National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for model technology cost

  1. Cost and Performance Assumptions for Modeling Electricity Generation Technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tidball, R.; Bluestein, J.; Rodriguez, N.; Knoke, S.

    2010-11-01

    The goal of this project was to compare and contrast utility scale power plant characteristics used in data sets that support energy market models. Characteristics include both technology cost and technology performance projections to the year 2050. Cost parameters include installed capital costs and operation and maintenance (O&M) costs. Performance parameters include plant size, heat rate, capacity factor or availability factor, and plant lifetime. Conventional, renewable, and emerging electricity generating technologies were considered. Six data sets, each associated with a different model, were selected. Two of the data sets represent modeled results, not direct model inputs. These two data sets include cost and performance improvements that result from increased deployment as well as resulting capacity factors estimated from particular model runs; other data sets represent model input data. For the technologies contained in each data set, the levelized cost of energy (LCOE) was also evaluated, according to published cost, performance, and fuel assumptions.

  2. Learning and cost reductions for generating technologies in the national energy modeling system (NEMS)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gumerman, Etan; Marnay, Chris

    2004-01-01

    of International Learning on Technology Cost. In Issues ofbetween initial new technology cost estimates and actualthe revolutionary technologies have cost reductions beyond

  3. Estimating the Market Penetration of Residential Cool Storage Technology Using Economic Cost Modeling 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weijo, R. O.; and Brown, D. R.

    1988-01-01

    This study estimated the market penetration for residential cool storage technology using economic cost modeling. Residential cool storage units produce and store chill during off-peak periods of the day to be used during times of peak electric...

  4. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2015: Technical Cost Modeling for Vehicle Lightweighting

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Presentation given by IBIS Associates at 2015 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about technical cost modeling for...

  5. High Cost/High Risk Components to Chalcogenide Molded Lens Model: Molding Preforms and Mold Technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bernacki, Bruce E.

    2012-10-05

    This brief report contains a critique of two key components of FiveFocal's cost model for glass compression molding of chalcogenide lenses for infrared applications. Molding preforms and mold technology have the greatest influence on the ultimate cost of the product and help determine the volumes needed to select glass molding over conventional single-point diamond turning or grinding and polishing. This brief report highlights key areas of both technologies with recommendations for further study.

  6. Technology and Cost of the Model Year (MY) 2007 Toyota Camry HEV Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2007-09-30

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) provides research and development (R&D) support to the Department of Energy on issues related to the cost and performance of hybrid vehicles. ORNL frequently benchmarks its own research against commercially available hybrid components currently used in the market. In 2005 we completed a detailed review of the cost of the second generation Prius hybrid. This study examines the new 2007 Camry hybrid model for changes in technology and cost relative to the Prius. The work effort involved a detailed review of the Camry hybrid and the system control strategy to identify the hybrid components used in the drive train. Section 2 provides this review while Section 3 presents our detailed evaluation of the specific drive train components and their cost estimates. Section 3 also provides a summary of the total electrical drive train cost for the Camry hybrid vehicle and contrasts these estimates to the costs for the second generation Prius that we estimated in 2005. Most of the information on cost and performance were derived from meetings with the technical staff of Toyota, Nissan, and some key Tier I suppliers like Hitachi and Panasonic Electric Vehicle Energy (PEVE) and we thank these companies for their kind cooperation.

  7. Transaction Costs, Information Technology and Development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Singh, Nirvikar

    2004-01-01

    Transaction Costs, Information Technology and Development 1.Transaction Costs, Information Technology and DevelopmentTransaction Costs, Information Technology and Development *

  8. Transaction Costs, Information Technology and Development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Singh, Nirvikar

    2004-01-01

    Transaction Costs, Information Technology and Development 1.Transaction Costs, Information Technology and DevelopmentTransaction Costs, Information Technology and Development

  9. A cost modeling approach using learning curves to study the evolution of technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kar, Ashish M. (Ashish Mohan)

    2007-01-01

    The present work looks into the concept of learning curves to decipher the underlying mechanism in cost evolution. The concept is not new and has been used since last seven decades to understand cost walk down in various ...

  10. Cost Model and Cost Estimating Software

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1997-03-28

    This chapter discusses a formalized methodology is basically a cost model, which forms the basis for estimating software.

  11. A cost/benefit model for insertion of technological innovation into a total quality management program 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ratliff, William L

    1997-01-01

    This study provides economic justification for insertion of technological innovation into a total quality management (TQM) program in a remanufacturing environment. One of the core principles of TQM is continuous improvement. A preferred metric...

  12. Cost Model for Digital Curation: Cost of Digital Migration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kejser, Ulla Bøgvad; Nielsen, Anders Bo; Thirifays, Alex

    2009-01-01

    and Monitor Technology functions each consists of two costinfluence, the fewer costs. Monitor Technology depends onCost Critical Activities Monitor community Report on monitoring Monitor technology

  13. Aerogel commercialization: Technology, markets and costs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carlson, G.; Lewis, D.; McKinley, K.; Richardson, J.; Tillotson, T.

    1994-10-07

    Commercialization of aerogels has been slow due to several factors including cost and manufacturability issues. The technology itself is well enough developed as a result of work over the past decade by an international-community of researchers. Several extensive substantial markets appear to exist for aerogels as thermal and sound insulators, if production costs can keep prices in line with competing established materials. The authors discuss here the elements which they have identified as key cost drivers, and they give a prognosis for the evolution of the technology leading to reduced cost aerogel production.

  14. NUCLEAR ENERGY SYSTEM COST MODELING

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Francesco Ganda; Brent Dixon

    2012-09-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy’s Fuel Cycle Technologies (FCT) Program is preparing to perform an evaluation of the full range of possible Nuclear Energy Systems (NES) in 2013. These include all practical combinations of fuels and transmuters (reactors and sub-critical systems) in single and multi-tier combinations of burners and breeders with no, partial, and full recycle. As part of this evaluation, Levelized Cost of Electricity at Equilibrium (LCAE) ranges for each representative system will be calculated. To facilitate the cost analyses, the 2009 Advanced Fuel Cycle Cost Basis Report is being amended to provide up-to-date cost data for each step in the fuel cycle, and a new analysis tool, NE-COST, has been developed. This paper explains the innovative “Island” approach used by NE-COST to streamline and simplify the economic analysis effort and provides examples of LCAE costs generated. The Island approach treats each transmuter (or target burner) and the associated fuel cycle facilities as a separate analysis module, allowing reuse of modules that appear frequently in the NES options list. For example, a number of options to be screened will include a once-through uranium oxide (UOX) fueled light water reactor (LWR). The UOX LWR may be standalone, or may be the first stage in a multi-stage system. Using the Island approach, the UOX LWR only needs to be modeled once and the module can then be reused on subsequent fuel cycles. NE-COST models the unit operations and life cycle costs associated with each step of the fuel cycle on each island. This includes three front-end options for supplying feedstock to fuel fabrication (mining/enrichment, reprocessing of used fuel from another island, and/or reprocessing of this island’s used fuel), along with the transmuter and back-end storage/disposal. Results of each island are combined based on the fractional energy generated by each islands in an equilibrium system. The cost analyses use the probability distributions of key parameters and employs Monte Carlo sampling to arrive at an island’s cost probability density function (PDF). When comparing two NES to determine delta cost, strongly correlated parameters can be cancelled out so that only the differences in the systems contribute to the relative cost PDFs. For example, one comparative analysis presented in the paper is a single stage LWR-UOX system versus a two-stage LWR-UOX to LWR-MOX system. In this case, the first stage of both systems is the same (but with different fractional energy generation), while the second stage of the UOX to MOX system uses the same type transmuter but the fuel type and feedstock sources are different. In this case, the cost difference between systems is driven by only the fuel cycle differences of the MOX stage.

  15. 2003 --Ninth Americas Conference on Information Systems 1653 FLEXIBILITY AND COST IN INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walden, Eric

    , outsourcing, economic models, flexibility, base cost Introduction Information technology (IT) outsourcing2003 -- Ninth Americas Conference on Information Systems 1653 FLEXIBILITY AND COST IN INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY OUTSOURCING: BALANCING OPPOSING GOALS Param V. Singh Jerry Rawls College of Business Texas Tech

  16. Innovative High-Performance Deposition Technology for Low-Cost...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Innovative High-Performance Deposition Technology for Low-Cost Manufacturing of OLED Lighting Innovative High-Performance Deposition Technology for Low-Cost Manufacturing of OLED...

  17. Estimating the Benefits and Costs of Distributed Energy Technologies...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Estimating the Benefits and Costs of Distributed Energy Technologies Workshop - Agenda and Summary Estimating the Benefits and Costs of Distributed Energy Technologies Workshop -...

  18. Estimating the Benefits and Costs of Distributed Energy Technologies...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Benefits and Costs of Distributed Energy Technologies Workshop - Agenda and Summary Estimating the Benefits and Costs of Distributed Energy Technologies Workshop - Agenda and...

  19. Fuel Consumption and Cost Benefits of DOE Vehicle Technologies...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Consumption and Cost Benefits of DOE Vehicle Technologies Program Fuel Consumption and Cost Benefits of DOE Vehicle Technologies Program 2012 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program...

  20. Market Concepts, Competing Technologies and Cost Challenges for Automotive and Stationary Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lipman, Todd; Sperling, Daniel

    2003-01-01

    concepts, competing technologies and cost challenges forconcepts, competing technologies and cost challenges forconcepts, competing technologies and cost challenges 1319

  1. New technology, concepts aim at lower costs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moritis, G.

    1996-10-07

    New technologies both at the application stage and at the concept stage aim at reducing costs for producing and developing offshore fields. At the center of many of these new technologies are floating production, storage, offloading, and drilling vessels. These vessels are tied to subsea completions that take advantage of smaller and lighter wellheads, and such emerging technologies as subsea multiphase meters and pumps, and subsea separators and boosters. The paper discusses floating production, the inclusion of a drilling/workover rig on the turret of a ship-shaped FPSO, the use of smaller turrets, and subsea systems (wellheads, flowmeters, composite materials).

  2. Cost Model for Digital Curation: Cost of Digital Migration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kejser, Ulla Bøgvad; Nielsen, Anders Bo; Thirifays, Alex

    2009-01-01

    Curation: Cost of Digital Migration Ulla Bøgvad Kejser, Thefocus especially on costing digital migration activities. Inof the OAIS Model digital migration includes both transfer (

  3. Modeling the Cost of Climate Policy: Distinguishing Between Alternative Cost Deftitions and Long-Run Cost Dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Modeling the Cost of Climate Policy: Distinguishing Between Alternative Cost Deftitions and Long. There are alternative definitions of cost and the evolution of technologies and preferences is a complex and highly, some are more useful." To be more useful, The Energy Journal, Vol. 24, No. 1. CopyrightQ2003

  4. Modeling TechnologyModeling Technology Innovation:Innovation: Uncertainties inUncertainties in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    costs and preferred technologies? #12;2 E.S. Rubin, Carnegie Mellon Focus on Innovation for technology for achieving climate change policy goals at the lowest cost, in conjunction with other mitigation1 Modeling TechnologyModeling Technology Innovation:Innovation: Uncertainties in

  5. Minimizing the cost of subsea developments through technological innovation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eyre, G.; Loth, B.

    1994-12-31

    The paper summarizes the results of an extensive study carried out for the UK Government. This assessed the cost and economic impact of technological innovation on subsea and floating developments in the UKCS. The study covered, innovations that could be applied to subsea developments to significantly reduce cost, including multiwell completions, composite pipelines, compartmented pipelines, pipeline specification breaking and autonomous control systems. Cost and economic models were used to assess the economic impact of technological innovation on marginal field developments. The results of these assessments were drawn up as a series of ranking lists designed to assist manufacturers and suppliers in establishing priorities for research and development funding. The study also explored the potential UKCS and World market for innovative subsea technologies and quantified the research and development required to bring key innovations into commercial use.

  6. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Cost-Effective...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Cost-Effective Fabrication of High-Temperature Ceramic Capacitors for Power Inverters Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Cost-Effective Fabrication of High-Temperature...

  7. Brookhaven National Laboratory's low cost solar technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilhelm, W.G.

    1984-09-01

    The problems identified in early study - cost, architectural compatibility, and reliability - were not likely to be solved with conventional practices in the solar industry. BNL then embarked upon an iterative development process towards a solution founded on the methodology which establish a set of key guidelines for the research. With the derivation of cost goals ($5 to $6 per square foot, installed) and performance targets (consistent with conventional technology) it was considered important to use sophisticated industrial product development technologies to achieve the desired results. The normal industrial practice to reduce cost, for example, is to reduce material intensity, strive for simplicity in design and apply as much mass production as possible. This approach revealed the potential of polymer films as a basic construction material for solar collectors. Further refinements to reduce cost were developed, including the perfection of a non-pressurized absorber/heat exchanger and the adaptability of a printable optical selective surface. Additional significant advantages were acquired through application of a monocoque construction technique borrowed from the aircraft industry. The procedures used, including important support from industry to help identify materials and guide fabrication techniques, eventually resulted in construction and successful testing of a thin polymer film solar collector. To achieve the overall objectives of viable solar economics some system concepts have been explored by BNL. Consistent with the cost goals mentioned, it is believed that the low pressure designs pursued will be successful. Designs for the storage tank and distribution system that have been pursued include the use of polymer film lined sheet metal for the storage tanks and plastic pipe.

  8. Innovative High-Performance Deposition Technology for Low-Cost...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Hamer, Tim Spencer OLEDWorks LLC Innovative High-Performance Deposition Technology for Low-Cost Manufacturing of OLED Lighting 2015 Building Technologies Office Peer Review DOE...

  9. Hydropower Baseline Cost Modeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    O'Connor, Patrick W.; Zhang, Qin Fen; DeNeale, Scott T.; Chalise, Dol Raj; Centurion, Emma E.

    2015-01-01

    Recent resource assessments conducted by the United States Department of Energy have identified significant opportunities for expanding hydropower generation through the addition of power to non-powered dams and on undeveloped stream-reaches. Additional interest exists in the powering of existing water resource infrastructure such as conduits and canals, upgrading and expanding existing hydropower facilities, and the construction new pumped storage hydropower. Understanding the potential future role of these hydropower resources in the nation’s energy system requires an assessment of the environmental and techno-economic issues associated with expanding hydropower generation. To facilitate these assessments, this report seeks to fill the current gaps in publically available hydropower cost-estimating tools that can support the national-scale evaluation of hydropower resources.

  10. Understanding the Costs of Business Process Management Technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ulm, Universität

    Understanding the Costs of Business Process Management Technology Bela Mutschler and Manfred. However, introduc- ing BPM approaches in enterprises is associated with significant costs. Though ex- isting economic-driven IT evaluation and software cost estimation approaches have received considerable

  11. New Technology Provides Cost-Effective Emissions Control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Technology Provides Cost- Effective Emissions Control Solution for CHP Applications Renewable are the most cost-effective CHP technology less than three MW in size. With a cost effective) applications less than three megawatts (MW). Because they are relatively low cost and have high

  12. COST TRANSFERS TO FEDERALLY FUNDED AWARDS California Institute of Technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    COST TRANSFERS TO FEDERALLY FUNDED AWARDS California Institute of Technology Pasadena, California 7) #12;COST TRANSFERS TO FEDERALLY FUNDED AWARDS California Institute of Technology Pasadena, California: A cost transfer is an after-the-fact transfer of costs (labor or non-labor) from a sponsored or non

  13. COST SHARING ON SPONSORED PROJECTS California Institute of Technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goddard III, William A.

    COST SHARING ON SPONSORED PROJECTS California Institute of Technology Pasadena, California 1 of 4 7 Institute of Technology (Caltech) that committed cost sharing is proposed, approved, administered;COST SHARING ON SPONSORED PROJECTS California Institute of Technology Pasadena, California 2 of 4 7

  14. Energy information systems (EIS): Technology costs, benefit, and best practice uses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Granderson, Jessica

    2014-01-01

    systems (EIS): Technology costs, benefit, and best practicesystems (EIS): Technology costs, benefits, and best practicesystems: 1. What are the technology costs of an EIS? 2. What

  15. Total cost model for making sourcing decisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Morita, Mark, M.B.A. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2007-01-01

    This thesis develops a total cost model based on the work done during a six month internship with ABB. In order to help ABB better focus on low cost country sourcing, a total cost model was developed for sourcing decisions. ...

  16. Updating MIT's cost estimation model for shipbuilding

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Matthew B., Lieutenant, junior grade

    2008-01-01

    This thesis project will update the MIT ship cost estimation model by combining the two existing models (the Basic Military Training School (BMTS) Cost Model and the MIT Math Model) in order to develop a program that can ...

  17. Energy information systems (EIS): Technology costs, benefit, and best practice uses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Granderson, Jessica

    2014-01-01

    in Case Investigations Technology Costs Up-front Costs:in the study to address technology costs EIS Energy and CostAppendix C: EIS Technology Costs This appendix contains a

  18. Comparing the Costs of Intermittent and Dispatchable Electricity Generating Technologies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Joskow, Paul L.

    Economic evaluations of alternative electric generating technologies typically rely on comparisons between their expected life-cycle production costs per unit of electricity supplied. The standard life-cycle cost metric ...

  19. On production costs in vertical differentiation models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    EA 4272 On production costs in vertical differentiation models Dorothée BRECARD(*) 2009,version1-1Oct2009 #12;1 On production costs in vertical differentiation models Dorothée Brécard production cost beside a fixed cost of quality improvement in a duopoly model of vertical product

  20. Lifecycle Cost Analysis of Hydrogen Versus Other Technologies...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    storage applications compared with three other storage technologies: batteries, pumped hydro, and compressed air energy storage (CAES). PDF icon Lifecycle Cost Analysis of...

  1. Estimating the Benefits and Costs of Distributed Energy Technologies...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    - Carl Imhoff, PNNL More Documents & Publications Estimating the Benefits and Costs of Distributed Energy Technologies Workshop - Day 1 Presentations Estimating the...

  2. Estimating the Benefits and Costs of Distributed Energy Technologies...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    1 Presentations Estimating the Benefits and Costs of Distributed Energy Technologies Workshop - Day 1 Presentations On September 30 and October 1, 2014, the Department of Energy...

  3. Fuel Consumption and Cost Benefits of DOE Vehicle Technologies...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    vehicles decreases with time. * Manufacturing costs associated with batteries and electric machines fall faster than those of conventional technologies (i.e., engine,...

  4. Low Cost PM Technology for Particle Reinforced Titanium Automotive...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Titanium Automotive Components: Manufacturing Process Feasibility StudyAMD 310 Low Cost PM Technology for Particle Reinforced Titanium Automotive Components: Manufacturing...

  5. Exploration of disruptive technologies for low cost RFID manufacturing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kommandur, Badarinath, 1968-

    2004-01-01

    Significant developments have taken place in defining technology standards and identifying avenues for technological innovations to reduce the cost of manufacturing RFID tags below the $0.05 price point. The Auto-ID center ...

  6. Costs and business models in scientific

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rambaut, Andrew

    Costs and business models in scientific research publishing A report commissioned by the Wellcome Trust DP-3114.p/100/04-2004/JM #12;Costs and business models in scientific research publishing A report, Cambridgeshire CB4 9ZR, UK Tel: +44 (0)1223 209400 Web: www.sqw.co.uk #12;Costs and business models in scientific

  7. Costs, Culture, and Complexity: An Analysis of Technology Enhancements in a Large Lecture Course at UC Berkeley

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2003-01-01

    Analysis of Technology Enhancements Costs, Culture, andtraditional and technology-enhanced costs only during Year 1An Analysis of Technology Enhancements Cost of technology

  8. Backup Power Cost of Ownership Analysis and Incumbent Technology Comparison

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kurtz, J.; Saur, G.; Sprik, S.; Ainscough, C.

    2014-09-01

    This cost of ownership analysis identifies the factors impacting the value proposition for fuel cell backup power and presents the estimated annualized cost of ownership for fuel cell backup power systems compared with the incumbent technologies of battery and diesel generator systems. The analysis compares three different backup power technologies (diesel, battery, and fuel cell) operating in similar circumstances in four run time scenarios (8, 52, 72, and 176 hours).

  9. Backup Power Cost of Ownership Analysis and Incumbent Technology Comparison

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    This cost of ownership analysis identifies the factors impacting the value proposition for fuel cell backup power and presents the estimated annualized cost of ownership for fuel cell backup power systems compared with the incumbent technologies of battery and diesel generator systems.

  10. The optimal suppression of a low-cost technology by a durable-good monopoly

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karp, Larry; Perloff, Jeffrey M

    1994-01-01

    SUPPRESSION OF A LOW-COST TECHNOLOGY BY A DURABLE-GOODsuppression of a low-cost technology by a durable-goodSuppression of a Low-Cost Technology by a Durable-Good

  11. Coal supply and cost under technological and environmental uncertainty

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coal supply and cost under technological and environmental uncertainty Submitted in partial chapters. My conversations with Kurt Walzer at Clean Air Task Force and Rory McIlmoil at Coal Valley Wind Technology Laboratory. I did not complete this work alone. I had a lot of help along the way. I would like

  12. Production Costing Models 1 Introduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCalley, James D.

    at each hour, The load is specified; A unit commitment decision is made; A dispatch decision is made. An important characterizing feature of PCMs is how it makes the unit commitment (UC) and dispatch decisions) such that units with lowest average cost are committed first. Startup costs are added when a unit #12;5 is started

  13. Wireless Sensors: Technology and Cost-Savings for Commercial Buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kintner-Meyer, Michael CW; Brambley, Michael R.; Carlon, Teresa A.; Bauman, Nathan N.

    2002-08-30

    Two projects under way for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Building Technology, State and Community Programs, aim to adapt, test and demonstrate wireless sensors and data acquisition for heating, ventilating, and air-conditioning (HVAC) in commercial buildings. One project focuses on built-up systems in medium to large buildings; the second on applications for rooftop units in small- to medium-size facilities. In this paper, the authors present the technical characteristics and costs of off-the-shelf wireless sensor and data-acquisition systems and describe how they can be adapted to commercial buildings. The first part of the paper discusses the appropriateness of the different wireless protocols and then uses a "low-cost" and "high-cost" scenario later in the paper for comparison to wired systems. The paper provides a brief overview of wireless communication standards and discusses their appropriateness to HVAC control applications. The authors describe two wireless technology demonstration projects and discuss the limitations of today's technology and how wireless technology might be improved to reduce costs. Finally, a cost comparison between wired and wireless control networks for retrofit and new construction is presented to provide insights into the key drivers that determine the cost competitive of wireless technologies for HVAC control applications.

  14. Wind Turbine Design Cost and Scaling Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fingersh, L.; Hand, M.; Laxson, A.

    2006-12-01

    This model intends to provide projections of the impact on cost from changes in economic indicators such as the Gross Domestic Product and Producer Price Index.

  15. Technology advances keeping LNG cost-competitive

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bellow, E.J. Jr.; Ghazal, F.P.; Silverman, A.J.; Myers, S.D.

    1997-06-02

    LNG plants, often very expensive in the past, will in the future need to cost less to build and operate and yet maintain high safety and reliability standards, both during construction and operation. Technical advancements, both in the process and in equipment scaling, manufacturing, and metallurgy, will provide much of the impetus for the improved economics. Although world energy demand is predicted to grow on average of about 2% annually over the next decade, LNG is expected to contribute an increasing portion of this growth with annual growth rates averaging about 7%. This steep growth increase will be propelled mainly by the environmentally friendlier burning characteristics of natural gas and the strong industrial growth in Asian and pacific Rim countries. While LNG is emerging as the fuel of choice for developing economies, its delivered cost to consumers will need to stay competitive with alternate energy supplies if it is to remain in front. The paper discusses LNG process development, treating process, equipment developments (man heat exchanger, compressors, drivers, and pressure vessels), and economy of scale.

  16. General equilibrium, electricity generation technologies and the cost of carbon abatement: A structural sensitivity analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    General equilibrium, electricity generation technologies and the cost of carbon abatement Institute of Technology, USA a b s t r a c ta r t i c l e i n f o Article history: Received 25 February 2011: C61 C68 D58 Q43 Keywords: Carbon policy Energy modeling Electric power sector Bottom-up Top

  17. Plug-in Hybrid Modeling and Application: Cost/Benefit Analysis (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Simpson, A.

    2006-08-24

    Presents data from a simulation of plug-in hybrid electric vehicle efficiency and cost, including baseline vehicle assumptions, powertrain technology scenarios, and component modeling.

  18. Developing Information on Energy Savings and Associated Costs and Benefits of Energy Efficient Emerging Technologies Applicable in California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xu, Tengfang

    2011-01-01

    energy savings, technology costs, market potential, andenergy savings, technology costs, market potential, andin this study. Normally, technology cost is quantified using

  19. Power Tower Technology Roadmap and cost reduction plan.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mancini, Thomas R.; Gary, Jesse A.; Kolb, Gregory J.; Ho, Clifford Kuofei

    2011-04-01

    Concentrating solar power (CSP) technologies continue to mature and are being deployed worldwide. Power towers will likely play an essential role in the future development of CSP due to their potential to provide dispatchable solar electricity at a low cost. This Power Tower Technology Roadmap has been developed by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to describe the current technology, the improvement opportunities that exist for the technology, and the specific activities needed to reach the DOE programmatic target of providing competitively-priced electricity in the intermediate and baseload power markets by 2020. As a first step in developing this roadmap, a Power Tower Roadmap Workshop that included the tower industry, national laboratories, and DOE was held in March 2010. A number of technology improvement opportunities (TIOs) were identified at this workshop and separated into four categories associated with power tower subsystems: solar collector field, solar receiver, thermal energy storage, and power block/balance of plant. In this roadmap, the TIOs associated with power tower technologies are identified along with their respective impacts on the cost of delivered electricity. In addition, development timelines and estimated budgets to achieve cost reduction goals are presented. The roadmap does not present a single path for achieving these goals, but rather provides a process for evaluating a set of options from which DOE and industry can select to accelerate power tower R&D, cost reductions, and commercial deployment.

  20. Cost Model for Digital Curation: Cost of Digital Migration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kejser, Ulla Bøgvad; Nielsen, Anders Bo; Thirifays, Alex

    2009-01-01

    Steece, B. 2000. Software cost estimation with COCOMO II.Developing a Framework of Cost Elements for PreservingAshley, K. 1999. Digital archive costs: Facts and fallacies.

  1. Alternative wind power modeling methods using chronological and load duration curve production cost models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Milligan, M R

    1996-04-01

    As an intermittent resource, capturing the temporal variation in windpower is an important issue in the context of utility production cost modeling. Many of the production cost models use a method that creates a cumulative probability distribution that is outside the time domain. The purpose of this report is to examine two production cost models that represent the two major model types: chronological and load duration cure models. This report is part of the ongoing research undertaken by the Wind Technology Division of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory in utility modeling and wind system integration.

  2. Cost effectiveness of recycling: A systems model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tonjes, David J., E-mail: david.tonjes@stonybrook.edu [Department of Technology and Society, College of Engineering and Applied Sciences, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY 11794-3560 (United States); Waste Reduction and Management Institute, School of Marine and Atmospheric Sciences, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY 11794-5000 (United States); Center for Bioenergy Research and Development, Advanced Energy Research and Technology Center, Stony Brook University, 1000 Innovation Rd., Stony Brook, NY 11794-6044 (United States); Mallikarjun, Sreekanth, E-mail: sreekanth.mallikarjun@stonybrook.edu [Department of Technology and Society, College of Engineering and Applied Sciences, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY 11794-3560 (United States)

    2013-11-15

    Highlights: • Curbside collection of recyclables reduces overall system costs over a range of conditions. • When avoided costs for recyclables are large, even high collection costs are supported. • When avoided costs for recyclables are not great, there are reduced opportunities for savings. • For common waste compositions, maximizing curbside recyclables collection always saves money. - Abstract: Financial analytical models of waste management systems have often found that recycling costs exceed direct benefits, and in order to economically justify recycling activities, externalities such as household expenses or environmental impacts must be invoked. Certain more empirically based studies have also found that recycling is more expensive than disposal. Other work, both through models and surveys, have found differently. Here we present an empirical systems model, largely drawn from a suburban Long Island municipality. The model accounts for changes in distribution of effort as recycling tonnages displace disposal tonnages, and the seven different cases examined all show that curbside collection programs that manage up to between 31% and 37% of the waste stream should result in overall system savings. These savings accrue partially because of assumed cost differences in tip fees for recyclables and disposed wastes, and also because recycling can result in a more efficient, cost-effective collection program. These results imply that increases in recycling are justifiable due to cost-savings alone, not on more difficult to measure factors that may not impact program budgets.

  3. Emerging High-Efficiency Low-Cost Solar Cell Technologies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McGehee, Michael

    J. of Photovoltaics, 2 (2012) p. 303. Si GaAs #12;Why thin film GaAs;Gallium Arsenide · The 1.4 eV band gap is ideal for solar cells. · High quality films are grownEmerging High-Efficiency Low-Cost Solar Cell Technologies Mike McGehee Materials Science

  4. Coal supply and cost under technological and environmental uncertainty

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coal supply and cost under technological and environmental uncertainty Submitted in partial, and Rod Lawrence at Foundation Coal. I received a lot of feedback and input on this report, and would like chapters. My conversations with Kurt Walzer at Clean Air Task Force and Rory McIlmoil at Coal Valley Wind

  5. Sandia Energy - Sandia Develops Stochastic Production Cost Model...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    & Analysis Analysis Modeling Modeling & Analysis Computational Modeling & Simulation Solar Newsletter Sandia Develops Stochastic Production Cost Model Simulator for Electric...

  6. Simple cost model for EV traction motors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cuenca, R.M.

    1995-02-01

    A simple cost model has been developed that allows the calculation of the OEM cost of electric traction motors of three different types, normalized as a function of power in order to accommodate different power and size. The model includes enough information on the various elements integrated in the motors to allow analysis of individual components and to factor-in the effects of changes in commodities prices. A scalable cost model for each of the main components of an electric vehicle (EV) is a useful tool that can have direct application in computer simulation or in parametric studies. For the cost model to have wide usefulness, it needs to be valid for a range of values of some parameter that determines the magnitude or size of the component. For instance, in the case of batteries, size may be determined by energy capacity, usually expressed in kilowatt-hours (kWh), while in the case of traction motors, size is better determined by rated power, usually expressed in kilowatts (kW). The simplest case is when the cost of the component in question is a direct function of its size; then cost is simply the product of its specific cost ($/unit size) and the number of units (size) in the vehicle in question. Batteries usually fall in this category (cost = energy capacity x $/kWh). But cost is not always linear with size or magnitude; motors (and controllers), for instance, become relatively less expensive as power rating increases. Traction motors, one of the main components for EV powertrains are examined in this paper, and a simplified cost model is developed for the three most popular design variations.

  7. A Phenomenological Cost Model for High Energy Particle Accelerators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vladimir Shiltsev

    2014-04-15

    Accelerator-based high-energy physics have been in the forefront of scientific discoveries for more than half a century. The accelerator technology of the colliders has progressed immensely, while the beam energy, luminosity, facility size, and cost have grown by several orders of magnitude. The method of colliding beams has not fully exhausted its potential but has slowed down considerably in its progress. In this paper we derive a simple scaling model for the cost of large accelerators and colliding beam facilities based on costs of 17 big facilities which have been either built or carefully estimated. Although this approach cannot replace an actual cost estimate based on an engineering design, this parameterization is to indicate a somewhat realistic cost range for consideration of what future frontier accelerator facilities might be fiscally realizable.

  8. Safeguards First Principle Initiative (SFPI) Cost Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mary Alice Price

    2010-07-11

    The Nevada Test Site (NTS) began operating Material Control and Accountability (MC&A) under the Safeguards First Principle Initiative (SFPI), a risk-based and cost-effective program, in December 2006. The NTS SFPI Comprehensive Assessment of Safeguards Systems (COMPASS) Model is made up of specific elements (MC&A plan, graded safeguards, accounting systems, measurements, containment, surveillance, physical inventories, shipper/receiver differences, assessments/performance tests) and various sub-elements, which are each assigned effectiveness and contribution factors that when weighted and rated reflect the health of the MC&A program. The MC&A Cost Model, using an Excel workbook, calculates budget and/or actual costs using these same elements/sub-elements resulting in total costs and effectiveness costs per element/sub-element. These calculations allow management to identify how costs are distributed for each element/sub-element. The Cost Model, as part of the SFPI program review process, enables management to determine if spending is appropriate for each element/sub-element.

  9. Forecasting technology costs via the Learning Curve - Myth or Magic?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alberth, Stephan

    Gas Turbine (CCGT) where data provided by Colpier was already converted from ‘costs per installed capacity’ to ‘costs per electricity produced’ (2002). The focus has been on technologies that remained in their growth stages in order to avoid... Electricity Usc(90)/kWh - TWh 1981 1997 15 3.6 Cleason Colpier 2002 Nuclear Instalation US$(90)/W - GW 1975 1993 19 2.0 Kouvaritakis et al. (2000) in M&S 2001 SCGT Instalation US$(90)/W - GW 1956 1981 14 8.9 IIASA-WEC (1998), p.50 Solar Production $/Wp - MWp...

  10. Distributed utility technology cost, performance, and environmental characteristics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wan, Y.; Adelman, S.

    1995-06-01

    Distributed Utility (DU) is an emerging concept in which modular generation and storage technologies sited near customer loads in distribution systems and specifically targeted demand-side management programs are used to supplement conventional central station generation plants to meet customer energy service needs. Research has shown that implementation of the DU concept could provide substantial benefits to utilities. This report summarizes the cost, performance, and environmental and siting characteristics of existing and emerging modular generation and storage technologies that are applicable under the DU concept. It is intended to be a practical reference guide for utility planners and engineers seeking information on DU technology options. This work was funded by the Office of Utility Technologies of the US Department of Energy.

  11. Examining the Costs and Benefits of Technology Pathways for Reducing Fuel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Davis, University of

    Examining the Costs and Benefits of Technology Pathways for Reducing Fuel Use and Emissions from On policy harmonized Tax credits Anti-idling Low Carbon Fuel Standard #12;Lifecycle Emissions Modeled in TOP-HDV 5 Fuel production, refining, and distribution Material acquisition, processing, and vehicle assembly

  12. Cost-Effective Modeling and Savings Projections for Multifamily...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Cost-Effective Modeling and Savings Projections for Multifamily Projects Cost-Effective Modeling and Savings Projections for Multifamily Projects Better Buildings Residential...

  13. A Mobility Model for Cost Analysis in Integrated Cellular/WLANs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shenoy, Nirmala

    A Mobility Model for Cost Analysis in Integrated Cellular/WLANs Nirmala Shenoy, Bruce Hartpence, Information Technology Department, Rochester Institute of Technology, Rochester NY 14623, USA Rafael Mantilla that can be used to study the costs and benefits of integrating cellular and Wireless LANs, from a vendor

  14. Mathematical Modeling for CostMathematical Modeling for Cost Optimization of PV RecyclingOptimization of PV Recycling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bergman, Keren

    Mathematical Modeling for CostMathematical Modeling for Cost Optimization of PV Recycling of plants Capital costs to open up a recycling center 4 #12;Time Horizon for PV Recycling Infrastructure 5 cost $189K System optimal cost $1079K 11 #12;PV Recycling ­Cost Optimization 1. Where is the optimized

  15. www.cost.esf.org European Cooperation in Science and Technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    De Cindio, Fiorella

    www.cost.esf.org European Cooperation in Science and Technology COST is supported by the EU RTD Framework Programme ESF provides the COST Office through an EC contract COSTCOST ­­ a flexible researchDr Martin Grabert COST Office, BrusselsCOST Office, Brussels #12;COST is supported by the EU RTD Framework

  16. CBE UFAD cost analysis tool: Life cycle cost model, issues and assumptions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Webster, Tom; Benedek, Corinne; Bauman, Fred

    2008-01-01

    Building Maintenance and Repair Cost Reference. ” WhitestoneJ. Wallis and H. Lin. 2008. “CBE UFAD Cost Analysis Tool:UFAD First Cost Model, Issues and Assumptions. ” Center for

  17. Harsh-environment, Low-cost Sensor Technology for Engine and...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Harsh-environment, Low-cost Sensor Technology for Engine and After-treatment Systems Harsh-environment, Low-cost Sensor Technology for Engine and After-treatment Systems Poster...

