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1

Application of TOPNET in the distributed model intercomparison project  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Application of TOPNET in the distributed model intercomparison project Christina Bandaragodaa of the Distributed Model Intercomparison Project (DMIP). The model implementation is based on a topographically network is mapped from the US National Elevation Dataset Digital Elevation Model (DEM) using procedures

Tarboton, David

2

Atmospheric model intercomparison project: Monsoon simulations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The simulation of monsoons, in particular the Indian summer monsoon, has proven to be a critical test of a general circulation model`s ability to simulate tropical climate and variability. The Monsoon Numerical Experimentation Group has begun to address questions regarding the predictability of monsoon extremes, in particular conditions associated with El Nino and La Nina conditions that tend to be associated with drought and flood conditions over the Indian subcontinent, through a series of seasonal integrations using analyzed initial conditions from successive days in 1987 and 1988. In this paper the authors present an analysis of simulations associated with the Atmospheric Model Intercomparison Project (AMIP), a coordinated effort to simulate the 1979--1988 decade using standardized boundary conditions with approximately 30 atmospheric general circulation models. The 13 models analyzed to date are listed. Using monthly mean data from these simulations they have calculated indices of precipitation and wind shear in an effort to access the performance of the models over the course of the AMIP decade.

Sperber, K.R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States). Program for Climate Model Diagnosis and Intercomparison; Palmer, T.N. [European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts, Reading (United Kingdom)

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

An energetic perspective on hydrological cycle changes in the Geoengineering Model Intercomparison Project  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An energetic perspective on hydrological cycle changes in the Geoengineering Model Intercomparison-ocean general circulation models simulating experiment G1 of the Geoengineering Model Intercomparison Project perspective on hydrological cycle changes in the Geoengineering Model Intercomparison Project, J. Geophys. Res

Robock, Alan

4

Climate model response from the Geoengineering Model Intercomparison Project (GeoMIP)1! Ben Kravitz,1*  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

! 1 Climate model response from the Geoengineering Model Intercomparison Project (GeoMIP)1! 2! Ben, MSIN K9-24, Richland, WA32! 99352, ben.kravitz@pnnl.gov.33! #12;! 2 Abstract34! Solar geoengineering of the Geoengineering Model37! Intercomparison Project (GeoMIP), in which 12 climate models have simulated the climate38

Robock, Alan

5

Climate model response from the Geoengineering Model Intercomparison Project (GeoMIP)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Climate model response from the Geoengineering Model Intercomparison Project (GeoMIP) Ben Kravitz,1 Received 7 January 2013; revised 3 July 2013; accepted 10 July 2013. [1] Solar geoengineering Experiment G1 of the Geoengineering Model Intercomparison Project, in which 12 climate models have simulated

Moore, John

6

Climate model response from the Geoengineering Model Intercomparison Project (GeoMIP)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Climate model response from the Geoengineering Model Intercomparison Project (GeoMIP) Ben Kravitz,1 geoengineering--deliberate reduction in the amount of solar radiation retained by the Earth--has been proposed present results from Experiment G1 of the Geoengineering Model Intercomparison Project, in which 12

Robock, Alan

7

Stretched-Grid Model Intercomparison Project  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

- Land-sea differences - Surface parameters Applications (besides regional climate variability and change, Russia #12;OUTLINE 1. INTRODUCTION: Exploring the variable- resolution stretched-grid approach (for grid- point models: Staniforth and Mitchell 1978, and for spectral models: Schmidt 1977) to regional climate

Gruner, Daniel S.

8

An overview of the Geoengineering Model Intercomparison Project (GeoMIP)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An overview of the Geoengineering Model Intercomparison Project (GeoMIP) Ben Kravitz,1 Alan Robock] The Geoengineering Model Intercomparison Project (GeoMIP) was designed to determine robust climate system model responses to solar geoengineering. GeoMIP currently consists of four standardized simulations involving

Robock, Alan

9

Arctic cryosphere response in the Geoengineering Model Intercomparison Project G3  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Arctic cryosphere response in the Geoengineering Model Intercomparison Project G3 and G4 scenarios output from the Geoengineering Model Intercomparison Project for the two most "realistic" scenarios, G4, injects 5 Tg SO2 per year. We ask whether geoengineering by injection of sulfate aerosols

Robock, Alan

10

The "termination effect" in experiment G2 of the1 Geoengineering Model Intercomparison Project2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The "termination effect" in experiment G2 of the1 Geoengineering Model Intercomparison Project2 have examined changes in climate which result from the sudden ter-5 mination of geoengineering after 50, as simulated7 by 11 different climate models in experiment G2 of the Geoengineering Model8 Intercomparison

Robock, Alan

11

Sea spray geoengineering experiments in the geoengineering model intercomparison project (GeoMIP): Experimental design  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sea spray geoengineering experiments in the geoengineering model intercomparison project (Geo geoengineering. We outline here a proposal for three coordinated climate modeling experiments to test aspects of sea spray geoengineering, to be conducted under the auspices of the Geoengineering Model

Robock, Alan

12

World Climate Research Programme (WCRP) Coupled Model Intercomparison Project phase 3 (CMIP3): Multi-Model Dataset Archive at PCMDI (Program for Climate Model Diagnosis and Intercomparison)  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

In response to a proposed activity of the WCRP's Working Group on Coupled Modelling (WGCM),PCMDI volunteered to collect model output contributed by leading modeling centers around the world. Climate model output from simulations of the past, present and future climate was collected by PCMDI mostly during the years 2005 and 2006, and this archived data constitutes phase 3 of the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP3). In part, the WGCM organized this activity to enable those outside the major modeling centers to perform research of relevance to climate scientists preparing the Fourth Asssessment Report (AR4) of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC). The IPCC was established by the World Meteorological Organization and the United Nations Environmental Program to assess scientific information on climate change. The IPCC publishes reports that summarize the state of the science. This unprecedented collection of recent model output is officially known as the WCRP CMIP3 multi-model dataset. It is meant to serve IPCC's Working Group 1, which focuses on the physical climate system - atmosphere, land surface, ocean and sea ice - and the choice of variables archived at the PCMDI reflects this focus. A more comprehensive set of output for a given model may be available from the modeling center that produced it. As of November 2007, over 35 terabytes of data were in the archive and over 303 terabytes of data had been downloaded among the more than 1200 registered users. Over 250 journal articles, based at least in part on the dataset, have been published or have been accepted for peer-reviewed publication. Countries from which models have been gathered include Australia, Canada, China, France, Germany and Korea, Italy, Japan, Norway, Russia, Great Britain and the United States. Models, variables, and documentation are collected and stored. Check http://www-pcmdi.llnl.gov/ipcc/data_status_tables.htm to see at a glance the output that is available. (Description taken from http://www-pcmdi.llnl.gov/ipcc/about_ipcc.php)

13

The Hydrological Impact of Geoengineering in the Geoengineering Model Intercomparison Project (GeoMIP)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Abstract: The hydrologic impact of enhancing Earthís albedo due to solar radiation management (SRM) is investigated using simulations from 12 models contributing to the Geoengineering Model Intercomparison Project (GeoMIP). An artificial experiment is investigated, where global mean temperature is preserved at pre-industrial conditions, while atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations are quadrupled. The associated reduction of downwelling surface solar radiation in a high CO2 environment leads to a reduction of global evaporation of 10% and 4% and precipitation of 6.1% and 6.3% over land and ocean, respectively. An initial reduction of latent heat flux at the surface is largely driven by reduced evapotranspiration over land with instantly increasing CO2 concentrations in both experiments. A warming surface associated with the transient adjustment in the 4xCO2 experiment further generates an increase of global precipitation, with considerable regional changes, such as a significant precipitation reduction of 7% for the North American summer monsoon. Reduced global precipitation persists in the geoengineered experiment where temperatures are stabilized, with considerable regional rainfall deficits. Precipitation reductions that are consistent in sign across models are identified in the geoengineered experiment over monsoonal land regions of East Asia (6%), North America (7%), South America (6%) and South Africa (5%). In contrast to the 4xCO2 experiment, where the frequency of months with heavy precipitation intensity is increased by over 50%, it is reduced by up to 20% in the geoengineering scenario . The reduction in heavy precipitation is more pronounced over land than over the ocean, and accompanies a stronger reduction in evaporation over land. For northern mid-latitudes, maximum precipitation reduction over land ranges from 1 to 16% for individual models. For 45-65įN, the frequency of median to high intensity precipitation in summer is strongly reduced. These changes in precipitation in both total amount and frequency of extremes, point to a considerable weakening of the hydrological cycle in a geoengineered world.

Tilmes, S.; Fasullo, John; Lamarque, J.-F.; Marsh, D.; Mills, Mike; Alterskjaer, Kari; Muri, Helene O.; Kristjansson, Jon E.; Boucher, Olivier; Schulz, M.; Cole, Jason N.; Curry, Charles L.; Jones, A.; Haywood, J.; Irvine, Peter; Ji, Duoying; Moore, John; Bou Karam, Diana; Kravitz, Benjamin S.; Rasch, Philip J.; Singh, Balwinder; Yoon, Jin-Ho; Niemeier, Ulrike; Schmidt, Hauke; Robock, Alan; Yang, Shuting; Watanabe, Shingo

2013-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

14

The North American Carbon Program Multi-scale synthesis and Terrestrial Model Intercomparison Project Part 1: Overview and experimental design  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Terrestrial biosphere models (TBMs) have become an integral tool for extrapolating local observations and understanding of land-atmosphere carbon exchange to larger regions. The North American Carbon Program (NACP) Multi-scale synthesis and Terrestrial Model Intercomparison Project (MsTMIP) is a formal model intercomparison and evaluation effort focused on improving the diagnosis and attribution of carbon exchange at regional and global scales. MsTMIP builds upon current and past synthesis activities, and has a unique framework designed to isolate, interpret, and inform understanding of how model structural differences impact estimates of carbon uptake and release. Here we provide an overview of the MsTMIP effort and describe how the MsTMIP experimental design enables the assessment and quantification of TBM structural uncertainty. Model structure refers to the types of processes considered (e.g. nutrient cycling, disturbance, lateral transport of carbon), and how these processes are represented (e.g. photosynthetic formulation, temperature sensitivity, respiration) in the models. By prescribing a common experimental protocol with standard spin-up procedures and driver data sets, we isolate any biases and variability in TBM estimates of regional and global carbon budgets resulting from differences in the models themselves (i.e. model structure) and model-specific parameter values. An initial intercomparison of model structural differences is represented using hierarchical cluster diagrams (a.k.a. dendrograms), which highlight similarities and differences in how models account for carbon cycle, vegetation, energy, and nitrogen cycle dynamics. We show that, despite the standardized protocol used to derive initial conditions, models show a high degree of variation for GPP, total living biomass, and total soil carbon, underscoring the influence of differences in model structure and parameterization on model estimates.

Huntzinger, D.N. [Northern Arizona University] [Northern Arizona University; Schwalm, C. [Northern Arizona University] [Northern Arizona University; Michalak, A.M [Carnegie Institution for Science, Stanford] [Carnegie Institution for Science, Stanford; Schaefer, K. [National Snow and Ice Data Center] [National Snow and Ice Data Center; King, A.W. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL)] [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Wei, Y. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL)] [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Jacobson, A. [National Snow and Ice Data Center] [National Snow and Ice Data Center; Liu, S. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL)] [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Cook, R. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL)] [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Post, W.M. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL)] [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Berthier, G. [Laboratoire des Sciences du Climat et de l'Environnement (LSCE)] [Laboratoire des Sciences du Climat et de l'Environnement (LSCE); Hayes, D. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL)] [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Huang, M. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL)] [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); Ito, A. [National Institute for Environmental Studies, Tsukuba, Japan] [National Institute for Environmental Studies, Tsukuba, Japan; Lei, H. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL)] [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); Lu, C. [International Center for Climate and Global Change Research and School of Forestry and Wildlife Sci.] [International Center for Climate and Global Change Research and School of Forestry and Wildlife Sci.; Mao, J. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL)] [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Peng, C.H. [University of Quebec at Montreal, Institute of Environment Sciences] [University of Quebec at Montreal, Institute of Environment Sciences; Peng, S. [Laboratoire des Sciences du Climat et de l'Environnement (LSCE)] [Laboratoire des Sciences du Climat et de l'Environnement (LSCE); Poulter, B. [Laboratoire des Sciences du Climat et de l'Environnement (LSCE)] [Laboratoire des Sciences du Climat et de l'Environnement (LSCE); Riccuito, D. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL)] [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Shi, X. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL)] [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Tian, H. [International Center for Climate and Global Change Research and School of Forestry and Wildlife Sci.] [International Center for Climate and Global Change Research and School of Forestry and Wildlife Sci.; Wang, W. [National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), Ames Research Center, Moffett Field] [National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), Ames Research Center, Moffett Field; Zeng, N. [University of Maryland] [University of Maryland; Zhao, F. [University of Maryland] [University of Maryland; Zhu, Q. [Laboratory for Ecological Forecasting and Northwest Agriculture and Forestry University] [Laboratory for Ecological Forecasting and Northwest Agriculture and Forestry University

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

The Atmospheric Chemistry and Climate Model Intercomparison Project (ACCMIP): Overview and Description of Models, Simulations and Climate Diagnostics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Atmospheric Chemistry and Climate Model Intercomparison Project (ACCMIP) consists of a series of timeslice experiments targeting the long-term changes in atmospheric composition between 1850 and 2100, with the goal of documenting radiative forcing and the associated composition changes. Here we introduce the various simulations performed under ACCMIP and the associated model output. The ACCMIP models have a wide range of horizontal and vertical resolutions, vertical extent, chemistry schemes and interaction with radiation and clouds. While anthropogenic and biomass burning emissions were specified for all time slices in the ACCMIP protocol, it is found that the natural emissions lead to a significant range in emissions, mostly for ozone precursors. The analysis of selected present-day climate diagnostics (precipitation, temperature, specific humidity and zonal wind) reveals biases consistent with state-of-the-art climate models. The model-to-model comparison of changes in temperature, specific humidity and zonal wind between 1850 and 2000 and between 2000 and 2100 indicates mostly consistent results, but with outliers different enough to possibly affect their representation of climate impact on chemistry.

Lamarque, J.-F.; Shindell, Drew; Josse, B.; Young, P. J.; Cionni, I.; Eyring, Veronika; Bergmann, D.; Cameron-Smith, Philip; Collins, W. J.; Doherty, R.; Dalsoren, S.; Faluvegi, G.; Folberth, G.; Ghan, Steven J.; Horowitz, L.; Lee, Y. H.; MacKenzie, I. A.; Nagashima, T.; Naik, Vaishali; Plummer, David; Righi, M.; Rumbold, S.; Schulz, M.; Skeie, R. B.; Stevenson, D. S.; Strode, S.; Sudo, K.; Szopa, S.; Voulgarakis, A.; Zeng, G.

2013-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

16

Results from the Carbon-Land Model Intercomparison Project (C-LAMP) and Availability of the Data on the Earth System Grid (ESG)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper describes the Carbon-Land Model Intercomparison Project (C-LAMP) being carried out through a collaboration between the Community Climate System Model (CCSM) Biogeochemistry Working Group, a DOE SciDAC-2 project, and the DOE Program for Climate Model Diagnosis and Intercomparison (PCMDI). The goal of the project is to intercompare terrestrial biogeochemistry models running within the CCSM framework to determine the best set of processes to include in future versions of CCSM. As a part of the project, observational datasets are being collected and used to score the scientific performance of these models following a well-defined set of metrics. In addition, metadata standards for terrestrial biosphere models are being developed to support archival and distribution of the C-LAMP model output via the Earth System Grid (ESG). Progress toward completion of this project and preliminary results from the first set of experiments are reported.

Hoffman, Forrest M [ORNL; Covey, Curtis [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL); Fung, Inez [University of California, Berkeley; Randerson, Jim [University of California, Irvine; Thornton, Peter [National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR); Lee, Jeff [National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR); Rosenbloom, Nan [National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR); Stockli, Reto [Colorado State University, Fort Collins; Running, Steven [University of Montana, Missoula; Bernholdt, David E [ORNL; Williams, Dean [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL)

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Northern Hemispheric cryosphere response to volcanic eruptions in the Paleoclimate Modeling Intercomparison Project 3 last  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(PMIP3) project to determine whether current state-of-the-art models produce sudden changes it is not sustained beyond a decade. Sea ice expansion in the North Atlantic is seen in some PMIP3 models after large eruptions, although none of these models produce significant centennial-scale effects. Warm Baffin Island

Robock, Alan

18

Multi-model Mean Nitrogen and Sulfur Deposition from the Atmospheric Chemistry and Climate Model Intercomparison Project (ACCMIP): Evaluation of Historical and Projected Future Changes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present multi-model global datasets of nitrogen and sulfate deposition covering time periods from 1850 to 2100, calculated within the Atmospheric Chemistry and Climate Model Intercomparison Project (ACCMIP). The computed deposition fluxes are compared to surface wet deposition and ice-core measurements. We use a new dataset of wet deposition for 2000-2002 based on critical assessment of the quality of existing regional network data. We show that for present-day (year 2000 ACCMIP time-slice), the ACCMIP results perform similarly to previously published multi-model assessments. The analysis of changes between 1980 and 2000 indicates significant differences between model and measurements over the United States, but less so over Europe. This difference points towards misrepresentation of 1980 NH3 emissions over North America. Based on ice-core records, the 1850 deposition fluxes agree well with Greenland ice cores but the change between 1850 and 2000 seems to be overestimated in the Northern Hemisphere for both nitrogen and sulfur species. Using the Representative Concentration Pathways to define the projected climate and atmospheric chemistry related emissions and concentrations, we find large regional nitrogen deposition increases in 2100 in Latin America, Africa and parts of Asia under some of the scenarios considered. Increases in South Asia are especially large, and are seen in all scenarios, with 2100 values more than double 2000 in some scenarios and reaching >1300 mgN/m2/yr averaged over regional to continental scale regions in RCP 2.6 and 8.5, ~30-50% larger than the values in any region currently (2000). Despite known issues, the new ACCMIP deposition dataset provides novel, consistent and evaluated global gridded deposition fields for use in a wide range of climate and ecological studies.

Lamarque, Jean-Francois; Dentener, Frank; McConnell, J.R.; Ro, C-U; Shaw, Mark; Vet, Robert; Bergmann, D.; Cameron-Smith, Philip; Dalsoren, S.; Doherty, R.; Faluvegi, G.; Ghan, Steven J.; Josse, B.; Lee, Y. H.; MacKenzie, I. A.; Plummer, David; Shindell, Drew; Skeie, R. B.; Stevenson, D. S.; Strode, S.; Zeng, G.; Curran, M.; Dahl-Jensen, D.; Das, S.; Fritzsche, D.; Nolan, M.

2013-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

19

E-Print Network 3.0 - atmospheric model intercomparison Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Project, phase 1 (CMIP1... Abstract An intercomparison of eight EMICs (Earth system Models of Intermediate Complexity) is carried out... doubling in the ... Source:...

20

The Impact of Abrupt Suspension of Solar Radiation Management (Termination Effect) in Experiment G2 of the Geoengineering Model Intercomparison Project (GeoMIP)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have examined changes in climate which result from the sudden termination of geoengineering after 50 years of offsetting a 1% per annum increase in CO2 concentra- tions as simulated by 11 different climate models in experiment G2 of the Geoengineering Model Intercomparison Project. The models agree on a rapid rate of global-mean warming following termination, accompanied by increases in global-mean precipitation rate and in plant net primary productivity, and decreases in sea-ice cover. While there is a considerable degree of consensus for the geographical distribution of warming, there is much less of an agreement regarding the patterns of change in the other quantities.

Jones, Andrew; Haywood, J.; Alterskjaer, Kari; Boucher, Olivier; Cole, Jason N.; Curry, Charles L.; Irvine, Peter; Ji, Duoying; Kravitz, Benjamin S.; Kristjansson, Jon E.; Moore, John; Niemeier, Ulrike; Robock, Alan; Schmidt, Hauke; Singh, Balwinder; Tilmes, S.; Watanabe, Shingo; Yoon, Jin-Ho

2013-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "model intercomparison project" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

OptIC project: An intercomparison of optimization techniques for parameter estimation in terrestrial biogeochemical models  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and earth system models, especially for long-term (multian- nual and greater) simulations. Data assimilation

Richardson, Andrew D.

22

Intercomparison and analyses of the climatology of the West African Monsoon in the West African Monsoon Modeling and Evaluation project (WAMME) first model intercomparison experiment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and analyses of the climatology of the West African Monsoonand analyses of the climatology Community Atmospheric Model/and analyses of the climatology Fig. 3 JJAS 2003-2006 mean

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

The Carbon-Land Model Intercomparison Project (C-LAMP): A Model-Data Comparison System for Evaluation of Coupled Biosphere-Atmosphere Models  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The need to capture important climate feebacks in general circulation models (GCMs) has resulted in new efforts to include atmospheric chemistry and land and ocean biogeochemistry into the next generation of production climate models, now often referred to as Earth System Models (ESMs). While many terrestrial and ocean carbon models have been coupled to GCMs, recent work has shown that such models can yield a wide range of results, suggesting that a more rigorous set of offline and partially coupled experiments, along with detailed analyses of processes and comparisons with measurements, are warranted. The Carbon-Land Model Intercomparison Project (C-LAMP) provides a simulation protocol and model performance metrics based upon comparisons against best-available satellite- and ground-based measurements (Hoffman et al., 2007). C-LAMP provides feedback to the modeling community regarding model improvements and to the measurement community by suggesting new observational campaigns. C-LAMP Experiment 1 consists of a set of uncoupled simulations of terrestrial carbon models specifically designed to examine the ability of the models to reproduce surface carbon and energy fluxes at multiple sites and to exhibit the influence of climate variability, prescribed atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}), nitrogen (N) deposition, and land cover change on projections of terrestrial carbon fluxes during the 20th century. Experiment 2 consists of partially coupled simulations of the terrestrial carbon model with an active atmosphere model exchanging energy and moisture fluxes. In all experiments, atmospheric CO{sub 2} follows the prescribed historical trajectory from C{sup 4}MIP. In Experiment 2, the atmosphere model is forced with prescribed sea surface temperatures (SSTs) and corresponding sea ice concentrations from the Hadley Centre; prescribed CO{sub 2} is radiatively active; and land, fossil fuel, and ocean CO{sub 2} fluxes are advected by the model. Both sets of experiments have been performed using two different terrestrial biogeochemistry modules coupled to the Community Land Model version 3 (CLM3) in the Community Climate System Model version 3 (CCSM3): The CASA model of Fung, et al., and the carbon-nitrogen (CN) model of Thornton. Comparisons against Ameriflus site measurements, MODIS satellite observations, NOAA flask records, TRANSCOM inversions, and Free Air CO{sub 2} Enrichment (FACE) site measurements, and other datasets have been performed and are described in Randerson et al. (2009). The C-LAMP diagnostics package was used to validate improvements to CASA and CN for use in the next generation model, CLM4. It is hoped that this effort will serve as a prototype for an international carbon-cycle model benchmarking activity for models being used for the Inter-governmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) Fifth Assessment Report. More information about C-LAMP, the experimental protocol, performance metrics, output standards, and model-data comparisons from the CLM3-CASA and CLM3-CN models are available at http://www.climatemodeling.org/c-lamp.

Hoffman, Forrest M [ORNL; Randerson, Jim [University of California, Irvine; Thornton, Peter E [ORNL; Mahowald, Natalie [Cornell University; Bonan, Gordon [National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR); Running, Steven [University of Montana, Missoula; Fung, Inez [University of California, Berkeley

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Cryospheric Response to Volcanic Eruptions in the1 Paleoclimate Model Intercomparison Project 3 Last Millennium Simulations2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) project to determine whether current state-of-the-art50 models produce sudden changes and persistence beyond a decade. Sea ice54 expansion in the North Atlantic is seen in some PMIP3 models after large eruptions, although55 none of these models produce significant centennial-scale effects. Warm biases

Robock, Alan

25

THE CARBON-LAND MODEL INTERCOMPARISON PROJECT (C-LAMP): A PROTOTYPE FOR COUPLED BIOSPHERE-ATMOSPHERE MODEL  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

often referred to as Earth System Models (ESMs). While a number of terrestrial and ocean carbon models

Hoffman, Forrest M.

26

Historical and idealized model experiments: an intercomparison of Earth system models of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Historical and idealized model experiments: an intercomparison of Earth system models: an intercomparison of Earth system models of intermediate complexity M. Eby1, A. J. Weaver1, K. Alexander1, K

27

The WAMME regional model intercomparison study  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

has produced a multi-model climatology of land surface ?uxesThe Global Precipitation Climatology Project (GPCP) combined

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

The Program for climate Model diagnosis and Intercomparison: 20-th anniversary Symposium  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Twenty years ago, W. Lawrence (Larry) Gates approached the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Energy Research (now the Office of Science) with a plan to coordinate the comparison and documentation of climate model differences. This effort would help improve our understanding of climate change through a systematic approach to model intercomparison. Early attempts at comparing results showed a surprisingly large range in control climate from such parameters as cloud cover, precipitation, and even atmospheric temperature. The DOE agreed to fund the effort at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), in part because of the existing computing environment and because of a preexisting atmospheric science group that contained a wide variety of expertise. The project was named the Program for Climate Model Diagnosis and Intercomparison (PCMDI), and it has changed the international landscape of climate modeling over the past 20 years. In spring 2009 the DOE hosted a 1-day symposium to celebrate the twentieth anniversary of PCMDI and to honor its founder, Larry Gates. Through their personal experiences, the morning presenters painted an image of climate science in the 1970s and 1980s, that generated early support from the international community for model intercomparison, thereby bringing PCMDI into existence. Four talks covered Gates√?¬?√?¬Ę√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?s early contributions to climate research at the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), the RAND Corporation, and Oregon State University through the founding of PCMDI to coordinate the Atmospheric Model Intercomparison Project (AMIP). The speakers were, in order of presentation, Warren Washington [National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR)], Kelly Redmond (Western Regional Climate Center), George Boer (Canadian Centre for Climate Modelling and Analysis), and Lennart Bengtsson [University of Reading, former director of the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF)]. The afternoon session emphasized the scientific ideas that are the basis of PCMDI√?¬?√?¬Ę√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?s success, summarizing their evolution and impact. Four speakers followed the various PCMDI-supported climate model intercomparison projects, beginning with early work on cloud representations in models, presented by Robert D. Cess (Distinguished Professor Emeritus, Stony Brook University), and then the latest Cloud Feedback Model Intercomparison Projects (CFMIPs) led by Sandrine Bony (Laboratoire de M√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬©t√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬©orologie Dynamique). Benjamin Santer (LLNL) presented a review of the climate change detection and attribution (D & A) work pioneered at PCMDI, and Gerald A. Meehl (NCAR) ended the day with a look toward the future of climate change research.

Potter, Gerald L; Bader, David C; Riches, Michael; Bamzai, Anjuli; Joseph, Renu

2011-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

29

accident dosimetry intercomparison: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Summary: This paper summarizes the results of an intercomparison project with Earth System Models of Intermediate Complexity (EMICs) undertaken in support of the...

30

A climate model intercomparison at the dynamics level Karsten Steinhaeuser Anastasios A. Tsonis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A climate model intercomparison at the dynamics level Karsten Steinhaeuser · Anastasios A. Tsonis-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2013 Abstract Until now, climate model intercomparison has focused primarily on annual they generate, we have adopted a new approach based on climate networks. We have considered 28 pre

Minnesota, University of

31

A climate model intercomparison at the dynamics level Karsten Steinhaeuser Anastasios A. Tsonis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A climate model intercomparison at the dynamics level Karsten Steinhaeuser · Anastasios A. Tsonis Until now, climate model intercomparison has focused primarily on annual and global averages of various adopted a new approach based on climate networks. We have considered 28 pre-industrial control runs

Minnesota, University of

32

Intercomparison of cloud model simulations of Arctic mixed-phase boundary layer clouds observed during  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

/crystal concentration also suggests the need for improved understanding of ice nucleation and its parameterizationIntercomparison of cloud model simulations of Arctic mixed-phase boundary layer clouds observed is presented. This case study is based on observations of a persistent mixed-phase boundary layer cloud

Zuidema, Paquita

33

An energy-diagnostics intercomparison of coupled ice-ocean Arctic models  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An energy-diagnostics intercomparison of coupled ice-ocean Arctic models Petteri Uotila a,*, David. Understanding the Arctic Ocean energy balance is important because it can strengthen our understanding for Atmosphere-Ocean Science, Courant Institute of Mathematical Sciences, New York University, NYU, 200 Water

Zhang, Jinlun

34

Mid-Holocene NAO: A PMIP2 model intercomparison R. M. Gladstone,1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Mid-Holocene NAO: A PMIP2 model intercomparison R. M. Gladstone,1 I. Ross,1 P. J. Valdes,1 A. Abe-Ouchi,2,3 P. Braconnot,4 S. Brewer,5 M. Kageyama,4 A. Kitoh,6 A. Legrande,7 O. Marti,4 R. Ohgaito,3 B shift in mean state during the mid- Holocene. Citation: Gladstone, R. M., et al. (2005), Mid- Holocene

Peltier, W. Richard

35

Long-Term Climate Change Commitment and Reversibility: An EMIC Intercomparison  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper summarizes the results of an intercomparison project with Earth System Models of Intermediate Complexity (EMICs) undertaken in support of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) Fifth Assessment ...

Forest, Chris E.

36

Intercomparison of the Cloud Water Phase among Global Climate Models  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Mixed-phase clouds (clouds that consist of both cloud droplets and ice crystals) are frequently present in the Earthís atmosphere and influence the Earthís energy budget through their radiative properties, which are highly dependent on the cloud water phase. In this study, the phase partitioning of cloud water is compared among six global climate models (GCMs) and with Cloud and Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization retrievals. It is found that the GCMs predict vastly different distributions of cloud phase for a given temperature, and none of them are capable of reproducing the spatial distribution or magnitude of the observed phase partitioning. While some GCMs produced liquid water paths comparable to satellite observations, they all failed to preserve sufficient liquid water at mixed-phase cloud temperatures. Our results suggest that validating GCMs using only the vertically integrated water contents could lead to amplified differences in cloud radiative feedback. The sensitivity of the simulated cloud phase in GCMs to the choice of heterogeneous ice nucleation parameterization is also investigated. The response to a change in ice nucleation is quite different for each GCM, and the implementation of the same ice nucleation parameterization in all models does not reduce the spread in simulated phase among GCMs. The results suggest that processes subsequent to ice nucleation are at least as important in determining phase and should be the focus of future studies aimed at understanding and reducing differences among the models.

Komurcu, Muge; Storelvmo, Trude; Tan, Ivy; Lohmann, U.; Yun, Yuxing; Penner, Joyce E.; Wang, Yong; Liu, Xiaohong; Takemura, T.

2014-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

37

RAMI4PILPS: An intercomparison of formulations for the partitioning of solar radiation in land surface models  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

RAMI4PILPS: An intercomparison of formulations for the partitioning of solar radiation in land for the partitioning of solar radiation in land surface models, J. Geophys. Res., 116, G02019, doi:10.1029/2010JG001511 [e.g., Zeng et al., 2000; Dai et al., 2004]. The partitioning of solar radiation between

Ni-Meister, Wenge

38

Future projections of daily precipitation and its extremes in simulations of 21st century climate change.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The current generation of climate models in the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 5 (CMIP5) is used to assess the future changes in daily precipitationÖ (more)

Yin, Lei

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

The AeroCom Evaluation and Intercomparison of Organic Aerosol in Global Models  

DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

This paper evaluates the current status of global modeling of the organic aerosol (OA) occurrence in the troposphere and analyzes the differences calculated between models as well as between models and observations. Thirty-one global chemistry/transport and general circulation models have participated in this intercomparison, in the framework of AeroCom phase II. The simulation of OA varies greatly between models in terms of the magnitude of primary emissions, secondary OA (SOA) formation, the number of OA species used (2 to 62), the complexity of OA parameterizations (gas-particle partitioning, chemical aging, multiphase chemistry, aerosol microphysics), and the OA physical, chemical and optical properties. The diversity of the global OA simulation results has increased since earlier AeroCom experiments, mainly due to the increasing complexity of the SOA parameterization in models, and the implementation of new, highly uncertain, OA sources. Diversity of over an order of magnitude exists in the modeled vertical distribution of OA that deserves a dedicated future study. Furthermore, although the OA/OC ratio depends on OA sources and atmospheric processing and is important for model evaluation against OA and OC observations, it is resolved only by few global models. The median global primary OA source strength is 56 Tg a 1 (range 34 - 144 Tg a-1) and the median secondary OA source strength (natural and anthropogenic) is 19 Tg a-1 (range 13-121 Tg a-1). Among the models that take into account the semi-volatile SOA nature, the median source is calculated to be 51 Tg a-1 (range 16-121 Tg a-1), much larger than the median value of the models that calculate SOA in a more simplistic way (19 Tg a-1; range 13-20 Tg a-1, with one model at 37 Tg a-1). The median atmospheric burden of OA is 1.4 Tg (24 models in the range of 0.6-2.0 Tg and 4 between 2.4-3.8 Tg) with a median OA lifetime of 5.4 days (range 3.8-9.6 days). In models that reported both OA and sulfate burdens, the median value of the OA/sulfate burden ratio of is calculated to be 0.77; 13 models calculate a ratio lower than 1, and 9 models higher than 1. For 26 models that reported OA deposition fluxes, the median wet removal is 70 Tg a-1 (range 28-209 Tg a-1), which is on average 85% of the total OA deposition.

Tsigaridis, Kostas; Daskalakis, N.; Kanakidou, M.; Adams, P. J.; Artaxo, Paulo; Bahadur, R.; Balkanski, Y.; Bauer, S.; Bellouin, N.; Benedetti, Angela; Bergman, T.; Berntsen, T.; Beukes, J. P.; Bian, Huisheng; Carslaw, K. S.; Chin, M.; Curci, Gabriele; Diehl, Thomas; Easter, Richard C.; Ghan, Steven J.; Gong, S.; Hodzic, Alma; Hoyle, Christopher R.; Iversen, T.; Jathar, S.; Jimenez, J. L.; Kaiser, J. W.; Kirkevag, A.; Koch, Dorothy; Kokkola, H.; Lee, Y. H.; Lin, G.; Liu, Xiaohong; Luo, Gan; Ma, Xiaoyan; Mann, G. W.; Mihalopoulos, Nikos; Morcrette, J. -J.; Muller, J. F.; Myhre, G.; Myriokefalitakis, S.; Ng, Nga L.; O'Donell, D.; Penner, J. E.; Pozzoli, L.; Pringle, K. J.; Russell, Lynn; Schulz, M.; Sciare, J.; Seland, O.; Shindell, Drew; Sillman, S.; Skeie, R. B.; Spracklen, D. V.; Stavrakou, T.; Steenrod, Stephen D.; Takemura, T.; Tiitta, P.; Tilmes, S.; Tost, H.; van Noije, T.; van Zyl, P. G.; von Salzen, Knut; Yu, Fangqun; Wang, Zaizi; Wang, Zhilli; Zaveri, Rahul A.; Zhang, Hua; Zhang, Kai; Zhang, Qi; Zhang, Xiaoye

2014-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

40

Dispersion Modeling Project  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Dispersion Modeling Project Nuclear & Criticality Safety Engineering Andrew Vincent Germantown, MD DOE Workshop Savannah River Nuclear Solutions, LLC June, 2012 SRNS-...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "model intercomparison project" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Four absolute cavity radiometer (pyrheliometer) intercomparisons at New River, Arizona: radiometer standards  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Four detailed intercomparisons were made for a number of models of cavity-type self-calibrating radiometers (pyrheliometers). Each intercomparison consisted of simultaneous readings of pyrheliometers at 30-second intervals in runs of 10 minutes, with at least 15 runs per intercomparison. Twenty-seven instruments were in at least one intercomparison, and five were in all four. Summarized results and all raw data are provided from the intercomparisons.

Estey, R.S.; Seaman, C.H.

1981-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Historical and idealized climate model experiments: an intercomparison of Earth system models of intermediate complexity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Both historical and idealized climate model experiments are performed with a variety of Earth system models of intermediate complexity (EMICs) as part of a community contribution to the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate ...

Monier, Erwan

43

Impacts of increased bioenergy demand on global food markets: an AgMIP economic model intercomparison  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Integrated Assessment studies have shown that meeting ambitious greenhouse gas mitigation targets will require substantial amounts of bioenergy as part of the future energy mix. In the course of the Agricultural Model Comparison and Improvement Project (AgMIP), five global agro-economic models were used to analyze a future scenario with global demand for ligno-cellulosic bioenergy rising to about 100 ExaJoule in 2050. From this exercise a tentative conclusion can be drawn that ambitious climate change mitigation need not drive up global food prices much, if the extra land required for bioenergy production is accessible or if the feedstock, e.g. from forests, does not directly compete for agricultural land. Agricultural price effects across models by the year 2050 from high bioenergy demand in an RCP2.6-type scenario appear to be much smaller (+5% average across models) than from direct climate impacts on crop yields in an RCP8.5-type scenario (+25% average across models). However, potential future scarcities of water and nutrients, policy-induced restrictions on agricultural land expansion, as well as potential welfare losses have not been specifically looked at in this exercise.

Lotze-Campen, Hermann; von Lampe, Martin; Kyle, G. Page; Fujimori, Shinichiro; Havlik, Petr; van Meijl, Hans; Hasegawa, Tomoko; Popp, Alexander; Schmitz, Christoph; Tabeau, Andrzej; Valin, Hugo; Willenbockel, Dirk; Wise, Marshall A.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Intercomparison of simulation models for CO2 disposal in underground storage reservoirs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

oil recovery (EOR) using CO2 requires an understanding ofexperience with using CO2 for EOR projects (SPE, 1999), and

Pruess, Karsten; Tsang, Chin-Fu; Law, David; Oldenburg, Curt

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Intercomparison of cloud model simulations of Arctic mixed-phase boundary layer clouds observed during SHEBA/FIRE-ACE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An intercomparison of six cloud-resolving and large-eddy simulation models is presented. This case study is based on observations of a persistent mixed-phase boundary layer cloud gathered on 7 May, 1998 from the Surface Heat Budget of Arctic Ocean (SHEBA) and First ISCCP Regional Experiment - Arctic Cloud Experiment (FIRE-ACE). Ice nucleation is constrained in the simulations in a way that holds the ice crystal concentration approximately fixed, with two sets of sensitivity runs in addition to the baseline simulations utilizing different specified ice nucleus (IN) concentrations. All of the baseline and sensitivity simulations group into two distinct quasi-steady states associated with either persistent mixed-phase clouds or all-ice clouds after the first few hours of integration, implying the existence of multiple equilibria. These two states are associated with distinctly different microphysical, thermodynamic, and radiative characteristics. Most but not all of the models produce a persistent mixed-phase cloud qualitatively similar to observations using the baseline IN/crystal concentration, while small increases in the IN/crystal concentration generally lead to rapid glaciation and conversion to the all-ice state. Budget analysis indicates that larger ice deposition rates associated with increased IN/crystal concentrations have a limited direct impact on dissipation of liquid in these simulations. However, the impact of increased ice deposition is greatly enhanced by several interaction pathways that lead to an increased surface precipitation flux, weaker cloud top radiative cooling and cloud dynamics, and reduced vertical mixing, promoting rapid glaciation of the mixed-phase cloud for deposition rates in the cloud layer greater than about 1-2x10-5 g kg-1 s-1. These results indicate the critical importance of precipitation-radiative-dynamical interactions in simulating cloud phase, which have been neglected in previous fixed-dynamical parcel studies of the cloud phase parameter space. Large sensitivity to the IN/crystal concentration also suggests the need for improved understanding of ice nucleation and its parameterization in models.

Morrison, H.; Zuidema, Paquita; Ackerman, Andrew; Avramov, Alexander; de Boer, Gijs; Fan, Jiwen; Fridlind, Ann; Hashino, Tempei; Harrington, Jerry Y.; Luo, Yali; Ovchinnikov, Mikhail; Shipway, Ben

2011-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

46

Technical Note: On the Use of Nudging for Aerosol-Climate Model Intercomparison Studies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Nudging is an assimilation technique widely used in the development and evaluation of climate models. Con- straining the simulated wind and temperature fields using global weather reanalysis facilitates more straightforward comparison between simulation and observation, and reduces uncertainties associated with natural variabilities of the large-scale circulation. On the other hand, the artificial forcing introduced by nudging can be strong enough to change the basic characteristics of the model climate. In the paper we show that for the Community Atmosphere Model version 5, due to the systematic temperature bias in the standard model and the relatively strong sensitivity of homogeneous ice nucleation to aerosol concentration, nudging towards reanalysis results in substantial reductions in the ice cloud amount and the impact of anthropogenic aerosols on longwave cloud forcing. In order to reduce discrepancies between the nudged and unconstrained simulations and meanwhile take the advantages of nudging, two alternative experimentation methods are evaluated. The first one constrains only the horizontal winds. The second method nudges both winds and temperature, but replaces the long-term climatology of the reanalysis by that of the model. Results show that both methods lead to substantially improved agreement with the free-running model in terms of the top-of-atmosphere radiation budget and cloud ice amount. The wind-only nudging is more convenient to apply, and provides higher correlations of the wind fields, geopotential height and specific humidity between simulation and reanalysis. This suggests that nudging the horizontal winds but not temperature is a good strategy, especially for studies that involve both warm and cold clouds.

Zhang, Kai; Wan, Hui; Liu, Xiaohong; Ghan, Steven J.; Kooperman, G. J.; Ma, Po-Lun; Rasch, Philip J.; Neubauer, David; Lohmann, U.

