National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for model regions source

  1. Modeling regional power transfers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kavicky, J.A.; Veselka, T.D.

    1994-03-01

    The Spot Market Network (SMN) model was used to estimate spot market transactions and prices between various North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) regions for summer on-peak situations. A preliminary analysis of new or proposed additions to the transmission network was performed. The effects of alternative exempt wholesale generator (EWG) options on spot market transactions and the transmission system are also studied. This paper presents the SMN regional modelling approach and summarizes simulation results. Although the paper focuses on a regional network representation, a discussion of how the SMN model was used to represent a detailed utility-level network is also presented.

  2. Evaluation of a chemical transport model for sulfate using ACE-2 observations and attribution of sulfate mixing ratios to source regions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    models driven by analyzed meteorological data. At Tenerife, Canary Islands, (minimal proximate sources ratios (MRs, in parts per billion, ppb, equal to nmol per mol air) at Tenerife, Canary Islands

  3. Tracing meteorite source regions through asteroid spectroscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas, Cristina Ana

    2009-01-01

    By virtue of their landing on Earth, meteorites reside in near-Earth object (NEO) orbits prior to their arrival. Thus the population of observable NEOs, in principle, give the best representation of meteorite source bodies. ...

  4. A Framework for Modeling Uncertainty in Regional Climate Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Monier, Erwan

    In this study, we present a new modeling framework and a large ensemble of climate projections to investigate the uncertainty in regional climate change over the US associated with four dimensions of uncertainty. The sources ...

  5. MODELING, SIMULATION AND OPTIMIZATION OF GROUND SOURCE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MODELING, SIMULATION AND OPTIMIZATION OF GROUND SOURCE HEAT PUMP SYSTEMS By MUHAMMAD HAIDER KHAN AND OPTIMIZATION OF GROUND SOURCE HEAT PUMP SYSTEMS Thesis Approved..................................................................................................................... 1 1.1 Overview of Ground Source Heat Pump Systems.............................................. 1 1

  6. Total cost model for making sourcing decisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Morita, Mark, M.B.A. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2007-01-01

    This thesis develops a total cost model based on the work done during a six month internship with ABB. In order to help ABB better focus on low cost country sourcing, a total cost model was developed for sourcing decisions. ...

  7. Regional weather modeling on parallel computers.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baillie, C.; Michalakes, J.; Skalin, R.; Mathematics and Computer Science; NOAA Forecast Systems Lab.; Norwegian Meteorological Inst.

    1997-01-01

    This special issue on 'regional weather models' complements the October 1995 special issue on 'climate and weather modeling', which focused on global models. In this introduction we review the similarities and differences between regional and global atmospheric models. Next, the structure of regional models is described and we consider how the basic algorithms applied in these models influence the parallelization strategy. Finally, we give a brief overview of the eight articles in this issue and discuss some remaining challenges in the area of adapting regional weather models to parallel computers.

  8. Regions in Energy Market Models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Short, W.

    2007-02-01

    This report explores the different options for spatial resolution of an energy market model--and the advantages and disadvantages of models with fine spatial resolution. It examines different options for capturing spatial variations, considers the tradeoffs between them, and presents a few examples from one particular model that has been run at different levels of spatial resolution.

  9. Regions in Energy Market Models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2009-01-18

    This report explores the different options for spatial resolution of an energy market model and the advantages and disadvantages of models with fine spatial resolution. It examines different options for capturing spatial variations, considers the tradeoffs between them, and presents a few examples from one particular model that has been run at different levels of spatial resolution.

  10. Regional Climate Modeling: Progress, Challenges, and Prospects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Yuqing; Leung, Lai R.; McGregor, John L.; Lee, Dong-Kyou; Wang, Wei-Chyung; Ding, Yihui; Kimura, Fujio

    2004-12-01

    Regional climate modeling with regional climate models (RCMs) has matured over the past decade and allows for meaningful utilization in a broad spectrum of applications. In this paper, latest progresses in regional climate modeling studies are reviewed, including RCM development, applications of RCMs to dynamical downscaling for climate change assessment, seasonal climate predictions and climate process studies, and the study of regional climate predictability. Challenges and potential directions of future research in this important area are discussed, with the focus on those to which less attention has been given previously, such as the importance of ensemble simulations, further development and improvement of regional climate modeling approach, modeling extreme climate events and sub-daily variation of clouds and precipitation, model evaluation and diagnostics, applications of RCMs to climate process studies and seasonal predictions, and development of regional earth system models. It is believed that with both the demonstrated credibility of RCMs’ capability in reproducing not only monthly to seasonal mean climate and interannual variability but also the extreme climate events when driven by good quality reanalysis and the continuous improvements in the skill of global general circulation models (GCMs) in simulating large-scale atmospheric circulation, regional climate modeling will remain an important dynamical downscaling tool for providing the needed information for assessing climate change impacts and seasonal climate predictions, and a powerful tool for improving our understanding of regional climate processes. An internationally coordinated effort can be developed with different focuses by different groups to advance regional climate modeling studies. It is also recognized that since the final quality of the results from nested RCMs depends in part on the realism of the large-scale forcing provided by GCMs, the reduction of errors and improvement in physics parameterizations in both GCMs and RCMs remain a priority for climate modeling community.

  11. Source sector and region contributions to BC and PM2.5 in Central Asia

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Kulkarni, S.; Sobhani, N.; Miller-Schulze, J. P.; Shafer, M. M.; Schauer, J. J.; Solomon, P. A.; Saide, P. E.; Spak, S. N.; Cheng, Y. F.; Denier van der Gon, H. A. C.; et al

    2015-02-18

    Particulate matter (PM) mass concentrations, seasonal cycles, source sector, and source region contributions in Central Asia (CA) are analyzed for the period April 2008–July 2009 using the Sulfur Transport and dEposition Model (STEM) chemical transport model and modeled meteorology from the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model. Predicted aerosol optical depth (AOD) values (annual mean value ~0.2) in CA vary seasonally, with lowest values in the winter. Surface PM2.5 concentrations (annual mean value ~10 ?g m-3) also exhibit a seasonal cycle, with peak values and largest variability in the spring/summer, and lowest values and variability in the winter (hourly valuesmore »from 2 to 90 ?g m-3). Surface concentrations of black carbon (BC) (mean value ~0.1 ?g m-3) show peak values in the winter. The simulated values are compared to surface measurements of AOD as well as PM2.5, PM10, BC, and organic carbon (OC) mass concentrations at two regional sites in Kyrgyzstan (Lidar Station Teplokluchenka (LST) and Bishkek). The predicted values of AOD and PM mass concentrations and their seasonal cycles are fairly well captured. The carbonaceous aerosols are underpredicted in winter, and analysis suggests that the winter heating emissions are underestimated in the current inventory. Dust, from sources within and outside CA, is a significant component of the PM mass and drives the seasonal cycles of PM and AOD. On an annual basis, the power and industrial sectors are found to be the most important contributors to the anthropogenic portion of PM2.5. Residential combustion and transportation are shown to be the most important sectors for BC. Biomass burning within and outside the region also contributes to elevated PM and BC concentrations. The analysis of the transport pathways and the variations in particulate matter mass and composition in CA demonstrates that this region is strategically located to characterize regional and intercontinental transport of pollutants. Aerosols at these sites are shown to reflect dust, biomass burning, and anthropogenic sources from Europe; South, East, and Central Asia; and Russia depending on the time period. Simulations for a reference 2030 emission scenario based on pollution abatement measures already committed to in current legislation show that PM2.5 and BC concentrations in the region increase, with BC growing more than PM2.5 on a relative basis. This suggests that both the health impacts and the climate warming associated with these particles may increase over the next decades unless additional control measures are taken. The importance of observations in CA to help characterize the changes that are rapidly taking place in the region are discussed.« less

  12. Source sector and region contributions to BC and PM??? in Central Asia

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Kulkarni, S.; Sobhani, N.; Miller-Schulze, J. P.; Shafer, M. M.; Schauer, J. J.; Solomon, P. A.; Saide, P. E.; Spak, S. N.; Cheng, Y. F.; Denier van der Gon, H. A. C.; et al

    2015-01-01

    Particulate matter (PM) mass concentrations, seasonal cycles, source sector, and source region contributions in Central Asia (CA) are analyzed for the period April 2008–July 2009 using the Sulfur Transport and dEposition Model (STEM) chemical transport model and modeled meteorology from the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model. Predicted aerosol optical depth (AOD) values (annual mean value ~0.2) in CA vary seasonally, with lowest values in the winter. Surface PM??? concentrations (annual mean value ~10 ?g m?ł) also exhibit a seasonal cycle, with peak values and largest variability in the spring/summer, and lowest values and variability in the winter (hourly valuesmore »from 2 to 90 ?g m?ł). Surface concentrations of black carbon (BC) (mean value ~0.1 ?g m?ł) show peak values in the winter. The simulated values are compared to surface measurements of AOD as well as PM???, PM??, BC, and organic carbon (OC) mass concentrations at two regional sites in Kyrgyzstan (Lidar Station Teplokluchenka (LST) and Bishkek). The predicted values of AOD and PM mass concentrations and their seasonal cycles are fairly well captured. The carbonaceous aerosols are underpredicted in winter, and analysis suggests that the winter heating emissions are underestimated in the current inventory. Dust, from sources within and outside CA, is a significant component of the PM mass and drives the seasonal cycles of PM and AOD. On an annual basis, the power and industrial sectors are found to be the most important contributors to the anthropogenic portion of PM???. Residential combustion and transportation are shown to be the most important sectors for BC. Biomass burning within and outside the region also contributes to elevated PM and BC concentrations. The analysis of the transport pathways and the variations in particulate matter mass and composition in CA demonstrates that this region is strategically located to characterize regional and intercontinental transport of pollutants. Aerosols at these sites are shown to reflect dust, biomass burning, and anthropogenic sources from Europe; South, East, and Central Asia; and Russia depending on the time period. Simulations for a reference 2030 emission scenario based on pollution abatement measures already committed to in current legislation show that PM??? and BC concentrations in the region increase, with BC growing more than PM??? on a relative basis. This suggests that both the health impacts and the climate warming associated with these particles may increase over the next decades unless additional control measures are taken. The importance of observations in CA to help characterize the changes that are rapidly taking place in the region are discussed.« less

  13. Regional parking fee : a potential funding source for transit?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Misiak, Jodie Mercer

    2005-01-01

    From a regional mobility perspective, Chicagoland is in serious trouble. The current Chicago Transit Authority (CTA) funding shortfall is just the most recent evidence of major flaws in the region's transit governance and ...

  14. MODELING, VERIFICATION AND OPTIMIZATION OF HYBRID GROUND SOURCE HEAT PUMP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MODELING, VERIFICATION AND OPTIMIZATION OF HYBRID GROUND SOURCE HEAT PUMP SYSTEMS IN ENERGYPLUS, VERIFICATION AND OPTIMIZATION OF HYBRID GROUND SOURCE HEAT PUMP SYSTEMS IN ENERGYPLUS Thesis Approved by: Dr.................................................................................................................... 16 MODELING OF HYBRID GROUND SOURCE HEAT PUMP SYSTEMS IN ENERGYPLUS

  15. Evaluating Regional Patterns in Nitrate Sources to Watersheds in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Elliott, Emily M.

    ) and NH3 (ammonia) from energy generation activities, transportation, industry, and agricul- tural Mountains in recent years for a variety of reasons (4­6), including increases in motor vehicle emissions which have offset reductions in NOx emissions from fossil-fuel burning industries (7) and regional

  16. Applying waste logistics modeling to regional planning

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holter, G.M.; Khawaja, A.; Shaver, S.R.; Peterson, K.L.

    1995-05-01

    Waste logistics modeling is a powerful analytical technique that can be used for effective planning of future solid waste storage, treatment, and disposal activities. Proper waste management is essential for preventing unacceptable environmental degradation from ongoing operations, and is also a critical part of any environmental remediation activity. Logistics modeling allows for analysis of alternate scenarios for future waste flowrates and routings, facility schedules, and processing or handling capacities. Such analyses provide an increased understanding of the critical needs for waste storage, treatment, transport, and disposal while there is still adequate lead time to plan accordingly. They also provide a basis for determining the sensitivity of these critical needs to the various system parameters. This paper discusses the application of waste logistics modeling concepts to regional planning. In addition to ongoing efforts to aid in planning for a large industrial complex, the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) is currently involved in implementing waste logistics modeling as part of the planning process for material recovery and recycling within a multi-city region in the western US.

  17. Seismogenic patterns in the Taiwan region: insights from source parameter inversion of BATS data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, Andrew Tien-Shun

    Seismogenic patterns in the Taiwan region: insights from source parameter inversion of BATS data Honn Kao*, Pei-Ru Jian Institute of Earth Sciences, Academia Sinica, Taipei, Taiwan, ROC Received 1 earthquakes that occurred in the Taiwan region between July 1995 and June 1998, using waveforms recorded

  18. MODELING OF VERTICAL GROUND LOOP HEAT EXCHANGERS FOR GROUND SOURCE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    exchanger model is crucial for analysis of hybrid ground source heat pump systems. Ground source heat pumps in a hybrid ground source heat pump application under different climate conditions. An actual office buildingMODELING OF VERTICAL GROUND LOOP HEAT EXCHANGERS FOR GROUND SOURCE HEAT PUMP SYSTEMS By CENK

  19. Modeling-Computer Simulations At Nw Basin & Range Region (Pritchett...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Modeling-Computer Simulations At Nw Basin & Range Region (Pritchett, 2004) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Modeling-Computer...

  20. Modeling-Computer Simulations At Nw Basin & Range Region (Biasi...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Modeling-Computer Simulations At Nw Basin & Range Region (Biasi, Et Al., 2009) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Modeling-Computer...

  1. Aalborg Universitet Current-voltage model of LED light sources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Munk-Nielsen, Stig

    Aalborg Universitet Current-voltage model of LED light sources Beczkowski, Szymon; Munk version (APA): Beczkowski, S., & Munk-Nielsen, S. (2012). Current-voltage model of LED light sources from vbn.aau.dk on: juli 06, 2015 #12;Current-voltage model of LED light sources Szymon Bczkowski, Stig

  2. Wavepacket Modeling of the Jet Noise Source Dimitri Papamoschou*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Papamoschou, Dimitri

    Wavepacket Modeling of the Jet Noise Source Dimitri Papamoschou* University of California, Irvine, CA 92697, USA This research is motivated by the need for physical models for the jet noise source be explained on the basis of a single noise source (the wavepacket), rather than the prevailing model of two

  3. Including Source-Specific Phosphorus Mobility in a Nonpoint Source Pollution Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walter, M.Todd

    pollution; Nonpoint pollution. Introduction In order to protect water quality, watershed managers tasked with implementing strategies for controlling nonpoint source NPS pollution need water quality models that canIncluding Source-Specific Phosphorus Mobility in a Nonpoint Source Pollution Model for Agricultural

  4. Diamond Lattice Model of Semicrystalline Polyethylene in the Amorphous Region

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Diamond Lattice Model of Semicrystalline Polyethylene in the Amorphous Region Zhong­Hui Duan Abstract The statistics of polyethylene chains in the amorphous region between two crystallites have been as models of the chain molecules in the amorphous region of semicrystalline polyethylene, both

  5. A Framework for Modeling Uncertainty in Regional Climate Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    climate models). The modeling framework revolves around the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MITA Framework for Modeling Uncertainty in Regional Climate Change Erwan Monier, Xiang Gao, Jeffery processes of policy development and implementation, climate change research needs to focus on improving

  6. Regional Short-Term Energy Model (RSTEM) Overview

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2009-01-01

    The Regional Short-Term Energy Model (RSTEM) utilizes estimated econometric relationships for demand, inventories and prices to forecast energy market outcomes across key sectors and selected regions throughout the United States.

  7. Model for a transformer-coupled toroidal plasma source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rauf, Shahid; Balakrishna, Ajit; Chen Zhigang; Collins, Ken [Applied Materials, Inc., 974 E. Arques Avenue, Sunnyvale, California 94085 (United States)

    2012-01-15

    A two-dimensional fluid plasma model for a transformer-coupled toroidal plasma source is described. Ferrites are used in this device to improve the electromagnetic coupling between the primary coils carrying radio frequency (rf) current and a secondary plasma loop. Appropriate components of the Maxwell equations are solved to determine the electromagnetic fields and electron power deposition in the model. The effect of gas flow on species transport is also considered. The model is applied to 1 Torr Ar/NH{sub 3} plasma in this article. Rf electric field lines form a loop in the vacuum chamber and generate a plasma ring. Due to rapid dissociation of NH{sub 3}, NH{sub x}{sup +} ions are more prevalent near the gas inlet and Ar{sup +} ions are the dominant ions farther downstream. NH{sub 3} and its by-products rapidly dissociate into small fragments as the gas flows through the plasma. With increasing source power, NH{sub 3} dissociates more readily and NH{sub x}{sup +} ions are more tightly confined near the gas inlet. Gas flow rate significantly influences the plasma characteristics. With increasing gas flow rate, NH{sub 3} dissociation occurs farther from the gas inlet in regions with higher electron density. Consequently, more NH{sub 4}{sup +} ions are produced and dissociation by-products have higher concentrations near the outlet.

  8. Modeling optical and UV polarization of AGNs III. From uniform-density to clumpy regions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marin, F; Gaskell, C M

    2015-01-01

    A growing body of evidence suggests that part of, if not all, scattering regions of active galactic nuclei (AGNs) are clumpy. Hence. in this paper, we run radiative transfer models in the optical/UV for a variety of AGN reprocessing regions with different distributions of clumpy scattering media. We use the latest version of the Monte Carlo code STOKES presented in the first two papers of this series to model AGN reprocessing regions of increasing morphological complexity. We replace previously uniform-density media with up to thousands of constant-density clumps. We couple a continuum source to fragmented equatorial scattering regions, polar outflows, and toroidal, obscuring dust regions and investigate a wide range of geometries. We also consider different levels of fragmentation in each scattering region to evaluate importance of fragmentation for the net polarization of the AGN. We find that, in comparison with uniform-density models, equatorial distributions of gas and dust clouds result in grayer spectr...

  9. MODELING OF VERTICAL GROUND LOOP HEAT EXCHANGERS FOR GROUND SOURCE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MODELING OF VERTICAL GROUND LOOP HEAT EXCHANGERS FOR GROUND SOURCE HEAT PUMP SYSTEMS By CENK SOURCE HEAT PUMP SYSTEMS Thesis Approved: ___________________________________________ Thesis Adviser pump systems. For detailed analysis and accurate simulation of the transient heat transfer in vertical

  10. Coupling of a regional atmospheric model (RegCM3) and a regional oceanic model (FVCOM) over the maritime continent

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wei, Jun

    Climatological high resolution coupled climate model simulations for the maritime continent have been carried out using the regional climate model (RegCM) version 3 and the finite volume coastal ocean model (FVCOM) ...

  11. Characterizing coal and mineral mines as a regional source of stress to stream fish assemblages

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Characterizing coal and mineral mines as a regional source of stress to stream fish assemblages, impervious surface or urban land use), mining had a more pronounced and consistent impact on fish assemblages biota to coal and mineral mines located in stream catchments have historically been conducted

  12. In Situ Observation of Type II Solar Radio Burst Source Region: a New Generation Mechanism

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    mechanisms: non-thermal -- shock waves -- Sun: radio radiation 1. Introduction Electromagnetic waves can by Cluster spacecraft (Escoubet et al. 1997). We observe intense radio waves above the local plasma frequencyIn Situ Observation of Type II Solar Radio Burst Source Region: a New Generation Mechanism M. V

  13. State of the Art of Air-source Heat Pump for Cold Regions 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tian, C.; Liang, N.

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, research on air source heat pump systems for cold regions in recent years is first summarized and compared. These systems can be divided into three kinds: a single-stage compression heat pump, liquid/vapor injection heat pump, and a...

  14. Survey of Source Modeling Techniques for ATM Networks Sponsor: Sprint

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kansas, University of

    . In section 2, we introduce the earliest renewal models that do not account for the correlation of the traffic-- -- Survey of Source Modeling Techniques for ATM Networks Sponsor: Sprint Yong-Qing Lu David W, Petr, Frost Page 1 #12;-- -- Survey of Source Modeling for ATM Networks September 1993 Abstract

  15. Regional Modeling of Dust Mass Balance and Radiative Forcing over East Asia using WRF-Chem

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Siyu; Zhao, Chun; Qian, Yun; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Huang, J.; Huang, Zhongwei; Bi, Jianrong; Zhang, Wu; Shi, Jinsen; Yang, Lei; Li, Deshuai; Li, Jinxin

    2014-12-01

    The Weather Research and Forecasting model with Chemistry (WRF-Chem) is used to investigate the seasonal and annual variations of mineral dust over East Asia during 2007-2011, with a focus on the dust mass balance and radiative forcing. A variety of measurements from in-stu and satellite observations have been used to evaluate simulation results. Generally, WRF-Chem reproduces not only the column variability but also the vertical profile and size distribution of mineral dust over and near the dust source regions of East Asia. We investigate the dust lifecycle and the factors that control the seasonal and spatial variations of dust mass balance and radiative forcing over the seven sub-regions of East Asia, i.e. source regions, the Tibetan Plateau, Northern China, Southern China, the ocean outflow region, and Korea-Japan regions. Results show that, over the source regions, transport and dry deposition are the two dominant sinks. Transport contributes to ~30% of the dust sink over the source regions. Dust results in a surface cooling of up to -14 and -10 W m-2, atmospheric warming of up to 20 and 15 W m-2, and TOA cooling of -5 and -8 W m-2 over the two major dust source regions of East Asia, respectively. Over the Tibetan Plateau, transport is the dominant source with a peak in summer. Over identified outflow regions, maximum dust mass loading in spring is contributed by the transport. Dry and wet depositions are the comparably dominant sinks, but wet deposition is larger than dry deposition over the Korea-Japan region, particularly in spring (70% versus 30%). The WRF-Chem simulations can generally capture the measured features of dust aerosols and its radaitve properties and dust mass balance over East Asia, which provides confidence for use in further investigation of dust impact on climate over East Asia.

  16. A Scalable Approach to Learn Semantic Models of Structured Sources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ambite, José Luis

    of information available on the Web is available in sources such as relational databases, spreadsheets, XML, JSON concepts and relationships within a domain, and source descriptions are formal specifications of semanticA Scalable Approach to Learn Semantic Models of Structured Sources Mohsen Taheriyan, Craig A

  17. Impact of external industrial sources on the regional and local SO? and O? levels of the Mexico megacity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Almanza, V. H.; Molina, Luisa T.; Li, Guohui; Fast, Jerome D.; Sosa, G.

    2014-08-22

    The air quality of megacities can be influenced by external emissions sources on both global and regional scale, and at the same time their outflow emissions can exert an important impact to the surrounding environment. The present study evaluates an SO? peak observed on 24 March 2006 at the suburban supersite T1 and ambient air quality monitoring stations located in the north region of the Mexico City Metropolitan Area (MCMA) during MILAGRO campaign. We found that this peak could be related to an important episodic emission event from Tizayuca region, northeast of the MCMA. Back trajectories analyses suggest that the emission event started in the early morning at 10 04:00 LST and lasted for about 9 h. The estimated emission rate is noticeably high, about 2 kgs-ą. This finding suggests the possibility of "overlooked"emission sources in this region that could influence the air quality of the MCMA. This further motivated us to study the cement plants, including those in the State of Hidalgo and in the State of Mexico, and we found that they can contribute in the NE region of the basin (about 15 41.7%), at the suburban supersite T1 (41.23%) and at some monitoring stations their contribution can be even higher than from the Tula Industrial Complex. The contribution of Tula Industrial Complex to regional ozone levels is estimated. The model suggests low contribution to the MCMA (1 ppb to 4 ppb) and slightly higher at the suburban T1 (6 ppb) and rural T2 (5 ppb) supersites. However, the contribution could be 20 as high as 10 ppb in the upper northwest region of the basin and in the southwest and south-southeast regions of State of Hidalgo. In addition, a first estimate of the potential contribution from flaring activities to regional ozone levels is presented. Emission rates are estimated with a CFD combustion model. Results suggest that up to 30% of the total regional ozone from TIC could be related to flaring activities. 25 Finally, the influence in SO? levels from technological changes in the existing refinery is briefly discussed. These changes are due to the upcoming construction of a new refinery in Tula. The combination of emission reductions in the power plant, the refinery and in local sources in the MCMA could result in higher reductions on the average SO? 26580 Discussion Paper | Discussion Paper | Discussion Paper | Discussion Paper | concentration. Reductions in external sources tend to affect more the northern part of the basin (-16.35% to -45.58%), whilst reductions of urban sources in the megacity tend to diminish SO? levels substantially in the central, southwest, and southeast regions (-30.71% to -49.75%).

  18. Dispersion modeling of ground-level area sources of particulate 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fritz, Bradley Keith

    1998-01-01

    The use of dispersion modeling by State Air Pollution hics. Regulatory Agencies (SAPRAS) is increasing. Dispersion modeling provides a quick and efficient means of determining the downwind impact of pollutant release from a source. The SAPRAS...

  19. SolarStat: Modeling Photovoltaic Sources through Stochastic Markov Processes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rossi, Michele

    SolarStat: Modeling Photovoltaic Sources through Stochastic Markov Processes Marco Miozzo target photovoltaic panels with small form factors, as those exploited by embedded communication devices the GPL license at [1]. Index Terms--Renewable Photovoltaic Sources, Stochastic Markov Modeling, Empirical

  20. F region above kauai: Measurement, model, modification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, C.Y.; Sjolander, G.W.; Oran, E.S.; Young, T.R.; Bernhardt, P.A.; Da Rosa, A.V.

    1980-08-01

    A detailed description and analysis is presented of the Lagopedo II results. The rocket was launched on September 11, 1977. Prior to an explosive chemical release a rocket-borne ion mass spectrometer and dual-frequency beacon measured the ion composition and electron content of the undisturbed F region above Kauai, Hawaii. These results are compared to a detailed calculation of ionospheric ion denities. Considerable H/sub 2/O outgassing produced measurable 18/sup +/(H/sub 2/O/sup +/) and 19/sup +/(H/sub 3/O/sup +/) currents which together with O/sup +/ current were used to determine the H/sup 3/O/sup +//H/sub 2/O/sup +/ dissociative recombination rate ratio. The explosive event at 283 km swept clean a l-km-radius region. The boundary of the ionic void was characterized by a steep gradient in the ion density. Results for the first 60 s after the event are presented which show changes in ambient ion species 14/sup +/, 16/sup +/, 30/sup +/, new reactant species 15/sup +/, 17/sup +/, 18/sup +/, 19/sup +/, 27/sup +/, and 46/sup +/, and evidence of ionic depletion by sweeping.

  1. SPATIAL MODELS FOR LOCALIZATION OF IMAGE TAMPERING USING DISTRIBUTED SOURCE CODES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Girod, Bernd

    SPATIAL MODELS FOR LOCALIZATION OF IMAGE TAMPERING USING DISTRIBUTED SOURCE CODES Yao-Chung Lin to distinguish the legitimate diversity of encoded images from tampering but also lo- calize the tampered regions extend the localization decoder with 1D and 2D spatial mod- els to exploit the contiguity of the tampered

  2. Nuisance Source Population Modeling for Radiation Detection System Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sokkappa, P; Lange, D; Nelson, K; Wheeler, R

    2009-10-05

    A major challenge facing the prospective deployment of radiation detection systems for homeland security applications is the discrimination of radiological or nuclear 'threat sources' from radioactive, but benign, 'nuisance sources'. Common examples of such nuisance sources include naturally occurring radioactive material (NORM), medical patients who have received radioactive drugs for either diagnostics or treatment, and industrial sources. A sensitive detector that cannot distinguish between 'threat' and 'benign' classes will generate false positives which, if sufficiently frequent, will preclude it from being operationally deployed. In this report, we describe a first-principles physics-based modeling approach that is used to approximate the physical properties and corresponding gamma ray spectral signatures of real nuisance sources. Specific models are proposed for the three nuisance source classes - NORM, medical and industrial. The models can be validated against measured data - that is, energy spectra generated with the model can be compared to actual nuisance source data. We show by example how this is done for NORM and medical sources, using data sets obtained from spectroscopic detector deployments for cargo container screening and urban area traffic screening, respectively. In addition to capturing the range of radioactive signatures of individual nuisance sources, a nuisance source population model must generate sources with a frequency of occurrence consistent with that found in actual movement of goods and people. Measured radiation detection data can indicate these frequencies, but, at present, such data are available only for a very limited set of locations and time periods. In this report, we make more general estimates of frequencies for NORM and medical sources using a range of data sources such as shipping manifests and medical treatment statistics. We also identify potential data sources for industrial source frequencies, but leave the task of estimating these frequencies for future work. Modeling of nuisance source populations is only useful if it helps in understanding detector system performance in real operational environments. Examples of previous studies in which nuisance source models played a key role are briefly discussed. These include screening of in-bound urban traffic and monitoring of shipping containers in transit to U.S. ports.

  3. Regional Dynamics Model (REDYN) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onRAPID/Geothermal/Exploration/Colorado <RAPID/Geothermal/WaterEnergyRedfield1989) Jump to:|OpenRegenesisDynamics Model

  4. High order hybrid discontinuous Galerkin regional ocean modelling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ueckermann, Mattheus Percy

    2014-01-01

    Accurate modeling of physical and biogeochemical dynamics in coastal ocean regions is required for multiple scientific and societal applications, covering a wide range of time and space scales. However, in light of the ...

  5. Source sector and region contributions to BC and PM2.5 in Central Asia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kulkarni, S.; Sobhani, N.; Miller-Schulze, J. P.; Shafer, M. M.; Schauer, J. J.; Solomon, P. A.; Saide, P. E.; Spak, S. N.; Cheng, Y. F.; Denier van der Gon, H. A. C.; Lu, Z.; Streets, D. G.; Janssens-Maenhout, G.; Wiedinmyer, C.; Lantz, J.; Artamonova, M.; Chen, B.; Imashev, S.; Sverdlik, L.; Deminter, J. T.; Adhikary, B.; D'Allura, A.; Wei, C.; Carmichael, G. R.

    2015-02-18

    Particulate matter (PM) mass concentrations, seasonal cycles, source sector, and source region contributions in Central Asia (CA) are analyzed for the period April 2008–July 2009 using the Sulfur Transport and dEposition Model (STEM) chemical transport model and modeled meteorology from the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model. Predicted aerosol optical depth (AOD) values (annual mean value ~0.2) in CA vary seasonally, with lowest values in the winter. Surface PM2.5 concentrations (annual mean value ~10 ?g m-3) also exhibit a seasonal cycle, with peak values and largest variability in the spring/summer, and lowest values and variability in the winter (hourly values from 2 to 90 ?g m-3). Surface concentrations of black carbon (BC) (mean value ~0.1 ?g m-3) show peak values in the winter. The simulated values are compared to surface measurements of AOD as well as PM2.5, PM10, BC, and organic carbon (OC) mass concentrations at two regional sites in Kyrgyzstan (Lidar Station Teplokluchenka (LST) and Bishkek). The predicted values of AOD and PM mass concentrations and their seasonal cycles are fairly well captured. The carbonaceous aerosols are underpredicted in winter, and analysis suggests that the winter heating emissions are underestimated in the current inventory. Dust, from sources within and outside CA, is a significant component of the PM mass and drives the seasonal cycles of PM and AOD. On an annual basis, the power and industrial sectors are found to be the most important contributors to the anthropogenic portion of PM2.5. Residential combustion and transportation are shown to be the most important sectors for BC. Biomass burning within and outside the region also contributes to elevated PM and BC concentrations. The analysis of the transport pathways and the variations in particulate matter mass and composition in CA demonstrates that this region is strategically located to characterize regional and intercontinental transport of pollutants. Aerosols at these sites are shown to reflect dust, biomass burning, and anthropogenic sources from Europe; South, East, and Central Asia; and Russia depending on the time period. Simulations for a reference 2030 emission scenario based on pollution abatement measures already committed to in current legislation show that PM2.5 and BC concentrations in the region increase, with BC growing more than PM2.5 on a relative basis. This suggests that both the health impacts and the climate warming associated with these particles may increase over the next decades unless additional control measures are taken. The importance of observations in CA to help characterize the changes that are rapidly taking place in the region are discussed.

  6. Major models and data sources for residential and commercial sector energy conservation analysis. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-09-01

    Major models and data sources are reviewed that can be used for energy-conservation analysis in the residential and commercial sectors to provide an introduction to the information that can or is available to DOE in order to further its efforts in analyzing and quantifying their policy and program requirements. Models and data sources examined in the residential sector are: ORNL Residential Energy Model; BECOM; NEPOOL; MATH/CHRDS; NIECS; Energy Consumption Data Base: Household Sector; Patterns of Energy Use by Electrical Appliances Data Base; Annual Housing Survey; 1970 Census of Housing; AIA Research Corporation Data Base; RECS; Solar Market Development Model; and ORNL Buildings Energy Use Data Book. Models and data sources examined in the commercial sector are: ORNL Commercial Sector Model of Energy Demand; BECOM; NEPOOL; Energy Consumption Data Base: Commercial Sector; F.W. Dodge Data Base; NFIB Energy Report for Small Businesses; ADL Commercial Sector Energy Use Data Base; AIA Research Corporation Data Base; Nonresidential Buildings Surveys of Energy Consumption; General Electric Co: Commercial Sector Data Base; The BOMA Commercial Sector Data Base; The Tishman-Syska and Hennessy Data Base; The NEMA Commercial Sector Data Base; ORNL Buildings Energy Use Data Book; and Solar Market Development Model. Purpose; basis for model structure; policy variables and parameters; level of regional, sectoral, and fuels detail; outputs; input requirements; sources of data; computer accessibility and requirements; and a bibliography are provided for each model and data source.

  7. Modeling Dynamic Landscapes in Open Source GIS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mitasova, Helena

    2013-11-20

    is free online • message board discussion, help • Google sites: post HW, get feedback • register to get credit Solar radiation modeling: monthly totals Applications in urban areas: solar panels, building design, thermal conditions,… Helena Mitasova, NCSU... topics: • Solar energy potential • Coastal hazards • Watershed analysis • Trail and greenway design • Lidar data processing Most students use ArcGIS but number of students who use GRASS for at least part of their project is increasing every semester...

  8. A Spatial Analysis of Multivariate Output from Regional Climate Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sain, Steve

    , Columbus, OH 43210, ncressie@stat.osu.edu. 1 #12;1 Introduction Many processes in the Earth system cannot, etc. Climate models attempt to represent this system, as well as to incorporate anthropogenic forcingsA Spatial Analysis of Multivariate Output from Regional Climate Models Stephan R. Sain,1 Reinhard

  9. PHARAO Laser Source Flight Model: Design and Performances

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lévčque, Thomas; Esnault, François-Xavier; Delaroche, Christophe; Massonnet, Didier; Grosjean, Olivier; Buffe, Fabrice; Torresi, Patrizia; Bomer, Thierry; Pichon, Alexandre; Béraud, Pascal; Lelay, Jean-Pierre; Thomin, Stéphane; Laurent, Philippe

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we describe the design and the main performances of the PHARAO laser source flight model. PHARAO is a laser cooled cesium clock specially designed for operation in space and the laser source is one of the main sub-systems. The flight model presented in this work is the first remote-controlled laser system designed for spaceborne cold atom manipulation. The main challenges arise from mechanical compatibility with space constraints, which impose a high level of compactness, a low electric power consumption, a wide range of operating temperature and a vacuum environment. We describe the main functions of the laser source and give an overview of the main technologies developed for this instrument. We present some results of the qualification process. The characteristics of the laser source flight model, and their impact on the clock performances, have been verified in operational conditions.

  10. A new neutrino source for the study of the solar neutrino physics in the vacuum-matter transition region

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shin, Jae Won

    2016-01-01

    Production of a neutrino source through proton induced reaction is studied by using the particle transport code, GEANT4. Unstable isotope such as $^{27}$Si can be produced when $^{27}$Al target is bombarded by 15 MeV energetic proton beams. Through the beta decay process of the unstable isotope, a new electron-neutrino source in the 1.0 $\\sim$ 5.0 MeV energy range is obtained. Proton induced reactions are simulated with JENDL High Energy File 2007 (JENDL/HE-2007) data and other nuclear data. For radioactive decay processes, we use "G4RadioactiveDecay" model based on the Evaluated Nuclear Structure Data File (ENSDF). We suggest target systems required for future's solar neutrino experiments, in particular, for the vacuum-matter transition region. As for the detection system of the new neutrino source, we evaluate reaction rates for available radiochemical detectors and LENA type scintillator detector. Possibility of detecting sterile neutrinos is also discussed.

  11. Short-Term Energy Outlook Model Documentation: Regional Residential Heating Oil Price Model

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2009-01-01

    The regional residential heating oil price module of the Short-Term Energy Outlook (STEO) model is designed to provide residential retail price forecasts for the 4 census regions: Northeast, South, Midwest, and West.

  12. Short-Term Energy Outlook Model Documentation: Regional Residential Propane Price Model

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2009-01-01

    The regional residential propane price module of the Short-Term Energy Outlook (STEO) model is designed to provide residential retail price forecasts for the 4 Census regions: Northeast, South, Midwest, and West.

  13. Models of radiofrequency coupling for negative ion sources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cavenago, M.; Petrenko, S. [INFN-LNL, viale dell'Universita n.2, 35020 Legnaro (Italy)

    2012-02-15

    Radiofrequency heating for ICP (inductively coupled plasma) ion sources depends on the source operating pressure, the presence or absence of a Faraday shield, the driver coil geometry, the frequency used, and the magnetic field configuration: in negative ion source a magnetic filter seems necessary for H{sup -} survival. The result of single particle simulations showing the possibility of electron acceleration in the preglow regime and for reasonable driver chamber radius (15 cm) is reported, also as a function of the static external magnetic field. An effective plasma conductivity, depending not only from electron density, temperature, and rf field but also on static magnetic field is here presented and compared to previous models. Use of this conductivity and of multiphysics tools for a plasma transport and heating model is shown and discussed for a small source.

  14. Numerical model of Electron Cyclotron Resonance Ion Source

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mironov, V; Bondarchenko, A; Efremov, A; Loginov, V

    2015-01-01

    Important features of Electron Cyclotron Resonance Ion Source (ECRIS) operation are accurately reproduced with a numerical code. The code uses the particle-in-cell technique to model a dynamics of ions in ECRIS plasma. It is shown that gas dynamical ion confinement mechanism is sufficient to provide the ion production rates in ECRIS close to the experimentally observed values. Extracted ion currents are calculated and compared to the experiment for few sources. Changes in the extracted ion currents are obtained with varying the gas flow into the source chamber and the microwave power. Empirical scaling laws for ECRIS design are studied and the underlying physical effects are discussed.

  15. IMPULSIVE ACCELERATION OF CORONAL MASS EJECTIONS. I. STATISTICS AND CORONAL MASS EJECTION SOURCE REGION CHARACTERISTICS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bein, B. M.; Berkebile-Stoiser, S.; Veronig, A. M.; Temmer, M.; Muhr, N.; Kienreich, I.; Utz, D.

    2011-09-10

    We use high time cadence images acquired by the STEREO EUVI and COR instruments to study the evolution of coronal mass ejections (CMEs) from their initiation through impulsive acceleration to the propagation phase. For a set of 95 CMEs we derived detailed height, velocity, and acceleration profiles and statistically analyzed characteristic CME parameters: peak acceleration, peak velocity, acceleration duration, initiation height, height at peak velocity, height at peak acceleration, and size of the CME source region. The CME peak accelerations we derived range from 20 to 6800 m s{sup -2} and are inversely correlated with the acceleration duration and the height at peak acceleration. Seventy-four percent of the events reach their peak acceleration at heights below 0.5 R{sub sun}. CMEs that originate from compact sources low in the corona are more impulsive and reach higher peak accelerations at smaller heights. These findings can be explained by the Lorentz force, which drives the CME accelerations and decreases with height and CME size.

  16. Adjoint modeling for atmospheric pollution process sensitivity at regional scale

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Menut, Laurent

    , a strong pollution event was documented over Paris as part of the Etude et Simulation de la Qualite´ de l'airAdjoint modeling for atmospheric pollution process sensitivity at regional scale Laurent Menut 1998 the pollution event changes from a well-marked ozone plume issued from Paris to a more general

  17. Reference wind farm selection for regional wind power prediction models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1 Reference wind farm selection for regional wind power prediction models Nils Siebert George.siebert@ensmp.fr, georges.kariniotakis@ensmp.fr Abstract Short-term wind power forecasting is recognized today as a major requirement for a secure and economic integration of wind generation in power systems. This paper deals

  18. Spatial Models for Groundwater Behavioral Analysis in Regions of Maharashtra

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sohoni, Milind

    Spatial Models for Groundwater Behavioral Analysis in Regions of Maharashtra M.Tech Dissertation In this project we have performed spatial analysis of groundwater data in Thane and Latur districts of Maharashtra Groundwater Survey and Development Agency, Maharashtra), shape files for watershed boundaries and drainage

  19. A regional modeling study of the entraining Mediterranean outflow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ozgökmen, Tamay M.

    A regional modeling study of the entraining Mediterranean outflow X. Xu,1,2 E. P. Chassignet,3 J. F­dependent entrainment parameterization of Xu et al. (2006). Given realistic topography and sufficient resolution of the outflow plume, and most importantly, the localized, strong entrainment that has been observed to occur

  20. Estimates of the absorbed fraction of energy for various electron source and target regions in the upper respiratory tract 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Calvo, Sebastian

    1994-01-01

    . ACKNOWLEDGMENTS The author would like to thank committee members Drs. Wesley Bolch and John Poston of thc Nuclear Engineering Department, Dr. Keith Eckerman of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory and the Nuclear Engineering Department, and Dr. Michael Walker... INFORMATION MATERIALS AND METHODS . The Model Used in This Study EGS4 Code RESULTS . Source in Tracheal Airway Source on Tracheal Airway Surface Source on Carinal Ridge Surface Source in Airways of Main Bronchi and Bifurcation Zone DISCUSSION...

  1. KAPPA DISTRIBUTION MODEL FOR HARD X-RAY CORONAL SOURCES OF SOLAR FLARES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oka, M.; Ishikawa, S.; Saint-Hilaire, P.; Krucker, S.; Lin, R. P. [Space Sciences Laboratory, University of California Berkeley (United States)] [Space Sciences Laboratory, University of California Berkeley (United States)

    2013-02-10

    Solar flares produce hard X-ray emission, the photon spectrum of which is often represented by a combination of thermal and power-law distributions. However, the estimates of the number and total energy of non-thermal electrons are sensitive to the determination of the power-law cutoff energy. Here, we revisit an 'above-the-loop' coronal source observed by RHESSI on 2007 December 31 and show that a kappa distribution model can also be used to fit its spectrum. Because the kappa distribution has a Maxwellian-like core in addition to a high-energy power-law tail, the emission measure and temperature of the instantaneous electrons can be derived without assuming the cutoff energy. Moreover, the non-thermal fractions of electron number/energy densities can be uniquely estimated because they are functions of only the power-law index. With the kappa distribution model, we estimated that the total electron density of the coronal source region was {approx}2.4 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 10} cm{sup -3}. We also estimated without assuming the source volume that a moderate fraction ({approx}20%) of electrons in the source region was non-thermal and carried {approx}52% of the total electron energy. The temperature was 28 MK, and the power-law index {delta} of the electron density distribution was -4.3. These results are compared to the conventional power-law models with and without a thermal core component.

  2. Realistic expanding source model for relativistic heavy-ion collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chapman, S; Chapman, Scott; Nix, J Rayford

    1996-01-01

    We introduce a new realistic expanding source model for invariant one-particle multiplicity distributions and two-particle correlations in nearly central relativistic heavy-ion collisions that contains nine adjustable parameters, which are necessary and sufficient to properly characterize the gross properties of the source during its freezeout from a hydrodynamical fluid into a collection of noninteracting, free-streaming hadrons. These nine physically relevant parameters fall into three categories of three parameters each, with the first category corresponding to the source's longitudinal motion, the second category corresponding to its transverse motion, and the third category corresponding to its intrinsic properties. As an initial application, we apply our model to the analysis of invariant pi^+, pi^-, K^+, and K^- one-particle multiplicity distributions and pi^+ and K^+ two-particle correlations for nearly central Si + Au collisions at p_lab/A = 14.6 GeV/c. In a minimization with 1416 data points, the re...

  3. Regional-Scale Climate Change: Observations and Model Simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Raymond S. Bradley; Henry F. Diaz

    2010-12-14

    This collaborative proposal addressed key issues in understanding the Earthâ??s climate system, as highlighted by the U.S. Climate Science Program. The research focused on documenting past climatic changes and on assessing future climatic changes based on suites of global and regional climate models. Geographically, our emphasis was on the mountainous regions of the world, with a particular focus on the Neotropics of Central America and the Hawaiian Islands. Mountain regions are zones where large variations in ecosystems occur due to the strong climate zonation forced by the topography. These areas are particularly susceptible to changes in critical ecological thresholds, and we conducted studies of changes in phonological indicators based on various climatic thresholds.

  4. Helium Reionization Simulations. I. Modeling Quasars as Radiation Sources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    La Plante, Paul

    2015-01-01

    We introduce a new project to understand helium reionization using fully coupled $N$-body, hydrodynamics, and radiative transfer simulations. This project aims to capture correctly the thermal history of the intergalactic medium (IGM) as a result of reionization and make predictions about the Lyman-$\\alpha$ forest and baryon temperature-density relation. The dominant sources of radiation for this transition are quasars, so modeling the source population accurately is very important for making reliable predictions. In this first paper, we present a new method for populating dark matter halos with quasars. Our set of quasar models include two different light curves, a lightbulb (simple on/off) and symmetric exponential model, and luminosity-dependent quasar lifetimes. Our method self-consistently reproduces an input quasar luminosity function (QLF) given a halo catalog from an $N$-body simulation, and propagates quasars through the merger history of halo hosts. After calibrating quasar clustering using measurem...

  5. Using an Explicit Emission Tagging Method in Global Modeling of Source-Receptor Relationships for Black Carbon in the Arctic: Variations, Sources and Transport Pathways

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Hailong; Rasch, Philip J.; Easter, Richard C.; Singh, Balwinder; Zhang, Rudong; Ma, Po-Lun; Qian, Yun; Ghan, Steven J.; Beagley, Nathaniel

    2014-11-27

    We introduce an explicit emission tagging technique in the Community Atmosphere Model to quantify source-region-resolved characteristics of black carbon (BC), focusing on the Arctic. Explicit tagging of BC source regions without perturbing the emissions makes it straightforward to establish source-receptor relationships and transport pathways, providing a physically consistent and computationally efficient approach to produce a detailed characterization of the destiny of regional BC emissions and the potential for mitigation actions. Our analysis shows that the contributions of major source regions to the global BC burden are not proportional to the respective emissions due to strong region-dependent removal rates and lifetimes, while the contributions to BC direct radiative forcing show a near-linear dependence on their respective contributions to the burden. Distant sources contribute to BC in remote regions mostly in the mid- and upper troposphere, having much less impact on lower-level concentrations (and deposition) than on burden. Arctic BC concentrations, deposition and source contributions all have strong seasonal variations. Eastern Asia contributes the most to the wintertime Arctic burden. Northern Europe emissions are more important to both surface concentration and deposition in winter than in summer. The largest contribution to Arctic BC in the summer is from Northern Asia. Although local emissions contribute less than 10% to the annual mean BC burden and deposition within the Arctic, the per-emission efficiency is much higher than for major non-Arctic sources. The interannual variability (1996-2005) due to meteorology is small in annual mean BC burden and radiative forcing but is significant in yearly seasonal means over the Arctic. When a slow aging treatment of BC is introduced, the increase of BC lifetime and burden is source-dependent. Global BC forcing-per-burden efficiency also increases primarily due to changes in BC vertical distributions. The relative contribution from major non-Arctic sources to the Arctic BC burden increases only slightly, although the contribution of Arctic local sources is reduced by a factor of 2 due to the slow aging treatment.

  6. REGIONAL SEISMIC AMPLITUDE MODELING AND TOMOGRAPHY FOR EARTHQUAKE-EXPLOSION DISCRIMINATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walter, W R; Pasyanos, M E; Matzel, E; Gok, R; Sweeney, J; Ford, S R; Rodgers, A J

    2008-07-08

    We continue exploring methodologies to improve earthquake-explosion discrimination using regional amplitude ratios such as P/S in a variety of frequency bands. Empirically we demonstrate that such ratios separate explosions from earthquakes using closely located pairs of earthquakes and explosions recorded on common, publicly available stations at test sites around the world (e.g. Nevada, Novaya Zemlya, Semipalatinsk, Lop Nor, India, Pakistan, and North Korea). We are also examining if there is any relationship between the observed P/S and the point source variability revealed by longer period full waveform modeling (e. g. Ford et al 2008). For example, regional waveform modeling shows strong tectonic release from the May 1998 India test, in contrast with very little tectonic release in the October 2006 North Korea test, but the P/S discrimination behavior appears similar in both events using the limited regional data available. While regional amplitude ratios such as P/S can separate events in close proximity, it is also empirically well known that path effects can greatly distort observed amplitudes and make earthquakes appear very explosion-like. Previously we have shown that the MDAC (Magnitude Distance Amplitude Correction, Walter and Taylor, 2001) technique can account for simple 1-D attenuation and geometrical spreading corrections, as well as magnitude and site effects. However in some regions 1-D path corrections are a poor approximation and we need to develop 2-D path corrections. Here we demonstrate a new 2-D attenuation tomography technique using the MDAC earthquake source model applied to a set of events and stations in both the Middle East and the Yellow Sea Korean Peninsula regions. We believe this new 2-D MDAC tomography has the potential to greatly improve earthquake-explosion discrimination, particularly in tectonically complex regions such as the Middle East. Monitoring the world for potential nuclear explosions requires characterizing seismic events and discriminating between natural and man-made seismic events, such as earthquakes and mining activities, and nuclear weapons testing. We continue developing, testing, and refining size-, distance-, and location-based regional seismic amplitude corrections to facilitate the comparison of all events that are recorded at a particular seismic station. These corrections, calibrated for each station, reduce amplitude measurement scatter and improve discrimination performance. We test the methods on well-known (ground truth) datasets in the U.S. and then apply them to the uncalibrated stations in Eurasia, Africa, and other regions of interest to improve underground nuclear test monitoring capability.

  7. Developing a Regional Integrated Assessment Model (RIAM) Framework PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Benjamin L. Preston

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    responses of human systems. This project seeks to apply a regional IAM framework to the Gulf Coast region issues, and energy supply issues are all occurring simultaneous- ly, but for which integrated modeling regionalized to develop a new regional IAM capability (Regional Global Change Assessment Model *RCGAM+). RCGAM

  8. California Wintertime Precipitation in Regional and Global Climate Models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Caldwell, P M

    2009-04-27

    In this paper, wintertime precipitation from a variety of observational datasets, regional climate models (RCMs), and general circulation models (GCMs) is averaged over the state of California (CA) and compared. Several averaging methodologies are considered and all are found to give similar values when model grid spacing is less than 3{sup o}. This suggests that CA is a reasonable size for regional intercomparisons using modern GCMs. Results show that reanalysis-forced RCMs tend to significantly overpredict CA precipitation. This appears to be due mainly to overprediction of extreme events; RCM precipitation frequency is generally underpredicted. Overprediction is also reflected in wintertime precipitation variability, which tends to be too high for RCMs on both daily and interannual scales. Wintertime precipitation in most (but not all) GCMs is underestimated. This is in contrast to previous studies based on global blended gauge/satellite observations which are shown here to underestimate precipitation relative to higher-resolution gauge-only datasets. Several GCMs provide reasonable daily precipitation distributions, a trait which doesn't seem tied to model resolution. GCM daily and interannual variability is generally underpredicted.

