Sample records for model ii compliance

  1. National Environmental Policy Act compliance guide. Volume II (reference book)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document (Volume II of the National Environmental Policy Act Compliance Guide) contains current copies of regulations and guidance from the Council on Environmental Quality, the Department of Energy, the Department of State, and the Environmental Protection Agency, related to compliance with the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA).

  2. TR-IIS-06-006 Compliance Enforcement of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Sheng-Wei

    .Y. Yu, P.C. Hsiu, C.S. Shih, J.W.S. Liu May 29, 2006 || Technical Report No. TR-IIS-06-006 http. Shih, Member, IEEE, J. W. S. Liu, Fellow, IEEE Abstract--Medication dispensers treated in this paper University, Taipei, Taiwan. Their email addresses are {r94922048, r91004, cshih}@csie.nthu.edu.tw. J. W. S

  3. Environmental Compliance Guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Volume II supplements Vol. I in providing procedures, relative timing, and details to assist in achieving compliance with Federal environmental requirements. (PSB)

  4. CSC6870 Computer Graphics II Geometric Modeling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hua, Jing

    CSC6870 Computer Graphics II Geometric Modeling CSC6870 Computer Graphics II Overview 3D Shape, subdivision surfaces, implicit surfaces, particles. · Solids CSC6870 Computer Graphics II Basic Shapes CSC6870 Computer Graphics II Fundamental Shapes CSC6870 Computer Graphics II Fundamental Shapes CSC6870 Computer

  5. Environmental Compliance Schofield Barracks, Hawaii

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Environmental Compliance Specialist Schofield Barracks, Hawaii POSITION An Environmental Compliance Specialist (Research Associate II Special) position is available with the Center for Environmental Management resource stewardship. We collaborate with our sponsors and within CSU to resolve complex environmental

  6. FORMAL MODELS OF QUALITY AND ISO 9000 COMPLIANCE: AN INFORMATION SYSTEMS APPROACH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fox, Mark S.

    A systematic approach to quality management, that is a systems perspective of quality-- total quality this formalization to reason about product, process, or system-wide quality, so that better quality managementFORMAL MODELS OF QUALITY AND ISO 9000 COMPLIANCE: AN INFORMATION SYSTEMS APPROACH Henry M. Kim

  7. Alternative Compliance

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Compliance Individual Permit: Alternative Compliance When permittees believe they have installed measures to minimize pollutants but are unable to certify completion of corrective...

  8. Environmental Compliance Guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Guide is intended to assist Department of Energy personnel by providing information on the NEPA process, the processes of other environmental statutes that bear on the NEPA process, the timing relationships between the NEPA process and these other processes, as well as timing relationships between the NEPA process and the development process for policies, programs, and projects. This information should be helpful not only in formulating environmental compliance plans but also in achieving compliance with NEPA and various other environmental statutes. The Guide is divided into three parts with related appendices: Part I provides guidance for developing environmental compliance plans for DOE actions; Part II is devoted to NEPA with detailed flowcharts depicting the compliance procedures required by CEQ regulations and Department of Energy NEPA Guidelines; and Part III contains a series of flowcharts for other Federal environmental requirements that may apply to DOE projects.

  9. Compliance problems of small utility systems with the Powerplant and Industrial Fuel Use Act of 1978: volume II - appendices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A study of the problems of compliance with the Powerplant and Industrial Fuel Use Act of 1978 experienced by electric utility systems which have a total generating capacity of less than 2000 MW is presented. This volume presents the following appendices: (A) case studies (Farmington, New Mexico; Lamar, Colorado; Dover, Delaware; Wolverine Electric Cooperative, Michigan; Central Telephone and Utilities, Kansas; Sierra Pacific Power Company, Nevada; Vero Beach, Florida; Lubbock, Texas; Western Farmers Cooperative, Oklahoma; and West Texas Utilities Company, Texas); (B) contacts and responses to study; (C) joint action legislation chart; (D) Texas Municipal Power Agency case study; (E) existing generating units jointly owned with small utilities; (F) future generating units jointly owned with small utilities; (G) Federal Register Notice of April 17, 1980, and letter of inquiry to utilities; (H) small utility responses; and (I) Section 744, PIFUA. (WHK)

  10. Part II, General Compliance Supplement

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    the page; find the Recipient Reported Data Search section 36 - Click on -Go (do not enter the name of the Agency, StateTerritory or the amount) to be taken to the -Advanced...

  11. II. GENERAL COMPLIANCE SUPPLEMENT INTRODUCTION

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    menu - Scroll down to the center of the page; find the Recipient Reported Data Search section - Click on "Go" (do not enter the name of the Agency, StateTerritory or the...

  12. II. GENERAL COMPLIANCE SUPPLEMENT INTRODUCTION

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of Energy Power.pdf11-161-LNG | Department ofHTS Cable ProjectsHistoryia/802871 IA Blog| DepartmentThisIII.

  13. DOE NEPA Compliance Officers

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    NEPA Compliance Officers NEPA Compliance Officers are listed first for Program Offices, then Power Marketing Administrations, then Field Offices. Please send updates to...

  14. Modeling the Arm II core in MicroCap IV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dalton, A.C.

    1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper reports on how an electrical model for the core of the Arm II machine was created and how to use this model. We wanted to get a model for the electrical characteristics of the ARM II core, in order to simulate this machine and to assist in the design of a future machine. We wanted this model to be able to simulate saturation, variable loss, and reset. Using the Hodgdon model and the circuit analysis program MicroCap IV, this was accomplished. This paper is written in such a way as to allow someone not familiar with the project to understand it.

  15. Simplified Risk Model Version II (SRM-II) Structure and Application

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    S. A. Eide; T. E. Wierman

    1999-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Simplified Risk Model Version II (SRM-II) is a quantitative tool for efficiently evaluating the risk from Department of Energy waste management activities. Risks evaluated include human safety and health and environmental impact. Both accidents and normal, incident-free operation are considered. The risk models are simplifications of more detailed risk analyses, such as those found in environmental impact statements, safety analysis reports, and performance assessments. However, wherever possible, conservatisms in such models have been removed to obtain best estimate results. The SRM-II is used to support DOE complex-wide environmental management integration studies. Typically such studies involve risk predictions covering the entire waste management program, including such activities as initial storage, handling, treatment, interim storage, transportation, and final disposal.

  16. Simplified Risk Model Version II (SRM-II) Structure and Application

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eide, Steven Arvid; Wierman, Thomas Edward

    1999-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Simplified Risk Model Version II (SRM-II) is a quantitative tool for efficiently evaluating the risk from Department of Energy waste management activities. Risks evaluated include human safety and health and environmental impact. Both accidents and normal, incident-free operation are considered. The risk models are simplifications of more detailed risk analyses, such as those found in environmental impact statements, safety analysis reports, and performance assessments. However, wherever possible, conservatisms in such models have been removed to obtain best estimate results. The SRM-II is used to support DOE complex-wide environmental management integration studies. Typically such activities involve risk predictions including such activities as initial storage, handling, treatment, interim storage, transportation, and final disposal.

  17. Modeling gas and brine migration for assessing compliance of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vaughn, P. [Applied Physics, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Butcher, B. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Helton, J. [Arizona State Univ., Tempe, AZ (United States); Swift, P. [Tech. Reps., Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    At the request of the WIPP Project Integration Office (WPIO) of the DOE, the WIPP Performance Assessment (PA) Department of Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) has completed preliminary uncertainty and sensitivity analyses of gas and brine migration away from the undisturbed repository. This paper contains descriptions of the numerical model and simulations, including model geometries and parameter values, and a summary of major conclusions from sensitivity analyses. Because significant transport of contaminants can only occur in a fluid (gas or brine) medium, two-phase flow modeling can provide an estimate of the distance to which contaminants can migrate. Migration of gas or brine beyond the RCRA ``disposal-unit boundary`` or the Standard`s accessible environment constitutes a potential, but not certain, violation and may require additional evaluations of contaminant concentrations.

  18. ENVIRONMENTAL COMPLIANCE SERVICES CENTER FOR ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT OF MILITARY LANDS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    · Environmental Database Development and Management · Storm Water Modeling #12;ENVIRONMENTAL COMPLIANCE SERVICES CENTER FOR ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT OF MILITARY LANDS CEMML of environmental managers. The Center provides assistance to environmental managers in compliance areas such as air

  19. Modeling of Alpine Atmospheric Dynamics II

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gohm, Alexander

    for large mesh sizes (x 20 km) to vertically redistribute heat and moisture in a grid column when model in a numerical model Convective cloud systems are not resolved if the mesh size of the grid is larger than small to treat convection as sub-grid scale process but too large to treat it explicitly For example

  20. PART II TECHNIQUES PROJECT MODELLING OF THE CORROSION OF

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cambridge, University of

    - 1 - PART II TECHNIQUES PROJECT MODELLING OF THE CORROSION OF BINARY ALLOYS R.A. Jones Produced and temperatures. In this work a neural network method was employed to study how the rate of corrosion of Fe accordance with the literature. 1. Introduction The atmosphere is the corrosive environment to which alloys

  1. Some Hamiltonian models of friction II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Egli, Daniel; Gang Zhou [Institute for Theoretical Physics, ETH Zurich, CH-8093 Zuerich (Switzerland)

    2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In the present paper we consider the motion of a very heavy tracer particle in a medium of a very dense, non-interacting Bose gas. We prove that, in a certain mean-field limit, the tracer particle will be decelerated and come to rest somewhere in the medium. Friction is caused by emission of Cerenkov radiation of gapless modes into the gas. Mathematically, a system of semilinear integro-differential equations, introduced in Froehlich et al. ['Some hamiltonian models of friction,' J. Math. Phys. 52(8), 083508 (2011)], describing a tracer particle in a dispersive medium is investigated, and decay properties of the solution are proven. This work is an extension of Froehlich et al. ['Friction in a model of hamiltonian dynamics,' Commun. Math. Phys. 315(2), 401-444 (2012)]; it is an extension because no weak coupling limit for the interaction between tracer particle and medium is assumed. The technical methods used are dispersive estimates and a contraction principle.

  2. Environmental Compliance Performance | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Compliance Environmental Compliance Performance Environmental Compliance Performance Most Office of Environmental Management (EM) cleanup is being performed under the...

  3. 2014-12-22 Issuance: Alternative Efficiency Determination Methods, Basic Model Definition, and Compliance for Commercial HVAC, Refrigeration, and Water Heating Equipment; Final Rule

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This document is a pre-publication Federal Register final rule regarding alternative efficiency determination methods, basic model definition, and compliance for commercial HVAC, refrigeration, and water heating equipment , as issued by the Deputy Assistant Secretary for Energy Efficiency on December 22, 2014. Though it is not intended or expected, should any discrepancy occur between the document posted here and the document published in the Federal Register, the Federal Register publication controls. This document is being made available through the Internet solely as a means to facilitate the public's access to this document.

  4. Fracture compliance estimation using borehole tube waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bakku, Sudhish Kumar

    We tested two models, one for tube-wave generation and the other for tube-wave attenuation at a fracture intersecting a borehole that can be used to estimate fracture compliance, fracture aperture, and lateral extent. In ...

  5. NEPA COMPLIANCE SURVEY

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    D D Hazardous Air Pollutants? Is the project subject to emissions limitations in an Air Quality 0 D Control Region? 2 Revised on: 11122008 NEPA COMPLIANCE SURVEY Impacts...

  6. NEPA COMPLIANCE SURVEY

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    ? 2 NEPA COMPLIANCE SURVEY 338 Is the project subject to emissions limitations in an Air Quality 0 181 0 Control Region? Impacts If YES, then complete below. Anticipated?...

  7. NEPA COMPLIANCE SURVEY

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    0 D Hazardous Air Pollutants? Is the project subject to emissions limitations in an Air Quality D 0 Control Region? 2 Revised on: 11122008 NEPA COMPLIANCE SURVEY Impacts...

  8. NEPA COMPLIANCE SURVEY

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    D D Hazardous Air Pollutants? Is the project subject to emissions limitations in an Air Quality D D Control Region? 2 Revised on: 11122008 NEPA COMPLIANCE SURVEY Impacts...

  9. NEPA COMPLIANCE SURVEY

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    0 0 Hazardous Air Pollutants? Is the project subject to emissions limitations in an Air Quality 0 0 Control Region? 2 Revised on: 11122008 NEPA COMPLIANCE SURVEY Impacts...

  10. Bound on Z{sup '} mass from CDMS II in the dark left-right gauge model II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khalil, Shaaban [Centre for Theoretical Physics, British University in Egypt, El Sherouk City, Postal No. 11837, P.O. Box 43 (Egypt); Department of Mathematics, Ain Shams University, Faculty of Science, Cairo 11566 (Egypt); Lee, Hye-Sung [Department of Physics, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York 11973 (United States); Ma, Ernest [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Riverside, California 92521 (United States)

    2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    With the recent possible signal of dark matter from the CDMS II experiment, the Z{sup '} mass of a new version of the dark left-right gauge model (DLRM II) is predicted to be at around a TeV. As such, it has an excellent discovery prognosis at the operating Large Hadron Collider.

  11. Environmental Compliance 2-1 2. Environmental Compliance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pennycook, Steve

    Environmental Compliance 2-1 2. Environmental Compliance It is DOE-ORO and NNSA policy to conduct its operations in compliance with federal, state, and local environmental protection laws, regulations operations in compliance with the letter and intent of applicable environmental statutes. The protection

  12. Environmental Compliance 2-1 2. Environmental Compliance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pennycook, Steve

    Environmental Compliance 2-1 2. Environmental Compliance It is DOE-ORO and NNSA policy to conduct operations in compliance with federal, state, and local environmental protection laws, regulations operations in compliance with the letter and intent of applicable environmental statutes. The protection

  13. E-Print Network 3.0 - administration compliance program Sample...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    finance, compliance issues related to federally funded programs, operational... efficiency, strategic planning, financial modeling, and other administrative,...

  14. Threat Insight Quarterly Regulatory Compliance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the importance of integrating regulatory compliance into an organization's overall strategic IT security planning

  15. Ethics and Compliance Manager

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This position is located in the Office of the Deputy Administrator, Compliance and Governance Section. Additional vacancies may be filled through this vacancy announcement or if they become available.

  16. NEPA COMPLIANCE SURVEY

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    1:8:1 D Hazardous Air Pollutants? Is the project subject to emissions limitations in an Air Quality D 1:8:1 D Control Region? 2 NEPA COMPLIANCE SURVEY Impacts If YES, then...

  17. NEPA COMPLIANCE SURVEY

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    81211 0 mjt NEPA COMPLIANCE SURVEY Is the project subject to emissions limitations in an Air Quality 0 I8'J 0 Control Region? Impacts If YES, then c omplete below. Anticipated?...

  18. NEPA COMPLIANCE SURVEY

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    0 t8l 0 Hazardous Air Pollutants? Is the project subject to emissions limitations in an Air Quality 0 t8l 0 Control Region? 2 Revised on: 11122008 NEPA COMPLIANCE SURVEY Impacts...

  19. NEPA COMPLIANCE SURVEY

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    0 181 0 Hazardous Air Pollutants? Is the project subject to emissions limitations in an Air Quality 0 181 0 Control Region? 2 Revised on: 11122008 NEPA COMPLIANCE SURVEY Impacts...

  20. NEPA COMPLIANCE SURVEY

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    1:8:1 D Hazardous Air Pollutants? Is the project subject to emissions limitations in an Air Quality D 1:8:1 D Control Region? 2 Revised on: 11122008 NEPA COMPLIANCE SURVEY...

  1. NEPA COMPLIANCE SURVEY

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    0 mjt NEPA COMPLIANCE SURVEY 334 Is the project subject to emissions limitations in an Air Quality 0 :gl 0 Control Region? Impacts If YES, then complete below. Anticipated?...

  2. NEPA COMPLIANCE SURVEY

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    D 81 D Hazardous Air Pollutants? Is the project subject to emissions limitations in an Air Quality D gl D Control Region? 2 Revised on: 111 22008 NEPA COMPLIANCE SURVEY...

  3. NEPA COMPLIANCE SURVEY

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    D 181 D Hazardous Air Pollutants? Is the project subject to emissions limitations in an Air Quality D 181 D Control Region? 2 Revised on: 11122008 NEPA COMPLIANCE SURVEY Impacts...

  4. NEPA COMPLIANCE SURVEY

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    D 18 0 Hazardous Air Pollutants? Is the project subject to emissions limitations in an Air Quality D 18 D Control Region? 2 Revised on: 111212008 NEPA COMPLIANCE SURVEY Impacts...

  5. NEPA COMPLIANCE SURVEY

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    0 181 0 Hazardous Air Pollutants ? Is the project subject to emissions limitations in an Air Quality 0 181 0 Control Region? 2 Revised on: 11122008 NEPA COMPLIANCE SURVEY Impacts...

  6. NEPA COMPLIANCE SURVEY

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    0 81 0 Hazardous Air Pollutants? Is the project subject to emissions limitations in a n Air Quality 0 81 0 Control Region? 2 Revised on: 111 22008 NEPA COMPLIANCE SURVEY...

  7. NEPA COMPLIANCE SURVEY

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    D t8l D Hazardous Air Pollutants? Is the project subject to emissions limitations in an Air Quality D t8l D Control Region? 2 Revised on: 11122008 NEPA COMPLIANCE SURVEY Impacts...

  8. NEPA COMPLIANCE SURVEY

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    0 I8J D Hazardous Air Pollutants? Is the project subject to emissions limitations in an Air Quality 0 I8J 0 Control Region? 2 Revised on: 11122008 NEPA COMPLIANCE SURVEY Impacts...

  9. NEPA COMPLIANCE SURVEY

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    0 I8J 0 Hazardous Air Pollutants? Is the project subject to emissions limitations in an Air Quality 0 I8J 0 Control Region? 2 Revised on: 11122008 NEPA COMPLIANCE SURVEY Impacts...

  10. NEPA COMPLIANCE SURVEY

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    D 181 D Hazardous Air Pollutants? Is the project subject to emissions limitations in an Air Quality D 181 0 Control Region? 2 Revised on: 11 122008 NEPA COMPLIANCE SURVEY...

  11. NEPA COMPLIANCE SURVEY

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    D D Hazardous Air Pollutants? Is the project subject to emissions limitations in an Air Quality D D Control Region? 2 Revised on: 11122008 I NEPA COMPLIANCE SURVEY 260...

  12. NEPA COMPLIANCE SURVEY

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    D 0 Hazardous A ir Pollutants? Is the project subject to emissions limitations in an Air Quality D D Control Region? 3 Revised 821 0 mjt NEPA COMPLIANCE SURVEY Impacts If...

  13. NEPA COMPLIANCE SURVEY

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    D 18 D Hazardous Air Pollutants? Is the project subject to emissions limitations in an Air Quality D 18 D Control Region? 2 Revised on: 11122008 NEPA COMPLIANCE SURVEY Impacts...

  14. NEPA COMPLIANCE SURVEY

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    0 0 Hazardous Air Pollutants? Is the project subject to emissions limitations In an Air Quality 0 l:8l 0 Control Region? 2 Revised on: 111212008 NEPA COMPLIANCE SURVEY...

  15. NEPA COMPLIANCE SURVEY

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    0 mjt NEPA COMPLIANCE SURVEY 336 Is the project subject to emissions limitations in an Air Quality D t8J 0 Control Region? Impacts If YES, then complete below. Anticipated?...

  16. NEPA COMPLIANCE SURVEY

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    0 18) 0 Hazardous Air Pollutants? Is the project subject to emissions limitations in an Air Quality 0 18) 0 Control Region? 2 Revised on: 11122008 NEPA COMPLIANCE SURVEY Impacts...

  17. NEPA COMPLIANCE SURVEY

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    0 181 0 Hazardous Air Pollutants? Is the project subject to emissions limitations in an Air Quality 0 181 0 Control Region? 2 Revised on: 111 22008 NEPA COMPLIANCE SURVEY...

  18. NEPA COMPLIANCE SURVEY

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    I8J 0 Hazardous Air Pollutants? I s the project subject to emission s limitations in a n Air Quality 0 181 0 Control Region? 2 Revised on: 11122008 NEPA COMPLIANCE SURVEY Impacts...

  19. NEPA COMPLIANCE SURVEY

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    0 181 0 Hazardous Air Pollutants? Is the project subject to emissions limitations in an Air Qua lity 0 181 0 Control Region? 2 Revised 82J1 0 mjt NEPA COMPLIANCE SURVEY Impacts...

  20. NEPA COMPLIANCE SURVEY

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    0 181 0 Hazardous Air Pollutants? Is the project subject to emissions limitations in an Air Quality 0 181 0 Control Region? 2 Revised on: 1111212008 NEPA COMPLIANCE SURVEY Impacts...

  1. NEPA COMPLIANCE SURVEY

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    D D Hazardous Air Pollutants? Is the project subject to emissions limitations in an Air Quality D 1:8:1 D Control Region? 2 Revised on: 11122008 NEPA COMPLIANCE SURVEY...

  2. NEPA COMPLIANCE SURVEY

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    f8J 0 Hazardous A. ir Pollutants? Is the project subject to emissions limitations in an Air Quality 0 f8J 0 Control Region? 2 Revised on: 1111212008 NEPA COMPLIANCE SURVEY Impacts...

  3. NEPA COMPLIANCE SURVEY

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    D 8J D Hazardous Air Pollutants? Is the project subject to emissions limitations in an Air Quality 0 1:81 D Control Region? 2 Revised 8121 0 mjt NEPA COMPLIANCE SURVEY Impacts...

  4. LHC Phenomenology of SO(10) Models with Yukawa Unification II

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Archana Anandakrishnan; B. Charles Bryant; Stuart Raby

    2014-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper we study Yukawa-unified SO(10) SUSY GUTs with two types of SO(10) boundary conditions: (i) universal gaugino masses and (ii) non-universal gaugino masses with effective "mirage" mediation. With these boundary conditions, we perform a global chi^2 analysis to obtain the parameters consistent with 11 low energy observables, including the top, bottom, and tau masses. Both boundary conditions have universal scalar masses and "just so" splitting for the up- and down-type Higgs masses. In these models, the third family scalars are lighter than the first two families and the gauginos are lighter than all the scalars. We therefore focus on the gluino phenomenology in these models. In particular, we estimate the lowest allowed gluino mass in our models coming from the most recent LHC data and compare these to limits obtained using simplified models. We find that the lower bound on M_gluino in Yukawa-unified SO(10) SUSY GUTs is generically ~1.2 TEV at the 1 sigma level unless there is considerable degeneracy between the gluino and the LSP, in which case the bounds are much weaker. Hence many of our benchmark points are not ruled out by the present LHC data and are still viable models which can be tested at LHC 14.

  5. Phase II Transport Model of Corrective Action Unit 98: Frenchman Flat, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada, Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gregg Ruskuaff

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document, the Phase II Frenchman Flat transport report, presents the results of radionuclide transport simulations that incorporate groundwater radionuclide transport model statistical and structural uncertainty, and lead to forecasts of the contaminant boundary (CB) for a set of representative models from an ensemble of possible models. This work, as described in the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) Underground Test Area (UGTA) strategy (FFACO, 1996; amended 2010), forms an essential part of the technical basis for subsequent negotiation of the compliance boundary of the Frenchman Flat corrective action unit (CAU) by Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP) and National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO). Underground nuclear testing via deep vertical shafts was conducted at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) from 1951 until 1992. The Frenchman Flat area, the subject of this report, was used for seven years, with 10 underground nuclear tests being conducted. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), NNSA/NSO initiated the UGTA Project to assess and evaluate the effects of underground nuclear tests on groundwater at the NTS and vicinity through the FFACO (1996, amended 2010). The processes that will be used to complete UGTA corrective actions are described in the Corrective Action Strategy in the FFACO Appendix VI, Revision No. 2 (February 20, 2008).

  6. Physics of Aquatic Systems II, 9. Modeling Universitt HeidelbergInstitut fr Umweltphysik Physics of Aquatic Systems II

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aeschbach-Hertig, Werner

    HeidelbergInstitut fr Umweltphysik 5 Influence of mixing on transient gas tracer ages 2-comp. mixing Mook, 2001 Example: Mixing of fast and slow runoff components in a river Physics of Aquatic Systems II, 9. Modeling Universitt HeidelbergInstitut fr Umweltphysik 10 Mixed reactor model (exponential

  7. Low Mach Number Modeling of Type Ia Supernovae. II. Energy Evolution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Almgren, Ann S.; Bell, John B.; Rendleman, Charles A.; Zingale, Mike

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Number Modeling of Type Ia Supernovae. II. Energy EvolutionIa. Subject headings: supernovae: general white dwarfs the ignition of Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) is critical to

  8. Estimation of fracture compliance from tubewaves generated at a fracture intersecting a borehole

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bakku, Sudhish Kumar

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Understanding fracture compliance is important for characterizing fracture networks and for inferring fluid flow in the subsurface. In an attempt to estimate fracture compliance in the field, we developed a new model to ...

  9. The black hole challenge in Randall-Sundrum II model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nikolaos D. Pappas

    2014-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Models postulating the existence of additional spacelike dimensions of macroscopic or even infinite size, while viewing our observable universe as merely a 3-brane living in a higher-dimensional bulk were a major breakthrough when proposed some 15 years ago. The most interesting among them both in terms of elegance of the setup and of the richness of the emerging phenomenology is the Randall-Sundrum II model where one infinite extra spacelike dimension is considered with an AdS topology, characterized by the warping effect caused by the presence of a negative cosmological constant in the bulk. A major drawback of this model is that despite numerous efforts no line element has ever been found that could describe a stable, regular, realistic black hole. Finding a smoothly behaved such solution supported by the presence of some more or less conventional fields either in the bulk and/or on the brane is the core of the black hole challenge. After a comprehensive presentation of the details of the model and the analysis of the significance and the utility of getting a specific analytic black hole solution, several (unsuccessful) analytic and numerical approaches to the problem developed over the years are presented with some discussion about their results. The chapter closes with the latest numerical results that actually consists a major advancement in the effort to address the challenge, the presentation of the most recent analytic work trying (and unfortunately failing) to build a solution assuming the existence of unconventional scalar fields and some ideas about the routes the forthcoming analytic approaches should explore.

  10. II

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartment ofDepartment ofof EnergyYou$0.C. 20545*. . : '* FEB1f\lMUC4cb90,fioml7aa AMY yII

  11. II

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartment ofDepartment ofof EnergyYou$0.C. 20545*. . : '* FEB1f\lMUC4cb90,fioml7aa AMY yII

  12. Compliance | ARPA-E

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinanInformation InInformationCenterResearchCASLNanoporous MaterialsCompliance View ARPA-E NEPA Compliance

  13. Great Lakes Spatially Distributed Watershed Model of Water and Materials Runoff Thomas E. Croley II

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Great Lakes Spatially Distributed Watershed Model of Water and Materials Runoff Thomas E. Croley II.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has identified contaminated sediments, urban runoff and storm sewers there are no integrated spatially distributed physically based watershed-scale hydrological/water quality models available

  14. Wake II model for hydrodynamic forces on marine pipelines for the wave plus current case

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ramirez Sabag, Said

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The concept of the Wake II model for the determination of the hydrodynamic forces on marine pipelines is extended to include the wave plus current case. There are two main differences between the Wake II and the traditional model that uses Morison...

  15. Environmental Compliance 2-1 2. Environmental Compliance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pennycook, Steve

    and DOE National Nuclear Security Administration policy to conduct its operations in compliance, and best management practices. DOE and its contractors make every effort to conduct operationsEnvironmental Compliance 2-1 2. Environmental Compliance It is DOE Oak Ridge Operations Office

  16. Environmental Compliance 2-1 2. Environmental Compliance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pennycook, Steve

    Security Administration (NNSA) policy to conduct operations in compliance with federal, state, and local. DOE and its contractors make every effort to conduct operations in compliance with the letter three ORR facilities operated in compliance with the regulatory dose limits of Tennessee Rule 1200

  17. COMPLIANCE FORMS SUMMARY APPENDIX A

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    approach is utilized for compliance, the CF-1R forms are produced by the compliance software. Thermal Mass. Thermal Mass Worksheet (WS-1R) This worksheet is completed by the documentation author when complying is used to calculate weight-averaged U-factors for prescriptive envelope compliance. #12;Appendix

  18. Environmental Compliance Issue Coordination

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1993-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

    To establish the Department of Energy (DOE) requirements for coordination of significant environmental compliance issues to ensure timely development and consistent application of Departmental environmental policy and guidance. Cancels DOE O 5400.2. Para. 5a(2) and 5a(7) canceled by DOE O 231.1.

  19. Hybrid coupled models of the tropical Paci c | II ENSO prediction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hsieh, William

    Hybrid coupled models of the tropical Paci#12;c | II ENSO prediction by Youmin Tang 1 , William W: ytang@cims.nyu.edu #12; Abstract Two hybrid coupled models (HCMs), a dynamical ocean model coupled Introduction Models for ENSO prediction can be categorized into purely statistical models, hybrid coupled

  20. Fleet Compliance Results for MY 2011/FY 2012 (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This annual report summarizes the compliance results of state and alternative fuel provider fleets covered by the Energy Policy Act of 1992 (EPAct) for model year 2011/fiscal year 2012.

  1. Energy policy modeling: United States and Canadian experiences. Volume II. Integrative energy policy models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ziemba, W.T.; Schwartz, S.L. (eds.)

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Canadian Energy Policy Modeling Conference, held in North Vancouver, May 18-20, 1978, was organized to assess the state of the art in energy modeling in North America. A major aim of the conference was to determine the extent to which energy modeling had and could make a contribution to the energy-policy decision-making process. Two volumes contain revised and updated versions of the major papers presented at the conference plus edited transcripts of the panel discussions and several additional papers aimed at particular topics deemed worthy of further study. For this volume, Vol. II, a separate abstract was prepared for each of 17 papers, 2 panel discussions, and three session-introduction commentaries for Energy Abstracts for Policy Analysis (EAPA); 7 abstracts will appear in Energy Research Abstracts (ERA).

  2. Compliance Agreements | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Agreements Compliance Agreements This photo shows the Savannah River Sites Heavy Water Components Test Reactor during decommissioning. This photo shows the Savannah...

  3. FAQS Reference Guide Environmental Compliance

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This reference guide addresses the competency statements in the June 2011 edition of DOE-STD-1156-2011, Environmental Compliance Functional Area Qualification Standard.

  4. Compliance Certification Application

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed New SubstationCleanCommunity Involvement andMISR, and4 NComplexComplexedCompliance

  5. Environmental Compliance 2-1 2. Environmental Compliance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pennycook, Steve

    to conduct its operations in compliance with federal, state, and local environmental protection laws contractors make every effort to conduct operations in compliance with the letter and intent of applicableMahon, and L. G. Shipe Abstract It is the policy of the U.S. Department of Energy Oak Ridge Operations Office

  6. Policy on Compliance in Athletics Policy on Compliance in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sridhar, Srinivas

    Policy on Compliance in Athletics 07/1/2014 Policy on Compliance in Athletics I. Purpose and Scope conference rules, and university policies and procedures. This policy applies to student with athletics rules, policies and procedures, including NCAA rules and regulations. Other terms used herein

  7. NSLS-II: Nonlinear Model Calibration for Synchrotrons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bengtsson, J.

    2010-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

    This tech note is essentially a summary of a lecture we delivered to the Acc. Phys. Journal Club Apr, 2010. However, since the estimated accuracy of these methods has been naive and misleading in the field of particle accelerators, i.e., ignores the impact of noise, we will elaborate on this in some detail. A prerequisite for a calibration of the nonlinear Hamiltonian is that the quadratic part has been understood, i.e., that the linear optics for the real accelerator has been calibrated. For synchrotron light source operations, this problem has been solved by the interactive LOCO technique/tool (Linear Optics from Closed Orbits). Before that, in the context of hadron accelerators, it has been done by signal processing of turn-by-turn BPM data. We have outlined how to make a basic calibration of the nonlinear model for synchrotrons. In particular, we have shown how this was done for LEAR, CERN (antiprotons) in the mid-80s. Specifically, our accuracy for frequency estimation was {approx} 1 x 10{sup -5} for 1024 turns (to calibrate the linear optics) and {approx} 1 x 10{sup -4} for 256 turns for tune footprint and betatron spectrum. For a comparison, the estimated tune footprint for stable beam for NSLS-II is {approx}0.1. Since the transverse damping time is {approx}20 msec, i.e., {approx}4,000 turns. There is no fundamental difference for: antiprotons, protons, and electrons in this case. Because the estimated accuracy for these methods in the field of particle accelerators has been naive, i.e., ignoring the impact of noise, we have also derived explicit formula, from first principles, for a quantitative statement. For e.g. N = 256 and 5% noise we obtain {delta}{nu} {approx} 1 x 10{sup -5}. A comparison with the state-of-the-arts in e.g. telecomm and electrical engineering since the 60s is quite revealing. For example, Kalman filter (1960), crucial for the: Ranger, Mariner, and Apollo (including the Lunar Module) missions during the 60s. Or Claude Shannon et al since the 40s for that matter. Conclusion: what's elementary in the latter is considered 'advanced', if at all, in the former. It is little surprise then that published measurements typically contains neither error bars (for the random errors) nor estimates for the systematic in the former discipline. We have also showed how to estimate the state space by turn-by-turn data from two adjacent BPMs. And how to improve the resolution of the nonlinear resonance spectrum by Fourier analyzing the linear action variables instead of the betatron motion. In fact, the state estimator could be further improved by adding a Kalman filter. For transparency, we have also summarized on how these techniques provide a framework- and method for a TQM (Total Quality Management) approach for the main ring. Of course, to make the ($2.5M) turn-by-turn data acquisition system that is being implemented (for all the BPMs) useful, a means ({approx}10% contingency for the BPM system) to drive the beam is obviously required.

  8. Super Models, Old King Coal II, & Civil Disobedience For fellow technocrats: "Climate simulations for 1880-2003 with GISS modelE", to appear soon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hansen, James E.

    Super Models, Old King Coal II, & Civil Disobedience Model: For fellow technocrats: "Climate simulations for 1880-2003 with GISS modelE", to appear soon in Clim. Dyn., is available at http and filesize.) The paper documents how well the model simulates past climate. Simulations with this model

  9. Make Model SPECS ACURA ILX (Model Year 2013) 2.0L 4, auto stk [P] ULEV II / Bin 5 45

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    II / Bin 5 42 BMW 328i (Model Year 2013) 2.0L 4, auto stk [P] Bin 5 / ULEV II 42 BMW 328i (Model Year 2013) 2.0L 4, manual [P] ULEV II / Bin 5 43 BMW 328i XDRIVE (Model Year 2013) 2.0L 4, auto stk Awd [P] ULEV II / Bin 5 41 BMW 335i (Model Year 2013) 3.0L 6, auto stk [P] ULEV II / Bin 5 41 BMW 528i (Model

  10. Phenomenology of heterotic and type II orientifold string models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mayes, Van Eric

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    on a variety of orientifold backgrounds. In particular, we construct ?ipped SU(5), Pati-Salam, and MSSM-like models. The phenomenological properties of these models are studied. For one model in particular, we ?nd that we may explain the quark masses...

  11. 2014-09-18 Issuance: Energy Conservation Standard for Alternative Efficiency Determination Methods, Basic Model Definition, and Compliance for Commercial HVAC, Refrigeration, and Water Heating Equipment; Supplemental Notice of Proposed Rulemaking

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This document is a pre-publication Federal Register supplemental notice of proposed rulemaking regarding energy conservation standards for alternative efficiency determination methods, basic model definition, and compliance for commercial HVAC, Refrigeration, and Water Heating Equipment, as issued by the Deputy Assistant Secretary for Energy Efficiency on September 18, 2014. Though it is not intended or expected, should any discrepancy occur between the document posted here and the document published in the Federal Register, the Federal Register publication controls. This document is being made available through the Internet solely as a means to facilitate the public's access to this document.

  12. The use of MAVIS II to integrate the modeling and analysis of explosive valve interactions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ng, R.; Kwon, D.M.

    1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The MAVIS II computer program provides for the modeling and analysis of explosive valve interactions. This report describes the individual components of the program and how MAVIS II is used with other available tools to integrate the design and understanding of explosive valves. The rationale and model used for each valve interaction is described. Comparisons of the calculated results with available data have demonstrated the feasibility and accuracy of using MAVIS II for analytical studies of explosive valve interactions. The model used for the explosive or pyrotechnic used as the driving force in explosive valves is the most critical to be understood and modeled. MAVIS II is an advanced version that incorporates a plastic, as well as elastic, modeling of the deformations experienced when plungers are forced into a bore. The inclusion of a plastic model has greatly expanded the use of MAVIS for all categories (opening, closure, or combined) of valves, especially for the closure valves in which the sealing operation requires the plastic deformation of either a plunger or bore over a relatively large area. In order to increase its effectiveness, the use of MAVIS II should be integrated with the results from available experimental hardware. Test hardware such as the Velocity Interferometer System for Any Reflector (VISAR) and Velocity Generator test provide experimental data for accurate comparison of the actual valve functions. Variable Explosive Chamber (VEC) and Constant Explosive Volume (CEV) tests are used to provide the proper explosive equation-of-state for the MAVIS calculations of the explosive driving forces. The rationale and logistics of this integration is demonstrated through an example. A recent valve design is used to demonstrate how MAVIS II can be integrated with experimental tools to provide an understanding of the interactions in this valve.

  13. Fast and Robust Algorithm for Compositional Modeling: Part II--

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Firoozabadi, Abbas

    later) we have noticed that compositional modeling of a rich-retrograde gas condensate het- erogeneous of our study, stability analysis testing in the reduced space was formulated, and its robustness- sitional modeling, stability analysis testing in the reduction method was presented.1 In this paper, Part

  14. Photoevaporation of protoplanetary discs II: evolutionary models and observable properties

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. D. Alexander; C. J. Clarke; J. E. Pringle

    2006-03-09T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a new model for protoplanetary disc evolution. This model combines viscous evolution with photoevaporation of the disc, in a manner similar to Clarke, Gendrin & Sotomayor (2001). However in a companion paper (Alexander, Clarke & Pringle 2006a) we have shown that at late times such models must consider the effect of stellar radiation directly incident on the inner disc edge, and here we model the observational implications of this process. We find that the entire disc is dispersed on a time-scale of order $10^5$yr after a disc lifetime of a few Myr, consistent with observations of T Tauri (TT) stars. We use a simple prescription to model the spectral energy distribution of the evolving disc, and demonstrate that the model is consistent with observational data across a wide range of wavelengths. We note also that the model predicts a short ``inner hole'' phase in the evolution of all TT discs, and make predictions for future observations at mid-infrared and millimetre wavelengths.

  15. Measurement and modeling of advanced coal conversion processes, Volume II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Solomon, P.R.; Serio, M.A.; Hamblen, D.G. [and others

    1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A two dimensional, steady-state model for describing a variety of reactive and nonreactive flows, including pulverized coal combustion and gasification, is presented. The model, referred to as 93-PCGC-2 is applicable to cylindrical, axi-symmetric systems. Turbulence is accounted for in both the fluid mechanics equations and the combustion scheme. Radiation from gases, walls, and particles is taken into account using a discrete ordinates method. The particle phase is modeled in a lagrangian framework, such that mean paths of particle groups are followed. A new coal-general devolatilization submodel (FG-DVC) with coal swelling and char reactivity submodels has been added.

  16. Environmental Compliance Management System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brownson, L.W.; Krsul, T.; Peralta, R.A. [Argonne National Lab., Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Knudson, D.A.; Rosignolo, C.L. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

    1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) is developing the Environmental Compliance Management System (ECMS) as a comprehensive, cost-effective tool to ensure (1) that the Laboratory complies with all applicable federal and state environmental laws and regulations, (2) that environmental issues and concerns are recognized and considered in the early phases of projects; and (3) that Laboratory personnel conduct Laboratory operations in the most environmentally acceptable manner. The ECMS is an expert computer system which is designed to allow project engineers to perform an environmental evaluation of their projects. The system includes a Master Program which collects basic project information, provide utility functions, and access the environmental expert modules, environmental expert system modules for each federal and state environmental law which allows the user to obtain specific information on how an individual law may affect his project; and site-specific databases which contain information necessary for effective management of the site under environmental regulations. The ECMS will have the capability to complete and print many of the necessary environmental forms required by federal and state agencies, including the Department of Energy.

  17. Oil Mist Compliance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lazarus, Lloyd

    2009-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes activities at the KCP related to evaluating and modifying machine tools in order to be in compliance with Section 23 of DOE 10 CFR 851, Worker Safety and Health Program. Section 851.23 (a) states that Contractors must comply with the following safety and health standards that are applicable to the hazards in their covered workplace, and subsection 9 contains the following applicable standard: American Congress of Governmental Industrial Hygienists (ACGIH), Threshold Limit Values for Chemical Substances and Physical Agents and Biological Exposure Indices, (2005) (incorporated by reference, see 851.27) when the ACGIH Threshold Limit Values are lower (more protective) than permissible exposure limits in 29 CFR 1910. In the 2005 ACGIH Threshold Limit Value book a Notice of Change was issued for exposure to mineral oil mist used in metalworking fluids (MWFs). The effects of planning for the new facility and which machine tools would be making the transition to the new facility affected which machine tools were modified.

  18. Hazardous Waste Compliance Program Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Potter, G.L.; Holstein, K.A.

    1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Hazardous Waste Compliance Program Plan (HWCPP) describes how the Rocky Flats Plant institutes a more effective waste management program designed to achieve and maintain strict adherence to the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) requirements. Emphasis is given to improve integration of line operations with programmatic and functional support activities necessary to achieve physical compliance to RCRA regulated equipment, facilities and operations at the floor level. This program focuses on specific activities occurring or which need to occur within buildings containing RCRA regulated units and activities. The plan describes a new approach to achieving and maintaining compliance. This approach concentrates authority and accountability for compliance with the line operating personnel, with support provided from the programmatic functions. This approach requires a higher degree of integration and coordination between operating and program support organizations. The principal changes in emphases are; (1) increased line operations involvement, knowledge and accountability in compliance activities, (2) improved management systems to identify, correct and/or avoid deficiencies and (3) enhanced management attention and employee awareness of compliance related matters.

