx trap (LNT), and catalyzed diesel particulate filter (DPF). The results demonstrate that, in the simulated conventional vehicle, PCCI can significantly reduce fuel consumption and emissions by reducing the need for LNT and DPF regeneration. However, the opportunity for PCCI operation in the simulated HEV is limited because the engine typically experiences higher loads and multiple stop-start transients that are outside the allowable PCCI operating range. Thus developing ways of extending the PCCI operating range combined with improved control strategies for engine and emissions control management will be especially important for realizing the potential benefits of PCCI in HEVs.

Gao, Zhiming [ORNL; Daw, C Stuart [ORNL; Wagner, Robert M [ORNL; Edwards, Kevin Dean [ORNL; Smith, David E [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Evaluation of unthrottled combustion system options for light duty applications with future syncrude derived fuels. Alternative Fuels Utilization Program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An experimental program examining the interaction between several fuel and light duty automotive engine combinations is detailed. Combustion systems addressed covered indirect and direct injection diesel and spark ignited stratified charge. Fuels primarily covered D2, naphtha and intermediate broadcut blends. Low ignition quality diesel fuels were also evaluated. The results indicate the baseline fuel tolerance of each combustion system and enable characteristics of the systems to be compared. Performance, gaseous and particulate emissions aspects were assessed. The data obtained assists in the selection of candidate combustion systems for potential future fuels. Performance and environmental penalties as appropriate are highlighted relative to the individual candidates. Areas of further work for increased understanding are also reviewed.

Needham, J. R.; Cooper, B. M.; Norris-Jones, S. R.

1982-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Assessment of costs and benefits of flexible and alternative fuel use in the U.S. transportation sector. Technical report fourteen: Market potential and impacts of alternative fuel use in light-duty vehicles -- A 2000/2010 analysis  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In this report, estimates are provided of the potential, by 2010, to displace conventional light-duty vehicle motor fuels with alternative fuels--compressed natural gas (CNG), liquefied petroleum gas (LPG), methanol from natural gas, ethanol from grain and from cellulosic feedstocks, and electricity--and with replacement fuels such as oxygenates added to gasoline. The 2010 estimates include the motor fuel displacement resulting both from government programs (including the Clean Air Act and EPACT) and from potential market forces. This report also provides an estimate of motor fuel displacement by replacement and alterative fuels in the year 2000. However, in contrast to the 2010 estimates, the year 2000 estimate is restricted to an accounting of the effects of existing programs and regulations. 27 figs., 108 tabs.

NONE

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

In-Cylinder Fuel Blending of Gasoline/Diesel for Improved Efficiency and Lowest Possible Emissions on a Multi-Cylinder Light-Duty Diesel Engine  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In-cylinder fuel blending of gasoline/diesel fuel is investigated on a multi-cylinder light-duty diesel engine as a potential strategy to control in-cylinder fuel reactivity for improved efficiency and lowest possible emissions. This approach was developed and demonstrated at the University of Wisconsin through modeling and single-cylinder engine experiments. The objective of this study is to better understand the potential and challenges of this method on a multi-cylinder engine. More specifically, the effect of cylinder-to-cylinder imbalances, heat rejection, and in-cylinder charge motion as well as the potential limitations imposed by real-world turbo-machinery were investigated on a 1.9-liter four-cylinder engine. This investigation focused on one engine condition, 2300 rpm, 4.2 bar brake mean effective pressure (BMEP). Gasoline was introduced with a port-fuel-injection system. Parameter sweeps included gasoline-to-diesel fuel ratio, intake air mixture temperature, in-cylinder swirl number, and diesel start-of-injection phasing. In addition, engine parameters were trimmed for each cylinder to balance the combustion process for maximum efficiency and lowest emissions. An important observation was the strong influence of intake charge temperature on cylinder pressure rise rate. Experiments were able to show increased thermal efficiency along with dramatic decreases in oxides of nitrogen (NOX) and particulate matter (PM). However, indicated thermal efficiency for the multi-cylinder experiments were less than expected based on modeling and single-cylinder results. The lower indicated thermal efficiency is believed to be due increased heat transfer as compared to the model predictions and suggest a need for improved cylinder-to-cylinder control and increased heat transfer control.

Curran, Scott [ORNL; Prikhodko, Vitaly Y [ORNL; Wagner, Robert M [ORNL; Parks, II, James E [ORNL; Cho, Kukwon [ORNL; Sluder, Scott [ORNL; Kokjohn, Sage [University of Wisconsin, Madison; Reitz, Rolf [University of Wisconsin

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Effect of Intake Air Filter Condition on Light-Duty Gasoline Vehicles  

SciTech Connect

Proper maintenance can help vehicles perform as designed, positively affecting fuel economy, emissions, and the overall drivability. This effort investigates the effect of one maintenance factor, intake air filter replacement, with primary focus on vehicle fuel economy, but also examining emissions and performance. Older studies, dealing with carbureted gasoline vehicles, have indicated that replacing a clogged or dirty air filter can improve vehicle fuel economy and conversely that a dirty air filter can be significantly detrimental to fuel economy. The effect of clogged air filters on the fuel economy, acceleration and emissions of five gasoline fueled vehicles is examined. Four of these were modern vehicles, featuring closed-loop control and ranging in model year from 2003 to 2007. Three vehicles were powered by naturally aspirated, port fuel injection (PFI) engines of differing size and cylinder configuration: an inline 4, a V6 and a V8. A turbocharged inline 4-cylinder gasoline direct injection (GDI) engine powered vehicle was the fourth modern gasoline vehicle tested. A vintage 1972 vehicle equipped with a carburetor (open-loop control) was also examined. Results reveal insignificant fuel economy and emissions sensitivity of modern vehicles to air filter condition, but measureable effects on the 1972 vehicle. All vehicles experienced a measured acceleration performance penalty with clogged intake air filters.

Thomas, John F [ORNL; Huff, Shean P [ORNL; West, Brian H [ORNL; Norman, Kevin M [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Light-Duty Drive Cycle Simulations of Diesel Engine-Out Exhaust Properties for an RCCI-Enabled Vehicle  

SciTech Connect

In-cylinder blending of gasoline and diesel fuels to achieve low-temperature reactivity controlled compression ignition (RCCI) can reduce NOx and PM emissions while maintaining or improving brake thermal efficiency compared to conventional diesel combustion (CDC). Moreover, the dual-fueling RCCI is able to achieve these benefits by tailoring combustion reactivity over a wider range of engine operation than is possible with a single fuel. However, the currently demonstrated range of stable RCCI combustion just covers a portion of the engine speed-load range required in several light-duty drive cycles. This means that engines must switch from RCCI to CDC when speed and load fall outside of the stable RCCI range. In this study we investigated the impact of RCCI as it has recently been demonstrated on practical engine-out exhaust temperature and emissions by simulating a multi-mode RCCI-enabled vehicle operating over two urban and two highway driving cycles. To implement our simulations, we employed experimental engine maps for a multi-mode RCCI/CDC engine combined with a standard mid-size, automatic transmission, passenger vehicle in the Autonomie vehicle simulation platform. Our results include both detailed transient and cycle-averaged engine exhaust temperature and emissions for each case, and we note the potential implications of the modified exhaust properties on catalytic emissions control and utilization of waste heat recovery on future RCCI-enabled vehicles.

Gao, Zhiming [ORNL; Curran, Scott [ORNL; Daw, C Stuart [ORNL; Wagner, Robert M [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "model year light-duty" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Ohio's First Ethanol-Fueled Light-Duty Fleet: Final Study Results  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In 1996, the State of Ohio established a project to demonstrate the use of an ethanol blend (E85, which is 85% transportation-grade ethanol and 15% gasoline) as a transportation fuel in flexible-fuel vehicles (FFVs). The study included ten FFVs and three gasoline vehicles (used as control vehicles) operated by five state agencies. The project included 24 months of data collection on vehicle operations. This report presents the data collection and analysis from the study, with a focus on the last year.

Battelle

1998-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Ohio's First Ethanol-Fueled Light-Duty Fleet: Final Study Results  

SciTech Connect

In 1996, the State of Ohio established a project to demonstrate the use of an ethanol blend (E85, which is 85% transportation-grade ethanol and 15% gasoline) as a transportation fuel in flexible-fuel vehicles (FFVs). The study included ten FFVs and three gasoline vehicles (used as control vehicles) operated by five state agencies. The project included 24 months of data collection on vehicle operations. This report presents the data collection and analysis from the study, with a focus on the last year.

Battelle

1998-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Lightweight materials in the light-duty passenger vehicle market: Their market penetration potential and impacts  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper summarizes the results of a lightweight materials study. Various lightweight materials are examined and the most cost effective are selected for further analysis. Aluminum and high-performance polymer matrix composites (PMCS) are found to have the highest potential for reducing the weight of automobiles and passenger-oriented light trucks. Weight reduction potential for aluminum and carbon fiber-based PMCs are computed based on a set of component-specific replacement criteria (such as stiffness and strength), and the consequent incremental cost scenarios are developed. The authors assume that a materials R and D program successfully reduces the cost of manufacturing aluminum and carbon fiber PMC-intensive vehicles. A vehicle choice model is used to project market shares for the lightweight vehicles. A vehicle survival and age-related usage model is employed to compute energy consumption over time for the vehicle stock. After a review of projected costs, the following two sets of vehicles are characterized to compete with the conventional materials vehicles: (1) aluminum vehicles with limited replacement providing 19% weight reduction (AIV-Mid), and (2) aluminum vehicles with the maximum replacement providing 31% weight reduction (AIV-Max). Assuming mass-market introduction in 2005, the authors project a national petroleum energy savings of 3% for AIV-Mid and 5% for AIV-Max in 2030.

Stodolsky, F. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Center for Transportation Research]|[Argonne National Lab., Washington, DC (United States); Vyas, A.; Cuenca, R. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Center for Transportation Research

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Rebound 2007: Analysis of U.S. Light-Duty Vehicle Travel Statistics  

SciTech Connect

U.S. national time series data on vehicle travel by passenger cars and light trucks covering the period 1966 2007 are used to test for the existence, size and stability of the rebound effect for motor vehicle fuel efficiency on vehicle travel. The data show a statistically significant effect of gasoline price on vehicle travel but do not support the existence of a direct impact of fuel efficiency on vehicle travel. Additional tests indicate that fuel price effects have not been constant over time, although the hypothesis of symmetry with respect to price increases and decreases is not rejected. Small and Van Dender (2007) model of a declining rebound effect with income is tested and similar results are obtained.

Greene, David L [ORNL

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Sulfur Management of NOx Adsorber Technology for Diesel Light-Duty Vehicle and Truck Applications  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Sulfur poisoning from engine fuel and lube is one of the most recognizable degradation mechanisms of a NOx adsorber catalyst system for diesel emission reduction. Even with the availability of 15 ppm sulfur diesel fuel, NOx adsorber will be deactivated without an effective sulfur management. Two general pathways are currently being explored for sulfur management: (1) the use of a disposable SOx trap that can be replaced or rejuvenated offline periodically, and (2) the use of diesel fuel injection in the exhaust and high temperature de-sulfation approach to remove the sulfur poisons to recover the NOx trapping efficiency. The major concern of the de-sulfation process is the many prolonged high temperature rich cycles that catalyst will encounter during its useful life. It is shown that NOx adsorber catalyst suffers some loss of its trapping capacity upon high temperature lean-rich exposure. With the use of a disposable SOx trap to remove large portion of the sulfur poisons from the exhaust, the NOx adsorber catalyst can be protected and the numbers of de-sulfation events can be greatly reduced. Spectroscopic techniques, such as DRIFTS and Raman, have been used to monitor the underlying chemical reactions during NOx trapping/ regeneration and de-sulfation periods, and provide a fundamental understanding of NOx storage capacity and catalyst degradation mechanism using model catalysts. This paper examines the sulfur effect on two model NOx adsorber catalysts. The chemistry of SOx/base metal oxides and the sulfation product pathways and their corresponding spectroscopic data are discussed. SAE Paper SAE-2003-01-3245 {copyright} 2003 SAE International. This paper is published on this website with permission from SAE International. As a user of this website, you are permitted to view this paper on-line, download this pdf file and print one copy of this paper at no cost for your use only. The downloaded pdf file and printout of this SAE paper may not be copied, distributed or forwarded to others or for the use of others.

Fang, Howard L.; Wang, Jerry C.; Yu, Robert C. (Cummins, Inc.); Wan, C. Z. (Engelhard Corp.); Howden, Ken (U.S. Dept. of Energy)

2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Ohio's first ethanol-fueled light-duty fleet: Clean cities alternative fuel information series case study  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In 1996, the State of Ohio established a project to demonstrate the effectiveness of ethanol as an alternative to gasoline in its fleet operations. All vehicles in the study were 1996 model year Ford Tauruses: ten were flexible-fuel vehicles (FFVs) and three were standard gasoline models. Overall, the State of Ohio's staff has been pleased with the Taurus FFVs. The vehicles perform well and meet the operators' needs.

Whalen, P.

1999-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

107

Ohio's first ethanol-fueled light-duty fleet: Clean cities alternative fuel information series case study  

SciTech Connect

In 1996, the State of Ohio established a project to demonstrate the effectiveness of ethanol as an alternative to gasoline in its fleet operations. All vehicles in the study were 1996 model year Ford Tauruses: ten were flexible-fuel vehicles (FFVs) and three were standard gasoline models. Overall, the State of Ohio's staff has been pleased with the Taurus FFVs. The vehicles perform well and meet the operators' needs.

Whalen, P.

1999-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

108

Program Record 13006 (Offices of Vehicle Technologies and Fuel Cell Technologies: Life-Cycle Costs of Mid-Size Light-Duty Vehicles  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Program Record (Offices of Vehicle Technologies & Fuel Cell Program Record (Offices of Vehicle Technologies & Fuel Cell Technologies) Record #: 13006 Date: April 24, 2013 Title: Life-cycle Costs of Mid-Size Light-Duty Vehicles Originator: Tien Nguyen & Jake Ward Approved by: Sunita Satyapal Pat Davis Date: April 25, 2013 Items: DOE is pursuing a portfolio of technologies with the potential to significantly reduce greenhouse gases (GHG) emissions and petroleum consumption while being cost-effective. This record documents the assumptions and results of analyses conducted to estimate the life-cycle costs resulting from several fuel/vehicle pathways, for a future mid-size car. The results are summarized graphically in the following figure. Costs of Operation for Future Mid-Size Car

109

Effect of E85 on RCCI Performance and Emissions on a Multi-Cylinder Light-Duty Diesel Engine - SAE World Congress  

SciTech Connect

This paper investigates the effect of E85 on load expansion and FTP modal point emissions indices under reactivity controlled compression ignition (RCCI) operation on a light-duty multi-cylinder diesel engine. A General Motors (GM) 1.9L four-cylinder diesel engine with the stock compression ratio of 17.5:1, common rail diesel injection system, high-pressure exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) system and variable geometry turbocharger was modified to allow for port fuel injection with gasoline or E85. Controlling the fuel reactivity in-cylinder by the adjustment of the ratio of premixed low-reactivity fuel (gasoline or E85) to direct injected high reactivity fuel (diesel fuel) has been shown to extend the operating range of high-efficiency clean combustion (HECC) compared to the use of a single fuel alone as in homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) or premixed charge compression ignition (PCCI). The effect of E85 on the Ad-hoc federal test procedure (FTP) modal points is explored along with the effect of load expansion through the light-duty diesel speed operating range. The Ad-hoc FTP modal points of 1500 rpm, 1.0bar brake mean effective pressure (BMEP); 1500rpm, 2.6bar BMEP; 2000rpm, 2.0bar BMEP; 2300rpm, 4.2bar BMEP; and 2600rpm, 8.8bar BMEP were explored. Previous results with 96 RON unleaded test gasoline (UTG-96) and ultra-low sulfur diesel (ULSD) showed that with stock hardware, the 2600rpm, 8.8bar BMEP modal point was not obtainable due to excessive cylinder pressure rise rate and unstable combustion both with and without the use of EGR. Brake thermal efficiency and emissions performance of RCCI operation with E85 and ULSD is explored and compared against conventional diesel combustion (CDC) and RCCI operation with UTG 96 and ULSD.

Curran, Scott [ORNL; Hanson, Reed M [ORNL; Wagner, Robert M [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - Sector  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

average fleet-wide CAFE compliance levels (miles per gallon) for passenger cars and light-duty trucks, model years 2017-2025 Model year Passenger cars Light-duty trucks...

111

Commercializing light-duty plug-in/plug-out hydrogen-fuel-cell vehicles: “Mobile Electricity” technologies and opportunities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and vehicular-distributed-generation model to estimate zero-power, Vehicular distributed generation, Household marketdistributed generation .25

Williams, Brett D; Kurani, Kenneth S

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Global Assessment of Hydrogen Technologies - Task 2 Report Comparison of Performance and Emissions from Near-Term Hydrogen Fueled Light Duty Vehicles  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An investigation was conducted on the emissions and efficiency from hydrogen blended compressed natural gas (CNG) in light duty vehicles. The different blends used in this investigation were 0%, 15%, 30%, 50%, 80%, 95%, and ~100% hydrogen, the remainder being compressed natural gas. The blends were tested using a Ford F-150 and a Chevrolet Silverado truck supplied by Arizona Public Services. Tests on emissions were performed using four different driving condition tests. Previous investigation by Don Karner and James Frankfort on a similar Ford F-150 using a 30% hydrogen blend showed that there was substantial reduction when compared to gasoline in carbon monoxide (CO), nitrogen oxide (NOx), and carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions while the reduction in hydrocarbon (HC) emissions was minimal. This investigation was performed using different blends of CNG and hydrogen to evaluate the emissions reducing capabilities associated with the use of the different fuel blends. The results were then tested statistically to confirm or reject the hypotheses on the emission reduction capabilities. Statistically analysis was performed on the test results to determine whether hydrogen concentration in the HCNG had any effect on the emissions and the fuel efficiency. It was found that emissions from hydrogen blended compressed natural gas were a function of driving condition employed. Emissions were found to be dependent on the concentration of hydrogen in the compressed natural gas fuel blend.

Fouad, Fouad H.; Peters, Robert W.; Sisiopiku, Virginia P.; Sullivan Andrew J.; Ng, Henry K.; Waller, Thomas

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Fabrication and testing of an enhanced ignition system to reduce cold-start emissions in an ethanol (E85) light-duty truck engine  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes an experimental investigation of the potential for an enhanced ignition system to lower the cold-start emissions of a light-duty vehicle engine using fuel ethanol (commonly referred to as E85). Plasma jet ignition and conventional inductive ignition were compared for a General Motors 4-cylinder, alcohol-compatible engine. Emission and combustion stability measurements were made over a range of air/fuel ratios and spark timing settings using a steady-state, cold-idle experimental technique in which the engine coolant was maintained at 25 C to simulate cold-running conditions. These tests were aimed at identifying the degree to which calibration strategies such as mixture enleanment and retarded spark timing could lower engine-out hydrocarbon emissions and raise exhaust temperatures, as well as determining how such calibration changes would affect the combustion stability of the engine (as quantified by the coefficient of variation, or COV, of indicated mean effective pressure calculated from successive cylinder pressure measurements). 44 refs., 39 figs.

Gardiner, D.; Mallory, R.; Todesco, M. [Nexum Research Corp., Kingston, Ontario (Canada). Thermotech Engineering Div.

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Experimental Investigation of the Effects of Fuel Characteristics on High Efficiency Clean Combustion (HECC) in a Light-Duty Diesel Engine  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An experimental study was performed to understand fuel property effects on low temperature combustion (LTC) processes in a light-duty diesel engine. These types of combustion modes are often collectively referred to as high efficiency clean combustion (HECC). A statistically designed set of research fuels, the Fuels for Advanced Combustion Engines (FACE), were used for this study. Engine conditions consistent with low speed cruise (1500 rpm, 2.6 bar BMEP) were chosen for investigating fuel property effects on HECC operation in a GM 1.9-L common rail diesel engine. The FACE fuel matrix includes nine combinations of fuel properties including cetane number (30 to 55), aromatic contents (20 to 45 %), and 90 % distillation temperature (270 to 340 C). HECC operation was achieved with high levels of EGR and adjusting injection parameters, e.g. higher fuel rail pressure and single injection event, which is also known as Premixed Charge Compression Ignition (PCCI) combustion. Engine performance, pollutant emissions, and details of the combustion process are discussed in this paper. Cetane number was found to significantly affect the combustion process with variations in the start of injection (SOI) timing, which revealed that the ranges of SOI timing for HECC operation and the PM emission levels were distinctively different between high cetane number (55) and low cetane number fuels (30). Low cetane number fuels showed comparable levels of regulated gas emissions with high cetane number fuels and had an advantage in PM emissions.

Cho, Kukwon [ORNL; Han, Manbae [ORNL; Wagner, Robert M [ORNL; Sluder, Scott [ORNL

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Quantifying the Effects of Idle-Stop Systems on Fuel Economy in Light-Duty Passenger Vehicles  

SciTech Connect

Vehicles equipped with idle-stop (IS) systems are capable of engine shut down when the vehicle is stopped and rapid engine re-start for the vehicle launch. This capability reduces fuel consumption and emissions during periods when the engine is not being utilized to provide propulsion or to power accessories. IS systems are a low-cost and fast-growing technology in the industry-wide pursuit of increased vehicle efficiency, possibly becoming standard features in European vehicles in the near future. In contrast, currently there are only three non-hybrid vehicle models for sale in North America with IS systems and these models are distinctly low-volume models. As part of the United States Department of Energy’s Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity, ECOtality North America has tested the real-world effect of IS systems on fuel consumption in three vehicle models imported from Europe. These vehicles were chosen to represent three types of systems: (1) spark ignition with 12-V belt alternator starter; (2) compression ignition with 12-V belt alternator starter; and (3) direct-injection spark ignition, with 12-V belt alternator starter/combustion restart. The vehicles have undergone both dynamometer and on-road testing; the test results show somewhat conflicting data. The laboratory data and the portion of the on-road data in which driving is conducted on a prescribed route with trained drivers produced significant fuel economy improvement. However, the fleet data do not corroborate improvement, even though the data show significant engine-off time. It is possible that the effects of the varying driving styles and routes in the fleet testing overshadowed the fuel economy improvements. More testing with the same driver over routes that are similar with the IS system-enabled and disabled is recommended. There is anecdotal evidence that current Environmental Protection Agency fuel economy test procedures do not capture the fuel economy gains that IS systems produce in real-world driving. The program test results provide information on the veracity of these claims.

Jeff Wishart; Matthew Shirk

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Transportation Energy Futures Series: Non-Cost Barriers to Consumer Adoption of New Light-Duty Vehicle Technologies  

SciTech Connect

Consumer preferences are key to the adoption of new vehicle technologies. Barriers to consumer adoption include price and other obstacles, such as limited driving range and charging infrastructure; unfamiliarity with the technology and uncertainty about direct benefits; limited makes and models with the technology; reputation or perception of the technology; standardization issues; and regulations. For each of these non-cost barriers, this report estimates an effective cost and summarizes underlying influences on consumer preferences, approximate magnitude and relative severity, and assesses potential actions, based on a comprehensive literature review. While the report concludes that non-cost barriers are significant, effective cost and potential market share are very uncertain. Policies and programs including opportunities for drivers to test drive advanced vehicles, general public outreach and information programs, incentives for providing charging and fueling infrastructure, and development of technology standards were examined for their ability to address barriers, but little quantitative data exists on the effectiveness of these measures. This is one in a series of reports produced as a result of the Transportation Energy Futures project, a Department of Energy-sponsored multi-agency effort to pinpoint underexplored strategies for reducing GHGs and petroleum dependence related to transportation.

Stephens, T.

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Comments on the Joint Proposed Rulemaking to Establish Light-Duty Vehicle Greenhouse Gas Emission Standards and Corporate Average Fuel Economy Standards  

SciTech Connect

I appreciate the opportunity to provide comments on the joint rulemaking to establish greenhouse gas emission and fuel economy standards for light-duty vehicles. My comments are directed at the choice of vehicle footprint as the attribute by which to vary fuel economy and greenhouse gas emission standards, in the interest of protecting vehicle occupants from death or serious injury. I have made several of these points before when commenting on previous NHTSA rulemakings regarding CAFE standards and safety. The comments today are mine alone, and do not necessarily represent the views of the US Department of Energy, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, or the University of California. My comments can be summarized as follows: (1) My updated analysis of casualty risk finds that, after accounting for drivers and crash location, there is a wide range in casualty risk for vehicles with the same weight or footprint. This suggests that reducing vehicle weight or footprint will not necessarily result in increased fatalities or serious injuries. (2) Indeed, the recent safety record of crossover SUVs indicates that weight reduction in this class of vehicles resulted in a reduction in fatality risks. (3) Computer crash simulations can pinpoint the effect of specific design changes on vehicle safety; these analyses are preferable to regression analyses, which rely on historical vehicle designs, and cannot fully isolate the effect of specific design changes, such as weight reduction, on crash outcomes. (4) There is evidence that automakers planned to build more large light trucks in response to the footprint-based light truck CAFE standards. Such an increase in the number of large light trucks on the road may decrease, rather than increase, overall safety.

Wenzel, Thomas P

2009-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

118

Experimental Investigation of Fuel-Reactivity Controlled Compression Ignition (RCCI) Combustion Mode in a Multi-Cylinder, Light-Duty Diesel Engine  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An experimental study was performed to provide the combustion and emission characteristics resulting from fuel-reactivity controlled compression ignition (RCCI) combustion mode utilizing dual-fuel approach in a light-duty, multi-cylinder diesel engine. In-cylinder fuel blending using port fuel injection of gasoline before intake valve opening (IVO) and early-cycle, direct injection of diesel fuel was used as the charge preparation and fuel blending strategy. In order to achieve the desired auto-ignition quality through the stratification of the fuel-air equivalence ratio ( ), blends of commercially available gasoline and diesel fuel were used. Engine experiments were performed at an engine speed of 2300rpm and an engine load of 4.3bar brake mean effective pressure (BMEP). It was found that significant reduction in both nitrogen oxide (NOx) and particulate matter (PM) was realized successfully through the RCCI combustion mode even without applying exhaust gas recirculation (EGR). However, high carbon monoxide (CO) and hydrocarbon (HC) emissions were observed. The low combustion gas temperature during the expansion and exhaust processes seemed to be the dominant source of high CO emissions in the RCCI combustion mode. The high HC emissions during the RCCI combustion mode could be due to the increased combustion quenching layer thickness as well as the -stratification at the periphery of the combustion chamber. The slightly higher brake thermal efficiency (BTE) of the RCCI combustion mode was observed than the other combustion modes, such as the conventional diesel combustion (CDC) mode, and single-fuel, premixed charge compression ignition (PCCI) combustion mode. The parametric study of the RCCI combustion mode revealed that the combustion phasing and/or the peak cylinder pressure rise rate of the RCCI combustion mode could be controlled by several physical parameters premixed ratio (rp), intake swirl intensity, and start of injection (SOI) timing of directly injected fuel unlike other low temperature combustion (LTC) strategies.

Cho, Kukwon [ORNL; Curran, Scott [ORNL; Prikhodko, Vitaly Y [ORNL; Sluder, Scott [ORNL; Parks, II, James E [ORNL; Wagner, Robert M [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Model Year 2014 SmartWay Vehicles  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

4 SmartWay Vehicles Updated November 6, 2013* *Vehicles may be added throughout the model year. Please check back for updates. Page 1 of 12 Model Displ Cyl Trans Drive Fuel Sales...

120

Model Year 2013 SmartWay Vehicles  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SmartWay Vehicles Updated August 14, 2013* *Vehicles may be added throughout the model year. Please check back for updates. Page 1 of 13 Model Displ Cyl Trans Drive Fuel Sales...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "model year light-duty" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Model Year 1999 Fuel Economy Guide  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

FUEL FUEL ECONOMY GUIDE MODEL YEAR 1999 DOE/EE-0178 Fuel Economy Estimates October 1998 1 CONTENTS PAGE Purpose of the Guide ..................................................... 1 Interior Volume ................................................................ 1 How the Fuel Economy Estimates are Obtained ........... 1 Factors Affecting MPG .................................................... 2 Fuel Economy and Climate Change ............................... 2 Gas Guzzler Tax ............................................................. 2 Vehicle Classes Used in This Guide. .............................. 2 Annuel Fuel Costs .......................................................... 3 How to Use the Guide .................................................... 4 Where to Re-order Guides

122

Optimizing U.S. Mitigation Strategies for the Light-Duty Transportation Sector: What We Learn from a Bottom-Up Model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

long-term. Biomass and Bioenergy 2005, 9. Wu, M. ; Wu, Y. ,industry. Biomass and Bioenergy 2005, 28, (6), 565-571. 18.the direct GHG effects of bioenergy crop production. Though

Yeh, Sonia; Farrell, Alexander E.; Plevin, Richard J; Sanstad, Alan; Weyant, John

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Optimizing U.S. Mitigation Strategies for the Light-Duty Transportation Sector: What We Learn from a Bottom-Up Model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy Market and Economic Impacts of S.280, the Climate Stewardship and Innovation Act of 2007; Energy InformationEnergy Market and Economic Impacts of S. 2191, the Lieberman-Warner Climate Security Act of 2007; Energy Information

Yeh, Sonia; Farrell, Alexander E.; Plevin, Richard J; Sanstad, Alan; Weyant, John

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Optimizing U.S. Mitigation Strategies for the Light-Duty Transportation Sector: What We Learn from a Bottom-Up Model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Compact Compact Compact Compact Full Size Type Adv GSL CNGCNG Flex Fuel DSL HEV DSL Ethanol Flex Fuel AbbreviationMinivan Minivan Minivan CNG CNG Flex Fuel DSL HEV DSL

Yeh, Sonia; Farrell, Alexander E.; Plevin, Richard J; Sanstad, Alan; Weyant, John

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Optimizing U.S. Mitigation Strategies for the Light-Duty Transportation Sector: What We Learn from a Bottom-Up Model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2007 with Projections to 2030. Report #DOE/EIA-0383(2007);2006 with Projections to 2030. Report #: DOE/EIA-0383(2006);from petroleum products. By 2030, the transportation sector’

Yeh, Sonia; Farrell, Alexander E.; Plevin, Richard J; Sanstad, Alan; Weyant, John

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Optimizing U.S. Mitigation Strategies for the Light-Duty Transportation Sector: What We Learn from a Bottom-Up Model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

U.S. Department of Energy: Washington, DC, 2006; http://U.S. Department of Energy: Washington, DC, April, 2008. 19.U.S. Department of Energy: Washington, DC, 2007; http://

Yeh, Sonia; Farrell, Alexander E.; Plevin, Richard J; Sanstad, Alan; Weyant, John

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Optimizing U.S. Mitigation Strategies for the Light-Duty Transportation Sector: What We Learn from a Bottom-Up Model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

R. C. , Comparative economics of biorefineries based on theBioprocessing, and Biorefineries 2007, 7. Shapouri, H. ;

Yeh, Sonia; Farrell, Alexander E.; Plevin, Richard J; Sanstad, Alan; Weyant, John

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Optimizing U.S. Mitigation Strategies for the Light-Duty Transportation Sector: What We Learn from a Bottom-Up Model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Miller, G. Multi-Path Transportation Futures Study: ResultsMiller, G. Multi-Path Transportation Futures Study. Phase 2in comparison to a transportation future without any efforts

Yeh, Sonia; Farrell, Alexander E.; Plevin, Richard J; Sanstad, Alan; Weyant, John

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Optimizing U.S. Mitigation Strategies for the Light-Duty Transportation Sector: What We Learn from a Bottom-Up Model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Renewable Energy (EERE), U.S. Department of Energy:and Renewable Energy (EERE), U.S. Department of Energy:

Yeh, Sonia; Farrell, Alexander E.; Plevin, Richard J; Sanstad, Alan; Weyant, John

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Optimizing U.S. Mitigation Strategies for the Light-Duty Transportation Sector: What We Learn from a Bottom-Up Model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

EISA) (we assume biofuel production must reach 36 billionspeci? c mandate for biofuel production, cellulosic ethanolethanol. Many biofuel production pathways, especially from

Yeh, Sonia; Farrell, Alexander E.; Plevin, Richard J; Sanstad, Alan; Weyant, John

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Optimizing U.S. Mitigation Strategies for the Light-Duty Transportation Sector: What We Learn from a Bottom-Up Model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and thermochemical platforms. Biofuels, Bioprocessing, andTyner, W. E. ; Birur, D. K. Biofuels for all? Understandingof renewable fuels (biofuels in particular). For example,

Yeh, Sonia; Farrell, Alexander E.; Plevin, Richard J; Sanstad, Alan; Weyant, John

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Optimizing U.S. Mitigation Strategies for the Light-Duty Transportation Sector: What We Learn from a Bottom-Up Model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

GHG fuels such as compressed natural gas, low-GHG ethanol,LPG) Methane Compressed natural gas (CNG) Ethanol production

Yeh, Sonia; Farrell, Alexander E.; Plevin, Richard J; Sanstad, Alan; Weyant, John

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Optimizing U.S. Mitigation Strategies for the Light-Duty Transportation Sector: What We Learn from a Bottom-Up Model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

fuel switching (increasing use of natural gas, nuclear after 2040, and renewables), adopting more ef?cient electricity-generating

Yeh, Sonia; Farrell, Alexander E.; Plevin, Richard J; Sanstad, Alan; Weyant, John

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Optimizing U.S. Mitigation Strategies for the Light-Duty Transportation Sector: What We Learn from a Bottom-Up Model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

types of ethanol: corn ethanol and cellulosic ethanol. ManyInput assumptions for corn ethanol and cellulosic ethanolMost of the values for corn ethanol are extracted from GREET

Yeh, Sonia; Farrell, Alexander E.; Plevin, Richard J; Sanstad, Alan; Weyant, John

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Optimizing U.S. Mitigation Strategies for the Light-Duty Transportation Sector: What We Learn from a Bottom-Up Model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

+ transportation cap without biofuel mandate after 2015 30%transportation cap without biofuel mandate after 2015 and noassumptions and improved biofuel characterization (see

Yeh, Sonia; Farrell, Alexander E.; Plevin, Richard J; Sanstad, Alan; Weyant, John

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Model Year 2012-2013 SmartWay Vans Year Model Displ Cyl Trans  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

-2013 SmartWay Vans Year Model Displ Cyl Trans Drive Fuel Sales Area Stnd Stnd Description Underhood ID Veh Class Air Pollution Score City MPG Hwy MPG Cmb MPG Greenhouse Gas Score...