2014-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

47

Aerosol indirect effects -- general circulation model intercomparison and evaluation with satellite data  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Aerosol indirect effects continue to constitute one of the most important uncertainties for anthropogenic climate perturbations. Within the international AEROCOM initiative, the representation of aerosol-cloud-radiation interactions in ten different general circulation models (GCMs) is evaluated using three satellite datasets. The focus is on stratiform liquid water clouds since most GCMs do not include ice nucleation effects, and none of the model explicitly parameterizes aerosol effects on convective clouds. We compute statistical relationships between aerosol optical depth (Ta) and various cloud and radiation quantities in a manner that is consistent between the models and the satellite data. It is found that the model-simulated influence of aerosols on cloud droplet number concentration (Nd) compares relatively well to the satellite data at least over the ocean. The relationship between Ta and liquid water path is simulated much too strongly by the models. It is shown that this is partly related to the representation of the second aerosol indirect effect in terms of autoconversion. A positive relationship between total cloud fraction (fcld) and Ta as found in the satellite data is simulated by the majority of the models, albeit less strongly than that in the satellite data in most of them. In a discussion of the hypotheses proposed in the literature to explain the satellite-derived strong fcld - Ta relationship, our results indicate that none can be identified as unique explanation. Relationships similar to the ones found in satellite data between Ta and cloud top temperature or outgoing long-wave radiation (OLR) are simulated by only a few GCMs. The GCMs that simulate a negative OLR - Ta relationship show a strong positive correlation between Ta and fcld The short-wave total aerosol radiative forcing as simulated by the GCMs is strongly influenced by the simulated anthropogenic fraction of Ta, and parameterisation assumptions such as a lower bound on Nd. Nevertheless, the strengths of the statistical relationships are good predictors for the aerosol forcings in the models. An estimate of the total short-wave aerosol forcing inferred from the combination of these predictors for the modelled forcings with the satellite-derived statistical relationships yields a global annual mean value of -1.5+-0.5 Wm-2. An alternative estimate obtained by scaling the simulated clear- and cloudy-sky forcings with estimates of anthropogenic Ta and satellite-retrieved Nd - Ta regression slopes, respectively, yields a global annual mean clear-sky (aerosol direct effect) estimate of -0.4+-0.2 Wm-2 and a cloudy-sky (aerosol indirect effect) estimate of -0.7+-0.5 Wm-2, with a total estimate of -1.2+-0.4 Wm-2.

Quaas, Johannes; Ming, Yi; Menon, Surabi; Takemura, Toshihiko; Wang, Minghuai; Penner, Joyce E.; Gettelman, Andrew; Lohmann, Ulrike; Bellouin, Nicolas; Boucher, Olivier; Sayer, Andrew M.; Thomas, Gareth E.; McComiskey, Allison; Feingold, Graham; Hoose, Corinna; Kristjansson, Jon Egill; Liu, Xiaohong; Balkanski, Yves; Donner, Leo J.; Ginoux, Paul A.; Stier, Philip; Feichter, Johann; Sednev, Igor; Bauer, Susanne E.; Koch, Dorothy; Grainger, Roy G.; Kirkevag, Alf; Iversen, Trond; Seland, Oyvind; Easter, Richard; Ghan, Steven J.; Rasch, Philip J.; Morrison, Hugh; Lamarque, Jean-Francois; Iacono, Michael J.; Kinne, Stefan; Schulz, Michael

2009-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

48

Studying the Causes of Recent Climate Change Program for Climate Model Diagnosis and Intercomparison  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Studying the Causes of Recent Climate Change Ben Santer Program for Climate Model Diagnosis of evidence suggests a discernible human influence on global climate" "There is new and stronger evidence that most of the warming observed over the last 50 years is attributable to human activities" "Most

Kammen, Daniel M.

49

Regional climate effects of irrigation and urbanization in thewestern united states: a model intercomparison  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the western United States, more than 30,500 square miles has been converted to irrigated agriculture and urban areas. This study compares the climate responses of four regional climate models (RCMs) to these past land-use changes. The RCMs used two contrasting land cover distributions: potential natural vegetation, and modern land cover that includes agriculture and urban areas. Three of the RCMs represented irrigation by supplementing soil moisture, producing large decreases in August mean (-2.5 F to -5.6 F) and maximum (-5.2 F to -10.1 F) 2-meter temperatures where natural vegetation was converted to irrigated agriculture. Conversion to irrigated agriculture also resulted in large increases in relative humidity (9 percent 36 percent absolute change). Only one of the RCMs produced increases in summer minimum temperature. Converting natural vegetation to urban land cover produced modest but discernable climate effects in all models, with the magnitude of the effects dependent upon the preexisting vegetation type. Overall, the RCM results indicate that land use change impacts are most pronounced during the summer months, when surface heating is strongest and differences in surface moisture between irrigated land and natural vegetation are largest. The irrigation effect on summer maximum temperatures is comparable in magnitude (but opposite in sign) to predicted future temperature change due to increasing greenhouse gas concentrations.

Snyder, M.A.; Kueppers, L.M.; Sloan, L.C.; Cavan, D.C.; Jin, J.; Kanamaru, H.; Miller, N.L.; Tyree, M.; Du, H.; Weare, B.

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Project Information Form Project Title Modeling for Local Impact Analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Project Information Form Project Title Modeling for Local Impact Analysis University University Research and Educational Foundation- $48,683.00 Total Project Cost $48,683.00 Agency ID or Contract Number Project We will develop a traffic simulation model for the Los Angeles region that will allow us

California at Davis, University of

51

EURADOS INTERCOMPARISON ON MEASUREMENTS AND MONTE CARLO MODELLING FOR THE ASSESSMENT OF AMERICIUM IN A USTUR LEG PHANTOM  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

United States Transuranium and Uranium Registries (USTUR) Case 0102 was the first whole-body donation to the USTUR (1979), of a worker affected by a substantial accidental 241Am intake(1). Half of this manís skeleton, encased in tissue-quivalent plastic, provides a unique human Ďphantomí for calibrating in vivo counting systems. In this case, the 241Am skeletal activity was measured 25 y after the intake. Approximately 82 % of the 241Am remaining in the body was found in the bones and teeth. The241Am activity concentration throughout the skeleton (in all types of bone) was fairly uniform(2). A protocol has been proposed by a group of in vivo laboratories from Europe [CIEMAT-Spain, IRSN-France and Helmholtz Zentrum Mu®nchen (HMGU)-Germany] and Canada (HML) participating in this DOS/USTUR intercomparison. The focus areas for the study included: (1) the efficiency pattern along the leg phantom using Germanium detectors (experimental and computational), (2) the comparison of Monte Carlo (MC) results with experimental values in counting efficiency data and (3) the inflence of americium distribution in the bone material (volume or surface).

Lopez, M. A.; Broggio, D.; Capello, K.; Cardenas-Mendez, E.; El-Faramawy, N.; Franck, D.; James, Anthony C.; Kramer, Gary H.; Lacerenza, G.; Lynch, Timothy P.; Navarro, J. F.; Navarro, T.; Perez, B.; Ruhm, W.; Tolmachev, Sergei Y.; Weitzenegger, E.

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Intercomparison of model simulations of mixed-phase clouds observed during the ARM Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment. Part I: Single layer cloud  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Results are presented from an intercomparison of single-column and cloud-resolving model simulations of a cold-air outbreak mixed-phase stratocumulus cloud observed during the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program's Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment. The observed cloud occurred in a well-mixed boundary layer with a cloud top temperature of -15 C. The observed liquid water path of around 160 g m{sup -2} was about two-thirds of the adiabatic value and much greater than the mass of ice crystal precipitation which when integrated from the surface to cloud top was around 15 g m{sup -2}. The simulations were performed by seventeen single-column models (SCMs) and nine cloud-resolving models (CRMs). While the simulated ice water path is generally consistent with the observed values, the median SCM and CRM liquid water path is a factor of three smaller than observed. Results from a sensitivity study in which models removed ice microphysics indicate that in many models the interaction between liquid and ice-phase microphysics is responsible for the large model underestimate of liquid water path. Despite this general underestimate, the simulated liquid and ice water paths of several models are consistent with the observed values. Furthermore, there is some evidence that models with more sophisticated microphysics simulate liquid and ice water paths that are in better agreement with the observed values, although considerable scatter is also present. Although no single factor guarantees a good simulation, these results emphasize the need for improvement in the model representation of mixed-phase microphysics. This case study, which has been well observed from both aircraft and ground-based remote sensors, could be a benchmark for model simulations of mixed-phase clouds.

Klein, S A; McCoy, R B; Morrison, H; Ackerman, A; Avramov, A; deBoer, G; Chen, M; Cole, J; DelGenio, A; Golaz, J; Hashino, T; Harrington, J; Hoose, C; Khairoutdinov, M; Larson, V; Liu, X; Luo, Y; McFarquhar, G; Menon, S; Neggers, R; Park, S; Poellot, M; von Salzen, K; Schmidt, J; Sednev, I; Shipway, B; Shupe, M; Spangenberg, D; Sud, Y; Turner, D; Veron, D; Falk, M; Foster, M; Fridlind, A; Walker, G; Wang, Z; Wolf, A; Xie, S; Xu, K; Yang, F; Zhang, G

2008-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

53

Intercomparison of model simulations of mixed-phase clouds observed during the ARM Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment. Part I: Single layer cloud  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Results are presented from an intercomparison of single-column and cloud-resolving model simulations of a cold-air outbreak mixed-phase stratocumulus cloud observed during the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program's Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment. The observed cloud occurred in a well-mixed boundary layer with a cloud top temperature of -15 C. The observed average liquid water path of around 160 g m{sup -2} was about two-thirds of the adiabatic value and much greater than the average mass of ice crystal precipitation which when integrated from the surface to cloud top was around 15 g m{sup -2}. The simulations were performed by seventeen single-column models (SCMs) and nine cloud-resolving models (CRMs). While the simulated ice water path is generally consistent with the observed values, the median SCM and CRM liquid water path is a factor of three smaller than observed. Results from a sensitivity study in which models removed ice microphysics suggest that in many models the interaction between liquid and ice-phase microphysics is responsible for the large model underestimate of liquid water path. Despite this general underestimate, the simulated liquid and ice water paths of several models are consistent with the observed values. Furthermore, there is evidence that models with more sophisticated microphysics simulate liquid and ice water paths that are in better agreement with the observed values, although considerable scatter is also present. Although no single factor guarantees a good simulation, these results emphasize the need for improvement in the model representation of mixed-phase microphysics.

Klein, Stephen A.; McCoy, Renata B.; Morrison, Hugh; Ackerman, Andrew S.; Avramov, Alexander; de Boer, Gijs; Chen, Mingxuan; Cole, Jason N.S.; Del Genio, Anthony D.; Falk, Michael; Foster, Michael J.; Fridlind, Ann; Golaz, Jean-Christophe; Hashino, Tempei; Harrington, Jerry Y.; Hoose, Corinna; Khairoutdinov, Marat F.; Larson, Vincent E.; Liu, Xiaohong; Luo, Yali; McFarquhar, Greg M.; Menon, Surabi; Neggers, Roel A. J.; Park, Sungsu; Poellot, Michael R.; Schmidt, Jerome M.; Sednev, Igor; Shipway, Ben J.; Shupe, Matthew D.; Spangenberg, Douglas A.; Sud, Yogesh C.; Turner, David D.; Veron, Dana E.; von Salzen, Knut; Walker, Gregory K.; Wang, Zhien; Wolf, Audrey B.; Xie, Shaocheng; Xu, Kuan-Man; Yang, Fanglin; Zhang, Gong

2009-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

54

Intercomparison of model simulations of mixed-phase clouds observed during the ARM Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment. Part II: Multi-layered cloud  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Results are presented from an intercomparison of single-column and cloud-resolving model simulations of a deep, multi-layered, mixed-phase cloud system observed during the ARM Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment. This cloud system was associated with strong surface turbulent sensible and latent heat fluxes as cold air flowed over the open Arctic Ocean, combined with a low pressure system that supplied moisture at mid-level. The simulations, performed by 13 single-column and 4 cloud-resolving models, generally overestimate the liquid water path and strongly underestimate the ice water path, although there is a large spread among the models. This finding is in contrast with results for the single-layer, low-level mixed-phase stratocumulus case in Part I of this study, as well as previous studies of shallow mixed-phase Arctic clouds, that showed an underprediction of liquid water path. The overestimate of liquid water path and underestimate of ice water path occur primarily when deeper mixed-phase clouds extending into the mid-troposphere were observed. These results suggest important differences in the ability of models to simulate Arctic mixed-phase clouds that are deep and multi-layered versus shallow and single-layered. In general, models with a more sophisticated, two-moment treatment of the cloud microphysics produce a somewhat smaller liquid water path that is closer to observations. The cloud-resolving models tend to produce a larger cloud fraction than the single-column models. The liquid water path and especially the cloud fraction have a large impact on the cloud radiative forcing at the surface, which is dominated by the longwave flux for this case.

Morrison, H; McCoy, R B; Klein, S A; Xie, S; Luo, Y; Avramov, A; Chen, M; Cole, J; Falk, M; Foster, M; Genio, A D; Harrington, J; Hoose, C; Khairoutdinov, M; Larson, V; Liu, X; McFarquhar, G; Poellot, M; Shipway, B; Shupe, M; Sud, Y; Turner, D; Veron, D; Walker, G; Wang, Z; Wolf, A; Xu, K; Yang, F; Zhang, G

2008-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

55

Tropical and subtropical cloud transitions in weather and climate prediction models: the GCSS/WGNE Pacific Cross-Section Intercomparison (GPCI)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A model evaluation approach is proposed where weather and climate prediction models are analyzed along a Pacific Ocean cross-section, from the stratocumulus regions off the coast of California, across the shallow convection dominated trade-winds, to the deep convection regions of the ITCZ: the GCSS/WGNE Pacific Cross-section Intercomparison (GPCI). The main goal of GPCI is to evaluate, and help understand and improve the representation of tropical and sub-tropical cloud processes in weather and climate prediction models. In this paper, a detailed analysis of cloud regime transitions along the cross-section from the sub-tropics to the tropics for the season JJA of 1998 is presented. This GPCI study confirms many of the typical weather and climate prediction model problems in the representation of clouds: underestimation of clouds in the stratocumulus regime by most models with the corresponding consequences in terms of shortwave radiation biases; overestimation of clouds by the ECMWF Re-Analysis (ERA40) in the deep tropics (in particular) with the corresponding impact in the outgoing longwave radiation; large spread between the different models in terms of cloud cover, liquid water path and shortwave radiation; significant differences between the models in terms of vertical crosssections of cloud properties (in particular), vertical velocity and relative humidity. An alternative analysis of cloud cover mean statistics is proposed where sharp gradients in cloud cover along the GPCI transect are taken into account. This analysis shows that the negative cloud bias of some models and ERA40 in the stratocumulus regions (as compared to ISCCP) is associated not only with lower values of cloud cover in these regimes, but also with a stratocumulus-to-cumulus transition that occurs too early along the trade-wind Lagrangian trajectory. Histograms of cloud cover along the cross-section differ significantly between models. Some models exhibit a quasi-bimodal structure with cloud cover being either very large (close to 100%) or very small, while other models show a more continuous transition. The ISCCP observations suggest that reality is in-between these two extreme examples. These different patterns reflect the diverse nature of the cloud, boundary layer, and convection parameterizations in the participating weather and climate prediction models.

Teixeira, J.; Cardoso, S.; Bonazzola, M.; Cole, Jason N.; DelGenio, Anthony D.; DeMott, C.; Franklin, A.; Hannay, Cecile; Jakob, Christian; Jiao, Y.; Karlsson, J.; Kitagawa, H.; Koehler, M.; Kuwano-Yoshida, A.; LeDrian, C.; Lock, Adrian; Miller, M.; Marquet, P.; Martins, J.; Mechoso, C. R.; Meijgaard, E. V.; Meinke, I.; Miranda, P.; Mironov, D.; Neggers, Roel; Pan, H. L.; Randall, David A.; Rasch, Philip J.; Rockel, B.; Rossow, William B.; Ritter, B.; Siebesma, A. P.; Soares, P.; Turk, F. J.; Vaillancourt, P.; Von Engeln, A.; Zhao, M.

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

W-320 Project thermal modeling  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes the results of thermal analysis performed to provide a technical basis in support of Project W-320 to retrieve by sluicing the sludge in Tank 241-C-106 and to transfer into Tank 241-AY-102. Prior theraml evaluations in support of Project W-320 safety analysis assumed the availability of 2000 to 3000 CFM, as provided by Tank Farm Operations, for tank floor cooling channels from the secondary ventilation system. As this flow availability has no technical basis, a detailed Tank 241-AY-102 secondary ventilation and floor coating channel flow model was developed and analysis was performed. The results of the analysis show that only about 150 cfm flow is in floor cooLing channels. Tank 241-AY-102 thermal evaluation was performed to determine the necessary cooling flow for floor cooling channels using W-030 primary ventilation system for different quantities of Tank 241-C-106 sludge transfer into Tank 241-AY-102. These sludge transfers meet different options for the project along with minimum required modification of the ventilation system. Also the results of analysis for the amount of sludge transfer using the current system is presented. The effect of sludge fluffing factor, heat generation rate and its distribution between supernatant and sludge in Tank 241-AY-102 on the amount of sludge transfer from Tank 241-C-106 were evaluated and the results are discussed. Also transient thermal analysis was performed to estimate the time to reach the steady state. For a 2 feet sludge transfer, about 3 months time will be requirad to reach steady state. Therefore, for the purpose of process control, a detailed transient thermal analysis using GOTH Computer Code will be required to determine transient response of the sludge in Tank 241-AY-102. Process control considerations are also discussed to eliminate the potential for a steam bump during retrieval and storage in Tanks 241-C-106 and 241-AY-102 respectively.

Sathyanarayana, K., Fluor Daniel Hanford

1997-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

57

Intercomparison and evaluation of global aerosol microphysical properties among AeroCom models of a range of complexity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Many of the next generation of global climate models will include aerosol schemes which explicitly simulate the microphysical processes that determine the particle size distribution. These models enable aerosol optical ...

Ridley, David Andrew

58

Data modeling projects at Bendix Kansas City  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper presents a discussion of three data modeling projects in an attempt to share the author's experiences with the NIAM data modeling methodology and some of his observations and opinions about it. The three projects are all different in their use of NIAM and in their size. One is a small proto-type project, one is a medium-large information system, and one is a plant-wide information system project.

Hobbs, D.L.

1987-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Intercomparison and Evaluation of Global Aerosol Microphysical Properties among AeroCom Models of a Range of Complexity  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Many of the next generation of global climate models will include aerosol schemes which explicitly simulate the microphysical processes that determine the particle size distribution. These models enable aerosol optical properties and cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) concentrations to be determined by fundamental aerosol processes, which should lead to a more physically based simulation of aerosol direct and indirect radiative forcings. This study examines the global variation in particle size distribution simulated by twelve global aerosol microphysics models to quantify model diversity and to identify any common biases against observations. Evaluation against size distribution measurements from a new European network of aerosol supersites shows that the mean model agrees quite well with the observations at many sites on the annual mean, but there are some seasonal biases common to many sites. In particular, at many of these European sites, the accumulation mode number concentration is biased low during winter and Aitken mode concentrations tend to be overestimated in winter and underestimated in summer. At high northern latitudes, the models strongly underpredict Aitken and accumulation particle concentrations compared to the measurements, consistent with previous studies that have highlighted the poor performance of global aerosol models in the Arctic. In the marine boundary layer, the models capture the observed meridional variation in the size distribution, which is dominated by the Aitken mode at high latitudes, with an increasing concentration of accumulation particles with decreasing latitude. Considering vertical profiles, the models reproduce the observed peak in total particle concentrations in the upper troposphere due to new particle formation, although modelled peak concentrations tend to be biased high over Europe. Overall, the results suggest that most global aerosol microphysics models simulate the global variation of the particle size distribution with a good degree of skill, but some models are in poor agreement with the observations. Further work is required to better constrain size-resolved primary and secondary particle number sources, and an improved understanding of nucleation and growth (e.g. the role of nitrate and secondary organics) will improve the fidelity of simulated particle size distributions.

Mann, G. W.; Carslaw, K. S.; Reddington, C. L.; Pringle, K. J.; Schulz, M.; Asmi, A.; Spracklen, D. V.; Ridley, D. A.; Woodhouse, M. T.; Lee, L. A.; Zhang, Kai; Ghan, Steven J.; Easter, Richard C.; Liu, Xiaohong; Stier, P.; Lee, Y. H.; Adams, P. J.; Tost, H.; Lelieveld, J.; Bauer, S.; Tsigaridis, Kostas; van Noije, T.; Strunk, A.; Vignati, E.; Bellouin, N.; Dalvi, M.; Johnson, C. E.; Bergman, T.; Kokkola, H.; Von Salzen, Knut; Yu, Fangqun; Luo, Gan; Petzold, A.; Heintzenberg, J.; Clarke, A. D.; Ogren, J. A.; Gras, J.; Baltensperger, Urs; Kaminski, U.; Jennings, S. G.; O'Dowd, C. D.; Harrison, R. M.; Beddows, D. C.; Kulmala, M.; Viisanen, Y.; Ulevicius, V.; Mihalopoulos, Nikos; Zdimal, V.; Fiebig, M.; Hansson, H. C.; Swietlicki, E.; Henzing, J. S.

2014-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

60

Measurement and modeling of Ar/H2/CH4 arc jet discharge chemical vapor deposition reactors. I. Intercomparison  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of thin, polycrystalline diamond films, and the results of a two-dimensional r,z computer model domains. dc arc jets offer considerable advantages as a route to deposition of polycrystalline diamond

Bristol, University of

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "model intercomparison project" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Model Ordinance for Renewable Energy Projects  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

'''''NOTE: This model ordinance was designed to provide guidance to local governments that wish to develop their own siting rules for renewable energy projects. While it was developed by the Oregon...

62

World Energy Projection System model documentation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The World Energy Projection System (WEPS) was developed by the Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting within the Energy Information Administration (EIA), the independent statistical and analytical agency of the US Department of Energy. WEPS is an integrated set of personal computer based spreadsheets containing data compilations, assumption specifications, descriptive analysis procedures, and projection models. The WEPS accounting framework incorporates projections from independently documented models and assumptions about the future energy intensity of economic activity (ratios of total energy consumption divided by gross domestic product GDP), and about the rate of incremental energy requirements met by natural gas, coal, and renewable energy sources (hydroelectricity, geothermal, solar, wind, biomass, and other renewable resources). Projections produced by WEPS are published in the annual report, International Energy Outlook. This report documents the structure and procedures incorporated in the 1998 version of the WEPS model. It has been written to provide an overview of the structure of the system and technical details about the operation of each component of the model for persons who wish to know how WEPS projections are produced by EIA.

Hutzler, M.J.; Anderson, A.T.

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Ocean Carbon Cycle Models from the Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC)  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

ē\tPacific data-model intercomparison from Patrick Wetzel (Max Planck Institute for Meteorology, Germany)

64

Cost-Effective Modeling and Savings Projections for Multifamily...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Multifamily and Low-Income Housing Peer Exchange Call Series: Cost-Effective Modeling and Savings Projections for Multifamily Projects, Call Slides and Discussion Summary, June 26,...

65

Stratospheric ozone response to sulfate geoengineering: Results from the Geoengineering Model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Stratospheric ozone response to sulfate geoengineering: Results from the Geoengineering Model for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, Colorado, USA Abstract Geoengineering with stratospheric sulfate aerosols has the experiments G3 and G4 of the Geoengineering Model Intercomparison Project. On average, the models simulate

Robock, Alan

66

Project Title Improved Emission Models for Project Evaluation (MOVES-Matrix) University Georgia Institute of Technology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Project Title Improved Emission Models for Project Evaluation (MOVES-Matrix) University Georgia or organization) DOT - $92,292.15 Total Project Cost $92,292.15 Agency ID or Contract Number DTRT13-G-UTC29 Start and End Dates November 2013 - June 2015 Brief Description of Research Project Local governments are using

California at Davis, University of

67

Indoor and Outdoor Spectroradiometer Intercomparison for Spectral Irradiance Measurement  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report details the global spectral irradiance intercomparison using spectroradiometers that was organized by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's Solar Radiation Research Laboratory. The intercomparison was performed both indoors and outdoors on September 17, 2013. Five laboratories participated in the intercomparison using 10 spectroradiometers, and a coordinated measurement setup and a common platform were employed to compare spectral irradiances under both indoor and outdoor conditions. The intercomparison aimed to understand the performance of the different spectroradiometers and to share knowledge in making spectral irradiance measurements. This intercomparison was the first of its kind in the United States.

Habte, A.; Andreas, A.; Ottoson, L.; Gueymard, C.; Fedor, G.; Fowler, S.; Peterson, J.; Naranen, R.; Kobashi, T.; Akiyama, A.; Takagi, S.

2014-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Seasonal cycle of Precipitation over Major River Basins in South and Southeast Asia: A Review of the CMIP5 climate models data for present climate and future climate projections  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We review the skill of thirty coupled climate models participating in Coupled Model Intercomparison Project 5 in terms of reproducing properties of the seasonal cycle of precipitation over the major river basins of South and Southeast Asia (Indus, Ganges, Brahmaputra and Mekong) for historical period (1961-2000). We also present projected changes by these models by end of century (2061-2100) under extreme scenario RCP8.5. First, we assess their ability to reproduce observed timings of the monsoon onset and the rate of rapid fractional accumulation (RFA slope) - a measure of seasonality within active monsoon period. Secondly, we apply a threshold-independent seasonality index (SI) - a multiplicative measure of precipitation and extent of its concentration relative to the uniform distribution (relative entropy - RE). We apply SI distinctly for monsoonal precipitation regime (MPR), westerly precipitation regime (WPR) and annual precipitation regime. For present climate, neither any single model nor the multi-mod...

Hasson, Shabeh ul; Lucarini, Valerio; BŲhner, JŁrgen

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Downscaling CMIP5 climate models shows increased tropical cyclone activity over the 21st century  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of historical and future climate states simulated by six Coupled Model Intercomparison Project 5 (CMIP5) global energy of the subcloud layer. On time scales larger than that characterizing the thermal equilibration of greater intensity. Calculations with a single-column model (4) confirm that increasing greenhouse gas

Rothman, Daniel

70

Model Investment Grade Audit and Project Proposal  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Information and documents for conducting an investment grade audit to evaluate potential measures and presenting a project proposal for a set of bundled measures that deliver savings to pay for the project over the finance term.

71

Information Technology Project Execution Model Guide  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

The guide was developed in support of DOE O 415.1 to assist IT Program and Project Managers in effectively managing and applying sound project management to IT. Does not cancel other directives.

2014-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

72

Information Technology Project Execution Model Guide  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

The guide was developed in support of DOE O 415.1 to assist IT Program and Project Managers in effectively managing and applying sound project management to IT.

2014-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

73

Uncertainty in emissions projections for climate models  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Future global climate projections are subject to large uncertainties. Major sources of this uncertainty are projections of anthropogenic emissions. We evaluate the uncertainty in future anthropogenic emissions using a ...

Webster, Mort David.; Babiker, Mustafa H.M.; Mayer, Monika.; Reilly, John M.; Harnisch, Jochen.; Hyman, Robert C.; Sarofim, Marcus C.; Wang, Chien.

74

Grounding-line migration in plan-view marine ice-sheet models: results of the ice2sea MISMIP3d intercomparison  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

models (SSA, AĖHySSA) produce larger ice sheets than modelsplan-view ice-sheet models they produce different results.the Antarctic ice sheet should at least produce grounding-

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

A model-data intercomparison of CO2 exchange across North America: Results from the North American Carbon Program Site Synthesis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Our current understanding of terrestrial carbon processes is represented in various models used to integrate and scale measurements of CO{sub 2} exchange from remote sensing and other spatiotemporal data. Yet assessments are rarely conducted to determine how well models simulate carbon processes across vegetation types and environmental conditions. Using standardized data from the North American Carbon Program we compare observed and simulated monthly CO{sub 2} exchange from 44 eddy covariance flux towers in North America and 22 terrestrial biosphere models. The analysis period spans {approx}220 site-years, 10 biomes, and includes two large-scale drought events, providing a natural experiment to evaluate model skill as a function of drought and seasonality. We evaluate models' ability to simulate the seasonal cycle of CO{sub 2} exchange using multiple model skill metrics and analyze links between model characteristics, site history, and model skill. Overall model performance was poor; the difference between observations and simulations was {approx}10 times observational uncertainty, with forested ecosystems better predicted than nonforested. Model-data agreement was highest in summer and in temperate evergreen forests. In contrast, model performance declined in spring and fall, especially in ecosystems with large deciduous components, and in dry periods during the growing season. Models used across multiple biomes and sites, the mean model ensemble, and a model using assimilated parameter values showed high consistency with observations. Models with the highest skill across all biomes all used prescribed canopy phenology, calculated NEE as the difference between GPP and ecosystem respiration, and did not use a daily time step.

Schwalm, C.R.; Williams, C.A.; Schaefer, K.; Anderson, R.; Arain, M.A.; Baker, I.; Black, T.A.; Chen, G.; Ciais, P.; Davis, K. J.; Desai, A. R.; Dietze, M.; Dragoni, D.; Fischer, M.L.; Flanagan, L.B.; Grant, R.F.; Gu, L.; Hollinger, D.; Izaurralde, R.C.; Kucharik, C.; Lafleur, P.M.; Law, B.E.; Li, L.; Li, Z.; Liu, S.; Lokupitiya, E.; Luo, Y.; Ma, S.; Margolis, H.; Matamala, R.; McCaughey, H.; Monson, R. K.; Oechel, W. C.; Peng, C.; Poulter, B.; Price, D.T.; Riciutto, D.M.; Riley, W.J.; Sahoo, A.K.; Sprintsin, M.; Sun, J.; Tian, H.; Tonitto, C.; Verbeeck, H.; Verma, S.B.

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Why Do Global Long-term Scenarios for Agriculture Differ? An overview of the AgMIP Global Economic Model Intercomparison  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Recent studies assessing plausible futures for agricultural markets and global food security have had contradictory outcomes. Ten global economic models that produce long-term scenarios were asked to compare a reference scenario with alternate socio-economic, climate change and bioenergy scenarios using a common set of key drivers. Results suggest that, once general assumptions are harmonized, the variability in general trends across models declines, and that several common conclusions are possible. Nonetheless, differences in basic model parameters, sometimes hidden in the way market behavior is modeled, result in significant differences in the details. This holds for both the common reference scenario and for the various shocks applied. We conclude that agro-economic modelers aiming to inform the agricultural and development policy debate require better data and analysis on both economic behavior and biophysical drivers. More interdisciplinary modeling efforts are required to cross-fertilize analyses at different scales.

von Lampe, Martin; Willenbockel, Dirk; Ahammad, Helal; Blanc, Elodie; Cai, Yongxia; Calvin, Katherine V.; Fujimori, Shinichiro; Hasegawa, Tomoko; Havlik, Petr; Kyle, G. Page; Lotze-Campen, Hermann; Mason d'Croz, Daniel; Nelson, Gerald; Sands, Ronald; Schmitz, Christoph; Tabeau, Andrzej; Valin, Hugo; van der Mensbrugghe, Dominique; van Meijl, Hans

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Webinar: Wind-to-Hydrogen Cost Modeling and Project Findings  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Video recording and text version of the webinar titled, Wind-to-Hydrogen Cost Modeling and Project Findings, originally presented on January 17, 2013.

78

Inter-comparison of the g-, f- and p-modes calculated using different oscillation codes for a given stellar model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In order to make astroseismology a powerful tool to explore stellar interiors, different numerical codes should give the same oscillation frequencies for the same input physics. This work is devoted to test, compare and, if needed, optimize the seismic codes used to calculate the eigenfrequencies to be finally compared with observations. The oscillation codes of nine research groups in the field have been used in this study. The same physics has been imposed for all the codes in order to isolate the non-physical dependence of any possible difference. Two equilibrium models with different grids, 2172 and 4042 mesh points, have been used, and the latter model includes an explicit modelling of semiconvection just outside the convective core. Comparing the results for these two models illustrates the effect of the number of mesh points and their distribution in particularly critical parts of the model, such as the steep composition gradient outside the convective core. A comprehensive study of the frequency diffe...

Moya, A; Charpinet, S; Lebreton, Y; Miglio, A; Montalban, J; Monteiro, M J P F G; Provost, J; Roxburgh, I W; Scuflaire, R; SuŠrez, J C; Suran, M

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Tropical and Subtropical Cloud Transitions in Weather and Climate Prediction Models: The GCSS/WGNE Pacific Cross-Section Intercomparison (GPCI)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Paris, France e Canadian Centre for Climate Modelling and Analysis, Victoria, British Columbia, Canada f, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia i Monash University, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia j Department of Earth for the season June­July­August

Randall, David A.

80

TransCom N[subscript 2]O model inter-comparison Ė Part 2: Atmospheric inversion estimates of N[subscript 2]O emissions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This study examines N[subscript 2]O emission estimates from five different atmospheric inversion frameworks based on chemistry transport models (CTMs). The five frameworks differ in the choice of CTM, meteorological data, ...

Thompson, R. L.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "model intercomparison project" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Results from 2010 Caliban Criticality Dosimetry Intercomparison  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The external dosimetry program participated in a criticality dosimetry intercomparison conducted at the Caliban facility in Valduc, France in 2010. Representatives from the dosimetry and instrumentation groups were present during testing which included irradiations of whole-body beta/gamma (HBGT) and neutron thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs), a fixed nuclear accident dosimeter (FNAD), electronic alarming dosimeters, and a humanoid phantom filled with reference man concentrations of sodium. This report reviews the testing procedures, preparations, irradiations, and presents results of the tests.

Veinot, K. G.

2011-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

82

Intercomparison of techniques to model water stress effects on CO2 and energy exchange in temperate and boreal deciduous forests  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Soil water deficits are a key controller of net ecosystem productivity (NEP) in deciduous broadleaf forests. Mathematical models of forest NEP need to represent the processes by which this control is exerted if they are to be used to predict the impacts of changing hydrology on forest C stocks. The key processes controlling NEP during soil water deficits are hydraulic limitations to water transfer in soil, roots, stems and leaves that impose constraints on gross primary productivity (GPP). We compare five ecosystem models with different techniques to simulate these processes for their ability to model reduced latent versus sensible heat fluxes, earlier diurnal declines in CO2 influxes and reduced soil CO2 effluxes during soil drying. Model accuracy was assessed using energy and CO2 fluxes measured by eddy covariance and surface chambers in a warm temperate and a cool boreal deciduous forest during a drying period. Diurnal declines in CO2 influxes during soil drying were consistently simulated by models in which soil drying lowered root and canopy water potentials ( c) and raised soil and root hydraulic resistances. Leaf stomatal conductance (gl), derived in these models from non-linear functions of c, then became more sensitive to diurnal changes in vapor pressure deficits (D). Diurnal declines in CO2 influxes could be simulated with comparable accuracy under most conditions by a model in which gl was empirically related to soil water potential and D, although these declines were sometimes not fully simulated. CO2 influxes declined too rapidly with diurnal rises in D in another model in which gl was calculated from CO2 fixation which was empirically related to soil water content. Divergences in modeled versus measured half-hourly or hourly CO2 exchange were also apparent in modeled versus measured annual GPP, net primary productivity (NPP) and NEP. The ability to distinguish among alternative algorithms for their accuracy in calculating CO2 and energy fluxes was often limited by uncertainty in the measurement of these fluxes using eddy covariance, especially when low wind speeds and stable boundary layers reduced atmospheric turbulence.

Grant, Robert F. [University of Alberta; Zhang, Y. [Canadian Centre for Remote Sensing; Yuan, F. [McMaster University; Wang, S. [Canadian Centre for Remote Sensing; Hanson, Paul J [ORNL; Gaumont-Guay, D. [University of British Columbia, Vancouver; Chen, j. [University of Toronto; Black, T. A. [University of British Columbia, Vancouver; Barr, A. [Environment Canada; Baldocchi, D. D. [University of California, Berkeley; Arain, A. [McMaster University

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Earth System Grid Center for Enabling Technologies (ESG-CET): A Data Infrastructure for Data-Intensive Climate Research  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and international climate projects (e.g., Coupled Model Intercomparison Project, Community Earth System Model

Chervenak, Ann

84

DOE Radiological Calibrations Intercomparison Program: Results of fiscal year 1987  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents the FY 1987 results of the radiological calibrations intercomparison program. The intercomparison operation is discussed, and the equipment is described, particularly the instrument set, the beta source set, and relevant calculations. Solutions to problems and improvements in the program are suggested, and conclusions are then introduced. 9 refs., 3 figs., 8 tabs.

Cummings, F.M.; McDonald, J.C.

1988-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

FINAL PROJECT REPORT LOAD MODELING TRANSMISSION RESEARCH  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Air†Conditioner†Testing†in†WECC,Ē†IEEE†Power† Engineering†Air†Conditioner†Modeling,†WECC†Load†Modeling†Task† Force†in†power†system†studies:†WECC†progress†update,?†Power†and†

Lesieutre, Bernard

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

The WAMME regional model intercomparison study  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Physics, Universite Abdou Moumouni, Niamey, Niger L. M.2007) was run at the Universite Abdou Moumouni (UAM, Niamey,

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

FINAL PROJECT REPORT LOAD MODELING TRANSMISSION RESEARCH  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

like hardware (PMU), software and data communication. TheSpecifications and Technical Data PMU Model Number of NumberPMU Specifications and Technical Data ..

Lesieutre, Bernard

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Belleville Hydroelectric Project: A {open_quotes}model{close_quotes} project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

With the development of hydropower stations at existing lock and dam structures, there is a need to develop a project layout that will provide efficient power generation with minimal impacts on the existing river conditions. Model studies have proven to be a cost effective method of ensuring that the most appropriate project layout is achieved prior to the large capital investment required for construction. Physical models provide a means of visualizing the overall project, including river flow patterns and sedimentation, and permit the acquisition of numerical data which can be used to aid in the refinement of the project design or to guide the regulatory bodies in assessing the potential impacts. As part of the proposed hydropower add-on at the existing Belleville Lock and Dam, a physical hydraulic model study was undertaken at Northwest Hydraulic Consultants laboratories in Vancouver, British Columbia to aid in the development of a project layout which would meet all project objectives. These objectives included refinement of the approach and tailrace channels to optimize the powerhouse performance and minimize the potential impacts on river navigation.

Hughes, B.R. [Northwest Hydraulic Consultants Ltd., North Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); Gemperline, E.J. [Harza Engineering Co., Chicago, IL (United States); Meier, P.E. [American Municipal Power - Ohio, Inc., Westerville, OH (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

89

ONGOING RESEARCH PROJECTS Model of tropical forest structure and dynamics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ONGOING RESEARCH PROJECTS Model of tropical forest structure and dynamics There is a need canopy structure and partitions dynamic rates for a tropical forest on Barro Colorado Island (BCI structure and partitions dynamic rates in a tropical forest. In Review. Journal of Ecology. #12;PPA model

Hill, Jeffrey E.

90

Multiscale Subsurface Biogeochemical Modeling Project at NERSC  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas Conchas recovery challengeMultiscale Subsurface Biogeochemical Modeling Multiscale Subsurface

91

Cacao Intensification in Sulawesi: A Green Prosperity Model Project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

NREL conducted eight model projects for Millennium Challenge Corporation's (MCC) Compact with Indonesia. Green Prosperity, the largest project of the Compact, seeks to address critical constraints to economic growth while supporting the Government of Indonesia's commitment to a more sustainable, less carbon-intensive future. This study evaluates techniques to improve cacao farming in Sulawesi Indonesia with an emphasis on Farmer Field Schools and Cocoa Development Centers to educate farmers and for train the trainer programs. The study estimates the economic viability of cacao farming if smallholder implement techniques to increase yield as well as social and environmental impacts of the project.

Moriarty, K.; Elchinger, M.; Hill, G.; Katz, J.; Barnett, J.

2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

INTERCOMPARISON OF RESULTS FOR A PWR ROD EJECTION ACCIDENT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study is part of an overall program to understand the uncertainty in best-estimate calculations of the local fuel enthalpy during the rod ejection accident. Local fuel enthalpy is used as the acceptance criterion for this design-basis event and can also be used to estimate fuel damage for the purpose of determining radiological consequences. The study used results from neutron kinetics models in PARCS, BARS, and CRONOS2, codes developed in the US, the Russian Federation, and France, respectively. Since BARS uses a heterogeneous representation of the fuel assembly as opposed to the homogeneous representations in PARCS and CRONOS, the effect of the intercomparison was primarily to compare different intra-assembly models. Quantitative comparisons for core power, reactivity, assembly fuel enthalpy and pin power were carried out. In general the agreement between methods was very good providing additional confidence in the codes and providing a starting point for a quantitative assessment of the uncertainty in calculated fuel enthalpy using best-estimate methods.

DIAMOND,D.J.; ARONSON,A.; JO,J.; AVVAKUMOV,A.; MALOFEEV,V.; SIDOROV,V.; FERRARESI,P.; GOUIN,C.; ANIEL,S.; ROYER,M.E.

1999-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

PART II TECHNIQUES PROJECT MODELLING OF THE CORROSION OF  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

- 1 - PART II TECHNIQUES PROJECT MODELLING OF THE CORROSION OF BINARY ALLOYS R.A. Jones Produced and temperatures. In this work a neural network method was employed to study how the rate of corrosion of Fe accordance with the literature. 1. Introduction The atmosphere is the corrosive environment to which alloys

Cambridge, University of

94

The Bayesian Advisor Project I: Modeling Academic Advising  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Bayesian Advisor Project I: Modeling Academic Advising Alex Dekhtyar, Judy Goldsmith, Huaizhi,goldsmit,hli3,brettg@cs.uky.edu, Abstract An academic advisor's job requires that the advisor knows university because the advisor has limited information about the student and because student performance can be in

Dekhtyar, Alexander

95

Energy Demand Modelling Introduction to the PhD project  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Energy Demand Modelling Introduction to the PhD project Erika Zvingilaite Ris√ł DTU System Analysis for optimization of energy systems Environmental effects Global externalities cost of CO2 Future scenarios for the Nordic energy systems 2010, 2020, 2030, 2040, 2050 (energy-production, consumption, emissions, net costs

96

Articles Intercomparison of Retrospective Radon Detectors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We performed both a laboratory and a field intercompanison of two novel glass-based retrospective radon detectors previously used in major radon case-control studies performed in Missouri and Iowa. The new detectors estimate retrospective residential radon exposure from the accumulation of a long-lived radon decay product, 210Pb, in glass. The detectors use track registration material in direct contact with glass surfaces to measure the a-emission of a 210Pb-decay product, 210Po. The detector's track density generation rate (tracks per square centimeter per hour) is proportional to the sur6ce a-activity. In the absence of other strong sources of a-emission in the glass, the implanted surface a-activity should be proportional to the accumulated 210Po, and hence to the cumulative radon gas exposure. The goals of the intercomparison were to a) perform collocated measurements using two different glass-based retrospective radon detectors in a controlled laboratory environment to compare their relative response to implanted polonium in the absence of environmental variation, b) perform collocated measurements using two different retrospective radon progeny detectors in a variety of residential settings to compare their detection of glass-implanted polonium activities, and c) examne the correlation between track density rates and contemporary radon gas concentrations. The laboratory results suggested that the materials

R. William Field; Daniel J. Steck; Mary Ann Parkhurst; Judy A. Mahaffey; Michael C. R. Alavanja

97

A summary documentation of the AMIP models  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes essential features of the global atmospheric models of 30 groups that are participating in the Atmospheric Model Intercomparison Project (AMIP), an international effort to simulate the climate of the period 1979-1988 with common ocean boundary conditions and radiative forcings. Salient features of the AMIP models are summarized in tabular form, and the principal numerical, dynamical, and physical properties of each model are described in greater detail as well. An extensive bibliography of references on the algorithms and parameterizations used in the AMIP models is also provided.