  9. Continuous VRML output fromContinuous VRML output from regional circulation models: aregional circulation models: a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Continuous VRML output fromContinuous VRML output from regional circulation models: aregional and volume to viewview ·· Generate Virtual Reality Modeling LanguageGenerate Virtual Reality ModelingDesktop or laptop PC with web browser ­­ High speed/large RAM not essentialHigh speed/large RAM not essential

  10. A review on regional convection-permitting climate modeling: Demonstrations, prospects, and challenges

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Prein, Andreas; Langhans, Wolfgang; Fosser, Giorgia; Ferrone, Andrew; Ban, Nikolina; Goergen, Klaus; Keller, Michael; Tolle, Merja; Gutjahr, Oliver; Feser, Frauke; et al

    2015-05-27

    Regional climate modeling using convection permitting models (CPMs) emerges as a promising framework to provide more reliable climate information on regional to local scales compared to traditionally used large-scale models (LSMs). CPMs do not use convection parameterization schemes, known as a major source of errors and uncertainties, and have more accurate surface and orography elds. The drawback of CPMs is their high demand on computational resources. For this reason, the CPM climate simulations only appeared a decade ago. In this study we aim to provide a common basis for CPM climate simulations by giving a holistic review of the topic.more »The most important components in CPM, such as physical parameterizations and dynamical formulations are discussed, and an outlook on required future developments and computer architectures that would support the application of CPMs is given. Most importantly, this review presents the consolidated outcome of studies that addressed the added value of CPM climate simulations compared to LSMs. Most improvements are found for processes related to deep convection (e.g., precipitation during summer), for mountainous regions, and for the soil-vegetation-atmosphere interactions. The climate change signals of CPM simulations reveal increases in short and extreme rainfall events and an increased ratio of liquid precipitation at the surface (a decrease of hail) potentially leading to more frequent ash oods. Concluding, CPMs are a very promising tool for future climate research. However, coordinated modeling programs are crucially needed to assess their full potential and support their development.« less

  11. Static and Impulsive Models of Solar Active Regions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Patsourakos; J. A. Klimchuk

    2008-08-20

    The physical modeling of active regions (ARs) and of the global coronal is receiving increasing interest lately. Recent attempts to model ARs using static equilibrium models were quite successful in reproducing AR images of hot soft X-ray (SXR) loops. They however failed to predict the bright EUV warm loops permeating ARs: the synthetic images were dominated by intense footpoint emission. We demonstrate that this failure is due to the very weak dependence of loop temperature on loop length which cannot simultaneously account for both hot and warm loops in the same AR. We then consider time-dependent AR models based on nanoflare heating. We demonstrate that such models can simultaneously reproduce EUV and SXR loops in ARs. Moreover, they predict radial intensity variations consistent with the localized core and extended emissions in SXR and EUV AR observations respectively. We finally show how the AR morphology can be used as a gauge of the properties (duration, energy, spatial dependence, repetition time) of the impulsive heating.

  12. Nonpoint Source Pollution Assessment: Framework, Vulnerability Analysis, and Modeling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pasternack, Gregory B.

    Regulating Water Pollution Sources Surface Water Quality Ground Water Quality Point Sources of Pollution Regulating Water Pollution Sources Surface Water Quality Ground Water Quality Point Sources of Pollution Quality Ground Water Quality Point Sources of Pollution Nonpoint Sources of Pollution 1970s now Clean

  13. A quantitative approach to combine sources in stable isotope mixing models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    - tance of food sources to animal diets, pollution sources to air or water bodies, carbon sources to soil organic matter, and numerous others (Lajtha and Michener 1994). Initial mixing model meth- ods relied

  14. The Central Region in M100: Observations and Modeling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. H. Knapen; J. E. Beckman; C. H. Heller; I. Shlosman; R. S. de Jong

    1995-06-19

    We present new high-resolution observations of the center of the late-type spiral M100 (NGC 4321) supplemented by 3D numerical modeling of stellar and gas dynamics, including star formation (SF). NIR imaging has revealed a stellar bar, previously inferred from optical and 21 cm observations, and an ovally-shaped ring-like structure in the plane of the disk. The K isophotes become progressively elongated and skewed to the position angle of the bar (outside and inside the `ring') forming an inner bar-like region. The galaxy exhibits a circumnuclear starburst in the inner part of the K `ring'. Two maxima of the K emission have been observed to lie symmetrically with respect to the nucleus and equidistant from it slightly leading the stellar bar. We interpret the twists in the K isophotes as being indicative of the presence of a double inner Lindblad resonance (ILR) and test this hypothesis by modeling the gas flow in a self-consistent gas + stars disk embedded in a halo, with an overall NGC4321-like mass distribution. We have reproduced the basic morphology of the region (the bar, the large scale trailing shocks, two symmetric K peaks corresponding to gas compression maxima which lie at the caustic formed by the interaction of a pair of trailing and leading shocks in the vicinity of the inner ILR, both peaks being sites of SF, and two additional zones of SF corresponding to the gas compression maxima, referred usually as `twin peaks').

  15. Depth and mineralogy of the magma source or pause region for the Carboniferous Liberty Hill pluton, South Carolina

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Speer, J.A.

    1988-06-01

    Use of Al content geobarometry on clinopyroxene inclusions in plagioclase from the Carboniferous Liberty Hill pluton, South Carolina, yields pressure estimates of 8-10 kbar. Amphibole crystallization pressures are 3.1-4.7 kbar; contact metamorphic pressure are 4.5 kbar. Clinopyroxenes could be early crystallization products from the melt, restite crystals from the source region, xenocrysts from the magma conduit walls, or xenocrysts from a more mafic magma. Compositional uniformity of granitoid clinopyroxenes but dissimilarity with those in contemporaneous gabbroids is evidence against a xenocrystic origin. The deeper depths are interpreted as either the source region or a pausing place important in the crystallization history of the magma during its ascent to the upper crust. Early crystallization assemblage of the granitoid, and possibly the assemblage of the source region, was amphibole + clinopyroxene +/- plagioclase-bearing. An amphibolitic lower crustal source is consistent with the Sr and O isotopic and rare-earth-element studies of this and many other similar-age granitoids in the southern Appalachians.

  16. Regionalization of subsurface stormflow parameters of hydrologic models: Derivation from regional analysis of streamflow recession curves

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ye, Sheng; Li, Hongyi; Huang, Maoyi; Ali, Melkamu; Leng, Guoyong; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Wang, Shaowen; Sivapalan, Murugesu

    2014-07-21

    Subsurface stormflow is an important component of the rainfall–runoff response, especially in steep terrain. Its contribution to total runoff is, however, poorly represented in the current generation of land surface models. The lack of physical basis of these common parameterizations precludes a priori estimation of the stormflow (i.e. without calibration), which is a major drawback for prediction in ungauged basins, or for use in global land surface models. This paper is aimed at deriving regionalized parameterizations of the storage–discharge relationship relating to subsurface stormflow from a top–down empirical data analysis of streamflow recession curves extracted from 50 eastern United States catchments. Detailed regression analyses were performed between parameters of the empirical storage–discharge relationships and the controlling climate, soil and topographic characteristics. The regression analyses performed on empirical recession curves at catchment scale indicated that the coefficient of the power-law form storage–discharge relationship is closely related to the catchment hydrologic characteristics, which is consistent with the hydraulic theory derived mainly at the hillslope scale. As for the exponent, besides the role of field scale soil hydraulic properties as suggested by hydraulic theory, it is found to be more strongly affected by climate (aridity) at the catchment scale. At a fundamental level these results point to the need for more detailed exploration of the co-dependence of soil, vegetation and topography with climate.

  17. NGC 7538 : Multiwavelength Study of Stellar Cluster Regions associated with IRS 1-3 and IRS 9 sources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mallick, K K; Tamura, M; Pandey, A K; Dib, S; Ghosh, S K; Sunada, K; Zinchenko, I; Pirogov, L; Tsujimoto, M

    2014-01-01

    We present deep and high-resolution (FWHM ~ 0.4 arcsec) near-infrared (NIR) imaging observations of the NGC 7538 IRS 1-3 region (in JHK bands), and IRS 9 region (in HK bands) using the 8.2m Subaru telescope. The NIR analysis is complemented with GMRT low-frequency observations at 325, 610, and 1280 MHz, molecular line observations of H13CO+ (J=1-0), and archival Chandra X-ray observations. Using the 'J-H/H-K' diagram, 144 Class II and 24 Class I young stellar object (YSO) candidates are identified in the IRS 1-3 region. Further analysis using 'K/H-K' diagram yields 145 and 96 red sources in the IRS 1-3 and IRS 9 regions, respectively. A total of 27 sources are found to have X-ray counterparts. The YSO mass function (MF), constructed using a theoretical mass-luminosity relation, shows peaks at substellar (~0.08-0.18 Msolar) and intermediate (~1-1.78 Msolar) mass ranges for the IRS 1-3 region. The MF can be fitted by a power law in the low mass regime with a slope of Gamma ~ 0.54-0.75, which is much shallower t...

  18. North American Carbon Program (NACP) Regional Interim Synthesis: Terrestrial Biospheric Model Intercomparision

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huntzinger, Deborah [University of Michigan; Post, Wilfred M [ORNL; Michalak, Anna [University of Michigan; West, Tristram O. [Joint Global Change Research Institute, PNNL; Jacobson, Andrew [NOAA ESRL and CIRES; Baker, Ian [Colorado State University, Fort Collins; Chen, Jing M. [University of Toronto; Davis, Kenneth [Pennsylvania State University; Hayes, Daniel J [ORNL; Hoffman, Forrest M [ORNL; Jain, Atul [University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign; Liu, Shuguang [United States Geological Survey, Center for Earth Resources Observation and Science (USGS EROS); Mcguire, David [University of Alaska; Neilson, Ronald [Oregon State University, Corvallis; Poulter, Ben [Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research, Potsdam, Germany; Tian, Hanqin [Auburn University, Auburn, Alabama; Thornton, Peter E [ORNL; Tomelleri, Enrico [Max Planck Institute for Biogeochemistry; Viovy, Nicolas [National Center for Scientific Research, Gif-sur-Yvette, France; Xiao, Jingfeng [Purdue University; Cook, Robert B [ORNL

    2012-01-01

    Understanding of carbon exchange between terrestrial ecosystems and the atmosphere can be improved through direct observations and experiments, as well as through modeling activities. Terrestrial biosphere models (TBMs) have become an integral tool for extrapolating local observations and understanding to much larger terrestrial regions. Although models vary in their specific goals and approaches, their central role within carbon cycle science is to provide a better understanding of the mechanisms currently controlling carbon exchange. Recently, the North American Carbon Program (NACP) organized several interim-synthesis activities to evaluate and inter-compare models and observations at local to continental scales for the years 2000-2005. Here, we compare the results from the TBMs collected as part of the regional and continental interim-synthesis (RCIS) activities. The primary objective of this work is to synthesize and compare the 19 participating TBMs to assess current understanding of the terrestrial carbon cycle in North America. Thus, the RCIS focuses on model simulations available from analyses that have been completed by ongoing NACP projects and other recently published studies. The TBM flux estimates are compared and evaluated over different spatial (1{sup o} x 1{sup o} and spatially aggregated to different regions) and temporal (monthly and annually) scales. The range in model estimates of net ecosystem productivity (NEP) for North America is much narrower than estimates of productivity or respiration, with estimates of NEP varying between -0.7 and 2.2 PgC yr{sup -1}, while gross primary productivity and heterotrophic respiration vary between 12.2 and 32.9 PgC yr{sup -1} and 5.6 and 13.2 PgC yr{sup -1}, respectively. The range in estimates from the models appears to be driven by a combination of factors, including the representation of photosynthesis, the source and of environmental driver data and the temporal variability of those data, as well as whether nutrient limitation is considered in soil carbon decomposition. The disagreement in current estimates of carbon flux across North America, including whether North America is a net biospheric carbon source or sink, highlights the need for further analysis through the use of model runs following a common simulation protocol, in order to isolate the influences of model formulation, structure, and assumptions on flux estimates.

  19. Sources of black carbon aerosols in South Asia and surrounding regions during the Integrated Campaign for Aerosols, Gases and Radiation Budget (ICARB)

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Kumar, R.; Barth, M. C.; Nair, V. S.; Pfister, G. G.; Suresh Babu, S.; Satheesh, S. K.; Moorthy, K. Krishna; Carmichael, G. R.; Lu, Z.; Streets, D. G.

    2015-05-19

    This study examines differences in the surface black carbon (BC) aerosol loading between the Bay of Bengal (BoB) and the Arabian Sea (AS) and identifies dominant sources of BC in South Asia and surrounding regions during March–May 2006 (Integrated Campaign for Aerosols, Gases and Radiation Budget, ICARB) period. A total of 13 BC tracers are introduced in the Weather Research and Forecasting Model coupled with Chemistry to address these objectives. The model reproduced the temporal and spatial variability of BC distribution observed over the AS and the BoB during the ICARB ship cruise and captured spatial variability at the inlandmore »sites. In general, the model underestimates the observed BC mass concentrations. However, the model–observation discrepancy in this study is smaller compared to previous studies. Model results show that ICARB measurements were fairly well representative of the AS and the BoB during the pre-monsoon season. Elevated BC mass concentrations in the BoB are due to 5 times stronger influence of anthropogenic emissions on the BoB compared to the AS. Biomass burning in Burma also affects the BoB much more strongly than the AS. Results show that anthropogenic and biomass burning emissions, respectively, accounted for 60 and 37% of the average ± standard deviation (representing spatial and temporal variability) BC mass concentration (1341 ± 2353 ng m-3) in South Asia. BC emissions from residential (61%) and industrial (23%) sectors are the major anthropogenic sources, except in the Himalayas where vehicular emissions dominate. We find that regional-scale transport of anthropogenic emissions contributes up to 25% of BC mass concentrations in western and eastern India, suggesting that surface BC mass concentrations cannot be linked directly to the local emissions in different regions of South Asia.« less

  20. Improvement of snowpack simulations in a regional climate model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jin, J.; Miller, N.L.

    2011-01-10

    To improve simulations of regional-scale snow processes and related cold-season hydroclimate, the Community Land Model version 3 (CLM3), developed by the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR), was coupled with the Pennsylvania State University/NCAR fifth-generation Mesoscale Model (MM5). CLM3 physically describes the mass and heat transfer within the snowpack using five snow layers that include liquid water and solid ice. The coupled MM5–CLM3 model performance was evaluated for the snowmelt season in the Columbia River Basin in the Pacific Northwestern United States using gridded temperature and precipitation observations, along with station observations. The results from MM5–CLM3 show a significant improvement in the SWE simulation, which has been underestimated in the original version of MM5 coupled with the Noah land-surface model. One important cause for the underestimated SWE in Noah is its unrealistic land-surface structure configuration where vegetation, snow and the topsoil layer are blended when snow is present. This study demonstrates the importance of the sheltering effects of the forest canopy on snow surface energy budgets, which is included in CLM3. Such effects are further seen in the simulations of surface air temperature and precipitation in regional weather and climate models such as MM5. In addition, the snow-season surface albedo overestimated by MM5–Noah is now more accurately predicted by MM5–CLM3 using a more realistic albedo algorithm that intensifies the solar radiation absorption on the land surface, reducing the strong near-surface cold bias in MM5–Noah. The cold bias is further alleviated due to a slower snowmelt rate in MM5–CLM3 during the early snowmelt stage, which is closer to observations than the comparable components of MM5–Noah. In addition, the over-predicted precipitation in the Pacific Northwest as shown in MM5–Noah is significantly decreased in MM5 CLM3 due to the lower evaporation resulting from the longer snow duration.

  1. Discrepancies in the prediction of solar wind using potential field source surface model: An investigation of possible sources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley, University of

    Discrepancies in the prediction of solar wind using potential field source surface model expansion factor (FTE) at the source surface and the solar wind speed (SWS) observed at Earth, which has been made use of in the prediction of solar wind speed near the Earth with reasonable accuracy. However

  2. Development of a criteria based strategic sourcing model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Quińonez, Carlo G. (Carlo Gabriel)

    2013-01-01

    Strategic sourcing is a key factor in enhancing Nike's competitiveness and organizational and operational performances. As Nike faces increasing pressure to expand margins and reduce source base risk during a climate of ...

  3. Source Contributions to VOC's to Ozone Formation in Southeast Texas Using a Source-oriented Air Quality Model 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krishnan, Anupama

    2011-08-08

    and petrochemical industries to ozone formation in the atmosphere. Source-oriented emissions needed to drive the model were generated using a revised Sparse Matrix Operator Kernel Emissions (SMOKE) model version 2.4. VOC/NOx ratios are found to be a critical factor...

  4. 3.3 SEDIMENT SOURCES, TRANSPORT PROCESSES AND MODELING APPROACHES by Michael Church

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    63 3.3 SEDIMENT SOURCES, TRANSPORT PROCESSES AND MODELING APPROACHES 3.3 by Michael Church, Environment Canada, Burlington, Ont. SEDIMENT SOURCES, TRANSPORT PROCESSES, AND MODELING APPROACHES FOR THE FRASER RIVER A thorough understanding of sediment sources and transport processes in rivers is essential

  5. Future regional climate change in the ten hydrologic regions of California: A climate modeling investigation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sloan, Lisa C

    2005-01-01

    4) Central Coast; (5) Tulare Lake; (6) San Joaquin; (7) San4) Central Coast, (5) Tulare Lake, (6) San Joaquin River, (the smallest increase is in the Tulare Lake region. Median

  6. Bilinear estimation of pollution source profiles in receptor models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Washington at Seattle, University of

    the pollution sources based on air pollution data. This article is concerned with estimation of the source and assess the contribution of each source based on this data. There have been two traditional approaches. Los Angeles, CA 90089-2531 + Address for correspondence: NRCSE, University of Washington, Box 351720

  7. Towards an improved modeling of the glottal source in statistical parametric speech synthesis 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cabral, Joao P; Renals, Steve; Richmond, Korin; Yamagishi, Junichi

    2007-01-01

    This paper proposes the use of the Liljencrants-Fant model (LF-model) to represent the glottal source signal in HMM-based speech synthesis systems. These systems generally use a pulse train to model the periodicity of the ...

  8. A regional numerical ocean model of the circulation in the Bay of Biscay

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Drijfhout, Sybren

    A regional numerical ocean model of the circulation in the Bay of Biscay Y. Friocourt,1,2,3 B Peninsula and in the Bay of Biscay is investigated by means of a regional ocean model. In particular numerical ocean model of the circulation in the Bay of Biscay, J. Geophys. Res., 112, C09008, doi:10

  9. Guiding the Discovery of Open Source Software Processes with a Reference Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scacchi, Walt

    Guiding the Discovery of Open Source Software Processes with a Reference Model Chris Jensen1 that characterize the process. Keywords. Reference model, open source, process discovery 1 Introduction OSS a reference model based approach for process discovery to assist in coding process evidence to reduce the risk

  10. Simulating an Automated Approach to Discovery and Modeling of Open Source Software Development Processes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scacchi, Walt

    of automated process discovery and modeling mechanisms that can be applied to Web-based software development projects. Keywords: Automated Process Discovery, Process Modeling and Simulation, Open Source SoftwareSimulating an Automated Approach to Discovery and Modeling of Open Source Software Development

  11. Simulating an Automated Approach to Discovery and Modeling of Open Source Software Development Processes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scacchi, Walt

    Process Discovery, Process Modeling and Simulation, Open Source Software Development 1. Introduction to that can more readily facilitate process discovery and modeling. In our approach, we identify the kindsSimulating an Automated Approach to Discovery and Modeling of Open Source Software Development

  12. A GIS Nonpoint Source Pollution Model for the Las Vegas Valley Marcelo Reginato* and Thomas Piechota*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Piechota, Thomas C.

    of the Las Vegas Valley basin. The nonpoint source pollution from urban runoff has direct water quality the model are compared to waste water treatment loads for 2000 and 2001. The Model Total monthly and annual1 A GIS Nonpoint Source Pollution Model for the Las Vegas Valley Marcelo Reginato* and Thomas

  13. Modeled regional climate change and California endemic oak ranges

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kueppers, Lara M.

    pressure from cutting for fuel, grazing, conversion of woodlands to vineyards and orchards, water resource development, competition with inva- sive grasses, and urban expansion (1). Here, we report how the regional

  14. Impact of external industrial sources on the regional and local SO[subscript 2] and O[subscript 3] levels of the Mexico megacity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Almanza, Victor

    The air quality of megacities can be influenced by external emission sources on both global and regional scales. At the same time their outflow emissions can exert an impact to the surrounding environment. The present study ...

  15. Regional Impact of an Elevated Heat Source: The Zagros Plateau of Iran BENJAMIN F. ZAITCHIK, JASON P. EVANS, AND RONALD B. SMITH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Evans, Jason

    Regional Impact of an Elevated Heat Source: The Zagros Plateau of Iran BENJAMIN F. ZAITCHIK, JASON in the north, the Taurus Moun- tains of Turkey, and the Zagros Plateau in Iran. Inter- secting atmospheric

  16. Usefulness of the reversible jump Markov chain Monte Carlo model in regional flood frequency

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ribatet, Mathieu

    Usefulness of the reversible jump Markov chain Monte Carlo model in regional flood frequency; revised 3 May 2007; accepted 17 May 2007; published 3 August 2007. [1] Regional flood frequency analysis and the index flood approach. Results show that the proposed estimator is absolutely suited to regional

  17. Evaluation of Reconstructed Images of Regional Lung Changes Using a Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adler, Andy

    Evaluation of Reconstructed Images of Regional Lung Changes Using a Model Robert P, Patterson1 A and Patterson 2004, Yang and Patterson 2010). In order to answer questions about regional lung changes, two regions were created in the posterior portion of the right lung where the resistivity can be independently

  18. Analyzing source apportioned methane in northern California during Discover-AQ-CA using airborne measurements and model simulations

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Johnson, Matthew S.; Yates, Emma L.; Iraci, Laura T.; Loewenstein, Max; Tadi?, Jovan M.; Wecht, Kevin J.; Jeong, Seongeun; Fischer, Marc L.

    2014-12-01

    This study analyzes source apportioned methane (CH4) emissions and atmospheric mixing ratios in northern California during the Discover-AQ-CA field campaign using airborne measurement data and model simulations. Source apportioned CH4 emissions from the Emissions Database for Global Atmospheric Research (EDGAR) version 4.2 were applied in the 3-D chemical transport model GEOS-Chem and analyzed using airborne measurements taken as part of the Alpha Jet Atmospheric eXperiment over the San Francisco Bay Area (SFBA) and northern San Joaquin Valley (SJV). During the time period of the Discover-AQ-CA field campaign EDGAR inventory CH4 emissions were ~5.30 Gg day –1 (Gg = 1.0 ×more »109 g) (equating to ~1.90 × 103 Gg yr–1) for all of California. According to EDGAR, the SFBA and northern SJV region contributes ~30% of total CH4 emissions from California. Source apportionment analysis during this study shows that CH4 mixing ratios over this area of northern California are largely influenced by global emissions from wetlands and local/global emissions from gas and oil production and distribution, waste treatment processes, and livestock management. Model simulations, using EDGAR emissions, suggest that the model under-estimates CH4 mixing ratios in northern California (average normalized mean bias (NMB) = –5.2% and linear regression slope = 0.20). The largest negative biases in the model were calculated on days when large amounts of CH4 were measured over local emission sources and atmospheric CH4 mixing ratios reached values >2.5 parts per million. Sensitivity emission studies conducted during this research suggest that local emissions of CH4 from livestock management processes are likely the primary source of the negative model bias. These results indicate that a variety, and larger quantity, of measurement data needs to be obtained and additional research is necessary to better quantify source apportioned CH4 emissions in California.« less

  19. Theoretical modeling of propagation of magneto-acoustic waves in magnetic regions below sunspots

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E. Khomenko; A. Kosovichev; M. Collados; K. Parchevsky; V. Olshevsky

    2008-12-10

    We use 2D numerical simulations and eikonal approximation, to study properties of MHD waves traveling below the solar surface through the magnetic structure of sunspots. We consider a series of magnetostatic models of sunspots of different magnetic field strengths, from 10 Mm below the photosphere to the low chromosphere. The purpose of these studies is to quantify the effect of the magnetic field on local helioseismology measurements by modeling waves excited by sub-photospheric sources. Time-distance propagation diagrams and wave travel times are calculated for models of various field strength and compared to the non-magnetic case. The results clearly indicate that the observed time-distance helioseismology signals in sunspot regions correspond to fast MHD waves. The slow MHD waves form a distinctly different pattern in the time-distance diagram, which has not been detected in observations. The numerical results are in good agreement with the solution in the short-wavelength (eikonal) approximation, providing its validation. The frequency dependence of the travel times is in a good qualitative agreement with observations.

  20. Small-scale methane dispersion modelling for possible plume sources on the surface of Mars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Strong, Kimberly

    Small-scale methane dispersion modelling for possible plume sources on the surface of Mars K. S 2012; published 11 October 2012. [1] Intense interest in the characteristics of a methane source Laboratory and future landers and orbiters will be tasked with understanding the sources of methane

  1. HYBRID GROUND SOURCE HEAT PUMP SYSTEM SIMULATION USING VISUAL MODELING TOOL FOR HVACSIM+

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    HYBRID GROUND SOURCE HEAT PUMP SYSTEM SIMULATION USING VISUAL MODELING TOOL FOR HVACSIM+ M.H. Khan, 74078, USA ABSTRACT This paper presents a simulation of a hybrid ground source heat pump system, performed using a new graphical user interface for HVACSIM+. Hybrid ground source heat pump systems

  2. Diagnostics and modeling of plasma processes in ion sources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vertes, Akos

    radiation (inductively coupled plasma (ICI'), microwave-induced plasma (MU'), pulsed laser). The present-8), radiofrequency (9) and microwave ion sources (10-12) are under intense investigation. Diligent research

  3. Integration of an Energy Balance Snowmelt Model into an Open Source Modeling Framework A. Sen Gupta1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tarboton, David

    1 Integration of an Energy Balance Snowmelt Model into an Open Source Modeling Framework A. Sen model for organizing the inputs and outputs of an energy balance snowmelt model (the Utah Energy Balance; data model; energy balance; snow melt; glacier melt #12;3 Software Availability Name of software: Utah

  4. An Analytic Linear Accelerator Source Model for Monte Carlo dose calculations. II. Model Utilization in a GPU-based Monte Carlo Package and Automatic Source Commissioning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tian, Zhen; Li, Yongbao; Shi, Feng; Jiang, Steve B; Jia, Xun

    2015-01-01

    We recently built an analytical source model for GPU-based MC dose engine. In this paper, we present a sampling strategy to efficiently utilize this source model in GPU-based dose calculation. Our source model was based on a concept of phase-space-ring (PSR). This ring structure makes it effective to account for beam rotational symmetry, but not suitable for dose calculations due to rectangular jaw settings. Hence, we first convert PSR source model to its phase-space let (PSL) representation. Then in dose calculation, different types of sub-sources were separately sampled. Source sampling and particle transport were iterated. So that the particles being sampled and transported simultaneously are of same type and close in energy to alleviate GPU thread divergence. We also present an automatic commissioning approach to adjust the model for a good representation of a clinical linear accelerator . Weighting factors were introduced to adjust relative weights of PSRs, determined by solving a quadratic minimization ...

  5. Efficient Compression and Handling of Current Source Model Library Waveforms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pedram, Massoud

    ) as an alternative. ECSM [2] (initially developed by Cadence Design Systems and adopted by SI2 Open Modeling separate models for timing, noise, and power applications. The new CSM modeling paradigm combined verification tools are also in the process of converting to waveform-based models, causing a further explosion

  6. On the Communication Complexity of Secret Key Generation in the Multiterminal Source Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kashyap, Navin

    On the Communication Complexity of Secret Key Generation in the Multiterminal Source Model Manuj Mukherjee Navin Kashyap Abstract--Communication complexity refers to the minimum rate of public communication required for generating a maximal- rate secret key (SK) in the multiterminal source model of Csisz

  7. MODELING OF STANDING COLUMN WELLS IN GROUND SOURCE HEAT PUMP SYSTEMS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MODELING OF STANDING COLUMN WELLS IN GROUND SOURCE HEAT PUMP SYSTEMS By ZHENG DENG Bachelor December, 2004 #12;ii MODELING OF STANDING COLUMN WELLS IN GROUND SOURCE HEAT PUMP SYSTEMS Thesis Approved) ..................................................................... 6 1.3. Basic physical mechanism in SCWs (heat transfer and mass transfer in porous media

  8. A source function method for generation of waves on currents in Boussinesq models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kirby, James T.

    A source function method for generation of waves on currents in Boussinesq models A. Chawlaa,*, J for the generation of waves internal to Boussinesq model grid boundaries (Wei G, Kirby JT, Sinha A. Generation Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved. Keywords: Source function method; Wave generation; Boussinesq

  9. A COMPARISON BETWEEN GLOBAL SOLAR MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMIC AND POTENTIAL FIELD SOURCE SURFACE MODEL RESULTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley, University of

    A COMPARISON BETWEEN GLOBAL SOLAR MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMIC AND POTENTIAL FIELD SOURCE SURFACE MODEL of the solar corona are (1) potential field source surface (PFSS) models, and (2) magnetohydrodynamic (MHD ABSTRACT The large-scale, steady-state magnetic field configuration of the solar corona is typically

  10. MODELLING GROUNDWATER FLOW ON THE REGIONAL SCALE IN THE UPPER DANUBE CATCHMENT (GERMANY)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cirpka, Olaf Arie

    MODELLING GROUNDWATER FLOW ON THE REGIONAL SCALE IN THE UPPER DANUBE CATCHMENT (GERMANY) Roland.barthel@iws.uni-stuttgart.de Abstract. A groundwater flow model for the Upper Danube catchment (A=77,000km2 at gauge Passau, Germany coupled models. Modelling of groundwater flow, using coupled deterministic and hydrological approaches

  11. Regional forecasting with global atmospheric models; Third year report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crowley, T.J.; North, G.R.; Smith, N.R.

    1994-05-01

    This report was prepared by the Applied Research Corporation (ARC), College Station, Texas, under subcontract to Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) as part of a global climate studies task. The task supports site characterization work required for the selection of a potential high-level nuclear waste repository and is part of the Performance Assessment Scientific Support (PASS) Program at PNL. The work is under the overall direction of the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM), US Department of Energy Headquarters, Washington, DC. The scope of the report is to present the results of the third year`s work on the atmospheric modeling part of the global climate studies task. The development testing of computer models and initial results are discussed. The appendices contain several studies that provide supporting information and guidance to the modeling work and further details on computer model development. Complete documentation of the models, including user information, will be prepared under separate reports and manuals.

  12. BioEarth: Envisioning and developing a new regional earth system model to inform natural and agricultural resource management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2015-01-01

    a new regional earth system model to inform natural andsystems, coupled earth system models (EaSMs) are essential.coupled regional earth system models (EaSMs). Decision

  13. PROCEEDINGS OF THE WORKSHOP ON NATIONAL/REGIONAL ENERGY-ENVIRONMENTAL MODELING CONCEPTS, MAY 30 - JUNE 1, 1979

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ritschard, R.L.

    2010-01-01

    comprehensive list of model and data base assumptions and toe.g. , scenario, data base, model linkages, etc. , andfor regional models (largely due to data base constraints).

  14. Annual Report On Regional Aquifer Modeling And Data Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lu, Zhiming

    .................................................................................. 13 3.1 Estimates based on 2-D flow, measured hydraulic gradients and field-based hydraulic........................................................................... 19 4.2 Model Calibrations, Using New Water Level Data from R-wells

  15. Spectrum and Morphology of the Two Brightest Milagro Sources in the Cygnus Region: MGRO J2019+37 and MGRO J2031+41

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abdo, A A; Aune, T; Berley, D; Bonamente, E; Christopher, G E; DeYoung, T; Dingus, B L; Ellsworth, R W; Galbraith-Frew, J G; Gonzalez, M M; Goodman, J A; Hoffman, C M; Huentemeyer, P H; Kolterman, B E; Linnemann, J T; McEnery, J E; Mincer, A I; Morgan, T; Nemethy, P; Pretz, J; Ryan, J M; Parkinson, P M Saz; Sinnis, G; Smith, A J; Vasileiou, V; Walker, G P; Williams, D A; Yodh, G B

    2012-01-01

    The Cygnus region is a very bright and complex portion of the TeV sky, host to unidentified sources and a diffuse excess with respect to conventional cosmic-ray propagation models. Two of the brightest TeV sources, MGRO J2019+37 and MGRO J2031+41, are analyzed using Milagro data with a new technique, and their emission is tested under two different spectral assumptions: a power law and a power law with an exponential cutoff. The new analysis technique is based on an energy estimator that uses the fraction of photomultiplier tubes in the observatory that detect the extensive air shower. The photon spectrum is measured in the range 1 to 200 TeV using the last 3 years of Milagro data (2005-2008), with the detector in its final configuration. MGRO J2019+37 is detected with a significance of 12.3 standard deviations ($\\sigma$), and is better fit by a power law with an exponential cutoff than by a simple power law, with a probability $>98$% (F-test). The best-fitting parameters for the power law with exponential cu...

  16. Modeling Long-Range Transportation and Land Use Scenarios for the Sacramento Region, Using Citizen-Generated Policies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnston, Robert A.; Gao, Shengyi; Clay, Michael J.

    2008-01-01

    Barra. Comparison from the Sacramento Model Testbed. Transp.Management Policies in the Sacramento Region: Year Two.Land Use Scenarios for the Sacramento Region, Using Citizen-

  17. Quantifying sources of black carbon in Western North America using observationally based analysis and an emission tagging technique in the Community Atmosphere Model

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Zhang, R.; Wang, H.; Hegg, D. A.; Qian, Y.; Doherty, S. J.; Dang, C.; Ma, P.-L.; Rasch, P. J.; Fu, Q.

    2015-05-04

    The Community Atmosphere Model (CAM5), equipped with a technique to tag black carbon (BC) emissions by source regions and types, has been employed to establish source-receptor relationships for atmospheric BC and its deposition to snow over Western North America. The CAM5 simulation was conducted with meteorological fields constrained by reanalysis for year 2013 when measurements of BC in both near-surface air and snow are available for model evaluation. We find that CAM5 has a significant low bias in predicted mixing ratios of BC in snow but only a small low bias in predicted atmospheric concentrations over the Northwest USA andmore »West Canada. Even with a strong low bias in snow mixing ratios, radiative transfer calculations show that the BC-in-snow darkening effect is substantially larger than the BC dimming effect at the surface by atmospheric BC. Local sources contribute more to near-surface atmospheric BC and to deposition than distant sources, while the latter are more important in the middle and upper troposphere where wet removal is relatively weak. Fossil fuel (FF) is the dominant source type for total column BC burden over the two regions. FF is also the dominant local source type for BC column burden, deposition, and near-surface BC, while for all distant source regions combined the contribution of biomass/biofuel (BB) is larger than FF. An observationally based Positive Matrix Factorization (PMF) analysis of the snow-impurity chemistry is conducted to quantitatively evaluate the CAM5 BC source-type attribution. While CAM5 is qualitatively consistent with the PMF analysis with respect to partitioning of BC originating from BB and FF emissions, it significantly underestimates the relative contribution of BB. In addition to a possible low bias in BB emissions used in the simulation, the model is likely missing a significant source of snow darkening from local soil found in the observations.« less

  18. Quantifying sources of black carbon in western North America using observationally based analysis and an emission tagging technique in the Community Atmosphere Model

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Zhang, R.; Wang, H.; Hegg, D. A.; Qian, Y.; Doherty, S. J.; Dang, C.; Ma, P.-L.; Rasch, P. J.; Fu, Q.

    2015-11-18

    The Community Atmosphere Model (CAM5), equipped with a technique to tag black carbon (BC) emissions by source regions and types, has been employed to establish source–receptor relationships for atmospheric BC and its deposition to snow over western North America. The CAM5 simulation was conducted with meteorological fields constrained by reanalysis for year 2013 when measurements of BC in both near-surface air and snow are available for model evaluation. We find that CAM5 has a significant low bias in predicted mixing ratios of BC in snow but only a small low bias in predicted atmospheric concentrations over northwestern USA and westernmore »Canada. Even with a strong low bias in snow mixing ratios, radiative transfer calculations show that the BC-in-snow darkening effect is substantially larger than the BC dimming effect at the surface by atmospheric BC. Local sources contribute more to near-surface atmospheric BC and to deposition than distant sources, while the latter are more important in the middle and upper troposphere where wet removal is relatively weak. Fossil fuel (FF) is the dominant source type for total column BC burden over the two regions. FF is also the dominant local source type for BC column burden, deposition, and near-surface BC, while for all distant source regions combined the contribution of biomass/biofuel (BB) is larger than FF. An observationally based positive matrix factorization (PMF) analysis of the snow-impurity chemistry is conducted to quantitatively evaluate the CAM5 BC source-type attribution. While CAM5 is qualitatively consistent with the PMF analysis with respect to partitioning of BC originating from BB and FF emissions, it significantly underestimates the relative contribution of BB. In addition to a possible low bias in BB emissions used in the simulation, the model is likely missing a significant source of snow darkening from local soil found in the observations.« less

  19. Regional Radiological Security Partnership in Southeast Asia – Increasing the Sustainability of Security Systems at the Site-Level by Using a Model Facility Approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chamberlain, Travis L.; Dickerson, Sarah; Ravenhill, Scott D.; Murray, Allan; Morris, Frederic A.; Herdes, Gregory A.

    2009-10-07

    In 2004, Australia, through the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation (ANSTO), created the Regional Security of Radioactive Sources (RSRS) project and partnered with the U.S. Department of Energy’s Global Threat Reduction Initiative (GTRI) and the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) to form the Southeast Asian Regional Radiological Security Partnership (RRSP). The intent of the RRSP is to cooperate with countries in Southeast Asia to improve the security of their radioactive sources. This Southeast Asian Partnership supports objectives to improve the security of high risk radioactive sources by raising awareness of the need and developing national programs to protect and control such materials, improve the security of such materials, and recover and condition the materials no longer in use. The RRSP has utilized many tools to meet those objectives including: provision of physical protection upgrades, awareness training, physical protection training, regulatory development, locating and recovering orphan sources, and most recently - development of model security procedures at a model facility. This paper discusses the benefits of establishing a model facility, the methods employed by the RRSP, and three of the expected outcomes of the Model Facility approach. The first expected outcome is to increase compliance with source security guidance materials and national regulations by adding context to those materials, and illustrating their impact on a facility. Second, the effectiveness of each of the tools above is increased by making them part of an integrated system. Third, the methods used to develop the model procedures establishes a sustainable process that can ultimately be transferred to all facilities beyond the model. Overall, the RRSP has utilized the Model Facility approach as an important tool to increase the security of radioactive sources, and to position facilities and countries for the long term secure management of those sources.

  20. Modeling Needs Related to the Regional Observing System in the Gulf of Maine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Modeling Needs Related to the Regional Observing System in the Gulf of Maine RARGOM Report 05-1 Theme Session 6-7 July, 2005 Cliff House Ogunquit, Maine Convened by Regional Association for Research on the Gulf of Maine Gulf of Maine Census of Marine Life Gulf of Maine Ocean Observing System Coastal

  1. Go to the Right of the Pillar: Modeling Unoccupied Regions for Robot Directives

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Skubic, Marjorie

    Go to the Right of the Pillar: Modeling Unoccupied Regions for Robot Directives Marjorie Skubic and Sam Blisard Dept. of Computer Engineering and Computer Science University of Missouri of regions that do not contain objects but may be referenced by objects in the environment, to compute target

  2. Near-Sun Speed of CMEs and the Magnetic Non-potentiality of their Source Active Regions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tiwari, Sanjiv K; Moore, Ronald L; Venkatakrishnan, P; Winebarger, Amy R; Khazanov, Igor G

    2015-01-01

    We show that the speed of the fastest coronal mass ejections (CMEs) that an active region (AR) can produce can be predicted from a vector magnetogram of the AR. This is shown by logarithmic plots of CME speed (from the SOHO LASCO CME catalog) versus each of ten AR-integrated magnetic parameters (AR magnetic flux, three different AR magnetic-twist parameters, and six AR free-magnetic-energy proxies) measured from the vertical and horizontal field components of vector magnetograms (from the {\\it Solar Dynamics Observatory's Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager}) of the source ARs of 189 CMEs. These plots show: (1) the speed of the fastest CMEs that an AR can produce increases with each of these whole-AR magnetic parameters, and (2) that one of the AR magnetic-twist parameters and the corresponding free-magnetic-energy proxy each determine the CME-speed upper-limit line somewhat better than any of the other eight whole-AR magnetic parameters.

  3. Coupling of Integrated Biosphere Simulator to Regional Climate Model Version 3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Winter, Jonathan (Jonathan Mark)

    A description of the coupling of Integrated Biosphere Simulator (IBIS) to Regional Climate Model version 3 (RegCM3) is presented. IBIS introduces several key advantages to RegCM3, most notably vegetation dynamics, the ...

  4. Modeling Regional Air Quality Using the Near-Explicit Master Chemical Mechanism 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Jingyi

    2014-08-01

    structure, allowing an explicit calculation of SOA formation from individual model species. Earlier attempts in this area were aimed at developing mechanisms for regional SOA using a small number of representative species (Griffin et al., 2002b; Griffin...

  5. Structural Informatics, Modeling, and Design with an Open-Source Molecular Software Library (MSL)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Senes, Alessandro

    Structural Informatics, Modeling, and Design with an Open-Source Molecular Software Library (MSL for the design, modeling, and analysis of macromolecules. Among the main features supported by the library coordinates (for modeling) and multiple amino acid identities at the same backbone position (for design

  6. Mesoscale environmental models accompanying convection in the Texas HIPLEX region / by Mark Edward Humbert 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Humbert, Mark Edward

    1980-01-01

    MESOSCALE ENVIRONMENTAL MODELS ACCOMPANYING CONVECTION IN THE TEXAS HIPLEX REGION A Thesis by MARK EDWARD HUMBERT Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER... OF SCIENCE May 1980 Major Subject: Meteorology MESOSCALE ENVIRONMENTAL MODELS ACCOMPANYING CONVECTION IN THE TEXAS HIPLEX REGION A Thesis by MARK EDWARD HUMBERT Approved as to style and content by: (Chairman of Co ttee) (Head of Department) (Member...

  7. Calibration and validation of a non-point source pollution model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grunwald, Sabine

    Calibration and validation of a non-point source pollution model S. Grunwalda,* , L.D. Nortonb drainage behavior and sediment yield to develop management strategies for agricultural waters. The objective of this study was to investigate the performance of the Agricultural Non-Point Source Pollution

  8. A Markov Random Field model of contamination source identification in porous media flow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zabaras, Nicholas J.

    A Markov Random Field model of contamination source identification in porous media flow Jingbo Wang A contamination source identification problem in constant porous media flow is addressed by solving the advection-dispersion equation (ADE) with a hierarchical Bayesian computation method backward through time. The contaminant

  9. SUBMILLIMETRE CONTINUUM EMISSION FROM CLASS 0 SOURCES: THEORY, OBSERVATIONS, AND MODELLING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Froebrich, Dirk

    ) and temperature (T bol ), and age) of Class 0 sources. Speci#12;cally, we combine the information from the dust1 SUBMILLIMETRE CONTINUUM EMISSION FROM CLASS 0 SOURCES: THEORY, OBSERVATIONS, AND MODELLING M Tautenburg, Sternwarte 5, 07778 Tautenburg, Germany 2 Institute for Astronomy, 640 N. A'ohoku Place, Hilo, HI

  10. Discrepancies in the Prediction of Solar Wind using Potential Field Source Surface Model: An

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhao, Xuepu

    Discrepancies in the Prediction of Solar Wind using Potential Field Source Surface Model. This inverse relation has been made use of in the prediction of solar wind speed at 1 AU using a potential between the magnetic flux tube expansion factor (FTE) at the source surface and the solar wind speed

  11. Gravitation law and source model in the anisotropic geometrodynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sergey Siparov

    2010-01-10

    The GRT modification taking into account the dependence of metric on the velocities of the sources is built. It is shown that this dependence follows from the equivalence principle and from the inseparability of the field equations and geodesics equations. As it is known, the latter are the conditions of the field equations solvability, and their form coincides with Newtonian one only in the lowest approximation. The obtained modification provides the explanation for the flat character of the rotation curves of spiral galaxies, for Tully-Fisher law, for some specific features of globular clusters behavior and for the essential excess of the observable gravitational lens effect over the predicted one. Neither dark matter nor arbitrary change of dynamics equations appeared to be needed. Important cosmological consequences are obtained.

  12. Resource Planning Model: An Integrated Resource Planning and Dispatch Tool for Regional Electric Systems

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In this report, we introduce a new transparent regional capacity expansion model with high spatio-temporal resolution and detailed representation of dispatch. The development of this model, referred to as the Resource Planning Model (RPM), is motivated by the lack of a tool in the public domain that can be used to characterize optimal regional deployment of resources with detailed dispatch modeling. In particular, RPM is designed to evaluate scenarios of renewable technology deployment to meet renewable portfolio standard (RPS) and emission-reduction goals, and to project possible deployment levels for various projections of future technology and fuel prices.

  13. Resource Planning Model: An Integrated Resource Planning and Dispatch Tool for Regional Electric Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mai, T.; Drury, E.; Eurek, K.; Bodington, N.; Lopez, A.; Perry, A.

    2013-01-01

    This report introduces a new capacity expansion model, the Resource Planning Model (RPM), with high spatial and temporal resolution that can be used for mid- and long-term scenario planning of regional power systems. Although RPM can be adapted to any geographic region, the report describes an initial version of the model adapted for the power system in Colorado. It presents examples of scenario results from the first version of the model, including an example of a 30%-by-2020 renewable electricity penetration scenario.

  14. Modeling Functional Data Sources as Relations Simone Santini and Amarnath Gupta

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gupta, Amarnath

    Modeling Functional Data Sources as Relations Simone Santini and Amarnath Gupta University, LNCS 3288, pp. 55­68, 2004. c Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2004 #12;56 Simone Santini and Amarnath

  15. GroBot : an open-source model for controlled environment agriculture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feshbach, Emma (Emma Elizabeth)

    2015-01-01

    The growing demand for food challenges our current farming methods, motivating the search for new paradigms for agricultural production. In this work, the GroBot is presented as an open-source model for the fourth agricultural ...

  16. Hadron Production Model Developments and Benchmarking in the 0.7 - 12 GeV Energy Region

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    N. V. Mokhov; K. K. Gudima; S. I. Striganov

    2014-08-29

    Driven by the needs of the intensity frontier projects with their Megawatt beams, e.g., ESS, FAIR and Project X, and their experiments, the event generators of the MARS15 code have been recently improved. After thorough analysis and benchmarking against data, including the newest ones by the HARP collaboration, both the exclusive and inclusive particle production models were further developed in the crucial for the above projects - but difficult from a theoretical standpoint - projectile energy region of 0.7 to 12 GeV. At these energies, modelling of prompt particle production in nucleon-nucleon and pion-nucleon inelastic reactions is now based on a combination of phase-space and isobar models. Other reactions are still modeled in the framework of the Quark-Gluon String Model. Pion, kaon and strange particle production and propagation in nuclear media are improved. For the alternative inclusive mode, experimental data on large-angle (> 20 degrees) pion production in hadron-nucleus interactions are parameterized in a broad energy range using a two-source model. It is mixed-and-matched with the native MARS model that successfully describes low-angle pion production data. Predictions of both new models are - in most cases - in a good agreement with experimental data obtained at CERN, JINR, LANL, BNL and KEK.

  17. Modeling Study of Proposed Field Calibration Source Using K-40 Source and High-Z Targets for Sodium Iodide Detector 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rogers, Jeremy 1987-

    2012-10-30

    this project, giving me a few ideas to get started, and answering my questions along the way. I hope this calibration source is exactly what you need. Thanks also go to Dr. Sunil Chirayath for answering my many questions on MCNP, and for helping me make sure... interactions, coincidence counting, and MCNP modeling. I want to thank my family for being so unshakably supportive. My life and career paths are completely different than I would have thought six years ago, but you?ve been there for me through it all...

  18. Carbonaceous aerosols recorded in a southeastern Tibetan glacier: analysis of temporal variations and model estimates of sources and radiative forcing

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Wang, Mo; Xu, B.; Cao, J.; Tie, X.; Wang, Hailong; Zhang, Rudong; Qian, Yun; Rasch, Philip J.; Zhao, Shuyu; Wu, Guangjian; et al

    2015-02-02

    High temporal resolution measurements of black carbon (BC) and organic carbon (OC) covering the time period of 1956–2006 in an ice core over the southeastern Tibetan Plateau show a distinct seasonal dependence of BC and OC with higher respective concentrations but a lower OC / BC ratio in the non-monsoon season than during the summer monsoon. We use a global aerosol-climate model, in which BC emitted from different source regions can be explicitly tracked, to quantify BC source–receptor relationships between four Asian source regions and the southeastern Tibetan Plateau as a receptor. The model results show that South Asia hasmore »the largest contribution to the present-day (1996–2005) mean BC deposition at the ice-core drilling site during the non-monsoon season (October to May) (81%) and all year round (74%), followed by East Asia (14% to the non-monsoon mean and 21% to the annual mean). The ice-core record also indicates stable and relatively low BC and OC deposition fluxes from the late 1950s to 1980, followed by an overall increase to recent years. This trend is consistent with the BC and OC emission inventories and the fuel consumption of South Asia (as the primary contributor to annual mean BC deposition). Moreover, the increasing trend of the OC / BC ratio since the early 1990s indicates a growing contribution of coal combustion and/or biomass burning to the emissions. The estimated radiative forcing induced by BC and OC impurities in snow has increased since 1980, suggesting an increasing potential influence of carbonaceous aerosols on the Tibetan glacier melting and the availability of water resources in the surrounding regions. Our study indicates that more attention to OC is merited because of its non-negligible light absorption and the recent rapid increases evident in the ice-core record.« less

  19. Carbonaceous aerosols recorded in a southeastern Tibetan glacier: analysis of temporal variations and model estimates of sources and radiative forcing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Mo; Xu, B.; Cao, J.; Tie, X.; Wang, Hailong; Zhang, Rudong; Qian, Yun; Rasch, Philip J.; Zhao, Shuyu; Wu, Guangjian; Zhao, Huabiao; Joswiak, Daniel R.; Li, Jiule; Xie, Ying

    2015-01-01

    High temporal resolution measurements of black carbon (BC) and organic carbon (OC) covering the time period of 1956–2006 in an ice core over the southeastern Tibetan Plateau show a distinct seasonal dependence of BC and OC with higher respective concentrations but a lower OC / BC ratio in the non-monsoon season than during the summer monsoon. We use a global aerosol-climate model, in which BC emitted from different source regions can be explicitly tracked, to quantify BC source–receptor relationships between four Asian source regions and the southeastern Tibetan Plateau as a receptor. The model results show that South Asia has the largest contribution to the present-day (1996–2005) mean BC deposition at the ice-core drilling site during the non-monsoon season (October to May) (81%) and all year round (74%), followed by East Asia (14% to the non-monsoon mean and 21% to the annual mean). The ice-core record also indicates stable and relatively low BC and OC deposition fluxes from the late 1950s to 1980, followed by an overall increase to recent years. This trend is consistent with the BC and OC emission inventories and the fuel consumption of South Asia (as the primary contributor to annual mean BC deposition). Moreover, the increasing trend of the OC / BC ratio since the early 1990s indicates a growing contribution of coal combustion and/or biomass burning to the emissions. The estimated radiative forcing induced by BC and OC impurities in snow has increased since 1980, suggesting an increasing potential influence of carbonaceous aerosols on the Tibetan glacier melting and the availability of water resources in the surrounding regions. Our study indicates that more attention to OC is merited because of its non-negligible light absorption and the recent rapid increases evident in the ice-core record.

  20. 11.482J / 1.285J / ESD.193J Regional Socioeconomic Impact Analysis and Modeling, Fall 2004

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Polenske, Karen R.

    Reviews regional economic theories and models and provides students with experience in using alternative economic impact assessment models on microcomputers. Problem sets are oriented around infrastructure, housing, energy, ...

  1. 11.482J / 1.285J / ESD.193J Regional Socioeconomic Impact Analysis and Modeling, Fall 2005

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Polenske, Karen R.

    Reviews regional economic theories and models and provides students with experience in using alternative economic impact assessment models on microcomputers. Problem sets are oriented around infrastructure, housing, energy, ...

  2. 11.482J / 1.285J / ESD.193J Regional Socioeconomic Impact Analysis and Modeling, Fall 2006

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Polenske, Karen

    Reviews regional economic theories and models and provides students with experience in using alternative economic impact assessment models on microcomputers. Problem sets are oriented around infrastructure, housing, energy, ...

