National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for model regions atlantic

  1. Comparisons of box model calculations and measurements of formaldehyde from the 1997 North Atlantic Regional Experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Comparisons of box model calculations and measurements of formaldehyde from the 1997 North Atlantic October 2001; accepted 16 November 2001; published 18 April 2002. [1] Formaldehyde (CH2O) measurements: formaldehyde, photochemical modeling, aircraft measurements, North Atlantic troposphere 1. Introduction [2

  2. Statistical Modelling of the Relationship Between Main Development Region Sea Surface Temperature and Atlantic Basin Hurricane Numbers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Binter, R; Khare, S; Binter, Roman; Jewson, Stephen; Khare, Shree

    2007-01-01

    We are building a hurricane number prediction scheme that relies, in part, on statistical modelling of the empirical relationship between Atlantic sea surface temperatures and Atlantic basin hurricane numbers. We test out a number of simple statistical models for this relationship, using data from 1900 to 2005 and data from 1950 to 2005, and for both all hurricane numbers and intense hurricane numbers.

  3. Mid-Atlantic Regional Wind Energy Institute

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Courtney Lane

    2011-12-20

    As the Department of Energy stated in its 20% Wind Energy by 2030 report, there will need to be enhanced outreach efforts on a national, state, regional, and local level to communicate wind development opportunities, benefits and challenges to a diverse set of stakeholders. To help address this need, PennFuture was awarded funding to create the Mid-Atlantic Regional Wind Energy Institute to provide general education and outreach on wind energy development across Maryland, Virginia, Delaware, Pennsylvania and West Virginia. Over the course of the two-year grant period, PennFuture used its expertise on wind energy policy and development in Pennsylvania and expanded it to other states in the Mid-Atlantic region. PennFuture accomplished this through reaching out and establishing connections with policy makers, local environmental groups, health and economic development organizations, and educational institutions and wind energy developers throughout the Mid-Atlantic region. PennFuture conducted two regional wind educational forums that brought together wind industry representatives and public interest organizations from across the region to discuss and address wind development in the Mid-Atlantic region. PennFuture developed the agenda and speakers in collaboration with experts on the ground in each state to help determine the critical issue to wind energy in each location. The sessions focused on topics ranging from the basics of wind development; model ordinance and tax issues; anti-wind arguments and counter points; wildlife issues and coalition building. In addition to in-person events, PennFuture held three webinars on (1) Generating Jobs with Wind Energy; (2) Reviving American Manufacturing with Wind Power; and (3) Wind and Transmission. PennFuture also created a web page for the institute (http://www.midatlanticwind.org) that contains an online database of fact sheets, research reports, sample advocacy letters, top anti-wind claims and information on how to address them, wind and wildlife materials and sample model ordinances. Video and presentations from each in-person meeting and webinar recordings are also available on the site. At the end of the two-year period, PennFuture has accomplished its goal of giving a unified voice and presence to wind energy advocates in the Mid-Atlantic region. We educated a broad range of stakeholders on the benefits of wind energy and gave them the tools to help make a difference in their states. We grew a database of over 500 contacts and hope to continue the discussion and work around the importance of wind energy in the region.

  4. Statistical Modelling of the Relationship Between Main Development Region Sea Surface Temperature and \\emph{Landfalling} Atlantic Basin Hurricane Numbers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Binter, R; Khare, S; Binter, Roman; Jewson, Stephen; Khare, Shree

    2007-01-01

    We are building a hurricane number prediction scheme that relies, in part, on statistical modelling of the empirical relationship between Atlantic sea surface temperatures and landfalling hurricane numbers. We test out a number of simple statistical models for that relationship, using data from 1900 to 2005 and data from 1950 to 2005, and for both all hurricane numbers and intense hurricane numbers. The results are very different from the corresponding analysis for basin hurricane numbers.

  5. 2015 ACI Mid-Atlantic Regional Home Performance Conference |...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    2015 ACI Mid-Atlantic Regional Home Performance Conference 2015 ACI Mid-Atlantic Regional Home Performance Conference October 20, 2015 9:00AM EDT to October 21, 2015 5:00PM EDT...

  6. Simulation of a Polar Low Case in the North Atlantic with different regional numerical models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zahn, Matthias

    by the DWD (German Weather Service) by means of their forecast model HRM (High Resolution Model) and another University Press, Cambridge. (a) CLM (b) REMO (c) HRM, DWD (d) BWK Figure 1: 1(a)- 1(c)10m wind velocity pressure from CLM and REMO simulations and HRM analysis, DWD, respectively, at 15/10/93, 6:00, 1(d) surface

  7. Field Testing Protocol Atlantic and Gulf Coastal Plain Regional Supplement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    Field Testing Protocol Atlantic and Gulf Coastal Plain Regional Supplement Organization of field the field testing of the draft Regional Supplement. Field testing will be done in cooperation with regional, the District coordinator will provide team members with an introduction to the Regional Supplement

  8. Potential Economic Impacts from Offshore Wind in the Mid-Atlantic Region (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Keyser, D.; Tegen, S.; Flores, F.; Zammit, D.; Kraemer, M.; Miles, J.

    2014-01-01

    Offshore wind is a clean, renewable source of energy and can be an economic driver in the United States. To better understand the employment opportunities and other potential regional economic impacts from offshore wind development, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) funded research that focuses on four regions of the country. The studies use multiple scenarios with various local job and domestic manufacturing content assumptions. Each regional study uses the new offshore wind Jobs and Economic Development Impacts (JEDI) model, developed by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory. This fact sheet summarizes the potential economic impacts for the Mid-Atlantic region.

  9. Causes of Ocean Surface temperature Changes in Atlantic andPacific Topical Cyclogenesis Regions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Santer, B.D.; Wigley, T.M.L.; Gleckler, P.J.; Bonfils, C.; Wehner, M.F.; AchutaRao, K.; Barnett, T.P.; Boyle, J.S.; Bruggemann, W.; Fiorino, M.; Gillett, N.; Hansen, J.E.; Jones, P.D.; Klein, S.A.; Meehl,G.A.; Raper, S.C.B.; Reynolds, R.W.; Stott, P.A.; Taylor, K.E.; Washington, W.M.

    2006-01-31

    Previous research has identified links between changes in sea surface temperature (SST) and hurricane intensity. We use climate models to study the possible causes of SST changes in Atlantic and Pacific tropical cyclogenesis regions. The observed SST increases in these regions range from 0.32 to 0.67 C over the 20th century. The 22 climate models examined here suggest that century-timescale SST changes of this magnitude cannot be explained solely by unforced variability of the climate system, even under conservative assumptions regarding the magnitude of this variability. Model simulations that include external forcing by combined anthropogenic and natural factors are generally capable of replicating observed SST changes in both tropical cyclogenesis regions.

  10. 2014 SAME Mid-Atlantic Regional Joint Engineer Training Symposium (JETS)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Society of American Military Engineers (SAME) presents its Mid-Atlantic Regional Joint Engineer Training Symposium (JETS) with the topic Navigating the New Normal: Partnerships for the Future.

  11. CONCEPTUAL REGIONAL SEDIMENT BUDGET FOR THE U.S. NORTH ATLANTIC COAST

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    1 CONCEPTUAL REGIONAL SEDIMENT BUDGET FOR THE U.S. NORTH ATLANTIC COAST JULIE DEAN ROSATI1 , ASHLEY Regional Sediment Budget (CRSB) was developed for coastal beaches, bays and estuaries extending from damage throughout this region. A CRSB is the first step in understanding sediment transport patterns

  12. Final Report of the Mid-Atlantic Marine Wildlife Surveys, Modeling...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Final Report of the Mid-Atlantic Marine Wildlife Surveys, Modeling, and Data Final Report of the Mid-Atlantic Marine Wildlife Surveys, Modeling, and Data The Wind Program hosted a...

  13. Modeling regional power transfers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kavicky, J.A.; Veselka, T.D.

    1994-03-01

    The Spot Market Network (SMN) model was used to estimate spot market transactions and prices between various North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) regions for summer on-peak situations. A preliminary analysis of new or proposed additions to the transmission network was performed. The effects of alternative exempt wholesale generator (EWG) options on spot market transactions and the transmission system are also studied. This paper presents the SMN regional modelling approach and summarizes simulation results. Although the paper focuses on a regional network representation, a discussion of how the SMN model was used to represent a detailed utility-level network is also presented.

  14. Savannah River Region: Transition between the Gulf and Atlantic Coastal Plains. Proceedings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zullo, V.A.; Harris, W.B.; Price, V. [eds.

    1990-12-31

    The focus of the this conference of Coastal Plains geologists was on the Savannah River region of Georgia and South Carolina, and particularly on the geology of the US Department of Energy`s 300 square mile Savannah River Site (SRS) in western South Carolina. Current geological studies indicate that the Mesozoic-Cenozoic section in the Savannah River region is transitional between that of the Gulf Coastal Plain to the southwest and that of the Atlantic Coastal Plain to the northeast. With the transitional aspect of the region as its theme, the first session was devoted to overviews of Cretaceous and Paleogene geology in the Gulf and Atlantic Coastal Plains. Succeeding presentations and resulting discussions dealt with more specific problems in structural, lithostratigraphic, hydrological, biostratigraphic, and cyclostratigraphic analysis, and of correlation to standard stratigraphic frameworks. For these conference proceedings, individual papers have been processed separately for the Energy Data Base.

  15. Appendix C of the Final Report of the Mid-Atlantic Marine Wildlife Surveys, Modeling, and Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2013-07-01

    The Wind Program hosted a two-day workshop on July 24-25, 2012 with scientists and regulators engaged in marine ecological survey, modeling, and database efforts pertaining to the waters of the Mid-Atlantic region. This is the third appendix to the report, the compendium of pre-workshop answers.

  16. Appendix E of the Final Report of the Mid-Atlantic Marine Wildlife Surveys, Modeling, and Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2013-07-01

    The Wind Program hosted a two-day workshop on July 24-25, 2012 with scientists and regulators engaged in marine ecological survey, modeling, and database efforts pertaining to the waters of the Mid-Atlantic region. This is the fifth appendix to the report, the bibliography of references.

  17. Appendix A of the Final Report of the Mid-Atlantic Marine Wildlife Surveys, Modeling, and Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2013-07-01

    The Wind Program hosted a two-day workshop on July 24-25, 2012 with scientists and regulators engaged in marine ecological survey, modeling, and database efforts pertaining to the waters of the Mid-Atlantic region. This is the first appendix to the report, the workshop agenda.

  18. Final Report of the Mid-Atlantic Marine Wildlife Surveys, Modeling, and Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saracino-Brown, Jocelyn; Smith, Courtney; Gilman, Patrick

    2013-07-01

    The Wind Program hosted a two-day workshop on July 24-25, 2012 with scientists and regulators engaged in marine ecological survey, modeling, and database efforts pertaining to the waters of the Mid-Atlantic region. The workshop was planned by Federal agency, academic, and private partners to promote collaboration between ongoing offshore ecological survey efforts, and to promote the collaborative development of complementary predictive models and compatible databases. The meeting primarily focused on efforts to establish and predict marine mammal, seabird, and sea turtle abundance, density, and distributions extending from the shoreline to the edge of the Exclusive Economic Zone between Nantucket Sound, Massachusetts and Cape Hatteras, North Carolina.

  19. Final Report of the Mid-Atlantic Marine Wildlife Surveys, Modeling...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    A: Workshop Agenda July 2013 Appendix A: Workshop Agenda Mid-Atlantic Marine Wildlife Surveys, Modeling, and Data: Workshop to Establish Coordination & Communication Dates: July...

  20. NETL Researcher Honored with 2014 FLC Mid-Atlantic Regional STEM Award

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMass map shines light on771/6/14 Contact: Janet Lambert4 FLC Mid-Atlantic Regional STEM

  1. Causes of Ocean Surface temperature Changes in Atlantic and Pacific Topical Cyclogenesis Regions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2006-01-01

    Causes of Ocean Surface Temperature Changes in Atlantic andt in understanding the causes of such changes. B. D. Santerto study the possible causes of SST changes in Atlantic and

  2. Very low zonally asymmetric ozone values in March 1997 above the North Atlantic-European region, induced by dynamic processes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Very low zonally asymmetric ozone values in March 1997 above the North Atlantic-European region September 1998 / Revised: 25 January 1999 / Accepted: 26 January 1999 Abstract. The total ozone distribution before. A spatial pattern correlation between the zonally asymmetric part of total ozone

  3. Appendix D of the Final Report of the Mid-Atlantic Marine Wildlife Surveys, Modeling, and Data. Workshop to Establish Coordination and Communication

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2013-07-01

    The Wind Program hosted a two-day workshop on July 24-25, 2012 with scientists and regulators engaged in marine ecological survey, modeling, and database efforts pertaining to the waters of the Mid-Atlantic region. This is the fourth appendix to the report, the presentations from the workshop.

  4. Appendix B of the Final Report of the Mid-Atlantic Marine Wildlife Surveys, Modeling, and Data. Workshop to Establish Coordination and Communication

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2013-07-01

    The Wind Program hosted a two-day workshop on July 24-25, 2012 with scientists and regulators engaged in marine ecological survey, modeling, and database efforts pertaining to the waters of the Mid-Atlantic region. This is the second appendix to the report, the workshop participants.

  5. A Database and Meta-Analysis of Ecological Responses to Flow in the South Atlantic Region

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McManamay, Ryan A [ORNL; Orth, Dr. Donald J [Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University (Virginia Tech); Davis, Dr, Mary [Southeastern Aquatic Resources Partnership; Kauffman, John [John Kauffman LLC.

    2013-01-01

    Generalized and quantitative relationships between flow and ecology are pivotal to developing environmental flow standards based on socially acceptable ecological conditions. Informing management at regional scales requires compiling sufficient hydrologic and ecological sources of information, identifying information gaps, and creating a framework for hypothesis development and testing. We compiled studies of empirical and theoretical relationships between flow and ecology in the South Atlantic region (SAR) of the United States to evaluate their utility for the development of environmental flow standards. Using database searches, internet searches, and agency contacts, we gathered 186 sources of information that provided a qualitative or quantitative relationship between flow and ecology within states encompassing the SAR. A total of 109 of the 186 sources had sufficient information to support quantitative analyses. Ecological responses to natural changes in flow magnitude, frequency, and duration were highly variable regardless of the direction and magnitude of changes in flow. In contrast, the majority of ecological responses to anthropogenic-induced flow alterations were negative. Fish consistently showed negative responses to anthropogenic flow alterations whereas other ecological groups showed somewhat variable responses (e.g. macroinvertebrates and riparian vegetation) and even positive responses (e.g. algae). Fish and organic matter had sufficient sample sizes to stratify natural flow-ecology relationships by specific flow categories (e.g. high flow, baseflows) or by region (e.g. coastal plain, uplands). After stratifying relationships, we found that significant correlations existed between changes in natural flow and ecological responses. In addition, a regression tree explained 57% of the variation in fish responses to anthropogenic and natural changes in flow. Because of some ambiguity in interpreting the directionality in ecological responses, we utilized ecological gains or losses, where each represents a benefit or reduction to ecosystem services, respectively. Variables explained 49% of the variation in ecological gains and losses for all ecological groups combined. Altogether, our results suggested that the source of flow change and the ecological group of interest played primary roles in determining the direction and magnitude of ecological responses. Furthermore, our results suggest that developing broadly generalized relationships between ecology and changes in flow at a regional scale is unlikely unless relationships are placed within meaningful contexts, such as environmental flow components or by geomorphic setting.

  6. Modeling of tsunami sources and propagation in the Atlantic Ocean Basin to assess coastal tsunami

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kirby, James T.

    Modeling of tsunami sources and propagation in the Atlantic Ocean Basin to assess coastal tsunami 19716, USA Abstract Since 2010, under the auspices of the US National Tsunami Hazard Mitigation Pro- gram (NTHMP), the authors have conducted modeling work to gradually develop tsunami inundation maps

  7. Smart balloon observations over the North Atlantic: O3 data analysis and modeling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thompson, Anne

    Smart balloon observations over the North Atlantic: O3 data analysis and modeling Huiting Mao,1) field campaign in July­August 2004. Our analysis utilized measurements of O3 from three smart balloons. Talbot, D. Troop, R. Johnson, S. Businger, and A. M. Thompson (2006), Smart balloon observations over

  8. A coupled model study of the remote influence of enso on tropical Atlantic sst variability 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fang, Yue

    2006-08-16

    To investigate the tropical Atlantic response to the remote El Nino-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) forcing, a Reduced Physics Â? Coupled Global Circulation Model (RP-CGCM) is developed, and four experiments are carried out. The results show that the RP...

  9. Extendedrange seasonal hurricane forecasts for the North Atlantic with a hybrid dynamicalstatistical model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Webster, Peter J.

    Extendedrange seasonal hurricane forecasts for the North Atlantic with a hybrid 20 September 2010; published 9 November 2010. [1] A hybrid forecast model for seasonal hurricane between the number of seasonal hurricane and the large scale variables from ECMWF hindcasts. The increase

  10. Regional weather modeling on parallel computers.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baillie, C.; Michalakes, J.; Skalin, R.; Mathematics and Computer Science; NOAA Forecast Systems Lab.; Norwegian Meteorological Inst.

    1997-01-01

    This special issue on 'regional weather models' complements the October 1995 special issue on 'climate and weather modeling', which focused on global models. In this introduction we review the similarities and differences between regional and global atmospheric models. Next, the structure of regional models is described and we consider how the basic algorithms applied in these models influence the parallelization strategy. Finally, we give a brief overview of the eight articles in this issue and discuss some remaining challenges in the area of adapting regional weather models to parallel computers.

  11. Regions in Energy Market Models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Short, W.

    2007-02-01

    This report explores the different options for spatial resolution of an energy market model--and the advantages and disadvantages of models with fine spatial resolution. It examines different options for capturing spatial variations, considers the tradeoffs between them, and presents a few examples from one particular model that has been run at different levels of spatial resolution.

  12. Regions in Energy Market Models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2009-01-18

    This report explores the different options for spatial resolution of an energy market model and the advantages and disadvantages of models with fine spatial resolution. It examines different options for capturing spatial variations, considers the tradeoffs between them, and presents a few examples from one particular model that has been run at different levels of spatial resolution.

  13. Regional Climate Modeling: Progress, Challenges, and Prospects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Yuqing; Leung, Lai R.; McGregor, John L.; Lee, Dong-Kyou; Wang, Wei-Chyung; Ding, Yihui; Kimura, Fujio

    2004-12-01

    Regional climate modeling with regional climate models (RCMs) has matured over the past decade and allows for meaningful utilization in a broad spectrum of applications. In this paper, latest progresses in regional climate modeling studies are reviewed, including RCM development, applications of RCMs to dynamical downscaling for climate change assessment, seasonal climate predictions and climate process studies, and the study of regional climate predictability. Challenges and potential directions of future research in this important area are discussed, with the focus on those to which less attention has been given previously, such as the importance of ensemble simulations, further development and improvement of regional climate modeling approach, modeling extreme climate events and sub-daily variation of clouds and precipitation, model evaluation and diagnostics, applications of RCMs to climate process studies and seasonal predictions, and development of regional earth system models. It is believed that with both the demonstrated credibility of RCMs’ capability in reproducing not only monthly to seasonal mean climate and interannual variability but also the extreme climate events when driven by good quality reanalysis and the continuous improvements in the skill of global general circulation models (GCMs) in simulating large-scale atmospheric circulation, regional climate modeling will remain an important dynamical downscaling tool for providing the needed information for assessing climate change impacts and seasonal climate predictions, and a powerful tool for improving our understanding of regional climate processes. An internationally coordinated effort can be developed with different focuses by different groups to advance regional climate modeling studies. It is also recognized that since the final quality of the results from nested RCMs depends in part on the realism of the large-scale forcing provided by GCMs, the reduction of errors and improvement in physics parameterizations in both GCMs and RCMs remain a priority for climate modeling community.

  14. Modeling of Tsunami Propagation in the Atlantic Ocean Basin for Tsunami Hazard Assessment along the North Shore of Hispaniola

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grilli, Stéphan T.

    Modeling of Tsunami Propagation in the Atlantic Ocean Basin for Tsunami Hazard Assessment along to estimating future seismic and tsunami hazard in Hispaniola. In 2013, the UNESCO commissioned initial modeling studies to assess tsunami hazard along the North shore of Hispaniola (NSOH), which is shared

  15. A study of mesoscale gravity waves over the North Atlantic with satellite observations and a mesoscale model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A study of mesoscale gravity waves over the North Atlantic with satellite observations and a mesoscale model Dong L. Wu Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena and compare AMSU-A observations to simulations from a mesoscale model (MM5). The simulated gravity waves

  16. Applying waste logistics modeling to regional planning

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holter, G.M.; Khawaja, A.; Shaver, S.R.; Peterson, K.L.

    1995-05-01

    Waste logistics modeling is a powerful analytical technique that can be used for effective planning of future solid waste storage, treatment, and disposal activities. Proper waste management is essential for preventing unacceptable environmental degradation from ongoing operations, and is also a critical part of any environmental remediation activity. Logistics modeling allows for analysis of alternate scenarios for future waste flowrates and routings, facility schedules, and processing or handling capacities. Such analyses provide an increased understanding of the critical needs for waste storage, treatment, transport, and disposal while there is still adequate lead time to plan accordingly. They also provide a basis for determining the sensitivity of these critical needs to the various system parameters. This paper discusses the application of waste logistics modeling concepts to regional planning. In addition to ongoing efforts to aid in planning for a large industrial complex, the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) is currently involved in implementing waste logistics modeling as part of the planning process for material recovery and recycling within a multi-city region in the western US.

  17. Atlantic Ocean circulation at the last glacial maximum : inferences from data and models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dail, Holly Janine

    2012-01-01

    This thesis focuses on ocean circulation and atmospheric forcing in the Atlantic Ocean at the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM, 18-21 thousand years before present). Relative to the pre-industrial climate, LGM atmospheric CO? ...

  18. Modeling-Computer Simulations At Nw Basin & Range Region (Pritchett...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Modeling-Computer Simulations At Nw Basin & Range Region (Pritchett, 2004) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Modeling-Computer...

  19. Modeling-Computer Simulations At Nw Basin & Range Region (Biasi...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Modeling-Computer Simulations At Nw Basin & Range Region (Biasi, Et Al., 2009) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Modeling-Computer...

  20. Diamond Lattice Model of Semicrystalline Polyethylene in the Amorphous Region

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Diamond Lattice Model of Semicrystalline Polyethylene in the Amorphous Region Zhong­Hui Duan Abstract The statistics of polyethylene chains in the amorphous region between two crystallites have been as models of the chain molecules in the amorphous region of semicrystalline polyethylene, both

  1. A Framework for Modeling Uncertainty in Regional Climate Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    climate models). The modeling framework revolves around the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MITA Framework for Modeling Uncertainty in Regional Climate Change Erwan Monier, Xiang Gao, Jeffery processes of policy development and implementation, climate change research needs to focus on improving

  2. Regional Short-Term Energy Model (RSTEM) Overview

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2009-01-01

    The Regional Short-Term Energy Model (RSTEM) utilizes estimated econometric relationships for demand, inventories and prices to forecast energy market outcomes across key sectors and selected regions throughout the United States.

  3. South Atlantic summary report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Havran, K.J.; Wiese, J.D.

    1983-12-01

    To date, four Federal offshore oil-and-gas leasing actions have occurred in the South Atlantic Region. Two additional South Atlantic lease offerings remain on the July 1982 final 5-year OCS oil-and-gas leasing schedule before June 1987. The South Atlantic Region consists of three major sedimentary basins: the Carolina Trough, the Blake Plateau, and the Southeast Georgia Embayment. Lease Sale 43, the first in the South Atlantic Region, featured blocks for exploration in the Southeast Georgia Embayment. Offshore operators drilled a total of six exploratory wells on blocks leased in Lease Sale 43. All were dry. The 43 leases from Lease Sale 43 have now expired, some blocks were relinquished earlier by their lease-holders. In the recent Lease Sales 56 and RS-2, and in the South Atlantic Lease Offering (July 1983), blocks leased were largely concentrated in the Carolina Trough Basin. Exploration of these blocks may begin anew in early 1984. The blocks are in deep water and will require careful, long-range planning before drilling can commence. As of July 1983, all 66 leases from the above three sales are active. Two plans of exploration have been approved by Minerals Management Service for exploration on blocks leased in Lease Sale 56. The plans are for Russell Area, Blocks 709 and 710, and Manteo Area, Block 510. Blocks 709 and 710 are held by ARCO, and Block 510 is held by Chevron. Based on current plans of exploration, operations will begin in 1984, first by Chevron, and sometime later by ARCO. Operations will be supported by a temporary service base to be established at Morehead City, North Carolina. 6 references, 4 figures.

  4. Coupling of a regional atmospheric model (RegCM3) and a regional oceanic model (FVCOM) over the maritime continent

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wei, Jun

    Climatological high resolution coupled climate model simulations for the maritime continent have been carried out using the regional climate model (RegCM) version 3 and the finite volume coastal ocean model (FVCOM) ...

  5. Offshore Wind Jobs and Economic Development Impact: Four Regional Scenarios (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tegen, S.

    2014-11-01

    NREL's Jobs and Economic Development Impact (JEDI) Model for Offshore Wind, is a computer tool for studying the economic impacts of fixed-bottom offshore wind projects in the United States. This presentation provides the results of an analysis of four offshore wind development scenarios in the Southeast Atlantic, Great Lakes, Mid-Atlantic, and Gulf of Mexico regions.

  6. Western South Atlantic holocene and glacial deepwater hydrography derived from benthic foraminiferal Cd/Ca and stable carbon isotope data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Horowitz, Michael (Michael Joshua), 1962-

    1999-01-01

    Today, deep waters produced in the North Atlantic are exported through the western South Atlantic. Antarctic intermediate water (AAIW) also enters the Atlantic in this region. Circumpolar deep water (CDW) fills the depths ...

  7. F region above kauai: Measurement, model, modification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, C.Y.; Sjolander, G.W.; Oran, E.S.; Young, T.R.; Bernhardt, P.A.; Da Rosa, A.V.

    1980-08-01

    A detailed description and analysis is presented of the Lagopedo II results. The rocket was launched on September 11, 1977. Prior to an explosive chemical release a rocket-borne ion mass spectrometer and dual-frequency beacon measured the ion composition and electron content of the undisturbed F region above Kauai, Hawaii. These results are compared to a detailed calculation of ionospheric ion denities. Considerable H/sub 2/O outgassing produced measurable 18/sup +/(H/sub 2/O/sup +/) and 19/sup +/(H/sub 3/O/sup +/) currents which together with O/sup +/ current were used to determine the H/sup 3/O/sup +//H/sub 2/O/sup +/ dissociative recombination rate ratio. The explosive event at 283 km swept clean a l-km-radius region. The boundary of the ionic void was characterized by a steep gradient in the ion density. Results for the first 60 s after the event are presented which show changes in ambient ion species 14/sup +/, 16/sup +/, 30/sup +/, new reactant species 15/sup +/, 17/sup +/, 18/sup +/, 19/sup +/, 27/sup +/, and 46/sup +/, and evidence of ionic depletion by sweeping.

  8. Intercomparison of Biogeochemical Properties at Atlantic and Pacific Observatory Sites Using Ocean Data and a PARADIGM Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yoder, James S.

    Intercomparison of Biogeochemical Properties at Atlantic and Pacific Observatory Sites Using Ocean compare 34 locations in the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans with respect to key upper ocean ecological by SeaWiFS mean chlorophyll: low chlorophyll ocean gyres, comparatively high chlorophyll ocean margin

  9. Response and impact of equatorial ocean dynamics and tropical instability waves in the tropical Atlantic under global warming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xie, Shang-Ping

    Atlantic under global warming: A regional coupled downscaling study Hyodae Seo1,2 and ShangPing Xie1. Under global warming, both global and regional models exhibit an increased (decreased) rainfall thermal stratification is suggested to be more important under global warming. The strengthened upwelling

  10. Regional Dynamics Model (REDYN) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onRAPID/Geothermal/Exploration/Colorado <RAPID/Geothermal/WaterEnergyRedfield1989) Jump to:|OpenRegenesisDynamics Model

  11. High order hybrid discontinuous Galerkin regional ocean modelling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ueckermann, Mattheus Percy

    2014-01-01

    Accurate modeling of physical and biogeochemical dynamics in coastal ocean regions is required for multiple scientific and societal applications, covering a wide range of time and space scales. However, in light of the ...

  12. A Framework for Modeling Uncertainty in Regional Climate Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Monier, Erwan

    In this study, we present a new modeling framework and a large ensemble of climate projections to investigate the uncertainty in regional climate change over the US associated with four dimensions of uncertainty. The sources ...

  13. A Spatial Analysis of Multivariate Output from Regional Climate Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sain, Steve

    , Columbus, OH 43210, ncressie@stat.osu.edu. 1 #12;1 Introduction Many processes in the Earth system cannot, etc. Climate models attempt to represent this system, as well as to incorporate anthropogenic forcingsA Spatial Analysis of Multivariate Output from Regional Climate Models Stephan R. Sain,1 Reinhard

  14. Long-term variations of North Atlantic tropical cyclone activity downscaled from a coupled model simulation of the last millennium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kozar, Michael E.

    The observed historical record of North Atlantic tropical cyclones (TCs) is relatively short and is subject to potential biases owing to a lack of observation platforms such as aircraft reconnaissance and satellite imagery ...

  15. Biomechanics of North Atlantic right whale bone : mandibular fracture as a fatal endpoint for blunt vessel-whale collision modeling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Campbell-Malone, Regina P

    2007-01-01

    The North Atlantic right whale, Eubalaena glacialis, one of the most critically endangered whales in the world, is subject to high anthropogenic mortality. Vessel-whale collisions and entanglement in fishing gear were ...

  16. Short-Term Energy Outlook Model Documentation: Regional Residential Heating Oil Price Model

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2009-01-01

    The regional residential heating oil price module of the Short-Term Energy Outlook (STEO) model is designed to provide residential retail price forecasts for the 4 census regions: Northeast, South, Midwest, and West.

  17. Short-Term Energy Outlook Model Documentation: Regional Residential Propane Price Model

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2009-01-01

    The regional residential propane price module of the Short-Term Energy Outlook (STEO) model is designed to provide residential retail price forecasts for the 4 Census regions: Northeast, South, Midwest, and West.

  18. North-Atlantic dynamics and European temperature extremes in the IPSL model: sensitivity to atmospheric resolution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Codron, Francis

    and CNRM global climate and Earth System Models, both developed in France and contributing to the 5th

  19. The Barrier Layer of the Atlantic Warmpool: Formation Mechanism and Influence on the Mean Climate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Balaguru, Karthik; Chang, P.; Saravanan, R.; Jang, C. J.

    2012-04-20

    Many Coupled General Circulation Models (CGCMs) tend to overestimate the salinity in the Atlantic warm pool or the Northwestern Tropical Atlantic (NWTA) and underestimate the surface salinity in the subtropical salinity maxima region. Most of these models also suffer from a sea-surface temperature (SST) bias in the NWTA region, leading to suggestions that the upper ocean salinity stratification may need to be improved in order to improve the Barrier Layer (BL) simulations and thus the SST through BL-SST-Intertropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ) feedbacks. In the present study, we use a CGCM to perform a set of idealized numerical experiments to test and understand the sensitivity of the BL and consequently SST in the NWTA region to freshwater flux and hence the upper ocean salinity stratification. We find that the BL of the NWTA is sensitive to upper ocean salinity changes in the Amazon river discharge region and the subtropical salinity maxima region. The BL phenomenon is further manifested by the formation of winter temperature inversions in our model simulations, the maximum magnitude of inversions being about 0.20 C. The atmo- spheric response causes a statistically significant reduction of mean precipitation and SST in the equatorial Atlantic region and helps improve the respective biases by 10-15 %. In the region of improved BL simulation, the SST change is positive and in the right direction of bias correction, albeit weak.

  20. Adjoint modeling for atmospheric pollution process sensitivity at regional scale

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Menut, Laurent

    , a strong pollution event was documented over Paris as part of the Etude et Simulation de la Qualite´ de l'airAdjoint modeling for atmospheric pollution process sensitivity at regional scale Laurent Menut 1998 the pollution event changes from a well-marked ozone plume issued from Paris to a more general

  1. Reference wind farm selection for regional wind power prediction models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1 Reference wind farm selection for regional wind power prediction models Nils Siebert George.siebert@ensmp.fr, georges.kariniotakis@ensmp.fr Abstract Short-term wind power forecasting is recognized today as a major requirement for a secure and economic integration of wind generation in power systems. This paper deals

  2. Spatial Models for Groundwater Behavioral Analysis in Regions of Maharashtra

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sohoni, Milind

    Spatial Models for Groundwater Behavioral Analysis in Regions of Maharashtra M.Tech Dissertation In this project we have performed spatial analysis of groundwater data in Thane and Latur districts of Maharashtra Groundwater Survey and Development Agency, Maharashtra), shape files for watershed boundaries and drainage

  3. A regional modeling study of the entraining Mediterranean outflow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ozgökmen, Tamay M.

    A regional modeling study of the entraining Mediterranean outflow X. Xu,1,2 E. P. Chassignet,3 J. F­dependent entrainment parameterization of Xu et al. (2006). Given realistic topography and sufficient resolution of the outflow plume, and most importantly, the localized, strong entrainment that has been observed to occur

  4. Modeling water column structure and suspended particulate matter on the Middle Atlantic continental shelf

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chang, Grace C.

    that contributed to the evolution of observed thermal structure and resuspension of particulate matter during resuspension processes. It is concluded that wave-current bottom shear stress was clearly the most important process for sediment resuspension during and following both hurricanes. Discrepancies between modeled

  5. Regional-Scale Climate Change: Observations and Model Simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Raymond S. Bradley; Henry F. Diaz

    2010-12-14

    This collaborative proposal addressed key issues in understanding the Earthâ??s climate system, as highlighted by the U.S. Climate Science Program. The research focused on documenting past climatic changes and on assessing future climatic changes based on suites of global and regional climate models. Geographically, our emphasis was on the mountainous regions of the world, with a particular focus on the Neotropics of Central America and the Hawaiian Islands. Mountain regions are zones where large variations in ecosystems occur due to the strong climate zonation forced by the topography. These areas are particularly susceptible to changes in critical ecological thresholds, and we conducted studies of changes in phonological indicators based on various climatic thresholds.

  6. Developing custom fire behavior fuel models from ecologically complex fuel structures for upper Atlantic Coastal Plain forests.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parresol, Bernard, R.; Scott, Joe, H.; Andreu, Anne; Prichard, Susan; Kurth, Laurie

    2012-01-01

    Currently geospatial fire behavior analyses are performed with an array of fire behavior modeling systems such as FARSITE, FlamMap, and the Large Fire Simulation System. These systems currently require standard or customized surface fire behavior fuel models as inputs that are often assigned through remote sensing information. The ability to handle hundreds or thousands of measured surface fuelbeds representing the fine scale variation in fire behavior on the landscape is constrained in terms of creating compatible custom fire behavior fuel models. In this study, we demonstrate an objective method for taking ecologically complex fuelbeds from inventory observations and converting those into a set of custom fuel models that can be mapped to the original landscape. We use an original set of 629 fuel inventory plots measured on an 80,000 ha contiguous landscape in the upper Atlantic Coastal Plain of the southeastern United States. From models linking stand conditions to component fuel loads, we impute fuelbeds for over 6000 stands. These imputed fuelbeds were then converted to fire behavior parameters under extreme fuel moisture and wind conditions (97th percentile) using the fuel characteristic classification system (FCCS) to estimate surface fire rate of spread, surface fire flame length, shrub layer reaction intensity (heat load), non-woody layer reaction intensity, woody layer reaction intensity, and litter-lichen-moss layer reaction intensity. We performed hierarchical cluster analysis of the stands based on the values of the fire behavior parameters. The resulting 7 clusters were the basis for the development of 7 custom fire behavior fuel models from the cluster centroids that were calibrated against the FCCS point data for wind and fuel moisture. The latter process resulted in calibration against flame length as it was difficult to obtain a simultaneous calibration against both rate of spread and flame length. The clusters based on FCCS fire behavior parameters represent reasonably identifiable stand conditions, being: (1) pine dominated stands with more litter and down woody debriscomponents than other stands, (2) hardwood and pine stands with no shrubs, (3) hardwood dominated stands with low shrub and high non-woody biomass and high down woody debris, (4) stands with high grass and forb (i.e., non-woody) biomass as well as substantial shrub biomass, (5) stands with both high shrub and litter biomass, (6) pine-mixed hardwood stands with moderate litter biomass and low shrub biomass, and (7) baldcypress-tupelo stands. Models representing these stand clusters generated flame lengths from 0.6 to 2.3 musing a 30 km h{sub 1} wind speed and fireline intensities of 100-1500 kW m{sub 1} that are typical within the range of experience on this landscape. The fuel models ranked 1 < 2 < 7 < 5 < 4 < 3 < 6 in terms of both flame length and fireline intensity. The method allows for ecologically complex data to be utilized in order to create a landscape representative of measured fuel conditions and to create models that interface with geospatial fire models.

  7. Could a 1755-Like Tsunami Reach the French Atlantic Coastline? Constraints from Twentieth Century Observations and Numerical Modeling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Madariaga, Raúl

    Could a 1755-Like Tsunami Reach the French Atlantic Coastline? Constraints from Twentieth Century and R. MADARIAGA 3 Abstract--The tsunami generated by the 1 November, 1755 earthquake off the coast the French coastline, we conducted a study to search for signs of the tsunami in historical records from all

  8. Developing a Regional Integrated Assessment Model (RIAM) Framework PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Benjamin L. Preston

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    responses of human systems. This project seeks to apply a regional IAM framework to the Gulf Coast region issues, and energy supply issues are all occurring simultaneous- ly, but for which integrated modeling regionalized to develop a new regional IAM capability (Regional Global Change Assessment Model *RCGAM+). RCGAM

  9. California Wintertime Precipitation in Regional and Global Climate Models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Caldwell, P M

    2009-04-27

    In this paper, wintertime precipitation from a variety of observational datasets, regional climate models (RCMs), and general circulation models (GCMs) is averaged over the state of California (CA) and compared. Several averaging methodologies are considered and all are found to give similar values when model grid spacing is less than 3{sup o}. This suggests that CA is a reasonable size for regional intercomparisons using modern GCMs. Results show that reanalysis-forced RCMs tend to significantly overpredict CA precipitation. This appears to be due mainly to overprediction of extreme events; RCM precipitation frequency is generally underpredicted. Overprediction is also reflected in wintertime precipitation variability, which tends to be too high for RCMs on both daily and interannual scales. Wintertime precipitation in most (but not all) GCMs is underestimated. This is in contrast to previous studies based on global blended gauge/satellite observations which are shown here to underestimate precipitation relative to higher-resolution gauge-only datasets. Several GCMs provide reasonable daily precipitation distributions, a trait which doesn't seem tied to model resolution. GCM daily and interannual variability is generally underpredicted.

  10. Continuous VRML output fromContinuous VRML output from regional circulation models: aregional circulation models: a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Continuous VRML output fromContinuous VRML output from regional circulation models: aregional and volume to viewview ·· Generate Virtual Reality Modeling LanguageGenerate Virtual Reality ModelingDesktop or laptop PC with web browser ­­ High speed/large RAM not essentialHigh speed/large RAM not essential

  11. Aeroelastic Modeling of Offshore Turbines and Support Structures in Hurricane-Prone Regions (Poster)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Damiani, R.

    2014-03-01

    US offshore wind turbines (OWTs) will likely have to contend with hurricanes and the associated loading conditions. Current industry standards do not account for these design load cases (DLCs), thus a new approach is required to guarantee that the OWTs achieve an appropriate level of reliability. In this study, a sequentially coupled aero-hydro-servo-elastic modeling technique was used to address two design approaches: 1.) The ABS (American Bureau of Shipping) approach; and 2.) The Hazard Curve or API (American Petroleum Institute) approach. The former employs IEC partial load factors (PSFs) and 100-yr return-period (RP) metocean events. The latter allows setting PSFs and RP to a prescribed level of system reliability. The 500-yr RP robustness check (appearing in [2] and [3] upcoming editions) is a good indicator of the target reliability for L2 structures. CAE tools such as NREL's FAST and Bentley's' SACS (offshore analysis and design software) can be efficiently coupled to simulate system loads under hurricane DLCs. For this task, we augmented the latest FAST version (v. 8) to include tower aerodynamic drag that cannot be ignored in hurricane DLCs. In this project, a 6 MW turbine was simulated on a typical 4-legged jacket for a mid-Atlantic site. FAST-calculated tower base loads were fed to SACS at the interface level (transition piece); SACS added hydrodynamic and wind loads on the exposed substructure, and calculated mudline overturning moments, and member and joint utilization. Results show that CAE tools can be effectively used to compare design approaches for the design of OWTs in hurricane regions and to achieve a well-balanced design, where reliability levels and costs are optimized.

  12. Atlantic update, July 1986--June 1990: Outer Continental Shelf oil and gas activities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Karpas, R.M.; Gould, G.J.

    1990-10-01

    This report describes outer continental shelf oil and gas activities in the Atlantic Region. This edition of the Atlantic Update includes an overview of the Mid-Atlantic Planning Area and a summary of the Manteo Prospect off-shore North Carolina. 6 figs., 8 tabs.

  13. Static and Impulsive Models of Solar Active Regions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Patsourakos; J. A. Klimchuk

    2008-08-20

    The physical modeling of active regions (ARs) and of the global coronal is receiving increasing interest lately. Recent attempts to model ARs using static equilibrium models were quite successful in reproducing AR images of hot soft X-ray (SXR) loops. They however failed to predict the bright EUV warm loops permeating ARs: the synthetic images were dominated by intense footpoint emission. We demonstrate that this failure is due to the very weak dependence of loop temperature on loop length which cannot simultaneously account for both hot and warm loops in the same AR. We then consider time-dependent AR models based on nanoflare heating. We demonstrate that such models can simultaneously reproduce EUV and SXR loops in ARs. Moreover, they predict radial intensity variations consistent with the localized core and extended emissions in SXR and EUV AR observations respectively. We finally show how the AR morphology can be used as a gauge of the properties (duration, energy, spatial dependence, repetition time) of the impulsive heating.

