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1

Help:FormattingResults | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

FormattingResults FormattingResults Jump to: navigation, search Contents 1 UL 2 Google Pie Charts 3 Outline 4 Calendar 5 Timeline 6 Gallery 7 Google Map 8 Geochart Ask Queries are used to pull results from semantic wiki content and can be displayed in a variety of formats. This page lists examples of the more common formats with the code used to generate them and when applicable, links to eternal help documents describing the options available for each format. When writing an ask query, one specifies the format with |format=. The examples below contain the ask query code used to generate them, including the format declaration. UL BioPower Atlas and BioFuels Atlas Biomass Energy Data Book CLIMWAT 2.0 CROPWAT 8.0 {{#ask:[[Category:Tools]] [[ProgramTopics::Resource assessment]] [[ProgramResources::Dataset]]

2

result formats | OpenEI Community  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

result formats Home Jweers's picture Submitted by Jweers(83) Contributor 16 May, 2013 - 14:22 Multicolor Maps from Compound Queries ask queries compound queries developer Google...

3

Investigation of Droplet Size Distributions and Drizzle Formation Using a New Trajectory Ensemble Model. Part I: Model Description and First Results in a Nonmixing Limit  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A novel trajectory ensemble model of a stratocumulus cloud is described. In this model, the boundary layer (BL) is fully covered by a great number of Lagrangian air parcels that during their motion can contain either wet aerosols or aerosols and ...

M. Pinsky; L. Magaritz; A. Khain; O. Krasnov; A. Sterkin

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Annual Energy Outlook 2000 - Model Results & Report  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Forecasts Summary of the AEO2001 Cases Scenarios - Appendix Table G1 bullet1.gif (843 bytes) Model Results (Formats - PDF, ZIP) - Appendix Tables - Reference Case - 1998 to 2020...

5

VALIDATION AND RESULTS OF A PSEUDO-MULTI-ZONE COMBUSTION TRAJECTORY PREDICTION MODEL FOR CAPTURING SOOT AND NOX FORMATION ON A MEDIUM DUTY DIESEL ENGINE  

SciTech Connect

A pseudo-multi-zone phenomenological model has been created with the ultimate goal of supporting efforts to enable broader commercialization of low temperature combustion modes in diesel engines. The benefits of low temperature combustion are the simultaneous reduction in soot and nitric oxide emissions and increased engine efficiency if combustion is properly controlled. Determining what qualifies as low temperature combustion for any given engine can be difficult without expensive emissions analysis equipment. This determination can be made off-line using computer models or through factory calibration procedures. This process could potentially be simplified if a real-time prediction model could be implemented to run for any engine platform this is the motivation for this study. The major benefit of this model is the ability for it to predict the combustion trajectory, i.e. local temperature and equivalence ratio in the burning zones. The model successfully captures all the expected trends based on the experimental data and even highlights an opportunity for simply using the average reaction temperature and equivalence ratio as an indicator of emissions levels alone - without solving formation sub-models. This general type of modeling effort is not new, but a major effort was made to minimize the calculation duration to enable implementation as an input to real-time next-cycle engine controller Instead of simply using the predicted engine out soot and NOx levels, control decisions could be made based on the trajectory. This has the potential to save large amounts of calibration time because with minor tuning (the model has only one automatically determined constant) it is hoped that the control algorithm would be generally applicable.

Bittle, Joshua A. [Texas A& M University] [Texas A& M University; Gao, Zhiming [ORNL] [ORNL; Jacobs, Timothy J. [Texas A& M University] [Texas A& M University

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

VEMAP 2: Selected Model Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Model Results Model Results The ORNL DAAC announces the release of two data sets from Phase 2 of the Vegetation/Ecosystem Modeling and Analysis Project (VEMAP). The two data sets contain monthly and annual results, respectively, from experiments conducted to compare the ecological responses of the suite of VEMAP models to projected transient scenarios of climate and atmospheric carbon dioxide for the period 1994 to 2100. The models investigated included five biogeochemical cycling models, which simulate plant production and nutrient cycles but rely on a static land-cover type, and two dynamic global vegetation models (DGVMs), which combine biogeochemical cycling processes with dynamic biogeographical processes including succession and fire simulation. VEMAP was an international project studying the response of biogeochemical

7

Marked correlations in galaxy formation models  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The two-point correlation function has been the standard statistic for quantifying how galaxies are clustered. The statistic uses the positions of galaxies, but not their properties. Clustering as a function of galaxy property, be it type, luminosity, color, etc., is usually studied by analysing a subset of the full population, the galaxies in the subset chosen because they have a similar range of properties. We explore an alternative technique---marked correlations---in which one weights galaxies by some property or `mark' when measuring clustering statistics. Marked correlations are particularly well-suited to quantifying how the properties of galaxies correlate with their environment. Therefore, measurements of marked statistics, with luminosity, stellar mass, color, star-formation rate, etc. as the mark, permit sensitive tests of galaxy formation models. We make measurements of such marked statistics in semi-analytic galaxy formation models to illustrate their utility. These measurements show that close pairs of galaxies are expected to be red, to have larger stellar masses, and to have smaller star formation rates. We also show that the simplest unbiased estimator of the particular marked statistic we use extensively is very simple to measure---it does not require construction of a random catalog---and provide an estimate of its variance. Large wide-field surveys of the sky are revolutionizing our view of galaxies and how they evolve. Our results indicate that application of marked statistics to this high quantity of high-quality data will provide a wealth of information about galaxy formation.

Ravi K. Sheth; Andrew J. Connolly; Ramin Skibba

2005-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

8

Concept formation using incremental Gaussian mixture models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents a new algorithm for incremental concept formation based on a Bayesian framework. The algorithm, called IGMM (for Incremental Gaussian Mixture Model), uses a probabilistic approach for modeling the environment, and so, it can rely ... Keywords: Bayesian methods, EM algorithm, clustering, concept formation, finite mixtures, incremental learning, unsupervised learning

Paulo Martins Engel; Milton Roberto Heinen

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

The Uflow Computational Model and Intermediate Format  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This report motivates and defines a general-purpose, architecture independent, parallel computational model, which captures the intuitions which underlie the design of the United Functions and Objects programming language. The model has two aspects, which turn out to be a traditional dataflow model and an actor-like model, with a very simple interface between the two. Certain aspects of the model, particularly strictness, maximum parallelism, and lack of suspension are stressed. The implications of introducing stateful objects are carefully spelled out. The model has several purposes, although we largely describe it as it would be used for visualising the execution of programs. The model is embodied in a textual intermediate format, and in a set of UFO data structures. This report also serves as a definition of the intermediate format, and gives a brief overview of the data structures. 1 Introduction This report serves two purposes. Firstly, in sections 1 to 9, the Uflow computational...

John Sargeant; Chris Kirkham; Steve Anderson

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Annual Energy Outlook with Projections to 2025-Model Results  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 with Projections to 2025 Data Tables Adobe Acrobat Reader Logo Adobe Acrobat Reader is required for PDF format MS Excel Viewer Spreadsheets are provided in excel Model Results in...

11

Annual Energy Outlook with Projections to 2025-Model Results  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5 with Projections to 2025 Data Tables Adobe Acrobat Reader Logo Adobe Acrobat Reader is required for PDF format MS Excel Viewer Spreadsheets are provided in excel Model Results in...

12

Lisburne Formation fracture characterization and flow modeling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Evaluation of fractured reservoirs for fluid flow and optimal well placement is often very complicated. In general, fractures enhance permeability and increase access to matrix surface, but their random aspects create difficulties for analysis and performance prediction. Each reservoir has unique aspects which require individual assessment. This study examined fracture properties in a part of the Carboniferous Lisburne Formation. Field study of outcrops yielded information on two sets of large-scale fractures (NNW and ENE orientations) from the lower Wahoo Limestone in the eastern Sadlerochit Mountains. Several statistical methods were used on these data to find appropriate models describing the megafracture properties. For NNW fracture height and ENE fracture spacing, the gamma model appears to adequately describe the distribution. NNW fracture spacing and ENE fracture height are lognormally distributed. Results of the statistical analyses were used as input for fracture set generation and modeling using "FracMan". Modeling different borehole orientations in the fractured domain revealed that horizontal wells with 60? azimuth have an optimal trajectory, resulting in the maximum number and area of fracture connections. The orientation maximizing the number of fracture connections did not necessarily give the maximum area. Conductivity analysis showed that the fracture network is weakly anisotropic and above the percolation threshold. The fracture conductance is strongly dependent on the NNW fracture set; larger fractures influence fluid flow more than smaller fractures. Fracture strike and dip variability increased the system interconnectivity, but did not affect the optimal wellbore orientation. Incorporating ENE fracture termination against the NNW fractures decreased the system conductance and shifted the optimal wellbore trajectory towards the direction perpendicular to the NNW set. Reservoir engineering implications of this study include: guidelines for optimal wellbore orientations, the relative placement of injectors and producers along the bisectors between the two fracture sets, and the importance of including fracture terminations. Further work should investigate the influence of variations in fracture aperture and transmissivities, and drainage area, and extend the analysis to additional units of the Lisburne Group.

Karpov, Alexandre Valerievich

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Hydropower Resource Assessment Modeling Results  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Hydropower Evaluation Software uses the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission?s Hydroelectric Power Resource Assessment database to identify sites with undeveloped hydropower capacity and the estimated megawatts of undeveloped capacity at each site. The software integrates this information with environmental values from the National Park Service?s National Rivers Inventory database. Other constraints to development that are modeled include Federal and state legislative protection for river segments that have been identified as being wild and scenic river segments. River segments containing threatened and/or endangered wildlife and fish are also modeled for their influence on hydropower development. The amount that each attribute affects the likelihood of development is dependent on the prior development of a site.

A. M. Conner; J. E. Francfort

1999-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

14

Annual Energy Outlook 1999 - Model Results & Report  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

results.gif (6669 bytes) AEO99 Report Available Formats Entire AEO Report as Printed (PDF, 2.2MB) Overview (PDF, 132KB) Legislation and Regulations (PDF, 96KB) Issues in Focus...

15

Engineering Glass Passivation Layers -Model Results  

SciTech Connect

The immobilization of radioactive waste into glass waste forms is a baseline process of nuclear waste management not only in the United States, but worldwide. The rate of radionuclide release from these glasses is a critical measure of the quality of the waste form. Over long-term tests and using extrapolations of ancient analogues, it has been shown that well designed glasses exhibit a dissolution rate that quickly decreases to a slow residual rate for the lifetime of the glass. The mechanistic cause of this decreased corrosion rate is a subject of debate, with one of the major theories suggesting that the decrease is caused by the formation of corrosion products in such a manner as to present a diffusion barrier on the surface of the glass. Although there is much evidence of this type of mechanism, there has been no attempt to engineer the effect to maximize the passivating qualities of the corrosion products. This study represents the first attempt to engineer the creation of passivating phases on the surface of glasses. Our approach utilizes interactions between the dissolving glass and elements from the disposal environment to create impermeable capping layers. By drawing from other corrosion studies in areas where passivation layers have been successfully engineered to protect the bulk material, we present here a report on mineral phases that are likely have a morphological tendency to encrust the surface of the glass. Our modeling has focused on using the AFCI glass system in a carbonate, sulfate, and phosphate rich environment. We evaluate the minerals predicted to form to determine the likelihood of the formation of a protective layer on the surface of the glass. We have also modeled individual ions in solutions vs. pH and the addition of aluminum and silicon. These results allow us to understand the pH and ion concentration dependence of mineral formation. We have determined that iron minerals are likely to form a complete incrustation layer and we plan to look more closely at Vivianite [Fe3(PO4)2-8(H2O)] and Siderite [FeCO3] in the next stage of the project.

Skorski, Daniel C.; Ryan, Joseph V.; Strachan, Denis M.; Lepry, William C.

2011-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

16

Toy Models for Galaxy Formation versus Simulations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We describe simple useful toy models for key processes of galaxy formation in its most active phase, at z > 1, and test the approximate expressions against the typical behaviour in a suite of high-resolution hydro-cosmological simulations of massive galaxies at z = 4-1. We address in particular the evolution of (a) the total mass inflow rate from the cosmic web into galactic haloes based on the EPS approximation, (b) the penetration of baryonic streams into the inner galaxy, (c) the disc size, (d) the implied steady-state gas content and star-formation rate (SFR) in the galaxy subject to mass conservation and a universal star-formation law, (e) the inflow rate within the disc to a central bulge and black hole as derived using energy conservation and self-regulated Q ~ 1 violent disc instability (VDI), and (f) the implied steady state in the disc and bulge. The toy models provide useful approximations for the behaviour of the simulated galaxies. We find that (a) the inflow rate is proportional to mass and to (...

Dekel, A; Tweed, D; Cacciato, M; Ceverino, D; Primack, J R

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Fracturing results in diatomaceous earth formations, South Belridge Field, California  

SciTech Connect

The company began fracturing diatomaceous earth zones in the San Joaquin Valley (CA) in 1976. Fracturing has proved an effective method of exploiting these previously noncommercial reservoirs. Nevertheless, productivity behavior is typified by high initial rates followed by rapid decline. Reasons for this decline have been evaluated and are discussed. Also discussed are laboratory experiments performed to determine an appropriate fracture design for this formation.

Strubhar, M.K.; Andreani, F.S.; Medlin, W.L.; Nabi, S.M.

1984-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

STRUCTURE FORMATION IN THE SYMMETRON MODEL  

SciTech Connect

Scalar fields, strongly coupled to matter, can be present in nature and still be invisible to local experiments if they are subject to a screening mechanism. The symmetron is one such mechanism that relies on restoration of a spontaneously broken symmetry in regions of high density to shield the scalar fifth force. We have investigated structure formation in the symmetron model by using N-body simulations and find observable signatures in both the linear and nonlinear matter power spectrum and on the halo mass function. The mechanism for suppressing the scalar fifth force in high-density regions is also found to work very well.

Davis, Anne-Christine; Li Baojiu [DAMTP, Centre for Mathematical Sciences, University of Cambridge, Wilberforce Road, Cambridge CB3 0WA (United Kingdom); Mota, David F.; Winther, Hans A. [Institute of Theoretical Astrophysics, University of Oslo, 0315 Oslo (Norway)

2012-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

19

Fracturing results in diatomaceous earth formations, South Belridge Field, California  

SciTech Connect

Fracturing significantly increases light oil production rates at South Belridge making this an economically successful technique for exploitation of the Reef Ridge reservoir. No fracturing mechanics problems were encountered in any of the treatments. The loosely consolidated formations behaved mechanically much like brittle, elastic rocks. Net oil and gross production is typified by initial high rates and an early rapid decline. The major cause of this early rapid decline is the transient flow effect. This behavior is typical of low permeability oil and gas production. Fractures are vertical, as shown by gamma ray and temperature logs run following several treatments. The fractures grow slightly out of the perforated intervals (10 to 15 feet). Loss of fracture conductivity due to fines migration, scale deposition, and/or fracture healing (imbedment) is not a serious problem. Oil viscosity can vary as much as ten-fold. Some wells produce significant amounts of gas--100 to 200 MCFPD initially. The formation is primarily diatomaceous earth which is very fine particle size siliceous material composed of whole or fragmented diatom tests (skeletons). There is no evidence that clay swelling or dispersion is a problem. Field and laboratory data support this conclusion. Aqueous fracturing fluids were successfully used which confirmed laboratory tests on cores.

Strubhar, M.K.; Medin, W.L.

1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

A PKN Hydraulic Fracture Model Study and Formation Permeability Determination  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Hydraulic fracturing is an important method used to enhance the recovery of oil and gas from reservoirs, especially for low permeability formations. The distribution of pressure in fractures and fracture geometry are needed to design conventional and unconventional hydraulic fracturing operations, fracturing during water-flooding of petroleum reservoirs, shale gas, and injection/extraction operation in a geothermal reservoir. Designing a hydraulic fracturing job requires an understanding of fracture growth as a function of treatment parameters. There are various models used to approximately define the development of fracture geometry, which can be broadly classified into 2D and 3D categories. 2D models include, the Perkins-Kern-Nordgren (PKN) fracture model, and the Khristianovic-Geertsma-de. Klerk (KGD) fracture model, and the radial model. 3D models include fully 3D models and pseudo-three-dimensional (P-3D) models. The P-3D model is used in the oil industry due to its simplification of height growth at the wellbore and along the fracture length in multi-layered formations. In this research, the Perkins-Kern-Nordgren (PKN) fracture model is adopted to simulate hydraulic fracture propagation and recession, and the pressure changing history. Two different approaches to fluid leak-off are considered, which are the classical Carter's leak-off theory with a constant leak-off coefficient, and Pressure-dependent leak-off theory. Existence of poroelastic effect in the reservoir is also considered. By examining the impact of leak-off models and poroelastic effects on fracture geometry, the influence of fracturing fluid and rock properties, and the leak-off rate on the fracture geometry and fracturing pressure are described. A short and wide fracture will be created when we use the high viscosity fracturing fluid or the formation has low shear modulus. While, the fracture length, width, fracturing pressure, and the fracture closure time increase as the fluid leak-off coefficient is decreased. In addition, an algorithm is developed for the post-fracture pressure-transient analysis to calculate formation permeability. The impulse fracture pressure transient model is applied to calculate the formation permeability both for the radial flow and linear fracture flow assumption. Results show a good agreement between this study and published work.

Xiang, Jing

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "model results formats" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Modeling trihalomethane formation potential from wastewater chlorination. Master's thesis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The deletion of federally mandated fecal coliform limits has led many states to review and modify their wastewater disinfection requirements. One issue in analyzing wastewater disinfection is the discharge of potentially carcinogenic halogenated organics formed during the chlorination process. This research investigates the formation of one class of the halogenated organics, the trihalomethanes. The applicability of using drinking water trihalomethane formation models for use with wastewater effluent is examined. Three models are compared for predictive capability by using measured trihalomethane values from previous research data. The results show that a previously developed model is applicable for use based on assumptions stated. Results provide environmental managers with worst case predictions for a range of wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) parameters. Predictions indicate that trihalomethane formation from the chlorination of wastewater is typically lower than the Safe Drinking Water Act trihalomethane standard of 100 ug/L. The worst case model predictions reach, and in certain extreme cases, pass the standard of 100 ug/L. This level of trihalomethanes formed is minimized if aeration of the receiving bodies of water occurs. Based on this research, the risk of forming trihalomethanes as disinfection by-products from chlorination do not outweigh the benefits gained from proper chlorine disinfection of effluent.

McCormick, C.A.

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

New Results on Standard Solar Models  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We describe the current status of solar modelling and focus on the problems originated with the introduction of solar abundance determinations with low CNO abundance values. We use models computed with solar abundance compilations obtained during the last decade, including the newest published abundances by Asplund and collaborators. Results presented here make focus both on helioseismic properties and the models as well as in the neutrino fluxes predictions. We also discuss changes in radiative opacities to restore agreement between helioseismology, solar models, and solar abundances and show the effect of such modifications on solar neutrino fluxes.

Serenelli, Aldo M

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Annual Energy Outlook with Projections to 2025-Model Results  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Model Results Model Results (To view or print in PDF format, Adobe Acrobat Reader 5.0 is required Download Acrobat Reader Now.) Adobe Acrobat Logo AEO2003 Appendix Tables XLS format A - Reference Case Forecast - PDF (728KB) Reference Case Forecast, Annual 2000-2025 - PDF (1115KB), HTML, XLS B - Economic Growth Case Comparisons - PDF (190KB) High Economic Case, Annual 2000-2025 - PDF (2482KB), XLS Low Economic Case, Annual 2000-2025 - PDF (3937KB), XLS C - Oil Price Case Comparisons - PDF (186KB) High Oil Price Case, Annual 2000-2025 - PDF (2533KB), XLS Low Oil Price Case, Annual 2000-2025 - PDF (2344KB), XLS D - Crude Oil Equivalence Summary - PDF (32KB) E - Household Expenditures - PDF (30KB) F - Results from Side Cases - PDF (89KB) G - Major Assumptions for the Forecast - PDF (160KB), HTML

24

Modeling deposit formation in diesel injector nozzle  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Formation of deposit in the diesel injector nozzle affects the injection behavior and hinders performance. Under running condition, deposit precursors are washed away by the ensuing injection. However, during the cool down ...

Sudhiesh Kumar, Chintoo

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

A Bayesian Forecast Model of Australian Region Tropical Cyclone Formation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new and potentially skillful seasonal forecast model of tropical cyclone formation [tropical cyclogenesis (TCG)] is developed for the Australian region. The model is based on Poisson regression using the Bayesian approach. Predictor combinations ...

Angelika Werner; Neil J. Holbrook

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

New Result Formats on OpenEI | OpenEI Community  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

New Result Formats on OpenEI New Result Formats on OpenEI Home > Groups > OpenEI Community Central Jweers's picture Submitted by Jweers(83) Contributor 25 March, 2013 - 12:22 developer mediawiki OpenEI Semantic Mediawiki wiki As a result of the recent upgrade, and some internal improvements, OpenEI now features a host of new result formats to enhance your wiki content. You can find a list of them right here: http://semantic-mediawiki.org/wiki/Result_formats I would like to call extra attention to two of these: Valuerank, which shows the number of things in a query (e.q. number of companies in a country) without the need for aggregating queries. (Once implemented, this will simplify LEDS maps and solve the latency issues we were seeing with activities/organizations per country). Listwidget, which builds a clean pagination mechanism for navigation

27

Annual Energy Outlook 2002 with Projections to 2020 - Model Results  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Model Results To view PDF Files, Download Free Copy of Adobe Reader Get Acrobat Reader Logo AEO2002 Report Available Formats Entire AEO Report as Printed (PDF, 2,292KB) Preface (PDF, 52KB) Overview (PDF, 117KB) Legislation and Regulations (PDF, 119KB) Issues in Focus (PDF, 172KB) Market Trends Macroeconomic & International Oil Market (PDF, 99KB) Energy Demand (PDF, 99KB) Electricity (PDF, 99KB) Oil and Gas (PDF, 99KB) Coal & Carbon Emissions (PDF, 99KB) Forecast Comparisons (PDF, 83KB) List of Acronyms (PDF, 99KB) Notes and Sources (PDF, 99KB) AEO2002 Appendix Tables XLS format A - Reference Case Forecast PDF (243KB) Reference Case Forecast, Annual 1999-2020 PDF (345KB), HTML, XLS B - Economic Growth Case Comparisons PDF (277KB)

28

Mathematical Modelling of Microshrinkage Formation during ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

3D Meso-scale Modelling of Aluminum-alloy Welding Processes for Prediction of ... Frequency Modulation Effect on the Solidification of Alloy 718 Fusion Zone.

29

Quasi Light Fields: A Model of Coherent Image Formation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We develop a model of coherent image formation that strikes a balance between the simplicity of the light field and the comprehensive predictive power of Maxwell's equations, by extending the light field to coherent radiation.

Accardi, Anthony J.

30

COMPARING MODEL RESULTS TO NATIONAL CLIMATE POLICY GOALS: RESULTS FROM THE ASIA MODELING EXERCISE  

SciTech Connect

While the world has yet to adopt a single unified policy to limit climate change, many countries and regions have adopted energy and climate policies that have implications for global emissions. In this paper, we discuss a few key policies and how they are included in a set of 24 energy and integrated assessment models that participated in the Asia Modeling Exercise. We also compare results from these models for a small set of stylized scenarios to the pledges made as part of the Copenhagen Accord and the goals stated by the Major Economies Forum. We find that the targets outlined by the United States, the European Union, Japan, and Korea require significant policy action in most of the models analyzed. For most of the models in the study, however, the goals outlined by India are met without any climate policy. The stringency of climate policy required to meet China’s Copenhagen pledges varies across models and accounting methodologies.

Calvin, Katherine V.; Fawcett, Allen A.; Jiang, Kejun

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Further results about field theory on the world sheet and string formation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

O n The W o r l d Sheet A n d String Formation K o r k u tthe model has two phases: A string forming phase and acan be thought of as the string slope, which is now promoted

Bardakci, Korbut

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

The flip-side of galaxy formation: A combined model of Galaxy Formation and Cluster Heating  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Only ~10% of baryons in the universe are in the form of stars, yet most models of luminous structure formation have concentrated on the properties of the luminous stellar matter. In this paper we focus on the "flip side" of galaxy formation and investigate the properties of the material that is not presently locked up in galaxies. This "by-product" of galaxy formation can be observed as an X-ray emitting plasma (the intracluster medium, hereafter ICM) in groups and clusters, and we present a version of the Durham semi-analytic galaxy formation model GALFORM that allows us to investigate the properties of the ICM. As we would expect on the basis of gravitational scaling arguments, the previous model (presented in Bower et al. 2006) fails to reproduce even the most basic observed properties of the ICM; however, we present a simple modification to the model to allow for heat input into the ICM from the AGN "radio mode" feedback. This heating acts to expel gas from the X-ray luminous central regions of the host halo. With this modification, the model reproduces the observed gas mass fractions and luminosity-temperature relation of groups and clusters. Introducing the heating process into the model requires changes to a number of model parameters in order to retain a good match to the observed galaxy properties. With the revised parameters, the best fitting luminosity function is comparable to that presented in Bower et al. (2006). The new model makes a fundamental step forward, providing a unified model of galaxy and cluster ICM formation. However, the detailed comparison with the data is not completely satisfactory, and we highlight key areas for improvement.

Richard G. Bower; Ian G. McCarthy; Andrew J. Benson

2008-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

33

H2A Delivery Models and Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of well defined "base cases" that span major markets and demand levels: Hydrogen Delivery Scenario Analysis Model (HDSAM) * Estimate the cost of H 2 delivery for base cases. *...

34

Modeling Molecular Hydrogen and Star Formation in Cosmological Simulations  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We describe a phenomenological model for molecular hydrogen formation suited for applications in galaxy formation simulations, which includes on-equilibrium formation of molecular hydrogen on dust and approximate treatment of both its self-shielding and shielding by dust from the dissociating UV radiation. The model is applicable in simulations in which individual star forming regions--the giant molecular complexes--can be identified (resolution of tens of pc) and their mean internal density estimated reliably, even if internal structure is not resolved. In agreement with previous studies, calculations based on our model show that the transition from atomic to fully molecular phase depends primarily on the metallicity, which we assume is directly related to the dust abundance, and clumpiness of the interstellar medium. The clumpiness simply boosts the formation rate of molecular hydrogen, while dust serves both as a catalyst of molecular hydrogen formation and as an additional shielding from dissociating UV radiation. The upshot is that it is difficult to form fully-shielded giant molecular clouds while gas metallicity is low. However, once the gas is enriched to Z {approx} 0.01-0.1 solar, the subsequent star formation and enrichment can proceed at a much faster rate. This may keep star formation efficiency in the low-mass, low-metallicity progenitors of galaxies very low for a certain period of time with the effect similar to a strong 'feedback' mechanism.

Gnedin, Nickolay Y.; /Fermilab /KICP, Chicago /Chicago U., Astron. Astrophys. Ctr.; Tassis, Konstantinos; /Chicago U., Astron. Astrophys. Ctr. /KICP, Chicago; Kravtsov, Andrey V.; /KICP, Chicago /Chicago U., Astron. Astrophys. Ctr. /Chicago U., EFI

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Modeling Coupled Processes in Clay Formations for Radioactive Waste Disposal  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As a result of the termination of the Yucca Mountain Project, the United States Department of Energy (DOE) has started to explore various alternative avenues for the disposition of used nuclear fuel and nuclear waste. The overall scope of the investigation includes temporary storage, transportation issues, permanent disposal, various nuclear fuel types, processing alternatives, and resulting waste streams. Although geologic disposal is not the only alternative, it is still the leading candidate for permanent disposal. The realm of geologic disposal also offers a range of geologic environments that may be considered, among those clay shale formations. Figure 1-1 presents the distribution of clay/shale formations within the USA. Clay rock/shale has been considered as potential host rock for geological disposal of high-level nuclear waste throughout the world, because of its low permeability, low diffusion coefficient, high retention capacity for radionuclides, and capability to self-seal fractures induced by tunnel excavation. For example, Callovo-Oxfordian argillites at the Bure site, France (Fouche et al., 2004), Toarcian argillites at the Tournemire site, France (Patriarche et al., 2004), Opalinus clay at the Mont Terri site, Switzerland (Meier et al., 2000), and Boom clay at Mol site, Belgium (Barnichon et al., 2005) have all been under intensive scientific investigations (at both field and laboratory scales) for understanding a variety of rock properties and their relations with flow and transport processes associated with geological disposal of nuclear waste. Clay/shale formations may be generally classified as indurated and plastic clays (Tsang et al., 2005). The latter (including Boom clay) is a softer material without high cohesion; its deformation is dominantly plastic. For both clay rocks, coupled thermal, hydrological, mechanical and chemical (THMC) processes are expected to have a significant impact on the long-term safety of a clay repository. For example, the excavation-damaged zone (EDZ) near repository tunnels can modify local permeability (resulting from induced fractures), potentially leading to less confinement capability (Tsang et al., 2005). Because of clay's swelling and shrinkage behavior (depending on whether the clay is in imbibition or drainage processes), fracture properties in the EDZ are quite dynamic and evolve over time as hydromechanical conditions change. To understand and model the coupled processes and their impact on repository performance is critical for the defensible performance assessment of a clay repository. Within the Natural Barrier System (NBS) group of the Used Fuel Disposition (UFD) Campaign at DOE's Office of Nuclear Energy, LBNL's research activities have focused on understanding and modeling such coupled processes. LBNL provided a report in this April on literature survey of studies on coupled processes in clay repositories and identification of technical issues and knowledge gaps (Tsang et al., 2010). This report will document other LBNL research activities within the natural system work package, including the development of constitutive relationships for elastic deformation of clay rock (Section 2), a THM modeling study (Section 3) and a THC modeling study (Section 4). The purpose of the THM and THC modeling studies is to demonstrate the current modeling capabilities in dealing with coupled processes in a potential clay repository. In Section 5, we discuss potential future R&D work based on the identified knowledge gaps. The linkage between these activities and related FEPs is presented in Section 6.

Liu, Hui-Hai; Rutqvist, Jonny; Zheng, Liange; Sonnenthal, Eric; Houseworth, Jim; Birkholzer, Jens

2010-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

36

Measurement and Modeling of SO3 Formation in Coal-Fired Power Boilers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents results from the second full-scale test and associated modeling work conducted under EPRI’s program on measurement and modeling of SO3 formation in coal-fired boilers. The objective of this program is to develop a fundamental understanding of the SO3 formation/depletion process with the hope that this understanding can suggest operational changes that minimize SO3 concentrations at the economizer outlet. The study focuses on SO3 formation up to the economizer outlet because SO3 forma...

2008-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

37

Modeling the Sequestration of CO2 in Deep Geological Formations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the Sequestration of CO the Sequestration of CO 2 in Deep Geological Formations K. Prasad Saripalli, B. Peter McGrail, and Mark D. White Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington 99352 corresponding author Prasad Saripalli Senior Research Scientist Pacific Northwest National Laboratory 1313 Sigma V Complex (K6-81) Richland, WA 99352 ph: (509) 376-1667 fax: (509) 376-5368 prasad.saripalli@pnl.gov 2 Modeling the Sequestration of CO 2 in Deep Geological Formations K. Prasad Saripalli, B. Peter McGrail, and Mark D. White Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington 99352 Modeling the injection of CO 2 and its sequestration will require simulations of a multi- well injection system in a large reservoir field. However, modeling at the injection well

38

Modeling and simulation of HVAC Results in EnergyPlus  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Modeling and simulation of HVAC Results in EnergyPlus Title Modeling and simulation of HVAC Results in EnergyPlus Publication Type Journal Article LBNL Report Number LBNL-5564E...

39

A Weighted Hybrid Fuzzy Result Merging Model for Metasearch  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Result merging of search engine results for metasearch is a well explored area. However most result merging models try to collate document rankings from the search engines whose results are being merged into a single ranking using some mathematical function. ...

Arijit De; Elizabeth D. Diaz

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Modeling of NOx formation in circular laminar jet flames  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Emissions of oxides of nitrogen (NOx) from combustion devices is a topic of tremendous current importance. The bulk of the review of NOx emissions has been in the field of turbulent jet flames. However laminar jet flames have provided much insight into the relative importance of NOx reaction pathways in non premixed combustion for various flame conditions. The existing models include detailed chemistry kinetics for various species involved in the flame. These detailed models involve very complex integration of hundreds of chemical reactions of various species and their intermediates. Hence such models are highly time consuming and also normally involve heavy computational costs. This work proposes a numerical model to compute the total production of NOx in a non-premixed isolated circular laminar jet flame. The jet consists of the fuel rich inner region and the O2 rich outer region. The model estimates both thermal NOx and prompt NOx assuming single step kinetics for NOx formation and a thin flame model. Further the amount of air entrainment by jet depends upon the Sc number of fuel. The higher the Sc number, the higher is the air entrained which lowers the flame temperature and hence NOx formation. With increasing Sc number, flame volume increases which leads to an increase in the NOx formation. The effect of the Sc number variation on the net production of NOx and flame structure is also investigated. The effect of equilibrium chemistry for CO2 CO + 1/2 O2 and H2O H2 +1/2 O2 on total NOx emission is studied. Also the effect of both CO2 and H2O equilibrium is considered simultaneously and the net x NO formation for propane is 45 ppm. The split between pre-flame and post-flame regions is also investigated. For Propane, 96% of NO emissions occur in the pre-flame region and about 4% in the post-flame region. The model predictions are compared with experimental values of NOx missions reported elsewhere.

Siwatch, Vivek

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "model results formats" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Structure formation in inhomogeneous Early Dark Energy models  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study the impact of Early Dark Energy fluctuations in the linear and non-linear regimes of structure formation. In these models the energy density of dark energy is non-negligible at high redshifts and the fluctuations in the dark energy component can have the same order of magnitude of dark matter fluctuations. Since two basic approximations usually taken in the standard scenario of quintessence models, that both dark energy density during the matter dominated period and dark energy fluctuations on small scales are negligible, are not valid in such models, we first study approximate analytical solutions for dark matter and dark energy perturbations in the linear regime. This study is helpful to find consistent initial conditions for the system of equations and to analytically understand the effects of Early Dark Energy and its fluctuations, which are also verified numerically. In the linear regime we compute the matter growth and variation of the gravitational potential associated with the Integrated Sach...

Batista, R C

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Results from Development of Model Specifications for Multifamily Energy Retrofits  

SciTech Connect

Specifications, modeled after CSI MasterFormat, provide the trade contractors and builders with requirements and recommendations on specific building materials, components and industry practices that comply with the expectations and intent of the requirements within the various funding programs associated with a project. The goal is to create a greater level of consistency in execution of energy efficiency retrofits measures across the multiple regions a developer may work. IBACOS and Mercy Housing developed sample model specifications based on a common building construction type that Mercy Housing encounters.

Brozyna, K.

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Coalescence model for Theta(c) pentaquark formation.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ar X iv :h ep -p h/ 04 09 12 1v 3 1 4 Ja n 20 05 Preprint typeset in JHEP style - PAPER VERSION Cavendish–HEP–04/35 TAUP–2774-04 Coalescence model for ?c pentaquark formation ? Marek Karliner Cavendish Laboratory, Madingley Road, Cambridge CB3 0... HE, U.K. and School of Physics and Astronomy, Raymond and Beverly Sackler Faculty of Exact Sciences Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv, Israel E-mail: marek@proton.tau.ac.il Bryan R. Webber Cavendish Laboratory, Madingley Road, Cambridge CB3 0HE, U.K. E...

Karliner, Marek

44

Formation of an Azores Current Due to Mediterranean Overflow in a Modeling Study of the North Atlantic  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A mechanism for the formation of the Azores Current is proposed. On the basis of observations and model results, it is argued that the primary cause of the Azores Current is the water mass transformation associated with the Mediterranean overflow ...

Yanli Jia

2000-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

TOP-DOWN MODELING; PRACTICAL, FAST TRACK, RESERVOIR SIMULATION & MODELING FOR SHALE FORMATIONS Shahab D. Mohaghegh1 & Grant Bromhal2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

development in the oil and gas industry and is being used on some shale formations. BAKKEN SHALE MuchTOP-DOWN MODELING; PRACTICAL, FAST TRACK, RESERVOIR SIMULATION & MODELING FOR SHALE FORMATIONS based on measure data, called Top-Down, Intelligent Reservoir Modeling for the shale formations

Mohaghegh, Shahab

46

Source Contributions to VOC's to Ozone Formation in Southeast Texas Using a Source-oriented Air Quality Model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Houston-Galveston-Brazoria area is in severe non-attainment status for ozone compliance. Source-oriented mechanistic modeling was used to determine the major sources of VOCs that contributes to ozone formation during the Texas Air Quality Study (TexAQS) from August 16, 2000 to September 7, 2000. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)?s Community Scale Air Quality Model (CMAQ) version 4.6 was used as a host model to include a revised Statewide Air Pollution Research Center (SAPRC99) photochemical mechanism with source-oriented extensions to track the contributions of Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) emissions from diesel engines, biogenic sources, highway gasoline vehicles, fuel combustion, off-highway gasoline engines, solvent utilization and petrochemical industries to ozone formation in the atmosphere. Source-oriented emissions needed to drive the model were generated using a revised Sparse Matrix Operator Kernel Emissions (SMOKE) model version 2.4. VOC/NOx ratios are found to be a critical factor in the formation of ozone. Highest ozone formation rates were observed for ratios from 5-15. The contributions of VOC to ozone formation were estimated based on the linear relationship between the rate of NO to NO2 conversion due to radicals generated from VOC oxidation and the rate of net ozone formation. Petroleum and other industrial sources are the largest anthropogenic sources in the urban Houston region and contribute to 45% of the ozone formation in the HGB area. Highway gasoline vehicles make contributions of approximately 28% to ozone formation. Wildfires contribute to as much 11% of ozone formation on days of high wildfire activity. The model results show that biogenic emissions account for a significant amount of ozone formation in the rural areas. Both highway and off-highway vehicles contribute significantly to ozone formation especially in the downwind region. Diesel vehicles do not contribute significantly to ozone formation due to their low VOC emissions.

Krishnan, Anupama

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Model NbTi Helical Solenoid Fabrication and Test Results  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A program to develop model magnets for a helical cooling channel is under way at Fermilab. In the first steps of a planned sequence of magnets, two four-coil helical solenoid models with 300 mm aperture have been fabricated and tested. These two models, HSM01 and HSM02, used insulated NbTi Rutherford cable wound onto stainless steel rings with spliceless transitions between coils. Strip heaters were included for quench protection of each coil, and the coils were epoxy-impregnated after winding inside the support structures. Based on the results of the first model the second model was made using a cable with optimized cross-section, improved winding and epoxy-impregnation procedures, enhanced ground insulation, and included heat exchange tubing for a test of conduction cooling. We report on the results and lessons learned from fabrication and tests of these two models.

Andreev, N.; Barzi, E.; Chlachidze, G.; Evbota, D.; Kashikhin, V.S.; Kashikhin, V.V.; Lamm, M.J.; Makarov, A.; Novitski, I.; Orris, D.F.; Tartaglia, M.A.; /Fermilab

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Water Mass Formation in an Isopycnal Model of the North Pacific  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An isopycnal model coupled with a mixed layer model is used to study transformation and formation rates in the North Pacific. When annual formation rates are averaged over the entire North Pacific, a large peak in water mass formation is found at ...

Carol Ladd; Lu Anne Thompson

2001-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Anthropogenic Warming of the Oceans: Observations and Model Results  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Observations show the oceans have warmed over the past 40 yr, with appreciable regional variation and more warming at the surface than at depth. Comparing the observations with results from two coupled ocean–atmosphere climate models [the ...

David W. Pierce; Tim P. Barnett; Krishna M. AchutaRao; Peter J. Gleckler; Jonathan M. Gregory; Warren M. Washington

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Formation of molecular hydrogen on analogues of interstellar dust grains: experiments and modelling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Molecular hydrogen has an important role in the early stages of star formation as well as in the production of many other molecules that have been detected in the interstellar medium. In this review we show that it is now possible to study the formation of molecular hydrogen in simulated astrophysical environments. Since the formation of molecular hydrogen is believed to take place on dust grains, we show that surface science techniques such as thermal desorption and time-of-flight can be used to measure the recombination efficiency, the kinetics of reaction and the dynamics of desorption. The analysis of the experimental results using rate equations gives useful insight on the mechanisms of reaction and yields values of parameters that are used in theoretical models of interstellar cloud chemistry.

Gianfranco Vidali; Joe Roser; Giulio Manico; Valerio Pirronello; Hagai B. Perets; Ofer Biham

2005-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

51

Modeling H2 formation in the turbulent ISM: Solenoidal versus compressive turbulent forcing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present results from high-resolution three-dimensional simulations of the turbulent interstellar medium that study the influence of the nature of the turbulence on the formation of molecular hydrogen. We have examined both solenoidal (divergence-free) and compressive (curl-free) turbulent driving, and show that compressive driving leads to faster H2 formation, owing to the higher peak densities produced in the gas. The difference in the H2 formation rate can be as much as an order of magnitude at early times, but declines at later times as the highest density regions become fully molecular and stop contributing to the total H2 formation rate. We have also used our results to test a simple prescription suggested by Gnedin et al. (2009) for modeling the influence of unresolved density fluctuations on the H2 formation rate in large-scale simulations of the ISM. We find that this approach works well when the H2 fraction is small, but breaks down once the highest density gas becomes fully molecular.

Milosavljevic, Milica; Federrath, Christoph; Klessen, Ralf S

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Results of a model for premixed combustion oscillation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Combustion oscillations are receiving renewed research interest due to the increasing application of lean premix (LPM) combustion to gas turbines. A simple, nonlinear model for premixed combustion is described in this paper. The model was developed to help explain specific experimental observations, and to provide guidance for the development of active control schemes based on nonlinear concepts. The model can be used to quickly examine instability trends associated with changes in equivalence ratio, mass flow rate, geometry, ambient conditions, and other pertinent factors. The model represents the relevant processes occurring in a fuel nozzle and combustor which are analogous to current LPM turbine combustors. Conservation equations for the fuel nozzle and combustor are developed from simple control volume analysis, providing a set of ordinary differential equations that can be solved on a personal computer. Combustion is modeled as a stirred reactor, with a bi- molecular reaction rate between fuel and air. A variety of numerical results and comparisons to experimental data are presented to demonstrate the utility of the model. Model results are used to understand the fundamental mechanisms which drive combustion oscillations, the effects of inlet air temperature and nozzle geometry on instability, and the effectiveness of active control schemes. The technique used in the model may also be valuable to understand oscillations in low NO{sub x} industrial burners.

Janus, M.C.; Richards, G.A.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

53

Results of a model for premixed combustion oscillations  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Combustion oscillations are receiving renewed research interest due to increasing use of lean premix (LPM) combustion to gas turbines. A simple, nonlinear model for premixed combustion is described in this paper. The model was developed to help explain specific experimental observations and to provide guidance for development of active control schemes based on nonlinear concepts. The model can be used to quickly examine instability trends associated with changes in equivalence ratio, mass flow rate, geometry, ambient conditions, etc. The model represents the relevant processes occurring in a fuel nozzle and combustor which are analogous to current LPM turbine combustors. Conservation equations for the fuel nozzle and combustor are developed from simple control volume analysis, providing a set of ordinary differential equations that can be solved on a personal computer. Combustion is modeled as a stirred reactor, with a bimolecular reaction rate between fuel and air. A variety of numerical results and comparisons to experimental data are presented to demonstrate the utility of the model. Model results are used to understand the fundamental mechanisms which drive combustion oscillations, effects of inlet air temperature and nozzle geometry on instability, and effectiveness of open loop control schemes.

Janus, M.C.; Richards, G.A.

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Analytical and numerical models of uranium ignition assisted by hydride formation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Analytical and numerical models of uranium ignition assisted by the oxidation of uranium hydride are described. The models were developed to demonstrate that ignition of large uranium ingots could not occur as a result of possible hydride formation during storage. The thermodynamics-based analytical model predicted an overall 17 C temperature rise of the ingot due to hydride oxidation upon opening of the storage can in air. The numerical model predicted locally higher temperature increases at the surface; the transient temperature increase quickly dissipated. The numerical model was further used to determine conditions for which hydride oxidation does lead to ignition of uranium metal. Room temperature ignition only occurs for high hydride fractions in the nominally oxide reaction product and high specific surface areas of the uranium metal.