Phillips, T.J.

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Project Modelling To utilise the types of integrated design system that can be described with the modelling and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chapter 7 Project Modelling To utilise the types of integrated design system that can be described the tasks and people involved in the projects in which the integrated system is used. This level of modelling enables an integrated design system to be customised for use in a specific project. Project

Goodman, James R.

99

GM Project G.6 October 20005 -1 5. OVERVIEW OF THE MODELING SYSTEM  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

GM Project G.6 October 20005 - 1 5. OVERVIEW OF THE MODELING SYSTEM 5.1 INTRODUCTION TO MODELING Our approach to projecting the number of fatalities involving older drivers used four distinct components: 1. projection of non-institutionalized population, 2. projection of the percentage

100

Urine Radiobioassay Intercomparison Results From The Intercomparison Studies Program At Oak Ridge National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Intercomparison Studies Program (ISP) at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL, Oak Ridge, TN USA) provides natural-matrix human urine quality-assurance/quality-control (QA/QC) samples to radiobioassay analysis laboratories. Samples are provided to these laboratories as 'single-blind' or 'double-blind' unknowns, spiked with radioactive-solution standards at 'low' levels (e.g., 0-250 mBq {center_dot} kg{sup -1} for alpha-emitters). Participants use the results as a tool for self-evaluation and a measure of performance. In this paper, sample preparation and the results of testing during the years 2000-2004 for the radionuclides natural uranium (U-nat), {sup 238}Pu, {sup 239}Pu, and {sup 241}Am are presented and discussed.

Bores, Norman [ORNL; Schultz, Michael K [ORNL

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "model intercomparison project" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Wind-to-Hydrogen Cost Modeling and Project Findings (Text Version...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Wind-to-Hydrogen Cost Modeling and Project Findings (Text Version) Wind-to-Hydrogen Cost Modeling and Project Findings (Text Version) Below is the text version of the webinar...

102

PNNL Results from 2010 CALIBAN Criticality Accident Dosimeter Intercomparison Exercise  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document reports the results of the Hanford personnel nuclear accident dosimeter (PNAD) and fixed nuclear accident dosimeter (FNAD) during a criticality accident dosimeter intercomparison exercise at the CEA Valduc Center on September 20-23, 2010. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) participated in a criticality accident dosimeter intercomparison exercise at the Commissariat a Energie Atomique (CEA) Valduc Center near Dijon, France on September 20-23, 2010. The intercomparison exercise was funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, Nuclear Criticality Safety Program, with Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory as the lead Laboratory. PNNL was one of six invited DOE Laboratory participants. The other participating Laboratories were: Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Savannah River Site (SRS), the Y-12 National Security Complex at Oak Ridge, and Sandia National Laboratory (SNL). The goals of PNNL's participation in the intercomparison exercise were to test and validate the procedures and algorithm currently used for the Hanford personnel nuclear accident dosimeters (PNADs) on the metallic reactor, CALIBAN, to test exposures to PNADs from the side and from behind a phantom, and to test PNADs that were taken from a historical batch of Hanford PNADs that had varying degrees of degradation of the bare indium foil. Similar testing of the PNADs was done on the Valduc SILENE test reactor in 2009 (Hill and Conrady, 2010). The CALIBAN results are reported here.

Hill, Robin L.; Conrady, Matthew M.

2011-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

103

Intercomparison and validation of continental water level products derived  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Abstract. Satellite radar altimeter measurements of lake and reservoir water levels complement in situIntercomparison and validation of continental water level products derived from satellite radar water level products derived from satellite radar altimetry Martina Ricko,a Charon M. Birkett,b James A

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

104

The Brasfield Hydroelectric Project: A model-prototype comparison  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Observations made during start-up and operation of the 3 MW Brasfield Hydroelectric Project provide an excellent means of comparing physical model results with the prototype installation. During start-up, the turbine generator unit was operated without the surface vortex suppression grid in place to allow engineers to observe vortex formation without, and later with, the grid. The model performance is reproduced in the prototype with regard to surface vortices. Field data has also been obtained at 0.7 in depth increments to provide dissolved oxygen (D.O.) concentrations profiles in the reservoir and in the nearfield zone surrounding the intake. Parallel D.O. measurements at the powerhouse outlet and 1.6 km downstream of the outlet provide a good means of determining the average depth of water column from which the water was removed. Measurements of model velocities, scaled to the prototype, multiplied times the field measurements of dissolved oxygen (D.O.) concentration and water temperature provide a model-predicted downstream D.O. concentration that also compares well to that measured in the prototype. This paper provides support for an unconventional design technique which may be applicable to many other sites facing similar environmental constraints. The model-prototype comparison also provides a strong verification of the combined use of both physical and mathematical models to solve such a design problem.

Gulliver, J.S.; Voigt, R.L. Jr.; Hibbs, D.E. [Univ. of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States)] [and others

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

105

Regional Climate Model Projections for the State of Washington  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Global climate models do not have sufficient spatial resolution to represent the atmospheric and land surface processes that determine the unique regional heterogeneity of the climate of the State of Washington. If future large-scale weather patterns interact differently with the local terrain and coastlines than current weather patterns, local changes in temperature and precipitation could be quite different from the coarse-scale changes projected by global models. Regional climate models explicitly simulate the interactions between the large-scale weather patterns simulated by a global model and the local terrain. We have performed two 100-year climate simulations using the Weather and Research Forecasting (WRF) model developed at the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR). One simulation is forced by the NCAR Community Climate System Model version 3 (CCSM3) and the second is forced by a simulation of the Max Plank Institute, Hamburg, global model (ECHAM5). The mesoscale simulations produce regional changes in snow cover, cloudiness, and circulation patterns associated with interactions between the large-scale climate change and the regional topography and land-water contrasts. These changes substantially alter the temperature and precipitation trends over the region relative to the global model result or statistical downscaling. To illustrate this effect, we analyze the changes from the current climate (1970-1999) to the mid 21st century (2030-2059). Changes in seasonal-mean temperature, precipitation, and snowpack are presented. Several climatological indices of extreme daily weather are also presented: precipitation intensity, fraction of precipitation occurring in extreme daily events, heat wave frequency, growing season length, and frequency of warm nights. Despite somewhat different changes in seasonal precipitation and temperature from the two regional simulations, consistent results for changes in snowpack and extreme precipitation are found in both simulations.

Salathe, E.; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Qian, Yun; Zhang, Yongxin

2010-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

106

Validation and Comparison of Carbon Sequestration Project Cost Models with Project Cost Data Obtained from the Southwest Partnership  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Obtaining formal quotes and engineering conceptual designs for carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) sequestration sites and facilities is costly and time-consuming. Frequently, when looking at potential locations, managers, engineers and scientists are confronted with multiple options, but do not have the expertise or the information required to quickly obtain a general estimate of what the costs will be without employing an engineering firm. Several models for carbon compression, transport and/or injection have been published that are designed to aid in determining the cost of sequestration projects. A number of these models are used in this study, including models by J. Ogden, MIT's Carbon Capture and Sequestration Technologies Program Model, the Environmental Protection Agency and others. This report uses the information and data available from several projects either completed, in progress, or conceptualized by the Southwest Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership on Carbon Sequestration (SWP) to determine the best approach to estimate a project's cost. The data presented highlights calculated versus actual costs. This data is compared to the results obtained by applying several models for each of the individual projects with actual cost. It also offers methods to systematically apply the models to future projects of a similar scale. Last, the cost risks associated with a project of this scope are discussed, along with ways that have been and could be used to mitigate these risks.

Robert Lee; Reid Grigg; Brian McPherson

2011-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

107

Project Controls to Minimize Cost and Schedule Overruns: A Model, Research Agenda, and Initial Results  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 of 27 Project Controls to Minimize Cost and Schedule Overruns: A Model, Research Agenda been successfully applied to the study of projects for many years. While this modeling has clearly defined the structures which create project dynamics, it has been less helpful in providing explicit

Ford, David N.

108

Spectroradiometer Intercomparison and Impact on Characterizing Photovoltaic Device Performance: Preprint  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Indoor and outdoor testing of photovoltaic (PV) device performance requires the use of solar simulators and natural solar radiation, respectively. This performance characterization requires accurate knowledge of spectral irradiance distribution that is incident on the devices. Spectroradiometers are used to measure the spectral distribution of solar simulators and solar radiation. On September 17, 2013, a global spectral irradiance intercomparison using spectroradiometers was organized by the Solar Radiation Research Laboratory (SRRL) at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL). This paper presents highlights of the results of this first intercomparison, which will help to decrease systematic inter-laboratory differences in the measurements of the outputs or efficiencies of PV devices and harmonize laboratory experimental procedures.

Habte, A.; Andreas, A.; Ottoson, L.; Gueymard, C.; Fedor, G.; Fowler, S.; Peterson, J.; Naranen, E.; Kobashi, T.; Akiyama, A.; Takagi, S.

2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Presented by The Earth System Grid (ESG)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of data at one location · 270,378 files · Includes all Carbon Land Model Intercomparison Project (C) ­ Cloud Feedback Model Intercomparison Project (CFMIP) ­ Carbon-Land Model Intercomparison Project (C is increasingly data intensive ­ Analysis and intercomparison of simulation and observations from many sources

110

Subsidence prediction for the forthcoming TONO UCG project. [Rubble model and block model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The motion of the strata that overlie the TONO UCG Project partial-seam test is calculated using the analyses that have been developed for the prediction of subsidence above coal mines. This purely mechanical analysis of the overburden response to the formation of a void in the underlying coal seam is based on the analysis of two codes. The first is a finite-element code that uses a nonlinear rubble model to describe both the kinematics of roof fall and the continuum behavior of broken and unbroken strata. The second is a block code that treats the overburden as an assemblage of blocks. The equations of motion are solved for each block using an explicit integration operator. As both of these calculations are two-dimensional in nature, they are used to calibrate the semi-empirical, complementary influence function model. This model permits the extension of the two-dimensional analyses to three dimensions by using computationally efficient algorithms. These techniques are calibrated to UCG projects by analyzing the Hoe Creek 3 burn. Their application to the TONO project required the estimation of the lateral extent of the cavity for the partial-seam test. The estimates utilized the projected tons of coal to be removed and two scenarios for the burn sequence. The subsidence analytical techniques were combined with the expected patterns of coal removal to place an upper bound on the surface subsidence that can be anticipated at the TONO UCG site. 9 figures.

Sutherland, H.R.; Hommert, P.J.; Taylor, L.M.; Benzley, S.E.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Design and Modeling of Centralized Distribution Network for the DC House Project.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

?? This thesis focuses on the design, modeling, simulation, and performance evaluation of Centralized Distribution Network for the DC House Project. Power System Computer AidedÖ (more)

Bassi, Harpreet S.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Climate Projections Using Bayesian Model Averaging and Space-Time Dependence  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Climate Projections Using Bayesian Model Averaging and Space-Time Dependence K. Sham Bhat, Murali Haran, Adam Terando, and Klaus Keller. Abstract Projections of future climatic changes are a key input to the design of climate change mitiga- tion and adaptation strategies. Current climate change projections

Haran, Murali

113

MHK Projects/Modeling the Physical and Biochemical Influence...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

and environmental changes, and will be used when designing an OTEC plant to minimize its environmental impact and optimize cost. Project Installed Capacity (MW) 0 PermitLicense...

114

RESERVOIR RELEASE FORECAST MODEL FOR FLOOD OPERATION OF THE FOLSOM PROJECT INCLUDING PRE-RELEASES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 RESERVOIR RELEASE FORECAST MODEL FOR FLOOD OPERATION OF THE FOLSOM PROJECT INCLUDING PRE-line Planning Mode, the Reservoir Release Forecast Model (RRFM) is being used to test alternatives operating River Forecast Center. The RRFM will make possible the risk-based operation of the Folsom Project

Bowles, David S.

115

3D Downtown Phoenix Modeling This project is to develop the efficient and effective method for  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

3D Downtown Phoenix Modeling ABSTRACT This project is to develop the efficient and effective method for creating 3D city models that will be used with GIS (Geographical Information Systems) data in VR (Virtual Reality) environment. Here introduces the modeling process to create 3D city model from aerial photos

Hall, Sharon J.

116

U. S. /JAERI calculational benchmarks for nuclear data and codes intercomparison  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Four calculational benchmarks were selected by the U.S. and JAERI to compare numerical results based on various transport codes and data bases developed individually by both parties. The benchmarks chosen are fusion-oriented. Data intercomparison were performed with the ENDF/B-IV, ENDF/B-V, and JENDL-3 evaluations. Both deterministic and Monte Carlo methods were used in the codes intercomparison. Among the codes considered are ONEDANT, ANISN-DD, DOT, MORSE, MCNP, and VIM. Results from these intercomparisons are presented in this paper.

Youssef, M.; Jung, J.; Sawan, M.; Nakagawa, M.; Mori, T.; Kosako, K.

1986-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

A SOFTWARE ARCHITECTURE FOR DEVELOPMENTAL MODELING IN PLANTS: THE COMPUTABLE PLANT PROJECT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

dynamic objects and relationships; a C++ code generator to translate SBML into highly efficient simulationA SOFTWARE ARCHITECTURE FOR DEVELOPMENTAL MODELING IN PLANTS: THE COMPUTABLE PLANT PROJECT Victoria present the software architecture of the Computable Plant Project, a multidisciplinary computationally

Mjolsness, Eric

118

Final Map Draft Comparison Report WIND ENERGY RESOURCE MODELING AND MEASUREMENT PROJECT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

II Final Map Draft Comparison Report #12;WIND ENERGY RESOURCE MODELING AND MEASUREMENT PROJECT Tel: 978-749-9591 Fax: 978-749-9713 mbrower@awstruewind.com August 10, 2004 #12;2 WIND ENERGY RESOURCE issues. 1 Background In Task 2 of the project, five promising areas of the state for wind energy

119

CROSS VALIDATION OF SATELLITE RADIATION TRANSFER MODELS DURING SWERA PROJECT IN BRAZIL  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the Solar and Wind Energy Resource Assessment (SWERA) project. SWERA is a multinational project financed by UNEP-GEF aimed at performing a detailed survey of solar and wind energy resources of various developing satellite data and climatological information; (2) SUNY-Albany model: a statistical satellite method based

Heinemann, Detlev

120

Modeling Methodology for Component Reuse and System Integration for Hurricane Loss Projection Application  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Modeling Methodology for Component Reuse and System Integration for Hurricane Loss Projection Distributed Multimedia Information System Laboratory School of Computing and Information Sciences Florida International University, Miami, FL 33199, USA 2 Department of Finance Florida International University, Miami

Chen, Shu-Ching

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "model intercomparison project" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Fermilab Project Oversight Model Director Associate Lab Director  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsing ZirconiaPolicyFeasibility ofSmall Works: 2008Submit a Question AskProject

122

A Satisficing Model for Project Selection Nicholas G. Hall ?Ü Zhuoyu ...  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Dec 29, 2009 ... We conduct a study of the sensitivity of our satisficing model to various target levels. ..... Mathematics of Operations Research 33 945Ė964.

2009-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

123

GFDL ARM Project Technical Report: Using ARM Observations to Evaluate Cloud and Convection Parameterizations & Cloud-Convection-Radiation Interactions in the GFDL Atmospheric General Circulation Model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report briefly summarizes the progress made by ARM postdoctoral fellow, Yanluan Lin, at GFDL during the period from October 2008 to present. Several ARM datasets have been used for GFDL model evaluation, understanding, and improvement. This includes a new ice fall speed parameterization with riming impact and its test in GFDL AM3, evaluation of model cloud and radiation diurnal and seasonal variation using ARM CMBE data, model ice water content evaluation using ARM cirrus data, and coordination of the TWPICE global model intercomparison. The work illustrates the potential and importance of ARM data for GCM evaluation, understanding, and ultimately, improvement of GCM cloud and radiation parameterizations. Future work includes evaluation and improvement of the new dynamicsPDF cloud scheme and aerosol activation in the GFDL model.

V. Ramaswamy; L. J. Donner; J-C. Golaz; S. A. Klein

2010-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

124

Climate Model Intercomparisons: Preparing for the Next Phase  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The article reports on the Aspen Global Change Institute workshopthat provided an input on scenarios. Our group is continuing to work on a number of aspects of scenarios for the next research cycle.

Meehl, J.; Moss, Richard H.; Taylor, K. E.; Eyring, Veronika; Stouffer, R. J.; Bony, Sandrine; Stevens, B.

2014-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

125

LLNL Program for Climate Model Diagnosis and Intercomparison (PCMDI) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy Resources Jump to:46 - 429 ThrottledInformationparticipants < LEDSGP‚Äé |featuresLEEDLFGLG

126

Posters Surface Flux Intercomparison Between the MM5 Model  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 - September 2006PhotovoltaicSeptember 22, 2014SocietyJ. Dudhia51 Posters755177331

127

The Monte Carlo Independent Column Approximation Model Intercomparison  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched Ferromagnetism in Layered NbS2 andThe Molecular Bond: October 2014

128

Student Project Model Checking of a Closed-Loop  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(PCA) infusion pump. They have also implemented a failure scenario where the safety of the patient.2 Model Descriptions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 3.2.1 PCA Infusion Pump such as infusion pumps can affect the patient'

129

The Projection Operator Method and the Ashtekar-Horowitz-Boulware Model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Motivated by the recent work of Louko and Molgado, we consider the Ashtekar-Horowitz-Boulware model using the projection operator formalism. This paper uses the techniques developed in a recent paper of Klauder and Little to overcome the potential difficulties of this particular model. We also extend the model by including a larger class of functions than previously considered and evaluate the classical limit of the model.

J. Scott Little

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Tank SY-102 remediation project summary report: ASPEN modeling  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy established the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) to safely manage and dispose of radioactive waste stored in underground tanks on the Hanford Site. As a part of this program, personnel at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) have developed and demonstrated a flow sheet to remediate tank SY-102, which is located in the 200 West Area and contains high-level radioactive waste. In the conceptual design report issued earlier, an ASPEN plus{trademark} computer model of the flow sheet was presented. This report documents improvements in the flow sheet model after additional thermodynamic data for the actinide species were incorporated.

Punjak, W.A.; Schreiber, S.B.; Yarbro, S.L.

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Empirical Evaluation of Defect Projection Models for Widely-deployed  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Reliability Engineering, Defect modeling, empirical research, COTS, open source software, maintenance resource. *Bonnie Ray and P. Santhanam are researchers at the Center for Software Engineering at IBM T. J. Watson Research Center. This research was supported by the National Science Foundation under Grand CCR-0086003

132

Empirical Evaluation of Defect Projection Models for Widelydeployed  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Reliability Engineering, Defect modeling, empirical research, COTS, open source software, maintenance resource. *Bonnie Ray and P. Santhanam are researchers at the Center for Software Engineering at IBM T. J. Watson Research Center. This research was supported by the National Science Foundation under Grand CCR­0086003

133

Evaluation of Advanced Wind Power Forecasting Models Results of the Anemos Project  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Evaluation of Advanced Wind Power Forecasting Models ­ Results of the Anemos Project I. Martí1.kariniotakis@ensmp.fr Abstract An outstanding question posed today by end-users like power system operators, wind power producers or traders is what performance can be expected by state-of-the-art wind power prediction models. This paper

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

134

MAC-Kaust Project P1 CO2 Sequestration Modeling of CO2 sequestration including parameter  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MAC-Kaust Project P1 ­ CO2 Sequestration Modeling of CO2 sequestration including parameter identification and numerical simulation M. Brokate, O. A. PykhteevHysteresis aspects of CO2 sequestration modeling K-H. Hoffmann, N. D. Botkin Objectives and methods of CO2 sequestration There is a popular belief

Turova, Varvara

135

Solid Waste Projection Model: Database (Version 1.4). Technical reference manual  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Solid Waste Projection Model (SWPM) system is an analytical tool developed by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) for Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC). The SWPM system provides a modeling and analysis environment that supports decisions in the process of evaluating various solid waste management alternatives. This document, one of a series describing the SWPM system, contains detailed information regarding the software and data structures utilized in developing the SWPM Version 1.4 Database. This document is intended for use by experienced database specialists and supports database maintenance, utility development, and database enhancement. Those interested in using the SWPM database should refer to the SWPM Database User`s Guide. This document is available from the PNL Task M Project Manager (D. L. Stiles, 509-372-4358), the PNL Task L Project Manager (L. L. Armacost, 509-372-4304), the WHC Restoration Projects Section Manager (509-372-1443), or the WHC Waste Characterization Manager (509-372-1193).

Blackburn, C.; Cillan, T.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Modeling and Simulation Optimization and Feasibility Studies for the Neutron Detection without Helium-3 Project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report details the results of the modeling and simulation work accomplished for the ĎNeutron Detection without Helium-3í project during the 2011 and 2012 fiscal years. The primary focus of the project is to investigate commercially available technologies that might be used in safeguards applications in the relatively near term. Other technologies that are being developed may be more applicable in the future, but are outside the scope of this study.

Ely, James H.; Siciliano, Edward R.; Swinhoe, Martyn T.; Lintereur, Azaree T.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Invited Article: Radon and thoron intercomparison experiments for integrated monitors at NIRS, Japan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Inhalation of radon ({sup 222}Rn) and its short-lived decay products and of products of the thoron ({sup 220}Rn) series accounts for more than half of the effective dose from natural radiation sources. At this time, many countries have begun large-scale radon and thoron surveys and many different measurement methods and instruments are used in these studies. Consequently, it is necessary to improve and standardize technical methods of measurements and to verify quality assurance by intercomparisons between laboratories. Four international intercomparisons for passive integrating radon and thoron monitors were conducted at the NIRS (National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Japan). Radon exercises were carried out in the 24.4 m{sup 3} inner volume walk-in radon chamber that has systems to control radon concentration, temperature, and humidity. Moreover, the NIRS thoron chamber with a 150 dm{sup 3} inner volume was utilized to provide three thoron intercomparisons. At present, the NIRS is the only laboratory world-wide that has carried out periodic thoron intercomparison of passive monitors. Fifty laboratories from 26 countries participated in the radon intercomparison, using six types of detectors (charcoal, CR-39, LR 115, polycarbonate film, electret plate, and silicon photodiode). Eighteen laboratories from 12 countries participated in the thoron intercomparisons, using two etch-track types (CR-39 and polycarbonate) detectors. The tests were made under one to three different exposures to radon and thoron. The data presented in this paper indicated that the performance quality of laboratories for radon measurement has been gradually increasing. Results of thoron exercises showed that the quality for thoron measurements still needs further development and additional studies are needed to improve its measuring methods. The present paper provides a summary of all radon and thoron international intercomparisons done at NIRS from 2007 to date and it describes the present status on radon and thoron passive, one-time cycle monitors.

Janik, M., E-mail: mirek@fml.nirs.go.jp; Ishikawa, T.; Omori, Y.; Kavasi, N. [National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Anagawa, Inage, 263-8555 Chiba (Japan)] [National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Anagawa, Inage, 263-8555 Chiba (Japan)

2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

138

Atmospheric transport and dispersion modeling for the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Radiation doses that may have resulted from operations at the Hanford Site are being estimated in the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project. One of the project subtasks, atmospheric transport, is responsible for estimating the transport, diffusion and deposition of radionuclides released to the atmosphere. This report discusses modeling transport and diffusion in the atmospheric pathway. It is divided into three major sections. The first section of the report presents the atmospheric modeling approach selected following discussion with the Technical Steering Panel that directs the HEDR Project. In addition, the section discusses the selection of the MESOI/MESORAD suite of atmospheric dispersion models that form the basis for initial calculations and future model development. The second section of the report describes alternative modeling approaches that were considered. Emphasis is placed on the family of plume and puff models that are based on Gaussian solution to the diffusion equations. The final portion of the section describes the performance of various models. The third section of the report discusses factors that bear on the selection of an atmospheric transport modeling approach for HEDR. These factors, which include the physical setting of the Hanford Site and the available meteorological data, serve as constraints on model selection. Five appendices are included in the report. 39 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

Ramsdell, J.V.

1991-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Implementations of a Flexible Framework for Managing Geologic Sequestration Modeling Projects  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Numerical simulation is a standard practice used to support designing, operating, and monitoring CO2 injection projects. Although a variety of computational tools have been developed that support the numerical simulation process, many are single-purpose or platform specific and have a prescribed workflow that may or may not be suitable for a particular project. We are developing an open-source, flexible framework named Velo that provides a knowledge management infrastructure and tools to support modeling and simulation for various types of projects in a number of scientific domains. The Geologic Sequestration Software Suite (GS3) is a version of this framework with features and tools specifically tailored for geologic sequestration studies. Because of its general nature, GS3 is being employed in a variety of ways on projects with differing goals. GS3 is being used to support the Sim-SEQ international model comparison study, by providing a collaborative framework for the modeling teams and providing tools for model comparison. Another customized deployment of GS3 has been made to support the permit application process. In this case, GS3 is being used to manage data in support of conceptual model development and provide documentation and provenance for numerical simulations. An additional customized deployment of GS3 is being created for use by the United States Environmental Protection Agency (US-EPA) to aid in the CO2 injection permit application review process in one of its regions. These use cases demonstrate GS3ís flexibility, utility, and broad applicability

White, Signe K.; Gosink, Luke J.; Sivaramakrishnan, Chandrika; Black, Gary D.; Purohit, Sumit; Bacon, Diana H.; Hou, Zhangshuan; Lin, Guang; Gorton, Ian; Bonneville, Alain

2013-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

140

Management and Conservation Article Sensitivity Analyses of a Population Projection Model of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

habitat) and Palo Alto County (high composition of perennial habitat) into a 2-stage (young and adult whereas estimated kiid was !1 in 88% of simulations from Palo Alto. Our analyses of the relativeManagement and Conservation Article Sensitivity Analyses of a Population Projection Model of Ring

Clark, William R.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "model intercomparison project" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Introduction: the concept of the MOC Climate models project a slow down of the Atlantic  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

be sustained. Also the `pull' by small-scale mixing, that gradually lightens the deep waters, is necessary water cools and sinks, forming North Atlantic Deep Water which spreads southward into the deep ocean78 Introduction: the concept of the MOC Climate models project a slow down of the Atlantic

Drijfhout, Sybren

142

Power system analysis project Modeling and Sizing optimization of Stand-alone  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Power system analysis project Modeling and Sizing optimization of Stand-alone photovoltaic/wind-in, cut-out wind speed and rated power, into the optimization based on the real load of the site and write wind turbine is used to adopt its advantage of low noise and relatively low requirement of the quality

Lavaei, Javad

143

Measurements and modelling of atmospheric pollution over the Paris area: an overview of the ESQUIF Project  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

dedicated to the study of the processes leading to air pollution events over the Paris area. The project, pollution levels in the Paris area due to concentrated activity have become a major health issue. CurrentMeasurements and modelling of atmospheric pollution over the Paris area: an overview of the ESQUIF

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

144

Consultancy The Tarbase Domestic Model, emanating from the Tarbase research project  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, such as climate (i.e. allowing for future warming), carbon intensity of electricity and thermal comfortConsultancy The Tarbase Domestic Model, emanating from the Tarbase research project mentioned above of technological and behavioural changes (and, where necessary, climatic change and energy tariff variations

Painter, Kevin

145

Exploring Flexible Strategies in Engineering Systems Using Screening Models Applications to Offshore Petroleum Projects  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to Offshore Petroleum Projects by Jijun Lin B.E., Mechanical Engineering, Beijing University of Aeronautics Flexible Strategies in Engineering Systems Using Screening Models Applications to Offshore Petroleum, such as offshore petroleum exploration and production systems, generally require a significant amount of capital

de Weck, Olivier L.

146

Experimental Wave Tank Test for Reference Model 3 Floating-Point Absorber Wave Energy Converter Project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy established a reference model project to benchmark a set of marine and hydrokinetic technologies including current (tidal, open-ocean, and river) turbines and wave energy converters. The objectives of the project were to first evaluate the status of these technologies and their readiness for commercial applications. Second, to evaluate the potential cost of energy and identify cost-reduction pathways and areas where additional research could be best applied to accelerate technology development to market readiness.

Yu, Y. H.; Lawson, M.; Li, Y.; Previsic, M.; Epler, J.; Lou, J.

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Data model description for the DESCARTES and CIDER codes. Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The primary objective of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project is to estimate the radiation dose that individuals could have received as a result of emissions since 1944 from the US Department of Energy`s (DOE) Hanford Site near Richland, Washington. One of the major objectives of the HEDR Project is to develop several computer codes to model the airborne releases. transport and envirorunental accumulation of radionuclides resulting from Hanford operations from 1944 through 1972. In July 1992, the HEDR Project Manager determined that the computer codes being developed (DESCARTES, calculation of environmental accumulation from airborne releases, and CIDER, dose calculations from environmental accumulation) were not sufficient to create accurate models. A team of HEDR staff members developed a plan to assure that computer codes would meet HEDR Project goals. The plan consists of five tasks: (1) code requirements definition. (2) scoping studies, (3) design specifications, (4) benchmarking, and (5) data modeling. This report defines the data requirements for the DESCARTES and CIDER codes.

Miley, T.B.; Ouderkirk, S.J.; Nichols, W.E.; Eslinger, P.W.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Dixie Valley Engineered Geothermal System Exploration Methodology Project, Baseline Conceptual Model Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Engineered Geothermal System (EGS) Exploration Methodology Project is developing an exploration approach for EGS through the integration of geoscientific data. The Project chose the Dixie Valley Geothermal System in Nevada as a field laboratory site for methodology calibration purposes because, in the public domain, it is a highly characterized geothermal system in the Basin and Range with a considerable amount of geoscience and most importantly, well data. The overall project area is 2500km2 with the Calibration Area (Dixie Valley Geothermal Wellfield) being about 170km2. The project was subdivided into five tasks (1) collect and assess the existing public domain geoscience data; (2) design and populate a GIS database; (3) develop a baseline (existing data) geothermal conceptual model, evaluate geostatistical relationships, and generate baseline, coupled EGS favorability/trust maps from +1km above sea level (asl) to -4km asl for the Calibration Area at 0.5km intervals to identify EGS drilling targets at a scale of 5km x 5km; (4) collect new geophysical and geochemical data, and (5) repeat Task 3 for the enhanced (baseline + new ) data. Favorability maps were based on the integrated assessment of the three critical EGS exploration parameters of interest: rock type, temperature and stress. A complimentary trust map was generated to compliment the favorability maps to graphically illustrate the cumulative confidence in the data used in the favorability mapping. The Final Scientific Report (FSR) is submitted in two parts with Part I describing the results of project Tasks 1 through 3 and Part II covering the results of project Tasks 4 through 5 plus answering nine questions posed in the proposal for the overall project. FSR Part I presents (1) an assessment of the readily available public domain data and some proprietary data provided by Terra-Gen Power, LLC, (2) a re-interpretation of these data as required, (3) an exploratory geostatistical data analysis, (4) the baseline geothermal conceptual model, and (5) the EGS favorability/trust mapping. The conceptual model presented applies to both the hydrothermal system and EGS in the Dixie Valley region. FSR Part II presents (1) 278 new gravity stations; (2) enhanced gravity-magnetic modeling; (3) 42 new ambient seismic noise survey stations; (4) an integration of the new seismic noise data with a regional seismic network; (5) a new methodology and approach to interpret this data; (5) a novel method to predict rock type and temperature based on the newly interpreted data; (6) 70 new magnetotelluric (MT) stations; (7) an integrated interpretation of the enhanced MT data set; (8) the results of a 308 station soil CO2 gas survey; (9) new conductive thermal modeling in the project area; (10) new convective modeling in the Calibration Area; (11) pseudo-convective modeling in the Calibration Area; (12) enhanced data implications and qualitative geoscience correlations at three scales (a) Regional, (b) Project, and (c) Calibration Area; (13) quantitative geostatistical exploratory data analysis; and (14) responses to nine questions posed in the proposal for this investigation. Enhanced favorability/trust maps were not generated because there was not a sufficient amount of new, fully-vetted (see below) rock type, temperature, and stress data. The enhanced seismic data did generate a new method to infer rock type and temperature. However, in the opinion of the Principal Investigator for this project, this new methodology needs to be tested and evaluated at other sites in the Basin and Range before it is used to generate the referenced maps. As in the baseline conceptual model, the enhanced findings can be applied to both the hydrothermal system and EGS in the Dixie Valley region.

Iovenitti, Joe

2014-01-02T23:59:59.000Z

149

A Study of the Economic Impact of Water Impoundment Through Validity Testing of a Comparitive-Projection Model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An established economic simulation model for reservoir development was applied to ten reservoir projects throughout Texas. The model as a predictor of economic impact was given a difficult test because of the diversity of geographic, economic...

Pearson, J. E.; Heideman, K. E.

150

A Study of the Economic Impact of Water Impoundment Through the Development of a Comparative-Projection Model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Using two established reservoir projects, an economic simulation model for reservoir development was constructed. The two comparative areas used for the model development are both reservoirs in central Texas and were constructed during approximately...

Pearson, J.E.

151

Methane for Power Generation in Muaro Jambi: A Green Prosperity Model Project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

NREL conducted eight model projects for Millennium Challenge Corporation's (MCC) Compact with Indonesia. Green Prosperity, the largest project of the Compact, seeks to address critical constraints to economic growth while supporting the Government of Indonesia's commitment to a more sustainable, less carbon-intensive future. This study evaluates electricity generation from the organic content of wastewater at a palm oil mill in Muaro Jambi, Sumatra. Palm mills use vast amounts of water in the production process resulting in problematic waste water called palm oil mill effluent (POME). The POME releases methane to the atmosphere in open ponds which could be covered to capture the methane to produce renewable electricity for rural villages. The study uses average Indonesia data to determine the economic viability of methane capture at a palm oil mill and also evaluates technology as well as social and environmental impacts of the project.

Moriarty, K.; Elchinger, M.; Hill, G.; Katz, J.; Barnett, J.

2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Climate change projections using the IPSL-CM5 Earth System Model: from CMIP3 to CMIP5  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Climate change projections using the IPSL-CM5 Earth System Model: from CMIP3 to CMIP5 J relevant to the climate system, it may be referred to as an Earth System Model. However, the IPSL-CM5 model climate and Earth System Models, both developed in France and contributing to the 5th coupled model

Codron, Francis

153

Water Transit Authority Project WTA #02-112 under Sub Contract to ABS Consulting Maritime Simulation Model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Simulation Model of San Francisco Bay Modeling Overview Corresponding Author: J. Rene van Dorp, Assistant COMMONWEALTH UNIVERSITY JASON R.W. MERRICK #12;Maritime Simulation Model of San Francisco Bay GWU ­ VCU 2002 Simulation Model of San Francisco Bay GWU ­ VCU 2002 Modeling Overview WTA Project #02-112 under Sub Contract

van Dorp, Johan René

154

Dixie Valley Engineered Geothermal System Exploration Methodology Project, Baseline Conceptual Model Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Engineered Geothermal System (EGS) Exploration Methodology Project is developing an exploration approach for EGS through the integration of geoscientific data. The Project chose the Dixie Valley Geothermal System in Nevada as a field laboratory site for methodlogy calibration purposes because, in the public domain, it is a highly characterized geothermal systems in the Basin and Range with a considerable amount of geoscience and most importantly, well data. This Baseline Conceptual Model report summarizes the results of the first three project tasks (1) collect and assess the existing public domain geoscience data, (2) design and populate a GIS database, and (3) develop a baseline (existing data) geothermal conceptual model, evaluate geostatistical relationships, and generate baseline, coupled EGS favorability/trust maps from +1km above sea level (asl) to -4km asl for the Calibration Area (Dixie Valley Geothermal Wellfield) to identify EGS drilling targets at a scale of 5km x 5km. It presents (1) an assessment of the readily available public domain data and some proprietary data provided by Terra-Gen Power, LLC, (2) a re-interpretation of these data as required, (3) an exploratory geostatistical data analysis, (4) the baseline geothermal conceptual model, and (5) the EGS favorability/trust mapping. The conceptual model presented applies to both the hydrothermal system and EGS in the Dixie Valley region.

Iovenitti, Joe

2013-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

155

Dixie Valley Engineered Geothermal System Exploration Methodology Project, Baseline Conceptual Model Report  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

The Engineered Geothermal System (EGS) Exploration Methodology Project is developing an exploration approach for EGS through the integration of geoscientific data. The Project chose the Dixie Valley Geothermal System in Nevada as a field laboratory site for methodlogy calibration purposes because, in the public domain, it is a highly characterized geothermal systems in the Basin and Range with a considerable amount of geoscience and most importantly, well data. This Baseline Conceptual Model report summarizes the results of the first three project tasks (1) collect and assess the existing public domain geoscience data, (2) design and populate a GIS database, and (3) develop a baseline (existing data) geothermal conceptual model, evaluate geostatistical relationships, and generate baseline, coupled EGS favorability/trust maps from +1km above sea level (asl) to -4km asl for the Calibration Area (Dixie Valley Geothermal Wellfield) to identify EGS drilling targets at a scale of 5km x 5km. It presents (1) an assessment of the readily available public domain data and some proprietary data provided by Terra-Gen Power, LLC, (2) a re-interpretation of these data as required, (3) an exploratory geostatistical data analysis, (4) the baseline geothermal conceptual model, and (5) the EGS favorability/trust mapping. The conceptual model presented applies to both the hydrothermal system and EGS in the Dixie Valley region.

Iovenitti, Joe

156

Intercomparison of tritium and noble gases analyses, 3 and derived parameters excess air and recharge temperature  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Intercomparison of tritium and noble gases analyses, 3 H/3 He ages and derived parameters excess with the tritium≠helium (3 H/3 He) method has become a powerful tool for hydrogeologists. The uncertainty in the inter- comparison for tritium analyses and ten laboratories participated in the noble gas

157

Long-Term Climate Change Commitment and Reversibility: An EMIC Intercomparison KIRSTEN ZICKFELD,a  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Long-Term Climate Change Commitment and Reversibility: An EMIC Intercomparison KIRSTEN ZICKFELD. Obukhov Institute of Atmospheric Physics, RAS, Moscow, Russia f Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact of Intermediate Complexity (EMICs) undertaken in support of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC

Matsumoto, Katsumi

158

Dixie Valley Engineered Geothermal System Exploration Methodology Project, Baseline Conceptual Model Report  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

FSR Part I presents (1) an assessment of the readily available public domain data and some proprietary data provided by Terra-Gen Power, LLC, (2) a re-interpretation of these data as required, (3) an exploratory geostatistical data analysis, (4) the baseline geothermal conceptual model, and (5) the EGS favorability/trust mapping. The conceptual model presented applies to both the hydrothermal system and EGS in the Dixie Valley region. FSR Part II presents (1) 278 new gravity stations; (2) enhanced gravity-magnetic modeling; (3) 42 new ambient seismic noise survey stations; (4) an integration of the new seismic noise data with a regional seismic network; (5) a new methodology and approach to interpret this data; (5) a novel method to predict rock type and temperature based on the newly interpreted data; (6) 70 new magnetotelluric (MT) stations; (7) an integrated interpretation of the enhanced MT data set; (8) the results of a 308 station soil CO2 gas survey; (9) new conductive thermal modeling in the project area; (10) new convective modeling in the Calibration Area; (11) pseudo-convective modeling in the Calibration Area; (12) enhanced data implications and qualitative geoscience correlations at three scales (a) Regional, (b) Project, and (c) Calibration Area; (13) quantitative geostatistical exploratory data analysis; and (14) responses to nine questions posed in the proposal for this investigation. Enhanced favorability/trust maps were not generated because there was not a sufficient amount of new, fully-vetted (see below) rock type, temperature, and stress data. The enhanced seismic data did generate a new method to infer rock type and temperature. However, in the opinion of the Principal Investigator for this project, this new methodology needs to be tested and evaluated at other sites in the Basin and Range before it is used to generate the referenced maps. As in the baseline conceptual model, the enhanced findings can be applied to both the hydrothermal system and EGS in the Dixie Valley region.

Iovenitti, Joe

159

MODEL REQUEST FOR PROPOSALS TO PROVIDE ENERGY AND OTHER ATTRIBUTES FROM AN OFFSHORE WIND POWER PROJECT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document provides a model RFP for new generation. The 'base' RFP is for a single-source offshore wind RFP. Required modifications are noted should a state or utility seek multi-source bids (e.g., all renewables or all sources). The model is premised on proposals meeting threshold requirements (e.g., a MW range of generating capacity and a range in terms of years), RFP issuer preferences (e.g., likelihood of commercial operation by a date certain, price certainty, and reduction in congestion), and evaluation criteria, along with a series of plans (e.g., site, environmental effects, construction, community outreach, interconnection, etc.). The Model RFP places the most weight on project risk (45%), followed by project economics (35%), and environmental and social considerations (20%). However, if a multi-source RFP is put forward, the sponsor would need to either add per-MWh technology-specific, life-cycle climate (CO2), environmental and health impact costs to bid prices under the 'Project Economics' category or it should increase the weight given to the 'Environmental and Social Considerations' category.