  3. Analyzing source apportioned methane in northern California during Discover-AQ-CA using airborne measurements and model simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, Matthew S.; Yates, Emma L.; Iraci, Laura T.; Loewenstein, Max; Tadi?, Jovan M.; Wecht, Kevin J.; Jeong, Seongeun; Fischer, Marc L.

    2014-12-01

    This study analyzes source apportioned methane (CH4) emissions and atmospheric mixing ratios in northern California during the Discover-AQ-CA field campaign using airborne measurement data and model simulations. Source apportioned CH4 emissions from the Emissions Database for Global Atmospheric Research (EDGAR) version 4.2 were applied in the 3-D chemical transport model GEOS-Chem and analyzed using airborne measurements taken as part of the Alpha Jet Atmospheric eXperiment over the San Francisco Bay Area (SFBA) and northern San Joaquin Valley (SJV). During the time period of the Discover-AQ-CA field campaign EDGAR inventory CH4 emissions were ~5.30 Gg day –1 (Gg = 1.0 × 109 g) (equating to ~1.90 × 103 Gg yr–1) for all of California. According to EDGAR, the SFBA and northern SJV region contributes ~30% of total CH4 emissions from California. Source apportionment analysis during this study shows that CH4 mixing ratios over this area of northern California are largely influenced by global emissions from wetlands and local/global emissions from gas and oil production and distribution, waste treatment processes, and livestock management. Model simulations, using EDGAR emissions, suggest that the model under-estimates CH4 mixing ratios in northern California (average normalized mean bias (NMB) = –5.2% and linear regression slope = 0.20). The largest negative biases in the model were calculated on days when large amounts of CH4 were measured over local emission sources and atmospheric CH4 mixing ratios reached values >2.5 parts per million. Sensitivity emission studies conducted during this research suggest that local emissions of CH4 from livestock management processes are likely the primary source of the negative model bias. These results indicate that a variety, and larger quantity, of measurement data needs to be obtained and additional research is necessary to better quantify source apportioned CH4 emissions in California.

  4. Temporal Models for Groundwater Level Prediction in Regions of Maharashtra Dissertation Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sohoni, Milind

    Temporal Models for Groundwater Level Prediction in Regions of Maharashtra Dissertation Report In this project work we perform analysis of groundwater level data in three districts of Maha- rashtra - Thane of these districts and developed seasonal models to represent the groundwater be- havior. Three different type

  5. Coupling of Integrated Biosphere Simulator to Regional Climate Model version 3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Winter, Jonathan (Jonathan Mark)

    2006-01-01

    Presented in this thesis is a description of the coupling of Integrated Biosphere Simulator (IBIS) to Regional Climate Model version 3 (RegCM3), and an assessment of the coupled model (RegCM3-IBIS). RegCM3 is a 3-dimensional, ...

  6. An improved model of the lightning electromagnetic field interaction with the D-region ionosphere

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    14 March 2012. [1] We present an improved time-domain model of the lightning electromagnetic pulse. Introduction [2] Lightning discharges produce both an electromagnetic pulse (EMP), due to the rapid lightningAn improved model of the lightning electromagnetic field interaction with the D-region ionosphere R

  7. Abundance determinations in HII regions: model fitting versus Te-method

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    L. S. Pilyugin

    2002-11-14

    The discrepancy between the oxygen abundances in high-metallicity HII regions determined through the Te-method (and/or through the corresponding "strong lines - oxygen abundance" calibration) and that determined through the model fitting (and/or through the corresponding "strong lines - oxygen abundance" calibration) is discussed. It is suggested to use the interstellar oxygen abundance in the solar vicinity, derived with very high precision from the high-resolution observations of the weak interstellar absorption lines towards the stars, as a "Rosetta stone" to verify the validity of the oxygen abundances derived in HII regions with the Te-method at high abundances. The agreement between the value of the oxygen abundance at the solar galactocentric distance traced by the abundances derived in HII regions through the Te-method and that derived from the interstellar absorption lines towards the stars is strong evidence in favor of that i) the two-zone model for Te seems to be a realistic interpretation of the temperature structure within HII regions, and ii) the classic Te-method provides accurate oxygen abundances in HII regions. It has been concluded that the "strong lines - oxygen abundance" calibrations must be based on the HII regions with the oxygen abundances derived with the Te-method but not on the existing grids of the models for HII regions.

  8. Statistical Models for Solar Flare Interval Distribution in Individual Active Regions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yuki Kubo

    2008-02-01

    This article discusses statistical models for solar flare interval distribution in individual active regions. We analyzed solar flare data in 55 active regions that are listed in the GOES soft X-ray flare catalog. We discuss some problems with a conventional procedure to derive probability density functions from any data set and propose a new procedure, which uses the maximum likelihood method and Akaike Information Criterion (AIC) to objectively compare some competing probability density functions. We found that lognormal and inverse Gaussian models are more likely models than the exponential model for solar flare interval distribution in individual active regions. The results suggest that solar flares do not occur randomly in time; rather, solar flare intervals appear to be regulated by solar flare mechanisms. We briefly mention a probabilistic solar flare forecasting method as an application of a solar flare interval distribution analysis.

  9. Simulation of ultrasonic surface waves with multi-Gaussian and point source beam models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhao, Xinyu; Schmerr, Lester W. Jr.; Li, Xiongbing; Sedov, Alexander

    2014-02-18

    In the past decade, multi-Gaussian beam models have been developed to solve many complicated bulk wave propagation problems. However, to date those models have not been extended to simulate the generation of Rayleigh waves. Here we will combine Gaussian beams with an explicit high frequency expression for the Rayleigh wave Green function to produce a three-dimensional multi-Gaussian beam model for the fields radiated from an angle beam transducer mounted on a solid wedge. Simulation results obtained with this model are compared to those of a point source model. It is shown that the multi-Gaussian surface wave beam model agrees well with the point source model while being computationally much more efficient.

  10. Detection of microseismic compressional (P) body waves aided by numerical modeling of oceanic noise sources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stutzmann, Eléonore

    Detection of microseismic compressional (P) body waves aided by numerical modeling of oceanic noise), Detection of microseismic compressional (P) body waves aided by numerical modeling of oceanic noise sources in seismic noise, body waves present appealing properties but are still challenging to extract. Here we first

  11. Development of source functions for modeling dissolution of residual DNAPL fingers in the saturated zone 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Brian Scott

    1993-01-01

    fmger in the saturated zone. Modeling dissolution from a residual fmger can be approached in one of two ways: as an equilibrium process or as a rate dependent kinetic process. Development of a source term for modeling the dissolution from remediation...

  12. Modeling of tsunami sources and propagation in the Atlantic Ocean Basin to assess coastal tsunami

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kirby, James T.

    Modeling of tsunami sources and propagation in the Atlantic Ocean Basin to assess coastal tsunami 19716, USA Abstract Since 2010, under the auspices of the US National Tsunami Hazard Mitigation Pro- gram (NTHMP), the authors have conducted modeling work to gradually develop tsunami inundation maps

  13. Sources of air pollution in a region of oil and gas exploration downwind of a large city

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2015-01-01

    Oxidation 2. from oil and gas development infrastructure (pollution in a region of oil and gas exploration downwind ofozone. Reactivities suggest oil and gas emissions contribute

  14. Investigation of the Summer Climate of the Contiguous United States and Mexico Using the Regional Atmospheric Modeling System (RAMS).

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Castro, Christopher L.

    to observations. The Great Plains low-level jet (LLJ) is also well represented in both RAMS and NARR, but the Baja Atmospheric Modeling System (RAMS). Part I: Model Climatology (1950­2002) CHRISTOPHER L. CASTRO* Department downscaled using the Regional Atmospheric Modeling System (RAMS) to generate a regional climate model (RCM

  15. Static and Dynamic Modeling of a Solar Active Region. I: Soft X-Ray Emission

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harry P. Warren; Amy R. Winebarger

    2006-09-01

    Recent simulations of solar active regions have shown that it is possible to reproduce both the total intensity and the general morphology of the high temperature emission observed at soft X-ray wavelengths using static heating models. There is ample observational evidence, however, that the solar corona is highly variable, indicating a significant role for dynamical processes in coronal heating. Because they are computationally demanding, full hydrodynamic simulations of solar active regions have not been considered previously. In this paper we make first application of an impulsive heating model to the simulation of an entire active region, AR8156 observed on 1998 February 16. We model this region by coupling potential field extrapolations to full solutions of the time-dependent hydrodynamic loop equations. To make the problem more tractable we begin with a static heating model that reproduces the emission observed in 4 different \\textit{Yohkoh} Soft X-Ray Telescope (SXT) filters and consider dynamical heating scenarios that yield time-averaged SXT intensities that are consistent with the static case. We find that it is possible to reproduce the total observed soft X-ray emission in all of the SXT filters with a dynamical heating model, indicating that nanoflare heating is consistent with the observational properties of the high temperature solar corona.

  16. Transforming the representation of the boundary layer and low clouds for high-resolution regional climate modeling: Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huang, Hsin-Yuan; Hall, Alex

    2013-07-24

    Stratocumulus and shallow cumulus clouds in subtropical oceanic regions (e.g., Southeast Pacific) cover thousands of square kilometers and play a key role in regulating global climate (e.g., Klein and Hartmann, 1993). Numerical modeling is an essential tool to study these clouds in regional and global systems, but the current generation of climate and weather models has difficulties in representing them in a realistic way (e.g., Siebesma et al., 2004; Stevens et al., 2007; Teixeira et al., 2011). While numerical models resolve the large-scale flow, subgrid-scale parameterizations are needed to estimate small-scale properties (e.g. boundary layer turbulence and convection, clouds, radiation), which have significant influence on the resolved scale due to the complex nonlinear nature of the atmosphere. To represent the contribution of these fine-scale processes to the resolved scale, climate models use various parameterizations, which are the main pieces in the model that contribute to the low clouds dynamics and therefore are the major sources of errors or approximations in their representation. In this project, we aim to 1) improve our understanding of the physical processes in thermal circulation and cloud formation, 2) examine the performance and sensitivity of various parameterizations in the regional weather model (Weather Research and Forecasting model; WRF), and 3) develop, implement, and evaluate the advanced boundary layer parameterization in the regional model to better represent stratocumulus, shallow cumulus, and their transition. Thus, this project includes three major corresponding studies. We find that the mean diurnal cycle is sensitive to model domain in ways that reveal the existence of different contributions originating from the Southeast Pacific land-masses. The experiments suggest that diurnal variations in circulations and thermal structures over this region are influenced by convection over the Peruvian sector of the Andes cordillera, while the mostly dry mountain-breeze circulations force an additional component that results in semi-diurnal variations near the coast. A series of numerical tests, however, reveal sensitivity of the simulations to the choice of vertical grid, limiting the possibility of solid quantitative statements on the amplitudes and phases of the diurnal and semidiurnal components across the domain. According to our experiments, the Mellor-Yamada-Nakanishi-Niino (MYNN) boundary layer scheme and the WSM6 microphysics scheme is the combination of schemes that performs best. For that combination, mean cloud cover, liquid water path, and cloud depth are fairly wellsimulated, while mean cloud top height remains too low in comparison to observations. Both microphysics and boundary layer schemes contribute to the spread in liquid water path and cloud depth, although the microphysics contribution is slightly more prominent. Boundary layer schemes are the primary contributors to cloud top height, degree of adiabaticity, and cloud cover. Cloud top height is closely related to surface fluxes and boundary layer structure. Thus, our study infers that an appropriate tuning of cloud top height would likely improve the low-cloud representation in the model. Finally, we show that entrainment governs the degree of adiabaticity, while boundary layer decoupling is a control on cloud cover. In the intercomparison study using WRF single-column model experiments, most parameterizations show a poor agreement of the vertical boundary layer structure when compared with large-eddy simulation models. We also implement a new Total-Energy/Mass- Flux boundary layer scheme into the WRF model and evaluate its ability to simulate both stratocumulus and shallow cumulus clouds. Result comparisons against large-eddy simulation show that this advanced parameterization based on the new Eddy-Diffusivity/Mass-Flux approach provides a better performance than other boundary layer parameterizations.

  17. BioEarth: Envisioning and developing a new regional earth system model to inform natural and agricultural resource management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2015-01-01

    systems, coupled earth system models (EaSMs) are essential.a new regional earth system model to inform natural andthe Community Earth System Model (CESM; www2.cesm.ucar.edu)

  18. Incorporating Stakeholder Decision Support Needs into an Integrated Regional Earth System Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rice, Jennie S.; Moss, Richard H.; Runci, Paul J.; Anderson, K. L.; Malone, Elizabeth L.

    2012-03-21

    A new modeling effort exploring the opportunities, constraints, and interactions between mitigation and adaptation at regional scale is utilizing stakeholder engagement in an innovative approach to guide model development and demonstration, including uncertainty characterization, to effectively inform regional decision making. This project, the integrated Regional Earth System Model (iRESM), employs structured stakeholder interactions and literature reviews to identify the most relevant adaptation and mitigation alternatives and decision criteria for each regional application of the framework. The information is used to identify important model capabilities and to provide a focus for numerical experiments. This paper presents the stakeholder research results from the first iRESM pilot region. The pilot region includes the Great Lakes Basin in the Midwest portion of the United States as well as other contiguous states. This geographic area (14 states in total) permits cohesive modeling of hydrologic systems while also providing gradients in climate, demography, land cover/land use, and energy supply and demand. The results from the stakeholder research indicate that iRESM should prioritize addressing adaptation alternatives in the water resources, urban infrastructure, and agriculture sectors, such as water conservation, expanded water quality monitoring, altered reservoir releases, lowered water intakes, urban infrastructure upgrades, increased electric power reserves in urban areas, and land use management/crop selection changes. Regarding mitigation alternatives, the stakeholder research shows a need for iRESM to focus on policies affecting the penetration of renewable energy technologies, and the costs and effectiveness of energy efficiency, bioenergy production, wind energy, and carbon capture and sequestration.

  19. Impact of transport model errors on the global and regional methane emissions estimated by inverse modelling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Locatelli, R.

    A modelling experiment has been conceived to assess the impact of transport model errors on methane emissions estimated in an atmospheric inversion system. Synthetic methane observations, obtained from 10 different model ...

  20. In situ measurements of speciated atmospheric mercury and the identification of source regions in the Mexico City Metropolitan Area

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rutter, A. P.

    In order to expand the currently limited understanding of atmospheric mercury source-receptor relationships in the Mexico City Metropolitan Area, real time measurements of atmospheric mercury were made at a downtown urban ...

  1. Design of a next-generation regional weather research and forecast model.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michalakes, J.

    1999-01-13

    The Weather Research and Forecast (WRF) model is a new model development effort undertaken jointly by the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR), the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), and a number of collaborating institutions and university scientists. The model is intended for use by operational NWP and university research communities, providing a common framework for idealized dynamical studies, fill physics numerical weather prediction, air-quality simulation, and regional climate. It will eventually supersede large, well-established but aging regional models now maintained by the participating institutions. The WRF effort includes re-engineering the underlying software architecture to produce a modular, flexible code designed from the outset to provide portable performance across diverse computing architectures. This paper outlines key elements of the WRF software design.

  2. Implementation of an Urban Parameterization Scheme into the Regional Climate Model COSMO-CLM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    July 2012, in final form 23 April 2013) ABSTRACT As the nonhydrostatic regional model of the Consortium of urbanization on the environment, the authors extend its surface-layer parameterization by the Town Energy on spatial scales below ;3 km. 1. Introduction Since the level of world urbanization crossed the 50% mark

  3. A MODIFIED GAMBLER'S RUIN MODEL POLYETHYLENE CHAINS IN THE AMORPHOUS REGION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A MODIFIED GAMBLER'S RUIN MODEL OF POLYETHYLENE CHAINS IN THE AMORPHOUS REGION Zhong­Hui Duan and Louis N. Howard Department of Mathematics The Florida State University ABSTRACT. Polyethylene chainsM 3 +O(M 2 ). INTRODUCTION Semicrystalline polyethylene formed from melt generally consists

  4. Detecting changes in seasonal precipitation extremes using regional climate model projections: Implications for managing fluvial flood

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fowler, Hayley

    further demonstrates that existing precautionary allowances for climate change used for flood managementClick Here for Full Article Detecting changes in seasonal precipitation extremes using regional climate model projections: Implications for managing fluvial flood risk H. J. Fowler1 and R. L. Wilby2

  5. Bayesian Monte Carlo analysis applied to regional-scale inverse emission modeling for reactive trace gases

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Menut, Laurent

    the a priori uncertainties in anthropogenic NOx and volatile organic compounds (VOC) emissions: (1) The a posteriori probability density function (pdf) for NOx emissions is not modified in its averageBayesian Monte Carlo analysis applied to regional-scale inverse emission modeling for reactive

  6. Static and flowing regions in granular collapses down channels: Insights from a sedimenting shallow water model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huppert, Herbert

    Static and flowing regions in granular collapses down channels: Insights from a sedimenting shallow extend the model of Larrieu 2006 to include an estimation for the interface between the static, 043301 2007 . An empirical sedimentation term Ls and the instantaneous removal of a static deposit wedge

  7. Spatial variability of regional model simulated JuneSeptember mean precipitation over West Africa

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    made with the CCSR/GISS RM3, driven by synchronous data from NCEP reanalysis. A five-member ensemble for a single season was generated by staggering the initial conditions of each member by 36 hr within] Regional climate model (RCM) simulations are driven by synchronous lateral boundary conditions (LBC

  8. A Prototype Integrated Transportation Land-use Model for the Lausanne Region

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bierlaire, Michel

    of Architecture, Civil and Environmental Engineering Ecole Polytechnique F´ed´erale de Lausanne transp . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 3.2 Demographic Transition Model . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 3.3 Development Project-Morges Region in 2000 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14 6 UrbanSim Submodels Estimated for the Lausanne-Morges Re

  9. Polar-region distributions of Poynting flux: Global models compared with observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lotko, William

    of electric potential, field-aligned current and Poynting flux derived from the Lyon-Fedder-Mobarry globalPolar-region distributions of Poynting flux: Global models compared with observations P. D submitted to J. Atmospheric and Solar-Terrestrial Physics 15 June 2007 #12;with updated simulation results

  10. Polar-region distributions of Poynting flux: Global models compared with observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lotko, William

    of electric potential, field-aligned current and Poynting flux derived from the Lyon-Fedder-Mobarry globalPolar-region distributions of Poynting flux: Global models compared with observations P. D from the Preprint submitted to J. Atmospheric and Solar-Terrestrial Physics 11 July 2008 #12;DMSP F13

  11. Intrashelf basins: A geologic model for source-bed and reservoir facies deposition within carbonate shelves

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grover, G. Jr. (Sauid Aramco, Dhahran (Saudi Arabia))

    1993-09-01

    Intrashelf basins (moats, inshore basins, shelf basins, differentiated shelf, and deep-water lagoons of others) are depressions of varying sizes and shapes that occur within tectonically passive and regionally extensive carbonate shelves. Intrashelf basins grade laterally and downdip (seaward) into shallow-water carbonates of the regional shelf, are separated from the open marine basin by the shelf margin, and are largely filled by fine-grained subtidal sediments having attributes of shallow- and deeper water sedimentation. These basins are commonly fringed or overlain by carbonate sands, reefs, or buildups. These facies may mimic those that occur along the regional shelf margin, and they can have trends that are at a high angle to that of the regional shelf. Intrashelf basins are not intracratonic basins. The history of most intrashelf basins is a few million to a few tens of million of years. Examples of intrashelf basins are known throughout the Phanerozoic; the southern portion of the Holocene Belize shelf is a modern example of an intrashelf basin. Two types of intrashelf basins are recognized. Coastal basins pass updip into coastal clastics of the craton with the basin primarily filled by fine clastics. Shelf basins occur on the outer part of the shelf, are surrounded by shallow-water carbonate facies, and are filled by peloidal lime mud, pelagics, and argillaceous carbonates. Intrashelf basins are commonly the site of organic-rich, source-bed deposition, resulting in the close proximity of source beds and reservoir facies that may fringe or overlie the basin. Examples of hydrocarbon-charged reservoirs that were sourced by an intrashelf basin include the Miocene Bombay High field, offshore India; the giant Jurassic (Arab-D) and Cretaceous (Shuaiba) reservoirs of the Arabian Shelf; the Lower Cretaceous Sunniland trend, South Florida basin; and the Permian-Pennsylvanian reservoirs surrounding the Tatum basin in southeastern New Mexico.

  12. Experimental validation of a kilovoltage x-ray source model for computing imaging dose

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Poirier, Yannick, E-mail: yannick.poirier@cancercare.mb.ca [CancerCare Manitoba, 675 McDermot Ave, Winnipeg, Manitoba R3E 0V9 (Canada)] [CancerCare Manitoba, 675 McDermot Ave, Winnipeg, Manitoba R3E 0V9 (Canada); Kouznetsov, Alexei; Koger, Brandon [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta T2N 1N4 (Canada)] [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta T2N 1N4 (Canada); Tambasco, Mauro, E-mail: mtambasco@mail.sdsu.edu [Department of Physics, San Diego State University, San Diego, California 92182-1233 and Department of Physics and Astronomy and Department of Oncology, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta T2N 1N4 (Canada)] [Department of Physics, San Diego State University, San Diego, California 92182-1233 and Department of Physics and Astronomy and Department of Oncology, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta T2N 1N4 (Canada)

    2014-04-15

    Purpose: To introduce and validate a kilovoltage (kV) x-ray source model and characterization method to compute absorbed dose accrued from kV x-rays. Methods: The authors propose a simplified virtual point source model and characterization method for a kV x-ray source. The source is modeled by: (1) characterizing the spatial spectral and fluence distributions of the photons at a plane at the isocenter, and (2) creating a virtual point source from which photons are generated to yield the derived spatial spectral and fluence distribution at isocenter of an imaging system. The spatial photon distribution is determined by in-air relative dose measurements along the transverse (x) and radial (y) directions. The spectrum is characterized using transverse axis half-value layer measurements and the nominal peak potential (kVp). This source modeling approach is used to characterize a Varian{sup ®} on-board-imager (OBI{sup ®}) for four default cone-beam CT beam qualities: beams using a half bowtie filter (HBT) with 110 and 125 kVp, and a full bowtie filter (FBT) with 100 and 125 kVp. The source model and characterization method was validated by comparing dose computed by the authors’ inhouse software (kVDoseCalc) to relative dose measurements in a homogeneous and a heterogeneous block phantom comprised of tissue, bone, and lung-equivalent materials. Results: The characterized beam qualities and spatial photon distributions are comparable to reported values in the literature. Agreement between computed and measured percent depth-dose curves is ?2% in the homogeneous block phantom and ?2.5% in the heterogeneous block phantom. Transverse axis profiles taken at depths of 2 and 6 cm in the homogeneous block phantom show an agreement within 4%. All transverse axis dose profiles in water, in bone, and lung-equivalent materials for beams using a HBT, have an agreement within 5%. Measured profiles of FBT beams in bone and lung-equivalent materials were higher than their computed counterparts resulting in an agreement within 2.5%, 5%, and 8% within solid water, bone, and lung, respectively. Conclusions: The proposed virtual point source model and characterization method can be used to compute absorbed dose in both the homogeneous and heterogeneous block phantoms within of 2%–8% of measured values, depending on the phantom and the beam quality. The authors’ results also provide experimental validation for their kV dose computation software, kVDoseCalc.

  13. Journal of Power Sources 142 (2005) 184193 Modeling and optimization of catalytic partial oxidation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daraio, Chiara

    2005-01-01

    of a micro-reformer for a fuel cell unit based on catalytic partial oxidation using a systematic numerical is around 80% is identified. © 2004 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved. Keywords: Catalytic partial oxidationJournal of Power Sources 142 (2005) 184­193 Modeling and optimization of catalytic partial

  14. EESOM: Electrical Energy Sourcing Optimization Model Department of Electrical and Systems Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fang-Yen, Christopher

    EESOM: Electrical Energy Sourcing Optimization Model Department of Electrical and Systems Sobkiw Dr. John Keenan Project Overview The United States' electrical energy sector faces a set. Questions such as when and where electrical energy is needed and how the resources that fuel its generation

  15. Monitoring Soil Moisture and Drought Using a Thermal TwoSource Energy Balance Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kuligowski, Bob

    Monitoring Soil Moisture and Drought Using a Thermal TwoSource Energy Balance Model Christopher. In general, dry soil or stressed vegetation heats up more rapidly than wet soil or unstressed vegetation, using one dual polarized channel (either Cband or Xband) for the retrieval of soil moisture

  16. Surface Water Quality Modeling Pollutant Release from a Surface Source during Rainfall Runoff

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walter, M.Todd

    Surface Water Quality Modeling Pollutant Release from a Surface Source during Rainfall Runoff M. Todd Walter,* J.-Y. Parlange, M. F. Walter, X. Xin, and C. A. Scott ABSTRACT different pollutants were is recognized as an impor- Agricultural runoff water quality research has primar-tant mode of nonpoint

  17. neutron density. The neutron density (nn) of the source was modeled by solving the simul-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    West, Stuart

    neutron density. The neutron density (nn) of the source was modeled by solving the simul- taneousT is the thermal neutron velocity, l is the decay constant, Ns is the s-process abun- dance, bsŔ is the maxwellian-averaged neutron capture cross-section, and t0 is the average neutron exposure (21). The branching decay of 186Re

  18. Finite source modelling of magmatic unrest in Socorro, New Mexico, and Long Valley, California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fialko, Yuri

    Finite source modelling of magmatic unrest in Socorro, New Mexico, and Long Valley, California Yuri associated with currently active crustal magma bodies in Socorro, New Mexico, and Long Valley, California induced by magma migration are also important for forecasting local volcanic and seismic hazards. A prime

  19. Source Constraints and Model Simulation of the December 26, 2004, Indian Ocean Tsunami

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kirby, James T.

    Source Constraints and Model Simulation of the December 26, 2004, Indian Ocean Tsunami Stéphan T ; and Philip Watts5 Abstract: The December 26, 2004 tsunami was perhaps the most devastating tsunami. There were numerous eyewitness observations and video digital recordings of coastal tsunami impact, as well

  20. HMM-BASED SPEECH SYNTHESISER USING THE LF-MODEL OF THE GLOTTAL SOURCE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Edinburgh, University of

    HMM-BASED SPEECH SYNTHESISER USING THE LF-MODEL OF THE GLOTTAL SOURCE Jo~ao P. Cabral1,2 , Steve College Dublin, Ireland 2 The Centre for Speech Technology Research, University of Edinburgh,UK joao.cabral

  1. Wetland model in an earth systems modeling framework for regional environmental policy analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Awadalla, Sirein Salah

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this research is to investigate incorporating a wetland component into a land energy and water fluxes model, the Community Land Model (CLM). CLM is the land fluxes component of the Integrated Global Systems ...

  2. Century-Long Source Apportionment of PAHs in Athabasca Oil Sands Region Lakes Using Diagnostic Ratios and Compound-Specific

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ratios and Compound-Specific Carbon Isotope Signatures Josue Jautzy, Jason M. E. Ahad,*, Charles Gobeil PAH molecular diagnostic ratios and carbon isotopic signatures (13 C) of individual PAHs were used with 13 C values progressively shifting to the value of unprocessed AOS bitumen. This petrogenic source

  3. Ion source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Leung, Ka-Ngo (Hercules, CA); Ehlers, Kenneth W. (Alamo, CA)

    1984-01-01

    A magnetic filter for an ion source reduces the production of undesired ion species and improves the ion beam quality. High-energy ionizing electrons are confined by the magnetic filter to an ion source region, where the high-energy electrons ionize gas molecules. One embodiment of the magnetic filter uses permanent magnets oriented to establish a magnetic field transverse to the direction of travel of ions from the ion source region to the ion extraction region. In another embodiment, low energy 16 eV electrons are injected into the ion source to dissociate gas molecules and undesired ion species into desired ion species.

  4. Supplementary materials of "High-resolution back-projection at regional distance: application to the Haiti M7.0 earthquake and comparisons with finite source studies"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ampuero, Jean Paul

    of the synthetic seismograms of the mainshock filtered from 0.2 to 0.7 Hz, assuming a point source with mechanism given by the CMT solution. Fig. S2 Fit of the teleseismic P and SH waveforms for the kinematic slip joint kinematic slip model. The P and SH waveforms are sorted with increasing azimuth angle (number

  5. A simplified fuzzy model to mimic a nonlinear system, applied to a plasma source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Z.; Rayner, J.; Cheetham, A.; Lund, T.

    1997-02-01

    This paper develops a fuzzy model to simulate the behavior of a nonlinear system, in particular a plasma source, with a view to developing a control system for materials processing plasmas employing a helicon source. Genetic algorithms are employed to optimize fuzzy rules related to the parameters of the fuzzy model which contain a set of variable zeros and poles of the nonlinear system as well as its time delay. A practical application of the fuzzy model is to estimate the electron number density of a low-temperature plasma. Based on the membership functions of the input and output, a set of fuzzy rules by which the variable zeros and poles are identified is derived and optimized u sing a genetic algorithm. The principal reason for investigating the proposed fuzzy model is the subsequent computer-aided design of a fuzzy controller to control the nonlinear system. Two experimental results are presented to validate the fuzzy model method. One shows a computer simulation and the other predicts the real-time behavior of the plasma source as its input parameters are varied.

  6. Development of a model of an x-ray tube transmission source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goda, Joetta M; Ianakiev, Kiril D; Moss, Cal E

    2009-01-01

    In support of the development of an x-ray tube based source for transmission measurements of UF6 gas, we have developed a one-dimensional, spreadsheet-based model of the source. Starting with the spectrum produced by an x-ray tube we apply the linear attenuation coefficients for various notch filters, the aluminum pipe, and UF6 gas. This model allows calculation of the transmitted spectrum based on the type of filter, the thickness of the filter, the x-ray tube high voltage, the Al pipe thickness, and the UF6 gas pressure. The sensitivity of the magnitude of the transmission peak produced by the notch filter to any of these variables can be explored quickly and easily to narrow the choices for experimental measurements. To validate the spreadsheet based model, comparisons have been made to various experimental data.

  7. Particle dynamics in a non-flaring solar active region model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Threlfall, J; Neukirch, T; Parnell, C E

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this work is to investigate and characterise particle behaviour in a (observationally-driven) 3D MHD model of the solar atmosphere above a slowly evolving, non-flaring active region. We use a relativistic guiding-centre particle code to investigate particle acceleration in a single snapshot of the 3D MHD simulation. Despite the lack of flare-like behaviour in the active region, direct acceleration of electrons and protons to non-thermal energies ($\\lesssim420$MeV) was found, yielding spectra with high-energy tails which conform to a power law. Examples of particle dynamics, including particle trapping caused by local electric rather than magnetic field effects, are observed and discussed, together with implications for future experiments which simulate non-flaring active region heating and reconnection.

  8. Short-Term Energy Outlook Model Documentation: Macro Bridge Procedure to Update Regional Macroeconomic Forecasts with National Macroeconomic Forecasts

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2010-01-01

    The Regional Short-Term Energy Model (RSTEM) uses macroeconomic variables such as income, employment, industrial production and consumer prices at both the national and regional1 levels as explanatory variables in the generation of the Short-Term Energy Outlook (STEO). This documentation explains how national macroeconomic forecasts are used to update regional macroeconomic forecasts through the RSTEM Macro Bridge procedure.

  9. A study on the background and clustering seismicity in the Taiwan region by using point process models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Yuh-Ing

    A study on the background and clustering seismicity in the Taiwan region by using point process), A study on the background and clustering seismicity in the Taiwan region by using point process models, J the shallow seismicity occurring in the Taiwan region during the 20th century using a stochastic declustering

  10. Analytical solutions for benchmarking cold regions subsurface water flow and energy transport models: One-dimensional soil thaw

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McKenzie, Jeffrey M.

    Analytical solutions for benchmarking cold regions subsurface water flow and energy transport Freezing and thawing a b s t r a c t Numerous cold regions water flow and energy transport models have of powerful simulators of cold regions subsurface water flow and energy transport have emerged in recent years

  11. Global budget of ethane and regional constraints on U.S. sources Yaping Xiao,1,2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jacob, Daniel J.

    ), with a best estimate for the global source of 13 Tg yrŔ1 , 8.0 Tg yrŔ1 from fossil fuel production, 2.6 Tg yr energy production in the U.S. may be underestimated by as much as 50%­100%. Citation: Xiao, Y., J. A and Europe. Simpson et al. [2006] used long-term measurements of C2H6 to show that recent fluctuations

  12. Source- and Age-Resolved Mechanistic Air Quality Models: Model Development and Application in Southeast Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Hongliang

    2012-07-16

    , road dust, internal combustion engines and industries are the major sources of primary PM2.5. Wildfire dominates primary PM near fire locations. Over 80% of sulfate is produced in upwind areas and coal combustion contributes most. Ammonium ion is mainly...

  13. Suzaku observations of two diffuse hard X-ray source regions, G22.0+0.0 and G23.5+0.1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yamauchi, Shigeo; Bamba, Aya

    2015-01-01

    G22.0+0.0 and G23.5+0.1 are diffuse hard X-ray sources discovered in the ASCA Galactic Plane Survey. We present Suzaku results of spectral analysis for these sources. G22.0+0.0 is confirmed to be a largely extended emission. The spectra were represented by a highly absorbed power-law model with a photon index of 1.7+/-0.3 and a moderately absorbed thermal emission with a temperature of 0.34^{+0.11}_{-0.08} keV. The difference in the N_{H} values between the two components suggests that the thermal component is unrelated with the power-law component and is a foreground emission located in the same line-of-sight. G23.5+0.1 is an extended source with a size of 3'.5. The spectra were fitted with an absorbed power-law model with a photon index of 2.4^{+0.5}_{-0.4}. The spatial and spectral properties show that both are candidates of old pulsar wind nebulae (PWNe). In addition to the extended sources, we analyzed spectra of three point sources found in the observed fields. Based on the spectral features, we discuss...

  14. Comparative study of Regional Urban Growth (RUG) model projections for new EU members in central Europe and the Baltic States 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Langner, Pawel

    2009-11-26

    Urban modelling and land-cover changes are well discussed in literature and are in a focal point of many researches. Regional urban growth (RUG) model for central Europe and the Baltic States projects land-cover changes ...

  15. Global warming and climate change - predictive models for temperate and tropical regions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Malini, B.H.

    1997-12-31

    Based on the assumption of 4{degree}C increase of global temperature by the turn of 21st century due to the accumulation of greenhouse gases an attempt is made to study the possible variations in different climatic regimes. The predictive climatic water balance model for Hokkaido island of Japan (a temperate zone) indicates the possible occurrence of water deficit for two to three months, which is a unknown phenomenon in this region at present. Similarly, India which represents tropical region also will experience much drier climates with increased water deficit conditions. As a consequence, the thermal region of Hokkaido which at present is mostly Tundra and Micro thermal will change into a Meso thermal category. Similarly, the moisture regime which at present supports per humid (A2, A3 and A4) and Humid (B4) climates can support A1, B4, B3, B2 and B1 climates indicating a shift towards drier side of the climatic spectrum. Further, the predictive modes of both the regions have indicated increased evapotranspiration rates. Although there is not much of change in the overall thermal characteristics of the Indian region the moisture regime indicates a clear shift towards the aridity in the country.

  16. Using Pre-Modeled Scenarios to Estimate Groundwater VOC Concentrations Resulting from Vadose Zone Sources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oostrom, Martinus; Truex, Michael J.; Rice, Amy K.; Johnson, Christian D.; Carroll, Kenneth C.; Becker, Dave; Simon, Michelle A.

    2014-04-28

    Soil vapor extraction (SVE) is a prevalent remediation approach for volatile contaminants in the vadose zone. To support selection of an appropriate endpoint for the SVE remedy, an evaluation is needed to determine whether vadose zone contamination has been diminished sufficiently to protect groundwater. When vapor-phase transport is an important component of the overall contaminant fate and transport from a vadose zone source, the contaminant concentration expected in groundwater is controlled by a limited set of parameters, including specific site dimensions, vadose zone properties, and source characteristics. An approach was developed for estimating the contaminant concentration in groundwater resulting from a contaminant source in the vadose zone based on pre-modeling contaminant transport for a matrix of parameter value combinations covering a range of potential site conditions. An interpolation and scaling process are then applied to estimate groundwater impact for site-specific conditions.

  17. Source characterization and modeling development for monoenergetic-proton radiography experiments on OMEGA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Manuel, M. J.-E.; Zylstra, A. B.; Rinderknecht, H. G.; Casey, D. T.; Rosenberg, M. J.; Sinenian, N.; Li, C. K.; Frenje, J. A.; Seguin, F. H.; Petrasso, R. D.

    2012-06-15

    A monoenergetic proton source has been characterized and a modeling tool developed for proton radiography experiments at the OMEGA [T. R. Boehly et al., Opt. Comm. 133, 495 (1997)] laser facility. Multiple diagnostics were fielded to measure global isotropy levels in proton fluence and images of the proton source itself provided information on local uniformity relevant to proton radiography experiments. Global fluence uniformity was assessed by multiple yield diagnostics and deviations were calculated to be {approx}16% and {approx}26% of the mean for DD and D{sup 3}He fusion protons, respectively. From individual fluence images, it was found that the angular frequencies of Greater-Than-Or-Equivalent-To 50 rad{sup -1} contributed less than a few percent to local nonuniformity levels. A model was constructed using the Geant4 [S. Agostinelli et al., Nuc. Inst. Meth. A 506, 250 (2003)] framework to simulate proton radiography experiments. The simulation implements realistic source parameters and various target geometries. The model was benchmarked with the radiographs of cold-matter targets to within experimental accuracy. To validate the use of this code, the cold-matter approximation for the scattering of fusion protons in plasma is discussed using a typical laser-foil experiment as an example case. It is shown that an analytic cold-matter approximation is accurate to within Less-Than-Or-Equivalent-To 10% of the analytic plasma model in the example scenario.

  18. A multiscale MDCT image-based breathing lung model with time-varying regional ventilation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yin, Youbing, E-mail: youbing-yin@uiowa.edu [Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering, The University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA 52242 (United States) [Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering, The University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA 52242 (United States); IIHR-Hydroscience and Engineering, The University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA 52242 (United States); Department of Radiology, The University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA 52242 (United States); Choi, Jiwoong, E-mail: jiwoong-choi@uiowa.edu [Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering, The University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA 52242 (United States) [Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering, The University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA 52242 (United States); IIHR-Hydroscience and Engineering, The University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA 52242 (United States); Hoffman, Eric A., E-mail: eric-hoffman@uiowa.edu [Department of Radiology, The University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA 52242 (United States); Department of Biomedical Engineering, The University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA 52242 (United States); Department of Internal Medicine, The University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA 52242 (United States); Tawhai, Merryn H., E-mail: m.tawhai@auckland.ac.nz [Auckland Bioengineering Institute, The University of Auckland, Auckland (New Zealand); Lin, Ching-Long, E-mail: ching-long-lin@uiowa.edu [Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering, The University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA 52242 (United States) [Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering, The University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA 52242 (United States); IIHR-Hydroscience and Engineering, The University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA 52242 (United States)

    2013-07-01

    A novel algorithm is presented that links local structural variables (regional ventilation and deforming central airways) to global function (total lung volume) in the lung over three imaged lung volumes, to derive a breathing lung model for computational fluid dynamics simulation. The algorithm constitutes the core of an integrative, image-based computational framework for subject-specific simulation of the breathing lung. For the first time, the algorithm is applied to three multi-detector row computed tomography (MDCT) volumetric lung images of the same individual. A key technique in linking global and local variables over multiple images is an in-house mass-preserving image registration method. Throughout breathing cycles, cubic interpolation is employed to ensure C{sub 1} continuity in constructing time-varying regional ventilation at the whole lung level, flow rate fractions exiting the terminal airways, and airway deformation. The imaged exit airway flow rate fractions are derived from regional ventilation with the aid of a three-dimensional (3D) and one-dimensional (1D) coupled airway tree that connects the airways to the alveolar tissue. An in-house parallel large-eddy simulation (LES) technique is adopted to capture turbulent-transitional-laminar flows in both normal and deep breathing conditions. The results obtained by the proposed algorithm when using three lung volume images are compared with those using only one or two volume images. The three-volume-based lung model produces physiologically-consistent time-varying pressure and ventilation distribution. The one-volume-based lung model under-predicts pressure drop and yields un-physiological lobar ventilation. The two-volume-based model can account for airway deformation and non-uniform regional ventilation to some extent, but does not capture the non-linear features of the lung.

  19. Phase transition free regions in the Ising model via the Kac-Ward operator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marcin Lis

    2015-05-17

    We investigate the spectral radius and operator norm of the Kac-Ward transition matrix for the Ising model on a general planar graph. We then use the obtained results to identify regions in the complex plane where the free energy density limits are analytic functions of the inverse temperature. The bound turns out to be optimal in the case of isoradial graphs, i.e. it yields criticality of the self-dual Z-invariant coupling constants.

  20. Real-Time Multi-Sensor Multi-Source Network Data Fusion Using Dynamic Traffic Assignment Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ben-Akiva, Moshe E.

    This paper presents a model-based data fusion framework that allows systematic fusing of multi-sensor multi-source traffic network data at real-time. Using simulation-based Dynamic Traffic Assignment (DTA) models, the ...

  1. Inverse modeling of NOx emissions at regional scale over northern France: Preliminary investigation of the second-order

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mallet, Vivien

    Inverse modeling of NOx emissions at regional scale over northern France: Preliminary investigation time distribution of NOx emissions is robust. Citation: Que´lo, D., V. Mallet, and B. Sportisse (2005), Inverse modeling of NOx emissions at regional scale over northern France: Preliminary investigation

  2. IEA Heat Pump Conference 2011, 16 -19 May 2011, Tokyo, Japan DYNAMIC MODELING OF AN AIR SOURCE HEAT PUMP WATER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    SOURCE HEAT PUMP WATER HEATER Farouk Fardoun, Associate Professor, Department of Industrial Engineering- 1 - 10th IEA Heat Pump Conference 2011, 16 - 19 May 2011, Tokyo, Japan DYNAMIC MODELING OF AN AIR of an air source heat pump water heater (ASHPWH). The mathematical model consists of submodels of the basic

  3. A revised tsunami source model for the 1707 Hoei earthquake and simulation of tsunami inundation of Ryujin Lake,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Furumura, Takashi

    A revised tsunami source model for the 1707 Hoei earthquake and simulation of tsunami inundation the currently accepted location at the westernmost end of Shikoku. Numerical simulation of the tsunami using a new source rupture model for the Hoei earthquake explains the distribution of the very high tsunami

  4. Constraining models of the large scale Galactic magnetic field with WMAP5 polarization data and extragalactic rotation measure sources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jansson, Ronnie; Farrar, Glennys R. [Center for Cosmology and Particle Physics and Department of Physics, New York University, 4 Washington Place, New York, NY 10003 (United States); Waelkens, Andre H.; Enßlin, Torsten A., E-mail: rj486@nyu.edu, E-mail: gf25@nyu.edu, E-mail: waelkens@MPA-Garching.MPG.DE, E-mail: ensslin@MPA-Garching.MPG.DE [Max-Planck-Institute für Astrophysik, Karl Schwarzschild-Str. 1, 85741 Garching (Germany)

    2009-07-01

    We introduce a method to quantify the quality-of-fit between data and observables depending on the large scale Galactic magnetic field. We combine WMAP5 polarized synchrotron data and rotation measures of extragalactic sources in a joint analysis to obtain best fit parameters and confidence levels for GMF models common in the literature. None of the existing models provide a good fit in both the disk and halo regions, and in many instances best-fit parameters are quite different than the original values. We note that probing a very large parameter space is necessary to avoid false likelihood maxima. The thermal and relativistic electron densities are critical for determining the GMF from the observables but they are not well constrained. We show that some characteristics of the electron densities can already be constrained using our method and with future data it may be possible to carry out a self-consistent analysis in which models of the GMF and electron densities are simultaneously optimized.

  5. Hollow cathode theory and experiment. II. A two-dimensional theoretical model of the emitter region

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mikellides, Ioannis G.; Katz, Ira; Goebel, Dan M.; Polk, James E.

    2005-12-01

    Despite their long history and wide range of applicability that includes electric propulsion, detailed understanding of the driving physics inside orificed hollow cathodes remains elusive. The theoretical complexity associated with the multicomponent fluid inside the cathode, and the difficulty of accessing empirically this region, have limited our ability to design cathodes that perform better and last longer. A two-dimensional axisymmetric theoretical model of the multispecies fluid inside an orificed hollow cathode is presented. The level of detail attained by the model is allowed by its extended system of governing equations not solved for in the past within the hollow cathode. Such detail is motivated in part by the need to quantify the effect(s) of the plasma on the emitter life, and by the need to build the foundation for future modeling that will assess erosion of the keeper plate. Results from numerical simulations of a 1.2-cm-diam cathode operating at a discharge current of 25 A and a gas flow rate of 5 SCCM show that approximately 10 A of electron current, and 3.45 A of ion current return back to the emitter surface. The total emitted electron current is 33.8 A and the peak emitter temperature is found to be 1440 K. Comparisons with the measurements suggest that anomalous heating of the plasma is possible near the orifice region. The model predicts heavy species temperatures as high as 2034 K and peak voltage drops near the emitting surface not exceeding 8 V.

  6. A Black-box Modelling Engine for Discharge Produced Plasma Radiation Sources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zakharov, S.V.; Choi, P.; Krukovskiy, A.Y.; Zhang, Q. [EPPRA sas, 91961 Courtaboeuf (France); Novikov, V.G.; Zakharov, V.S. [KIAM RAS, 125047 Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2006-01-05

    A Blackbox Modelling Engine (BME), is an instrument based on the adaptation of the RMHD code Z*, integrated into a specific computation environment to provide a turn key simulation instrument and to enable routine plasma modelling without specialist knowledge in numerical computation. Two different operating modes are provided: Detailed Physics mode and Fast Numerics mode. In the Detailed Physics mode, non-stationary, non-equilibrium radiation physics have been introduced to allow the modelling of transient plasmas in experimental geometry. In the Fast Numerics mode, the system architecture and the radiation transport is simplified to significantly accelerate the computation rate. The Fast Numerics mode allows the BME to be used realistically in parametric scanning to explore complex physical set up, before using the Detailed Physics mode. As an example of the results from the BME modelling, the EUV source plasma dynamics in the pulsed capillary discharge are presented.

  7. Solar surface emerging flux regions: a comparative study of radiative MHD modeling and Hinode SOT observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. C. M. Cheung; M. Schuessler; T. D. Tarbell; A. M. Title

    2008-10-31

    We present results from numerical modeling of emerging flux regions on the solar surface. The modeling was carried out by means of 3D radiative MHD simulations of the rise of buoyant magnetic flux tubes through the convection zone and into the photosphere. Due to the strong stratification of the convection zone, the rise results in a lateral expansion of the tube into a magnetic sheet, which acts as a reservoir for small-scale flux emergence events at the scale of granulation. The interaction of the convective downflows and the rising magnetic flux undulates it to form serpentine field lines emerging into the photosphere. Observational characteristics including the pattern of emerging flux regions, the cancellation of surface flux and associated high speed downflows, the convective collapse of photospheric flux tubes, the appearance of anomalous darkenings, the formation of bright points and the possible existence of transient kilogauss horizontal fields are discussed in the context of new observations from the Hinode Solar Optical Telescope. Implications for the local helioseismology of emerging flux regions are also discussed.

  8. A Multi-Model Analysis of the Regional and Sectoral Roles of Bioenergy in Near- and Long-Term CO2 Emissions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Calvin, Katherine V.; Wise, Marshall A.; Klein, David; McCollum, David; Tavoni, Massimo; van der Zwaan, Bob; Van Vuuren, Detlef

    2013-11-01

    We study the near term and the longer term the contribution of bioenergy in different LIMITS scenarios as modeled by the participating models in the LIMITS project. With These scenarios have proven useful for exploring a range of outcomes for bioenergy use in response to both regionally diverse near term policies and the transition to a longer-term global mitigation policy and target. The use of several models has provided a source of heterogeneity in terms of incorporating uncertain assumptions about future socioeconomics and technology, as well as different paradigms for how the world may respond to policies. The results have also highlighted the heterogeneity and versatility of bioenergy itself, with different types of resources and applications in several energy sectors. In large part due to this versatility, the contribution of bioenergy to climate mitigation is a robust response across all models, despite their differences.

  9. MODEL-BASED HYDROACOUSTIC BLOCKAGE ASSESSMENT AND DEVELOPMENT OF AN EXPLOSIVE SOURCE DATABASE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matzel, E; Ramirez, A; Harben, P

    2005-07-11

    We are continuing the development of the Hydroacoustic Blockage Assessment Tool (HABAT) which is designed for use by analysts to predict which hydroacoustic monitoring stations can be used in discrimination analysis for any particular event. The research involves two approaches (1) model-based assessment of blockage, and (2) ground-truth data-based assessment of blockage. The tool presents the analyst with a map of the world, and plots raypath blockages from stations to sources. The analyst inputs source locations and blockage criteria, and the tool returns a list of blockage status from all source locations to all hydroacoustic stations. We are currently using the tool in an assessment of blockage criteria for simple direct-path arrivals. Hydroacoustic data, predominantly from earthquake sources, are read in and assessed for blockage at all available stations. Several measures are taken. First, can the event be observed at a station above background noise? Second, can we establish backazimuth from the station to the source. Third, how large is the decibel drop at one station relative to other stations. These observational results are then compared with model estimates to identify the best set of blockage criteria and used to create a set of blockage maps for each station. The model-based estimates are currently limited by the coarse bathymetry of existing databases and by the limitations inherent in the raytrace method. In collaboration with BBN Inc., the Hydroacoustic Coverage Assessment Model (HydroCAM) that generates the blockage files that serve as input to HABAT, is being extended to include high-resolution bathymetry databases in key areas that increase model-based blockage assessment reliability. An important aspect of this capability is to eventually include reflected T-phases where they reliably occur and to identify the associated reflectors. To assess how well any given hydroacoustic discriminant works in separating earthquake and in-water explosion populations it is necessary to have both a database of reference earthquake events and of reference in-water explosive events. Although reference earthquake events are readily available, explosive reference events are not. Consequently, building an in-water explosion reference database requires the compilation of events from many sources spanning a long period of time. We have developed a database of small implosive and explosive reference events from the 2003 Indian Ocean Cruise data. These events were recorded at some or all of the IMS Indian Ocean hydroacoustic stations: Diego Garcia, Cape Leeuwin, and Crozet Island. We have also reviewed many historical large in-water explosions and identified five that have adequate source information and can be positively associated to the hydrophone recordings. The five events are: Cannekin, Longshot, CHASE-3, CHASE-5, and IITRI-1. Of these, the first two are nuclear tests on land but near water. The latter three are in-water conventional explosive events with yields from ten to hundreds of tons TNT equivalent. The objective of this research is to enhance discrimination capabilities for events located in the world's oceans. Two research and development efforts are needed to achieve this: (1) improvement in discrimination algorithms and their joint statistical application to events, and (2) development of an automated and accurate blockage prediction capability that will identify all stations and phases (direct and reflected) from a given event that will have adequate signal to be used in a discrimination analysis. The strategy for improving blockage prediction in the world's oceans is to improve model-based prediction of blockage and to develop a ground-truth database of reference events to assess blockage. Currently, research is focused on the development of a blockage assessment software tool. The tool is envisioned to develop into a sophisticated and unifying package that optimally and automatically assesses both model and data based blockage predictions in all ocean basins, for all NDC stations, and accounting for refle

  10. Impact of Agricultural Practice on Regional Climate in a CoupledLand Surface Mesoscale Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cooley, H.S.; Riley, W.J.; Torn, M.S.; He, Y.

    2004-07-01

    The land surface has been shown to form strong feedbacks with climate due to linkages between atmospheric conditions and terrestrial ecosystem exchanges of energy, momentum, water, and trace gases. Although often ignored in modeling studies, land management itself may form significant feedbacks. Because crops are harvested earlier under drier conditions, regional air temperature, precipitation, and soil moisture, for example, affect harvest timing, particularly of rain-fed crops. This removal of vegetation alters the land surface characteristics and may, in turn, affect regional climate. We applied a coupled climate(MM5) and land-surface (LSM1) model to examine the effects of early and late winter wheat harvest on regional climate in the Department of Energy Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility in the Southern Great Plains, where winter wheat accounts for 20 percent of the land area. Within the winter wheat region, simulated 2 m air temperature was 1.3 C warmer in the Early Harvest scenario at mid-day averaged over the two weeks following harvest. Soils in the harvested area were drier and warmer in the top 10 cm and wetter in the 10-20 cm layer. Midday soils were 2.5 C warmer in the harvested area at mid-day averaged over the two weeks following harvest. Harvest also dramatically altered latent and sensible heat fluxes. Although differences between scenarios diminished once both scenarios were harvested, the short-term impacts of land management on climate were comparable to those from land cover change demonstrated in other studies.

