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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "model intercomparison project" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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1

OVERVIEW OF THE COUPLED MODEL INTERCOMPARISON PROJECT  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Coupled Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP) involves study and intercomparison of multi-model simulations of present and future climate. The simulations of the future use idealized forcing in increase is compounded which CO2 1% yr?1 until it ...

Gerald A. Meehl; Curt Covey; Bryant McAvaney; Mojib Latif; Ronald J. Stouffer

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

AMIP: The Atmospheric Model Intercomparison Project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Atmospheric Model Intercomparison Project (AMIP) is an international effort to determine the systematic climate errors of atmospheric models under realistic conditions, and calls for the simulation of the climate of the decade 1979–1988 using ...

W. Lawrence Gates

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Interannual Tropical Rainfall Variability in General Circulation Model Simulations Associated with the Atmospheric Model Intercomparison Project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The interannual variability of rainfall over the Indian subcontinent, the African Sahel, and the Nordeste region of Brazil have been evaluated in 32 models for the period 1979–88 as part of the Atmospheric Model Intercomparison Project (AMIP). ...

K. R. Sperber; T. N. Palmer

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

El Niño–La Niña Asymmetry in the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Simulations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The El Niño–La Niña asymmetry was estimated in the 10 different models participating in the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP). Large differences in the “asymmetricity” (a variance-weighted skewness) of SST anomalies are found between ...

Soon-Il An; Yoo-Geun Ham; Jong-Seong Kug; Fei-Fei Jin; In-Sik Kang

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Evaluation of Tropospheric Water Vapor Simulations from the Atmospheric Model Intercomparison Project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Simulations of humidity from 28 general circulation models for the period 1979–88 from the Atmospheric Model Intercomparison Project are compared with observations from radiosondes over North America and the globe and with satellite microwave ...

Dian J. Gaffen; Richard D. Rosen; David A. Salstein; James S. Boyle

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Snow Mass over North America: Observations and Results from the Second Phase of the Atmospheric Model Intercomparison Project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Eighteen global atmospheric general circulation models (AGCMs) participating in the second phase of the Atmospheric Model Intercomparison Project (AMIP-2) are evaluated for their ability to simulate the observed spatial and temporal variability ...

Allan Frei; Ross Brown; James A. Miller; David A. Robinson

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Projected changes in late 21st century tropical cyclone frequency in thirteen coupled climate models from the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 5  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Changes in tropical cyclone (TC) frequency under anthropogenic climate change are examined for thirteen global models from the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 5 (CMIP5), using the OWZP TC detection method developed by the authors in ...

K. J. Tory; S. S. Chand; J. L. McBride; H. Ye; R. A. Dare

8

Evaluation of the Vertical Structure of Zonally Averaged Cloudiness and Its Variability in the Atmospheric Model Intercomparison Project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Estimates of zonally averaged cloudiness at each pressure level in 24 models participating in the Atmospheric Model Intercomparison Project are compared with the ISCCP C2 as well as the Nimbus 7 (N7) and Warren et al. (hereafter WH) observations. ...

Bryan C. Weare; Amip Modeling Groups

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

World Climate Research Programme's (WCRP) Coupled Model Intercomparison Project phase 3 (CMIP3) Multi-Model Dataset Archive at PCMDI (Program for Climate Model Diagnosis and Intercomparison)  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

In response to a proposed activity of the WCRP's Working Group on Coupled Modelling (WGCM),PCMDI volunteered to collect model output contributed by leading modeling centers around the world. Climate model output from simulations of the past, present and future climate was collected by PCMDI mostly during the years 2005 and 2006, and this archived data constitutes phase 3 of the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP3). In part, the WGCM organized this activity to enable those outside the major modeling centers to perform research of relevance to climate scientists preparing the Fourth Asssessment Report (AR4) of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC). The IPCC was established by the World Meteorological Organization and the United Nations Environmental Program to assess scientific information on climate change. The IPCC publishes reports that summarize the state of the science. This unprecedented collection of recent model output is officially known as the WCRP CMIP3 multi-model dataset. It is meant to serve IPCC's Working Group 1, which focuses on the physical climate system - atmosphere, land surface, ocean and sea ice - and the choice of variables archived at the PCMDI reflects this focus. A more comprehensive set of output for a given model may be available from the modeling center that produced it. As of November 2007, over 35 terabytes of data were in the archive and over 303 terabytes of data had been downloaded among the more than 1200 registered users. Over 250 journal articles, based at least in part on the dataset, have been published or have been accepted for peer-reviewed publication. Countries from which models have been gathered include Australia, Canada, China, France, Germany and Korea, Italy, Japan, Norway, Russia, Great Britain and the United States. Models, variables, and documentation are collected and stored. Check http://www-pcmdi.llnl.gov/ipcc/data_status_tables.htm to see at a glance the output that is available. (Description taken from http://www-pcmdi.llnl.gov/ipcc/about_ipcc.php)

10

The Hydrological Impact of Geoengineering in the Geoengineering Model Intercomparison Project (GeoMIP)  

SciTech Connect

Abstract: The hydrologic impact of enhancing Earth’s albedo due to solar radiation management (SRM) is investigated using simulations from 12 models contributing to the Geoengineering Model Intercomparison Project (GeoMIP). An artificial experiment is investigated, where global mean temperature is preserved at pre-industrial conditions, while atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations are quadrupled. The associated reduction of downwelling surface solar radiation in a high CO2 environment leads to a reduction of global evaporation of 10% and 4% and precipitation of 6.1% and 6.3% over land and ocean, respectively. An initial reduction of latent heat flux at the surface is largely driven by reduced evapotranspiration over land with instantly increasing CO2 concentrations in both experiments. A warming surface associated with the transient adjustment in the 4xCO2 experiment further generates an increase of global precipitation, with considerable regional changes, such as a significant precipitation reduction of 7% for the North American summer monsoon. Reduced global precipitation persists in the geoengineered experiment where temperatures are stabilized, with considerable regional rainfall deficits. Precipitation reductions that are consistent in sign across models are identified in the geoengineered experiment over monsoonal land regions of East Asia (6%), North America (7%), South America (6%) and South Africa (5%). In contrast to the 4xCO2 experiment, where the frequency of months with heavy precipitation intensity is increased by over 50%, it is reduced by up to 20% in the geoengineering scenario . The reduction in heavy precipitation is more pronounced over land than over the ocean, and accompanies a stronger reduction in evaporation over land. For northern mid-latitudes, maximum precipitation reduction over land ranges from 1 to 16% for individual models. For 45-65°N, the frequency of median to high intensity precipitation in summer is strongly reduced. These changes in precipitation in both total amount and frequency of extremes, point to a considerable weakening of the hydrological cycle in a geoengineered world.

Tilmes, S.; Fasullo, John; Lamarque, J.-F.; Marsh, D.; Mills, Mike; Alterskjaer, Kari; Muri, Helene O.; Kristjansson, Jon E.; Boucher, Olivier; Schulz, M.; Cole, Jason N.; Curry, Charles L.; Jones, A.; Haywood, J.; Irvine, Peter; Ji, Duoying; Moore, John; Bou Karam, Diana; Kravitz, Benjamin S.; Rasch, Philip J.; Singh, Balwinder; Yoon, Jin-Ho; Niemeier, Ulrike; Schmidt, Hauke; Robock, Alan; Yang, Shuting; Watanabe, Shingo

2013-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

11

Global Chemistry Simulations in the AMMA Multimodel Intercomparison Project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The authors present results obtained during the chemistry-transport modeling (CTM) component of the African Monsoon Multi-disciplinary Analysis Multimodel Intercomparison Project (AMMA-MIP) using the recently developed L3JRCv2 emission dataset ...

Jason Edward Williams; Rinus Scheele; Peter van Velthoven; Idir Bouarar; Kathy Law; Béatrice Josse; Vincent-Henri Peuch; Xin Yang; John Pyle; Valérie Thouret; Brice Barret; Cathy Liousse; Frédéric Hourdin; Sophie Szopa; Anne Cozic

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Intercomparison and analyses of the climatology of the West African Monsoon in the West African Monsoon Modeling and Evaluation project (WAMME) first model intercomparison experiment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the climatology of the West African Monsoon in theWest African Monsoon Modeling and Evaluation project (the West African Monsoon (WAM) Modeling and Evaluation

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Multi-model Mean Nitrogen and Sulfur Deposition from the Atmospheric Chemistry and Climate Model Intercomparison Project (ACCMIP): Evaluation of Historical and Projected Future Changes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present multi-model global datasets of nitrogen and sulfate deposition covering time periods from 1850 to 2100, calculated within the Atmospheric Chemistry and Climate Model Intercomparison Project (ACCMIP). The computed deposition fluxes are compared to surface wet deposition and ice-core measurements. We use a new dataset of wet deposition for 2000-2002 based on critical assessment of the quality of existing regional network data. We show that for present-day (year 2000 ACCMIP time-slice), the ACCMIP results perform similarly to previously published multi-model assessments. The analysis of changes between 1980 and 2000 indicates significant differences between model and measurements over the United States, but less so over Europe. This difference points towards misrepresentation of 1980 NH3 emissions over North America. Based on ice-core records, the 1850 deposition fluxes agree well with Greenland ice cores but the change between 1850 and 2000 seems to be overestimated in the Northern Hemisphere for both nitrogen and sulfur species. Using the Representative Concentration Pathways to define the projected climate and atmospheric chemistry related emissions and concentrations, we find large regional nitrogen deposition increases in 2100 in Latin America, Africa and parts of Asia under some of the scenarios considered. Increases in South Asia are especially large, and are seen in all scenarios, with 2100 values more than double 2000 in some scenarios and reaching >1300 mgN/m2/yr averaged over regional to continental scale regions in RCP 2.6 and 8.5, ~30-50% larger than the values in any region currently (2000). Despite known issues, the new ACCMIP deposition dataset provides novel, consistent and evaluated global gridded deposition fields for use in a wide range of climate and ecological studies.

Lamarque, Jean-Francois; Dentener, Frank; McConnell, J.R.; Ro, C-U; Shaw, Mark; Vet, Robert; Bergmann, D.; Cameron-Smith, Philip; Dalsoren, S.; Doherty, R.; Faluvegi, G.; Ghan, Steven J.; Josse, B.; Lee, Y. H.; MacKenzie, I. A.; Plummer, David; Shindell, Drew; Skeie, R. B.; Stevenson, D. S.; Strode, S.; Zeng, G.; Curran, M.; Dahl-Jensen, D.; Das, S.; Fritzsche, D.; Nolan, M.

2013-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

14

California Winter Precipitation Change under Global Warming in the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 5 Ensemble  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Projections of possible precipitation change in California under global warming have been subject to considerable uncertainty because California lies between the region anticipated to undergo increases in precipitation at mid-to-high latitudes and ...

J. David Neelin; Baird Langenbrunner; Joyce E. Meyerson; Alex Hall; Neil Berg

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Multimodel Combination Techniques for Analysis of Hydrological Simulations: Application to Distributed Model Intercomparison Project Results  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper examines several multimodel combination techniques that are used for streamflow forecasting: the simple model average (SMA), the multimodel superensemble (MMSE), modified multimodel superensemble (M3SE), and the weighted average method ...

Newsha K. Ajami; Qingyun Duan; Xiaogang Gao; Soroosh Sorooshian

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

The Project for Intercomparison of Land-surface Parameterization Schemes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Project for Intercomparison of Land-surface Parameterization Schemes (PILPS) is described and the first stage science plan outlined. PILPS is a project designed to improve the parameterization of the continental surface, especially the ...

A. Henderson-Sellers; Z-L. Yang; R. E. Dickinson

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Intercomparison and analyses of the climatology of the West African Monsoon in the West African Monsoon Modeling and Evaluation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Intercomparison and analyses of the climatology of the West African Monsoon in the West African Monsoon Modeling and Evaluation project (WAMME) first model intercomparison experiment Yongkang Xue This paper briefly presents the West African Monsoon (WAM) Modeling and Evaluation Project (WAMME

Xue, Yongkang

18

The Monte Carlo Independent Column Approximation Model Intercomparison  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The Monte Carlo Independent Column Approximation Model Intercomparison The Monte Carlo Independent Column Approximation Model Intercomparison Project (McMIP) Barker, Howard Meteorological Service of Canada Cole, Jason Meteorological Service of Canada Raisanen, Petri Finnish Meteorological Institute Pincus, Robert NOAA-CIRES Climate Diagnostics Center Morcrette, Jean-Jacques European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts Li, Jiangnan Canadian Center for Climate Modelling Stephens, Graeme Colorado State University Vaillancourt, Paul Environment Canada Oreopoulos, Lazaros JCET/UMBC and NASA/GSFC Siebesma, Pier KNMI Los, Alexander KNMI Clothiaux, Eugene The Pennsylvania State University Randall, David Colorado State University Iacono, Michael Atmospheric & Environmental Research, Inc. Category: Radiation The Monte Carlo Independent Column Approximation (McICA) method for

19

LLNL Program for Climate Model Diagnosis and Intercomparison (PCMDI) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

LLNL Program for Climate Model Diagnosis and Intercomparison (PCMDI) LLNL Program for Climate Model Diagnosis and Intercomparison (PCMDI) Jump to: navigation, search Name LLNL Program for Climate Model Diagnosis and Intercomparison (PCMDI) Agency/Company /Organization Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Sector Energy, Land Topics Pathways analysis References LLNL Program for Climate Model Diagnosis and Intercomparison (PCMDI)[1] Abstract Established in 1989, the Program for Climate Model Diagnosis and Intercomparison (PCMDI) is an International focal point for understanding climate change and analyzing and diagnosing the performance of the world's climate models; the PCMDI is a DOE program located at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The PCMDI mission is to develop improved methods and tools for the diagnosis ...

20

Intercomparison of Hydrologic Processes in AMIP GCMs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Results of an intercomparison study under the Atmospheric Model Intercomparison Project (AMIP) to assess the abilities of 29 global climate models (GCMS) in simulating various aspects of regional and hydrologic processes in response to observed ...

K-M. Lau; Y. Sud; J. H. Kim

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "model intercomparison project" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

The Rhône-Aggregation Land Surface Scheme Intercomparison Project: An Overview  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Rhône-Aggregation (Rhône-AGG) Land Surface Scheme (LSS) intercomparison project is an initiative within the Global Energy and Water Cycle Experiment (GEWEX)/Global Land–Atmosphere System Study (GLASS) panel of the World Climate Research ...

A. Boone; F. Habets; J. Noilhan; D. Clark; P. Dirmeyer; S. Fox; Y. Gusev; I. Haddeland; R. Koster; D. Lohmann; S. Mahanama; K. Mitchell; O. Nasonova; G.-Y. Niu; A. Pitman; J. Polcher; A. B. Shmakin; K. Tanaka; B. van den Hurk; S. Vérant; D. Verseghy; P. Viterbo; Z.-L. Yang

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

The Project for Intercomparison of Land Surface Parameterization Schemes (PILPS): Phases 2 and 3  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The World Climate Research Programme Project for Intercomparison of Land Surface Parameterization Schemes (PILPS) is moving into its second and third phases that will exploit observational data and consider the performance of land surface schemes ...

A. Henderson-Sellers; A. J. Pitman; P. K. Love; P. Irannejad; T. H. Chen

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

The Global Precipitation Climatology Project: First Algorithm Intercomparison Project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Global Precipitation Climatology Project (GPCP) was established by the World Climate Research Programme to produce global analyses of area- and time-averaged precipitation for use in climate research. To achieve the required spatial coverage, ...

Phillip A. Arkin; Pingping Xie

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Global dust model intercomparison in AeroCom phase I  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstract. This study presents the results of a broad intercomparison of a total of 15 global aerosol models within the AeroCom project. Each model is compared to observations related to desert dust aerosols, their direct radiative effect, and their impact on the biogeochemical cycle, i.e., aerosol optical depth (AOD) and dust deposition. Additional comparisons to Angstr¨om exponent (AE), coarse mode AOD and dust surface concentrations are included to extend the assessment of model performance and to identify common biases present in models. These data comprise a benchmark dataset that is proposed for model inspection and future dust model development. There are large differences among the global models that simulate the dust cycle and its impact on climate. In general, models simulate the climatology of vertically integrated parameters (AOD and AE) within a factor of two whereas the total deposition and surface concentration are reproduced within a factor of 10. In addition, smaller mean normalized bias and root mean square errors are obtained for the climatology of AOD and AE than for total deposition and surface concentration. Characteristics of the datasets used and their uncertainties may influence these differences. Large uncertainties still exist with respect to the deposition fluxes in the southern oceans. Further measurements and model studies are necessary to assess the general model performance to reproduce dust deposition in ocean regions sensible to iron contributions. Models overestimate the wet deposition in regions dominated by dry deposition. They generally simulate more realistic surface concentration at stations downwind of the main sources than at remote ones. Most models simulate the gradient in AOD and AE between the different dusty regions. However the seasonality and magnitude of both variables is better simulated at African stations than Middle East ones. The models simulate the offshore transport of West Africa throughout the year but they overestimate the AOD and they transport too fine particles. The models also reproduce the dust transport across the Atlantic in the summer in terms of both AOD and AE but not so well in winter-spring nor the southward displacement of the dust cloud that is responsible of the dust transport into South America. Based on the dependency of AOD on aerosol burden and size distribution we use model bias with respect to AOD and AE to infer the bias of the dust emissions in Africa and the Middle East. According to this analysis we suggest that a range of possible emissions for North Africa is 400 to 2200 Tg yr?1 and in the Middle East 26 to 526 Tg yr?1.

Huneeus, N.; Schulz, M.; Balkanski, Y.; Griesfeller, J.; Prospero, J.; Kinne, Stefan; Bauer, S.; Boucher, O.; Chin, M.; Dentener, F.; Diehl, T.; Easter, Richard C.; Fillmore, D.; Ghan, Steven J.; Ginnoux, P.; Grini, A.; Horowitz, L.; Koch, D.; Krol, M.; Landing, W.; Liu, Xiaohong; Mahowald, N.; Miller, R.; Morcrette, J. -J.; Myhre, G.; Penner, J.; Perlwitz, J.; Stier, P.; Takemura, T.; Zender, C. S.

2011-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

25

Cabauw Experimental Results from the Project for Intercomparison of Land-Surface Parameterization Schemes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the Project for Intercomparison of Land-Surface Parameterization Schemes phase 2a experiment, meteorological data for the year 1987 from Cabauw, the Netherlands, were used as inputs to 23 land-surface flux schemes designed for use in climate ...

T. H. Chen; A. Henderson-Sellers; P. C. D. Milly; A. J. Pitman; A. C. M. Beljaars; J. Polcher; F. Abramopoulos; A. Boone; S. Chang; F. Chen; Y. Dai; C. E. Desborough; R. E. Dickinson; L. Dümenil; M. Ek; J. R. Garratt; N. Gedney; Y. M. Gusev; J. Kim; R. Koster; E. A. Kowalczyk; K. Laval; J. Lean; D. Lettenmaier; X. Liang; J.-F. Mahfouf; H.-T. Mengelkamp; K. Mitchell; O. N. Nasonova; J. Noilhan; A. Robock; C. Rosenzweig; J. Schaake; C. A. Schlosser; J.-P. Schulz; Y. Shao; A. B. Shmakin; D. L. Verseghy; P. Wetzel; E. F. Wood; Y. Xue; Z.-L. Yang; Q. Zeng

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Virtual Floe Ice Drift Forecast Model Intercomparison  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Both sea ice forecast models and methods to measure their skill are needed for operational sea ice forecasting. Two simple sea ice models are described and tested here. Four different measures of skill are also tested. The forecasts from the ...

Robert W. Grumbine

1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

TDE Ecosystem Model Intercomparison Data Archive: Publications  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Aber, J.D., and C.A. Federer. 1992. A generalized, lumped-parameter model of photosynthesis, evapotranspiration, and net primary production in temperate and boreal forest...

28

Mercury Flux Measurements: An Intercomparison and Assessment: Nevada Mercury Emissions Project (NvMEP)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An understanding of the contribution of natural nonpoint mercury sources to regional and global atmospheric mercury pools is critical for developing emission inventories, formulating environmental regulations, and assessing human and ecological health risks. This report discusses the results of the Nevada Mercury Emissions Project (NvMEP) and takes a close look at the emerging technologies used to obtain mercury flux field data. In specific, it provides an intercomparison of mercury flux measurements obt...

1998-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

29

Posters Surface Flux Intercomparison Between the MM5 Model  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Posters Surface Flux Intercomparison Between the MM5 Model and Observations During the Storm-Scale Observations Regional Measurement Program-Fronts Experiment Systems Test 1992 J. Dudhia and S. P. Oncley Mesoscale and Microscale Meteorology Division Atmospheric Technology Division National Center for Atmospheric Research Boulder, Colorado Introduction Mesoscale model 5 (MM5) is being used as a data assimilation tool for the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program. There is a need to verify that the model physics is consistent with observations under a range of conditions. Surface fluxes of heat, moisture, and momentum are a particular area of uncertainty in the model owing to their dependence on surface properties, some of which are time-dependent. The National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR)

30

Biases and Model Agreement in Projections of Climate Extremes over the Tropical Pacific  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Using the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project phase 3 (CMIP3) general circulation models (GCMs), projections of a range of climate extremes are explored for the western Pacific. These projections include the 1-in-20-yr return levels and a ...

Sarah E. Perkins

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Realism of the Indian Ocean Dipole in CMIP5 models: the implication for climate projections  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An assessment of how well climate models simulate the Indian Ocean Dipole (IOD) is undertaken using 20 coupled models that have partaken in the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 5 (CMIP5). Compared to CMIP3 models, no substantial ...

Evan Weller; Wenju Cai

32

TDE Ecosystem Model Intercomparison Data Archive: Model Descriptions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Model Descriptions Model Descriptions BGC++ BIOME-BGC CANOAK EALCO ecosys INTRASTAND LaRS LINKAGES v2.1 LoTEC MAESTRA NuCM PnET II SPA Literature Cited A total of 13 models were used in this study covering a range of temporal scales, spatial complexity, and mechanistic detail (Figure 1). Eight of the models (8) used an hourly time step, four models used a daily time step, and only one model used a monthly time step (i.e., PnET-II). Most models provided estimates for both stand carbon and water budgets, but other were limited to either the carbon (MAESTRA) or water (LINKAGES and NuCM) budgets. The most mechanistically complex models (ecosys, CLASS, LaRS, and CANOAK) also used a complete energy balance. A brief description of each of the models is provided below. BGC++ The BGC++ model (Hunt et al. 1999) simulates carbon, nitrogen, and

33

Continuous Intercomparison of Radiation Codes (CIRC)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Intercomparison of Intercomparison of Radiation Codes (CIRC) * Sponsored by ARM and endorsed by GEWEX Radiation Panel * Aims to become the standard for documenting the performance of SW and LW RT codes in Large-Scale Models * Goal is to have RT codes of IPCC models report performance against the CIRC cases * Phase I to be launched in the following weeks: http://www.circ-project.org Differences from previous intercomparisons: * Observation-tested LBL calculations to used as radiative benchmarks * Benchmark results are publicly available * ARM observations provide input (largely select BBHRP cases) * Flexible structure and longer lifespan than previous intercomparisons Core team: Oreopoulos, Mlawer, Delamere, Shippert CIRC Practical Challenges * For input and reference calculations to be credible, a reasonable level of

34

Dynamical Downscaling Projections of Twenty-First-Century Atlantic Hurricane Activity: CMIP3 and CMIP5 Model-Based Scenarios  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Twenty-first-century projections of Atlantic climate change are downscaled to explore the robustness of potential changes in hurricane activity. Multimodel ensembles using the phase 3 of the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP3)/Special ...

Thomas R. Knutson; Joseph J. Sirutis; Gabriel A. Vecchi; Stephen Garner; Ming Zhao; Hyeong-Seog Kim; Morris Bender; Robert E. Tuleya; Isaac M. Held; Gabriele Villarini

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Intercomparison and Interpretation of Single-Column Model Simulations of a Nocturnal Stratocumulus-Topped Marine Boundary Layer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ten single-column models (SCMs) from eight groups are used to simulate a nocturnal nonprecipitating marine stratocumulus-topped mixed layer as part of an intercomparison organized by the Global Energy and Water Cycle Experiment Cloud System Study,...

Ping Zhu; Christopher S. Bretherton; Martin Köhler; Anning Cheng; Andreas Chlond; Quanzhen Geng; Phil Austin; Jean-Christophe Golaz; Geert Lenderink; Adrian Lock; Bjorn Stevens

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

An Intercomparison Study of Simulation Models for Geologic Sequestration of CO2  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Intercomparison Study of Simulation Models Intercomparison Study of Simulation Models for Geologic Sequestration of CO2 Karsten Pruess (K_Pruess@lbl.gov; 510/486-6732) Chin-Fu Tsang (CFTsang@lbl.gov; 510/486-5782) Earth Sciences Division, E.O. Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory One Cyclotron Rd., MS 90-1116, Berkeley, CA 94720, U.S.A. David H.-S. Law (Law@arc.ab.ca; 780/450-5034) Alberta Research Council 250 Karl Clark Rd., Edmonton, Alberta T6N 1E4, Canada Curtis M. Oldenburg (CMOldenburg@lbl.gov; 510/486-7419) Earth Sciences Division, E.O. Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory One Cyclotron Rd., MS 90-1116, Berkeley, CA 94720, U.S.A. ABSTRACT Mathematical models and numerical simulation tools will play an important role in evaluating the feasibility of CO2 storage in subsurface reservoirs, such as brine aquifers,

37

A multi-model assessment of future projections of North Atlantic and European extratropical cyclones in the CMIP5 climate models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The response of North Atlantic and European extratropical cyclones to climate change is investigated in the climate models participating in CMIP5 (Fifth Coupled Model Intercomparison Project). In contrast to previous multi–model studies, a feature ...

Giuseppe Zappa; Len C. Shaffrey; Kevin I. Hodges; Phil G. Sansom; David B. Stephenson

38

A Multimodel Assessment of Future Projections of North Atlantic and European Extratropical Cyclones in the CMIP5 Climate Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The response of North Atlantic and European extratropical cyclones to climate change is investigated in the climate models participating in phase 5 of the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP5). In contrast to previous multimodel studies, a ...

Giuseppe Zappa; Len C. Shaffrey; Kevin I. Hodges; Phil G. Sansom; David B. Stephenson

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

The Transpose-AMIP II Experiment and Its Application to the Understanding of Southern Ocean Cloud Biases in Climate Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Transpose-Atmospheric Model Intercomparison Project (AMIP) is an international model intercomparison project in which climate models are run in “weather forecast mode.” The Transpose-AMIP II experiment is run alongside phase 5 of the Coupled ...

K. D. Williams; A. Bodas-Salcedo; M. Déqué; S. Fermepin; B. Medeiros; M. Watanabe; C. Jakob; S. A. Klein; C. A. Senior; D. L. Williamson

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Proceedings: special panel on geothermal model intercomparison study  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Separate abstracts were prepared for five papers. Two papers were abstracted previously for EDB. Five panel responses to the project, three workshop session summaries, and conclusions drawn are also included in this report. (MHR)

Not Available

1980-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "model intercomparison project" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

The Asian summer monsoon: an intercomparison of CMIP5 vs. CMIP3 simulations of the late 20th century  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Asian summer monsoon: an intercomparison of CMIP5 vs. CMIP3 simulations of the late 20th The boreal summer Asian monsoon has been evaluated in 25 Coupled Model Intercomparison Project-5 (CMIP5 variability. Progress has been made in modeling these aspects of the monsoon, though there is no single model

Kang, In-Sik

42

Comparison of Monthly Temperature Extremes Simulated by CMIP3 and CMIP5 Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The extreme monthly-mean temperatures simulated by 28 models in the fifth phase of the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP5) are evaluated and compared with those from 24 models in the third phase of the Coupled Model Intercomparison ...

Yao Yao; Yong Luo; Jianbin Huang; Zongci Zhao

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Intercomparison of Soil Moisture Memory in Two Land Surface Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A heavy rain or a dry period can produce an anomaly in soil moisture, and the dissipation of this anomaly may take weeks to months. It is important to understand how land surface models (LSMs) used with atmospheric general circulation models ...

Sarith P. P. Mahanama; Randal D. Koster

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Airborne spread of foot-and-mouth disease - model intercomparison  

SciTech Connect

Foot-and-mouth disease is a highly infectious vesicular disease of cloven-hoofed animals caused by foot-and-mouth disease virus. It spreads by direct contact between animals, by animal products (milk, meat and semen), by mechanical transfer on people or fomites and by the airborne route - with the relative importance of each mechanism depending on the particular outbreak characteristics. Over the years a number of workers have developed or adapted atmospheric dispersion models to assess the risk of foot-and-mouth disease virus spread through the air. Six of these models were compared at a workshop hosted by the Institute for Animal Health/Met Office during 2008. A number of key issues emerged from the workshop and subsequent modelling work: (1) in general all of the models predicted similar directions for 'at risk' livestock with much of the remaining differences strongly related to differences in the meteorological data used; (2) determination of an accurate sequence of events is highly important, especially if the meteorological conditions vary substantially during the virus emission period; and (3) differences in assumptions made about virus release, environmental fate, and subsequent infection can substantially modify the size and location of the downwind risk area. Close relationships have now been established between participants, which in the event of an outbreak of disease could be readily activated to supply advice or modelling support.

Gloster, J; Jones, A; Redington, A; Burgin, L; Sorensen, J H; Turner, R; Dillon, M; Hullinger, P; Simpson, M; Astrup, P; Garner, G; Stewart, P; D'Amours, R; Sellers, R; Paton, D

2008-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

45

Long-Term Climate Change Commitment and Reversibility: An EMIC Intercomparison  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper summarizes the results of an intercomparison project with Earth System Models of Intermediate Complexity (EMICs) undertaken in support of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) Fifth Assessment Report (AR5). The focus is ...

Kirsten Zickfeld; Michael Eby; Andrew J. Weaver; Kaitlin Alexander; Elisabeth Crespin; Neil R. Edwards; Alexey V. Eliseev; Georg Feulner; Thierry Fichefet; Chris E. Forest; Pierre Friedlingstein; Hugues Goosse; Philip B. Holden; Fortunat Joos; Michio Kawamiya; David Kicklighter; Hendrik Kienert; Katsumi Matsumoto; Igor I. Mokhov; Erwan Monier; Steffen M. Olsen; Jens O. P. Pedersen; Mahe Perrette; Gwenaëlle Philippon-Berthier; Andy Ridgwell; Adam Schlosser; Thomas Schneider Von Deimling; Gary Shaffer; Andrei Sokolov; Renato Spahni; Marco Steinacher; Kaoru Tachiiri; Kathy S. Tokos; Masakazu Yoshimori; Ning Zeng; Fang Zhao

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Dominant Mode of Climate Variability, Intermodel Diversity, and Projected Future Changes over the Summertime Western North Pacific Simulated in the CMIP3 Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A set of multimodel twentieth-century climate simulations for phase 3 of the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP3) is analyzed to assess the model reproducibility of the Pacific–Japan (PJ) teleconnection pattern. It is the dominant low-...

Yu Kosaka; Hisashi Nakamura

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Realism of the Indian Ocean Dipole in CMIP5 Models: The Implications for Climate Projections  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An assessment of how well climate models simulate the Indian Ocean dipole (IOD) is undertaken using 20 coupled models that have partaken in phase 5 of the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP5). Compared with models in phase 3 (CMIP3), no ...

Evan Weller; Wenju Cai

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

The AMMA Land Surface Model Intercomparison Project (ALMIP)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The rainfall over West Africa has been characterized by extreme variability in the last half-century, with prolonged droughts resulting in humanitarian crises. There is, therefore, an urgent need to better understand and predict the West African ...

Aaron Boone; Bertrand Decharme; Françoise Guichard; Patricia de Rosnay; Gianpaolo Balsamo; Anton Beljaars; Franck Chopin; Tristan Orgeval; Jan Polcher; Christine Delire; Agnes Ducharne; Simon Gascoin; Manuela Grippa; Lionel Jarlan; Laurent Kergoat; Eric Mougin; Yeugeniy Gusev; Olga Nasonova; Phil Harris; Christopher Taylor; Anette Norgaard; Inge Sandholt; Catherine Ottlé; Isabelle Poccard-Leclercq; Stephane Saux-Picart; Yongkang Xue

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Special Issue WCRP Coupled Model Intercomparison Project -Phase 5  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

software for data distribution, including an Earth System Grid Federation (ESGF) node. This will allow for federation of NCPP data archives with other ESGF sites at ORNL, Argonne, JPL, NCDC, and elsewhere. Worked undertaken across Curator, the Earth System Grid (ESG), the Earth System Grid Federation (ESGF), the EU

50

An Intercomparison of Observational, Reanalysis, Satellite, and Coupled Model Data on Mean Rainfall in the Caribbean  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study examines the spatial variability of mean annual rainfall in the Caribbean in the satellite era 1979–2000. Intercomparisons of gridded rainfall fields from conventional stations, satellite estimators, reanalysis products, and coupled ...

Mark R. Jury

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

TWP-ICE Global Atmospheric Model Intercomparison: Convection Responsiveness and Resolution Impact  

SciTech Connect

Results are presented from an intercomparison of global atmospheric model (GAM) simulations of tropical convection during the Tropical Warm Pool-International Cloud Experiment (TWP-ICE). The distinct cloud properties, precipitation, radiation, and vertical diabatic heating profiles associated with three different monsoon regimes (wet, dry, and break) from available observations are used to evaluate 9 GAM forecasts initialized daily from realistic global analyses. All models well captured the evolution of large-scale circulation and the thermodynamic fields, but cloud properties differed substantially among models. For example, liquid water path and ice water path differed by up to two orders of magnitude. Compared with the relatively well simulated top-heavy heating structures during the wet and break period, most models had difficulty in depicting the bottom-heavy heating profiles associated with cumulus congestus. The best performing models during this period were the ones whose convection scheme was most responsive to the free tropospheric humidity. Compared with the large impact of cloud and convective parameterizations on model cloud and precipitation characteristics, resolution has relatively minor impact on simulated cloud properties. However, one feature that was influence by the resolution study in several models was the diurnal cycle of precipitation. Peaking at a different time from convective precipitation, large-scale precipitation generally increases in high resolution forecasts and modulates the total precipitation diurnal cycle. Overall, the study emphasizes the importance of more environmental responsive convective parameterizations to capture various types of convection and the substantial diversity among large-scale cloud and precipitation schemes in current GAMs. This experiment has also demonstrated itself to be a very useful testbed for those developing cloud and convection schemes in these models.

Lin, Yanluan; Donner, Leo J.; Petch, Jon C.; Bechtold, P.; Boyle, James; Klein, Stephen A.; Komori, T.; Wapler, K.; Willett, M.; Xie, X.; Zhao, M.; Xie, Shaocheng; McFarlane, Sally A.; Schumacher, Courtney

2012-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

52

Sources of Spread in Multimodel Projections of the Greenland Ice Sheet Surface Mass Balance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The many studies investigating the future change of the Greenland Ice Sheet surface mass balance from climate model output exhibit a wide range of projections. This study makes projections from the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project phase 3 ...

Masakazu Yoshimori; Ayako Abe-Ouchi

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Cold tongue and warm pool ENSO events in CMIP5: mean state and future projections  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The representation of the El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) under historical forcing and future projections is analyzed in 34 Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 5 (CMIP5) models. Most models realistically simulate the observed intensity ...

Andréa S. Taschetto; Alexander Sen Gupta; Nicolas C. Jourdain; Agus Santoso; Caroline C. Ummenhofer; Matthew H. England

54

Climate Change Projections in CESM1(CAM5) Compared to CCSM4  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Future climate change projections for phase 5 of the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP5) are presented for the Community Earth System Model version 1 that includes the Community Atmospheric Model version 5 [CESM1(CAM5)]. These results ...

Gerald A. Meehl; Warren M. Washington; Julie M. Arblaster; Aixue Hu; Haiyan Teng; Jennifer E. Kay; Andrew Gettelman; David M. Lawrence; Benjamin M. Sanderson; Warren G. Strand

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Historical and idealized climate model experiments: an intercomparison of Earth system models of intermediate complexity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Both historical and idealized climate model experiments are performed with a variety of Earth system models of intermediate complexity (EMICs) as part of a community contribution to the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate ...

Monier, Erwan

56

Proposing the Simplification of the Multilayer Urban Canopy Model: Intercomparison Study of Four Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The study proposes the simplification of the multilayer urban canopy model. Four types of multilayer urban canopy models—level 4, level 3, level 2, and level 1—are developed to reduce the computational load of the heat budget calculations at the ...

Ryosaku Ikeda; Hiroyuki Kusaka

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Evaluation of Cloud-Resolving Model Intercomparison Simulations Using TWP-ICE Observations: Precipitation and Cloud Structure  

SciTech Connect

The Tropical Warm Pool – International Cloud Experiment (TWP-ICE) provided high quality model forcing and observational datasets through which detailed model and observational intercomparisons could be performed. In this first of a two part study, precipitation and cloud structures within nine cloud-resolving model simulations are compared with scanning radar reflectivity and satellite infrared brightness temperature observations during an active monsoon period from 19 to 25 January 2006. Most simulations slightly overestimate volumetric convective rainfall. Overestimation of simulated convective area by 50% or more in several simulations is somewhat offset by underestimation of mean convective rain rates. Stratiform volumetric rainfall is underestimated by 13% to 53% despite overestimation of stratiform area by up to 65% because stratiform rain rates in every simulation are much lower than observed. Although simulations match the peaked convective radar reflectivity distribution at low levels, they do not reproduce the peaked distributions observed above the melting level. Simulated radar reflectivity aloft in convective regions is too high in most simulations. In stratiform regions, there is a large spread in model results with none resembling observed distributions. Above the melting level, observed radar reflectivity decreases more gradually with height than simulated radar reflectivity. A few simulations produce unrealistically uniform and cold 10.8-?m infrared brightness temperatures, but several simulations produce distributions close to observed. Assumed ice particle size distributions appear to play a larger role than ice water contents in producing incorrect simulated radar reflectivity distributions aloft despite substantial differences in mean graupel and snow water contents across models.

Varble, Adam; Fridlind, Ann; Zipser, Edward J.; Ackerman, Andrew; Chaboureau, Jean-Pierre; Fan, Jiwen; Hill, Adrian; McFarlane, Sally A.; Pinty, Jean-Pierre; Shipway, Ben

2011-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

58

Future Changes in the South Asian Summer Monsoon: An Analysis of the CMIP3 Multimodel Projections  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The projected future behavior of the South Asian summer monsoon (SASM) is analyzed for the 720-ppm stabilization experiments [Special Report on Emissions Scenarios (SRES) A1B] of phase 3 of the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP3) ...

Fangxing Fan; Michael E. Mann; Sukyoung Lee; Jenni L. Evans

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Evaluation of Cloud-Resolving Model Intercomparison Simulations Using TWP-ICE Observations: Precipitation and Cloud Structure  

SciTech Connect

The Tropical Warm Pool - International Cloud Experiment (TWP-ICE) provided high quality model forcing and observational datasets through which detailed model and observational intercomparisons could be performed. In this first of a two part study, precipitation and cloud structures within nine cloud-resolving model simulations are compared with scanning radar reflectivity and satellite infrared brightness temperature observations during an active monsoon period from 19 to 25 January 2006. Most simulations slightly overestimate volumetric convective rainfall. Overestimation of simulated convective area by 50% or more in several simulations is somewhat offset by underestimation of mean convective rain rates. Stratiform volumetric rainfall is underestimated by 13% to 53% despite overestimation of stratiform area by up to 65% because stratiform rain rates in every simulation are much lower than observed. Although simulations match the peaked convective radar reflectivity distribution at low levels, they do not reproduce the peaked distributions observed above the melting level. Simulated radar reflectivity aloft in convective regions is too high in most simulations. 29 In stratiform regions, there is a large spread in model results with none resembling 30 observed distributions. Above the melting level, observed radar reflectivity decreases 31 more gradually with height than simulated radar reflectivity. A few simulations produce 32 unrealistically uniform and cold 10.8-?m infrared brightness temperatures, but several 33 simulations produce distributions close to observed. Assumed ice particle size 34 distributions appear to play a larger role than ice water contents in producing incorrect 35 simulated radar reflectivity distributions aloft despite substantial differences in mean 36 graupel and snow water contents across models. 37

Varble, Adam C.; Fridlind, Ann; Zipser, Ed; Ackerman, Andrew; Chaboureau, Jean-Pierre; Fan, Jiwen; Hill, Adrian; McFarlane, Sally A.; Pinty, Jean-Pierre; Shipway, Ben

2011-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

60

Climate System Response to External Forcings and Climate Change Projections in CCSM4  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Results are presented from experiments performed with the Community Climate System Model, version 4 (CCSM4) for the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project phase 5 (CMIP5). These include multiple ensemble members of twentieth-century climate with ...

