Sample records for model compliance standards

  1. DOE standard compliance demonstration program: An office building example

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bailey, S.A.; Keller, J.M.; Wrench, L.E.; Williams, C.J.

    1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) issued interim new building energy standards (10 CFR 435 1989) to achieve maximum energy efficiency in the designs of new buildings. DOE then entered into a project to demonstrate and assess the impact of these standards on the design community. One area of focus was a test to see how a less conventional design-focused building would meet the standards` requirements -- DOE wanted to demonstrate that compliance with energy standards does not mean compromising the architectural intent of a building. This study, which was initiated at Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL), illustrated the process by which compliance with the standards can be proven for a highly {open_quotes}design-oriented{close_quotes} office building. The study also assessed the impact of the whole building simulation compliance alternatives on design. This report documents the compliance requirements, gives a description of the sample building chosen for the study, provides general guidance for the compliance process, documents the method of compliance that was undertaken for the sample building, presents the results of the study, and provides a recommendation on how the compliance requirements could be improved to reflect more realistic use types.

  2. PG&E's Renewable Portfolio Standard & Greenhouse Gas Compliance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Electric Transportation Natural Gas Capped at 334 MMT 80 MMT #12;(MMT CO2e Business as Usual ­ 2020 507 Electric and Natural Gas Sectors Energy Efficiency 12 Renewables 11 Other 2 Transportation Low Carbon FuelPG&E's Renewable Portfolio Standard & Greenhouse Gas Compliance Fong Wan Senior Vice President

  3. Using Enterprise Reference Models for Automated ISO 9000 Compliance Evaluation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fox, Mark S.

    1 Using Enterprise Reference Models for Automated ISO 9000 Compliance Evaluation Henry M. Kim1, and then compared to a reference model of "good" processes and structures, such as the ISO 9000 standards. In this paper, the TOVE ISO 9000 Micro-Theory is presented as a formal reference model of quality goodness. ISO

  4. 2014-09-18 Issuance: Energy Conservation Standard for Alternative Efficiency Determination Methods, Basic Model Definition, and Compliance for Commercial HVAC, Refrigeration, and Water Heating Equipment; Supplemental Notice of Proposed Rulemaking

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This document is a pre-publication Federal Register supplemental notice of proposed rulemaking regarding energy conservation standards for alternative efficiency determination methods, basic model definition, and compliance for commercial HVAC, Refrigeration, and Water Heating Equipment, as issued by the Deputy Assistant Secretary for Energy Efficiency on September 18, 2014. Though it is not intended or expected, should any discrepancy occur between the document posted here and the document published in the Federal Register, the Federal Register publication controls. This document is being made available through the Internet solely as a means to facilitate the public's access to this document.

  5. Executive Order 12088: Federal Compliance with Pollution Control Standards

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011 Strategic Plan| Department of Energy 088: Federal Compliance with Pollution Control

  6. Developing an Efficient Surveillance Scheme for Assessing Compliance with Air Quality Standards

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Washington at Seattle, University of

    of a component of a major pollution sources, like a power plant or oil re neries; or an increase in the level compliance with air quality standards. Since many countries maintain online surveillance of air pollution. This work proposes a three-step procedure for implementing the SR scheme to air pollution data. The rst step

  7. The Standard Model

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Lincoln, Don

    2014-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Fermilab scientist Don Lincoln describes the Standard Model of particle physics, covering both the particles that make up the subatomic realm and the forces that govern them.

  8. Standard 90. 1's ENVSTD: Both a compliance program and an envelope design tool

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crawley, D.B.; Boulin, J.J.

    1989-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Since 1982, ASHRAE and the US Department of Energy have worked together to update ANSI/ASHRAE/IES Standard 90A-1980, Energy Conservation in Building Design.'' The new standard, ASHRAE/IES Standard 90.1-1989, Energy-Efficient Design of New Buildings Except Low-Rise Residential Buildings,'' is substantially changed in form and concept from Standard 90A-1980, especially in how it deals with exterior envelopes. In the new standard, designers can use either of two methods -- prescriptive or system performance -- to comply with building envelope requirements. Under the prescriptive method, requirements are listed in tabular form and designers must demonstrate compliance with each individual requirement. In the system performance method, designers generate the requirements for their specific building using a set of equations. The equations establish limits on permissible heating and cooling coil loads based on the local climate and the internal loads in the exterior zones of the building. A personal computer program, ENVSTD (ENVelope STanDard), has been written to simplify compliance with the system performance path of the standard. The program can also be used to evaluate the impact of varying envelope characteristics on building heating and cooling coil loads in specific locations. This paper provides examples of the impacts that the standard's envelope requirements have on envelope design. Use of the ENVSTD program as a design tool to determine the heating and cooling load impacts of various envelope strategies is also demonstrated. 7 refs., 12 figs.

  9. EnergyPlus Analysis Capabilities for Use in California Building Energy Efficiency Standards Development and Compliance Calculations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hong, Tianzhen; Buhl, Fred; Haves, Philip

    2008-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

    California has been using DOE-2 as the main building energy analysis tool in the development of building energy efficiency standards (Title 24) and the code compliance calculations. However, DOE-2.1E is a mature program that is no longer supported by LBNL on contract to the USDOE, or by any other public or private entity. With no more significant updates in the modeling capabilities of DOE-2.1E during recent years, DOE-2.1E lacks the ability to model, with the necessary accuracy, a number of building technologies that have the potential to reduce significantly the energy consumption of buildings in California. DOE-2's legacy software code makes it difficult and time consuming to add new or enhance existing modeling features in DOE-2. Therefore the USDOE proposed to develop a new tool, EnergyPlus, which is intended to replace DOE-2 as the next generation building simulation tool. EnergyPlus inherited most of the useful features from DOE-2 and BLAST, and more significantly added new modeling capabilities far beyond DOE-2, BLAST, and other simulations tools currently available. With California's net zero energy goals for new residential buildings in 2020 and for new commercial buildings in 2030, California needs to evaluate and promote currently available best practice and emerging technologies to significantly reduce energy use of buildings for space cooling and heating, ventilating, refrigerating, lighting, and water heating. The California Energy Commission (CEC) needs to adopt a new building energy simulation program for developing and maintaining future versions of Title 24. Therefore, EnergyPlus became a good candidate to CEC for its use in developing and complying with future Title 24 upgrades. In 2004, the Pacific Gas and Electric Company contracted with ArchitecturalEnergy Corporation (AEC), Taylor Engineering, and GARD Analytics to evaluate EnergyPlus in its ability to model those energy efficiency measures specified in both the residential and nonresidential Alternative Calculation Method (ACM) of the Title-24 Standards. The AEC team identified gaps between EnergyPlus modeling capabilities and the requirements of Title 24 and ACMs. AEC's evaluation was based on the 2005 version of Title 24 and ACMs and the version 1.2.1 of EnergyPlus released on October 1, 2004. AEC's evaluation is useful for understanding the functionality and technical merits of EnergyPlus for implementing the performance-based compliance methods described in the ACMs. However, it did not study the performance of EnergyPlus in actually making building energy simulations for both the standard and proposed building designs, as is required for any software program to be certified by the CEC for use in doing Title-24 compliance calculations. In 2005, CEC funded LBNL to evaluate the use of EnergyPlus for compliance calculations by comparing the ACM accuracy test runs between DOE-2.1E and EnergyPlus. LBNL team identified key technical issues that must be addressed before EnergyPlus can be considered by the CEC for use in developing future Nonresidential Title-24 Standards or as an ACM tool. With Title 24 being updated to the 2008 version (which adds new requirements to the standards and ACMs), and EnergyPlus having been through several update cycles from version 1.2.1 to 2.1, it becomes crucial to review and update the previously identified gaps of EnergyPlus for use in Title 24, and more importantly to close the gaps which would help pave the way for EnergyPlus to be adopted as a Title 24 compliance ACM. With this as the key driving force, CEC funded LBNL in 2008 through this PIER (Public Interest Energy Research) project with the overall technical goal to expand development of EnergyPlus to provide for its use in Title-24 standard compliance and by CEC staff.

  10. SRS ES&H standards compliance program management plan. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hearn, W.H.

    1993-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

    On March 8, 1990, the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (DNFSB) issued Recommendation 90-2 to the Secretary of Energy. This recommendation, based upon the DNFSB`s initial review and evaluation of the content and implementation of standards relating to the design, construction, operations, and decommissioning of defense nuclear facilities of the Department of Energy (DOE), called for three actions: (1) identification of specific standards that apply to design, construction, operation and decommissioning of DOE facilities; (2) assessment of the adequacy of those standards for protecting public health and safety; and (3) determination of the extent to which they have and are being implemented. This document defines the elements of the SRS program required to support the HQ program in response to DNFSB Recommendation 90-2. The objective is to ensure a consistent approach for all sitewide ES and H Standards Compliance Program efforts that satisfied the intent of Recommendation 90-2 and the HQ 90-2 Implementation Plan in a cost-effective manner. The methodology and instructions for implementation of the SRS program are contained in the Standards Compliance Program Implementation Plan. The Management Plan shall be used in conjunction with the Implementation Plan.

  11. Applicability issues and compliance strategies for the proposed oil and gas industry hazardous air pollutant standards

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tandon, N.; Winborn, K.A.; Grygar, W.W. II

    1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Environmental Protection Agency (US EPA) has targeted oil and natural gas transmission and storage facilities located across the United States for regulation under the National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP) program (proposed in Title 40, Code of Federal Regulations, Part 63 [40 CFR 63], Subparts HH and HHH). The proposed NESHAP were published in the February 6, 1998 Federal Register and are expected to be promulgated in May 1999. These rules are intended to reduce Hazardous Air Pollutants (HAP) emitted from oil and gas facilities. It is expected that these rules will require more than 400 major sources and more than 500 non-major sources (also referred to as area sources) to meet maximum achievable control technology (MACT) standards defined in the NESHAP. The rules would regulate HAP emission from glycol dehydration units, storage vessels and various fugitive leak sources. This technical paper addresses the applicability issues and compliance strategies related to the proposed NESHAP. The applicability criteria for both rules differ from those promulgated for other source categories under 40 CFR 63. For example, individual unit throughput and/or HAP emission thresholds may exempt specific units from the MACT standards in the NESHAP. The proposed Subpart HH would apply not only to major sources, but also to triethylene glycol (TEC) dehydration units at area sources located in urban areas. For both proposed NESHAP all 199 HAP must be considered for the major source determinations, but only 15 specific HAP are targeted for control under the proposed standards. An overview of the HAP control requirements, exemption criteria, as well as initial and continued compliance determination strategies are presented. Several industry examples are included to assist industry develop compliance strategies.

  12. Beyond the Standard Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lykken, Joseph D.; /Fermilab

    2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    'BSM physics' is a phrase used in several ways. It can refer to physical phenomena established experimentally but not accommodated by the Standard Model, in particular dark matter and neutrino oscillations (technically also anything that has to do with gravity, since gravity is not part of the Standard Model). 'Beyond the Standard Model' can also refer to possible deeper explanations of phenomena that are accommodated by the Standard Model but only with ad hoc parameterizations, such as Yukawa couplings and the strong CP angle. More generally, BSM can be taken to refer to any possible extension of the Standard Model, whether or not the extension solves any particular set of puzzles left unresolved in the SM. In this general sense one sees reference to the BSM 'theory space' of all possible SM extensions, this being a parameter space of coupling constants for new interactions, new charges or other quantum numbers, and parameters describing possible new degrees of freedom or new symmetries. Despite decades of model-building it seems unlikely that we have mapped out most of, or even the most interesting parts of, this theory space. Indeed we do not even know what is the dimensionality of this parameter space, or what fraction of it is already ruled out by experiment. Since Nature is only implementing at most one point in this BSM theory space (at least in our neighborhood of space and time), it might seem an impossible task to map back from a finite number of experimental discoveries and measurements to a unique BSM explanation. Fortunately for theorists the inevitable limitations of experiments themselves, in terms of resolutions, rates, and energy scales, means that in practice there are only a finite number of BSM model 'equivalence classes' competing at any given time to explain any given set of results. BSM phenomenology is a two-way street: not only do experimental results test or constrain BSM models, they also suggest - to those who get close enough to listen - new directions for BSM model building. Contrary to popular shorthand jargon, supersymmetry (SUSY) is not a BSM model: it is a symmetry principle characterizing a BSM framework with an infinite number of models. Indeed we do not even know the full dimensionality of the SUSY parameter space, since this presumably includes as-yet-unexplored SUSY-breaking mechanisms and combinations of SUSY with other BSM principles. The SUSY framework plays an important role in BSM physics partly because it includes examples of models that are 'complete' in the same sense as the Standard Model, i.e. in principle the model predicts consequences for any observable, from cosmology to b physics to precision electroweak data to LHC collisions. Complete models, in addition to being more explanatory and making connections between diverse phenomena, are also much more experimentally constrained than strawman scenarios that focus more narrowly. One sometimes hears: 'Anything that is discovered at the LHC will be called supersymmetry.' There is truth behind this joke in the sense that the SUSY framework incorporates a vast number of possible signatures accessible to TeV colliders. This is not to say that the SUSY framework is not testable, but we are warned that one should pay attention to other promising frameworks, and should be prepared to make experimental distinctions between them. Since there is no formal classification of BSM frameworks I have invented my own. At the highest level there are six parent frameworks: (1) Terascale supersymmetry; (2) PNGB Higgs; (3) New strong dynamics; (4) Warped extra dimensions; (5) Flat extra dimensions; and (6) Hidden valleys. Here is the briefest possible survey of each framework, with the basic idea, the generic new phenomena, and the energy regime over which the framework purports to make comprehensive predictions.

  13. Compliance and Verification of Standards and Labelling Programs in China: Lessons Learned

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saheb, Yamina; Zhou, Nan; Fridley, David; Pierrot, Andr& #233

    2010-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

    After implementing several energy efficiency standards and labels (30 products covered by MEPS, 50 products covered by voluntary labels and 19 products by mandatory labels), the China National Institute of Standardization (CNIS) is now implementing verification and compliance mechanism to ensure that the energy information of labeled products comply with the requirements of their labels. CNIS is doing so by organizing check testing on a random basis for room air-conditioners, refrigerators, motors, heaters, computer displays, ovens, and self -ballasted lamps. The purpose of the check testing is to understand the implementation of the Chinese labeling scheme and help local authorities establishing effective compliance mechanisms. In addition, to ensure robustness and consistency of testing results, CNIS has coordinated a round robin testing for room air conditioners. Eight laboratories (Chinese (6), Australian (1) and Japanese (1)) have been involved in the round robin testing and tests were performed on four sets of samples selected from manufacturer?s production line. This paper describes the methodology used in undertaking both check and round robin testing, provides analysis of testing results and reports on the findings. The analysis of both check and round robin testing demonstrated the benefits of a regularized verification and monitoring system for both laboratories and products such as (i) identifying the possible deviations between laboratories to correct them, (ii) improving the quality of testing facilities, (iii) ensuring the accuracy and reliability of energy label information in order to strength the social credibility of the labeling program and the enforcement mechanism in place.