  18. Cost-Benefit Analysis of Plug-In Hybrid-Electric Vehicle Technology (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pesaran, A.; Markel, T.; Simpson, A.

    2006-10-01

    Presents a cost-benefit of analysis of plug-in hybrid electric vehicle technology, including potential petroleum use reduction.

  19. Energyenvironment policy modeling of endogenous technological change with personal vehicles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    - producing activity (notably fossil fuel consumption) and the level of emissions. They define abatement cost-down modelers focus on estimating aggregate price­quan- tity relationships between the cost of emission to acquiring low-GHG technologies and top- down modelers suggesting price-based policies like taxes

  20. Technology and Technical Change in the MIT EPPA Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jacoby, Henry D.

    Potential technology change has a strong influence on projections of greenhouse gas emissions and costs of control, and computable general equilibrium (CGE) models are a common device for studying these phenomena. Using ...

  1. The role of technology in reducing health care costs. Final project report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sill, A.E.; Warren, S.; Dillinger, J.D.; Cloer, B.K.

    1997-08-01

    Sandia National Laboratories applied a systems approach to identifying innovative biomedical technologies with the potential to reduce U.S. health care delivery costs while maintaining care quality. This study was conducted by implementing both top-down and bottom-up strategies. The top-down approach used prosperity gaming methodology to identify future health care delivery needs. This effort provided roadmaps for the development and integration of technology to meet perceived care delivery requirements. The bottom-up approach identified and ranked interventional therapies employed in existing care delivery systems for a host of health-related conditions. Economic analysis formed the basis for development of care pathway interaction models for two of the most pervasive, chronic disease/disability conditions: coronary artery disease (CAD) and benign prostatic hypertrophy (BPH). Societal cost-benefit relationships based on these analyses were used to evaluate the effect of emerging technology in these treatment areas. 17 figs., 48 tabs.

  2. Developing a Cost Model and Methodology to Estimate Capital Costs for Thermal Energy Storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Glatzmaier, G.

    2011-12-01

    This report provides an update on the previous cost model for thermal energy storage (TES) systems. The update allows NREL to estimate the costs of such systems that are compatible with the higher operating temperatures associated with advanced power cycles. The goal of the Department of Energy (DOE) Solar Energy Technology Program is to develop solar technologies that can make a significant contribution to the United States domestic energy supply. The recent DOE SunShot Initiative sets a very aggressive cost goal to reach a Levelized Cost of Energy (LCOE) of 6 cents/kWh by 2020 with no incentives or credits for all solar-to-electricity technologies.1 As this goal is reached, the share of utility power generation that is provided by renewable energy sources is expected to increase dramatically. Because Concentrating Solar Power (CSP) is currently the only renewable technology that is capable of integrating cost-effective energy storage, it is positioned to play a key role in providing renewable, dispatchable power to utilities as the share of power generation from renewable sources increases. Because of this role, future CSP plants will likely have as much as 15 hours of Thermal Energy Storage (TES) included in their design and operation. As such, the cost and performance of the TES system is critical to meeting the SunShot goal for solar technologies. The cost of electricity from a CSP plant depends strongly on its overall efficiency, which is a product of two components - the collection and conversion efficiencies. The collection efficiency determines the portion of incident solar energy that is captured as high-temperature thermal energy. The conversion efficiency determines the portion of thermal energy that is converted to electricity. The operating temperature at which the overall efficiency reaches its maximum depends on many factors, including material properties of the CSP plant components. Increasing the operating temperature of the power generation system leads to higher thermal-to-electric conversion efficiency. However, in a CSP system, higher operating temperature also leads to greater thermal losses. These two effects combine to give an optimal system-level operating temperature that may be less than the upper operating temperature limit of system components. The overall efficiency may be improved by developing materials, power cycles, and system-integration strategies that enable operation at elevated temperature while limiting thermal losses. This is particularly true for the TES system and its components. Meeting the SunShot cost target will require cost and performance improvements in all systems and components within a CSP plant. Solar collector field hardware will need to decrease significantly in cost with no loss in performance and possibly with performance improvements. As higher temperatures are considered for the power block, new working fluids, heat-transfer fluids (HTFs), and storage fluids will all need to be identified to meet these new operating conditions. Figure 1 shows thermodynamic conversion efficiency as a function of temperature for the ideal Carnot cycle and 75% Carnot, which is considered to be the practical efficiency attainable by current power cycles. Current conversion efficiencies for the parabolic trough steam cycle, power tower steam cycle, parabolic dish/Stirling, Ericsson, and air-Brayton/steam Rankine combined cycles are shown at their corresponding operating temperatures. Efficiencies for supercritical steam and carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) are also shown for their operating temperature ranges.

  3. Solar PV Manufacturing Cost Model Group: Installed Solar PV System Prices (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goodrich, A. C.; Woodhouse, M.; James, T.

    2011-02-01

    EERE's Solar Energy Technologies Program is charged with leading the Secretary's SunShot Initiative to reduce the cost of electricity from solar by 75% to be cost competitive with conventional energy sources without subsidy by the end of the decade. As part of this Initiative, the program has funded the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to develop module manufacturing and solar PV system installation cost models to ensure that the program's cost reduction targets are carefully aligned with current and near term industry costs. The NREL cost analysis team has leveraged the laboratories' extensive experience in the areas of project finance and deployment, as well as industry partnerships, to develop cost models that mirror the project cost analysis tools used by project managers at leading U.S. installers. The cost models are constructed through a "bottoms-up" assessment of each major cost element, beginning with the system's bill of materials, labor requirements (type and hours) by component, site-specific charges, and soft costs. In addition to the relevant engineering, procurement, and construction costs, the models also consider all relevant costs to an installer, including labor burdens and overhead rates, supply chain costs, and overhead and materials inventory costs, and assume market-specific profits.

  4. Validation and Comparison of Carbon Sequestration Project Cost Models with Project Cost Data Obtained from the Southwest Partnership

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robert Lee; Reid Grigg; Brian McPherson

    2011-04-15

    Obtaining formal quotes and engineering conceptual designs for carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) sequestration sites and facilities is costly and time-consuming. Frequently, when looking at potential locations, managers, engineers and scientists are confronted with multiple options, but do not have the expertise or the information required to quickly obtain a general estimate of what the costs will be without employing an engineering firm. Several models for carbon compression, transport and/or injection have been published that are designed to aid in determining the cost of sequestration projects. A number of these models are used in this study, including models by J. Ogden, MIT's Carbon Capture and Sequestration Technologies Program Model, the Environmental Protection Agency and others. This report uses the information and data available from several projects either completed, in progress, or conceptualized by the Southwest Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership on Carbon Sequestration (SWP) to determine the best approach to estimate a project's cost. The data presented highlights calculated versus actual costs. This data is compared to the results obtained by applying several models for each of the individual projects with actual cost. It also offers methods to systematically apply the models to future projects of a similar scale. Last, the cost risks associated with a project of this scope are discussed, along with ways that have been and could be used to mitigate these risks.

  5. Technology and Cost of the MY 2007 toyota Camry HEV -- A Subcontract Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marlino, Laura D [ORNL

    2007-09-01

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) provides research and development (R&D) support to the Department of Energy on issues related to the cost and performance of hybrid vehicles. ORNL frequently benchmarks its own research against commercially available hybrid components currently used in the market. In 2005 we completed a detailed review of the cost of the second generation Prius hybrid. This study examines the new 2007 Camry hybrid model for changes in technology and cost relative to the Prius. The work effort involved a detailed review of the Camry hybrid and the system control strategy to identify the hybrid components used in the drive train. Section 2 provides this review while Section 3 presents our detailed evaluation of the specific drive train components and their cost estimates. Section 3 also provides a summary of the total electrical drive train cost for the Camry hybrid vehicle and contrasts these estimates to the costs for the second generation Prius that we estimated in 2005. Most of the information on cost and performance were derived from meetings with the technical staff of Toyota, Nissan, and some key Tier I suppliers like Hitachi and Panasonic Electric Vehicle Energy (PEVE) and we thank these companies for their kind cooperation.

  6. Survey of LWR environmental control technology performance and cost

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heeb, C.M.; Aaberg, R.L.; Cole, B.M.; Engel, R.L.; Kennedy, W.E. Jr.; Lewallen, M.A.

    1980-03-01

    This study attempts to establish a ranking for species that are routinely released to the environment for a projected nuclear power growth scenario. Unlike comparisons made to existing standards, which are subject to frequent revision, the ranking of releases can be used to form a more logical basis for identifying the areas where further development of control technology could be required. This report describes projections of releases for several fuel cycle scenarios, identifies areas where alternative control technologies may be implemented, and discusses the available alternative control technologies. The release factors were used in a computer code system called ENFORM, which calculates the annual release of any species from any part of the LWR nuclear fuel cycle given a projection of installed nuclear generation capacity. This survey of fuel cycle releases was performed for three reprocessing scenarios (stowaway, reprocessing without recycle of Pu and reprocessing with full recycle of U and Pu) for a 100-year period beginning in 1977. The radioactivity releases were ranked on the basis of a relative ranking factor. The relative ranking factor is based on the 100-year summation of the 50-year population dose commitment from an annual release of radioactive effluents. The nonradioactive releases were ranked on the basis of dilution factor. The twenty highest ranking radioactive releases were identified and each of these was analyzed in terms of the basis for calculating the release and a description of the currently employed control method. Alternative control technology is then discussed, along with the available capital and operating cost figures for alternative control methods.

  7. Sensitivity of Concentrating Solar Power Trough Performance, Cost and Financing with Solar Advisor Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blair, N.; Mehos, M.; Christensen, C.

    2008-03-01

    A comprehensive solar technology systems analysis model, the Solar Advisor Model (SAM) was developed to support the federal R&D community and the solar industry. This model, developed by staff at NREL and Sandia National Laboratory, is able to model the costs, finances, and performance of concentrating solar power and photovoltaics (PV). Currently, parabolic troughs and concentrating PV are the two concentrating technologies modeled within the SAM environment.

  8. Using Pinch Technology to Explore Trade-Offs Between Energy Cost, Capital Cost, Process Modifications, and Utility Selection 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McMullan, A. S.

    1988-01-01

    TECHNOLOGY TO EXPLORE TRADE-OFFS BETWEEN ENERGY COST, CAPITAL COST, PROCESS MODIFICATIONS, AND UTILITY SELECTION A.S. McMullan, Consultant and H.D. Spriggs, President Linnhoff March, Inc., Leesburg, Virginia ABSTRACT Process design is a complex task... and operatlng a process. Understanding the impact of these decisions in the context of the overall process can lead to significant savings in both capital and operating costs. Full investigation of these interactions through engineering studies is expensive...

  9. Integrating Sequencing Technologies in Personal Genomics: Optimal Low Cost Reconstruction of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gerstein, Mark

    Integrating Sequencing Technologies in Personal Genomics: Optimal Low Cost Reconstruction, Snyder M, et al. (2009) Integrating Sequencing Technologies in Personal Genomics: Optimal Low Cost of these technologies differ considerably from each other. As an important goal of personal genomics is to reduce

  10. Comparative Analysis of the Cost Models Used for Estimating Renovation Costs of Universities in Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Faquih, Yaquta Fakhruddin

    2010-10-12

    Facility managers use various cost models and techniques to estimate the cost of renovating a building and to secure the required funds needed for building renovation. A literature search indicates that these techniques offer both advantages...

  11. Discrete Event Modeling of Algae Cultivation and Harvesting at Commercial Scale: Capital Costs, Operating Costs, and System Bottlenecks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lacey, Ph.D, P.E., Ronald E.

    2012-07-16

    Discrete Event Modeling of Algae Cultivation and Harvesting at Commercial Scale: Capital Costs, Operating Costs, and System Bottlenecks

  12. DOE Fuel Cell Technologies Office Record 13013: H2 Delivery Cost...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    3013: H2 Delivery Cost Projections - 2013 DOE Fuel Cell Technologies Office Record 13013: H2 Delivery Cost Projections - 2013 This program record from the U.S. Department of...

  13. Alternative methods of modeling wind generation using production cost models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Milligan, M.R. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States)] [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States); Pang, C.K. [P Plus Corp., Cupertino, CA (United States)] [P Plus Corp., Cupertino, CA (United States)

    1996-08-01

    This paper examines the methods of incorporating wind generation in two production costing models: one is a load duration curve (LDC) based model and the other is a chronological-based model. These two models were used to evaluate the impacts of wind generation on two utility systems using actual collected wind data at two locations with high potential for wind generation. The results are sensitive to the selected wind data and the level of benefits of wind generation is sensitive to the load forecast. The total production cost over a year obtained by the chronological approach does not differ significantly from that of the LDC approach, though the chronological commitment of units is more realistic and more accurate. Chronological models provide the capability of answering important questions about wind resources which are difficult or impossible to address with LDC models.

  14. Modeling Solar Energy Technology Evolution breakout session ...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Modeling Solar Energy Technology Evolution breakout session Modeling Solar Energy Technology Evolution breakout session This presentation summarizes the information given on the...

  15. Alternative water sources: Desalination model provides life-cycle costs of facility 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Supercinski, Danielle

    2009-01-01

    -1 Story by Danielle Supercinski tx H2O | pg. 8 Alternative water sourcees Desalination model provides life-cycle costs of facility platform and design standards as DESAL ECONOMICS?, but created to analyze con- ventional surface water treatment... facilities. The models allow experts to analyze which technology and/or facility design and asset configuration provides the lowest long-term cost of potable water supplies. Using these newly developed models, the team conducted case studies...

  16. Cost-Effective Modeling and Savings Projections for Multifamily...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Effective Modeling and Savings Projections for Multifamily Projects Cost-Effective Modeling and Savings Projections for Multifamily Projects Better Buildings Residential Network...

  17. APT cost scaling: Preliminary indications from a Parametric Costing Model (PCM)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krakowski, R.A.

    1995-02-03

    A Parametric Costing Model has been created and evaluate as a first step in quantitatively understanding important design options for the Accelerator Production of Tritium (APT) concept. This model couples key economic and technical elements of APT in a two-parameter search of beam energy and beam power that minimizes costs within a range of operating constraints. The costing and engineering depth of the Parametric Costing Model is minimal at the present {open_quotes}entry level{close_quotes}, and is intended only to demonstrate a potential for a more-detailed, cost-based integrating design tool. After describing the present basis of the Parametric Costing Model and giving an example of a single parametric scaling run derived therefrom, the impacts of choices related to resistive versus superconducting accelerator structures and cost of electricity versus plant availability ({open_quotes}load curve{close_quotes}) are reported. Areas of further development and application are suggested.

  18. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2015: Low Cost, Structurally Advanced Novel Electrode and Cell Manufacturing

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by 24M Technologies at 2015 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about low cost, structurally...

  19. Technology Improvement Opportunities for Low Wind Speed Turbines and Implications for Cost of Energy Reduction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2008-02-01

    This report analyzes the status of wind energy technology in 2002 and describes the potential for technology advancements to reduce the cost and increase the performance of wind turbines.

  20. Cost Effectiveness of Technology Solutions for Future Vehicle...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Technology Solutions for Future Vehicle Systems Explores the economics of CO2 emission reductions by added engine technology to determine if there is an overall...

  1. AVCEM: Advanced-Vehicle Cost and Energy Use Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Delucchi, Mark

    2005-01-01

    California 95616 PHONE: WEB: FAX: http://its.ucdavis.edu/ AVCEM: ADVANCED-VEHICLE COST AND ENERGY-Cost and Energy Use Model Overview of AVCEM Mark A. Delucchi Institute of Transportation Studies ? University of California,

  2. An Analysis of TRL-Based Cost and Schedule Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kenley, C. Robert

    2012-04-30

    The GAO's, NASA's, and the DoD's adoption of the technology readiness level (TRL) scale to improve technology management has led to the emergence of many TRL-based models that are used to monitor technology maturation, ...

  3. Geothermal Electricity Technology Evaluation Model (GETEM) Development...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Model (GETEM) Development Geothermal Electricity Technology Evaluation Model (GETEM) Development Project objective: Provide a tool for estimating the performance and...

  4. Guidebook for Selecting Cost-Effective Wireless Communication Technologies for Intelligent Transportation Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Texas at Austin, University of

    0-4449-P1 Guidebook for Selecting Cost-Effective Wireless Communication Technologies Research, The University of Texas at Austin Project 0-4449: Cost-Effective Strategies for Communicating-2650 Sponsoring Organization: Texas Department of Transportation Research and Technology Implementation Office P

  5. Molten Salt Power Tower Cost Model for the System Advisor Model (SAM)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Turchi, C. S.; Heath, G. A.

    2013-02-01

    This report describes a component-based cost model developed for molten-salt power tower solar power plants. The cost model was developed by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), using data from several prior studies, including a contracted analysis from WorleyParsons Group, which is included herein as an Appendix. The WorleyParsons' analysis also estimated material composition and mass for the plant to facilitate a life cycle analysis of the molten salt power tower technology. Details of the life cycle assessment have been published elsewhere. The cost model provides a reference plant that interfaces with NREL's System Advisor Model or SAM. The reference plant assumes a nominal 100-MWe (net) power tower running with a nitrate salt heat transfer fluid (HTF). Thermal energy storage is provided by direct storage of the HTF in a two-tank system. The design assumes dry-cooling. The model includes a spreadsheet that interfaces with SAM via the Excel Exchange option in SAM. The spreadsheet allows users to estimate the costs of different-size plants and to take into account changes in commodity prices. This report and the accompanying Excel spreadsheet can be downloaded at https://sam.nrel.gov/cost.

  6. Innovation in Nuclear Technology for the Least Product Price and Cost

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duffey, Romney

    2003-09-01

    In energy markets, costs dominate for all new technology introductions (pressure valves, gas turbines, reactors) both now and far into the future. Technology improves, and costs are reduced as markets are penetrated with the trend following a learning/experience curve (MCE) based on classic economic forces. The curve followed is governed by development costs and market targets, and nuclear systems follow such a curve in order to compete with other technologies and projected future cost for alternate energy initiatives. Funding impacts directly on market penetration and on the ''learning rate.'' The CANDU/AECL development path (experience curve) is a chosen balance between evolution and revolution for a competitive advantage.

  7. Backup Power Cost of Ownership Analysis and Incumbent Technology...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of ownership analysis identifies the factors impacting the value proposition for fuel cell backup power and presents the estimated annualized cost of ownership for fuel cell...

  8. Technology Improvement Pathways to Cost-Effective Vehicle Electrification: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brooker, A.; Thornton, M.; Rugh, J.

    2010-02-01

    This paper evaluates several approaches aimed at making plug-in electric vehicles (EV) and plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs) cost-effective.

  9. Automobiles on Steroids: Product Attribute Trade-Offs and Technological Progress in the Automobile Sector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Knittel, Christopher R

    2009-01-01

    engine power/weight technology costs is correlated withto Vehicle-Speci?c Technology Costs I estimate threefor Proxies of Technology Costs Base Cobb-Douglas Model

  10. GETEM -Geothermal Electricity Technology Evaluation Model | Department...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    guide to providing input to GETEM, the Geothermal Electricity Technology Evaluation Model. GETEM is designed to help the Geothermal Technologies Program of the U.S. Department of...

  11. A Multiple Model Cost-Sensitive Approach for Intrusion Detection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Wenke

    that are optimized for user-de#12;ned cost metrics. Empirical experiments in o#11;- line analysis show a reduction of approximately 97% in operational cost over a single model approach, and a reduction of approximately 30 the initial results of our current research in extending our data mining framework to build cost

  12. COSTS MODELS IN DESIGN AND MANUFACTURING OF SAND CASTING PRODUCTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    COSTS MODELS IN DESIGN AND MANUFACTURING OF SAND CASTING PRODUCTS Nicolas PERRY Ass. Prof., IRCCy.Bernard@irccyn.ec-nantes.fr Abstract: In the early phases of the product life cycle, the costs controls became a major decision tool difficulties, we will present an approach using a concept of cost entity related to the design and realization

  13. Technical Cost Modeling - Life Cycle Analysis Basis for Program...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    - Life Cycle Analysis Basis for Program Focus Technical Cost Modeling - Life Cycle Analysis Basis for Program Focus Polymer Composites Research in the LM Materials Program Overview...

  14. Webinar: Wind-to-Hydrogen Cost Modeling and Project Findings

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Video recording and text version of the webinar titled, Wind-to-Hydrogen Cost Modeling and Project Findings, originally presented on January 17, 2013.

  15. Measuring Technology Effects on Software Change Cost D. L. Atkins, A. Mockus, and H. P. Siy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Atkins, David

    that correlates technology usage with effort es- timates based on analysis of the change history of a softwareMeasuring Technology Effects on Software Change Cost D. L. Atkins, A. Mockus, and H. P. Siy May 11, 2000 Abstract We describe a methodologyfor precise quantitative measure- ment of technology impact

  16. Cost Effectiveness of Technology Solutions for Future Vehicle Systems

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Explores the economics of CO2 emission reductions by added engine technology to determine if there is an overall positive or negative benefit.

  17. Breakthrough Cutting Technology Promises to Reduce Solar Costs

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Silicon Genesis advancing the field of solar energy by developing a process that will virtually eliminate all waste when cutting materials needed to implement solar technology.

  18. Cost and Performance Model for Redox Flow Batteries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Viswanathan, Vilayanur V.; Crawford, Aladsair J.; Stephenson, David E.; Kim, Soowhan; Wang, Wei; Li, Bin; Coffey, Greg W.; Thomsen, Edwin C.; Graff, Gordon L.; Balducci, Patrick J.; Kintner-Meyer, Michael CW; Sprenkle, Vincent L.

    2014-02-01

    A cost model was developed for all vanadium and iron-vanadium redox flow batteries. Electrochemical performance modeling was done to estimate stack performance at various power densities as a function of state of charge. This was supplemented with a shunt current model and a pumping loss model to estimate actual system efficiency. The operating parameters such as power density, flow rates and design parameters such as electrode aspect ratio, electrolyte flow channel dimensions were adjusted to maximize efficiency and minimize capital costs. Detailed cost estimates were obtained from various vendors to calculate cost estimates for present, realistic and optimistic scenarios. The main drivers for cost reduction for various chemistries were identified as a function of the energy to power ratio of the storage system. Levelized cost analysis further guided suitability of various chemistries for different applications.

  19. Developing Information on Energy Savings and Associated Costs and Benefits of Energy Efficient Emerging Technologies Applicable in California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xu, Tengfang

    2011-01-01

    costs and energy savings potential of emerging technologies applicable to Californiacosts and energy savings potential of emerging technologies applicable to Californiaof cost- and energy-efficient installations. California has

  20. Transportation Energy Futures Series: Non-Cost Barriers to Consumer Adoption of New Light-Duty Vehicle Technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stephens, T.

    2013-03-01

    Consumer preferences are key to the adoption of new vehicle technologies. Barriers to consumer adoption include price and other obstacles, such as limited driving range and charging infrastructure; unfamiliarity with the technology and uncertainty about direct benefits; limited makes and models with the technology; reputation or perception of the technology; standardization issues; and regulations. For each of these non-cost barriers, this report estimates an effective cost and summarizes underlying influences on consumer preferences, approximate magnitude and relative severity, and assesses potential actions, based on a comprehensive literature review. While the report concludes that non-cost barriers are significant, effective cost and potential market share are very uncertain. Policies and programs including opportunities for drivers to test drive advanced vehicles, general public outreach and information programs, incentives for providing charging and fueling infrastructure, and development of technology standards were examined for their ability to address barriers, but little quantitative data exists on the effectiveness of these measures. This is one in a series of reports produced as a result of the Transportation Energy Futures project, a Department of Energy-sponsored multi-agency effort to pinpoint underexplored strategies for reducing GHGs and petroleum dependence related to transportation.

  1. Transportation Energy Futures Series. Non-Cost Barriers to Consumer Adoption of New Light-Duty Vehicle Technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stephens, Thomas

    2013-03-01

    Consumer preferences are key to the adoption of new vehicle technologies. Barriers to consumer adoption include price and other obstacles, such as limited driving range and charging infrastructure; unfamiliarity with the technology and uncertainty about direct benefits; limited makes and models with the technology; reputation or perception of the technology; standardization issues; and regulations. For each of these non-cost barriers, this report estimates an effective cost and summarizes underlying influences on consumer preferences, approximate magnitude and relative severity, and assesses potential actions, based on a comprehensive literature review. While the report concludes that non-cost barriers are significant, effective cost and potential market share are very uncertain. Policies and programs including opportunities for drivers to test drive advanced vehicles, general public outreach and information programs, incentives for providing charging and fueling infrastructure, and development of technology standards were examined for their ability to address barriers, but little quantitative data exists on the effectiveness of these measures. This is one in a series of reports produced as a result of the Transportation Energy Futures project, a Department of Energy-sponsored multi-agency effort to pinpoint underexplored strategies for reducing GHGs and petroleum dependence related to transportation. View all reports on the TEF Web page, http://www.eere.energy.gov/analysis/transportationenergyfutures/index.html.

  2. A Dynamic Network Oligopoly Model Transportation Costs, Product Differentiation,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nagurney, Anna

    of Operations & Information Management Isenberg School of Management University of Massachusetts AmherstA Dynamic Network Oligopoly Model with Transportation Costs, Product Differentiation, and Quality of Massachusetts Amherst A Dynamic Network Oligopoly Model with Quality Competition #12;Acknowledgments

  3. A Dynamic Network Oligopoly Model Transportation Costs, Product Differentiation,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nagurney, Anna

    and Operations Management Isenberg School of Management University of Massachusetts Amherst, Massachusetts 01003A Dynamic Network Oligopoly Model with Transportation Costs, Product Differentiation, and Quality Network Oligopoly Model with Quality Competition #12;Acknowledgments This research was supported, in part

  4. Renewable Energy Cost Modeling. A Toolkit for Establishing Cost-Based Incentives in the United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gifford, Jason S.; Grace, Robert C.; Rickerson, Wilson H.

    2011-05-01

    This report serves as a resource for policymakers who wish to learn more about levelized cost of energy (LCOE) calculations, including cost-based incentives. The report identifies key renewable energy cost modeling options, highlights the policy implications of choosing one approach over the other, and presents recommendations on the optimal characteristics of a model to calculate rates for cost-based incentives, FITs, or similar policies. These recommendations shaped the design of NREL's Cost of Renewable Energy Spreadsheet Tool (CREST), which is used by state policymakers, regulators, utilities, developers, and other stakeholders to assist with analyses of policy and renewable energy incentive payment structures. Authored by Jason S. Gifford and Robert C. Grace of Sustainable Energy Advantage LLC and Wilson H. Rickerson of Meister Consultants Group, Inc.

  5. Non-Cost Barriers to Consumer Adoption of New Light-Duty Vehicle Technologies

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The rate of adoption of new vehicle technologies and related reductions in petroleum use and greenhouse gas emissions rely on how rapidly technology innovations enter the fleet through new vehicle purchases. New technologies often increase vehicle price, which creates a barrier to consumer purchase, but other barriers to adoption are not due to increased purchase prices. For example, plug-in vehicles, dedicated alternative fuel vehicles, and other new technologies face non-cost barriers such as consumer unfamiliarity or requirements for drivers to adjust behavior. This report reviews recent research to help classify these non-cost barriers and determine federal government programs and actions with the greatest potential to overcome them.

  6. Wind Technology Modeling Within the System Advisor Model (SAM) (Poster)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blair, N.; Dobos, A.; Ferguson, T.; Freeman, J.; Gilman, P.; Whitmore, J.

    2014-05-01

    This poster provides detail for implementation and the underlying methodology for modeling wind power generation performance in the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's (NREL's) System Advisor Model (SAM). SAM's wind power model allows users to assess projects involving one or more large or small wind turbines with any of the detailed options for residential, commercial, or utility financing. The model requires information about the wind resource, wind turbine specifications, wind farm layout (if applicable), and costs, and provides analysis to compare the absolute or relative impact of these inputs. SAM is a system performance and economic model designed to facilitate analysis and decision-making for project developers, financers, policymakers, and energy researchers. The user pairs a generation technology with a financing option (residential, commercial, or utility) to calculate the cost of energy over the multi-year project period. Specifically, SAM calculates the value of projects which buy and sell power at retail rates for residential and commercial systems, and also for larger-scale projects which operate through a power purchase agreement (PPA) with a utility. The financial model captures complex financing and rate structures, taxes, and incentives.

  7. OLEDWORKS DEVELOPS INNOVATIVE HIGH-PERFORMANCE DEPOSITION TECHNOLOGY TO REDUCE MANUFACTURING COST OF OLED LIGHTING

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The high manufacturing cost of OLED lighting is a major barrier to the growth of the emerging OLED lighting industry. OLEDWorks is developing high-performance deposition technology that addresses...

  8. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2015: Low Cost, High Capacity Non-Intercalation Chemistry Automotive Cells

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by Sila Nanotechnologies at 2015 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about low cost, high capacity...

  9. NASA Ames Saves Energy and Reduces Project Costs with Non-Invasive Retrofit Technologies

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation—given at the Fall 2011 Federal Utility Partnership Working Group (FUPWG) meeting—covers the NASA Ames Research Center's effort to save energy and reduce project costs with non-invasive retrofit technologies.

  10. A LOW COST WAFER-LEVEL MEMS PACKAGING TECHNOLOGY Pejman Monajemi, Paul J. Joseph*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ayazi, Farrokh

    A LOW COST WAFER-LEVEL MEMS PACKAGING TECHNOLOGY Pejman Monajemi, Paul J. Joseph* , Paul A. Kohl-cost low-temperature packaging technique for wafer-level encapsulation of MEMS devices fabricated on any arbitrary substrate. The packaging process presented here does not involve wafer bonding and can be applied

  11. Cost trajectories of low carbon electricity generation technologies: A study of cost uncertainty

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levi, Peter; Pollitt, Michael

    2015-08-03

    for three important electricity generation technologies for the UK; nuclear, offshore wind and coal with carbon capture and storage. The first analysis composes LCOE estimate trajectories from previous years' DECC estimates and presents them alongside...

  12. ELECTRIFIED VEHICLE TECHNOLOGY TRENDS, INFRASTRUCTURE IMPLICATIONS, AND COST COMPARISONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kockelman, Kara M.

    The motivations for developing alternative energy sources and associated vehicle powertrains1 is to reduce-market-viable plug-in electric vehicle (PEV) alternative. In this paper, the various PEV architectures are described/powertrain technologies critical for success in global vehicle markets. These alternative powertrains may, in the end

  13. DOE Fuel Cell Technologies Office Record 12024: Hydrogen Production Cost

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergy A plug-in electric vehicle10nominate an employee forThis formisUsing Low-Cost

  14. CFD Modeling for Mercury Control Technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Madsen, J.I.

    2006-12-01

    Compliance with the Clean Air Mercury Rule will require implementation of dedicated mercury control solutions at a significant portion of the U.S. coal-fired utility fleet. Activated Carbon Injection (ACI) upstream of a particulate control device (ESP or baghouse) remains one of the most promising near-term mercury control technologies. The DOE/NETL field testing program has advanced the understanding of mercury control by ACI, but a persistent need remains to develop predictive models that may improve the understanding and practical implementation of this technology. This presentation describes the development of an advanced model of in-flight mercury capture based on Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD). The model makes detailed predictions of the induct spatial distribution and residence time of sorbent, as well as predictions of mercury capture efficiency for particular sorbent flow rates and injection grid configurations. Hence, CFD enables cost efficient optimization of sorbent injection systems for mercury control to a degree that would otherwise be impractical both for new and existing plants. In this way, modeling tools may directly address the main cost component of operating an ACI system – the sorbent expense. A typical 300 MW system is expected to require between $1 and $2 million of sorbent per year, and so even modest reductions (say 10-20%) in necessary sorbent feed injection rates will quickly make any optimization effort very worthwhile. There are few existing models of mercury capture, and these typically make gross assumptions of plug gas flow, zero velocity slip between particle and gas phase, and uniform sorbent dispersion. All of these assumptions are overcome with the current model, which is based on first principles and includes mass transfer processes occurring at multiple scales, ranging from the large-scale transport in the duct to transport within the porous structure of a sorbent particle. In principle any single one of these processes could limit the overall capture of mercury. For example, capture may be severely limited in situations where the dispersion of sorbent is poor, or where adsorption rates are low because of relatively high temperatures. Application examples taken from the DOE/NETL field test program were considered. The sites considered include Brayton Point, Meramec, Monroe, and Yates. Some general lessons learned concerning the impact of turbulence and flow stratification on dispersion and capture will be presented.

  15. EXPERT ELICITATION OF ACROSS-TECHNOLOGY CORRELATIONS FOR REACTOR CAPITAL COSTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brent Dixon; Various

    2014-06-01

    Calculations of the uncertainty in the Levelized Cost at Equilibrium (LCAE) of generating nuclear electricity typically assume that the costs of the system component, notably reactors, are uncorrelated. Partial cancellation of independent errors thus gives rise to unrealistically small cost uncertainties for fuel cycles that incorporate multiple reactor technologies. This summary describes an expert elicitation of correlations between overnight reactor construction costs. It also defines a method for combining the elicitations into a single, consistent correlation matrix suitable for use in Monte Carlo LCAE calculations. Both the elicitation and uncertainty propagation methods are demonstrated through a pilot study where cost correlations between eight reactor technologies were elicited from experts in the US DOE Fuel Cycle Research

  16. Technology Cost and Performance Toolkit | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EA EISTJ Automation Jump to: navigation,Electrification Technologies

  17. AN INTEGRATED MODELING FRAMEWORK FOR CARBON MANAGEMENT TECHNOLOGIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anand B. Rao; Edward S. Rubin; Michael B. Berkenpas

    2004-03-01

    CO{sub 2} capture and storage (CCS) is gaining widespread interest as a potential method to control greenhouse gas emissions from fossil fuel sources, especially electric power plants. Commercial applications of CO{sub 2} separation and capture technologies are found in a number of industrial process operations worldwide. Many of these capture technologies also are applicable to fossil fuel power plants, although applications to large-scale power generation remain to be demonstrated. This report describes the development of a generalized modeling framework to assess alternative CO{sub 2} capture and storage options in the context of multi-pollutant control requirements for fossil fuel power plants. The focus of the report is on post-combustion CO{sub 2} capture using amine-based absorption systems at pulverized coal-fired plants, which are the most prevalent technology used for power generation today. The modeling framework builds on the previously developed Integrated Environmental Control Model (IECM). The expanded version with carbon sequestration is designated as IECM-cs. The expanded modeling capability also includes natural gas combined cycle (NGCC) power plants and integrated coal gasification combined cycle (IGCC) systems as well as pulverized coal (PC) plants. This report presents details of the performance and cost models developed for an amine-based CO{sub 2} capture system, representing the baseline of current commercial technology. The key uncertainties and variability in process design, performance and cost parameters which influence the overall cost of carbon mitigation also are characterized. The new performance and cost models for CO{sub 2} capture systems have been integrated into the IECM-cs, along with models to estimate CO{sub 2} transport and storage costs. The CO{sub 2} control system also interacts with other emission control technologies such as flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems for SO{sub 2} control. The integrated model is applied to study the feasibility and cost of carbon capture and sequestration at both new and existing PC plants as well as new NGCC plants. The cost of CO{sub 2} avoidance using amine-based CO{sub 2} capture technology is found to be sensitive to assumptions about the reference plant design and operation, as well as assumptions about the CO{sub 2} capture system design. The case studies also reveal multi-pollutant interactions and potential tradeoffs in the capture of CO{sub 2}, SO{sub 2}, NO{sub 2} and NH{sub 3}. The potential for targeted R&D to reduce the cost of CO{sub 2} capture also is explored using the IECM-cs in conjunction with expert elicitations regarding potential improvements in key performance and cost parameters of amine-based systems. The results indicate that the performance of amine-based CO{sub 2} capture systems can be improved significantly, and the cost of CO{sub 2} capture reduced substantially over the next decade or two, via innovations such as new or improved sorbents with lower regeneration heat requirements, and improvements in power plant heat integration to reduce the (currently large) energy penalty of CO{sub 2} capture. Future work will explore in more detail a broader set of advanced technology options to lower the costs of CO{sub 2} capture and storage. Volume 2 of this report presents a detailed User's Manual for the IECM-cs computer model as a companion to the technical documentation in Volume 1.