  19. Modeling Degradation in Solid Oxide Electrolysis Cells - Volume II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Manohar Motwani

    2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Idaho National Laboratory has an ongoing project to generate hydrogen from steam using solid oxide electrolysis cells (SOECs). To accomplish this, technical and degradation issues associated with the SOECs will need to be addressed. This report covers various approaches being pursued to model degradation issues in SOECs. An electrochemical model for degradation of SOECs is presented. The model is based on concepts in local thermodynamic equilibrium in systems otherwise in global thermodynamic non-equilibrium. It is shown that electronic conduction through the electrolyte, however small, must be taken into account for determining local oxygen chemical potential,, within the electrolyte. The within the electrolyte may lie out of bounds in relation to values at the electrodes in the electrolyzer mode. Under certain conditions, high pressures can develop in the electrolyte just near the oxygen electrode/electrolyte interface, leading to oxygen electrode delamination. These predictions are in accordance with the reported literature on the subject. Development of high pressures may be avoided by introducing some electronic conduction in the electrolyte. By combining equilibrium thermodynamics, non-equilibrium (diffusion) modeling, and first-principles, atomic scale calculations were performed to understand the degradation mechanisms and provide practical recommendations on how to inhibit and/or completely mitigate them.

  20. TR-IIS-06-003 A Scarce Resource Model for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Sheng-Wei

    .S. Shih, T.W. Kuo and J.W.S. Liu April 6, 2006 || Technical Report No. TR-IIS-06-003 http and J. W. S. Liu Abstract This report describes a resource model for medication scheduling. It is called with Department of Computer Science and Information Science, National Taiwan University, Taiwan. J. W. S. Liu

  1. F2010-B-107 MODELING OF THE THS-II SERIES/PARALLEL POWER TRAIN AND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    F2010-B-107 MODELING OF THE THS-II SERIES/PARALLEL POWER TRAIN AND ITS ENERGY MANAGEMENT SYSTEM ­ Hybrid power train, power-split eCVT, rule-based control strategy, Toyota Hybrid System, driver the challenge of minimizing the consumption of the road transport. Although hybrid power train technologies did

  2. Solving seismological problems using sgraph program: II-waveform modeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abdelwahed, Mohamed F. [Geological Hazards Research Unit, King Abdulaziz University (Saudi Arabia) and National Research Institute of Astronomy and Geophysics (NRIAG), Helwan (Egypt)

    2012-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

    One of the seismological programs to manipulate seismic data is SGRAPH program. It consists of integrated tools to perform advanced seismological techniques. SGRAPH is considered a new system for maintaining and analyze seismic waveform data in a stand-alone Windows-based application that manipulate a wide range of data formats. SGRAPH was described in detail in the first part of this paper. In this part, I discuss the advanced techniques including in the program and its applications in seismology. Because of the numerous tools included in the program, only SGRAPH is sufficient to perform the basic waveform analysis and to solve advanced seismological problems. In the first part of this paper, the application of the source parameters estimation and hypocentral location was given. Here, I discuss SGRAPH waveform modeling tools. This paper exhibits examples of how to apply the SGRAPH tools to perform waveform modeling for estimating the focal mechanism and crustal structure of local earthquakes.

  3. Slag Behavior in Gasifiers. Part II: Constitutive Modeling of Slag

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Massoudi, Mehrdad [National Energy Technology Laboratory; Wang, Ping

    2013-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The viscosity of slag and the thermal conductivity of ash deposits are among two of the most important constitutive parameters that need to be studied. The accurate formulation or representations of the (transport) properties of coal present a special challenge of modeling efforts in computational fluid dynamics applications. Studies have indicated that slag viscosity must be within a certain range of temperatures for tapping and the membrane wall to be accessible, for example, between 1,300 C and 1,500 C, the viscosity is approximately 25 Pas. As the operating temperature decreases, the slag cools and solid crystals begin to form. Since slag behaves as a non-linear fluid, we discuss the constitutive modeling of slag and the important parameters that must be studied. We propose a new constitutive model, where the stress tensor not only has a yield stress part, but it also has a viscous part with a shear rate dependency of the viscosity, along with temperature and concentration dependency, while allowing for the possibility of the normal stress effects. In Part I, we reviewed, identify and discuss the key coal ash properties and the operating conditions impacting slag behavior.

  4. Electromagnetic scattering from grassland Part II: Measurement and modeling results

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stiles, James Marion; Ulaby, F. T.; Sarabandi, K.

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    -InvestigatoronmanyprojectssponsoredbyNASA,JPL,ARO,ONR,ARL, and GM all related in one way or the other to microwave and millimeter wave radar remote sensing. He has published many book chapters and more than 80 papers in refereed journals on electromagnetic scattering, random media modeling, microwave measurement...LecturerAwardfromtheGerman Federal Ministry for Education, Science, and Technology. FawwazT.Ulaby(M68SM74F80)receivedthe B.S.degreeinphysicsfromtheAmericanUniversity of Beirut, Lebanon, in 1964, and the M.S.E.E. and Ph.D.degreesinelectricalengineeringfromtheUni- versity...

  5. Webinar: Residential Energy Code Compliance | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Webinar: Residential Energy Code Compliance Webinar: Residential Energy Code Compliance View the Code Compliance Funding Opportunity video or see the slides below. This webinar...

  6. Photochemical oxidation of coals and some selected model compounds by using copper(II) chloride

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yilmaz, M.

    1999-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The H-donor ability of different rank coals was examined by using a copper(II)chloride-acetonitrile system as the dehydrogenator. A bituminous coal and two lignites were irradiated in the UV in the presence of copper(II)chloride in acetonitrile. The coal was dehydrogenated while the Cu(II) was reduced to CU(I). Considerable amounts of aliphatic or alicyclic hydrogen were removed from the coals. In the process, while the oxygen contents of coals do not increase, more condensed aromatic products occur. It was concluded that lignites are better reducing agents than bituminous coals. A photooxidation mechanism is proposed on the basis of the model compound reaction. Photooxidation of alcohols (ethanol, 2-propanol, benzyl alcohol, 4-hydroxybenzyl alcohol, and diphenyl carbinol), a hydroaromatic compound (tetrahydronaphthalene), and an aromatic ether (dibenzyl ether) was performed under similar reaction conditions.

  7. Modeling the Jovian subnebula: II - Composition of regular satellites ices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Olivier Mousis; Yann Alibert

    2005-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

    We use the evolutionary turbulent model of Jupiter's subnebula described by Alibert et al. (2005a) to constrain the composition of ices incorporated in its regular icy satellites. We consider CO2, CO, CH4, N2, NH3, H2S, Ar, Kr, and Xe as the major volatile species existing in the gas-phase of the solar nebula. All these volatile species, except CO2 which crystallized as a pure condensate, are assumed to be trapped by H2O to form hydrates or clathrate hydrates in the solar nebula. Once condensed, these ices were incorporated into the growing planetesimals produced in the feeding zone of proto-Jupiter. Some of these solids then flowed from the solar nebula to the subnebula, and may have been accreted by the forming Jovian regular satellites. We show that ices embedded in solids entering at early epochs into the Jovian subdisk were all vaporized. This leads us to consider two different scenarios of regular icy satellites formation in order to estimate the composition of the ices they contain. In the first scenario, icy satellites were accreted from planetesimals that have been produced in Jupiter's feeding zone without further vaporization, whereas, in the second scenario, icy satellites were accreted from planetesimals produced in the Jovian subnebula. In this latter case, we study the evolution of carbon and nitrogen gas-phase chemistries in the Jovian subnebula and we show that the conversions of N2 to NH3, of CO to CO2, and of CO to CH4 were all inhibited in the major part of the subdisk. Finally, we assess the mass abundances of the major volatile species with respect to H2O in the interiors of the Jovian regular icy satellites. Our results are then compatible with the detection of CO2 on the surfaces of Callisto and Ganymede and with the presence of NH3 envisaged in subsurface oceans within Ganymede and Callisto.

  8. Environmental Compliance 2-1 2. Environmental Compliance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pennycook, Steve

    .S. Department of Energy Oak Ridge Operations Office to conduct its operations in compliance with federal, state, and best management practices. DOE and its contractors make every effort to conduct operations agreements, executive orders, DOE orders (as incorporated into the operating contracts), work smart standards

  9. Environmental Compliance 2-1 2. Environmental Compliance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pennycook, Steve

    .S. Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge Operations Office to conduct its operations in compliance with federal, settlement agreements, executive orders, DOE orders (as incorporated into the operating contracts), necessary and sufficient standards, and best management practices. DOE and its contractors make every effort to conduct

  10. Environmental Compliance 2-1 2. Environmental Compliance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pennycook, Steve

    Security Administration (DOE-NNSA) policy to conduct its operations in compliance with federal, state, and best management practices. DOE and its contractors make every effort to conduct operations agreements, executive orders, DOE orders (as incorporated into the operating contracts), work smart standards

  11. Environmental Compliance 2-1 2. Environmental Compliance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pennycook, Steve

    Nuclear Security Administration (DOE-NNSA) policy to conduct its operations in compliance with federal, settlement agreements, executive orders, DOE orders (as incorporated into the operating contracts), work smart standards, and best management practices. DOE and its contractors make every effort to conduct

  12. 300 area TEDF permit compliance monitoring plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    BERNESKI, L.D.

    1998-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

    This document presents the permit compliance monitoring plan for the 300 Area Treated Effluent Disposal Facility (TEDF). It addresses the compliance with the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permit and Department of Natural Resources Aquatic Lands Sewer Outfall Lease.

  13. The College Station Residential Energy Compliance Code

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Claridge, D. E.; Schrock, D.

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The City of College Station, Texas adopted a new residential Energy Compliance Code in January, 1988. The code, which strengthens compliance requirements in several areas, has received broadly based support and acceptance from all major constituent...

  14. Pushing using Compliance Dennis Nieuwenhuisen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Utrecht, Universiteit

    , but also exploits the power of compliance. 1 Introduction Over the years various techniques have been developed that address the problem of navigating through or interacting with a real or virtual world by an autonomous robot. An example of manipulation is a robot arm in a manufacturing plant that needs to insert

  15. Transient PVT measurements and model predictions for vessel heat transfer. Part II.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Felver, Todd G.; Paradiso, Nicholas Joseph; Winters, William S., Jr.; Evans, Gregory Herbert; Rice, Steven F.

    2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Part I of this report focused on the acquisition and presentation of transient PVT data sets that can be used to validate gas transfer models. Here in Part II we focus primarily on describing models and validating these models using the data sets. Our models are intended to describe the high speed transport of compressible gases in arbitrary arrangements of vessels, tubing, valving and flow branches. Our models fall into three categories: (1) network flow models in which flow paths are modeled as one-dimensional flow and vessels are modeled as single control volumes, (2) CFD (Computational Fluid Dynamics) models in which flow in and between vessels is modeled in three dimensions and (3) coupled network/CFD models in which vessels are modeled using CFD and flows between vessels are modeled using a network flow code. In our work we utilized NETFLOW as our network flow code and FUEGO for our CFD code. Since network flow models lack three-dimensional resolution, correlations for heat transfer and tube frictional pressure drop are required to resolve important physics not being captured by the model. Here we describe how vessel heat transfer correlations were improved using the data and present direct model-data comparisons for all tests documented in Part I. Our results show that our network flow models have been substantially improved. The CFD modeling presented here describes the complex nature of vessel heat transfer and for the first time demonstrates that flow and heat transfer in vessels can be modeled directly without the need for correlations.

  16. EPAct Alternative Fuel Transportation Program: State and Alternative Fuel Provider Fleet Compliance Annual Report, Fleet Compliance Results for MY 2009/FY 2010 (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This annual report summarizes the compliance results of state and alternative fuel provider fleets covered by the Energy Policy Act of 1992 (EPAct) for model year 2009/fiscal year 2010.

  17. TRUPACT-II Operating and Maintenance Instructions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Westinghouse Electric Corporation, Waste Isolation Division

    1999-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this document is to provide the technical requirements for preparation for use, operation, inspection, and maintenance of a Transuranic Package Transporter Model II (TRUPACT-II) Shipping Package and directly related components. This document complies with the minimum requirements as specified in the TRUPACT-II Safety Analysis Report for Packaging (SARP) and Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Certificate of Compliance (C of C) 9218. In the event there is a conflict between this document and the TRUPACT-II SARP, the TRUPACT-II SARP shall govern. TRUPACT-II C of C number 9218 states, ''... each package must be prepared for shipment and operated in accordance with the procedures described in Chapter 7.0, Operating Procedures, of the application.'' It further states, ''... each package must be tested and maintained in accordance with the procedures described in Chapter 8.0, Acceptance Tests and Maintenance Program of the application.'' Chapter 9 of the TRUPACT-II SARP charges the Westinghouse Electric Corporation Waste Isolation Division (WID) with assuring that the TRUPACT-II is used in accordance with the requirements of the C of C. To meet this requirement and verify consistency of operations when loading and unloading the TRUPACT-II on the trailer, placing a payload in the packaging, unloading the payload from the packaging, or performing maintenance, the U.S. Department of Energy Carlsbad Area Office (U.S. DOE/CAO) finds it necessary to implement the changes that follow. This TRUPACT-II maintenance document represents a change to previous philosophy regarding site specific procedures for the use of the TRUPACT-II. This document details the instructions to be followed to consistently operate and maintain the TRUPACT-II. The intent of these instructions is to ensure that all users of the TRUPACT-II follow the same or equivalent instructions. Users may achieve this intent by any of the following methods: (1) Utilizing these instructions as is, or (2) Attaching a site-specific cover page/letter to this document stating that these are the instructions to be used at their location, or (3) Sites may prepare their own document using the steps in this document word-for-word, in-sequence, including Notes and Cautions. Site specific information may be included as deemed necessary. Submit the document to WID National TRU Programs for approval. Any revision made subsequent to WID TRU Program's approval shall be reviewed and approved by WID TRU Programs. A copy of the approval letter from WID National TRU Programs should be available for audit purposes. Users shall develop site-specific procedures addressing leak testing, preoperational activities, quality assurance, hoisting and rigging, and radiation health physics to be used in conjunction with the instructions contained in this document. Users desiring to recommend changes to this document may submit their recommendations to the WID National TRU Programs for evaluation. If approved, the change(s) will be incorporated into this document for use by all TRUPACT-II users. User sites will be audited to this document to ensure compliance within one year from the effective date of this revision. This document discusses operating instructions, required inspections and maintenance for the following: TRUPACT-II packaging, and Miscellaneous packaging, special tools, and equipment. Packaging and payload handling equipment and transport trailers have been specifically designed for use with the TRUPACT-II Packaging. This document discusses the required instructions for use of the following equipment in conjunction with the TRUPACT-II Packaging: TRUPACT-II Mobile Loading Unit (MLU), Adjustable Center-of-Gravity Lift Fixture (ACGLF), and TRUPACT-II Transport Trailer. Attachment E contains the various TRUPACT-II packaging interface control drawings, leak-test and vent-port tool drawings, ACGLF drawings, and tie-down drawings that identify the various system components.

  18. COMPLIANCE STUDIES: WHAT ABOUT THE FISH?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Woodley, Christa M.; Fischer, Eric S.; Wagner, Katie A.; Weiland, Mark A.; Eppard, M. B.; Carlson, Thomas J.

    2013-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

    ABSTRACT It is understood that operational and structural conditions at hydroelectric facilities along with environmental conditions of the migration corridors affect the passage conditions for fish. Hydropower fish survival assessments at the individual- and population-level have progressed over the past decade with development of turbine simulation software and improvements in telemetry systems, in particular, micro-transmitters, cabled and autonomous receivers, and advanced statistical designs that provide precise estimates of passage routes and dam-passage survival. However, these approaches often ignore fish condition as a variable in passage and survival analyses. To account for fish condition effects on survival results, compliance statistical models often require increased numbers of tagged fish. For example, prior to and during migration, fish encounter numerous stressors (e.g., disease, predation, contact with structures, decompression events), all of which can cause physical and physiological stress, altering the probability of survival after passage through a dam or a series of dams. In addition, the effects of surgical transmitter implantation process or the transmitter itself may cause physiological stress, alter behavior, and/or decrease survival. Careful physiological evaluations can augment survival model assumptions, resultant data, and predictive scenarios. To exemplify this, surgeons concurrently noted fish condition and surgical implantation during a multi-dam compliance study in 2011. The analyses indicted that surgeon observations on fish condition and surgical outcomes were related to 24 h holding mortalities and fish that never detected after release. Short reach and long reach survival were related to surgical outcomes and fish condition, respectively.

  19. Tools for NEPA compliance: Baseline reports and compliance guides

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wolff, T.A. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Hansen, R.P. [Hansen Environmental Consultants, Englewood, CO (United States)

    1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Environmental baseline documents and NEPA compliance guides should be carried in every NEPA implementation ``tool kit``. These two indispensable tools can play a major role in avoiding repeated violations of NEPA requirements that have occurred over the past 26 years. This paper describes these tools, discusses their contents, and explains how they are used to prepare better NEPA documents more cost-effectively. Focus is on experience at Sandia Laboratories (NM).

  20. A phenomenological model for the responses of auditory-nerve fibers. II. Nonlinear tuning with a frequency glide

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carney, Laurel H.

    A phenomenological model for the responses of auditory-nerve fibers. II. Nonlinear tuning and the level-dependent compressive nonlinearity into a phenomenological model for the AN was the primary focus nonlinear phenomenological model for the response patterns of AN fibers to different sound inputs

  1. Directory of Certificates of Compliance for radioactive materials packages: Certificates of Compliance. Volume 2, Revision 18

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this directory is to make available a convenient source of information on packagings which have been approved by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. To assist in identifying packaging, an index by Model Number and corresponding Certificate of Compliance Number is included at the front of Volumes 1 and 2. An alphabetical listing by user name is included in the back of Volume 3 of approved QA programs. The reports include a listing of all users of each package design and approved QA programs prior to the publication date.

  2. EPAct Alternative Fuel Transportation Program: State and Alternative Fuel Provider Fleet Compliance Annual Report (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This annual report summarizes the compliance results of state and alternative fuel provider fleets covered by the Energy Policy Act of 1992 (EPAct) for model year 2008/fiscal year 2009.

  3. Scientific uncertainties in atmospheric mercury models III: Boundary and initial conditions, model grid resolution, and Hg(II) reduction mechanism

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lin, Che-Jen [ORNL; Pongprueksa, Pruek [Lamar University; Lindberg, Steven Eric [ORNL; Jang, Carey [U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Raleigh, North Carolina; Braverman, Thomas [U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Raleigh, North Carolina; Bullock, Russell O [NOAA; Ho, Thomas [ORNL; Chu, Hsing-Wei [Lamar University

    2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this study, the model response in terms of simulated mercury concentration and deposition to boundary condition (BC), initial condition (IC), model grid resolution (12 km versus 36 km), and two alternative Hg(II) reduction mechanisms, was investigated. The model response to the change of gaseous elemental mercury (GEM) concentration from 0 to 2 ngm3 in IC/BC is found to be very linear (r240.99) based on the results of sensitivity simulations in July 2001. An increase of 1 ngm3 of GEM in BC resulted in an increase of 0.81 ngm3 in the monthly average of total mercury concentration, and 1270 ngm2 in the monthly total deposition. IC has similar but weaker effects compared to those of BC. An increase of 1 ngm3 of GEM in IC resulted in an increase of 0.14 ngm3 in the monthly average of total mercury concentration, and 250 ngm2 in the monthly total deposition. Varying reactive gaseous mercury (RGM) or particulate mercury (PHg) in BC/IC has much less significant impact. Simulation results at different grid resolutions show good agreement (slope 0.950 1.026, r 0.816 0.973) in mercury concentration, dry deposition, and total deposition. The agreement in wet deposition is somewhat weaker (slope 0.770 0.794, r 0.685 0.892) due to the difference in emission dilution and simulated precipitation that subsequently change reaction rates in the aqueous phase. Replacing the aqueous Hg(II)-HO2 reduction by either RGM reduction by CO (51018cm3 molecule1 s1) or photoreduction of RGM (1105 s1) gives significantly better model agreement with the wet deposition measured by Mercury Deposition Network (MDN). Possible ranges of the reduction rates are estimated based on model sensitivity results. The kinetic estimate requires further verification by laboratory studies.

  4. A summary of the models used for the mechanical response of disposal rooms in the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant with regard to compliance with 40 CFR 191, Subpart B

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Butcher, B.M.; Mendenhall, F.T.

    1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A summary is presented of the results of a number of studies conducted prior to March 1992 that have led to a conceptual model describing how the porosity (and therefore the permeability) of waste and backfill in a Waste Isolation Pilot Plant disposal room changes with time and also describes how results from calculations involving mathematical models of these processes are used to provide input into performance assessment of the repository. Included in the report are descriptions of essential material response or constitutive models that include the influence of gas generation and the response of simple gas-pressurized cracks and fractures in salt, marker beds, and clay seams. Two-dimensional versus three-dimensional disposal room configurations and descriptions of the differences between numerical codes are also discussed. Calculational results using the mathematical models for disposal room response are described, beginning with closure of empty rooms and becoming progressively more complex. More recent results address some of the effects of gas generation in a room containing waste and backfill and intersected by a gas permeable marker bed. Developments currently in progress to improve the evaluation of the disposal room performance are addressing the coupling between brine flow and closure and the two-dimensional capability for analyzing a complete panel of rooms. Next, a method is described for including disposal room closure results into performance assessment analyses that determine if the repository is in compliance with regulatory standards. The coupling is accomplished using closure surfaces that describe the relationship among porosity, total amount of gas in the repository, and time. A number of conclusions about room response and recommendations for further work are included throughout the report.

  5. Automated Security Compliance Tool for the Cloud.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ullah, Kazi Wali

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ?? Security, especially security compliance, is a major concern that is slowing down the large scale adoption of cloud computing in the enterprise environment. Business (more)

  6. NEPA COMPLIANCE SURVEY Project Information Project Title:

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Pollutants? NEPA COMPLIANCE SURVEY Is the project subject to emissions limitations In an Air 0 81 0 Quality Control Region? Impacts If YES, then complete below. Anticipated?...

  7. Tests of an Ensemble Kalman Filter for Mesoscale and Regional-Scale Data Assimilation. Part II: Imperfect Model Experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meng, Zhiyong

    degraded). As in Part I, where the perfect model assumption was utilized, most analysis error reduction of significant model errors due to physical parameterizations by assimilating synthetic sounding and surfaceTests of an Ensemble Kalman Filter for Mesoscale and Regional-Scale Data Assimilation. Part II

  8. Fleet Compliance Results for MY 2010/FY 2011, EPAct Alternative Fuel Transportation Program: State and Alternative Fuel Provider Fleet Compliance Annual Report (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This annual report summarizes the compliance results of state and alternative fuel provider fleets covered by the Energy Policy Act of 1992 (EPAct) for model year 2010/fiscal year 2011. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) regulates covered state and alternative fuel provider (SFP) fleets under the Energy Policy Act of 1992 (EPAct), as amended. For model year (MY) 2010, the compliance rate for the 2911 covered SFP fleets was 100%. Fleets used either Standard Compliance or Alternative Compliance. The 279 fleets that used Standard Compliance exceeded their aggregate MY 2010 acquisition requirements by 61%. The 12 covered fleets that complied using Alternative Compliance exceeded their aggregate MY 2010 petroleum-use-reduction requirements by 89%. Overall, DOE saw modest decreases from MY 2009 in biodiesel fuel use credits earned and in the number of light-duty vehicles (LDVs) acquired. Compared to years before MY 2009, these rates were far lower. Because covered fleets acquired fewer new vehicles overall in MY 2010, the requirement for alternative fuel vehicles (AFVs), which is proportional to new acquisitions, also dropped.

  9. 3Compliance Status 2004 SITE ENVIRONMENTAL REPORT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    3-1 3Compliance Status 2004 SITE ENVIRONMENTAL REPORT DRAFT Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL County Department of Health Services. Thirty reportable spills of petroleum products or antifreeze status #12;3-22004 SITE ENVIRONMENTAL REPORT CHAPTER 3: COMPLIANCE STATUS DRAFT 3.2.2 New or Modified

  10. Environmental Compliance Audit& Assessment Program Manual

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thorson, Patrick; Baskin, David; Borglin, Ned; Fox, Robert; Wahl, Linnea; Hatayama, Howard; Pauer, Ronald

    2009-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

    This document describes the elements, schedule, roles, and responsibilities of the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) Environmental Compliance Audit & Assessment Program (ECAAP). The ECAAP has been developed to meet the requirements of DOE Order 450.1A,1 and Executive Order 13423.2 These referenced Orders stipulate that government agencies must develop environmental compliance audit programs to monitor and improve compliance with environmental regulations. As stated specifically in the DOE Order, as a part of a DOE facility's Environmental Management System (EMS), 'An environmental compliance audit and review program that identifies compliance deficiencies and root causes of non-compliance' shall be developed and implemented. The ECAAP has also been developed to satisfy LBNL's institutional technical assurance assessment requirements promulgated in the Environment, Safety and Health (ES&H) Self-Assessment Program (LBNL/PUB-5344) and described by the ES&H Technical Assurance Program (TAP) Manual (LBNL/PUB-913E). The ES&H TAP Manual provides the framework for systematic reviews of ES&H programs with the intent to provide assurance that these programs comply with their guiding regulations, are effective, and are properly implemented. As required by the DOE and Executive Orders and by LBNL's TAP, the goal of the ECAAP is to identify environmental regulatory compliance deficiencies and to determine their respective causes. The ECAAP then provides a means of correcting any deficiencies identified, and leads to continually improving environmental compliance performance.

  11. Effects of chronic receptor blockade on intracardiac angiotensin II and aldosterone content in an angiotensin II-infused model of hypertension

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Conte, Debra Ann

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of Ang II following acute infusion. However in rats, chronic10mg/kg/d for 21 d). Ang II-infusion increased intracardiacANIMALS . A NG II INFUSION (80 NG / MIN X 4

  12. DOE Publishes Notice of Proposed Rulemaking Regarding the Compliance...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Regarding the Compliance Date for the Dehumidifier Test Procedure DOE Publishes Notice of Proposed Rulemaking Regarding the Compliance Date for the Dehumidifier Test Procedure...

  13. 2014-04-17 DOE Certification, Compliance, and Enforcement Overview...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    04-17 DOE Certification, Compliance, and Enforcement Overview for Plumbing Products 2014-04-17 DOE Certification, Compliance, and Enforcement Overview for Plumbing Products This...

  14. CHP: A Technical & Economic Compliance Strategy - SEE Action...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    CHP: A Technical & Economic Compliance Strategy - SEE Action Webinar, January 2012 CHP: A Technical & Economic Compliance Strategy - SEE Action Webinar, January 2012 This...

  15. POLICY GUIDANCE MEMORANDUM #35 Procedures for Compliance with...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    POLICY GUIDANCE MEMORANDUM 35 Procedures for Compliance with Nepotism and Misuse of Position POLICY GUIDANCE MEMORANDUM 35 Procedures for Compliance with Nepotism and Misuse of...

  16. Energy Code Compliance and Enforcement Best Practices (Text Version...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Energy Code Compliance and Enforcement Best Practices (Text Version) Energy Code Compliance and Enforcement Best Practices (Text Version) Curtis Framel: Good afternoon, and good...

  17. Directory of certificates of compliance for radioactive materials packages

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This directory provides an information source for packagings approved by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission. Volumes 1 and 2 of the directory provide an index by model number and corresponding Certificate of Compliance number. Volume 3 includes an alphabetical listing by user name for approved quality assurance programs. The reports include a listing of all users of each package design and approved quality assurance programs.

  18. Viscoelastic Model for Lung Parenchyma for Multi-Scale Modeling of Respiratory System, Phase II: Dodecahedral Micro-Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Freed, Alan D.; Einstein, Daniel R.; Carson, James P.; Jacob, Rick E.

    2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the first year of this contractual effort a hypo-elastic constitutive model was developed and shown to have great potential in modeling the elastic response of parenchyma. This model resides at the macroscopic level of the continuum. In this, the second year of our support, an isotropic dodecahedron is employed as an alveolar model. This is a microscopic model for parenchyma. A hopeful outcome is that the linkage between these two scales of modeling will be a source of insight and inspiration that will aid us in the final year's activity: creating a viscoelastic model for parenchyma.

  19. Transport-theoretic model for the electron-proton-hydrogen atom auroa. II. Model results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Strickland, D.J. [Computational Physics, Inc., Fairfax, VA (United States); Daniell, R.E. Jr. [Computational Physics, Inc., Newton, MA (United States); Basu, B. [Hanscom Air Force Base, MA (United States)] [and others

    1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In a companion paper, a self-consistent transport-theoretic model for the combined electron-proton-hydrogen atom aurora was described. In this paper, numberical results based on the model are presented. This is done for the pure electron aurora, the pure proton-hydrogen atom aurora, and finally for the combined aurora. Adopting commonly used types of energy distributions for the incident particle (electron and proton) fluxes, the authors give numerical solutions for the precipitating electron, proton, and hydrogen atom differential number fluxes. Results are also given for ionization yields and emission yields of the following features: N{sub 2}{sup +} first negative group (3914 {Angstrom}), N{sub 2} second positive group (3371 {Angstrom}), selected N{sub 2} Lyman-Birge-Hopfields bands (1325, 1354, 1383, 1493, and all bands between 1700 and 1800 {Angstrom}), O I (1356 {Angstrom}), L{sub {alpha}} (1216 {Angstrom}), H{sub {beta}} (4861 {Angstrom}), and H{sub {alpha}} (6563 {Angstrom}). The yield at 1493 {Angstrom} also contains a contribution from N I (1493 {Angstrom}), which in fact dominates LBH emission. A major new result of this study is that the secondary electron flux produced by the proton-hydrogen atom aurora is much softer than that produced by the electron aurora. This increased softness is due to the fact that (for energies of aurora interest) cross sections for secondary electron flux produced by the proton-hydrogen atom aurora is much softer than that produced by the electron aurora. This increased softness is due to the fact that (for energies of auroral interest) cross sections for secondary electron production by proton and hydrogen atom impact decrease exponentially with increasing secondary electron energy, whereas the cross sections for electron impact decrease as an inverse power law with increasing secondary energy.

  20. A Structure-Based Model of Energy Transfer Reveals the Principles of Light Harvesting in Photosystem II Supercomplexes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fleming, Graham R.

    of excitation energy to chemical energy via charge separation. The pigment binding proteins associated with PSII charge separation occurs. Because of the lack of a rate-limiting step, fitting kinetic models to the antenna, or light harvesting, proteins of photosystem II (PSII). The resulting excitation energy

  1. Inclusive Search for Standard Model Higgs Boson Production in the WW Decay Channel Using the CDF II Detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xie, Si

    We present a search for standard model (SM) Higgs boson production using pp? collision data at ?s=1.96??TeV, collected with the CDF II detector and corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 4.8??fb[superscript -1]. We ...

  2. Forward Modeling of Active Region Coronal Emissions. II. Implications for Coronal Heating This article has been downloaded from IOPscience. Please scroll down to see the full text article.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McTiernan, James M.

    Forward Modeling of Active Region Coronal Emissions. II. Implications for Coronal Heating of Contents and more related content is available Home Search Collections Journals About Contact us My IOPscience #12;FORWARD MODELING OF ACTIVE REGION CORONAL EMISSIONS. II. IMPLICATIONS FOR CORONAL HEATING L. L

  3. Search for non-standard model signatures in the WZ/ZZ final state at CDF run II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Norman, Matthew; /UC, San Diego

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis discusses a search for non-Standard Model physics in heavy diboson production in the dilepton-dijet final state, using 1.9 fb{sup -1} of data from the CDF Run II detector. New limits are set on the anomalous coupling parameters for ZZ and WZ production based on limiting the production cross-section at high {cflx s}. Additionally limits are set on the direct decay of new physics to ZZ andWZ diboson pairs. The nature and parameters of the CDF Run II detector are discussed, as are the influences that it has on the methods of our analysis.

  4. LADTAP II: technical reference and user guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Strenge, D.L.; Peloquin, R.A.; Whelan, G.

    1986-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission computer program LADTAP II, which performs environmental dose analyses for releases of radioactive effluents from nuclear power plants into surface waters. The analyses estimate radiation dose to individuals, population groups, and biota from ingestion (aquatic foods, water, and terrestrial irrigated foods) and external exposure (shoreline, swimming, and boating) pathways. The calculated doses provide information for National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) evaluations and for determining compliance with Appendix I of 10 CFR 50 (the ''ALARA'' philosophy). The report also instructs the user in preparing input to the program, describes the mathematical models that are used, and supplies detailed information on program structure and parameters used to modify the program.

  5. GASPAR II: Technical reference and user guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Strenge, D.L.; Bander, T.J.; Soldat, J.K.

    1987-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the computer program GASPAR II used by the staff of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission to perform environmental dose analyses for releases of radioactive effluents from nuclear power plants into the atmosphere. The analyses estimate radiation dose to individuals and population groups from inhalation, ingestion (terrestrial foods), and external-exposure (ground and plume) pathways. The calculated doses provide information for National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) evaluations and for determining compliance with Appendix I of 10 CFR 50 (the ''ALARA'' philosophy). The report also instructs the user in preparing input to the program, describes the mathematical models that are used, and supplies detailed information on program structure and parameters used to modify the program. 20 refs., 11 figs., 77 tabs.

  6. Utah Compliance Implementation and Evaluation Guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cole, Pamala C.

    2012-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This Guide is designed to assist state and local code jurisdictions in achieving statewide compliance with the 2009 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) for residential buildings and ANSI/ASHRAE/IESNA Standard 90.1-2007 for commercial buildings.

  7. Iowa Compliance Implementation and Evaluation Guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cole, Pamala C.

    2012-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

    This Guide is designed to assist state and local code jurisdictions in achieving statewide compliance with the 2009 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) for residential buildings and ANSI/ASHRAE/IESNA Standard 90.1-2007 for commercial buildings.

  8. Nevada Compliance Implementation and Evaluation Guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cole, Pamala C.

    2012-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This Guide is designed to assist state and local code jurisdictions in achieving statewide compliance with the 2009 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) for residential buildings and ANSI/ASHRAE/IESNA Standard 90.1-2007 for commercial buildings.

  9. NEPA COMPLIANCE SURVEY NEPA Review Routing Form

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    0 18 0 Hazardous Air Pollutants? Is the project subject to emissions limitations in an Air Quality 0 18 0 Control Region? 4 Revised 8121 0 mjt NEPA COMPLIANCE SURVEY Impacts If...

  10. Discrete-Time Dataflow Models for Visual Simulation in Ptolemy II

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in Ptolemy II is a timed extension of the Synchronous Dataflow (SDF) domain. Although not completely backward compatible with SDF, DT keeps most of the desirable properties of SDF like static scheduling, regular in Ptolemy II 3.2 Synchronous Dataflow (SDF) Domain 3.3 Discrete Event (DE) Domain 3.4 Continuous Time (CT

  11. Compliance, Inventory, and Surveys LSUHSC's Office of Compliance functions under the direction of the Vice Chancellor for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Compliance, Inventory, and Surveys Compliance LSUHSC's Office of Compliance functions under of Compliance. Inventory Tagged equipment is currently defined as having a purchase price of $1,000.00 or greater; shipping costs do count toward reaching this threshold. For inventory purposes, LSUHSC

  12. Radiation-MHD models of elephant trunks and globules in H II regions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mackey, Jonathan

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the formation and evolution of pillars of dense gas, known as elephant trunks, at the boundaries of H II regions, formed by shadowing of ionising radiation by dense clumps. The effects of magnetic fields on this process are investigated using 3D radiation-magnetohydrodynamics simulations. For a simulation in which an initially uniform magnetic field of strength |B|=50 uG is oriented perpendicular to the radiation propagation direction, the field is swept into alignment with the pillar during its dynamical evolution, in agreement with observations of the "Pillars of Creation" in M16, and of some cometary globules. This effect is significantly enhanced when the simulation is re-run with a weaker field of 18 uG. A stronger field with |B|=160 uG is sufficient to prevent this evolution completely, also significantly affecting the photoionisation process. Using a larger simulation domain it is seen that the pillar formation models studied in Mackey & Lim (2010) ultimately evolve to cometary structures ...

  13. Effects of chronic receptor blockade on intracardiac angiotensin II and aldosterone content in an angiotensin II-infused model of hypertension

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Conte, Debra Ann

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    During Ang II-Induced Hypertension: Role of AT1 Receptor.Hypertension 39: 116-121, 2002. Zou L, Hymel A, Imig J, andAngiotensin II-Infused Rats. Hypertension 27: 658-662, 1996.

  14. Final Report: Phase II Nevada Water Resources Data, Modeling, and Visualization (DMV) Center

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jackman, Thomas [Desert Research Institute] [Desert Research Institute; Minor, Timothy [Desert Research Institute] [Desert Research Institute; Pohll, Gregory [Desert Research Institute] [Desert Research Institute

    2013-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Water is unquestionably a critical resource throughout the United States. In the semi-arid west -- an area stressed by increase in human population and sprawl of the built environment -- water is the most important limiting resource. Crucially, science must understand factors that affect availability and distribution of water. To sustain growing consumptive demand, science needs to translate understanding into reliable and robust predictions of availability under weather conditions that could be average but might be extreme. These predictions are needed to support current and long-term planning. Similar to the role of weather forecast and climate prediction, water prediction over short and long temporal scales can contribute to resource strategy, governmental policy and municipal infrastructure decisions, which are arguably tied to the natural variability and unnatural change to climate. Change in seasonal and annual temperature, precipitation, snowmelt, and runoff affect the distribution of water over large temporal and spatial scales, which impact the risk of flooding and the groundwater recharge. Anthropogenic influences and impacts increase the complexity and urgency of the challenge. The goal of this project has been to develop a decision support framework of data acquisition, digital modeling, and 3D visualization. This integrated framework consists of tools for compiling, discovering and projecting our understanding of processes that control the availability and distribution of water. The framework is intended to support the analysis of the complex interactions between processes that affect water supply, from controlled availability to either scarcity or deluge. The developed framework enables DRI to promote excellence in water resource management, particularly within the Lake Tahoe basin. In principle, this framework could be replicated for other watersheds throughout the United States. Phase II of this project builds upon the research conducted during Phase I, in which the hydrologic framework was investigated and the development initiated. Phase II concentrates on practical implementation of the earlier work but emphasizes applications to the hydrology of the Lake Tahoe basin. Phase 1 efforts have been refined and extended by creating a toolset for geographic information systems (GIS) that is usable for disparate types of geospatial and geo-referenced data. The toolset is intended to serve multiple users for a variety of applications. The web portal for internet access to hydrologic and remotely sensed product data, prototyped in Phase I, has been significantly enhanced. The portal provides high performance access to LANDSAT-derived data using techniques developed during the course of the project. The portal is interactive, and supports the geo-referenced display of hydrologic information derived from remotely sensed data, such as various vegetative indices used to calculate water consumption. The platform can serve both internal and external constituencies using inter-operating infrastructure that spans both sides of the DRI firewall. The platform is intended grow its supported data assets and to serve as a template for replication to other geographic areas. An unanticipated development during the project was the use of ArcGIS software on a new computer system, called the IBM PureSytems, and the parallel use of the systems for faster, more efficient image processing. Additional data, independent of the portal, was collected within the Sagehen basin and provides detailed information regarding the processes that control hydrologic responses within mountain watersheds. The newly collected data include elevation, evapotranspiration, energy balance and remotely sensed snow-pack data. A Lake Tahoe basin hydrologic model has been developed, in part to help predict the hydrologic impacts of climate change. The model couples both the surface and subsurface hydrology, with the two components having been independently calibrated. Results from the coupled simulations involving both surface water and groundwater processes

  15. Renewable Energy Requirements for Future Building Codes: Options for Compliance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dillon, Heather E.; Antonopoulos, Chrissi A.; Solana, Amy E.; Russo, Bryan J.

    2011-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    As the model energy codes are improved to reach efficiency levels 50 percent greater than current codes, use of on-site renewable energy generation is likely to become a code requirement. This requirement will be needed because traditional mechanisms for code improvement, including envelope, mechanical and lighting, have been pressed to the end of reasonable limits. Research has been conducted to determine the mechanism for implementing this requirement (Kaufman 2011). Kaufmann et al. determined that the most appropriate way to structure an on-site renewable requirement for commercial buildings is to define the requirement in terms of an installed power density per unit of roof area. This provides a mechanism that is suitable for the installation of photovoltaic (PV) systems on future buildings to offset electricity and reduce the total building energy load. Kaufmann et al. suggested that an appropriate maximum for the requirement in the commercial sector would be 4 W/ft{sup 2} of roof area or 0.5 W/ft{sup 2} of conditioned floor area. As with all code requirements, there must be an alternative compliance path for buildings that may not reasonably meet the renewables requirement. This might include conditions like shading (which makes rooftop PV arrays less effective), unusual architecture, undesirable roof pitch, unsuitable building orientation, or other issues. In the short term, alternative compliance paths including high performance mechanical equipment, dramatic envelope changes, or controls changes may be feasible. These options may be less expensive than many renewable systems, which will require careful balance of energy measures when setting the code requirement levels. As the stringency of the code continues to increase however, efficiency trade-offs will be maximized, requiring alternative compliance options to be focused solely on renewable electricity trade-offs or equivalent programs. One alternate compliance path includes purchase of Renewable Energy Credits (RECs). Each REC represents a specified amount of renewable electricity production and provides an offset of environmental externalities associated with non-renewable electricity production. The purpose of this paper is to explore the possible issues with RECs and comparable alternative compliance options. Existing codes have been examined to determine energy equivalence between the energy generation requirement and the RECs alternative over the life of the building. The price equivalence of the requirement and the alternative are determined to consider the economic drivers for a market decision. This research includes case studies that review how the few existing codes have incorporated RECs and some of the issues inherent with REC markets. Section 1 of the report reviews compliance options including RECs, green energy purchase programs, shared solar agreements and leases, and other options. Section 2 provides detailed case studies on codes that include RECs and community based alternative compliance methods. The methods the existing code requirements structure alternative compliance options like RECs are the focus of the case studies. Section 3 explores the possible structure of the renewable energy generation requirement in the context of energy and price equivalence. The price of RECs have shown high variation by market and over time which makes it critical to for code language to be updated frequently for a renewable energy generation requirement or the requirement will not remain price-equivalent over time. Section 4 of the report provides a maximum case estimate for impact to the PV market and the REC market based on the Kaufmann et al. proposed requirement levels. If all new buildings in the commercial sector complied with the requirement to install rooftop PV arrays, nearly 4,700 MW of solar would be installed in 2012, a major increase from EIA estimates of 640 MW of solar generation capacity installed in 2009. The residential sector could contribute roughly an additional 2,300 MW based on the same code requirement levels of 4 W/ft{sup 2} of r

  16. Heterogeneous Concurrent Modeling and Design in Java (Volume 1: Introduction to Ptolemy II)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    : Agilent, Bosch, HSBC, Lockheed-Martin, National Instruments, and Toyota #12;PTOLEMY II HETEROGENEOUS (AFRL), the State of California Micro Program, and the following companies: Agi- lent, Bosch, HSBC

  17. Comparison of the EXAFS Spectra of Heteronuclear MnCa/Sr Model Complexes to the Oxygen-Evolving Mn(4)Ca Complex of Photosystem II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mishra, A.; Yano, J.; Pushkar, Y.; Abboud, K.A.; Yachandra, V.K.; Christou, G.