Totemeier, T.C.; Hayes, S.L. [Argonne National Lab., Idaho Falls, ID (United States). Engineering Div.

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

THE RESULTS OF TESTING TO EVALUATE CRYSTAL FORMATION AND SETTLING IN THE COLD CRUCIBLE INDUCTION MELTER  

SciTech Connect

The Cold Crucible Induction Melter (CCIM) technology offers the potential to increase waste loading for High Level Waste (HLW) glasses leading to significant improvements in waste throughput rates compared to the reference Joule Heated Melter (JHM). Prior to implementation of a CCIM in a production facility it is necessary to better understand processing constraints associated with the CCIM. The glass liquidus temperature requirement for processing in the CCIM is an open issue. Testing was conducted to evaluate crystal formation and crystal settling during processing in the CCIM to gain insight into the effects on processing. A high aluminum/high iron content glass composition with known crystal formation tendencies was selected for testing. A continuous melter test was conducted for approximately 51 hours. To evaluate crystal formation, glass samples were obtained from pours and from glass receipt canisters where the glass melt had varying residence time in the melter. Additionally, upon conclusion of the testing, glass samples from the bottom of the melter were obtained to assess the degree of crystal settling. Glass samples were characterized in an attempt to determine quantitative fractions of crystals in the glass matrix. Crystal identity and relative composition were determined using a combination of x-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy coupled with energy dispersive spectroscopy (SEM/EDS). Select samples were also analyzed by digesting the glass and determining the composition using inductively coupled atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES). There was evidence of crystal formation (primarily spinels) in the melt and during cooling of the collected glass. There was evidence of crystal settling in the melt over the duration of the melter campaign.

Marra, J.

2009-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

56

Modeling of Nonuniform Degradation in Large-Format Li-ion Batteries (Presentation)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Study of impacts of large-format cell design features on battery useful life to improve battery engineering models, including both realistic geometry and physics.

Smith, K.; Kim, G. H.; Pesaran, A.

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

INVENTORY DYNAMICS IMPLEMENTATION TO A NETWORK DESIGN MODEL Format Review.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This research presents an inventory dynamics model that is implemented into an already existing supply chain footprint model for a multinational manufacturing company. The model… (more)

Better Romero, Miguel

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Models and Results Database (MAR-D), Version 4. 0  

SciTech Connect

The Nuclear Regulatory Commission's Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research (NRC-RES) is presently funding the development of the Models and Results Database (MAR-D) at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. MAR-D's primary function is to create a data repository for NUREG-1150 and other permanent data by providing input, conversion, and output capabilities for data used by IRRAS, SARA, SETS, and FRANTIC personal computer (PC) codes. As probabilistic risk assessments and individual plant examinations are submitted to the NRC for review, MAR-D can be used to convert the models and results from the study for use with IRRAS and SARA. Then, these data can be easily accessed by future studies and will be in a form that will enhance the analysis process. This reference manual provides an overview of the function available within MAR-D and step-by-step operating instructions.

Branham-Haar, K.A.; Dinneen, R.A.; Russell, K.D.; Skinner, N.L. (EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (United States))

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Prognostic Modeling Studies of the Keweenaw Current in Lake Superior. Part I: Formation and Evolution  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The formation and evolution of the Keweenaw Current in Lake Superior were examined using a nonorthogonal-coordinate primitive equation numerical model. The model was initialized by the monthly averaged temperaturefield observed in June and ...

Changsheng Chen; Jianrong Zhu; Elise Ralph; Sarah A. Green; Judith Wells Budd; Frank Y. Zhang

2001-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

The Formation and Evolution of Planetary Systems: First Results from a Spitzer Legacy Science Program  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present 3-160 micron photometry obtained with the IRAC and MIPS instruments for the first five targets from the Spitzer Legacy Science Program "Formation and Evolution of Planetary Systems" and 4-35 micron spectro-photometry obtained with the IRS for two sources. We discuss in detail our observations of the debris disks surrounding HD 105 (G0V, 30 +- 10 Myr) and HD 150706 (G3V, ~ 700 +- 300 Myr). For HD 105, possible interpretations include large bodies clearing the dust inside of 45 AU or a reservoir of gas capable of sculpting the dust distribution. The disk surrounding HD 150706 also exhibits evidence of a large inner hole in its dust distribution. Of the four survey targets without previously detected IR excess, spanning ages 30 Myr to 3 Gyr, the new detection of excess in just one system of intermediate age suggests a variety of initial conditions or divergent evolutionary paths for debris disk systems orbiting solar-type stars.

M. R. Meyer; L. A. Hillenbrand; D. E. Backman; S. V. W. Beckwith; J. Bouwman; T. Y. Brooke; J. M. Carpenter; M. Cohen; U. Gorti; T. Henning; D. C. Hines; D. Hollenbach; J. S. Kim; J. Lunine; R. Malhotra; E. E. Mamajek; S. Metchev; A. Moro--Martin; P. Morris; J. Najita; D. L. Padgett; J. Rodmann; M. D. Silverstone; D. R. Soderblom; J. R. Stauffer; E. B. Stobie; S. E. Strom; D. M. Watson; S. J. Weidenschilling; S. Wolf; E. Young; C. W. Engelbracht; K. D. Gordon; K. Misselt; J. Morrison; J. Muzerolle; K. Su

2004-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "model results formats" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Comparison of Blade-Strike Modeling Results with Empirical Data  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This study is the initial stage of further investigation into the dynamics of injury to fish during passage through a turbine runner. As part of the study, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) estimated the probability of blade strike, and associated injury, as a function of fish length and turbine operating geometry at two adjacent turbines in Powerhouse 1 of Bonneville Dam. Units 5 and 6 had identical intakes, stay vanes, wicket gates, and draft tubes, but Unit 6 had a new runner and curved discharge ring to minimize gaps between the runner hub and blades and between the blade tips and discharge ring. We used a mathematical model to predict blade strike associated with two Kaplan turbines and compared results with empirical data from biological tests conducted in 1999 and 2000. Blade-strike models take into consideration the geometry of the turbine blades and discharges as well as fish length, orientation, and distribution along the runner.

Carlson, Thomas J.; Ploskey, Gene R.

2004-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

62

Gas generation and bubble formation model for crystalline silicotitanate ion exchange columns  

SciTech Connect

The authors developed a transient model to describe the process of gas generation due to radiolysis and bubble formation in crystalline silicotitanate (CST) ion exchange (IX) columns using the Aspen Custom Modeler (ACM) software package. The model calculates gas concentrations and onset of bubble formation for large CST IX columns. The calculations include cesium loading as a function of time, gas generation as a function of cesium loading, and bubble formation as a function of gas solubility. This report summarizes the model development and predictions.

Hang, T.

2000-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

63

Loss of spent fuel pool cooling PRA: Model and results  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This letter report documents models for quantifying the likelihood of loss of spent fuel pool cooling; models for identifying post-boiling scenarios that lead to core damage; qualitative and quantitative results generated for a selected plant that account for plant design and operational practices; a comparison of these results and those generated from earlier studies; and a review of available data on spent fuel pool accidents. The results of this study show that for a representative two-unit boiling water reactor, the annual probability of spent fuel pool boiling is 5 {times} 10{sup {minus}5} and the annual probability of flooding associated with loss of spent fuel pool cooling scenarios is 1 {times} 10{sup {minus}3}. Qualitative arguments are provided to show that the likelihood of core damage due to spent fuel pool boiling accidents is low for most US commercial nuclear power plants. It is also shown that, depending on the design characteristics of a given plant, the likelihood of either: (a) core damage due to spent fuel pool-associated flooding, or (b) spent fuel damage due to pool dryout, may not be negligible.

Siu, N.; Khericha, S.; Conroy, S.; Beck, S.; Blackman, H.

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Formation of Dense Partonic Matter in High Energy Heavy-Ion Collisions: Highlights of RHIC Results  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

I review some important results from RHIC experiments. They were obtained in a unique environment for studying QCD bulk matter at temperatures and densities that surpass the limits where hadrons can exist as individual entities, raising the quark-gluon degrees of freedom to prominence. These findings support the major experimental observations from measuring the bulk properties of particle production, particle ratios and chemical freeze-out conditions, elliptic flow followed by hard probes measurements: di-jet fragment azimuthal correlations, high-pt hadron suppression, and heavy-flavors probes. I present the measurements as a function of collision centrality, energy, system size and for different particle species. These results reveal that a dense strongly interacting medium was created in central Au+Au collisions at 200 GeV: the RHIC discovery. Further, they suggest that this medium is partonic. However, the discoveries so far observed at RHIC are far from being understood fully. Accordingly, the focus of the experiments has shifted from the discovery phase to the detailed exploration phase of the properties of this medium.

Rachid Nouicer

2009-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

65

CHARACTERIZING THE FORMATION HISTORY OF MILKY WAY LIKE STELLAR HALOS WITH MODEL EMULATORS  

SciTech Connect

We use the semi-analytic model ChemTreeN, coupled to cosmological N-body simulations, to explore how different galaxy formation histories can affect observational properties of Milky Way like galaxies' stellar halos and their satellite populations. Gaussian processes are used to generate model emulators that allow one to statistically estimate a desired set of model outputs at any location of a p-dimensional input parameter space. This enables one to explore the full input parameter space orders of magnitude faster than could be done otherwise. Using mock observational data sets generated by ChemTreeN itself, we show that it is possible to successfully recover the input parameter vectors used to generate the mock observables if the merger history of the host halo is known. However, our results indicate that for a given observational data set, the determination of 'best-fit' parameters is highly susceptible to the particular merger history of the host. Very different halo merger histories can reproduce the same observational data set, if the 'best-fit' parameters are allowed to vary from history to history. Thus, attempts to characterize the formation history of the Milky Way using these kind of techniques must be performed statistically, analyzing large samples of high-resolution N-body simulations.

Gomez, Facundo A.; O'Shea, Brian W. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Coleman-Smith, Christopher E. [Department of Physics, Duke University, Durham, NC 27708 (United States); Tumlinson, Jason [Space Telescope Science Institute, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Wolpert, Robert L. [Department of Statistical Science, Duke University, Durham, NC 27708-0251 (United States)

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Cross-cooled dehumidifier model test results and computer simulations  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Research on the development of a solar operated cross-cooled desiccant cooling system is described. A 15 cm x 15 cm x 15 cm (6'' x 6'' x 6'') cross-cooled silica gel desiccant dehumidifier model was designed, built and tested. The process of producing the silica gel sheets, the design and construction of the unit, the test setup and the test procedures are described in detail. A total of twenty tests were performed to determine the effect of inlet process stream dew point, process stream and cooling stream flowrates and regeneration stream temperature and dew point, on the performance of the unit. The test results show that the unit performance improves with increasing regeneration temperature, process stream flowrate and process air inlet dew point. The unit performance decreases with increase of the regeneration stream dew point. The results clearly show that the process stream inlet dew point is the dominating factor and that the concept of cross-cooling works very well. With moderate cross-cooling, the unit performance can increase over 50%. All tests were simulated by a computer program. The experimental and theoretical results are in very good agreement.

Mei, V.; Lavan, Z.

1979-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Molecular Dynamics Modelling of Diffusional Formation of Titanium ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Carbon diffusion is a crucial factor governing the response of titanium ... Adaptive phase-field modeling of grain growth in sintered uranium dioxide under high ...

68

Quantum liquids resulted from the models with four-fermion interaction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A (nearly) perfect liquid discovered in the experements with ultrarelativistic heavy ion collisions is investigated by studying the quark ensembles with four-fermion interection as a fundamental theoretical approach. The comparative analysis of several quantum liquid models is performed and it results in the conclusion that the presence of gas---liquid phase transition is their characteristic feature. The problem of instability of the quark droplets of small quark number is discussed and argued to be rooted in the chiral soliton formation. An existence of mixed phase of the vacuum and baryon matter is proposed as a possible reason of the latter stability.

S. V. Molodtsov; G. M. Zinovjev

2013-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

69

Improvements to Hydrogen Delivery Scenario Analysis Model (HDSAM) and Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

to Hydrogen to Hydrogen Delivery Scenario Analysis Model (HDSAM) and Results May 8, 2007 Amgad Elgowainy Argonne National Laboratory Comparison of Delivery Pathways- V1.0 vs. V2.0 2 1 3 i delivery by a Loading, the plant Version 1.0 character zed components for 3 pathways with single mode. conditioning and storage are at or adjacent to Liquid Hydrogen (LH) Truck H2 Production 100 or 1500 kg/d Compressed H2 (CH) Truck H2 Production 3 or 7 kpsi 100 or 1500 kg/d H2 Production Gaseous H2 Pipeline 100 or 1500 kg/d HDSAM V1.0 Estimates Delivery Cost for 3 Pathways 4 H2 H2 1 2 3 H2 Distribution and Ci I. Liquid H2 Distribution: HDSAM V2.0 Simulates Nine Pathways Production Production LH Terminal LH Terminal Production LH Terminal Transmission Transmission Distribution

70

Further Results on Forecasting and Model Selection Under Asymmetric Loss  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

: We make three related contributions. First, we propose a new technique for solving prediction problems under asymmetric loss using piecewise-linear approximations to the loss function, and we establish existence and uniqueness of the optimal predictor. Second, we provide a detailed application to optimal prediction of a conditionally heteroskedastic process under asymmetric loss, the insights gained from which are broadly applicable. Finally, we incorporate our results into a general framework for recursive prediction-based model selection under the relevant loss function. Acknowledgements: Helpful discussion was provided by Adolf Buse, Hashem Pesaran, Dale Poirrier, Enrique Sentana, Jim Stock, Ken Wallis, participants at meetings of the Econometric Society World Congress, the NBER/NSF Forecasting Seminar, the UCSD Conference on Multivariate Financial Econometrics, and numerous university seminars. All remaining inadequacies are ours alone. We thank the National Science Foundation, t...

Peter F. Christoffersen; Francis X. Diebold

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Facilitated oriented spin models:some non equilibrium results  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We analyze the relaxation to equilibrium for kinetically constrained spin models (KCSM) when the initial distribution $\

Nicoletta Cancrini; Fabio Martinelli; Roberto H. Schonmann; Cristina Toninelli

2008-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

72

Shock-Wave Heating Model for Chondrule Formation: Prevention of Isotopic Fractionation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Chondrules are considered to have much information on dust particles and processes in the solar nebula. It is naturally expected that protoplanetary disks observed in present star forming regions have similar dust particles and processes, so study of chondrule formation may provide us great information on the formation of the planetary systems. Evaporation during chondrule melting may have resulted in depletion of volatile elements in chondrules. However, no evidence for a large degree of heavy-isotope enrichment has been reported in chondrules. In order to meet this observed constraint, the rapid heating rate at temperatures below the silicate solidus is required to suppress the isotopic fractionation. We have developed a new shock-wave heating model taking into account the radiative transfer of the dust thermal continuum emission and the line emission of gas molecules and calculated the thermal history of chondrules. We have found that optically-thin shock waves for the thermal continuum emission from dust particles can meet the rapid heating constraint, because the dust thermal emission does not keep the dust particles high temperature for a long time in the pre-shock region and dust particles are abruptly heated by the gas drag heating in the post-shock region. We have also derived the upper limit of optical depth of the pre-shock region using the radiative diffusion approximation, above which the rapid heating constraint is not satisfied. It is about 1 ? 10. Subject headings: meteors, meteoroids — shock waves — solar system: formation 1

Hitoshi Miura; Taishi Nakamoto

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Results of a near field physical model study  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A physical model study is ongoing to investigate the sensitivity of recirculation and near field plume dynamics to variation in OTEC plant design and ambient ocean conditions. A thermally-stratified 18 x 12 x 0.6 m basin at a nominal scale of 1/300 allows the upper 180 m of the ocean to be studied for plant sizes up to 600 MW(e). Tests have been conducted for stagnant conditions and for conditions with a current, using both the mixed discharge (combined evaporator and condenser) and non-mixed discharge concepts. Separate tests were made to investigate interactions between evaporator and condenser discharges in a non-mixed concept. Measurements include temperature, dye concentration, mean velocity and visual observations obtained from still and motion pictures. Results for the stagnant water tests showed no significant recirculation except for those tests where the discharge ports were oriented (slightly) upward or where the largest plant size (600 MW(e)) was tested. No significant difference in recirculation could be discerned between the mixed and the non-mixed discharge designs although differences in the equilibrium positions of the discharge plumes were noted. Tests in a current are still in progress but some preliminary results are presented.

Adams, E.E.; Fry, D.J.; Coxe, D.H.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

The Formation and Fate of a River Plume: A Numerical Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A mathematical model that describes the formation and dilution of a frontally bounded river plume is presented. Such features were first studied at the mouth of the Connecticut River during periods of high discharge and have subsequently been ...

James O'Donnell

1990-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Modeling the Barrier-Layer Formation in the Southeastern Arabian Sea  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The effect of salinity on the formation of the barrier layer (BL) in the southeastern Arabian Sea (SEAS) is investigated using an ocean general circulation model. In accordance with previous studies, the runoff distribution and the India–Sri ...

F. Durand; D. Shankar; C. de Boyer Montégut; S. S. C. Shenoi; B. Blanke; G. Madec

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Results of EPRI/ANL DCH investigations and model development  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The results of a series of five experiments are described addressing the severity and mitigation of direct containment heating. The tests were performed in a 1:30 linear scale mockup of the Zion PWR containment system using a reactor-material corium melt consisting of 60% UO/sub 2/, 16% ZrO/sub 2/, 24% SSt at nominally 2800C initial temperature. A ''worst-case'' type test involving unimpeded corium dispersal through an air atmosphere in a closed vessel produced an atmosphere heatup of 323K, equivalent to a DCH efficiency of 62%. With the addition of structural features which impeded the corium dispersal, representative of dispersal pathway features at Zion, the DCH efficiency was reduced to 1--5%. (This important result is scale dependent and requires larger scale tests such as the SURTSEY program at SNL plus mechanistic modeling for application to the reactor system.) With the addition of water in the cavity region, there was no measurable heatup of the atmosphere. This was attributable to the vigorous codispersal of water with corium which prevented the temperature of the atmosphere from significantly exceeding T/sub sat/. In this case the DCH load was replaced by the more benign ''steam spike'' from corium quench. Significant oxidation of the corium constituents occurred in the tests, adding chemical energy to the system and producing hydrogen. Overall, the results suggest that with consideration of realistic, plant specific, mitigating features, DCH may be no worse and possibly far less severe than the previously examined steam spike. Implications for accident management are addressed. 17 refs., 7 figs., 4 tabs.

Spencer, B.W.; Sienicki, J.J.; Sehgal, B.R.; Merilo, M.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Arctic Precipitation and Evaporation: Model Results and Observational Estimates  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Observational estimates of precipitation and evaporation over the Arctic Ocean and its terrestrial watersheds are compared with corresponding values from the climate model simulations of the Atmospheric Model Intercomparison Project (AMIP). ...

John E. Walsh; Vladimir Kattsov; Diane Portis; Valentin Meleshko

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Comprehensive Electricity Competition Act: A Comparison of Model Results, The  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This report describes EIA's use of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) to evaluate the effects of the Administration's restructuring proposal using the parameter settings and assumptions from the Policy Office Electricity Modeling System (POEMS) analysis.

Andy S. Kydes

1999-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Preliminary results of model predictive control of shading systems (WIP)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Shades in buildings are widely installed and are an effective technique for managing solar gains and occupant comfort. A model of a typical office space located in Ottawa, Ontario has been created and the model was developed for analysis under variable ... Keywords: energy management system, model predictive control, reactive control, shades

Brent Huchuk; William O'Brien; Cynthia A. Cruickshank

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

User modelling for live help systems: initial results  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper explores the role of user modelling in live help systems for e-commerce web sites. There are several potential benefits with user modelling in this context: 1) Human assistants can use the personal information in the user models to provide ...

Johan Aberg; Nahid Shahmehri; Dennis Maciuszek

2001-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "model results formats" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Formation of algae growth constitutive relations for improved algae modeling.  

SciTech Connect

This SAND report summarizes research conducted as a part of a two year Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project to improve our abilities to model algal cultivation. Algae-based biofuels have generated much excitement due to their potentially large oil yield from relatively small land use and without interfering with the food or water supply. Algae mitigate atmospheric CO2 through metabolism. Efficient production of algal biofuels could reduce dependence on foreign oil by providing a domestic renewable energy source. Important factors controlling algal productivity include temperature, nutrient concentrations, salinity, pH, and the light-to-biomass conversion rate. Computational models allow for inexpensive predictions of algae growth kinetics in these non-ideal conditions for various bioreactor sizes and geometries without the need for multiple expensive measurement setups. However, these models need to be calibrated for each algal strain. In this work, we conduct a parametric study of key marine algae strains and apply the findings to a computational model.

Gharagozloo, Patricia E.; Drewry, Jessica L.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

New Model Predicts Dendrite Formation in Li-Ion Batteries  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mar 28, 2013 ... The dendrites are lithium deposits that form on electrode surfaces that can potentially cause an internal short circuit, resulting in battery failure ...

83

Annual Energy Outlook 2000 - Model Results & Report  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Homepage Homepage AEO2000 Report Available Formats Entire AEO Report as Printed (PDF, 2.2MB) Overview (PDF, 102KB) Legislation and Regulations (PDF, 63KB) Issues in Focus (PDF, 274KB) Market Trends Macroeconomic & International Oil Markets (PDF, 92KB) Energy Demand (PDF, 120KB) Electricity (PDF, 129KB) Oil and Gas (PDF, 134KB) Coal & Carbon Emissions (PDF, 115KB) Forecast Comparisons (PDF, 78KB) AEO2000 Appendix Tables (1997-2020) XLS files A - Reference Case Forecast PDF (314KB), HTML, XLS B - High Economic Growth Case Comparisons PDF (315KB), XLS B - Low Economic Growth Case Comparisons PDF (313KB), XLS C - High Oil Price Case Comparisons PDF (315KB), XLS C - Low Oil Price Case Comparisons PDF (314KB), XLS D - Crude Oil Equivalence Summary PDF (297KB)

84

GREET 1.5 - transportation fuel-cycle model - Vol. 1 : methodology, development, use, and results.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report documents the development and use of the most recent version (Version 1.5) of the Greenhouse Gases, Regulated Emissions, and Energy Use in Transportation (GREET) model. The model, developed in a spreadsheet format, estimates the full fuel-cycle emissions and energy associated with various transportation fuels and advanced vehicle technologies for light-duty vehicles. The model calculates fuel-cycle emissions of five criteria pollutants (volatile organic compounds, carbon monoxide, nitrogen oxides, particulate matter with diameters of 10 micrometers or less, and sulfur oxides) and three greenhouse gases (carbon dioxide, methane, and nitrous oxide). The model also calculates total energy consumption, fossil fuel consumption, and petroleum consumption when various transportation fuels are used. The GREET model includes the following cycles: petroleum to conventional gasoline, reformulated gasoline, conventional diesel, reformulated diesel, liquefied petroleum gas, and electricity via residual oil; natural gas to compressed natural gas, liquefied natural gas, liquefied petroleum gas, methanol, Fischer-Tropsch diesel, dimethyl ether, hydrogen, and electricity; coal to electricity; uranium to electricity; renewable energy (hydropower, solar energy, and wind) to electricity; corn, woody biomass, and herbaceous biomass to ethanol; soybeans to biodiesel; flared gas to methanol, dimethyl ether, and Fischer-Tropsch diesel; and landfill gases to methanol. This report also presents the results of the analysis of fuel-cycle energy use and emissions associated with alternative transportation fuels and advanced vehicle technologies to be applied to passenger cars and light-duty trucks.

Wang, M. Q.

1999-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

85

Research on Ammonium Bisulfate Formation in Air Preheaters - Experimental Investigation and CFD Modeling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ammonium bisulfate (ABS) formation and deposition is the most common operating problem affecting air preheaters (APHs) in fossil power plants with post combustion NOx controls that use selective noncatalytic reduction (SNCR) or selective catalytic reduction (SCR). This report describes pilot-scale experiments conducted to better understand ABS chemistry and efforts to develop a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model of an APH to identify the key phenomena that may affect ABS formation and deposition.

2008-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

86

Linear Models: Useful Tools to Analyze GCM Results  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Using a two-level linear, steady state model, we diagnose the 40-day mean response of a GCM to a tropical sea surface temperature (SST) anomaly. The time-mean anomalies produced by the GCM are simulated as linear response to the anomalous ...

C. J. Kok; J. D. Opsteegh; H. M. van den Dool

1987-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Operational Ensemble Cloud Model Forecasts: Some Preliminary Results  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

From 15 July through 30 September of 2001, an ensemble cloud-scale model was run for the Storm Prediction Center on a daily basis. Each ensemble run consisted of 78 members whose initial conditions were derived from the 20-km Rapid Update Cycle ...

Kimberly L. Elmore; Steven J. Weiss; Peter C. Banacos

2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Reservoir Characterization and Modeling of the Glorieta and the Clearfork Formations, Monahans Field, Permian Basin, Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Monahans Field of the Permian Basin in West Texas is a complex carbonate reservoir due to the lateral heterogeneity caused by facies changes throughout the Lower Guadalupian Glorieta Formation and the Upper Leonardian Upper Clearfork Formation. A facies model, porosity model, and a siltstone model were generated in Petrel to better characterize the Monahans Field reservoir. Interbedded impermeable siltstone beds in Monahans Field partition the reservoir making oil production and water injection difficult. The facies model indicates that during deposition, a tectonically uplifted area (island) influenced sedimentation and also shows that the Upper Clearfork Formation is mainly subtidal facies and the Glorieta Formation consists mainly of tidal flat facies. The porosity model shows the greatest porosity to be in the diagenetically altered supratidal deposits. The siltstone model identified siltstone barriers that prograded across the platform when sea level was low. 4th-order sequences occur within the larger 3rd-order sequence. The models identified multiple flow units in Monahans Field. Preferential injection of water within the reservoir compartments, horizontal drilling, and hydraulic fracture stimulation may all provide mechanisms to more efficiently sweep the remaining reserves from the reservoir.

Yeatman, Ryan Yeatman

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

PHEV Parcel Delivery Truck Model - Development and Preliminary Results (Presentation)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Describes results of a study to determine the impact of drive cycles on the energy- and cost-effectiveness of plug-in hybrid electric delivery vans.

Barnitt, R

2009-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

90

A THREE-PHASE CHEMICAL MODEL OF HOT CORES: THE FORMATION OF GLYCINE  

SciTech Connect

A new chemical model is presented that simulates fully coupled gas-phase, grain-surface, and bulk-ice chemistry in hot cores. Glycine (NH{sub 2}CH{sub 2}COOH), the simplest amino acid, and related molecules such as glycinal, propionic acid, and propanal, are included in the chemical network. Glycine is found to form in moderate abundance within and upon dust-grain ices via three radical-addition mechanisms, with no single mechanism strongly dominant. Glycine production in the ice occurs over temperatures {approx}40-120 K. Peak gas-phase glycine fractional abundances lie in the range 8 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -11}-8 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -9}, occurring at {approx}200 K, the evaporation temperature of glycine. A gas-phase mechanism for glycine production is tested and found insignificant, even under optimal conditions. A new spectroscopic radiative-transfer model is used, allowing the translation and comparison of the chemical-model results with observations of specific sources. Comparison with the nearby hot-core source NGC 6334 IRS1 shows excellent agreement with integrated line intensities of observed species, including methyl formate. The results for glycine are consistent with the current lack of a detection of this molecule toward other sources; the high evaporation temperature of glycine renders the emission region extremely compact. Glycine detection with ALMA is predicted to be highly plausible, for bright, nearby sources with narrow emission lines. Photodissociation of water and subsequent hydrogen abstraction from organic molecules by OH, and NH{sub 2}, are crucial to the buildup of complex organic species in the ice. The inclusion of alternative branches within the network of radical-addition reactions appears important to the abundances of hot-core molecules; less favorable branching ratios may remedy the anomalously high abundance of glycolaldehyde predicted by this and previous models.

Garrod, Robin T., E-mail: rgarrod@astro.cornell.edu [Center for Radiophysics and Space Research, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853-6801 (United States)

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

DIPPER project 871 determination of ideal-gas enthalpies of formation for key compounds, The 1991 project results  

SciTech Connect

Results of a study aimed at improving group-contribution methodology for estimating thermodynamic properties of organic substances are reported. Specific weaknesses where particular group-contribution terms were unknown, or estimated because of lack of experimental data, are addressed by experimental studies of enthalpies of combustion in condensed phase, vapor-pressure measurements, and differential scanning calorimetric (d.s.c.) heat-capacity measurements. Ideal-gas enthalpies of formation of cyclohexene, phthalan (2,5-dihydrobenzo-3,4-furan), isoxazole, n-octylamine, di-n-octylamine, tri-n-octylamine, phenyl isocyanate, and 1,4,5,6-tetrahydropyrimidine are reported. Two-phase (liquid + vapor) heat capacities were determined for phthalan, isoxazole, the three octylamines, and phenyl isocyanate. Liquid-phase densities along the saturation line were measured for phthalan and isoxazole at 298 to 425 K. The critical temperature and critical density of n-octylamine were determined from d.s.c. results and critical pressure derived from the fitting procedures. Fitting procedures were used to derive critical temperatures, pressures, and densities for cyclohexene (pressure and density only), phthalan, isoxazole, di-n-octylamine, and phenyl isocyanate. Group-additivity parameters or ring-correction terms are derived.

Steele, W.V.; Chirico, R.D.; Knipmeyer, S.E.; Nguyen, A.; Tasker, I.R.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Hydrogen-burn survival: preliminary thermal model and test results  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report documents preliminary Hydrogen Burn Survival (HBS) Program experimental and analytical work conducted through February 1982. The effects of hydrogen deflagrations on safety-related equipment in nuclear power plant containment buildings are considered. Preliminary results from hydrogen deflagration experiments in the Sandia Variable Geometry Experimental System (VGES) are presented and analytical predictions for these tests are compared and discussed. Analytical estimates of component thermal responses to hydrogen deflagrations in the upper and lower compartments of an ice condenser, pressurized water reactor are also presented.

McCulloch, W.H.; Ratzel, A.C.; Kempka, S.N.; Furgal, D.T.; Aragon, J.J.

1982-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Automated forensic fingerprint analysis: a novel generic process model and container format  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The automated forensic analysis of latent fingerprints poses a new challenge. While for the pattern recognition aspects involved, the required processing steps can be related to fingerprint biometrics, the common biometric model needs to be extended ... Keywords: automated dactyloscopy, automated forensic analysis, forensic container format, multibranched biometric process

Tobias Kiertscher; Claus Vielhauer; Marcus Leich

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Spatial pattern formation in the Keller-Segel model with a logistic source  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper deals with a Neumann boundary value problem in a d-dimensional box T^d=(0,@p)^d(d=1,2,3) for the chemotaxis-diffusion-growth model (@? ){U"t=@?(D"u@?U-@gU@?V)+rU(1-U/K),V"t=D"v@?^2V+@aU-@bV, which describes the movement of cells in response ... Keywords: Keller-Segel model, Logistic source, Nonlinear dynamics, Pattern formation

Shengmao Fu, Ji Liu

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Collision-induced galaxy formation: semi-analytical model and multi-wavelength predictions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A semi-analytic model is proposed that couples the Press-Schechter formalism for the number of galaxies with a prescription for galaxy-galaxy interactions that enables to follow the evolution of galaxy morphologies along the Hubble sequence. Within this framework, we calculate the chemo-spectrophotometric evolution of galaxies to obtain spectral energy distributions. We find that such an approach is very successful in reproducing the statistical properties of galaxies as well as their time evolution. We are able to make predictions as a function of galaxy type: for clarity, we restrict ourselves to two categories of galaxies: early and late types that are identified with ellipticals and disks. In our model, irregulars are simply an early stage of galaxy formation. In particular, we obtain good matches for the galaxy counts and redshift distributions of sources from UV to submm wavelengths. We also reproduce the observed cosmic star formation history and the diffuse background radiation, and make predictions as to the epoch and wavelength at which the dust-shrouded star formation of spheroids begins to dominate over the star formation that occurs more quiescently in disks. A new prediction of our model is a rise in the FIR luminosity density with increasing redshift, peaking at about $z\\sim 3$, and with a ratio to the local luminosity density $\\rho_{L,\

Christophe Balland; Julien E. G. Devriendt; Joe Silk

2002-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Expanding the potential for saline formations : modeling carbon dioxide storage, water extraction and treatment for power plant cooling.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The National Water, Energy and Carbon Sequestration simulation model (WECSsim) is being developed to address the question, 'Where in the current and future U.S. fossil fuel based electricity generation fleet are there opportunities to couple CO{sub 2} storage and extracted water use, and what are the economic and water demand-related impacts of these systems compared to traditional power systems?' The WECSsim collaborative team initially applied this framework to a test case region in the San Juan Basin, New Mexico. Recently, the model has been expanded to incorporate the lower 48 states of the U.S. Significant effort has been spent characterizing locations throughout the U.S. where CO{sub 2} might be stored in saline formations including substantial data collection and analysis efforts to supplement the incomplete brine data offered in the NatCarb database. WECSsim calculates costs associated with CO{sub 2} capture and storage (CCS) for the power plant to saline formation combinations including parasitic energy costs of CO{sub 2} capture, CO{sub 2} pipelines, water treatment options, and the net benefit of water treatment for power plant cooling. Currently, the model can identify the least-cost deep saline formation CO{sub 2} storage option for any current or proposed coal or natural gas-fired power plant in the lower 48 states. Initial results suggest that additional, cumulative water withdrawals resulting from national scale CCS may range from 676 million gallons per day (MGD) to 30,155 MGD depending on the makeup power and cooling technologies being utilized. These demands represent 0.20% to 8.7% of the U.S. total fresh water withdrawals in the year 2000, respectively. These regional and ultimately nation-wide, bottom-up scenarios coupling power plants and saline formations throughout the U.S. can be used to support state or national energy development plans and strategies.

Not Available

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Reconciling Simulated Moisture Fluxes Resulting from Alternate Hydrologic Model Time Steps and Energy Budget Closure Assumptions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Hydrological model predictions are sensitive to model forcings, input parameters, and the parameterizations of physical processes. Analyses performed for the Variable Infiltration Capacity model show that the resulting moisture fluxes are ...

Ingjerd Haddeland; Dennis P. Lettenmaier; Thomas Skaugen

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Deep-Water Formation and Meridional Overturning in a High-Resolution Model of the North Atlantic  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The authors use different versions of the model of the wind- and thermohaline-driven circulation in the North and Equatorial Atlantic developed under the WOCE Community Modeling Effort to investigate the mean flow pattern and deep-water formation ...

Claus W. Böning; Frank O. Bryan; William R. Holland; Ralf Döscher

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Structure and Formation of an Annular Hurricane Simulated in a Fully Compressible, Nonhydrostatic Model—TCM4  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The structure and formation of an annular hurricane simulated in a fully compressible, nonhydrostatic tropical cyclone model—TCM4—are analyzed. The model is initialized with an axisymmetric vortex on an f plane in a quiescent environment, and ...

Yuqing Wang

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Leaching of BTEX from Aged Crude Oil Contaminated Model Soils: Experimental and Modeling Results  

SciTech Connect

It is generally assumed that soil properties such as organic matter content, porosity, and mineral surface area have a significant effect on the bioavailability and leachability of aged petroleum hydrocarbons. In order to test this hypothesis, nine model soils or sorbents (i.e., fine and coarse quartz sand, montmorillonite and kaolinite clay, peat, 60? and 150? silica gel, a loam soil, and non-porous glass beads) were spiked with a crude oil, aged for 27 months in the laboratory, and transferred to glass columns for the performance of continuous flow leaching experiments. The column effluents were periodically sampled for 43 days and analyzed for BTEX. A one-dimensional flow model for predicting the dissolution and dispersion of individual hydrocarbons from a multi-component NAPL such as crude oil was used to fit the leaching data (i.e., the BTEX concentration versus time curves) by adjusting the equilibrium oil-leachate partitioning coefficient (Kol) for each respective hydrocarbon. The Peclet number, which is a measure of dispersion and a required modeling parameter, was measured in separate chloride tracer experiments for each soil column. Results demonstrate that soil properties did not significantly affect the leaching kinetics of BTEX from the columns. Instead, BTEX leaching curves could be successfully fitted with the one-dimensional NAPL dissolution flow model for all sorbents with the exception of montmorillonite clay. The fitting parameter Kol for each hydrocarbon was found to be similar to the Kol values that were independently measured for the same crude oil by Rixey et al. (Journal of Hazardous Materials B, 65: 137-156, 1999). In addition, the fitted Kol values were very similar for BTEX leaching from aged compared to freshly spiked loam soil. These findings indicate that leaching of BTEX in the aged soils that are contaminated with crude oil at the high concentrations commonly found in the environment (i.e., >20,000 mg/kg) was not affected by soil properties or aging but rather was governed by the equilibrium dissolution of these hydrocarbons from the crude oil NAPL that is coating the soil particles.

Huesemann, Michael H.; Hausmann, Tom S.; Fortman, Timothy J.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "model results formats" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Modeling of Nonuniform Degradation in Large-Format Li-ion Batteries (Poster)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Shows results of an empirical model capturing effects of both storage and cycling and developed the lithium ion nickel cobalt aluminum advanced battery chemistry.

Smith, K.; Kim, G. H.; Pesaran, A.

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Baryon history and cosmic star formation in non-Gaussian cosmological models: numerical simulations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present the first numerical, N-body, hydrodynamical, chemical simulations of cosmic structure formation in the framework of non-Gaussian models. We study the impact of primordial non-Gaussianities on early chemistry (e, H, H+, H-, He, He+, He++, H2, H2+, D, D+, HD, HeH+), molecular and atomic gas cooling, star formation, metal (C, O, Si, Fe, Mg, S) enrichment, population III (popIII) and population II-I (popII) transition, and on the evolution of "visible" objects. We find that non-Gaussianities can have some consequences on baryonic structure formation at very early epochs, but the subsequent evolution at later times washes out any difference among the various models. When assuming reasonable values for primordial non-Gaussian perturbations, it turns out that they are responsible for: (i) altering early molecular fractions in the cold, dense gas phase of ~10 per cent; (ii) inducing small temperature fluctuations of ~15, and of the popIII/popII transition of up to some 10^7yr; (iv) determining variations of history of the Universe. We stress, though, that purely non-Gaussian effects might be difficult to address, since they are strictly twisted with additional physical phenomena (e.g. primordial gas bulk flows, unknown primordial popIII stellar mass function, etc.) that have similar or stronger impact on the behaviour of the baryons.

Umberto Maio; Francesca Iannuzzi

2011-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

103

Radiative effects of a CO/sub 2/ increase: results of a model comparison  

SciTech Connect

A comparison of infrared radiative transfer models is announced. The initial phase is underway, with other phases scheduled through 1984. The results of the ir model comparison will be included in the state-of-the-art report on climate modeling. Although the time scale for completion of the comparison is a few years, significant preliminary results have already been obtained. (PSB)

Luther, F.M.

1982-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

104

North Atlantic modeling of low-frequency variability in mode water formation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The generation of interannual and near-decadal variability in the formation of mode waters in the western North Atlantic is investigated in the realistic framework of an isopycnic coordinate ocean model forced with atmospheric data from 1946 to 1988. At Bermuda, the model reproduces quite well the observed potential vorticity and isopycnal depth anomalies associated with the subtropical mode water (STMW). Heat storage and preconditioning of the convective activity are found to be the important factors for the generation of STMW variability, with persistence of cold (warm) conditions, associated with anomalous heat loss (gain) over the western subtropics, being more significant for the generation of the simulated variability than are strong anomalous events in isolated years. In the Labrador Sea, the model captures the phase and order of magnitude of the observed near-decadal variability in the convective activity, if not its maximum amplitude. The simulated potential vorticity anomali...

Afonso M. Paiva; Eric P. Chassignet

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

On the Dynamics of Hawaiian Cloud Bands: Comparison of Model Results with Observations and Island Climatology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents a detailed comparison study of three-dimensional model results with an aircraft wind field mapping for the island of Hawaii. Model runs were initialized using an aircraft sounding from 1 August 1985, and detailed predictions ...

Roy M. Rasmussen; Piotr Smolarkiewicz; John Warner

1989-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Heavy precipitation events in a warmer climate: results from CMIP5 models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this work the authors investigate possible changes in the distribution of heavy precipitation events under a warmer climate, using the results of a set of 20 climate models taking part in the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project phase 5 effort ...

Enrico Scoccimarro; Silvio Gualdi; Alessio Bellucci; Matteo Zampieri; Antonio Navarra

107

SUSTAINING STAR FORMATION RATES IN SPIRAL GALAXIES: SUPERNOVA-DRIVEN TURBULENT ACCRETION DISK MODELS APPLIED TO THINGS GALAXIES  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Gas disks of spiral galaxies can be described as clumpy accretion disks without a coupling of viscosity to the actual thermal state of the gas. The model description of a turbulent disk consisting of emerging and spreading clumps contains free parameters, which can be constrained by observations of molecular gas, atomic gas, and the star formation rate for individual galaxies. Radial profiles of 18 nearby spiral galaxies from THINGS, HERACLES, SINGS, and GALEX data are used to compare the observed star formation efficiency, molecular fraction, and velocity dispersion to the model. The observed radially decreasing velocity dispersion can be reproduced by the model. In the framework of this model, the decrease in the inner disk is due to the stellar mass distribution which dominates the gravitational potential. Introducing a radial break in the star formation efficiency into the model improves the fits significantly. This change in the star formation regime is realized by replacing the free-fall time in the prescription of the star formation rate with the molecule formation timescale. Depending on the star formation prescription, the break radius is located near the transition region between the molecular-gas-dominated and atomic-gas-dominated parts of the galactic disk or closer to the optical radius. It is found that only less massive galaxies (log M(M{sub sun}) {approx}gas loss via star formation by radial gas accretion within the disk. These galaxies can thus access their gas reservoirs with large angular momentum. On the other hand, the star formation of massive galaxies is determined by the external gas mass accretion rate from a putative spherical halo of ionized gas or from satellite accretion. In the absence of this external accretion, star formation slowly exhausts the gas within the optical disk within the star formation timescale.

Vollmer, Bernd [CDS, Observatoire astronomique, UMR 7550, 11 rue de l'universite, 67000 Strasbourg (France); Leroy, Adam K., E-mail: bvollmer@astro.u-strasbg.fr [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, 520 Edgemont Road, Charlottesville, VA 22903 (United States)

2011-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

108

Analysis of Regional Climate Model Results for Simulations of Future Climates  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Contemporary global climate models produce results that are too coarse to provide the level of detail required to evaluate environmental, social, and economic impacts of global climate change. High-resolution limited-area models (regional climate models) nested within the global model output have been used to create physically and spatially consistent climates with high spatial resolution. This report evaluates the effectiveness of these models.

2002-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

109

Mathematical model for ice formation in the Arctic during Alain Pham Ngoc Dinh and Phan Thanh Nam  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Mathematical model for ice formation in the Arctic during summer Alain Pham Ngoc Dinh and Phan The only source of ice formation in the Arctic during summer is a layer of ice be- tween an under-ice melt-bottoms is governed by both of heat fluxes and salt fluxes. This is a two-phase Stefan problem with two free

110

A PDF-Based Model for Boundary Layer Clouds. Part II: Model Results  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new single-column model for the cloudy boundary layer, described in a companion paper, is tested for a variety of regimes. To represent the subgrid-scale variability, the model uses a joint probability density function (PDF) of vertical ...

Jean-Christophe Golaz; Vincent E. Larson; William R. Cotton

2002-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Effect of Blade Torsion on Modeling Results for the Small Wind Research Turbine (SWRT): Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper summarizes modeling results from both the FAST and ADAMS aeroelastic simulators characterizing small wind turbine loads and dynamic behavior.

Corbus, D.; Hansen, A. C.; Minnema, J.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Investigation of Droplet Size Distributions and Drizzle Formation Using A New Trajectory Ensemble Model. Part II: Lucky Parcels  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A novel trajectory ensemble model of the cloud-topped boundary layer containing 1340 Lagrangian parcels moving with a turbulent-like flow with the observed statistical properties was applied to investigate the formation of the microphysical ...

L. Magaritz; M. Pinsky; O. Krasnov; A. Khain

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

The Effect of Cold Climate upon North Atlantic Deep Water Formation in a Simple Ocean–Atmosphere Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The sensitivity of North Atlantic Deep Water formation to variations in mean surface temperature is explored with a meridional-vertical plane ocean model coupled to an energy balance atmosphere. It is found that North Atlantic Deep Water ...