  14. SRS ES and H Standards Compliance Program Implementation Plan. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hearn, W.H.

    1993-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

    On March 8, 1990, the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (DNFSB) issued Recommendation 90-2 to the Secretary of Energy. This recommendation, based upon the DNFSB`s initial review and evaluation of the content and implementation of standards relating to the design, construction, operations, and decommissioning of defense nuclear facilities of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), called for three actions: identification of specific standards that apply to design, construction, operation and decommissioning of DOE facilities; assessment of the adequacy of those standards for protecting public health and safety; and determination of the extent to which they have and are being implemented. The purpose of this Implementation Plan is to define the single program for all sitewide and facility 90-2 ES and H Standards Compliance efforts, which will satisfy the HQ Implementation Plan, avoid duplicate efforts, be as simple and achievable as possible, include cost-saving innovations, use a graded approach based on facility hazards and future needs of facilities, and support configuration control for facility requirements. The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) has been designated a pilot facility for the 90-2 program and has progressed with their facility program ahead of the site-level program. The DWPF, and other Government-Owned Contractor-Operated (GOCO) facilities that progress on an enhanced schedule, will serve as pilot facilities for the site-level program. The lessons learned with their requirement identifications, and their assessments of the adequacy of and their compliance with these requirements will be used to improve the efficiency of the site-level and subsequent programs.

  15. Field Theory and Standard Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    W. Buchmüller; C. Lüdeling

    2006-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

    This is a short introduction to the Standard Model and the underlying concepts of quantum field theory.

  16. MODEL CONSERVATION STANDARD INTRODUCTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    programs, the standard for all new commercial buildings, the standard for utility commercial conservation RESIDENTIAL AND COMMERCIAL BUILDINGS The region should acquire all electric energy conservation measure savings from new residential and new commercial buildings that have a benefit-to-cost ratio greater than

  17. Energy standards and model codes development, adoption, implementation, and enforcement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Conover, D.R.

    1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report provides an overview of the energy standards and model codes process for the voluntary sector within the United States. The report was prepared by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) for the Building Energy Standards Program and is intended to be used as a primer or reference on this process. Building standards and model codes that address energy have been developed by organizations in the voluntary sector since the early 1970s. These standards and model codes provide minimum energy-efficient design and construction requirements for new buildings and, in some instances, existing buildings. The first step in the process is developing new or revising existing standards or codes. There are two overall differences between standards and codes. Energy standards are developed by a consensus process and are revised as needed. Model codes are revised on a regular annual cycle through a public hearing process. In addition to these overall differences, the specific steps in developing/revising energy standards differ from model codes. These energy standards or model codes are then available for adoption by states and local governments. Typically, energy standards are adopted by or adopted into model codes. Model codes are in turn adopted by states through either legislation or regulation. Enforcement is essential to the implementation of energy standards and model codes. Low-rise residential construction is generally evaluated for compliance at the local level, whereas state agencies tend to be more involved with other types of buildings. Low-rise residential buildings also may be more easily evaluated for compliance because the governing requirements tend to be less complex than for commercial buildings.

  18. An Expert System for Determining Compliance with the Texas Building Energy Design Standard

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Doan, E. C.; Hunn, B. D.; Jones, J. W.; Gatton, T. M.

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    an expert system to serve as both the compliance procedure and its documentation. This expert system directs the user with queries (screen menus), prompting the user for all relevant information. A graphical user interface has been developed to facilitate...

  19. Lorentz conserving noncommutative standard model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ettefaghi, M. M.; Haghighat, M. [Department of Physics, Isfahan University of Technology, Isfahan (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2007-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider Lorentz-conserving noncommutative field theory to construct the Lorentz-conserving noncommutative standard model based on the gauge group SU(3)xSU(2)xU(1). We obtain the enveloping algebra-valued of Higgs field up to the second order of the noncommutativity parameter {theta}{sub {mu}}{sub {nu}}. We derive the action at the leading order and find new vertices which are absent in the ordinary standard model as well as the minimal noncommutative standard model. We briefly study the phenomenological aspects of the model.

  20. Evaluation of the WIPP Project`s compliance with the EPA radiation protection standards for disposal of transuranic waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neill, R.H.; Chaturvedi, L.; Rucker, D.F.; Silva, M.K.; Walker, B.A.; Channell, J.K.; Clemo, T.M. [Environmental Evaluation Group, Albuquerque, NM (United States)] [Environmental Evaluation Group, Albuquerque, NM (United States); [Environmental Evaluation Group, Carlsbad, NM (United States)

    1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Environmental Protection Agency`s (EPA) proposed rule to certify that the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) meets compliance with the long-term radiation protection standards for geologic repositories (40CFR191 Subparts B and C), is one of the most significant milestones to date for the WIPP project in particular, and for the nuclear waste issue in general. The Environmental Evaluation Group (EEG) has provided an independent technical oversight for the WIPP project since 1978, and is responsible for many improvements in the location, design, and testing of various aspects of the project, including participation in the development of the EPA standards since the early 1980s. The EEG reviewed the development of documentation for assessing the WIPP`s compliance by the Sandia National Laboratories following the 1985 promulgation by EPA, and provided many written and verbal comments on various aspects of this effort, culminating in the overall review of the 1992 performance assessment. For the US Department of Energy`s (DOE) compliance certification application (CCA), the EEG provided detailed comments on the draft CCA in March, 1996, and additional comments through unpublished letters in 1997 (included as Appendices 8.1 and 8.2 in this report). Since the October 30, 1997, publication of the EPA`s proposed rule to certify WIPP, the EEG gave presentations on important issues to the EPA on December 10, 1997, and sent a December 31, 1997 letter with attachments to clarify those issues (Appendix 8.3). The EEG has raised a number of questions that may have an impact on compliance. In spite of the best efforts by the EEG, the EPA reaction to reviews and suggestions has been slow and apparently driven by legal considerations. This report discusses in detail the questions that have been raised about containment requirements. Also discussed are assurance requirements, groundwater protection, individual protection, and an evaluation of EPA`s responses to EEG`s comments.

  1. Are Standard Solar Models Reliable?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    John N. Bahcall; M. H. Pinsonneault; Sarbani Basu; J. Christensen-Dalsgaard

    1996-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The sound speeds of solar models that include element diffusion agree with helioseismological measurements to a rms discrepancy of better than 0.2% throughout almost the entire sun. Models that do not include diffusion, or in which the interior of the sun is assumed to be significantly mixed, are effectively ruled out by helioseismology. Standard solar models predict the measured properties of the sun more accurately than is required for applications involving solar neutrinos.

  2. The Costs and Benefits of Compliance with Renewable Portfolio Standards: Reviewing Experience to Date

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heeter, Jenny

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    M. (2007). Can deployment of renewable energy put downwardXcel Energy. (2011). Renewable Energy Standard Rate Impact2010. ” Alpena. (2012). “Renewable Energy Annual Report for

  3. Q. For the 2005 Standards there is a new compliance credit for "ducts buried in attic insulation." What must be done to qualify for that credit?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Q. For the 2005 Standards there is a new compliance credit for "ducts buried in attic insulation installation of insulation and duct sealing. When taking the buried duct credit, a minimum of R-30 insulation-4.2 duct insulation. Only the portions of duct runs that are directly on or within 3.5 inches

  4. Standard Compliance: Guidelines to Help State and Alternative Fuel Provider Fleets Meet Their Energy Policy Act Requirements, 10 CFR Part 490 (Book)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This guidebook addresses the primary requirements of the Alternative Fuel Transportation Program to help state and alternative fuel provider fleets comply with the Energy Policy Act via the Standard Compliance option. It also addresses the topics that covered fleets ask about most frequently.

  5. Standard Compliance: Guidelines to Help State and Alternative Fuel Provider Fleets Meet Their Energy Policy Act Requirements, 10 CFR Part 490 (Book)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This guidebook addresses the primary requirements of the Alternative Fuel Transportation Program to help state and alternative fuel provider fleets comply with the Energy Policy Act via the Standard Compliance option. It also addresses the topics that covered fleets ask about most frequently.

  6. FORMAL MODELS OF QUALITY AND ISO 9000 COMPLIANCE: AN INFORMATION SYSTEMS APPROACH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fox, Mark S.

    FORMAL MODELS OF QUALITY AND ISO 9000 COMPLIANCE: AN INFORMATION SYSTEMS APPROACH Henry M. Kim, and the ISO 9003 Micro-Theory. The TOVE Quality Ontology represents a prototype formalization, researched from ISO 9000 and other quality management references, but independent of any one source. And the ISO 9003

  7. DOE-STD-1156-2002; Environmental Compliance Function Area Qualification Standard

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny:Revised Finding of No Significant6-2002 October 2002 DOE STANDARD ENVIRONMENTAL

  8. Beyond the Cosmological Standard Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Austin Joyce; Bhuvnesh Jain; Justin Khoury; Mark Trodden

    2014-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    After a decade and a half of research motivated by the accelerating universe, theory and experiment have a reached a certain level of maturity. The development of theoretical models beyond \\Lambda, or smooth dark energy, often called modified gravity, has led to broader insights into a path forward, and a host of observational and experimental tests have been developed. In this review we present the current state of the field and describe a framework for anticipating developments in the next decade. We identify the guiding principles for rigorous and consistent modifications of the standard model, and discuss the prospects for empirical tests. We begin by reviewing attempts to consistently modify Einstein gravity in the infrared, focusing on the notion that additional degrees of freedom introduced by the modification must screen themselves from local tests of gravity. We categorize screening mechanisms into three broad classes: mechanisms which become active in regions of high Newtonian potential, those in which first derivatives become important, and those for which second derivatives are important. Examples of the first class, such as f(R) gravity, employ the familiar chameleon or symmetron mechanisms, whereas examples of the last class are galileon and massive gravity theories, employing the Vainshtein mechanism. In each case, we describe the theories as effective theories. We describe experimental tests, summarizing laboratory and solar system tests and describing in some detail astrophysical and cosmological tests. We discuss future tests which will be sensitive to different signatures of new physics in the gravitational sector. Parts that are more relevant to theorists vs. observers/experimentalists are clearly indicated, in the hope that this will serve as a useful reference for both audiences, as well as helping those interested in bridging the gap between them.

  9. The Costs and Benefits of Compliance with Renewable Portfolio Standards: Reviewing Experience to Date

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heeter, Jenny; Barbose, Galen; Bird, Lori; Weaver, Samantha; Flores, Francisco; Kuskova-Burns, Ksenia; Wiser, Ryan

    2014-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

    More than half of U.S. states have renewable portfolio standards (RPS) in place and have collectively deployed approximately 46,000 MW of new renewable energy capacity through year-end 2012. Most of these policies have five or more years of implementation experience, enabling an assessment of their costs and benefits. Understanding RPS benefits and costs is essential for policymakers evaluating existing RPS policies, assessing the need for modifications, and considering new policies. A key aspect of this study is the comprehensive review of existing RPS cost and benefit estimates, in addition to an examination of the variety of methods used to calculate such estimates. Based on available data and estimates reported by utilities and regulators, this study summarizes RPS costs to date. The study considers how those costs may evolve going forward, given scheduled increases in RPS targets and cost containment mechanisms incorporated into existing policies. The report also summarizes RPS benefits estimates, based on published studies for individual states, and discusses key methodological considerations.

  10. On the design of a sampling plan to verify compliance with EPA standards for radium-226 in soil at uranium mill tailings remedial action sites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gilbert, R.O.; Miller, M.L.; Meyer, H.R.

    1987-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper discusses design aspects of a two-stage compliance sampling program being developed to verify that removal of soil at windblown uranium mill-tailings sites are results in /sup 226/Ra concentrations that meet Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) standards. In the first stage, gamma scans of surface soil would be conducted over the entire remediated region using a tractor-mounted gamma-ray counting system (RTRAK) to measure /sup 214/Bi (Bismuth), which is an indicator of /sup 226/Ra in soil. In the second stage, composite soil samples would be collected from a systematic sample of 10-m by 10-m plots, where the number of plots is determined using a compliance acceptance sampling plan. These soil samples are analyzed for /sup 226/Ra and compared with the EPA standard of 5 pCi/g above background using a selected statistical rule.

  11. Executive Order 12088: Federal Compliance with Pollution Control...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    088: Federal Compliance with Pollution Control Standards Executive Order 12088: Federal Compliance with Pollution Control Standards The head of each Executive agency is responsible...

  12. Export Compliance Certificate Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barrett, Jeffrey A.

    Export Compliance Certificate Program Accelerate Your Career BusinessandManagement extension.uci.edu/export bearing the UC seal signifies a well- known, uncompromising standard of academic excellence. #12;Export Compliance Certificate Program The importance of understanding export controls and how to develop

  13. Alternative Compliance

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Compliance Individual Permit: Alternative Compliance When permittees believe they have installed measures to minimize pollutants but are unable to certify completion of corrective...

  14. FAQS Reference Guide – Environmental Compliance

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This reference guide addresses the competency statements in the June 2011 edition of DOE-STD-1156-2011, Environmental Compliance Functional Area Qualification Standard.

  15. Dark world and the standard model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhao, Gang

    2009-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

    by the latest of CMB (Cosmic Microwave Background). The reason for the accelerated universe is the existence of dark energy. In this dissertation, we discuss the relationship between dark matter, dark energy, reheating and the standard model, and we find...

  16. Threshold Effects Beyond the Standard Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tomasz R. Taylor

    2006-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

    In this contribution to the Festschrift celebrating Gabriele Veneziano on his 65th birthday, I discuss the threshold effects of extra dimensions and their applications to physics beyond the standard model, focusing on superstring theory.

  17. Dark world and the standard model 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhao, Gang

    2009-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

    by the latest of CMB (Cosmic Microwave Background). The reason for the accelerated universe is the existence of dark energy. In this dissertation, we discuss the relationship between dark matter, dark energy, reheating and the standard model, and we find...