    2009-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Heterometallic Mn-Ca and Mn-Sr complexes have been prepared and employed as model complexes for Ca and Sr EXAFS spectral comparisons with the Oxygen-Evolving Complex (OEC) of Photosystem II (PS II); these have revealed similarities that support the presence of at least one O atom bridge between the Mn and Ca/Sr in the OEC.

  18. Phase II Contaminant Transport Parameters for the Groundwater Flow and Contaminant Transport Model of Corrective Action Unit 98: Frenchman Flat, Nye County, Nevada, Rev. No.: 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeNovio, Nicole M.; Bryant, Nathan; King, Chrissi B.; Bhark, Eric; Drellack, Sigmund L.; Pickens, John F.; Farnham, Irene; Brooks, Keely M.; Reimus, Paul; Aly, Alaa

    2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents pertinent transport data and data analyses as part of the Phase II Corrective Action Investigation (CAI) for Frenchman Flat (FF) Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 98. The purpose of this data compilation and related analyses is to provide the primary reference to support parameterization of the Phase II FF CAU transport model.

  19. Phase II Hydrologic Data for the Groundwater Flow and Contaminant Transport Model of Corrective Action Unit 98: Frenchman Flat, Nye County, Nevada, Rev. No.: 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John McCord

    2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents pertinent hydrologic data and data analyses as part of the Phase II Corrective Action Investigation (CAI) for Frenchman Flat (FF) Corrective Action Unit (CAU): CAU 98. The purpose of this data compilation and related analyses is to provide the primary reference to support the development of the Phase II FF CAU groundwater flow model.

  20. Savannah River Site Approved Site Treatment Plan, 2001 Annual Update (Volumes I and II)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lawrence, B.

    2001-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The Compliance Plan Volume (Volume I) identifies project activity scheduled milestones for achieving compliance with Land Disposal Restrictions. Information regarding the technical evaluation of treatment options for SRS mixed wastes is contained in the Background Volume (Volume II) and is provided for information.

  1. Ecological Monitoring and Compliance Program 2013 Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hall, Derek B.; Anderson, David C.; Greger, Paul D.

    2014-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The Ecological Monitoring and Compliance Program (EMAC), funded through the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Field Office (NNSA/NFO, formerly Nevada Site Office), monitors the ecosystem of the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) and ensures compliance with laws and regulations pertaining to NNSS biota. This report summarizes the programs activities conducted by National Security Technologies, LLC (NSTec), during calendar year 2013. Program activities included (a) biological surveys at proposed activity sites, (b) desert tortoise compliance, (c) ecosystem monitoring, (d) sensitive plant species monitoring, (e) sensitive and protected/regulated animal monitoring, and (f) habitat restoration monitoring. During 2013, all applicable laws, regulations, and permit requirements were met, enabling EMAC to achieve its intended goals and objectives.

  2. Ecological Monitoring and Compliance Program 2010 Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hansen, D.J.; Anderson, D.C.; Hall, D.B.; Greger, P.D.; Ostler, W.K.

    2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Ecological Monitoring and Compliance (EMAC) Program, funded through the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO), monitors the ecosystem of the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) and ensures compliance with laws and regulations pertaining to NNSS biota. This report summarizes the programs activities conducted by National Security Technologies, LLC (NSTec), during calendar year 2010. Program activities included (a) biological surveys at proposed construction sites, (b) desert tortoise compliance, (c) ecosystem monitoring, (d) sensitive plant species monitoring, (e) sensitive and protected/regulated animal monitoring, (f) habitat restoration monitoring, and (g) monitoring of the Nonproliferation Test and Evaluation Complex (NPTEC). During 2010, all applicable laws, regulations, and permit requirements were met, enabling EMAC to achieve its intended goals and objectives.

  3. Ecological Monitoring and Compliance Program 2012 Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hall, Derek B.; Anderson, David C.; Greger, Paul D.; Ostler, W. Kent; Hansen, Dennis J.

    2013-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The Ecological Monitoring and Compliance Program (EMAC), funded through the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Field Office (NNSA/NFO, formerly Nevada Site Office), monitors the ecosystem of the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) and ensures compliance with laws and regulations pertaining to NNSS biota. This report summarizes the programs activities conducted by National Security Technologies, LLC (NSTec), during calendar year 2012. Program activities included (a) biological surveys at proposed construction sites, (b) desert tortoise compliance, (c) ecosystem monitoring, (d) sensitive plant species monitoring, (e) sensitive and protected/regulated animal monitoring, (f) habitat restoration monitoring, and (g) monitoring of the Nonproliferation Test and Evaluation Complex (NPTEC). During 2012, all applicable laws, regulations, and permit requirements were met, enabling EMAC to achieve its intended goals and objectives.

  4. Ecological Monitoring and Compliance Program 2011 Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hansen, D. J., Anderson, D. C., Hall, D. B., Greger, P. D., Ostler, W. K.

    2012-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The Ecological Monitoring and Compliance (EMAC) Program, funded through the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office, monitors the ecosystem of the Nevada National Security Site and ensures compliance with laws and regulations pertaining to NNSS biota. This report summarizes the program's activities conducted by National Security Technologies, LLC, during calendar year 2011. Program activities included (a) biological surveys at proposed construction sites, (b) desert tortoise compliance, (c) ecosystem monitoring, (d) sensitive plant species monitoring, (e) sensitive and protected/regulated animal monitoring, (f) habitat restoration monitoring, and (g) monitoring of the Nonproliferation Test and Evaluation Complex. During 2011, all applicable laws, regulations, and permit requirements were met, enabling EMAC to achieve its intended goals and objectives.

  5. Ecological Monitoring and Compliance Program 2008 Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dennis J. Hansen, David C. Anderson, Derek B. Hall, Paul D. Greger, W. Kent Ostler

    2009-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The Ecological Monitoring and Compliance Program, funded through the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO), monitors the ecosystem of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and ensures compliance with laws and regulations pertaining to NTS biota. This report summarizes the programs activities conducted by National Security Technologies, LLC (NSTec), during calendar year 2008. Program activities included (a) biological surveys at proposed construction sites, (b) desert tortoise compliance, (c) ecosystem mapping and data management, (d) sensitive plant species monitoring, (e) sensitive and protected/regulated animal monitoring, (f) habitat monitoring, (g) habitat restoration monitoring, and (h) monitoring of the Nonproliferation Test and Evaluation Complex (NPTEC).

  6. Ecological Monitoring and Compliance Program 2009 Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dennis J. Hansen, David C. Anderson, Derek B. Hall, Paul D. Greger, and W. Kent Ostler

    2010-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The Ecological Monitoring and Compliance Program (EMAC), funded through the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office, monitors the ecosystem of the Nevada Test Site and ensures compliance with laws and regulations pertaining to NTS biota. This report summarizes the programs activities conducted by National Security Technologies, LLC, during calendar year 2009. Program activities included (a) biological surveys at proposed construction sites, (b) desert tortoise compliance, (c) ecosystem mapping and data management, (d) sensitive plant species monitoring, (e) sensitive and protected/regulated animal monitoring, (f) habitat monitoring, (g) habitat restoration monitoring, and (h) monitoring of the Nonproliferation Test and Evaluation Complex. During 2009, all applicable laws, regulations, and permit requirements were met, enabling EMAC to achieve its intended goals and objectives.

  7. Conduct of Operations and Quality Assurance Compliance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Andrews, N.S.

    1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this document is to present and detail the deliverables for the Tiger Team Action Plan, Finding MF-11, and milestones in the FY92 Performance Appraisal for Conduct of Operations from Sandia National Laboratories to DOE. The ``Proposal for Reporting Conduct of Operations & Quality Assurance Compliance to DOE`` describes what the deliverables shall be. Five major steps that result in the development of line practices are covered in this document. These line practices specify what Sandia will do to comply with the above DOE management orders. The five steps include: hazard classification; programmatic risk classification; management grouping; compliance plan; and corporate reporting.

  8. Conduct of Operations and Quality Assurance Compliance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Andrews, N.S.

    1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this document is to present and detail the deliverables for the Tiger Team Action Plan, Finding MF-11, and milestones in the FY92 Performance Appraisal for Conduct of Operations from Sandia National Laboratories to DOE. The Proposal for Reporting Conduct of Operations Quality Assurance Compliance to DOE'' describes what the deliverables shall be. Five major steps that result in the development of line practices are covered in this document. These line practices specify what Sandia will do to comply with the above DOE management orders. The five steps include: hazard classification; programmatic risk classification; management grouping; compliance plan; and corporate reporting.

  9. September 2006 A Laboratory Investigation of Compliance Behavior under Tradable

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Murphy, James J.

    emissions trading programs. We test the hypotheses that both the violations of competitive risk neutral find significant differences between compliance behavior under fixed standards and emissions trading programs. Keywords: enforcement, compliance, emissions trading, permit markets, standards, command- and

  10. arterial compliance volume: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Paper: Improving Browsing Environment Compliance Evaluations for Websites Cyntrica Eaton heterogeneous browsing environments, the browser, browser version, and operating...

  11. Alternative Compliance Program: 10 CFR Part 490 (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sears, T.

    2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Presentation explains the Alternative Compliance option under the U.S. Department of Energy's State and Alternative Fuel Provider program.

  12. E-Print Network 3.0 - areas-part ii implementation Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    40 CFR 191 COMPLIANCE DETERMINATION FOR THE WASTE ISOLATION Summary: Report Rev 3 (DOECAO-95- 1121) 696 II-A-26 101596 EPA ReportEPA-402-R-96-010, Implementation......

  13. The effects of ankle compliance and flexibility on ankle sprains

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The effects of ankle compliance and flexibility on ankle sprains IAN C. WRIGHT, RICHARD R. NEPTUNE. J VAN DEN BOGERT, and B. M. NIGG. The effects of ankle compliance and flexibility on ankle sprains was to examine the influence of changes in subtalar joint flexibility and compliance on ankle sprain occurrence

  14. Can Affirmative Motivations Improve Compliance in Emissions Trading Leigh Raymond

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Can Affirmative Motivations Improve Compliance in Emissions Trading Programs?* Leigh Raymond be inferred. #12;Can Affirmative Motivations Improve Compliance in Emissions Trading Programs? Abstract Early emissions trading programs have obtained a very high rate of compliance, in part by using continuous

  15. COMPLIANCE SUMMARY 1997 BNL Site Environmental Report 2 -1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    COMPLIANCE SUMMARY 1997 BNL Site Environmental Report 2 - 1 Chapter 2 COMPLIANCE SUMMARY regulations and DOE Orders. This section briefly summarizes the compliance status for existing facilities to regulatory permits. They include one SPDES permit, a Major Petroleum Facility (MPF) license, two Resource

  16. Compliance Status 2012 SITE ENVIRONMENTAL REPORT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    dioxide from the Central Steam Facility were all within permit limits. There were nine unexpected opacity was submitted to address the non-compliance findings. Emissions of nitrogen oxides, carbon monoxide, and sulfur of the light path brought recorded opacity readings back to normal; other opacity excursions reported

  17. Research Integrity & Compliance Review Office (RICRO)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stephens, Graeme L.

    Research Integrity & Compliance Review Office (RICRO) Animal Subjects Human Subjects of bringing a problem forward? You may as well begin to develop these skills now, because they are part, as well as the scientific dimensions." - Dr. Bernard Rollin, University Bioethicist #12;Research

  18. Ecological Monitoring and Compliance Program 2007 Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dennis Hansen, David Anderson, Derek Hall, Paul Greger, W. Kent Ostler

    2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In accordance with U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 450.1, 'Environmental Protection Program', the Office of the Assistant Manager for Environmental Management of the DOE, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) requires ecological monitoring and biological compliance support for activities and programs conducted at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). National Security Technologies, LLC (NSTec), Ecological Services has implemented the Ecological Monitoring and Compliance (EMAC) Program to provide this support. EMAC is designed to ensure compliance with applicable laws and regulations, delineate and define NTS ecosystems, and provide ecological information that can be used to predict and evaluate the potential impacts of proposed projects and programs on those ecosystems. This report summarizes the EMAC activities conducted by NSTec during calendar year 2007. Monitoring tasks during 2007 included eight program areas: (a) biological surveys, (b) desert tortoise compliance, (c) ecosystem mapping and data management, (d) sensitive plant monitoring, (e) sensitive and protected/regulated animal monitoring, (f) habitat monitoring, (g) habitat restoration monitoring, and (h) biological monitoring at the Nonproliferation Test and Evaluation Complex (NPTEC). The following sections of this report describe work performed under these eight areas.

  19. CRIS Project Internal DASNR Compliance Checklist

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ghajar, Afshin J.

    CRIS Project Internal DASNR Compliance Checklist Researcher's Name: Department: Address / Phone: Project Title: Does this project involve research with: Human Subjects Yes No If yes, attach copy of IRB to Animals, Plants, or Humans Radioactive Materials or Yes No If yes, attach copy of Radiation Sa X

  20. Environmental Compliance Audit & Assessment Program Manual

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    LBNL-1636E Environmental Compliance Audit & Assessment Program Manual Prepared by: Environment Berkeley National Laboratory Berkeley, CA 94720 This work was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor The Regents of the University

  1. 3Compliance Status 2003 SITE ENVIRONMENTAL REPORT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Homes, Christopher C.

    3-1 3Compliance Status 2003 SITE ENVIRONMENTAL REPORT Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL supply met all drinking water requirements. Groundwater monitoring at the Major Petroleum Facility reported to the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (NYSDEC). Twenty-two reportable

  2. Are collisions with neutral hydrogen important for modelling the Second Solar Spectrum of Ti I and Ca II ?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Derouich; J. Trujillo Bueno; R. Manso Sainz

    2007-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The physical interpretation of scattering line polarization offers a novel diagnostic window for exploring the thermal and magnetic structure of the quiet regions of the solar atmosphere. Here we evaluate the impact of isotropic collisions with neutral hydrogen atoms on the scattering polarization signals of the 13 lines of multiplet 42 of Ti I and on those of the K line and of the IR triplet of Ca II, with emphasis on the collisional transfer rates between nearby J-levels. To this end, we calculate the linear polarization produced by scattering processes considering realistic multilevel models and solving the statistical equilibrium equations for the multipolar components of the atomic density matrix. We confirm that the lower levels of the 13 lines of multiplet 42 of Ti I are completely depolarized by elastic collisions. We find that upper-level collisional depolarization turns out to have an unnoticeable impact on the emergent linear polarization amplitudes, except for the ${\\lambda 4536$ line for which it is possible to notice a rather small depolarization caused by the collisional transfer rates. Concerning the Ca II lines, we show that the collisional rates play no role on the polarization of the upper level of the K line, while they have a rather small depolarizing effect on the atomic polarization of the metastable lower levels of the Ca II IR triplet.

  3. Methods for verifying compliance with low-level radioactive waste acceptance criteria

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the methods that are currently employed and those that can be used to verify compliance with low-level radioactive waste (LLW) disposal facility waste acceptance criteria (WAC). This report presents the applicable regulations representing the Federal, State, and site-specific criteria for accepting LLW. Typical LLW generators are summarized, along with descriptions of their waste streams and final waste forms. General procedures and methods used by the LLW generators to verify compliance with the disposal facility WAC are presented. The report was written to provide an understanding of how a regulator could verify compliance with a LLW disposal facility`s WAC. A comprehensive study of the methodology used to verify waste generator compliance with the disposal facility WAC is presented in this report. The study involved compiling the relevant regulations to define the WAC, reviewing regulatory agency inspection programs, and summarizing waste verification technology and equipment. The results of the study indicate that waste generators conduct verification programs that include packaging, classification, characterization, and stabilization elements. The current LLW disposal facilities perform waste verification steps on incoming shipments. A model inspection and verification program, which includes an emphasis on the generator`s waste application documentation of their waste verification program, is recommended. The disposal facility verification procedures primarily involve the use of portable radiological survey instrumentation. The actual verification of generator compliance to the LLW disposal facility WAC is performed through a combination of incoming shipment checks and generator site audits.

  4. RADIOACTIVE MATERIAL PACKAGING TORQUE REQUIREMENTS COMPLIANCE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Watkins, R.; Leduc, D.

    2011-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Shipping containers used to transport radioactive material (RAM) in commerce employ a variety of closure mechanisms. Often, these closure mechanisms require a specific amount of torque be applied to a bolt, nut or other threaded fastener. It is important that the required preload is achieved so that the package testing and analysis is not invalidated for the purpose of protecting the public. Torque compliance is a means of ensuring closure preload, is a major factor in accomplishing the package functions of confinement/containment, sub-criticality, and shielding. This paper will address the importance of applying proper torque to package closures, discuss torque value nomenclature, and present one methodology to ensure torque compliance is achieved.

  5. Optics elements for modeling electrostatic lenses and accelerator components II. Acceleration columns

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gillespie, G.H., Brown, T.A.

    1998-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A set of optical models for a variety of electrostatic lenses and accelerator columns has been developed for the computer code TRACE 3-D. TRACE 3-D is an envelope (matrix) code including space charge that is often used to model bunched beams in magnetic transport systems and radiofrequency (RF) accelerators when the effects of beam current may be important. Several new matrix models have been developed that allow the code to be used for modeling beam lines and accelerators with electrostatic components. The new models include a number of options for: (1) einzel lenses, (2) accelerator columns, (3) electrostatic deflectors (prisms), and (4) an electrostatic quadrupole. A prescription for setting up the initial beam appropriate to modeling 2-D (continuous) beams has also been developed. The new models for (2) are described in this paper, selected comparisons with other calculations are presented, and a beamline application is summarized.

  6. Idaho CERCLA Disposal Facility Complex Compliance Demonstration for DOE Order 435.1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. Simonds

    2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This compliance demonstration document provides an analysis of the Idaho CERCLA Disposal Facility (ICDF) Complex compliance with DOE Order 435.1. The ICDF Complex includes the disposal facility (landfill), evaporation pond, admin facility, weigh scale, decon building, treatment systems, and various staging/storage areas. These facilities were designed and are being constructed to be compliant with DOE Order 435.1, Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Subtitle C, and Toxic Substances Control Act polychlorinated biphenyl design and construction standards. The ICDF Complex is designated as the central Idaho National Laboratory (INL) facilityyy for the receipt, staging/storage, treatment, and disposal of INL Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA) waste streams. This compliance demonstration document discusses the conceptual site model for the ICDF Complex area. Within this conceptual site model, the selection of the area for the ICDF Complex is discussed. Also, the subsurface stratigraphy in the ICDF Complex area is discussed along with the existing contamination beneath the ICDF Complex area. The designs for the various ICDF Complex facilities are also included in this compliance demonstration document. These design discussions are a summary of the design as presented in the Remedial Design/Construction Work Plans for the ICDF landfill and evaporation pond and the Staging, Storage, Sizing, and Treatment Facility. Each of the major facilities or systems is described including the design criteria.

  7. Nonresident Alien Tax Compliance: A Guide for Institutions Making Payments to Foreign Students, Scholars, Employees, and Other International Visitors Volume One by

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dyer, Bill

    Nonresident Alien Tax Compliance: A Guide for Institutions Making Payments to Foreign Students.S. citizens, (ii) permanent resident aliens (i.e., "green card holders") and immigrants, (iii) resident aliens for tax purposes, and (iv) Nonresident aliens for tax purposes.' `There are two tests that are used

  8. Black liquor combustion validated recovery boiler modeling: Final year report. Volume 2 (Appendices I, section 5 and II, section 1)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grace, T.M.; Frederick, W.J.; Salcudean, M.; Wessel, R.A.

    1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This project was initiated in October 1990, with the objective of developing and validating a new computer model of a recovery boiler furnace using a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code specifically tailored to the requirements for solving recovery boiler flows, and using improved submodels for black liquor combustion based on continued laboratory fundamental studies. The key tasks to be accomplished were as follows: (1) Complete the development of enhanced furnace models that have the capability to accurately predict carryover, emissions behavior, dust concentrations, gas temperatures, and wall heat fluxes. (2) Validate the enhanced furnace models, so that users can have confidence in the predicted results. (3) Obtain fundamental information on aerosol formation, deposition, and hardening so as to develop the knowledge base needed to relate furnace model outputs to plugging and fouling in the convective sections of the boiler. (4) Facilitate the transfer of codes, black liquid submodels, and fundamental knowledge to the US kraft pulp industry. Volume 2 contains the last section of Appendix I, Radiative heat transfer in kraft recovery boilers, and the first section of Appendix II, The effect of temperature and residence time on the distribution of carbon, sulfur, and nitrogen between gaseous and condensed phase products from low temperature pyrolysis of kraft black liquor.

  9. ES2A7 -Fluid Mechanics Example Classes Model Answers to Example Questions (Set II)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas, Peter J.

    of msvp = 2 -1 . Calculate the mean model wind tunnel speed if the model is made to 1/10 scale. Assume in a wind tunnel. The airspeed range to be investigated is at the docking end of its range, a maximum -=-=-= --- Question 4: Sliding Board #12;A board with an area slides down an inclined ramp as is schematically

  10. Statistical system with fantom scalar interaction. II. Macroscopic Equations and Cosmological Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu. G. Ignatyev; A. A. Agathonov; D. Yu. Ignatyev

    2014-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Based on the proposed earlier by the Author approach to macroscopic description of scalar interaction, this paper develops the macroscopic model of relativistic plasma with a fantom scalar interaction of elementary particles. In the article the macroscopic equations for a statistical system with scalar interaction of particles are obtained and the complete set of macroscopic equations describing cosmological models is built.

  11. EMPIRICAL MODELS FOR DARK MATTER HALOS. II. INNER PROFILE SLOPES, DYNAMICAL PROFILES, AND /3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Terzi, Bal?a

    simulated dark matter halos better than a Navarro- Frenk-WhiteYlike model with an equal number of parameters]) density profiles of simulated dark matter halos (Navarro et al. 2004). Intriguingly, this function was shown to provide a better fit than thethree-parameter Navarro-Frenk-White (NFW)Ylike model

  12. Detailed modeling of spectroscopic data: Modeling support for ORNL PMI WORK: TEXTORALT-II, TORE SUPRA, ATF

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hogan, J.; Klepper, C.; Hillis, D.; Uckan, T.

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper contains vugraphs on particle source effects on confinement time scaling. Detailed modeling of H/sub ..cap alpha../ intensity spatial distribution is discussed. (LSP)

  13. Model documentation natural gas transmission and distribution model (NGTDM) of the national energy modeling system. Volume II: Model developer`s report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1995-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

    To partially fulfill the requirements for {open_quotes}Model Acceptance{close_quotes} as stipulated in EIA Standard 91-01-01 (effective February 3, 1991), the Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting has conducted tests of the Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Model (NGTDM) for the specific purpose of validating the forecasting model. This volume of the model documentation presents the results of {open_quotes}one-at-a-time{close_quotes} sensitivity tests conducted in support of this validation effort. The test results are presented in the following forms: (1) Tables of important model outputs for the years 2000 and 2010 are presented with respect to change in each input from the reference case; (2) Tables of percent changes from base case results for the years 2000 and 2010 are presented for important model outputs; (3) Tables of conditional sensitivities (percent change in output/percent change in input) for the years 2000 and 2010 are presented for important model outputs; (4) Finally, graphs presenting the percent change from base case results for each year of the forecast period are presented for selected key outputs. To conduct the sensitivity tests, two main assumptions are made in order to test the performance characteristics of the model itself and facilitate the understanding of the effects of the changes in the key input variables to the model on the selected key output variables: (1) responses to the amount demanded do not occur since there are no feedbacks of inputs from other NEMS models in the stand-alone NGTDM run. (2) All the export and import quantities from and to Canada and Mexico, and liquefied natural gas (LNG) imports and exports are held fixed (i.e., there are no changes in imports and exports between the reference case and the sensitivity cases) throughout the forecast period.

  14. Inclusive Search for Standard Model Higgs Boson Production in the WW Decay Channel using the CDF II Detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The CDF Collaboration; T. Aaltonen

    2010-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a search for standard model (SM) Higgs boson production using ppbar collision data at sqrt(s) = 1.96 TeV, collected with the CDF II detector and corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 4.8 fb-1. We search for Higgs bosons produced in all processes with a significant production rate and decaying to two W bosons. We find no evidence for SM Higgs boson production and place upper limits at the 95% confidence level on the SM production cross section (sigma(H)) for values of the Higgs boson mass (m_H) in the range from 110 to 200 GeV. These limits are the most stringent for m_H > 130 GeV and are 1.29 above the predicted value of sigma(H) for mH = 165 GeV.

  15. Smog Check II Evaluation Part II: Overview of Vehicle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Denver, University of

    Smog Check II Evaluation Part II: Overview of Vehicle Emissions . . . . . . . . . . . . Prepared in Later Sections ____________________ 1 3. Older Vehicles Have Higher Emissions on Average _____________ 3 4. The Vehicle Fleet Is Dominated by Newer Vehicles______________ 8 5. More Recent Vehicle Models

  16. Ecological Monitoring and Compliance Program Fiscal Year 1999 Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cathy A. Wills

    1999-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Ecological and Compliance program, funded through the U. S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office, monitors the ecosystem of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and ensures compliance with laws and regulations pertaining to NTS biota. This report summarizes the program's activities conducted by Bechtel Nevada during fiscal year 1999. Program activities included: (1) biological surveys at proposed construction sites (2) desert tortoise compliance (3) ecosystem mapping (4) sensitive species and unique habitat monitoring and (5) biological monitoring at the HAZMAT Spill Center.

  17. DOE Steps Lead to Significant Increase in Compliance with Energy...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Department of Energy Subpoenas Compliance Data from AeroSys, Inc. DOE Requires Manufacturers to Halt Sales of Heat Pumps and Air Conditioners Violating Minimum Appliance Standards...

  18. State and Alternative Fuel Provider Fleet Compliance Methods (Revised) (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fact sheet describes the difference between Standard and Alternative Compliance requirements for state and alternative fuel provider fleets covered under the Energy Policy Acts of 1992 and 2005.

  19. ENERGY EFFICIENCY AND CONSERVATION BLOCK GRANTS NEPA COMPLIANCE...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    40 Recipien, ..ounty of Westmoreland, PA ENERGY EFFICIENCY AND CONSERVATION BLOCK GRANTS NEPA COMPLIANCE FORM Activities Determination Categorical Exclusion Reviewer's Specific...

  20. ENERGY EFFICIENCY AND CONSERVATION BLOCK GRANTS NEPA COMPLIANCE...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    068 Re ent: City of Reno, NV ENERGY EFFICIENCY AND CONSERVATION BLOCK GRANTS NEPA COMPLIANCE FORM Activities Determination Categorical Exclusion Reviewer's Specific Instructions...

  1. ENERGY EFFICIENCY AND CONSERVATION BLOCK GRANTS NEPA COMPLIANCE...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    12 Recipient: County of Hidalgo, Texas ENERGY EFFICIENCY AND CONSERVATION BLOCK GRANTS NEPA COMPLIANCE FORM Activities Determination Reviewer's Specific Instructions and...

  2. ENERGY EFFICIENCY AND CONSERVATION BLOCK GRANTS NEPA COMPLIANCE...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    0847 Recipient: City of .viadison, WI ENERGY EFFICIENCY AND CONSERVATION BLOCK GRANTS NEPA COMPLIANCE FORM Activities Determination Categorical Exclusion Reviewer's Specific...

  3. Learning & Development Policy/Compliance | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    & Development PolicyCompliance Searching for information on Department and Federal training policy and guidelines? The following websites can be of help: DOE Learning &...

  4. ENERGY EFFICIENCY AND CONSERVATION BLOCK GRANTS NEPA COMPLIANCE...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    56 Recipient: County of Clark ) 114.4- ENERGY EFFICIENCY AND CONSERVATION BLOCK GRANTS NEPA COMPLIANCE FORM Activities Determination Categorical Exclusion Reviewer's Specific...

  5. Report to the Legislature in Compliance with Public Utilities Code

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    "................................................................................................................................8 DISTRIBUTED GENERATION COSTS AND SAVINGSReport to the Legislature in Compliance with Public Utilities Code Section 910 March 2013 #12...................................................................17 Self-Generation Incentive Program (SGIP

  6. 2014-10-06 DOE Certification, Compliance, and Enforcement Overview...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Dehumidifiers, Room Air Conditioners, Clothes Washers, Clothes Dryers, and Dishwashers 2014-10-06 DOE Certification, Compliance, and Enforcement Overview for Refrigerators,...

  7. ENERGY EFFICIENCY AND CONSERVATION BLOCK GRANTS NEPA COMPLIANCE...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    7 Recipient: county of Monterey, CA ENERGY EFFICIENCY AND CONSERVATION BLOCK GRANTS NEPA COMPLIANCE FORM Activities Determination Categorical Exclusion Reviewer's Specific...

  8. Environmental Protection- Industrial Compliance (Newfoundland and Labrador, Canada)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Industrial Compliance Section develops and administers Certificates of Approval for the Construction and/or Operation of various industrial facilities. Industries with air emissions and/or...

  9. Exploring Partnerships to Further Building Code Compliance Enhancement

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This presentation, given through the DOE's Technical Assitance Program (TAP), identifies opportunities for municipal and state partnerships to ensure better building code compliance.

  10. Perception of petroleum profits tax compliance in Nigeria.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oremade, Babatunde Timothy

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ??The aim of this research is to examine whether the extent of tax compliance by oil producing companies in Nigeria is determined by the knowledge, (more)

  11. State and Alternative Fuel Provider Fleet Compliance Methods (Revised) (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This fact sheet describes the difference between Standard and Alternative Compliance requirements for state and alternative fuel provider fleets covered by the Energy Policy Act.

  12. Technical Assistance: Increasing Code Compliance - 2014 BTO Peer...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Code Compliance - 2014 BTO Peer Review More Documents & Publications Building Energy Codes Program - 2014 BTO Peer Review Building Energy Codes Program Overview - 2014 BTO Peer...

  13. Directory of certificates of compliance for radioactive materials packages

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this directory is to make available a convenient source of information on packagings approved by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission. To assist in identifying packaging, an index by Model Number and corresponding Certificate of Compliance Number is included at the front of Volumes 1 and 2. An alphabetical listing by user name is included in the back of Volume 3 for approved Quality Assurance programs. The reports include a listing of all users of each package design and approved Quality Assurance programs prior to the publication date of the directory. Comments to make future revisions of this directory more useful are invited and should be directed to the Spent Fuel Project Office, U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission.

  14. Modeling of the AISI Two-Zone Smelter, Part II: Physical Modeling and the AISI Pilot Plant Trials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Keller, Joseph George; Zhang, X.; Fuehan, R. J.; Vassilicos, A.; Sarma, B.

    2001-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Physical modeling experiments were conducted for the American Iron and Steel Institute (AISI) two-zone smelter process. The effects of geometrical and operating parameters on backmixing flow rates were investigated. It was found that the driving force for a backmixing flow in the AISI smelter comes from gas stirring in a liquid bath. The backmixing flow rate in the AISI smelter is proportional to a bath depth and an opening area of a barrier. Based on the results of the physical modeling experiments, a dimensional analysis was performed to extrapolate the water modeling results to the operating conditions in the AISI pilot plant. Copper tracer trials were conducted at the AISI pilot plant to investigate the backmixing flow of the AISI two-zone smelter process. The results obtained from the pilot plant trials and the water modeling experiments were compared.

  15. 2009 Compliance Recertification Application (2009 CRA) Compliance Application Review Document (CARD) No. 53

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    dissolved solids." The groundwater protection requirements limit releases to the maximum contamination level a bounding analysis of the concentrations of the contaminants to assess compliance (Subpart C of 40 CFR part is much less than the observed concentration of brine derived from the Salado anhydrite marker beds. Also

  16. Quality assurance guidance for TRUPACT-II (Transuranic Package Transporter-II) payload control

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1989-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Transuranic Package Transporter-II (TRUPACT-II) Safety Analysis Report for Packaging (SARP) approved by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), discusses authorized methods for payload control in Appendix 1.3.7 and the Quality Assurance (QA) requirements in Section 9.3. Subsection 9.3.2.1 covers maintenance and use of the TRUPACT-II and the specific QA requirements are given in DOE/WIPP 89-012. Subsection 9.3.2.2 covers payload compliance, for which this document was written. 6 refs.

  17. Status of Waste Isolation Pilot Plant compliance with 40 CFR 191B, December 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marietta, M.G.; Anderson, D.R.

    1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Before disposing of transuranic radioactive waste at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), the US Department of Energy (DOE) must evaluate compliance with long-term regulations of the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) is conducting iterative performance assessments (PAs) of the WIPP for the DOE to provide interim guidance while preparing for final compliance evaluations. This paper describes the 1992 preliminary comparison with Subpart B of the Environmental Standards for the Management and Disposal of Spent Nuclear Fuel, High-Level and Transuranic Radioactive Wastes (40 CFR 191), which regulates long-term releases of radioactive waste. Results of the 1992 PA are preliminary, and cannot be used to determine compliance or noncompliance with EPA regulations because portions of the modeling system and data base are incomplete. Results are consistent, however, with those of previous iterations of PA, and the SNL WIPP PA Department has high confidence that compliance with 40 CFR 191B can be demonstrated. Comparison of predicted radiation doses from the disposal system also gives high confidence that the disposal system is safe for long-term isolation.

  18. Aerosol cluster impact and break-up : II. Atomic and Cluster Scale Models.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lechman, Jeremy B.; Takato, Yoichi (State University of New York at Buffalo, Buffalo, NY)

    2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Understanding the interaction of aerosol particle clusters/flocs with surfaces is an area of interest for a number of processes in chemical, pharmaceutical, and powder manufacturing as well as in steam-tube rupture in nuclear power plants. Developing predictive capabilities for these applications involves coupled phenomena on multiple length and timescales from the process macroscopic scale ({approx}1m) to the multi-cluster interaction scale (1mm-0.1m) to the single cluster scale ({approx}1000 - 10000 particles) to the particle scale (10nm-10{micro}m) interactions, and on down to the sub-particle, atomic scale interactions. The focus of this report is on the single cluster scale; although work directed toward developing better models of particle-particle interactions by considering sub-particle scale interactions and phenomena is also described. In particular, results of mesoscale (i.e., particle to single cluster scale) discrete element method (DEM) simulations for aerosol cluster impact with rigid walls are presented. The particle-particle interaction model is based on JKR adhesion theory and is implemented as an enhancement to the granular package in the LAMMPS code. The theory behind the model is outlined and preliminary results are shown. Additionally, as mentioned, results from atomistic classical molecular dynamics simulations are also described as a means of developing higher fidelity models of particle-particle interactions. Ultimately, the results from these and other studies at various scales must be collated to provide systems level models with accurate 'sub-grid' information for design, analysis and control of the underlying systems processes.

  19. 1 Intevep/2002/papers/FoamyOil-Pt2/nucleation_5-03.doc Modeling Foamy Oil Flow in Porous Media II

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Joseph, Daniel D.

    in a depletion experiment in which oil is pulled out of a closed sand pack at a constant rate reservoirs of heavy foamy oil under solution gas drive. All of the background motivation, the arguments1 · Intevep/2002/papers/FoamyOil-Pt2/nucleation_5-03.doc Modeling Foamy Oil Flow in Porous Media II

  20. Proc. SPIE 8396, Geospatial InfoFusion II, 83960N (May 1, 2012); doi:10.1117/12.920878 Modeling spatial uncertainties in geospatial data fusion and mining

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kovalerchuk, Boris

    ., Seattle, WA, 98178 ABSTRACT Geospatial data analysis relies on Spatial Data Fusion and Mining (SDFMProc. SPIE 8396, Geospatial InfoFusion II, 83960N (May 1, 2012); doi:10.1117/12.920878 Modeling spatial uncertainties in geospatial data fusion and mining Boris Kovalerchuka* , Leonid Perlovskyb

  1. Regulatory treatment of allowances and compliance costs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rose, K. [National Regulatory Research Institute, Columbus, OH (United States)

    1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 (CAAA) established a national emission allowance trading system, a market-based form of environmental regulation designed to reduce and limit sulfur dioxide emissions. However, the allowance trading system is being applied primarily to an economically regulated electric utility industry. The combining of the new form of environmental regulation and economic regulation of electric utilities has raised a number of questions including what the role should be of the federal and state utility regulating commissions and how those actions will affect the decision making process of the utilities and the allowance market. There are several dimensions to the regulatory problems that commissions face. Allowances and utility compliance expenditures have implications for least-cost/IPR (integrated resource planning), prudence review procedures, holding company and multistate utility regulation and ratemaking treatment. The focus of this paper is on the ratemaking treatment. The following topics are covered: ratemaking treatment of allowances and compliance costs; Traditional cost-recovery mechanisms; limitations to the traditional approach; traditional approach and the allowance trading market; market-based cost recovery mechanisms; methods of determining the benchmark; determining the split between ratepayers and the utility; other regulatory approaches; limitations of incentive mechanisms.

  2. A Simple Quantum-Mechanical Model of Spacetime II: Thermodynamics of Spacetime

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Makela

    2009-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    In this second part of our series of two papers, where spacetime is modelled by a graph, where Planck size quantum black holes lie on the vertices, we consider the thermodynamics of spacetime. We formulate an equation which tells in which way an accelerating, spacelike two-surface of spacetime interacts with the thermal radiation flowing through that surface. In the low temperature limit, where most quantum black holes constituting spacetime are assumed to lie in the ground state, our equation implies, among other things, the Hawking and the Unruh effects, as well as Einstein's field equation with a vanishing cosmological constant for general matter fields. We also consider the high temperature limit, where the microscopic black holes are assumed to lie in highly excited states. In this limit our model implies, among other things, that black hole entropy depends logarithmically on its area, instead of being proportional to the area.

  3. Novel Geometrical Models of Relativistic Stars. II. Incompressible Stars and Heavy Black Dwarfs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. P. Fiziev

    2004-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

    In a series of articles we describe a novel class of geometrical models of relativistic stars. Our approach to the static spherically symmetric solutions of Einstein equations is based on a careful physical analysis of radial gauge conditions. It turns out that there exist heavy black dwarfs: relativistic stars with arbitrary large mass, which are to have arbitrary small radius and arbitrary small luminosity. In the present article we mathematically prove this new phenomena, using a detailed consideration of incompressible GR stars. We study the whole two parameter family of solutions of extended TOV equations for incompressible stars. This example is used to illustrate most of the basic features of the new geometrical models of relativistic stars. Comparison with newest observational data is discussed

  4. ISO-SWS calibration and the accurate modelling of cool-star atmospheres - II. General results

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    L. Decin; B. Vandenbussche; C. Waelkens; K. Eriksson; B. Gustafsson; B. Plez; A. J. Sauval; K. Hinkle

    2002-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The fine calibration of the ISO-SWS detectors (Infrared Space Observatory - Short Wavelength Spectrometer) has proven to be a delicate problem. We therefore present a detailed spectroscopic study in the 2.38 -- 12 micron wavelength range of a sample of 16 A0 -- M2 stars used for the calibration of ISO-SWS. By investigating the discrepancies between the ISO-SWS data of these sources, the theoretical predictions of their spectra, the high-resolution FTS-KP (Kitt Peak) spectrum of Alpha Boo and the solar FTS-ATMOS (Atmospheric Trace Molecule Spectroscopy) spectrum, both calibration problems and problems in computing the theoretical models and the synthetic spectra are revealed. The underlying reasons for these problems are sought for and the impact on the further calibration of ISO-SWS and on the theoretical modelling is discussed extensively.

  5. Probing Quantum General Relativity Through Exactly Soluble Midi-Superspaces II: Polarized Gowdy Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Pierri

    2001-01-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Canonical quantization of the polarized Gowdy midi-superspace with a 3-torus spatial topology is carried out. As in an earlier work on the Einstein-Rosen cylindrical waves, symmetry reduction is used to cast the original problem in 4-dimensional space-times to a 3-dimensional setting. To our knowledge, this is the first complete, systematic treatment of the Gowdy model in the geometrodynamical setting.

  6. Rate of reduction of ore-carbon composites: Part II. Modeling of reduction in extended composites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fortini, O.M.; Fruehan, R.J. [US Steel Research & Technological Center, Monroeville, PA (United States)

    2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A new process for ironmaking was proposed using a rotary hearth furnace and an iron bath smelter to produce iron employing wood charcoal as an energy source and reductant. This paper examines reactions in composite pellet samples with sizes close to sizes used in industrial practice (10 to 16 min in diameter). A model was constructed using the combined kinetic mechanism developed in Part I of this series of articles along with equations for the computation of pellet temperature and shrinkage during the reaction. The analysis of reaction rates measured for pellets with wood charcoal showed that heat transfer plays a significant role in their overall rate of reaction at elevated temperatures. The slower rates measured in pellets containing coal char show that the intrinsic kinetics of carbon oxidation is more significant than heat transfer. Model calculations suggest that the rates are highly sensitive to the thermal conductivity of pellets containing wood charcoal and are less sensitive to the external conditions of heat transfer. It was seen that the changes in pellet surface area and diameter due to shrinkage introduce little change on reaction rates. The model developed provides an adequate description of pellets of wood charcoal up to circa 90% of reduction. Experimentally determined rates of reduction of iron oxide by wood charcoal were approximately 5 to 10 times faster than rates measured in pellets with coal char.