  11. NREL: Regional Energy Deployment System (ReEDS) Model - Model Description

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMass map shines lightGeospatial Toolkit TheCompetitiveMattPhotoQualitative Model

  12. MOBILE4. 1: Highway-vehicle mobile-source emission-factor model (Apple MacIntosh version) (for microcomputers). Model-Simulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-08-01

    MOBILE4.1 is the latest revision to EPA's highway vehicle mobile source emission factor model. Relative to MOBILE4, it contains numerous revisions and provides the user with additional options for modeling highway vehicle emission factors. it will calculate emission factors for hydrocarbons (HC), carbon monoxide, (CO), and oxides of nitrogen (NOx) from highway motor vehicles. It calculates emission factors for eight individual vehicle types, in two regions of the country (low and high altitude). The emission factors depend on various conditions such as ambient temperature, fuel volatility, speed, and mileage accrual rates. It will estimate emission factors for any calendar year between 1960 and 2020 inclusive. The 25 most recent model years are considered in operation in each calendar year. EPA is requiring that states and others preparing emission inventories for nonattainment areas for CO and ozone to use MOBILE4.1 in the development of the base year 1990 emission inventories required under the Clean Air Act of 1990.

  13. Improvements to Regional Explosion Identification using Attenuation Models of the Lithosphere

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pasyanos, M E; Walter, W R

    2009-03-30

    Regional P/S amplitudes have been recognized as an effective discriminant between earthquakes and explosions. While closely spaced earthquake and explosions generally discriminate easily, the application of this technique to broad regions has been hampered by large variations in the amplitude of regional phases due to the attenuation structure of the crust and upper mantle. Making use of a recent P-wave and S-wave attenuation model of the lithosphere, we have found that correcting the events using our amplitude methodology significantly reduces the scattering in the earthquake population. We demonstrate an application of this technique to station NIL (Nilore, Pakistan) using broad area earthquakes and the 1998 Indian nuclear explosion recorded at the station using the Pn/Lg discriminant in the 1-2 Hz passband. We find that the explosion, which is lost in the scatter of the earthquakes in the uncorrected discriminant, clearly separates by correcting for the attenuation structure. We see a similar reduction in scatter and separation for the Pn/Sn and Pg/Lg discriminants in the same passband.

  14. Regional scale cropland carbon budgets: evaluating a geospatial agricultural modeling system using inventory data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Xuesong; Izaurralde, Roberto C.; Manowitz, David H.; Sahajpal, Ritvik; West, Tristram O.; Thomson, Allison M.; Xu, Min; Zhao, Kaiguang; LeDuc, Stephen D.; Williams, Jimmy R.

    2015-01-01

    Accurate quantification and clear understanding of regional scale cropland carbon (C) cycling is critical for designing effective policies and management practices that can contribute toward stabilizing atmospheric CO2 concentrations. However, extrapolating site-scale observations to regional scales represents a major challenge confronting the agricultural modeling community. This study introduces a novel geospatial agricultural modeling system (GAMS) exploring the integration of the mechanistic Environmental Policy Integrated Climate model, spatially-resolved data, surveyed management data, and supercomputing functions for cropland C budgets estimates. This modeling system creates spatially-explicit modeling units at a spatial resolution consistent with remotely-sensed crop identification and assigns cropping systems to each of them by geo-referencing surveyed crop management information at the county or state level. A parallel computing algorithm was also developed to facilitate the computationally intensive model runs and output post-processing and visualization. We evaluated GAMS against National Agricultural Statistics Service (NASS) reported crop yields and inventory estimated county-scale cropland C budgets averaged over 2000–2008. We observed good overall agreement, with spatial correlation of 0.89, 0.90, 0.41, and 0.87, for crop yields, Net Primary Production (NPP), Soil Organic C (SOC) change, and Net Ecosystem Exchange (NEE), respectively. However, we also detected notable differences in the magnitude of NPP and NEE, as well as in the spatial pattern of SOC change. By performing crop-specific annual comparisons, we discuss possible explanations for the discrepancies between GAMS and the inventory method, such as data requirements, representation of agroecosystem processes, completeness and accuracy of crop management data, and accuracy of crop area representation. Based on these analyses, we further discuss strategies to improve GAMS by updating input data and by designing more efficient parallel computing capability to quantitatively assess errors associated with the simulation of C budget components. The modularized design of the GAMS makes it flexible to be updated and adapted for different agricultural models so long as they require similar input data, and to be linked with socio-economic models to understand the effectiveness and implications of diverse C management practices and policies.

  15. A One-Dimensional (1-D) Three-Region Model for a Bubbling Fluidized-Bed Adsorber

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, Andrew; Miller, David C.

    2012-01-01

    A general one-dimensional (1-D), three-region model for a bubbling fluidized-bed adsorber with internal heat exchangers has been developed. The model can predict the hydrodynamics of the bed and provides axial profiles for all temperatures, concentrations, and velocities. The model is computationally fast and flexible and allows for any system of adsorption and desorption reactions to be modeled, making the model applicable to any adsorption process. The model has been implemented in both gPROMS and Aspen Custom Modeler, and the behavior of the model has been verified.

  16. MODELING SUPER-FAST MAGNETOSONIC WAVES OBSERVED BY SDO IN ACTIVE REGION FUNNELS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ofman, L.; Liu, W.; Title, A.; Aschwanden, M.

    2011-10-20

    Recently, quasi-periodic, rapidly propagating waves have been observed in extreme ultraviolet by the Solar Dynamics Observatory/Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) instrument in about 10 flare/coronal mass ejection (CME) events thus far. A typical example is the 2010 August 1 C3.2 flare/CME event that exhibited arc-shaped wave trains propagating in an active region (AR) magnetic funnel with {approx}5% intensity variations at speeds in the range of 1000-2000 km s{sup -1}. The fast temporal cadence and high sensitivity of AIA enabled the detection of these waves. We identify them as fast magnetosonic waves driven quasi-periodically at the base of the flaring region and develop a three-dimensional MHD model of the event. For the initial state we utilize the dipole magnetic field to model the AR and include gravitationally stratified density at coronal temperature. At the coronal base of the AR, we excite the fast magnetosonic wave by periodic velocity pulsations in the photospheric plane confined to a funnel of magnetic field lines. The excited fast magnetosonic waves have similar amplitude, wavelength, and propagation speeds as the observed wave trains. Based on the simulation results, we discuss the possible excitation mechanism of the waves, their dynamical properties, and the use of the observations for coronal MHD seismology.

  17. A nanoflare model for active region radiance: application of artificial neural networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Bazarghan; H. Safari; D. E. Innes; E. Karami; S. K. Solanki

    2008-12-20

    Context. Nanoflares are small impulsive bursts of energy that blend with and possibly make up much of the solar background emission. Determining their frequency and energy input is central to understanding the heating of the solar corona. One method is to extrapolate the energy frequency distribution of larger individually observed flares to lower energies. Only if the power law exponent is greater than 2, is it considered possible that nanoflares contribute significantly to the energy input. Aims. Time sequences of ultraviolet line radiances observed in the corona of an active region are modelled with the aim of determining the power law exponent of the nanoflare energy distribution. Methods. A simple nanoflare model based on three key parameters (the flare rate, the flare duration time, and the power law exponent of the flare energy frequency distribution) is used to simulate emission line radiances from the ions Fe XIX, Ca XIII, and Si iii, observed by SUMER in the corona of an active region as it rotates around the east limb of the Sun. Light curve pattern recognition by an Artificial Neural Network (ANN) scheme is used to determine the values. Results. The power law exponents, alpha 2.8, 2.8, and 2.6 for Fe XIX, Ca XIII, and Si iii respectively. Conclusions. The light curve simulations imply a power law exponent greater than the critical value of 2 for all ion species. This implies that if the energy of flare-like events is extrapolated to low energies, nanoflares could provide a significant contribution to the heating of active region coronae.

  18. Heat and freshwater exchange on the Antarctic continental1" shelf in a regional coupled climate model2"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gerber, Edwin

    Heat and freshwater exchange on the Antarctic continental1" shelf in a regional coupled climate, South Korea 120-749. Email:21" cyoo@cims.nyu.edu.22" #12;2" Abstract23" Understanding heat. This study analyzes the heat and freshwater budget using a regional25" coupled climate model, which has been

  19. MEG (Magnetoencephalography) multipolar modeling of distributed sources using RAP-MUSIC (Recursively Applied and Projected Multiple Signal Characterization)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mosher, J. C.; Baillet, S.; Jerbi, K.; Leahy, R. M.

    2001-01-01

    We describe the use of truncated multipolar expansions for producing dynamic images of cortical neural activation from measurements of the magnetoencephalogram. We use a signal-subspace method to find the locations of a set of multipolar sources, each of which represents a region of activity in the cerebral cortex. Our method builds up an estimate of the sources in a recursive manner, i.e. we first search for point current dipoles, then magnetic dipoles, and finally first order multipoles. The dynamic behavior of these sources is then computed using a linear fit to the spatiotemporal data. The final step in the procedure is to map each of the multipolar sources into an equivalent distributed source on the cortical surface. The method is illustrated through an application to epileptic interictal MEG data.

  20. Modeling of magnetically enhanced capacitively coupled plasma sources: ArC4F8 O2 discharges

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kushner, Mark

    Modeling of magnetically enhanced capacitively coupled plasma sources: ArŐC4F8 ŐO2 discharges Alex Magnetically enhanced, capacitively coupled radio frequency plasma sources are finding continued use increase the plasma density at a given pressure or to lower the operating pressure. The use of MERIEs

  1. On an improved sub-regional water resources management representation for integration into earth system models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Voisin, Nathalie; Li, Hongyi; Ward, Duane L.; Huang, Maoyi; Wigmosta, Mark S.; Leung, Lai-Yung R.

    2013-09-30

    Human influence on the hydrologic cycle includes regulation and storage, consumptive use and overall redistribution of water resources in space and time. Representing these processes is essential for applications of earth system models in hydrologic and climate predictions, as well as impact studies at regional to global scales. Emerging large-scale research reservoir models use generic operating rules that are flexible for coupling with earth system models. Those generic operating rules have been successful in reproducing the overall regulated flow at large basin scales. This study investigates the uncertainties of the reservoir models from different implementations of the generic operating rules using the complex multi-objective Columbia River Regulation System in northwestern United States as an example to understand their effects on not only regulated flow but also reservoir storage and fraction of the demand that is met. Numerical experiments are designed to test new generic operating rules that combine storage and releases targets for multi-purpose reservoirs and to compare the use of reservoir usage priorities, withdrawals vs. consumptive demand, as well as natural vs. regulated mean flow for calibrating operating rules. Overall the best performing implementation is the use of the combined priorities (flood control storage targets and irrigation release targets) operating rules calibrated with mean annual natural flow and mean monthly withdrawals. The challenge of not accounting for groundwater withdrawals, or on the contrary, assuming that all remaining demand is met through groundwater extractions, is discussed.

  2. Stochastic earthquake source model: the omega-square hypothesis and the directivity effect

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Molchan, G

    2015-01-01

    Recently A. Gusev suggested and numerically investigated the doubly stochastic earthquake source model. The model is supposed to demonstrate the following features in the far-field body waves: 1) the omega-square high-frequency (HF) behavior of displacement spectra; 2) lack of the directivity effect in HF radiation; and 3) a stochastic nature of the HF signal component. The model involves two stochastic elements: the local stress drop (SD) on a fault and the rupture time function (RT) with a linear dominant component. The goal of the present study is to investigate the Gusev model theoretically and to find conditions for (1, 2) to be valid and stable relative to receiver site. The models with smooth elements SD, RT are insufficient for these purposes. Therefore SD and RT are treated as realizations of stochastic fields of the fractal type. The local smoothness of such fields is characterized by the fractional (Hurst) exponent H, 0 < H < 1. This allows us to consider a wide class of stochastic functions ...

  3. Global and regional modeling of clouds and aerosols in the marine boundary layer during VOCALS: the VOCA intercomparison

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Wyant, M. C.; Bretherton, Christopher S.; Wood, Robert; Carmichael, Gregory; Clarke, A. D.; Fast, Jerome D.; George, R.; Gustafson, William I.; Hannay, Cecile; Lauer, Axel; et al

    2015-01-09

    A diverse collection of models are used to simulate the marine boundary layer in the southeast Pacific region during the period of the October–November 2008 VOCALS REx (VAMOS Ocean Cloud Atmosphere Land Study Regional Experiment) field campaign. Regional models simulate the period continuously in boundary-forced free-running mode, while global forecast models and GCMs (general circulation models) are run in forecast mode. The models are compared to extensive observations along a line at 20° S extending westward from the South American coast. Most of the models simulate cloud and aerosol characteristics and gradients across the region that are recognizably similar tomore »observations, despite the complex interaction of processes involved in the problem, many of which are parameterized or poorly resolved. Some models simulate the regional low cloud cover well, though many models underestimate MBL (marine boundary layer) depth near the coast. Most models qualitatively simulate the observed offshore gradients of SO2, sulfate aerosol, CCN (cloud condensation nuclei) concentration in the MBL as well as differences in concentration between the MBL and the free troposphere. Most models also qualitatively capture the decrease in cloud droplet number away from the coast. However, there are large quantitative intermodel differences in both means and gradients of these quantities. Many models are able to represent episodic offshore increases in cloud droplet number and aerosol concentrations associated with periods of offshore flow. Most models underestimate CCN (at 0.1% supersaturation) in the MBL and free troposphere. The GCMs also have difficulty simulating coastal gradients in CCN and cloud droplet number concentration near the coast. The overall performance of the models demonstrates their potential utility in simulating aerosol–cloud interactions in the MBL, though quantitative estimation of aerosol–cloud interactions and aerosol indirect effects of MBL clouds with these models remains uncertain.« less

  4. Global and regional modeling of clouds and aerosols in the marine boundary layer during VOCALS: the VOCA intercomparison

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wyant, M. C.; Bretherton, Christopher S.; Wood, Robert; Carmichael, Gregory; Clarke, A. D.; Fast, Jerome D.; George, R.; Gustafson, William I.; Hannay, Cecile; Lauer, Axel; Lin, Yanluan; Morcrette, J. -J.; Mulcahay, Jane; Saide, Pablo; Spak, S. N.; Yang, Qing

    2015-01-01

    A diverse collection of models are used to simulate the marine boundary layer in the southeast Pacific region during the period of the October–November 2008 VOCALS REx (VAMOS Ocean Cloud Atmosphere Land Study Regional Experiment) field campaign. Regional models simulate the period continuously in boundary-forced free-running mode, while global forecast models and GCMs (general circulation models) are run in forecast mode. The models are compared to extensive observations along a line at 20° S extending westward from the South American coast. Most of the models simulate cloud and aerosol characteristics and gradients across the region that are recognizably similar to observations, despite the complex interaction of processes involved in the problem, many of which are parameterized or poorly resolved. Some models simulate the regional low cloud cover well, though many models underestimate MBL (marine boundary layer) depth near the coast. Most models qualitatively simulate the observed offshore gradients of SO2, sulfate aerosol, CCN (cloud condensation nuclei) concentration in the MBL as well as differences in concentration between the MBL and the free troposphere. Most models also qualitatively capture the decrease in cloud droplet number away from the coast. However, there are large quantitative intermodel differences in both means and gradients of these quantities. Many models are able to represent episodic offshore increases in cloud droplet number and aerosol concentrations associated with periods of offshore flow. Most models underestimate CCN (at 0.1% supersaturation) in the MBL and free troposphere. The GCMs also have difficulty simulating coastal gradients in CCN and cloud droplet number concentration near the coast. The overall performance of the models demonstrates their potential utility in simulating aerosol–cloud interactions in the MBL, though quantitative estimation of aerosol–cloud interactions and aerosol indirect effects of MBL clouds with these models remains uncertain.

  5. Assessing FPAR Source and Parameter Optimization Scheme in Application of a Diagnostic Carbon Flux Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Turner, D P; Ritts, W D; Wharton, S; Thomas, C; Monson, R; Black, T A

    2009-02-26

    The combination of satellite remote sensing and carbon cycle models provides an opportunity for regional to global scale monitoring of terrestrial gross primary production, ecosystem respiration, and net ecosystem production. FPAR (the fraction of photosynthetically active radiation absorbed by the plant canopy) is a critical input to diagnostic models, however little is known about the relative effectiveness of FPAR products from different satellite sensors nor about the sensitivity of flux estimates to different parameterization approaches. In this study, we used multiyear observations of carbon flux at four eddy covariance flux tower sites within the conifer biome to evaluate these factors. FPAR products from the MODIS and SeaWiFS sensors, and the effects of single site vs. cross-site parameter optimization were tested with the CFLUX model. The SeaWiFs FPAR product showed greater dynamic range across sites and resulted in slightly reduced flux estimation errors relative to the MODIS product when using cross-site optimization. With site-specific parameter optimization, the flux model was effective in capturing seasonal and interannual variation in the carbon fluxes at these sites. The cross-site prediction errors were lower when using parameters from a cross-site optimization compared to parameter sets from optimization at single sites. These results support the practice of multisite optimization within a biome for parameterization of diagnostic carbon flux models.

  6. Instabilities in a simplified Fermi-like model with Krook-type collisions, intrinsic damping, and a source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zale?ny, J. [West Pomeranian University of Technology, Institute of Physics, 70-310 Szczecin (Poland)] [West Pomeranian University of Technology, Institute of Physics, 70-310 Szczecin (Poland)

    2013-08-15

    Plasma micro-instabilities have been investigated numerically using a simplified Fermi-like model extended to include also a Krook-type collision operator containing a source plus collisions and a phenomenologically introduced intrinsic damping. In this simplified Fermi-like model, the wave is modeled as a single potential well. The resonant wave-particle interaction occurs due to bounces of the particles trapped between the well barriers, the height of which depends on the energy exchange between the particles and the wave. A fast numerical algorithm is used for solving the simplified Fermi-like model with the source and the relaxation processes and is briefly described and the obtained numerical results are presented and discussed. The main observation is that the presence of the source and the Krook-type collisions tends to suppress the process of filamentation in phase space and to restore the initial distribution function with free energy. In the Fermi like model including source and collisions, the steady state of the wave amplitude is achieved only due to the presence of the damping in the system. This is different from the collisionless case, when the steady state is achieved due to phase mixing. Some remarks in the end of the paper compare the results of the Fermi-like model with those of the analytical Berk-Breizman model, which inspired the extension of the Fermi-like model to include a source, collisions, and damping.

  7. Journal of the Meteorological Society of Japan, Vol. 82, No. 6, pp. 1599--1628, 2004 1599 Regional Climate Modeling: Progress, Challenges, and Prospects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Yuqing

    , and development of regional earth system models. It is believed that with the demonstrated credibility of RCMs

  8. Electron-beam-ion-source (EBIS) modeling progress at FAR-TECH, Inc

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, J. S. Zhao, L. Spencer, J. A. Evstatiev, E. G.

    2015-01-09

    FAR-TECH, Inc. has been developing a numerical modeling tool for Electron-Beam-Ion-Sources (EBISs). The tool consists of two codes. One is the Particle-Beam-Gun-Simulation (PBGUNS) code to simulate a steady state electron beam and the other is the EBIS-Particle-In-Cell (EBIS-PIC) code to simulate ion charge breeding with the electron beam. PBGUNS, a 2D (r,z) electron gun and ion source simulation code, has been extended for efficient modeling of EBISs and the work was presented previously. EBIS-PIC is a space charge self-consistent PIC code and is written to simulate charge breeding in an axisymmetric 2D (r,z) device allowing for full three-dimensional ion dynamics. This 2D code has been successfully benchmarked with Test-EBIS measurements at Brookhaven National Laboratory. For long timescale (< tens of ms) ion charge breeding, the 2D EBIS-PIC simulations take a long computational time making the simulation less practical. Most of the EBIS charge breeding, however, may be modeled in 1D (r) as the axial dependence of the ion dynamics may be ignored in the trap. Where 1D approximations are valid, simulations of charge breeding in an EBIS over long time scales become possible, using EBIS-PIC together with PBGUNS. Initial 1D results are presented. The significance of the magnetic field to ion dynamics, ion cooling effects due to collisions with neutral gas, and the role of Coulomb collisions are presented.

  9. Application of an automatic approach to calibrate the NEMURO nutrientphytoplanktonzooplankton food web model in the Oyashio region

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ­phytoplankton­zooplankton food web model in the Oyashio region Shin-ichi Ito a, , Naoki Yoshie b , Takeshi Okunishi c , Tsuneo without ontogenetic vertical migration of the large zooplankton functional group. Determining or averaged state variables were used, in whether state variables were model functional groups or were

  10. Dietary supplement users vary in attitudes and sources of dietary supplement information in East and West geographic regions: a cross-sectional study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rozga, Mary R; Stern, Judith S; Stanhope, Kimber; Havel, Peter J; Kazaks, Alexandra G

    2013-01-01

    to be the primary sources of information (52.4%), and therebecoming a primary source of information from being one of

  11. Global distribution and sources of dissolved inorganic nitrogen export to the coastal zone: Results from a spatially explicit, global model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seitzinger, Sybil

    Global distribution and sources of dissolved inorganic nitrogen export to the coastal zone: Results dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN) export by rivers to coastal waters (NEWS-DIN). NEWS-DIN was developed as part of an internally consistent suite of global nutrient export models. Modeled and measured DIN

  12. Journal of Power Sources 164 (2007) 189195 Modeling water transport in liquid feed direct methanol fuel cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2007-01-01

    Journal of Power Sources 164 (2007) 189­195 Modeling water transport in liquid feed direct methanol management in direct methanol fuel cells (DMFCs) is very critical and complicated because of many interacting rights reserved. Keywords: Direct methanol fuel cell; Water transport; Mathematical modeling; Three

  13. Journal of Power Sources 162 (2006) 388399 Model-based condition monitoring of PEM fuel cell using

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ding, Yu

    2006-01-01

    Journal of Power Sources 162 (2006) 388­399 Model-based condition monitoring of PEM fuel cell using of polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cell systems, temporary faults in such systems still might occur/uncertainty of the fuel cell system, and the measurement noise. In this research, we propose a model-based condition

  14. A multidisciplinary effort to assign realistic source parameters to models of volcanic ash-cloud transport and dispersion during eruptions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rose, William I.

    A multidisciplinary effort to assign realistic source parameters to models of volcanic ash: volcanic eruption aircraft volcanic plumes ash clouds During volcanic eruptions, volcanic ash transport and dispersion models (VATDs) are used to forecast the location and movement of ash clouds over hours to days

  15. Effects of two Asian sand dusts transported from the dust source regions of Inner Mongolia and northeast China on murine lung eosinophilia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    He, Miao; Ichinose, Takamichi; Song, Yuan; Yoshida, Yasuhiro; Arashidani, Keiichi; Yoshida, Seiichi; Liu, Boying; Nishikawa, Masataka; Takano, Hirohisa; and others

    2013-11-01

    The quality and quantity of toxic materials adsorbed onto Asian sand dust (ASD) are different based on dust source regions and passage routes. The aggravating effects of two ASDs (ASD1 and ASD2) transported from the source regions of Inner Mongolia and northeast China on lung eosinophilia were compared to clarify the role of toxic materials in ASD. The ASDs contained different amounts of lipopolysaccharides (LPS) and ?-glucan (ASD1 < ASD2) and SiO{sub 2} (ASD1 > ASD2). CD-1 mice were instilled intratracheally with ASD1, ASD2 and/or ovalbumin (OVA) four times at 2-week intervals. ASD1 and ASD2 enhanced eosinophil recruitment induced by OVA in the submucosa of the airway, with goblet cell proliferation in the bronchial epithelium. ASD1 and ASD2 synergistically increased OVA-induced eosinophil-relevant cytokines interleukin-5 (IL-5), IL-13 (ASD1 < ASD2) and chemokine eotaxin (ASD1 > ASD2) in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. ASD2 aggravating effects on lung eosinophilia were greater than ASD1. The role of LPS and ?-glucan in ASD2 on the production of pro-inflammatory mediators was assessed using in vitro bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMDMs) from wild type, Toll-like receptor 2-deficient (TLR2 ?/?), TLR4 ?/?, and MyD88 ?/? mice (on Balb/c background). ASD2-stimulated TLR2 ?/? BMDMs enhanced IL-6, IL-12, TNF-?, MCP-1 and MIP-1? secretion compared with ASD2-stimulated TLR4 ?/? BMDMs. Protein expression from ASD2-stimulated MyD88 ?/? BMDM were very low or undetectable. The in vitro results indicate that lung eosinophilia caused by ASD is TLR4 dependent. Therefore, the aggravation of OVA-related lung eosinophilia by ASD may be dependent on toxic substances derived from microbes, such as LPS, rather than SiO{sub 2}. - Highlights: • Asian sand dust (ASD) from the deserts of China causes serious respiratory problems. • The aggravating effects of two ASDs on lung eosinophilia were compared. • The ASDs contained different LPS and ?-glucan (ASD1 < ASD2) and SiO{sub 2} (ASD1 > ASD2). • The ASD2 aggravating effects on lung eosinophilia were greater than ASD1. • The aggravation of lung eosinophilia may be dependent on LPS in ASD, rather than SiO{sub 2}.

  16. A global aerosol model forecast for the ACE-Asia field experiment Mian Chin,1,2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chin, Mian

    layer. We attribute this ``missing'' dust source to desertification regions in the Inner Mongolia forecasting. After incorporating the desertification sources, the model is able to reproduce the observed

  17. Modeling Advanced Neutron Source reactor station blackout accident using RELAP5

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, N.C.J. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA)); Fletcher, C.D. (EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (USA))

    1990-01-01

    The Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) system model using RELAP5 has been developed to perform loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) and non-LOCA transients as safety-related input for early design considerations. The transients studies include LOCA, station blackout, and reactivity insertion accidents. The small-, medium-, and large-break LOCA results were presented and documented. This paper will focus on the station blackout scenario. The station blackout analyses have concentrated on thermal-hydraulic system response with and without accumulators. Five transient calculations were performed to characterize system performance using various numbers and sizes of accumulators at several key sites. The main findings will be discussed with recommendations for conceptual design considerations. ANS is a state-of-the-art research reactor to be built and operated at high heat flux, high mass flux, and high coolant subcooling. To accommodate these features, three ANS-specific changes were made in the RELAP5 code by adding: the Petukhov heat transfer correlation for single-phase forced convection in the thin coolant channel; the Gambill additive method with the Weatherhead wall superheat for the critical heat flux; and the Griffith drift flux model for the interfacial drag in the slug flow regime. 7 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  18. Influence of polarization and a source model for dose calculation in MRT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bartzsch, Stefan Oelfke, Uwe; Lerch, Michael; Petasecca, Marco; Bräuer-Krisch, Elke

    2014-04-15

    Purpose: Microbeam Radiation Therapy (MRT), an alternative preclinical treatment strategy using spatially modulated synchrotron radiation on a micrometer scale, has the great potential to cure malignant tumors (e.g., brain tumors) while having low side effects on normal tissue. Dose measurement and calculation in MRT is challenging because of the spatial accuracy required and the arising high dose differences. Dose calculation with Monte Carlo simulations is time consuming and their accuracy is still a matter of debate. In particular, the influence of photon polarization has been discussed in the literature. Moreover, it is controversial whether a complete knowledge of phase space trajectories, i.e., the simulation of the machine from the wiggler to the collimator, is necessary in order to accurately calculate the dose. Methods: With Monte Carlo simulations in the Geant4 toolkit, the authors investigate the influence of polarization on the dose distribution and the therapeutically important peak to valley dose ratios (PVDRs). Furthermore, the authors analyze in detail phase space information provided byMartínez-Rovira et al. [“Development and commissioning of a Monte Carlo photon model for the forthcoming clinical trials in microbeam radiation therapy,” Med. Phys. 39(1), 119–131 (2012)] and examine its influence on peak and valley doses. A simple source model is developed using parallel beams and its applicability is shown in a semiadjoint Monte Carlo simulation. Results are compared to measurements and previously published data. Results: Polarization has a significant influence on the scattered dose outside the microbeam field. In the radiation field, however, dose and PVDRs deduced from calculations without polarization and with polarization differ by less than 3%. The authors show that the key consequences from the phase space information for dose calculations are inhomogeneous primary photon flux, partial absorption due to inclined beam incidence outside the field center, increased beam width and center to center distance due to the beam propagation from the collimator to the phantom surface and imperfect absorption in the absorber material of the Multislit Collimator. These corrections have an effect of approximately 10% on the valley dose and suffice to describe doses in MRT within the measurement uncertainties of currently available dosimetry techniques. Conclusions: The source for the first clinical pet trials in MRT is characterized with respect to its phase space and the photon polarization. The results suggest the use of a presented simplified phase space model in dose calculations and hence pave the way for alternative and fast dose calculation algorithms. They also show that the polarization is of minor importance for the clinical important peak and valley doses inside the microbeam field.

  19. An assessment of possible climate change in the Australian region based on intercomparison of general circulation modeling results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Whetton, P.H.; Pittock, A.B.; Haylock, M.R. ); Rayner, P.J. )

    1994-03-01

    To assist in estimating likely future climate change in the Australian region, the authors examine the results of four different general circulation modeling experiments run to assess the equilibrium impact of doubling greenhouse gases. The results examined were the most recent available at the time of study from various research centers in North America and Europe, as well as those of the Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO). The approach used is, first, to assess the quality of the control (1 x CO[sub 2]) simulations from each of the models of mean sea level (MSL) pressure and precipitation in the Australian region by comparing these with the corresponding observed patterns; and, second, to then analyze the 2 x CO[sub 2] results of only those model experiments with the best control simulations. Of the models examined two are chosen on the basis of their simulation of current climate in the region: the CSIRO four-level model (CSIRO4) and the United Kingdom Meteorological Office (UKMO) model. For conditions of equivalent doubling of CO[sub 2], both models show substantial increases in surface air temperature of around 4[degrees]-6[degrees] inland and 2[degrees]-4[degrees]C in coastal regions. Both models show decreased MSL pressure over the Australian continent and increases in rainfall over northern, central, and eastern Australia, particularly in the summer half of the year. The CSIRO4 model, but not the UKMO model, also shows increased pressure to the south of the continent and decreased winter rainfall in southwest and southern Australia. Generally, field significance tests show the pattern and magnitude of the changes to be significant of CSIRO4 (for which the necessary monthly simulated data were available). 42 refs., 20 figs., 5 tabs.

  20. Exploring the connection between coronal and footpoint sources in a thin-thick target solar flare model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marina Battaglia; Arnold O. Benz

    2007-02-12

    Context: Hard X-ray emission of coronal sources in solar flares has been observed and studied since its discovery in Yohkoh observations. Several models have been proposed to explain the physical mechanisms causing this emission and the relations between those sources and simultaneously observed footpoint sources. Aims: We investigate and test one of the models (intermediate thin-thick target model) developed on the basis of Yohkoh observations. The model makes precise predictions on the shape of coronal and footpoint spectra and the relations between them, that can be tested with new instruments such as RHESSI. Methods: RHESSI observations of well observed events are studied in imaging and spectroscopy and compared to the predictions from the intermediate thin-thick target model. Results: The results indicate that such a simple model cannot account for the observed relations between the non-thermal spectra of coronal and footpoint sources. Including non-collisional energy loss of the electrons in the flare loop due to an electric field can solve most of the inconsistencies.

  1. Exact solution of the van der Waals model in the critical region

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adriano Barra; Antonio Moro

    2015-05-01

    The celebrated van der Waals model describes simple fluids in the thermodynamic limit and predicts the existence of a critical point associated to the gas-liquid phase transition. However the behaviour of critical isotherms according to the equation of state, where a gas-liquid phase transition occurs, significantly departs from experimental observations. The correct critical isotherms are heuristically re-established via the Maxwell equal areas rule. A long standing open problem in mean field theory is concerned with the analytic description of van der Waals isotherms for a finite size system that is consistent, in the thermodynamic limit, with the Maxwell prescription. Inspired by the theory of nonlinear conservation laws, we propose a novel mean field approach, based on statistical mechanics, that allows to calculate the van der Waals partition function for a system of large but finite number of particles $N$. Our partition function naturally extends to the whole space of thermodynamic variables, reproduces, in the thermodynamic limit $N\\to \\infty$, the classical results outside the critical region and automatically encodes Maxwell's prescription. We show that isothermal curves evolve in the space of thermodynamic variables like nonlinear breaking waves and the criticality is explained as the mechanism of formation of a classical hydrodynamic shock.

  2. Environment and the Lifetime of Tropical Deep Convection in a Cloud-Permitting Regional Model Simulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hagos, Samson M.; Feng, Zhe; McFarlane, Sally A.; Leung, Lai-Yung R.

    2013-08-01

    By applying a cloud tracking algorithm to tropical convective systems simulated by a regional high resolution model, the study documents environmental conditions before and after convective systems are initiated over ocean and land by following them during their lifetime. The comparative roles of various environmental fields in affecting the lifetime of convection are also quantified. The statistics of lifetime, maximum area, propagation speed and direction of the simulated deep convection agrees well with geostationary satellite observations. Over ocean, convective systems enhance surface fluxes through the associated wind gusts as well as cooling and drying of the boundary layer. A significant relationship is found between the mean surface fluxes during their lifetime and the longevity of the systems which in turn is related to the initial intensity of the moist updraft and to a lesser extent upper level shear. Over land, on the other hand, convective activity suppresses surface fluxes through cloud cover and the lifetime of convection is related to the upper level shear during their lifetime and strength of the heat fluxes several hours before the initiation of convection. For systems of equal lifetime, those over land are significantly more intense than those over ocean especially during early stages of their lifetime.

  3. Reactor physics methods, models, and applications used to support the conceptual design of the Advanced Neutron Source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gehin, J.C.; Worley, B.A.; Renier, J.P.; Wemple, C.A.; Jahshan, S.N.; Ryskammp, J.M.

    1995-08-01

    This report summarizes the neutronics analysis performed during 1991 and 1992 in support of characterization of the conceptual design of the Advanced Neutron Source (ANS). The methods used in the analysis, parametric studies, and key results supporting the design and safety evaluations of the conceptual design are presented. The analysis approach used during the conceptual design phase followed the same approach used in early ANS evaluations: (1) a strong reliance on Monte Carlo theory for beginning-of-cycle reactor performance calculations and (2) a reliance on few-group diffusion theory for reactor fuel cycle analysis and for evaluation of reactor performance at specific time steps over the fuel cycle. The Monte Carlo analysis was carried out using the MCNP continuous-energy code, and the few- group diffusion theory calculations were performed using the VENTURE and PDQ code systems. The MCNP code was used primarily for its capability to model the reflector components in realistic geometries as well as the inherent circumvention of cross-section processing requirements and use of energy-collapsed cross sections. The MCNP code was used for evaluations of reflector component reactivity effects and of heat loads in these components. The code was also used as a benchmark comparison against the diffusion-theory estimates of key reactor parameters such as region fluxes, control rod worths, reactivity coefficients, and material worths. The VENTURE and PDQ codes were used to provide independent evaluations of burnup effects, power distributions, and small perturbation worths. The performance and safety calculations performed over the subject time period are summarized, and key results are provided. The key results include flux and power distributions over the fuel cycle, silicon production rates, fuel burnup rates, component reactivities, control rod worths, component heat loads, shutdown reactivity margins, reactivity coefficients, and isotope production rates.

  4. Benchmarking the New RESRAD-OFFSITE Source Term Model with DUST-MS and GoldSim - 13377

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cheng, J.J.; Kamboj, S.; Gnanapragasam, E.; Yu, C.

    2013-07-01

    RESRAD-OFFSITE is a computer code developed by Argonne National Laboratory under the sponsorship of U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). It is designed on the basis of RESRAD (onsite) code, a computer code designated by DOE and NRC for evaluating soil-contaminated sites for compliance with human health protection requirements pertaining to license termination or environmental remediation. RESRAD-OFFSITE has enhanced capabilities of modeling radionuclide transport to offsite locations and calculating potential radiation exposure to offsite receptors. Recently, a new source term model was incorporated into RESRAD-OFFSITE to enhance its capability further. This new source term model allows simulation of radionuclide releases from different waste forms, in addition to the soil sources originally considered in RESRAD (onsite) and RESRAD-OFFSITE codes. With this new source term model, a variety of applications can be achieved by using RESRAD-OFFSITE, including but not limited to, assessing the performance of radioactive waste disposal facilities. This paper presents the comparison of radionuclide release rates calculated by the new source term model of RESRAD-OFFSITE versus those calculated by DUST-MS and GoldSim, respectively. The focus of comparison is on the release rates of radionuclides from the bottom of the contaminated zone that was assumed to contain radioactive source materials buried in soil. The transport of released contaminants outside of the primary contaminated zone is beyond the scope of this paper. Overall, the agreement between the RESRAD-OFFSITE results and the DUST-MS and GoldSim results is fairly good, with all three codes predicting identical or similar radionuclide release profiles over time. Numerical dispersion in the DUST-MS and GoldSim results was identified as potentially contributing to the disagreement in the release rates. In general, greater discrepancy in the release rates was found for short-lived, fast-moving radionuclides than for long-lived, slow-moving radionuclides. (authors)

  5. An integrated assessment modeling framework for uncertainty studies in global and regional

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    environmental changes. Being data-driven, the Program uses extensive Earth system and economic data and models System Model (IGSM), an integrated assessment model that couples an Earth system model of intermediate's Integrated Global System Model. Through this integrated model, the Program seeks to: discover new

  6. Global search tool for the Advanced Photon Source Integrated Relational Model of Installed Systems (IRMIS) database.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Quock, D. E. R.; Cianciarulo, M. B.; APS Engineering Support Division; Purdue Univ.

    2007-01-01

    The Integrated Relational Model of Installed Systems (IRMIS) is a relational database tool that has been implemented at the Advanced Photon Source to maintain an updated account of approximately 600 control system software applications, 400,000 process variables, and 30,000 control system hardware components. To effectively display this large amount of control system information to operators and engineers, IRMIS was initially built with nine Web-based viewers: Applications Organizing Index, IOC, PLC, Component Type, Installed Components, Network, Controls Spares, Process Variables, and Cables. However, since each viewer is designed to provide details from only one major category of the control system, the necessity for a one-stop global search tool for the entire database became apparent. The user requirements for extremely fast database search time and ease of navigation through search results led to the choice of Asynchronous JavaScript and XML (AJAX) technology in the implementation of the IRMIS global search tool. Unique features of the global search tool include a two-tier level of displayed search results, and a database data integrity validation and reporting mechanism.

  7. Analytical solutions for benchmarking cold regions subsurface water flow and energy transport models: One-dimensional soil thaw

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Freezing and thawing a b s t r a c t Numerous cold regions water flow and energy transport models have. Simulated and/or observed climate change impacts in cryogenic soils include permafrost degradation, active that include the dynamic freeze­thaw process have been tested against analytical solutions, such as the Neumann

  8. USING THE UTAH ENERGY BALANCE SNOW MELT MODEL TO QUANTIFY SNOW AND GLACIER MELT IN THE HIMALAYAN REGION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tarboton, David

    USING THE UTAH ENERGY BALANCE SNOW MELT MODEL TO QUANTIFY SNOW AND GLACIER MELT IN THE HIMALAYAN of glacier ice as a substrate and generation of melt from the ice substrate when seasonal snow has melted for the entire domain. Therefore, regional variability in snow and glacier melting is computed. Outflow can

  9. Volumetric 3D Modeling of the X-ray Emission Region within the Planetary Nebula BD+303639

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dewey, Daniel

    a b c d N WE S N S FB E W B F Volumetric 3D Modeling of the X-ray Emission Region within://space.mit.edu/hydra/v3d.html **ISIS and APED are available via http://space.mit.edu/CXC/ISIS Approach - Volumetric 3D

  10. A MODEL FOR THE STRENGTH OF THE AS-DEPOSITED REGIONS OF LOW-ALLOY STEEL WELD METALS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cambridge, University of

    true average strain ~ true plastic strain in softer phase of a dual-phase steel ~I true plastic strain in harder phase of a dual-phase steel UTS true strain at ultimate tensile stress y true strain at yieldingCHAPTER 5 A MODEL FOR THE STRENGTH OF THE AS-DEPOSITED REGIONS OF LOW-ALLOY STEEL WELD METALS 5

  11. Full-fuel-cycle approach to vehicle emissions modeling: A case study of gasoline in the southeastern region of the United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bell, S.R.; Gupta, M. [Univ. of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL (United States); Greening, L.A. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)

    1995-09-01

    The use of full-fuel-cycle analysis as a scientific, economic, and policy tool for the evaluation of alternative sources of transportation energy has become increasingly widespread. However, consistent methods for performance of these types of analyses are only now becoming recognized and utilized. The work presented here provides a case study of full-fuel-cycle analysis methods applied to the evaluation of gasoline in the southeastern region of the United States. Results of the study demonstrate the significance of nonvehicle processes, such as fuel refining, in terms of energy expenditure and emissions production. Unique to this work is the application of the MOBILE5 mobile emissions model in the full-fuel-cycle analysis. Estimates of direct and indirect greenhouse gas production are also presented and discussed using the full-fuel-cycle analysis method.

  12. Modeling of Multiphase Flow in the Near-Wellbore Region of the Reservoir under Transient Conditions 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, He

    2010-07-14

    .......................................................................................................... 144 APPENDIX A: GAS-WATER TWO PHASE FLOW IMPES ALGORITHMS ..... 149 APPENDIX B: BLACK OIL PVT CHARACTERIZATION .................................. 158 APPENDIX C: SOFTWARE STRUCTURE ........................................................... 175... profile in the near-wellbore region ..................... 61 Fig. 6.2 Realistic fabricated PVT data lay out the correct trends upon pressure and create appropriate fluid compressibility for pressure oscillation in the near-wellbore region...

  13. Aeroelastic Modeling of Offshore Turbines and Support Structures in Hurricane-Prone Regions (Poster)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Damiani, R.

    2014-03-01

    US offshore wind turbines (OWTs) will likely have to contend with hurricanes and the associated loading conditions. Current industry standards do not account for these design load cases (DLCs), thus a new approach is required to guarantee that the OWTs achieve an appropriate level of reliability. In this study, a sequentially coupled aero-hydro-servo-elastic modeling technique was used to address two design approaches: 1.) The ABS (American Bureau of Shipping) approach; and 2.) The Hazard Curve or API (American Petroleum Institute) approach. The former employs IEC partial load factors (PSFs) and 100-yr return-period (RP) metocean events. The latter allows setting PSFs and RP to a prescribed level of system reliability. The 500-yr RP robustness check (appearing in [2] and [3] upcoming editions) is a good indicator of the target reliability for L2 structures. CAE tools such as NREL's FAST and Bentley's' SACS (offshore analysis and design software) can be efficiently coupled to simulate system loads under hurricane DLCs. For this task, we augmented the latest FAST version (v. 8) to include tower aerodynamic drag that cannot be ignored in hurricane DLCs. In this project, a 6 MW turbine was simulated on a typical 4-legged jacket for a mid-Atlantic site. FAST-calculated tower base loads were fed to SACS at the interface level (transition piece); SACS added hydrodynamic and wind loads on the exposed substructure, and calculated mudline overturning moments, and member and joint utilization. Results show that CAE tools can be effectively used to compare design approaches for the design of OWTs in hurricane regions and to achieve a well-balanced design, where reliability levels and costs are optimized.

  14. A comparison of geospatially modeled fire behavior and fire management utility of three data sources in the southeastern United States.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hollingsworth, LaWen T.; Kurth, Laurie,; Parresol, Bernard, R.; Ottmar, Roger, D.; Prichard, Susan J.

    2012-01-01

    Landscape-scale fire behavior analyses are important to inform decisions on resource management projects that meet land management objectives and protect values from adverse consequences of fire. Deterministic and probabilistic geospatial fire behavior analyses are conducted with various modeling systems including FARSITE, FlamMap, FSPro, and Large Fire Simulation System. The fundamental fire intensity algorithms in these systems require surface fire behavior fuel models and canopy cover to model surface fire behavior. Canopy base height, stand height, and canopy bulk density are required in addition to surface fire behavior fuel models and canopy cover to model crown fire activity. Several surface fuel and canopy classification efforts have used various remote sensing and ecological relationships as core methods to develop the spatial layers. All of these methods depend upon consistent and temporally constant interpretations of crown attributes and their ecological conditions to estimate surface fuel conditions. This study evaluates modeled fire behavior for an 80,000 ha tract of land in the Atlantic Coastal Plain of the southeastern US using three different data sources. The Fuel Characteristic Classification System (FCCS) was used to build fuelbeds from intensive field sampling of 629 plots. Custom fire behavior fuel models were derived from these fuelbeds. LANDFIRE developed surface fire behavior fuel models and canopy attributes for the US using satellite imagery informed by field data. The Southern Wildfire Risk Assessment (SWRA) developed surface fire behavior fuel models and canopy cover for the southeastern US using satellite imagery. Differences in modeled fire behavior, data development, and data utility are summarized to assist in determining which data source may be most applicable for various land management activities and required analyses. Characterizing fire behavior under different fuel relationships provides insights for natural ecological processes, management strategies for fire mitigation, and positive and negative features of different modeling systems. A comparison of flame length, rate of spread, crown fire activity, and burn probabilities modeled with FlamMap shows some similar patterns across the landscape from all three data sources, but there are potentially important differences. All data sources showed an expected range of fire behavior. Average flame lengths ranged between 1 and 1.4 m. Rate of spread varied the greatest with a range of 2.4-5.7 m min{sup -1}. Passive crown fire was predicted for 5% of the study area using FCCS and LANDFIRE while passive crown fire was not predicted using SWRA data. No active crown fire was predicted regardless of the data source. Burn probability patterns across the landscape were similar but probability was highest using SWRA and lowest using FCCS.

  15. Flows and Non-thermal Velocities in Solar Active Regions Observed with the Extreme-ultraviolet Imaging Spectrometer on Hinode: A Tracer of Active Region Sources of Heliospheric Magnetic Fields?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. A. Doschek; H. P. Warren; J. T. Mariska; K. Muglach; J. L. Culhane; H. Hara; T Watanabe

    2008-07-17

    From Doppler velocity maps of active regions constructed from spectra obtained by the Extreme-ultraviolet Imaging Spectrometer (EIS) on the Hinode spacecraft we observe large areas of outflow (20-50 km/s) that can persist for at least a day. These outflows occur in areas of active regions that are faint in coronal spectral lines formed at typical quiet Sun and active region temperatures. The outflows are positively correlated with non-thermal velocities in coronal plasmas. The bulk mass motions and non-thermal velocities are derived from spectral line centroids and line widths, mostly from a strong line of Fe XII at 195.12 Angstroms. The electron temperature of the outflow regions estimated from an Fe XIII to Fe XII line intensity ratio is about 1.2-1.4 MK. The electron density of the outflow regions derived from a density sensitive intensity ratio of Fe XII lines is rather low for an active region. Most regions average around 7E10+8 cm(-3), but there are variations on pixel spatial scales of about a factor of 4. We discuss results in detail for two active regions observed by EIS. Images of active regions in line intensity, line width, and line centroid are obtained by rastering the regions. We also discuss data from the active regions obtained from other orbiting spacecraft that support the conclusions obtained from analysis of the EIS spectra. The locations of the flows in the active regions with respect to the longitudinal photospheric magnetic fields suggest that these regions might be tracers of long loops and/or open magnetic fields that extend into the heliosphere, and thus the flows could possibly contribute significantly to the solar wind.

  16. An MILP-MINLP decomposition method for the global optimization of a source based model of the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grossmann, Ignacio E.

    and regulatory specifications of products. For example, the economic and operability benefits from optimal crude-oilAn MILP-MINLP decomposition method for the global optimization of a source based model. In this work we present two major contributions for the global solution of the problem. The first one

  17. Regional Transportation Coordination Study 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Golden Crescent Regional Planning Commission

    2006-01-01

    stream_source_info Golden Crescent Regional Transportation Coordination Study.pdf.txt stream_content_type text/plain stream_size 357268 Content-Encoding ISO-8859-1 stream_name Golden Crescent Regional Transportation Coordination... Study.pdf.txt Content-Type text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1 Golden Crescent Regional Transit i Regional Transportation Coordination Study: 7-County Golden Crescent Region Regional...

  18. A Marked Point Process Model for the Source Proximity E ect in the Indoor Environment 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    West, Mike

    indoor air quality monitors arise because of the source proximity e#11;ect, in which pollutant sources. McBride Abstract In indoor air quality studies, discrepancies between personal and station- ary Science Foundation Graduate Fellowship as well as the Center for Indoor Air Research. The author thanks

  19. Developing regionalized models of lithospheric thickness and velocity structure across Eurasia and the Middle East from jointly inverting P-wave and S-wave receiver functions with Rayleigh wave group and phase velocities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Julia, J; Nyblade, A; Hansen, S; Rodgers, A; Matzel, E

    2009-07-06

    In this project, we are developing models of lithospheric structure for a wide variety of tectonic regions throughout Eurasia and the Middle East by regionalizing 1D velocity models obtained by jointly inverting P-wave and S-wave receiver functions with Rayleigh wave group and phase velocities. We expect the regionalized velocity models will improve our ability to predict travel-times for local and regional phases, such as Pg, Pn, Sn and Lg, as well as travel-times for body-waves at upper mantle triplication distances in both seismic and aseismic regions of Eurasia and the Middle East. We anticipate the models will help inform and strengthen ongoing and future efforts within the NNSA labs to develop 3D velocity models for Eurasia and the Middle East, and will assist in obtaining model-based predictions where no empirical data are available and for improving locations from sparse networks using kriging. The codes needed to conduct the joint inversion of P-wave receiver functions (PRFs), S-wave receiver functions (SRFs), and dispersion velocities have already been assembled as part of ongoing research on lithospheric structure in Africa. The methodology has been tested with synthetic 'data' and case studies have been investigated with data collected at an open broadband stations in South Africa. PRFs constrain the size and S-P travel-time of seismic discontinuities in the crust and uppermost mantle, SRFs constrain the size and P-S travel-time of the lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary, and dispersion velocities constrain average S-wave velocity within frequency-dependent depth-ranges. Preliminary results show that the combination yields integrated 1D velocity models local to the recording station, where the discontinuities constrained by the receiver functions are superimposed to a background velocity model constrained by the dispersion velocities. In our first year of this project we will (i) generate 1D velocity models for open broadband seismic stations in the western half of the study area (Eurasia and the Middle East) and (ii) identify well located seismic events with event-station paths isolated to individual tectonic provinces within the study area and collect broadband waveforms and source parameters for the selected events. The 1D models obtained from the joint inversion will then be combined with published geologic terrain maps to produce regionalized models for distinctive tectonic areas within the study area, and the models will be validated through full waveform modeling of well-located seismic events recorded at local and regional distances.

  20. Impact of natural and anthropogenic aerosols on stratocumulus and precipitation in the Southeast Pacific: A regional modeling study using WRF-Chem

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, Qing; Gustafson, William I.; Fast, Jerome D.; Wang, Hailong; Easter, Richard C.; Wang, Minghuai; Ghan, Steven J.; Berg, Larry K.; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Morrison, H.