  18. Solid waste integrated cost analysis model: 1991 project year report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-01-01

    The purpose of the City of Houston's 1991 Solid Waste Integrated Cost Analysis Model (SWICAM) project was to continue the development of a computerized cost analysis model. This model is to provide solid waste managers with tool to evaluate the dollar cost of real or hypothetical solid waste management choices. Those choices have become complicated by the implementation of Subtitle D of the Resources Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) and the EPA's Integrated Approach to managing municipal solid waste;. that is, minimize generation, maximize recycling, reduce volume (incinerate), and then bury (landfill) only the remainder. Implementation of an integrated solid waste management system involving all or some of the options of recycling, waste to energy, composting, and landfilling is extremely complicated. Factors such as hauling distances, markets, and prices for recyclable, costs and benefits of transfer stations, and material recovery facilities must all be considered. A jurisdiction must determine the cost impacts of implementing a number of various possibilities for managing, handling, processing, and disposing of waste. SWICAM employs a single Lotus 123 spreadsheet to enable a jurisdiction to predict or assess the costs of its waste management system. It allows the user to select his own process flow for waste material and to manipulate the model to include as few or as many options as he or she chooses. The model will calculate the estimated cost for those choices selected. The user can then change the model to include or exclude waste stream components, until the mix of choices suits the user. Graphs can be produced as a visual communication aid in presenting the results of the cost analysis. SWICAM also allows future cost projections to be made.

  19. Costs Models in Design and Manufacturing of Sand Casting Products

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Perry, Nicolas; Bernard, Alain

    2010-01-01

    In the early phases of the product life cycle, the costs controls became a major decision tool in the competitiveness of the companies due to the world competition. After defining the problems related to this control difficulties, we will present an approach using a concept of cost entity related to the design and realization activities of the product. We will try to apply this approach to the fields of the sand casting foundry. This work will highlight the enterprise modelling difficulties (limits of a global cost modelling) and some specifics limitations of the tool used for this development. Finally we will discuss on the limits of a generic approach.

  20. Costs Models in Design and Manufacturing of Sand Casting Products

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nicolas Perry; Magali Mauchand; Alain Bernard

    2010-11-26

    In the early phases of the product life cycle, the costs controls became a major decision tool in the competitiveness of the companies due to the world competition. After defining the problems related to this control difficulties, we will present an approach using a concept of cost entity related to the design and realization activities of the product. We will try to apply this approach to the fields of the sand casting foundry. This work will highlight the enterprise modelling difficulties (limits of a global cost modelling) and some specifics limitations of the tool used for this development. Finally we will discuss on the limits of a generic approach.

  1. Cost savings deliverables and criteria for the OST technology decision process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCown, A.

    1997-04-01

    This document has been prepared to assist focus area (FA) technical and management teams in understanding the cost savings deliverables associated with a technology system during its research and development (R and D) phases. It discusses the usefulness of cost analysis in the decision-making process, and asserts that the level of confidence and data quality of a cost analysis is proportional to the maturity of the technology system`s development life cycle. Suggestions of specific investment criteria or cost savings metrics that a FA might levy on individual research projects are made but the final form of these elements should be stipulated by the FA management based on their rationale for a successful technology development project. Also, cost savings deliverables for a single FA will be more detailed than those for management of the Office of Science and Technology (OST). For example, OST management may want an analysis of the overall return on investment for each FA, while the FA program manager may want this analysis and the return on investment metrics for each technology research activity the FA supports.

  2. Parabolic Trough Collector Cost Update for the System Advisor Model (SAM)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kurup, Parthiv; Turchi, Craig S.

    2015-11-01

    This report updates the baseline cost for parabolic trough solar fields in the United States within NREL's System Advisor Model (SAM). SAM, available at no cost at https://sam.nrel.gov/, is a performance and financial model designed to facilitate decision making for people involved in the renewable energy industry. SAM is the primary tool used by NREL and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) for estimating the performance and cost of concentrating solar power (CSP) technologies and projects. The study performed a bottom-up build and cost estimate for two state-of-the-art parabolic trough designs -- the SkyTrough and the Ultimate Trough. The SkyTrough analysis estimated the potential installed cost for a solar field of 1500 SCAs as $170/m2 +/- $6/m2. The investigation found that SkyTrough installed costs were sensitive to factors such as raw aluminum alloy cost and production volume. For example, in the case of the SkyTrough, the installed cost would rise to nearly $210/m2 if the aluminum alloy cost was $1.70/lb instead of $1.03/lb. Accordingly, one must be aware of fluctuations in the relevant commodities markets to track system cost over time. The estimated installed cost for the Ultimate Trough was only slightly higher at $178/m2, which includes an assembly facility of $11.6 million amortized over the required production volume. Considering the size and overall cost of a 700 SCA Ultimate Trough solar field, two parallel production lines in a fully covered assembly facility, each with the specific torque box, module and mirror jigs, would be justified for a full CSP plant.

  3. Hypothetical Distance Learning Program Costs Model A framework for thinking about the comprehensive costs of hosting a DL program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Snider, Barry B.

    Hypothetical Distance Learning Program Costs Model A framework for thinking about the comprehensive costs of hosting a DL program Start-Up Ongoing Explanation 100,000$ 100,000$ FTE needed to develop any or repurpose old courses for the online context. Infrastructure Costs tbd tbd Cost of adding or improving

  4. Selected bibliography: cost and energy savings of conservation and renewable energy technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1980-05-01

    This bibliography is a compilation of reports on the cost and energy savings of conservation and renewable energy applications throughout the United States. It is part of an overall effort to inform utilities of technological developments in conservation and renewable energy technologies and so aid utilities in their planning process to determine the most effective and economic combination of capital investments to meet customer needs. Department of Energy assessments of the applications, current costs and cost goals for the various technologies included in this bibliography are presented. These assessments are based on analyses performed by or for the respective DOE Program Offices. The results are sensitive to a number of variables and assumptions; however, the estimates presented are considered representative. These assessments are presented, followed by some conclusions regarding the potential role of the conservation and renewable energy alternative. The approach used to classify the bibliographic citations and abstracts is outlined.

  5. Modeling Photovoltaic and Concentrating Solar Power Trough Performance, Cost, and Financing with the Solar Advisor Model: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blair, N.; Mehos, M.; Christensen, C.; Cameron, C.

    2008-05-01

    A comprehensive solar technology systems analysis model, the Solar Advisor Model (SAM), has been developed to support the federal R&D community and the solar industry by staff at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and Sandia National Laboratory. This model is able to model the finances, incentives, and performance of flat-plate photovoltaic (PV), concentrating PV, and concentrating solar power (specifically, parabolic troughs). The primary function of the model is to allow users to investigate the impact of variations in performance, cost, and financial parameters to better understand their impact on key figures of merit. Figures of merit related to the cost and performance of these systems include, but aren't limited to, system output, system efficiencies, levelized cost of energy, return on investment, and system capital and O&M costs. There are several models within SAM to model the performance of photovoltaic modules and inverters. This paper presents an overview of each PV and inverter model, introduces a new generic model, and briefly discusses the concentrating solar power (CSP) parabolic trough model. A comparison of results using the different PV and inverter models is also presented.

  6. Aqueous nitrate waste treatment: Technology comparison, cost/benefit, and market analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-01-01

    The purpose of this analysis is to provide information necessary for the Department of Energy (DOE) to evaluate the practical utility of the Nitrate to Ammonia and Ceramic or Glass (NAC/NAG/NAX) process, which is under development in the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The NAC/NACx/NAX process can convert aqueous radioactive nitrate-laden waste to a glass, ceramic, or grout solid waste form. The tasks include, but are not limited to, the following: Identify current commercial technologies to meet hazardous and radiological waste disposal requirements. The technologies may be thermal or non-thermal but must be all inclusive (i.e., must convert a radionuclide-containing nitrate waste with a pH around 12 to a stable form that can be disposed at permitted facilities); evaluate and compare DOE-sponsored vitrification, grouting, and minimum additive waste stabilization projects for life-cycle costs; compare the technologies above with respect to material costs, capital equipment costs, operating costs, and operating efficiencies. For the NAC/NAG/NAX process, assume aluminum reactant is government furnished and ammonia gas may be marketed; compare the identified technologies with respect to frequency of use within DOE for environmental management applications with appropriate rationale for use; Assess the potential size of the DOE market for the NAC/NAG/NAX process; assess and off-gas issues; and compare with international technologies, including life-cycle estimates.

  7. Technological cost-reduction pathways for attenuator wave energy converters in the marine hydrokinetic environment.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bull, Diana L; Ochs, Margaret Ellen

    2013-09-01

    This report considers and prioritizes the primary potential technical costreduction pathways for offshore wave activated body attenuators designed for ocean resources. This report focuses on technical research and development costreduction pathways related to the device technology rather than environmental monitoring or permitting opportunities. Three sources of information were used to understand current cost drivers and develop a prioritized list of potential costreduction pathways: a literature review of technical work related to attenuators, a reference device compiled from literature sources, and a webinar with each of three industry device developers. Data from these information sources were aggregated and prioritized with respect to the potential impact on the lifetime levelized cost of energy, the potential for progress, the potential for success, and the confidence in success. Results indicate the five most promising costreduction pathways include advanced controls, an optimized structural design, improved power conversion, planned maintenance scheduling, and an optimized device profile.

  8. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Significant Cost Improvement of Li-ion Cells Through Non-NMP Electrode Coating, Direct Separator Coating, and Fast Formation Technologies

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by Johnson Controls at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about significant cost improvement...

  9. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2015: Significant Cost Improvement of Li-Ion Cells Through Non-NMP Electrode Coating, Direct Separator Coating, and Fast Formation Technologies

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by Johnson Controls at 2015 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about significant cost improvement...

  10. Legal Issues and Risks Associated with Building Information Modeling Technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Foster, Leon Lewis

    2008-07-22

    International Alliance for Interoperability IFC Industry Foundation Classes IPD Integrated Project Delivery NIBS National Institute of Building Standards NIST National Institute of Standards and Technology VDC Virtual Design and Construction 1 CHAPTER 1... to generate cost and schedule savings. BIM is expected to drive the construction industry towards a ?model based? process and gradually move the industry away from a ?2D Based? process. 1.3 DEFINITION AND CHARACTERISTICS OF BIM BIM is not merely a 3D...

  11. Low Cost Carbon Fibre: Applications, Performance and Cost Models - Chapter 17

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Warren, Charles David; Wheatley, Dr. Alan; Das, Sujit

    2014-01-01

    Weight saving in automotive applications has a major bearing on fuel economy. It is generally accepted that, typically, a 10% weight reduction in an automobile will lead to a 6-8% improvement in fuel economy. In this respect, carbon fibre composites are extremely attractive in their ability to provide superlative mechanical performance per unit weight. That is why they are specified for high-end uses such as Formula 1 racing cars and the latest aircraft (e.g. Boeing 787, Airbus A350 and A380), where they comprise over 50% by weight of the structure However, carbon fibres are expensive and this renders their composites similarly expensive. Research has been carried out at Oak Ridge National Laboratories (ORNL), Tennessee, USA for over a decade with the aim of reducing the cost of carbon fibre such that it becomes a cost-effective option for the automotive industry. Aspects of this research relating to the development of low cost carbon fibre have been reported in Chapter 3 of this publication. In this chapter, the practical industrial applications of low-cost carbon fibre are presented, together with considerations of the performance and cost models which underpin the work.

  12. Development of Advanced Technologies to Reduce Design, Fabrication and Construction Costs for Future Nuclear Power Plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Camillo A. DiNunzio Framatome ANP DE& S; Dr. Abhinav Gupta Assistant Professor NCSU; Dr. Michael Golay Professor MIT Dr. Vincent Luk Sandia National Laboratories; Rich Turk Westinghouse Electric Company Nuclear Systems; Charles Morrow, Sandia National Laboratories; Geum-Taek Jin, Korea Power Engineering Company Inc.

    2002-11-30

    OAK-B135 This report presents a summation of the third and final year of a three-year investigation into methods and technologies for substantially reducing the capital costs and total schedule for future nuclear plants. In addition, this is the final technical report for the three-year period of studies.

  13. Bottom-up Representation of Industrial Energy Efficiency Technologies in Integrated Assessment Models for the Cement Sector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sathaye, J.

    2011-01-01

    energy-efficiency technology costs and improvementon behavioral responses, technology costs, energy savings,is to characterize technology costs and potentials for

  14. A new principle for low-cost hydrogen sensors for fuel cell technology safety

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liess, Martin [Rhein Main University of Applied Sciences, Rüsselsheim, Wiesbaden (Germany)

    2014-03-24

    Hydrogen sensors are of paramount importance for the safety of hydrogen fuel cell technology as result of the high pressure necessary in fuel tanks and its low explosion limit. I present a novel sensor principle based on thermal conduction that is very sensitive to hydrogen, highly specific and can operate on low temperatures. As opposed to other thermal sensors it can be operated with low cost and low power driving electronics. On top of this, as sensor element a modified standard of-the shelf MEMS thermopile IR-sensor can be used. The sensor principle presented is thus suited for the future mass markets of hydrogen fuel cell technology.S.

  15. IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON SMART GRID 1 A Response Cost Model for Advanced Metering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sanders, William H.

    Metering Infras- tructure (AMI). The cost model reflects the costs of response actions due to outages of the challenge is the requirement for a cost model that can accurately predict the costs of possible responseIEEE TRANSACTIONS ON SMART GRID 1 A Response Cost Model for Advanced Metering Infrastructures Ahmed

  16. General Equilibrium, Electricity Generation Technologies and the Cost of Carbon Abatement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lanz, Bruno, 1980-

    Electricity generation is a major contributor to carbon dioxide emissions, and a key determinant of abatement costs. Ex-ante assessments of carbon policies mainly rely on either of two modeling paradigms: (i) partial ...

  17. Advances in Life-Cycle Cost Analysis and Design of Civil Infrastructure Systems LIFE CYCLE COST MODEL FOR EVALUATING THE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lepech, Michael D.

    ). Cement production accounts for 5% of all global anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions #12;AdvancesAdvances in Life-Cycle Cost Analysis and Design of Civil Infrastructure Systems 143 LIFE CYCLE COST and cost model was developed to evaluate infrastructure sustainability, and compare alternative materials

  18. General Network Lifetime and Cost Models for Evaluating Sensor Network

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heinzelman, Wendi

    General Network Lifetime and Cost Models for Evaluating Sensor Network Deployment Strategies Zhao Cheng, Mark Perillo, and Wendi B. Heinzelman, Senior Member, IEEE Abstract--In multihop wireless sensor to energy imbalance among sensors often appear. Sensors closer to a data sink are usually required

  19. A COST-EFFECTIVE DIGITAL FORENSICS INVESTIGATION MODEL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Overill, Richard E.

    i #12;ii #12;Chapter 1 A COST-EFFECTIVE DIGITAL FORENSICS INVESTIGATION MODEL R.E. Overill, M. Kwan, K.P. Chow, P. Lai and F. Law Abstract Computers operate at discrete points in time and hence digital the perspective of a digital investigation, it is the duty of digital investigators or forensic examiners

  20. Technological cost%3CU%2B2010%3Ereduction pathways for axial%3CU%2B2010%3Eflow turbines in the marine hydrokinetic environment.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Laird, Daniel L.; Johnson, Erick L.; Ochs, Margaret Ellen; Boren, Blake

    2013-05-01

    This report considers and prioritizes potential technical costreduction pathways for axialflow turbines designed for tidal, river, and ocean current resources. This report focuses on technical research and development costreduction pathways related to the device technology rather than environmental monitoring or permitting opportunities. Three sources of information were utilized to understand current cost drivers and develop a list of potential costreduction pathways: a literature review of technical work related to axialflow turbines, the U.S. Department of Energy Reference Model effort, and informal webinars and other targeted interactions with industry developers. Data from these various information sources were aggregated and prioritized with respect to potential impact on the lifetime levelized cost of energy. The four most promising costreduction pathways include structural design optimization; improved deployment, maintenance, and recovery; system simplicity and reliability; and array optimization.

  1. IEA Wind Task 26. Wind Technology, Cost and Performance Trends in Denmark, Germany, Ireland, Norway, the European Union, and the United States. 2007 - 2012

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vitina, Aisma; Luers, Silke; Wallasch, Anna-Kathrin; Berkhout, Volker; Duffy, Aidan; Cleary, Brendan; Husabo, Leif I.; Weir, David E.; Lacal-Arantegui, Roberto; Hand, M. Maureen; Lantz, Eric; Belyeu, Kathy; Wiser, Ryan; Bolinger, Mark; Hoen, Ben

    2015-06-12

    This report builds from a similar previous analysis (Schwabe et al., 2011) exploring the differences in cost of wind energy in 2008 among countries participating in IEA Wind Task 26 at that time. The levelized cost of energy (LCOE) is a widely recognized metric for understanding how technology, capital investment, operations, and financing impact the life-cycle cost of building and operating a wind plant. Schwabe et al. (2011) apply a spreadsheet-based cash flow model developed by the Energy Research Centre of the Netherlands (ECN) to estimate LCOE. This model is a detailed, discounted cash flow model used to represent the various cost structures in each of the participating countries from the perspective of a financial investor in a domestic wind energy project. This model is used for the present analysis as well, and comparisons are made for those countries who contributed to both reports, Denmark, Germany, and the United States.

  2. Performance and cost models for the direct sulfur recovery process. Task 1 Topical report, Volume 3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Frey, H.C. [North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh, NC (United States); Williams, R.B. [Carneigie Mellon Univ., Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    1995-09-01

    The purpose of this project is to develop performance and cost models of the Direct Sulfur Recovery Process (DSRP). The DSRP is an emerging technology for sulfur recovery from advanced power generation technologies such as Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) systems. In IGCC systems, sulfur present in the coal is captured by gas cleanup technologies to avoid creating emissions of sulfur dioxide to the atmosphere. The sulfur that is separated from the coal gas stream must be collected. Leading options for dealing with the sulfur include byproduct recovery as either sulfur or sulfuric acid. Sulfur is a preferred byproduct, because it is easier to handle and therefore does not depend as strongly upon the location of potential customers as is the case for sulfuric acid. This report describes the need for new sulfur recovery technologies.

  3. Low-cost thin-material solar technology, the key to a viable energy alternative

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilhelm, W.G.; Ripel, B.D.

    1985-08-01

    The creation of a solar technology based on a dramatic reduction in material intensity and greater simplicity of design is the result of a cost-guided research approach. It takes advantage of a progressive material science based on polymer films and unique construction methods that optimize material requirements, performance and durability. The current level of technical maturity has revealed a solar collector design that has the potential for a dramatic reduction in installed cost while maintaining high thermal performance and durability. In addition, the same methodology has guided total solar system designs with similar economies and performance advantages.

  4. A stochastic model for the measurement of electricity outage costs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grosfeld-Nir, A.; Tishler, A. (Tel Aviv Univ. (Israel))

    1993-01-01

    The measurement of customer outage costs has recently become an important subject of research for electric utilities. This paper uses a stochastic dynamic model as the starting point in developing a market-based method for the evaluation of outage costs. Specifically, the model postulates that once an electricity outage occurs, all production activity stops. Full production is resumed once the electricity outage is over. This process repeats itself indefinitely. The business customer maximizes his expected discounted profits (the expected value of the firm), taking into account his limited ability to respond to repeated random electricity outages. The model is applied to 11 industrial branches in Israel. The estimates exhibit a large variation across branches. 34 refs., 3 tabs.

  5. Value of Demand Response: Quantities from Production Cost Modeling (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hummon, M.

    2014-04-01

    Demand response (DR) resources present a potentially important source of grid flexibility particularly on future systems with high penetrations of variable wind and solar power generation. However, managed loads in grid models are limited by data availability and modeling complexity. This presentation focuses on the value of co-optimized DR resources to provide energy and ancillary services in a production cost model. There are significant variations in the availabilities of different types of DR resources, which affect both the operational savings as well as the revenue for each DR resource. The results presented include the system-wide avoided fuel and generator start-up costs as well as the composite revenue for each DR resource by energy and operating reserves. In addition, the revenue is characterized by the capacity, energy, and units of DR enabled.

  6. Development of ITM Oxygen Technology for Low-cost and Low-emission Gasification and Other Industrial Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Armstrong, Phillip

    2014-11-01

    Air Products is carrying out a scope of work under DOE Award No. DE-FE0012065 “Development of ITM Oxygen Technology for Low-cost and Low-emission Gasification and Other Industrial Applications.” The Statement of Project Objectives (SOPO) includes a Task 4f in which a Decision Point shall be reached, necessitating a review of Tasks 2-5 with an emphasis on Task 4f. This Topical Report constitutes the Decision Point Application pertaining to Task 4f. The SOPO under DOE Award No. DE-FE0012065 is aimed at furthering the development of the Ion Transport Membrane (ITM) Oxygen production process toward a demonstration scale facility known as the Oxygen Development Facility (ODF). It is anticipated that the completion of the current SOPO will advance the technology significantly along a pathway towards enabling the design and construction of the ODF. Development progress on several fronts is critical before an ODF project can commence; this Topical Report serves as an early update on the progress in critical development areas. Progress was made under all tasks, including Materials Development, Ceramic Processing Development, Engineering Development, and Performance Testing. Under Task 4f, Air Products carried out a cost and performance study in which several process design and cost parameters were varied and assessed with a process model and budgetary costing exercise. The results show that the major variables include ceramic module reliability, ITM operating temperature, module production yield, and heat addition strategy. High-temperature compact heat exchangers are shown to contribute significant cost benefits, while directly firing into the feed stream to an ITM are even a mild improvement on the high-temperature recuperation approach. Based on the findings to-date, Air Products recommends no changes to the content or emphasis in the current SOPO and recommends its completion prior to another formal assessment of these factors.

  7. A Total Cost of Ownership Model for Low Temperature PEM Fuel...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    cost modeling framework of other studies to include operational costs and life-cycle impact assessment of possible ancillary financial benefits during operation and at...

  8. Melanoma costs: A dynamic model comparing estimated overall costs of various clinical stages

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alexandrescu, Doru Traian

    2009-01-01

    AL. Trends in treatment costs for localized prostate cancer:R, Elkin EP, et al. Cumulative cost pattern comparison ofAn estimate of the annual direct cost of treating cutaneous

  9. On modeling pollution-generating technologies July 22, 2010 On modeling pollution-generating technologies.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bandyopadhyay, Antar

    On modeling pollution-generating technologies July 22, 2010 On modeling pollution modeling pollution-generating technologies July 22, 2010 Abstract We distinguish between intended with respect to inputs and intended outputs that cause pollution. We derive implications from the phenomenon

  10. Application and Development of Appropriate Tools and Technologies for Cost-Effective Carbon Sequestration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bill Stanley; Sandra Brown; Patrick Gonzalez; Brent Sohngen; Neil Sampson; Mark Anderson; Miguel Calmon; Sean Grimland; Ellen Hawes; Zoe Kant; Dan Morse; Sarah Woodhouse Murdock; Arlene Olivero; Tim Pearson; Sarah Walker; Jon Winsten; Chris Zganjar

    2006-09-30

    The Nature Conservancy is participating in a Cooperative Agreement with the Department of Energy (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) to explore the compatibility of carbon sequestration in terrestrial ecosystems and the conservation of biodiversity. The title of the research project is ''Application and Development of Appropriate Tools and Technologies for Cost-Effective Carbon Sequestration''. The objectives of the project are to: (1) improve carbon offset estimates produced in both the planning and implementation phases of projects; (2) build valid and standardized approaches to estimate project carbon benefits at a reasonable cost; and (3) lay the groundwork for implementing cost-effective projects, providing new testing ground for biodiversity protection and restoration projects that store additional atmospheric carbon. This Technical Progress Report discusses preliminary results of the six specific tasks that The Nature Conservancy is undertaking to answer research needs while facilitating the development of real projects with measurable greenhouse gas reductions. The research described in this report occurred between April 1st and July 30th 2006. The specific tasks discussed include: Task 1: carbon inventory advancements; Task 2: emerging technologies for remote sensing of terrestrial carbon; Task 3: baseline method development; Task 4: third-party technical advisory panel meetings; Task 5: new project feasibility studies; and Task 6: development of new project software screening tool.

  11. Application and Development of Appropriate Tools and Technologies for Cost-Effective Carbon Sequestration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bill Stanley; Sandra Brown; Patrick Gonzalez; Brent Sohngen; Neil Sampson; Mark Anderson; Miguel Calmon; Sean Grimland; Zoe Kant; Dan Morse; Sarah Woodhouse Murdock; Arlene Olivero; Tim Pearson; Sarah Walker; Jon Winsten; Chris Zganjar

    2007-03-31

    The Nature Conservancy is participating in a Cooperative Agreement with the Department of Energy (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) to explore the compatibility of carbon sequestration in terrestrial ecosystems and the conservation of biodiversity. The title of the research project is ''Application and Development of Appropriate Tools and Technologies for Cost-Effective Carbon Sequestration''. The objectives of the project are to: (1) improve carbon offset estimates produced in both the planning and implementation phases of projects; (2) build valid and standardized approaches to estimate project carbon benefits at a reasonable cost; and (3) lay the groundwork for implementing cost-effective projects, providing new testing ground for biodiversity protection and restoration projects that store additional atmospheric carbon. This Technical Progress Report discusses preliminary results of the six specific tasks that The Nature Conservancy is undertaking to answer research needs while facilitating the development of real projects with measurable greenhouse gas reductions. The research described in this report occurred between January 1st and March 31st 2007. The specific tasks discussed include: Task 1--carbon inventory advancements; Task 2--emerging technologies for remote sensing of terrestrial carbon; Task 3--baseline method development; Task 4--third-party technical advisory panel meetings; Task 5--new project feasibility studies; and Task 6--development of new project software screening tool.

  12. Application and Development of Appropriate Tools and Technologies for Cost-Effective Carbon Sequestration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bill Stanley; Sandra Brown; Patrick Gonzalez; Brent Sohngen; Neil Sampson; Mark Anderson; Miguel Calmon; Sean Grimland; Zoe Kant; Dan Morse; Sarah Woodhouse Murdock; Arlene Olivero; Tim Pearson; Sarah Walker; Jon Winsten; Chris Zganjar

    2006-12-31

    The Nature Conservancy is participating in a Cooperative Agreement with the Department of Energy (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) to explore the compatibility of carbon sequestration in terrestrial ecosystems and the conservation of biodiversity. The title of the research project is ''Application and Development of Appropriate Tools and Technologies for Cost-Effective Carbon Sequestration''. The objectives of the project are to: (1) improve carbon offset estimates produced in both the planning and implementation phases of projects; (2) build valid and standardized approaches to estimate project carbon benefits at a reasonable cost; and (3) lay the groundwork for implementing cost-effective projects, providing new testing ground for biodiversity protection and restoration projects that store additional atmospheric carbon. This Technical Progress Report discusses preliminary results of the six specific tasks that The Nature Conservancy is undertaking to answer research needs while facilitating the development of real projects with measurable greenhouse gas reductions. The research described in this report occurred between October 1st and December 31st 2006. The specific tasks discussed include: Task 1: carbon inventory advancements; Task 2: emerging technologies for remote sensing of terrestrial carbon; Task 3: baseline method development; Task 4: third-party technical advisory panel meetings; Task 5: new project feasibility studies; and Task 6: development of new project software screening tool.

  13. Application and Development of Appropriate Tools and Technologies for Cost-Effective Carbon Sequestration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bill Stanley; Patrick Gonzalez; Sandra Brown; Jenny Henman; Zoe Kant; Sarah Woodhouse Murdock; Neil Sampson; Gilberto Tiepolo; Tim Pearson; Sarah Walker; Miguel Calmon

    2006-01-01

    The Nature Conservancy is participating in a Cooperative Agreement with the Department of Energy (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) to explore the compatibility of carbon sequestration in terrestrial ecosystems and the conservation of biodiversity. The title of the research project is ''Application and Development of Appropriate Tools and Technologies for Cost-Effective Carbon Sequestration''. The objectives of the project are to: (1) improve carbon offset estimates produced in both the planning and implementation phases of projects; (2) build valid and standardized approaches to estimate project carbon benefits at a reasonable cost; and (3) lay the groundwork for implementing cost-effective projects, providing new testing ground for biodiversity protection and restoration projects that store additional atmospheric carbon. This Technical Progress Report discusses preliminary results of the six specific tasks that The Nature Conservancy is undertaking to answer research needs while facilitating the development of real projects with measurable greenhouse gas reductions. The research described in this report occurred between April 1st , 2005 and June 30th, 2005. The specific tasks discussed include: Task 1: carbon inventory advancements; Task 2: emerging technologies for remote sensing of terrestrial carbon; Task 3: baseline method development; Task 4: third-party technical advisory panel meetings; Task 5: new project feasibility studies; and Task 6: development of new project software screening tool.

  14. Application and Development of Appropriate Tools and Technologies for Cost-Effective Carbon Sequestration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bill Stanley; Patrick Gonzalez; Sandra Brown; Sarah Woodhouse Murdock; Jenny Henman; Zoe Kant; Gilberto Tiepolo; Tim Pearson; Neil Sampson; Miguel Calmon

    2005-10-01

    The Nature Conservancy is participating in a Cooperative Agreement with the Department of Energy (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) to explore the compatibility of carbon sequestration in terrestrial ecosystems and the conservation of biodiversity. The title of the research project is ''Application and Development of Appropriate Tools and Technologies for Cost-Effective Carbon Sequestration''. The objectives of the project are to: (1) improve carbon offset estimates produced in both the planning and implementation phases of projects; (2) build valid and standardized approaches to estimate project carbon benefits at a reasonable cost; and (3) lay the groundwork for implementing cost-effective projects, providing new testing ground for biodiversity protection and restoration projects that store additional atmospheric carbon. This Technical Progress Report discusses preliminary results of the six specific tasks that The Nature Conservancy is undertaking to answer research needs while facilitating the development of real projects with measurable greenhouse gas reductions. The research described in this report occurred between April 1st , 2005 and June 30th, 2005. The specific tasks discussed include: Task 1: carbon inventory advancements; Task 2: emerging technologies for remote sensing of terrestrial carbon; Task 3: baseline method development; Task 4: third-party technical advisory panel meetings; Task 5: new project feasibility studies; and Task 6: development of new project software screening tool.

  15. Application and Development of Appropriate Tools and Technologies for Cost-Effective Carbon Sequestration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bill Stanley; Patrick Gonzalez; Sandra Brown; Jenny Henman; Sarah Woodhouse Murdock; Neil Sampson; Tim Pearson; Sarah Walker; Zoe Kant; Miguel Calmon

    2006-04-01

    The Nature Conservancy is participating in a Cooperative Agreement with the Department of Energy (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) to explore the compatibility of carbon sequestration in terrestrial ecosystems and the conservation of biodiversity. The title of the research project is ''Application and Development of Appropriate Tools and Technologies for Cost-Effective Carbon Sequestration''. The objectives of the project are to: (1) improve carbon offset estimates produced in both the planning and implementation phases of projects; (2) build valid and standardized approaches to estimate project carbon benefits at a reasonable cost; and (3) lay the groundwork for implementing cost-effective projects, providing new testing ground for biodiversity protection and restoration projects that store additional atmospheric carbon. This Technical Progress Report discusses preliminary results of the six specific tasks that The Nature Conservancy is undertaking to answer research needs while facilitating the development of real projects with measurable greenhouse gas reductions. The research described in this report occurred between January 1st and March 31st 2006. The specific tasks discussed include: Task 1: carbon inventory advancements; Task 2: emerging technologies for remote sensing of terrestrial carbon; Task 3: baseline method development; Task 4: third-party technical advisory panel meetings; Task 5: new project feasibility studies; and Task 6: development of new project software screening tool.

  16. Model for a web-based hospital technology management system 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Srinivasan, Niranjana

    2002-01-01

    The objective of this project is to design a hospital technology management system that is web-based. Technology management may be defined as 'an accountable, systematic approach to ensure that cost-effective, efficacious, safe and appropriate...

  17. Fuel Cell Power Model Elucidates Life-Cycle Costs for Fuel Cell-Based Combined Heat, Hydrogen, and Power (CHHP) Production Systems (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2010-11-01

    This fact sheet describes NREL's accomplishments in accurately modeling costs for fuel cell-based combined heat, hydrogen, and power systems. Work was performed by NREL's Hydrogen Technologies and Systems Center.

  18. A HIGH ASPECT RATIO, FLEXIBLE, TRANSPARENT AND LOW-COST PARYLENE-C SHADOW MASK TECHNOLOGY FOR MICROPATTERNING APPLICATIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dokmeci, Mehmet

    A HIGH ASPECT RATIO, FLEXIBLE, TRANSPARENT AND LOW-COST PARYLENE-C SHADOW MASK TECHNOLOGY and Technology, MIT, Cambridge, MA, USA Abstract: In this paper, we present a flexible parylene-C shadow mask technology for creating microscale patterns on flat and curved surfaces. The smallest feature size of 4 µm

  19. A proposed framework for establishing integrated cost and performance criteria for environmental technologies: A summary report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1994-05-01

    This document presents a summary of results of a joint EPA/DOE project aimed at establishing a suite of standard cost and performance criteria for evaluating environmental cleanup technologies for DOE sites. Project findings include: (1) decisionmakers have quite different perspectives with interests and information needs varying among decisionmaker groups, (2) previous criteria development efforts may be too narrowly focused to apply to all decisionmakers, (3) criteria must include social/political/economic interests of decisionmakers as well as site-specific variations, and (4) there are 5 core questions that all decisionmakers are likely to ask when considering a technology for use at a site. The resource developed in the project offers decisionmakers a first-time comprehensive assessment of major technology evaluation issues.

  20. WHICH MODEL OF TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER FOR NANOTECHNOLOGY?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1 WHICH MODEL OF TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER FOR NANOTECHNOLOGY? A Comparison with Biotech.genet@grenoble-em.com Website: www.nanoeconomics.eu Abstract. Nanotechnologies are often presented as breakthrough innovations. This article investigates the model of knowledge transfer in the nanotechnologies in depth, by comparing

  1. Technology, Safety and Costs of Decommissioning a Reference Uranium Hexafluoride Conversion Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elder, H. K.