  7. RESEARCH ARTICLE Aerodynamic and functional consequences of wing compliance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daniel, Tom

    RESEARCH ARTICLE Aerodynamic and functional consequences of wing compliance Andrew M. Mountcastle ?, the instantaneous shape of an insect wing is dictated by the interaction of aerodynamic forces with the inertial rever- sals--loads that well exceed the mean aerodynamic force. Although wing compliance has been

  8. COLORADO STATE UNIVERSITY Research Integrity & Compliance Review Office (RICRO)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    COLORADO STATE UNIVERSITY Research Integrity & Compliance Review Office (RICRO) Assistant of the Research Integrity and Compliance Review Office (RICRO) is responsible for a broad range of duties to the campus community and visitors to campus. #12; Ability to successfully plan and prepare for as well as set

  9. Ecological Monitoring and Compliance Program Fiscal Year 2003 Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bechtel Nevada

    2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Ecological Monitoring and Compliance program, funded through the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office, monitors the ecosystem of the Nevada Test Site and ensures compliance with laws and regulations pertaining to Nevada Test Site biota. This report summarizes the program's activities conducted by Bechtel Nevada during fiscal year 2003.

  10. STATE OF CALIFORNIA CERTIFICATE OF COMPLIANCE, PRESCRIPTIVE HVAC ALTERATIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    STATE OF CALIFORNIA CERTIFICATE OF COMPLIANCE, PRESCRIPTIVE HVAC ALTERATIONS CEC-MECH-1C-ALT-HVAC (Revised 07/10) CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION CERTIFICATE OF COMPLIANCE MECH-1C-ALT-HVAC Prescriptive HVAC Steps" column below. Note: After installation of HVAC units and/or ducts, the Installation

  11. SOUND COMPLIANCE MONITORING FOR THE GAMESA WIND TURBINE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Firestone, Jeremy

    SOUND COMPLIANCE MONITORING FOR THE GAMESA WIND TURBINE UD - LEWES, DELAWARE January 2011 ` #12;SOUND COMPLIANCE MONITORING FOR THE GAMESA WIND TURBINE AT THE UNIVERSITY OF DELAWARE LEWES, DELAWARE A Gamesa G90 2.0-MW wind turbine operates at the University of Delaware (UD), Lewes campus on a parcel

  12. Compliance Verification Paths for Residential and Commercial Energy Codes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Conover, David R.; Makela, Eric J.; Fannin, Jerica D.; Sullivan, Robin S.

    2011-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    This report looks at different ways to verify energy code compliance and to ensure that the energy efficiency goals of an adopted document are achieved. Conformity assessment is the body of work that ensures compliance, including activities that can ensure residential and commercial buildings satisfy energy codes and standards. This report identifies and discusses conformity-assessment activities and provides guidance for conducting assessments.

  13. Ecological Monitoring and Compliance Program Fiscal Year 2000 Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wills, C.A.

    2000-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Ecological Monitoring and Compliance program, funded through the U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office, monitors the ecosystem of he Nevada Test Site (NTS) and ensures compliance with laws and regulations pertaining to NTS biota. This report summarizes the program's activities conducted by Bechtel Nevada during fiscal year 2000. Program activities included: (1) biological surveys at proposed construction sites, (2) desert tortoise compliance,(3) ecosystem mapping, (4) sensitive species and unique habitat monitoring, and (5) biological monitoring at the HAZMAT Spill Center. Biological surveys for the presence of sensitive species were conducted for 24 NTS projects. Seventeen sites were in desert tortoise habitat, and six acres of tortoise habitat were documented as being disturbed this year. No tortoises were found in or displaced from project areas, and no tortoises were accidentally injured or killed. A topical report describing the classification of habitat types o n the NTS was completed. The report is the culmination of three years of field vegetation mapping and the analysis of vegetation data from over 1,500 ecological landform units. A long-term monitoring plan for important plant species that occur on the NTS was completed. Sitewide inventories were conducted for the western burrowing owl, bat species of concern, wild horses, raptor nests, and mule deer. Fifty-nine of 69 known owl burrows were monitored. Forty-four of the known burrows are in disturbed habitat. As in previous years, some owls were present year round on the NTS. An overall decrease in active owl burrows was observed within all three ecoregions (Mojave Desert, Transition, Great Basin Desert) from October through January. An increase in active owl burrows was observed from mid-March to early April. A total of 45 juvenile owls was detected from eight breeding pairs. One nest burrow was detected in the Mojave Desert,one in the Great Basin Desert, and six in the Transition ecoregion. Seventy bats, representing four bat species of concern, were captured in mist-nets at water sources in the Great Basin Desert ecoregion. Bats were detected with the Anabat II call-recording system at selected tunnel and mine entrances verifying that some NTS mines and tunnels are used as bat roosts. Thirty-seven adult horses and 11 foals were counted this year. Four of the five foals observed last year have survived to yearlings. A monitoring plan for NTS horses was completed. Six active red-tailed hawk nests and 10 nestling red-tailed hawks were detected this year. Two spotlighting surveys for mule deer were conducted, each over three consecutive nights in October 1999 and August 2000. The mean sighting rate in October was 1.2 deer/10 kilometers (km) and 1.6 deer/10 km in August. Selected wetlands and man-made water sources were monitored for physical parameters and wildlife use. No dead animals were observed this year in any plastic-lined sump. Pahute Mesa Pond was confirmed to have vegetation,hydrology, and soil indicators that qualify the site as a jurisdictional wetland. The chemical spill test plan for one experiment at the HAZMAT Spill Center was reviewed for its potential to impact biota downwind of spills on Frenchman Lake playa.

  14. Ecological Monitoring and Compliance Program Fiscal Year 2001

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    C. A. Wills

    2001-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Ecological Monitoring and Compliance program, funded through the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Operations Office, monitors the ecosystem of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and ensures compliance with laws and regulations pertaining to NTS biota. This report summarizes the program's activities conducted by Bechtel Nevada during fiscal year 2001. Program activities included: (1) biological surveys at proposed construction sites, (2) desert tortoise compliance, (3) ecosystem mapping and data management, (4) sensitive species and unique habitat monitoring, and (5) biological monitoring at the HAZMAT Spill Center. Biological surveys for the presence of sensitive species were conducted for 23 NTS projects. Eleven sites were in desert tortoise habitat. These projects have the potential to disturb a total of 588 acres, where 568 acres of disturbance would be off-road driving. No tortoises were found in or displaced from project areas, and no tortoise s were accidentally injured or killed at project areas. One tortoise was crushed by a vehicle on a paved road. A topical report describing the classification of habitat types on the NTS was completed and distributed. The report is the culmination of three years of field vegetation mapping and the analysis of vegetation data from over 1,500 ecological landform units. Compilation of historical wildlife data was initiated. A long-term monitoring plan for important plant species that occur on the NTS was completed. Site-wide monitoring was conducted for the western burrowing owl, bat species of concern, wild horses, and raptor nests. Sixty-nine of 77 known owl burrows were monitored. As in previous years, some owls were present year round on the NTS. An overall decrease in active owl burrows was observed within all three ecoregions (Mojave Desert, Transition, Great Basin Desert) from October through January. An increase in active owl burrows was observed from mid March to early April. A total of 55 juvenile owls was detected from 11 breeding pairs. Pellet analysis of burrowing owls was completed which identified key prey species. A total of 272 bats, representing 10 bat species were captured in mist-nets at water sources in the Great Basin Desert ecoregion. Bats were detected with the Anabat II call-recording system at water sources and selected tunnel and mine entrances. Thirty-seven adult horses and 11 foals were counted this year. Two of the eleven foals observed last year survived to yearlings. Seven active raptor nests were found and monitored this year. These included two Great-horned Owl nests, three Barn Owl nests, and two Red-tailed Hawk nests. Selected wetlands and man-made water sources were monitored for physical parameters and wildlife use. No dead animals were observed this year in any plastic-lined sump. The chemical spill test plans for four experiments at the HAZMAT Spill Center were reviewed for their potential to impact biota downwind of spills on Frenchman Lake playa.

  15. Diesel Passenger Car Technology for Low Emissions and CO2 Compliance...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Passenger Car Technology for Low Emissions and CO2 Compliance Diesel Passenger Car Technology for Low Emissions and CO2 Compliance Cost effective reduction of legislated emissions...

  16. ORISE: Dose modeling and assessments

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    or state regulatory compliance requirements are being met during the decontamination and decommissioning of nuclear facilities. Dose modeling is an important step in the...

  17. Electron spin and the origin of Bio-homochirality II. Prebiotic inorganic-organic reaction model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Wei

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The emergence of biomolecular homochirality is a critically important question about life phenomenon and the origins of life. In a previous paper (arXiv:1309.1229), I tentatively put forward a new hypothesis that the emergence of a single chiral form of biomolecules in living organisms is specifically determined by the electron spin state during their enzyme-catalyzed synthesis processes. However, how a homochirality world of biomolecules could have formed in the absence of enzymatic networks before the origins of life remains unanswered. Here I discussed the electron spin properties in Fe3S4, ZnS, and transition metal doped dilute magnetic ZnS, and their possible roles in the prebiotic synthesis of chiral molecules. Since the existence of these minerals in hydrothermal vent systems is matter of fact, the suggested prebiotic inorganic-organic reaction model, if can be experimentally demonstrated, may help explain where and how life originated on early Earth.

  18. Renormalization of lattice-regularized quantum gravity models II. The case of causal dynamical triangulations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Joshua H. Cooperman

    2014-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The causal dynamical triangulations approach aims to construct a quantum theory of gravity as the continuum limit of a lattice-regularized model of dynamical geometry. A renormalization group scheme--in concert with finite size scaling analysis--is essential to this aim. Formulating and implementing such a scheme in the present context raises novel and notable conceptual and technical problems. I explored these problems, and, building on standard techniques, suggested potential solutions in the first paper of this two-part series. As an application of these solutions, I now propose a renormalization group scheme for causal dynamical triangulations. This scheme differs significantly from that studied recently by Ambjorn, Gorlich, Jurkiewicz, Kreienbuehl, and Loll.

  19. Clinical Compliance Manual This manual was developed to guide students, staff and faculty through the Clinical Compliance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ward, Karen

    mandates and thus responsive to research regarding the best practices in the profession, they are subjectClinical Compliance Manual This manual was developed to guide students, staff and faculty through in this manual is to provide the reader with a comprehensible view of the Clinical Compliance Office, its

  20. Search for the Trilepton Signal of the Minimal Supergravity Model in D0 Run II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Binder, Meta; /Munich U.; ,

    2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A search for associated chargino neutralino pair production is performed in the trilepton decay channel q{bar q} {yields} {tilde {chi}}{sub 1}{sup {+-}} {tilde {chi}}{sub 2}{sup 0} {yields} {ell}{sup {+-}} {nu} {tilde {chi}}{sub 1}{sup 0} {mu}{sup {+-}} {mu}{sup {-+}} {tilde {chi}}{sub 1}{sup 0}, using data collected with the D0 detector at a center-of-mass energy of 1.96 TeV at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. The data sample corresponds to an integrated luminosity of {approx}300 pb{sup -1}. A dedicated event selection is applied to all samples including the data sample and the Monte Carlo simulated samples for the Standard Model background and the Supersymmetry signal. Events with two muons plus an additional isolated track, replacing the requirement of a third charged lepton in the event, are analyzed. Additionally, selected events must have a large amount of missing transverse energy due to the neutrino and the two {tilde {chi}}{sub 1}{sup 0}. After all selection cuts are applied, 2 data events are found, with an expected number of background events of 1.75 {+-} 0.34 (stat.) {+-} 0.46 (syst.). No evidence for Supersymmetry is found and limits on the production cross section times leptonic branching fraction are set. When the presented analysis is considered in combination with three other decay channels, no evidence for Supersymmetry is found. Limits on the production cross section times leptonic branching fraction are set. A lower chargino mass limit of 117 GeV at 95% CL is then derived for the mSUGRA model in a region of parameter space with enhanced leptonic branching fractions.

  1. Frequency dependence of mass flow gain factor and cavitation compliance of cavitating inducers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Otsuka, S.; Tsujimoto, Yoshinobu [Osaka Univ. (Japan); Kamijo, Kenjiro [National Aerospace Lab., Kakuda, Miyagi (Japan). Kakuda Research Center; Furuya, O. [AMP Technologies, Osaka (Japan)

    1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Unsteady cavitation characteristics are analyzed based on a closed cavity model in which the length of the cavity is allowed to oscillate. It is shown that the present model blends smoothly into quasisteady calculations in the low frequency limit, unlike fixed cavity length models. Effects of incidence angle and cavitation number on cavitation compliance and mass flow gain factor are shown as functions of reduce frequency. The cavity volume is evaluated by three methods and the results were used to confirm the accuracy and adequacy of the numerical calculation. By comparison with experimental data on inducers, it was shown that the present model can simulate the characteristics of unsteady cavitation qualitatively.

  2. Computational Study of Copper(II) Complexation and Hydrolysis in Aqueous Solutions Using Mixed Cluster/Continuum Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goddard III, William A.

    Computational Study of Copper(II) Complexation and Hydrolysis in Aqueous Solutions Using Mixed and thermodynamic properties of Cu(II) species in aqueous solution. 1. Introduction Copper is a key component evidence that copper may be involved in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis, Alzheimer's diseases

  3. WIPP shaft seal system parameters recommended to support compliance calculations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hurtado, L.D.; Knowles, M.K. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Kelley, V.A.; Jones, T.L.; Ogintz, J.B. [INTERA Inc., Austin, TX (United States); Pfeifle, T.W. [RE/SPEC, Inc., Rapid City, SD (United States)

    1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Department of Energy plans to dispose of transuranic waste at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), which is sited in southeastern New Mexico. The WIPP disposal facility is located approximately 2,150 feet (650 m) below surface in the bedded halite of the Salado Formation. Prior to initiation of disposal activities, the Department of Energy must demonstrate that the WIPP will comply with all regulatory requirements. Applicable regulations require that contaminant releases from the WIPP remain below specified levels for a period of 10,000 years. To demonstrate that the WIPP will comply with these regulations, the Department of Energy has requested that Sandia National Laboratories develop and implement a comprehensive performance assessment of the WIPP repository for the regulatory period. This document presents the conceptual model of the shaft sealing system to be implemented in performance assessment calculations conducted in support of the Compliance Certification Application for the WIPP. The model was developed for use in repository-scale calculations and includes the seal system geometry and materials to be used in grid development as well as all parameters needed to describe the seal materials. These calculations predict the hydrologic behavior of the system. Hence conceptual model development is limited to those processes that could impact the fluid flow through the seal system.

  4. DOE standard compliance demonstration program: An office building example

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bailey, S.A.; Keller, J.M.; Wrench, L.E.; Williams, C.J.

    1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) issued interim new building energy standards (10 CFR 435 1989) to achieve maximum energy efficiency in the designs of new buildings. DOE then entered into a project to demonstrate and assess the impact of these standards on the design community. One area of focus was a test to see how a less conventional design-focused building would meet the standards` requirements -- DOE wanted to demonstrate that compliance with energy standards does not mean compromising the architectural intent of a building. This study, which was initiated at Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL), illustrated the process by which compliance with the standards can be proven for a highly {open_quotes}design-oriented{close_quotes} office building. The study also assessed the impact of the whole building simulation compliance alternatives on design. This report documents the compliance requirements, gives a description of the sample building chosen for the study, provides general guidance for the compliance process, documents the method of compliance that was undertaken for the sample building, presents the results of the study, and provides a recommendation on how the compliance requirements could be improved to reflect more realistic use types.

  5. ECOLOGICAL MONITORING AND COMPLIANCE PROGRAM CALENDAR YEAR 2005 REPORT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    BECHTEL NEVADA ECOLOGICAL SERVICES

    2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Ecological Monitoring and Compliance program (EMAC), funded through the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO), monitors the ecosystem of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and ensures compliance with laws and regulations pertaining to NTS biota. This report summarizes the programs activities conducted by Bechtel Nevada (BN) during the Calendar Year 2005. Program activities included: (1) biological surveys at proposed construction sites, (2) desert tortoise compliance, (3) ecosystem mapping and data management, (4) sensitive and protected/regulated species and unique habitat monitoring, (5) habitat restoration monitoring, and (6) biological monitoring at the Non-Proliferation Test and Evaluation Complex (NPTEC).

  6. Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Biennial Environmental Compliance Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Washington Regulatory and Environmental Services (WRES)

    2004-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

    This Biennial Environmental Compliance Report (BECR) documents environmental regulatory compliance at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), a facility designed and authorized for the safe disposal of transuranic (TRU) radioactive waste, for the reporting period of April 1, 2002, to March 31, 2004. As required by the WIPP Land Withdrawal Act (LWA) (Public Law [Pub. L.] 102-579, as amended by Pub. L. 104-201), the BECR documents U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) compliance with applicable environmental protection laws and regulations implemented by agencies of the federal government and the state of New Mexico.

  7. array ii comparing: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    I I I I IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII I II I I I II I I I II I I 292 STEAM RECEIVER MODELS FOR SOLAR DISH CONCENTRATORS: TWO MODELS COMPARED Energy Storage, Conversion and Utilization...

  8. Compliance, Certification and Enforcement for US Appliance and Equipment Energy Efficiency Programs by US DOE

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Information about energy and water conservation standards, ENERGY STAR, and compliance and certification enforcement.

  9. Alternative Compliance: Guidelines for Preparing and Submitting a Waiver Request Application and Other Documentation Requirements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document is designed to assist covered fleets interested in taking advantage of more flexible compliance options and to facilitate the transition from Standard Compliance to Alternative Compliance. It is designed to help fleets better understand the Alternative Compliance option and successfully complete the waiver application process.

  10. Alternative Compliance: Guidelines for Preparing and Submitting a Waiver Request Application and Other Documentation Requirements (Book)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sears, T.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document is designed to assist covered fleets interested in taking advantage of more flexible compliance options and to facilitate the transition from Standard Compliance to Alternative Compliance. It is designed to help fleets better understand the Alternative Compliance option and successfully complete the waiver application process.

  11. Alternative Compliance: Guidelines for Preparing and Submitting a Waiver Request Application and Other Documentation Requirements (Book)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document is designed to assist covered fleets interested in taking advantage of more flexible compliance options and to facilitate the transition from Standard Compliance to Alternative Compliance. It is designed to help fleets better understand the Alternative Compliance option and successfully complete the waiver application process.

  12. Alternative Compliance: Guidelines for Preparing and Submitting a Waiver Request Application and Other Documentation Requirements (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document is designed to assist covered fleets interested in taking advantage of more flexible compliance options and to facilitate the transition from Standard Compliance to Alternative Compliance. It is designed to help fleets better understand the Alternative Compliance option and successfully complete the waiver application process.

  13. Unbonded Post Tensioned Concrete Slabs in Fire Part II Modelling Tendon Response and the Consequences of Localized Heating

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gales, John; Bisby, Luke; Gillie, Martin

    This is Part II of a two part paper dealing with the current state of knowledge of the fire-safe structural design and construction of unbonded post-tensioned (UPT) flat plate concrete structures. Part I provided ...

  14. Ecological Monitoring and Compliance Program 2006 Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David C. Anderson; Paul D. Greger; Derek B. Hall; Dennis J. Hansen; William K. Ostler

    2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Ecological Monitoring and Compliance program (EMAC), funded through the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO), monitors the ecosystem of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and ensures compliance with laws and regulations pertaining to NTS biota. This report summarizes the program's activities conducted by National Security Technologies LLC (NSTec) during the Calendar Year 2006. Program activities included: (a) biological surveys at proposed construction sites, (b) desert tortoise compliance, (c) ecosystem mapping and data management, (d) sensitive plant species monitoring, (e) sensitive and protected/regulated animal monitoring, (f) habitat monitoring, (g) habitat restoration monitoring, and (h) monitoring of the Nonproliferation Test and Evaluation Complex (NPTEC). Sensitive and protected/regulated species of the NTS include 44 plants, 1 mollusk, 2 reptiles, over 250 birds, and 26 mammals protected, managed, or considered sensitive as per state or federal regulations and natural resource agencies and organizations. The threatened desert tortoise (Gopherus agassizii) is the only species on the NTS protected under the Endangered Species Act. Biological surveys for the presence of sensitive and protected/regulated species and important biological resources on which they depend were conducted for 34 projects. A total of 342.1 hectares (ha) (845.37 acres [ac]) was surveyed for these projects. Sensitive and protected/regulated species and important biological resources found included: 2 inactive tortoise burrows, 2 western burrowing owls (Athene cunicularia hypugaea), several horses (Equus caballus), 2 active predator burrows, mature Joshua trees (Yucca brevifolia), yuccas and cacti; and also 1 bird nest (2 eggs), 1 barn owl (Tyto alba) and 2 great-horned owls (Bubo virginianus). NSTec provided a written summary report of all survey findings and mitigation recommendations, where applicable. All flagged burrows were avoided during construction activities. Twenty one of the 34 projects had sites within the distribution range of the threatened desert tortoise. NNSA/NSO must comply with the terms and conditions of a permit (called a Biological Opinion) from the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) when conducting work in tortoise habitat. No tortoises were found in or displaced from project areas. No desert tortoises were accidentally injured or killed, nor were any captured or displaced from project sites. One desert tortoise was accidentally killed along a paved road. One site specific revegetation plan was submitted this year as required by the desert tortoise habitat revegetation plan approved in 2004. This year a total of 1.89 ha (4.69 ac) of tortoise habitat was disturbed. Revegetation of habitat at the Bren Tower burn was completed in the spring of 2006. In the summer of 2006, NSTec scientists prepared a Biological Assessment of the security activities that were being conducted at the Device Assembly Facility (DAF). NNSA requested a Biological Opinion from FWS in late 2006. Ecosystem mapping and data management in 2006 focused primarily on two tasks: (a) converting hardcopies of about 17 reports (EMAC annual reports and selected topical reports from 1996 to 2003) into electronic versions (Portable Document Format [PDF] files) to facilitate electronic document exchange, rapid retrieval, duplication, and printing, and (b) conducting an annual vegetation survey to determine wildland fire hazards on the NTS.

  15. Ecological Monitoring and Compliance Program 2006 Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David C. Anderson; Paul D. Greger; Derek B. Hall; Dennis J. Hansen; William K. Ostler

    2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Ecological Monitoring and Compliance program (EMAC), funded through the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO), monitors the ecosystem of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and ensures compliance with laws and regulations pertaining to NTS biota. This report summarizes the program's activities conducted by National Security Technologies LLC (NSTec) during the Calendar Year 2006. Program activities included: (a) biological surveys at proposed construction sites, (b) desert tortoise compliance, (c) ecosystem mapping and data management, (d) sensitive plant species monitoring, (e) sensitive and protected/regulated animal monitoring, (f) habitat monitoring, (g) habitat restoration monitoring, and (h) monitoring of the Nonproliferation Test and Evaluation Complex (NPTEC). Sensitive and protected/regulated species of the NTS include 44 plants, 1 mollusk, 2 reptiles, over 250 birds, and 26 mammals protected, managed, or considered sensitive as per state or federal regulations and natural resource agencies and organizations. The threatened desert tortoise (Gopherus agassizii) is the only species on the NTS protected under the Endangered Species Act. Biological surveys for the presence of sensitive and protected/regulated species and important biological resources on which they depend were conducted for 34 projects. A total of 342.1 hectares (ha) (845.37 acres [ac]) was surveyed for these projects. Sensitive and protected/regulated species and important biological resources found included: 2 inactive tortoise burrows, 2 western burrowing owls (Athene cunicularia hypugaea), several horses (Equus caballus), 2 active predator burrows, mature Joshua trees (Yucca brevifolia), yuccas and cacti; and also 1 bird nest (2 eggs), 1 barn owl (Tyto alba) and 2 great-horned owls (Bubo virginianus). NSTec provided a written summary report of all survey findings and mitigation recommendations, where applicable. All flagged burrows were avoided during construction activities. Twenty one of the 34 projects had sites within the distribution range of the threatened desert tortoise. NNSA/NSO must comply with the terms and conditions of a permit (called a Biological Opinion) from the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) when conducting work in tortoise habitat. No tortoises were found in or displaced from project areas. No desert tortoises were accidentally injured or killed, nor were any captured or displaced from project sites. One desert tortoise was accidentally killed along a paved road. One site specific re-vegetation plan was submitted this year as required by the desert tortoise habitat re-vegetation plan approved in 2004. This year a total of 1.89 ha (4.69 ac) of tortoise habitat was disturbed. Re-vegetation of habitat at the Bren Tower burn was completed in the spring of 2006. In the summer of 2006, NSTec scientists prepared a Biological Assessment of the security activities that were being conducted at the Device Assembly Facility (DAF). NNSA requested a Biological Opinion from FWS in late 2006. Ecosystem mapping and data management in 2006 focused primarily on two tasks: (a) converting hardcopies of about 17 reports (EMAC annual reports and selected topical reports from 1996 to 2003) into electronic versions (Portable Document Format [PDF] files) to facilitate electronic document exchange, rapid retrieval, duplication, and printing, and (b) conducting an annual vegetation survey to determine wildland fire hazards on the NTS. Copies of the PDF documents were sent to DOE's Office of Scientific and Technical Information website in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, and the DOE National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) Public Reading Facility.

  16. Knowledge discovery in corporate email : the compliance bot meets Enron

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Waterman, K. Krasnow

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    I propose the creation of a real-time compliance "bot" - software to momentarily pause each employee's email at the moment of sending and to electronically assess whether that email is likely to create liability or ...

  17. Environmental Compliance and Sustainability The College of William and Mary

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lewis, Robert Michael

    Environmental Compliance and Sustainability The College of William and Mary Thomas. Thanks are also in order for Professor Sarah Stafford, The College of William nautical miles1 from San Francisco? How will Blueseed demonstrate sustainability

  18. Office of NEPA Policy and Compliance, Staff Directory

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Office of NEPA Policy and Compliance, Staff Directory including phone number and areas of responsibility for the Energy and Waste Management Unit, Western Energy and Waste Management Unit, and the...

  19. NEPA COMPLIANCE SURVEY Project Information Project Title: Casing...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    0 X 0 Hazardous Air Pollutants? Is the project subject to emissions limitations in an Air Quality 0 X 0 Control Region? 2 Revised 8121 0 mjt NEPA COMPLIANCE SURVEY Impacts If...

  20. NEPA COMPLIANCE SURVEY Project Information Project Title: Liner...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    l8l 0 Hazardous Air Pollutants? I Is the project subject to emissions limitations in an Air Quality 0 l8l 0 Control Region? 2 Rev*sed on 111212008 NEPA COMPLIANCE SURVEY Impacts...

  1. NEPA COMPLIANCE SURVEY Project Information Project Title: T-2...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    0 l8l 0 Hazardous Air Pollutants? Is t he project subject to emissions limitations in an Air Quality 0 l8l 0 Control Region? 2 Revised on: 111212008 NEPA COMPLIANCE SURVEY Impacts...

  2. NEPA COMPLIANCE SURVEY Project Information Project TitJe: Geothermal...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    0 18 0 Hazardous Air Pollutants? Is the project subject to emissions limitations in an Air Quality 0 18 0 Control Region? 2 Revised on: 11122008 NEPA COMPLIANCE SURVEY Impacts...

  3. Project Title: DOE Code: Project Lead: NEPA COMPLIANCE SURVEY

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    0 8J 0 Hazardous Air Pollutants? Is the project subject to emissions limitations in an Air Quality 0 8J 0 Control Region? 2 Revised on: 111212008 NEPA COMPLIANCE SURVEY Impacts...

  4. DWPF waste form compliance plan (Draft Revision)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Plodinec, M.J.; Marra, S.L.

    1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The Department of Energy currently has over 100 million liters of high-level radioactive waste in storage at the Savannah River Site (SRS). In the late 1970`s, the Department of Energy recognized that there were significant safety and cost advantages associated with immobilizing the high-level waste in a stable solid form. Several alternative waste forms were evaluated in terms of product quality and reliability of fabrication. This evaluation led to a decision to build the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) at SRS to convert the easily dispersed liquid waste to borosilicate glass. In accordance with the NEPA (National Environmental Policy Act) process, an Environmental Impact Statement was prepared for the facility, as well as an Environmental Assessment of the alternative waste forms, and issuance of a Record of Decision (in December, 1982) on the waste form. The Department of Energy, recognizing that start-up of the DWPF would considerably precede licensing of a repository, instituted a Waste Acceptance Process to ensure that these canistered waste forms would be acceptable for eventual disposal at a federal repository. This report is a revision of the DWPF compliance plan.

  5. DWPF waste form compliance plan (Draft Revision)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Plodinec, M.J.; Marra, S.L.

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Department of Energy currently has over 100 million liters of high-level radioactive waste in storage at the Savannah River Site (SRS). In the late 1970's, the Department of Energy recognized that there were significant safety and cost advantages associated with immobilizing the high-level waste in a stable solid form. Several alternative waste forms were evaluated in terms of product quality and reliability of fabrication. This evaluation led to a decision to build the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) at SRS to convert the easily dispersed liquid waste to borosilicate glass. In accordance with the NEPA (National Environmental Policy Act) process, an Environmental Impact Statement was prepared for the facility, as well as an Environmental Assessment of the alternative waste forms, and issuance of a Record of Decision (in December, 1982) on the waste form. The Department of Energy, recognizing that start-up of the DWPF would considerably precede licensing of a repository, instituted a Waste Acceptance Process to ensure that these canistered waste forms would be acceptable for eventual disposal at a federal repository. This report is a revision of the DWPF compliance plan.

  6. The COMPLY computer program for demonstrating compliance with national radionuclide air emission standards

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Colli, A.; Beal, S.; Loomis, D. (Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC (USA))

    1990-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has proposed national radionuclide air emission standards for a number of source categories. One of these standards applies to Nuclear Regulatory Commission Licensees and non-Department of Energy facilities having the potential to release radionuclides to the atmosphere. Approximately 6000 facilities are subject to the standard, which limits the effective whole-body dose commitment to the maximally exposed individual from radionuclide releases to the atmosphere. A computer program to assist the regulated community in determining compliance has been developed by the EPA's Office of Radiation Programs. The computer program COMPLY calculates the dose to an individual residing outside the facility. The program considers dose from inhalation, ingestion of contaminated food, air immersion, and ground deposition. It is based on models developed by the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements (NCRP). Compliance procedures provided in COMPLY are designed to reduce the burden on the regulated community. The approach begins with simple-to-use methods that are very conservative in determining compliance. The methods become progressively less conservative but more complicated at succeeding levels. Each higher level requires the input of site-specific information, but allows a more realistic estimate of dose. This paper describes the COMPLY program, and provides estimates of the work required and the degree of conservatism in the dose computed at each level.

  7. WIPP Compliance Certification Application calculations parameters. Part 1: Parameter development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Howarth, S.M.

    1997-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) in southeast New Mexico has been studied as a transuranic waste repository for the past 23 years. During this time, an extensive site characterization, design, construction, and experimental program was completed, which provided in-depth understanding of the dominant processes that are most likely to influence the containment of radionuclides for 10,000 years. Nearly 1,500 parameters were developed using information gathered from this program; the parameters were input to numerical models for WIPP Compliance Certification Application (CCA) Performance Assessment (PA) calculations. The CCA probabilistic codes frequently require input values that define a statistical distribution for each parameter. Developing parameter distributions begins with the assignment of an appropriate distribution type, which is dependent on the type, magnitude, and volume of data or information available. The development of the parameter distribution values may require interpretation or statistical analysis of raw data, combining raw data with literature values, scaling of lab or field data to fit code grid mesh sizes, or other transformation. Parameter development and documentation of the development process were very complicated, especially for those parameters based on empirical data; they required the integration of information from Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) code sponsors, parameter task leaders (PTLs), performance assessment analysts (PAAs), and experimental principal investigators (PIs). This paper, Part 1 of two parts, contains a discussion of the parameter development process, roles and responsibilities, and lessons learned. Part 2 will discuss parameter documentation, traceability and retrievability, and lessons learned from related audits and reviews.

  8. Compliance and Verification of Standards and Labelling Programs in China: Lessons Learned

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saheb, Yamina; Zhou, Nan; Fridley, David; Pierrot, Andr& #233

    2010-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

    After implementing several energy efficiency standards and labels (30 products covered by MEPS, 50 products covered by voluntary labels and 19 products by mandatory labels), the China National Institute of Standardization (CNIS) is now implementing verification and compliance mechanism to ensure that the energy information of labeled products comply with the requirements of their labels. CNIS is doing so by organizing check testing on a random basis for room air-conditioners, refrigerators, motors, heaters, computer displays, ovens, and self -ballasted lamps. The purpose of the check testing is to understand the implementation of the Chinese labeling scheme and help local authorities establishing effective compliance mechanisms. In addition, to ensure robustness and consistency of testing results, CNIS has coordinated a round robin testing for room air conditioners. Eight laboratories (Chinese (6), Australian (1) and Japanese (1)) have been involved in the round robin testing and tests were performed on four sets of samples selected from manufacturer?s production line. This paper describes the methodology used in undertaking both check and round robin testing, provides analysis of testing results and reports on the findings. The analysis of both check and round robin testing demonstrated the benefits of a regularized verification and monitoring system for both laboratories and products such as (i) identifying the possible deviations between laboratories to correct them, (ii) improving the quality of testing facilities, (iii) ensuring the accuracy and reliability of energy label information in order to strength the social credibility of the labeling program and the enforcement mechanism in place.

  9. Compliance and Verification of Standards and Labeling Programs in China: Lessons Learned

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saheb, Yamina; Zhou, Nan; Fridley, David; Pierrot, Andre

    2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    After implementing several energy efficiency standards and labels (30 products covered by MEPS, 50 products covered by voluntary labels and 19 products by mandatory labels), the China National Institute of Standardization (CNIS) is now implementing verification and compliance mechanism to ensure that the energy information of labeled products comply with the requirements of their labels. CNIS is doing so by organizing check testing on a random basis for room air-conditioners, refrigerators, motors, heaters, computer displays, ovens, and self -ballasted lamps. The purpose of the check testing is to understand the implementation of the Chinese labeling scheme and help local authorities establishing effective compliance mechanisms. In addition, to ensure robustness and consistency of testing results, CNIS has coordinated a round robin testing for room air conditioners. Eight laboratories (Chinese (6), Australian (1) and Japanese (1)) have been involved in the round robin testing and tests were performed on four sets of samples selected from manufacturer's production line. This paper describes the methodology used in undertaking both check and round robin testing, provides analysis of testing results and reports on the findings. The analysis of both check and round robin testing demonstrated the benefits of a regularized verification and monitoring system for both laboratories and products such as (i) identifying the possible deviations between laboratories to correct them, (ii) improving the quality of testing facilities, (iii) ensuring the accuracy and reliability of energy label information in order to strength the social credibility of the labeling program and the enforcement mechanism in place.

  10. Phase II Groundwater Flow Model of Corrective Action Unit 98: Frenchman Flat, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada, Rev. No.: 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John McCord

    2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Phase II Frenchman Flat groundwater flow model is a key element in the ''Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order'' (FFACO) (1996) corrective action strategy for the Underground Test Area (UGTA) Frenchman Flat corrective action unit (CAU). The objective of this integrated process is to provide an estimate of the vertical and horizontal extent of contaminant migration for each CAU to predict contaminant boundaries. A contaminant boundary is the model-predicted perimeter that defines the extent of radionuclide-contaminated groundwater from underground testing above background conditions exceeding the ''Safe Drinking Water Act'' (SDWA) standards. The contaminant boundary will be composed of both a perimeter boundary and a lower hydrostratigraphic unit (HSU) boundary. The computer model will predict the location of this boundary within 1,000 years and must do so at a 95 percent level of confidence. Additional results showing contaminant concentrations and the location of the contaminant boundary at selected times will also be presented. These times may include the verification period, the end of the five-year proof-of-concept period, as well as other times that are of specific interest. This report documents the development and implementation of the groundwater flow model for the Frenchman Flat CAU. Specific objectives of the Phase II Frenchman Flat flow model are to: (1) Incorporate pertinent information and lessons learned from the Phase I Frenchman Flat CAU models. (2) Develop a three-dimensional (3-D), mathematical flow model that incorporates the important physical features of the flow system and honors CAU-specific data and information. (3) Simulate the steady-state groundwater flow system to determine the direction and magnitude of groundwater fluxes based on calibration to Frenchman Flat hydrogeologic data. (4) Quantify the uncertainty in the direction and magnitude of groundwater flow due to uncertainty in parameter values and alternative component conceptual models (e.g., geology, boundary flux, and recharge).

  11. A Spin Topological Model for the g ) 4.1 S2 State Photosystem II Water Oxidase Manganese Aggregate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hendrich, Mike

    ReceiVed NoVember 30, 1998 The oxygen-evolving complex (OEC) of photosystem II (PSII) catalyzes*, Departments of Chemistry Eugene F. Merkert Chemistry Center, Boston College Chestnut Hill, Massachusetts 02167 photosynthetic oxidation of water to molecular oxygen. Although the precise structure of the OEC is unknown

  12. Honda Gen II Insight HEV Accelerated Testing - August 2012

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Honda Gen II Insight HEV Accelerated Testing - August 2012 Two model year 2010 Honda Generation II Insight hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs) entered Accelerated testing during July...

  13. Compliance status report for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) is responsible for the disposition of transuranic (TRU) waste generated through national defense-related activities. Approximately 53,700 m{sup 2} of these wastes have been generated and are currently stored at government defense installations across the country. The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), located in southeastern New Mexico, has been sited and constructed to meet the criteria established by the scientific and regulatory community for the safe, long-term disposal of TRU and TRU-mixed wastes. This Compliance Status Report (CSR) provides an assessment of the progress of the WIPP Program toward compliance with long-term disposal regulations, set forth in Title 40 CFR 191 (EPA, 1993a), Subparts B and C, and Title 40 CFR {section}268.6 (EPA, 1993b), in order to focus on-going and future experimental and engineering activities. The CSR attempts to identify issues associated with the performance of the WIPP as a long-term repository and to focus on the resolution of these issues. This report will serve as a tool to focus project resources on the areas necessary to ensure complete, accurate, and timely submittal of the compliance application. This document is not intended to constitute a statement of compliance or a demonstration of compliance.

  14. User manual for GEOCITY: a computer model for cost analysis of geothermal district-heating-and-cooling systems. Volume II. Appendices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huber, H.D.; Fassbender, L.L.; Bloomster, C.H.

    1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this model is to calculate the costs of residential space heating, space cooling, and sanitary water heating or process heating (cooling) using geothermal energy from a hydrothermal reservoir. The model can calculate geothermal heating and cooling costs for residential developments, a multi-district city, or a point demand such as an industrial factory or commercial building. Volume II contains all the appendices, including cost equations and models for the reservoir and fluid transmission system and the distribution system, descriptions of predefined residential district types for the distribution system, key equations for the cooling degree hour methodology, and a listing of the sample case output. Both volumes include the complete table of contents and lists of figures and tables. In addition, both volumes include the indices for the input parameters and subroutines defined in the user manual.

  15. Part II: Project Summaries Project Summaries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Perkins, Richard A.

    Part II: Project Summaries Part II Project Summaries #12 generally cannot be achieved for reasonable computational cost. Applications that require modeling, and in nondestructive testing. The objective of this project is to advance the state of the art in electromagnetic

  16. National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Compliance Guide, Sandia National Laboratories

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hansen, R.P. [Hansen Environmental Consultants, Englewood, CO (United States)

    1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report contains a comprehensive National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Compliance Guide for the Sandia National Laboratories. It is based on the Council on Environmental Quality (CEQ) NEPA regulations in 40 CFR Parts 1500 through 1508; the US Department of Energy (DOE) N-EPA implementing procedures in 10 CFR Part 102 1; DOE Order 5440.1E; the DOE ``Secretarial Policy Statement on the National Environmental Policy Act`` of June 1994- Sandia NEPA compliance procedures-, and other CEQ and DOE guidance. The Guide includes step-by-step procedures for preparation of Environmental Checklists/Action Descriptions Memoranda (ECL/ADMs), Environmental Assessments (EAs), and Environmental Impact Statements (EISs). It also includes sections on ``Dealing With NEPA Documentation Problems`` and ``Special N-EPA Compliance Issues.``

  17. Environmental surveillance and compliance at Los Alamos during 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents environmental data that characterize environmental performance and addresses compliance with environmental standards and requirements at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL or the Laboratory) during 1996. The Laboratory routinely monitors for radiation and for radioactive nonradioactive materials at Laboratory sites as well as in the surrounding region. LANL uses the monitoring results to determine compliance with appropriate standards and to identify potentially undesirable trends. Data were collected in 1996 to assess external penetrating radiation; quantities of airborne emissions; and concentrations of chemicals and radionuclides in ambient air, surface waters and groundwaters, the municipal water supply, soils and sediments, and foodstuffs. Using comparisons with standards and regulations, this report concludes that environmental effects from Laboratory operations are small and do not pose a demonstrable threat to the public, Laboratory employees, or the environment. Laboratory operations were in compliance with all major environmental regulations.

  18. certification, compliance and enforcement regulations for Commercial...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    no sense". The regulations define the basic model as any product that has a different energy use or efficiency level. It does not allow for modeling the performance of our...