Jeremy Firestone; Dawn Kurtz Crompton

2011-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

160

Solid Waste Projection Model: Database (Version 1.3). Technical reference manual  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Solid Waste Projection Model (SWPM) system is an analytical tool developed by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) for Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC). The SWPM system provides a modeling and analysis environment that supports decisions in the process of evaluating various solid waste management alternatives. This document, one of a series describing the SWPM system, contains detailed information regarding the software and data structures utilized in developing the SWPM Version 1.3 Database. This document is intended for use by experienced database specialists and supports database maintenance, utility development, and database enhancement.

Blackburn, C.L.

1991-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "model intercomparison project" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Solid waste projection model: Database version 1. 0 technical reference manual  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Solid Waste Projection Model (SWPM) system is an analytical tool developed by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) for Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC). The SWPM system provides a modeling and analysis environment that supports decisions in the process of evaluating various solid waste management alternatives. This document, one of a series describing the SWPM system, contains detailed information regarding the software and data structures utilized in developing the SWPM Version 1.0 Database. This document is intended for use by experienced database specialists and supports database maintenance, utility development, and database enhancement. Those interested in using the SWPM database should refer to the SWPM Database User's Guide. 14 figs., 6 tabs.

Carr, F.; Bowman, A.

1990-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Status of the ground water flow model for the UMTRA Project, Shiprock, New Mexico, site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A two-dimensional numerical model was constructed for the alluvial aquifer in the area of the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project Shiprock, New Mexico, site. This model was used to investigate the effects of various hydrologic parameters on the evolution of the ground water flow field. Results of the model are useful for defining uncertainties in the site conceptual model and suggesting data collection efforts to reduce these uncertainties. The computer code MODFLOW was used to simulate the two-dimensional flow of ground water in the alluvium. The escarpment was represented as a no-flow boundary. The San Juan River was represented with the MODFLOW river package. A uniform hydraulic conductivity distribution with the value estimated by the UMTRA Project Technical Assistance Contractor (TAC) and a uniform recharge distribution was used. Infiltration from the flowing artesian well was represented using the well package. The ground water flow model was calibrated to ground water levels observed in April 1993. Inspection of hydrographs shows that these levels are representative of typical conditions at the site.

Not Available

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

RADIATION MEASUREMENTS BY BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY DURING THE WOODS HOLE OCEANOGRAPHIC INSTITUTION INTERCOMPARISON STUDY, MAY-JUNE 2000.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The WHOI buoy radiometer intercomparison took place during May and June, 2000 at the WHOI facility. The WHOI IMET, JAMSTEC Triton, and NOAA TAO buoy systems were operated from a beach site and the Brookhaven National Laboratory set up two Portable Radiation Package systems (P01 and P02) alongside the WHOI instrumentation on the roof of the Clark Building, about 300 m away. The BNL instruments were named ''P01'' and ''P02'' and were identical. Buoy instruments were all leveled to {+-}1{degree} to horizontal. The purpose of the project was to compare the buoy systems with precision measurements so that any differences in data collection or processing would be evaluated. BNL was pleased to participate so the PRP system could be evaluated as a calibration tool. The Portable Radiation Package is an integral component of the BNL Shipboard Oceanographic and Atmospheric Radiation (SOAR) system. It is designed to make accurate downwelling radiation measurements, including the three solar irradiance components (direct normal, diffuse and global) at six narrowband channels, aerosol optical depth measurements, and broadband longwave and shortwave irradiance measurements.

REYNOLDS, R.M.; BARTHOLOMEW, M.J.; MILLER, M.A.; SMITH, S.; EDWARDS, R.

2000-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Idaho Model Watershed Project : Annual Report to the Bonneville Power Administration January 1, 1997 - December 31, 1997.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Model Watershed Project was initiated in the fall of 1992 with a grant from Bonneville Power Administration. The objective of this project is to protect, enhance and restore anadromous and resident fish habitat and achieve and maintain a balance between resource protection and resource use on a holistic watershed basis.

Bradbury, Allen; Slavin, Katie

1998-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

165

MATH 360: Project 5, Modeling of a single species population This project is due Friday 5th December.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

December. Background: In this project, we will study a fish population in a lake. By setting up of protection of this population, we will set up a scheme for fishing. Question 1: Denote by P(t) the fish and M using the relations in Q1. Suppose an epidemic disease attacked the fish in the lake

Fletcher, Alastair

166

Water Transit Authority Project WTA #02-112 under Sub Contract to ABS Consulting Maritime Simulation Model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Simulation Model of San Francisco Bay Explanation of Exposure Results Corresponding Author: J. Rene van Dorp.P. BLACKFORD VIRGINIA COMMONWEALTH UNIVERSITY JASON R.W. MERRICK #12;Maritime Simulation Model of San Francisco;Maritime Simulation Model of San Francisco Bay GWU ­ VCU 2002 Explanation of Analysis Results WTA Project

van Dorp, Johan René

167

The Alpha Project: a model system for systems biology research. | EMSL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched Ferromagnetism in Layered NbS2 and NbSe2 .2004 North SlopeAlpha Project: a model

168

Reduced order models for thermal analysis : final report : LDRD Project No. 137807.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This LDRD Senior's Council Project is focused on the development, implementation and evaluation of Reduced Order Models (ROM) for application in the thermal analysis of complex engineering problems. Two basic approaches to developing a ROM for combined thermal conduction and enclosure radiation problems are considered. As a prerequisite to a ROM a fully coupled solution method for conduction/radiation models is required; a parallel implementation is explored for this class of problems. High-fidelity models of large, complex systems are now used routinely to verify design and performance. However, there are applications where the high-fidelity model is too large to be used repetitively in a design mode. One such application is the design of a control system that oversees the functioning of the complex, high-fidelity model. Examples include control systems for manufacturing processes such as brazing and annealing furnaces as well as control systems for the thermal management of optical systems. A reduced order model (ROM) seeks to reduce the number of degrees of freedom needed to represent the overall behavior of the large system without a significant loss in accuracy. The reduction in the number of degrees of freedom of the ROM leads to immediate increases in computational efficiency and allows many design parameters and perturbations to be quickly and effectively evaluated. Reduced order models are routinely used in solid mechanics where techniques such as modal analysis have reached a high state of refinement. Similar techniques have recently been applied in standard thermal conduction problems e.g. though the general use of ROM for heat transfer is not yet widespread. One major difficulty with the development of ROM for general thermal analysis is the need to include the very nonlinear effects of enclosure radiation in many applications. Many ROM methods have considered only linear or mildly nonlinear problems. In the present study a reduced order model is considered for application to the combined problem of thermal conduction and enclosure radiation. The main objective is to develop a procedure that can be implemented in an existing thermal analysis code. The main analysis objective is to allow thermal controller software to be used in the design of a control system for a large optical system that resides with a complex radiation dominated enclosure. In the remainder of this section a brief outline of ROM methods is provided. The following chapter describes the fully coupled conduction/radiation method that is required prior to considering a ROM approach. Considerable effort was expended to implement and test the combined solution method; the ROM project ended shortly after the completion of this milestone and thus the ROM results are incomplete. The report concludes with some observations and recommendations.

Hogan, Roy E., Jr.; Gartling, David K.

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Projecting Low Dimensional Chaos from Spatio-temporal Dynamics in a Model for Plastic Instability  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We investigate the possibility of projecting low dimensional chaos from spatiotemporal dynamics of a model for a kind of plastic instability observed under constant strain rate deformation conditions. We first discuss the relationship between the spatiotemporal patterns of the model reflected in the nature of dislocation bands and the nature of stress serrations. We show that at low applied strain rates, there is a one-to-one correspondence with the randomly nucleated isolated bursts of mobile dislocation density and the stress drops. We then show that the model equations are spatiotemporally chaotic by demonstrating the number of positive Lyapunov exponents and Lyapunov dimension scale with the system size at low and high strain rates. Using a modified algorithm for calculating correlation dimension density, we show that the stress-strain signals at low applied strain rates corresponding to spatially uncorrelated dislocation bands exhibit features of low dimensional chaos. This is made quantitative by demonstrating that the model equations can be approximately reduced to space independent model equations for the average dislocation densities, which is known to be low-dimensionally chaotic. However, the scaling regime for the correlation dimension shrinks with increasing applied strain rate due to increasing propensity for propagation of the dislocation bands.

Ritupan Sarmah; G. Ananthakrishna

2013-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

170

Accounting for Global Climate Model Projection Uncertainty in Modern Statistical Downscaling  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Future climate change has emerged as a national and a global security threat. To carry out the needed adaptation and mitigation steps, a quantification of the expected level of climate change is needed, both at the global and the regional scale; in the end, the impact of climate change is felt at the local/regional level. An important part of such climate change assessment is uncertainty quantification. Decision and policy makers are not only interested in 'best guesses' of expected climate change, but rather probabilistic quantification (e.g., Rougier, 2007). For example, consider the following question: What is the probability that the average summer temperature will increase by at least 4 C in region R if global CO{sub 2} emission increases by P% from current levels by time T? It is a simple question, but one that remains very difficult to answer. It is answering these kind of questions that is the focus of this effort. The uncertainty associated with future climate change can be attributed to three major factors: (1) Uncertainty about future emission of green house gasses (GHG). (2) Given a future GHG emission scenario, what is its impact on the global climate? (3) Given a particular evolution of the global climate, what does it mean for a particular location/region? In what follows, we assume a particular GHG emission scenario has been selected. Given the GHG emission scenario, the current batch of the state-of-the-art global climate models (GCMs) is used to simulate future climate under this scenario, yielding an ensemble of future climate projections (which reflect, to some degree our uncertainty of being able to simulate future climate give a particular GHG scenario). Due to the coarse-resolution nature of the GCM projections, they need to be spatially downscaled for regional impact assessments. To downscale a given GCM projection, two methods have emerged: dynamical downscaling and statistical (empirical) downscaling (SDS). Dynamic downscaling involves configuring and running a regional climate model (RCM) nested within a given GCM projection (i.e., the GCM provides bounder conditions for the RCM). On the other hand, statistical downscaling aims at establishing a statistical relationship between observed local/regional climate variables of interest and synoptic (GCM-scale) climate predictors. The resulting empirical relationship is then applied to future GCM projections. A comparison of the pros and cons of dynamical versus statistical downscaling is outside the scope of this effort, but has been extensively studied and the reader is referred to Wilby et al. (1998); Murphy (1999); Wood et al. (2004); Benestad et al. (2007); Fowler et al. (2007), and references within those. The scope of this effort is to study methodology, a statistical framework, to propagate and account for GCM uncertainty in regional statistical downscaling assessment. In particular, we will explore how to leverage an ensemble of GCM projections to quantify the impact of the GCM uncertainty in such an assessment. There are three main component to this effort: (1) gather the necessary climate-related data for a regional SDS study, including multiple GCM projections, (2) carry out SDS, and (3) assess the uncertainty. The first step is carried out using tools written in the Python programming language, while analysis tools were developed in the statistical programming language R; see Figure 1.

Johannesson, G

2010-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

171

Improving the representation of terrestrial ecosystem processes in Earth system models to increase the quality of climate model projections and inform DOE's energy decisions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Improving the representation of terrestrial ecosystem processes in Earth system models to increase results are incorporated into Earth system models to improve climate projections. e overarching goal of TES is to improve the representation of terrestrial ecosystem processes in Earth system models

172

Part II: Project Summaries Project Summaries  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Part II: Project Summaries Part II Project Summaries #12 generally cannot be achieved for reasonable computational cost. Applications that require modeling, and in nondestructive testing. The objective of this project is to advance the state of the art in electromagnetic

Perkins, Richard A.

173

TransCom model simulations of CH? and related species: linking transport, surface flux and chemical loss with CH? variability in the troposphere and lower stratosphere  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A chemistry-transport model (CTM) intercomparison experiment (TransCom-CH?) has been designed to investigate the roles of surface emissions, transport and chemical loss in simulating the global methane distribution. Model ...

Patra, P. K.

174

Hanford River Protection Project Life cycle Cost Modeling Tool to Enhance Mission Planning - 13396  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Life cycle Cost Model (LCM) Tool is an overall systems model that incorporates budget, and schedule impacts for the entire life cycle of the River Protection Project (RPP) mission, and is replacing the Hanford Tank Waste Operations Simulator (HTWOS) model as the foundation of the RPP system planning process. Currently, the DOE frequently requests HTWOS simulations of alternative technical and programmatic strategies for completing the RPP mission. Analysis of technical and programmatic changes can be performed with HTWOS; however, life cycle costs and schedules were previously generated by manual transfer of time-based data from HTWOS to Primavera P6. The LCM Tool automates the preparation of life cycle costs and schedules and is needed to provide timely turnaround capability for RPP mission alternative analyses. LCM is the simulation component of the LCM Tool. The simulation component is a replacement of the HTWOS model with new capability to support life cycle cost modeling. It is currently deployed in G22, but has been designed to work in any full object-oriented language with an extensive feature set focused on networking and cross-platform compatibility. The LCM retains existing HTWOS functionality needed to support system planning and alternatives studies going forward. In addition, it incorporates new functionality, coding improvements that streamline programming and model maintenance, and capability to input/export data to/from the LCM using the LCM Database (LCMDB). The LCM Cost/Schedule (LCMCS) contains cost and schedule data and logic. The LCMCS is used to generate life cycle costs and schedules for waste retrieval and processing scenarios. It uses time-based output data from the LCM to produce the logic ties in Primavera P6 necessary for shifting activities. The LCM Tool is evolving to address the needs of decision makers who want to understand the broad spectrum of risks facing complex organizations like DOE-RPP to understand how near-term programmatic decisions affect life cycle costs and commitments. (authors)

Dunford, Gary [AEM Consulting, LLC, 1201 Jadwin Avenue, Richland, WA 99352 (United States)] [AEM Consulting, LLC, 1201 Jadwin Avenue, Richland, WA 99352 (United States); Williams, David [WIT, Inc., 11173 Oak Fern Court, San Diego, CA 92131 (United States)] [WIT, Inc., 11173 Oak Fern Court, San Diego, CA 92131 (United States); Smith, Rick [Knowledge Systems Design, Inc., 13595 Quaker Hill Cross Rd, Nevada City, CA 95959 (United States)] [Knowledge Systems Design, Inc., 13595 Quaker Hill Cross Rd, Nevada City, CA 95959 (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Advanced Test Reactor Core Modeling Update Project Annual Report for Fiscal Year 2011  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Legacy computational reactor physics software tools and protocols currently used for support of Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) core fuel management and safety assurance and, to some extent, experiment management are obsolete, inconsistent with the state of modern nuclear engineering practice, and are becoming increasingly difficult to properly verify and validate (V&V). Furthermore, the legacy staff knowledge required for application of these tools and protocols from the 1960s and 1970s is rapidly being lost due to staff turnover and retirements. In 2009 the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) initiated a focused effort to address this situation through the introduction of modern high-fidelity computational software and protocols, with appropriate V&V, within the next 3-4 years via the ATR Core Modeling and Simulation and V&V Update (or 'Core Modeling Update') Project. This aggressive computational and experimental campaign will have a broad strategic impact on the operation of the ATR, both in terms of improved computational efficiency and accuracy for support of ongoing DOE programs as well as in terms of national and international recognition of the ATR National Scientific User Facility (NSUF). The ATR Core Modeling Update Project, targeted for full implementation in phase with the anticipated ATR Core Internals Changeout (CIC) in the 2014 time frame, began during the last quarter of Fiscal Year 2009, and has just completed its first full year. Key accomplishments so far have encompassed both computational as well as experimental work. A new suite of stochastic and deterministic transport theory based reactor physics codes and their supporting nuclear data libraries (SCALE, KENO-6, HELIOS, NEWT, and ATTILA) have been installed at the INL under various permanent sitewide license agreements and corresponding baseline models of the ATR and ATRC are now operational, demonstrating the basic feasibility of these code packages for their intended purpose. Furthermore, a capability for rigorous sensitivity analysis and uncertainty quantification based on the TSUNAMI system is being implemented and initial computational results have been obtained. This capability will have many applications in 2011 and beyond as a tool for understanding the margins of uncertainty in the new models as well as for validation experiment design and interpretation. Finally we note that although full implementation of the new computational models and protocols will extend over a period 3-4 years as noted above, interim applications in the much nearer term have already been demonstrated. In particular, these demonstrations included an analysis that was useful for understanding the cause of some issues in December 2009 that were triggered by a larger than acceptable discrepancy between the measured excess core reactivity and a calculated value that was based on the legacy computational methods. As the Modeling Update project proceeds we anticipate further such interim, informal, applications in parallel with formal qualification of the system under the applicable INL Quality Assurance procedures and standards.

David W. Nigg; Devin A. Steuhm

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Climate system modeling on massively parallel systems: LDRD Project 95-ERP-47 final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Global warming, acid rain, ozone depletion, and biodiversity loss are some of the major climate-related issues presently being addressed by climate and environmental scientists. Because unexpected changes in the climate could have significant effect on our economy, it is vitally important to improve the scientific basis for understanding and predicting the earth`s climate. The impracticality of modeling the earth experimentally in the laboratory together with the fact that the model equations are highly nonlinear has created a unique and vital role for computer-based climate experiments. However, today`s computer models, when run at desired spatial and temporal resolution and physical complexity, severely overtax the capabilities of our most powerful computers. Parallel processing offers significant potential for attaining increased performance and making tractable simulations that cannot be performed today. The principal goals of this project have been to develop and demonstrate the capability to perform large-scale climate simulations on high-performance computing systems (using methodology that scales to the systems of tomorrow), and to carry out leading-edge scientific calculations using parallelized models. The demonstration platform for these studies has been the 256-processor Cray-T3D located at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. Our plan was to undertake an ambitious program in optimization, proof-of-principle and scientific study. These goals have been met. We are now regularly using massively parallel processors for scientific study of the ocean and atmosphere, and preliminary parallel coupled ocean/atmosphere calculations are being carried out as well. Furthermore, our work suggests that it should be possible to develop an advanced comprehensive climate system model with performance scalable to the teraflops range. 9 refs., 3 figs.

Mirin, A.A.; Dannevik, W.P.; Chan, B.; Duffy, P.B.; Eltgroth, P.G.; Wehner, M.F.

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Senior Design Projects 2013 Project Title 1 : Monte Carlo Simulations Using a Benchmark Full-Core Pressured Water Rector Model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

that it would be 2019 before such a full reactor core calculation could be accomplished in 1 hour. In this case a full-core PWR reactor model for parallel MCNP calculations on the CCNI system 4. Code optimization in inhomogeneous, 3D media such as a nuclear reactor assembly. However, the large computation time that is required

Danon, Yaron

178

Summary of the March 25--26, 1991 atmospheric model working meeting. Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Atmospheric transport and diffusion calculations for the initial phase of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project were made using the MESOILT2 computer code (Ramsdell and Burk 1991). This code implemented a Lagrangian trajectory, puff dispersion model using components from other models designed primarily for regulatory applications. Uncertainty in the dispersion calculations was estimated following model calculations. The results of the atmospheric dispersion calculations were summarized in frequency distributions by location for use in preliminary dose calculations.

Ramsdell, J.V.

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Application of price uncertainty quantification models and their impacts on project evaluations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(EIA),16 the price of West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil is projected to average $68 per barrel in both 2006 and 2007. 2.2 Uncertainty in Petroleum Project Evaluations The literature indicates an informal distinction between ?risk...

Fariyibi, Festus Lekan

2006-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

180

Neural networks for modelling the final target cost of water projects  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Producing reasonably accurate cost estimates at the planning stage of a project important for the subsequent success of the project. The estimator has to be able to make judgement on the cost influence of a number of factors ...

Ahiaga-Dagbui, Dominic D; Smith, Simon D

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "model intercomparison project" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

An international land-biosphere model benchmarking activity for the IPCC Fifth Assessment Report (AR5)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The need to capture important climate feedbacks in general circulation models (GCMs) has resulted in efforts to include atmospheric chemistry and land and ocean biogeochemistry into the next generation of production climate models, called Earth System Models (ESMs). While many terrestrial and ocean carbon models have been coupled to GCMs, recent work has shown that such models can yield a wide range of results (Friedlingstein et al., 2006). This work suggests that a more rigorous set of global offline and partially coupled experiments, along with detailed analyses of processes and comparisons with measurements, are needed. The Carbon-Land Model Intercomparison Project (C-LAMP) was designed to meet this need by providing a simulation protocol and model performance metrics based upon comparisons against best-available satellite- and ground-based measurements (Hoffman et al., 2007). Recently, a similar effort in Europe, called the International Land Model Benchmark (ILAMB) Project, was begun to assess the performance of European land surface models. These two projects will now serve as prototypes for a proposed international land-biosphere model benchmarking activity for those models participating in the IPCC Fifth Assessment Report (AR5). Initially used for model validation for terrestrial biogeochemistry models in the NCAR Community Land Model (CLM), C-LAMP incorporates a simulation protocol for both offline and partially coupled simulations using a prescribed historical trajectory of atmospheric CO2 concentrations. Models are confronted with data through comparisons against AmeriFlux site measurements, MODIS satellite observations, NOAA Globalview flask records, TRANSCOM inversions, and Free Air CO2 Enrichment (FACE) site measurements. Both sets of experiments have been performed using two different terrestrial biogeochemistry modules coupled to the CLM version 3 in the Community Climate System Model version 3 (CCSM3): the CASA model of Fung, et al., and the carbon-nitrogen (CN) model of Thornton. Comparisons of the CLM3 offline results against observational datasets have been performed and are described in Randerson et al. (2009). CLM version 4 has been evaluated using C-LAMP, showing improvement in many of the metrics. Efforts are now underway to initiate a Nitrogen-Land Model Intercomparison Project (N-LAMP) to better constrain the effects of the nitrogen cycle in biosphere models. Presented will be new results from C-LAMP for CLM4, initial N-LAMP developments, and the proposed land-biosphere model benchmarking activity.

Hoffman, Forrest M [ORNL; Randerson, James T [ORNL; Thornton, Peter E [ORNL; Bonan, Gordon [National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR); Erickson III, David J [ORNL; Fung, Inez [University of California, Berkeley

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Recommendations for computer modeling codes to support the UMTRA groundwater restoration project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Uranium Mill Tailings Remediation Action (UMTRA) Project is responsible for the assessment and remedial action at the 24 former uranium mill tailings sites located in the US. The surface restoration phase, which includes containment and stabilization of the abandoned uranium mill tailings piles, has a specific termination date and is nearing completion. Therefore, attention has now turned to the groundwater restoration phase, which began in 1991. Regulated constituents in groundwater whose concentrations or activities exceed maximum contaminant levels (MCLs) or background levels at one or more sites include, but are not limited to, uranium, selenium, arsenic, molybdenum, nitrate, gross alpha, radium-226 and radium-228. The purpose of this report is to recommend computer codes that can be used to assist the UMTRA groundwater restoration effort. The report includes a survey of applicable codes in each of the following areas: (1) groundwater flow and contaminant transport modeling codes, (2) hydrogeochemical modeling codes, (3) pump and treat optimization codes, and (4) decision support tools. Following the survey of the applicable codes, specific codes that can best meet the needs of the UMTRA groundwater restoration program in each of the four areas are recommended.

Tucker, M.D. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Khan, M.A. [IT Corp., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Advanced Test Reactor Core Modeling Update Project Annual Report for Fiscal Year 2010  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Legacy computational reactor physics software tools and protocols currently used for support of Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) core fuel management and safety assurance and, to some extent, experiment management are obsolete, inconsistent with the state of modern nuclear engineering practice, and are becoming increasingly difficult to properly verify and validate (V&V). Furthermore, the legacy staff knowledge required for application of these tools and protocols from the 1960s and 1970s is rapidly being lost due to staff turnover and retirements. In 2009 the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) initiated a focused effort to address this situation through the introduction of modern high-fidelity computational software and protocols, with appropriate V&V, within the next 3-4 years via the ATR Core Modeling and Simulation and V&V Update (or ďCore Modeling UpdateĒ) Project. This aggressive computational and experimental campaign will have a broad strategic impact on the operation of the ATR, both in terms of improved computational efficiency and accuracy for support of ongoing DOE programs as well as in terms of national and international recognition of the ATR National Scientific User Facility (NSUF).

Rahmat Aryaeinejad; Douglas S. Crawford; Mark D. DeHart; George W. Griffith; D. Scott Lucas; Joseph W. Nielsen; David W. Nigg; James R. Parry; Jorge Navarro

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Final report for the ASC gas-powder two-phase flow modeling project AD2006-09.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents activities performed in FY2006 under the ''Gas-Powder Two-Phase Flow Modeling Project'', ASC project AD2006-09. Sandia has a need to understand phenomena related to the transport of powders in systems. This report documents a modeling strategy inspired by powder transport experiments conducted at Sandia in 2002. A baseline gas-powder two-phase flow model, developed under a companion PEM project and implemented into the Sierra code FUEGO, is presented and discussed here. This report also documents a number of computational tests that were conducted to evaluate the accuracy and robustness of the new model. Although considerable progress was made in implementing the complex two-phase flow model, this project has identified two important areas that need further attention. These include the need to compute robust compressible flow solutions for Mach numbers exceeding 0.35 and the need to improve conservation of mass for the powder phase. Recommendations for future work in the area of gas-powder two-phase flow are provided.

Evans, Gregory Herbert; Winters, William S.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Determining Columbia and Snake River Project Tailrace and Forebay Zones of Hydraulic Influence using MASS2 Modeling  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Although fisheries biology studies are frequently performed at US Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) projects along the Columbia and Snake Rivers, there is currently no consistent definition of the ``forebay'' and ``tailrace'' regions for these studies. At this time, each study may use somewhat arbitrary lines (e.g., the Boat Restriction Zone) to define the upstream and downstream limits of the study, which may be significantly different at each project. Fisheries researchers are interested in establishing a consistent definition of project forebay and tailrace regions for the hydroelectric projects on the lower Columbia and Snake rivers. The Hydraulic Extent of a project was defined by USACE (Brad Eppard, USACE-CENWP) as follows: The river reach directly upstream (forebay) and downstream (tailrace) of a project that is influenced by the normal range of dam operations. Outside this reach, for a particular river discharge, changes in dam operations cannot be detected by hydraulic measurement. The purpose of this study was to, in consultation with USACE and regional representatives, develop and apply a consistent set of criteria for determining the hydraulic extent of each of the projects in the lower Columbia and Snake rivers. A 2D depth-averaged river model, MASS2, was applied to the Snake and Columbia Rivers. New computational meshes were developed most reaches and the underlying bathymetric data updated to the most current survey data. The computational meshes resolved each spillway bay and turbine unit at each project and extended from project to project. MASS2 was run for a range of total river flows and each flow for a range of project operations at each project. The modeled flow was analyzed to determine the range of velocity magnitude differences and the range of flow direction differences at each location in the computational mesh for each total river flow. Maps of the differences in flow direction and velocity magnitude were created. USACE fishery biologists requested data analysis to determine the project hydraulic extent based on the following criteria: 1) For areas where the mean velocities are less than 4 ft/s, the water velocity differences between operations are not greater than 0.5 ft/sec and /or the differences in water flow direction are not greater than 10 degrees, 2) If mean water velocity is 4.0 ft/second or greater the boundary is determined using the differences in water flow direction (i.e., not greater than 10 degrees). Based on these criteria, and excluding areas with a mean velocity of less than 0.1 ft/s (within the error of the model), a final set of graphics were developed that included data from all flows and all operations. Although each hydroelectric project has a different physical setting, there were some common results. The downstream hydraulic extent tended to be greater than the hydraulic extent in the forebay. The hydraulic extent of the projects tended to be larger at the mid-range flows. At higher flows, the channel geometry tends to reduce the impact of project operations.

Rakowski, Cynthia L.; Serkowski, John A.; Richmond, Marshall C.; Perkins, William A.

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

The Smart Engineering Apprentice (SEA) Project is an advanced artificial intelligence model that aims to predict the future failure of rod pump units. Innovative and modern, this  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Smart Engineering Apprentice (SEA) Project is an advanced artificial intelligence model system is the apprentice of field experts, and `learns' from experts through their past experiences

Shahabi, Cyrus

187

The Smart Engineering Apprentice (SEA) Project is an advanced artificial intelligence model that aims to predict the future failure of rod pump units. Innovative and modern, this novel  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Smart Engineering Apprentice (SEA) Project is an advanced artificial intelligence model system is the apprentice of field experts, and ,,learns from experts through their past experiences

Wang, Hai

188

Advanced Test Reactor Core Modeling Update Project Annual Report for Fiscal Year 2012  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Legacy computational reactor physics software tools and protocols currently used for support of Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) core fuel management and safety assurance, and to some extent, experiment management, are inconsistent with the state of modern nuclear engineering practice, and are difficult, if not impossible, to properly verify and validate (V&V) according to modern standards. Furthermore, the legacy staff knowledge required for application of these tools and protocols from the 1960s and 1970s is rapidly being lost due to staff turnover and retirements. In late 2009, the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) initiated a focused effort, the ATR Core Modeling Update Project, to address this situation through the introduction of modern high-fidelity computational software and protocols. This aggressive computational and experimental campaign will have a broad strategic impact on the operation of the ATR, both in terms of improved computational efficiency and accuracy for support of ongoing DOE programs as well as in terms of national and international recognition of the ATR National Scientific User Facility (NSUF). The ATR Core Modeling Update Project, targeted for full implementation in phase with the next anticipated ATR Core Internals Changeout (CIC) in the 2014-2015 time frame, began during the last quarter of Fiscal Year 2009, and has just completed its third full year. Key accomplishments so far have encompassed both computational as well as experimental work. A new suite of stochastic and deterministic transport theory based reactor physics codes and their supporting nuclear data libraries (HELIOS, KENO6/SCALE, NEWT/SCALE, ATTILA, and an extended implementation of MCNP5) has been installed at the INL under various licensing arrangements. Corresponding models of the ATR and ATRC are now operational with all five codes, demonstrating the basic feasibility of the new code packages for their intended purpose. Of particular importance, a set of as-run core depletion HELIOS calculations for all ATR cycles since August 2009, Cycle 145A through Cycle 151B, was successfully completed during 2012. This major effort supported a decision late in the year to proceed with the phased incorporation of the HELIOS methodology into the ATR Core Safety Analysis Package (CSAP) preparation process, in parallel with the established PDQ-based methodology, beginning late in Fiscal Year 2012. Acquisition of the advanced SERPENT (VTT-Finland) and MC21 (DOE-NR) Monte Carlo stochastic neutronics simulation codes was also initiated during the year and some initial applications of SERPENT to ATRC experiment analysis were demonstrated. These two new codes will offer significant additional capability, including the possibility of full-3D Monte Carlo fuel management support capabilities for the ATR at some point in the future. Finally, a capability for rigorous sensitivity analysis and uncertainty quantification based on the TSUNAMI system has been implemented and initial computational results have been obtained. This capability will have many applications as a tool for understanding the margins of uncertainty in the new models as well as for validation experiment design and interpretation.

David W. Nigg, Principal Investigator; Kevin A. Steuhm, Project Manager

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Advanced Test Reactor Core Modeling Update Project Annual Report for Fiscal Year 2013  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Legacy computational reactor physics software tools and protocols currently used for support of Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) core fuel management and safety assurance, and to some extent, experiment management, are inconsistent with the state of modern nuclear engineering practice, and are difficult, if not impossible, to verify and validate (V&V) according to modern standards. Furthermore, the legacy staff knowledge required for effective application of these tools and protocols from the 1960s and 1970s is rapidly being lost due to staff turnover and retirements. In late 2009, the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) initiated a focused effort, the ATR Core Modeling Update Project, to address this situation through the introduction of modern high-fidelity computational software and protocols. This aggressive computational and experimental campaign will have a broad strategic impact on the operation of the ATR, both in terms of improved computational efficiency and accuracy for support of ongoing DOE programs as well as in terms of national and international recognition of the ATR National Scientific User Facility (NSUF).

David W. Nigg

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

West Pearl Queen CO2 sequestration pilot test and modeling project 2006-2008.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The West Pearl Queen is a depleted oil reservoir that has produced approximately 250,000 bbl of oil since 1984. Production had slowed prior to CO{sub 2} injection, but no previous secondary or tertiary recovery methods had been applied. The initial project involved reservoir characterization and field response to injection of CO{sub 2}; the field experiment consisted of injection, soak, and venting. For fifty days (December 20, 2002, to February 11, 2003) 2090 tons of CO{sub 2} were injected into the Shattuck Sandstone Member of the Queen Formation at the West Pearl Queen site. This technical report highlights the test results of the numerous research participants and technical areas from 2006-2008. This work included determination of lateral extents of the permeability units using outcrop observations, core results, and well logs. Pre- and post-injection 3D seismic data were acquired. To aid in interpreting seismic data, we performed numerical simulations of the effects of CO{sub 2} replacement of brine where the reservoir model was based upon correlation lengths established by the permeability studies. These numerical simulations are not intended to replicate field data, but to provide insight of the effects of CO{sub 2}.

Engler, Bruce Phillip; Cooper, Scott Patrick; Symons, Neill Phillip; Bartel, Lewis Clark; Byrer, Charles (National Energy Laboratory, Morgantown, WV); Elbring, Gregory Jay; McNemar, Andrea (National Energy Laboratory, Morgantown, WV); Aldridge, David Franklin; Lorenz, John Clay

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

JOURNAL OF GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH: ATMOSPHERES, VOL. 118, 11,03611,058, doi:10.1002/jgrd.50868, 2013 The hydrological impact of geoengineering in the Geoengineering  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Earth's albedo by solar radiation management is investigated using simulations from 12 Earth System models contributing to the Geoengineering Model Intercomparison Project (GeoMIP). We contrast

Robock, Alan

192

A multiperiod optimization model to schedule large-scale petroleum development projects  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

............................................................................. 79 5.3.2 Uncertainties of Oil Prices ................................................... 87 5.3.3 Flexibility of Constraints ...................................................... 89 5.3.4 Projects Staging....3 World oil prices from EIA, AEO2007 ...................................................... 50 4.4 Cash flow streams in the aggregate ........................................................... 52 4.5a Development projects P1 to P3...

Husni, Mohammed Hamza

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

193

Renewable Resources: a national catalog of model projects. Volume 3. Southern Solar Energy Center Region  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This compilation of diverse conservation and renewable energy projects across the United States was prepared through the enthusiastic participation of solar and alternate energy groups from every state and region. Compiled and edited by the Center for Renewable Resources, these projects reflect many levels of innovation and technical expertise. In many cases, a critique analysis is presented of how projects performed and of the institutional conditions associated with their success or failure. Some 2000 projects are included in this compilation; most have worked, some have not. Information about all is presented to aid learning from these experiences. The four volumes in this set are arranged in state sections by geographic region, coinciding with the four Regional Solar Energy Centers. The table of contents is organized by project category so that maximum cross-referencing may be obtained. This volume includes information on the Southern Solar Energy Center Region. (WHK)

None

1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Renewable Resources: a national catalog of model projects. Volume 4. Western Solar Utilization Network Region  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This compilation of diverse conservation and renewable energy projects across the United States was prepared through the enthusiastic participation of solar and alternate energy groups from every state and region. Compiled and edited by the Center for Renewable Resources, these projects reflect many levels of innovation and technical expertise. In many cases, a critique analysis is presented of how projects performed and of the institutional conditions associated with their success or failure. Some 2000 projects are included in this compilation; most have worked, some have not. Information about all is presented to aid learning from these experiences. The four volumes in this set are arranged in state sections by geographic region, coinciding with the four Regional Solar Energy Centers. The table of contents is organized by project category so that maximum cross-referencing may be obtained. This volume includes information on the Western Solar Utilization Network Region. (WHK)

None

1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Renewable Resources: a national catalog of model projects. Volume 1. Northeast Solar Energy Center Region  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This compilation of diverse conservation and renewable energy projects across the United States was prepared through the enthusiastic participation of solar and alternate energy groups from every state and region. Compiled and edited by the Center for Renewable Resources, these projects reflect many levels of innovation and technical expertise. In many cases, a critique analysis is presented of how projects performed and of the institutional conditions associated with their success or failure. Some 2000 projects are included in this compilation; most have worked, some have not. Information about all is presented to aid learning from these experiences. The four volumes in this set are arranged in state sections by geographic region, coinciding with the four Regional Solar Energy Centers. The table of contents is organized by project category so that maximum cross-referencing may be obtained. This volume includes information on the Northeast Solar Energy Center Region. (WHK).

None

1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Algal biomass and sea surface temperature in the Mediterranean Basin Intercomparison of data from various satellite sensors, and implications for  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Algal biomass and sea surface temperature in the Mediterranean Basin Intercomparison of data from and to increasing anthropogenic inputs, is an appropriate test site for observing the evolution of algal biomass progress in the knowledge of spatial and temporal variations in algal biomass in various regions

Bricaud, Annick

197

Intercomparison study of atmospheric mercury models: 1. Comparison of models with short-term measurements  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Quebec, Canada f GKSS -- Research Centre, Max-Plank-Strasse 1, D-21502 Geesthacht, Germany g National

198

Intercomparison study of atmospheric mercury models: 2. Modelling results vs. long-term observations and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Canada, Dorval, Quebec, Canada f GKSS - Research Centre, Max-Plank-Strasse 1, D-21502 Geesthacht, Germany

199

Project Year Project Title  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the cost of the project to labor only. The efficacy of the examples will be assessed through their useProject Year 2012-2013 Project Title Sight-Reading at the Piano Project Team Ken Johansen, Peabody) Faculty Statement The goal of this project is to create a bank of practice exercises that student pianists

Gray, Jeffrey J.

200

Project Year Project Team  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

design goals for this project include low cost (less than $30 per paddle) and robustness. The projectProject Year 2001 Project Team Faculty: Allison Okamura, Mechanical Engineering, Whiting School Project Title Haptic Display of Dynamic Systems Audience 30 to 40 students per year, enrolled

Gray, Jeffrey J.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "model intercomparison project" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Project Year Project Team  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-year section of the summer project will cost $1344.) This project will be measured by the CER surveys conductedProject Year 2005 Project Team Sean Greenberg, Faculty, Philosophy Department, Krieger School of Arts & Sciences; Kevin Clark, Student, Philosophy Department, Krieger School of Arts & Sciences Project

Gray, Jeffrey J.

202

The! Community! Earth! System! Model! (CESM)! Large! Ensemble! Project:! A! Community!3! Resource!for!Studying!Climate!Change!in!the!Presence!of!Internal!Climate!Variability!4!  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

!1! !2! The! Community! Earth! System! Model! (CESM)! Large! Ensemble! Project:! A! Community!3!Earth!System!Model!(CESM)!community!designed!the!CESM!Large!Ensemble!39! (CESMWLE)!with!the!explicit

Kay, Jennifer

203

Regional climate model data used within the SWURVE project 2: addressing uncertainty in regional climate model data Hydrol. Earth Syst. Sci., 11(1), 10851096, 2007  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.Ekstrom@uea.ac.uk Abstract To aid assessments of the impact of climate change on water related activities in the case study on the impacts of climate change on specific water management activities (Kilsby, 2007). Uncertainties linked, temperature, rainfall, Europe Introduction As climate model projections are often used in climate change

Boyer, Edmond

204

Theoretical Modelling of Magnetic Refrigeration Materials A PhD studentship is available in the Warwick Theory Group on a theoretical/computational PhD project  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

materials. The project will involve condensed matter physics theory, high performance computingTheoretical Modelling of Magnetic Refrigeration Materials A PhD studentship is available in the Warwick Theory Group on a theoretical/computational PhD project on the modelling of magnetic refrigeration

Low, Robert

205

Analysis of dc harmonics using the three-pulse model for the intermountain power project HVDC transmission  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The harmonic analysis of the dc-side of an HVDC line transmission requires realistic models of the converters, the dc line, and other relevant equipment. These models must include all important paths for harmonic current, and appropriate sources of harmonic voltage generation. The classical converter modeling technique has been demonstrated to be insufficient in field measurements and analysis of the harmonic spectra found on recent HVDC line transmission. For this reason, a new model of the converter bridge which takes into account the major stray capacitances in the converter (the three-pulse model) has been developed, and is described in detail elsewhere. This paper presents comparisons between the classical and three-pulse calculations for the Intermountain Power Project (IPP) HVDC transmission. The calculation results from the three-pulse model agree favorably with the harmonics found in field measurements.

Dickmander, D.L.; Peterson, K.J.

1989-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Project Year Project Team  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Project Year 2002 Project Team Faculty: Louise Pasternack, Chemistry Department, Krieger School, Krieger School of Arts & Sciences Project Title Introductory Chemistry Lab Demonstrations Audience an interactive virtual lab manual that will facilitate understanding of the procedures and techniques required

Gray, Jeffrey J.

207

Final Technical Report for "Collaborative Research: Regional climate-change projections through next-generation empirical and dynamical models"  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project was a continuation of previous work under DOE CCPP funding in which we developed a twin approach of non-homogeneous hidden Markov models (NHMMs) and coupled ocean-atmosphere (O-A) intermediate-complexity models (ICMs) to identify the potentially predictable modes of climate variability, and to investigate their impacts on the regional-scale. We have developed a family of latent-variable NHMMs to simulate historical records of daily rainfall, and used them to downscale seasonal predictions. We have also developed empirical mode reduction (EMR) models for gaining insight into the underlying dynamics in observational data and general circulation model (GCM) simulations. Using coupled O-A ICMs, we have identified a new mechanism of interdecadal climate variability, involving the midlatitude oceans mesoscale eddy field and nonlinear, persistent atmospheric response to the oceanic anomalies. A related decadal mode is also identified, associated with the oceans thermohaline circulation. The goal of the continuation was to build on these ICM results and NHMM/EMR model developments and software to strengthen two key pillars of support for the development and application of climate models for climate change projections on time scales of decades to centuries, namely: (a) dynamical and theoretical understanding of decadal-to-interdecadal oscillations and their predictability; and (b) an interface from climate models to applications, in order to inform societal adaptation strategies to climate change at the regional scale, including model calibration, correction, downscaling and, most importantly, assessment and interpretation of spread and uncertainties in multi-model ensembles. Our main results from the grant consist of extensive further development of the hidden Markov models for rainfall simulation and downscaling specifically within the non-stationary climate change context together with the development of parallelized software; application of NHMMs to downscaling of rainfall projections over India; identification and analysis of decadal climate signals in data and models; and, studies of climate variability in terms of the dynamics of atmospheric flow regimes. Each of these project components is elaborated on below, followed by a list of publications resulting from the grant.