  14. The Central Region in M100: Observations and Modeling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. H. Knapen; J. E. Beckman; C. H. Heller; I. Shlosman; R. S. de Jong

    1995-06-19

    We present new high-resolution observations of the center of the late-type spiral M100 (NGC 4321) supplemented by 3D numerical modeling of stellar and gas dynamics, including star formation (SF). NIR imaging has revealed a stellar bar, previously inferred from optical and 21 cm observations, and an ovally-shaped ring-like structure in the plane of the disk. The K isophotes become progressively elongated and skewed to the position angle of the bar (outside and inside the `ring') forming an inner bar-like region. The galaxy exhibits a circumnuclear starburst in the inner part of the K `ring'. Two maxima of the K emission have been observed to lie symmetrically with respect to the nucleus and equidistant from it slightly leading the stellar bar. We interpret the twists in the K isophotes as being indicative of the presence of a double inner Lindblad resonance (ILR) and test this hypothesis by modeling the gas flow in a self-consistent gas + stars disk embedded in a halo, with an overall NGC4321-like mass distribution. We have reproduced the basic morphology of the region (the bar, the large scale trailing shocks, two symmetric K peaks corresponding to gas compression maxima which lie at the caustic formed by the interaction of a pair of trailing and leading shocks in the vicinity of the inner ILR, both peaks being sites of SF, and two additional zones of SF corresponding to the gas compression maxima, referred usually as `twin peaks').

  15. Regionalization of subsurface stormflow parameters of hydrologic models: Derivation from regional analysis of streamflow recession curves

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ye, Sheng; Li, Hongyi; Huang, Maoyi; Ali, Melkamu; Leng, Guoyong; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Wang, Shaowen; Sivapalan, Murugesu

    2014-07-21

    Subsurface stormflow is an important component of the rainfall–runoff response, especially in steep terrain. Its contribution to total runoff is, however, poorly represented in the current generation of land surface models. The lack of physical basis of these common parameterizations precludes a priori estimation of the stormflow (i.e. without calibration), which is a major drawback for prediction in ungauged basins, or for use in global land surface models. This paper is aimed at deriving regionalized parameterizations of the storage–discharge relationship relating to subsurface stormflow from a top–down empirical data analysis of streamflow recession curves extracted from 50 eastern United States catchments. Detailed regression analyses were performed between parameters of the empirical storage–discharge relationships and the controlling climate, soil and topographic characteristics. The regression analyses performed on empirical recession curves at catchment scale indicated that the coefficient of the power-law form storage–discharge relationship is closely related to the catchment hydrologic characteristics, which is consistent with the hydraulic theory derived mainly at the hillslope scale. As for the exponent, besides the role of field scale soil hydraulic properties as suggested by hydraulic theory, it is found to be more strongly affected by climate (aridity) at the catchment scale. At a fundamental level these results point to the need for more detailed exploration of the co-dependence of soil, vegetation and topography with climate.

  16. Improvement of snowpack simulations in a regional climate model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jin, J.; Miller, N.L.

    2011-01-10

    To improve simulations of regional-scale snow processes and related cold-season hydroclimate, the Community Land Model version 3 (CLM3), developed by the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR), was coupled with the Pennsylvania State University/NCAR fifth-generation Mesoscale Model (MM5). CLM3 physically describes the mass and heat transfer within the snowpack using five snow layers that include liquid water and solid ice. The coupled MM5–CLM3 model performance was evaluated for the snowmelt season in the Columbia River Basin in the Pacific Northwestern United States using gridded temperature and precipitation observations, along with station observations. The results from MM5–CLM3 show a significant improvement in the SWE simulation, which has been underestimated in the original version of MM5 coupled with the Noah land-surface model. One important cause for the underestimated SWE in Noah is its unrealistic land-surface structure configuration where vegetation, snow and the topsoil layer are blended when snow is present. This study demonstrates the importance of the sheltering effects of the forest canopy on snow surface energy budgets, which is included in CLM3. Such effects are further seen in the simulations of surface air temperature and precipitation in regional weather and climate models such as MM5. In addition, the snow-season surface albedo overestimated by MM5–Noah is now more accurately predicted by MM5–CLM3 using a more realistic albedo algorithm that intensifies the solar radiation absorption on the land surface, reducing the strong near-surface cold bias in MM5–Noah. The cold bias is further alleviated due to a slower snowmelt rate in MM5–CLM3 during the early snowmelt stage, which is closer to observations than the comparable components of MM5–Noah. In addition, the over-predicted precipitation in the Pacific Northwest as shown in MM5–Noah is significantly decreased in MM5 CLM3 due to the lower evaporation resulting from the longer snow duration.

  17. Fuelwood Use by Rural Households in the Brazilian Atlantic Forest 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilcox-Moore, Kellie J.

    2010-07-14

    Fuelwood is an important source of domestic energy in rural regions of Brazil. In the Zona da Mata of Minas Gerais, native species from the Atlantic Forest are an important source of fuelwood, supplemented by wood from ...

  18. Ionospheric equatorial anomaly formation over Pacific and Atlantic oceans measured by NASA TOPEX satellite

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ewell, V.R.; Vladimer, J.A.; Lee, M.C. [Boston Univ., MA (United States). Electrical, Computer, and Systems Engineering Dept.; Doherty, P.H.; Decker, D.T. [Boston Coll., Newton, MA (United States). Inst. for Science Research; Anderson, D.N.; Klobuchar, J.A. [Phillips Lab., Hanscom AFB, MA (United States). Ionospheric Effects Branch

    1996-12-31

    Previous ionospheric observations have measured Total Electron Content (TEC) values at fixed land based locations. These observations suggest the existence of longitudinal variations in TEC values. Complementing ground data, the current NASA TOPEX mission is providing TEC data collected over oceans as a function of latitude, longitude and time starting from September 1992. With this broad data base, the authors show a more complete picture of the longitudinal dependence between the Atlantic and Pacific ocean regions and relate this dependence to plasma drifts. Periods during June and December solstice, and March and September equinox in the years 1992, through 1995, are picked to study the low-latitude regions spanning the Atlantic and Pacific oceans. TEC isodensity contours are presented by latitude versus longitude at common local time. They correlate these contours with results from the Phillips Laboratory ionospheric model.

  19. Climate and the Tropical Atlantic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Climate and the Tropical Atlantic Presenter: Rick Lumpkin AOML Program Review 4-6 March 2014 What drives Tropical Atlantic climate changes and what are their impacts? #12;AOML Program Review2 Climate and the Tropical Atlantic Why this matters to NOAA and to society: Climate variability in the Tropical Atlantic

  20. Future regional climate change in the ten hydrologic regions of California: A climate modeling investigation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sloan, Lisa C

    2005-01-01

    4) Central Coast; (5) Tulare Lake; (6) San Joaquin; (7) San4) Central Coast, (5) Tulare Lake, (6) San Joaquin River, (the smallest increase is in the Tulare Lake region. Median

  1. A regional numerical ocean model of the circulation in the Bay of Biscay

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Drijfhout, Sybren

    A regional numerical ocean model of the circulation in the Bay of Biscay Y. Friocourt,1,2,3 B Peninsula and in the Bay of Biscay is investigated by means of a regional ocean model. In particular numerical ocean model of the circulation in the Bay of Biscay, J. Geophys. Res., 112, C09008, doi:10

  2. Modeled regional climate change and California endemic oak ranges

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kueppers, Lara M.

    pressure from cutting for fuel, grazing, conversion of woodlands to vineyards and orchards, water resource development, competition with inva- sive grasses, and urban expansion (1). Here, we report how the regional

  3. Usefulness of the reversible jump Markov chain Monte Carlo model in regional flood frequency

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ribatet, Mathieu

    Usefulness of the reversible jump Markov chain Monte Carlo model in regional flood frequency; revised 3 May 2007; accepted 17 May 2007; published 3 August 2007. [1] Regional flood frequency analysis and the index flood approach. Results show that the proposed estimator is absolutely suited to regional

  4. Evaluation of Reconstructed Images of Regional Lung Changes Using a Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adler, Andy

    Evaluation of Reconstructed Images of Regional Lung Changes Using a Model Robert P, Patterson1 A and Patterson 2004, Yang and Patterson 2010). In order to answer questions about regional lung changes, two regions were created in the posterior portion of the right lung where the resistivity can be independently

  5. Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological Laboratory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological Laboratory AOML is an environmental research laboratory Laboratory conducts research that seeks to understand the physical, chemical, and biological characteristics;Organizational Structure The Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological Laboratory (AOML) fits within

  6. MODELLING GROUNDWATER FLOW ON THE REGIONAL SCALE IN THE UPPER DANUBE CATCHMENT (GERMANY)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cirpka, Olaf Arie

    MODELLING GROUNDWATER FLOW ON THE REGIONAL SCALE IN THE UPPER DANUBE CATCHMENT (GERMANY) Roland.barthel@iws.uni-stuttgart.de Abstract. A groundwater flow model for the Upper Danube catchment (A=77,000km2 at gauge Passau, Germany coupled models. Modelling of groundwater flow, using coupled deterministic and hydrological approaches

  7. Regional forecasting with global atmospheric models; Third year report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crowley, T.J.; North, G.R.; Smith, N.R.

    1994-05-01

    This report was prepared by the Applied Research Corporation (ARC), College Station, Texas, under subcontract to Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) as part of a global climate studies task. The task supports site characterization work required for the selection of a potential high-level nuclear waste repository and is part of the Performance Assessment Scientific Support (PASS) Program at PNL. The work is under the overall direction of the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM), US Department of Energy Headquarters, Washington, DC. The scope of the report is to present the results of the third year`s work on the atmospheric modeling part of the global climate studies task. The development testing of computer models and initial results are discussed. The appendices contain several studies that provide supporting information and guidance to the modeling work and further details on computer model development. Complete documentation of the models, including user information, will be prepared under separate reports and manuals.

  8. Modeling optical and UV polarization of AGNs III. From uniform-density to clumpy regions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marin, F; Gaskell, C M

    2015-01-01

    A growing body of evidence suggests that part of, if not all, scattering regions of active galactic nuclei (AGNs) are clumpy. Hence. in this paper, we run radiative transfer models in the optical/UV for a variety of AGN reprocessing regions with different distributions of clumpy scattering media. We use the latest version of the Monte Carlo code STOKES presented in the first two papers of this series to model AGN reprocessing regions of increasing morphological complexity. We replace previously uniform-density media with up to thousands of constant-density clumps. We couple a continuum source to fragmented equatorial scattering regions, polar outflows, and toroidal, obscuring dust regions and investigate a wide range of geometries. We also consider different levels of fragmentation in each scattering region to evaluate importance of fragmentation for the net polarization of the AGN. We find that, in comparison with uniform-density models, equatorial distributions of gas and dust clouds result in grayer spectr...

  9. BioEarth: Envisioning and developing a new regional earth system model to inform natural and agricultural resource management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2015-01-01

    a new regional earth system model to inform natural andsystems, coupled earth system models (EaSMs) are essential.coupled regional earth system models (EaSMs). Decision

  10. PROCEEDINGS OF THE WORKSHOP ON NATIONAL/REGIONAL ENERGY-ENVIRONMENTAL MODELING CONCEPTS, MAY 30 - JUNE 1, 1979

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ritschard, R.L.

    2010-01-01

    comprehensive list of model and data base assumptions and toe.g. , scenario, data base, model linkages, etc. , andfor regional models (largely due to data base constraints).

  11. Annual Report On Regional Aquifer Modeling And Data Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lu, Zhiming

    .................................................................................. 13 3.1 Estimates based on 2-D flow, measured hydraulic gradients and field-based hydraulic........................................................................... 19 4.2 Model Calibrations, Using New Water Level Data from R-wells

  12. Modeling Long-Range Transportation and Land Use Scenarios for the Sacramento Region, Using Citizen-Generated Policies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnston, Robert A.; Gao, Shengyi; Clay, Michael J.

    2008-01-01

    Barra. Comparison from the Sacramento Model Testbed. Transp.Management Policies in the Sacramento Region: Year Two.Land Use Scenarios for the Sacramento Region, Using Citizen-

  13. Constructing an idealized model of the North Atlantic Ocean using slippery sacks Patrick T. Haertel a,*, Luke Van Roekel b

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jensen, Tommy

    steps are taken to reduce the potential energy barrier to sacks crossing one another, the model the northern boundary for a time. Taking advantage of the new mixing scheme and lessons learned from Institute of Technol- ogy general circulation model (MITgcm). The SSOM and the MITgcm produce similar wind

  14. Modeling Needs Related to the Regional Observing System in the Gulf of Maine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Modeling Needs Related to the Regional Observing System in the Gulf of Maine RARGOM Report 05-1 Theme Session 6-7 July, 2005 Cliff House Ogunquit, Maine Convened by Regional Association for Research on the Gulf of Maine Gulf of Maine Census of Marine Life Gulf of Maine Ocean Observing System Coastal

  15. Go to the Right of the Pillar: Modeling Unoccupied Regions for Robot Directives

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Skubic, Marjorie

    Go to the Right of the Pillar: Modeling Unoccupied Regions for Robot Directives Marjorie Skubic and Sam Blisard Dept. of Computer Engineering and Computer Science University of Missouri of regions that do not contain objects but may be referenced by objects in the environment, to compute target

  16. Polarity and energetics of inner core lightning in three intense North Atlantic hurricanes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cummer, Steven A.

    Atlantic hurricanes Jeremy N. Thomas,1,2,3 Natalia N. Solorzano,1,3 Steven A. Cummer,4 and Robert H and energetics of lightning within 100 km of the centers (inner core regions) of North Atlantic hurricanes Emily important for hurricane intensity change forecasting. Additionally, we find that the majority of inner core

  17. Atlantic Demonstration Buoys: Preliminary Results by: Rick Lumpkin, Mayra Pazos, Craig Engler

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Atlantic Demonstration Buoys: Preliminary Results by: Rick Lumpkin, Mayra Pazos, Craig Engler DBCP) Miami, Florida USA #12;Atlantic Demonstration Buoys Objectives of Study ·The Global Drifter Center Demonstration Buoys (ADB). ·The SVP drifters with mini drogue were deployed as clusters in open ocean regions

  18. Coupling of Integrated Biosphere Simulator to Regional Climate Model Version 3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Winter, Jonathan (Jonathan Mark)

    A description of the coupling of Integrated Biosphere Simulator (IBIS) to Regional Climate Model version 3 (RegCM3) is presented. IBIS introduces several key advantages to RegCM3, most notably vegetation dynamics, the ...

  19. Modeling Regional Air Quality Using the Near-Explicit Master Chemical Mechanism 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Jingyi

    2014-08-01

    structure, allowing an explicit calculation of SOA formation from individual model species. Earlier attempts in this area were aimed at developing mechanisms for regional SOA using a small number of representative species (Griffin et al., 2002b; Griffin...

  20. Mesoscale environmental models accompanying convection in the Texas HIPLEX region / by Mark Edward Humbert 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Humbert, Mark Edward

    1980-01-01

    MESOSCALE ENVIRONMENTAL MODELS ACCOMPANYING CONVECTION IN THE TEXAS HIPLEX REGION A Thesis by MARK EDWARD HUMBERT Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER... OF SCIENCE May 1980 Major Subject: Meteorology MESOSCALE ENVIRONMENTAL MODELS ACCOMPANYING CONVECTION IN THE TEXAS HIPLEX REGION A Thesis by MARK EDWARD HUMBERT Approved as to style and content by: (Chairman of Co ttee) (Head of Department) (Member...

  1. Resource Planning Model: An Integrated Resource Planning and Dispatch Tool for Regional Electric Systems

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In this report, we introduce a new transparent regional capacity expansion model with high spatio-temporal resolution and detailed representation of dispatch. The development of this model, referred to as the Resource Planning Model (RPM), is motivated by the lack of a tool in the public domain that can be used to characterize optimal regional deployment of resources with detailed dispatch modeling. In particular, RPM is designed to evaluate scenarios of renewable technology deployment to meet renewable portfolio standard (RPS) and emission-reduction goals, and to project possible deployment levels for various projections of future technology and fuel prices.

  2. Resource Planning Model: An Integrated Resource Planning and Dispatch Tool for Regional Electric Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mai, T.; Drury, E.; Eurek, K.; Bodington, N.; Lopez, A.; Perry, A.

    2013-01-01

    This report introduces a new capacity expansion model, the Resource Planning Model (RPM), with high spatial and temporal resolution that can be used for mid- and long-term scenario planning of regional power systems. Although RPM can be adapted to any geographic region, the report describes an initial version of the model adapted for the power system in Colorado. It presents examples of scenario results from the first version of the model, including an example of a 30%-by-2020 renewable electricity penetration scenario.

  3. 11.482J / 1.285J / ESD.193J Regional Socioeconomic Impact Analysis and Modeling, Fall 2004

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Polenske, Karen R.

    Reviews regional economic theories and models and provides students with experience in using alternative economic impact assessment models on microcomputers. Problem sets are oriented around infrastructure, housing, energy, ...

  4. 11.482J / 1.285J / ESD.193J Regional Socioeconomic Impact Analysis and Modeling, Fall 2005

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Polenske, Karen R.

    Reviews regional economic theories and models and provides students with experience in using alternative economic impact assessment models on microcomputers. Problem sets are oriented around infrastructure, housing, energy, ...

  5. 11.482J / 1.285J / ESD.193J Regional Socioeconomic Impact Analysis and Modeling, Fall 2006

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Polenske, Karen

    Reviews regional economic theories and models and provides students with experience in using alternative economic impact assessment models on microcomputers. Problem sets are oriented around infrastructure, housing, energy, ...

  6. Temporal Models for Groundwater Level Prediction in Regions of Maharashtra Dissertation Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sohoni, Milind

    Temporal Models for Groundwater Level Prediction in Regions of Maharashtra Dissertation Report In this project work we perform analysis of groundwater level data in three districts of Maha- rashtra - Thane of these districts and developed seasonal models to represent the groundwater be- havior. Three different type

  7. Coupling of Integrated Biosphere Simulator to Regional Climate Model version 3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Winter, Jonathan (Jonathan Mark)

    2006-01-01

    Presented in this thesis is a description of the coupling of Integrated Biosphere Simulator (IBIS) to Regional Climate Model version 3 (RegCM3), and an assessment of the coupled model (RegCM3-IBIS). RegCM3 is a 3-dimensional, ...

  8. An improved model of the lightning electromagnetic field interaction with the D-region ionosphere

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    14 March 2012. [1] We present an improved time-domain model of the lightning electromagnetic pulse. Introduction [2] Lightning discharges produce both an electromagnetic pulse (EMP), due to the rapid lightningAn improved model of the lightning electromagnetic field interaction with the D-region ionosphere R

  9. Abundance determinations in HII regions: model fitting versus Te-method

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    L. S. Pilyugin

    2002-11-14

    The discrepancy between the oxygen abundances in high-metallicity HII regions determined through the Te-method (and/or through the corresponding "strong lines - oxygen abundance" calibration) and that determined through the model fitting (and/or through the corresponding "strong lines - oxygen abundance" calibration) is discussed. It is suggested to use the interstellar oxygen abundance in the solar vicinity, derived with very high precision from the high-resolution observations of the weak interstellar absorption lines towards the stars, as a "Rosetta stone" to verify the validity of the oxygen abundances derived in HII regions with the Te-method at high abundances. The agreement between the value of the oxygen abundance at the solar galactocentric distance traced by the abundances derived in HII regions through the Te-method and that derived from the interstellar absorption lines towards the stars is strong evidence in favor of that i) the two-zone model for Te seems to be a realistic interpretation of the temperature structure within HII regions, and ii) the classic Te-method provides accurate oxygen abundances in HII regions. It has been concluded that the "strong lines - oxygen abundance" calibrations must be based on the HII regions with the oxygen abundances derived with the Te-method but not on the existing grids of the models for HII regions.

  10. Statistical Models for Solar Flare Interval Distribution in Individual Active Regions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yuki Kubo

    2008-02-01

    This article discusses statistical models for solar flare interval distribution in individual active regions. We analyzed solar flare data in 55 active regions that are listed in the GOES soft X-ray flare catalog. We discuss some problems with a conventional procedure to derive probability density functions from any data set and propose a new procedure, which uses the maximum likelihood method and Akaike Information Criterion (AIC) to objectively compare some competing probability density functions. We found that lognormal and inverse Gaussian models are more likely models than the exponential model for solar flare interval distribution in individual active regions. The results suggest that solar flares do not occur randomly in time; rather, solar flare intervals appear to be regulated by solar flare mechanisms. We briefly mention a probabilistic solar flare forecasting method as an application of a solar flare interval distribution analysis.

  11. Architecture of North Atlantic Contourite Drifts Modified by Transient Circulation of the Icelandic Mantle Plume

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Parnell-Turner, Ross; White, Nicky; McCave, I. Nick; Henstock, Tim; Murton, Bramley; Jones, Stephen M.

    2015-10-15

    influenced North Atlantic bathymetry through time. Thus pathways and intensities of bottom currents that control deposition of contourite drifts could be affected by mantle processes. Here, we present regional seismic reflection profiles that cross...

  12. Investigation of the Summer Climate of the Contiguous United States and Mexico Using the Regional Atmospheric Modeling System (RAMS).

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Castro, Christopher L.

    to observations. The Great Plains low-level jet (LLJ) is also well represented in both RAMS and NARR, but the Baja Atmospheric Modeling System (RAMS). Part I: Model Climatology (1950­2002) CHRISTOPHER L. CASTRO* Department downscaled using the Regional Atmospheric Modeling System (RAMS) to generate a regional climate model (RCM

  13. Strategic Plan ATLANTIC OCEANOGRAPHIC AND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Strategic Plan ATLANTIC OCEANOGRAPHIC AND METEOROLOGICAL LABORATORY ATLANTIC OCEANOGRAPHIC comments concerning this strategic plan and the future of our Laboratory. Sincerely yours, Kristina B of the Laboratory to have a clear vision of AOML, a context for interaction and a plan for the future. However

  14. AGCM Precipitation Biases in the Tropical Atlantic M. BIASUTTI

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Biasutti, Michela

    AGCM Precipitation Biases in the Tropical Atlantic M. BIASUTTI Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory precipitation in the Southern Hemisphere in boreal spring and in the Caribbean region in boreal summer precipitation maximum does not occur there. This is the case even though these GCMs accurately place the maximum

  15. Static and Dynamic Modeling of a Solar Active Region. I: Soft X-Ray Emission

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harry P. Warren; Amy R. Winebarger

    2006-09-01

    Recent simulations of solar active regions have shown that it is possible to reproduce both the total intensity and the general morphology of the high temperature emission observed at soft X-ray wavelengths using static heating models. There is ample observational evidence, however, that the solar corona is highly variable, indicating a significant role for dynamical processes in coronal heating. Because they are computationally demanding, full hydrodynamic simulations of solar active regions have not been considered previously. In this paper we make first application of an impulsive heating model to the simulation of an entire active region, AR8156 observed on 1998 February 16. We model this region by coupling potential field extrapolations to full solutions of the time-dependent hydrodynamic loop equations. To make the problem more tractable we begin with a static heating model that reproduces the emission observed in 4 different \\textit{Yohkoh} Soft X-Ray Telescope (SXT) filters and consider dynamical heating scenarios that yield time-averaged SXT intensities that are consistent with the static case. We find that it is possible to reproduce the total observed soft X-ray emission in all of the SXT filters with a dynamical heating model, indicating that nanoflare heating is consistent with the observational properties of the high temperature solar corona.

  16. BioEarth: Envisioning and developing a new regional earth system model to inform natural and agricultural resource management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2015-01-01

    systems, coupled earth system models (EaSMs) are essential.a new regional earth system model to inform natural andthe Community Earth System Model (CESM; www2.cesm.ucar.edu)

  17. Incorporating Stakeholder Decision Support Needs into an Integrated Regional Earth System Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rice, Jennie S.; Moss, Richard H.; Runci, Paul J.; Anderson, K. L.; Malone, Elizabeth L.

    2012-03-21

    A new modeling effort exploring the opportunities, constraints, and interactions between mitigation and adaptation at regional scale is utilizing stakeholder engagement in an innovative approach to guide model development and demonstration, including uncertainty characterization, to effectively inform regional decision making. This project, the integrated Regional Earth System Model (iRESM), employs structured stakeholder interactions and literature reviews to identify the most relevant adaptation and mitigation alternatives and decision criteria for each regional application of the framework. The information is used to identify important model capabilities and to provide a focus for numerical experiments. This paper presents the stakeholder research results from the first iRESM pilot region. The pilot region includes the Great Lakes Basin in the Midwest portion of the United States as well as other contiguous states. This geographic area (14 states in total) permits cohesive modeling of hydrologic systems while also providing gradients in climate, demography, land cover/land use, and energy supply and demand. The results from the stakeholder research indicate that iRESM should prioritize addressing adaptation alternatives in the water resources, urban infrastructure, and agriculture sectors, such as water conservation, expanded water quality monitoring, altered reservoir releases, lowered water intakes, urban infrastructure upgrades, increased electric power reserves in urban areas, and land use management/crop selection changes. Regarding mitigation alternatives, the stakeholder research shows a need for iRESM to focus on policies affecting the penetration of renewable energy technologies, and the costs and effectiveness of energy efficiency, bioenergy production, wind energy, and carbon capture and sequestration.

  18. Impact of transport model errors on the global and regional methane emissions estimated by inverse modelling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Locatelli, R.

    A modelling experiment has been conceived to assess the impact of transport model errors on methane emissions estimated in an atmospheric inversion system. Synthetic methane observations, obtained from 10 different model ...

  19. Regional Modeling of Dust Mass Balance and Radiative Forcing over East Asia using WRF-Chem

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Siyu; Zhao, Chun; Qian, Yun; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Huang, J.; Huang, Zhongwei; Bi, Jianrong; Zhang, Wu; Shi, Jinsen; Yang, Lei; Li, Deshuai; Li, Jinxin

    2014-12-01

    The Weather Research and Forecasting model with Chemistry (WRF-Chem) is used to investigate the seasonal and annual variations of mineral dust over East Asia during 2007-2011, with a focus on the dust mass balance and radiative forcing. A variety of measurements from in-stu and satellite observations have been used to evaluate simulation results. Generally, WRF-Chem reproduces not only the column variability but also the vertical profile and size distribution of mineral dust over and near the dust source regions of East Asia. We investigate the dust lifecycle and the factors that control the seasonal and spatial variations of dust mass balance and radiative forcing over the seven sub-regions of East Asia, i.e. source regions, the Tibetan Plateau, Northern China, Southern China, the ocean outflow region, and Korea-Japan regions. Results show that, over the source regions, transport and dry deposition are the two dominant sinks. Transport contributes to ~30% of the dust sink over the source regions. Dust results in a surface cooling of up to -14 and -10 W m-2, atmospheric warming of up to 20 and 15 W m-2, and TOA cooling of -5 and -8 W m-2 over the two major dust source regions of East Asia, respectively. Over the Tibetan Plateau, transport is the dominant source with a peak in summer. Over identified outflow regions, maximum dust mass loading in spring is contributed by the transport. Dry and wet depositions are the comparably dominant sinks, but wet deposition is larger than dry deposition over the Korea-Japan region, particularly in spring (70% versus 30%). The WRF-Chem simulations can generally capture the measured features of dust aerosols and its radaitve properties and dust mass balance over East Asia, which provides confidence for use in further investigation of dust impact on climate over East Asia.

  20. P h y s i c a l O c e a n o g r a p h y D i v i s i o n The Tropical Atlantic Sea Surface Temperature Bias in Coupled

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    using the NCAR community earth system model version 1 (CESM1). The tropical Atlantic SST bias (simulated

  1. Design of a next-generation regional weather research and forecast model.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michalakes, J.

    1999-01-13

    The Weather Research and Forecast (WRF) model is a new model development effort undertaken jointly by the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR), the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), and a number of collaborating institutions and university scientists. The model is intended for use by operational NWP and university research communities, providing a common framework for idealized dynamical studies, fill physics numerical weather prediction, air-quality simulation, and regional climate. It will eventually supersede large, well-established but aging regional models now maintained by the participating institutions. The WRF effort includes re-engineering the underlying software architecture to produce a modular, flexible code designed from the outset to provide portable performance across diverse computing architectures. This paper outlines key elements of the WRF software design.

  2. Implementation of an Urban Parameterization Scheme into the Regional Climate Model COSMO-CLM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    July 2012, in final form 23 April 2013) ABSTRACT As the nonhydrostatic regional model of the Consortium of urbanization on the environment, the authors extend its surface-layer parameterization by the Town Energy on spatial scales below ;3 km. 1. Introduction Since the level of world urbanization crossed the 50% mark

  3. A MODIFIED GAMBLER'S RUIN MODEL POLYETHYLENE CHAINS IN THE AMORPHOUS REGION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A MODIFIED GAMBLER'S RUIN MODEL OF POLYETHYLENE CHAINS IN THE AMORPHOUS REGION Zhong­Hui Duan and Louis N. Howard Department of Mathematics The Florida State University ABSTRACT. Polyethylene chainsM 3 +O(M 2 ). INTRODUCTION Semicrystalline polyethylene formed from melt generally consists

  4. Detecting changes in seasonal precipitation extremes using regional climate model projections: Implications for managing fluvial flood

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fowler, Hayley

    further demonstrates that existing precautionary allowances for climate change used for flood managementClick Here for Full Article Detecting changes in seasonal precipitation extremes using regional climate model projections: Implications for managing fluvial flood risk H. J. Fowler1 and R. L. Wilby2

  5. Bayesian Monte Carlo analysis applied to regional-scale inverse emission modeling for reactive trace gases

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Menut, Laurent

    the a priori uncertainties in anthropogenic NOx and volatile organic compounds (VOC) emissions: (1) The a posteriori probability density function (pdf) for NOx emissions is not modified in its averageBayesian Monte Carlo analysis applied to regional-scale inverse emission modeling for reactive

  6. Static and flowing regions in granular collapses down channels: Insights from a sedimenting shallow water model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huppert, Herbert

    Static and flowing regions in granular collapses down channels: Insights from a sedimenting shallow extend the model of Larrieu 2006 to include an estimation for the interface between the static, 043301 2007 . An empirical sedimentation term Ls and the instantaneous removal of a static deposit wedge

  7. Spatial variability of regional model simulated JuneSeptember mean precipitation over West Africa

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    made with the CCSR/GISS RM3, driven by synchronous data from NCEP reanalysis. A five-member ensemble for a single season was generated by staggering the initial conditions of each member by 36 hr within] Regional climate model (RCM) simulations are driven by synchronous lateral boundary conditions (LBC

  8. A Prototype Integrated Transportation Land-use Model for the Lausanne Region

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bierlaire, Michel

    of Architecture, Civil and Environmental Engineering Ecole Polytechnique F´ed´erale de Lausanne transp . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 3.2 Demographic Transition Model . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 3.3 Development Project-Morges Region in 2000 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14 6 UrbanSim Submodels Estimated for the Lausanne-Morges Re

  9. Polar-region distributions of Poynting flux: Global models compared with observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lotko, William

    of electric potential, field-aligned current and Poynting flux derived from the Lyon-Fedder-Mobarry globalPolar-region distributions of Poynting flux: Global models compared with observations P. D submitted to J. Atmospheric and Solar-Terrestrial Physics 15 June 2007 #12;with updated simulation results

  10. Polar-region distributions of Poynting flux: Global models compared with observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lotko, William

    of electric potential, field-aligned current and Poynting flux derived from the Lyon-Fedder-Mobarry globalPolar-region distributions of Poynting flux: Global models compared with observations P. D from the Preprint submitted to J. Atmospheric and Solar-Terrestrial Physics 11 July 2008 #12;DMSP F13

  11. Estimating Salinity between 25 and 45S in the Atlantic Ocean Using Local Regression

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Estimating Salinity between 25° and 45°S in the Atlantic Ocean Using Local Regression W. C. THACKER and temperature in the South Atlantic is quantified with the aid of local regression. To capture the spatial fitting regression models to the profile data is considerably more work than using published clima

  12. THE INTERACTION OF ECONOMIC, BIOLOGICAL, AND LEGAL FORCES IN THE MIDDLE ATLANTIC OYSTER INDUSTRY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    are contributing factors in the decline of the Middle Atlantic oyster industry. This paper determinesTHE INTERACTION OF ECONOMIC, BIOLOGICAL, AND LEGAL FORCES IN THE MIDDLE ATLANTIC OYSTER INDUSTRY into a supply and demand model of the oyster industry. The statistical results yield significantand expected

  13. Wetland model in an earth systems modeling framework for regional environmental policy analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Awadalla, Sirein Salah

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this research is to investigate incorporating a wetland component into a land energy and water fluxes model, the Community Land Model (CLM). CLM is the land fluxes component of the Integrated Global Systems ...

  14. Mid-Atlantic Wind - Overcoming the Challenges

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Daniel F. Ancona III; Kathryn E. George; Richard P. Bowers; Dr. Lynn Sparling; Bruce Buckheit; Daniel LoBue

    2012-05-31

    This study, supported by the US Department of Energy, Wind Powering America Program, Maryland Department of Natural Resources and Chesapeake Bay Foundation, analyzed barriers to wind energy development in the Mid-Atlantic region along with options for overcoming or mitigating them. The Mid-Atlantic States including Delaware, Maryland, North Carolina and Virginia, have excellent wind energy potential and growing demand for electricity, but only two utility-scale projects have been installed to date. Reasons for this apathetic development of wind resources were analyzed and quantified for four markets. Specific applications are: 1) Appalachian mountain ridgeline sites, 2) on coastal plains and peninsulas, 3) at shallow water sites in Delaware and Chesapeake Bays, Albemarle and Pamlico Sounds, and 4) at deeper water sites off the Atlantic coast. Each market has distinctly different opportunities and barriers. The primary barriers to wind development described in this report can be grouped into four categories; state policy and regulatory issues, wind resource technical uncertainty, economic viability, and public interest in environmental issues. The properties of these typologies are not mutually independent and do interact. The report concluded that there are no insurmountable barriers to land-based wind energy projects and they could be economically viable today. Likewise potential sites in sheltered shallow waters in regional bay and sounds have been largely overlooked but could be viable currently. Offshore ocean-based applications face higher costs and technical and wind resource uncertainties. The ongoing research and development program, revision of state incentive policies, additional wind measurement efforts, transmission system expansion, environmental baseline studies and outreach to private developers and stakeholders are needed to reduce barriers to wind energy development.

  15. Mid-Atlantic Wind - Overcoming the Challenges

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Daniel F. Ancona III; Kathryn E. George; Lynn Sparling; Bruce C. Buckheit; Daniel LoBue; and Richard P. Bowers

    2012-06-29

    This study, supported by the US Department of Energy, Wind Powering America Program, Maryland Department of Natural Resources and Chesapeake Bay Foundation, analyzed barriers to wind energy development in the Mid-Atlantic region along with options for overcoming or mitigating them. The Mid-Atlantic States including Delaware, Maryland, North Carolina and Virginia, have excellent wind energy potential and growing demand for electricity, but only two utility-scale projects have been installed to date. Reasons for this apathetic development of wind resources were analyzed and quantified for four markets. Specific applications are: 1) Appalachian mountain ridgeline sites, 2) on coastal plains and peninsulas, 3) at shallow water sites in Delaware and Chesapeake Bays, Albemarle and Pamlico Sounds, and 4) at deeper water sites off the Atlantic coast. Each market has distinctly different opportunities and barriers. The primary barriers to wind development described in this report can be grouped into four categories; state policy and regulatory issues, wind resource technical uncertainty, economic viability, and public interest in environmental issues. The properties of these typologies are not mutually independent and do interact. The report concluded that there are no insurmountable barriers to land-based wind energy projects and they could be economically viable today. Likewise potential sites in sheltered shallow waters in regional bay and sounds have been largely overlooked but could be viable currently. Offshore ocean-based applications face higher costs and technical and wind resource uncertainties. The ongoing research and development program, revision of state incentive policies, additional wind measurement efforts, transmission system expansion, environmental baseline studies and outreach to private developers and stakeholders are needed to reduce barriers to wind energy development.

  16. REGIONAL SEISMIC AMPLITUDE MODELING AND TOMOGRAPHY FOR EARTHQUAKE-EXPLOSION DISCRIMINATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walter, W R; Pasyanos, M E; Matzel, E; Gok, R; Sweeney, J; Ford, S R; Rodgers, A J

    2008-07-08

    We continue exploring methodologies to improve earthquake-explosion discrimination using regional amplitude ratios such as P/S in a variety of frequency bands. Empirically we demonstrate that such ratios separate explosions from earthquakes using closely located pairs of earthquakes and explosions recorded on common, publicly available stations at test sites around the world (e.g. Nevada, Novaya Zemlya, Semipalatinsk, Lop Nor, India, Pakistan, and North Korea). We are also examining if there is any relationship between the observed P/S and the point source variability revealed by longer period full waveform modeling (e. g. Ford et al 2008). For example, regional waveform modeling shows strong tectonic release from the May 1998 India test, in contrast with very little tectonic release in the October 2006 North Korea test, but the P/S discrimination behavior appears similar in both events using the limited regional data available. While regional amplitude ratios such as P/S can separate events in close proximity, it is also empirically well known that path effects can greatly distort observed amplitudes and make earthquakes appear very explosion-like. Previously we have shown that the MDAC (Magnitude Distance Amplitude Correction, Walter and Taylor, 2001) technique can account for simple 1-D attenuation and geometrical spreading corrections, as well as magnitude and site effects. However in some regions 1-D path corrections are a poor approximation and we need to develop 2-D path corrections. Here we demonstrate a new 2-D attenuation tomography technique using the MDAC earthquake source model applied to a set of events and stations in both the Middle East and the Yellow Sea Korean Peninsula regions. We believe this new 2-D MDAC tomography has the potential to greatly improve earthquake-explosion discrimination, particularly in tectonically complex regions such as the Middle East. Monitoring the world for potential nuclear explosions requires characterizing seismic events and discriminating between natural and man-made seismic events, such as earthquakes and mining activities, and nuclear weapons testing. We continue developing, testing, and refining size-, distance-, and location-based regional seismic amplitude corrections to facilitate the comparison of all events that are recorded at a particular seismic station. These corrections, calibrated for each station, reduce amplitude measurement scatter and improve discrimination performance. We test the methods on well-known (ground truth) datasets in the U.S. and then apply them to the uncalibrated stations in Eurasia, Africa, and other regions of interest to improve underground nuclear test monitoring capability.

  17. A review on regional convection-permitting climate modeling: Demonstrations, prospects, and challenges

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Prein, Andreas; Langhans, Wolfgang; Fosser, Giorgia; Ferrone, Andrew; Ban, Nikolina; Goergen, Klaus; Keller, Michael; Tolle, Merja; Gutjahr, Oliver; Feser, Frauke; et al

    2015-05-27

    Regional climate modeling using convection permitting models (CPMs) emerges as a promising framework to provide more reliable climate information on regional to local scales compared to traditionally used large-scale models (LSMs). CPMs do not use convection parameterization schemes, known as a major source of errors and uncertainties, and have more accurate surface and orography elds. The drawback of CPMs is their high demand on computational resources. For this reason, the CPM climate simulations only appeared a decade ago. In this study we aim to provide a common basis for CPM climate simulations by giving a holistic review of the topic.more »The most important components in CPM, such as physical parameterizations and dynamical formulations are discussed, and an outlook on required future developments and computer architectures that would support the application of CPMs is given. Most importantly, this review presents the consolidated outcome of studies that addressed the added value of CPM climate simulations compared to LSMs. Most improvements are found for processes related to deep convection (e.g., precipitation during summer), for mountainous regions, and for the soil-vegetation-atmosphere interactions. The climate change signals of CPM simulations reveal increases in short and extreme rainfall events and an increased ratio of liquid precipitation at the surface (a decrease of hail) potentially leading to more frequent ash oods. Concluding, CPMs are a very promising tool for future climate research. However, coordinated modeling programs are crucially needed to assess their full potential and support their development.« less

  18. Particle dynamics in a non-flaring solar active region model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Threlfall, J; Neukirch, T; Parnell, C E

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this work is to investigate and characterise particle behaviour in a (observationally-driven) 3D MHD model of the solar atmosphere above a slowly evolving, non-flaring active region. We use a relativistic guiding-centre particle code to investigate particle acceleration in a single snapshot of the 3D MHD simulation. Despite the lack of flare-like behaviour in the active region, direct acceleration of electrons and protons to non-thermal energies ($\\lesssim420$MeV) was found, yielding spectra with high-energy tails which conform to a power law. Examples of particle dynamics, including particle trapping caused by local electric rather than magnetic field effects, are observed and discussed, together with implications for future experiments which simulate non-flaring active region heating and reconnection.

  19. Short-Term Energy Outlook Model Documentation: Macro Bridge Procedure to Update Regional Macroeconomic Forecasts with National Macroeconomic Forecasts

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2010-01-01

    The Regional Short-Term Energy Model (RSTEM) uses macroeconomic variables such as income, employment, industrial production and consumer prices at both the national and regional1 levels as explanatory variables in the generation of the Short-Term Energy Outlook (STEO). This documentation explains how national macroeconomic forecasts are used to update regional macroeconomic forecasts through the RSTEM Macro Bridge procedure.

  20. A study on the background and clustering seismicity in the Taiwan region by using point process models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Yuh-Ing

    A study on the background and clustering seismicity in the Taiwan region by using point process), A study on the background and clustering seismicity in the Taiwan region by using point process models, J the shallow seismicity occurring in the Taiwan region during the 20th century using a stochastic declustering

  1. Analytical solutions for benchmarking cold regions subsurface water flow and energy transport models: One-dimensional soil thaw

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McKenzie, Jeffrey M.

    Analytical solutions for benchmarking cold regions subsurface water flow and energy transport Freezing and thawing a b s t r a c t Numerous cold regions water flow and energy transport models have of powerful simulators of cold regions subsurface water flow and energy transport have emerged in recent years

  2. Comparative study of Regional Urban Growth (RUG) model projections for new EU members in central Europe and the Baltic States 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Langner, Pawel

    2009-11-26

    Urban modelling and land-cover changes are well discussed in literature and are in a focal point of many researches. Regional urban growth (RUG) model for central Europe and the Baltic States projects land-cover changes ...

  3. Global warming and climate change - predictive models for temperate and tropical regions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Malini, B.H.

    1997-12-31

    Based on the assumption of 4{degree}C increase of global temperature by the turn of 21st century due to the accumulation of greenhouse gases an attempt is made to study the possible variations in different climatic regimes. The predictive climatic water balance model for Hokkaido island of Japan (a temperate zone) indicates the possible occurrence of water deficit for two to three months, which is a unknown phenomenon in this region at present. Similarly, India which represents tropical region also will experience much drier climates with increased water deficit conditions. As a consequence, the thermal region of Hokkaido which at present is mostly Tundra and Micro thermal will change into a Meso thermal category. Similarly, the moisture regime which at present supports per humid (A2, A3 and A4) and Humid (B4) climates can support A1, B4, B3, B2 and B1 climates indicating a shift towards drier side of the climatic spectrum. Further, the predictive modes of both the regions have indicated increased evapotranspiration rates. Although there is not much of change in the overall thermal characteristics of the Indian region the moisture regime indicates a clear shift towards the aridity in the country.