  19. Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Biennial Environmental Compliance Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Westinghouse TRU Solutions

    2000-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Biennial Environmental Compliance Report (BECR) documents environmental regulatory compliance at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), a facility designed for the safe disposal of transuranic (TRU) radioactive waste, for the reporting period of April 1, 1998, to March 31, 2000. As required by the WIPP Land Withdrawal Act (LWA)(Public Law [Pub. L.] 102-579, and amended by Pub. L. 104-201), the BECR documents U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Carlsbad Area Office's (hereinafter the ''CAO'') compliance with applicable environmental protection laws and regulations implemented by agencies of the federal government and the state of New Mexico. An issue was identified in the 1998 BECR relating to a potential cross-connection between the fire-water systems and the site domestic water system. While the CAO and its managing and operating contractor (hereinafter the ''MOC'') believe the site was always in compliance with cross-connection control requirements, hardware and procedural upgrades w ere implemented in March 1999 to strengthen its compliance posture. Further discussion of this issue is presented in section 30.2.2 herein. During this reporting period WIPP received two letters and a compliance order alleging violation of certain requirements outlined in section 9(a)(1) of the LWA. With the exception of one item, pending a final decision by the New Mexico Environment Department (NMED), all alleged violations have been resolved without the assessment of fines or penalties. Non-mixed TRU waste shipments began on March 26, 1999. Shipments continued through November 26, 1999, the effective date of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Hazardous Waste Facility Permit (NM4890139088-TSDF). No shipments regulated under the Hazardous Waste Facility Permit were received at WIPP during this BECR reporting period.

  20. Photosystem II

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    James Barber

    2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    James Barber, Ernst Chain Professor of Biochemistry at Imperial College, London, gives a BSA Distinguished Lecture titled, "The Structure and Function of Photosystem II: The Water-Splitting Enzyme of Photosynthesis."

  1. The waste isolation pilot plant regulatory compliance program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mewhinney, J.A. [U.S. Dept. of Energy, Carlsbad, NM (United States); Kehrman, R.F. [Westinghouse Electric Corp., Carlsbad, NM (United States)

    1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The passage of the WIPP Land Withdrawal Act of 1992 (LWA) marked a turning point for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) program. It established a Congressional mandate to open the WIPP in as short a time as possible, thereby initiating the process of addressing this nation`s transuranic (TRU) waste problem. The DOE responded to the LWA by shifting the priority at the WIPP from scientific investigations to regulatory compliance and the completion of prerequisites for the initiation of operations. Regulatory compliance activities have taken four main focuses: (1) preparing regulatory submittals; (2) aggressive schedules; (3) regulator interface; and (4) public interactions

  2. Ecological Monitoring and Compliance Program Fiscal Year 1998 Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bechtel Nevada Ecological Services

    1998-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Ecological Monitoring and Compliance program, funded through the U. S. Department of Energy/Nevada Operations Office, monitors the ecosystem of the Nevada Test Site and ensures compliance with laws and regulations pertaining to NTS biota. This report summarizes the program's activities conducted by Bechtel Nevada during fiscal year 1998. Twenty-one sites for seven projects were surveyed for the presence of state or federally protected species. Three projects were in or near habitat of the threatened desert tortoise and required special clearance and transect surveys. All geospatial data collected were entered into Bechtel Nevada's Ecological Geographic Information system for use in ongoing ecosystem management of the NTS.

  3. Diesel Engine CO2 and SOx Emission Compliance Strategy for the...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    CO2 and SOx Emission Compliance Strategy for the Royal Navy (RN) and Royal Fleet Auxiliary (RFA) Flotillas Diesel Engine CO2 and SOx Emission Compliance Strategy for the Royal Navy...

  4. Increasing Child Compliance with Essential Healthcare Routines: Acquisition, Maintenance, and Generalization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harrison, Kelley Lynne Attix

    2014-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    be effective and by assessing whether the effects of compliance training in an analogue setting will generalize to the actual healthcare setting. Keywords: demand fading, differential reinforcement, essential healthcare routines, compliance, problem behavior...

  5. Model Project Streamlines Compliance, Reduces Emissions and Energy Use

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vining, S. K.

    refinery components. A typical refinery may have units or operations subject to the LDAR requirements of 40 CFR 60 Subparts W, GGG; 40 CFR 61 Subparts FF, J, and V:. 40 CFR 63 Subparts F, H, and CC; 40 CFR 264 Subpart BB and 40 CFR 265 Subpart BB... Industrial Energy Technology Conference, Houston, TX, April 22-23, 1998 monitored component if a leak is detected above a certain threshold, commonly 10,000 parts per million (ppm). However, under Phase III of the Hazardous Organic NESHAP's (HON), limits...

  6. Using Enterprise Reference Models for Automated ISO 9000 Compliance Evaluation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fox, Mark S.

    an organization's quality management processes and structures, and conformance or nonconformance to requirements of information systems like ERP, CRM, and supply chain management applications that operate the enterprise by such applications is quality management; software applications for statistical quality control, quality problem

  7. Year GBClass Make Model M/M/Specs EmisStd City Hiwy Green Score 2014 01_TS AUDI TT ROADSTER QUATTRO 2.0L 4, auto Awd [P] ULEV II / Bin 5 22 31 42

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Derisi, Joseph

    Year GBClass Make Model M/M/Specs EmisStd City Hiwy Green Score 2014 01_TS MERCEDES-BENZ SMART FORTWO (CONVERTIBLE) 1.0L 3, auto [P] ULEV II / Bin 5 34 38 53 2014 01_TS MERCEDES-BENZ SMART FORTWO (COUPE) 1.0L 3, auto [P] ULEV II / Bin 5 34 38 53 2014 01_TS MERCEDES

  8. Discrete Quantum Gravity: II. Simplicial complexes, irreps of SL(2,C), and a Lorentz invariant weight in a state sum model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. Kramer; M. Lorente

    2008-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    In part I of [1] we have developed the tensor and spin representation of SO(4) in order to apply it to the simplicial decomposition of the Barrett-Crane model. We attach to each face of a triangle the spherical function constructed from the Dolginov-Biedenharn function. In part II we apply the same technique to the Lorentz invariant state sum model. We need three new ingredients: the classification of the edges and the corresponding subspaces that arises in the simplicial decomposition, the irreps of SL(2,C) and its isomorphism to the bivectors appearing in the 4-simplices, the need of a zonal spherical function from the intertwining condition of the tensor product for the simple representations attached to the faces of the simplicial decomposition.

  9. 3-1 SITE ENVIRONMENTAL REPORT 2000 CHAPTER 3: COMPLIANCE STATUS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Homes, Christopher C.

    3-1 SITE ENVIRONMENTAL REPORT 2000 CHAPTER 3: COMPLIANCE STATUS SITE ENVIRONMENTAL REPORT 2000 reportable spills of petroleum products occurred onsite in 2000. The majority were less than ten gallons;3-2SITE ENVIRONMENTAL REPORT 2000 CHAPTER 3: COMPLIANCE STATUS 3.1 COMPLIANCE WITH ENVIRONMENTAL

  10. 3-1 2002 SITE ENVIRONMENTAL REPORT CHAPTER 3: COMPLIANCE STATUS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Homes, Christopher C.

    3-1 2002 SITE ENVIRONMENTAL REPORT CHAPTER 3: COMPLIANCE STATUS Brookhaven National Laboratory reportable spills of petroleum products occurred on site in 2002. Seventeen were less than 10 gallons: COMPLIANCE STATUS 2002 SITE ENVIRONMENTAL REPORT 3.1 COMPLIANCE WITH ENVIRONMENTAL REQUIREMENTS Brookhaven

  11. Design and Verification of Instantiable Compliance Rule Graphs in Process-Aware

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pfeifer, Holger

    against imposed compliance rules. Tab. 1 summarizes quality compliance rules imposed on the software. Nevertheless, for quality assurance, it could be desired to verify c2 over the development process. ThusDesign and Verification of Instantiable Compliance Rule Graphs in Process-Aware Information Systems

  12. Canister storage building compliance assessment DOE Order 6430.1A, General Design Criteria

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    BLACK, D.M.

    1999-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

    This document presents the Project's position on compliance with DOE Order 6430.1A ''General Design Criteria.'' No non-compliances are shown. The compliance statements have been reviewed and approved by DOE. Open items are scheduled to be closed prior to project completion.

  13. STATE OF CALIFORNIA CERTIFICATE OF COMPLIANCE, SIGN LIGHTING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    STATE OF CALIFORNIA CERTIFICATE OF COMPLIANCE, SIGN LIGHTING CEC-SLTG-1C (Revised 10/10) CALIFORNIA Lighting) (Page 1 of 4) SLTG-1C Project Name: Date: Project Address: Location of Sign Phase of Sign Construction Type of Lighting Control Outdoor Signs New Signs New Lighting Controls Indoor Signs Sign

  14. UNLV OFFICE OF INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY NETWORK ACCESS COMPLIANCE POLICY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hemmers, Oliver

    UNLV OFFICE OF INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY NETWORK ACCESS COMPLIANCE POLICY RESPONSIBLE ADMINISTRATOR: Create a secure network environment for UNLV's computer and network resources by establishing different levels of network access to meet the needs of UNLV staff and students as well as the general public

  15. PG&E's Renewable Portfolio Standard & Greenhouse Gas Compliance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    PG&E's Renewable Portfolio Standard & Greenhouse Gas Compliance Fong Wan Senior Vice President, Energy Procurement 9/5/13 California Power Markets Symposium #12;1. PG&E Renewable Portfolio Standard 2. AB32 and Greenhouse Gas Legislation Outline #12;PG&E's Electric Generation Portfolio *Note: Other

  16. OFFICE OF THE PRESIDENT DIGITAL AND MEDIA COPYRIGHT COMPLIANCE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hemmers, Oliver

    OFFICE OF THE PRESIDENT DIGITAL AND MEDIA COPYRIGHT COMPLIANCE RESPONSIBLE ADMlNISTRA TOR and supervisors, deans, directors, and department heads should read this policy. #12;DIGITAL AND MEDIA COPYRIGHT will investigate all digital and media copyright infringement complaints and take appropriate action. NOTE

  17. On the Effect of Compliance in Robotic Contact Tasks Problem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 1995 ACC On the Effect of Compliance in Robotic Contact Tasks Problem Shahram Payandeh, Assistant Professor Experimental Robotics Laboratory (ERL) School of Engineering Science Simon Fraser University control of the robotic manipulator during its phase transition from free to constrained motions. One

  18. RESEARCH ARTICLE Open Access Compliance and treatment satisfaction of post

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Universit de

    practicing in France. Investigators included post- menopausal women with a diagnosis of osteoporosis significantly the risk of osteoporotic fracture in women with post-menopausal osteoporosis [1]. NonethelessRESEARCH ARTICLE Open Access Compliance and treatment satisfaction of post menopausal women treated

  19. Environmental management compliance reengineering project, FY 1997 report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    VanVliet, J.A.; Davis, J.N.

    1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Through an integrated reengineering effort, the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) is successfully implementing process improvements that will permit safe and compliant operations to continue during the next 5 years, even though $80 million was removed from the Environmental Management (EM) program budget. A 2-year analysis, design, and implementation project will reengineer compliance-related activities and reduce operating costs by approximately $17 million per year from Fiscal Year (FY) 1998 through 2002, while continuing to meet the INEEL`s environment, safety, and health requirements and milestone commitments. Compliance reengineer`s focus is improving processes, not avoiding full compliance with environmental, safety, and health laws. In FY 1997, compliance reengineering used a three-phase approach to analyze, design, and implement the changes that would decrease operating costs. Implementation for seven specific improvement projects was completed in FY 1997, while five projects will complete implementation in FY 1998. During FY 1998, the three-phase process will be repeated to continue reengineering the INEEL.

  20. Compliance of Hazardous Waste Satellite Accumulation Areas (SAAs)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    through prevention, minimization, and recycling Classroom or one-on-one waste generator training, other DOE and University waste organizations Flammable waste cans, 30-gallon, 55-gallon drums (steelCompliance of Hazardous Waste Satellite Accumulation Areas (SAAs) All Hazardous waste generated

  1. Money Laundering and FATF Compliance by the International Community

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Money Laundering and FATF Compliance by the International Community Ali Alkaabi, George Mohay.mohay@qut.edu.au, a.mccullagh@qut.edu.au, a.chantler@qut.edu.au Abstract. This paper examines the anti-money and socio-economic situation, and examine how such local factors have affected the UAE's financial and anti-money

  2. TUSDM Patient Billing and HIPAA Privacy Compliance Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dennett, Daniel

    - Attachment E 14 B4133045v2 #12;1.) Definitions The following definitions are utilized throughout. Because of complex and ever-changing regulatory requirements, the Federal Government has encouraged health care providers to vigorously educate their employees and establish their own compliance program

  3. Financial constraints in capacity planning: a national utility regulatory model (NUREG). Volume II of III: user's guide. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1981-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

    This volume is a User's Guide to the National Utility Regulatory Model (NUREG) and its implementation of the National Coal Model. This is the second of three volumes provided by ICF under contract number DEAC-01-79EI-10579. These three volumes are: a manual describing the NUREG methodology; a users guide; and a description of the software. This manual provides a brief introduction to the National Utility Regulation Model, describes the various programs that comprise the National Utility Regulatory Model, gives sample input files, and provides information needed to run the model.

  4. The Spatial Clustering of ROSAT All-Sky Survey AGNs II. Halo Occupation Distribution Modeling of the Cross Correlation Function

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miyaji, Takamitsu; Coil, Alison L; Aceves, Hector

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This is the second paper of a series that reports on our investigation of the clustering properties of AGNs in the ROSAT All-Sky Survey (RASS) through cross-correlation functions (CCFs) with Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) galaxies. In this paper, we apply the Halo Occupation Distribution (HOD) model to the CCFs between the RASS Broad-line AGNs with SDSS Luminous Red Galaxies (LRGs) in the redshift range 0.16modeling approach, we use the known HOD of LRGs and constrain the HOD of the AGNs by a model fit to the CCF. For the first time, we are able to go beyond quoting merely a `typical' AGN host halo mass, M_h, and model the full distribution function of AGN host dark matter halos. In addition, we are able to determine the large-scale bias and the mean M_h more accurately. We explore the behavior of three simple HOD models. Our first model (Model A) is a truncated power-law HOD model in which all AGNs are satellites. With this model, we find an upper lim...

  5. Check-Testing of Manufacturer Self Reported Labeling Data& Compliance with MEPS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhou, Nan; Zhou, Nan; Zheng, Nina; Fridley, David; Wang, Ruohong; Egan, Christine

    2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    China first adopted minimum energy performance standards (MEPS) in 1989. Today, there are standards for a wide range of domestic, commercial and selected industrial equipment. In 1999, China launched a voluntary endorsement label, which has grown to cover over 40 products including water-saving products. Further, in 2005, China started a mandatory energy information label that initially covered two products and in 2007 was extended to cover four products total including: air conditioners; household refrigerators; clothes washers; and unitary air conditioners. These programs have had an important impact in reducing the energy consumption of appliances in China. China has built up a strong infrastructure to develop and implement standards. Historically, however, the government's primary focus has been on the technical requirements for specifying efficiency performance. Less attention has been paid to monitoring and enforcement with a minimal commitment of resources and little expansion of administrative capacity in this area. Thus, market compliance with both mandatory standard and labeling programs has been questionable. Furthermore, actual energy savings have quite possibly been undermined as a result. The establishment of a regularized monitoring system for tracking compliance with the mandatory standard and energy information label programs in China is a major area for program improvement. Over the years, the Collaborative Labeling and Appliance Standards Program (CLASP) has partnered with several Chinese institutions to promote energy-efficient products in China. CLASP, together with its implementing partner Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), has assisted China in developing and updating the above-mentioned standards and labeling programs. Because of the increasing need for the development of a monitoring system to track compliance with the standard, CLASP, with support from Japan's Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry (METI) and the Institute of Energy Economics, Japan (IEEJ), has expanded its on-going collaboration with the China National Institute of Standards (CNIS) to include enforcement and monitoring. CNIS has already begun working on the issue of compliance. In early 2007, LBNL compiled a report, with the support of METI, summarizing the findings from these activities and indicating China's progress to date. The report concluded that although the existing legal basis for monitoring and enforcement is sufficient- with multiple laws and regulations defining the responsibility of each government agency and specifying a system of fines and penal-ties for non-compliance-compared with international best practices, there is still a big gap in China's monitoring and enforcement efforts for mandatory standards and labels. In sum, the report concludes that while the sample size is far smaller than the mid-term goal of developing a regular check testing program for 20 percent of the market for each of the three products, this study provides highly valuable feedback on manufacturer compliance rates in the absence of a large-scale national testing program. With METI/IEEJ support, CLASP could assist the China Energy Label Center (CELC) in expanding its verification testing programs to cover more models and products, and in developing a plan for ramping up the national verification testing program over the next three to five years. This is particularly important as the information labeling program gains more visibility and expands to additional product categories. CLASP could also assist CELC to plan for a round-robin testing scheme-first among three national laboratories with sub-sequent expansion of this program to other regional test laboratories--with the goal of improving the consistency of testing results from different testing laboratories.

  6. Deactivation of the EBR-II complex

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michelbacher, J.A.; Earle, O.K.; Henslee, S.P. [and others

    1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    In January of 1994, the Department of Energy mandated the termination of the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) Program, effective October 1, 1994. To comply with this decision, Argonne National Laboratory-West (ANL-W) prepared a plan providing detailed requirements to place the Experimental Breeder Reactor-II (EBR-II) in a radiologically and industrially safe condition, including removal of all irradiated fuel assemblies from the reactor plant, and removal and stabilization of the primary and secondary sodium, a liquid metal used to transfer heat within the reactor plant. The ultimate goal of the deactivation process is to place the EBR-II complex in a stable condition until a decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) plan can be prepared, thereby minimizing requirements for maintenance and surveillance and maximizing the amount of time for radioactive decay. The final closure state will be achieved in full compliance with federal, state and local environmental, safety, and health regulations and requirements. The decision to delay the development of a detailed D&D plan has necessitated this current action. The EBR-II is a pool-type reactor. The primary system contains approximately 87,000 gallons of sodium, while the secondary system has 13,000 gallons. In order to properly dispose of the sodium in compliance with the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), a facility has been built to react the sodium to a dry carbonate powder in a two stage process. Deactivation of a liquid metal fast breeder reactor (LMFBR) presents unique concerns. Residual amounts of sodium remaining in the primary and secondary systems must be either reacted or inerted to preclude future concerns with sodium-air reactions that generate explosive mixtures of hydrogen and leave corrosive compounds. Residual amounts of sodium on components will effectively {open_quotes}solder{close_quotes} components in place, making future operation or removal unfeasible.

  7. An axisymmetric hydrodynamical model for the torus wind in AGN. II: X-ray excited funnel flow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Dorodnitsyn; T. Kallman; D. Proga

    2008-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

    We have calculated a series of models of outflows from the obscuring torus in active galactic nuclei (AGN). Our modeling assumes that the inner face of a rotationally supported torus is illuminated and heated by the intense X-rays from the inner accretion disk and black hole. As a result of such heating a strong biconical outflow is observed in our simulations. We calculate 3-dimensional hydrodynamical models, assuming axial symmetry, and including the effects of X-ray heating, ionization, and radiation pressure. We discuss the behavior of a large family of these models, their velocity fields, mass fluxes and temperature, as functions of the torus properties and X-ray flux. Synthetic warm absorber spectra are calculated, assuming pure absorption, for sample models at various inclination angles and observing times. We show that these models have mass fluxes and flow speeds which are comparable to those which have been inferred from observations of Seyfert 1 warm absorbers, and that they can produce rich absorption line spectra.

  8. An axisymmetric hydrodynamical model for the torus wind in AGN. II: X-ray excited funnel flow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dorodnitsyn, A; Proga, D

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have calculated a series of models of outflows from the obscuring torus in active galactic nuclei (AGN). Our modeling assumes that the inner face of a rotationally supported torus is illuminated and heated by the intense X-rays from the inner accretion disk and black hole. As a result of such heating a strong biconical outflow is observed in our simulations. We calculate 3-dimensional hydrodynamical models, assuming axial symmetry, and including the effects of X-ray heating, ionization, and radiation pressure. We discuss the behavior of a large family of these models, their velocity fields, mass fluxes and temperature, as functions of the torus properties and X-ray flux. Synthetic warm absorber spectra are calculated, assuming pure absorption, for sample models at various inclination angles and observing times. We show that these models have mass fluxes and flow speeds which are comparable to those which have been inferred from observations of Seyfert 1 warm absorbers, and that they can produce rich absorp...

  9. Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Biennial Environmental Compliance Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Washinton TRU Solutions LLC

    2002-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This Biennial Environmental Compliance Report (BECR) documents environmental regulatory compliance at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), a facility designed for the safe disposal of transuranic (TRU) radioactive waste, for the reporting period of April 1, 2000, to March 31, 2002. As required by the WIPP Land Withdrawal Act (LWA)(Public Law [Pub. L.] 102-579, as amended by Pub. L. 104-201), the BECR documents U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Carlsbad Field Office's (CBFO) compliance with applicable environmental protection laws and regulations implemented by agencies of the federal government and the state of New Mexico. In the prior BECR, the CBFO and the management and operating contractor (MOC)committed to discuss resolution of a Letter of Violation that had been issued by the New Mexico Environment Department (NMED) in August 1999, which was during the previous BECR reporting period. This Letter of Violation alleged noncompliance with hazardous waste aisle spacing, labeling, a nd tank requirements. At the time of publication of the prior BECR, resolution of the Letter of Violation was pending. On July 7, 2000, the NMED issued a letter noting that the aisle spacing and labeling concerns had been adequately addressed and that they were rescinding the violation alleging that the Exhaust Shaft Catch Basin failed to comply with the requirements for a hazardous waste tank. During the current reporting period, WIPP received a Notice of Violation and a compliance order alleging the violation of the New Mexico Hazardous Waste Regulations and the WIPP Hazardous Waste Facility Permit (HWFP).

  10. Federal Facilities Compliance Act, Conceptual Site Treatment Plan. Part 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1993-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

    This Conceptual Site Treatment Plan was prepared by Ames Laboratory to meet the requirements of the Federal Facilities Compliance Act. Topics discussed in this document include: general discussion of the plan, including the purpose and scope; technical aspects of preparing plans, including the rationale behind the treatability groupings and a discussion of characterization issues; treatment technology needs and treatment options for specific waste streams; low-level mixed waste options; TRU waste options; and future waste generation from restoration activities.

  11. Technical Assistance: Increasing Code Compliance - 2014 BTO Peer Review |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-Up from the GridwiseSiteDepartmentChallengeCompliance7/109THETTUFrequently

  12. Black Liquor Combustion Validated Recovery Boiler Modeling, Final Year Report, Volume 3: Appendix II, Sections 2 & 3 and Appendix III

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    T.M. Grace, W.J. Frederick, M. Salcudean, R.A. Wessel

    1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This project was initiated in October 1990 with the objective of developing and validating a new computer model of a recovery boiler furnace using a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code specifically tailored to the requirements for solving recovery boiler flows, and using improved submodels for black liquor combustion based on continued laboratory fundamental studies. Many of these objectives were accomplished at the end of the first five years and documented in a comprehensive report on that work (DOE/CE/40936-T3, 1996). A critical review of recovery boiler modeling, carried out in 1995, concluded that further enhancements of the model were needed to make reliable predictions of key output variables. In addition, there was a need for sufficient understanding of fouling and plugging processes to allow model outputs to be interpreted in terms of the effect on plugging and fouling. As a result, the project was restructured and reinitiated at the end of October 1995, and was completed in June 1997. The entire project is now complete and this report summarizes all of the work done on the project since it was restructured. The key tasks to be accomplished under the restructured project were to (1) Complete the development of enhanced furnace models that have the capability to accurately predict carryover, emissions behavior, dust concentrations, gas temperatures, and wall heat fluxes; (2) Validate the enhanced furnace models, so that users can have confidence in the results; (3) Obtain fundamental information on aerosol formation, deposition, and hardening so as to develop the knowledge base needed to relate furnace model outputs to plugging and fouling in the convective sections of the boiler; and (4) Facilitate the transfer of codes, black liquor submodels, and fundamental knowledge to the U.S. kraft pulp industry.

  13. Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Biennial Environmental Compliance Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Washington Regulatory and Environmental Services

    2006-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

    This Biennial Environmental Compliance Report (BECR) documents compliance with environmental regulations at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), a facility designed and authorized for the safe disposal of transuranic (TRU) radioactive waste. This BECR covers the reporting period from April 1, 2004, to March 31, 2006. As required by the WIPP Land Withdrawal Act (LWA) (Public Law [Pub. L.] 102-579, as amended by Pub. L. 104-201), the BECR documents United States (U.S.) Department of Energy (DOE) compliance with regulations and permits issued pursuant to the following: (1) Title 40 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 191, Subpart A, "Environmental Standards for Management and Storage"; (2) Clean Air Act (CAA) (42 United States Code [U.S.C.] 7401, et seq.); (3) Solid Waste Disposal Act (SWDA) (42 U.S.C. 6901-6992, et seq.); (4) Safe Drinking Water Act (SDWA) (42 U.S.C. 300f, et seq.); (5) Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) (15 U.S.C. 2601, et seq.); (6) Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) (42 U.S.C. 9601, et seq.); and all other federal and state of New Mexico laws pertaining to public health and safety or the environment.

  14. Black liquor combustion validated recovery boiler modeling: Final year report. Volume 3 (Appendices II, sections 2--3 and III)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grace, T.M.; Frederick, W.J.; Salcudean, M.; Wessel, R.A.

    1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This project was initiated in October 1990, with the objective of developing and validating a new computer model of a recovery boiler furnace using a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code specifically tailored to the requirements for solving recovery boiler flows, and using improved submodels for black liquor combustion based on continued laboratory fundamental studies. The key tasks to be accomplished were as follows: (1) Complete the development of enhanced furnace models that have the capability to accurately predict carryover, emissions behavior, dust concentrations, gas temperatures, and wall heat fluxes. (2) Validate the enhanced furnace models, so that users can have confidence in the predicted results. (3) Obtain fundamental information on aerosol formation, deposition, and hardening so as to develop the knowledge base needed to relate furnace model outputs to plugging and fouling in the convective sections of the boiler. (4) Facilitate the transfer of codes, black liquid submodels, and fundamental knowledge to the US kraft pulp industry. Volume 3 contains the following appendix sections: Formation and destruction of nitrogen oxides in recovery boilers; Sintering and densification of recovery boiler deposits laboratory data and a rate model; and Experimental data on rates of particulate formation during char bed burning.

  15. Combined search for the standard model Higgs boson decaying to b bbar using the D0 Run II data set

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D0 Collaboration

    2012-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the results of the combination of searches for the standard model Higgs boson produced in association with a W or Z boson and decaying into b bbar using the data sample collected with the D0 detector in p pbar collisions at sqrt{s}=1.96 TeV at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. We derive 95% CL upper limits on the Higgs boson cross section relative to the standard model prediction in the mass range 100 GeV Higgs boson.

  16. Comparison of Strong Gravitational Lens Model Software II. HydraLens: Computer-Assisted Strong Gravitational Lens Model Generation and Translation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lefor, Alsn T

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The behavior of strong gravitational lens model software in the analysis of lens models is not necessarily consistent among the various software available, suggesting that the use of several models may enhance the understanding of the system being studied. Among the publicly available codes, the model input files are heterogeneous, making the creation of multiple models tedious. An enhanced method of creating model files and a method to easily create multiple models, may increase the number of comparison studies. HydraLens simplifies the creation of model files for four strong gravitational lens model software packages, including Lenstool, Gravlens/Lensmodel, glafic and PixeLens, using a custom designed GUI for each of the four codes that simplifies the entry of the model for each of these codes, obviating the need for user manuals to set the values of the many flags and in each data field. HydraLens is designed in a modular fashion, which simplifies the addition of other strong gravitational lens codes in th...

  17. Comparison between Model Simulations and Measurements of Hyperspectral Far- infrared Radiation from FIRST during the RHUBC-II Campaign

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baugher, Elizabeth

    2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    for its dry, cold, and dominantly clear atmosphere, which is optimal for studying the effects, that water vapor and cirrus clouds have on the far-IR. Comparisons with Line-By-Line Discrete Ordinants Radiative Transfer model, LBLDIS, show that FIRST...

  18. Mapping thin resistors and hydrocarbons with marine EM methods, Part II --Modeling and analysis in 3D

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Constable, Steve

    be used in the ma- rine environment to map geological structure e.g., Hoversten et al., 2000; Key et al of the canonical disk model 100 m, 100 m thick, variable radius, 1 km deep in 1- m sediments showed that the inline

  19. On the intersection of the shell, collective and cluster models of atomic nuclei II: Symmetry-breaking and large deformations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Cseh; J. Darai

    2014-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss the role of the broken symmetries in the connection of the shell, collective and cluster models. The cluster-shell competition is described in terms of cold quantum phases. Stable quasi-dynamical U(3) symmetry is found for specific large deformations for a Nilsson-type Hamiltonian.

  20. Integration of Environmental Compliance at the Savannah River Site - 13024

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoel, David [United States Department of Energy - Savannah River Operations Office (United States)] [United States Department of Energy - Savannah River Operations Office (United States); Griffith, Michael [Savannah River Nuclear Solutions, LLC (United States)] [Savannah River Nuclear Solutions, LLC (United States)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Savannah River Site (SRS) is a large federal installation hosting diverse missions and multiple organizations with competing regulatory needs. Accordingly, there was a need to integrate environmental compliance strategies to ensure the consistent flow of information between Department of Energy-Savannah River (DOE-SR), the regulatory agencies and other interested parties. In order to meet this objective, DOE and major SRS contractors and tenants have committed to a strategy of collaboratively working together to ensure that a consistent, integrated, and fully coordinated approach to environmental compliance and regulator relationships is maintained. DOE-SR and Savannah River Nuclear Solutions, LLC, the SRS management and operations contractor, have established an environmental compliance integration process that provides for the consistent flow down of requirements to projects, facilities, SRS contractors, and subcontractors as well as the upward flow of information to assist in the early identification and resolution of environmental regulatory issues and enhancement of compliance opportunities. In addition, this process strongly fosters teamwork to collaboratively resolve complex regulatory challenges, promote pollution prevention and waste minimization opportunities to advance site missions in a manner that balances near-term actions with the long-term site vision, while being protective of human health and the environment. Communication tools are being utilized, some with enhancements, to ensure appropriate information is communicated to all levels with environmental responsibility at SRS. SRS internal regulatory integration is accomplished through a variety of informational exchange forums (e.g., Challenges, Opportunities and Resolution (COR) Team, DOE's Joint Site Regulatory Integration Team, and the Senior Environmental Managers Council (SEMC)). SRS communications and problem-solving with the regulatory agencies have been enhanced through formation of an interagency 'SRS Regulatory Integration Team (SRIT)'. The SRIT is a partnership comprised of representatives from DOE-SR (with contractor support), EPA Region 4 and the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (SCDHEC) and is chartered to develop a consensus understanding of SRS regulatory issues and activities. These forums and a formal environmental compliance integration process improve timely cross-functional decision making, problem solving, information sharing, and issue resolution. The SRS internal process has been formally documented in an Environmental Regulatory Integration Program Description, which is linked to the SRS Environmental Policy and agreed upon by all major contractors, subcontractors and tenants. (authors)

  1. Health effects model for nuclear power plant accident consequence analysis. Part I. Introduction, integration, and summary. Part II. Scientific basis for health effects models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Evans, J.S.; Moeller, D.W.; Cooper, D.W.

    1985-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Analysis of the radiological health effects of nuclear power plant accidents requires models for predicting early health effects, cancers and benign thyroid nodules, and genetic effects. Since the publication of the Reactor Safety Study, additional information on radiological health effects has become available. This report summarizes the efforts of a program designed to provide revised health effects models for nuclear power plant accident consequence modeling. The new models for early effects address four causes of mortality and nine categories of morbidity. The models for early effects are based upon two parameter Weibull functions. They permit evaluation of the influence of dose protraction and address the issue of variation in radiosensitivity among the population. The piecewise-linear dose-response models used in the Reactor Safety Study to predict cancers and thyroid nodules have been replaced by linear and linear-quadratic models. The new models reflect the most recently reported results of the follow-up of the survivors of the bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki and permit analysis of both morbidity and mortality. The new models for genetic effects allow prediction of genetic risks in each of the first five generations after an accident and include information on the relative severity of various classes of genetic effects. The uncertainty in modeloling radiological health risks is addressed by providing central, upper, and lower estimates of risks. An approach is outlined for summarizing the health consequences of nuclear power plant accidents. 298 refs., 9 figs., 49 tabs.

  2. Dual-use tools and systematics-aware analysis workflows in the ATLAS Run-II analysis model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    FARRELL, Steven; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The ATLAS analysis model has been overhauled for the upcoming run of data collection in 2015 at 13 TeV. One key component of this upgrade was the Event Data Model (EDM), which now allows for greater flexibility in the choice of analysis software framework and provides powerful new features that can be exploited by analysis software tools. A second key component of the upgrade is the introduction of a dual-use tool technology, which provides abstract interfaces for analysis software tools to run in either the Athena framework or a ROOT-based framework. The tool interfaces, including a new interface for handling systematic uncertainties, have been standardized for the development of improved analysis workflows and consolidation of high-level analysis tools. This presentation will cover the details of the dual-use tool functionality, the systematics interface, and how these features fit into a centrally supported analysis environment.

  3. Modeling Improvements for Air Source Heat Pumps using Different Expansion Devices at Varied Charge Levels Part II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shen, Bo [ORNL

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes steady-state performance simulations performed on a 3-ton R-22 split heat pump in heating mode. In total, 150 steady-state points were simulated, which covers refrigerant charge levels from 70 % to 130% relative to the nominal value, the outdoor temperatures at 17 F (-8.3 C), 35 F (1.7 C) and 47 F (8.3 C), indoor air flow rates from 60% to 150% of the rated air flow rate, and two types of expansion devices (fixed orifice and thermostatic expansion valve). A charge tuning method, which is to calibrate the charge inventory model based on measurements at two operation conditions, was applied and shown to improve the system simulation accuracy significantly in an extensive range of charge levels. In addition, we discuss the effects of suction line accumulator in modeling a heat pump system using either a fixed orifice or thermal expansion valve. Last, we identify the issue of refrigerant mass flow mal-distribution at low charge levels and propose an improved modeling approach.

  4. The Magneto Hydro Dynamical Model of KHz Quasi Periodic Oscillations in Neutron Star Low Mass X-ray Binaries (II)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shi, Chang-Sheng; Li, Xiang-Dong

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the kilohertz quasi-periodic oscillations (kHz QPOs) in neutron star low mass X-ray binaries (LMXBs) with a new magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) model, in which the compressed magnetosphere is considered. The previous MHD model (Shi \\& Li 2009) is re-examined and the relation between the frequencies of the kHz QPOs and the accretion rate in LMXBs is obtained. Our result agrees with the observations of six sources (4U 0614+09, 4U 1636--53, 4U 1608--52, 4U 1915--15, 4U 1728--34, XTE 1807--294) with measured spins. In this model the kHz QPOs originate from the MHD waves in the compressed magnetosphere. The single kHz QPOs and twin kHz QPOs are produced in two different parts of the accretion disk and the boundary is close to the corotation radius. The lower QPO frequency in a frequency-accretion rate diagram is cut off at low accretion rate and the twin kHz QPOs encounter a top ceiling at high accretion rate due to the restriction of innermost stable circular orbit.

  5. Modelled Black Carbon Radiative Forcing and Atmospheric Lifetime in AeroCom Phase II Constrained by Aircraft Observations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Samset, B. H.; Myhre, G.; Herber, Andreas; Kondo, Yutaka; Li, Shao-Meng; Moteki, N.; Koike, Makoto; Oshima, N.; Schwarz, Joshua P.; Balkanski, Y.; Bauer, S.; Bellouin, N.; Berntsen, T.; Bian, Huisheng; Chin, M.; Diehl, Thomas; Easter, Richard C.; Ghan, Steven J.; Iversen, T.; Kirkevag, A.; Lamarque, Jean-Francois; Lin, Guang; Liu, Xiaohong; Penner, Joyce E.; Schulz, M.; Seland, O.; Skeie, R. B.; Stier, P.; Takemura, T.; Tsigaridis, Kostas; Zhang, Kai

    2014-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Black carbon (BC) aerosols absorb solar radiation, and are generally held to exacerbate global warming through exerting a positive radiative forcing1. However, the total contribution of BC to the ongoing changes in global climate is presently under debate2-8. Both anthropogenic BC emissions and the resulting spatial and temporal distribution of BC concentration are highly uncertain2,9. In particular, long range transport and processes affecting BC atmospheric lifetime are poorly understood, leading to large estimated uncertainty in BC concentration at high altitudes and far from emission sources10. These uncertainties limit our ability to quantify both the historical, present and future anthropogenic climate impact of BC. Here we compare vertical profiles of BC concentration from four recent aircraft measurement campaigns with 13 state of the art aerosol models, and show that recent assessments may have overestimated present day BC radiative forcing. Further, an atmospheric lifetime of BC of less than 5 days is shown to be essential for reproducing observations in transport dominated remote regions. Adjusting model results to measurements in remote regions, and at high altitudes, leads to a 25% reduction in the multi-model median direct BC forcing from fossil fuel and biofuel burning over the industrial era.

  6. Mechanical and Thermal Prototype Testing for a Rotatable Collimator for the LHC Phase II Collimation Upgrade

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, Jeffrey Claiborne; Doyle, Eric; Keller, Lewis; Lundgren, Steven; Markiewicz, Thomas Walter; /SLAC; ,

    2010-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The Phase II upgrade to the LHC collimation system calls for complementing the robust Phase I graphite collimators with high Z, low impedance Phase II collimators. The design for the collimation upgrade has not been finalized. One option is to use metallic rotatable collimators and testing of this design will be discussed here. The Phase II collimators must be robust in various operating conditions and accident scenarios. A prototype collimator jaw has been tested for both mechanical and thermal compliance with the design goals. Thermal expansion bench-top tests are compared to ANSYS simulation results.

  7. Refined Cauchy/Littlewood identities and six-vertex model partition functions: II. Proofs and new conjectures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. Betea; M. Wheeler; P. Zinn-Justin

    2014-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

    We prove two identities of Hall-Littlewood polynomials, which appeared recently in a paper by two of the authors. We also conjecture, and in some cases prove, new identities which relate infinite sums of symmetric polynomials and partition functions associated with symmetry classes of alternating sign matrices. These identities generalize those already found in our earlier paper, via the introduction of additional parameters. The left hand side of each of our identities is a simple refinement of a relevant Cauchy or Littlewood identity. The right hand side of each identity is (one of the two factors present in) the partition function of the six-vertex model on a relevant domain.

  8. Dissociative electron attachment to the H2O molecule II: nucleardynamics on coupled electronic surfaces within the local complexpotential model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haxton, Daniel J.; Rescigno, Thomas N.; McCurdy, C. William

    2006-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

    We report the results of a first-principles study of dissociative electron attachment (DEA) to H{sub 2}O. The cross sections were obtained from nuclear dynamics calculations carried out in full dimensionality within the local complex potential model by using the multi-configuration time-dependent Hartree method. The calculations employ our previously obtained global, complex-valued, potential energy surfaces for the three ({sup 2}B{sub 1}, {sup 2}A{sub 1}, and {sup 2}B{sub 2}) electronic Feshbach resonances involved in this process. These three metastable states of H{sub 2}O{sup -} undergo several degeneracies, and we incorporate both the Renner-Teller coupling between the {sup 2}B{sub 1} and {sup 2}A{sub 1} states, as well as the conical intersection between the {sup 2}A{sub 1} and {sup 2}B{sub 2} states, into our treatment. The nuclear dynamics are inherently multi-dimensional and involve branching between different final product arrangements as well as extensive excitation of the diatomic fragment. Our results successfully mirror the qualitative features of the major fragment channels observed, but are less successful in reproducing the available results for some of the minor channels. We comment on the applicability of the local complex potential model to such a complicated resonant system.

  9. Energy- and flux-budget turbulence closure model for stably stratified flows. Part II: the role of internal gravity waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. S. Zilitinkevich; T. Elperin; N. Kleeorin; V. L'vov; I. Rogachevskii

    2009-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

    We advance our prior energy- and flux-budget turbulence closure model (Zilitinkevich et al., 2007, 2008) for the stably stratified atmospheric flows and extend it accounting for additional vertical flux of momentum and additional productions of turbulent kinetic energy, turbulent potential energy (TPE) and turbulent flux of potential temperature due to large-scale internal gravity waves (IGW). Main effects of IGW are following: the maximal value of the flux Richardson number (universal constant 0.2-0.25 in the no-IGW regime) becomes strongly variable. In the vertically homogeneous stratification, it increases with increasing wave energy and can even exceed 1. In the heterogeneous stratification, when IGW propagate towards stronger stratification, the maximal flux Richardson number decreases with increasing wave energy, reaches zero and then becomes negative. In other words, the vertical flux of potential temperature becomes counter-gradient. IGW also reduce anisotropy of turbulence and increase the share of TPE in the turbulent total energy. Depending on the direction (downward or upward), IGW either strengthen or weaken the total vertical flux of momentum. Predictions from the proposed model are consistent with available data from atmospheric and laboratory experiments, direct numerical simulations and large-eddy simulations.

  10. Format and Content Guide for Title 40 CFR 191 and Title 40 CFR 268.6 Compliance Reports

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Format and Content Guide was followed in preparing the WIPP Compliance Status Report submitted in March 1994 and will be used for the compliance documents scheduled for submittal in the Spring of 1995. The Compliance Status Report was issued to stakeholders in March 1994 and describes the status of associated activities on compliance with the requirements in Title 40 CFR 268.6 and Title 40 CFR 191. The Compliance Status Report focuses on (1) the information required for a demonstration of compliance, (2) preliminary results, (3) the areas of the WIPP program that are either not currently mature enough, or do not provide adequate margin for a demonstration of compliance, and (4) the areas of the WIPP program that will be focused upon to provide the remaining necessary information for use in the 1995 compliance demonstration reports. The Compliance Status Report is not intended to constitute a statement of compliance or a demonstration of compliance. It is intended to report the status of progress made to date in project efforts to achieve the required level of data/information necessary for the required compliance demonstrations. Comments on the Compliance Status Report from stakeholders will likely result in a modified Format and Content Guide, as will the promulgation of the EPA`s Compliance Criteria for WIPP (40 CFR 194).

  11. Performance Assessment in Support of the 1996 Compliance Certification Application for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anderson, D.R.; Basabilvazo, G.; Helton, J.C.; Jow, H.-N.; Marietta, M.G.