Robertson, A.W.; Ghil, M.; Kravtsov, K.; Smyth, P.J.

2011-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

208

Final Technical Report for "Collaborative Research: Regional climate-change projections through next-generation empirical and dynamical models"  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project was a continuation of previous work under DOE CCPP funding in which we developed a twin approach of non-homogeneous hidden Markov models (NHMMs) and coupled ocean-atmosphere (O-A) intermediate-complexity models (ICMs) to identify the potentially predictable modes of climate variability, and to investigate their impacts on the regional-scale. We have developed a family of latent-variable NHMMs to simulate historical records of daily rainfall, and used them to downscale seasonal predictions. We have also developed empirical mode reduction (EMR) models for gaining insight into the underlying dynamics in observational data and general circulation model (GCM) simulations. Using coupled O-A ICMs, we have identified a new mechanism of interdecadal climate variability, involving the midlatitude oceans‚?? mesoscale eddy field and nonlinear, persistent atmospheric response to the oceanic anomalies. A related decadal mode is also identified, associated with the oceans‚?? thermohaline circulation. The goal of the continuation was to build on these ICM results and NHMM/EMR model developments and software to strengthen two key pillars of support for the development and application of climate models for climate change projections on time scales of decades to centuries, namely: (a) dynamical and theoretical understanding of decadal-to-interdecadal oscillations and their predictability; and (b) an interface from climate models to applications, in order to inform societal adaptation strategies to climate change at the regional scale, including model calibration, correction, downscaling and, most importantly, assessment and interpretation of spread and uncertainties in multi-model ensembles. Our main results from the grant consist of extensive further development of the hidden Markov models for rainfall simulation and downscaling specifically within the non-stationary climate change context together with the development of parallelized software; application of NHMMs to downscaling of rainfall projections over India; identification and analysis of decadal climate signals in data and models; and, studies of climate variability in terms of the dynamics of atmospheric flow regimes. Each of these project components is elaborated on below, followed by a list of publications resulting from the grant.

Kravtsov, S.; Robertson, A. W.; Ghil, M.; Smyth, P. J.

2011-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

209

THREE-DIMENSIONAL THERMAL MODELING ANALYSIS OF CST MEDIA FOR THE SMALL ION EXCHANGE PROJECT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Small Column Ion Exchange (SCIX) project is designed to accelerate closure of High Level Waste (HLW) tanks at the Savannah River Site (SRS). The SRS tanks store HLW in three forms: sludge, saltcake, and supernate. An in-tank ion exchange process is being designed to treat supernate and dissolved saltcake waste. Through this process, radioactive cesium from the salt solution is adsorbed into Crystalline Silicotitanate (CST) ion exchange media packed within a flow-through column. A packed column loaded with radioactive cesium generates significant heat from radiolytic decay. The waste supernate solution within the ion exchange bed will boil around 120 C. Solution superheating above the boiling point within the column could lead to violent hazardous energy releases. System heating from loaded CST is also of concern in other process modules, such as the waste tank. Due to tank structural integrity concerns, the wall temperature limit for the SRS waste tanks is 100 C. The transfer of cesium-loaded CST to the tank could result in localized hot spots on the tank floor and walls which may exceed this limit. As a result, thermal modeling calculations have been conducted to predict the maximum temperatures achievable both in the column and in the waste tank. As specified in the associated Technical Task Plan, one objective of the present work was to compute temperature distributions within the ion exchange column module under accident scenarios including loss of salt solution flow through the bed and loss of coolant system flow. The column modeling domain and the scope of the calculations in this case were broadened relative to previous two-dimensional calculations to include vertical temperature distributions within the packed bed of ion exchange media as well as the upper column plenum region containing only fluid. The baseline design conditions and in-column modeling domain for the ion-exchange column module are shown in Figure 1. These evaluations assumed the maximum bounding cesium loading considered possible based on current knowledge regarding CST media and the anticipated feed compositions. Since this cesium loading was considerably higher than the nominal loading conditions in SRS waste, cases with lower loading were also evaluated. Modeling parameters were the same as those used previously unless otherwise indicated. The current model does not capture multi-phase cooling mechanisms operative when solution boiling occurs. This feature is conservative in the sense that it does not account for the large cooling effects associated with phase transfer. However, the potential transfer of heat to the plenum region associated with vertical bubble ascension through the column during boiling is also neglected. Thermal modeling calculations were also performed for the entire waste storage tank for the case where loaded and ground CST was transferred to the tank. The modeling domain used for the in-tank calculations is provided in Figure 2. The in-tank domain is based on SRS Tank 41, which is a Type-IIIA tank. Temperature distributions were evaluated for cylindrical, ground CST mounds located on the tank floor. Media grinding is required prior to vitrification processing of the CST in the SRS Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). The location of the heat source region on the tank floor due to the accumulation of CST material was assumed to be just under the grinder. The shape of the CST mound was assumed to be cylindrical. This shape is believed to be most representative of the actual mound shape formed in the tank, given that submersible mixing pumps will be available for media dispersion. Alternative configurations involving other geometrical shapes for the CST mound were evaluated in the previous work. Sensitivity analysis for the in-tank region was performed for different amounts of CST media. As was the case for the in-column model, the in-tank model does not include multi-phase cooling mechanisms operative when solution boiling occurs. The in-column and the in-tank evaluations incorporated recently updated maximum cesi

Lee, S.; King, W.

2011-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

210

Downscaling Global Land Cover Projections from an Integrated Assessment Model for Use in Regional Analyses: Results and Evaluation for the US from 2005 to 2095  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Projections of land cover change generated from Integrated Assessment Models (IAM) and other economic-based models can be applied for analyses of environmental impacts at subregional and landscape scales. For those IAM and economic models that project land use at the sub-continental or regional scale, these projections must be downscaled and spatially distributed prior to use in climate or ecosystem models. Downscaling efforts to date have been conducted at the national extent with relatively high spatial resolution (30m) and at the global extent with relatively coarse spatial resolution (0.5 degree).

West, Tristram O.; Le Page, Yannick LB; Huang, Maoyi; Wolf, Julie; Thomson, Allison M.

2014-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

211

IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON NUCLEAR SCIENCE, VOL. 47, NO. 4, AUGUST 2000 An Inter-comparison of Three Spectral-Deconvolution Algorithms  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in the assay of waste materials generated in the decommissioning of nuclear installations in which one wouldIEEE TRANSACTIONS ON NUCLEAR SCIENCE, VOL. 47, NO. 4, AUGUST 2000 An Inter-comparison of Three

He, Zhong

212

Project Year Project Title  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Project Year 2013-2014 Project Title German Online Placement Exam Project Team Deborah Mifflin to increased cost. As well, it lacked listening comprehension, writing and speaking components providing support, we will use Blackboard for this project. The creation will require numerous steps

Gray, Jeffrey J.

213

Project Year Project Title  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

that incorporate video taped procedures for student preview. Solution This project will create videos for more to study the procedure and techniques before coming to class. Our previous fellowship project addressedProject Year 2009 Project Title Enhancing Biology Laboratory Preparation through Video

Gray, Jeffrey J.

214

Project Year Project Team  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, there is no resource available to view the procedure before class. Solution The purpose of this project is to capture available to view the procedure before class. The purpose #12;of this project is to capture variousProject Year 2007 Project Team Kristina Obom, Faculty, Advanced Academic Programs, Krieger School

Gray, Jeffrey J.

215

Seventeenth nuclear accident dosimetry intercomparison study: August 11-15, 1980  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Seventeenth Nuclear Accident Dosimetry Intercomparison Study was conducted August 11-15, 1980, at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Nuclear criticality accidents with three different neutron and gamma ray energy spectra were simulated by operating the Health Physics Research Reactor in the pulse mode. Participants from 13 organizations exposed dosimeters set up as area monitors and mounted on phantoms for personnel monitoring. Analysis of experimental results reported by participants showed that less than 60% of the neutron dose measurements using foil activation, thermoluminescent, or sodium activation methods and less than 20% of the gamma dose measurements using thermoluminescent dosimeters met nuclear criticality accident dosimetry guidelines which suggest accuracies of +-25% for neutron dose and +-20% for gamma dose. This indicates that continued development and evaluation of criticality accident dosimetry systems for area and personnel monitoring are required to improve measurement accuracy so that existing standards can be met.

Swaja, R.E.; Greene, R.T.

1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

U.S. bioassay Intercomparison Studies Program at Oak Ridge National Lab  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Intercomparison Studies Program (ISP) for in-vitro bioassay at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has been in place since May 1991. The ISP was originally created to fill a need in the Radiobioassay area at ORNL, specifically in the areas of Quality Control, Quality Assurance, and Performance Testing. In the beginning, this consisted of two or three laboratories working in a pilot intercomparison program. Once it was determined that this could work effectively, the program began to seek additional members to broaden the scope of the effort. The program became formalized with a quarterly report in January 1992. The ISP currently provides cross-check blind/double-blind samples spiked with known amounts of radioactivity to various Department of Energy (DOE) facilities, universities, and private industry organizations throughout the US. These samples can be packaged according to ORNL procedures (ORNL sample bottles, ORNL chain-of-custody forms, tamper seals etc.), for a single blind sample or according to the needs of a particular facility if the double-blind sample mode is to be maintained. In 1998, the customer base was broadened to include European facilities. In January 1993, the whole-body count program was added. This involves each participating facility receiving a block phantom from the ISP and determining a geometry factor using a known standard. At quarterly intervals, each participant receives an unknown sample for analysis. The sample is counted and the data is collected for publication in an annual report. In October 1994, the fecal program was added. This involves spiking an artificial matrix with known amounts of radioactivity. Laboratories receive unknown samples on a quarterly basis. The sample is counted and the data is collected and published in a quarterly report. The ISP maintains archive samples which can be analyzed in the QC laboratory at the request of any participants if a conflict or discrepancy in a sample analysis/result occurs.

Payne, G.F.; Bores, N.; Melton, K.K.; Rankin, J.M.

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Projected 21st century decrease in marine productivity: a multi-model analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

IPSL), the COSMOS Earth System Model from the Max-PlanckCSM1.4) of the four Earth System models used in this study.productivity MPIM The Earth System Model employed at the

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Enhanced terrestrial carbon uptake in the Northern High Latitudes in the 21st century from the Coupled Carbon  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the Coupled Carbon Cycle Climate Model Intercomparison Project model projections H A I F E N G Q I A N *, R E Carbon Cycle Climate Model Intercomparison Project. Our analysis suggests that the NHL will be a carbon the intense warming there enhances SOM decomposition, soil organic carbon (SOC) storage continues to increase

Zeng, Ning

219

Math 151 -Fall 2007 -Project #5 The Leslie Population Model in a Random Environment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

individuals present then. Suppose that the population projection matrix is: P = 0 .5 0 1. 0 q F 0 0 in this range. Making use of the Matlab code in the file ranleslie.m, do the following: Calculate your value and standard deviations computed in (a) and (b), as well as by providing a graph of these results. Compose

Gross, Louis J.

220

What is the importance of climate model bias when projecting the impacts of climate change on land surface processes?  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Regional climate change impact (CCI) studies have widely involved downscaling and bias-correcting (BC) Global Climate Model (GCM)-projected climate for driving land surface models. However, BC may cause uncertainties in projecting hydrologic and biogeochemical responses to future climate due to the impaired spatiotemporal covariance of climate variables and a breakdown of physical conservation principles. Here we quantify the impact of BC on simulated climate-driven changes in water variables(evapotranspiration, ET; runoff; snow water equivalent, SWE; and water demand for irrigation), crop yield, biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOC), nitric oxide (NO) emissions, and dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN) export over the Pacific Northwest (PNW) Region. We also quantify the impacts on net primary production (NPP) over a small watershed in the region (HJ Andrews). Simulation results from the coupled ECHAM5/MPI-OM model with A1B emission scenario were firstly dynamically downscaled to 12 km resolutions with WRF model. Then a quantile mapping based statistical downscaling model was used to downscale them into 1/16th degree resolution daily climate data over historical and future periods. Two series climate data were generated according to the option of bias-correction (i.e. with bias-correction (BC) and without bias-correction, NBC). Impact models were then applied to estimate hydrologic and biogeochemical responses to both BC and NBC meteorological datasets. These im20 pact models include a macro-scale hydrologic model (VIC), a coupled cropping system model (VIC-CropSyst), an ecohydrologic model (RHESSys), a biogenic emissions model (MEGAN), and a nutrient export model (Global-NEWS). Results demonstrate that the BC and NBC climate data provide consistent estimates of the climate-driven changes in water fluxes (ET, runoff, and water demand), VOCs (isoprene and monoterpenes) and NO emissions, mean crop yield, and river DIN export over the PNW domain. However, significant differences rise from projected SWE, crop yield from dry lands, and HJ Andrewsís ET between BC and NBC data. Even though BC post-processing has no significant impacts on most of the studied variables when taking PNW as a whole, their effects have large spatial variations and some local areas are substantially influenced. In addition, there are months during which BC and NBC post-processing produces significant differences in projected changes, such as summer runoff. Factor-controlled simulations indicate that BC post-processing of precipitation and temperature both substantially contribute to these differences at region scales. We conclude that there are trade-offs between using BC climate data for offline CCI studies vs. direct modeled climate data. These trade-offs should be considered when designing integrated modeling frameworks for specific applications; e.g., BC may be more important when considering impacts on reservoir operations in mountainous watersheds than when investigating impacts on biogenic emissions and air quality (where VOCs are a primary indicator).

Liu, M. L.; Rajagopalan, K.; Chung, S. H.; Jiang, X.; Harrison, J. H.; Nergui, T.; Guenther, Alex B.; Miller, C.; Reyes, J.; Tague, C. L.; Choate, J. S.; Salathe, E.; Stockle, Claudio O.; Adam, J. C.

2014-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "model intercomparison project" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Sacks R. (1998), `Issues in the Development and Implementation of a Building Project Model for an Automated Building System', International Journal of Construction Information Technology, Salford University, Salford  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

designed to support computer-based integration between various construction applications, it is proposed of an Automated, Computer Integrated Building Realization System is to automatically generate all of the information required for the design, planning and execution of a building project. The project model forms

Sacks, Rafael

222

Part II: Project Summaries Project Summaries  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Part II: Project Summaries Part II Project Summaries #12;22 Math & Computational Sciences Division generally cannot be achieved for reasonable computational cost. Applications that require modeling of this project is to advance the state of the art in electromagnetic computations by eliminating three existing

Perkins, Richard A.

223

Modeling, Analysis, Predictions, and Projections Email: oar.cpo.mapp@noaa.gov  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Earth system models to better simulate the climate system? Can we improve intraseasonal to seasonal mission, MAPP supports the development of advanced Earth system models that can predict climate variations, and the external research community. MAPP Objectives · Improve Earth system models · Achieve an integrated Earth

224

Project Year Project Team  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Project Year 2002 Project Team Faculty: Gregory Hager, Computer Science, Whiting School of Engineering Fellow: Alan Chen, Biomedical Engineering, Whiting School of Engineering Project Title Robotics is complicated, time-consuming, and costly, making a robot for an introductory-level class is not practical

Gray, Jeffrey J.

225

Project Proposal Project Logistics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Project Proposal · Project Logistics: ­ 2-3 person teams ­ Significant implementation, worth 55 and anticipated cost of copying to/from host memory. IV. Intellectual Challenges - Generally, what makes this computation worthy of a project? - Point to any difficulties you anticipate at present in achieving high

Hall, Mary W.

226

Project Year Project Title  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

operators, matrix indexing, vector computations, loops, functions, and plotting graphs, among others basic arithmetic operators, matrix indexing, and vector computations in MATLAB. After creatingProject Year 2011-2012 Project Title Online Tutorial for MATLAB Project Team Eileen Haase, Whiting

Gray, Jeffrey J.

227

Project Year Project Team  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Project Year 2005 Project Team Krysia Hudson, Faculty, School of Nursing, Undergraduate Instruction for Educational Resources Project Title Enhanced Web-based Learning Environments for Beginning Nursing Students (e.g., demonstrations of procedures or tasks) into the WBL systems, it will be possible to increase

Gray, Jeffrey J.

228

Project Year Project Team  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Project Year 2002 Project Team Faculty: Michael McCloskey, Cognitive Science/Neuroscience, Krieger of Arts & Sciences Project Title Cognitive Neuropsychology Audience The initial audience to access. The current procedure calls for individual students or researchers to contact the faculty member

Gray, Jeffrey J.

229

SINGLE-SHELL TANK INTEGRITY PROJECT ANALYSIS OF RECORD-PRELIMINARY MODELING PLAN FOR THERMAL AND OPERATING LOADS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document is a Phase I deliverable for the Single-Shell Tank Analysis of Record effort. This document is not the Analysis of Record. The intent of this document is to guide the Phase II detailed modeling effort. Preliminary finite element models for each of the tank types were developed and different case studies were performed on one or more of these tank types. Case studies evaluated include thermal loading, waste level variation, the sensitivity of boundary effects (soil radial extent), excavation slope or run to rise ratio, soil stratigraphic (property and layer thickness) variation at different farm locations, and concrete material property variation and their degradation under thermal loads. The preliminary analysis document reviews and preliminary modeling analysis results are reported herein. In addition, this report provides recommendations for the next phase of the SST AOR project, SST detailed modeling. Efforts and results discussed in this report do not include seismic modeling as seismic modeling is covered by a separate report. The combined results of both static and seismic models are required to complete this effort. The SST AOR project supports the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of River Protection (ORP) mission for obtaining a better understanding of the structural integrity of Hanford's SSTs. The 149 SSTs, with six different geometries, have experienced a range of operating histories which would require a large number of unique analyses to fully characterize their individual structural integrity. Preliminary modeling evaluations were conducted to determine the number of analyses required for adequate bounding of each of the SST tank types in the Detailed Modeling Phase of the SST AOR Project. The preliminary modeling was conducted in conjunction with the Evaluation Criteria report, Johnson et al. (2010). Reviews of existing documents were conducted at the initial stage of preliminary modeling. These reviews guided the topics that were explored in the SST preliminary modeling. The reviews determined the level of detail necessary to perform the analyses of the SSTs. To guide the Phase II detailed modeling effort, preliminary finite element models for each of the tank types were developed and different case studies were performed on one or more of these tank types. Case studies evaluated include thermal loading, waste level variation, the sensitivity of boundary effects (soil radial extent), excavation slope or run to rise ratio, soil stratigraphic (property and layer thickness) variation at different farm locations, and concrete material property variation and their degradation under thermal loads. Conclusions were derived from case studies on one of the tank types when no additional runs of similar cases on other types of tanks were found necessary to derive those conclusions. The document reviews provided relatively complete temperature histories for Type IV tanks. The temperature history data for Type I, II, and III tanks was almost nonexistent for years prior to 1975. Document reviews indicate that there might be additional useful data in the US Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office (DOE-RL) records in Seattle, WA, and these records need to be reviewed to extract data that might have been disregarded during previous reviews. Thermal stress analyses were conducted using different temperature distribution scenarios on Type IV tanks. Such studies could not be carried out for other tank types due to lack of temperature history data. The results from Type IV tank analyses indicate that factors such as temperature distribution in the tank waste and rate of rise in waste temperature have a significant impact on the thermal stresses in the tank structures. Overall, the conclusion that can drawn from the thermal stress analyses is that these studies should be carried out for all tank types during the detailed analysis phase with temperature values that are reasonably close to the typical temperature histories of the respective tank types. If and/or when additional waste temperature data

RAST RS; RINKER MW; BAPANAALLI SK; DEIBLER JE; GUZMAN-LEONG CE; JOHNSON KI; KARRI NK; PILLI SP; SANBORN SE

2010-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

230

Lamar repowering project's creative modeling of old and new wins Marmaduke award  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Lamar Light and Power is a municipal utility that has been generating the south eastern Colorado city's electricity since 1920. Rising natural gas and oil costs pushed LL & P to retire its steam plant five years ago and begin hunting for more economic power sources. The answer: repower the existing plant with a state-of-the-art coal-fired circulating fluidized-bed combustor and cross-connect old and new steam turbines. The 120 million dollar project will stabilize the region's electricity rates for many years to come. 10 figs. 1 tab.

Peltier, R.

2008-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

231

Grand challenge problems in environmental modeling and remediation: Groundwater contaminant transport. Final project report 1998  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The over-reaching goal of the Groundwater Grand Challenge component of the Partnership in Computational Science (PICS) was to develop and establish the massively parallel approach for the description of groundwater flow and transport and to address the problem of uncertainties in the data and its interpretation. This necessitated the development of innovative algorithms and the implementation of massively parallel computational tools to provide a suite of simulators for groundwater flow and transport in heterogeneous media. This report summarizes the activities and deliverables of the Groundwater Grand Challenge project funded through the High Performance Computing grand challenge program of the Department of Energy from 1995 through 1997.

NONE

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Cloudnet Project  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

Cloudnet is a research project supported by the European Commission. This project aims to use data obtained quasi-continuously for the development and implementation of cloud remote sensing synergy algorithms. The use of active instruments (lidar and radar) results in detailed vertical profiles of important cloud parameters which cannot be derived from current satellite sensing techniques. A network of three already existing cloud remote sensing stations (CRS-stations) will be operated for a two year period, activities will be co-ordinated, data formats harmonised and analysis of the data performed to evaluate the representation of clouds in four major european weather forecast models.

Hogan, Robin

233

Notice of Intent to Develop DOE G 415.1-1, Information Technology Project Execution Model Guide  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

The proposed guide will support consistent and effective implementation of DOE O 415.1 and will assist IT Program and Project Managers in effectively managing and applying sound project management to IT projects subject to that order.

2014-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

234

Project Profile: Predictive Physico-Chemical Modeling of Intrinsic Degradation Mechanisms for Advanced Reflector Materials  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

NREL, under the Physics of Reliability: Evaluating Design Insights for Component Technologies in Solar (PREDICTS) Program will be developing a physics-based computational degradation model to assess the kinetic oxidation rates; realistic model light attenuation and transport; and multi-layer treatment with variable properties Simulation based experimental design.

235

CSE293 Computer Science & Engineering Design Laboratory Marklin Computer Controllable Model Trains Project  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CSE293 Computer Science & Engineering Design Laboratory Marklin Computer Controllable Model Trains" of the system. The real time control is for, of all things, model railroading trains. If you had them as a kid trains, where there is digital control for every train (each train has an onboard computer), for switches

Demurjian, Steven A.

236

HANFORD RIVER PROTECTION PROJECT ENHANCED MISSION PLANNING THROUGH INNOVATIVE TOOLS LIFECYCLE COST MODELING AND AQUEOUS THERMODYNAMIC MODELING - 12134  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Two notable modeling efforts within the Hanford Tank Waste Operations Simulator (HTWOS) are currently underway to (1) increase the robustness of the underlying chemistry approximations through the development and implementation of an aqueous thermodynamic model, and (2) add enhanced planning capabilities to the HTWOS model through development and incorporation of the lifecycle cost model (LCM). Since even seemingly small changes in apparent waste composition or treatment parameters can result in large changes in quantities of high-level waste (HLW) and low-activity waste (LAW) glass, mission duration or lifecycle cost, a solubility model that more accurately depicts the phases and concentrations of constituents in tank waste is required. The LCM enables evaluation of the interactions of proposed changes on lifecycle mission costs, which is critical for decision makers.

PIERSON KL; MEINERT FL

2012-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

237

3D Geologic Modeling of the Southern San Joaquin Basin for the Westcarb Kimberlina Demonstration Project- A Status Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of the Westcarb Kimberlina pilot project is to safely inject 250,000 t CO{sub 2}/yr for four years into the deep subsurface at the Clean Energy Systems (CES) Kimberlina power plant in southern San Joaquin Valley, California. In support of this effort, we have constructed a regional 3D geologic model of the southern San Joaquin basin. The model is centered on the Kimberlina power plant and spans the UTM range E 260000-343829 m and N 3887700-4000309 m; the depth of the model ranges from the topographic surface to >9000 m below sea level. The mapped geologic units are Quaternary basin fill, Tertiary marine and continental deposits, and pre-Tertiary basement rocks. Detailed geologic data, including surface maps, borehole data, and geophysical surveys, were used to define the geologic framework. Fifteen time-stratigraphic formations were mapped, as well as >140 faults. The free surface is based on a 10 m lateral resolution DEM. We use Earthvision (Dynamic Graphics, Inc.) to integrate the geologic and geophysical information into a 3D model of x,y,z,p nodes, where p is a unique integer index value representing the geologic unit. This grid represents a realistic model of the subsurface geology and provides input into subsequent flow simulations.

Wagoner, J

2009-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

238

3D Geologic Modeling of the Southern San Joaquin Basin for the Westcarb Kimberlina Demonstration Project- A Status Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of the Westcarb Kimberlina pilot project is to safely inject 250,000 t CO{sub 2}/yr for four years into the deep subsurface at the Clean Energy Systems (CES) Kimberlina power plant in southern San Joaquin Valley, California. In support of this effort, we have constructed a regional 3D geologic model of the southern San Joaquin basin. The model is centered on the Kimberlina power plant and spans the UTM range E 260000-343829 m and N 3887700-4000309 m; the depth of the model ranges from the topographic surface to >9000 m below sea level. The mapped geologic units are Quaternary basin fill, Tertiary marine and continental deposits, and pre-Tertiary basement rocks. Detailed geologic data, including surface maps, borehole data, and geophysical surveys, were used to define the geologic framework. Fifteen time-stratigraphic formations were mapped, as well as >140 faults. The free surface is based on a 10 m lateral resolution DEM. We use Earthvision (Dynamic Graphics, Inc.) to integrate the geologic and geophysical information into a 3D model of x,y,z,p nodes, where p is a unique integer index value representing the geologic unit. This grid represents a realistic model of the subsurface geology and provides input into subsequent flow simulations.

Wagoner, J

2009-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

239

Groundwater Model Validation for the Project Shoal Area, Corrective Action Unit 447  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Stoller has examined newly collected water level data in multiple wells at the Shoal site. On the basis of these data and information presented in the report, we are currently unable to confirm that the model is successfully validated. Most of our concerns regarding the model stem from two findings: (1) measured water level data do not provide clear evidence of a prevailing lateral flow direction; and (2) the groundwater flow system has been and continues to be in a transient state, which contrasts with assumed steady-state conditions in the model. The results of DRI's model validation efforts and observations made regarding water level behavior are discussed in the following sections. A summary of our conclusions and recommendations for a path forward are also provided in this letter report.

None

2008-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

240

Modeling the solar thermal receiver for the CSPonD Project  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The objective was to create an accurate steady state thermal model of a molten salt receiver prototype with a horizontal divider plate in the molten salt for Concentrated Solar Power on Demand (CSPonD). The purpose of the ...

Rees, Jennifer A. (Jennifer Anne)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "model intercomparison project" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Stochastic Modeling of Future Highway Maintenance Costs for Flexible Type Highway Pavement Construction Projects  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

that affect pavement performances; 2) develop a stochastic model that predicts future maintenance costs of flexible-type pavement in Texas. The study data were gathered through the Pavement Management Information System (PMIS) containing more than 190...

Kim, Yoo Hyun

2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

242

Project Profile: Physics-Based Reliability Models for Supercritical-CO2 Turbomachinery Components  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

GE, under the Physics of Reliability: Evaluating Design Insights for Component Technologies in Solar (PREDICTS) Program will be leveraging internally developed models to predict the reliability of hybrid gas bearing (HGB) and dry gas seal (DGS) components in the turboexpander of a supercritical CO2 turbine. The Bayesian model is to include phase changes, low cycle fatigue/high cycle fatigue, dynamic instabilities, and corrosion processes.

243

The Community Earth System Model: A Framework for Collaborative Research  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Community Earth System Model (CESM) is a flexible and extensible community tool used to investigate a diverse set of earth system interactions across multiple time and space scales. This global coupled model is a natural evolution from its predecessor, the Community Climate System Model, following the incorporation of new earth system capabilities. These include the ability to simulate biogeochemical cycles, atmospheric chemistry, ice sheets, and a high-top atmosphere. These and other new model capabilities are enabling investigations into a wide range of pressing scientific questions, providing new predictive capabilities and increasing our collective knowledge about the behavior and interactions of the earth system. Simulations with numerous configurations of the CESM have been provided to the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 5 (CMIP5) and are being analyzed by the broader community of scientists. Additionally, the model source code and associated documentation are freely available to the scientific community to use for earth system studies, making it a true community tool. Here we describe this earth modeling system, its various possible configurations, and illustrate its capabilities with a few science highlights.

Hurrell, Jim; Holland, Marika M.; Gent, Peter R.; Ghan, Steven J.; Kay, Jennifer; Kushner, P.; Lamarque, J.-F.; Large, William G.; Lawrence, David M.; Lindsay, Keith; Lipscomb, William; Long , Matthew; Mahowald, N.; Marsh, D.; Neale, Richard; Rasch, Philip J.; Vavrus, Steven J.; Vertenstein, Mariana; Bader, David C.; Collins, William D.; Hack, James; Kiehl, J. T.; Marshall, Shawn

2013-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

244

Atmospheric Environment 42 (2008) 35103527 MICS-Asia II: Model intercomparison and evaluation of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.engardt@smhi.se (M. Engardt), Cecilia.Bennet@smhi.se (C. Bennet), cfung@epd.gov.hk (C. Fung), alick@epd.gov.hk (A

245

An Intercomparison of Radar-Based Liquid Cloud Microphysics Retrievals and Implication for Model Evaluation Studies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Research Facility of the US Department of Energy provides long-term continuous cloud and radiation datasets Forks, ND 58202, U.S.A. 4 University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT 84112, U.S.A. Corresponding Author Dong of single-frequency radar approaches. It is therefore suggested that data users should use the retrievals

Dong, Xiquan

246

MSC-E Technical Report 1/2003 Intercomparison Study of Numerical Models for  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-Planck-Strasse 1, D-21502 Geesthacht Germany fax: 49 41 52 87 23 66 e-mail: ebinghaus@dvmc10.gkss.de Ilia ILYIN - Research Centre, Institute of Hydrophysics Max-Planck-Strasse 1 D-21502 Geesthacht GERMANY tel: 49 41 52 87

247

Regional climate effects of irrigation and urbanization in the western united states: a model intercomparison  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In the two northern grid cells, sensible heat flux decreasedthe two southern grid cells sensible heat flux increased andgrid cells that were irrigated in Figure 5. January and August latent heat

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

2006 EUR 22241 EN report on model inter-comparison performed  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Centre Institute for Environment and Sustainability (IES) Climate Change Unit TP 280 I-21020 Ispra (Va) Tel. +39 0332 789621 peter.bergamaschi@jrc.it Document also available on the JRC/IES/CCU world wide is to provide scientific and technical support to the European Union's policies for protecting the environment

Haak, Hein

249

Intercomparison of model simulations of mixed-phase clouds observed during  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsingFunInfrared Land SurfaceVirus-InfectedIntelligentCO2the ARM Mixed-Phase Arctic

250

JOURNAL OF GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH: ATMOSPHERES, VOL. 118, 97439752, doi:10.1002/jgrd.50762, 2013 The impact of abrupt suspension of solar radiation management  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the Geoengineering Model Intercomparison Project (GeoMIP) Andy Jones,1 Jim M. Haywood,1,2 Kari Alterskjær,3 Olivier the sudden termination of geoengineering after 50 years of offsetting a 1% per annum increase in CO2 of the Geoengineering Model Intercomparison Project. The models agree on a rapid increase in global-mean temperature

Moore, John

251

Equilibrium Response and Transient Dynamics Datasets from VEMAP: Vegetation/Ecosystem Modeling and Analysis Project  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

Users of the VEMAP Portal can access input files of numerical data that include monthly and daily files of geographic data, soil and site files, scenario files, etc. Model results from Phase I, the Equilibrium Response datasets, are available through the NCAR anonymous FTP site at http://www.cgd.ucar.edu/vemap/vresults.html. Phase II, Transient Dynamics, include climate datasets, models results, and analysis tools. Many supplemental files are also available from the main data page at http://www.cgd.ucar.edu/vemap/datasets.html.

252

Project Year Project Title  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Project Year 2011-2012 Project Title Using M-Health and GIS Technology in the Field to Improve-specialized, but practically useless skill. Solution One goal of this summer's Applied Geographic Information Systems in Public lessons about observational epidemiology. Technologies Used Geographic Info System (GIS), Blackboard

Gray, Jeffrey J.

253

Empirical Evaluation of Defect Projection Models for Widely-deployed Production Software Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ray, P.Santhanam Center for Software Engineering IBM T.J. Watson Research Center Hawthorne, NY 10532 Descriptors D.2.8 [Software Engineering]: Empirical Studies, Metrics, Reliability Engineering Keywords Defect modeling, empirical research, COTS, open source software, maintenance resource planning, software insurance

Herbsleb, James D.

254

The H-Cube Project: Hydrodynamics, Heterogeneity and Homogenization in CO2 storage modeling  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Audigane, BRGM, E. Mouche, CEA, S. Viseur, CEREGE, D. Guérillot, TERRA 3E And the H-CUBE team Key words-scaling processes We propose to assess the buoyant forces on the CO2 and brine vertical migration of heterogeneity field distribution on the same 3D static earth model appropriate ranking measures of the static

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

255

Atmospheric Climate Model Experiments Performed at Multiple Horizontal Resolutions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents salient features of version 3.3 of the Community Atmosphere Model (CAM3.3) and of three climate simulations in which the resolution of its latitude-longitude grid was systematically increased. For all these simulations of global atmospheric climate during the period 1980-1999, observed monthly ocean surface temperatures and sea ice extents were prescribed according to standard Atmospheric Model Intercomparison Project (AMIP) values. These CAM3.3 resolution experiments served as control runs for subsequent simulations of the climatic effects of agricultural irrigation, the focus of a Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project. The CAM3.3 model was able to replicate basic features of the historical climate, although biases in a number of atmospheric variables were evident. Increasing horizontal resolution also generally failed to ameliorate the large-scale errors in most of the climate variables that could be compared with observations. A notable exception was the simulation of precipitation, which incrementally improved with increasing resolution, especially in regions where orography plays a central role in determining the local hydroclimate.

Phillips, T; Bala, G; Gleckler, P; Lobell, D; Mirin, A; Maxwell, R; Rotman, D

2007-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

256

Understanding Building Infrastructure and Building Operation through DOE Asset Score Model: Lessons Learned from a Pilot Project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is developing a national voluntary energy asset score system to help building owners to evaluate the as-built physical characteristics (including building envelope, the mechanical and electrical systems) and overall building energy efficiency, independent of occupancy and operational choices. The energy asset score breaks down building energy use information by simulating building performance under typical operating and occupancy conditions for a given use type. A web-based modeling tool, the energy asset score tool facilitates the implementation of the asset score system. The tool consists of a simplified user interface built on a centralized simulation engine (EnergyPlus). It is intended to reduce both the implementation cost for the users and increase modeling standardization compared with an approach that requires users to build their own energy models. A pilot project with forty-two buildings (consisting mostly offices and schools) was conducted in 2012. This paper reports the findings. Participants were asked to collect a minimum set of building data and enter it into the asset score tool. Participants also provided their utility bills, existing ENERGY STAR scores, and previous energy audit/modeling results if available. The results from the asset score tool were compared with the building energy use data provided by the pilot participants. Three comparisons were performed. First, the actual building energy use, either from the utility bills or via ENERGY STAR Portfolio Manager, was compared with the modeled energy use. It was intended to examine how well the energy asset score represents a buildingís system efficiencies, and how well it is correlated to a buildingís actual energy consumption. Second, calibrated building energy models (where they exist) were used to examine any discrepancies between the asset score model and the pilot participant buildingsí [known] energy use pattern. This comparison examined the end use breakdowns and more detailed time series data. Third, ASHRAE 90.1 prototype buildings were also used as an industry standard modeling approach to test the accuracy level of the asset score tool. Our analysis showed that the asset score tool, which uses simplified building simulation, could provide results comparable to a more detailed energy model. The buildingsí as-built efficiency can be reflected in the energy asset score. An analysis between the modeled energy use through the asset score tool and the actual energy use from the utility bills can further inform building owners about the effectiveness of their buildingís operation and maintenance.

Wang, Na; Goel, Supriya; Gorrissen, Willy J.; Makhmalbaf, Atefe

2013-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

257

Project Accounts  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Project Accounts Project Accounts Overview Project accounts are designed to facilitate collaborative computing by allowing multiple users to use the same account. All actions...

258

A. Dias and P.G. Ioannou Company and Project Evaluation Model for Privately-Promoted Infrastructure Projects Page 1 of 16  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

that they should not own and/or operate certain types of facilities because of their less effective utilization By Antonio Dias, Jr.,1 A.M. ASCE, and Photios G. Ioannou,2 A.M. ASCE ABSTRACT: The decline in government (Build- Operate-Own) projects where private-sector companies (including construction companies) become

259

Hydrologic Response to Climate Variability, Climate Change, and Climate Extreme in the U.S.: Climate Model Evaluation and Projections  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Water resources are sensitive to climate variability and change; predictions of seasonal to interannual climate variations and projections of long-term climate trends can provide significant values in managing water resources. This study examines the control (1975Ė1995) and future (1995Ė2100) climate simulated by a global climate model (GCM) and a regional climate simulation driven by the GCM control simulation for the U.S. Comparison of the regional climate simulation with observations across 13 subregions showed that the simulation captured the seasonality and the distributions of precipitation rate quite well. The GCM control and climate change simulations showed that, as a result of a 1% increase in greenhouse gas concentrations per year, there will be a warming of 2Ė3įC across the U.S. from 2000 to 2100. Although precipitation is not projected to change during this century, the warming trend will increase evapotranspiration to reduce annual basin mean runoff over five subregions along the coastal and south-central U.S.

Leung, Lai R.; Qian, Yun

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Climate simulations and projections with a super-parameterized climate model. Journal of Environmental Modeling and Software. Volume: 60. Pages: 134-152  

DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

The mean climate and its variability are analyzed in a suite of numerical experiments with a fully coupled general circulation model in which subgrid-scale moist convection is explicitly represented through embedded 2D cloud-system resolving models. Control simulations forced by the present day, fixed atmospheric carbon dioxide concentration are conducted using two horizontal resolutions and validated against observations and reanalyses. The mean state simulated by the higher resolution configuration has smaller biases. Climate variability also shows some sensitivity to resolution but not as uniform as in the case of mean state. The interannual and seasonal variability are better represented in the simulation at lower resolution whereas the subseasonal variability is more accurate in the higher resolution simulation. The equilibrium climate sensitivity of the model is estimated from a simulation forced by an abrupt quadrupling of the atmospheric carbon dioxide concentration. The equilibrium climate sensitivity temperature of the model is 2.77 degrees C, and this value is slightly smaller than the mean value (3.37 degrees C) of contemporary models using conventional representation of cloud processes. The climate change simulation forced by the representative concentration pathway 8.5 scenario projects an increase in the frequency of severe droughts over most of the North America.

Stan, Cristiana; Xu, Li

2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "model intercomparison project" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Modelling the economic and social consequences of drought under future projections of climate change  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on agriculture (scenario one), seasonal drought effects on agriculture (scenario two), and sudden drought effects on agriculture (scenario three). .............................................................................. 140 Figure 6.2: Simulated change... in VA of Spainís economy during the 1990-1995 drought modelled using SPI-12 for the three agricultural scenarios ................................................ 142 Figure 6.3: Simulated change in VA of Spainís economy during the 1998-2002 drought...

Jenkins, Katie L.

2012-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

262

Numerical-model developments for stimulation technologies in the Eastern Gas Shales Project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

These efforts were directed towards the development of a numerical tensile failure model that could be used to make a parameter sensitivity study of the EGSP wellbore stimulation methods for gas recovery in Devonain shales, calculations were performed using the NTS Multi-Frac Mineback Experiments as the geometry, boundary conditions and material properties of the models. Several major accomplishments were achieved during this task. These include: development of a Crack and Void Strain (CAVS) tensile failure model for one-dimensional fracture analysis using the one-dimensional geometries available in SAI's STEALTH 1-D finite-difference code; modification of the original CAVS tensile failure criteria to improve its representation of multiple fracture development by introducing a logic that adjusts the material's tensile strength (both for crack initiation and crack propagation) according to the degree of cracking that has occurred; adding a submodel to CAVS to allow for cracking propping when a crack is reclosed and to require energy to be expanded during this process; adding a submodel to CAVS to allow for crack pressurization when a crack void strain is in communication with the fluid pressure of the borehole; and performing a parameter sensitivity analysis to determine the effect that the material properties of the rock has on crack development, to include the effects of yielding and compaction. Using the CAVS model and its submodels, a series of STEALTH calculations were then performed to estimate the response of the NTS unaugmented Dynafrac experiment. Pressure, acceleration and stress time histories and snapshot data were obtained and should aid in the evaluation of these experiments. Crack patterns around the borehole were also calculated and should be valuable in a comparison with the fracture patterns observed during mineback.

Barbour, T.G.; Maxwell, D.E.; Young, C.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Project Team Participants Summary  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-sponsored by Information, Society & Culture) Energy--7 project teams 15 Schools and Institutes Represented Trinity College-Year Seminar: Mapping and Modeling Early Modern Venice #12;

Ferrari, Silvia

264

Asian Tracer Experiment and Atmospheric Modeling (TEAM) Project: Draft Field Work Plan for the Asian Long-Range Tracer Experiment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report provides an experimental plan for a proposed Asian long-range tracer study as part of the international Tracer Experiment and Atmospheric Modeling (TEAM) Project. The TEAM partners are China, Japan, South Korea and the United States. Optimal times of year to conduct the study, meteorological measurements needed, proposed tracer release locations, proposed tracer sampling locations and the proposed durations of tracer releases and subsequent sampling are given. Also given are the activities necessary to prepare for the study and the schedule for completing the preparation activities leading to conducting the actual field operations. This report is intended to provide the TEAM members with the information necessary for planning and conducting the Asian long-range tracer study. The experimental plan is proposed, at this time, to describe the efforts necessary to conduct the Asian long-range tracer study, and the plan will undoubtedly be revised and refined as the planning goes forward over the next year.