  4. A multiscale MDCT image-based breathing lung model with time-varying regional ventilation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yin, Youbing, E-mail: youbing-yin@uiowa.edu [Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering, The University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA 52242 (United States) [Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering, The University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA 52242 (United States); IIHR-Hydroscience and Engineering, The University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA 52242 (United States); Department of Radiology, The University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA 52242 (United States); Choi, Jiwoong, E-mail: jiwoong-choi@uiowa.edu [Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering, The University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA 52242 (United States) [Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering, The University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA 52242 (United States); IIHR-Hydroscience and Engineering, The University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA 52242 (United States); Hoffman, Eric A., E-mail: eric-hoffman@uiowa.edu [Department of Radiology, The University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA 52242 (United States); Department of Biomedical Engineering, The University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA 52242 (United States); Department of Internal Medicine, The University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA 52242 (United States); Tawhai, Merryn H., E-mail: m.tawhai@auckland.ac.nz [Auckland Bioengineering Institute, The University of Auckland, Auckland (New Zealand); Lin, Ching-Long, E-mail: ching-long-lin@uiowa.edu [Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering, The University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA 52242 (United States) [Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering, The University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA 52242 (United States); IIHR-Hydroscience and Engineering, The University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA 52242 (United States)

    2013-07-01

    A novel algorithm is presented that links local structural variables (regional ventilation and deforming central airways) to global function (total lung volume) in the lung over three imaged lung volumes, to derive a breathing lung model for computational fluid dynamics simulation. The algorithm constitutes the core of an integrative, image-based computational framework for subject-specific simulation of the breathing lung. For the first time, the algorithm is applied to three multi-detector row computed tomography (MDCT) volumetric lung images of the same individual. A key technique in linking global and local variables over multiple images is an in-house mass-preserving image registration method. Throughout breathing cycles, cubic interpolation is employed to ensure C{sub 1} continuity in constructing time-varying regional ventilation at the whole lung level, flow rate fractions exiting the terminal airways, and airway deformation. The imaged exit airway flow rate fractions are derived from regional ventilation with the aid of a three-dimensional (3D) and one-dimensional (1D) coupled airway tree that connects the airways to the alveolar tissue. An in-house parallel large-eddy simulation (LES) technique is adopted to capture turbulent-transitional-laminar flows in both normal and deep breathing conditions. The results obtained by the proposed algorithm when using three lung volume images are compared with those using only one or two volume images. The three-volume-based lung model produces physiologically-consistent time-varying pressure and ventilation distribution. The one-volume-based lung model under-predicts pressure drop and yields un-physiological lobar ventilation. The two-volume-based model can account for airway deformation and non-uniform regional ventilation to some extent, but does not capture the non-linear features of the lung.

  5. Phase transition free regions in the Ising model via the Kac-Ward operator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marcin Lis

    2015-05-17

    We investigate the spectral radius and operator norm of the Kac-Ward transition matrix for the Ising model on a general planar graph. We then use the obtained results to identify regions in the complex plane where the free energy density limits are analytic functions of the inverse temperature. The bound turns out to be optimal in the case of isoradial graphs, i.e. it yields criticality of the self-dual Z-invariant coupling constants.

  6. Inverse modeling of NOx emissions at regional scale over northern France: Preliminary investigation of the second-order

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mallet, Vivien

    Inverse modeling of NOx emissions at regional scale over northern France: Preliminary investigation time distribution of NOx emissions is robust. Citation: Que´lo, D., V. Mallet, and B. Sportisse (2005), Inverse modeling of NOx emissions at regional scale over northern France: Preliminary investigation

  7. Relationship of regional water quality to aquifer thermal energy storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allen, R.D.

    1983-11-01

    Ground-water quality and associated geologic characteristics may affect the feasibility of aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES) system development in any hydrologic region. This study sought to determine the relationship between ground-water quality parameters and the regional potential for ATES system development. Information was collected from available literature to identify chemical and physical mechanisms that could adversely affect an ATES system. Appropriate beneficiation techniques to counter these potential geochemical and lithologic problems were also identified through the literature search. Regional hydrology summaries and other sources were used in reviewing aquifers of 19 drainage regions in the US to determine generic geochemical characteristics for analysis. Numerical modeling techniques were used to perform geochemical analyses of water quality from 67 selected aquifers. Candidate water resources regions were then identified for exploration and development of ATES. This study identified six principal mechanisms by which ATES reservoir permeability may be impaired: (1) particulate plugging, (2) chemical precipitation, (3) liquid-solid reactions, (4) formation disaggregation, (5) oxidation reactions, and (6) biological activity. Specific proven countermeasures to reduce or eliminate these effects were found. Of the hydrologic regions reviewed, 10 were identified as having the characteristics necessary for ATES development: (1) Mid-Atlantic, (2) South-Atlantic Gulf, (3) Ohio, (4) Upper Mississippi, (5) Lower Mississippi, (6) Souris-Red-Rainy, (7) Missouri Basin, (8) Arkansas-White-Red, (9) Texas-Gulf, and (10) California.

  8. North American Carbon Program (NACP) Regional Interim Synthesis: Terrestrial Biospheric Model Intercomparision

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huntzinger, Deborah [University of Michigan; Post, Wilfred M [ORNL; Michalak, Anna [University of Michigan; West, Tristram O. [Joint Global Change Research Institute, PNNL; Jacobson, Andrew [NOAA ESRL and CIRES; Baker, Ian [Colorado State University, Fort Collins; Chen, Jing M. [University of Toronto; Davis, Kenneth [Pennsylvania State University; Hayes, Daniel J [ORNL; Hoffman, Forrest M [ORNL; Jain, Atul [University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign; Liu, Shuguang [United States Geological Survey, Center for Earth Resources Observation and Science (USGS EROS); Mcguire, David [University of Alaska; Neilson, Ronald [Oregon State University, Corvallis; Poulter, Ben [Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research, Potsdam, Germany; Tian, Hanqin [Auburn University, Auburn, Alabama; Thornton, Peter E [ORNL; Tomelleri, Enrico [Max Planck Institute for Biogeochemistry; Viovy, Nicolas [National Center for Scientific Research, Gif-sur-Yvette, France; Xiao, Jingfeng [Purdue University; Cook, Robert B [ORNL

    2012-01-01

    Understanding of carbon exchange between terrestrial ecosystems and the atmosphere can be improved through direct observations and experiments, as well as through modeling activities. Terrestrial biosphere models (TBMs) have become an integral tool for extrapolating local observations and understanding to much larger terrestrial regions. Although models vary in their specific goals and approaches, their central role within carbon cycle science is to provide a better understanding of the mechanisms currently controlling carbon exchange. Recently, the North American Carbon Program (NACP) organized several interim-synthesis activities to evaluate and inter-compare models and observations at local to continental scales for the years 2000-2005. Here, we compare the results from the TBMs collected as part of the regional and continental interim-synthesis (RCIS) activities. The primary objective of this work is to synthesize and compare the 19 participating TBMs to assess current understanding of the terrestrial carbon cycle in North America. Thus, the RCIS focuses on model simulations available from analyses that have been completed by ongoing NACP projects and other recently published studies. The TBM flux estimates are compared and evaluated over different spatial (1{sup o} x 1{sup o} and spatially aggregated to different regions) and temporal (monthly and annually) scales. The range in model estimates of net ecosystem productivity (NEP) for North America is much narrower than estimates of productivity or respiration, with estimates of NEP varying between -0.7 and 2.2 PgC yr{sup -1}, while gross primary productivity and heterotrophic respiration vary between 12.2 and 32.9 PgC yr{sup -1} and 5.6 and 13.2 PgC yr{sup -1}, respectively. The range in estimates from the models appears to be driven by a combination of factors, including the representation of photosynthesis, the source and of environmental driver data and the temporal variability of those data, as well as whether nutrient limitation is considered in soil carbon decomposition. The disagreement in current estimates of carbon flux across North America, including whether North America is a net biospheric carbon source or sink, highlights the need for further analysis through the use of model runs following a common simulation protocol, in order to isolate the influences of model formulation, structure, and assumptions on flux estimates.

  9. Yersiniosis in Farmed Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua) in a Marine Nursery in Atlantic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kane, Andrew S.

    Diagnostic Services, Atlantic Veterinary College , University of Prince Edward Island, Charlottetown, PEI C1A

  10. Hollow cathode theory and experiment. II. A two-dimensional theoretical model of the emitter region

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mikellides, Ioannis G.; Katz, Ira; Goebel, Dan M.; Polk, James E.

    2005-12-01

    Despite their long history and wide range of applicability that includes electric propulsion, detailed understanding of the driving physics inside orificed hollow cathodes remains elusive. The theoretical complexity associated with the multicomponent fluid inside the cathode, and the difficulty of accessing empirically this region, have limited our ability to design cathodes that perform better and last longer. A two-dimensional axisymmetric theoretical model of the multispecies fluid inside an orificed hollow cathode is presented. The level of detail attained by the model is allowed by its extended system of governing equations not solved for in the past within the hollow cathode. Such detail is motivated in part by the need to quantify the effect(s) of the plasma on the emitter life, and by the need to build the foundation for future modeling that will assess erosion of the keeper plate. Results from numerical simulations of a 1.2-cm-diam cathode operating at a discharge current of 25 A and a gas flow rate of 5 SCCM show that approximately 10 A of electron current, and 3.45 A of ion current return back to the emitter surface. The total emitted electron current is 33.8 A and the peak emitter temperature is found to be 1440 K. Comparisons with the measurements suggest that anomalous heating of the plasma is possible near the orifice region. The model predicts heavy species temperatures as high as 2034 K and peak voltage drops near the emitting surface not exceeding 8 V.

  11. The Potential for Wind Energy in Atlantic Canada

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hughes, Larry

    of many renewable sources of energy, such as solar, biomass, hydroelectric, and wind. This paper considers is a viable, renewable energy source for Atlantic Canada. 2 Data The data used by the modelling tool comes- sible for collecting Canadian climate data, including solar radiation, temperature, precipitation

  12. Solar surface emerging flux regions: a comparative study of radiative MHD modeling and Hinode SOT observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. C. M. Cheung; M. Schuessler; T. D. Tarbell; A. M. Title

    2008-10-31

    We present results from numerical modeling of emerging flux regions on the solar surface. The modeling was carried out by means of 3D radiative MHD simulations of the rise of buoyant magnetic flux tubes through the convection zone and into the photosphere. Due to the strong stratification of the convection zone, the rise results in a lateral expansion of the tube into a magnetic sheet, which acts as a reservoir for small-scale flux emergence events at the scale of granulation. The interaction of the convective downflows and the rising magnetic flux undulates it to form serpentine field lines emerging into the photosphere. Observational characteristics including the pattern of emerging flux regions, the cancellation of surface flux and associated high speed downflows, the convective collapse of photospheric flux tubes, the appearance of anomalous darkenings, the formation of bright points and the possible existence of transient kilogauss horizontal fields are discussed in the context of new observations from the Hinode Solar Optical Telescope. Implications for the local helioseismology of emerging flux regions are also discussed.

  13. MARINE MAMMALS OF THE ATL ANTIC REGION AND GULF OF MEXICO marine mammals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    301 MARINE MAMMALS OF THE ATL ANTIC REGION AND GULF OF MEXICO UNIT 23 marine mammals of the atlantic region and the gulf of mexico INTRODUCTION The Atlantic region, including the Gulf of Mexico, has above: Oceanic bottlenose dolphins in the Gulf of Mexico. SEFSC/NMFS Species Act (ESA;Table 23

  14. Near-inertial and thermal to atmospheric forcing in the North Atlantic Ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Silverthorne, Katherine E

    2010-01-01

    Observational and modeling techniques are employed to investigate the thermal and inertial upper ocean response to wind and buoyancy forcing in the North Atlantic Ocean. First, the seasonal kinetic energy variability of ...

  15. The effect of subsurface temperature variability on the predictability of SST in the tropical Atlantic Ocean 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bates, Susan Carr

    1999-01-01

    The role of thermocouple variability and its effects on tropical Atlantic SST is investigated through the generation of SST predictions using a linear inverse modeling technique developed by Penland (1989). In order to ...

  16. Atlantic Climate Variability and Predictability: A CLIVAR Perspective J. W. HURRELL,a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCartney, Michael S.

    Town, Rondebosch, South Africa o LODYC, Université Paris VI, Paris, France p University of Săo Paulo observations, basin-scale reanalysis, and modeling and theoretical investigations of the coupled Atlantic

  17. Impact of Agricultural Practice on Regional Climate in a CoupledLand Surface Mesoscale Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cooley, H.S.; Riley, W.J.; Torn, M.S.; He, Y.

    2004-07-01

    The land surface has been shown to form strong feedbacks with climate due to linkages between atmospheric conditions and terrestrial ecosystem exchanges of energy, momentum, water, and trace gases. Although often ignored in modeling studies, land management itself may form significant feedbacks. Because crops are harvested earlier under drier conditions, regional air temperature, precipitation, and soil moisture, for example, affect harvest timing, particularly of rain-fed crops. This removal of vegetation alters the land surface characteristics and may, in turn, affect regional climate. We applied a coupled climate(MM5) and land-surface (LSM1) model to examine the effects of early and late winter wheat harvest on regional climate in the Department of Energy Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility in the Southern Great Plains, where winter wheat accounts for 20 percent of the land area. Within the winter wheat region, simulated 2 m air temperature was 1.3 C warmer in the Early Harvest scenario at mid-day averaged over the two weeks following harvest. Soils in the harvested area were drier and warmer in the top 10 cm and wetter in the 10-20 cm layer. Midday soils were 2.5 C warmer in the harvested area at mid-day averaged over the two weeks following harvest. Harvest also dramatically altered latent and sensible heat fluxes. Although differences between scenarios diminished once both scenarios were harvested, the short-term impacts of land management on climate were comparable to those from land cover change demonstrated in other studies.

  18. NREL: Regional Energy Deployment System (ReEDS) Model - Model Description

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMass map shines lightGeospatial Toolkit TheCompetitiveMattPhotoQualitative Model

  19. Observational and numerical study of Atlantic tropical instability waves 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Qiaoyan

    2009-06-02

    (solid line) and Atlantic ATL3 index (dot line) from 1998 to 2005. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 4 The scheme of Radon transform to estimate wave characteristics from the longitude-time TIW distribution... variance is computed at each point, then averaged over the active TIW region. We use this filter to derive anomaly fields of SST. After the filtering, the Radon transform technique is applied to estimate the propagation characteristics of the TIW. The Radon...

  20. Improvements to Regional Explosion Identification using Attenuation Models of the Lithosphere

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pasyanos, M E; Walter, W R

    2009-03-30

    Regional P/S amplitudes have been recognized as an effective discriminant between earthquakes and explosions. While closely spaced earthquake and explosions generally discriminate easily, the application of this technique to broad regions has been hampered by large variations in the amplitude of regional phases due to the attenuation structure of the crust and upper mantle. Making use of a recent P-wave and S-wave attenuation model of the lithosphere, we have found that correcting the events using our amplitude methodology significantly reduces the scattering in the earthquake population. We demonstrate an application of this technique to station NIL (Nilore, Pakistan) using broad area earthquakes and the 1998 Indian nuclear explosion recorded at the station using the Pn/Lg discriminant in the 1-2 Hz passband. We find that the explosion, which is lost in the scatter of the earthquakes in the uncorrected discriminant, clearly separates by correcting for the attenuation structure. We see a similar reduction in scatter and separation for the Pn/Sn and Pg/Lg discriminants in the same passband.

  1. Regional scale cropland carbon budgets: evaluating a geospatial agricultural modeling system using inventory data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Xuesong; Izaurralde, Roberto C.; Manowitz, David H.; Sahajpal, Ritvik; West, Tristram O.; Thomson, Allison M.; Xu, Min; Zhao, Kaiguang; LeDuc, Stephen D.; Williams, Jimmy R.

    2015-01-01

    Accurate quantification and clear understanding of regional scale cropland carbon (C) cycling is critical for designing effective policies and management practices that can contribute toward stabilizing atmospheric CO2 concentrations. However, extrapolating site-scale observations to regional scales represents a major challenge confronting the agricultural modeling community. This study introduces a novel geospatial agricultural modeling system (GAMS) exploring the integration of the mechanistic Environmental Policy Integrated Climate model, spatially-resolved data, surveyed management data, and supercomputing functions for cropland C budgets estimates. This modeling system creates spatially-explicit modeling units at a spatial resolution consistent with remotely-sensed crop identification and assigns cropping systems to each of them by geo-referencing surveyed crop management information at the county or state level. A parallel computing algorithm was also developed to facilitate the computationally intensive model runs and output post-processing and visualization. We evaluated GAMS against National Agricultural Statistics Service (NASS) reported crop yields and inventory estimated county-scale cropland C budgets averaged over 2000–2008. We observed good overall agreement, with spatial correlation of 0.89, 0.90, 0.41, and 0.87, for crop yields, Net Primary Production (NPP), Soil Organic C (SOC) change, and Net Ecosystem Exchange (NEE), respectively. However, we also detected notable differences in the magnitude of NPP and NEE, as well as in the spatial pattern of SOC change. By performing crop-specific annual comparisons, we discuss possible explanations for the discrepancies between GAMS and the inventory method, such as data requirements, representation of agroecosystem processes, completeness and accuracy of crop management data, and accuracy of crop area representation. Based on these analyses, we further discuss strategies to improve GAMS by updating input data and by designing more efficient parallel computing capability to quantitatively assess errors associated with the simulation of C budget components. The modularized design of the GAMS makes it flexible to be updated and adapted for different agricultural models so long as they require similar input data, and to be linked with socio-economic models to understand the effectiveness and implications of diverse C management practices and policies.

  2. A One-Dimensional (1-D) Three-Region Model for a Bubbling Fluidized-Bed Adsorber

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, Andrew; Miller, David C.

    2012-01-01

    A general one-dimensional (1-D), three-region model for a bubbling fluidized-bed adsorber with internal heat exchangers has been developed. The model can predict the hydrodynamics of the bed and provides axial profiles for all temperatures, concentrations, and velocities. The model is computationally fast and flexible and allows for any system of adsorption and desorption reactions to be modeled, making the model applicable to any adsorption process. The model has been implemented in both gPROMS and Aspen Custom Modeler, and the behavior of the model has been verified.

  3. MODELING SUPER-FAST MAGNETOSONIC WAVES OBSERVED BY SDO IN ACTIVE REGION FUNNELS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ofman, L.; Liu, W.; Title, A.; Aschwanden, M.

    2011-10-20

    Recently, quasi-periodic, rapidly propagating waves have been observed in extreme ultraviolet by the Solar Dynamics Observatory/Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) instrument in about 10 flare/coronal mass ejection (CME) events thus far. A typical example is the 2010 August 1 C3.2 flare/CME event that exhibited arc-shaped wave trains propagating in an active region (AR) magnetic funnel with {approx}5% intensity variations at speeds in the range of 1000-2000 km s{sup -1}. The fast temporal cadence and high sensitivity of AIA enabled the detection of these waves. We identify them as fast magnetosonic waves driven quasi-periodically at the base of the flaring region and develop a three-dimensional MHD model of the event. For the initial state we utilize the dipole magnetic field to model the AR and include gravitationally stratified density at coronal temperature. At the coronal base of the AR, we excite the fast magnetosonic wave by periodic velocity pulsations in the photospheric plane confined to a funnel of magnetic field lines. The excited fast magnetosonic waves have similar amplitude, wavelength, and propagation speeds as the observed wave trains. Based on the simulation results, we discuss the possible excitation mechanism of the waves, their dynamical properties, and the use of the observations for coronal MHD seismology.

  4. A nanoflare model for active region radiance: application of artificial neural networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Bazarghan; H. Safari; D. E. Innes; E. Karami; S. K. Solanki

    2008-12-20

    Context. Nanoflares are small impulsive bursts of energy that blend with and possibly make up much of the solar background emission. Determining their frequency and energy input is central to understanding the heating of the solar corona. One method is to extrapolate the energy frequency distribution of larger individually observed flares to lower energies. Only if the power law exponent is greater than 2, is it considered possible that nanoflares contribute significantly to the energy input. Aims. Time sequences of ultraviolet line radiances observed in the corona of an active region are modelled with the aim of determining the power law exponent of the nanoflare energy distribution. Methods. A simple nanoflare model based on three key parameters (the flare rate, the flare duration time, and the power law exponent of the flare energy frequency distribution) is used to simulate emission line radiances from the ions Fe XIX, Ca XIII, and Si iii, observed by SUMER in the corona of an active region as it rotates around the east limb of the Sun. Light curve pattern recognition by an Artificial Neural Network (ANN) scheme is used to determine the values. Results. The power law exponents, alpha 2.8, 2.8, and 2.6 for Fe XIX, Ca XIII, and Si iii respectively. Conclusions. The light curve simulations imply a power law exponent greater than the critical value of 2 for all ion species. This implies that if the energy of flare-like events is extrapolated to low energies, nanoflares could provide a significant contribution to the heating of active region coronae.

  5. Heat and freshwater exchange on the Antarctic continental1" shelf in a regional coupled climate model2"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gerber, Edwin

    Heat and freshwater exchange on the Antarctic continental1" shelf in a regional coupled climate, South Korea 120-749. Email:21" cyoo@cims.nyu.edu.22" #12;2" Abstract23" Understanding heat. This study analyzes the heat and freshwater budget using a regional25" coupled climate model, which has been

  6. Influence of eddydriven jet latitude on North Atlantic jet persistence and blocking frequency in CMIP3 integrations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hartmann, Dennis

    Influence of eddydriven jet latitude on North Atlantic jet persistence and blocking frequency Atlantic jet latitude is analyzed in 45 CMIP3 integrations. It is demonstrated that models that place the jet equatorward of its observed position have more positively skewed jet latitude distributions, while

  7. Semidirect Dynamical and Radiative Impact of North African Dust Transport on Lower Tropospheric Clouds over the Subtropical North Atlantic in CESM 1.0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeFlorio, Mike; Ghan, Steven J.; Singh, Balwinder; Miller, Arthur J.; Cayan, Dan; Russell, Lynn M.; Somerville, Richard C.

    2014-07-16

    This study uses a century length pre-industrial climate simulation by the Community Earth System Model (CESM 1.0) to explore statistical relationships between dust, clouds and atmospheric circulation, and to suggest a dynamical, rather than microphysical, mechanism linking subtropical North Atlantic lower tropospheric cloud cover with North African dust transport. The length of the run allows us to account for interannual variability of dust emissions and transport downstream of North Africa in the model. CESM’s mean climatology and probability distribution of aerosol optical depth in this region agrees well with available AERONET observations. In addition, CESM shows strong seasonal cycles of dust burden and lower tropospheric cloud fraction, with maximum values occurring during boreal summer, when a strong correlation between these two variables exists downstream of North Africa over the subtropical North Atlantic. Calculations of Estimated Inversion Strength (EIS) and composites of EIS on high and low downstream North Africa dust months during boreal summer reveal that dust is likely increasing inversion strength over this region due to both solar absorption and reflection. We find no evidence for a microphysical link between dust and lower tropospheric clouds in this region. These results yield new insight over an extensive period of time into the complex relationship between North African dust and lower tropospheric clouds over the open ocean, which has previously been hindered by spatiotemporal constraints of observations. Our findings lay a framework for future analyses using sub-monthly data over regions with different underlying dynamics.

  8. On an improved sub-regional water resources management representation for integration into earth system models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Voisin, Nathalie; Li, Hongyi; Ward, Duane L.; Huang, Maoyi; Wigmosta, Mark S.; Leung, Lai-Yung R.

    2013-09-30

    Human influence on the hydrologic cycle includes regulation and storage, consumptive use and overall redistribution of water resources in space and time. Representing these processes is essential for applications of earth system models in hydrologic and climate predictions, as well as impact studies at regional to global scales. Emerging large-scale research reservoir models use generic operating rules that are flexible for coupling with earth system models. Those generic operating rules have been successful in reproducing the overall regulated flow at large basin scales. This study investigates the uncertainties of the reservoir models from different implementations of the generic operating rules using the complex multi-objective Columbia River Regulation System in northwestern United States as an example to understand their effects on not only regulated flow but also reservoir storage and fraction of the demand that is met. Numerical experiments are designed to test new generic operating rules that combine storage and releases targets for multi-purpose reservoirs and to compare the use of reservoir usage priorities, withdrawals vs. consumptive demand, as well as natural vs. regulated mean flow for calibrating operating rules. Overall the best performing implementation is the use of the combined priorities (flood control storage targets and irrigation release targets) operating rules calibrated with mean annual natural flow and mean monthly withdrawals. The challenge of not accounting for groundwater withdrawals, or on the contrary, assuming that all remaining demand is met through groundwater extractions, is discussed.

  9. 4, 667695, 2008 SE Atlantic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Research Centre, Department of Geography, University College London, Pearson Building, Gower Street, London, WC1E 6BT, UK 2 NERC Isotope Geosciences Laboratory, British Geological Survey, Keyworth, Nottingham Discussion Abstract A detailed record of benthic foraminifera carbon isotopes from the South East Atlantic

  10. Strategic Plan Atlantic Oceanographic and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Strategic Plan Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological Laboratory FY2010-2015 www.aoml.noaa.gov U the Director Dr. Robert Atlas, AOML Director #12;This version of the AOML Strategic Plan was updated in March of this strategic plan, please contact AOML's Communications Office at 305-361-4451 or visit us on the web at www

  11. Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological Laboratory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological Laboratory Science Research Review March 18-20, 2008. Quality: Assess the quality of the laboratory's research and development. Assess whether appropriate." · How does the quality of the laboratory's research and development rank among Research and Development

  12. Global and regional modeling of clouds and aerosols in the marine boundary layer during VOCALS: the VOCA intercomparison

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Wyant, M. C.; Bretherton, Christopher S.; Wood, Robert; Carmichael, Gregory; Clarke, A. D.; Fast, Jerome D.; George, R.; Gustafson, William I.; Hannay, Cecile; Lauer, Axel; et al

    2015-01-09

    A diverse collection of models are used to simulate the marine boundary layer in the southeast Pacific region during the period of the October–November 2008 VOCALS REx (VAMOS Ocean Cloud Atmosphere Land Study Regional Experiment) field campaign. Regional models simulate the period continuously in boundary-forced free-running mode, while global forecast models and GCMs (general circulation models) are run in forecast mode. The models are compared to extensive observations along a line at 20° S extending westward from the South American coast. Most of the models simulate cloud and aerosol characteristics and gradients across the region that are recognizably similar tomore »observations, despite the complex interaction of processes involved in the problem, many of which are parameterized or poorly resolved. Some models simulate the regional low cloud cover well, though many models underestimate MBL (marine boundary layer) depth near the coast. Most models qualitatively simulate the observed offshore gradients of SO2, sulfate aerosol, CCN (cloud condensation nuclei) concentration in the MBL as well as differences in concentration between the MBL and the free troposphere. Most models also qualitatively capture the decrease in cloud droplet number away from the coast. However, there are large quantitative intermodel differences in both means and gradients of these quantities. Many models are able to represent episodic offshore increases in cloud droplet number and aerosol concentrations associated with periods of offshore flow. Most models underestimate CCN (at 0.1% supersaturation) in the MBL and free troposphere. The GCMs also have difficulty simulating coastal gradients in CCN and cloud droplet number concentration near the coast. The overall performance of the models demonstrates their potential utility in simulating aerosol–cloud interactions in the MBL, though quantitative estimation of aerosol–cloud interactions and aerosol indirect effects of MBL clouds with these models remains uncertain.« less

  13. Global and regional modeling of clouds and aerosols in the marine boundary layer during VOCALS: the VOCA intercomparison

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wyant, M. C.; Bretherton, Christopher S.; Wood, Robert; Carmichael, Gregory; Clarke, A. D.; Fast, Jerome D.; George, R.; Gustafson, William I.; Hannay, Cecile; Lauer, Axel; Lin, Yanluan; Morcrette, J. -J.; Mulcahay, Jane; Saide, Pablo; Spak, S. N.; Yang, Qing

    2015-01-01

    A diverse collection of models are used to simulate the marine boundary layer in the southeast Pacific region during the period of the October–November 2008 VOCALS REx (VAMOS Ocean Cloud Atmosphere Land Study Regional Experiment) field campaign. Regional models simulate the period continuously in boundary-forced free-running mode, while global forecast models and GCMs (general circulation models) are run in forecast mode. The models are compared to extensive observations along a line at 20° S extending westward from the South American coast. Most of the models simulate cloud and aerosol characteristics and gradients across the region that are recognizably similar to observations, despite the complex interaction of processes involved in the problem, many of which are parameterized or poorly resolved. Some models simulate the regional low cloud cover well, though many models underestimate MBL (marine boundary layer) depth near the coast. Most models qualitatively simulate the observed offshore gradients of SO2, sulfate aerosol, CCN (cloud condensation nuclei) concentration in the MBL as well as differences in concentration between the MBL and the free troposphere. Most models also qualitatively capture the decrease in cloud droplet number away from the coast. However, there are large quantitative intermodel differences in both means and gradients of these quantities. Many models are able to represent episodic offshore increases in cloud droplet number and aerosol concentrations associated with periods of offshore flow. Most models underestimate CCN (at 0.1% supersaturation) in the MBL and free troposphere. The GCMs also have difficulty simulating coastal gradients in CCN and cloud droplet number concentration near the coast. The overall performance of the models demonstrates their potential utility in simulating aerosol–cloud interactions in the MBL, though quantitative estimation of aerosol–cloud interactions and aerosol indirect effects of MBL clouds with these models remains uncertain.

  14. South Atlantic summary report 2. Revision of Outer Continental Shelf oil and gas activities in the South Atlantic (US) and their onshore impacts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deis, J.L.; Kurz, F.N.; Porter, E.O.

    1982-05-01

    The search for oil and gas on the Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) in the South Atlantic Region began in 1960, when geophysical surveys of the area were initiated. In 1977, a Continental Offshore Stratigraphic Test (COST) well was drilled in the Southeast Georgia Embayment. In March 1978, the first lease sale, Sale 43, was held, resulting in the leasing of 43 tracts. Approximately a year later, in May 1979, the first exploratory drilling began, and by February 1980, six exploratory wells had been drilled by four companies. Hydrocarbons were not found in any of these wells. Lease Sale 56, the second lease sale in the South Atlantic Region, was held in August 1981. The sale resulted in the leasing of 47 tracts. Most of the leased tracts are in deep water along the Continental Slope off North Carolina. To date, no drilling has occurred on these tracts, but it is likely that two wells will be drilled or will be in the process of being drilled by the end of 1982. Reoffering Sale RS-2 is scheduled for July 1982, and it will include tracts offered in Lease Sale 56 that were not awarded leases. Lease Sale 78 is scheduled to be held in July 1983. The most recent (March 1982) estimates of risked resources for leased lands in the South Atlantic OCS are 27 million barrels of oil and 120 billion cubic feet of gas. To date, onshore impacts resulting from OCS exploration have been minimal, and they were associated with Lease Sale 43 exploratory activities. In June 1981, the South Atlantic Regional Technical Working Group prepared a Regional Transportation Management Plan for the South Atlantic OCS. The plan is principally an integration of regulatory frameworks, policies, and plans that are applicable to pipeline siting from each of the South Atlantic coastal States and Federal agencies with jurisdiction in the area.

  15. Journal of the Meteorological Society of Japan, Vol. 82, No. 6, pp. 1599--1628, 2004 1599 Regional Climate Modeling: Progress, Challenges, and Prospects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Yuqing

    , and development of regional earth system models. It is believed that with the demonstrated credibility of RCMs

  16. Theoretical modeling of propagation of magneto-acoustic waves in magnetic regions below sunspots

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E. Khomenko; A. Kosovichev; M. Collados; K. Parchevsky; V. Olshevsky

    2008-12-10

    We use 2D numerical simulations and eikonal approximation, to study properties of MHD waves traveling below the solar surface through the magnetic structure of sunspots. We consider a series of magnetostatic models of sunspots of different magnetic field strengths, from 10 Mm below the photosphere to the low chromosphere. The purpose of these studies is to quantify the effect of the magnetic field on local helioseismology measurements by modeling waves excited by sub-photospheric sources. Time-distance propagation diagrams and wave travel times are calculated for models of various field strength and compared to the non-magnetic case. The results clearly indicate that the observed time-distance helioseismology signals in sunspot regions correspond to fast MHD waves. The slow MHD waves form a distinctly different pattern in the time-distance diagram, which has not been detected in observations. The numerical results are in good agreement with the solution in the short-wavelength (eikonal) approximation, providing its validation. The frequency dependence of the travel times is in a good qualitative agreement with observations.

  17. Application of an automatic approach to calibrate the NEMURO nutrientphytoplanktonzooplankton food web model in the Oyashio region

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ­phytoplankton­zooplankton food web model in the Oyashio region Shin-ichi Ito a, , Naoki Yoshie b , Takeshi Okunishi c , Tsuneo without ontogenetic vertical migration of the large zooplankton functional group. Determining or averaged state variables were used, in whether state variables were model functional groups or were

  18. Seasonal Export of South Atlantic and Mid-Atlantic Bight Shelf Waters at Cape Hatteras

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Savidge, Dana

    Seasonal Export of South Atlantic and Mid-Atlantic Bight Shelf Waters at Cape Hatteras Dana K 31411 Abstract Studies of Middle Atlantic Bight (MAB) shelf water export to the open ocean at Cape SAB shelf water to the Cape Hatteras, which must also be exported to the open ocean. In the following

  19. Florida Atlantic University Division of Research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fernandez, Eduardo

    Florida Atlantic University Division of Research Institutes/Centers Seven Year Review Fiscal Year 2007 through Fiscal Year 2013 College Contact Name: _________________________ Directory Information Institute/Center Name

  20. Oil and gas developments in Atlantic coastal plain and outer Continental Shelf in 1981

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Giordano, A.C.; Amato, R.V.

    1982-11-01

    Exploratory drilling in the Atlantic coastal plain region increased in 1981. Eight wells were drilled, 5 of which were completed for a total footage of 71,439 ft (21,780 m). Four of the wells were located in the Baltimore Canyon Trough area and 4 were located in the Georges Bank basin. No exploratory wells were drilled in the Southeast Georgia Embayment or in the onshore portion of this region in 1981. The 5 completed wells were reported as dry holes. Two lease sales were held in 1981: OCS Lease Sale 56 drew bids on 47 tracts for a total of $342,766,174 in the South Atlantic and OCS Lease Sale 59 drew bids on 50 tracts for a total of $321,981,000 in the Mid-Atlantic. Geophysical activity provided a total of 24,470 line-mi (39,380 line-km) of seismic data.

  1. An assessment of possible climate change in the Australian region based on intercomparison of general circulation modeling results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Whetton, P.H.; Pittock, A.B.; Haylock, M.R. ); Rayner, P.J. )

    1994-03-01

    To assist in estimating likely future climate change in the Australian region, the authors examine the results of four different general circulation modeling experiments run to assess the equilibrium impact of doubling greenhouse gases. The results examined were the most recent available at the time of study from various research centers in North America and Europe, as well as those of the Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO). The approach used is, first, to assess the quality of the control (1 x CO[sub 2]) simulations from each of the models of mean sea level (MSL) pressure and precipitation in the Australian region by comparing these with the corresponding observed patterns; and, second, to then analyze the 2 x CO[sub 2] results of only those model experiments with the best control simulations. Of the models examined two are chosen on the basis of their simulation of current climate in the region: the CSIRO four-level model (CSIRO4) and the United Kingdom Meteorological Office (UKMO) model. For conditions of equivalent doubling of CO[sub 2], both models show substantial increases in surface air temperature of around 4[degrees]-6[degrees] inland and 2[degrees]-4[degrees]C in coastal regions. Both models show decreased MSL pressure over the Australian continent and increases in rainfall over northern, central, and eastern Australia, particularly in the summer half of the year. The CSIRO4 model, but not the UKMO model, also shows increased pressure to the south of the continent and decreased winter rainfall in southwest and southern Australia. Generally, field significance tests show the pattern and magnitude of the changes to be significant of CSIRO4 (for which the necessary monthly simulated data were available). 42 refs., 20 figs., 5 tabs.

  2. Exact solution of the van der Waals model in the critical region

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adriano Barra; Antonio Moro

    2015-05-01

    The celebrated van der Waals model describes simple fluids in the thermodynamic limit and predicts the existence of a critical point associated to the gas-liquid phase transition. However the behaviour of critical isotherms according to the equation of state, where a gas-liquid phase transition occurs, significantly departs from experimental observations. The correct critical isotherms are heuristically re-established via the Maxwell equal areas rule. A long standing open problem in mean field theory is concerned with the analytic description of van der Waals isotherms for a finite size system that is consistent, in the thermodynamic limit, with the Maxwell prescription. Inspired by the theory of nonlinear conservation laws, we propose a novel mean field approach, based on statistical mechanics, that allows to calculate the van der Waals partition function for a system of large but finite number of particles $N$. Our partition function naturally extends to the whole space of thermodynamic variables, reproduces, in the thermodynamic limit $N\\to \\infty$, the classical results outside the critical region and automatically encodes Maxwell's prescription. We show that isothermal curves evolve in the space of thermodynamic variables like nonlinear breaking waves and the criticality is explained as the mechanism of formation of a classical hydrodynamic shock.

  3. Environment and the Lifetime of Tropical Deep Convection in a Cloud-Permitting Regional Model Simulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hagos, Samson M.; Feng, Zhe; McFarlane, Sally A.; Leung, Lai-Yung R.

    2013-08-01

    By applying a cloud tracking algorithm to tropical convective systems simulated by a regional high resolution model, the study documents environmental conditions before and after convective systems are initiated over ocean and land by following them during their lifetime. The comparative roles of various environmental fields in affecting the lifetime of convection are also quantified. The statistics of lifetime, maximum area, propagation speed and direction of the simulated deep convection agrees well with geostationary satellite observations. Over ocean, convective systems enhance surface fluxes through the associated wind gusts as well as cooling and drying of the boundary layer. A significant relationship is found between the mean surface fluxes during their lifetime and the longevity of the systems which in turn is related to the initial intensity of the moist updraft and to a lesser extent upper level shear. Over land, on the other hand, convective activity suppresses surface fluxes through cloud cover and the lifetime of convection is related to the upper level shear during their lifetime and strength of the heat fluxes several hours before the initiation of convection. For systems of equal lifetime, those over land are significantly more intense than those over ocean especially during early stages of their lifetime.

  4. PROFESSIONAL SERVICES GUIDE FLORIDA ATLANTIC UNIVERSITY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fernandez, Eduardo

    PROFESSIONAL SERVICES GUIDE FOR FLORIDA ATLANTIC UNIVERSITY APRIL 2003 #12;April 2003 FAU-PSG Page 2 of 74 FLORIDA ATLANTIC UNIVERSITY PROFESSIONAL SERVICES GUIDE Table of Contents Page 2-4 ARTICLE 1 of Contract 5.2 Construction Manager Projects Page 34 ARTICLE 6 Construction Administration 6.1 General Page

  5. State of the South Atlantic 2015

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boynton, Walter R.

    : Home to Charlotte, Raleigh, and large areas of upland hardwood forest. People who live and workState of the South Atlantic 2015 Understanding our living landscapes #12;2 The South Atlantic Recreation Wind and weather Sea-level rise Marine life Pine forests/ Forestry Fall line SA LCC marine

  6. urricane activity in the Atlantic basin increased

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    with levels in the 1970s and 1980s. For example, the accumulated cyclone energy (ACE) index in the Atlantic of disturbances. Bottom: annual number (Aug­Oct) of North Atlantic basin hurricanes (1980­2005). See figures 2, is a crucial question for the future outlook of hurricane activity in the basin. It is difficult to distinguish

  7. An integrated assessment modeling framework for uncertainty studies in global and regional

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    environmental changes. Being data-driven, the Program uses extensive Earth system and economic data and models System Model (IGSM), an integrated assessment model that couples an Earth system model of intermediate's Integrated Global System Model. Through this integrated model, the Program seeks to: discover new

  8. Analytical solutions for benchmarking cold regions subsurface water flow and energy transport models: One-dimensional soil thaw

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Freezing and thawing a b s t r a c t Numerous cold regions water flow and energy transport models have. Simulated and/or observed climate change impacts in cryogenic soils include permafrost degradation, active that include the dynamic freeze­thaw process have been tested against analytical solutions, such as the Neumann

  9. USING THE UTAH ENERGY BALANCE SNOW MELT MODEL TO QUANTIFY SNOW AND GLACIER MELT IN THE HIMALAYAN REGION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tarboton, David

    USING THE UTAH ENERGY BALANCE SNOW MELT MODEL TO QUANTIFY SNOW AND GLACIER MELT IN THE HIMALAYAN of glacier ice as a substrate and generation of melt from the ice substrate when seasonal snow has melted for the entire domain. Therefore, regional variability in snow and glacier melting is computed. Outflow can

  10. Volumetric 3D Modeling of the X-ray Emission Region within the Planetary Nebula BD+303639

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dewey, Daniel

    a b c d N WE S N S FB E W B F Volumetric 3D Modeling of the X-ray Emission Region within://space.mit.edu/hydra/v3d.html **ISIS and APED are available via http://space.mit.edu/CXC/ISIS Approach - Volumetric 3D

  11. A MODEL FOR THE STRENGTH OF THE AS-DEPOSITED REGIONS OF LOW-ALLOY STEEL WELD METALS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cambridge, University of

    true average strain ~ true plastic strain in softer phase of a dual-phase steel ~I true plastic strain in harder phase of a dual-phase steel UTS true strain at ultimate tensile stress y true strain at yieldingCHAPTER 5 A MODEL FOR THE STRENGTH OF THE AS-DEPOSITED REGIONS OF LOW-ALLOY STEEL WELD METALS 5

  12. CCCommunity Fishery Rightsommunity Fishery Rightsommunity Fishery Rights in Canada's Atlantic Regionin Canada's Atlantic Regionin Canada's Atlantic Region

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Charles, Anthony

    of local ecological knowledge, can lead to better acceptance of management rules, can resolve conflicts measures jointly by government, resource users, fishing communities and the public; · Local resource users & sustainability. · CBM can be seen as a framework for organizing management of fisheries at the local level

  13. Modeling of Multiphase Flow in the Near-Wellbore Region of the Reservoir under Transient Conditions 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, He

    2010-07-14

    .......................................................................................................... 144 APPENDIX A: GAS-WATER TWO PHASE FLOW IMPES ALGORITHMS ..... 149 APPENDIX B: BLACK OIL PVT CHARACTERIZATION .................................. 158 APPENDIX C: SOFTWARE STRUCTURE ........................................................... 175... profile in the near-wellbore region ..................... 61 Fig. 6.2 Realistic fabricated PVT data lay out the correct trends upon pressure and create appropriate fluid compressibility for pressure oscillation in the near-wellbore region...

  14. Modeling regional transportation demand in China and the impacts of a national carbon constraint

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kishimoto, Paul

    2015-01-30

    Climate and energy policy in China will have important and uneven impacts on the country’s regionally heterogeneous transport system. In order to simulate these impacts, transport sector detail is added to a multi-sector, ...