  18. Beyond the Standard Model with Supersymmetry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sessolo, Enrico Maria

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We introduce recent research topics in beyond the Standard Model particle physics with Supersymmetry. In the first part we implement a new, extended approach to placing bounds on trilinear R-parity violating couplings. We ...

  19. A Comparative Analysis of Residential Energy Use for 2009 IECC Code Compliance and 2001 IECC Compliance with 2006 NAECA Appliance Standards for Selected Climate Zones in Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mukhopadhyay, J.; Baltazar, J. C.; Liu, Z.; Haberl, J.; Culp, C.; Yazdani, B.

    IECC with IECC 2001 Amendments house. The models were prepared for a house with electric heat-pump heating and domestic hot water (DHW) and a house with natural gas heating and DHW. Table 1 provides a list of input parameters for the base...

  20. A Modest Revision of the Standard Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. J. Stephenson, Jr.; T. Goldman

    2015-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

    With a modest revision of the mass sector of the Standard Model, the systematics of the fermion masses and mixings can be fully described and interpreted as providing information on matrix elements of physics beyond the Standard Model. A by-product is a reduction of the largest Higgs Yukawa fine structure constant by an order of magnitude. The extension to leptons provides for insight on the difference between quark mixing and lepton mixing as evidenced in neutrino oscillations. The large difference between the scale for up-quark and down-quark masses is not addressed.

  1. A Modest Revision of the Standard Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stephenson,, G J

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    With a modest revision of the mass sector of the Standard Model, the systematics of the fermion masses and mixings can be fully described and interpreted as providing information on matrix elements of physics beyond the Standard Model. A by-product is a reduction of the largest Higgs Yukawa fine structure constant by an order of magnitude. The extension to leptons provides for insight on the difference between quark mixing and lepton mixing as evidenced in neutrino oscillations. The large difference between the scale for up-quark and down-quark masses is not addressed.

  2. Superconnections an Interpretation of the Standard Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roepstorff, G

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The mathematical framework of superbundles suggests that one considers the Higgs field as a natural constituent of a superconnection. I propose to take as superbundle the exterior algebra obtained from a Hermitian vector bundle of rank 5 for the Standard Model.

  3. Superconnections: an Interpretation of the Standard Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. Roepstorff

    1999-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The mathematical framework of superbundles suggests that one considers the Higgs field as a natural constituent of a superconnection. I propose to take as superbundle the exterior algebra obtained from a Hermitian vector bundle of rank 5 for the Standard Model.

  4. Future Colliders Beyond the Standard Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Murayama, Hitoshi

    . Of course, the lesson of high energy physics has been that higher energies have generally revealed new that the full exploration of the Standard Model was likely to require a very high energy hadron collider important, it is not possible to postpone indefinitely new physics associated with the Higgs boson. To see

  5. Quantum field theory and the Standard Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    W. Hollik

    2010-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

    In this lecture we discuss the basic ingredients for gauge invariant quantum field theories. We give an introduction to the elements of quantum field theory, to the construction of the basic Lagrangian for a general gauge theory, and proceed with the formulation of QCD and the electroweak Standard Model with electroweak symmetry breaking via the Higgs mechanism. The phenomenology of W and Z bosons is discussed and implications for the Higgs boson are derived from comparison with experimental precision data.

  6. EnergyPlus Analysis Capabilities for Use in California Building Energy Efficiency Standards Development and Compliance Calculations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hong, Tianzhen

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    PV (BIPV). The CEC PV Calculator has an inverter model whichEnergyPlus PV models do not have inverter models yet. CECmodels. EnergyPlus PV models need to add inverter models, be

  7. A precise definition of the Standard Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    W-Y. Pauchy Hwang

    2014-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

    To write the $SU_c(3) \\times SU_L(2) \\times U(1) \\times SU_f(3)$ Standard Model in Minkowski space-time in a precise way, we assume that a special space-time such as the $SU_c(3) \\times SU_L(2) \\times U(1) \\times SU_f(3)$ Minkowski space-time exists to begin with. Thus, the scalar fields $\\Phi(1,2)$ (the Standard-Model Higgs), $\\Phi(3,1)$ (the purely family Higgs), and $\\Phi(3,2)$ (the mixed family Higgs), with the first family label and the second $SU_L(2)$ label, all pre-exist with all gauge bosons, each with well-defined group assignment and the "purpose" (of making a certain gauge boson massive). Moreover, this space-time turns out to support the lepton world, and it also supports the quark world. In this language, all the various gauge bosons are born with the special gauge-group Minkowski space-time. (Or, the Minkowski space-time is further characterized by the force fields, or the gauge group.) This may be the most efficient and clearest way to spell out the Standard Model.

  8. Beyond standard model calculations with Sherpa

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Höche, Stefan; Kuttimalai, Silvan; Schumann, Steffen; Siegert, Frank

    2015-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a fully automated framework as part of the Sherpa event generator for the computation of tree-level cross sections in beyond Standard Model scenarios, making use of model information given in the Universal FeynRules Output format. Elementary vertices are implemented into C++ code automatically and provided to the matrix-element generator Comix at runtime. Widths and branching ratios for unstable particles are computed from the same building blocks. The corresponding decays are simulated with spin correlations. Parton showers, QED radiation and hadronization are added by Sherpa, providing a full simulation of arbitrary BSM processes at the hadron level.

  9. Beyond Standard Model calculations with Sherpa

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stefan Höche; Silvan Kuttimalai; Steffen Schumann; Frank Siegert

    2014-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a fully automated framework as part of the Sherpa event generator for the computation of tree-level cross sections in beyond Standard Model scenarios, making use of model information given in the Universal FeynRules Output format. Elementary vertices are implemented into C++ code automatically and provided to the matrix-element generator Comix at runtime. Widths and branching ratios for unstable particles are computed from the same building blocks. The corresponding decays are simulated with spin correlations. Parton showers, QED radiation and hadronization are added by Sherpa, providing a full simulation of arbitrary BSM processes at the hadron level.

  10. The Standard Cosmological Model and CMB Anisotropies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    James G. Bartlett

    1999-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

    This is a course on cosmic microwave background (CMB) anisotropies in the standard cosmological model, designed for beginning graduate students and advanced undergraduates. ``Standard cosmological model'' in this context means a Universe dominated by some form of cold dark matter (CDM) with adiabatic perturbations generated at some initial epoch, e.g., Inflation, and left to evolve under gravity alone (which distinguishes it from defect models). The course is primarily theoretical and concerned with the physics of CMB anisotropies in this context and their relation to structure formation. Brief presentations of the uniform Big Bang model and of the observed large--scale structure of the Universe are given. The bulk of the course then focuses on the evolution of small perturbations to the uniform model and on the generation of temperature anisotropies in the CMB. The theoretical development is performed in the (pseudo--)Newtonian gauge because it aids intuitive understanding by providing a quick reference to classical (Newtonian) concepts. The fundamental goal of the course is not to arrive at a highly exact nor exhaustive calculation of the anisotropies, but rather to a good understanding of the basic physics that goes into such calculations.

  11. Searches for physics beyond the standard model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Julie Roche, Willem T H van Oers, Ross D Young

    2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Jefferson Lab has now demonstrated ablility to test the fundamental symmetries of nature, and thereby probe for new physics beyond the Standard Model. Here we review the tremendous advances in precision parity-violation measurements with CEBAF that enable searches for new physics. This has been demonstrated with a determination of the weak charge of the proton, which is found to be in agreement with the prediction of the standard electroweak theory, and at a precision that rules out relevant new physics to the TeV scale. We also review the planned future experiments which aim to further test the electroweak theory at Jefferson Lab, including a further improvement on the proton weak charge, an ultra-precise Møller measurement, and a probe of the axial quark charges in PVDIS.

  12. NEW - DOE O 350.3, Labor Standards Compliance, Contractor Labor Relations, and Contractor Workforce Restructuring Programs

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    To ensure that contractors pursue collective bargaining practices that promote efficiency and economy in contract operations, judicious expenditure of public funds, equitable resolution of disputes, and effective collective bargaining relationships; that contractor relations/human resources specialists achieve consultations with management and operating contractors; and that appropriate labor standards are included in DOE/NNSA contracts and subcontracts. Cancels Chapters I-III of DOE O 350.1 Chg 4. Does not cancel other directives.

  13. September 2006 A Laboratory Investigation of Compliance Behavior under Tradable

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Murphy, James J.

    emissions trading programs. We test the hypotheses that both the violations of competitive risk neutral find significant differences between compliance behavior under fixed standards and emissions trading programs. Keywords: enforcement, compliance, emissions trading, permit markets, standards, command- and

  14. Applying Appearance Standards to Light Reflection Models Harold B. Westlund

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meyer, Gary

    standards for gloss, haze, and goniochromatic color are applied to computer graphic reflection modelsApplying Appearance Standards to Light Reflection Models Harold B. Westlund Gary W. Meyer. Correspondences are derived between both the gloss and haze standards and the specular exponent of the Phong model

  15. Standard Model Fermions and N=8 supergravity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krzysztof A. Meissner; Hermann Nicolai

    2015-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

    In a scheme originally proposed by M. Gell-Mann, and subsequently shown to be realized at the SU(3)xU(1) stationary point of maximal gauged SO(8) supergravity by N. Warner and one of the present authors, the 48 spin 1/2 fermions of the theory remaining after the removal of eight Goldstinos can be identified with the 48 quarks and leptons (including right-chiral neutrinos) of the Standard Model, provided one identifies the residual SU(3) with the diagonal subgroup of the color group SU(3)_c and a family symmetry SU(3)_f. However, there remained a systematic mismatch in the electric charges by a spurion charge of $\\pm$1/6. We here identify the `missing' U(1) that rectifies this mismatch, and that takes a surprisingly simple, though unexpected form.

  16. Does SUSY know about the Standard Model?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. A. Dixon

    2013-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The BRST cohomology of free chiral SUSY has a wealth of Extraordinary Invariants. When one adds a superpotential to the free theory, the extention of the Extraordinary Invariants leads to some constraints on that superpotential. A particularly simple solution of those constraints is based on a $3 \\times 3$ matrix of nine chiral superfields, and then the superpotential is simply the determinant of that matrix. It is remarkable that this same theory is also a plausible basic version of the SUSY Standard Model for one Lepton family, and then the nine superfields are seen to be a left (Weak) SU(2) Lepton Doublet, Two Higgs Doublets, a Right Electron Singlet, a Right Neutrino Singlet and a Higgs singlet. Moreover, the algebra is consistent with the notion that the other two observed Lepton families arise from the coupling of the Extraordinary Invariants.

  17. Modeling gas and brine migration for assessing compliance of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vaughn, P. [Applied Physics, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Butcher, B. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Helton, J. [Arizona State Univ., Tempe, AZ (United States); Swift, P. [Tech. Reps., Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    At the request of the WIPP Project Integration Office (WPIO) of the DOE, the WIPP Performance Assessment (PA) Department of Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) has completed preliminary uncertainty and sensitivity analyses of gas and brine migration away from the undisturbed repository. This paper contains descriptions of the numerical model and simulations, including model geometries and parameter values, and a summary of major conclusions from sensitivity analyses. Because significant transport of contaminants can only occur in a fluid (gas or brine) medium, two-phase flow modeling can provide an estimate of the distance to which contaminants can migrate. Migration of gas or brine beyond the RCRA ``disposal-unit boundary`` or the Standard`s accessible environment constitutes a potential, but not certain, violation and may require additional evaluations of contaminant concentrations.

  18. EnergyPlus Analysis Capabilities for Use in California Building Energy Efficiency Standards Development and Compliance Calculations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hong, Tianzhen

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    DOE-2. EnergyPlus has multiple objects, Water Heater:Mixed, Water Heater:Stratified, andHeat Pump:Water Heater, to model water heaters. The WATER

  19. EnergyPlus Analysis Capabilities for Use in California Building Energy Efficiency Standards Development and Compliance Calculations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hong, Tianzhen

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Stratified, and Heat Pump:Water Heater, to model waterto the zone. The heat pump water heater is a compound objectnor can electric heat pump water heaters. Default shade and

  20. Compliance, Certification and Enforcement for US Appliance and Equipment Energy Efficiency Programs by US DOE

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Information about energy and water conservation standards, ENERGY STAR, and compliance and certification enforcement.

  1. Lead Compliance Specialist

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The incumbent in this position will serve as a Lead Compliance Specialist in the FERC Compliance organization of Agency Compliance & Governance. Organizationally this position is known as "Lead...

  2. Modeling Gaps and Overlaps of Sustainability Standards

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D'Alessio, Anna E.; Witherell, Paul; Rachuri, Sudarsan

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in “Europe” must “comply” with “WEEE (Waste Electrical andof another. For example, “WEEE” (instance) “has_product_the instance of “Standard” (WEEE). In an ontology, “part_of”

  3. Standard imsets for undirected and chain graphical models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kashimura, Takuya

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We derive standard imsets for undirected graphical models and chain graphical models. Standard imsets for undirected graphical models are described in terms of minimal triangulations for maximal prime subgraphs of the undirected graphs. For describing standard imsets for chain graphical models, we first define a triangulation of a chain graph. We then use the triangulation to generalize our results for the undirected graphs to chain graphs.

  4. Neutrinos: in and out of the standard model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parke, Stephen; /Fermilab

    2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The particle physics Standard Model has been tremendously successful in predicting the outcome of a large number of experiments. In this model Neutrinos are massless. Yet recent evidence points to the fact that neutrinos are massive particles with tiny masses compared to the other particles in the Standard Model. These tiny masses allow the neutrinos to change flavor and oscillate. In this series of Lectures, I will review the properties of Neutrinos In the Standard Model and then discuss the physics of Neutrinos Beyond the Standard Model. Topics to be covered include Neutrino Flavor Transformations and Oscillations, Majorana versus Dirac Neutrino Masses, the Seesaw Mechanism and Leptogenesis.

  5. Standardization of Thermo-Fluid Modeling in Modelica.Fluid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Franke, Rudiger

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ob- ject-Oriented Modeling of Thermo-Fluid Systems, Modelicable and Compressible Thermo-Fluid Pipe Networks, ModelicaStandardization of Thermo-Fluid Modeling in Modelica.Fluid

  6. CDF Note 10796 Search for Standard Model Higgs Boson Production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fermilab

    CDF Note 10796 Search for Standard Model Higgs Boson Production in Association with a W± Boson present a search for the standard model Higgs boson produced in association with a W± boson. This search that at least one jet be identified to originate from a bottom quark. Discrimination between the Higgs boson

  7. Testing the noncommutative standard model at a future photon collider

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ohl, Thorsten [Institut fuer Theoretische Physik und Astrophysik, Universitaet Wuerzburg, D-97074 Wuerzburg (Germany); Reuter, Juergen [Institut fuer Theoretische Teilchenphysik, Universitaet Karlsruhe, D-76128 Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Extensions of the Standard Model of elementary particle physics to noncommutative geometries have been proposed as a low-energy limit of string models. Independent of this motivation, one may consider such a model as an effective field theory with higher-dimensional operators containing an antisymmetric rank-two background field. We study the signals of such a Noncommutative Standard Model (NCSM) and analyze the discovery potential of a future photon collider, considering angular distributions in fermion pair production.