Allwine, K Jerry; Flaherty, Julia E.

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Uncertainties in nuclear transition matrix elements for neutrinoless {beta}{beta} decay within the projected-Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The nuclear transition matrix elements M{sup (0{nu})} for the neutrinoless {beta}{beta} decay of {sup 94,96}Zr, {sup 98,100}Mo, {sup 104}Ru, {sup 110}Pd, {sup 128,130}Te, and {sup 150}Nd isotopes in the case of 0{sup +}{yields}0{sup +} transition are calculated using the projected-Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov wave functions, which are eigenvectors of four different parametrizations of a Hamiltonian with pairing plus multipolar effective two-body interaction. Employing two (three) different parametrizations of Jastrow-type short-range correlations, a set of eight (twelve) different nuclear transition matrix elements M{sup (0{nu})} is built for each decay, whose averages in conjunction with their standard deviations provide an estimate of the model's uncertainties.

Rath, P. K. [Department of Physics, University of Lucknow, Lucknow 226007 (India); Chandra, R. [Department of Physics, University of Lucknow, Lucknow 226007 (India); Department of Physics and Meteorology, Indian Institute of Technology, Kharagpur 721302 (India); Chaturvedi, K. [Department of Physics, Bundelkhand University, Jhansi 284128 (India); Raina, P. K. [Department of Physics and Meteorology, Indian Institute of Technology, Kharagpur 721302 (India); Hirsch, J. G. [Instituto de Ciencias Nucleares, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, 04510 Mexico, D.F. (Mexico)

2010-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

266

Shrinkage and Swelling of Coal Induced by Desorption and Sorption of Fluids: Theoretical Model and Interpretation of a Field Project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Geologic sequestration in deep unmineable coal seams and enhanced coalbed methane production is a promising choice, economically and environmentally, to reduce anthropogenic gases such as carbon dioxide in the atmosphere. Unmineable coal seams are typically known to adsorb large amounts of carbon dioxide in comparison to the sizeable amounts of sorbed methane, which raises the potential for large scale sequestration projects. During the process of sequestration, carbon dioxide is injected into the coalbed and desorbed methane is produced. The coal matrix is believed to shrink when a gas is desorbed and swell when a gas is sorbed, sometimes causing profound changes in the cleat porosity and permeability of the coal seam. These changes may have significant impact on the reservoir performance. Therefore, it is necessary to understand the combined influence of swelling and shrinkage, and geomechanical properties including elastic modulus, cleat porosity, and permeability of the reservoir. The present paper deals with the influence of swelling and shrinkage on the reservoir performance, and the geomechanical response of the reservoir system during the process of geologic sequestration of carbon dioxide and enhanced coalbed methane production in an actual field project located in northern New Mexico. A three-dimensional swelling and shrinkage model was developed and implemented into an existing reservoir model to understand the influence of geomechanical parameters, as well as swelling and shrinkage properties, on the reservoir performance. Numerical results obtained from the modified simulator were compared to available measured values from that site and previous studies. Results show that swelling and shrinkage, and the combination of geomechanical and operational parameters, have a significant influence on the performance of the reservoir system.

Siriwardane, H.J.; Gondle, R.K.; Smith, D.H.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

THERMAL MODELING ANALYSIS OF CST MEDIA IN THE SMALL COLUMN ION EXCHANGE PROJECT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Models have been developed to simulate the thermal characteristics of Crystalline Silicotitanate (CST) ion exchange media fully loaded with radioactive cesium in a column configuration and distributed within a waste storage tank. This work was conducted to support the Small Column Ion Exchange (SCIX) program which is focused on processing dissolved, high-sodium salt waste for the removal of specific radionuclides (including Cs-137, Sr-90, and actinides) within a High Level Waste (HLW) storage tank at the Savannah River Site. The SCIX design includes CST columns inserted and supported in the tank top risers for cesium removal. Temperature distributions and maximum temperatures across the column were calculated with a focus on process upset conditions. A two-dimensional computational modeling approach for the in-column ion-exchange domain was taken to include conservative, bounding estimates for key parameters such that the results would provide the maximum centerline temperatures achievable under the design configurations using a feed composition known to promote high cesium loading on CST. One salt processing scenario includes the transport of the loaded (and possibly ground) CST media to the treatment tank floor. Therefore, additional thermal modeling calculations were conducted using a three-dimensional approach to evaluate temperature distributions for the entire in-tank domain including distribution of the spent CST media either as a mound or a flat layer on the tank floor. These calculations included mixtures of CST with HLW sludge or loaded Monosodium Titanate (MST) media used for strontium/actinide sorption. The current full-scale design for the CST column includes one central cooling pipe and four outer cooling tubes. Most calculations assumed that the fluid within the column was stagnant (i.e. no buoyancy-induced flow) for a conservative estimate. A primary objective of these calculations was to estimate temperature distributions across packed CST beds immersed in waste supernate or filled with dry air under various accident scenarios. Accident scenarios evaluated included loss of salt solution flow through the bed (a primary heat transfer mechanism), inadvertent column drainage, and loss of active cooling in the column. The calculation results showed that for a wet CST column with active cooling through one central and four outer tubes and 35 C ambient external air, the peak temperature for the fully-loaded column is about 63 C under the loss of fluid flow accident, which is well below the supernate boiling point. The peak temperature for the naturally-cooled (no active, engineered cooling) wet column is 156 C under fully-loaded conditions, exceeding the 130 C boiling point. Under these conditions, supernate boiling would maintain the column temperature near 130 C until all supernate was vaporized. Without active engineered cooling and assuming a dry column suspended in unventilated air at 35 C, the fully-loaded column is expected to rise to a maximum of about 258 C due to the combined loss-of coolant and column drainage accidents. The modeling results demonstrate that the baseline design using one central and four outer cooling tubes provides a highly efficient cooling mechanism for reducing the maximum column temperature. Results for the in-tank modeling calculations clearly indicate that when realistic heat transfer boundary conditions are imposed on the bottom surface of the tank wall, as much as 450 gallons of ground CST (a volume equivalent to two ion exchange processing cycles) in an ideal hemispherical shape (the most conservative geometry) can be placed in the tank without exceeding the 100 C wall temperature limit. Furthermore, in the case of an evenly-distributed flat layer, the tank wall reaches the temperature limit after the ground CST material reaches a height of approximately 8 inches.

Lee, S.

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

TORP (Tertiary Oil Recovery Project) stream tube model for waterflood performance calculations in a reservoir with arbitrary well patterns and irregular boundaries  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Tertiary Oil Recovery Project stream tube model was developed as a tool to help oil operators in Kansas evaluate and understand their waterflood projects in a more systematic approach. The model utilizes the stream tube concept and Buckley-Leverett theory and can be applied to any homogeneous reservoir with arbitrary well patterns and regular or irregular boundaries. It also can be applied to tracer projects to estimate tracer breakthrough time if the tracer is injected during the stage of high water-oil ratio. The computer package has been prepared in a fashion such that minimum effort and interaction are required for the user to obtain the final results from specified input data. The model was applied to an example problem consisting of a 5-spot pattern. 19 references.

Vossoughi, S.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

JOURNAL OF GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH: ATMOSPHERES, VOL. 118, 123, doi:10.1002/jgrd.50868, 2013 The hydrological impact of geoengineering in the Geoengineering  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The hydrological impact of geoengineering in the Geoengineering Model Intercomparison Project (GeoMIP) Simone to the Geoengineering Model Intercomparison Project (GeoMIP). We contrast an idealized experiment, G1, where the global of extremes point to a considerable weakening of the hydrological cycle in a geoengineered world. Citation

Moore, John

270

Mobility chains analysis of technologies for passenger cars and light duty vehicles fueled with biofuels : application of the Greet model to project the role of biomass in America's energy future (RBAEF) project.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Role of Biomass in America's Energy Future (RBAEF) is a multi-institution, multiple-sponsor research project. The primary focus of the project is to analyze and assess the potential of transportation fuels derived from cellulosic biomass in the years 2015 to 2030. For this project, researchers at Dartmouth College and Princeton University designed and simulated an advanced fermentation process to produce fuel ethanol/protein, a thermochemical process to produce Fischer-Tropsch diesel (FTD) and dimethyl ether (DME), and a combined heat and power plant to co-produce steam and electricity using the ASPEN Plus{trademark} model. With support from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) conducted, for the RBAEF project, a mobility chains or well-to-wheels (WTW) analysis using the Greenhouse gases, Regulated Emissions, and Energy use in Transportation (GREET) model developed at ANL. The mobility chains analysis was intended to estimate the energy consumption and emissions associated with the use of different production biofuels in light-duty vehicle technologies.

Wu, M.; Wu, Y.; Wang, M; Energy Systems

2008-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

271

The CoDECS project: a publicly available suite of cosmological N-body simulations for interacting dark energy models  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present the largest set of N-body and hydrodynamical simulations to date for cosmological models featuring a direct interaction between the Dark Energy (DE) scalar field, responsible of the observed cosmic acceleration, and the Cold Dark Matter (CDM) fluid. With respect to previous works, our simulations considerably extend the statistical significance of the simulated volume and cover a wider range of different realizations of the interacting DE scenario, including the recently proposed bouncing coupled DE model. Furthermore, all the simulations are normalized in order to be consistent with the present bounds on the amplitude of density perturbations at last scattering, thereby providing the first realistic determination of the effects of a DE coupling for cosmological growth histories fully compatible with the latest Cosmic Microwave Background data. As a first basic analysis, we have studied the impact of the coupling on the nonlinear matter power spectrum and on the bias between the CDM and baryon distributions, as a function of redshift and scale. For the former, we have addressed the issue of the degeneracy between the effects of the coupling and other standard cosmological parameters, as e.g sigma_8, showing how the redshift evolution of the linear amplitude or the scale dependence of the nonlinear power spectrum might provide a way to break the degeneracy. For the latter, instead, we have computed the redshift and scale dependence of the bias in all our different models showing how a growing coupling or a bouncing coupled DE scenario provide much stronger effects with respect to constant coupling models. We refer to this vast numerical initiative as the COupled Dark Energy Cosmological Simulations project, or CoDECS, and we hereby release all the CoDECS outputs for public use through a dedicated web database, providing information on how to access and interpret the data.

Marco Baldi

2012-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

272

THE SUMMER NORTH ATLANTIC OSCILLATION IN CMIP3 MODELS AND RELATED UNCERTAINTIES IN PROJECTED SUMMER DRYING IN EUROPE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in these projections. 1) Introduction Credible projections of future climate change on a regional scale require Bilt, Netherlands 4. NOAA/Earth System Research Laboratory, and CIRES Climate Diagnostics Center projections of summer drying in the Euro-Mediterranean region related to errors and uncertainties

Stoffelen, Ad

273

Project OPTEX: Field study at a petrochemical facility to assess optical remote sensing and dispersion modeling techniques  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The American Petroleum Inst. has conducted a field study at a petrochemical facility for the purpose of (1) testing the ability of optical remote sensing (ORS) techniques to characterize fugitive emissions, and (2) assembling ambient and tracer sampler data for evaluating air dispersion models. The study, referred to as the OPTEX (Operational Petrochemical Tracer Experiment) Project, took place during October 1996 at a Texas petrochemical facility. This paper reports on the design of the field study and summarizes the measurements that were obtained in the field. Several aspects of the field study are described in the paper: the types and locations of the emission releases and tracer gases that were used, the deployment of tracer samplers at various downwind distances, the use of open-path FTIR (OP-FTIR) equipment at the site to quantify tracer gas emissions, special short-term tracer gas emissions designed to test the ability of the ORS systems to detect accidental releases, and the use of a Doppler sodar to evaluate vertical profiles of wind and turbulence upwind and downwind of the facility. The data base for this study, as well as that from an earlier field study that took place at the Duke Forest green field site in North Carolina, will be used for evaluating air dispersion model performance and the ability of ORS measurements to quantify fugitive emissions.

Paien, R.J. [ENSR Corp., Acton, MA (United States); Zwicker, J.O. [Remote Sensing Air, Inc., St. Louis, MO (United States); Feldman, H. [American Petroleum Inst., Washington, DC (United States)

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

274

Project Description: page 1 Project Description  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Project Description: page 1 Project Description I. Introduction: Josephson junction networks Over the past 25 years, superconducting Josephson junctions have gradually become one of the major topics standards. Our research uses Josephson junctions as model systems for problems in nonlinear and neural

Segall, Ken

275

Modeling Climate-Water Impacts on Electricity Sector Capacity Expansion: Preprint  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Climate change has the potential to exacerbate water availability concerns for thermal power plant cooling, which is responsible for 41% of U.S. water withdrawals. This analysis describes an initial link between climate, water, and electricity systems using the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) Regional Energy Deployment System (ReEDS) electricity system capacity expansion model. Average surface water projections from Coupled Model Intercomparison Project 3 (CMIP3) data are applied to surface water rights available to new generating capacity in ReEDS, and electric sector growth is compared with and without climate-influenced water rights. The mean climate projection has only a small impact on national or regional capacity growth and water use because most regions have sufficient unappropriated or previously retired water rights to offset climate impacts. Climate impacts are notable in southwestern states that purchase fewer water rights and obtain a greater share from wastewater and other higher-cost water resources. The electric sector climate impacts demonstrated herein establish a methodology to be later exercised with more extreme climate scenarios and a more rigorous representation of legal and physical water availability.

Cohen, S. M.; Macknick, J.; Averyt, K.; Meldrum, J.

2014-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

NA22 Model Cities Project - LL244T An Intelligent Transportation System-Based Radiation Alert and Detection System  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this project was twofold: first, provide an understanding of the technical foundation and planning required for deployment of Intelligent Transportation System (ITS)-based system architectures for the protection of New York City from a terrorist attack using a vehicle-deployed nuclear device; second, work with stakeholders to develop mutual understanding of the technologies and tactics required for threat detection/identification and establish guidelines for designing operational systems and procedures. During the course of this project we interviewed and coordinated analysis with people from the New Jersey State Attorney General's office, the New Jersey State Police, the Port Authority of New York/New Jersey, the Counterterrorism Division of the New York City Police Department, the New Jersey Transit Authority, the State of New Jersey Department of Transportation, TRANSCOM and a number of contractors involved with state and federal intelligent transportation development and implementation. The basic system architecture is shown in the figure below. In an actual system deployment, radiation sensors would be co-located with existing ITS elements and the data will be sent to the Traffic Operations Center. A key element of successful system operation is the integration of vehicle data, such as license plate, EZ pass ID, vehicle type/color and radiation signature. A threat data base can also be implemented and utilized in cases where there is a suspect vehicle identified from other intelligence sources or a mobile detector system. Another key aspect of an operational architecture is the procedures used to verify the threat and plan interdiction. This was a major focus of our work and discussed later in detail. In support of the operational analysis, we developed a detailed traffic simulation model that is described extensively in the body of the report.

Peglow, S

2004-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

277

Project Fact Sheet Project Brief  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Project Fact Sheet Project Brief: Construction Project Team: Project Facts & Figures: Budget: £500,000 Funding Source: Capital Construction Project Programme: Start on Site: October 2010 End Date : April 2011 Occupation Date: n/a For further information contact Project Manager as listed above or the Imperial College

278

Project Fact Sheet Project Brief  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Project Fact Sheet Project Brief: This project refurbished half of the 5th and 7th floors on the Faculty of Medicine, please visit: http://www1.imperial.ac.uk/medicine/ Construction Project Team: Project Facts & Figures: Budget: £3,500,000 Funding Source: SRIF III Construction Project Programme: Start

279

Response of precipitation extremes to idealized global warming in an aqua-planet climate model: Towards robust projection across different horizontal resolutions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Current climate models produce quite heterogeneous projections for the responses of precipitation extremes to future climate change. To help understand the range of projections from multimodel ensembles, a series of idealized 'aquaplanet' Atmospheric General Circulation Model (AGCM) runs have been performed with the Community Atmosphere Model CAM3. These runs have been analysed to identify the effects of horizontal resolution on precipitation extreme projections under two simple global warming scenarios. We adopt the aquaplanet framework for our simulations to remove any sensitivity to the spatial resolution of external inputs and to focus on the roles of model physics and dynamics. Results show that a uniform increase of sea surface temperature (SST) and an increase of low-to-high latitude SST gradient both lead to increase of precipitation and precipitation extremes for most latitudes. The perturbed SSTs generally have stronger impacts on precipitation extremes than on mean precipitation. Horizontal model resolution strongly affects the global warming signals in the extreme precipitation in tropical and subtropical regions but not in high latitude regions. This study illustrates that the effects of horizontal resolution have to be taken into account to develop more robust projections of precipitation extremes.

Li, F.; Collins, W.D.; Wehner, M.F.; Williamson, D.L.; Olson, J.G.

2011-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

280

SUPPORT FOR THE COMPLETION OF THE ARM PROJECT AND DEVELOPMENT OF A FIELD DEMONSTRATION OF THE GWIS MODEL FOR A VIRTUAL ENTERPRISE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Strategic Technology Resources, L.L.C. (STR) provided work for Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) in response to Request for Proposal 005BZ0019-35. The objectives of the work in this project were to: (1) support the completion of the Advanced Reservoir Management (ARM) cooperative research and development agreement (CRADA) LA9502037, and (2) support the development of a field demonstration of the LANL-developed Global Weapons Information System (GWIS) model for virtual enterprises. The second objective was contingent upon DOE approval of the Advanced Information Management (AIM) CRADA. At the request of the LANL Technical Representative, the project was granted a no-cost extension to November 30, 1999. As part of the project, STR provided managerial support for the ARM CRADA by: (1) assessing the data resources of the participating companies, (2) facilitating the transfer of technical data to LANL, (3) preparing reports, (4) managing communications between the parties to the ARM CRADA, and (5) assisting with the dissemination of information between the parties to technical professional societies and trade associations. The first phase of the current project was to continue to engage subcontractors to perform tasks in the ARM CRADA for which LANL expertise was lacking. All of the ARM field studies required of the project were completed, and final reports for all of the project studies are appended to this final report. The second phase of the current project was to support the field demonstration of the GWIS model for virtual enterprises in an oilfield setting. STR developed a hypertext Webpage that describes the concept and implementation of a virtual enterprise for reservoir management in the petroleum industry. Contents of the hypertext document are included in this report on the project.

F. DAVID MARTIN; MARK B. MURPHY - STRATEGIC TECHNOLOGY RESOURCES, LLC

1999-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "model intercomparison project" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

LONG-TERM GLOBAL WATER USE PROJECTIONS USING SIX SOCIOECONOMIC SCENARIOS IN AN INTEGRATED ASSESSMENT MODELING FRAMEWORK  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this paper, we assess future water demands for the agricultural (irrigation and livestock), energy (electricity generation, primary energy production and processing), industrial (manufacturing and mining), and municipal sectors, by incorporating water demands into a technologically-detailed global integrated assessment model of energy, agriculture, and climate change Ė the Global Change Assessment Model (GCAM). Base-year water demandsóboth gross withdrawals and net consumptive useóare assigned to specific modeled activities in a way that maximizes consistency between bottom-up estimates of water demand intensities of specific technologies and practices, and top-down regional and sectoral estimates of water use. The energy, industrial, and municipal sectors are represented in fourteen geopolitical regions, with the agricultural sector further disaggregated into as many as eighteen agro-ecological zones (AEZs) within each region. We assess future water demands representing six socioeconomic scenarios, with no constraints imposed by future water supplies. The scenarios observe increases in global water withdrawals from 3,578 km3 year-1 in 2005 to 5,987 Ė 8,374 km3 year-1 in 2050, and to 4,719 Ė 12,290 km3 year-1 in 2095. Comparing the projected total regional water withdrawals to the historical supply of renewable freshwater, the Middle East exhibits the highest levels of water scarcity throughout the century, followed by India; water scarcity increases over time in both of these regions. In contrast, water scarcity improves in some regions with large base-year electric sector withdrawals, such as the USA and Canada, due to capital stock turnover and the almost complete phase-out of once-through flow cooling systems. The scenarios indicate that: 1) water is likely a limiting factor in climate change mitigation policies, 2) many regions can be expected to increase reliance on non-renewable groundwater, water reuse, and desalinated water, but they also highlight an important role for development and deployment of water conservation technologies and practices.

Hejazi, Mohamad I.; Edmonds, James A.; Clarke, Leon E.; Kyle, G. Page; Davies, Evan; Chaturvedi, Vaibhav; Wise, Marshall A.; Patel, Pralit L.; Eom, Jiyong; Calvin, Katherine V.; Moss, Richard H.; Kim, Son H.

2014-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

282

Retrieval of Optical And Size Parameters of Aerosols Utilizing a Multi-Filter Rotating Shadowband Radiometer and Inter-Comparison with CIMEL Sun Photometer and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Radiometer and Inter-Comparison with CIMEL Sun Photometer and MICROTOPS Sun Photometer Antonio Aguirre Radiometer (MFRSR) and comparing with data from a CIMEL Sun Photometer and a MICROTOPS Sun Photometer. Using the inverse cosine of the angle between the sun and the vertical. A Langley plot provides a linear regression

283

Project Management Project Managment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

­ Inspired by agile methods #12;Background · Large-scale software development & IT projects, plagued relations #12;One Agile Approach to Scheduling · The creative nature of game development resist heavy up Problems ­incompatible platforms, 3rd party etc. #12;Is Games Development Similar? · Yes & No

Stephenson, Ben

284

Project Year Project Team  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An Engineer's Guide to the Structures of Baltimore Audience Students from the Krieger School of Arts City, interfaced through a course website, the team will integrate descriptions of structural behavior format. Technologies Used HTML/Web Design, MySQL Project Abstract Structural analysis is typically taught

Gray, Jeffrey J.

285

Final Technical Report for Collaborative Research: Regional climate-change projections through next-generation empirical and dynamical models, DE-FG02-07ER64429  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is the final report for a DOE-funded research project describing the outcome of research on non-homogeneous hidden Markov models (NHMMs) and coupled ocean-atmosphere (O-A) intermediate-complexity models (ICMs) to identify the potentially predictable modes of climate variability, and to investigate their impacts on the regional-scale. The main results consist of extensive development of the hidden Markov models for rainfall simulation and downscaling specifically within the non-stationary climate change context together with the development of parallelized software; application of NHMMs to downscaling of rainfall projections over India; identification and analysis of decadal climate signals in data and models; and, studies of climate variability in terms of the dynamics of atmospheric flow regimes.

Smyth, Padhraic [University of California, Irvine

2013-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

286

Ice-sheet model sensitivities to environmental forcing and their use in projecting future sea level (the SeaRISE project)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for shallow polythermal ice sheets. Philos. Trans. R. Soc.doi:10.3189/2013JoG12J125 Ice-sheet model sensitivities to1993) On the initiation of ice sheets. Ann. Glaciol. , 18,

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

UC Irvine's Earth System Science Department has opportunities for postdocs and grad. students interested in global-scale cryospheric modeling. Our projects  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

interested in global-scale cryospheric modeling. Our projects (http://www.ess.uci.edu/~zender#ans and http://www.ess among the groups of Professors Charlie Zender (Aerosols, Radiation, http://www.ess.uci.edu/~zender), Jay Famiglietti (Hydrology, http://www.ess.uci.edu/~famiglietti), and Jim Randerson (Fire, C, H2O, http://www.ess

Zender, Charles

288

Dispersion Modeling Project  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergy CooperationRequirements Matrix U.S. DepartmentBaseload OperationDirectDiscussion

289

Project Fact Sheet Project Update  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Project Fact Sheet Project Update: Project Brief: A state of the art facility, at Hammersmith information visit the Faculty of Medicine web pages http://www1.imperial.ac.uk/medicine/ Construction Project Team: Project Facts & Figures: Budget: £60 000 000 Funding Source: SRIF II (Imperial College), GSK, MRC

290

Project Fact Sheet Project Update  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Project Fact Sheet Project Update: Project Brief: The refurbishment of the instrumentation equipment. This project encompasses refurbishment work on over 1,150m2 of laboratory space across four, the completed project will allow researchers to expand their work in satellite instrumentation, the fabrication

291

Project Fact Sheet Project Brief  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Project Fact Sheet Project Brief: In the first phase of the Union Building re.union.ic.ac.uk/marketing/building Construction Project Team: Project Facts & Figures: Budget: £1,400,000 Funding Source: Capital Plan and Imperial College Union reserves Construction Project Programme: Start on Site: August 2006 End Date: March

292

Volume Project  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Math 13900. Volume Project. For the following project, you may use any materials. This must be your own original creation. Construct a right pyramid with a base†...

rroames

2010-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

293

Reconstruction from a flexible number of projections in cone-beam computed tomography via active shape models  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Reconstruction from a flexible number of projections in cone-beam computed tomography via active, and limited view computed tomography. 1. INTRODUCTION In recent years, cone beam computed tomography (CBCT a limited set of projections. Evaluations were performed using simulations with Shepp-Logan phantoms

Corso, Jason J.

294

New process modeling [sic], design, and control strategies for energy efficiency, high product quality, and improved productivity in the process industries. Final project report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project was concerned with the development of process design and control strategies for improving energy efficiency, product quality, and productivity in the process industries. In particular, (i) the resilient design and control of chemical reactors, and (ii) the operation of complex processing systems, was investigated. Specific topics studied included new process modeling procedures, nonlinear controller designs, and control strategies for multiunit integrated processes. Both fundamental and immediately applicable results were obtained. The new design and operation results from this project were incorporated into computer-aided design software and disseminated to industry. The principles and design procedures have found their way into industrial practice.

Ray, W. Harmon

2002-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

295

Renewable Resources: a national catalog of model projects. Volume 2. Mid-American Solar Energy Complex Region  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This compilation of diverse conservation and renewable energy projects across the United States was prepared through the enthusiastic participation of solar and alternate energy groups from every state and region. Compiled and edited by the Center for Renewable Resources, these projects reflect many levels of innovation and technical expertise. In many cases, a critique analysis is presented of how projects performed and of the institutional conditions associated with their success or failure. Some 2000 projects are included in this compilation; most have worked, some have not. Information about all is presented to aid learning from these experiences. The four volumes in this set are arranged in state sections by geographic region, coinciding with the four Regional Solar Energy Centers. The table of contents is organized by project category so that maximum cross-referencing may be obtained. This volume includes information on the Mid-American Solar Energy Complex Region. (WHK)

None

1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Project Controls  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

Project controls are systems used to plan, schedule, budget, and measure the performance of a project/program. The cost estimation package is one of the documents that is used to establish the baseline for project controls. This chapter gives a brief description of project controls and the role the cost estimation package plays.

1997-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

297

Hydrologic Data and Evaluation for Model Validation Wells, MV-1, MV-2, and MV-3 near the Project Shoal Area  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 2006, a drilling campaign was conducted at the Project Shoal Area (PSA) to provide information for model validation, emplace long-term monitoring wells, and develop baseline geochemistry for long term hydrologic monitoring. Water levels were monitored in the vicinity of the drilling, in the existing wells HC-1 and HC-6, as well as in the newly drilled wells, MV-1, MV-2 and MV-3 and their associated piezometers. Periodic water level measurements were also made in existing wells HC-2, HC-3, HC-4, HC-5 and HC-7. A lithium bromide chemical tracer was added to drilling fluids during the installation of the monitoring and validation (MV) wells and piezometers. The zones of interest were the fractured, jointed and faulted horizons within a granitic body. These horizons generally have moderate hydraulic conductivities. As a result, the wells and their shallower piezometers required strenuous purging and development to remove introduced drilling fluids as evidenced by bromide concentrations. After airlift and surging well development procedures, the wells were pumped continuously until the bromide concentration was less then 1 milligram per liter (mg/L). Water quality samples were collected after the well development was completed. Tritium scans were preformed before other analyses to ensure the absence of high levels of radioactivity. Tritium levels were less than 2,000 pico-curies per liter. Samples were also analyzed for carbon-14 and iodine-129, stable isotopes of oxygen and hydrogen, as well as major cations and anions. Aquifer tests were performed in each MV well after the bromide concentration fell below acceptable levels. Water level data from the aquifer tests were used to compute aquifer hydraulic conductivity and transmissivity

B. Lyles; P. Oberlander; D. Gillespie; D. Donithan; J. Chapman; J. Healey

2007-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

298

State of Advancement of the International REVE Project: Computational Modelling of Irradiation-Induced Hardening in Reactor Pressure Vessel Steels and Relevant Experimental Validation Programme  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The REVE (Reactor for Virtual Experiments) project is an international joint effort aimed at developing multi-scale modelling computational toolboxes capable of simulating the behaviour of materials under irradiation at different time and length scales. Well grounded numerical techniques such as molecular dynamics (MD) and Monte Carlo (MC) algorithms, as well as rate equation (RE) and dislocation-defect interaction theory, form the basis on which the project is built. The goal is to put together a suite of integrated codes capable of deducing the changes in macroscopic properties starting from a detailed simulation of the microstructural changes produced by irradiation in materials. To achieve this objective, several European laboratories are closely collaborating, while exchanging data with American and Japanese laboratories currently pursuing similar approaches. The material chosen for the first phase of this project is reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steel, the target macroscopic magnitude to be predicted being the yield strength increase ({delta}{sigma}y) due, essentially, to irradiation-enhanced formation of intragranular solute atom precipitates or clouds, as well as irradiation induced defects in the matrix, such as point defect clusters and dislocation loops. A description of the methodological approach used in the project and its current state is given in the paper. The development of the simulation tools requires a continuous feedback from ad hoc experimental data. In the framework of the REVE project SCK EN has therefore performed a neutron irradiation campaign of model alloys of growing complexity (from pure Fe to binary and ternary systems and a real RPV steel) in the Belgian test reactor BR2 and is currently carrying on the subsequent materials characterisation using its hot cell facilities. The paper gives the details of this experimental programme - probably the first large-scale one devoted to the validation of numerical simulation tools - and presents and discusses the first available results, with a view to their use as feedback for the improvement of the computational modelling. (authors)

Malerba, Lorenzo; Van Walle, Eric [SCK.CEN, Boeretang 200, 2400 Mol (Belgium); Domain, Christophe; Jumel, Stephanie; Van Duysen, Jean-Claude [EDR R and D (France)

2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Federal and State Structures to Support Financing Utility-Scale Solar Projects and the Business Models Designed to Utilize Them  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Utility-scale solar projects have grown rapidly in number and size over the last few years, driven in part by strong renewable portfolio standards (RPS) and federal incentives designed to stimulate investment in renewable energy technologies. This report provides an overview of such policies, as well as the project financial structures they enable, based on industry literature, publicly available data, and questionnaires conducted by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL).

Mendelsohn, M.; Kreycik, C.

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Project Leadership and the PMBOK(RTM) Guide.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

?? The career model for the future of project management is leadership. Portfolio managers, program managers, project managers, and project co-coordinators need to evolve fromÖ (more)

Toth, Paul Alexander

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "model intercomparison project" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Project Fact Sheet Project Update  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Project Fact Sheet Project Update: Project Brief: The works cover the refurbishment of floors 4, 5, with `wet' labs for molecular biology, materials characterisation, cell culture and flow studies, and `dry operating theatre. The Bionanotechnology Centre is one of the projects funded from the UK Government's £20

302

Circle Project  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This project asks students to decide if a collection of points in space do or do not lie on a ... The project is accessible to linear algebra students who have studied†...

303

Water Transit Authority Project WTA #02-112 under Sub Contract to ABS Consulting Maritime Simulation Model of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Simulation Model of San Francisco Bay Notes on Risk Management Corresponding Author: J. Rene van Dorp Figure 3. Capability of Maritime Simulation Model to Evaluate Risk Intervention Effectiveness

van Dorp, Johan René

304

A project health check for coal mining caompanies : case of Douglas Middelburg optimisation project .  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The purpose of the study is to develop a project health check model to evaluate the status of projects within the coal mining industry. TheÖ (more)

De Wet, G.F.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

SimHydro 2012: Hydraulic modeling and uncertainty, 12-14 September 2012, Sophia Antipolis N. Jean-Baptiste, C. Dore, P-O. Malaterre, J. Sau -Data assimilation for hydraulic state estimation of a development project  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SimHydro 2012: Hydraulic modeling and uncertainty, 12-14 September 2012, Sophia Antipolis ≠ N. Jean-Baptiste, C. Dorťe, P-O. Malaterre, J. Sau - Data assimilation for hydraulic state estimation of a development project Data assimilation for hydraulic state estimation of a development project Assimilation de donnťes

Paris-Sud XI, Universitť de

306

Preliminary Model Comparison Results From the Sim-SEQ Project Using TOUGH2, STOMP, Eclipse, and VESA Approach  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Sim-SEQ is an international initiative on model comparison for geologic carbon sequestration (GCS), with an objective to understand and, if possible, quantify model uncertainties. Model comparison efforts in Sim-SEQ are initially limited to one specific field test site, hereafter referred to as the Sim-SEQ Study site (or S-3 site). Within Sim-SEQ, different modeling teams are developing conceptual models of CO2 injection at the S-3 site. One of the conceptual models, developed by the LBNL team, is based on TOUGH2/EOS7C. In this paper, we present some preliminary model predictions of the S-3 site using the TOUGH2/EOS7C simulator. We also compare the predictions of the TOUGH2 simulator with three other conceptual models, developed by three different organizations, of the S-3 site.

Mukhopadhyay, Sumit; Doughty, Christine A.; Bacon, Diana H.; Bacci, Giacomo; Govindan, Rajesh; Shi, Ji-Quan; Gasda, Sarah E.; Ramanathan, Ramya; Nicot, Jean-Philippe; Hosseini, Seyyed; Birkholzer, Jens

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Modeling the barotropic response of the global ocean to atmospheric wind and pressure forcing -comparisons with observations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-G. Model outputs are compared to in situ observations with tide gauge data (TG) and bottom pressure gauge data (BPR), and also with T/P altimetric cross over points (noted CO). Intercomparisons were performed/P and Jason altimeters deliver very accurate data sets (within 2 centimeter global error for T/P). How- ever

308

Project Construction  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Integrating renewable energy into Federal new construction or major renovations requires effective structuring of the construction team and project schedule. This overview discusses key construction team considerations for renewable energy as well as timing and expectations for the construction phase. The project construction phase begins after a project is completely designed and the construction documents (100%) have been issued. Construction team skills and experience with renewable energy technologies are crucial during construction, as is how the integration of renewable energy affects the project construction schedule.

309

Magnesium Projects  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

cyberinfrastructure projects and will be augmented by original research in Computer Science and Software Engineering towards the creation of large, distributed, autonomic and...

310

Using CORE Model-Based Systems Engineering Software to Support Program Management in the U.S. Department of Energy Office of the Biomass Project: Preprint  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper describes how a model-based systems engineering software, CORE, is helping the U. S. Department of Energy's Office of Biomass Program assist with bringing biomass-derived biofuels to the market. This software tool provides information to guide informed decision-making as biomass-to-biofuels systems are advanced from concept to commercial adoption. It facilitates management and communication of program status by automatically generating custom reports, Gantt charts, and tables using the widely available programs of Microsoft Word, Project and Excel.

Riley, C.; Sandor, D.; Simpkins, P.

2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Job and Economic Development Impact (JEDI) Model: A User-Friendly Tool to Calculate Economic Impacts from Wind Projects; Preprint  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia:FAQ < RAPID Jump to:SeadovCooperative JumpWilliamsonWoodsonCounty iscomfortNewsAffiliate ProjectsJob and

312

Final report on LDRD project: A phenomenological model for multicomponent transport with simultaneous electrochemical reactions in concentrated solutions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A phenomenological model was developed for multicomponent transport of charged species with simultaneous electrochemical reactions in concentrated solutions, and was applied to model processes in a thermal battery cell. A new general framework was formulated and implemented in GOMA (a multidimensional, multiphysics, finite-element computer code developed and being enhanced at Sandia) for modeling multidimensional, multicomponent transport of neutral and charged species in concentrated solutions. The new framework utilizes the Stefan-Maxwell equations that describe multicomponent diffusion of interacting species using composition-insensitive binary diffusion coefficients. The new GOMA capability for modeling multicomponent transport of neutral species was verified and validated using the model problem of ternary gaseous diffusion in a Stefan tube. The new GOMA-based thermal battery computer model was verified using an idealized battery cell in which concentration gradients are absent; the full model was verified by comparing with that of Bernardi and Newman (1987) and validated using limited thermal battery discharge-performance data from the open literature (Dunning 1981) and from Sandia (Guidotti 1996). Moreover, a new Liquid Chemkin Software Package was developed, which allows the user to handle manly aspects of liquid-phase kinetics, thermodynamics, and transport (particularly in terms of computing properties). Lastly, a Lattice-Boltzmann-based capability was developed for modeling pore- or micro-scale phenomena involving convection, diffusion, and simplified chemistry; this capability was demonstrated by modeling phenomena in the cathode region of a thermal battery cell.

CHEN,KEN S.; EVANS,GREGORY H.; LARSON,RICHARD S.; NOBLE,DAVID R.; HOUF,WILLIAM G.

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Model program for the recruitment and preparation of high ability elementary mathematics/science teachers: A collaborative project among scientists, teacher educators and classroom teachers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This teacher education program will provide a model for recruiting, educating and retaining high ability students to become mathematics and science lead teachers in elementary schools. The quality experiences and support provided these students will help them develop the knowledge and attitudes necessary to provide leadership for elementary mathematics and science programs. Students will have research experiences at the Ames Laboratory, high quality field experiences with nationally recognized mathematics and science teachers in local schools and opportunities to meaningfully connect these two experiences. This program, collaboratively designed and implemented by scientists, teacher educators and classroom teachers, should provide a replicatable model for other teacher education institutions. In addition, materials developed for the project should help other laboratories interface more effectively with K-8 schools and help other teacher education programs incorporate real science and mathematics experience into their curriculum.

Not Available

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Project Information Form Project Title Integrating Management of Truck and Rail Systems in Los Angeles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Project Information Form Project Title Integrating Management of Truck and Rail Systems in Los or organization) Volvo Research and Educational Foundation- $79,604.00 Total Project Cost $79,604.00 Agency ID of Research Project This project will develop models to optimize the balance of freight demand across rail

California at Davis, University of

315

Research project on CO2 geological storage and groundwaterresources: Large-scale hydrological evaluation and modeling of impact ongroundwater systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

If carbon dioxide capture and storage (CCS) technologies areimplemented on a large scale, the amounts of CO2 injected and sequesteredunderground could be extremely large. The stored CO2 then replaces largevolumes of native brine, which can cause considerable pressureperturbation and brine migration in the deep saline formations. Ifhydraulically communicating, either directly via updipping formations orthrough interlayer pathways such as faults or imperfect seals, theseperturbations may impact shallow groundwater or even surface waterresources used for domestic or commercial water supply. Possibleenvironmental concerns include changes in pressure and water table,changes in discharge and recharge zones, as well as changes in waterquality. In compartmentalized formations, issues related to large-scalepressure buildup and brine displacement may also cause storage capacityproblems, because significant pressure buildup can be produced. Toaddress these issues, a three-year research project was initiated inOctober 2006, the first part of which is summarized in this annualreport.

Birkholzer, Jens; Zhou, Quanlin; Rutqvist, Jonny; Jordan,Preston; Zhang,K.; Tsang, Chin-Fu

2007-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

316

Validation, Proof-of-Concept, and Postaudit of the Groundwater Flow and Transport Model of the Project Shoal Area  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The groundwater flow and radionuclide transport model characterizing the Shoal underground nuclear test has been accepted by the State of Nevada Division of Environmental Protection. According to the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) between DOE and the State of Nevada, the next steps in the closure process for the site are then model validation (or postaudit), the proof-of-concept, and the long-term monitoring stage. This report addresses the development of the validation strategy for the Shoal model, needed for preparing the subsurface Corrective Action Decision Document-Corrective Action Plan and the development of the proof-of-concept tools needed during the five-year monitoring/validation period. The approach builds on a previous model, but is adapted and modified to the site-specific conditions and challenges of the Shoal site.

Ahmed Hassan

2004-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Project X  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

provided by Project X would be a cost- effective approach toin Section I and for the cost estimate necessary as part ofby DOE order 413.3b. The cost range required for CD-0 will

Holmes, Steve

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Project Manager  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

A successful candidate in this position will serve as a project manager in the Fuel Cell Technologies Office in the DOE-EERE Office of Transportation responsible for a wide variety of highly...

319

Project Title:  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

0 181 0 Hazardous Air Pollutants? Is the project subject to emissions limitations in an Air Quality 0 181 0 Control Region? 2 Revised on: 11122008 NEPA COMPLIANCE SURVEY Impacts...

320

Preliminary performance assessment for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant, December 1992. Volume 3, Model parameters: Sandia WIPP Project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This volume documents model parameters chosen as of July 1992 that were used by the Performance Assessment Department of Sandia National Laboratories in its 1992 preliminary performance assessment of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). Ranges and distributions for about 300 modeling parameters in the current secondary data base are presented in tables for the geologic and engineered barriers, global materials (e.g., fluid properties), and agents that act upon the WIPP disposal system such as climate variability and human-intrusion boreholes. The 49 parameters sampled in the 1992 Preliminary Performance Assessment are given special emphasis with tables and graphics that provide insight and sources of data for each parameter.

Not Available

1992-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "model intercomparison project" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Processes, mechanisms, parameters, and modeling approaches for partially saturated flow in soil and rock media; Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report discusses conceptual models and mathematical equations, analyzes distributions and correlations among hydrological parameters of soils and tuff, introduces new path integration approaches, and outlines scaling procedures to model potential-driven fluid flow in heterogeneous media. To properly model the transition from fracture-dominated flow under saturated conditions to matrix-dominated flow under partially saturated conditions, characteristic curves and permeability functions for fractures and matrix need to be improved and validated. Couplings from two-phase flow, heat transfer, solute transport, and rock deformation to liquid flow are also important. For stochastic modeling of alternating units of welded and nonwelded tuff or formations bounded by fault zones, correlations and constraints on average values of saturated permeability and air entry scaling factor between different units need to be imposed to avoid unlikely combinations of parameters and predictions. Large-scale simulations require efficient and verifiable numerical algorithms. New path integration approaches based on postulates of minimum work and mass conservation to solve flow geometry and potential distribution simultaneously are introduced. This verifiable integral approach, together with fractal scaling procedures to generate statistical realizations with parameter distribution, correlation, and scaling taken into account, can be used to quantify uncertainties and generate the cumulative distribution function for groundwater travel times.