Michael Winton

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Understanding the Importance of Microphysics and Macrophysics for Warm Rain in Marine Low Clouds. Part II: Heuristic Models of Rain Formation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Two simple heuristic model formulations for warm rain formation are introduced and their behavior explored. The first, which is primarily aimed at representing warm rain formation in shallow convective clouds, is a continuous collection model ...

Robert Wood; Terence L. Kubar; Dennis L. Hartmann

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

A Detailed Microphysical Model Within a Two-Dimensional Dynamic Framework: Model Description and Preliminary Results  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A two-dimensional anelastic cloud model which incorporates detailed treatments of the water and ice phase is presented. The liquid phase processes considered include condensation, quasi-stochastic coalescence, fallout and breakup, while the ice ...

William D. Hall

1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

The formation of IRIS diagnostics I. A quintessential model atom of Mg II and general formation properties of the Mg II h&k lines  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

NASA's Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS) space mission will study how the solar atmosphere is energized. IRIS contains an imaging spectrograph that covers the Mg II h&k lines as well as a slit-jaw imager centered at Mg II k. Understanding the observations will require forward modeling of Mg II h&k line formation from 3D radiation-MHD models. This paper is the first in a series where we undertake this forward modeling. We discuss the atomic physics pertinent to h&k line formation, present a quintessential model atom that can be used in radiative transfer computations and discuss the effect of partial redistribution (PRD) and 3D radiative transfer on the emergent line profiles. We conclude that Mg II h&k can be modeled accurately with a 4-level plus continuum Mg II model atom. Ideally radiative transfer computations should be done in 3D including PRD effects. In practice this is currently not possible. A reasonable compromise is to use 1D PRD computations to model the line profile up ...

Leenaarts, J; Carlsson, M; Uitenbroek, H; de Pontieu, B

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

TURBULENT COMBUSTION MODELING OF COAL:BIOMASS BLENDS IN A SWIRL BURNER I -PRELIMINARY RESULTS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

TURBULENT COMBUSTION MODELING OF COAL:BIOMASS BLENDS IN A SWIRL BURNER I - PRELIMINARY RESULTS of Mathematics Texas A&M University College Station, TX 77843 ABSTRACT A combustion model using three mixture fractions has been developed for accurate simulation of coal:manure combustion. This model treats coal

Daripa, Prabir

118

Cost Benefit Analysis Modeling Tool for Electric vs. ICE Airport Ground Support Equipment – Development and Results  

SciTech Connect

This report documents efforts to develop a computer tool for modeling the economic payback for comparative airport ground support equipment (GSE) that are propelled by either electric motors or gasoline and diesel engines. The types of GSE modeled are pushback tractors, baggage tractors, and belt loaders. The GSE modeling tool includes an emissions module that estimates the amount of tailpipe emissions saved by replacing internal combustion engine GSE with electric GSE. This report contains modeling assumptions, methodology, a user’s manual, and modeling results. The model was developed based on the operations of two airlines at four United States airports.

James Francfort; Kevin Morrow; Dimitri Hochard

2007-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

AN EVOLUTIONARY MODEL FOR COLLAPSING MOLECULAR CLOUDS AND THEIR STAR FORMATION ACTIVITY  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present an idealized, semi-empirical model for the evolution of gravitationally contracting molecular clouds (MCs) and their star formation rate (SFR) and efficiency (SFE). The model assumes that the instantaneous SFR is given by the mass above a certain density threshold divided by its free-fall time. The instantaneous number of massive stars is computed assuming a Kroupa initial mass function. These stars feed back on the cloud through ionizing radiation, eroding it. The main controlling parameter of the evolution turns out to be the maximum cloud mass, M{sub max}. This allows us to compare various properties of the model clouds against their observational counterparts. A giant molecular cloud (GMC) model (M{sub max} {approx} 10{sup 5} M{sub Sun }) adheres very well to the evolutionary scenario recently inferred by Kawamura et al. for GMCs in the Large Magellanic Cloud. A model cloud with M{sub max} Almost-Equal-To 2000 M{sub Sun} evolves in the Kennicutt-Schmidt diagram, first passing through the locus of typical low-to-intermediate-mass star-forming clouds, and then moving toward the locus of high-mass star-forming ones over the course of {approx}10 Myr. Also, the stellar age histograms for this cloud a few Myr before its destruction agree very well with those observed in the {rho}-Oph stellar association, whose parent cloud has a similar mass, and imply that the SFR of the clouds increases with time. Our model thus agrees well with various observed properties of star-forming MCs, suggesting that the scenario of gravitationally collapsing MCs, with their SFR regulated by stellar feedback, is entirely feasible and in agreement with key observed properties of MCs.

Zamora-Aviles, Manuel; Vazquez-Semadeni, Enrique; Colin, Pedro [Centro de Radioastronomia y Astrofisica, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Apdo. Postal 3-72, Morelia, Michoacan, 58089 (Mexico)

2012-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

120

COMPUTATIONAL FLUID DYNAMICS MODELING OF SCALED HANFORD DOUBLE SHELL TANK MIXING - CFD MODELING SENSITIVITY STUDY RESULTS  

SciTech Connect

The primary purpose of the tank mixing and sampling demonstration program is to mitigate the technical risks associated with the ability of the Hanford tank farm delivery and celtification systems to measure and deliver a uniformly mixed high-level waste (HLW) feed to the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) Uniform feed to the WTP is a requirement of 24590-WTP-ICD-MG-01-019, ICD-19 - Interface Control Document for Waste Feed, although the exact definition of uniform is evolving in this context. Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) modeling has been used to assist in evaluating scaleup issues, study operational parameters, and predict mixing performance at full-scale.

JACKSON VL

2011-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

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121

Results and Comparison from the SAM Linear Fresnel Technology Performance Model: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper presents the new Linear Fresnel technology performance model in NREL's System Advisor Model. The model predicts the financial and technical performance of direct-steam-generation Linear Fresnel power plants, and can be used to analyze a range of system configurations. This paper presents a brief discussion of the model formulation and motivation, and provides extensive discussion of the model performance and financial results. The Linear Fresnel technology is also compared to other concentrating solar power technologies in both qualitative and quantitative measures. The Linear Fresnel model - developed in conjunction with the Electric Power Research Institute - provides users with the ability to model a variety of solar field layouts, fossil backup configurations, thermal receiver designs, and steam generation conditions. This flexibility aims to encompass current market solutions for the DSG Linear Fresnel technology, which is seeing increasing exposure in fossil plant augmentation and stand-alone power generation applications.

Wagner, M. J.

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Heavy Precipitation Events in a Warmer Climate: Results from CMIP5 Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this work, the authors investigate possible changes in the distribution of heavy precipitation events under a warmer climate, using the results of a set of 20 climate models taking part in phase 5 of Coupled Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP5)...

Enrico Scoccimarro; Silvio Gualdi; Alessio Bellucci; Matteo Zampieri; Antonio Navarra

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Impulsively Started Flow in a Submarine Canyon: Comparison of Results from Laboratory and Numerical Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Intercomparisons have been made of results from laboratory experiments and a numerical model for the flow in the vicinity of an idealized submarine canyon located along an otherwise continuous shelf. Motion in the rotating and continuously ...

Nicolas Pérenne; J. William Lavelle; David C. Smith IV; Don L. Boyer

2001-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Long-term Contracting in a Deregulated Electricity Industry: Simulation Results from a Hydro Management Model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The deregulation of electricity industry has introduced long-term contracting as a tool for hedging risk and strategy. A vital consideration for market participants is the relationship between behaviour in the spot market, and decisions taken in the contract market. We have developed a reservoir management model which integrates a Cournot spot market model into a Dual Dynamic Programming framework. Simulations using this model show that the market outcomes depend strongly upon the level of contracting undertaken by both competitors. We develop hypotheses for the dynamics involved, and present results from the simulation model reinforcing these. 1.

Stephen Batstone; Tristram Scott

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Modeling of the formation of short-chain acids in propane flames  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In order to better understand their potential formation in combustion systems, a detailed kinetic mechanism for the formation of short-chain monocarboxylic acids, formic (HCOOH), acetic (CH3COOH), propionic (C2H5COOH) and propenic (C2H3COOH)) acids, has been developed. Simulations of lean (equivalence ratios from 0.9 to 0.48) laminar premixed flames of propane stabilized at atmospheric pressure with nitrogen as diluent have been performed. It was found that amounts up to 25 ppm of acetic acid, 15 ppm of formic acid and 1 ppm of C3 acid can be formed for some positions in the flames. Simulations showed that the more abundant C3 acid formed is propenic acid. A quite acceptable agreement has been obtained with the scarce results from the literature concerning oxygenated compounds, including aldehydes (CH2O, CH3CHO) and acids. A reaction pathways analysis demonstrated that each acid is mainly derived from the aldehyde of similar structure.

Battin-Leclerc, Frédérique; Jaffrezo, J L; Legrand, M

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Jet Formation in Black Hole Accretion Systems I: Theoretical Unification Model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Two types of relativistic jets are suggested to form near accreting black holes: a potentially ultrarelativistic Poynting-dominated jet and a Poynting-baryon jet. One source of jet matter is electron-positron pair production, which is driven by neutrino annihilation in GRBs and photon annihilation in AGN and x-ray binaries. GRB Poynting-dominated jets are also loaded by electron-proton pairs by the collisional cascade of Fick-diffused free neutrons. We show that, for the collapsar model, the neutrino-driven enthalpy flux (classic fireball model) is probably dominated by the Blandford-Znajek energy flux, which predicts a jet Lorentz factor of $\\Gamma\\sim 100-1000$. We show that radiatively inefficient AGN, such as M87, are synchrotron-cooling limited to $\\Gamma\\sim 2-10$. Radiatively efficient x-ray binaries, such as GRS1915+105, are Compton-drag limited to $\\Gamma \\lesssim 2$, but the jet may be destroyed by Compton drag. However, the Poynting-baryon jet is a collimated outflow with $\\Gamma \\sim 1-3$. The jet from radiatively efficient systems, such as microquasar GRS1915+105, may instead be a Poynting-baryon jet that is only relativistic when the disk is geometrically thick. In a companion paper, general relativistic hydromagnetic simulations of black hole accretion with pair creation are used to simulate jet formation in GRBs, AGN, and x-ray binaries.

Jonathan C. McKinney

2005-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

127

A three-dimensional dynamical model of current sheet formation in a coronal loop  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, the coronal field comprises multiple flux domains. The model shows that motion at the footpoints results to the hypothesis that its magnetic field develops current sheets when the photospheric footpoints move (Sweet 1958) whereby the coronal field develops tangential discontinuities (current sheets) which heat the coro- na

Longcope, Dana

128

Gearbox Reliability Collaborative Phase 1 and 2: Testing and Modeling Results; Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Gearbox Reliability Collaborative (GRC) investigates root causes of wind turbine gearbox premature failures and validates design assumptions that affect gearbox reliability using a combined testing and modeling approach. Knowledge gained from the testing and modeling of the GRC gearboxes builds an understanding of how the selected loads and events translate into internal responses of three-point mounted gearboxes. This paper presents some testing and modeling results of the GRC research during Phase 1 and 2. Non-torque loads from the rotor including shaft bending and thrust, traditionally assumed to be uncoupled with gearbox, affect gear and bearing loads and resulting gearbox responses. Bearing clearance increases bearing loads and causes cyclic loading, which could contribute to a reduced bearing life. Including flexibilities of key drivetrain subcomponents is important in order to reproduce the measured gearbox response during the tests using modeling approaches.

Keller, J.; Guo, Y.; LaCava, W.; Link, H.; McNiff, B.

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Combined Stellar Structure and Atmosphere Models: Exploratory Results for Wolf-Rayet Stars  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper we present Complete Stellar models (CoStar) for massive stars, which treat the stellar interior and atmosphere, including its wind. Particular emphasis is given to Wolf-Rayet stars. We address the question of the effective temperatures of WNE and WC stars. Our first results show a satisfactory agreement between the CoStar models and the simple temperature correction method applied by Schaller et al. (1992). An analyses of the subphotospheric structure of the WR star models shows the importance of metal opacity. This may be essential for understanding the driving mechanism of Wolf-Rayet winds.

D. Schaerer; A. de Koter; W. Schmutz

1994-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

130

Constitutive models for the Etchegoin Sands, Belridge Diatomite, and overburden formations at the Lost Hills oil field, California  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the development of constitutive material models for the overburden formations, reservoir formations, and underlying strata at the Lost Hills oil field located about 45 miles northwest of Bakersfield in Kern County, California. Triaxial rock mechanics tests were performed on specimens prepared from cores recovered from the Lost Hills field, and included measurements of axial and radial stresses and strains under different load paths. The tested intervals comprise diatomaceous sands of the Etchegoin Formation and several diatomite types of the Belridge Diatomite Member of the Monterey Formation, including cycles both above and below the diagenetic phase boundary between opal-A and opal-CT. The laboratory data are used to drive constitutive parameters for the Extended Sandler-Rubin (ESR) cap model that is implemented in Sandia's structural mechanics finite element code JAS3D. Available data in the literature are also used to derive ESR shear failure parameters for overburden formations. The material models are being used in large-scale three-dimensional geomechanical simulations of the reservoir behavior during primary and secondary recovery.

FOSSUM,ARLO F.; FREDRICH,JOANNE T.

2000-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Modeling the Behavior of Formate, Acetate, and Carbon Dioxide in Water/Steam Cycles  

SciTech Connect

Organic substances persist in high-temperature aqueous environments for varying periods of tiem depending on temperature, pH, contact with solid surfaces, and other factors. Since carboxylic acids and CO{sub 2} affect the pH and can potentially play specific roles in the promotion of inhibition of turbine corrosion, it is important to be able to predict the amounts of these substances that are transferred to steam and the composition of the early condensate as a function of condesnation ratio for various boiler chemistries. Such predictions can only be made using a speciated model including all the solutes. Example calculations for AVT and OT chemistry show complex relationships between early condensate enrichment ratios and boiler pressure, boiler water composition, and condensation ratio. Even small amounts of sodium and chloride below 0.1 {mu}g {center_dot} kg{sup -1} in the steam are relevant to early condensate pH and carboxylic acid concentration. The calculations show that the enrichment of the early condensate relative to steam is typically 10 times greater for formate than for acetate.

Gruszkiewicz, Miroslaw {Mirek} S [ORNL; Palmer, Donald [ORNL

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

A coupled flow and geomechanics model for enhanced oil and gas recovery in shale formations.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Economic production from shale formations has been achieved because of advances in horizontal well drilling and hydraulic fracturing. Nonetheless, hydrocarbon recovery from these reservoirs is… (more)

Fakcharoenphol, Perapon

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

A hybrid source apportionment model integrating measured data and air quality model results - article no. D07301  

SciTech Connect

The Big Bend Regional Aerosol and Visibility (BRAVO) study was an intensive air quality study designed to understand the causes of haze in Big Bend National Park. Daily speciated fine aerosols were measured from July through October 1999 at 37 sites located mostly in Texas. In support of BRAVO, two chemical transport models (CTMs) were used to apportion particulate sulfate at Big Bend and other sites in Texas to sources in the eastern and western United States, Texas, Mexico, and the Carbon I and II coal-fired power plants, located 225 km southeast of Big Bend in Mexico. Analysis of the CTM source attribution results and comparison to results from receptor models revealed systematic biases. To reduce the multiplicative biases, a hybrid source apportionment model, based on inverse modeling, was developed that adjusted the initial CTM source contributions so the modeled sulfate concentrations optimally fit the measured data, resulting in refined daily source contributions. The method was tested using synthetic data and successfully reduced source attribution biases. The refined sulfate source attribution results reduced the initial eastern U.S. contribution to Big Bend, averaged over the BRAVO study period, from about 40% to about 30%, while Mexico's contribution increased from 24 - 32% about 40%. The contribution from the Carbon facility increased from similar to 14% to over 20%. The increase in Mexico's contribution is consistent with more recent SO{sub 2} emissions estimates that indicate that the BRAVO Mexican SO{sub 2} emissions were underestimated. Source attribution results for other monitoring sites in west Texas were similar to results at Big Bend.

Schichtel, B.A.; Malm, W.C.; Gebhart, K.A.; Barna, M.G.; Knipping, E.M. [Colorado State University, Ft. Collins, CO (United States)

2006-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

134

Results from baseline tests of the SPRE I and comparison with code model predictions  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Space Power Research Engine (SPRE), a free-piston Stirling engine with linear alternator, is being tested at the NASA Lewis Research Center as part of the Civil Space Technology Initiative (CSTI) as a candidate for high capacity space power. This paper presents results of base-line engine tests at design and off-design operating conditions. The test results are compared with code model predictions.

Cairelli, J.E.; Geng, S.M. [National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Cleveland, OH (United States). Lewis Research Center; Skupinski, R.C. [Sverdrup Technology, Inc., Cleveland, OH (United States). NASA Lewis Research Center Group

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Tumor Necrosis Factor Receptor p55 Is Essential for Intrahepatic Granuloma Formation and Hepatocellular Apoptosis in a Murine Model of Bacterium-Induced Fulminant Hepatitis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Tumor necrosis factor receptor p55 is essential for intrahepatic granuloma formation and hepatocellular apoptosis in a murine model of bacterium-induced fulminant hepatitis.

H Tsuji; A Harada; N Mukaida; Y Nakanuma; H Bluethmann; K Yamakawa; S I Nakamura; K I Kobayashi; Hirokazu Tsuji; Akihisa Harada; Naofumi Mukaida; Yasuni Nakanuma; Horst Bluethmann; Shuichi Kaneko; Kiyotaka Yamakawa; Shin-ichi Nakamura

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Assessment of Energy Removal Impacts on Physical Systems: Hydrodynamic Model Domain Expansion and Refinement, and Online Dissemination of Model Results  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this report we describe the 1) the expansion of the PNNL hydrodynamic model domain to include the continental shelf along the coasts of Washington, Oregon, and Vancouver Island; and 2) the approach and progress in developing the online/Internet disseminations of model results and outreach efforts in support of the Puget Sound Operational Forecast System (PS-OPF). Submittal of this report completes the work on Task 2.1.2, Effects of Physical Systems, Subtask 2.1.2.1, Hydrodynamics, for fiscal year 2010 of the Environmental Effects of Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy project.

Yang, Zhaoqing; Khangaonkar, Tarang; Wang, Taiping

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Solar Deployment System (SolarDS) Model: Documentation and Sample Results  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Solar Deployment System (SolarDS) model is a bottom-up, market penetration model that simulates the potential adoption of photovoltaics (PV) on residential and commercial rooftops in the continental United States through 2030. NREL developed SolarDS to examine the market competitiveness of PV based on regional solar resources, capital costs, electricity prices, utility rate structures, and federal and local incentives. The model uses the projected financial performance of PV systems to simulate PV adoption for building types and regions then aggregates adoption to state and national levels. The main components of SolarDS include a PV performance simulator, a PV annual revenue calculator, a PV financial performance calculator, a PV market share calculator, and a regional aggregator. The model simulates a variety of installed PV capacity for a range of user-specified input parameters. PV market penetration levels from 15 to 193 GW by 2030 were simulated in preliminary model runs. SolarDS results are primarily driven by three model assumptions: (1) future PV cost reductions, (2) the maximum PV market share assumed for systems with given financial performance, and (3) PV financing parameters and policy-driven assumptions, such as the possible future cost of carbon emissions.

Denholm, P.; Drury, E.; Margolis, R.

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

ORIGEN2 model and results for the Clinch River Breeder Reactor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Reactor physics calculations and literature information acquisition have led to the development of a Clinch River Breeder Reactor (CRBR) model for the ORIGEN2 computer code. The model is based on cross sections taken directly from physics codes. Details are presented concerning the physical description of the fuel assemblies, the fuel management scheme, irradiation parameters, and initial material compositions. The ORIGEN2 model for the CRBR has been implemented, resulting in the production of graphical and tabular characteristics (radioactivity, thermal power, and toxicity) of CRBR spent fuel, high-level waste, and fuel-assembly structural material waste as a function of decay time. Characteristics for pressurized water reactors (PWRs), commercial liquid-metal fast breeder reactors (LMFBRs), and the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) have also been included in this report for comparison with the CRBR data.

Croff, A.G.; Bjerke, M.A.

1982-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Solar Deployment System (SolarDS) Model: Documentation and Sample Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2 2 September 2009 The Solar Deployment System (SolarDS) Model: Documentation and Sample Results Paul Denholm, Easan Drury, and Robert Margolis National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard, Golden, Colorado 80401-3393 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC Contract No. DE-AC36-08-GO28308 Technical Report NREL/TP-6A2-45832 September 2009 The Solar Deployment System (SolarDS) Model: Documentation and Sample Results Paul Denholm, Easan Drury, and Robert Margolis Prepared under Task No. PVD9.1210 NOTICE This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States government.

140

Chemical kinetic modeling of high pressure propane oxidation and comparison to experimental results  

SciTech Connect

A pressure dependent kinetic mechanism for propane oxidation is developed and compared to experimental data from a high pressure flow reactor. The experiment conditions range from 10--15 atm, 650--800 K, and were performed at a residence time of 200 {micro}s for propane-air mixtures at an equivalence ratio of 0.4. The experimental results include data on negative temperature coefficient (NTC) behavior, where the chemistry describing this phenomena is considered critical in understanding automotive engine knock and cool flame oscillations. Results of the numerical model are compared to a spectrum of stable species profiles sampled from the flow reactor. Rate constants and product channels for the reaction of propyl radicals, hydroperoxy-propyl radicals and important isomers with O{sub 2} were estimated using thermodynamic properties, with multifrequency quantum Kassel Theory for k(E) coupled with modified strong collision analysis for fall-off. Results of the chemical kinetic model show an NTC region over nearly the same temperature regime as observed in the experiments. The model simulates properly the production of many of the major and minor species observed in the experiments. Numerical simulations show many of the key reactions involving propylperoxy radicals are in partial equilibrium at 10--15 atm. This indicates that their relative concentrations are controlled by a combination of thermochemistry and rate of minor reaction channels (bleed reactions) rather than primary reaction rates. This suggests that thermodynamic parameters of the oxygenated species, which govern equilibrium concentrations, are important. The modeling results show propyl radical and hydroperoxy-propyl radicals reaction with O{sub 2} proceeds, primarily, through thermalized adducts, not chemically activated channels.

Koert, D.N. [Wichita State Univ., KS (United States). Mechanical Engineering Dept.; Pitz, W.J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Bozzelli, J.W. [New Jersey Inst. of Tech., Newark, NJ (United States). Chemistry and Chemical Engineering Dept.; Cernansky, N.P. [Drexel Univ., Philadelphia, PA (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering and Mechanics

1995-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "model results formats" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

COMPARISON OF EXPERIMENTAL RESULTS TO CFD MODELS FOR BLENDING IN A TANK USING DUAL OPPOSING JETS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Research has been completed in a pilot scale, eight foot diameter tank to investigate blending, using a pump with dual opposing jets. The jets re-circulate fluids in the tank to promote blending when fluids are added to the tank. Different jet diameters and different horizontal and vertical orientations of the jets were investigated. In all, eighty five tests were performed both in a tank without internal obstructions and a tank with vertical obstructions similar to a tube bank in a heat exchanger. These obstructions provided scale models of several miles of two inch diameter, serpentine, vertical cooling coils below the liquid surface for a full scale, 1.3 million gallon, liquid radioactive waste storage tank. Two types of tests were performed. One type of test used a tracer fluid, which was homogeneously blended into solution. Data were statistically evaluated to determine blending times for solutions of different density and viscosity, and the blending times were successfully compared to computational fluid dynamics (CFD) models. The other type of test blended solutions of different viscosity. For example, in one test a half tank of water was added to a half tank of a more viscous, concentrated salt solution. In this case, the fluid mechanics of the blending process was noted to significantly change due to stratification of fluids. CFD models for stratification were not investigated. This paper is the fourth in a series of papers resulting from this research (Leishear, et.al. [1- 4]), and this paper documents final test results, statistical analysis of the data, a comparison of experimental results to CFD models, and scale-up of the results to a full scale tank.

Leishear, R.

2011-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

142

MPI-PhT/2003-28 Some results on distinction of Higgs boson models  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

MPI-PhT/2003-28 Some results on distinction of Higgs boson models #3; Jaume Guasch a , Wolfgang on the analysis of the ratio of branching ratios R = BR(H ! b #22; b)=BR(H ! #28; + #28; ) of Higgs boson decays and the e + e Linear Collider at 500 GeV center of mass energy. The search of a Higgs boson is nowadays

143

Quantifying the Value of Hydropower in the Electric Grid: Modeling Results for Future Scenarios  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Work reported in this Technical Report is part of a larger study that is made up of multiple components and intends to utilize and enhance tools that can value hydropower assets in a changing electric grid. The study’s main objective is to develop a methodology to facilitate improved valuation and resource planning for pumped storage and conventional hydropower projects in the future electric transmission grid.This report covers Modeling Results for Future Electricity Market ...

2012-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

144

Results on the search for the standard model Higgs boson at CMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A summary of the results from searches for the Standard Model Higgs Boson in the CMS experiment at LHC with data collected from proton-proton collisions at {radical}(s) = 7TeV is presented. The Higgs boson is searched in a multiplicity of decay channels using data samples corresponding to integrated luminosities in the range 4.6 - 4.8 fb{sup -1}. The investigated mass range is 110 - 600 GeV. Results are reported for each channel as well as for their combination.

Fabozzi, Francesco [INFN Sezione di Napoli, Complesso Univ. di Monte S. Angelo Via Cintia - 80126 Napoli (Italy) and Universita della Basilicata, Viale dell'Ateneo Lucano 10 - 85100 Potenza (Italy); Collaboration: CMS Collaboration

2012-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

145

Chemical kinetic modeling of high pressure propane oxidation and comparison to experimental results. Revision 1  

SciTech Connect

A pressure dependent kinetic mechanism for propane oxidation is developed and compared to experimental data from a high pressure flow reactor. Experimental conditions range from 10--15 atm, 650--800 K, and a residence time of 198 ms for propane-air mixtures at an equivalence ratio of 0.4. The experimental results clearly indicate a negative temperature coefficient (NTC) behavior. The chemistry describing this phenomena is critical in understanding automotive engine knock and cool flame oscillations. Results of the numerical model are compared to a spectrum of stable species profiles sampled from the flow reactor. Rate constants and product channels for the reaction of propyl radicals, hydroperoxy-propyl radicals and important isomers (radicals) with O{sub 2} were estimated using thermodynamic properties, with multifrequency quantum Kassel Theory for k(E) coupled with modified strong collision analysis for fall-off. Results of the chemical kinetic model show an NTC region over nearly the same temperature regime as observed in the experiments. Sensitivity analysis identified the key reaction steps that control the rate of oxidation in the NTC region. The model reasonably simulates the profiles for many of the major and minor species observed in the experiments.

Koert, D.N. [Wichita State Univ., KS (United States). Mechanical Engineering Dept.; Pitz, W.J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Bozzelli, J.W. [New Jersey Inst. of Tech., Newark, NJ (United States). Chemistry and Chemical Engineering Dept.; Cernansky, N.P. [Drexel Univ., Philadelphia, PA (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering and Mechanics

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Energetic neutral atom imaging with the Polar CEPPAD/IPS instrument: Initial forward modeling results  

SciTech Connect

Although the primary function of the CEP-PAD/IPS instrument on Polar is the measurement of energetic ions in-situ, it has also proven to be a very capable Energetic neutral Atom (ENA) imager. Raw ENA images are currently being constructed on a routine basis with a temporal resolution of minutes during both active and quiet times. However, while analyses of these images by themselves provide much information on the spatial distribution and dynamics of the energetic ion population in the ring current, detailed modeling is required to extract the actual ion distributions. In this paper, the authors present the initial results of forward modeling an IPS ENA image obtained during a small geo-magnetic storm on June 9, 1997. The equatorial ion distribution inferred with this technique reproduces the expected large noon/midnight and dawn/dusk asymmetries. The limitations of the model are discussed and a number of modifications to the basic forward modeling technique are proposed which should significantly improve its performance in future studies.

Henderson, M.G.; Reeves, G.D.; Moore, K.R. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Spence, H.E.; Jorgensen, A.M. [Boston Univ., MA (United States). Center for Space Physics; Fennell, J.F.; Blake, J.B. [Aerospace Corp., Los Angeles, CA (United States); Roelof, E.C. [Johns Hopkins Univ., Laurel, MD (United States). Applied Physics Lab.

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

147

Recent results on QCD thermodynamics: lattice QCD versus Hadron Resonance Gas model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present our most recent investigations on the QCD cross-over transition temperatures with 2+1 staggered flavours and one-link stout improvement [JHEP 1009:073, 2010]. We extend our previous two studies [Phys. Lett. B643 (2006) 46, JHEP 0906:088 (2009)] by choosing even finer lattices ($N_t$=16) and we work again with physical quark masses. All these results are confronted with the predictions of the Hadron Resonance Gas model and Chiral Perturbation Theory for temperatures below the transition region. Our results can be reproduced by using the physical spectrum in these analytic calculations. A comparison with the results of the hotQCD collaboration is also discussed.

Szabolcs Borsanyi; Zoltan Fodor; Christian Hoelbling; Sandor D. Katz; Stefan Krieg; Claudia Ratti; Kalman K. Szabo

2010-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

148

Three-Dimensional Thermal-Electrochemical Coupled Model for Spirally Wound Large-Format Lithium-Ion Batteries (Presentation)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This presentation discusses the behavior of spirally wound large-format Li-ion batteries with respect to their design. The objectives of the study include developing thermal and electrochemical models resolving 3-dimensional spirally wound structures of cylindrical cells, understanding the mechanisms and interactions between local electrochemical reactions and macroscopic heat and electron transfers, and developing a tool and methodology to support macroscopic designs of cylindrical Li-ion battery cells.

Lee, K. J.; Smith K.; Kim, G. H.

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Fast 2D non-LTE radiative modelling of prominences I. Numerical methods and benchmark results  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

New high-resolution spectropolarimetric observations of solar prominences require improved radiative modelling capabilities in order to take into account both multi-dimensional - at least 2D - geometry and complex atomic models. This makes necessary the use of very fast numerical schemes for the resolution of 2D non-LTE radiative transfer problems considering freestanding and illuminated slabs. The implementation of Gauss-Seidel and successive over-relaxation iterative schemes in 2D, together with a multi-grid algorithm, is thoroughly described in the frame of the short characteristics method for the computation of the formal solution of the radiative transfer equation in cartesian geometry. We propose a new test for multidimensional radiative transfer codes and we also provide original benchmark results for simple 2D multilevel atom cases which should be helpful for the further development of such radiative transfer codes, in general.

L. Leger; L. Chevallier; F. Paletou

2007-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

150

Comparison of calculated results from two analytical models with measured data from a heat-exchanger flow test  

SciTech Connect

Predicted results from both a network flow model and a turbulent flow model were compared with measured results from an air flow test on a half-scale model of the auxiliary heat exchanger for a high-temperature gas-cooled reactor. Measurements of both velocity and pressure were made within the heat exchanger shell side flow field. These measurements were compared with calculated results from both a network flow model and a turbulent flow model. Both analytical models predicted early identical results which, except for some minor anomalies, compared favorably with the measured data.

Carosella, D.P.; Pavlics, P.N.

1983-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

3D Thermal and Electrochemical Model for Spirally Wound Large Format Lithium-ion Batteries (Presentation)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In many commercial cells, long tabs at both cell sides, leading to uniform potentials along the spiral direction of wound jelly rolls, are rarely seen because of their high manufacturing cost. More often, several metal strips are welded at discrete locations along both current collector foils. With this design, the difference of electrical potentials is easily built up along current collectors in the spiral direction. Hence, the design features of the tabs, such as number, location and size, can be crucial factors for spiral-shaped battery cells. This paper presents a Li-ion battery cell model having a 3-dimensional spiral mesh involving a wound jellyroll structure. Further results and analysis will be given regarding impacts of tab location, number, and size.

Lee, K. J.; Kim, G. H.; Smith, K.

2010-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

152

THE TAOS PROJECT: UPPER BOUNDS ON THE POPULATION OF SMALL KUIPER BELT OBJECTS AND TESTS OF MODELS OF FORMATION AND EVOLUTION OF THE OUTER SOLAR SYSTEM  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We have analyzed the first 3.75 years of data from the Taiwanese American Occultation Survey (TAOS). TAOS monitors bright stars to search for occultations by Kuiper Belt objects (KBOs). This data set comprises 5 x 10{sup 5} star hours of multi-telescope photometric data taken at 4 or 5 Hz. No events consistent with KBO occultations were found in this data set. We compute the number of events expected for the Kuiper Belt formation and evolution models of Pan and Sari, Kenyon and Bromley, Benavidez and Campo Bagatin, and Fraser. A comparison with the upper limits we derive from our data constrains the parameter space of these models. This is the first detailed comparison of models of the KBO size distribution with data from an occultation survey. Our results suggest that the KBO population is composed of objects with low internal strength and that planetary migration played a role in the shaping of the size distribution.

Bianco, F. B. [Department of Physics, University of California Santa Barbara, Mail Code 9530, Santa Barbara, CA 93106-9530 (United States); Zhang, Z.-W.; King, S.-K.; Wang, J.-H.; Lee, T.; Lin, H.-C. [Institute of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Academia Sinica, P.O. Box 23-141, Taipei 10617, Taiwan (China); Lehner, M. J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Pennsylvania, 209 South 33rd Street, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Mondal, S. [Aryabhatta Research Institute of Observational Sciences (ARIES), Manora Peak, Nainital 263 129 (India); Giammarco, J. [Department of Astronomy and Physics, Eastern University, 1300 Eagle Road, Saint Davids, PA 19087 (United States); Holman, M. J.; Alcock, C. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Coehlo, N. K. [Department of Statistics, University of California-Berkeley, 367 Evans Hall, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Axelrod, T. [Steward Observatory, 933 North Cherry Avenue, Room N204, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Byun, Y.-I.; Kim, D.-W. [Department of Astronomy, Yonsei University, 134 Shinchon, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of); Chen, W. P. [Institute of Astronomy, National Central University, 300 Jhongda Road, Jhongli 32054, Taiwan (China); Cook, K. H. [Institute for Geophysics and Planetary Physics, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA 94550 (United States); Dave, R. [Initiative in Innovative Computing at Harvard, 60 Oxford Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); De Pater, I. [Department of Astronomy, University of California-Berkeley, 601 Campbell Hall, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Lissauer, J. J. [Space Science and Astrobiology Division 245-3, NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, CA 94035 (United States)], E-mail: fbianco@lcogt.net (and others)

2010-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

153

Results from Alloy 600 And Alloy 690 Caustic SCC Model Boiler Tests  

SciTech Connect

A versatile model boiler test methodology was developed and used to compare caustic stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of mill annealed Alloy 600 and thermally treated Alloy 690. The model boiler included simulated crevice devices that efficiently and consistently concentrated Na2CO3, resulting in volatilization of CO2 with the steam and concentration of NaOH at the tube surfaces. The test methodology also included variation in tube stress, either produced by the primary to secondary side pressure differential, or by a novel method that reproducibly yields a higher stress condition on the tube. The significant effect of residual stress on tube SCC was also considered. SCC of both Alloy 600 and Alloy 690 were evaluated as a function of temperature and stress. Analytical transmission electron microscopy (ATEM) evaluations of the cracks and the grain boundaries ahead of the cracks were performed, providing insight into the SCC mechanism. This model boiler test methodology may be applicable to a range of bulkwater secondary chemistries that concentrate to produce aggressive crevice environments.

Miller, Frederick D.; Thomas, Larry E.

2009-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

154

Hawaii Solar Integration Study: Solar Modeling Developments and Study Results; Preprint  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Hawaii Solar Integration Study (HSIS) is a follow-up to the Oahu Wind Integration and Transmission Study completed in 2010. HSIS focuses on the impacts of higher penetrations of solar energy on the electrical grid and on other generation. HSIS goes beyond the island of Oahu and investigates Maui as well. The study examines reserve strategies, impacts on thermal unit commitment and dispatch, utilization of energy storage, renewable energy curtailment, and other aspects of grid reliability and operation. For the study, high-frequency (2-second) solar power profiles were generated using a new combined Numerical Weather Prediction model/ stochastic-kinematic cloud model approach, which represents the 'sharp-edge' effects of clouds passing over solar facilities. As part of the validation process, the solar data was evaluated using a variety of analysis techniques including wavelets, power spectral densities, ramp distributions, extreme values, and cross correlations. This paper provides an overview of the study objectives, results of the solar profile validation, and study results.

Orwig, K.; Corbus, D.; Piwko, R.; Schuerger, M.; Matsuura, M.; Roose, L.

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

A Coupled Model Study on the Formation and Dissipation of Sea Fogs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study examined the impact of air–sea coupling using a coupled atmosphere–ocean modeling system consisting of the Coupled Ocean–Atmosphere Mesoscale Prediction System as the atmospheric component and the Regional Ocean Modeling System as the ...

Ki-Young Heo; Kyung-Ja Ha

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Multi-Dimensional Electrochemical-Thermal Coupled Model of Large Format Cylindrical Lithium Ion Cells (Presentation)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Presentation on 3-D modeling of lithium-ion cells used in plug-in hyybrid electric vehicle batteries. 3-D models provide better understanding of cell design, operation, and management.

Kim, G.-H.; Smith, K.

2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

The NewFLOW Computational Model and Intermediate Format - Version 1.04  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This report motivates and defines a general-purpose, architecture independent, parallel computational model, which captures the intuitions which underlie the design of the United Functions and Objects (UFO) programming language. The model has two aspects, which turn out to be a traditional dataflow model and an actor-like model, with a very simple interface between the two. Certain aspects of the model, particularly strictness, maximum parallelism, and lack of suspension are stressed. The implications of introducing stateful objects are carefully spelled out. The model has several purposes, although we primarily describe it as a vehicle for the compilation and optimisation of UFO, and for visualising the execution of programs. Having motivated the model, this report specifies, in detail, both the syntax and semantics of the model, and provides some examples of its use. 1 Motivation The primary purpose of this report is to define the semantics and syntax of NewFLOW, an intermediate rep...

Julian Seward; John Sargeant; Chris Kirkham

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Modeling of fate and transport of co-injection of H2S with CO2 in deep saline formations  

SciTech Connect

The geological storage of CO{sub 2} in deep saline formations is increasing seen as a viable strategy to reduce the release of greenhouse gases into the atmosphere. However, costs of capture and compression of CO{sub 2} from industrial waste streams containing small quantities of sulfur and nitrogen compounds such as SO{sub 2}, H{sub 2}S and N{sub 2} are very expensive. Therefore, studies on the co-injection of CO{sub 2} containing other acid gases from industrial emissions are very important. In this paper, numerical simulations were performed to study the co-injection of H{sub 2}S with CO{sub 2} in sandstone and carbonate formations. Results indicate that the preferential dissolution of H{sub 2}S gas (compared with CO{sub 2} gas) into formation water results in the delayed breakthrough of H{sub 2}S gas. Co-injection of H{sub 2}S results in the precipitation of pyrite through interactions between the dissolved H{sub 2}S and Fe{sup 2+} from the dissolution of Fe-bearing minerals. Additional injection of H{sub 2}S reduces the capabilities for solubility and mineral trappings of CO{sub 2} compared to the CO{sub 2} only case. In comparison to the sandstone (siliciclastic) formation, the carbonate formation is less favorable to the mineral sequestration of CO{sub 2}. Different from CO{sub 2} mineral trapping, the presence of Fe-bearing siliciclastic and/or carbonate is more favorable to the H{sub 2}S mineral trapping.

Zhang, W.; Xu, T.; Li, Y.

2010-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

159

Examination of Numerical Results from Tangent Linear and Adjoint of Discontinuous Nonlinear Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The forward model solution and its functional (e.g., the cost function in 4DVAR) are discontinuous with respect to the model's control variables if the model contains discontinuous physical processes that occur during the assimilation window. In ...

S. Zhang; X. Zou; Jon E. Ahlquist

2001-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Modeling the Capacity and Emissions Impacts of Reduced Electricity Demand. Part 1. Methodology and Preliminary Results.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Modeling the Capacity and Emissions Impacts of Reducedpurposes. Modeling the Capacity and Emissions Impacts ofFigure 2: Comparison of capacity projections from AEO2011

Coughlin, Katie

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "model results formats" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Design and Analysis of a Test Rig for Modeling the Bit/Formation Interface in Petroleum Drilling Applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Equipment failure and well deviations are prevailing contributors to production delays within the petroleum industry. Particular monetary focus is given to the drilling operations of wells to overcome these deficits, in order to extract natural resources as efficiently, and as safely, as possible. The research presented here focuses on minimizing vibrations of the drill string near the bottom-hole assembly (BHA) by identifying the cause of external forcing on the drillstring in vertical and horizontal wells and measuring the effects of various factors on the stability of perturbations on the system. A test rig concept has been developed to accurately measure the interaction forces and torques between the bit, formation and fluids during drilling in order to clearly define a bit/formation interface law (BFIL) for the purpose vibrational analysis. As a secondary function, the rig will be able to measure the potential inputs to a drilling simulation code that can be used to model drillstring vibrations. All notable quantities will be measured including torque on bit (TOB), weight on bit (WOB), lateral impact loads (LIL), formation stiffness, bit specific properties, fluid damping coefficients and rate of penetration (ROP). The conceptual design has been analyzed and refined, in detail, to verify its operational integrity and range of measurement error. The operational envelope of the rig is such that a drill bit of up to 8 ½ inches in diameter can be effectively tested at desired operational parameters (WOB: 0-55,000 lbf, RPM: 60-200) with various rock formations and multiple fluid types. Future use and design possibilities are also discussed to enhance the functionality of the rig and the potential for further research in the area of oil and gas drilling and vibrational modeling.

Wilson, Joshua Kyle

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

The Role of Asia in Mitigating Climate Change: Results from the Asia Modeling Exercise  

SciTech Connect

In 2010, Asia accounted for 60% of global population, 39% of Gross World Product, 44% of global energy consumption and nearly half of the world’s energy system CO2 emissions. Thus, Asia is an important region to consider in any discussion of climate change or climate change mitigation. This paper explores the role of Asia in mitigating climate change, by comparing the results of 23 energy-economy and integrated assessment models. We focus our analysis on seven key areas: base year data, future energy use and emissions absent climate policy, the effect of urban and rural development on future energy use and emissions, the role of technology in emissions mitigation, regional emissions mitigation, and national climate policies

Calvin, Katherine V.; Clarke, Leon E.; Krey, Volker; Blanford, Geoffrey J.; Jiang, Kejun; Kainuma, M.; Kriegler, Elmar; Luderer, Gunnar; Shukla, Priyadarshi R.

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Comparison of Nonlinear Model Results Using Modified Recorded and Synthetic Ground Motions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A study has been performed that compares results of nonlinear model runs using two sets of earthquake ground motion time histories that have been modified to fit the same design response spectra. The time histories include applicable modified recorded earthquake ground motion time histories and synthetic ground motion time histories. The modified recorded earthquake ground motion time histories are modified from time history records that are selected based on consistent magnitude and distance. The synthetic ground motion time histories are generated using appropriate Fourier amplitude spectrums, Arias intensity, and drift correction. All of the time history modification is performed using the same algorithm to fit the design response spectra. The study provides data to demonstrate that properly managed synthetic ground motion time histories are reasonable for use in nonlinear seismic analysis.

Robert E. Spears; J. Kevin Wilkins

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

SEARCH RESULTS  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Home | search results Please enter one or more search words. ADVANCED SEARCH with all the words with the exact phrase with at least one of the words without the words File Format...