137

Variability of Battery Wear in Light Duty Plug-In Electric Vehicles Subject to Ambient Temperature, Battery Size, and Consumer Usage: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Battery wear in plug-in electric vehicles (PEVs) is a complex function of ambient temperature, battery size, and disparate usage. Simulations capturing varying ambient temperature profiles, battery sizes, and driving patterns are of great value to battery and vehicle manufacturers. A predictive battery wear model developed by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory captures the effects of multiple cycling and storage conditions in a representative lithium chemistry. The sensitivity of battery wear rates to ambient conditions, maximum allowable depth-of-discharge, and vehicle miles travelled is explored for two midsize vehicles: a battery electric vehicle (BEV) with a nominal range of 75 mi (121 km) and a plug-in hybrid electric vehicle (PHEV) with a nominal charge-depleting range of 40 mi (64 km). Driving distance distributions represent the variability of vehicle use, both vehicle-to-vehicle and day-to-day. Battery wear over an 8-year period was dominated by ambient conditions for the BEV with capacity fade ranging from 19% to 32% while the PHEV was most sensitive to maximum allowable depth-of-discharge with capacity fade ranging from 16% to 24%. The BEV and PHEV were comparable in terms of petroleum displacement potential after 8 years of service, due to the BEV?s limited utility for accomplishing long trips.

Wood, E.; Neubauer, J.; Brooker, A. D.; Gonder, J.; Smith, K. A.

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Model Year 2014 SmartWay Vehicles  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SmartWay Vehicles SmartWay Vehicles Updated December 20, 2013* *Vehicles may be added throughout the model year. Please check back for updates. Page 1 of 14 Model Displ Cyl Trans Drive Fuel Sales Area Stnd Stnd Description Underhood ID Veh Class Smog Rating City MPG Hwy MPG Cmb MPG Greenhouse Gas Rating SmartWay ACURA ILX 1.5 4 SCV-7 2WD Gasoline FA B2 Federal Tier 2 Bin 2 EHNXV01.58D2 small car 9 39 38 38 9 yes ACURA ILX 1.5 4 SCV-7 2WD Gasoline CA PZEV California PZEV EHNXV01.58D2 small car 9 39 38 38 9 yes ACURA ILX 2 4 SemiAuto-5 2WD Gasoline CA U2 California LEV-II ULEV EHNXV02.0EB3 small car 6 24 35 28 7 yes ACURA RLX 3.5 6 SemiAuto-7 4WD Gasoline FA B3 Federal Tier 2 Bin 3 EHNXV03.52G2 midsize car 7 28 32 30 8 yes ACURA RLX 3.5 6 SemiAuto-7 4WD Gasoline CA L3SULEV30 California LEV-III SULEV30 EHNXV03.52G2 midsize car 8 28 32 30 8 yes ACURA TSX 2.4 4 SemiAuto-5

139

Model Year 2013 SmartWay Vehicles  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SmartWay Vehicles SmartWay Vehicles Updated August 14, 2013* *Vehicles may be added throughout the model year. Please check back for updates. Page 1 of 13 Model Displ Cyl Trans Drive Fuel Sales Area Stnd Stnd Description Underhood ID Veh Class Air Pollution Score City MPG Hwy MPG Cmb MPG Greenhouse Gas Score SmartWay ACURA ILX 1.5 4 SCV-7 2WD Gasoline FC B3 Federal Tier 2 Bin 3 DHNXV01.5WF2 small car 7 39 38 38 9 yes ACURA ILX 1.5 4 SCV-7 2WD Gasoline FA B2 Federal Tier 2 Bin 2 DHNXV01.5YD2 small car 8 39 38 38 9 yes ACURA ILX 1.5 4 SCV-7 2WD Gasoline CA PZEV California PZEV DHNXV01.5YD2 small car 9 39 38 38 9 yes ACURA ILX 2 4 SemiAuto-5 2WD Gasoline CA U2 California LEV-II ULEV DHNXV02.0CB2 small car 6 24 35 28 7 yes ACURA TSX 2.4 4 SemiAuto-5 2WD Gasoline CA U2 California LEV-II ULEV DHNXV02.4DB3 small car 6 22 31 26 7 yes AUDI A3 2 4 AMS-6 2WD Diesel FA B5 Federal Tier 2 Bin 5

140

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - Source  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Pollutants for industrial boilers and process heaters 1; New light-duty vehicle (LDV) greenhouse gas (GHG) and corporate average fuel economy (CAFE) standards for model years...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "model year light-duty" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Commercializing Light-Duty Plug-In/Plug-Out Hydrogen-Fuel-Cell Vehicles: "Mobile Electricity" Technologies, Early California Household Markets, and Innovation Management  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and vehicular-distributed-generation model to estimate zero-power, Vehicular distributed generation, Household marketdistributed generation .25

Williams, Brett D

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Commercializing Light-Duty Plug-In/Plug-Out Hydrogen-Fuel-Cell Vehicles:“Mobile Electricity” Technologies, Early California Household Markets, and Innovation Management  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and vehicular-distributed-generation model to estimate zero-power, Vehicular distributed generation, Household marketdistributed generation .25

Williams, Brett D

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Model Year 2003 SmartWay Vehicles  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SmartWay Vehicles Page 1 of 2 Model Displ Cyl Trans Drive Fuel Sales Area Stnd Underhood ID Veh Class Air Pollution Score City MPG Hwy MPG Cmb MPG Greenhouse Gas Score SmartWay...

144

Model Year 2010 SmartWay Vehicles  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SmartWay Vehicles Page 1 of 20 Model Displ Cyl Trans Drive Fuel Sales Area Stnd Description Underhood ID Veh Class Air Pollution Score City MPG Hwy MPG Cmb MPG Greenhouse Gas Score...

145

Model Year 2009 SmartWay Vehicles  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SmartWay Vehicles Page 1 of 16 Model Displ Cyl Trans Drive Fuel Sales Area Stnd Stnd Description Underhood ID Veh Class Air Pollution Score City MPG Hwy MPG Cmb MPG Greenhouse Gas...

146

Model Year 2001 SmartWay Vehicles  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SmartWay Vehicles Page 1 of 1 Model Displ Cyl Trans Drive Fuel Sales Area Stnd Underhood ID Veh Class Air Pollution Score City MPG Hwy MPG Cmb MPG GHG Score SmartWay HONDA Accord...

147

Model Year 2012 SmartWay Vehicles  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SmartWay Vehicles Page 1 of 14 Model Displ Cyl Trans Drive Fuel Sales Area Stnd Stnd Description Underhood ID Veh Class Air Pollution Score City MPG Hwy MPG Cmb MPG Greenhouse Gas...

148

Model Year 2007 SmartWay Vehicles  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SmartWay Vehicles Page 1 of 18 Model Displ Cyl Trans Drive Fuel Sales Area Stnd Underhood ID Veh Class Air Pollution Score City MPG Hwy MPG Cmb MPG Greenhouse Gas Score SmartWay...

149

Model Year 2000 SmartWay Vehicles  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SmartWay Vehicles Page 1 of 1 Model Displ Cyl Trans Drive Fuel Sales Area Stnd Stnd Description Underhood ID Veh Class Air Pollution Score City MPG Hwy MPG Cmb MPG GHG Score...

150

Model Year 2011 SmartWay Vehicles  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SmartWay Vehicles Page 1 of 10 Model Displ Cyl Trans Drive Fuel Sales Area Stnd Stnd Description Underhood ID Veh Class Air Pollution Score City MPG Hwy MPG Cmb MPG Greenhouse Gas...

151

Model Year 2008 SmartWay Vehicles  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SmartWay Vehicles Page 1 of 20 Model Displ Cyl Trans Drive Fuel Sales Area Stnd Underhood ID Veh Class Air Pollution Score City MPG Hwy MPG Cmb MPG Greenhouse Gas Score SmartWay...

152

Model Year 2012 SmartWay Vehicles  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SmartWay Vehicles SmartWay Vehicles Page 1 of 14 Model Displ Cyl Trans Drive Fuel Sales Area Stnd Stnd Description Underhood ID Veh Class Air Pollution Score City MPG Hwy MPG Cmb MPG Greenhouse Gas Score SmartWay ACURA TSX 2.4 4 SemiAuto-5 2WD Gasoline CA U2 California LEV-II ULEV CHNXV02.4DB9 small car 6 22 31 26 6 yes ACURA TSX Wagon 2.4 4 SemiAuto-5 2WD Gasoline CA U2 California LEV-II ULEV CHNXV02.4DB9 station wagon 6 22 30 25 6 yes AUDI A3 2 4 SemiAuto-6 2WD Diesel FA B5 Federal Tier 2 Bin 5 CVWXV02.0U5N station wagon 5 30 42 34 7 yes AUDI A3 2 4 SemiAuto-6 2WD Diesel CA U2 California LEV-II ULEV CVWXV02.0U5N station wagon 6 30 42 34 7 yes AUDI A4 2 4 CVT 2WD Gasoline CA U2 California LEV-II ULEV CADXJ02.03UB small car 6 22 30 25 6 yes AUDI A4 2 4 Man-6 4WD Gasoline CA U2 California LEV-II ULEV CADXJ02.03UB small car 6 21 31 25 6 yes AUDI A5 2 4 Man-6 4WD Gasoline CA U2 California LEV-II ULEV

153

Model Year 2004 SmartWay Vehicles  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SmartWay Vehicles SmartWay Vehicles Page 1 of 5 Model Displ Cyl Trans Drive Fuel Sales Area Stnd Underhood ID Veh Class Air Pollution Score City MPG Hwy MPG Cmb MPG Greenhouse Gas Score SmartWay ACURA RSX 2 (4 cyl) Man-6 2WD Gasoline FA B5 4HNXV02.0RKC small car 6 21 28 24 7 yes ACURA RSX 2 (4 cyl) Auto-S5 2WD Gasoline FA B5 4HNXV02.0XKC small car 6 22 31 25 7 yes ACURA RSX 2 (4 cyl) Man-5 2WD Gasoline FA B5 4HNXV02.0XKC small car 6 24 30 26 8 yes ACURA RSX 2 (4 cyl) Man-6 2WD Gasoline CA LEV 4HNXV02.0RKC small car 6 21 28 24 7 yes ACURA RSX 2 (4 cyl) Auto-S5 2WD Gasoline CA LEV 4HNXV02.0XKC small car 6 22 31 25 7 yes ACURA RSX 2 (4 cyl) Man-5 2WD Gasoline CA LEV 4HNXV02.0XKC small car 6 24 30 26 8 yes ACURA TL 3.2 (6 cyl) Auto-S5 2WD Gasoline CA U2 4HNXV03.2CKR midsize car 7 18 26 21 6 yes ACURA TL 3.2 (6 cyl) Man-6 2WD Gasoline CA U2 4HNXV03.2CKR midsize car 7 18 28 21 6 yes ACURA TSX 2.4 (4 cyl) Auto-S5

154

Model Year 2005 SmartWay Vehicles  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SmartWay Vehicles SmartWay Vehicles Page 1 of 9 Model Displ Cyl Trans Drive Fuel Sales Area Stnd Underhood ID Veh Class Air Pollution Score City MPG Hwy MPG Cmb MPG Greenhouse Gas Score SmartWay ACURA RSX 2 (4 cyl) Man-6 2WD Gasoline FA B5 5HNXV02.0HKC small car 6 20 28 23 7 yes ACURA RSX 2 (4 cyl) Auto-S5 2WD Gasoline FA B5 5HNXV02.4KBP small car 6 22 31 25 7 yes ACURA RSX 2 (4 cyl) Man-5 2WD Gasoline FA B5 5HNXV02.4KBP small car 6 24 31 26 8 yes ACURA RSX 2 (4 cyl) Man-6 2WD Gasoline CA L2 5HNXV02.0HKC small car 6 20 28 23 7 yes ACURA RSX 2 (4 cyl) Auto-S5 2WD Gasoline CA L2 5HNXV02.4KBP small car 6 22 31 25 7 yes ACURA RSX 2 (4 cyl) Man-5 2WD Gasoline CA L2 5HNXV02.4KBP small car 6 24 31 26 8 yes ACURA TL 3.2 (6 cyl) Auto-S5 2WD Gasoline CA U2 5HNXV03.24B4 midsize car 7 18 26 21 6 yes ACURA TL 3.2 (6 cyl) Man-6 2WD Gasoline CA U2 5HNXV03.24B4 midsize car 7 18 26 21 6 yes ACURA TSX 2.4 (4 cyl) Auto-S5 2WD

155

Model Year 2002 SmartWay Vehicles  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SmartWay Vehicles SmartWay Vehicles Page 1 of 1 Model Displ Cyl Trans Drive Fuel Sales Area Stnd Underhood ID Veh Class Air Pollution Score City MPG Hwy MPG Cmb MPG GHG Score SmartWay ACURA RSX 2 (4 cyl) Man-6 2WD Gasoline CL LEV 2HNXV02.0EKC small car 6 21 28 24 7 yes ACURA RSX 2 (4 cyl) Auto-S5 2WD Gasoline CL LEV 2HNXV02.0VBP small car 6 21 30 24 7 yes ACURA RSX 2 (4 cyl) Man-5 2WD Gasoline CL LEV 2HNXV02.0VBP small car 6 23 30 26 8 yes HONDA Accord 2.3 (4 cyl) Auto-L4 2WD Gasoline CA SLEV 2HNXV02.3FK6 midsize car 9 20 28 23 7 yes HONDA CR-V 2.4 (4 cyl) Auto-L4 2WD Gasoline NF LEV 2HNXT02.4YBP SUV 6 20 26 23 7 yes HONDA Civic 1.7 (4 cyl) Auto-AV 2WD CNG CA SLEV 2HNXV01.74WN small car 9.5 26 31 28 9 yes HONDA Civic 1.7 (4 cyl) Auto-AV 2WD CNG NL+CF ULEV 2HNXV01.74WN small car 9 26 31 28 9 yes HONDA Civic 2 (4 cyl) Man-5 2WD Gasoline CL LEV 2HNXV02.0VBP small car 6 23 28 25 7 yes HONDA Insight 1 (3 cyl)

156

Model Year 2006 SmartWay Vehicles  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SmartWay Vehicles SmartWay Vehicles Page 1 of 11 Model Displ Cyl Trans Drive Fuel Sales Area Stnd Underhood ID Veh Class Air Pollution Score City MPG Hwy MPG Cmb MPG Greenhouse Gas Score SmartWay ACURA RSX 2 (4 cyl) Man-6 2WD Gasoline FA B5 6HNXV02.0DKC small car 6 20 28 23 7 yes ACURA RSX 2 (4 cyl) Auto-S5 2WD Gasoline FA B5 6HNXV02.0DKC small car 6 22 31 25 7 yes ACURA RSX 2 (4 cyl) Man-5 2WD Gasoline FA B5 6HNXV02.0DKC small car 6 24 31 26 8 yes ACURA RSX 2 (4 cyl) Man-6 2WD Gasoline CA L2 6HNXV02.0DKC small car 6 20 28 23 7 yes ACURA RSX 2 (4 cyl) Auto-S5 2WD Gasoline CA L2 6HNXV02.0DKC small car 6 22 31 25 7 yes ACURA RSX 2 (4 cyl) Man-5 2WD Gasoline CA L2 6HNXV02.0DKC small car 6 24 31 26 8 yes ACURA TL 3.2 (6 cyl) Auto-S5 2WD Gasoline CA U2 6HNXV03.2NKR midsize car 7 18 26 21 6 yes ACURA TL 3.2 (6 cyl) Man-6 2WD Gasoline CA U2 6HNXV03.2NKR midsize car 7 18 26 21 6 yes ACURA TSX 2.4 (4 cyl) Auto-S5 2WD

157

Model Year 2011 SmartWay Vehicles  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SmartWay Vehicles SmartWay Vehicles Page 1 of 10 Model Displ Cyl Trans Drive Fuel Sales Area Stnd Stnd Description Underhood ID Veh Class Air Pollution Score City MPG Hwy MPG Cmb MPG Greenhouse Gas Score SmartWay ACURA TSX 2.4 4 SemiAuto-5 2WD Gasoline CA U2 California LEV-II ULEV BHNXV02.4DB9 small car 6 22 31 26 6 yes ACURA TSX Wagon 2.4 4 SemiAuto-5 2WD Gasoline CA U2 California LEV-II ULEV BHNXV02.4DB9 station wagon 6 22 30 25 6 yes AUDI A3 2 4 SemiAuto-6 2WD Diesel CA U2 California LEV-II ULEV BVWXV02.0U5N station wagon 6 30 42 34 7 yes AUDI A3 2 4 SemiAuto-6 2WD Diesel FA B5 Federal Tier 2 Bin 5 BVWXV02.0U5N station wagon 5 30 42 34 7 yes AUDI A4 2 4 Man-6 4WD Gasoline CA U2 California LEV-II ULEV BADXJ02.03UB small car 6 21 31 25 6 yes AUDI A4 2 4 CVT 2WD Gasoline CA U2 California LEV-II ULEV BADXJ02.03UB small car 6 22 30 25 6 yes AUDI A5 2 4 Man-6 4WD Gasoline CA U2 California LEV-II ULEV

158

Generic Disposal System Modeling, Fiscal Year 2011 Progress Report |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Disposal System Modeling, Fiscal Year 2011 Progress Report Disposal System Modeling, Fiscal Year 2011 Progress Report Generic Disposal System Modeling, Fiscal Year 2011 Progress Report The UFD Campaign is developing generic disposal system models (GDSM) of different disposal environments and waste form options. Currently, the GDSM team is investigating four main disposal environment options: mined repositories in three geologic media (salt, clay, and granite) and the deep borehole concept in crystalline rock (DOE 2010d). Further developed the individual generic disposal system (GDS) models for salt, granite, clay, and deep borehole disposal environments. GenericDisposalSystModelFY11.pdf More Documents & Publications Integration of EBS Models with Generic Disposal System Models TSPA Model Development and Sensitivity Analysis of Processes Affecting

159

Model Year 2013-2014 SmartWay Large Cars Year Model Displ Cyl  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Large Cars Large Cars Year Model Displ Cyl Trans Drive Fuel Sales Area Stnd Stnd Description Underhood ID Veh Class Smog Rating City MPG Hwy MPG Cmb MPG Greenhouse Gas Rating SmartWay 2013 BMW X1 sDrive28i 2 4 SemiAuto-8 2WD Gasoline CA U2 California LEV-II ULEV DBMXJ02.0N20 large car 6 24 34 28 7 yes 2013 BMW X1 xDrive28i 2 4 SemiAuto-8 4WD Gasoline CA U2 California LEV-II ULEV DBMXJ02.0N20 large car 6 22 33 26 7 yes 2013 FORD C-MAX Hybrid 2 4 CVT 2WD Gasoline FC B3 Federal Tier 2 Bin 3 DFMXV02.0VZL large car 7 45 40 43 10 yes 2013 FORD Taurus 2 4 SemiAuto-6 2WD Gasoline CA U2 California LEV-II ULEV DFMXV02.0VE6 large car 6 22 32 26 7 yes 2013 HYUNDAI Sonata 2 4 Auto-6 2WD Gasoline CA U2 California LEV-II ULEV DHYXV02.01FE large car 6 22 34 26 7 yes 2013 HYUNDAI Sonata 2.4 4 Auto-6 2WD Gasoline CA U2 California LEV-II ULEV DHYXV02.41GE large car 6 24 35 28 7 yes 2013 HYUNDAI Sonata

160

Model Year 2013-2014 SmartWay Station Wagons Year Model Displ  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Station Wagons Station Wagons Year Model Displ Cyl Trans Drive Fuel Sales Area Stnd Stnd Description Underhood ID Veh Class Smog Rating City MPG Hwy MPG Cmb MPG Greenhouse Gas Rating SmartWay 2013 AUDI A3 2 4 AMS-6 2WD Diesel FA B5 Federal Tier 2 Bin 5 DVWXV02.0U5N station wagon 5 30 42 34 8 yes 2013 AUDI A3 2 4 AMS-6 2WD Diesel CA U2 California LEV-II ULEV DVWXV02.0U5N station wagon 6 30 42 34 8 yes 2013 HONDA Fit N/A N/A Auto-1 2WD Electricity FA B1 Federal Tier 2 Bin 1 DHNXV00.05ET station wagon 10 132 105 118 10 yes 2013 HONDA Fit N/A N/A Auto-1 2WD Electricity CA ZEV California ZEV DHNXV00.05ET station wagon 10 132 105 118 10 yes 2013 HONDA Fit 1.5 4 Auto-5 2WD Gasoline FA B5 Federal Tier 2 Bin 5 DHNXV01.5JB2 station wagon 5 28 35 31 8 yes 2013 HONDA Fit 1.5 4 Auto-5 2WD Gasoline CA U2 California LEV-II ULEV DHNXV01.5JB2 station wagon 6 28 35 31 8 yes 2013 HONDA Fit 1.5 4 Man-5 2WD

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "model year light-duty" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Model Year 2013-2014 SmartWay MidsizeCars Year Model Displ Cyl  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

MidsizeCars MidsizeCars Year Model Displ Cyl Trans Drive Fuel Sales Area Stnd Stnd Description Underhood ID Veh Class Smog Rating City MPG Hwy MPG Cmb MPG Greenhouse Gas Rating SmartWay 2013 AUDI A6 2 4 SCV-8 2WD Gasoline CA U2 California LEV-II ULEV DADXV02.03UB midsize car 6 25 33 28 7 yes 2013 BMW 528i 2 4 SemiAuto-8 4WD Gasoline CA U2 California LEV-II ULEV DBMXJ02.0N20 midsize car 6 22 33 26 7 yes 2013 BMW 528i 2 4 SemiAuto-8 2WD Gasoline CA U2 California LEV-II ULEV DBMXJ02.0N20 midsize car 6 24 34 28 7 yes 2013 BMW ActiveHybrid 5 3 6 SemiAuto-8 2WD Gasoline CA U2 California LEV-II ULEV DBMXV03.0AH5 midsize car 6 23 30 26 7 yes 2013 BUICK Lacrosse 2.4 4 SemiAuto-6 2WD Gasoline FA B5 Federal Tier 2 Bin 5 DGMXV02.4060 midsize car 5 25 36 29 8 yes 2013 BUICK Lacrosse 2.4 4 SemiAuto-6 2WD Gasoline CA L2 California LEV-II LEV DGMXV02.4060 midsize car 5 25 36 29 8 yes 2013 BUICK Regal

162

Model Year 2013-2014 SmartWay Small Cars Year Model Displ Cyl  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Small Cars Small Cars Year Model Displ Cyl Trans Drive Fuel Sales Area Stnd Stnd Description Underhood ID Veh Class Smog Rating City MPG Hwy MPG Cmb MPG Greenhouse Gas Rating SmartWay 2013 ACURA ILX 1.5 4 SCV-7 2WD Gasoline FC B3 Federal Tier 2 Bin 3 DHNXV01.5WF2 small car 7 39 38 38 9 yes 2013 ACURA ILX 1.5 4 SCV-7 2WD Gasoline FA B2 Federal Tier 2 Bin 2 DHNXV01.5YD2 small car 8 39 38 38 9 yes 2013 ACURA ILX 1.5 4 SCV-7 2WD Gasoline CA PZEV California PZEV DHNXV01.5YD2 small car 9 39 38 38 9 yes 2013 ACURA ILX 2 4 SemiAuto-5 2WD Gasoline CA U2 California LEV-II ULEV DHNXV02.0CB2 small car 6 24 35 28 7 yes 2013 ACURA TSX 2.4 4 SemiAuto-5 2WD Gasoline CA U2 California LEV-II ULEV DHNXV02.4DB3 small car 6 22 31 26 7 yes 2013 AUDI A4 2 4 Man-6 4WD Gasoline CA U2 California LEV-II ULEV DADXV02.03UB small car 6 22 32 26 7 yes 2013 AUDI A4 2 4 SCV-8 2WD Gasoline CA U2 California LEV-II ULEV DADXV02.03UB

163

Regional forecasting with global atmospheric models; Third year report  

SciTech Connect

This report was prepared by the Applied Research Corporation (ARC), College Station, Texas, under subcontract to Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) as part of a global climate studies task. The task supports site characterization work required for the selection of a potential high-level nuclear waste repository and is part of the Performance Assessment Scientific Support (PASS) Program at PNL. The work is under the overall direction of the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM), US Department of Energy Headquarters, Washington, DC. The scope of the report is to present the results of the third year`s work on the atmospheric modeling part of the global climate studies task. The development testing of computer models and initial results are discussed. The appendices contain several studies that provide supporting information and guidance to the modeling work and further details on computer model development. Complete documentation of the models, including user information, will be prepared under separate reports and manuals.

Crowley, T.J.; North, G.R.; Smith, N.R. [Applied Research Corp., College Station, TX (United States)

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Property:Buildings/ModelYear | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Buildings/ModelYear Buildings/ModelYear Jump to: navigation, search This is a property of type Date. Pages using the property "Buildings/ModelYear" Showing 12 pages using this property. G General Merchandise 2009 TSD Chicago High Plug Load 50% Energy Savings + 2009 + General Merchandise 2009 TSD Chicago High Plug Load Baseline + 2009 + General Merchandise 2009 TSD Chicago Low Plug Load 50% Energy Savings + 2009 + General Merchandise 2009 TSD Chicago Low Plug Load Baseline + 2009 + General Merchandise 2009 TSD Miami High Plug Load 50% Energy Savings + 2009 + General Merchandise 2009 TSD Miami High Plug Load Baseline + 2009 + General Merchandise 2009 TSD Miami Low Plug Load 50% Energy Savings + 2009 + General Merchandise 2009 TSD Miami Low Plug Load Baseline + 2009 +

165

TAFV Alternative Fuels and Vehicles Choice Model Documentation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A model for predicting choice of alternative fuel and among alternative vehicle technologies for light-duty motor vehicles is derived. The nested multinomial logit (NML) mathematical framework is used. Calibration of the model is based on information in the existing literature and deduction based on assuming a small number of key parameters, such as the value of time and discount rates. A spreadsheet model has been developed for calibration and preliminary testing of the model.

Greene, D.L.

2001-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

166

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - Sector  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

average fleet-wide CAFE compliane levels (miles per gallon) for passenger cars and light-duty tracks, model years 2017-2025, based on the model year 2010 baseline fleet Model...

167

Model documentation: electricity market module. [15 year forecasts  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the electricity market model. This model is a component of the Intermediate Future Forecasting System (IFFS), the energy market model used to provide projections of energy markets up to 15 years into the future. The electricity market model was developed by the Supply Analysis and Integration Branch as part of building the larger system. This report is written for an audience consisting of mathematical economists, statisticians, operations research analysts, and utility planners. This report contains an overview and a mathematical specification of the electricity market module. It includes a description of the model logic and the individual subroutines in the computer code. A companion document Intermediate Future Forecasting System: Executive Summary (DOE/EIA-430) provides an overview of the components in IFFS and their linkages. 22 figures, 2 tables.

Sanders, R.C.; Murphy, F.H.

1984-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

TO: ALL PASSENGER CAR MANUFACTURERS ALL LIGHT-DUTY TRUCK MANUFACTURERS ALL MEDIUM-DUTY VEHICLE MANUFACTURERS ALL DIRECT IMPORTERS ALL OTHER INTERESTED PARTIES SUBJECT: Submission of Certification Data Demonstrating  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This letter transmits the attached Manufacturers Advisory Correspondence (MAC) which informs vehicle manufacturers of the need to submit demonstrations of compliance with the Inspection and Maintenance (I/M) idle mode and Acceleration Simulation Mode (ASM) loaded mode emission standards, for all 2000 and subsequent model-year emission-data vehicles (EDVs) at the time of certification. If you have any questions or comments, please contact

John D. Dunlap; Pete Wilson; R. B. Summerfield

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

SP-100 operational life model. Fiscal Year 1990 annual report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report covers the initial year`s effort in the development of an Operational Life Model (OLM) for the SP-100 Space Reactor Power System. The initial step undertaken in developing the OLM was to review all available documentation from GE on their plans for the OLM and on the degradation and failure mechanisms envisioned for the SP-100. In addition, the DEGRA code developed at JPL, which modelled the degradation of the General Purpose Heat Source based Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator (GPHS-RTG), was reviewed. Based on the review of the degradation and failure mechanisms, a list of the most pertinent degradation effects along with their key degradation mechanisms was compiled. This was done as a way of separating the mechanisms from the effects and allowing all of the effects to be incorporated into the OLM. The emphasis was on parameters which will tend to change performance as a function of time and not on those that are simply failures without any prior degradation.

Ewell, R.; Awaya, H.

1990-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

170

Model documentation report: Transportation sector model of the National Energy Modeling System  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Over the past year, several modifications have been made to the NEMS Transportation Model, incorporating greater levels of detail and analysis in modules previously represented in the aggregate or under a profusion of simplifying assumptions. This document is intended to amend those sections of the Model Documentation Report (MDR) which describe these superseded modules. Significant changes have been implemented in the LDV Fuel Economy Model, the Alternative Fuel Vehicle Model, the LDV Fleet Module, and the Highway Freight Model. The relevant sections of the MDR have been extracted from the original document, amended, and are presented in the following pages. A brief summary of the modifications follows: In the Fuel Economy Model, modifications have been made which permit the user to employ more optimistic assumptions about the commercial viability and impact of selected technological improvements. This model also explicitly calculates the fuel economy of an array of alternative fuel vehicles (AFV`s) which are subsequently used in the estimation of vehicle sales. In the Alternative Fuel Vehicle Model, the results of the Fuel Economy Model have been incorporated, and the program flows have been modified to reflect that fact. In the Light Duty Vehicle Fleet Module, the sales of vehicles to fleets of various size are endogenously calculated in order to provide a more detailed estimate of the impacts of EPACT legislation on the sales of AFV`s to fleets. In the Highway Freight Model, the previous aggregate estimation has been replaced by a detailed Freight Truck Stock Model, where travel patterns, efficiencies, and energy intensities are estimated by industrial grouping. Several appendices are provided at the end of this document, containing data tables and supplementary descriptions of the model development process which are not integral to an understanding of the overall model structure.