  8. Gold Standard Program Model | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdfGetec AG Contracting Jump to:Echo,GEF JumpGloverville,GogebicGold Standard

  9. Alternative Compliance

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisiting the TWP TWP RelatedCellulase C. bescii CelA,PortalCompliance Individual

  10. Fleet Compliance Results for MY 2010/FY 2011, EPAct Alternative Fuel Transportation Program: State and Alternative Fuel Provider Fleet Compliance Annual Report (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This annual report summarizes the compliance results of state and alternative fuel provider fleets covered by the Energy Policy Act of 1992 (EPAct) for model year 2010/fiscal year 2011. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) regulates covered state and alternative fuel provider (SFP) fleets under the Energy Policy Act of 1992 (EPAct), as amended. For model year (MY) 2010, the compliance rate for the 2911 covered SFP fleets was 100%. Fleets used either Standard Compliance or Alternative Compliance. The 279 fleets that used Standard Compliance exceeded their aggregate MY 2010 acquisition requirements by 61%. The 12 covered fleets that complied using Alternative Compliance exceeded their aggregate MY 2010 petroleum-use-reduction requirements by 89%. Overall, DOE saw modest decreases from MY 2009 in biodiesel fuel use credits earned and in the number of light-duty vehicles (LDVs) acquired. Compared to years before MY 2009, these rates were far lower. Because covered fleets acquired fewer new vehicles overall in MY 2010, the requirement for alternative fuel vehicles (AFVs), which is proportional to new acquisitions, also dropped.

  11. Enhancements to ASHRAE Standard 90.1 Prototype Building Models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goel, Supriya; Athalye, Rahul A.; Wang, Weimin; Zhang, Jian; Rosenberg, Michael I.; Xie, YuLong; Hart, Philip R.; Mendon, Vrushali V.

    2014-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

    This report focuses on enhancements to prototype building models used to determine the energy impact of various versions of ANSI/ASHRAE/IES Standard 90.1. Since the last publication of the prototype building models, PNNL has made numerous enhancements to the original prototype models compliant with the 2004, 2007, and 2010 editions of Standard 90.1. Those enhancements are described here and were made for several reasons: (1) to change or improve prototype design assumptions; (2) to improve the simulation accuracy; (3) to improve the simulation infrastructure; and (4) to add additional detail to the models needed to capture certain energy impacts from Standard 90.1 improvements. These enhancements impact simulated prototype energy use, and consequently impact the savings estimated from edition to edition of Standard 90.1.

  12. DOE NEPA Compliance Officers

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    NEPA Compliance Officers NEPA Compliance Officers are listed first for Program Offices, then Power Marketing Administrations, then Field Offices. Please send updates to...

  13. Tracking Land Cover Change in a Mixed Logit Model: Recognizing Temporal and Spatial Effects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kockelman, Kara M.

    , but high residential densities can impede future development. Model application produces graphic in order to demonstrate compliance with air quality- related planning standards. Moreover, with further

  14. Draft Fourth Northwest Conservation and Electric Power Plan, Appendix J THE MODEL CONSERVATION STANDARDS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    buildings, the standard for utility residential conservation programs, the standard for all new commercial buildings, the standard for utility commercial conservation programs, the standard for conversions THE MODEL CONSERVATION STANDARDS FOR NEW ELECTRICALLY HEATED RESIDENTIALAND COMMERCIAL BUILDINGS The region

  15. Enforcement Policy Statement: Compliance Period for Regional...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Compliance Period for Regional Standards Applicable to Central Air Conditioners April 24, 2014 On June 27, 2011, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) published in the Federal...

  16. Utah Compliance Implementation and Evaluation Guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cole, Pamala C.

    2012-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This Guide is designed to assist state and local code jurisdictions in achieving statewide compliance with the 2009 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) for residential buildings and ANSI/ASHRAE/IESNA Standard 90.1-2007 for commercial buildings.

  17. Iowa Compliance Implementation and Evaluation Guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cole, Pamala C.

    2012-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

    This Guide is designed to assist state and local code jurisdictions in achieving statewide compliance with the 2009 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) for residential buildings and ANSI/ASHRAE/IESNA Standard 90.1-2007 for commercial buildings.

  18. Nevada Compliance Implementation and Evaluation Guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cole, Pamala C.

    2012-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This Guide is designed to assist state and local code jurisdictions in achieving statewide compliance with the 2009 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) for residential buildings and ANSI/ASHRAE/IESNA Standard 90.1-2007 for commercial buildings.

  19. Inflation scenario via the Standard Model Higgs boson and LHC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. O. Barvinsky; A. Yu. Kamenshchik; A. A. Starobinsky

    2008-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider a quantum corrected inflation scenario driven by a generic GUT or Standard Model type particle model whose scalar field playing the role of an inflaton has a strong non-minimal coupling to gravity. We show that currently widely accepted bounds on the Higgs mass falsify the suggestion of the paper arXiv:0710.3755 (where the role of radiative corrections was underestimated) that the Standard Model Higgs boson can serve as the inflaton. However, if the Higgs mass could be raised to $\\sim 230$ GeV, then the Standard Model could generate an inflationary scenario with the spectral index of the primordial perturbation spectrum $n_s\\simeq 0.935$ (barely matching present observational data) and the very low tensor-to-scalar perturbation ratio $r\\simeq 0.0006$.

  20. The Effective Standard Model after LHC Run I

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    John Ellis; Veronica Sanz; Tevong You

    2014-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

    We treat the Standard Model as the low-energy limit of an effective field theory that incorporates higher-dimensional operators to capture the effects of decoupled new physics. We consider the constraints imposed on the coefficients of dimension-6 operators by electroweak precision tests (EWPTs), applying a framework for the effects of dimension-6 operators on electroweak precision tests that is more general than the standard $S,T$ formalism, and use measurements of Higgs couplings and the kinematics of associated Higgs production at the Tevatron and LHC, as well as triple-gauge couplings at the LHC. We highlight the complementarity between EWPTs, Tevatron and LHC measurements in obtaining model-independent limits on the effective Standard Model after LHC Run~1. We illustrate the combined constraints with the example of the two-Higgs doublet model.

  1. State and Alternative Fuel Provider Fleet Compliance Methods (Revised) (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fact sheet describes the difference between Standard and Alternative Compliance requirements for state and alternative fuel provider fleets covered under the Energy Policy Acts of 1992 and 2005.

  2. State and Alternative Fuel Provider Fleet Compliance Methods (Revised) (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This fact sheet describes the difference between Standard and Alternative Compliance requirements for state and alternative fuel provider fleets covered by the Energy Policy Act.

  3. Peer Review of NRC Standardized Plant Analysis Risk Models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anthony Koonce; James Knudsen; Robert Buell

    2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Standardized Plant Analysis Risk (SPAR) Models underwent a Peer Review using ASME PRA standard (Addendum C) as endorsed by NRC in Regulatory Guide (RG) 1.200. The review was performed by a mix of industry probabilistic risk analysis (PRA) experts and NRC PRA experts. Representative SPAR models, one PWR and one BWR, were reviewed against Capability Category I of the ASME PRA standard. Capability Category I was selected as the basis for review due to the specific uses/applications of the SPAR models. The BWR SPAR model was reviewed against 331 ASME PRA Standard Supporting Requirements; however, based on the Capability Category I level of review and the absence of internal flooding and containment performance (LERF) logic only 216 requirements were determined to be applicable. Based on the review, the BWR SPAR model met 139 of the 216 supporting requirements. The review also generated 200 findings or suggestions. Of these 200 findings and suggestions 142 were findings and 58 were suggestions. The PWR SPAR model was also evaluated against the same 331 ASME PRA Standard Supporting Requirements. Of these requirements only 215 were deemed appropriate for the review (for the same reason as noted for the BWR). The PWR review determined that 125 of the 215 supporting requirements met Capability Category I or greater. The review identified 101 findings or suggestions (76 findings and 25 suggestions). These findings or suggestions were developed to identify areas where SPAR models could be enhanced. A process to prioritize and incorporate the findings/suggestions supporting requirements into the SPAR models is being developed. The prioritization process focuses on those findings that will enhance the accuracy, completeness and usability of the SPAR models.

  4. Alternative Compliance: Guidelines for Preparing and Submitting a Waiver Request Application and Other Documentation Requirements (Book)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document is designed to assist covered fleets interested in taking advantage of more flexible compliance options and to facilitate the transition from Standard Compliance to Alternative Compliance. It is designed to help fleets better understand the Alternative Compliance option and successfully complete the waiver application process.

  5. Alternative Compliance: Guidelines for Preparing and Submitting a Waiver Request Application and Other Documentation Requirements (Book)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sears, T.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document is designed to assist covered fleets interested in taking advantage of more flexible compliance options and to facilitate the transition from Standard Compliance to Alternative Compliance. It is designed to help fleets better understand the Alternative Compliance option and successfully complete the waiver application process.

  6. Alternative Compliance: Guidelines for Preparing and Submitting a Waiver Request Application and Other Documentation Requirements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document is designed to assist covered fleets interested in taking advantage of more flexible compliance options and to facilitate the transition from Standard Compliance to Alternative Compliance. It is designed to help fleets better understand the Alternative Compliance option and successfully complete the waiver application process.

  7. Alternative Compliance: Guidelines for Preparing and Submitting a Waiver Request Application and Other Documentation Requirements (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document is designed to assist covered fleets interested in taking advantage of more flexible compliance options and to facilitate the transition from Standard Compliance to Alternative Compliance. It is designed to help fleets better understand the Alternative Compliance option and successfully complete the waiver application process.

  8. Testing the Standard Model under the weight of heavy flavors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. M. Bouchard

    2015-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

    I review recently completed (since Lattice 2013) and ongoing lattice calculations in charm and bottom flavor physics. A comparison of the precision of lattice and experiment is made using both current experimental results and projected experimental precision in 2020. The combination of experiment and theory reveals several tensions between nature and the Standard Model. These tensions are reviewed in light of recent lattice results.

  9. Testing the Standard Model under the weight of heavy flavors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bouchard, C M

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    I review recently completed (since Lattice 2013) and ongoing lattice calculations in charm and bottom flavor physics. A comparison of the precision of lattice and experiment is made using both current experimental results and projected experimental precision in 2020. The combination of experiment and theory reveals several tensions between nature and the Standard Model. These tensions are reviewed in light of recent lattice results.

  10. The ALEPH Search for the Standard Model Higgs Boson

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. A. Kennedy

    2001-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A search has been performed for the Standard Model Higgs boson in the data collected with the ALEPH detector in 2000. An excess of 3 sigma above the background expectation is found. The observed excess is consistent with the production of the Higgs boson with a mass close to 114 GeV/c2.

  11. Search for the Standard Model Higgs boson at LEP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilson, Graham Wallace; ALEPH Collaboration; DELPHI Collaboration; L3 Collaboration; OPAL Collaboration; The LEP Working Group for Higgs Boson Searches

    2003-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The four LEP Collaborations, ALEPH, DELPHI, L3 and OPAL, have collected a total of 2461 pb^(?1) of e^+e^? collision data at centre-of-mass energies between 189 and 209 GeV. The data are used to search for the Standard Model Higgs boson. The search...

  12. The Standard Model Higgs boson as the inflaton

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. L. Bezrukov; M. E. Shaposhnikov

    2008-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

    We argue that the Higgs boson of the Standard Model can lead to inflation and produce cosmological perturbations in accordance with observations. An essential requirement is the non-minimal coupling of the Higgs scalar field to gravity; no new particle besides already present in the electroweak theory is required.

  13. Gravity Effects on Antimatter in the Standard-Model Extension

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jay D. Tasson

    2015-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The gravitational Standard-Model Extension (SME) is the general field-theory based framework for the analysis of CPT and Lorentz violation. In this work we summarize the implications of Lorentz and CPT violation for antimatter gravity in the context of the SME. Implications of various attempts to place indirect limits on anomalous antimatter gravity are considered in the context of SME-based models.

  14. Gravity Effects on Antimatter in the Standard-Model Extension

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tasson, Jay D

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The gravitational Standard-Model Extension (SME) is the general field-theory based framework for the analysis of CPT and Lorentz violation. In this work we summarize the implications of Lorentz and CPT violation for antimatter gravity in the context of the SME. Implications of various attempts to place indirect limits on anomalous antimatter gravity are considered in the context of SME-based models.

  15. COMPLIANCE OVERVIEW 1. Compliance and enforcement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Davis, University of

    Method- Lighting Power Density Values (Watts/ ft2) 11/20/2014 COMPLIANCE OVERVIEW #12;SECTION 2 requirements · Maximum lighting power allowance for a building or an area · Some methods allow for trade/20/2014 COMPLIANCE OVERVIEW #12;SECTION 2 THE PRESCRIPTIVE APPROACH Indoor Lighting The prescriptive lighting power

  16. Standard model high mass Higgs search at CDF

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lucchesi, Donatella; /INFN, Padua

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The CDF collaboration has analyzed almost 6 f b{sup -1} of data collected at the Tevatron Collider at {radical}{ovr s} = 1.96 TeV to search for Standard Model Higgs boson through the decay into W{sup +}W{sup -}*. Starting from events with two leptons, advanced analysis techniques are applied to better discriminate signal from background. The Higgs sensitivity is maximized combining together analysis that exploit different event topologies. No significant excess over the expected background is observed and data is used to set a limit in units of Standard Model expectations. The limit plays a fundamental role in the Higgs search excluding the existence of this particle with mass between 158 and 175 GeV/c{sup 2} when combined with D0, the other Tevatron experiment.

  17. Search for Beyond the Standard Model Physics at D0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kraus, James

    2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The standard model (SM) of particle physics has been remarkably successful at predicting the outcomes of particle physics experiments, but there are reasons to expect new physics at the electroweak scale. Over the last several years, there have been a number of searches for beyond the standard model (BSM) physics at D0. Here, we limit our focus to three: searches for diphoton events with large missing transverse energy (E{sub T}), searches for leptonic jets and E{sub T}, and searches for single vector-like quarks. We have discussed three recent searches at D0. There are many more, including limits on heavy neutral gauge boson in the ee channel, a search for scalar top quarks, a search for quirks, and limits on a new resonance decaying to WW or WZ.