    2012-09-28

    Cloud-system resolving simulations with the chemistry version of the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF-Chem) model are used to quantify the impacts of regional anthropogenic and oceanic emissions on changes in aerosol properties, cloud macro- and microphysics, and cloud radiative forcing over the Southeast Pacific (SEP) during the VAMOS Ocean-Cloud-Atmosphere-Land Study Regional Experiment (VOCALS-REx) (15 Oct–Nov 16, 2008). The effects of oceanic aerosols on cloud properties, precipitation, and the shortwave forcing counteract those of anthropogenic aerosols. Despite the relatively small changes in Na concentrations (2-12%) from regional oceanic emissions, their net effect (direct and indirect) on the surface shortwave forcing is opposite and comparable or even larger in magnitude compared to those of regional anthropogenic emissions over the SEP. Two distinct regions are identified in the VOCALS-REx domain. The near-coast polluted region is characterized with strong droplet activation suppression of small particles by sea-salt particles, the more important role of the first than the second indirect effect, low surface precipitation rate, and low aerosol-cloud interaction strength associated with anthropogenic emissions. The relatively clean remote region is characterized with large contributions of Cloud Condensation Nuclei (CCN, number concentration denoted by NCCN) and droplet number concentrations (Nd) from non-local sources (lateral boundaries), a significant amount of surface precipitation, and high aerosol-cloud interactions under a scenario of five-fold increase in anthropogenic emissions. In the clean region, cloud properties have high sensitivity (e.g., 13% increase in cloud-top height and a 9% surface albedo increase) to the moderate increase in CCN concentration (?Nccn = 13 cm-3; 25%) produced by a five-fold increase in regional anthropogenic emissions. The increased anthropogenic aerosols reduce the precipitation amount over the relatively clean remote ocean. The reduction of precipitation (as a cloud water sink) more than doubles the wet scavenging timescale, resulting in an increased aerosol lifetime in the marine boundary layer. Therefore, the aerosol impacts on precipitation are amplified by the positive feedback of precipitation on aerosol. The positive feedback ultimately alters the cloud micro- and macro-properties, leading to strong aerosol-cloud-precipitation interactions. The higher sensitivity of clouds to anthropogenic aerosols over this region is also related to a 16% entrainment rate increase due to anthropogenic aerosols. The simulated aerosol-cloud-precipitation interactions are stronger at night over the clean marine region, while during the day, solar heating results in more frequent decoupling, thinner clouds, reduced precipitation, and reduced sensitivity to anthropogenic emissions. The simulated high sensitivity to the increased anthropogenic emissions over the clean region suggests that the perturbation of the clean marine environment with anthropogenic aerosols may have a larger effect on climate than that of already polluted marine environments.

  1. Modeling regional transportation demand in China and the impacts of a national carbon constraint

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kishimoto, Paul

    2015-01-30

    Climate and energy policy in China will have important and uneven impacts on the country’s regionally heterogeneous transport system. In order to simulate these impacts, transport sector detail is added to a multi-sector, ...

  2. Renewable Resources: a national catalog of model projects. Volume 4. Western Solar Utilization Network Region

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1980-07-01

    This compilation of diverse conservation and renewable energy projects across the United States was prepared through the enthusiastic participation of solar and alternate energy groups from every state and region. Compiled and edited by the Center for Renewable Resources, these projects reflect many levels of innovation and technical expertise. In many cases, a critique analysis is presented of how projects performed and of the institutional conditions associated with their success or failure. Some 2000 projects are included in this compilation; most have worked, some have not. Information about all is presented to aid learning from these experiences. The four volumes in this set are arranged in state sections by geographic region, coinciding with the four Regional Solar Energy Centers. The table of contents is organized by project category so that maximum cross-referencing may be obtained. This volume includes information on the Western Solar Utilization Network Region. (WHK)

  3. Renewable Resources: a national catalog of model projects. Volume 1. Northeast Solar Energy Center Region

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1980-07-01

    This compilation of diverse conservation and renewable energy projects across the United States was prepared through the enthusiastic participation of solar and alternate energy groups from every state and region. Compiled and edited by the Center for Renewable Resources, these projects reflect many levels of innovation and technical expertise. In many cases, a critique analysis is presented of how projects performed and of the institutional conditions associated with their success or failure. Some 2000 projects are included in this compilation; most have worked, some have not. Information about all is presented to aid learning from these experiences. The four volumes in this set are arranged in state sections by geographic region, coinciding with the four Regional Solar Energy Centers. The table of contents is organized by project category so that maximum cross-referencing may be obtained. This volume includes information on the Northeast Solar Energy Center Region. (WHK).

  4. Renewable Resources: a national catalog of model projects. Volume 3. Southern Solar Energy Center Region

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1980-07-01

    This compilation of diverse conservation and renewable energy projects across the United States was prepared through the enthusiastic participation of solar and alternate energy groups from every state and region. Compiled and edited by the Center for Renewable Resources, these projects reflect many levels of innovation and technical expertise. In many cases, a critique analysis is presented of how projects performed and of the institutional conditions associated with their success or failure. Some 2000 projects are included in this compilation; most have worked, some have not. Information about all is presented to aid learning from these experiences. The four volumes in this set are arranged in state sections by geographic region, coinciding with the four Regional Solar Energy Centers. The table of contents is organized by project category so that maximum cross-referencing may be obtained. This volume includes information on the Southern Solar Energy Center Region. (WHK)

  5. Integrated simulation of snow and glacier melt in water and energy balance-based, distributed hydrological modeling framework at Hunza River Basin of Pakistan Karakoram region

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2015-01-01

    basin, Nepal Himalaya, in Snow and Glacier Hydrology, vol.274, 198–210. INTEGRATED SNOW AND GLACIERMELT MODEL Journalon water availability in snow-dominated regions, Nature,

  6. Verifying the Accuracy of Land Use Models Used in Transportation and Air Quality: A Case Study in the Sacramento, California Region

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rodier, Caroline J.

    2005-01-01

    A Case Study in the Sacramento Region (Ph.D. Dissertation,Analysis using the Sacramento MEPLAN Land Use Transportationin the MEPLAN model of Sacramento. ” Transportation Research

  7. Controlled-source electromagnetic modeling of the masking effect of marine gas hydrate on a deeper hydrocarbon reservoir 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dickins, David

    2009-06-02

    prospective regions of high resistivity in development drilling. A 3-D finite-element MCSEM Fortran algorithm used for forward modeling was developed by Badea. Additional code was written and used for this thesis, with the goal of enforcing more realistic...

  8. Sixth Northwest Conservation and Electric Power Plan Appendix J: The Regional Portfolio Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ............................................................................................................ 10 Capacity and Costs Related to Capacity ............................................................................................... 15 Variable Capacity.......................................................................................................................... 28 Modeling Energy-Limited Resources

  9. Defining the source region of the Indian Ocean Tsunami from GPS, altimeters, tide gauges and tsunami models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Socquet, Anne

    propagation time of the rupture led to constructive interference of waves radiating first from the South and minutes later from the North, strengthening the tsunami in Southern India, Sri Lanka and Thailand. We

  10. Using Local and Regional Air Quality Modeling and Source Apportionment Tools to Evaluate Vehicles and Biogenic Emission Factors 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kota, Sri H

    2014-07-25

    that NO_(2)/NO_(x) ratio at curbside is approximately 29%, much higher than the generally used 5% ratio. This increase in ratio resulted in predicted 8-hour ozone increase in ST by as much as 6 ppb. While the near-road analysis didn’t reveal significant...

  11. Light Source Effects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Forbus, K.

    1977-05-01

    The perception of surface luster in achromatic single view images seems to depend on the existence of regions with source-like properties. These regions are due to the interaction of specular component of the surface's ...

  12. Open source software maturity model based on linear regression and Bayesian analysis 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Dongmin

    2009-05-15

    Open Source Software (OSS) is widely used and is becoming a significant and irreplaceable part of the software engineering community. Today a huge number of OSS exist. This becomes a problem if one needs to choose from ...

  13. Development of a total landed cost and risk analysis model for global strategic sourcing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feller, Brian (Brian C.)

    2008-01-01

    Total landed cost and supply chain risk analysis are methods that many companies use to assess strategic sourcing decisions. For this project, landed cost is defined as those costs associated with material movement from a ...

  14. Modeled and observed ozone sensitivity to mobile-source emissions in Mexico City

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zavala, M.

    The emission characteristics of mobile sources in the Mexico City Metropolitan Area (MCMA) have changed significantly over the past few decades in response to emission control policies, advancements in vehicle technologies ...

  15. PSCAD/EMTDC-Based Modeling and Analysis of a Microgrid with Renewable Energy Sources 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chu, Zhengguo

    2010-07-14

    Microgrid is a relatively new concept which has gained significant attention recently due to the increasing penetration of distributed energy sources. It brings many benefits to the traditional distribution system. Couples of microgrid testbeds...

  16. Non point source pollution modelling in the watershed managed by Integrated Conctructed Wetlands: A GIS approach. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vyavahare, Nilesh

    2008-12-05

    The non-point source pollution has been recognised as main cause of eutrophication in Ireland (EPA Ireland, 2001). Integrated Constructed Wetland (ICW) is a management practice adopted in Annestown stream watershed, located ...

  17. Implementation and evaluation of online gas-phase chemistry within a regional climate model (RegCM-CHEM4)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shalaby, A. K.; Zakey, A. S.; Tawfik, A. B.; Solmon, F.; Giorgi, Filippo; Stordal, F.; Sillman, S.; Zaveri, Rahul A.; Steiner, A. L.

    2012-05-22

    The RegCM-CHEM4 is a new online climate-chemistry model based on the International Centre for Theoretical Physics (ICTP) regional climate model (RegCM4). Tropospheric gas-phase chemistry is integrated into the climate model using the condensed version of the Carbon Bond Mechanism (CBM-Z; Zaveri and Peters, 1999) with a fast solver based on radical balances. We evaluate the model over Continental Europe for two different time scales: (1) an event-based analysis of the ozone episode associated with the heat wave of August 2003 and (2) a climatological analysis of a sixyear simulation (2000-2005). For the episode analysis, model simulations show good agreement with European Monitoring and Evaluation Program (EMEP) observations of hourly ozone over different regions in Europe and capture ozone concentrations during and after the August 2003 heat wave event. For long-term climate simulations, the model captures the seasonal cycle of ozone concentrations with some over prediction of ozone concentrations in non-heat wave summers. Overall, the ozone and ozone precursor evaluation shows the feasibility of using RegCM-CHEM4 for decadal-length simulations of chemistry-climate interactions.

  18. Analytical Modeling of Wave Generation by the Borehole Orbital Vibrator Source

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nakagawa, Seiji; Daley, Thomas M.

    2004-01-01

    Analytical modeling of wave generation by the Boreholeand the mechanism of wave generation and the characteristicswave energy, and guided-wave generation. These models are

  19. Impact of Agricultural Practice on Regional Climate in a Coupled Land Surface Mesoscale Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cooley, H.S.; Riley, W.J.; Torn, M.S.; He, Y.

    2004-01-01

    winter wheat belt on the mesoscale environment, Monthlygeneration Penn State/NCAR mesoscale model (MM5), NCAR,in a Coupled Land Surface Mesoscale Model H.S. Cooley Energy

  20. Forest dynamics at regional scales: predictive models constrained with inventory data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lines, Emily

    2012-06-12

    by scaling from key tree-level processes, but models typically have no climate dependency. In this thesis I demonstrate how large-scale national inventories combined with improvements in computational methods mean that models that incorporate the climate...

  1. Stochastic Modeling of the Rainfall Runoff-Process for Nonpoint Source Pollutant Load Estimation 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collins, Michael A.; Dickey, Roger O.

    1989-01-01

    was applied to a study watershed in the Lake Ray Hubbard reservoir drainage basin near Dallas, Texas. Regional rainfall characteristics were established using historical hourly data from the Federal Aviation Administration rain gage at Love Field Airport...

  2. Sources of methane and nitrous oxide in California's Central Valley estimated through direct airborne flux and positive matrix factorization source apportionment of ground-based and regional tall tower measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guha, Abhinav

    2014-01-01

    or vented sources and cogeneration plants in the oil and gasLa Paloma natural gas cogeneration plant; (c) and (d) CymricPaloma natural gas cogeneration plant, McKittrick; and (3)

  3. A Habitat-based Wind-Wildlife Collision Model with Application to the Upper Great Plains Region

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Forcey, Greg, M.

    2012-08-28

    Most previous studies on collision impacts at wind facilities have taken place at the site-specific level and have only examined small-scale influences on mortality. In this study, we examine landscape-level influences using a hierarchical spatial model combined with existing datasets and life history knowledge for: Horned Lark, Red-eyed Vireo, Mallard, American Avocet, Golden Eagle, Whooping Crane, red bat, silver-haired bat, and hoary bat. These species were modeled in the central United States within Bird Conservation Regions 11, 17, 18, and 19. For the bird species, we modeled bird abundance from existing datasets as a function of habitat variables known to be preferred by each species to develop a relative abundance prediction for each species. For bats, there are no existing abundance datasets so we identified preferred habitat in the landscape for each species and assumed that greater amounts of preferred habitat would equate to greater abundance of bats. The abundance predictions for bird and bats were modeled with additional exposure factors known to influence collisions such as visibility, wind, temperature, precipitation, topography, and behavior to form a final mapped output of predicted collision risk within the study region. We reviewed published mortality studies from wind farms in our study region and collected data on reported mortality of our focal species to compare to our modeled predictions. We performed a sensitivity analysis evaluating model performance of 6 different scenarios where habitat and exposure factors were weighted differently. We compared the model performance in each scenario by evaluating observed data vs. our model predictions using spearmans rank correlations. Horned Lark collision risk was predicted to be highest in the northwestern and west-central portions of the study region with lower risk predicted elsewhere. Red-eyed Vireo collision risk was predicted to be the highest in the eastern portions of the study region and in the forested areas of the western portion; the lowest risk was predicted in the treeless portions of the northwest portion of the study area. Mallard collision risk was predicted to be highest in the eastern central portion of the prairie potholes and in Iowa which has a high density of pothole wetlands; lower risk was predicted in the more arid portions of the study area. Predicted collision risk for American Avocet was similar to Mallard and was highest in the prairie pothole region and lower elsewhere. Golden Eagle collision risk was predicted to be highest in the mountainous areas of the western portion of the study area and lowest in the eastern portion of the prairie potholes. Whooping Crane predicted collision risk was highest within the migration corridor that the birds follow through in the central portion of the study region; predicted collision risk was much lower elsewhere. Red bat collision risk was highly driven by large tracts of forest and river corridors which made up most of the areas of higher collision risk. Silver-haired bat and hoary bat predicted collision risk were nearly identical and driven largely by forest and river corridors as well as locations with warmer temperatures, and lower average wind speeds. Horned Lark collisions were mostly influenced by abundance and predictions showed a moderate correlation between observed and predicted mortality (r = 0.55). Red bat, silver-haired bat, and hoary bat predictions were much higher and shown a strong correlations with observed mortality with correlations of 0.85, 0.90, and 0.91 respectively. Red bat collisions were influenced primarily by habitat, while hoary bat and silver-haired bat collisions were influenced mainly by exposure variables. Stronger correlations between observed and predicted collision for bats than for Horned Larks can likely be attributed to stronger habitat associations and greater influences of weather on behavior for bats. Although the collision predictions cannot be compared among species, our model outputs provide a convenient and easy landscape-level tool to quick

  4. Investigation of global and regional BWR instabilities with a four heated-channel Reduced Order Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Demazičre, Christophe

    and regional Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) instabilities is described. The ROM contains three sub. Introduction Over the past decades, the concept of linear analysis to study the stability of Boiling Water Reactors (BWR) has become one of the most commonly-used methodologies in reactor diagnostics. Conceptually

  5. Ability of a global three-dimensional model to locate regional events

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shapiro, Nikolai

    is that the Comprehensive Nuclear Test-Ban Treaty (CTBT), irrespec- tive of its current status, has motivated greater; revised 31 March 2003; accepted 29 April 2003; published 30 July 2003. [1] We assess the ability events using regional travel time data alone (epicentral distances Assessments are based

  6. Coronal energy input and dissipation in a solar active region 3D MHD model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bourdin, Philippe-A; Peter, Hardi

    2015-01-01

    Context. We have conducted a 3D MHD simulation of the solar corona above an active region in full scale and high resolution, which shows coronal loops, and plasma flows within them, similar to observations. Aims. We want to find the connection between the photospheric energy input by field-line braiding with the coronal energy conversion by Ohmic dissipation of induced currents. Methods. To this end we compare the coronal energy input and dissipation within our simulation domain above different fields of view, e.g. for a small loops system in the active region (AR) core. We also choose an ensemble of field lines to compare, e.g., the magnetic energy input to the heating per particle along these field lines. Results. We find an enhanced Ohmic dissipation of currents in the corona above areas that also have enhanced upwards-directed Poynting flux. These regions coincide with the regions where hot coronal loops within the AR core are observed. The coronal density plays a role in estimating the coronal temperatur...

  7. Deformed shell model results for neutrinoless double beta decay of nuclei in A=60-90 region

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. Sahu; V. K. B. Kota

    2015-03-20

    Nuclear transition matrix elements (NTME) for the neutrinoless double beta decay of $^{70}$Zn, $^{80}$Se and $^{82}$Se nuclei are calculated within the framework of the deformed shell model based on Hartree-Fock states. For $^{70}$Zn, jj44b interaction in $^{2}p_{3/2}$, $^{1}f_{5/2}$, $^{2}p_{1/2}$ and $^{1}g_{9/2}$ space with $^{56}$Ni as the core is employed. However, for $^{80}$Se and $^{82}$Se nuclei, a modified Kuo interaction with the above core and model space are employed. Most of our calculations in this region were performed with this effective interaction. However, jj44b interaction has been found to be better for $^{70}$Zn. The above model space was used in many recent shell model and interacting boson model calculations for nuclei in this region. After ensuring that DSM gives good description of the spectroscopic properties of low-lying levels in these three nuclei considered, the NTME are calculated. The deduced half-lives with these NTME, assuming neutrino mass is 1 eV, are $1.1 \\times 10^{26}$ yr, $2.3 \\times 10^{27}$ yr and $2.2 \\times 10^{24}$ yr for $^{70}$Zn, $^{80}$Se and $^{82}$Se, respectively.

  8. Regional CO2 and latent heat surface fluxes in the Southern Great Plains: Measurements, modeling, and scaling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Riley, W. J.; Biraud, S.C.; Torn, M.S.; Fischer, M.L.; Billesbach, D.P.; Berry, J.A.

    2009-08-15

    Characterizing net ecosystem exchanges (NEE) of CO{sub 2} and sensible and latent heat fluxes in heterogeneous landscapes is difficult, yet critical given expected changes in climate and land use. We report here a measurement and modeling study designed to improve our understanding of surface to atmosphere gas exchanges under very heterogeneous land cover in the mostly agricultural U.S. Southern Great Plains (SGP). We combined three years of site-level, eddy covariance measurements in several of the dominant land cover types with regional-scale climate data from the distributed Mesonet stations and Next Generation Weather Radar precipitation measurements to calibrate a land surface model of trace gas and energy exchanges (isotope-enabled land surface model (ISOLSM)). Yearly variations in vegetation cover distributions were estimated from Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer normalized difference vegetation index and compared to regional and subregional vegetation cover type estimates from the U.S. Department of Agriculture census. We first applied ISOLSM at a 250 m spatial scale to account for vegetation cover type and leaf area variations that occur on hundred meter scales. Because of computational constraints, we developed a subsampling scheme within 10 km 'macrocells' to perform these high-resolution simulations. We estimate that the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility SGP region net CO{sub 2} exchange with the local atmosphere was -240, -340, and -270 gC m{sup -2} yr{sup -1} (positive toward the atmosphere) in 2003, 2004, and 2005, respectively, with large seasonal variations. We also performed simulations using two scaling approaches at resolutions of 10, 30, 60, and 90 km. The scaling approach applied in current land surface models led to regional NEE biases of up to 50 and 20% in weekly and annual estimates, respectively. An important factor in causing these biases was the complex leaf area index (LAI) distribution within cover types. Biases in predicted weekly average regional latent heat fluxes were smaller than for NEE, but larger than for either ecosystem respiration or assimilation alone. However, spatial and diurnal variations of hundreds of W m{sup -2} in latent heat fluxes were common. We conclude that, in this heterogeneous system, characterizing vegetation cover type and LAI at the scale of spatial variation are necessary for accurate estimates of bottom-up, regional NEE and surface energy fluxes.

  9. A Guide for Using the Transient Ground-Water Flow Model of the Death Valley Regional Ground-Water Flow System, Nevada and California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joan B. Blainey; Claudia C. Faunt, and Mary C. Hill

    2006-05-16

    This report is a guide for executing numerical simulations with the transient ground-water flow model of the Death Valley regional ground-water flow system, Nevada and California using the U.S. Geological Survey modular finite-difference ground-water flow model, MODFLOW-2000. Model inputs, including observations of hydraulic head, discharge, and boundary flows, are summarized. Modification of the DVRFS transient ground-water model is discussed for two common uses of the Death Valley regional ground-water flow system model: predictive pumping scenarios that extend beyond the end of the model simulation period (1998), and model simulations with only steady-state conditions.

  10. Modeling the resuspension of radionuclides in Ukranian regions impacted by Chernobyl fallout

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nair, S.K.; Thiessen, K.M.; Hoffman, F.O. [SENES Oak Ridge Inc., TN (United States)] [and others

    1997-01-01

    Following the 1986 Chernobyl event, large amounts of radioactive materials were deposited in nearby areas. Concentrations of various radionuclides were measured in air and surface soil. To study the resuspension of radioactive particulate, three different exposure situations were developed on the basis of the collected data under the auspices of the international BIOMOVS II (BIOspheric MOdel Validation Study) project. Modelers were asked to predict seasonal air concentrations and resuspension factors at several locations at different distances from Chernobyl for six successive years following the accident. Measurements of radionuclide deposition on topsoil were provided for each site along with information on soil, vegetation, land use, surface roughness, meteorology, and climate. In this paper, the three exposure situations are described, along with the initial data set provided to the modelers; two modeling approaches used to make the endpoint predictions are also presented. After the model predictions were submitted, the measured air concentrations and resuspension factors were released to the modelers. Generally, the predictions were well within an order of magnitude of the measured values. Time-dependent trends in predictions and measurements were in good agreement with one of the models, which (a) explicitly accounted for loss processes in soil and (b) used calibration to improve its predictive capabilities. Reasons for variations between predictions and measurements, suggestions for the improvement of models, and conclusions from the model validation study are presented. 12 refs., 15 figs., 4 tabs.

  11. How gas-dynamic flare models powered by Petschek reconnection differ from those with ad hoc energy sources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Longcope, Dana

    2015-01-01

    Aspects of solar flare dynamics, such as chromospheric evaporation and flare light-curves, have long been studied using one-dimensional models of plasma dynamics inside a static flare loop, subjected to some energy input. While extremely successful at explaining the observed characteristics of flares, all such models so far have specified energy input ad hoc, rather than deriving it self-consistently. There is broad consensus that flares are powered by magnetic energy released through reconnection. Recent work has generalized Petschek's basic reconnection scenario, topological change followed by field line retraction and shock heating, to permit its inclusion into a one-dimensional flare loop model. Here we compare the gas dynamics driven by retraction and shocking to those from more conventional static loop models energized by ad hoc source terms. We find significant differences during the first minute, when retraction leads to larger kinetic energies and produces higher densities at the loop top, while ad h...

  12. Beyond Hierarchy: Towards a Service Model supporting new Sourcing Strategies for IT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -providers to realize these services. In their current releases, both the IT Infrastructure Library (ITIL modeling of services: According to ITIL, service models are blueprints for ser- vice management processes

  13. Payback Analysis for Ground Source Heat Pump Retrofits Using eQuest Modeling Software

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wahlers, Drake

    2011-12-16

    There has been much research and analysis done on the performance and potential energy savings related to installing a ground source heat pump (GSHP) system. Much of this research has been dedicated to the new construction industry, and focused on a...

  14. Journal of Power Sources xxx (2006) xxxxxx Polymer electrolyte membrane resistance model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weidner, John W.

    2006-01-01

    and reliable power source has led to the rapid development of fuel cell technology applications [1,2]. These polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs) consist of the membrane elec- trode conductors and their application to fuel cells is presented by Kreuer [5]. The most commonly used mem- brane

  15. Journal of Power Sources 160 (2006) 386397 Polymer electrolyte membrane resistance model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sethuraman, Vijay A.

    2006-01-01

    for a clean, efficient and reliable power source has led to the rapid development of fuel cell technology applications [1,2]. These polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs) consist of the membrane elec- trode conductors and their application to fuel cells is presented by Kreuer [5]. The most commonly used mem- brane

  16. Comparisons of box model calculations and measurements of formaldehyde from the 1997 North Atlantic Regional Experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Comparisons of box model calculations and measurements of formaldehyde from the 1997 North Atlantic October 2001; accepted 16 November 2001; published 18 April 2002. [1] Formaldehyde (CH2O) measurements: formaldehyde, photochemical modeling, aircraft measurements, North Atlantic troposphere 1. Introduction [2

  17. Simulation of a Polar Low Case in the North Atlantic with different regional numerical models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zahn, Matthias

    by the DWD (German Weather Service) by means of their forecast model HRM (High Resolution Model) and another University Press, Cambridge. (a) CLM (b) REMO (c) HRM, DWD (d) BWK Figure 1: 1(a)- 1(c)10m wind velocity pressure from CLM and REMO simulations and HRM analysis, DWD, respectively, at 15/10/93, 6:00, 1(d) surface

  18. Integrated Canada-U.S. Power Sector Modeling with the Regional Energy Deployment System (ReEDS)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martinez, A.; Eurek, K.; Mai, T.; Perry, A.

    2013-02-01

    The electric power system in North America is linked between the United States and Canada. Canada has historically been a net exporter of electricity to the United States. The extent to which this remains true will depend on the future evolution of power markets, technology deployment, and policies. To evaluate these and related questions, we modify the Regional Energy Deployment System (ReEDS) model to include an explicit representation of the grid-connected power system in Canada to the continental United States. ReEDS is unique among long-term capacity expansion models for its high spatial resolution and statistical treatment of the impact of variable renewable generation on capacity planning and dispatch. These unique traits are extended to new Canadian regions. We present example scenario results using the fully integrated Canada-U.S. version of ReEDS to demonstrate model capabilities. The newly developed, integrated Canada-U.S. ReEDS model can be used to analyze the dynamics of electricity transfers and other grid services between the two countries under different scenarios.

  19. Formation and eruption of an active region sigmoid. I. A study by nonlinear force-free field modeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jiang, Chaowei; Feng, Xueshang [SIGMA Weather Group, State Key Laboratory for Space Weather, Center for Space Science and Applied Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Wu, S. T.; Hu, Qiang, E-mail: cwjiang@spaceweather.ac.cn, E-mail: fengx@spaceweather.ac.cn, E-mail: wus@uah.edu, E-mail: qh0001@uah.edu [Center for Space Plasma and Aeronomic Research, The University of Alabama in Huntsville, Huntsville, AL 35899 (United States)

    2014-01-01

    We present a comprehensive study of the formation and eruption of an active region (AR) sigmoid in AR 11283. To follow the quasi-static evolution of the coronal magnetic field, we reconstruct a time sequence of static fields using a recently developed nonlinear force-free field model constrained by vector magnetograms. A detailed analysis of the fields compared with observations suggests the following scenario for the evolution of the region. Initially, a new bipole emerges into the negative polarity of a preexisting bipolar AR, forming a null-point topology between the two flux systems. A weakly twisted flux rope (FR) is then built up slowly in the embedded core region, largely through flux cancellation, forming a bald patch separatrix surface (BPSS). The FR grows gradually until its axis runs into a torus instability (TI) domain, and the BPSS also develops a full S-shape. The combined effects of the TI-driven expansion of the FR and the line tying at the BP tear the FR into two parts with the upper portion freely expelled and the lower portion remaining behind the postflare arcades. This process dynamically perturbs the BPSS and results in the enhanced heating of the sigmoid and the rope. The accelerated expansion of the upper-portion rope strongly pushes its envelope flux near the null point and triggers breakout reconnection at the null, which further drives the eruption. We discuss the important implications of these results for the formation and disruption of the sigmoid region with an FR.

  20. A numerical modeling study of the upwelling source waters along the Oregon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kurapov, Alexander

    Rivas and R.M. Samelson College of Oceanic and Atmospheric Sciences, Oregon State University, Corvallis. E-mail: drivasc@ipn.mx #12;2 Abstract. Regional ocean circulation along the Oregon coast is studied arrives from points offshore and west of the zone. For both year 2005 and the climatological simulations

  1. Development of a next-generation regional weather research and forecast model.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michalakes, J.; Chen, S.; Dudhia, J.; Hart, L.; Klemp, J.; Middlecoff, J.; Skamarock, W.

    2001-02-05

    The Weather Research and Forecast (WRF) project is a multi-institutional effort to develop an advanced mesoscale forecast and data assimilation system that is accurate, efficient, and scalable across a range of scales and over a host of computer platforms. The first release, WRF 1.0, was November 30, 2000, with operational deployment targeted for the 2004-05 time frame. This paper provides an overview of the project and current status of the WRF development effort in the areas of numerics and physics, software and data architecture, and single-source parallelism and performance portability.

  2. Deformation of layered rocks in the ramp regions of thrust faults: a study with rock models 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chester, Judith Savaso

    1985-01-01

    wall at an S/Lr of 0. 20. " . . . . . . " "" . . -" . 43 17 Diagram showing the thrust belt terminology used to refer to locations and structures in the models. . . . . . 47 18 Deformation maps of configuration A models layered with lead and a... of configuration A. 65 xi LIST OF FIGURES (continued) Figure Page 25 Plot of slip across the lowest lead or mica unit of the veneer at the apex of the anticline above the ramp (location c) versus S/Lr for models of configurations A and B. 67 26 27 Plot...

  3. Predicting hurricane regional landfall rates: comparing local and basin-wide track model approaches

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hall, T; Hall, Tim; Jewson, Stephen

    2006-01-01

    We compare two methods for making predictions of the climatological distribution of the number of hurricanes making landfall along short sections of the North American coastline. The first method uses local data, and the second method uses a basin-wide track model. Using cross-validation we show that the basin-wide track model gives better predictions for almost all parts of the coastline. This is the first time such a comparison has been made, and is the first rigourous justification for the use of basin-wide track models for predicting hurricane landfall rates and hurricane risk.

  4. Regional & Global Climate Modeling (RGCM) Program | U.S. DOE Office of

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorkingLosThe 26thIWalter H.4 »ProgrammingScience (SC) Regional &

  5. From Connectivity Models to Region Labels: Identifying Foci of a Neurological Disorder

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Venkataraman, Archana

    We propose a novel approach to identify the foci of a neurological disorder based on anatomical and functional connectivity information. Specifically, we formulate a generative model that characterizes the network of ...

  6. START: Status and Region Aware Taxi Mobility Model for Urban Vehicular Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Yu

    networks [1]­[3] play a critical role in building smart cities and supporting comprehensive urban, and other important tasks of smart cities. Mobility models for mobile networks [4], [5] have been well

  7. Modeled Neutron Induced Nuclear Reaction Cross Sections for Radiochemistry in the region of Iriduim and Gold

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoffman, R D; Dietrich, F S; Kelley, K; Escher, J; Bauer, R; Mustafa, M

    2008-02-26

    We have developed a set of modeled nuclear reaction cross sections for use in radiochemical diagnostics. Systematics for the input parameters required by the Hauser-Feshbach statistical model were developed and used to calculate neutron induced nuclear reaction cross sections for targets ranging from osmium (Z = 76) to gold (Z = 79). Of particular interest are the cross sections on Ir and Au including reactions on isomeric targets.

  8. Dynamical Coupled-Channel Model of Meson Production Reactions in the Nucleon Resonance Region

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    T.-S. H. Lee; A. Matsuyama; T. Sato

    2006-11-15

    A dynamical coupled-channel model is presented for investigating the nucleon resonances (N*) in the meson production reactions induced by pions and photons. Our objective is to extract the N* parameters and to investigate the meson production reaction mechanisms for mapping out the quark-gluon substructure of N* from the data. The model is based on an energy-independent Hamiltonian which is derived from a set of Lagrangians by using a unitary transformation method.

  9. Foundation heat exchangers for residential ground source heat pump systems Numerical modeling and experimental validation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xing, Lu [Oklahoma State University; Cullin, James [Oklahoma State University; Spitler, Jeffery [Oklahoma State University; Im, Piljae [ORNL; Fisher, Daniel [Oklahoma State University

    2011-01-01

    A new type of ground heat exchanger that utilizes the excavation often made for basements or foundations has been proposed as an alternative to conventional ground heat exchangers. This article describes a numerical model that can be used to size these foundation heat exchanger (FHX) systems. The numerical model is a two-dimensional finite-volume model that considers a wide variety of factors, such as soil freezing and evapotranspiration. The FHX numerical model is validated with one year of experimental data collected at an experimental house located near Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The model shows good agreement with the experimental data-heat pump entering fluid temperatures typically within 1 C (1.8 F) - with minor discrepancies due to approximations, such as constant moisture content throughout the year, uniform evapotranspiration over the seasons, and lack of ground shading in the model.

  10. Cosmic Ray Confinement and Transport Models for Probing their Putative Sources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Malkov, M A

    2015-01-01

    Recent efforts in cosmic ray (CR) confinement and transport theory are discussed. Three problems are addressed as being crucial for understanding the present day observations and their possible telltale signs of the CR origin. The first problem concerns CR behavior right after their release from a source, such as a supernova remnant (SNR). At this phase the CRs are confined near the source by self-emitted Alfven waves. The second is the problem of diffusive propagation of CRs through the turbulent ISM. This is a seemingly straightforward and long-resolved problem, but it remains controversial and reveals paradoxes. A resolution based on the Chapman-Enskog asymptotic CR transport analysis, that also includes magnetic focusing, is suggested. The third problem is about a puzzling sharp ($\\sim10^{\\circ}$) anisotropies in the CR arrival directions that might bear on important clues of their transport between the source and observer. The overarching goal is to improve our understanding of all aspects of the CR's so...

  11. Alternative water sources: Desalination model provides life-cycle costs of facility 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Supercinski, Danielle

    2009-01-01

    -1 Story by Danielle Supercinski tx H2O | pg. 8 Alternative water sourcees Desalination model provides life-cycle costs of facility platform and design standards as DESAL ECONOMICS?, but created to analyze con- ventional surface water treatment... facilities. The models allow experts to analyze which technology and/or facility design and asset configuration provides the lowest long-term cost of potable water supplies. Using these newly developed models, the team conducted case studies...

  12. Improved ion source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Leung, K.N.; Ehlers, K.W.

    1982-05-04

    A magnetic filter for an ion source reduces the production of undesired ion species and improves the ion beam quality. High-energy ionizing electrons are confined by the magnetic filter to an ion source region, where the high-energy electrons ionize gas molecules. One embodiment of the magnetic filter uses permanent magnets oriented to establish a magnetic field transverse to the direction of travel of ions from the ion source region to the ion extraction region. In another embodiment, low energy 16 eV electrons are injected into the ion source to dissociate gas molecules and undesired ion species into desired ion species,

  13. Use of Source Term and Air Dispersion Modeling in Planning Demolition of Highly Alpha-Contaminated Buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Droppo, James G.; Napier, Bruce A.; Rishel, Jeremy P.; Bloom, Richard W.

    2011-06-22

    The current cleanup of structures related to cold-war production of nuclear materials includes the need to demolish a number of highly alpha-contaminated structures. The process of planning for the demolition of such structures includes unique challenges related to ensuring the protection of both workers and the public. Pre-demolition modeling analyses were conducted to evaluate potential exposures resulting from the proposed demolition of a number of these structures. Estimated emission rates of transuranic materials during demolition are used as input to an air-dispersion model. The climatological frequencies of occurrence of peak air and surface exposures at locations of interest are estimated based on years of hourly meteorological records. The modeling results indicate that downwind deposition is the main operational limitation for demolition of a highly alpha-contaminated building. The pre-demolition modeling directed the need for better contamination characterization and/or different demolition methods—and in the end, provided a basis for proceeding with the planned demolition activities. Post-demolition modeling was also conducted for several contaminated structures, based on the actual demolition schedule and conditions. Comparisons of modeled and monitoring results are shown. Recent monitoring data from the demolition of a UO3 plant shows increments in concentrations that were previously identified in the pre-demolition modeling predictions; these comparisons confirm the validity and value of the pre-demolition source-term and air dispersion computations for planning demolition activities for other buildings with high levels of radioactive contamination.

  14. ISET Journal of Earthquake Technology, Paper No. 459, Vol. 42, No. 4, December 2005, pp. 111-125 TSUNAMI SOURCES IN THE SUMATRA REGION, INDONESIAAND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gupta, Vinay Kumar

    ISET Journal of Earthquake Technology, Paper No. 459, Vol. 42, No. 4, December 2005, pp. 111 Bandung Jalan Ganeca 10, Bandung 40132, Indonesia ABSTRACT A total of 19 tsunamis generated by earthquakes occurred in the Sumatra region in the period from 1770 to 2005. About 84% of the tsunamigenic earthquakes

  15. Realistic expanding source model for invariant one-particle multiplicity distributions and two-particle correlations in relativistic heavy-ion collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chapman, S; Chapman, Scott; Nix, J Rayford

    1996-01-01

    We present a realistic expanding source model with nine parameters that are necessary and sufficient to describe the main physics occuring during hydrodynamical freezeout of the excited hadronic matter produced in relativistic heavy-ion collisions. As a first test of the model, we compare it to data from central Si + Au collisions at p_lab/A = 14.6 GeV/c measured in experiment E-802 at the AGS. An overall chi-square per degree of freedom of 1.055 is achieved for a fit to 1416 data points involving invariant pi^+, pi^-, K^+, and K^- one-particle multiplicity distributions and pi^+ and K^+ two-particle correlations. The 99-percent-confidence region of parameter space is identified, leading to one-dimensional error estimates on the nine fitted parameters and other calculated physical quantities. Three of the most important results are the freezeout temperature, longitudinal proper time, and baryon density along the symmetry axis. For these we find values of 92.9 +/- 4.4 MeV, 8.2 +/- 2.2 fm/c, and 0.0222 + 0.0097...

  16. Model testing using Chernobyl data: III. Atmospheric resuspension of radionuclides in Ukrainian regions impacted by Chernobyl fallout

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garger, E.K. [Inst. of Radioecology, Kiev (Ukraine); Hoffman, F.O. [SENES Oak Ridge, Inc., TN (United States); Miller, C.W. [Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA (United States)

    1996-01-01

    The {open_quotes}Resuspension{close_quotes} scenario is designed to test models for atmospheric resuspension of radionuclides from contaminated soils. Resuspension can be a secondary source of contamination after a release has stopped, as well as a source of contamination for people and areas not exposed to the original release. The test scenario describes three exposure situations: (1) locations within the highly contaminated 30-km zone at Chernobyl, where exposures to resuspended material are probably dominated by local processes; (2) an urban area (Kiev) outside the 30-km zone, where local processes include extensive vehicular traffic; and (3) a location 40 to 60 km west of the Chernobyl reactor, where upwind sources of contamination are important. Input data include characteristics of the {sup 137}Cs ground contamination around specific sites, climatological data for the sites, characteristics of the terrain and topography, and locations of the sampling sites. Predictions are requested for average air concentrations of {sup 137}Cs at specified locations due to resuspension of Chernobyl fallout and for specified resuspension factors and rates. Test data (field measurements) are available for all endpoints. 9 refs., 4 figs., 11 tabs.

  17. The sensitivity of modeled ozone to the temporal distribution of point, area, and mobile source emissions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dickerson, Russell R.

    emissions in the eastern United States Patricia Castellanos , Sheryl H. Ehrman* , Jeffrey W. Stehr , Russell pollution problems in the US. Hourly emissions fields used in air quality models (AQMs) generally show less of estimated emissions affects modeled ozone, we analyzed the effects of altering all anthropogenic emissions

  18. Dose Reconstruction Using Computational Modeling of Handling a Particular Arsenic-73/Arsenic-74 Source 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stallard, Alisha M.

    2011-08-08

    . This prompted a reconstruction of the dose to the worker’s hands. The computer code MCNP was chosen to model the tasks that the worker performed to evaluate the potential nonuniform hand dose distribution. A model was constructed similar to the worker’s hands...

  19. Borders as membranes :metaphors and models for improved policy in border regions.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Malczynski, Leonard A.; Passell, Howard David; Forster, Craig B. (University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT); Cockerill, Kristan (Cockerill Consulting, Boone, NC)

    2005-10-01

    Political borders are controversial and contested spaces. In an attempt to better understand movement along and through political borders, this project applied the metaphor of a membrane to look at how people, ideas, and things ''move'' through a border. More specifically, the research team employed this metaphor in a system dynamics framework to construct a computer model to assess legal and illegal migration on the US-Mexico border. Employing a metaphor can be helpful, as it was in this project, to gain different perspectives on a complex system. In addition to the metaphor, the multidisciplinary team utilized an array of methods to gather data including traditional literature searches, an experts workshop, a focus group, interviews, and culling expertise from the individuals on the research team. Results from the qualitative efforts revealed strong social as well as economic drivers that motivate individuals to cross the border legally. Based on the information gathered, the team concluded that legal migration dynamics were of a scope we did not want to consider hence, available demographic models sufficiently capture migration at the local level. Results from both the quantitative and qualitative data searches were used to modify a 1977 border model to demonstrate the dynamic nature of illegal migration. Model runs reveal that current US-policies based on neo-classic economic theory have proven ineffective in curbing illegal migration, and that proposed enforcement policies are also likely to be ineffective. We suggest, based on model results, that improvement in economic conditions within Mexico may have the biggest impact on illegal migration to the U.S. The modeling also supports the views expressed in the current literature suggesting that demographic and economic changes within Mexico are likely to slow illegal migration by 2060 with no special interventions made by either government.

  20. A regional economic impact model for identifying the relationship between transportation investments and economic development 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Freyre, German Eleodoro

    1989-01-01

    Impacts 21 3. 5 Past Applications of the REIMHS Model 22 I V PROPOSED METHODOLOGY 24 4. 1 Project Classification Criteria 4. 2 Allocation of Project Costs 4. 3 Computation and Distribution of the Efficiency Savings 24 26 31 TABLE OF CONTENTS... OF CONTENTS Chapter Page I INTRODUCIION 1. 1 General Background 1. 2 Objectives of the Research 1. 3 Summary of Research Plan 1. 4 Thesis Organization II LITERATURE REVIEW I I I OVERVIEW OF THE REIMHS MODEL 14 3. 1 Distribution of the Monetary...

  1. Observing and modelling f-region ionospheric dynamics using the (OII) 7320a emission. Doctoral thesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carr, S.S.

    1992-01-01

    Limb-scan observations of Doppler line profiles from the (OII) lambda 7320A emission at F-Region altitudes, made with the Fabry-Perot interferometer (FPI) on the Dynamics Explorer-2 (DE-2) spacecraft, have been analyzed to provide measurements of the meridional component of the ion convection velocity along the instrument line-of-sight. The DE-2 results presented here demonstrate the first spaceborne use of the remote-sensing Doppler techniques for measurements of ionospheric convection. The FPI meridional ion drift measurements have been compared with nearly simultaneous in situ ion drift measurements from the Retarding Potential Analyzer (RPA) on DE 2. Once allowance is made for the temporal lag between the in situ and remote measurements, the results from the two techniques are found to be in good agreement, within specified experimental errors, giving confidence in the FPI measurements.

  2. Neutron lifetimes behavior analysis considering the two-region kinetic model in the IPEN/MB-01 reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gonnelli, Eduardo; Diniz, Ricardo

    2014-11-11

    This is a complementary work about the behavior analysis of the neutron lifetimes that was developed in the IPEN/MB-01 nuclear reactor facility. The macroscopic neutron noise technique was experimentally employed using pulse mode detectors for two stages of control rods insertion, where a total of twenty levels of subcriticality have been carried out. It was also considered that the neutron reflector density was treated as an additional group of delayed neutrons, being a sophisticated approach in the two-region kinetic theoretical model.

  3. Assessment of Uncertainties in the Response of the African Monsoon Precipitation to Land Use change simulated by a regional model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hagos, Samson M.; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Xue, Yongkang; Boone, Aaron; de Sales, Fernando; Neupane, Naresh; Huang, Maoyi; Yoon, Jin-Ho

    2014-02-22

    Land use and land cover over Africa have changed substantially over the last sixty years and this change has been proposed to affect monsoon circulation and precipitation. This study examines the uncertainties on the effect of these changes on the African Monsoon system and Sahel precipitation using an ensemble of regional model simulations with different combinations of land surface and cumulus parameterization schemes. Although the magnitude of the response covers a broad range of values, most of the simulations show a decline in Sahel precipitation due to the expansion of pasture and croplands at the expense of trees and shrubs and an increase in surface air temperature.

  4. The Regional Atmospheric Modeling System (RAMS): Development for Parallel Processing Computer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cirne, Walfredo

    on the mesoscale (horizontal scales from 2 km to 2000 km) for purposes ranging from operational weather forecasting and simulating convective clouds, mesoscale convective systems, cirrus clouds, and precipitating weather systems models that had a great deal of overlap, the CSU cloud/mesoscale mode (Tripoli and Cotton, 1982

  5. Multitarget region tracking based on short-sight modeling of background and color distribution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mille, Julien

    as well as non-parametric modeling of color statistics, we develop an energy-minimization based approach of color statistics and shapes of objects over time and space [1][2]. Most often, the energy is derived for tracking in real scenes with cluttered backgrounds, where statistical color data is highly scattered

  6. Modeling the Dynamics of Desakota Regions: Global - Local Nexus in the Taipei Metropolitan Area 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Bing-Sheng

    2010-10-12

    in 1991, focuses on how internal domestic and local forces drive the specific rural-urban transformation in Asia. However, the McGee-Ginsburg model does not emphasize the importance of globalization on Asian urbanization. To fill the gap, this study...

  7. Realistic Shell-Model Calculations for Nuclei in the Region of Shell Closures off Stability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Covello; L. Coraggio; A. Gargano

    1998-07-24

    We have performed realistic shell-model calculations for nuclei around doubly magic 100Sn and 132Sn using an effective interaction derived from the Bonn A nucleon-nucleon potential. The results are in remarkably good agreement with the experimental data showing the ability of our effective interaction to provide an accurate description of nuclear structure properties.

  8. An Evaluation of High Order Spatial Accuracy Algorithms for Modeling Fixed and Rotary Wing Tip regions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 An Evaluation of High Order Spatial Accuracy Algorithms for Modeling Fixed and Rotary Wing Tip Nielsen Engineering and Research, Inc., Mountain View, CA 94043-2212 Yi Liu, Radhika Gupta, and L. N. Sankar School of Aerospace Engineering, Georgia Tech, Atlanta, GA 30332-0150 ABSTRACT Several high order

  9. Performance Evaluation of a ground source heat pump system based on ANN and ANFIS models 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sun, W.; Hu, P.; Lei, F.; Zhu, N.; Zhang,J.

    2014-01-01

    .H DONG," MATLAB neural network and application," Beijing: National Defense Industry Press, 2005. [10] S. A. Kalogirou, "Applications of artificial neural networks in energy systems," Energy Conversion and Management, vol. 40, pp. 1073-1087, 1999. [11... stream_source_info ESL-IC-14-09-38.pdf.txt stream_content_type text/plain stream_size 28204 Content-Encoding UTF-8 stream_name ESL-IC-14-09-38.pdf.txt Content-Type text/plain; charset=UTF-8 Performance evaluation of a...

  10. Air dispersion modeling of particulate matter from ground-level area sources 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meister, Michael Todd

    2000-01-01

    State Air Pollution Regulatory Agencies (SAPRAs) often use dispersion modeling to predict downwind concentrations of particulate matter (PM) from a facility. As such, a facility may be granted or denied an operating permit ...

  11. Back-calculating emission rates for ammonia and particulate matter from area sources using dispersion modeling 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Price, Jacqueline Elaine

    2004-11-15

    Engineering directly impacts current and future regulatory policy decisions. The foundation of air pollution control and air pollution dispersion modeling lies in the math, chemistry, and physics of the environment. ...

  12. 2D versus 1D ground-motion modelling for the Friuli region, north-eastern Italy1 W. Imperatori1, *

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    12 evaluate how the 2D (in the NW-SE direction) geological structure of the Friuli (NE Italy) basin13-studied regions, such as California, 3D geological structure models are often used for4 ground-motion modelling analyses, different 1D models are9 chosen for different stations to better characterize the structure

  13. Energy balance in two phase models for temperature fluctuations in HII regions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. Giammanco; J. E. Beckman

    2006-02-14

    Aims. The main objective of this article is to provide a simple physical framework with permits a quantitative comparison of measurements of the temperature fluctuations in the ionized interstellar medium with possible mechanisms which can produce them. Methods. We assume a generalized two phase ISM and derive expressions relating the mean amplitude of the temperature fluctuations to the temperatures of the phases and to the energy input, in excess of the basic component due to photoionization, required to maintain them. We apply these expressions to a set of limiting cases for the temperature and density differences between the phases. Finally we compare the most plausible case with the most complete data set available: the temperature fluctuations observed in the Orion Nebula. Results. We first list the cases considered and our general inferences: (a) Very hot tenuous substrate and warm moderately dense clouds; discarded as requiring too much excess energy input. (b) Two phases with equal densities but different temperatures, both warm; feasible but not general. (c) Two warm phases at moderately different temperatures and densities; the most probable case. This case is then used to quantify a specific hypothesis, reconnection of turbulent magnetic fields, as the source of the fluctuations observed in the Orion Nebula. Field strengths of a few hundred microG are required, not out of line with the limited observations available. Time variability on scales of months is a testable prediction of the scenario.

  14. Complex Chemistry in Star-Forming Regions: An Expanded Gas-Grain Warm-up Chemical Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robin T. Garrod; Susanna L. Widicus Weaver; Eric Herbst

    2008-03-08

    Gas-phase processes were long thought to be the key formation mechanisms for complex organic molecules in star-forming regions. However, recent experimental and theoretical evidence has cast doubt on the efficiency of such processes. Grain-surface chemistry is frequently invoked as a solution, but until now there have been no quantitative models taking into account both the high degree of chemical complexity and the evolving physical conditions of star-forming regions. Here, we introduce a new gas-grain chemical network, wherein a wide array of complex species may be formed by reactions involving radicals. The radicals we consider (H, OH, CO, HCO, CH3, CH3O, CH2OH, NH and NH2) are produced primarily by cosmic ray-induced photodissociation of the granular ices formed during the colder, earlier stages of evolution. The gradual warm-up of the hot core is crucial to the formation of complex molecules, allowing the more strongly-bound radicals to become mobile on grain surfaces. This type of chemistry is capable of reproducing the high degree of complexity seen in Sgr B2(N), and can explain the observed abundances and temperatures of a variety of previously detected complex organic molecules, including structural isomers. Many other complex species are predicted by this model, and several of these species may be detectable in hot cores. Differences in the chemistry of high- and low-mass star-formation are also addressed; greater chemical complexity is expected where evolution timescales are longer.

  15. SERA Scenarios of Early Market Fuel Cell Electric Vehicle Introductions: Modeling Framework, Regional Markets, and Station Clustering; NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Melaina, M.

    2015-03-23

    This presentation provides an overview of the Scenario Evaluation and Regionalization Analysis (SERA) model, describes the methodology for developing scenarios for hydrogen infrastructure development, outlines an example "Hydrogen Success" scenario, and discusses detailed scenario metrics for a particular case study region, the Northeast Corridor.

  16. Modeling microbial dynamics in heterogeneous environments: Growth on soil carbon sources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Resat, Haluk; Bailey, Vanessa L.; McCue, Lee Ann; Konopka, Allan

    2012-01-01

    We have developed a new hybrid model to study how microbial dynamics are affected by the heterogeneity in the physical structure of the environment. The modeling framework can represent porous media such as soil. The individual based biological model can explicitly simulate microbial diversity, and cell metabolism is regulated via optimal allocation of cellular resources to enzyme synthesis, control of growth rate by protein synthesis capacity, and shifts to dormancy. This model was developed to study how microbial community functioning is influenced by local environmental conditions and by the functional attributes of individual microbes. Different strategies for acquisition of carbon from polymeric cellulose were investigated. Bacteria that express membrane-associated hydrolase had different growth and survival dynamics in soil pores than bacteria that release extracellular hydrolases. The kinetic differences may suggest different functional roles for these two classes of microbes in cellulose utilization. Our model predicted an emergent behavior in which co-existence led to higher cellulose utilization efficiency and reduced stochasticity. Microbial community dynamics were simulated at two spatial scales: micro-pores that resemble 6-20 {micro}m size portions of the soil physical structure and in 111 {micro}m size soil aggregates with a random pore structure. Trends in dynamic properties were very similar at these two scales, implying that micro-scale studies can be useful approximations to aggregate scale studies when local effects on microbial dynamics are studied.