NONE

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

The Economic, Energy, and GHG Emissions Impacts of Proposed 2017–2025 Vehicle Fuel Economy Standards in the United States  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Increases in the U.S. Corporate Average Fuel Economy (CAFE) Standards for 2017 to 2025 model year light-duty vehicles are currently under consideration. This analysis uses an economy-wide model with detail in the passenger ...

Karplus, Valerie

2012-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

172

Generic Disposal System Modeling--Fiscal Year 2011 Progress Report  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

12/2011 12/2011 Rev. 2 FCRD- T10-201 0-00005 FCRD Technical Integration Office (TIO) DOCUMENT NUMBER REQUEST TRANSMITTAL SHEET 1. Document Information Document Title/Description: Generic Disposal System Modeling--Fiscal Year 2011 Revision: 0 Progress Re~ort Assigned Document Number: FCRD-USED-2011-000184 Effective Start Date: 08/1112011 Document Author/Creator: D. Clayton, G. Freeze, T. Hadgu, E. Hardin, J. Lee, OR .~: J. Prouty, R. Rogers, W.M. Nutt, J. Berkholzer, H.H. Liu, L. Zheng, S. Chu Document Owner: Palmer Vaughn Date Range: Originating Organization: Sandia National Laboratories From: To: Milestone OM1 ~M2 OM3 ~M4 o Not a Milestone Milestone Number:: M21UF034101 and M41UF035102 Work Package WBS Number: FTSN11 UF0341 and FTSN11 UF0351; 1.02.08.03 Controlled Unclassified Infonnation (CUI) Type ~ None OOUO OAT o Other FCRD SYSTEM: Year: o FUEL Fuels 2011 OINTL International

173

YEAR  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

1 1 YEAR 2011 Males 18 Females 23 YEAR 2011 SES 2 EJ/EK 2 NQ (Prof/Tech/Admin) 35 NU (Tech/Admin Support) 2 YEAR 2011 American Indian Male 1 American Indian Female 2 African American Male 3 African American Female 9 Asian Male 0 Asian Female 0 Hispanic Male 2 Hispanic Female 6 White Male 12 White Female 6 DIVERSITY Workforce Diversity Associate Administrator for Information Management & Chief Information Officer, NA-IM As of Sep 24, 2011 PAY PLAN TOTAL WORKFORCE GENDER 18 43.9% 23 56.1% Gender Males Females 4.9% 4.9% 85.4% 4.9% Pay Plan SES EJ/EK NQ (Prof/Tech/Admin) NU (Tech/Admin Support) 2.4% 4.9% 7.3% 22.0% 0.0% 0.0% 4.9% 14.6% 29.3% 14.6% Race and Gender American Indian Male American Indian Female African American Male African American Female Asian Male Asian Female Hispanic Male

174

YEAR  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

4 4 YEAR 2011 Males 21 Females 23 YEAR 2011 SES 3 EJ/EK 1 EN 03 1 NN (Engineering) 3 NQ (Prof/Tech/Admin) 31 NU (Tech/Admin Support) 5 YEAR 2011 American Indian Male 0 American Indian Female 0 African American Male 1 African American Female 2 Asian Male 1 Asian Female 1 Hispanic Male 6 Hispanic Female 10 White Male 13 White Female 10 DIVERSITY Workforce Diversity Office of General Counsel, NA-GC As of Sep 24, 2011 PAY PLAN TOTAL WORKFORCE GENDER 21 47.7% 23 52.3% Gender Males Females 6.8% 2.3% 2.3% 6.8% 70.5% 11.4% Pay Plan SES EJ/EK EN 03 NN (Engineering) NQ (Prof/Tech/Admin) NU (Tech/Admin Support) 0.0% 0.0% 2.3% 4.5% 2.3% 2.3% 13.6% 22.7% 29.5% 22.7% Race and Gender American Indian Male American Indian Female African American Male African American Female Asian Male Asian Female Hispanic Male

175

YEAR  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

6 6 YEAR 2011 Males 7 Females 9 YEAR 2011 SES 1 NQ (Prof/Tech/Admin) 9 GS 15 2 GS 13 2 GS 12 1 GS 11 1 YEAR 2011 American Indian Male 0 American Indian Female 0 African American Male 1 African American Female 3 Asian Male 1 Asian Female 0 Hispanic Male 1 Hispanic Female 0 White Male 4 White Female 6 DIVERSITY Workforce Diversity Associate Administrator of External Affairs, NA-EA As of Sep 24, 2011 PAY PLAN TOTAL WORKFORCE GENDER 7 43.8% 9 56.3% Gender Males Females 6.3% 56.3% 12.5% 12.5% 6.3% 6.3% Pay Plan SES NQ (Prof/Tech/Admin) GS 15 GS 13 GS 12 GS 11 0.0% 0.0% 6.3% 18.8% 6.3% 0.0% 6.3% 0.0% 25.0% 37.5% Race and Gender American Indian Male American Indian Female African American Male African American Female Asian Male Asian Female Hispanic Male Hispanic Female White Male White Female FY11 Workforce Diversity

176

YEAR  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

40 40 YEAR 2011 Males 68 Females 72 YEAR 2011 SES 5 EJ/EK 1 NN (Engineering) 16 NQ (Prof/Tech/Admin) 115 NU (Tech/Admin Support) 3 YEAR 2011 American Indian Male 1 American Indian Female 2 African American Male 3 African American Female 7 Asian Male 4 Asian Female 0 Hispanic Male 25 Hispanic Female 26 White Male 35 White Female 37 DIVERSITY Workforce Diversity Associate Administrator for Acquistion & Project Management, NA-APM As of Sep 24, 2011 PAY PLAN TOTAL WORKFORCE GENDER 68 48.6% 72 51.4% Gender Males Females 3.6% 0.7% 11.4% 82.1% 2.1% Pay Plan SES EJ/EK NN (Engineering) NQ (Prof/Tech/Admin) NU (Tech/Admin Support) 0.7% 1.4% 2.1% 5.0% 2.9% 0.0% 17.9% 18.6% 25.0% 26.4% Race and Gender American Indian Male American Indian Female African American Male African American Female Asian Male

177

Model year 2010 Ford Fusion Level-1 testing report.  

SciTech Connect

As a part of the US Department of Energy's Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity (AVTA), a model year 2010 Ford Fusion was procured by eTec (Phoenix, AZ) and sent to ANL's Advanced Powertrain Research Facility for the purposes of vehicle-level testing in support of the Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity. Data was acquired during testing using non-intrusive sensors, vehicle network information, and facilities equipment (emissions and dynamometer). Standard drive cycles, performance cycles, steady-state cycles, and A/C usage cycles were conducted. Much of this data is openly available for download in ANL's Downloadable Dynamometer Database. The major results are shown in this report. Given the benchmark nature of this assessment, the majority of the testing was done over standard regulatory cycles and sought to obtain a general overview of how the vehicle performs. These cycles include the US FTP cycle (Urban) and Highway Fuel Economy Test cycle as well as the US06, a more aggressive supplemental regulatory cycle. Data collection for this testing was kept at a fairly high level and includes emissions and fuel measurements from an exhaust emissions bench, high-voltage and accessory current/voltage from a DC power analyzer, and CAN bus data such as engine speed, engine load, and electric machine operation. The following sections will seek to explain some of the basic operating characteristics of the MY2010 Fusion and provide insight into unique features of its operation and design.

Rask, E.; Bocci, D.; Duoba, M.; Lohse-Busch, H.; Energy Systems

2010-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

178

Model year 2010 Honda insight level-1 testing report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

As a part of the US Department of Energy's Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity (AVTA), a model year 2010 Honda Insight was procured by eTec (Phoenix, AZ) and sent to ANL's Advanced Powertrain Research Facility for the purposes of vehicle-level testing in support of the Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity (AVTA). Data was acquired during testing using non-intrusive sensors, vehicle network information, and facilities equipment (emissions and dynamometer data). Standard drive cycles, performance cycles, steady-state cycles and A/C usage cycles were tested. Much of this data is openly available for download in ANL's Downloadable Dynamometer Database (D3). The major results are shown here in this report. Given the preliminary nature of this assessment, the majority of the testing was done over standard regulatory cycles and seeks to obtain a general overview of how the vehicle performs. These cycles include the US FTP cycle (Urban) and Highway Fuel Economy Test cycle as well as the US06, a more aggressive supplemental regulatory cycle. Data collection for this testing was kept at a fairly high level and includes emissions and fuel measurements from an exhaust emissions bench, high-voltage and accessory current and voltage from a DC power analyzer, and CAN bus data such as engine speed, engine load, and electric machine operation when available. The following sections will seek to explain some of the basic operating characteristics of the MY2010 Insight and provide insight into unique features of its operation and design.

Rask, E.; Bocci, D.; Duoba, M.; Lohse-Busch, H. (Energy Systems)

2011-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

179

Years  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and Technology in and Technology in the National Interest 60 Years of Excellence Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory FY 2012 Annual Report About the Cover: Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) engineers Chris Spadaccini (left) and Eric Duoss are shown experimenting with direct ink-writing to create micro- to macroscale structures with extreme precision. The Laboratory is advancing this process and other additive manufacturing technologies to develop new materials with extraordinary properties for use in a wide range of national-security and other applications. About the Laboratory: Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory was founded in 1952 to enhance the security of the United States by advancing nuclear weapons science and technology. With a talented and dedicated workforce and

180

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - Sector  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

8. Estimateda average fuel economy and greenhouse gas emissions standards proposed for light-duty vehicles, model years 2017-2025 2016 (base) 2017 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022 2023...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "model year light-duty" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

GREET 1.0 -- Transportation fuel cycles model: Methodology and use  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report documents the development and use of the Greenhouse Gases, Regulated Emissions, and Energy Use in Transportation (GREET) model. The model, developed in a spreadsheet format, estimates the full fuel-cycle emissions and energy use associated with various transportation fuels for light-duty vehicles. The model calculates fuel-cycle emissions of five criteria pollutants (volatile organic compounds, Co, NOx, SOx, and particulate matter measuring 10 microns or less) and three greenhouse gases (carbon dioxide, methane, and nitrous oxide). The model also calculates the total fuel-cycle energy consumption, fossil fuel consumption, and petroleum consumption using various transportation fuels. The GREET model includes 17 fuel cycles: petroleum to conventional gasoline, reformulated gasoline, clean diesel, liquefied petroleum gas, and electricity via residual oil; natural gas to compressed natural gas, liquefied petroleum gas, methanol, hydrogen, and electricity; coal to electricity; uranium to electricity; renewable energy (hydropower, solar energy, and wind) to electricity; corn, woody biomass, and herbaceous biomass to ethanol; and landfill gases to methanol. This report presents fuel-cycle energy use and emissions for a 2000 model-year car powered by each of the fuels that are produced from the primary energy sources considered in the study.

Wang, M.Q.

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Model year 2010 Honda insight level-1 testing report.  

SciTech Connect

As a part of the US Department of Energy's Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity (AVTA), a model year 2010 Honda Insight was procured by eTec (Phoenix, AZ) and sent to ANL's Advanced Powertrain Research Facility for the purposes of vehicle-level testing in support of the Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity (AVTA). Data was acquired during testing using non-intrusive sensors, vehicle network information, and facilities equipment (emissions and dynamometer data). Standard drive cycles, performance cycles, steady-state cycles and A/C usage cycles were tested. Much of this data is openly available for download in ANL's Downloadable Dynamometer Database (D3). The major results are shown here in this report. Given the preliminary nature of this assessment, the majority of the testing was done over standard regulatory cycles and seeks to obtain a general overview of how the vehicle performs. These cycles include the US FTP cycle (Urban) and Highway Fuel Economy Test cycle as well as the US06, a more aggressive supplemental regulatory cycle. Data collection for this testing was kept at a fairly high level and includes emissions and fuel measurements from an exhaust emissions bench, high-voltage and accessory current and voltage from a DC power analyzer, and CAN bus data such as engine speed, engine load, and electric machine operation when available. The following sections will seek to explain some of the basic operating characteristics of the MY2010 Insight and provide insight into unique features of its operation and design.

Rask, E.; Bocci, D.; Duoba, M.; Lohse-Busch, H. (Energy Systems)

2011-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

183

The Ability of Automakers to Introduce a Costly, Regulated New Technology: A Case Study of Automotive Airbags in the U.S. Light-Duty Vehicle Market with Implications for Future Automobile and Light Truck Regulation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cir. 1972). Motor Vehicle Manufacturers Association of theon the vehicle model and manufacturer. [31] An additionalgreatly across manufacturers and vehicle segments leading to

Abeles, Ethan

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Transportation Sector Model of the National Energy Modeling System. Volume 1  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the objectives, analytical approach and development of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) Transportation Model (TRAN). The report catalogues and describes the model assumptions, computational methodology, parameter estimation techniques, model source code, and forecast results generated by the model. The NEMS Transportation Model comprises a series of semi-independent models which address different aspects of the transportation sector. The primary purpose of this model is to provide mid-term forecasts of transportation energy demand by fuel type including, but not limited to, motor gasoline, distillate, jet fuel, and alternative fuels (such as CNG) not commonly associated with transportation. The current NEMS forecast horizon extends to the year 2010 and uses 1990 as the base year. Forecasts are generated through the separate consideration of energy consumption within the various modes of transport, including: private and fleet light-duty vehicles; aircraft; marine, rail, and truck freight; and various modes with minor overall impacts, such as mass transit and recreational boating. This approach is useful in assessing the impacts of policy initiatives, legislative mandates which affect individual modes of travel, and technological developments. The model also provides forecasts of selected intermediate values which are generated in order to determine energy consumption. These elements include estimates of passenger travel demand by automobile, air, or mass transit; estimates of the efficiency with which that demand is met; projections of vehicle stocks and the penetration of new technologies; and estimates of the demand for freight transport which are linked to forecasts of industrial output. Following the estimation of energy demand, TRAN produces forecasts of vehicular emissions of the following pollutants by source: oxides of sulfur, oxides of nitrogen, total carbon, carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, and volatile organic compounds.

NONE

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #234: September 16, 2002 2003 Model Year  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

4: September 16, 4: September 16, 2002 2003 Model Year Alternative Fuel Vehicles to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #234: September 16, 2002 2003 Model Year Alternative Fuel Vehicles on Facebook Tweet about Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #234: September 16, 2002 2003 Model Year Alternative Fuel Vehicles on Twitter Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #234: September 16, 2002 2003 Model Year Alternative Fuel Vehicles on Google Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #234: September 16, 2002 2003 Model Year Alternative Fuel Vehicles on Delicious Rank Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #234: September 16, 2002 2003 Model Year Alternative Fuel Vehicles on Digg Find More places to share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #234: September 16, 2002 2003 Model Year Alternative Fuel Vehicles on

186

Solid waste integrated cost analysis model: 1991 project year report  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of the City of Houston's 1991 Solid Waste Integrated Cost Analysis Model (SWICAM) project was to continue the development of a computerized cost analysis model. This model is to provide solid waste managers with tool to evaluate the dollar cost of real or hypothetical solid waste management choices. Those choices have become complicated by the implementation of Subtitle D of the Resources Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) and the EPA's Integrated Approach to managing municipal solid waste;. that is, minimize generation, maximize recycling, reduce volume (incinerate), and then bury (landfill) only the remainder. Implementation of an integrated solid waste management system involving all or some of the options of recycling, waste to energy, composting, and landfilling is extremely complicated. Factors such as hauling distances, markets, and prices for recyclable, costs and benefits of transfer stations, and material recovery facilities must all be considered. A jurisdiction must determine the cost impacts of implementing a number of various possibilities for managing, handling, processing, and disposing of waste. SWICAM employs a single Lotus 123 spreadsheet to enable a jurisdiction to predict or assess the costs of its waste management system. It allows the user to select his own process flow for waste material and to manipulate the model to include as few or as many options as he or she chooses. The model will calculate the estimated cost for those choices selected. The user can then change the model to include or exclude waste stream components, until the mix of choices suits the user. Graphs can be produced as a visual communication aid in presenting the results of the cost analysis. SWICAM also allows future cost projections to be made.

Not Available

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Development and use of the GREET model to estimate fuel-cycle energy use and emissions of various transportation technologies and fuels  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the development and use of the Greenhouse Gases, Regulated Emissions, and Energy Use in Transportation (GREET) model. The model, developed in a spreadsheet format, estimates the full fuel- cycle emissions and energy use associated with various transportation fuels for light-duty vehicles. The model calculates fuel-cycle emissions of five criteria pollutants (volatile organic compounds, carbon monoxide, nitrogen oxides, sulfur oxides, and particulate matter measuring 10 microns or less) and three greenhouse gases (carbon dioxide, methane, and nitrous oxide). The model also calculates the total fuel-cycle energy consumption, fossil fuel consumption, and petroleum consumption using various transportation fuels. The GREET model includes 17 fuel cycles: petroleum to conventional gasoline, reformulated gasoline, clean diesel, liquefied petroleum gas, and electricity via residual oil; natural gas to compressed natural gas, liquefied petroleum gas, methanol, hydrogen, and electricity; coal to electricity; uranium to electricity; renewable energy (hydrogen, solar energy, and wind) to electricity; corn, woody biomass, and herbaceous biomass to ethanol; and landfill gases to methanol. This report presents fuel-cycle energy use and emissions for a 2000 model-year car powered by each of the fuels that are produced from the primary energy sources considered in the study.

Wang, M.Q.

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Model Year 2006: Alternative Fuel and Advanced Technology Vehicles  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

06: Alternative Fuel and Advanced Technology Vehicles 06: Alternative Fuel and Advanced Technology Vehicles Fuel Type EPAct Compliant? Model Vehicle Type Emission Class Powertrain Fuel Capacity Range American Honda Motor Corporation 888-CCHONDA www.honda.com CNG Dedicated EPAct Yes Civic GX Compact Sedan SULEV Tier 2 Bin II 1.7L, 4-cylinder 8 GGE 200 mi HEV (NiMH) EPAct No Accord Hybrid Sedan ULEV 3.0L V6 144 volt NiMH + 17.1 Gal Gasoline TBD HEV (NiMH) EPAct No Civic Hybrid Sedan CA ULEV 1.3L, 4-cylinder 144 volt NiMH + 13.2 Gal Gasoline TBD HEV (NiMH) EPAct No Insight Two-seater SULEV (CVT model) ULEV (MT model) 1.0L, 3-cylinder 144 volt NiMH + 10.6 Gal Gasoline 636 mi DaimlerChrysler 800-999-FLEET www.fleet.chrysler.com E85 FFV EPAct Yes Dodge Ram Pickup 1500 Series 1 Pickup Tier 2 Bin 10A 4.7L V8 26 Gal 416 mi E85 FFV

189

Search for Model Year 2014 Vehicles by Fuel or Vehicle Type  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Vehicle Type Model Year: 2014 Select Class... Diesel Vehicles Electric Vehicles Flex-Fuel (E85) Vehicles Hybrid Vehicles Plug-in Hybrid Vehicles...

190

Model Year 2013: Alternative Fuel Vehicles and Advanced Technology Vehicles  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

13: Alternative Fuel and Advanced Technology Vehicles 13: Alternative Fuel and Advanced Technology Vehicles 1 (Updated 3/6/13) 1 Source: http:/afdc.energy.gov/vehicles/search/light/ Fuel/Powertrain Type Make Model Vehicle Type Engine Size/Cylinders Transmission Emissions Class 2 Fuel Economy Gasoline 3,4 City/Hwy Fuel Economy Alt Fuel 3,4 City/Hwy HEV Acura ILX Sedan 1.5L I4 ECVT Tier 2 Bin 3 LEVII PZEV 39 / 38 N/A FFV E85 Audi A4 Sedan 2.0 I4 Auto Tier 2 Bin 5 LEVII ULEV 20 / 29 14 / 20 FFV E85 Audi A5 Sedan 2.0 I4 Auto Tier 2 Bin 5 LEVII ULEV 20 / 29 14 / 20 FFV E85 Audi A5 Cabriolet Sedan 2.0 I4 Auto Tier 2 Bin 5 LEVII ULEV 20 / 29 14 / 20 FFV E85 Audi Allroad Quatro Wagon 2.0 I4 Auto Tier 2 Bin 5 LEVII ULEV 20 / 27 14 / 18 FFV E85 Audi Q5 SUV 2.0 I4 Auto Tier 2 Bin 5 LEVII ULEV 20 / 28 14 / 19 HEV Audi Q5 Hybrid SUV 2.0 I4 Auto Tier 2 Bin 5 LEVII ULEV 24 / 30 N/A FFV E85 Bentley

191

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Light-Duty Vehicle Search  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

GTC (2014) Fuel: Flex Fuel (E85) (Flexible Fuel) Class: SedanWagon Fuel Economy (Gasoline): 12 mpg city, 20...

192

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Light-Duty Vehicle Search  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Fuel Type Fuel Type All Bi-Fuel Natural Gas (16) Bi-Fuel Propane (12) Biodiesel (B20) (11) Electric (13) Flex Fuel (E85) (91) Hybrid Electric (36) Hydrogen (3) Methanol (0) Natural Gas (4) Plug-in Hybrid Electric (10) Propane (2) Manufacturer All Acura (2) Audi (6) BMW (6) Bentley Motors (4) Buick (2) Cadillac (4) Chevrolet (25) Chrysler (3) Coda Automotive (0) Dodge (7) Fiat (1) Fisker Automotive (0) Ford (48) GMC (19) General Motors EV (0) HUMMER (0) Honda (8) Hyundai (2) Infiniti (4) Jaguar (6) Jeep (1) Kia (2) Land Rover (4) Lexus (5) Lincoln (2) Mazda (0) Mazda (0) McLaren (1) Mercedes-Benz (8) Mercury (0) Mitsubishi (1) Nissan (4) Plymouth (0) Porsche (2) QUANTUM-PROCON (0) Ram (5) Saab (0) Saturn (0) Scion (1) Smart (1) Solectria (0) Subaru (1) Tesla (1) Tesla Motors (0) Toyota (10) Vehicle

193

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Light-Duty Vehicle Search  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

The All American Utility Vehicle is built on a rust-proof, all-aluminum chassis. Sunray Solar Tops supplied by Eco Trans Alliance, LLC, allows the vehicle to convert solar energy...

194

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Light-Duty Vehicle Search  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

The All American Cruise Car is built on a rust-proof, all-aluminum chassis. Sunray Solar Tops supplied by Eco Trans Alliance, LLC, allows the vehicle to convert solar energy...

195

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Light-Duty Vehicle Search  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Jeep - Grand Cherokee 2WD AWD (2014) Fuel: Flex Fuel (E85) (Flexible Fuel) Class: Sport Utility Vehicle Fuel Economy (Gasoline): 17 mpg city, 24 mpg highway Fuel Economy (Flex...

196

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Light-Duty Vehicle Search  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Flying Spur (2014) Fuel: Flex Fuel (E85) (Flexible Fuel) Class: SedanWagon Fuel Economy (Gasoline): 12 mpg city, 21 mpg highway Fuel Economy (Flex Fuel (E85)): 9 mpg city, 15 mpg...

197

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Light-Duty Vehicle Search  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Mercedes-Benz - E350 (2014) Fuel: Flex Fuel (E85) (Flexible Fuel) Class: SedanWagon Fuel Economy (Gasoline): 21 mpg city, 31 mpg highway Fuel Economy (Flex Fuel (E85)): 16 mpg...

198

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Light-Duty Vehicle Search  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

(Gasoline): 12 mpg city, 20 mpg highway Fuel Economy (Flex Fuel (E85)): 9 mpg city, 15 mpg highway Emission Certification: California LEV II, Tier 2 Bin 5 Engine: 12-cyl, 6.0L...

199

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Light-Duty Vehicle Search  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

(Gasoline): 12 mpg city, 20 mpg highway Fuel Economy (Flex Fuel (E85)): 9 mpg city, 15 mpg highway Emission Certification: California LEV II, Tier 2 Bin 5 Engine: 12-cyl, 6.0 L...

200

Light-Duty Vehicle Program Emissions Results (Interim Results...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Procedure (FTP) emissions testing of flexible- fuel methanol, ethanol, and dedicated CNG vehicles from the U. S. Federal Fleet was completed in 1995. The vehicles tested in the...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "model year light-duty" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity: Light-Duty Vehicle Publications  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2008 B Baker EV100 Electric Pickup (1994) - EVAmerica Performance Results Barwood CNG Cab Fleet Study Final Results, May 1999 Summary: Case Study, May 1999 BAT International...

202

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Light-Duty Vehicle Search  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

mpg city, 29 mpg highway Fuel Economy (Flex Fuel (E85)): 15 mpg city, 21 mpg highway Emission Certification: California LEV II, Tier 2 Bin 5 Engine: 6-cyl, 3.5L Transmission: Auto...

203

American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) - Light-Duty Electric...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

by the U.S. Department of Energys (DOE) Vehicle Technology Program (VTP) to collect electric drive vehicle and charging infrastructure data for several deployment projects...

204

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Light-Duty Vehicle Search  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Acura - ILX (2014) Fuel: Hybrid Electric (Hybrid Electric) Class: SedanWagon Fuel Economy (Gasoline): 39 mpg city, 38 mpg highway Emission Certification: California PZEV, Tier 2...

205

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Light-Duty Vehicle Search  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Honda - Accord Plug-in Hybrid (2014) Fuel: Hybrid Electric (Hybrid Electric) Class: SedanWagon Fuel Economy (Gasoline): 36 mpg city, 39 mpg highway Engine: 4-cyl, 2.0L...

206

Light-Duty Fuel Cell Vehicles State of Development  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

delivered by Honda and Toyota within hours of each other on December 23, 2002. The current inventory includes concept vehicles like the General Motors HyWire and comparable visions from Toyota and Daimler, such as generating electricity in an emergency or power failure. It is telling that Toyota, which is regarded

207

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Light-Duty Vehicle Search  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Flying Spur (2013) Fuel: Flex Fuel (E85) (Flexible Fuel) Class: SedanWagon Fuel Economy (Gasoline): 12 mpg city, 21 mpg highway Fuel Economy (Flex Fuel (E85)): 9 mpg city, 15 mpg...

208

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Light-Duty Vehicle Search  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Regal (2013) Fuel: Flex Fuel (E85) (Flexible Fuel) Class: SedanWagon Fuel Economy (Gasoline): 19 mpg city, 31 mpg highway Fuel Economy (Flex Fuel (E85)): 15 mpg city, 22...

209

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Light-Duty Vehicle Search  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

GT (2013) Fuel: Flex Fuel (E85) (Flexible Fuel) Class: SedanWagon Fuel Economy (Gasoline): 12 mpg city, 19 mpg highway Fuel Economy (Flex Fuel (E85)): 8 mpg city, 14 mpg highway...

210

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Light-Duty Vehicle Search  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Verano (2013) Fuel: Flex Fuel (E85) (Flexible Fuel) Class: SedanWagon Fuel Economy (Gasoline): 21 mpg city, 32 mpg highway Fuel Economy (Flex Fuel (E85)): 15 mpg city, 23...

211

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Light-Duty Vehicle Search  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Allroad Quatro (2013) Fuel: Flex Fuel (E85) (Flexible Fuel) Class: SedanWagon Fuel Economy (Gasoline): 20 mpg city, 27 mpg highway Fuel Economy (Flex Fuel (E85)): 14 mpg city, 18...

212

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Light-Duty Vehicle Search  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Q5 (2013) Fuel: Flex Fuel (E85) (Flexible Fuel) Class: Sport Utility Vehicle Fuel Economy (Gasoline): 20 mpg city, 28 mpg highway Fuel Economy (Flex Fuel (E85)): 14 mpg city, 19...

213

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Light-Duty Vehicle Search  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Super Sport (2013) Fuel: Flex Fuel (E85) (Flexible Fuel) Class: SedanWagon Fuel Economy (Gasoline): 12 mpg city, 19 mpg highway Fuel Economy (Flex Fuel (E85)): 8 mpg city, 14...

214

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Light-Duty Vehicle Search  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

GTC (2013) Fuel: Flex Fuel (E85) (Flexible Fuel) Class: SedanWagon Fuel Economy (Gasoline): 11 mpg city, 19 mpg highway Fuel Economy (Flex Fuel (E85)): 8 mpg city, 13...

215

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Light-Duty Vehicle Search  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Regal (2013) Fuel: Flex Fuel (E85) (Flexible Fuel) Class: SedanWagon Fuel Economy (Gasoline): 18 mpg city, 29 mpg highway Fuel Economy (Flex Fuel (E85)): 13 mpg city, 20 mpg...

216

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Light-Duty Vehicle Search  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Cadillac - ATS RWD AWD (2013) Fuel: Flex Fuel (E85) (Flexible Fuel) Class: SedanWagon Fuel Economy (Gasoline): 19 mpg city, 28 mpg highway Fuel Economy (Flex Fuel (E85)): 14 mpg...

217

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Light-Duty Vehicle Search  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Q5 Hybrid (2013) Fuel: Hybrid Electric (Hybrid Electric) Class: Sport Utility Vehicle Fuel Economy (Gasoline): 24 mpg city, 30...

218

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Light-Duty Vehicle Search  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

3 (2013) Fuel: Hybrid Electric (Hybrid Electric) Class: SedanWagon Fuel Economy (Gasoline): 25 mpg city, 33...

219

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Light-Duty Vehicle Search  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Acura - ILX (2013) Fuel: Hybrid Electric (Hybrid Electric) Class: SedanWagon Fuel Economy (Gasoline): 39 mpg city, 38 mpg highway Emission Certification: LEV II PZEV, Tier 2 Bin 3...

220

WORKSHOP REPORT:Light-Duty Vehicles Technical Requirements and...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the OEMs have improved the fuel efficiency and rate of acceleration. Now, however, the demand to reduce greenhouse gases and use of oil require additional solutions for...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "model year light-duty" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Light-Duty Vehicle Search  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Electric (Dedicated) Class: Neighborhood Electric Vehicle Estimated Range: 35 city Battery: 6 12-volt flooded electrolyte Dealer: Locate a dealer Description: The GEM e2 is a...

222

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Light-Duty Vehicle Search  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Electric (Dedicated) Class: Neighborhood Electric Vehicle Estimated Range: 30 city Battery: absorbed glass mat lead-acid (6 12-volt batteries) Engine: Brushless 3 phase...

223

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Light-Duty Vehicle Search  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Close Detail Chevrolet - Spark (2014) Fuel: Electric (Dedicated) Class: SedanWagon Battery: 20 kWh Emission Certification: California ZEV, Tier 2 Bin 1 Engine: 100 kW e-motor...

224

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Light-Duty Vehicle Search  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Passenger Van (2011) Fuel: Electric (Dedicated) Class: Neighborhood Electric Vehicle Battery: 6 12-volt lead acid (72) Dealer: Locate a dealer Description: The Greentruck EVP1000...

225

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Light-Duty Vehicle Search  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Electric (Dedicated) Class: Neighborhood Electric Vehicle Estimated Range: 40 city Battery: Absorbed glass mat lead-acid (6 12-volt batteries) Dealer: Locate a dealer...

226

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Light-Duty Vehicle Search  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Crew Cab (2011) Fuel: Electric (Dedicated) Class: Neighborhood Electric Vehicle Battery: 6 12-volt lead-acid (72) Dealer: Locate a dealer Description: The Greentruck EVX1000...

227

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Light-Duty Vehicle Search  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Electric (Dedicated) Class: Neighborhood Electric Vehicle Estimated Range: 40 city Battery: 9 8-volt gel batteries Engine: 7.0 hp motor Dealer: Locate a dealer Description: The...