  15. Renewable Resources: a national catalog of model projects. Volume 4. Western Solar Utilization Network Region

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1980-07-01

    This compilation of diverse conservation and renewable energy projects across the United States was prepared through the enthusiastic participation of solar and alternate energy groups from every state and region. Compiled and edited by the Center for Renewable Resources, these projects reflect many levels of innovation and technical expertise. In many cases, a critique analysis is presented of how projects performed and of the institutional conditions associated with their success or failure. Some 2000 projects are included in this compilation; most have worked, some have not. Information about all is presented to aid learning from these experiences. The four volumes in this set are arranged in state sections by geographic region, coinciding with the four Regional Solar Energy Centers. The table of contents is organized by project category so that maximum cross-referencing may be obtained. This volume includes information on the Western Solar Utilization Network Region. (WHK)

  16. Renewable Resources: a national catalog of model projects. Volume 1. Northeast Solar Energy Center Region

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1980-07-01

    This compilation of diverse conservation and renewable energy projects across the United States was prepared through the enthusiastic participation of solar and alternate energy groups from every state and region. Compiled and edited by the Center for Renewable Resources, these projects reflect many levels of innovation and technical expertise. In many cases, a critique analysis is presented of how projects performed and of the institutional conditions associated with their success or failure. Some 2000 projects are included in this compilation; most have worked, some have not. Information about all is presented to aid learning from these experiences. The four volumes in this set are arranged in state sections by geographic region, coinciding with the four Regional Solar Energy Centers. The table of contents is organized by project category so that maximum cross-referencing may be obtained. This volume includes information on the Northeast Solar Energy Center Region. (WHK).

  17. Renewable Resources: a national catalog of model projects. Volume 3. Southern Solar Energy Center Region

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1980-07-01

    This compilation of diverse conservation and renewable energy projects across the United States was prepared through the enthusiastic participation of solar and alternate energy groups from every state and region. Compiled and edited by the Center for Renewable Resources, these projects reflect many levels of innovation and technical expertise. In many cases, a critique analysis is presented of how projects performed and of the institutional conditions associated with their success or failure. Some 2000 projects are included in this compilation; most have worked, some have not. Information about all is presented to aid learning from these experiences. The four volumes in this set are arranged in state sections by geographic region, coinciding with the four Regional Solar Energy Centers. The table of contents is organized by project category so that maximum cross-referencing may be obtained. This volume includes information on the Southern Solar Energy Center Region. (WHK)

  18. Integrated simulation of snow and glacier melt in water and energy balance-based, distributed hydrological modeling framework at Hunza River Basin of Pakistan Karakoram region

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2015-01-01

    basin, Nepal Himalaya, in Snow and Glacier Hydrology, vol.274, 198–210. INTEGRATED SNOW AND GLACIERMELT MODEL Journalon water availability in snow-dominated regions, Nature,

  19. Verifying the Accuracy of Land Use Models Used in Transportation and Air Quality: A Case Study in the Sacramento, California Region

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rodier, Caroline J.

    2005-01-01

    A Case Study in the Sacramento Region (Ph.D. Dissertation,Analysis using the Sacramento MEPLAN Land Use Transportationin the MEPLAN model of Sacramento. ” Transportation Research

  20. Oil and gas developments in Atlantic Coastal Plain and Outer Continental Shelf in 1983

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Giordano, A.C.; Carpenter, G.B.; Amato, R.V.

    1984-10-01

    Exploratory drilling in the Atlantic coastal plain region declined slightly in 1983. Four wells were spudded during the year: 2 in the offshore Baltimore Canyon area and 2 onshore in Lee County, North Carolina. One North Carolina well was drilled, and the other was being tested at year end. In April, 4050 tracts were offered in the mid-Atlantic lease offering (OCS Sale 76), the first area-wide offering of offshore oil and gas leases under the Department of the Interior's new streamlined leasing system. Bids of $86,822,680 were exposed on 40 tracts, and 37 tracts were subsequently leased. In July 3, 082 tracts were offered in the south Atlantic lease offering (OCS Sale 78). Bids of $14,562,040 were exposed on 11 tracts, and all high bids were accepted. Seismic data acquisition decreased 64% below the 1982 level to 13,166 line-mi (21,189 line-km). 3 figures, 2 tables.

  1. Sixth Northwest Conservation and Electric Power Plan Appendix J: The Regional Portfolio Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ............................................................................................................ 10 Capacity and Costs Related to Capacity ............................................................................................... 15 Variable Capacity.......................................................................................................................... 28 Modeling Energy-Limited Resources

  2. FORECASTING OF ATLANTIC TROPICAL CYCLONES USING A KILO-MEMBER ENSEMBLE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schubert, Wayne H.

    system using an efficient multigrid barotropic vorticity equation model (MBAR). Five perturbation classes Advisor Department Head ii #12;ABSTRACT OF THESIS FORECASTING OF ATLANTIC TROPICAL CYCLONES USING A KILO forecasts. These increases have been largely driven by improved numerical weather prediction models

  3. Mid-Atlantic Region Combined Heat and Power Projects

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE's CHP Technical Assistance Partnerships (CHP TAPs) have compiled a select number of combined heat and power (CHP) project profiles, which are available as Adobe Acrobat PDFs.

  4. Implementation and evaluation of online gas-phase chemistry within a regional climate model (RegCM-CHEM4)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shalaby, A. K.; Zakey, A. S.; Tawfik, A. B.; Solmon, F.; Giorgi, Filippo; Stordal, F.; Sillman, S.; Zaveri, Rahul A.; Steiner, A. L.

    2012-05-22

    The RegCM-CHEM4 is a new online climate-chemistry model based on the International Centre for Theoretical Physics (ICTP) regional climate model (RegCM4). Tropospheric gas-phase chemistry is integrated into the climate model using the condensed version of the Carbon Bond Mechanism (CBM-Z; Zaveri and Peters, 1999) with a fast solver based on radical balances. We evaluate the model over Continental Europe for two different time scales: (1) an event-based analysis of the ozone episode associated with the heat wave of August 2003 and (2) a climatological analysis of a sixyear simulation (2000-2005). For the episode analysis, model simulations show good agreement with European Monitoring and Evaluation Program (EMEP) observations of hourly ozone over different regions in Europe and capture ozone concentrations during and after the August 2003 heat wave event. For long-term climate simulations, the model captures the seasonal cycle of ozone concentrations with some over prediction of ozone concentrations in non-heat wave summers. Overall, the ozone and ozone precursor evaluation shows the feasibility of using RegCM-CHEM4 for decadal-length simulations of chemistry-climate interactions.

  5. Impact of Agricultural Practice on Regional Climate in a Coupled Land Surface Mesoscale Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cooley, H.S.; Riley, W.J.; Torn, M.S.; He, Y.

    2004-01-01

    winter wheat belt on the mesoscale environment, Monthlygeneration Penn State/NCAR mesoscale model (MM5), NCAR,in a Coupled Land Surface Mesoscale Model H.S. Cooley Energy

  6. Forest dynamics at regional scales: predictive models constrained with inventory data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lines, Emily

    2012-06-12

    by scaling from key tree-level processes, but models typically have no climate dependency. In this thesis I demonstrate how large-scale national inventories combined with improvements in computational methods mean that models that incorporate the climate...

  7. A Habitat-based Wind-Wildlife Collision Model with Application to the Upper Great Plains Region

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Forcey, Greg, M.

    2012-08-28

    Most previous studies on collision impacts at wind facilities have taken place at the site-specific level and have only examined small-scale influences on mortality. In this study, we examine landscape-level influences using a hierarchical spatial model combined with existing datasets and life history knowledge for: Horned Lark, Red-eyed Vireo, Mallard, American Avocet, Golden Eagle, Whooping Crane, red bat, silver-haired bat, and hoary bat. These species were modeled in the central United States within Bird Conservation Regions 11, 17, 18, and 19. For the bird species, we modeled bird abundance from existing datasets as a function of habitat variables known to be preferred by each species to develop a relative abundance prediction for each species. For bats, there are no existing abundance datasets so we identified preferred habitat in the landscape for each species and assumed that greater amounts of preferred habitat would equate to greater abundance of bats. The abundance predictions for bird and bats were modeled with additional exposure factors known to influence collisions such as visibility, wind, temperature, precipitation, topography, and behavior to form a final mapped output of predicted collision risk within the study region. We reviewed published mortality studies from wind farms in our study region and collected data on reported mortality of our focal species to compare to our modeled predictions. We performed a sensitivity analysis evaluating model performance of 6 different scenarios where habitat and exposure factors were weighted differently. We compared the model performance in each scenario by evaluating observed data vs. our model predictions using spearmans rank correlations. Horned Lark collision risk was predicted to be highest in the northwestern and west-central portions of the study region with lower risk predicted elsewhere. Red-eyed Vireo collision risk was predicted to be the highest in the eastern portions of the study region and in the forested areas of the western portion; the lowest risk was predicted in the treeless portions of the northwest portion of the study area. Mallard collision risk was predicted to be highest in the eastern central portion of the prairie potholes and in Iowa which has a high density of pothole wetlands; lower risk was predicted in the more arid portions of the study area. Predicted collision risk for American Avocet was similar to Mallard and was highest in the prairie pothole region and lower elsewhere. Golden Eagle collision risk was predicted to be highest in the mountainous areas of the western portion of the study area and lowest in the eastern portion of the prairie potholes. Whooping Crane predicted collision risk was highest within the migration corridor that the birds follow through in the central portion of the study region; predicted collision risk was much lower elsewhere. Red bat collision risk was highly driven by large tracts of forest and river corridors which made up most of the areas of higher collision risk. Silver-haired bat and hoary bat predicted collision risk were nearly identical and driven largely by forest and river corridors as well as locations with warmer temperatures, and lower average wind speeds. Horned Lark collisions were mostly influenced by abundance and predictions showed a moderate correlation between observed and predicted mortality (r = 0.55). Red bat, silver-haired bat, and hoary bat predictions were much higher and shown a strong correlations with observed mortality with correlations of 0.85, 0.90, and 0.91 respectively. Red bat collisions were influenced primarily by habitat, while hoary bat and silver-haired bat collisions were influenced mainly by exposure variables. Stronger correlations between observed and predicted collision for bats than for Horned Larks can likely be attributed to stronger habitat associations and greater influences of weather on behavior for bats. Although the collision predictions cannot be compared among species, our model outputs provide a convenient and easy landscape-level tool to quick

  8. Investigation of global and regional BWR instabilities with a four heated-channel Reduced Order Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Demazičre, Christophe

    and regional Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) instabilities is described. The ROM contains three sub. Introduction Over the past decades, the concept of linear analysis to study the stability of Boiling Water Reactors (BWR) has become one of the most commonly-used methodologies in reactor diagnostics. Conceptually

  9. Ability of a global three-dimensional model to locate regional events

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shapiro, Nikolai

    is that the Comprehensive Nuclear Test-Ban Treaty (CTBT), irrespec- tive of its current status, has motivated greater; revised 31 March 2003; accepted 29 April 2003; published 30 July 2003. [1] We assess the ability events using regional travel time data alone (epicentral distances Assessments are based

  10. Coronal energy input and dissipation in a solar active region 3D MHD model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bourdin, Philippe-A; Peter, Hardi

    2015-01-01

    Context. We have conducted a 3D MHD simulation of the solar corona above an active region in full scale and high resolution, which shows coronal loops, and plasma flows within them, similar to observations. Aims. We want to find the connection between the photospheric energy input by field-line braiding with the coronal energy conversion by Ohmic dissipation of induced currents. Methods. To this end we compare the coronal energy input and dissipation within our simulation domain above different fields of view, e.g. for a small loops system in the active region (AR) core. We also choose an ensemble of field lines to compare, e.g., the magnetic energy input to the heating per particle along these field lines. Results. We find an enhanced Ohmic dissipation of currents in the corona above areas that also have enhanced upwards-directed Poynting flux. These regions coincide with the regions where hot coronal loops within the AR core are observed. The coronal density plays a role in estimating the coronal temperatur...

  11. TransCom 3 inversion intercomparison: Impact of transport model errors on the interannual variability of regional CO 2 fluxes, 1988-2003

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2006-01-01

    East Pacific South Pacific Northern Ocean North AtlanticEast Pacific South Pacific Northern Ocean North Atlanticand South Pacific, and the Northern Ocean) for which there

  12. Deformed shell model results for neutrinoless double beta decay of nuclei in A=60-90 region

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. Sahu; V. K. B. Kota

    2015-03-20

    Nuclear transition matrix elements (NTME) for the neutrinoless double beta decay of $^{70}$Zn, $^{80}$Se and $^{82}$Se nuclei are calculated within the framework of the deformed shell model based on Hartree-Fock states. For $^{70}$Zn, jj44b interaction in $^{2}p_{3/2}$, $^{1}f_{5/2}$, $^{2}p_{1/2}$ and $^{1}g_{9/2}$ space with $^{56}$Ni as the core is employed. However, for $^{80}$Se and $^{82}$Se nuclei, a modified Kuo interaction with the above core and model space are employed. Most of our calculations in this region were performed with this effective interaction. However, jj44b interaction has been found to be better for $^{70}$Zn. The above model space was used in many recent shell model and interacting boson model calculations for nuclei in this region. After ensuring that DSM gives good description of the spectroscopic properties of low-lying levels in these three nuclei considered, the NTME are calculated. The deduced half-lives with these NTME, assuming neutrino mass is 1 eV, are $1.1 \\times 10^{26}$ yr, $2.3 \\times 10^{27}$ yr and $2.2 \\times 10^{24}$ yr for $^{70}$Zn, $^{80}$Se and $^{82}$Se, respectively.

  13. Transforming the representation of the boundary layer and low clouds for high-resolution regional climate modeling: Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huang, Hsin-Yuan; Hall, Alex

    2013-07-24

    Stratocumulus and shallow cumulus clouds in subtropical oceanic regions (e.g., Southeast Pacific) cover thousands of square kilometers and play a key role in regulating global climate (e.g., Klein and Hartmann, 1993). Numerical modeling is an essential tool to study these clouds in regional and global systems, but the current generation of climate and weather models has difficulties in representing them in a realistic way (e.g., Siebesma et al., 2004; Stevens et al., 2007; Teixeira et al., 2011). While numerical models resolve the large-scale flow, subgrid-scale parameterizations are needed to estimate small-scale properties (e.g. boundary layer turbulence and convection, clouds, radiation), which have significant influence on the resolved scale due to the complex nonlinear nature of the atmosphere. To represent the contribution of these fine-scale processes to the resolved scale, climate models use various parameterizations, which are the main pieces in the model that contribute to the low clouds dynamics and therefore are the major sources of errors or approximations in their representation. In this project, we aim to 1) improve our understanding of the physical processes in thermal circulation and cloud formation, 2) examine the performance and sensitivity of various parameterizations in the regional weather model (Weather Research and Forecasting model; WRF), and 3) develop, implement, and evaluate the advanced boundary layer parameterization in the regional model to better represent stratocumulus, shallow cumulus, and their transition. Thus, this project includes three major corresponding studies. We find that the mean diurnal cycle is sensitive to model domain in ways that reveal the existence of different contributions originating from the Southeast Pacific land-masses. The experiments suggest that diurnal variations in circulations and thermal structures over this region are influenced by convection over the Peruvian sector of the Andes cordillera, while the mostly dry mountain-breeze circulations force an additional component that results in semi-diurnal variations near the coast. A series of numerical tests, however, reveal sensitivity of the simulations to the choice of vertical grid, limiting the possibility of solid quantitative statements on the amplitudes and phases of the diurnal and semidiurnal components across the domain. According to our experiments, the Mellor-Yamada-Nakanishi-Niino (MYNN) boundary layer scheme and the WSM6 microphysics scheme is the combination of schemes that performs best. For that combination, mean cloud cover, liquid water path, and cloud depth are fairly wellsimulated, while mean cloud top height remains too low in comparison to observations. Both microphysics and boundary layer schemes contribute to the spread in liquid water path and cloud depth, although the microphysics contribution is slightly more prominent. Boundary layer schemes are the primary contributors to cloud top height, degree of adiabaticity, and cloud cover. Cloud top height is closely related to surface fluxes and boundary layer structure. Thus, our study infers that an appropriate tuning of cloud top height would likely improve the low-cloud representation in the model. Finally, we show that entrainment governs the degree of adiabaticity, while boundary layer decoupling is a control on cloud cover. In the intercomparison study using WRF single-column model experiments, most parameterizations show a poor agreement of the vertical boundary layer structure when compared with large-eddy simulation models. We also implement a new Total-Energy/Mass- Flux boundary layer scheme into the WRF model and evaluate its ability to simulate both stratocumulus and shallow cumulus clouds. Result comparisons against large-eddy simulation show that this advanced parameterization based on the new Eddy-Diffusivity/Mass-Flux approach provides a better performance than other boundary layer parameterizations.

  14. Regional CO2 and latent heat surface fluxes in the Southern Great Plains: Measurements, modeling, and scaling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Riley, W. J.; Biraud, S.C.; Torn, M.S.; Fischer, M.L.; Billesbach, D.P.; Berry, J.A.

    2009-08-15

    Characterizing net ecosystem exchanges (NEE) of CO{sub 2} and sensible and latent heat fluxes in heterogeneous landscapes is difficult, yet critical given expected changes in climate and land use. We report here a measurement and modeling study designed to improve our understanding of surface to atmosphere gas exchanges under very heterogeneous land cover in the mostly agricultural U.S. Southern Great Plains (SGP). We combined three years of site-level, eddy covariance measurements in several of the dominant land cover types with regional-scale climate data from the distributed Mesonet stations and Next Generation Weather Radar precipitation measurements to calibrate a land surface model of trace gas and energy exchanges (isotope-enabled land surface model (ISOLSM)). Yearly variations in vegetation cover distributions were estimated from Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer normalized difference vegetation index and compared to regional and subregional vegetation cover type estimates from the U.S. Department of Agriculture census. We first applied ISOLSM at a 250 m spatial scale to account for vegetation cover type and leaf area variations that occur on hundred meter scales. Because of computational constraints, we developed a subsampling scheme within 10 km 'macrocells' to perform these high-resolution simulations. We estimate that the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility SGP region net CO{sub 2} exchange with the local atmosphere was -240, -340, and -270 gC m{sup -2} yr{sup -1} (positive toward the atmosphere) in 2003, 2004, and 2005, respectively, with large seasonal variations. We also performed simulations using two scaling approaches at resolutions of 10, 30, 60, and 90 km. The scaling approach applied in current land surface models led to regional NEE biases of up to 50 and 20% in weekly and annual estimates, respectively. An important factor in causing these biases was the complex leaf area index (LAI) distribution within cover types. Biases in predicted weekly average regional latent heat fluxes were smaller than for NEE, but larger than for either ecosystem respiration or assimilation alone. However, spatial and diurnal variations of hundreds of W m{sup -2} in latent heat fluxes were common. We conclude that, in this heterogeneous system, characterizing vegetation cover type and LAI at the scale of spatial variation are necessary for accurate estimates of bottom-up, regional NEE and surface energy fluxes.

  15. A Guide for Using the Transient Ground-Water Flow Model of the Death Valley Regional Ground-Water Flow System, Nevada and California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joan B. Blainey; Claudia C. Faunt, and Mary C. Hill

    2006-05-16

    This report is a guide for executing numerical simulations with the transient ground-water flow model of the Death Valley regional ground-water flow system, Nevada and California using the U.S. Geological Survey modular finite-difference ground-water flow model, MODFLOW-2000. Model inputs, including observations of hydraulic head, discharge, and boundary flows, are summarized. Modification of the DVRFS transient ground-water model is discussed for two common uses of the Death Valley regional ground-water flow system model: predictive pumping scenarios that extend beyond the end of the model simulation period (1998), and model simulations with only steady-state conditions.

  16. Hadron Production Model Developments and Benchmarking in the 0.7 - 12 GeV Energy Region

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    N. V. Mokhov; K. K. Gudima; S. I. Striganov

    2014-08-29

    Driven by the needs of the intensity frontier projects with their Megawatt beams, e.g., ESS, FAIR and Project X, and their experiments, the event generators of the MARS15 code have been recently improved. After thorough analysis and benchmarking against data, including the newest ones by the HARP collaboration, both the exclusive and inclusive particle production models were further developed in the crucial for the above projects - but difficult from a theoretical standpoint - projectile energy region of 0.7 to 12 GeV. At these energies, modelling of prompt particle production in nucleon-nucleon and pion-nucleon inelastic reactions is now based on a combination of phase-space and isobar models. Other reactions are still modeled in the framework of the Quark-Gluon String Model. Pion, kaon and strange particle production and propagation in nuclear media are improved. For the alternative inclusive mode, experimental data on large-angle (> 20 degrees) pion production in hadron-nucleus interactions are parameterized in a broad energy range using a two-source model. It is mixed-and-matched with the native MARS model that successfully describes low-angle pion production data. Predictions of both new models are - in most cases - in a good agreement with experimental data obtained at CERN, JINR, LANL, BNL and KEK.

  17. Modeling the resuspension of radionuclides in Ukranian regions impacted by Chernobyl fallout

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nair, S.K.; Thiessen, K.M.; Hoffman, F.O. [SENES Oak Ridge Inc., TN (United States)] [and others

    1997-01-01

    Following the 1986 Chernobyl event, large amounts of radioactive materials were deposited in nearby areas. Concentrations of various radionuclides were measured in air and surface soil. To study the resuspension of radioactive particulate, three different exposure situations were developed on the basis of the collected data under the auspices of the international BIOMOVS II (BIOspheric MOdel Validation Study) project. Modelers were asked to predict seasonal air concentrations and resuspension factors at several locations at different distances from Chernobyl for six successive years following the accident. Measurements of radionuclide deposition on topsoil were provided for each site along with information on soil, vegetation, land use, surface roughness, meteorology, and climate. In this paper, the three exposure situations are described, along with the initial data set provided to the modelers; two modeling approaches used to make the endpoint predictions are also presented. After the model predictions were submitted, the measured air concentrations and resuspension factors were released to the modelers. Generally, the predictions were well within an order of magnitude of the measured values. Time-dependent trends in predictions and measurements were in good agreement with one of the models, which (a) explicitly accounted for loss processes in soil and (b) used calibration to improve its predictive capabilities. Reasons for variations between predictions and measurements, suggestions for the improvement of models, and conclusions from the model validation study are presented. 12 refs., 15 figs., 4 tabs.

  18. Impact of Atlantic multidecadal oscillations on India/Sahel rainfall and Atlantic hurricanes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Impact of Atlantic multidecadal oscillations on India/Sahel rainfall and Atlantic hurricanes Rong; published 9 September 2006. [1] Prominent multidecadal fluctuations of India summer rainfall, Sahel summer their mechanism(s) will have enormous social and economic implications. We first use statistical analyses to show

  19. Genetic heterogeneity of Atlantic bluefin tuna caught in the eastern North Atlantic Ocean south of Iceland

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Newman, Michael C.

    of Iceland Jens Carlsson, Jan R. McDowell, Jeanette E. L. Carlsson, Droplaug O´ lafsdo´ttir, and John E. Genetic heterogeneity of Atlantic bluefin tuna caught in the eastern North Atlantic Ocean south of Iceland, more recent studies south of Iceland reported only small differences in size of tuna caught

  20. Integrated Canada-U.S. Power Sector Modeling with the Regional Energy Deployment System (ReEDS)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martinez, A.; Eurek, K.; Mai, T.; Perry, A.

    2013-02-01

    The electric power system in North America is linked between the United States and Canada. Canada has historically been a net exporter of electricity to the United States. The extent to which this remains true will depend on the future evolution of power markets, technology deployment, and policies. To evaluate these and related questions, we modify the Regional Energy Deployment System (ReEDS) model to include an explicit representation of the grid-connected power system in Canada to the continental United States. ReEDS is unique among long-term capacity expansion models for its high spatial resolution and statistical treatment of the impact of variable renewable generation on capacity planning and dispatch. These unique traits are extended to new Canadian regions. We present example scenario results using the fully integrated Canada-U.S. version of ReEDS to demonstrate model capabilities. The newly developed, integrated Canada-U.S. ReEDS model can be used to analyze the dynamics of electricity transfers and other grid services between the two countries under different scenarios.

  1. Formation and eruption of an active region sigmoid. I. A study by nonlinear force-free field modeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jiang, Chaowei; Feng, Xueshang [SIGMA Weather Group, State Key Laboratory for Space Weather, Center for Space Science and Applied Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Wu, S. T.; Hu, Qiang, E-mail: cwjiang@spaceweather.ac.cn, E-mail: fengx@spaceweather.ac.cn, E-mail: wus@uah.edu, E-mail: qh0001@uah.edu [Center for Space Plasma and Aeronomic Research, The University of Alabama in Huntsville, Huntsville, AL 35899 (United States)

    2014-01-01

    We present a comprehensive study of the formation and eruption of an active region (AR) sigmoid in AR 11283. To follow the quasi-static evolution of the coronal magnetic field, we reconstruct a time sequence of static fields using a recently developed nonlinear force-free field model constrained by vector magnetograms. A detailed analysis of the fields compared with observations suggests the following scenario for the evolution of the region. Initially, a new bipole emerges into the negative polarity of a preexisting bipolar AR, forming a null-point topology between the two flux systems. A weakly twisted flux rope (FR) is then built up slowly in the embedded core region, largely through flux cancellation, forming a bald patch separatrix surface (BPSS). The FR grows gradually until its axis runs into a torus instability (TI) domain, and the BPSS also develops a full S-shape. The combined effects of the TI-driven expansion of the FR and the line tying at the BP tear the FR into two parts with the upper portion freely expelled and the lower portion remaining behind the postflare arcades. This process dynamically perturbs the BPSS and results in the enhanced heating of the sigmoid and the rope. The accelerated expansion of the upper-portion rope strongly pushes its envelope flux near the null point and triggers breakout reconnection at the null, which further drives the eruption. We discuss the important implications of these results for the formation and disruption of the sigmoid region with an FR.

  2. Deformation of layered rocks in the ramp regions of thrust faults: a study with rock models 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chester, Judith Savaso

    1985-01-01

    wall at an S/Lr of 0. 20. " . . . . . . " "" . . -" . 43 17 Diagram showing the thrust belt terminology used to refer to locations and structures in the models. . . . . . 47 18 Deformation maps of configuration A models layered with lead and a... of configuration A. 65 xi LIST OF FIGURES (continued) Figure Page 25 Plot of slip across the lowest lead or mica unit of the veneer at the apex of the anticline above the ramp (location c) versus S/Lr for models of configurations A and B. 67 26 27 Plot...

  3. Predicting hurricane regional landfall rates: comparing local and basin-wide track model approaches

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hall, T; Hall, Tim; Jewson, Stephen

    2006-01-01

    We compare two methods for making predictions of the climatological distribution of the number of hurricanes making landfall along short sections of the North American coastline. The first method uses local data, and the second method uses a basin-wide track model. Using cross-validation we show that the basin-wide track model gives better predictions for almost all parts of the coastline. This is the first time such a comparison has been made, and is the first rigourous justification for the use of basin-wide track models for predicting hurricane landfall rates and hurricane risk.

  4. Regional & Global Climate Modeling (RGCM) Program | U.S. DOE Office of

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorkingLosThe 26thIWalter H.4 »ProgrammingScience (SC) Regional &

  5. From Connectivity Models to Region Labels: Identifying Foci of a Neurological Disorder

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Venkataraman, Archana

    We propose a novel approach to identify the foci of a neurological disorder based on anatomical and functional connectivity information. Specifically, we formulate a generative model that characterizes the network of ...

  6. START: Status and Region Aware Taxi Mobility Model for Urban Vehicular Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Yu

    networks [1]­[3] play a critical role in building smart cities and supporting comprehensive urban, and other important tasks of smart cities. Mobility models for mobile networks [4], [5] have been well

  7. Modeled Neutron Induced Nuclear Reaction Cross Sections for Radiochemistry in the region of Iriduim and Gold

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoffman, R D; Dietrich, F S; Kelley, K; Escher, J; Bauer, R; Mustafa, M

    2008-02-26

    We have developed a set of modeled nuclear reaction cross sections for use in radiochemical diagnostics. Systematics for the input parameters required by the Hauser-Feshbach statistical model were developed and used to calculate neutron induced nuclear reaction cross sections for targets ranging from osmium (Z = 76) to gold (Z = 79). Of particular interest are the cross sections on Ir and Au including reactions on isomeric targets.

  8. Dynamical Coupled-Channel Model of Meson Production Reactions in the Nucleon Resonance Region

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    T.-S. H. Lee; A. Matsuyama; T. Sato

    2006-11-15

    A dynamical coupled-channel model is presented for investigating the nucleon resonances (N*) in the meson production reactions induced by pions and photons. Our objective is to extract the N* parameters and to investigate the meson production reaction mechanisms for mapping out the quark-gluon substructure of N* from the data. The model is based on an energy-independent Hamiltonian which is derived from a set of Lagrangians by using a unitary transformation method.

  9. The Atlantic Alliance and Geopolitics: New Realities and New Challenges

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lie, Kai Olaf

    2009-01-01

    Cooley, John K. (2005) An Alliance against Babylon. London:The Future of the Atlantic Alliance. Colombia: University ofKai Lie* Draft The Atlantic Alliance and Geopolitics: New

  10. Borders as membranes :metaphors and models for improved policy in border regions.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Malczynski, Leonard A.; Passell, Howard David; Forster, Craig B. (University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT); Cockerill, Kristan (Cockerill Consulting, Boone, NC)

    2005-10-01

    Political borders are controversial and contested spaces. In an attempt to better understand movement along and through political borders, this project applied the metaphor of a membrane to look at how people, ideas, and things ''move'' through a border. More specifically, the research team employed this metaphor in a system dynamics framework to construct a computer model to assess legal and illegal migration on the US-Mexico border. Employing a metaphor can be helpful, as it was in this project, to gain different perspectives on a complex system. In addition to the metaphor, the multidisciplinary team utilized an array of methods to gather data including traditional literature searches, an experts workshop, a focus group, interviews, and culling expertise from the individuals on the research team. Results from the qualitative efforts revealed strong social as well as economic drivers that motivate individuals to cross the border legally. Based on the information gathered, the team concluded that legal migration dynamics were of a scope we did not want to consider hence, available demographic models sufficiently capture migration at the local level. Results from both the quantitative and qualitative data searches were used to modify a 1977 border model to demonstrate the dynamic nature of illegal migration. Model runs reveal that current US-policies based on neo-classic economic theory have proven ineffective in curbing illegal migration, and that proposed enforcement policies are also likely to be ineffective. We suggest, based on model results, that improvement in economic conditions within Mexico may have the biggest impact on illegal migration to the U.S. The modeling also supports the views expressed in the current literature suggesting that demographic and economic changes within Mexico are likely to slow illegal migration by 2060 with no special interventions made by either government.

  11. A regional economic impact model for identifying the relationship between transportation investments and economic development 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Freyre, German Eleodoro

    1989-01-01

    Impacts 21 3. 5 Past Applications of the REIMHS Model 22 I V PROPOSED METHODOLOGY 24 4. 1 Project Classification Criteria 4. 2 Allocation of Project Costs 4. 3 Computation and Distribution of the Efficiency Savings 24 26 31 TABLE OF CONTENTS... OF CONTENTS Chapter Page I INTRODUCIION 1. 1 General Background 1. 2 Objectives of the Research 1. 3 Summary of Research Plan 1. 4 Thesis Organization II LITERATURE REVIEW I I I OVERVIEW OF THE REIMHS MODEL 14 3. 1 Distribution of the Monetary...

  12. Observing and modelling f-region ionospheric dynamics using the (OII) 7320a emission. Doctoral thesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carr, S.S.

    1992-01-01

    Limb-scan observations of Doppler line profiles from the (OII) lambda 7320A emission at F-Region altitudes, made with the Fabry-Perot interferometer (FPI) on the Dynamics Explorer-2 (DE-2) spacecraft, have been analyzed to provide measurements of the meridional component of the ion convection velocity along the instrument line-of-sight. The DE-2 results presented here demonstrate the first spaceborne use of the remote-sensing Doppler techniques for measurements of ionospheric convection. The FPI meridional ion drift measurements have been compared with nearly simultaneous in situ ion drift measurements from the Retarding Potential Analyzer (RPA) on DE 2. Once allowance is made for the temporal lag between the in situ and remote measurements, the results from the two techniques are found to be in good agreement, within specified experimental errors, giving confidence in the FPI measurements.

  13. Neutron lifetimes behavior analysis considering the two-region kinetic model in the IPEN/MB-01 reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gonnelli, Eduardo; Diniz, Ricardo

    2014-11-11

    This is a complementary work about the behavior analysis of the neutron lifetimes that was developed in the IPEN/MB-01 nuclear reactor facility. The macroscopic neutron noise technique was experimentally employed using pulse mode detectors for two stages of control rods insertion, where a total of twenty levels of subcriticality have been carried out. It was also considered that the neutron reflector density was treated as an additional group of delayed neutrons, being a sophisticated approach in the two-region kinetic theoretical model.

  14. Assessment of Uncertainties in the Response of the African Monsoon Precipitation to Land Use change simulated by a regional model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hagos, Samson M.; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Xue, Yongkang; Boone, Aaron; de Sales, Fernando; Neupane, Naresh; Huang, Maoyi; Yoon, Jin-Ho

    2014-02-22

    Land use and land cover over Africa have changed substantially over the last sixty years and this change has been proposed to affect monsoon circulation and precipitation. This study examines the uncertainties on the effect of these changes on the African Monsoon system and Sahel precipitation using an ensemble of regional model simulations with different combinations of land surface and cumulus parameterization schemes. Although the magnitude of the response covers a broad range of values, most of the simulations show a decline in Sahel precipitation due to the expansion of pasture and croplands at the expense of trees and shrubs and an increase in surface air temperature.

  15. The Regional Atmospheric Modeling System (RAMS): Development for Parallel Processing Computer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cirne, Walfredo

    on the mesoscale (horizontal scales from 2 km to 2000 km) for purposes ranging from operational weather forecasting and simulating convective clouds, mesoscale convective systems, cirrus clouds, and precipitating weather systems models that had a great deal of overlap, the CSU cloud/mesoscale mode (Tripoli and Cotton, 1982

  16. Multitarget region tracking based on short-sight modeling of background and color distribution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mille, Julien

    as well as non-parametric modeling of color statistics, we develop an energy-minimization based approach of color statistics and shapes of objects over time and space [1][2]. Most often, the energy is derived for tracking in real scenes with cluttered backgrounds, where statistical color data is highly scattered

  17. Modeling the Dynamics of Desakota Regions: Global - Local Nexus in the Taipei Metropolitan Area 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Bing-Sheng

    2010-10-12

    in 1991, focuses on how internal domestic and local forces drive the specific rural-urban transformation in Asia. However, the McGee-Ginsburg model does not emphasize the importance of globalization on Asian urbanization. To fill the gap, this study...

  18. Realistic Shell-Model Calculations for Nuclei in the Region of Shell Closures off Stability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Covello; L. Coraggio; A. Gargano

    1998-07-24

    We have performed realistic shell-model calculations for nuclei around doubly magic 100Sn and 132Sn using an effective interaction derived from the Bonn A nucleon-nucleon potential. The results are in remarkably good agreement with the experimental data showing the ability of our effective interaction to provide an accurate description of nuclear structure properties.

  19. An Evaluation of High Order Spatial Accuracy Algorithms for Modeling Fixed and Rotary Wing Tip regions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 An Evaluation of High Order Spatial Accuracy Algorithms for Modeling Fixed and Rotary Wing Tip Nielsen Engineering and Research, Inc., Mountain View, CA 94043-2212 Yi Liu, Radhika Gupta, and L. N. Sankar School of Aerospace Engineering, Georgia Tech, Atlanta, GA 30332-0150 ABSTRACT Several high order

  20. 2015 403(b) Plan Universal Availability Notice Florida Atlantic University ("FAU") sponsors Florida Atlantic University 403(b) Plan (the "Plan").

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fernandez, Eduardo

    2015 403(b) Plan Universal Availability Notice Florida Atlantic University ("FAU") sponsors Florida Atlantic University 403(b) Plan (the "Plan"). Eligible employees of the University can voluntarily elect enroll in the FAU 403(b) Plan. Please see: http

  1. Aircraft vertical profiles of trace gas and aerosol pollution over the mid-Atlantic United States: Statistics and meteorological cluster

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thompson, Anne

    measurements of O3, CO, SO2, and aerosol properties were made during summertime air pollution episodes over. Introduction [2] In 1992, in response to mounting air pollution prob- lems over the mid-Atlantic United States holistic, long-term air quality studies in the region and analyzing transboundary pollution transport

  2. Geochemical evidence for African dust inputs to soils of western Atlantic islands: Barbados, the Bahamas, and Florida

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prospero, Joseph M.

    Geochemical evidence for African dust inputs to soils of western Atlantic islands: Barbados of Barbados, the Florida Keys, and the Bahamas. Potential soil parent materials in this region, external to the carbonate substrate, include volcanic ash from the island of St. Vincent (near Barbados), volcanic ash from

  3. 2D versus 1D ground-motion modelling for the Friuli region, north-eastern Italy1 W. Imperatori1, *

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    12 evaluate how the 2D (in the NW-SE direction) geological structure of the Friuli (NE Italy) basin13-studied regions, such as California, 3D geological structure models are often used for4 ground-motion modelling analyses, different 1D models are9 chosen for different stations to better characterize the structure

  4. Complex Chemistry in Star-Forming Regions: An Expanded Gas-Grain Warm-up Chemical Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robin T. Garrod; Susanna L. Widicus Weaver; Eric Herbst

    2008-03-08

    Gas-phase processes were long thought to be the key formation mechanisms for complex organic molecules in star-forming regions. However, recent experimental and theoretical evidence has cast doubt on the efficiency of such processes. Grain-surface chemistry is frequently invoked as a solution, but until now there have been no quantitative models taking into account both the high degree of chemical complexity and the evolving physical conditions of star-forming regions. Here, we introduce a new gas-grain chemical network, wherein a wide array of complex species may be formed by reactions involving radicals. The radicals we consider (H, OH, CO, HCO, CH3, CH3O, CH2OH, NH and NH2) are produced primarily by cosmic ray-induced photodissociation of the granular ices formed during the colder, earlier stages of evolution. The gradual warm-up of the hot core is crucial to the formation of complex molecules, allowing the more strongly-bound radicals to become mobile on grain surfaces. This type of chemistry is capable of reproducing the high degree of complexity seen in Sgr B2(N), and can explain the observed abundances and temperatures of a variety of previously detected complex organic molecules, including structural isomers. Many other complex species are predicted by this model, and several of these species may be detectable in hot cores. Differences in the chemistry of high- and low-mass star-formation are also addressed; greater chemical complexity is expected where evolution timescales are longer.

  5. SERA Scenarios of Early Market Fuel Cell Electric Vehicle Introductions: Modeling Framework, Regional Markets, and Station Clustering; NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Melaina, M.

    2015-03-23

    This presentation provides an overview of the Scenario Evaluation and Regionalization Analysis (SERA) model, describes the methodology for developing scenarios for hydrogen infrastructure development, outlines an example "Hydrogen Success" scenario, and discusses detailed scenario metrics for a particular case study region, the Northeast Corridor.

  6. Role of the tropical Atlantic sea surface temperature in the decadal change of the summer North Atlantic Oscillation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    pattern exhibited a traditional distribution with two centers over the North Atlantic. Citation: Sun, JRole of the tropical Atlantic sea surface temperature in the decadal change of the summer North Atlantic Oscillation Jianqi Sun,1,2 Huijun Wang,1,2 and Wei Yuan2,3 Received 1 May 2009; revised 11 July

  7. An integrated assessment modeling framework for uncertainty studies in global and regional climate change: the MIT IGSM-CAM (version 1.0)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Monier, Erwan

    This paper describes a computationally efficient framework for uncertainty studies in global and regional climate change. In this framework, the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) Integrated Global System Model ...

  8. First Structure Formation: I. Primordial Star Forming Regions in hierarchical models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tom Abel; Peter Anninos; Michael L. Norman; Yu Zhang

    1997-05-17

    We investigate the possibility of very early formation of primordial star clusters from high-\\sigma perturbations in cold dark matter dominated structure formation scenarios. For this we have developed a powerful 2-level hierarchical cosmological code with a realistic and robust treatment of multi-species primordial gas chemistry, paying special attention to the formation and destruction of hydrogen molecules, non-equilibrium ionization, and cooling processes. We performed 3-D simulations at small scales and at high redshifts and find that, analogous to simulations of large scale structure, a complex system of filaments, sheets, and spherical knots at the intersections of filaments form. On the mass scales covered by our simulations (5x10^5 - 1x10^9\\Ms) that collapse at redshifts z>25, we find that only at the spherical knots can enough H2 be formed (n_{H_2}/n_H > 5x10^-4) to cool the gas appreciably. Quantities such as the time dependence of the formation of H2 molecules, the final H2 fraction, and central densities from the simulations are compared to the theoretical predictions of Abel (1995) and Tegmark et al. (1997) and found to agree remarkably well. Comparing the 3-D results to an isobaric collapse model we further discuss the possible implications of the extensive merging of small structure that is inherent in hierarchical models. Typically only 5-8% percent of the total baryonic mass in the collapsing structures is found to cool significanlty. Assuming the Padoan (1995) model for star formation our results would predict the first stellar systems to be as small as ~30\\Ms. Some implications for primordial globular cluster formation scenarios are also discussed.

  9. A solar active region loop compared with a 2D MHD model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gontikakis, C; Dara, H C; Tsinganos, K

    2005-01-01

    We analyzed a coronal loop observed with the Normal Incidence Spectrometer (NIS), which is part of the Coronal Diagnostic Spectrometer (CDS) on board the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO). The measured Doppler shifts and proper motions along the selected loop strongly indicate unidirectional flows. Analysing the Emission Measure Curves of the observed spectral lines, we estimated that the temperature along the loop was about 380000 K. We adapted a solution of the ideal MHD steady equations to our set of measurements. The derived energy balance along the loop, as well as the advantages/disadvantages of this MHD model for understanding the characteristics of solar coronal loops are discussed.

  10. A solar active region loop compared with a 2D MHD model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. Gontikakis; G. J. D. Petrie; H. C. Dara; K. Tsinganos

    2005-03-31

    We analyzed a coronal loop observed with the Normal Incidence Spectrometer (NIS), which is part of the Coronal Diagnostic Spectrometer (CDS) on board the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO). The measured Doppler shifts and proper motions along the selected loop strongly indicate unidirectional flows. Analysing the Emission Measure Curves of the observed spectral lines, we estimated that the temperature along the loop was about 380000 K. We adapted a solution of the ideal MHD steady equations to our set of measurements. The derived energy balance along the loop, as well as the advantages/disadvantages of this MHD model for understanding the characteristics of solar coronal loops are discussed.

  11. A new driver for the Atlantic`s moods and Europe`s weather?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kerr, R.A.