Gerald A. Meehl; Warren M. Washington; Julie M. Arblaster; Aixue Hu; Haiyan Teng; Claudia Tebaldi; Benjamin N. Sanderson; Jean-Francois Lamarque; Andrew Conley; Warren G. Strand; James B. White III

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "model intercomparison project" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Intercomparison of Meteorological Models Applied to the Athens Area and the Effect on photochemical Pollutant Predictions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this study, four different meteorological models, one diagnostic and three prognostic, are used to develop meteorological inputs for a photochemical model, as applied to the peninsula of Athens, Greece. The comparison of meteorological models ...

P. Grossi; J-M. Giovannoni; A. G. Russell

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

The Relationship between Intermodel Differences and Surface Energy Balance Complexity in the Rhône-Aggregation Intercomparison Project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Six modes of complexity of the Chameleon land surface model (CHASM) are used to explore the relationship between the complexity of the surface energy balance (SEB) formulation and the capacity of the model to explain intermodel variations in ...

S. Fox; A. J. Pitman; A. Boone; F. Habets

2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Climate–Carbon Cycle Feedback Analysis: Results from the C4MIP Model Intercomparison  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Eleven coupled climate–carbon cycle models used a common protocol to study the coupling between climate change and the carbon cycle. The models were forced by historical emissions and the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) Special ...

P. Friedlingstein; P. Cox; R. Betts; L. Bopp; W. von Bloh; V. Brovkin; P. Cadule; S. Doney; M. Eby; I. Fung; G. Bala; J. John; C. Jones; F. Joos; T. Kato; M. Kawamiya; W. Knorr; K. Lindsay; H. D. Matthews; T. Raddatz; P. Rayner; C. Reick; E. Roeckner; K.-G. Schnitzler; R. Schnur; K. Strassmann; A. J. Weaver; C. Yoshikawa; N. Zeng

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Intercomparison of Spatially Distributed Models for Predicting Surface Energy Flux Patterns during SMACEX  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The treatment of aerodynamic surface temperature in soil–vegetation–atmosphere transfer (SVAT) models can be used to classify approaches into two broad categories. The first category contains models utilizing remote sensing (RS) observations of ...

Wade T. Crow; Fuqin Li; William P. Kustas

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Intercomparison of Radiation Transfer Models Representing Direct Shortwave Forcing by Sulfate Aerosols  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A study has been conducted, involving 15 models by 12 groups, to compare modeled forcing (change in shortwave radiation budget) due to sulfate aerosol for a wide range of values of particle radius, optical depth, surface albedo, and solar zenith angle (SZA). The models included high- and low-spectral resolution models, incorporating a variety of radiative transfer approximations, as well as a line-by-line model. The normalized forcings (forcing per sulfate column burden) obtained with the radiative transfer models were examined and the differences characterized. All models simulate forcings of comparable amplitude and exhibit a similar dependence on input parameters. As expected for a non-light-absorbing aerosol, forcings were negative (cooling influence), except at high surface albedo combined with low SZA. The relative standard deviation of the zenith-angle-average normalized broadband forcing for 15 models was 8% for particle radius near the maximum in magnitude of this forcing (ca....

Sulfate Aerosols; Stephen E Schwartz

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Numerical Model-Reality Intercomparison Tests Using Small-Sample Statistics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

When a numerical model's representation of a physical field is to be compared with a corresponding real observed field, it is usually the case that the numbers of realizations of model and observed field are relatively small, so that the natural ...

Rudolph W. Preisendorfer; Tim P. Barnett

1983-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Intercomparison of cloud model simulations of Arctic mixed-phase boundary layer clouds observed during SHEBA/FIRE-ACE  

SciTech Connect

An intercomparison of six cloud-resolving and large-eddy simulation models is presented. This case study is based on observations of a persistent mixed-phase boundary layer cloud gathered on 7 May, 1998 from the Surface Heat Budget of Arctic Ocean (SHEBA) and First ISCCP Regional Experiment - Arctic Cloud Experiment (FIRE-ACE). Ice nucleation is constrained in the simulations in a way that holds the ice crystal concentration approximately fixed, with two sets of sensitivity runs in addition to the baseline simulations utilizing different specified ice nucleus (IN) concentrations. All of the baseline and sensitivity simulations group into two distinct quasi-steady states associated with either persistent mixed-phase clouds or all-ice clouds after the first few hours of integration, implying the existence of multiple equilibria. These two states are associated with distinctly different microphysical, thermodynamic, and radiative characteristics. Most but not all of the models produce a persistent mixed-phase cloud qualitatively similar to observations using the baseline IN/crystal concentration, while small increases in the IN/crystal concentration generally lead to rapid glaciation and conversion to the all-ice state. Budget analysis indicates that larger ice deposition rates associated with increased IN/crystal concentrations have a limited direct impact on dissipation of liquid in these simulations. However, the impact of increased ice deposition is greatly enhanced by several interaction pathways that lead to an increased surface precipitation flux, weaker cloud top radiative cooling and cloud dynamics, and reduced vertical mixing, promoting rapid glaciation of the mixed-phase cloud for deposition rates in the cloud layer greater than about 1-2x10-5 g kg-1 s-1. These results indicate the critical importance of precipitation-radiative-dynamical interactions in simulating cloud phase, which have been neglected in previous fixed-dynamical parcel studies of the cloud phase parameter space. Large sensitivity to the IN/crystal concentration also suggests the need for improved understanding of ice nucleation and its parameterization in models.

Morrison, H.; Zuidema, Paquita; Ackerman, Andrew; Avramov, Alexander; de Boer, Gijs; Fan, Jiwen; Fridlind, Ann; Hashino, Tempei; Harrington, Jerry Y.; Luo, Yali; Ovchinnikov, Mikhail; Shipway, Ben

2011-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

68

Intercomparison of Mesoscale Model Simulations of the Daytime Valley Wind System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Three-dimensional simulations of the daytime thermally induced valley wind system for an idealized valley–plain configuration, obtained from nine nonhydrostatic mesoscale models, are compared with special emphasis on the evolution of the along-...

Juerg Schmidli; Brian Billings; Fotini K. Chow; Stephan F. J. de Wekker; James Doyle; Vanda Grubiši?; Teddy Holt; Qiangfang Jiang; Katherine A. Lundquist; Peter Sheridan; Simon Vosper; C. David Whiteman; Andrzej A. Wyszogrodzki; Günther Zängl

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

An Intercomparison of Model-Predicted Wave Breaking for the 11 January 1972 Boulder Windstorm  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Two-dimensional simulations of the 11 January 1972 Boulder, Colorado, windstorm, obtained from 11 diverse nonhydrostatic models, are intercompared with special emphasis on the turbulent breakdown of topographically forced gravity waves, as part ...

J. D. Doyle; D. R. Durran; C. Chen; B. A. Colle; M. Georgelin; V. Grubisic; W. R. Hsu; C. Y. Huang; D. Landau; Y. L. Lin; G. S. Poulos; W. Y. Sun; D. B. Weber; M. G. Wurtele; M. Xue

2000-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

A Global Intercomparison of Modeled and Observed Land–Atmosphere Coupling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Land–atmosphere coupling strength or the degree to which land surface anomalies influence boundary layer development—and in extreme cases, rainfall—is arguably the single most fundamental criterion for evaluating hydrological model performance. ...

Craig R. Ferguson; Eric F. Wood; Raghuveer K. Vinukollu

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Aerosol indirect effects – general circulation model intercomparison and evaluation with satellite data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Aerosol indirect effects continue to constitute one of the most important uncertainties for anthropogenic climate perturbations. Within the international AEROCOM initiative, the representation of aerosol-cloud-radiation interactions in ten different general circulation models (GCMs) is evaluated in the present study using three satellite datasets. The satellite datasets are taken as reference bearing in mind that cloud and aerosol retrievals include uncertainties. We compute statistical relationships between aerosol optical depth (?a) and various cloud and radiation quantities consistently in models and satellite data. It is found that the model-simulated influence of aerosols on cloud droplet number concentration (Nd) compares relatively well to the satellite data at least over oceans. The relationship between ?a and liquid water path is simulated much too strongly by the models. It is shown that this is partly related to rep¬resentation of the second aerosol indirect effect in terms of autoconversion. A positive re¬lationship between total cloud fraction (fcld) and ?a as found in the satellite data is simulated by the majority of the models, albeit less strongly in most of them. In a discussion of the hypo¬theses proposed in the literature to explain the satellite-derived strong fcld – ?a relation¬ship, we find that none is unequivocally confirmed by our results. Relationships similar to the ones found in satellite data between ?a and cloud top tem¬perature and outgoing long-wave radiation (OLR) are simulated by only a few GCMs. The GCMs that simulate a negative OLR - ?a relationship show a strong positive cor¬relation between ?a and cloud fraction. The short-wave total aerosol radiative forcing as simulated by the GCMs is strongly influenced by the simulated anthropogenic fraction of ?a, and parameterisation assumptions such as a lower bound on Nd. Nevertheless, the strengths of the statistical relationships are good predictors for the short-wave total aerosol forcings in the models. An estimate of the total short-wave aerosol forcing inferred from the combination of these predictors for the modelled forcings with the satellite-derived statistical relationships yields a global annual mean value of -1.5±0.5 Wm-2. An alternative estim¬ate obtained by scaling the simulated clear- and cloudy-sky forcings with estimates of anthropogenic ?a and satellite-retrieved Nd – ?a regression slopes, respectively, yields a global annual mean clear-sky (aerosol direct effect) es¬timate of -0.4±0.2 Wm-2 and a cloudy-sky (aerosol indirect effect) estimate of -0.7±0.5 Wm-2, with a total estimate of -1.2±0.4 Wm-2.

Quaas, Johannes; Ming, Yi; Menon, Surabi; Takemura, T.; Wang, Minghuai; Penner, Joyce E.; Gettelman, A.; Lohmann, U.; Bellouin, N.; Boucher, Olivier; Sayer, Andrew M.; Thomas, Gareth E.; McComiskey, A.; Feingold, G.; Hoose, Corinna; Kristjansson, J. E.; Liu, Xiaohong; Balkanski, Y.; Donner, Leo J.; Ginoux, P.; Stier, P.; Grandey, B.; Feichter, J.; Sednev, Igor; Bauer, Susanne E.; Koch, D.; Grainger, Roy G.; Kirkevag, A.; Iversen, T.; Seland, O.; Easter, Richard C.; Ghan, Steven J.; Rasch, Philip J.; Morrison, H.; Lamarque, J. F.; Iacono, Michael J.; Kinne, Stefan; Schulz, M.

2009-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

72

Aerosol indirect effects ? general circulation model intercomparison and evaluation with satellite data  

SciTech Connect

Aerosol indirect effects continue to constitute one of the most important uncertainties for anthropogenic climate perturbations. Within the international AEROCOM initiative, the representation of aerosol-cloud-radiation interactions in ten different general circulation models (GCMs) is evaluated using three satellite datasets. The focus is on stratiform liquid water clouds since most GCMs do not include ice nucleation effects, and none of the model explicitly parameterises aerosol effects on convective clouds. We compute statistical relationships between aerosol optical depth ({tau}{sub a}) and various cloud and radiation quantities in a manner that is consistent between the models and the satellite data. It is found that the model-simulated influence of aerosols on cloud droplet number concentration (N{sub d}) compares relatively well to the satellite data at least over the ocean. The relationship between {tau}{sub a} and liquid water path is simulated much too strongly by the models. This suggests that the implementation of the second aerosol indirect effect mainly in terms of an autoconversion parameterisation has to be revisited in the GCMs. A positive relationship between total cloud fraction (f{sub cld}) and {tau}{sub a} as found in the satellite data is simulated by the majority of the models, albeit less strongly than that in the satellite data in most of them. In a discussion of the hypotheses proposed in the literature to explain the satellite-derived strong f{sub cld} - {tau}{sub a} relationship, our results indicate that none can be identified as a unique explanation. Relationships similar to the ones found in satellite data between {tau}{sub a} and cloud top temperature or outgoing long-wave radiation (OLR) are simulated by only a few GCMs. The GCMs that simulate a negative OLR - {tau}{sub a} relationship show a strong positive correlation between {tau}{sub a} and f{sub cld} The short-wave total aerosol radiative forcing as simulated by the GCMs is strongly influenced by the simulated anthropogenic fraction of {tau}{sub a}, and parameterization assumptions such as a lower bound on N{sub d}. Nevertheless, the strengths of the statistical relationships are good predictors for the aerosol forcings in the models. An estimate of the total short-wave aerosol forcing inferred from the combination of these predictors for the modelled forcings with the satellite-derived statistical relationships yields a global annual mean value of -1.5 {+-} 0.5 Wm{sup -2}. In an alternative approach, the radiative flux perturbation due to anthropogenic aerosols can be broken down into a component over the cloud-free portion of the globe (approximately the aerosol direct effect) and a component over the cloudy portion of the globe (approximately the aerosol indirect effect). An estimate obtained by scaling these simulated clear- and cloudy-sky forcings with estimates of anthropogenic {tau}{sub a} and satellite-retrieved Nd - {tau}{sub a} regression slopes, respectively, yields a global, annual-mean aerosol direct effect estimate of -0.4 {+-} 0.2 Wm{sup -2} and a cloudy-sky (aerosol indirect effect) estimate of -0.7 {+-} 0.5 Wm{sup -2}, with a total estimate of -1.2 {+-} 0.4 Wm{sup -2}.

Quaas, Johannes; Ming, Yi; Menon, Surabi; Takemura, Toshihiko; Wang, Minghuai; Penner, Joyce E.; Gettelman, Andrew; Lohmann, Ulrike; Bellouin, Nicolas; Boucher, Olivier; Sayer, Andrew M.; Thomas, Gareth E.; McComiskey, Allison; Feingold, Graham; Hoose, Corinna; Kristansson, Jon Egill; Liu, Xiaohong; Balkanski, Yves; Donner, Leo J.; Ginoux, Paul A.; Stier, Philip; Grandey, Benjamin; Feichter, Johann; Sednev, Igor; Bauer, Susanne E.; Koch, Dorothy; Grainger, Roy G.; Kirkevag, Alf; Iversen, Trond; Seland, Oyvind; Easter, Richard; Ghan, Steven J.; Rasch, Philip J.; Morrison, Hugh; Lamarque, Jean-Francois; Iacono, Michael J.; Kinne, Stefan; Schulz, Michael

2010-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

73

CMIP5 Projected Changes in the Annual Cycle of Precipitation in Monsoon Regions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Analyses of the 5th Coupled Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP5) experiments show that the global monsoon is expected to increase in area, precipitation and intensity as the climate system responds to anthropogenic forcing. Concurrently, detailed ...

Anji Seth; Sara A. Rauscher; Michela Biasutti; Alessandra Giannini; Suzana J. Camargo; Maisa Rojas

74

Uncertainties in CMIP5 climate projections due to carbon cycle feedbacks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the context of Coupled Model Intercomparison Project phase 5, most climate simulations use prescribed atmospheric CO2 concentration and therefore do not interactively include the effect of carbon cycle feedbacks. However, the RCP8.5 scenario ...

Pierre Friedlingstein; Malte Meinshausen; Vivek K. Arora; Chris D. Jones; Alessandro Anav; Spencer K. Liddicoat; Reto Knutti

75

CMIP5 Projected Changes in the Annual Cycle of Precipitation in Monsoon Regions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Analyses of phase 5 of the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP5) experiments show that the global monsoon is expected to increase in area, precipitation, and intensity as the climate system responds to anthropogenic forcing. Concurrently, ...

Anji Seth; Sara A. Rauscher; Michela Biasutti; Alessandra Giannini; Suzana J. Camargo; Maisa Rojas

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Indian Ocean variability in the CMIP5 multi-model ensemble: The basin mode  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study evaluates the simulation of the Indian Ocean Basin (IOB) mode and relevant physical processes in Coupled Model Intercomparison Projects phase 5 (CMIP5) models. Historical runs from 20 CMIP5 models are available for the analysis. They ...

Yan Du; Shang-Ping Xie; Ya-Li Yang; Xiao-Tong Zheng; Lin Liu; Gang Huang

77

CMIP3 Subtropical Stratocumulus Cloud Feedback Interpreted through a Mixed-Layer Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Large-scale conditions over subtropical marine stratocumulus areas are extracted from global climate models (GCMs) participating in phase 3 of the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP3) and used to drive an atmospheric mixed-layer model (...

Peter M. Caldwell; Yunyan Zhang; Stephen A. Klein

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Precipitation Reproducibility over Tropical Oceans and Its Relationship to the Double ITCZ Problem in CMIP3 and MIROC5 Climate Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Precipitation reproducibility over the tropical oceans in climate models is examined. Models participating in phase 3 of the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP3) and the current (fifth) version Model for Interdisciplinary Research on ...

Nagio Hirota; Yukari N. Takayabu; Masahiro Watanabe; Masahide Kimoto

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

The Role of Regional SST Warming Variations in the Drying of Meso-America in Future Climate Projections  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper addresses several hypotheses designed to explain why AOGCM simulations of future climate in the third phase of the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP3) feature an intensified reduction of precipitation over the Meso-America (MA)...

Sara A. Rauscher; Fred Kucharski; David B. Enfield

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Arctic Precipitation and Evaporation: Model Results and Observational Estimates  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Observational estimates of precipitation and evaporation over the Arctic Ocean and its terrestrial watersheds are compared with corresponding values from the climate model simulations of the Atmospheric Model Intercomparison Project (AMIP). ...

John E. Walsh; Vladimir Kattsov; Diane Portis; Valentin Meleshko

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "model intercomparison project" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Documentation of the AMIP Models on the World Wide Web  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Summary documentation of the numerics, dynamics, and physics of models participating in the Atmospheric Model Intercomparison Project is now available on the Internet's World Wide Web. In this article the principal attributes of the electronic ...

Thomas J. Phillips

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Southern Ocean Circulation and Eddy Compensation in CMIP5 Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Thirteen state-of-the-art climate models from phase 5 of the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP5) are used to evaluate the response of the Antarctic Circumpolar Current (ACC) transport and Southern Ocean meridional overturning circulation ...

Stephanie M. Downes; Andrew McC. Hogg

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Analysis of Permafrost Thermal Dynamics and Response to Climate Change in the CMIP5 Earth System Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The authors analyze global climate model predictions of soil temperature [from the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project phase 5 (CMIP5) database] to assess the models’ representation of current-climate soil thermal dynamics and their predictions ...

Charles D. Koven; William J. Riley; Alex Stern

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

A Large Eddy Simulation Intercomparison Study of Shallow Cumulus Convection  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper reports an intercomparison study on undisturbed trade wind cumulus convection under steady-state conditions as observed during the Barbados Oceanographic and Meteorological Experiment (BOMEX) with 10 large eddy simulation (LES) models. ...

A. Pier Siebesma; Christopher S. Bretherton; Andrew Brown; Andreas Chlond; Joan Cuxart; Peter G. Duynkerke; Hongli Jiang; Marat Khairoutdinov; David Lewellen; Chin-Hoh Moeng; Enrique Sanchez; Bjorn Stevens; David E. Stevens

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Development of Electronic Acquisition Model for Project ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... have independent decision support models to ... An agent-based communication environment called Electronic Acquisition Model for Project ...

2003-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

86

NREL: Technology Deployment - Project Development Model  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Project Development Model Project Development Model NREL developed the Project Development Model to evaluate the risks and investment decisions required for successful renewable energy project development. The two-phase iterative model includes elements in project fundamentals and project development based off commercial project development practices supported by tools such as pro formas and checklists. Project Fundamentals or BEPTC(tm) Renewable Energy Project Development Tool For help with the BEPTC phase of your project, check out the Renewable Energy Project Development Tool, developed by NREL for U.S. Department of Energy's Community Renewable Energy Deployment effort. The tool helps you quickly establish the key motivators and feasibility of your project. Strong project fundamentals and an understanding of how a project fits

87

An Assessment of a Model-, Grid-, and Basin-Independent Tropical Cyclone Detection Scheme in Selected CMIP3 Global Climate Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A novel tropical cyclone (TC) detection technique designed for coarse-resolution models is tested and evaluated. The detector, based on the Okubo–Weiss–Zeta parameter (OWZP), is applied to a selection of Coupled Model Intercomparison Project, ...

K. J. Tory; S. S. Chand; R. A. Dare; J. L. McBride

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

The Global Monsoon Variability Simulated by CMIP3 Coupled Climate Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The global monsoon climate variability during the second half of the twentieth century simulated by 21 coupled global climate models (CGCMs) that participated in the World Climate Research Programme’s Coupled Model Intercomparison Project phase 3 ...

Hyung-Jin Kim; Bin Wang; Qinghua Ding

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Terrestrial carbon cycle - climate relations in eight CMIP5 earth system models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Eight Earth System Models from the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP5) are evaluated, focusing on both the net carbon dioxide flux and its components, and their relation with climatic variables (temperature, precipitation and soil ...

Pu Shao; Xubin Zeng; Koichi Sakaguchi; Russell K. Monson; Xiaodong Zeng

90

The Temporal Variability of Soil Moisture and Surface Hydrological Quantities in a Climate Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The variance budget of land surface hydrological quantities is analyzed in the second Atmospheric Model Intercomparison Project (AMIP2) simulation made with the Canadian Centre for Climate Modelling and Analysis (CCCma) third-generation general ...

Vivek K. Arora; George J. Boer

2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Tropical Water Vapor and Cloud Feedbacks in Climate Models: A Further Assessment Using Coupled Simulations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

By comparing the response of clouds and water vapor to ENSO forcing in nature with that in Atmospheric Model Intercomparison Project (AMIP) simulations by some leading climate models, an earlier evaluation of tropical cloud and water vapor ...

De-Zheng Sun; Yongqiang Yu; Tao Zhang

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC) in CMIP5 Models: RCP and Historical Simulations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Atlantic meridional overturning circulation (AMOC) simulated by 10 models from phase 5 of the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP5) for the historical (1850–2005) and future climate is examined. The historical simulations of the AMOC ...

Wei Cheng; John C. H. Chiang; Dongxiao Zhang

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Interactions of ENSO, the IOD, and the SAM in CMIP3 Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Simulations of individual global climate drivers using models from the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project phase 3(CMIP3) have been examined; however, the relationship among them has not been assessed. This is carried out to address several ...

Wenju Cai; Arnold Sullivan; Tim Cowan

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Heavy precipitation events in a warmer climate: results from CMIP5 models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this work the authors investigate possible changes in the distribution of heavy precipitation events under a warmer climate, using the results of a set of 20 climate models taking part in the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project phase 5 effort ...

Enrico Scoccimarro; Silvio Gualdi; Alessio Bellucci; Matteo Zampieri; Antonio Navarra

95

Southern Africa Summer Drought and Heat Waves: Observations and Coupled Model Behavior  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Observations of daily maximum temperature (Tx) and monthly precipitation and their counterpart fields from three coupled models from the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 3 (CMIP3) archive have been used for exploratory research into ...

Bradfield Lyon

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Storm-Track Activity in IPCC AR4/CMIP3 Model Simulations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The climatological storm-track activity simulated by 17 Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change Fourth Assessment Report (IPCC AR4)/phase 3 of the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP3) models is compared to that in the interim ECMWF Re-...

Edmund K. M. Chang; Yanjuan Guo; Xiaoming Xia; Minghua Zheng

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

The Ability of CMIP5 Models to Simulate North Atlantic Extratropical Cyclones  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The ability of the climate models participating in phase 5 of the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP5) to simulate North Atlantic extratropical cyclones in winter [December–February (DJF)] and summer [June–August (JJA)] is investigated in ...

Giuseppe Zappa; Len C. Shaffrey; Kevin I. Hodges

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Potential Predictability and AMIP Implications of Midlatitude Climate Variability in Two General Circulation Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ensembles of extended Atmospheric Model Intercomparison Project (AMIP) runs from the general circulation models of the National Centers for Environmental Prediction (formerly the National Meteorological Center) and the Max-Planck Institute (...

T. P. Barnett; K. Arpe; L. Bengtsson; M. Ji; A. Kumar

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Intercomparison Study of the Land Surface Process Model and the Common Land Model for a Prairie Wetland in Florida  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Common Land Model (CLM) and Land Surface Process (LSP) model simulations are compared to measured values for a 13-day dry-down period with a rapidly decreasing near-surface water table for a marsh wetland community in Florida. LSP was able to ...

B. Whitfield; J. M. Jacobs; J. Judge

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

How Well Do Regional Climate Models Reproduce Radiation and Clouds in the Arctic? An Evaluation of ARCMIP Simulations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Downwelling radiation in six regional models from the Arctic Regional Climate Model Intercomparison (ARCMIP) project is systematically biased negative in comparison with observations from the Surface Heat Budget of the Arctic Ocean (SHEBA) ...

Michael Tjernström; Joseph Sedlar; Matthew D. Shupe

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "model intercomparison project" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Response of the Midlatitude Jets, and of Their Variability, to Increased Greenhouse Gases in the CMIP5 Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This work documents how the midlatitude, eddy-driven jets respond to climate change using model output from phase 5 of the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP5). The authors consider separately the North Atlantic, the North Pacific, and ...

Elizabeth A. Barnes; Lorenzo Polvani

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Dynamic and Thermodynamic Air–Sea Coupling Associated with the Indian Ocean Dipole Diagnosed from 23 WCRP CMIP3 Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The performance of 23 World Climate Research Programme (WCRP) Coupled Model Intercomparison Project, phase 3 (CMIP3) models in the simulation of the Indian Ocean dipole (IOD) is evaluated, and the results show large diversity in the simulated IOD ...

Lin Liu; Weidong Yu; Tim Li

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Reversed Spatial Asymmetries between El Niño and La Niña and Their Linkage to Decadal ENSO Modulation in CMIP3 Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study examines preindustrial simulations from Coupled Model Intercomparison Project, phase 3 (CMIP3), models to show that a tendency exists for El Niño sea surface temperature anomalies to be located farther eastward than La Niña anomalies ...

Jin-Yi Yu; Seon Tae Kim

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Intercomparison of model simulations of mixed-phase clouds observed during the ARM Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment. Part I: Single layer cloud  

SciTech Connect

Results are presented from an intercomparison of single-column and cloud-resolving model simulations of a cold-air outbreak mixed-phase stratocumulus cloud observed during the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program's Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment. The observed cloud occurred in a well-mixed boundary layer with a cloud top temperature of -15 C. The observed liquid water path of around 160 g m{sup -2} was about two-thirds of the adiabatic value and much greater than the mass of ice crystal precipitation which when integrated from the surface to cloud top was around 15 g m{sup -2}. The simulations were performed by seventeen single-column models (SCMs) and nine cloud-resolving models (CRMs). While the simulated ice water path is generally consistent with the observed values, the median SCM and CRM liquid water path is a factor of three smaller than observed. Results from a sensitivity study in which models removed ice microphysics indicate that in many models the interaction between liquid and ice-phase microphysics is responsible for the large model underestimate of liquid water path. Despite this general underestimate, the simulated liquid and ice water paths of several models are consistent with the observed values. Furthermore, there is some evidence that models with more sophisticated microphysics simulate liquid and ice water paths that are in better agreement with the observed values, although considerable scatter is also present. Although no single factor guarantees a good simulation, these results emphasize the need for improvement in the model representation of mixed-phase microphysics. This case study, which has been well observed from both aircraft and ground-based remote sensors, could be a benchmark for model simulations of mixed-phase clouds.

Klein, S A; McCoy, R B; Morrison, H; Ackerman, A; Avramov, A; deBoer, G; Chen, M; Cole, J; DelGenio, A; Golaz, J; Hashino, T; Harrington, J; Hoose, C; Khairoutdinov, M; Larson, V; Liu, X; Luo, Y; McFarquhar, G; Menon, S; Neggers, R; Park, S; Poellot, M; von Salzen, K; Schmidt, J; Sednev, I; Shipway, B; Shupe, M; Spangenberg, D; Sud, Y; Turner, D; Veron, D; Falk, M; Foster, M; Fridlind, A; Walker, G; Wang, Z; Wolf, A; Xie, S; Xu, K; Yang, F; Zhang, G

2008-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

105

Evaluation of AMIP II Global Climate Model Simulations of the Land Surface Water Budget and Its Components over the GEWEX-CEOP Regions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The land surface water balance components simulated by 20 atmospheric global circulation models (AGCMs) participating in phase II of the Atmospheric Model Intercomparison Project (AMIP II) are analyzed globally and over seven Global Energy and ...

P. Irannejad; A. Henderson-Sellers

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Intercomparison of model simulations of mixed-phase clouds observed during the ARM Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment. Part I: Single layer cloud  

SciTech Connect

Results are presented from an intercomparison of single-column and cloud-resolving model simulations of a cold-air outbreak mixed-phase stratocumulus cloud observed during the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program's Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment. The observed cloud occurred in a well-mixed boundary layer with a cloud top temperature of -15 C. The observed average liquid water path of around 160 g m{sup -2} was about two-thirds of the adiabatic value and much greater than the average mass of ice crystal precipitation which when integrated from the surface to cloud top was around 15 g m{sup -2}. The simulations were performed by seventeen single-column models (SCMs) and nine cloud-resolving models (CRMs). While the simulated ice water path is generally consistent with the observed values, the median SCM and CRM liquid water path is a factor of three smaller than observed. Results from a sensitivity study in which models removed ice microphysics suggest that in many models the interaction between liquid and ice-phase microphysics is responsible for the large model underestimate of liquid water path. Despite this general underestimate, the simulated liquid and ice water paths of several models are consistent with the observed values. Furthermore, there is evidence that models with more sophisticated microphysics simulate liquid and ice water paths that are in better agreement with the observed values, although considerable scatter is also present. Although no single factor guarantees a good simulation, these results emphasize the need for improvement in the model representation of mixed-phase microphysics.

Klein, Stephen A.; McCoy, Renata B.; Morrison, Hugh; Ackerman, Andrew S.; Avramov, Alexander; de Boer, Gijs; Chen, Mingxuan; Cole, Jason N.S.; Del Genio, Anthony D.; Falk, Michael; Foster, Michael J.; Fridlind, Ann; Golaz, Jean-Christophe; Hashino, Tempei; Harrington, Jerry Y.; Hoose, Corinna; Khairoutdinov, Marat F.; Larson, Vincent E.; Liu, Xiaohong; Luo, Yali; McFarquhar, Greg M.; Menon, Surabi; Neggers, Roel A. J.; Park, Sungsu; Poellot, Michael R.; Schmidt, Jerome M.; Sednev, Igor; Shipway, Ben J.; Shupe, Matthew D.; Spangenberg, Douglas A.; Sud, Yogesh C.; Turner, David D.; Veron, Dana E.; von Salzen, Knut; Walker, Gregory K.; Wang, Zhien; Wolf, Audrey B.; Xie, Shaocheng; Xu, Kuan-Man; Yang, Fanglin; Zhang, Gong

2009-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

107

Intercomparison of model simulations of mixed-phase clouds observed during the ARM Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment. Part II: Multi-layered cloud  

SciTech Connect

Results are presented from an intercomparison of single-column and cloud-resolving model simulations of a deep, multi-layered, mixed-phase cloud system observed during the ARM Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment. This cloud system was associated with strong surface turbulent sensible and latent heat fluxes as cold air flowed over the open Arctic Ocean, combined with a low pressure system that supplied moisture at mid-level. The simulations, performed by 13 single-column and 4 cloud-resolving models, generally overestimate the liquid water path and strongly underestimate the ice water path, although there is a large spread among the models. This finding is in contrast with results for the single-layer, low-level mixed-phase stratocumulus case in Part I of this study, as well as previous studies of shallow mixed-phase Arctic clouds, that showed an underprediction of liquid water path. The overestimate of liquid water path and underestimate of ice water path occur primarily when deeper mixed-phase clouds extending into the mid-troposphere were observed. These results suggest important differences in the ability of models to simulate Arctic mixed-phase clouds that are deep and multi-layered versus shallow and single-layered. In general, models with a more sophisticated, two-moment treatment of the cloud microphysics produce a somewhat smaller liquid water path that is closer to observations. The cloud-resolving models tend to produce a larger cloud fraction than the single-column models. The liquid water path and especially the cloud fraction have a large impact on the cloud radiative forcing at the surface, which is dominated by the longwave flux for this case.

Morrison, H; McCoy, R B; Klein, S A; Xie, S; Luo, Y; Avramov, A; Chen, M; Cole, J; Falk, M; Foster, M; Genio, A D; Harrington, J; Hoose, C; Khairoutdinov, M; Larson, V; Liu, X; McFarquhar, G; Poellot, M; Shipway, B; Shupe, M; Sud, Y; Turner, D; Veron, D; Walker, G; Wang, Z; Wolf, A; Xu, K; Yang, F; Zhang, G

2008-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

108

The Interplay between Transpiration and Runoff Formulations in Land Surface Schemes Used with Atmospheric Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Project for Intercomparison of Land-surface Parameterization Schemes (PILPS) has shown that different land surface models (LSMs) driven by the same meteorological forcing can produce markedly different surface energy and water budgets, even ...

Randal D. Koster; P. C. D. Milly

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Radiative Characteristics of the Canadian Climate Centre Second-Generation General Circulation Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Several observational datasets were used to assess the quality of the radiative characteristics of the Canadian Climate Centre (CCC) second-generation GCM. The GCM data were obtained from the Atmospheric Model Intercomparison Project (AMIP) ...

Howard W. Barker; Zhanqing Li; Jean-Pierre Blanchet

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Assessing Future Changes in the East Asian Summer Monsoon Using CMIP5 Coupled Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Future changes in the East Asian summer monsoon (EASM) are estimated from historical and Representative Concentration Pathway 6.0 (RCP6) experiments of the fifth phase of the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP5). The historical runs show ...

Kyong-Hwan Seo; Jung Ok; Jun-Hyeok Son; Dong-Hyun Cha

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Challenges to Reproduce Vegetation Structure and Dynamics in Amazonia Using a Coupled Climate–Biosphere Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Amazon rain forest constitutes one of the major global stocks of carbon. Recent studies, including the last Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change report and the Coupled Climate Carbon Cycle Model Intercomparison Project, have suggested ...

Mônica Carneiro Alves Senna; Marcos Heil Costa; Lucía Iracema Chipponelli Pinto; Hewlley Maria Acioli Imbuzeiro; Luciana Mara Freitas Diniz; Gabrielle Ferreira Pires

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Application of the Composite Method to the Spatial Forecast Verification Methods Intercomparison Dataset  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The composite method is applied to verify a series of idealized and real precipitation forecasts as part of the Spatial Forecast Verification Methods Intercomparison Project. The test cases range from simple geometric shapes to high-resolution (...

Jason E. Nachamkin

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Intercomparison of Spatial Forecast Verification Methods: Identifying Skillful Spatial Scales Using the Fractions Skill Score  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The fractions skill score (FSS) was one of the measures that formed part of the Intercomparison of Spatial Forecast Verification Methods project. The FSS was used to assess a common dataset that consisted of real and perturbed Weather Research ...

Marion Mittermaier; Nigel Roberts

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Effect of project characteristics on project performance in construction projects based on structural equation model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Most past studies that analyze project performance and the characteristics that affect such performance consist of a simple form, in which they present the brief relationship between project performance and a few characteristics that affect it. Furthermore, ... Keywords: Project characteristics, Project performance, Structural equation model

KyuMan Cho; TaeHoon Hong; ChangTaek Hyun

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Tropical and subtropical cloud transitions in weather and climate prediction models: the GCSS/WGNE Pacific Cross-Section Intercomparison (GPCI)  

SciTech Connect

A model evaluation approach is proposed where weather and climate prediction models are analyzed along a Pacific Ocean cross-section, from the stratocumulus regions off the coast of California, across the shallow convection dominated trade-winds, to the deep convection regions of the ITCZ: the GCSS/WGNE Pacific Cross-section Intercomparison (GPCI). The main goal of GPCI is to evaluate, and help understand and improve the representation of tropical and sub-tropical cloud processes in weather and climate prediction models. In this paper, a detailed analysis of cloud regime transitions along the cross-section from the sub-tropics to the tropics for the season JJA of 1998 is presented. This GPCI study confirms many of the typical weather and climate prediction model problems in the representation of clouds: underestimation of clouds in the stratocumulus regime by most models with the corresponding consequences in terms of shortwave radiation biases; overestimation of clouds by the ECMWF Re-Analysis (ERA40) in the deep tropics (in particular) with the corresponding impact in the outgoing longwave radiation; large spread between the different models in terms of cloud cover, liquid water path and shortwave radiation; significant differences between the models in terms of vertical crosssections of cloud properties (in particular), vertical velocity and relative humidity. An alternative analysis of cloud cover mean statistics is proposed where sharp gradients in cloud cover along the GPCI transect are taken into account. This analysis shows that the negative cloud bias of some models and ERA40 in the stratocumulus regions (as compared to ISCCP) is associated not only with lower values of cloud cover in these regimes, but also with a stratocumulus-to-cumulus transition that occurs too early along the trade-wind Lagrangian trajectory. Histograms of cloud cover along the cross-section differ significantly between models. Some models exhibit a quasi-bimodal structure with cloud cover being either very large (close to 100%) or very small, while other models show a more continuous transition. The ISCCP observations suggest that reality is in-between these two extreme examples. These different patterns reflect the diverse nature of the cloud, boundary layer, and convection parameterizations in the participating weather and climate prediction models.

Teixeira, J.; Cardoso, S.; Bonazzola, M.; Cole, Jason N.; DelGenio, Anthony D.; DeMott, C.; Franklin, A.; Hannay, Cecile; Jakob, Christian; Jiao, Y.; Karlsson, J.; Kitagawa, H.; Koehler, M.; Kuwano-Yoshida, A.; LeDrian, C.; Lock, Adrian; Miller, M.; Marquet, P.; Martins, J.; Mechoso, C. R.; Meijgaard, E. V.; Meinke, I.; Miranda, P.; Mironov, D.; Neggers, Roel; Pan, H. L.; Randall, David A.; Rasch, Philip J.; Rockel, B.; Rossow, William B.; Ritter, B.; Siebesma, A. P.; Soares, P.; Turk, F. J.; Vaillancourt, P.; Von Engeln, A.; Zhao, M.

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

North American Climate in CMIP5 Experiments: Part III: Assessment of 21st Century Projections  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In Part 3 of a three-part study on North American climate in Coupled Model Intercomparison project (CMIP5) models, we examine projections of 21st century climate in the RCP8.5 emission experiments. This paper summarizes and synthesizes results ...

Eric D. Maloney; Suzana J. Camargo; Edmund Chang; Brian Colle; Rong Fu; Kerrie L. Geil; Qi Hu; Xianan Jiang; Nathaniel Johnson; Kristopher B. Karnauskas; James Kinter; Benjamin Kirtman; Sanjiv Kumar; Baird Langenbrunner; Kelly Lombardo; Lindsey N. Long; Annarita Mariotti; Joyce E. Meyerson; Kingtse C. Mo; J. David Neelin; Zaitao Pan; Richard Seager; Yolande Serra; Anji Seth; Justin Sheffield; Julienne Stroeve; Jeanne Thibeault; Shang-Ping Xie; Chunzai Wang; Bruce Wyman; Ming Zhao

117

Multimodel Analysis of Energy and Water Fluxes: Intercomparisons between Operational Analyses, a Land Surface Model, and Remote Sensing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Using data from seven global model operational analyses (OA), one land surface model, and various remote sensing retrievals, the energy and water fluxes over global land areas are intercompared for 2003/04. Remote sensing estimates of ...

Raghuveer K. Vinukollu; Justin Sheffield; Eric F. Wood; Michael G. Bosilovich; David Mocko

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Transferability Intercomparison: An Opportunity for New Insight on the Global Water Cycle and Energy Budget  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new approach, called transferability intercomparisons, is described for advancing both understanding and modeling of the global water cycle and energy budget. Under this approach, individual regional climate models perform simulations with all ...

E. S. Takle; W. J. Gutowski Jr.; R. W. Arritt; J. Roads; I. Meinke; B. Rockel; C. G. Jones; A. Zadra

2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

An Intercomparison of ERS-Scat and AMSR-E Soil Moisture Observations with Model Simulations over France  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents a study undertaken in preparation of the work leading up to the assimilation of Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS) observations into the land surface model (LSM) Interaction Soil Biosphere Atmosphere (ISBA) at Météo-...

Christoph Rüdiger; Jean-Christophe Calvet; Claire Gruhier; Thomas R. H. Holmes; Richard A. M. de Jeu; Wolfgang Wagner

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

An Assessment of Possible Climate Change in the Australian Region Based on an Intercomparison of General Circulation Modeling Results  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To assist in estimating likely future climate change in the Australian region, the authors examine the results of four different general circulation modeling experiments run to assess the equilibrium impact of doubling greenhouse gases. The ...

P. H. Whetton; A. B. Pittock; M. R. Haylock; P. J. Rayner

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "model intercomparison project" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Project: Sustainability Modeling and Optimization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... and the capabilities to formulate simulation and optimization models. ... “Energy Efficiency Analysis for a Casting Production System,” Berglund ...