165

Spatio-temporal pattern formation in coupled models of plankton dynamics and fish school motion  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Keywords: bistability, chaos, plankton dynamics, predator-prey model, reaction-diffusion system, rule-based fish school motion, spiral waves

Horst Malchow; Birgit Radtke; Malaak Kallache; Alexander B. Medvinsky; Dmitry A. Tikhonov; Sergei V. Petrovskii

2000-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Numerical modeling of injection and mineral trapping of CO2 withH2S and SO2 in a Sandstone Formation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) injection into deep geologic formations could decrease the atmospheric accumulation of this gas from anthropogenic sources. Furthermore, by co-injecting H{sub 2}S or SO{sub 2}, the products respectively of coal gasification or combustion, with captured CO{sub 2}, problems associated with surface disposal would be mitigated. We developed models that simulate the co-injection of H{sub 2}S or SO{sub 2} with CO{sub 2} into an arkose formation at a depth of about 2 km and 75 C. The hydrogeology and mineralogy of the injected formation are typical of those encountered in Gulf Coast aquifers of the United States. Six numerical simulations of a simplified 1-D radial region surrounding the injection well were performed. The injection of CO{sub 2} alone or co-injection with SO{sub 2} or H{sub 2}S results in a concentrically zoned distribution of secondary minerals surrounding a leached and acidified region adjacent to the injection well. Co-injection of SO{sub 2} with CO{sub 2} results in a larger and more strongly acidified zone, and alteration differs substantially from that caused by the co-injection of H{sub 2}S or injection of CO{sub 2} alone. Precipitation of carbonates occurs within a higher pH (pH > 5) peripheral zone. Significant quantities of CO{sub 2} are sequestered by ankerite, dawsonite, and lesser siderite. The CO{sub 2} mineral-trapping capacity of the formation can attain 40-50 kg/m{sup 3} medium for the selected arkose. In contrast, secondary sulfates precipitate at lower pH (pH simulations.

Xu, Tianfu; Apps, John A.; Pruess, Karsten; Yamamoto, Hajime

2004-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

167

Climate–Carbon Cycle Feedback Analysis: Results from the C4MIP Model Intercomparison  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Eleven coupled climate–carbon cycle models used a common protocol to study the coupling between climate change and the carbon cycle. The models were forced by historical emissions and the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) Special ...

P. Friedlingstein; P. Cox; R. Betts; L. Bopp; W. von Bloh; V. Brovkin; P. Cadule; S. Doney; M. Eby; I. Fung; G. Bala; J. John; C. Jones; F. Joos; T. Kato; M. Kawamiya; W. Knorr; K. Lindsay; H. D. Matthews; T. Raddatz; P. Rayner; C. Reick; E. Roeckner; K.-G. Schnitzler; R. Schnur; K. Strassmann; A. J. Weaver; C. Yoshikawa; N. Zeng

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Initial Results From The Navy Two-Way Interactive Nested Tropical Cyclone Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A primitive equation, two-way interactive nested tropical cyclone model has been developed by the Naval Environmental Prediction Research Facility for operational use during the 1980 typhoon season. The fine mesh grid of the model operates ...

Edward J. Harrison Jr.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

The International Urban Energy Balance Models Comparison Project: First Results from Phase 1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A large number of urban surface energy balance models now exist with different assumptions about the important features of the surface and exchange processes that need to be incorporated. To date, no comparison of these models has been conducted; ...

C. S. B. Grimmond; M. Blackett; M. J. Best; J. Barlow; J-J. Baik; S. E. Belcher; S. I. Bohnenstengel; I. Calmet; F. Chen; A. Dandou; K. Fortuniak; M. L. Gouvea; R. Hamdi; M. Hendry; T. Kawai; Y. Kawamoto; H. Kondo; E. S. Krayenhoff; S-H. Lee; T. Loridan; A. Martilli; V. Masson; S. Miao; K. Oleson; G. Pigeon; A. Porson; Y-H. Ryu; F. Salamanca; L. Shashua-Bar; G-J. Steeneveld; M. Tombrou; J. Voogt; D. Young; N. Zhang

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Thermal Tides in the Atmosphere of Venus: Comparison of Model Results with Observations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A linearized primitive equation (LPE) model is developed to study thermal tides in the atmosphere of Venus. The LPE model describes diurnal and semidiurnal oscillations of a cyclostrophically balanced atmosphere in which zonal velocity varies ...

Judith Burt Pechmann; Andrew P. Ingersoll

1984-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Influence of defect formation as a result of incorporation of a Mn {delta} layer on the photosensitiviy spectrum of InGaAs/GaAs quantum wells  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The influence of defect formation upon the deposition of a Mn {delta} layer and a GaAs coating layer (with the use of laser evaporation) on the photosensitivity spectra of heterostructures with InGaAs/GaAs quantum wells located in the near-surface region has been studied.

Gorshkov, A. P., E-mail: gorskovap@phys.unn.ru; Karpovich, I. A.; Pavlova, E. D.; Kalenteva, I. L. [Lobachevsky State University of Nizhny Novgorod (Russian Federation)

2012-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

172

Exact results for parallel-chain kinetic models of biological transport Anatoly B. Kolomeisky  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-state models. Thus, the application of phenomenological simple chemical kinetic models20­22,25 which provide ``chemical'' approach is based on a kinetic multistate description of the molecular motor transport.17 or conformations leads to the motion of motor proteins. In the simplest chemical kinetic model see Fig. 1 , a motor

173

A Heuristic Model of the Dansgaard-Oeschger Cycles: Description, Results, and Sensitivity Studies: Part I  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present a simple model for studying the D-O cycles of the last glacial period, based on the Dokken Et Al Hypothesis for D-O Cycles. The model is a column model representing the Nordic Seas, and is composed of ocean boxes stacked below a one-...

Hansi A. Singh; David S. Battisti; Cecilia M. Bitz

174

Genetic programming model of solid oxide fuel cell stack: first results  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Models that predict performance are important tools in understanding and designing solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs). Modelling of SOFC stack-based systems is a powerful approach that can provide useful insights into the nonlinear dynamics of ... Keywords: SOFC stack, genetic programming, modelling, nonlinear dynamics, simulation, solid oxide fuel cells

Uday K. Chakraborty

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Modeling Ozone Formation and Transport in the Cascadia Region of the Pacific Northwest  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The rapidly growing Cascadia region of the Pacific Northwest, consisting of western Washington, Oregon, and southwestern British Columbia, has experienced surface ozone concentrations that exceed federally mandated standards. A modeling system ...

Mike Barna; Brian Lamb; Susan O’Neill; Hal Westberg; Cris Figueroa-Kaminsky; Sally Otterson; Clint Bowman; Jennifer DeMay

2000-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

The influence of Microphysics in the Formation of Intense Wake Lows: A Numerical Modeling Study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A two-dimensional cloud model is used to investigate whether microphysical processes alone within the stratiform rain regions of mesoscale convection systems can induce strong descent and intense surface wake lows accompanying such systems. ...

William A. Gallus Jr.

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Multiphase flow modeling of oil mist and liquid film formation in oil shale retorting  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A first level model is developed to account for the appearance and disappearance of liquid oil produced during oil shale retorting. Although nearly all the kerogen initially present in the oil shale exits the retort in the form of a liquid either in the form of a mist or a falling film, the flow of this valuable, clean liquid fuel is not presently accounted for in oil shale retorting computer models. A rigorous treatment of the problem is very difficult. A simplified but sophisticated treatment is developed which is designed to be easily incorporated into the LLL computer model now without major modifications to the numerical solution algorithms. A complete set of equations and simple models are developed to explicitly account for the movement of condensed oil mist and liquid film flowing at unequal velocities. The equations clearly illustrate where more detailed treatments may be inserted, as they are developed.

Lyczkowski, R.W.; Gidaspow, D.

1979-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

178

Mechanisms for Wave Packet Formation and Maintenance in a Quasigeostrophic Two-Layer Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A quasigeostrophic, two-layer, ?-plane channel model is used to investigate the dynamics of baroclinic wave packets. A series of experiments are performed in which an unstable flow is maintained by lower-level Ekman friction and radiative ...

J. G. Esler; P. H. Haynes

1999-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Numerical Modeling of Meander and Eddy Formation in the Azores Current Frontal Zone  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Numerical experiments with an 11-level primitive equation, finite-difference model in a periodic channel are performed to analyze the properties of unstable finite-amplitude disturbances in an idealized Azores Current. Release of available ...

Jürgen Kielmann; Rolf H. Käse

1987-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Results from a workshop on research needs for modeling aquifer thermal energy storage systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A workshop an aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES) system modeling was conducted in Seattle, Washington, on November 30 and December 1, 1989 by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL). The goal of the workshop was to develop a list of high-priority research activities that would facilitate the commercial success of ATES. During the workshop, participants reviewed currently available modeling tools for ATES systems and produced a list of significant issues related to modeling ATES systems. Participants assigned a priority to each issue on the list by voting and developed a list of research needs for each of four high-priority research areas; the need for a feasibility study model, the need for engineering design models, the need for aquifer characterization, and the need for an economic model. The workshop participants concluded that ATES commercialization can be accelerated by aggressive development of ATES modeling tools and made specific recommendations for that development. 2 tabs.

Drost, M K

1990-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "model results formats" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Effect of finite chemical potential on QGP-Hadron phase transition in a statistical model of fireball formation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study the effect of finite chemical potential for the QGP constituents in the Ramanathan et al. statistical model (Phys.Rev.C70, 027903,2004). While the earlier computations using this model with vanishing chemical potentials indicated a weakly first order phase transition for the system in the vicinity of 170 MeV (Pramana, 68, 757, 2007), the introduction of finite values for the chemical potentials of the constituents makes the transition a smooth roll over of the phases, while allowing fireball formation with radius of a few "fermi" to take place. This seems to be in conformity with the latest consensus on the nature of the QGP-Hadron phase transition. Keywords: Quark Gluon Plasma, Quark Hadron Phase Transition

R. Ramanathan; Agam k. Jha; K. k. Gupta; S. S. Singh

2008-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

182

Formation and emission of methane in rice soils: Experimental determination and modeling analysis. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Rice paddy soils have been identified as a major source of methane emissions contributing to the observed atmospheric increase in methane. This points to the need for a method of quantifying and predicting methane emissions for the widely varying conditions used in rice agriculture throughout the world. In the present work, a mathematical model for estimating the emission of methane from rice paddy soils is developed and refined. Kinetic parameters for methanogenesis in a Louisiana rice soil are determined from laboratory data on methane production from acetic acid substrate. Use of a stirred reactor allows simultaneous measurement of acetate consumption and methane production while minimizing mass transfer limitations. An existing model for rice plant growth is utilized to provide data on the availability of root exudates as a carbon source for the methanogens. The final methane model includes the kinetic parameters, plant data, and estimated transport parameters. With adjustments in these parameters, it provides an acceptable match to field data.

Law, V.J.; Bhattacharya, S.K.

1993-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

183

Assessing Future Changes in the East Asian Summer Monsoon Using CMIP3 Models: Results from the Best Model Ensemble  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Future changes in the East Asian summer monsoon (EASM) have been estimated from the six best-performing models in phase 3 of the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP3) included in the Fourth Assessment Report (AR4) of the Intergovernmental ...

Kyong-Hwan Seo; Jung Ok

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

A Numerical Model of the Formation and Evolution of a Low-Level Jet  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A one-layer. one-dimensional numerical model is described which simulates the life cycle of the extratropical low-level jet (LLJ). The LLJ starts as an isallobaric wind near the point of maximum pressure tall. Subsequently, the LLJ expands over a ...

Dušan Djuri?

1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Statistical Wind Power Forecasting Models: Results for U.S. Wind Farms; Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Electricity markets in the United States are evolving. Accurate wind power forecasts are beneficial for wind plant operators, utility operators, and utility customers. An accurate forecast makes it possible for grid operators to schedule the economically efficient generation to meet the demand of electrical customers. In the evolving markets, some form of auction is held for various forward markets, such as hour ahead or day ahead. This paper develops several statistical forecasting models that can be useful in hour-ahead markets that have a similar tariff. Although longer-term forecasting relies on numerical weather models, the statistical models used here focus on the short-term forecasts that can be useful in the hour-ahead markets. We investigate the extent to which time-series analysis can improve on simplistic persistence forecasts. This project applied a class of models known as autoregressive moving average (ARMA) models to both wind speed and wind power output.

Milligan, M.; Schwartz, M.; Wan, Y.

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Mixture Preparation and Nitric Oxide Formation in a GDI Engine studied by Combined Laser Diagnostics and Numerical Modeling  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Through the combination of advanced imaging laser diagnostics with multi-dimensional computer models, a new understanding of the performance of direct-injection gasoline engines is pursuit. The work focuses on the fuel injection process, the breakup of the liquid into a fine spray and the mixing of the fuel with the in-cylinder gases. Non-intrusive laser diagnostics will be used to measure the spatial distribution of droplets and vaporized fuel with very high temporal resolution. These data along with temperature measurements will be used to validate a new spray breakup model for gasoline direct-injection. Experimental data on near wall fuel distributions will be used for comparison with a model that predicts the spray-wall interaction and the dynamics of the liquid film on the surface. Quantitative measurements of local nitric oxide concentrations inside the combustion chamber will provide a critical test for a numerical simulation of the nitric oxide formation process. This model is based on a modified flamelet approach and will be used to study the effects of exhaust gas recirculation.

Volker Sick; Dennis N. Assanis

2002-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

187

Results from a discrete fracture network model of a Hot Dry Rock system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The work described represents a move towards better representations of the natural fracture system. The discrete fracture network model used during the study was the NAPSAC code (Grindrod et al, 1992). The goals of the work were to investigate the application of discrete fracture network models to Hot Dry Rock systems, increase the understanding of the basic thermal extraction process and more specifically the understanding of the Rosemanowes Phase 2B system. The aim in applying the work to the Rosemanowes site was to use the discrete fracture network approach to integrate a diverse set of field measurements into as simple a model as possible.

Lanyon, G.W.; Batchelor, A.S.; Ledingham, P.

1993-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

188

The Lagrangian View of South Atlantic Interocean Exchange in a Global Ocean Model Compared with Inverse Model Results  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Data from a global ocean general circulation model (OCCAM) has been used to investigate the interocean exchange of thermocline and intermediate waters in the South Atlantic Ocean. To resolve the pathways between different ocean basins a ...

J. Donners; S. S. Drijfhout

2004-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

The Effects of Assimilation on the Physics of an Ocean Model. Part I: Theoretical Model and Barotropic Results  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Although data assimilation is now an established oceanographic technique, little work has been done on the interaction of the assimilation scheme and the physics of the underlying model. The way in which even a simple assimilation scheme (here ...

Rebecca A. Woodgate; Peter D. Killworth

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Multimodel Combination Techniques for Analysis of Hydrological Simulations: Application to Distributed Model Intercomparison Project Results  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper examines several multimodel combination techniques that are used for streamflow forecasting: the simple model average (SMA), the multimodel superensemble (MMSE), modified multimodel superensemble (M3SE), and the weighted average method ...

Newsha K. Ajami; Qingyun Duan; Xiaogang Gao; Soroosh Sorooshian

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Evaluation of Radar Multiple-Scattering Effects from a GPM Perspective. Part II: Model Results  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Multiple-scattering effects as sensed by radars in configurations useful in the context of the Global Precipitation Mission (GPM) are evaluated for a range of meteorological profiles extracted from four different cloud-resolving model ...

A. Battaglia; M. O. Ajewole; C. Simmer

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Stability and Variability in a Coupled Ocean–Atmosphere Climate Model: Results of 100-year Simulations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Two 100-year seasonal simulators, one performed with a low resolution atmospheric general circulation model (GCM) coupled to a mixed-layer ocean formulation and the other made with the GCM forced by prescribed ocean conditions, are compared to ...

David D. Houghton; Robert G. Gallimore; Linda M. Keller

1991-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Response of the Middle Atmosphere to CO2 Doubling: Results from the Canadian Middle Atmosphere Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Canadian Middle Atmosphere Model (CMAM) has been used to examine the middle atmosphere response to CO2 doubling. The radiative-photochemical response induced by doubling CO2 alone and the response produced by changes in prescribed SSTs are ...

V. I. Fomichev; A. I. Jonsson; J. de Grandpré; S. R. Beagley; C. McLandress; K. Semeniuk; T. G. Shepherd

2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Internal Tide Generation at the Continental Shelf Modeled Using a Modal Decomposition: Two-Dimensional Results  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Stratified flow over topography is studied, with oceanic applications in mind. A model is developed for a fluid with arbitrary vertical stratification and a free surface, flowing over three-dimensional topography of arbitrary size and steepness, ...

Stephen D. Griffiths; R. H. J. Grimshaw

2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Comparison of Results from a Meandering-Plume Model with Measured Atmospheric Tracer Concentration Fluctuations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Measured wind-azimuth data are used in a simple meandering-plume model to predict observed SF6 concentration fluctuations measured downwind of a point source during a range of stability conditions. The meander component of plume diffusion is ...

Holly Peterson; Brian Lamb

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Transformation from spots to waves in a model of actin pattern formation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Actin networks in certain single-celled organisms exhibit a complex pattern-forming dynamics that starts with the appearance of static spots of actin on the cell cortex. Spots soon become mobile, executing persistent random walks, and eventually give rise to traveling waves of actin. Here we describe a possible physical mechanism for this distinctive set of dynamic transformations, by equipping an excitable reaction-diffusion model with a field describing the spatial orientation of its chief constituent (which we consider to be actin). The interplay of anisotropic actin growth and spatial inhibition drives a transformation at fixed parameter values from static spots to moving spots to waves.

Stephen Whitelam; Till Bretschneider; Nigel J. Burroughs

2008-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

197

Spatial Variation of Stratospheric Aerosol Acidity and Model Refractive Index: Implications of Recent Results  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recent experimental results indicate that little or no solid ammonium sulfate is present in background stratospheric aerosols. Other results allow straightforward calculation of sulfuric acid/water droplet properties (acidity, specific gravity, ...

Philip B. Russell; Patrick Hamill

1984-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

The Surface Energy Balance at Local and Regional Scales-A Comparison of General Circulation Model Results with Observations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Aspects of the mean monthly energy balance at continental surfaces are examined by appeal to the results of general circulation model (GCM) simulations, climatological maps of surface fluxes, and direct observations. Emphasis is placed on net ...

J. R. Garratt; P. B. Krummel; E. A. Kowalczyk

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

An Assessment of Possible Climate Change in the Australian Region Based on an Intercomparison of General Circulation Modeling Results  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To assist in estimating likely future climate change in the Australian region, the authors examine the results of four different general circulation modeling experiments run to assess the equilibrium impact of doubling greenhouse gases. The ...

P. H. Whetton; A. B. Pittock; M. R. Haylock; P. J. Rayner

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Result Summary for the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site Performance Assessment Model Version 4.113  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Preliminary results for Version 4.113 of the Nevada National Security Site Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site performance assessment model are summarized. Version 4.113 includes the Fiscal Year 2011 inventory estimate.

Shott, G. J.

2012-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "model results formats" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Operational Implementation of the ISBA Land Surface Scheme in the Canadian Regional Weather Forecast Model. Part I: Warm Season Results  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The summertime improvement resulting from the operational implementation of a new surface modeling and assimilation strategy into the Canadian regional weather forecasting system is described in this study. The surface processes over land are ...

Stéphane Bélair; Louis-Philippe Crevier; Jocelyn Mailhot; Bernard Bilodeau; Yves Delage

2003-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

The Parameterization Of the Planetary Boundary Layer in the UCLA General Circulation Model: Formulation and Results  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A planetary boundary layer (PBL) parameterization for general circulation models (GCMs) is presented. It uses a mixed-layer approach in which the PBL is assumed to be capped by discontinuities in the mean profiles. Both clear and cloud-topped ...

Max J. Suarez; Akio Arakawa; David A. Randall

1983-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Local Mass Conservation and Velocity Splitting in PV-Based Balanced Models. Part II: Numerical Results  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The effects of enforcing local mass conservation on the accuracy of non-Hamiltonian potential-vorticity- based balanced models (PBMs) are examined numerically for a set of chaotic shallow-water f-plane vortical flows in a doubly periodic square ...

Ali R. Mohebalhojeh; Michael E. McIntyre

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Tidal Mixing in the Southern Weddell Sea: Results from a Three-Dimensional Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A three-dimensional primitive equation ocean model is used to study the magnitude and distribution of tidal mixing in the southern Weddell Sea. The contributions of (i) semidiurnal barotropic constituents M2 and S2, (ii) internal tides, and (iii) ...

Adriene F. Pereira; Aike Beckmann; Hartmut H. Hellmer

2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Case Studies Comparing System Advisor Model (SAM) Results to Real Performance Data: Preprint  

SciTech Connect

NREL has completed a series of detailed case studies comparing the simulations of the System Advisor Model (SAM) and measured performance data or published performance expectations. These case studies compare PV measured performance data with simulated performance data using appropriate weather data. The measured data sets were primarily taken from NREL onsite PV systems and weather monitoring stations.

Blair, N.; Dobos, A.; Sather, N.

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Modeling experimental results of diffusion of alkaline solutions through a compacted bentonite barrier  

SciTech Connect

The interaction between concrete/cement and swelling clay (bentonite) has been modeled in the context of engineered barrier systems for deep geological disposal of high-level radioactive waste. The geochemical transformations observed in laboratory diffusion experiments at 60 and 90 {sup o}C between bentonite and different high-pH solutions (K-Na-OH and Ca(OH){sub 2}-saturated) were reconciled with the reactive transport code CrunchFlow. For K-Na-OH solutions (pH = 13.5 at 25 {sup o}C) partial dissolution of montmorillonite and precipitation of Mg-silicates (talc-like), hydrotalcite and brucite at the interface are predicted at 60 {sup o}C, while at 90 {sup o}C the alteration is wider. Alkaline cations diffused beyond the mineralogical alteration zone by means of exchange with Mg{sup 2+} in the interlayer region of montmorillonite. Very slow reactivity and minor alteration of the clay are predicted in the Ca(OH){sub 2}-bentonite system. The model is a reasonable description of the experiments but also demonstrates the difficulties in modeling processes operating at a small scale under a diffusive regime.

Fernandez, Raul, E-mail: raul.fernandez@ietcc.csic.e [Instituto Eduardo Torroja de Ciencias de la Construccion (CSIC), C/Serrano Galvache, 4, 28033 Madrid (Spain); Institut fuer Geologie, Universitaet Bern, Baltzerstrasse 3, CH-3012 Bern (Switzerland); Cuevas, Jaime [Dpto. Geologia y Geoquimica, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Campus Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Maeder, Urs K. [Institut fuer Geologie, Universitaet Bern, Baltzerstrasse 3, CH-3012 Bern (Switzerland)

2010-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

207

Formation dry-out from CO2 injection into saline acquifers: Part 2, Analytical model for salt precipitation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Formation in Natural Gas Storage Aquifers, Proceedings,in aquifer storage projects for natural gas (Lorenz and

Pruess, Karsten

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

External reflectors for large solar collector arrays, simulation model and experimental results  

SciTech Connect

A model for the calculation of incident solar radiation from flat-and CPC-shaped external reflectors onto flat plate solar collector arrays has been developed. Assuming an infinite length of the collector/reflector rows, the basic calculations of incident radiation in the collector plane from the reflector become very simple. The direct radiation from the sun is projected into a vertical plane perpendicular to the collector and reflector plane. The incident radiation onto the collector, including corrections for shadowing and lost radiation above the collector, can then be calculated using 2-D geometry. For very short collector/reflector rows a 3-D model is given for correction for the loss of specular radiation in the east west direction. The diffuse radiation is assumed to be isotropic. The diffuse radiation in the collector plane is calculated using view factors. CPC-shaped reflectors can be treated with the same models by introducing an equivalent flat reflector. The incidence angle for the solar radiation from the reflector onto the collector is in most cases higher than the incidence angle for the radiation directly from the sun. Therefore the incidence angle characteristics of the collector glazing and absorber become more important in this application. Equations are given for the incidence angles for diffuse and beam radiation. An annual performance increase of over 30%, 100-120 kW h/m[sup 2], has been measured for aged (four operating seasons) flat reflectors in the Swedish climate. With a CPC-shaped reflector and new reflector materials, a performance increase of up to 170 kW h/m[sup 2] is not unrealistic. This means that the collector and ground area requirement can be reduced by more than 30% for a given load.

Perers, B.; Karlsson, B. (Vattenfall Utveckling, Aelvkarleby (Sweden))

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Use of Modeling for Prevention of Solids Formation During Canyon Processing of Legacy Nuclear Materials at the Savannah River Site  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Savannah River Site (SRS) Environmental Management (EM) nuclear material stabilization program includes the dissolution and processing of legacy materials from various DOE sites. The SRS canyon facilities were designed to dissolve and process spent nuclear fuel and targets. As the processing of typical materials is completed, unusual and exotic nuclear materials are being targeted for stabilization. These unusual materials are often difficult to dissolve using historical flowsheet conditions and require more aggressive dissolver solutions. Solids must be prevented in the dissolver to avoid expensive delays associated with the build-up of insoluble material in downstream process equipment. Moreover, it is vital to prevent precipitation of all solids, especially plutonium-bearing solids, since their presence in dissolver solutions raises criticality safety issues. To prevent precipitation of undesirable solids in aqueous process solutions, the accuracy of computer models to predict precipitate formation requires incorporation of plant specific fundamental data. These data are incorporated into a previously developed thermodynamic computer program that applies the Pitzer correlation to derive activity coefficient parameters. This improved predictive model will reduce unwanted precipitation in process solutions at DOE sites working with EM nuclear materials in aqueous solutions.

Rhodes, W. D.; Crooks III, W. J.; Christian, J. D.

2002-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

210

Effects of rock properties on explosive source modeling: Preliminary results. Los Alamos Source Region Project  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this study was to investigate possible reasons for unexpectedly low ground motion measurements obtained during some events at the Nevada Test Site. Of particular interest were the unexpected low results obtained for the Mission Cyber event which was the first test conducted in the P-tunnel complex.

Dick, R.D.; Fourney, W.L. [Maryland Univ., College Park, MD (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

2H2A Hydrogen Delivery Infrastructure Analysis Models and Conventional Pathway Options Analysis Results - Interim Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

H2A Hydrogen Delivery Infrastructure Analysis Models and H2A Hydrogen Delivery Infrastructure Analysis Models and Conventional Pathway Options Analysis Results DE-FG36-05GO15032 Interim Report Nexant, Inc., Air Liquide, Argonne National Laboratory, Chevron Technology Venture, Gas Technology Institute, National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, and TIAX LLC May 2008 Contents Section Page Executive Summary ................................................................................................................... 1-9 Delivery Options ...................................................................................................................... 1-9 Evaluation of Options 2 and 3 ................................................................................................. 1-9

212

Evaluation of Model Results and Measured Performance of Net-Zero Energy Homes in Hawaii: Preprint  

SciTech Connect

The Kaupuni community consists of 19 affordable net-zero energy homes that were built within the Waianae Valley of Oahu, Hawaii in 2011. The project was developed for the native Hawaiian community led by the Department of Hawaiian Homelands. This paper presents a comparison of the modeled and measured energy performance of the homes. Over the first year of occupancy, the community as a whole performed within 1% of the net-zero energy goals. The data show a range of performance from house to house with the majority of the homes consistently near or exceeding net-zero, while a few fall short of the predicted net-zero energy performance. The impact of building floor plan, weather, and cooling set point on this comparison is discussed. The project demonstrates the value of using building energy simulations as a tool to assist the project to achieve energy performance goals. Lessons learned from the energy performance monitoring has had immediate benefits in providing feedback to the homeowners, and will be used to influence future energy efficient designs in Hawaii and other tropical climates.

Norton, P.; Kiatreungwattana, K.; Kelly, K. J.

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Reactive Power Laboratory: Synchronous Condenser Testing&Modeling Results - Interim Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The subject report documents the work carried out by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) during months 5-7 (May-July 2005) of a multi-year research project. The project has the overall goal of developing methods of incorporating distributed energy (DE) that can produce reactive power locally and for injecting into the distribution system. The objective for this new type of DE is to be able to provide voltage regulation and dynamic reactive power reserves without the use of extensive communication and control systems. The work performed over this three-month period focused on four aspects of the overall objective: (1) characterization of a 250HP (about 300KVAr) synchronous condenser (SC) via test runs at the ORNL Reactive Power Laboratory; (2) development of a data acquisition scheme for collecting the necessary voltage, current and power readings at the synchronous condenser and on the distribution system; (3) development of algorithms for analyzing raw test data from the various test runs; and (4) validation of a steady-state model for the synchronous condenser via the use of a commercial software package to study its effects on the ORNL 13.8/2.4kV distribution network.

Henry, SD

2005-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

214

Uncertainty and sensitivity analysis of early exposure results with the MACCS Reactor Accident Consequence Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Uncertainty and sensitivity analysis techniques based on Latin hypercube sampling, partial correlation analysis and stepwise regression analysis are used in an investigation with the MACCS model of the early health effects associated with a severe accident at a nuclear power station. The primary purpose of this study is to provide guidance on the variables to be considered in future review work to reduce the uncertainty in the important variables used in the calculation of reactor accident consequences. The effects of 34 imprecisely known input variables on the following reactor accident consequences are studied: number of early fatalities, number of cases of prodromal vomiting, population dose within 10 mi of the reactor, population dose within 1000 mi of the reactor, individual early fatality probability within 1 mi of the reactor, and maximum early fatality distance. When the predicted variables are considered collectively, the following input variables were found to be the dominant contributors to uncertainty: scaling factor for horizontal dispersion, dry deposition velocity, inhalation protection factor for nonevacuees, groundshine shielding factor for nonevacuees, early fatality hazard function alpha value for bone marrow exposure, and scaling factor for vertical dispersion.

Helton, J.C. [Arizona State Univ., Tempe, AZ (United States); Johnson, J.D. [GRAM, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States); McKay, M.D. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Shiver, A.W.; Sprung, J.L. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

A Comparison of TWP-ICE Observational Data with Cloud-Resolving Model Results  

SciTech Connect

Observations made during the TWP-ICE campaign are used to drive and evaluate thirteen cloud-resolving model simulations with periodic lateral boundary conditions. The simulations employ 2D and 3D dynamics, one- and two-moment microphysics, several variations on large-scale forcing, and the use of observationally derived aerosol properties to prognose droplet numbers. When domain means are averaged over a 6-day active monsoon period, all simulations reproduce observed surface precipitation rate but not its structural distribution. Simulated fractional areas covered by convective and stratiform rain are uncorrelated with one another, and are both variably overpredicted by up to a factor of {approx}2. Stratiform area fractions are strongly anticorrelated with outgoing longwave radiation (OLR) but are negligibly correlated with ice water path (IWP), indicating that ice spatial distribution controls OLR more than mean IWP. Overpredictions of OLR tend to be accompanied by underpredictions of reflected shortwave radiation (RSR). When there are two simulations differing only in microphysics scheme or large-scale forcing, the one with smaller stratiform area tends to exhibit greater OLR and lesser RSR by similar amounts. After {approx}10 days, simulations reach a suppressed monsoon period with a wide range of mean precipitable water vapor, attributable in part to varying overprediction of cloud-modulated radiative flux divergence compared with observationally derived values. Differences across the simulation ensemble arise from multiple sources, including dynamics, microphysics, and radiation treatments. Close agreement of spatial and temporal averages with observations may not be expected, but the wide spreads of predicted stratiform fraction and anticorrelated OLR indicate a need for more rigorous observation-based evaluation of the underlying micro- and macrophysical properties of convective and stratiform structures.

Fridlind, A. M.; Ackerman, Andrew; Chaboureau, Jean-Pierre; Fan, Jiwen; Grabowski, Wojciech W.; Hill, A.; Jones, T. R.; Khaiyer, M. M.; Liu, G.; Minnis, Patrick; Morrison, H.; Nguyen, L.; Park, S.; Petch, Jon C.; Pinty, Jean-Pierre; Schumacher, Courtney; Shipway, Ben; Varble, A. C.; Wu, Xiaoqing; Xie, Shaocheng; Zhang, Minghua

2012-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

216

Uncertainty and sensitivity analysis of food pathway results with the MACCS Reactor Accident Consequence Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Uncertainty and sensitivity analysis techniques based on Latin hypercube sampling, partial correlation analysis and stepwise regression analysis are used in an investigation with the MACCS model of the food pathways associated with a severe accident at a nuclear power station. The primary purpose of this study is to provide guidance on the variables to be considered in future review work to reduce the uncertainty in the important variables used in the calculation of reactor accident consequences. The effects of 87 imprecisely-known input variables on the following reactor accident consequences are studied: crop growing season dose, crop long-term dose, milk growing season dose, total food pathways dose, total ingestion pathways dose, total long-term pathways dose, area dependent cost, crop disposal cost, milk disposal cost, condemnation area, crop disposal area and milk disposal area. When the predicted variables are considered collectively, the following input variables were found to be the dominant contributors to uncertainty: fraction of cesium deposition on grain fields that is retained on plant surfaces and transferred directly to grain, maximum allowable ground concentrations of Cs-137 and Sr-90 for production of crops, ground concentrations of Cs-134, Cs-137 and I-131 at which the disposal of milk will be initiated due to accidents that occur during the growing season, ground concentrations of Cs-134, I-131 and Sr-90 at which the disposal of crops will be initiated due to accidents that occur during the growing season, rate of depletion of Cs-137 and Sr-90 from the root zone, transfer of Sr-90 from soil to legumes, transfer of Cs-137 from soil to pasture, transfer of cesium from animal feed to meat, and the transfer of cesium, iodine and strontium from animal feed to milk.

Helton, J.C. [Arizona State Univ., Tempe, AZ (United States); Johnson, J.D.; Rollstin, J.A. [GRAM, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Shiver, A.W.; Sprung, J.L. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Uncertainty and sensitivity analysis of chronic exposure results with the MACCS reactor accident consequence model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Uncertainty and sensitivity analysis techniques based on Latin hypercube sampling, partial correlation analysis and stepwise regression analysis are used in an investigation with the MACCS model of the chronic exposure pathways associated with a severe accident at a nuclear power station. The primary purpose of this study is to provide guidance on the variables to be considered in future review work to reduce the uncertainty in the important variables used in the calculation of reactor accident consequences. The effects of 75 imprecisely known input variables on the following reactor accident consequences are studied: crop growing season dose, crop long-term dose, water ingestion dose, milk growing season dose, long-term groundshine dose, long-term inhalation dose, total food pathways dose, total ingestion pathways dose, total long-term pathways dose, total latent cancer fatalities, area-dependent cost, crop disposal cost, milk disposal cost, population-dependent cost, total economic cost, condemnation area, condemnation population, crop disposal area and milk disposal area. When the predicted variables are considered collectively, the following input variables were found to be the dominant contributors to uncertainty: dry deposition velocity, transfer of cesium from animal feed to milk, transfer of cesium from animal feed to meat, ground concentration of Cs-134 at which the disposal of milk products will be initiated, transfer of Sr-90 from soil to legumes, maximum allowable ground concentration of Sr-90 for production of crops, fraction of cesium entering surface water that is consumed in drinking water, groundshine shielding factor, scale factor defining resuspension, dose reduction associated with decontamination, and ground concentration of 1-131 at which disposal of crops will be initiated due to accidents that occur during the growing season.

Helton, J.C. [Arizona State Univ., Tempe, AZ (United States); Johnson, J.D.; Rollstin, J.A. [Gram, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Shiver, A.W.; Sprung, J.L. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

STAR FORMATION IN ATOMIC GAS  

SciTech Connect

Observations of nearby galaxies have firmly established, over a broad range of galactic environments and metallicities, that star formation occurs exclusively in the molecular phase of the interstellar medium (ISM). Theoretical models show that this association results from the correlation between chemical phase, shielding, and temperature. Interstellar gas converts from atomic to molecular only in regions that are well shielded from interstellar ultraviolet (UV) photons, and since UV photons are also the dominant source of interstellar heating, only in these shielded regions does the gas become cold enough to be subject to Jeans instability. However, while the equilibrium temperature and chemical state of interstellar gas are well correlated, the timescale required to reach chemical equilibrium is much longer than that required to reach thermal equilibrium, and both timescales are metallicity-dependent. Here I show that the difference in timescales implies that, at metallicities below a few percent of the solar value, well shielded gas will reach low temperatures and proceed to star formation before the bulk of it is able to convert from atomic to molecular. As a result, at extremely low metallicities, star formation will occur in a cold atomic phase of the ISM rather than a molecular phase. I calculate the observable consequences of this result for star formation in low-metallicity galaxies, and I discuss how some current numerical models for H{sub 2}-regulated star formation may need to be modified.

Krumholz, Mark R., E-mail: krumholz@ucolick.org [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States)

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Drop Test Results for the Combustion Engineering Model No. ABB-2901 Fuel Pellet Package  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (USNRC) contracted with the Packaging Review Group (PRG) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) to conduct a single, 30-ft shallow-angle drop test on the Combustion Engineering ABB-2901 drum-type shipping package. The purpose of the test was to determine if bolted-ring drum closures could fail during shallow-angle drops. The PRG at LLNL planned the test, and Defense Technologies Engineering Division (DTED) personnel from LLNL's Site-300 Test Group executed the plan. The test was conducted in November 2001 using the drop-tower facility at LLNL's Site 300. Two representatives from Westinghouse Electric Company in Columbia, South Carolina (WEC-SC); two USNRC staff members; and three PRG members from LLNL witnessed the preliminary test runs and the final test. The single test clearly demonstrated the vulnerability of the bolted-ring drum closure to shallow-angle drops-the test package's drum closure was easily and totally separated from the drum package. The results of the preliminary test runs and the 30-ft shallow-angle drop test offer valuable qualitative understandings of the shallow-angle impact.

Hafner, R S; Mok, G C; Hagler, L G

2004-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

220

Month-Long 2D Cloud-Resolving Model Simulation and Resultant Statistics of Cloud Systems Over the ARM SGP  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Month-Long 2D Cloud-Resolving Model Simulation Month-Long 2D Cloud-Resolving Model Simulation and Resultant Statistics of Cloud Systems Over the ARM SGP X. Wu Department of Geological and Atmospheric Sciences Iowa State University Ames, Iowa X.-Z. Liang Illinois State Water Survey University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign, Illinois Introduction The cloud-resolving model (CRM) has recently emerged as a useful tool to develop improved representations of convections, clouds, and cloud-radiation interactions in general circulation models (GCMs). In particular, the fine spatial resolution allows the CRM to more realistically represent the detailed structure of cloud systems, including cloud geometric and radiative properties. The CRM simulations thus provide unique and comprehensive datasets, based on which more realistic GCM

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221

ON THE DYNAMICS OF THE SOLAR CORONA: FIRST RESULTS OBTAINED WITH A NEW 3D MHD MODEL  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

; CWENO. 1. MOTIVATION For many decades space scientists have been at- tracted to the solar wind and its1 ON THE DYNAMICS OF THE SOLAR CORONA: FIRST RESULTS OBTAINED WITH A NEW 3D MHD MODEL J. Kleimann 1) is applied to the problem of the dynamics of the solar corona. First, we present the basic system

Grauer, Rainer

222

Vista at CDF: Results of a model-independent search for new physics in 927 pb**-1 at CDF  

SciTech Connect

A global, model-independent search for high-pT exotic phenomena is presented using 927 pb{sup -1} of CDF II data. The search algorithms employed in this analysis are Vista and Sleuth. These proceedings focus on Vista, including a description of the method and a summary of results.

Choudalakis, Georgios; /MIT, LNS

2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Segment-Based Recognition on the PhoneBook Task: Initial Results and Observations on Duration Modeling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper describes preliminary recognition experiments on PhoneBook [1], a corpus of isolated, telephone-bandwidth, read words from a large (almost 8,000-word) vocabulary. We have chosen this corpus as a testbed for experiments on the language model-independent parts of a segment-based recognizer. We present results showing that a segment-based recognizer performs well on this task, and that a simple Gaussian mixture phone duration model significantly reduces the error rate. We compare context-independent, stress-dependent, and word position-dependent duration models and obtain relative error rate reductions of up to 12% on the test set. Finally, we make some observations regarding the effects of stress and word position in this isolated-word task and discuss our plans for further research using PhoneBook. 1.

Karen Livescu; James Glass

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Modeling of 1,3-hexadiene, 2,4-hexadiene and 1,4-hexadiene-doped methane flames: Flame modeling, benzene and styrene formation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this work, we have developed a detailed chemical kinetic model and reacting flow simulation for the hexadiene-doped 2-d methane diffusion flames studied experimentally by McEnally and Pfefferle. The GRI-Mech 2.11 methane oxidation and Lawrence Livermore butane oxidation mechanisms were used as the base mechanism to which hexadiene chemistry generated by Reaction Mechanism Generator (RMG) was added. Some important chemically activated pathways leading to aromatic species formation, including the reactions on C{sub 5}H{sub 7}, C{sub 6}H{sub 10}, C{sub 6}H{sub 9}, C{sub 6}H{sub 7}, C{sub 8}H{sub 8} and C{sub 8}H{sub 9} potential energy surfaces, are examined in great detail using quantum chemistry (CBS-QB3) and master equation analysis as implemented in Variflex. An efficient program to solve the doped methane diffusion flame was developed. The solver uses the method of lines to solve the species mass balance equation arising in the diffusion flame. It assumes that the temperature and velocity profiles of the doped flame are the same as those of the undoped flame. The mole fractions of various species as predicted by our model are compared to the experimentally measured mole fractions. The agreement between theory and experiments is quite good for most molecules. The added hexadiene dopants to the flame decompose to produce significant amount of cyclopentadienyl radical, which combines with methyl radical to produce benzene. We also show that styrene is formed primarily by recombination of cyclopentadienyl and propargyl radicals, a pathway which to our knowledge, has not been included in prior flame simulations. (author)

Sharma, Sandeep; Harper, Michael R.; Green, William H. [Department of Chemical Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States)

2010-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

225

Comparison of entrainment rates from a tank experiment with results using the one-dimensional turbulence model.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recent work suggests that cloud effects remain one of the largest sources of uncertainty in model-based estimates of climate sensitivity. In particular, the entrainment rate in stratocumulus-topped mixed layers needs better models. More than thirty years ago a clever laboratory experiment was conducted by McEwan and Paltridge to examine an analog of the entrainment process at the top of stratiform clouds. Sayler and Breidenthal extended this pioneering work and determined the effect of the Richardson number on the dimensionless entrainment rate. The experiments gave hints that the interaction between molecular effects and the one-sided turbulence seems to be crucial for understanding entrainment. From the numerical point of view large-eddy simulation (LES) does not allow explicitly resolving all the fine scale processes at the entrainment interface. Direct numerical simulation (DNS) is limited due to the Reynolds number and is not the tool of choice for parameter studies. Therefore it is useful to investigate new modeling strategies, such as stochastic turbulence models which allow sufficient resolution at least in one dimension while having acceptable run times. We will present results of the One-Dimensional Turbulence stochastic simulation model applied to the experimental setup of Sayler and Breidenthal. The results on radiatively induced entrainment follow quite well the scaling of the entrainment rate with the Richardson number that was experimentally found for a set of trials. Moreover, we investigate the influence of molecular effects, the fluids optical properties, and the artifact of parasitic turbulence experimentally observed in the laminar layer. In the simulations the parameters are varied systematically for even larger ranges than in the experiment. Based on the obtained results a more complex parameterization of the entrainment rate than currently discussed in the literature seems to be necessary.

Kerstein, Alan R.; Sayler, B. J. (Black Hills State University, Spearfish, SD); Wunsch, S. (Johns Hopkins University, Laurel, MD); Schmidt, H. (BTU Cottbus, Siemens-Halske-Ring 14, 03046 Cottbus, Germany); Nedelec, R. (Ecole Centrale Marseille, Technopole de Chateau-Gombert, 13451 Marseille, France)

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Effects of cloudy/clear air mixing and droplet pH on sulfate aerosol formation in a coupled chemistry/climate global model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper we will briefly describe our coupled ECHAM/GRANTOUR model, provide a detailed description of our atmospheric chemistry parameterizations, and discuss a couple of numerical experiments in which we explore the influence of assumed pH and rate of mixing between cloudy and clear air on aqueous sulfate formation and concentration. We have used our tropospheric chemistry and transport model, GRANTOUR, to estimate the life cycle and global distributions of many trace species. Recently, we have coupled GRANTOUR with the ECHAM global climate model, which provides several enhanced capabilities in the representation of aerosol interactions.

Molenkamp, C.R.; Atherton, C.A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Penner, J.E.; Walton, J.J. [Michigan Univ., Ann Arbor, MI (United States). Dept. of Atmospheric, Oceanic and Space Sciences

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Mixing Layer Formation near the Tropopause Due to Gravity Wave–Critical Level Interactions in a Cloud-Resolving Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A plausible mechanism for the formation of mixing layers in the lower stratosphere above regions of tropical convection is demonstrated numerically using high-resolution, two-dimensional (2D), anelastic, nonlinear, cloud-resolving simulations. ...