    1981-10-01

    Safety and cost information is developed for the conceptual decommissioning of a commercial uranium hexafluoride conversion (UF{sub 6}) plant. Two basic decommissioning alternatives are studied to obtain comparisons between cost and safety impacts: DECON, and passive SAFSTOR. A third alternative, DECON of the plant and equipment with stabilization and long-term care of lagoon wastes. is also examined. DECON includes the immediate removal (following plant shutdown) of all radioactivity in excess of unrestricted release levels, with subsequent release of the site for public use. Passive SAFSTOR requires decontamination, preparation, maintenance, and surveillance for a period of time after shutdown, followed by deferred decontamination and unrestricted release. DECON with stabilization and long-term care of lagoon wastes (process wastes generated at the reference plant and stored onsite during plant operation} is also considered as a decommissioning method, although its acceptability has not yet been determined by the NRC. The decommissioning methods assumed for use in each decommissioning alternative are based on state-of-the-art technology. The elapsed time following plant shutdown required to perform the decommissioning work in each alternative is estimated to be: for DECON, 8 months; for passive SAFSTOR, 3 months to prepare the plant for safe storage and 8 months to accomplish deferred decontamination. Planning and preparation for decommissioning prior to plant shutdown is estimated to require about 6 months for either DECON or passive SAFSTOR. Planning and preparation prior to starting deferred decontamination is estimated to require an additional 6 months. OECON with lagoon waste stabilization is estimated to take 6 months for planning and about 8 months to perform the decommissioning work. Decommissioning cost, in 1981 dollars, is estimated to be $5.91 million for OECON. For passive SAFSTOR, preparing the facility for safe storage is estimated to cost $0.88 million, the annual maintenance and surveillance cost is estimated to be about $0.095 million, and deferred decontamination is estimated to cost about $6.50 million. Therefore, passive SAFSTOR for 10 years is estimated to cost $8.33 million in nondiscounted 1981 dollars. DECON with lagoon waste stabilization is estimated to cost about $4.59 million, with an annual cost of $0.011 million for long-term care. All of these estimates include a 25% contingency. Waste management costs for DECON, including the net cost of disposal of the solvent extraction lagoon wastes by shipping those wastes to a uranium mill for recovery of residual uranium, comprise about 38% of the total decommissioning cost. Disposal of lagoon waste at a commercial low-level waste burial ground is estimated to add $10.01 million to decommissioning costs. Safety analyses indicate that radiological and nonradiological safety impacts from decommissioning activities should be small. The 50-year committed dose equivalent to members of the public from airborne releases during normal decommissioning activities is estimated to 'Je about 4.0 man-rem. Radiation doses to the public from accidents are found to be very low for all phases of decommissioning. Occupational radiation doses from normal decommissioning operations (excluding transport operations) are estimated to be about 79 man-rem for DECON and about 80 man-rem for passive SAFSTOR with 10 years of safe storage. Doses from DECON with lagoon waste stabilization are about the same as for DECON except there is less dose resulting from transportation of radioactive waste. The number of fatalities and serious lost-time injuries not related to radiation is found to be very small for all decommissioning alternatives. Comparison of the cost estimates shows that DECON with lagoon waste stabilization is the least expensive method. However, this alternative does not allow unrestricted release of the site. The cumulative cost of maintenance and surveillance and the higher cost of deferred decontamination makes passive SAFSTOR more expensive than DECON. Seve

  2. Renewable Energy Cost Modeling: A Toolkit for Establishing Cost-Based Incentives in the United States; March 2010 -- March 2011

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gifford, J. S.; Grace, R. C.; Rickerson, W. H.

    2011-05-01

    This report is intended to serve as a resource for policymakers who wish to learn more about establishing cost-based incentives. The report will identify key renewable energy cost modeling options, highlight the policy implications of choosing one approach over the other, and present recommendations on the optimal characteristics of a model to calculate rates for cost-based incentives, feed-in tariffs (FITs), or similar policies. These recommendations will be utilized in designing the Cost of Renewable Energy Spreadsheet Tool (CREST). Three CREST models will be publicly available and capable of analyzing the cost of energy associated with solar, wind, and geothermal electricity generators. The CREST models will be developed for use by state policymakers, regulators, utilities, developers, and other stakeholders to assist them in current and future rate-setting processes for both FIT and other renewable energy incentive payment structures and policy analyses.

  3. Technical Report on Application and Development of Appropriate Tools and Technologies for Cost-Effective Carbon Sequestration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bill Stanley; Sandra Brown; Zoe Kant; Patrick Gonzalez

    2009-01-07

    The Nature Conservancy participated in a Cooperative Agreement with the Department of Energy (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) to explore the compatibility of carbon sequestration in terrestrial ecosystems and the conservation of biodiversity. The title of the research project was 'Application and Development of Appropriate Tools and Technologies for Cost-Effective Carbon Sequestration'. The objectives of the project were to: (1) improve carbon offset estimates produced in both the planning and implementation phases of projects; (2) build valid and standardized approaches to estimate project carbon benefits at a reasonable cost; and (3) lay the groundwork for implementing cost-effective projects, providing new testing ground for biodiversity protection and restoration projects that store additional atmospheric carbon. This Final Technical Report discusses the results of the six tasks that The Nature Conservancy undertook to answer research needs while facilitating the development of real projects with measurable greenhouse gas reductions. The research described in this report occurred between July 1st 2001 and July 10th 2008. The specific tasks discussed include: Task 1: carbon inventory advancements; Task 2: emerging technologies for remote sensing of terrestrial carbon; Task 3: baseline method development; Task 4: third-party technical advisory panel meetings; Task 5: new project feasibility studies; and Task 6: development of new project software screening tool. The project occurred in two phases. The first was a focused exploration of specific carbon measurement and monitoring methodologies and pre-selected carbon sequestration opportunities. The second was a more systematic and comprehensive approach to compare various competing measurement and monitoring methodologies, and assessment of a variety of carbon sequestration opportunities in order to find those that are the lowest cost with the greatest combined carbon and other environmental benefits. In the first phase we worked in the U.S., Brazil, Belize, Bolivia, Peru, and Chile to develop and refine specific carbon inventory methods, pioneering a new remote-sensing method for cost-effectively measuring and monitoring terrestrial carbon sequestration and system for developing carbon baselines for both avoided deforestation and afforestation/reforestation projects. We evaluated the costs and carbon benefits of a number of specific terrestrial carbon sequestration activities throughout the U.S., including reforestation of abandoned mined lands in southwest Virginia, grassland restoration in Arizona and Indiana, and reforestation in the Mississippi Alluvial Delta. The most cost-effective U.S. terrestrial sequestration opportunity we found through these studies was reforestation in the Mississippi Alluvial Delta. In Phase II we conducted a more systematic assessment and comparison of several different measurement and monitoring approaches in the Northern Cascades of California, and a broad 11-state Northeast regional assessment, rather than pre-selected and targeted, analysis of terrestrial sequestration costs and benefits. Work was carried out in Brazil, Belize, Chile, Peru and the USA. Partners include the Winrock International Institute for Agricultural Development, The Sampson Group, Programme for Belize, Society for Wildlife Conservation (SPVS), Universidad Austral de Chile, Michael Lefsky, Colorado State University, UC Berkeley, the Carnegie Institution of Washington, ProNaturaleza, Ohio State University, Stephen F. Austin University, Geographical Modeling Services, Inc., WestWater, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Century Ecosystem Services, Mirant Corporation, General Motors, American Electric Power, Salt River Project, Applied Energy Systems, KeySpan, NiSource, and PSEG. This project, 'Application and Development of Appropriate Tools and Technologies for Cost-Effective Carbon Sequestration', has resulted in over 50 presentations and reports, available publicly through the Department of Energy or by visiting the links listed in Appendix 1. More

  4. Parabolic Trough Reference Plant for Cost Modeling with the Solar Advisor Model (SAM)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Turchi, C.

    2010-07-01

    This report describes a component-based cost model developed for parabolic trough solar power plants. The cost model was developed by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), assisted by WorleyParsons Group Inc., for use with NREL's Solar Advisor Model (SAM). This report includes an overview and explanation of the model, two summary contract reports from WorleyParsons, and an Excel spreadsheet for use with SAM. The cost study uses a reference plant with a 100-MWe capacity and six hours of thermal energy storage. Wet-cooling and dry-cooling configurations are considered. The spreadsheet includes capital and operating cost by component to allow users to estimate the impact of changes in component costs.

  5. THE APPLICATION AND DEVELOPMENT OF APPROPRIATE TOOLS AND TECHNOLOGIES FOR COST-EFFECTIVE CARBON SEQUESTRATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bill Stanley; Sandra Brown; Ellen Hawes; Zoe Kant; Miguel Calmon; Gilberto Tiepolo

    2002-09-01

    The Nature Conservancy is participating in a Cooperative Agreement with the Department of Energy (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) to explore the compatibility of carbon sequestration in terrestrial ecosystems and the conservation of biodiversity. The title of the research projects is ''Application and Development of Appropriate Tools and Technologies for Cost-Effective Carbon Sequestration''. The objectives of the project are to: (1) improve carbon offset estimates produced in both the planning and implementation phases of projects; (2) build valid and standardized approaches to estimate project carbon benefits at a reasonable cost; and (3) lay the groundwork for implementing cost-effective projects, providing new testing ground for biodiversity protection and restoration projects that store additional atmospheric carbon. This Technical Progress Report discusses preliminary results of the six specific tasks that The Nature Conservancy is undertaking to answer research needs while facilitating the development of real projects with measurable greenhouse gas impacts. The specific tasks discussed include: Task 1: carbon inventory advancements; Task 2: advanced videography testing; Task 3: baseline method development; Task 4: third-party technical advisory panel meetings; Task 5: new project feasibility studies; and Task 6: development of new project software screening tool.

  6. APPLICATION AND DEVELOPMENT OF APPROPRIATE TOOLS AND TECHNOLOGIES FOR COST-EFFECTIVE CARBON

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bill Stanley; Sandra Brown; Ellen Hawes; Zoe Kant; Miguel Calmon; Patrick Gonzalez; Brad Kreps; Gilberto Tiepolo

    2003-09-01

    The Nature Conservancy is participating in a Cooperative Agreement with the Department of Energy (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) to explore the compatibility of carbon sequestration in terrestrial ecosystems and the conservation of biodiversity. The title of the research project is ''Application and Development of Appropriate Tools and Technologies for Cost-Effective Carbon Sequestration''. The objectives of the project are to: (1) improve carbon offset estimates produced in both the planning and implementation phases of projects; (2) build valid and standardized approaches to estimate project carbon benefits at a reasonable cost; and (3) lay the groundwork for implementing cost-effective projects, providing new testing ground for biodiversity protection and restoration projects that store additional atmospheric carbon. This Technical Progress Report discusses preliminary results of the six specific tasks that The Nature Conservancy is undertaking to answer research needs while facilitating the development of real projects with measurable greenhouse gas impacts. The research described in this report occurred between July 1, 2002 and June 30, 2003. The specific tasks discussed include: Task 1: carbon inventory advancements; Task 2: advanced videography testing; Task 3: baseline method development; Task 4: third-party technical advisory panel meetings; Task 5: new project feasibility studies; and Task 6: development of new project software screening tool.

  7. Application and Development of Appropriate Tools and Technologies for Cost-Effective Carbon Sequestration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bill Stanley; Sandra Brown; Patrick Gonzalez; Zoe Kant; Gilberto Tiepolo; Wilber Sabido; Ellen Hawes; Jenny Henman; Miguel Calmon; Michael Ebinger

    2004-07-10

    The Nature Conservancy is participating in a Cooperative Agreement with the Department of Energy (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) to explore the compatibility of carbon sequestration in terrestrial ecosystems and the conservation of biodiversity. The title of the research project is ''Application and Development of Appropriate Tools and Technologies for Cost-Effective Carbon Sequestration''. The objectives of the project are to: (1) improve carbon offset estimates produced in both the planning and implementation phases of projects; (2) build valid and standardized approaches to estimate project carbon benefits at a reasonable cost; and (3) lay the groundwork for implementing cost-effective projects, providing new testing ground for biodiversity protection and restoration projects that store additional atmospheric carbon. This Technical Progress Report discusses preliminary results of the six specific tasks that The Nature Conservancy is undertaking to answer research needs while facilitating the development of real projects with measurable greenhouse gas impacts. The research described in this report occurred between July 1, 2002 and June 30, 2003. The specific tasks discussed include: Task 1: carbon inventory advancements; Task 2: remote sensing for carbon analysis; Task 3: baseline method development; Task 4: third-party technical advisory panel meetings; Task 5: new project feasibility studies; and Task 6: development of new project software screening tool.

  8. Toward Cost-Sensitive Modeling for Intrusion Detection Computer Science Department

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Toward Cost-Sensitive Modeling for Intrusion Detection Wenke Lee Computer Science Department North,ezk,weaselg@cs.columbia.edu Abstract Intrusion detection systems need to maximize security while minimizing costs. In this paper, we study the problem of building cost-sensitive intrusion detection models. We examine the major cost

  9. Improving Power System Modeling. A Tool to Link Capacity Expansion and Production Cost Models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Diakov, Victor; Cole, Wesley; Sullivan, Patrick; Brinkman, Gregory; Margolis, Robert

    2015-11-01

    Capacity expansion models (CEM) provide a high-level long-term view at the prospects of the evolving power system. In simulating the possibilities of long-term capacity expansion, it is important to maintain the viability of power system operation in the short-term (daily, hourly and sub-hourly) scales. Production-cost models (PCM) simulate routine power system operation on these shorter time scales using detailed load, transmission and generation fleet data by minimizing production costs and following reliability requirements. When based on CEM 'predictions' about generating unit retirements and buildup, PCM provide more detailed simulation for the short-term system operation and, consequently, may confirm the validity of capacity expansion predictions. Further, production cost model simulations of a system that is based on capacity expansion model solution are 'evolutionary' sound: the generator mix is the result of logical sequence of unit retirement and buildup resulting from policy and incentives. The above has motivated us to bridge CEM with PCM by building a capacity expansion - to - production cost model Linking Tool (CEPCoLT). The Linking Tool is built to onset capacity expansion model prescriptions onto production cost model inputs. NREL's ReEDS and Energy Examplar's PLEXOS are the capacity expansion and the production cost models, respectively. Via the Linking Tool, PLEXOS provides details of operation for the regionally-defined ReEDS scenarios.

  10. Multi-core Technologies Model Design and System Architecture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Albanese, Claudio

    Multi-core Technologies Model Design and System Architecture Conclusions High Performance Pricing-core Technologies Model Design and System Architecture Conclusions Summary Multi-core Technologies Model Design Model Design and System Architecture Conclusions Banking, Mathematics and Technology Modern banking

  11. Minimizing the Cost of Innovative Nuclear Technology Through Flexibility: The Case of a Demonstration Accelerator-Driven Subcritical Reactor Park

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cardin, Michel-Alexandre; Steer, Steven J.; Nuttall, William J.; Parks, Geoffrey T.; Gonçalves, Leonardo V. N.; de Neufville, Richard

    Presented is a methodology to analyze the expected Levelised Cost Of Electricity (LCOE) in the face of technology uncertainty for Accelerator-Driven Subcritical Reactors (ADSRs). It shows that flexibility in the design and deployment strategy...

  12. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2015: Thick Low-Cost, High-Power Lithium-Ion Electrodes via Aqueous Processing

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Presentation given by Oak Ridge National Laboratory at 2015 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about thick low-cost,...

  13. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2015: Low?Cost, High?Capacity Lithium Ion Batteries through Modified Surface and Microstructure

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by Navitas Systems at 2015 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about low?cost, high?capacity...

  14. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Cost-Effective Fabrication of High-Temperature Ceramic Capacitors for Power Inverters

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by Argonne National Laboratory at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about cost-effective...

  15. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2015: Cost-Effective Fabrication of High-Temperature Ceramic Capacitors for Power Inverters

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by Argonne National Laboratory at 2015 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about cost-effective...

  16. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2015: Low-cost, High Energy Si/Graphene Anodes for Li-ion Batteries

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by XG Sciences at 2015 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about low-cost, high energy Si/graphene...

  17. Hour-by-Hour Cost Modeling of Optimized Central Wind-Based Water...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Hour-by-Hour Cost Modeling of Optimized Central Wind-Based Water Electrolysis Production Hour-by-Hour Cost Modeling of Optimized Central Wind-Based Water Electrolysis Production...

  18. An analysis of cost effective incentives for initial commercial deployment of advanced clean coal technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spencer, D.F. [SIMTECHE, Half Moon Bay, CA (United States)

    1997-12-31

    This analysis evaluates the incentives necessary to introduce commercial scale Advanced Clean Coal Technologies, specifically Integrated Coal Gasification Combined Cycle (ICGCC) and Pressurized Fluidized Bed Combustion (PFBC) powerplants. The incentives required to support the initial introduction of these systems are based on competitive busbar electricity costs with natural gas fired combined cycle powerplants, in baseload service. A federal government price guarantee program for up to 10 Advanced Clean Coal Technology powerplants, 5 each ICGCC and PFBC systems is recommended in order to establish the commercial viability of these systems by 2010. By utilizing a decreasing incentives approach as the technologies mature (plants 1--5 of each type), and considering the additional federal government benefits of these plants versus natural gas fired combined cycle powerplants, federal government net financial exposure is minimized. Annual net incentive outlays of approximately 150 million annually over a 20 year period could be necessary. Based on increased demand for Advanced Clean Coal Technologies beyond 2010, the federal government would be revenue neutral within 10 years of the incentives program completion.

  19. Advanced Coating Technologies and Processes --The development of low-cost high-yield coating technologies is one of the most important ingredients for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Post, Wilfred M.

    #12;Advanced Coating Technologies and Processes -- The development of low-cost high-yield coating the reliability of batteries. ORNL's research on wet and dry coating technologies could reduce the time and energy techniques to fuse amorphous iron-based powders into ultrahard nanocomposite coatings many times harder than

  20. Arbitrage With Fixed Costs" and Interest Rate Models Elys JOUINI Clotilde NAPPy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Arbitrage With Fixed Costs" and Interest Rate Models Elyès JOUINI Clotilde NAPPy June 26, 2007 Congress participants and in particular D. Feldman. 1 #12;Arbitrage With "Fixed Costs" and Interest Rate Models Abstract In this paper, we study securities market models with "...xed costs." We characterize

  1. Technology, safety and costs of decommissioning a reference boiling water reactor power station. Appendices. Volume 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oak, H.D.; Holter, G.M.; Kennedy, W.E. Jr.; Konzek, G.J.

    1980-06-01

    Appendices are presented concerning the evaluations of decommissioning financing alternatives; reference site description; reference BWR facility description; radiation dose rate and concrete surface contamination data; radionuclide inventories; public radiation dose models and calculated maximum annual doses; decommissioning methods; generic decommissioning information; immediate dismantlement details; passive safe storage, continuing care, and deferred dismantlement details; entombment details; demolition and site restoration details; cost estimating bases; public radiological safety assessment details; and details of alternate study bases.

  2. Switching Cost, Market Effects and the Pricing Model of e-Commerce , GUO Minyi b

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guo, Minyi

    ;2 phenomena. For instance, switching costs have linked to prices, entry decisions, new product diffusion1 Switching Cost, Market Effects and the Pricing Model of e-Commerce LI Ke a , GUO Minyi b and LI to investigate the role of switching cost, trading efficiency and fixed learning cost in a competitive market

  3. Modeling the Benefits of Storage Technologies to Wind Power

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sullivan, P.; Short, W.; Blair, N.

    2008-06-01

    Rapid expansion of wind power in the electricity sector is raising questions about how wind resource variability might affect the capacity value of wind farms at high levels of penetration. Electricity storage, with the capability to shift wind energy from periods of low demand to peak times and to smooth fluctuations in output, may have a role in bolstering the value of wind power at levels of penetration envisioned by a new Department of Energy report ('20% Wind by 2030, Increasing Wind Energy's Contribution to U.S. Electricity Supply'). This paper quantifies the value storage can add to wind. The analysis was done employing the Regional Energy Deployment System (ReEDS) model, formerly known as the Wind Deployment System (WinDS) model. ReEDS was used to estimate the cost and development path associated with 20% penetration of wind in the report. ReEDS differs from the WinDS model primarily in that the model has been modified to include the capability to build and use three storage technologies: pumped-hydroelectric storage (PHS), compressed-air energy storage (CAES), and batteries. To assess the value of these storage technologies, two pairs of scenarios were run: business-as-usual, with and without storage; 20% wind energy by 2030, with and without storage. This paper presents the results from those model runs.

  4. Renewable Diesel from Algal Lipids: An Integrated Baseline for Cost, Emissions, and Resource Potential from a Harmonized Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davis, R.; Fishman, D.; Frank, E. D.; Wigmosta, M. S.; Aden, A.; Coleman, A. M.; Pienkos, P. T.; Skaggs, R. J.; Venteris, E. R.; Wang, M. Q.

    2012-06-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy's Biomass Program has begun an initiative to obtain consistent quantitative metrics for algal biofuel production to establish an 'integrated baseline' by harmonizing and combining the Program's national resource assessment (RA), techno-economic analysis (TEA), and life-cycle analysis (LCA) models. The baseline attempts to represent a plausible near-term production scenario with freshwater microalgae growth, extraction of lipids, and conversion via hydroprocessing to produce a renewable diesel (RD) blendstock. Differences in the prior TEA and LCA models were reconciled (harmonized) and the RA model was used to prioritize and select the most favorable consortium of sites that supports production of 5 billion gallons per year of RD. Aligning the TEA and LCA models produced slightly higher costs and emissions compared to the pre-harmonized results. However, after then applying the productivities predicted by the RA model (13 g/m2/d on annual average vs. 25 g/m2/d in the original models), the integrated baseline resulted in markedly higher costs and emissions. The relationship between performance (cost and emissions) and either productivity or lipid fraction was found to be non-linear, and important implications on the TEA and LCA results were observed after introducing seasonal variability from the RA model. Increasing productivity and lipid fraction alone was insufficient to achieve cost and emission targets; however, combined with lower energy, less expensive alternative technology scenarios, emissions and costs were substantially reduced.

  5. Modeling learning when alternative technologies are learning & resource constrained : cases In semiconductor & advanced automotive manufacturing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rand-Nash, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    When making technology choice decisions, firms must consider technology costs over time. In many industries, technology costs have been shown to decrease over time due to (a) improvements in production efficiency and the ...

  6. Bottom-up Representation of Industrial Energy Efficiency Technologies in Integrated Assessment Models for the Cement Sector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sathaye, J.; Xu, T.; Galitsky, C.

    2010-08-15

    Adoption of efficient end-use technologies is one of the key measures for reducing greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. How to effectively analyze and manage the costs associated with GHG reductions becomes extremely important for the industry and policy makers around the world. Energy-climate (EC) models are often used for analyzing the costs of reducing GHG emissions for various emission-reduction measures, because an accurate estimation of these costs is critical for identifying and choosing optimal emission reduction measures, and for developing related policy options to accelerate market adoption and technology implementation. However, accuracies of assessing of GHG-emission reduction costs by taking into account the adoption of energy efficiency technologies will depend on how well these end-use technologies are represented in integrated assessment models (IAM) and other energy-climate models.

  7. Developing Information on Energy Savings and Associated Costs and Benefits of Energy Efficient Emerging Technologies Applicable in California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xu, Tengfang; Slaa, Jan Willem; Sathaye, Jayant

    2010-12-15

    Implementation and adoption of efficient end-use technologies have proven to be one of the key measures for reducing greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions throughout the industries. In many cases, implementing energy efficiency measures is among one of the most cost effective investments that the industry could make in improving efficiency and productivity while reducing carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions. Over the years, there have been incentives to use resources and energy in a cleaner and more efficient way to create industries that are sustainable and more productive. With the working of energy programs and policies on GHG inventory and regulation, understanding and managing the costs associated with mitigation measures for GHG reductions is very important for the industry and policy makers around the world and in California. Successful implementation of applicable emerging technologies not only may help advance productivities, improve environmental impacts, or enhance industrial competitiveness, but also can play a significant role in climate-mitigation efforts by saving energy and reducing the associated GHG emissions. Developing new information on costs and savings benefits of energy efficient emerging technologies applicable in California market is important for policy makers as well as the industries. Therefore, provision of timely evaluation and estimation of the costs and energy savings potential of emerging technologies applicable to California is the focus of this report. The overall goal of the project is to identify and select a set of emerging and under-utilized energy-efficient technologies and practices as they are important to reduce energy consumption in industry while maintaining economic growth. Specifically, this report contains the results from performing Task 3 Technology Characterization for California Industries for the project titled Research Opportunities in Emerging and Under-Utilized Energy-Efficient Industrial Technologies, sponsored by California Energy Commission (CEC) and managed by California Institute for Energy and Environment (CIEE). The project purpose is to characterize energy savings, technology costs, market potential, and economic viability of newly selected technologies applicable to California. In this report, LBNL first performed technology reviews to identify new or under-utilized technologies that could offer potential in improving energy efficiency and additional benefits to California industries as well as in the U.S. industries, followed by detailed technology assessment on each targeted technology, with a focus on California applications. A total of eleven emerging or underutilized technologies applicable to California were selected and characterized with detailed information in this report. The outcomes essentially include a multi-page summary profile for each of the 11 emerging or underutilized technologies applicable to California industries, based on the formats used in the technology characterization reports (Xu et al. 2010; Martin et al. 2000).

  8. Offshore Wind Balance-of-System Cost Modeling (Poster), NREL...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    parameters, can yield a rise in BOS cost, such as the spike near 500 megawatts. Figure 4. Offshore wind fixed substructure BOS costs decrease as turbine rating increases, which is...

  9. Towards a Cost Model for Network Traffic Murtaza Motiwala , Amogh Dhamdhere , Nick Feamster , Anukool Lakhina

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at San Diego, University of

    Towards a Cost Model for Network Traffic Murtaza Motiwala , Amogh Dhamdhere , Nick Feamster@gatech.edu, anukool.lakhina@guavus.com ABSTRACT We develop a holistic cost model that operators can use to help evaluate the costs of various routing and peering decisions. Using real traffic data from a large carrier

  10. Energy information systems (EIS): Technology costs, benefit, and best practice uses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Granderson, Jessica; Lin, Guanjing; Piette, Mary Ann

    2013-11-26

    Energy information systems are the web-based software, data acquisition hardware, and communication systems used to store, analyze, and display building energy data. They often include analysis methods such as baselining, benchmarking, load profiling, and energy anomaly detection. This report documents a large-scale assessment of energy information system (EIS) uses, costs, and energy benefits, based on a series of focused case study investigations that are synthesized into generalizable findings. The overall objective is to provide organizational decision makers with the information they need to make informed choices as to whether or not to invest in an EIS--a promising technology that can enable up to 20 percent site energy savings, quick payback, and persistent low-energy performance when implemented as part of best-practice energy management programs.

  11. AVCEM: Advanced Vehicle Cost and Energy Use Model. Overview of AVCEM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Delucchi, Mark

    2005-01-01

    California 95616 PHONE: WEB: FAX: http://its.ucdavis.edu/ AVCEM: ADVANCED-VEHICLE COST AND ENERGY-Cost and Energy Use Model Overview of AVCEM Mark A. Delucchi Institute of Transportation Studies ? University of California,

  12. Financing end-use solar technologies in a restructured electricity industry: Comparing the cost of public policies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jones, E.; Eto, J.

    1997-09-01

    Renewable energy technologies are capital intensive. Successful public policies for promoting renewable energy must address the significant resources needed to finance them. Public policies to support financing for renewable energy technologies must pay special attention to interactions with federal, state, and local taxes. These interactions are important because they can dramatically increase or decrease the effectiveness of a policy, and they determine the total cost of a policy to society as a whole. This report describes a comparative analysis of the cost of public policies to support financing for two end-use solar technologies: residential solar domestic hot water heating (SDHW) and residential rooftop photovoltaic (PV) systems. The analysis focuses on the cost of the technologies under five different ownership and financing scenarios. Four scenarios involve leasing the technologies to homeowners in return for a payment that is determined by the financing requirements of each form of ownership. For each scenario, the authors examine nine public policies that might be used to lower the cost of these technologies: investment tax credits (federal and state), production tax credits (federal and state), production incentives, low-interest loans, grants (taxable and two types of nontaxable), direct customer payments, property and sales tax reductions, and accelerated depreciation.

  13. Energy information systems (EIS): Technology costs, benefit, and best practice uses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Granderson, Jessica

    2014-01-01

    interviews, and gathering energy and cost data. Similarly,EIS? 2. What are the energy- and cost-savings benefits of anEIS? Quantifying the energy and cost-savings benefits

  14. Use of Air Modeling to Reduce Facility Demolition Costs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, Dennis; Sanford, Peter; Parsons, Duane A.

    2003-02-26

    DOE faces the problem of decommissioning facilities contaminated with plutonium, uranium, and beryllium. The standard process has been to remove the contaminated process equipment from a facility, and then decontaminate the residual radiological and hazardous contamination from the facility structure to an ''unconditional release'' level. The facility would then be taken down as a clean demolition. Several beryllium-contaminated facilities were identified that will be particularly difficult to decontaminate to these release levels. A number of alternative decommissioning approaches were investigated that would require less decontamination, and thus reduced cost and schedule. Initial alternative approaches proposed erection of barriers (i.e. building-size tent structures with ventilation controls) to minimize the release of contamination to the environment. More recently we have investigated methods to control contamination at the structure surfaces before and during demolition, and model the risk posed to the workers, public, and the environment by the small residual material actually dispersed. This approach promises to minimize decontamination by removing only the highest contamination levels, and eliminates the need for erecting large contamination control structures along with the attendant ventilation equipment and administrative controls. The modeling has demonstrated the regulatory acceptability of this approach, and the approach is ready to be discussed with the regulators and the public.

  15. GEOCITY: a computer model for systems analysis of geothermal district heating and cooling costs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fassbender, L.L.; Bloomster, C.H.

    1981-06-01

    GEOCITY is a computer-simulation model developed to study the economics of district heating/cooling using geothermal energy. GEOCITY calculates the cost of district heating/cooling based on climate, population, resource characteristics, and financing conditions. The basis for our geothermal-energy cost analysis is the unit cost of energy which will recover all the costs of production. The calculation of the unit cost of energy is based on life-cycle costing and discounted-cash-flow analysis. A wide variation can be expected in the range of potential geothermal district heating and cooling costs. The range of costs is determined by the characteristics of the resource, the characteristics of the demand, and the distance separating the resource and the demand. GEOCITY is a useful tool for estimating costs for each of the main parts of the production process and for determining the sensitivity of these costs to several significant parameters under a consistent set of assumptions.

  16. Photovoltaic manufacturing technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wohlgemuth, J.H.; Whitehouse, D.; Wiedeman, S.; Catalano, A.W.; Oswald, R. (Solarex Corp., Frederick, MD (United States))

    1991-12-01

    This report identifies steps leading to manufacturing large volumes of low-cost, large-area photovoltaic (PV) modules. Both crystalline silicon and amorphous silicon technologies were studied. Cost reductions for each step were estimated and compared to Solarex Corporation's manufacturing costs. A cost model, a simple version of the SAMICS methodology developed by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), projected PV selling prices. Actual costs of materials, labor, product yield, etc., were used in the cost model. The JPL cost model compared potential ways of lowering costs. Solarex identified the most difficult technical challenges that, if overcome, would reduce costs. Preliminary research plans were developed to solve the technical problems. 13 refs.

  17. Institute for Software Technology Model-Based Testing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    t Institute for Software Technology Model-Based Testing Ausgewählte Kapitel Softwaretechnologie 2 2013/14 B.K. Aichernig Model-Based Testing 1 / 38 #12;t Institute for Software Technology Testing-Based Testing 2 / 38 #12;t Institute for Software Technology Testing vs. Model Checking vs. Proving One proves

  18. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Emissions Modeling...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Emissions Modeling: GREET Life Cycle Analysis Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Emissions Modeling: GREET Life Cycle Analysis Presentation given by Argonne National...

  19. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2015: Emissions Modeling...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Emissions Modeling: GREET Life Cycle Analysis Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2015: Emissions Modeling: GREET Life Cycle Analysis Presentation given by Argonne National...

  20. Modeling cost and time uncertainty in rail line construction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moret, Yvonne

    2011-01-01

    Transportation construction projects are often plagued by cost overruns and delays. Technical, economic-political, psychological, and legal causes explain the frequent underestimations. To counteract such underestimations, ...

  1. Low Cost Carbon Fiber Produc on Carbon Fiber Manufacturing Cost Modeling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    a lengthy and energy intensive oxidative stabilization step so that the fibers can endure the high be developed in order to evaluate the cost- effectiveness of alternative manufacturing pathways being considered by the industry today. Approach ORNL is investigating various alternative precursors and advanced

  2. On the Inclusion of Energy-Shifting Demand Response in Production Cost Models: Methodology and a Case Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    O'Connell, Niamh; Hale, Elaine; Doebber, Ian; Jorgenson, Jennie

    2015-07-20

    In the context of future power system requirements for additional flexibility, demand response (DR) is an attractive potential resource. Its proponents widely laud its prospective benefits, which include enabling higher penetrations of variable renewable generation at lower cost than alternative storage technologies, and improving economic efficiency. In practice, DR from the commercial and residential sectors is largely an emerging, not a mature, resource, and its actual costs and benefits need to be studied to determine promising combinations of physical DR resource, enabling controls and communications, power system characteristics, regulatory environments, market structures, and business models. The work described in this report focuses on the enablement of such analysis from the production cost modeling perspective. In particular, we contribute a bottom-up methodology for modeling load-shifting DR in production cost models. The resulting model is sufficiently detailed to reflect the physical characteristics and constraints of the underlying flexible load, and includes the possibility of capturing diurnal and seasonal variations in the resource. Nonetheless, the model is of low complexity and thus suitable for inclusion in conventional unit commitment and market clearing algorithms. The ability to simulate DR as an operational resource on a power system over a year facilitates an assessment of its time-varying value to the power system.

  3. Active and Accelerated Learning of Cost Models for Optimizing Scientific Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chase, Jeffrey S.

    Active and Accelerated Learning of Cost Models for Optimizing Scientific Applications Piyush Shivam of sciences including astrophysics, bioinformatics, systems biology, and climate modeling [15, 31]. This new University chase@cs.duke.edu ABSTRACT We present the NIMO system that automatically learns cost models

  4. A COST ONTOLOGY FOR ENTERPRISE MODELLING K. D.(Donald) Tham, Mark S. Fox, Michael Gruninger

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fox, Mark S.

    A COST ONTOLOGY FOR ENTERPRISE MODELLING K. D.(Donald) Tham, Mark S. Fox, Michael GruningerS 1A4 Abstract There is an urgent need to formalize Activity-Based Costing (ABC) for purposes success, viz., strategic management accounting. To make this possible, the authors present a core cost

  5. Cost-efficiency in multivariate Levy models Ludger Ruschendorf*, Viktor Wolf*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rüschendorf, Ludger

    Cost-efficiency in multivariate L´evy models Ludger R¨uschendorf*, Viktor Wolf* November 5, 2014 Abstract In this paper we determine lowest cost strategies for given payoff distributions called cost-efficient on the pricing of efficient versions of univariate payoffs. We state various relevant existence and uniqueness

  6. Electric and Gasoline Vehicle Lifecycle Cost and Energy-Use Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Delucchi, Mark; Burke, Andy; Lipman, Timothy; Miller, Marshall

    2000-01-01

    Cost and Energy-Use Model Report for the California AirCalifornia INTRODUCTION As part of the calculation of the lifecycle cost, the energy-Costs , Mail-out #94-11, El Monte, California, March 2 (1994). California Energy

  7. Motivation Literature Trans. Network Models Relative Total Cost Indices Numerical Examples Summary A Relative Total Cost Index for the Evaluation of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nagurney, Anna

    A Relative Total Cost Index for the Evaluation of Transportation Network Robustness in the Presence Index #12;Motivation Literature Trans. Network Models Relative Total Cost Indices Numerical Examples, Qiang Qiang Relative Total Cost Index #12;Motivation Literature Trans. Network Models Relative Total

  8. Modeling Solar Energy Technology Evolution breakout session

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Technology Evolution What is a question we could ask about technology evolution, which when answered could yield deep insight into how to spur innovation? Introductory question...

  9. Low-cost, highly efficient, and tunable ultrafast laser technology based on directly diode-pumped Cr:Colquiriites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Demirbas, Umit

    2010-01-01

    This doctoral project aims to develop robust, ultra low-cost ($5,000-20,000), highly-efficient, and tunable femtosecond laser technology based on diode-pumped Cr:Colquiriite gain media (Cr:LiCAF, Cr3+:LiSAF and Cr:LiSGaF). ...