  17. Exploiting Data Semantics to Discover, Extract, and Model Web Sources Jose Luis Ambite, Craig A. Knoblock, Kristina Lerman, Anon Plangprasopchok, Thomas Russ

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ambite, José Luis

    . Knoblock, Kristina Lerman, Anon Plangprasopchok, Thomas Russ USC Information Sciences Institute 4676.carman@lu.unisi.ch Abstract We describe DEIMOS, a system that automatically dis- covers and models new sources of information sources. We provide an end-to- end validation of the system in two information domains to show that it can

  18. An integrated assessment modeling framework for uncertainty studies in global and regional climate change: the MIT IGSM-CAM (version 1.0)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Monier, Erwan

    This paper describes a computationally efficient framework for uncertainty studies in global and regional climate change. In this framework, the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) Integrated Global System Model ...

  19. First Structure Formation: I. Primordial Star Forming Regions in hierarchical models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tom Abel; Peter Anninos; Michael L. Norman; Yu Zhang

    1997-05-17

    We investigate the possibility of very early formation of primordial star clusters from high-\\sigma perturbations in cold dark matter dominated structure formation scenarios. For this we have developed a powerful 2-level hierarchical cosmological code with a realistic and robust treatment of multi-species primordial gas chemistry, paying special attention to the formation and destruction of hydrogen molecules, non-equilibrium ionization, and cooling processes. We performed 3-D simulations at small scales and at high redshifts and find that, analogous to simulations of large scale structure, a complex system of filaments, sheets, and spherical knots at the intersections of filaments form. On the mass scales covered by our simulations (5x10^5 - 1x10^9\\Ms) that collapse at redshifts z>25, we find that only at the spherical knots can enough H2 be formed (n_{H_2}/n_H > 5x10^-4) to cool the gas appreciably. Quantities such as the time dependence of the formation of H2 molecules, the final H2 fraction, and central densities from the simulations are compared to the theoretical predictions of Abel (1995) and Tegmark et al. (1997) and found to agree remarkably well. Comparing the 3-D results to an isobaric collapse model we further discuss the possible implications of the extensive merging of small structure that is inherent in hierarchical models. Typically only 5-8% percent of the total baryonic mass in the collapsing structures is found to cool significanlty. Assuming the Padoan (1995) model for star formation our results would predict the first stellar systems to be as small as ~30\\Ms. Some implications for primordial globular cluster formation scenarios are also discussed.

  20. A solar active region loop compared with a 2D MHD model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gontikakis, C; Dara, H C; Tsinganos, K

    2005-01-01

    We analyzed a coronal loop observed with the Normal Incidence Spectrometer (NIS), which is part of the Coronal Diagnostic Spectrometer (CDS) on board the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO). The measured Doppler shifts and proper motions along the selected loop strongly indicate unidirectional flows. Analysing the Emission Measure Curves of the observed spectral lines, we estimated that the temperature along the loop was about 380000 K. We adapted a solution of the ideal MHD steady equations to our set of measurements. The derived energy balance along the loop, as well as the advantages/disadvantages of this MHD model for understanding the characteristics of solar coronal loops are discussed.

  1. A solar active region loop compared with a 2D MHD model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. Gontikakis; G. J. D. Petrie; H. C. Dara; K. Tsinganos

    2005-03-31

    We analyzed a coronal loop observed with the Normal Incidence Spectrometer (NIS), which is part of the Coronal Diagnostic Spectrometer (CDS) on board the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO). The measured Doppler shifts and proper motions along the selected loop strongly indicate unidirectional flows. Analysing the Emission Measure Curves of the observed spectral lines, we estimated that the temperature along the loop was about 380000 K. We adapted a solution of the ideal MHD steady equations to our set of measurements. The derived energy balance along the loop, as well as the advantages/disadvantages of this MHD model for understanding the characteristics of solar coronal loops are discussed.

  2. A Catalog of CH_3OH 7_0-6_1 A^+ Maser Sources in Massive Star-Forming Regions. II. Masers in NGC 6334F, G8.67-0.36, and M17

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gomez, Laura; Hernandez-Curiel, Idalia; Kurtz, Stan; Hofner, Peter; Araya, Esteban

    2010-01-01

    We present Very Large Array observations of the 7_0-6_1 A^+ methanol maser transition at 44 GHz towards NGC 6334F, G8.67-0.36, and M17. These arcsecond resolution observations complete a previous, larger VLA survey of this maser transition in high-mass star-forming regions reported by Kurtz et al. We confirm the presence of 44 GHz methanol maser emission in all three sources, detecting eight distinct maser components in NGC 6334F, twelve components in G8.67-0.36 and one in M17.

  3. An ultra-compact virtual source FET model for deeply-scaled devices: Parameter extraction and validation for standard cell libraries and digital circuits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mysore, Omar

    In this paper, we present the first validation of the virtual source (VS) charge-based compact model for standard cell libraries and large-scale digital circuits. With only a modest number of physically meaningful parameters, ...

  4. KINETIC MODELING OF FUEL EFFECTS OVER A WIDE RANGE OF CHEMISTRY, PROPERTIES, AND SOURCES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bunting, Bruce G [ORNL] [ORNL; Bunce, Michael [ORNL] [ORNL; Niak, Chitralkumar [Reaction Design] [Reaction Design; Puduppakkam, Karthik [Reaction Design] [Reaction Design

    2012-01-01

    Kinetic modeling is an important tool for engine design and can also be used for engine tuning and to study response to fuel chemistry and properties before an engine configuration is physically built and tested. Methodologies needed for studying fuel effects include development of fuel kinetic mechanisms for pure compounds, tools for designing surrogate blends of pure compounds that mimic a desired market fuel, and tools for reducing kinetic mechanisms to a size that allows inclusion in complex CFD engine models. In this paper, we demonstrate the use of these tools to reproduce engine results for a series of research diesel fuels using surrogate fuels in an engine and then modeling results with a simple 2 component surrogate blend with physical properties adjusted to vary fuel volatility. Results indicate that we were reasonably successful in mimicking engine performance of real fuels with blends of pure compounds. We were also successful in spanning the range of the experimental data using CFD and kinetic modeling, but further tuning and matching will be needed to exactly match engine performance of the real and surrogate fuels.

  5. Special Section --Marine Controlled-Source Electromagnetic Methods A Bayesian model for gas saturation estimation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Jinsong

    reservoir model. We consid- er the porosity and fluid saturation of each layer in the reservoir, the bulk- trical resistivity of reservoir materials is highly sensitive to water saturation. However, estimating saturation estimation using marine seismic AVA and CSEM data Jinsong Chen1 , G. Michael Hoversten1 , Donald

  6. A double-layer based model of ion confinement in electron cyclotron resonance ion source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mascali, D. Neri, L.; Celona, L.; Castro, G.; Gammino, S.; Ciavola, G.; Torrisi, G.; Universitŕ Mediterranea di Reggio Calabria, Dipartimento di Ingegneria dell’Informazione, delle Infrastrutture e dell’Energia Sostenibile, Via Graziella, I-89100 Reggio Calabria ; Sorbello, G.; Universitŕ degli Studi di Catania, Dipartimento di Ingegneria Elettrica Elettronica ed Informatica, Viale Andrea Doria 6, 95125 Catania

    2014-02-15

    The paper proposes a new model of ion confinement in ECRIS, which can be easily generalized to any magnetic configuration characterized by closed magnetic surfaces. Traditionally, ion confinement in B-min configurations is ascribed to a negative potential dip due to superhot electrons, adiabatically confined by the magneto-static field. However, kinetic simulations including RF heating affected by cavity modes structures indicate that high energy electrons populate just a thin slab overlapping the ECR layer, while their density drops down of more than one order of magnitude outside. Ions, instead, diffuse across the electron layer due to their high collisionality. This is the proper physical condition to establish a double-layer (DL) configuration which self-consistently originates a potential barrier; this “barrier” confines the ions inside the plasma core surrounded by the ECR surface. The paper will describe a simplified ion confinement model based on plasma density non-homogeneity and DL formation.

  7. Monitoring and Modeling Non-Point Source Contributions of Host-Specific Fecal Contamination in San Pablo Bay

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wuertz, Stefan; Bombardelli, Fabian A; Sirikanchana, Kwanrawee; Wang, Dan

    2009-01-01

    Host-Specific Fecal Contamination in San Pablo Bay Principlelivestock sources of fecal contamination in Kenya with host-Huang. Abstract Fecal contamination from non-point sources

  8. Gaseous Chemistry and Aerosol Mechanism Developments for Version 3.5.1 of the Online Regional Model, WRF-Chem

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Archer-Nicholls, Scott; Lowe, Douglas; Utembe, Steve; Allan, James D.; Zaveri, Rahul A.; Fast, Jerome D.; Hodnebrog, Oivind; Denier van der Gon, Hugo; McFiggans, Gordon

    2014-11-08

    We have made a number of developments in the regional coupled model WRF-Chem, with the aim of making the model more suitable for prediction of atmospheric composition and of interactions between air quality and weather. We have worked on the European domain, with a particular focus on making the model suitable for the study of night time chemistry and oxidation by the nitrate radical in the UK atmosphere. A reduced form of the Common Reactive Intermediates gas-phase chemical mechanism (CRIv2-R5) has been implemented to enable more explicit simulation of VOC degradation. N2O5 heterogeneous chemistry has been added to the existing sectional MOSAIC aerosol module, and coupled to both the CRIv2-R5 and existing CBM-Z gas phase scheme. Modifications have also been made to the sea-spray aerosol emission representation, allowing the inclusion of primary organic material in sea-spray aerosol. Driven by appropriate emissions, wind fields and chemical boundary conditions, implementation of the different developments is illustrated in order to demonstrate the impact that these changes have in the North-West European domain. These developments are now part of the freely available WRF-Chem distribution.

  9. Modeling the heat transfer in geometrically complex media with a volume source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gurevich, M. I., E-mail: gur.m@mail.ru; Tel’kovskaya, O. V.; Chukbar, B. K.; Shkarovskiy, D. A. [National Research Center Kurchatov Institute (Russian Federation)

    2014-12-15

    Fuel elements produced from spent fuel are porous media with spatially varying characteristics. A hierarchical discrete structure for the numerical modeling of heat-transfer processes in media with an anisotropic geometry that is characterized by both the microscopic voids and macroscopic changes in the parameters is proposed. The basic unit of the structure at its lower level is a cell that represents the local properties of the medium. The cells have a standard interface that allows one to form three-dimensional networks of such cells. Different types of cells in the network represent macroscopic changes. The potential for parallel processing is analyzed.

  10. Modeling the Market Potential of Hydrogen from Wind and Competing Sources: Preprint

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMass map shines light on77 PAGEMission MissionModeling distributed generation in8 May 2005

  11. Moisture Flux Convergence in Regional and Global Climate Models: Implications for Droughts in the Southwestern United States Under Climate Change

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gao, Yanhong; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Salathe, E.; Dominguez, Francina; Nijssen, Bart; Lettenmaier, D. P.

    2012-05-10

    The water cycle of the southwestern United States (SW) is dominated by winter storms that maintain a positive annual net precipitation. Analysis of the control and future climate from four pairs of regional and global climate models (RCMs and GCMs) shows that the RCMs simulate a higher fraction of transient eddy moisture fluxes because the hydrodynamic instabilities associated with flow over complex terrain are better resolved. Under global warming, this enables the RCMs to capture the response of transient eddies to increased atmospheric stability that allows more moisture to converge on the windward side of the mountains by blocking. As a result, RCMs simulate enhanced transient eddy moisture convergence in the SW compared to GCMs, although both robustly simulate drying due to enhanced moisture divergence by the divergent mean flow in a warmer climate. This enhanced convergence leads to reduced susceptibility to hydrological change in the RCMs compared to GCMs.

  12. Anisotropic parton escape is the dominant source of azimuthal anisotropy in transport models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liang He; Terrence Edmonds; Zi-Wei Lin; Feng Liu; Denes Molnar; Fuqiang Wang

    2015-07-02

    We trace the development of elliptic anisotropy ($v_2$) via parton-parton collision history in two transport models. The parton $v_2$ is studied as a function of the number of collisions of each parton in Au+Au and $d$+Au collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{_{\\rm NN}}}=200$~GeV. It is found that the majority of $v_2$ comes from the anisotropic escape probability of partons, with no fundamental difference at low and high transverse momenta. The contribution to $v_2$ from hydrodynamic-type collective flow is found to be small. Only when the parton-parton cross-section is set unrealistically large does this contribution start to take over. Our findings challenge the current paradigm emerged from hydrodynamic comparisons to anisotropy data.

  13. Fermi Large Area Telescope Third Source Catalog

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ,

    2015-01-01

    We present the third Fermi Large Area Telescope source catalog (3FGL) of sources in the 100~MeV--300~GeV range. Based on the first four years of science data from the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope mission, it is the deepest yet in this energy range. Relative to the 2FGL catalog, the 3FGL catalog incorporates twice as much data as well as a number of analysis improvements, including improved calibrations at the event reconstruction level, an updated model for Galactic diffuse gamma-ray emission, a refined procedure for source detection, and improved methods for associating LAT sources with potential counterparts at other wavelengths. The 3FGL catalog includes 3033 sources above 4 sigma significance, with source location regions, spectral properties, and monthly light curves for each. Of these, 78 are flagged as potentially being due to imperfections in the model for Galactic diffuse emission. Twenty-five sources are modeled explicitly as spatially extended, and overall 232 sources are considered as identifie...

  14. Collaborative Research: Towards Advanced Understanding and Predictive Capability of Climate Change in the Arctic using a High-Resolution Regional Arctic Climate System Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lettenmaier, Dennis P

    2013-04-08

    Primary activities are reported in these areas: climate system component studies via one-way coupling experiments; development of the Regional Arctic Climate System Model (RACM); and physical feedback studies focusing on changes in Arctic sea ice using the fully coupled model.

  15. Conceptual design of first toroidal electron cyclotron resonance ion source and modeling of ion extraction from it

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Caliri, C; Volpe, F A

    2015-01-01

    Electron Cyclotron Resonance Ion Sources (ECRIS) progressed to higher and higher ion currents and charge states by adopting stronger magnetic fields (beneficial for confinement) and proportionally higher ECR frequencies. Further improvements would require the attainment of "triple products" of density, temperature and confinement time comparable with major fusion experiments. For this, we propose a new, toroidal rather than linear, ECRIS geometry, which would at the same time improve confinement and make better use of the magnetic field. Ion extraction is more complicated than from a linear device, but feasible, as our modelling suggests: single-particle tracings showed successful extraction by at least two techniques, making use respectively of a magnetic extractor and of ExB drifts. Additional techniques are briefly discussed.

  16. Force-free field modeling of twist and braiding-induced magnetic energy in an active-region corona

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thalmann, J. K.

    2014-01-01

    The theoretical concept that braided magnetic field lines in the solar corona may dissipate a sufficient amount of energy to account for the brightening observed in the active-region (AR) corona has only recently been substantiated by high-resolution observations. From the analysis of coronal images obtained with the High Resolution Coronal Imager, first observational evidence of the braiding of magnetic field lines was reported by Cirtain et al. (hereafter CG13). We present nonlinear force-free reconstructions of the associated coronal magnetic field based on Solar Dynamics Observatory/Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager vector magnetograms. We deliver estimates of the free magnetic energy associated with a braided coronal structure. Our model results suggest (?100 times) more free energy at the braiding site than analytically estimated by CG13, strengthening the possibility of the AR corona being heated by field line braiding. We were able to appropriately assess the coronal free energy by using vector field measurements and we attribute the lower energy estimate of CG13 to the underestimated (by a factor of 10) azimuthal field strength. We also quantify the increase in the overall twist of a flare-related flux rope that was noted by CG13. From our models we find that the overall twist of the flux rope increased by about half a turn within 12 minutes. Unlike another method to which we compare our results, we evaluate the winding of the flux rope's constituent field lines around each other purely based on their modeled coronal three-dimensional field line geometry. To our knowledge, this is done for the first time here.

  17. Effect of Terrestrial and Marine Organic Aerosol on Regional and Global Climate: Model Development, Application, and Verification with Satellite Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meskhidze, Nicholas; Zhang, Yang; Kamykowski, Daniel

    2012-03-28

    In this DOE project the improvements to parameterization of marine primary organic matter (POM) emissions, hygroscopic properties of marine POM, marine isoprene derived secondary organic aerosol (SOA) emissions, surfactant effects, new cloud droplet activation parameterization have been implemented into Community Atmosphere Model (CAM 5.0), with a seven mode aerosol module from the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL)���¢��������s Modal Aerosol Model (MAM7). The effects of marine aerosols derived from sea spray and ocean emitted biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) on microphysical properties of clouds were explored by conducting 10 year CAM5.0-MAM7 model simulations at a grid resolution 1.9�������°��������2.5�������° with 30 vertical layers. Model-predicted relationship between ocean physical and biological systems and the abundance of CCN in remote marine atmosphere was compared to data from the A-Train satellites (MODIS, CALIPSO, AMSR-E). Model simulations show that on average, primary and secondary organic aerosol emissions from the ocean can yield up to 20% increase in Cloud Condensation Nuclei (CCN) at 0.2% Supersaturation, and up to 5% increases in droplet number concentration of global maritime shallow clouds. Marine organics were treated as internally or externally mixed with sea salt. Changes associated with cloud properties reduced (absolute value) the model-predicted short wave cloud forcing from -1.35 Wm-2 to -0.25 Wm-2. By using different emission scenarios, and droplet activation parameterizations, this study suggests that addition of marine primary aerosols and biologically generated reactive gases makes an important difference in radiative forcing assessments. All baseline and sensitivity simulations for 2001 and 2050 using global-through-urban WRF/Chem (GU-WRF) were completed. The main objective of these simulations was to evaluate the capability of GU-WRF for an accurate representation of the global atmosphere by exploring the most accurate configuration of physics options in GWRF for global scale modeling in 2001 at a horizontal grid resolution of 1�������° x 1�������°. GU-WRF model output was evaluated using observational datasets from a variety of sources including surface based observations (NCDC and BSRN), model reanalysis (NCEP/ NCAR Reanalysis and CMAP), and remotely-sensed data (TRMM) to evaluate the ability of GU-WRF to simulate atmospheric variables at the surface as well as aloft. Explicit treatment of nanoparticles produced from new particle formation in GU-WRF/Chem-MADRID was achieved by expanding particle size sections from 8 to 12 to cover particles with the size range of 1.16 nm to 11.6 �������µm. Simulations with two different nucleation parameterizations were conducted for August 2002 over a global domain at a 4�������º by 5�������º horizontal resolution. The results are evaluated against field measurement data from the 2002 Aerosol Nucleation and Real Time Characterization Experiment (ANARChE) in Atlanta, Georgia, as well as satellite and reanalysis data. We have also explored the relationship between ���¢��������clean marine���¢������� aerosol optical properties and ocean surface wind speed using remotely sensed data from the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP) on board the CALIPSO satellite and the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer (AMSR-E) on board the AQUA satellite. Detailed data analyses

  18. Ecosystem-scale Selenium Model for the San Francisco Bay-Delta Regional Ecosystem Restoration Implementation Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Presser, Theresa S.; Luoma, Samuel N.

    2013-01-01

    experimental ponds. Water, Air, and Soil Pollution 62(1–2):Pollution [SFBRWQCB] California San Francisco Bay Regional Water

  19. Collaborative Research: Towards Advanced Understanding and Predictive Capability of Climate Change in the Arctic Using a High-Resolution Regional Arctic Climate Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cassano, John

    2013-06-30

    The primary research task completed for this project was the development of the Regional Arctic Climate Model (RACM). This involved coupling existing atmosphere, ocean, sea ice, and land models using the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) Community Climate System Model (CCSM) coupler (CPL7). RACM is based on the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) atmospheric model, the Parallel Ocean Program (POP) ocean model, the CICE sea ice model, and the Variable Infiltration Capacity (VIC) land model. A secondary research task for this project was testing and evaluation of WRF for climate-scale simulations on the large pan-Arctic model domain used in RACM. This involved identification of a preferred set of model physical parameterizations for use in our coupled RACM simulations and documenting any atmospheric biases present in RACM.

  20. Regional seismic discrimination research at LLNL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walter, W.R.; Mayeda, K.M.; Goldstein, P.; Patton, H.J.; Jarpe, S.; Glenn, L.

    1995-10-01

    The ability to verify a Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty (CTBT) depends in part on the ability to seismically detect and discriminate between potential clandestine underground nuclear tests and other seismic sources, including earthquakes and mining activities. Regional techniques are necessary to push detection and discrimination levels down to small magnitudes, but existing methods of event discrimination are mainly empirical and show much variability from region to region. The goals of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory`s (LLNL`s) regional discriminant research are to evaluate the most promising discriminants, improve the understanding of their physical basis and use this information to develop new and more effective discriminants that can be transported to new regions of high monitoring interest. In this report the authors discuss preliminary efforts to geophysically characterize the Middle East and North Africa. They show that the remarkable stability of coda allows one to develop physically based, stable single station magnitude scales in new regions. They then discuss progress to date on evaluating and improving physical understanding and ability to model regional discriminants, focusing on the comprehensive NTS dataset. The authors apply this modeling ability to develop improved discriminants including slopes of P to S ratios. They find combining disparate discriminant techniques is particularly effective in identifying consistent outliers such as shallow earthquakes and mine seismicity. Finally they discuss development and use of new coda and waveform modeling tools to investigate special events.

  1. Numerical Simulation of Inter-basin Groundwater Flow into Northern Yucca Flat, Nevada National Security Site, Using the Death Valley Regional Flow System Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pohlmann Karl,Ye Ming

    2012-03-01

    Models of groundwater flow for the Yucca Flat area of the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) are under development by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) for corrective action investigations of the Yucca Flat-Climax Mine Corrective Action Unit (CAU). One important aspect of these models is the quantity of inter-basin groundwater flow from regional systems to the north. This component of flow, together with its uncertainty, must be properly accounted for in the CAU flow models to provide a defensible regional framework for calculations of radionuclide transport that will support determinations of the Yucca Flat-Climax Mine contaminant boundary. Because characterizing flow boundary conditions in northern Yucca Flat requires evaluation to a higher level of detail than the scale of the Yucca Flat-Climax Mine CAU model can efficiently provide, a study more focused on this aspect of the model was required.

  2. A three-dimensional numerical model of predevelopment conditions in the Death Valley regional ground-water flow system, Nevada and California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D'Agnese, F.A.; O'Brien, G.M.; Faunt, C.C.; Belcher, W.R.; San Juan, Carma

    2002-11-22

    In the early 1990's, two numerical models of the Death Valley regional ground-water flow system were developed by the U.S. Department of Energy. In general, the two models were based on the same basic hydrogeologic data set. In 1998, the U.S. Department of Energy requested that the U.S. Geological Survey develop and maintain a ground-water flow model of the Death Valley region in support of U.S. Department of Energy programs at the Nevada Test Site. The purpose of developing this ''second-generation'' regional model was to enhance the knowledge and understanding of the ground-water flow system as new information and tools are developed. The U.S. Geological Survey also was encouraged by the U.S. Department of Energy to cooperate to the fullest extent with other Federal, State, and local entities in the region to take advantage of the benefits of their knowledge and expertise. The short-term objective of the Death Valley regional ground-water flow system project was to develop a steady-stat e representation of the predevelopment conditions of the ground-water flow system utilizing the two geologic interpretations used to develop the previous numerical models. The long-term objective of this project was to construct and calibrate a transient model that simulates the ground-water conditions of the study area over the historical record that utilizes a newly interpreted hydrogeologic conceptual model. This report describes the result of the predevelopment steady-state model construction and calibration.

  3. A unified analysis of plasma-sheath transition in the Tonks–Langmuir model with warm ion source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tskhakaya, D. D. [Fusion@ÖAW, Institute for Theoretical Physics, University of Innsbruck, A-6020 Innsbruck (Austria); Kos, L. [LECAD Laboratory, Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, University of Ljubljana, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Jeli?, N. [Fusion@ÖAW, Institute for Theoretical and Computational Physics, TU Graz, A-8010 Graz (Austria)

    2014-07-15

    The paper presents a comprehensive kinetic theory of the famous Tonks–Langmuir model of a plane symmetric discharge, taking into account the thermal motion of ion source particles. The ion kinetics is governed by the ionization of neutrals at electron impacts. The plasma consisting of Boltzmann distributed electrons and singly charged ions is in contact with the absorbing negative wall. The derivations are performed in the frame of the “asymptotic two-scale” approximation, when the ionization mean-free path L{sub i} is much larger than the electron Debye length ?{sub D}. In the limit (?{sub D}/L{sub i})?0, the plasma-wall transition (PWT) layer can be split into two sublayers: a quasineutral presheath (PS) (with the scale-length L{sub i}) and the Debye sheath (DS) (with the scale ?{sub D}). Such a subdivision of the PWT layer allows to investigate these sublayers separately and simplify the analysis of the influence of the ion source thermal motion (this has been neglected in the major part of publications up to now). The uniform description of the PWT layer as a single unit is complicated by the singular presheath and sheath structure and by a coupling with the eigenvalue problem originating from the plasma balance in the bounded system. The issue is clarified both analytically and numerically by construction of a matched asymptotic expressions. The equation and the length-scale governing the transition between neighboring PS and DS sublayers are derived. The eigenvalue problem combining the wall potential, the wall location, and the ionization mean-free path is discussed.

  4. Quasar H II Regions During Cosmic Reionization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marcelo A. Alvarez; Tom Abel

    2007-09-10

    Cosmic reionization progresses as HII regions form around sources of ionizing radiation. Their average size grows continuously until they percolate and complete reionization. We demonstrate how this typical growth can be calculated around the largest, biased sources of UV emission, such as quasars, by further developing an analytical model based on the excursion set formalism. This approach allows us to calculate the sizes and growth of the HII regions created by the progenitors of any dark matter halo of given mass and redshift with a minimum of free parameters. Statistical variations in the size of these pre-existing HII regions are an additional source of uncertainty in the determination of very high redshift quasar properties from their observed HII region sizes. We use this model to demonstrate that the transmission gaps seen in very high redshift quasars can be understood from the radiation of only their progenitors and associated clustered small galaxies. The fit sets a lower limit on the redshift of overlap at z = 5.8 +/- 0.1. This interpretation makes the transmission gaps independent of the age of the quasars observed. If this interpretation were correct it would raise the prospects of using radio interferometers currently under construction to detect the epoch of reionization.

  5. Determining Greenland Ice Sheet sensitivity to regional climate change: one-way coupling of a 3-D thermo-mechanical ice sheet model with a mesoscale climate model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schlegel, Nicole-Jeanne

    2011-01-01

    ice sheet model with a mesoscale climate model By Nicole-ice sheet model with a mesoscale climate model Copyrightice sheet model with a mesoscale climate model by Nicole-

  6. Downscaling Global Land Cover Projections from an Integrated Assessment Model for Use in Regional Analyses: Results and Evaluation for the US from 2005 to 2095

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    West, Tristram O.; Le Page, Yannick LB; Huang, Maoyi; Wolf, Julie; Thomson, Allison M.

    2014-06-05

    Projections of land cover change generated from Integrated Assessment Models (IAM) and other economic-based models can be applied for analyses of environmental impacts at subregional and landscape scales. For those IAM and economic models that project land use at the sub-continental or regional scale, these projections must be downscaled and spatially distributed prior to use in climate or ecosystem models. Downscaling efforts to date have been conducted at the national extent with relatively high spatial resolution (30m) and at the global extent with relatively coarse spatial resolution (0.5 degree).

  7. Megacity impacts on regional ozone formation: observations and WRF-Chem modeling for the MIRAGE-Shanghai field campaign

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-01-01

    Tie, X. : Analysis of ozone and VOCs measured in Shanghai: AMegacity impacts on regional ozone formation terminations inand Tie, X. : Study of ozone “weekend effect” in Shanghai,

  8. Radiation source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thode, Lester E. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1981-01-01

    A device and method for relativistic electron beam heating of a high-density plasma in a small localized region. A relativistic electron beam generator or accelerator produces a high-voltage electron beam which propagates along a vacuum drift tube and is modulated to initiate electron bunching within the beam. The beam is then directed through a low-density gas chamber which provides isolation between the vacuum modulator and the relativistic electron beam target. The relativistic beam is then applied to a high-density target plasma which typically comprises DT, DD, or similar thermonuclear gas at a density of 10.sup.17 to 10.sup.20 electrons per cubic centimeter. The target gas is ionized prior to application of the relativistic electron beam by means of a laser or other preionization source to form a plasma. Utilizing a relativistic electron beam with an individual particle energy exceeding 3 MeV, classical scattering by relativistic electrons passing through isolation foils is negligible. As a result, relativistic streaming instabilities are initiated within the high-density target plasma causing the relativistic electron beam to efficiently deposit its energy into a small localized region of the high-density plasma target.

  9. A simple object-oriented and open-source model for scientific and policy analyses of the global climate system – Hector v1.0

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Hartin, Corinne A.; Patel, Pralit L.; Schwarber, Adria; Link, Robert P.; Bond-Lamberty, Benjamin

    2015-04-01

    Simple climate models play an integral role in the policy and scientific communities. They are used for climate mitigation scenarios within integrated assessment models, complex climate model emulation, and uncertainty analyses. Here we describe Hector v1.0, an open source, object-oriented, simple global climate carbon-cycle model. This model runs essentially instantaneously while still representing the most critical global-scale earth system processes. Hector has a three-part main carbon cycle: a one-pool atmosphere, land, and ocean. The model's terrestrial carbon cycle includes primary production and respiration fluxes, accommodating arbitrary geographic divisions into, e.g., ecological biomes or political units. Hector actively solves the inorganicmore »carbon system in the surface ocean, directly calculating air–sea fluxes of carbon and ocean pH. Hector reproduces the global historical trends of atmospheric [CO2], radiative forcing, and surface temperatures. The model simulates all four Representative Concentration Pathways (RCPs) with equivalent rates of change of key variables over time compared to current observations, MAGICC (a well-known simple climate model), and models from the 5th Coupled Model Intercomparison Project. Hector's flexibility, open-source nature, and modular design will facilitate a broad range of research in various areas.« less

  10. A simple object-oriented and open source model for scientific and policy analyses of the global climate system–Hector v1.0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hartin, Corinne A.; Patel, Pralit L.; Schwarber, Adria; Link, Robert P.; Bond-Lamberty, Benjamin

    2015-01-01

    Simple climate models play an integral role in policy and scientific communities. They are used for climate mitigation scenarios within integrated assessment models, complex climate model emulation, and uncertainty analyses. Here we describe Hector, an open source, object-oriented, simple global climate carbon-cycle model. This model runs essentially instantaneously while still representing the most critical global scale earth system processes. Hector has three main carbon pools: an atmosphere, land, and ocean. The model’s terrestrial carbon cycle includes respiration and primary production, accommodating arbitrary geographic divisions into, e.g., ecological biomes or political units. Hector’s actively solves the inorganic carbon system in the surface ocean, directly calculating air-sea fluxes of carbon and ocean pH. Hector reproduces the global historical trends of atmospheric [CO2] and surface temperatures. The model simulates all four Representative Concentration Pathways with high correlations (R >0.7) with current observations, MAGICC (a well-known simple climate model), and the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project version 5. Hector is freely available under an open source license, and its modular design will facilitate a broad range of research in various areas.

  11. Modeling the Summertime Climate of Southwest Asia: The Role of Land Surface Processes in Shaping the Climate of Semiarid Regions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marcella, Marc P.

    Presented is a study on the role of land surface processes in determining the summertime climate over the semiarid region of southwest Asia. In this region, a warm surface air temperature bias of 3.5°C is simulated in the ...

  12. A long Saharan dust event over the western Mediterranean: Lidar, Sun photometer observations, and regional dust modeling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    over the Mediterranean region (http://www.bsc.es/projects/earthscience/ DREAM/) considering four of dust exported annually from northern Africa (Sahara-Sahel region) are still not reliable, and range]. Once in the atmosphere, dust particles interact with solar and thermal radiation, modulating the Earth

  13. Resampling Methods and High-Dimensional Data, Texas A&M, 3/25/2010 Analyzing and Combining Regional

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sain, Steve

    to Geosciences National Center for Atmospheric Research Boulder, CO Claudia Tebaldi, Climate Central; Cari of regional climate models and NARCCAP. · Combining data sources and model output. · Initial analysis of future climate change (summer temperature). µ #12;Climate Models and Climate Change 3 · Climate models

  14. Nitrous oxide (N?O) isotopic composition in the troposphere : instrumentation, observations at Mace Head, Ireland, and regional modeling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Potter, Katherine Ellison

    2011-01-01

    Nitrous oxide (N?O) is a significant greenhouse gas and main contributor to stratospheric ozone destruction. Surface measurements of N?O mole fractions have been used to attribute source and sink strengths, but large ...

  15. Renewable Resources: a national catalog of model projects. Volume 2. Mid-American Solar Energy Complex Region

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1980-07-01

    This compilation of diverse conservation and renewable energy projects across the United States was prepared through the enthusiastic participation of solar and alternate energy groups from every state and region. Compiled and edited by the Center for Renewable Resources, these projects reflect many levels of innovation and technical expertise. In many cases, a critique analysis is presented of how projects performed and of the institutional conditions associated with their success or failure. Some 2000 projects are included in this compilation; most have worked, some have not. Information about all is presented to aid learning from these experiences. The four volumes in this set are arranged in state sections by geographic region, coinciding with the four Regional Solar Energy Centers. The table of contents is organized by project category so that maximum cross-referencing may be obtained. This volume includes information on the Mid-American Solar Energy Complex Region. (WHK)

  16. WRF-Chem model predictions of the regional impacts of N2O5 heterogeneous processes on night-time chemistry over north-western Europe

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Lowe, Douglas; Archer-Nicholls, Scott; Morgan, Will; Allan, James D.; Utembe, Steve; Ouyang, Bin; Aruffo, Eleonora; Le Breton, Michael; Zaveri, Rahul A.; di Carlo, Piero; et al

    2015-02-09

    Chemical modelling studies have been conducted over north-western Europe in summer conditions, showing that night-time dinitrogen pentoxide (N2O5) heterogeneous reactive uptake is important regionally in modulating particulate nitrate and has a~modest influence on oxidative chemistry. Results from Weather Research and Forecasting model with Chemistry (WRF-Chem) model simulations, run with a detailed volatile organic compound (VOC) gas-phase chemistry scheme and the Model for Simulating Aerosol Interactions and Chemistry (MOSAIC) sectional aerosol scheme, were compared with a series of airborne gas and particulate measurements made over the UK in July 2010. Modelled mixing ratios of key gas-phase species were reasonably accurate (correlationsmore »with measurements of 0.7–0.9 for NO2 and O3). However modelled loadings of particulate species were less accurate (correlation with measurements for particulate sulfate and ammonium were between 0.0 and 0.6). Sulfate mass loadings were particularly low (modelled means of 0.5–0.7 ?g kg?1air, compared with measurements of 1.0–1.5 ?g kg?1air). Two flights from the campaign were used as test cases – one with low relative humidity (RH) (60–70%), the other with high RH (80–90%). N2O5 heterogeneous chemistry was found to not be important in the low-RH test case; but in the high-RH test case it had a strong effect and significantly improved the agreement between modelled and measured NO3 and N2O5. When the model failed to capture atmospheric RH correctly, the modelled NO3 and N2O5 mixing ratios for these flights differed significantly from the measurements. This demonstrates that, for regional modelling which involves heterogeneous processes, it is essential to capture the ambient temperature and water vapour profiles. The night-time NO3 oxidation of VOCs across the whole region was found to be 100–300 times slower than the daytime OH oxidation of these compounds. The difference in contribution was less for alkenes (× 80) and comparable for dimethylsulfide (DMS). However the suppression of NO3 mixing ratios across the domain by N2O5 heterogeneous chemistry has only a very slight, negative, influence on this oxidative capacity. The influence on regional particulate nitrate mass loadings is stronger. Night-time N2O5 heterogeneous chemistry maintains the production of particulate nitrate within polluted regions: when this process is taken into consideration, the daytime peak (for the 95th percentile) of PM10 nitrate mass loadings remains around 5.6 ?g kg?1air, but the night-time minimum increases from 3.5 to 4.6 ?g kg?1air. The sustaining of higher particulate mass loadings through the night by this process improves model skill at matching measured aerosol nitrate diurnal cycles and will negatively impact on regional air quality, requiring this process to be included in regional models.« less

  17. Computer programs for developing source terms for a UF{sub 6} dispersion model to simulate postulated UF{sub 6} releases from buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, W.R.

    1985-03-01

    Calculational methods and computer programs for the analysis of source terms for postulated releases of UF{sub 6} are presented. Required thermophysical properties of UF{sub 6}, HF, and H{sub 2}O are described in detail. UF{sub 6} reacts with moisture in the ambient environment to form HF and H{sub 2}O. The coexistence of HF and H{sub 2}O significantly alters their pure component properties, and HF vapor polymerizes. Transient compartment models for simulating UF{sub 6} releases inside gaseous diffusion plant feed and withdrawl buildings and cascade buildings are also described. The basic compartment model mass and energy balances are supported by simple heat transfer, ventilation system, and deposition models. A model that can simulate either a closed compartment or a steady-state ventilation system is also discussed. The transient compartment models provide input to an atmospheric dispersion model as output.

  18. COLLABORATIVE RESEARCH: TOWARDS ADVANCED UNDERSTANDING AND PREDICTIVE CAPABILITY OF CLIMATE CHANGE IN THE ARCTIC USING A HIGH-RESOLUTION REGIONAL ARCTIC CLIMATE SYSTEM MODEL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gutowski, William J.

    2013-02-07

    The motivation for this project was to advance the science of climate change and prediction in the Arctic region. Its primary goals were to (i) develop a state-of-the-art Regional Arctic Climate system Model (RACM) including high-resolution atmosphere, land, ocean, sea ice and land hydrology components and (ii) to perform extended numerical experiments using high performance computers to minimize uncertainties and fundamentally improve current predictions of climate change in the northern polar regions. These goals were realized first through evaluation studies of climate system components via one-way coupling experiments. Simulations were then used to examine the effects of advancements in climate component systems on their representation of main physics, time-mean fields and to understand variability signals at scales over many years. As such this research directly addressed some of the major science objectives of the BER Climate Change Research Division (CCRD) regarding the advancement of long-term climate prediction.

  19. Regional refining models for alternative fuels using shale and coal synthetic crudes: identification and evaluation of optimized alternative fuels. Annual report, March 20, 1979-March 19, 1980

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sefer, N.R.; Russell, J.A.

    1980-11-01

    The initial phase has been completed in the project to evaluate alternative fuels for highway transportation from synthetic crudes. Three refinery models were developed for Rocky Mountain, Mid-Continent and Great Lakes regions to make future product volumes and qualities forecast for 1995. Projected quantities of shale oil and coal oil syncrudes were introduced into the raw materials slate. Product slate was then varied from conventional products to evaluate maximum diesel fuel and broadcut fuel in all regions. Gasoline supplement options were evaluated in one region for 10% each of methanol, ethanol, MTBE or synthetic naphtha in the blends along with syncrude components. Compositions and qualities of the fuels were determined for the variation in constraints and conditions established for the study. Effects on raw materials, energy consumption and investment costs were reported. Results provide the basis to formulate fuels for laboratory and engine evaluation in future phases of the project.

  20. An improved dust emission model - Part 2: Evaluation in the Community Earth System Model, with implications for the use of dust source functions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kok, JF; Albani, S; Mahowald, NM; Ward, DS

    2014-01-01

    S. : The Community Earth System Model A Framework forin the Community Earth System Model, with implications forinto the Community Earth System Model (CESM) and comparing

  1. A preliminary regional PBPK model of lung metabolism for improving species dependent descriptions of 1,3-butadiene and its metabolites

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Campbell, Jerry; Van Landingham, Cynthia; Crowell, Susan; Gentry, Robinan; Kaden, Debra; Fiebelkorn, Stacy; Loccisano, Anne; Clewell, Harvey

    2015-06-12

    1,3-Butadiene (BD), a volatile organic chemical (VOC), is used in synthetic rubber production and other industrial processes. It is detectable at low levels in ambient air as well as in tobacco smoke and gasoline vapors. Inhalation exposures to high concentrations of BD have been associated with lung cancer in both humans and experimental animals, although differences in species sensitivity have been observed. Metabolically active lung cells such as Pulmonary Type I and Type II epithelial cells and club cells (Clara cells)1 are potential targets of BD metabolite-induced toxicity. Metabolic capacities of these cells, their regional densities, and distributions vary throughoutmore »the respiratory tract as well as between species and cell types. Here we present a physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model for BD that includes a regional model of lung metabolism, based on a previous model for styrene, to provide species-dependent descriptions of BD metabolism in the mouse, rat, and human. Since there are no in vivo data on BD pharmacokinetics in the human, the rat and mouse models were parameterized to the extent possible on the basis of in vitro metabolic data. Where it was necessary to use in vivo data, extrapolation from rat to mouse was performed to evaluate the level of uncertainty in the human model. A kidney compartment and description of downstream metabolism were also included in the model to allow for eventual use of available urinary and blood biomarker data in animals and humans to calibrate the model for estimation of BD exposures and internal metabolite levels. Results from simulated inhalation exposures to BD indicate that incorporation of differential lung region metabolism is important in describing species differences in pulmonary response and that these differences may have implications for risk assessments of human exposures to BD.« less

  2. Long-Range Atmospheric Transport of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons: A Global 3-D Model Analysis Including Evaluation of Arctic Sources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Friedman, Carey

    We use the global 3-D chemical transport model GEOS-Chem to simulate long-range atmospheric transport of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). To evaluate the model’s ability to simulate PAHs with different volatilities, ...

  3. 3D HYBRID RAY-FD AND DWN-FD SEISMIC MODELING FOR SIMPLE MODELS CONTAINING COMPLEX LOCAL STRUCTURES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cerveny, Vlastislav

    3D HYBRID RAY-FD AND DWN-FD SEISMIC MODELING FOR SIMPLE MODELS CONTAINING COMPLEX LOCAL STRUCTURES local structure embedded in a large, but considerably simpler, regional structure. The hybrid modelling to compute the seismic wavefield due to the source and simple regional structure. The complex local structure

  4. Organizational Project Management Maturity Model (OPM3) to Improve Ministery of Construction and Housing (MOCAH) Within Kurdistan Regional Government 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mustafa, Azad Jabbar

    2015-05-06

    The Organizational Project Management Maturity Model (OPM3®), a standard developed by the Project Management Institute (PMI), has become an effective model to help an organization successfully implement strategies and achieve its objectives...

  5. Remote Sensing-based Estimates of Potential Evapotranspiration for Hydrologic Modeling in the Upper Colorado River Basin Region

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barik, Muhammad Ghulam

    2014-01-01

    evapotranspiration equations and their relevance to stream flow modeling in semi-arid environments.evapotranspiration equations and their relevance to stream flow modeling in semi-arid environments.evapotranspiration equations and their relevance to stream flow modeling in semi-arid environments.

  6. Evaluation of the accuracy of the EPA model for BOD5 prediction in various climatic regions of Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Koutny, Jessica Leigh

    2000-01-01

    model demonstrated removal rates for BOD?, TSS, fecal coliform, ammonium, and phosphorus of 80.0%, 70.9%, 87.1%, 34.7%, and 22.7%, respectively. These data provided the basis for evaluating the EPA model. A sensitivity analysis of the EPA model...

  7. Dynamic downscaling of 22-year CFS winter seasonal hindcasts with the UCLA-ETA regional climate model over the United

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xue, Yongkang

    Dynamic downscaling of 22-year CFS winter seasonal hindcasts with the UCLA-ETA regional climate for Environmental Prediction Climate Forecast System (NCEP CFS), winter season predictions over the contiguous in the study. CFS over-predicts the precipitation in eastern and western US by as much as 45 and 90

  8. Heat and freshwater exchange on the Antarctic continental1 shelf in a regional coupled climate model2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holland, David

    Heat and freshwater exchange on the Antarctic continental1 shelf in a regional coupled climate exchange with the atmosphere and sea ice dominates the annual cycle in heat29 and freshwater content;2 Abstract23 Understanding heat and freshwater content change in the Antarctic shelf seas is important

  9. Final Technical Report for Collaborative Research: Regional climate-change projections through next-generation empirical and dynamical models, DE-FG02-07ER64429

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smyth, Padhraic

    2013-07-22

    This is the final report for a DOE-funded research project describing the outcome of research on non-homogeneous hidden Markov models (NHMMs) and coupled ocean-atmosphere (O-A) intermediate-complexity models (ICMs) to identify the potentially predictable modes of climate variability, and to investigate their impacts on the regional-scale. The main results consist of extensive development of the hidden Markov models for rainfall simulation and downscaling specifically within the non-stationary climate change context together with the development of parallelized software; application of NHMMs to downscaling of rainfall projections over India; identification and analysis of decadal climate signals in data and models; and, studies of climate variability in terms of the dynamics of atmospheric flow regimes.

  10. Source Term Estimation of Radioxenon Released from the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Reactors Using Measured Air Concentrations and Atmospheric Transport Modeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eslinger, Paul W. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Biegalski, S. [Univ. of Texas at Austin, TX (United States); Bowyer, Ted W. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Cooper, Matthew W. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Haas, Derek A. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Hayes, James C. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Hoffman, Ian [Radiation Protection Bureau, Health Canada, Ottawa, ON (Canada); Korpach, E. [Radiation Protection Bureau, Health Canada, Ottawa, ON (Canada); Yi, Jing [Radiation Protection Bureau, Health Canada, Ottawa, ON (Canada); Miley, Harry S. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Rishel, Jeremy P. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Ungar, R. Kurt [Radiation Protection Bureau, Health Canada, Ottawa, ON (Canada); White, Brian [Radiation Protection Bureau, Health Canada, Ottawa, ON (Canada); Woods, Vincent T. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Systems designed to monitor airborne radionuclides released from underground nuclear explosions detected radioactive fallout from the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear accident in March 2011. Atmospheric transport modeling (ATM) of plumes of noble gases and particulates were performed soon after the accident to determine plausible detection locations of any radioactive releases to the atmosphere. We combine sampling data from multiple International Modeling System (IMS) locations in a new way to estimate the magnitude and time sequence of the releases. Dilution factors from the modeled plume at five different detection locations were combined with 57 atmospheric concentration measurements of 133-Xe taken from March 18 to March 23 to estimate the source term. This approach estimates that 59% of the 1.24×1019 Bq of 133-Xe present in the reactors at the time of the earthquake was released to the atmosphere over a three day period. Source term estimates from combinations of detection sites have lower spread than estimates based on measurements at single detection sites. Sensitivity cases based on data from four or more detection locations bound the source term between 35% and 255% of available xenon inventory.

  11. BioEarth: Envisioning and developing a new regional earth system model to inform natural and agricultural resource management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2015-01-01

    model for complex terrain. Water Resour Res 30:1665–1679systems (e.g. , land, air, or water). The interconnectednessof nitrogen, carbon, and water present daunting management

  12. Identifying Potential Land Use-derived Solute Sources to Stream Baseflow Using Ground Water Models and GIS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to assess the impact of different baseflow solute contributions to surface water chemistry. Numerous field systems, locations of oil brine fields and high- density human populations) likely exist. Impacts of otherBoutt 1 Identifying Potential Land Use-derived Solute Sources to Stream Baseflow Using Ground Water

  13. Assessing the CAM5 Physics Suite in the WRF-Chem Model: Implementation, Resolution Sensitivity, and a First Evaluation for a Regional Case Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ma, Po-Lun; Rasch, Philip J.; Fast, Jerome D.; Easter, Richard C.; Gustafson, William I.; Liu, Xiaohong; Ghan, Steven J.; Singh, Balwinder

    2014-05-06

    A suite of physical parameterizations (deep and shallow convection, turbulent boundary layer, aerosols, cloud microphysics, and cloud fraction) from the global climate model Community Atmosphere Model version 5.1 (CAM5) has been implemented in the regional model Weather Research and Forecasting with chemistry (WRF-Chem). A downscaling modeling framework with consistent physics has also been established in which both global and regional simulations use the same emissions and surface fluxes. The WRF-Chem model with the CAM5 physics suite is run at multiple horizontal resolutions over a domain encompassing the northern Pacific Ocean, northeast Asia, and northwest North America for April 2008 when the ARCTAS, ARCPAC, and ISDAC field campaigns took place. These simulations are evaluated against field campaign measurements, satellite retrievals, and ground-based observations, and are compared with simulations that use a set of common WRF-Chem Parameterizations. This manuscript describes the implementation of the CAM5 physics suite in WRF-Chem provides an overview of the modeling framework and an initial evaluation of the simulated meteorology, clouds, and aerosols, and quantifies the resolution dependence of the cloud and aerosol parameterizations. We demonstrate that some of the CAM5 biases, such as high estimates of cloud susceptibility to aerosols and the underestimation of aerosol concentrations in the Arctic, can be reduced simply by increasing horizontal resolution. We also show that the CAM5 physics suite performs similarly to a set of parameterizations commonly used in WRF-Chem, but produces higher ice and liquid water condensate amounts and near-surface black carbon concentration. Further evaluations that use other mesoscale model parameterizations and perform other case studies are needed to infer whether one parameterization consistently produces results more consistent with observations.

  14. Statistical Modelling of the Relationship Between Main Development Region Sea Surface Temperature and Atlantic Basin Hurricane Numbers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Binter, R; Khare, S; Binter, Roman; Jewson, Stephen; Khare, Shree

    2007-01-01

    We are building a hurricane number prediction scheme that relies, in part, on statistical modelling of the empirical relationship between Atlantic sea surface temperatures and Atlantic basin hurricane numbers. We test out a number of simple statistical models for this relationship, using data from 1900 to 2005 and data from 1950 to 2005, and for both all hurricane numbers and intense hurricane numbers.

  15. Incorporation of aqueous reaction kinetics and biodegradation into TOUGHREACT: Application of a multi-region model to hydrobiogeoChemical transport of denitrification and sulfate reduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xu, Tianfu

    2008-01-01

    Region: quartz calcite gypsum goethite Hydro- Region: Na + ,minerals gypsum and goethite were assumed to be initiallyChem-Region, Fe generated from goethite dissolution and HS

  16. Open source hardware

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Acosta, Roberto, S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2009-01-01

    Open source software development models have created some of the most innovative tools and companies in the industry today modifying the way value is created and businesses developed. The purpose of this thesis is to analyze ...

  17. Ecosystem feedbacks to climate change in California: Development, testing, and analysis using a coupled regional atmosphere and land-surface model (WRF3-CLM3.5)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Subin, Z.M.; Riley, W.J.; Kueppers, L.M.; Jin, J.; Christianson, D.S.; Torn, M.S.

    2010-11-01

    A regional atmosphere model [Weather Research and Forecasting model version 3 (WRF3)] and a land surface model [Community Land Model, version 3.5 (CLM3.5)] were coupled to study the interactions between the atmosphere and possible future California land-cover changes. The impact was evaluated on California's climate of changes in natural vegetation under climate change and of intentional afforestation. The ability of WRF3 to simulate California's climate was assessed by comparing simulations by WRF3-CLM3.5 and WRF3-Noah to observations from 1982 to 1991. Using WRF3-CLM3.5, the authors performed six 13-yr experiments using historical and future large-scale climate boundary conditions from the Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory Climate Model version 2.1 (GFDL CM2.1). The land-cover scenarios included historical and future natural vegetation from the Mapped Atmosphere-Plant-Soil System-Century 1 (MC1) dynamic vegetation model, in addition to a future 8-million-ha California afforestation scenario. Natural vegetation changes alone caused summer daily-mean 2-m air temperature changes of -0.7 to +1 C in regions without persistent snow cover, depending on the location and the type of vegetation change. Vegetation temperature changes were much larger than the 2-m air temperature changes because of the finescale spatial heterogeneity of the imposed vegetation change. Up to 30% of the magnitude of the summer daily-mean 2-m air temperature increase and 70% of the magnitude of the 1600 local time (LT) vegetation temperature increase projected under future climate change were attributable to the climate-driven shift in land cover. The authors projected that afforestation could cause local 0.2-1.2 C reductions in summer daily-mean 2-m air temperature and 2.0-3.7 C reductions in 1600 LT vegetation temperature for snow-free regions, primarily because of increased evapotranspiration. Because some of these temperature changes are of comparable magnitude to those projected under climate change this century, projections of climate and vegetation change in this region need to consider these climate-vegetation interactions.