Mohamed Moustaoui; Binson Joseph; Hector Teitelbaum

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Analysis of the differences in energy simulation results between building information modeling (BIM)-based simulation method and the detailed simulation method  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Building Information Modeling (BIM)-based simulation models have been used to automate lengthy building energy modeling processes and it enable fast acquisition of results. Recent improvements of simulation programs have continued to the increase in ...

Seongchan Kim; Jeong-Han Woo

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Numerical modeling of injection and mineral trapping of CO2 withH2S and SO2 in a Sandstone Formation  

SciTech Connect

Carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) injection into deep geologic formations could decrease the atmospheric accumulation of this gas from anthropogenic sources. Furthermore, by co-injecting H{sub 2}S or SO{sub 2}, the products respectively of coal gasification or combustion, with captured CO{sub 2}, problems associated with surface disposal would be mitigated. We developed models that simulate the co-injection of H{sub 2}S or SO{sub 2} with CO{sub 2} into an arkose formation at a depth of about 2 km and 75 C. The hydrogeology and mineralogy of the injected formation are typical of those encountered in Gulf Coast aquifers of the United States. Six numerical simulations of a simplified 1-D radial region surrounding the injection well were performed. The injection of CO{sub 2} alone or co-injection with SO{sub 2} or H{sub 2}S results in a concentrically zoned distribution of secondary minerals surrounding a leached and acidified region adjacent to the injection well. Co-injection of SO{sub 2} with CO{sub 2} results in a larger and more strongly acidified zone, and alteration differs substantially from that caused by the co-injection of H{sub 2}S or injection of CO{sub 2} alone. Precipitation of carbonates occurs within a higher pH (pH > 5) peripheral zone. Significant quantities of CO{sub 2} are sequestered by ankerite, dawsonite, and lesser siderite. The CO{sub 2} mineral-trapping capacity of the formation can attain 40-50 kg/m{sup 3} medium for the selected arkose. In contrast, secondary sulfates precipitate at lower pH (pH < 5) within the acidified zone. Most of the injected SO{sub 2} is transformed and immobilized through alunite precipitation with lesser amounts of anhydrite and minor quantities of pyrite. The dissolved CO{sub 2} increases with time (enhanced solubility trapping). The mineral alteration induced by injection of CO{sub 2} with either SO{sub 2} or H{sub 2}S leads to corresponding changes in porosity. Significant increases in porosity occur in the acidified zones where mineral dissolution dominates. With co-injection of SO{sub 2}, the porosity increases from an initial 0.3 to 0.43 after 100 years. However, within the CO{sub 2} mineral-trapping zone, the porosity decreases to about 0.28 for both cases, because of the addition of CO{sub 2} mass as secondary carbonates to the rock matrix. Precipitation of sulfates at the acidification front causes porosity to decrease to 0.23. The limited information currently available on the mineralogy of naturally occurring high-pressure CO{sub 2} reservoirs is generally consistent with our simulations.

Xu, Tianfu; Apps, John A.; Pruess, Karsten; Yamamoto, Hajime

2004-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

230

Observations of the Hubble Deep Field with the Infrared Space Observatory. V. Spectral Energy Distributions, Starburst Models and Star Formation History  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We have modelled the spectral energy distributions of the 13 HDF galaxies reliably detected by ISO. For 2 galaxies the emission detected by ISO is consistent with being starlight or the infrared 'cirrus' in the galaxies. For the remaining 11 galaxies there is a clear mid-infrared excess, which we interpret as emission from dust associated with a strong starburst. 10 of these galaxies are spirals or interacting pairs, while the remaining one is an elliptical with a prominent nucleus and broad emission lines. We give a new discussion of how the star formation rate can be deduced from the far infrared luminosity and derive star formation rates for these galaxies of 8-1000 $\\phi M_{\\sun}$ per yr, where $\\phi$ takes account of the uncertainty in the initial mass function. The HDF galaxies detected by ISO are clearly forming stars at a prodigious rate compared with nearby normal galaxies. We discuss the implications of our detections for the history of star and heavy element formation in the universe. Although uncertainties in the calibration, reliability of source detection, associations, and starburst models remain, it is clear that dust plays an important role in star formation out to redshift 1 at least.

The ISO-HDF Consortium; :; Michael Rowan-Robinson

1997-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

231

Offshore Code Comparison Collaboration within IEA Wind Task 23: Phase IV Results Regarding Floating Wind Turbine Modeling; Preprint  

SciTech Connect

Offshore wind turbines are designed and analyzed using comprehensive simulation codes that account for the coupled dynamics of the wind inflow, aerodynamics, elasticity, and controls of the turbine, along with the incident waves, sea current, hydrodynamics, and foundation dynamics of the support structure. This paper describes the latest findings of the code-to-code verification activities of the Offshore Code Comparison Collaboration, which operates under Subtask 2 of the International Energy Agency Wind Task 23. In the latest phase of the project, participants used an assortment of codes to model the coupled dynamic response of a 5-MW wind turbine installed on a floating spar buoy in 320 m of water. Code predictions were compared from load-case simulations selected to test different model features. The comparisons have resulted in a greater understanding of offshore floating wind turbine dynamics and modeling techniques, and better knowledge of the validity of various approximations. The lessons learned from this exercise have improved the participants' codes, thus improving the standard of offshore wind turbine modeling.

Jonkman, J.; Larsen, T.; Hansen, A.; Nygaard, T.; Maus, K.; Karimirad, M.; Gao, Z.; Moan, T.; Fylling, I.

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Offshore Code Comparison Collaboration within IEA Wind Task 23: Phase IV Results Regarding Floating Wind Turbine Modeling; Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Offshore wind turbines are designed and analyzed using comprehensive simulation codes that account for the coupled dynamics of the wind inflow, aerodynamics, elasticity, and controls of the turbine, along with the incident waves, sea current, hydrodynamics, and foundation dynamics of the support structure. This paper describes the latest findings of the code-to-code verification activities of the Offshore Code Comparison Collaboration, which operates under Subtask 2 of the International Energy Agency Wind Task 23. In the latest phase of the project, participants used an assortment of codes to model the coupled dynamic response of a 5-MW wind turbine installed on a floating spar buoy in 320 m of water. Code predictions were compared from load-case simulations selected to test different model features. The comparisons have resulted in a greater understanding of offshore floating wind turbine dynamics and modeling techniques, and better knowledge of the validity of various approximations. The lessons learned from this exercise have improved the participants' codes, thus improving the standard of offshore wind turbine modeling.

Jonkman, J.; Larsen, T.; Hansen, A.; Nygaard, T.; Maus, K.; Karimirad, M.; Gao, Z.; Moan, T.; Fylling, I.

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Lattice Wess-Zumino model with Ginsparg-Wilson fermions: One-loop results and GPU benchmarks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We numerically evaluate the one-loop counterterms for the four-dimensional Wess-Zumino model formulated on the lattice using Ginsparg-Wilson fermions of the overlap (Neuberger) variety, together with an auxiliary fermion (plus superpartners), such that a lattice version of $U(1)_R$ symmetry is exactly preserved in the limit of vanishing bare mass. We confirm previous findings by other authors that at one loop there is no renormalization of the superpotential in the lattice theory, but that there is a mismatch in the wavefunction renormalization of the auxiliary field. We study the range of the Dirac operator that results when the auxiliary fermion is integrated out, and show that localization does occur, but that it is less pronounced than the exponential localization of the overlap operator. We also present preliminary simulation results for this model, and outline a strategy for nonperturbative improvement of the lattice supercurrent through measurements of supersymmetry Ward identities. Related to this, some benchmarks for our graphics processing unit code are provided. Our simulation results find a nearly vanishing vacuum expectation value for the auxiliary field, consistent with approximate supersymmetry at weak coupling.

Chen Chen; Eric Dzienkowski; Joel Giedt

2010-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

234

Lattice Wess-Zumino model with Ginsparg-Wilson fermions: One-loop results and GPU benchmarks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We numerically evaluate the one-loop counterterms for the four-dimensional Wess-Zumino model formulated on the lattice using Ginsparg-Wilson fermions of the overlap (Neuberger) variety, together with an auxiliary fermion (plus superpartners), such that a lattice version of U(1){sub R} symmetry is exactly preserved in the limit of vanishing bare mass. We confirm previous findings by other authors that at one loop there is no renormalization of the superpotential in the lattice theory, but that there is a mismatch in the wave-function renormalization of the auxiliary field. We study the range of the Dirac operator that results when the auxiliary fermion is integrated out, and show that localization does occur, but that it is less pronounced than the exponential localization of the overlap operator. We also present preliminary simulation results for this model, and outline a strategy for nonperturbative improvement of the lattice supercurrent through measurements of supersymmetry Ward identities. Related to this, some benchmarks for our graphics processing unit code are provided. Our simulation results find a nearly vanishing vacuum expectation value for the auxiliary field, consistent with approximate supersymmetry at weak coupling.

Chen Chen; Dzienkowski, Eric; Giedt, Joel [Department of Physics, Applied Physics and Astronomy, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, 110 8th Street, Troy New York 12065 (United States)

2010-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

235

Using MiniBooNE neutral current elastic cross section results to constrain 3+1 sterile neutrino models  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The MiniBooNE Neutral Current Elastic (NCEL) cross section results are used to extract limits in the $\\Delta m^{2}-\\sin^{2}\\vartheta_{\\mu s}$ plane for a 3+1 sterile neutrino model with a mass splitting $0.1 \\leq \\Delta m^{2} \\leq 10.0$ eV$^{2}$. GENIE is used with a cross section model close to the one employed by MiniBooNE to make event rate predictions using simulations on the MiniBooNE target material CH$_{2}$. The axial mass is a free parameter in all fits. Sterile modifications to the flux and changes to the cross section in the simulation relate the two and allow limits to be set on sterile neutrino mixing using cross section results. The large axial mass problem makes it necessary for experiments to perform their own axial mass fits, but a prior fit to the same dataset could mask a sterile oscillation signal. Results are given with and without a penalty term on the axial mass from a prior fit. We find that a simultaneous fit to the axial mass and the sterile neutrino parameters favours very high axial mass values. The general problems that the current uncertainty on charged-current quasi-elastic (CCQE) cross sections at MiniBooNE energies pose for sterile neutrino measurements are discussed.

Callum Wilkinson; Susan Cartwright; Lee Thompson

2013-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

236

Summary of the GRI regional sectoral electricity model and the issues relating to those results. Occasional pub  

SciTech Connect

Results are summarized for an analysis of the U.S. electric utility industry conducted as an outgrowth of the '1984 GRI Baseline Projection of U.S. Energy Supply and Demand, 1983-2010.' The GRI Regional Sectoral Electricity Model shows a potential increase in gas demand by electric utilities of over one quad by the year 2000 if gas-fired combined-cycle is used to help offset any potential shortfall in generating capacity. Key issues emerging from the study include load growth, new generating capacity, capacity utilization, fuel choice, financial performance, and electricity prices.

Hilt, R.H.; Coyne, J.M.; Makovich, L.J.

1987-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Mutual Intrusion of a Gravity Current and Density Front Formation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A two-dimensional prognostic model was employed to examine the mutual intrusion of a gravity current and the formation of a density front. The results indicated strong vertical motion near the front and, with Earth rotation included, a baroclinic ...

Dono-Ping Wang

1984-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

A new model for mixing by double-diffusive convection (semi-convection): I. The conditions for layer formation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The process referred to as "semi-convection" in astrophysics and "double-diffusive convection in the diffusive regime" in Earth and planetary sciences, occurs in stellar and planetary interiors in regions which are stable according to the Ledoux criterion but unstable according to the Schwarzschild criterion. In this series of papers, we analyze the results of an extensive suite of 3D numerical simulations of the process, and ultimately propose a new 1D prescription for heat and compositional transport in this regime which can be used in stellar or planetary structure and evolution models. In a preliminary study of the phenomenon, Rosenblum et al. (2011) showed that, after saturation of the primary instability, a system can evolve in one of two possible ways: the induced turbulence either remains homogeneous, with very weak transport properties, or transitions into a thermo-compositional staircase where the transport rate is much larger (albeit still smaller than in standard convection). In this paper, we sho...

Mirouh, Giovanni M; Stellmach, Stephan; Traxler, Adrienne L; Wood, Toby S

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

The Role of Land–Sea Topography in Blocking Formation in a Block–Eddy Interaction Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper is an extension of a theoretical study by Luo on the effect of large-scale land–sea contrast (LSC) topography on the formation of an eddy-driven blocking. It is found that the topography term can be included explicitly in the blocking ...

Dehai Luo; Zhe Chen

2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Non Poisson intermittent events in price formation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The formation of price in a financial market is modelled as a chain of Ising spin with three fundamental figures of trading. We investigate the time behaviour of the model, and we compare the results with the real EURO/USD change rate. By using the test of local Poisson hypothesis, we show that this minimal model leads to clustering and "declustering" in the volatility signal, typical of the real market data.

Greco, A; Sorriso-Valvo, L; Carbone, Vincenzo; Greco, Antonella; Sorriso-Valvo, Luca

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "model results formats" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Health effects models for nuclear power plant accident consequence analysis: Modifications of models resulting from recent reports on health effects of ionizing radiation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Nuclear Regulatory Commission has sponsored several studies to identify and quantify the potential health effects of accidental releases of radionuclides from nuclear power plants. The most recent health effects models resulting from these efforts were published in two reports, NUREG/CR-4214, Rev. 1, Part 1 (1990) and Part 2 (1989). Several major health effects reports have been published recently that may impact the health effects models presented in these reports. This addendum to the Part 2 (1989) report, provides a review of the 1986 and 1988 reports by the United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation, the National Academy of Sciences/National Research Council BEAR 5 Committee report and Publication 60 of the International Commission on Radiological Protection as they relate to this report. The three main sections of this addendum discuss early occurring and continuing effects, late somatic effects, and genetic effects. The major changes to the NUREG/CR-4214 health effects models recommended in this addendum are for late somatic effects. These changes reflect recent changes in cancer risk factors that have come from longer followup and revised dosimetry in major studies like that on the Japanese A-bomb survivors. The results presented in this addendum should be used with the basic NUREG/CR-4214 reports listed above to obtain the most recent views on the potential health effects of radionuclides released accidentally from nuclear power plants. 48 refs., 4 figs., 24 tabs.

Abrahamson, S. (Wisconsin Univ., Madison, WI (United States)); Bender, M.A. (Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)); Boecker, B.B.; Scott, B.R. (Lovelace Biomedical and Environmental Research Inst., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Inhalation Toxicology Research Inst.); Gilbert, E.S. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States))

1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Positronium formation in positron-hydrogen collisions with Debye potentials  

SciTech Connect

Positronium (Ps) formation cross sections (n = 1, 2) in positron-hydrogen collisions in Debye plasma environment are calculated using the screening approximation model for various Debye screening lengths from the Ps formation thresholds to 50 eV. The effect of the screened Coulomb potential on Ps formation process is investigated by using the Debye-Hueckel potential. The present results are compared with available theoretical calculations.

Ma, J.; Cheng, Y.; Wang, Y. C.; Zhou, Y. [Center for Theoretical Atomic and Molecular Physics, Academy of Fundamental and Interdisciplinary Sciences, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150080 (China)

2012-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

243

Result Summary for the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site Performance Assessment Model Version 4.110  

SciTech Connect

Results for Version 4.110 of the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site (RWMS) performance assessment (PA) model are summarized. Version 4.110 includes the fiscal year (FY) 2010 inventory estimate, including a future inventory estimate. Version 4.110 was implemented in GoldSim 10.11(SP4). The following changes have been implemented since the last baseline model, Version 4.105: (1) Updated the inventory and disposal unit configurations with data through the end of FY 2010. (1) Implemented Federal Guidance Report 13 Supplemental CD dose conversion factors (U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, 1999). Version 4.110 PA results comply with air pathway and all-pathways annual total effective dose (TED) performance objectives (Tables 2 and 3, Figures 1 and 2). Air pathways results decrease moderately for all scenarios. The time of the maximum for the air pathway open rangeland scenario shifts from 1,000 to 100 years (y). All-pathways annual TED increases for all scenarios except the resident scenario. The maximum member of public all-pathways dose occurs at 1,000 y for the resident farmer scenario. The resident farmer dose was predominantly due to technetium-99 (Tc-99) (82 percent) and lead-210 (Pb-210) (13 percent). Pb-210 present at 1,000 y is produced predominantly by radioactive decay of uranium-234 (U-234) present at the time of disposal. All results for the postdrilling and intruder-agriculture scenarios comply with the performance objectives (Tables 4 and 5, Figures 3 and 4). The postdrilling intruder results are similar to Version 4.105 results. The intruder-agriculture results are similar to Version 4.105, except for the Pit 6 Radium Disposal Unit (RaDU). The intruder-agriculture result for the Shallow Land Burial (SLB) disposal units is a significant fraction of the performance objective and exceeds the performance objective at the 95th percentile. The intruder-agriculture dose is due predominantly to Tc-99 (75 percent) and U-238 (9.5 percent). The acute intruder scenario results comply with all performance objectives (Tables 6 and 7, Figures 5 and 6). The acute construction result for the SLB disposal units decreases significantly with this version. The maximum acute intruder dose occurs at 1,000 y for the SLB disposal units under the acute construction scenario. The acute intruder dose is caused by multiple radionuclides including U-238 (31 percent), Th-229 (28 percent), plutonium-239 (8.6 percent), U-233 (7.8 percent), and U-234 (6.7 percent). All results for radon-222 (Rn-222) flux density comply with the performance objective (Table 8, Figure 7). The mean Pit 13 RaDU flux density is close to the 0.74 Bq m{sup -2} s{sup -1} limit.

NSTec Environmental Management

2011-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

244

Methodology and results of the impacts of modeling electric utilities ; a comparative evaluation of MEMM and REM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This study compares two models of the U.S. electric utility industry including the EIA's electric utility submodel in the Midterm Energy Market Model (MEMM), and the Baughman-Joskow Regionalized Electricity Model (REM). ...

Baughman, Martin L.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

The Madden–Julian Oscillation, Barotropic Dynamics, and North Pacific Tropical Cyclone Formation. Part II: Stochastic Barotropic Modeling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A stochastic barotropic model linearized about the 850-mb flow is used to investigate the relationship between wind variations associated with the Madden–Julian oscillation (MJO) and eddy kinetic energy variations in the Tropics. Such a model is ...

Dennis L. Hartmann; Eric D. Maloney

2001-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

File Formats  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Home Page Home Page File Formats MODIS Product Subsets Output Data File Format Descriptions The MODIS product subsets for North America and Worldwide are available in several formats, which are described in the following text. MODIS Land Product ASCII Data Image Data Files in ASCII Grid Format QC-Filtered Data and Statistics Generated for this Request Land Cover Data in ASCII Grid Format Statistical Data for MODIS Land Products in Comma Separated Format Underlying BRDF Parameters Used in Generating this Request (available with Albedo MOD43B and MCD43B only) MODIS Land Product ASCII Data Description of File File Content: Data as read from MODIS Land Product HDF-EOS data files. These data are the starting point for deriving the other subset data products. Data Type: As indicated by Land Product Code (e.g., MOD15A2).

247

A CENSUS OF OXYGEN IN STAR-FORMING GALAXIES: AN EMPIRICAL MODEL LINKING METALLICITIES, STAR FORMATION RATES, AND OUTFLOWS  

SciTech Connect

In this contribution, we present the first census of oxygen in star-forming galaxies in the local universe. We examine three samples of galaxies with metallicities and star formation rates (SFRs) at z = 0.07, 0.8, and 2.26, including the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) and DEEP2 survey. We infer the total mass of oxygen produced and mass of oxygen found in the gas-phase from our local SDSS sample. The star formation history is determined by requiring that galaxies evolve along the relation between stellar mass and SFR observed in our three samples. We show that the observed relation between stellar mass and SFR for our three samples is consistent with other samples in the literature. The mass-metallicity relation is well established for our three samples, and from this we empirically determine the chemical evolution of star-forming galaxies. Thus, we are able to simultaneously constrain the SFRs and metallicities of galaxies over cosmic time, allowing us to estimate the mass of oxygen locked up in stars. Combining this work with independent measurements reported in the literature, we conclude that the loss of oxygen from the interstellar medium of local star-forming galaxies is likely to be a ubiquitous process with the oxygen mass loss scaling (almost) linearly with stellar mass. We estimate the total baryonic mass loss and argue that only a small fraction of the baryons inferred from cosmological observations accrete onto galaxies.

Zahid, H. J.; Dima, G. I.; Kewley, L. J. [Institute for Astronomy, University of Hawaii at Manoa, 2680 Woodlawn Drive, Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States); Erb, D. K. [Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, 1900 E. Kenwood Boulevard, Milwaukee, Wisconsin, WI 53211 (United States); Dave, R. [Department of Astronomy, University of Arizona, 933 North Cherry Avenue, Rm. N204 Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States)

2012-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

248

Albedo Feedback, the Meridional Structure of the Effective Heat Diffusivity, and Climatic Sensitivity: Results from Dynamic and Diffusive Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The sensitivity of a two-level primitive equation atmospheric model to solar constant perturbations is examined in the presence of surface albedo feedback. The model is simplified to the point that a large number of numerical experiments can be ...

Isaac M. Held; David I. Linder; Max J. Suarez

1981-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Snow Mass over North America: Observations and Results from the Second Phase of the Atmospheric Model Intercomparison Project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Eighteen global atmospheric general circulation models (AGCMs) participating in the second phase of the Atmospheric Model Intercomparison Project (AMIP-2) are evaluated for their ability to simulate the observed spatial and temporal variability ...

Allan Frei; Ross Brown; James A. Miller; David A. Robinson

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Medium Range Prediction by a GFDL Global Spectral Model: Results for Three Winter Cases and Sensitivity to Dissipation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A preliminary evaluation is made of the medium range predictive capability of a GFDL global spectral model of the atmosphere, based upon three winter blocking cases. Analogous forecasts by a GFDL global grid point model provide a background ...

Charles T. Gordon; William P. Stern

1984-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

The Impact of GEM and MM5 Modeled Meteorological Conditions on CMAQ Air Quality Modeling Results in Eastern Canada and the Northeastern United States  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The fifth-generation Pennsylvania State University–National Center for Atmospheric Research Mesoscale Model (MM5) is currently the meteorological model most widely used as input into the Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) modeling system. In ...

Steven C. Smyth; Dazhong Yin; Helmut Roth; Weimin Jiang; Michael D. Moran; Louis-Philippe Crevier

2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Fast Track Reservoir Modeling of Shale Formations in the Appalachian Basin. Application to Lower Huron Shale in Eastern Kentucky  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper a fast track reservoir modeling and analysis of the Lower Huron Shale in Eastern Kentucky is presented. Unlike conventional reservoir simulation and modeling which is a bottom up approach (geo-cellular model to history matching) this new approach starts by attempting to build a reservoir realization from well production history (Top to Bottom), augmented by core, well-log, well-test and seismic data in order to increase accuracy. This approach requires creation of a large spatial-temporal database that is efficiently handled with state of the art Artificial Intelligence and Data Mining techniques (AI & DM), and therefore it represents an elegant integration of reservoir engineering techniques with Artificial Intelligence and Data Mining. Advantages of this new technique are a) ease of development, b) limited data requirement (as compared to reservoir simulation), and c) speed of analysis. All of the 77 wells used in this study are completed in the Lower Huron Shale and are a part of the Big Sandy Gas field in Eastern Kentucky. Most of the wells have production profiles for more than twenty years. Porosity and thickness data was acquired from the available well logs, while permeability, natural fracture network properties, and fracture aperture data was acquired through a single well history matching process that uses the FRACGEN/NFFLOW simulator package. This technology, known as Top-Down Intelligent Reservoir Modeling, starts with performing conventional reservoir engineering analysis on individual wells such as decline curve analysis and volumetric reserves estimation. Statistical techniques along with information generated from the reservoir engineering analysis contribute to an extensive spatio-temporal database of reservoir behavior. The database is used to develop a cohesive model of the field using fuzzy pattern recognition or similar techniques. The reservoir model is calibrated (history matched) with production history from the most recently drilled wells. The calibrated model is then further used for field development strategies to improve and enhance gas recovery.

Grujic, Ognjen; Mohaghegh, Shahab; Bromhal, Grant

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

The Formation of Hurricane Frederic of 1979  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A high-resolution global model forecast of the formation of Hurricane Frederic of 1979 is analyzed by means of several diagnostic computations on the model's output history. The formation is addressed from an analysis of limited-area energetics ...

T. N. Krishnamurthi; H. S. Bedi; Darlene Oosterhof; Vivek Hardiker

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Monolithic or hierarchical star formation? A new statistical analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We consider an analytic model of cosmic star formation which incorporates supernova feedback, gas accretion and enriched outflows, reproducing the history of cosmic star formation, metallicity, supernovae type II rates and the fraction of baryons allocated to structures. We present a new statistical treatment of the available observational data on the star formation rate and metallicity that accounts for the presence of possible systematics. We then employ a Bayesian Markov Chain Monte Carlo method to compare the predictions of our model with observations and derive constraints on the 7 free parameters of the model. We find that the dust correction scheme one chooses to adopt for the star formation data is critical in determining which scenario is favoured between a hierarchical star formation model, where star formation is prolonged by accretion, infall and merging, and a monolithic scenario, where star formation is rapid and efficient. We distinguish between these modes by defining a characteristic minimum mass, M > 10^{11} M_solar, in our fiducial model, for early type galaxies where star formation occurs efficiently. Our results indicate that the hierarchical star formation model can achieve better agreement with the data, but that this requires a high efficiency of supernova-driven outflows. In a monolithic model, our analysis points to the need for a mechanism that drives metal-poor winds, perhaps in the form of supermassive black hole-induced outflows. Furthermore, the relative absence of star formation beyond z ~ 5 in the monolithic scenario requires an alternative mechanism to dwarf galaxies for reionizing the universe at z ~ 11, as required by observations of the microwave background. While the monolithic scenario is less favoured in terms of its quality-of-fit, it cannot yet be excluded.

Marios Kampakoglou; Roberto Trotta; Joe Silk

2007-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

255

Determining Plutonium Mass in Spent Fuel with Nondestructive Assay Techniques -- Preliminary Modeling Results Emphasizing Integration among Techniques  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

There are a variety of motivations for quantifying Pu in spent (used) fuel assemblies by means of nondestructive assay (NDA) including the following: strengthen the capabilities of the International Atomic Energy Agencies to safeguards nuclear facilities, quantifying shipper/receiver difference, determining the input accountability value at reprocessing facilities and providing quantitative input to burnup credit determination for repositories. For the purpose of determining the Pu mass in spent fuel assemblies, twelve NDA techniques were identified that provide information about the composition of an assembly. A key point motivating the present research path is the realization that none of these techniques, in isolation, is capable of both (1) quantifying the elemental Pu mass of an assembly and (2) detecting the diversion of a significant number of pins. As such, the focus of this work is determining how to best integrate 2 or 3 techniques into a system that can quantify elemental Pu and to assess how well this system can detect material diversion. Furthermore, it is important economically to down-select among the various techniques before advancing to the experimental phase. In order to achieve this dual goal of integration and down-selection, a Monte Carlo library of PWR assemblies was created and is described in another paper at Global 2009 (Fensin et al.). The research presented here emphasizes integration among techniques. An overview of a five year research plan starting in 2009 is given. Preliminary modeling results for the Monte Carlo assembly library are presented for 3 NDA techniques: Delayed Neutrons, Differential Die-Away, and Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence. As part of the focus on integration, the concept of"Pu isotopic correlation" is discussed and the role of cooling time determination.

Tobin, S. J.; Fensin, M. L.; Ludewigt, B. A.; Menlove, H. O.; Quiter, B. J.; Sandoval, N. P.; Swinhoe, M. T.; Thompson, S. J.

2009-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

256

Modeling the performance of a two-phase turbine using numerical methods and the results of nozzle, static cascade, and windage experiments  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Performance models for a two-phase turbine were developed to verify the understanding of the loss mechanisms and to extrapolate from the single-nozzle test condition to a full-admission turbine. The numerical models for predicting the performance of the nozzle and the combined nozzle and rotor are described. Results from two-phase, static cascade tests and disk-friction and windage experiments are used to calibrate the performance model(s). Model predictions are compared with single-nozzle prototype-turbine test results, and extrapolations are made to a full-admission design. The modeling also provides predictions of performance for turbines with various blade geometries, inlet conditions, and droplet sizes. Thus the modeling provides insight into design improvements.

Comfort, W.J. III

1978-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

257

MM5 Modeling of the Madden–Julian Oscillation in the Indian and West Pacific Oceans: Model Description and Control Run Results  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new methodology to study the Madden–Julian oscillation (MJO) is introduced. While previous MJO studies typically have involved highly simplified mathematical models or general circulation models, this new approach seeks to reproduce the MJO by ...

William I. Gustafson Jr.; Bryan C. Weare

2004-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Top-Down Modeling; Practical, Fast-Track, Reservoir Modeling for Shale Formations AAPG/SEG/SPE/SPWLA Hedberg Conference, Austin, TX December 2010  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

& Intelligent Solutions, Inc. Grant Bromhal, U.S. Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory reservoir model is calibrated using the production history of multiple wells and the history matched model of the reservoir starting with well production behavior (history). The production history is augmented with core

Mohaghegh, Shahab

259

Health effects models for nuclear power plant accident consequence analysis. Modification of models resulting from addition of effects of exposure to alpha-emitting radionuclides: Revision 1, Part 2, Scientific bases for health effects models, Addendum 2  

SciTech Connect

The Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) has sponsored several studies to identify and quantify, through the use of models, the potential health effects of accidental releases of radionuclides from nuclear power plants. The Reactor Safety Study provided the basis for most of the earlier estimates related to these health effects. Subsequent efforts by NRC-supported groups resulted in improved health effects models that were published in the report entitled {open_quotes}Health Effects Models for Nuclear Power Plant Consequence Analysis{close_quotes}, NUREG/CR-4214, 1985 and revised further in the 1989 report NUREG/CR-4214, Rev. 1, Part 2. The health effects models presented in the 1989 NUREG/CR-4214 report were developed for exposure to low-linear energy transfer (LET) (beta and gamma) radiation based on the best scientific information available at that time. Since the 1989 report was published, two addenda to that report have been prepared to (1) incorporate other scientific information related to low-LET health effects models and (2) extend the models to consider the possible health consequences of the addition of alpha-emitting radionuclides to the exposure source term. The first addendum report, entitled {open_quotes}Health Effects Models for Nuclear Power Plant Accident Consequence Analysis, Modifications of Models Resulting from Recent Reports on Health Effects of Ionizing Radiation, Low LET Radiation, Part 2: Scientific Bases for Health Effects Models,{close_quotes} was published in 1991 as NUREG/CR-4214, Rev. 1, Part 2, Addendum 1. This second addendum addresses the possibility that some fraction of the accident source term from an operating nuclear power plant comprises alpha-emitting radionuclides. Consideration of chronic high-LET exposure from alpha radiation as well as acute and chronic exposure to low-LET beta and gamma radiations is a reasonable extension of the health effects model.

Abrahamson, S. [Wisconsin Univ., Madison, WI (United States); Bender, M.A. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Boecker, B.B.; Scott, B.R. [Lovelace Biomedical and Environmental Research Inst., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Inhalation Toxicology Research Inst.; Gilbert, E.S. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Greenland Surface Mass Balance as Simulated by the Community Earth System Model. Part I: Model Evaluation and 1850-2005 Results  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The modeling of the surface mass balance (SMB) of the Greenland ice sheet (GIS) requires high-resolution models in order to capture the observed large gradients in the steep marginal areas. Until now, global climate models have not been considered ...

Miren Vizcaíno; William H. Lipscomb; William J. Sacks; Jan H. van Angelen; Bert Wouters; Michiel R. van den Broeke

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "model results formats" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Greenland Surface Mass Balance as Simulated by the Community Earth System Model. Part I: Model Evaluation and 1850–2005 Results  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The modeling of the surface mass balance (SMB) of the Greenland Ice Sheet (GIS) requires high-resolution models in order to capture the observed large gradients in the steep marginal areas. Until now, global climate models have not been considered ...

Miren Vizcaíno; William H. Lipscomb; William J. Sacks; Jan H. van Angelen; Bert Wouters; Michiel R. van den Broeke

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

On the Dynamics of Planetary Flow Regimes. Part II: Results from a Hierarchy of Orographically Forced Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The relationship between steady states of the large-scale flow regimes revealed by multimodality in phase space and quasi-resonant axes of a linearized atmospheric model (neutral vectors) is investigated by means of a hierarchy of three ...

Franco Molteni

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

The Land Surface Scheme ISBA within the Météo-France Climate Model ARPEGE. Part I. Implementation and Preliminary Results  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes recent developments in climate modeling at Météo-France related to land surface processes. The implementation of a simple land surface parameterization, Interactions between Soil Biosphere Atmosphere (ISBA), has gained from ...

J-F. Mahfouf; A. O. Manzi; J. Noilhan; H. Giordani; M. DéQué

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Emission-Induced Nonlinearities in the Global Aerosol System: Results from the ECHAM5-HAM Aerosol-Climate Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In a series of simulations with the global ECHAM5-HAM aerosol-climate model, the response to changes in anthropogenic emissions is analyzed. Traditionally, additivity is assumed in the assessment of the aerosol climate impact, as the underlying ...

Philip Stier; Johann Feichter; Silvia Kloster; Elisabetta Vignati; Julian Wilson

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Numerical Simulation of Cyclone Sidr Using a Cloud-Resolving Model: Characteristics and Formation Process of an Outer Rainband  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cyclone Sidr, one of the most devastating tropical cyclones that resulted in several thousand deaths and substantial damages, developed in the north Indian Ocean and made landfall over the Bangladesh coast on 15 November 2007. Observation and ...

Nasreen Akter; Kazuhisa Tsuboki

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Tolman Test from z = 0.1 to z = 5.5: Preliminary results challenge the expanding universe model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We performed the Tolman surface-brightness test for the expansion of the universe using a large UV dataset of disk galaxies in a wide range of redshifts (from 0.03 to 5.7). We combined data for low-z galaxies from GALEX observations with those for high-z objects from HST UltraDeep Field images. Starting from the data in publicly- available GALEX and UDF catalogs, we created 6 samples of galaxies with observations in a rest-frame band centered at 141 nm and 5 with data from one centered on 225 nm. These bands correspond, respectively, to the FUV and NUV bands of GALEX for objects at z = 0.1. By maintaining the same rest-frame wave-band of all observations we greatly minimized the effects of k-correction and filter transformation. Since SB depends on the absolute magnitude, all galaxy samples were then matched for the absolute magnitude range (-17.7 data with two models: 1) The LCDM expanding universe model with the widely-accepted evolution of galaxy size R prop H(z)-1 and 2) a simple, Euclidean, non-expanding (ENE) model with the distance given by d=cz/H0. We found that the ENE model was a significantly better fit to the data than the LCDM model with galaxy size evolution. While the LCDM model provides a good fit to the HUDF data alone, there is a 1.2 magnitude difference in the SB predicted from the model for the GALEX data and observations, a difference at least 5 times larger than any statistical error. The ENE provides a good fit to all the data except the two points with z>4.

Eric J. Lerner

2009-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

267

Decline curve analysis in unconventional resource plays using logistic growth models.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Current models used to forecast production in unconventional oil and gas formations are often not producing valid results. When traditional decline curve analysis models are… (more)

Clark, Aaron James

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Determination of High-Frequency Current Distribution Using EMTP-Based Transmission Line Models with Resulting Radiated Electromagnetic Fields  

SciTech Connect

Application of BPL technologies to existing overhead high-voltage power lines would benefit greatly from improved simulation tools capable of predicting performance - such as the electromagnetic fields radiated from such lines. Existing EMTP-based frequency-dependent line models are attractive since their parameters are derived from physical design dimensions which are easily obtained. However, to calculate the radiated electromagnetic fields, detailed current distributions need to be determined. This paper presents a method of using EMTP line models to determine the current distribution on the lines, as well as a technique for using these current distributions to determine the radiated electromagnetic fields.

Mork, B; Nelson, R; Kirkendall, B; Stenvig, N

2009-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

269

Combining In-Situ Buffer-Layer-Assisted-Growth with Scanning Probe Microscopy for Formation and Study of Supported Model Catalysts  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

STM images showing the morphology of BaO film (7 ML-left and STM images showing the morphology of BaO film (7 ML-left and 80 ML-right) formed by the direct evaporation of the BaO. EMSL Research and Capability Development Proposals Combining In Situ Buffer-Layer-Assisted-Growth with Scanning Probe Microscopy for Formation and Study of Supported Model Catalysts Project start date: Spring 2008 EMSL Lead Investigator: Igor Lyubinetsky Microscopy Group, EMSL, PNNL Co-investigators: Yingge Du Spectroscopy and Diffraction Group, EMSL, PNNL Wayne Goodman Department of Chemistry, Texas A&M University, College Station, Texas The objective of the project is to implement in situ advanced buffer-layer-assisted growth (BLAG) technique by combining EMSL's ultra-high vacuum scanning probe microscopy (UHV SPM) and

270

Predictive geochemical modeling of interactions between uranium-mill-tailings solutions and sediments in a flow-through system: model formulations and preliminary results  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An equilibrium thermodynamic conceptual model consisting of minerals and solid phases was developed to represent a soil column. A computer program was used as a tool to solve the system of mathematical equations imposed by the conceptual chemical model. The combined conceptual model and computer program were used to predict aqueous phase compositions of effluent solutions from permeability cells packed with geologic materials and percolated with uranium mill tailings solutions. Initial calculations of ion speciation and mineral solubility and our understanding of the chemical processes occurring in the modeled system were used to select solid phases for inclusion in the conceptual model. The modeling predictions were compared to the analytically determined column effluent concentrations. Hypotheses were formed, based on modeling predictions and laboratory evaluations, as to the probable mechanisms controlling the migration of selected contaminants. An assemblage of minerals and other solid phases could be used to predict the concentrations of several of the macro constituents (e.g., Ca, SO/sub 4/, Al, Fe, and Mn) but could not be used to predict trace element concentrations. These modeling conclusions are applicable to situations where uranium mill tailings solutions of low pH and high total dissolved solids encounter either clay liners or natural geologic materials that contain inherent acid neutralizing capacities. 116 references, 22 figures, 6 tables.

Peterson, S.R.; Felmy, A.R.; Serne, R.J.; Gee, G.W.

1983-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

The Dispersion of Tracer Plumes in Mountainous Regions in Central Arizona: Comparisons between Observations and Modeling Results  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A three-dimensional, time-dependent, nested-grid model is used to calculate the targeting of tracer or Seeding material over complex terrain in northern Arizona. Good agreement with measurements of SF6 tracer is reported in three case studies. ...

Roelof T. Bruintjes; Terry L. Clark; William D. Hall

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Aircraft Microwave Observations and Simulations of Deep Convection from 18 to 183 GHz. Part II: Model Results  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In Part II of the 29 June 1986 case study, a radiative transfer model is used to simulate the aircraft multichannel microwave brightness temperatures presented in Part I and to study the convective storm structure. Ground-based radar data are ...

Hwa-Young M. Yeh; N. Prasad; Robert A. Mack; Robert F. Adler

1990-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Temporal Variations of Aerosol Optical Parameters Resulting from the Aging of a Model Aerosol Number Size Distribution  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Aerosol number size distributions are subject to aging, i.e., to temporal variations. The aging of a Junge number size distribution due to a multitude of processes was modeled by Junge and Abel. The pertinent changes with time of aerosol optical ...

J. Freund

1984-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Multicentury Changes to the Global Climate and Carbon Cycle: Results from a Coupled Climate and Carbon Cycle Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A coupled climate and carbon (CO2) cycle model is used to investigate the global climate and carbon cycle changes out to the year 2300 that would occur if CO2 emissions from all the currently estimated fossil fuel resources were released to the ...

G. Bala; K. Caldeira; A. Mirin; M. Wickett; C. Delire

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Formative time of breakdown modeled for the ignition of air and n-butane mixtures using effective ionization coefficients  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

It is shown that simulations of ignition by electric arc discharge in n-butane and air mixtures have interesting features, which deviate from results obtained by simple extension of calculations based on methanelike fuels. In particular, it is demonstrated that lowering the temperature of the n-butane-air mixture before ignition under certain conditions will actually decrease the ignition stage time as well as the required electric field.

Kudryavtsev, A. A.; Popugaev, S. D. [St. Petersburg State University, St. Petersburg 198904 (Russian Federation); Demidov, V. I. [Department of Physics, West Virginia University, Morgantown, West Virginia 26506 (United States); Adams, S. F. [Air Force Research Laboratory, Wright-Patterson AFB, Ohio 45433 (United States); Jiao, C. Q. [ISSI Inc., Dayton, Ohio 45440-3638 (United States)

2008-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

276

North American CO2 exchange: Inter comparison of modeled estimates with results from a fine scale atmospheric inversion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Monitoring  Division  Tall  Tower  Network,   http://These  include  two  tall  towers  with  a  height  of  dioxide  on  very  tall   towers:    Results  of  the  NOAA/

Gourdji, Sharon M.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Stellar masses of SDSS-III BOSS galaxies at z~0.5 and constraints to galaxy formation models  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We calculate stellar masses for ~400,000 massive luminous galaxies at redshift ~0.2-0.7 using the first two years of data from the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS). Stellar masses are obtained by fitting model spectral energy distributions to u,g,r,i,z magnitudes. Accurate BOSS spectroscopic redshifts are used to constrain the fits. We find that the distribution of stellar masses in BOSS is narrow (Delta log M ~0.5 dex) and peaks at about log M/M_sun ~ 11.3 (for a Kroupa initial stellar mass function), and that the mass sampling is uniform over the redshift range 0.2 to 0.6, in agreement with the intended BOSS target selection. The galaxy masses probed by BOSS extend over ~ 10^{12} M_{sun}, providing unprecedented measurements of the high-mass end of the galaxy mass function. We find that the galaxy number density above ~ 2.5 10^{11} M_{sun} agrees with previous determinations within 2sigma, but there is a slight offset towards lower number densities in BOSS. This alleviates a tension between th...

Maraston, Claudia; Henriques, Bruno M; Thomas, Daniel; Wake, David; Brownstein, Joel R; Capozzi, Diego; Bundy, Kevin; Skibba, Ramin A; Beifiori, Alessandra; Nichol, Robert C; Edmondson, Edd; Schneider, Don P; Chen, Yanmei; Masters, Karen L; Steele, Oliver; Bolton, Adam S; York, Donald G; Bizyaev, Dmitry; Brewington, Howard; Malanushenko, Elena; Malanushenko, Viktor; Snedden, Stephanie; Oravetz, Daniel; Pan, Kaike; Shelden, Alaina; Simmons, Audrey

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Model of Procedure Usage – Results from a Qualitative Study to Inform Design of Computer-Based Procedures  

SciTech Connect

The nuclear industry is constantly trying to find ways to decrease the human error rate, especially the human errors associated with procedure use. As a step toward the goal of improving procedure use performance, researchers, together with the nuclear industry, have been looking at replacing the current paper-based procedures with computer-based procedure systems. The concept of computer-based procedures is not new by any means; however most research has focused on procedures used in the main control room. Procedures reviewed in these efforts are mainly emergency operating procedures and normal operating procedures. Based on lessons learned for these previous efforts we are now exploring a more unknown application for computer based procedures - field procedures, i.e. procedures used by nuclear equipment operators and maintenance technicians. The Idaho National Laboratory, the Institute for Energy Technology, and participants from the U.S. commercial nuclear industry are collaborating in an applied research effort with the objective of developing requirements and specifications for a computer-based procedure system to be used by field operators. The goal is to identify the types of human errors that can be mitigated by using computer-based procedures and how to best design the computer-based procedures to do this. The underlying philosophy in the research effort is “Stop – Start – Continue”, i.e. what features from the use of paper-based procedures should we not incorporate (Stop), what should we keep (Continue), and what new features or work processes should be added (Start). One step in identifying the Stop – Start – Continue was to conduct a baseline study where affordances related to the current usage of paper-based procedures were identified. The purpose of the study was to develop a model of paper based procedure use which will help to identify desirable features for computer based procedure prototypes. Affordances such as note taking, markups, sharing procedures between fellow coworkers, the use of multiple procedures at once, etc. were considered. The model describes which affordances associated with paper based procedures should be transferred to computer-based procedures as well as what features should not be incorporated. The model also provides a means to identify what new features not present in paper based procedures need to be added to the computer-based procedures to further enhance performance. The next step is to use the requirements and specifications to develop concepts and prototypes of computer-based procedures. User tests and other data collection efforts will be conducted to ensure that the real issues with field procedures and their usage are being addressed and solved in the best manner possible. This paper describes the baseline study, the construction of the model of procedure use, and the requirements and specifications for computer-based procedures that were developed based on the model. It also addresses how the model and the insights gained from it were used to develop concepts and prototypes for computer based procedures.