2012-12-27T23:59:59.000Z

122

DOE Hydrogen Analysis Repository: Hydrogen Modeling Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Modeling Projects Modeling Projects Below are models grouped by topic. These models are used to analyze hydrogen technology, infrastructure, and other areas related to the development and use of hydrogen. Cross-Cutting Distributed Energy Resources Customer Adoption Model (DER_CAM) Hydrogen Deployment System (HyDS) Model and Analysis Hydrogen Technology Assessment and Selection Model (HyTASM) Renewable Energy Power System Modular Simulator (RPM-Sim) Stranded Biogas Decision Tool for Fuel Cell Co-Production Energy Infrastructure All Modular Industry Growth Assessment (AMIGA) Model Building Energy Optimization (BEopt) Distributed Energy Resources Customer Adoption Model (DER_CAM) Hydrogen Deployment System (HyDS) Model and Analysis Hydrogen Technology Assessment and Selection Model (HyTASM)

123

An intercomparison of models used to simulate the short-range atmospheric dispersion of agricultural ammonia emissions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ammonia emitted into the atmosphere from agricultural sources can have an impact on nearby sensitive ecosystems, either through elevated ambient concentrations or dry/wet deposition to vegetation and soil surfaces. Short-range atmospheric dispersion ... Keywords: Agriculture, Ammonia, Atmospheric dispersion model, Evaluation, Validation

Mark R. Theobald; Per LøFstrøM; John Walker; Helle V. Andersen; Poul Pedersen; Antonio Vallejo; Mark A. Sutton

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Intercomparison of Water Vapor Data Measured with Lidar during IHOP_2002. Part II: Airborne-to-Airborne Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The dataset of the International H2O Project (IHOP_2002) gives the first opportunity for direct intercomparisons of airborne water vapor lidar systems and allows very important conclusions to be drawn for future field campaigns. Three airborne ...

Andreas Behrendt; Volker Wulfmeyer; Thorsten Schaberl; Hans-Stefan Bauer; Christoph Kiemle; Gerhard Ehret; Cyrille Flamant; Susan Kooi; Syed Ismail; Richard Ferrare; Edward V. Browell; David N. Whiteman

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

World Energy Projection System Plus Model Documentation: Macroeconomic Model  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This report documents the objectives, analytical approach and development of the World Energy Projection System Plus (WEPS+) Macroeconomic Model. It also catalogues and describes critical assumptions, computational methodology, parameter estimation techniques, and model source code.

Brian Murphy

2011-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

126

World Energy Projection System Plus Model Documentation: World Electricity Model  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This report documents the objectives, analytical approach and development of the World Energy Projection System Plus (WEPS+) World Electricity Model. It also catalogues and describes critical assumptions, computational methodology, parameter estimation techniques, and model source code.

2011-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

127

World Energy Projection System Plus Model Documentation: Greenhouse Gases Model  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This report documents the objectives, analytical approach and development of the World Energy Projection System Plus (WEPS+) Greenhouse Gases Model. It also catalogues and describes critical assumptions, computational methodology, parameter estimation techniques, and model source code.

2011-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

128

World Energy Projection System Plus Model Documentation: Natural Gas Model  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This report documents the objectives, analytical approach and development of the World Energy Projection System Plus (WEPS+) Natural Gas Model. It also catalogues and describes critical assumptions, computational methodology, parameter estimation techniques, and model source code.

Brian Murphy

2011-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

129

World Energy Projection System Plus Model Documentation: Main Model  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This report documents the objectives, analytical approach and development of the World Energy Projection System Plus (WEPS+) Main Model. It also catalogues and describes critical assumptions, computational methodology, parameter estimation techniques, and model source code.

Information Center

2011-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

130

World Energy Projection System Plus Model Documentation: Coal Model  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This report documents the objectives, analytical approach and development of the World Energy Projection System Plus (WEPS+) Coal Model. It also catalogues and describes critical assumptions, computational methodology, parameter estimation techniques, and model source code.

Brian Murphy

2011-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

131

World Energy Projection System Plus Model Documentation: District Heat Model  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This report documents the objectives, analytical approach and development of the World Energy Projection System Plus (WEPS+) District Heat Model. It also catalogues and describes critical assumptions, computational methodology, parameter estimation techniques, and model source code.

Brian Murphy

2011-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

132

World Energy Projection System Plus Model Documentation: Commercial Model  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This report documents the objectives, analytical approach and development of the World Energy Projection System Plus (WEPS+) Commercial Model. It also catalogues and describes critical assumptions, computational methodology, parameter estimation techniques, and model source code.

Brian Murphy

2011-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

133

World Energy Projection System Plus Model Documentation: Transportation Model  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This report documents the objectives, analytical approach and development of the World Energy Projection System Plus (WEPS+) International Transportation model. It also catalogues and describes critical assumptions, computational methodology, parameter estimation techniques, and model source code.

Victoria Zaretskaya

2011-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

134

World Energy Projection System Plus Model Documentation: Residential Model  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This report documents the objectives, analytical approach and development of the World Energy Projection System Plus (WEPS+) Residential Model. It also catalogues and describes critical assumptions, computational methodology, parameter estimation techniques, and model source code.

Brian Murphy

2011-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

135

World Energy Projection System Plus Model Documentation: Refinery Model  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This report documents the objectives, analytical approach and development of the World Energy Projection System Plus (WEPS+) Refinery Model. It also catalogues and describes critical assumptions, computational methodology, parameter estimation techniques, and model source code.

Adrian Geagla

2011-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

136

World Energy Projection System Plus Model Documentation: Industrial Model  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This report documents the objectives, analytical approach and development of the World Energy Projection System Plus (WEPS+) World Industrial Model (WIM). It also catalogues and describes critical assumptions, computational methodology, parameter estimation techniques, and model source code.

Peter Gross

2011-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

137

ISCCP Cloud Algorithm Intercomparison  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project (ISCCP) will provide a uniform global climatology of satellite-measured radiances and derive an experimental climatology of cloud radiative properties from these radiances. A pilot study to ...

W. B. Rossow; F. Mosher; E. Kinsella; A. Arking; M. Desbois; E. Harrison; P. Minnis; E. Ruprecht; G. Seze; C. Simmer; E. Smith

1985-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

World Energy Projection System model documentation  

SciTech Connect

The World Energy Projection System (WEPS) was developed by the Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting within the Energy Information Administration (EIA), the independent statistical and analytical agency of the US Department of Energy. WEPS is an integrated set of personal computer based spreadsheets containing data compilations, assumption specifications, descriptive analysis procedures, and projection models. The WEPS accounting framework incorporates projections from independently documented models and assumptions about the future energy intensity of economic activity (ratios of total energy consumption divided by gross domestic product GDP), and about the rate of incremental energy requirements met by natural gas, coal, and renewable energy sources (hydroelectricity, geothermal, solar, wind, biomass, and other renewable resources). Projections produced by WEPS are published in the annual report, International Energy Outlook. This report documents the structure and procedures incorporated in the 1998 version of the WEPS model. It has been written to provide an overview of the structure of the system and technical details about the operation of each component of the model for persons who wish to know how WEPS projections are produced by EIA.

Hutzler, M.J.; Anderson, A.T.

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Regional Climate Simulations for Impact Assessment: Project to Intercompare Regional Climate Simulations (PIRCS) Interim Report -- 1998  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This project provides the first direct intercomparison of regional climate model predictions with observations, as a means to quantify the uncertainties in future predictions of climate change. Results from regional climate model simulations will be inputs to national and international assessments of possible future climate change and impacts due to increased emissions of greenhouse gases and aerosols.

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

140

ILAMB Goals What is a Benchmark? ILAMB Meeting International Land Model Benchmarking (ILAMB) Project  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Develop benchmarks for land model performance, with a focus on carbon cycle, ecosystem, surface energy, and hydrological processes. The benchmarks should be designed and accepted by the community. Apply the benchmarks to global models. Support the design and development of a new, open-source, benchmarking software system for either diagnostic or model intercomparison purposes. Strengthen linkages between experimental, monitoring, remote sensing, and climate modeling communities in the design of new model tests and new measurement programs.

Forrest M. Hoffman; James T. R; Forrest M. Hoffman; James T. R; Forrest M. Hoffman; James T. R; Forrest M. Hoffman; James T. R; Forrest M. Hoffman; James T. R

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "model intercomparison project" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

VEMAP Project Page  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Regional/Global > Veg-Eco Modeling (VEMAP) Regional/Global > Veg-Eco Modeling (VEMAP) The Vegetation-Ecosystem Modeling and Analysis (VEMAP) Project Overview [VEMAP Logo] The Vegetation/Ecosystem Modeling and Analysis Program (VEMAP) was a multi- institutional, international effort that addressed the response of biogeography and biochemistry to environmental variability in climate and other drivers in both space and time domains. The objectives of VEMAP were to: study the intercomparison of biogeochemistry models and vegetation type distribution (biogeography) models determine model sensitivity to changing climate, elevated atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations, and other sources of altered forcing The VEMAP project was conducted in two phases. VEMAP Phase 1 was structured as a sensitivity analysis with combinations of

142

An Intercomparison of a Bryan-Cox-Type Ocean Model and an Isopycnic Ocean Model. Part II: The Subtropical Gyre and Meridional Heat Transport  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In a companion paper, two ocean general circulation models were implemented in order to simulate and intercompare the main features of the North Atlantic circulation: the Atlantic Isopycnic Model (AIM) and the Hadley Centre Bryan-Cox-type ocean ...

Robert Marsh; Adrian L. New; Malcolm J. Roberts; Richard A. Wood

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Ocean Carbon Cycle Models from the Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC)  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

•\tPacific data-model intercomparison from Patrick Wetzel (Max Planck Institute for Meteorology, Germany)

144

Winter and Summer Northern Hemisphere Blocking in CMIP5 Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The frequencies of atmospheric blocking in both winter and summer and the changes in them from the twentieth to the twenty-first centuries as simulated in 12 models from phase 5 of the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP5) are analyzed. ...

Giacomo Masato; Brian J. Hoskins; Tim Woollings

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Assessing Future Changes in the East Asian Summer Monsoon Using CMIP3 Models: Results from the Best Model Ensemble  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Future changes in the East Asian summer monsoon (EASM) have been estimated from the six best-performing models in phase 3 of the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP3) included in the Fourth Assessment Report (AR4) of the Intergovernmental ...

Kyong-Hwan Seo; Jung Ok

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Comparison of Arctic Climate Simulations by Uncoupled and Coupled Global Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Simulations of present-day Arctic climate are assessed from suites of 1) 13 global atmosphere-only models from the Atmospheric Model Intercomparison Project (AMIP-II) and 2) 8 coupled atmosphere–ocean–ice models from the Data Distribution Center ...

John E. Walsh; Vladimir M. Kattsov; William L. Chapman; Veronika Govorkova; Tatyana Pavlova

2002-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

An Initial Assessment of Antarctic Sea Ice Extent in the CMIP5 Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper examines the annual cycle and trends in Antarctic sea ice extent (SIE) for 18 models used in phase 5 of the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP5) that were run with historical forcing for the 1850s to 2005. Many of the models ...

John Turner; Thomas J. Bracegirdle; Tony Phillips; Gareth J. Marshall; J. Scott Hosking

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Global and regional aspects of tropical cyclone activity in the CMIP5 models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Tropical cyclone (TC) activity is analyzed in 14 Coupled Model Intercomparison Project phase 5 (CMIP5) models. The global TC activity in the historical runs is compared with observations. The simulation of TC activity in the CMIP5 models is not as ...

Suzana J. Camargo

149

Pataha Creek Model Watershed : 1998 Habitat Conservation Projects.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The projects outlined in detail on the attached project reports are a few of the many projects implemented in the Pataha Creek Model Watershed since it was selected as a model in 1993. 1998 was a year where a focused effort was made to work on the upland conservation practices to reduce the sedimentation into Pataha Creek.

Bartels, Duane G.

1999-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Uncertainty in emissions projections for climate models  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Future global climate projections are subject to large uncertainties. Major sources of this uncertainty are projections of anthropogenic emissions. We evaluate the uncertainty in future anthropogenic emissions using a ...

Webster, Mort David.; Babiker, Mustafa H.M.; Mayer, Monika.; Reilly, John M.; Harnisch, Jochen.; Hyman, Robert C.; Sarofim, Marcus C.; Wang, Chien.

151

Modeling new coal projects: supercritical or subcritical?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Decisions made on new build coal-fired plants are driven by several factors - emissions, fuel logistics and electric transmission access all provide constraints. The crucial economic decision whether to build supercritical or subcritical units often depends on assumptions concerning the reliability/availability of each technology, the cost of on-fuel operations including maintenance, the generation efficiencies and the potential for emissions credits at some future value. Modeling the influence of these key factors requires analysis and documentation to assure the assets actually meet the projected financial performance. This article addresses some of the issue related to the trade-offs that have the potential to be driven by the supercritical/subcritical decision. Solomon Associates has been collecting cost, generation and reliability data on coal-fired power generation assets for approximately 10 years using a strict methodology and taxonomy to categorize and compare actual plant operations data. This database provides validated information not only on performance, but also on alternative performance scenarios, which can provide useful insights in the pro forma financial analysis and models of new plants. 1 ref., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

Carrino, A.J.; Jones, R.B. [Solomon Associates, Dallas, TX (United States)

2006-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

152

Simulation of a Stratocumulus-Topped Planetary Boundary Layer: Intercomparison among Different Numerical Codes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper reports an intercomparison study of a stratocumulus-topped planetary boundary layer (PBL) generated from ten 3D large eddy simulation (LES) codes and four 2D cloud-resolving models (CRMs). These models vary in the numerics, the ...

C-H. Moeng; W. R. Cotton; B. Stevens; C. Bretherton; H. A. Rand; A. Chlond; M. Khairoutdinov; S. Krueger; W. S. Lewellen; M. K. MacVean; J. R. M. Pasquier; A. P. Siebesma; R. I. Sykes

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Model Ordinance for Renewable Energy Projects | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Model Ordinance for Renewable Energy Projects Model Ordinance for Renewable Energy Projects Model Ordinance for Renewable Energy Projects < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Fed. Government Industrial Institutional Local Government Nonprofit Residential Schools State Government Savings Category Bioenergy Biofuels Alternative Fuel Vehicles Commercial Heating & Cooling Manufacturing Buying & Making Electricity Solar Wind Program Info State Oregon Program Type Solar/Wind Permitting Standards Provider Oregon Department of Energy '''''NOTE: This model ordinance was designed to provide guidance to local governments that wish to develop their own siting rules for renewable energy projects. While it was developed by the Oregon Department of Energy, the model itself has no legal or regulatory authority.'''''

154

Effect of anthropogenic land-use and land cover changes on climate and land carbon storage in CMIP5 projections for the 21st century  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The effects of land-use changes on climate are assessed using specified-concentration simulations complementary to the RCP2.6 and 8.5 scenarios performed for the fifth coupled model intercomparison project (CMIP5). This analysis focuses on ...

V. Brovkin; L. Boysen; V. K. Arora; J. P. Boisier; P. Cadule; L. Chini; M. Claussen; P. Friedlingstein; V. Gayler; B. J. J. M. van den Hurk; G. C. Hurtt; C. D. Jones; E. Kato; N. de Noblet-Ducoudré; F. Pacifico; J. Pongratz; M. Weiss

155

Project: Whole Building Energy Modeling and Measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... buildings use approximately 22% of the total energy consumed in the US The objective of this project is to increase the energy efficiency of the ...

2012-12-27T23:59:59.000Z

156

Reliability modeling for capital project decisions.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Exploration and Production (E&P) project costs within the oil industry are continuously increasing reflecting a reality of more harsh environments, remote locations with minimal existing… (more)

Poulassichidis, Antonios

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

FINAL PROJECT REPORT LOAD MODELING TRANSMISSION RESEARCH  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

staff at Southern California Edison and  Bonneville Power by Southern California Edison for this project.   Similar that Southern California Edison is initiating such tests 

Lesieutre, Bernard

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Heavy Precipitation Events in a Warmer Climate: Results from CMIP5 Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this work, the authors investigate possible changes in the distribution of heavy precipitation events under a warmer climate, using the results of a set of 20 climate models taking part in phase 5 of Coupled Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP5)...

Enrico Scoccimarro; Silvio Gualdi; Alessio Bellucci; Matteo Zampieri; Antonio Navarra

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Evaluation of the Global Climate Models in the CMIP5 over the Tibetan Plateau  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The performance of 24 GCMs available in the fifth phase of the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP5) is evaluated over the eastern Tibetan Plateau (TP) by comparing the model outputs with ground observations for the period 1961–2005. The ...

Fengge Su; Xiaolan Duan; Deliang Chen; Zhenchun Hao; Lan Cuo

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

A model-data intercomparison of CO2 exchange across North America: Results from the North American Carbon Program site synthesis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Our current understanding of terrestrial carbon processes is represented in various models used to integrate and scale measurements of CO2 exchange from remote sensing and other spatiotemporal data. Yet assessments are rarely conducted to determine how well models simulate carbon processes across vegetation types and environmental conditions. Using standardized data from the North American Carbon Program we compare observed and simulated monthly CO2 exchange from 44 eddy covariance flux towers in North America and 22 terrestrial biosphere models. The analysis period spans 220 site-years, 10 biomes, and includes two large-scale drought events, providing a natural experiment to evaluate model skill as a function of drought and seasonality. We evaluate models' ability to simulate the seasonal cycle of CO2 exchange using multiple model skill metrics and analyze links between model characteristics, site history, and model skill. Overall model performance was poor; the difference between observations and simulations was 10 times observational uncertainty, with forested ecosystems better predicted than nonforested. Model-data agreement was highest in summer and in temperate evergreen forests. In contrast, model performance declined in spring and fall, especially in ecosystems with large deciduous components, and in dry periods during the growing season. Models used across multiple biomes and sites, the mean model ensemble, and a model using assimilated parameter values showed high consistency with observations. Models with the highest skill across all biomes all used prescribed canopy phenology, calculated NEE as the difference between GPP and ecosystem respiration, and did not use a daily time step.

Schwalm, Christopher R. [Clark University; Williams, Christopher A. [Clark University; Schaefer, Kevin [University of Colorado, Boulder; Anderson, Ryan [University of Montana, Missoula; Arain, A. [McMaster University; Baker, Ian [Colorado State University, Fort Collins; Lokupitiya, Erandathie [Colorado State University, Fort Collins; Barr, Alan [Atmospheric Science and Technology Directorate, Saskatoo, SK, Canada; Black, T. A. [University of British Columbia, Vancouver; Gu, Lianhong [ORNL; Riciutto, Dan M. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL)

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "model intercomparison project" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Purpose driven competency planning for enterprise modeling projects  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Much of the success of projects using Enterprise Modeling (EM) depends more on the quality of the process of modeling rather than on the method used. One important influence on the quality of the modeling process is the competency level of the experts ... Keywords: competence profile, enterprise modeling, modeling practitioner

Janis Stirna; Anne Persson

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Global Trade and Analysis Project (GTAP) Model | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Global Trade and Analysis Project (GTAP) Model Global Trade and Analysis Project (GTAP) Model Jump to: navigation, search LEDSGP green logo.png FIND MORE DIA TOOLS This tool is part of the Development Impacts Assessment (DIA) Toolkit from the LEDS Global Partnership. Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Global Trade Analysis Project (GTAP) Model Agency/Company /Organization: Purdue University Sector: Climate, Energy Topics: Baseline projection, - Macroeconomic, Market analysis, Pathways analysis Resource Type: Software/modeling tools User Interface: Desktop Application Complexity/Ease of Use: Moderate Website: www.gtap.agecon.purdue.edu/models/current.asp Cost: Free References: GTAP[1] Related Tools IGES GHG Calculator For Solid Waste ICCT Roadmap Model Applied Dynamic Analysis of the Global Economy (ADAGE) Model

163

A model-data intercomparison of CO2 exchange across North America: Results from the North American Carbon Program Site Synthesis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Our current understanding of terrestrial carbon processes is represented in various models used to integrate and scale measurements of CO{sub 2} exchange from remote sensing and other spatiotemporal data. Yet assessments are rarely conducted to determine how well models simulate carbon processes across vegetation types and environmental conditions. Using standardized data from the North American Carbon Program we compare observed and simulated monthly CO{sub 2} exchange from 44 eddy covariance flux towers in North America and 22 terrestrial biosphere models. The analysis period spans {approx}220 site-years, 10 biomes, and includes two large-scale drought events, providing a natural experiment to evaluate model skill as a function of drought and seasonality. We evaluate models' ability to simulate the seasonal cycle of CO{sub 2} exchange using multiple model skill metrics and analyze links between model characteristics, site history, and model skill. Overall model performance was poor; the difference between observations and simulations was {approx}10 times observational uncertainty, with forested ecosystems better predicted than nonforested. Model-data agreement was highest in summer and in temperate evergreen forests. In contrast, model performance declined in spring and fall, especially in ecosystems with large deciduous components, and in dry periods during the growing season. Models used across multiple biomes and sites, the mean model ensemble, and a model using assimilated parameter values showed high consistency with observations. Models with the highest skill across all biomes all used prescribed canopy phenology, calculated NEE as the difference between GPP and ecosystem respiration, and did not use a daily time step.

Schwalm, C.R.; Williams, C.A.; Schaefer, K.; Anderson, R.; Arain, M.A.; Baker, I.; Black, T.A.; Chen, G.; Ciais, P.; Davis, K. J.; Desai, A. R.; Dietze, M.; Dragoni, D.; Fischer, M.L.; Flanagan, L.B.; Grant, R.F.; Gu, L.; Hollinger, D.; Izaurralde, R.C.; Kucharik, C.; Lafleur, P.M.; Law, B.E.; Li, L.; Li, Z.; Liu, S.; Lokupitiya, E.; Luo, Y.; Ma, S.; Margolis, H.; Matamala, R.; McCaughey, H.; Monson, R. K.; Oechel, W. C.; Peng, C.; Poulter, B.; Price, D.T.; Riciutto, D.M.; Riley, W.J.; Sahoo, A.K.; Sprintsin, M.; Sun, J.; Tian, H.; Tonitto, C.; Verbeeck, H.; Verma, S.B.

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Validation of HEDR models. Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project has developed a set of computer models for estimating the possible radiation doses that individuals may have received from past Hanford Site operations. This document describes the validation of these models. In the HEDR Project, the model validation exercise consisted of comparing computational model estimates with limited historical field measurements and experimental measurements that are independent of those used to develop the models. The results of any one test do not mean that a model is valid. Rather, the collection of tests together provide a level of confidence that the HEDR models are valid.

Napier, B.A.; Simpson, J.C.; Eslinger, P.W.; Ramsdell, J.V. Jr.; Thiede, M.E.; Walters, W.H.

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

FINAL PROJECT REPORT LOAD MODELING TRANSMISSION RESEARCH  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

appliances including lighting, refrigerators, dishwashers, clothes washers, dryers, fans, and electronic equipment for developing model databases

Lesieutre, Bernard

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Nuclear Asset Management (NAM) Model - Update for Project Prioritization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides an update of the Nuclear Asset Management (NAM) Process Model developed in 2007 and published in EPRI report 1015091. It incorporates results from modeling project prioritization guidance developed as part of EPRI's participation in the Equipment Reliability Working Group (ERWG). This update presents additional detail on the model described in report 1015091 and provides a reflection of current industry best practices for project prioritization.

2009-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

167

A model?data intercomparison of CO2 exchange across North America: Results from the North American Carbon Program Site Synthesis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

There is a continued need for models to improve consistency and agreement with observations [Friedlingstein et al., 2006], both overall and under more frequent extreme climatic events related to global environmental change such as drought [Trenberth et al., 2007]. Past validation studies of terrestrial biosphere models have focused only on few models and sites, typically in close proximity and primarily in forested biomes [e.g., Amthor et al., 2001; Delpierre et al., 2009; Grant et al., 2005; Hanson et al., 2004; Granier et al., 2007; Ichii et al., 2009; Ito, 2008; Siqueira et al., 2006; Zhou et al., 2008]. Furthermore, assessing model?data agreement relative to drought requires, in addition to high?quality observedCO2 exchange data, a reliable drought metric as well as a natural experiment across sites and drought conditions.

Schwalm, Christopher R.; Williams, Christopher A.; Schaefer, Kevin; Anderson, Ryan; Arain, M. A.; Baker, Ian; Barr, Alan; Black, T. Andrew; Chen, Guangsheng; Chen, Jing Ming; Ciais, Philippe; Davis, Kenneth J.; Desai, Ankur R.; Dietze, Michael; Dragoni, Danilo; Fischer, Marc; Flanagan, Lawrence; Grant, Robert; Gu, Lianghong; Hollinger, D.; Izaurralde, Roberto C.; Kucharik, Chris; Lafleur, Peter; Law, Beverly E.; Li, Longhui; Li, Zhengpeng; Liu, Shuguang; Lokupitiya, Erandathie; Luo, Yiqi; Ma, Siyan; Margolis, Hank; Matamala, R.; McCaughey, Harry; Monson, Russell K.; Oechel, Walter C.; Peng, Changhui; Poulter, Benjamin; Price, David T.; Riciutto, Dan M.; Riley, William; Sahoo, Alok Kumar; Sprintsin, Michael; Sun, Jianfeng; Tian, Hanqin; Tonitto, Christine; Verbeeck, Hans; Verma, Shashi B.

2010-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

168

A model-data intercomparison of CO2 exchange across North America: Results from the North American Carbon Program Site Synthesis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Running SW, Hunt ER (2005) Biome-BGC: Terrestrial Ecosystemdivergence was reported using Biome-BGC, LPJ and ORCHIDEE toYes Enzyme Kinetic Model Biome?BGC Temporal Resolution

Schwalm, C.R.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Intercomparison of Meteorological Forcing Data from Empirical and Mesoscale Model Sources in the North Fork American River Basin in Northern Sierra Nevada, California  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The data required to drive distributed hydrological models are significantly limited within mountainous terrain because of a scarcity of observations. This study evaluated three common configurations of forcing data: 1) one low-elevation station, ...

Nicholas E. Wayand; Alan F. Hamlet; Mimi Hughes; Shara I. Feld; Jessica D. Lundquist

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

The Fog Remote Sensing and Modeling Field Project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The main purpose of this work is to describe a major field project on fog and summarize the preliminary results. Three field phases of the Fog Remote Sensing and Modeling (FRAM) project were conducted over the following two regions of Canada: 1) ...

I. Gultepe; B. Hansen; S. G. Cober; G. Pearson; J. A. Milbrandt; S. Platnick; P. Taylor; M. Gordon; J. P. Oakley

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

An Initial Intercomparison of Atmospheric and Oceanic Climatology for the ICE-5G and ICE-4G Models of LGM Paleotopography  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper investigates the impact of the new ICE-5G paleotopography dataset for Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) conditions on a coupled model simulation of the thermal and dynamical state of the glacial atmosphere and on both land surface and sea ...

F. Justino; A. Timmermann; U. Merkel; W. R. Peltier

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Challenges in Combining Projections from Multiple Climate Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recent coordinated efforts, in which numerous general circulation climate models have been run for a common set of experiments, have produced large datasets of projections of future climate for various scenarios. Those multimodel ensembles sample ...

Reto Knutti; Reinhard Furrer; Claudia Tebaldi; Jan Cermak; Gerald A. Meehl

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Annual Energy Outlook with Projections to 2025-Model Results  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 with Projections to 2025 Data Tables Adobe Acrobat Reader Logo Adobe Acrobat Reader is required for PDF format MS Excel Viewer Spreadsheets are provided in excel Model Results in...

174

Annual Energy Outlook with Projections to 2025-Model Results  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5 with Projections to 2025 Data Tables Adobe Acrobat Reader Logo Adobe Acrobat Reader is required for PDF format MS Excel Viewer Spreadsheets are provided in excel Model Results in...

175

A simulation model for strategic management process of software projects  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this study, a simulation model for the strategic management process of software development projects is presented. The proposed model simulates the implications of strategic decisions on factors such as cost, risk, budget and schedule of software ... Keywords: Cost estimation, Decision analysis systems, Risk analysis, Simulation modelling, Strategic management

Masood Uzzafer

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

FINAL PROJECT REPORT LOAD MODELING TRANSMISSION RESEARCH  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Modeling Task  Force white paper, October 2006.   Lu, N. , system simulations.   This white  paper examines the use of task reports  and white papers.  (See appendices. )  The 

Lesieutre, Bernard

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

PROJECT/CAMPAIGN Document Name  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Canopy Chemistry Program (ACCP) Project/Campaign Document Canopy Chemistry Program (ACCP) Project/Campaign Document Summary: TThe Accelerated Canopy Chemistry Program (ACCP) was charged to determine whether a sound theoretical and empirical basis existed for the estimation of nitrogen and lignin concentrations in ecosystem canopies from remote sensing data. Three streams of activity were initiated to meet this charge: 1) new field and remote sensing data acquisitions for well-characterized sites, 2) canopy-level radiosity and ray-tracing modeling, and 3) intercomparison of information extraction techniques. 1991-1992. Table of Contents: 1 Project/Campaign Overview 2 Data Availability 3 Data Access 4 Principal Investigator Information 5 Submitting Investigator Information 6 References 7 Glossary of Terms 8 List of Acronyms

178

Gulf of Mexico numerical model. Project summary  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An efficient three-dimensional, time dependent prognostic model of the Gulf of Mexico has been developed. The model is driven by winds and surface heat flux derived from climatological, atmospheric surface data, the result of an intensive data analysis study. Mean velocity, temperature, salinity, turbulence kinetic energy and turbulence macroscale are the prognostic variables. Lateral boundary conditions for temperature and salinity and geostrophically derived velocity at the Straits of Yucatan and Florida are obtained from climatological ocean data. An analytical second moment turbulence closure scheme embedded within the model provides realistic surface mixed layer dynamics. Free surface elevation distributions are calculated with an algorithm which calculates the external (tidal) mode separately from the internal mode. The external mode, an essentially two-dimensional calculation, requires a short integrating timestep whereas the more costly, three-dimensional, internal mode can be executed with a long step. The result is a fully three-dimensional code which includes a free surface at no sacrifice in computer cost compared to rigid lid models.

Blumberg, A. F.; Mellor, G. L.; Herring, H. J.

1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Project  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Exploring the Standard Model Exploring the Standard Model       You've heard a lot about the Standard Model and the pieces are hopefully beginning to fall into place. However, even a thorough understanding of the Standard Model is not the end of the story but the beginning. By exploring the structure and details of the Standard Model we encounter new questions. Why do the most fundamental particles have the particular masses we observe? Why aren't they all symmetric? How is the mass of a particle related to the masses of its constituents? Is there any other way of organizing the Standard Model? The activities in this project will elucidate but not answer our questions. The Standard Model tells us how particles behave but not necessarily why they do so. The conversation is only beginning. . . .

180

How Well Do Atmospheric General Circulation Models Capture the Leading Modes of the Interannual Variability of the Asian–Australian Monsoon?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The authors evaluate the performances of 11 AGCMs that participated in the Atmospheric Model Intercomparison Project II (AMIP II) and that were run in an AGCM-alone way forced by historical sea surface temperature covering the period 1979–99 and ...

Tianjun Zhou; Bo Wu; Bin Wang

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "model intercomparison project" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Fuzzy regression model of R&D project evaluation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Engineering and technology play an important role in strengthening the competitive power of a company and in surviving a severe competition in the world. About 70% of the total R&D investment in Japan comes from the private sector. It is the most important ... Keywords: AHP, Fuzzy regression model, Management of technology and engineering, Project management, R&D

Shinji Imoto; Yoshiyuki Yabuuchi; Junzo Watada

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Energy Demand Modelling Introduction to the PhD project  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy Demand Modelling Introduction to the PhD project Erika Zvingilaite Risø DTU System Analysis for optimization of energy systems Environmental effects Global externalities cost of CO2 Future scenarios for the Nordic energy systems 2010, 2020, 2030, 2040, 2050 (energy-production, consumption, emissions, net costs

183

The REFLEX project: Comparing different algorithms and implementations for the inversion of a terrestrial ecosystem model against eddy covariance data  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We describe a model-data fusion (MDF) inter-comparison project (REFLEX), which compared various algorithms for estimating carbon (C) model parameters consistent with both measured carbon fluxes and states and a simple C model. Participants were provided with the model and with both synthetic net ecosystem exchange (NEE) ofCO2 and leaf area index (LAI) data, generated from the model with added noise, and observed NEE and LAI data from two eddy covariance sites. Participants endeavoured to estimate model parameters and states consistent with the model for all cases over the two years for which data were provided, and generate predictions for one additional year without observations. Nine participants contributed results using Metropolis algorithms, Kalman filters and a genetic algorithm. For the synthetic data case, parameter estimates compared well with the true values. The results of the analyses indicated that parameters linked directly to gross primary production (GPP) and ecosystem respiration, such as those related to foliage allocation and turnover, or temperature sensitivity of heterotrophic respiration,were best constrained and characterised. Poorly estimated parameters were those related to the allocation to and turnover of fine root/wood pools. Estimates of confidence intervals varied among algorithms, but several algorithms successfully located the true values of annual fluxes from synthetic experiments within relatively narrow 90% confidence intervals, achieving>80% success rate and mean NEE confidence intervals <110 gCm-2 year-1 for the synthetic case. Annual C flux estimates generated by participants generally agreed with gap-filling approaches using half-hourly data. The estimation of ecosystem respiration and GPP through MDF agreed well with outputs from partitioning studies using half-hourly data. Confidence limits on annual NEE increased by an average of 88% in the prediction year compared to the previous year, when data were available. Confidence intervals on annual NEE increased by 30% when observed data were used instead of synthetic data, reflecting and quantifying the addition of model error. Finally, our analyses indicated that incorporating additional constraints, using data on C pools (wood, soil and fine roots) would help to reduce uncertainties for model parameters poorly served by eddy covariance data.

Fox, Andrew [University of Sheffield; Williams, Mathew [University of Edinburgh; Richardson, Andrew D. [Harvard University; Cameron, David [Centre for Ecology and Hydrology, Bush Estate; Gove, Jeffrey H. [USDA Forest Service; Quaife, Tristan [University College, London; Ricciuto, Daniel M [ORNL; Reichstein, Markus [Max Planck Institute for Biogeochemistry; Tomelleri, Enrico [Max Planck Institute for Biogeochemistry; Trudinger, Cathy [CSIRO Marine and Atmospheric Research; Van Wijk, Mark T. [Wageningen University and Research Centre, The Netherlands

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

EPRI (2004, 2006) Ground-Motion Model Review Project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This project plan describes the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) (2004, 2006) Ground-Motion Model (GMM) Review Project, which will provide industry with information necessary to respond to the Nuclear Regulatory Commission Request for Information to Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations 50.54(f), Recommendation 2.1 of the Near-Term Task Force Review of Insights from the Fukushima Dai-Ichi Accident, dated March 12, 2012. The purpose of this study is to determine whether the EPRI (2004, 2006)...

2012-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

185

City of Austin: Green habitat learning project. A green builder model home project  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of the Year 14 UCETF project was to design and construct a residential structure that could serve as a demonstration facility, training site, and testing and monitoring laboratory for issues related to the implementation of sustainable building practices and materials. The Model Home Project builds on the previous and existing efforts, partially funded by the UCETF, of the City of Austin Green Builder Program to incorporate sustainable building practices into mainstream building activities. The Green Builder Program uses the term {open_quotes}green{close_quotes} as a synonym for sustainability. In the research and analysis that was completed for our earlier reports in Years 12 and 13, we characterized specific elements that we associate with sustainability and, thus, green building. In general, we refer to a modified life cycle assessment to ascertain if {open_quotes}green{close_quotes} building options reflect similar positive cyclical patterns found in nature (i.e. recyclability, recycled content, renewable resources, etc.). We additionally consider economic, human health and synergistic ecological impacts associated with our building choices and characterize the best choices as {open_quotes}green.{close_quotes} Our ultimate goal is to identify and use those {open_quotes}green{close_quotes} materials and processes that provide well for us now and do not compromise similar benefits for future generations. The original partnership developed for this project shifted during the year from a project stressing advanced (many prototypical) {open_quotes}green{close_quotes} building materials and techniques in a research and demonstration context, to off-the-shelf but underutilized {open_quotes}green{close_quotes} materials in the practical social context of using {open_quotes}green{close_quotes} technologies for low income housing. That project, discussed in this report, is called the Green Habitat Learning Project.

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Pataha Creek Model Watershed : 1999 Habitat Conservation Projects.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The projects outlined in detail on the attached project reports are a summary of the many projects implemented in the Pataha Creek Model Watershed since it was selected as a model in 1993. Up until last year, demonstration sites using riparian fencing, off site watering facilities, tree and shrub plantings and upland conservation practices were used for information and education and was the main focus of the implementation phase of the watershed plan. These practices are the main focus of the watershed plan to reduce the majority of the sediment entering the stream. However, the watershed stream evaluation team used in the watershed analysis determined that there were problems along the Pataha Creek that needed to be addressed that would add further protection to the banks and therefore a further reduction of sedimentation into the stream. 1999 was a year where a focused effort was made to work on the upland conservation practices to reduce the sedimentation into Pataha Creek. Over 95% of the sediment entering the stream can be tied directly to the upland and riparian areas of the watershed. In stream work was not addressed this year because of the costs associated with these projects and the low impact of the sediment issue concerning Pataha Creeks impact on Chinook Salmon in the Tucannon River.

Bartels, Duane G.

2000-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

The SPARC Intercomparison of Middle-Atmosphere Climatologies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An updated assessment of uncertainties in “observed” climatological winds and temperatures in the middle atmosphere (over altitudes 10–80 km) is provided by detailed intercomparisons of contemporary and historic datasets. These datasets include ...

William Randel; Petra Udelhofen; Eric Fleming; Marvin Geller; Mel Gelman; Kevin Hamilton; David Karoly; Dave Ortland; Steve Pawson; Richard Swinbank; Fei Wu; Mark Baldwin; Marie-Lise Chanin; Philippe Keckhut; Karin Labitzke; Ellis Remsberg; Adrian Simmons; Dong Wu

2004-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Intercomparison of Four Commercial Analyzers for Water Vapor Isotope Measurement  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The ?18O and ?D of atmospheric water vapor are important tracers in hydrological and ecological studies. Isotope ratio infrared spectroscopy (IRIS) provides an in situ technology for measuring ?18O and ?D in ambient conditions. An intercomparison ...

Xue-Fa Wen; Xuhui Lee; Xiao-Min Sun; Jian-Lin Wang; Ya-Kun Tang; Sheng-Gong Li; Gui-Rui Yu

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

The TWP-ICE CRM Intercomparison Specification and First Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

TWP-ICE CRM Intercomparison Specification and First Results Ann Fridlind (ann.fridlind@nasa.gov), Andrew Ackerman (andrew.ackerman@nasa.gov), Adrian Hill (adrian.hill@metoffice.gov...

190

Intercomparison of Local Hydroxyl Measurements by Radiocarbon and FAGE Techniques  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A direct intercomparison of near-surface tropospheric HO concentration measurements by two different techniques was made in October–November 1992 at a rural site near Pullman, Washington. The atmosphere at the site is believed to contain low ...

Malcolm J. Campbell; Brad D. Hall; John C. Sheppard; Philip L. Utley; Robert J. O'brien; Thomas M. Hard; Linda A. George

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Aerosol Measurement in the Australian Outback: Intercomparison of Sun Photometers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The low background aerosol loadings prevailing over much of the Australian continent necessitate careful attention to the calibration of sun photometers. The validity of such calibrations can only be assessed objectively by intercomparison of ...

R. M. Mitchell; B. W. Forgan

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Pre-EUCREX Intercomparison of Airborne Humidity Measuring Instruments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During the pre-EUCREX (European Cloud and Radiation Experiment) intercomparison of airborne instrumentation in January 1992, nine hygrometers mounted on three different aircraft were compared. Although the different instruments are based on ...

J. Ström; R. Busen; M. Quante; B. Guillemet; P. R. A. Brown; J. Heintzenberg

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Development of whole-building energy performance models as benchmarks for retrofit projects  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents a systematic development process of whole-building energy models as performance benchmarks for retrofit projects. Statistical regression-based models and computational performance models are being used for retrofit projects in industry ...

Omer Tugrul Karaguzel; Khee Poh Lam

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Solid Waste Projection Model: Database (Version 1. 3)  

SciTech Connect

The Solid Waste Projection Model (SWPM) system is an analytical tool developed by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) for Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC). The SWPM system provides a modeling and analysis environment that supports decisions in the process of evaluating various solid waste management alternatives. This document, one of a series describing the SWPM system, contains detailed information regarding the software and data structures utilized in developing the SWPM Version 1.3 Database. This document is intended for use by experienced database specialists and supports database maintenance, utility development, and database enhancement.

Blackburn, C.L.

1991-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Results of WetNet PIP-2 Project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The second WetNet Precipitation Intercomparison Project (PIP-2) evaluates the performance of 20 satellite precipitation retrieval algorithms, implemented for application with Special Sensor Microwave/Imager (SSM/I) passive microwave (PMW) ...