    1998-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The conceptual and computational structure of a performance assessment (PA) for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) is described. Important parts of thk structure are @ maintenance of a separation between stochastic (i.e., aleatory) and subjective (i.e., epistemic) uncertain, with stochastic uncefinty arising from the many possible disruptions that could occur over the 10,000 Y regulatory period fiat applies to the WIPP and subjective uncertainty arising from `the imprecision with which many of the quantities rquired in tie `hdysis are known, (ii) use of Latin hypercttbe sampling to incorporate the effects of subjective uncefirtty, (iii) use of Monte Carlo (i.e., random) sampling to incorporate the effects of stochastic uncetinty, and OV) efficient use of tie necessarily limited number of mechanistic calculations that can be performed to SUPPOII the analysis. The WIPP is under development by the U.S. Department of Ener~ (DOE) for the geologic (i.e., deep underground) disposal of transuranic (TRU) waste, with the indicated PA supporting a ~Compliance Certification Application (CCA) by the DOE to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) in October 1996 for tie necessary certifications for the WIPP to begin operation. If certified, the WIPP will be the first operational faciliv in tie United States for the geologic disposal of ra&oactive waste.

  12. E-Print Network 3.0 - agarose mold compliance Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    to all, regardless of race, color, national origin, sex, religion, age, disability, political beliefs, sexual orientation, o Summary: is in compliance with any standards for mold...

  13. EA-1406: Ground Water Compliance at the New Rifle, Colorado, UMTRA Project Site, Rifle, Colorado

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EA evaluates the environmental impacts for the proposed compliance strategy of natural flushing combined with institutional controls and continued monitoring for the New Rifle uranium mill...

  14. Evaluation of the Cask Transportation Facility Modifications (CTFM) compliance to DOE order 6430.1A

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    ARD, K.E.

    1999-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    This report was prepared to evaluate the compliance of Cask Transportation Facility Modifications (CTFM) to DOE Order 6430.1A.

  15. Diesel Passenger Car Technology for Low Emissions and CO2 Compliance...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    has been integrated into the engine design to target SULEV NMHC compliance Pre turbo catalysts for low NMOG Small LNT due to low absolute NOx mass reduction required...

  16. National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) compliance at Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico (SNL/NM)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wolff, T.A. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Community Involvement and Issues Management Dept.; Hansen, R.P. [Hansen Environmental Consultants, Englewood, CO (United States)

    1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report on National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) compliance at Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico (SNL/NM) chronicles past and current compliance activities and includes a recommended strategy that can be implemented for continued improvement. This report provides a list of important references. Attachment 1 contains the table of contents for SAND95-1648, National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Compliance Guide Sandia National Laboratories (Hansen, 1995). Attachment 2 contains a list of published environmental assessments (EAs) and environmental impact statements (EISs) prepared by SNL/NM. Attachment 3 contains abstracts of NEPA compliance papers authored by SNL/NM and its contractors.

  17. Colorado - C.R.S. 40-5-101 - New Construction - Extension - Compliance...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    - New Construction - Extension - Compliance with Local Zoning Rules Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- StatuteStatute: Colorado -...

  18. Table of Contents Page i 2013 Residential Compliance Manual January 2014

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Panel 7.6 California Fire Code Solar Access Requirements 7.7 Compliance and Enforcement #12;Page 7. Solar Ready ..................................................................................2 7.3 Solar Zone

  19. The Costs and Benefits of Compliance with Renewable Portfolio Standards: Reviewing Experience to Date

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heeter, Jenny

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2012). In 2010, energy suppliers reported 100% complianceYork. In New York, energy suppliers contracted through RPSon data reported by energy suppliers. NYSERDA estimated the

  20. Title V, compliance assurance monitoring (CAM), and the use of any credible evidence (ACE): The effects on compliance and enforcement in the future

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lowery, K.P. [Trinity Consultants Inc., Overland Park, KS (United States); Poffenberger, C.G. [Hogan and Hartson L.L.P., Washington, DC (United States)

    1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Under Title V, facilities are required to determine the compliance status of each air emission source with all applicable requirements. In addition, facilities are required to determine the methods that will be used to demonstrate on-going compliance with these requirements. Under Title V, it is no longer the responsibility of the regulator to determine whether a facility is in compliance; it is the facility`s responsibility to continuously prove they are in compliance. The CAM rule, as drafted, will implement the Enhanced Monitoring (EM) and periodic monitoring requirements of the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments (CAAA). CAM will require facilities subject to Title V to develop CAM plans for specific emission units at the facility. CAM plans will include the methods that will be used to provide reasonable assurance of continuous compliance with applicable requirements. In addition, the EPA is also proposing to finalize portions of the 1993 EM rule that would allow the use of ACE to determine compliance with emission limits. Reference test methods are the only means currently available to determine compliance with emission limits. The EPA has indicated that, under the ACE rule, even data obtained via CAM will be considered credible evidence in determining the compliance status of a facility. CAM and Title V will require sources to submit large amounts of data to the regulatory agency. The data, upon submittal, are public record and can be used to indicate non-compliance under the ACE rule. Therefore, the burden shift associated with CAM and Title V, in conjunction with the use of ACE, will significantly increase the potential liability of industry. This paper discusses the implications Title V, CAM, and the ACE rule will have on industry as well as the possible effects the regulations will have on enforcement in the future. The paper will provide the perspectives of both plant managers and legal counsel.

  1. Capitalizing on information technology to reduce environmental compliance costs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schott, J. [Entergy Services, Beaumont, TX (United States); Gloski, D.M.; Manning, L.A. [Electric Software Products, Inc., Los Altos, CA (United States)

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Over the last several years environmental regulations have proliferated at a pace similar to the explosive growth of micro-computing. The new desktop computing power has encouraged compliance solutions developed in-house using PC based database tools. The result has often been numerous internally developed applications scattered throughout the company, managed or supported by personnel unfamiliar with the underlying principles of the original software. Each individual database may contain redundant and sometimes conflicting data. Expertise on these systems is often not transferable to the next system and may be lost as staff is promoted, transferred, or downsized.

  2. PSI Gibson turns compliance into a vision for the future

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Makansi, J.

    1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This article examines the technologies and the decisions behind their selection to help this plant achieve compliance with environmental regulations and remain competitive. The topics of the article include an overview of retrofits on the five boilers, on-line coal analysis, low nitrogen oxide burners, use of wet scrubbers, electrostatic precipitator upgrades, addition of a distributed control and data acquisition system that interfaces with an existing on-line boiler and turbine performance monitoring system, and chemical cleaning of supercritical boilers to improve plant performance.

  3. Davis-Bacon Compliance and Performance | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergyENERGYWomentheATLANTA, GA - U.S. DepartmenttoJune 16,AprilFrankDavis-Bacon Compliance and

  4. Office of NEPA Policy and Compliance | Department of Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinanInformation InInformation InExplosion Monitoring: InnovationISCNEPA Policy and Compliance Search

  5. Enforcement Policy Statement: Compliance Period for Regional Standards

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarly Career Scientists'Montana.Program -Department oftoTheseClickDepartment of Energy June 4,Compliance

  6. EnergyPlus Analysis Capabilities for Use in California Building Energy Efficiency Standards Development and Compliance Calculations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hong, Tianzhen; Buhl, Fred; Haves, Philip

    2008-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

    California has been using DOE-2 as the main building energy analysis tool in the development of building energy efficiency standards (Title 24) and the code compliance calculations. However, DOE-2.1E is a mature program that is no longer supported by LBNL on contract to the USDOE, or by any other public or private entity. With no more significant updates in the modeling capabilities of DOE-2.1E during recent years, DOE-2.1E lacks the ability to model, with the necessary accuracy, a number of building technologies that have the potential to reduce significantly the energy consumption of buildings in California. DOE-2's legacy software code makes it difficult and time consuming to add new or enhance existing modeling features in DOE-2. Therefore the USDOE proposed to develop a new tool, EnergyPlus, which is intended to replace DOE-2 as the next generation building simulation tool. EnergyPlus inherited most of the useful features from DOE-2 and BLAST, and more significantly added new modeling capabilities far beyond DOE-2, BLAST, and other simulations tools currently available. With California's net zero energy goals for new residential buildings in 2020 and for new commercial buildings in 2030, California needs to evaluate and promote currently available best practice and emerging technologies to significantly reduce energy use of buildings for space cooling and heating, ventilating, refrigerating, lighting, and water heating. The California Energy Commission (CEC) needs to adopt a new building energy simulation program for developing and maintaining future versions of Title 24. Therefore, EnergyPlus became a good candidate to CEC for its use in developing and complying with future Title 24 upgrades. In 2004, the Pacific Gas and Electric Company contracted with ArchitecturalEnergy Corporation (AEC), Taylor Engineering, and GARD Analytics to evaluate EnergyPlus in its ability to model those energy efficiency measures specified in both the residential and nonresidential Alternative Calculation Method (ACM) of the Title-24 Standards. The AEC team identified gaps between EnergyPlus modeling capabilities and the requirements of Title 24 and ACMs. AEC's evaluation was based on the 2005 version of Title 24 and ACMs and the version 1.2.1 of EnergyPlus released on October 1, 2004. AEC's evaluation is useful for understanding the functionality and technical merits of EnergyPlus for implementing the performance-based compliance methods described in the ACMs. However, it did not study the performance of EnergyPlus in actually making building energy simulations for both the standard and proposed building designs, as is required for any software program to be certified by the CEC for use in doing Title-24 compliance calculations. In 2005, CEC funded LBNL to evaluate the use of EnergyPlus for compliance calculations by comparing the ACM accuracy test runs between DOE-2.1E and EnergyPlus. LBNL team identified key technical issues that must be addressed before EnergyPlus can be considered by the CEC for use in developing future Nonresidential Title-24 Standards or as an ACM tool. With Title 24 being updated to the 2008 version (which adds new requirements to the standards and ACMs), and EnergyPlus having been through several update cycles from version 1.2.1 to 2.1, it becomes crucial to review and update the previously identified gaps of EnergyPlus for use in Title 24, and more importantly to close the gaps which would help pave the way for EnergyPlus to be adopted as a Title 24 compliance ACM. With this as the key driving force, CEC funded LBNL in 2008 through this PIER (Public Interest Energy Research) project with the overall technical goal to expand development of EnergyPlus to provide for its use in Title-24 standard compliance and by CEC staff.

  7. Measurement and modeling of Ar/H2/CH4 arc jet discharge chemical vapor deposition reactors II: Modeling of the spatial dependence of expanded

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bristol, University of

    and used to deposit thin films of polycrystalline diamond. This reactor has been the subject of many prior of micro- and nanocrystalline diamond and diamondlike carbon films. The model incorporates gas activation-containing radical species incident on the growing diamond surface C atoms and CH radicals within this reactor

  8. A New Double-Moment Microphysics Parameterization for Application in Cloud and Climate Models. Part II: Single-Column Modeling of Arctic Clouds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shupe, Matthew

    of the arctic bound- ary layer, the presence of leads (cracks) in the sea ice surface, the persistence of mixed-phaseA New Double-Moment Microphysics Parameterization for Application in Cloud and Climate Models. Part- dicted cloud boundaries and total cloud fraction compare reasonably well with observations. Cloud phase

  9. Ground motion modeling of Hayward fault scenario earthquakes II:Simulation of long-period and broadband ground motions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aagaard, B T; Graves, R W; Rodgers, A; Brocher, T M; Simpson, R W; Dreger, D; Petersson, N A; Larsen, S C; Ma, S; Jachens, R C

    2009-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

    We simulate long-period (T > 1.0-2.0 s) and broadband (T > 0.1 s) ground motions for 39 scenarios earthquakes (Mw 6.7-7.2) involving the Hayward, Calaveras, and Rodgers Creek faults. For rupture on the Hayward fault we consider the effects of creep on coseismic slip using two different approaches, both of which reduce the ground motions compared with neglecting the influence of creep. Nevertheless, the scenario earthquakes generate strong shaking throughout the San Francisco Bay area with about 50% of the urban area experiencing MMI VII or greater for the magnitude 7.0 scenario events. Long-period simulations of the 2007 Mw 4.18 Oakland and 2007 Mw 4.5 Alum Rock earthquakes show that the USGS Bay Area Velocity Model version 08.3.0 permits simulation of the amplitude and duration of shaking throughout the San Francisco Bay area, with the greatest accuracy in the Santa Clara Valley (San Jose area). The ground motions exhibit a strong sensitivity to the rupture length (or magnitude), hypocenter (or rupture directivity), and slip distribution. The ground motions display a much weaker sensitivity to the rise time and rupture speed. Peak velocities, peak accelerations, and spectral accelerations from the synthetic broadband ground motions are, on average, slightly higher than the Next Generation Attenuation (NGA) ground-motion prediction equations. We attribute at least some of this difference to the relatively narrow width of the Hayward fault ruptures. The simulations suggest that the Spudich and Chiou (2008) directivity corrections to the NGA relations could be improved by including a dependence on the rupture speed and increasing the areal extent of rupture directivity with period. The simulations also indicate that the NGA relations may under-predict amplification in shallow sedimentary basins.

  10. The metal carbonyl promoted rearrangement of aryl-cyclopropenes. II. Approaches towards a model system of dynemicin A

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cohen, D.H.

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The ability of 3-vinyl- or 3-phenylcyclopropenes to undergo metal carbonyl promoted rearrangement with CO insertion to yield phenol or naphthol derivatives led to investigations using 3-naphthylcyclopropenes with the goal of producing material containing an anthracene carbon framework. Rearrangement of 1-methyl-3-(1,4-dimethoxynaphth-2-yl)cyclopropene, however, only gave material containing the phenanthrene framework. It is the goal of Part I of this thesis to modify a naphthylcyclopropene so that the metal carbonyl induced rearrangement will yield material containing an anthracene framework. A working hypothesis was put forth that focused on the electronic stabilization of certain aromatic intermediates to explain phenanthrene vs. anthracene formation. Semi-empirical calculations performed on model systems to estimate thermodynamic properties supported the hypothesis. Two naphthoquinone derivatives were prepared based on the hypothesis. In the first case, the cyclopropene substituent is arranged in the 2-position of a naphthoquinone-1,4-bisketal; in the second case, the cyclpropene is at C-2 in a 1,4-naphthoquinone. In both cases, the alkene unit (C-2/C-4) is less aromatic' than an alkene unit in a naphthalene ring, and the expected rearrangement can give only the anthraquinone skeleton. Investigations with the bisketal were unsucessful; attempted rearrangement at low temperatures gave only recovered starting material and experiments at higher temperatures polymerized the sensitive cyclopropene. Investigations with the 1,4-naphthoquinone proved modestly successful. Metal carbonyl catalyzed rearrangement with CO insertion to yield anthraquinone was observed. Additionally, low temperature conditions were developed that may prove useful in future work.

  11. Addendum for the Phase II Groundwater Flow Model of Corrective Action Unit 98: Frenchman Flat, NevadaTest Site, Nye County, Nevada, Revision 0 (page changes)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John McCord

    2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document, which makes changes to Phase II Groundwater Flow Model of Corrective Action Unit 98: Frenchman Flat, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada, S-N/99205--074, Revision 0 (May 2006) was prepared to address review comments on this final document provided by the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP) in a letter dated June 20, 2006. The document includes revised pages that address NDEP review comments and comments from other document users. Change bars are included on these pages to identify where the text was revised. In addition to the revised pages, the following clarifications are made: Section 6.0 Conceptual Model Uncertainty Analyses. Please note that in this section figures showing the observed versus simulated well head (Figures 6-1, 6-5, 6-7, 6-16, 6-28, 6-30, 6-32, 6-34, 6-37, 6-42, 6-47, 6-52, 6-57, 6-62, 6-71, and 6-86) have a vertical break in scale on the y axis. Section 7.0 Parameter Sensitivity Analysis. In Section 7.2, the parameter perturbation analysis defines two components of the objective function PHI. These two components include the WELL component that represents the head portion of the objective function as measured in wells and the FLUX component that represents the lateral boundary flux portion of the objective function. In the text and figures in Section 7.2, the phrases well portion of the objective function and head portion of the objective function are used interchangeably in discussions of the WELL component of the objective function.

  12. Programmer`s manual for CAMCON: Compliance Assessment Methodology CONtroller

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rechard, R.P. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Gilkey, A.P.; Rudeen, D.K.; Byle, K.A. [New Mexico Engineering Research Inst., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Iuzzolino, H.J. [Geo-Centers, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    CAMCON, the Compliance Assessment Methodology CONtroller, is an analysis system that assists in assessing the compliance of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) with applicable long-term regulations of the US Environmental Protection Agency, including Subpart B of the Environmental Standards for the Management and Disposal of spent Nuclear Fuel, High-Level and Transuranic Radioactive Wastes, 40 CFR 191 and 40CFR268.6, which is the portion of the Land Disposal Restrictions implementing the Resource, Conservative, and Recovery Act of 1976, as amended that states the conditions for disposal of hazardous chemical wastes. This manual provides an architectural overview of the CAMCON system. Furthermore this manual presents guidelines and presents suggestions for programmers developing the many different types of software necessary to investigate various events and physical processes of the WIPP. These guidelines include user interface requirements, minimum quality assurance requirements, coding style suggestions, and the use of numerous software libraries developed specifically for or adapted for the CAMCON system.

  13. Environmental Compliance and Protection Program Description Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bechtel Jacobs

    2009-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of the Environmental Compliance and Protection (EC and P) Program Description (PD) is to establish minimum environmental compliance requirements and natural resources protection goals for the Bechtel Jacobs Company LLC (BJC) Oak Ridge Environmental Management Cleanup Contract (EMCC) Contract Number DE-AC05-98OR22700-M198. This PD establishes the work practices necessary to ensure protection of the environment during the performance of EMCC work activities on the US Department of Energy's (DOE's) Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, by BJC employees and subcontractor personnel. Both BJC and subcontractor personnel are required to implement this PD. A majority of the decontamination and demolition (D and D) activities and media (e.g., soil and groundwater) remediation response actions at DOE sites on the ORR are conducted under the authority of the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA). CERCLA activities are governed by individual CERCLA decision documents (e.g., Record of Decision [ROD] or Action Memorandum) and according to requirements stated in the Federal Facility Agreement for the Oak Ridge Reservation (DOE 1992). Applicable or relevant and appropriate requirements (ARARs) for the selected remedy are the requirements for environmental remediation responses (e.g., removal actions and remedial actions) conducted under CERCLA.

  14. Directory of Certificates of Compliance for radioactive materials packages: Report of NRC approved packages. Volume 1, Revision 18

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this directory is to make available a convenient source of information on packagings which have been approved by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. To assist in identifying packaging, an index by Model Number and corresponding Certificate of Compliance Number is included at the front of Volumes 1 and 2. An alphabetical listing by user name is included in the back of Volume 3 of approved QA programs. The reports include a listing of all users of each package design and approved QA programs prior to the publication date.

  15. Artificial Photosynthesis II -

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    II - Artificial Photosynthesis II - Joint Center for Artificial Photosynthesis (JCAP) Simulations NathanLewis.png Schematic of a photoelectrochemical cell being designed to harness...

  16. Comply. Improve. Transform. IBM Rational solutions for compliance-driven development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to: · Establish a sustainable framework for regulatory compliance management · Automate and document improvement · Remain flexible and responsive in a rapidly changing business climate Establish a sustainable framework for regulatory compliance Changes in regulatory policy can have sweeping effects on how your

  17. Mechanical Compliance Control System for A Pneumatic Robot Arm Kouichi Watanabe1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tachi, Susumu

    - 2789 - Mechanical Compliance Control System for A Pneumatic Robot Arm Kouichi Watanabe1 , Hisashi position and posture of the arm. Keywords: Pneumatic actuator, Humanoid robot arm, Compliance control 1 actuators have started gaining attention as robot actuators. We focused on the robot arm using a pneumatic

  18. Innovative compliance and enforcement approaches in Minnesota`s air program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Biewen, T.; Lockwood, B.; Giddings, S. [Minnesota Pollution Control Agency, St. Paul, MN (United States). Air Quality Div.

    1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    As the universe of sources subject to air regulations continues to expand, traditional compliance and enforcement approaches that evaluate compliance status and address noncompliance one source at-a-time, are becoming less useful. In addition, increasing complexity of state and federal air regulations are a drain on resources as regulatory agencies try to manage Title V Permitting, new NESHAPS standards for hazardous air pollutants and new monitoring requirements associated with Title V Permits. In order to keep pace, regulatory agencies can use alternative approaches to compliance and enforcement that maximize resources while improving rates of compliance with state and federal air requirements. This paper discusses approaches used by the Minnesota Pollution Control Agency that are designed to improve compliance rates using non-conventional compliance and enforcement techniques. Approaches discussed include sector based initiatives, compliance assistance activities, and initiatives that encourage companies to conduct compliance self-assessments. Specific initiatives that have been used in 1996 and that are ongoing in 1997 are presented, including the purpose and outcome of these efforts.

  19. 3-1 2001 SITE ENVIRONMENTAL REPORT CHAPTER 3: COMPLIANCE STATUS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Homes, Christopher C.

    3-1 2001 SITE ENVIRONMENTAL REPORT CHAPTER 3: COMPLIANCE STATUS Brookhaven National Laboratory Department of Environmental Conservation. Ten reportable spills of petroleum products occurred on site items. 2001 SITE ENVIRONMENTAL REPORT Compliance Status B R O O K H A V E N N A T I O N A L L A B O R

  20. An Expert System for Determining Compliance with the Texas Building Energy Design Standard

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Doan, E. C.; Hunn, B. D.; Jones, J. W.; Gatton, T. M.

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    's compliance is provided and the compliance checker must manage the data collected. To assist designers in complying with the Standard and to reduce the time required, the Center for Energy Studies (CES) at the University of Texas at Austin has developed...

  1. NCI-Frederick Safety and Environmental Compliance Manual 03/2013 B-2. Accident Reporting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wlodawer, Alexander

    and Environmental Compliance Manual 03/2013 B-2-2 Occupational injury - Is identified as any bodily damageNCI-Frederick Safety and Environmental Compliance Manual 03/2013 B-2-1 B-2. Accident Reporting I or reasonably could result in injury, illness, or property damage. Reporting is mandatory in order that: 1

  2. Ecological Monitoring and Compliance Program Fiscal Year 2002 Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    C. A. Wills

    2002-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Ecological Monitoring and Compliance program, funded through the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Operations Office, monitors the ecosystem of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and ensures compliance with laws and regulations pertaining to NTS biota. This report summarizes the program's activities conducted by Bechtel Nevada (BN) during fiscal year 2002. Program activities included: (1) biological surveys at proposed construction sites, (2) desert tortoise compliance, (3) ecosystem mapping and data management, (4) sensitive species and unique habitat monitoring, and (5) biological monitoring at the HAZMAT Spill Center. Biological surveys for the presence of sensitive species and important biological resources were conducted for 26 NTS projects. These projects have the potential to disturb a total of 374 acres. Thirteen of the projects were in desert tortoise habitat, and 13.38 acres of desert tortoise habitat were disturbed. No tortoises were found in or displaced from project areas, and no tortoises were accidentally injured or killed at project areas or along paved roads. Compilation of historical wildlife data continued this year in efforts to develop faunal distribution maps for the NTS. Photographs associated with the NTS ecological landform units sampled to create the NTS vegetation maps were cataloged for future retrieval and analysis. The list of sensitive plant species for which long-term population monitoring is scheduled was revised. Six vascular plants and five mosses were added to the list. Plant density estimates from ten populations of Astragalus beatleyae were collected, and eight known populations of Eriogonum concinnum were visited to assess plant and habitat status. Minimal field monitoring of western burrowing owl burrows occurred. A report relating to the ecology of the western burrowing owl on the Nevada Test Site was prepared which summarizes four years of data collected on this species' distribution, burrow use, reproduction, activity patterns, and food habits. Bat roost sites within seven buildings slated for demolition were identified, and a BN biologist was a contributing author of the Nevada Bat Conservation Plan published by the Nevada Bat Working Group. Thirty-three adult horses and five foals were counted this year. Six active raptor nests (two American kestrel, two Red-tailed hawk, and two Great-horned owl nests) were found and monitored this year. Selected wetlands and man-made water sources were monitored for physical parameters and wildlife use. No dead animals were observed this year in any plastic-lined sump. The chemical release test plan for one experiment at the HAZMAT Spill Center on Frenchman Lake playa was reviewed. Seasonal sampling of downwind and upwind transects near the spill center was conducted to document baseline conditions of biota.

  3. Technical Safety Appraisal of the EBR-II, Argonne National Laboratory--West

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schleiter, T.G.

    1988-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of the Technical Safety Appraisal Program is to strengthen DOE nuclear operations by encouraging contractors to improve compliance with DOE Orders, to incorporate industry lessons learned, and to promote excellence in safety. Thus, the appraisals address more issues than would be addressed in a strictly compliance-oriented appraisal. The EBR-II is a liquid-metal-cooled fast breeder reactor. It is cooled with molten sodium metal and its chain reactors is perpetuated with very energetic (fast) neutrons. A total of 50 concerns with respect to EBR-II operations were identified. None of these were judged to require prompt or expedited action. No concerns were identified with respect to 54 of the 95 Performance Objectives considered in the appraisal. Programs in the areas of these Performance Objectives were considered adequate. One Noteworthy Practice was identified in the technical area of Maintenance.

  4. A Study of The Standard Model Higgs, WW and ZZ Production in Dilepton Plus Missing Transverse Energy Final State at CDF Run II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hsu, Shih-Chieh; /UC, San Diego

    2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on a search for Standard Model (SM) production of Higgs to WW* in the two charged lepton (e, {mu}) and two neutrino final state in p{bar p} collisions at a center of mass energy {radical}s = 1.96 TeV. The data were collected with the CDF II detector at the Fermilab Tevatron and correspond to an integrated luminosity of 1.9fb{sup -1}. The Matrix Element method is developed to calculate the event probability and to construct a likelihood ratio discriminator. There are 522 candidates observed with an expectation of 513 {+-} 41 background events and 7.8 {+-} 0.6 signal events for Higgs mass 160GeV/c{sup 2} at next-to-next-to-leading logarithmic level calculation. The observed 95% C.L. upper limit is 0.8 pb which is 2.0 times the SM prediction while the median expected limit is 3.1{sub -0.9}{sup +1.3} with systematics included. Results for 9 other Higgs mass hypotheses ranging from 110GeV/c{sup 2} to 200GeV/c{sup 2} are also presented. The same dilepton plus large transverse energy imbalance (E{sub T}) final state is used in the SM ZZ production search and the WW production study. The observed significance of ZZ {yields} ll{nu}{nu} channel is 1.2{sigma}. It adds extra significance to the ZZ {yields} 4l channel and leads to a strong evidence of ZZ production with 4.4 {sigma} significance. The potential improvement of the anomalous triple gauge coupling measurement by using the Matrix Element method in WW production is also studied.

  5. Part II: Project Summaries Project Summaries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Perkins, Richard A.

    Part II: Project Summaries Part II Project Summaries #12;22 Math & Computational Sciences Division generally cannot be achieved for reasonable computational cost. Applications that require modeling of this project is to advance the state of the art in electromagnetic computations by eliminating three existing

  6. Federal Agency Hazardous Waste Compliance Docket (docket). Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Federal Facilities Hazardous Waste Compliance Docket (``docket``) identifies Federal facilities that may be contaminated with hazardous substances and that must be evaluated to determine if they pose a risk to public health or the environment The docket, required by Section 120(c) of the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA), as amended by the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act of 1986 (SARA), also provides a vehicle for making information about potentially contaminated facilities available to the public. Facilities listed on the docket must complete site assessments that provide the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) with information needed to determine whether or not the facility should be included on he National Priorities List (NPL). This Information Brief, which revises the previous Federal Agency Hazardous Waste Compiliance Docket Information Brief, provides updated information on the docket listing process, the implications of listing, and facility status after listing.

  7. Permit compliance monitoring for the power generation industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Macak, J.J. III [Mostardi-Platt Associates, Inc., Elmhurst, IL (United States); Platt, T.B. [Commonwealth Edison Company, Waukegan, IL (United States); Miller, S.B. [Commonwealth Edison Company, Chicago, IL (United States)

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The Clean Air Act Amendments (CAAA) of 1990 authorized EPA to develop regulations requiring facilities to monitor the adequacy of emission control equipment and plant operations. Furthermore, under the CAAA, EPA is required to issue regulations to require owners and operators of large industrial facilities to enhance air pollution monitoring and certify compliance with air pollution regulations. The fossil-fueled power generation industry has been targeted with the promulgation of the Acid Rain Program regulations of 40 CFR 72, and the Continuous Emissions Monitoring requirements of 40 CFR 75. The Part 75 regulations, with a few exceptions, establish requirements for monitoring, recordkeeping, and reporting of sulfur dioxide, nitrogen oxides, and carbon dioxide emissions, volumetric flow, and opacity data from affected units under the Acid Rain Program. Depending upon the type of unit and location, other applicable emission limitations may apply for particulate emissions (both total and PM-10), carbon monoxide, volatile organic compounds and sulfuric acid mist.

  8. Statistical aspects of determining compliance with radiation standards

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kennedy, W.E. Jr.; Kinnison, R.R.; Gilbert, R.O.; Watson, E.C.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Radiation surveys are an important tool used to monitor the safety of operations at nuclear fuel cycle facilities, as well as determining if contaminated sites require remedial action before license termination or unrestricted release. It is important that radiation surveys are carefully designed to provide the right quantity and quality of useful information for making valid decisions concerning public safety. The validity of survey information is especially important when low-level radiation detection techniques are required such as for environmental radiation monitoring. Thus, statistical aspects of radiation surveys are important in demonstrating compliance with radiation guidelines and for deciding when remedial action or cleanup is required. In this paper, we discuss the statistical aspects of evaluating whether guidelines are, in fact, being exceeded.

  9. The effect of the proposed use of any credible evidence to determine compliance on utilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lowery, K.P. [Trinity Consultants Inc., Overland Park, KS (United States); Facca, G.L. [IES Utilities Inc., Cedar Rapids, IA (United States)

    1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Reference test methods are the only means currently available to determine compliance with air quality emission standards. All parties involved acknowledge that this excludes the use of data from continuous monitoring systems (CMS) to determine compliance with many air quality regulations. However, the United States Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) is proposing to finalize portions of the 1993 Enhanced Monitoring (EM) rule that would allow the use of any credible evidence (ACE) to determine compliance with air emission limitations (including CMS data). This position has been taken by the USEPA in spite of strenuous objections that the 1993 rule has been subsequently replaced with the more relevant 1995 Compliance Assurance Monitoring (CAM) rule. The use of ACE to determine compliance will have a significant impact on utilities due to the large number and type of air quality regulations that affect utilities; specifically, subparts D and Da of the New Source Performance Standards (NSPS) and regulations implementing Title IV (the Acid Rain Program) of the Clean Air Act (CAA) which require the use of CMS. These monitoring systems produce large amounts of emission data that are submitted to the USEPA, State, and/or local regulators agencies and, once submitted, become public record. Any interested party, either the regulator or the public, can use the data to show non-compliance with applicable standards; therefore, the use of ACE to determine compliance will substantially increase a utility`s liability. This paper discusses: (1) the regulatory history behind what data can be considered in determining compliance, (2) the potential implications of the ACE rule on utilities, and (3) the potential implications of the ACE rule on the development of a compliance demonstration plan for the Title V operating permit.

  10. Technical assessment of compliance with workplace air sampling requirements at WRAP

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    HACKWORTH, M.F.

    1999-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this Technical Assessment is to satisfy HSRCM-1, ''Hanford Site Radiological Control Manual'' Article 551.4 for a documented study of facility Workplace Air Monitoring (WAM) programs. HSRCM-1 is the primary guidance for radiological control at Waste Management Federal Services of Hanford, Inc. (WMH). The HSRCM-1 complies with Title 10. Part 835 of the Code of Federal Regulations (10CFR835). This document provides an evaluation of the compliance of the Waste Receiving and Processing facility (WRAP) WAM program to the criteria standards, requirements, and documents compliance with the requirements where appropriate. Where necessary, it also indicates changes needed to bring specific locations into compliance.

  11. Air Pollution Accountability and Compliance Tracking System (A-PACT System)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    regulatory authorities in making their decisions. (Abstract) Keywords-air pollution; aviation; data mining IAir Pollution Accountability and Compliance Tracking System (A-PACT System) Andrew Keller and emissions regulations for aircraft at major airports. The proposed Air Pollution Accountability

  12. Sensitivity of time lapse seismic data to the compliance of hydraulic fractures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fang, Xinding

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the sensitivity of seismic waves to changes in the fracture normal and tangential compliances by analyzing the fracture sensitivity wave equation, which is derived by differentiating the elastic wave equation with ...

  13. Oregon Strategies for Transportation Compliance with the Migratory Bird Treaty Act

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maguire, Chris C.

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Migratory Bird Treaty Act (MBTA), a federal law enforced byof non-compliance with the MBTA as the agency carries outsystem. Although the MBTA is one of the oldest laws in the

  14. The Effects of Firm Size, Corporate Governance Quality, and Bad News on Disclosure Compliance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ettredge, Michael L.; Johnstone, Karla; Stone, Mary S.; Wang, Qian

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Motivated by calls for increased compliance, size-based regulation, and continued exemption of small firms from internal control reporting requirements, we assess the incremental effects of firm size, corporate governance quality, and bad news...

  15. Adoption of IFRS by Greek listed companies: financial statement effects, level of compliance and value relevance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsalavoutas, Ioannis

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . Greek listed companies financial statements were affected significantly by the adoption of IFRS. The average level of compliance with IFRS mandatory disclosures approximates to 80%. The impact on net income and shareholders equity, as a result...

  16. Docket Number: 09-AFC-07C Project Title: Palen Solar Power Project -Compliance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DOCKETED Docket Number: 09-AFC-07C Project Title: Palen Solar Power Project - Compliance TN schedule and procedures necessary to conclude the amendment review process. At the Prehearing Conference

  17. Docket Number: 09-AFC-07C Project Title: Palen Solar Power Project -Compliance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DOCKETED Docket Number: 09-AFC-07C Project Title: Palen Solar Power Project - Compliance TN-700-2009-004.PDF #12;2 Notice of Committee's Intention to Use Informal Hearing Procedures Pursuant

  18. Lessons from Phase 2 compliance with the U.S. Acid Rain Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ellerman, A. Denny

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper provides preliminary answers to four questions concerning the behavior of agents operating under the SO2 Allowance Trading Program that could not be adequately answered until several years' data on compliance ...

  19. What can I do with this degree? Tax Planning and Compliance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Escher, Christine

    What can I do with this degree? BUSINESS ACCOUNTING Tax Planning and Compliance Auditing energy level and detail orientation. Publicaccountingfirms Governmentagencies Banks and other financial--primary,secondary schools, colleges or private schools Financialinstitutions Trade/labor organizations Governmentagencies

  20. Optimal design of a phase-in emissions trading program with voluntary compliance options

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Montero, Juan Pablo

    In this paper we explore the welfare implications of voluntary compliance within an emissions trading program and derive optimal permits allocations to affected and opti-in sources when the environmental regulator has ...

  1. 1996 update on compliance and emissions trading under the U.S. acid rain program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ellerman, A. Denny

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    November 1997This paper reports on the second year of compliance with the sulfur dioxide (SO2) emissions-reduction and -trading provisions of the Title IV of the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments (CAAA). The material is intended ...

  2. Simplified Prescriptive Options in the Texas Residential Building Energy Code Make Compliance Easy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stone, G. A.; DeVito, E. M.; Nease, N. H.

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Simplified Prescriptive Options in the Texas Residential Building Energy Code Make Compliance Easy Garrett A. Stone Eric M. DeVito Nelson H. Nease Partner Associate Associate Brickfield, Burchette...

  3. Predicting and improving dietary compliance among participants of a dietary study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Devries, Suzanne Mishael

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . vi viii Predicting Compliant Behavior Neasuring Compliance. Improving Dietary Compliance. . Objectives. NETHODS. 3 8 ll 12 Subject Selection. Diet Prescription. Education, Feedback and Follor-up. Food Intake Analysis Survey and 24-hour... Recall. Dietary Adequacy Evaluation and Personalized Diet Portfolios. Feedback Questionnaire. Ethical Standards Data Interpretation. RESULTS 12 12 13 14 16 16 . . 17 19 19 28 21 Sample Description. Dietary Adequacy (controls vs...

  4. Conversion Technologies II: Bio-Oils, Sugar Intermediates, Precursors...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Technologies II: Bio-Oils, Sugar Intermediates, Precursors, Distributed Models, and Refinery Co-Processing July 30, 2014 Bryna Berendzen Technology Manager BETO Conversion...

  5. Phase II Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schuknecht, Nate [Project Manager; White, David [Principle Investigator; Hoste, Graeme [Research Engineer

    2014-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The SkyTrough DSP will advance the state-of-the-art in parabolic troughs for utility applications, with a larger aperture, higher operating temperature, and lower cost. The goal of this project was to develop a parabolic trough collector that enables solar electricity generation in the 2020 marketplace for a 216MWe nameplate baseload power plant. This plant requires an LCOE of 9/kWhe, given a capacity factor of 75%, a fossil fuel limit of 15%, a fossil fuel cost of $6.75/MMBtu, $25.00/kWht thermal storage cost, and a domestic installation corresponding to Daggett, CA. The result of our optimization was a trough design of larger aperture and operating temperature than has been fielded in large, utility scale parabolic trough applications: 7.6m width x 150m SCA length (1,118m2 aperture), with four 90mm diameter 4.7m receivers per mirror module and an operating temperature of 500C. The results from physical modeling in the System Advisory Model indicate that, for a capacity factor of 75%: The LCOE will be 8.87/kWhe. SkyFuel examined the design of almost every parabolic trough component from a perspective of load and performance at aperture areas from 500 to 2,900m2. Aperture-dependent design was combined with fixed quotations for similar parts from the commercialized SkyTrough product, and established an installed cost of $130/m2 in 2020. This project was conducted in two phases. Phase I was a preliminary design, culminating in an optimum trough size and further improvement of an advanced polymeric reflective material. This phase was completed in October of 2011. Phase II has been the detailed engineering design and component testing, which culminated in the fabrication and testing of a single mirror module. Phase II is complete, and this document presents a summary of the comprehensive work.

  6. CARD No. 23 Models and Computer Codes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CARD No. 23 Models and Computer Codes 23.A BACKGROUND Section 194.23 addresses the compliance criteria requirements for conceptual models and computer codes. Conceptual models capture a general (PA). The design of computer codes begins with the development of conceptual models. Conceptual models

  7. Disposal demonstration of a high integrity container (HIC) containing an EPICOR-II prefilter from Three Mile Island

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McConnell, J.W. Jr.; Tyacke, M.J.; Schmitt, R.C.; Reno, H.W.

    1985-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A high integrity container (HIC) was developed, tested, and certified for use in disposing of unusual low-level radioactive waste from Three Mile Island Unit 2 (TMI-2). The work was coordinated by EG and G Idaho, Inc. and funded by the US Department of Energy. A disposal demonstration using an HIC containing an EPICOR-II prefilter from TMI-2 was completed at the commercial disposal facility in the State of Washington. A Certification of Compliance was issued by the Department of Social and Health Services of the State of Washington to use the HIC in disposing of up to 50 EPICOR-II prefilters. That Certification of Compliance was issued after rigorous review of the HIC design and test program by the State and by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. This report describes the processes of loading, transporting, and disposing of the demonstration HIC and briefly describes the design, testing, and approval effort leading up to the demonstration.

  8. Strategies for Compliance with Stage 2 Disinfectants and Disinfection Byproducts Rule for Surface Water Treatment Facilities in Northeastern Oklahoma.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wintle, Brian N.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ??The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) recently created new regulations that better protect human health but that also make achieving compliance more difficult for existing water (more)

  9. Status and Trends in U.S. Compliance and Voluntary Renewable Energy Certificate Markets (2010 Data)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heeter, J.; Bird, L.

    2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents the status and trends of 'compliance'--renewable energy certificate (REC) markets used to meet state renewable portfolio standard (RPS) requirements--and 'voluntary' markets--those in which consumers and institutions purchase renewable energy to match their electricity needs on a voluntary basis. Today, 29 states and the District of Columbia have an RPS, more than half of all U.S. electricity customers have an option to purchase some type of green power product directly from a retail electricity provider, and all consumers have the option to purchase RECs. This report documents REC activities and trends in the United States. The compliance REC market analysis includes analysis of REC trading, regional REC markets, REC tracking systems, types of compliance RECs, compliance REC pricing trends, and an overview of compliance with RPS polices. The voluntary REC analysis presents data and analysis on voluntary market sales and customer participation, products and premiums, green pricing marketing and administrative expenses, voluntary REC pricing, and the voluntary carbon offsets market. The report concludes with a discussion of upcoming guidance from the Federal Trade Commission on green marketing claims, the emergence of community solar programs, and the potential impact of Dodd-Frank regulations on the REC market.

  10. Dartmouth Stellar Evolution Database and the ACS Survey of Galactic Globular Clusters II. Stellar Evolution Tracks, Isochrones, Luminosity Functions, and Synthetic Horizontal-Branch Models

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Dotter, A; Chaboyer, B; Jevremovic, D; Kostov, V; Baron, E; Ferguson, J; Sarajedini, A; Anderson, J

    Web tools are also available at the home page (http://stellar.dartmouth.edu/~models/index.html). These tools allow users to create isochrones and convert them to luminosity functions or create synthetic horizontal branch models.