    1997-02-07

    This article describes current ideas about what drive the decade-long swings in North Atlantic wind and weather. It appears not to be random but rather a complex interaction between the ocean and the atmosphere, something like the shorter oscillations in the tropical Pacific Ocean - the southern oscillation. In higher latitudes, the existence of such an ocean-atmosphere link has never been clear, but new data suggest such a connection - the North Atlantic Oscillation. 2 figs.

  12. Gaseous Chemistry and Aerosol Mechanism Developments for Version 3.5.1 of the Online Regional Model, WRF-Chem

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Archer-Nicholls, Scott; Lowe, Douglas; Utembe, Steve; Allan, James D.; Zaveri, Rahul A.; Fast, Jerome D.; Hodnebrog, Oivind; Denier van der Gon, Hugo; McFiggans, Gordon

    2014-11-08

    We have made a number of developments in the regional coupled model WRF-Chem, with the aim of making the model more suitable for prediction of atmospheric composition and of interactions between air quality and weather. We have worked on the European domain, with a particular focus on making the model suitable for the study of night time chemistry and oxidation by the nitrate radical in the UK atmosphere. A reduced form of the Common Reactive Intermediates gas-phase chemical mechanism (CRIv2-R5) has been implemented to enable more explicit simulation of VOC degradation. N2O5 heterogeneous chemistry has been added to the existing sectional MOSAIC aerosol module, and coupled to both the CRIv2-R5 and existing CBM-Z gas phase scheme. Modifications have also been made to the sea-spray aerosol emission representation, allowing the inclusion of primary organic material in sea-spray aerosol. Driven by appropriate emissions, wind fields and chemical boundary conditions, implementation of the different developments is illustrated in order to demonstrate the impact that these changes have in the North-West European domain. These developments are now part of the freely available WRF-Chem distribution.

  13. Florida Atlantic University Study Tour to Tanzania

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fernandez, Eduardo

    1 Florida Atlantic University Study Tour to Tanzania WST 4417/6934 Gender, Culture, and Social Change in Africa: A Case Study of Tanzania May 9th -May 25th , 2015 Course Instructor: Dr. Josephine the Universities of Tanzania will present some guest lectures and lead class discussions. Topics to be covered

  14. Pacific and Atlantic herring produce burst pulse

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dill, Lawrence M.

    Pacific and Atlantic herring produce burst pulse sounds Ben Wilson1,2* , Robert S. Batty3 wild-caught herring. Pacific herring pro- duce distinctive bursts of pulses, termed Fast Repetitive Tick (FRT) sounds. These trains of broadband pulses (1.7­22 kHz) lasted between 0.6 s and 7.6 s. Most

  15. Moisture Flux Convergence in Regional and Global Climate Models: Implications for Droughts in the Southwestern United States Under Climate Change

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gao, Yanhong; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Salathe, E.; Dominguez, Francina; Nijssen, Bart; Lettenmaier, D. P.

    2012-05-10

    The water cycle of the southwestern United States (SW) is dominated by winter storms that maintain a positive annual net precipitation. Analysis of the control and future climate from four pairs of regional and global climate models (RCMs and GCMs) shows that the RCMs simulate a higher fraction of transient eddy moisture fluxes because the hydrodynamic instabilities associated with flow over complex terrain are better resolved. Under global warming, this enables the RCMs to capture the response of transient eddies to increased atmospheric stability that allows more moisture to converge on the windward side of the mountains by blocking. As a result, RCMs simulate enhanced transient eddy moisture convergence in the SW compared to GCMs, although both robustly simulate drying due to enhanced moisture divergence by the divergent mean flow in a warmer climate. This enhanced convergence leads to reduced susceptibility to hydrological change in the RCMs compared to GCMs.

  16. Collaborative Research: Towards Advanced Understanding and Predictive Capability of Climate Change in the Arctic using a High-Resolution Regional Arctic Climate System Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lettenmaier, Dennis P

    2013-04-08

    Primary activities are reported in these areas: climate system component studies via one-way coupling experiments; development of the Regional Arctic Climate System Model (RACM); and physical feedback studies focusing on changes in Arctic sea ice using the fully coupled model.

  17. Force-free field modeling of twist and braiding-induced magnetic energy in an active-region corona

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thalmann, J. K.

    2014-01-01

    The theoretical concept that braided magnetic field lines in the solar corona may dissipate a sufficient amount of energy to account for the brightening observed in the active-region (AR) corona has only recently been substantiated by high-resolution observations. From the analysis of coronal images obtained with the High Resolution Coronal Imager, first observational evidence of the braiding of magnetic field lines was reported by Cirtain et al. (hereafter CG13). We present nonlinear force-free reconstructions of the associated coronal magnetic field based on Solar Dynamics Observatory/Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager vector magnetograms. We deliver estimates of the free magnetic energy associated with a braided coronal structure. Our model results suggest (?100 times) more free energy at the braiding site than analytically estimated by CG13, strengthening the possibility of the AR corona being heated by field line braiding. We were able to appropriately assess the coronal free energy by using vector field measurements and we attribute the lower energy estimate of CG13 to the underestimated (by a factor of 10) azimuthal field strength. We also quantify the increase in the overall twist of a flare-related flux rope that was noted by CG13. From our models we find that the overall twist of the flux rope increased by about half a turn within 12 minutes. Unlike another method to which we compare our results, we evaluate the winding of the flux rope's constituent field lines around each other purely based on their modeled coronal three-dimensional field line geometry. To our knowledge, this is done for the first time here.

  18. Ecosystem-scale Selenium Model for the San Francisco Bay-Delta Regional Ecosystem Restoration Implementation Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Presser, Theresa S.; Luoma, Samuel N.

    2013-01-01

    experimental ponds. Water, Air, and Soil Pollution 62(1–2):Pollution [SFBRWQCB] California San Francisco Bay Regional Water

  19. Collaborative Research: Towards Advanced Understanding and Predictive Capability of Climate Change in the Arctic Using a High-Resolution Regional Arctic Climate Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cassano, John

    2013-06-30

    The primary research task completed for this project was the development of the Regional Arctic Climate Model (RACM). This involved coupling existing atmosphere, ocean, sea ice, and land models using the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) Community Climate System Model (CCSM) coupler (CPL7). RACM is based on the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) atmospheric model, the Parallel Ocean Program (POP) ocean model, the CICE sea ice model, and the Variable Infiltration Capacity (VIC) land model. A secondary research task for this project was testing and evaluation of WRF for climate-scale simulations on the large pan-Arctic model domain used in RACM. This involved identification of a preferred set of model physical parameterizations for use in our coupled RACM simulations and documenting any atmospheric biases present in RACM.

  20. Coherent water transport across the South Atlantic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Y; Beron-Vera, F J

    2015-01-01

    The role of mesoscale eddies in transporting Agulhas leakage is investigated using a recent technique from nonlinear dynamical systems theory applied on geostrophic currents inferred from the over two-decade-long satellite altimetry record. Eddies are found to acquire material coherence away from the Agulhas retroflection, near the Walvis Ridge in the South Atlantic. Yearly, 1 to 4 coherent material eddies are detected with diameters ranging from 40 to 280 km. A total of 23 eddy cores of about 50 km in diameter and with at least 30% of their contents traceable into the Indian Ocean were found to travel across the subtropical gyre with minor filamentation. No more than 5\\% of such cores pour their contents on the North Brazil Current. While ability of eddies to carry Agulhas leakage northwestward across the South Atlantic is supported by our analysis, this is more restricted than suggested by earlier ring transport assessments.

  1. Numerical Simulation of Inter-basin Groundwater Flow into Northern Yucca Flat, Nevada National Security Site, Using the Death Valley Regional Flow System Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pohlmann Karl,Ye Ming

    2012-03-01

    Models of groundwater flow for the Yucca Flat area of the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) are under development by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) for corrective action investigations of the Yucca Flat-Climax Mine Corrective Action Unit (CAU). One important aspect of these models is the quantity of inter-basin groundwater flow from regional systems to the north. This component of flow, together with its uncertainty, must be properly accounted for in the CAU flow models to provide a defensible regional framework for calculations of radionuclide transport that will support determinations of the Yucca Flat-Climax Mine contaminant boundary. Because characterizing flow boundary conditions in northern Yucca Flat requires evaluation to a higher level of detail than the scale of the Yucca Flat-Climax Mine CAU model can efficiently provide, a study more focused on this aspect of the model was required.

  2. A three-dimensional numerical model of predevelopment conditions in the Death Valley regional ground-water flow system, Nevada and California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D'Agnese, F.A.; O'Brien, G.M.; Faunt, C.C.; Belcher, W.R.; San Juan, Carma

    2002-11-22

    In the early 1990's, two numerical models of the Death Valley regional ground-water flow system were developed by the U.S. Department of Energy. In general, the two models were based on the same basic hydrogeologic data set. In 1998, the U.S. Department of Energy requested that the U.S. Geological Survey develop and maintain a ground-water flow model of the Death Valley region in support of U.S. Department of Energy programs at the Nevada Test Site. The purpose of developing this ''second-generation'' regional model was to enhance the knowledge and understanding of the ground-water flow system as new information and tools are developed. The U.S. Geological Survey also was encouraged by the U.S. Department of Energy to cooperate to the fullest extent with other Federal, State, and local entities in the region to take advantage of the benefits of their knowledge and expertise. The short-term objective of the Death Valley regional ground-water flow system project was to develop a steady-stat e representation of the predevelopment conditions of the ground-water flow system utilizing the two geologic interpretations used to develop the previous numerical models. The long-term objective of this project was to construct and calibrate a transient model that simulates the ground-water conditions of the study area over the historical record that utilizes a newly interpreted hydrogeologic conceptual model. This report describes the result of the predevelopment steady-state model construction and calibration.

  3. Sandia Energy - Sandia, the Atlantic Council, and NM Water Resource...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Sandia, the Atlantic Council, and NM Water Resource Research Institute Sponsor Roundtable on Western Water Scarcity Home Climate Water Security Partnership News Global Climate &...

  4. Determining Greenland Ice Sheet sensitivity to regional climate change: one-way coupling of a 3-D thermo-mechanical ice sheet model with a mesoscale climate model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schlegel, Nicole-Jeanne

    2011-01-01

    ice sheet model with a mesoscale climate model By Nicole-ice sheet model with a mesoscale climate model Copyrightice sheet model with a mesoscale climate model by Nicole-

  5. Downscaling Global Land Cover Projections from an Integrated Assessment Model for Use in Regional Analyses: Results and Evaluation for the US from 2005 to 2095

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    West, Tristram O.; Le Page, Yannick LB; Huang, Maoyi; Wolf, Julie; Thomson, Allison M.

    2014-06-05

    Projections of land cover change generated from Integrated Assessment Models (IAM) and other economic-based models can be applied for analyses of environmental impacts at subregional and landscape scales. For those IAM and economic models that project land use at the sub-continental or regional scale, these projections must be downscaled and spatially distributed prior to use in climate or ecosystem models. Downscaling efforts to date have been conducted at the national extent with relatively high spatial resolution (30m) and at the global extent with relatively coarse spatial resolution (0.5 degree).

  6. Megacity impacts on regional ozone formation: observations and WRF-Chem modeling for the MIRAGE-Shanghai field campaign

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-01-01

    Tie, X. : Analysis of ozone and VOCs measured in Shanghai: AMegacity impacts on regional ozone formation terminations inand Tie, X. : Study of ozone “weekend effect” in Shanghai,

  7. GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH LETTERS, VOL. 28, NO. 8, APRIL15, PAGES 1507-1510, 2001 Tropical Atlantic air-sea interaction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCreary Jr., Julian P.

    GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH LETTERS, VOL. 28, NO. 8, APRIL15, PAGES 1507-1510, 2001 Tropical Atlantic air- quate at this time, and it is currently under debate whether it represents a mode of air-sea interaction to the extratropics. 2. GCM experiments The global AGCM is a Japanese community model de- scribed by Numaguti [1999

  8. GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH LETTERS, VOL. 28, NO. 8, PAGES 1507-1510, APRIL 15, 2001 Tropical Atlantic air-sea interaction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xie, Shang-Ping

    GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH LETTERS, VOL. 28, NO. 8, PAGES 1507-1510, APRIL 15, 2001 Tropical Atlantic air- quate at this time, and it is currently under debate whether it represents a mode of air-sea interaction to the extratropics. 2. GCM experiments The global AGCM is a Japanese community model de- scribed by Numaguti [1999

  9. Rayleigh wave tomography in the North Atlantic: high resolution images of the Iceland, Azores and Eifel mantle plumes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rayleigh wave tomography in the North Atlantic: high resolution images of the Iceland, Azores, but to improve the path coverage a number of instruments at coastal sites in northwest Europe, Iceland three major hotspots: Iceland, the Azores and Eifel. The best depth resolution in the model occurs in NW

  10. Contrasting trends in North Atlantic deep-water formation in the Labrador Sea and Nordic Seas during the Holocene

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Renssen, Hans

    Contrasting trends in North Atlantic deep-water formation in the Labrador Sea and Nordic Seas deep-water formation is studied in a 9,000-year long simulation with a coupled climate model the experiment, deep-water formation in the Nordic Seas is reduced due to an enhanced influx of sea ice from

  11. Modeling the Summertime Climate of Southwest Asia: The Role of Land Surface Processes in Shaping the Climate of Semiarid Regions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marcella, Marc P.

    Presented is a study on the role of land surface processes in determining the summertime climate over the semiarid region of southwest Asia. In this region, a warm surface air temperature bias of 3.5°C is simulated in the ...

  12. A long Saharan dust event over the western Mediterranean: Lidar, Sun photometer observations, and regional dust modeling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    over the Mediterranean region (http://www.bsc.es/projects/earthscience/ DREAM/) considering four of dust exported annually from northern Africa (Sahara-Sahel region) are still not reliable, and range]. Once in the atmosphere, dust particles interact with solar and thermal radiation, modulating the Earth

  13. Blue whale (Balaenoptera musculus) sounds from the North Atlantic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blue whale (Balaenoptera musculus) sounds from the North Atlantic David K. Mellingera) Bioacoustics 2003 Sounds of blue whales were recorded from U.S. Navy hydrophone arrays in the North Atlantic-duration, very-low-frequency sound units repeated every 1­2 min are typical of blue whale sounds recorded

  14. North-Atlantic atmospheric dynamics and climate change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    North-Atlantic atmospheric dynamics and climate change Julien Cattiaux1 with Christophe Cassou2 weather and global warming J. Cattiaux - North-Atlantic atmospheric dynamics and climate change AMA & LEFE the climate change affect the dynamics? The midlatitude dynamics is driven by the equator-to-pole T gradient

  15. QUALITATIVE DISCUSSION OF ATLANTIC BASIN SEASONAL HURRICANE ACTIVITY FOR 2012

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Connors, Daniel A.

    QUALITATIVE DISCUSSION OF ATLANTIC BASIN SEASONAL HURRICANE ACTIVITY FOR 2012 We are discontinuing our early December quantitative hurricane forecast for the next year and giving a more qualitative discussion of the factors which will determine next year's Atlantic basin hurricane activity. Our early

  16. QUALITATIVE DISCUSSION OF ATLANTIC BASIN SEASONAL HURRICANE ACTIVITY FOR 2015

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collett Jr., Jeffrey L.

    1 QUALITATIVE DISCUSSION OF ATLANTIC BASIN SEASONAL HURRICANE ACTIVITY FOR 2015 We discontinued our early December quantitative hurricane forecast in 2012 and are now giving a more qualitative discussion of the factors which will determine next year's Atlantic basin hurricane activity. One of the big uncertainties

  17. TransAtlantic Petroleum | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EA EISTJThin Film SolarTown of Skiatook,1993)Trane Jump to:TransAtlantic

  18. Renewable Resources: a national catalog of model projects. Volume 2. Mid-American Solar Energy Complex Region

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1980-07-01

    This compilation of diverse conservation and renewable energy projects across the United States was prepared through the enthusiastic participation of solar and alternate energy groups from every state and region. Compiled and edited by the Center for Renewable Resources, these projects reflect many levels of innovation and technical expertise. In many cases, a critique analysis is presented of how projects performed and of the institutional conditions associated with their success or failure. Some 2000 projects are included in this compilation; most have worked, some have not. Information about all is presented to aid learning from these experiences. The four volumes in this set are arranged in state sections by geographic region, coinciding with the four Regional Solar Energy Centers. The table of contents is organized by project category so that maximum cross-referencing may be obtained. This volume includes information on the Mid-American Solar Energy Complex Region. (WHK)

  19. WRF-Chem model predictions of the regional impacts of N2O5 heterogeneous processes on night-time chemistry over north-western Europe

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Lowe, Douglas; Archer-Nicholls, Scott; Morgan, Will; Allan, James D.; Utembe, Steve; Ouyang, Bin; Aruffo, Eleonora; Le Breton, Michael; Zaveri, Rahul A.; di Carlo, Piero; et al

    2015-02-09

    Chemical modelling studies have been conducted over north-western Europe in summer conditions, showing that night-time dinitrogen pentoxide (N2O5) heterogeneous reactive uptake is important regionally in modulating particulate nitrate and has a~modest influence on oxidative chemistry. Results from Weather Research and Forecasting model with Chemistry (WRF-Chem) model simulations, run with a detailed volatile organic compound (VOC) gas-phase chemistry scheme and the Model for Simulating Aerosol Interactions and Chemistry (MOSAIC) sectional aerosol scheme, were compared with a series of airborne gas and particulate measurements made over the UK in July 2010. Modelled mixing ratios of key gas-phase species were reasonably accurate (correlationsmore »with measurements of 0.7–0.9 for NO2 and O3). However modelled loadings of particulate species were less accurate (correlation with measurements for particulate sulfate and ammonium were between 0.0 and 0.6). Sulfate mass loadings were particularly low (modelled means of 0.5–0.7 ?g kg?1air, compared with measurements of 1.0–1.5 ?g kg?1air). Two flights from the campaign were used as test cases – one with low relative humidity (RH) (60–70%), the other with high RH (80–90%). N2O5 heterogeneous chemistry was found to not be important in the low-RH test case; but in the high-RH test case it had a strong effect and significantly improved the agreement between modelled and measured NO3 and N2O5. When the model failed to capture atmospheric RH correctly, the modelled NO3 and N2O5 mixing ratios for these flights differed significantly from the measurements. This demonstrates that, for regional modelling which involves heterogeneous processes, it is essential to capture the ambient temperature and water vapour profiles. The night-time NO3 oxidation of VOCs across the whole region was found to be 100–300 times slower than the daytime OH oxidation of these compounds. The difference in contribution was less for alkenes (× 80) and comparable for dimethylsulfide (DMS). However the suppression of NO3 mixing ratios across the domain by N2O5 heterogeneous chemistry has only a very slight, negative, influence on this oxidative capacity. The influence on regional particulate nitrate mass loadings is stronger. Night-time N2O5 heterogeneous chemistry maintains the production of particulate nitrate within polluted regions: when this process is taken into consideration, the daytime peak (for the 95th percentile) of PM10 nitrate mass loadings remains around 5.6 ?g kg?1air, but the night-time minimum increases from 3.5 to 4.6 ?g kg?1air. The sustaining of higher particulate mass loadings through the night by this process improves model skill at matching measured aerosol nitrate diurnal cycles and will negatively impact on regional air quality, requiring this process to be included in regional models.« less

  20. COLLABORATIVE RESEARCH: TOWARDS ADVANCED UNDERSTANDING AND PREDICTIVE CAPABILITY OF CLIMATE CHANGE IN THE ARCTIC USING A HIGH-RESOLUTION REGIONAL ARCTIC CLIMATE SYSTEM MODEL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gutowski, William J.

    2013-02-07

    The motivation for this project was to advance the science of climate change and prediction in the Arctic region. Its primary goals were to (i) develop a state-of-the-art Regional Arctic Climate system Model (RACM) including high-resolution atmosphere, land, ocean, sea ice and land hydrology components and (ii) to perform extended numerical experiments using high performance computers to minimize uncertainties and fundamentally improve current predictions of climate change in the northern polar regions. These goals were realized first through evaluation studies of climate system components via one-way coupling experiments. Simulations were then used to examine the effects of advancements in climate component systems on their representation of main physics, time-mean fields and to understand variability signals at scales over many years. As such this research directly addressed some of the major science objectives of the BER Climate Change Research Division (CCRD) regarding the advancement of long-term climate prediction.

  1. Regional refining models for alternative fuels using shale and coal synthetic crudes: identification and evaluation of optimized alternative fuels. Annual report, March 20, 1979-March 19, 1980

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sefer, N.R.; Russell, J.A.

    1980-11-01

    The initial phase has been completed in the project to evaluate alternative fuels for highway transportation from synthetic crudes. Three refinery models were developed for Rocky Mountain, Mid-Continent and Great Lakes regions to make future product volumes and qualities forecast for 1995. Projected quantities of shale oil and coal oil syncrudes were introduced into the raw materials slate. Product slate was then varied from conventional products to evaluate maximum diesel fuel and broadcut fuel in all regions. Gasoline supplement options were evaluated in one region for 10% each of methanol, ethanol, MTBE or synthetic naphtha in the blends along with syncrude components. Compositions and qualities of the fuels were determined for the variation in constraints and conditions established for the study. Effects on raw materials, energy consumption and investment costs were reported. Results provide the basis to formulate fuels for laboratory and engine evaluation in future phases of the project.

  2. Cenozoic climates: evidence from the North Atlantic

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berggren, W.A.

    1985-01-01

    Cenozoic biostratigraphy and climatology of the North Atlantic and adjacent land areas reflects the continuing fragmentation of Eurasia and concomitant changes on ocean-continent geometry. A latitudinal (zonal) Mesozoic circulation pattern evolved into a predominantly longitudinal (meridional) pattern during the Cenozoic in which the development of oceanic gateways and barriers gradually decreased the efficiency of poleward heat transfer resulting in the progressive climatic change which has taken place over the past 50 million years. Cenozoic distributional data from the North Atlantic and adjacent land areas will be reviewed from the following fields: a) terrestrial vertebrates and floras: b) marine calcareous microplankton and benthic foraminifera; c) other marine invertebrates. Available data suggests that the present climate in the northern hemisphere has resulted from a gradual, but inexorable, strengthening of latitudinal and vertical temperature gradients punctuated by several brief intervals of accelerated change. The absence of evidence for northern hemisphere polar glaciation prior to the late Neogene does not preclude seasonal cooling near the freezing point in post-Eocene time. Evidence for early Paleogene cold climates is not reflected in the fossil record.

  3. A preliminary regional PBPK model of lung metabolism for improving species dependent descriptions of 1,3-butadiene and its metabolites

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Campbell, Jerry; Van Landingham, Cynthia; Crowell, Susan; Gentry, Robinan; Kaden, Debra; Fiebelkorn, Stacy; Loccisano, Anne; Clewell, Harvey

    2015-06-12

    1,3-Butadiene (BD), a volatile organic chemical (VOC), is used in synthetic rubber production and other industrial processes. It is detectable at low levels in ambient air as well as in tobacco smoke and gasoline vapors. Inhalation exposures to high concentrations of BD have been associated with lung cancer in both humans and experimental animals, although differences in species sensitivity have been observed. Metabolically active lung cells such as Pulmonary Type I and Type II epithelial cells and club cells (Clara cells)1 are potential targets of BD metabolite-induced toxicity. Metabolic capacities of these cells, their regional densities, and distributions vary throughoutmore »the respiratory tract as well as between species and cell types. Here we present a physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model for BD that includes a regional model of lung metabolism, based on a previous model for styrene, to provide species-dependent descriptions of BD metabolism in the mouse, rat, and human. Since there are no in vivo data on BD pharmacokinetics in the human, the rat and mouse models were parameterized to the extent possible on the basis of in vitro metabolic data. Where it was necessary to use in vivo data, extrapolation from rat to mouse was performed to evaluate the level of uncertainty in the human model. A kidney compartment and description of downstream metabolism were also included in the model to allow for eventual use of available urinary and blood biomarker data in animals and humans to calibrate the model for estimation of BD exposures and internal metabolite levels. Results from simulated inhalation exposures to BD indicate that incorporation of differential lung region metabolism is important in describing species differences in pulmonary response and that these differences may have implications for risk assessments of human exposures to BD.« less

  4. Organizational Project Management Maturity Model (OPM3) to Improve Ministery of Construction and Housing (MOCAH) Within Kurdistan Regional Government 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mustafa, Azad Jabbar

    2015-05-06

    The Organizational Project Management Maturity Model (OPM3®), a standard developed by the Project Management Institute (PMI), has become an effective model to help an organization successfully implement strategies and achieve its objectives...

  5. Remote Sensing-based Estimates of Potential Evapotranspiration for Hydrologic Modeling in the Upper Colorado River Basin Region

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barik, Muhammad Ghulam

    2014-01-01

    evapotranspiration equations and their relevance to stream flow modeling in semi-arid environments.evapotranspiration equations and their relevance to stream flow modeling in semi-arid environments.evapotranspiration equations and their relevance to stream flow modeling in semi-arid environments.

  6. Evaluation of the accuracy of the EPA model for BOD5 prediction in various climatic regions of Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Koutny, Jessica Leigh

    2000-01-01

    model demonstrated removal rates for BOD?, TSS, fecal coliform, ammonium, and phosphorus of 80.0%, 70.9%, 87.1%, 34.7%, and 22.7%, respectively. These data provided the basis for evaluating the EPA model. A sensitivity analysis of the EPA model...

  7. Dynamic downscaling of 22-year CFS winter seasonal hindcasts with the UCLA-ETA regional climate model over the United

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xue, Yongkang

    Dynamic downscaling of 22-year CFS winter seasonal hindcasts with the UCLA-ETA regional climate for Environmental Prediction Climate Forecast System (NCEP CFS), winter season predictions over the contiguous in the study. CFS over-predicts the precipitation in eastern and western US by as much as 45 and 90

  8. Heat and freshwater exchange on the Antarctic continental1 shelf in a regional coupled climate model2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holland, David

    Heat and freshwater exchange on the Antarctic continental1 shelf in a regional coupled climate exchange with the atmosphere and sea ice dominates the annual cycle in heat29 and freshwater content;2 Abstract23 Understanding heat and freshwater content change in the Antarctic shelf seas is important

  9. A Multi-Model Analysis of the Regional and Sectoral Roles of Bioenergy in Near- and Long-Term CO2 Emissions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Calvin, Katherine V.; Wise, Marshall A.; Klein, David; McCollum, David; Tavoni, Massimo; van der Zwaan, Bob; Van Vuuren, Detlef

    2013-11-01

    We study the near term and the longer term the contribution of bioenergy in different LIMITS scenarios as modeled by the participating models in the LIMITS project. With These scenarios have proven useful for exploring a range of outcomes for bioenergy use in response to both regionally diverse near term policies and the transition to a longer-term global mitigation policy and target. The use of several models has provided a source of heterogeneity in terms of incorporating uncertain assumptions about future socioeconomics and technology, as well as different paradigms for how the world may respond to policies. The results have also highlighted the heterogeneity and versatility of bioenergy itself, with different types of resources and applications in several energy sectors. In large part due to this versatility, the contribution of bioenergy to climate mitigation is a robust response across all models, despite their differences.

  10. Final Technical Report for Collaborative Research: Regional climate-change projections through next-generation empirical and dynamical models, DE-FG02-07ER64429

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smyth, Padhraic

    2013-07-22

    This is the final report for a DOE-funded research project describing the outcome of research on non-homogeneous hidden Markov models (NHMMs) and coupled ocean-atmosphere (O-A) intermediate-complexity models (ICMs) to identify the potentially predictable modes of climate variability, and to investigate their impacts on the regional-scale. The main results consist of extensive development of the hidden Markov models for rainfall simulation and downscaling specifically within the non-stationary climate change context together with the development of parallelized software; application of NHMMs to downscaling of rainfall projections over India; identification and analysis of decadal climate signals in data and models; and, studies of climate variability in terms of the dynamics of atmospheric flow regimes.

  11. Aerosol remote sensing in polar regions

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Tomasi, Claudio; Kokhanovsky, Alexander A.; Lupi, Angelo; Ritter, Christoph; Smirnov, Alexander; O'Neill, Norman T.; Stone, Robert S.; Holben, Brent N.; Nyeki, Stephan; Wehrli, Christoph; et al

    2015-01-01

    Multi-year sets of ground-based sun-photometer measurements conducted at 12 Arctic sites and 9 Antarctic sites were examined to determine daily mean values of aerosol optical thickness ?(?) at visible and near-infrared wavelengths, from which best-fit values of Ĺngström's exponent ? were calculated. Analysing these data, the monthly mean values of ?(0.50 ?m) and ? and the relative frequency histograms of the daily mean values of both parameters were determined for winter–spring and summer–autumn in the Arctic and for austral summer in Antarctica. The Arctic and Antarctic covariance plots of the seasonal median values of ? versus ?(0.50 ?m) showed: (i)more »a considerable increase in ?(0.50 ?m) for the Arctic aerosol from summer to winter–spring, without marked changes in ?; and (ii) a marked increase in ?(0.50 ?m) passing from the Antarctic Plateau to coastal sites, whereas ? decreased considerably due to the larger fraction of sea-salt aerosol. Good agreement was found when comparing ground-based sun-photometer measurements of ?(?) and ? at Arctic and Antarctic coastal sites with Microtops measurements conducted during numerous AERONET/MAN cruises from 2006 to 2013 in three Arctic Ocean sectors and in coastal and off-shore regions of the Southern Atlantic, Pacific, and Indian Oceans, and the Antarctic Peninsula. Lidar measurements were also examined to characterise vertical profiles of the aerosol backscattering coefficient measured throughout the year at Ny-Ĺlesund. Satellite-based MODIS, MISR, and AATSR retrievals of ?(?) over large parts of the oceanic polar regions during spring and summer were in close agreement with ship-borne and coastal ground-based sun-photometer measurements. An overview of the chemical composition of mode particles is also presented, based on in-situ measurements at Arctic and Antarctic sites. Fourteen log-normal aerosol number size-distributions were defined to represent the average features of nuclei, accumulation and coarse mode particles for Arctic haze, summer background aerosol, Asian dust and boreal forest fire smoke, and for various background austral summer aerosol types at coastal and high-altitude Antarctic sites. The main columnar aerosol optical characteristics were determined for all 14 particle modes, based on in-situ measurements of the scattering and absorption coefficients. Diurnally averaged direct aerosol-induced radiative forcing and efficiency were calculated for a set of multimodal aerosol extinction models, using various Bidirectional Reflectance Distribution Function models over vegetation-covered, oceanic and snow-covered surfaces. These gave a reliable measure of the pronounced effects of aerosols on the radiation balance of the surface–atmosphere system over polar regions.« less

  12. Aerosol remote sensing in polar regions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tomasi, Claudio; Kokhanovsky, Alexander A.; Lupi, Angelo; Ritter, Christoph; Smirnov, Alexander; O'Neill, Norman T.; Stone, Robert S.; Holben, Brent N.; Nyeki, Stephan; Mazzola, Mauro; Lanconelli, Christian; Vitale, Vito; Stebel, Kerstin; Aaltonen, Veijo; de Leeuw, Gerrit; Rodriguez, Edith; Herber, Andreas B.; Radionov, Vladimir F.; Zielinski, Tymon; Petelski, Tomasz; Sakerin, Sergey M.; Kabanov, Dmitry M.; Xue, Yong; Mei, Linlu; Istomina, Larysa; Wagener, Richard; McArthur, Bruce; Sobolewski, Piotr S.; Kivi, Rigel; Courcoux, Yann; Larouche, Pierre; Broccardo, Stephen; Piketh, Stuart J.

    2015-01-01

    Multi-year sets of ground-based sun-photometer measurements conducted at 12 Arctic sites and 9 Antarctic sites were examined to determine daily mean values of aerosol optical thickness ?(?) at visible and near-infrared wavelengths, from which best-fit values of Ĺngström's exponent ? were calculated. Analysing these data, the monthly mean values of ?(0.50 ?m) and ? and the relative frequency histograms of the daily mean values of both parameters were determined for winter–spring and summer–autumn in the Arctic and for austral summer in Antarctica. The Arctic and Antarctic covariance plots of the seasonal median values of ? versus ?(0.50 ?m) showed: (i) a considerable increase in ?(0.50 ?m) for the Arctic aerosol from summer to winter–spring, without marked changes in ?; and (ii) a marked increase in ?(0.50 ?m) passing from the Antarctic Plateau to coastal sites, whereas ? decreased considerably due to the larger fraction of sea-salt aerosol. Good agreement was found when comparing ground-based sun-photometer measurements of ?(?) and ? at Arctic and Antarctic coastal sites with Microtops measurements conducted during numerous AERONET/MAN cruises from 2006 to 2013 in three Arctic Ocean sectors and in coastal and off-shore regions of the Southern Atlantic, Pacific, and Indian Oceans, and the Antarctic Peninsula. Lidar measurements were also examined to characterise vertical profiles of the aerosol backscattering coefficient measured throughout the year at Ny-Ĺlesund. Satellite-based MODIS, MISR, and AATSR retrievals of ?(?) over large parts of the oceanic polar regions during spring and summer were in close agreement with ship-borne and coastal ground-based sun-photometer measurements. An overview of the chemical composition of mode particles is also presented, based on in-situ measurements at Arctic and Antarctic sites. Fourteen log-normal aerosol number size-distributions were defined to represent the average features of nuclei, accumulation and coarse mode particles for Arctic haze, summer background aerosol, Asian dust and boreal forest fire smoke, and for various background austral summer aerosol types at coastal and high-altitude Antarctic sites. The main columnar aerosol optical characteristics were determined for all 14 particle modes, based on in-situ measurements of the scattering and absorption coefficients. Diurnally averaged direct aerosol-induced radiative forcing and efficiency were calculated for a set of multimodal aerosol extinction models, using various Bidirectional Reflectance Distribution Function models over vegetation-covered, oceanic and snow-covered surfaces. These gave a reliable measure of the pronounced effects of aerosols on the radiation balance of the surface–atmosphere system over polar regions.

  13. BioEarth: Envisioning and developing a new regional earth system model to inform natural and agricultural resource management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2015-01-01

    model for complex terrain. Water Resour Res 30:1665–1679systems (e.g. , land, air, or water). The interconnectednessof nitrogen, carbon, and water present daunting management

  14. Atlantic Skipjack Tuna: Influences of Mean Environmental Conditions on

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    are exploit- ed commercially in the Atlantic, only the skipjack tuna, Katsuwonus pelamis, appears presently distribution of skipjack tuna, Katsu- wonus pelamis, in both the At/antic and Pacific Oceans. Environment

  15. DOE Designates Southwest Area and Mid-Atlantic Area National...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Corridors DOE Designates Southwest Area and Mid-Atlantic Area National Interest Electric Transmission Corridors October 2, 2007 - 2:50pm Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - U.S. Department...

  16. Regional Radiological Security Partnership in Southeast Asia – Increasing the Sustainability of Security Systems at the Site-Level by Using a Model Facility Approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chamberlain, Travis L.; Dickerson, Sarah; Ravenhill, Scott D.; Murray, Allan; Morris, Frederic A.; Herdes, Gregory A.

    2009-10-07

    In 2004, Australia, through the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation (ANSTO), created the Regional Security of Radioactive Sources (RSRS) project and partnered with the U.S. Department of Energy’s Global Threat Reduction Initiative (GTRI) and the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) to form the Southeast Asian Regional Radiological Security Partnership (RRSP). The intent of the RRSP is to cooperate with countries in Southeast Asia to improve the security of their radioactive sources. This Southeast Asian Partnership supports objectives to improve the security of high risk radioactive sources by raising awareness of the need and developing national programs to protect and control such materials, improve the security of such materials, and recover and condition the materials no longer in use. The RRSP has utilized many tools to meet those objectives including: provision of physical protection upgrades, awareness training, physical protection training, regulatory development, locating and recovering orphan sources, and most recently - development of model security procedures at a model facility. This paper discusses the benefits of establishing a model facility, the methods employed by the RRSP, and three of the expected outcomes of the Model Facility approach. The first expected outcome is to increase compliance with source security guidance materials and national regulations by adding context to those materials, and illustrating their impact on a facility. Second, the effectiveness of each of the tools above is increased by making them part of an integrated system. Third, the methods used to develop the model procedures establishes a sustainable process that can ultimately be transferred to all facilities beyond the model. Overall, the RRSP has utilized the Model Facility approach as an important tool to increase the security of radioactive sources, and to position facilities and countries for the long term secure management of those sources.

  17. Assessing the CAM5 Physics Suite in the WRF-Chem Model: Implementation, Resolution Sensitivity, and a First Evaluation for a Regional Case Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ma, Po-Lun; Rasch, Philip J.; Fast, Jerome D.; Easter, Richard C.; Gustafson, William I.; Liu, Xiaohong; Ghan, Steven J.; Singh, Balwinder

    2014-05-06

    A suite of physical parameterizations (deep and shallow convection, turbulent boundary layer, aerosols, cloud microphysics, and cloud fraction) from the global climate model Community Atmosphere Model version 5.1 (CAM5) has been implemented in the regional model Weather Research and Forecasting with chemistry (WRF-Chem). A downscaling modeling framework with consistent physics has also been established in which both global and regional simulations use the same emissions and surface fluxes. The WRF-Chem model with the CAM5 physics suite is run at multiple horizontal resolutions over a domain encompassing the northern Pacific Ocean, northeast Asia, and northwest North America for April 2008 when the ARCTAS, ARCPAC, and ISDAC field campaigns took place. These simulations are evaluated against field campaign measurements, satellite retrievals, and ground-based observations, and are compared with simulations that use a set of common WRF-Chem Parameterizations. This manuscript describes the implementation of the CAM5 physics suite in WRF-Chem provides an overview of the modeling framework and an initial evaluation of the simulated meteorology, clouds, and aerosols, and quantifies the resolution dependence of the cloud and aerosol parameterizations. We demonstrate that some of the CAM5 biases, such as high estimates of cloud susceptibility to aerosols and the underestimation of aerosol concentrations in the Arctic, can be reduced simply by increasing horizontal resolution. We also show that the CAM5 physics suite performs similarly to a set of parameterizations commonly used in WRF-Chem, but produces higher ice and liquid water condensate amounts and near-surface black carbon concentration. Further evaluations that use other mesoscale model parameterizations and perform other case studies are needed to infer whether one parameterization consistently produces results more consistent with observations.

  18. Incorporation of aqueous reaction kinetics and biodegradation into TOUGHREACT: Application of a multi-region model to hydrobiogeoChemical transport of denitrification and sulfate reduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xu, Tianfu

    2008-01-01

    Region: quartz calcite gypsum goethite Hydro- Region: Na + ,minerals gypsum and goethite were assumed to be initiallyChem-Region, Fe generated from goethite dissolution and HS

  19. Influence of atmospheric nutrients on primary productivity in a coastal upwelling region

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2010-01-01

    NW African coast, Canary Islands Atlantic Atlantic Atlanticvalues Izana, Tenerife, Canary Islands Sal Island, Cape

  20. Ecosystem feedbacks to climate change in California: Development, testing, and analysis using a coupled regional atmosphere and land-surface model (WRF3-CLM3.5)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Subin, Z.M.; Riley, W.J.; Kueppers, L.M.; Jin, J.; Christianson, D.S.; Torn, M.S.

    2010-11-01

    A regional atmosphere model [Weather Research and Forecasting model version 3 (WRF3)] and a land surface model [Community Land Model, version 3.5 (CLM3.5)] were coupled to study the interactions between the atmosphere and possible future California land-cover changes. The impact was evaluated on California's climate of changes in natural vegetation under climate change and of intentional afforestation. The ability of WRF3 to simulate California's climate was assessed by comparing simulations by WRF3-CLM3.5 and WRF3-Noah to observations from 1982 to 1991. Using WRF3-CLM3.5, the authors performed six 13-yr experiments using historical and future large-scale climate boundary conditions from the Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory Climate Model version 2.1 (GFDL CM2.1). The land-cover scenarios included historical and future natural vegetation from the Mapped Atmosphere-Plant-Soil System-Century 1 (MC1) dynamic vegetation model, in addition to a future 8-million-ha California afforestation scenario. Natural vegetation changes alone caused summer daily-mean 2-m air temperature changes of -0.7 to +1 C in regions without persistent snow cover, depending on the location and the type of vegetation change. Vegetation temperature changes were much larger than the 2-m air temperature changes because of the finescale spatial heterogeneity of the imposed vegetation change. Up to 30% of the magnitude of the summer daily-mean 2-m air temperature increase and 70% of the magnitude of the 1600 local time (LT) vegetation temperature increase projected under future climate change were attributable to the climate-driven shift in land cover. The authors projected that afforestation could cause local 0.2-1.2 C reductions in summer daily-mean 2-m air temperature and 2.0-3.7 C reductions in 1600 LT vegetation temperature for snow-free regions, primarily because of increased evapotranspiration. Because some of these temperature changes are of comparable magnitude to those projected under climate change this century, projections of climate and vegetation change in this region need to consider these climate-vegetation interactions.

  1. Multilocus Bayesian Estimates of Intra-Oceanic Genetic Differentiation, Connectivity, and Admixture in Atlantic Swordfish (Xiphias gladius L.) 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Brad L.; Lu, Ching-Ping; Garcí a-Corté s, Blanca; Viñ as, Jordi; Yeh, Shean-Ya; Bremer, Jaime R. Alvarado

    2015-06-09

    Previous genetic studies of Atlantic swordfish (Xiphias gladius L.) revealed significant differentiation among Mediterranean, North Atlantic and South Atlantic populations using both mitochondrial and nuclear DNA data. However, limitations...

  2. Conceptual Model Summary Report Simulation Framework for Regional Geologic CO{sub 2} Storage Along Arches Province of Midwestern United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2011-06-30

    A conceptual model was developed for the Arches Province that integrates geologic and hydrologic information on the Eau Claire and Mt. Simon formations into a geocellular model. The conceptual model describes the geologic setting, stratigraphy, geologic structures, hydrologic features, and distribution of key hydraulic parameters. The conceptual model is focused on the Mt. Simon sandstone and Eau Claire formations. The geocellular model depicts the parameters and conditions in a numerical array that may be imported into the numerical simulations of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) storage. Geophysical well logs, rock samples, drilling logs, geotechnical test results, and reservoir tests were evaluated for a 500,000 km{sup 2} study area centered on the Arches Province. The geologic and hydraulic data were integrated into a three-dimensional (3D) grid of porosity and permeability, which are key parameters regarding fluid flow and pressure buildup due to CO{sub 2} injection. Permeability data were corrected in locations where reservoir tests have been performed in Mt. Simon injection wells. The final geocellular model covers an area of 600 km by 600 km centered on the Arches Province. The geocellular model includes a total of 24,500,000 cells representing estimated porosity and permeability distribution. CO{sub 2} injection scenarios were developed for on-site and regional injection fields at rates of 70 to 140 million metric tons per year.