  18. Cosmology and the noncommutative approach to the standard model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nelson, William; Sakellariadou, Mairi [Institute of Gravitation and the Cosmos, Pennsylvania State University, State College, University Park, Pennsylvania 16801 (United States); Department of Physics, King's College, University of London, Strand WC2R 2LS, London (United Kingdom)

    2010-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We study cosmological consequences of the noncommutative approach to the standard model of particle physics. Neglecting the nonminimal coupling of the Higgs field to the curvature, noncommutative corrections to Einstein's equations are present only for inhomogeneous and anisotropic space-times. Considering the nonminimal coupling however, corrections are obtained even for background cosmologies. Links with dilatonic gravity as well as chameleon cosmology are briefly discussed, and potential experimental consequences are mentioned.

  19. Searches for the Standard Model Higgs Boson at CMS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marco Pieri; for the CMS Collaboration

    2012-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

    We searched for the standard model Higgs boson in many different channels using approximately 5 fb-1 of 7 TeV pp collisions data collected with the CMS detector at LHC. Combining the results of the different searches we exclude at 95% confidence level a standard model Higgs boson with mass between 127.5 and 600 GeV. The expected 95% confidence level exclusion if the Higgs boson is not present is from 114.5 and 543 GeV. The observed exclusion is weaker than expected at low mass because of some excess that is observed below about 128 GeV. The most significant excess is found at 125 GeV with a local significance of 2.8 sigma. It has a global significance of 0.8 sigma when evaluated in the full search range and of 2.1 sigma when evaluated in the range 110-145 GeV. The excess is consistent both with background fluctuation and a standard model Higgs boson with mass of about 125 GeV, and more data are needed to investigate its origin.

  20. Neutrino minimal standard model predictions for neutrinoless double beta decay

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bezrukov, F. [Institute for Nuclear Research of the Russian Academy of Sciences, 60th October Anniversary prospect 7a, Moscow 117312 (Russian Federation) and Institut de Theorie des Phenomenes Physiques, Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne, CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland)

    2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Prediction of the effective Majorana mass for neutrinoless double {beta} decay in a simple extension of the standard model ({nu}MSM) is given. The model adds three right-handed neutrinos with masses smaller than the electroweak scale and explains dark matter of the Universe. This leads to constraints 1.3

  1. Standard Model Higgs Boson Combination at the Tevatron

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wei-Ming Yao for the CDF; D0 Collaborations

    2012-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the recent results from combinations of searches for a standard model (SM) Higgs boson ($H$) by the CDF and D0 experiments at the Tevatron $p\\bar p$ collider at $\\sqrt{s}=1.96$ TeV. The data correspond to an integrated total luminosity of 8.2 (CDF) and 8.6 (D0) fb$^{-1}$. Compared to the previous Tevatron Higgs boson search combination more data have been added, additional channels have been added, and some previously used channels have been reanalyzed to gain sensitivity. No excess is observed above background expectation, and set 95% C.L. upper limits (median expected) on Higgs boson production at factors of 1.17 (1.16), 1.71 (1.16), and 0.48(0.57) times the SM predictions for Higgs bosons of mass $m_H$=115, 140, and 165 GeV/c$^2$, respectively. We exclude a standard-model Higgs boson in the mass range 156--177 GeV/c$^2$ at the 95% C.L, with an expected exclusion region 148--180 GeV/c$^2$. The absence of a Higgs boson signal also constrains some new physics such as $4^{th}$ generation models and other exotic models.

  2. Standardization of Thermo-Fluid Modeling in Modelica.Fluid

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Franke, Rudiger; Casella, Francesco; Sielemann, Michael; Proelss, Katrin; Otter, Martin; Wetter, Michael

    2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This article discusses the Modelica.Fluid library that has been included in the Modelica Standard Library 3.1. Modelica.Fluid provides interfaces and basic components for the device-oriented modeling of onedimensional thermo-fluid flow in networks containing vessels, pipes, fluid machines, valves and fittings. A unique feature of Modelica.Fluid is that the component equations and the media models as well as pressure loss and heat transfer correlations are decoupled from each other. All components are implemented such that they can be used for media from the Modelica.Media library. This means that an incompressible or compressible medium, a single or a multiple substance medium with one or more phases might be used with one and the same model as long as the modeling assumptions made hold. Furthermore, trace substances are supported. Modeling assumptions can be configured globally in an outer System object. This covers in particular the initialization, uni- or bi-directional flow, and dynamic or steady-state formulation of mass, energy, and momentum balance. All assumptions can be locally refined for every component. While Modelica.Fluid contains a reasonable set of component models, the goal of the library is not to provide a comprehensive set of models, but rather to provide interfaces and best practices for the treatment of issues such as connector design and implementation of energy, mass and momentum balances. Applications from various domains are presented.

  3. Standard Model-like D-brane models and gauge couplings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yuta Hamada; Tatsuo Kobayashi; Shohei Uemura

    2014-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

    We systematically search intersecting D-brane models, which just realize the Standard Model chiral matter contents and gauge symmetry. We construct new classes of non-supersymmetric Standard Model-like models. We also study gauge coupling constants of these models. The tree level gauge coupling is a function of compactification moduli, string scale, string coupling and winding number of D-branes. By tuning them, we examine whether the models can explain the experimental values of gauge couplings. As a result, we find that the string scale should be greater than $10^{14-15}$GeV if the compactification scale and the string scale are the same order.

  4. Environmental Compliance Performance | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Compliance Environmental Compliance Performance Environmental Compliance Performance Most Office of Environmental Management (EM) cleanup is being performed under the...

  5. Efficiency of appliance models on the market before and after DOE standards

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meyers, Stephen

    2004-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Energy efficiency standards for appliances mandate that appliance manufacturers not manufacture or import models that have a test energy efficiency below a specified level after the standard effective date. Thus, appliance standards set a floor for energy efficiency. But do they also induce more significant changes in the efficiencies that manufacturers offer after the standard becomes effective? To address this question, we undertook an examination of before-standard and after-standard efficiency of models on the market for three products: (1) Refrigerators (1990, 1993, and 2001 standards); (2) Room air conditioners (1990 and 2000 standards); and (3) Gas furnaces (1992 standard).

  6. Compact stars in the standard model - and beyond

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. Sandin

    2004-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

    In the context of the standard model of particle physics, there is a definite upper limit to the density of stable compact stars. However, if there is a deeper layer of constituents, below that of quarks and leptons, stability may be re-established far beyond this limiting density and a new class of compact stars could exist. These objects would cause gravitational lensing of white dwarfs and gamma-ray bursts, which might be observable as a diffraction pattern in the spectrum. Such observations could provide means for obtaining new clues about the fundamental particles and the origin of cold dark matter.

  7. Searches for the standard model Higgs at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kilminster, Ben; /Ohio State U.

    2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The CDF and D0 experiments at the Tevatron are currently the only capable of searching for the Standard Model Higgs boson. This article describes their most sensitive searches in the expected Higgs mass range, focusing on advanced methods used to extract the maximal sensitivity from the data. CDF presents newly updated results for H {yields} W{sup +}W{sup -} and Zh {yields} l{sup +}l{sup -}b{bar b}. D0 presents two new searches for WH {yields} lvb{bar b}. These new analyses use the same 1 fb{sup -1} dataset as previous searches, but with improved techniques resulting in markedly improved sensitivity.

  8. Neutrinoless Double Beta Decay and Physics Beyond the Standard Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rabindra N. Mohapatra

    1995-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The various mechanisms for neutrinoless double beta decay in gauge theories are reviewed and the present experimental data is used to set limits on physics scenarios beyond the standard model. The positive indications for nonzero neutrino masses in various experiments such as those involving solar, atmospheric and accelerator neutrinos are discussed and it is pointed out how some neutrino mass textures consistent with all data can be tested by the ongoing double beta decay experiments. Finally, the outlook for observable neutrinoless double beta decay signal in grand unified theories is discussed.

  9. Searches for the standard model Higgs boson at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dorigo, Tommaso; /Padua U.

    2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The CDF and D0 experiments at the Tevatron have searched for the Standard Model Higgs boson in data collected between 2001 and 2004. Upper limits have been placed on the production cross section times branching ratio to b{bar b} pairs or W{sup +}W{sup -} pairs as a function of the Higgs boson mass. projections indicate that the Tevatron experiments have a chance of discovering a M{sub H} = 115 GeV Higgs with the total dataset foreseen by 2009, or excluding it at 95% C.L. up to a mass of 135 GeV.

  10. An Effective Guide to Beyond the Standard Model Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eduard Masso

    2014-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Effective Lagrangians with dimension-six operators are widely used to analyse Higgs and other electroweak data. We show how to build a basis of operators such that each operator corresponds to a coupling which is well measured or will be in the future. We choose a set of couplings such that the correspondence is one-to-one. In our framework, some important features of the Lagrangian are transparent. For example, one can clearly see the presence or absence of correlations among measurable quantities. This may be a useful guide when searching for physics beyond the Standard Model.

  11. Model Standards of Conduct April 2006[1]

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHighandSWPA / SPRA /Ml'. William Hirst Hirst Enterprises,MODEL STANDARDS OF

  12. Fracture compliance estimation using borehole tube waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bakku, Sudhish Kumar

    We tested two models, one for tube-wave generation and the other for tube-wave attenuation at a fracture intersecting a borehole that can be used to estimate fracture compliance, fracture aperture, and lateral extent. In ...

  13. 2014-12-22 Issuance: Alternative Efficiency Determination Methods, Basic Model Definition, and Compliance for Commercial HVAC, Refrigeration, and Water Heating Equipment; Final Rule

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This document is a pre-publication Federal Register final rule regarding alternative efficiency determination methods, basic model definition, and compliance for commercial HVAC, refrigeration, and water heating equipment , as issued by the Deputy Assistant Secretary for Energy Efficiency on December 22, 2014. Though it is not intended or expected, should any discrepancy occur between the document posted here and the document published in the Federal Register, the Federal Register publication controls. This document is being made available through the Internet solely as a means to facilitate the public's access to this document.

  14. Precision measurements of Standard Model parameters with the ATLAS detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brandt, Gerhard; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The ATLAS Collaboration is engaged in precision measurement of fundamental Standard Model parameters, e.g. the weak-mixing angle and the complete set of coefficients that describe the angular distributions of Drell-Yan production. A measurement of the forward-backward asymmetry for the neutral current Drell Yan process is presented and the results are then used to extract a measurement of the effective weak mixing angle. This measurement shows significant sensitivity to the uncertainties of the parton density functions of the proton. The angular distributions of the Drell-Yan lepton pairs around the Z-boson mass peak probe the underlying QCD dynamic of the Z-boson production mechanisms. We present a measurement of the complete set of angular coefficients describing these distributions using 8 TeV centre-of-mass energy. The measurement is compared with the theoretical predictions and shows discrimination power between different approaches of the QCD modeling.

  15. Angular correlations in top quark decays in standard model extensions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Batebi, S. [Science and Research Branch, Islamic Azad University (IAU), Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Etesami, S. M. [School of Particles and Accelerators, Institute for Research in Fundamental Sciences (IPM), P.O. Box 19395-5531, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Physics Department, Isfahan University of Technology (IUT), P.O. Box 11365-9161, Isfahan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Mohammadi-Najafabadi, M. [Physics Department, Isfahan University of Technology (IUT), P.O. Box 11365-9161, Isfahan (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The CMS Collaboration at the CERN LHC has searched for the t-channel single top quark production using the spin correlation of the t-channel. The signal extraction and cross section measurement rely on the angular distribution of the charged lepton in the top quark decays, the angle between the charged lepton momentum and top spin in the top rest frame. The behavior of the angular distribution is a distinct slope for the t-channel single top (signal) while it is flat for the backgrounds. In this Brief Report, we investigate the contributions which this spin correlation may receive from a two-Higgs doublet model, a top-color assisted technicolor (TC2) and the noncommutative extension of the standard model.

  16. Modeling the wet bulb globe temperature using standard meteorological measurements.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liljegren, J. C.; Carhart, R. A.; Lawday, P.; Tschopp, S.; Sharp, R.; Decision and Information Sciences

    2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Army has a need for continuous, accurate estimates of the wet bulb globe temperature to protect soldiers and civilian workers from heat-related injuries, including those involved in the storage and destruction of aging chemical munitions at depots across the United States. At these depots, workers must don protective clothing that increases their risk of heat-related injury. Because of the difficulty in making continuous, accurate measurements of wet bulb globe temperature outdoors, the authors have developed a model of the wet bulb globe temperature that relies only on standard meteorological data available at each storage depot for input. The model is composed of separate submodels of the natural wet bulb and globe temperatures that are based on fundamental principles of heat and mass transfer, has no site-dependent parameters, and achieves an accuracy of better than 1 C based on comparisons with wet bulb globe temperature measurements at all depots.

  17. Environmental Compliance Guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Volume II supplements Vol. I in providing procedures, relative timing, and details to assist in achieving compliance with Federal environmental requirements. (PSB)

  18. NEPA COMPLIANCE SURVEY

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    affecting the the work each day. SOPs will be reviewed for generation, transportation, treatment, storage or disposal of compliance to state and local regulations. hazardous and...

  19. 10,000 Standard Solar Models: a Monte Carlo Simulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    John N. Bahcall; Aldo M. Serenelli; Sarbani Basu

    2005-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We have evolved 10,000 solar models using 21 input parameters that are randomly drawn for each model from separate probability distributions for every parameter. We use the results of these models to determine the theoretical uncertainties in the predicted surface helium abundance, the profile of the sound speed versus radius, the profile of the density versus radius, the depth of the solar convective zone, the eight principal solar neutrino fluxes, and the fractions of nuclear reactions that occur in the CNO cycle or in the three branches of the p-p chains. We also determine the correlation coefficients of the neutrino fluxes for use in analysis of solar neutrino oscillations. Our calculations include the most accurate available input parameters, including radiative opacity, equation of state, and nuclear cross sections. We incorporate both the recently determined heavy element abundances recommended by Asplund, Grevesse & Sauval (2005) and the older (higher) heavy element abundances recommended by Grevesse & Sauval (1998). We present best-estimates of many characteristics of the standard solar model for both sets of recommended heavy element compositions.