Johanna H Oxstrand; Katya L Le Blanc

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Impacts of a gas cartel on the European gas market – selected results from the supply model EUGAS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

b, * This article introduces the simulation model EUGAS which allows a quantitative analysis of the long-term natural gas supply of Europe. Based on chosen parameter specifications, the simulation shows that no discernible physical gas scarcity at least for the next 20-30 years will occur in Europe. Significant investments in new production and transport facilities will be necessary during the next decades. Diversification of supplies and political considerations will have a significant impact on the development of new natural gas resources. Possibly, a new built gas cartel similar to the OPEC may modify the gas supply pattern of Europe.

J. Perner A; A. Seeliger

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Pressure Calculation in Polar and Charged Systems using Ewald Summation Results for the Extended Simple Point Charge Model of Water  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ewald summation and physically equivalent methods such as particle-mesh Ewald, kubic-harmonic expansions, or Lekner sums are commonly used to calculate long-range electrostatic interactions in computer simulations of polar and charged substances. The calculation of pressures in such systems is investigated. We find that the virial and thermodynamic pressures differ because of the explicit volume dependence of the effective, resummed Ewald potential. The thermodynamic pressure, obtained from the volume derivative of the Helmholtz free energy, can be expressed easily for both ionic and rigid molecular systems. For a system of rigid molecules, the electrostatic energy and the forces at the atom positions are required, both of which are readily available in molecular dynamics codes. We then calculate the virial and thermodynamic pressures for the extended simple point charge (SPC/E) water model at standard conditions. We find that the thermodynamic pressure exhibits considerably less system size dependence than t...

Hummer, G; Neumann, M; Hummer, Gerhard; Gr{ø}nbech-Jensen, Niels; Neumann, Martin

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "model results formats" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Pressure Calculation in Polar and Charged Systems using Ewald Summation: Results for the Extended Simple Point Charge Model of Water  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ewald summation and physically equivalent methods such as particle-mesh Ewald, kubic-harmonic expansions, or Lekner sums are commonly used to calculate long-range electrostatic interactions in computer simulations of polar and charged substances. The calculation of pressures in such systems is investigated. We find that the virial and thermodynamic pressures differ because of the explicit volume dependence of the effective, resummed Ewald potential. The thermodynamic pressure, obtained from the volume derivative of the Helmholtz free energy, can be expressed easily for both ionic and rigid molecular systems. For a system of rigid molecules, the electrostatic energy and the forces at the atom positions are required, both of which are readily available in molecular dynamics codes. We then calculate the virial and thermodynamic pressures for the extended simple point charge (SPC/E) water model at standard conditions. We find that the thermodynamic pressure exhibits considerably...

Gerhard Hummer; Niels Grønbech-Jensen; Martin Neumann

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Market Structure Across Retail Formats  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We study how market structure within a product category varies across retail formats. Building on the literature on internal market structure, we estimate a joint store and brand choice model where the loading matrix of brand attributes are allowed to ... Keywords: brand maps, heterogeniety, market structure, retail formats

Karsten Hansen; Vishal Singh

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Pressure Calculation in Polar and Charged Systems using Ewald Summation: Results for the Extended Simple Point Charge Model of Water  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ewald summation and physically equivalent methods such as particle-mesh Ewald, kubic-harmonic expansions, or Lekner sums are commonly used to calculate long-range electrostatic interactions in computer simulations of polar and charged substances. The calculation of pressures in such systems is investigated. We find that the virial and thermodynamic pressures differ because of the explicit volume dependence of the effective, resummed Ewald potential. The thermodynamic pressure, obtained from the volume derivative of the Helmholtz free energy, can be expressed easily for both ionic and rigid molecular systems. For a system of rigid molecules, the electrostatic energy and the forces at the atom positions are required, both of which are readily available in molecular dynamics codes. We then calculate the virial and thermodynamic pressures for the extended simple point charge (SPC/E) water model at standard conditions. We find that the thermodynamic pressure exhibits considerably less system size dependence than the virial pressure. From an analysis of the cross correlation between the virial and thermodynamic pressure, we conclude that the thermodynamic pressure should be used to drive volume fluctuations in constant-pressure simulations.

Gerhard Hummer; Niels Grønbech-Jensen; Martin Neumann

1998-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

284

Pressure calculation in polar and charged systems using Ewald summation: Results for the extended simple point charge model of water  

SciTech Connect

Ewald summation and physically equivalent methods such as particle-mesh Ewald, kubic-harmonic expansions, or Lekner sums are commonly used to calculate long-range electrostatic interactions in computer simulations of polar and charged substances. The calculation of pressures in such systems is investigated. We find that the virial and thermodynamic pressures differ because of the explicit volume dependence of the effective, resummed Ewald potential. The thermodynamic pressure, obtained from the volume derivative of the Helmholtz free energy, can be expressed easily for both ionic and rigid molecular systems. For a system of rigid molecules, the electrostatic energy and the forces at the atom positions are required, both of which are readily available in molecular dynamics codes. We then calculate the virial and thermodynamic pressures for the extended simple point charge (SPC/E) water model at standard conditions. We find that the thermodynamic pressure exhibits considerably less system size dependence than the virial pressure. From an analysis of the cross correlation between the virial and thermodynamic pressure, we conclude that the thermodynamic pressure should be used to drive volume fluctuations in constant-pressure simulations. {copyright} {ital 1998 American Institute of Physics.}

Hummer, G.; Gro/nbech-Jensen, N. [Theoretical Division, MS K710, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Neumann, M. [Institut fuer Experimentalphysik, Universitaet Wien, A-1090 Vienna (Austria)] [Institut fuer Experimentalphysik, Universitaet Wien, A-1090 Vienna (Austria)

1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Nonmonotonic Relaxation as a Result of Spatial Heterogeneity in the Model of In-series Blocks Chain  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Recently the materials possessing structure of molecular and supramolecular matrix are more and more actively studied. They are relative to many polymeric materials of a technological origin, such as rubber, and living biological tissues. Processes of mechanical deformation of these continuous media have peculiarities connected, first, with accounting for internal friction and dissipation of energy, and secondly, with nonlinearity of their elastic and viscous properties, that is with violation of Hook and Newtons laws. Traditional approaches to mechanics of viscoelastic bodies sometimes are excessively difficult, and more evident and available representations are necessary. The invaluable role in studying of the operating processes mechanisms of elastic deformation and motility of biological materials is played by the mathematical modeling. New effect obtained by means of computer experiment of nonmonotonic relaxation of deformation in heterogeneous media is considered in the present work. Rheological properties of described media are governed by the differential equations of the first order on time (the evolution equations), as well as a huge variety of other physical processes. The physical phenomena in nonlinear systems with dissipation have a big community, including such it would seem far areas, as dynamics of magnetization in ferrite. Therefore the problem of studying new effects of viscous friction in the conditions of nonlinearity and heterogeneity, is very actual as in respect of fundamental research nonlinear and non-uniform environments, and in many areas of materials science, design of new materials, engineering of biological substitutes of living tissues and development of the micromagnetic devices using essentially new opportunities.

A. A. Bedulina; A. V. Kobelev

2013-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

286

Star Formation and Chemical Evolution of Lyman-Break Galaxies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The number density and clustering properties of Lyman-break galaxies (LBGs) observed at redshift $z\\sim 3$ are best explained by assuming that they are associated with the most massive haloes at $z\\sim 3$ predicted in hierarchical models of structure formation. In this paper we study, under the same assumption, how star formation and chemical enrichment may have proceeded in the LBG population. A consistent model, in which the amount of cold gas available for star formation must be regulated, is suggested. It is found that gas cooling in dark haloes provides a natural regulation process. In this model, the star formation rate in an LBG host halo is roughly constant over about 1 Gyr. The predicted star formation rates and effective radii are consistent with observations. The metallicity of the gas associated with an LBG is roughly equal to the chemical yield, or about the order of $1 Z_{\\odot}$ for a Salpeter IMF. The contribution to the total metals of LBGs is roughly consistent with that obtained from the observed cosmic star formation history. The model predicts a marked radial metallicity gradient in a galaxy, with the gas in the outer region having much lower metallicity. As a result, the metallicities for the damped Lyman-alpha absorption systems expected from the LBG population are low. Since LBG halos are filled with hot gas in this model, their contributions to the soft X-ray background and to the UV ionization background are calculated and discussed.

Chenggang Shu

2000-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

287

EPRI/C-E PWR Safety Valve Test Report Volume 3: Test Results for Dresser Safety Valve Model 31739A  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

EPRI at the request of the PWR utilities developed an overall program for the testing of PWR primary system safety and relief valves. This program was in response to NUREG 0578 Item 2.1.2 and NUREG 0737 Item II.D.1.A requirements. This report documents the results of safety valve testing performed as part of the overall program at the EPRI/C-E Valve Test Facility located at Combustion Engineering's Kreisinger Development Laboratory, Windsor, Connecticut. Seven safety valves representative of those utiliz...

1983-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Variable-response model of electricity demand by time of day: Results of a Wisconsin pricing experiment: Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Observationally alike households may differ in demand parameters and thus in economic quantities that are functions of those parameters. We have proposed a methodology for dealing with this variation. Estimation of both translog and CES versions of the model with data from the Wisconsin Electricity Pricing Experiment revealed considerable variation among households in time-of-day electricity consumption demand parameters for both summer and winter seasons and for several different definitions of the peak period. Observed household characteristics explained only a small share of total household differences, but permanent household differences dominated month-to-month variation in either expenditure shares or log consumption ratios in most cases. Permanent differences among households are important relative to total variation, including transitory month-to-month variation. We calculated various economic variables from the demand parameters, including the partial elasticity of substitution, compensated and uncompensated elasticities, and a measure of electricity expenditure under peak load pricing required to maintain the utility level under flat rate pricing relative to the flat rate expenditure. Because these are nonlinear functions of the household demand parameters, the mean parameter value over households with different demand parameters may be substantially different from the value of the function at mean values, under the representative household paradigm. For time-of-day electricity demand, variation among households is significant but small relative to mean parameter values. Therefore, controlling for the effect of household variation makes little difference in these mean calculations, but it does imply substantial variation among households in the welfare implications (and elasticities of response) of the introduction of time-of-day pricing. 25 refs., 12 tabs.

Lillard, L.

1987-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Formation and Evolution of Frontal Rainbands and Geostrophic Potential Vorticity Anomalies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A viscous semigeostrophic model is developed and used to study the formation and evolution of frontal rainbands in association with the dry and moist geostrophic potential vorticity (GPV) anomalies. The numerical results show that when moist GPV (...

Qin Xu

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Numerical modeling of carbon dioxide sequestration on the rate of pressure solution creep in limestone: Preliminary results  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

When carbon dioxide (CO2) is injected into an aquifer or a depleted geological reservoir, its dissolution into solution results in acidification of the pore waters. As a consequence, the pore waters become more reactive, which leads to enhanced dissolution-precipitation processes and a modification of the mechanical and hydrological properties of the rock. This effect is especially important for limestones given that the solubility and reactivity of carbonates is strongly dependent on pH and the partial pressure of CO2. The main mechanism that couples dissolution, precipitation and rock matrix deformation is commonly referred to as intergranular pressure solution creep (IPS) or pervasive pressure solution creep (PSC). This process involves dissolution at intergranular grain contacts subject to elevated stress, diffusion of dissolved material in an intergranular fluid, and precipitation in pore spaces subject to lower stress. This leads to an overall and pervasive reduction in porosity due to both grain indent...

Renard, Francois; Hellmann, Roland; Collombet, Marielle; Guen, Yvi Le

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

NREL: Jobs and Economic Development Impacts (JEDI) Models - About...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The basic user interface for the natural gas model is the same as the wind and coal models. Results are provided in the same format as the coal and wind models allowing...

292

Formation of molecular hydrogen on amorphous silicate surfaces  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Experimental results on the formation of molecular hydrogen on amorphous silicate surfaces are presented and analyzed using a rate equation model. The energy barriers for the relevant diffusion and desorption processes are obtained. They turn out to be significantly higher than those obtained for polycrystalline silicates, demonstrating the importance of grain morphology. Using these barriers we evaluate the efficiency of molecular hydrogen formation on amorphous silicate grains under interstellar conditions. It is found that unlike polycrystalline silicates, amorphous silicate grains are efficient catalysts of H_2 formation in diffuse interstellar clouds.

Ling Li; Giulio Manico; Emanuele Congiu; Joe Roser; Sol Swords; Hagai B. Perets; Adina Lederhendler; Ofer Biham; John Robert Brucato; Valerio Pirronello; Gianfranco Vidali

2007-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

293

Ice Formation in Arctic Mixed-Phase Clouds: Insights from a 3-D Cloud-Resolving Model with Size-Resolved Aerosol and Cloud Microphysics  

SciTech Connect

The single-layer mixed-phase clouds observed during the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program’s Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment (MPACE) are simulated with a 3-dimensional cloud-resolving model the System for Atmospheric Modeling (SAM) coupled with an explicit bin microphysics scheme and a radar-lidar simulator. Two possible ice enhancement mechanisms – activation of droplet evaporation residues by condensation-followed-by-freezing and droplet freezing by contact freezing inside-out, are scrutinized by extensive comparisons with aircraft and radar and lidar measurements. The locations of ice initiation associated with each mechanism and the role of ice nuclei (IN) in the evolution of mixed-phase clouds are mainly addressed. Simulations with either mechanism agree well with the in-situ and remote sensing measurements on ice microphysical properties but liquid water content is slightly underpredicted. These two mechanisms give very similar cloud microphysical, macrophysical, dynamical, and radiative properties, although the ice nucleation properties (rate, frequency and location) are completely different. Ice nucleation from activation of evaporation nuclei is most efficient near cloud top areas concentrated on the edges of updrafts, while ice initiation from the drop freezing process has no significant location preference (occurs anywhere that droplet evaporation is significant). Both enhanced nucleation mechanisms contribute dramatically to ice formation with ice particle concentration of 10-15 times higher relative to the simulation without either of them. The contribution of ice nuclei (IN) recycling from ice particle evaporation to IN and ice particle concentration is found to be very significant in this case. Cloud can be very sensitive to IN initially and form a nonquilibrium transition condition, but become much less sensitive as cloud evolves to a steady mixed-phase condition. The parameterization of Meyers et al. [1992] with the observed MPACE IN concentration is able to predict the observed mixed-phase clouds reasonably well. This validation may facilitate the application of this parameterization in the cloud and climate models to simulate Arctic clouds.

Fan, Jiwen; Ovtchinnikov, Mikhail; Comstock, Jennifer M.; McFarlane, Sally A.; Khain, Alexander

2009-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

294

The influence of strange quarks on QCD phase diagram and chemical freeze-out: Results from the hadron resonance gas model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We confront the lattice results on QCD phase diagram for two and three flavors with the hadron resonance gas model. Taking into account the truncations in the Taylor-expansion of energy density $\\epsilon$ done on the lattice at finite chemical potential $\\mu$, we find that the hadron resonance gas model under the condition of constant $\\epsilon$ describes very well the lattice phase diagram. We also calculate the chemical freeze-out curve according to the entropy density $s$. The $s$-values are taken from lattice QCD simulations with two and three flavors. We find that this condition is excellent in reproducing the experimentally estimated parameters of the chemical freeze-out.

A. Tawfik

2004-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

295

Context: Modeling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Yang, JC; Huber, ML; Boyer, CI; 1995. Modeling of Hydrogen Fluoride Formation From Flame Suppressants During Combustion.. ...

2013-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

296

Method of fracturing a geological formation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved method of fracturing a geological formation surrounding a well bore is disclosed. A relatively small explosive charge is emplaced in a well bore and the bore is subsequently hydraulically pressurized to a pressure less than the formation breakdown pressure and preferably greater than the fracture propagation pressure of the formation. The charge is denoted while the bore is so pressurized, resulting in the formation of multiple fractures in the surrounding formation with little or no accompanying formation damage. Subsequent hydraulic pressurization can be used to propagate and extend the fractures in a conventional manner. The method is useful for stimulating production of oil, gas and possibly water from suitable geologic formations.

Johnson, James O. (2679-B Walnut, Los Alamos, NM 87544)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Galaxy Formation at z~3: Constraints from Spatial Clustering  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We use N-body simulations combined with semi-analytic models to compute the clustering properties of modeled galaxies at z~3, and confront these predictions with the clustering properties of the observed population of Lyman-break galaxies (LBGs). Several scenarios for the nature of LBGs are explored, which may be broadly categorized into models in which high-redshift star formation is driven by collisional starbursts and those in which quiescent star formation dominates. For each model, we make predictions for the LBG overdensity distribution, the variance of counts-in-cells, the correlation length, and close pair statistics. Models which assume a one-to-one relationship between massive dark-matter halos and galaxies are disfavored by close pair statistics, as are models in which colliding halos are associated with galaxies in a simplified way. However, when modeling of gas consumption and star formation is included using a semi-analytic treatment, the quiescent and collisional starburst models predict similar clustering properties and none of these models can be ruled out based on the available clustering data. None of the ``realistic'' models predict a strong dependence of clustering amplitude on the luminosity threshold of the sample, in apparent conflict with some observational results.

Risa H. Wechsler; Rachel S. Somerville; James S. Bullock; Tsafrir S. Kolatt; Joel R. Primack; George R. Blumenthal; Avishai Dekel

2000-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

298

The Influence of Bismuth on Microstructure and Porosity Formation ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The results show that a small amount of bismuth has no significant impact on the formation of ... A Multi-Scale 3D Model of the Vacuum Arc Remelting Process ... Deformation Prediction of a Heavy Hydro Turbine Blade During Casting Process

299

RESRAD-RECYCLE : a computer model for analyzing radiation exposures resulting from recycling radioactively contaminated scrap metals or reusing ratioactively surface-contaminated materials and equipment.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

RESRAD-RECYCLE is a computer code designed by Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) to be used in making decisions about the disposition of radioactively contaminated materials and scrap metals. It implements a pathway analysis methodology to evaluate potential radiation exposures resulting from the recycling of contaminated scrap metals and the reuse of surface-contaminated materials and equipment. For modeling purposes, it divides the entire metal recycling process into six steps: (1) scrap delivery, (2) scrap melting, (3) ingot delivery, (4) product fabrication, (5) product distribution, and (6) use of finished product. RESRAD-RECYCLE considers the reuse of surface-contaminated materials in their original forms. It contains representative exposure scenarios for each recycling step and the reuse process; users can also specify scenarios if desired. The model calculates individual and collective population doses for workers involved in the recycling process and for the public using the finished products. The results are then used to derive clearance levels for the contaminated materials on the basis of input dose restrictions. The model accounts for radiological decay and ingrowth, dilution and partitioning during melting, and distribution of refined metal in the various finished products, as well as the varying densities and geometries of the radiation sources during the recycling process. A complete material balance in terms of mass and radioactivity during the recycling process can also be implemented. In an international validation study, the radiation doses calculated by RESRAD-RECYCLE were shown to agree fairly well with actual measurement data.

Cheng, J. J.; Kassas, B.; Yu, C.; Arnish, J. J.; LePoire, D.; Chen, S.-Y.; Williams, W. A.; Wallo, A.; Peterson, H.; Environmental Assessment; DOE; Univ. of Texas

2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Formation of Carbon Dwarfs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We consider the formation of dwarf carbon stars via accretion from a carbon AGB companion in light of the new 107 object sample of Downes et al. (2004). This sample is now large enough to allow good mass determination via comparison of a composite spectrum to theoretical atmospheric models. Carbon dwarfs of spectral type M are indeed main sequence M dwarfs with enhanced metallicity and carbon abundance. We also calculate the predicted abundance of both M and of F/G carbon dwarfs, and show that the latter should be falsifiable in the near future.

Charles L. Steinhardt; Dimitar D. Sasselov

2005-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "model results formats" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Hypervelocity impact jet formation  

SciTech Connect

The hypervelocity impact of a particle on a surface generates a jet of shocked material which is thrown from the impact site. A simple analytic model has been developed to obtain expressions for the evolution of this jet of ejecta. The analysis is based on applying the conservation equations of mass and momentum to the problem of a normal impact of a sphere against a semi-infinite flat target. Expressions are developed for the evolution of the jet velocity, jet release point and the locus of points which describe the ejecta envelope. These analytical ejecta profiles are compared with high speed photographs of impact jet formation. 6 refs., 7 figs.

Ang, J.A.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Search Results  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Search Results. CAS Number, Formula, Name, State, JANAF Table, Links. 7439-97-6, Hg, Mercury, ref, view, ... 7439-97-6, Hg, Mercury, cr,l, view, ...

303

GLODAP Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Results Evaluation of Inorganic Carbon Quality Carbon Thermodynamics Anthropogenic CO2 Radio Carbon Gridded Carbon Fields Click the map to enlarge. Indian Ocean Pacific Ocean...

304

Search Results  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Search Results. CAS Number, Formula, Name, State, JANAF Table, Links. 7440-33-7, W, Tungsten, cr,l, view, ... 7440-33-7, W, Tungsten, cr, view, ...

305

Essential Dynamics of Secondary Eyewall Formation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The authors conduct an analysis of the dynamics of secondary eyewall formation in two modeling frameworks to obtain a more complete understanding of the phenomenon. The first is a full-physics, three-dimensional mesoscale model in which the ...

Sergio F. Abarca; Michael T. Montgomery

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Fuzzy coalition formation among rational cooperative agents  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Formation of coalitions in multi-agent systems (MAS) enables the development of efficient organizations. In the article, a model of fuzzy cooperative game with coalitions is described. It extends the model of the fuzzy coalition game with associated ...

Leonid B. Sheremetov; José C. Romero Cortés

2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Comparison and validation of HEU and LEU modeling results to HEU experimental benchmark data for the Massachusetts Institute of Technology MITR reactor.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Massachusetts Institute of Technology Reactor (MITR-II) is a research reactor in Cambridge, Massachusetts designed primarily for experiments using neutron beam and in-core irradiation facilities. It delivers a neutron flux comparable to current LWR power reactors in a compact 6 MW core using Highly Enriched Uranium (HEU) fuel. In the framework of its non-proliferation policies, the international community presently aims to minimize the amount of nuclear material available that could be used for nuclear weapons. In this geopolitical context, most research and test reactors both domestic and international have started a program of conversion to the use of Low Enriched Uranium (LEU) fuel. A new type of LEU fuel based on an alloy of uranium and molybdenum (UMo) is expected to allow the conversion of U.S. domestic high performance reactors like the MITR-II reactor. Towards this goal, comparisons of MCNP5 Monte Carlo neutronic modeling results for HEU and LEU cores have been performed. Validation of the model has been based upon comparison to HEU experimental benchmark data for the MITR-II. The objective of this work was to demonstrate a model which could represent the experimental HEU data, and therefore could provide a basis to demonstrate LEU core performance. This report presents an overview of MITR-II model geometry and material definitions which have been verified, and updated as required during the course of validation to represent the specifications of the MITR-II reactor. Results of calculations are presented for comparisons to historical HEU start-up data from 1975-1976, and to other experimental benchmark data available for the MITR-II Reactor through 2009. This report also presents results of steady state neutronic analysis of an all-fresh LEU fueled core. Where possible, HEU and LEU calculations were performed for conditions equivalent to HEU experiments, which serves as a starting point for safety analyses for conversion of MITR-II from the use of HEU fuel to the use of UMo LEU fuel.

Newton, T. H.; Wilson, E. H; Bergeron, A.; Horelik, N.; Stevens, J. (Nuclear Engineering Division); (MIT Nuclear Reactor Lab.)

2011-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

308

QCD String formation and the Casimir Energy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Three distinct scales are identified in the excitation spectrum of the gluon field around a static quark-antiquark pair as the color source separation R is varied. The spectrum, with string-like excitations on the largest length scales of 2-3 fm, provides clues in its rich fine structure for developing an effective bosonic string description. New results are reported from the three-dimensional Z(2) and SU(2) gauge models, providing further insight into the mechanism of bosonic string formation. The precocious onset of string-like behavior in the Casimir energy of the static quark-antiquark ground state is observed below R=1 fm where most of the string eigenmodes do not exist and the few stable excitations above the ground state are displaced. We find no firm theoretical foundation for the widely held view of discovering string formation from high precision ground state properties below the 1 fm scale.

K. Jimmy Juge; J. Kuti; C. Morningstar

2004-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

309

The Star Formation History in a Hierarchical Universe  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Observations now probe the star formation history of the Universe back to a redshift of $z\\sim5$. We investigate whether the predictions of semi-analytic models of galaxy formation based on hierarchical Cold Dark Matter (CDM) type models are in agreement with these direct observations and also with the ``fossil'' evidence contained in constraints on the ages of present day early-type galaxies. Previous models predicted that the star formation rate density falls off rather steeply at $z\\ga 2$, and correspondingly that the majority of the stars in the Universe formed at relatively low redshift. We investigate the effect of including a bursting mode of star formation, assuming that galaxy-galaxy mergers trigger starbursts and using the merger rate that arises naturally in the CDM merging hierarchy. The resulting starbursts substantially increase the global star formation rate at high redshift, leading to predictions that are in good agreement with the star formation rate density at $z\\sim3$ obtained from sub-millimeter observations (SCUBA) and optical/UV estimates after correction for dust extinction. The mass of stars formed at $z \\ge 3$ is correspondingly in better agreement with the fossil evidence. We also investigate complementary global quantities such as the mass of cold gas and the average metallicity of cold gas as a function of redshift, and the integrated extra-galactic background light. We argue that these observations, taken together, provide strong constraints on the star formation history of the Universe, and that hierarchical models of the CDM type are in reasonable agreement with these observations when starbursts are included.

Rachel S. Somerville; Joel R. Primack

1998-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

310

Modeling studies to evaluate performance of the horizontal wells completed in shale.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The results of the modeling studies to determine the production performance of multiple fractured horizontal wells completed in shale formation has been summarized in this… (more)

Belyadi, Abbas.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

SAR polar format implementation with MATLAB.  

SciTech Connect

Traditional polar format image formation for Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) requires a large amount of processing power and memory in order to accomplish in real-time. These requirements can thus eliminate the possible usage of interpreted language environments such as MATLAB. However, with trapezoidal aperture phase history collection and changes to the traditional polar format algorithm, certain optimizations make MATLAB a possible tool for image formation. Thus, this document's purpose is two-fold. The first outlines a change to the existing Polar Format MATLAB implementation utilizing the Chirp Z-Transform that improves performance and memory usage achieving near realtime results for smaller apertures. The second is the addition of two new possible image formation options that perform a more traditional interpolation style image formation. These options allow the continued exploration of possible interpolation methods for image formation and some preliminary results comparing image quality are given.

Martin, Grant D.; Doerry, Armin Walter

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

A model-data intercomparison of CO2 exchange across North America: Results from the North American Carbon Program site synthesis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Our current understanding of terrestrial carbon processes is represented in various models used to integrate and scale measurements of CO2 exchange from remote sensing and other spatiotemporal data. Yet assessments are rarely conducted to determine how well models simulate carbon processes across vegetation types and environmental conditions. Using standardized data from the North American Carbon Program we compare observed and simulated monthly CO2 exchange from 44 eddy covariance flux towers in North America and 22 terrestrial biosphere models. The analysis period spans 220 site-years, 10 biomes, and includes two large-scale drought events, providing a natural experiment to evaluate model skill as a function of drought and seasonality. We evaluate models' ability to simulate the seasonal cycle of CO2 exchange using multiple model skill metrics and analyze links between model characteristics, site history, and model skill. Overall model performance was poor; the difference between observations and simulations was 10 times observational uncertainty, with forested ecosystems better predicted than nonforested. Model-data agreement was highest in summer and in temperate evergreen forests. In contrast, model performance declined in spring and fall, especially in ecosystems with large deciduous components, and in dry periods during the growing season. Models used across multiple biomes and sites, the mean model ensemble, and a model using assimilated parameter values showed high consistency with observations. Models with the highest skill across all biomes all used prescribed canopy phenology, calculated NEE as the difference between GPP and ecosystem respiration, and did not use a daily time step.

Schwalm, Christopher R. [Clark University; Williams, Christopher A. [Clark University; Schaefer, Kevin [University of Colorado, Boulder; Anderson, Ryan [University of Montana, Missoula; Arain, A. [McMaster University; Baker, Ian [Colorado State University, Fort Collins; Lokupitiya, Erandathie [Colorado State University, Fort Collins; Barr, Alan [Atmospheric Science and Technology Directorate, Saskatoo, SK, Canada; Black, T. A. [University of British Columbia, Vancouver; Gu, Lianhong [ORNL; Riciutto, Dan M. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL)

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Molecular Hydrogen Formation on Amorphous Silicates Under Interstellar Conditions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Experimental results on the formation of molecular hydrogen on amorphous silicate surfaces are presented for the first time and analyzed using a rate equation model. The energy barriers for the relevant diffusion and desorption processes are obtained. They turn out to be significantly higher than those obtained earlier for polycrystalline silicates, demonstrating the importance of grain morphology. Using these barriers we evaluate the efficiency of molecular hydrogen formation on amorphous silicate grains under interstellar conditions. It is found that unlike polycrystalline silicates, amorphous silicate grains are efficient catalysts of H$_{2}$ formation within a temperature range which is relevant to diffuse interstellar clouds. The results also indicate that the hydrogen molecules are thermalized with the surface and desorb with low kinetic energy. Thus, they are unlikely to occupy highly excited states.

Hagai B. Perets; Adina Lederhendler; Ofer Biham; Gianfranco Vidali; Ling Li; Sol Swords; Emanuele Congiu; Joe Roser; Giulio Manico; John Robert Brucato; Valerio Pirronello

2007-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

314

A model-data intercomparison of CO2 exchange across North America: Results from the North American Carbon Program Site Synthesis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Our current understanding of terrestrial carbon processes is represented in various models used to integrate and scale measurements of CO{sub 2} exchange from remote sensing and other spatiotemporal data. Yet assessments are rarely conducted to determine how well models simulate carbon processes across vegetation types and environmental conditions. Using standardized data from the North American Carbon Program we compare observed and simulated monthly CO{sub 2} exchange from 44 eddy covariance flux towers in North America and 22 terrestrial biosphere models. The analysis period spans {approx}220 site-years, 10 biomes, and includes two large-scale drought events, providing a natural experiment to evaluate model skill as a function of drought and seasonality. We evaluate models' ability to simulate the seasonal cycle of CO{sub 2} exchange using multiple model skill metrics and analyze links between model characteristics, site history, and model skill. Overall model performance was poor; the difference between observations and simulations was {approx}10 times observational uncertainty, with forested ecosystems better predicted than nonforested. Model-data agreement was highest in summer and in temperate evergreen forests. In contrast, model performance declined in spring and fall, especially in ecosystems with large deciduous components, and in dry periods during the growing season. Models used across multiple biomes and sites, the mean model ensemble, and a model using assimilated parameter values showed high consistency with observations. Models with the highest skill across all biomes all used prescribed canopy phenology, calculated NEE as the difference between GPP and ecosystem respiration, and did not use a daily time step.

Schwalm, C.R.; Williams, C.A.; Schaefer, K.; Anderson, R.; Arain, M.A.; Baker, I.; Black, T.A.; Chen, G.; Ciais, P.; Davis, K. J.; Desai, A. R.; Dietze, M.; Dragoni, D.; Fischer, M.L.; Flanagan, L.B.; Grant, R.F.; Gu, L.; Hollinger, D.; Izaurralde, R.C.; Kucharik, C.; Lafleur, P.M.; Law, B.E.; Li, L.; Li, Z.; Liu, S.; Lokupitiya, E.; Luo, Y.; Ma, S.; Margolis, H.; Matamala, R.; McCaughey, H.; Monson, R. K.; Oechel, W. C.; Peng, C.; Poulter, B.; Price, D.T.; Riciutto, D.M.; Riley, W.J.; Sahoo, A.K.; Sprintsin, M.; Sun, J.; Tian, H.; Tonitto, C.; Verbeeck, H.; Verma, S.B.

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Modeling  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ALE-AMR ALE-AMR code Wangyi Liu, John Bernard, Alex Friedman, Nathan Masters, Aaron Fisher, Velemir Mlaker, Alice Koniges, David Eder June 4, 2011 Abstract In this paper we describe an implementation of a single-fluid inter- face model in the ALE-AMR code to simulate surface tension effects. The model does not require explicit information on the physical state of the two phases. The only change to the existing fluid equations is an additional term in the stress tensor. We show results of applying the model to an expanding Al droplet surrounded by an Al vapor, where additional droplets are created. 1 Introduction The Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment II (NDCX II) is an induction accelerator planned for initial commissioning in 2012. The final design calls for a 3 MeV, Li+ ion beam, delivered in a bunch with characteristic pulse duration of 1 ns, and transverse dimension of order 1 mm. The

316

Dynamics and flight control of the UAV formations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this paper is to describe the flight of an Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAV) formation by using a 6 degrees of freedom (6 DOF) models. The problem of flight formation will be approached in a simple manner, by using a 3 DOF models, as well ... Keywords: UAV, control, dynamic, flight, formation

Teodor-Viorel Chelaru; Valentin Pana; Adrian Chelaru

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Nuclear Reaction Rates and Carbon Star Formation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We have studied how the third dredge-up and the carbon star formation in low-mass Asymptotic Giant Branch stars depends on certain key nuclear reaction rates. We find from a set of complete stellar evolution calculations of a 2Msun model with Z=0.01 including mass loss, that varying either the N14(p,g)O15 or the 3-alpha reaction rate within their uncertainties as given in the NACRE compilation results in dredge-up and yields that differ by a factor of 2. Model tracks with a higher rate for the 3-alpha rate and a lower rate for the N14(p,g)O15 reaction both show more efficient third dredge-up. New experimental results for the N14(p,g)O15 reaction rates are surveyed, yielding a rate which is about 40% lower than the tabulated NACRE rate, and smaller than NACRE's lower limit. We discuss the possible implications of the revised nuclear reaction stellar evolution calculations that aim to reproduce the observed carbon star formation at low mass, which requires efficient third dredge-up.

Falk Herwig; Sam M. Austin

2004-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

318

Eddy Formation in 2½-Layer, Quasigeostrophic Jets  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The formation of nonlinear eddies in unstable 2½-layer, quasigeostrophic jets is investigated using a piecewise constant potential vorticity, “contour dynamical” model. Both infinite and semi-infinite jet dynamics are explored, considering a ...

Ilson C. A. da Silveira; Glenn R. Flierl

2002-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Numerical Simulation of Macrosegregation Formation during ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Direct Numerical Simulation of Inclusion Turbulent Deposition at Liquid ... Flow and Shrinkage Pipe Formation on Macrosegregation of Investment Cast -TiAl Alloys ... Numerical Modeling of the Interaction between a Foreign Particle an ...

320

Interactive Cloud Formation and Climatic Temperature Perturbations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A one-dimensional climate model with an interactive cloud formation program is developed to investigate its effects on temperature perturbations due to various radiative forcings including doubling of CO2, a 2% increase of the solar constant and ...

Kuo-Nan Liou; S. C. S. Ou; P. J. Lu

1985-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "model results formats" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Predicting Nepheline Formation with Artificial Neural Networks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... model has been developed to predict nepheline (NaAlSiO4) formation in compositions of interest for waste glasses projected to be formed at the Hanford Site.

322

Summer Land–Atmosphere Coupling Strength over the United States: Results from the Regional Climate Model RegCM4–CLM3.5  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study investigates the land–atmosphere coupling strength during summer over the United States using the Regional Climate Model version 4 (RegCM4)–Community Land Model version 3.5 (CLM3.5). First, a 10-yr simulation driven with reanalysis ...

Rui Mei; Guiling Wang; Huanghe Gu

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Annual Cycle of Poleward Heat Transport in the Ocean: Results from High-Resolution Modeling of the North and Equatorial Atlantic  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The annual cycle of meridional heat transport in the North and equatorial Atlantic Ocean is studied by means of the high-resolution numerical model that had been developed in recent years as a Community Modeling Effort for the World Ocean ...

Claus W. Böning; Peter Herrmann

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Population Physiologically-Based Pharmacokinetic Modeling for the Human Lactational Transfer of PCB 153 with Consideration of Worldwide Human Biomonitoring Results  

SciTech Connect

We developed a physiologically based pharmacokinetic model of PCB 153 in women, and predict its transfer via lactation to infants. The model is the first human, population-scale lactational model for PCB 153. Data in the literature provided estimates for model development and for performance assessment. Physiological parameters were taken from a cohort in Taiwan and from reference values in the literature. We estimated partition coefficients based on chemical structure and the lipid content in various body tissues. Using exposure data in Japan, we predicted acquired body burden of PCB 153 at an average childbearing age of 25 years and compare predictions to measurements from studies in multiple countries. Forward-model predictions agree well with human biomonitoring measurements, as represented by summary statistics and uncertainty estimates. The model successfully describes the range of possible PCB 153 dispositions in maternal milk, suggesting a promising option for back estimating doses for various populations. One example of reverse dosimetry modeling was attempted using our PBPK model for possible exposure scenarios in Canadian Inuits who had the highest level of PCB 153 in their milk in the world.

Redding, Laurel E.; Sohn, Michael D.; McKone, Thomas E.; Wang, Shu-Li; Hsieh, Dennis P. H.; Yang, Raymond S. H.

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Star Formation History and Other Properties of the Northern HDF  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The original analysis of the star formation history in the NICMOS Deep images of the NHDF is extended to the entire NHDF utilizing NICMOS and WFPC2 archival data. The roughly constant star formation rate from redshifts 1 to 6 found in this study is consistent with the original results. Star formation rates from this study, Lyman break galaxies and sub-mm observations are now in concordance The spike of star formation at redshift 2 due to 2 ULIRGs in the small Deep NICMOS field is smoothed out in the larger area results presented here. The larger source base of this study allows comparison with predictions from hierarchical galaxy formation models. In general the observation are consistent with the predictions. The observed luminosity functions at redshifts 1-6 are presented for future comparisons with theoretical galaxy evolution calculations. Mid and far infrared properties of the sources are also calculated and compared with observations. A candidate for the VLA source VLA 3651+1221 is discussed.

Rodger I. Thompson

2003-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

326

Application of MELCOR Code to a French PWR 900 MWe Severe Accident Sequence and Evaluation of Models Performance Focusing on In-Vessel Thermal Hydraulic Results  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the ambit of the Severe Accident Network of Excellence Project (SARNET), funded by the European Union, 6. FISA (Fission Safety) Programme, one of the main tasks is the development and validation of the European Accident Source Term Evaluation Code (ASTEC Code). One of the reference codes used to compare ASTEC results, coming from experimental and Reactor Plant applications, is MELCOR. ENEA is a SARNET member and also an ASTEC and MELCOR user. During the first 18 months of this project, we performed a series of MELCOR and ASTEC calculations referring to a French PWR 900 MWe and to the accident sequence of 'Loss of Steam Generator (SG) Feedwater' (known as H2 sequence in the French classification). H2 is an accident sequence substantially equivalent to a Station Blackout scenario, like a TMLB accident, with the only difference that in H2 sequence the scram is forced to occur with a delay of 28 seconds. The main events during the accident sequence are a loss of normal and auxiliary SG feedwater (0 s), followed by a scram when the water level in SG is equal or less than 0.7 m (after 28 seconds). There is also a main coolant pumps trip when {delta}Tsat < 10 deg. C, a total opening of the three relief valves when Tric (core maximal outlet temperature) is above 603 K (330 deg. C) and accumulators isolation when primary pressure goes below 1.5 MPa (15 bar). Among many other points, it is worth noting that this was the first time that a MELCOR 1.8.5 input deck was available for a French PWR 900. The main ENEA effort in this period was devoted to prepare the MELCOR input deck using the code version v.1.8.5 (build QZ Oct 2000 with the latest patch 185003 Oct 2001). The input deck, completely new, was prepared taking into account structure, data and same conditions as those found inside ASTEC input decks. The main goal of the work presented in this paper is to put in evidence where and when MELCOR provides good enough results and why, in some cases mainly referring to its specific models (candling, corium pool behaviour, etc.) they were less good. A future work will be the preparation of an input deck for the new MELCOR 1.8.6. and to perform a code-to-code comparison with ASTEC v1.2 rev. 1. (author)

De Rosa, Felice [ENEA, Italian National Agency for New Technologies, Energy and the Environment (Italy)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Eddy formation and propagation in the eastern tropical Pacific  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Observations of eddies in the eastern tropical Pacific from TOPEX altimetry data show that there are seasonal and interannual variations in eddy activity. Comparisons between time of eddy formation and corresponding wind data show that not all eddies are caused by winds blowing offshore from the coast of Central America. Plots of eddy tracks from TOPEX data show that some of these eddies last for over 6 months and travel more than 250 of longitude toward the west. Others go more towards the equator and dissipate quickly. A General Circulation Model is used to study the formation and propagation aspects of these eddies. Results from experiments exploring the formation mechanism show that high frequency wind bursts are sufficient but not necessary for eddy formation in the eastern tropical Pacific. Eddy activity remains almost the same if only the annual harmonic of the wind field is used to force the model. Forcing the model with only the high frequency wind component produces almost no eddies. The formation of eddies during periods of weak offshore winds suggests other possible mechanisms, such as unstable mean flows, for the formation of the eddies. Experiments done to study the propagation of the eddies show that the eddies are greatly affected by the structure of the background flow. Eddies formed in September or October encounter a strong westward flowing current and do not dissipate rapidly. These eddies do not travel south beyond the region of shear between the currents. They last for more than 6 months and travel westward for more than 250 of longitude. Eddies formed in March and April encounter a strong eastward flow dissipate quickly and propagate towards the equator where they disappear. These eddies last for less than four months and cover less than 150 of longitude. Eddies generated in January show properties between these two extreme cases.

Jhingran, Vikas Gopal

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Diffraction Results from CDF  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present final results by the CDF II collaboration on diffractive W and Z production, report on the status of ongoing analyses on diffractive dijet production and on rapidity gaps between jets, and briefly summarize results obtained on exclusive production pointing to their relevance to calibrating theoretical models used to predict exclusive Higgs-boson production at the LHC.

Goulianos, Konstantin

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Analysis of Star Formation in Galaxy-like Objects  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Using cosmological hydrodynamical simulations, we investigate the effects of hierarchical aggregation on the triggering of star formation in galactic-like objects. We include a simple star formation model to transform the cold gas in dense regions into stars. Simulations with different parameters have been performed in order to quantify the dependence of the results on the parameters. We then resort to stellar population synthesis models to trace the color evolution of each object with red-shift and in relation to their merger histories. We find that, in a hierarchical clustering scenario, the process of assembling of the structure is one natural mechanism that may trigger star formation. The resulting star formation rate history for each individual galactic object is composed of a continuous one ($\\leq 3 \\rm{M_{\\odot}/yr}$) and a series of star bursts. We find that even the accretion of a small satellite can be correlated with a stellar burst. Massive mergers are found to be more efficient at transforming gas into stars

Patricia B. Tissera

1999-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

330

Application of the CALIOP Layer Product to Evaluate the Vertical Distribution of Aerosols Estimated by Global Models: AeroCom Phase I Results  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The CALIOP (Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization) layer product is used for a multimodel evaluation of the vertical distribution of aerosols. Annual and seasonal aerosol extinction profiles are analyzed over 13 sub-continental regions representative of industrial, dust, and biomass burning pollution, from CALIOP 2007-2009 observations and from AeroCom (Aerosol Comparisons between Observations and Models) 2000 simulations. An extinction mean height diagnostic (Z{sub a}) is defined to quantitatively assess the models performance. It is calculated over the 0-6 km and 0-10 km altitude ranges by weighting the altitude of each 100 m altitude layer by its aerosol extinction coefficient. The mean extinction profiles derived from CALIOP layer products provide consistent regional and seasonal specificities and a low inter-annual variability. While the outputs from most models are significantly correlated with the observed Z{sub a} climatologies, some do better than others, and 2 of the 12 models perform particularly well in all seasons. Over industrial and maritime regions, most models show higher Z{sub a} than observed by CALIOP, whereas over the African and Chinese dust source regions, Z{sub a} is underestimated during Northern Hemisphere Spring and Summer. The positive model bias in Z{sub a} is mainly due to an overestimate of the extinction above 6 km. Potential CALIOP and model limitations, and methodological factors that might contribute to the differences are discussed.