E. A. Smith; J. E. Lamm; R. Adler; J. Alishouse; K. Aonashi; E. Barrett; P. Bauer; W. Berg; A. Chang; R. Ferraro; J. Ferriday; S. Goodman; N. Grody; C. Kidd; D. Kniveton; C. Kummerow; G. Liu; F. Marzano; A. Mugnai; W. Olson; G. Petty; A. Shibata; R. Spencer; F. Wentz; T. Wilheit; E. Zipser

1998-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Solid waste integrated cost analysis model: 1991 project year report  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of the City of Houston's 1991 Solid Waste Integrated Cost Analysis Model (SWICAM) project was to continue the development of a computerized cost analysis model. This model is to provide solid waste managers with tool to evaluate the dollar cost of real or hypothetical solid waste management choices. Those choices have become complicated by the implementation of Subtitle D of the Resources Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) and the EPA's Integrated Approach to managing municipal solid waste;. that is, minimize generation, maximize recycling, reduce volume (incinerate), and then bury (landfill) only the remainder. Implementation of an integrated solid waste management system involving all or some of the options of recycling, waste to energy, composting, and landfilling is extremely complicated. Factors such as hauling distances, markets, and prices for recyclable, costs and benefits of transfer stations, and material recovery facilities must all be considered. A jurisdiction must determine the cost impacts of implementing a number of various possibilities for managing, handling, processing, and disposing of waste. SWICAM employs a single Lotus 123 spreadsheet to enable a jurisdiction to predict or assess the costs of its waste management system. It allows the user to select his own process flow for waste material and to manipulate the model to include as few or as many options as he or she chooses. The model will calculate the estimated cost for those choices selected. The user can then change the model to include or exclude waste stream components, until the mix of choices suits the user. Graphs can be produced as a visual communication aid in presenting the results of the cost analysis. SWICAM also allows future cost projections to be made.

Not Available

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Potential bias of model projected greenhouse warming in irrigated regions  

SciTech Connect

Atmospheric general circulation models (GCMs) used to project climate responses to increased CO{sub 2} generally omit irrigation of agricultural land. Using the NCAR CAM3 GCM coupled to a slab-ocean model, we find that inclusion of an extreme irrigation scenario has a small effect on the simulated temperature and precipitation response to doubled CO{sub 2} in most regions, but reduced warming by as much as 1 C in some agricultural regions, such as Europe and India. This interaction between CO{sub 2} and irrigation occurs in cases where agriculture is a major fraction of the land surface and where, in the absence of irrigation, soil moisture declines are projected to provide a positive feedback to temperature change. The reduction of warming is less than 25% of the temperature increase modeled for doubled CO{sub 2} in most regions; thus greenhouse warming will still be dominant. However, the results indicate that land use interactions may be an important component of climate change uncertainty in some agricultural regions. While irrigated lands comprise only {approx}2% of the land surface, they contribute over 40% of global food production. Climate changes in these regions are therefore particularly important to society despite their relatively small contribution to average global climate.

Lobell, D; Bala, G; Bonfils, C; Duffy, P

2006-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

198

EPRI (2004, 2006) Ground-Motion Model (GMM) Review Project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) (2004, 2006) Ground-Motion Model (GMM) Review Project, which developed an updated GMM for the Central and Eastern United States (CEUS) for use by licensees of nuclear generating plants to respond to the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission’s (NRC’s) Request for Information to Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations 50.54(f), Recommendation 2.1 of the Near-Term Task Force Review of Insights from the Fukushima Dai-Ichi ...

2013-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

199

Cirrus Parcel Model Comparison Project. Phase 1: The Critical Components to Simulate Cirrus Initiation Explicitly  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Cirrus Parcel Model Comparison Project, a project of the GCSS [Global Energy and Water Cycle Experiment (GEWEX) Cloud System Studies] Working Group on Cirrus Cloud Systems, involves the systematic comparison of current models of ice crystal ...

Ruei-Fong Lin; David O'C. Starr; Paul J. DeMott; Richard Cotton; Kenneth Sassen; Eric Jensen; Bernd Kärcher; Xiaohong Liu

2002-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

CROSS VALIDATION OF SATELLITE RADIATION TRANSFER MODELS DURING SWERA PROJECT  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

ISES- 2003 ISES- 2003 CROSS VALIDATION OF SATELLITE RADIATION TRANSFER MODELS DURING SWERA PROJECT IN BRAZIL Enio B. Pereira, Fernando R. Martins 1 Brazilian Institute for Space Research - INPE, São José dos Campos, 12245-970, SP, Brazil Phone + 55 12 39456741, Fax + 55 12 39456810, enio@dge.inpe.br Samuel L. Abreu, Hans Georg Beyer, Sergio Colle, and Solar Energy Laboratory - LABSOLAR - Department of Mechanical Engineering, Federal University of Santa Catarina -UFSC, Florianopolis, 88040-900, (SC), Brazil, Richard Perez The University at Albany (SUNY), ASRC-CESTM, Albany, 12203 (NY), USA Abstract - This work describes the cross validation between two different core radiation transfer models that will be applied during the SWERA (Solar and Wind Energy Assessment): the BRAZIL-SR, and the

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "model intercomparison project" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Regional Climate Model Projections for the State of Washington  

SciTech Connect

Global climate models do not have sufficient spatial resolution to represent the atmospheric and land surface processes that determine the unique regional heterogeneity of the climate of the State of Washington. If future large-scale weather patterns interact differently with the local terrain and coastlines than current weather patterns, local changes in temperature and precipitation could be quite different from the coarse-scale changes projected by global models. Regional climate models explicitly simulate the interactions between the large-scale weather patterns simulated by a global model and the local terrain. We have performed two 100-year climate simulations using the Weather and Research Forecasting (WRF) model developed at the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR). One simulation is forced by the NCAR Community Climate System Model version 3 (CCSM3) and the second is forced by a simulation of the Max Plank Institute, Hamburg, global model (ECHAM5). The mesoscale simulations produce regional changes in snow cover, cloudiness, and circulation patterns associated with interactions between the large-scale climate change and the regional topography and land-water contrasts. These changes substantially alter the temperature and precipitation trends over the region relative to the global model result or statistical downscaling. To illustrate this effect, we analyze the changes from the current climate (1970-1999) to the mid 21st century (2030-2059). Changes in seasonal-mean temperature, precipitation, and snowpack are presented. Several climatological indices of extreme daily weather are also presented: precipitation intensity, fraction of precipitation occurring in extreme daily events, heat wave frequency, growing season length, and frequency of warm nights. Despite somewhat different changes in seasonal precipitation and temperature from the two regional simulations, consistent results for changes in snowpack and extreme precipitation are found in both simulations.

Salathe, E.; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Qian, Yun; Zhang, Yongxin

2010-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

202

ARM - Field Campaign - IRSI Inter-Comparison Study  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

govCampaignsIRSI Inter-Comparison Study govCampaignsIRSI Inter-Comparison Study Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign : IRSI Inter-Comparison Study 2007.08.27 - 2007.09.23 Lead Scientist : Victor Morris For data sets, see below. Description The principle objective of this campaign was to compare measurements of cloud fraction from different types of commercially available infrared sky imagers (IRSI) and to compare the daytime values with an operational Total Sky Imager (TSI). In 2004, the Radiative Processes working group requested that an infrared sky imaging system be added to our measurement suite to provide a nighttime cloud fraction product. A Blue Sky Imaging Ltd. (BSI) All-Sky Thermal Infrared Camera (ASTIC) was purchased and deployed at the SGP Guest

203

ARM - Field Campaign - AERI-ER Intercomparison IOP  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

govCampaignsAERI-ER Intercomparison IOP govCampaignsAERI-ER Intercomparison IOP Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign : AERI-ER Intercomparison IOP 2004.01.12 - 2006.06.29 Lead Scientist : David Turner Data Availability Data were collected and submitted to the ARM Archive for IOPs. For data sets, see below. Summary There were three, potentially four, phases to this experiment. The length of time required for each phase was the time needed to ensure at least one severe clear period, which occur relatively frequently in January and February on the North Slope. The phases were: 1) Run the two systems side-by-side in their nominal modes to ensure that the calibration is reproducible. 2) Adjust the set-point of the hot blackbody on the second system from 60

204

Modeling the Air Traffic Controller's Cognitive Projection Process  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cognitive projection enables the operator of a supervisory control system, such as air traffic control, to

Davison Reynolds, Hayley J

2006-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

205

Validation and Comparison of Carbon Sequestration Project Cost Models with Project Cost Data Obtained from the Southwest Partnership  

SciTech Connect

Obtaining formal quotes and engineering conceptual designs for carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) sequestration sites and facilities is costly and time-consuming. Frequently, when looking at potential locations, managers, engineers and scientists are confronted with multiple options, but do not have the expertise or the information required to quickly obtain a general estimate of what the costs will be without employing an engineering firm. Several models for carbon compression, transport and/or injection have been published that are designed to aid in determining the cost of sequestration projects. A number of these models are used in this study, including models by J. Ogden, MIT's Carbon Capture and Sequestration Technologies Program Model, the Environmental Protection Agency and others. This report uses the information and data available from several projects either completed, in progress, or conceptualized by the Southwest Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership on Carbon Sequestration (SWP) to determine the best approach to estimate a project's cost. The data presented highlights calculated versus actual costs. This data is compared to the results obtained by applying several models for each of the individual projects with actual cost. It also offers methods to systematically apply the models to future projects of a similar scale. Last, the cost risks associated with a project of this scope are discussed, along with ways that have been and could be used to mitigate these risks.

Robert Lee; Reid Grigg; Brian McPherson

2011-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

206

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Wind-to-Hydrogen Cost Modeling and Project  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Wind-to-Hydrogen Cost Wind-to-Hydrogen Cost Modeling and Project Findings (Text Version) to someone by E-mail Share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Wind-to-Hydrogen Cost Modeling and Project Findings (Text Version) on Facebook Tweet about Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Wind-to-Hydrogen Cost Modeling and Project Findings (Text Version) on Twitter Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Wind-to-Hydrogen Cost Modeling and Project Findings (Text Version) on Google Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Wind-to-Hydrogen Cost Modeling and Project Findings (Text Version) on Delicious Rank Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Wind-to-Hydrogen Cost Modeling and Project Findings (Text Version) on Digg Find More places to share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Wind-to-Hydrogen Cost Modeling and Project Findings (Text Version) on

207

GM Project G.6 October 20005 -1 5. OVERVIEW OF THE MODELING SYSTEM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in the prices, #12;GM Project G.6 October 20005 - 3 or acquisition costs, of the goods or servicesGM Project G.6 October 20005 - 1 5. OVERVIEW OF THE MODELING SYSTEM 5.1 INTRODUCTION TO MODELING Our approach to projecting the number of fatalities involving older drivers used four distinct

208

A Test Suite for GCMs: An Intercomparison of 11  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A Test Suite for GCMs: An Intercomparison of 11 Dynamical Cores Christiane Jablonowski1, PeterSandia National Laboratories PDEs on the Sphere Workshop, Santa Fe Apr/28/2009 #12;Motivation · Test standardized & easy-to-use analysis techniques · Idea: Establish a collection of test cases that finds broad

Jablonowski, Christiane

209

PNNL Results from 2010 CALIBAN Criticality Accident Dosimeter Intercomparison Exercise  

SciTech Connect

This document reports the results of the Hanford personnel nuclear accident dosimeter (PNAD) and fixed nuclear accident dosimeter (FNAD) during a criticality accident dosimeter intercomparison exercise at the CEA Valduc Center on September 20-23, 2010. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) participated in a criticality accident dosimeter intercomparison exercise at the Commissariat a Energie Atomique (CEA) Valduc Center near Dijon, France on September 20-23, 2010. The intercomparison exercise was funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, Nuclear Criticality Safety Program, with Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory as the lead Laboratory. PNNL was one of six invited DOE Laboratory participants. The other participating Laboratories were: Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Savannah River Site (SRS), the Y-12 National Security Complex at Oak Ridge, and Sandia National Laboratory (SNL). The goals of PNNL's participation in the intercomparison exercise were to test and validate the procedures and algorithm currently used for the Hanford personnel nuclear accident dosimeters (PNADs) on the metallic reactor, CALIBAN, to test exposures to PNADs from the side and from behind a phantom, and to test PNADs that were taken from a historical batch of Hanford PNADs that had varying degrees of degradation of the bare indium foil. Similar testing of the PNADs was done on the Valduc SILENE test reactor in 2009 (Hill and Conrady, 2010). The CALIBAN results are reported here.

Hill, Robin L.; Conrady, Matthew M.

2011-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

210

Outlook for Combined TMI–VIRS Algorithms for TRMM: Lessons from the PIP and AIP Projects  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The status of current rainfall-retrieval techniques by satellite radiometry has been evaluated by recent international algorithm intercomparison projects. As a general result, passive microwave techniques perform superiorly for instantaneous ...

P. Bauer; L. Schanz; R. Bennartz; P. Schlüssel

1998-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

MHK Projects/Modeling the Physical and Biochemical Influence...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

conference *3102012 Determine pilot plant and 100 MW plant parameters with Lockheed Martin Project Licensing Environmental Monitoring and Mitigation Efforts See Tethys << Return...

212

A Satisficing Model for Project Selection Nicholas G. Hall ?† Zhuoyu ...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Dec 29, 2009 ... Department of Management Sciences, The Ohio State University .... Similar results are independently derived by Lu et al. ...... R&D projects.

213

Project  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

classroom investigations: QNI - SRCH Catchin' Some Z's - Energy Momentum Mass - Accelerators - Detectors - Relativistic Lifetimes - Standard Model Other Sites Particle Graffiti...

214

Uncertainty quantification of US Southwest climate from IPCC projections.  

SciTech Connect

The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) Fourth Assessment Report (AR4) made extensive use of coordinated simulations by 18 international modeling groups using a variety of coupled general circulation models (GCMs) with different numerics, algorithms, resolutions, physics models, and parameterizations. These simulations span the 20th century and provide forecasts for various carbon emissions scenarios in the 21st century. All the output from this panoply of models is made available to researchers on an archive maintained by the Program for Climate Model Diagnosis and Intercomparison (PCMDI) at LLNL. I have downloaded this data and completed the first steps toward a statistical analysis of these ensembles for the US Southwest. This constitutes the final report for a late start LDRD project. Complete analysis will be the subject of a forthcoming report.

Boslough, Mark Bruce Elrick

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Integrated knowledge management model and system for construction projects  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the past there has been no structured approach to learning from construction projects once they are completed. Now, however, the construction industry is adapting concepts of tacit and explicit knowledge management to improve the situation. Top managers ... Keywords: COPRAS method, Construction projects management, Knowledge management, Multiple criteria and multivariant analysis, Tacit and explicit knowledge

L. Kanapeckiene; A. Kaklauskas; E. K. Zavadskas; M. Seniut

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

The 5D to 4D projection model applied as a Lepton to Galaxy Creation model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The 5D to 4D projection is presented in a simple geometry giving the Perelman Theorem, resulting in a 3D doughnut structure for the space manifold of the Lorentz space-time. It is shown that in the lowest quantum state, this Lorentz manifold confines and gives the de Broglie leptons from the massless 5D e-trinos. On the scale of the universe, it allows for a model for the creation of galaxies.

Kai-Wai Wong; Gisela A. M. Dreschhoff; Högne Jungner

2013-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

217

Financial Projection Model This spreadsheet walks you through the process of developing an integrated set of financial projections.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

- - - - Estimated Hours Per Week 20.00 Estimated Rate Per Hour 9.00$ Instructor Cost 0 - - - Total SalariesFinancial Projection Model This spreadsheet walks you through the process of developing -$ Buildings - 20.00 years Leasehold Improvements - 7.00 years Equipment 20,000 7.00 years tractor

Jones, Michelle

218

FDA Construction Project Serves as a Super ESPC Model | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

FDA Construction Project Serves as a Super ESPC Model FDA Construction Project Serves as a Super ESPC Model FDA Construction Project Serves as a Super ESPC Model October 7, 2013 - 1:55pm Addthis The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has initiated an $890 million energy-saving construction project at the site of its new headquarters-a 1940s-era Navy base in White Oak, Maryland. Using a wide range of energy efficiency measures and solar energy, it has led to one of the largest Super Energy Savings Performance Contracts (ESPC). Watch the video modules below to learn more about this successful Super ESPC project. And find out how you can apply the FDA's energy management performance model to your federal agency's construction or building renovation project. Related Links Learn more about the energy-efficient and renewable energy technologies

219

Modeling the air traffic controller's cognitive projection process  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cognitive projection enables the operator of a supervisory control system, such as air traffic control, to use predicted future behavior of the system to make decisions about if and how to control the system. New procedures ...

Reynolds, Hayley J. Davison (Hayley Jaye Davison)

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Regional Climate Model Projections and Uncertainties of U.S. Summer Heat Waves  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Regional climate model (RCM) simulations, driven by low and high climate-sensitivity coupled general circulation models (CGCMs) under various future emissions scenarios, were compared to projected changes in heat wave characteristics. The RCM ...

Kenneth E. Kunkel; Xin-Zhong Liang; Jinhong Zhu

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "model intercomparison project" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Regional Changes in Wind Energy Potential over Europe Using Regional Climate Model Ensemble Projections  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The impact of climate change on wind power generation potentials over Europe is investigated by considering ensemble projections from two regional climate models (RCMs) driven by a global climate model (GCM). Wind energy density and its ...

Hanna Hueging; Rabea Haas; Kai Born; Daniela Jacob; Joaquim G. Pinto

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Electric and Magnetic Fields (EMF) RAPID Engineering Program, Project 7: Development of Field Exposure Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this project was to develop a conceptual model for estimating magnetic field (EMF) personal exposure (PE) of individuals or groups and construct a working model using existing data.

Bracken, T.D.; Rankin, R.F.; Wiley, J.A.

1999-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Project Title Economic Modeling & Unconventional Gas Resource Appraisal Program Line Tough Gas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

support to assess the economic viability of new tough gas plays (tight gas, shale gas, CBM). Project are illustrated using the US shale gas plays as case templates. Discounted cash flow models are applied1 Project Title Economic Modeling & Unconventional Gas Resource Appraisal Program Line Tough Gas

Santos, Juan

224

Transportation Energy Model of the World Energy Projection System ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

The WEPS Transportation Energy Model is a structural accounting model for road, rail, air, domestic shipping, international shipping, and pipeline energy use.

225

Project: Fire Modeling for Performance-Based Design  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... processors [7] , [8] . In addition to finer grids, an Immersed ... [13] As modeling grid sizes increase ... models are to be used in nuclear power applications ...

2013-01-02T23:59:59.000Z

226

Dynamic risks modelling in ERP maintenance projects with FCM  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Firms adopting Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP) have to maintain their applications until the end of the system life span. Proper ERP maintenance is a condition that is necessary to achieve the benefits expected of these packages. However, too many ... Keywords: ERP maintenance, Enterprise system, Expert knowledge, Fuzzy cognitive map, Projects risk

Cristina Lopez, Jose L. Salmeron

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Foreign Participation in US-Funded R&D: the EUV Project as a New Model for a New Reality.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Participation in US-Funded R&D: the EUV Project as a Newworld economy. For US-funded R&D projects, as for technologya new model for US-funded R&D projects that better defines

Borrus, Michael

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

An integrated coastal modeling system for analyzing beach processes and beach restoration projects, SMC  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A user-friendly system called coastal modeling system (SMC) has been developed by the Spanish Ministry of Environment and the University of Cantabria. The system includes several numerical models specifically developed for the application of the methodology ... Keywords: Beach nourishment, Beach project design, Coastal modeling, Coastal numerical model, Littoral GUI

M. González; R. Medina; J. Gonzalez-Ondina; A. Osorio; F. J. Méndez; E. García

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

A multi-project model of key factors affecting organizational benefits from enterprise systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper develops a long-term, multi-project model of factors affecting organizational benefits from enterprise systems (ES), then reports a preliminary test of the model. In the shorter-term half of the model, it is hypothesized that once a system ... Keywords: IS implementation, IS project management, change management, enterprise system success, functional fit, improved access to information, integration, overcoming organizational inertia, packaged software, process optimization

Peter B. Seddon; Cheryl Calvert; Song Yang

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Experience from Intercomparison Exercises of Radon Gas Detectors in the Years 1996?2006  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Radon gas measuring services in Switzerland must be approved by the Federal Office for Public Health (FOPH). The maintenance of approval includes the obligation to participate in annual intercomparison exercises performed at the radon gas reference laboratory of the Paul Scherrer Institut (PSI). In eleven intercomparison exercises since 1996 a total of 1

Gernot Butterweck; Christoph Schuler

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Marine low cloud sensitivity to an idealized climate change: The CGILS LES intercomparison  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

low low cloud sensitivity to an idealized climate change: The CGILS LES intercomparison Peter N. Blossey, 1 Christopher S. Bretherton, 1 Minghua Zhang, 2 Anning Cheng, 3 Satoshi Endo, 4 Thijs Heus, 5 Yangang Liu, 4 Adrian P. Lock, 6 Stephan R. de Roode, 7 and Kuan-Man Xu 8 Received 31 July 2012; revised 4 February 2013; accepted 20 February 2013. [1] Subtropical marine low cloud sensitivity to an idealized climate change is com- pared in six large-eddy simulation (LES) models as part of CGILS. July cloud cover is simulated at three locations over the subtropical northeast Pacific Ocean, which are typified by cold sea surface temperatures (SSTs) under well-mixed stratocumulus, cool SSTs under decoupled stratocumulus, and shallow cumulus clouds overlying warmer SSTs. The idealized climate change includes a uniform 2 K SST increase with corre- sponding moist-adiabatic warming aloft and

232

An evolving collaborative model of working in students' global software development projects  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes the evolution of the collaborative model of working of our annual global software development project that started in 2005. The global software development project unites students from up to five countries with different roles to ... Keywords: agile methodologies, communication, global software development, scrum, software engineering

Christelle Scharff

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Generalized linear model-based expert system for estimating the cost of transportation projects  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Timely effective cost management requires reliable cost estimates at every stage of project development. While underestimation of transportation costs seems to be a global trend, improving early cost prediction accuracy in estimates is difficult. This ... Keywords: Cost management, Expert system, Generalized linear model, Relational database, Transportation projects

Jui-Sheng Chou

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Final Map Draft Comparison Report WIND ENERGY RESOURCE MODELING AND MEASUREMENT PROJECT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

II Final Map Draft Comparison Report #12;WIND ENERGY RESOURCE MODELING AND MEASUREMENT PROJECT Tel: 978-749-9591 Fax: 978-749-9713 mbrower@awstruewind.com August 10, 2004 #12;2 WIND ENERGY RESOURCE issues. 1 Background In Task 2 of the project, five promising areas of the state for wind energy

235

Lithium Ion Battery Modeling using Orthogonal Projections And Descriptor Form.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This thesis focuses on computationally efficient methods to solve the equations of the Doyle Fuller Newman electrochemical battery model. The two methods used in this… (more)

Beeney, Michael

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

NETL: Methane Hydrates - DOE/NETL Projects - THCM Coupled Model...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

effort are to develop a truly coupled numerical model that addresses the complex thermo-hydro-chemo-mechanical (THCM) phenomena in hydrate-bearing sediments through incorporation...

237

ALCF Project Seeks Evidence of Physics Beyond the Standard Model...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Beyond the Standard Model November 21, 2013 Printer-friendly version Finding the Higgs boson at CERN's Large Hadron Collider was a monumental discovery that confirmed the...

238

Intercomparison of Spatial Forecast Verification Methods  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Advancements in weather forecast models and their enhanced resolution have led to substantially improved and more realistic-appearing forecasts for some variables. However, traditional verification scores often indicate poor performance because ...

Eric Gilleland; David Ahijevych; Barbara G. Brown; Barbara Casati; Elizabeth E. Ebert

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Final technical report for DOE Computational Nanoscience Project: Integrated Multiscale Modeling of Molecular Computing Devices  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document reports the outcomes of the Computational Nanoscience Project, "Integrated Multiscale Modeling of Molecular Computing Devices". It includes a list of participants and publications arising from the research supported.

Cummings, P. T.

2010-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

240

Long-Term Climate Commitments Projected with Climate–Carbon Cycle Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Eight earth system models of intermediate complexity (EMICs) are used to project climate change commitments for the recent Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change’s (IPCC’s) Fourth Assessment Report (AR4). Simulations are run until the year ...

G.-K. Plattner; R. Knutti; F. Joos; T. F. Stocker; W. von Bloh; V. Brovkin; D. Cameron; E. Driesschaert; S. Dutkiewicz; M. Eby; N. R. Edwards; T. Fichefet; J. C. Hargreaves; C. D. Jones; M. F. Loutre; H. D. Matthews; A. Mouchet; S. A. Müller; S. Nawrath; A. Price; A. Sokolov; K. M. Strassmann; A. J. Weaver

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "model intercomparison project" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Influence of model biases on projected future changes in tropical cyclone frequency of occurrence  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The influence of model biases on projected future changes in the frequency of occurrence of tropical cyclones (FOCs) was investigated using a new empirical statistical method. Assessments were made of present-day (1979–2003) simulations and future ...

Hiroyuki Murakami; Pang-Chi Hsu; Osamu Arakawa; Tim Li

242

Evaluating the Consistency between Statistically Downscaled and Global Dynamical Model Climate Change Projections  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The consistency between rainfall projections obtained from direct climate model output and statistical downscaling is evaluated. Results are averaged across an area large enough to overcome the difference in spatial scale between these two types ...

B. Timbal; P. Hope; S. Charles

2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Revolutionizing Climate Modeling with Project Athena: A Multi-Institutional, International Collaboration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The importance of using dedicated high-end computing resources to enable high spatial resolution in global climate models and advance knowledge of the climate system has been evaluated in an international collaboration called Project Athena. Inspired by ...

J. L. Kinter; III; B. Cash; D. Achuthavarier; J. Adams; E. Altshuler; P. Dirmeyer; B. Doty; B. Huang; E. K. Jin; L. Marx; J. Manganello; C. Stan; T. Wakefield; T. Palmer; M. Hamrud; T. Jung; M. Miller; P. Towers; N. Wedi; M. Satoh; H. Tomita; C. Kodama; T. Nasuno; K. Oouchi; Y. Yamada; H. Taniguchi; P. Andrews; T. Baer; M. Ezell; C. Halloy; D. John; B. Loftis; R. Mohr; K. Wong

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Clean Energy Works Portland: A Model For Retrofit Projects | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Clean Energy Works Portland: A Model For Retrofit Projects Clean Energy Works Portland: A Model For Retrofit Projects Clean Energy Works Portland: A Model For Retrofit Projects June 4, 2010 - 4:34pm Addthis Paul Lester Communications Specialist for the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy What does this mean for me? Clean Energy Works Portland (CEWP) seeks to cut energy costs for residents, create green jobs and slash greenhouse gases by retrofitting 500 homes in the Portland area by this fall. A program developed by the city of Portland, Ore., is proving to be a model of public and private collaboration for large-scale home retrofit projects throughout the country. Clean Energy Works Portland (CEWP) seeks to cut energy costs for residents, create green jobs and slash greenhouse gases by retrofitting 500 homes in

245

Geothermal Chemical Modeling Project DOE Advanced Brine Chemistry Program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The brine-calcite-anhydrite-silica scale model program is ready to be used by the industry at a research level. Versions are already in use in studies of scaling in geothermal and oil production systems. A set of short course notes has been prepared to help perspective users. IBM and Macintosh versions of the model are available. The gas phase models have been incorporated in the general package for distribution. Both mainframe (SUN) and PC versions (MacIntosh and IBM) of the code have been distributed.

Moeller, N.; Weare, J.H.

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Satellite-based remote sensing of cirrus clouds: hyperspectral radiative transfer modeling, analysis of uncertainties in in-situ cloud extinction measurements and intercomparison of cirrus retrievals from a-train instruments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This dissertation consists of three parts, each devoted to a particular issue of significant importance for satellite-based remote sensing of cirrus clouds. In the first part, we develop and present a fast infrared radiative transfer model on the basis of the adding-doubling principle. The model aims to facilitate the radiative transfer computations involved in hyperspectral remote sensing applications. The model is applicable to a variety of cloud conditions, including vertically inhomogeneous or multilayered clouds. It is shown that for hyperspectral applications the model is two order-of-magnitude faster than the well-known discrete ordinate transfer (DISORT) model, while maintains a similar accuracy. The second part is devoted to the investigation of uncertainties in the FSSP (Forward Scattering Spectrometer Probe) measurement of cloud extinction by small ice particles. First, the single-scattering properties of small ice particles in cirrus clouds are derived and compared to those of equivalent spheres according to various definitions. It is found that, although small ice particles in cirrus clouds are often “quasi-spherical”, their scattering phase functions and asymmetry factors are significant different from those of ice spheres. Such differences may lead to substantial underestimation of cloud extinction in FSSP measurement, if small ice particles are assumed to be spheres. In the third part, we present a comparison of cirrus cloud optical thickness retrievals from two important instruments, MODIS (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectrometer) and POLDER (Polarization and Directionality of Earth’s Reflection), on board NASA’s A-train satellite constellation. The comparison reveals a large difference. Several possible reasons are discussed. It is found that much of the difference is attributable to the difference between the MODIS and POLDER retrieval algorithm in the assumption of cirrus cloud bulk scattering properties. Potential implications of the difference for climate studies are investigated. An important finding is that the use of an unrealistic cirrus bulk scattering model might introduce artificial seasonal variation of cirrus optical thickness and shortwave radiative forcing into the retrieval.

Zhang, Zhibo

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Modelling collaborative knowledge to support engineering design project manager  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Product development cycles are nowadays tightened to the minimum and submitted to a growing competitive pressure. However, product and process complexities are constantly increasing. This paradox requires new organisational concepts to satisfy customers' ... Keywords: Collaborative design, Collaborative knowledge, Engineering design model

Vincent Robin; Bertrand Rose; Philippe Girard

2007-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

GFDL ARM Project Technical Report: Using ARM Observations to Evaluate Cloud and Convection Parameterizations & Cloud-Convection-Radiation Interactions in the GFDL Atmospheric General Circulation Model  

SciTech Connect

This report briefly summarizes the progress made by ARM postdoctoral fellow, Yanluan Lin, at GFDL during the period from October 2008 to present. Several ARM datasets have been used for GFDL model evaluation, understanding, and improvement. This includes a new ice fall speed parameterization with riming impact and its test in GFDL AM3, evaluation of model cloud and radiation diurnal and seasonal variation using ARM CMBE data, model ice water content evaluation using ARM cirrus data, and coordination of the TWPICE global model intercomparison. The work illustrates the potential and importance of ARM data for GCM evaluation, understanding, and ultimately, improvement of GCM cloud and radiation parameterizations. Future work includes evaluation and improvement of the new dynamicsPDF cloud scheme and aerosol activation in the GFDL model.

V. Ramaswamy; L. J. Donner; J-C. Golaz; S. A. Klein

2010-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

249

Annual Energy Outlook with Projections to 2025-Model Results  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Model Results Model Results (To view or print in PDF format, Adobe Acrobat Reader 5.0 is required Download Acrobat Reader Now.) Adobe Acrobat Logo AEO2003 Appendix Tables XLS format A - Reference Case Forecast - PDF (728KB) Reference Case Forecast, Annual 2000-2025 - PDF (1115KB), HTML, XLS B - Economic Growth Case Comparisons - PDF (190KB) High Economic Case, Annual 2000-2025 - PDF (2482KB), XLS Low Economic Case, Annual 2000-2025 - PDF (3937KB), XLS C - Oil Price Case Comparisons - PDF (186KB) High Oil Price Case, Annual 2000-2025 - PDF (2533KB), XLS Low Oil Price Case, Annual 2000-2025 - PDF (2344KB), XLS D - Crude Oil Equivalence Summary - PDF (32KB) E - Household Expenditures - PDF (30KB) F - Results from Side Cases - PDF (89KB) G - Major Assumptions for the Forecast - PDF (160KB), HTML

250

Unsolicited Projects in 2012: Research in Computer Architecture, Modeling,  

Office of Science (SC) Website

2: Research in Computer Architecture, 2: Research in Computer Architecture, Modeling, and Evolving MPI for Exascale Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR) ASCR Home About Research Applied Mathematics Computer Science Exascale Tools Workshop Programming Challenges Workshop Architectures I Workshop External link Architectures II Workshop External link Next Generation Networking Scientific Discovery through Advanced Computing (SciDAC) Computational Science Graduate Fellowship (CSGF) ASCR SBIR-STTR Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of ASCR Funding Opportunities Advanced Scientific Computing Advisory Committee (ASCAC) News & Resources Contact Information Advanced Scientific Computing Research U.S. Department of Energy SC-21/Germantown Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (301) 903-7486 F: (301)

251

ENSO Amplitude Changes due to Climate Change Projections in Different Coupled Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Four climate system models are chosen here for an analysis of ENSO amplitude changes in 4 × CO2 climate change projections. Despite the large changes in the tropical Pacific mean state, the changes in ENSO amplitude are highly model dependant. To ...

Sang-Wook Yeh; Ben P. Kirtman

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Annual Energy Outlook 2002 with Projections to 2020 - Model Results  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Model Results To view PDF Files, Download Free Copy of Adobe Reader Get Acrobat Reader Logo AEO2002 Report Available Formats Entire AEO Report as Printed (PDF, 2,292KB) Preface (PDF, 52KB) Overview (PDF, 117KB) Legislation and Regulations (PDF, 119KB) Issues in Focus (PDF, 172KB) Market Trends Macroeconomic & International Oil Market (PDF, 99KB) Energy Demand (PDF, 99KB) Electricity (PDF, 99KB) Oil and Gas (PDF, 99KB) Coal & Carbon Emissions (PDF, 99KB) Forecast Comparisons (PDF, 83KB) List of Acronyms (PDF, 99KB) Notes and Sources (PDF, 99KB) AEO2002 Appendix Tables XLS format A - Reference Case Forecast PDF (243KB) Reference Case Forecast, Annual 1999-2020 PDF (345KB), HTML, XLS B - Economic Growth Case Comparisons PDF (277KB)

253

MDM Project: Analysis of the Micromechanics Damage Model Suite  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This report extends a previous study of core algorithms and portability considerations associated with the Micromechanics Damage Model computer software developed by the AFRL Materials Directorate at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base. 1 The MDM analysis suite is comprised of four fracture mechanics codes used to establish design criteria for newly developed composite materials, particularly for brittle, heat-resistant composites associated with the fabrication of turbine blades. The MDM codes are based on a semi-analytical approach in which single coated fibers and the surrounding composite material are represented as a nested set of concentric shells (Fig. 1). Stresses and displacements at prescribed points along the length of the cylinder are determined by evaluation of a polynomial function. Numerically challenging conditions arise during the construction of this function. The calculation of matrix exponentials in terms of the full spectrum of eigenvalues associated with the pri...

D. C. O' neal; R. Luczak; N. J. Pagano; H. W. Brown Iii; G. P. Tandon

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Modeling and Simulation Optimization and Feasibility Studies for the Neutron Detection without Helium-3 Project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report details the results of the modeling and simulation work accomplished for the ‘Neutron Detection without Helium-3’ project during the 2011 and 2012 fiscal years. The primary focus of the project is to investigate commercially available technologies that might be used in safeguards applications in the relatively near term. Other technologies that are being developed may be more applicable in the future, but are outside the scope of this study.

Ely, James H.; Siciliano, Edward R.; Swinhoe, Martyn T.; Lintereur, Azaree T.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

The Miami2001 Infrared Radiometer Calibration and Intercomparison. Part I: Laboratory Characterization of Blackbody Targets  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The second calibration and intercomparison of infrared radiometers (Miami2001) was held at the University of Miami's Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science (RSMAS) during May–June 2001. The participants were from several groups ...

J. P. Rice; J. J. Butler; B. C. Johnson; P. J. Minnett; K. A. Maillet; T. J. Nightingale; S. J. Hook; A. Abtahi; C. J. Donlon; I. J. Barton

2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Intercomparison of Aircraft and Surface Buoy Meteorological Data during CODE-1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Intercomparisons of meteorological data—wind speed and direction, surface temperature and surface pressure—were obtained for NCAR Queen Air overflights of four buoys during the CODE-1 experiment. The overflights were at a nominal altitude of 33 ...

Carl A. Friehe; Robert C. Beardsley; Clinton D. Winant; Jerome P. Dean

1984-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

An Intercomparison Study Using Electromagnetic Three-Component Turbulent Velocity Probes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An intercomparison study was performed with four Russian-made, electromagnetic probes capable of measuring three components of oceanic turbulent velocities and two single-axis velocity sensors familiar to western scientists, namely, a hot-film ...

David Y. Lai; Vadim T. Paka; Donald P. Delisi; Anatoli V. Arjannikov; Sergei A. Khanaev

2000-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

The Miami2001 Infrared Radiometer Calibration and Intercomparison. Part II: Shipboard Results  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The second calibration and intercomparison of infrared radiometers (Miami2001) was held at the University of Miami's Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science (RSMAS) during a workshop held from May to June 2001. The radiometers ...

I. J. Barton; P. J. Minnett; K. A. Maillet; C. J. Donlon; S. J. Hook; A. T. Jessup; T. J. Nightingale

2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Field Intercomparison of Ground-Based Cloud Physics Instruments at Whitetop Mountain, Virginia  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In May 1987 a two-week field intercomparison study of ground-based cloud liquid water content (LWC) and cloud detector instruments was performed at the Tennessee Valley Authority research station at the summit of Whitetop Mountain, Virginia. The ...

R. J. Valente; R. K. A. M. Mallant; S. E. McLaren; R. S. Schemenauer; R. E. Stogner

1989-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

An Intercomparison of Acoustic Current Meter Measurements in Low to Moderate Flow Regions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Instrumented, subsurface moorings deployed in the Scotian shelf and slope regions of the North Atlantic provide data in low to moderate flows for a current meter intercomparison. The primary instruments being evaluated are two acoustic Doppler ...

Adam Drozdowski; Blair J. W. Greenan

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "model intercomparison project" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Impact of a Statistical Bias Correction on the Projected Hydrological Changes Obtained from Three GCMs and Two Hydrology Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Future climate model scenarios depend crucially on the models’ adequate representation of the hydrological cycle. Within the EU integrated project Water and Global Change (WATCH), special care is taken to use state-of-the-art climate model output ...

Stefan Hagemann; Cui Chen; Jan O. Haerter; Jens Heinke; Dieter Gerten; Claudio Piani

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

A Neural Network Model for Construction Projects Site Overhead Cost Estimating in Egypt  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Estimating of the overhead costs of building construction projects is an important task in the management of these projects. The quality of construction management depends heavily on their accurate cost estimation. Construction costs prediction is a very difficult and sophisticated task especially when using manual calculation methods. This paper uses Artificial Neural Network (ANN) approach to develop a parametric cost-estimating model for site overhead cost in Egypt. Fifty-two actual real-life cases of building projects constructed in Egypt during the seven year period 2002-2009 were used as training materials. The neural network architecture is presented for the estimation of the site overhead costs as a percentage from the total project price.

ElSawy, Ismaail; Razek, Mohammed Abdel

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Evaluation of PV performance models and their impact on project risk.  

SciTech Connect

Photovoltaic systems are often priced in $/W{sub p}, where Wp refers to the DC power rating of the modules at Standard Test Conditions (1000 W/m{sup 2}, 25 C cell temperature) and $ refers to the installed cost of the system. However, the true value of the system is in the energy it will produce in kWhs, not the power rating. System energy production is a function of the system design and location, the mounting configuration, the power conversion system, and the module technology, as well as the solar resource. Even if all other variables are held constant, the annual energy yield (kWh/kW{sup p}) will vary among module technologies because of differences in response to low-light levels and temperature. Understanding energy yield is a key part of understanding system value. System performance models are used during project development to estimate the expected output of PV systems for a given design and location. Performance modeling is normally done by the system designer/system integrator. Often, an independent engineer will also model system output during a due diligence review of a project. A variety of system performance models are available. The most commonly used modeling tool for project development and due diligence in the United States is probably PVsyst, while those seeking a quick answer to expected energy production may use PVWatts. In this paper, we examine the variation in predicted energy output among modeling tools and users and compare that to measured output.

Stein, Joshua S.; Hansen, Clifford W.; Cameron, Christopher P.

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Spin-projection orientations in the plane square-lattice Ising model with periodic boundary conditions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The periodic boundary conditions changed the plane square-lattice Ising model to the torus-lattice system which restricts the spin-projection orientations. Only two of the three important spin-projection orientations, parallel to the x-axis or to the y-axis, are suited to the torus-lattice system. The infinitesimal difference of the free-energies of the systems between the two systems mentioned above makes their critical temperatures infinitely close to each other, but their topological fundamental groups are distinct.

You-gang Feng

2005-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

265

Livermore energy policy model and projections of energy futures for the Gas Research Institute  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Energy and Resource Planning Group at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) was asked by the Gas Research Institute to evaluate ten of their research projects relative to proposed funding levels for 1982. These energy technology projects included gas from unconventional and synthetic sources as well as utilization technologies. The primary tool used in the evaluation was the LLNL Energy Policy Model (EPM). The report gives background information about the study, the basic assumptions used in the study, and some conclusions, and presents selected supporting results from the EPM runs.