  18. Conceptual Model Summary Report Simulation Framework for Regional Geologic CO{sub 2} Storage Along Arches Province of Midwestern United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2011-06-30

    A conceptual model was developed for the Arches Province that integrates geologic and hydrologic information on the Eau Claire and Mt. Simon formations into a geocellular model. The conceptual model describes the geologic setting, stratigraphy, geologic structures, hydrologic features, and distribution of key hydraulic parameters. The conceptual model is focused on the Mt. Simon sandstone and Eau Claire formations. The geocellular model depicts the parameters and conditions in a numerical array that may be imported into the numerical simulations of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) storage. Geophysical well logs, rock samples, drilling logs, geotechnical test results, and reservoir tests were evaluated for a 500,000 km{sup 2} study area centered on the Arches Province. The geologic and hydraulic data were integrated into a three-dimensional (3D) grid of porosity and permeability, which are key parameters regarding fluid flow and pressure buildup due to CO{sub 2} injection. Permeability data were corrected in locations where reservoir tests have been performed in Mt. Simon injection wells. The final geocellular model covers an area of 600 km by 600 km centered on the Arches Province. The geocellular model includes a total of 24,500,000 cells representing estimated porosity and permeability distribution. CO{sub 2} injection scenarios were developed for on-site and regional injection fields at rates of 70 to 140 million metric tons per year.

  19. Statistical Modelling of the Relationship Between Main Development Region Sea Surface Temperature and \\emph{Landfalling} Atlantic Basin Hurricane Numbers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Binter, R; Khare, S; Binter, Roman; Jewson, Stephen; Khare, Shree

    2007-01-01

    We are building a hurricane number prediction scheme that relies, in part, on statistical modelling of the empirical relationship between Atlantic sea surface temperatures and landfalling hurricane numbers. We test out a number of simple statistical models for that relationship, using data from 1900 to 2005 and data from 1950 to 2005, and for both all hurricane numbers and intense hurricane numbers. The results are very different from the corresponding analysis for basin hurricane numbers.

  20. Texas State Planning Region 3 Report of Regional Transportation Coordination 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nortex Regional Planning Commission

    2006-12-01

    stream_source_info Nortex Regional Transportation Coordination Plan.pdf.txt stream_content_type text/plain stream_size 50110 Content-Encoding ISO-8859-1 stream_name Nortex Regional Transportation Coordination Plan.pdf.txt Content... Transportation Coordination December 1, 2006 Submitted to The Texas Department of Transportation Mission To provide reliable, quality, coordinated, public transportation. Texas State Planning Region 3 Page 1 Table of Contents Table...

  1. SIGMOIDAL ACTIVE REGION ON THE SUN: COMPARISON OF A MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMICAL SIMULATION AND A NONLINEAR FORCE-FREE FIELD MODEL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Savcheva, A.; Van Ballegooijen, A.; DeLuca, E.; Pariat, E.; Aulanier, G.

    2012-05-01

    In this paper we show that when accurate nonlinear force-free field (NLFFF) models are analyzed together with high-resolution magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations, we can determine the physical causes for the coronal mass ejection (CME) eruption on 2007 February 12. We compare the geometrical and topological properties of the three-dimensional magnetic fields given by both methods in their pre-eruptive phases. We arrive at a consistent picture for the evolution and eruption of the sigmoid. Both the MHD simulation and the observed magnetic field evolution show that flux cancellation plays an important role in building the flux rope. We compute the squashing factor, Q, in different horizontal maps in the domains. The main shape of the quasi-separatrix layers (QSLs) is very similar between the NLFFF and MHD models. The main QSLs lie on the edge of the flux rope. While the QSLs in the NLFFF model are more complex due to the intrinsic large complexity in the field, the QSLs in the MHD model are smooth and possess lower maximum value of Q. In addition, we demonstrate the existence of hyperbolic flux tubes (HFTs) in both models in vertical cross sections of Q. The main HFT, located under the twisted flux rope in both models, is identified as the most probable site for reconnection. We also show that there are electric current concentrations coinciding with the main QSLs. Finally, we perform torus instability analysis and show that a combination between reconnection at the HFT and the resulting expansion of the flux rope into the torus instability domain is the cause of the CME in both models.

  2. A Quantitative Model of Energy Release and Heating by Time-dependent, Localized Reconnection in a Flare with a Thermal Loop-top X-ray Source

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Longcope, D W; Carranza-Fulmer, T; Qiu, J; 10.1007/s11207-010-9635-z

    2011-01-01

    We present a quantitative model of the magnetic energy stored and then released through magnetic reconnection for a flare on 26 Feb 2004. This flare, well observed by RHESSI and TRACE, shows evidence of non-thermal electrons only for a brief, early phase. Throughout the main period of energy release there is a super-hot (T>30 MK) plasma emitting thermal bremsstrahlung atop the flare loops. Our model describes the heating and compression of such a source by localized, transient magnetic reconnection. It is a three-dimensional generalization of the Petschek model whereby Alfven-speed retraction following reconnection drives supersonic inflows parallel to the field lines, which form shocks heating, compressing, and confining a loop-top plasma plug. The confining inflows provide longer life than a freely-expanding or conductively-cooling plasma of similar size and temperature. Superposition of successive transient episodes of localized reconnection across a current sheet produces an apparently persistent, localiz...

  3. Inversion Methods for Determining Tsunami Source Amplitudes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Percival, Don

    Inversion Methods for Determining Tsunami Source Amplitudes from DART Buoy Data Don Percival: given data from DART buoys and models for unit magnitude earthquakes from various tsunami source

  4. Journal of Power Sources 172 (2007) 816830 One-dimensional thermal model of cold-start in a polymer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mench, Matthew M.

    2007-01-01

    A transient, one-dimensional thermal model for a generic polymer electrolyte fuel cell (PEFC) stack; PEFC; Stack; Thermal model 1. Introduction The current state of fuel cell technology faces a number the internal combustion engine. Among those, cold-start (i.e. start-up of polymer elec- trolyte fuel cell (PEFC

  5. Implications of Model Configurations on Capacity Planning Decisions: Scenario Case Studies of the Western Interconnection and Colorado Region using the Resource Planning Model

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In this report, we analyze the impacts of model configuration and detail in capacity expansion models, computational tools used by utility planners looking to find the least cost option for planning the system and by researchers or policy makers attempting to understand the effects of various policy implementations. The present analysis focuses on the importance of model configurations—particularly those related to capacity credit, dispatch modeling, and transmission modeling—to the construction of scenario futures. Our analysis is primarily directed toward advanced tools used for utility planning and is focused on those impacts that are most relevant to decisions with respect to future renewable capacity deployment. To serve this purpose, we develop and employ the NREL Resource Planning Model to conduct a case study analysis that explores 12 separate capacity expansion scenarios of the Western Interconnection through 2030.

  6. Complex zero-free regions at large |q| for multivariate Tutte polynomials (alias Potts-model partition functions) with general complex edge weights

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bill Jackson; Aldo Procacci; Alan D. Sokal

    2014-12-02

    We find zero-free regions in the complex plane at large |q| for the multivariate Tutte polynomial (also known in statistical mechanics as the Potts-model partition function) Z_G(q,w) of a graph G with general complex edge weights w = {w_e}. This generalizes a result of Sokal (cond-mat/9904146) that applies only within the complex antiferromagnetic regime |1+w_e| \\le 1. Our proof uses the polymer-gas representation of the multivariate Tutte polynomial together with the Penrose identity.

  7. Longitudinal variations in the F region ionosphere and the topside ionosphere-plasmasphere: Observations and model simulations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Larson, Kristine

    -plasmasphere: Observations and model simulations N. M. Pedatella,1,2 J. M. Forbes,1 A. Maute,3 A. D. Richmond,3 T.-W. Fang,4 in the topside ionosphere-plasmasphere TEC. Citation: Pedatella, N. M., J. M. Forbes, A. Maute, A. D. Richmond, T

  8. Made-to-Measure models of the Galactic Box/Peanut bulge: stellar and total mass in the bulge region

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Portail, M; Gerhard, O; Martinez-Valpuesta, I

    2015-01-01

    We construct dynamical models of the Milky Way's Box/Peanut (B/P) bulge, using the recently measured 3D density of Red Clump Giants (RCGs) as well as kinematic data from the BRAVA survey. We match these data using the NMAGIC Made-to-Measure method, starting with N-body models for barred discs in different dark matter haloes. We determine the total mass in the bulge volume of the RCGs measurement (+-2.2 x +- 1.4 x +- 1.2 kpc) with unprecedented accuracy and robustness to be 1.84 +- 0.07 x10^10 Msun. The stellar mass in this volume varies between 1.25-1.6 x10^10 Msun, depending on the amount of dark matter in the bulge. We evaluate the mass-to-light and mass-to-clump ratios in the bulge and compare them to theoretical predictions from population synthesis models. We find a mass-to-light ratio in the K-band in the range 0.8-1.1. The models are consistent with a Kroupa or Chabrier IMF, but a Salpeter IMF is ruled out for stellar ages of 10 Gyr. To match predictions from the Zoccali IMF derived from the bulge stel...

  9. Three Dimensional Controlled-source Electromagnetic Edge-based Finite Element Modeling of Conductive and Permeable Heterogeneities 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mukherjee, Souvik

    2010-10-12

    in both subsurface conductivity ? and relative permeability ?r. In this dissertation, I present a new three dimensional edge–based finite element (FE) algorithm capable of modeling the CSEM response of buried conductive and permeable targets. A coupled...

  10. Modelling flow pattern transitions for steady upward gas-liquid flow in vertical tubes. [Bubble, slug, churn and dispersed-annular; also existence regions and transitions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Taitel, Y. (Tel-Aviv Univ., Israel); Bornea, D.; Dukler, A.E.

    1980-05-01

    Models for predicting flow patterns in steady upward gas-liquid flow in vertical tubes (such as production-well tubing) delineate the transition boundaries between each of the four basic flow patterns for gas-liquid flow in vertical tubes: bubble, slug, churn, and dispersed-annular. Model results suggest that churn flow is the development region for the slug pattern and that bubble flow can exist in small pipes only at high liquid rates, where turbulent dispersion forces are high. Each transition depends on the flow-rate pair, fluid properties, and pipe size, but the nature of the dependence is different for each transition because of differing control mechanisms. The theoretical predictions are in reasonably good agreement with a variety of published flow maps based on experimental data.

  11. Structure and Stability of Magnetic Fields in Solar Active Region12192 Based on Nonlinear Force-Free Field Modeling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Inoue, S; Kusano, K

    2016-01-01

    We analyze a three-dimensional (3D) magnetic structure and its stability in large solar active region(AR) 12192, using the 3D coronal magnetic field constructed under a nonlinear force-free field (NLFFF) approximation. In particular, we focus on the magnetic structure that produced an X3.1-class flare which is one of the X-class flares observed in AR 12192. According to our analysis, the AR contains multiple-flux-tube system, {\\it e.g.}, a large flux tube, both of whose footpoints are anchored to the large bipole field, under which other tubes exist close to a polarity inversion line (PIL). These various flux tubes of different sizes and shapes coexist there. In particular, the later are embedded along the PIL, which produces a favorable shape for the tether-cutting reconnection and is related to the X-class solar flare. We further found that most of magnetic twists are not released even after the flare, which is consistent with the fact that no observational evidence for major eruptions was found. On the oth...

  12. Modeling of the HERMES J105751.1+573027 submillimeter source lensed by a dark matter dominated foreground group of galaxies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gavazzi, R; Conley, A; Aguirre, J E; Amblard, A; Auld, R; Beelen, A; Blain, A; Blundell, R; Bock, J; Bradford, C M; Bridge, C; Brisbin, D; Burgarella, D; Chanial, P; Chapin, E; Christopher, N; Clements, D L; Cox, P; Djorgovski, S G; Dowell, C D; Eales, S; Earle, L; Ellsworth-Bowers, T P; Farrah, D; Franceschini, A; Fu, H; Glenn, J; Solares, E A González; Griffin, M; Gurwell, M A; Halpern, M; Ibar, E; Ivison, R J; Jarvis, M; Kamenetzky, J; Kim, S; Krips, M; Levenson, L; Lupu, R; Mahabal, A; Maloney, P D; Maraston, C; Marchetti, L; Marsden, G; Matsuhara, H; Mortier, A M J; Murphy, E; Naylor, B J; Neri, R; Nguyen, H T; Oliver, S J; Omont, A; Page, M J; Papageorgiou, A; Pearson, C P; Pérez-Fournon, I; Pohlen, M; Rangwala, N; Rawlings, J I; Raymond, G; Riechers, D; Rodighiero, G; Roseboom, I G; Rowan-Robinson, M; Schulz, B; Scott, Douglas; Scott, K S; Serra, P; Seymour, N; Shupe, D L; Smith, A J; Symeonidis, M; Tugwell, K E; Vaccari, M; Valiante, E; Valtchanov, I; Verma, A; Vieira, J D; Vigroux, L; Wang, L; Wardlow, J; Wiebe, D; Wright, G; Xu, C K; Zeimann, G; Zemcov, M; Zmuidzinas, J

    2011-01-01

    We present the results of a gravitational lensing analysis of the bright $\\zs=2.957$ sub-millimeter galaxy (SMG), HERMES J105751.1+573027 found in {\\it Herschel}/SPIRE Science Demonstration Phase data from the Herschel Multi-tiered Extragalactic Survey (HerMES) project. The high resolution imaging available in optical and Near-IR channels, along with CO emission obtained with the Plateau de Bure Interferometer, allow us to precisely estimate the intrinsic source extension and hence estimate the total lensing magnification to be $\\mu=10.9\\pm 0.7$. We measure the half-light radius $R_{\\rm eff}$ of the source in the rest-frame Near-UV and $V$ bands that characterize the unobscured light coming from stars and find $R_{\\rm eff,*}= [2.0 \\pm 0.1]$ kpc, in good agreement with recent studies on the Submillimeter Galaxy population. This lens model is also used to estimate the size of the gas distribution ($R_{\\rm eff,gas}= [1.1\\pm0.5]$) kpc by mapping back in the source plane the CO (J=5-4) transition line emission. Th...

  13. Potential Economic Impacts from Offshore Wind in the Gulf of Mexico Region (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Flores, F.; Keyser, D.; Tegen, S.

    2014-01-01

    Offshore wind is a clean, renewable source of energy and can be an economic driver in the United States. To better understand the employment opportunities and other potential regional economic impacts from offshore wind development, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) funded research that focuses on four regions of the country. The studies use multiple scenarios with various local job and domestic manufacturing content assumptions. Each regional study uses the new offshore wind Jobs and Economic Development Impacts (JEDI) model, developed by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory. This fact sheet summarizes the potential economic impacts for the Gulf of Mexico region.

  14. Potential Economic Impacts from Offshore Wind in the Great Lakes Region (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tegen, S.; Keyser, D.

    2014-01-01

    Offshore wind is a clean, renewable source of energy and can be an economic driver in the United States. To better understand the employment opportunities and other potential regional economic impacts from offshore wind development, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) funded research that focuses on four regions of the country. The studies use multiple scenarios with various local job and domestic manufacturing content assumptions. Each regional study uses the new offshore wind Jobs and Economic Development Impacts (JEDI) model, developed by DOE's National Renewable Energy Laboratory. This fact sheet summarizes the potential economic impacts identified by the study for the Great Lakes region.

  15. Potential Economic Impacts from Offshore Wind in the Mid-Atlantic Region (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Keyser, D.; Tegen, S.; Flores, F.; Zammit, D.; Kraemer, M.; Miles, J.

    2014-01-01

    Offshore wind is a clean, renewable source of energy and can be an economic driver in the United States. To better understand the employment opportunities and other potential regional economic impacts from offshore wind development, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) funded research that focuses on four regions of the country. The studies use multiple scenarios with various local job and domestic manufacturing content assumptions. Each regional study uses the new offshore wind Jobs and Economic Development Impacts (JEDI) model, developed by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory. This fact sheet summarizes the potential economic impacts for the Mid-Atlantic region.

  16. Parametric Explosion Spectral Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ford, S R; Walter, W R

    2012-01-19

    Small underground nuclear explosions need to be confidently detected, identified, and characterized in regions of the world where they have never before occurred. We develop a parametric model of the nuclear explosion seismic source spectrum derived from regional phases that is compatible with earthquake-based geometrical spreading and attenuation. Earthquake spectra are fit with a generalized version of the Brune spectrum, which is a three-parameter model that describes the long-period level, corner-frequency, and spectral slope at high-frequencies. Explosion spectra can be fit with similar spectral models whose parameters are then correlated with near-source geology and containment conditions. We observe a correlation of high gas-porosity (low-strength) with increased spectral slope. The relationship between the parametric equations and the geologic and containment conditions will assist in our physical understanding of the nuclear explosion source.

  17. Three-Year Global Survey of Coronal Null Points from Potential-Field-Source-Surface (PFSS) Modeling and Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) Observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Freed, Michael; McKenize, David

    2014-01-01

    This article compiles and examines a comprehensive coronal magnetic-null-point survey created by potential-field-source-surface (PFSS) modeling and Solar Dynamics Observatory/Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (SDO/AIA) observations. The locations of 582 potential magnetic null points in the corona were predicted from the PFSS model between Carrington Rotations (CR) 2098 (June 2010) and 2139 (July 2013). These locations were manually inspected, using contrast-enhanced SDO/AIA images in 171 angstroms at the east and west solar limb, for structures associated with nulls. A Kolmogorov--Smirnov (K--S) test showed a statistically significant difference between observed and predicted latitudinal distributions of null points. This finding is explored further to show that the observability of null points could be affected by the Sun's asymmetric hemisphere activity. Additional K--S tests show no effect on observability related to eigenvalues associated with the fan and spine structure surrounding null points or to the orie...

  18. Constraining UV continuum slopes of active galactic nuclei with cloudy models of broad-line region extreme-ultraviolet emission lines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moloney, Joshua [CASA, Department of Astrophysical and Planetary Sciences, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO 80309 (United States); Michael Shull, J., E-mail: joshua.moloney@colorado.edu, E-mail: michael.shull@colorado.edu [Also at Institute of Astronomy, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB3 0HA, UK. (United Kingdom)

    2014-10-01

    Understanding the composition and structure of the broad-line region (BLR) of active galactic nuclei (AGNs) is important for answering many outstanding questions in supermassive black hole evolution, galaxy evolution, and ionization of the intergalactic medium. We used single-epoch UV spectra from the Cosmic Origins Spectrograph (COS) on the Hubble Space Telescope to measure EUV emission-line fluxes from four individual AGNs with 0.49 ? z ? 0.64, two AGNs with 0.32 ? z ? 0.40, and a composite of 159 AGNs. With the CLOUDY photoionization code, we calculated emission-line fluxes from BLR clouds with a range of density, hydrogen ionizing flux, and incident continuum spectral indices. The photoionization grids were fit to the observations using single-component and locally optimally emitting cloud (LOC) models. The LOC models provide good fits to the measured fluxes, while the single-component models do not. The UV spectral indices preferred by our LOC models are consistent with those measured from COS spectra. EUV emission lines such as N IV ?765, O II ?833, and O III ?834 originate primarily from gas with electron temperatures between 37,000 K and 55,000 K. This gas is found in BLR clouds with high hydrogen densities (n {sub H} ? 10{sup 12} cm{sup –3}) and hydrogen ionizing photon fluxes (?{sub H} ? 10{sup 22} cm{sup –2} s{sup –1}).

  19. A Stochastic Optimization Case Study using ILOG CPLEX Concert Technology: Dual Sourcing Model for Managing Supply Chain Disruptions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bjřrnstad, Ottar Nordal

    of a company under uncertainty is proposed in this study. Deterministic planning and scheduling models is optimal usage of future resources on the basis of available present information and future scenarios1 increase. As simple as uncertain lead time can affect the production plans which necessitates

  20. Commercial Building Energy Baseline Modeling Software: Performance Metrics and Method Testing with Open Source Models and Implications for Proprietary Software Testing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Price, Phillip N.; Granderson, Jessica; Sohn, Michael; Addy, Nathan; Jump, David

    2013-09-01

    The overarching goal of this work is to advance the capabilities of technology evaluators in evaluating the building-level baseline modeling capabilities of Energy Management and Information System (EMIS) software. Through their customer engagement platforms and products, EMIS software products have the potential to produce whole-building energy savings through multiple strategies: building system operation improvements, equipment efficiency upgrades and replacements, and inducement of behavioral change among the occupants and operations personnel. Some offerings may also automate the quantification of whole-building energy savings, relative to a baseline period, using empirical models that relate energy consumption to key influencing parameters, such as ambient weather conditions and building operation schedule. These automated baseline models can be used to streamline the whole-building measurement and verification (M&V) process, and therefore are of critical importance in the context of multi-measure whole-building focused utility efficiency programs. This report documents the findings of a study that was conducted to begin answering critical questions regarding quantification of savings at the whole-building level, and the use of automated and commercial software tools. To evaluate the modeling capabilities of EMIS software particular to the use case of whole-building savings estimation, four research questions were addressed: 1. What is a general methodology that can be used to evaluate baseline model performance, both in terms of a) overall robustness, and b) relative to other models? 2. How can that general methodology be applied to evaluate proprietary models that are embedded in commercial EMIS tools? How might one handle practical issues associated with data security, intellectual property, appropriate testing ‘blinds’, and large data sets? 3. How can buildings be pre-screened to identify those that are the most model-predictable, and therefore those whose savings can be calculated with least error? 4. What is the state of public domain models, that is, how well do they perform, and what are the associated implications for whole-building measurement and verification (M&V)? Additional project objectives that were addressed as part of this study include: (1) clarification of the use cases and conditions for baseline modeling performance metrics, benchmarks and evaluation criteria, (2) providing guidance for determining customer suitability for baseline modeling, (3) describing the portfolio level effects of baseline model estimation errors, (4) informing PG&E’s development of EMIS technology product specifications, and (5) providing the analytical foundation for future studies about baseline modeling and saving effects of EMIS technologies. A final objective of this project was to demonstrate the application of the methodology, performance metrics, and test protocols with participating EMIS product vendors.

  1. Modeling, Analysis, and Preservation Techniques for Historic Reinforced Concrete Structures in Seismic Prone Regions Case Study: Augusta Airship Hangar, Sicily

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cronin, Kelly; Whyte, Catherine [University of California at Berkeley, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, 760 Davis Hall (United States); Reiner, Tom [Graduate Engineer, Buro Happold Consulting Engineers, Inc., 9601 Jefferson Blvd., Suite B, Culver City, CA 90232 (United States)

    2008-07-08

    Throughout the world there are hundreds of historic monuments and structures considered to be invaluable and irreplaceable. They are symbols of cultural identity and a means of educating people about history. Preservation of historic monuments and structures is therefore an important part of safeguarding these cultural heritage sites so that they retain their value for future generations.This report discusses a procedure for the investigation of seismic hazards in existing buildings and possible steps that can be taken to avoid damage caused by these hazards. The Augusta Airship Hangar located in Sicily, will be used as a case study however the topics addressed in this paper can be applied to other structures of historic value around the world.First state-of-the-art scanning procedures were used to create scale digital models that were imported into a structural analysis program. Within this program dynamic analyses were performed on the model based on actual ground motions taken close to the site. This data was used to determine the period and mode shapes of the structure. Then a nonlinear analysis, including a static pushover analysis, was implemented on a two-dimensional model of the structural frame. From this analysis the failure mechanisms of the structure were revealed with relation to an allowable roof displacement. The structural integrity of the structure was evaluated based on pre-defined performance goals. Finally multiple suggestions were made how the Augusta Airship Hangar might be repaired and strengthened so that this structure will not be destroyed should an earthquake occur.The results of our study show that historic structures, despite their age, can still be strong and ductile. Also there are a multitude of effective preservation and retrofit techniques that can be used to strengthen these historic structures, should an earthquake occur. Through this study, the Augusta Airship Hangar has proven to be not only a historic symbol for Sicily but also can be used as an example for the rehabilitation of other historic structures. The techniques and processes discussed in this paper can be applied to other historic reinforced concrete structures and can be expanded upon in future investigations.

  2. Non-linear force-free field modeling of a solar active region around the time of a major flare and coronal mass ejection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. J. Schrijver; M. L. DeRosa; T. Metcalf; G. Barnes; B. Lites; T. Tarbell; J. McTiernan; G. Valori; T. Wiegelmann; M. S. Wheatland; T. Amari; G. Aulanier; P. Demoulin; M. Fuhrmann; K. Kusano; S. Regnier; J. K. Thalmann

    2007-11-30

    Solar flares and coronal mass ejections are associated with rapid changes in field connectivity and powered by the partial dissipation of electrical currents in the solar atmosphere. A critical unanswered question is whether the currents involved are induced by the motion of pre-existing atmospheric magnetic flux subject to surface plasma flows, or whether these currents are associated with the emergence of flux from within the solar convective zone. We address this problem by applying state-of-the-art nonlinear force-free field (NLFFF) modeling to the highest resolution and quality vector-magnetographic data observed by the recently launched Hinode satellite on NOAA Active Region 10930 around the time of a powerful X3.4 flare. We compute 14 NLFFF models with 4 different codes and a variety of boundary conditions. We find that the model fields differ markedly in geometry, energy content, and force-freeness. We discuss the relative merits of these models in a general critique of present abilities to model the coronal magnetic field based on surface vector field measurements. For our application in particular, we find a fair agreement of the best-fit model field with the observed coronal configuration, and argue (1) that strong electrical currents emerge together with magnetic flux preceding the flare, (2) that these currents are carried in an ensemble of thin strands, (3) that the global pattern of these currents and of field lines are compatible with a large-scale twisted flux rope topology, and (4) that the ~10^32 erg change in energy associated with the coronal electrical currents suffices to power the flare and its associated coronal mass ejection.

  3. Soil Carbon Change and Net Energy Associated with Biofuel Production on Marginal Lands: A Regional Modeling Perspective

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bandaru, Varaprasad; Izaurralde, Roberto C.; Manowitz, David H.; Link, Robert P.; Zhang, Xuesong; Post, W. M.

    2013-12-01

    The use of marginal lands (MLs) for biofuel production has been contemplated as a promising solution for meeting biofuel demands. However, there have been concerns with spatial location of MLs, their inherent biofuel potential, and possible environmental consequences with the cultivation of energy crops. Here, we developed a new quantitative approach that integrates high-resolution land cover and land productivity maps and uses conditional probability density functions for analyzing land use patterns as a function of land productivity to classify the agricultural lands. We subsequently applied this method to determine available productive croplands (P-CLs) and non-crop marginal lands (NC-MLs) in a nine-county Southern Michigan. Furthermore, Spatially Explicit Integrated Modeling Framework (SEIMF) using EPIC (Environmental Policy Integrated Climate) was used to understand the net energy (NE) and soil organic carbon (SOC) implications of cultivating different annual and perennial production systems.

  4. Modeling Improvements for Air Source Heat Pumps using Different Expansion Devices at Varied Charge Levels Part II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shen, Bo [ORNL

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes steady-state performance simulations performed on a 3-ton R-22 split heat pump in heating mode. In total, 150 steady-state points were simulated, which covers refrigerant charge levels from 70 % to 130% relative to the nominal value, the outdoor temperatures at 17 F (-8.3 C), 35 F (1.7 C) and 47 F (8.3 C), indoor air flow rates from 60% to 150% of the rated air flow rate, and two types of expansion devices (fixed orifice and thermostatic expansion valve). A charge tuning method, which is to calibrate the charge inventory model based on measurements at two operation conditions, was applied and shown to improve the system simulation accuracy significantly in an extensive range of charge levels. In addition, we discuss the effects of suction line accumulator in modeling a heat pump system using either a fixed orifice or thermal expansion valve. Last, we identify the issue of refrigerant mass flow mal-distribution at low charge levels and propose an improved modeling approach.

  5. High current ion source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brown, Ian G. (1088 Woodside Rd., Berkeley, CA 94708); MacGill, Robert A. (645 Kern St., Richmond, CA 94805); Galvin, James E. (2 Commodore Dr. #276, Emeryville, CA 94608)

    1990-01-01

    An ion source utilizing a cathode and anode for producing an electric arc therebetween. The arc is sufficient to vaporize a portion of the cathode to form a plasma. The plasma leaves the generation region and expands through another regon. The density profile of the plasma may be flattened using a magnetic field formed within a vacuum chamber. Ions are extracted from the plasma to produce a high current broad on beam.

  6. OSRP Source Repatriations-Case Studies: Brazil, Ecuador, Uruguay

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greenberg, Ray Jr. [U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration, Office of Global Threat Reduction, Washington, DC (United States); Abeyta, Cristy; Matzke, Jim; Wald-Hopkins, Mark; Streeper, Charles [Offsite Source Recovery Project, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico (United States)

    2012-07-01

    The Global Threat Reduction Initiative's (GTRI) Offsite Source Recovery Project (OSRP) began recovering excess and unwanted radioactive sealed sources (sources) in 1999. As of February 2012, the project had recovered over 30,000 sources totaling over 820,000 Ci. OSRP grew out of early efforts at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) to recover disused excess Plutonium- 239 (Pu-239) sources that were distributed in the 1960's and 1970's under the Atoms for Peace Program. Source recovery was initially considered a waste management activity. However, after the 9/11 terrorist attacks, the interagency community began to recognize that excess and unwanted radioactive sealed sources pose a national security threat, particularly those that lack a disposition path. After OSRP's transfer to the U.S. National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) to be part of GTRI, its mission was expanded to include all disused sealed sources that might require national security consideration. Recognizing the transnational threat posed by porous borders and the ubiquitous nature of sources, GTRI/OSRP repatriates U.S. origin sources based on threat reduction prioritization criteria. For example, several recent challenging source repatriation missions have been conducted by GTRI/OSRP in South America. These include the repatriation of a significant amount of Cs-137 and other isotopes from Brazil; re-packaging of conditioned Ra-226 sources in Ecuador for future repatriation; and, multilateral cooperation in the consolidation and export of Canadian, US, and Indian Co-60/Cs-137 sources from Uruguay. In addition, cooperation with regulators and private source owners in other countries presents opportunities for GTRI/OSRP to exchange best practices for managing disused sources. These positive experiences often result in long-term cooperation and information sharing with key foreign counterparts. International source recovery operations are essential to the preservation of U.S. national security interests. They are also mutually beneficial for fostering positive relationships with other governments and private industry, and demonstrate that responsible end-of-life options are given to legacy U.S.-origin sources in other countries. GTRI/OSRP does not take back sources that have a viable path for commercial disposal. Most US origin sources were sold commercially and were not provided by the US government. Below is a synopsis of cooperative efforts with Brazil, Ecuador, and Uruguay. Bilateral and multilateral efforts have been successful in removing hundreds of U.S.origin sealed radioactive sources from Latin American countries to the U.S. As many disused sources remain in the region, and since repatriation is not always an option, GTRI will continue to work with those countries to ensure that these sources are stored securely for the long-term. Successful Latin America operations should serve as a model for other regional cooperation in the repatriation of sealed sources, encouraging other source exporting countries to implement similar programs. Securing and removing sources, both domestically and internationally, is crucial to strengthening the life-cycle management of radioactive sources worldwide. Such efforts not only prevent these materials from being used maliciously, but also address public health and safety concerns, and under-gird the IAEA Code of Conduct on the Safety and Security of Radioactive Sources. (authors)

  7. Multi-epoch very long baseline interferometric observations of the nuclear starburst region of NGC 253: Improved modeling of the supernova and star formation rates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rampadarath, H.; Morgan, J. S.; Tingay, S. J.; Lenc, E.

    2014-01-01

    The results of multi-epoch observations of the southern starburst galaxy, NGC 253, with the Australian Long Baseline Array at 2.3 GHz are presented. As with previous radio interferometric observations of this galaxy, no new sources were discovered. By combining the results of this survey with Very Large Array observations at higher frequencies from the literature, spectra were derived and a free-free absorption model was fitted of 20 known sources in NGC 253. The results were found to be consistent with previous studies. The supernova remnant, 5.48-43.3, was imaged with the highest sensitivity and resolution to date, revealing a two-lobed morphology. Comparisons with previous observations of similar resolution give an upper limit of 10{sup 4} km s{sup –1} for the expansion speed of this remnant. We derive a supernova rate of <0.2 yr{sup –1} for the inner 300 pc using a model that improves on previous methods by incorporating an improved radio supernova peak luminosity distribution and by making use of multi-wavelength radio data spanning 21 yr. A star formation rate of SFR(M ? 5 M {sub ?}) < 4.9 M {sub ?} yr{sup –1} was also estimated using the standard relation between supernova and star formation rates. Our improved estimates of supernova and star formation rates are consistent with studies at other wavelengths. The results of our study point to the possible existence of a small population of undetected supernova remnants, suggesting a low rate of radio supernova production in NGC 253.

  8. Semianalytical quantum model for graphene field-effect transistors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pugnaghi, Claudio; Grassi, Roberto Gnudi, Antonio; Di Lecce, Valerio; Gnani, Elena; Reggiani, Susanna; Baccarani, Giorgio

    2014-09-21

    We develop a semianalytical model for monolayer graphene field-effect transistors in the ballistic limit. Two types of devices are considered: in the first device, the source and drain regions are doped by charge transfer with Schottky contacts, while, in the second device, the source and drain regions are doped electrostatically by a back gate. The model captures two important effects that influence the operation of both devices: (i) the finite density of states in the source and drain regions, which limits the number of states available for transport and can be responsible for negative output differential resistance effects, and (ii) quantum tunneling across the potential steps at the source-channel and drain-channel interfaces. By comparison with a self-consistent non-equilibrium Green's function solver, we show that our model provides very accurate results for both types of devices, in the bias region of quasi-saturation as well as in that of negative differential resistance.

  9. SIMULATION MODEL ANALYSIS OF THE MOST PROMISING GEOLOGIC SEQUESTRATION FORMATION CANDIDATES IN THE ROCKY MOUNTAIN REGION, USA, WITH FOCUS ON UNCERTAINTY ASSESSMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, Si-Yong; Zaluski, Wade; Will, Robert; Eisinger, Chris; Matthews, Vince; McPherson, Brian

    2013-09-01

    The purpose of this report is to report results of reservoir model simulation analyses for forecasting subsurface CO2 storage capacity estimation for the most promising formations in the Rocky Mountain region of the USA. A particular emphasis of this project was to assess uncertainty of the simulation-based forecasts. Results illustrate how local-scale data, including well information, number of wells, and location of wells, affect storage capacity estimates and what degree of well density (number of wells over a fixed area) may be required to estimate capacity within a specified degree of confidence. A major outcome of this work was development of a new workflow of simulation analysis, accommodating the addition of “random pseudo wells” to represent virtual characterization wells.

  10. Northeast Regional Biomass Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lusk, P.D.

    1992-12-01

    The Northeast Regional Biomass Program has been in operation for a period of nine years. During this time, state managed programs and technical programs have been conducted covering a wide range of activities primarily aim at the use and applications of wood as a fuel. These activities include: assessments of available biomass resources; surveys to determine what industries, businesses, institutions, and utility companies use wood and wood waste for fuel; and workshops, seminars, and demonstrations to provide technical assistance. In the Northeast, an estimated 6.2 million tons of wood are used in the commercial and industrial sector, where 12.5 million cords are used for residential heating annually. Of this useage, 1504.7 mw of power has been generated from biomass. The use of wood energy products has had substantial employment and income benefits in the region. Although wood and woodwaste have received primary emphasis in the regional program, the use of municipal solid waste has received increased emphasis as an energy source. The energy contribution of biomass will increase as potentia users become more familiar with existing feedstocks, technologies, and applications. The Northeast Regional Biomass Program is designed to support region-specific to overcome near-term barriers to biomass energy use.

  11. Uranium Contamination in the 300 Area: Emergent Data and their Impact on the Source Term Conceptual Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, Christopher F.; Um, Wooyong; Serne, R. Jeffrey

    2008-09-30

    The primary objectives of this characterization activity were to: 1) determine the extent of uranium contamination in the sediments, 2) quantify the leachable (labile) concentration of uranium in the sediments, and 3) create a data set that could be used to correlate the present data to existing 300 Area data. In order to meet these objectives, sediments collected from wells 399-2-5 (C5708), 299-3-22 (C5706) and 299-4-14 (C5707) were analyzed for moisture content, 1:1 sediment:water extracts (which provide soil pH, electrical conductivity [EC], cation, and anion data), total carbon and inorganic carbon content, 8 M nitric acid extracts (which provide a measure of the total leachable sediment content of the contaminants), microwave-assisted digestion (which results in total digestion of the sediment), and carbonate leaches (which provide an assessment of the concentration of labile uranium present in the sediments). Additionally, pore waters present in select samples were extracted using ultracentrifugation. The mobility characteristics of uranium vary within the multiple subsurface zones that contain residual contaminant uranium. Principal subsurface zones include 1) the vadose zone, 2) a zone through which the water table rises and falls, 3) the aquifer, and 4) a zone where groundwater and river water interact beneath the river shoreline. Principal controls on mobilization include the form of the residual uranium (e.g., crystalline minerals, amorphous precipitates/coatings, sorbed onto sediment), the transporting medium (e.g., water infiltration from the land surface, groundwater), and the rate of exchange between the form and transporting medium. The bicarbonate content of aqueous media strongly influences the rate of exchange, with relatively higher content enhancing mobility. Groundwater has a higher bicarbonate content than river water or other freshwater sources, such as utility and potable water systems. The variety of processes affecting the mobility of uranium in the subsurface, along with the numerous potential compartments where residual contamination may be located, presents challenges for predicting uranium movement through environmental pathways. The processes responsible for the persistence of the plume may involve cycling of uranium between the aquifer and overlying zone through which the water table fluctuates. Contaminated groundwater is moved upward into the lower vadose zone, and when the water table subsequently falls, contaminated moisture is left behind. Some of the uranium in groundwater may become sorbed to sediment in that zone, to subsequently slowly release. Also, near the Columbia River in the zone of groundwater/river water interaction, where the bicarbonate content is lowered because of infiltrating river water, the tendency for uranium to adsorb onto sediment is enhanced, thus slowing dissipation via the groundwater pathway. Fluctuations in the Columbia River stage are the driving mechanism for the rise and fall of the water table beneath the 300 Area, and also for creating the dynamic hydraulic and geochemical environment found in the zone of interaction beneath the shoreline.

  12. NV PFA Regional Data

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    James Faulds

    2015-10-28

    This project focused on defining geothermal play fairways and development of a detailed geothermal potential map of a large transect across the Great Basin region (96,000 km2), with the primary objective of facilitating discovery of commercial-grade, blind geothermal fields (i.e. systems with no surface hot springs or fumaroles) and thereby accelerating geothermal development in this promising region. Data included in this submission consists of: structural settings (target areas, recency of faulting, slip and dilation potential, slip rates, quality), regional-scale strain rates, earthquake density and magnitude, gravity data, temperature at 3 km depth, permeability models, favorability models, degree of exploration and exploration opportunities, data from springs and wells, transmission lines and wilderness areas, and published maps and theses for the Nevada Play Fairway area.

  13. Regional Purchasing

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMassR&D100 Winners * ImpactsandRegarding ConfinementRegional Partnerships

  14. Hypernovae as possible sources of Galactic positrons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stephane Schanne; Michel Casse; Bertrand Cordier; Jacques Paul

    2004-07-15

    INTEGRAL/SPI has recently observed a strong and extended emission resulting from electron-positron annihilation located in the Galactic center region, consistent with the Galactic bulge geometry, without any counterpart at high gamma-ray energies, nor in the 1809 keV $^{26}$Al decay line. In order to explain the rate of positron injection in the Galactic bulge, estimated to more than 10$^{43}$ s$^{-1}$, the most commonly considered positron injection sources are type Ia supernovae. However, SN Ia rate estimations show that those sources fall short to explain the observed positron production rate, raising a challenging question about the nature of the Galactic positron source. In this context, a possible source of Galactic positrons could be supernova events of a new type, as the recently observed SN2003dh/GRB030329, an exploding Wolf-Rayet star (type Ic supernova) associated with a hypernova/gamma-ray burst; the question about the rate of this kind of events remains open, but could be problematically low. In this paper, we explore the possibility of positron production and escape by such an event in the framework of an asymmetric model, in which a huge amount of $^{56}$Ni is ejected in a cone with a very high velocity; the ejected material becomes quickly transparent to positrons, which spread out in the interstellar medium.

  15. Identifying Isotropic Events Using a Regional Moment Tensor Inversion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dreger, D S; Ford, S R; Walter, W R

    2009-08-03

    In our previous work the deviatoric and isotropic source components for 17 explosions at the Nevada Test Site, as well as 12 earthquakes and 4 collapses in the surrounding region of the western US, were calculated using a regional time-domain full waveform inversion for the complete moment tensor (Dreger et al., 2008; Ford et al., 2008; Ford et al., 2009a). The events separate into specific populations according to their deviation from a pure double-couple and ratio of isotropic to deviatoric energy. The separation allows for anomalous event identification and discrimination between explosions, earthquakes, and collapses. Confidence regions of the model parameters are estimated from the data misfit by assuming normally distributed parameter values. We developed a new Network Sensitivity Solution (NSS) in which the fit of sources distributed over a source-type plot (Hudson et al., 1989) show the resolution of the source parameters. The NSS takes into account the unique station distribution, frequency band, and signal-to-noise ratio of a given event scenario. The NSS compares both a hypothetical pure source (for example an explosion or an earthquake) and the actual data with several thousand sets of synthetic data from a uniform distribution of all possible sources. The comparison with a hypothetical pure source provides the theoretically best-constrained source-type region for a given set of stations, and with it one can determine whether further analysis with the data is warranted. We apply the NSS to a NTS nuclear explosion, and earthquake, as well as the 2006 North Korean explosion, and a nearby earthquake. The results show that explosions and earthquakes are distinguishable, however the solution space depends strongly on the station coverage. Finally, on May 25, 2009 a second North Korean test took place. Our preliminary results show that the explosive nature of the event may be determined using the regional distance moment tensor method. Results indicate that the 2009 event is approximately 5-6 times larger than the earlier test, with an isotropic moment of about 1.8e+22 dyne cm. We perform a series of inversions for pure double-couple, pure explosion, combined double-couple and explosion, full moment tensor, and damped moment tensor inversions to assess the resolution of the isotropic moment of the event.

  16. Integration of Landsat Imagery and an Inundation Model in Flood Assessment and Predictions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ezer,Tal

    regions. The topography data used by the model were based only on a subjective assessment from various data in shallow regions and flood zones where land- base data are not available. Keywords constraint to the development of such numerical models is the lack of suitable validation data sources [3

  17. Uplifted supersymmetric Higgs region

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bogdan A. Dobrescu; Patrick J. Fox

    2010-05-26

    We show that the parameter space of the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model includes a region where the down-type fermion masses are generated by the loop-induced couplings to the up-type Higgs doublet. In this region the down-type Higgs doublet does not acquire a vacuum expectation value at tree level, and has sizable couplings in the superpotential to the tau leptons and bottom quarks. Besides a light standard-like Higgs boson, the Higgs spectrum includes the nearly degenerate states of a heavy spin-0 doublet which can be produced through their couplings to the $b$ quark and decay predominantly into \\tau^+\\tau^- or \\tau\

  18. HIGH RESOLUTION FORWARD AND INVERSE EARTHQUAKE MODELING ON TERASCALE COMPUTERS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shewchuk, Jonathan

    highly populated seismic region in the U.S., it has well- characterized geological structures (including in characterizing earthquake source and basin material properties, a critical remaining challenge is to invert basin geology and earthquake sources, and to use this capability to model and forecast strong ground

  19. DISTRIBUTION OF ELECTRIC CURRENTS IN SOLAR ACTIVE REGIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Török, T.; Titov, V. S.; Miki?, Z.; Leake, J. E.; Archontis, V.; Linton, M. G.; Dalmasse, K.; Aulanier, G.; Kliem, B.

    2014-02-10

    There has been a long-standing debate on the question of whether or not electric currents in solar active regions are neutralized. That is, whether or not the main (or direct) coronal currents connecting the active region polarities are surrounded by shielding (or return) currents of equal total value and opposite direction. Both theory and observations are not yet fully conclusive regarding this question, and numerical simulations have, surprisingly, barely been used to address it. Here we quantify the evolution of electric currents during the formation of a bipolar active region by considering a three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic simulation of the emergence of a sub-photospheric, current-neutralized magnetic flux rope into the solar atmosphere. We find that a strong deviation from current neutralization develops simultaneously with the onset of significant flux emergence into the corona, accompanied by the development of substantial magnetic shear along the active region's polarity inversion line. After the region has formed and flux emergence has ceased, the strong magnetic fields in the region's center are connected solely by direct currents, and the total direct current is several times larger than the total return current. These results suggest that active regions, the main sources of coronal mass ejections and flares, are born with substantial net currents, in agreement with recent observations. Furthermore, they support eruption models that employ pre-eruption magnetic fields containing such currents.

  20. Source Term Modeling for Evaluating the Potential Impacts to Groundwater of Fluids Escaping from a Depleted Oil Reservoir Used for Carbon Sequestration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cantrell, Kirk J.; Brown, Christopher F.

    2014-06-13

    In recent years depleted oil reservoirs have received special interest as carbon storage reservoirs because of their potential to offset costs through collaboration with enhanced oil recovery projects. Modeling is currently being conducted to evaluate potential risks to groundwater associated with leakage of fluids from depleted oil reservoirs used for storage of CO2. Modeling results reported here focused on understanding how toxic organic compounds found in oil will distribute between the various phases within a storage reservoir after introduction of CO2, understanding the migration potential of these compounds, and assessing potential groundwater impacts should leakage occur. Two model scenarios were conducted to evaluate how organic components in oil will distribute among the phases of interest (oil, CO2, and brine). The first case consisted of 50 wt.% oil and 50 wt.% water; the second case was 90 wt.% CO2 and 10 wt.% oil. Several key organic compounds were selected for special attention in this study based upon their occurrence in oil at significant concentrations, relative toxicity, or because they can serve as surrogate compounds for other more highly toxic compounds for which required input data are not available. The organic contaminants of interest (COI) selected for this study were benzene, toluene, naphthalene, phenanthrene, and anthracene. Partitioning of organic compounds between crude oil and supercritical CO2 was modeled using the Peng-Robinson equation of state over temperature and pressure conditions that represent the entire subsurface system (from those relevant to deep geologic carbon storage environments to near surface conditions). Results indicate that for a typical set of oil reservoir conditions (75°C, and 21,520 kPa) negligible amounts of the COI dissolve into the aqueous phase. When CO2 is introduced into the reservoir such that the final composition of the reservoir is 90 wt.% CO2 and 10 wt.% oil, a significant fraction of the oil dissolves into the vapor phase. As the vapor phase moves up through the stratigraphic column, pressures and temperatures decrease, resulting in significant condensation of oil components. The heaviest organic components condense early in this process (at higher pressures and temperatures), while the lighter components tend to remain in the vapor phase until much lower pressures and temperatures are reached. Based on the model assumptions, the final concentrations of COI to reach an aquifer at 1,520 kPa and 25°C were quite significant for benzene and toluene, whereas the concentrations of polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons that reach the aquifer were very small. This work demonstrates a methodology that can provide COI source term concentrations in CO2 leaking from a reservoir and entering an overlying aquifer for use in risk assessments.

  1. Rigidity of a spherical capsule switches the localization of encapsulated particles between inner and peripheral regions under crowding condition: Simple model on cellular architecture

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shew, Chwen-Yang Kondo, Kenta; Yoshikawa, Kenichi

    2014-01-14

    We have investigated the inhomogeneous interior of confined spherical cavities as capsules containing encapsulated binary hard sphere mixtures for different compositions and cavity wall rigidity. Such a greatly simplified model manifests the effects of macromolecular crowding arising from excluded volume interactions in a tiny cell or a cellular nucleus. By fixing the number of large particles, the level of crowding is adjusted by changing the amount of small hard spheres in the cavity. For a rigid cavity, large spheres tend to pack in liquid-like order apart from the surface to the center of the cavity as the crowding level is increased. Whereas, for a soft cavity, larger spheres tend to blend with small spheres in the peripheral region at near the boundary of the cavity, and are susceptible to be depleted from the interior of the cavity as the cavity becomes more crowded. These results may help future elucidation of the thermodynamic pathways to stabilize the inhomogeneous structure of mixtures confined in cavities, such as the derepression of genome materials around the interior rim of the nucleus in a cancerous cell.

  2. Application of an online-coupled regional climate model, WRF-CAM5, over East Asia for examination of ice nucleation schemes: Part I. Comprehensive model evaluation and trend analysis for 2006 and 2011

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Chen, Ying; Zhang, Yang; Fan, Jiwen; Leung, Lai -Yung; Zhang, Qiang; He, Kebin

    2015-08-18

    Online-coupled climate and chemistry models are necessary to realistically represent the interactions between climate variables and chemical species and accurately simulate aerosol direct and indirect effects on cloud, precipitation, and radiation. In this Part I of a two-part paper, simulations from the Weather Research and Forecasting model coupled with the physics package of Community Atmosphere Model (WRF-CAM5) are conducted with the default heterogeneous ice nucleation parameterization over East Asia for two full years: 2006 and 2011. A comprehensive model evaluation is performed using satellite and surface observations. The model shows an overall acceptable performance for major meteorological variables at themore »surface and in the boundary layer, as well as column variables (e.g., precipitation, cloud fraction, precipitating water vapor, downward longwave and shortwave radiation). Moderate to large biases exist for cloud condensation nuclei over oceanic areas, cloud variables (e.g., cloud droplet number concentration, cloud liquid and ice water paths, cloud optical depth, longwave and shortwave cloud forcing). These biases indicate a need to improve the model treatments for cloud processes, especially cloud droplets and ice nucleation, as well as to reduce uncertainty in the satellite retrievals. The model simulates well the column abundances of chemical species except for column SO2 but relatively poor for surface concentrations of several species such as CO, NO2, SO2, PM2.5, and PM10. Several reasons could contribute to the underestimation of major chemical species in East Asia including underestimations of anthropogenic emissions and natural dust emissions, uncertainties in the spatial and vertical distributions of the anthropogenic emissions, as well as biases in meteorological, radiative, and cloud predictions. Despite moderate to large biases in the chemical predictions, the model performance is generally consistent with or even better than that reported for East Asia with only a few exceptions. The model generally reproduces the observed seasonal variations and the difference between 2006 and 2011 for most variables or chemical species. Overall, these results demonstrate promising skills of WRF-CAM5 for long-term simulations at a regional scale and suggest several areas of potential improvements.« less

  3. REGIONAL WATER SUPPLY PLANNING AND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mays, Larry W.

    CHAPTER 3 REGIONAL WATER SUPPLY PLANNING AND CAPACITY EXPANSION MODELS Messele Z. Ejeta California Department of Water Resources Sacramento, California Larry W. Mays Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering Arizona State University Tempe, Arizona 3.1 INTRODUCTION Water supply planning on a regional scale

  4. Frey, H.C., A. Unal, J. Chen, and S. Li, "Modeling Mobile Source Emissions Based Upon In-Use and Second-by-Second Data: Development of Conceptual Approaches for EPA's New MOVES Model," Proceedings, Annual Meeting of the Air & Waste

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frey, H. Christopher

    upon HC, CO, NOx, and CO2 hot stabilized LDGV tailpipe emissions. The methods demonstrated here includeFrey, H.C., A. Unal, J. Chen, and S. Li, "Modeling Mobile Source Emissions Based Upon In Source Emissions Based Upon In-Use and Second-by-Second Data: Development of Conceptual Approaches

  5. Investigating CXOU J163802.6–471358: A new pulsar wind nebula in the norma region?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jakobsen, Simone J.; Watson, Darach; Tomsick, John A.; Gotthelf, Eric V.; Kaspi, Victoria M.

    2014-06-01

    We present the first analysis of the extended source CXOU J163802.6–471358, which was discovered serendipitously during the Chandra X-ray survey of the Norma region of the Galactic spiral arms. The X-ray source exhibits a cometary appearance with a point source and an extended tail region. The complete source spectrum is fitted well with an absorbed power law model and jointly fitting the Chandra spectrum of the full source with one obtained from an archived XMM-Newton observation results in best fit parameters N {sub H} =1.5{sub ?0.5}{sup +0.7}×10{sup 23} cm{sup ?2} and ?=1.1{sub ?0.6}{sup +0.7} (90% confidence uncertainties). The unabsorbed luminosity of the full source is then L{sub X}?4.8×10{sup 33}d{sub 10}{sup 2} erg s{sup –1} with d {sub 10} = d/10 kpc, where a distance of 10 kpc is a lower bound inferred from the large column density. The radio counterpart found for the source using data from the Molonglo Galactic Plane Survey epoch-2 shows an elongated tail offset from the X-ray emission. No infrared counterpart was found. The results are consistent with the source being a previously unknown pulsar driving a bow shock through the ambient medium.