228

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Light-Duty Vehicle Search  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Electric (Dedicated) Class: Neighborhood Electric Vehicle Estimated Range: 35 city Battery: 6 12-volt flooded electrolyte Dealer: Locate a dealer Description: The GEM eS is a...

229

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Light-Duty Vehicle Search  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Electric (Dedicated) Class: Neighborhood Electric Vehicle Estimated Range: 40 city Battery: 6 12-volt lead-acid Dealer: Locate a dealer Description: The Greentruck EVC1000 is a...

230

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Light-Duty Vehicle Search  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Electric (Dedicated) Class: Neighborhood Electric Vehicle Estimated Range: 30 city Battery: 6 12-volt gel batteries Dealer: Locate a dealer Description: The GEM e6 has seating...

231

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Light-Duty Vehicle Search  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Electric (Dedicated) Class: Neighborhood Electric Vehicle Estimated Range: 30 city Battery: 6 12-volt flooded electrolyte Dealer: Locate a dealer Description: The GEM eS is a...

232

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Light-Duty Vehicle Search  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Electric (Dedicated) Class: Neighborhood Electric Vehicle Estimated Range: 30 city Battery: 6 12-volt flooded electrolyte Dealer: Locate a dealer Description: The GEM e4 has...

233

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Light-Duty Vehicle Search  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Extended Cab (2011) Fuel: Electric (Dedicated) Class: Neighborhood Electric Vehicle Battery: 12 6-volt lead-acid (72 volts) Dealer: Locate a dealer Description: The Greentruck...

234

Light duty utility arm equipment qualification test procedure  

SciTech Connect

The Equipment Qualification Test described in this test procedure document is the acceptance test procedure (ATP) for the LDUA Baseline System. It verifies that the equipment is complete and in working order, and demonstrates its readiness for being deployed into an actual underground storage tank.

Kiebel, G.R., Westinghouse Hanford

1996-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

235

Fire hazards evaluation for light duty utility arm system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In accordance with DOE Order 5480.7A, Fire Protection, a Fire Hazards Analysis must be performed for all new facilities. LMHC Fire Protection has reviewed and approved the significant documentation leading up to the LDUA operation. This includes, but is not limited to, development criteria and drawings, Engineering Task Plan, Quality Assurance Program Plan, and Safety Program Plan. LMHC has provided an appropriate level of fire protection for this activity as documented.

HUCKFELDT, R.A.

1999-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

236

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Light-Duty Vehicle Search  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

ILX (2014) Fuel: Hybrid Electric Class: SedanWagon Fuel Economy: 39 mpg city, 38 mpg highway Emission Certification: LEV II PZEV, Tier 2 Bin 2 Engine: 1.5L I4 Transmission: ECVT...

237

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Light-Duty Vehicle Search  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

LaCrosse, FWDAWD (2014) Fuel: Flex Fuel (E85) Class: SedanWagon Fuel Economy (gasoline): 18 mpg city, 28 mpg highway Fuel Economy (E85): 14 mpg city, 20 mpg highway Emission...

238

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Light-Duty Vehicle Search  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Q5 AWD (2014) Fuel: Flex Fuel (E85) Class: Sport Utility Vehicle Fuel Economy (gasoline): 20 mpg city, 28 mpg highway Fuel Economy (E85): 14 mpg city, 19...

239

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Light-Duty Vehicle Search  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Supersports (2014) Fuel: Flex Fuel (E85) Class: SedanWagon Fuel Economy (gasoline): 12 mpg city, 20...

240

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Light-Duty Vehicle Search  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Allroad quattro (2014) Fuel: Flex Fuel (E85) Class: SedanWagon Fuel Economy (gasoline): 20 mpg city, 27 mpg highway Fuel Economy (E85): 14 mpg city, 18...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "model year light-duty" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Light-Duty Vehicle Search  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Audi - Q5 Hybrid, AWD (2014) Fuel: Hybrid Electric Class: Sport Utility Vehicle Fuel Economy: 24 mpg city, 30 mpg highway Emission Certification: LEV II ULEV, Tier 2 Bin 5 Engine:...

242

Vehicle technologies program Government Performance and Results Act (GPA) report for fiscal year 2012  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy has defined milestones for its Vehicle Technologies Program (VTP). This report provides estimates of the benefits that would accrue from achieving these milestones relative to a base case that represents a future in which there is no VTP-supported vehicle technology development. Improvements in the fuel economy and reductions in the cost of light- and heavy-duty vehicles were estimated by using Argonne National Laboratory's Autonomie powertrain simulation software and doing some additional analysis. Argonne also estimated the fraction of the fuel economy improvements that were attributable to VTP-supported development in four 'subsystem' technology areas: batteries and electric drives, advanced combustion engines, fuels and lubricants, and materials (i.e., reducing vehicle mass, called 'lightweighting'). Oak Ridge National Laboratory's MA{sup 3}T (Market Acceptance of Advanced Automotive Technologies) tool was used to project the market penetration of light-duty vehicles, and TA Engineering's TRUCK tool was used to project the penetrations of medium- and heavy-duty trucks. Argonne's VISION transportation energy accounting model was used to estimate total fuel savings, reductions in primary energy consumption, and reductions in greenhouse gas emissions that would result from achieving VTP milestones. These projections indicate that by 2030, the on-road fuel economy of both light- and heavy-duty vehicles would improve by more than 20%, and that this positive impact would be accompanied by a reduction in oil consumption of nearly 2 million barrels per day and a reduction in greenhouse gas emissions of more than 300 million metric tons of CO{sub 2} equivalent per year. These benefits would have a significant economic value in the U.S. transportation sector and reduce its dependency on oil and its vulnerability to oil price shocks.

Ward, J.; Stephens, T. S.; Birky, A. K. (Energy Systems); (DOE-EERE); (TA Engineering)

2012-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

243

What are the Starting Points? Evaluating Base-Year Assumptions in the Asian Modeling Exercise  

SciTech Connect

A common feature of model inter-comparison efforts is that the base year numbers for important parameters such as population and GDP can differ substantially across models. This paper explores the sources and implications of this variation in Asian countries across the models participating in the Asian Modeling Exercise (AME). Because the models do not all have a common base year, each team was required to provide data for 2005 for comparison purposes. This paper compares the year 2005 information for different models, noting the degree of variation in important parameters, including population, GDP, primary energy, electricity, and CO2 emissions. It then explores the difference in these key parameters across different sources of base-year information. The analysis confirms that the sources provide different values for many key parameters. This variation across data sources and additional reasons why models might provide different base-year numbers, including differences in regional definitions, differences in model base year, and differences in GDP transformation methodologies, are then discussed in the context of the AME scenarios. Finally, the paper explores the implications of base-year variation on long-term model results.

Chaturvedi, Vaibhav; Waldhoff, Stephanie; Clarke, Leon E.; Fujimori, Shinichiro

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Search for Model Year 2005 Vehicles by Fuel or Vehicle Type  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Year: 2005 Select Class... Compressed Natural Gas Vehicles Diesel Vehicles Flex-Fuel (E85) Vehicles Hybrid Vehicles Search by Make Search by Model Search by EPA Size Class...

245

Search for Model Year 2009 Vehicles by Fuel or Vehicle Type  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Year: 2009 Select Class... Compressed Natural Gas Vehicles Diesel Vehicles Flex-Fuel (E85) Vehicles Hybrid Vehicles Search by Make Search by Model Search by EPA Size Class...

246

Search for Model Year 2010 Vehicles by Fuel or Vehicle Type  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Year: 2010 Select Class... Compressed Natural Gas Vehicles Diesel Vehicles Flex-Fuel (E85) Vehicles Hybrid Vehicles Search by Make Search by Model Search by EPA Size Class...

247

Paleoclimate data–model comparison and the role of climate forcings over the past 1500 years  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The past 1500 years provides a valuable opportunity to study the response of the climate system to external forcings. However, the integration of paleoclimate proxies with climate modeling is critical to improving our understanding of climate ...

Steven J. Phipps; Helen V. McGregor; Joëlle Gergis; Ailie J. E. Gallant; Raphael Neukom; Samantha Stevenson; Duncan Ackerley; Josephine R. Brown; Matt J. Fischer; Tas D. van Ommen

248

Stability and Variability in a Coupled Ocean–Atmosphere Climate Model: Results of 100-year Simulations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Two 100-year seasonal simulators, one performed with a low resolution atmospheric general circulation model (GCM) coupled to a mixed-layer ocean formulation and the other made with the GCM forced by prescribed ocean conditions, are compared to ...

David D. Houghton; Robert G. Gallimore; Linda M. Keller

1991-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Paleoclimate Data–Model Comparison and the Role of Climate Forcings over the Past 1500 Years  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The past 1500 years provide a valuable opportunity to study the response of the climate system to external forcings. However, the integration of paleoclimate proxies with climate modeling is critical to improving the understanding of climate ...

Steven J. Phipps; Helen V. McGregor; Joëlle Gergis; Ailie J. E. Gallant; Raphael Neukom; Samantha Stevenson; Duncan Ackerley; Josephine R. Brown; Matt J. Fischer; Tas D. van Ommen

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

A New, Stochastic, Energy Model of the U.S. is Under Construction: SEDS and Its Industrial Structure  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

"A new energy model for the United States is currently being constructed by staff at five National Laboratories for the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy at the Department of Energy. This new model, SEDS (Stochastic Energy Deployment Model), is designed to test the impact of DOE R&D on energy use in the economy. The “stochastic” part of this model will also allow examination of the risks associated with sudden oil shocks, imposition of carbon taxes or trading schemes, and other shocks to the energy economy. SEDS is organized by supply-side and demand-side sectors. The supply-side sectors include electricity, liquid fuels, natural gas, coal, and various renewable energy options. On the demand side, there are the usual suspects: industry, commercial buildings, residential buildings, and two transport sectors, light-duty vehicles and heavy-duty vehicles. The industrial sector is currently modeled as a single sector, using the latest Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey (MECS) to calibrate energy consumption to end-use energy categories: boilers, process heating, electro-chemical processes, and other process requirements. As with the CIMS model, these process requirements have ancillary requirements – conveyance, motor drive, pumps, fans, and compressors – that all require certain classes of motors. Lighting and HVAC are considered separately from process requirements. The current version of SEDS, called SEDS-Lite, has technology detail in many sectors, but these are quite simple. The intent is to add detail over time: this year, we expect to add a pulp and paper sector and a iron and steel sector, pull these and petroleum refining out of the aggregate industrial sector, and add the non-manufacturing industrial component to the model. In future years, we expect the industrial detail to replicate CIMS. Our simulations with the industrial sector of SEDS-Lite will show how closely it tracks the NEMS forecasts. Other simulations will demonstrate how the stochastic component can be used to show industry"

Roop, J. M.

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Model Year 2011 Green Vehicle Guide Model Displ Cyl Trans Drive  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Green Vehicle Guide Green Vehicle Guide Model Displ Cyl Trans Drive Fuel Sales Area Stnd Stnd Description Underhood ID Veh Class Air Pollution Score City MPG Hwy MPG Cmb MPG Greenhouse Gas Score SmartWay ACURA MDX 3.5 6 SemiAuto-6 4WD Gasoline CA U2 California LEV-II ULEV BHNXT03.7M19 SUV 6 16 21 18 3 no ACURA MDX 3.5 6 SemiAuto-6 4WD Gasoline FA B5 Federal Tier 2 Bin 5 BHNXT03.7M19 SUV 5 16 21 18 3 no ACURA RDX 2.3 4 SemiAuto-5 2WD Gasoline CA U2 California LEV-II ULEV BHNXT02.3X19 SUV 6 19 24 21 4 no ACURA RDX 2.3 4 SemiAuto-5 4WD Gasoline CA U2 California LEV-II ULEV BHNXT02.3X19 SUV 6 17 22 19 3 no ACURA RDX 2.3 4 SemiAuto-5 2WD Gasoline FA B5 Federal Tier 2 Bin 5 BHNXT02.3X19 SUV 5 19 24 21 4 no ACURA RDX 2.3 4 SemiAuto-5 4WD Gasoline FA B5 Federal Tier 2 Bin 5 BHNXT02.3X19 SUV 5 17 22 19 3 no ACURA RL 3.7 6 SemiAuto-6 4WD Gasoline CA U2 California LEV-II ULEV BHNXV03.7PB9 midsize car

252

Model Year 2012 Green Vehicle Guide Model Displ Cyl Trans Drive  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Green Vehicle Guide Green Vehicle Guide Model Displ Cyl Trans Drive Fuel Sales Area Stnd Stnd Description Underhood ID Veh Class Air Pollution Score City MPG Hwy MPG Cmb MPG Greenhouse Gas Score SmartWay ACURA MDX 3.7 6 SemiAuto-6 4WD Gasoline FA B5 Federal Tier 2 Bin 5 CHNXT03.7R19 SUV 5 16 21 18 3 no ACURA MDX 3.7 6 SemiAuto-6 4WD Gasoline CA U2 California LEV-II ULEV CHNXT03.7R19 SUV 6 16 21 18 3 no ACURA RDX 2.3 4 SemiAuto-5 4WD Gasoline FA B5 Federal Tier 2 Bin 5 CHNXT02.3Y19 SUV 5 17 22 19 3 no ACURA RDX 2.3 4 SemiAuto-5 4WD Gasoline CA U2 California LEV-II ULEV CHNXT02.3Y19 SUV 6 17 22 19 3 no ACURA RDX 2.3 4 SemiAuto-5 2WD Gasoline FA B5 Federal Tier 2 Bin 5 CHNXT02.3Y19 SUV 5 19 24 21 4 no ACURA RDX 2.3 4 SemiAuto-5 2WD Gasoline CA U2 California LEV-II ULEV CHNXT02.3Y19 SUV 6 19 24 21 4 no ACURA TL 3.5 6 SemiAuto-6 2WD Gasoline FA B5 Federal Tier 2 Bin 5 CHNXV03.5EB3 midsize car 5

253

Model Year 2010 Green Vehicle Guide Model Displ Cyl Trans Drive  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Green Vehicle Guide Green Vehicle Guide Model Displ Cyl Trans Drive Fuel Sales Area Stnd Stnd Description Underhood ID Veh Class Air Pollution Score City MPG Hwy MPG Cmb MPG Greenhouse Gas Score SmartWay ACURA MDX 3.7 6 SemiAuto-6 4WD Gasoline CA U2 California LEV-II ULEV AHNXT03.7W19 SUV 7 16 21 18 4 no ACURA MDX 3.7 6 SemiAuto-6 4WD Gasoline FA B5 Federal Tier 2 Bin 5 AHNXT03.7W19 SUV 6 16 21 18 4 no ACURA RDX 2.3 4 SemiAuto-5 2WD Gasoline CA U2 California LEV-II ULEV AHNXT02.3Y19 SUV 7 19 24 21 5 no ACURA RDX 2.3 4 SemiAuto-5 4WD Gasoline CA U2 California LEV-II ULEV AHNXT02.3Y19 SUV 7 17 22 19 4 no ACURA RDX 2.3 4 SemiAuto-5 2WD Gasoline FA B5 Federal Tier 2 Bin 5 AHNXT02.3Y19 SUV 6 19 24 21 5 no ACURA RDX 2.3 4 SemiAuto-5 4WD Gasoline FA B5 Federal Tier 2 Bin 5 AHNXT02.3Y19 SUV 6 17 22 19 4 no ACURA RL 3.7 6 SemiAuto-5 4WD Gasoline CA U2 California LEV-II ULEV AHNXV03.7PB9 midsize car

254

Table 2.8 Motor Vehicle Mileage, Fuel Consumption, and Fuel ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Table 2.8 Motor Vehicle Mileage, Fuel Consumption, and Fuel Economy, 1949-2010: Year: Light-Duty Vehicles, Short Wheelbase 1: Light-Duty Vehicles, Long Wheelbase 2:

255

Changes in release cycles for EIA's  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Potential efficiency improvements and their impacts on end-use energy demand Increasing light-duty vehicle greenhouse gas and fuel economy standards for model years 2017 to 2025 Energy intensity trends in AEO2010 Potential efficiency improvements and their impacts on end-use energy demand Increasing light-duty vehicle greenhouse gas and fuel economy standards for model years 2017 to 2025 Energy intensity trends in AEO2010 Energy impacts of proposed CAFE standards for light-duty vehicles, model years 2017 to 2025 Fuel consumption and greenhouse gas emissions standards for heavy-duty vehicles Natural gas as a fuel for heavy trucks: issues and incentives Nuclear power in AEO2012 Carbon capture and storage: economics and issues Potential impact of minimum pipeline throughput constraints on Alaska North Slope oil production Power sector environmental regulations on the horizon U.S. crude oil and natural gas resource uncertainty Evolving Marcellus Shale gas resource estimates

256

Transportation Sector Model of the National Energy Modeling System. Volume 2 -- Appendices: Part 2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The attachments contained within this appendix provide additional details about the model development and estimation process which do not easily lend themselves to incorporation in the main body of the model documentation report. The information provided in these attachments is not integral to the understanding of the model`s operation, but provides the reader with opportunity to gain a deeper understanding of some of the model`s underlying assumptions. There will be a slight degree of replication of materials found elsewhere in the documentation, made unavoidable by the dictates of internal consistency. Each attachment is associated with a specific component of the transportation model; the presentation follows the same sequence of modules employed in Volume 1. The following attachments are contained in Appendix F: Fuel Economy Model (FEM)--provides a discussion of the FEM vehicle demand and performance by size class models; Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) Model--describes data input sources and extrapolation methodologies; Light-Duty Vehicle (LDV) Stock Model--discusses the fuel economy gap estimation methodology; Light Duty Vehicle Fleet Model--presents the data development for business, utility, and government fleet vehicles; Light Commercial Truck Model--describes the stratification methodology and data sources employed in estimating the stock and performance of LCT`s; Air Travel Demand Model--presents the derivation of the demographic index, used to modify estimates of personal travel demand; and Airborne Emissions Model--describes the derivation of emissions factors used to associate transportation measures to levels of airborne emissions of several pollutants.

NONE

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Modeling the Office of Science Ten Year FacilitiesPlan: The PERI Architecture Tiger Team  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Performance Engineering Institute (PERI) originally proposed a tiger team activity as a mechanism to target significant effort to the optimization of key Office of Science applications, a model that was successfully realized with the assistance of two JOULE metric teams. However, the Office of Science requested a new focus beginning in 2008: assistance in forming its ten year facilities plan. To meet this request, PERI formed the Architecture Tiger Team, which is modeling the performance of key science applications on future architectures, with S3D, FLASH and GTC chosen as the first application targets. In this activity, we have measured the performance of these applications on current systems in order to understand their baseline performance and to ensure that our modeling activity focuses on the right versions and inputs of the applications. We have applied a variety of modeling techniques to anticipate the performance of these applications on a range of anticipated systems. While our initial findings predict that Office of Science applications will continue to perform well on future machines from major hardware vendors, we have also encountered several areas in which we must extend our modeling techniques in order to fulfill our mission accurately and completely. In addition, we anticipate that models of a wider range of applications will reveal critical differences between expected future systems, thus providing guidance for future Office of Science procurement decisions, and will enable DOE applications to exploit machines in future facilities fully.

de Supinski, B R; Alam, S R; Bailey, D H; Carrington, L; Daley, C

2009-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

258

Modeling the Office of Science Ten Year Facilities Plan: The PERI Architecture Tiger Team  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Performance Engineering Institute (PERI) originally proposed a tiger team activity as a mechanism to target significant effort optimizing key Office of Science applications, a model that was successfully realized with the assistance of two JOULE metric teams. However, the Office of Science requested a new focus beginning in 2008: assistance in forming its ten year facilities plan. To meet this request, PERI formed the Architecture Tiger Team, which is modeling the performance of key science applications on future architectures, with S3D, FLASH and GTC chosen as the first application targets. In this activity, we have measured the performance of these applications on current systems in order to understand their baseline performance and to ensure that our modeling activity focuses on the right versions and inputs of the applications. We have applied a variety of modeling techniques to anticipate the performance of these applications on a range of anticipated systems. While our initial findings predict that Office of Science applications will continue to perform well on future machines from major hardware vendors, we have also encountered several areas in which we must extend our modeling techniques in order to fulfill our mission accurately and completely. In addition, we anticipate that models of a wider range of applications will reveal critical differences between expected future systems, thus providing guidance for future Office of Science procurement decisions, and will enable DOE applications to exploit machines in future facilities fully.

de Supinski, Bronis R.; Alam, Sadaf; Bailey, David H.; Carrington, Laura; Daley, Chris; Dubey, Anshu; Gamblin, Todd; Gunter, Dan; Hovland, Paul D.; Jagode, Heike; Karavanic, Karen; Marin, Gabriel; Mellor-Crummey, John; Moore, Shirley; Norris, Boyana; Oliker, Leonid; Olschanowsky, Catherine; Roth, Philip C.; Schulz, Martin; Shende, Sameer; Snavely, Allan; Spear, Wyatt; Tikir, Mustafa; Vetter, Jeff; Worley, Pat; Wright, Nicholas

2009-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

259

GREET 1.5 - transportation fuel-cycle model - Vol. 1 : methodology, development, use, and results.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report documents the development and use of the most recent version (Version 1.5) of the Greenhouse Gases, Regulated Emissions, and Energy Use in Transportation (GREET) model. The model, developed in a spreadsheet format, estimates the full fuel-cycle emissions and energy associated with various transportation fuels and advanced vehicle technologies for light-duty vehicles. The model calculates fuel-cycle emissions of five criteria pollutants (volatile organic compounds, carbon monoxide, nitrogen oxides, particulate matter with diameters of 10 micrometers or less, and sulfur oxides) and three greenhouse gases (carbon dioxide, methane, and nitrous oxide). The model also calculates total energy consumption, fossil fuel consumption, and petroleum consumption when various transportation fuels are used. The GREET model includes the following cycles: petroleum to conventional gasoline, reformulated gasoline, conventional diesel, reformulated diesel, liquefied petroleum gas, and electricity via residual oil; natural gas to compressed natural gas, liquefied natural gas, liquefied petroleum gas, methanol, Fischer-Tropsch diesel, dimethyl ether, hydrogen, and electricity; coal to electricity; uranium to electricity; renewable energy (hydropower, solar energy, and wind) to electricity; corn, woody biomass, and herbaceous biomass to ethanol; soybeans to biodiesel; flared gas to methanol, dimethyl ether, and Fischer-Tropsch diesel; and landfill gases to methanol. This report also presents the results of the analysis of fuel-cycle energy use and emissions associated with alternative transportation fuels and advanced vehicle technologies to be applied to passenger cars and light-duty trucks.

Wang, M. Q.

1999-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

260

Yearly distributed insolation model and optimum design of a two dimensional compound parabolic concentrator  

SciTech Connect

Optimum acceptance angle of a compound parabolic concentrator (CPC) is studied by the use of an insolation model proposed in this paper. The insolation consists of two components: diffuse and direct. The direct radiation is supposed to be distributed in the field within {+-}23.5{degree} of declination on the celestial hemisphere and the diffuse radiation is assumed to have uniform irradiance. This yearly insolation model suggests that the optimum half-acceptance angle at the two-dimensional CPC becomes 26{degree} irrespective of the change of the diffuse radiation fraction. This result leads us to the conclusion that, almost all over the world, a common CPC could be used as an optimum concentration for many solar radiation collecting systems. 11 refs., 8 figs.

Suzuki, Akio; Kobayashi, Shigeo [Tokyo Univ. of Agriculture and Technology (Japan)

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "model year light-duty" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Advanced Test Reactor Core Modeling Update Project Annual Report for Fiscal Year 2011  

SciTech Connect

Legacy computational reactor physics software tools and protocols currently used for support of Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) core fuel management and safety assurance and, to some extent, experiment management are obsolete, inconsistent with the state of modern nuclear engineering practice, and are becoming increasingly difficult to properly verify and validate (V&V). Furthermore, the legacy staff knowledge required for application of these tools and protocols from the 1960s and 1970s is rapidly being lost due to staff turnover and retirements. In 2009 the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) initiated a focused effort to address this situation through the introduction of modern high-fidelity computational software and protocols, with appropriate V&V, within the next 3-4 years via the ATR Core Modeling and Simulation and V&V Update (or 'Core Modeling Update') Project. This aggressive computational and experimental campaign will have a broad strategic impact on the operation of the ATR, both in terms of improved computational efficiency and accuracy for support of ongoing DOE programs as well as in terms of national and international recognition of the ATR National Scientific User Facility (NSUF). The ATR Core Modeling Update Project, targeted for full implementation in phase with the anticipated ATR Core Internals Changeout (CIC) in the 2014 time frame, began during the last quarter of Fiscal Year 2009, and has just completed its first full year. Key accomplishments so far have encompassed both computational as well as experimental work. A new suite of stochastic and deterministic transport theory based reactor physics codes and their supporting nuclear data libraries (SCALE, KENO-6, HELIOS, NEWT, and ATTILA) have been installed at the INL under various permanent sitewide license agreements and corresponding baseline models of the ATR and ATRC are now operational, demonstrating the basic feasibility of these code packages for their intended purpose. Furthermore, a capability for rigorous sensitivity analysis and uncertainty quantification based on the TSUNAMI system is being implemented and initial computational results have been obtained. This capability will have many applications in 2011 and beyond as a tool for understanding the margins of uncertainty in the new models as well as for validation experiment design and interpretation. Finally we note that although full implementation of the new computational models and protocols will extend over a period 3-4 years as noted above, interim applications in the much nearer term have already been demonstrated. In particular, these demonstrations included an analysis that was useful for understanding the cause of some issues in December 2009 that were triggered by a larger than acceptable discrepancy between the measured excess core reactivity and a calculated value that was based on the legacy computational methods. As the Modeling Update project proceeds we anticipate further such interim, informal, applications in parallel with formal qualification of the system under the applicable INL Quality Assurance procedures and standards.

David W. Nigg; Devin A. Steuhm

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Advanced Test Reactor Core Modeling Update Project Annual Report for Fiscal Year 2011  

SciTech Connect

Legacy computational reactor physics software tools and protocols currently used for support of Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) core fuel management and safety assurance and, to some extent, experiment management are obsolete, inconsistent with the state of modern nuclear engineering practice, and are becoming increasingly difficult to properly verify and validate (V&V). Furthermore, the legacy staff knowledge required for application of these tools and protocols from the 1960s and 1970s is rapidly being lost due to staff turnover and retirements. In 2009 the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) initiated a focused effort to address this situation through the introduction of modern high-fidelity computational software and protocols, with appropriate V&V, within the next 3-4 years via the ATR Core Modeling and Simulation and V&V Update (or 'Core Modeling Update') Project. This aggressive computational and experimental campaign will have a broad strategic impact on the operation of the ATR, both in terms of improved computational efficiency and accuracy for support of ongoing DOE programs as well as in terms of national and international recognition of the ATR National Scientific User Facility (NSUF). The ATR Core Modeling Update Project, targeted for full implementation in phase with the anticipated ATR Core Internals Changeout (CIC) in the 2014 time frame, began during the last quarter of Fiscal Year 2009, and has just completed its first full year. Key accomplishments so far have encompassed both computational as well as experimental work. A new suite of stochastic and deterministic transport theory based reactor physics codes and their supporting nuclear data libraries (SCALE, KENO-6, HELIOS, NEWT, and ATTILA) have been installed at the INL under various permanent sitewide license agreements and corresponding baseline models of the ATR and ATRC are now operational, demonstrating the basic feasibility of these code packages for their intended purpose. Furthermore, a capability for rigorous sensitivity analysis and uncertainty quantification based on the TSUNAMI system is being implemented and initial computational results have been obtained. This capability will have many applications in 2011 and beyond as a tool for understanding the margins of uncertainty in the new models as well as for validation experiment design and interpretation. Finally we note that although full implementation of the new computational models and protocols will extend over a period 3-4 years as noted above, interim applications in the much nearer term have already been demonstrated. In particular, these demonstrations included an analysis that was useful for understanding the cause of some issues in December 2009 that were triggered by a larger than acceptable discrepancy between the measured excess core reactivity and a calculated value that was based on the legacy computational methods. As the Modeling Update project proceeds we anticipate further such interim, informal, applications in parallel with formal qualification of the system under the applicable INL Quality Assurance procedures and standards.

David W. Nigg; Devin A. Steuhm

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Record 11002: Number of Cars Equivalent to 100 Metric Tons of Avoided Greenhouse Gases per Year  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

02 Date: January 5, 2011 02 Date: January 5, 2011 Title: Number of Cars Equivalent to 100 Metric Tons of Avoided Greenhouse Gases per Year Originator: Andrea Chew & Tien Nguyen Approved by: Sunita Satyapal Date: January 25, 2011 A conventional mid-size gasoline car emits 0.45 kg of greenhouse gases (GHG) per mile. 1 One hundred (100) metric tons (t) of GHG per year are equivalent to emissions from 17 conventional gasoline cars. Item: The GHG emissions cited above are from an analysis record prepared by the Department of Energy's Fuel Cell Technologies and Vehicle Technologies Programs on life-cycle emissions of greenhouse gases and petroleum use for several light-duty vehicles. 1 For cars that are between 1 and 5 years old, the average mileage is approximately 13,000,

264

The IMPACTT model: Structure and technical description  

SciTech Connect

The Integrated Market Penetration and Anticipated Cost of Transportation Technologies model, or IMPACTT, is a spreadsheet model that calculates the effect of advanced-technology vehicles and market penetration on baseline fuel use and emissions. Outputs include estimates of the quantity and value of oil displaced and emissions reduced by advanced-technology vehicles, the quantity of alternative fuels they consume, and the total incremental costs bome by purchasers of advanced-technology vehicles. In the current version of IMPACTT, up to eight fuel or engine technologies applicable to light-duty vehicles can be modeled by using a three-phase approach. First, the vehicle stock and miles traveled by the advanced-technology vehicle are determined. Second, assumptions about efficiency and fuel shares are used to estimate substitution-fuel use and oil displacement. Third, changes in emissions of carbon monoxide, non-methane hydrocarbons, nitrogen oxides, and carbon dioxide are computed.

Mintz, M.M.; Tompkins, M.M.; Camp, J.

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Advanced Test Reactor Core Modeling Update Project Annual Report for Fiscal Year 2012  

SciTech Connect

Legacy computational reactor physics software tools and protocols currently used for support of Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) core fuel management and safety assurance, and to some extent, experiment management, are inconsistent with the state of modern nuclear engineering practice, and are difficult, if not impossible, to properly verify and validate (V&V) according to modern standards. Furthermore, the legacy staff knowledge required for application of these tools and protocols from the 1960s and 1970s is rapidly being lost due to staff turnover and retirements. In late 2009, the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) initiated a focused effort, the ATR Core Modeling Update Project, to address this situation through the introduction of modern high-fidelity computational software and protocols. This aggressive computational and experimental campaign will have a broad strategic impact on the operation of the ATR, both in terms of improved computational efficiency and accuracy for support of ongoing DOE programs as well as in terms of national and international recognition of the ATR National Scientific User Facility (NSUF). The ATR Core Modeling Update Project, targeted for full implementation in phase with the next anticipated ATR Core Internals Changeout (CIC) in the 2014-2015 time frame, began during the last quarter of Fiscal Year 2009, and has just completed its third full year. Key accomplishments so far have encompassed both computational as well as experimental work. A new suite of stochastic and deterministic transport theory based reactor physics codes and their supporting nuclear data libraries (HELIOS, KENO6/SCALE, NEWT/SCALE, ATTILA, and an extended implementation of MCNP5) has been installed at the INL under various licensing arrangements. Corresponding models of the ATR and ATRC are now operational with all five codes, demonstrating the basic feasibility of the new code packages for their intended purpose. Of particular importance, a set of as-run core depletion HELIOS calculations for all ATR cycles since August 2009, Cycle 145A through Cycle 151B, was successfully completed during 2012. This major effort supported a decision late in the year to proceed with the phased incorporation of the HELIOS methodology into the ATR Core Safety Analysis Package (CSAP) preparation process, in parallel with the established PDQ-based methodology, beginning late in Fiscal Year 2012. Acquisition of the advanced SERPENT (VTT-Finland) and MC21 (DOE-NR) Monte Carlo stochastic neutronics simulation codes was also initiated during the year and some initial applications of SERPENT to ATRC experiment analysis were demonstrated. These two new codes will offer significant additional capability, including the possibility of full-3D Monte Carlo fuel management support capabilities for the ATR at some point in the future. Finally, a capability for rigorous sensitivity analysis and uncertainty quantification based on the TSUNAMI system has been implemented and initial computational results have been obtained. This capability will have many applications as a tool for understanding the margins of uncertainty in the new models as well as for validation experiment design and interpretation.