Castleton, R.

1981-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

A multiperiod optimization model to schedule large-scale petroleum development projects  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This dissertation solves an optimization problem in the area of scheduling large-scale petroleum development projects under several resources constraints. The dissertation focuses on the application of a metaheuristic search Genetic Algorithm (GA) in solving the problem. The GA is a global search method inspired by natural evolution. The method is widely applied to solve complex and sizable problems that are difficult to solve using exact optimization methods. A classical resource allocation problem in operations research known under Knapsack Problems (KP) is considered for the formulation of the problem. Motivation of the present work was initiated by certain petroleum development scheduling problem in which large-scale investment projects are to be selected subject to a number of resources constraints in several periods. The constraints may occur from limitations in various resources such as capital budgets, operating budgets, and drilling rigs. The model also accounts for a number of assumptions and business rules encountered in the application that motivated this work. The model uses an economic performance objective to maximize the sum of Net Present Value (NPV) of selected projects over a planning horizon subject to constraints involving discrete time dependent variables. Computational experiments of 30 projects illustrate the performance of the model. The application example is only illustrative of the model and does not reveal real data. A Greedy algorithm was first utilized to construct an initial estimate of the objective function. GA was implemented to improve the solution and investigate resources constraints and their effect on the assets value. The timing and order of investment decisions under constraints have the prominent effect on the economic performance of the assets. The application of an integrated optimization model provides means to maximize the financial value of the assets, efficiently allocate limited resources and to analyze more scheduling alternatives in less time.

Husni, Mohammed Hamza

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Progress report on terrestrial model development (TERRA and HABITAT): Research in support of the CERES earth system modeling project  

SciTech Connect

Although there is only a developing understanding of the many processes affecting and coupling the atmosphere, oceans, and land systems of the earth, we are embarked on an effort to construct a prototype model (CERES) of the full Earth system. As part of this effort, we have proposed to the EPA to construct an Earth System Framework for the CERES model that supports flexible, modular development, coupling, and replacement of Earth System submodel components. This project has two specific areas of study. These areas are (1) the terrestrial contribution to the biogeochemical cycling and (2) the interactions of climate and the land ecosystems. The objectives of these two areas of study are: development of a globally distributed model of terrestrial ecosystem productivity, linking model to the submodels, using coupled system to explore biogeochemical cycles, exploration of greenhouse effect, development of models of surface, and the study of the dynamics of climate change and vegetation response.

Kercher, J.R.; Axelrod, M.C.; Amthor, J.S. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Chambers, J.Q. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)]|[California Univ., Santa Barbara, CA (United States). Dept. of Biological Sciences

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Forecasting world oil prices: the evolution of modeling methodologies and summary of recent projections  

SciTech Connect

This paper has three main objectives: (1) to review and summarize the varios methodologies that have been developed to explain historical oil price changes and forecast future price trends, (2) to summarize recent world oil price forecasts, and, when possible, discuss the methodologies used in formulating those forecasts, and (3) utilizing conclusions from the reviews of the modeling methodologies and the recent price forecasts, in combination with an assessment of recent and projected oil market trends, to give oil price projections for the time period 1987 to 2022. The paper argues that modeling methodologies have undergone significant evolution during the past decade as modelers increasingly recognize the complex and constantly changing structure of the world oil market. Unfortunately, a consensus about the appropriate methodology to use in formulating oil price forecasts is yet to be reached. There is, however, a general movement toward the opinion that both economic and political factors should be considered when making price projections. Likewise, there is no consensus about future oil price trends. Forecasts differ widely. However, in general, forecasts have been adjusted downwardly in recent years. Further, an overall assessment of the forecasts and recent oil market trends suggests that oil prices will remain constant in real terms for the remainder of the 1980s. Real oil prices are expected to increase by between 2 and 3% during the 1990s and beyond. Forecasters are quick to point out, however, that all forecasts are subject to significant uncertainty. 68 references, 1 figure, 6 tables.

Curlee, T.R.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

MODEL REQUEST FOR PROPOSALS TO PROVIDE ENERGY AND OTHER ATTRIBUTES FROM AN OFFSHORE WIND POWER PROJECT  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This document provides a model RFP for new generation. The 'base' RFP is for a single-source offshore wind RFP. Required modifications are noted should a state or utility seek multi-source bids (e.g., all renewables or all sources). The model is premised on proposals meeting threshold requirements (e.g., a MW range of generating capacity and a range in terms of years), RFP issuer preferences (e.g., likelihood of commercial operation by a date certain, price certainty, and reduction in congestion), and evaluation criteria, along with a series of plans (e.g., site, environmental effects, construction, community outreach, interconnection, etc.). The Model RFP places the most weight on project risk (45%), followed by project economics (35%), and environmental and social considerations (20%). However, if a multi-source RFP is put forward, the sponsor would need to either add per-MWh technology-specific, life-cycle climate (CO2), environmental and health impact costs to bid prices under the 'Project Economics' category or it should increase the weight given to the 'Environmental and Social Considerations' category.

Jeremy Firestone; Dawn Kurtz Crompton

2011-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

270

Solid Waste Projection Model: Database (Version 1.3). Technical reference manual  

SciTech Connect

The Solid Waste Projection Model (SWPM) system is an analytical tool developed by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) for Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC). The SWPM system provides a modeling and analysis environment that supports decisions in the process of evaluating various solid waste management alternatives. This document, one of a series describing the SWPM system, contains detailed information regarding the software and data structures utilized in developing the SWPM Version 1.3 Database. This document is intended for use by experienced database specialists and supports database maintenance, utility development, and database enhancement.

Blackburn, C.L.

1991-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Validated modeling of distributed energy resources at distribution voltages : LDRD project 38672.  

SciTech Connect

A significant barrier to the deployment of distributed energy resources (DER) onto the power grid is uncertainty on the part of utility engineers regarding impacts of DER on their distribution systems. Because of the many possible combinations of DER and local power system characteristics, these impacts can most effectively be studied by computer simulation. The goal of this LDRD project was to develop and experimentally validate models of transient and steady state source behavior for incorporation into utility distribution analysis tools. Development of these models had not been prioritized either by the distributed-generation industry or by the inverter industry. A functioning model of a selected inverter-based DER was developed in collaboration with both the manufacturer and industrial power systems analysts. The model was written in the PSCAD simulation language, a variant of the ElectroMagnetic Transients Program (EMTP), a code that is widely used and accepted by utilities. A stakeholder team was formed and a methodology was established to address the problem. A list of detailed DER/utility interaction concerns was developed and prioritized. The list indicated that the scope of the problem significantly exceeded resources available for this LDRD project. As this work progresses under separate funding, the model will be refined and experimentally validated. It will then be incorporated in utility distribution analysis tools and used to study a variety of DER issues. The key next step will be design of the validation experiments.

Ralph, Mark E.; Ginn, Jerry W.

2004-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Natural Phenomena Hazards Modeling Project: Seismic Hazard Models for Department of Energy Sites  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has developed seismic and wind hazard models for the Office of Nuclear Safety (ONS), Department of Energy (DOE). The work is part of a three-phase effort aimed at establishing uniform building design criteria for seismic and wind hazards at DOE sites throughout the US. In Phase 1, LLNL gathered information on the sites and their critical facilities, including nuclear reactors, fuel-reprocessing plants, high-level waste storage and treatment facilities, and special nuclear material facilities. In Phase 2, development of seismic and wind hazard models, was initiated. These hazard models express the annual probability that the site will experience an earthquake or wind speed greater than some specified magnitude. This report summarizes the final seismic hazard models and response spectra recommended for each site and the methodology used to develop these models. 15 references, 2 figures, 1 table.

Coats, D.W.; Murray, R.C.

1984-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Hydrology Group - Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Projects Bonneville Project Powerhouse 2 Fish Guidance Efficiency Simulations Bonneville Tailrace Project: Three-Dimensional CFD Models and Flow Measurements Chandler Fish Handling...

274

Worldwide transportation/energy demand, 1975-2000. Revised Variflex model projections  

SciTech Connect

The salient features of the transportation-energy relationships that characterize the world of 1975 are reviewed, and worldwide (34 countries) long-range transportation demand by mode to the year 2000 is reviewed. A worldwide model is used to estimate future energy demand for transportation. Projections made by the forecasting model indicate that in the year 2000, every region will be more dependent on petroleum for the transportation sector than it was in 1975. This report is intended to highlight certain trends and to suggest areas for further investigation. Forecast methodology and model output are described in detail in the appendices. The report is one of a series addressing transportation energy consumption; it supplants and replaces an earlier version published in October 1978 (ORNL/Sub-78/13536/1).

Ayres, R.U.; Ayres, L.W.

1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Project: Modeling Relativistic Electrons from Nuclear Explosions in the Magnetosphere  

SciTech Connect

We present a summary of the FY12 activities for DTRA-funded project 'Modeling Relativistic Electrons from Nuclear Explosions in the Magnetosphere'. We briefly review the outstanding scientific questions and discuss the work done in the last year to try to answer these questions. We then discuss the agenda for this Technical Meeting with the DTRA sponsors. In the last year, we have continued our efforts to understand artificial radiation belts from several different perspectives: (1) Continued development of Electron Source Model (ESM) and comparison to HANE test data; (2) Continued studies of relativistic electron scattering by waves in the natural radiation belts; (3) Began study of self-generated waves from the HANE electrons; and (4) Began modeling for the UCLA laser experiment.

Cowee, Misa [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Gary, S. Peter [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Winske, Dan [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Liu, Kaijun [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

276

Projections for Two Higgs Doublet Models at the LHC and ILC: A Snowmass White Paper  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The discovery of the 125 GeV Higgs boson and the measurement of its branching ratios has initiated the exploration of the electroweak symmetry breaking sector. There have been numerous studies exploring the restrictions these results place on the parameter space of two Higgs doublet models. We extend these results to include the full data set and study the expected sensitivity that can be obtained with 300 and 3000 inverse femtobarn of integrated luminosity. In addition, searches for a heavy Standard Model Higgs boson are also considered. It is shown that the nonobservation of such a Higgs boson can substantially narrow the allowed regions of parameter space in two Higgs doublet models. Finally, projections for the ILC at the center of mass energy 250, 500, and 1000 GeV are investigated.

Chien-Yi Chen

2013-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

277

Solid waste integrated cost analysis model: 1991 project year report. Part 2  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of the City of Houston`s 1991 Solid Waste Integrated Cost Analysis Model (SWICAM) project was to continue the development of a computerized cost analysis model. This model is to provide solid waste managers with tool to evaluate the dollar cost of real or hypothetical solid waste management choices. Those choices have become complicated by the implementation of Subtitle D of the Resources Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) and the EPA`s Integrated Approach to managing municipal solid waste;. that is, minimize generation, maximize recycling, reduce volume (incinerate), and then bury (landfill) only the remainder. Implementation of an integrated solid waste management system involving all or some of the options of recycling, waste to energy, composting, and landfilling is extremely complicated. Factors such as hauling distances, markets, and prices for recyclable, costs and benefits of transfer stations, and material recovery facilities must all be considered. A jurisdiction must determine the cost impacts of implementing a number of various possibilities for managing, handling, processing, and disposing of waste. SWICAM employs a single Lotus 123 spreadsheet to enable a jurisdiction to predict or assess the costs of its waste management system. It allows the user to select his own process flow for waste material and to manipulate the model to include as few or as many options as he or she chooses. The model will calculate the estimated cost for those choices selected. The user can then change the model to include or exclude waste stream components, until the mix of choices suits the user. Graphs can be produced as a visual communication aid in presenting the results of the cost analysis. SWICAM also allows future cost projections to be made.

Not Available

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

278

Nellis Air Force Base solar array provides model for renewable projects |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Nellis Air Force Base solar array provides model for renewable Nellis Air Force Base solar array provides model for renewable projects Nellis Air Force Base solar array provides model for renewable projects March 24, 2010 - 4:58pm Addthis The solar array at Nellis Air Force Base in Nevada consists of 70,000 panels. | Photo by Larry E. Reid Jr./U.S. Air Force The solar array at Nellis Air Force Base in Nevada consists of 70,000 panels. | Photo by Larry E. Reid Jr./U.S. Air Force A public-private partnership has helped one Air Force base reduce its energy costs and convert to 25 percent renewable energy. Nellis Air Force Base, just north of Las Vegas, took a big step in 2007 when it installed a 14.2-megawatt, 70,000-panel photovoltaic solar array that reduced carbon dioxide emissions by 24,000 tons a year. Built partly on a landfill, the

279

Development of a Groundwater Management Model for the Project Shoal Area  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document describes the development of a user-friendly and efficient groundwater management model of the Project Shoal Area (PSA and surrounding area that will allow the U.S. Department of Energy and State of Nevada personnel to evaluate the impact of proposed water-use scenarios. The management model consists of a simple hydrologic model within an interactive groundwater management framework. This framework is based on an object user interface that was developed by the U.S. Geological Survey and has been used by the Desert Research Institute researchers and others to couple disparate environmental resource models, manage temporal and spatial data, and evaluate model results for management decision making. This framework was modified and applied to the PSA and surrounding Fairview Basin. The utility of the management model was demonstrated through the application of hypothetical future scenarios including mineral mining, regional expansion of agriculture, and export of water to large urban areas outside the region. While the results from some of the scenarios indicated potential impacts to groundwater levels near the PSA and others did not, together they demonstrate the utility of the management tool for the evaluation of proposed changes in groundwater use in or near the PSA.

G. Lamorey; S. Bassett; R. Schumer; D. Boyle; G. Pohll; J. Chapman

2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Considerations in the Selection of Global Climate Models for Regional Climate Projections: The Arctic as a Case Study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Climate projections at regional scales are in increased demand from management agencies and other stakeholders. While global atmosphere–ocean climate models provide credible quantitative estimates of future climate at continental scales and above,...

James E. Overland; Muyin Wang; Nicholas A. Bond; John E. Walsh; Vladimir M. Kattsov; William L. Chapman

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "model intercomparison project" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Projecting Monthly Natural Gas Sales for Space Heating Using a Monthly Updated Model and Degree-days from Monthly Outlooks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The problem of projecting monthly residential natural gas sales and evaluating interannual changes in demand is investigated using a linear regression model adjusted monthly. with lagged monthly heating degree-days as the independent variable. ...

Richard L. Lehman; Henry E. Warren

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Projected Changes to the Southern Hemisphere Ocean and Sea Ice in the IPCC AR4 Climate Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fidelity and projected changes in the climate models, used for the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) Fourth Assessment Report (AR4), are assessed with regard to the Southern Hemisphere extratropical ocean and sea ice systems. While ...

Alexander Sen Gupta; Agus Santoso; Andréa S. Taschetto; Caroline C. Ummenhofer; Jessica Trevena; Matthew H. England

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Method of computer generation and projection recording of microholograms for holographic memory systems: mathematical modelling and experimental implementation  

SciTech Connect

A method of computer generation and projection recording of microholograms for holographic memory systems is presented; the results of mathematical modelling and experimental implementation of the method are demonstrated. (holographic memory)

Betin, A Yu; Bobrinev, V I; Evtikhiev, N N; Zherdev, A Yu; Zlokazov, E Yu; Lushnikov, D S; Markin, V V; Odinokov, S B; Starikov, S N; Starikov, R S

2013-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

284

Intercomparison of NDSC Ground-Based Solar FTIR Measurements of Atmospheric Gases at Lauder, New Zealand  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A formal intercomparison of atmospheric total column measurements of N2O, N2, CH4, O3, HCl, HNO3, and HF by two ground-based solar Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectrometers conducted as part of the Network for the Detection of Stratospheric ...

D. W. T. Griffith; N. B. Jones; B. McNamara; C. Paton Walsh; W. Bell; C. Bernardo

2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Intercomparison of Spectroradiometers for Global and Direct Solar Irradiance in the Visible Range  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents the results of the analysis of the spectral, global, and direct solar irradiance measurements in the visible range (400–700 nm) that were made in the framework of the first Iberian UV–visible (VIS) instruments intercomparison. ...

José A. Martínez-Lozano; Maria P. Utrillas; Roberto Pedrós; Fernando Tena; Juan P. Díaz; Francisco J. Expósito; Jerónimo Lorente; Xavier de Cabo; Victoria Cachorro; Ricardo Vergaz; Virgilio Carreño

2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

An Intercomparison of Ground-Based Solar FTIR Measurements of Atmospheric Gases at Eureka, Canada  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The authors report the results of an intercomparison of vertical column amounts of hydrogen chloride (HCl), hydrogen fluoride (HF), nitrous oxide (N2O), nitric acid (HNO3), methane (CH4), ozone (O3), carbon dioxide (CO2), and nitrogen (N2) ...

C. Paton-Walsh; R. L. Mittermeier; W. Bell; H. Fast; N. B. Jones; A. Meier

2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

MHK Projects/Wave Star Energy 1 10 Scale Model Test | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

1 10 Scale Model Test 1 10 Scale Model Test < MHK Projects Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":5,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"File:Aquamarine-marker.png","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":56.6948,"lon":8.33559,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"http:\/\/prod-http-80-800498448.us-east-1.elb.amazonaws.com\/w\/images\/7\/74\/Aquamarine-marker.png","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

288

Reduced order models for thermal analysis : final report : LDRD Project No. 137807.  

SciTech Connect

This LDRD Senior's Council Project is focused on the development, implementation and evaluation of Reduced Order Models (ROM) for application in the thermal analysis of complex engineering problems. Two basic approaches to developing a ROM for combined thermal conduction and enclosure radiation problems are considered. As a prerequisite to a ROM a fully coupled solution method for conduction/radiation models is required; a parallel implementation is explored for this class of problems. High-fidelity models of large, complex systems are now used routinely to verify design and performance. However, there are applications where the high-fidelity model is too large to be used repetitively in a design mode. One such application is the design of a control system that oversees the functioning of the complex, high-fidelity model. Examples include control systems for manufacturing processes such as brazing and annealing furnaces as well as control systems for the thermal management of optical systems. A reduced order model (ROM) seeks to reduce the number of degrees of freedom needed to represent the overall behavior of the large system without a significant loss in accuracy. The reduction in the number of degrees of freedom of the ROM leads to immediate increases in computational efficiency and allows many design parameters and perturbations to be quickly and effectively evaluated. Reduced order models are routinely used in solid mechanics where techniques such as modal analysis have reached a high state of refinement. Similar techniques have recently been applied in standard thermal conduction problems e.g. though the general use of ROM for heat transfer is not yet widespread. One major difficulty with the development of ROM for general thermal analysis is the need to include the very nonlinear effects of enclosure radiation in many applications. Many ROM methods have considered only linear or mildly nonlinear problems. In the present study a reduced order model is considered for application to the combined problem of thermal conduction and enclosure radiation. The main objective is to develop a procedure that can be implemented in an existing thermal analysis code. The main analysis objective is to allow thermal controller software to be used in the design of a control system for a large optical system that resides with a complex radiation dominated enclosure. In the remainder of this section a brief outline of ROM methods is provided. The following chapter describes the fully coupled conduction/radiation method that is required prior to considering a ROM approach. Considerable effort was expended to implement and test the combined solution method; the ROM project ended shortly after the completion of this milestone and thus the ROM results are incomplete. The report concludes with some observations and recommendations.

Hogan, Roy E., Jr.; Gartling, David K.

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Projecting Low Dimensional Chaos from Spatio-temporal Dynamics in a Model for Plastic Instability  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We investigate the possibility of projecting low dimensional chaos from spatiotemporal dynamics of a model for a kind of plastic instability observed under constant strain rate deformation conditions. We first discuss the relationship between the spatiotemporal patterns of the model reflected in the nature of dislocation bands and the nature of stress serrations. We show that at low applied strain rates, there is a one-to-one correspondence with the randomly nucleated isolated bursts of mobile dislocation density and the stress drops. We then show that the model equations are spatiotemporally chaotic by demonstrating the number of positive Lyapunov exponents and Lyapunov dimension scale with the system size at low and high strain rates. Using a modified algorithm for calculating correlation dimension density, we show that the stress-strain signals at low applied strain rates corresponding to spatially uncorrelated dislocation bands exhibit features of low dimensional chaos. This is made quantitative by demonstrating that the model equations can be approximately reduced to space independent model equations for the average dislocation densities, which is known to be low-dimensionally chaotic. However, the scaling regime for the correlation dimension shrinks with increasing applied strain rate due to increasing propensity for propagation of the dislocation bands.

Ritupan Sarmah; G. Ananthakrishna

2013-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

290

An adaptive projection method for the modeling of unsteady, low-Mach number combustion  

SciTech Connect

In this paper the authors present an adaptive projection method for modeling unsteady, low-Mach reacting flow in an unconfined region. The equations they solve are based on a model for low-Mach number combustion that consists of the evolution equations for density, species concentrations, enthalpy, and momentum coupled with a constraint on the divergence of the flow. The algorithm is based on a projection methodology in which they first advance the evolution equations and then solve an elliptic equation to enforce the divergence constraint. The adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) scheme uses a time-varying, hierarchical grid structure composed of uniform rectangular grids of varying resolution. The integration scheme on the grid hierarchy is a recursive procedure in which a coarse grid is advanced, fine grids are advanced multiple steps to reach the same time as the coarse grid, and the coarse and the fine grids are synchronized. The method is valid for multiple grids on each level and multiple levels of refinement. The method is currently implemented for laminar, axisymmetric flames with a reduced kinetics mechanism and a Lewis number of unity. Two methane-air flames, one steady and the other flickering, are presented as numerical examples.

Pember, R.B.; Howell, L.H.; Bell, J.B.; Colella, P.; Crutchfield, W.Y. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States); Fiveland, W.A.; Jesse, J.P. [Babcock and Wilcox, Alliance, OH (United States)

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Pataha Creek Model Watershed : January 2000-December 2002 Habitat Conservation Projects.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The projects outlined in detail on the attached project reports were implemented from calendar year 2000 through 2002 in the Pataha Creek Watershed. The Pataha Creek Watershed was selected in 1993, along with the Tucannon and Asotin Creeks, as model watersheds by NPPC. In previous years, demonstration sites using riparian fencing, off site watering facilities, tree and shrub plantings and upland conservation practices were used for information and education and were the main focus of the implementation phase of the watershed plan. These practices were the main focus of the watershed plan to reduce the majority of the sediment entering the stream. Prior to 2000, several bank stabilization projects were installed but the installation costs became prohibitive and these types of projects were reduced in numbers over the following years. The years 2000 through 2002 were years where a focused effort was made to work on the upland conservation practices to reduce the sedimentation into Pataha Creek. Over 95% of the sediment entering the stream can be tied directly to the upland and riparian areas of the watershed. The Pataha Creek has steelhead in the upper reaches and native and planted rainbow trout in the mid to upper portion. Suckers, pikeminow and shiners inhabit the lower portion because of the higher water temperatures and lack of vegetation. The improvement of riparian habitat will improve habitat for the desired fish species. The lower portion of the Pataha Creek could eventually develop into spawning and rearing habitat for chinook salmon if some migration barriers are removed and habitat is restored. The upland projects completed during 2000 through 2002 were practices that reduce erosion from the cropland. Three-year continuous no-till projects were finishing up and the monitoring of this particular practice is ongoing. Its direct impact on soil erosion along with the economical aspects is being studied. Other practices such as terrace, waterway, sediment basin construction and the installation of strip systems are also taking place. The years 2000 through 2002 were productive years for the Pataha Creek Model Watershed but due to the fact that most of the cooperators in the watershed have reached their limitation allowed for no-till and direct seed/ two pass of 3 years with each practice, the cost share for these practices is lower than the years of the late 90's. All the upland practices that were implemented have helped to further reduce erosion from the cropland. This has resulted in a reduction of sedimentation into the spawning and rearing area of the fall chinook salmon located in the lower portion of the Tucannon River. The tree planting projects have helped in reducing sedimentation and have also improved the riparian zone of desired locations inside the Pataha Creek Watershed. The CREP (Conservation Reserve Enhancement Program) along with the CCRP (Continuous Conservation Reserve Program) are becoming more prevalent in the watershed and are protecting the riparian areas along the Pataha Creek at an increasing level every year. Currently roughly 197 acres of riparian has been enrolled along the Pataha Creek in the CREP program.

Bartels, Duane G.

2003-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Grande Ronde Model Watershed Project; Dark Canyon Riparian Exclosure, Completion Report 2002.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Baker Field Office, Vale District Bureau of Land Management (BLM) submitted a project proposal for funding in 2002 through the Grande Ronde Model Watershed Program (GRMWP). The project consisted of constructing two riparian exclosures to prevent livestock grazing in the riparian areas of Dark Canyon and Meadow Creek. The BLM completed the NEPA documentation and supplied the fencing materials. Funding from BPA through the GRMWP was used to complete the construction of the two exclosures. This project was completed in the fall of 2002. The project area is located in Union County, Oregon on BLM managed land adjacent to Dark Canyon and Meadow Creek, T. 3. S., R. 35 E., Section 24 and 25. Section 24 is along Dark Canyon Creek and section 25 is along Meadow Creek. Approximately 0.4 miles of stream would be protected from grazing with the construction of the two exclosures. A two person crew was hired to construct a four-strand barbed wire fence. The fence enclosed the riparian area on both sides of each creek so that no grazing would occur within the riparian area on BLM managed land. Total fence length is approximately 1.25 miles. Materials consisted of metal fence posts, barbed wire, rockjacks, fence stays, and 2 x 4's. The fence was constructed in the fall of 2002. The riparian area is effectively excluded from livestock grazing at this time. The construction of the exclosures should enhance riparian vegetation, increase bank stability, and improve riparian and in-stream habitat by exclusion of livestock in the riparian areas. Monitoring will ensure that the exclosures continues to be effective. Annual monitoring will include photo-points and compliance checks during the grazing season by BLM personnel. The BLM will submit a monitoring report, which includes the results of the annual monitoring, to the GRMWP in years 2005 and 2007. The exclosures do cross the creeks so maintenance may be needed on occasion, especially after high flow events in the creeks. Material such as logs which are mobilized during high stream flows may damage the exclosures requiring maintenance to keep cattle from grazing in the riparian areas. The BLM spent approximately $4,000 on fencing materials and $1,375 on NEPA compliance. In addition, the estimated cost of the monitoring over five years is expected to be approximately $1,600. The $5,050 that the BLM received from the BPA for the project was used to hire two temporary employees to construct the exclosures.

Kuck, Todd

2003-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Demand Management Demonstration Project, Stage 5: development of industrial load simulation model. Executive summary. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this project was to design, develop, test and document a computer simulation model of electric utility generating costs required to meet industrial power demands and the effects of utility load management on these generating costs. The results showed that the model developed is a well conceived load management testing, marginal costing tool. What if situations can be readily tested to determine their impact on system profile and short run marginal costs. The terms unshaped and shaped refer to customers or system use patterns before and after some load management technique was tested. The total flexibility of the model is only apparent after the user has studied test runs in detail. Hourly marginal costs reveal many unexpected changes as a result of shaping loads. Other unexpected changes due to varying economic dispatch schedules while shaping, illustrate the unprecedental latitude for the user to explore optimum generation and load management combinations. The general concept of the model is depicted in the flow chart on the next page.

1977-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1-23, 2012 1-23, 2012 2 Presentation Outline I. Benefits II. Project Overview III. Technical Status A. Background B. Results IV. Accomplishments V. Summary 3 Benefit to the Program * Program goals. - Prediction of CO 2 storage capacity. * Project benefits. - Workforce/Student Training: Support of 3 student GAs in use of multiphase flow and geochemical models simulating CO 2 injection. - Support of Missouri DGLS Sequestration Program. 4 Project Overview: Goals and Objectives Project Goals and Objectives. 1. Training graduate students in use of multi-phase flow models related to CO 2 sequestration. 2. Training graduate students in use of geochemical models to assess interaction of CO

295

Why software projects escalate: an empirical analysis and test of four theoretical models1,2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Software projects can often spiral out of control to become "runaway systems" that far exceed original budget and schedule projections. The behavior that underlies many runaway systems can best be characterized as "escalation of commitment to a failing ... Keywords: IS project failure, escalation, software project management

Mark Keil; Joan Mann; Arun Rai

2000-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Senior Design Projects 2013 Project Title 1 : Monte Carlo Simulations Using a Benchmark Full-Core Pressured Water Rector Model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

defined in MCNP. There are a number of approaches in parallel high performance computing that can and 7,168 GPUs. The high performance computing industry is moving toward a hybrid computer model, where

Danon, Yaron

297

New Developments of the Intensity-Scale Technique within the Spatial Verification Methods Intercomparison Project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The intensity-scale verification technique introduced in 2004 by Casati, Ross, and Stephenson is revisited and improved. Recalibration is no longer performed, and the intensity-scale skill score for biased forecasts is evaluated. Energy and its ...

B. Casati

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Spatial Forecast Verification Methods Intercomparison Project: Application of the SAL Technique  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this study, a recently introduced feature-based quality measure called SAL, which provides information about the structure, amplitude, and location of a quantitative precipitation forecast (QPF) in a prespecified domain, is applied to ...

Heini Wernli; Christiane Hofmann; Matthias Zimmer

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Validating the Validation: The Influence of Liquid Water Distribution in Clouds on the Intercomparison of Satellite and Surface Observations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The intercomparison of LWP retrievals from observations by a geostationary satellite imager [Spinning Enhanced Visible and Infrared Imager (SEVIRI) on board Meteosat Second Generation (MSG)] and a ground-based microwave (MW) radiometer is ...

N. A. J. Schutgens; R. A. Roebeling

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

An Intercomparison of Two Tunable Diode Laser Spectrometers Used for Eddy Correlation Measurements of Methane Flux in a Prairie Wetland  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An intercomparison was made between two tunable diode laser spectrometers used to measure methane fluxes by the eddy correlation technique at a prairie wetland site. The spectrometers were built by Unisearch Associates Inc. of Concord, Ontario, ...

D. P. Billesbach; Joon Kim; R. J. Clement; S. B. Verma; F. G. Ullman

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "model intercomparison project" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Advanced Test Reactor Core Modeling Update Project Annual Report for Fiscal Year 2011  

SciTech Connect

Legacy computational reactor physics software tools and protocols currently used for support of Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) core fuel management and safety assurance and, to some extent, experiment management are obsolete, inconsistent with the state of modern nuclear engineering practice, and are becoming increasingly difficult to properly verify and validate (V&V). Furthermore, the legacy staff knowledge required for application of these tools and protocols from the 1960s and 1970s is rapidly being lost due to staff turnover and retirements. In 2009 the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) initiated a focused effort to address this situation through the introduction of modern high-fidelity computational software and protocols, with appropriate V&V, within the next 3-4 years via the ATR Core Modeling and Simulation and V&V Update (or 'Core Modeling Update') Project. This aggressive computational and experimental campaign will have a broad strategic impact on the operation of the ATR, both in terms of improved computational efficiency and accuracy for support of ongoing DOE programs as well as in terms of national and international recognition of the ATR National Scientific User Facility (NSUF). The ATR Core Modeling Update Project, targeted for full implementation in phase with the anticipated ATR Core Internals Changeout (CIC) in the 2014 time frame, began during the last quarter of Fiscal Year 2009, and has just completed its first full year. Key accomplishments so far have encompassed both computational as well as experimental work. A new suite of stochastic and deterministic transport theory based reactor physics codes and their supporting nuclear data libraries (SCALE, KENO-6, HELIOS, NEWT, and ATTILA) have been installed at the INL under various permanent sitewide license agreements and corresponding baseline models of the ATR and ATRC are now operational, demonstrating the basic feasibility of these code packages for their intended purpose. Furthermore, a capability for rigorous sensitivity analysis and uncertainty quantification based on the TSUNAMI system is being implemented and initial computational results have been obtained. This capability will have many applications in 2011 and beyond as a tool for understanding the margins of uncertainty in the new models as well as for validation experiment design and interpretation. Finally we note that although full implementation of the new computational models and protocols will extend over a period 3-4 years as noted above, interim applications in the much nearer term have already been demonstrated. In particular, these demonstrations included an analysis that was useful for understanding the cause of some issues in December 2009 that were triggered by a larger than acceptable discrepancy between the measured excess core reactivity and a calculated value that was based on the legacy computational methods. As the Modeling Update project proceeds we anticipate further such interim, informal, applications in parallel with formal qualification of the system under the applicable INL Quality Assurance procedures and standards.

David W. Nigg; Devin A. Steuhm

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Advanced Test Reactor Core Modeling Update Project Annual Report for Fiscal Year 2011  

SciTech Connect

Legacy computational reactor physics software tools and protocols currently used for support of Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) core fuel management and safety assurance and, to some extent, experiment management are obsolete, inconsistent with the state of modern nuclear engineering practice, and are becoming increasingly difficult to properly verify and validate (V&V). Furthermore, the legacy staff knowledge required for application of these tools and protocols from the 1960s and 1970s is rapidly being lost due to staff turnover and retirements. In 2009 the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) initiated a focused effort to address this situation through the introduction of modern high-fidelity computational software and protocols, with appropriate V&V, within the next 3-4 years via the ATR Core Modeling and Simulation and V&V Update (or 'Core Modeling Update') Project. This aggressive computational and experimental campaign will have a broad strategic impact on the operation of the ATR, both in terms of improved computational efficiency and accuracy for support of ongoing DOE programs as well as in terms of national and international recognition of the ATR National Scientific User Facility (NSUF). The ATR Core Modeling Update Project, targeted for full implementation in phase with the anticipated ATR Core Internals Changeout (CIC) in the 2014 time frame, began during the last quarter of Fiscal Year 2009, and has just completed its first full year. Key accomplishments so far have encompassed both computational as well as experimental work. A new suite of stochastic and deterministic transport theory based reactor physics codes and their supporting nuclear data libraries (SCALE, KENO-6, HELIOS, NEWT, and ATTILA) have been installed at the INL under various permanent sitewide license agreements and corresponding baseline models of the ATR and ATRC are now operational, demonstrating the basic feasibility of these code packages for their intended purpose. Furthermore, a capability for rigorous sensitivity analysis and uncertainty quantification based on the TSUNAMI system is being implemented and initial computational results have been obtained. This capability will have many applications in 2011 and beyond as a tool for understanding the margins of uncertainty in the new models as well as for validation experiment design and interpretation. Finally we note that although full implementation of the new computational models and protocols will extend over a period 3-4 years as noted above, interim applications in the much nearer term have already been demonstrated. In particular, these demonstrations included an analysis that was useful for understanding the cause of some issues in December 2009 that were triggered by a larger than acceptable discrepancy between the measured excess core reactivity and a calculated value that was based on the legacy computational methods. As the Modeling Update project proceeds we anticipate further such interim, informal, applications in parallel with formal qualification of the system under the applicable INL Quality Assurance procedures and standards.

David W. Nigg; Devin A. Steuhm

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

A distributed multi-model-based Management Information System for simulation and decision-making on construction projects  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The conceptual development of a Management Information System to support decision making on construction projects across all management levels within the owner and the contractor organizations is introduced. The system is designed as a distributed information ... Keywords: Building information model, Construction management, Interoperability, Multi-model, Ontologies, Process-centric

R. J. Scherer; S. -E. Schapke

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Thermodynamic data base needs for modeling studies of the Yucca Mountain project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document is the first in a series of documents outlining the thermodynamic data needs for performing geochemical modeling calculations in support of various waste package performance assessment activities for the Yucca Mountain Project. The documents are intended to identify and justify the critical thermodynamic data needs for the data base to be used with the models. The Thermodynamic Data Determinations task supplies data needed to resolve performance or design issues and the development of the data base will remain an iterative process as needs change or data improve. For example, data are needed to predict: (1) major ion groundwater chemistry and its evolution, (2) mineral stabilities and evolution, (3) engineered barrier near-field transport and retardation properties, (4) changes in geochemical conditions and processes, (5) solubilities, speciation and transport of waste radionuclides and (6) the dissolution of corrosion of construction and canister materials and the effect on groundwater chemistry and radionuclide solubilities and transport. The system is complex and interactive, and data need to be supplied in order to model the changes and their effect on other components of the system, e.g., temperature, pH and redox conditions (Eh). Through sensitivity and uncertainty analyses, the critical data and system parameters will be identified and the acceptable variations in them documented.

Palmer, C.E.A.; Silva, R.J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States). Nuclear Chemistry Div.; Bucher, J.J. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States). Materials and Chemical Sciences Div.

1996-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

305

Climate system modeling on massively parallel systems: LDRD Project 95-ERP-47 final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Global warming, acid rain, ozone depletion, and biodiversity loss are some of the major climate-related issues presently being addressed by climate and environmental scientists. Because unexpected changes in the climate could have significant effect on our economy, it is vitally important to improve the scientific basis for understanding and predicting the earth`s climate. The impracticality of modeling the earth experimentally in the laboratory together with the fact that the model equations are highly nonlinear has created a unique and vital role for computer-based climate experiments. However, today`s computer models, when run at desired spatial and temporal resolution and physical complexity, severely overtax the capabilities of our most powerful computers. Parallel processing offers significant potential for attaining increased performance and making tractable simulations that cannot be performed today. The principal goals of this project have been to develop and demonstrate the capability to perform large-scale climate simulations on high-performance computing systems (using methodology that scales to the systems of tomorrow), and to carry out leading-edge scientific calculations using parallelized models. The demonstration platform for these studies has been the 256-processor Cray-T3D located at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. Our plan was to undertake an ambitious program in optimization, proof-of-principle and scientific study. These goals have been met. We are now regularly using massively parallel processors for scientific study of the ocean and atmosphere, and preliminary parallel coupled ocean/atmosphere calculations are being carried out as well. Furthermore, our work suggests that it should be possible to develop an advanced comprehensive climate system model with performance scalable to the teraflops range. 9 refs., 3 figs.

Mirin, A.A.; Dannevik, W.P.; Chan, B.; Duffy, P.B.; Eltgroth, P.G.; Wehner, M.F.

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Project Description This project is intended to provide the powertrain and vehicle modeling and simulation tools needed  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and compared with the more standard parallel and Prius planetary arrangements in terms of system efficiency and electric operation of the actuators in the CVT. Modeling of the Prius planetary and Civic single in the drivelines and to validate the simulation results for the hybrids, especially the PHEVs. 2004 Prius PHEV, 3 k

California at Davis, University of

307

Stochastic Modeling of Future Highway Maintenance Costs for Flexible Type Highway Pavement Construction Projects  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The transportation infrastructure systems in the United States were built between the 50's and 80's, with 20 years design life. As most of them already exceeded their original life expectancy, state transportation agencies (STAs) are now under increased needs to rebuild deteriorated transportation networks. For major highway maintenance projects, a federal rule enforces to perform a life-cycle cost analysis (LCCA). The lack of analytical methods for LCCA creates many challenges of STAs to comply with the rule. To address these critical issues, this study aims at developing a new methodology for quantifying the future maintenance cost to assist STAs in performing a LCCA. The major objectives of this research are twofold: 1) identify the critical factors that affect pavement performances; 2) develop a stochastic model that predicts future maintenance costs of flexible-type pavement in Texas. The study data were gathered through the Pavement Management Information System (PMIS) containing more than 190,000 highway sections in Texas. These data were then grouped by critical performance-driven factor which was identified by K-means cluster analysis. Many factors were evaluated to identify the most critical factors that affect pavement maintenance need. With these data, a series of regression analyses were carried out to develop predictive models. Lastly, a validation study with PRESS statistics was conducted to evaluate reliability of the model. The research results reveal that three factors, annual average temperature, annual precipitation, and pavement age, were the most critical factors under very low traffic volume conditions. This research effort was the first of its kind undertaken in this subject. The maintenance cost lookup tables and stochastic model will assist STAs in carrying out a LCCA, with the reliable estimation of maintenance costs. This research also provides the research community with the first view and systematic estimation method that STAs can use to determine long-term maintenance costs in estimating life-cycle costs. It will reduce the agency's expenses in the time and effort required for conducting a LCCA. Estimating long-term maintenance cost is a core component of the LCCA. Therefore, methods developed from this project have the great potential to improve the accuracy of LCCA.

Kim, Yoo Hyun

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Schedule and Cost Buffer Sizing How to account for the bias between project performance and your model.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Schedule and Cost Buffer Sizing How to account for the bias between project performance and your model. Bias in project performance causes schedule and cost to over-run baseline estimates (your model). Bias is the one-sided tendency of actual schedule or cost to over-run the model. The PMBOK Guide ™ and supporting literature recommend estimating the variability for all project time and cost estimates, and sizing appropriate schedule or cost buffers (also known as contingency or management reserve) using Monte-Carlo analysis or PERT. Critical Chain Project Management (CCPM) uses a similar approach to size buffers (the Square Root of the Sum of the Squares, or SSQ method). These techniques pool the variance from individual task estimates. Statistical pooling of variance does not account for sources of bias 1 in the estimates; i.e., systematic reasons that the estimates may be high or low. This paper describes a number of sources of bias in performance of projects to schedule and cost estimates, and provides recommendations to size buffers that ensure your projects come in under your baseline schedule and budget.