  10. Technology Improvement Opportunities for Low Wind Speed Turbines and Implications for Cost of Energy Reduction: July 9, 2005 - July 8, 2006

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cohen, J.; Schweizer, T.; Laxson, A.; Butterfield, S.; Schreck, S.; Fingersh, L.; Veers, P.; Ashwill, T.

    2008-02-01

    This report analyzes the status of wind energy technology in 2002 and describes the potential for technology advancements to reduce the cost and increase the performance of wind turbines.

  11. Decision Analysis Science Modeling for Application and Fielding Selection Applied to Concrete Decontamination Technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ebadian, M.A. Ross, T.L.

    1998-01-01

    Concrete surfaces contaminated with radionuclides present a significant challenge during the decontamination and decommissioning (D and D) process. As structures undergo D and D, coating layers and/or surface layers of the concrete containing the contaminants must be removed for disposal in such a way as to present little to no risk to human health or the environment. The selection of a concrete decontamination technology that is safe, efficient, and cost-effective is critical to the successful D and D of contaminated sites. To support U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Environmental Management objectives and to assist DOE site managers in the selection of the best-suited concrete floor decontamination technology(s) for a given site, two innovative and three baseline technologies have been assessed under standard, non-nuclear conditions at the Hemispheric Center for Environmental Technology (HCET) at Florida International University (FIU). The innovative technologies assessed include the Pegasus Coating Removal System and Textron's Electro-Hydraulic Scabbling System. The three baseline technologies assessed include: the Wheelabrator Blastrac model 1-15D, the NELCO Porta Shot Blast{trademark} model GPx-1O-18 HO Rider, and the NELCO Porta Shot Blast{trademark} model EC-7-2. These decontamination technology assessments provide directly comparable performance data that have previously been available for only a limited number of technologies under restrictive site-specific constraints. Some of the performance data collected during these technology assessments include: removal capability, production rate, removal gap, primary and secondary waste volumes, and operation and maintenance requirements. The performance data generated by this project is intended to assist DOE site managers in the selection of the safest, most efficient, and cost-effective decontamination technologies to accomplish their remediation objectives.

  12. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2015: Advanced Drying Process for Lower Manufacturing Cost of Electrodes

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by Lambda Technologies at 2015 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about advanced drying process...

  13. Cost of Ownership and Well-to-Wheels Carbon Emissions/Oil Use of Alternative Fuels and Advanced Light-Duty Vehicle Technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elgowainy, Mr. Amgad; Rousseau, Mr. Aymeric; Wang, Mr. Michael; Ruth, Mr. Mark; Andress, Mr. David; Ward, Jacob; Joseck, Fred; Nguyen, Tien; Das, Sujit

    2013-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Argonne National Laboratory (Argonne), and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) updated their analysis of the well-to-wheels (WTW) greenhouse gases (GHG) emissions, petroleum use, and the cost of ownership (excluding insurance, maintenance, and miscellaneous fees) of vehicle technologies that have the potential to significantly reduce GHG emissions and petroleum consumption. The analyses focused on advanced light-duty vehicle (LDV) technologies such as plug-in hybrid, battery electric, and fuel cell electric vehicles. Besides gasoline and diesel, alternative fuels considered include natural gas, advanced biofuels, electricity, and hydrogen. The Argonne Greenhouse Gases, Regulated Emissions, and Energy Use in Transportation (GREET) and Autonomie models were used along with the Argonne and NREL H2A models.

  14. CHARACTERIZING COSTS, SAVINGS AND BENEFITS OF A SELECTION OF ENERGY EFFICIENT EMERGING TECHNOLOGIES IN THE UNITED STATES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xu, T.; Slaa, J.W.; Sathaye, J.

    2010-12-15

    Implementation and adoption of efficient end-use technologies have proven to be one of the key measures for reducing greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions throughout the industries. In many cases, implementing energy efficiency measures is among one of the most cost effective investments that the industry could make in improving efficiency and productivity while reducing CO2 emissions. Over the years, there have been incentives to use resources and energy in a cleaner and more efficient way to create industries that are sustainable and more productive. With the working of energy programs and policies on GHG inventory and regulation, understanding and managing the costs associated with mitigation measures for GHG reductions is very important for the industry and policy makers around the world. Successful implementation of emerging technologies not only can help advance productivities and competitiveness but also can play a significant role in mitigation efforts by saving energy. Providing evaluation and estimation of the costs and energy savings potential of emerging technologies is the focus of our work in this project. The overall goal of the project is to identify and select emerging and under-utilized energy-efficient technologies and practices as they are important to reduce energy consumption in industry while maintaining economic growth. This report contains the results from performing Task 2"Technology evaluation" for the project titled"Research Opportunities in Emerging and Under-Utilized Energy-Efficient Industrial Technologies," which was sponsored by California Energy Commission and managed by CIEE. The project purpose is to analyze market status, market potential, and economic viability of selected technologies applicable to the U.S. In this report, LBNL first performed re-assessments of all of the 33 emerging energy-efficient industrial technologies, including re-evaluation of the 26 technologies that were previously identified by Martin et al. (2000) and their potential significance to energy use in the industries, and new evaluation of additional seven technologies. The re-assessments were essentially updated with recent information that we searched and collected from literature to the extent possible. The progress of selected technologies as they diffused into the marketplace from 2000 to 2010 was then discussed in this report. The report also includes updated detailed characterizations of 15 technologies studied in 2000, with comparisons noted.

  15. GETEM -Geothermal Electricity Technology Evaluation Model

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Input Fixed Stimulation Cost per well 2,000,000 Calculated Hydraulic Drawdown How is Hydraulic Drawdown determined? recommend input value recommend input value Inputted...

  16. FTT:Power : A global model of the power sector with induced technological change and natural resource depletion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mercure, J -F

    2012-01-01

    This work introduces a model of Future Technology Transformations for the power sector (FTT:Power), a representation of global power systems based on market competition, induced technological change (ITC) and natural resource use and depletion. It is the first component of a family of sectoral bottom-up models of technology, designed for integration into the global macroeconometric model E3MG. ITC occurs as a result of technological learning produced by cumulative investment and leads to highly nonlinear, irreversible and path dependent technological transitions. The model uses a dynamic coupled set of logistic differential equations. As opposed to traditional bottom-up energy models based on systems optimisation, such differential equations offer an appropriate treatment of the times and structure of change involved in sectoral technology transformations, as well as a much reduced computational load. Resource use and depletion are represented by local cost-supply curves, which give rise to different regional...

  17. Advanced Technologies in Energy-Economy Models for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Advanced Technologies in Energy-Economy Models for Climate Change Assessment Jennifer F. Morris: globalchange@mit.edu Website: http://globalchange.mit.edu/ #12;1 Advanced Technologies in Energy-Economy Models is applied to a global economy-wide model to study the roles of low-carbon alternatives in the power sector

  18. RCRA Part B permit modifications for cost savings and increased flexibility at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jierree, C.; Ticknor, K.

    1996-10-01

    With shrinking budgets and downsizing, a need for streamlined compliance initiatives became evident at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS). Therefore, Rocky Mountain Remediation Services (RMRS) at the RFETS successfully and quickly modified the RFETS RCRA Part B Permit to obtain significant cost savings and increased flexibility. This `was accomplished by requesting operations personnel to suggest changes to the Part B Permit which did not diminish overall compliance and which would be most. cost beneficial. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) subsequently obtained approval of those changes from the Colorado Department of Public Health and the Environment (CDPHE).

  19. Dynamics of the Oil Transition: Modeling Capacity, Costs, and Emissions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brandt, Adam R.; Farrell, Alexander E.

    2008-01-01

    D. J. and Cecchine, G. Oil shale development in the Unitedresources of some world oil-shale deposits. Technical Reportfor CO2 evolved from oil shale. Fuel Processing Technology,

  20. Evaluating Trade-Offs Between Sustainability, Performance, and Cost of Green Machining Technologies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Helu, Moneer; Rühl, Jan; Dornfeld, David; Werner, Patrick; Lanza, Gisela

    2011-01-01

    Offs Between Sustainability, Performance, and Cost of GreenGreen and Sustainability Aspects into Life Cycle Performance2011 Sustainability in Manufacturing the performance of

  1. Evaluating trade-offs between sustainability, performance, and cost of green machining technologies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Helu, Moneer

    2012-01-01

    Offs Between Sustainability, Performance, and Cost of GreenGreen and Sustainability Aspects into Life Cycle Performance2011 Sustainability in Manufacturing the performance of

  2. V1.6 Development of Advanced Manufacturing Technologies for Low Cost Hydrogen Storage Vessels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leavitt, Mark; Lam, Patrick; Nelson, Karl M.; johnson, Brice A.; Johnson, Kenneth I.; Alvine, Kyle J.; Ruiz, Antonio; Adams, Jesse

    2012-10-01

    The goal of this project is to develop an innovative manufacturing process for Type IV high-pressure hydrogen storage vessels, with the intent to significantly lower manufacturing costs. Part of the development is to integrate the features of high precision AFP and commercial FW. Evaluation of an alternative fiber to replace a portion of the baseline fiber will help to reduce costs further.

  3. Modeling and simulation technology readiness levels.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clay, Robert L.; Shneider, Max S.; Marburger, S. J.; Trucano, Timothy Guy

    2006-01-01

    This report summarizes the results of an effort to establish a framework for assigning and communicating technology readiness levels (TRLs) for the modeling and simulation (ModSim) capabilities at Sandia National Laboratories. This effort was undertaken as a special assignment for the Weapon Simulation and Computing (WSC) program office led by Art Hale, and lasted from January to September 2006. This report summarizes the results, conclusions, and recommendations, and is intended to help guide the program office in their decisions about the future direction of this work. The work was broken out into several distinct phases, starting with establishing the scope and definition of the assignment. These are characterized in a set of key assertions provided in the body of this report. Fundamentally, the assignment involved establishing an intellectual framework for TRL assignments to Sandia's modeling and simulation capabilities, including the development and testing of a process to conduct the assignments. To that end, we proposed a methodology for both assigning and understanding the TRLs, and outlined some of the restrictions that need to be placed on this process and the expected use of the result. One of the first assumptions we overturned was the notion of a ''static'' TRL--rather we concluded that problem context was essential in any TRL assignment, and that leads to dynamic results (i.e., a ModSim tool's readiness level depends on how it is used, and by whom). While we leveraged the classic TRL results from NASA, DoD, and Sandia's NW program, we came up with a substantially revised version of the TRL definitions, maintaining consistency with the classic level definitions and the Predictive Capability Maturity Model (PCMM) approach. In fact, we substantially leveraged the foundation the PCMM team provided, and augmented that as needed. Given the modeling and simulation TRL definitions and our proposed assignment methodology, we conducted four ''field trials'' to examine how this would work in practice. The results varied substantially, but did indicate that establishing the capability dependencies and making the TRL assignments was manageable and not particularly time consuming. The key differences arose in perceptions of how this information might be used, and what value it would have (opinions ranged from negative to positive value). The use cases and field trial results are included in this report. Taken together, the results suggest that we can make reasonably reliable TRL assignments, but that using those without the context of the information that led to those results (i.e., examining the measures suggested by the PCMM table, and extended for ModSim TRL purposes) produces an oversimplified result--that is, you cannot really boil things down to just a scalar value without losing critical information.

  4. Modelling Dynamic Constraints in Electricity Markets and the Costs of Uncertain Wind Output

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Musgens, Felix; Neuhoff, Karsten

    2006-03-14

    define model demand as German demand net of CHP, run off river hydro, expected wind generation and international power exchange. Hourly wind forecasts and realisations are provided by ISET e.V. Generation plant data are taken from EWI’s plant data base... one model region and endogenously determine international power exchange. In addition, the model is directly applicable to many other empirical questions, such as the effect of CO2emission costs on plant dispatch and costs or competitive bench...

  5. Technical Progress Report on Application and Development of Appropriate Tools and Technologies for Cost-Effective Carbon Sequestration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bill Stanley; Patrick Gonzalez; Sandra Brown; Jenny Henman; Ben Poulter; Sarah Woodhouse Murdock; Neil Sampson; Tim Pearson; Sarah Walker; Zoe Kant; Miguel Calmon; Gilberto Tiepolo

    2006-06-30

    The Nature Conservancy is participating in a Cooperative Agreement with the Department of Energy (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) to explore the compatibility of carbon sequestration in terrestrial ecosystems and the conservation of biodiversity. The title of the research project is ''Application and Development of Appropriate Tools and Technologies for Cost-Effective Carbon Sequestration''. The objectives of the project are to: (1) improve carbon offset estimates produced in both the planning and implementation phases of projects; (2) build valid and standardized approaches to estimate project carbon benefits at a reasonable cost; and (3) lay the groundwork for implementing cost-effective projects, providing new testing ground for biodiversity protection and restoration projects that store additional atmospheric carbon. This Technical Progress Report discusses preliminary results of the six specific tasks that The Nature Conservancy is undertaking to answer research needs while facilitating the development of real projects with measurable greenhouse gas reductions. The research described in this report occurred between April 1st and July 30th 2006. The specific tasks discussed include: Task 1: carbon inventory advancements; Task 2: emerging technologies for remote sensing of terrestrial carbon; Task 3: baseline method development; Task 4: third-party technical advisory panel meetings; Task 5: new project feasibility studies; and Task 6: development of new project software screening tool. Work is being carried out in Brazil, Belize, Chile, Peru and the USA.

  6. Estimating Specialty Costs

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1997-03-28

    Specialty costs are those nonstandard, unusual costs that are not typically estimated. Costs for research and development (R&D) projects involving new technologies, costs associated with future regulations, and specialty equipment costs are examples of specialty costs. This chapter discusses those factors that are significant contributors to project specialty costs and methods of estimating costs for specialty projects.

  7. CONSTRUCTION OF COST-EFFICIENT SELF-QUANTO CALLS AND PUTS IN EXPONENTIAL L EVY MODELS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rüschendorf, Ludger

    martingale measure. Whereas the construction and evaluation of the efficient self- quanto call these difficulties and arrive at numerically tractable expressions. The potential savings of the cost-efficientCONSTRUCTION OF COST-EFFICIENT SELF-QUANTO CALLS AND PUTS IN EXPONENTIAL L ´EVY MODELS Ernst August

  8. Cost-Effective Modeling and Savings Projections for Multifamily Projects |

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergyTher i n c i p aDepartmentEnergy comparingDeepDecemberCornstalks Cost

  9. Development of design & technology package for cost effective housing in Gujrat

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chaudhry, Rajive

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: Improve quality of life in rural areas through intervention of infrastructure and housing improvement. Provide methods of building better and cost-effective houses at a quicker pace. Devise strategies of withdrawing ...

  10. Case Studies of Energy Information Systems and Related Technology: Operational Practices, Costs, and Benefits 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Motegi, N.; Piette, M. A.; Kinney, S.; Dewey, J.

    2003-01-01

    Energy Information Systems (EIS), which can monitor and analyze building energy consumption and related data throughout the Internet, have been increasing in use over the last decade. Though EIS developers describe the capabilities, costs...

  11. Cost-Benefit Analysis of Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicle Technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Simpson, A.

    2006-11-01

    This paper presents a comparison of vehicle purchase and energy costs, and fuel-saving benefits of plug-in hybrid electric vehicles relative to hybrid electric and conventional vehicles.

  12. Technology, safety, and costs of decommissioning reference nuclear research and test reactors. Main report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Konzek, G.J.; Ludwick, J.D.; Kennedy, W.E. Jr.; Smith, R.I.

    1982-03-01

    Safety and Cost Information is developed for the conceptual decommissioning of two representative licensed nuclear research and test reactors. Three decommissioning alternatives are studied to obtain comparisons between costs (in 1981 dollars), occupational radiation doses, potential radiation dose to the public, and other safety impacts. The alternatives considered are: DECON (immediate decontamination), SAFSTOR (safe storage followed by deferred decontamination), and ENTOMB (entombment). The study results are presented in two volumes. Volume 1 (Main Report) contains the results in summary form.

  13. Modeling the Performance, Emissions, and Cost of an Entrained-Flow Gasification Combined Cycle System Using

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frey, H. Christopher

    the type of coal gasifier technology, oxidant (e.g., oxygen or air), and gas cleanup system employed for the conversion of a variety of feedstocks, including coal, heavy residue oil, biomass, solid waste, and others is presented to illustrate the typical performance, emissions, and cost of a coal- based system

  14. U.S. Department of Energy Geothermal Electricity Technology Evaluation...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    spreadsheet model developed by the Geothermal Technologies Program to assess power generation costs and the potential for technology improvements to impact those generation...

  15. A Neural Network Model for Construction Projects Site Overhead Cost Estimating in Egypt

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ElSawy, Ismaail; Razek, Mohammed Abdel

    2011-01-01

    Estimating of the overhead costs of building construction projects is an important task in the management of these projects. The quality of construction management depends heavily on their accurate cost estimation. Construction costs prediction is a very difficult and sophisticated task especially when using manual calculation methods. This paper uses Artificial Neural Network (ANN) approach to develop a parametric cost-estimating model for site overhead cost in Egypt. Fifty-two actual real-life cases of building projects constructed in Egypt during the seven year period 2002-2009 were used as training materials. The neural network architecture is presented for the estimation of the site overhead costs as a percentage from the total project price.

  16. A chronological probabilistic production cost model to evaluate the reliability contribution of limited energy plants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leung, Tommy (Tommy Chun Ting)

    2012-01-01

    The growth of renewables in power systems has reinvigorated research and regulatory interest in reliability analysis algorithms such as the Baleriaux/Booth convolution-based probabilistic production cost (PPC) model. ...

  17. Solid waste integrated cost analysis model: 1991 project year report. Part 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-12-31

    The purpose of the City of Houston`s 1991 Solid Waste Integrated Cost Analysis Model (SWICAM) project was to continue the development of a computerized cost analysis model. This model is to provide solid waste managers with tool to evaluate the dollar cost of real or hypothetical solid waste management choices. Those choices have become complicated by the implementation of Subtitle D of the Resources Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) and the EPA`s Integrated Approach to managing municipal solid waste;. that is, minimize generation, maximize recycling, reduce volume (incinerate), and then bury (landfill) only the remainder. Implementation of an integrated solid waste management system involving all or some of the options of recycling, waste to energy, composting, and landfilling is extremely complicated. Factors such as hauling distances, markets, and prices for recyclable, costs and benefits of transfer stations, and material recovery facilities must all be considered. A jurisdiction must determine the cost impacts of implementing a number of various possibilities for managing, handling, processing, and disposing of waste. SWICAM employs a single Lotus 123 spreadsheet to enable a jurisdiction to predict or assess the costs of its waste management system. It allows the user to select his own process flow for waste material and to manipulate the model to include as few or as many options as he or she chooses. The model will calculate the estimated cost for those choices selected. The user can then change the model to include or exclude waste stream components, until the mix of choices suits the user. Graphs can be produced as a visual communication aid in presenting the results of the cost analysis. SWICAM also allows future cost projections to be made.

  18. Disruptive technology business models in cloud computing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krikos, Alexis Christopher

    2010-01-01

    Cloud computing, a term whose origins have been in existence for more than a decade, has come into fruition due to technological capabilities and marketplace demands. Cloud computing can be defined as a scalable and flexible ...

  19. Dynamics of the Oil Transition: Modeling Capacity, Costs, and Emissions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brandt, Adam R.; Farrell, Alexander E.

    2008-01-01

    and income on energy and oil demand. Energy Journal, 23(1):conventional oil supply and demand. But, interestingly,World crude oil and natural gas: a demand and supply model.

  20. 201202 Reservoir System Modeling Technologies Conference

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Modeling Applied To The Columbia River - PSR Adjoint Modeling Framework for Real-Time Control of Water - Deltares Reservoir Operations Analysis in the Willamette Water 2100...

  1. Technology, safety, and costs of decommissioning reference nuclear research and test reactors. Appendices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Konzek, G.J.; Ludwick, J.D.; Kennedy, W.E. Jr.; Smith, R.I.

    1982-03-01

    Safety and Cost Information is developed for the conceptual decommissioning of two representative licensed nuclear research and test reactors. Three decommissioning alternatives are studied to obtain comparisons between costs (in 1981 dollars), occupational radiation doses, potential radiation dose to the public, and other safety impacts. The alternatives considered are: DECON (immediate decontamination), SAFSTOR (safe storage followed by deferred decontamination), and EMTOMB (entombment). The study results are presented in two volumes. Volume 2 (Appendices) contains the detailed data that support the results given in Volume 1, including unit-component data.

  2. Hanford River Protection Project Life cycle Cost Modeling Tool to Enhance Mission Planning - 13396

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dunford, Gary [AEM Consulting, LLC, 1201 Jadwin Avenue, Richland, WA 99352 (United States)] [AEM Consulting, LLC, 1201 Jadwin Avenue, Richland, WA 99352 (United States); Williams, David [WIT, Inc., 11173 Oak Fern Court, San Diego, CA 92131 (United States)] [WIT, Inc., 11173 Oak Fern Court, San Diego, CA 92131 (United States); Smith, Rick [Knowledge Systems Design, Inc., 13595 Quaker Hill Cross Rd, Nevada City, CA 95959 (United States)] [Knowledge Systems Design, Inc., 13595 Quaker Hill Cross Rd, Nevada City, CA 95959 (United States)

    2013-07-01

    The Life cycle Cost Model (LCM) Tool is an overall systems model that incorporates budget, and schedule impacts for the entire life cycle of the River Protection Project (RPP) mission, and is replacing the Hanford Tank Waste Operations Simulator (HTWOS) model as the foundation of the RPP system planning process. Currently, the DOE frequently requests HTWOS simulations of alternative technical and programmatic strategies for completing the RPP mission. Analysis of technical and programmatic changes can be performed with HTWOS; however, life cycle costs and schedules were previously generated by manual transfer of time-based data from HTWOS to Primavera P6. The LCM Tool automates the preparation of life cycle costs and schedules and is needed to provide timely turnaround capability for RPP mission alternative analyses. LCM is the simulation component of the LCM Tool. The simulation component is a replacement of the HTWOS model with new capability to support life cycle cost modeling. It is currently deployed in G22, but has been designed to work in any full object-oriented language with an extensive feature set focused on networking and cross-platform compatibility. The LCM retains existing HTWOS functionality needed to support system planning and alternatives studies going forward. In addition, it incorporates new functionality, coding improvements that streamline programming and model maintenance, and capability to input/export data to/from the LCM using the LCM Database (LCMDB). The LCM Cost/Schedule (LCMCS) contains cost and schedule data and logic. The LCMCS is used to generate life cycle costs and schedules for waste retrieval and processing scenarios. It uses time-based output data from the LCM to produce the logic ties in Primavera P6 necessary for shifting activities. The LCM Tool is evolving to address the needs of decision makers who want to understand the broad spectrum of risks facing complex organizations like DOE-RPP to understand how near-term programmatic decisions affect life cycle costs and commitments. (authors)

  3. Harsh-environment, Low-cost Sensor Technology for Engine and After-treatment Systems

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Poster presentation at the 2007 Diesel Engine-Efficiency & Emissions Research Conference (DEER 2007). 13-16 August, 2007, Detroit, Michigan. Sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies (OFCVT).

  4. Cost-effective allocation of public funding to promote the commercialization of renewable energy technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Culver, Lauren C. (Lauren Claire)

    2009-01-01

    The need for new Renewable Energy Technologies (RETs) is growing with the challenge of providing affordable electricity under increasing environmental and public health constraints while promoting energy security and ...

  5. Lifecycle Cost Analysis of Hydrogen Versus Other Technologies for Electrical Energy Storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steward, D.; Saur, G.; Penev, M.; Ramsden, T.

    2009-11-01

    This report presents the results of an analysis evaluating the economic viability of hydrogen for medium- to large-scale electrical energy storage applications compared with three other storage technologies: batteries, pumped hydro, and compressed air energy storage (CAES).

  6. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2015: PHEV and EV Battery Performance and Cost Assessment

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by Argonne National Laboratory at 2015 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about PHEV and EV...

  7. Natural Gas Compression Technology Improves Transport and Efficiencies, Lowers Operating Costs

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    An award-winning compressor design that decreases the energy required to compress and transport natural gas, lowers operating costs, improves efficiencies and reduces the environmental footprint of well site operations has been developed by a Massachusetts-based company with support from the U.S. Department of Energy

  8. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Cost-Competitive Advanced Thermoelectric Generators for Direct Conversion of Vehicle Waste Heat into Useful Electrical Power

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by General Motors at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about cost-competitive advanced...

  9. Technology, Safety and Costs of Decommissioning Nuclear Reactors At Multiple-Reactor Stations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wittenbrock, N. G.

    1982-01-01

    Safety and cost information is developed for the conceptual decommissioning of large (1175-MWe) pressurized water reactors (PWRs) and large (1155-MWe) boiling water reactors {BWRs) at multiple-reactor stations. Three decommissioning alternatives are studied: DECON (immediate decontamination), SAFSTOR (safe storage followed by deferred decontamination), and ENTOMB (entombment). Safety and costs of decommissioning are estimated by determining the impact of probable features of multiple-reactor-station operation that are considered to be unavailable at a single-reactor station, and applying these estimated impacts to the decommissioning costs and radiation doses estimated in previous PWR and BWR decommissioning studies. The multiple-reactor-station features analyzed are: the use of interim onsite nuclear waste storage with later removal to an offsite nuclear waste disposal facility, the use of permanent onsite nuclear waste disposal, the dedication of the site to nuclear power generation, and the provision of centralized services. Five scenarios for decommissioning reactors at a multiple-reactor station are investigated. The number of reactors on a site is assumed to be either four or ten; nuclear waste disposal is varied between immediate offsite disposal, interim onsite storage, and immediate onsite disposal. It is assumed that the decommissioned reactors are not replaced in one scenario but are replaced in the other scenarios. Centralized service facilities are provided in two scenarios but are not provided in the other three. Decommissioning of a PWR or a BWR at a multiple-reactor station probably will be less costly and result in lower radiation doses than decommissioning an identical reactor at a single-reactor station. Regardless of whether the light water reactor being decommissioned is at a single- or multiple-reactor station: • the estimated occupational radiation dose for decommissioning an LWR is lowest for SAFSTOR and highest for DECON • the estimated cost of decommissioning a PWR is lowest for ENTOMB and highest for SAFSTOR • the estimated cost of decommissioning a BWR is lowest for OECON and highest for SAFSTOR. In all cases, SAFSTOR has the lowest occupational radiation dose and the highest cost.

  10. Towards a Model of the Costs of Security David Larochelle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Wei

    areas, in information security there is no free lunch. The process of system design involves trade technical advances. In our model, the software design process involves trade-offs between security, there is an implicit trade-off between security and functionality. We refer to the set of points that represent

  11. Grid Integration of Aggregated Demand Response, Part 2: Modeling Demand Response in a Production Cost Model

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Renewable integration studies have evaluated many challenges associated with deploying large amounts of variable wind and solar generation technologies. These studies can evaluate operational impacts associated with variable generation, benefits of improved wind and solar resource forecasting, and trade-offs between institutional changes, including increasing balancing area cooperation and technical changes such as installing new flexible generation. Demand response (DR) resources present a potentially important source of grid flexibility and can aid in integrating variable generation; however, integration analyses have not yet incorporated these resources explicitly into grid simulation models as part of a standard toolkit for resource planners.

  12. An enumerative technique for modeling wind power variations in production costing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Milligan, M.R.; Graham, M.S.

    1997-04-01

    Production cost, generation expansion, and reliability models are used extensively by utilities in the planning process. Most models do not provide adequate means for representing the full range of potential variation in wind power plants. In order to properly account for expected variation in wind-generated electricity with these models, the authors describe an enumerated probabilistic approach that is performed outside the production cost model, compare it with a reduced enumerated approach, and present some selected utility results. The technique can be applied to any model, and can considerably reduce the number of model runs as compared to the full enumerated approach. They use both a load duration curve model and a chronological model to measure wind plant capacity credit, and also present some other selected results.

  13. Technology, safety and costs of decommissioning a reference boiling water reactor power station. Volume 1. Main report. Technical report, September 1977-October 1979

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oak, H.D.; Holter, G.M.; Kennedy, W.E. Jr.; Konzek, G.J.

    1980-06-01

    Technology, safety and cost information is given for the conceptual decommissioning of a large (1100MWe) boiling water reactor (BWR) power station. Three approaches to decommissioning, immediate dismantlement, safe storage with deferred dismantlement and entombment, were studied to obtain comparisons between costs, occupational radiation doses, potential dose to the public and other safety impacts. It also shows the sensitivity of decommissioning safety and costs to the power rating of a BWR in the range of 200 to 1100 MWE.

  14. A system-level cost-of-energy wind farm layout optimization with landowner modeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Le [Ames Laboratory; MacDonald, Erin [Ames Laboratory

    2013-10-01

    This work applies an enhanced levelized wind farm cost model, including landowner remittance fees, to determine optimal turbine placements under three landowner participation scenarios and two land-plot shapes. Instead of assuming a continuous piece of land is available for the wind farm construction, as in most layout optimizations, the problem formulation represents landowner participation scenarios as a binary string variable, along with the number of turbines. The cost parameters and model are a combination of models from the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, and Windustiy. The system-level cost-of-energy (COE) optimization model is also tested under two land-plot shapes: equally-sized square land plots and unequal rectangle land plots. The optimal COEs results are compared to actual COE data and found to be realistic. The results show that landowner remittances account for approximately 10% of farm operating costs across all cases. Irregular land-plot shapes are easily handled by the model. We find that larger land plots do not necessarily receive higher remittance fees. The model can help site developers identify the most crucial land plots for project success and the optimal positions of turbines, with realistic estimates of costs and profitability. (C) 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Modeling the reliability and maintenance costs of wind turbines using Weibull analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vachon, W.A. [W.A. Vachon & Associates, Inc., Manchester, MA (United States)

    1996-12-31

    A general description is provided of the basic mathematics and use of Weibull statistical models for modeling component failures and maintenance costs as a function of time. The applicability of the model to wind turbine components and subsystems is discussed with illustrative examples of typical component reliabilities drawn from actual field experiences. Example results indicate the dominant role of key subsystems based on a combination of their failure frequency and repair/replacement costs. The value of the model is discussed as a means of defining (1) maintenance practices, (2) areas in which to focus product improvements, (3) spare parts inventory, and (4) long-term trends in maintenance costs as an important element in project cash flow projections used by developers, investors, and lenders. 6 refs., 8 figs., 3 tabs.

  16. System modeling, analysis, and optimization methodology for diesel exhaust after-treatment technologies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Graff, Christopher Dominic

    2006-01-01

    Developing new aftertreatment technologies to meet emission regulations for diesel engines is a growing problem for many automotive companies and suppliers. Balancing manufacturing cost, meeting emission performance, ...

  17. HANFORD RIVER PROTECTION PROJECT ENHANCED MISSION PLANNING THROUGH INNOVATIVE TOOLS LIFECYCLE COST MODELING AND AQUEOUS THERMODYNAMIC MODELING - 12134

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    PIERSON KL; MEINERT FL

    2012-01-26

    Two notable modeling efforts within the Hanford Tank Waste Operations Simulator (HTWOS) are currently underway to (1) increase the robustness of the underlying chemistry approximations through the development and implementation of an aqueous thermodynamic model, and (2) add enhanced planning capabilities to the HTWOS model through development and incorporation of the lifecycle cost model (LCM). Since even seemingly small changes in apparent waste composition or treatment parameters can result in large changes in quantities of high-level waste (HLW) and low-activity waste (LAW) glass, mission duration or lifecycle cost, a solubility model that more accurately depicts the phases and concentrations of constituents in tank waste is required. The LCM enables evaluation of the interactions of proposed changes on lifecycle mission costs, which is critical for decision makers.

  18. Broadening the Appeal of Marginal Abatement Cost Curves: Capturing Both Carbon Mitigation and Development Benefits of Clean Energy Technologies; Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cowlin, S.; Cochran, J.; Cox, S.; Davison, C.; van der Gaast, Y.

    2012-08-01

    Low emission development strategies (LEDS) articulate policies and implementation plans that enable countries to advance sustainable, climate-resilient development and private sector growth while significantly reducing the greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions traditionally associated with economic growth. In creating a LEDS, policy makers often have access to information on abatement potential and costs for clean energy technologies, but there is a scarcity of economy-wide approaches for evaluating and presenting information on other dimensions of importance to development, such as human welfare, poverty alleviation, and energy security. To address this shortcoming, this paper proposes a new tool for communicating development benefits to policy makers as part of a LEDS process. The purpose of this tool is two-fold: 1. Communicate development benefits associated with each clean energy-related intervention; 2. Facilitate decision-making on which combination of interventions best contributes to development goals. To pilot this tool, the authors created a visual using data on developmental impacts identified through the Technology Needs Assessment (TNA) project in Montenegro. The visual will then be revised to reflect new data established through the TNA that provides information on cost, GHG mitigation, as well as the range and magnitude of developmental impacts.

  19. Low-cost, high-efficiency solar cells utilizing GaAs-on-Si technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vernon, S.M. )

    1993-04-01

    This report describes work to develop technology to deposit GaAs on Si using a nucleation layer of atomic-layer-epitaxy-grown GaAs or AlAs on Si. This ensures two-dimensional nucleation and should lead to fewer defects in the final GaAs layer. As an alternative, we also developed technology for depositing GaAs on sawtooth-patterned Si. Preliminary studies showed that this material can have a very low defect density, [approximately] 1 [times] 10[sup 5] cm[sup [minus]5], as opposed to our conventionally grown GaAs on SL which has a typical defect density of over 1 [times]10[sup 7] cm[sup [minus]2]. Using these two now methods of GaAs-on-Si material growth, we made solar cells that are expected to show higher efficiencies than those of previous cells.

  20. A least-cost optimisation model of CO{sub 2} capture applied to major UK power plants within the EU-ETS framework

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kemp, A.G.; Kasim, A.S.

    2008-02-15

    Concerns about the cost of CO{sub 2} capture and sequestration, and the effectiveness of carbon abatement policies loom large in discussions on climate change mitigation. Several writers address the issue from various perspectives. This paper attempts to add relative realism to discussions on CO{sub 2} capture costs and the deployment of carbon capture technology in the UK by using publicly available company data on the long term capacity expansion and CO{sub 2} capture investment programmes of selected power plants in the UK. With an estimated 8 billion plan to install a generation capacity of GW and capture capability of 44 Mt CO{sub 2}/year, it is imperative to optimise this huge potential investment. A least-cost optimisation model was formulated and solved with the LP algorithm available in GAMS. The model was then applied to address a number of issues, including the choice of an optimal carbon abatement policy within the EU-ETS framework. The major findings of the study include (a) the long term total cost curve of CO{sub 2} capture has three phases rising, plateau, rising; (b) alternative capture technologies do not have permanent relative cost advantages or disadvantages; (c) Government incentives encourage carbon capture and the avoidance of emission penalty charges; and (d) the goals of EU-ETS are more effectively realised with deeper cuts in the EUA ratios than merely hiking the emission penalty, as proposed in EU-ETS Phase II.

  1. Examining the effectiveness of municipal solid waste management systems: An integrated cost-benefit analysis perspective with a financial cost modeling in Taiwan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weng, Yu-Chi; Fujiwara, Takeshi

    2011-06-15

    In order to develop a sound material-cycle society, cost-effective municipal solid waste (MSW) management systems are required for the municipalities in the context of the integrated accounting system for MSW management. Firstly, this paper attempts to establish an integrated cost-benefit analysis (CBA) framework for evaluating the effectiveness of MSW management systems. In this paper, detailed cost/benefit items due to waste problems are particularly clarified. The stakeholders of MSW management systems, including the decision-makers of the municipalities and the citizens, are expected to reconsider the waste problems in depth and thus take wise actions with the aid of the proposed CBA framework. Secondly, focusing on the financial cost, this study develops a generalized methodology to evaluate the financial cost-effectiveness of MSW management systems, simultaneously considering the treatment technological levels and policy effects. The impacts of the influencing factors on the annual total and average financial MSW operation and maintenance (O and M) costs are analyzed in the Taiwanese case study with a demonstrative short-term future projection of the financial costs under scenario analysis. The established methodology would contribute to the evaluation of the current policy measures and to the modification of the policy design for the municipalities.