  20. Sixth Northwest Conservation and Electric Power Plan Appendix F: Model Conservation Standards

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sixth Northwest Conservation and Electric Power Plan Appendix F: Model Conservation Standards the model conservation standards should provide reliable savings to the power system. The Council also................................................ 8 Buildings Converting to Electric Space Conditioning or Water Heating Systems

  1. Compliance Verification Paths for Residential and Commercial Energy Codes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Conover, David R.; Makela, Eric J.; Fannin, Jerica D.; Sullivan, Robin S.

    2011-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    This report looks at different ways to verify energy code compliance and to ensure that the energy efficiency goals of an adopted document are achieved. Conformity assessment is the body of work that ensures compliance, including activities that can ensure residential and commercial buildings satisfy energy codes and standards. This report identifies and discusses conformity-assessment activities and provides guidance for conducting assessments.

  2. CDF Note 9674 Combined Upper Limit on Standard Model Higgs Boson Production for Winter 2009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fermilab

    CDF Note 9674 Combined Upper Limit on Standard Model Higgs Boson Production for Winter 2009 The CDF of searches for the Standard Model Higgs boson at CDF. The six major analyses combined are the WH bV/c2 in steps of 5 GeV/c2 , assuming Standard Model decay branching fractions of the Higgs boson

  3. Compliance Summary and Community Involvement 2-1 2. Compliance Summary and Community

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pennycook, Steve

    DOE operations on ORR are required to be in conformance with environmental standards established by a number of federal and state statutes and regulations, executive orders (EOs), DOE orders, contract-based standards, and compliance and settlement agreements. Principal among the regulating agencies are EPA

  4. Test of Physics beyond the Standard Model in Nuclei

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Amand Faessler; Fedor Simkovic

    1999-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

    The modern theories of Grand Unification (GUT) and supersymmetric (SUSY) extensions of standard model (SM) suppose that the conservation laws of the SM may be violated to some small degree. The nuclei are well-suited as a laboratory to test fundamental symmetries and fundamental interactions like lepton flavor (LF) and lepton number (LN) conservation. A prominent role between experiments looking for LF and total LN violation play yet not observed processes of neutrinoless double beta decay. The GUT's and SUSY models offer a variety of mechanisms which allow this process to occur. They are based on mixing of Majorana neutrinos and/or R-parity violation hypothesis. Although the neutrinoless double beta decay has not been seen it is possible to extract from the lower limits of the lifetime upper limits for the effective electron Majorana neutrino mass, effective right handed weak interaction parameters, the effective Majoron coupling constant, R-parity violating SUSY parameters etc. In this work the limits on the LN violating parameters extracted from current neutrinoless double beta decay experiments are listed. Studies in respect to future neutrinoless double beta decay experimental projects are also presented.

  5. Environmental Compliance 2-1 2. Environmental Compliance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pennycook, Steve

    Environmental Compliance 2-1 2. Environmental Compliance Setting It is the policy of the U, and local environmental protection laws, regulations, compliance agreements and decrees, settlement in compliance with the letter and intent of applicable environmental statutes. The protection of the public

  6. Environmental Compliance 2-1 2. Environmental Compliance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pennycook, Steve

    Environmental Compliance 2-1 2. Environmental Compliance Setting It is DOE-ORO and DOE National, state, and local environmental protection laws, regulations, compliance agreements and decrees operations in compliance with the letter and intent of applicable environmental statutes. The protection

  7. Environmental Compliance 2-1 2. Environmental Compliance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pennycook, Steve

    Environmental Compliance 2-1 2. Environmental Compliance It is DOE-ORO and NNSA policy to conduct its operations in compliance with federal, state, and local environmental protection laws, regulations operations in compliance with the letter and intent of applicable environmental statutes. The protection

  8. Environmental Compliance 2-1 2. Environmental Compliance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pennycook, Steve

    Environmental Compliance 2-1 2. Environmental Compliance It is DOE-ORO and NNSA policy to conduct operations in compliance with federal, state, and local environmental protection laws, regulations operations in compliance with the letter and intent of applicable environmental statutes. The protection

  9. Environmental Compliance 2-1 2. Environmental Compliance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pennycook, Steve

    Environmental Compliance 2-1 2. Environmental Compliance Abstract It is the policy of the U, state, and local environmental protection laws, regulations, compliance agreements and decrees operations in compliance with the letter and intent of applicable environmental statutes. The protection

  10. Environmental Compliance 2-1 2. Environmental Compliance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pennycook, Steve

    Environmental Compliance 2-1 2. Environmental Compliance It is DOE-ORO and DOE National Nuclear, and local environmental protection laws, regulations, compliance agreements and decrees, settlement in compliance with the letter and intent of applicable environmental statutes. The protection of the public

  11. Environmental Compliance 2-1 2. Environmental Compliance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pennycook, Steve

    Environmental Compliance 2-1 2. Environmental Compliance It is DOE Oak Ridge Operations Office with federal, state, and local environmental protection laws, regulations, compliance agreements and decrees in compliance with the letter and intent of applicable environmental statutes. The protection of the public

  12. Environmental Compliance Functional Area Qualification Standard

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011AT&T,OfficeEnd of Year 2010 SNFEnergySession0-02Nationwide Greenhouse Gas Emissions

  13. Is the Standard Model saved asymptotically by conformal symmetry?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gorsky, A; Morozov, A; Tomaras, T N

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    It is pointed out that the top-quark and Higgs masses and the Higgs VEV satisfy with great accuracy the relations 4m_H^2=2m_T^2=v^2, which are very special and reminiscent of analogous ones at Argyres - Douglas points with enhanced conformal symmetry. Furthermore, the RG evolution of the corresponding Higgs self-interaction and Yukawa couplings \\lambda(0)=1/8 and y(0)=1 leads to the free-field stable point \\lambda(M_Pl)= \\dot \\lambda(M_Pl)=0 in the pure scalar sector at the Planck scale, also suggesting enhanced conformal symmetry. Thus, it is conceivable that the Standard Model is the low-energy limit of a distinct special theory with (super?) conformal symmetry at the Planck scale. In the context of such a "scenario" one may further speculate that the Higgs particle is the Goldstone boson of (partly) spontaneously broken conformal symmetry. This would simultaneously resolve the hierarchy and Landau pole problems in the scalar sector and would provide a nearly flat potential with two almost degenerate minima...

  14. Effects of the Noncommutative Standard Model in WW Scattering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Conley, John A.; Hewett, JoAnne L.

    2008-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

    We examine W pair production in the Noncommutative Standard Model constructed with the Seiberg-Witten map. Consideration of partial wave unitarity in the reactions WW {yields} WW and e{sup +}e{sup -} {yields} WW shows that the latter process is more sensitive and that tree-level unitarity is violated when scattering energies are of order a TeV and the noncommutative scale is below about a TeV. We find that WW production at the LHC is not sensitive to scales above the unitarity bounds. WW production in e{sup +}e{sup -} annihilation, however, provides a good probe of such effects with noncommutative scales below 300-400 GeV being excluded at LEP-II, and the ILC being sensitive to scales up to 10-20 TeV. In addition, we find that the ability to measure the helicity states of the final state W bosons at the ILC provides a diagnostic tool to determine and disentangle the different possible noncommutative contributions.

  15. Gravitational wave background from Standard Model physics: Qualitative features

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ghiglieri, J

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Because of physical processes ranging from microscopic particle collisions to macroscopic hydrodynamic fluctuations, any plasma in thermal equilibrium emits gravitational waves. For the largest wavelengths the emission rate is proportional to the shear viscosity of the plasma. In the Standard Model at T > 160 GeV, the shear viscosity is dominated by the most weakly interacting particles, right-handed leptons, and is relatively large. We estimate the order of magnitude of the corresponding spectrum of gravitational waves. Even though at small frequencies (corresponding to the sub-Hz range relevant for planned observatories such as eLISA) this background is tiny compared with that from non-equilibrium sources, the total energy carried by the high-frequency part of the spectrum is non-negligible if the production continues for a long time. We suggest that this may constrain (weakly) the highest temperature of the radiation epoch. Observing the high-frequency part directly sets a very ambitious goal for future ge...

  16. Pseudo-Dirac neutrinos in the new standard model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gouvea, Andre de; Huang, W.-C.; Jenkins, James [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Northwestern University, 2145 Sheridan Road, Evanston, Illinois 60208 (United States); Elementary Particles and Field Theory Group, MS B285, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States) and Department of Physics and Astronomy, Northwestern University, 2145 Sheridan Road, Evanston, Illinois 60208 (United States)

    2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The addition of gauge-singlet fermions to the standard model Lagrangian renders the neutrinos massive and allows one to explain all that is experimentally known about neutrino masses and lepton mixing by varying the values of the Majorana mass parameters M for the gauge singlets and the neutrino Yukawa couplings {lambda}. Here we explore the region of parameter space where M values are much smaller than the neutrino Dirac masses {lambda}v. In this region, neutrinos are pseudo-Dirac fermions. We find that current solar data constrain M values to be less than at least 10{sup -9} eV, and discuss the sensitivity of future experiments to tiny gauge-singlet fermion masses. We also discuss a useful basis for analyzing pseudo-Dirac neutrino mixing effects. In particular, we identify a simple relationship between elements of M and the induced enlarged mixing matrix and new mass-squared differences. These allow one to directly relate bounds on the new mass-squared differences to bounds on the singlet fermion Majorana masses.

  17. Is the Standard Model saved asymptotically by conformal symmetry?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Gorsky; A. Mironov; A. Morozov; T. N. Tomaras

    2014-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

    It is pointed out that the top-quark and Higgs masses and the Higgs VEV satisfy with great accuracy the relations 4m_H^2=2m_T^2=v^2, which are very special and reminiscent of analogous ones at Argyres - Douglas points with enhanced conformal symmetry. Furthermore, the RG evolution of the corresponding Higgs self-interaction and Yukawa couplings \\lambda(0)=1/8 and y(0)=1 leads to the free-field stable point \\lambda(M_Pl)= \\dot \\lambda(M_Pl)=0 in the pure scalar sector at the Planck scale, also suggesting enhanced conformal symmetry. Thus, it is conceivable that the Standard Model is the low-energy limit of a distinct special theory with (super?) conformal symmetry at the Planck scale. In the context of such a "scenario" one may further speculate that the Higgs particle is the Goldstone boson of (partly) spontaneously broken conformal symmetry. This would simultaneously resolve the hierarchy and Landau pole problems in the scalar sector and would provide a nearly flat potential with two almost degenerate minima at the electroweak and Planck scales.

  18. Environmental Compliance Guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Guide is intended to assist Department of Energy personnel by providing information on the NEPA process, the processes of other environmental statutes that bear on the NEPA process, the timing relationships between the NEPA process and these other processes, as well as timing relationships between the NEPA process and the development process for policies, programs, and projects. This information should be helpful not only in formulating environmental compliance plans but also in achieving compliance with NEPA and various other environmental statutes. The Guide is divided into three parts with related appendices: Part I provides guidance for developing environmental compliance plans for DOE actions; Part II is devoted to NEPA with detailed flowcharts depicting the compliance procedures required by CEQ regulations and Department of Energy NEPA Guidelines; and Part III contains a series of flowcharts for other Federal environmental requirements that may apply to DOE projects.

  19. NEPA COMPLIANCE SURVEY

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    rig, etc.)? The table below is to be completed by the Project Lead and reviewed by the Environmental Specialist and the DOE NEPA Compliance Officer. NOTE: If Change of Scope...

  20. NEPA COMPLIANCE SURVEY

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    of the State?" D D Any action that has potential impacts on Waters of the State' or wetland areas will require a separate NEPA Compliance Survey. Will the project area...

  1. Hypercholesterolemia and dietary compliance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Person, Judith Fredricka

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ) Wx liam McIntosh (Member) December 1988 ABSTRACT Hypercholesterolemia and Dietary Complianoe (December 1988) Judith Fredricka Person, B. S. , Texas AS, M University Chairman of Advisory Committee: Dr. Karen Kubena Cholesterol-lowering diets... disease and to choles- terol-lowering diets make this an especially difficult area in which to obtain and maintain patient compliance. Many factors influence the degree of dietary compliance, and there are various techniques which may be useful...

  2. Fourth standard model family neutrino at future linear colliders

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ciftci, A.K.; Ciftci, R.; Sultansoy, S. [Physics Department, Faculty of Sciences, Ankara University, 06100 Tandogan, Ankara (Turkey); Physics Department, Faculty of Sciences and Arts, Gazi University, 06500 Teknikokullar, Ankara (Turkey)

    2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    It is known that flavor democracy favors the existence of the fourth standard model (SM) family. In order to give nonzero masses for the first three-family fermions flavor democracy has to be slightly broken. A parametrization for democracy breaking, which gives the correct values for fundamental fermion masses and, at the same time, predicts quark and lepton Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa (CKM) matrices in a good agreement with the experimental data, is proposed. The pair productions of the fourth SM family Dirac ({nu}{sub 4}) and Majorana (N{sub 1}) neutrinos at future linear colliders with {radical}(s)=500 GeV, 1 TeV, and 3 TeV are considered. The cross section for the process e{sup +}e{sup -}{yields}{nu}{sub 4}{nu}{sub 4}(N{sub 1}N{sub 1}) and the branching ratios for possible decay modes of the both neutrinos are determined. The decays of the fourth family neutrinos into muon channels ({nu}{sub 4}(N{sub 1}){yields}{mu}{sup {+-}}W{sup {+-}}) provide cleanest signature at e{sup +}e{sup -} colliders. Meanwhile, in our parametrization this channel is dominant. W bosons produced in decays of the fourth family neutrinos will be seen in detector as either di-jets or isolated leptons. As an example, we consider the production of 200 GeV mass fourth family neutrinos at {radical}(s)=500 GeV linear colliders by taking into account di-muon plus four jet events as signatures.

  3. CDF Note 9999 Combined Upper Limit on Standard Model Higgs Boson Production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fermilab

    CDF Note 9999 Combined Upper Limit on Standard Model Higgs Boson Production The CDF Collaboration for the Standard Model Higgs boson at CDF. The six major analyses combined are the WH b¯b channels, the WH + ZH E Model decay branching fractions of the Higgs boson and that the ratios of the rates for the WH, ZH, gg

  4. MODEL-DRIVEN ENGINEERING FOR IMPLEMENTING THE ISO 19100 SERIES OF INTERNATIONAL STANDARDS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    MODEL-DRIVEN ENGINEERING FOR IMPLEMENTING THE ISO 19100 SERIES OF INTERNATIONAL STANDARDS CYRIL of the ISO 19100 series of standards with use of Model-Driven Engineering (MDE) techniques. We expose how MDE to use ISO 19109, 19110 and 19117 models in order to generate a rich client application. Our work takes

  5. Topological invariants for Standard Model: from semi-metal to topological insulator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. E. Volovik

    2010-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider topological invariants describing semimetal (gapless) and insulating (gapped) states of the quantum vacuum of Standard Model and possible quantum phase transitions between these states.