Chain Ccpm; Larry Leach

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

The application of the value-added activity model for the Mark-6 LE integration project  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Powerful information and workflow management tools can minimize risks and maximize productivity for a project. However, a conventional task-based project management approach does not provide the kind of details necessary ...

Liang, Joanna (Joanna Jung-Yen)

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Complexity and Choice of Complexity and Choice of Model Approaches for Practical Simulations of CO 2 Injection, Migration, Leakage, and Long- term Fate Karl W. Bandilla Princeton University U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Infrastructure for CCS August 20-22, 2013 Project Number DE-FE0009563 2 Presentation Outline * Project Goals and Objectives * Project overview * Accomplishments * Summary 3 Benefit to the Program * The aim of the project is to develop criteria for the selection of the appropriate level of model complexity for CO 2 sequestration modeling at a given site. This will increase the confidence in modeling results, and reduce computational cost when appropriate.

311

MHK Projects/Modeling the Physical and Biochemical Influence of Ocean  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Modeling the Physical and Biochemical Influence of Ocean Modeling the Physical and Biochemical Influence of Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Plant Discharges into their Adjacent Waters < MHK Projects Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":5,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"File:Aquamarine-marker.png","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":21.9,"lon":158.75,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"http:\/\/prod-http-80-800498448.us-east-1.elb.amazonaws.com\/w\/images\/7\/74\/Aquamarine-marker.png","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

312

Advanced Test Reactor Core Modeling Update Project Annual Report for Fiscal Year 2010  

SciTech Connect

Legacy computational reactor physics software tools and protocols currently used for support of Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) core fuel management and safety assurance and, to some extent, experiment management are obsolete, inconsistent with the state of modern nuclear engineering practice, and are becoming increasingly difficult to properly verify and validate (V&V). Furthermore, the legacy staff knowledge required for application of these tools and protocols from the 1960s and 1970s is rapidly being lost due to staff turnover and retirements. In 2009 the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) initiated a focused effort to address this situation through the introduction of modern high-fidelity computational software and protocols, with appropriate V&V, within the next 3-4 years via the ATR Core Modeling and Simulation and V&V Update (or “Core Modeling Update”) Project. This aggressive computational and experimental campaign will have a broad strategic impact on the operation of the ATR, both in terms of improved computational efficiency and accuracy for support of ongoing DOE programs as well as in terms of national and international recognition of the ATR National Scientific User Facility (NSUF).

Rahmat Aryaeinejad; Douglas S. Crawford; Mark D. DeHart; George W. Griffith; D. Scott Lucas; Joseph W. Nielsen; David W. Nigg; James R. Parry; Jorge Navarro

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Project information  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Project Information Amistad Project (Texas) Collbran Project (Colorado) Colorado River Storage Project Dolores Project (Colorado) Falcon Project (Texas) Provo River Project (Utah)...

314

Final report for the ASC gas-powder two-phase flow modeling project AD2006-09.  

SciTech Connect

This report documents activities performed in FY2006 under the ''Gas-Powder Two-Phase Flow Modeling Project'', ASC project AD2006-09. Sandia has a need to understand phenomena related to the transport of powders in systems. This report documents a modeling strategy inspired by powder transport experiments conducted at Sandia in 2002. A baseline gas-powder two-phase flow model, developed under a companion PEM project and implemented into the Sierra code FUEGO, is presented and discussed here. This report also documents a number of computational tests that were conducted to evaluate the accuracy and robustness of the new model. Although considerable progress was made in implementing the complex two-phase flow model, this project has identified two important areas that need further attention. These include the need to compute robust compressible flow solutions for Mach numbers exceeding 0.35 and the need to improve conservation of mass for the powder phase. Recommendations for future work in the area of gas-powder two-phase flow are provided.

Evans, Gregory Herbert; Winters, William S.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Impulsively Started Flow in a Submarine Canyon: Comparison of Results from Laboratory and Numerical Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Intercomparisons have been made of results from laboratory experiments and a numerical model for the flow in the vicinity of an idealized submarine canyon located along an otherwise continuous shelf. Motion in the rotating and continuously ...

Nicolas Pérenne; J. William Lavelle; David C. Smith IV; Don L. Boyer

2001-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

TransCom model simulations of CH? and related species: linking transport, surface flux and chemical loss with CH? variability in the troposphere and lower stratosphere  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A chemistry-transport model (CTM) intercomparison experiment (TransCom-CH?) has been designed to investigate the roles of surface emissions, transport and chemical loss in simulating the global methane distribution. Model ...

Patra, P. K.

317

Historical Evaluation and Future Prediction of Eastern North American and Western Atlantic Extratropical Cyclones in the CMIP5 Models during the Cool Season  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Extratropical cyclone track density, genesis frequency, deepening rate, and maximum intensity distributions over eastern North America and the western North Atlantic were analyzed for 15 models from phase 5 of the Coupled Model Intercomparison ...

Brian A. Colle; Zhenhai Zhang; Kelly A. Lombardo; Edmund Chang; Ping Liu; Minghua Zhang

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

An Evaluation of the MM5, RAMS, and Meso-Eta Models at Subkilometer Resolution Using VTMX Field Campaign Data in the Salt Lake Valley  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study presents what is, to the authors' knowledge, the first intercomparison and evaluation of three state-of-the-art mesoscale numerical models, the fifth-generation Pennsylvania State University–NCAR Mesoscale Model (MMS), the Regional ...

Shiyuan Zhong; Jerome Fast

2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Characterizing the performance of ecosystem models across time scales: A spectral analysis of the North American Carbon Program site-level synthesis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ecosystem models are important tools for diagnosing the carbon cycle and projecting its behavior across space and time. Most assessments of model performance occur at individual temporal scales, but ecosystems respond to drivers at multiple time scales. Spectral methods, such as wavelet analyses, present an alternative approach that enables the identification of the dominant time scales contributing to model performance in the frequency domain. In this study we used wavelet analyses to synthesize the performance of twenty-one ecosystem models at nine eddy-covariance towers as part of the North American Carbon Program's site-level inter-comparison. This study expands upon previous single-site and single-model analyses to determine what patterns of model failure are consistent across a diverse range of models and sites.

Dietze, Michael; Vargas, Rodrigo; Richardson, Andrew D.; Stoy, Paul C.; Barr, Alan; Anderson, Ryan; Arain, M. A.; Baker, Ian; Black, T. Andrew; Chen, Jing Ming; Ciais, Philippe; Flanagan, Lawrence; Gough, Christopher; Grant, R. F.; Hollinger, D.; Izaurralde, Roberto C.; Kucharik, Chris; Lafleur, Peter; Liu, Shuguang; Lokupitiya, Erandathie; Luo, Yiqi; Munger, J. W.; Peng, Changhui; Poulter, Benjamin; Price, David T.; Ricciuto, Daniel M.; Riley, William; Sahoo, Alok Kumar; Schaefer, Kevin; Suyker, Andrew E.; Tian, Hanqin; Tonitto, Christine; Verbeeck, Hans; Verma, Shashi B.; Wang, Weifeng; Weng, Ensheng

2011-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

320

Advanced Test Reactor Core Modeling Update Project Annual Report for Fiscal Year 2012  

SciTech Connect

Legacy computational reactor physics software tools and protocols currently used for support of Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) core fuel management and safety assurance, and to some extent, experiment management, are inconsistent with the state of modern nuclear engineering practice, and are difficult, if not impossible, to properly verify and validate (V&V) according to modern standards. Furthermore, the legacy staff knowledge required for application of these tools and protocols from the 1960s and 1970s is rapidly being lost due to staff turnover and retirements. In late 2009, the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) initiated a focused effort, the ATR Core Modeling Update Project, to address this situation through the introduction of modern high-fidelity computational software and protocols. This aggressive computational and experimental campaign will have a broad strategic impact on the operation of the ATR, both in terms of improved computational efficiency and accuracy for support of ongoing DOE programs as well as in terms of national and international recognition of the ATR National Scientific User Facility (NSUF). The ATR Core Modeling Update Project, targeted for full implementation in phase with the next anticipated ATR Core Internals Changeout (CIC) in the 2014-2015 time frame, began during the last quarter of Fiscal Year 2009, and has just completed its third full year. Key accomplishments so far have encompassed both computational as well as experimental work. A new suite of stochastic and deterministic transport theory based reactor physics codes and their supporting nuclear data libraries (HELIOS, KENO6/SCALE, NEWT/SCALE, ATTILA, and an extended implementation of MCNP5) has been installed at the INL under various licensing arrangements. Corresponding models of the ATR and ATRC are now operational with all five codes, demonstrating the basic feasibility of the new code packages for their intended purpose. Of particular importance, a set of as-run core depletion HELIOS calculations for all ATR cycles since August 2009, Cycle 145A through Cycle 151B, was successfully completed during 2012. This major effort supported a decision late in the year to proceed with the phased incorporation of the HELIOS methodology into the ATR Core Safety Analysis Package (CSAP) preparation process, in parallel with the established PDQ-based methodology, beginning late in Fiscal Year 2012. Acquisition of the advanced SERPENT (VTT-Finland) and MC21 (DOE-NR) Monte Carlo stochastic neutronics simulation codes was also initiated during the year and some initial applications of SERPENT to ATRC experiment analysis were demonstrated. These two new codes will offer significant additional capability, including the possibility of full-3D Monte Carlo fuel management support capabilities for the ATR at some point in the future. Finally, a capability for rigorous sensitivity analysis and uncertainty quantification based on the TSUNAMI system has been implemented and initial computational results have been obtained. This capability will have many applications as a tool for understanding the margins of uncertainty in the new models as well as for validation experiment design and interpretation.

David W. Nigg, Principal Investigator; Kevin A. Steuhm, Project Manager

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "model intercomparison project" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Determining Columbia and Snake River Project Tailrace and Forebay Zones of Hydraulic Influence using MASS2 Modeling  

SciTech Connect

Although fisheries biology studies are frequently performed at US Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) projects along the Columbia and Snake Rivers, there is currently no consistent definition of the ``forebay'' and ``tailrace'' regions for these studies. At this time, each study may use somewhat arbitrary lines (e.g., the Boat Restriction Zone) to define the upstream and downstream limits of the study, which may be significantly different at each project. Fisheries researchers are interested in establishing a consistent definition of project forebay and tailrace regions for the hydroelectric projects on the lower Columbia and Snake rivers. The Hydraulic Extent of a project was defined by USACE (Brad Eppard, USACE-CENWP) as follows: The river reach directly upstream (forebay) and downstream (tailrace) of a project that is influenced by the normal range of dam operations. Outside this reach, for a particular river discharge, changes in dam operations cannot be detected by hydraulic measurement. The purpose of this study was to, in consultation with USACE and regional representatives, develop and apply a consistent set of criteria for determining the hydraulic extent of each of the projects in the lower Columbia and Snake rivers. A 2D depth-averaged river model, MASS2, was applied to the Snake and Columbia Rivers. New computational meshes were developed most reaches and the underlying bathymetric data updated to the most current survey data. The computational meshes resolved each spillway bay and turbine unit at each project and extended from project to project. MASS2 was run for a range of total river flows and each flow for a range of project operations at each project. The modeled flow was analyzed to determine the range of velocity magnitude differences and the range of flow direction differences at each location in the computational mesh for each total river flow. Maps of the differences in flow direction and velocity magnitude were created. USACE fishery biologists requested data analysis to determine the project hydraulic extent based on the following criteria: 1) For areas where the mean velocities are less than 4 ft/s, the water velocity differences between operations are not greater than 0.5 ft/sec and /or the differences in water flow direction are not greater than 10 degrees, 2) If mean water velocity is 4.0 ft/second or greater the boundary is determined using the differences in water flow direction (i.e., not greater than 10 degrees). Based on these criteria, and excluding areas with a mean velocity of less than 0.1 ft/s (within the error of the model), a final set of graphics were developed that included data from all flows and all operations. Although each hydroelectric project has a different physical setting, there were some common results. The downstream hydraulic extent tended to be greater than the hydraulic extent in the forebay. The hydraulic extent of the projects tended to be larger at the mid-range flows. At higher flows, the channel geometry tends to reduce the impact of project operations.

Rakowski, Cynthia L.; Serkowski, John A.; Richmond, Marshall C.; Perkins, William A.

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Advanced Test Reactor Core Modeling Update Project Annual Report for Fiscal Year 2013  

SciTech Connect

Legacy computational reactor physics software tools and protocols currently used for support of Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) core fuel management and safety assurance, and to some extent, experiment management, are inconsistent with the state of modern nuclear engineering practice, and are difficult, if not impossible, to verify and validate (V&V) according to modern standards. Furthermore, the legacy staff knowledge required for effective application of these tools and protocols from the 1960s and 1970s is rapidly being lost due to staff turnover and retirements. In late 2009, the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) initiated a focused effort, the ATR Core Modeling Update Project, to address this situation through the introduction of modern high-fidelity computational software and protocols. This aggressive computational and experimental campaign will have a broad strategic impact on the operation of the ATR, both in terms of improved computational efficiency and accuracy for support of ongoing DOE programs as well as in terms of national and international recognition of the ATR National Scientific User Facility (NSUF).

David W. Nigg

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Dynamical Downscaling Projections of Twenty-First-Century Atlantic Hurricane Activity: CMIP3 and CMIP5 Model-Based Scenarios  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Twenty-first century projections of Atlantic climate change are downscaled to explore the robustness of potential changes in hurricane activity. Multi-model ensembles using theCMIP3/A1B (Late 21st century) and CMIP5/RCP4.5 (Early and Late 21st ...

Thomas R. Knutson; Joseph J. Sirutis; Gabriel A. Vecchi; Steven Garner; Ming Zhao; Hyeong-Seog Kim; Morris Bender; Robert E. Tuleya; Isaac M. Held; Gabriele Villarini

324

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and Research on Probabilistic Hydro-Thermo-Mechanical (HTM) Modeling of CO 2 Geological Sequestration (GS) in Fractured Porous Rocks Project DE-FE0002058 Marte Gutierrez, Ph.D....

325

NETL: Turbines - UTSR Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2 Turbulent Flame Speed Measurements and Modeling of Syngas Fuels Georgia Tech Jerry Seitzman Project Dates: 812007 - 9302010 Area of Research: Combusion Federal Project...

326

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Center for Coal's Center for Coal's FY10 Carbon Sequestration Peer Review February 8 - 12, 2010 2 Collaborators * Tissa Illangasekare (Colorado School of Mines) * Michael Plampin (Colorado School of Mines) * Jeri Sullivan (LANL) * Shaoping Chu (LANL) * Jacob Bauman (LANL) * Mark Porter (LANL) 3 Presentation Outline * Benefit to the program * Project overview * Project technical status * Accomplishments to date * Future Plans * Appendix 4 Benefit to the program * Program goals being addressed (2011 TPP): - Develop technologies to demonstrate that 99 percent of injected CO 2 remains in the injection zones. * Project benefit: - This project is developing system modeling capabilities that can be used to address challenges associated with infrastructure development, integration, permanence &

327

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Test and Evaluation of Test and Evaluation of Engineered Biomineralization Technology for Sealing Existing wells Project Number: FE0009599 Robin Gerlach Al Cunningham, Lee H Spangler Montana State University U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Infrastructure for CCS August 20-22, 2013 Presentation Outline * Motivation & Benefit to the Program (required) * Benefit to the Program and Project Overview (required) * Background information - Project Concept (MICP) - Ureolytic Biomineralization, Biomineralization Sealing * Accomplishments to Date - Site Characterization - Site Preparation - Experimentation and Modeling - Field Deployable Injection Strategy Development * Summary

328

Renewable Resources: a national catalog of model projects. Volume 3. Southern Solar Energy Center Region  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This compilation of diverse conservation and renewable energy projects across the United States was prepared through the enthusiastic participation of solar and alternate energy groups from every state and region. Compiled and edited by the Center for Renewable Resources, these projects reflect many levels of innovation and technical expertise. In many cases, a critique analysis is presented of how projects performed and of the institutional conditions associated with their success or failure. Some 2000 projects are included in this compilation; most have worked, some have not. Information about all is presented to aid learning from these experiences. The four volumes in this set are arranged in state sections by geographic region, coinciding with the four Regional Solar Energy Centers. The table of contents is organized by project category so that maximum cross-referencing may be obtained. This volume includes information on the Southern Solar Energy Center Region. (WHK)

None

1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Renewable Resources: a national catalog of model projects. Volume 4. Western Solar Utilization Network Region  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This compilation of diverse conservation and renewable energy projects across the United States was prepared through the enthusiastic participation of solar and alternate energy groups from every state and region. Compiled and edited by the Center for Renewable Resources, these projects reflect many levels of innovation and technical expertise. In many cases, a critique analysis is presented of how projects performed and of the institutional conditions associated with their success or failure. Some 2000 projects are included in this compilation; most have worked, some have not. Information about all is presented to aid learning from these experiences. The four volumes in this set are arranged in state sections by geographic region, coinciding with the four Regional Solar Energy Centers. The table of contents is organized by project category so that maximum cross-referencing may be obtained. This volume includes information on the Western Solar Utilization Network Region. (WHK)

None

1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Renewable Resources: a national catalog of model projects. Volume 1. Northeast Solar Energy Center Region  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This compilation of diverse conservation and renewable energy projects across the United States was prepared through the enthusiastic participation of solar and alternate energy groups from every state and region. Compiled and edited by the Center for Renewable Resources, these projects reflect many levels of innovation and technical expertise. In many cases, a critique analysis is presented of how projects performed and of the institutional conditions associated with their success or failure. Some 2000 projects are included in this compilation; most have worked, some have not. Information about all is presented to aid learning from these experiences. The four volumes in this set are arranged in state sections by geographic region, coinciding with the four Regional Solar Energy Centers. The table of contents is organized by project category so that maximum cross-referencing may be obtained. This volume includes information on the Northeast Solar Energy Center Region. (WHK).

None

1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CCS CCS August 20-22, 2013 2 Presentation Outline * Benefits to the program * Project overall objectives * Technical status * Project summary * Conclusions and future plans 3 Benefit to the Program * Develop technologies that will support industries' ability to predict CO 2 storage capacity in geologic formations to within ±30 percent. * Develop technologies to demonstrate that 99 percent of injected CO 2 remains in the injection zones. * This research project develops a reservoir scale CO 2 plume migration model at the Sleipner project, Norway. The Sleipner project in the Norwegian North Sea is the world's first commercial scale geological carbon storage project. 4D seismic data have delineated the CO 2 plume migration history. The relatively long history and high fidelity data make

332

© Author(s) 2007. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons License. Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics Global 2-D intercomparison of sectional and modal aerosol modules  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract. We present an intercomparison of several aerosol modules, sectional and modal, in a global 2-D model in order to differentiate their behavior for tropospheric and stratospheric applications. We model only binary sulfuric acidwater aerosols in this study. Three versions of the sectional model and three versions of the modal model are used to test the sensitivity of background aerosol mass and size distribution to the number of bins or modes and to the prescribed width of the largest mode. We find modest sensitivity to the number of bins (40 vs. 150) used in the sectional model. Aerosol mass is found to be reduced in a modal model if care is not taken in selecting the width of the largest lognormal mode, reflecting differences in sedimentation in the middle stratosphere. The size distributions calculated by the sectional model can be better matched by a modal model with four modes rather than three modes in most but not all situations. A simulation of aerosol decay following the 1991 eruption of Mt. Pinatubo shows that the representation of the size distribution can have a signficant impact on modelcalculated aerosol decay rates in the stratosphere. Between 1991 and 1995, aerosol extinction and surface area density calculated by two versions of the modal model adequately match results from the sectional model. Calculated effective radius for the same time period shows more intermodel variability, with a 20-bin sectional model performing much better than any of the modal models. 1

D. K. Weisenstein; J. E. Penner; M. Herzog; X. Liu

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Residential on site solar heating systems: a project evaluation using the capital asset pricing model  

SciTech Connect

An energy source ready for immediate use on a commercial scale is solar energy in the form of On Site Solar Heating (OSSH) systems. These systems collect solar energy with rooftop panels, store excess energy in water storage tanks and can, in certain circumstances, provide 100% of the space heating and hot water required by the occupants of the residential or commercial structure on which the system is located. Such systems would take advantage of a free and inexhaustible energy source--sunlight. The principal drawback of such systems is the high initial capital cost. The solution would normally be a carefully worked out corporate financing plan. However, at the moment it is individual homeowners and not corporations who are attempting to finance these systems. As a result, the terms of finance are excessively stringent and constitute the main obstacle to the large scale market penetration of OSSH. This study analyzes the feasibility of OSSH as a private utility investment. Such systems would be installed and owned by private utilities and would displace other investment projects, principally electric generating plants. The return on OSSH is calculated on the basis of the cost to the consumer of the equivalent amount of electrical energy that is displaced by the OSSH system. The hurdle rate for investment in OSSH is calculated using the Sharpe--Lintner Capital Asset Pricing Model. The results of this study indicate that OSSH is a low risk investment having an appropriate hurdle rate of 7.9%. At this rate, OSSH investment appears marginally acceptable in northern California and unambiguously acceptable in southern California. The results also suggest that utility investment in OSSH should lead to a higher degree of financial leverage for utility companies without a concurrent deterioration in the risk class of utility equity.

Schutz, S.R.

1978-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

THREE-DIMENSIONAL THERMAL MODELING ANALYSIS OF CST MEDIA FOR THE SMALL ION EXCHANGE PROJECT  

SciTech Connect

The Small Column Ion Exchange (SCIX) project is designed to accelerate closure of High Level Waste (HLW) tanks at the Savannah River Site (SRS). The SRS tanks store HLW in three forms: sludge, saltcake, and supernate. An in-tank ion exchange process is being designed to treat supernate and dissolved saltcake waste. Through this process, radioactive cesium from the salt solution is adsorbed into Crystalline Silicotitanate (CST) ion exchange media packed within a flow-through column. A packed column loaded with radioactive cesium generates significant heat from radiolytic decay. The waste supernate solution within the ion exchange bed will boil around 120 C. Solution superheating above the boiling point within the column could lead to violent hazardous energy releases. System heating from loaded CST is also of concern in other process modules, such as the waste tank. Due to tank structural integrity concerns, the wall temperature limit for the SRS waste tanks is 100 C. The transfer of cesium-loaded CST to the tank could result in localized hot spots on the tank floor and walls which may exceed this limit. As a result, thermal modeling calculations have been conducted to predict the maximum temperatures achievable both in the column and in the waste tank. As specified in the associated Technical Task Plan, one objective of the present work was to compute temperature distributions within the ion exchange column module under accident scenarios including loss of salt solution flow through the bed and loss of coolant system flow. The column modeling domain and the scope of the calculations in this case were broadened relative to previous two-dimensional calculations to include vertical temperature distributions within the packed bed of ion exchange media as well as the upper column plenum region containing only fluid. The baseline design conditions and in-column modeling domain for the ion-exchange column module are shown in Figure 1. These evaluations assumed the maximum bounding cesium loading considered possible based on current knowledge regarding CST media and the anticipated feed compositions. Since this cesium loading was considerably higher than the nominal loading conditions in SRS waste, cases with lower loading were also evaluated. Modeling parameters were the same as those used previously unless otherwise indicated. The current model does not capture multi-phase cooling mechanisms operative when solution boiling occurs. This feature is conservative in the sense that it does not account for the large cooling effects associated with phase transfer. However, the potential transfer of heat to the plenum region associated with vertical bubble ascension through the column during boiling is also neglected. Thermal modeling calculations were also performed for the entire waste storage tank for the case where loaded and ground CST was transferred to the tank. The modeling domain used for the in-tank calculations is provided in Figure 2. The in-tank domain is based on SRS Tank 41, which is a Type-IIIA tank. Temperature distributions were evaluated for cylindrical, ground CST mounds located on the tank floor. Media grinding is required prior to vitrification processing of the CST in the SRS Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). The location of the heat source region on the tank floor due to the accumulation of CST material was assumed to be just under the grinder. The shape of the CST mound was assumed to be cylindrical. This shape is believed to be most representative of the actual mound shape formed in the tank, given that submersible mixing pumps will be available for media dispersion. Alternative configurations involving other geometrical shapes for the CST mound were evaluated in the previous work. Sensitivity analysis for the in-tank region was performed for different amounts of CST media. As was the case for the in-column model, the in-tank model does not include multi-phase cooling mechanisms operative when solution boiling occurs. The in-column and the in-tank evaluations incorporated recently updated maximum cesi

Lee, S.; King, W.

2011-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

335

State energy price projections for the residential sector, 1992--1993. [Contains model documentation  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this report, State Energy Price Projections for the Residential Sector, 1992--1993, is to provide projections of State-level residential prices for 1992 and 1993 for the following fuels: electricity, natural gas, heating oil, liquefied petroleum gas (LPG), kerosene, and coal. Prices for 1991 are also included for comparison purposes. This report also explains the methodology used to produce these estimates and the limitations.

Not Available

1992-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

336

Inter-Comparison and Synergy Between the Two Long-Term Gloval Aerosol Products Derived from AVHRR and TOMS  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Inter-Comparison and Synergy Between the Inter-Comparison and Synergy Between the Two Long-Term Global Aerosol Products Derived from AVHRR and TOMS M.-J. Jeong and Z. Li Department of Meteorology University of Maryland College Park, Maryland D. A. Chu and S.-C. Tsay National Aeronautics and Space Administration Goddard Flight Center Greenbelt, Maryland Introduction Eighteen years of satellite-based monthly aerosol products have been derived from the advanced very high resolution radiometer (AVHRR) and total ozone mapping experiment spectrometer (TOMS) sensors. The two products differ in many regards rendering a great potential for developing an integrated product for climate studies. Presented here are some preliminary results of inter-comparison and synergy analyses. Global Aerosol Climatology

337

The results of the PEP`93 intercomparison of reference cell calibrations and newer technology performance measurements: Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report presents the results of an international intercomparison of photovoltaic (PV) performance measurements and calibrations that took place from 1993 to 1997. The intercomparison, which was organized and operated by a group of representatives from national PV measurements laboratories, was accomplished by circulating two sample sets. One set, consisting of 20 silicon reference cells, was intended to form the basis of an international PV reference scale. A qualification procedure applied to the calibration results gave average calibration numbers with an overall standard deviation of less than 2% for the entire set. The second sample set was assembled from a wide range of newer technologies that present unique problems for PV measurements. As might be expected, these results showed much greater differences among the laboratories. Methods were then identified that should be used to measure such devices, along with problems to avoid. The report concludes with recommendations for future intercomparisons.

Osterwald, C.R. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States); Anevsky, S. [All-Union Research Inst. for Optophysical Measurements, Moscow (Russian Federation); Barua, A.K. [Indian Association for the Cultivation of Science, Calcutta (India)] [and others

1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Final Technical Report for "Collaborative Research: Regional climate-change projections through next-generation empirical and dynamical models"  

SciTech Connect

This project was a continuation of previous work under DOE CCPP funding in which we developed a twin approach of non-homogeneous hidden Markov models (NHMMs) and coupled ocean-atmosphere (O-A) intermediate-complexity models (ICMs) to identify the potentially predictable modes of climate variability, and to investigate their impacts on the regional-scale. We have developed a family of latent-variable NHMMs to simulate historical records of daily rainfall, and used them to downscale seasonal predictions. We have also developed empirical mode reduction (EMR) models for gaining insight into the underlying dynamics in observational data and general circulation model (GCM) simulations. Using coupled O-A ICMs, we have identified a new mechanism of interdecadal climate variability, involving the midlatitude oceans mesoscale eddy field and nonlinear, persistent atmospheric response to the oceanic anomalies. A related decadal mode is also identified, associated with the oceans thermohaline circulation. The goal of the continuation was to build on these ICM results and NHMM/EMR model developments and software to strengthen two key pillars of support for the development and application of climate models for climate change projections on time scales of decades to centuries, namely: (a) dynamical and theoretical understanding of decadal-to-interdecadal oscillations and their predictability; and (b) an interface from climate models to applications, in order to inform societal adaptation strategies to climate change at the regional scale, including model calibration, correction, downscaling and, most importantly, assessment and interpretation of spread and uncertainties in multi-model ensembles. Our main results from the grant consist of extensive further development of the hidden Markov models for rainfall simulation and downscaling specifically within the non-stationary climate change context together with the development of parallelized software; application of NHMMs to downscaling of rainfall projections over India; identification and analysis of decadal climate signals in data and models; and, studies of climate variability in terms of the dynamics of atmospheric flow regimes. Each of these project components is elaborated on below, followed by a list of publications resulting from the grant.

Robertson, A.W.; Ghil, M.; Kravtsov, K.; Smyth, P.J.

2011-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

339

Final Technical Report for "Collaborative Research: Regional climate-change projections through next-generation empirical and dynamical models"  

SciTech Connect

This project was a continuation of previous work under DOE CCPP funding in which we developed a twin approach of non-homogeneous hidden Markov models (NHMMs) and coupled ocean-atmosphere (O-A) intermediate-complexity models (ICMs) to identify the potentially predictable modes of climate variability, and to investigate their impacts on the regional-scale. We have developed a family of latent-variable NHMMs to simulate historical records of daily rainfall, and used them to downscale seasonal predictions. We have also developed empirical mode reduction (EMR) models for gaining insight into the underlying dynamics in observational data and general circulation model (GCM) simulations. Using coupled O-A ICMs, we have identified a new mechanism of interdecadal climate variability, involving the midlatitude oceansâ?? mesoscale eddy field and nonlinear, persistent atmospheric response to the oceanic anomalies. A related decadal mode is also identified, associated with the oceansâ?? thermohaline circulation. The goal of the continuation was to build on these ICM results and NHMM/EMR model developments and software to strengthen two key pillars of support for the development and application of climate models for climate change projections on time scales of decades to centuries, namely: (a) dynamical and theoretical understanding of decadal-to-interdecadal oscillations and their predictability; and (b) an interface from climate models to applications, in order to inform societal adaptation strategies to climate change at the regional scale, including model calibration, correction, downscaling and, most importantly, assessment and interpretation of spread and uncertainties in multi-model ensembles. Our main results from the grant consist of extensive further development of the hidden Markov models for rainfall simulation and downscaling specifically within the non-stationary climate change context together with the development of parallelized software; application of NHMMs to downscaling of rainfall projections over India; identification and analysis of decadal climate signals in data and models; and, studies of climate variability in terms of the dynamics of atmospheric flow regimes. Each of these project components is elaborated on below, followed by a list of publications resulting from the grant.

Kravtsov, S.; Robertson, A. W.; Ghil, M.; Smyth, P. J.

2011-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

340

Federal and State Structures to Support Financing Utility-Scale Solar Projects and the Business Models Designed to Utilize Them  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Federal and State Structures to Federal and State Structures to Support Financing Utility-Scale Solar Projects and the Business Models Designed to Utilize Them Michael Mendelsohn and Claire Kreycik Technical Report NREL/TP-6A20-48685 April 2012 NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. National Renewable Energy Laboratory 15013 Denver West Parkway Golden, Colorado 80401 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov Contract No. DE-AC36-08GO28308 Federal and State Structures to Support Financing Utility-Scale Solar Projects and the Business Models Designed to Utilize Them Michael Mendelsohn and Claire Kreycik Prepared under Task No. CP09.2320

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "model intercomparison project" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Infrastructure for CCS August 20-22, 2013 DE-FE0001159 Advanced Technologies for Monitoring CO 2 Saturation and Pore Pressure in Geologic Formations Gary Mavko Rock Physics Project/Stanford University 2 Presentation Outline * Benefit to the Program * Project Overview * Motivating technical challenge * Approach * Technical Status - Laboratory results - Theoretical modeling * Summary Mavko: Stanford University 3 Benefit to the Program * Program goals being addressed. - Develop technologies that will support industries' ability to predict CO 2 storage capacity in geologic formations. - Develop technologies to demonstrate that 99% of injected CO 2 remains in injection zones. * Project benefits statement.

342

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Large Volume Injection of CO Large Volume Injection of CO 2 to Assess Commercial Scale Geological Sequestration in Saline Formations in the Big Sky Region Project Number: DE-FC26-05NT42587 Dr. Lee Spangler Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership Montana State University U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Building the Infrastructure for CO 2 Storage August 21-23, 2012 2 Presentation Outline * Goals and Objectives * Project overview * Kevin Dome characteristics * Project design philosophy * Infrastructure * Modeling * Monitoring * Project Opportunities 3 Benefit to the Program Program goals being addressed. * Develop technologies that will support industries' ability to predict CO

343

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and Research on Probabilistic and Research on Probabilistic Hydro-Thermo-Mechanical (HTM) Modeling of CO 2 Geological Sequestration (GS) in Fractured Porous Rocks Project DE-FE0002058 Marte Gutierrez, Ph.D. Colorado School of Mines U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Building the Infrastructure for CO 2 Storage August 21-23, 2012 2 Presentation Outline * Benefit to the program (Program goals addressed and Project benefits) * Project goals and objectives * Technical status - Project tasks * Technical status - Key findings * Lessons learned * Summary - Accomplishments to date 3 Benefit to the Program * Program goals being addressed. - Develop technologies that will support industries'

344

EPRI (2004, 2006) Ground-Motion Model (GMM) Review Project: Shear Wave Velocity Measurements at Seismic Recording Stations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents the results of site characterization studies for the EPRI (2004, 2006) Ground-Motion Model Review Project. The primary purpose of this investigation was to develop S-wave velocity (VS) profiles to a depth of 30 m, or more, and to estimate the average shear wave velocity of the upper 30 m (VS30) at thirty three (33) seismic instrument sites located in the Central and Eastern United States. Results are presented in individual seismic recording station site ...

2013-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

345

BWRVIP-228: BWR Vessel and Internals Project, A Computational Modeling Tool for Welding Repair of Irradiated Materials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Repair welding on highly irradiated stainless steel BWR internals can lead to cracking in the heat-affected zone (HAZ) of the weld region. EPRI and participating Boiling Water Reactor Vessel and Internals Project (BWRVIP) members have sponsored development of a computational modeling tool to assist in determining appropriate welding process conditions (heat input and process selection) to produce crack-free welds on irradiated materials. This tool integrates a finite-element-based welding temperature and...

2009-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

346

Modeling the determinants of the social impacts of agricultural development projects  

SciTech Connect

In an attempt to help policy-makers improve the social sustainability of development projects, this study identifies the key determinants of farmers' attitudes relating to the social impacts of the floodwater spreading project (FWSP) on the Gareh-Bygone plain in Iran. In order to analyze the links between the various factors that affect the experience of social impact, a theoretical framework was developed. Stratified random sampling was used to survey 138 farm households from the four villages in the region. One male and one female from each house were interviewed face-to-face using a questionnaire, resulting in a total of 276 interviews. Structural factors were found to be the largest contribution to stakeholders' attitudes relating to the social impacts of the project. Results from a cluster analysis suggested that the level of floodwater information, level of participation, water access, ownership change, and environmental worldview were the most important factors explaining attitude towards social impact of the FWSP.

Ahmadvand, Mostafa, E-mail: Ahmadvand_2000@yahoo.co [Department of Rural Development Management, Faculty of Agriculture, Yasouj University, Yasouj (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Karami, Ezatollah, E-mail: ekarami@shirazu.ac.i [Department of Agricultural Extension and Education, College of Agriculture, Shiraz University, Shiraz (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Iman, Mohammad Taghi, E-mail: Iman@shirazu.ac.i [Department of Sociology, School of Social Sciences, Shiraz University, Shiraz (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

2011-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

347

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Web-based CO Web-based CO 2 Subsurface Modeling Geologic Sequestration Training and Research Project Number DE-FE0002069 Christopher Paolini San Diego State University U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Building the Infrastructure for CO 2 Storage August 21-23, 2012 2 Presentation Outline * Project benefits and goals. * Web interface for simulating water-rock interaction. * Development of, and experience teaching, a new Carbon Capture and Sequestration course at San Diego State University. * Some noteworthy results of student research and training in CCS oriented geochemistry. * Status of active student geochemical and geomechancal modeling projects.

348

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Model Complexity in Geological Carbon Model Complexity in Geological Carbon Sequestration: A Design of Experiment (DoE) & Response Surface (RS) Uncertainty Analysis Project Number: DE-FE-0009238 Mingkan Zhang 1 , Ye Zhang 1 , Peter Lichtner 2 1. Dept. of Geology & Geophysics, University of Wyoming, Laramie, Wyoming 2. OFM Research, Inc., Santa Fe, New Mexico U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Infrastructure for CCS August 20-22, 2013 2 Presentation Outline * Project major goals and benefits; * Detailed project objectives & success criteria; * Accomplishments to date; * Summary of results; * Appendix (organization chart; Gantt chart; additional results). Dept. of Geology & Geophysics, University of Wyoming

349

Incorporating uncertainty in vehicle miles traveled projections of the National Energy Modeling System.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) is a computational model that forecasts the production, consumption, and prices of energy in the United States. Although NEMS… (more)

Poetting, David Michael

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Analysis of Field Development Strategies of CO2 EOR/Capture Projects Using a Reservoir Simulation Economic Model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A model for the evaluation of CO2-EOR projects has been developed. This model includes both reservoir simulation to handle reservoir properties, fluid flow and injection and production schedules, and a numerical economic model that generates a monthly cash flow stream from the outputs of the reservoir model. This model is general enough to be used with any project and provide a solid common basis to all of them. This model was used to evaluate CO2-EOR injection and production strategies and develop an optimization workflow. Producer constraints (maximum oil and gas production rates) should be optimized first to generate a reference case. Further improvements can then be obtained by optimizing the injection starting date and the injection plateau rate. Investigation of sensitivity of CO2-EOR to the presence of an aquifer showed that CO2 injection can limit water influx in the reservoir and is beneficial to recovery, even with a strong water drive. The influence of some key parameters was evaluated: the producer should be completed in the top part of the reservoir, while the injector should be completed over the entire thickness; it is recommended but not mandatory that the injection should start as early as possible to allow for lower water cut limit. Finally, the sensitivity of the economics of the projects to some key parameters was evaluated. The most influent parameter is by far the oil price, but other parameters such as the CO2 source to field distance, the pipeline cost scenario, the CO2 source type or the CO2 market price have roughly the same influence. It is therefore possible to offset an increase of one of them by reducing another.

Saint-Felix, Martin

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Excitation spectra from angular momentum projection of Hartree-Fock states and the configuration-interaction shell-model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We make numerical comparison of spectra from angular-momentum projection on Hartree-Fock states with spectra from configuration-interaction nuclear shell-model calculations, all carried out in the same model spaces (in this case the sd, lower pf, and p-sd_5/2 shells) and using the same input Hamiltonians. We find, unsurprisingly, that the low-lying excitation spectra for rotational nuclides are well reproduced, but the spectra for vibrational nuclides, and more generally the complex specta for odd-A and odd-odd nuclides are less well reproduced in detail.

Joshua T. Staker; Calvin W. Johnson

2013-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

352

Intercomparison tests of moored current measurements in the upper ocean  

SciTech Connect

During the August-September 1977 Mixed Layer Experiment (Mile) and the July-September 1978 Joint Air-Sea (Jasin) project, moored current measurements were made in the upper ocean with Savonius rotor and vane vector-averaging current meters (VACM), dual orthogonal propeller vector-measuring current meters (VMCM), and dual orthogonal acoustic travel-time vector-averaging current meters (ACM). Wind speeds and significant wave heights reached 20 m s/sup -1/ and 5m. The influence of mooring motion upon ACM, VACM, and VMCM measurements are described. In the mixed layer above about 30 m depth where mean currents are relatively large, the effect of a surface-following buoy upon ACM, VACM, and VMCM velocity fluctuations at frequencies less than 0.3 cph was negligible; at frequencies above 4 cph, the VACM data contained the largest amount of mooring induced contamination. Below the mixed layer at depths greater than about 75 m, a subsurface mooring should be used; however, when a surface-following buoy was used, then VMCM data better approximated the spectrum of the fluctuations than VACM data. A spar-buoy should not be used to measure currents at depths as deep as 80 m. The frequency-dependent differences between VACM and VMCM and between VACM and ACM measurements are described. At frequencies less than 0.3 cph, the differences between the VACM and ACM or the VMCM records were not significant with 95% confidence limits, were always positive, and above 80 m depth were less than 20%. At frequencies above 4 cph, the VACM-VMCM differences were about 5 times larger than the VACM-ACM differences.

Halpern, D.; Weller, R.A.; Briscoe, M.G.; Davis, R.E.; McCullough, J.R.

1981-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

353

Comonotonic bounds on the survival probabilities in the Lee-Carter model for mortality projection  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the Lee-Carter framework, future survival probabilities are random variables with an intricate distribution function. In large homogeneous portfolios of life annuities, value-at-risk or conditional tail expectation of the total yearly payout of the ... Keywords: Comonotonicity, Mortality projection, Risk measure, Stop-loss order

Michel Denuit; Jan Dhaene

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

The International Urban Energy Balance Models Comparison Project: First Results from Phase 1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A large number of urban surface energy balance models now exist with different assumptions about the important features of the surface and exchange processes that need to be incorporated. To date, no comparison of these models has been conducted; ...