David W. Nigg, Principal Investigator; Kevin A. Steuhm, Project Manager

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Advanced Test Reactor Core Modeling Update Project Annual Report for Fiscal Year 2010  

SciTech Connect

Legacy computational reactor physics software tools and protocols currently used for support of Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) core fuel management and safety assurance and, to some extent, experiment management are obsolete, inconsistent with the state of modern nuclear engineering practice, and are becoming increasingly difficult to properly verify and validate (V&V). Furthermore, the legacy staff knowledge required for application of these tools and protocols from the 1960s and 1970s is rapidly being lost due to staff turnover and retirements. In 2009 the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) initiated a focused effort to address this situation through the introduction of modern high-fidelity computational software and protocols, with appropriate V&V, within the next 3-4 years via the ATR Core Modeling and Simulation and V&V Update (or “Core Modeling Update”) Project. This aggressive computational and experimental campaign will have a broad strategic impact on the operation of the ATR, both in terms of improved computational efficiency and accuracy for support of ongoing DOE programs as well as in terms of national and international recognition of the ATR National Scientific User Facility (NSUF).

Rahmat Aryaeinejad; Douglas S. Crawford; Mark D. DeHart; George W. Griffith; D. Scott Lucas; Joseph W. Nielsen; David W. Nigg; James R. Parry; Jorge Navarro

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

A Diagnostic Study of Recurrent Meteorological Anomalies Appearing in a 15-Year Simulation with a GFDL General Circulation Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The spatial structure and temporal characteristics of prominent anomalies occurring in a 15-year simulation with a GFDL spectral general circulation model are examined using empirical orthogonal functions, teleconnection patterns, composite ...

Ngar-Cheung Lau

1981-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Abstract--We present new approaches for building yearly and seasonal models for 5-minute ahead electricity load  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

electricity load forecasting. They are evaluated using two full years of Australian electricity load data. We first analyze the cyclic nature of the electricity load and show that the autocorrelation function to building a single yearly model. I. INTRODUCTION PREDICTING the future electricity demand, also called

Koprinska, Irena

269

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Energy Consumption by Sector Energy Consumption by Sector Transportation The AEO2011 Reference case does not include the proposed fuel economy standards for heavy-duty vehicles provided in The Proposed Rule for Greenhouse Gas Emissions Standards and Fuel Efficiency Standards for Medium- and Heavy-Duty Engines and Vehicles, published by the EPA and the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) in November 2010, nor does it include increases in fuel economy standards for light-duty vehicles, as outlined in the September 2010 EPA/NHTSA Notice of Upcoming Joint Rulemaking to Establish 2017 and Later Model Year Light-Duty Vehicle Greenhouse Gas Emissions and Corporate Average Fuel Economy (CAFE) Standards because the specifi cs of the new standards are not yet available. Figure DataAEO2011 assumes the adoption of CAFE standards for light-duty

270

Comparison of GCM and Energy Balance Model Simulations of Seasonal Temperature Changes over the Past 18 000 Years  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Sensitivity of a linear two dimensional Energy Balance Model (EBM) to altered surface albedo and insolation over the last 18 000 years is compared to simulators made with the NCAR Community Climate Model (CCM). The two-dimensional EBM is a ...

William T. Hyde; Thomas J. Crowley; Kwang-Yul Kim; Gerald R. North

1989-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Model year 2010 (Gen 3) Toyota Prius level 1 testing report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

As a part of the US Department of Energy's Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity (AVTA), a model year 2010 Toyota Prius (Generation 3) was procured by eTec (Phoenix, AZ) and sent to ANL's Advanced Powertrain Research Facility for the purposes of 'Level 1' testing in support of the Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity (AVTA). Data was acquired during testing using non-intrusive sensors, vehicle network connection, and facilities equipment (emissions and dynamometer data). Standard drive cycles, performance cycles, steady-state cycles and A/C usage cycles were conducted. Much of this data is openly available for download in ANL's Downloadable Dynamometer Database (D{sup 3}). The major results are shown here in this report. Given the preliminary nature of this assessment, the majority of the testing was done over standard regulatory cycles and seeks to obtain a general overview of how the vehicle performs. These cycles include the US FTP cycle (Urban) and Highway Fuel Economy Test cycle as well as the US06, a more aggressive supplemental regulatory cycle. Data collection for this testing was kept at a fairly high level and includes emissions and fuel measurements from the exhaust emissions bench, high-voltage and accessory current and voltage from a DC power analyzer, and minimal CAN bus data such as engine speed and pedal position. The following sections will seek to explain some of the basic operating characteristics of the MY2010 Prius over standard regulatory cycles.

Rask, E.; Duoba, M.; Lohse-Busch, H.; Bocci, D.; Energy Systems

2010-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

272

Macro-System Model: A Federated Object Model for Cross-Cutting Analysis of Hydrogen Production, Delivery, Consumption and Associated Emissions; Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

It is commonly accepted that the introduction of hydrogen as an energy carrier for light-duty vehicles involves concomitant technological development of infrastructure elements, such as production, delivery, and consumption, all associated with certain emission levels. To analyze these at a system level, the suite of corresponding models developed by the United States Department of Energy and involving several national laboratories is combined in one macro-system model (MSM). The macro-system model is being developed as a cross-cutting analysis tool that combines a set of hydrogen technology analysis models. Within the MSM, a federated simulation framework is used for consistent data transfer between the component models. The framework is built to suit cross-model as well as cross-platform data exchange and involves features of 'over-the-net' computation.

Ruth, M.; Diakov, V.; Goldsby, M. E.; Sa, T. J.

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Macro-System Model: A Federated Object Model for Cross-Cutting Analysis of Hydrogen Production, Delivery, Consumption and Associated Emissions  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The introduction of hydrogen as an energy carrier for light-duty vehicles involves concomitant technological progress in several directions, such as production, delivery, consumption, and related emissions. To analyze each of these, a suite of corresponding models have been developed by the DOE, involving inputs from several national laboratories. The macro-system model is being developed as a cross-cutting analysis tool which combines a set of hydrogen technology analysis models. Within the macro-system model (MSM), federated simulation framework used for consistent data transfer between the component models. The framework is built to suit cross-model as well as cross-platform data exchange and will involve features of 'over-the-net' computation.

Ruth, M.; Diakov, V.; Goldsby, M. E.; Sa, T. J.

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Market Acceptance of Advanced Automotive Technologies Model (MA3T) Consumer  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Market Acceptance of Advanced Automotive Technologies Model (MA3T) Consumer Market Acceptance of Advanced Automotive Technologies Model (MA3T) Consumer Choice Model Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Market Acceptance of Advanced Automotive Technologies Model (MA3T) Consumer Choice Model Agency/Company /Organization: Oak Ridge National Laboratory OpenEI Keyword(s): EERE tool, Market Acceptance of Advanced Automotive Technologies Model (MA3T) Consumer Choice Model, MA3T Project U.S. consumer demand for plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEV) in competition among various light-duty vehicle technologies for hundreds of market segments based and multiple regions. For more information, contact the ORNL Energy and Transportation Science Division at http://www.ornl.gov/sci/ees/etsd/contactus.shtml References Retrieved from

275

Clean Cities 2011 Vehicle Buyer's Guide  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The 2011 Clean Cities Light-Duty Vehicle Buyer's Guide is a consumer publication that provides a comprehensive list of commercially available alternative fuel and advanced vehicles in model year 2011. The guide allows for side-by-side comparisons of fuel economy, price, emissions, and vehicle specifications.

Not Available

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Search for Model Year 2001 Vehicles by Fuel or Vehicle Type  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

(Propane) Compressed Natural Gas Vehicles Diesel Vehicles Electric Vehicles Flex-Fuel (E85) Vehicles Hybrid Vehicles Search by Make Search by Model Search by EPA Size Class...

277

Search for Model Year 2004 Vehicles by Fuel or Vehicle Type  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Vehicles Bifuel (Propane) Compressed Natural Gas Vehicles Diesel Vehicles Flex-Fuel (E85) Vehicles Hybrid Vehicles Search by Make Search by Model Search by EPA Size Class...

278

Search for Model Year 2008 Vehicles by Fuel or Vehicle Type  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Class... Compressed Natural Gas Vehicles Diesel Vehicles Electric Vehicles Flex-Fuel (E85) Vehicles Hybrid Vehicles Search by Make Search by Model Search by EPA Size Class...

279

Search for Model Year 2003 Vehicles by Fuel or Vehicle Type  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

(Propane) Compressed Natural Gas Vehicles Diesel Vehicles Electric Vehicles Flex-Fuel (E85) Vehicles Hybrid Vehicles Search by Make Search by Model Search by EPA Size Class...

280

Search for Model Year 2002 Vehicles by Fuel or Vehicle Type  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

(Propane) Compressed Natural Gas Vehicles Diesel Vehicles Electric Vehicles Flex-Fuel (E85) Vehicles Hybrid Vehicles Search by Make Search by Model Search by EPA Size Class...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "model year light-duty" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Search for Model Year 2000 Vehicles by Fuel or Vehicle Type  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Vehicles Compressed Natural Gas Vehicles Diesel Vehicles Electric Vehicles Flex-Fuel (E85) Vehicles Hybrid Vehicles Search by Make Search by Model Search by EPA Size Class...

282

18-Year Land-Surface Hydrology Model Simulations for a Midlatitude Grassland Catchment in Valdai, Russia  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Off-line simulations of improved bucket hydrology and Simplified Simple Biosphere (SSiB) models are performed for a grassland vegetation catchment region, located at the Valdai water-balance research station in Russia, forced by observed ...

C. Adam Schlosser; Alan Robock; Konstantin Ya Vinnikov; Nina A. Speranskaya; Yongkang Xue

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Search for Model Year 2013 Vehicles by Fuel or Vehicle Type  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Class... Compressed Natural Gas Vehicles Diesel Vehicles Electric Vehicles Flex-Fuel (E85) Vehicles Hybrid Vehicles Plug-in Hybrid Vehicles Search by Make Search by Model Search...

284

Search for Model Year 2012 Vehicles by Fuel or Vehicle Type  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Class... Compressed Natural Gas Vehicles Diesel Vehicles Electric Vehicles Flex-Fuel (E85) Vehicles Hybrid Vehicles Plug-in Hybrid Vehicles Search by Make Search by Model Search...

285

Search for Model Year 2011 Vehicles by Fuel or Vehicle Type  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Class... Compressed Natural Gas Vehicles Diesel Vehicles Electric Vehicles Flex-Fuel (E85) Vehicles Hybrid Vehicles Plug-in Hybrid Vehicles Search by Make Search by Model Search...

286

Two-Year Simulation of the Great Lakes Region with a Coupled Modeling System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, we report on an experiment aimed at evaluating the feasibility of the application of our coupled regional climate modeling system to long-term climate simulations over the Great Lakes region. The simulation analyzed covers a ...

Gary T. Bates; Steven W. Hostetler; Filippo Giorgi

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Model Output Statistics Forecasts: Three Years of Operational Experience in the Netherlands  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the Netherlands, one to five day Model Output Statistics (MOS) forecasts have been used operationally since November 1983. The weather elements predicted are the probability of precipitation, the conditional probability of frozen precipitation,...

C. Lemcke; S. Kruizinga

1988-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

The Market Acceptance of Advanced Automotive Technologies (MA3T) Model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to be learned about how consumers will evaluate novel vehicle technologies, such as plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEV), extended-range electric vehicle (EREV), battery electric vehicles (BEV) and fuel cell-- passenger cars and light-duty trucks. MA3 T considers the U.S. household users of light- duty vehicles (LDV

289

Unified Modeling and Prediction of Weather and Climate: A 25-Year Journey  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In recent years there has been a growing appreciation of the potential advantages of using a seamless approach to weather and climate prediction. However, what exactly should this mean in practice? To help address this question, we document some of the ...

Andrew Brown; Sean Milton; Mike Cullen; Brian Golding; John Mitchell; Ann Shelly

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Modeling the Office of Science Ten Year Facilities Plan: The PERI Architecture Tiger Team  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Inside this issue: 350: An Interna- tional Day of Cli- mate Change 1-3 Fall 2009 Energy Campaign 4 visit: www.350.org #12;Fall 2009 Energy Campaign Page 4 Sustainability Bulletin This year's Energy. Then you can turn them all off with one switch and eliminate vampire power*. 4. Learn how to put your

Marin, Gabriel

291

Modeling the Office of Science ten year facilities plan: The PERI Architecture Tiger Team  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Inside this issue: 350: An Interna- tional Day of Cli- mate Change 1-3 Fall 2009 Energy Campaign 4 visit: www.350.org #12;Fall 2009 Energy Campaign Page 4 Sustainability Bulletin This year's Energy. Then you can turn them all off with one switch and eliminate vampire power*. 4. Learn how to put your

Snavely, Allan

292

Black liquor combustion validated recovery boiler modeling: Final year report. Volume 5 (Appendix V)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This project was initiated in October 1990, with the objective of developing and validating a new computer model of a recovery boiler furnace using a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code specifically tailored to the requirements for solving recovery boiler flows, and using improved submodels for black liquor combustion based on continued laboratory fundamental studies. The key tasks to be accomplished were as follows: (1) Complete the development of enhanced furnace models that have the capability to accurately predict carryover, emissions behavior, dust concentrations, gas temperatures, and wall heat fluxes. (2) Validate the enhanced furnace models, so that users can have confidence in the predicted results. (3) Obtain fundamental information on aerosol formation, deposition, and hardening so as to develop the knowledge base needed to relate furnace model outputs to plugging and fouling in the convective sections of the boiler. (4) Facilitate the transfer of codes, black liquid submodels, and fundamental knowledge to the US kraft pulp industry. Volume 5 contains model validation simulations and comparison with data.

Grace, T.M.; Frederick, W.J.; Salcudean, M.; Wessel, R.A.

1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Solid waste integrated cost analysis model: 1991 project year report. Part 2  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of the City of Houston`s 1991 Solid Waste Integrated Cost Analysis Model (SWICAM) project was to continue the development of a computerized cost analysis model. This model is to provide solid waste managers with tool to evaluate the dollar cost of real or hypothetical solid waste management choices. Those choices have become complicated by the implementation of Subtitle D of the Resources Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) and the EPA`s Integrated Approach to managing municipal solid waste;. that is, minimize generation, maximize recycling, reduce volume (incinerate), and then bury (landfill) only the remainder. Implementation of an integrated solid waste management system involving all or some of the options of recycling, waste to energy, composting, and landfilling is extremely complicated. Factors such as hauling distances, markets, and prices for recyclable, costs and benefits of transfer stations, and material recovery facilities must all be considered. A jurisdiction must determine the cost impacts of implementing a number of various possibilities for managing, handling, processing, and disposing of waste. SWICAM employs a single Lotus 123 spreadsheet to enable a jurisdiction to predict or assess the costs of its waste management system. It allows the user to select his own process flow for waste material and to manipulate the model to include as few or as many options as he or she chooses. The model will calculate the estimated cost for those choices selected. The user can then change the model to include or exclude waste stream components, until the mix of choices suits the user. Graphs can be produced as a visual communication aid in presenting the results of the cost analysis. SWICAM also allows future cost projections to be made.

Not Available

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

294

Black liquor combustion validated recovery boiler modeling: Final year report. Volume 4 (Appendix IV)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This project was initiated in October 1990, with the objective of developing and validating a new computer model of a recovery boiler furnace using a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code specifically tailored to the requirements for solving recovery boiler flows, and using improved submodels for black liquor combustion based on continued laboratory fundamental studies. The key tasks to be accomplished were as follows: (1) Complete the development of enhanced furnace models that have the capability to accurately predict carryover, emissions behavior, dust concentrations, gas temperatures, and wall heat fluxes. (2) Validate the enhanced furnace models, so that users can have confidence in the predicted results. (3) Obtain fundamental information on aerosol formation, deposition, and hardening so as to develop the knowledge base needed to relate furnace model outputs to plugging and fouling in the convective sections of the boiler. (4) Facilitate the transfer of codes, black liquid submodels, and fundamental knowledge to the US kraft pulp industry. Volume 4 contains the following appendix sections: Radiative heat transfer properties for black liquor combustion -- Facilities and techniques and Spectral absorbance and emittance data; and Radiate heat transfer determination of the optical constants of ash samples from kraft recovery boilers -- Calculation procedure; Computation program; Density determination; Particle diameter determination; Optical constant data; and Uncertainty analysis.

Grace, T.M.; Frederick, W.J.; Salcudean, M.; Wessel, R.A.

1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Modeling Wet Snow Accretion on Power Lines: Improvements to Previous Methods Using 50 Years of Observations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Methods to model wet snow accretion on structures are developed and improved, based on unique records of wet snow icing events as well as large datasets of observed and simulated weather. Hundreds of observed wet snow icing events are logged in ...

Bjørn Egil Kringlebotn Nygaard; Hálfdán Ágústsson; Katalin Somfalvi-Tóth

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Modeling Wet Snow Accretion on Power Lines: Improvements to Previous Methods Using 50 Years of Observations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Methods to model wet snow accretion on structures are developed and improved, based on unique records of wet snow icing events as well as large datasets of observed and simulated weather. Hundreds of observed wet snow icing events are logged in ...

Bjørn Egil Kringlebotn Nygaard; Hálfdán Ágústsson; Katalin Somfalvi-Tóth

297

APBF-DEC NOx Adsorber/DPF Project: SUV / Pick-up Truck Platform  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this project is to determine the influence of diesel fuel composition on the ability of NOX adsorber catalyst (NAC) technology, in conjunction with diesel particle filters (DPFs), to achieve stringent emissions levels with a minimal fuel economy impact. The test bed for this project was intended to be a light-duty sport utility vehicle (SUV) with a goal of achieving light-duty Tier 2-Bin 5 tail pipe emission levels (0.07 g/mi. NOX and 0.01 g/mi. PM). However, with the current US market share of light-duty diesel applications being so low, no US 2002 model year (MY) light-duty truck (LDT) or SUV platforms equipped with a diesel engine and having a gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) less than 8500 lb exist. While the current level of diesel engine use is relatively small in the light-duty class, there exists considerable potential for the diesel engine to gain a much larger market share in the future as manufacturers of heavy light-duty trucks (HLDTs) attempt to offset the negative impact on cooperate average fuel economy (CAFE) that the recent rise in market share of the SUVs and LDTs has caused. The US EPA Tier 2 emission standards also contain regulation to prevent the migration of heavy light-duty trucks and SUV's to the medium duty class. This preventive measure requires that all medium duty trucks, SUV's and vans in the 8,500 to 10,000 lb GVWR range being used as passenger vehicles, meet light-duty Tier 2 standards. In meeting the Tier 2 emission standards, the HLDTs and medium-duty passenger vehicles (MDPVs) will face the greatest technological challenges. Because the MDPV is the closest weight class and application relative to the potential upcoming HLDTs and SUV's, a weight class compromise was made in this program to allow the examination of using a diesel engine with a NAC-DPF system on a 2002 production vehicle. The test bed for this project is a 2500 series Chevrolet Silverado equipped with a 6.6L Duramax diesel engine certified to 2002 MY Federal heavy-duty and 2002 MY California medium-duty emission standards. The stock vehicle included cooled air charge (CAC), turbocharger (TC), direct fuel injection (DFI), oxidation catalyst (OC), and exhaust gas recirculation (EGR)

Webb, C; Weber, P; Thornton,M

2003-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

298

Advanced Test Reactor Core Modeling Update Project Annual Report for Fiscal Year 2013  

SciTech Connect

Legacy computational reactor physics software tools and protocols currently used for support of Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) core fuel management and safety assurance, and to some extent, experiment management, are inconsistent with the state of modern nuclear engineering practice, and are difficult, if not impossible, to verify and validate (V&V) according to modern standards. Furthermore, the legacy staff knowledge required for effective application of these tools and protocols from the 1960s and 1970s is rapidly being lost due to staff turnover and retirements. In late 2009, the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) initiated a focused effort, the ATR Core Modeling Update Project, to address this situation through the introduction of modern high-fidelity computational software and protocols. This aggressive computational and experimental campaign will have a broad strategic impact on the operation of the ATR, both in terms of improved computational efficiency and accuracy for support of ongoing DOE programs as well as in terms of national and international recognition of the ATR National Scientific User Facility (NSUF).

David W. Nigg

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Technology and Cost of the Model Year (MY) 2007 Toyota Camry HEV Final Report  

SciTech Connect

The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) provides research and development (R&D) support to the Department of Energy on issues related to the cost and performance of hybrid vehicles. ORNL frequently benchmarks its own research against commercially available hybrid components currently used in the market. In 2005 we completed a detailed review of the cost of the second generation Prius hybrid. This study examines the new 2007 Camry hybrid model for changes in technology and cost relative to the Prius. The work effort involved a detailed review of the Camry hybrid and the system control strategy to identify the hybrid components used in the drive train. Section 2 provides this review while Section 3 presents our detailed evaluation of the specific drive train components and their cost estimates. Section 3 also provides a summary of the total electrical drive train cost for the Camry hybrid vehicle and contrasts these estimates to the costs for the second generation Prius that we estimated in 2005. Most of the information on cost and performance were derived from meetings with the technical staff of Toyota, Nissan, and some key Tier I suppliers like Hitachi and Panasonic Electric Vehicle Energy (PEVE) and we thank these companies for their kind cooperation.

2007-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

300

Electric and Hybrid Vehicles Program 18th annual report to Congress for Fiscal Year 1994  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Department remains focused on the technologies that are critical to making electric and hybrid vehicles commercially viable and competitive with current production gasoline-fueled vehicles in performance, reliability, and affordability. During Fiscal Year 1994, significant progress was made toward fulfilling the intent of Congress. The Department and the United States Advanced Battery Consortium (a partnership of the three major domestic automobile manufacturers) continued to work together and to focus the efforts of battery developers on the battery technologies that are most likely to be commercialized in the near term. Progress was made in industry cost-shared contracts toward demonstrating the technical feasibility of fuel cells for passenger bus and light duty vehicle applications. Two industry teams which will develop hybrid vehicle propulsion technologies have been selected through competitive procurement and have initiated work, in Fiscal Year 1994. In addition, technical studies and program planning continue, as required by the Energy Policy Act of 1992, to achieve the goals of reducing the transportation sector dependence on imported oil, reducing the level of environmentally harmful emissions, and enhancing industrial productivity and competitiveness.

NONE

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "model year light-duty" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Impact of Canada's Voluntary Agreement on Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Light Duty Vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

variable displacement compressors. Conventional MAC systems have fixed speed compressors with a constant refrigerant flow

Lutsey, Nicholas P.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Impact of Canada’s Voluntary Agreement on Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Light Duty Vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

variable displacement compressors. Conventional MAC systems have fixed speed compressors with a constant refrigerant flow

Lutsey, Nicholas P.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Impact of Canada's Voluntary Agreement on Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Light Duty Vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Tasks Across Engine and Aftertreatment Systems. ” Society ofaftertreatment catalyst systems together with engineengine control and design as well as improved aftertreatment

Lutsey, Nicholas P.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Impact of Canada’s Voluntary Agreement on Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Light Duty Vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Tasks Across Engine and Aftertreatment Systems. ” Society ofaftertreatment catalyst systems together with engineengine control and design as well as improved aftertreatment

Lutsey, Nicholas P.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Ohio's First Ethanol-Fueled Light-Duty Fleet: Final Study Results  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In 1996, the State of Ohio established a project to demonstrate the use of an ethanol blend transportation fuel in flexible-fuel vehicles. This report presents the data collection and analysis from this project, with particular focus on vehicle performance, cost of operation and limited emissions testing.

Whalen, P.; Poole, L.; Howard, R.

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

306

Resource Assessment and Land Use Change Light Duty Vehicles/Fuels  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to farmgate or forest roadside (not transportation or conversion) · Exogenous targets for biofuel production emissions related to biofuels ­ Emissions can be reduced by including a broad set of incentives targeting · Resource assessment and indirect land use change 2 #12;Increasing Feedstock Production for Biofuels

307

INL Update: The EV Project and Other Light-Duty Electric Drive...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

summary and future * Other ARRA and TADA data collection activities * DC Fast Charge battery impacts g y p * EVSE, DC FC and wireless activities * Vehicle Mass impacts on fuel...

308

Evaluation of aftermarket CNG conversion kits in light-duty vehicle applications. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Institute of Gas Technology (IGT) was contracted by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to evaluate three compressed natural gas (CNG) conversion systems using a 1993 Chevrolet Lumina baseline vehicle. A fourth conversion system was added to the test matrix through funding support from Brooklyn Union. The objective of this project was to measure the Federal Test Procedure (FTP) emissions and fuel economy of the different conversion systems, and to compare the performance to gasoline-fueled operation and each other. Different natural gas compositions were selected to represent the 10th percentile, mean, and 90th percentile compositions distributed in the Continental United States. Testing with these different compositions demonstrated the systems` ability to accommodate the spectrum of gas found in the United States. Each compressed natural gas conversion system was installed and adjusted according to the manufacturer`s instructions. In addition to the FTP testing, an evaluation of the comparative installation times and derivability tests (based on AGA and CRC guidelines) were conducted on each system.

Blazek, C.F.; Rowley, P.F.; Grimes, J.W. [Institute of Gas Technology, Chicago, IL (United States)

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Myths Regarding Alternative Fuel Vehicle Demand by Light-Duty Vehicle Fleets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

concern was the notion that CNG tanks would explode ifCA) did not have concerns about CNG tank integrity, and were

Nesbitt, Kevin; Sperling, Daniel

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Ohio's First Ethanol-Fueled Light-Duty Fleet: Final Study Results  

SciTech Connect

In 1996, the State of Ohio established a project to demonstrate the use of an ethanol blend transportation fuel in flexible-fuel vehicles. This report presents the data collection and analysis from this project, with particular focus on vehicle performance, cost of operation and limited emissions testing.

Whalen, P.; Poole, L.; Howard, R.

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

311

How Much Could You Save by Idling Your Light-Duty Vehicle Less...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Idling Fuel Costs How much does How many miles Preventive an oil change cost? between oil changes? "Miles of Idling" Maintenance Costs How much does How many miles a new...

312

Myths Regarding Alternative Fuel Vehicle Demand by Light-Duty Vehicle Fleets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

unlikely). For electric vehicles the primary safety concernsand safety issues of nickel metal-hydride batteries for electric vehicles.

Nesbitt, Kevin; Sperling, Daniel

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Myths Regarding Alternative Fuel Vehicle Demand by Light-Duty Vehicle Fleets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

unlikely). For electric vehicles the primary safety concernsand safety issues of mckel C M metal-hydride batteries for electric vehicles

Nesbitt, Kevin; Sperling, Daniel

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Effect of E85 on Tailpipe Emissions from Light-Duty Vehicles  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

E85, which consists of nominally 85% fuel grade ethanol and 15% gasoline, must be used in flexible-fuel (or 'flexfuel') vehicles (FFVs) that can operate on fuel with an ethanol content of 0-85%. Published studies include measurements of the effect of E85 on tailpipe emissions for Tier 1 and older vehicles. Car manufacturers have also supplied a large body of FFV certification data to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, primarily on Tier 2 vehicles. These studies and certification data reveal wide variability in the effects of E85 on emissions from different vehicles. Comparing Tier 1 FFVs running on E85 to similar non-FFVs running on gasoline showed, on average, significant reductions in emissions of oxides of nitrogen (NOx; 54%), non-methane hydrocarbons (NMHCs; 27%), and carbon monoxide (CO; 18%) for E85. Comparing Tier 2 FFVs running on E85 and comparable non-FFVs running on gasoline shows, for E85 on average, a significant reduction in emissions of CO (20%), and no significant effect on emissions of non-methane organic gases (NMOGs). NOx emissions from Tier 2 FFVs averaged approximately 28% less than comparable non-FFVs. However, perhaps because of the wide range of Tier 2 NOx standards, the absolute difference in NOx emissions between Tier 2 FFVs and non-FFVs is not significant (P 0.28). It is interesting that Tier 2 FFVs operating on gasoline produced approximately 13% less NMOGs than non-FFVs operating on gasoline. The data for Tier 1 vehicles show that E85 will cause significant reductions in emissions of benzene and butadiene, and significant increases in emissions of formaldehyde and acetaldehyde, in comparison to emissions from gasoline in both FFVs and non-FFVs. The compound that makes up the largest proportion of organic emissions from E85-fueled FFVs is ethanol.

Yanowitz, J.; McCormick, R. L.

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

DOE AVTA: The EV Project and Other Light-Duty Electric Drive...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Committee on Overcoming Barriers to Electric Vehicle Deployment The National Academies, Washington, DC , g , October 29, 2012 This presentation does not contain any proprietary...

316

Impacts of Biodiesel Fuel Blends Oil Dilution on Light-Duty Diesel Engine Operation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Assesses oil dilution impacts on a diesel engine operating with a diesel particle filter, NOx storage, a selective catalytic reduction emission control system, and a soy-based 20% biodiesel fuel blend.

Thornton, M. J.; Alleman, T. L.; Luecke, J.; McCormick, R. L.

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Light-Duty Vehicle Exhaust Emission Control Cost Estimates Using a Part-Pricing Approach  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

9. D. Jones, "Development Cost Estimates for Fuel Economy ofExhaust Emission Control Cost Estimates Using a Part-PricingExhaust Emission Control Cost Estimates Using a Part-Pricing

Wang, Quanlu; Kling, Catherine; Sperling, Daniel

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Increasing the Fuel Economy and Safety of New Light-Duty Vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

drivers. They let the vehicle manufacturers off the hook. Weon their website. Vehicle manufacturers have striven toand manufacturers to see them incorporated in new vehicles.

Wenzel, Tom; Ross, Marc

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Impact of Canada's Voluntary Agreement on Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Light Duty Vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

April 5. Canadian Vehicle Manufacturers Association (CVMA),equivalent Canadian Vehicle Manufacturers’ Associationof the Canadian Vehicle Manufacturers’ Association, Joe

Lutsey, Nicholas P.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Impact of Canada’s Voluntary Agreement on Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Light Duty Vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

April 5. Canadian Vehicle Manufacturers Association (CVMA),equivalent Canadian Vehicle Manufacturers’ Associationof the Canadian Vehicle Manufacturers’ Association, Joe

Lutsey, Nicholas P.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "model year light-duty" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Electric powertrains : opportunities and challenges in the US light-duty vehicle fleet  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Managing impending environmental and energy challenges in the transport sector requires a dramatic reduction in both the petroleum consumption and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions of in-use vehicles. This study quantifies ...

Kromer, Matthew A

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Assessing the fuel Use and greenhouse gas emissions of future light-duty vehicles in Japan  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Reducing greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions is of great concern in Japan, as well as elsewhere, such as in the U.S. and EU. More than 20% of GHG emissions in Japan come from the transportation sector, and a more than 70% ...

Nishimura, Eriko

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Impact of Canada's Voluntary Agreement on Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Light Duty Vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the Effects of Air Conditioning Operation and AssociatedSystem for Mobile Air Conditioning. ” Society of Automotiveof R-134a Automotive Air Conditioning System. ” Society of

Lutsey, Nicholas P.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Impact of Canada’s Voluntary Agreement on Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Light Duty Vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the Effects of Air Conditioning Operation and AssociatedSystem for Mobile Air Conditioning. ” Society of Automotiveof R-134a Automotive Air Conditioning System. ” Society of

Lutsey, Nicholas P.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Ohio's First Ethanol-Fueled Light-Duty Fleet: Summary of Final...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

using study vehicles Council of Great Lakes Governors Public Utilities Commission of Ohio, Biomass Energy Program U.S. Department of Energy Battelle (under contract to NREL...