  3. Impact of natural and anthropogenic aerosols on stratocumulus and precipitation in the Southeast Pacific: A regional modeling study using WRF-Chem

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, Qing; Gustafson, William I.; Fast, Jerome D.; Wang, Hailong; Easter, Richard C.; Wang, Minghuai; Ghan, Steven J.; Berg, Larry K.; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Morrison, H.

    2012-09-28

    Cloud-system resolving simulations with the chemistry version of the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF-Chem) model are used to quantify the impacts of regional anthropogenic and oceanic emissions on changes in aerosol properties, cloud macro- and microphysics, and cloud radiative forcing over the Southeast Pacific (SEP) during the VAMOS Ocean-Cloud-Atmosphere-Land Study Regional Experiment (VOCALS-REx) (15 Oct–Nov 16, 2008). The effects of oceanic aerosols on cloud properties, precipitation, and the shortwave forcing counteract those of anthropogenic aerosols. Despite the relatively small changes in Na concentrations (2-12%) from regional oceanic emissions, their net effect (direct and indirect) on the surface shortwave forcing is opposite and comparable or even larger in magnitude compared to those of regional anthropogenic emissions over the SEP. Two distinct regions are identified in the VOCALS-REx domain. The near-coast polluted region is characterized with strong droplet activation suppression of small particles by sea-salt particles, the more important role of the first than the second indirect effect, low surface precipitation rate, and low aerosol-cloud interaction strength associated with anthropogenic emissions. The relatively clean remote region is characterized with large contributions of Cloud Condensation Nuclei (CCN, number concentration denoted by NCCN) and droplet number concentrations (Nd) from non-local sources (lateral boundaries), a significant amount of surface precipitation, and high aerosol-cloud interactions under a scenario of five-fold increase in anthropogenic emissions. In the clean region, cloud properties have high sensitivity (e.g., 13% increase in cloud-top height and a 9% surface albedo increase) to the moderate increase in CCN concentration (?Nccn = 13 cm-3; 25%) produced by a five-fold increase in regional anthropogenic emissions. The increased anthropogenic aerosols reduce the precipitation amount over the relatively clean remote ocean. The reduction of precipitation (as a cloud water sink) more than doubles the wet scavenging timescale, resulting in an increased aerosol lifetime in the marine boundary layer. Therefore, the aerosol impacts on precipitation are amplified by the positive feedback of precipitation on aerosol. The positive feedback ultimately alters the cloud micro- and macro-properties, leading to strong aerosol-cloud-precipitation interactions. The higher sensitivity of clouds to anthropogenic aerosols over this region is also related to a 16% entrainment rate increase due to anthropogenic aerosols. The simulated aerosol-cloud-precipitation interactions are stronger at night over the clean marine region, while during the day, solar heating results in more frequent decoupling, thinner clouds, reduced precipitation, and reduced sensitivity to anthropogenic emissions. The simulated high sensitivity to the increased anthropogenic emissions over the clean region suggests that the perturbation of the clean marine environment with anthropogenic aerosols may have a larger effect on climate than that of already polluted marine environments.

  4. Atlantic Mesozoic marginal basins: an Iberian view

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilson, R.C.L.

    1987-05-01

    In the light of theoretical models for crustal stretching that precedes ocean opening, it is unlikely that Iberian basins have mirror image counterparts beneath North American or other European continental shelves. However, certain Iberian sedimentary sequences are comparable to those found in other basins. Of particular note are (1) the almost identical pre-rift sequences in all these areas, (2) the development of Upper Jurassic carbonate buildups in Portugal, Morocco, and beneath the Scotian Shelf, and (3) the hydrocarbon-bearing Upper Jurassic and Lower Cretaceous synrift and postrift siliciclastics of North America, Iberia, and Aquitaine. In the prerift sequences, Triassic red beds are capped by evaporites, which subsequently influenced the structural development of basins. Intertidal and supratidal carbonates occur at the base of the Jurassic and are overlain by Lower and Middle Jurassic limestone-shale sequences, which in places contain bituminous shales. In Portugal only, resedimented carbonates of Toarcian-Aalenian age are associated with an uplifted basement horst. In Portugal, Aquitaine, and eastern Canada, Middle Jurassic high-energy carbonate platforms developed. Synrift siliciclastic sequences show spectacular evidence for deposition within fault-bounded basins. In Portugal, lower Kimmeridgian clastics are up to 3 km thick, but Upper-Lower Cretaceous sequences are relatively thin (ca. 1 km), in contrast to those of the Basco-Cantabrian region where they exceed 10 km. In the latter region occurs the fluvially dominated Wealden (Upper Jurassic-Neocomian) and Urgonian carbonate platforms and associated basinal sediments. In the Asturias basin, Kimmeridgian shales and fluvially dominated deltaic sandstones succeed conglomeratic fluvial sandstones of uncertain age.

  5. SIGMOIDAL ACTIVE REGION ON THE SUN: COMPARISON OF A MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMICAL SIMULATION AND A NONLINEAR FORCE-FREE FIELD MODEL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Savcheva, A.; Van Ballegooijen, A.; DeLuca, E.; Pariat, E.; Aulanier, G.

    2012-05-01

    In this paper we show that when accurate nonlinear force-free field (NLFFF) models are analyzed together with high-resolution magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations, we can determine the physical causes for the coronal mass ejection (CME) eruption on 2007 February 12. We compare the geometrical and topological properties of the three-dimensional magnetic fields given by both methods in their pre-eruptive phases. We arrive at a consistent picture for the evolution and eruption of the sigmoid. Both the MHD simulation and the observed magnetic field evolution show that flux cancellation plays an important role in building the flux rope. We compute the squashing factor, Q, in different horizontal maps in the domains. The main shape of the quasi-separatrix layers (QSLs) is very similar between the NLFFF and MHD models. The main QSLs lie on the edge of the flux rope. While the QSLs in the NLFFF model are more complex due to the intrinsic large complexity in the field, the QSLs in the MHD model are smooth and possess lower maximum value of Q. In addition, we demonstrate the existence of hyperbolic flux tubes (HFTs) in both models in vertical cross sections of Q. The main HFT, located under the twisted flux rope in both models, is identified as the most probable site for reconnection. We also show that there are electric current concentrations coinciding with the main QSLs. Finally, we perform torus instability analysis and show that a combination between reconnection at the HFT and the resulting expansion of the flux rope into the torus instability domain is the cause of the CME in both models.

  6. A Theory of Decay of Security Communities with an Application to the Present State of the Atlantic Alliance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mueler Müller, Harald

    2006-01-01

    that the Atlantic alliance, one of the most astonishingsecurity value in European alliance;economc dynamics seen instate of the Atlantic Alliance Harald Müller, Director of

  7. (Re)creating Social Life Out of Social Death : cross-cultural alliances in the circum- Atlantic, 1760-1815

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gagnon, Jeffrey Charles

    2012-01-01

    Death: Cross-Cultural Alliances in the Circum-Atlantic,Death: Cross-Cultural Alliances in the Circum-Atlantic,historical cross-cultural alliances and political coalitions

  8. Implications of Model Configurations on Capacity Planning Decisions: Scenario Case Studies of the Western Interconnection and Colorado Region using the Resource Planning Model

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In this report, we analyze the impacts of model configuration and detail in capacity expansion models, computational tools used by utility planners looking to find the least cost option for planning the system and by researchers or policy makers attempting to understand the effects of various policy implementations. The present analysis focuses on the importance of model configurations—particularly those related to capacity credit, dispatch modeling, and transmission modeling—to the construction of scenario futures. Our analysis is primarily directed toward advanced tools used for utility planning and is focused on those impacts that are most relevant to decisions with respect to future renewable capacity deployment. To serve this purpose, we develop and employ the NREL Resource Planning Model to conduct a case study analysis that explores 12 separate capacity expansion scenarios of the Western Interconnection through 2030.

  9. Support of Publication Costs, Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation Special Issue of Deep Sea Research II Journal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Amy Honchar

    2012-11-12

    The contribution of funds from DOE supported publication costs of a special issue of Deep Sea Research arising from presentations at the First U.S. Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC) Meeting held 4-6 May, 2009 to review the US implementation plan and its coordination with other monitoring activities. The special issue includes a total of 16 papers, including publications from three DOE-supported investigators (ie Sevellec, F., and A.V. Fedorov; Hu et. al., and Wan et. al.,). The special issue addresses DOE interests in understanding and simulation/modeling of abrupt climate change.

  10. Complex zero-free regions at large |q| for multivariate Tutte polynomials (alias Potts-model partition functions) with general complex edge weights

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bill Jackson; Aldo Procacci; Alan D. Sokal

    2014-12-02

    We find zero-free regions in the complex plane at large |q| for the multivariate Tutte polynomial (also known in statistical mechanics as the Potts-model partition function) Z_G(q,w) of a graph G with general complex edge weights w = {w_e}. This generalizes a result of Sokal (cond-mat/9904146) that applies only within the complex antiferromagnetic regime |1+w_e| \\le 1. Our proof uses the polymer-gas representation of the multivariate Tutte polynomial together with the Penrose identity.

  11. Longitudinal variations in the F region ionosphere and the topside ionosphere-plasmasphere: Observations and model simulations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Larson, Kristine

    -plasmasphere: Observations and model simulations N. M. Pedatella,1,2 J. M. Forbes,1 A. Maute,3 A. D. Richmond,3 T.-W. Fang,4 in the topside ionosphere-plasmasphere TEC. Citation: Pedatella, N. M., J. M. Forbes, A. Maute, A. D. Richmond, T

  12. Made-to-Measure models of the Galactic Box/Peanut bulge: stellar and total mass in the bulge region

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Portail, M; Gerhard, O; Martinez-Valpuesta, I

    2015-01-01

    We construct dynamical models of the Milky Way's Box/Peanut (B/P) bulge, using the recently measured 3D density of Red Clump Giants (RCGs) as well as kinematic data from the BRAVA survey. We match these data using the NMAGIC Made-to-Measure method, starting with N-body models for barred discs in different dark matter haloes. We determine the total mass in the bulge volume of the RCGs measurement (+-2.2 x +- 1.4 x +- 1.2 kpc) with unprecedented accuracy and robustness to be 1.84 +- 0.07 x10^10 Msun. The stellar mass in this volume varies between 1.25-1.6 x10^10 Msun, depending on the amount of dark matter in the bulge. We evaluate the mass-to-light and mass-to-clump ratios in the bulge and compare them to theoretical predictions from population synthesis models. We find a mass-to-light ratio in the K-band in the range 0.8-1.1. The models are consistent with a Kroupa or Chabrier IMF, but a Salpeter IMF is ruled out for stellar ages of 10 Gyr. To match predictions from the Zoccali IMF derived from the bulge stel...

  13. Effect of Terrestrial and Marine Organic Aerosol on Regional and Global Climate: Model Development, Application, and Verification with Satellite Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meskhidze, Nicholas; Zhang, Yang; Kamykowski, Daniel

    2012-03-28

    In this DOE project the improvements to parameterization of marine primary organic matter (POM) emissions, hygroscopic properties of marine POM, marine isoprene derived secondary organic aerosol (SOA) emissions, surfactant effects, new cloud droplet activation parameterization have been implemented into Community Atmosphere Model (CAM 5.0), with a seven mode aerosol module from the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL)���¢��������s Modal Aerosol Model (MAM7). The effects of marine aerosols derived from sea spray and ocean emitted biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) on microphysical properties of clouds were explored by conducting 10 year CAM5.0-MAM7 model simulations at a grid resolution 1.9�������°��������2.5�������° with 30 vertical layers. Model-predicted relationship between ocean physical and biological systems and the abundance of CCN in remote marine atmosphere was compared to data from the A-Train satellites (MODIS, CALIPSO, AMSR-E). Model simulations show that on average, primary and secondary organic aerosol emissions from the ocean can yield up to 20% increase in Cloud Condensation Nuclei (CCN) at 0.2% Supersaturation, and up to 5% increases in droplet number concentration of global maritime shallow clouds. Marine organics were treated as internally or externally mixed with sea salt. Changes associated with cloud properties reduced (absolute value) the model-predicted short wave cloud forcing from -1.35 Wm-2 to -0.25 Wm-2. By using different emission scenarios, and droplet activation parameterizations, this study suggests that addition of marine primary aerosols and biologically generated reactive gases makes an important difference in radiative forcing assessments. All baseline and sensitivity simulations for 2001 and 2050 using global-through-urban WRF/Chem (GU-WRF) were completed. The main objective of these simulations was to evaluate the capability of GU-WRF for an accurate representation of the global atmosphere by exploring the most accurate configuration of physics options in GWRF for global scale modeling in 2001 at a horizontal grid resolution of 1�������° x 1�������°. GU-WRF model output was evaluated using observational datasets from a variety of sources including surface based observations (NCDC and BSRN), model reanalysis (NCEP/ NCAR Reanalysis and CMAP), and remotely-sensed data (TRMM) to evaluate the ability of GU-WRF to simulate atmospheric variables at the surface as well as aloft. Explicit treatment of nanoparticles produced from new particle formation in GU-WRF/Chem-MADRID was achieved by expanding particle size sections from 8 to 12 to cover particles with the size range of 1.16 nm to 11.6 �������µm. Simulations with two different nucleation parameterizations were conducted for August 2002 over a global domain at a 4�������º by 5�������º horizontal resolution. The results are evaluated against field measurement data from the 2002 Aerosol Nucleation and Real Time Characterization Experiment (ANARChE) in Atlanta, Georgia, as well as satellite and reanalysis data. We have also explored the relationship between ���¢��������clean marine���¢������� aerosol optical properties and ocean surface wind speed using remotely sensed data from the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP) on board the CALIPSO satellite and the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer (AMSR-E) on board the AQUA satellite. Detailed data analyses

  14. What controls the recent changes in African mineral dust aerosol across the Atlantic?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ridley, David Andrew

    Dust from Africa strongly perturbs the radiative balance over the Atlantic, with emissions that are highly variable from year to year. We show that the aerosol optical depth (AOD) of dust over the mid-Atlantic observed by ...

  15. Complex origins of the Lusitania biogeographic province and northeastern Atlantic fishes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-01-01

    tropical  eastern  Atlantic  (TEA),  encom? passing  the Tropical E Atlantic (TEA)  Lessepsian taxa  Introduced taxa for  two  distinct  areas:  the  TEA  (33.6%)  and  the 

  16. Modelling flow pattern transitions for steady upward gas-liquid flow in vertical tubes. [Bubble, slug, churn and dispersed-annular; also existence regions and transitions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Taitel, Y. (Tel-Aviv Univ., Israel); Bornea, D.; Dukler, A.E.

    1980-05-01

    Models for predicting flow patterns in steady upward gas-liquid flow in vertical tubes (such as production-well tubing) delineate the transition boundaries between each of the four basic flow patterns for gas-liquid flow in vertical tubes: bubble, slug, churn, and dispersed-annular. Model results suggest that churn flow is the development region for the slug pattern and that bubble flow can exist in small pipes only at high liquid rates, where turbulent dispersion forces are high. Each transition depends on the flow-rate pair, fluid properties, and pipe size, but the nature of the dependence is different for each transition because of differing control mechanisms. The theoretical predictions are in reasonably good agreement with a variety of published flow maps based on experimental data.

  17. Structure and Stability of Magnetic Fields in Solar Active Region12192 Based on Nonlinear Force-Free Field Modeling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Inoue, S; Kusano, K

    2016-01-01

    We analyze a three-dimensional (3D) magnetic structure and its stability in large solar active region(AR) 12192, using the 3D coronal magnetic field constructed under a nonlinear force-free field (NLFFF) approximation. In particular, we focus on the magnetic structure that produced an X3.1-class flare which is one of the X-class flares observed in AR 12192. According to our analysis, the AR contains multiple-flux-tube system, {\\it e.g.}, a large flux tube, both of whose footpoints are anchored to the large bipole field, under which other tubes exist close to a polarity inversion line (PIL). These various flux tubes of different sizes and shapes coexist there. In particular, the later are embedded along the PIL, which produces a favorable shape for the tether-cutting reconnection and is related to the X-class solar flare. We further found that most of magnetic twists are not released even after the flare, which is consistent with the fact that no observational evidence for major eruptions was found. On the oth...

  18. THE DEEP ATLANTIC OCEAN Lisa A. LEVIN and Andrew J. GOODAY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levin, Lisa

    Chapter 5 THE DEEP ATLANTIC OCEAN Lisa A. LEVIN and Andrew J. GOODAY INTRODUCTION The Atlantic are covered in Chapter 4 of this volume. Following a description of the environment of the deep Atlantic influences the movement of surface currents (Longhurst, 1998) and, ultimately, the nature of the deep

  19. Atlantic meridional overturning and climate response to Arctic Ocean W. R. Peltier,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peltier, W. Richard

    Atlantic meridional overturning and climate response to Arctic Ocean freshening W. R. Peltier,1 G to the response to North Atlantic freshening. Citation: Peltier, W. R., G. Vettoretti, and M. Stastna (2006 of the Atlantic by Heinrich Event 1 [Peltier, 2005]. Simi- larly, the onset of the Younger Dryas (Y-D) cold

  20. Second Year of the Atlantic Data Buoys Comparison Study (ADB 2006)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Second Year of the Atlantic Data Buoys Comparison Study (ADB 2006) Mayra Pazos, Craig Engler, Rick Lumpkin DBCP-22, Oct 16-20, 2006 La Jolla, California, USA #12;Second Year Atlantic Data Buoys Study ·The. This study is called Atlantic Data Buoys (ADB). ·The SVP drifters with mini drogue were deployed as clusters

  1. JOUtNALOFGEOPHYSICALRESEARCH VOLUME55, NO.9 SEPTEMBER1950 Natural Radiocarbon in the Atlantic Ocean I

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ocean I WALLACES.BROECKER,ROBERTGERARD,MAURICEEw·, ANDBRUCEC. I-IEEZEN Lamont Geological Observatory may well represent a wedge of young water penetrating the older North Atlantic deep water. Bottom of water along the surface of the Atlantic Ocean,with a return flow at depth. The Atlantic and Pacific

  2. Relationships between Pacific and Atlantic ocean sea surface temperatures and U.S. streamflow variability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Piechota, Thomas C.

    Relationships between Pacific and Atlantic ocean sea surface temperatures and U.S. streamflow March 2006; published 19 July 2006. [1] An evaluation of Pacific and Atlantic Ocean sea surface by an interdecadal-temporal evaluation for the Pacific (Atlantic) Ocean based on the phase of the Pacific Decadal

  3. 2012 Changing Arctic Ocean 506E/497E -Lecture 7 -Woodgate Schematic Surface and Atlantic Circulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Washington at Seattle, University of

    LHW ­ Lower Halocline Water AW ­ Atlantic Water DW ­ Deep Water WESTERN ARCTIC (PACIFIC) HALOCLINE Halocline Water LHW ­ Lower Halocline Water AW ­ Atlantic Water DW ­ Deep Water European Speak: e.g. Manley Circulation Jones, 2001 Typical Arctic profiles Bottom Water "the rest" Western Arctic warmer ATLANTIC WATER T

  4. Outer Continental Shelf oil and gas activities in the Mid-Atlantic and their onshore impacts: a summary report, November 1979. Update 3, August 1981

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCord, C.A.

    1981-01-01

    At the present, there are no operators drilling in the Mid-Atlantic Region. The prime targets for future exploration will be in areas of 3000 to 6000 feet (914 to 1829 m) depth of water, seaward of previously leased tracts. No commercial discoveries have been found during the 4-year drilling history of the area. Because of the minimal offshore oil- and gas-related activity in the Mid-Atlantic Region, the onshore impacts are also minimal. Little development has occurred as a result of exploration or development. The level of nearshore and onshore activity may increase with exploration associated with upcoming Lease Sale 59. More permanent onshore development will be contingent on the outcome of future exploration efforts. After Lease Sale 59, the next sale is Lease Sale 76, which is tentatively scheduled for March 1983.

  5. Constraining UV continuum slopes of active galactic nuclei with cloudy models of broad-line region extreme-ultraviolet emission lines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moloney, Joshua [CASA, Department of Astrophysical and Planetary Sciences, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO 80309 (United States); Michael Shull, J., E-mail: joshua.moloney@colorado.edu, E-mail: michael.shull@colorado.edu [Also at Institute of Astronomy, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB3 0HA, UK. (United Kingdom)

    2014-10-01

    Understanding the composition and structure of the broad-line region (BLR) of active galactic nuclei (AGNs) is important for answering many outstanding questions in supermassive black hole evolution, galaxy evolution, and ionization of the intergalactic medium. We used single-epoch UV spectra from the Cosmic Origins Spectrograph (COS) on the Hubble Space Telescope to measure EUV emission-line fluxes from four individual AGNs with 0.49 ? z ? 0.64, two AGNs with 0.32 ? z ? 0.40, and a composite of 159 AGNs. With the CLOUDY photoionization code, we calculated emission-line fluxes from BLR clouds with a range of density, hydrogen ionizing flux, and incident continuum spectral indices. The photoionization grids were fit to the observations using single-component and locally optimally emitting cloud (LOC) models. The LOC models provide good fits to the measured fluxes, while the single-component models do not. The UV spectral indices preferred by our LOC models are consistent with those measured from COS spectra. EUV emission lines such as N IV ?765, O II ?833, and O III ?834 originate primarily from gas with electron temperatures between 37,000 K and 55,000 K. This gas is found in BLR clouds with high hydrogen densities (n {sub H} ? 10{sup 12} cm{sup –3}) and hydrogen ionizing photon fluxes (?{sub H} ? 10{sup 22} cm{sup –2} s{sup –1}).

  6. Modeling, Analysis, and Preservation Techniques for Historic Reinforced Concrete Structures in Seismic Prone Regions Case Study: Augusta Airship Hangar, Sicily

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cronin, Kelly; Whyte, Catherine [University of California at Berkeley, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, 760 Davis Hall (United States); Reiner, Tom [Graduate Engineer, Buro Happold Consulting Engineers, Inc., 9601 Jefferson Blvd., Suite B, Culver City, CA 90232 (United States)

    2008-07-08

    Throughout the world there are hundreds of historic monuments and structures considered to be invaluable and irreplaceable. They are symbols of cultural identity and a means of educating people about history. Preservation of historic monuments and structures is therefore an important part of safeguarding these cultural heritage sites so that they retain their value for future generations.This report discusses a procedure for the investigation of seismic hazards in existing buildings and possible steps that can be taken to avoid damage caused by these hazards. The Augusta Airship Hangar located in Sicily, will be used as a case study however the topics addressed in this paper can be applied to other structures of historic value around the world.First state-of-the-art scanning procedures were used to create scale digital models that were imported into a structural analysis program. Within this program dynamic analyses were performed on the model based on actual ground motions taken close to the site. This data was used to determine the period and mode shapes of the structure. Then a nonlinear analysis, including a static pushover analysis, was implemented on a two-dimensional model of the structural frame. From this analysis the failure mechanisms of the structure were revealed with relation to an allowable roof displacement. The structural integrity of the structure was evaluated based on pre-defined performance goals. Finally multiple suggestions were made how the Augusta Airship Hangar might be repaired and strengthened so that this structure will not be destroyed should an earthquake occur.The results of our study show that historic structures, despite their age, can still be strong and ductile. Also there are a multitude of effective preservation and retrofit techniques that can be used to strengthen these historic structures, should an earthquake occur. Through this study, the Augusta Airship Hangar has proven to be not only a historic symbol for Sicily but also can be used as an example for the rehabilitation of other historic structures. The techniques and processes discussed in this paper can be applied to other historic reinforced concrete structures and can be expanded upon in future investigations.

  7. Non-linear force-free field modeling of a solar active region around the time of a major flare and coronal mass ejection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. J. Schrijver; M. L. DeRosa; T. Metcalf; G. Barnes; B. Lites; T. Tarbell; J. McTiernan; G. Valori; T. Wiegelmann; M. S. Wheatland; T. Amari; G. Aulanier; P. Demoulin; M. Fuhrmann; K. Kusano; S. Regnier; J. K. Thalmann

    2007-11-30

    Solar flares and coronal mass ejections are associated with rapid changes in field connectivity and powered by the partial dissipation of electrical currents in the solar atmosphere. A critical unanswered question is whether the currents involved are induced by the motion of pre-existing atmospheric magnetic flux subject to surface plasma flows, or whether these currents are associated with the emergence of flux from within the solar convective zone. We address this problem by applying state-of-the-art nonlinear force-free field (NLFFF) modeling to the highest resolution and quality vector-magnetographic data observed by the recently launched Hinode satellite on NOAA Active Region 10930 around the time of a powerful X3.4 flare. We compute 14 NLFFF models with 4 different codes and a variety of boundary conditions. We find that the model fields differ markedly in geometry, energy content, and force-freeness. We discuss the relative merits of these models in a general critique of present abilities to model the coronal magnetic field based on surface vector field measurements. For our application in particular, we find a fair agreement of the best-fit model field with the observed coronal configuration, and argue (1) that strong electrical currents emerge together with magnetic flux preceding the flare, (2) that these currents are carried in an ensemble of thin strands, (3) that the global pattern of these currents and of field lines are compatible with a large-scale twisted flux rope topology, and (4) that the ~10^32 erg change in energy associated with the coronal electrical currents suffices to power the flare and its associated coronal mass ejection.

  8. Soil Carbon Change and Net Energy Associated with Biofuel Production on Marginal Lands: A Regional Modeling Perspective

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bandaru, Varaprasad; Izaurralde, Roberto C.; Manowitz, David H.; Link, Robert P.; Zhang, Xuesong; Post, W. M.

    2013-12-01

    The use of marginal lands (MLs) for biofuel production has been contemplated as a promising solution for meeting biofuel demands. However, there have been concerns with spatial location of MLs, their inherent biofuel potential, and possible environmental consequences with the cultivation of energy crops. Here, we developed a new quantitative approach that integrates high-resolution land cover and land productivity maps and uses conditional probability density functions for analyzing land use patterns as a function of land productivity to classify the agricultural lands. We subsequently applied this method to determine available productive croplands (P-CLs) and non-crop marginal lands (NC-MLs) in a nine-county Southern Michigan. Furthermore, Spatially Explicit Integrated Modeling Framework (SEIMF) using EPIC (Environmental Policy Integrated Climate) was used to understand the net energy (NE) and soil organic carbon (SOC) implications of cultivating different annual and perennial production systems.

  9. Investigation of Brazil Current rings in the confluence region Carlos A. D. Lentini,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Investigation of Brazil Current rings in the confluence region Carlos A. D. Lentini,1 Gustavo J Atlantic. These fields were used to monitor the formation and characteristics of the Brazil Current warm-core anticyclonic rings shed by the first meander trough after poleward excursions of the Brazil Current (BC

  10. Model testing using Chernobyl data: III. Atmospheric resuspension of radionuclides in Ukrainian regions impacted by Chernobyl fallout

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garger, E.K. [Inst. of Radioecology, Kiev (Ukraine); Hoffman, F.O. [SENES Oak Ridge, Inc., TN (United States); Miller, C.W. [Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA (United States)

    1996-01-01

    The {open_quotes}Resuspension{close_quotes} scenario is designed to test models for atmospheric resuspension of radionuclides from contaminated soils. Resuspension can be a secondary source of contamination after a release has stopped, as well as a source of contamination for people and areas not exposed to the original release. The test scenario describes three exposure situations: (1) locations within the highly contaminated 30-km zone at Chernobyl, where exposures to resuspended material are probably dominated by local processes; (2) an urban area (Kiev) outside the 30-km zone, where local processes include extensive vehicular traffic; and (3) a location 40 to 60 km west of the Chernobyl reactor, where upwind sources of contamination are important. Input data include characteristics of the {sup 137}Cs ground contamination around specific sites, climatological data for the sites, characteristics of the terrain and topography, and locations of the sampling sites. Predictions are requested for average air concentrations of {sup 137}Cs at specified locations due to resuspension of Chernobyl fallout and for specified resuspension factors and rates. Test data (field measurements) are available for all endpoints. 9 refs., 4 figs., 11 tabs.

  11. Ballast Water Exchange in the North Atlantic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pederson, Judith

    2004-01-01

    This white paper focuses on the regional component of ballast water management and specifically addresses concerns in the Gulf of St. Lawrence and Gulf of Maine. It summarizes vessel traffic and ballast water exchange in ...

  12. Outer Continental Shelf oil and gas activities in the Atlantic and their onshore impacts. Atlantic summary report, July 1, 1983-December 31, 1984

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rudolph, R.W.; Havran, K.J.

    1984-12-01

    The search for oil and gas on the Outer Continental Shelf in the Atlantic continues. Hydrocarbon exploration efforts have been and probably will continue to be concentrated on four major sedimentary basins: the Georges Bank Basin, the Baltimore Canyon Trough, the Carolina Trough, and the Blake Plateau Basin. To date, 46 exploratory wells have been drilled in these areas, most of them in the Mid-Atlantic Planning Area where resource estimates indicate the hydrocarbon potential is the greatest of the three Atlantic Outer Continental Shelf planning areas. Currently, no operators are involved in exploration efforts in the Atlantic. No commercial discoveries have been announced. Since the first and most successful sale of Atlantic Outer Continental Shelf blocks in Lease Sale 40 in August 1976, there have been eight other sales bringing total revenues of almost $3 billion to the Federal Treasury. The current tentative milestone chart for the 5-year offshore leasing schedule calls for four additional lease sales to be held in the Atlantic Outer Continental Shelf. Although no firm plans have been made for the transportation of potential offshore hydrocarbons to onshore processing facilities, it is believed that oil would be transported by tanker or tug-barge system to existing refineries on the Raritan and Delaware Bays. Gas probably would be transported by pipeline to one of several onshore landfalls identifed by Atlantic Coast States and in Federal environmental impact documents. Recent onshore support for Atlantic Outer Continental Shelf exploration came from Davisville, Rhode Island, the only shore support base for the Atlantic that was active during 1984. Three maps are provided in the back pocket of this report for the North Atlantic, Mid-Atlantic and South Atlantic planning areas. 29 refs., 8 figs., 6 tabs.

  13. SIMULATION MODEL ANALYSIS OF THE MOST PROMISING GEOLOGIC SEQUESTRATION FORMATION CANDIDATES IN THE ROCKY MOUNTAIN REGION, USA, WITH FOCUS ON UNCERTAINTY ASSESSMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, Si-Yong; Zaluski, Wade; Will, Robert; Eisinger, Chris; Matthews, Vince; McPherson, Brian

    2013-09-01

    The purpose of this report is to report results of reservoir model simulation analyses for forecasting subsurface CO2 storage capacity estimation for the most promising formations in the Rocky Mountain region of the USA. A particular emphasis of this project was to assess uncertainty of the simulation-based forecasts. Results illustrate how local-scale data, including well information, number of wells, and location of wells, affect storage capacity estimates and what degree of well density (number of wells over a fixed area) may be required to estimate capacity within a specified degree of confidence. A major outcome of this work was development of a new workflow of simulation analysis, accommodating the addition of “random pseudo wells” to represent virtual characterization wells.

  14. Full-fuel-cycle approach to vehicle emissions modeling: A case study of gasoline in the southeastern region of the United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bell, S.R.; Gupta, M. [Univ. of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL (United States); Greening, L.A. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)

    1995-09-01

    The use of full-fuel-cycle analysis as a scientific, economic, and policy tool for the evaluation of alternative sources of transportation energy has become increasingly widespread. However, consistent methods for performance of these types of analyses are only now becoming recognized and utilized. The work presented here provides a case study of full-fuel-cycle analysis methods applied to the evaluation of gasoline in the southeastern region of the United States. Results of the study demonstrate the significance of nonvehicle processes, such as fuel refining, in terms of energy expenditure and emissions production. Unique to this work is the application of the MOBILE5 mobile emissions model in the full-fuel-cycle analysis. Estimates of direct and indirect greenhouse gas production are also presented and discussed using the full-fuel-cycle analysis method.

  15. NV PFA Regional Data

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    James Faulds

    2015-10-28

    This project focused on defining geothermal play fairways and development of a detailed geothermal potential map of a large transect across the Great Basin region (96,000 km2), with the primary objective of facilitating discovery of commercial-grade, blind geothermal fields (i.e. systems with no surface hot springs or fumaroles) and thereby accelerating geothermal development in this promising region. Data included in this submission consists of: structural settings (target areas, recency of faulting, slip and dilation potential, slip rates, quality), regional-scale strain rates, earthquake density and magnitude, gravity data, temperature at 3 km depth, permeability models, favorability models, degree of exploration and exploration opportunities, data from springs and wells, transmission lines and wilderness areas, and published maps and theses for the Nevada Play Fairway area.

  16. Decadal variability of the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Buckley, Martha Weaver

    2011-01-01

    In the mean, the Atlantic Ocean transports 1 to 1.5 PW of heat northward, and estimates suggest that 60% of this heat transport is associated with a circulation that reaches the cold waters of the abyss. Due to the role ...

  17. Preparing for the peak: Energy security and Atlantic Canada

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hughes, Larry

    ­ Hydroelectricity­ Uranium­ Canada is not "energy homogenous"· #12;Atlantic Canada Older housing stock· Declining:· Hibernia, Terra Nova, and­ White Rose >85% exported­ Hebron?­ Hydroelectric:· Churchill Falls 5,400 MW Statistics Canada #12;New Brunswick Limited coal reserves· Electricity:· Oil and coal­ Hydroelectric­ Nuclear

  18. Florida Atlantic University Department of Civil, Environmental and Geomatics Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fernandez, Eduardo

    Florida Atlantic University Department of Civil, Environmental and Geomatics Engineering. Learn about various high-performance new materials in Civil Engineering construction 2. Understand.fau.edu) Recommended Reference Materials 1. Civil Engineering Materials, Shan Somayaji, 2nd Ed., Prentice Hall, 2001 2

  19. TIDAL FRESHWATER WETLANDS OF THE MID-ATLANTIC AND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fabrizio, Mary C.

    Chapter 14 TIDAL FRESHWATER WETLANDS OF THE MID-ATLANTIC AND SOUTHEASTERN UNITED STATES James E Jensen& Aat Barendregt 7. Animal communities in North American tidal fresh- water wetlands Christopher W Struyf, Tom Maris, Tom Cox & Patrick Meire 12. Carbon flows, nutrient cycling, and food webs in tidal

  20. CARINA (Carbon dioxide in the Atlantic Ocean) Data from CDIAC

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    The idea for CARINA developed at a workshop (CO2 in the northern North Atlantic) that was held at the HANSE-Wissenschaftskolleg (HANSE Institute for Advanced Study) in Delmenhorst, Germany from June 9 to 11, 1999. While the main scientific focus is the North Atlantic, some data from the South Atlantic have been included in the project, along with data from the Arctic Ocean. Data sets go back to 1972, and more than 100 are currently available. The data are also being used in conjunction with other projects and research groups, such as the Atlantic Ocean Carbon Synthesis Group. See the inventory of data at http://store.pangaea.de/Projects/CARBOOCEAN/carina/data_inventory.htm See a detailed table of information on the cruises at http://cdiac.ornl.gov/oceans/CARINA/Carina_table.html and also provides access to data files. The CARBOOCEAN data portal provides a specialized interface for CARINA data, a reference list for historic carbon data, and password protected access to the "Data Underway Warehouse.".

  1. FLORIDA ATLANTIC UNIVERSITY NOTICE OF PROPOSED NEW REGULATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richman, Fred

    FLORIDA ATLANTIC UNIVERSITY NOTICE OF PROPOSED NEW REGULATION Date: October 9, 2007 REGULATION Board of Governors ("BOG") promulgated new regulations that relate to new program termination (6C-8.012, Academic Program Termination). The Regulations require that each university board of trustees adopt

  2. FLORIDA ATLANTIC UNIVERSITY NOTICE OF PROPOSED NEW REGULATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richman, Fred

    FLORIDA ATLANTIC UNIVERSITY NOTICE OF PROPOSED NEW REGULATION Date: October 13, 2011 REGULATION-support organizations (DSOs) are governed by Florida Statute s. 1004.28 and Board of Governors Regulation 6 conditions, controls and requirements as each board deems appropriate for oversight. The proposed regulation

  3. FLORIDA ATLANTIC UNIVERSITY NOTICE OF PROPOSED NEW REGULATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richman, Fred

    FLORIDA ATLANTIC UNIVERSITY NOTICE OF PROPOSED NEW REGULATION Date: February 11, 2011 REGULATION.009). SUMMARY: The University administration seeks approval to amend FAU Regulation 4.009, Major Medical Insurance Requirements for Foreign Students. This proposed amended regulation, renamed Health Insurance

  4. FLORIDA ATLANTIC UNIVERSITY NOTICE OF PROPOSED NEW REGULATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richman, Fred

    FLORIDA ATLANTIC UNIVERSITY NOTICE OF PROPOSED NEW REGULATION Date: October 9, 2007 REGULATION: At its March 2007 meeting, the Florida Board of Governors ("BOG") promulgated new regulations that relate to new program authorization (6C-8.011, Academic Program Authorization). The Regulations require

  5. FLORIDA ATLANTIC UNIVERSITY NOTICE OF PROPOSED NEW REGULATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richman, Fred

    FLORIDA ATLANTIC UNIVERSITY NOTICE OF PROPOSED NEW REGULATION Date: April 29, 2008 REGULATION TITLE for the proposed FAU Regulation 4.014, Medical Advisory Committee. This committee will advise and make to themselves or others in the University. Approval of this proposed regulation allows the University to have

  6. FLORIDA ATLANTIC UNIVERSITY NOTICE OF PROPOSED NEW REGULATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richman, Fred

    FLORIDA ATLANTIC UNIVERSITY NOTICE OF PROPOSED NEW REGULATION Date: June 18, 2009 REGULATION TITLE of Governors is required to promulgate a regulation to implement the Textbook Affordability Act of 2008. The BOG promulgated Regulation 8.003 on March 26, 2009, which requires each Board of Trustees

  7. FLORIDA ATLANTIC UNIVERSITY NOTICE OF PROPOSED NEW REGULATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richman, Fred

    -1- FLORIDA ATLANTIC UNIVERSITY NOTICE OF PROPOSED NEW REGULATION Date: April 5, 2010 REGULATION of Academic Affairs seeks approval of the proposed FAU Regulation 4.002, Student Academic Grievance Procedures for Grade Reviews. Approval is dependent on the repeal of the current FAU Regulation 4.002 and the approval

  8. FLORIDA ATLANTIC UNIVERSITY NOTICE OF PROPOSED NEW REGULATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richman, Fred

    FLORIDA ATLANTIC UNIVERSITY NOTICE OF PROPOSED NEW REGULATION Date: April 29, 2008 REGULATION TITLE approval FAU Regulation 4.013, Exceptional Circumstance Withdrawals. This regulation outlines the process, and staff when it is appropriate to use this regulation. The committee, composed of representatives from all

  9. FLORIDA ATLANTIC UNIVERSITY NOTICE OF PROPOSED NEW REGULATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richman, Fred

    FLORIDA ATLANTIC UNIVERSITY NOTICE OF PROPOSED NEW REGULATION Date: April 14, 2011 REGULATION TITLE College of Medicine seeks approval of the proposed FAU Regulation 9.001, Faculty Practice Plan and administration of the Faculty Practice Plan. FULL TEXT OF THE REGULATION: The full text of the proposed

  10. FLORIDA ATLANTIC UNIVERSITY NOTICE OF PROPOSED NEW REGULATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richman, Fred

    FLORIDA ATLANTIC UNIVERSITY NOTICE OF PROPOSED NEW REGULATION Date: April 16, 2009 REGULATION TITLE AND NUMBER: Institutes and Centers (2.006). SUMMARY: Board of Governors Regulation 10.015(3), University with Board of Governors criteria. Proposed Regulation 2.006 responds to this requirement and provides

  11. Particulate optical scattering coefficients along an Atlantic Meridional Transect

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boss, Emmanuel S.

    Particulate optical scattering coefficients along an Atlantic Meridional Transect G. Dall'Olmo,1, E, USA gdal@pml.ac.uk Abstract: The particulate optical backscattering coefficient (bbp) is a fundamental optical property that allows monitoring of marine suspended particles both in situ and from space

  12. PLUTONIUM ISOTOPES I N THE NORTH ATLANTIC KEN 0. BUESSELER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Buesseler, Ken

    PLUTONIUM ISOTOPES I N THE NORTH ATLANTIC by KEN 0. BUESSELER B.A., University of California The a r t i f i c i a l radionuclide Plutonium (Pu) has been introduced i n t o the environment p r i m

  13. Ozone Treatments of Fresh Atlantic Cod, Gadus morhua

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ozone Treatments of Fresh Atlantic Cod, Gadus morhua ELINOR M. RAVESI, JOSEPH J. L1CCIARDELLO and LINDA D. RACICOT Introduction The strong oxidizing nature of ozone, known since its discovery in 1840 (1977) cited in a review article numerous reports of the successful use of ozone to I) control microbial

  14. Atlantic Winds, Waves, Nonlinearities, and the North Equatorial Countercurrent

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maryland at College Park, University of

    1 Atlantic Winds, Waves, Nonlinearities, and the North Equatorial Countercurrent Jeff Armbruster an eastward current flowing counter to the direction of the prevailing trade winds. Already by the 1500's for Environmental Prediction, Camp Springs, MD #12;2 Figure 1. Wind stress and current conditions during August

  15. INV Spring, 2009 1 CANARY ISLANDS (see Atlantic Ocean)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    INV Spring, 2009 1 UPD 5/6/15 CANARY ISLANDS (see Atlantic Ocean) 1950 1:100,000 Lanzarote 1950 1:130,000 International travel maps, Canary Islands = Mapas internacionales de viaje, Islas Canarias (bc) - International Nacional 9126/C1/100/1950- 1:100,000 Canary Islands (6 sheets) Mapa Militar: 1 - de la Isla de Hierro 2

  16. Mariner's Guide For Hurricane Awareness In The North Atlantic Basin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mariner's Guide For Hurricane Awareness In The North Atlantic Basin Eric J. Holweg eholweg.navy.mil/data/oceans/gulfstream.html Hurricane Preparedness & Tracks: http://www.fema.gov/fema/trop.htm Time Zone Conversions: http.....................................................................................................2 · Tropical Wave · Tropical Disturbance · Tropical Depression · Tropical Storm · Hurricane

  17. NOAA 2015 Atlantic Hurricane Season Outlook Dr. Gerry Bell

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Tsuhan

    NOAA 2015 Atlantic Hurricane Season Outlook Dr. Gerry Bell Lead Seasonal Forecaster Climate Prediction Center NOAA/ NWS/ NCEP Collaboration With National Hurricane Center/ NOAA/ NWS/ NCEP Hurricane Research Division/ NOAA/ OAR/ AOML/ HRD www.cpc.ncep.noaa.gov/products/hurricane #12;Outline 1. Features

  18. Developing regionalized models of lithospheric thickness and velocity structure across Eurasia and the Middle East from jointly inverting P-wave and S-wave receiver functions with Rayleigh wave group and phase velocities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Julia, J; Nyblade, A; Hansen, S; Rodgers, A; Matzel, E

    2009-07-06

    In this project, we are developing models of lithospheric structure for a wide variety of tectonic regions throughout Eurasia and the Middle East by regionalizing 1D velocity models obtained by jointly inverting P-wave and S-wave receiver functions with Rayleigh wave group and phase velocities. We expect the regionalized velocity models will improve our ability to predict travel-times for local and regional phases, such as Pg, Pn, Sn and Lg, as well as travel-times for body-waves at upper mantle triplication distances in both seismic and aseismic regions of Eurasia and the Middle East. We anticipate the models will help inform and strengthen ongoing and future efforts within the NNSA labs to develop 3D velocity models for Eurasia and the Middle East, and will assist in obtaining model-based predictions where no empirical data are available and for improving locations from sparse networks using kriging. The codes needed to conduct the joint inversion of P-wave receiver functions (PRFs), S-wave receiver functions (SRFs), and dispersion velocities have already been assembled as part of ongoing research on lithospheric structure in Africa. The methodology has been tested with synthetic 'data' and case studies have been investigated with data collected at an open broadband stations in South Africa. PRFs constrain the size and S-P travel-time of seismic discontinuities in the crust and uppermost mantle, SRFs constrain the size and P-S travel-time of the lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary, and dispersion velocities constrain average S-wave velocity within frequency-dependent depth-ranges. Preliminary results show that the combination yields integrated 1D velocity models local to the recording station, where the discontinuities constrained by the receiver functions are superimposed to a background velocity model constrained by the dispersion velocities. In our first year of this project we will (i) generate 1D velocity models for open broadband seismic stations in the western half of the study area (Eurasia and the Middle East) and (ii) identify well located seismic events with event-station paths isolated to individual tectonic provinces within the study area and collect broadband waveforms and source parameters for the selected events. The 1D models obtained from the joint inversion will then be combined with published geologic terrain maps to produce regionalized models for distinctive tectonic areas within the study area, and the models will be validated through full waveform modeling of well-located seismic events recorded at local and regional distances.