Wang, J.S.Y.; Narasimhan, T.N. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Project Fact Sheet Project Update  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

medical and dental centre; shop and café area for students and vacation accommodation centre. The new & Figures: Budget: £51,074,000 Funding Source: Capital Plan Construction Project Programme: Start on Site

323

Final Report for the portion performed in the University of Illinois on the project entitled "Optimizing the Cloud-Aerosol-Radiation Ensemble Modeling System to Improve Future Climate Change Projections at Regional to Local Scales"  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is the final report for the closure of the research tasks on the project that have performed during the entire reporting period in the University of Illinois. It contains a summary of the achievements and details of key results as well as the future plan for this project to be continued in the University of Maryland.

Liang, Xin-Zhong

2011-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

324

Final report on LDRD project : elucidating performance of proton-exchange-membrane fuel cells via computational modeling with experimental discovery and validation.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this report, we document the accomplishments in our Laboratory Directed Research and Development project in which we employed a technical approach of combining experiments with computational modeling and analyses to elucidate the performance of hydrogen-fed proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs). In the first part of this report, we document our focused efforts on understanding water transport in and removal from a hydrogen-fed PEMFC. Using a transparent cell, we directly visualized the evolution and growth of liquid-water droplets at the gas diffusion layer (GDL)/gas flow channel (GFC) interface. We further carried out a detailed experimental study to observe, via direct visualization, the formation, growth, and instability of water droplets at the GDL/GFC interface using a specially-designed apparatus, which simulates the cathode operation of a PEMFC. We developed a simplified model, based on our experimental observation and data, for predicting the onset of water-droplet instability at the GDL/GFC interface. Using a state-of-the-art neutron imaging instrument available at NIST (National Institute of Standard and Technology), we probed liquid-water distribution inside an operating PEMFC under a variety of operating conditions and investigated effects of evaporation due to local heating by waste heat on water removal. Moreover, we developed computational models for analyzing the effects of micro-porous layer on net water transport across the membrane and GDL anisotropy on the temperature and water distributions in the cathode of a PEMFC. We further developed a two-phase model based on the multiphase mixture formulation for predicting the liquid saturation, pressure drop, and flow maldistribution across the PEMFC cathode channels. In the second part of this report, we document our efforts on modeling the electrochemical performance of PEMFCs. We developed a constitutive model for predicting proton conductivity in polymer electrolyte membranes and compared model prediction with experimental data obtained in our laboratory and from literature. Moreover, we developed a one-dimensional analytical model for predicting electrochemical performance of an idealized PEMFC with small surface over-potentials. Furthermore, we developed a multi-dimensional computer model, which is based on the finite-element method and a fully-coupled implicit solution scheme via Newton's technique, for simulating the performance of PEMFCs. We demonstrated utility of our finite-element model by comparing the computed current density distribution and overall polarization with those measured using a segmented cell. In the last part of this report, we document an exploratory experimental study on MEA (membrane electrode assembly) degradation.

Wang, Chao Yang (Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA); Pasaogullari, Ugur (Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA); Noble, David R.; Siegel, Nathan P.; Hickner, Michael A.; Chen, Ken Shuang

2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Analysis of Field Development Strategies of CO2 EOR/Capture Projects Using a Reservoir Simulation Economic Model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

($) Drilling cost for one well ($) Facilities cost for one pattern ($) Tubing cost for one well ($) Drilling depth (feet) EIA US Energy Information Administration EOR Enhanced Oil Recovery EOS Equation of State IEA International... in the reservoir ................................................................ 20 Figure 13: Scope of this chapter: definition of the economic model ............................... 21 Figure 14: Spot price of the oil on the WTI market from 1986 to 2013 (EIA...

Saint-Felix, Martin

2013-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

326

Project Final Report UBC LBS Project Services1 Project Final Report UBC LBS Project Services2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Project Final Report UBC LBS Project Services1 #12;Project Final Report UBC LBS Project Services2 EXECUTIVE SUMMARY The purpose of the UBC Project Services web-based project management portal project on campus within Project Services, and with the rest of the UBC community. We began this project by defining

327

Can reductions in logging damage increase carbon storage over time? Evaluation of a simulation model for a pilot carbon offset project in Malaysia  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Selective timber harvesting operations, if uncontrolled, can severely degrade a forest. Although techniques for reducing logging damage are well-known and inexpensive to apply, incentives to adopt these techniques are generally lacking. Power companies and other emitters of {open_quotes}greenhouse{close_quotes} gases soon may be forced to reduce or otherwise offset their net emissions; one offset option is to fund programs aimed at reducing logging damage. To investigate the consequences of reductions in logging damage for ecosystem carbon storage, I constructed a model to simulate changes in biomass and carbon pools following logging of primary dipterocarp forests in southeast Asia. I adapted a physiologically-driven, tree-based model of natural forest gap dynamics (FORMIX) to simulate forest recovery following logging. Input variables included stand structure, volume extracted, stand damage (% stems), and soil disturbance (% area compacted). Output variables included total biomass, tree density, and total carbon storage over time. Assumptions of the model included the following: (1) areas with soil disturbances have elevated probabilities of vine colonization and reduced rates of tree establishment, (2) areas with broken canopy but no soil disturbance are colonized initially by pioneer tree species and 20 yr later by persistent forest species, (3) damaged trees have reduced growth and increased mortality rates. Simulation results for two logging techniques, conventional and reduced-impact logging, are compared with data from field studies conducted within a pilot carbon offset project in Sabah, Malaysia.

Pinard, M.A. [Univ. of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States)

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

On the Sensitivity of Atmospheric Model Implied Ocean Heat Transport to the Dominant Terms of the Surface Energy Balance  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The oceanic meridional heat transport (T{sub o}) implied by an atmospheric General Circulation Model (GCM) can help evaluate a model's readiness for coupling with an ocean GCM. In this study we examine the T{sub o} from benchmark experiments of the Atmospheric Model Intercomparison Project, and evaluate the sensitivity of T{sub o} to the dominant terms of the surface energy balance. The implied global ocean TO in the Southern Hemisphere of many models is equatorward, contrary to most observationally-based estimates. By constructing a hybrid (model corrected by observations) T{sub o}, an earlier study demonstrated that the implied heat transport is critically sensitive to the simulated shortwave cloud radiative effects, which have been argued to be principally responsible for the Southern Hemisphere problem. Systematic evaluation of one model in a later study suggested that the implied T{sub o} could be equally as sensitive to a model's ocean surface latent heat flux. In this study we revisit the problem with more recent simulations, making use of estimates of ocean surface fluxes to construct two additional hybrid calculations. The results of the present study demonstrate that indeed the implied T{sub o} of an atmospheric model is very sensitive to problems in not only the surface net shortwave, but the latent heat flux as well. Many models underestimate the shortwave radiation reaching the surface in the low latitudes, and overestimate the latent heat flux in the same region. The additional hybrid transport calculations introduced here could become useful model diagnostic tests as estimates of implied ocean surface fluxes are improved.

Gleckler, P J

2004-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

329

Initial stages of ICRCCM3: Intercomparison of Radiation Codes in Climate  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsingFunInfrared Land Surface Emissivity in the VicinitySrTiO3(100). |Models for

330

PROJECT REQUEST FORM PROJECT HOLDER INFORMATION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PROJECT REQUEST FORM Last Name: Email: PROJECT HOLDER INFORMATION UCID:Last Name: Email: Institute if different than Project Holder) First Name: Project Short Name: (50 characters max) (for eFIN view only) Project Title: PROJECT INFORMATION Start Date (MM/DD/YYYY): End Date (MM/DD/YYYY): For Questions or HELP

de Leon, Alex R.

331

Structure finance for hybrid infrastructure models : the application of project finance into public-private partnerships for the construction and operation of infrastructure  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis studies the application of project finance as the most efficient financing method for the construction and operation of infrastructure projects such as motorways, airports, power plants, pipelines, wastewater/sewage ...

Patramanis, Theodoros

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Project TRACS: Empirically Investigating Transformation through Relatedness, Autonomy, and Competence Support Logic Model Rooted in Self-Determination Theory (Deci & Ryan, 2000)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Project TRACS: Empirically Investigating Transformation through Relatedness, Autonomy appointments toolkit (R, A , C) Project TRACS PI/Director Co-Director & Manager Project Leads & Team MSU&T and hiring procedures -Modern sexism is reduced -Women faculty feel improved job satisfaction -Women intend

Dyer, Bill

333

Table of Contents Project Summary  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

­heat interactions, and movement of water during storms. Water- related projects bring new hydrologic expertise and models to bear on questions of landscape redistribution of water and connectivity, ecosystem services of Products List of Datasets List of Letters of Collaboration #12;Project Summary CAP3: Urban Sustainability

Hall, Sharon J.

334

Energy Design Assistance Project Tracker - 2014 BTO Peer Review...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

checks of energy model designs, and generates project documentation and reports for commercial buildings. The ultimate goal of this project is to develop cost control best...

335

Energy Department Announces Five Research Projects to Improve...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

an experimental model to test four dewatering strategies. The project team leader is West Virginia University, Morgantown, W.V. Partners in this project are: Luscar Ltd.,...

336

Computational Fluid Dynamics Modeling of the Bonneville Project: Tailrace Spill Patterns for Low Flows and Corner Collector Smolt Egress  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 2003, an extension of the existing ice and trash sluiceway was added at Bonneville Powerhouse 2 (B2). This extension started at the existing corner collector for the ice and trash sluiceway adjacent to Bonneville Powerhouse 2 and the new sluiceway was extended to the downstream end of Cascade Island. The sluiceway was designed to improve juvenile salmon survival by bypassing turbine passage at B2, and placing these smolt in downstream flowing water minimizing their exposure to fish and avian predators. In this study, a previously developed computational fluid dynamics model was modified and used to characterized tailrace hydraulics and sluiceway egress conditions for low total river flows and low levels of spillway flow. STAR-CD v4.10 was used for seven scenarios of low total river flow and low spill discharges. The simulation results were specifically examined to look at tailrace hydraulics at 5 ft below the tailwater elevation, and streamlines used to compare streamline pathways for streamlines originating in the corner collector outfall and adjacent to the outfall. These streamlines indicated that for all higher spill percentage cases (25% and greater) that streamlines from the corner collector did not approach the shoreline at the downstream end of Bradford Island. For the cases with much larger spill percentages, the streamlines from the corner collector were mid-channel or closer to the Washington shore as they moved downstream. Although at 25% spill at 75 kcfs total river, the total spill volume was sufficient to "cushion" the flow from the corner collector from the Bradford Island shore, areas of recirculation were modeled in the spillway tailrace. However, at the lowest flows and spill percentages, the streamlines from the B2 corner collector pass very close to the Bradford Island shore. In addition, the very flow velocity flows and large areas of recirculation greatly increase potential predator exposure of the spillway passed smolt. If there is concern for egress issues for smolt passing through the spillway, the spill pattern and volume need to be revisited.

Rakowski, Cynthia L.; Serkowski, John A.; Richmond, Marshall C.; Perkins, William A.

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Project Fact Sheet Project Brief  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Name: Centre for Assisted Robotic Surgery Number: BESS1002b Project Champion: Professor Guang-Zong Yang of the refurbishment is to renew and expand the laboratory space for Robotic Assisted Surgery at the South Kensington Campus as par to the Hamlyn Centre for Robotic Surgery. The overall programme incorpo- rates both core

338

Evaluation of Clear Sky Models for Satellite-Based Irradiance Estimates  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes an intercomparison of three popular broadband clear sky solar irradiance model results with measured data, as well as satellite-based model clear sky results compared to measured clear sky data. The authors conclude that one of the popular clear sky models (the Bird clear sky model developed by Richard Bird and Roland Hulstrom) could serve as a more accurate replacement for current satellite-model clear sky estimations. Additionally, the analysis of the model results with respect to model input parameters indicates that rather than climatological, annual, or monthly mean input data, higher-time-resolution input parameters improve the general clear sky model performance.

Sengupta, M.; Gotseff, P.

2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Causes and Implications of Persistent Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide Biases in Earth System Models  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The strength of feedbacks between a changing climate and future CO2 concentrations are uncertain and difficult to predict using Earth System Models (ESMs). We analyzed emission-driven simulations--in which atmospheric CO2 levels were computed prognostically--for historical (1850-2005) and future periods (RCP 8.5 for 2006-2100) produced by 15 ESMs for the Fifth Phase of the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP5). Comparison of ESM prognostic atmospheric CO2 over the historical period with observations indicated that ESMs, on average, had a small positive bias in predictions of contemporary atmospheric CO2. Weak ocean carbon uptake in many ESMs contributed to this bias, based on comparisons with observations of ocean and atmospheric anthropogenic carbon inventories. We found a significant linear relationship between contemporary atmospheric CO2 biases and future CO2 levels for the multi-model ensemble. We used this relationship to create a contemporary CO2 tuned model (CCTM) estimate of the atmospheric CO2 trajectory for the 21st century. The CCTM yielded CO2 estimates of 600 {plus minus} 14 ppm at 2060 and 947 {plus minus} 35 ppm at 2100, which were 21 ppm and 32 ppm below the multi-model mean during these two time periods. Using this emergent constraint approach, the likely ranges of future atmospheric CO2, CO2-induced radiative forcing, and CO2-induced temperature increases for the RCP 8.5 scenario were considerably narrowed compared to estimates from the full ESM ensemble. Our analysis provided evidence that much of the model-to-model variation in projected CO2 during the 21st century was tied to biases that existed during the observational era, and that model differences in the representation of concentration-carbon feedbacks and other slowly changing carbon cycle processes appear to be the primary driver of this variability. By improving models to more closely match the long-term time series of CO2 from Mauna Loa, our analysis suggests uncertainties in future climate projections can be reduced.

Hoffman, Forrest M [ORNL] [ORNL; Randerson, James T. [University of California, Irvine] [University of California, Irvine; Arora, Vivek K. [Canadian Centre for Climate Modelling and Analysis, Meteorological Service of Canada] [Canadian Centre for Climate Modelling and Analysis, Meteorological Service of Canada; Bao, Qing [State Key Laboratory of Numerical Modeling for Atmospheric Sciences and Geophysical Fluid Dynamics] [State Key Laboratory of Numerical Modeling for Atmospheric Sciences and Geophysical Fluid Dynamics; Cadule, Patricia [Institut Pierre Simon Laplace, Laboratoire des Sciences du Climat et de l'Environment] [Institut Pierre Simon Laplace, Laboratoire des Sciences du Climat et de l'Environment; Ji, Duoying [State Key Laboratory of Earth Surface Processes and Resource Ecology, Beijing] [State Key Laboratory of Earth Surface Processes and Resource Ecology, Beijing; Jones, Chris D. [Hadley Centre, U.K. Met Office] [Hadley Centre, U.K. Met Office; Kawamiya, Michio [Japan Agency for Marine-Earth Science and Technology (JAMSTEC)] [Japan Agency for Marine-Earth Science and Technology (JAMSTEC); Khatiwala, Samar [Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory, Columbia University, Palisades, NY] [Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory, Columbia University, Palisades, NY; Lindsay, Keith [National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR)] [National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR); Obata, Atsushi [Meteorological Research Institute, Japan] [Meteorological Research Institute, Japan; Shevliakova, Elena [Princeton University] [Princeton University; Six, Katharina D. [Max Planck Institute for Meteorology, Hamburg, Germany] [Max Planck Institute for Meteorology, Hamburg, Germany; Tjiputra, Jerry F. [Uni Climate, Uni Research] [Uni Climate, Uni Research; Volodin, Evgeny M. [Institute of Numerical Mathematics, Russian Academy of Science, Moscow] [Institute of Numerical Mathematics, Russian Academy of Science, Moscow; Wu, Tongwen [China Meteorological Administration (CMA), Beijing] [China Meteorological Administration (CMA), Beijing

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

In this project, we deal with the simulation and the optimisation of flows when uncertainties exist in the models and/or the data. We only consider non intrusive methods so that existing CFD softwares  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

with the thermodynamical models for dense organic gas flows used in some energy production devices. It is knownSummary In this project, we deal with the simulation and the optimisation of flows when arising from the study of energy generators for renewable sources. The three task will be done in parallel

Abgrall, Rémi

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "model intercomparison project" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Hallmark Project  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarly Career Scientists'Montana.ProgramJulietip sheetK-4In 2013 many autoThis road map isofAOnOctoberProject

342

PROJECT SUMMARY  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion | Department ofT ib l L d F SSales LLCDieselEnergyHistoryWATER-ENERGYofPROJECT

343

Custom Projects  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed Newcatalyst phases onOrganization FY 2012 FY 2013 FYCurtailment DateCustom-Projects

344

Project Gnome  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 - SeptemberMicroneedles for4-16Hamada winsProgress ReportProject CostEnergy

345

U.S. National Committee for Rock Mechanics; and Conceptual model of fluid infiltration in fractured media. Project summary, July 28, 1997--July 27, 1998  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The title describes the two tasks summarized in this report. The remainder of the report contains information on meetings held or to be held on the subjects. The US National Committee for Rock Mechanics (USNC/RM) provides for US participation in international activities in rock mechanics, principally through adherence to the International Society for Rock Mechanics (ISRM). It also keeps the US rock mechanics community informed about new programs directed toward major areas of national concern in which rock mechanics problems represent critical or limiting factors, such as energy resources, excavation, underground storage and waste disposal, and reactor siting. The committee also guides or produces advisory studies and reports on problem areas in rock mechanics. A new panel under the auspices of the US National Committee for Rock Mechanics has been appointed to conduct a study on Conceptual Models of Fluid Infiltration in Fractured Media. The study has health and environmental applications related to the underground flow of pollutants through fractured rock in and around mines and waste repositories. Support of the study has been received from the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission and the Department of Energy`s Yucca Mountain Project Office. The new study builds on the success of a recent USNC/RM report entitled Rock Fractures and Fluid Flow: Contemporary Understanding and Applications (National Academy Press, 1996, 551 pp.). A summary of the new study is provided.

NONE

1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

EVLA Project Book, Chapter 5: Receivers EVLA Project Book, Chapter 5.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

EVLA Project Book, Chapter 5: Receivers 1 EVLA Project Book, Chapter 5. 5 RECEIVERS (5 March 2009 14 CTI Incorporated model numbers. #12;EVLA Project Book, Chapter 5: Receivers 2 5.1 General the CTI model 22 refrigerator for load and temperature stability, long-term maintenance cost and over all

Groppi, Christopher

347

Project Overview This project is evaluating how climate change, population growth, and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for plugging in hydrological, ecological, and socio-economic process models, "agents" who can make parcelProject Overview This project is evaluating how climate change, population growth, and economic? Model the Willamette water system. The project will develop or adapt hydrologic, socio-economic

348

RESULTS FROM THE (1) DATA COLLECTION WORKSHOP, (2) MODELING WORKSHOP AND (3) DRILLING AND CORING METHODS WORKSHOP AS PART OF THE JOINT INDUSTRY PARTICIPATION (JIP) PROJECT TO CHARACTERIZE NATURAL GAS HYDRATES IN THE DEEPWATER GULF OF MEXICO  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 2000, Chevron began a project to learn how to characterize the natural gas hydrate deposits in the deepwater portions of the Gulf of Mexico. A Joint Industry Participation (JIP) group was formed in 2001, and a project partially funded by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) began in October 2001. The primary objective of this project is to develop technology and data to assist in the characterization of naturally occurring gas hydrates in the deepwater Gulf of Mexico. These naturally occurring gas hydrates can cause problems relating to drilling and production of oil and gas, as well as building and operating pipelines. Other objectives of this project are to better understand how natural gas hydrates can affect seafloor stability, to gather data that can be used to study climate change, and to determine how the results of this project can be used to assess if and how gas hydrates act as a trapping mechanism for shallow oil or gas reservoirs. As part of the project, three workshops were held. The first was a data collection workshop, held in Houston during March 14-15, 2002. The purpose of this workshop was to find out what data exist on gas hydrates and to begin making that data available to the JIP. The second and third workshop, on Geoscience and Reservoir Modeling, and Drilling and Coring Methods, respectively, were held simultaneously in Houston during May 9-10, 2002. The Modeling Workshop was conducted to find out what data the various engineers, scientists and geoscientists want the JIP to collect in both the field and the laboratory. The Drilling and Coring workshop was to begin making plans on how we can collect the data required by the project's principal investigators.

Stephen A. Holditch; Emrys Jones

2002-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Project Management Practices  

Energy Savers [EERE]

on the DOE Project Management web page. 1.2 INTENDED USE Federal Project Directors, Contracting Officers, Contracting Officer's Technical Representatives, Integrated Project Team...

350

PROCEDURES FOR ARC PROJECTS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PROCEDURES FOR ARC PROJECTS Revised - May 2013 Agricultural Research Center Washington State University #12;Table of Contents THE PROJECT SYSTEM, AN INTRODUCTION................................................................................. 5 DEVELOPING AN ARC PROJECT

Collins, Gary S.

351

Final project report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The proposed overarching goal for this project was the following: Data integration, simulation and visualization will facilitate metabolic and regulatory network prediction, exploration, and formulation of hypotheses. We stated three specific aims to achieve the overarching goal of this project: (1) Integration of multiple levels of information such as mRNA and protein levels, predicted protein-protein interactions/associations and gene function will enable construction of models describing environmental response and dynamic behavior. (2) Flexible tools for network inference will accelerate our understanding of biological systems. (3) Flexible exploration and queries of model hypotheses will provide focus and reveal novel dependencies. The underlying philosophy of these proposed aims is that an iterative cycle of experiments, experimental design, and verification will lead to a comprehensive and predictive model that will shed light on systems level mechanisms involved in responses elicited by living systems upon sensing a change in their environment. In the previous years report we demonstrated considerable progress in development of data standards, regulatory network inference and data visualization and exploration. We are pleased to report that several manuscripts describing these procedures have been published in top international peer reviewed journals including Genome Biology, PNAS, and Cell. The abstracts of these manuscripts are given and they summarize our accomplishments in this project.

Nitin S. Baliga and Leroy Hood

2008-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

352

Project Plan UC Online Education (UCOE)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Contents I. PROJECT DESCRIPTION II. COST REVENUE MODEL AND FINANCIAL FORECAST III. INCENTIVES1 Project Plan UC Online Education (UCOE) March 24, 2011 Office of the President SUPPORTING CAMPUS AND FACULTY PARTICIPATION IV. RISKS AND RISK MANAGEMENT V. PROJECT ORGANIZATION

Becker, Luann

353

COST 526 Project CH4 Final Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 COST 526 ­ Project CH4 Final Report Modelling, Simulating and Analysing EQ-Casting and Quenching. Remark: Due to the delay of the funding of the proposed investment casting project we change the focus of the project. The development of an Open Source optimization tool (see collaboration) was a relevant

354

The Development of a Coordinated Database for Water Resources and Flow Model in the Paso Del Norte Watershed (Phase III) Part II Availability of Flow and Water Quality Data for the Rio Grande Project Area  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cruces, NM 88003 (575) 646-4337 i i Acknowledgement This document and the underlying pr oject activities detailed in this report reflect the joint efforts of many people working with the Paso del Norte Watershed Council (PdNWC). The authors... wish to acknowledge and extend our grat itude to the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers for the generous financial support extende d to the PdNWC for development of the Coordinated Water Resources Database and Model Developm ent Project (called Project...

Tillery, Sue; Sheng, Zhuping; King, J. Phillip; Creel, Bobby; Brown, Christopher; Michelsen, Ari; Srinivasan, Raghavan; Granados, Alfredo

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Project Management Lessons Learned  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

The guide supports DOE O 413.3A, Program and Project Management for the Acquisition of Capital Assets, and aids the federal project directors and integrated project teams in the execution of projects.

2008-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

356

Windy Gap Firming Project  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Infrastructure projects Interconnection OASIS OATT Windy Gap Firming Project, Final Environmental Impact Statement, DOEEIS-0370 (cooperating agency) Western's proposed...

357

Perspectives on Project Finance  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Plenary III: Project Finance and Investment Perspectives on Project Finance John May, Managing Partner, Stern Brothers & Co.

358

Physics from Angular Projection of Rectangular Grids  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this paper, we present a mathematical model for the angular projection of a rectangular arrangement of points in a grid. This simple, yet interesting problem, has both a scholarly value and applications for data extraction techniques to study the physics of various systems. Our work can interest undergraduate students to understand subtle points in the angular projection of a grid and describes various quantities of interest in the projection with completeness and sufficient rigour. We show that for certain angular ranges, the projection has non-distinctness, and calculate the details of such angles, and correspondingly, the number of distinct points and the total projected length. We focus on interesting trends obtained for the projected length of the grid elements and present a simple application of the model to determine the geometry of an unknown grid whose spatial extensions are known, using measurement of the grid projection at two angles only. Towards the end, our model is shown to have potential ap...

Singh, Ashmeet

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

NSTX Upgrade Project Project Execution Plan  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NSTX Upgrade Project Project Execution Plan 6 PPPL Laboratory Director S.Prager Deputy Director.Gentile Centerstack Dsgn & Fab J. Chrzanowski NSTX Upgrade Project Manager R. Strykowsky Deputy and Construction Manager E. Perry Project Controls S. Langish NSTXCenterstack Manager L. Dudek NSTXNeutral Beam Manager T

Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

360

NSTX Upgrade Project Project Execution Plan  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NSTX Upgrade Project Project Execution Plan Appendix 1 - WBS Dictionary 25 Appendix 1 - NSTX Upgrade Project Work Breakdown Structure This Work Breakdown Structure (WBS) organizes and defines the scope of the NSTX Upgrade using the WBS as established by the original NSTX project and modified

Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "model intercomparison project" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

CIMI PROJECT LONG TERM THEMATIC PROJECT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

thematic projects (3 months) on specific topics in mathematics, computer science and their interactionsCIMI PROJECT LONG TERM THEMATIC PROJECT This document aims at providing guidance on the format to be used when submitting a scientific project to CIMI Executive Committee. CIMI will support long term

Ledoux, Michel

362

Livingston Solar Canopy Project The Project  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

,000 high efficiency solar panels on canopy structures over two major surface parking areasLivingston Solar Canopy Project The Project: This project entails the installation of more than 40. In conjunction with the existing 1.4 megawatt solar energy facility on this campus, this project will generate

Delgado, Mauricio

363

Information Visualization Graduate Project (Group Project)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Information Visualization Fall 2011 Graduate Project (Group Project) (100 points total) Handed out:59PM Research Article due by online submission on Sunday, December 11, 2011, 11:59PM Project Demo due last week of classes The idea of the project is to take the knowledge and background that you

Rusu, Adrian

364

Project Title Project Sponsor (funding agency)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and procedures applicable to the above project; and we confirm that the PI is eligible to apply in accordance Project Title Project Sponsor (funding agency) Declaration of Principal Investigator (PI) I certify that: I agree that my participation in the project must be in accordance with all

Saskatchewan, University of

365

Chopwell Wood Health Project  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chopwell Wood Health Project An innovative project of school visits and General Practitioner. The project took place at Chopwell Wood a 360 hectare mixed woodland managed by the Forestry Commission to carry on being involved in the project. Next stage of the project Although the project leader has now

366

Sustainability Project Fund Application Form Requirements Project Title  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sustainability Project Fund Application Form Requirements Project Title: Budget Requested: Applicant/Project Leader: Faculty/Department: Email: Daytime Phone: Project Team: (Please include. Project Overview Project summary: · Provide a brief background, describing the project, objectives

Volesky, Bohumil

367

Energy Research and Development Division FINAL PROJECT REPORT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the 225bus WECC model. ∑ The Project Advisory Committee (PAC) for its candid and insightful input

368

A compendium on the NIST radionuclide assays of the massic activity of {sup 63}Ni and {sup 55}Fe solutions used for an international intercomparison of liquid scintillation spectrometry techniques  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The National Institute of Standards and Technology recently participated in an international measurement intercomparison for {sup 63}Ni and {sup 55}Fe, which was conducted among principal national radionuclidic metrology laboratories. The intercomparison was sponsored by EUROMET, and was primarily intended to evaluate the capabilities of liquid scintillation (LS) spectrometry techniques for standardizing nuclides that decay by low-energy {beta}-emission (like {sup 63}Ni) and by low-Z (atomic number) electron capture (like {sup 55}Fe). The intercomparison findings exhibit a very good agreement for {sup 63}Ni among the various participating laboratories, including that for NIST, which suggests that the presently invoked LS methodologies are very capable of providing internationally-compatible standardizations for low-energy {beta}-emitters. The results for {sup 55}Fe are in considerably poorer agreement, and demonstrated the existence of several unresolved problems. It has thus become apparent that there is a need for the various international laboratories to conduct rigorous, systematic evaluations of their LS capabilities in assaying radionuclides that decay by low-Z electron capture.

Colle, R.; Zimmerman, B.E. [National Inst. of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD (United States)

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Project Work Anna-Maria Liebho  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Project Work Anna-Maria Liebho Reusable QVT patterns for state machine model transformations Hamburg #12;Project initiated by Airbus Operations GmbH Department ECYE22 - A350 / A380 Software transformation patterns are introduced. They contain typical procedures for converting models from one design

370

Geobacter Project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Analysis of the Genetic Potential and Gene Expression of Microbial Communities Involved in the In Situ Bioremediation of Uranium and Harvesting Electrical Energy from Organic Matter The primary goal of this research is to develop conceptual and computational models that can describe the functioning of complex microbial communities involved in microbial processes of interest to the Department of Energy. Microbial Communities to be Investigated: (1) Microbial community associated with the in situ bioremediation of uranium-contaminated groundwater; and (2) Microbial community that is capable of harvesting energy from waste organic matter in the form of electricity.

Derek Lovley; Maddalena Coppi; Stacy Ciufo; Barbara Methe; Pablo, Pomposiello; Steve Sandler; Cinthia Nunez; Daniel Bond; Susan Childers; Carol Giometti; Julia Krushkal; Christophe Shilling; Bernard Palsson

2004-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

371

Project Sponsor Professor Peter  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Project Sponsor Professor Peter McGearoge Project Director Nicki Matthew Audit / Quality Mazars Architect IT ServicesProcess Owners Build Team Lead Nicki Matthew Project Manager ­ Unit4 Joe Cairney Student Lifecycle Project Board InfrastructureDBA's TBC TBC TBC Process 1 Process 2 Project Sponsor ­ Unit

Levi, Ran

372

Project Structure Elke Karrenberg  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Project Structure Elke Karrenberg Project Manager, Head of Personnel Development Phone +49 6131 39-20634 Dr. Jana Leipold Project Staff, Personnel Development Consultant Phone +49 6131 39-25433 Antje Swietlik Project Staff Phone +49 6131 39-20140 Project Office JGU Leadership Forum Universitatis 3, Room 00

Kaus, Boris

373

NREL Smart Grid Projects  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Although implementing Smart Grid projects at the distribution level provides many advantages and opportunities for advanced operation and control, a number of significant challenges must be overcome to maintain the high level of safety and reliability that the modern grid must provide. For example, while distributed generation (DG) promises to provide opportunities to increase reliability and efficiency and may provide grid support services such as volt/var control, the presence of DG can impact distribution operation and protection schemes. Additionally, the intermittent nature of many DG energy sources such as photovoltaics (PV) can present a number of challenges to voltage regulation, etc. This presentation provides an overview a number of Smart Grid projects being performed by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) along with utility, industry, and academic partners. These projects include modeling and analysis of high penetration PV scenarios (with and without energy storage), development and testing of interconnection and microgrid equipment, as well as the development and implementation of advanced instrumentation and data acquisition used to analyze the impacts of intermittent renewable resources. Additionally, standards development associated with DG interconnection and analysis as well as Smart Grid interoperability will be discussed.

Hambrick, J.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

CS348 Project 1 Oracle Project  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CS348 Project 1 Oracle Project Due Date: 2/12/2009 You are going to use Oracle to design a simple; if nothing else, mark each query with its number. Turnin You may turn in the project for grading using the procedure described below. Run the following shell command (see 'man turnin' for details): turnin -c cs348

Elmagarmid, Ahmed K.

375

Project Name Project Number Tagging Type  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Project Name Project Number Primary Tagging Type Secondary Tagging Type Fish Species Tagging/ Secondary Legal Driver (BiOp, MOA, Accord, etc.) Tagging Purpose Funded Entity Tagging Location Retrieval CWT Recovery Project 2010-036-00 CWT PIT Chinook, coho retrieval, analysis, address PSMFC sampling

376

Project management improves well control events  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During a well control operation, the efficient use of personnel and equipment, through good project management techniques, contributes to increased safety and ensures a quality project. The key to a successful blowout control project is to use all resources in the most efficient manner. Excessive use of resources leads to unnecessary expenditures and delays in bringing the project under control. The Kuwait well control project, which involved more than 700 blowouts, was accomplished in a much shorter time (8 months) than first estimated (5 years). This improvement partly resulted from the application of sound project management techniques. These projects were prime examples of the need for a formal project management approach to handling wild well projects. There are many examples of projects that were successful in controlling wells but were economic disasters. Only through the effective application of project management can complex well control projects be completed in reasonable time frames at reasonable cost. The paper describes team management, project scope, organizational structures, scheduling, tracking models, critical path method, and decision trees.

Oberlender, G.D. [Oklahoma State Univ., Stillwater, OK (United States); Abel, L.W. [Wild Well Control Inc., Spring, TX (United States)

1995-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

377

California Hydrogen Infrastructure Project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Air Products and Chemicals, Inc. has completed a comprehensive, multiyear project to demonstrate a hydrogen infrastructure in California. The specific primary objective of the project was to demonstrate a model of a √?¬?√?¬Ę√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?real-world√?¬?√?¬Ę√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬Ě retail hydrogen infrastructure and acquire sufficient data within the project to assess the feasibility of achieving the nation√?¬?√?¬Ę√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?s hydrogen infrastructure goals. The project helped to advance hydrogen station technology, including the vehicle-to-station fueling interface, through consumer experiences and feedback. By encompassing a variety of fuel cell vehicles, customer profiles and fueling experiences, this project was able to obtain a complete portrait of real market needs. The project also opened its stations to other qualified vehicle providers at the appropriate time to promote widespread use and gain even broader public understanding of a hydrogen infrastructure. The project engaged major energy companies to provide a fueling experience similar to traditional gasoline station sites to foster public acceptance of hydrogen. Work over the course of the project was focused in multiple areas. With respect to the equipment needed, technical design specifications (including both safety and operational considerations) were written, reviewed, and finalized. After finalizing individual equipment designs, complete station designs were started including process flow diagrams and systems safety reviews. Material quotes were obtained, and in some cases, depending on the project status and the lead time, equipment was placed on order and fabrication began. Consideration was given for expected vehicle usage and station capacity, standard features needed, and the ability to upgrade the station at a later date. In parallel with work on the equipment, discussions were started with various vehicle manufacturers to identify vehicle demand (short- and long-term needs). Discussions included identifying potential areas most suited for hydrogen fueling stations with a focus on safe, convenient, fast-fills. These potential areas were then compared to and overlaid with suitable sites from various energy companies and other potential station operators. Work continues to match vehicle needs with suitable fueling station locations. Once a specific site was identified, the necessary agreements could be completed with the station operator and expected station users. Detailed work could then begin on the site drawings, permits, safety procedures and training needs. Permanent stations were successfully installed in Irvine (delivered liquid hydrogen), Torrance (delivered pipeline hydrogen) and Fountain Valley (renewable hydrogen from anaerobic digester gas). Mobile fueling stations were also deployed to meet short-term fueling needs in Long Beach and Placerville. Once these stations were brought online, infrastructure data was collected and reported to DOE using Air Products√?¬?√?¬Ę√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬? Enterprise Remote Access Monitoring system. Feedback from station operators was incorporated to improve the station user√?¬?√?¬Ę√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?s fueling experience.

Edward C. Heydorn

2013-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

378

project.m  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

function project(u,w) %last updated 5/9/94 %PROJECT Projecting vector U onto vector W orthogonally. Vectors % U and W can be either a pair of 2D or 3D†...

379

Super Projects (Arkansas)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

A 2004 amendment to the state constitution authorizes the state to attract super projects by issuing bonds to fund a projectís infrastructure, limited to 5% of the net general revenues during the...

380

Project Selection - Record Keeping  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

4-H members have many project areas to choose from, depending on where they live. Members should consult with their parents and 4-H leaders when choosing a project. This publication outlines project considerations....

Howard, Jeff W.

2005-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "model intercomparison project" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Projecting future changes in distributions of pelagic fish species of Northeast Pacific shelf seas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

characteristics. Using projected ocean condition changes from three different Earth System Models, we simulated

Pauly, Daniel

382

Automated and Optimized Project Scheduling Using BIM  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Construction Information Model (BCIM) including three models: building product model (BPM), building construction resource, and cost model (BPRCM), and building construction process model (BCPM) (Firat C. E., Kiiras, KšhkŲnen, & Huovinen, 2007). These three... construction projects using his BCIM sub-model along with ALoB method (Firat C. E., Arditi, Hamalainen, Stenstrand, & Kiiras, 2010). Vriesa and Harink (2007) presented their algorithm that extracted the construction sequence from a 3D model of the building...

Faghihi, Vahid

2014-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

383

Falls Creek Hydroelectric Project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project was for planning and construction of a 700kW hydropower project on the Fall River near Gustavus, Alaska.

Gustavus Electric Company; Richard Levitt; DOE Project Officer - Keith Bennett

2007-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

384

EV Project Overview Report  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Leafs Enrolled to Date EV Project Chevrolet Volts Enrolled to Date EV Project Smart Electric Drives Enrolled to Date Distance Driven (mi) Phoenix, AZ Metropolitan Area 274...

385

EV Project Overview Report  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Leafs Enrolled to Date EV Project Chevrolet Volts Enrolled to Date EV Project Smart Electric Drives Enrolled to Date Distance Driven (mi) Phoenix, AZ Metropolitan Area 259...

386

Project Risk Management:.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

?? The recent increase in international projects has resulted in higher risk along with difficulties in control and coordination. Effective project management can therefore beÖ (more)

Koelmeyer, Chris

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Contract/Project Management  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

3 rd Quarter Overall Contract and Project Management Performance Metrics and Targets ContractProject Management Performance Metrics FY 2009 Target FY 2009 Actual Comment 1....

388

Project BETA Cover Page  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Distribution of the Project BETA articles were funded inproduct is discussed in the BETA articles. Western JournalProject BETA: Best practices in Evaluation and Treatment of

Cover Page, Project BETA

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

EV Project Overview Report  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Report Project to date through March 2013 Charging Infrastructure Region Number of EV Project Charging Units Installed To Date Number of Charging Events Performed Electricity...

390

Project Finance and Investments  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Plenary III: Project Finance and Investment Project Finance and Investments Chris Cassidy, National Business Renewable Energy Advisor, U.S. Department of Agriculture

391

Clean Coal Projects (Virginia)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This legislation directs the Virginia Air Pollution Control Board to facilitate the construction and implementation of clean coal projects by expediting the permitting process for such projects.

392

THE ACCIMA PROJECT COUPLED MODELING OF THE HIGH SOUTHERN LATITUDES K.M. Hines1* , D.H. Bromwich1,2, L.-S. Bai1, J.P. Nicolas1,2, D.M. Holland3, J.M. Klinck4, M. Dinniman4, C. Yoo3, and E.P. Gerber3  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

THE ACCIMA PROJECT ­ COUPLED MODELING OF THE HIGH SOUTHERN LATITUDES K.M. Hines1* , D.H. Bromwich1 including surface and bottom layer formulations; as well as procedures for data assimilation. Numerical balance of the Antarctic ice sheet is critical for projecting global sea-level change. Also, Antarctica

Howat, Ian M.

393

Research scientist ChuanLi Jiang has dedicated her career to investigating the ocean's role in climate variations. She shares some insights into the role air-sea exchanges play in climate change dynamics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) Earth System Models (ESM). Four of these indicated excessive partial pressure of CO2 (pCO2 ) values to be a part of this community. What do you consider to be the greatest challenge facing earth systems modelling and projections? We examined eight of the CMIP5 (Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 5

Jiang, ChuanLi

394

Integrated Assessment of Hadley Centre (HadCM2) Climate Change Projections on Agricultural Productivity and Irrigation Water Supply in the Conterminous United States.I. Climate change scenarios and impacts on irrigation water supply simulated with the HUMUS model.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper describes methodology and results of a study by researchers at PNNL contributing to the water sector study of the U.S. National Assessment of Climate Change. The vulnerability of water resources in the conterminous U.S. to climate change in 10-y periods centered on 2030 and 2095--as projected by the HadCM2 general circulation model--was modeled with HUMUS (Hydrologic Unit Model of the U.S.). HUMUS consists of a GIS that provides data on soils, land use and climate to drive the hydrology model Soil Water Assessment Tool (SWAT). The modeling was done at the scale of the 2101 8-digit USGS hydrologic unit areas (HUA). Results are aggregated to the 4-digit and 2-digit (Major Water Resource Region, MWRR) scales for various purposes. Daily records of temperature and precipitation for 1961-1990 provided the baseline climate. Water yields (WY)--sum of surface and subsurface runoff--increases from the baseline period over most of the U.S. in 2030 and 2095. In 2030, WY increases in the western US and decreases in the central and southeast regions. Notably, WY increases by 139 mm from baseline in the Pacific NW. Decreased WY is projected for the Lower Mississippi and Texas Gulf basins, driven by higher temperatures and reduced precipitation. The HadCM2 2095 scenario projects a climate significantly wetter than baseline, resulting in WY increases of 38%. WY increases are projected throughout the eastern U.S. WY also increases in the western U.S. Climate change also affects the seasonality of the hydrologic cycle. Early snowmelt is induced in western basins, leading to dramatically increased WYs in late winter and early spring. The simulations were run at current (365 ppm) and elevated (560 ppm) atmospheric CO2 concentrations to account for the potential impacts of the CO2-fertilization effect. The effects of climate change scenario were considerably greater than those due to elevated CO2 but the latter, overall, decreased losses and augmented increases in water yield.