  11. ACRA-II

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    003089IBMPC00 ACRA-II: Kernel Integration Code System for Estimation of Radiation Doses Caused by a Hypothetical Reactor Accident

  12. CSC6870 Computer Graphics II CSC6870 Computer Graphics II

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hua, Jing

    CSC6870 Computer Graphics II Surfaces CSC6870 Computer Graphics II Surfaces · Plane · Quadratic. CSC6870 Computer Graphics II Plane and Intersection CSC6870 Computer Graphics II Plane Equations · General plane equation ax+by+cz+d=0 · Normal of the plane n=[a, b, c] CSC6870 Computer Graphics II

  13. Ecological Monitoring and Compliance Program Fiscal/Calendar Year 2004 Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bechtel Nevada

    2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Ecological Monitoring and Compliance program, funded through the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office, monitors the ecosystem of the Nevada Test Site and ensures compliance with laws and regulations pertaining to Nevada Test Site biota. This report summarizes the program's activities conducted by Bechtel Nevada during the Fiscal Year 2004 and the additional months of October, November, and December 2004, reflecting a change in the monitoring period to a calendar year rather than a fiscal year as reported in the past. This change in the monitoring period was made to better accommodate information required for the Nevada Test Site Environmental Report, which reports on a calendar year rather than a fiscal year. Program activities included: (1) biological surveys at proposed construction sites, (2) desert tortoise compliance, (3) ecosystem mapping and data management, (4) sensitive species and unique habitat monitoring, (5) habitat restoration monitoring, and (6) biological monitoring at the Hazardous Materials Spill Center.

  14. Environment, safety and health compliance assessment, Feed Materials Production Center, Fernald, Ohio

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1989-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Secretary of Energy established independent Tiger Teams to conduct environment, safety, and health (ES H) compliance assessments at US Department of Energy (DOE) facilities. This report presents the assessment of the Feed Materials Production Center (FMPC) at Fernald, Ohio. The purpose of the assessment at FMPC is to provide the Secretary with information regarding current ES H compliance status, specific ES H noncompliance items, evaluation of the adequacy of the ES H organizations and resources (DOE and contractor), and root causes for noncompliance items. Areas reviewed included performance under Federal, state, and local agreements and permits; compliance with Federal, state and DOE orders and requirements; adequacy of operations and other site activities, such as training, procedures, document control, quality assurance, and emergency preparedness; and management and staff, including resources, planning, and interactions with outside agencies.

  15. Building Energy Efficiency in India: Compliance Evaluation of Energy Conservation Building Code

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yu, Sha; Evans, Meredydd; Delgado, Alison

    2014-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

    India is experiencing unprecedented construction boom. The country doubled its floorspace between 2001 and 2005 and is expected to add 35 billion m2 of new buildings by 2050. Buildings account for 35% of total final energy consumption in India today, and building energy use is growing at 8% annually. Studies have shown that carbon policies will have little effect on reducing building energy demand. Chaturvedi et al. predicted that, if there is no specific sectoral policies to curb building energy use, final energy demand of the Indian building sector will grow over five times by the end of this century, driven by rapid income and population growth. The growing energy demand in buildings is accompanied by a transition from traditional biomass to commercial fuels, particularly an increase in electricity use. This also leads to a rapid increase in carbon emissions and aggravates power shortage in India. Growth in building energy use poses challenges to the Indian government. To curb energy consumption in buildings, the Indian government issued the Energy Conservation Building Code (ECBC) in 2007, which applies to commercial buildings with a connected load of 100 kW or 120kVA. It is predicted that the implementation of ECBC can help save 25-40% of energy, compared to reference buildings without energy-efficiency measures. However, the impact of ECBC depends on the effectiveness of its enforcement and compliance. Currently, the majority of buildings in India are not ECBC-compliant. The United Nations Development Programme projected that code compliance in India would reach 35% by 2015 and 64% by 2017. Whether the projected targets can be achieved depends on how the code enforcement system is designed and implemented. Although the development of ECBC lies in the hands of the national government the Bureau of Energy Efficiency under the Ministry of Power, the adoption and implementation of ECBC largely relies on state and local governments. Six years after ECBCs enactment, only two states and one territory out of 35 Indian states and union territories formally adopted ECBC and six additional states are in the legislative process of approving ECBC. There are several barriers that slow down the process. First, stakeholders, such as architects, developers, and state and local governments, lack awareness of building energy efficiency, and do not have enough capacity and resources to implement ECBC. Second, institution for implementing ECBC is not set up yet; ECBC is not included in local building by-laws or incorporated into the building permit process. Third, there is not a systematic approach to measuring and verifying compliance and energy savings, and thus the market does not have enough confidence in ECBC. Energy codes achieve energy savings only when projects comply with codes, yet only few countries measure compliance consistently and periodic checks often indicate poor compliance in many jurisdictions. China and the U.S. appear to be two countries with comprehensive systems in code enforcement and compliance The United States recently developed methodologies measuring compliance with building energy codes at the state level. China has an annual survey investigating code compliance rate at the design and construction stages in major cities. Like many developing countries, India has only recently begun implementing an energy code and would benefit from international experience on code compliance. In this paper, we examine lessons learned from the U.S. and China on compliance assessment and how India can apply these lessons to develop its own compliance evaluation approach. This paper also provides policy suggestions to national, state, and local governments to improve compliance and speed up ECBC implementation.

  16. SCENARIOS FOR DEEP CARBON EMISSION REDUCTIONS FROM ELECTRICITY BY 2050 IN WESTERN NORTH AMERICA USING THE SWITCH ELECTRIC POWER SECTOR PLANNING MODEL California's Carbon Challenge Phase II Volume II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Collaboration/ University of California, Berkeley; Nelson, James; Mileva, Ana; Johnston, Josiah; Kammen, Daniel; Wei, Max; Greenblatt, Jeffrey

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study used a state-of-the-art planning model called SWITCH for the electric power system to investigate the evolution of the power systems of California and western North America from present-day to 2050 in the context of deep decarbonization of the economy. Researchers concluded that drastic power system carbon emission reductions were feasible by 2050 under a wide range of possible futures. The average cost of power in 2050 would range between $149 to $232 per megawatt hour across scenarios, a 21 to 88 percent increase relative to a business-as-usual scenario, and a 38 to 115 percent increase relative to the present-day cost of power. The power system would need to undergo sweeping change to rapidly decarbonize. Between present-day and 2030 the evolution of the Western Electricity Coordinating Council power system was dominated by implementing aggressive energy efficiency measures, installing renewable energy and gas-fired generation facilities and retiring coal-fired generation. Deploying wind, solar and geothermal power in the 2040 timeframe reduced power system emissions by displacing gas-fired generation. This trend continued for wind and solar in the 2050 timeframe but was accompanied by large amounts of new storage and long-distance high-voltage transmission capacity. Electricity storage was used primarily to move solar energy from the daytime into the night to charge electric vehicles and meet demand from electrified heating. Transmission capacity over the California border increased by 40 - 220 percent by 2050, implying that transmission siting, permitting, and regional cooperation will become increasingly important. California remained a net electricity importer in all scenarios investigated. Wind and solar power were key elements in power system decarbonization in 2050 if no new nuclear capacity was built. The amount of installed gas capacity remained relatively constant between present-day and 2050, although carbon capture and sequestration was installed on some gas plants by 2050.

  17. Idaho CERCLA Disposal Facility Complex Compliance Demonstration for DOE Order 435.1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Simonds, J.

    2007-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

    This compliance demonstration document provides an analysis of the Idaho CERCLA Disposal Facility (ICDF) Complex compliance with DOE Order 435.1. The ICDF Complex includes the disposal facility (landfill), evaporation pond, administration facility, weigh scale, and various staging/storage areas. These facilities were designed and constructed to be compliant with DOE Order 435.1, Resource Conservation and Recovery act Subtitle C, and Toxic Substances Control Act polychlorinated biphenyl design and construction standards. The ICDF Complex is designated as the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) facility for the receipt, staging/storage, treatment, and disposal of INL Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA) waste streams.

  18. ECRH and transport modeling in tandem mirrors and divertor physics. Task II. Annual progress report on fusion plasma theory, January 1-September 31, 1982

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Emmert, G A

    1982-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A summary of work during this period is given for the following: ecrh and transport modeling in tandem mirrors and divertor physics. (MOW)

  19. The contribution of knowledge bases to compliance assessment : a case study of industrial maintenance in the gas sector.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    , particularly in the field of health, safety and environmental (HSE) risk management. Collaborative research the management of regulatory compliance. Originally oriented towards HSE issues, the long-term intention compliance management system. This paper therefore discusses the criteria for a knowledge base management

  20. An analysis of SO sub 2 emission compliance under the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hanson, D.A.; Cilek, C.M.; Pandola, G.; Taxon, T.

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The effectiveness of SO{sub 2} emission allowance trading under Title 4 of the 1990 Amendments to the Clean Air Act (CAA) is of great interest due to the innovative nature of this market incentive approach. However, it may be a mistake to frame the compliance problem for a utility as a decision to trade or not. Trading of allowances should be the consequence, not the decision. The two meaningful decision variables for a utility are the control approaches chosen for its units and the amount of allowances to hold in its portfolio of assets for the future. The number allowances to be bought or sold (i.e. traded) is determined by the emission reduction and banking decisions. Our preferred approach is to think of the problem in terms of ABC's of the 1990 CAA Amendments: abatement strategy, banking, and cost competitiveness. The implications of the general principles presented in this paper on least cost emission reductions and emissions banking to hedge against risk are being simulated with version 2 of the ARGUS model representing the electric utility sector and regional coal supplies and transportation rates. A rational expectations forecast for allowances prices is being computed. The computed allowance price path has the property that demand for allowances by electric utilities for current use or for banking must equal the supply of allowances issued by the federal government or provided as forward market contracts in private market transactions involving non-utility speculators. From this rational expectations equilibrium forecast, uncertainties are being explored using sensitivity tests. Some of the key issues are the amount of scrubbing and when it is economical to install it, the amount of coal switching and how much low sulfur coal premiums will be bid up; and the amount of emission trading within utilities and among different utilities.

  1. An analysis of SO{sub 2} emission compliance under the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hanson, D.A.; Cilek, C.M.; Pandola, G.; Taxon, T.

    1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The effectiveness of SO{sub 2} emission allowance trading under Title 4 of the 1990 Amendments to the Clean Air Act (CAA) is of great interest due to the innovative nature of this market incentive approach. However, it may be a mistake to frame the compliance problem for a utility as a decision to trade or not. Trading of allowances should be the consequence, not the decision. The two meaningful decision variables for a utility are the control approaches chosen for its units and the amount of allowances to hold in its portfolio of assets for the future. The number allowances to be bought or sold (i.e. traded) is determined by the emission reduction and banking decisions. Our preferred approach is to think of the problem in terms of ABC`s of the 1990 CAA Amendments: abatement strategy, banking, and cost competitiveness. The implications of the general principles presented in this paper on least cost emission reductions and emissions banking to hedge against risk are being simulated with version 2 of the ARGUS model representing the electric utility sector and regional coal supplies and transportation rates. A rational expectations forecast for allowances prices is being computed. The computed allowance price path has the property that demand for allowances by electric utilities for current use or for banking must equal the supply of allowances issued by the federal government or provided as forward market contracts in private market transactions involving non-utility speculators. From this rational expectations equilibrium forecast, uncertainties are being explored using sensitivity tests. Some of the key issues are the amount of scrubbing and when it is economical to install it, the amount of coal switching and how much low sulfur coal premiums will be bid up; and the amount of emission trading within utilities and among different utilities.

  2. THE SPATIAL CLUSTERING OF ROSAT ALL-SKY SURVEY AGNs. II. HALO OCCUPATION DISTRIBUTION MODELING OF THE CROSS-CORRELATION FUNCTION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miyaji, Takamitsu; Aceves, Hector [Instituto de AstronomIa, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Ensenada, Baja California (Mexico); Krumpe, Mirko; Coil, Alison L., E-mail: miyaji@astrosen.unam.mx [University of California, San Diego, Center for Astrophysics and Space Sciences, 9500 Gilman Drive, La Jolla, CA 92093-0424 (United States)

    2011-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

    This is the second paper of a series that reports on our investigation of the clustering properties of active galactic nuclei (AGNs) in the ROSAT All-Sky Survey (RASS) through cross-correlation functions (CCFs) with Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) galaxies. In this paper, we apply the Halo Occupation Distribution (HOD) model to the CCFs between the RASS broad-line AGNs with SDSS luminous red galaxies (LRGs) in the redshift range 0.16 < z < 0.36 that was calculated in Paper I. In our HOD modeling approach, we use the known HOD of LRGs and constrain the HOD of the AGNs by a model fit to the CCF. For the first time, we are able to go beyond quoting merely a 'typical' AGN host halo mass, M{sub h}, and model the full distribution function of AGN host dark matter halos. In addition, we are able to determine the large-scale bias and the mean M{sub h} more accurately. We explore the behavior of three simple HOD models. Our first model (Model A) is a truncated power-law HOD model in which all AGNs are satellites. With this model, we find an upper limit to the slope ({alpha}) of the AGN HOD that is far below unity. The other two models have a central component, which has a step function form, where the HOD is constant above a minimum mass, without (Model B) or with (Model C) an upper mass cutoff, in addition to the truncated power-law satellite component, similar to the HOD that is found for galaxies. In these two models we find that the upper limits on {alpha} are still below unity, with {alpha} {approx}< 0.95 and {alpha} {approx}< 0.84 for Models B and C, respectively. Our analysis suggests that the satellite AGN occupation increases slower than, or may even decrease with, M{sub h}, in contrast to the satellite HODs of luminosity-threshold samples of galaxies, which, in contrast, grow approximately as (N{sub s}) {proportional_to} M{sup {alpha}}{sub h} with {alpha} {approx} 1. These results are consistent with observations that the AGN fraction in groups and clusters decreases with richness.

  3. Abstract Presented at Synchrotron Environmental Science II (SES-II)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brookhaven National Laboratory

    Abstract Presented at Synchrotron Environmental Science II (SES-II) Argonne National Laboratory - 6 such as dioxins and furans, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), and polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). *Work

  4. Development of the stored waste autonomous mobile inspector (SWAMI II)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peterson, K.D.; Ward, C.R.

    1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A mobile robot system called the Stored Waste Autonomous Mobile Inspector (SWAMI) is under development by the Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC) Robotics Group of Westinghouse Savannah River Company (WSRC) to perform mandated inspections of waste drums stored in warehouse facilities. The system will reduce personnel exposure to potential hazards and create accurate, high-quality documentation to ensure regulatory compliance and enhance waste management operations. Development work is coordinated among several Department of Energy (DOE), academic, and commercial entities in accordance with DOE`s technology transfer initiative. The prototype system, SWAMI I, was demonstrated at Savannah River Site (SRS) in November, 1993. SWAMI II is now under development for field trials at the Fernald site.

  5. Lighting Overview Page 6-1 2008 Residential Compliance Manual August 2009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lighting ­ Overview Page 6-1 2008 Residential Compliance Manual August 2009 6 Lighting 6.1 Overview, or lighting designer can get the information they need about residential lighting in low-rise buildings and in the dwelling units of high-rise buildings. For residential buildings, all of the lighting requirements

  6. Outdoor Lighting Overview Page 6-1 2008 Nonresidential Compliance Manual August 2009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Outdoor Lighting ­ Overview Page 6-1 2008 Nonresidential Compliance Manual August 2009 6 Outdoor Lighting This chapter covers the requirements for outdoor lighting design and installation, including controls. This section applies to all outdoor lighting, whether attached to buildings, poles, structures

  7. STATE OF CALIFORNIA CERTIFICATE OF COMPLIANCE AND FIELD INSPECTION ENERGY CHECKLIST

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Overall Envelope TDV Energy Unconditioned (file affidavit) Front Orientation: N, E, S, W or in Degrees, this compliance approach cannot be used). Go to Overall Envelope Approach or Performance Approach. CHECK-sloped Wood framed roofs in Climate Zones 3 and 5 are exempted solar relectance and thermal emittance or SRI

  8. Environmental Assessment of Ground Water Compliance at the Durango, Colorado, UMTRA Project Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    N /A

    2002-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is proposing a ground water compliance strategy for the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project site near Durango, Colorado. DOE has prepared this environmental assessment to provide the public with information concerning the potential effects of this proposed strategy.

  9. Student manual, Book 2: Orientation to occupational safety compliance in DOE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Colley, D.L.

    1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This is a student hand-book an Occupational Safety Compliance in DOE. Topics include the following: Electrical; materials handling & storage; inspection responsibilities & procedures; general environmental controls; confined space entry; lockout/tagout; office safety, ergonomics & human factors; medical & first aid, access to records; construction safety; injury/illness reporting system; and accident investigation procedures.

  10. Draft Title 40 CFR 191 compliance certification application for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) is a research and development facility for the demonstration of the permanent isolation of transuranic radioactive wastes in a geologic formation. The facility was constructed in southeastern New Mexico in a manner intended to meet criteria established by the scientific and regulatory community for the safe, long-term disposal of transuranic wastes. The US Department of Energy (DOE) is preparing an application to demonstrate compliance with the requirements outlined in Title 40, Part 191 of the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) for the permanent disposal of transuranic wastes. As mandated by the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Land Withdrawal Act of 1992, the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) must evaluate this compliance application and provide a determination regarding compliance with the requirements within one year of receiving a complete application. Because the WIPP is a very complex program, the DOE has planned to submit the application as a draft in two parts. This strategy will allow for the DOE and the EPA to begin technical discussions on critical WIPP issues before the one-year compliance determination period begins. This report is the first of these two draft submittals.

  11. FIA-12-0020- In the Matter of California-Arizona-Nevada District Organization Contract Compliance

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Office of Hearings and Appeals granted a Motion for Reconsideration of part of a Decision we issued on March 23, 2012, relating to appeals filed by California-Arizona-Nevada District Organization Contract Compliance (CANDO) under the Freedom of Information Act (FOIA).

  12. FIA-12-0005- In the Matter of California-Arizona-Nevada District Organization Contract Compliance

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Office of Hearings and Appeals issued one Decision relating to two appeals filed by California-Arizona-Nevada District Organization Contract Compliance (CANDO) from two determination letters issued by the Loan Guarantee Program Office (LGPO) of the Department of Energy (DOE) under the Freedom of Information Act (FOIA).

  13. FIA-12-0004- In the Matter of California-Arizona-Nevada District Organization Contract Compliance

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Office of Hearings and Appeals issued one Decision relating to two appeals filed by California-Arizona-Nevada District Organization Contract Compliance (CANDO) from two determination letters issued by the Loan Guarantee Program Office (LGPO) of the Department of Energy (DOE) under the Freedom of Information Act (FOIA).

  14. Docket Number: 09-AFC-06C Project Title: Blythe Solar Power Project -Compliance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DOCKETED Docket Number: 09-AFC-06C Project Title: Blythe Solar Power Project - Compliance TN #: 200840 Document Title: Blythe Solar Power Project Staff Assessment - Part B Description: Staff Assessment - Part B Amendment to the Blythe Solar Power Project BLYTHE SOLAR POWER PROJECT #12;DISCLAIMER Staff

  15. Docket Number: 09-AFC-06C Project Title: Blythe Solar Power Project -Compliance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DOCKETED Docket Number: 09-AFC-06C Project Title: Blythe Solar Power Project - Compliance TN #: 200629 Document Title: Blythe Solar Power Project Staff Assessment - Part A (Corrected) Description NUMBER 09-AFC-6C Staff Assessment - Part A Amendment to the Blythe Solar Power Project BLYTHE SOLAR POWER

  16. Docket Number: 09-AFC-07C Project Title: Palen Solar Power Project -Compliance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DOCKETED Docket Number: 09-AFC-07C Project Title: Palen Solar Power Project - Compliance TN Solar Power Project PALEN SOLAR ELECTRIC GENERATING SYSTEM #12;DISCLAIMER Staff members SYSTEM (09-AFC-7C) FINAL STAFF ASSESSMENT ­ Part A Amendment to the Palen Solar Power Project Executive

  17. Indoor Lighting Overview Page 5-1 2008 Nonresidential Compliance Manual August 2009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Compliance Manual August 2009 5.1 Overview The primary mechanism for regulating indoor lighting energy under building's energy consumption, including lighting power, meets the energy budget. The performance approach lighting applications. Indoor lighting is one of the single largest consumers of energy (kilowatt

  18. PUBLIC UTILITY COMMISSION (IPUC) RPS PROCUREMENT & COMPLIANCE PLAN (SBX1 2)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    PUBLIC UTILITY COMMISSION (IPUC) RPS PROCUREMENT & COMPLIANCE PLAN (SBX1 2) CITY OF INDUSTRY California's Renewable Portfolio Standard (RPS) requirements for publically owned utilities (POU Energy Resources Act, Senate Bill 2 1st Ex. Session ("SBX1 2") requires utilities to achieve 33% RPS

  19. Princeton University Nondiscrimination Statement In compliance with Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972, Section

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    programs, or other aspects of its educational programs or activities. The vice provost for institutionalPrinceton University Nondiscrimination Statement In compliance with Title IX of the Education action programs should be directed to the Office of the Vice Provost for Institutional Equity

  20. Does the management of regulatory compliance and occupational risk have an impact on safety culture?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Does the management of regulatory compliance and occupational risk have an impact on safety culture of safety culture has progressively taken hold in organizations. The idea has numerous benefits and can the nature and strength of relationships between safety culture and two explanatory variables; namely

  1. On the E ect of Compliance in Robotic Contact Tasks Problem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 1995 ACC On the E ect of Compliance in Robotic Contact Tasks Problem Shahram Payandeh, Assistant Professor Experimental Robotics Laboratory ERL School of Engineering Science Simon Fraser University Burnaby Introduction Various methodologies have been proposed in the literature for stable control of the robotic

  2. Eur J Cancer Prev. Author manuscript Determinants of non-compliance to recommendations on breast cancer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Eur J Cancer Prev. Author manuscript Page /1 11 Determinants of non-compliance to recommendations on breast cancer screening among women participating in the French E3N cohort study Flamant Camille , Gauthier Estelle , Clavel-Chapelon Fran oiseç * E3N, Nutrition, hormones et cancer: pid miologie et pr

  3. Building Envelope Overview Page 3-1 2008 Nonresidential Compliance Manual August 2009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Building Envelope ­ Overview Page 3-1 2008 Nonresidential Compliance Manual August 2009 3 Building Envelope This chapter describes the requirements for the design of the building envelope for nonresidential buildings. Loads from the building envelope, especially windows, skylights, and roofs are among the most

  4. University of Kentucky Tobacco-free Initiative Implementation Guidelines for Compliance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MacAdam, Keith

    University of Kentucky Tobacco-free Initiative Implementation Guidelines for Compliance Effective November 19, 2009, the University of Kentucky (UK) Tobacco Policy is changed to create a tobacco, or controlled by UK in Fayette County, Kentucky. These guidelines are intended to assist employees, students

  5. Office of Compliance Programs PRIVACY POLICY AND PROCEDURES Policy #: 2100.22

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ; · utilization review; · quality assurance; · billing; #12;Office of Compliance Programs PRIVACY POLICY and Accountability Act (HIPAA), Privacy, Security, Breach Notification, and Enforcement Rules at 45 CFR Part 160 and Part 164 ("HIPAA Rules") that relate to the disclosure of a patient's Protected Health Information

  6. TURBULENCE IN A THREE-DIMENSIONAL DEFLAGRATION MODEL FOR TYPE Ia SUPERNOVAE. II. INTERMITTENCY AND THE DEFLAGRATION-TO-DETONATION TRANSITION PROBABILITY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schmidt, W.; Niemeyer, J. C. [Institut fuer Astrophysik, Universitaet Goettingen, Friedrich-Hund-Platz 1, D-37077 Goettingen (Germany); Ciaraldi-Schoolmann, F. [Lehrstuhl fuer Astronomie und Astrophysik, Universitaet Wuerzburg, Am Hubland, D-97074 Wuerzburg (Germany); Roepke, F. K.; Hillebrandt, W., E-mail: schmidt@astro.physik.uni-goettingen.d [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Astrophysik, Karl-Schwarzschild-Str. 1, D-85741 Garching (Germany)

    2010-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The delayed detonation model describes the observational properties of the majority of Type Ia supernovae very well. Using numerical data from a three-dimensional deflagration model for Type Ia supernovae, the intermittency of the turbulent velocity field and its implications on the probability of a deflagration-to-detonation (DDT) transition are investigated. From structure functions of the turbulent velocity fluctuations, we determine intermittency parameters based on the log-normal and the log-Poisson models. The bulk of turbulence in the ash regions appears to be less intermittent than predicted by the standard log-normal model and the She-Leveque model. On the other hand, the analysis of the turbulent velocity fluctuations in the vicinity of the flame front by Roepke suggests a much higher probability of large velocity fluctuations on the grid scale in comparison to the log-normal intermittency model. Following Pan et al., we computed probability density functions for a DDT for the different distributions. The determination of the total number of regions at the flame surface, in which DDTs can be triggered, enables us to estimate the total number of events. Assuming that a DDT can occur in the stirred flame regime, as proposed by Woosley et al., the log-normal model would imply a delayed detonation between 0.7 and 0.8 s after the beginning of the deflagration phase for the multi-spot ignition scenario used in the simulation. However, the probability drops to virtually zero if a DDT is further constrained by the requirement that the turbulent velocity fluctuations reach about 500 km s{sup -1}. Under this condition, delayed detonations are only possible if the distribution of the velocity fluctuations is not log-normal. From our calculations follows that the distribution obtained by Roepke allow for multiple DDTs around 0.8 s after ignition at a transition density close to 1 x 10{sup 7} g cm{sup -3}.

  7. Black Liquor Combustion Validated Recovery Boiler Modeling, Final Year Report, Volume 2: Appendix I, Section 5, and Appendix II, Section 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    T.M. Grace, W.J. Frederick, M. Salcudean, R.A. Wessel

    1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This project was initiated in October 1990 with the objective of developing and validating a new computer model of a recovery boiler furnace using a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code specifically tailored to the requirements for solving recovery boiler flows, and using improved submodels for black liquor combustion based on continued laboratory fundamental studies. Many of these objectives were accomplished at the end of the first five years and documented in a comprehensive report on that work (DOE/CE/40936-T3, 1996). A critical review of recovery boiler modeling, carried out in 1995, concluded that further enhancements of the model were needed to make reliable predictions of key output variables. In addition, there was a need for sufficient understanding of fouling and plugging processes to allow model outputs to be interpreted in terms of the effect on plugging and fouling. As a result, the project was restructured and reinitiated at the end of October 1995, and was completed in June 1997. The entire project is now complete and this report summarizes all of the work done on the project since it was restructured. The key tasks to be accomplished under the restructured project were to (1) Complete the development of enhanced furnace models that have the capability to accurately predict carryover, emissions behavior, dust concentrations, gas temperatures, and wall heat fluxes; (2) Validate the enhanced furnace models, so that users can have confidence in the results; (3) Obtain fundamental information on aerosol formation, deposition, and hardening so as to develop the knowledge base needed to relate furnace model outputs to plugging and fouling in the convective sections of the boiler; and (4) Facilitate the transfer of codes, black liquor submodels, and fundamental knowledge to the U.S. kraft pulp industry.

  8. Intercomparison of model simulations of mixed-phase clouds observed during the ARM Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment. Part II: Multi-layered cloud

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morrison, H; McCoy, R B; Klein, S A; Xie, S; Luo, Y; Avramov, A; Chen, M; Cole, J; Falk, M; Foster, M; Genio, A D; Harrington, J; Hoose, C; Khairoutdinov, M; Larson, V; Liu, X; McFarquhar, G; Poellot, M; Shipway, B; Shupe, M; Sud, Y; Turner, D; Veron, D; Walker, G; Wang, Z; Wolf, A; Xu, K; Yang, F; Zhang, G

    2008-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Results are presented from an intercomparison of single-column and cloud-resolving model simulations of a deep, multi-layered, mixed-phase cloud system observed during the ARM Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment. This cloud system was associated with strong surface turbulent sensible and latent heat fluxes as cold air flowed over the open Arctic Ocean, combined with a low pressure system that supplied moisture at mid-level. The simulations, performed by 13 single-column and 4 cloud-resolving models, generally overestimate the liquid water path and strongly underestimate the ice water path, although there is a large spread among the models. This finding is in contrast with results for the single-layer, low-level mixed-phase stratocumulus case in Part I of this study, as well as previous studies of shallow mixed-phase Arctic clouds, that showed an underprediction of liquid water path. The overestimate of liquid water path and underestimate of ice water path occur primarily when deeper mixed-phase clouds extending into the mid-troposphere were observed. These results suggest important differences in the ability of models to simulate Arctic mixed-phase clouds that are deep and multi-layered versus shallow and single-layered. In general, models with a more sophisticated, two-moment treatment of the cloud microphysics produce a somewhat smaller liquid water path that is closer to observations. The cloud-resolving models tend to produce a larger cloud fraction than the single-column models. The liquid water path and especially the cloud fraction have a large impact on the cloud radiative forcing at the surface, which is dominated by the longwave flux for this case.

  9. Jan Hendrik Bruinier II Anna von Pippich Fabrizio Andreatta -Milan, Italy II Massimo Bertolini -Essen, Germany II Siegfried Bcherer -

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haller-Dintelmann, Robert

    Massimo Bertolini - Essen, Germany II Siegfried Böcherer - Mannheim, Germany II Thanasis Bouganis - Durham II Jay Jorgenson - New York, USA II Winfried Kohnen - Heidelberg, Germany II Jürg Kramer - Berlin, Germany II Siddarth Sankaran - Bonn, Germany II Maryna Viazovska - Bonn, Germany II Tonghai Yang - Madison

  10. PARS II Training Workbook (Course 103) | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    PARS II Training Workbook (Course 103) PARS II Training Workbook (Course 103) PARS II More Documents & Publications PARS II TRAINING PARS II TRAINING PARS II 104 Contractor Monthly...

  11. Physical and chemical properties of the regional mixed layer of Mexico's Megapolis Part II: Evaluation of measured and modeled trace gases and particle size distributions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ochoa, Carlos; Baumgardner, Darrel; Grutter, M.; Allan, James D.; Fast, Jerome D.; Rappengluck, B.

    2012-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This study extends the work of Baumgardner et al. (2009) in which measurements of trace gases and particles at a remote, high-altitude mountain site 60 km from Mexico City were analyzed with respect to the origin of air masses. In the current evaluation, the temperature, water vapor, ozone (O3), carbon monoxide (CO), acyl peroxy nitrate (APN) and particle size distributions (PSDs) of the mass concentrations of sulfate, nitrate, ammonium and organic mass (OM) were simulated with the WRF-Chem chemical transport model and compared with the measurements at the mountain site. The model prediction of the diurnal trends of the gases were well correlated with the measurements before the regional boundary layer reached the measurement site but underestimated the concentrations after that time. The differences are caused by an overly rapid growth of the boundary layer by the model with too much dilution. There also appears to be more O3 produced by photochemical production, downwind of the emission sources, than predicted by the model. The measured and modeled PSDs compare very well with respect to their general shape and diameter of the peak concentrations. The spectra are log normally distributed with most of the mass in the accumulation mode and the geometric diameter centered at 200 20 nm, with little observed or predicted change with respect to the origin of the air mass or the time when the RBL is above the Altzomoni research. Only the total mass changed with time and air mass origin. The invariability of the average diameter of the accumulation mode suggests that there is very little growth of the particles by condensation or coagulation after six hours of aging downwind of the major sources of anthropogenic emissions in Mexicos Megapolis.

  12. User manual for AQUASTOR: a computer model for cost analysis of aquifer thermal-energy storage oupled with district-heating or cooling systems. Volume II. Appendices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huber, H.D.; Brown, D.R.; Reilly, R.W.

    1982-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A computer model called AQUASTOR was developed for calculating the cost of district heating (cooling) using thermal energy supplied by an aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES) system. the AQUASTOR Model can simulate ATES district heating systems using stored hot water or ATES district cooling systems using stored chilled water. AQUASTOR simulates the complete ATES district heating (cooling) system, which consists of two prinicpal parts: the ATES supply system and the district heating (cooling) distribution system. The supply system submodel calculates the life-cycle cost of thermal energy supplied to the distribution system by simulating the technical design and cash flows for the exploration, development, and operation of the ATES supply system. The distribution system submodel calculates the life-cycle cost of heat (chill) delivered by the distribution system to the end-users by simulating the technical design and cash flows for the construction and operation of the distribution system. The model combines the technical characteristics of the supply system and the technical characteristics of the distribution system with financial and tax conditions for the entities operating the two systems into one techno-economic model. This provides the flexibility to individually or collectively evaluate the impact of different economic and technical parameters, assumptions, and uncertainties on the cost of providing district heating (cooling) with an ATES system. This volume contains all the appendices, including supply and distribution system cost equations and models, descriptions of predefined residential districts, key equations for the cooling degree-hour methodology, a listing of the sample case output, and appendix H, which contains the indices for supply input parameters, distribution input parameters, and AQUASTOR subroutines.

  13. Clean Slate Environmental Remediation DSA for 10 CFR 830 Compliance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James L. Traynor, Stephen L. Nicolosi, Michael L. Space, Louis F. Restrepo

    2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Clean Slate Sites II and III are scheduled for environmental remediation (ER) to remove elevated levels of radionuclides in soil. These sites are contaminated with legacy remains of non-nuclear yield nuclear weapons experiments at the Nevada Test Site, that involved high explosive, fissile, and related materials. The sites may also hold unexploded ordnance (UXO) from military training activities in the area over the intervening years. Regulation 10 CFR 830 (Ref. 1) identifies DOE-STD-1120-98 (Ref. 2) and 29 CFR 1910.120 (Ref. 3) as the safe harbor methodologies for performing these remediation operations. Of these methodologies, DOE-STD-1120-98 has been superseded by DOE-STD-1120-2005 (Ref. 4). The project adopted DOE-STD-1120-2005, which includes an approach for ER projects, in combination with 29 CFR 1910.120, as the basis documents for preparing the documented safety analysis (DSA). To securely implement the safe harbor methodologies, we applied DOE-STD-1027-92 (Ref. 5) and DOE-STD-3009-94 (Ref. 6), as needed, to develop a robust hazard classification and hazards analysis that addresses non-standard hazards such as radionuclides and UXO. The hazard analyses provided the basis for identifying Technical Safety Requirements (TSR) level controls. The DOE-STD-1186-2004 (Ref. 7) methodology showed that some controls warranted elevation to Specific Administrative Control (SAC) status. In addition to the Evaluation Guideline (EG) of DOE-STD-3009-94, we also applied the DOE G 420.1 (Ref. 8) annual, radiological dose, siting criterion to define a controlled area around the operation to protect the maximally exposed offsite individual (MOI).

  14. Thursday, March 15, 2007 POSTER SESSION II: MERCURY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rathbun, Julie A.

    Thursday, March 15, 2007 POSTER SESSION II: MERCURY 6:30 p.m. Fitness Center Dombard A. J. Hauck S. A. II Despinning Plus Global Contraction and the Orientation of Lobate Scarps on Mercury [#2026] We thermal models of Mercury. King S. D. A Possible Connection Between Convection in Mercury's Mantle

  15. Search for the standard model Higgs boson produced in association with a Z boson in 7.9 fb[superscript ?1] of p[bar-over p] collisions at ?s = 1.96 TeV using the CDF II detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gomez-Ceballos, Guillelmo

    We present a search for the standard model Higgs boson produced in association with a Z boson, using up to 7.9 fb[superscript ?1] of integrated luminosity from p[bar-over p] collisions collected with the CDF II detector. ...

  16. TRU waste certification compliance requirements for contact-handled wastes retrieved from storage for shipment to the WIPP

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Compliance requirements are presented for certifying that unclassified, contact-handled (CH) transuranic (TRU) solid wastes retrieved from storage at DOE sites meet the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC). All applicable DOE Orders must continue to be met. The compliance requirements for certified waste retrieved from certified storage are addressed in another document. The compliance requirements are divided into four sections, primarily determined by the general feature that the requirements address. These sections are General Requirements, Waste Container Requirements, Waste Form Requirements, and Waste Package Requirements. The waste package is the combination of waste container and waste.

  17. Computer Graphics II CSC6870 Computer Graphics II CSC6870 Computer Graphics II

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hua, Jing

    1 Computer Graphics II CSC6870 Computer Graphics II CSC6870 Computer Graphics II Course Information://www.cs.wayne.edu/~jinghua/6870/csc6870.htm) CSC6870 Computer Graphics II Textbooks · REQUIRED TEXTBOOK: Interactive Computer Graphics: A Top-Down Approach with Shader-Based OpenGL (6th Edition) Edward Angel, Dave Shreiner ISBN-10

  18. An Urban Parameterization for a Global Climate Model. Part II: Sensitivity to Input Parameters and the Simulated Urban Heat Island in Offline Simulations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oleson, Keith W.; Bonan, Gordon B.; Feddema, Johannes J.; Vertenstein, M.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    tempera- tures of urban systems as impervious fraction increases. In general, these findings are in agreement with those observed for real urban ecosystems. Thus, the model appears to be a useful tool for examining the nature of the urban climate within... of the physical processes controlling energy and water fluxes and 2) the charac- terization of urban morphology and urban materials with respect to aerodynamic, radiative, and heat trans- fer properties (e.g., Terjung and ORourke 1980; Arn- field 2000; Masson...

  19. Quark-Model Baryon-Baryon Interaction Applied to the Neutron-Deuteron Scattering (II) Polalization Observables of the Elastic Scattering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kenji Fukukawa; Yoshikazu Fujiwara

    2011-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The neutron-deuteron (nd) scattering is solved in the Faddeev formalism, employing the energy-independent version of the quark-model baryon-baryon interaction fss2. The differential cross sections and the spin polarization of the elastic scattering up to the neutron incident energy $E_n=65$ MeV are well reproduced without reinforcing fss2 with the three-body force. The vector analyzing-power of the neutron, $A_y(\\theta)$, in the energy region $E_n$ < 25 MeV is largely improved in comparison with the predictions by the meson-exchange potentials, thus yielding a partial solution of the long-standing $A_y$-puzzle owing to the nonlocality of the short-range repulsion produced by the quark-model baryon-baryon interaction. The large Coulomb effect in the vector and tensor analyzing-powers in $E_n$ < 10 MeV is also analyzed based on the Vincent and Phatak method and recent detailed studies by other authors.

  20. Solid-State 55Mn NMR Spectroscopy of bis(?-oxo)dimanganese(IV) [Mn2O2(salpn)2], a Model for the Oxygen Evolving Complex in Photosystem II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ellis, Paul D.; Sears, Jesse A.; Yang, Ping; Dupuis, Michel; Boron, Ted; Pecoraro, Vince; Stich, Troy; Britt, R. David; Lipton, Andrew S.

    2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Given the obvious global energy needs, it has become imperative to develop a catalytic process for converting water to molecular oxygen and protons. Many have sought to understand the details of photosynthesis and in particular the water splitting reaction to help in the development of the appropriate catalysis.1-3 While the scientific community has made great strides towards this goal, it has fallen short at the critical stage of the determination of the structure associated with the oxygen evolving complex (OEC) within photosystem II (PSII).4,5 Despite the existence of x-ray structures of PSII,6-8 the best data we have for the structure of the OEC comes from models derived from EPR and EXAFS measurements.9-14 This experimental situation has led to collaborations with theoreticians to enable the development of models for the structure of the OEC where the experimental observables (EXAFS and magnetic resonance parameters) serve as constraints to the theoretical calculations. Of particular interest to this study is the observation of the S1 state of the Kok cycle15 where the core of the OEC can be described as a tetranuclear manganese cluster composed of Mn4OxCa. The simplest model for the OEC can be thought of as two Mn-pairs and a Ca2+ where each Mn-pair is antiferromagnetically coupled to its partner. We utilize the term "pair" to describe the Mn atoms within the OEC with the same oxidation state, which for the S1 state is (Mn2(III, III) and Mn2(IV, IV)).16 It is unclear as to the degree of interaction between the pairs as well as the role of the Ca2+. At cryogenic temperatures the S1 state of the OEC is diamagnetic and in principle amenable to solid-state NMR experiments.

  1. Why did they comply while others did not? : environmental compliance of small firms and implications for regulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Eungkyoon

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This doctoral dissertation aims to offer new insights into the environmental compliance behavior of small firms (SFs). Specifically, the dissertation examines the impacts of two categories of factors. The first category ...

  2. Energy, Product, and Ecomonic Implications of Environmental Compliance Options- Lessons Learned from a Southern California Case Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kyricopoulos, P. F.; Faruqui, A.; Chisti, I.

    Industrial plants that are faced with regulated emissions constraints may be able to choose from a complex array of compliance options. Technology options may include a number of pollution control alternatives-retrofits with more efficient equipment...

  3. Environmental Assessment of Ground Water Compliance at the Gunnison, Colorado, UMTRA Project Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    N /A

    2002-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is in the process of selecting a ground water compliance strategy for the Gunnison, Colorado, Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project site. This Environmental Assessment (EA) discusses two alternatives and the effects associated with each. The two alternatives are (1) natural flushing coupled with institutional controls and continued monitoring and (2) no action. The compliance strategy must meet U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) ground water standards defined in Title 40 ''Code of Federal Regulations'' Part 192, Subpart B, in areas where ground water beneath and around the site is contaminated as a result of past milling operations. It has been determined that contamination in the ground water at the Gunnison site consists of soluble residual radioactive material (RRM) as defined in the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act (UMTRCA).

  4. Environmental compliance assessment findings for Weldon Spring Site Remedial Action Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sigmon, C.F.; Levine, M.B.

    1990-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents the results of an environmental assessment conducted at Weldon Spring Site Remedial Action Project (WSSRAP) in St. Charles County, Missouri, in accordance with the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP) Environmental Compliance Assessment Checklists. The purpose of this assessment was to evaluate the compliance of the site with applicable federal and Missouri environment regulations. Assessments activities included the following: review of site records, reports ,and files; inspection of the WSSRAP storage building, other selected buildings, and the adjacent grounds; and interviews with project personnel. This assessment was conducted on August 28-30, 1989. The assessment covered five management areas as set forth in the Checklist: Hazardous Waste Management, Polychlorinated Biphenyls (PCBs) Management; Air Emissions; Wastewater Discharges and Petroleum Management. No samples were collected. 1 ref., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  5. area part ii: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Derived Leaf Area Index over the High-Latitude Northern Hemisphere. Part II: Earth System Models CiteSeer Summary: Abstract: Leaf Area Index (LAI) is a key parameter in the...