  6. LOW-LATITUDE CORONAL HOLES, DECAYING ACTIVE REGIONS, AND GLOBAL CORONAL MAGNETIC STRUCTURE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Petrie, G. J. D. [National Solar Observatory, Tucson, AZ 85719 (United States); Haislmaier, K. J. [George Mason University, Fairfax, VA 22030 (United States)

    2013-10-01

    We study the relationship between decaying active-region magnetic fields, coronal holes, and the global coronal magnetic structure using Global Oscillations Network Group synoptic magnetograms, Solar TErrestrial RElations Observatory extreme-ultraviolet synoptic maps, and coronal potential-field source-surface models. We analyze 14 decaying regions and associated coronal holes occurring between early 2007 and late 2010, 4 from cycle 23 and 10 from cycle 24. We investigate the relationship between asymmetries in active regions' positive and negative magnetic intensities, asymmetric magnetic decay rates, flux imbalances, global field structure, and coronal hole formation. Whereas new emerging active regions caused changes in the large-scale coronal field, the coronal fields of the 14 decaying active regions only opened under the condition that the global coronal structure remained almost unchanged. This was because the dominant slowly varying, low-order multipoles prevented opposing-polarity fields from opening and the remnant active-region flux preserved the regions' low-order multipole moments long after the regions had decayed. Thus, the polarity of each coronal hole necessarily matched the polar field on the side of the streamer belt where the corresponding active region decayed. For magnetically isolated active regions initially located within the streamer belt, the more intense polarity generally survived to form the hole. For non-isolated regions, flux imbalance and topological asymmetry prompted the opposite to occur in some cases.

  7. Application of an online-coupled regional climate model, WRF-CAM5, over East Asia for examination of ice nucleation schemes. Part II. Sensitivity to heterogeneous ice nucleation parameterizations and dust emissions

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Zhang, Yang; Chen, Ying; Fan, Jiwen; Leung, Lai -Yung

    2015-09-14

    Aerosol particles can affect cloud microphysical properties by serving as ice nuclei (IN). Large uncertainties exist in the ice nucleation parameterizations (INPs) used in current climate models. In this Part II paper, to examine the sensitivity of the model predictions to different heterogeneous INPs, WRF-CAM5 simulation using the INP of Niemand et al. (N12) [1] is conducted over East Asia for two full years, 2006 and 2011, and compared with simulation using the INP of Meyers et al. (M92) [2], which is the original INP used in CAM5. M92 calculates the nucleated ice particle concentration as a function of icemore »supersaturation, while N12 represents the nucleated ice particle concentration as a function of temperature and the number concentrations and surface areas of dust particles. Compared to M92, the WRF-CAM5 simulation with N12 produces significantly higher nucleated ice crystal number concentrations (ICNCs) in the northern domain where dust sources are located, leading to significantly higher cloud ice number and mass concentrations and ice water path, but the opposite is true in the southern domain where temperatures and moistures play a more important role in ice formation. Overall, the simulation with N12 gives lower downward shortwave radiation but higher downward longwave radiation, cloud liquid water path, cloud droplet number concentrations, and cloud optical depth. The increase in cloud optical depth and the decrease in downward solar flux result in a stronger shortwave and longwave cloud forcing, and decreases temperature at 2-m and precipitation. Changes in temperature and radiation lower surface concentrations of OH, O?, SO?˛?, and PM2.5, but increase surface concentrations of CO, NO?, and SO? over most of the domain. By acting as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) and IN, dust particles have different impacts on cloud water and ice number concentrations, radiation, and temperature at 2-m and precipitation depending on whether the dominant role of dust is CCN or IN. These results indicate the importance of the heterogeneous ice nucleation treatments and dust emissions in accurately simulating regional climate and air quality.« less

  8. Sanders, J. E.; and Merguerian, Charles, 1995b, New York City region: Unique testing ground for flow models of Quaternary continental glaciers.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Merguerian, Charles

    Sanders, J. E.; and Merguerian, Charles, 1995b, New York City region: Unique testing ground This Abstract: Sanders, J. E.; and Merguerian, Charles, 1995b, New York City region: Unique testing ground City came from the NNE (from the "Labrador center"). When ice blocked the N end of Hudson Bay and Lake

  9. Quantifying the Difference Between the Flux-Tube Expansion Factor at the Source Surface and at the Alfv\\'en Surface Using A Global MHD Model for the Solar Wind

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cohen, Ofer

    2015-01-01

    The potential field approximation has been providing a fast, and computationally inexpensive estimation for the solar corona's global magnetic field geometry for several decades. In contrast, more physics-based global magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) models have been used for a similar purpose, while being much more computationally expensive. Here, we investigate the difference in the field geometry between a global MHD model and the potential field source surface model (PFSSM) by tracing individual magnetic field lines in the MHD model from the Alfven surface (AS), through the source surface (SS), all the way to the field line footpoint, and then back to the source surface in the PFSSM. We also compare the flux-tube expansion at two points at the SS and the AS along the same radial line. We study the effect of solar cycle variations, the order of the potential field harmonic expansion, and different magnetogram sources. We find that the flux-tube expansion factor is consistently smaller at the AS than at the SS for...

  10. Microgrid Policy Review of Selected Major Countries, Regions, and Organizations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qu, Min

    2014-01-01

    4.IRED (Integration of Renewable Energy Sources and1.Regional Power Grid with renewable Energy Resourcespdf 2. Spanish Renewable Energy Review http://www.erec.org/

  11. Relationship of regional water quality to aquifer thermal energy storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allen, R.D.

    1983-11-01

    Ground-water quality and associated geologic characteristics may affect the feasibility of aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES) system development in any hydrologic region. This study sought to determine the relationship between ground-water quality parameters and the regional potential for ATES system development. Information was collected from available literature to identify chemical and physical mechanisms that could adversely affect an ATES system. Appropriate beneficiation techniques to counter these potential geochemical and lithologic problems were also identified through the literature search. Regional hydrology summaries and other sources were used in reviewing aquifers of 19 drainage regions in the US to determine generic geochemical characteristics for analysis. Numerical modeling techniques were used to perform geochemical analyses of water quality from 67 selected aquifers. Candidate water resources regions were then identified for exploration and development of ATES. This study identified six principal mechanisms by which ATES reservoir permeability may be impaired: (1) particulate plugging, (2) chemical precipitation, (3) liquid-solid reactions, (4) formation disaggregation, (5) oxidation reactions, and (6) biological activity. Specific proven countermeasures to reduce or eliminate these effects were found. Of the hydrologic regions reviewed, 10 were identified as having the characteristics necessary for ATES development: (1) Mid-Atlantic, (2) South-Atlantic Gulf, (3) Ohio, (4) Upper Mississippi, (5) Lower Mississippi, (6) Souris-Red-Rainy, (7) Missouri Basin, (8) Arkansas-White-Red, (9) Texas-Gulf, and (10) California.

  12. Low-latitude coronal holes, decaying active regions and global coronal magnetic structure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Petrie, Gordon

    2013-01-01

    We study the relationship between decaying active region magnetic fields, coronal holes and the global coronal magnetic structure using Global Oscillations Network Group (GONG) synoptic magnetograms, Solar Terrestrial RElations Observatory (STEREO) extreme ultra-violet (EUV) synoptic maps and coronal potential-field source-surface (PFSS) models. We analyze 14 decaying regions and associated coronal holes occurring between early 2007 and late 2010, four from cycle 23 and 10 from cycle 24. We investigate the relationship between asymmetries in active regions' positive and negative magnetic intensities, asymmetric magnetic decay rates, flux imbalances, global field structure and coronal hole formation. Whereas new emerging active regions caused changes in the large-scale coronal field, the coronal fields of the 14 decaying active regions only opened under the condition that the global coronal structure remained almost unchanged. This was because the dominant slowly-varying, low-order multipoles prevented opposin...

  13. Improved negative ion source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Delmore, J.E.

    1984-05-01

    A method and apparatus for providing a negative ion source accelerates electrons away from a hot filament electron emitter into a region of crossed electric and magnetic fields arranged in a magnetron configuration. During a portion of the resulting cycloidal path, the electron velocity is reduced below its initial value. The electron accelerates as it leaves the surface at a rate of only slightly less than if there were no magnetic field, thereby preventing a charge buildup at the surface of the emitter. As the electron traverses the cycloid, it is decelerated during the second, third, and fourth quadrants, then reaccelerated as it approaches the end of the fourth quadrant to regain its original velocity. The minimum velocity occurs during the fourth quadrant, and corresponds to an electron temperature of 200 to 500/sup 0/C for the electric and magnetic fields commonly encountered in the ion sources of magnetic sector mass spectrometers. An ion source using the above-described thermalized electrons is also disclosed.

  14. Negative ion source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Delmore, James E. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    1987-01-01

    A method and apparatus for providing a negative ion source accelerates electrons away from a hot filament electron emitter into a region of crossed electric and magnetic fields arranged in a magnetron configuration. During a portion of the resulting cycloidal path, the electron velocity is reduced below its initial value. The electron accelerates as it leaves the surface at a rate of only slightly less than if there were no magnetic field, thereby preventing a charge buildup at the surface of the emitter. As the electron traverses the cycloid, it is decelerated during the second, third, and fourth quadrants, then reeccelerated as it approaches the end of the fourth quadrant to regain its original velocity. The minimum velocity occurs during the fourth quadrant, and corresponds to an electron temperature of 200.degree. to 500.degree. for the electric and magnetic fields commonly encountered in the ion sources of magnetic sector mass spectrometers. An ion source using the above-described thermalized electrons is also disclosed.

  15. Photoionization Models of NGC 346

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Relano; M. Peimbert; J. E. Beckman

    2001-09-07

    We present spherically symmetric and plane parallel photoionization models of NGC 346, an HII region in the Small Magellanic Cloud. The models are based on CLOUDY and on the observations of Peimbert, Peimbert, & Ruiz (2000). We find that approximately 45% of the H ionization photons escape from the HII region providing an important ionizing source for the low density interstellar medium of the SMC. The predicted I(4363)/I(5007) value is smaller than that observed, probably implying that there is an additional source of energy not taken into account by the models. From the ionization structure of the best model and the observed line intensities we determine the abundances of N, Ne, S, Ar, and Fe relative to O.

  16. Effect of source tampering in the security of quantum cryptography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sun, Shi-Hai

    The security of source has become an increasingly important issue in quantum cryptography. Based on the framework of measurement-device-independent quantum key distribution (MDI-QKD), the source becomes the only region ...

  17. Integrated simulation of snow and glacier melt in water and energy balance-based, distributed hydrological modeling framework at Hunza River Basin of Pakistan Karakoram region

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2015-01-01

    in the surface energy balance of Haut Glacier d’Arolla,2008), Distributed energy balance modeling of South CascadeA distributed energy balance model for complex topography

  18. Integrated simulation of snow and glacier melt in water and energy balance-based, distributed hydrological modeling framework at Hunza River Basin of Pakistan Karakoram region

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2015-01-01

    variations in the surface energy balance of Haut Glacier d’2005), A distributed energy balance model for complexat Fraser using a energy balance based snowmelt model (WEB-

  19. Integrated simulation of snow and glacier melt in water and energy balance-based, distributed hydrological modeling framework at Hunza River Basin of Pakistan Karakoram region

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2015-01-01

    variations in the surface energy balance of Haut Glacier d’Clark (2008), Distributed energy balance modeling of South2005), A distributed energy balance model for complex

  20. Regional Summary Pacific Region Management Context

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pacific Rim nations. As such, the management of the HMS fisheries s coordinated by the Pacific FisheryRegional Summary Pacific Region Management Context The Pacific Region includes California, Oregon, and Washington. Federal fisheries in this region are managed by the Pacific Fishery Management Council (PFMC

  1. Lateral boundary errors in regional numerical weather

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ?umer, Slobodan

    Lateral boundary errors in regional numerical weather prediction models Author: Ana Car Advisor, they describe evolution of atmospher - weather forecast. Every NWP model solves the same system of equations (1: assoc. prof. dr. Nedjeljka Zagar January 5, 2015 Abstract Regional models are used in many national

  2. Role of positive ions on the surface production of negative ions in a fusion plasma reactor type negative ion source—Insights from a three dimensional particle-in-cell Monte Carlo collisions model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fubiani, G.; Boeuf, J. P. [Université de Toulouse, UPS, INPT, LAPLACE (Laboratoire Plasma et Conversion d'Energie), 118 route de Narbonne, F-31062 Toulouse cedex 9 (France) [Université de Toulouse, UPS, INPT, LAPLACE (Laboratoire Plasma et Conversion d'Energie), 118 route de Narbonne, F-31062 Toulouse cedex 9 (France); CNRS, LAPLACE, F-31062 Toulouse (France)

    2013-11-15

    Results from a 3D self-consistent Particle-In-Cell Monte Carlo Collisions (PIC MCC) model of a high power fusion-type negative ion source are presented for the first time. The model is used to calculate the plasma characteristics of the ITER prototype BATMAN ion source developed in Garching. Special emphasis is put on the production of negative ions on the plasma grid surface. The question of the relative roles of the impact of neutral hydrogen atoms and positive ions on the cesiated grid surface has attracted much attention recently and the 3D PIC MCC model is used to address this question. The results show that the production of negative ions by positive ion impact on the plasma grid is small with respect to the production by atomic hydrogen or deuterium bombardment (less than 10%)

  3. WRF-Chem model predictions of the regional impacts of N2O5 heterogeneous processes on night-time chemistry over north-western Europe

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lowe, Douglas; Archer-Nicholls, Scott; Morgan, Will; Allan, James D.; Utembe, Steve; Ouyang, Bin; Aruffo, Eleonora; Le Breton, Michael; Zaveri, Rahul A.; di Carlo, Piero; Percival, Carl; Coe, H.; Jones, Roderic L.; McFiggans, Gordon

    2015-01-01

    Chemical modelling studies have been conducted over north-western Europe in summer conditions, showing that night-time dinitrogen pentoxide (N2O5) heterogeneous reactive uptake is important regionally in modulating particulate nitrate and has a~modest influence on oxidative chemistry. Results from Weather Research and Forecasting model with Chemistry (WRF-Chem) model simulations, run with a detailed volatile organic compound (VOC) gas-phase chemistry scheme and the Model for Simulating Aerosol Interactions and Chemistry (MOSAIC) sectional aerosol scheme, were compared with a series of airborne gas and particulate measurements made over the UK in July 2010. Modelled mixing ratios of key gas-phase species were reasonably accurate (correlations with measurements of 0.7–0.9 for NO2 and O3). However modelled loadings of particulate species were less accurate (correlation with measurements for particulate sulfate and ammonium were between 0.0 and 0.6). Sulfate mass loadings were particularly low (modelled means of 0.5–0.7 ?g kg?1air, compared with measurements of 1.0–1.5 ?g kg?1air). Two flights from the campaign were used as test cases – one with low relative humidity (RH) (60–70%), the other with high RH (80–90%). N2O5 heterogeneous chemistry was found to not be important in the low-RH test case; but in the high-RH test case it had a strong effect and significantly improved the agreement between modelled and measured NO3 and N2O5. When the model failed to capture atmospheric RH correctly, the modelled NO3 and N2O5 mixing ratios for these flights differed significantly from the measurements. This demonstrates that, for regional modelling which involves heterogeneous processes, it is essential to capture the ambient temperature and water vapour profiles.

    The night-time NO3 oxidation of VOCs across the whole region was found to be 100–300 times slower than the daytime OH oxidation of these compounds. The difference in contribution was less for alkenes (× 80) and comparable for dimethylsulfide (DMS). However the suppression of NO3 mixing ratios across the domain by N2O5 heterogeneous chemistry has only a very slight, negative, influence on this oxidative capacity. The influence on regional particulate nitrate mass loadings is stronger. Night-time N2O5 heterogeneous chemistry maintains the production of particulate nitrate within polluted regions: when this process is taken into consideration, the daytime peak (for the 95th percentile) of PM10 nitrate mass loadings remains around 5.6 ?g kg?1air, but the night-time minimum increases from 3.5 to 4.6 ?g kg?1air. The sustaining of higher particulate mass loadings through the night by this process improves model skill at matching measured aerosol nitrate diurnal cycles and will negatively impact on regional air quality, requiring this process to be included in regional models.

  4. Radiation source with shaped emission

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kubiak, Glenn D.; Sweatt, William C.

    2003-05-13

    Employing a source of radiation, such as an electric discharge source, that is equipped with a capillary region configured into some predetermined shape, such as an arc or slit, can significantly improve the amount of flux delivered to the lithographic wafers while maintaining high efficiency. The source is particularly suited for photolithography systems that employs a ringfield camera. The invention permits the condenser which delivers critical illumination to the reticle to be simplified from five or more reflective elements to a total of three or four reflective elements thereby increasing condenser efficiency. It maximizes the flux delivered and maintains a high coupling efficiency. This architecture couples EUV radiation from the discharge source into a ring field lithography camera.

  5. Contaminant Sources are Known

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Sources are Known Historical contaminant sources from liquid discharges and solid waste management units are known. August 1, 2013 Contaminant source map LANL contaminant...

  6. Southwest Regional Partnership on Carbon Sequestration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brian McPherson

    2006-04-01

    The Southwest Partnership on Carbon Sequestration completed several more tasks during the period of April 1, 2005-September 30, 2005. The main objective of the Southwest Partnership project is to evaluate and demonstrate the means for achieving an 18% reduction in carbon intensity by 2012. While Phase 2 planning is well under way, the content of this report focuses exclusively on Phase 1 objectives completed during this reporting period. Progress during this period was focused in the three areas: geological carbon storage capacity in New Mexico, terrestrial sequestration capacity for the project area, and the Integrated Assessment Model efforts. The geologic storage capacity of New Mexico was analyzed and Blanco Mesaverde (which extends into Colorado) and Basin Dakota Pools were chosen as top two choices for the further analysis for CO{sub 2} sequestration in the system dynamics model preliminary analysis. Terrestrial sequestration capacity analysis showed that the four states analyzed thus far (Arizona, Colorado, New Mexico and Utah) have relatively limited potential to sequester carbon in terrestrial systems, mainly due to the aridity of these areas, but the large land area offered could make up for the limited capacity per hectare. Best opportunities were thought to be in eastern Colorado/New Mexico. The Integrated Assessment team expanded the initial test case model to include all New Mexico sinks and sources in a new, revised prototype model in 2005. The allocation mechanism, or ''String of Pearls'' concept, utilizes potential pipeline routes as the links between all combinations of the source to various sinks. This technique lays the groundwork for future, additional ''String of Pearls'' analyses throughout the SW Partnership and other regions as well.

  7. Calculating energy storage due to topological changes in emerging active region NOAA AR 11112

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tarr, L A

    2012-01-01

    The Minimum Current Corona (MCC) model provides a way to estimate stored coronal energy using the number of field lines connecting regions of positive and negative photospheric flux. This information is quantified by the net flux connecting pairs of opposing regions in a connectivity matrix. Changes in the coronal magnetic field, due to processes such as magnetic reconnection, manifest themselves as changes in the connectivity matrix. However, the connectivity matrix will also change when flux sources emerge or submerge through the photosphere, as often happens in active regions. We have developed an algorithm to estimate the changes in flux due to emergence and submergence of magnetic flux sources. These estimated changes must be accounted for in order to quantify storage and release of magnetic energy in the corona. To perform this calculation over extended periods of time, we must additionally have a consistently labeled connectivity matrix over the entire observational time span. We have therefore develop...

  8. Problems with packaged sources in foreign countries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abeyta, Cristy L; Matzke, James L; Zarling, John; Tompkin, J. Andrew

    2010-01-01

    The Global Threat Reduction Initiative's (GTRI) Off-Site Source Recovery Project (OSRP), which is administered by the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), removes excess, unwanted, abandoned, or orphan radioactive sealed sources that pose a potential threat to national security, public health, and safety. In total, GTRI/OSRP has been able to recover more than 25,000 excess and unwanted sealed sources from over 825 sites. In addition to transuranic sources, the GTRI/OSRP mission now includes recovery of beta/gamma emitting sources, which are of concern to both the U.S. government and the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). This paper provides a synopsis of cooperative efforts in foreign countries to remove excess and unwanted sealed sources by discussing three topical areas: (1) The Regional Partnership with the International Atomic Energy Agency; (2) Challenges in repatriating sealed sources; and (3) Options for repatriating sealed sources.

  9. Developing a robust geochemical and reactive transport model to evaluate possible sources of arsenic at the CO[subscript 2] sequestration natural analog site in Chimayo, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Viswanathan, Hari; Dai, Zhenxue; Lopano, Christina; Keating, Elizabeth; Hakala, J. Alexandra; Scheckel, Kirk G.; Zheng, Liange; Gutherie, George D.; Pawar, Rajesh

    2012-10-24

    Migration of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) from deep storage formations into shallow drinking water aquifers is a possible system failure related to geologic CO{sub 2} sequestration. A CO{sub 2} leak may cause mineral precipitation/dissolution reactions, changes in aqueous speciation, and alteration of pH and redox conditions leading to potential increases of trace metal concentrations above EPA National Primary Drinking Water Standards. In this study, the Chimayo site (NM) was examined for site-specific impacts of shallow groundwater interacting with CO{sub 2} from deep storage formations. Major ion and trace element chemistry for the site have been previously studied. This work focuses on arsenic (As), which is regulated by the EPA under the Safe Drinking Water Act and for which some wells in the Chimayo area have concentrations higher than the maximum contaminant level (MCL). Statistical analysis of the existing Chimayo groundwater data indicates that As is strongly correlated with trace metals U and Pb indicating that their source may be from the same deep subsurface water. Batch experiments and materials characterization, such as: X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and synchrotron micro X-ray fluorescence ({mu}-XRF), were used to identify As association with Fe-rich phases, such as clays or oxides, in the Chimayo sediments as the major factor controlling As fate in the subsurface. Batch laboratory experiments with Chimayo sediments and groundwater show that pH decreases as CO{sub 2} is introduced into the system and buffered by calcite. The introduction of CO{sub 2} causes an immediate increase in As solution concentration, which then decreases over time. A geochemical model was developed to simulate these batch experiments and successfully predicted the pH drop once CO{sub 2} was introduced into the experiment. In the model, sorption of As to illite, kaolinite and smectite through surface complexation proved to be the key reactions in simulating the drop in As concentration as a function of time in the batch experiments. Based on modeling, kaolinite precipitation is anticipated to occur during the experiment, which allows for additional sorption sites to form with time resulting in the slow decrease in As concentration. This mechanism can be viewed as trace metal 'scavenging' due to sorption caused secondary mineral precipitation. Since deep geologic transport of these trace metals to the shallow subsurface by brine or CO{sub 2} intrusion is critical to assessing environmental impacts, the effective retardation of trace metal transport is an important parameter to estimate and it is dependent on multiple coupled reactions. At the field scale, As mobility is retarded due to the influence of sorption reactions, which can affect environmental performance assessment studies of a sequestration site.

  10. Climatological simulations of ozone and atmospheric aerosols in the Greater Cairo region

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steiner, A. L.; Tawfik, A. B.; Shalaby, A.; Zakey, A. S.; Abdel Wahab, M. M.; Salah, Z.; Solmon, F.; Sillman, S.; Zaveri, Rahul A.

    2014-04-16

    An integrated chemistry-climate model (RegCM4-CHEM) simulates present-day climate, ozone and tropospheric aerosols over Egypt with a focus on Greater Cairo (GC) region. The densley populated GC region is known for its severe air quality issues driven by high levels of anthropogenic pollution in conjuction with natural sources such as dust and agricultural burning events. We find that current global emission inventories underestimate key pollutants such as nitrogen oxides and anthropogenic aerosol species. In the GC region, average-ground-based NO2 observations of 40-60 ppb are substantially higher than modeled estimates (5-10 ppb), likely due to model grid resolution, improper boundary layer representation, and poor emissions inventories. Observed ozone concentrations range from 35 ppb (winter) to 80 ppb (summer). The model reproduces the seasonal cycle fairly well, but modeled summer ozone is understimated by approximately 15 ppb and exhibits little interannual variability. For aerosols, springtime dust events dominate the seasonal aerosol cycle. The chemistry-climate model captures the springtime peak aerosol optical depth (AOD) of 0.7-1 but is slightly greater than satellite-derived AOD. Observed AOD decreases in the summer and increases again in the fall due to agricultural burning events in the Nile Delta, yet the model underestimates this fall observed AOD peak, as standard emissions inventories underestimate this burning and the resulting aerosol emissions. Our comparison of modeled gas and particulate phase atmospheric chemistry in the GC region indicates that improved emissions inventories of mobile sources and other anthropogenic activities are needed to improve air quality simulations in this region.

  11. Central and Eastern United States (CEUS) Seismic Source Characterization (SSC) for Nuclear Facilities Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kevin J. Coppersmith; Lawrence A. Salomone; Chris W. Fuller; Laura L. Glaser; Kathryn L. Hanson; Ross D. Hartleb; William R. Lettis; Scott C. Lindvall; Stephen M. McDuffie; Robin K. McGuire; Gerry L. Stirewalt; Gabriel R. Toro; Robert R. Youngs; David L. Slayter; Serkan B. Bozkurt; Randolph J. Cumbest; Valentina Montaldo Falero; Roseanne C. Perman' Allison M. Shumway; Frank H. Syms; Martitia P. Tuttle

    2012-01-31

    This report describes a new seismic source characterization (SSC) model for the Central and Eastern United States (CEUS). It will replace the Seismic Hazard Methodology for the Central and Eastern United States, EPRI Report NP-4726 (July 1986) and the Seismic Hazard Characterization of 69 Nuclear Plant Sites East of the Rocky Mountains, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Model, (Bernreuter et al., 1989). The objective of the CEUS SSC Project is to develop a new seismic source model for the CEUS using a Senior Seismic Hazard Analysis Committee (SSHAC) Level 3 assessment process. The goal of the SSHAC process is to represent the center, body, and range of technically defensible interpretations of the available data, models, and methods. Input to a probabilistic seismic hazard analysis (PSHA) consists of both seismic source characterization and ground motion characterization. These two components are used to calculate probabilistic hazard results (or seismic hazard curves) at a particular site. This report provides a new seismic source model. Results and Findings The product of this report is a regional CEUS SSC model. This model includes consideration of an updated database, full assessment and incorporation of uncertainties, and the range of diverse technical interpretations from the larger technical community. The SSC model will be widely applicable to the entire CEUS, so this project uses a ground motion model that includes generic variations to allow for a range of representative site conditions (deep soil, shallow soil, hard rock). Hazard and sensitivity calculations were conducted at seven test sites representative of different CEUS hazard environments. Challenges and Objectives The regional CEUS SSC model will be of value to readers who are involved in PSHA work, and who wish to use an updated SSC model. This model is based on a comprehensive and traceable process, in accordance with SSHAC guidelines in NUREG/CR-6372, Recommendations for Probabilistic Seismic Hazard Analysis: Guidance on Uncertainty and Use of Experts. The model will be used to assess the present-day composite distribution for seismic sources along with their characterization in the CEUS and uncertainty. In addition, this model is in a form suitable for use in PSHA evaluations for regulatory activities, such as Early Site Permit (ESPs) and Combined Operating License Applications (COLAs). Applications, Values, and Use Development of a regional CEUS seismic source model will provide value to those who (1) have submitted an ESP or COLA for Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) review before 2011; (2) will submit an ESP or COLA for NRC review after 2011; (3) must respond to safety issues resulting from NRC Generic Issue 199 (GI-199) for existing plants and (4) will prepare PSHAs to meet design and periodic review requirements for current and future nuclear facilities. This work replaces a previous study performed approximately 25 years ago. Since that study was completed, substantial work has been done to improve the understanding of seismic sources and their characterization in the CEUS. Thus, a new regional SSC model provides a consistent, stable basis for computing PSHA for a future time span. Use of a new SSC model reduces the risk of delays in new plant licensing due to more conservative interpretations in the existing and future literature. Perspective The purpose of this study, jointly sponsored by EPRI, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), and the NRC was to develop a new CEUS SSC model. The team assembled to accomplish this purpose was composed of distinguished subject matter experts from industry, government, and academia. The resulting model is unique, and because this project has solicited input from the present-day larger technical community, it is not likely that there will be a need for significant revision for a number of years. See also Sponsors Perspective for more details. The goal of this project was to implement the CEUS SSC work plan for developing a regional CEUS SSC model. The work plan, formulated by the project manager and a

  12. Regional Ecosystem-Atmosphere CO2 Exchange Via Atmospheric Budgets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davis, K.J.; Richardson, S.J.; Miles, N.L.

    2007-03-07

    Inversions of atmospheric CO2 mixing ratio measurements to determine CO2 sources and sinks are typically limited to coarse spatial and temporal resolution. This limits our ability to evaluate efforts to upscale chamber- and stand-level CO2 flux measurements to regional scales, where coherent climate and ecosystem mechanisms govern the carbon cycle. As a step towards the goal of implementing atmospheric budget or inversion methodology on a regional scale, a network of five relatively inexpensive CO2 mixing ratio measurement systems was deployed on towers in northern Wisconsin. Four systems were distributed on a circle of roughly 150-km radius, surrounding one centrally located system at the WLEF tower near Park Falls, WI. All measurements were taken at a height of 76 m AGL. The systems used single-cell infrared CO2 analyzers (Licor, model LI-820) rather than the siginificantly more costly two-cell models, and were calibrated every two hours using four samples known to within ± 0.2 ppm CO2. Tests prior to deployment in which the systems sampled the same air indicate the precision of the systems to be better than ± 0.3 ppm and the accuracy, based on the difference between the daily mean of one system and a co-located NOAA-ESRL system, is consistently better than ± 0.3 ppm. We demonstrate the utility of the network in two ways. We interpret regional CO2 differences using a Lagrangian parcel approach. The difference in the CO2 mixing ratios across the network is at least 2?3 ppm, which is large compared to the accuracy and precision of the systems. Fluxes estimated assuming Lagrangian parcel transport are of the same sign and magnitude as eddy-covariance flux measurements at the centrally-located WLEF tower. These results indicate that the network will be useful in a full inversion model. Second, we present a case study involving a frontal passage through the region. The progression of a front across the network is evident; changes as large as four ppm in one minute are captured. Influence functions, derived using a Lagrangian Particle Dispersion model driven by the CSU Regional Atmospheric Modeling System and nudged to NCEP reanalysis meteorological fields, are used to determine source regions for the towers. The influence functions are combined with satellite vegetation observations to interpret the observed trends in CO2 concentration. Full inversions will combine these elements in a more formal analytic framework.

  13. Dusty cradles in a turbulent nursery: the SGR A east H II region complex at the galactic center

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lau, R. M.; Herter, T. L.; Adams, J. D. [Astronomy Department, Cornell University, 202 Space Sciences Building, Ithaca, NY 14853-6801 (United States); Morris, M. R. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Los Angeles, 430 Portola Plaza, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1547 (United States)

    2014-10-20

    We present imaging at 19, 25, 31, and 37 ?m of the compact H II region complex G-0.02-0.07 located 6 pc in projection from the center of the Galaxy obtained with SOFIA using FORCAST. G-0.02-0.07 contains three compact H II regions (A, B, and C) and one ultra-compact H II region (D). Our observations reveal the presence of two faint, infrared sources located 23'' and 35'' to the east of region C (FIRS 1 and 2) and detect dust emission in two of the three 'ridges' of ionized gas west of region A. The 19/37 color temperature and 37 ?m optical depth maps of regions A-C are used to characterize the dust energetics and morphology. Regions A and B exhibit average 19/37 color temperatures of ?105 K, and regions C and D exhibit color temperatures of ?115 K and ?130 K, respectively. Using the DustEM code, we model the SEDs of regions A-D and FIRS 1, all of which require populations of very small, transiently heated grains and large, equilibrium-heated grains. We also require the presence of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in regions A-C in order to fit the 3.6, 4.5, 5.8, and 8.0 ?m fluxes observed by Spitzer/IRAC. The location of the heating source for region A is determined by triangulation from distances and temperatures derived from DustEM models fit to SEDs of three different points around the region, and it is found to be displaced to the northeast of the center of curvature near the color temperature peak. Based on total luminosity, expected 1.90 ?m fluxes, and proximity to the mid-IR color temperature peaks, we identify heating source candidates for regions A, B, and C. However, for region D, the observed fluxes at 1.87 and 1.90 ?m of the previously proposed ionizing star are a factor of ?40 times too bright to be the heating source and hence is likely just a star lying along the line of sight toward region D.

  14. Development and testing of a lithium ion source and injector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seidl, P. A.

    2014-01-01

    Development and testing of a lithium ion source and injectortesting of an intense lithium ion source and injector for anFIG. 4. The modeled and measured lithium ion source surface

  15. Neutrino Sources and Properties

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Francesco Vissani

    2015-05-19

    In this lecture, prepared for PhD students, basic considerations on neutrino interactions, properties and sites of production are overviewed. The detailed content is as follows: Sect. 1, Weak interactions and neutrinos: Fermi coupling; definition of neutrinos; global numbers. Sect. 2, A list of neutrino sources: Explanatory note and examples (solar pp- and supernova-neutrinos). Sect. 3, Neutrinos oscillations: Basic formalism (Pontecorvo); matter effect (Mikheev, Smirnov, Wolfenstein); status of neutrino masses and mixings. Sect. 4, Modifying the standard model to include neutrinos masses: The fermions of the standard model; one additional operator in the standard model (Weinberg); implications. One summary table and several exercises offer the students occasions to check, consolidate and extend their understanding; the brief reference list includes historical and review papers and some entry points to active research in neutrino physics.

  16. Discovery of TeV Gamma-Ray Emission from the Cygnus Region of the Galaxy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. A. Abdo; B. Allen; D. Berley; E. Blaufuss; S. Casanova; C. Chen; D. G. Coyne; R. S. Delay; B. L. Dingus; R. W. Ellsworth; L. Fleysher; R. Fleysher; M. M. Gonzalez; J. A. Goodman; E. Hays; C. M. Hoffman; B. E. Kolterman; L. A. Kelley; C. P. Lansdell; J. T. Linnemann; J. E. McEnery; A. I. Mincer; I. V. Moskalenko; P. Nemethy; D. Noyes; J. M. Ryan; F. W. Samuelson; P. M. Saz Parkinson; M. Schneider; A. Shoup; G. Sinnis; A. J. Smith; A. W. Strong; G. W. Sullivan; V. Vasileiou; G. P. Walker; D. A. Williams; X. W. Xu; G. B. Yodh

    2006-11-21

    The diffuse gamma radiation arising from the interaction of cosmic ray particles with matter and radiation in the Galaxy is one of the few probes available to study the origin of the cosmic rays. Milagro is a water Cherenkov detector that continuously views the entire overhead sky. The large field-of-view combined with the long observation time makes Milagro the most sensitive instrument available for the study of large, low surface brightness sources such as the diffuse gamma radiation arising from interactions of cosmic radiation with interstellar matter. In this paper we present spatial and flux measurements of TeV gamma-ray emission from the Cygnus Region. The TeV image shows at least one new source MGRO J2019+37 as well as correlations with the matter density in the region as would be expected from cosmic-ray proton interactions. However, the TeV gamma-ray flux as measured at ~12 TeV from the Cygnus region (after excluding MGRO J2019+37) exceeds that predicted from a conventional model of cosmic ray production and propagation. This observation indicates the existence of either hard-spectrum cosmic-ray sources and/or other sources of TeV gamma rays in the region.

  17. SLAM: a sodium-limestone concrete ablation model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Suo-Anttila, A.J.

    1983-12-01

    SLAM is a three-region model, containing a pool (sodium and reaction debris) region, a dry (boundary layer and dehydrated concrete) region, and a wet (hydrated concrete) region. The model includes a solution to the mass, momentum, and energy equations in each region. A chemical kinetics model is included to provide heat sources due to chemical reactions between the sodium and the concrete. Both isolated model as well as integrated whole code evaluations have been made with good results. The chemical kinetics and water migration models were evaluated separately, with good results. Several small and large-scale sodium limestone concrete experiments were simulated with reasonable agreement between SLAM and the experimental results. The SLAM code was applied to investigate the effects of mixing, pool temperature, pool depth and fluidization. All these phenomena were found to be of significance in the predicted response of the sodium concrete interaction. Pool fluidization is predicted to be the most important variable in large scale interactions.

  18. Two source emission behaviour of alpha fragments of projectile having energy around 1 GeV per nucleon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. Singh; M. K. Singh; Ramji Pathak

    2010-09-17

    The emission of projectile fragments alpha has been studied in ^{84}Kr interactions with nuclei of the nuclear emulsion detector composition at relativistic energy below 2 GeV per nucleon. The angular distribution of projectile fragments alpha in terms of transverse momentum could not be explained by a straight and clean-cut collision geometry hypothesis of Participant - Spectator (PS) Model. Therefore, it is assumed that projectile fragments alpha were produced from two separate sources that belong to the projectile spectator region differing drastically in their temperatures. It has been clearly observed that the emission of projectile fragments alpha are from two different sources. The contribution of projectile fragments alpha from contact layer or hot source is a few percent of the total emission of projectile fragments alphas. Most of the projectile fragments alphas are emitted from the cold source. It has been noticed that the temperature of hot and cold regions are dependent on the projectile mass number.

  19. CALCULATING ENERGY STORAGE DUE TO TOPOLOGICAL CHANGES IN EMERGING ACTIVE REGION NOAA AR 11112

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tarr, Lucas; Longcope, Dana

    2012-04-10

    The minimum current corona model provides a way to estimate stored coronal energy using the number of field lines connecting regions of positive and negative photospheric flux. This information is quantified by the net flux connecting pairs of opposing regions in a connectivity matrix. Changes in the coronal magnetic field, due to processes such as magnetic reconnection, manifest themselves as changes in the connectivity matrix. However, the connectivity matrix will also change when flux sources emerge or submerge through the photosphere, as often happens in active regions. We have developed an algorithm to estimate the changes in flux due to emergence and submergence of magnetic flux sources. These estimated changes must be accounted for in order to quantify storage and release of magnetic energy in the corona. To perform this calculation over extended periods of time, we must additionally have a consistently labeled connectivity matrix over the entire observational time span. We have therefore developed an automated tracking algorithm to generate a consistent connectivity matrix as the photospheric source regions evolve over time. We have applied this method to NOAA Active Region 11112, which underwent a GOES M2.9 class flare around 19:00 on 2010 October 16th, and calculated a lower bound on the free magnetic energy buildup of {approx}8.25 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 30} erg over 3 days.

  20. An alternative model for ultra-high pressure in the Svartberget Fe-Ti garnet-peridotite, Western Gneiss Region, Norway

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Podladchikov, Yuri

    Gneiss Region, Norway JOHANNES C. VRIJMOED1,*, YURI Y. PODLADCHIKOV1 , TORGEIR B. ANDERSEN1 and EBBE H, Norway *Corresponding author, e-mail: j.c.vrijmoed@fys.uio.no 2 Aker Exploration AS, PO Box 580, Sentrum, 4003 Stavanger, Norway Abstract: The previously reported ``Fe-Ti type'' garnet-peridotite is located

  1. International Data on Radiological Sources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martha Finck; Margaret Goldberg

    2010-07-01

    ABSTRACT The mission of radiological dispersal device (RDD) nuclear forensics is to identify the provenance of nuclear and radiological materials used in RDDs and to aid law enforcement in tracking nuclear materials and routes. The application of databases to radiological forensics is to match RDD source material to a source model in the database, provide guidance regarding a possible second device, and aid the FBI by providing a short list of manufacturers and distributors, and ultimately to the last legal owner of the source. The Argonne/Idaho National Laboratory RDD attribution database is a powerful technical tool in radiological forensics. The database (1267 unique vendors) includes all sealed sources and a device registered in the U.S., is complemented by data from the IAEA Catalogue, and is supported by rigorous in-lab characterization of selected sealed sources regarding physical form, radiochemical composition, and age-dating profiles. Close working relationships with global partners in the commercial sealed sources industry provide invaluable technical information and expertise in the development of signature profiles. These profiles are critical to the down-selection of potential candidates in either pre- or post- event RDD attribution. The down-selection process includes a match between an interdicted (or detonated) source and a model in the database linked to one or more manufacturers and distributors.

  2. Aspects of a high intensity neutron source

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chapman, Peter H. (Peter Henry)

    2010-01-01

    A unique methodology for creating a neutron source model was developed for deuterons and protons incident on solid phase beryllium and lithium targets. This model was then validated against experimental results already ...

  3. Gravitational Microlensing of Fractal Sources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Geraint F. Lewis

    2004-08-11

    Gravitational microlensing has proven to be a powerful tool in the study of quasars, providing some of the strongest limits on the scales of structure in the central engine. Typically sources are considered to be smoothly varying on some particular scale; such simple sources result in recognisable time scales in microlensing light curves from which the size of the source can be determined. Various emission processes, however, result in sources with a fractal appearance, possessing structure on a range of scales. Here, the gravitational microlensing of such fractal sources at the heart of quasars is considered. It is shown that the resulting light curves reflect the fractal nature of the sources, possessing pronounced structure at various scales, markedly different to the case with the random distribution of emission clouds that are typically considered. Hence, the determination of a characteristic scale of variability in a microlensing light curve may not necessarily reveal the size of the individual emission clouds, the key value that is required to determine the physical state of the emission region, rather it may correspond to a particular hierarchy in a fractal structure. Current X-ray satellites can detect such fractal structure via the monitoring of gravitationally lensed quasars during a microlensing event, providing a test of high energy emission processes in quasars.

  4. A regional scale modeling analysis of aerosol and trace gas distributions over the eastern Pacific during the INTEX-B field campaign

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2010-01-01

    Attribution 3.0 License. Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics Aused in current atmospheric chemistry models in general andalso influence atmospheric chemistry by pro- viding surface

  5. Integrated simulation of snow and glacier melt in water and energy balance-based, distributed hydrological modeling framework at Hunza River Basin of Pakistan Karakoram region

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2015-01-01

    will affect the Asian water towers, Science, 328(5984),hydrologic modelling, J. Water Resour. Plann. Manag. , 119(impact of climate change on the water resource of Hindukush-

  6. Miniature x-ray source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Trebes, James E. (Livermore, CA); Stone, Gary F. (Livermore, CA); Bell, Perry M. (Tracy, CA); Robinson, Ronald B. (Modesto, CA); Chornenky, Victor I. (Minnetonka, MN)

    2002-01-01

    A miniature x-ray source capable of producing broad spectrum x-ray emission over a wide range of x-ray energies. The miniature x-ray source comprises a compact vacuum tube assembly containing a cathode, an anode, a high voltage feedthru for delivering high voltage to the anode, a getter for maintaining high vacuum, a connection for an initial vacuum pump down and crimp-off, and a high voltage connection for attaching a compact high voltage cable to the high voltage feedthru. At least a portion of the vacuum tube wall is highly x-ray transparent and made, for example, from boron nitride. The compact size and potential for remote operation allows the x-ray source, for example, to be placed adjacent to a material sample undergoing analysis or in proximity to the region to be treated for medical applications.

  7. Infrared light sources with semimetal electron injection

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kurtz, Steven R. (Albuquerque, NM); Biefeld, Robert M. (Albuquerque, NM); Allerman, Andrew A. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1999-01-01

    An infrared light source is disclosed that comprises a layered semiconductor active region having a semimetal region and at least one quantum-well layer. The semimetal region, formed at an interface between a GaAsSb or GalnSb layer and an InAsSb layer, provides electrons and holes to the quantum-well layer to generate infrared light at a predetermined wavelength in the range of 2-6 .mu.m. Embodiments of the invention can be formed as electrically-activated light-emitting diodes (LEDs) or lasers, and as optically-pumped lasers. Since the active region is unipolar, multiple active regions can be stacked to form a broadband or multiple-wavelength infrared light source.

  8. Interstellar Seeing. II. The Case of the Vela Pulsar: Source Unresolved

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. M. Cordes

    2000-07-17

    I use a method based on interstellar scintillations for discerning information about source sizes on scales less than one micro-arc sec. I use a comprehensive model for a pulsar signal, scintillated amplitude modulated noise, that includes source fluctuations and noise statistics. The method takes into account time-frequency averaging in the signal processing as well as effects due to source structure. The method is applied to interferometric visibility data on the Vela pulsar which show slightly less scintillation modulation than expected for a point source in the strong scattering regime. The decreased scintillation modulation is likely to be due exclusively to time-frequency averaging rather than from any source size effects. The implied upper limit on source extent, derived through Bayesian inference, is compared to predictions that take into account beaming from the relativistic plasma flow in neutron star magnetospheres. The upper limit for the transverse source size ($\\lesssim 400$ km at 95% confidence for a pulsar distance of 0.5 kpc) is easily consistent with conventional models for radio emission regions in pulsar magnetospheres that place them well inside the light cylinder at only a few neutron-star radii from the star's surface.

  9. Modeling the Integrated Expansion of the Canadian and U.S. Power Sectors with the Regional Energy Deployment System (ReEDS)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zinaman, Owen; Ibanez, Eduardo; Heimiller, Donna; Eurek, Kelly; Mai, Trieu

    2015-07-02

    This document describes the development effort for creating a robust representation of the combined capacity expansion of the U.S. and Canadian electric sectors within the NREL ReEDS model. Thereafter, it demonstrates the newly established capability through an illustrative sensitivity analysis. In conducting the sensitivity analysis, we describe the value of an integrated modeling approach.

  10. Evidence of Bulk Acceleration of the GRB X-ray Flare Emission Region

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Uhm, Z Lucas

    2015-01-01

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), the most luminous explosions in the universe, invoke relativistic jets beaming towards Earth with the highest velocities for bulk motion in the universe. Some of them are followed by softer, less energetic, X-ray flares, which also move with relativistic velocities towards Earth. Observations and theoretical modeling suggest that X-ray flares share a similar physical mechanism as GRB prompt emission itself. Here we show a clear observational evidence that the X-ray flare emission region is undergoing rapid acceleration as the photons are emitted. The observed X-ray flare light curves and photon index evolution can be interpreted within a simple toy model invoking synchrotron radiation in an accelerating emission region far from the GRB central engine. Such an acceleration process demands an additional energy dissipation source other than kinetic energy, which points towards a significant Poynting-flux in the emission region.

  11. Calculating chiller emissions and source energy use

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aumann, D.J. [Bevilacqua-Knight, Inc., Oakland, CA (United States)

    1996-12-31

    Various analyses have compared the emissions and over-all source energy use of different chillers. However, these analyses are typically based on national or regional electric power plant annual averages or rely on outdated emissions data that do not account for scrubbers and other pollution controls applied in response to the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments (CAAA). Other analyses have used power generation data for a specific utility but require hourly generation profiles, which are difficult to obtain. Thus, many of the existing models are either too general to provide valuable information or too complex to be practical for the day-to-day applications engineers face. This paper introduces a simple yet reliable hand calculation method for estimating the combustion-related emissions and source energy use of gas and electric chillers. The user needs to supply only two inputs: annual chiller system energy use and the utility`s power generation mix during chiller operation. The analysis supplies electric power plant heat rates and emission factors. Referenced guidelines are documented for all calculation inputs.

  12. DEVELOPMENT OF NEW MID-INFRARED ULTRAFAST LASER SOURCES FOR COMPACT COHERENT X-RAY SOURCES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sterling Backus

    2012-05-14

    In this project, we proposed to develop laser based mid-infrared lasers as a potentially robust and reliable source of ultrafast pulses in the mid-infrared region of the spectrum, and to apply this light source to generating bright, coherent, femtosecond-to-attosecond x-ray beams.

  13. Dosimetric characterization of model Cs-1 Rev2 cesium-131 brachytherapy source in water phantoms and human tissues with MCNP5 Monte Carlo simulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang Jianhua; Zhang Hualin [Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics, CAS, Shanghai 201800 (China); Department of Radiation Medicine, Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States)

    2008-04-15

    A recently developed alternative brachytherapy seed, Cs-1 Rev2 cesium-131, has begun to be used in clinical practice. The dosimetric characteristics of this source in various media, particularly in human tissues, have not been fully evaluated. The aim of this study was to calculate the dosimetric parameters for the Cs-1 Rev2 cesium-131 seed following the recommendations of the AAPM TG-43U1 report [Rivard et al., Med. Phys. 31, 633-674 (2004)] for new sources in brachytherapy applications. Dose rate constants, radial dose functions, and anisotropy functions of the source in water, Virtual Water, and relevant human soft tissues were calculated using MCNP5 Monte Carlo simulations following the TG-43U1 formalism. The results yielded dose rate constants of 1.048, 1.024, 1.041, and 1.044 cGy h{sup -1} U{sup -1} in water, Virtual Water, muscle, and prostate tissue, respectively. The conversion factor for this new source between water and Virtual Water was 1.02, between muscle and water was 1.006, and between prostate and water was 1.004. The authors' calculation of anisotropy functions in a Virtual Water phantom agreed closely with Murphy's measurements [Murphy et al., Med. Phys. 31, 1529-1538 (2004)]. Our calculations of the radial dose function in water and Virtual Water have good agreement with those in previous experimental and Monte Carlo studies. The TG-43U1 parameters for clinical applications in water, muscle, and prostate tissue are presented in this work.

  14. Lithium ion sources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roy, Prabir K.

    2014-01-01

    HIFAN 1866 Lithium ion sources by Prabir K. Roy, Wayne G.No. DE-AC02-05CH11231. Lithium ion sources Prabir K. Roya source of ?100 mA lithium ion current for the Neutralized

  15. Integrated simulation of snow and glacier melt in water and energy balance-based, distributed hydrological modeling framework at Hunza River Basin of Pakistan Karakoram region

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2015-01-01

    model of land surface water and energy ?uxes for GSMs, J.glacier melt in water and energy balance-based, distributedglacier melt in water and energy balance-based, distributed

  16. Modelling narrow-line regions of active galaxies in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey - I.Sample selection and physical conditions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Zhitai; Hammer, François; 10.1093/mnras/sts713

    2013-01-01

    We systematically determine the electron density and electron temperature of active galaxies and star-forming galaxies using spectroscopy from the SDSS DR7, while mainly focusing on the NLRs. Density and temperature are determined through the I[S II] 6716/6731 and I[O III] 5007/4363 ratios, respectively, in our [O III] 4363 emission sample of 15 019 galaxies. We find two sequences and the typical range of density in the NLRs of AGNs is 100-1000 /cm3. The temperatures in the NLRs range from 10 000 to 20 000 K for Seyferts, and the ranges were even higher and wider for LINERs and composites. We also propose that Y_LINER ~ Y_Seyfert > Y_composite > Y_star-forming, where Y is the characteristic present-day star-formation time-scale. While in the AGN case, we find several strong lines of evidence suggest that some supplementary energy source(s) should be responsible for high ionization potential.

  17. Measuring the chargino mixing parameters of the minimal SUSY extension of the standard model at e sup + e sup minus colliders in the TeV region

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leike, A. )

    1989-01-01

    In this paper it is proposed to measure the parameters of the chargino mixing of the minimal supersymmetric extension of the standard model by chargino pair production at e{sup +} e{sup {minus}} colliders with TeV energies. Some information about the lightest SUSY particle and its mass can be gained. With a polarized beam the minimal SUSY extension of the Standard model could be ruled out.

  18. Electrolytes for power sources

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Doddapaneni, N.; Ingersoll, D.

    1995-01-03

    Electrolytes are disclosed for power sources, particularly alkaline and acidic power sources, comprising benzene polysulfonic acids and benzene polyphosphonic acids or salts of such acids. 7 figures.

  19. Electrolytes for power sources

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Doddapaneni, Narayan (Albuquerque, NM); Ingersoll, David (Albuquerque, NM)

    1995-01-01

    Electrolytes for power sources, particularly alkaline and acidic power sources, comprising benzene polysulfonic acids and benzene polyphosphonic acids or salts of such acids.

  20. NORTHWEST REGIONAL TECHNOLOGY CENTER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    NORTHWEST REGIONAL TECHNOLOGY CENTER for Homeland Security Northwest Regional Technology Center May 2015 | 1 AROUND THE REGION IN HOMELAND SECURITY The Northwest Regional Technology Center (NWRTC.S. Army Cyber Command; and Michael Echols, Director, Cyber Joint Program Management Office National