326

Hydrogen Storage Options: Technologies and Comparisons for Light-Duty Vehicle Applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in a hydrogen-fueled Prius by Texaco Ovonic (References 10-rates permitting the Prius to be tested on the Federal Urbanof the hydrogen-fueled Prius was about 150 miles. Higher

Burke, Andy; Gardiner, Monterey

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Soybean and Coconut Biodiesel Fuel Effects on Combustion Characteristics in a Light-Duty Diesel Engine  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study investigated the effects of soybean- and coconut-derived biodiesel fuels on combustion characteristics in a 1.7-liter direct injection, common rail diesel engine. Five sets of fuels were studied: 2007 ultra-low sulfur diesel (ULSD), 5% and 20% volumetric blends of soybean biodiesel with ULSD (soybean B5 and B20), and 5% and 20% volumetric blends of coconut biodiesel with ULSD (coconut B5 and B20). In conventional diesel combustion mode, particulate matter (PM) and nitrogen oxides (NO/dx) emissions were similar for all fuels studied except soybean B20. Soybean B20 produced the lowest PM but the highest NO/dx emissions. Compared with conventional diesel combustion mode, high efficiency clean combustion (HECC) mode, achieved by increased EGR and combustion phasing, significantly reduced both PM and NO/dx emissions for all fuels studied at the expense of higher hydrocarbon (HC) and carbon monoxide (CO) emissions and an increase in fuel consumption (less than 4%). ULSD, soybean B5, and coconut B5 showed no difference in exhaust emissions. However, PM emissions increased slightly for soybean B20 and coconut B20. NO/dx emissions increased significantly for soybean B20, while those for coconut B20 were comparable to ULSD. Differences in the chemical and physical properties of soybean and coconut biodiesel fuels compared with ULSD, such as higher fuel-borne oxygen, greater viscosity, and higher boiling temperatures, play a key role in combustion processes and, therefore, exhaust emissions. Furthermore, the highly unsaturated ester composition in soybean biodiesel can be another factor in the increase of NO/dx emissions.

Han, Manbae [ORNL; Cho, Kukwon [ORNL; Sluder, Scott [ORNL; Wagner, Robert M [ORNL

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Hydrogen Storage Options: Technologies and Comparisons for Light-Duty Vehicle Applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and 70 MPa (10 kpsi) in carbon fiber-composite tanks, liquidloss of strength. The carbon fiber is the highest cost

Burke, Andy; Gardiner, Monterey

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Hydrogen Storage Options: Technologies and Comparisons for Light-Duty Vehicle Applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

New Methods for the Storage of Hydrogen in Microspheres,15 th World Hydrogen Energy Conference, Yokohama, Japan,Uhlemann, M. , etals. , Hydrogen Storage in Different Carbon

Burke, Andy; Gardiner, Monterey

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Hydrogen Storage Options: Technologies and Comparisons for Light-Duty Vehicle Applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

B. , and Ovshinsky, S.R. , A Hydrogen ICE Vehicle Powered byM. , and Stetson, N. , Solid Hydrogen Storage Systems forpaper from Texaco Ovonic Hydrogen Systems, Rochester Hills,

Burke, Andrew; Gardnier, Monterey

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Hydrogen Storage Options: Technologies and Comparisons for Light-Duty Vehicle Applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Storage of Hydrogen in Microspheres, 15 th World Hydrogen Energyhydrogen in storage varies between the various energy storagethe energy storage characteristics of the various hydrogen

Burke, Andy; Gardiner, Monterey

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Hydrogen Storage Options: Technologies and Comparisons for Light-Duty Vehicle Applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

hydrogen in storage varies between the various energy storagethe energy storage characteristics of the various hydrogenthat the energy densities of hydrogen storage technologies

Burke, Andrew; Gardnier, Monterey

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Myths Regarding Alternative Fuel Vehicle Demand by Light-Duty Vehicle Fleets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

respondents beheve compressed natural gas vehicles are asbelieved that compressed natural gas vehlcles (CNGVs) werethat he converts compressed natural gas vehicles back to

Nesbitt, Kevin; Sperling, Daniel

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Myths Regarding Alternative Fuel Vehicle Demand by Light-Duty Vehicle Fleets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

respondents believe compressed natural gas vehicles are asrespondents believe compressed natural gas vehicles are lessbelieved that compressed natural gas vehicles (CNGVs) were

Nesbitt, Kevin; Sperling, Daniel

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Evaluation of aftermarket LPG conversion kits in light-duty vehicle applications. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

SwRI was contracted by NREL to evaluate three LPG conversion kits on a Chevrolet Lumina. The objective of the project was to measure the Federal Test Procedure (FTP) emissions and fuel economy of these kits, and compare their performance to gasoline-fueled operation and to each other. Varying LPG fuel blends allowed a preliminary look at the potential for fuel system disturbance. The project required kit installation and adjustment according to manufacturer`s instructions. A limited amount of trouble diagnosis was also performed on the fuel systems. A simultaneous contract from the Texas Railroad Commission, in cooperation with NREL, provided funds for additional testing with market fuels (HD5 propane and industry average gasoline) and hydrocarbon (HC) emissions speciation to determine the ozone-forming potential of LPG HC emissions. This report documents the procurement, installation, and testing of these LPG conversion kits.

Bass, E.A. [Southwest Research Inst., San Antonio, TX (US)] [Southwest Research Inst., San Antonio, TX (US)

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Mobility Chains Analysis of Technologies for Passenger Cars and Light-Duty Vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

biological processes, thermochemical processes, and steam and electricity generation. The Role of Biomass BOUNDARY Fuel pathways simulated in this study are divided into five stages: biomass farming; biomass it undergoes anaerobic and aerobic fermentation. In the thermochemical plant (TCP), biomass feedstock undergoes

Argonne National Laboratory

337

Impact of Canada's Voluntary Agreement on Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Light Duty Vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of grain-based corn ethanol and cellulosic ethanol intohas made today’s corn-derived ethanol a net GHG benefit. Onethat present corn-based ethanol production technology

Lutsey, Nicholas P.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Impact of Canada’s Voluntary Agreement on Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Light Duty Vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of grain-based corn ethanol and cellulosic ethanol intohas made today’s corn-derived ethanol a net GHG benefit. Onethat present corn-based ethanol production technology

Lutsey, Nicholas P.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Impact of Canada’s Voluntary Agreement on Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Light Duty Vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Technologies for Reducing Greenhouse Gas Emissions form RoadConsiders Copying California’s Greenhouse Gas Law. ” http://Regulations to Control Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Motor

Lutsey, Nicholas P.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Impact of Canada's Voluntary Agreement on Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Light Duty Vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Technologies for Reducing Greenhouse Gas Emissions form RoadConsiders Copying California’s Greenhouse Gas Law. ” http://Regulations to Control Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Motor

Lutsey, Nicholas P.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "model year light-duty" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Impact of Canada’s Voluntary Agreement on Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Light Duty Vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Canada. ANL/ESD/02-5, Argonne National Laboratory, U.S.Department of Energy. Argonne, Illinois. Schwarz, W. and J.and Greenhouse Gas Emissions. ” Argonne National Laboratory,

Lutsey, Nicholas P.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Impact of Canada's Voluntary Agreement on Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Light Duty Vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Canada. ANL/ESD/02-5, Argonne National Laboratory, U.S.Department of Energy. Argonne, Illinois. Schwarz, W. and J.and Greenhouse Gas Emissions. ” Argonne National Laboratory,

Lutsey, Nicholas P.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Hydrogen Storage Options: Technologies and Comparisons for Light-Duty Vehicle Applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

compared with the DOE goals in order to assess the presentcompared with the DOE goals in order to assess the present

Burke, Andrew; Gardnier, Monterey

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Drive cycle analysis of butanol/diesel blends in a light-duty vehicle.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The potential exists to displace a portion of the petroleum diesel demand with butanol and positively impact engine-out particulate matter. As a preliminary investigation, 20% and 40% by volume blends of butanol with ultra low sulfur diesel fuel were operated in a 1999 Mercedes Benz C220 turbo diesel vehicle (Euro III compliant). Cold and hot start urban as well as highway drive cycle tests were performed for the two blends of butanol and compared to diesel fuel. In addition, 35 MPH and 55 MPH steady-state tests were conducted under varying road loads for the two fuel blends. Exhaust gas emissions, fuel consumption, and intake and exhaust temperatures were acquired for each test condition. Filter smoke numbers were also acquired during the steady-state tests.

Miers, S. A.; Carlson, R. W.; McConnell, S. S.; Ng, H. K.; Wallner, T.; LeFeber, J.; Energy Systems; Esper Images Video & Multimedia

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Impacts of Oxygenated Gasoline Use on California Light-Duty Vehicle Emissions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Air Resources Board, Sacramento, CA, 1993. Received forAir Resources Board, Sacramento, CA. Personal communiciat/Resources Board, Sacramento, CA. Personal communiciation,

Kirchstetter, Thomas W.; Singer, Brett C.; Harley, Robert A.

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Modeling and Analysis of the Wind-Waves Field Variability in the Indian Ocean During 1998-2009 Years  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

To calculate the wind-waves in the Indian Ocean (IO), the wind field for the period from 1998 to 2009 was used, obtained from the NCEP/NOAA archive, and numerical model WAM (Cycle-4) was applied, modified by the new source function proposed in Polnikov (2005). Based on buoy data for the Indian Ocean, the fitting of the modified model WAM was done, which provides the win in accuracy of calculations on 35%, in comparison with the original model. All the further calculations of the wave fields in IO were made for these model settings. At the first stage, the analysis of the simulation results involves a) mapping the fields of the significant wave height and the wave energy , calculated with different scales of averaging in time T and space R; b) estimating the fields of seasonal, annual and long-term variability; and c) determining the 12-year trend of the annually averaged fields. The analysis was carried out taking into account the previously introduced zoning the ocean area, provided by the spatial inhomogen...

Polnikov, V G; Sannasiraj, S A; Sundar, V

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Jobs in Fuel Cell Technologies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Transportation applications, including light-duty vehicles, will also create many more job opportunities over the next 10 to 20 years. National energy security, environmental...

348

DOE Hydrogen Analysis Repository: Hydrogen Analysis Projects...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cell Vehicles Automotive System Cost Model (ASCM) B Biofuels in Light-Duty Vehicles Biogas Resources Characterization Biological Water-Gas Shift Biomass Gasification,...

349

Modelling of catalytic aftertreatment of NOx emissions using hydrocarbon as a reductant.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Hydrocarbon selective catalytic reduction (HC-SCR) is emerging as one of the most practical methods for the removal of nitrogen oxides (NOx) from light-duty-diesel engine exhaust… (more)

Sawatmongkhon, Boonlue

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Impact of emissions, chemistry, and climate on atmospheric carbon monoxide : 100-year predictions from a global chemistry-climate model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The possible trends for atmospheric carbon monoxide in the next 100 yr have been illustrated using a coupled atmospheric chemistry and climate model driven by emissions predicted by a global economic development model. ...

Wang, Chien.; Prinn, Ronald G.

351

The Meteorological Model BOLAM at the National Observatory of Athens: Assessment of Two-Year Operational Use  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Since November 1999, the hydrostatic meteorological Bologna Limited-Area Model (BOLAM) has been running operationally at the National Observatory of Athens. The assessment of the model forecast skill during the 2-yr period included (a) ...

K. Lagouvardos; V. Kotroni; A. Koussis; H. Feidas; A. Buzzi; P. Malguzzi

2003-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

New Vehicle Fuel Economy Standards Will Continue to Inspire Innovation |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Vehicle Fuel Economy Standards Will Continue to Inspire Vehicle Fuel Economy Standards Will Continue to Inspire Innovation New Vehicle Fuel Economy Standards Will Continue to Inspire Innovation July 29, 2011 - 1:48pm Addthis President Barack Obama delivers remarks on fuel efficiency standards for 2017-2025 model year cars and light-duty trucks during an event at the Washington Convention Center in Washington, D.C., July 29, 2011. Seated behind the President are at left are auto industry executives and Transportation Secretary Ray LaHood. (Official White House Photo by Samantha Appleton) President Barack Obama delivers remarks on fuel efficiency standards for 2017-2025 model year cars and light-duty trucks during an event at the Washington Convention Center in Washington, D.C., July 29, 2011. Seated behind the President are at left are auto industry executives and

353

Annual Energy Outlook 2009 with Projections to 2030-Graphic Data  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Annual Energy Outlook 2009 with Projections to 2030 Annual Energy Outlook 2009 with Projections to 2030 Annual Energy Outlook 2009 with Projections to 2030 Graphic Data Figure 1. Total liquid fuels demand by sector Figure 1 Data Figure 2. Total natural gas supply by source Figure 2 Data Figure 3. New light-duty vehicle sales shares by type Figure 3 Data Figure 4. Proposed CAFE standards for passenger cars by vehicle footprint, model years 2011-2015 Figure 4 Data Figure 5. Proposed CAFE standards for light trucks by vehicle footprint, model years 2011-2015 Figure 5 Data Figure 6. Average fuel economy of new light-duty vehicles in the AEO2008 and AEO2009 projections, 1995-2030 Figure 6 Data Figure 7. Value of fuel saved by a PHEV compared with a conventional ICE vehicle over the life of the vehicles, by gasoline price and PHEV all-electric driving range

354

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - Sector  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Issues in focus Issues in focus Table 4. Key analyses from "Issues in focus" in recent AEOs AEO2012 AEO2011 AEO2010 Potential efficiency improvements and their impacts on end-use energy demand Increasing light-duty vehicle greenhouse gas and fuel economy standards for model years 2017 to 2025 Energy intensity trends in AEO2010 Energy impacts of proposed CAFE standards for light-duty vehicles, model years 2017 to 2025 Fuel consumption and greenhouse gas emissions standards for heavy-duty vehicles Natural gas as a fuel for heavy trucks: issues and incentives Impacts of a breakthrough in battery vehicle technology Potential efficiency improvements in alternative cases for appliance standards and building codes Factors affecting the relationship between crude oil and natural gas prices

355

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - Sector  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4. Key analyses from "Issues in focus" in recent AEOs 4. Key analyses from "Issues in focus" in recent AEOs AEO2012 AEO2011 AEO2010 Potential efficiency improvements and their impacts on end-use energy demand Increasing light-duty vehicle greenhouse gas and fuel economy standards for model years 2017 to 2025 Energy intensity trends in AEO2010 Energy impacts of proposed CAFE standards for light-duty vehicles, model years 2017 to 2025 Fuel consumption and greenhouse gas emissions standards for heavy-duty vehicles Natural gas as a fuel for heavy trucks: issues and incentives Impacts of a breakthrough in battery vehicle technology Potential efficiency improvements in alternative cases for appliance standards and building codes Factors affecting the relationship between crude oil and natural gas prices

356

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - Pub  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Legislation AEO 2011 Legislation and regulations Legislation AEO 2011 Legislation and regulations Introduction 1. Greenhouse gas emissions and corporate average fuel economy standards for 2017 and later model year light-duty vehicles On October 15, 2012, EPA and the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) jointly issued a final rule for tailpipe emissions of carbon dioxide (CO2) and CAFE standards for light-duty vehicles, model years 2017 and beyond [16]... 2. Recent rulings on the Cross-State Air Pollution Rule and the Clean Air Interstate Rule On August 21, 2012, the United States Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit announced its intent to vacate CSAPR, which it had stayed from going into effect earlier in 2012... 3. Nuclear waste disposal and the Waste Confidence Rule

357

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - Pub  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Legislation AEO 2011 Legislation and regulations Legislation AEO 2011 Legislation and regulations Introduction 1. Greenhouse gas emissions and corporate average fuel economy standards for 2017 and later model year light-duty vehicles On October 15, 2012, EPA and the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) jointly issued a final rule for tailpipe emissions of carbon dioxide (CO2) and CAFE standards for light-duty vehicles, model years 2017 and beyond [16]... 2. Recent rulings on the Cross-State Air Pollution Rule and the Clean Air Interstate Rule On August 21, 2012, the United States Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit announced its intent to vacate CSAPR, which it had stayed from going into effect earlier in 2012... 3. Nuclear waste disposal and the Waste Confidence Rule

358

The Hydrogen Infrastructure Transition (HIT) Model and Its Application in Optimizing a 50-year Hydrogen Infrastructure for Urban Beijing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in FIGURE 5. NG: natural gas price increase 50% per 5 years,cost, as opposed to constant natural gas price in Base case.no effect of natural gas price increase on electricity cost

Lin, Zhenhong; Ogden, Joan M; Fan, Yueyue; Sperling, Dan

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

The Hydrogen Infrastructure Transition Model (HIT) & Its Application in Optimizing a 50-year Hydrogen Infrastructure for Urban Beijing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in FIGURE 5. NG: natural gas price increase 50% per 5 years,cost, as opposed to constant natural gas price in Base case.no effect of natural gas price increase on electricity cost

Lin, Zhenhong; Ogden, J; Fan, Yueyue; Sperling, Dan

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

The Hydrogen Infrastructure Transition (HIT) Model and Its Application in Optimizing a 50-year Hydrogen Infrastructure for Urban Beijing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

a Hydrogen Energy Infrastructure." Annual Review of EnergyZoia (2005). "Hydrogen infrastructure strategic planning06—05 The Hydrogen Infrastructure Transition Model (HIT) &

Lin, Zhenhong; Ogden, Joan M; Fan, Yueyue; Sperling, Dan

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "model year light-duty" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

The Hydrogen Infrastructure Transition Model (HIT) & Its Application in Optimizing a 50-year Hydrogen Infrastructure for Urban Beijing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

a Hydrogen Energy Infrastructure." Annual Review of EnergyZoia (2005). "Hydrogen infrastructure strategic planning06—05 The Hydrogen Infrastructure Transition Model (HIT) &

Lin, Zhenhong; Ogden, J; Fan, Yueyue; Sperling, Dan

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Modeling of Future-Year Emissions Control Scenarios for the Lower Fraser Valley: Impacts of Natural Gas and Propane Vehicle Technologies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The MC2–CALGRID photochemical modeling system is used to simulate the impact of two fuel substitution scenarios on ozone levels for a future year in the Lower Fraser Valley of British Columbia, Canada. The relative impacts of selected natural gas ...

M. Hedley; W. Jiang; R. McLaren; D. L. Singleton

1998-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Modeling & Simulation - AFLEET  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

AFLEET Estimates Petroleum Use, GHG Emissions, Air Pollutant Emissions and Cost of Vehicle Ownership Calculator examines the environmental and economic costs and benefits of alternative fuel and advanced vehicles How do you quantify the effects of using alternative fuel and other advanced vehicles? To answer such questions, Argonne National Laboratory recently created the Alternative Fuel Life-Cycle Environmental and Economic Transportation (AFLEET) Tool for the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Clean Cities program to help Clean Cities stakeholders estimate petroleum use, greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, air pollutant emissions and cost of ownership of light-duty and heavy-duty vehicles using simple spreadsheet inputs. The AFLEET Tool provides three calculation methods depending on the user's goals. The first option is the Simple Payback Calculator, which examines acquisition and annual operating costs to calculate a simple payback for purchasing a new alternative fuel vehicle as compared to its conventional counterpart, as well as average annual petroleum use, greenhouse gas (GHG) and air pollutant emissions. The second option is the Total Cost of Ownership Calculator, which evaluates the net present value of operating and fixed costs over the years of planned ownership of a new vehicle, as well as lifetime petroleum use, GHGs and air pollutant emissions. Finally, the Fleet Energy and Emissions Footprint Calculator estimates the annual petroleum use, GHGs and air pollutant emissions of existing and new vehicles, taking into consideration that older vehicles typically have higher air pollutant emission rates than newer ones. AFLEET Tool requires Microsoft Excel to run and may be downloaded free of charge at http://greet.es.anl.gov/afleet_tool.

364

Response of the HadGEM2 Earth System Model to Future Greenhouse Gas Emissions Pathways to the Year 2300  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new ensemble of simulations from the Earth System configuration of the Hadley Centre Global Environmental Model, version 2 (HadGEM2-ES), is used to evaluate the response to historical and projected future greenhouse gas forcings that follow ...

John Caesar; Erika Palin; Spencer Liddicoat; Jason Lowe; Eleanor Burke; Anne Pardaens; Michael Sanderson; Ron Kahana

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

A Description of a 1260-Year Control Integration with the Coupled ECHAM1/LSG General Circulation Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A 1260-yr integration generated by the ECHAM1/LSG (Large Scale Geostrophic) coupled atmosphere–ocean general circulation model is analyzed in this paper. The analysis focuses on the climate drift and on the variations of the coupled atmosphere–...

Jin-Song von Storch; Viatcheslav V. Kharin; Ulrich Cubasch; Gabriele C. Hegerl; Dierk Schriever; Hans von Storch; Eduardo Zorita

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

The HAMMONIA Chemistry Climate Model: Sensitivity of the Mesopause Region to the 11-Year Solar Cycle and CO2 Doubling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper introduces the three-dimensional Hamburg Model of the Neutral and Ionized Atmosphere (HAMMONIA), which treats atmospheric dynamics, radiation, and chemistry interactively for the height range from the earth’s surface to the ...

H. Schmidt; G. P. Brasseur; M. Charron; E. Manzini; M. A. Giorgetta; T. Diehl; V. I. Fomichev; D. Kinnison; D. Marsh; S. Walters

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Black liquor combustion validated recovery boiler modeling: Final year report. Volume 3 (Appendices II, sections 2--3 and III)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This project was initiated in October 1990, with the objective of developing and validating a new computer model of a recovery boiler furnace using a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code specifically tailored to the requirements for solving recovery boiler flows, and using improved submodels for black liquor combustion based on continued laboratory fundamental studies. The key tasks to be accomplished were as follows: (1) Complete the development of enhanced furnace models that have the capability to accurately predict carryover, emissions behavior, dust concentrations, gas temperatures, and wall heat fluxes. (2) Validate the enhanced furnace models, so that users can have confidence in the predicted results. (3) Obtain fundamental information on aerosol formation, deposition, and hardening so as to develop the knowledge base needed to relate furnace model outputs to plugging and fouling in the convective sections of the boiler. (4) Facilitate the transfer of codes, black liquid submodels, and fundamental knowledge to the US kraft pulp industry. Volume 3 contains the following appendix sections: Formation and destruction of nitrogen oxides in recovery boilers; Sintering and densification of recovery boiler deposits laboratory data and a rate model; and Experimental data on rates of particulate formation during char bed burning.

Grace, T.M.; Frederick, W.J.; Salcudean, M.; Wessel, R.A.

1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Black liquor combustion validated recovery boiler modeling: Final year report. Volume 2 (Appendices I, section 5 and II, section 1)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This project was initiated in October 1990, with the objective of developing and validating a new computer model of a recovery boiler furnace using a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code specifically tailored to the requirements for solving recovery boiler flows, and using improved submodels for black liquor combustion based on continued laboratory fundamental studies. The key tasks to be accomplished were as follows: (1) Complete the development of enhanced furnace models that have the capability to accurately predict carryover, emissions behavior, dust concentrations, gas temperatures, and wall heat fluxes. (2) Validate the enhanced furnace models, so that users can have confidence in the predicted results. (3) Obtain fundamental information on aerosol formation, deposition, and hardening so as to develop the knowledge base needed to relate furnace model outputs to plugging and fouling in the convective sections of the boiler. (4) Facilitate the transfer of codes, black liquid submodels, and fundamental knowledge to the US kraft pulp industry. Volume 2 contains the last section of Appendix I, Radiative heat transfer in kraft recovery boilers, and the first section of Appendix II, The effect of temperature and residence time on the distribution of carbon, sulfur, and nitrogen between gaseous and condensed phase products from low temperature pyrolysis of kraft black liquor.

Grace, T.M.; Frederick, W.J.; Salcudean, M.; Wessel, R.A.

1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

A model for cGMP signal transduction in Dictyostelium in perspective of 25 years of cGMP research  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The chemoattactant mediated cGMP response of Dictyostelium cells was discovered about twenty-five years ago. Shortly thereafter, guanylyl cyclases, cGMP-phosphodiesterases and cGMP-binding proteins were detected already in lysates, but the encoding genes were discovered only very recently. The deduced proteins appear to be very different from proteins with the same function in metazoa. In this review we discuss these new findings in perspective of the previously obtained biochemical and functional data on cGMP in Dictyostelium.

Leonard Bosgraaf; Peter J. M. Van Haastert

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Energy Blog | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

9, 2011 9, 2011 President Barack Obama delivers remarks on fuel efficiency standards for 2017-2025 model year cars and light-duty trucks during an event at the Washington Convention Center in Washington, D.C., July 29, 2011. Seated behind the President are at left are auto industry executives and Transportation Secretary Ray LaHood. (Official White House Photo by Samantha Appleton) New Vehicle Fuel Economy Standards Will Continue to Inspire Innovation President Obama announced a landmark agreement with automakers that sets aggressive new fuel-economy standards for cars and light-duty trucks. Find out how the Energy Department is unleashing innovation that will create jobs and make sure that the fuel-efficient vehicles of the future are made in America. July 29, 2011

371

Blog Feed: Vehicles | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

July 29, 2011 July 29, 2011 President Barack Obama delivers remarks on fuel efficiency standards for 2017-2025 model year cars and light-duty trucks during an event at the Washington Convention Center in Washington, D.C., July 29, 2011. Seated behind the President are at left are auto industry executives and Transportation Secretary Ray LaHood. (Official White House Photo by Samantha Appleton) New Vehicle Fuel Economy Standards Will Continue to Inspire Innovation President Obama announced a landmark agreement with automakers that sets aggressive new fuel-economy standards for cars and light-duty trucks. Find out how the Energy Department is unleashing innovation that will create jobs and make sure that the fuel-efficient vehicles of the future are made in America.

372

Trends in On-Road Vehicle Emissions of Ammonia  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Trends in On-Road Vehicle Emissions of Ammonia Trends in On-Road Vehicle Emissions of Ammonia Title Trends in On-Road Vehicle Emissions of Ammonia Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2008 Authors Kean, Andrew J., David Littlejohn, George Ban-Weiss, Robert A. Harley, Thomas W. Kirchstetter, and Melissa M. Lunden Journal Atmospheric Environment Abstract Motor vehicle emissions of ammonia have been measured at a California highway tunnel in the San Francisco Bay area. Between 1999 and 2006, light-duty vehicle ammonia emissions decreased by 38 ± 6%, from 640 ± 40 to 400 ± 20 mg kg-1. High time resolution measurements of ammonia made in summer 2001 at the same location indicate a minimum in ammonia emissions correlated with slower-speed driving conditions. Variations in ammonia emission rates track changes in carbon monoxide more closely than changes in nitrogen oxides, especially during later evening hours when traffic speeds are highest. Analysis of remote sensing data of Burgard et al. (Environ Sci. Technol. 2006, 40, 7018-7022) indicates relationships between ammonia and vehicle model year, nitrogen oxides, and carbon monoxide. Ammonia emission rates from diesel trucks were difficult to measure in the tunnel setting due to the large contribution to ammonia concentrations in a mixed-traffic bore that were assigned to light-duty vehicle emissions. Nevertheless, it is clear that heavy-duty diesel trucks are a minor source of ammonia emissions compared to light-duty gasoline vehicles.

373

Commercializing light-duty plug-in/plug-out hydrogen-fuel-cell vehicles: “Mobile Electricity” technologies and opportunities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Table 2-5 presents the cost per kWh produced by variousHybrid battery module cost per kWh required for lifecycleelectricity rates on a cost per kWh basis only with some

Williams, Brett D; Kurani, Kenneth S

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Commercializing light-duty plug-in/plug-out hydrogen-fuel-cell vehicles: “Mobile Electricity” technologies and opportunities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to produce clean, quiet electrical power for purposes otherHEVWG), led by the Electrical Power Research Institute (section), as well as if electrical power, flowing along the

Williams, Brett D; Kurani, Kenneth S

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Commercializing light-duty plug-in/plug-out hydrogen-fuel-cell vehicles: “Mobile Electricity” technologies and opportunities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

combustion Prius, Eco Fuel CNG Hybrid Escape, and Solara methanol vehicle, and a CNG vehicle. The participants werewas predominately the CNG vehicle. The authors explain the

Williams, Brett D; Kurani, Kenneth S

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Commercializing light-duty plug-in/plug-out hydrogen-fuel-cell vehicles: “Mobile Electricity” technologies and opportunities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

status, gender, and age), vehicle type (energy storage andstatus, gender, and age), vehicle type (energy storage and

Williams, Brett D; Kurani, Kenneth S

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Commercializing light-duty plug-in/plug-out hydrogen-fuel-cell vehicles: “Mobile Electricity” technologies and opportunities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

power, and heat generation), and grid-side benefits (peakpre-) heat/cool, etc. ); home recharging using off-peak grid

Williams, Brett D; Kurani, Kenneth S

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Ethanol Blends and Engine Operating Strategy Effects on Light-Duty Spark-Ignition Engine Particle Emissions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Spark ignition (SI) engines with direct injection (DI) fueling can improve fuel economy and vehicle power beyond that of port fuel injection (PFI). Despite this distinct advantage, DI fueling often increases particle emissions such that SI exhaust may be subject to future particle emissions regulations. Challenges in controlling particle emissions arise as engines encounter varied fuel composition such as intermediate ethanol blends. Furthermore, modern engines are operated using unconventional breathing strategies with advanced cam-based variable valve actuation systems. In this study, we investigate particle emissions from a multi-cylinder DI engine operated with three different breathing strategies, fueling strategies and fuels. The breathing strategies are conventional throttled operation, early intake valve closing (EIVC) and late intake valve closing (LIVC); the fueling strategies are single injection DI (sDI), multi-injection DI (mDI), and PFI; and the fuels are emissions certification gasoline, E20 and E85. The results indicate the dominant factor influencing particle number concentration emissions for the sDI and mDI strategies is the fuel injection timing. Overly advanced injection timing results in particle formation due to fuel spray impingement on the piston, and overly retarded injection timing results in particle formation due to poor fuel and air mixing. In addition, fuel type has a significant effect on particle emissions for the DI fueling strategies. Gasoline and E20 fuels generate comparable levels of particle emissions, but E85 produces dramatically lower particle number concentration. The particle emissions for E85 are near the detection limit for the FSN instrument, and particle number emissions are one to two orders of magnitude lower for E85 relative to gasoline and E20. We found PFI fueling produces very low levels of particle emissions under all conditions and is much less sensitive to engine breathing strategy and fuel type than the DI fueling strategies. The particle number-size distributions for PFI fueling are of the same order for all of the breathing strategies and fuel types and are one to two orders lower than for the sDI fuel injection strategy with gasoline and E20. Remarkably, the particle emissions for E85 under the sDI fueling strategy are similar to particle emissions with a PFI fueling strategy. Thus by using E85, the efficiency and power advantages of DI fueling can be gained without generating high particle emissions.

Szybist, James P [ORNL; Youngquist, Adam D [ORNL; Barone, Teresa L [ORNL; Storey, John Morse [ORNL; Moore, Wayne [Delphi; Foster, Matthew [Delphi; Confer, Keith [Delphi

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Commercializing light-duty plug-in/plug-out hydrogen-fuel-cell vehicles: “Mobile Electricity” technologies and opportunities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Toyota and Ford Hybrids," in Green Car Congress, 21 Februaryplant using idle hybrid airport-rental cars to provide localengine (ICE) hybrids in airport-rental-car and other

Williams, Brett D; Kurani, Kenneth S

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Commercializing light-duty plug-in/plug-out hydrogen-fuel-cell vehicles: “Mobile Electricity” technologies and opportunities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

learned from natural gas for vehicles," Energy Policy, vol.learned from natural gas for vehicles." Energy Policy 30(7):Policy, Flynn, the former president of Canadian firm CNG Fuel Systems discusses lessons from compressed-natural-gas-

Williams, Brett D; Kurani, Kenneth S

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "model year light-duty" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Commercializing light-duty plug-in/plug-out hydrogen-fuel-cell vehicles: “Mobile Electricity” technologies and opportunities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Economic Implications of Net Metering for Stationary andEconomic Implications of Net Metering for Stationary andEconomic Implications of Net Metering for Stationary and

Williams, Brett D; Kurani, Kenneth S

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Exploring the use of a higher octane gasoline for the U.S. light-duty vehicle fleet  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis explores the possible benefits that can be achieved if U.S. oil companies produced and offered a grade of higher-octane gasoline to the consumer market. The octane number of a fuel represents how resistant the ...