  6. Extending the Standard Model Effective Field Theory with the Complete Set of Dimension-7 Operators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Landon Lehman

    2014-12-26T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a complete list of the independent dimension-7 operators that are constructed using the Standard Model degrees of freedom and are invariant under the Standard Model gauge group. This list contains only 20 independent operators; far fewer than the 63 operators available at dimension 6. All of these dimension-7 operators contain fermions and violate lepton number, and 7 of the 20 violate baryon number as well. This result extends the Standard Model Effective Field Theory (SMEFT) and allows a more detailed exploration of the structure and properties of possible deformations from the Standard Model Lagrangian.

  7. Estimation of fracture compliance from tubewaves generated at a fracture intersecting a borehole

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bakku, Sudhish Kumar

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Understanding fracture compliance is important for characterizing fracture networks and for inferring fluid flow in the subsurface. In an attempt to estimate fracture compliance in the field, we developed a new model to ...

  8. Standardization of Thermo-Fluid Modeling in Modelica.Fluid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Franke, Rudiger

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    a replaceable heat transfer model with the flag use_heat transfer. A concrete heat transfer model extending fromcycle. Also note that the heat transfer model of the tank is

  9. Idaho CERCLA Disposal Facility Complex Compliance Demonstration for DOE Order 435.1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. Simonds

    2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This compliance demonstration document provides an analysis of the Idaho CERCLA Disposal Facility (ICDF) Complex compliance with DOE Order 435.1. The ICDF Complex includes the disposal facility (landfill), evaporation pond, admin facility, weigh scale, decon building, treatment systems, and various staging/storage areas. These facilities were designed and are being constructed to be compliant with DOE Order 435.1, Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Subtitle C, and Toxic Substances Control Act polychlorinated biphenyl design and construction standards. The ICDF Complex is designated as the central Idaho National Laboratory (INL) facilityyy for the receipt, staging/storage, treatment, and disposal of INL Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA) waste streams. This compliance demonstration document discusses the conceptual site model for the ICDF Complex area. Within this conceptual site model, the selection of the area for the ICDF Complex is discussed. Also, the subsurface stratigraphy in the ICDF Complex area is discussed along with the existing contamination beneath the ICDF Complex area. The designs for the various ICDF Complex facilities are also included in this compliance demonstration document. These design discussions are a summary of the design as presented in the Remedial Design/Construction Work Plans for the ICDF landfill and evaporation pond and the Staging, Storage, Sizing, and Treatment Facility. Each of the major facilities or systems is described including the design criteria.

  10. Environmental Compliance 2-1 2. Environmental Compliance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pennycook, Steve

    Environmental Compliance 2-1 2. Environmental Compliance It is DOE-ORO and National Nuclear environmental protection laws, regulations, compliance agree- ments and decrees, settlement agreements and intent of applicable environmental statutes. The protection of the public, personnel, and the environment

  11. Environmental Compliance 2-1 2. Environmental Compliance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pennycook, Steve

    Environmental Compliance 2-1 2. Environmental Compliance H. M. Braunstein, L. V. Hamilton, L. W. Mc to conduct its operations in compliance with federal, state, and local environmental protection laws environmental statutes. The protection of the public, personnel, and the environment is of paramount importance

  12. Phenomenology Of The Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model Without R–Parity 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Leary, Benjamin Hugh

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis is an investigation into the current bounds on the trilinear R–parity–violating couplings in the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model without R–parity conservation. The model is described, and its implications ...

  13. Environmental Compliance Schofield Barracks, Hawaii

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Environmental Compliance Specialist Schofield Barracks, Hawaii POSITION An Environmental Compliance Specialist (Research Associate II Special) position is available with the Center for Environmental Management resource stewardship. We collaborate with our sponsors and within CSU to resolve complex environmental

  14. CDF Note 10625 Search for the Standard Model Higgs boson in +

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fermilab

    CDF Note 10625 Search for the Standard Model Higgs boson in + - + jets final state with 8.3fb-1 a search for the Standard Model Higgs boson in + - + jets final state, using CDF Run II data with an integrated luminosity of 8.3 fb-1 . The Signal considered in this search is four Higgs boson production

  15. certification, compliance and enforcement regulations for Commercial...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    certification, compliance and enforcement regulations for Commercial Refrigeration Equipment (CRE) certification, compliance and enforcement regulations for Commercial...

  16. A Stable Whole Building Performance Method for Standard 90.1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rosenberg, Michael I.; Eley, Charles

    2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Wouldn’t it be great if a single energy model could be used to demonstrate minimum code compliance, green code compliance, establish a Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) rating, and determine eligibility for federal tax and utility incentives? Even better, what if the basic rules for creating those models did not change every few years? This paper descibes a recently proposed addendum to ASHRAE/ANSI/IES Standard 90.1 aims to meet those goals. Addendum BM establishes the Performance Rating Method found in Appendix G of Standard 90.1 as a new method of compliance while maintaining its traditional use in gauging the efficiency of beyond code buildings. Furthermore, Addendum BM sets a common baseline building that does not change with each update to the standard.

  17. Environmental Compliance Issue Coordination

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1993-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

    To establish the Department of Energy (DOE) requirements for coordination of significant environmental compliance issues to ensure timely development and consistent application of Departmental environmental policy and guidance. Cancels DOE O 5400.2. Para. 5a(2) and 5a(7) canceled by DOE O 231.1.

  18. COMPLIANCE FORMS SUMMARY APPENDIX A

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    approach is utilized for compliance, the CF-1R forms are produced by the compliance software. Thermal Mass. Thermal Mass Worksheet (WS-1R) This worksheet is completed by the documentation author when complying is used to calculate weight-averaged U-factors for prescriptive envelope compliance. #12;Appendix

  19. Status of Waste Isolation Pilot Plant compliance with 40 CFR 191B, December 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marietta, M.G.; Anderson, D.R.

    1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Before disposing of transuranic radioactive waste at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), the US Department of Energy (DOE) must evaluate compliance with long-term regulations of the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) is conducting iterative performance assessments (PAs) of the WIPP for the DOE to provide interim guidance while preparing for final compliance evaluations. This paper describes the 1992 preliminary comparison with Subpart B of the Environmental Standards for the Management and Disposal of Spent Nuclear Fuel, High-Level and Transuranic Radioactive Wastes (40 CFR 191), which regulates long-term releases of radioactive waste. Results of the 1992 PA are preliminary, and cannot be used to determine compliance or noncompliance with EPA regulations because portions of the modeling system and data base are incomplete. Results are consistent, however, with those of previous iterations of PA, and the SNL WIPP PA Department has high confidence that compliance with 40 CFR 191B can be demonstrated. Comparison of predicted radiation doses from the disposal system also gives high confidence that the disposal system is safe for long-term isolation.

  20. New Model of Inflation with Non-minimal Derivative Coupling of Standard Model Higgs Boson to Gravity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cristiano Germani; Alex Kehagias

    2010-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

    In this letter we show that there is a unique non-minimal derivative coupling of the Standard Model Higgs boson to gravity such that: it propagates no more degrees of freedom than General Relativity sourced by a scalar field, reproduces a successful inflating background within the Standard Model Higgs parameters and, finally, does not suffer from dangerous quantum corrections.

  1. Symmetry Breaking, Unification, and Theories Beyond the Standard Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nomura, Yasunori

    2009-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

    A model was constructed in which the supersymmetric fine-tuning problem is solved without extending the Higgs sector at the weak scale. We have demonstrated that the model can avoid all the phenomenological constraints, while avoiding excessive fine-tuning. We have also studied implications of the model on dark matter physics and collider physics. I have proposed in an extremely simple construction for models of gauge mediation. We found that the {mu} problem can be simply and elegantly solved in a class of models where the Higgs fields couple directly to the supersymmetry breaking sector. We proposed a new way of addressing the flavor problem of supersymmetric theories. We have proposed a new framework of constructing theories of grand unification. We constructed a simple and elegant model of dark matter which explains excess flux of electrons/positrons. We constructed a model of dark energy in which evolving quintessence-type dark energy is naturally obtained. We studied if we can find evidence of the multiverse.

  2. Hazard Communication -Regulatory Compliance 1/17/2013 a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lawrence, Rick L.

    Hazard Communication - Regulatory Compliance 1/17/2013 a OSHA has updated their Hazard Communication Standard (29 CFR 1910.1200) and requires that all employees that work with Hazardous Chemicals this standard applies are required to receive an updated training as new chemical hazards are introduced

  3. Neutrinoless Double Beta Decay and Physics Beyond the Standard Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frank F. Deppisch; Martin Hirsch; Heinrich Päs

    2012-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Neutrinoless double beta decay is the most powerful tool to probe not only for Majorana neutrino masses but for lepton number violating physics in general. We discuss relations between lepton number violation, double beta decay and neutrino mass, review a general Lorentz invariant parametrization of the double beta decay rate, highlight a number of different new physics models showing how different mechanisms can trigger double beta decay, and finally discuss possibilities to discriminate and test these models and mechanisms in complementary experiments.

  4. Upper bound on the cutoff in the Standard Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Veselov, A I

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The main objective of this presentation is to point out that the Upper bound on the cutoff in lattice Electroweak theory is still unknown. The consideration of the continuum theory is based on the perturbation expansion around trivial vacuum. The internal structure of the lattice Weinberg - Salam model may appear to be more complicated especially in the region of the phase diagram close to the phase transition between the physical Higgs phase and the unphysical symmetric phase of the lattice model, where the continuum physics is to be approached. We represent the results of our numerical investigation of the quenched model at infinite bare scalar self coupling $\\lambda$. These results demonstrate that at $\\lambda = \\infty$ the upper bound on the cutoff is around $\\frac{\\pi}{a} = 1.4$ Tev. The preliminary results for finite $\\lambda$ are also presented. Basing on these results we cannot yet make a definite conclusion on the maximal value of the cutoff admitted in the lattice model, although we have found that ...

  5. 3. Classical problems of the Standard Big Bang Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aretxaga, Itziar

    and inflation stops. There are many variants of inflation. · Universe in the state of false vacuum · energy of Universe dominated by vacuum energy · Universe expands exponentially · In some models, when it transits to true vacuum matter/antimatter is created and inflation ends. #12;

  6. Standard model extensions for PV electron scattering, g-2, EDM: Overview

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jens Erler

    2011-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

    I review how various extensions of the Standard Model, in particular supersymmetry and extra neutral gauge bosons, may affect low energy observables, including parity-violating electron scattering and related observables, as well as electric and magnetic dipole moments.

  7. Adaptive Hardness and Composable Security in the Plain Model from Standard Assumptions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keinan, Alon

    Adaptive Hardness and Composable Security in the Plain Model from Standard Assumptions Ran Canetti-up or public keys. Tel Aviv University, Email: Canetti@tau.ac.il Cornell University, E-Mail: huijia

  8. Environmental surveillance and compliance at Los Alamos during 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents environmental data that characterize environmental performance and addresses compliance with environmental standards and requirements at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL or the Laboratory) during 1996. The Laboratory routinely monitors for radiation and for radioactive nonradioactive materials at Laboratory sites as well as in the surrounding region. LANL uses the monitoring results to determine compliance with appropriate standards and to identify potentially undesirable trends. Data were collected in 1996 to assess external penetrating radiation; quantities of airborne emissions; and concentrations of chemicals and radionuclides in ambient air, surface waters and groundwaters, the municipal water supply, soils and sediments, and foodstuffs. Using comparisons with standards and regulations, this report concludes that environmental effects from Laboratory operations are small and do not pose a demonstrable threat to the public, Laboratory employees, or the environment. Laboratory operations were in compliance with all major environmental regulations.

  9. D Note 6229-CONF Combined Upper Limits on Standard Model Higgs Boson Production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Quigg, Chris

    D� Note 6229-CONF Combined Upper Limits on Standard Model Higgs Boson Production from the D�) Searches for standard model Higgs boson production in p¯p collisions at s = 1.96 TeV are carried out for Higgs boson masses (mH) in the range 100 mH 200 GeV/c2 . The contributing production processes include

  10. Search for the Standard Model Higgs Boson at the LEP2 Collider near

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Search for the Standard Model Higgs Boson at the LEP2 Collider near ps = 183 GeV The ALEPHV. These data are used to look for possible signals from the production of the Standard Model Higgs boson on the mass of the Higgs boson: mH > 87:9 GeV=c2 at 95% con#12;dence level. The ALEPH Collaboration wish

  11. Standard Model with the additional $Z_6$ symmetry on the lattice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. L. G. Bakker; A. I. Veselov; M. A. Zubkov

    2005-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

    An additional $Z_6$ symmetry hidden in the fermion and Higgs sectors of the Standard Model has been found recently\\cite{BVZ2003}. A lattice regularization of the Standard Model was constructed that possesses this symmetry. In \\cite{BVZ2004} we have reported our results on the numerical simulation of the Electroweak sector of the model. In this paper we report our results on the numerical simulation of the full ($SU(3)\\otimes SU(2) \\otimes U(1)$) model. The phase diagram of the model has been investigated using static quark and lepton potentials. Various types of monopoles have been constructed. Their densities appear to be sensitive to the phase transition lines. Differences between the realizations of the Standard Model which do or do not possess the mentioned $Z_6$ symmetry, are discussed.

  12. New perspectives in physics beyond the standard model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weiner, Neal Jonathan

    2000-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

    In 1934 Fermi postulated a theory for weak interactions containing a dimensionful coupling with a size of roughly 250 GeV. Only now are we finally exploring this energy regime. What arises is an open question: supersymmetry and large extra dimensions are two possible scenarios. Meanwhile, other experiments will begin providing definitive information into the nature of neutrino masses and CP violation. In this paper, we explore features of possible theoretical scenarios, and study the phenomenological implications of various models addressing the open questions surrounding these issues.

  13. A Lattice Non-Perturbative Definition of an SO(10) Chiral Gauge Theory and Its Induced Standard Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wen, Xiao-Gang

    The standard model is a chiral gauge theory where the gauge fields couple to the right-hand and the left-hand fermions differently. The standard model is defined perturbatively and describes all elementary particles (except ...