Koffi, Brigitte; Schultz, Michael; Breon, Francois-Marie; Griesfeller, Jan; Winker, D.; Balkanski, Y.; Bauer, Susanne E.; Berntsen, T.; Chin, Mian; Collins, William D.; Dentener, Frank; Diehl, Thomas; Easter, Richard C.; Ghan, Steven J.; Ginoux, P.; Gong, S.; Horowitz, L.; Iversen, T.; Kirkevag, A.; Koch, Dorothy; Krol, Maarten; Myhre, G.; Stier, P.; Takemura, T.

2012-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

331

A model?data intercomparison of CO2 exchange across North America: Results from the North American Carbon Program Site Synthesis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

There is a continued need for models to improve consistency and agreement with observations [Friedlingstein et al., 2006], both overall and under more frequent extreme climatic events related to global environmental change such as drought [Trenberth et al., 2007]. Past validation studies of terrestrial biosphere models have focused only on few models and sites, typically in close proximity and primarily in forested biomes [e.g., Amthor et al., 2001; Delpierre et al., 2009; Grant et al., 2005; Hanson et al., 2004; Granier et al., 2007; Ichii et al., 2009; Ito, 2008; Siqueira et al., 2006; Zhou et al., 2008]. Furthermore, assessing model?data agreement relative to drought requires, in addition to high?quality observedCO2 exchange data, a reliable drought metric as well as a natural experiment across sites and drought conditions.

Schwalm, Christopher R.; Williams, Christopher A.; Schaefer, Kevin; Anderson, Ryan; Arain, M. A.; Baker, Ian; Barr, Alan; Black, T. Andrew; Chen, Guangsheng; Chen, Jing Ming; Ciais, Philippe; Davis, Kenneth J.; Desai, Ankur R.; Dietze, Michael; Dragoni, Danilo; Fischer, Marc; Flanagan, Lawrence; Grant, Robert; Gu, Lianghong; Hollinger, D.; Izaurralde, Roberto C.; Kucharik, Chris; Lafleur, Peter; Law, Beverly E.; Li, Longhui; Li, Zhengpeng; Liu, Shuguang; Lokupitiya, Erandathie; Luo, Yiqi; Ma, Siyan; Margolis, Hank; Matamala, R.; McCaughey, Harry; Monson, Russell K.; Oechel, Walter C.; Peng, Changhui; Poulter, Benjamin; Price, David T.; Riciutto, Dan M.; Riley, William; Sahoo, Alok Kumar; Sprintsin, Michael; Sun, Jianfeng; Tian, Hanqin; Tonitto, Christine; Verbeeck, Hans; Verma, Shashi B.

2010-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

332

A model-data intercomparison of CO2 exchange across North America: Results from the North American Carbon Program Site Synthesis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Running SW, Hunt ER (2005) Biome-BGC: Terrestrial Ecosystemdivergence was reported using Biome-BGC, LPJ and ORCHIDEE toYes Enzyme Kinetic Model Biome?BGC Temporal Resolution

Schwalm, C.R.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Basin Analysis of the Mississippi Interior Salt Basin and Petroleum System Modeling of the Jurassic Smackover Formation, Eastern Gulf Coastal Plain, Final Report and Topical Reports 5-8 on Smackover Petroleum system and Underdevelopment Reservoirs  

SciTech Connect

The Smackover Formation, a major hydrocarbon-producing horizon in the Mississippi Interior Salt Basin (MISB), conformably overlies the Norphlet Formation and is conformably overlain by the Buckner Anhydrite Member of the Haynesville Formation. The Norphlet-Smackover contact can be either gradational or abrupt. The thickness and lithofacies distribution of the Smackover Formation were controlled by the configuration of incipient paleotopography. The Smackover Formation has been subdivided into three informal members, referred to as the lower, middle and upper members.

Mancini, Ernest A.; Puckett, T. Markham; Parcell, William C.; Llinas, Juan Carlos; Kopaska-Merkel, David C.; Townsend, Roger N.

2002-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

334

Petrophysical evaluation of subterranean formations  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Methods and systems are provided for evaluating petrophysical properties of subterranean formations and comprehensively evaluating hydrate presence through a combination of computer-implemented log modeling and analysis. Certain embodiments include the steps of running a number of logging tools in a wellbore to obtain a variety of wellbore data and logs, and evaluating and modeling the log data to ascertain various petrophysical properties. Examples of suitable logging techniques that may be used in combination with the present invention include, but are not limited to, sonic logs, electrical resistivity logs, gamma ray logs, neutron porosity logs, density logs, NRM logs, or any combination or subset thereof.

Klein, James D; Schoderbek, David A; Mailloux, Jason M

2013-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

335

Formation of deformation textures in face-centered-cubic materials studied by in-situ high-energy x-ray diffraction and self-consistent model.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The evolution of deformation textures in copper and a brass that are representative of fcc metals with different stacking fault energies (SFEs) during cold rolling is predicted using a self-consistent (SC) model. The material parameters used for describing the micromechanical behavior of each metal are determined from the high-energy X-ray (HEXRD) diffraction data. At small reductions, a reliable prediction of the evolution of the grain orientation distribution that is represented as the continuous increase of the copper and brass components is achieved for both metals when compared with the experimental textures. With increasing deformation, the model could characterize the textures of copper, i.e., the strengthening of the copper component, when dislocation slip is still the dominant mechanism. For a brass at moderate and large reductions, a reliable prediction of its unique feature of texture evolution, i.e., the weakening of the copper component and the strengthening of the brass component, could only be achieved when proper boundary conditions together with some specified slip/twin systems are considered in the continuum micromechanics mainly containing twinning and shear banding. The present investigation suggests that for fcc metals with a low SFE, the mechanism of shear banding is the dominant contribution to the texture development at large deformations.

Jia, N.; Nie, Z. H.; Ren, Y.; Peng, R. L.; Wang, Y. D.; Zhao, X.; X-Ray Science Division; Northeastern Univ.; Linkoping Univ.; Beijing Inst. of Tech.

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Independence and interdependence in the nest-site choice by honeybee swarms: agent-based models, analytical approaches and pattern formation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In a recent paper List, Elsholtz and Seeley [Phil. Trans. Roy. Soc. B. 364 (2009) 755] have devised an agent-based model of the the nest-choice dynamics in swarms of honeybees, and have concluded that both interdependence and independence are needed for the bees to reach a consensus on the best nest site. We here present a simplified version of the model which can be treated analytically with the tools of statistical physics and which largely has the same features as the original dynamics. Based on our analytical approaches it is possible to characterize the co-ordination outcome exactly on the deterministic level, and to a good approximation if stochastic effects are taken into account, reducing the need for computer simulations on the agent-based level. In the second part of the paper we present a spatial extension, and show that transient non-trivial patterns emerge, before consensus is reached. Approaches in terms of Langevin equations for continuous field variables are discussed.

Galla, Tobias

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Eddy–Zonal Flow Interactions Associated with the Southern Hemisphere Annular Mode: Results from NCEP–DOE Reanalysis and a Quasi-Linear Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Using a recent 22-yr (1979–2000) record of the NCEP–Department of Energy (DOE) reanalysis 2 dataset (hereafter, NCEP2 reanalysis) and a two-level spherical quasi-geostrophic, quasi-linear model, the eddy–zonal- mean flow interactions associated ...

Harun A. Rashid; Ian Simmonds

2004-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Molecular Hydrogen Formation on Ice Under Interstellar Conditions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The results of experiments on the formation of molecular hydrogen on low density and high density amorphous ice surfaces are analyzed using a rate equation model. The activation energy barriers for the relevant diffusion and desorption processes are obtained. The more porous morphology of the low density ice gives rise to a broader spectrum of energy barriers compared to the high density ice. Inserting these parameters into the rate equation model under steady state conditions we evaluate the production rate of molecular hydrogen on ice-coated interstellar dust grains.

Hagai B. Perets; Ofer Biham; Giulio Manico; Valerio Pirronello; Joe Roser; Sol Swords; Gianfranco Vidali

2004-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

339

A model for the Z-track phenomenon, jet formation and the kilohertz QPO based on Rossi-XTE observations of the Z-track sources  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a new model for the Z-track phenomenon, based on analysis of the spectral evolution around the Z-track in several Z-track sources, in which radiation pressure plays a major role. Increasing mass accretion rate on the normal branch causes heating of the neutron star with the emissive flux from the surface increasing by an order of magnitude to become super-Eddington at the horizontal branch where radio detection shows the presence of jets. We propose that the radiation pressure disrupts the inner disk leading to the launching of the jets. Secondly, by timing analysis of the same data we find a correlation of the frequency of kHz QPO with the emissive flux and propose that the higher frequency QPO is an oscillation at the inner disk edge which progressively moves to larger radial positions as the disk is disrupted by radiation pressure.

M. J. Church; M. Balucinska-Church; N. K. Jackson; A. Gibiec

2008-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

340

Influence of Feeding Flow and Shrinkage Pipe Formation on ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Influence of Feeding Flow and Shrinkage Pipe Formation on ... CFD–Based Modelling on Interfacial Heat Transfer for Water Quenching.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "model results formats" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

First measurement of the small-scale spatial variability of the rain drop size distribution: Results from a crucial experiment and maximum entropy modeling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The main challenges of measuring precipitation are related to the spatio-temporal variability of the drop-size distribution, to the uncertainties that condition the modeling of that distribution, and to the instrumental errors present in the in situ estimations. This PhD dissertation proposes advances in all these questions. The relevance of the spatial variability of the drop-size distribution for remote sensing measurements and hydro-meteorology field studies is asserted by analyzing the measurement of a set of disdrometers deployed on a network of 5 squared kilometers. This study comprises the spatial variability of integral rainfall parameters, the ZR relationships, and the variations within the one moment scaling method. The modeling of the drop-size distribution is analyzed by applying the MaxEnt method and comparing it with the methods of moments and the maximum likelihood. The instrumental errors are analyzed with a compressive comparison of sampling and binning uncertainties that affect actual device...

Checa-Garcia, Ramiro

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Tropical Cyclone Formation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The physics of tropical cyclone formation is not well understood, and more is known about the mature hurricane than the formative mechanisms that produce it. It is believed part of the reason for this can be traced to insufficient upper-level ...

Michael T. Montgomery; Brian F. Farrell

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

SIMULATION OF THE FORMATION OF A SOLAR ACTIVE REGION  

SciTech Connect

We present a radiative magnetohydrodynamics simulation of the formation of an active region (AR) on the solar surface. The simulation models the rise of a buoyant magnetic flux bundle from a depth of 7.5 Mm in the convection zone up into the solar photosphere. The rise of the magnetic plasma in the convection zone is accompanied by predominantly horizontal expansion. Such an expansion leads to a scaling relation between the plasma density and the magnetic field strength such that B {proportional_to} rhov{sup 1/2}. The emergence of magnetic flux into the photosphere appears as a complex magnetic pattern, which results from the interaction of the rising magnetic field with the turbulent convective flows. Small-scale magnetic elements at the surface first appear, followed by their gradual coalescence into larger magnetic concentrations, which eventually results in the formation of a pair of opposite polarity spots. Although the mean flow pattern in the vicinity of the developing spots is directed radially outward, correlations between the magnetic field and velocity field fluctuations allow the spots to accumulate flux. Such correlations result from the Lorentz-force-driven, counterstreaming motion of opposite polarity fragments. The formation of the simulated AR is accompanied by transient light bridges between umbrae and umbral dots. Together with recent sunspot modeling, this work highlights the common magnetoconvective origin of umbral dots, light bridges, and penumbral filaments.

Cheung, M. C. M.; Title, A. M. [Lockheed Martin Solar and Astrophysics Laboratory, Palo Alto, CA 94304 (United States); Rempel, M. [High Altitude Observatory, NCAR, P.O. Box 3000, Boulder, CO 80307 (United States); Schuessler, M. [Max Planck Institute for Solar System Research, Katlenburg-Lindau, 37191 (Germany)

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Stability and control of the UAV formations flight  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this paper is to analyze the flight stability of an Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAV) formation by using 3 degrees of freedom (3 DOF) models. The problem of flight formation will be approached in a simple manner, by using 3 DOF nonlinear ... Keywords: automation, control, flight, formation, simulation, stability

Teodor-Viorel Chelaru; Valentin Pan?

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Essential Dynamics of Secondary Eyewall Formation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We conduct an analysis of the dynamics of secondary eyewall formation, in two modeling frameworks to obtain a more complete understanding of the phenomenon. The first is a full-physics, three-dimensional mesoscale model in which we examine an ...

Sergio F. Abarca; Michael T. Montgomery

346

Moisture studies of a self-drying roof: Tests in the large scale climate simulator and results from thermal and hygric models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Simultaneous experiments on the moisture behavior of six low-slope roof systems were performed in a climate simulator. The systems comprised a self-drying design over a conventional metal deck, a self-drying design over a significantly more permeable slotted metal deck and four others over conventional metal decks: a system typical of US construction with a liquid water permeable vapor retarder, a system typical of European construction with a liquid water permeable vapor retarder, a top-ventilated system with a polyethylene vapor retarder, and an impermeable control system with a polyethylene vapor retarder. Total weight of each test panel was measured and recorded continuously, along with temperatures and heat fluxes, to compare the behavior of the various systems. The authors imposed steady-state temperatures from hot summer to cold winter conditions to obtain the R-values of the construction dry insulations in each panel. Temperature cycles typical of hot summer days and mild winter days were then imposed above the construction dry assemblies to obtain baseline diurnal performance. The authors applied a one-dimensional thermal and hygric model. The solid and slotted deck were assumed to differ only in water vapor permeance. A model was not attempted for the top-ventilated system. The 1-D model predicted very well the slow rates of wetting in the winter cycles and both the slow then fast rates of drying in the summer cycles before and after water addition, except it overpredicted the drying rate for the US construction with a liquid water permeable vapor retarder.

Desjarlais, A.O.; Petrie, T.W.; Childs, P.W.; Atchley, J.A.

1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

The Fluid Mechanics of Gravitational Structure Formation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The standard model for gravitational structure formation in astrophysics, astronomy, and cosmology is questioned. Cold dark matter (CDM) hierarchical clustering cosmology neglects particle collisions, viscosity, turbulence and diffusion and makes predictions in conflict with observations. From Jeans 1902 and CDMHC, the non-baryonic dark matter NBDM forms small clumps during the plasma epoch after the big bang that ``cluster'' into larger clumps. CDM halo clusters collect the baryonic matter (H and He) by gravity so that after 300 Myr of ``dark ages'', huge, explosive (Population III) first stars appear, and then galaxies and galaxy clusters. Contrary to CDMHC cosmology, ``hydro-gravitational-dynamics'' HGD cosmology suggests the diffusive NBDM material cannot clump and the clumps cannot cluster. From HGD, the big bang results from an exothermic turbulent instability at Planck scales (10^{-35} m). Turbulent stresses cause an inflation of space and fossil density turbulence remnants that trigger gravitational i...

Gibson, C H

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Katabatic Flows and Their Relation to the Formation of Convective Clouds—Idealized Case Studies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The formation of a convective cloud system as a result of a katabatic-induced surface cold front at the eastern Andes Mountains of South America was investigated in a numerical model study. The occurrence of this cloud system is hypothesized to be ...

Katja Trachte; Joerg Bendix

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

A SIMPLE LAW OF STAR FORMATION  

SciTech Connect

We show that supersonic MHD turbulence yields a star formation rate (SFR) as low as observed in molecular clouds, for characteristic values of the free-fall time divided by the dynamical time, t{sub ff}/t{sub dyn}, the Alfvenic Mach number, M{sub a}, and the sonic Mach number, M{sub s}. Using a very large set of deep adaptive-mesh-refinement simulations, we quantify the dependence of the SFR per free-fall time, {epsilon}{sub ff}, on the above parameters. Our main results are (1) that {epsilon}{sub ff} decreases exponentially with increasing t{sub ff}/t{sub dyn}, but is insensitive to changes in M{sub s}, for constant values of t{sub ff}/t{sub dyn} and M{sub a}. (2) Decreasing values of M{sub a} (stronger magnetic fields) reduce {epsilon}{sub ff}, but only to a point, beyond which {epsilon}{sub ff} increases with a further decrease of M{sub a}. (3) For values of M{sub a} characteristic of star-forming regions, {epsilon}{sub ff} varies with M{sub a} by less than a factor of two. We propose a simple star formation law, based on the empirical fit to the minimum {epsilon}{sub ff}, and depending only on t{sub ff}/t{sub dyn}: {epsilon}{sub ff} Almost-Equal-To {epsilon}{sub wind}exp (- 1.6 t{sub ff}/t{sub dyn}). Because it only depends on the mean gas density and rms velocity, this law is straightforward to implement in simulations and analytical models of galaxy formation and evolution.

Padoan, Paolo [ICREA and ICC, University of Barcelona, Marti i Franques 1, E-08028 Barcelona (Spain); Haugbolle, Troels [Centre for Star and Planet Formation, University of Copenhagen, Oestervoldgade 5-7., DK-1350, Copenhagen (Denmark); Nordlund, Ake, E-mail: ppadoan@icc.ub.edu, E-mail: haugboel@nbi.dk, E-mail: aake@nbi.dk [Centre for Star and Planet Formation and Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen, Juliane Maries Vej 30, DK-2100, Copenhagen (Denmark)

2012-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

350

Organic tank safety project: Preliminary results of energetics and thermal behavior studies of model organic nitrate and/or nitrite mixtures and a simulated organic waste  

SciTech Connect

As a result of years of production and recovery of nuclear defense materials and subsequent waste management at the Hanford Site, organic-bearing radioactive high-level wastes (HLW) are currently stored in large (up to 3. ML) single-shell storage tanks (SSTs). Because these wastes contain both fuels (organics) and the oxidants nitrate and nitrite, rapid energetic reactions at certain conditions could occur. In support of Westinghouse Hanford Company`s (WHC) efforts to ensure continued safe storage of these organic- and oxidant-bearing wastes and to define the conditions necessary for reactions to occur, we measured the thermal sensitivities and thermochemical and thermokinetic properties of mixtures of selected organics and sodium nitrate and/or nitrite and a simulated Hanford organic-bearing waste using thermoanalytical technologies. These thermoanalytical technologies are used by chemical reactivity hazards evaluation organizations within the chemical industry to assess chemical reaction hazards.

Scheele, R.D.; Sell, R.L.; Sobolik, J.L.; Burger, L.L.

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Thermal-hydraulic simulation of natural convection decay heat removal in the High Flux Isotope Reactor using RELAP5 and TEMPEST: Part 1, Models and simulation results  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A study was conducted to examine decay heat removal requirements in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) following shutdown from 85 MW. The objective of the study was to determine when forced flow through the core could be terminated without causing the fuel to melt. This question is particularly relevant when a station blackout caused by an external event is considered. Analysis of natural circulation in the core, vessel upper plenum, and reactor pool indicates that 12 h of forced flow will permit a safe shutdown with some margin. However, uncertainties in the analysis preclude conclusive proof that 12 h is sufficient. As a result of the study, two seismically qualified diesel generators were installed in HFIR. 9 refs., 4 figs.

Morris, D.G.; Wendel, M.W.; Chen, N.C.J.; Ruggles, A.E.; Cook, D.H.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Formation of the intermediate baryon systems in hadron-nuclear and nuclear-nuclear interactions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The centrality experiments indicate regime change and saturation in the behavior of some characteristics of the secondary particles emitted in hadron-nuclear and nuclear-nuclear interactions at high energies. The phenomenon has a critical character. The simple models do not explain the effect. We suppose that the responsible mechanism to explain the phenomenon could be the formation and decay of the intermediate baryon systems. Such systems could be formed as a result of nucleon percolation in compressed baryonic matter. Formation of big percolation cluster may change the properties of the medium, e.g., it could lead to the changing its transparency. This could be used to get a signal of the intermediate baryonic system formation. We consider two signals to identify the formation of the intermediate baryon systems: the critical changing of transparency of the strongly interacting matter and the enhancement of light nuclei production with increase in centrality.

M. K. Suleymanov; E. U. Khan; A Kravchakova; Mahnaz Q. Haseeb; S. M. Saleem; Y. H. Huseynaliyev; S Vokal; A. S. Vodopianov; O. B. Abdinov

2007-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

353

Summary Results of Electricity Distribution System Challenges and Opportunities  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

6, 2012 6, 2012 Summary Results of Electricity Distribution System Challenges & Opportunities From Breakout Group Sessions Red Team Results Top Challenges * Communication * System Awareness & Modeling * Standards and Interoperability * Need a national scale Grid Operating System (Grid OS) including microgrids - a uniform framework towards operating all of the nation's distribution grids using a collaborative approach - DOE needs to develop an advanced SCADA system definition given to system operators * Bring information together from various sources - differing protocols, lack of a data service bus, automated processes * Lack of a standard communication protocols, data formats/interfaces

354

Mark formation model for optical rewritable PROEFSCHRIFT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Microstructure Of Ferrofluids · LaGrange Multiplier Method Used To Satisfy Local Magnetic Field Effects requires costly training. · Haptic simulators provide a cost-effective alternative to traditional training

Vuik, Kees

355

Method for laser drilling subterranean earth formations  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Laser drilling of subterranean earth formations is efficiently accomplished by directing a collimated laser beam into a bore hole in registry with the earth formation and transversely directing the laser beam into the earth formation with a suitable reflector. In accordance with the present invention, the bore hole is highly pressurized with a gas so that as the laser beam penetrates the earth formation the high pressure gas forces the fluids resulting from the drilling operation into fissures and pores surrounding the laser-drilled bore so as to inhibit deleterious occlusion of the laser beam. Also, the laser beam may be dynamically programmed with some time dependent wave form, e.g., pulsed, to thermally shock the earth formation for forming or enlarging fluid-receiving fissures in the bore.

Shuck, Lowell Z. (Morgantown, WV)

1976-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

356

Models  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

• A very typical statistical/econometric model assumes something like yt ? i.i.d. f (y, x, ?) (1) where f (·) is a parametric family known up to parameters ?. • Parameter estimation: maximum likelihood ˆ?n = arg max ? ln f (Yt, Xt, ?) (2) t • What if the basic model assumptions of (1) are violated? The parametric family may not contain the true model f0(x, y) that generated the data; or the data may not be i.i.d.; etc. Misspecified

Stas Kolenikov; U Of Missouri; U Of Missouri

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Effect of dark matter annihilation on gas cooling and star formation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In the current paradigm of cosmic structure formation, dark matter plays a key role on the formation and evolution of galaxies through its gravitational influence. On microscopic scales, dark matter particles are expected to annihilate amongst themselves into different products, with some fraction of the energy being transferred to the baryonic component. It is the aim of the present work to show that, in the innermost regions of dark matter halos, heating by dark matter annihilation may be comparable to the cooling rate of the gas. We use analytical models of the dark matter and gas distributions in order to estimate the heating and cooling rates, as well as the energy available from supernova explosions. Depending on the model parameters and the precise nature of dark matter particles, the injected energy may be enough to balance radiative cooling in the cores of galaxy clusters. On galactic scales, it would inhibit star formation more efficiently than supernova feedback. Our results suggest that dark matte...

Ascasibar, Y

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Primary Radiation Damage Formation  

SciTech Connect

The physical processes that give rise to changes in the microstructure, and the physical and mechanical properties of materials exposed to energetic particles are initiated by essentially elastic collisions between atoms in what has been called an atomic displacement cascade. The formation and evolution of this primary radiation damage mechanism are described to provide an overview of how stable defects are formed by displacement cascades, as well as the nature and morphology of the defects themselves. The impact of the primary variables cascade energy and irradiation temperature are discussed, along with a range of secondary factors that can influence damage formation.

Stoller, Roger E [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Stochastic opinion formation in scale-free networks  

SciTech Connect

The dynamics of opinion formation in large groups of people is a complex nonlinear phenomenon whose investigation is just beginning. Both collective behavior and personal views play an important role in this mechanism. In the present work we mimic the dynamics of opinion formation of a group of agents, represented by two states 1, as a stochastic response of each agent to the opinion of his/her neighbors in the social network and to feedback from the average opinion of the whole. In the light of recent studies, a scale-free Barabsi-Albert network has been selected to simulate the topology of the interactions. A turbulent-like dynamics, characterized by an intermittent behavior, is observed for a certain range of the model parameters. The problem of uncertainty in decision taking is also addressed both from a topological point of view, using random and targeted removal of agents from the network, and by implementing a three-state model, where the third state, zero, is related to the information available to each agent. Finally, the results of the model are tested against the best known network of social interactions: the stock market. A time series of daily closures of the Dow-Jones index has been used as an indicator of the possible applicability of our model in the financial context. Good qualitative agreement is found.

M. Bartolozzi; D. B. Leinweber; A. W. Thomas

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Drilling Through Gas Hydrates Formations: Managing Wellbore Stability Risks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

As hydrocarbon exploration and development moves into deeper water and onshore arctic environments, it becomes increasingly important to quantify the drilling hazards posed by gas hydrates. To address these concerns, a 1D semi-analytical model for heat and fluid transport in the reservoir was coupled with a numerical model for temperature distribution along the wellbore. This combination allowed the estimation of the dimensions of the hydratebearing layer where the initial pressure and temperature can dynamically change while drilling. These dimensions were then used to build a numerical reservoir model for the simulation of the dissociation of gas hydrate in the layer. The bottomhole pressure (BHP) and formation properties used in this workflow were based on a real field case. The results provide an understanding of the effects of drilling through hydratebearing sediments and of the impact of drilling fluid temperature and BHP on changes in temperature and pore pressure within the surrounding sediments. It was found that the amount of gas hydrate that can dissociate will depend significantly on both initial formation characteristics and bottomhole conditions, namely mud temperature and pressure. The procedure outlined suggested in this work can provide quantitative results of the impact of hydrate dissociation on wellbore stability, which can help better design drilling muds for ultra deep water operations.

Khabibullin, Tagir R.

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "model results formats" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Parameterized formatting of an XML document by XSL rules  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The possibilities of formatting offered by database management systems (DBMS) are insufficient and do not allow emphasizing the various data results. It is the same for the usual browsing of an XML document without any particular rules of formatting. ... Keywords: DOM tree, XHTML document, XML document, XSL rules, XSLT, parameters of formatting

Madani Kenab; Tayeb Ould Braham; Pierre Bazex

2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Warm Water Mass Formation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Poleward heat transport by the own implies warm Water mass formation, i.e., the retention by the tropical and subtropical ocean of some of its net radiant heat gain. Under what condition net heat retention becomes comparable to latent heat ...

G. T. Csanady

1984-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Soil Moisture: Empirical Data and Model Results  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A unique dataset of soil moisture in the upper 1-m soil layer at sites with natural plant cover in the Soviet Union is compared to simulations of soil moisture for the present climate by the Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory, Oregon State ...

K. Ya Vinnikov; I. B. Yeserkepova

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Preliminary Results from the Structural Model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

,3985,125 Natural gas deliveries (million Mcf) 24.61 %13098 Allowance price ($/ton) 2.35 %976953 Coal deliveries,4468,583 SO2 emissions (thousand tons) 5.06 %5,3985,125 Natural gas deliveries (million Mcf) 2.56 %976951 Coal: reference case n Actual generation, demand, and emissions n Optimized coal and natural gas flows o Case B

Tesfatsion, Leigh

365

Model Homes Offer National IAQ Impact Results  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... The new NIST set of more than 200 residential dwellings, representing 80 percent of the United States housing stock, can be combined with a ...

2013-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

366

S-102 Transfer Pump Restriction Modeling Results  

SciTech Connect

It was determined that a radioactive waste leak in the Hanford S Farm in the vicinity of the S-102 retrieval pump discharge occurred because of over-pressurization and failure of the S-102 dilution water supply hose while operating the retrieval pump in reverse with an obstructed suction cavity and an unobstructed flow path to the dilution water supply hose. This report describes efforts to identify plausible scenarios for the waste leak to occur.

Wells, Beric E.; Johnson, Kenneth I.; Rector, David R.; Trent, Donald S.

2008-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

367

STAR FORMATION IN DENSE CLUSTERS  

SciTech Connect

A model of core-clump accretion with equally likely stopping describes star formation in the dense parts of clusters, where models of isolated collapsing cores may not apply. Each core accretes at a constant rate onto its protostar, while the surrounding clump gas accretes as a power of protostar mass. Short accretion flows resemble Shu accretion and make low-mass stars. Long flows resemble reduced Bondi accretion and make massive stars. Accretion stops due to environmental processes of dynamical ejection, gravitational competition, and gas dispersal by stellar feedback, independent of initial core structure. The model matches the field star initial mass function (IMF) from 0.01 to more than 10 solar masses. The core accretion rate and the mean accretion duration set the peak of the IMF, independent of the local Jeans mass. Massive protostars require the longest accretion durations, up to 0.5 Myr. The maximum protostar luminosity in a cluster indicates the mass and age of its oldest protostar. The distribution of protostar luminosities matches those in active star-forming regions if protostars have a constant birthrate but not if their births are coeval. For constant birthrate, the ratio of young stellar objects to protostars indicates the star-forming age of a cluster, typically {approx}1 Myr. The protostar accretion luminosity is typically less than its steady spherical value by a factor of {approx}2, consistent with models of episodic disk accretion.

Myers, Philip C., E-mail: pmyers@cfa.harvard.edu [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)

2011-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

368

Thermoporoelastic Effects of Drilling Fluid Temperature on Rock Drillability at Bit/Formation Interface  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A drilling operation leads to thermal disturbances in the near-wellbore stress, which is an important cause of many undesired incidents in well drilling. A major cause of this thermal disturbance is the temperature difference between the drilling fluid and the downhole formation. It is critical for drilling engineers to understand this thermal impact to optimize their drilling plans. This thesis develops a numerical model using partially coupled thermoporoelasticity to study the effects of the temperature difference between the drilling fluid and formation in a drilling operation. This study focuses on the thermal impacts at the bit/formation interface. The model applies the finite-difference method for the pore pressure and temperature solutions, and the finite-element method for the deformation and stress solutions. However, the model also provides the thermoporoelastic effects at the wellbore wall, which involves wellbore fractures and wellbore instability. The simulation results show pronounced effects of the drilling fluid temperature on near-wellbore stresses. At the bottomhole area, a cool drilling fluid reduces the radial and tangential effective stresses in formation, whereas the vertical effective stress increases. The outcome is a possible enhancement in the drilling rate of the drill bit. At the wellbore wall, the cool drilling fluid reduces the vertical and tangential effective stresses but raises the radial effective stress. The result is a lower wellbore fracture gradient; however, it benefits formation stability and prevents wellbore collapse. Conversely, the simulation gives opposite induced stress results to the cooling cases when the drilling fluid is hotter than the formation.

Thepchatri, Kritatee 1984-

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Specifying formative constructs in information systems research  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

While researchers go to great lengths to justify and prove theoretical links between constructs, the relationship between measurement items and constructs is often ignored. By default, the relationship between construct and item is assumed to be reflective, ... Keywords: composite constructs, formative constructs, latent constructs, measurement models, methodology, reflective constructs, statistical conclusion validity, type i and type II errors

Stacie Petter; Detmar Straub; Arun Rai

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Formation flow channel blocking  

SciTech Connect

A method is claimed for selectively blocking high permeability flow channels in an underground hydrocarbon material bearing formation having flow channels of high permeability and having flow channels of lesser permeability. The method includes the following steps: introducing a blocking material fluid comprising a blocking material in a carrier into the flow channels through an injection well in communication with the formation; introducing a buffer fluid into the formation through the injection well for the buffer fluid to displace the blocking material fluid away from the injection well; allowing the blocking material to settle in the channels to resist displacement by fluid flowing through the channels; introducing a quantity of an activating fluid into the channels through the injection well at a sufficient rate for the activating fluid to displace the buffer fluid and finger into the high permeability channels to reach the blocking material in the high permeability channels without reaching the blocking material in the low permeability channels, the activating fluid being adapted to activate the blocking material which it reaches to cause blocking of the high permeability channels.

Kalina, A.I.

1982-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

371

WMAP First Year Results  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) science team has released results from the first year of operation at the Earth-Sun L2 Lagrange point. The maps are consistent with previous observations but have much better sensitivity and angular resolution than the COBE DMR maps, and much better calibration accuracy and sky coverage than ground-based and balloon-borne experiments. The angular power spectra from these ground-based and balloon-borne experiments are consistent within their systematic and statistical uncertainties with the WMAP results. WMAP detected the large angular-scale correlation between the temperature and polarization anisotropies of the CMB caused by electron scattering since the Universe became reionized after the "Dark Ages", giving a value for the electron scattering optical depth of 0.17+/-0.04. The simplest Lambda-CDM model with n=1 and Omega_tot=1 provides an adequate fit to the WMAP data and gives parameters which are consistent with determinations of the Hubble constant and observations of the accelerating Universe using supernovae. The time-ordered data, maps, and power spectra from WMAP can be found at http://lambda.gsfc.nasa.gov along with 13 papers by the WMAP science team describing the results in detail.

E. L. Wright

2003-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

372

Innovative nuclear fuels: results and strategy  

SciTech Connect

To facilitate the discovery and design of innovative nuclear fuels, multi-scale models and simulations are used to predict irradiation effects on the thermal conductivity, oxygen diffusivity, and thermal expansion of oxide fuels. The multi-scale approach is illustrated using results on ceramic fuels with a focus on predictions of point defect concentrations, stoichiometry, and phase stability. The high performance computer simulations include coupled heat transport, diffusion, and thermal expansion, gas bubble formation and temperature evolution in a fuel element consisting of UO2 fuel and metallic cladding. The second part of the talk is dedicated to a discussion of an international strategy for developing advanced, innovative nuclear fuels. Four initiative are proposed to accelerate the discovery and design of new materials: (a) Develop an international pool of experts, (b) Create Institutes for Materials Discovery and Design, (c) Create an International Knowledge base for experimental data, models (mathematical expressions), and simulations (codes) and (d) Organize international workshops and conference sessions. The paper ends with a discussion of existing and emerging international collaborations.

Stan, Marius [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Coupled gas flow/solid dynamics model for predicting the formation of fracture patterns in gas well simulation experiments. [Propellant mixture used instead of explosives to fracture rock surrounding borehole  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A two-dimensional finite element model for predicting fracture patterns obtained in high energy gas fracture experiments is presented. In these experiments, a mixture of propellants is used instead of explosives to fracture the rock surrounding the borehole. The propellant mixture is chosen to tailor the pressure pulse so that multiple fractures emanate from the borehole. The model allows the fracture pattern and pressure pulse to be calculated for different combinations of propellant mixture, in situ stress conditions, and rock properties. The model calculates the amount of gas generated by the burning propellants using a burn rate given by a power law in pressure. By assuming that the gas behaves as a perfect gas and that the flow down the fractures is isothermal, the loss of gas from the borehole due to flow down the cracks is accounted for. The flow of gas down the cracks is included in an approximate manner by assuming self-similar pressure profiles along the fractures. Numerical examples are presented and compared to three different full-scale experiments. Results show a good correlation with the experimental data over a wide variety of test parameters. 9 reference, 10 figures, 3 tables.

Taylor, L.M.; Swenson, D.V.; Cooper, P.W.

1984-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Mutual feedback between star formation and nuclear activity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this invited contribution I review the justifications for the attempts, currently very popular, to include in semi-analytic models of galaxy formation prescriptions to describe the mutual link between the star formation and nuclear activity in galaxies, which has been for surprisingly long time neglected.

Gian Luigi Granato

2006-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

375

in Deep Geologic Formations,"  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

authors' model (as well as all previous work), which overestimates the rates of feldspar dissolution near equilibrium. Nevertheless, the authors' simulations indicate the...

376

Formation of Cyanoformaldehyde in the interstellar space  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cyanoformaldehyde (HCOCN) molecule has recently been suspected towards the Sagittarius B2(N) by the Green Bank telescope, though a confirmation of this observation has not yet been made. In and around a star forming region, this molecule could be formed by the exothermic reaction between two abundant interstellar species, H$_2$CO and CN. Till date, the reaction rate coefficient for the formation of this molecule is unknown. Educated guesses were used to explain the abundance of this molecule by chemical modeling. In this paper, we carried out quantum chemical calculations to find out empirical rate coefficients for the formation of HCOCN and different chemical properties during the formation of HCOCN molecules. Though HCOCN is stable against unimolecular decomposition, this gas phase molecule could be destroyed by many other means, like: ion-molecular reactions or by the effect of cosmic rays. Ion-molecular reaction rates are computed by using the capture theories. We have also included the obtained rate coef...

Das, Ankan; Chakrabarti, Sandip K; Saha, Rajdeep; Chakrabarti, Sonali

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Self-formation in Microelectronics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The external formation of integrated circuits based on lithographic processes is not the only possible method for manufacturing electron devices, either integrated circuits or photovoltaic cells. Planar technology, based on external formation, requires ... Keywords: Artificial Systems, Development, Microelectronics, Reproduction, Self-Formation

Stepas Janušonis

2000-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Optimal reorganization of agent formations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this article we address the problem of determining how a structured formation of autonomous undistinguishable agents can be reorganized into another, eventually non-rigid, formation based on changes in the environment, perhaps unforeseeable. The methodology ... Keywords: combinatorial optimization, dynamic programming, formation reorganization

Dalila B. M. M. Fontes; Fernando A. C. C. Fontes

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

results | OpenEI Community  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

5 5 Varnish cache server Home Groups Community Central Green Button Applications Developer Utility Rate FRED: FRee Energy Database More Public Groups Private Groups Features Groups Blog posts Content Stream Documents Discussions Polls Q & A Events Notices My stuff Energy blogs 429 Throttled (bot load) Error 429 Throttled (bot load) Throttled (bot load) Guru Meditation: XID: 2142235135 Varnish cache server results Home Jweers's picture Submitted by Jweers(83) Contributor 16 May, 2013 - 14:22 Multicolor Maps from Compound Queries ask queries compound queries developer Google maps maps multicolor result formats results Semantic Mediawiki Hi all, Recently, a couple of people on OpenEI have asked me how to do compound (or multicolor) maps like this one: Syndicate content 429 Throttled (bot load)

380

Jet Formation and Evolution in Baroclinic Turbulence with Simple Topography  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Satellite altimetry and high-resolution ocean models indicate that the Southern Ocean comprises an intricate web of narrow, meandering jets that undergo spontaneous formation, merger, and splitting events, as well as rapid latitude shifts over ...

Andrew F. Thompson

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "model results formats" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

The Formation of Concentric Vorticity Structures in Typhoons  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An important issue in the formation of concentric eyewalls in a tropical cyclone is the development of a symmetric structure from asymmetric convection. It is proposed herein, with the aid of a nondivergent barotropic model, that concentric ...

H-C. Kuo; L-Y. Lin; C-P. Chang; R. T. Williams

2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

The Santa Cruz Eddy. Part II: Mechanisms of Formation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The formation mechanism of the Santa Cruz eddy (SCE) is investigated using the fifth-generation Pennsylvania State University–National Center for Atmospheric Research Mesoscale Model (MM5). Simulations of 25–26 August 2000 showed that two eddy ...

Cristina L. Archer; Mark Z. Jacobson

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Formation and Maintenance of Shelfbreak Fronts in an Unstratified Flow  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A depth-averaged model with no density variations was used by Chapman to describe the formation of a passive tracer front at a shelfbreak. The relevance of this frontogenesis mechanism to cases that allow vertical variations is examined by ...

Glen Gawarkiewicz; David C. Chapman

1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Dense Water Formation beneath a Time-Dependent Coastal Polynya  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recent modeling studies of dense water formation beneath an idealized steady coastal polynya have provided simple analytical expressions for the maximum density anomaly achievable as a function of the polynya geometry and the imposed surface ...

David C. Chapman

1999-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Possible influence of the two string events on the hadron formation in a nuclear environment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

One of the basic assumptions of the string model is that as a result of a DIS in nucleus a single string arises, which then breaks into hadrons. However the pomeron exchange considered in this work, leads to the production of two strings in the one event. The hadrons produced in these events have smaller formation lengths, than those with the same energy produced in the single string events. As a consequence, they undergo more substantial absorption in the nuclear matter.

N. Akopov; L. Grigoryan; Z. Akopov

2007-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

386

XAFS and LIBD Investigation of the Formation and Structure of Pu(IV) Hydrolysis Products  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Pu(IV) oxyhydroxide colloid growth is investigated with XAFS and LIBD. From combined results a model of colloid formation is proposed, which leads to a face-centered cubic Pu sublattice having cation defects, as observed with EXAFS, and a linear dependency of log [Pu(IV)] on -log [H{sup +}] with slope -2, in accord with LIBD. The solubility for Pu(IV) measured with LIBD is close to the lower limit of the solubility curve from previously reported data.

Rothe, J.; Walther, C.; Denecke, M.A.; Fanghänel, Th. (Karlesruhe)

2010-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

387

High temperature simulation of petroleum formation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Petroleum formation has been simulated in the laboratory with emphasis on the effects of temperature, mineral catalysis, and starting material structure on the yield and composition of the liquid and gaseous hydrocarbon products. In an attempt to prove the hypothesis that petroleum formation can be simulated using high temperatures, Green River Shale from Colorado, USA, was subjected to pyrolysis for 16 hours at temperatures ranging from 300 to 500/sup 0/C. The sequence of products formed over this temperature range was used as the basis for defining five different zones of maturation reaction: 1) a heterobond cracking zone; 2) a labile carbon bond cracking zone; 3) a free radical synthesis zone; 4) a wet gas formation zone; and 5) an aromatization zone. The role of some typical inorganic components of sedimentary rocks in the origin and maturation of petroleum has been investigated using this high temperature model. The importance of the structure of organic matter in petroelum formation has also been investigated using this high temperature model. Lignin and cellulose are poor sources of liquid hydrocarbons, but cellulose in the presence of carbonate gives a high yield of gaseous hydrocarbons. Protein pyrolysis gives a high oil yield with an alkane distribution similar to petroleum. The lipids produced the highest oil yield of the substances tested but the n-alkanes show an odd carbon length predominance unlike the distribution found in petroleum.

Evans, R.J.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Dynamics of precipitation pattern formation at geothermal hot springs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We formulate and model the dynamics of spatial patterns arising during the precipitation of calcium carbonate from a supersaturated shallow water flow. The model describes the formation of travertine deposits at geothermal hot springs and rimstone dams of calcite in caves. We find explicit solutions for travertine domes at low flow rates, identify the linear instabilities which generate dam and pond formation on sloped substrates, and present simulations of statistical landscape evolution.

Nigel Goldenfeld; Pak Yuen Chan; John Veysey

2006-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

389

Looking at Transistor Gate Oxide Formation in Real Time  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Looking at Transistor Gate Oxide Formation in Real Time Print Looking at Transistor Gate Oxide Formation in Real Time Print The oxide gate layer is critical to every transistor, and present-day layer thicknesses are in the 10-20 Å range (1-2 nm). However, little information exists on the oxidation process at this thickness. Available results are either for thicker layers grown under high-pressure conditions or for only the first couple of monolayers studied under high-vacuum conditions. Now, for the first time, a group of researchers has obtained real-time oxidation results for this elusive range. Using the ambient-pressure x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (APXPS) endstation at ALS Beamline 9.3.2, they examined oxidation of Si(100) at pressures up to 1 torr and temperatures up to 450 ºC. The Si 2p chemical shifts allowed determination of oxide thickness as a function of time with a precision of 1-2 Å. The initial oxidation rate was very high (up to ~234 Å/h). Then, after an initial oxide thickness of 6-22 Å was formed, the rate decreased markedly (~1.5-4.0Å/h). Neither rate regime can be explained by the standard Deal-Grove (D-G) model for Si oxidation. These results are a significant step toward developing a better understanding of this critical thickness regime.

390

Looking at Transistor Gate Oxide Formation in Real Time  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Looking at Transistor Gate Oxide Formation in Real Time Print Looking at Transistor Gate Oxide Formation in Real Time Print The oxide gate layer is critical to every transistor, and present-day layer thicknesses are in the 10-20 Å range (1-2 nm). However, little information exists on the oxidation process at this thickness. Available results are either for thicker layers grown under high-pressure conditions or for only the first couple of monolayers studied under high-vacuum conditions. Now, for the first time, a group of researchers has obtained real-time oxidation results for this elusive range. Using the ambient-pressure x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (APXPS) endstation at ALS Beamline 9.3.2, they examined oxidation of Si(100) at pressures up to 1 torr and temperatures up to 450 ºC. The Si 2p chemical shifts allowed determination of oxide thickness as a function of time with a precision of 1-2 Å. The initial oxidation rate was very high (up to ~234 Å/h). Then, after an initial oxide thickness of 6-22 Å was formed, the rate decreased markedly (~1.5-4.0Å/h). Neither rate regime can be explained by the standard Deal-Grove (D-G) model for Si oxidation. These results are a significant step toward developing a better understanding of this critical thickness regime.