Chow, Eric W

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Assessing the viability of compressed natural gas as a transportation fuel for light-duty vehicles in the United States.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Recent optimistic revisions to projections for recoverable natural gas resources in the United States have generated renewed interest in the possibility of greater utilization of… (more)

Kennedy, Castlen Moore

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Commercializing light-duty plug-in/plug-out hydrogen-fuel-cell vehicles: “Mobile Electricity” technologies and opportunities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and S. E. Letendre, "Electric Vehicles as a New Power Sourceassessment for fuel cell electric vehicles." Argonne, Ill. :at 20th International Electric Vehicle Symposium (EVS-20),

Williams, Brett D; Kurani, Kenneth S

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Commercializing light-duty plug-in/plug-out hydrogen-fuel-cell vehicles: “Mobile Electricity” technologies and opportunities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

H 2 FCVs, plug- in hybrids, and vehicle-to-grid (V2G) power.markets using primarily hybrid vehicles in fleet and otherin hybrid, Plug-out hybrid, Vehicle-to-grid power, Vehicular

Williams, Brett D; Kurani, Kenneth S

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Alternative Fuel Evaluation Program: Alternative Fuel Light Duty Vehicle Project - Data collection responsibilities, techniques, and test procedures  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes the data gathering and analysis procedures that support the US Department of Energy's implementation of the Alternative Motor Fuels Act (AMFA) of 1988. Specifically, test procedures, analytical methods, and data protocols are covered. The aim of these collection and analysis efforts, as mandated by AMFA, is to demonstrate the environmental, economic, and performance characteristics of alternative transportation fuels.

Not Available

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Alternative Fuel Evaluation Program: Alternative Fuel Light Duty Vehicle Project - Data collection responsibilities, techniques, and test procedures  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes the data gathering and analysis procedures that support the US Department of Energy`s implementation of the Alternative Motor Fuels Act (AMFA) of 1988. Specifically, test procedures, analytical methods, and data protocols are covered. The aim of these collection and analysis efforts, as mandated by AMFA, is to demonstrate the environmental, economic, and performance characteristics of alternative transportation fuels.

Not Available

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Commercializing light-duty plug-in/plug-out hydrogen-fuel-cell vehicles: “Mobile Electricity” technologies and opportunities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Plug-in Hybrid Kits for Toyota and Ford Hybrids," in Greenfactsheet.pdf, 2006. J. Rosebro, "Toyota Ratchets Up Plug-InCongress, 23 April ed, 2006. "Toyota to Unveil Prius with

Williams, Brett D; Kurani, Kenneth S

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Commercializing light-duty plug-in/plug-out hydrogen-fuel-cell vehicles: “Mobile Electricity” technologies and opportunities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Toyota Ratchets Up Plug-In Prius Talk," in Green Cared, 2006. "Toyota to Unveil Prius with Large Auxiliary Powerfive, including several Prius conversions in various stages

Williams, Brett D; Kurani, Kenneth S

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Commercializing light-duty plug-in/plug-out hydrogen-fuel-cell vehicles: “Mobile Electricity” technologies and opportunities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

includes “car-company” battery cost estimates, scaled toas the desire to keep battery cost, and thus size, down isjustify current marginal battery costs. So, too, might there

Williams, Brett D; Kurani, Kenneth S

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Commercializing light-duty plug-in/plug-out hydrogen-fuel-cell vehicles: “Mobile Electricity” technologies and opportunities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

device to compressed-natural-gas-vehicle consumers. ) TheZealand’s use of compressed-natural-gas (CNG) and liquefied-discusses lessons from compressed-natural-gas-vehicle (NGV)

Williams, Brett D; Kurani, Kenneth S

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Effect of Biodiesel Blending on the Speciation of Soluble Organic Fraction from a Light Duty Diesel Engine  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Soy methyl ester (SME) biodiesel was volumetrically blended with 2007 certification ultra low sulfur diesel (ULSD) fuel and run in a 1.7L direct-injection common rail diesel engine at one speed-load point (1500rpm, 2.6bar BMEP). Engine fueling rate and injection timing were adjusted to maintain a constant load, while particulate samples were collected in a diesel particulate filter (DPF) and with a dilution tunnel sampling train. The samples collected at these two locations were found to contain different levels of soluble organic fraction (SOF) and the different hydrocarbon species in the SOF. This observation indicates that traditional SOF measurements, in light of the specific sampling procedure used, may not be appropriate to DPF applications.

Strzelec, Andrea [ORNL; Storey, John Morse [ORNL; Lewis Sr, Samuel Arthur [ORNL; Daw, C Stuart [ORNL; Foster, Prof. Dave [University of Wisconsin; Rutland, Prof. Christopher J. [University of Wisconsin

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Commercializing light-duty plug-in/plug-out hydrogen-fuel-cell vehicles: “Mobile Electricity” technologies and opportunities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Early Markets for Hybrid Electric Vehicles," University ofof Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicles on Wind Energy Markets,"Power Assist Hybrid Electric Vehicles, and Plug-In Hybrid

Williams, Brett D; Kurani, Kenneth S

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Commercializing light-duty plug-in/plug-out hydrogen-fuel-cell vehicles: “Mobile Electricity” technologies and opportunities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

goals for automotive fuel cell power systems hydrogen vs.a comparative assessment for fuel cell electric vehicles."plug-out hydrogen-fuel- cell vehicles: “Mobile Electricity"

Williams, Brett D; Kurani, Kenneth S

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Trends in on-road vehicle emissions of ammonia  

SciTech Connect

Motor vehicle emissions of ammonia have been measured at a California highway tunnel in the San Francisco Bay area. Between 1999 and 2006, light-duty vehicle ammonia emissions decreased by 38 {+-} 6%, from 640 {+-} 40 to 400 {+-} 20 mg kg{sup -1}. High time resolution measurements of ammonia made in summer 2001 at the same location indicate a minimum in ammonia emissions correlated with slower-speed driving conditions. Variations in ammonia emission rates track changes in carbon monoxide more closely than changes in nitrogen oxides, especially during later evening hours when traffic speeds are highest. Analysis of remote sensing data of Burgard et al. (Environ Sci. Technol. 2006, 40, 7018-7022) indicates relationships between ammonia and vehicle model year, nitrogen oxides, and carbon monoxide. Ammonia emission rates from diesel trucks were difficult to measure in the tunnel setting due to the large contribution to ammonia concentrations in a mixed-traffic bore that were assigned to light-duty vehicle emissions. Nevertheless, it is clear that heavy-duty diesel trucks are a minor source of ammonia emissions compared to light-duty gasoline vehicles.

Kean, A.J.; Littlejohn, D.; Ban-Weiss, G.A.; Harley, R.A.; Kirchstetter, T.W.; Lunden, M. M.

2008-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

396

A Plug-in Hybrid Consumer Choice Model with Detailed Market Segmentation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper describes a consumer choice model for projecting U.S. demand for plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEV) in competition among 13 light-duty vehicle technologies over the period 2005-2050. New car buyers are disaggregated by region, residential area, attitude toward technology risk, vehicle usage intensity, home parking and work recharging. The nested multinomial logit (NMNL) model of vehicle choice incorporates daily vehicle usage distributions, refueling and recharging availability, technology learning by doing, and diversity of choice among makes and models. Illustrative results are presented for a Base Case, calibrated to the Annual Energy Outlook (AEO) 2009 Reference Updated Case, and an optimistic technology scenario reflecting achievement of U.S. Department of Energy s (DOE s) FreedomCAR goals. PHEV market success is highly dependent on the degree of technological progress assumed. PHEV sales reach one million in 2037 in the Base Case but in 2020 in the FreedomCARGoals Case. In the FreedomCARGoals Case, PHEV cumulative sales reach 1.5 million by 2015. Together with efficiency improvements in other technologies, petroleum use in 2050 is reduced by about 45% from the 2005 level. After technological progress, PHEV s market success appears to be most sensitive to recharging availability, consumers attitudes toward novel echnologies, and vehicle usage intensity. Successful market penetration of PHEVs helps bring down battery costs for electric vehicles (EVs), resulting in a significant EV market share after 2040.

Lin, Zhenhong [ORNL; Greene, David L [ORNL

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Models for evaluation of energy technology and policy options to maximize low carbon source penetration in the United States energy supply.  

SciTech Connect

An initial version of a Systems Dynamics (SD) modeling framework was developed for the analysis of a broad range of energy technology and policy questions. The specific question selected to demonstrate this process was 'what would be the carbon and import implications of expanding nuclear electric capacity to provide power for plug in hybrid vehicles?' Fifteen SNL SD energy models were reviewed and the US Energy and Greenhouse gas model (USEGM) and the Global Nuclear Futures model (GEFM) were identified as the basis for an initial modeling framework. A basic U.S. Transportation model was created to model U.S. fleet changes. The results of the rapid adoption scenario result in almost 40% of light duty vehicles being PHEV by 2040 which requires about 37 GWy/y of additional electricity demand, equivalent to about 25 new 1.4 GWe nuclear plants. The adoption rate of PHEVs would likely be the controlling factor in achieving the associated reduction in carbon emissions and imports.

Pickard, Paul S.; Kataoka, Dawn; Reno, Marissa Devan; Malczynski, Leonard A.; Peplinski, William J.; Roach, Jesse D.; Brainard, James Robert; West, Todd H.; Schoenwald, David Alan

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Development of a high-resolution emission inventory for Spain using the SMOKE modelling system: A case study for the years 2000 and 2010  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Emission preparation is a critical stage in air quality modelling. The generation of input information from regulatory emission inventories compatible with the requirements of eulerian chemical-transport models needs a computationally efficient, reliable, ... Keywords: Air quality, Atmospheric emissions, Emission preparation for modelling, SMOKE, Spain

Rafael Borge; Julio Lumbreras; Encarnacion Rodríguez

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Four Years of TRMM/VIRS On-Orbit Calibrations and Characterization Using Lunar Models and Data from Terra/MODIS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Four years of on-orbit solar calibration data have been used to quantify the temporal degradation of the two reflected solar bands of the Visible and Infrared Scanner (VIRS) aboard the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) satellite. Solar ...

Cheng-Hsuan Lyu; William L. Barnes

2003-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Black liquor combustion validated recovery boiler modeling: Final year report. Volume 1 (Main text and Appendix I, sections 1--4)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This project was initiated in October 1990, with the objective of developing and validating a new computer model of a recovery boiler furnace using a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code specifically tailored to the requirements for solving recovery boiler flows, and using improved submodels for black liquor combustion based on continued laboratory fundamental studies. The key tasks to be accomplished were as follows: (1) Complete the development of enhanced furnace models that have the capability to accurately predict carryover, emissions behavior, dust concentrations, gas temperatures, and wall heat fluxes. (2) Validate the enhanced furnace models, so that users can have confidence in the predicted results. (3) Obtain fundamental information on aerosol formation, deposition, and hardening so as to develop the knowledge base needed to relate furnace model outputs to plugging and fouling in the convective sections of the boiler. (4) Facilitate the transfer of codes, black liquid submodels, and fundamental knowledge to the US kraft pulp industry. Volume 1 contains the main body of the report and the first 4 sections of Appendix 1: Modeling of black liquor recovery boilers -- summary report; Flow and heat transfer modeling in the upper furnace of a kraft recovery boiler; Numerical simulation of black liquor combustion; and Investigation of turbulence models and prediction of swirling flows for kraft recovery furnaces.

Grace, T.M.; Frederick, W.J.; Salcudean, M.; Wessel, R.A.

1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "model year light-duty" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Through the years  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Through the years Through the years Early 1960s Researchers at PNL (now called PNNL) developed the standards and devices for setting and measuring radiation doses received by nuclear industry work- ers. Tens of thousands of people, including children, have been mea- sured by whole-body counters since the 1960s to relate their physical content of radioactive materials to sources such as food and water. 1960s PNL formulated the first use of a digital computer for complete process control of a mass spectrometer. Mid-1960s PNL devised a computer code, called COBRA for COolant Boiling in Rod Arrays, which allowed for three-dimensional, multiphase hydrothermal modeling of reactor and other complex systems. 1967 PNL researchers continued the fundamental scientific and

402

The National Energy Modeling System: An Overview 1998 - Transportation  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

TRANSPORTATION DEMAND MODULE TRANSPORTATION DEMAND MODULE blueball.gif (205 bytes) Fuel Economy Submodule blueball.gif (205 bytes) Regional Sales Submodule blueball.gif (205 bytes) Alternative-Fuel Vehicle Submodule blueball.gif (205 bytes) Light-Duty Vehicle Stock Submodule blueball.gif (205 bytes) Vehicle-Miles Traveled (VMT) Submodule blueball.gif (205 bytes) Light-Duty Vehicle Commercial Fleet Submodule blueball.gif (205 bytes) Commercial Light Truck Submodule blueball.gif (205 bytes) Air Travel Demand Submodule blueball.gif (205 bytes) Aircraft Fleet Efficiency Submodule blueball.gif (205 bytes) Freight Transport Submodule blueball.gif (205 bytes) Miscellaneous Energy Use Submodule The transportation demand module (TRAN) forecasts the consumption of transportation sector fuels by transportation mode, including the use of

403

Commercializing Light-Duty Plug-In/Plug-Out Hydrogen-Fuel-Cell Vehicles:“Mobile Electricity” Technologies, Early California Household Markets, and Innovation Management  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Table 2-5 presents the cost per kWh produced by variousHybrid battery module cost per kWh required for lifecycleelectricity rates on a cost per kWh basis only with some

Williams, Brett D

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Commercializing Light-Duty Plug-In/Plug-Out Hydrogen-Fuel-Cell Vehicles: "Mobile Electricity" Technologies, Early California Household Markets, and Innovation Management  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Table 2-5 presents the cost per kWh produced by variousHybrid battery module cost per kWh required for lifecycleelectricity rates on a cost per kWh basis only with some

Williams, Brett D

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Commercializing Light-Duty Plug-In/Plug-Out Hydrogen-Fuel-Cell Vehicles: "Mobile Electricity" Technologies, Early California Household Markets, and Innovation Management  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to produce clean, quiet electrical power for purposes otherHEVWG), led by the Electrical Power Research Institute (section), as well as if electrical power, flowing along the

Williams, Brett D

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Commercializing Light-Duty Plug-In/Plug-Out Hydrogen-Fuel-Cell Vehicles:“Mobile Electricity” Technologies, Early California Household Markets, and Innovation Management  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to produce clean, quiet electrical power for purposes otherHEVWG), led by the Electrical Power Research Institute (section), as well as if electrical power, flowing along the

Williams, Brett D

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Present Status and Marketing Prospects of the Emerging Hybrid-Electric and Diesel Technologies to Reduce CO2 Emissions of New Light-Duty Vehicles in California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the engine and emission aftertreatment technologies toengine technology and the utilization of complex emissions aftertreatment

Burke, Andy

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Comments on the Joint Proposed Rulemaking to Establish Light-Duty Vehicle Greenhouse Gas Emission Standards and Corporate Average Fuel Economy Standards  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

on occupant safety than fuel economy standards that arethe automobile fuel economy standards program, NHTSA docketCorporate Average Fuel Economy Standards Docket No. NHTSA–

Wenzel, Thomas P

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Commercializing Light-Duty Plug-In/Plug-Out Hydrogen-Fuel-Cell Vehicles: "Mobile Electricity" Technologies, Early California Household Markets, and Innovation Management  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

combustion Prius, Eco Fuel CNG Hybrid Escape, and Solara methanol vehicle, and a CNG vehicle. The participants werewas predominately the CNG vehicle. The authors explain the

Williams, Brett D

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Commercializing Light-Duty Plug-In/Plug-Out Hydrogen-Fuel-Cell Vehicles:“Mobile Electricity” Technologies, Early California Household Markets, and Innovation Management  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

combustion Prius, Eco Fuel CNG Hybrid Escape, and Solara methanol vehicle, and a CNG vehicle. The participants werewas predominately the CNG vehicle. The authors explain the

Williams, Brett D

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Present Status and Marketing Prospects of the Emerging Hybrid-Electric and Diesel Technologies to Reduce CO2 Emissions of New Light-Duty Vehicles in California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and to recover energy during regenerative braking. Both theof energy. The batteries are also recharged via regenerative

Burke, Andy

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Feasible Café Standard Increases Using Emerging Diesel and Hybrid-Electric Technologies for Light-Duty Vehicles in the United States  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and to recover energy during regenerative braking. Both theof energy. The batteries are also recharged via regenerative

Burke, Andy; Abeles, Ethan

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Feasible CAFE Standard Increases Using Emerging Diesel and Hybrid-Electric Technologies for Light-Duty Vehicles in the United States  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and to recover energy during regenerative braking. Both theof energy. The batteries are also recharged via regenerative

Burke, Andy; Abeles, Ethan C.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Feasibility Study Of Advanced Technology Hov Systems: Volume 2b: Emissions Impact Of Roadway-powered Electric Buses, Light-duty Vehicles, And Automobiles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of 20 mph. Regenerative braking affects energy consumptionenergy consumption is significantly affected by both the driving cycle, and to some extent, regenerative

Miller, Mark A.; Dato, Victor; Chira-chavala, Ted

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Commercializing Light-Duty Plug-In/Plug-Out Hydrogen-Fuel-Cell Vehicles:“Mobile Electricity” Technologies, Early California Household Markets, and Innovation Management  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

status, gender, and age), vehicle type (energy storage andstatus, gender, and age), vehicle type (energy storage and

Williams, Brett D

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Commercializing Light-Duty Plug-In/Plug-Out Hydrogen-Fuel-Cell Vehicles: "Mobile Electricity" Technologies, Early California Household Markets, and Innovation Management  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

status, gender, and age), vehicle type (energy storage andstatus, gender, and age), vehicle type (energy storage and

Williams, Brett D

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Comments on the Joint Proposed Rulemaking to Establish Light-Duty Vehicle Greenhouse Gas Emission Standards and Corporate Average Fuel Economy Standards  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Efficiency and Renewable Energy, US Department of Energy.the views of the US Department of Energy, Lawrence BerkeleyAnalysis, of the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract

Wenzel, Thomas P

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Commercializing Light-Duty Plug-In/Plug-Out Hydrogen-Fuel-Cell Vehicles:“Mobile Electricity” Technologies, Early California Household Markets, and Innovation Management  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

power, and heat generation), and grid-side benefits (peakpre-) heat/cool, etc. ); home recharging using off-peak grid

Williams, Brett D

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Commercializing Light-Duty Plug-In/Plug-Out Hydrogen-Fuel-Cell Vehicles: "Mobile Electricity" Technologies, Early California Household Markets, and Innovation Management  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

power, and heat generation), and grid-side benefits (peakpre-) heat/cool, etc. ); home recharging using off-peak grid

Williams, Brett D

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Commercializing Light-Duty Plug-In/Plug-Out Hydrogen-Fuel-Cell Vehicles:“Mobile Electricity” Technologies, Early California Household Markets, and Innovation Management  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Toyota and Ford Hybrids," in Green Car Congress, 21 Februaryplant using idle hybrid airport-rental cars to provide localengine (ICE) hybrids in airport-rental-car and other

Williams, Brett D

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "model year light-duty" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Present Status and Marketing Prospects of the Emerging Hybrid-Electric and Diesel Technologies to Reduce CO2 Emissions of New Light-Duty Vehicles in California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

economy and emissions of the Toyota and Honda Hybrid Cars (of the Toyota and Honda Hybrid Cars (2003) Vehicle Trans. /is uncertain. Hybrid-electric passenger cars are currently

Burke, Andy

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Commercializing Light-Duty Plug-In/Plug-Out Hydrogen-Fuel-Cell Vehicles: "Mobile Electricity" Technologies, Early California Household Markets, and Innovation Management  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Toyota and Ford Hybrids," in Green Car Congress, 21 Februaryplant using idle hybrid airport-rental cars to provide localengine (ICE) hybrids in airport-rental-car and other

Williams, Brett D

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Feasible CAFE Standard Increases Using Emerging Diesel and Hybrid-Electric Technologies for Light-Duty Vehicles in the United States  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the Toyota and Honda Hybrid Cars (2003) V e h i c l e Hondavehicles Full Hybrid Vehicle class Compact car Mid-size carthe hybrid powertrain technologies in the new car fleet

Burke, Andy; Abeles, Ethan C.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Feasible Café Standard Increases Using Emerging Diesel and Hybrid-Electric Technologies for Light-Duty Vehicles in the United States  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the Toyota and Honda Hybrid Cars (2003) V e h i c l e Hondavehicles Full Hybrid Vehicle class Compact car Mid-size carthe hybrid powertrain technologies in the new car fleet

Burke, Andy; Abeles, Ethan

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Commercializing Light-Duty Plug-In/Plug-Out Hydrogen-Fuel-Cell Vehicles: "Mobile Electricity" Technologies, Early California Household Markets, and Innovation Management  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

learned from natural gas for vehicles," Energy Policy, vol.learned from natural gas for vehicles." Energy Policy 30(7):Policy, Flynn, the former president of Canadian firm CNG Fuel Systems discusses lessons from compressed-natural-gas-

Williams, Brett D

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Commercializing Light-Duty Plug-In/Plug-Out Hydrogen-Fuel-Cell Vehicles:“Mobile Electricity” Technologies, Early California Household Markets, and Innovation Management  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

learned from natural gas for vehicles," Energy Policy, vol.learned from natural gas for vehicles." Energy Policy 30(7):Policy, Flynn, the former president of Canadian firm CNG Fuel Systems discusses lessons from compressed-natural-gas-

Williams, Brett D

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Commercializing Light-Duty Plug-In/Plug-Out Hydrogen-Fuel-Cell Vehicles: "Mobile Electricity" Technologies, Early California Household Markets, and Innovation Management  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Economic Implications of Net Metering for Stationary andEconomic Implications of Net Metering for Stationary andEconomic Implications of Net Metering for Stationary and

Williams, Brett D

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Commercializing Light-Duty Plug-In/Plug-Out Hydrogen-Fuel-Cell Vehicles:“Mobile Electricity” Technologies, Early California Household Markets, and Innovation Management  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Economic Implications of Net Metering for Stationary andEconomic Implications of Net Metering for Stationary andEconomic Implications of Net Metering for Stationary and

Williams, Brett D

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Feasibility Study Of Advanced Technology Hov Systems: Volume 2b: Emissions Impact Of Roadway-powered Electric Buses, Light-duty Vehicles, And Automobiles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Russell, A. , Electric Vehicles and the Environment:Roadway Powered Electric Vehicle ---An All-Electric Hybrid8th International Electric Vehicle Symposium, Washington,

Miller, Mark A.; Dato, Victor; Chira-chavala, Ted

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Commercializing Light-Duty Plug-In/Plug-Out Hydrogen-Fuel-Cell Vehicles:“Mobile Electricity” Technologies, Early California Household Markets, and Innovation Management  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and S. E. Letendre, "Electric Vehicles as a New Power Sourceassessment for fuel cell electric vehicles." Argonne, Ill. :at 20th International Electric Vehicle Symposium (EVS-20),

Williams, Brett D

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Commercializing Light-Duty Plug-In/Plug-Out Hydrogen-Fuel-Cell Vehicles: "Mobile Electricity" Technologies, Early California Household Markets, and Innovation Management  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

assessment for fuel cell electric vehicles." Argonne, Ill. :of Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicles on Wind Energy Markets,"Recharging and Household Electric Vehicle Market: A Near-

Williams, Brett D

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

The effects of driving style and vehicle performance on the real-world fuel consumption of U.S. light-duty vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Even with advances in vehicle technology, both conservation and methods for reducing the fuel consumption of existing vehicles are needed to decrease the petroleum consumption and greenhouse gas emissions of the U.S. ...

Berry, Irene Michelle

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Feasible CAFE Standard Increases Using Emerging Diesel and Hybrid-Electric Technologies for Light-Duty Vehicles in the United States  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

R&D Co. at the SAE Hybrid Vehicle Symposium in San Diego,already being utilized in hybrid vehicles being marketed byfirst marketed their hybrid vehicles in Japan before doing

Burke, Andy; Abeles, Ethan C.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Feasible Café Standard Increases Using Emerging Diesel and Hybrid-Electric Technologies for Light-Duty Vehicles in the United States  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

R&D Co. at the SAE Hybrid Vehicle Symposium in San Diego,already being utilized in hybrid vehicles being marketed byfirst marketed their hybrid vehicles in Japan before doing

Burke, Andy; Abeles, Ethan

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Present Status and Marketing Prospects of the Emerging Hybrid-Electric and Diesel Technologies to Reduce CO2 Emissions of New Light-Duty Vehicles in California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Conventional vs. Hybrid Vehicles, paper to be presented15 Table 10 Hybrid Vehicle Sales to Date - North America &Power Projections of Hybrid Vehicle Characteristics (1999-

Burke, Andy

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Potential of electric propulsion systems to reduce petroleum use and greenhouse gas emissions in the U.S. light-duty vehicle fleet  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In the summer of 2008, the United States of America experienced an oil shock, first of a kind since 1970s. The American public became sensitized to the concerns about foreign oil supply and climate change and global warming, ...

Khusid, Michael

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

Commercializing Light-Duty Plug-In/Plug-Out Hydrogen-Fuel-Cell Vehicles: "Mobile Electricity" Technologies, Early California Household Markets, and Innovation Management  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Plug-in Hybrid Kits for Toyota and Ford Hybrids," in Greenfactsheet.pdf, 2006. J. Rosebro, "Toyota Ratchets Up Plug-InCongress, 23 April ed, 2006. "Toyota to Unveil Prius with

Williams, Brett D

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Commercializing Light-Duty Plug-In/Plug-Out Hydrogen-Fuel-Cell Vehicles:“Mobile Electricity” Technologies, Early California Household Markets, and Innovation Management  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Plug-in Hybrid Kits for Toyota and Ford Hybrids," in Greenfactsheet.pdf, 2006. J. Rosebro, "Toyota Ratchets Up Plug-InCongress, 23 April ed, 2006. "Toyota to Unveil Prius with

Williams, Brett D

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Commercializing Light-Duty Plug-In/Plug-Out Hydrogen-Fuel-Cell Vehicles:“Mobile Electricity” Technologies, Early California Household Markets, and Innovation Management  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Toyota Ratchets Up Plug-In Prius Talk," in Green Cared, 2006. "Toyota to Unveil Prius with Large Auxiliary Powerfive, including several Prius conversions in various stages

Williams, Brett D

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Commercializing Light-Duty Plug-In/Plug-Out Hydrogen-Fuel-Cell Vehicles: "Mobile Electricity" Technologies, Early California Household Markets, and Innovation Management  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Toyota Ratchets Up Plug-In Prius Talk," in Green Cared, 2006. "Toyota to Unveil Prius with Large Auxiliary Powerfive, including several Prius conversions in various stages

Williams, Brett D

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "model year light-duty" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Feasibility Study Of Advanced Technology Hov Systems: Volume 2b: Emissions Impact Of Roadway-powered Electric Buses, Light-duty Vehicles, And Automobiles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

SCR sox - low sulfur oil 30 Source: Wang f et al. (1989).the three major fuel sources (gas, oil, and coal) assumed inIGCC Oil-fired: Residual Boiler Cogen-Turbine Source: N/A co

Miller, Mark A.; Dato, Victor; Chira-chavala, Ted

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

Commercializing Light-Duty Plug-In/Plug-Out Hydrogen-Fuel-Cell Vehicles: "Mobile Electricity" Technologies, Early California Household Markets, and Innovation Management  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

includes “car-company” battery cost estimates, scaled toas the desire to keep battery cost, and thus size, down isjustify current marginal battery costs. So, too, might there

Williams, Brett D

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Commercializing Light-Duty Plug-In/Plug-Out Hydrogen-Fuel-Cell Vehicles:“Mobile Electricity” Technologies, Early California Household Markets, and Innovation Management  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

includes “car-company” battery cost estimates, scaled toas the desire to keep battery cost, and thus size, down isjustify current marginal battery costs. So, too, might there

Williams, Brett D

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

Present Status and Marketing Prospects of the Emerging Hybrid-Electric and Diesel Technologies to Reduce CO2 Emissions of New Light-Duty Vehicles in California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to meet the SULEV NOx standard, a reduction of at least anto meet the SULEV NOx standard, a reduction of at least an

Burke, Andy

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

Feasible Café Standard Increases Using Emerging Diesel and Hybrid-Electric Technologies for Light-Duty Vehicles in the United States  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2003 7. Hermance, D. , Toyota Hybrid System, 1999SAE TOPTECGasoline Engine for the Toyota Hybrid System, JSAE Papervehicles being marketed by Toyota and Honda in the United

Burke, Andy; Abeles, Ethan

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

Feasible CAFE Standard Increases Using Emerging Diesel and Hybrid-Electric Technologies for Light-Duty Vehicles in the United States  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2003 7. Hermance, D. , Toyota Hybrid System, 1999SAE TOPTECGasoline Engine for the Toyota Hybrid System, JSAE Papervehicles being marketed by Toyota and Honda in the United

Burke, Andy; Abeles, Ethan C.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

Present Status and Marketing Prospects of the Emerging Hybrid-Electric and Diesel Technologies to Reduce CO2 Emissions of New Light-Duty Vehicles in California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

119, 2003 18. Hermance, D. , Toyota Hybrid System, 1999 SAEGasoline Engine for the Toyota Hybrid System, JSAE papereconomy and emissions of the Toyota and Honda Hybrid Cars (

Burke, Andy

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

Commercializing Light-Duty Plug-In/Plug-Out Hydrogen-Fuel-Cell Vehicles: "Mobile Electricity" Technologies, Early California Household Markets, and Innovation Management  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

device to compressed-natural-gas-vehicle consumers. ) TheZealand’s use of compressed-natural-gas (CNG) and liquefied-discusses lessons from compressed-natural-gas-vehicle (NGV)

Williams, Brett D

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

Commercializing Light-Duty Plug-In/Plug-Out Hydrogen-Fuel-Cell Vehicles:“Mobile Electricity” Technologies, Early California Household Markets, and Innovation Management  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

device to compressed-natural-gas-vehicle consumers. ) TheZealand’s use of compressed-natural-gas (CNG) and liquefied-discusses lessons from compressed-natural-gas-vehicle (NGV)

Williams, Brett D

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

Feasibility Study Of Advanced Technology Hov Systems: Volume 2b: Emissions Impact Of Roadway-powered Electric Buses, Light-duty Vehicles, And Automobiles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Excluding Conventional - Coal-fired Power Plants Chapter VI.of Conventional Coal-fired Power Plants The procedureCase II: Conventional Coal-fired Power Plants The procedure

Miller, Mark A.; Dato, Victor; Chira-chavala, Ted

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

Feasible Café Standard Increases Using Emerging Diesel and Hybrid-Electric Technologies for Light-Duty Vehicles in the United States  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

C.J. , The Future of Hybrid- Electric Vehicles and FuelsWith the emergence of hybrid-electric vehicles from JapaneseTechnologies 2.1 Hybrid-electric vehicles Hybrid-electric

Burke, Andy; Abeles, Ethan

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

Feasible CAFE Standard Increases Using Emerging Diesel and Hybrid-Electric Technologies for Light-Duty Vehicles in the United States  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

C.J. , The Future of Hybrid- Electric Vehicles and FuelsWith the emergence of hybrid-electric vehicles from JapaneseTechnologies 2.1 Hybrid-electric vehicles Hybrid-electric

Burke, Andy; Abeles, Ethan C.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

Present Status and Marketing Prospects of the Emerging Hybrid-Electric and Diesel Technologies to Reduce CO2 Emissions of New Light-Duty Vehicles in California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Hybrid-electric vehicles Hybrid -Electric Vehicles ..11 Figure 3 Sales of Hybrid Electric Vehicles in the U.S. to

Burke, Andy

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

Commercializing Light-Duty Plug-In/Plug-Out Hydrogen-Fuel-Cell Vehicles: "Mobile Electricity" Technologies, Early California Household Markets, and Innovation Management  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

goals for automotive fuel cell power systems hydrogen vs.a comparative assessment for fuel cell electric vehicles."Transition: Designing a Fuel- Cell Hypercar. ” 8th Annual

Williams, Brett D

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

Commercializing Light-Duty Plug-In/Plug-Out Hydrogen-Fuel-Cell Vehicles:“Mobile Electricity” Technologies, Early California Household Markets, and Innovation Management  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

goals for automotive fuel cell power systems hydrogen vs.a comparative assessment for fuel cell electric vehicles."plug-out hydrogen-fuel- cell vehicles: “Mobile Electricity"

Williams, Brett D

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

Summary of results from the National Renewable Energy Laboratory`s vehicle evaluation data collection efforts  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The U.S. DOE National Renewable Energy Laboratory conducted a data collection project for light-duty, alternative fuel vehicles (AFVs) for about 4 years. The project has collected data on 10 vehicle models (from the original equipment manufacturers) spanning model years 1991 through 1995. Emissions data have also been collected from a number of vehicles converted to natural gas (CNG) and liquefied petroleum gas (LPG). Most of the vehicles involved in the data collection and evaluation are part of the General Services Administration`s fleet of AFVs. This evaluation effort addressed the performance and reliability, fuel economy, and emissions of light- duty AFVs, with comparisons to similar gasoline vehicles when possible. Driver-reported complaints and unscheduled vehicle repairs were used to assess the performance and reliability of the AFVs compared to the comparable gasoline vehicles. Two sources of fuel economy were available, one from testing of vehicles on a chassis dynamometer, and the other from records of in-service fuel use. This report includes results from emissions testing completed on 169 AFVs and 161 gasoline control vehicles.