  2. Simulating the Value of Concentrating Solar Power with Thermal Energy Storage in a Production Cost Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Denholm, P.; Hummon, M.

    2012-11-01

    Concentrating solar power (CSP) deployed with thermal energy storage (TES) provides a dispatchable source of renewable energy. The value of CSP with TES, as with other potential generation resources, needs to be established using traditional utility planning tools. Production cost models, which simulate the operation of grid, are often used to estimate the operational value of different generation mixes. CSP with TES has historically had limited analysis in commercial production simulations. This document describes the implementation of CSP with TES in a commercial production cost model. It also describes the simulation of grid operations with CSP in a test system consisting of two balancing areas located primarily in Colorado.

  3. Modeling the performance and cost of lithium-ion batteries for electric-drive vehicles.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nelson, P. A. Gallagher, K. G. Bloom, I. Dees, D. W.

    2011-10-20

    This report details the Battery Performance and Cost model (BatPaC) developed at Argonne National Laboratory for lithium-ion battery packs used in automotive transportation. The model designs the battery for a specified power, energy, and type of vehicle battery. The cost of the designed battery is then calculated by accounting for every step in the lithium-ion battery manufacturing process. The assumed annual production level directly affects each process step. The total cost to the original equipment manufacturer calculated by the model includes the materials, manufacturing, and warranty costs for a battery produced in the year 2020 (in 2010 US$). At the time this report is written, this calculation is the only publically available model that performs a bottom-up lithium-ion battery design and cost calculation. Both the model and the report have been publically peer-reviewed by battery experts assembled by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. This report and accompanying model include changes made in response to the comments received during the peer-review. The purpose of the report is to document the equations and assumptions from which the model has been created. A user of the model will be able to recreate the calculations and perhaps more importantly, understand the driving forces for the results. Instructions for use and an illustration of model results are also presented. Almost every variable in the calculation may be changed by the user to represent a system different from the default values pre-entered into the program. The distinct advantage of using a bottom-up cost and design model is that the entire power-to-energy space may be traversed to examine the correlation between performance and cost. The BatPaC model accounts for the physical limitations of the electrochemical processes within the battery. Thus, unrealistic designs are penalized in energy density and cost, unlike cost models based on linear extrapolations. Additionally, the consequences on cost and energy density from changes in cell capacity, parallel cell groups, and manufacturing capabilities are easily assessed with the model. New proposed materials may also be examined to translate bench-scale values to the design of full-scale battery packs providing realistic energy densities and prices to the original equipment manufacturer. The model will be openly distributed to the public in the year 2011. Currently, the calculations are based in a Microsoft{reg_sign} Office Excel spreadsheet. Instructions are provided for use; however, the format is admittedly not user-friendly. A parallel development effort has created an alternate version based on a graphical user-interface that will be more intuitive to some users. The version that is more user-friendly should allow for wider adoption of the model.

  4. Development of High Rate Coating Technology for Low Cost Electrochromic Dynamic Windows

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kwak, B.; Joshi, Ajey

    2013-03-31

    Objectives of the Project: The objective of this project was to develop and demonstrate the feasibility of depositing critical electrochromic layers at high rate using new novel vacuum coating sources, to develop a full electrochromic process flow by combining conventional processes with new deposition sources, to characterize, test, evaluate, and optimize the resulting coatings and devices, and, to demonstrate an electrochromic device using the new process flow and sources. As addendum objectives, this project was to develop and demonstrate direct patterning methods with novel integration schemes. The long term objective, beyond this program, is to integrate these innovations to enable production of low-cost, high-performance electrochromic windows produced on highly reliable and high yielding manufacturing equipment and systems.

  5. A Total Cost of Ownership Model for Low Temperature PEM Fuel Cells in Combined Heat and Power and Backup Power Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    University of California, Berkeley; Wei, Max; Lipman, Timothy; Mayyas, Ahmad; Chien, Joshua; Chan, Shuk Han; Gosselin, David; Breunig, Hanna; Stadler, Michael; McKone, Thomas; Beattie, Paul; Chong, Patricia; Colella, Whitney; James, Brian

    2014-06-23

    A total cost of ownership model is described for low temperature proton exchange membrane stationary fuel cell systems for combined heat and power (CHP) applications from 1-250kW and backup power applications from 1-50kW. System designs and functional specifications for these two applications were developed across the range of system power levels. Bottom-up cost estimates were made for balance of plant costs, and detailed direct cost estimates for key fuel cell stack components were derived using design-for-manufacturing-and-assembly techniques. The development of high throughput, automated processes achieving high yield are projected to reduce the cost for fuel cell stacks to the $300/kW level at an annual production volume of 100 MW. Several promising combinations of building types and geographical location in the U.S. were identified for installation of fuel cell CHP systems based on the LBNL modelling tool DER CAM. Life-cycle modelling and externality assessment were done for hotels and hospitals. Reduced electricity demand charges, heating credits and carbon credits can reduce the effective cost of electricity ($/kWhe) by 26-44percent in locations such as Minneapolis, where high carbon intensity electricity from the grid is displaces by a fuel cell system operating on reformate fuel. This project extends the scope of existing cost studies to include externalities and ancillary financial benefits and thus provides a more comprehensive picture of fuel cell system benefits, consistent with a policy and incentive environment that increasingly values these ancillary benefits. The project provides a critical, new modelling capacity and should aid a broad range of policy makers in assessing the integrated costs and benefits of fuel cell systems versus other distributed generation technologies.

  6. Aqueous-stream uranium-removal technology cost/benefit and market analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1994-03-01

    The primary purpose of this report is to present information that was gathered by Kapline Enterprises, Inc. (KEI) in order to help the Department of Energy (DOE) determine the merit of continued biosorption research funding. However, in the event that funding is continued, it is also intended to help the researchers in their efforts to develop a better uranium-removal process. This report (1) provides a comparison of DOE sites that may utilize aqueous-stream, uranium-removal biosorption technology, (2) presents a comparison of the biosorption and ion exchange processes, and (3) establishes performance criteria by which the project can be measured. It also attempts to provide focus for biosorbent ground-water-remediation research and to ask questions that need to be answered. This report is primarily a study of the US market for technologies that remove uranium from aqueous streams, but it also addresses the international market-particularly for Germany. Because KEI`s access to international market information is extremely limited, the material presented in this report represents a best effort to obtain this data. Although uranium-contaminated aqueous streams are a problem in other countries as well, the scope of this report is primarily limited to the US and Germany for two reasons: (1) Germany is the country of the biosorbent-CRADA partner and (2) time constraints.

  7. Technology Innovations and Experience Curves for Nitrogen Oxides Control Technologies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yeh, Sonia; Rubin, Edward S.; Taylor, Margaret R.

    2007-01-01

    including issues of technology and cost un- certainties, areon NO x Control Technologies and Cost Effectiveness forand other factors on technology cost trends (hence, the

  8. High Efficiency Low Cost CO2 Compression Using Supersonic Shock Wave Technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, J; Aarnio, M; Grosvenor, A; Taylor, D; Bucher, J

    2010-12-31

    Development and testing results from a supersonic compressor are presented. The compressor achieved record pressure ratio for a fully-supersonic stage and successfully demonstrated the technology potential. Several tasks were performed in compliance with the DOE award objectives. A high-pressure ratio compressor was retrofitted to improve rotordynamics behavior and successfully tested. An outside review panel confirmed test results and design approach. A computational fluid dynamics code used to analyze the Ramgen supersonic flowpath was extensively and successfully modified to improve use on high-performance computing platforms. A comprehensive R&D implementation plan was developed and used to lay the groundwork for a future full-scale compressor demonstration. Conceptual design for a CO2 demonstration compressor was developed and reviewed.

  9. 2008 Solar Technologies Market Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Price, S.

    2010-01-01

    Concentrating Solar Power—Technology, Cost, and Markets.Concentrating Solar Power—Technology, Cost, and Markets.Concentrating Solar Power—Technology, Cost, and Markets.

  10. Challenges in Using an Economic Cost Model for Software Engineering Simulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van der Hoek, André

    1 Challenges in Using an Economic Cost Model for Software Engineering Simulation Emily Oh André van dynamics underlying real-world software engineering processes. We are constructing a new approach to software engineering education that is based on the use of an educa- tional software engineering simulation

  11. Two objectives are included in the model: A cost minimization and an environmental impact minimization.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grossmann, Ignacio E.

    Method Two objectives are included in the model: A cost minimization and an environmental impact minimization. The environmental impact is evaluated using the Eco- indicator 99 method. A set of Pareto optimal solutions is generated using the -constraint method. Conclusions · Environmental impact can be reduced by up

  12. Using painted turtles (Chrysemys picta) to test the cost benefit model of thermoregulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blouin-Demers, Gabriel

    Using painted turtles (Chrysemys picta) to test the cost benefit model of thermoregulation Alanna,297 internal body temperature (Tb) measurements from 18 midland painted turtles (Chrysemys picta marginata (Tset) of painted turtles in a thermal gradient. Tset was 21.3o C to 25.0o C. I used Tb, Te, and Tset

  13. A Model and Case Study of the Impacts of Stochastic Capacity on Freeway Traffic Flow Benefits and Costs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bertini, Robert L.

    and Costs Alexander Bigazzi1 and Dr. Miguel Figliozzi2 1 Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering conditions with the accompanying heavy congestion costs. As the traffic volume at which flow breaks down is uncertain, this research utilizes a stochastic capacity model to estimate congestion costs in terms

  14. STATE-OF-THE-ART AND EMERGING TRUCK ENGINE TECHNOLOGIES FOR OPTIMIZED PERFORMANCE, EMISSIONS AND LIFE CYCLE COSTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schittler, M

    2003-08-24

    The challenge for truck engine product engineering is not only to fulfill increasingly stringent emission requirements, but also to improve the engine's economical viability in its role as the backbone of our global economy. While societal impact and therefore emission limit values are to be reduced in big steps, continuous improvement is not enough but technological quantum leaps are necessary. The introduction and refinement of electronic control of all major engine systems has already been a quantum leap forward. Maximizing the benefits of these technologies to customers and society requires full use of parameter optimization and other enabling technologies. The next big step forward will be widespread use of exhaust aftertreatment on all transportation related diesel engines. While exhaust gas aftertreatment has been successfully established on gasoline (Otto cycle) engines, the introduction of exhaust aftertreatment especially for heavy-duty diesel engines will be much mo re demanding. Implementing exhaust gas aftertreatment into commercial vehicle applications is a challenging task but the emission requirements to be met starting in Europe, the USA and Japan in the 2005-2007 timeframe require this step. The engine industry will be able to implement the new technology if all stakeholders support the necessary decisions. One decision has already been taken: the reduction of sulfur in diesel fuel being comparable with the elimination of lead in gasoline as a prerequisite for the three-way catalyst. Now we have the chance to optimize ecology and economy of the Diesel engine simultaneously by taking the decision to provide an additional infrastructure for a NOx reduction agent needed for the introduction of the Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) technology that is already implemented in the electric power generation industry. This requires some effort, but the resulting societal benefits, fuel economy and vehicle life cycle costs are significantly better when compared to other competitive technologies. After long discussions this decision for SCR has been made in Europe and is supported by all truck and engine manufacturers. The necessary logistic support will be in place when it will be needed commercially in 2005. For the US the decision has to be taken this year in order to have the infrastructure available in 2007. It will enable the global engine industry to focus their R & D resources in one direction not only for 2007, but for the years beyond 2010 with the best benefit for the environment, the customers and the industry.

  15. NREL: Technology Deployment - Models and Tools

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMass map shines lightGeospatial ToolkitSMARTS - SimpleProject:DeploymentMicrogridModels

  16. Development of Bottom-up Representation of Industrial Energy Efficiency Technologies in Integrated Assessment Models for the Iron and Steel Sector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xu, T.T.; Sathaye, J.; Galitsky, C.

    2010-09-30

    Adoption of efficient end-use technologies is one of the key measures for reducing greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. With the working of energy programs and policies on carbon regulation, how to effectively analyze and manage the costs associated with GHG reductions become extremely important for the industry and policy makers around the world. Energy-climate (EC) models are often used for analyzing the costs of reducing GHG emissions (e.g., carbon emission) for various emission-reduction measures, because an accurate estimation of these costs is critical for identifying and choosing optimal emission reduction measures, and for developing related policy options to accelerate market adoption and technology implementation. However, accuracies of assessing of GHG-emission reduction costs by taking into account the adoption of energy efficiency technologies will depend on how well these end-use technologies are represented in integrated assessment models (IAM) and other energy-climate models. In this report, we first conduct brief overview on different representations of end-use technologies (mitigation measures) in various energy-climate models, followed by problem statements, and a description of the basic concepts of quantifying the cost of conserved energy including integrating non-regrets options. A non-regrets option is defined as a GHG reduction option that is cost effective, without considering their additional benefits related to reducing GHG emissions. Based upon these, we develop information on costs of mitigation measures and technological change. These serve as the basis for collating the data on energy savings and costs for their future use in integrated assessment models. In addition to descriptions of the iron and steel making processes, and the mitigation measures identified in this study, the report includes tabulated databases on costs of measure implementation, energy savings, carbon-emission reduction, and lifetimes. The cost curve data on mitigation measures are available over time, which allows an estimation of technological change over a decade-long historical period. In particular, the report will describe new treatment of technological change in energy-climate modeling for this industry sector, i.e., assessing the changes in costs and energy-savings potentials via comparing 1994 and 2002 conservation supply curves. In this study, we compared the same set of mitigation measures for both 1994 and 2002 -- no additional mitigation measure for year 2002 was included due to unavailability of such data. Therefore, the estimated potentials in total energy savings and carbon reduction would most likely be more conservative for year 2002 in this study. Based upon the cost curves, the rate of change in the savings potential at a given cost can be evaluated and be used to estimate future rates of change that can be the input for energy-climate models. Through characterizing energy-efficiency technology costs and improvement potentials, we have developed and presented energy cost curves for energy efficiency measures applicable to the U.S. iron and steel industry for the years 1994 and 2002. The cost curves can change significantly under various scenarios: the baseline year, discount rate, energy intensity, production, industry structure (e.g., integrated versus secondary steel making and number of plants), efficiency (or mitigation) measures, share of iron and steel production to which the individual measures can be applied, and inclusion of other non-energy benefits. Inclusion of other non-energy benefits from implementing mitigation measures can reduce the costs of conserved energy significantly. In addition, costs of conserved energy (CCE) for individual mitigation measures increase with the increases in discount rates, resulting in a general increase in total cost of mitigation measures for implementation and operation with a higher discount rate. In 1994, integrated steel mills in the U.S. produced 55.

  17. Analyzing the Levelized Cost of Centralized and Distributed Hydrogen Production Using the H2A Production Model, Version 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ramsden, T.; Steward, D.; Zuboy, J.

    2009-09-01

    Analysis of the levelized cost of producing hydrogen via different pathways using the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's H2A Hydrogen Production Model, Version 2.

  18. Developing Information on Energy Savings and Associated Costs and Benefits of Energy Efficient Emerging Technologies Applicable in California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xu, Tengfang

    2011-01-01

    and grid owners. Energy (and cost) savings might be found inSystem to Offset Peak Energy Cost at a Wastewater TreatmentSavings Estimation (GWh) Energy Costs Current Other Total

  19. CHARACTERIZING COSTS, SAVINGS AND BENEFITS OF A SELECTION OF ENERGY EFFICIENT EMERGING TECHNOLOGIES IN THE UNITED STATES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xu, T.

    2011-01-01

    has become a potential energy and cost saver for refineries.Refrigeration System Reduces Energy Costs - September - GRIin material and energy costs ([DOE-OIT], U.S. Department of

  20. Marginal Abatement Costs and Marginal Welfare Costs for Greenhouse Gas Emissions Reductions: Results from the EPPA Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Morris, Jennifer

    Marginal abatement cost (MAC) curves, relationships between tons of emissions abated and the CO2 (or GHG) price, have been widely used as pedagogic devices to illustrate simple economic concepts such as the benefits of ...

  1. CHARACTERIZING COSTS, SAVINGS AND BENEFITS OF A SELECTION OF ENERGY EFFICIENT EMERGING TECHNOLOGIES IN THE UNITED STATES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xu, T.

    2011-01-01

    energy costs of this plant as representative for the calculationsenergy (fuel) NA Cost of conserved energy (primary energy) $/MBtu Discount rate for all CCE calculations

  2. CHARACTERIZING COSTS, SAVINGS AND BENEFITS OF A SELECTION OF ENERGY EFFICIENT EMERGING TECHNOLOGIES IN THE UNITED STATES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xu, T.

    2011-01-01

    froth flotation technology, plastics of similar densitiescost estimates for plastics separations technologies vary in2000), the technology to recover plastics from car residues

  3. Integrating Volume Reduction and Packaging Alternatives to Achieve Cost Savings for Low Level Waste Disposal at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Church, A.; Gordon, J.; Montrose, J. K.

    2002-02-26

    In order to reduce costs and achieve schedules for Closure of the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS), the Waste Requirements Group has implemented a number of cost saving initiatives aimed at integrating waste volume reduction with the selection of compliant waste packaging methods for the disposal of RFETS low level radioactive waste (LLW). Waste Guidance Inventory and Shipping Forecasts indicate that over 200,000 m3 of low level waste will be shipped offsite between FY2002 and FY2006. Current projections indicate that the majority of this waste will be shipped offsite in an estimated 40,000 55-gallon drums, 10,000 metal and plywood boxes, and 5000 cargo containers. Currently, the projected cost for packaging, shipment, and disposal adds up to $80 million. With these waste volume and cost projections, the need for more efficient and cost effective packaging and transportation options were apparent in order to reduce costs and achieve future Site packaging a nd transportation needs. This paper presents some of the cost saving initiatives being implemented for waste packaging at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (the Site). There are many options for either volume reduction or alternative packaging. Each building and/or project may indicate different preferences and/or combinations of options.

  4. Proceedings of the 2007 Aging Aircraft Conference Cost Model for Assessing the Transition to Lead-Free Electronics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sandborn, Peter

    Proceedings of the 2007 Aging Aircraft Conference Cost Model for Assessing the Transition to Lead the cost ramifications of the transition from tin- lead to lead-free electronic parts. All tin-lead, all lead-free and mixed assembly approaches are considered. The model makes basic assumptions of a fixed

  5. Cost-Based Abduction (CBA) is an AI model for reasoning under uncertainty. In CBA, evidence to

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bonner, Anthony

    Abstract Cost-Based Abduction (CBA) is an AI model for reasoning under uncertainty. In CBA that are assumed to complete the proof. The aim is to find the Least Cost Proof. This paper uses CBA to develop. We show that CBA is a powerful formal- ism for modeling GRN that can easily and effec- tively

  6. ImSET 3.1: Impact of Sector Energy Technologies Model Description and User's Guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scott, Michael J.; Livingston, Olga V.; Balducci, Patrick J.; Roop, Joseph M.; Schultz, Robert W.

    2009-05-22

    This 3.1 version of the Impact of Sector Energy Technologies (ImSET) model represents the next generation of the previously-built ImSET model (ImSET 2.0) that was developed in 2005 to estimate the macroeconomic impacts of energy-efficient technology in buildings. In particular, a special-purpose version of the Benchmark National Input-Output (I-O) model was designed specifically to estimate the national employment and income effects of the deployment of Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)–developed energy-saving technologies. In comparison with the previous versions of the model, this version features the use of the U.S. Bureau of Economic Analysis 2002 national input-output table and the central processing code has been moved from the FORTRAN legacy operating environment to a modern C++ code. ImSET is also easier to use than extant macroeconomic simulation models and incorporates information developed by each of the EERE offices as part of the requirements of the Government Performance and Results Act. While it does not include the ability to model certain dynamic features of markets for labor and other factors of production featured in the more complex models, for most purposes these excluded features are not critical. The analysis is credible as long as the assumption is made that relative prices in the economy would not be substantially affected by energy efficiency investments. In most cases, the expected scale of these investments is small enough that neither labor markets nor production cost relationships should seriously affect national prices as the investments are made. The exact timing of impacts on gross product, employment, and national wage income from energy efficiency investments is not well-enough understood that much special insight can be gained from the additional dynamic sophistication of a macroeconomic simulation model. Thus, we believe that this version of ImSET is a cost-effective solution to estimating the economic impacts of the development of energy-efficient technologies.

  7. Tornadoes and related damage costs: statistical modeling with a semi-Markov approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Corini, Chiara; Petroni, Filippo; Prattico, Flavio; Manca, Raimondo

    2015-01-01

    We propose a statistical approach to tornadoes modeling for predicting and simulating occurrences of tornadoes and accumulated cost distributions over a time interval. This is achieved by modeling the tornadoes intensity, measured with the Fujita scale, as a stochastic process. Since the Fujita scale divides tornadoes intensity into six states, it is possible to model the tornadoes intensity by using Markov and semi-Markov models. We demonstrate that the semi-Markov approach is able to reproduce the duration effect that is detected in tornadoes occurrence. The superiority of the semi-Markov model as compared to the Markov chain model is also affirmed by means of a statistical test of hypothesis. As an application we compute the expected value and the variance of the costs generated by the tornadoes over a given time interval in a given area. he paper contributes to the literature by demonstrating that semi-Markov models represent an effective tool for physical analysis of tornadoes as well as for the estimati...

  8. A proposed framework for establishing integrated cost and performance criteria for environmental technologies. A summary report to the U.S. Department of Energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-05-01

    Through an Interagency Agreement between the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the US Department of Energy (DOE), EPA directed a project to establish a suite of standard cost and performance criteria to guide the evaluation of environmental cleanup technologies for DOE sites. Ideally, these criteria would be ``generic`` in that they could be used as a basis for evaluating any cleanup technology for any DOE site. To be most useful, however, these criteria would also reflect the interests of diverse decisionmakers who influence DOE technology evaluation. The project was conducted by the National Environmental Technology Applications Center (NETAC), a nonprofit organization specializing in the development and commercialization of new and innovative environmental technologies for national and international markets. To accomplish the project objective, NETAC (1) developed a data gathering questionnaire, (2) interviewed government and industry decisionmakers, (3) identified previous criteria development efforts, (4) conducted a workshop, (5) evaluated workshop discussions, and (6) applied its five years` experience in commercializing environmental technologies to analyze project findings. The project resulted in the development of a unique and comprehensive resource or tool to enhance communication among decisionmakers. This resource, a ``Proposed Framework for Establishing Integrated Cost and Performance Criteria for Evaluating Environmental Cleanup Technologies for DOE Sites,`` offers decisionmakers a first-time comprehensive assessment of major technology evaluation issues by a decisionmaker group.

  9. Use of experience curves to estimate the future cost of power plants with CO2 capture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rubin, Edward S.; Yeh, Sonia; Antes, Matt; Berkenpas, Michael; Davison, John

    2007-01-01

    and storage costs) Technology Cost of electricity (excludingstages of commercialization Technology Capital cost Flue gasPlant type and technology Capital cost $/kW NGCC plant

  10. Stochastic Dynamic Demand Inventory Models with Explicit Transportation Costs and Decisions 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Liqing

    2011-07-01

    Peters August 2011 Major Subject: Industrial Engineering iii ABSTRACT Stochastic Dynamic Demand Inventory Models with Explicit Transportation Costs and Decisions. (August 2011) Liqing Zhang, B.S.; M.S., Tsinghua University, P.R. China Chair... An Illustration of (Q,~s, ~S) Policy ( m = ? s1n?Qn C ? + 1 ) . . . . . . . . 52 5 Optimal Policies for Special Case . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 71 6 Influence of Parameter K . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 74 7 Influence...

  11. Power System Modeling of 20percent Wind-Generated Electricity by 2030

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hand, Maureen

    2008-01-01

    Assumptions Land-Based Wind Technology Cost $1730/kW in 2005Shallow Offshore Wind Technology Cost Wind Technologyare modeled by WinDS, the costs of building transmission

  12. Model Conservation Standards COST-EFFECTIVENESS AND ECONOMIC FEASIBILITY OF THE MODEL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and savings assumptions used to establish the efficiency level that achieves all electricity savings and assumptions used to determine whether the regionally cost-effective efficiency levels are economically of the states in the region have revised their energy codes. Consequently, many of the conservation measures

  13. Clean Energy Manufacturing Initiative: Technology Research and...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Motors' lightweight composite technology. DOE R&D has reduced the modeled, high-volume cost of advanced battery technology to 289 per kilowatt hour-40 percent lower than what it...

  14. Methodology for Calculating Cost-per-Mile for Current and Future Vehicle Powertrain Technologies, with Projections to 2024: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ruth, M.; Timbario, T. A.; Timbario, T. J.; Laffen, M.

    2011-01-01

    Currently, several cost-per-mile calculators exist that can provide estimates of acquisition and operating costs for consumers and fleets. However, these calculators are limited in their ability to determine the difference in cost per mile for consumer versus fleet ownership, to calculate the costs beyond one ownership period, to show the sensitivity of the cost per mile to the annual vehicle miles traveled (VMT), and to estimate future increases in operating and ownership costs. Oftentimes, these tools apply a constant percentage increase over the time period of vehicle operation, or in some cases, no increase in direct costs at all over time. A more accurate cost-per-mile calculator has been developed that allows the user to analyze these costs for both consumers and fleets. The calculator was developed to allow simultaneous comparisons of conventional light-duty internal combustion engine (ICE) vehicles, mild and full hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs), and fuel cell vehicles (FCVs). This paper is a summary of the development by the authors of a more accurate cost-per-mile calculator that allows the user to analyze vehicle acquisition and operating costs for both consumer and fleets. Cost-per-mile results are reported for consumer-operated vehicles travelling 15,000 miles per year and for fleets travelling 25,000 miles per year.

  15. To appear in the Journal of Engineering Education, October 2001 Teaching with ALN Technology: Benefits and Costs *

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    : Benefits and Costs * * Supported by the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation, the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation educational and cost effectiveness are presented. Even with higher course standards for success, student, with mostly positive (but some negative) effects. Data concerning cost effectiveness indicate

  16. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: High Temperature DC-Bus Capacitors Cost Reduction and Performance Improvements

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by Sigma Technologies International at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about high...

  17. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2015: High Temperature DC-Bus Capacitor Cost Reduction and Performance Improvements

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by Sigma Technologies International at 2015 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about high...

  18. Study of Possible Applications of Currently Available Building Information Modeling Tools for the Analysis of Initial Costs and Energy Costs for Performing Life Cycle Cost Analysis 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mukherji, Payal Tapandev

    2011-02-22

    forms the core, it has become necessary to use computer building models for examining these changes. The building modeling softwares are enumerated. The case studies have highlighted that the evaluation of the alternatives are primarily to achieve energy...

  19. The value of windpower: An investigation using a qualified production cost model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Milligan, M.R.; Miller, A.H.

    1993-07-01

    As part of the US Department of Energy`s Wind Energy Program at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory, we are using the Environmental Defense Fund`s Electric Utility Financial & Production Cost Model (Elfin) as a tool to determine the value of wind energy to specific utilities. The cases we have developed exercise a number of options in the way in which wind energy is treated: (1) as a load modifer (negative load); (2) as a quick-start supply-side resource with hourly varying output; and (3) probabilistically, using time-varying Weibull distributions. By using two wind speed distributions, two different wind turbines, and two different utilities, we show what the wind turbine cost/kW might be that results in a positive value of wind energy for these utilities.

  20. Innovative Clean Coal Technology (ICCT): Demonstration of innovative applications of technology for cost reductions to the CT-121 FGD process. Quarterly report No. 6, July--September 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-11-15

    The project`s objective is to demonstrate innovative applications of technology for cost reduction for the Chiyoda Thoroughbred-121 (CT-121) process. The CT-121 process is a wet FGD process that removes SO{sub 2}, can achieve simultaneous particulate control, and can produce a salable by-product gypsum thereby reducing or even eliminating solid waste disposal problems. Figure 1 shows a flow schematic of the process. CT-121 removes SO{sub 2} and particulate matter in a unique limestone-based scrubber called the Jet Bubbling Reactor (JBR). IN the JBR, flue gas bubbles beneath the slurry, SO{sub 2} is absorbed, and particulate matter is removed from the gas. The agitator circulates limestone slurry to ensure that fresh reactant is always available in the bubbling or froth zone sot that SO{sub 2} removal can proceed at a rapid rate. Air is introduced into the bottom of the JBR to oxidize the absorbed SO{sub 2} to sulfate, and limestone is added continuously to neutralize the acid slurry and form gypsum. The JBR is designed to allow ample time for complete oxidation of the SO{sub 2}, for complete reaction of the limestone, and for growth of large gypsum crystals. The gypsum slurry is continuously withdrawn from the JBR and is to be dewatered in a gypsum stack. The stacking technique involves filing a diked area with gypsum slurry, allowing the gypsum solids to settle, and removing clear liquid from the top of the stack for recycle back to the process.

  1. IEEE Transactions on Electronics Packaging Manufacturing, 2001 On the Use of Yielded Cost in Modeling Electronic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sandborn, Peter

    that is independent of step order between steps that scrap defective product. Index Terms ­ cost, yield, yielded costIEEE Transactions on Electronics Packaging Manufacturing, 2001 1 On the Use of Yielded Cost and Systems Center University of Maryland College Park, MD 20742 Abstract ­ Yielded cost is defined as cost

  2. System Modeling, Analysis, and Optimization Methodology for Diesel Exhaust After-treatment Technologies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Weck, Olivier L.

    System Modeling, Analysis, and Optimization Methodology for Diesel Exhaust After;System Modeling, Analysis, and Optimization Methodology for Diesel Exhaust After-treatment Technologies Developing new aftertreatment technologies to meet emission regulations for diesel engines is a growing

  3. Development of a total landed cost and risk analysis model for global strategic sourcing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feller, Brian (Brian C.)

    2008-01-01

    Total landed cost and supply chain risk analysis are methods that many companies use to assess strategic sourcing decisions. For this project, landed cost is defined as those costs associated with material movement from a ...

  4. CCSI Technology Readiness Levels Likelihood Model (TRL-LM) User’s Guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Engel, David W.; Dalton, Angela C.; Sivaramakrishnan, Chandrika; Lansing, Carina

    2013-03-26

    This is the manual for the Carbon Capture Simulation Initiative (CCSI) Technology Readiness Level Likelihood model based on PNNL velo.

  5. Technology and U.S. Emissions Reductions Goals: Results of the EMF 24 Modeling Exercise

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clarke, Leon E.; Fawcett, Allen; Weyant, John; McFarland, Jim; Chaturvedi, Vaibhav; Zhou, Yuyu

    2014-09-01

    This paper discusses Technology and U.S. Emissions Reductions Goals: Results of the EMF 24 Modeling Exercise

  6. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2015: Scale-Up of Low-Cost Encapsulation Technologies for High Capacity and High Voltage Electrode Powders

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by Pneumaticoat Technologies at 2015 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about scale-up of low...

  7. NOVEL TECHNOLOGIES DEVELOPED BY CREE LOWER THE COST OF HIGH-PERFORMANCE LED TROFFERS ON THE MARKET

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Cree used a comprehensive approach to reduce the costs of various optical, thermal, and electrical subsystems without impacting performance, resulting in an LED troffer luminaire platform emitting...

  8. CHARACTERIZING COSTS, SAVINGS AND BENEFITS OF A SELECTION OF ENERGY EFFICIENT EMERGING TECHNOLOGIES IN THE UNITED STATES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xu, T.

    2011-01-01

    role in mitigation efforts by saving energy. Providingin mitigation efforts by saving energy. Providing evaluationof the costs and energy savings potential of emerging

  9. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Reassessing the...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Documents & Publications Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2015: Assessing the Outlook of US Oil Dependence Using Oil Security Metrics Model (OSMM) Measuring the Costs...

  10. Refining and Extending the Business Model with Information Technology: Dell Computer Corporation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kraemer, Kenneth L; Dedrick, Jason; Yamashiro, Sandra

    1999-01-01

    of Dell’s Direct Business Model Fuels Fifteenth ConsecutiveAND EXTENDING THE REFINING AND EXTENDING THE BUSINESS MODELBUSINESS MODEL CENTER FOR RESEARCH ON INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY

  11. Weighing the Costs and Benefits of Renewables Portfolio Standards: A Comparative Analysis of State-Level Policy Impact Projections

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Cliff; Wiser, Ryan; Bolinger, Mark

    2007-01-01

    projections of renewable technology cost, fossil fuel priceboth renewable technology costs and avoided fuel costs. Theof future renewable technology cost and performance would

  12. EXECUTIVE SUMMARY: RETHINKING STANDBY & FIXED COST CHARGES REGULATORY & RATE DESIGN PATHWAYS TO DEEPER SOLAR PV COST

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    PV technology, however, PV-specific charges will negatively impact the solar PV cost reduction goals TO DEEPER SOLAR PV COST REDUCTIONS The Current Terrain In recent years, electric utilities have experienced business models almost exclusively to the rapid growth of distributed solar PV. This focus has led

  13. Resistive Bridge Fault Model Evolution From Conventional to Ultra Deep Submicron Technologies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Polian, Ilia

    Resistive Bridge Fault Model Evolution From Conventional to Ultra Deep Submicron Technologies Ilia three resistive bridging fault models valid for dif- ferent CMOS technologies. The models. The second model is obtained by fitting SPICE data. The third resistive bridging fault model uses Berkeley

  14. Weighing the Costs and Benefits of Renewables Portfolio Standards: A Comparative Analysis of State-Level Policy Impact Projections

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Cliff; Wiser, Ryan; Bolinger, Mark

    2007-01-01

    wholesale electricity price projections as a model output.in natural gas prices projections over the past severalprojections of renewable technology cost, fossil fuel price

  15. IT/Automation Cost Reduction in Intel's Manufacturing Environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Subirana for an MIT Leaders For Manufacturing class on Information Technology as an Integrating force with Information Technology management challenges. In particular all headcount and cost numbers referred areas quickly. Then use this as a role model for other groups within Technology and Manufacturing. Look

  16. Hydrogen and Infrastructure Costs

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    FUEL CELL TECHNOLOGIES PROGRAM Hydrogen and Infrastructure Costs Hydrogen Infrastructure Market Readiness Workshop Washington D.C. February 17, 2011 Fred Joseck U.S. Department of...

  17. CHARACTERIZING COSTS, SAVINGS AND BENEFITS OF A SELECTION OF ENERGY EFFICIENT EMERGING TECHNOLOGIES IN THE UNITED STATES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xu, T.

    2011-01-01

    Institute and National Renewable Energy Laboratory. (2003).of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy. Xu, P. , Feng, J.End‐Use Energy Efficiency Renewable Energy Technologies

  18. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Overcoming Processing Cost Barriers of High-Performance Lithium-Ion Battery Electrodes

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Presentation given by Oak Ridge National Laboratory at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about overcoming...

  19. Developing Information on Energy Savings and Associated Costs and Benefits of Energy Efficient Emerging Technologies Applicable in California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xu, Tengfang

    2011-01-01

    D. (2004). Advances in solar thermal electricity technology.table.. 21  Table 8. Solar Thermal Cooling Data19  Solar Thermal Cooling

  20. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2015: Innovative Manufacturing and Materials for Low-Cost Lithium-Ion Batteries

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Presentation given by Optodot Corporation at 2015 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about innovative manufacturing...

  1. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Innovative Manufacturing and Materials for Low-Cost Lithium-Ion Batteries

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Presentation given by Optodot Corporation at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about innovative manufacturing...