  19. Regional Purchasing

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMassR&D100 Winners * ImpactsandRegarding ConfinementRegional Partnerships

  20. Regional Report Issue Paper

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garfunkel, Eric

    South Atlantic Delaware, Florida, Georgia, Maryland, North Carolina, South Carolina, Virginia, West Virginia [The District of Columbia is part of this division but is not included in the analysis Nebraska SD South Dakota KS Kansas MN Minnesota IA Iowa MO Missouri WI Wisconsin IL Illinois IN Indiana OH

  1. Uplifted supersymmetric Higgs region

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bogdan A. Dobrescu; Patrick J. Fox

    2010-05-26

    We show that the parameter space of the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model includes a region where the down-type fermion masses are generated by the loop-induced couplings to the up-type Higgs doublet. In this region the down-type Higgs doublet does not acquire a vacuum expectation value at tree level, and has sizable couplings in the superpotential to the tau leptons and bottom quarks. Besides a light standard-like Higgs boson, the Higgs spectrum includes the nearly degenerate states of a heavy spin-0 doublet which can be produced through their couplings to the $b$ quark and decay predominantly into \\tau^+\\tau^- or \\tau\

  2. NETL Outreach Specialist Honored with 2014 FLC Mid-Atlantic Regional

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    NETL's STEM education efforts in southwestern Pennsylvania. Ms. Soukup leads NETL's K-12 educational outreach efforts by providing educators with resources to improve their skills...

  3. NETL Researcher Honored with 2014 FLC Mid-Atlantic Regional STEM...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the competition to increase from 18 to 24 high school teams and adding 16 middle school teams. This partnership, along with a college recruiting and information fair and...

  4. Causes of Ocean Surface temperature Changes in Atlantic and Pacific Topical Cyclogenesis Regions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2006-01-01

    17, 1777 (2004). 11. T. P. Barnett, D. W. Pierce, R. Schnur,267 (2001). 13. T. P. Barnett et al. , Science 309, 284 (4 K. AchutaRao, 1 T.P. Barnett, 5 J.S. Boyle, 1 W. Br¨

  5. Economic Growth in the Mid Atlantic Region: Conjectural Estimates for 1720 to 1800

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rosenbloom, Joshua L.; Weiss, Thomas

    2013-09-19

    included beef or pork, rice, peas, flour, beer, molasses, cheese, butter, spice, sugar, vinegar, and salt. Moreover, quantities of each category of provisions were specified for adult males, adult females, children, and servants. We have calculated... of free colonists because of shifts in the composition of the population. The relative level of consumption of free adults is higher than that of children, and that of free colonists is higher than that of slaves. Declines in the slave share...

  6. NETL Outreach Specialist Honored with 2014 FLC Mid-Atlantic Regional

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMass map shines light on771/6/14 Contact: Janet Lambert Reviewed: 3/5/14 Page 1 ofOutreach

  7. 2015 ACI Mid-Atlantic Regional Home Performance Conference | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative FuelsofProgram:Y-12 Beta-3 Racetracks2 DOEEnergyEnergyand4-FederalEnergy

  8. Rigidity of a spherical capsule switches the localization of encapsulated particles between inner and peripheral regions under crowding condition: Simple model on cellular architecture

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shew, Chwen-Yang Kondo, Kenta; Yoshikawa, Kenichi

    2014-01-14

    We have investigated the inhomogeneous interior of confined spherical cavities as capsules containing encapsulated binary hard sphere mixtures for different compositions and cavity wall rigidity. Such a greatly simplified model manifests the effects of macromolecular crowding arising from excluded volume interactions in a tiny cell or a cellular nucleus. By fixing the number of large particles, the level of crowding is adjusted by changing the amount of small hard spheres in the cavity. For a rigid cavity, large spheres tend to pack in liquid-like order apart from the surface to the center of the cavity as the crowding level is increased. Whereas, for a soft cavity, larger spheres tend to blend with small spheres in the peripheral region at near the boundary of the cavity, and are susceptible to be depleted from the interior of the cavity as the cavity becomes more crowded. These results may help future elucidation of the thermodynamic pathways to stabilize the inhomogeneous structure of mixtures confined in cavities, such as the derepression of genome materials around the interior rim of the nucleus in a cancerous cell.

  9. The Relation Between Dry Vortex Merger and Tropical Cyclone Genesis over the Atlantic Ocean

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Shu-Hua; Liu, Yi-Chin

    2014-10-27

    A strong, convective African tropical disturbance has a greater chance to develop into a Tropical 23 Depression (TD) if it merges with a shallow, dry vortex (D-vortex) from the north of the African 24 easterly jet (AEJ) after leaving the western coast. Using 11-year reanalysis data we found that the 25 western tip of a vortex strip at northwestern Africa can serve as dry vortices for the D-vortex 26 merger if it shifts southward. Another source of D-vortices is the westward propagating lows 27 along the southern edge of the Saharan air. The D-vortex merger process occurred for 63.5% of 28 tropical cyclones (TCs) or developing systems over the main development region of the Atlantic 29 Ocean, while it occurred for 54% of non-developing systems. TC genesis could be largely 30 controlled by the large-scale environment, but the differences in characteristics of vortices 31 associated with the D-vortex merger between developing and non-developing systems could 32 potentially help determine their destinies; in general, developing systems were dominated by a 33 more intense and moist south vortex, while non-developing systems were dominated by a north 34 vortex which was more intense, drier, and larger in size. Analysis also shows that 74% of intense 35 developing systems were involved with the D-vortex merger process. More attention needs to be 36 paid to the D-vortex merger and the characteristics of those vortices as they can play significant 37 roles or have a strong indication in Atlantic TC genesis.

  10. Application of an online-coupled regional climate model, WRF-CAM5, over East Asia for examination of ice nucleation schemes: Part I. Comprehensive model evaluation and trend analysis for 2006 and 2011

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Chen, Ying; Zhang, Yang; Fan, Jiwen; Leung, Lai -Yung; Zhang, Qiang; He, Kebin

    2015-08-18

    Online-coupled climate and chemistry models are necessary to realistically represent the interactions between climate variables and chemical species and accurately simulate aerosol direct and indirect effects on cloud, precipitation, and radiation. In this Part I of a two-part paper, simulations from the Weather Research and Forecasting model coupled with the physics package of Community Atmosphere Model (WRF-CAM5) are conducted with the default heterogeneous ice nucleation parameterization over East Asia for two full years: 2006 and 2011. A comprehensive model evaluation is performed using satellite and surface observations. The model shows an overall acceptable performance for major meteorological variables at themore »surface and in the boundary layer, as well as column variables (e.g., precipitation, cloud fraction, precipitating water vapor, downward longwave and shortwave radiation). Moderate to large biases exist for cloud condensation nuclei over oceanic areas, cloud variables (e.g., cloud droplet number concentration, cloud liquid and ice water paths, cloud optical depth, longwave and shortwave cloud forcing). These biases indicate a need to improve the model treatments for cloud processes, especially cloud droplets and ice nucleation, as well as to reduce uncertainty in the satellite retrievals. The model simulates well the column abundances of chemical species except for column SO2 but relatively poor for surface concentrations of several species such as CO, NO2, SO2, PM2.5, and PM10. Several reasons could contribute to the underestimation of major chemical species in East Asia including underestimations of anthropogenic emissions and natural dust emissions, uncertainties in the spatial and vertical distributions of the anthropogenic emissions, as well as biases in meteorological, radiative, and cloud predictions. Despite moderate to large biases in the chemical predictions, the model performance is generally consistent with or even better than that reported for East Asia with only a few exceptions. The model generally reproduces the observed seasonal variations and the difference between 2006 and 2011 for most variables or chemical species. Overall, these results demonstrate promising skills of WRF-CAM5 for long-term simulations at a regional scale and suggest several areas of potential improvements.« less

  11. Seismic Modelling for the Sub-Basalt Imaging Problem Including an Analysis and Development of the Boundary Element Method 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dobson, Andrew

    The north-east Atlantic margin (NEAM) is important for hydrocarbon exploration because of the growing evidence of hydrocarbon reserves in the region. However, seismic exploration of the sub-surface is hampered by large ...

  12. REGIONAL WATER SUPPLY PLANNING AND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mays, Larry W.

    CHAPTER 3 REGIONAL WATER SUPPLY PLANNING AND CAPACITY EXPANSION MODELS Messele Z. Ejeta California Department of Water Resources Sacramento, California Larry W. Mays Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering Arizona State University Tempe, Arizona 3.1 INTRODUCTION Water supply planning on a regional scale

  13. The Rise of Europe: Atlantic Trade, Institutioanl Change and Economic Growth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Acemoglu, Daron

    2003-04-14

    This paper documents that the Rise of (Western) Europe between 1500 and 1850 is largely accounted for by the growth of European nations with access to the Atlantic, ...

  14. Efficient Multifamily Homes in a Hot-Humid Climate by Atlantic Housing Partners

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chasar, D.; Martin, E.

    2013-04-01

    With assistance from the Florida Solar Energy Center (FSEC) and its Building America Partnership for Improved Residential Construction (BA-PIRC), Atlantic Housing Partners (AHP) has implemented a high performance, systems engineered package of measures. This report demonstrates how the initiative achieves Building America (BA) goals of 30%-50% energy savings. Specifically, the goals are documented as being achieved in the new construction multifamily housing sector in the hot humid climate. Results from energy modeling of the high performance package are presented. The role of utility allowance calculations, used as part of the low-income housing tax credit process, to value those energy savings is discussed, as is customer satisfaction with heat pump water heaters.

  15. Efficient Multifamily Homes in a Hot Humid Climate by Atlantic Housing Partners

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chaser, Dave; Martin, Eric

    2013-04-01

    With assistance from the Florida Solar Energy Center (FSEC) and its Building America Partnership for Improved Residential Construction (BA-PIRC), Atlantic Housing Partners (AHP) has implemented a high performance, systems engineered package of measures. This report demonstrates how the initiative achieves Building America (BA) goals of 30%-50% energy savings. Specifically, the goals are documented as being achieved in the new construction multifamily housing sector in the hot humid climate. Results from energy modeling of the high performance package are presented. The role of utility allowance calculations, used as part of the low-income housing tax credit process, to value those energy savings is discussed, as is customer satisfaction with heat pump water heaters.

  16. Mussels as a model system for integrative ecomechanics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carrington, E; Waite, JH; Sarŕ, G; Sebens, KP

    2015-01-01

    a dynamic energy budget model of marine ecosystem size-energy budget-based comparison of North Atlantic marineenergy budget, ?tness, mussel foot proteins, tenacity The Annual Review of Marine

  17. Sanders, J. E.; and Merguerian, Charles, 1995b, New York City region: Unique testing ground for flow models of Quaternary continental glaciers.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Merguerian, Charles

    Sanders, J. E.; and Merguerian, Charles, 1995b, New York City region: Unique testing ground This Abstract: Sanders, J. E.; and Merguerian, Charles, 1995b, New York City region: Unique testing ground City came from the NNE (from the "Labrador center"). When ice blocked the N end of Hudson Bay and Lake

  18. Calcareous nannofossil changes during the Mid-Pleistocene Revolution: Paleoecologic and paleoceanographic evidence from North Atlantic Site 980/981

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    South Florida, University of

    acquired in high sample resolution (2­3 ky) at northern Atlantic ODP (Ocean Drilling Program) Site 980) and possibly to deep and intermediate water production of both Northern and Southern Hemisphere origin during Atlantic DSDP (Deep Sea Drilling Project) Site 607 and South Atlantic ODP Site 1090. Data collected provide

  19. Are the winters 2010 and 2012 archetypes exhibiting extreme1 opposite behavior of the North Atlantic jet stream?2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Woollings, Tim

    Atlantic jet stream?2 Joăo A. Santos1 3 Centre for the Research and Technology of Agro of the eddy-driven westerly jet over the North16 Atlantic. In the 2010 winter the maximum of the jet stream Atlantic jet variability under current climate conditions.31 32 Keywords: jet stream, blocking, wave

  20. Integrated simulation of snow and glacier melt in water and energy balance-based, distributed hydrological modeling framework at Hunza River Basin of Pakistan Karakoram region

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2015-01-01

    in the surface energy balance of Haut Glacier d’Arolla,2008), Distributed energy balance modeling of South CascadeA distributed energy balance model for complex topography

  1. Integrated simulation of snow and glacier melt in water and energy balance-based, distributed hydrological modeling framework at Hunza River Basin of Pakistan Karakoram region

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2015-01-01

    variations in the surface energy balance of Haut Glacier d’2005), A distributed energy balance model for complexat Fraser using a energy balance based snowmelt model (WEB-

  2. Integrated simulation of snow and glacier melt in water and energy balance-based, distributed hydrological modeling framework at Hunza River Basin of Pakistan Karakoram region

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2015-01-01

    variations in the surface energy balance of Haut Glacier d’Clark (2008), Distributed energy balance modeling of South2005), A distributed energy balance model for complex

  3. Regional Summary Pacific Region Management Context

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pacific Rim nations. As such, the management of the HMS fisheries s coordinated by the Pacific FisheryRegional Summary Pacific Region Management Context The Pacific Region includes California, Oregon, and Washington. Federal fisheries in this region are managed by the Pacific Fishery Management Council (PFMC

  4. Lateral boundary errors in regional numerical weather

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ?umer, Slobodan

    Lateral boundary errors in regional numerical weather prediction models Author: Ana Car Advisor, they describe evolution of atmospher - weather forecast. Every NWP model solves the same system of equations (1: assoc. prof. dr. Nedjeljka Zagar January 5, 2015 Abstract Regional models are used in many national

  5. Muted change in Atlantic overturning circulation over some glacial-aged Heinrich events

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lynch-Stieglitz, Jean

    Muted change in Atlantic overturning circulation over some glacial-aged Heinrich events Jean Lynch--punctuated the last glacial period. The events are associated with millennial-scale cooling in the Northern Hemisphere. Fresh water from the melting icebergs is thought to have interrupted the Atlantic meridional overturning

  6. The contributions of atmosphere and ocean to North Atlantic Subtropical Mode Water volume anomalies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The formation of Subtropical Mode Water (STMW) in the western North Atlantic has been attributed to both are the subject of a study, the CLIvar MOde Water Dynamics Experiment (CLIMODE), which includes a large fieldThe contributions of atmosphere and ocean to North Atlantic Subtropical Mode Water volume anomalies

  7. EA-1970: Fishermen’s Energy LLC Offshore Wind Demonstration Project, offshore Atlantic City, New Jersey

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    DOE is proposing to provide funding to Fishermen’s Atlantic City Windfarm, LLC to construct and operate up to six wind turbine generators, for an offshore wind demonstration project, approximately 2.8 nautical miles off the coast of Atlantic City, NJ. The proposed action includes a cable crossing from the turbines to an on-shore existing substation.

  8. Evolution of Cyclone Characteristics The composite evolution of west and east Atlantic cyclone is likely to

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dacre, Helen

    Evolution of Cyclone Characteristics The composite evolution of west and east Atlantic cyclone. The spatial distribution and evolution characteristics of North Atlantic cyclones. Mon. Wea. Rev. 137, 99 characteristics and the evolution of these characteristics are calculated in composite cyclones. Method · Cyclones

  9. The glacial North Atlantic Oscillation Flavio Justino and W. Richard Peltier

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peltier, W. Richard

    The glacial North Atlantic Oscillation Fla´vio Justino and W. Richard Peltier Department of Physics: Justino, F., and W. R. Peltier (2005), The glacial North Atlantic Oscillation, Geophys. Res. Lett., 32, L. Climate simulations [e.g., Justino et al., 2005; Peltier and Solheim, 2004; Shin et al., 2003; Hewitt et

  10. ATL ANTIC AND GULF OF MEXICO COASTAL PEL AGIC FISHERIES atlantic and gulf of mexico

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    149 ATL ANTIC AND GULF OF MEXICO COASTAL PEL AGIC FISHERIES UNIT 7 atlantic and gulf of mexico Center Miami Florida INTRODUCTION Coastal pelagic species of the U.S. Atlantic Ocean and Gulf of Mexico north of the Yucatan peninsula in Mexico. Cobia and dolphinfish are broadly distributed in tropical

  11. Irradiation and Potassium Sorbate Compared as Preservation Treatments for Atlantic Cod, Gadus morhua

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Irradiation and Potassium Sorbate Compared as Preservation Treatments for Atlantic Cod, Gadus of these two seafood preserva- tion methods (irradiation vs. sorbate ABSTRACT-Treatments offresh Atlantic cod, Gadus morhua, fillets with either 100 Krad gamma irradiation or a sorbate dip were found

  12. Effect of the Atlantic hurricanes on the oceanic meridional overturning circulation and heat transport

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hu, Aixue

    Effect of the Atlantic hurricanes on the oceanic meridional overturning circulation and heat February 2009. [1] Hurricanes have traditionally been perceived as intense but relatively small scale that hurricanes could play a much more significant role in global climate. Here we prescribe Atlantic hurricanes

  13. Impact of the Atlantic warm pool on United States landfalling hurricanes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Chunzai

    Impact of the Atlantic warm pool on United States landfalling hurricanes Chunzai Wang,1 Hailong Liu September 2011; published 7 October 2011. [1] The 2010 Atlantic hurricane season was extremely active, but no hurricanes made landfall in the United States, raising a question of what dictated the hurricane track. Here

  14. FORECAST OF ATLANTIC SEASONAL HURRICANE ACTIVITY AND LANDFALL STRIKE PROBABILITY FOR 2014

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Connors, Daniel A.

    1 FORECAST OF ATLANTIC SEASONAL HURRICANE ACTIVITY AND LANDFALL STRIKE PROBABILITY FOR 2014 We are higher than normal, and vertical wind shear throughout the Atlantic basin has been much stronger than-period average values. (as of 31 July 2014) By Philip J. Klotzbach1 and William M. Gray2 This forecast as well

  15. Behaviour of the winter North Atlantic eddy-driven jet stream in the CMIP3 integrations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barnes, Elizabeth A.

    Behaviour of the winter North Atlantic eddy-driven jet stream in the CMIP3 integrations Abdel-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2012 Abstract A systematic analysis of the winter North Atlantic eddy-driven jet stream is associated with variations in the westerly eddy-driven jet stream. Extratropical weather and climate

  16. Dynamical Evolution of North Atlantic Ridges and Poleward Jet Stream Displacements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Woollings, Tim

    Dynamical Evolution of North Atlantic Ridges and Poleward Jet Stream Displacements TIM WOOLLINGS eddy-driven jet stream and an associated strong and persistent ridge in the subtropics, is investigated to the development of the regime, suggesting a preconditioning of the Atlantic jet stream and an upstream influence

  17. REPRODUCTIVE BIOLOGY OF WESTERN ATLANTIC BLUEFIN TUNAl RAYMOND E. BAGLIN, JR.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Newfoundland to Brazil and from Norway to the Canary Islands (Gibbs and Collette 1967). In the western Atlantic BULLETIN: VOL. 80, NO.1, 1982. Canary Islands, the Mediterranean coast of Spain, and occasionally off and in the Gulf of Mexico. In the eastern Atlantic, a sport fishery for bluefin tuna exists around the Canary

  18. Increasing hurricane wave power along the U.S. Atlantic and Gulf coasts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bromirski, Peter D.

    erosion along the North Carolina coast [Dolan and Davis, 1992]. From a coastal management and planningIncreasing hurricane wave power along the U.S. Atlantic and Gulf coasts Peter D. Bromirski1 power index (WPI) increases significantly in the Atlantic during the mid-1990s, resulting largely from

  19. LONG TERM AND RECENT CLIMATE CHANGES RECORDED IN NORTH ATLANTIC OCEANIC ARCHIVES AROUND ICELAND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1 LONG TERM AND RECENT CLIMATE CHANGES RECORDED IN NORTH ATLANTIC OCEANIC ARCHIVES AROUND ICELAND natural variability and the underlying forcing mechanisms. A focus will be made on peri-icelandic marine of the Icelandic sector 1.1. A "hot spot" for oceanographers! The North Atlantic Ocean has always been the focus

  20. The Economic Contribution of Atlantic Highly Migratory Species Angling Permit Holders in New

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Economic Contribution of Atlantic Highly Migratory Species Angling Permit Holders in New Memorandum NMFS-F/SPO-147 November 2014 #12;#12;The Economic Contribution of Atlantic Highly Migratory Recommended citation: Hutt, Clifford, Sabrina Lovell, and George Silva. 2014. The Economic Contributions

  1. Equatorial currents transport changes for extreme warm and cold events in the Atlantic Ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Equatorial currents transport changes for extreme warm and cold events in the Atlantic Ocean Marlos compositedevents.For the cold(warm)eventthe EUC shows a greater (reduced) transport and core velocity, and a deeper.Wainer, Equatorial currents transport changes for extreme warm and cold events in the Atlantic Ocean, Geophys. Res

  2. Mesoscale distribution of zooplankton biomass in the northeast Atlantic Ocean determined with an Optical Plankton Counter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mesoscale distribution of zooplankton biomass in the northeast Atlantic Ocean determined Available online 2 June 2009 Keywords: Zooplankton Biomass Size distribution Mesoscale eddies Optical plankton counter Pelagic environment Northeast Atlantic Ocean a b s t r a c t We examined the mesoscale

  3. WRF-Chem model predictions of the regional impacts of N2O5 heterogeneous processes on night-time chemistry over north-western Europe

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lowe, Douglas; Archer-Nicholls, Scott; Morgan, Will; Allan, James D.; Utembe, Steve; Ouyang, Bin; Aruffo, Eleonora; Le Breton, Michael; Zaveri, Rahul A.; di Carlo, Piero; Percival, Carl; Coe, H.; Jones, Roderic L.; McFiggans, Gordon

    2015-01-01

    Chemical modelling studies have been conducted over north-western Europe in summer conditions, showing that night-time dinitrogen pentoxide (N2O5) heterogeneous reactive uptake is important regionally in modulating particulate nitrate and has a~modest influence on oxidative chemistry. Results from Weather Research and Forecasting model with Chemistry (WRF-Chem) model simulations, run with a detailed volatile organic compound (VOC) gas-phase chemistry scheme and the Model for Simulating Aerosol Interactions and Chemistry (MOSAIC) sectional aerosol scheme, were compared with a series of airborne gas and particulate measurements made over the UK in July 2010. Modelled mixing ratios of key gas-phase species were reasonably accurate (correlations with measurements of 0.7–0.9 for NO2 and O3). However modelled loadings of particulate species were less accurate (correlation with measurements for particulate sulfate and ammonium were between 0.0 and 0.6). Sulfate mass loadings were particularly low (modelled means of 0.5–0.7 ?g kg?1air, compared with measurements of 1.0–1.5 ?g kg?1air). Two flights from the campaign were used as test cases – one with low relative humidity (RH) (60–70%), the other with high RH (80–90%). N2O5 heterogeneous chemistry was found to not be important in the low-RH test case; but in the high-RH test case it had a strong effect and significantly improved the agreement between modelled and measured NO3 and N2O5. When the model failed to capture atmospheric RH correctly, the modelled NO3 and N2O5 mixing ratios for these flights differed significantly from the measurements. This demonstrates that, for regional modelling which involves heterogeneous processes, it is essential to capture the ambient temperature and water vapour profiles.

    The night-time NO3 oxidation of VOCs across the whole region was found to be 100–300 times slower than the daytime OH oxidation of these compounds. The difference in contribution was less for alkenes (× 80) and comparable for dimethylsulfide (DMS). However the suppression of NO3 mixing ratios across the domain by N2O5 heterogeneous chemistry has only a very slight, negative, influence on this oxidative capacity. The influence on regional particulate nitrate mass loadings is stronger. Night-time N2O5 heterogeneous chemistry maintains the production of particulate nitrate within polluted regions: when this process is taken into consideration, the daytime peak (for the 95th percentile) of PM10 nitrate mass loadings remains around 5.6 ?g kg?1air, but the night-time minimum increases from 3.5 to 4.6 ?g kg?1air. The sustaining of higher particulate mass loadings through the night by this process improves model skill at matching measured aerosol nitrate diurnal cycles and will negatively impact on regional air quality, requiring this process to be included in regional models.

  4. Outer Continental Shelf oil and gas activities in the South Atlantic (US) and their onshore impacts: a summary report, July 1980. Update 1, February 1981

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Havran, K.J.

    1981-02-01

    Lease Sale 43, in the Southeast Georgia Embayment, was the first lease sale to be held in the South Atlantic. Two additional sales are scheduled between now and 1985: Sale 56 is scheduled for August 1981 and Sale 78, for January 1984. All leases from Sale 43 remain active, but no drilling has taken place since the last of six dry holes was plugged and abandoned. There are no additional plans for drilling on Sale 43 leases in the immediate future. Future exploration may shift away from previous Sale 43 leased tracts to deep-water areas after Sale 56. One hundred thirty of the 286 proposed Sale 56 tracts are in deep-water. The geologic conditions in the deep-water areas are more favorable for hydrocarbon accumulation than those under shallower waters. Structures that may provide trapping mechanisms have been shown to exist in the area. Because leases in deep-water areas take longer and are more costly to explore and develop than those in areas of shallower water, industry consensus is that longer primary lease terms may be required and some delays in acquiring rigs may be experienced. The Sale 43 area appears to be a region of relatively low hydrocarbon-bearing potential. However, the Bureau of Land Management's Intergovernmental Planning Program is preparing the necessary Regional Transportation Management Plan for the entire South Atlantic OCS Region. Nearly all the support facilities associated with Sale 43 have been removed or converted to other uses. Temporary support facilities are likely to be reactivated only if Sale 56 results in further exploration of the South Atlantic OCS.

  5. Testing the Subsistence Model for the Adoption of Ceramic Technology Among Coastal Sambaqui Foragers of Southern Brazil 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crouch, Maria Shannon Parks

    2013-12-10

    This research tests the subsistence model for the adoption of ceramic technology among coastal fisher-hunter-gatherers of the southern Atlantic coast of Brazil (5000 to 600 BP). The subsistence model correlates the appearance ...

  6. A Mechanistic Study of Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation Changes on Tropical Atlantic Climate 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wen, Caihong

    2010-10-12

    An eddy-permitting 2-1/2-layer Reduced Gravity Ocean (RGO) model is developed. Compared with the conventional 2-1/2-layer RGO models, the new model has improvements in subsurface thermodynamics, vertical mixing scheme and open boundary conditions...

  7. Atlantic Beach, Florida: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EAandAmminex A SOpenAshley, Ohio:Atchison-HoltAtlanta ChemicalAtlantic

  8. Regional Algal Biofuel Production Potential in the Coterminous United States as Affected by Resource Availability Trade-offs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Venteris, Erik R.; Skaggs, Richard; Wigmosta, Mark S.; Coleman, Andre M.

    2014-03-15

    The warm sunny climate and unoccupied arid lands in the American southwest are favorable factors for algae cultivation. However, additional resources affect the overall viability of specific sites and regions. We investigated the tradeoffs between growth rate, water, and CO2 availability and costs for two strains: N. salina and Chlorella sp. We conducted site selection exercises (~88,000 US sites) to produce 21 billion gallons yr-1 (BGY) of renewable diesel (RD). Experimental trials from the National Alliance for Advanced Biofuels and Bio-Products (NAABB) team informed the growth model of our Biomass Assessment Tool (BAT). We simulated RD production by both lipid extraction and hydrothermal liquefaction. Sites were prioritized by the net value of biofuel minus water and flue gas costs. Water cost models for N. salina were based on seawater and high salinity groundwater and for Chlorella, fresh and brackish groundwater. CO2 costs were based on a flue gas delivery model. Selections constrained by production and water were concentrated along the Gulf of Mexico and southeast Atlantic coasts due to high growth rates and low water costs. Adding flue gas constraints increased the spatial distribution, but the majority of sites remained in the southeast. The 21 BGY target required ~3.8 million hectares of mainly forest (41.3%) and pasture (35.7%). Exclusion in favor of barren and scrub lands forced most production to the southwestern US, but with increased water consumption (5.7 times) and decreased economic efficiency (-38%).

  9. An alternative model for ultra-high pressure in the Svartberget Fe-Ti garnet-peridotite, Western Gneiss Region, Norway

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Podladchikov, Yuri

    Gneiss Region, Norway JOHANNES C. VRIJMOED1,*, YURI Y. PODLADCHIKOV1 , TORGEIR B. ANDERSEN1 and EBBE H, Norway *Corresponding author, e-mail: j.c.vrijmoed@fys.uio.no 2 Aker Exploration AS, PO Box 580, Sentrum, 4003 Stavanger, Norway Abstract: The previously reported ``Fe-Ti type'' garnet-peridotite is located

  10. Stantec Investigates Bat Activity in Atlantic and Great Lakes...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    coastal states regions to inform efforts to mitigate potential impacts associated with offshore wind energy development in these regions. Monitoring was initiated by Stantec in...

  11. A regional scale modeling analysis of aerosol and trace gas distributions over the eastern Pacific during the INTEX-B field campaign

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2010-01-01

    Attribution 3.0 License. Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics Aused in current atmospheric chemistry models in general andalso influence atmospheric chemistry by pro- viding surface

  12. Integrated simulation of snow and glacier melt in water and energy balance-based, distributed hydrological modeling framework at Hunza River Basin of Pakistan Karakoram region

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2015-01-01

    will affect the Asian water towers, Science, 328(5984),hydrologic modelling, J. Water Resour. Plann. Manag. , 119(impact of climate change on the water resource of Hindukush-

  13. The Role of Statistical Principles in Quantitative Biomedical Modeling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davidian, Marie

    The Role of Statistical Principles in Quantitative Biomedical Modeling Atlantic Coast Conference University http://www.stat.ncsu.edu/davidian Statistical Principles in Biomedical Modeling 1 #12;Outline 1. Modeling in biomedical research 2. Sources of variation in data 3. Statistical models 4. Hierarchical

  14. Modeling the Integrated Expansion of the Canadian and U.S. Power Sectors with the Regional Energy Deployment System (ReEDS)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zinaman, Owen; Ibanez, Eduardo; Heimiller, Donna; Eurek, Kelly; Mai, Trieu

    2015-07-02

    This document describes the development effort for creating a robust representation of the combined capacity expansion of the U.S. and Canadian electric sectors within the NREL ReEDS model. Thereafter, it demonstrates the newly established capability through an illustrative sensitivity analysis. In conducting the sensitivity analysis, we describe the value of an integrated modeling approach.

  15. Regional Transportation Coordination Study 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Golden Crescent Regional Planning Commission

    2006-01-01

    stream_source_info Golden Crescent Regional Transportation Coordination Study.pdf.txt stream_content_type text/plain stream_size 357268 Content-Encoding ISO-8859-1 stream_name Golden Crescent Regional Transportation Coordination... Study.pdf.txt Content-Type text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1 Golden Crescent Regional Transit i Regional Transportation Coordination Study: 7-County Golden Crescent Region Regional...

  16. Genetic variation in Atlantic yellowfin tuna (Thunnus albacares) to assess stock structure and reproductive variance 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farnham, Tiffany Talley

    2005-02-17

    The population genetic structure of Atlantic yellowfin tuna (Thunnus albacares) has received little attention despite the substantial fishing mortality of juveniles caused by purse seining around fish aggregating devices ...

  17. Tropical Pacific response to 20th century Atlantic warming F. Kucharski,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kang, In-Sik

    and L. Feudale1 Received 16 November 2010; accepted 13 December 2010; published 1 February 2011. [1. Feudale (2011), Tropical Pacific response to 20th century Atlantic warming, Geophys. Res. Lett., 38, L

  18. Radium isotopes as tracers of coastal circulation pathways in the Mid-Atlantic Blight

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rasmussen, Linda L

    2003-01-01

    Pathways of exchange between the shelf and slope in the Mid-Atlantic Bight were investigated using a combination of radiochemical tracer and hydrographic measurements. The motivation was to provide evidence of transport ...

  19. Centennial-scale elemental and isotopic variability in the tropical and subtropical North Atlantic Ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reuer, Matthew K. (Matthew Kindt), 1972-

    2002-01-01

    The marine geochemistry of the North Atlantic Ocean varies on decadal to centennial time scales, a consequence of natural and anthropogenic forcing. Surface corals provide a useful geochemical archive to quantify past mixed ...

  20. Atlantic Interstate Low-Level Radioactive Waste Management Compact (South Carolina)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Atlantic (Northeast) Interstate Low-Level Radioactive Waste Management Compact is a cooperative effort to plan, regulate, and administer the disposal of low-level radioactive waste in the...

  1. Mass, heat and nutrient fluxes in the Atlantic Ocean determined by inverse methods

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rintoul, Stephen R. (Stephen Rich)

    1988-01-01

    Inverse methods are applied to historical hydrographic data to address two aspects of the general circulation of the Atlantic Ocean. The method allows conservation statements for mass and other properties, along with a ...

  2. AUTUMNAL BIRD MIGRATION OBSERVED FROM SHIPS IN THE WESTERN NORTH ATLANTIC OCEAN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holberton, Rebecca L.

    drifted offshore by winds. For three to sixweekseachfall from 1971 through 1974,we and D. Griffin, RAUTUMNAL BIRD MIGRATION OBSERVED FROM SHIPS IN THE WESTERN NORTH ATLANTIC OCEAN BY CAROLP

  3. On the Pacific Decadal Oscillation and the Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation: Might they be related?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peltier, W. Richard

    ? Marc d'Orgeville1 and W. Richard Peltier1 Received 3 August 2007; revised 21 September 2007; accepted 1. Peltier (2007), On the Pacific Decadal Oscillation and the Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation: Might

  4. Tropical North Atlantic ocean-atmosphere interactions synchronize forest carbon losses from hurricanes and Amazon fires

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Y; Randerson, JT; Morton, DC

    2015-01-01

    19), 7888–7892. CHEN ET AL. HURRICANES AND AMAZON FIRES AREand G. C. Hurtt (2007), Hurricane Katrina’s carbon footprintThe 2013 Atlantic basin hurricane season: Blip or ?ip? ,

  5. Feasibility of Ocean Acoustic Waveguide Remote Sensing (OAWRS) of Atlantic Cod with Seafloor Scattering Limitations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ignisca, Anamaria

    Recently reported declines in the population of Atlantic cod have led to calls for additional survey methods for stock assessments. In combination with conventional line-transect methods that may have ambiguities in sampling ...

  6. Impact of the Atlantic meridional overturning circulation on ocean heat storage and transient climate change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Armour, Kyle C.

    We propose here that the Atlantic meridional overturning circulation (AMOC) plays an important role in setting the effective heat capacity of the World Ocean and thus impacts the pace of transient climate change. The depth ...

  7. On the role of wind driven ocean dynamics in tropical Atlantic variability 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Da Silva, Meyre Pereira

    2006-08-16

    The response of the tropical Atlantic Ocean to wind stress forcing on seasonal and interannual time scales is examined using an ocean data assimilation product from the Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory (GFDL), and an ocean general circulation...

  8. Alkenone-based evidence of Holocene slopewater cooling in the northwest Atlantic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kneeland, Jessie M. (Jessie Mary)

    2006-01-01

    Alkenone-based estimates of sea surface temperature (SST) in the northwest Atlantic during the last 10,000 years are presented and used to assess scenarios for Holocene climate variability. Alkenone concentration and ...

  9. The Role of Wave Energy Accumulation in Tropical Cyclogenesis over the Tropical North Atlantic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Webster, Peter J.

    The Role of Wave Energy Accumulation in Tropical Cyclogenesis over the Tropical North Atlantic "wave energy"). Relative vorticity increases locally leading to an increase in the likelihood scales of interaction. The importance of wave energy accumulation for tropical cyclogenesis

  10. Methanol, acetaldehyde, and acetone in the surface waters of the Atlantic Ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arnold, Steve

    production or chlorophyll-a levels in the surface Atlantic Ocean. However, we did find a novel monoxide and formaldehyde [Millet et al., 2008]. Acetone and acetalde- hyde are both recognized precursors

  11. Oil and gas developments in Atlantic Coastal Plain and outer continental shelf in 1984

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Giordano, A.C.; Amato, R.V.

    1985-10-01

    Exploratory drilling on the Atlantic outer continental shelf remained at about the same level as in 1983. Two wells were spudded in the Baltimore Canyon Trough. Three were completed and announced as dry holes, one in a world record water depth of 6,952 ft (2,119 m). Onshore in the Atlantic coastal plain, a dry hole was drilled in Colleton County, South Carolina, and another well, drilled in 1982 in Lee County, North Carolina, was plugged and abandoned as a dry hole. North Atlantic Lease Sale 82, which was to be held in 2 parts, was cancelled in late 1984. The International Court of Justice determined the United States-Canada boundary line in the North Atlantic. Seismic data acquisition decreased 41% below the 1983 level to 7,223 line-mi(11,625 line-km).

  12. Evolution of Atlantic deep-water circulation: from the greenhouse to the icehouse 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Via, Rachael Kathleen

    2005-11-01

    To better understand how the evolution of Cenozoic deep-water circulation related to changes in global climate and ocean basin configuration, we generated Nd isotope records from Ocean Drilling Program sites in the southeastern Atlantic to track...

  13. Biological interactions and hydro-climatic forcing of Atlantic menhaden stock

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hilderbrand, Robert H.

    Biological interactions and hydro-climatic forcing of Atlantic menhaden stock recruitment NOAA and Chesapeake Bay Program in: ·· Evaluating roles of biological interactions and hydroEvaluating roles of biological interactions and hydro--climaticclimatic forcing onforcing on forage

  14. Contemporary population structure and historical demography of sailfish (Istiophorus platypterus) in the Atlantic Ocean 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bangma, Jessica

    2009-06-02

    The Atlantic sailfish (Istiophorus platypterus) is considered over-fished in U.S. waters. Furthermore, preliminary analyses of abundance indicate that a decline in biomass has occurred. While seminal studies have provided ...

  15. Monitoring and Mitigation Alternatives for Protection of North Atlantic Right Whales during Offshore Wind Farm Installation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carlson, Thomas J.; Halvorsen, Michele B.; Matzner, Shari; Copping, Andrea E.; Stavole, Jessica

    2012-09-01

    Progress report on defining and determining monitoring and mitigation measures for protecting North Atlantic Right Whales from the effects of pile driving and other activities associated with installation of offshore wind farms.

  16. An objective change point analysis of landfalling historical Atlantic hurricane numbers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jewson, S; Jewson, Stephen; Penzer, Jeremy

    2006-01-01

    In previous work we have analysed the Atlantic basin hurricane number time-series to identify decadal time-scale change points. We now repeat the analysis but for US landfalling hurricanes. The results are very different.

  17. Evaluation of a chemical transport model for sulfate using ACE-2 observations and attribution of sulfate mixing ratios to source regions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    models driven by analyzed meteorological data. At Tenerife, Canary Islands, (minimal proximate sources ratios (MRs, in parts per billion, ppb, equal to nmol per mol air) at Tenerife, Canary Islands

  18. Integrated simulation of snow and glacier melt in water and energy balance-based, distributed hydrological modeling framework at Hunza River Basin of Pakistan Karakoram region

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2015-01-01

    model of land surface water and energy ?uxes for GSMs, J.glacier melt in water and energy balance-based, distributedglacier melt in water and energy balance-based, distributed

  19. Measuring the chargino mixing parameters of the minimal SUSY extension of the standard model at e sup + e sup minus colliders in the TeV region

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leike, A. )

    1989-01-01

    In this paper it is proposed to measure the parameters of the chargino mixing of the minimal supersymmetric extension of the standard model by chargino pair production at e{sup +} e{sup {minus}} colliders with TeV energies. Some information about the lightest SUSY particle and its mass can be gained. With a polarized beam the minimal SUSY extension of the Standard model could be ruled out.

  20. Global Climate network evolves with North Atlantic Oscillation phases: Coupling to Southern Pacific Ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guez, Oded; Berezin, Yehiel; Wang, Yang; Havlin, Shlomo

    2013-01-01

    We construct a network from climate records of atmospheric temperature at surface level, at different geographical sites in the globe, using reanalysis data from years 1948-2010. We find that the network correlates with the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO), both locally in the north Atlantic, and through coupling to the southern Pacific Ocean. The existence of tele-connection links between those areas and their stability over time allows us to suggest a possible physical explanation for this phenomenon.