  6. Plain Language Compliance Report (2012) | Department of Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 - September 2006Photovoltaic Theory and ModelingPink Skies Coming

  7. Plain Language Compliance Report (2014) | Department of Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 - September 2006Photovoltaic Theory and ModelingPink Skies ComingPlain Language

  8. Impact of Environmental Compliance Costs on U.S. Refining Profitability 1995-2001

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report assesses the effects of pollution abatement requirements on the financial performance of U.S. petroleum refining and marketing operations during the 1995 to 2001 period. This study is a follow-up to the October 1997 publication entitled The Impact of Environmental Compliance Costs on U.S. Refining Profitability, that focused on the financial impacts of U.S. refining pollution abatement investment requirements in the 1988 to1995 period.

  9. Environmental assessment of ground-water compliance activities at the Uranium Mill Tailings Site, Spook, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report assesses the environmental impacts of the Uranium Mill Tailings Site at Spook, Wyoming on ground water. DOE previously characterized the site and monitoring data were collected during the surface remediation. The ground water compliance strategy is to perform no further remediation at the site since the ground water in the aquifer is neither a current nor potential source of drinking water. Under the no-action alternative, certain regulatory requirements would not be met.

  10. United States Department of Energy Nevada Operations Office Environmental Compliance Handbook. Third edition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Environment, Safety & Health Division (ESHD) of the Nevada Operations Office has prepared this Environmental Compliance Handbook for all users of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and other US Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office (DOE/NV) facilities. The Handbook gives an overview of the important environmental laws and regulations that apply to the activities conducted by the Nevada Operations Office and other users of DOE/NV facilities in Nevada.

  11. Federal Facilities Compliance Act, Draft Site Treatment Plan: Background Volume, Part 2, Volume 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1994-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This Draft Site Treatment Plan was prepared by Ames Laboratory to meet the requirements of the Federal Facilities Compliance Act. Topics discussed include: purpose and scope of the plan; site history and mission; draft plant organization; waste minimization; waste characterization; preferred option selection process; technology for treating low-level radioactive wastes and TRU wastes; future generation of mixed waste streams; funding; and process for evaluating disposal issues in support of the site treatment plan.

  12. Compliance Monitoring of Subyearling Chinook Salmon Smolt Survival and Passage at Bonneville Dam, Summer 2012

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Skalski, J. R.; Townsend, Richard L.; Seaburg, Adam; Ploskey, Gene R.; Weiland, Mark A.; Hughes, James S.; Woodley, Christa M.; Deng, Zhiqun; Carlson, Thomas J.

    2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this compliance study was to estimate dam passage survival of subyearling Chinook salmon at Bonneville Dam during summer 2012, as required by the 2008 Federal Columbia River Power System Biological Opinion. The study also estimated smolt passage survival from the forebay 2 km upstream of the dam to the tailrace 1 km below the dam, as well as forebay residence time, tailrace egress, and spill passage efficiency, as required in the 2008 Columbia Basin Fish Accords.

  13. Chemical detection and laser wavelength stabilization employing spectroscopic absorption via laser compliance voltage sensing

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Taubman, Matthew S; Phillips, Mark C

    2014-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Systems and methods are disclosed that provide a direct indication of the presence and concentration of an analyte within the external cavity of a laser device that employ the compliance voltage across the laser device. The systems can provide stabilization of the laser wavelength. The systems and methods can obviate the need for an external optical detector, an external gas cell, or other sensing region and reduce the complexity and size of the sensing configuration.

  14. Environmental Assessment of Ground Water Compliance at the Naturita, Colorado, UMTRA Project Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2003-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

    This Environmental Assessment addresses the environmental effects of a proposed action and the no action alternative to comply with U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) ground water standards at the Naturita, Colorado, Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project site. In 1998, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) completed surface cleanup at the site and encapsulated the tailings in a disposal cell 15 miles northwest near the former town of Uravan, Colorado. Ground water contaminants of potential concern at the Naturita site are uranium and vanadium. Uranium concentrations exceed the maximum concentration limit (MCL) of 0.044 milligram per liter (mg/L). Vanadium has no MCL; however, vanadium concentrations exceed the EPA Region III residential risk-based concentration of 0.33 mg/L (EPA 2002). The proposed compliance strategy for uranium and vanadium at the Naturita site is no further remediation in conjunction with the application of alternate concentration limits. Institutional controls with ground water and surface water monitoring will be implemented for these constituents as part of the compliance strategy. This compliance strategy will be protective of human health and the environment. The proposed monitoring program will begin upon regulatory concurrence with the Ground Water Compliance Action Plan (DOE 2002a). Monitoring will consist of verifying that institutional controls remain in place, collecting ground water samples to verify that concentrations of uranium and vanadium are decreasing, and collecting surface water samples to verify that contaminant concentrations do not exceed a regulatory limit or risk-based concentration. If these criteria are not met, DOE would reevaluate the proposed action and determine the need for further National Environmental Policy Act documentation. No comments were received from the public during the public comment period. Two public meetings were held during this period. Minutes of these meetings are included as Attachment 1.

  15. Proposed Changes to Simplify Review of the Next WIPP Compliance Re-certification Application

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Patterson, R. [Department of Energy, Carlsbad Field Office, Carlsbad, NM (United States); Kouba, St.; Kolander, M. [Washington Group International, Washington Regulatory and Environmental Services, Carlsbad, NM (United States)

    2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The amended Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Land Withdrawal Act (LWA) of 1996, P. L. 104-201, 110 Stat. 2422 [1], requires the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to prepare and submit documentation demonstrating continued compliance with the Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA's) radioactive waste disposal standard 40 CFR Part 191 [2] every five years starting after first waste receipt in accordance with the criteria of 40 CFR 194 [3]. The DOE submitted the WIPP Compliance Certification Application (CCA) [4] to EPA in 1996 and it was approved by EPA in 1998. The first shipment of waste was received for disposal at WIPP on March 26, 1999. Subsequently, the first Compliance Re-certification Application (CRA) [5] was submitted to EPA on March 26, 2004. Reflecting on lessons learned from the previous applications, the DOE is proposing a change in the format for the next CRA due on March 26, 2009. The DOE has an objective to communicate plans, schedules and re-certification methodology as early as possible to EPA and stakeholders. With that objective in mind, the DOE began communicating the proposed new application strategy to the EPA in mid- 2006. For the 2009 CRA submittal, the DOE is proposing to align the document's format to match each section to the requirements of the WIPP compliance criteria at 40 CFR Part 194 [3] and the EPA re-certification support documents. The benefits of the revised format include improved integration of all regulatory, operational, and programmatic activities; easier access to historical information and decisions; a decreased level of effort for DOE, EPA and Stakeholder review; enhancing the likelihood of a quicker re-certification decision; and potentially reducing DOE's post-submittal CRA tasks. This paper will provide insight to those wishing to understand and be kept abreast of changes in the WIPP's certification process. (authors)

  16. Draft Title 40 CFR 191 compliance certification application for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. Volume 9: Appendices RM, SCR, SER, SUM, WRAC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The Rock Mechanics Program is important to the establishment of a radioactive waste repository in salt because rock mechanics deals with the prediction of creep closure and eventual encapsulation of the waste. The intent of this paper is to give the current status of the program. This program consists of three major modeling efforts: continuum creep, fracture, and the disturbed rock zone. These models, together with laboratory material parameters, plastic flow potentials, initial and boundary input data, and other peripheral information forms the predictive technology. The extent to which the predictive technology is validated against in situ test data adds certainty to the method. Application of the technology is through simulations of the test results, design, or performance using numerical codes. In summary, the predictive capabilities are technically sound and reasonable. The current status of the program is that which would be advanced for compliance.

  17. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory National Environmental Policy Act Compliance Program -- FY 2010 Annual Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weeks, Regan S.

    2011-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

    During fiscal year (FY) 2010, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) Environmental Protection and Regulatory Programs Division (before March 1, 2011 known as the Environmental Management Services Department) staff performed a number of activities as part of PNNLs National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) compliance program. These activities helped to verify U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Pacific Northwest Site Office (PNSO) and Richland Operations Office (RL) compliance with NEPA requirements and streamline the NEPA process for federal activities conducted at PNNL. Self-assessments were performed to address NEPA compliance and cultural and biological resource protection. The NEPA self-assessments focused on implementation within the PNNL Energy and Environment Directorate and routine maintenance activities conducted during the previous calendar year. The cultural and biological resource self-assessments were conducted in accordance with the PNSO Cultural and Biological Resources Management Plan, which specifies annual monitoring of important resources to assess and document the status of the resources and the associated protective mechanisms in place to protect sensitive resources.

  18. Corporate planning for compliance with EPA`s proposed risk management program rule

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mannan, M.; Keeney, R.C. [RMT/Jones and Neuse, Inc., Austin, TX (United States)

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    On October 20, 1993, the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) published in the Federal Register the proposed rule entitled Risk Management Programs for Chemical Accidental Release Prevention (40 CFR 68). Subsequently, on January 31, 1994, EPA published in the Federal Register the finalized list of 77 regulated toxic substances and 63 regulated flammable substances that are to be covered under the rule along with the associated threshold quantities for each substance. This list of substances will dictate which stationary sources will have to comply with the requirements of the proposed risk management program rule. The risk management program rule will most likely be finalized sometime after mid-1995. Covered facilities will then have a total of three years to achieve complete compliance with the requirements of the rule. This paper presents an approach for corporations with multiple sites to develop action plans for implementation of the risk management program rule. The process starts with a determination of which facilities are potentially covered, development of a matrix of requirements that each facility must comply with, and finally, common strategies that may be used in achieving compliance. Thus, a multi-facility corporation can develop a baseline compliance guideline document that individual plants can use in developing and implementing their risk management programs.

  19. A Scientific Trigger Unit for Space-Based Real-Time Gamma Ray Burst Detection, II - Data Processing Model and Benchmarks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Provost, Herv Le; Flouzat, Christophe; Kestener, Pierre; Chaminade, Thomas; Donati, Modeste; Chteau, Frdric; Daly, Franois; Fontignie, Jean

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Scientific Trigger Unit (UTS) is a satellite equipment designed to detect Gamma Ray Bursts (GRBs) observed by the onboard 6400 pixels camera ECLAIRs. It is foreseen to equip the low-Earth orbit French-Chinese satellite SVOM and acts as the GRB trigger unit for the mission. The UTS analyses in real-time and in great details the onboard camera data in order to select the GRBs, to trigger a spacecraft slew re-centering each GRB for the narrow field-of-view instruments, and to alert the ground telescope network for GRB follow-up observations. A few GRBs per week are expected to be observed by the camera; the UTS targets a close to 100% trigger efficiency, while being selective enough to avoid fake alerts. This is achieved by running the complex scientific algorithms on a radiation tolerant hardware, based on a FPGA data pre-processor and a CPU with a Real-Time Operating System. The UTS is a scientific software, firmware and hardware co-development. A Data Processing Model (DPM) has been developed to fully val...

  20. Individual-based model of young-of-the-year striped bass population dynamics. II. Factors affecting recruitment in the Potomac River, Maryland

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cowan, J.H. (Univ. of South Alabama, Mobile, AL (United States)); Rose, K.A. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)); Rutherford, E.S.; Houde, E.D. (Univ. of Maryland System, Solomons, MD (United States))

    1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An individual-based model of the population dynamics of young-of-the-year striped bass Morone saxatilis in the Potomac River, Maryland, was used to test the hypothesis that historically high recruitment variability can be explained by changes in environmental and biological factors that result in relatively small changes in growth and mortality rates of striped bass larvae. The four factors examined were (1) size distribution of female parents, (2) zooplankton prey density during the development of striped bass larvae, (3) density of completing larval white perch M. americana, and (4) temperature during larval development. Simulation results suggest that variations in female size and in prey for larvae alone could cause 10-fold variability in recruitment. But no single factor alone caused changes in vital rates of age-0 fish that could account for the 145-fold variability in the Potomac River index of juvenile recruitment. However, combined positive or negative effects of two or more factors resulted in more than a 150-fold simulated recruitment variability, suggesting that combinations of factors can account for the high observed annual variability in striped bass recruitment success. Higher cumulative mortality of feeding larvae and younger life stages than of juveniles was common to all simulations. supporting the contention that striped bass year-class strength is determined prior to metamorphosis. 76 refs., 7 figs., 4 tabs.

  1. FAKULTT II MATHEMATIK UND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nabben, Reinhard

    OF A NETWORK CREATION GAME WITH EXPONENTIAL PAYOFF by NADINE BAUMANN SEBASTIAN STILLER No. 2007/19 #12;The Price of Anarchy of a Network Creation Game with Exponential Payoff Nadine Baumann Sebastian Stiller May/5-3. Technische Universität Berlin, Fakultät II, Stra?e des 17. Juni 136, 10623 Berlin, Germany. Email: stiller

  2. Atmospheric Dynamics II Instructor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    AT602 Atmospheric Dynamics II 2 credits Instructor: David W. J. Thompson davet: An Introduction to Dynamic Meteorology, 5th Edition, Academic Press (recommended) · Marshall, J., and Plumb, R. A., 2008: Atmosphere, Ocean, and Climate Dynamics: An Introductory Text, Academic Press. · Vallis, G. K

  3. Final Environmental Assessment and Finding of No Significant Impact: Ground Water Compliance at the Slick Rock, Colorado, UMTRA Project Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    N /A

    2003-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

    This environmental assessment addresses the environmental effects of a proposed action and the no action alternative to comply with U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) ground water standards at the Slick Rock, Colorado, Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project sites. The sites consist of two areas designated as the North Continent (NC) site and the Union Carbide (UC) site. In 1996, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) completed surface cleanup at both sites and encapsulated the tailings in a disposal cell 5 miles east of the original sites. Maximum concentration limits (MCLs) referred to in this environmental assessment are the standards established in Title 40 ''Code of Federal Regulations'' Part 192 (40 CFR 192) unless noted otherwise. Ground water contaminants of potential concern at the NC site are uranium and selenium. Uranium is more prevalent, and concentrations in the majority of alluvial wells at the NC site exceed the MCL of 0.044 milligram per liter (mg/L). Selenium contamination is less prevalent; samples from only one well had concentrations exceeding the MCL of 0.01 mg/L. To achieve compliance with Subpart B of 40 CFR 192 at the NC site, DOE is proposing the strategy of natural flushing in conjunction with institutional controls and continued monitoring. Ground water flow and transport modeling has predicted that concentrations of uranium and selenium in the alluvial aquifer will decrease to levels below their respective MCLs within 50 years.

  4. Compliance Monitoring of Juvenile Yearling Chinook Salmon and Steelhead Survival and Passage at The Dalles Dam, Spring 2010

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carlson, Thomas J.; Skalski, John R.

    2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this compliance study was to estimate dam passage survival of yearling Chinook salmon and steelhead smolts at The Dalles Dam during spring 2010. Under the 2008 Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS) Biological Opinion (BiOp), dam passage survival should be greater than or equal to 0.96 and estimated with a standard error (SE) less than or equal 0.015. The study also estimated smolt passage survival from the forebay boat-restricted zone (BRZ) to the tailrace BRZ at The Dalles Dam, as well as the forebay residence time, tailrace egress, and spill passage efficiency (SPE), as required in the Columbia Basin Fish Accords. A virtual/paired-release design was used to estimate dam passage survival at The Dalles Dam. The approach included releases of acoustic-tagged smolts above John Day Dam that contributed to the formation of a virtual release at the face of The Dalles Dam. A survival estimate from this release was adjusted by a paired release below The Dalles Dam. A total of 4,298 yearling Chinook salmon and 4,309 steelhead smolts were tagged and released in the investigation. The Juvenile Salmon Acoustic Telemetry System (JSATS) tag model number ATS-156dB, weighing 0.438 g in air, was used in this investigation. The dam passage survival results are summarized as follows: Yearling Chinook Salmon 0.9641 (SE = 0.0096) and Steelhead 0.9535 (SE = 0.0097).

  5. Guidebook for performance assessment parameters used in the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant compliance certification application. Volume 2: Appendices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Howarth, S.M.; Martell, M.A.; Weiner, R. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)] [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Lattier, C. [GRAM, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States)] [GRAM, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Compliance Certification Application (CCA) Performance Assessment (PA) Parameter Database and its ties to supporting information evolved over the course of two years. When the CCA was submitted to the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) in October 1996, information such as identification of parameter value or distribution source was documented using processes established by Sandia National Laboratories WIPP Quality Assurance Procedures. Reviewers later requested additional supporting documentation, links to supporting information, and/or clarification for many parameters. This guidebook is designed to document a pathway through the complex parameter process and help delineate flow paths to supporting information for all WIPP CCA parameters. In addition, this report is an aid for understanding how model parameters used in the WIPP CCA were developed and qualified. To trace the source information for a particular parameter, a dual-route system was established. The first route uses information from the Parameter Records package as it existed when the CCA calculations were run. The second route leads from the EPA Parameter Database to additional supporting information.

  6. Guidebook for performance assessment parameters used in the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant compliance certification application. Volume 1: Main report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Howarth, S.M.; Martell, M.A.; Weiner, R. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Lattier, C. [GRAM, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Compliance Certification Application (CCA) Performance Assessment (PA) Parameter Database and its ties to supporting information evolved over the course of two years. When the CCA was submitted to the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) in October 1996, information such as identification of parameter value or distribution source was documented using processes established by Sandia National Laboratories WIPP Quality Assurance Procedures. Reviewers later requested additional supporting documentation, links to supporting information, and/or clarification for many parameters. This guidebook is designed to document a pathway through the complex parameter process and help delineate flow paths to supporting information for all WIPP CCA parameters. In addition, this report is an aid for understanding how model parameters used in the WIPP CCA were developed and qualified. To trace the source information for a particular parameter, a dual-route system was established. The first route uses information from the Parameter Records Package as it existed when the CCA calculations were run. The second route leads from the EPA Parameter Database to additional supporting information.

  7. Three-dimensional modeling of ionized gas. II. Spectral energy distributions of massive and very massive stars in stationary and time-dependent modeling of the ionization of metals in HII regions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weber, J A; Hoffmann, T L

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    HII regions play a crucial role in the measurement of the chemical composition of the interstellar medium and provide fundamental data about element abundances that constrain models of galactic chemical evolution. Discrepancies that still exist between observed emission line strengths and those predicted by nebular models can be partly attributed to the spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of the sources of ionizing radiation used in the models as well as simplifying assumptions made in nebular modeling. The influence of stellar metallicity on nebular line strength ratios, via its effect on the SEDs, is of similar importance as variations in the nebular metallicity. We have computed a grid of model atmosphere SEDs for massive and very massive O-type stars covering a range of metallicities from significantly subsolar (0.1 Zsun) to supersolar (2 Zsun). The SEDs have been computed using a state-of-the-art model atmosphere code that takes into account the attenuation of the ionizing flux by the spectral lines of ...

  8. Fluorescence of [Fe II] in H II regions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Rodriguez

    1999-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

    A study of [Fe II] lines at various positions within the H II regions M42 and M43 is presented. The relative intensities of selected optical [Fe II] lines are shown to be correlated with the intensity of the apparent nebular continuous spectrum. Since the continuum of H II regions is known to be mostly stellar radiation scattered by dust intermixed with the emitting gas, these correlations provide direct evidence for the existence of fluorescent excitation in the formation process of the [Fe II] lines, irrespective of the prevailing physical state.

  9. STREAM II-V5: REVISION OF STREAM II-V4 TO ACCOUNT FOR THE EFFECTS OF RAINFALL EVENTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, K.

    2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    STREAM II-V4 is the aqueous transport module currently used by the Savannah River Site emergency response Weather Information Display (WIND) system. The transport model of the Water Quality Analysis Simulation Program (WASP) was used by STREAM II to perform contaminant transport calculations. WASP5 is a US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) water quality analysis program that simulates contaminant transport and fate through surface water. STREAM II-V4 predicts peak concentration and peak concentration arrival time at downstream locations for releases from the SRS facilities to the Savannah River. The input flows for STREAM II-V4 are derived from the historical flow records measured by the United States Geological Survey (USGS). The stream flow for STREAM II-V4 is fixed and the flow only varies with the month in which the releases are taking place. Therefore, the effects of flow surge due to a severe storm are not accounted for by STREAM II-V4. STREAM II-V4 has been revised to account for the effects of a storm event. The steps used in this method are: (1) generate rainfall hyetographs as a function of total rainfall in inches (or millimeters) and rainfall duration in hours; (2) generate watershed runoff flow based on the rainfall hyetographs from step 1; (3) calculate the variation of stream segment volume (cross section) as a function of flow from step 2; (4) implement the results from steps 2 and 3 into the STREAM II model. The revised model (STREAM II-V5) will find the proper stream inlet flow based on the total rainfall and rainfall duration as input by the user. STREAM II-V5 adjusts the stream segment volumes (cross sections) based on the stream inlet flow. The rainfall based stream flow and the adjusted stream segment volumes are then used for contaminant transport calculations.

  10. Ribosomal Database Project II

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    The Ribosomal Database Project (RDP) provides ribosome related data and services to the scientific community, including online data analysis and aligned and annotated Bacterial small-subunit 16S rRNA sequences. As of March 2008, RDP Release 10 is available and currently (August 2009) contains 1,074,075 aligned 16S rRNA sequences. Data that can be downloaded include zipped GenBank and FASTA alignment files, a histogram (in Excel) of the number of RDP sequences spanning each base position, data in the Functional Gene Pipeline Repository, and various user submitted data. The RDP-II website also provides numerous analysis tools.[From the RDP-II home page at http://rdp.cme.msu.edu/index.jsp

  11. PARS II TRAINING | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    TRAINING PARS II TRAINING BASICS TRAINING WORKBOOK PARS II TRAINING More Documents & Publications PARS II PARS II Training Workbook (Course 103) PARSIIUserGuideV1.0Draft.pdf...

  12. SRC-II process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schmid, B.K.; Jackson, D.M.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Extensive laboratory and pilot plant experimental work on the Solvent Refined Coal Process has led to the development of an improved version of the process known as SRC-II. This work has shown considerable promise and plans are being made to demonstrate the SRC-II process using commercial size equipment in a 6000 T/D plant to be located near Morgantown, West Virginia. On the basis of recent economic studies, the products (both liquid and gas) from a future large-scale commercial plant are expected to have an overall selling price of $4.00 to 5.00 per million Btu (first quarter 1980 basis). The major product of the primary process is distillate fuel oil of less than 0.3% sulfur for use largely as a non-polluting fuel for generating electrical power and steam, especially in the east where utilities and industry are presently using petroleum products. For the longer term, the major growth opportunity for SRC-II fuel oil in the generation of electric power will probably be through advanced combustion turbine units with heat recovery boilers (combined cycle units). The light liquid fractions (naphtha and middle distillate) produced by the SRC-II process can be upgraded to a high octane unleaded gasoline to supplement petroleum-derived supplies. Significant quantities of pipeline gas are also produced at a cost which should be competitive with SNG from direct coal gasification. Light hydrocarbons (ethane, propane) from the process may be effectively converted to ethylene in conventional cracking plants to offset ethylene demand from petroleum-derived naphtha and gas oil, both of which could otherwise be used for other refinery products. In addition, certain fraction of the fuel oil might also be used in medium speed diesel engines and automotive gas turbines.

  13. I - Matter, antimatter and geometry II - The twin universe model : a solution to the problem of negative energy particles III - The twin universe model plus electric charges and matter-antimatter symmetry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frederic Henry-Couannier; Gilles D'Agostini; Jean-Pierre Petit

    2005-03-09T23:59:59.000Z

    We introduce a new dynamical group whose coadjoint action on its momentum space takes account of matter-antimatter symmetry on pure geometrical grounds. According to this description the energy and the spin are unchanged under matter-antimatter symmetry. We recall that the antichron components of the Poincar\\'{e} group, ruling relativistic motions of a mass-point particle, generate negative energy particles. The model with two twin universes, inspired by Sakharov's one, solves the stability issue. Positive and negative energy particles motions hold in two distinct folds. The model is extended to charged particles. As a result, the matter-antimatter duality holds in both universes.

  14. REAL ALGEBRAIC THREEFOLDS II. MINIMAL MODEL PROGRAM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kollár, János

    --to--Curve Contractions 33 8. Proof of the Main Theorems 39 9. cAx and cD­type Points 43 10. cA­type Points 47 11. c

  15. Some Hamiltonian Models of Friction II

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daniel Egli; Gang Zhou

    2011-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

    In the present paper we consider the motion of a very heavy tracer particle in a medium of a very dense, non-interacting Bose gas. We prove that, in a certain mean-field limit, the tracer particle will be decelerated and come to rest somewhere in the medium. Friction is caused by emission of Cerenkov radiation of gapless modes into the gas. Mathematically, a system of semilinear integro-differential equations, introduced in [FSSG10], describing a tracer particle in a dispersive medium is investigated, and decay properties of the solution are proven. This work is an extension of [FGS10]; it is an extension because no weak coupling limit for the interaction between tracer particle and medium is assumed. The technical methods used are dispersive estimates and a contraction principle.

  16. Modeling of Alpine Atmospheric Dynamics II

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gohm, Alexander

    Parameterization 22 March 2005 Alexander Gohm IMGI, University of Innsbruck #12;The Walko et al. (1995) paper 22 are liquid (may be supercooled); pristine ice, snow and aggregates are completely frozen; graupel and hail are mixed-phase categories Cloud droplets are liquid and small enough to not fall (other categories fall

  17. DOE Audit Guidance for For-Profit Financial Assistance Awards...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    II) General Compliance Supplement April 2012 1 II. GENERAL COMPLIANCE SUPPLEMENT INTRODUCTION The objectives of most compliance requirements for DOE programs are generic in nature....

  18. Direct conversion of rheological compliance measurements into storage and loss moduli

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R M L Evans; Manlio Tassieri; Dietmar Auhl; Thomas A Waigh

    2008-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

    We remove the need for Laplace/inverse-Laplace transformations of experimental data, by presenting a direct and straightforward mathematical procedure for obtaining frequency-dependent storage and loss moduli ($G'(\\omega)$ and $G"(\\omega)$ respectively), from time-dependent experimental measurements. The procedure is applicable to ordinary rheological creep (stress-step) measurements, as well as all microrheological techniques, whether they access a Brownian mean-square displacement, or a forced compliance. Data can be substituted directly into our simple formula, thus eliminating traditional fitting and smoothing procedures that disguise relevant experimental noise.

  19. From science to compliance: Geomechanics studies of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    HANSEN,FRANCIS D.

    2000-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Mechanical and hydrological properties of salt provide excellent bases for geological isolation of hazardous materials. Regulatory certification of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) testifies to the nearly ideal characteristics of bedded salt deposits in southeast New Mexico. The WIPP history includes decades of testing and scientific investigations, which have resulted in a comprehensive understanding of salt's mechanical deformational and hydrological properties over an applicable range of stresses and temperatures. Comprehensive evaluation of salt's favorable characteristics helped demonstrate regulatory compliance and ensure isolation of radioactive waste placed in a salt geological setting.

  20. Compliance Monitoring of Subyearling Chinook Salmon Survival and Passage at The Dalles Dam, Summer 2012

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Skalski, J. R.; Townsend, Richard L.; Seaburg, Adam; Ploskey, Gene R.; Weiland, Mark A.; Hughes, James S.; Woodley, Christa M.; Deng, Zhiqun; Carlson, Thomas J.; Johnson, Gary E.

    2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this compliance study was to estimate dam passage survival of subyearling Chinook salmon at The Dalles Dam during summer 2012. Under the 2008 Federal Columbia River Power System Biological Opinion, dam passage survival is required to be greater than or equal to 0.93 and estimated with a standard error (SE) less than or equal to 0.015. The study also estimated survival from the forebay 2 km upstream of the dam and through the tailrace to 2 km downstream of the dam, forebay residence time, tailrace egress time, spill passage efficiency (SPE), and fish passage efficiency (FPE), as required by the 2008 Columbia Basin Fish Accords.

  1. Environmental implementation plan: Chapter 5, Chemical management, pollution prevention and other compliance programs. Draft revision

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peterson, G.L. [comp.

    1993-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Compliance with environmental regulations and US Department of Energy Orders (DOE) relating to environmental protection is an important part of SRS`s program. Over the past few years, the number of environmental regulations has increased. The strategy to comply with new and existing environmental regulations and DOE orders is described in chapter two. In this chapter, the following environmental programs are described: Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA); Federal Insecticide, Fungicide, and Rodenticide Act (FIFRA); Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act (EPCRA); and SPCC/BMP/Pollution Prevention Plans;The implementation section identifies issues and those responsible to achieve defined objectives.

  2. Optimizing electric utility air toxics compliance with other titles of the Clean Air Act

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Loeb, A.P.; South, D.W.

    1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper provides an overview of regulatory issues under Title III of the Clean Air Act Amendments that could affect electric utilities. Title III contains provisions relating to hazardous air pollutants (HAPs) and provides special treatment for electric utilities. Generally, this discussion documents that if utility toxic emissions are regulated, one of the chief difficulties confronting utilities will be the lack of coordination between Title III and other titles of the Act. The paper concludes that if the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) determines that regulation of utility HAPs is warranted under Title III, savings can be realized from flexible compliance treatment.

  3. Stochastic dynamics and mechanosensitivity of myosin II minifilaments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Philipp J. Albert; Thorsten Erdmann; Ulrich S. Schwarz

    2014-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Tissue cells are in a state of permanent mechanical tension that is maintained mainly by myosin II minifilaments, which are bipolar assemblies of tens of myosin II molecular motors contracting actin networks and bundles. Here we introduce a stochastic model for myosin II minifilaments as two small myosin II motor ensembles engaging in a stochastic tug-of-war. Each of the two ensembles is described by the parallel cluster model that allows us to use exact stochastic simulations and at the same time to keep important molecular details of the myosin II cross-bridge cycle. Our simulation and analytical results reveal a strong dependence of myosin II minifilament dynamics on environmental stiffness that is reminiscent of the cellular response to substrate stiffness. For small stiffness, minifilaments form transient crosslinks exerting short spikes of force with negligible mean. For large stiffness, minifilaments form near permanent crosslinks exerting a mean force which hardly depends on environmental elasticity. This functional switch arises because dissociation after the power stroke is suppressed by force (catch bonding) and because ensembles can no longer perform the power stroke at large forces. Symmetric myosin II minifilaments perform a random walk with an effective diffusion constant which decreases with increasing ensemble size, as demonstrated for rigid substrates with an analytical treatment.

  4. Compliance Evaluation

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergy Cooperation |South42.2 (AprilBiden2|SuperiorHighthe NaturalCommitteeComplete Set ofComplex

  5. Alternative Compliance

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc Documentation RUCProductstwrmrAre theAdministratorCFMFusionReviewAlternate Watch Office |

  6. ARM - RHUBC II Instruments

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc Documentation RUC :ProductsSCM Forcing Data DerivedInstruments Related Links RHUBC-II Home RHUBC

  7. PART II - CONTRACT CLAUSES

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 - September 2006 The 2002OpticsPeriodical: Volume 5, Issue 32012) |GContract115I,I

  8. Evaluation of the computerized procedures Manual II (COPMA II)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Converse, S.A. [North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh, NC (United States)

    1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of a computerized procedure system, the Computerized Procedure Manual II (COPMA-II), on the performance and mental workload of licensed reactor operators. To evaluate COPMA-II, eight teams of two operators were trained to operate a scaled pressurized water reactor facility (SPWRF) with traditional paper procedures and with COPMA-II. Following training, each team operated the SPWRF under normal operating conditions with both paper procedures and COPMA-II. The teams then performed one of two accident scenarios with paper procedures, but performed the remaining accident scenario with COPMA-II. Performance measures and subjective estimates of mental workload were recorded for each performance trial. The most important finding of the study was that the operators committed only half as many errors during the accident scenarios with COPMA-II as they committed with paper procedures. However, time to initiate a procedure was fastest for paper procedures for accident scenario trials. For performance under normal operating conditions, there was no difference in time to initiate or to complete a procedure, or in the number of errors committed with paper procedures and with COPMA-II. There were no consistent differences in the mental workload ratings operators recorded for trials with paper procedures and COPMA-II.

  9. Modeling

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    an implementation of a single-fluid inter- face model in the ALE-AMR code to simulate surface tension effects. The model does not require explicit information on the physical...

  10. SRS ES&H standards compliance program management plan. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hearn, W.H.

    1993-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

    On March 8, 1990, the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (DNFSB) issued Recommendation 90-2 to the Secretary of Energy. This recommendation, based upon the DNFSB`s initial review and evaluation of the content and implementation of standards relating to the design, construction, operations, and decommissioning of defense nuclear facilities of the Department of Energy (DOE), called for three actions: (1) identification of specific standards that apply to design, construction, operation and decommissioning of DOE facilities; (2) assessment of the adequacy of those standards for protecting public health and safety; and (3) determination of the extent to which they have and are being implemented. This document defines the elements of the SRS program required to support the HQ program in response to DNFSB Recommendation 90-2. The objective is to ensure a consistent approach for all sitewide ES and H Standards Compliance Program efforts that satisfied the intent of Recommendation 90-2 and the HQ 90-2 Implementation Plan in a cost-effective manner. The methodology and instructions for implementation of the SRS program are contained in the Standards Compliance Program Implementation Plan. The Management Plan shall be used in conjunction with the Implementation Plan.

  11. Standard 90. 1's ENVSTD: Both a compliance program and an envelope design tool

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crawley, D.B.; Boulin, J.J.

    1989-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Since 1982, ASHRAE and the US Department of Energy have worked together to update ANSI/ASHRAE/IES Standard 90A-1980, Energy Conservation in Building Design.'' The new standard, ASHRAE/IES Standard 90.1-1989, Energy-Efficient Design of New Buildings Except Low-Rise Residential Buildings,'' is substantially changed in form and concept from Standard 90A-1980, especially in how it deals with exterior envelopes. In the new standard, designers can use either of two methods -- prescriptive or system performance -- to comply with building envelope requirements. Under the prescriptive method, requirements are listed in tabular form and designers must demonstrate compliance with each individual requirement. In the system performance method, designers generate the requirements for their specific building using a set of equations. The equations establish limits on permissible heating and cooling coil loads based on the local climate and the internal loads in the exterior zones of the building. A personal computer program, ENVSTD (ENVelope STanDard), has been written to simplify compliance with the system performance path of the standard. The program can also be used to evaluate the impact of varying envelope characteristics on building heating and cooling coil loads in specific locations. This paper provides examples of the impacts that the standard's envelope requirements have on envelope design. Use of the ENVSTD program as a design tool to determine the heating and cooling load impacts of various envelope strategies is also demonstrated. 7 refs., 12 figs.

  12. Baseline Design Compliance Matrix for the Rotary Mode Core Sampling System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LECHELT, J.A.

    2000-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of the design compliance matrix (DCM) is to provide a single-source document of all design requirements associated with the fifteen subsystems that make up the rotary mode core sampling (RMCS) system. It is intended to be the baseline requirement document for the RMCS system and to be used in governing all future design and design verification activities associated with it. This document is the DCM for the RMCS system used on Hanford single-shell radioactive waste storage tanks. This includes the Exhauster System, Rotary Mode Core Sample Trucks, Universal Sampling System, Diesel Generator System, Distribution Trailer, X-Ray Cart System, Breathing Air Compressor, Nitrogen Supply Trailer, Casks and Cask Truck, Service Trailer, Core Sampling Riser Equipment, Core Sampling Support Trucks, Foot Clamp, Ramps and Platforms and Purged Camera System. Excluded items are tools such as light plants and light stands. Other items such as the breather inlet filter are covered by a different design baseline. In this case, the inlet breather filter is covered by the Tank Farms Design Compliance Matrix.

  13. Environmental compliance program FY 1999 multi-year work plan, WBS 1.8.2.3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Giese, K.A.

    1998-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The Environmental Compliance Program is developing and implementing a PHMC-wide chemical management system with the goal being to: (1) manage and control chemicals from procurement through use and final disposition; (2) develop and maintain procedures for identifying and evaluating hazards and environmental impacts present in facilities, and the hazard classification of the facilities. The US Department of Energy (DOE) may promulgate the final rule, 1 0 CFR 834, Radiation Protection of the Public and the Environment in FY 1999. This rule establishes controls for the release of radioactive material and limits for the amount of radiation exposure to the public and the environment. It will be applicable to activities of DOE contractors at the Hanford site. This rule is expected to replace the bulk of DOE Orders 5400.5, Radiation Protection of the Public and the Environment and 5400. 1, General Environmental Protection Program. In doing so, these Orders will be backed by the Price-Anderson enforcement procedures and carry penalties for non-compliance.

  14. An automated tool for evaluating compliance and providing assistance with building energy standards during design

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Quadrel, R.W.; Brambley, M.R.; Stratton, R.C.

    1992-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    In an effort to encourage the maximum cost-effective level of energy efficiency in new building design, energy-efficiency standards have become more location-specific and performance-based. As a result, standards often provide more than one path for ensuring and demonstrating that a design complies, but at the cost of increased complexity. In addition, the burden of remedying a noncompliant design rests on the designers' knowledge and experience, with only general guidance provided by the standards. As part of efforts in the US Department of Energy's (DOE's) Advanced Energy Design and Operation Technologies (AEDOT) project, a team at DOE's Pacific Northwest Laboratory is developing a computer program known as the Energy Standards Intelligent Design Tool (ES-IDT). The ES-IDT is one component of a prototype computer-based building design environment. It performs automatic compliance checking for parts of ASHRAE/IES Standard 90.1-1989 and provides designers assistance in bringing noncomplying designs into compliance. This paper describes the ES-IDT, the functions it provides, and how it is integrated into the design process via the AEDOT prototype building design environment. 9 refs.

  15. An automated tool for evaluating compliance and providing assistance with building energy standards during design

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Quadrel, R.W.; Brambley, M.R.; Stratton, R.C.

    1992-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    In an effort to encourage the maximum cost-effective level of energy efficiency in new building design, energy-efficiency standards have become more location-specific and performance-based. As a result, standards often provide more than one path for ensuring and demonstrating that a design complies, but at the cost of increased complexity. In addition, the burden of remedying a noncompliant design rests on the designers` knowledge and experience, with only general guidance provided by the standards. As part of efforts in the US Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Advanced Energy Design and Operation Technologies (AEDOT) project, a team at DOE`s Pacific Northwest Laboratory is developing a computer program known as the Energy Standards Intelligent Design Tool (ES-IDT). The ES-IDT is one component of a prototype computer-based building design environment. It performs automatic compliance checking for parts of ASHRAE/IES Standard 90.1-1989 and provides designers assistance in bringing noncomplying designs into compliance. This paper describes the ES-IDT, the functions it provides, and how it is integrated into the design process via the AEDOT prototype building design environment. 9 refs.

  16. PROGRAMA FISICA II. INTRODUCCI O

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Batiste, Oriol

    PROGRAMA F´ISICA II. INTRODUCCI ´O I ELECTRICITAT I.1 Camp electrost`atic I.2 Potencial i energia I.4 `Optica #12;BIBLIOGRAFIA B`asica 1. Tipler, P.A. F´isica. Vol. II, ed. Revert´e, 1992. 2. Purcell Blum, R. F´isica: Electricidad, Mag- netismo y Luz. Vol. II, ed. Revert´e, 1986. Complement`aria 1

  17. Supernovae. Part II: The aftermath

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Trimble, V

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    R. Viswanathan, 1980, As- Supernovae. Part II ExperimentalSmith, 1982, Astrophys. Supernovae. Chevalier, R. A. , andC. B. , 1974, Ed. , Supernovae and Supernova Rem- nants,

  18. UNDERSTANDING SPATIAL AND SPECTRAL MORPHOLOGIES OF ULTRACOMPACT H II REGIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peters, Thomas; Banerjee, Robi; Klessen, Ralf S. [Zentrum fuer Astronomie der Universitaet Heidelberg, Institut fuer Theoretische Astrophysik, Albert-Ueberle-Str. 2, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Low, Mordecai-Mark Mac [Department of Astrophysics, American Museum of Natural History, 79th Street at Central Park West, New York, New York 10024-5192 (United States); Dullemond, Cornelis P., E-mail: thomas.peters@ita.uni-heidelberg.d [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Astronomie, Koenigstuhl 17, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany)

    2010-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The spatial morphology, spectral characteristics, and time variability of ultracompact (UC) H II regions provide strong constraints on the process of massive star formation. We have performed simulations of the gravitational collapse of rotating molecular cloud cores, including treatments of the propagation of ionizing and non-ionizing radiation. We here present synthetic radio continuum observations of H II regions from our collapse simulations, to investigate how well they agree with observation, and what we can learn about how massive star formation proceeds. We find that intermittent shielding by dense filaments in the gravitationally unstable accretion flow around the massive star leads to highly variable H II regions that do not grow monotonically, but rather flicker, growing and shrinking repeatedly. This behavior appears to be able to resolve the well-known lifetime problem. We find that multiple ionizing sources generally form, resulting in groups of UC H II regions, consistent with observations. We confirm that our model reproduces the qualitative H II region morphologies found in surveys, with generally consistent relative frequencies. We also find that simulated spectral energy distributions (SEDs) from our model are consistent with the range of observed H II region SEDs, including both regions showing a normal transition from optically thick to optically thin emission, and those with intermediate spectral slopes. In our models, anomalous slopes are solely produced by inhomogeneities in the H II region, with no contribution from dust emission at millimeter or submillimeter wavelengths. We conclude that many observed characteristics of UC H II regions appear consistent with massive star formation in fast, gravitationally unstable, accretion flows.

  19. CSC6870 Computer Graphics II Bezier Curves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hua, Jing

    CSC6870 Computer Graphics II Bezier Curves CSC6870 Computer Graphics II Bezier Curve CSC6870 Computer Graphics II Cubic Bezier Curves · Curve: · Control points · Basis functions: = = 3 0 3 )()( i ii uBpuc ip CSC6870 Computer Graphics II Bezier Curves (degree n) · Curve: · Control points · Basis functions

  20. LMS-based method for damage detection applied to Phase II of Structural Health Monitoring benchmark problem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Preston, Robin Huckaby

    2006-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

    in structural stiffness for the IASC-ASCE Structural Health Monitoring Task Group Benchmark problem for both Phase I and II. The research focuses primarily on Phase II of the benchmark problem. In Phase II, modeling error and noise is introduced to the problem...