  2. Low Cost PM Technology for Particle Reinforced Titanium Automotive Components: Manufacturing Process Feasibility Study?AMD 310

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation from the U.S. DOE Office of Vehicle Technologies "Mega" Merit Review 2008 on February 25, 2008 in Bethesda, Maryland.

  3. Developing Information on Energy Savings and Associated Costs and Benefits of Energy Efficient Emerging Technologies Applicable in California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xu, Tengfang

    2011-01-01

    digestion of waste-activated sludge. Progress in Energy andgeneration in wastewater sludge digestion . Solar dishTechnology Novel materials for sludge dewatering Ozonation

  4. ECONOMIC MODELING OF THE GLOBAL ADOPTION OF CARBON CAPTURE AND SEQUESTRATION TECHNOLOGIES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ECONOMIC MODELING OF THE GLOBAL ADOPTION OF CARBON CAPTURE AND SEQUESTRATION TECHNOLOGIES J. R. Mc of carbon capture and sequestration technologies as applied to electric generating plants. The MIT Emissions, is used to model carbon capture and sequestration (CCS) technologies based on a natural gas combined cycle

  5. GM-Ford-Chrysler: ATV Proposed Product Costs | Department of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ATV Proposed Product Costs GM-Ford-Chrysler: ATV Proposed Product Costs "Proposed Product Cost for Advanced Technology Vehicles" GM-Ford-Chrysler: ATV Proposed Product Costs More...

  6. Technology Roadmap Analysis 2013: Assessing Automotive Technology...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Technology Roadmap Analysis 2013: Assessing Automotive Technology R&D Relevant to DOE Power Electronics Cost Targets Technology Roadmap Analysis 2013: Assessing Automotive...

  7. Cost Contributors to Geothermal Power Production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nathwani, Jay; Mines, Greg

    2011-07-01

    The US Department of Energy Geothermal Technologies Office (DOE-GTO) has developed the tool Geothermal Electricity Technologies Evaluation Model (GETEM) to assess the levelized cost of electricity (LCOE) of power produced from geothermal resources. Recently modifications to GETEM allow the DOE-GTO to better assess how different factors impact the generation costs, including initial project risk, time required to complete a development, and development size. The model characterizes the costs associated with project risk by including the costs to evaluate and drill those sites that are considered but not developed for commercial power generation, as well as to assign higher costs to finance those activities having more risk. This paper discusses how the important parameters impact the magnitude project costs for different project scenarios. The cost distributions presented include capital cost recovery for the exploration, confirmation, well field completion and power plant construction, as well as the operation and maintenance (O&M) costs. The paper will present these cost distributions for both EGS and hydrothermal resources.

  8. Cost modeling and design for manufacturing guidelines for advanced composite fabrication

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haffner, Sascha M. (Sascha Marcel), 1968-

    2002-01-01

    Experience shows that the majority of costs are committed during the early stages of the development process. Presently, many cost estimation methods are available to the public for metal processing, but there are almost ...

  9. Neural networks for modelling the final target cost of water projects 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ahiaga-Dagbui, Dominic D; Smith, Simon D

    Producing reasonably accurate cost estimates at the planning stage of a project important for the subsequent success of the project. The estimator has to be able to make judgement on the cost influence of a number of factors ...

  10. A model for predicting the costs of research and development in the Post Office Department 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watts, David Eli

    1970-01-01

    Structural Operational mechanisms Control and sensing subassemblies. Pneumatic. . . . . . . . ~ . . ~ ~ ~ ~ . . ~ Power distribution and conversion. Contxol and sensing subassemblies. Electronic subsystems. Optical components Performance Variables... illustrating need for a trans- formation to achieve linearity. 14 A. 1 A. 2 Cost versus quantity of electronic components Cost versus power requirements. 83 A. 3 Cost versus quantity of electrical power components. 85 A. 4 A. 5 Cost versus feed speed...

  11. Visual Tracking via Adaptive Structural Local Sparse Appearance Model Dalian University of Technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Ming-Hsuan

    Visual Tracking via Adaptive Structural Local Sparse Appearance Model Xu Jia Dalian University of Technology jiaxu1986@mail.dlut.edu.cn Huchuan Lu Dalian University of Technology lhchuan@dlut.edu.cn Ming

  12. Robust Object Tracking via Sparsity-based Collaborative Model Dalian University of Technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Ming-Hsuan

    Robust Object Tracking via Sparsity-based Collaborative Model Wei Zhong Dalian University of Technology zhongwei@mail.dlut.edu.cn Huchuan Lu Dalian University of Technology lhchuan@dlut.edu.cn Ming

  13. Advanced Technologies in Energy-Economy Models for Climate Change Assessment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Morris, J.F.

    Considerations regarding the roles of advanced technologies are crucial in energy-economic modeling, as these technologies, while usually not yet commercially viable, could substitute for fossil energy when relevant policies ...

  14. Determination of a cost-effective air pollution control technology for the control of VOC and HAP emissions from a steroids processing plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hamel, T.M.

    1997-12-31

    A steroids processing plant located in northeastern Puerto Rico emits a combined average of 342 lb/hr of hazardous air pollutants (HAPs) and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from various process operations. The approach that this facility used to implement maximum achievable control technology (MACT) may assist others who must contend with MACT for pharmaceutical or related manufacturing facilities. Federal air regulations define MACT standards for stationary sources emitting any of 189 HAPs. The MACT standards detailed in the NESHAPs are characterized by industry and type of emission control system or technology. It is anticipated that the standard will require HAP reductions of approximately 95%. The steroid plant`s emissions include the following pollutant loadings: VOC/HAP Emission Rate (lb/hr): Methanol 92.0; Acetone 35.0; Methylene chloride 126.0; Chloroform 25.0; Ethyl acetate 56.0; Tetrahydrofuran 5.00; and 1,4-Dioxane 3.00. The facility`s existing carbon adsorption control system was nearing the end of its useful life, and the operators sought to install an air pollution control system capable of meeting MACT requirements for the pharmaceutical industry. Several stand-alone and hybrid control technologies were considered for replacement of the carbon adsorption system at the facility. This paper examines the following technologies: carbon adsorption, membrane separation, thermal oxidation, membrane separation-carbon adsorption, and condensation-carbon adsorption. Each control technology is described; the advantages and disadvantages of utilizing each technology for the steroid processing plant are examined; and capital and operating costs associated with the implementation of each technology are presented. The rationale for the technology ultimately chosen to control VOC and HAP emissions is presented.

  15. Baseline System Costs for 50.0 MW Enhanced Geothermal System--A Function of: Working Fluid, Technology, and Location, Location, Location

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Project objectives: Develop a baseline cost model of a 50.0 MW Enhanced Geothermal System, including all aspects of the project, from finding the resource through to operation, for a particularly challenging scenario: the deep, radioactively decaying granitic rock of the Pioneer Valley in Western Massachusetts.

  16. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2015: Utilization of UV or EB Curing Technology to Significantly Reduce Costs and VOCs in the Manufacture of Lithium-Ion Battery Electrodes

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by Miltec UV International at 2015 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about utilization of UV or...

  17. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Utilization of UV or EB Curing Technology to Significantly Reduce Costs and VOCs in the Manufacture of Lithium-Ion Battery Electrodes

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by Miltec UV International at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about the utilization of UV...

  18. Representing energy technologies in top-down economic models using bottom-up information

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McFarland, James R.; Reilly, John M.; Herzog, Howard J.

    This paper uses bottom-up engineering information as a basis for modeling new technologies within the MIT Emissions Prediction and Policy Analysis (EPPA) model, a computable general equilibrium model of the world economy. ...

  19. Optimal Deployment of Emissions Reduction Technologies for Construction Equipment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Quadrifoglio, Luca

    Optimal Deployment of Emissions Reduction Technologies for Construction Equipment Muhammad Ehsanul The objective of this research was to develop a multiob- jective optimization model to deploy emissions reduction technologies for nonroad construction equipment to re- duce emissions in a cost

  20. Web 2.0 Wiki technology : enabling technologies, community behaviors, and successful business techniques and models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davidi, Ilana

    2007-01-01

    Many technologies fall under the umbrella of what is commonly known as "Web 2.0," including the Wiki, a software product which allows multiple users to review and edit documents online. Like all Web 2.0 technologies, Wikis ...

  1. Environmental Modeling & ISSN 1420-2026

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . The method included (1) data collection of key technology market shares, capital costs, and operating costs models attempt to combine the technological explicitness of bottom-up models with the macroeconomic estimation of behavioral parameters (portraying firm and household technology choices) with such models

  2. CHARACTERIZING COSTS, SAVINGS AND BENEFITS OF A SELECTION OF ENERGY EFFICIENT EMERGING TECHNOLOGIES IN THE UNITED STATES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xu, T.

    2011-01-01

    approaches (e.g. , thermal storage). Due to the wideof gas engines, thermal storage and new working fluids. Gasto be installed. Thermal storage is an “old” technology

  3. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Development and Commercialization of a Novel Low-Cost Carbon Fiber

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by Zoltek at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about development and commercialization of a...

  4. Current Transportation Models Used in the Vehicle Technologies Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2009-04-06

    A summary of various transportation models (VISION, TRUCK, GREET, Oil Peaking Model, Feebate Model, Oil Security Metrics Model, ORNL PHEV Choice Model: Version 1, PSAT, PSAT-PRO,

  5. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2015: Advanced Low-Cost SiC and GaN Wide Bandgap Inverters for Under-the-Hood Electric Vehicle Traction Drives

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by APEI Inc. at 2015 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about advanced low-cost SiC and GaN wide...

  6. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Advanced Low-Cost SiC and GaN Wide Bandgap Inverters for Under-the-Hood Electric Vehicle Traction Drives

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by APEI Inc. at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about Advanced low-cost SIC and GaN wide...

  7. COMPARATIVE COSTS OF CALIFORNIA CENTRAL STATION ELECTRICITY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laughlin, Robert B.

    CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION COMPARATIVE COSTS OF CALIFORNIA CENTRAL STATION ELECTRICITY GENERATION and Anitha Rednam, Comparative Costs of California Central Station Electricity Generation Technologies................................................................................................... 1 CHAPTER 1: Summary of Technology Costs

  8. Summary of: Simulating the Value of Concentrating Solar Power with Thermal Energy Storage in a Production Cost Model (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Denholm, P.; Hummon, M.

    2013-02-01

    Concentrating solar power (CSP) deployed with thermal energy storage (TES) provides a dispatchable source of renewable energy. The value of CSP with TES, as with other potential generation resources, needs to be established using traditional utility planning tools. Production cost models, which simulate the operation of grid, are often used to estimate the operational value of different generation mixes. CSP with TES has historically had limited analysis in commercial production simulations. This document describes the implementation of CSP with TES in a commercial production cost model. It also describes the simulation of grid operations with CSP in a test system consisting of two balancing areas located primarily in Colorado.

  9. Final project report - CRADA with United Solar Technologies and Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL-021): Thin film materials for low-cost high performance solar concentrators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martin, P.M.; Affinito, J.D.; Gross, M.E.; Bennett, W.D.

    1995-03-01

    The objectives of this project were as follows: To develop and evaluate promising low-cost dielectric and polymer-protected thin-film reflective metal coatings to be applied to preformed continuously-curved solar reflector panels to enhance their solar reflectance, and to demonstrate protected solar reflective coatings on preformed solar concentrator panels. The opportunity for this project arose from a search by United Solar Technologies (UST) for organizations and facilities capable of applying reflective coatings to large preformed panels. PNL was identified as being uniquely qualified to participate in this collaborative project.

  10. Equipment Design and Cost Estimation for Small Modular Biomass Systems, Synthesis Gas Cleanup, and Oxygen Separation Equipment; Task 9: Mixed Alcohols From Syngas -- State of Technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nexant Inc.

    2006-05-01

    This deliverable is for Task 9, Mixed Alcohols from Syngas: State of Technology, as part of National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) Award ACO-5-44027, ''Equipment Design and Cost Estimation for Small Modular Biomass Systems, Synthesis Gas Cleanup and Oxygen Separation Equipment''. Task 9 supplements the work previously done by NREL in the mixed alcohols section of the 2003 technical report Preliminary Screening--Technical and Economic Assessment of Synthesis Gas to Fuels and Chemicals with Emphasis on the Potential for Biomass-Derived Syngas.

  11. Economic Modeling of Carbon Capture and Sequestration Technologies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -617-253-6609) Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) Room E52-444 50 Memorial Drive Cambridge, MA 02139 ABSTRACT) technologies. The CCS technologies are based on a natural gas combined cycle plant and an integrated coal gasification combined cycle plant. Additionally, the role of natural gas combined cycle plants without capture

  12. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Coupled Hierarchical Models for Thermal, Mechanical, Electrical and Electrochemical Processes

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by [company name] at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about coupled hierarchical models...

  13. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2015: Model Development and Analysis of Clean & Efficient Engine Combustion

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory at 2015 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about model...

  14. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Atomistic models of LMRNMC Materials

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by Argonne National Laboratory at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about atomistic models...

  15. Choosing the Right Technologies A Model for Cost Optimized Design of a Renewable

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berning, Torsten

    -term generation scheduling for a renewable micro-grid using a hydrogen storage system. Mario Petrollese; Giorgio

  16. Conceptual design of an integrated technology model for carbon policy assessment.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Backus, George A.; Dimotakes, Paul E.

    2011-01-01

    This report describes the conceptual design of a technology choice model for understanding strategies to reduce carbon intensity in the electricity sector. The report considers the major modeling issues affecting technology policy assessment and defines an implementable model construct. Further, the report delineates the basis causal structure of such a model and attempts to establish the technical/algorithmic viability of pursuing model development along with the associated analyses.

  17. Carrots and Sticks: A Comprehensive Business Model for the Successful Achievement of Energy Efficiency Resource Standards Environmental Energy Technologies Division March 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Satchwell, Andrew

    2011-01-01

    calculation of resource benefits, we include the avoided cost of energy,energy costs. Model Inputs Utility Characterization Business-as-Usual Scenario Analysis Model Calculations

  18. An Enterprise Decision Model for Optimal Vehicle Design and Technology Valuation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Papalambros, Panos

    engineering simulation to provide a preliminary understanding of the technology's market and design potentialAn Enterprise Decision Model for Optimal Vehicle Design and Technology Valuation by Adam B. Cooper for Optimal Vehicle Design and Technology Valuation by Adam B. Cooper Chair: Panos Y. Papalambros Design

  19. Industrial validation models 1 4/23/03 Experimental validation of new software technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zelkowitz, Marvin V.

    Industrial validation models 1 4/23/03 Experimental validation of new software technology Marvin V When to apply a new technology in an organization is a critical decision for every software development organization. Earlier work defines a set of methods that the research community uses when a new technology

  20. Prioritizing Climate Change Mitigation Alternatives: Comparing Transportation Technologies to Options in Other Sectors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lutsey, Nicholas P.

    2008-01-01

    Inc. (EEA). 2001. Technology and Cost of Future Fuel Economyproduction leads to lower technology costs. In the case ofpollution control technology costs. As a result, the cost-

  1. Incorporating Latest Technologies in a Cost-Effective Design of Rainfall Catchment and Filtration Systems for Coastal Rhode Island Communities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rhode Island, University of

    to augment the current supply. #12;Catching, storing, and using rainwater at the household level can help months when groundwater levels are at their lowest. While the ancient practice of rainwater collection existing water supplies, but the practice is not so common in the U.S. The basic technology of catching

  2. Cost-effective design of scale-inhibitor squeeze treatments using a mathematical model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kokal, S.L.; Raju, K.U.; Bayona, H.

    1996-05-01

    Scale formation and deposition in production facilities is a challenging problem faced by the oil industry. Their deposition leads to operational problems, safety hazards, and an overall decrease in production efficiency. Downhole scale-inhibitor squeeze treatments provide the most common and effective means of preventing the formation of oilfield scale deposits. This paper presents an analysis and design study of field-inhibitor squeeze treatments. A mathematical model was used to simulate inhibitor-squeeze return data from several Saudi Aramco wells. A wide range of sensitivities in squeeze treatments were investigated, including inhibitor concentration, inhibitor volume, overflush size, and shut-in time. An optimization of the squeeze injection parameters was carried out with the numerical simulator. This optimization was based on squeeze performance as well as on economic criteria. The results indicate that the optimized treatment strategy is very well-specific and depends on the water production rates and operational parameters, like the scale-inhibitor concentration and volume and the amount of overflush. Recommendations are made for optimizing (in terms of cost effectiveness) the squeeze-treatment design.

  3. Cost effective design of scale inhibitor squeeze treatments using a mathematical model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kokal, S.L.; Raju, K.U.; Bayona, H. [Saudi Aramco, Dhahran (Saudi Arabia)

    1995-11-01

    Scale formation and deposition in production facilities is a challenging problem faced by the oil industry. Their deposition leads to operational problems, safety hazards and an overall decrease in production efficiency. Downhole scale inhibitor squeeze treatments provide the most common and effective means of preventing the formation of oilfield scale deposits. This paper presents an analysis and design study of field inhibitor squeeze treatments. A mathematical model was used to simulate inhibitor squeeze return data from several Saudi Aramco wells. A wide range of sensitivities in squeeze treatments were investigated including inhibitor concentration, inhibitor volume, overflush size, shut-in time, etc. An optimization of the squeeze injection parameters was carried out using the numerical simulator. This optimization was based on squeeze performance as well as on economic criteria. The results indicate that the optimized treatment strategy is very well specific and depends on the water production rates, and operational parameters like the scale inhibitor concentration and volume and the amount of overflush. Recommendations are made for optimizing (in terms of cost effectiveness) the squeeze treatment design.

  4. Sensitivity of injection costs to input petrophysical parameters in numerical geologic carbon sequestration models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cheng, C. L.; Gragg, M. J.; Perfect, E.; White, Mark D.; Lemiszki, P. J.; McKay, L. D.

    2013-08-24

    Numerical simulations are widely used in feasibility studies for geologic carbon sequestration. Accurate estimates of petrophysical parameters are needed as inputs for these simulations. However, relatively few experimental values are available for CO2-brine systems. Hence, a sensitivity analysis was performed using the STOMP numerical code for supercritical CO2 injected into a model confined deep saline aquifer. The intrinsic permeability, porosity, pore compressibility, and capillary pressure-saturation/relative permeability parameters (residual liquid saturation, residual gas saturation, and van Genuchten alpha and m values) were varied independently. Their influence on CO2 injection rates and costs were determined and the parameters were ranked based on normalized coefficients of variation. The simulations resulted in differences of up to tens of millions of dollars over the life of the project (i.e., the time taken to inject 10.8 million metric tons of CO2). The two most influential parameters were the intrinsic permeability and the van Genuchten m value. Two other parameters, the residual gas saturation and the residual liquid saturation, ranked above the porosity. These results highlight the need for accurate estimates of capillary pressure-saturation/relative permeability parameters for geologic carbon sequestration simulations in addition to measurements of porosity and intrinsic permeability.

  5. Energy efficiency and the cost of GHG abatement: A comparison of bottom-up and hybrid models for the US

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Energy efficiency and the cost of GHG abatement: A comparison of bottom-up and hybrid models February 2011 Accepted 16 August 2011 Available online 17 September 2011 Keywords: Energy efficiency that a large potential for profitable energy efficiency exists in the US, and that substantial greenhouse gas

  6. High-resolution modeling of the western North American power system demonstrates low-cost and low-carbon futures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kammen, Daniel M.

    the daily grid operations and costs of specific, predefined deployment levels of renewable energy,b,d , Autumn Petros-Good a,b , Christian Blanco a , Daniel M. Kammen a,b,e,n a Renewable and Appropriate Energy 2011 Accepted 14 January 2012 Available online 3 February 2012 Keywords: Energy modeling Renewable

  7. Application of a New Structural Model and Exploration Technologies...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Energy, University of Nevada, Reno Funding Opportunity Announcement DE-FOA-0000109 DOE Funding Level (total award amount) 5,000,000.00 Awardee Cost Share 6,126,664.00...

  8. Technolog

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    focuses on multi-scale, multiphysics approaches to understanding natural systems, "engineering the earth" with sensing and drilling technologies and characterizing geomaterials...

  9. Project Profile: An Emergent Model of Technology Adoption for...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    the solar strategies of electric utility companies to achieve maximum impact. Motivation The diffusion of solar energy technologies is affected as much by policy and...

  10. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Unified Modeling...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    given by National Renewable Energy Laboratory at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation...

  11. Hydrogen Technology Analysis: H2A Production Model Update (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ramsden, T.

    2007-05-15

    This presentation by Todd Ramsden at the 2007 DOE Hydrogen Program Annual Merit Review Meeting provides information about NREL's hydrogen technology analysis activities.

  12. Fast Pyrolysis and Hydrotreating: 2014 State of Technology R&D and Projections to 2017

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jones, Susanne B.; Snowden-Swan, Lesley J.; Meyer, Pimphan A.; Zacher, Alan H.; Olarte, Mariefel V.; Drennan, Corinne

    2015-03-20

    This report documents the technical targets and modeled costs associated with the Bioenergy Technologies Office 2014 fiscal year research related to pyrolysis oil upgrading to hydrocarbons.

  13. Networking technology adoption : system dynamics modeling of fiber-to-the-home

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kelic, Andjelka, 1972-

    2005-01-01

    A system dynamics model is developed and run to study the adoption of fiber-to-the-home as a residential broadband technology. Communities that currently do not have broadband in the United States are modeled. This case ...

  14. IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON CIRCUITS AND SYSTEMS FOR VIDEO TECHNOLOGY, VOL. X, NO. Y, 2014 1 Cost-effective features for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cavallaro, Andrea

    Agency (FPA n 2010-0012). This work was partially supported by the Artemis JU and UK Technology Strategy-time operation and energy efficiency [3], [4]. Data reduction can be achieved by using image com- pression [5 are with the Centre for Intelligent Sensing, Queen Mary Univer- sity of London, E1 4NS, London, UK. (email: s.fahad.tahir@eecs.qmul.ac.uk

  15. Technology Overview Fundamentals of Wind Energy (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Butterfield, S.

    2005-05-01

    A presentation that describes the technology, costs and trends, and future development of wind energy technologies.

  16. Predicting Response to Political Blog Posts with Topic Models Language Technologies Institute

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cohen, William W.

    Predicting Response to Political Blog Posts with Topic Models Tae Yano Language Technologies Language Technologies Institute Carnegie Mellon University Pittsburgh, PA 15213, USA nasmith@cs.cmu.edu Abstract In this paper we model discussions in online po- litical weblogs (blogs). To do this, we extend La

  17. Startup Costs

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1997-03-28

    This chapter discusses startup costs for construction and environmental projects, and estimating guidance for startup costs.

  18. Long-Term Modeling of Solar Energy: Analysis of Concentrating Solar Power (CSP) and PV Technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Yabei; Smith, Steven J.

    2007-08-16

    This report presents an overview of research conducted on solar energy technologies and their implementation in the ObjECTS framework. The topics covered include financing assumptions and selected issues related to the integration of concentrating thermal solar power (CSP) and photovoltaics PV technologies into the electric grid. A review of methodologies for calculating the levelized energy cost of capital-intensive technologies is presented, along with sensitivity tests illustrating how the cost of a solar plant would vary depending on financing assumptions. An analysis of the integration of a hybrid concentrating thermal solar power (CSP) system into the electric system is conducted. Finally a failure statistics analysis for PV plants illustrates the central role of solar irradiance uncertainty in determining PV grid integration characteristics.

  19. Emerging Energy-Efficient Technologies in Buildings Technology Characterizations for Energy Modeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hadley, SW

    2004-10-11

    The energy use in America's commercial and residential building sectors is large and growing. Over 38 quadrillion Btus (Quads) of primary energy were consumed in 2002, representing 39% of total U.S. energy consumption. While the energy use in buildings is expected to grow to 52 Quads by 2025, a large number of energy-related technologies exist that could curtail this increase. In recent years, improvements in such items as high efficiency refrigerators, compact fluorescent lights, high-SEER air conditioners, and improved building shells have all contributed to reducing energy use. Hundreds of other technology improvements have and will continue to improve the energy use in buildings. While many technologies are well understood and are gradually penetrating the market, more advanced technologies will be introduced in the future. The pace and extent of these advances can be improved through state and federal R&D. This report focuses on the long-term potential for energy-efficiency improvement in buildings. Five promising technologies have been selected for description to give an idea of the wide range of possibilities. They address the major areas of energy use in buildings: space conditioning (33% of building use), water heating (9%), and lighting (16%). Besides describing energy-using technologies (solid-state lighting and geothermal heat pumps), the report also discusses energy-saving building shell improvements (smart roofs) and the integration of multiple energy service technologies (CHP packaged systems and triple function heat pumps) to create synergistic savings. Finally, information technologies that can improve the efficiency of building operations are discussed. The report demonstrates that the United States is not running out of technologies to improve energy efficiency and economic and environmental performance, and will not run out in the future. The five technology areas alone can potentially result in total primary energy savings of between 2 and 4.2 Quads by 2025, or 3.8% to 8.1% of the total commercial and residential energy use by 2025 (52 Quads). Many other technologies will contribute to additional potential for energy-efficiency improvement, while the technical potential of these five technologies on the long term is even larger.

  20. Results and Comparison from the SAM Linear Fresnel Technology Performance Model: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wagner, M. J.

    2012-04-01

    This paper presents the new Linear Fresnel technology performance model in NREL's System Advisor Model. The model predicts the financial and technical performance of direct-steam-generation Linear Fresnel power plants, and can be used to analyze a range of system configurations. This paper presents a brief discussion of the model formulation and motivation, and provides extensive discussion of the model performance and financial results. The Linear Fresnel technology is also compared to other concentrating solar power technologies in both qualitative and quantitative measures. The Linear Fresnel model - developed in conjunction with the Electric Power Research Institute - provides users with the ability to model a variety of solar field layouts, fossil backup configurations, thermal receiver designs, and steam generation conditions. This flexibility aims to encompass current market solutions for the DSG Linear Fresnel technology, which is seeing increasing exposure in fossil plant augmentation and stand-alone power generation applications.

  1. Building Distributed Energy Performance Optimization for China a Regional Analysis of Building Energy Costs and CO2 Emissions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feng, Wei

    2013-01-01

    electricity tariff, technology costs, and governmenttariff Natural gas tariff Technology costs and financialand estimated the technology costs in the current Chinese

  2. Electric and Gasoline Vehicle Lifecycle Cost and Energy-Use Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Delucchi, Mark; Burke, Andy; Lipman, Timothy; Miller, Marshall

    2000-01-01

    147 Lifecycle cost (break-even gasoline price): base-casegrease. 37B part: Fuel Gasoline, for the conventional ICEVs.BTU-from-battery to mi/BTU-gasoline. C OST SUMMARY (F ORD T

  3. Integrated Cost and Schedule using Monte Carlo Simulation of a CPM Model - 12419

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hulett, David T.; Nosbisch, Michael R.

    2012-07-01

    This discussion of the recommended practice (RP) 57R-09 of AACE International defines the integrated analysis of schedule and cost risk to estimate the appropriate level of cost and schedule contingency reserve on projects. The main contribution of this RP is to include the impact of schedule risk on cost risk and hence on the need for cost contingency reserves. Additional benefits include the prioritizing of the risks to cost, some of which are risks to schedule, so that risk mitigation may be conducted in a cost-effective way, scatter diagrams of time-cost pairs for developing joint targets of time and cost, and probabilistic cash flow which shows cash flow at different levels of certainty. Integrating cost and schedule risk into one analysis based on the project schedule loaded with costed resources from the cost estimate provides both: (1) more accurate cost estimates than if the schedule risk were ignored or incorporated only partially, and (2) illustrates the importance of schedule risk to cost risk when the durations of activities using labor-type (time-dependent) resources are risky. Many activities such as detailed engineering, construction or software development are mainly conducted by people who need to be paid even if their work takes longer than scheduled. Level-of-effort resources, such as the project management team, are extreme examples of time-dependent resources, since if the project duration exceeds its planned duration the cost of these resources will increase over their budgeted amount. The integrated cost-schedule risk analysis is based on: - A high quality CPM schedule with logic tight enough so that it will provide the correct dates and critical paths during simulation automatically without manual intervention. - A contingency-free estimate of project costs that is loaded on the activities of the schedule. - Resolves inconsistencies between cost estimate and schedule that often creep into those documents as project execution proceeds. - Good-quality risk data that are usually collected in risk interviews of the project team, management and others knowledgeable in the risk of the project. The risks from the risk register are used as the basis of the risk data in the risk driver method. The risk driver method is based in the fundamental principle that identifiable risks drive overall cost and schedule risk. - A Monte Carlo simulation software program that can simulate schedule risk, burn WM2012 rate risk and time-independent resource risk. The results include the standard histograms and cumulative distributions of possible cost and time results for the project. However, by simulating both cost and time simultaneously we can collect the cost-time pairs of results and hence show the scatter diagram ('football chart') that indicates the joint probability of finishing on time and on budget. Also, we can derive the probabilistic cash flow for comparison with the time-phased project budget. Finally the risks to schedule completion and to cost can be prioritized, say at the P-80 level of confidence, to help focus the risk mitigation efforts. If the cost and schedule estimates including contingency reserves are not acceptable to the project stakeholders the project team should conduct risk mitigation workshops and studies, deciding which risk mitigation actions to take, and re-run the Monte Carlo simulation to determine the possible improvement to the project's objectives. Finally, it is recommended that the contingency reserves of cost and of time, calculated at a level that represents an acceptable degree of certainty and uncertainty for the project stakeholders, be added as a resource-loaded activity to the project schedule for strategic planning purposes. The risk analysis described in this paper is correct only for the current plan, represented by the schedule. The project contingency reserve of time and cost that are the main results of this analysis apply if that plan is to be followed. Of course project managers have the option of re-planning and re-scheduling in the face of new facts, in part by m

  4. A Cost Analysis for a Higher-Order Parallel Programming Model 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rangaswami, Roopa

    of functions borrowed from BMF. A parallel implementation is defined for each of these functions for a particular topology, and the associated execution costs are derived. The topologies which have been considered include the hypercube, 2-D torus, tree...

  5. Utilizing an encroachment probability benefit-cost model to estimate accident reduction factors 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hayes, Carolyn A

    1997-01-01

    Improving safety on Texas roadways is a major public concern. Over the years, the Texas Department of Transportation and other highway agencies have become interested in reducing society's accident cost while maximizing returns on accident...

  6. Using a total landed cost model to foster global logistics strategy in the electronics industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jearasatit, Apichart

    2010-01-01

    Global operation strategies have been widely used in the last several decades as many companies and industries have taken advantage of lower production costs. However, in choosing a location, companies often only consider ...

  7. Substitution and price elasticity estimates using inter-country pooled data in a translog cost model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roy, Joyashree; Sanstad, Alan H.; Sathaye, Jayant A.; Khaddaria, Raman

    2006-01-01

    Productivity trends in India's energy intensive industries,technological change in India's energy-intensive industries,in Energy Intensive Industries in Brazil, India and South

  8. Cost analysis of paint-waste-incineration technology at U. S. Army depots. Final report, Nov 88-Oct 91

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hall, F.D.; McKibben, R.S.

    1991-10-01

    The U.S. Army Depot System Command (DESCOM) has 16 maintenance depots located throughout the U.S. Several army depots generate paint wastes that must be disposed of. These depots are located in different parts of the country, and a comprehensive strategy is required to manage the disposal of the paint wastes generated at the individual depots. Incineration is a candidate technology for disposal of such wastes. This report presents an economic analysis of developing an incineration strategy. The economic analysis of paint waste incineration was limited to six major maintenance depots: Anniston, Corpus Christi, Letterkenny, Red River, Tobyhanna, and Tooele. These particular depots are included in the analysis because they are responsible for the majority of all paint wastes generated annually be DESCOM. Three scenarios were evaluated: (1) locating an incinerator at each depot, (2) locating an incinerator at a single site and transporting waste from other depots to this location, and (3) using multiple units at two or more depots. The analysis considers the locations of the army depots, the types and quantities of the wastes they generate, and transportation of the wastes. It also assumes that the individual army depots are equally equipped for proper management of the paint waste by the incineration technology and that the waste can be transferred between the depots without any restrictions. It is further assumed that only incinerable paint wastes will be treated.

  9. Examining pervasive technology practices in schools : a mental models approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vaikakul, Savalai, 1976-

    2005-01-01

    Studies of computers and education have failed to account for the relevance and importance of tacit assumptions and unquestioned expectations that underlie educational technology practices. A major premise of this dissertation ...

  10. Limitations of integrated assessment models of climate change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ackerman, Frank; DeCanio, Stephen J.; Howarth, Richard B.; Sheeran, Kristen

    2009-01-01

    cost-effective technologies into climate models that yieldcosts of climate policy depend heavily on how technology andTechnology forecasts: not so bright IAMs simulate the macroeconomic impacts of climate

  11. Model for Evolutionary Technology An Automatically Defined Terminal Approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fernandez, Thomas

    to satisfy consumer pref- erences on the demand side and lower production costs of products on the supply, but also how market selection plays an important role in the evolution of innovation. In other word innovations as the introduction of a new good, the introduction of a new method of production, the opening

  12. Technology Assessment

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    capabilities that are energy efficient, low environmental impact 72 and lower cost and that are employed to manufacture technologies and products for clean energy 73...

  13. EPA's (Environmental Protection Agency's) program for evaluation and demonstration of low-cost retrofit LIMB (Limestone Injection Multistage Burner) technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stern, R.D.

    1987-09-01

    This paper discusses program objectives, approaches, current status and results, future activities, and schedules for EPA's program for research and development, field evaluation, and demonstration of Limestone Injection Multistage Burner (LIMB) technology. Primary emphasis is on: (1) the full-scale demonstration being conducted on Ohio Edison's 104-MW wall-fired Edgewater Station Unit 4; (2) evaluation on a 50 million Btu/hr tangentially fired prototype nearing completion; (3) on-going field evaluation on Richmond Power and Light's 61-MW tangentially fired Whitewater Valley Generating Station Unit 2. The new program for demonstration on Virginia Electric Power's 180-MW tangentially fired Yorktown II Plant is also described. The LIMB process is based on injecting dry sorbents into the boiler for direct capture of SO/sub 2/ from the combustion gases. LIMB combines sorbent injection for SO/sub 2/ control with the use of low-NOx burners, in which staged combustion is utilized for NOx control.

  14. Proceedings of the International Electronics Packaging Education Conference (at the ECTC), May 30, 2006 Using Teardown Analysis as a Vehicle to Teach Electronic Systems Manufacturing Cost Modeling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sandborn, Peter

    Proceedings of the International Electronics Packaging Education Conference (at the ECTC), May 30, 2006 Using Teardown Analysis as a Vehicle to Teach Electronic Systems Manufacturing Cost Modeling Peter@umd.edu Abstract This paper describes the use of product teardowns in an electronic systems cost modeling course

  15. 2008 Solar Technologies Market Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Price, S.

    2010-01-01

    relatively low residential PV costs in Japan is that a largeavenue to reducing lifetime PV cost. The data, however, are2009). PV Technology, Production, and Cost, 2009 Forecast:

  16. PRESSURE ACTIVATED SEALANT TECHNOLOGY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michael A. Romano

    2004-04-01

    The objective of this project is to develop new, efficient, cost effective methods of internally sealing natural gas pipeline leaks through the application of differential pressure activated sealants. In researching the current state of the art for gas pipeline sealing technologies we concluded that if the project was successful, it appeared that pressure activated sealant technology would provide a cost effective alternative to existing pipeline repair technology. From our analysis of current field data for a 13 year period from 1985 to 1997 we were able to identify 205 leaks that were candidates for pressure activated sealant technology, affirming that pressure activated sealant technology is a viable option to traditional external leak repairs. The data collected included types of defects, areas of defects, pipe sizes and materials, incident and operating pressures, ability of pipeline to be pigged and corrosion states. This data, and subsequent analysis, was utilized as a basis for constructing applicable sealant test modeling.