  1. NORTHWEST REGIONAL TECHNOLOGY CENTER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    NORTHWEST REGIONAL TECHNOLOGY CENTER for Homeland Security Northwest Regional Technology Center May 2015 | 1 AROUND THE REGION IN HOMELAND SECURITY The Northwest Regional Technology Center (NWRTC.S. Army Cyber Command; and Michael Echols, Director, Cyber Joint Program Management Office National

  2. Conservation Regional ConservationRegional Conservation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Northwest Power and Conservation Council Regional ConservationRegional Conservation Update:Update?"" #12;slide 3 Northwest Power and Conservation Council PNW Energy Efficiency AchievementsPNW Energy Since 1978 Utility & BPASince 1978 Utility & BPA Programs, Energy Codes &Programs, Energy Codes

  3. Aerosol Indirect Effect on the Grid-scale Clouds in the Two-way Coupled WRF-CMAQ: Model Description, Development, Evaluation and Regional Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yu, Shaocai; Mathur, Rohit; Pleim, Jonathan; Wong, David; Gilliam, R.; Alapaty, Kiran; Zhao, Chun; Liu, Xiaohong

    2014-10-24

    This study implemented first, second and glaciations aerosol indirect effects (AIE) on resolved clouds in the two-way coupled WRF-CMAQ modeling system by including parameterizations for both cloud drop and ice number concentrations on the basis of CMAQpredicted aerosol distributions and WRF meteorological conditions. The performance of the newly-developed WRF-CMAQ model, with alternate CAM and RRTMG radiation schemes, was evaluated with the observations from the CERES satellite and surface monitoring networks (AQS, IMPROVE, CASTNet, STN, and PRISM) over the continental U.S. (CONUS) (12-km resolution) and eastern Texas (4-km resolution) during August and September of 2006. The results at the AQS surface sites show that in August, the NMB values for PM2.5 over the eastern/western U.S (EUS/WUS) and western U.S. (WUS) are 5.3% (?0.1%) and 0.4% (-5.2%) for WRF-CMAQ/CAM (WRF-CMAQ/RRTMG), respectively. The evaluation of PM2.5 chemical composition reveals that in August, WRF-CMAQ/CAM (WRF-CMAQ/RRTMG) consistently underestimated the observed SO4 2? by -23.0% (-27.7%), -12.5% (-18.9%) and -7.9% (-14.8%) over the EUS at the CASTNet, IMPROVE and STN sites, respectively. Both models (WRF-CMAQ/CAM, WRF-CMAQ/RRTMG) overestimated the observed mean OC, EC and TC concentrations over the EUS in August at the IMPROVE sites. Both models generally underestimated the cloud field (SWCF) over the CONUS in August due to the fact that the AIE on the subgrid convective clouds was not considered when the model simulations were run at the 12 km resolution. This is in agreement with the fact that both models captured SWCF and LWCF very well for the 4-km simulation over the eastern Texas when all clouds were resolved by the finer domain. Both models generally overestimated the observed precipitation by more than 40% mainly because of significant overestimation in the southern part of the CONUS in August. The simulations of WRF-CMAQ/CAM and WRF-CMAQ/RRTMG show dramatic improvements for SWCF, LWCF, COD, cloud fractions and precipitation over the ocean relative to those of WRF default cases in August. The model performance in September is similar to that in August except for greater overestimation of PM2.5 due to the overestimations of SO4 2-, NH4 +, NO3 -, and TC over the EUS, less underestimation of clouds (SWCF) over the land areas due to about 10% lower SWCF values and less convective clouds in September.

  4. REGIONAL MODELING OF LIVE AND DEAD WOODY BIOMASS FOR THE EASTERN U.S. Robert A. Mickler, Todd S. Earnhardt, Jennifer A. Moore, David C.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in atmospheric carbon dioxide, air temperature, and variability in precipitation will increase fire seasonal data, species-specific forest allometric biomass equations, and remotely sensed land cover. Live tree of the research described here is to utilize remotely sensed forest cover data linked to a productivity model

  5. Precipitation over eastern South America and the South AtlanticSea surface temperature during neutral ENSO periods

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jones, Charles

    2015-01-01

    2003) GPCP pentad precipitation analyses: an experimentalconvec- tion and increase precipitation over eastern SouthAmerica. Keywords SST Precipitation South Atlantic Dipole

  6. Glaciation and saline-freshwater mixing as a possible cause of cave formation in the eastern midcontinent region of the United States: A conceptual model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Panno, S.V. (Illinois State Geological Survey, Champaign (USA)); Bourcier, W.L. (Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (USA))

    1990-08-01

    We present a hypothesis for the formation of caves and associated karst features near the southern margins of the Illinois, Michigan, and Appalachian basins. Spatial and temporal relations among intracratonic basins, karstic terrain, and continental glaciation suggest that Pleistocene glaciation may have initiated the discharge of saline waters from the margins of these basins. Glaciation-induced discharge of saline waters could result from the consolidation of sediments due to the overlying pressure of glacial ice, and flushing of underlying aquifers as a result of bottom melting in recharge areas of basic aquifers. The upward migration of basin-derived saline waters into near-surface aquifers would result in the mixing of saline waters with infiltrating glacial meltwater and meteoric water. The development of a vertically restricted zone of mixing of saline and fresh water in limestone aquifers would result in the dissolution of limestone; this mechanism could be responsible for the formation, or at least the initiation of, some caves and associated karst features in the midcontinent region.

  7. Assessment of the Contemporary Population Structure and Admixture of Atlantic Swordfish (Xiphias gladius L.) via Mixed Stock Analysis and Bayesian Clustering of Multiple Nuclear SNPS Genotyped through High Resolution Melting 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Brad 1979-

    2012-11-28

    7. Slatkin?s (1993) linearized FST values of 18 localities of Atlantic and Mediterranean swordfish. ................................................................................. 50 Figure 8. Principle coordinate analysis (PCoA) (Orl?ci 1978... and Mediterranean swordfish in STRUCTURE v2.3 (Pritchard et al. 2000) using no admixture, correlated alleles, and LOCPRIOR models and inferred from 50 independent runs of K = 3 using 100,000 MCMC iterations and a burn-in period of 100,000. ...... 57 Figure 11...

  8. Regional Research Collaborations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Regional Research Collaborations Merrill Series on The Research Mission of Public Universities at Birmingham Regional Neuroscience Research Collaboration: The Alabama Experience Panel 1: Research ........................................................................................................5 Vice Chancellor for Research, University of Kansas Medical Center Evolution of Reproductive

  9. Northwest Regional Technology Center

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    management and public safety professionals to define and prioritize technology needs. Coordinate and leadNorthwest Regional Technology Center for Homeland Security The Northwest Regional Technology Center and deployment of technologies that are effective homeland security solutions for the region, and accelerate

  10. A reduced order modeling approach to represent subgrid-scale hydrological dynamics for regional- and climate-scale land-surface simulations: application in a polygonal tundra landscape

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Pau, G. S. H.; Bisht, G.; Riley, W. J.

    2014-04-04

    Existing land surface models (LSMs) describe physical and biological processes that occur over a wide range of spatial and temporal scales. For example, biogeochemical and hydrological processes responsible for carbon (CO2, CH4) exchanges with the atmosphere range from molecular scale (pore-scale O2 consumption) to tens of kilometer scale (vegetation distribution, river networks). Additionally, many processes within LSMs are nonlinearly coupled (e.g., methane production and soil moisture dynamics), and therefore simple linear upscaling techniques can result in large prediction error. In this paper we applied a particular reduced-order modeling (ROM) technique known as "Proper Orthogonal Decomposition mapping method" that reconstructs temporally-resolvedmore »fine-resolution solutions based on coarse-resolution solutions. We applied this technique to four study sites in a polygonal tundra landscape near Barrow, Alaska. Coupled surface-subsurface isothermal simulations were performed for summer months (June–September) at fine (0.25 m) and coarse (8 m) horizontal resolutions. We used simulation results from three summer seasons (1998–2000) to build ROMs of the 4-D soil moisture field for the four study sites individually (single-site) and aggregated (multi-site). The results indicate that the ROM produced a significant computational speedup (> 103) with very small relative approximation error (« less

  11. IN THIS ISSUE Regional Climate Change..............1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hamann, Andreas

    IN THIS ISSUE · Regional Climate Change..............1 · From the Executive Director...........2 release of new climate change scenarios from the Canadian Regional Climate Model (CRCM) heralds of the fundamental questions remaining with respect to understanding climate change and even climate variability. And

  12. Outer Continental Shelf Oil and Gas Information Program. Update 2, August 1981, Outer Continental Shelf Oil and Gas Activities in the South Atlantic (US) and their Onshore Impacts: a summary report, July 1980

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCord, C.A.

    1981-01-01

    In July 1980, the Office of Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) Information issued an initial report called Outer Continental Shelf Oil and Gas Activities in the South Atlantic (US) and their Onshore Impacts: A Summary Report, July 1980. The purpose of this report was to provide State and local governments with current information about offshore oil and gas resources and onshore activity in the area extending from Cape Hatteras, North Carolina, to Cape Canaveral, Florida. This information was designed to assist in socioeconomic planning for the onshore impacts of oil and gas development in the affected areas. This report, Update 2, discusses Outer Continental Shelf oil and gas activities and their onshore impacts for the period of February 1981 to August 1981. Because of the minimal offshore oil- and gas-related activity in the South Atlantic Region, the onshore impacts are also minimal. Very little, if any, development has occurred as a result of exploration or development. Even though the South Atlantic OCS does contain large areas with hydrocarbon potential, little optimism has been generated by exploration associated with Lease Sale 43. Lease Sale 56 included tracts with geologic conditions more favorable to the generation, migration, and accumulation of hydrocarbons, especially the deepwatr tracts, but industry showed moderate interest in the first deepwater lease sale. The level of nearshore and onshore activity may increase with exploration associated with Lease Sale 56. More permanent onshore development will be contingent on the outcome of exploration efforts.

  13. Multi-epoch very long baseline interferometric observations of the nuclear starburst region of NGC 253: Improved modeling of the supernova and star formation rates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rampadarath, H.; Morgan, J. S.; Tingay, S. J.; Lenc, E.

    2014-01-01

    The results of multi-epoch observations of the southern starburst galaxy, NGC 253, with the Australian Long Baseline Array at 2.3 GHz are presented. As with previous radio interferometric observations of this galaxy, no new sources were discovered. By combining the results of this survey with Very Large Array observations at higher frequencies from the literature, spectra were derived and a free-free absorption model was fitted of 20 known sources in NGC 253. The results were found to be consistent with previous studies. The supernova remnant, 5.48-43.3, was imaged with the highest sensitivity and resolution to date, revealing a two-lobed morphology. Comparisons with previous observations of similar resolution give an upper limit of 10{sup 4} km s{sup –1} for the expansion speed of this remnant. We derive a supernova rate of <0.2 yr{sup –1} for the inner 300 pc using a model that improves on previous methods by incorporating an improved radio supernova peak luminosity distribution and by making use of multi-wavelength radio data spanning 21 yr. A star formation rate of SFR(M ? 5 M {sub ?}) < 4.9 M {sub ?} yr{sup –1} was also estimated using the standard relation between supernova and star formation rates. Our improved estimates of supernova and star formation rates are consistent with studies at other wavelengths. The results of our study point to the possible existence of a small population of undetected supernova remnants, suggesting a low rate of radio supernova production in NGC 253.

  14. To cite this document: Pirovano, Alain and Garcia, Fabien and Radzik, Jos Capacity Dimensioning for Aeronautical Communications in North Atlantic Corridor. (2013) In

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mailhes, Corinne

    2013-01-01

    for Aeronautical Communications in North Atlantic Corridor. (2013) In: 19th Ka and Broadband Communications Dimensioning for Aeronautical Communications in North Atlantic Corridor Alain Pirovano, Fabien Garcia ENAC, the specific structure of aeronautical traffic must be taken into account. NAT (North Atlantic Tracks

  15. Active methane venting observed at giant pockmarks along the U.S. mid-Atlantic shelf break

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eustice, Ryan

    Active methane venting observed at giant pockmarks along the U.S. mid-Atlantic shelf break Kori R the edge of the mid-Atlantic continental shelf confirms that methane is actively venting at the site. Dissolved methane concentrations, which were measured with a commercially available methane sensor (METS

  16. The Role of Interocean Exchanges on Decadal Variations of the Meridional Heat Transport in the South Atlantic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Role of Interocean Exchanges on Decadal Variations of the Meridional Heat Transport 2010, in final form 19 April 2011) ABSTRACT The interocean exchange of water from the South Atlantic the role of the interocean exchanges in the variability of the Atlantic meridional overturning circulation

  17. Movements and behaviors of swordfish in the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans examined using pop-up satellite archival tags

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hawai'i at Manoa, University of

    Movements and behaviors of swordfish in the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans examined using pop depths were signifi- cantly correlated with light penetration as measured by the diffuse attenuation words: Atlantic Ocean, deep sound scattering layer, diel migration, Pacific Ocean, satellite tags

  18. A Hierarchical Evaluation of Regional Climate Simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Ringler, Todd; Collins, William D.; Taylor, Mark; Ashfaq, Moetasim

    2013-08-20

    Global climate models (GCMs) are the primary tools for predicting the evolution of the climate system. Through decades of development, GCMs have demonstrated useful skill in simulating climate at continental to global scales. However, large uncertainties remain in projecting climate change at regional scales, which limit our ability to inform decisions on climate change adaptation and mitigation. To bridge this gap, different modeling approaches including nested regional climate models (RCMs), global stretch-grid models, and global high-resolution atmospheric models have been used to provide regional climate simulations (Leung et al. 2003). In previous efforts to evaluate these approaches, isolating their relative merits was not possible because factors such as dynamical frameworks, physics parameterizations, and model resolutions were not systematically constrained. With advances in high performance computing, it is now feasible to run coupled atmosphere-ocean GCMs at horizontal resolution comparable to what RCMs use today. Global models with local refinement using unstructured grids have become available for modeling regional climate (e.g., Rauscher et al. 2012; Ringler et al. 2013). While they offer opportunities to improve climate simulations, significant efforts are needed to test their veracity for regional-scale climate simulations.

  19. Identification of Highly Deformed Even-Even Nuclides in the Neutron- and Proton-Rich Regions of the Nuclear Chart from the B(E2) and E2 Predictions in the Generalized Differential Equation Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. C. Nayak; S. Pattnaik

    2015-08-04

    We identify here possible occurrence of large deformations in the neutron- and proton-rich regions of the nuclear chart from extensive predictions of the values of the reduced quadrupole transition probability B-E2 for the transition from the ground state to the first 2+ state and the corresponding excitation energy E2 of even-even nuclei in the recently developed Generalized Differential Equation model exclusively meant for these physical quantities. This is made possible from our analysis of the predicted values of these two physical quantities and the corresponding deformation parameters derived from them such as the quadrupole deformation beta-2, the ratio of beta-2 to the Weisskopf single-particle beta-2 and the intrinsic electric quadruplole moment , calculated for a large number of both known as well as hitherto unknown even-even isotopes of Oxygen to Fermium (Z=8 to 100). Our critical analysis of the resulting data convincingly support possible existence of large collectivity for the nuclides 30,32 Ne, 34 Mg, 60 Ti, 42,62,64 Cr, 50,68 Fe, 52,72 Ni, 72,70,96 Kr, 74,76 Sr,78,80,106,108 Zr , 82,84,110,112 Mo, 140 Te,144 Xe, 148 Ba, 122 Ce, 128,156 Nd, 130,132,158,160 Sm and 138,162,164,166 Gd, whose values of beta-2 are found to exceed 0.3 and even 0.4 in some cases. Our findings of large deformations in the exotic neutron-rich regions support the existence of another Island of Inversion in the heavy-mass region possibly caused by breaking of the N=70 sub-shell closure.

  20. Observations of Diurnal to Weekly Variations of Monoterpene-Dominated Fluxes of Volatile Organic Compounds from Mediterranean Forests: Implications for Regional Modeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fares, Silvano; Schnitzhofer, Ralf; Xiaoyan, Jiang; Guenther, Alex B.; Hansel, Armin; Loreto, Francesco

    2013-09-04

    Most vascular plants species, especially trees, emit biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOC). Global estimates of BVOC emissions from plants range from 1 to 1.5 Pg C yr?1.1 Mediterranean forest trees have been described as high BVOC emitters, with emission depending primarily on light and temperature, and therefore being promoted by the warm Mediterranean climate. In the presence of sufficient sunlight and nitrogen oxides (NOx), the oxidation of BVOCs can lead to the formation of tropospheric ozone, a greenhouse gas with detrimental effects on plant health, crop yields, and human health. BVOCs are also precursors for aerosol formation, accounting for a significant fraction of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) produced in the atmosphere. The presidential Estate of Castelporziano covers an area of about 6000 ha located 25 km SW from the center of Rome, Italy (Figure 1) and hosts representative forest ecosystems typical of Mediterranean areas: holm oak forests, pine forests, dune vegetation, mixed oak and pine forests. Between 1995 and 2011, three intensive field campaigns were carried out on Mediterranean-type ecosystems inside the Estate. These campaigns were aimed at measuring BVOC emissions and environmental parameters, to improve formulation of basal emission factors (BEFs), that is, standardized emissions at 30 °C and 1000 ?mol m?2s?1 of photosynthetic active radiation (PAR). BEFs are key input parameters of emission models. The first campaign in Castelporziano was a pioneering integrated study on biogenic emissions (1993? 19964). BVOC fluxes from different forest ecosystems were mainly investigated using plant- and leaf enclosures connected to adsorption tubes followed by GC?MS analysis in the laboratory. This allowed a first screening of Mediterranean species with respect to their BVOC emission potential, environmental control, and emission algorithms. In particular, deciduous oak species revealed high isoprene emissions (Quercus f rainetto, Quercus petrea, Quercus pubescens), while evergreen oaks emitted monoterpenes only, for example, Quercus ilex = holm oak. Differences in constitutive emission patterns discovered in Castelporziano supplied basic information to discriminate oak biodiversity in following studies.Ten years later, a second experimental campaign took place in spring and summer 2007 on a dune-shrubland experimental site. In this campaign, the use of a proton transfer reaction mass spectrometer (PTR-MS14) provided the fast BVOC observations necessary for quasi-real-time flux measurements using Disjunct Eddy Covariance. This allowed for the first time continuous measurements and BEFs calculation at canopy level. Finally, in September 2011 a third campaign was performed with the aim of further characterizing and improving estimates of BVOC fluxes from mixed Mediterranean forests dominated by a mixed holm oak and stone pine forest, using for the first time a proton transfer reaction?time-of-flight?mass spectrometer (PTR-TOF-MS). In contrast to the standard quadrupole PTR-MS, which can only measure one m/z ratio at a discrete time, thus being inadequate to quantify fluxes of more than a handful of compounds simultaneously, PTR-TOF-MS allowed simultaneous measurements (10 Hz) of fluxes of all BVOCs at the canopy level by Eddy Covariance.17?20, 50 In this work, we reviewed BEFs from previous campaigns in Castelporziano and calculated new BEFs from the campaign based on PTR-TOF-MS analysis. The new BEFs were used to parametrize the model of emissions of gases and aerosols from nature (MEGAN v2.11).

  1. Exploiting Emerging Data for Enhanced Load Modeling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Data for Enhanced Load Modeling Final Project Report Project Team Santiago Grijalva, Project Leader information about this project, contact Santiago Grijalva Van Leer E284 Georgia Tech 777 Atlantic Dr. N.W. E Kleitsch, American Transmission Company · Naim Logic, Salt River Project · Art Mander, Tri-State G

  2. Evaluating sub-national building-energy efficiency policy options under uncertainty: Efficient sensitivity testing of alternative climate, technolgical, and socioeconomic futures in a regional intergrated-assessment model.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scott, Michael J.; Daly, Don S.; Zhou, Yuyu; Rice, Jennie S.; Patel, Pralit L.; McJeon, Haewon C.; Kyle, G. Page; Kim, Son H.; Eom, Jiyong; Clarke, Leon E.

    2014-05-01

    Improving the energy efficiency of the building stock, commercial equipment and household appliances can have a major impact on energy use, carbon emissions, and building services. Subnational regions such as U.S. states wish to increase their energy efficiency, reduce carbon emissions or adapt to climate change. Evaluating subnational policies to reduce energy use and emissions is difficult because of the uncertainties in socioeconomic factors, technology performance and cost, and energy and climate policies. Climate change may undercut such policies. Assessing these uncertainties can be a significant modeling and computation burden. As part of this uncertainty assessment, this paper demonstrates how a decision-focused sensitivity analysis strategy using fractional factorial methods can be applied to reveal the important drivers for detailed uncertainty analysis.

  3. Regional Test Centers (RTCs)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    has established five Regional Test Centers (RTCs) across the United States to independently validate the performance and reliability of photovoltaic (PV) systems in different...

  4. African Dust Influence on Atlantic Hurricane Activity and the Peculiar Behaviour of Category 5 Hurricanes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Herrera, Victor M Velasco; H., Graciela Velasco; Gonzalez, Laura Luna

    2010-01-01

    We study the specific influence of African dust on each one of the categories of Atlantic hurricanes. By applying wavelet analysis, we find a strong decadal modulation of African dust on Category 5 hurricanes and an annual modulation on all other categories of hurricanes. We identify the formation of Category 5 hurricanes occurring mainly around the decadal minimum variation of African dust and in deep water areas of the Atlantic Ocean, where hurricane eyes have the lowest pressure. According to our results, future tropical cyclones will not evolve to Category 5 until the next decadal minimum that is, by the year 2015 +/- 2.

  5. Land-Use History and Contemporary Management Inform an Ecological Reference Model for Longleaf Pine Woodland Understory Plant Communities.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brudvig, Lars A.; Orrock, John L.; Damschen, Ellen I.; et al, et al

    2014-01-23

    Ecological restoration is frequently guided by reference conditions describing a successfully restored ecosystem; however, the causes and magnitude of ecosystem degradation vary, making simple knowledge of reference conditions insufficient for prioritizing and guiding restoration. Ecological reference models provide further guidance by quantifying reference conditions, as well as conditions at degraded states that deviate from reference conditions. Many reference models remain qualitative, however, limiting their utility. We quantified and evaluated a reference model for southeastern U.S. longleaf pine woodland understory plant communities. We used regression trees to classify 232 longleaf pine woodland sites at three locations along the Atlantic coastal plain based on relationships between understory plant community composition, soils lol(which broadly structure these communities), and factors associated with understory degradation, including fire frequency, agricultural history, and tree basal area. To understand the spatial generality of this model, we classified all sites together. and for each of three study locations separately. Both the regional and location-specific models produced quantifiable degradation gradients–i.e., progressive deviation from conditions at 38 reference sites, based on understory species composition, diversity and total cover, litter depth, and other attributes. Regionally, fire suppression was the most important degrading factor, followed by agricultural history, but at individual locations, agricultural history or tree basal area was most important. At one location, the influence of a degrading factor depended on soil attributes. We suggest that our regional model can help prioritize longleaf pine woodland restoration across our study region; however, due to substantial landscape-to-landscape variation, local management decisions should take into account additional factors (e.g., soil attributes). Our study demonstrates the utility of quantifying degraded states and provides a series of hypotheses for future experimental restoration work. More broadly, our work provides a framework for developing and evaluating reference models that incorporate multiple, interactive anthropogenic drivers of ecosystem degradation.

  6. Influence of the Southern Annular Mode on Projected Weakening of the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Helen

    ) under greenhouse gas forcing, with considerable spread in the response between models. There is also of the AMOC under greenhouse gas forcing. The initial AMOC strength is also a major cause of intermodel spread) with the potential for both regional and global climate im- pacts, such as moderation of global warming in Europe

  7. Northern Hemisphere summer monsoon intensified by mega-El Nio/southern oscillation and Atlantic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Webster, Peter J.

    because the monsoons over Asia, West Africa, and North America have been studied primarily on a regional- expected from recent theoretical prediction and model projections of the 21st century. The intensification.g., solar and volcanic activity) and anthropogenic (e.g., greenhouse gas, aerosols, and land use) climate

  8. Improvement of Offshore Wind Resource Modeling in the Mid-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Firestone, Jeremy

    Improvement of Offshore Wind Resource Modeling in the Mid- Atlantic Bight Wind Energy Symposium Sienkiewicz , Chris Hughes 26 February 2013 #12;Improving Atmospheric Models for Offshore Wind Resource Interaction Tower ­ 23 m NOAA Buzzard's Bay Tower ­ 25 m Cape Wind Tower (60 m from 2003-2011; just platform

  9. Evidence for a winter sink of atmospheric carbonyl sulfide in the northeast Atlantic Ocean

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ulshoefer, V.S.; Uher, G.; Andreae, M.O. [Max Planck Institute for Chemistry, Mainz (Germany)] [Max Planck Institute for Chemistry, Mainz (Germany)

    1995-10-01

    Atmospheric and dissolved carbonyl sulfide (COS) concentrations were measured on 473 samples during three cruises into the northeast Atlantic Ocean. The cruises took place in April/May 1992, January 1994, and September 1994, covering three seasons. In January 1994, persistent undersaturation of COS in seawater with respect to the atmosphere was observed. This is the first data set to show a strong and persistent undersaturation with the mean saturation ratio (SR) being 46% and the standard deviation 13%. In April 1992. the seawater was slightly supersaturated, with a SR of 126{plus_minus}58%. Only in September 1994, strong supersaturation of 214{plus_minus}86% was observed. The measured air concentrations were relatively uniform, averaging 410{plus_minus}67 pptv in January 1994, 466{plus_minus}42 pptv in April 1992, and 396{plus_minus}18 pptv in September 1994. Sea-to-air fluxes of COS were estimated using three different exchange models. We obtained moderate to low COS emissions in September (19 to 33 nmol m{sup -2} d{sup -1}) and April/May (5 to 10 nmol m{sup -2} d{sup -1}), in contrast to a significant flux from the atmosphere into the ocean in January (-76 to -31 nmol m{sup -2} d{sup -1}). The strong seasonal variation of COS emissions with the possibility of reversed fluxes into the ocean during winter must be considered in future oceanic source estimates. The possible effect of an open ocean winter sink on global marine emissions of COS could be a reduction by some 10-15%. 23 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  10. Diurnal analysis of intensity trends in Atlantic tropical cyclones

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kowch, Roman S

    2013-01-01

    I postulate that a diurnal cycle may exist in observational variables related to tropical cyclone (TC) intensity. Prior studies document a significant diurnal signal in moist convection across tropical regions. Since ...

  11. Regional Public Coordination Transportation Plan Texoma Region #22 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Texoma Council of Governments

    2006-12-01

    .......................................................................................................... 6 Regional Geography and Demographics..................................................................................... 6 Regional Agencies Responsible for Transportation Planning.................................................. 6 Descriptions... of the Region?s Public Transportation Providers................................................. 7 Coordinated Transportation Plan..................................................................................................... 8 Coordination Actions...

  12. Regional Analysis Briefs

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2028-01-01

    Regional Analysis Briefs (RABs) provide an overview of specific regions that play an important role in world energy markets, either directly or indirectly. These briefs cover areas that are currently major producers (Caspian Sea), have geopolitical importance (South China Sea), or may have future potential as producers or transit areas (East Africa, Eastern Mediterranean).

  13. Daily mean sea level pressure reconstructions for the European -North Atlantic region for the period 1850-2003

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Moberg4 , J. Jacobeit5 , P. Brohan1 , N.A. Rayner1 , E. Aguilar3 , M. Barriendos6 , T. Brandsma7 , N, Canada 18. Meteorological and Hydrological Service, Croatia 19. Armagh Observatory, Ireland 20. Environment Canada, Canada 21. University of Sunderland, United Kingdom Date received: 10th June, 2005

  14. Daily Mean Sea Level Pressure Reconstructions for the EuropeanNorth Atlantic Region for the Period 18502003

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brandsma, Theo

    ,d J. JACOBEIT,e P. BROHAN,a N. A. RAYNER,a E. AGUILAR,c H. ALEXANDERSSON,f M. BARRIENDOS,g T. BRANDSMAGill University, Montreal, Quebec, Canada t Meteorological and Hydrological Service, Zagreb, Croatia u Environment Canada, Ontario, Canada v Armagh Observatory, Armagh, Ireland w University of Sunderland, Sunderland

  15. Baseline for Climate Change: Modeling Watershed Aquatic Biodiversity Relative to Environmental and Anthropogenic Factors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maurakis, Eugene G

    2010-10-01

    Objectives of the two-year study were to (1) establish baselines for fish and macroinvertebrate community structures in two mid-Atlantic lower Piedmont watersheds (Quantico Creek, a pristine forest watershed; and Cameron Run, an urban watershed, Virginia) that can be used to monitor changes relative to the impacts related to climate change in the future; (2) create mathematical expressions to model fish species richness and diversity, and macroinvertebrate taxa and macroinvertebrate functional feeding group taxa richness and diversity that can serve as a baseline for future comparisons in these and other watersheds in the mid-Atlantic region; and (3) heighten people’s awareness, knowledge and understanding of climate change and impacts on watersheds in a laboratory experience and interactive exhibits, through internship opportunities for undergraduate and graduate students, a week-long teacher workshop, and a website about climate change and watersheds. Mathematical expressions modeled fish and macroinvertebrate richness and diversity accurately well during most of the six thermal seasons where sample sizes were robust. Additionally, hydrologic models provide the basis for estimating flows under varying meteorological conditions and landscape changes. Continuations of long-term studies are requisite for accurately teasing local human influences (e.g. urbanization and watershed alteration) from global anthropogenic impacts (e.g. climate change) on watersheds. Effective and skillful translations (e.g. annual potential exposure of 750,000 people to our inquiry-based laboratory activities and interactive exhibits in Virginia) of results of scientific investigations are valuable ways of communicating information to the general public to enhance their understanding of climate change and its effects in watersheds.

  16. Regional seismic discrimination research at LLNL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walter, W.R.; Mayeda, K.M.; Goldstein, P.; Patton, H.J.; Jarpe, S.; Glenn, L.

    1995-10-01

    The ability to verify a Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty (CTBT) depends in part on the ability to seismically detect and discriminate between potential clandestine underground nuclear tests and other seismic sources, including earthquakes and mining activities. Regional techniques are necessary to push detection and discrimination levels down to small magnitudes, but existing methods of event discrimination are mainly empirical and show much variability from region to region. The goals of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory`s (LLNL`s) regional discriminant research are to evaluate the most promising discriminants, improve the understanding of their physical basis and use this information to develop new and more effective discriminants that can be transported to new regions of high monitoring interest. In this report the authors discuss preliminary efforts to geophysically characterize the Middle East and North Africa. They show that the remarkable stability of coda allows one to develop physically based, stable single station magnitude scales in new regions. They then discuss progress to date on evaluating and improving physical understanding and ability to model regional discriminants, focusing on the comprehensive NTS dataset. The authors apply this modeling ability to develop improved discriminants including slopes of P to S ratios. They find combining disparate discriminant techniques is particularly effective in identifying consistent outliers such as shallow earthquakes and mine seismicity. Finally they discuss development and use of new coda and waveform modeling tools to investigate special events.

  17. The Radiative Role of Free Tropospheric Aerosols and Marine Clouds over the Central North Atlantic

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mazzoleni, Claudio; Kumar, Sumit; Wright, Kendra; Kramer, Louisa; Mazzoleni, Lynn; Owen, Robert; Helmig, Detlev

    2014-12-09

    The scientific scope of the project was to exploit the unique location of the Pico Mountain Observatory (PMO) located in the summit caldera of the Pico Volcano in Pico Island in the Azores, for atmospheric studies. The observatory, located at 2225m a.s.l., typically samples free tropospheric aerosols laying above the marine low-level clouds and long-range transported from North America. The broad purpose of this research was to provide the scientific community with a better understanding of fundamental physical processes governing the effects of aerosols on radiative forcing and climate; with the ultimate goal of improving our abilities to understand past climate and to predict future changes through numerical models. The project was 'exploratory' in nature, with the plan to demonstrate the feasibility of deploying for the first time, an extensive aerosol research package at PMO. One of the primary activities was to test the deployment of these instruments at the site, to collect data during the 2012 summer season, and to further develop the infrastructure and the knowledge for performing novel research at PMO in follow-up longer-term aerosol-cloud studies. In the future, PMO could provide an elevated research outpost to support the renewed DOE effort in the Azores that was intensified in 2013 with the opening of the new sea-level ARM-DOE Eastern North Atlantic permanent facility at Graciosa Island. During the project period, extensive new data sets were collected for the planned 2012 season. Thanks to other synergistic activities and opportunities, data collection was then successfully extended to 2013 and 2014. Highlights of the scientific findings during this project include: a) biomass burning contribute significantly to the aerosol loading in the North Atlantic free troposphere; however, long-range transported black carbon concentrations decreased substantially in the last decade. b) Single black carbon particles – analyzed off-line at the electron microscope – were often very compacted, suggesting cloud processing and exhibiting different optical properties from fresh emissions. In addition, black carbon was found to be sometimes mixed with mineral dust, affecting its optical properties and potential forcing. c) Some aerosols collected at PMO acted as ice nuclei, potentially contributing to cirrus cloud formation during their transport in the upper free troposphere. Identified good ice nuclei were often mineral dust particles. d) The free tropospheric aerosols studied at PMO have relevance to low level marine clouds due, for example, to synoptic subsidence entraining free tropospheric aerosols into the marine boundary layer. This has potentially large consequences on cloud condensation nuclei concentrations and compositions in the marine boundary layer; therefore, having an effect on the marine stratus clouds, with potentially important repercussions on the radiative forcing. The scientific products of this project currently include contributions to two papers published in the Nature Publishing group (Nature Communications and Scientific Reports), one paper under revision for Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics, one in review in Geophysical Research Letters and one recently submitted to Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics Discussion. In addition, four manuscripts are in advanced state of preparation. Finally, twenty-eight presentations were given at international conferences, workshops and seminars.

  18. Author's personal copy Sensitivity of the Atlantic Ocean circulation to a hydraulic overflow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levermann, Anders

    Author's personal copy Sensitivity of the Atlantic Ocean circulation to a hydraulic overflow the explicit representation of the overflows using a parameterisation by hydraulic constraints and compare circulation (AMOC) (Redler and Böning, 1997; Kuhlbrodt et al., 2007). The potential energy stored in the dense

  19. NOAA Atlantic Oceanographic & Meteorological Laboratory Global warming and U.S. landfalling hurricanes.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    NOAA Atlantic Oceanographic & Meteorological Laboratory Global warming and U.S. landfalling worldwide (plus many TV & radio shows). An AOML's paper "Global warming and United States landfalling & Meteorological Laboratory Warming Occurs Almost Everywhere over the Global Ocean The first EOF mode from

  20. Towards a more saline North Atlantic and a fresher Arctic under global warming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Drange, Helge

    Towards a more saline North Atlantic and a fresher Arctic under global warming I. Bethke,1,2,3 T global warming, Geophys. Res. Lett., 33, L21712, doi:10.1029/ 2006GL027264. 1. Introduction [2.g., Cubasch et al., 2001; Ra¨isa¨nen, 2002]. At the high northern latitudes, a combination of warming

  1. The Atlantic menhaden, Brevoortia tyrannus, is a pelagic filter-feeding

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    coastal waters of North America from Maine to Florida. Menhaden adopt filter feed- ing in early juvenile282 The Atlantic menhaden, Brevoortia tyrannus, is a pelagic filter-feeding clupeoid inhabiting distribution of par- ticulate material in the water rela- tive to the "pore size" of the gill rak- ers; they do

  2. THE OCEANIC MIGRATION OF AMERICAN SHAD, ALOSA SAPIDISSIMA, ALONG THE ATLANTIC COAST

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    THE OCEANIC MIGRATION OF AMERICAN SHAD, ALOSA SAPIDISSIMA, ALONG THE ATLANTIC COAST RICHARD J N in two primary areas: GulfofMaine and an area south ofNantucket Shoals. Previous studies on food that shad were vertical migrators, probably following the diel movements oflarge zooplankters in the water

  3. NASA/TP--2007214905 Statistical Aspects of the North Atlantic Basin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    NASA/TP--2007­214905 Statistical Aspects of the North Atlantic Basin Tropical Cyclones: Trends Flight Center, Alabama May 2007 #12;The NASA STI Program...in Profile Since its founding, NASA has been dedicated to the advancement of aeronautics and space science. The NASA Scientific and Technical Information

  4. High connectivity across the fragmented chemosynthetic ecosystems of the deep Atlantic Equatorial Belt: efficient

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Borges, Rita

    Belt: efficient dispersal mechanisms or questionable endemism? SARA TEIXEIRA,* KARINE OLU,* CAROLE Equatorial Belt (AEB). Here, we combined genetic data (COI) from several taxa to assess the possible distributions in overlooked parts of the deep sea. Keywords: Atlantic equatorial belt, chemosynthetic habitats

  5. Florida Atlantic University Regulation 5.010 Anti-Discrimination and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fernandez, Eduardo

    Florida Atlantic University Regulation 5.010 Anti-Discrimination and Anti-Harassment Regulation 1 discrimination or harassment that is based on a legally protected class, including race, color, religion, age a complaint of alleged discrimination or harassment. (b) It shall be a violation of this Regulation for any

  6. Florida Atlantic University Regulation 5.010 Anti-Discrimination and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marques, Oge

    -1- Florida Atlantic University Regulation 5.010 Anti-Discrimination and Anti-Harassment Regulation discrimination or harassment that is based on race, color, religion, age, disability, sex, national origin, employee or a member of the University community to file a complaint of alleged discrimination

  7. Reddish Egret Extends its Breeding Range along the North American Atlantic Coast into South Carolina

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jodice, Patrick

    525 Reddish Egret Extends its Breeding Range along the North American Atlantic Coast into South Carolina LISA M. FERGUSON 1 , PATRICK G.R. JODICE 2 , WILLIAM POST 3 AND FELICIA I. SANDERS 4 1 Department USGS-South Carolina Cooperative Fish & Wildlife Research Unit, Clemson University, Clemson, SC 29634

  8. Scientists unravel secrets of marine life at the only atoll in South Atlantic: Rocas Atoll, Brazil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Floeter, Sergio Ricardo

    of a permanent research and monitoring station. Since then, the Marine Biological Reserve of Rocas Atoll have during low tide. The authors believe these environments provide shelter against direct wave action the Northeastern coast of Brazil is Rocas Atoll, the only atoll in the entire Southern Atlantic. Atolls

  9. Tornado Outbreaks Associated with Landfalling Hurricanes in the North Atlantic Basin: 19542004

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schultz, David

    1 Tornado Outbreaks Associated with Landfalling Hurricanes in the North Atlantic Basin: 1954 are a notable potential hazard associated with landfalling hurricanes. The purpose of this paper is to discriminate hurricanes that produce numerous tornadoes (tornado outbreaks) from those that do

  10. MIGRATION AND DISTRIBUTION OF WHITE MARLIN AND BLUE MARLIN IN THE ATLANTIC OCEAN'

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    catches of exploratory fishing vessels. De Sylva and Davis (1963) reported on their studies of the white the distribu- tion, spawning, and relative abundance of bill- fishes in the Atlantic Ocean; this comprehensive, Japanese longline vessels began fishing for tunas and bill-

  11. Century-scale movement of the Atlantic Intertropical Convergence Zone linked to solar variability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    South Florida, University of

    Century-scale movement of the Atlantic Intertropical Convergence Zone linked to solar variability R June 2004. [1] The abundance of the planktic foraminifer Globigerinoides sacculifer in Gulf of Mexico-scale periodicity observed in proxy records of solar variability, which suggests that the average position

  12. haden in the South Atlantic summer fishery alone was 34,435 metric tons.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . CHEEK National Marine Fisheries Service Atlantic Estuolrine Fisheries Center Beaufort, NC 28516 four were available. Specimens ranged from 12 to 580 mm standard length (SL). Specimens smaller than about 60 mm SL were x-rayed with a soft-ray machine and larger specimens with a hard-ray machine. Counts

  13. Simulation of electricity supply of an Atlantic island by offshore wind turbines and wave

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Simulation of electricity supply of an Atlantic island by offshore wind turbines and wave energy community. Key words: Wave energy, offshore wind turbines, marine energy 1 Introduction Marine renewables installations of a few kW like small wind turbines or photovoltaic cells installed to provide electricity

  14. MAINTENANCE OF THE NORTH ATLANTIC RIGIFfWHALE CATALOG 1 JANUARY -30 JUNE, 1998

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Center 166 Water Street Woods Hole, MA 02543 Contract No. 46 EANF 600004 October, 1998 #12;CATALOG STATUSMAINTENANCE OF THE NORTH ATLANTIC RIGIFfWHALE CATALOG 1 JANUARY - 30 JUNE, 1998 Philip K. Hamilton The right whale photo-identification catalog presently contains 12,688 photographed records of388 right

  15. Effect of Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation Changes on Tropical Coupled Ocean-Atmosphere System 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wan, Xiuquan

    2010-01-14

    by the surface cooling of the North Atlantic and the North Pacific in response to a weakened AMOC, is a leading physical mechanism that dictates the behavior of El Nino/Southern Oscillation (ENSO) response to AMOC changes. However, depending on its origin...

  16. MECHANISMS CONTROLLING THE AIR-SEA FLUX IN THE NORTH ATLANTIC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Follows, Mick

    -sea flux of carbon is controlled by the disequilibrium in partial pres- sure of carbon dioxide between describe the distribution of carbon in the Atlantic basin and its relation to other water-mass properties increase of atmospheric Ą§¦©¨ . Fig. 1 illustrates the annual mean air- sea flux of carbon, , estimated

  17. Ocean advection, Arctic-Atlantic Connections, Climate P.B.Rhines, University of Washington

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ocean advection, Arctic-Atlantic Connections, Climate P.B.Rhines, University of Washington Sirpa Hakkinen, NASA Goddard SPC with David Bailey, Wei Cheng, Jerome Cuny, Trisha Sawatzky WUN Climate Track,Wintertime Storm Track,Wintertime Storm Track, Eurasian climate and weatherEurasian climate

  18. ECOLE THEMATIQUE CNRS SPRING SCHOOL Plouzan 11 14 May 2010 Iceland in the Central Northern Atlantic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huck, Thierry

    #12;ECOLE THEMATIQUE ­ CNRS ­ SPRING SCHOOL ­ Plouzané ­ 11 ­14 May 2010 Iceland in the Central Northern Atlantic 2 #12;ECOLE THEMATIQUE ­ CNRS ­ SPRING SCHOOL ­ Plouzané ­ 11 ­14 May 2010 Iceland COMMUNICATIONS Recent and present-day tectonics near a hot spot : the transform zones of Iceland 12 Jökylhlaups

  19. Page 1 of 2 Policy 02 Approved 10/31/03 Florida Atlantic University

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fernandez, Eduardo

    an acceptable source such as an USDA inspected slaughterhouse or from an in house animal that was euthanizedPage 1 of 2 Policy 02 Approved 10/31/03 Florida Atlantic University Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee USE OF ANIMAL TISSUES (PRODUCTS) POLICIES AND PROCEDURES Principles: An investigator

  20. TELECONNECTIONS BETWEEN NORTHEASTERN PACIFIC OCEAN AND THE GULF OF MEXICO AND NORTHWESTERN ATLANTIC OCEAN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    TELECONNECTIONS BETWEEN NORTHEASTERN PACIFIC OCEAN AND THE GULF OF MEXICO AND NORTHWESTERN ATLANTIC-scale interactions in the tropical Pacific Ocean, especially, processes associated with the EI Nino phenomena. He has of ocean temperatures. He suggests that an anomalously high heat supply in the equatorial Pacific