C. S. B. Grimmond; M. Blackett; M. J. Best; J. Barlow; J-J. Baik; S. E. Belcher; S. I. Bohnenstengel; I. Calmet; F. Chen; A. Dandou; K. Fortuniak; M. L. Gouvea; R. Hamdi; M. Hendry; T. Kawai; Y. Kawamoto; H. Kondo; E. S. Krayenhoff; S-H. Lee; T. Loridan; A. Martilli; V. Masson; S. Miao; K. Oleson; G. Pigeon; A. Porson; Y-H. Ryu; F. Salamanca; L. Shashua-Bar; G-J. Steeneveld; M. Tombrou; J. Voogt; D. Young; N. Zhang

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

DE-FE0002225: DE-FE0002225: Actualistic and geochemical modeling of reservoir rock, CO 2 and formation fluid interaction, Citronelle oil field, Alabama West Virginia University & University of Alabama Presenter: Dr. Amy Weislogel (WVU) Co-PI: Dr. Rona Donahoe (UA) U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Building the Infrastructure for CO 2 Storage August 21-23, 2012 2 Presentation Outline * Benefits * Overview & Project Map * Reservoir Geochemical Characterization * Formation Fluid Geochemistry * Geochemical Modeling * Summary 3 Benefit to the Program * Develop technologies that will support industries'

356

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

for Modeling CO for Modeling CO 2 Processes: Pressure Management, Basin-Scale Models, Model Comparison, and Stochastic Inversion ESD09-056 Jens T. Birkholzer with Abdullah Cihan, Marco Bianchi, Quanlin Zhou, Xiaoyi Liu, Sumit Mukhopadhyay, Dorothee Rebscher, Barbara Fialeix Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Infrastructure for CCS August 20-22, 2013 2 Presentation Outline * Benefit to the Program * Project Overview and Technical Status - Task 1: Optimization of Brine Extraction for Pressure Management and Mitigation - Task 2: Basin-scale Simulation of CO 2 Storage in the Northern Plains - Prairie Basal Aquifer - Task 3: Sim-SEQ Model Comparison

357

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

FE/NETL CTS Cost Models and FE/NETL CTS Cost Models and Benefits Assessment of Carbon Storage R&D Program David Morgan Benefits Division Office of Program Planning and Analysis National Energy Technology Laboratory U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Building the Infrastructure for CO 2 Storage August 21-23, 2012 OFFICE OF FOSSIL ENERGY 2 Presentation Outline * Overview of benefits assessment * Overview of FE/NETL models used to assess benefits of CO 2 capture and storage * Benefits evaluation of Storage Program's R&D projects using a model to estimate costs of CO 2 storage in a saline aquifer * Description of model used to estimate costs of

358

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

0-22, 2013 0-22, 2013 Collaborators Zhengrong Wang, Yale University Kevin Johnson, University of Hawaii 2 Presentation Outline * Program Focus Area and DOE Connections * Goals and Objectives * Scope of Work * Technical Discussion * Accomplishments to Date * Project Wrap-up * Appendix (Organization Chart, Gantt Chart, and Bibliography 3 Benefit to the Program * Program goals addressed: - Technology development to predict CO 2 storage capacity - Demonstrate fate of injected CO 2 and most common contaminants * Project benefits statement: This research project conducts modeling, laboratory studies, and pilot-scale research aimed at developing new technologies and new systems for utilization of basalt formations for long term subsurface storage of CO 2 . Findings from this project

359

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CO CO 2 leakage and cap rock remediation DE-FE0001132 Runar Nygaard Missouri University of Science and Technology U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Building the Infrastructure for CO 2 Storage August 21-23, 2012 Presentation Outline * Benefit to the program * Project overview * Technical status * Accomplishments to date * Summary 2 3 Benefit to the Program * Program goals being addressed. - Develop technologies to demonstrate that 99 percent of injected CO 2 remains in the injection zones. * Project benefits statement. - The project develops a coupled reservoir and geomechanical modeling approach to simulate cap rock leakage and simulate the success of remediation

360

Evaluation of Black Carbon Estimations in Global Aerosol Models  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We evaluate black carbon (BC) model predictions from the AeroCom model intercomparison project by considering the diversity among year 2000 model simulations and comparing model predictions with available measurements. These model-measurement intercomparisons include BC surface and aircraft concentrations, aerosol absorption optical depth (AAOD) from AERONET and OMI retrievals and BC column estimations based on AERONET. In regions other than Asia, most models are biased high compared to surface concentration measurements. However compared with (column) AAOD or BC burden retreivals, the models are generally biased low. The average ratio of model to retrieved AAOD is less than 0.7 in South American and 0.6 in African biomass burning regions; both of these regions lack surface concentration measurements. In Asia the average model to observed ratio is 0.6 for AAOD and 0.5 for BC surface concentrations. Compared with aircraft measurements over the Americas at latitudes between 0 and 50N, the average model is a factor of 10 larger than observed, and most models exceed the measured BC standard deviation in the mid to upper troposphere. At higher latitudes the average model to aircraft BC is 0.6 and underestimate the observed BC loading in the lower and middle troposphere associated with springtime Arctic haze. Low model bias for AAOD but overestimation of surface and upper atmospheric BC concentrations at lower latitudes suggests that most models are underestimating BC absorption and should improve estimates for refractive index, particle size, and optical effects of BC coating. Retrieval uncertainties and/or differences with model diagnostic treatment may also contribute to the model-measurement disparity. Largest AeroCom model diversity occurred in northern Eurasia and the remote Arctic, regions influenced by anthropogenic sources. Changing emissions, aging, removal, or optical properties within a single model generated a smaller change in model predictions than the range represented by the full set of AeroCom models. Upper tropospheric concentrations of BC mass from the aircraft measurements are suggested to provide a unique new benchmark to test scavenging and vertical dispersion of BC in global models.

Koch, D.; Schulz, M.; Kinne, Stefan; McNaughton, C. S.; Spackman, J. R.; Balkanski, Y.; Bauer, S.; Berntsen, T.; Bond, Tami C.; Boucher, Olivier; Chin, M.; Clarke, A. D.; De Luca, N.; Dentener, F.; Diehl, T.; Dubovik, O.; Easter, Richard C.; Fahey, D. W.; Feichter, J.; Fillmore, D.; Freitag, S.; Ghan, Steven J.; Ginoux, P.; Gong, S.; Horowitz, L.; Iversen, T.; Kirkevag, A.; Klimont, Z.; Kondo, Yutaka; Krol, M.; Liu, Xiaohong; Miller, R.; Montanaro, V.; Moteki, N.; Myhre, G.; Penner, J.; Perlwitz, Ja; Pitari, G.; Reddy, S.; Sahu, L.; Sakamoto, H.; Schuster, G.; Schwarz, J. P.; Seland, O.; Stier, P.; Takegawa, Nobuyuki; Takemura, T.; Textor, C.; van Aardenne, John; Zhao, Y.

2009-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "model intercomparison project" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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361

Grand challenge problems in environmental modeling and remediation: Groundwater contaminant transport. Final project report 1998  

SciTech Connect

The over-reaching goal of the Groundwater Grand Challenge component of the Partnership in Computational Science (PICS) was to develop and establish the massively parallel approach for the description of groundwater flow and transport and to address the problem of uncertainties in the data and its interpretation. This necessitated the development of innovative algorithms and the implementation of massively parallel computational tools to provide a suite of simulators for groundwater flow and transport in heterogeneous media. This report summarizes the activities and deliverables of the Groundwater Grand Challenge project funded through the High Performance Computing grand challenge program of the Department of Energy from 1995 through 1997.

NONE

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Lamar repowering project's creative modeling of old and new wins Marmaduke award  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Lamar Light and Power is a municipal utility that has been generating the south eastern Colorado city's electricity since 1920. Rising natural gas and oil costs pushed LL & P to retire its steam plant five years ago and begin hunting for more economic power sources. The answer: repower the existing plant with a state-of-the-art coal-fired circulating fluidized-bed combustor and cross-connect old and new steam turbines. The 120 million dollar project will stabilize the region's electricity rates for many years to come. 10 figs. 1 tab.

Peltier, R.

2008-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

363

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mohammad Piri and Felipe Pereira Mohammad Piri and Felipe Pereira University of Wyoming U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Building the Infrastructure for CO 2 Storage August 2013 2 Presentation Outline * Benefit to the Program * Project Overview * Technical Status o Experimentation: core-flooding and IFT/CA o Pore-scale modeling modeling * Accomplishments to Date * Summary University of Wyoming 3 Benefit to the Program * Program goal: o 'Develop technologies that will support industries' ability to predict CO 2 storage capacity in geologic formations to within ±30 percent.' * Benefits statement: o The research project is focused on performing reservoir conditions experiments to measure steady-state relative permeabilities,

364

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Project Results from Simulation Project Results from Simulation Framework for Regional Geologic CO 2 Storage Infrastructure along Arches Province of Midwest United States DOE Award No. DE-FE0001034 Ohio Dept. of Dev. Grant CDO/D-10-03 U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting August 21-23, 2012 Joel Sminchak and Neeraj Gupta Battelle Energy Systems sminchak@battelle.org, 614-424-7392 gupta@battelle.org, 614-424-3820 BUSINESS SENSITIVE 2 Presentation Outline 1. Technical Status 2. Background (CO 2 Sources, Geologic Setting) 3. Injection Well history 4. Geocellular Model Development 5. Geological Data (Geological dataset, Geostatistics) 6. Geocellular porosity/permeability model development 7. Pipeline Routing Analysis

365

HANFORD RIVER PROTECTION PROJECT ENHANCED MISSION PLANNING THROUGH INNOVATIVE TOOLS LIFECYCLE COST MODELING AND AQUEOUS THERMODYNAMIC MODELING - 12134  

SciTech Connect

Two notable modeling efforts within the Hanford Tank Waste Operations Simulator (HTWOS) are currently underway to (1) increase the robustness of the underlying chemistry approximations through the development and implementation of an aqueous thermodynamic model, and (2) add enhanced planning capabilities to the HTWOS model through development and incorporation of the lifecycle cost model (LCM). Since even seemingly small changes in apparent waste composition or treatment parameters can result in large changes in quantities of high-level waste (HLW) and low-activity waste (LAW) glass, mission duration or lifecycle cost, a solubility model that more accurately depicts the phases and concentrations of constituents in tank waste is required. The LCM enables evaluation of the interactions of proposed changes on lifecycle mission costs, which is critical for decision makers.

PIERSON KL; MEINERT FL

2012-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

366

SINGLE-SHELL TANK INTEGRITY PROJECT ANALYSIS OF RECORD-PRELIMINARY MODELING PLAN FOR THERMAL AND OPERATING LOADS  

SciTech Connect

This document is a Phase I deliverable for the Single-Shell Tank Analysis of Record effort. This document is not the Analysis of Record. The intent of this document is to guide the Phase II detailed modeling effort. Preliminary finite element models for each of the tank types were developed and different case studies were performed on one or more of these tank types. Case studies evaluated include thermal loading, waste level variation, the sensitivity of boundary effects (soil radial extent), excavation slope or run to rise ratio, soil stratigraphic (property and layer thickness) variation at different farm locations, and concrete material property variation and their degradation under thermal loads. The preliminary analysis document reviews and preliminary modeling analysis results are reported herein. In addition, this report provides recommendations for the next phase of the SST AOR project, SST detailed modeling. Efforts and results discussed in this report do not include seismic modeling as seismic modeling is covered by a separate report. The combined results of both static and seismic models are required to complete this effort. The SST AOR project supports the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of River Protection (ORP) mission for obtaining a better understanding of the structural integrity of Hanford's SSTs. The 149 SSTs, with six different geometries, have experienced a range of operating histories which would require a large number of unique analyses to fully characterize their individual structural integrity. Preliminary modeling evaluations were conducted to determine the number of analyses required for adequate bounding of each of the SST tank types in the Detailed Modeling Phase of the SST AOR Project. The preliminary modeling was conducted in conjunction with the Evaluation Criteria report, Johnson et al. (2010). Reviews of existing documents were conducted at the initial stage of preliminary modeling. These reviews guided the topics that were explored in the SST preliminary modeling. The reviews determined the level of detail necessary to perform the analyses of the SSTs. To guide the Phase II detailed modeling effort, preliminary finite element models for each of the tank types were developed and different case studies were performed on one or more of these tank types. Case studies evaluated include thermal loading, waste level variation, the sensitivity of boundary effects (soil radial extent), excavation slope or run to rise ratio, soil stratigraphic (property and layer thickness) variation at different farm locations, and concrete material property variation and their degradation under thermal loads. Conclusions were derived from case studies on one of the tank types when no additional runs of similar cases on other types of tanks were found necessary to derive those conclusions. The document reviews provided relatively complete temperature histories for Type IV tanks. The temperature history data for Type I, II, and III tanks was almost nonexistent for years prior to 1975. Document reviews indicate that there might be additional useful data in the US Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office (DOE-RL) records in Seattle, WA, and these records need to be reviewed to extract data that might have been disregarded during previous reviews. Thermal stress analyses were conducted using different temperature distribution scenarios on Type IV tanks. Such studies could not be carried out for other tank types due to lack of temperature history data. The results from Type IV tank analyses indicate that factors such as temperature distribution in the tank waste and rate of rise in waste temperature have a significant impact on the thermal stresses in the tank structures. Overall, the conclusion that can drawn from the thermal stress analyses is that these studies should be carried out for all tank types during the detailed analysis phase with temperature values that are reasonably close to the typical temperature histories of the respective tank types. If and/or when additional waste temperature data

RAST RS; RINKER MW; BAPANAALLI SK; DEIBLER JE; GUZMAN-LEONG CE; JOHNSON KI; KARRI NK; PILLI SP; SANBORN SE

2010-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

367

Statistical emulation of climate model projections based on precomputed GCM runs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We describe a new approach for emulating the output of a fully coupled climate model under arbitrary forcing scenarios that is based on a small set of precomputed runs from the model. We express temperature and precipitation as simple functions of ...

Stefano Castruccio; David J. McInerney; Michael L. Stein; Feifei Liu; Robert L. Jacob; Elisabeth J. Moyer

368

Defining assessment projects and scenarios for policy support: Use of ontology in Integrated Assessment and Modelling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Integrated Assessment and Modelling (IAM) provides an interdisciplinary approach to support ex-ante decision-making by combining quantitative models representing different systems and scales into a framework for integrated assessment. Scenarios in IAM ... Keywords: Collaborative approach, Integration, Knowledge management, Multi-disciplinary teams, Policy assessment

S. Janssen; F. Ewert; Hongtao Li; I. N. Athanasiadis; J. J. F. Wien; O. Thérond; M. J. R. Knapen; I. Bezlepkina; J. Alkan-Olsson; A. E. Rizzoli; H. Belhouchette; M. Svensson; M. K. van Ittersum

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Müller: Modeling the Impact of a Learning Phase on the Business Value of a Pair Programming Project. APSEC 11  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract. Pair programmers need a ”warmup phase” before the pair can work at full speed. The length of the learning interval varies, depending on how experienced the developers are with pair programming and how familiar they are with each other. We study how large the impact of the lower pair productivity during warmup is on the business value of the pair programming project. To this end, we extend our net present value model for pair programming to explicitly include a learning interval for pairs. We then carry out a simulation study where we vary the shape of the learning curve, the length of the learning interval, the final productivity level of the pairs, the market pressure, and the size of the workforce. Our simulations show that the cost of the warmup phase is reasonably small compared to the project value, but nonetheless must be taken into account when estimating the project. Our results also suggest that the learning overhead is not an obstacle to introducing and using pair programming in a real environment.

Frank Padberg

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

A Framework for Evaluating Model Credibility for Warm Season Precipitation in the Northeast: A Case Study of CMIP5 Simulations and Projections  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Future projections of Northeast warm season precipitation (JJA) indicate substantial uncertainty. Atmospheric processes important to Northeast JJA precipitation are identified and a first evaluation of five CMIP5 models’ ability to simulate these ...

Jeanne M. Thibeault; Anji Seth

371

Intercomparison of Variational Data Assimilation and the Ensemble Kalman Filter for Global Deterministic NWP. Part II: One-Month Experiments with Real Observations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An intercomparison of the Environment Canada variational and ensemble Kalman filter (EnKF) data assimilation systems is presented in the context of producing global deterministic numerical weather forecasts. Five different variational data ...

Mark Buehner; P. L. Houtekamer; Cecilien Charette; Herschel L. Mitchell; Bin He

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Intercomparison of Variational Data Assimilation and the Ensemble Kalman Filter for Global Deterministic NWP. Part I: Description and Single-Observation Experiments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An intercomparison of the Environment Canada variational and ensemble Kalman filter (EnKF) data assimilation systems is presented in the context of global deterministic NWP. In an EnKF experiment having the same spatial resolution as the inner ...

Mark Buehner; P. L. Houtekamer; Cecilien Charette; Herschel L. Mitchell; Bin He

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

INTERCOMPARISON OF WATER VAPOR CALIBRATION CONSTANTS DERIVED FROM IN-SITU AND DISTANT SOUNDINGS FOR A RAMAN-LIDAR OPERATING IN THE AMAZON  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

INTERCOMPARISON OF WATER VAPOR CALIBRATION CONSTANTS DERIVED FROM IN-SITU AND DISTANT SOUNDINGS such measurements on tropical regions. Indeed, there were important field campaigns in the Amazon that explored some

Barbosa, Henrique

374

Geomechanical/Geochemical Modeling Studies Conducted within the International DECOVALEX Project  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Scale Heater Test at Yucca Mountain,” International JournalA is a simplified model of the Yucca Mountain site, a deepthe Drift Scale Test at Yucca Mountain (a setting similar to

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Will Amazonia Dry Out? Magnitude and Causes of Change from IPCC Climate Model Projections  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Amazon rain forest may undergo significant change in response to future climate change. To determine the likelihood and causes of such changes, the authors analyzed the output of 24 models from the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (...

Brian Cook; Ning Zeng; Jin-Ho Yoon

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Modeling the solar thermal receiver for the CSPonD Project  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The objective was to create an accurate steady state thermal model of a molten salt receiver prototype with a horizontal divider plate in the molten salt for Concentrated Solar Power on Demand (CSPonD). The purpose of the ...

Rees, Jennifer A. (Jennifer Anne)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Simulation and Projection of the Southern Hemisphere Annular Mode in CMIP5 Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Climate variability in the Southern Hemisphere (SH) extratropical regions is dominated by the SH Annular Mode (SAM). Future changes in the SAM could have a large influence on climate over broad regions. In this paper, we utilized model simulations ...

Fei Zheng; Jianping Li; Robin T. Clark; Hyacinth C. Nnamchi

378

Cloud shading direct solar radiation model for the Crosbyton Solar Power Project  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The CSPP was initiated to study the feasibility of using hemispheric bowl solar collectors for power generation. A non-spectral direct solar radiation (DSR) model was developed to aid in determining whether there exists a preferred spacing of these solar collectors based solely on meteorological considerations. The DSR model is applicable to the Northern Hemisphere and, with a few adjustments, to the Southern Hemisphere. The DSR model considers the reduction of direct insolation through the atmosphere due to Rayleigh scattering, uniformly mixed gases, ozone, precipitable water, and aerosols. It incorporates geographical information along with temperature, dew point, barometric pressure, and visibility data, updated every 15 minutes. This clear sky DSR model was verified against actual direct insolation data.

Peterson, R.E.; Smalley, D.J.

1985-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Distributed Ocean–Atmosphere Modeling and Sensitivity to the Coupling Flux Precision: The CATHODe Project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The authors present the distribution of a coupled ocean–atmosphere global circulation model. The atmospheric (ARPEGE) and the oceanic (OPA) components run separately at different sites; the coupling is achieved through the exchanges of fluxes via ...

C. Cassou; P. Noyret; E. Sevault; O. Thual; L. Terray; D. Beaucourt; M. Imbard

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

SOLERAS - Solar-Powered Water Desalination Project at Yanbu: Forecasting models for operating and maintenance cost of the pilot plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study was conducted in cooperation with the Department of Industrial Engineering of King Abdulaziz University. The main objective of this study is to meet some of the goals of the Solar Energy Water Desalination Plant (SEWDP) plan in the area of economic evaluation. The first part of this project focused on describing the existing trend in the operation and maintenance (OandM) cost for the SOLERAS Solar Energy Water Desalination Plant in Yanbu. The second part used the information obtained on existing trends to find suitable forecasting models. These models, which are found here, are sensitive to changes in costs trends. Nevertheless, the study presented here has established the foundation for (OandM) costs estimating in the plant. The methodologies used in this study should continue as more data on operation and maintenance costs become available, because, in the long run, the trend in costs will help determine where cost effectiveness might be improved. 7 refs., 24 figs., 15 tabs.

Al-Idrisi, M.; Hamad, G.

1987-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "model intercomparison project" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

3D Geologic Modeling of the Southern San Joaquin Basin for the Westcarb Kimberlina Demonstration Project- A Status Report  

SciTech Connect

The objective of the Westcarb Kimberlina pilot project is to safely inject 250,000 t CO{sub 2}/yr for four years into the deep subsurface at the Clean Energy Systems (CES) Kimberlina power plant in southern San Joaquin Valley, California. In support of this effort, we have constructed a regional 3D geologic model of the southern San Joaquin basin. The model is centered on the Kimberlina power plant and spans the UTM range E 260000-343829 m and N 3887700-4000309 m; the depth of the model ranges from the topographic surface to >9000 m below sea level. The mapped geologic units are Quaternary basin fill, Tertiary marine and continental deposits, and pre-Tertiary basement rocks. Detailed geologic data, including surface maps, borehole data, and geophysical surveys, were used to define the geologic framework. Fifteen time-stratigraphic formations were mapped, as well as >140 faults. The free surface is based on a 10 m lateral resolution DEM. We use Earthvision (Dynamic Graphics, Inc.) to integrate the geologic and geophysical information into a 3D model of x,y,z,p nodes, where p is a unique integer index value representing the geologic unit. This grid represents a realistic model of the subsurface geology and provides input into subsequent flow simulations.

Wagoner, J

2009-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

382

3D Geologic Modeling of the Southern San Joaquin Basin for the Westcarb Kimberlina Demonstration Project- A Status Report  

SciTech Connect

The objective of the Westcarb Kimberlina pilot project is to safely inject 250,000 t CO{sub 2}/yr for four years into the deep subsurface at the Clean Energy Systems (CES) Kimberlina power plant in southern San Joaquin Valley, California. In support of this effort, we have constructed a regional 3D geologic model of the southern San Joaquin basin. The model is centered on the Kimberlina power plant and spans the UTM range E 260000-343829 m and N 3887700-4000309 m; the depth of the model ranges from the topographic surface to >9000 m below sea level. The mapped geologic units are Quaternary basin fill, Tertiary marine and continental deposits, and pre-Tertiary basement rocks. Detailed geologic data, including surface maps, borehole data, and geophysical surveys, were used to define the geologic framework. Fifteen time-stratigraphic formations were mapped, as well as >140 faults. The free surface is based on a 10 m lateral resolution DEM. We use Earthvision (Dynamic Graphics, Inc.) to integrate the geologic and geophysical information into a 3D model of x,y,z,p nodes, where p is a unique integer index value representing the geologic unit. This grid represents a realistic model of the subsurface geology and provides input into subsequent flow simulations.

Wagoner, J

2009-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

383

The Northwest Geysers EGS Demonstration Project Phase 1: Pre-stimulation coupled geomechanical modeling to guide stimulation and monitoring plans  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper presents activities and results associated with Phase 1 (pre-stimulation phase) of an Enhanced Geothermal System (EGS) demonstration project at the northwest part of The Geysers geothermal field, California. The paper presents development of a 3-D geological model, coupled thermal-hydraulic-mechanical (THM) modeling of proposed stimulation injection as well as current plans for stimulation and monitoring of the site. The project aims at creating an EGS by directly and systematically injecting cool water at relatively low pressure into a known High Temperature (about 280 to 350 C) Zone (HTZ) located under the conventional (240 C) steam reservoir at depths of {approx}3 km. Accurate micro-earthquake monitoring initiated before the start of the injection will be used as a tool for tracking the development of the EGS and monitoring changes in microseismicity. We first analyzed historic injection and micro-earthquake data from an injection well (Aidlin 11) located about 3 miles to the west of the new EGS demonstration area. Thereafter, we used the same modeling approach to predict the likely extent of the zone of enhanced permeability for a proposed initial injection in two wells (Prati State 31 and Prati 32) at the new EGS demonstration area. Our modeling indicates that the proposed injection scheme will provide additional steam production in the area by creating a zone of permeability enhancement extending about 0.5 km from each injection well which will connect to the overlying conventional steam reservoir, in agreement with the conclusions of Nielson and Moore (2000).

Rutqvist, J.; Dobson, P.F.; Oldenburg, C.M.; Garcia, J.; Walters, M.

2010-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

384

Impacts of Future Climate Change on California Perennial Crop Yields: Model Projections with Climate and Crop Uncertainties  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Most research on the agricultural impacts of climate change has focused on the major annual crops, yet perennial cropping systems are less adaptable and thus potentially more susceptible to damage. Improved assessments of yield responses to future climate are needed to prioritize adaptation strategies in the many regions where perennial crops are economically and culturally important. These impact assessments, in turn, must rely on climate and crop models that contain often poorly defined uncertainties. We evaluated the impact of climate change on six major perennial crops in California: wine grapes, almonds, table grapes, oranges, walnuts, and avocados. Outputs from multiple climate models were used to evaluate climate uncertainty, while multiple statistical crop models, derived by resampling historical databases, were used to address crop response uncertainties. We find that, despite these uncertainties, climate change in California is very likely to put downward pressure on yields of almonds, walnuts, avocados, and table grapes by 2050. Without CO{sub 2} fertilization or adaptation measures, projected losses range from 0 to >40% depending on the crop and the trajectory of climate change. Climate change uncertainty generally had a larger impact on projections than crop model uncertainty, although the latter was substantial for several crops. Opportunities for expansion into cooler regions are identified, but this adaptation would require substantial investments and may be limited by non-climatic constraints. Given the long time scales for growth and production of orchards and vineyards ({approx}30 years), climate change should be an important factor in selecting perennial varieties and deciding whether and where perennials should be planted.

Lobell, D; Field, C; Cahill, K; Bonfils, C

2006-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

385

A Projective Model Structure on Pro Simplicial Sheaves, and the Relative \\'Etale Homotopy Type  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In \\cite{Isa}, Isaksen showed that a proper model category $\\cC$, induces a model structure on the pro category $Pro(\\cC)$. In this paper we generalize Isaksen's theorem to the case when $\\cC$ possess a weaker structure, which we call a "weak fibration category". Namely, we show that if $\\mcal{C}$ is a weak fibration category, that satisfies an extra condition, there is a naturally induced model structure on $Pro(\\cC)$. We then apply our theorem to the case when $\\cC$ is the weak fibration category of simplicial sheafs on a Grothendieck site, where both weak equivalences and fibrations are local as in \\cite{Jar}. This gives a new model structure on the category of pro simplicial sheaves. Using this new model structure we give a definition of the \\'etale homotopy type of Artin and Mazur \\cite{AM}, as the result of applying a derived functor. Our definition actually gives as object in $Pro(\\cS)$ and not just in $Pro(Ho(\\cS))$ as in \\cite{AM}. Our definition also extends naturally to a relative notion of the \\'e...

Barnea, Ilan

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

INTERCOMPARISON PROCEDURES  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... The block is moved tangentially toward the stop allowing one corner ' to touch the stop and then with an angular motion (which se.ats the probe on ...

2002-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

387

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

DE-FE0001836: DE-FE0001836: Numerical modeling of geomechanical processes related to CO 2 injection within generic reservoirs Andreas Eckert & Runar Nygaard Missouri University of Science & Technology U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Building the Infrastructure for CO 2 Storage August 21-23, 2012 2 Presentation Outline * Objectives, Benefits and Outcomes * Technical status: Project summary - Teaching - Reservoir scale (Geomechanics & Fluid flow simulation) - Borehole scale (Wellbore integrity & wellbore trajectory planning) * Conclusions * Appendix 3 Benefit to the Program * Program goals being addressed. - Develop technologies that will support industries'

388

Design modeling of the 100-J diode-pumped solid-state laser for Project Mercury  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present the energy, propagation, and thermal modeling for a diode-pumped solid-state laser called Mercury being designed and built at LLNL using Yb:S-FAP [i.e., Yb{sup 3+}-doped Sr{sub 5}(PO{sub 4}){sub 3}F crystals] for the gain medium. This laser is intended to produce 100 J pulses at 1 to 10 ns at 10 Hz with an electrical efficiency of {approximately}10%. Our modeling indicates that the laser will be able to meet its performance goals.

Orth, C., LLNL

1998-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

389

Equilibrium Response and Transient Dynamics Datasets from VEMAP, the Vegetation/Ecosystem Modeling and Analysis Project  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

Users of the VEMAP Portal can access input files of numerical data that include monthly and daily files of geographic data, soil and site files, scenario files, etc. Model results from Phase I, the Equilibrium Response datasets, are available through the NCAR anonymous FTP site at http://www.cgd.ucar.edu/vemap/vresults.html. Phase II, Transient Dynamics, include climate datasets, models results, and analysis tools. Many supplemental files are also available from the main data page at http://www.cgd.ucar.edu/vemap/datasets.html.

390

An Organisational Culture Model for Comparative Studies and Assessment of IT Projects  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The research supports the notion that values affect work practices. It develops a comparatively simple organisational cultural model based on four work practices: support orientation, innovation orientation, co-ordination orientation, and rules orientation. ... Keywords: Coordination, IT Professionals, Innovation, Organisational Culture, Rules

Abel Usoro; Grzegorz Majewski; Imran U. Khan

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Projections of a Wetter Sahel in the Twenty-First Century from Global and Regional Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Confident regional-scale climate change predictions for the Sahel are needed to support adaptation planning. State-of-the-art regional climate model (RCM) simulations at 90- and 30-km resolutions are run and analyzed along with output from five ...

Edward K. Vizy; Kerry H. Cook; Julien Crétat; Naresh Neupane

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Infrastructure for CCS August 20-22, 2013 2 Presentation Outline * Introduction * Organization * Benefit to Program * Project Overview * Technical Status * Accomplishments to Date * Summary * Appendix Introduction * Most storage modeling studies assume a discrete reservoir/caprock interface with simple (uniform) flow conditions. * We address the question of whether or not heterogeneities at the interface influence transmission of CO 2 into the caprock 3 4 Reservoir Caprock Reservoir Introduction The nature of reservoir/caprock interfaces 4 Organization 5 Peter Mozley (PD/PI) NMT Sedimentology James Evans (Co-PI) USU Structure Thomas Dewers (Co-I) Jason Heath (Staff) SNL Modeling Mark Person (Cooperating Scientist) NMT Modeling Stefan Raduha NMT Sedimentology

393

Advanced neutron source project information management. A model for the future  

SciTech Connect

The Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) is a proposed new research facility that will provide steady-state beams of neutrons for experiments by more than 1000 researchers per year in the fields of materials science and engineering, biology, chemistry, materials analysis, and nuclear science. The facility will also include irradiation capabilities to produce radioisotopes for medical applications, research, industry, and materials testing. This paper discusses the architecture and data flow used by the project, some quantitative examinations of potential cost savings and return on investment and software applications used to generate and manage data across IBM-compatible personal computers, Macintosh, and Unix-based workstations. Personnel management aspects addressed include providing paper copy to users only when needed for adequate technical review, using graded approaches to providing support for numerous user-needed software applications, and implementing a phased approach to compliance with computer-aided acquisition and logistic support (CALS) standards that allows sufficient user flexibility for performing technical tasks while providing needed data sharing and integration.

King-Jones, K.; Cleaves, J.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

394

Advanced Neutron Source project information management: A model for the future  

SciTech Connect

The Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) is a proposed new research facility that will provide steady-state beams of neutrons for experiments by more than 1,000 researchers per year in the fields of materials science and engineering, biology, chemistry, materials analysis, and nuclear science. The facility will also include irradiation capabilities to produce radioisotopes for medical applications, research, industry, and materials testing. This paper discusses the architecture and data flow used by the project, some quantitative examinations of potential cost savings and return on investment, and software applications used to generate and manage data across IBM-compatible personal computers, Macintosh, and Unix-based workstations. Personnel management aspects addressed include providing paper copy to users only when needed for adequate technical review, using graded approaches to providing support for numerous user-needed software applications, and implementing a phased approach to compliance with computer-aided acquisition and logistic support (CALS) standards that allows sufficient user flexibility for performing technical tasks while providing needed data sharing and integration.

King-Jones, K.; Cleaves, J.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

395

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Project Number (DE-FE0002056) U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Infrastructure for CCS August 20-22, 2013 W. Lynn Watney & Jason Rush (Joint PIs) Kansas Geological Survey Lawrence, KS 66047 Brighton 1&2 2:40 August 20, 2013 2 Presentation Outline * Benefits to the Program * Project Overview * Technical Status * Accomplishments to Date * Summary ORGANIZATIONAL STRUCTURE Modeling CO 2 Sequestration in Saline A quifer and Depleted Oil Reservoir to Evaluate Regional CO 2 Sequestration Potential of Ozark Plateau A quifer System, South-Central Kansas Co-Principal Investigators Co-Principal Investigators Kerry D. Newell -- stratigraphy, geochemistry

396

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fidelity Computational Analysis of Fidelity Computational Analysis of CO2 Trappings at Pore-scales Project Number: DE-FE0002407 Vinod Kumar (vkumar@utep.edu) & Paul Delgado (pmdelgado2@utep.edu) University of Texas at El Paso U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Building the Infrastructure for CO 2 Storage August 21-23, 2012 Collaborators: Dr. C. Harris (Shell Oil Company/Imperial College), Dr. G. Bromhal (NETL), Dr. M. Ferer (WVU/NETL), Dr. D. Crandall (NETL-Ctr), and Dr. D. McIntyre (NETL). 2 Presentation Outline * Benefit to the Program * Project Overview * Technical Status - Pore-network modeling - Conductance derivation for irregular geom. - Pore-to-CFD Computations

397

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Project Number (DE-FE0002056) W. Lynn Watney & Jason Rush (Joint PIs) Kansas Geological Survey Lawrence, KS 66047 U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Building the Infrastructure for CO 2 Storage August 21-23, 2012 2 Presentation Outline * Benefits to the Program * Project Overview * Technical Status * Accomplishments to Date * Summary KANSAS STATE UNIVERSITY Bittersweet Energy Inc. Partners FE0002056 Devilbiss Coring Service Basic Energy Services Wellington Field Operator Industrial and Electrical Power Sources of CO 2 Southwest Kansas CO 2 -EOR Initiative Industry Partners (modeling 4 Chester/Morrowan oil fields to make CO2 ready) +drilling and seismic contractors TBN

398

Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

TDE Ecosystem Model Intercomparison Project Data Archive image Navigate CDIAC image About CDIAC Information on CDIAC's mission, new and frequently used data products, data...

399

Increase in Very Wet and Very Dry Months in the Tropics Linked...  

Office of Science (SC) Website

predictions of monthly precipitation from Coupled Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP3) climate change simulations the authors show that the occurrence of very dry (<0.5 mmday)...

400

Risk identification and assessment for build-operate-transfer projects: A fuzzy multi attribute decision making model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In recent years, BOT approach has provided an increasingly popular project financing to move toward infrastructure development in Asian countries such as Iran. There are many complexities in projects because of the variety of factors in project's trend ... Keywords: BOT projects, FMADM, Risk identification, Risk ranking

Sadoullah Ebrahimnejad; Seyed Meysam Mousavi; Hamed Seyrafianpour

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "model intercomparison project" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Unsolicited Projects in 2011: Research in Execution Models | U.S. DOE  

Office of Science (SC) Website

1: Research in Execution Models 1: Research in Execution Models Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR) ASCR Home About Research Applied Mathematics Computer Science Exascale Tools Workshop Programming Challenges Workshop Architectures I Workshop External link Architectures II Workshop External link Next Generation Networking Scientific Discovery through Advanced Computing (SciDAC) Computational Science Graduate Fellowship (CSGF) ASCR SBIR-STTR Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of ASCR Funding Opportunities Advanced Scientific Computing Advisory Committee (ASCAC) News & Resources Contact Information Advanced Scientific Computing Research U.S. Department of Energy SC-21/Germantown Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (301) 903-7486 F: (301) 903-4846 E: sc.ascr@science.doe.gov More Information »

402

South America PAR SR Solar Model from INPE and LABSOLAR | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

PAR SR Solar Model from INPE and LABSOLAR PAR SR Solar Model from INPE and LABSOLAR Dataset Summary Description (Abstract): Mean values of PAR Solar Radiation in kWh/m2/day for 40km cells for 1 year (month, season, year) based on data from 1995 to 2005 (Purpose): To provide a set of consistent, reliable, verifiable, and accessible global data sets for international and in-country investors and other stakeholders (Supplemental Information): The BRASIL-SR model (developed by INPE - National Institute for Space Research) and the ARCVIEW software were used to produce the dataset and SHAPE files. The assessment of reliability levels of the BRASIL-SR model were performed through the evaluation of the deviations shown by the estimated values for solar radiation flux vis-à-vis the values measured at the surface (ground truth). This evaluation was done in two phases. The first phase consisted in an inter-comparison between the core radiation transfer models adopted by the SWERA Project to map the solar energy n the various countries participating in the project. The HELIOSAT model took part in this phase like benchmark due to its employment to apply solar energy resources in countries from European Union. In the second phase, the solar flux estimates provided by the BRASIL-SR model were compared with measured values acquired at several solarimetric stations spread along the Brazilian territory. The BRASIL-SR model is not validated for areas covered by snow.

403

South America Latitude Tilted SR Solar Model from INPE and LABSOLAR |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Latitude Tilted SR Solar Model from INPE and LABSOLAR Latitude Tilted SR Solar Model from INPE and LABSOLAR Dataset Summary Description (Abstract): Mean values of Latitude Tilted Solar Radiation in kWh/m2/day for 40km cells for 1 year (month, season, year) based on data from 1995 to 2005 (Purpose): To provide a set of consistent, reliable, verifiable, and accessible global data sets for international and in-country investors and other stakeholders (Supplemental Information): The BRASIL-SR model (developed by INPE - National Institute for Space Research) and the ARCVIEW software were used to produce the dataset and SHAPE files.The assessment of reliability levels of the BRASIL-SR model were performed through the evaluation of the deviations shown by the estimated values for solar radiation flux vis-à-vis the values measured at the surface (ground truth). This evaluation was done in two phases. The first phase consisted in an inter-comparison between the core radiation transfer models adopted by the SWERA Project to map the solar energy in the various countries participating in the project. The HELIOSAT model took part in this phase like benchmark due to its employment to map solar energy resources in countries from European Union. In the second phase, the solar flux estimates provided by the BRASIL-SR model were compared with measured values acquired at several solarimetric stations spread along the Brazilian territory. The BRASIL-SR model is not validated for areas covered by snow.

404

THERMAL MODELING ANALYSIS OF CST MEDIA IN THE SMALL COLUMN ION EXCHANGE PROJECT  

SciTech Connect

Models have been developed to simulate the thermal characteristics of Crystalline Silicotitanate (CST) ion exchange media fully loaded with radioactive cesium in a column configuration and distributed within a waste storage tank. This work was conducted to support the Small Column Ion Exchange (SCIX) program which is focused on processing dissolved, high-sodium salt waste for the removal of specific radionuclides (including Cs-137, Sr-90, and actinides) within a High Level Waste (HLW) storage tank at the Savannah River Site. The SCIX design includes CST columns inserted and supported in the tank top risers for cesium removal. Temperature distributions and maximum temperatures across the column were calculated with a focus on process upset conditions. A two-dimensional computational modeling approach for the in-column ion-exchange domain was taken to include conservative, bounding estimates for key parameters such that the results would provide the maximum centerline temperatures achievable under the design configurations using a feed composition known to promote high cesium loading on CST. One salt processing scenario includes the transport of the loaded (and possibly ground) CST media to the treatment tank floor. Therefore, additional thermal modeling calculations were conducted using a three-dimensional approach to evaluate temperature distributions for the entire in-tank domain including distribution of the spent CST media either as a mound or a flat layer on the tank floor. These calculations included mixtures of CST with HLW sludge or loaded Monosodium Titanate (MST) media used for strontium/actinide sorption. The current full-scale design for the CST column includes one central cooling pipe and four outer cooling tubes. Most calculations assumed that the fluid within the column was stagnant (i.e. no buoyancy-induced flow) for a conservative estimate. A primary objective of these calculations was to estimate temperature distributions across packed CST beds immersed in waste supernate or filled with dry air under various accident scenarios. Accident scenarios evaluated included loss of salt solution flow through the bed (a primary heat transfer mechanism), inadvertent column drainage, and loss of active cooling in the column. The calculation results showed that for a wet CST column with active cooling through one central and four outer tubes and 35 C ambient external air, the peak temperature for the fully-loaded column is about 63 C under the loss of fluid flow accident, which is well below the supernate boiling point. The peak temperature for the naturally-cooled (no active, engineered cooling) wet column is 156 C under fully-loaded conditions, exceeding the 130 C boiling point. Under these conditions, supernate boiling would maintain the column temperature near 130 C until all supernate was vaporized. Without active engineered cooling and assuming a dry column suspended in unventilated air at 35 C, the fully-loaded column is expected to rise to a maximum of about 258 C due to the combined loss-of coolant and column drainage accidents. The modeling results demonstrate that the baseline design using one central and four outer cooling tubes provides a highly efficient cooling mechanism for reducing the maximum column temperature. Results for the in-tank modeling calculations clearly indicate that when realistic heat transfer boundary conditions are imposed on the bottom surface of the tank wall, as much as 450 gallons of ground CST (a volume equivalent to two ion exchange processing cycles) in an ideal hemispherical shape (the most conservative geometry) can be placed in the tank without exceeding the 100 C wall temperature limit. Furthermore, in the case of an evenly-distributed flat layer, the tank wall reaches the temperature limit after the ground CST material reaches a height of approximately 8 inches.