Rosenberg, Norman J.; Brown, Robert A.; Izaurralde, R Cesar C.; Thomson, Allison M.

2003-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

395

Ultracomputer Research Project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document presents significant accomplishments made on the Ultracomputer Research Project during CY92.

Gottlieb, A.

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

CGILS: Results from the First Phase of an International Project to Understand the Physical Mechanisms of Low Cloud Feedbacks in Single Column Models  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Large Eddy Models (LES) and Single Column Models (SCM) are used in a surrogate climate change 101 to investigate the physical mechanism of low cloud feedbacks in climate models. Enhanced surface-102 driven boundary layer turbulence and shallow convection in a warmer climate are found to be 103 dominant mechanisms in SCMs.

Zhang, Minghua; Bretherton, Christopher S.; Blossey, Peter; Austin, Phillip A.; Bacmeister, J.; Bony, Sandrine; Brient, Florent; Cheedela, Suvarchal K.; Cheng, Anning; Del Genio, Anthony D.; De Roode, Stephan R.; Endo , Satoshi; Franklin, Charmaine N.; Golaz, Jean-Christophe; Hannay, Cecile; Heus, Thijs; Isotta, Francesco A.; Jean-Louis, Dufresne; Kang, In-Sik; Kawai, Hideaki; Koehler, M.; Larson, Vincent E.; Liu, Yangang; Lock, Adrian; Lohmann, U.; Khairoutdinov, Marat; Molod, Andrea M.; Neggers, Roel; Rasch, Philip J.; Sandu, Irina; Senkbeil, Ryan; Siebesma, A. P.; Siegenthaler-Le Drian, Colombe; Stevens, Bjorn; Suarez, Max; Xu, Kuan-Man; Von Salzen, Knut; Webb, Mark; Wolf, Audrey; Zhao, M.

2013-12-26T23:59:59.000Z

397

Supplementary Information for: Global soil carbon projections are improved by modeling microbial processes. William R. Wieder, Gordon B. Bonan, & Steven D. Allison (2.1 MB .pdf)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

total = 660 Pg C; (b) Observed soil profile, global total = 1259 Pg C; (c) CLM microbial model surface soils, global total = 784 Pg C [spatial correlation with observations (r) = 0.75, model-weighted root mean square error (RMSE) = 2.9 kg C m-2 ]; (d) CLM microbial model soil profile, global total = 1310 Pg

Saleska, Scott

398

Advanced engineering environment collaboration project.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Advanced Engineering Environment (AEE) is a model for an engineering design and communications system that will enhance project collaboration throughout the nuclear weapons complex (NWC). Sandia National Laboratories and Parametric Technology Corporation (PTC) worked together on a prototype project to evaluate the suitability of a portion of PTC's Windchill 9.0 suite of data management, design and collaboration tools as the basis for an AEE. The AEE project team implemented Windchill 9.0 development servers in both classified and unclassified domains and used them to test and evaluate the Windchill tool suite relative to the needs of the NWC using weapons project use cases. A primary deliverable was the development of a new real time collaborative desktop design and engineering process using PDMLink (data management tool), Pro/Engineer (mechanical computer aided design tool) and ProductView Lite (visualization tool). Additional project activities included evaluations of PTC's electrical computer aided design, visualization, and engineering calculations applications. This report documents the AEE project work to share information and lessons learned with other NWC sites. It also provides PTC with recommendations for improving their products for NWC applications.

Lamph, Jane Ann; Pomplun, Alan R.; Kiba, Grant W.; Dutra, Edward G.; Dankiewicz, Robert J.; Marburger, Scot J.

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Evaluation of Project Achievements in VOMARE -project.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The purpose of the thesis is to study the achievements of VOMARE Ėproject from the Finnish Lifeboat Institutions perspective. The organisation is a roof organisationÖ (more)

Kokkarinen, Eeva

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

NEPA COMPLIANCE SURVEY Project Information Project Title:  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Pollutants? NEPA COMPLIANCE SURVEY Is the project subject to emissions limitations In an Air 0 81 0 Quality Control Region? Impacts If YES, then complete below. Anticipated?...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "model intercomparison project" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Lemnos interoperable security project.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

With the Lemnos framework, interoperability of control security equipment is straightforward. To obtain interoperability between proprietary security appliance units, one or both vendors must now write cumbersome 'translation code.' If one party changes something, the translation code 'breaks.' The Lemnos project is developing and testing a framework that uses widely available security functions and protocols like IPsec - to form a secure communications channel - and Syslog, to exchange security log messages. Using this model, security appliances from two or more different vendors can clearly and securely exchange information, helping to better protect the total system. Simplify regulatory compliance in a complicated security environment by leveraging the Lemnos framework. As an electric utility, are you struggling to implement the NERC CIP standards and other regulations? Are you weighing the misery of multiple management interfaces against committing to a ubiquitous single-vendor solution? When vendors build their security appliances to interoperate using the Lemnos framework, it becomes practical to match best-of-breed offerings from an assortment of vendors to your specific control systems needs. The Lemnos project is developing and testing a framework that uses widely available open-source security functions and protocols like IPsec and Syslog to create a secure communications channel between appliances in order to exchange security data.

Halbgewachs, Ronald D.

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

The Carpenteria reservoir redevelopment project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is the final report of a one-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The objective of this project was to develop a simulation-based reservoir management system that could be used to guide the redevelopment of the Carpenteria Offshore Field, which is located just seven miles from Santa Barbara. The system supports geostatistical and geological modeling and reservoir forecasting. Moreover, it is also a shared resource between the field operator, Pacific Operators Offshore, and the mineral owners, the U.S. Department of the Interior and the State of California.

Kendall, R.P.; Whitney, E.M.; Krogh, K.E. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Coombs, S. [Pacific Operators Offshore, Inc., Carpinteria, CA (United States); Paul, R.G. [Dept. of the Interior (United States); Voskanian, M.M. [California State Lands Commission, Sacramento, CA (United States); Ershaghi, I. [University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

NSTX Upgrade Project Execution Plan NSTX Upgrade Project  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NSTX Upgrade Project Execution Plan NSTX Upgrade Project Project Execution Plan National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) Upgrade Project Execution Plan Revision 1 October 6, 2011 Submitted by: R. Strykowsky NSTX Upgrade Project Manager _____________________________ M. Williams Associate Director, PPPL

Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

404

NSTX Upgrade Project Execution Plan NSTX Upgrade Project  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NSTX Upgrade Project Execution Plan NSTX Upgrade Project Project Execution Plan National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) Upgrade Project Execution Plan Revision 3 October 12, 2012 Administrative Change Submitted by: ______________________________ R. Strykowsky NSTX Upgrade Project Manager Anthony Indelicato

Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

405

A Guide to Community Shared Solar: Utility, Private, and Non-Profit Project Development (Book)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This guide is organized around three sponsorship models: utility-sponsored projects, projects sponsored by special purpose entities - businesses formed for the purpose of producing community solar power, and non-profit sponsored projects. The guide addresses issues common to all project models, as well as issues unique to each model.

Coughlin, J.; Grove, J.; Irvine, L.; Jacobs, J. F.; Johnson Phillips, S.; Sawyer, A.; Wiedman, J.

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Senior projectS corporate Sponsored  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

--Professor, Computer Engineering | http://users.soe.ucsc. edu/~larrabee/Site/Professor_Tracy_Larrabee.html Charlie McSenior projectS program corporate Sponsored Partner's Day May 31, 2012 Baskin School of Engineering earning their engineering degree and fulfilling this capstone design sequence. Our students who have

Stuart, Josh

407

Livingston Campus Geothermal Project The Project  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Livingston Campus Geothermal Project The Project: Geothermal power is a cost effective, reliable is a Closed Loop Geothermal System involving the removal and storage of approximately four feet of dirt from the entire Geothermal Field and the boring of 321 vertical holes reaching a depth of 500 feet. These holes

Delgado, Mauricio

408

Decontamination systems information and research program -- Literature review in support of development of standard test protocols and barrier design models for in situ formed barriers project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy is responsible for approximately 3,000 sites in which contaminants such as carbon tetrachloride, trichlorethylene, perchlorethylene, non-volatile and soluble organic and insoluble organics (PCBs and pesticides) are encountered. In specific areas of these sites radioactive contaminants are stored in underground storage tanks which were originally designed and constructed with a 30-year projected life. Many of these tanks are now 10 years beyond the design life and failures have occurred allowing the basic liquids (ph of 8 to 9) to leak into the unconsolidated soils below. Nearly one half of the storage tanks located at the Hanford Washington Reservation are suspected of leaking and contaminating the soils beneath them. The Hanford site is located in a semi-arid climate region with rainfall of less than 6 inches annually, and studies have indicated that very little of this water finds its way to the groundwater to move the water down gradient toward the Columbia River. This provides the government with time to develop a barrier system to prevent further contamination of the groundwater, and to develop and test remediation systems to stabilize or remove the contaminant materials. In parallel to remediation efforts, confinement and containment technologies are needed to retard or prevent the advancement of contamination plumes through the environment until the implementation of remediation technology efforts are completed. This project examines the various confinement and containment technologies and protocols for testing the materials in relation to their function in-situ.

NONE

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Probabilistic calibration of a Greenland Ice Sheet model using spatially-resolved synthetic observations: toward projections of ice mass loss with uncertainties  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Probabilistic calibration of a Greenland Ice Sheet model using spatially-resolved synthetic on how well the model reproduces the Greenland Ice Sheet profile. We improve on the previous state et al., 2012). Here, we focus on the Greenland Ice Sheet component of future sea level rise

Haran, Murali

410

ERB and Northern European FRIEND Project 5 Conference, Demnovsk dolina, Slovakia, 2002 Evaluation of a distributed hydrology model to support restoration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of a distributed hydrology model to support restoration efforts in small watersheds with limited data: from to assist in decision making. Distributed hydrologic modeling in geographic information systems (GIS) has scale, or they require excessive calibration, or they are not based on the dominant hydrologic processes

Walter, M.Todd

411

Costilla County Biodiesel Pilot Project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Costilla County Biodiesel Pilot Project has demonstrated the compatibility of biodiesel technology and economics on a local scale. The project has been committed to making homegrown biodiesel a viable form of community economic development. The project has benefited by reducing risks by building the facility gradually and avoiding large initial outlays of money for facilities and technologies. A primary advantage of this type of community-scale biodiesel production is that it allows for a relatively independent, local solution to fuel production. Successfully using locally sourced feedstocks and putting the fuel into local use emphasizes the feasibility of different business models under the biodiesel tent and that there is more than just a one size fits all template for successful biodiesel production.

Doon, Ben; Quintana, Dan

2011-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

412

Contract/Project Management  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

and Targets 1 ContractProject Management Performance Metric FY 2012 Target FY 2012 Forecast FY 2012 Pre- & Post-CAP Forecast Comment Capital Asset Project Success: Complete 90%...

413

Contract/Project Management  

Energy Savers [EERE]

on a 3-year rolling average (FY09 to FY11). TPC is Total Project Cost. 2a. EM Cleanup (Soil and Groundwater Remediation, D&D, and Waste Treatment and Disposal) Projects: (Pre-...

414

Rank Project Name Directorate,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Rank Project Name Directorate, Dept/Div and POC Cost Savings Payback (Years) Waste Reduction 1 NATIONAL LABORATORY FY02 Funded Pollution Prevention Projects 0.4 Years (~5 months) #12;

415

The 4-H Project  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

As a 4-H volunteer, you will find that projects are useful tools for teaching a wide variety of skills to young people. This publication will help you plan and evaluate 4-H learning projects....

Howard, Jeff W.

2005-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

416

Information Technology Project Management  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

The Order provides program and project management direction for the acquisition and management of IT projects, investments, and initiatives. Cancels DOE G 200.1-1. Admin Chg 1 approved 1-16-2013.

2012-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

417

Planning the Project Meeting  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Project group meetings must be planned well in advance. Members should be involved in completing some type of work before the next meeting. This helps the leader plan the next project meeting and makes efficient use of time....

Howard, Jeff W.

2005-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

418

Information Technology Project Management  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

The Order provides program and project management direction for the acquisition and management of IT projects, investments, and initiatives. Cancels DOE G 200.1-1. Admin Chg 1, dated 1-16-2013, cancels DOE O 415.1.

2012-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

419

Page 1 of 26 INDEPENDENT PROJECT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Page 1 of 26 INDEPENDENT PROJECT EVALUATION PROJECT NAME: HIVE PROOF-OF- CONCEPT PROJECT PROJECT ............................................................................................................................................3 The Project..............................................................................................................................................3 Project Objectives and Achievements

Evans, Paul

420

NSTX Upgrade Project Execution Plan NSTX Upgrade Project  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

#12;#12;NSTX Upgrade Project Execution Plan NSTX Upgrade Project Project Execution Plan i Record;NSTX Upgrade Project Execution Plan NSTX Upgrade Project Project Execution Plan ii Table of Contents 1 ..............................................................................................................................1 1.2.1 DOE-approved project documents

Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "model intercomparison project" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

NSTX Upgrade Project Execution Plan NSTX Upgrade Project  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

#12;NSTX Upgrade Project Execution Plan NSTX Upgrade Project Project Execution Plan i Record/schedule baseline updates #12;NSTX Upgrade Project Execution Plan NSTX Upgrade Project Project Execution Plan ii ..............................................................................................................................1 1.2.1 DOE-approved project documents

Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

422

WIPP Projects Interative Map  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

View WIPP Projects in a larger map. To report corrections, please email†WeatherizationInnovation@ee.doe.gov.

423

GHPsRUS Project  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

The GHPsRUS Project's full name is "Measuring the Costs and Benefits of Nationwide Geothermal Heat Pump Deployment." The dataset contains employment and installation price data collected by four economic surveys: (1)GHPsRUS Project Manufacturer & OEM Survey, (2) GHPsRUS Project Geothermal Loop Survey, (3) GHPsRUS Project Mechanical Equipment Installation Survey, and (4) GHPsRUS Geothermal Heat Pump Industry Survey

Battocletti, Liz

424

GHPsRUS Project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The GHPsRUS Project's full name is "Measuring the Costs and Benefits of Nationwide Geothermal Heat Pump Deployment." The dataset contains employment and installation price data collected by four economic surveys: (1)GHPsRUS Project Manufacturer & OEM Survey, (2) GHPsRUS Project Geothermal Loop Survey, (3) GHPsRUS Project Mechanical Equipment Installation Survey, and (4) GHPsRUS Geothermal Heat Pump Industry Survey

Battocletti, Liz

2013-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

425

Project: BELLA Bldg. #: 71  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

: BEVATRON Bldg. #: 51 Affected Area: Lot I (6) Lower Lot (52) Dates: 6/2009 - 11/2011 Project: Seismic PhaseProject: BELLA Bldg. #: 71 Affected Area: Lot M-1(12) B81 (18) Dates: 10/2010 ­ 10/2011 Project II Bldg. #: 74 Affected Area: U1 (50) U3 (21) Dates: 10/2009 ­ 4/2012 Project: Old Town Demo Bldg

426

Colorado: Energy Modeling Products Support Energy Efficiency...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Colorado: Energy Modeling Products Support Energy Efficiency Projects Colorado: Energy Modeling Products Support Energy Efficiency Projects May 1, 2014 - 11:04am Addthis Xcel...

427

International Research Reactor Decommissioning Project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Many research reactors have been or will be shut down and are candidates for decommissioning. Most of the respective countries neither have a decommissioning policy nor the required expertise and funds to effectively implement a decommissioning project. The IAEA established the Research Reactor Decommissioning Demonstration Project (R{sup 2}D{sup 2}P) to help answer this need. It was agreed to involve the Philippine Research Reactor (PRR-1) as model reactor to demonstrate 'hands-on' experience as it is just starting the decommissioning process. Other facilities may be included in the project as they fit into the scope of R{sup 2}D{sup 2}P and complement to the PRR-1 decommissioning activities. The key outcome of the R{sup 2}D{sup 2}P will be the decommissioning of the PRR-1 reactor. On the way to this final goal the preparation of safety related documents (i.e., decommissioning plan, environmental impact assessment, safety analysis report, health and safety plan, cost estimate, etc.) and the licensing process as well as the actual dismantling activities could provide a model to other countries involved in the project. It is expected that the R{sup 2}D{sup 2}P would initiate activities related to planning and funding of decommissioning activities in the participating countries if that has not yet been done.

Leopando, Leonardo [Philippine Nuclear Research Institute, Quezon City (Philippines); Warnecke, Ernst [International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna (Austria)

2008-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

428

SAPHIRE 8 Software Project Plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project is being conducted at the request of the DOE and the NRC. The INL has been requested by the NRC to improve and maintain the Systems Analysis Programs for Hands-on Integrated Reliability Evaluation (SAPHIRE) tool set concurrent with the changing needs of the user community as well as staying current with new technologies. Successful completion will be upon NRC approved release of all software and accompanying documentation in a timely fashion. This project will enhance the SAPHIRE tool set for the user community (NRC, Nuclear Power Plant operations, Probabilistic Risk Analysis (PRA) model developers) by providing improved Common Cause Failure (CCF), External Events, Level 2, and Significance Determination Process (SDP) analysis capabilities. The SAPHIRE development team at the Idaho National Laboratory is responsible for successful completion of this project. The project is under the supervision of Curtis L. Smith, PhD, Technical Lead for the SAPHIRE application. All current capabilities from SAPHIRE version 7 will be maintained in SAPHIRE 8. The following additional capabilities will be incorporated: ē Incorporation of SPAR models for the SDP interface. ē Improved quality assurance activities for PRA calculations of SAPHIRE Version 8. ē Continue the current activities for code maintenance, documentation, and user support for the code.

Curtis L.Smith; Ted S. Wood

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Final report for %22High performance computing for advanced national electric power grid modeling and integration of solar generation resources%22, LDRD Project No. 149016.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Design and operation of the electric power grid (EPG) relies heavily on computational models. High-fidelity, full-order models are used to study transient phenomena on only a small part of the network. Reduced-order dynamic and power flow models are used when analysis involving thousands of nodes are required due to the computational demands when simulating large numbers of nodes. The level of complexity of the future EPG will dramatically increase due to large-scale deployment of variable renewable generation, active load and distributed generation resources, adaptive protection and control systems, and price-responsive demand. High-fidelity modeling of this future grid will require significant advances in coupled, multi-scale tools and their use on high performance computing (HPC) platforms. This LDRD report demonstrates SNL's capability to apply HPC resources to these 3 tasks: (1) High-fidelity, large-scale modeling of power system dynamics; (2) Statistical assessment of grid security via Monte-Carlo simulations of cyber attacks; and (3) Development of models to predict variability of solar resources at locations where little or no ground-based measurements are available.

Reno, Matthew J.; Riehm, Andrew Charles; Hoekstra, Robert John; Munoz-Ramirez, Karina; Stamp, Jason Edwin; Phillips, Laurence R.; Adams, Brian M.; Russo, Thomas V.; Oldfield, Ron A.; McLendon, William Clarence, III; Nelson, Jeffrey Scott; Hansen, Clifford W.; Richardson, Bryan T.; Stein, Joshua S.; Schoenwald, David Alan; Wolfenbarger, Paul R.

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Fundamental Aeronautics Hypersonics Project  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Fundamental Aeronautics Hypersonics Project Reference Document Principal Investigator: James and detailed content of a comprehensive Fundamental Aeronautics Hypersonics research project. It contains) Hypersonic Project is based on the fact that all access to earth or planetary orbit, and all entry into earth

431

Project Website Information Architecture  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Project Website Information Architecture Overview Purpose: To describe up front what your initiative/project does. This section does not need to literally be called "Overview;" you can come up with anther suitable title that is more specific to your project. Examples of what to include: Information

432

Project Scheduling (3) Corequisite  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) CMGT 111 Construction Materials & Methods Lab (1) CMGT 460 Project Cost Controls (3) FA SP CMGT 320 FASYMBOLS CMGT 417 Project Scheduling (3) Corequisite Offered FALL Only CMGT 240 Intro) CMGT 475 Construction Project Management (3) MATH 108 College Algebra (4) Construction Elective

Barrash, Warren

433

Project Scheduling (3) Corequisite  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

460 Project Cost Controls (3) FA SP FA CE 210/211 Surveying & Lab (3) CMGT 410 Concrete FormworkSYMBOLS CMGT 417 Project Scheduling (3) Corequisite Offered FALL Only CMGT 240 Intro Construction Project Management (3) MATH 108 College Algebra (4) MGMT 301 Leadership Skills (3) ENGL 101

Barrash, Warren

434

New Project Opportunities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

/year. Most projects will be sponsored by between four and ten companies. The cost of participation may changeNew Project Opportunities PIMS: Porphyry Indicator Minerals The characteristics and relative, the next phase of this project has started and MDRU are looking for industry partners. Exploring Lithocaps

Michelson, David G.

435

Kansas Advanced Semiconductor Project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

KASP (Kansas Advanced Semiconductor Project) completed the new Layer 0 upgrade for D0, assumed key electronics projects for the US CMS project, finished important new physics measurements with the D0 experiment at Fermilab, made substantial contributions to detector studies for the proposed e+e- international linear collider (ILC), and advanced key initiatives in non-accelerator-based neutrino physics.

Baringer, P.; Bean, A.; Bolton, T.; Horton-Smith, G.; Maravin, Y.; Ratra, B.; Stanton, N.; von Toerne, E.; Wilson, G.

2007-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

436

Product Guide Project Standard and Project Professional  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

................................................................................................................................................................6 Manage Projects and Programs, or other intellectual property that are the subject matter of this document. #12;Table of Contents .......................................................................................................9 Make It Yours ­ Personalize the Ribbon

Narasayya, Vivek

437

Project Overload in Project Based Organizations - Causes, Symptoms and Effects.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

?? This study investigates the matter of project overload which project members have to face in project based organizations. The thesis is based on 13Ö (more)

Hochdorfer, Tobias

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

PUBLISHED ONLINE: XX MONTH XXXX | DOI: 10.1038/NCLIMATE1951 Global soil carbon projections are improved by  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Society relies on Earth system models (ESMs) to project future climate and carbon cycle feedbacks. However

German, Donovan P.

439

PUBLISHED ONLINE: 28 JULY 2013 | DOI: 10.1038/NCLIMATE1951 Global soil carbon projections are improved by  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Society relies on Earth system models (ESMs) to project future climate and carbon (C) cycle feedbacks

Saleska, Scott

440

Cost-Effective Modeling and Savings Projections for Multifamily Projects |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarly Career Scientists'Montana. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLEReport 2009 activitiesof Energy As a basis for

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "model intercomparison project" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Renewable Energy Project Refinement Webinar  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Attendees will become familiar with the three components of project refinement: project financing strategies, off-taker agreements, and vendor selection. Project refinement obstacles, particularly...

442

RENOTER Project | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

RENOTER Project RENOTER Project Overview of French project on thermoelectric waste heat recovery for cars and trucks with focus on cheap, available, efficient, and sustainable TE...

443

Projecting Electricity Demand in 2050  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper describes the development of end-use electricity projections and load curves that were developed for the Renewable Electricity (RE) Futures Study (hereafter RE Futures), which explored the prospect of higher percentages (30% ? 90%) of total electricity generation that could be supplied by renewable sources in the United States. As input to RE Futures, two projections of electricity demand were produced representing reasonable upper and lower bounds of electricity demand out to 2050. The electric sector models used in RE Futures required underlying load profiles, so RE Futures also produced load profile data in two formats: 8760 hourly data for the year 2050 for the GridView model, and in 2-year increments for 17 time slices as input to the Regional Energy Deployment System (ReEDS) model. The process for developing demand projections and load profiles involved three steps: discussion regarding the scenario approach and general assumptions, literature reviews to determine readily available data, and development of the demand curves and load profiles.

Hostick, Donna J.; Belzer, David B.; Hadley, Stanton W.; Markel, Tony; Marnay, Chris; Kintner-Meyer, Michael CW

2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

C. REFERENCES CITED (NSF grant-supported project authors in bold) 1. Agha, G.A. 1987. Actors: A model of concurrent computation I distributed systems. MIT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Aspinall, R. and D. Pearson. 2000. Integrated geographical assessment of environmental condition in water catchments: Linking landscape ecology, environmental modeling and GIS. Journal of Environmental Management 59. Sustainable development and environmental management of small islands. Man and the Biosphere Series, 5

445

BEACON SOLAR ENERGY PROJECT (08-AFC-2) Project Title: Beacon Solar Energy Project (Beacon)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

BEACON SOLAR ENERGY PROJECT (08-AFC-2) FACT SHEET Project Title: Beacon Solar Energy Project and operate the Beacon Solar Energy Project (Beacon). Location: The project is located in eastern Kern County;BEACON SOLAR ENERGY PROJECT (08-AFC-2) FACT SHEET Licensing: The Beacon project would have a nominal

446

Ford Plug-In Project: Bringing PHEVs to Market  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

projects: - analysis of infield results of the Escape PHEVs, - field demonstration of Smart Meter communication, and - creation of a model studying plug-in vehicles as a grid...

447

National Compact Stellarator Experiment Project Closeout Report PROJECT CLOSEOUT REPORT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

National Compact Stellarator Experiment Project Closeout Report i PROJECT CLOSEOUT REPORT NATIONAL of Science Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory Oak Ridge National Laboratory #12;National Compact Stellarator Experiment Project Closeout Report PROJECT CLOSEOUT REPORT NATIONAL COMPACT STELLARATOR EXPERIMENT (NCSX

Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

448

Coastal Ohio Wind Project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Coastal Ohio Wind Project intends to address problems that impede deployment of wind turbines in the coastal and offshore regions of Northern Ohio. The project evaluates different wind turbine designs and the potential impact of offshore turbines on migratory and resident birds by developing multidisciplinary research, which involves wildlife biology, electrical and mechanical engineering, and geospatial science. Firstly, the project conducts cost and performance studies of two- and three-blade wind turbines using a turbine design suited for the Great Lakes. The numerical studies comprised an analysis and evaluation of the annual energy production of two- and three-blade wind turbines to determine the levelized cost of energy. This task also involved wind tunnel studies of model wind turbines to quantify the wake flow field of upwind and downwind wind turbine-tower arrangements. The experimental work included a study of a scaled model of an offshore wind turbine platform in a water tunnel. The levelized cost of energy work consisted of the development and application of a cost model to predict the cost of energy produced by a wind turbine system placed offshore. The analysis found that a floating two-blade wind turbine presents the most cost effective alternative for the Great Lakes. The load effects studies showed that the two-blade wind turbine model experiences less torque under all IEC Standard design load cases considered. Other load effects did not show this trend and depending on the design load cases, the two-bladed wind turbine showed higher or lower load effects. The experimental studies of the wake were conducted using smoke flow visualization and hot wire anemometry. Flow visualization studies showed that in the downwind turbine configuration the wake flow was insensitive to the presence of the blade and was very similar to that of the tower alone. On the other hand, in the upwind turbine configuration, increasing the rotor blade angle of attack reduced the wake size and enhanced the vortices in the flow downstream of the turbine-tower compared with the tower alone case. Mean and rms velocity distributions from hot wire anemometer data confirmed that in a downwind configuration, the wake of the tower dominates the flow, thus the flow fields of a tower alone and tower-turbine combinations are nearly the same. For the upwind configuration, the mean velocity shows a narrowing of the wake compared with the tower alone case. The downwind configuration wake persisted longer than that of an upwind configuration; however, it was not possible to quantify this difference because of the size limitation of the wind tunnel downstream of the test section. The water tunnel studies demonstrated that the scale model studies could be used to adequately produce accurate motions to model the motions of a wind turbine platform subject to large waves. It was found that the important factors that affect the platform is whether the platform is submerged or surface piercing. In the former, the loads on the platform will be relatively reduced whereas in the latter case, the structure pierces the wave free surface and gains stiffness and stability. The other important element that affects the movement of the platform is depth of the sea in which the wind turbine will be installed. Furthermore, the wildlife biology component evaluated migratory patterns by different monitoring systems consisting of marine radar, thermal IR camera and acoustic recorders. The types of radar used in the project are weather surveillance radar and marine radar. The weather surveillance radar (1988 Doppler), also known as Next Generation Radar (NEXRAD), provides a network of weather stations in the US. Data generated from this network were used to understand general migratory patterns, migratory stopover habitats, and other patterns caused by the effects of weather conditions. At a local scale our marine radar was used to complement the datasets from NEXRAD and to collect additional monitoring parameters such as passage rates, flight paths, flight directi

Gorsevski, Peter; Afjeh, Abdollah; Jamali, Mohsin; Bingman, Verner

2014-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

449

Physics from Angular Projection of Rectangular Grids  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this paper, we present a mathematical model for the angular projection of a rectangular arrangement of points in a grid. This simple, yet interesting problem, has both a scholarly value and applications for data extraction techniques to study the physics of various systems. Our work can interest undergraduate students to understand subtle points in the angular projection of a grid and describes various quantities of interest in the projection with completeness and sufficient rigour. We show that for certain angular ranges, the projection has non-distinctness, and calculate the details of such angles, and correspondingly, the number of distinct points and the total projected length. We focus on interesting trends obtained for the projected length of the grid elements and present a simple application of the model to determine the geometry of an unknown grid whose spatial extensions are known, using measurement of the grid projection at two angles only. Towards the end, our model is shown to have potential applications in various branches of physical sciences including crystallography, astrophysics and bulk properties of materials.

Ashmeet Singh

2014-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

450

Uncertainty in projected impacts of climate change on water  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Global Carbon Project · Scenarios trends are averages across all models available for each scenario class1928 2000 Uncertainty in projected impacts of climate change on water Uncertainty in projected-2004Observed Changes: 1970-2004 · High confidence changes in: ­ rainfall intensity ­ extreme temperatures

Maurer,. Edwin P.

451

The MAC-GEO project 1/84 The MAC-GEO project  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of deep geothermal uids extraction process upon phreatic supercial water layers The nal product should impact of deep geothermal uids extraction process upon phreatic supercial water layers The nal productThe MAC-GEO project 1/84 The MAC-GEO project MAthematical modelling for government control

Rosso, Fabio

452

Jobs and Economic Development Modeling | Department of Energy  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Project objective: Develop models to estimate jobs and economic impacts from geothermal project development and operation. analysisyoungeconomicdevelopmentmodeling.pdf...

453

NSTX Upgrade Project Execution Plan NSTX Upgrade Project  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

#12;NSTX Upgrade Project Execution Plan NSTX Upgrade Project Project Execution Plan i Record 10/12/2012 Update to WBS Level 2 Threshold (top of page 20), Change DOE Federal Project Director and Deputy Federal Project Director. Various OBS changes. #12;NSTX Upgrade Project Execution Plan NSTX

Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

454

FutureGen Project Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes the comprehensive siting, permitting, engineering, design, and costing activities completed by the FutureGen Industrial Alliance, the Department of Energy, and associated supporting subcontractors to develop a first of a kind near zero emissions integrated gasification combined cycle power plant and carbon capture and storage project (IGCC-CCS). With the goal to design, build, and reliably operate the first IGCC-CCS facility, FutureGen would have been the lowest emitting pulverized coal power plant in the world, while providing a timely and relevant basis for coal combustion power plants deploying carbon capture in the future. The content of this report summarizes key findings and results of applicable project evaluations; modeling, design, and engineering assessments; cost estimate reports; and schedule and risk mitigation from initiation of the FutureGen project through final flow sheet analyses including capital and operating reports completed under DOE award DE-FE0000587. This project report necessarily builds upon previously completed siting, design, and development work executed under DOE award DE-FC26- 06NT4207 which included the siting process; environmental permitting, compliance, and mitigation under the National Environmental Policy Act; and development of conceptual and design basis documentation for the FutureGen plant. For completeness, the report includes as attachments the siting and design basis documents, as well as the source documentation for the following: ē Site evaluation and selection process and environmental characterization ē Underground Injection Control (UIC) Permit Application including well design and subsurface modeling ē FutureGen IGCC-CCS Design Basis Document ē Process evaluations and technology selection via Illinois Clean Coal Review Board Technical Report ē Process flow diagrams and heat/material balance for slurry-fed gasifier configuration ē Process flow diagrams and heat/material balance for dry-fed gasifier configuration ē Full capital cost report and cost category analysis (CAPEX) ē Full operating cost report and assumptions (OPEX) Comparative technology evaluations, value engineering exercises, and initial air permitting activities are also provided; the report concludes with schedule, risk, and cost mitigation activities as well as lessons learned such that the products of this report can be used to support future investments in utility scale gasification and carbon capture and sequestration. Collectively, the FutureGen project enabled the comprehensive site specific evaluation and determination of the economic viability of IGCC-CCS. The project report is bound at that determination when DOE formally proposed the FutureGen 2.0 project which focuses on repowering a pulverized coal power plant with oxy-combustion technology including CCS.

Cabe, Jim; Elliott, Mike

2010-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

455

TransCom 3 inversion intercomparison: Impact of transport model errors on the interannual variability of regional CO 2 fluxes, 1988-2003  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

dioxide emissions from fossil fuel consumption and cementthe consumption and flaring of fossil fuels, 1980 Ė present,of the increase: fossil fuel burning and deforestation.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

TransCom 3 inversion intercomparison: Impact of transport model errors on the interannual variability of regional CO 2 fluxes, 1988-2003  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

East Pacific South Pacific Northern Ocean North AtlanticEast Pacific South Pacific Northern Ocean North Atlanticand South Pacific, and the Northern Ocean) for which there

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

Intercomparison of model simulations of mixed-phase clouds observed during the ARM Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment. Part I: Single layer cloud  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

radiation calculations performed with an ice-free ocean orradiation calculations performed with an ice-free ocean orradiation. STREAMER calculations with the observed cloud, either over an ocean

Klein, Stephen A.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

TransCom 3 inversion intercomparison: Impact of transport model errors on the interannual variability of regional CO 2 fluxes, 1988-2003  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

931 Ė 943. Energy Information Administration (2002), U.S.is from Energy Information Administration [2002]. Cement

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

A model-data intercomparison of CO2 exchange across North America: Results from the North American Carbon Program Site Synthesis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

College Park, MD 20740, USA cesar.izaurralde@pnl.gov, Tel: 301-314-6751 Department of Agronomy & Nelson Institute Center for Sustainability and

Schwalm, C.R.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

Response of the water balance to climate change in the United States over the 20th and 21st centuries: Results from the VEMAP Phase 2 model intercomparisons  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

distribution: The role of the water balance, Am. Nat. , 135,NPP): The importance of water avail- ability, Global Change1982a), Ecological optimality in water-limited natural soil-

Gordon, W. S; Famiglietti, J. S

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "model intercomparison project" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

TransCom 3 inversion intercomparison: Impact of transport model errors on the interannual variability of regional CO 2 fluxes, 1988-2003  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

When computational resources permit it, a study of the sortuncertainties are low enough to permit the main features of

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

462

An Initial Intercomparison of Atmospheric and Oceanic Climatology for the ICE-5G and ICE-4G Models of LGM Paleotopography  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Institut fŁr Meereswissenschaften, IfM-GEOMAR, Kiel, Germany W. R. PELTIER Department of Physics on both present and past climates regimes (e.g. Peltier and Solheim 2004; Vettoretti et al. 2000; Kitoh on the climate during the last glacial period (Jus- tino et al. 2005; Peltier and Solheim 2004; Vettoretti et al

Peltier, W. Richard

463

The CHPRC Columbia River Protection Project Quality Assurance Project Plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory researchers are working on the CHPRC Columbia River Protection Project (hereafter referred to as the Columbia River Project). This is a follow-on project, funded by CH2M Hill Plateau Remediation Company, LLC (CHPRC), to the Fluor Hanford, Inc. Columbia River Protection Project. The work scope consists of a number of CHPRC funded, related projects that are managed under a master project (project number 55109). All contract releases associated with the Fluor Hanford Columbia River Project (Fluor Hanford, Inc. Contract 27647) and the CHPRC Columbia River Project (Contract 36402) will be collected under this master project. Each project within the master project is authorized by a CHPRC contract release that contains the project-specific statement of work. This Quality Assurance Project Plan provides the quality assurance requirements and processes that will be followed by the Columbia River Project staff.

Fix, N. J.

2008-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

464

Battleground Energy Recovery Project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In October 2009, the project partners began a 36-month effort to develop an innovative, commercial-scale demonstration project incorporating state-of-the-art waste heat recovery technology at Clean Harbors, Inc., a large hazardous waste incinerator site located in Deer Park, Texas. With financial support provided by the U.S. Department of Energy, the Battleground Energy Recovery Project was launched to advance waste heat recovery solutions into the hazardous waste incineration market, an area that has seen little adoption of heat recovery in the United States. The goal of the project was to accelerate the use of energy-efficient, waste heat recovery technology as an alternative means to produce steam for industrial processes. The project had three main engineering and business objectives: Prove Feasibility of Waste Heat Recovery Technology at a Hazardous Waste Incinerator Complex; Provide Low-cost Steam to a Major Polypropylene Plant Using Waste Heat; and Ô?∑ Create a Showcase Waste Heat Recovery Demonstration Project.

Daniel Bullock

2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

465

Operational Waste Volume Projection  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Waste receipts to the double-shell tank system are analyzed and wastes through the year 2015 are projected based on generation trends of the past 12 months. A computer simulation of site operations is performed, which results in projections of tank fill schedules, tank transfers, evaporator operations, tank retrieval, and aging waste tank usage. This projection incorporates current budget planning and the clean-up schedule of the Tri-Party Agreement. Assumptions were current as of June. 2000.

STRODE, J.N.

2000-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

466

Operational waste volume projection  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Waste receipts to the double-shell tank system are analyzed and wastes through the year 2015 are projected based on generation trends of the past 12 months. A computer simulation of site operations is performed, which results in projections of tank fill schedules, tank transfers, evaporator operations, tank retrieval, and aging waste tank usage. This projection incorporates current budget planning and the clean-up schedule of the Tri-Party Agreement. Assumptions were current as of June 1996.

Koreski, G.M.

1996-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

467

Investor Confidence Project  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

projects (under $1MM), Lighter engineering requirements Ė V1 Released September 2013 ē Targeted Commercial Ė Single Measure or Non-Interactive Retrofits Ė Release Date Dec 2013 ē Multifamily Ė Release Q1 2014 ē Quality Assurance Protocol Ė Currently in BETA...Environmental Defense Fundís Investor Confidence Project Delivering Investment Quality Energy Efficiency to Market ESL-KT-13-12-38 CATEE 2013: Clean Air Through Energy Efficiency Conference, San Antonio, Texas Dec. 16-18 Investor Confidence Project...

Golden, M.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

468

The Columbia River Protection Supplemental Technologies Quality Assurance Project Plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory researchers are working on the Columbia River Protection Supplemental Technologies Project. This project is a U. S. Department of Energy, Office of Environmental Management-funded initiative designed to develop new methods, strategies, and technologies for characterizing, modeling, remediating, and monitoring soils and groundwater contaminated with metals, radionuclides, and chlorinated organics. This Quality Assurance Project Plan provides the quality assurance requirements and processes that will be followed by the Technologies Project staff.

Fix, N. J.

2008-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

469

Project Organization name Project title 1 Centre for Sustainable Food Systems at UBC  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Recovery Industry 3 City Studio, City of Vancouver Identify Food Recovery Models Farms ICF Farm to Retail Research Project 11 King George Secondary School King George Secondary School Garden 12 Richmond Food Security Society Cost

Pulfrey, David L.

470

Project Information Form Project Title Eco-Friendly Intelligent Transportation System Technology for Freight  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

movement to improve energy efficiency and reduce emissions designed. In this project, the researchers will utilize port/roadway network microscopic models (specifically for the Ports of Long Beach and Los Angeles

California at Davis, University of

471

Project Finance Case Studies  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Presentation covers the Project Finance Case Studies and is given at the Spring 2010 Federal Utility Partnership Working Group (FUPWG) meeting in Rapid City, South Dakota.

472

Prison Solar Project  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Presentation covers the Prison Solar Project for the Federal Utility Partnership Working Group (FUPWG) meeting, held on November 18-19, 2009.

473

Recovery Act Project Stories  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Funded by the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act, these Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) projects exemplify the range of technical assistance provided to federal agencies.

474

Barstow Wind Turbine Project  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Presentation covers the Barstow Wind Turbine project for the Federal Utility Partnership Working Group (FUPWG) meeting, held on November 18-19, 2009.

475

TThe {\\sc Majorana} Project  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The {\\sc Majorana} Project, a neutrinoless double-beta decay experiment is described with an emphasis on the choice of Ge-detector configuration.

The MAJORANA collaboration

2009-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

476

EV Project Overview Report  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Greater Seattle and Olympia Metropolitan Areas Vehicle enrollment numbers refer to the EV Project only. Numbers do not reflect total regional or national vehicles sales or...

477

Our Project Regional, community,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

City departments -City Engineering and Traffic Engineering Public engagement early in project process modes and all users See.Safe.Smart.Rochester campaign to decrease modal conflict Connection

Minnesota, University of

478

2015 Technology Innovation Projects  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

for RTU and Lighting Retrofits Energy Efficiency TIP 140: Energy Efficiency Emerging Technology Assessment and Demonstration Projects TIP 261: Determining and Improving the...

479

The MAJORANA project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Majorana Project, a neutrinoless double-beta decay experiment is described with an emphasis on the choice of Ge-detector configuration.

Elliott, Steven R [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

480

NAESB BPS ATC Project  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

By Phone * 10114 NAESB BPS ATC Project Kick Off * 107 - 10814 NAESB BPS - MISO (Carmel, IN) * 112515 - NAESB BPS Conference Call * 12215 - NAESB BPS Conference...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "model intercomparison project" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

PROJECT PLANNING TEMPLATE  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

on public affairs efforts, which includes public information activities, press and media services, DOE home-page content, speaking engagements, special projects, internal...

482

Gravity Train Project  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Dec 7, 2013 ... Gravity Train Project. Same page in Romanian, Polish, and in French. Let us drill a straight tunnel from West Lafayette, IN to Paris, France:.

483

Mascoma: Frontier Biorefinery Project  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This project involves the construction and operation of a biorefinery that produces ethanol and other co-products from cellulosic materials through advanced consolidated bioprocessing.