Whalen, P.; Kelly, K.; Motta, R.; Broderick, J.

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

Models  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

• A very typical statistical/econometric model assumes something like yt ? i.i.d. f (y, x, ?) (1) where f (·) is a parametric family known up to parameters ?. • Parameter estimation: maximum likelihood ˆ?n = arg max ? ln f (Yt, Xt, ?) (2) t • What if the basic model assumptions of (1) are violated? The parametric family may not contain the true model f0(x, y) that generated the data; or the data may not be i.i.d.; etc. Misspecified

Stas Kolenikov; U Of Missouri; U Of Missouri

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

Fuel Economy Guide - Model Year 1997  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

31 2.04DOHC TP TALON (4WD) . . . .L4 19 25 2.04DOHC TP M5 21 28 2.04DOHC TP FERRARI 456 . . . . . . . . . . . .L4 9 15 5.512 GP M6 10 16 5.512 GP FORD ASPIRE . . . . . . . ....

459

Model Year 2013 Green Vehicle Guide  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ID Veh Class Air Pollution Score City MPG Hwy MPG Cmb MPG Greenhouse Gas Score SmartWay Comb CO2 ACURA ILX 1.5 4 SCV-7 2WD Gasoline FC B3 Federal Tier 2 Bin 3 DHNXV01.5WF2...

460

Activities and Accomplishments in Model Year 2007  

SciTech Connect

Document summarizes the compliance activity of EPAct-covered state and alternative fuel provider fleets.

Not Available

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "model year light-duty" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

WMAP First Year Results  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) science team has released results from the first year of operation at the Earth-Sun L2 Lagrange point. The maps are consistent with previous observations but have much better sensitivity and angular resolution than the COBE DMR maps, and much better calibration accuracy and sky coverage than ground-based and balloon-borne experiments. The angular power spectra from these ground-based and balloon-borne experiments are consistent within their systematic and statistical uncertainties with the WMAP results. WMAP detected the large angular-scale correlation between the temperature and polarization anisotropies of the CMB caused by electron scattering since the Universe became reionized after the "Dark Ages", giving a value for the electron scattering optical depth of 0.17+/-0.04. The simplest Lambda-CDM model with n=1 and Omega_tot=1 provides an adequate fit to the WMAP data and gives parameters which are consistent with determinations of the Hubble constant and observations of the accelerating Universe using supernovae. The time-ordered data, maps, and power spectra from WMAP can be found at http://lambda.gsfc.nasa.gov along with 13 papers by the WMAP science team describing the results in detail.

E. L. Wright

2003-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

462

2009 Reporting Year  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

FRS Accumu- Book Value Year End Year's Foot Line # Gross Lated DD&A Net Additions DD&A of Disposals Other Balance Additions Other note Petroleum: A BCD E F G H IJ

463

Modeling  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ALE-AMR ALE-AMR code Wangyi Liu, John Bernard, Alex Friedman, Nathan Masters, Aaron Fisher, Velemir Mlaker, Alice Koniges, David Eder June 4, 2011 Abstract In this paper we describe an implementation of a single-fluid inter- face model in the ALE-AMR code to simulate surface tension effects. The model does not require explicit information on the physical state of the two phases. The only change to the existing fluid equations is an additional term in the stress tensor. We show results of applying the model to an expanding Al droplet surrounded by an Al vapor, where additional droplets are created. 1 Introduction The Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment II (NDCX II) is an induction accelerator planned for initial commissioning in 2012. The final design calls for a 3 MeV, Li+ ion beam, delivered in a bunch with characteristic pulse duration of 1 ns, and transverse dimension of order 1 mm. The

464

Allocation Year Rollover  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Allocation Year Rollover Allocation Year Rollover Allocation Year Rollover: 2013 to 2014 Note: Allocation Year 2013 (AY13) ends at 23:59:59 on Monday, January 13, 2014. AY14 runs from Tuesday, January 14, 2014 through Monday, January 12, 2015. Below are major changes that will go into effect with the beginning of AY14 on Tuesday, January 14, 2014. All times listed are PST. Scheduled System Downtimes There will be no service disruption during the allocation year rollover this year. Interactive and batch use will continue uninterrupted (except for "premium" jobs on Hopper; see below). Charging Across AY Boundary All batch jobs will continue running during the rollover. Time accrued before midnight will be charged to AY13 repos; time accrued after midnight will be charged to AY14 repos. Running batch jobs that are associated with

465

Applied Science and Technology Task Order Fiscal Year 2009 Year...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

09 Year-End Summary Report Applied Science and Technology Task Order Fiscal Year 2009 Year-End Summary Report Applied Science and Technology Task Order Fiscal Year 2009 Year-End...

466

Applied Science and Technology Task Order Fiscal Year 2010 Year...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

0 Year-End Summary Report Applied Science and Technology Task Order Fiscal Year 2010 Year-End Summary Report Applied Science and Technology Task Order Fiscal Year 2010 Year-End...

467

Applied Science and Technology Task Order Fiscal Year 2011 Year...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1 Year-End Summary Report Applied Science and Technology Task Order Fiscal Year 2011 Year-End Summary Report Applied Science and Technology Task Order Fiscal Year 2011 Year-End...

468

Applied Science and Technology Task Order Fiscal Year 2008 Year...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

8 Year-End Summary Report Applied Science and Technology Task Order Fiscal Year 2008 Year-End Summary Report Applied Science and Technology Task Order Fiscal Year 2008 Year-End...

469

Previous Year Awards  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Awards Awards Previous Year Awards 2013 Allocation Awards This page lists the allocation awards for NERSC for the 2013 allocation year (Jan 8, 2013 through Jan 13, 2014). Read More » NERSC Initiative for Scientific Exploration (NISE) 2013 Awards NISE is a mechanism used for allocating the NERSC reserve (10% of the total allocation). In 2013 we made the second year of the two-year awards made in 2012, supplemented by projects selected by the NERSC director. Read More » Data Intensive Computing Pilot Program 2012/2013 Awards NERSC's new data-intensive science pilot program is aimed at helping scientists capture, analyze and store the increasing stream of scientific data coming out of experiments, simulations and instruments. Read More » 2012 Allocation Awards This page lists the allocation awards for NERSC for the 2012 allocation

470

Welcome Year in Review  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

1 NMMSS Users Annual Training Meeting Orlando, Florida-May 23-25, 2006 Sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy & the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission Welcome & Year In Review...

471

Agency Improvement Plan For Fiscal Year 2006 and Fiscal Year...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Improvement Plan For Fiscal Year 2006 and Fiscal Year 2007 More Documents & Publications U.S> Department of Energy, Fiscal Year 2007 Buy American Act Report. Audit Report:...

472

Model Year 2013-2014 SmartWay SUVs Year Model Displ Cyl Trans  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Underhood ID Veh Class Smog Rating City MPG Hwy MPG Cmb MPG Greenhouse Gas Rating SmartWay 2013 AUDI Q5 Hybrid 2 4 SemiAuto-8 4WD Gasoline CA U2 California LEV-II ULEV...

473

Fiscal Year Justification of  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, epidemiology, laboratory services strengthen support for state, tribal, local, and territorial public healthDEPARTMENT of HEALTH and HUMAN SERVICES Fiscal Year 2012 Justification of Estimates Justification is one of several documents that fulfill the Department of Health and Human Services` (HHS

474

Year 2000: energy enough  

SciTech Connect

The growing needs for energy in the U.S. are reviewed, and it is predicted that energy supplies will need be more than doubled by the year 2000. The solution lies in three areas: goal targeting, resource management, and timing. A no-growth economy and an economy continuing growth at an appropriate rate are two scenarios discussed. The second major area of choice in fixing energy capabilities for the year 2000 involves management of fuel resources. Shortages of oil and gas dictate that the increase in energy consumption be changed to coal and uranium, both of which are available domestically; utilization of these energy sources will mean increased electrification. It is concluded, then, that the best avenues toward ensuring a national energy supply are utilization of coal and uranium and the practice of energy conservation through greater efficiency. Timing is the third critical area of decision making that affects future energy supply. The long lead time required to bring about a change in the national energy mix is cited. Current estimates indicate that now is the time to push toward a national electricity target of at least 7500 billion kWh for the year 2000. Meeting the target means almost four times the present electricity supply, at a growth rate of about 5.7 percent per year. This target assumes a reasonable measure of energy conservation. (MCW)

Starr, C.

1976-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

475

Outlook: The Next Twenty Years  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

all this discussion, the outlook for the next twenty yearsLBNL-54470 OUTLOOK: THE NEXT TWENTY YEARS H. MURAYAMAUniversity of California. OUTLOOK: THE NEXT TWENTY YEARS H.

Murayama, Hitoshi

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

476

From here to efficiency : time lags between the introduction of new technology and the achievement of fuel savings.  

SciTech Connect

In this paper, the energy savings of new technology offering significant improvements in fuel efficiency are tracked for over 20 years as vehicles incorporating that technology enter the fleet and replace conventional light-duty vehicles. Two separate analyses are discussed: a life-cycle analysis of aluminum-intensive vehicles and a fuel-cycle analysis of the energy and greenhouse gas emissions of double vs. triple fuel-economy vehicles. In both efforts, market-penetration modeling is used to simulate the rate at which new technology enters the new fleet, and stock-adjustment modeling is used to capture the inertia in turnover of new and existing current-technology vehicles. Together, these two effects--slowed market penetration and delayed vehicle replacement--increase the time lag between market introduction and the achievement of substantial energy savings. In both cases, 15-20 years elapse, before savings approach these levels.

Mintz, M.; Vyas, A.; Wang, M.; Stodolsky, F.; Cuenca, R.; Gaines, L.

1999-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

477

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 Early Release Reference Case  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Flex-Fuel Vehicle Modeling in the Flex-Fuel Vehicle Modeling in the Annual Energy Outlook John Maples Office of Energy Consumption and Energy Analysis March 20, 2013 | Washington, DC Light duty vehicle technology and alternative fuel market penetration 2 * Technologies affecting light-duty vehicle fuel economy are considered as either: - subsystem technologies (transmissions, materials, turbo charging) - advanced/alternative fuel vehicles (hybrids, EVs, FFVs) * Manufacturers Technology Choice Component (MTCC) - 9 manufacturers, 16 vehicle types, 6 size classes - adopts vehicle subsystem technologies for all vehicle types (conventional gasoline, FFV, hybrid, diesel, etc.) based on value of fuel economy and/or performance improvement * Consumer Vehicle Choice Component (CVCC)

478

Scenarios for a Clean Energy Future Transportation 6.1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

automotive manufacturers have announced commercial introductions of hybrid vehicles five to ten years sooner turnover of fleets, gasoline's dominance of light-duty vehicle fueling infrastructure, and low energy vehicles are included, as in the case here. Recent studies limited to a 10-year time horizon suggest

479

Calendar Year 2013  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3 Office of Inspector General 
1000 3 Office of Inspector General 
1000 Independence Avenue, SW 
 Washington, DC 20585 202-586-4128 en Audit Report: OAS-FS-14-03 http://energy.gov/ig/downloads/audit-report-oas-fs-14-03 Audit Report: OAS-FS-14-03

480

Clean Cities 2013 Vehicle Buyer's Guide (Brochure), Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy (EERE)  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Natural Gas Natural Gas Propane Electric Hybrid Ethanol Flex-Fuel Biodiesel Vehicle Buyer's Guide Clean Cities 2013 Today's auto manufacturers offer hundreds of light-duty vehicle models that take advantage of alternative fuels and advanced technologies in order to help drivers and fleets reduce petroleum use, cut emissions, and save on fuel costs. This guide features a comprehensive list of such vehicles set to arrive in Model Year 2013. Contents Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 About This Guide . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Compressed Natural Gas . . . . . 6 Propane . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 All-Electric . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 Plug-In Hybrid Electric . . . . . . . 16 Hybrid Electric . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 Ethanol Flex-Fuel . . . . . . . . . . . . 24 Biodiesel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34 Vehicle Buyer's Guide Clean Cities 2013 Disclaimers This report was

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "model year light-duty" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

2013 Director's New Year Address  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Director's New Year Address 2013 Director's New Year Address Print Looking Forward and Celebrating 20 Years in 2013 falocne We recently sat down with ALS Director Roger Falcone to...

482

Residential Commercial Industrial Year  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 Residential Commercial Industrial Year and State Volume (million cubic feet) Consumers Volume (million cubic feet) Consumers Volume (million cubic feet) Consumers 2000 Total ................... 4,996,179 59,252,728 3,182,469 5,010,817 8,142,240 220,251 2001 Total ................... 4,771,340 60,286,364 3,022,712 4,996,446 7,344,219 217,026 2002 Total ................... 4,888,816 61,107,254 3,144,169 5,064,384 7,507,180 205,915 2003 Total ................... R 5,079,351 R 61,871,450 R 3,179,493 R 5,152,177 R 7,150,396 R 205,514 2004 Total ................... 4,884,521 62,469,142 3,141,653 5,135,985 7,250,634 212,191 Alabama ...................... 43,842 806,175 26,418 65,040 169,135 2,800 Alaska.......................... 18,200 104,360 18,373 13,999 46,580 10 Arizona ........................

483

Projects of the year  

SciTech Connect

The Peabody Hotel, Orlando, Florida was the site of Power Engineering magazine's 2006 Projects of the Year Awards Banquet, which kicked-off the Power-Gen International conference and exhibition. The Best Coal-fired Project was awarded to Tri-State Generation and Transmission Association Inc., owner of Springenville Unit 3. This is a 400 MW pulverized coal plant in Springeville, AZ, sited with two existing coal-fired units. Designed to fire Powder River Basin coal, it has low NOx burners and selective catalytic reduction for NOx control, dry flue gas desulfurization for SO{sub 2} control and a pulse jet baghouse for particulate control. It has a seven-stage feedwater heater and condensers to ensure maximum performance. Progress Energy-Carolinas' Asheville Power Station FGD and SCR Project was awarded the 2006 coal-fired Project Honorable Mention. This plant in Skyland, NC was required to significantly reduce NOx emissions. When completed, the improvements will reduce NOx by 93% compared to 1996 levels and SO{sub 2} by 93% compared to 2001 levels. Awards for best gas-fired, nuclear, and renewable/sustainable energy projects are recorded. The Sasyadko Coal-Mine Methane Cogeneration Plant near Donezk, Ukraine, was given the 2006 Honorable Mention for Best Renewable/Sustainable Energy Project. In November 2004, Ukraine was among 14 nations to launch the Methane to Markets partnership. The award-winning plant is fuelled by methane released during coal extraction. It generates 42 MW of power. 4 photos.

Hansen, T.

2007-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

484

YEAR 2 BIOMASS UTILIZATION  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) Year 2 Biomass Utilization Final Technical Report summarizes multiple projects in biopower or bioenergy, transportation biofuels, and bioproducts. A prototype of a novel advanced power system, termed the high-temperature air furnace (HITAF), was tested for performance while converting biomass and coal blends to energy. Three biomass fuels--wood residue or hog fuel, corn stover, and switchgrass--and Wyoming subbituminous coal were acquired for combustion tests in the 3-million-Btu/hr system. Blend levels were 20% biomass--80% coal on a heat basis. Hog fuel was prepared for the upcoming combustion test by air-drying and processing through a hammer mill and screen. A K-Tron biomass feeder capable of operating in both gravimetric and volumetric modes was selected as the HITAF feed system. Two oxide dispersion-strengthened (ODS) alloys that would be used in the HITAF high-temperature heat exchanger were tested for slag corrosion rates. An alumina layer formed on one particular alloy, which was more corrosion-resistant than a chromia layer that formed on the other alloy. Research activities were completed in the development of an atmospheric pressure, fluidized-bed pyrolysis-type system called the controlled spontaneous reactor (CSR), which is used to process and condition biomass. Tree trimmings were physically and chemically altered by the CSR process, resulting in a fuel that was very suitable for feeding into a coal combustion or gasification system with little or no feed system modifications required. Experimental procedures were successful for producing hydrogen from biomass using the bacteria Thermotoga, a deep-ocean thermal vent organism. Analytical procedures for hydrogen were evaluated, a gas chromatography (GC) method was derived for measuring hydrogen yields, and adaptation culturing and protocols for mutagenesis were initiated to better develop strains that can use biomass cellulose. Fly ash derived from cofiring coal with waste paper, sunflower hulls, and wood waste showed a broad spectrum of chemical and physical characteristics, according to American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) C618 procedures. Higher-than-normal levels of magnesium, sodium, and potassium oxide were observed for the biomass-coal fly ash, which may impact utilization in cement replacement in concrete under ASTM requirements. Other niche markets for biomass-derived fly ash were explored. Research was conducted to develop/optimize a catalytic partial oxidation-based concept for a simple, low-cost fuel processor (reformer). Work progressed to evaluate the effects of temperature and denaturant on ethanol catalytic partial oxidation. A catalyst was isolated that had a yield of 24 mole percent, with catalyst coking limited to less than 15% over a period of 2 hours. In biodiesel research, conversion of vegetable oils to biodiesel using an alternative alkaline catalyst was demonstrated without the need for subsequent water washing. In work related to biorefinery technologies, a continuous-flow reactor was used to react ethanol with lactic acid prepared from an ammonium lactate concentrate produced in fermentations conducted at the EERC. Good yields of ester were obtained even though the concentration of lactic acid in the feed was low with respect to the amount of water present. Esterification gave lower yields of ester, owing to the lowered lactic acid content of the feed. All lactic acid fermentation from amylose hydrolysate test trials was completed. Management activities included a decision to extend several projects to December 31, 2003, because of delays in receiving biomass feedstocks for testing and acquisition of commercial matching funds. In strategic studies, methods for producing acetate esters for high-value fibers, fuel additives, solvents, and chemical intermediates were discussed with several commercial entities. Commercial industries have an interest in efficient biomass gasification designs but are waiting for economic incentives. Utility, biorefinery, pulp and paper, or o

Christopher J. Zygarlicke

2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

485

Canada's Fuel Consumption Guide | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Canada's Fuel Consumption Guide Canada's Fuel Consumption Guide Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Canada's Fuel Consumption Guide Agency/Company /Organization: Natural Resources Canada Focus Area: Fuels & Efficiency Topics: Analysis Tools Website: oee.nrcan.gc.ca/transportation/tools/fuel-consumption-guide/fuel-consu Natural Resources Canada has compiled fuel consumption ratings for passenger cars and light-duty pickup trucks, vans, and special purpose vehicles sold in Canada. The website links to the Fuel Consumption Guide and allows users to search for vehicles from current and past model years. It also provides information about vehicle maintenance and other practices to reduce fuel consumption. How to Use This Tool This tool is most helpful when using these strategies:

486

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - Source  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Efficiency from Executive Summary Efficiency from Executive Summary With more efficient light-duty vehicles, motor gasoline consumption declines while diesel fuel use grows, even as more natural gas is used in heavy-duty vehicles figure data The AEO2013 Reference case incorporates the GHG and CAFE standards for LDVs [6] through the 2025 model year. The increase in vehicle efficiency reduces LDV energy use from 16.1 quadrillion Btu in 2011 to 14.0 quadrillion Btu in 2025, predominantly motor gasoline (Figure 6). LDV energy use continues to decline through 2036, then levels off until 2039 as growth in population and vehicle miles traveled offsets more modest improvement in fuel efficiency. Furthermore, the improved economics of natural gas as a fuel for heavy-duty vehicles result in increased use that offsets a portion of diesel fuel

487

Annual Energy Outlook 2010: With Projections to 2035  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

average average fleet-wide fuel economy and CO2-equivalent emissions compliance levels, model years 2012-2016: Environmental Protection Agency and National Highway Traffic Safety Administra- tion, Light-Duty Vehicle Greenhouse Gas Emission Stan- dards and Corporate Average Fuel Economy Standards; Fi- nal Rule, 40 CFR, Parts 85, 86, and 600, 49 CFR Parts 531, 533, 537, and 538 [EPA-HQ-OAR-2009-0472; FRL-_8959-4; NHTSA-2009-0059], RIN 2060-AP58; RIN 2127-AK50 (Washington, DC, April 2010), web site www.nhtsa.dot.gov/ staticfiles/DOT/NHTSA/Rulemaking/Rules/ AssociatedFiles/CAFE-GHG-MY_2012-2016_Final_Rule_ v2. pdf. Table 2. Renewable portfolio standards in the 30 States with current mandates: U.S. Energy Informa- tion Administration, Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting. Based on a review of enabling legislation and regulatory actions from the various

488

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - Source  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Transportation from Executive Summary Transportation from Executive Summary With more efficient light-duty vehicles, motor gasoline consumption declines while diesel fuel use grows, even as more natural gas is used in heavy-duty vehicles figure data The AEO2013 Reference case incorporates the GHG and CAFE standards for LDVs [6] through the 2025 model year. The increase in vehicle efficiency reduces LDV energy use from 16.1 quadrillion Btu in 2011 to 14.0 quadrillion Btu in 2025, predominantly motor gasoline (Figure 6). LDV energy use continues to decline through 2036, then levels off until 2039 as growth in population and vehicle miles traveled offsets more modest improvement in fuel efficiency. Furthermore, the improved economics of natural gas as a fuel for heavy-duty vehicles result in increased use that offsets a portion of diesel fuel

489

Mass-Production Cost Estimation for Automotive Fuel Cell Systems - DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report Brian D. James (Primary Contact), Kevin Baum, Andrew B. Spisak, Whitney G. Colella Strategic Analysis, Inc. 4075 Wilson Blvd. Suite 200 Arlington VA 22203 Phone: (703) 778-7114 Email: bjames@sainc.com DOE Managers HQ: Jason Marcinkoski, Phone: (202) 586-7466 Email: Jason.Marcinkoski@ee.doe.gov GO: Gregory Kleen Phone: (720) 356-1672 Email: Gregory.Kleen@go.doe.gov Contract Number: DE-EE0005236 Project Start Date: September 30, 2011 Project End Date: September 30, 2016 Fiscal Year (FY) 2012 Objectives Update 2011 automotive fuel cell cost model to include * latest performance data and system design information. Examine costs of fuel cell systems (FCSs) for light-duty * vehicle and bus applications.

490

Finalize Historic National Program to Reduce Greenhouse Gases and Improve  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Finalize Historic National Program to Reduce Greenhouse Gases and Improve Finalize Historic National Program to Reduce Greenhouse Gases and Improve Fuel Economy for Cars and Trucks Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Finalize Historic National Program to Reduce Greenhouse Gases and Improve Fuel Economy for Cars and Trucks Agency/Company /Organization: EPA and NHTSA Focus Area: Standards - Incentives - Policies - Regulations Topics: Policy Impacts Resource Type: Reports, Journal Articles, & Tools Website: www.epa.gov/oms/climate/regulations/420f10014.pdf This document establish a national program consisting of new standards for model year 2012 through 2016 light-duty vehicles that will reduce greenhouse gas emissions and improve fuel economy. EPA is finalizing the first-ever national greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions standards under the

491

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - Source  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Transportation from Executive Summary Transportation from Executive Summary With more efficient light-duty vehicles, motor gasoline consumption declines while diesel fuel use grows, even as more natural gas is used in heavy-duty vehicles figure data The AEO2013 Reference case incorporates the GHG and CAFE standards for LDVs [6] through the 2025 model year. The increase in vehicle efficiency reduces LDV energy use from 16.1 quadrillion Btu in 2011 to 14.0 quadrillion Btu in 2025, predominantly motor gasoline (Figure 6). LDV energy use continues to decline through 2036, then levels off until 2039 as growth in population and vehicle miles traveled offsets more modest improvement in fuel efficiency. Furthermore, the improved economics of natural gas as a fuel for heavy-duty vehicles result in increased use that offsets a portion of diesel fuel

492

Canada's Fuel Consumption Guide Website | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Canada's Fuel Consumption Guide Website Canada's Fuel Consumption Guide Website Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Canada's Fuel Consumption Guide Website Focus Area: Fuel Efficiency Topics: Market Analysis Website: oee.nrcan.gc.ca/transportation/tools/fuelratings/ratings-search.cfm Equivalent URI: cleanenergysolutions.org/content/canadas-fuel-consumption-guide-websit Language: English Policies: Regulations Regulations: Fuel Efficiency Standards This website provides a compilation of fuel consumption ratings for passenger cars and light-duty pickup trucks, vans and special purpose vehicles sold in Canada. The website links to the Fuel Consumption Guide and allows users to search for vehicles from current and past model years. It also provides information about vehicle maintenance and other practices

493

Development of a dedicated ethanol ultra-low-emissions vehicle (ULEV): Phase 3 report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of the 3.5 year project discussed in this report was to develop a commercially competitive vehicle powered by ethanol (or an ethanol blend) that can meet California`s Ultra Low Emissions Vehicle (ULEV) standards and equivalent Corporate Average Fuel Economy (CAFE) energy efficiency for a light duty passenger car application. This particular report summarizes the third phase of the project, which lasted 12 months. Emissions tests were conducted with advanced after-treatment devices on one of the two, almost identical, test vehicles, a 1993 Ford Taurus flexible fuel vehicle. The report also covers tests on the engine removed from the second Taurus vehicle. This engine was modified for an increased compression ratio, fitted with air assist injectors, and included an advanced engine control system with model-based control.

Dodge, L.; Callahan, T.; Leone, D.; Naegeli, D.; Shouse, K.; Smith, L.; Whitney, K. [Southwest Research Inst., San Antonio, TX (United States)] [Southwest Research Inst., San Antonio, TX (United States)

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

494

Final report for the DOE Metal Hydride Center of Excellence.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report summarizes the R&D activities within the U.S. Department of Energy Metal Hydride Center of Excellence (MHCoE) from March 2005 to June 2010. The purpose of the MHCoE has been to conduct highly collaborative and multi-disciplinary applied R&D to develop new reversible hydrogen storage materials that meet or exceed DOE 2010 and 2015 system goals for hydrogen storage materials. The MHCoE combines three broad areas: mechanisms and modeling (which provide a theoretically driven basis for pursuing new materials), materials development (in which new materials are synthesized and characterized) and system design and engineering (which allow these new materials to be realized as practical automotive hydrogen storage systems). This Final Report summarizes the organization and execution of the 5-year research program to develop practical hydrogen storage materials for light duty vehicles. Major results from the MHCoE are summarized, along with suggestions for future research areas.

Keller, Jay O.; Klebanoff, Leonard E.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

495

Neutron capture therapy: Years of experimentation---Years of reflection  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes early research on neutron capture therapy over a number of years, beginning in 1950, speaking briefly of patient treatments but dwelling mostly on interpretations of our animal experiments. This work carried out over eighteen years, beginning over forty years ago. Yet, it is only fitting to start by relating how neutron capture therapy became part of Brookhaven's Medical Research Center program.

Farr, L.E.

1991-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

496

Clean Cities 2014 Vehicle Buyer's Guide (Brochure)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This annual guide features a comprehensive list of 2014 light-duty alternative fuel and advanced vehicles, grouped by fuel and technology. The guide provides model-specific information on vehicle specifications, manufacturer suggested retail price, fuel economy, energy impact, and emissions. The information can be used to identify options, compare vehicles, and help inform purchase decisions.

Not Available

2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

497

Introduction: Twenty Years of ACCESS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

vision of future priorities in transportation research ands 20th Transportation Center. A year ago, UCTC’s future, and

Cervero, Robert

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

498

Kinetic Model Development for the Combustion of Particulate Matter from Conventional and Soy Methyl Ester Diesel Fuels  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The primary objective of this research has been to investigate how the oxidation characteristics of diesel particulate matter (PM) are affected by blending soy-based biodiesel fuel with conventional ultra low sulfur diesel (ULSD) fuel. PM produced in a light duty engine from different biodiesel-conventional fuel blends was subjected to a range of physical and chemical measurements in order to better understand the mechanisms by which fuel-related changes to oxidation reactivity are brought about. These observations were then incorporated into a kinetic model to predict PM oxidation. Nanostructure of the fixed carbon was investigated by HR-TEM and showed that particulates from biodiesel had a more open structure than particulates generated from conventional diesel fuel, which was confirmed by BET surface area measurements. Surface area evolution with extent of oxidation reaction was measured for PM from ULSD and biodiesel. Biodiesel particulate has a significantly larger surface area for the first 40% of conversion, at which point the samples become quite similar. Oxidation characteristics of nascent PM and the fixed carbon portion were measured by temperature programmed oxidation (TPO) and it was noted that increased biodiesel blending lowered the light-off temperature as well as the temperature where the peak rate of oxidation occurred. A shift in the oxidation profiles of all fuels was seen when the mobile carbon fraction was removed, leaving only the fixed carbon, however the trend in temperature advantage of the biofuel blending remained. The mobile carbon fraction was measured by temperature programmed desorption found to generally increase with increasing biodiesel blend level. The relative change in the light-off temperatures for the nascent and fixed carbon samples was found to be related to the fraction of mobile carbon. Effective Arrhenius parameters for fixed carbon oxidation were directly measured with isothermal, differential oxidation experiments. Normalizing the reaction rate to the total carbon surface area available for reaction allowed for the definition of a single reaction rate with constant activation energy (112.5 {+-} 5.8 kJ/mol) for the oxidation of PM, independent of its fuel source. A kinetic model incorporating the surface area dependence of fixed carbon oxidation rate and the impact of the mobile carbon fraction was constructed and validated against experimental data.

Strzelec, Andrea [ORNL

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

499

ACTIVITIES REPORT FISCAL YEAR 2009  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Phase Transition in Cooperative Agent-based Digital Ant ... a method of structurally constructing models of an ... This figure shows a temporal model of a ...

2010-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

500

Neutron capture therapy: Years of experimentation---Years of reflection  

SciTech Connect

This report describes early research on neutron capture therapy over a number of years, beginning in 1950, speaking briefly of patient treatments but dwelling mostly on interpretations of our animal experiments. This work carried out over eighteen years, beginning over forty years ago. Yet, it is only fitting to start by relating how neutron capture therapy became part of Brookhaven`s Medical Research Center program.

Farr, L.E.

1991-12-16T23:59:59.000Z