391

Looking at Transistor Gate Oxide Formation in Real Time  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Looking at Transistor Gate Oxide Formation in Real Time Print Looking at Transistor Gate Oxide Formation in Real Time Print The oxide gate layer is critical to every transistor, and present-day layer thicknesses are in the 10-20 Å range (1-2 nm). However, little information exists on the oxidation process at this thickness. Available results are either for thicker layers grown under high-pressure conditions or for only the first couple of monolayers studied under high-vacuum conditions. Now, for the first time, a group of researchers has obtained real-time oxidation results for this elusive range. Using the ambient-pressure x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (APXPS) endstation at ALS Beamline 9.3.2, they examined oxidation of Si(100) at pressures up to 1 torr and temperatures up to 450 ºC. The Si 2p chemical shifts allowed determination of oxide thickness as a function of time with a precision of 1-2 Å. The initial oxidation rate was very high (up to ~234 Å/h). Then, after an initial oxide thickness of 6-22 Å was formed, the rate decreased markedly (~1.5-4.0Å/h). Neither rate regime can be explained by the standard Deal-Grove (D-G) model for Si oxidation. These results are a significant step toward developing a better understanding of this critical thickness regime.

392

A study of coal formation  

SciTech Connect

Coal is a solid, brittle, more or less distinctly stratified, combustible, carbonaceous rock. It is being rediscovered as a reliable energy source, which, historically provided the resource base for the industrialization of the United States economy. A firm understanding of growth in coal development is important to the national energy scene so that the implications of factors influencing coal growth upon the industry`s ability to realize national energy objectives may be determined. As a result, the future of coal development will be facilitated by compiling basic facts on coal reserves, production, and utilization. In view of this, a review and assessment of facts pertaining to the nature and origin of coal is presented. The various properties and uses of coal are then described, followed by a discussion of the process of coal formation.

Jubert, K.; Stevens, G.; Masudi, H.

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Results from hadron colliders  

SciTech Connect

The present status of hadron collider physics is reviewed. The total cross section for {bar p} + p has been measured at 1.8 TeV: {sigma}{sub tot} = 72.1 {plus minus} 3.3 mb. New data confirm the UA2 observation of W/Z {yields} {bar q}q. Precision measurements of M{sub W} by UA2 and CDF give an average value M{sub W} = 80.13 {plus minus} 0.30 GeV/c{sup 2}. When combined with measurements of M{sub Z} from LEP and SLC this number gives sin{sup 2}{theta}{sub W} = 0.227 {plus minus} 0.006, or m{sub top} = 130{sub {minus}60}{sup +40} GeV/c{sup 2} from the EWK radiative correction term {Delta}r. Evidence for hadron colliders as practical sources of b quarks has been strengthened, while searches for t quarks have pushed the mass above M{sub W}: m{sub top} > 89 GeV/c{sup 2} 95% cl (CDF Preliminary). Searches beyond the standard model based on the missing E{sub T} signature have not yet produced any positive results. Future prospects for the discovery of the top quark in the range m{sub top} < 200 GeV/c{sup 2} look promising. 80 refs., 35 figs., 7 tabs.

Pondrom, L.G. (Wisconsin Univ., Madison, WI (USA))

1990-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

394

Formation of molecular oxygen in ultracold O + OH reaction  

SciTech Connect

We discuss the formation of molecular oxygen in ultracold collisions between hydroxyl radicals and atomic oxygen. A time-independent quantum formalism based on hyperspherical coordinates is employed for the calculations. Elastic, inelastic and reactive cross sections as well as the vibrational and rotational populations of the product O{sub 2} molecules are reported. A J-shifting approximation is used to compute the rate coefficients. At temperatures T = 10--100 mK for which the OH molecules have been cooled and trapped experimentally, the elastic and reactive rate coefficients are of comparable magnitude, while at colder temperatures, T < 1 mK, the formation of molecular oxygen becomes the dominant pathway. The validity of a classical capture model to describe cold collisions of OH and O is also discussed. While very good agreement is found between classical and quantum results at T = 0.3 K, at higher temperatures, the quantum calculations predict a higher rate coefficient than the classical model, in agreement with experimental data for the O + OH reaction. The zero-temperature limiting value of the rate coefficient is predicted to be about 6 x 10{sup -12} cm{sup 3} s{sup 01}, a value comparable to that of barrierless alkali metal atom-dimer systems and about a factor of five larger than that of the tunneling dominated F + H{sub 2} reaction.

Kendrick, Brian Kent [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Quemener, Goulven [UNLV; Balakrishman, Naduvalath [UNLV

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Aromatics oxidation and soot formation in flames  

SciTech Connect

Work during this contract period has been concerned with the mechanisms through which aromatics are formed and destroyed in flames, and the processes responsible for soot formation. Recent progress has been primarily in two areas: experiments and modeling of the soot nucleation process in low pressure benzene flames and preparation for experiments on the destruction mechanisms of benzene. In addition, we have incorporated weak collision'' formalisms into a fall-off computer code.

Howard, J.B.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Transport in porous and fractured media of the Creede Formation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Direct measurement was made of the hydraulic conductivity of Creede Formation rocks using a new experimental method. The UFA{trademark} method employs open-flow centrifugation. Centrifugation, like gravity, has the effect on a material of a whole-body force exerting equal force at all points within the sample. The equivalent gravitational force exerted throughout the sample can be chosen to be from one to four orders of magnitude higher than earth gravity (from 10 to 10,000 g). The result is an increase in rate of fluid flow equally at all points throughout the sample so that hydraulic steady state is obtained in most geologic materials in hours, even under highly unsaturated conditions. This extraordinarily short time allows direct measurement of transport parameters, such as hydraulic conductivity, diffusion coefficient, and retardation factors, in any porous media over the complete range of field moisture contents. Hydraulic conductivities in the Creede Formation rocks ranged from 10{sup {minus}12} cm/s to 10{sup {minus}7} cm/s (10{sup {minus}9} Darcy to 10{sup {minus}4} Darcy) and showed no correlation with any other physical or mineralogical properties including porosity. The high degree of alteration to clay minerals appears to obscure any porosity/permeability relationship of the kind that occurs in many reservoir rocks. However, down-hole neutron porosities correlated well with laboratory-determined porosities. The objective of this investigation is to determine the hydrologic transport parameters of Creede Formation rocks for use in transport model development and for image analysis of transport pathways to produce a porosity/permeability evolution curve in support of geochemical and isotopic water/rock interaction models.

Conca, J.L.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

397

Estimation of static formation temperatures in geothermal wells | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Estimation of static formation temperatures in geothermal wells Estimation of static formation temperatures in geothermal wells Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: Estimation of static formation temperatures in geothermal wells Abstract Stabilized formation temperatures were estimated at different depths in 40 wells from the Los Humeros geothermal field, Mexico, using the Horner and the spherical radial flow (SRF) methods. The results showed that the Horner method underestimates formation temperatures, while the SRF method gives temperatures that are closer to the true formation temperatures. This was supported by numerical simulation of a combined circulation and shut-in period in several wells, and results for well H-26 are presented. Numerical reproduction of logged temperature is more feasible if an initial

398

The Influence of Seasonal and Decadal Trends in Coastal Ocean Processes on the Population Biology of the krill species Euphausia pacifica: Results of a coupled ecosystem and individual based modeling study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

aleuticus responses to ocean climate, 2005: Unusualand the Climate of the Ocean, Phase II (ECCO2) model (assessment of the Regional Ocean Modeling System. J Comp

Dorman, Jeffrey

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

The Influence of Seasonal and Decadal Trends in Coastal Ocean Processes on the Population Biology of the Krill Species Euphausia pacifica: Results of a Coupled Ecosystem and Individual Based Modeling Study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

aleuticus responses to ocean climate, 2005: Unusualand the Climate of the Ocean, Phase II (ECCO2) model (assessment of the Regional Ocean Modeling System. J Comp

Dorman, Jeffrey G.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

The Implications and Flow Behavior of the Hydraulically Fractured Wells in Shale Gas Formation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Shale gas formations are known to have low permeability. This low permeability can be as low as 100 nano darcies. Without stimulating wells drilled in the shale gas formations, it is hard to produce them at an economic rate. One of the stimulating approaches is by drilling horizontal wells and hydraulically fracturing the formation. Once the formation is fractured, different flow patterns will occur. The dominant flow regime observed in the shale gas formation is the linear flow or the transient drainage from the formation matrix toward the hydraulic fracture. This flow could extend up to years of production and it can be identified by half slop on the log-log plot of the gas rate against time. It could be utilized to evaluate the hydraulic fracture surface area and eventually evaluate the effectiveness of the completion job. Different models from the literature can be used to evaluate the completion job. One of the models used in this work assumes a rectangular reservoir with a slab shaped matrix between each two hydraulic fractures. From this model, there are at least five flow regions and the two regions discussed are the Region 2 in which bilinear flow occurs as a result of simultaneous drainage form the matrix and hydraulic fracture. The other is Region 4 which results from transient matrix drainage which could extend up to many years. The Barnett shale production data will be utilized throughout this work to show sample of the calculations. This first part of this work will evaluate the field data used in this study following a systematic procedure explained in Chapter III. This part reviews the historical production, reservoir and fluid data and well completion records available for the wells being analyzed. It will also check for data correlations from the data available and explain abnormal flow behaviors that might occur utilizing the field production data. It will explain why some wells might not fit into each model. This will be followed by a preliminary diagnosis, in which flow regimes will be identified, unclear data will be filtered, and interference and liquid loading data will be pointed. After completing the data evaluation, this work will evaluate and compare the different methods available in the literature in order to decide which method will best fit to analyze the production data from the Barnett shale. Formation properties and the original gas in place will be evaluated and compared for different methods.

Almarzooq, Anas Mohammadali S.

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "model results formats" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Category:Formatting Templates | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Category Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Category:Formatting Templates Jump to: navigation, search Formatting Templates are Templates used primarily to achieve a certian layout or style on a wiki page. They can be generic, like Template:Clear or specific, like Template:Definition. For help on creating templates, see Help:Templates. Subcategories This category has only the following subcategory. Q [×] Query Results Templates‎ 4 pages Pages in category "Formatting Templates" The following 200 pages are in this category, out of 465 total. (previous 200) (next 200) A Abraham Hot Springs Geothermal Area

402

Isocurvature Fluctuations Induce Early Star Formation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The early reionisation of the Universe inferred from the WMAP polarisation results, if confirmed, poses a problem for the hypothesis that scale-invariant adiabatic density fluctuations account for large-scale structure and galaxy formation. One can only generate the required amount of early star formation if extreme assumptions are made about the efficiency and nature of early reionisation. We develop an alternative hypothesis that invokes an additional component of a non-scale-free isocurvature power spectrum together with the scale-free adiabatic power spectrum for inflation-motivated primordial density fluctuations. Such a component is constrained by the Lyman alpha forest observations, can account for the small-scale power required by spectroscopic gravitational lensing, and yields a source of early star formation that can reionise the universe at z~20 yet becomes an inefficient source of ionizing photons by z~10, thereby allowing the conventional adiabatic fluctuation component to reproduce the late thermal history of the intergalactic medium.

Naoshi Sugiyama; Saleem Zaroubi; Joseph Silk

2003-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

403

Stellar populations in gas-rich galaxy mergers I. Dependence on star formation history  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We investigate the nature of stellar populations of major galaxy mergers between late-type spirals considerably abundant in interstellar medium by performing numerical simulations designed to solve both the dynamical and chemical evolution in a self-consistent manner. We particularly consider that the star formation history of galaxy mergers is a crucial determinant for the nature of stellar populations of merger remnants, and therefore investigate how the difference in star formation history between galaxy mergers affects the chemical evolution of galaxy mergers. We found that the rapidity of star formation, which is defined as the ratio of the dynamical time-scale to the time-scale of gas consumption by star formation, is the most important determinant for a number of fundamental characteristics of stellar populations of merger remnants. We mainly demonstrate that even the chemical evolution of elliptical galaxies can be strongly affected by the details of dynamical evolution of galaxy merging. Based upon the present numerical results, we adopt a specific assumption of the luminosity dependence of the rapidity of star formation and thereby discuss how successfully the present merger model can reproduce a number of fundamental chemical, photometric, and spectroscopic characteristics of elliptical galaxies.

Kenji Bekki; Yasuhiro Shioya

1998-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

404

Results from NationalResults from National Biorefinery Siting ModelBiorefinery Siting Model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of a local Jatropha-based biofuel supply chain and produce the technical and organizational knowledgeBRIEFING NOTES November 2010 Sustainable biofuels in Africa: cultivation of Jatropha curcas in Mali Background Case study 1 - Mali Case study 2 - Malawi Policy recommendations Biofuel cultivation worldwide

California at Davis, University of

405

Help - Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Search Results The search results are displayed ten documents at a time. The Next >> and << Back links at the top and bottom of the list allow you to navigate through the results...

406

Effect of dark matter annihilation on gas cooling and star formation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In the current paradigm of cosmic structure formation, dark matter plays a key role on the formation and evolution of galaxies through its gravitational influence. On microscopic scales, dark matter particles are expected to annihilate amongst themselves into different products, with some fraction of the energy being transferred to the baryonic component. It is the aim of the present work to show that, in the innermost regions of dark matter halos, heating by dark matter annihilation may be comparable to the cooling rate of the gas. We use analytical models of the dark matter and gas distributions in order to estimate the heating and cooling rates, as well as the energy available from supernova explosions. Depending on the model parameters and the precise nature of dark matter particles, the injected energy may be enough to balance radiative cooling in the cores of galaxy clusters. On galactic scales, it would inhibit star formation more efficiently than supernova feedback. Our results suggest that dark matter annihilation prevents gas cooling and star formation within at least $0.01-1$ per cent of the virial radius.

Y. Ascasibar

2006-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

407

ANI Testbed: Published Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Testbed Results R&D Overview 100G Testbed Testbed Description Testbed Results Current Testbed Research Proposal Process Terms and Conditions Virtual Circuits (OSCARS) Performance...

408

LITHIUM ABUNDANCES IN EXOPLANET HOST STARS AS TEST OF PLANETARY FORMATION SCENARII  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract. Following the observations of Israelian et al. (2004), we compare different evolutionary models in order to study the lithium destruction processes and the planetary formation scenarii. 1

G. Alecian; O. Richard; S. Vauclair (eds; M. Castro; O. Richard; S. Vauclair

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Lithium abundances in exoplanet host stars as test of planetary formation scenarii  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Following the observations of Israelian et al. 2004, we compare different evolutionary models in order to study the lithium destruction processes and the planetary formation scenarii.

M. Castro; O. Richard; S. Vauclair

2005-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

410

FORMATION OF ORGANIC MOLECULES AND WATER IN WARM DISK ATMOSPHERES  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Observations from Spitzer and ground-based infrared spectroscopy reveal significant diversity in the molecular emission from the inner few AU of T Tauri disks. We explore theoretically the possible origin of this diversity by expanding on our earlier thermal-chemical model of disk atmospheres. We consider how variations in grain settling, X-ray irradiation, accretion-related mechanical heating, and the oxygen-to-carbon ratio can affect the thermal and chemical properties of the atmosphere at 0.25-40 AU. We find that these model parameters can account for many properties of the detected molecular emission. The column density of the warm (200-2000 K) molecular atmosphere is sensitive to grain settling and the efficiency of accretion-related heating, which may account, at least in part, for the large range in molecular emission fluxes that have been observed. The dependence of the atmospheric properties on the model parameters may also help to explain trends that have been reported in the literature between molecular emission strength and mid-infrared color, stellar accretion rate, and disk mass. We discuss whether some of the differences between our model results and the observations (e.g., for water) indicate a role for vertical transport and freezeout in the disk midplane. We also discuss how planetesimal formation in the outer disk (beyond the snowline) may imprint a chemical signature on the inner few AU of the disk and speculate on possible observational tracers of this process.

Najita, Joan R. [National Optical Astronomy Observatory, 950 N. Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85719 (United States); Adamkovics, Mate; Glassgold, Alfred E. [Astronomy Department, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

2011-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

411

Practical results with CADSYS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

CADSYS is an interactive computer-aided decision support system which interfaces designer with a mathematical, rather than graphic, model of a design problem. Multiple design goals can be imposed in the form of equality and inequality constraints, whose ...

Daniel E. Whitney

1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Grid result checking  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Result checking is the theory and practice of proving that the result of an execution of a program on an input is correct. Result checking has most often been envisioned in the framework of program testing or property testing, where the issue is the ... Keywords: grids, result checking, simulation

Cécile Germain-Renaud; Dephine Monnier-Ragaigne

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

CONTAM Overview - Simulation Results  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Currently there are two types: boundary layer diffusion (BLS) deposition/ resuspension (DVR). Table — CONTAM Results Files. ...

414

Improved steamflood analytical model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Jeff Jones steamflood model incorporates oil displacement by steam as described by Myhill and Stegemeier, and a three-component capture factor based on empirical correlations. The main drawback of the model however is the unsatisfactory prediction of the oil production peak: usually significantly lower than the actual. Our study focuses on improving this aspect of the Jeff Jones model. In our study, we simulated the production performance of a 5-spot steamflood pattern unit and compared the results against those based on the Jeff Jones model. Three reservoir types were simulated using 3-D Cartesian black oil models: Hamaca (9�°API), San Ardo (12�°API) and that based on the SPE fourth comparative solution project (14�°API). In the first two field cases, a 45x23x8 model was used that represented 1/8 of a 10-acre 5-spot pattern unit, using typical rock and reservoir fluid properties. In the SPE project case, three models were used: 23x12x12 (2.5 ac), 31x16x12 (5 ac) and 45x23x8 (10 ac), that represented 1/8 of a 5-spot pattern unit. To obtain a satisfactory match between simulation and Jeff Jones analytical model results of the start and height of the production peak, the following refinements to the Jeff Jones model were necessary. First, the dimensionless steam zone size AcD was modified to account for decrease in oil viscosity during steamflood and its dependence on the steam injection rate. Second, the dimensionless volume of displaced oil produced VoD was modified from its square-root format to an exponential form. The modified model gave very satisfactory results for production performance up to 20 years of simulated steamflood, compared to the original Jeff Jones model. Engineers will find the modified model an improved and useful tool for prediction of steamflood production performance.

Chandra, Suandy

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

formatting | OpenEI Community  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

formatting formatting Home Jweers's picture Submitted by Jweers(83) Contributor 7 August, 2013 - 18:23 New Robust References! citation citing developer formatting reference Semantic Mediawiki wiki Check out the new Reference Form. Adding a reference object to OpenEI using this form is the most complete way to cite a reference. After providing the name of your reference, the form will ask for your document type. Rmckeel's picture Submitted by Rmckeel(297) Contributor 25 June, 2013 - 07:39 How to create formatted blocks to hold OpenEI wiki content content formatting user interface wiki The OpenEI wiki frontpage uses "boxes" that help organize content. These boxes are frequently re-used across the site. Syndicate content 429 Throttled (bot load) Error 429 Throttled (bot load)

416

STAR FORMATION EFFICIENCY IN THE COOL CORES OF GALAXY CLUSTERS  

SciTech Connect

We have assembled a sample of high spatial resolution far-UV (Hubble Space Telescope Advanced Camera for Surveys/Solar Blind Channel) and H{alpha} (Maryland-Magellan Tunable Filter) imaging for 15 cool core galaxy clusters. These data provide a detailed view of the thin, extended filaments in the cores of these clusters. Based on the ratio of the far-UV to H{alpha} luminosity, the UV spectral energy distribution, and the far-UV and H{alpha} morphology, we conclude that the warm, ionized gas in the cluster cores is photoionized by massive, young stars in all but a few (A1991, A2052, A2580) systems. We show that the extended filaments, when considered separately, appear to be star forming in the majority of cases, while the nuclei tend to have slightly lower far-UV luminosity for a given H{alpha} luminosity, suggesting a harder ionization source or higher extinction. We observe a slight offset in the UV/H{alpha} ratio from the expected value for continuous star formation which can be modeled by assuming intrinsic extinction by modest amounts of dust (E(B - V) {approx} 0.2) or a top-heavy initial mass function in the extended filaments. The measured star formation rates vary from {approx}0.05 M{sub sun} yr{sup -1} in the nuclei of non-cooling systems, consistent with passive, red ellipticals, to {approx}5 M{sub sun} yr{sup -1} in systems with complex, extended, optical filaments. Comparing the estimates of the star formation rate based on UV, H{alpha}, and infrared luminosities to the spectroscopically determined X-ray cooling rate suggests a star formation efficiency of 14{sup +18}{sub -8}%. This value represents the time-averaged fraction, by mass, of gas cooling out of the intracluster medium, which turns into stars and agrees well with the global fraction of baryons in stars required by simulations to reproduce the stellar mass function for galaxies. This result provides a new constraint on the efficiency of star formation in accreting systems.

McDonald, Michael; Veilleux, Sylvain; Mushotzky, Richard; Reynolds, Christopher [Department of Astronomy, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States); Rupke, David S. N., E-mail: mcdonald@astro.umd.edu, E-mail: veilleux@astro.umd.edu [Department of Physics, Rhodes College, Memphis, TN 38112 (United States)

2011-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

417

RESULTS FROM THE (1) DATA COLLECTION WORKSHOP, (2) MODELING WORKSHOP AND (3) DRILLING AND CORING METHODS WORKSHOP AS PART OF THE JOINT INDUSTRY PARTICIPATION (JIP) PROJECT TO CHARACTERIZE NATURAL GAS HYDRATES IN THE DEEPWATER GULF OF MEXICO  

SciTech Connect

In 2000, Chevron began a project to learn how to characterize the natural gas hydrate deposits in the deepwater portions of the Gulf of Mexico. A Joint Industry Participation (JIP) group was formed in 2001, and a project partially funded by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) began in October 2001. The primary objective of this project is to develop technology and data to assist in the characterization of naturally occurring gas hydrates in the deepwater Gulf of Mexico. These naturally occurring gas hydrates can cause problems relating to drilling and production of oil and gas, as well as building and operating pipelines. Other objectives of this project are to better understand how natural gas hydrates can affect seafloor stability, to gather data that can be used to study climate change, and to determine how the results of this project can be used to assess if and how gas hydrates act as a trapping mechanism for shallow oil or gas reservoirs. As part of the project, three workshops were held. The first was a data collection workshop, held in Houston during March 14-15, 2002. The purpose of this workshop was to find out what data exist on gas hydrates and to begin making that data available to the JIP. The second and third workshop, on Geoscience and Reservoir Modeling, and Drilling and Coring Methods, respectively, were held simultaneously in Houston during May 9-10, 2002. The Modeling Workshop was conducted to find out what data the various engineers, scientists and geoscientists want the JIP to collect in both the field and the laboratory. The Drilling and Coring workshop was to begin making plans on how we can collect the data required by the project's principal investigators.

Stephen A. Holditch; Emrys Jones

2002-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

THE AVERAGE STAR FORMATION HISTORIES OF GALAXIES IN DARK MATTER HALOS FROM z = 0-8  

SciTech Connect

We present a robust method to constrain average galaxy star formation rates (SFRs), star formation histories (SFHs), and the intracluster light (ICL) as a function of halo mass. Our results are consistent with observed galaxy stellar mass functions, specific star formation rates (SSFRs), and cosmic star formation rates (CSFRs) from z = 0 to z = 8. We consider the effects of a wide range of uncertainties on our results, including those affecting stellar masses, SFRs, and the halo mass function at the heart of our analysis. As they are relevant to our method, we also present new calibrations of the dark matter halo mass function, halo mass accretion histories, and halo-subhalo merger rates out to z = 8. We also provide new compilations of CSFRs and SSFRs; more recent measurements are now consistent with the buildup of the cosmic stellar mass density at all redshifts. Implications of our work include: halos near 10{sup 12} M{sub Sun} are the most efficient at forming stars at all redshifts, the baryon conversion efficiency of massive halos drops markedly after z {approx} 2.5 (consistent with theories of cold-mode accretion), the ICL for massive galaxies is expected to be significant out to at least z {approx} 1-1.5, and dwarf galaxies at low redshifts have higher stellar mass to halo mass ratios than previous expectations and form later than in most theoretical models. Finally, we provide new fitting formulae for SFHs that are more accurate than the standard declining tau model. Our approach places a wide variety of observations relating to the SFH of galaxies into a self-consistent framework based on the modern understanding of structure formation in {Lambda}CDM. Constraints on the stellar mass-halo mass relationship and SFRs are available for download online.

Behroozi, Peter S.; Wechsler, Risa H. [Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Conroy, Charlie [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of California at Santa Cruz, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States)

2013-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

419

Numerical simulation of cloud droplet formation in a tank  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Using the computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code FLUENT 6 together with the fine particle model (FPM), numerical simulations of droplet dynamics in a 12.4m^3 cloud tank were conducted. The coupled fields of water vapor, temperature, flow velocity, particle ... Keywords: Cloud droplet formation, Particle-dynamics modeling, Stirred tank, Turbulence

Matthias Schütze; Frank Stratmann

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

The Fluid Mechanics of Gravitational Structure Formation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The standard model for gravitational structure formation in astrophysics, astronomy, and cosmology is questioned. Cold dark matter (CDM) hierarchical clustering cosmology neglects particle collisions, viscosity, turbulence and diffusion and makes predictions in conflict with observations. From Jeans 1902 and CDMHC, the non-baryonic dark matter NBDM forms small clumps during the plasma epoch after the big bang that ``cluster'' into larger clumps. CDM halo clusters collect the baryonic matter (H and He) by gravity so that after 300 Myr of ``dark ages'', huge, explosive (Population III) first stars appear, and then galaxies and galaxy clusters. Contrary to CDMHC cosmology, ``hydro-gravitational-dynamics'' HGD cosmology suggests the diffusive NBDM material cannot clump and the clumps cannot cluster. From HGD, the big bang results from an exothermic turbulent instability at Planck scales (10^{-35} m). Turbulent stresses cause an inflation of space and fossil density turbulence remnants that trigger gravitational instability at protosupercluster masses (10^{46} kg) in the H-He plasma. These fragment along plasma turbulence vortex lines to form protogalaxy masses (10^{42} kg) just before the transition to gas. The gas has x10^{-13} smaller viscosity, so it fragments at planetary and globular-star-cluster masses (10^{25} and 10^{36} kg) to form the baryonic dark matter (BDM). Observations from the Hubble Space Telescope show protogalaxies (PGs) in linear clusters reflecting their likely fragmentation on plasma vortex lines. From merging BDM planets, these PGs gently form small stars in globular clusters <1 Myr after the big bang without the dark ages, superstars, or reionization of CDM cosmology.

Carl H. Gibson

2006-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "model results formats" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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421

CMS: First Results  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A summary of the LHC and CMS detector performance is given and the first CMS results are presented. In particular

Paolo Checchia; The CMS collaboration

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Review of Test Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

GAC004 Revision 1 Effective June 2008 Review of Test Results Prepared by Electric Transportation Applications Prepared by: Date: Garrett...

423

Formation of Nuclear Disks and Supermassive Black Hole Binaries in Multi-Scale Hydrodynamical Galaxy Mergers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(Abridged) We review the results of the first multi-scale, hydrodynamical simulations of mergers between galaxies with central supermassive black holes (SMBHs) to investigate the formation of SMBH binaries in galactic nuclei. We demonstrate that strong gas inflows produce nuclear disks at the centers of merger remnants whose properties depend sensitively on the details of gas thermodynamics. In numerical simulations with parsec-scale spatial resolution in the gas component and an effective equation of state appropriate for a starburst galaxy, we show that a SMBH binary forms very rapidly, less than a million years after the merger of the two galaxies. Binary formation is significantly suppressed in the presence of a strong heating source such as radiative feedback by the accreting SMBHs. We also present preliminary results of numerical simulations with ultra-high spatial resolution of 0.1 pc in the gas component. These simulations resolve the internal structure of the resulting nuclear disk down to parsec scales and demonstrate the formation of a central massive object (~ 10^8 Mo) by efficient angular momentum transport. This is the first time that a radial gas inflow is shown to extend to parsec scales as a result of the dynamics and hydrodynamics involved in a galaxy merger, and has important implications for the fueling of SMBHs. Due to the rapid formation of the central clump, the density of the nuclear disk decreases significantly in its outer region, reducing dramatically the effect of dynamical friction and leading to the stalling of the two SMBHs at a separation of ~1 pc. We discuss how the orbital decay of the black holes might continue in a more realistic model which incorporates star formation and the multi-phase nature of the ISM.

Lucio Mayer; Stelios Kazantzidis; Andres Escala

2008-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

424

QCD results at CDF  

SciTech Connect

Recent QCD measurements from the CDF collaboration at the Tevatron are presented, together with future prospects as the luminosity increases. The measured inclusive jet cross section is compared to pQCD NLO predictions. Precise measurements on jet shapes and hadronic energy flows are compared to different phenomenological models that describe gluon emissions and the underlying event in hadron-hadron interactions.

Norniella, Olga; /Barcelona, IFAE

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Nucleosome interactions in chromatin: fiber stiffening and hairpin formation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We use Monte Carlo simulations to study attractive and excluded volume interactions between nucleosome core particles in 30 nm-chromatin fibers. The nucleosomes are treated as disk-like objects having an excluded volume and short range attraction modelled by a variant of the Gay-Berne potential. The nucleosomes are connected via bendable and twistable linker DNA in the crossed linker fashion. We investigate the influence of the nucleosomal excluded volume on the stiffness of the fiber. For parameter values that correspond to chicken erythrocyte chromatin we find that the persistence length is governed to a large extent by that excluded volume whereas the soft linker backbone elasticity plays only a minor role. We further find that internucleosomal attraction can induce the formation of hairpin configurations. Tension-induced opening of such configurations into straight fibers manifests itself in a quasi-plateau in the force-extension curve that resembles results from recent micromanipulation experiments. Such hairpins may play a role in the formation of higher order structures in chromosomes like chromonema fibers.

Boris Mergell; Ralf Everaers; Helmut Schiessel

2004-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

426

Changes in the halo formation rates due to features in the primordial spectrum  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Features in the primordial scalar power spectrum provide a possible roadway to describe the outliers at the low multipoles in the WMAP data. Apart from the CMB angular power spectrum, these features can also alter the matter power spectrum and, thereby, the formation of the large scale structure. Carrying out a complete numerical analysis, we investigate the effects of primordial features on the formation rates of the halos. We consider a few different inflationary models that lead to features in the scalar power spectrum and an improved fit to the CMB data, and analyze the corresponding imprints on the formation of halos. Performing a Markov Chain Monte Carlo analysis with the WMAP seven year data and the SDSS halo power spectrum from LRG DR7 for the models of our interest, we arrive at the parameter space of the models allowed by the data. We illustrate that, inflationary potentials, such as the quadratic potential with sinusoidal modulations and the axion monodromy model, which generate certain repeated, oscillatory features in the inflationary perturbation spectrum, do not induce a substantial difference in the number density of halos at their best fit values, when compared with, say, a nearly scale invariant spectrum as is generated by the standard quadratic potential. However, we find that the number density and the formation rates of halos change by about 13-22% for halo masses ranging over 10^4-10^14 solar mass, for potential parameters that lie within 2-sigma around the best fit values arrived at from the aforesaid joint constraints. We briefly discuss the implications of our results.

Dhiraj Kumar Hazra

2012-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

427

Geothermal resources Frio Formation, South Texas  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A preliminary study of the Frio sand distribution and formation temperatures and pressures was undertaken in order to define prospective areas in which a more detailed reservoir analysis is necessary prior to the selection of a site for a geothermal well. As a result two potential geothermal fairways were identified--one in the south part of the area in Hidalgo, Willacy, and Cameron Counties, and the other in the north part in north-central Nueces County.

Bebout, D.G.; Dorfman, M.H.; Agagu, O.K.

1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

NZERTF, Recent Research Results  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... A. Hunter Fanney, Chief Building Environment Division (301) 975-5864 hunter.fanney@nist.gov. *. Bookmark and Share. Recent Research Results. ...

2013-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

429

Search Results Quadrats  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

lassoquadratss-searchresults-quadrat2006.lasso (1 of 2)61507 10:18 AM Search Results Quadrats 3183 Lederman Science Center Docent .P 3184 Lederman Science Center...

430

On water ice formation in interstellar clouds  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A model is proposed for the formation of water ice mantles on grains in interstellar clouds. This occurs by direct accretion of monomers from the gas, be they formed by gas or surface reactions. The model predicts the existence of a threshold in interstellar light extinction, A(v), which is mainly determined by the adsorption energy of water molecules on the grain material; for hydrocarbon material, chemical simulation places this energy between 0.5 and 2 kcal/mole, which sets the visible exctinction threshold at a few magnitudes, as observed. Once the threshold is crossed, all available water molecules in the gas are quickly adsorbed, forming an ice mantle, because the grain cools down and the adsorption energy on ice is higher than on bare grain. The model also predicts that the thickness of the mantle, and, hence, the optical thickness at 3 mu, grow linearly with A(v), as observed, with a slope which depends upon the total amount of water in the gas. Chemical simulation was also used to determine the adsorption sites and energies of O and OH on hydrocarbons, and study the dynamics of formation of water molecules by surface reactions with gaseous H atoms, as well as their chances of sticking in situ.

Renaud Papoular

2005-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

431

Reservoir simulation of co2 sequestration and enhanced oil recovery in Tensleep Formation, Teapot Dome field  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Teapot Dome field is located 35 miles north of Casper, Wyoming in Natrona County. This field has been selected by the U.S. Department of Energy to implement a field-size CO2 storage project. With a projected storage of 2.6 million tons of carbon dioxide a year under fully operational conditions in 2006, the multiple-partner Teapot Dome project could be one of the world's largest CO2 storage sites. CO2 injection has been used for decades to improve oil recovery from depleted hydrocarbon reservoirs. In the CO2 sequestration technique, the aim is to "co-optimize" CO2 storage and oil recovery. In order to achieve the goal of CO2 sequestration, this study uses reservoir simulation to predict the amount of CO2 that can be stored in the Tensleep Formation and the amount of oil that can be produced as a side benefit of CO2 injection. This research discusses the effects of using different reservoir fluid models from EOS regression and fracture permeability in dual porosity models on enhanced oil recovery and CO2 storage in the Tensleep Formation. Oil and gas production behavior obtained from the fluid models were completely different. Fully compositional and pseudo-miscible black oil fluid models were tested in a quarter of a five spot pattern. Compositional fluid model is more convenient for enhanced oil recovery evaluation. Detailed reservoir characterization was performed to represent the complex characteristics of the reservoir. A 3D black oil reservoir simulation model was used to evaluate the effects of fractures in reservoir fluids production. Single porosity simulation model results were compared with those from the dual porosity model. Based on the results obtained from each simulation model, it has been concluded that the pseudo-miscible model can not be used to represent the CO2 injection process in Teapot Dome. Dual porosity models with variable fracture permeability provided a better reproduction of oil and water rates in the highly fractured Tensleep Formation.

Gaviria Garcia, Ricardo

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Microphysical Structure of the Marine Boundary Layer under Strong Wind and Spray Formation as Seen from Simulations Using a 2D Explicit Microphysical Model. Part I: The Impact of Large Eddies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The effects of large eddies (LE) on the marine boundary layer (MBL) microphysics and thermodynamics is investigated using a 2D Lagrangian model with spectral bin microphysics including effects of sea spray. The 600 m × 400 m MBL computational area ...

J. Shpund; M. Pinsky; A. Khain

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Bailey, D. A., P. B. Rhines, and S. Hkkinen, 2005: Formation and pathways of North Atlantic Deep Water in a coupled ice-ocean model of the Arctic-North Atlantic Oceans. Climate  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Water in a coupled ice-ocean model of the Arctic-North Atlantic Oceans. Climate Dyn., 25, doi:10.1007/s. P. Shen, World Scientific, Singapore, 360pp. Yeh, S.- W., and B. P. Kirtman, 2005: Pacific decadal

434

Mechanisms of Banner Cloud Formation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Banner clouds are clouds in the lee of steep mountains or sharp ridges. Their formation has previously been hypothesized as due to three different mechanisms: (i) vertical uplift in a lee vortex (which has a horizontal axis), (ii) adiabatic ...

Matthias Voigt; Volkmar Wirth

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Hail Formation via Microphysical Recycling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

It is suggested that alternation of low-density riming and wet growth processes play a role in hailstone formation. Such alternation of growth processes, which has been called microphysical recycling, is envisioned to operate in the following ...

John C. Pflaum

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

An Investigation of Ice Production Mechanisms in Small Cumuliform Clouds Using a 3D Model with Explicit Microphysics. Part II: Case Study of New Mexico Cumulus Clouds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new 3D model with explicit liquid- and ice-phase microphysics and a detailed treatment of ice nucleation and multiplication processes is applied to study ice formation and evolution in cumulus clouds. Simulation results are compared with in ...

Mikhail Ovtchinnikov; Yefim L. Kogan; Alan M. Blyth

2000-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

Grid Transformation Workshop Results  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In an earlier white paper entitled Needed: A Grid Operating System to Facilitate Grid Transformation; EPRI; Palo Alto, CA: 2011; 1023223, we set the stage for a new grid operating system called Grid 3.0. Since that time we have identified four core research areas that are required to achieve the expected outcome. These research areas are called: seamless geospatial power system model, seamless power system analytics, integrated energy management system and setting-less protection method. While each area ...

2012-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

438

METALLICITY-DEPENDENT QUENCHING OF STAR FORMATION AT HIGH REDSHIFT IN SMALL GALAXIES  

SciTech Connect

The star formation rates (SFRs) of low-metallicity galaxies depend sensitively on the gas metallicity, because metals are crucial to mediating the transition from intermediate-temperature atomic gas to cold molecular gas, a necessary precursor to star formation. We study the impact of this effect on the star formation history of galaxies. We incorporate metallicity-dependent star formation and metal enrichment in a simple model that follows the evolution of a halo main progenitor. Our model shows that including the effect of metallicity leads to suppression of star formation at redshift z > 2 in dark halos with masses {approx}< 10{sup 11} M{sub Sun }, with the suppression becoming near total for halos below {approx}10{sup 9.5}-10{sup 10} M{sub Sun }. We find that at high redshift, until z {approx} 2, the SFR cannot catch up with the gas inflow rate (IR), because the SFR is limited by the free-fall time, and because it is suppressed further by a lack of metals in small halos. As a result, in each galaxy the SFR is growing in time faster than the IR, and the integrated cosmic SFR density is rising with time. The suppressed in situ SFR at high-z makes the growth of stellar mass dominated by ex situ SFR, meaning stars formed in lower mass progenitor galaxies and then accreted, which implies that the specific SFR (sSFR) remains constant with time. The intensely accreted gas at high-z is accumulating as an atomic gas reservoir. This provides additional fuel for star formation in 10{sup 10}-10{sup 12} M{sub Sun} halos at z {approx} 1-3, which allows the SFR to exceed the instantaneous IR, and may enable an even higher outflow rate. At z < 1, following the natural decline in IR with time due to the universal expansion, the SFR and sSFR are expected to drop. We specify the expected dependence of sSFR and metallicity on stellar mass and redshift. At a given z, and below a critical mass, these relations are predicted to be flat and rising, respectively. Our model predictions qualitatively match some of the puzzling features in the observed star formation history.

Krumholz, Mark R. [Astronomy Department, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95060 (United States); Dekel, Avishai, E-mail: krumholz@ucolick.edu, E-mail: dekel@phys.huji.ac.il [Racah Institute of Physics, Hebrew University, Jerusalem 91904 (Israel)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

An interpretation of soliton formation and parametric instabilities. Interim report  

SciTech Connect

It is shown that soliton formation and the resulting plasma heating are nothing more than the description in configuration space of well-known parametric processes and quasilinear theory. (GRA)

Manheimer, W.M.; Papadopoulos, K.

1975-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Consumption externalities, habit formation and equilibrium efficiency  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We analyze the welfare properties of the competitive equilibrium in a capital accumulation model where individual preferences are subject to both habit formation and consumption spillovers. Using an additive specification for preferences, according to which the argument in the utility function is a linear combination of present and past values of own consumption and consumption spillovers, we analyze the circumstances under which these spillovers are a source of inefficiency. It is shown that consumption externalities have to interact with habits in order to generate an inefficient dynamic equilibrium. Finally, we characterize optimal tax policies aimed at restoring efficient decentralized paths.

Jaime Alonso-carrera; Jordi Caballé; Xavier Raurich

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "model results formats" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Aromatics Oxidation and Soot Formation in Flames  

SciTech Connect

This project is concerned with the kinetics and mechanisms of aromatics oxidation and the growth process to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) of increasing size, soot and fullerenes formation in flames. The overall objective of the experimental aromatics oxidation work is to extend the set of available data by measuring concentration profiles for decomposition intermediates such as phenyl, cyclopentadienyl, phenoxy or indenyl radicals which could not be measured with molecular-beam mass spectrometry to permit further refinement and testing of benzene oxidation mechanisms. The focus includes PAH radicals which are thought to play a major role in the soot formation process while their concentrations are in many cases too low to permit measurement with conventional mass spectrometry. The radical species measurements are used in critical testing and improvement of a kinetic model describing benzene oxidation and PAH growth. Thermodynamic property data of selected species are determined computationally, for instance using density functional theory (DFT). Potential energy surfaces are explored in order to identify additional reaction pathways. The ultimate goal is to understand the conversion of high molecular weight compounds to nascent soot particles, to assess the roles of planar and curved PAH and relationships between soot and fullerenes formation. The specific aims are to characterize both the high molecular weight compounds involved in the nucleation of soot particles and the structure of soot including internal nanoscale features indicative of contributions of planar and/or curved PAH to particle inception.

Howard, J. B.; Richter, H.

2005-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

442

Formation and Circulation of Mode Waters of the North Pacific in a High-Resolution GCM  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Formation and circulation of mode waters in the subtropical North Pacific are investigated by performing a numerical simulation with a high-resolution general circulation model. In the model, important features for forming mode waters, such as ...

Hiroyuki Tsujino; Tamaki Yasuda

2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Thermodynamics of the formation of catalyst clusters for carbon nanotube growth  

SciTech Connect

A fundamental thermodynamic model of formation of catalyst clusters for growing carbon nanotubes has been developed and model predictions have been compared with the experimental data. An expression for the size distribution function of clusters, depending on the conditions of their formation, is obtained. It is shown that surface tension plays an important role in the cluster formation. The surface tension coefficient for iron clusters at 950 deg. C is determined.

Bulyarskii, S. V.; Pyatilova, O. V.; Tsygantsov, A. V. [Ulyanovsk State University (Russian Federation); Basaev, A. S.; Galperin, V. A., E-mail: V.Galperin@tcen.ru; Pavlov, A. A.; Shaman, Yu. P. [Moscow Institute of Electronic Engineering, Technology Center Research and Production Complex (Russian Federation)

2010-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

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NETL: Predictive Modeling and Evaluation - TVA Model Comparison  

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Ozone/PM2.5 Formation & Transport Model Comparison Ozone/PM2.5 Formation & Transport Model Comparison Future regulatory actions for mitigating PM2.5 concentrations will rely, to some extent, on results from large-scale atmospheric models. The most efficient approach to evaluating regulatory actions is to use an integrated approach that examines multiple air quality impacts simultaneously. This is because of the strong linkage between PM2.5 levels, visibility degradation, ozone and acidic deposition. Thus, regional modeling of the impacts on PM2.5 levels from proposed emission reductions should be evaluated in terms of computed impacts not only on PM2.5 levels, but on ozone and acidic deposition as well. TVA is an active participant in the only ongoing assessment of this type, which is being done for the Southern Appalachian Mountains Initiative (SAMI) as part of its integrated assessment in the southeastern United States. SAMI, with its focus on protecting PSD Class I areas, is using a model called URM that can examine all the aforementioned phenomena at once. In addition, URM has the capability, which SAMI intends to use, of efficiently examining the sensitivity of model outputs to changes in emissions across the entire