  17. PV technology differences and discrepancies in modelling between...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    sensitivity and limitations of present and alternative PV models The sensitivity and limitations of present and alternative PV models Steve Ransome - Independent PV Consultant,...

  18. Technologies

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservationBio-Inspired Solar Fuel ProductionRecoverable15/2008Technologies Technologies

  19. Technology

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservationBio-Inspired Solar FuelTechnology /newsroom/_assets/images/s-icon.png Technology

  20. NATIONAL ENERGY TECHNOLOGY LABORATORY Technology Transfer Basic...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    in Technology Transfer" award from the Federal Laboratory Consortium. Application of this technology reduces the costs and energy associated with more conventional scrubbing...

  1. Journal of Engineering Valuation and Cost Analysis, Vol. 2, pp. 285-301 Risk Analysis for Large Engineering Projects: Modeling Cost Uncertainty

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Dorp, Johan René

    Journal of Engineering Valuation and Cost Analysis, Vol. 2, pp. 285-301 1 Risk Analysis for Large Carlo simulation of activity networks has generated interest as a method for cost/schedule risk analysis risk analysis is now widely available as extensions to many popular project management

  2. A Low-cost and Modular, 20-DOF Anthropomorphic Robotic Hand: Design, Actuation and Modeling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Todorov, Emanuel

    -driven, anthropomorphic robotic hand. The prototyping process makes the most of 3D printing technology, and takes@cs.washington.edu Fig. 1. The 3D-printed 20-DOF anthropomorphic robotic hand. Many anthropomorphic robotic hands were

  3. QUANTIFYING THE EXTERNAL COSTS OF VEHICLE USE: EVIDENCE FROM AMERICA'S TOP SELLING LIGHT-DUTY MODELS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kockelman, Kara M.

    -selling passenger cars and light-duty trucks in the U.S. Among these external costs, those associated with crashes estimated for several other vehicles of particular interest, including GM's Hummer and several hybrid drive: small cars, mid-sized cars, large cars, luxury cars, crossover utility vehicles (CUVs), sport

  4. Modeling low cost hybrid tandem photovoltaics with the potential for efficiencies exceeding 20%

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McGehee, Michael

    shows that an organic solar cell may be added on top of a commercial CIGS cell to improve its efficiency% in order to keep installation costs down. In this work we explore a novel solar cell architecture, a hybrid of an inexpensive and low temperature processed solar cell, such as an organic or dye-sensitized solar cell

  5. Role of design complexity in technology improvement James McNerneya,b

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Redner, Sidney

    if the total cost of the clus- ter is lowered. We show that the relationship between the cost of the whole model for the evolution of the cost (or more generally the performance) of a technology or production consists of randomly changing the cost of each component in a cluster, and accepting the changes only

  6. Vehicle Cost Calculator

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    fuel cost and emissions with a conventional vehicle. Select FuelTechnology Electric Hybrid Electric Plug-in Hybrid Electric Natural Gas (CNG) Flex Fuel (E85) Biodiesel (B20)...

  7. Estimating Renewable Energy Costs

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Some renewable energy measures, such as daylighting, passive solar heating, and cooling load avoidance, do not add much to the cost of a building. However, renewable energy technologies typically...

  8. Model for a web based medical technology assessment system 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prabhu, Gopal

    1999-01-01

    would be able to compare and contrast existing medical technology. A central web site will be designed which clinical engineers/biomedical technicians can access. This web site will be used to interact with the database. When queried it will return HTML...

  9. The Future of Connective Technology: Greater Integration through Semantic Modeling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brock, David

    engineering from the Indian Institute of Technology, Kanpur and a master's degree in logistics from MIT. #12 to significant improvements in productivity, especially in the areas of logistics, supply chain management of Director, Affiliates Program in Logistics at the MIT Center for Transportation and Logistics

  10. Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Instrumentation, Measurement, and Computer Modeling Workshop

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The workshop brought together over 60 experts in marine energy technologies to disseminate technical information to the marine energy community, and to collect information to help identify ways in which the development of a commercially viable marine energy industry can be accelerated. The workshop was comprised of plenary sessions that reviewed the state of the marine energy industry.

  11. Preemptive scheduling with position costs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    In most scheduling models presented in the literature [3, 10], the cost for ... Preemptive scheduling in order to minimize the total position costs also stems.

  12. Market penetration of new energy technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Packey, D.J.

    1993-02-01

    This report examines the characteristics, advantages, disadvantages, and, for some, the mathematical formulas of forecasting methods that can be used to forecast the market penetration of renewable energy technologies. Among the methods studied are subjective estimation, market surveys, historical analogy models, cost models, diffusion models, time-series models, and econometric models. Some of these forecasting methods are more effective than others at different developmental stages of new technologies.

  13. Utilizing spatial technologies to understand and model wildlife species distributions 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daugherty, Brad Ellis

    2000-01-01

    The objective of this study was to utilize Geographic Information Systems (GIS), Remote Sensing, and the Global Positioning System (GPS) to develop and test an environmental model. The model was designed to predict, based ...

  14. Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Options in ISEEM Global Energy Model: 2010-2050 Scenario Analysis for Least-Cost Carbon Reduction in Iron and Steel Sector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Karali, Nihan; Xu, Tengfang; Sathaye, Jayant

    2013-12-01

    The goal of the modeling work carried out in this project was to quantify long-term scenarios for the future emission reduction potentials in the iron and steel sector. The main focus of the project is to examine the impacts of carbon reduction options in the U.S. iron and steel sector under a set of selected scenarios. In order to advance the understanding of carbon emission reduction potential on the national and global scales, and to evaluate the regional impacts of potential U.S. mitigation strategies (e.g., commodity and carbon trading), we also included and examined the carbon reduction scenarios in China’s and India’s iron and steel sectors in this project. For this purpose, a new bottom-up energy modeling framework, the Industrial Sector Energy Efficiency Modeling (ISEEM), (Karali et al. 2012) was used to provide detailed annual projections starting from 2010 through 2050. We used the ISEEM modeling framework to carry out detailed analysis, on a country-by-country basis, for the U.S., China’s, and India’s iron and steel sectors. The ISEEM model applicable to iron and steel section, called ISEEM-IS, is developed to estimate and evaluate carbon emissions scenarios under several alternative mitigation options - including policies (e.g., carbon caps), commodity trading, and carbon trading. The projections will help us to better understand emission reduction potentials with technological and economic implications. The database for input of ISEEM-IS model consists of data and information compiled from various resources such as World Steel Association (WSA), the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), China Steel Year Books, India Bureau of Mines (IBM), Energy Information Administration (EIA), and recent LBNL studies on bottom-up techno-economic analysis of energy efficiency measures in the iron and steel sector of the U.S., China, and India, including long-term steel production in China. In the ISEEM-IS model, production technology and manufacturing details are represented, in addition to the extensive data compiled from recent studies on bottom-up representation of efficiency measures for the sector. We also defined various mitigation scenarios including long-term production trends to project country-specific production, energy use, trading, carbon emissions, and costs of mitigation. Such analyses can provide useful information to assist policy-makers when considering and shaping future emissions mitigation strategies and policies. The technical objective is to analyze the costs of production and CO{sub 2} emission reduction in the U.S, China, and India’s iron and steel sectors under different emission reduction scenarios, using the ISEEM-IS as a cost optimization model. The scenarios included in this project correspond to various CO{sub 2} emission reduction targets for the iron and steel sector under different strategies such as simple CO{sub 2} emission caps (e.g., specific reduction goals), emission reduction via commodity trading, and emission reduction via carbon trading.

  15. IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON COMPONENTS, PACKAGING, AND MANUFACTURING TECHNOLOGY--PART C, VOL. 21, NO. 2, APRIL 1998 97 Material-Centric Modeling of PWB Fabrication

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sandborn, Peter

    processes. Index Terms-- Cost modeling, design-for-environment (DFE), design-to-cost, material, Associate Member, IEEE Abstract--This paper presents an activity-based cost model for printed wiring board-based manufacturing cost models, activities are based on equipment and facilities ("equipment

  16. GETEM -Geothermal Electricity Technology Evaluation Model | Department of

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergyTher i nA Guide to Tapping intoandMinimal Cost2-95) DATE OFGEAGENESISEnergy guide

  17. Watt-Sun: A Multi-Scale, Multi-Model, Machine-Learning Solar Forecasting Technology

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    As part of this project, new solar forecasting technology will be developed that leverages big data processing, deep machine learning, and cloud modeling integrated in a universal platform with an...

  18. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Validation of Material Models for Automotive Carbon Fiber Composite Structures

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by General Motors at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about validation of material models...

  19. Geospatial Science and Technology for Bioenergy Modeling the Sustainability of the National Bioenergy Infrastructure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Geospatial Science and Technology for Bioenergy Modeling the Sustainability of the National sensing, and geospatial data services. With High Performance Computing (HPC), global geospatial data: · Feasibility of sustainably producing biofuels · Reliability of biofuel production and distribution · Security

  20. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2015: BatPaC Model Development

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by Argonne National Laboratory at 2015 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about BatPaC model...

  1. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2015: Modeling for Light and Heavy Vehicle Market Analysis

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Presentation given by Energetics at 2015 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about modeling for light and heavy...

  2. Technology detail in a multi-sector CGE model : transport under climate policy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schafer, Andreas.

    A set of three analytical models is used to study the imbedding of specific transport technologies within a multi-sector, multi-region evaluation of constraints on greenhouse emissions. Key parameters of a computable general ...

  3. Environmental Cost Analysis 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Edge, D.

    2000-01-01

    Analysis David Edge Texas Natural Resource Conservation Commission 131 ESL-IE-00-04-21 Proceedings from the Twenty-second National Industrial Energy Technology Conference, Houston, TX, April 5-6, 2000 Tuas Natural Resource Conservation Cor...DDliuion Environmental Cost Analysis Presented By David Edge Determine the Costs c> Input co Output c> Hidden c> Capital (non recurring) Envirormenlal Cost Analy.;is "There has to be a measurable result ofimprovement and it should be tied to dollars...

  4. Geothermal Electricity Technology Evaluation Model (GETEM) | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View New PagesSustainable UrbanKentucky:Bore Technologies Inc Jump to: navigation,

  5. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Electrochemical Modeling of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on DeliciousMathematics And Statistics » USAJobs Search USAJobs SearchWater-SavingofCode&TechnologyDensityLMR-NMC

  6. A Cross-model Comparison of Global Long-term Technology Diffusion under a 2?C Climate Change Control Target

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    van der Zwaan, Bob; Rosler, Hilke; Kober, Tom; Aboumahboub, Tino; Calvin, Katherine V.; Gernaat, David; Marangoni, Giacomo; McCollum, David

    2013-11-01

    We investigate the long-term global energy technology diffusion patterns required to reach a stringent climate change target with a maximum average atmospheric temperature increase of 2°C. If the anthropogenic temperature increase is to be limited to 2°C, total CO2 emissions have to be reduced massively, so as to reach substantial negative values during the second half of the century. Particularly power sector CO2 emissions should become negative from around 2050 onwards according to most models used for this analysis in order to compensate for GHG emissions in other sectors where abatement is more costly. The annual additional capacity deployment intensity (expressed in GW/yr) for solar and wind energy until 2030 needs to be around that recently observed for coal-based power plants, and will have to be several times higher in the period 2030–2050. Relatively high agreement exists across models in terms of the aggregated low-carbon energy system cost requirements on the supply side until 2050, which amount to about 50 trillion US$.

  7. sustainable technologies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Junshan

    : · realize continuous improvements in performance (efficiency), cost and manufacturability of PV technologies, transformative PV technologies that circumvent cost/performance trade-offs and maintain compatibility with P the growing demand for energy. Photovoltaics (PV) leverages one of the 20th century's greatest scientific

  8. Operating Costs Estimates Cost Indices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boisvert, Jeff

    cost projections · Chemical Engineering (CE) Plant Construction Cost Index ­ Base value = 100 in 1957.0 in 2Q 2001 · Engineering News Record (ENR) · Nelson Refinery (NR) Construction Cost Index Cost Indices available for estimation are based upon the past · These data must be updated using cost indexes . · Cost

  9. Cost Benefit Analysis Modeling Tool for Electric vs. ICE Airport Ground Support Equipment – Development and Results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James Francfort; Kevin Morrow; Dimitri Hochard

    2007-02-01

    This report documents efforts to develop a computer tool for modeling the economic payback for comparative airport ground support equipment (GSE) that are propelled by either electric motors or gasoline and diesel engines. The types of GSE modeled are pushback tractors, baggage tractors, and belt loaders. The GSE modeling tool includes an emissions module that estimates the amount of tailpipe emissions saved by replacing internal combustion engine GSE with electric GSE. This report contains modeling assumptions, methodology, a user’s manual, and modeling results. The model was developed based on the operations of two airlines at four United States airports.

  10. Technologies

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorking With U.S. CoalMexico IndependentMatter and Technologies R&D

  11. Discrete Event Model Development of Pilot Plant Scale Microalgae Facilities: An Analysis of Productivity and Costs 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stepp, Justin Wayne

    2011-10-21

    ................................. 61 4.4.1.5 Contamination .................................................................. 62 4.4.1.6 Culture Transfer and Raceway/Mixer Maintenance ........ 64 4.4.1.6.1 Stepwise Model ................................................. 66 4....4.2.7 Culture Transfer and Raceway/Mixer Maintenance ........ 79 4.4.2.7.1 Stepwise Model ................................................. 80 4.4.2.7.2 Volume Batching Model ................................... 80 4.4.2.7.3 Intense Culturing Model...

  12. Carbon cost of plant nitrogen acquisition: A mechanistic, globally applicable model of plant nitrogen uptake, retranslocation,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Malhi, Yadvinder

    in the new generation of Earth system models that aim to describe the global N cycle. Citation: Fisher, J. B

  13. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Emissions Modeling: GREET

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:Financing ToolInternationalReport FY 2009,BiofuelsLetEnergy Vehicle Technologies OfficeforLife

  14. Advanced Methods for Incorporating Solar Energy Technologies into Electric Sector Capacity-Expansion Models: Literature Review and Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sullivan, P.; Eurek, K.; Margolis, R.

    2014-07-01

    Because solar power is a rapidly growing component of the electricity system, robust representations of solar technologies should be included in capacity-expansion models. This is a challenge because modeling the electricity system--and, in particular, modeling solar integration within that system--is a complex endeavor. This report highlights the major challenges of incorporating solar technologies into capacity-expansion models and shows examples of how specific models address those challenges. These challenges include modeling non-dispatchable technologies, determining which solar technologies to model, choosing a spatial resolution, incorporating a solar resource assessment, and accounting for solar generation variability and uncertainty.

  15. PHEV Battery Cost Assessment

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Program Modeling Advanced Li-ion Couples 13 Courtesy of Junbing Yang & K. Amine Graphite with LNMO and LMRNMC similar in cost and energy density LMRNMC shows synergy...

  16. Weighing the Costs and Benefits of State Renewables Portfolio Standards in the United States: A Comparative Analysis of State-Level Policy Impact Projections

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Cliff

    2009-01-01

    would stimulate wind technology cost reductions on theprojections of renewable technology costs, fossil fuel priceavailability. Renewable technology cost: Reflects changes to

  17. Weighing the Costs and Benefits of State Renewables Portfolio Standards in the United States: A Comparative Analysis of State-Level Policy Impact Projections

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Cliff

    2009-01-01

    New Jersey “high technology cost” scenario, which exceedsthan-expected solar technology costs would probably causeAvailability Renew able Technology Cost Fossil Fuel Price

  18. Three-Stage Production Cost Modeling Approach for Evaluating the Benefits of Intra-Hour Scheduling between Balancing Authorities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Samaan, Nader A.; Milligan, Michael; Hunsaker, Matthew; Guo, Tao

    2015-07-30

    This paper introduces a Production Cost Modeling (PCM) approach to evaluate the benefits of intra-hour scheduling between Balancing Authorities (BAs). The system operation is modeled in a three-stage sequential manner: day ahead (DA)-hour ahead (HA)-real time (RT). In addition to contingency reserve, each BA will need to carry out “up” and “down” load following and regulation reserve capacity requirements in the DA and HA time frames. In the real-time simulation, only contingency and regulation reserves are carried out as load following is deployed. To model current real-time operation with hourly schedules, a new constraint was introduced to force each BA net exchange schedule deviation from HA schedules to be within NERC ACE limits. Case studies that investigate the benefits of moving from hourly exchange schedules between WECC BAs into 10-min exchange schedules under two different levels of wind and solar penetration (11% and 33%) are presented.

  19. Development and application of performance and cost models for the externally-fired combined cycle. Task 1, Volume 2. Topical report, June 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Agarwal, P.; Frey, H. [North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh, NC (United States); Rubin, E.S. [Carnegie Mellon Univ., Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    1995-07-01

    Increasing restrictions on emission of pollutants from conventional pulverized coal fired steam (PCFS) plant generating electrical power is raising capital and operating cost of these plants and at the same time lowering plant efficiency. This is creating a need for alternative technologies which result in lower emissions of regulated pollutants and which are thermally more efficient. Natural gas-fired combined cycle power generation systems have lower capital cost and higher efficiencies than conventional coal fired steam plants, and at this time they are the leading contender for new power plant construction in the U.S. But the intermediate and long term cost of these fuels is high and there is uncertainty regarding their long-term price and availability. Coal is a relatively low cost fuel which will be abundantly available in the long term. This has motivated the development of advanced technologies for power production from coal which will have advantages of other fuels. The Externally Fired Combined Cycle (EFCC) is one such technology. Air pollution control/hot gas cleanup issues associated with this technology are described.

  20. Waste generation process modeling and analysis for fuel reprocessing technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kornreich, D. E. (Drew E.); Koehler, A. C. (Andrew C.); Farman, Richard F.

    2002-01-01

    Estimates of electric power generation requirements for the next century, even when taking the most conservative tack, indicate that the United States will have to increase its production capacity significantly. If the country determines that nuclear power will not be a significant component of this production capacity, the nuclear industry will have to die, as maintaining a small nuclear component will not be justifiable. However, if nuclear power is to be a significant component, it will probably require some form of reprocessing technology. The once-through fuel cycle is only feasible for a relatively small number of nuclear power plants. If we are maintaining several hundred reactors, the once-through fuel cycle is more expensive and ethically questionable.

  1. THE TRUE COST OF PAIR PROGRAMMING: DEVELOPMENT OF A COMPREHENSIVE MODEL AND TEST

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sun, Wenying

    2011-09-19

    To advance the nomological net and theory, this dissertation proposed a comprehensive pair programming research model where the relationships among system complexity, programming methods, pair composition, effort, duration, ...

  2. Optimal Technology Investment and Operation in Zero-Net-Energy Buildings with Demand Response

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stadler, Michael

    2009-01-01

    examples due to higher technology costs. To be presented atwe find that at current technology costs, the nursing homeconsidered, and current technology costs from Section 3.2

  3. Project Title Improved Emission Models for Project Evaluation (MOVES-Matrix) University Georgia Institute of Technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Davis, University of

    Project Title Improved Emission Models for Project Evaluation (MOVES-Matrix) University Georgia or organization) DOT - $92,292.15 Total Project Cost $92,292.15 Agency ID or Contract Number DTRT13-G-UTC29 Start and End Dates November 1, 2013 ­ June 30, 2015 Brief Description of Research Project Local governments

  4. Enrichment Talk -The Biotech Company in the 21st New Models and Strategies for developing Science and Technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    technologies covered with the digital and supercomputing age has spawned new opportunities in the biotech arena sectors and new models for growth and development of science and technology - how entrepreneurship and commercialization - introduce both theory and practice, new models for commercialization of science and technology

  5. A Model of Marketing Oriented Corporate Culture Influences on Information Technology Adoption

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A Model of Marketing Oriented Corporate Culture Influences on Information Technology Adoption Kofi-9792; kofi.poku@kodak.com 2 Richard P. Vlosky, Ph.D, Professor, Forest Products Marketing and Director a model to investigate the influence of corporate orientation (marketing orientation) on Internet adoption

  6. Modeling Energy Use and Technological Change for Policy Makers: Campbell Watkins'

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    31 Modeling Energy Use and Technological Change for Policy Makers: Campbell Watkins' Contribution to Campbell, I survey the last 30 years of modeling energy use for assisting policy makers, an area where his buys more efficient fridges, we use less energy. We have substituted capital (in the form

  7. SpaceWire model development technology for satellite architecture.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eldridge, John M.; Leemaster, Jacob Edward; Van Leeuwen, Brian P.

    2011-09-01

    Packet switched data communications networks that use distributed processing architectures have the potential to simplify the design and development of new, increasingly more sophisticated satellite payloads. In addition, the use of reconfigurable logic may reduce the amount of redundant hardware required in space-based applications without sacrificing reliability. These concepts were studied using software modeling and simulation, and the results are presented in this report. Models of the commercially available, packet switched data interconnect SpaceWire protocol were developed and used to create network simulations of data networks containing reconfigurable logic with traffic flows for timing system distribution.

  8. A Cost Model for Communication on a Symmetric MultiProcessor \\Lambda

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dale, Lucia K.

    ], who introduced the Bulk­Synchronous Parallel (BSP) model. The model abstracts a parallel machine in part by NATOCRG 961243 ``Bulk SynchronousComputational Geometry,'' and by the National Center algorithms exhibit poor performance when implemented on real machines. This is due not only to the intrinsic

  9. AN ARTIFICIAL NEURAL NETWORK FOR DIMENSIONS AND COST MODELLING OF INTERNAL MICRO-CHANNELS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Hyowon

    of training data should be used, the model that used Face-Centred Cubic (FCC) Design for selecting the ANN training data sets were obtained by Design of Experiments (DoE) methodology. A 33 factorial design criteria were used for comparing the performance of the ANN predictive models. The comparison showed

  10. Argonne National Laboratory Smart Grid Technology Interactive Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ted Bohn

    2009-10-13

    As our attention turns to new cars that run partially or completely on electricity, how can we redesign our electric grid to not only handle the new load, but make electricity cheap and efficient for everyone? Argonne engineer Ted Bohn explains a model of a "smart grid" that gives consumers the power to choose their own prices and sources of electricity.

  11. Argonne National Laboratory Smart Grid Technology Interactive Model

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Ted Bohn

    2010-01-08

    As our attention turns to new cars that run partially or completely on electricity, how can we redesign our electric grid to not only handle the new load, but make electricity cheap and efficient for everyone? Argonne engineer Ted Bohn explains a model of a "smart grid" that gives consumers the power to choose their own prices and sources of electricity.

  12. Wind Integration Cost and Cost-Causation: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Milligan, M.; Kirby, B.; Holttinen, H.; Kiviluoma, J.; Estanqueiro, A.; Martin-Martinez, S.; Gomez-Lazaro, E.; Peneda, I.; Smith, C.

    2013-10-01

    The question of wind integration cost has received much attention in the past several years. The methodological challenges to calculating integration costs are discussed in this paper. There are other sources of integration cost unrelated to wind energy. A performance-based approach would be technology neutral, and would provide price signals for all technology types. However, it is difficult to correctly formulate such an approach. Determining what is and is not an integration cost is challenging. Another problem is the allocation of system costs to one source. Because of significant nonlinearities, this can prove to be impossible to determine in an accurate and objective way.

  13. Analytical study and cost modeling of secondary aluminum consumption for alloy producers under uncertain demands

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Yaoqi

    2008-01-01

    A series of case studies on raw materials inventory strategy for both wrought and cast aluminum alloy productions were conducted under recourse-based modeling framework with the explicit considerations of the demand ...

  14. Sporting Good Manufacturing Company: Optimal Manufacturing and Shipping Cost Through Linear Programming Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Malik, Ejaz

    2009-05-15

    total manufacturing capacity. Data regarding the factory workers, machines, warehouse staff, and scheduling were not relevant and, therefore, were not considered in the creation of the linear programming model. All of the basic steps of generating a...

  15. Production Cost Modeling of Cogenerators in an Interconnected Electric Supply System 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ragsdale, K.

    1989-01-01

    of various electric supply system configurations necessary to appropriately model the present and future cogeneration activity in the service areas of the electric utilities that compose the Electric Reliability Council of Texas (ERCOT)....

  16. Modeling Solar Energy Technology Evolution breakout session | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankADVANCED MANUFACTURING OFFICESpecialAPPENDIX F Wetlandsof Energy Model RepairCladdings: A

  17. An Approach to Technology Risk Management Ricardo Valerdi

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Weck, Olivier L.

    in parametric cost estimation models. Introduction The rapid change of Information Technology has madeAn Approach to Technology Risk Management Ricardo Valerdi USC Center for Software Engineering 941 W Symposium MIT, Cambridge, MA, March 29-31, 2004 ABSTRACT NASA's Technology Readiness Levels (TRL) approach

  18. Bounding the marginal cost of producing potable water including the use of seawater desalinization as a backstop potable water production technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dooley, James J.

    2014-04-01

    The analysis presented in this technical report should allow for the creation of high, medium, and low cost potable water prices for GCAM. Seawater reverse osmosis (SWRO) based desalinization should act as a backstop for the cost of producing potable water (i.e., the literature seems clear that SWRO should establish an upper bound for the plant gate cost of producing potable water). Transporting water over significant distances and having to lift water to higher elevations to reach end-users can also have a significant impact on the cost of producing water. The three potable fresh water scenarios describe in this technical report are: low cost water scenario ($0.10/m3); medium water cost scenario ($1.00/m3); and high water cost scenario ($2.50/m3).

  19. Overlay Costs National Concrete Consortium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Overlay Costs National Concrete Consortium TTCC April 6, 2010 Savannah, Georgia Gary Fick Representing The National Concrete Pavement Technology Center #12;Overlay Cost Tech Brief · Developed to address common questions we have received during our implementation efforts #12;Overlay Cost Tech Brief

  20. Defect Engineering, Cell Processing, and Modeling for High-Performance, Low-Cost Crystalline Silicon Photovoltaics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buonassisi, Tonio

    2013-02-26

    The objective of this project is to close the efficiency gap between industrial multicrystalline silicon (mc-Si) and monocrystalline silicon solar cells, while preserving the economic advantage of low-cost, high-volume substrates inherent to mc-Si. Over the course of this project, we made significant progress toward this goal, as evidenced by the evolution in solar-cell efficiencies. While most of the benefits of university projects are diffuse in nature, several unique contributions can be traced to this project, including the development of novel characterization methods, defect-simulation tools, and novel solar-cell processing approaches mitigate the effects of iron impurities ("Impurities to Efficiency" simulator) and dislocations. In collaboration with our industrial partners, this project contributed to the development of cell processing recipes, specialty materials, and equipment that increased cell efficiencies overall (not just multicrystalline silicon). Additionally, several students and postdocs who were either partially or fully engaged in this project (as evidenced by the publication record) are currently in the PV industry, with others to follow.

  1. Machine Learning with Operational Costs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rudin, Cynthia

    This work proposes a way to align statistical modeling with decision making. We provide a method that propagates the uncertainty in predictive modeling to the uncertainty in operational cost, where operational cost is the ...

  2. JOURNAL OF LIGHTWAVE TECHNOLOGY, VOL. 27, NO. 3, FEBRUARY 1, 2009 243 Evolution of WDM Optical IP Networks: A Cost and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shihada, Basem

    with less-well-proven technologies, especially if there is no alternate supplier. An additional factor

  3. Vehicle Technologies Office: Modeling and Simulation | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirley Ann Jackson About1996HowFOAShowingFuel Efficiency & Emissions » VehicleModeling, Testing,

  4. Model Year 2006: Alternative Fuel and Advanced Technology Vehicles

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home PageBlender PumpVehiclesThe Heat Letter to Science of 2Model

  5. The cost of gauge coupling unification in the SU(5) model at three loops

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    L. Mihaila

    2013-05-14

    The non-supersymmetric SU(5) model can accommodate heavy neutrinos and gauge coupling unification when augmented with an adjoint fermionic multiplet 24_F. Among the most important phenomenological implications of the model is the prediction of light fermions and scalars, charged under the SU(2) gauge group, in the reach of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). In this talk, we report on the recent calculation of the correlation function between the mass scale of the new electroweak multiplets and the gauge coupling unification scale at three loop accuracy.

  6. Awareness and Movement vs. the Spread of Epidemics - Analyzing a Dynamic Model for Urban Social/Technological Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Elsässer, Robert

    2011-01-01

    We consider the spread of epidemics in technological and social networks. How do people react? Does awareness and cautious behavior help? We analyze these questions and present a dynamic model to describe the movement of individuals and/or their mobile devices in a certain (idealistic) urban environment. Furthermore, our model incorporates the fact that different locations can accommodate a different number of people (possibly with their mobile devices), who may pass the infection to each other. We obtain two main results. First, we prove that w.r.t. our model at least a small part of the system will remain uninfected even if no countermeasures are taken. The second result shows that with certain counteractions in use, which only influence the individuals' behavior, a prevalent epidemic can be avoided. The results explain possible courses of a disease, and point out why cost-efficient countermeasures may reduce the number of total infections from a high percentage of the population to a negligible fraction.

  7. Spatial Correlation Modeling For Probe Test Cost Reduction in RF Devices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Makris, Yiorgos

    ), introduce new alternative tests [1], [2], or build machine learning models to learn classification boundaries separating passing and failing populations of devices [3], [4]. Permission to make digital or hard to lists, requires prior specific permission and/or a fee. IEEE/ACM International Conference on Computer-Aided

  8. Modelling pulsed releases for sterile insect techniques: fitness costs of sterile and transgenic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rohani, Pej

    the focus of our models are based on the mosquito, A. aegypti, which can spread yellow fever, dengue fever-words: Aedes aegypti, biological control, dengue fever, fitness, population cycles, RIDL, SIT, transgenic males and the effects on mosquito dynamics Steven M. White1 *, Pejman Rohani2,3,4 and Steven M. Sait1 1

  9. Universal model for water costs of gas exchange by animals and plants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of the respiratory system near the outside of the organism, the gas consumed (oxygen or carbon dioxide meta- bolic and exchange systems. carbon dioxide | oxygen | respiration | temperature | scaling All for specific taxa, we integrate properties common to all terrestrial gas exchangers into a universal model

  10. Project Profile: Forecasting and Influencing Technological Progress...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    R&D translates into improved performance and reduced costs for energy technologies. Motivation Technological forecasts, which plot the anticipated performance and costs of...

  11. Calculating Wind Integration Costs: Separating Wind Energy Value from Integration Cost Impacts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Milligan, M.; Kirby, B.

    2009-07-01

    Accurately calculating integration costs is important so that wind generation can be fairly compared with alternative generation technologies.

  12. Modeling of GE Appliances: Cost Benefit Study of Smart Appliances in Wholesale Energy, Frequency Regulation, and Spinning Reserve Markets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fuller, Jason C.; Parker, Graham B.

    2012-12-31

    This report is the second in a series of three reports describing the potential of GE’s DR-enabled appliances to provide benefits to the utility grid. The first report described the modeling methodology used to represent the GE appliances in the GridLAB-D simulation environment and the estimated potential for peak demand reduction at various deployment levels. The third report will explore the technical capability of aggregated group actions to positively impact grid stability, including frequency and voltage regulation and spinning reserves, and the impacts on distribution feeder voltage regulation, including mitigation of fluctuations caused by high penetration of photovoltaic distributed generation. In this report, a series of analytical methods were presented to estimate the potential cost benefit of smart appliances while utilizing demand response. Previous work estimated the potential technical benefit (i.e., peak reduction) of smart appliances, while this report focuses on the monetary value of that participation. The effects on wholesale energy cost and possible additional revenue available by participating in frequency regulation and spinning reserve markets were explored.

  13. Renewable Energy and Efficiency Modeling Analysis Partnership: An Analysis of How Different Energy Models Addressed a Common High Renewable Energy Penetration Scenario in 2025

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blair, N.

    2010-01-01

    a clear statement of technology and cost assumptions—becomesincluding those for technology costs, fuels costs, andassumptions about technology cost and market assumptions is

  14. Hydrogen Pathways: Cost, Well-to-Wheels Energy Use, and Emissions for the Current Technology Status of Seven Hydrogen Production, Delivery, and Distribution Scenarios

    Fuel Cell Technologies Publication and Product Library (EERE)

    Report of levelized cost in 2005 U.S. dollars, energy use, and GHG emission benefits of seven hydrogen production, delivery, and distribution pathways.

  15. Hydrogen Pathways: Cost, Well-to-Wheels Energy Use, and Emissions for the Current Technology Status of Seven Hydrogen Production, Delivery, and Distribution Scenarios

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ruth, M.; Laffen, M.; Timbario, T. A.

    2009-09-01

    Report of levelized cost in 2005 U.S. dollars, energy use, and GHG emission benefits of seven hydrogen production, delivery, and distribution pathways.

  16. Hydrogen Pathways. Cost, Well-to-Wheels Energy Use, and Emissions for the Current Technology Status of Seven Hydrogen Production, Delivery, and Distribution Scenarios

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ruth, Mark; Laffen, Melissa; Timbario, Thomas A.

    2009-09-01

    Report of levelized cost in 2005 U.S. dollars, energy use, and GHG emission benefits of seven hydrogen production, delivery, and distribution pathways.

  17. Modeling the Performance and Cost of Lithium-Ion Batteries for

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfate Reducing(JournalspectroscopyReport)Fermentative Activity onConnect Modeling ofElectric-Drive

  18. Modeling the Performance and Cost of Lithium-Ion Batteries for

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfate Reducing(JournalspectroscopyReport)Fermentative Activity onConnect Modeling

  19. Modeling principles and computing technology for high-speed simulation of LWR transients

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wulff, W.; Cheng, H.S.; Mallen, A.N.

    1986-01-01

    The plant analyzer recently developed at Brookhaven National Laboratory embodies the unique combination of high simulation fidelity, with convenient interactive access, much faster than real-time simulation speed and low cost. This has been achieved through a deliberate match of modeling techniques with modern, special-purpose minicomputer architecture, designed for high-speed simulations of complex systems. The BNL Plant Analyzer is a powerful engineering tool for carrying out, routinely and cost-effectively, safety analyses, optimizations of procedures, parametric studies to obtain safety margins and for generic training. It is also applicable for operator assistance through plant performance monitoring, automatic fault diagnostics and on-line support during emergencies. This paper presents five modeling principles, the criteria for selecting numerical integration techniques and the key features of the special-purpose peripheral processor, the AD10 of Applied Dynamics International. The paper presentation is followed by a remote access demonstration of the plant analyzer.

  20. Structural health and prognostics management for offshore wind turbines : case studies of rotor fault and blade damage with initial O&M cost modeling.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Myrent, Noah J.; Kusnick, Joshua F.; Barrett, Natalie C.; Adams, Douglas E.; Griffith, Daniel Todd

    2013-04-01

    Operations and maintenance costs for offshore wind plants are significantly higher than the current costs for land-based (onshore) wind plants. One way to reduce these costs would be to implement a structural health and prognostic management (SHPM) system as part of a condition based maintenance paradigm with smart load management and utilize a state-based cost model to assess the economics associated with use of the SHPM system. To facilitate the development of such a system a multi-scale modeling approach developed in prior work is used to identify how the underlying physics of the system are affected by the presence of damage and faults, and how these changes manifest themselves in the operational response of a full turbine. This methodology was used to investigate two case studies: (1) the effects of rotor imbalance due to pitch error (aerodynamic imbalance) and mass imbalance and (2) disbond of the shear web; both on a 5-MW offshore wind turbine in the present report. Based on simulations of damage in the turbine model, the operational measurements that demonstrated the highest sensitivity to the damage/faults were the blade tip accelerations and local pitching moments for both imbalance and shear web disbond. The initial cost model provided a great deal of insight into the estimated savings in operations and maintenance costs due to the implementation of an effective SHPM system. The integration of the health monitoring information and O&M cost versus damage/fault severity information provides the initial steps to identify processes to reduce operations and maintenance costs for an offshore wind farm while increasing turbine availability, revenue, and overall profit.