Lee, S.

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Job and Economic Development Impact (JEDI) Model: A User-Friendly Tool to Calculate Economic Impacts from Wind Projects; Preprint  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

Job and Economic Job and Economic Development Impact (JEDI) Model: A User-Friendly Tool to Calculate Economic Impacts from Wind Projects Preprint March 2004 * NREL/CP-500-35953 M. Goldberg MRG & Associates K. Sinclair and M. Milligan (Consultant) National Renewable Energy Laboratory To be presented at the 2004 Global WINDPOWER Conference Chicago, Illinois March 29-31, 2004 National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard Golden, Colorado 80401-3393 NREL is a U.S. Department of Energy Laboratory Operated by Midwest Research Institute * Battelle Contract No. DE-AC36-99-GO10337 NOTICE The submitted manuscript has been offered by an employee of the Midwest Research Institute (MRI), a contractor of the US Government under Contract No. DE-AC36-99GO10337. Accordingly, the US

406

Final Report for LDRD Project 05-ERD-050: "Developing a Reactive Chemistry Capability for the NARAC Operational Model (LODI)"  

SciTech Connect

In support of the National Security efforts of LLNL, this project addressed the existing imbalance between dispersion and chemical capabilities of LODI (Lagrangian Operational Dispersion Integrator--the NARAC operational dispersion model). We have demonstrated potentially large effects of atmospheric chemistry on the impact of chemical releases (e.g., industrial chemicals and nerve agents). Prior to our work, LODI could only handle chains of first-order losses (exponential decays) that were independent of time and space, limiting NARAC's capability to respond when reactive chemistry is important. We significantly upgraded the chemistry and aerosol capability of LODI to handle (1) arbitrary networks of chemical reactions, (2) mixing and reactions with ambient species, (3) evaporation and condensation of aerosols, and (4) heat liberated from chemical reactions and aerosol condensation (which can cause a cold and dense plume hugging the ground to rise into the atmosphere, then descend to the ground again as droplets). When this is made operational, it will significantly improve NARAC's ability to respond to terrorist attacks and industrial accidents that involve reactive chemistry, including many chemical agents and toxic industrial chemicals (TICS). As a dual-use, the resulting model also has the potential to be a state-of-the-art air-quality model. Chemical releases are the most common type of airborne hazardous release and many operational applications involve such scenarios. The new capability we developed is therefore relevant to the needs of the Department of Energy (DOE), Department of Homeland Security (DHS) and Department of Defense (DoD).

Cameron-Smith, P; Grant, K; Connell, P

2008-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

407

Measurement and modeling of energetic material mass transfer to soil pore water :project CP-1227 FY03 annual technical report.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Military test and training ranges operate with live fire engagements to provide realism important to the maintenance of key tactical skills. Ordnance detonations during these operations typically produce minute residues of parent explosive chemical compounds. Occasional low order detonations also disperse solid phase energetic material onto the surface soil. These detonation remnants are implicated in chemical contamination impacts to groundwater on a limited set of ranges where environmental characterization projects have occurred. Key questions arise regarding how these residues and the environmental conditions (e.g., weather and geostratigraphy) contribute to groundwater pollution impacts. This report documents interim results of experimental work evaluating mass transfer processes from solid phase energetics to soil pore water. The experimental work is used as a basis to formulate a mass transfer numerical model, which has been incorporated into the porous media simulation code T2TNT. This report documents the results of the Phase III experimental effort, which evaluated the impacts of surface deposits versus buried deposits, energetic material particle size, and low order detonation debris. Next year, the energetic material mass transfer model will be refined and a 2-d screening model will be developed for initial site-specific applications. A technology development roadmap was created to show how specific R&D efforts are linked to technology and products for key customers.

Phelan, James M.; Barnett, James L.; Kerr, Dayle R.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Application of Low-Cost Digital Elevation Models to Detect Change in Forest Carbon Sequestration Projects  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This two-year study evaluated advanced multispectral digital imagery applications for assessment of forest carbon stock change. A series of bench and field studies in North Carolina and Ohio tested aerial assessments of forest change between two time periods using two software packages (ERDAS and TERREST) for Digital Elevation Model (DEM) creation, automated classification software (eCognition) for canopy segmentation and a multiple ranging laser designed to improve quality of elevation data. Results of the DEM software comparison showed that while TERREST has the potential to produce much higher resolution DEM than ERDAS, it is unable to resolve crucial canopy features adequately. Lab tests demonstrated that additional laser data improves image registration and Z-axis DEM quality. Data collected in the field revealed difficult challenges in correctly modeling the location of laser strike and subsequently determining elevations in both software packages. Automated software segmentation of tree canopies provided stem diameter and biomass carbon estimates that were within 3% of comparable ground based estimates in the Ohio site and produced similar biomass estimates for a limited number of plots in the Duke forest. Tree height change between time periods and canopy segmentation from multispectral imagery allowed calculation of forest carbon stock change at costs that are comparable to those for ground-based methods. This work demonstrates the potential of lower cost imagery systems enhanced with laser data to collect high quality imagery and paired laser data for forestry and environmental applications. Additional research on automated canopy segmentation and multi-temporal image registration is needed to refine these methods for commercial use.

Kenneth Glenn MacDicken

2007-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

409

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Chart: project timeline - Project Milestones - Budget - Bibliography * Thank you 29 30 Organization Chart * Project team: Purdue University - Dr. Brenda B. Bowen: PI, student...

410

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Building the Building the Infrastructure for CO 2 Storage August 21-23, 2012 2 Presentation Outline * Introduction - Objective - Industrial Review Committee - Background * Steps Involved - Geological and Reservoir Simulation Modeling - Leakage Modeling & Real-Time Data Processing - Pattern Recognition & Intelligent Leakage Detection System (ILDS) * Accomplishments to Date * Summary Objective * Develop an in-situ CO 2 leak detection technology based on the concept of Smart Fields. - Using real-time pressure data from permanent downhole gauges to estimate the location and the rate of CO 2 leakage. Industrial Advisory Committee (IAC) * Project goes through continuous peer-review by an Industrial Review Committee. * Meetings: - November 6 th 2009 :

411

Application of price uncertainty quantification models and their impacts on project evaluations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This study presents an analysis of several recently published methods for quantifying the uncertainty in economic evaluations due to uncertainty in future oil prices. Conventional price forecasting methods used in the industry typically underestimate the range of uncertainty in oil and gas price forecasts. These forecasts traditionally consider pessimistic, most-likely, and optimistic cases in an attempt to quantify economic uncertainty. The recently developed alternative methods have their unique strengths as well as weaknesses that may affect their applicability in particular situations. While stochastic methods can improve the assessment of price uncertainty they can also be tedious to implement. The inverted hockey stick method is found to be an easily applied alternative to the stochastic methods. However, the primary basis for validating this method has been found to be unreliable. In this study, a consistent and reliable validation of uncertainty estimates predicted by the inverted hockey stick method is presented. Verifying the reliability of this model will ensure reliable quantification of economic uncertainty. Although we cannot eliminate uncertainty from investment evaluations, we can better quantify the uncertainty by accurately predicting the volatility in future oil and gas prices. Reliably quantifying economic uncertainty will enable operators to make better decisions and allocate their capital with increased efficiency.

Fariyibi, Festus Lekan

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Lessons Learned from the TOF-Benchmark Intercomparison Exercise Within EU CONRAD Project (How Not to Misinterpret a TOF Benchmark)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Miscellaneous / Special Issue on the 11th International Conference on Radiation Shielding and the 15th Topical Meeting of the Radiation Protection and Shielding Division (PART 3) / Radiation Measurements and Instrumentation

I. Kodeli; A. Milocco; A. Trkov

413

Mobility chains analysis of technologies for passenger cars and light duty vehicles fueled with biofuels : application of the Greet model to project the role of biomass in America's energy future (RBAEF) project.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Role of Biomass in America's Energy Future (RBAEF) is a multi-institution, multiple-sponsor research project. The primary focus of the project is to analyze and assess the potential of transportation fuels derived from cellulosic biomass in the years 2015 to 2030. For this project, researchers at Dartmouth College and Princeton University designed and simulated an advanced fermentation process to produce fuel ethanol/protein, a thermochemical process to produce Fischer-Tropsch diesel (FTD) and dimethyl ether (DME), and a combined heat and power plant to co-produce steam and electricity using the ASPEN Plus{trademark} model. With support from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) conducted, for the RBAEF project, a mobility chains or well-to-wheels (WTW) analysis using the Greenhouse gases, Regulated Emissions, and Energy use in Transportation (GREET) model developed at ANL. The mobility chains analysis was intended to estimate the energy consumption and emissions associated with the use of different production biofuels in light-duty vehicle technologies.

Wu, M.; Wu, Y.; Wang, M; Energy Systems

2008-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

414

Mobility chains analysis of technologies for passenger cars and light duty vehicles fueled with biofuels : application of the Greet model to project the role of biomass in America's energy future (RBAEF) project.  

SciTech Connect

The Role of Biomass in America's Energy Future (RBAEF) is a multi-institution, multiple-sponsor research project. The primary focus of the project is to analyze and assess the potential of transportation fuels derived from cellulosic biomass in the years 2015 to 2030. For this project, researchers at Dartmouth College and Princeton University designed and simulated an advanced fermentation process to produce fuel ethanol/protein, a thermochemical process to produce Fischer-Tropsch diesel (FTD) and dimethyl ether (DME), and a combined heat and power plant to co-produce steam and electricity using the ASPEN Plus{trademark} model. With support from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) conducted, for the RBAEF project, a mobility chains or well-to-wheels (WTW) analysis using the Greenhouse gases, Regulated Emissions, and Energy use in Transportation (GREET) model developed at ANL. The mobility chains analysis was intended to estimate the energy consumption and emissions associated with the use of different production biofuels in light-duty vehicle technologies.

Wu, M.; Wu, Y.; Wang, M; Energy Systems

2008-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

415

The Community Earth System Model: A Framework for Collaborative Research  

SciTech Connect

The Community Earth System Model (CESM) is a flexible and extensible community tool used to investigate a diverse set of earth system interactions across multiple time and space scales. This global coupled model is a natural evolution from its predecessor, the Community Climate System Model, following the incorporation of new earth system capabilities. These include the ability to simulate biogeochemical cycles, atmospheric chemistry, ice sheets, and a high-top atmosphere. These and other new model capabilities are enabling investigations into a wide range of pressing scientific questions, providing new predictive capabilities and increasing our collective knowledge about the behavior and interactions of the earth system. Simulations with numerous configurations of the CESM have been provided to the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 5 (CMIP5) and are being analyzed by the broader community of scientists. Additionally, the model source code and associated documentation are freely available to the scientific community to use for earth system studies, making it a true community tool. Here we describe this earth modeling system, its various possible configurations, and illustrate its capabilities with a few science highlights.

Hurrell, Jim; Holland, Marika M.; Gent, Peter R.; Ghan, Steven J.; Kay, Jennifer; Kushner, P.; Lamarque, J.-F.; Large, William G.; Lawrence, David M.; Lindsay, Keith; Lipscomb, William; Long , Matthew; Mahowald, N.; Marsh, D.; Neale, Richard; Rasch, Philip J.; Vavrus, Steven J.; Vertenstein, Mariana; Bader, David C.; Collins, William D.; Hack, James; Kiehl, J. T.; Marshall, Shawn

2013-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

416

Regional climate effects of irrigation and urbanization in the western united states: a model intercomparison  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In the two northern grid cells, sensible heat flux decreasedthe two southern grid cells sensible heat flux increased andgrid cells that were irrigated in Figure 5. January and August latent heat

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

meeting summary: Third COMPARE Workshop: A Model Intercomparison Experiment of Tropical Cyclone Intensity and Track Prediction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Third Comparison of Mesoscale Prediction and Research Experiment (COMPARE) workshop was held in Tokyo, Japan, on 13–15 December 1999, cosponsored by the Japan Meteorological Agency (JMA), Japan Science and Technology Agency, and the World ...

Masashi Nagata; Lance Leslie; Yoshio Kurihara; Russell L. Elsberry; Masanori Yamasaki; Hirotaka Kamahori; Robert Abbey Jr.; Kotaro Bessho; Javier Calvo; Johnny C. L. Chan; Peter Clark; Michel Desgagne; Song-You Hong; Detlev Majewski; Piero Malguzzi; John McGregor; Hiroshi Mino; Akihiko Murata; Jason Nachamkin; Michel Roch; Clive Wilson

2001-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Aerosol indirect effects -- general circulation model intercomparison and evaluation with satellite data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

while the two others (CAM-PNNL and CAM-Umich) indicate ain T42L26 resolution. CAM-PNNL: The simulations were doneCAM- NCAR CAM- Oslo CAM- PNNL CAM- Umich ECHAM5 GFDL GISS

Quaas, Johannes

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Aerosol indirect effects ? general circulation model intercomparison and evaluation with satellite data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

while the two others (CAM-PNNL and CAM-Umich) indicate ain T42L26 resolution. CAM-PNNL: The simulations were doneCAM- NCAR CAM- Oslo CAM- PNNL CAM- Umich ECHAM5 GFDL GISS

Quaas, Johannes

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Intercomparison of Spatial Interpolation Schemes for Use in Nested Grid Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Two geometrical and two advection-equivalent spatial interpolation schemes were tested in providing lateral boundary conditions to a nested grid domain. Geometric interpolation schemes used in this study are a zeroth- order and a quadratic scheme,...

Kiran Alapaty; Rohit Mathur; Talat Odman

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "model intercomparison project" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Aerosol indirect effects -- general circulation model intercomparison and evaluation with satellite data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

J. : A parameterization of aerosol activation - 3. Sectionalclouds on indirect aerosol climate forcing, Nature, 432,2004. Albrecht, B. A. : Aerosols, cloud microphysics, and

Quaas, Johannes

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Aerosol indirect effects ? general circulation model intercomparison and evaluation with satellite data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Oscillation influence aerosol variability? , J. Geophys.clouds on indirect aerosol climate forcing, Nature, 432,2004. Albrecht, B. A. : Aerosols, cloud microphysics, and

Quaas, Johannes

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mart Oostrom Mart Oostrom Pacific Northwest National Laboratory U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Infrastructure for CCS August 20-22, 2013 2 Presentation Outline  Project overview  Sub-Task 1: Investigation of CO 2 migration in heterogeneous porous media  Sub-Task 2: Modeling CCUS deployment in China  Summary Collaboration with China on Clean Energy Research 3 Benefit to the Program The Clean Energy Partnership was established by a memorandum of understanding between the Chinese Academy of Sciences, the National Energy Technology Laboratory and the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory in May of 2009 with the goal of significantly reducing the environmental emissions and improving the efficiency of

424

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

0-22, 2013 0-22, 2013 2 Presentation Outline * Benefit to the Program * Project Overview: Goals and Objectives * Technical Status * Accomplishments to Date * Summary * Appendix 3 Benefit to the Program * Advanced simulation tool for quantifying transport in porous and fractured geological formations during CO 2 sequestration that includes all mechanisms: convection, diffusion, dissolution and chemical reactions * A simulator that can fully model these processes does not currently exist * Simulator will contribute to our ability to predict CO 2 storage capacity in geologic formations, to within ±30 percent 4 Project Overview: Goals and Objectives Comprehensive reservoir simulator for investigation of CO 2 non-isothermal, multiphase flow and long-term storage in

425

Response of precipitation extremes to idealized global warming in an aqua-planet climate model: Towards robust projection across different horizontal resolutions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Current climate models produce quite heterogeneous projections for the responses of precipitation extremes to future climate change. To help understand the range of projections from multimodel ensembles, a series of idealized 'aquaplanet' Atmospheric General Circulation Model (AGCM) runs have been performed with the Community Atmosphere Model CAM3. These runs have been analysed to identify the effects of horizontal resolution on precipitation extreme projections under two simple global warming scenarios. We adopt the aquaplanet framework for our simulations to remove any sensitivity to the spatial resolution of external inputs and to focus on the roles of model physics and dynamics. Results show that a uniform increase of sea surface temperature (SST) and an increase of low-to-high latitude SST gradient both lead to increase of precipitation and precipitation extremes for most latitudes. The perturbed SSTs generally have stronger impacts on precipitation extremes than on mean precipitation. Horizontal model resolution strongly affects the global warming signals in the extreme precipitation in tropical and subtropical regions but not in high latitude regions. This study illustrates that the effects of horizontal resolution have to be taken into account to develop more robust projections of precipitation extremes.

Li, F.; Collins, W.D.; Wehner, M.F.; Williamson, D.L.; Olson, J.G.

2011-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

426

Dispersion Modeling Project  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Development and Concurrence * Plan Execution * Potential Impacts Executing the Plan * HSS Bulletin regarding specification of "Deposition Velocity" * Solicited external review...

427

The Google Library Project  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This is an economic analysis of the Google Library project. I describe the project and outline why it is consistent with the legal doctrine of fair use. I go on to examine the transactions costs associated with optin and opt-out models for publisher participation. I conclude that the Google Library Project is legally sound and economically sensible. In particular, an opt-in model would incur very substantial transactions costs, making the entire undertaking problematic.

Hal R. Varian

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Final Technical Report for Collaborative Research: Regional climate-change projections through next-generation empirical and dynamical models, DE-FG02-07ER64429  

SciTech Connect

This is the final report for a DOE-funded research project describing the outcome of research on non-homogeneous hidden Markov models (NHMMs) and coupled ocean-atmosphere (O-A) intermediate-complexity models (ICMs) to identify the potentially predictable modes of climate variability, and to investigate their impacts on the regional-scale. The main results consist of extensive development of the hidden Markov models for rainfall simulation and downscaling specifically within the non-stationary climate change context together with the development of parallelized software; application of NHMMs to downscaling of rainfall projections over India; identification and analysis of decadal climate signals in data and models; and, studies of climate variability in terms of the dynamics of atmospheric flow regimes.

Smyth, Padhraic [University of California, Irvine

2013-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

429

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Infrastructure for CCS August 20-22, 2013 2 Presentation Outline * Introduction * Reservoir Simulation Model * Intelligent Leakage Detection System (ILDS) * Accomplishments * Summary Objective * Develop an in-situ CO 2 leak detection technology based on the concept of Smart Fields. - Using real-time pressure data from permanent downhole gauges to estimate the location and the rate of CO 2 leakage. CO2 Leakage(X,Y,Q) Artificial Intelligence & Data Mining Industrial Advisory Committee (IAC) * Project goes through continuous peer-review by an Industrial Review Committee. * Meetings: - November 6 th 2009 : * Conference call * Site selection criteria - November 17 th 2009: * A meeting during the Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership Meeting in Pittsburgh

430

Brazil Global Horizontal Solar Radiation Model (40km) from INPE | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

40km) from INPE 40km) from INPE Dataset Summary Description (Abstract): Global horizontal solar radiation in kWh/m2/day for 1 year organized into cells with 40km x 40km (Purpose): To provide a set of consistent, reliable, verifiable, and accessible global data sets for international and in-country investors and other stakeholders (Supplemental Information): The BRASIL-SR model and the SPRING software (both developed by INPE - National Institute for Space Research) were used to produce the dataset and SHAPE files. The assessment of reliability levels of the BRASIL-SR model were performed through the evaluation of the deviations shown by the estimated values for solar radiation flux vis-à-vis the values measured at the surface (ground truth). This evaluation was done in two phases. The first phase consisted in an inter-comparison between the core radiation transfer models adopted by the SWERA Project to map the solar energy in the various countries participating in the project. The HELIOSAT model took art in this phase like benchmark due to its employment to map solar energy resources in countries from European Union. In the second phase, the solar flux estimates provided by the BRASIL-SR model were compared with measured values acquired at several solarimetric stations spread along the Brazilian territory.

431

Brazil PAR Solar Radiation Model (40km) from INPE and LABSOLAR | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

40km) from INPE and LABSOLAR 40km) from INPE and LABSOLAR Dataset Summary Description (Abstract): Photosynthetically active radiation in kWh/m2/day for 1 year organized into cells with 40km x 40km (Purpose): The BRASIL-SR model and the SPRING software (both developed by INPE - National Institute for Space Research) were used to produce the dataset and SHAPE files (Supplemental Information): The assessment of reliability levels of the BRASIL-SR model were performed through the evaluation of the deviations shown by the estimated values for solar radiation flux vis-à-vis the values measured at the surface (ground truth). This evaluation was done in two phases. The first phase consisted in an inter-comparison between the core radiation transfer models adopted by the SWERA Project to map the solar energy in the various countries participating in the project. The HELIOSAT model took part in this phase like benchmark due to its employment to map solar energy resources in countries from European Union. In the second phase, the solar flux estimates provided by the BRASIL-SR model were compared with measured values acquired at several solarimetric stations spread along the Brazilian territory

432

Brazil Direct Normal Solar Radiation Model (40km) from INPE and LABSOLAR |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

40km) from INPE and LABSOLAR 40km) from INPE and LABSOLAR Dataset Summary Description (Abstract): Normal direct solar radiation in kWh/m2/day for 1 year organized into cells with 40km x 40km (Purpose): To provide a set of consistent, reliable, verifiable, and accessible global data sets for international and in-country investors and other stakeholders (Supplemental Information): The BRASIL-SR model and the SPRING software (both developed by INPE - National Institute for Space Research) were used to produce the dataset and SHAPE files. The assessment of reliability levels of the BRASIL-SR model were performed through the evaluation of the deviations shown by the estimated values for solar radiation flux vis-à-vis the values measured at the surface (ground truth). This evaluation was done in two phases. The first phase consisted in an inter-comparison between the core radiation transfer models adopted by the SWERA Project to map the solar energy in the various countries participating in the project. The HELIOSAT model took part in this phase like benchmark due to its employment to map solar energy resources in countries from European Union. In the second phase, the solar flux estimates provided by the BRASIL-SR model were compared with measured values acquired at several solarimetric stations spread along the Brazilian territory.

433

Brazil Direct Normal Solar Radiation Model (10km) from INPE and LABSOLAR |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

10km) from INPE and LABSOLAR 10km) from INPE and LABSOLAR Dataset Summary Description (Abstract): Normal direct solar radiation in kWh/m2/day for 1 year organized into cells with 10km x 10km (Purpose): The BRASIL-SR model and the SPRING software (both developed by INPE - National Institute for Space Research) were used to produce the dataset and SHAPE files (Supplemental Information): The assessment of reliability levels of the BRASIL-SR model were performed through the evaluation of the deviations shown by the estimated values for solar radiation flux vis-à-vis the values measured at the surface (ground truth). This evaluation was done in two phases. The first phase consisted in an inter-comparison between the core radiation transfer models adopted by the SWERA Project to map the solar energy in the various countries participating in the project. The HELIOSAT model took part in this phase like benchmark due to its employment to map solar energy resources in countries from European Union. In the second phase, the solar flux estimates provided by the BRASIL-SR model were compared with measured values acquired at several solarimetric stations spread along the Brazilian territory

434

Brazil Global Horizontal Solar Radiation Model (10km) from INPE | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

10km) from INPE 10km) from INPE Dataset Summary Description (Abstract): Global horizontal solar radiation in kWh/m2/day for 1 year organized into cells with 10km x 10km (Purpose): The BRASIL-SR model and the SPRING software (both developed by INPE - National Institute for Space Research) were used to produce the dataset and SHAPE files (Supplemental Information): The assessment of reliability levels of the BRASIL-SR model were performed through the evaluation of the deviations shown by the estimated values for solar radiation flux vis-à-vis the values measured at the surface (ground truth). This evaluation was done in two phases. The first phase consisted in an inter-comparison between the core radiation transfer models adopted by the SWERA Project to map the solar energy in the various countries participating in the project. The HELIOSAT model took part in this phase like benchmark due to its employment to map solar energy resources in countries from European Union. In the second phase, the solar flux estimates provided by the BRASIL-SR model were compared with measured values acquired at several solarimetric stations spread along the Brazilian territory

435

Brazil PAR Solar Radiation Model (10km) from INPE and LABSOLAR | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

10km) from INPE and LABSOLAR 10km) from INPE and LABSOLAR Dataset Summary Description (Abstract): Photosynthetically active radiation in kWh/m2/day for 1 year organized into cells with 10km x 10km (Purpose): The BRASIL-SR model and the SPRING software (both developed by INPE -National Institute for Space Research) were used to produce the dataset and SHAPE files (Supplemental Information): The assessment of reliability levels of the BRASIL-SR model were performed through the evaluation of the deviations shown by the estimated values for solar radiation flux vis-à-vis the values measured at the surface (ground truth). This evaluation was done in two phases. The first phase consisted in an inter-comparison between the core radiation transfer models adopted by the SWERA Project to map the solar energy in the various countries participating in the project. The HELIOSAT model took part in this phase like benchmark due to its employment to map solar energy resources in countries from European Union. In the second phase, the solar flux estimates provided by the BRASIL-SR model were compared with measured values acquired at several solarimetric stations spread along the Brazilian territory

436

Brazil Latitude Tilted Solar Radiation Model (10km) from INPE and LABSOLAR  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

10km) from INPE and LABSOLAR 10km) from INPE and LABSOLAR Dataset Summary Description (Abstract): Latitude tilted solar radiation in kWh/m2/day for 1 year organized into cells with 10km x 10km (Purpose): The BRASIL-SR model and the SPRING software (both developed by INPE -National Institute for Space Research) were used to produce the dataset and SHAPE files (Supplemental Information): The assessment of reliability levels of the BRASIL-SR model were performed through the evaluation of the deviations shown by the estimated values for solar radiation flux vis-à-vis the values measured at the surface (ground truth). This evaluation was done in two phases. The first phase consisted in an inter-comparison between the core radiation transfer models adopted by the SWERA Project to map the solar energy in the various countries participating in the project. The HELIOSAT model took part in this phase like benchmark due to its employment to map solar energy resources incountries from European Union. In the second phase, the solar flux estimates providedby the BRASIL-SR model were compared with measured values acquired at several solarimetric stations spread along the Brazilian territory

437

Renewable Resources: a national catalog of model projects. Volume 2. Mid-American Solar Energy Complex Region  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This compilation of diverse conservation and renewable energy projects across the United States was prepared through the enthusiastic participation of solar and alternate energy groups from every state and region. Compiled and edited by the Center for Renewable Resources, these projects reflect many levels of innovation and technical expertise. In many cases, a critique analysis is presented of how projects performed and of the institutional conditions associated with their success or failure. Some 2000 projects are included in this compilation; most have worked, some have not. Information about all is presented to aid learning from these experiences. The four volumes in this set are arranged in state sections by geographic region, coinciding with the four Regional Solar Energy Centers. The table of contents is organized by project category so that maximum cross-referencing may be obtained. This volume includes information on the Mid-American Solar Energy Complex Region. (WHK)

None

1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Development of a Toolkit for Calculating Linear, Change-Point Linear and Multiple-Linear Inverse Building Energy Analysis Models, ASHRAE Research Project 1050-RP, Final Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This report summarizes the results of ASHRAE Research Project 1050: Development of a Toolkit for Calculating Linear, Change-Point Linear and Multiple Linear Inverse Building Energy Analysis Models. The Inverse Modeling Toolkit (WIT) is a FORTRAN 90 application for developing regression models of building energy use. IMT can identify single and multi-variable least-squares regression models. It can also identify variable-base degree-day and single and multi-variable change-point models, which have been shown to be especially useful for modeling building energy use. This report includes background information about IMT and the models, instructions for its installation and operation, and the results of accuracy and robustness testing.

Kissock, J. K.; Haberl, J. S.; Claridge, D. E.

2002-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Project Accounts  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

» Project Accounts » Project Accounts Project Accounts Overview Project accounts are designed to facilitate collaborative computing by allowing multiple users to use the same account. All actions performed by the project account are traceable back to the individual who used the project account to perform those actions via gsisshd accounting logs. Requesting a Project Account PI's, PI proxies and project managers are allowed to request a project account. In NIM do "Actions->Request a Project Account" and fill in the form. Select the repository that the Project Account is to use from the drop-down menu, "Sponsoring Repository". Enter the name you want for the account (8 characters maximum) and a description of what you will use the account for and then click on the "Request Project Account" button. You

440

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Building the Building the Infrastructure for CO 2 Storage August 21-23, 2012 2 Presentation Outline * Introduction * Organization * Benefit to Program * Project Overview * Technical Status * Accomplishments to Date * Summary * Appendix Introduction * Most storage modeling studies involve a caprock/reservoir interface, and assume a discrete contact with simple (uniform) flow conditions. * We address the question of whether or not heterogeneities at the interface influence transmission of CO 2 into the caprock 3 Introduction The nature of reservoir/caprock interfaces 4 Triassic-Jurassic Strata, San Rafael Swell, UT Organization 5 Peter Mozley (PD/PI) NMT Sedimentology James Evans (Co-PI) USU Structure Thomas Dewers (Co-I) Jason Heath (Staff) SNL Modeling Mark Person

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "model intercomparison project" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Space Geodesy and Geochemistry Space Geodesy and Geochemistry Applied to Monitoring and Verification of Carbon Capture and Storage Award # DE-FE0002184 Peter Swart University of Miami Tim Dixon University of South Florida U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Building the Infrastructure for CO 2 Storage August 21-23, 2012 2 Presentation Outline * What is the Award For? * What Research Work is being Supported? * Geochemical Research What is the Award For? * Provides Support for the Training of Two Graduate Students - Student 1: Involved in analysis of SAR images - Student 2: Involved in modeling of sub-surface geochemistry and application of models for policy decisions

442

New process modeling [sic], design, and control strategies for energy efficiency, high product quality, and improved productivity in the process industries. Final project report  

SciTech Connect

This project was concerned with the development of process design and control strategies for improving energy efficiency, product quality, and productivity in the process industries. In particular, (i) the resilient design and control of chemical reactors, and (ii) the operation of complex processing systems, was investigated. Specific topics studied included new process modeling procedures, nonlinear controller designs, and control strategies for multiunit integrated processes. Both fundamental and immediately applicable results were obtained. The new design and operation results from this project were incorporated into computer-aided design software and disseminated to industry. The principles and design procedures have found their way into industrial practice.

Ray, W. Harmon

2002-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

443

Project 244  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

PROJECT PARTNER Advanced Technology Systems, Inc. Pittsburgh, PA PROJECT PARTNERS Ohio University Athens, OH Texas A&M University-Kingsville Kingsville, TX WEBSITES http:...

444

Projects | ORNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and Conferences Supporting Organizations Supercomputing and Computation Home | Science & Discovery | Supercomputing and Computation | Projects Projects 1-10 of 180 Results Prev...

445

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CCS August 20-22, 2013 2 Presentation Outline * Benefits to the program * Project overall objectives * Technical status * Project summary * Conclusions and future plans 3 Benefit...

446

Characterization of materials for a reactive transport model validation experiment: Interim report on the caisson experiment. Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project  

SciTech Connect

Models used in performance assessment and site characterization activities related to nuclear waste disposal rely on simplified representations of solute/rock interactions, hydrologic flow field and the material properties of the rock layers surrounding the repository. A crucial element in the design of these models is the validity of these simplifying assumptions. An intermediate-scale experiment is being carried out at the Experimental Engineered Test Facility at Los Alamos Laboratory by the Los Alamos and Sandia National Laboratories to develop a strategy to validate key geochemical and hydrological assumptions in performance assessment models used by the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project.

Siegel, M.D.; Cheng, W.C. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Ward, D.B.; Bryan, C.R. [Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States). Dept. of Earth and Planetary Sciences

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

DOE/EIS-0265-SA-169: Supplement Analysis for the Watershed Management Program EIS --Idaho Model Watershed Habitat Projects - Pahsimeroi Fence Crossing (08/11/04)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Supplement Analysis for the Watershed Management Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0265/SA-169) Supplement Analysis for the Watershed Management Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0265/SA-169) Mickey Carter Fish and Wildlife Project Manager - KEWU-4 Proposed Action: Idaho Model Watershed Habitat Projects - Pahsimeroi Fence Crossing Project No: 1994-017-00 Watershed Management Techniques or Actions Addressed Under This Supplement Analysis (See App. A of the Watershed Management Program EIS): 2.1 Maintain Healthy Riparian Plant Communities, 2.15 Acquisition of Sensitive Riparian Resources, 6.10 Access Fencing Location: Lemhi County, Idaho Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and the Custer Soil and Water Conservation District Description of the Proposed Action: The Bonneville Power Administration is proposing to fund the installation of a fenced stream crossing over the Pahsimeroi River to enhance a livestock riparian exclosure.

448

Future Change of Western North Pacific Typhoons: Projections by a 20-km-Mesh Global Atmospheric Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Projected future changes in tropical cyclone (TC) activity over the western North Pacific (WNP) under the Special Report on Emissions Scenarios (SRES) A1B emission scenario were investigated using a 20-km-mesh, very-high-resolution Meteorological ...

Hiroyuki Murakami; Bin Wang; Akio Kitoh

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

Resurrection of the Bombay trans-harbour link project by using Wheaton's monocentric models of urban land use  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

BOMBAY TRANS-HARBOUR LINK PROJECT: A possible solution to Bombay's seemingly unsurmountable social problems. The primary idea behind this thesis is to present a new technique for the appraisal of large scale urban ...

Bhave, Shubhada

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

Incorporating livability benefits into the Federal Transit Administration New Starts project evaluation process through accessibility-based modeling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Department of Transportation's announcement of the "Livability initiative" for major transit projects in January 2010 has prompted the Federal Transit Administration (FTA) to reassess the criteria used in the evaluation ...

Ducas, Caroline R. (Caroline Rose)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

Modeling uncertainty in the New York City no. 7 subway line extension project using Decision Aids for Tunnelling (DAT)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Given the frequent cost overruns and schedule delays associated with underground construction projects, it is imperative that a detailed estimate of both be developed and considered prior to starting construction. The ...

Hung, Vinnie

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

Federal and State Structures to Support Financing Utility-Scale Solar Projects and the Business Models Designed to Utilize Them  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Utility-scale solar projects have grown rapidly in number and size over the last few years, driven in part by strong renewable portfolio standards (RPS) and federal incentives designed to stimulate investment in renewable energy technologies. This report provides an overview of such policies, as well as the project financial structures they enable, based on industry literature, publicly available data, and questionnaires conducted by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL).

Mendelsohn, M.; Kreycik, C.

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

Project Status  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Hybrid Generation Simulator Hybrid Generation Simulator HybSim© 1.0 DAVID TRUJILLO SANDIA NATIONAL LABORATORY Presented by Joshua Bartlett - University of Michigan Introduction * HybSim© 1.0 copyrighted 2006 * First license to University of Michigan Introduction HybSim© Model What - "Hybrid Simulator"; Tool designed to evaluate the economic and environmental benefits of adding renewable energy to the fossil fuel generation mix in remote and difficult-accessible locations. Why - Benefits of energy storage, decision analysis, risk analysis, load growth issues, load management, economic analysis, planning (what-ifs) Who - Availability to coops, field techs, project managers, administrative personnel Where - Remote villages, military installations, remote industrial systems; any climate

454

Project 350  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Gas Hydrates Gas Hydrates CONTACTS Ray Boswell Acting Technology Manager Gas Technology Management Division 304-285-4541 ray.boswell@netl.doe.gov James Ammer Director Gas Technology Management Division 304-285-4383 james.ammer@netl.doe.gov Kelly Rose Project Manager Gas Technology Management Division 304-285-4157 kelly.rose@netl.doe.gov Joseph Wilder Research Group Leader Simulation, Analysis and Computational Science Division 304-285-0989 joseph.wilder@netl.doe.gov NETL - DIRECTING THE DEVELOPMENT OF WORLD-CLASS GAS HYDRATE RESERVOIR SIMULATORS Development of reliable simulators that accurately predict the behavior methane hydrates in nature is a critical component of NETL's program to appraise the gas supply potential of hydrates. NETL is leading the development of a suite of modeling tools that are providing

455

Selecting Ensemble Members to Provide Regional Climate Change Information  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Climate model ensembles, such as the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project, phase 3 (CMIP3), are used to characterize broadscale ranges of projected regional climate change and their impacts. The 17-member Hadley Centre perturbed physics GCM ...

Carol F. McSweeney; Richard G. Jones; Ben B. B. Booth

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

Future Changes in Northern Hemisphere Snowfall  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Using simulations performed with 18 coupled atmosphere–ocean global climate models from phase 5 of the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP5), projections of the Northern Hemisphere snowfall under the representative concentration pathway (...

John P. Krasting; Anthony J. Broccoli; Keith W. Dixon; John R. Lanzante

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

Biophysical modelling and NDVI time series to project near-term forage supply: spectral analysis aided by wavelet denoising and ARIMA modelling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Point-based biophysical simulation of forage production coupled with 1-km AVHRR NDVI data was used to determine the feasibility of projecting forage conditions 84 days into the future to support stocking decision making for livestock production using ...

M. N. Alhamad; J. Stuth; M. Vannucci

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

A fuzzy robust evaluation model for selecting and ranking NPD projects using Bayesian belief network and weight-restricted DEA  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Due to brutal business competition, new product development (NPD) has become a key factor for promoting business sustainability. To help a company determine the direction of NPD for the future, this study applies the fuzzy analytical hierarchy procedure ... Keywords: Bayesian belief network, Fuzzy AHP, Fuzzy DEA, NPD risk, New product development project

Tzu-An Chiang; Z. H. Che

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

Science Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Argonne Argonne Science Project Ideas! Our Science Project section provides you with sample classroom projects and experiments, online aids for learning about science, as well as ideas for Science Fair Projects. Please select any project below to continue. Also, if you have an idea for a great project or experiment that we could share, please click our Ideas page. We would love to hear from you! Science Fair Ideas Science Fair Ideas! The best ideas for science projects are learning about and investigating something in science that interests you. NEWTON has a list of Science Fair linkd that can help you find the right topic. Toothpick Bridge Web Sites Toothpick Bridge Sites! Building a toothpick bridge is a great class project for physics and engineering students. Here are some sites that we recommend to get you started!

460

Projections of Full-Fuel-Cycle Energy and Emissions Metrics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2012a. “Analysis & Projections - Models & Documentation. ”Projections of Full-Fuel-Cycle Energy and Emissions MetricsGovernment purposes. Projections of Full-Fuel-Cycle Energy

Coughlin, Katie

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

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461

Impact of Climate Drift on Twenty-First-Century Projection in a Coupled Atmospheric–Ocean General Circulation Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Reducing climate drift in coupled atmosphere–ocean general circulation models (AOGCMs) usually requires 1000–2000 years of spinup, which has not been practical for every modeling group to do. For the purpose of evaluating the impact of climate ...

Mao-Chang Liang; Li-Ching Lin; Ka-Kit Tung; Yuk L. Yung; Shan Sun

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

462

Power Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Power Projects Power Projects Contact SN Customers Environmental Review-NEPA Operations & Maintenance Planning & Projects Power Marketing Rates You are here: SN Home page > About SNR Power Projects Central Valley: In California's Central Valley, 18 dams create reservoirs that can store 13 million acre-feet of water. The project's 615 miles of canals irrigate an area 400 miles long and 45 miles wide--almost one third of California. Powerplants at the dams have an installed capacity of 2,099 megawatts and provide enough energy for 650,000 people. Transmission lines total about 865 circuit-miles. Washoe: This project in west-central Nevada and east-central California was designed to improve the regulation of runoff from the Truckee and Carson river systems and to provide supplemental irrigation water and drainage, as well as water for municipal, industrial and fishery use. The project's Stampede Powerplant has a maximum capacity of 4 MW.

463

Supplement Analysis for the Watershed Management Program EIS - Idaho Model Watershed Habitat Projects - Welp Riparian Enhancement Fence  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Bonneville Power Administration is proposing to fund the installation of approximately 1.5 miles of post and wire fence along Valley Creek in Stanley, Idaho. The proposed fence will meet or exceed BPA's minimum requirement of a 35-foot setback from the stream. Fence posts will be driven into the ground with a post ponder. The goal of this project is to enhance salmon and steelhead rearing and migration habitat through exclusion fencing.

N /A

2004-08-04T23:59:59.000Z