  14. Fleet Compliance Results for MY 2011/FY 2012 (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This annual report summarizes the compliance results of state and alternative fuel provider fleets covered by the Energy Policy Act of 1992 (EPAct) for model year 2011/fiscal year 2012.

  15. Search for the Standard Model Higgs Boson in the Lepton + Missing Transverse Energy + Jets Final State in ATLAS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mark S. Neubauer; for the ATLAS Collaboration

    2011-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

    A search for the Standard Model Higgs boson has been performed in the H \\rightarrow WW \\rightarrow l{\

  16. Coach Compliance Form

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041clothAdvanced Materials Advanced. C o w l i t zManufacturing:DOECoach Compliance Form My team is

  17. Compliance Certification Application

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power Administration would like submit the followingthMeasurementsMay-20,-2015 Compliance

  18. Compliance | ARPA-E

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItem NotEnergy,ARMForms AboutRESEARCHHydrosilylation Catalysts ComparingCompliance

  19. Parsimonious additive logistic models Logistic regression is a standard tool in statistics for binary classification. The logistic model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    a linear regression model. A generalization is the additive logistic model, which replaces each linear term, removes irrelevant variables, and identifies non linear trends. The estimates are computed via the usualParsimonious additive logistic models Logistic regression is a standard tool in statistics

  20. Policy on Compliance in Athletics Policy on Compliance in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sridhar, Srinivas

    Policy on Compliance in Athletics 07/1/2014 Policy on Compliance in Athletics I. Purpose and Scope conference rules, and university policies and procedures. This policy applies to student with athletics rules, policies and procedures, including NCAA rules and regulations. Other terms used herein

  1. EconoGrid: A detailed Simulation Model of a Standards-based Grid Compute Economy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    EconoGrid: A detailed Simulation Model of a Standards-based Grid Compute Economy EconoGrid is a detailed simulation model, implemented in SLX1 , of a grid compute economy that implements selected of users. In a grid compute economy, computing resources are sold to users in a market where price

  2. Search for the neutral Higgs bosons of the Standard Model and the MSSM in e+

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Search for the neutral Higgs bosons of the Standard Model and the MSSM in e+ e- collisions at s = 189 GeV The ALEPH Collaboration ) CERN-EP-2000-019 January 27, 2000 Abstract Neutral Higgs bosons Model Higgs boson. In the MSSM, for tan 0.7 and for benchmark parameter choices, lower limits of 82

  3. Refrigerated Warehouses Introduction Page 8-1 2008 Nonresidential Compliance Manual August 2009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Refrigerated Warehouses ­ Introduction Page 8-1 2008 Nonresidential Compliance Manual August 2009 8 Refrigerated Warehouses 8.1 Introduction This section of the nonresidential compliance manual addresses refrigerated warehouses. Since regulation of refrigerated warehouses is new for the 2008 Standards (§126

  4. Refrigerant Compliance Updated: July 12, 2012

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holland, Jeffrey

    Refrigerant Compliance Policy Updated: July 12, 2012 #12;TABLE OF CONTENTS The official version ........................................................................................................ 3 A. Refrigerant Compliance Manager (RCM).................................................................. 3 B. Refrigerant Inventory Coordinator (RIC

  5. Effect of non-standard interaction for radiative neutrino mass model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Konishi, Y.; Sato, J.; Shimomura, T. [Department of Physics, Saitama University, Shimo-okubo, Sakura-ku, Saitama, 338-8570 (Japan); Department of Physics, Niigata University, Niigata, 950-2181 (Japan)

    2012-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

    We examined effects of non-standard interactions (NSIs) in a radiative neutrino mass model. The radiative neutrino mass model suggested by Kraus Nasri and Trodden can explain not only neutrino flavor mixing and neutrino masses, but also dark matter relic abundance. Although the NSI effects of the model are too small to be detected by present neutrino oscillation experiments, we might observe the small effects in future experiments such as neutrino factory.

  6. INTERPRETATION REGARDING THE APPLICATION OF DOE TECHNICAL STANDARD...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    THE APPLICATION OF DOE TECHNICAL STANDARD 1027-92, HAZARD CATEGORIZATION AND ACCIDENT ANALYSIS TECHNIQUES FOR COMPLIANCE WITH DOE ORDER 5480.23, NUCLEAR SAFETY ANALYSIS REPORTS,...

  7. Information Security Governance: When Compliance Becomes more Important than Security

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Information Security Governance: When Compliance Becomes more Important than Security Terence Tan1 information security must adapt to changing conditions by extending security governance to middle management for implementing information security are more interested in complying with organizational standards and policies

  8. Air Pollution Accountability and Compliance Tracking System (A-PACT System)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ICAO (International Civil Aviation Organization) data to estimate pollution of individual sources and Compliance Tracking (A-PACT) System references existing standardized pollutant index databases using approaching and departing aircraft within designated boundaries surrounding the international airport

  9. Heavy Higgs signal-background interference in gg --> VV in the Standard Model plus real singlet

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kauer, Nikolas

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    For the Standard Model extended with a real scalar singlet field, the modification of the heavy Higgs signal due to interference with the continuum background and the off-shell light Higgs contribution is studied for gg --> ZZ, WW --> 4 lepton processes at the Large Hadron Collider. A public program that allows to simulate the full interference is presented.

  10. Les Houches 2013: Physics at TeV Colliders: Standard Model Working Group Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Butterworth; G. Dissertori; S. Dittmaier; D. de Florian; N. Glover; K. Hamilton; J. Huston; M. Kado; A. Korytov; F. Krauss; G. Soyez; J. R. Andersen; S. Badger; L. Barzè; J. Bellm; F. U. Bernlochner; A. Buckley; J. Butterworth; N. Chanon; M. Chiesa; A. Cooper-Sarkar; L. Cieri; G. Cullen; H. van Deurzen; G. Dissertori; S. Dittmaier; D. de Florian; S. Forte; R. Frederix; B. Fuks; J. Gao; M. V. Garzelli; T. Gehrmann; E. Gerwick; S. Gieseke; D. Gillberg; E. W. N. Glover; N. Greiner; K. Hamilton; T. Hapola; H. B. Hartanto; G. Heinrich; A. Huss; J. Huston; B. Jäger; M. Kado; A. Kardos; U. Klein; F. Krauss; A. Kruse; L. Lönnblad; G. Luisoni; Daniel Maître; P. Mastrolia; O. Mattelaer; J. Mazzitelli; E. Mirabella; P. Monni; G. Montagna; M. Moretti; P. Nadolsky; P. Nason; O. Nicrosini; C. Oleari; G. Ossola; S. Padhi; T. Peraro; F. Piccinini; S. Plätzer; S. Prestel; J. Pumplin; K. Rabbertz; Voica Radescu; L. Reina; C. Reuschle; J. Rojo; M. Schönherr; J. M. Smillie; J. F. von Soden-Fraunhofen; G. Soyez; R. Thorne; F. Tramontano; Z. Trocsanyi; D. Wackeroth; J. Winter; C-P. Yuan; V. Yundin; K. Zapp

    2014-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

    This Report summarizes the proceedings of the 2013 Les Houches workshop on Physics at TeV Colliders. Session 1 dealt primarily with (1) the techniques for calculating standard model multi-leg NLO and NNLO QCD and NLO EW cross sections and (2) the comparison of those cross sections with LHC data from Run 1, and projections for future measurements in Run 2.

  11. The $B-L$ Supersymmetric Standard Model with Inverse Seesaw at the Large Hadron Collider

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Khalil, S

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We review the TeV scale $B-L$ extension of the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model (BLSSM) where an inverse seesaw mechanism of light neutrino mass generation is naturally implemented and concentrate on its hallmark manifestations at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC).

  12. A problem of hypothetical emerging of matter objects on horizon in the standard model of universe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. Skalsky

    2000-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

    In the standard model of universe the increase in mass of our observed expansive Universe is explained by the assumption of emerging the matter objects on the horizon (of the most remote visibility). However, the physical analysis of the influence of this assumption on the velocity of matter objects shows unambiguously that this hypothetical assumption contradicts the theory of gravity.

  13. A wave equation including leptons and quarks for the standard model of quantum physics in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    A wave equation including leptons and quarks for the standard model of quantum physics in Clifford-m@orange.fr August 27, 2014 Abstract A wave equation with mass term is studied for all particles and an- tiparticles of color and antiquarks u and d. This wave equation is form invariant under the Cl 3 group generalizing

  14. Search for Physics Beyond the Standard Model at BaBar and Belle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. Calderini

    2012-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent results on the search for new physics at BaBar and Belle B-factories are presented. The search for a light Higgs boson produced in the decay of different Y resonances is shown. In addition, recent measurements aimed to discover invisible final states produced by new physics mechanisms beyond the standard model are presented.

  15. CDF/PUB/EXOTIC/PUBLIC/10737 Search for a Standard Model Higgs Boson Decaying Into Photons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fermilab

    CDF/PUB/EXOTIC/PUBLIC/10737 Search for a Standard Model Higgs Boson Decaying Into Photons at CDF) A search for the SM Higgs boson in the diphoton decay channel is reported using data corre- sponding are set on the production cross section times the H branching fraction for hypothetical Higgs boson

  16. CDF note 9642 Search for the Standard Model Higgs boson in the ET plus jets sample

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fermilab

    CDF note 9642 Search for the Standard Model Higgs boson in the ET plus jets sample The CDF Collaboration URL http://www-cdf.fnal.gov (Dated: August 17, 2009) We search for the Higgs boson produced; the Higgs boson decays into a bb pair. This analysis is an update of the previous one to 3.6 fb-1 of CDF

  17. W / Z + heavy flavor production and the standard model Higgs searches at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Choi, S.Y.; /UC, Riverside

    2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Searches for the Standard Model Higgs in WH and H {yields} WW channels by CDF and D0 collaborations are presented. The preliminary results are based on < 180 pb{sup -1} of data analyzed by each experiment. Important backgrounds to Higgs searches, such as heavy flavor production in association with massive vector bosons (W and Z) are studied in the process.

  18. Search for standard model Higgs boson production in association with a W boson at CDF

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bauer, Gerry P.

    We present a search for the standard model Higgs boson production in association with a W boson in proton-antiproton collisions (pp? ?W[superscript ±]H???bb? ) at a center of mass energy of 1.96 TeV. The search employs ...

  19. Search for the Standard Model Higgs boson decaying to two W bosons at CMS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xie, Si, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this thesis, we search for the production of the Standard Model Higgs boson at the Large Hadron Collider, through its decay mode to two W bosons, which each in turn decay into a charged lepton and a neutrino. The Higgs ...

  20. Has a standard model solution to the solar neutrino problem been found?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bahcall, J N; Christensen-Dalsgaard, J; Clevelend, B T; Degl'Innocenti, S; Filippone, B W; Glasner, A; Kavanagh, R W; Koonin, S E; Lande, K; Kanganke, K; Parker, P D; Pinsonneault, M H; Proffitt, C R; Shoppa, T D; John N Bahcall et al

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The claim by Dar and Shaviv that they have found a standard model solution to the solar neutrino problem is based upon an incorrect assumption made in extrapolating nuclear cross sections and the selective use of a small fraction of the nuclear physics and of the neutrino data. In addition, five different solar model codes show that the rate obtained for the chlorine experiment using the Dar-Shaviv stated parameters differs by at least 14 .sigma. from the observed rate.

  1. Has a standard model solution to the solar neutrino problem been found?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bahcall, J.N.; Barnes, C.A.; Christensen-Dalsgaard, J.; Cleveland, B.T.; Degl'Innocenti, S.; Filippone, B.W.; Glasner, A.; Kavanagh, R.W.; Koonin, S.E.; Lande, K.; Langanke, K.; Parker, P.D.; Pinsonneault, M.H.; Proffitt, C.R.; Shoppa, T.

    1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The claim by Dar and Shaviv that they have found a standard model solution to the solar neutrino problem is base upon an incorrect assumption made in extrapolating nuclear cross sections and the selective use of a small fraction of the nuclear physics and of the neutrino data. In addition, five different solar model codes show that the rate obtained for the chlorine experiment using the Dar- Shaviv stated parameters differs by a least 14{sigma} from the observed rate.

  2. EXPORT CONTROLS COMPLIANCE Policy Statement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shahriar, Selim

    Page 1 EXPORT CONTROLS COMPLIANCE Policy Statement Northwestern University ("Northwestern" or "University") must comply with all export control regulations issued by the federal government, which apply of the Northwestern community to comply with federal export control regulations, and the repercussions

  3. Financial Impact of Energy Efficiency under a Federal Renewable Electricity Standard: Case Study of a Kansas "super-utility"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cappers, Peter

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    efficiency resources as part of an RES compliance strategy). Energy efficiency with a comprehensive business model:

  4. Gluon Fusion Processes at One-loop within the Standard Model and Beyond

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ambresh Shivaji

    2013-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

    In this thesis, we have studied certain gluon fusion processes which proceed via quark loop diagrams at the leading order. The fact that these gluon-gluon channel processes are independent processes, their contributions towards the total/differential hadronic cross sections can be calculated separately. We have considered the production of a pair of electroweak vector bosons in association with a jet via gluon fusion within the standard model. These processes were not accessible at earlier hadron colliders such as the Tevatron. Therefore, observation of these rare processes at the LHC will be a test of the standard model itself. Like the di-vector boson production via gluon fusion processes, these processes are also important backgrounds for many new physics signals, and the standard model Higgs boson signal at the LHC. These leading order gluon fusion processes contribute to the corresponding hadronic processes at the next-to-next-to-leading order in {\\alpha}_s. We have taken a model of extra-dimensions, the ADD (Arkani-Hamed, Dimopoulos and Dvali) model, as the possible candidate of new physics at the LHC. This model tries to solve the hierarchy problem of the standard model by proposing large extra space dimensions which may be accessible at TeV scale. We have considered the direct production of KK-gravitons (GKK) in association with an electroweak boson (H/{\\gamma}/Z) via gluon fusion. These processes contribute to the corresponding hadronic processes at the next-to-leading order in {\\alpha}_s. Many interesting issues related to the fermion loop amplitudes have also been discussed.

  5. Hazardous Waste Compliance Program Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Potter, G.L.; Holstein, K.A.

    1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Hazardous Waste Compliance Program Plan (HWCPP) describes how the Rocky Flats Plant institutes a more effective waste management program designed to achieve and maintain strict adherence to the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) requirements. Emphasis is given to improve integration of line operations with programmatic and functional support activities necessary to achieve physical compliance to RCRA regulated equipment, facilities and operations at the floor level. This program focuses on specific activities occurring or which need to occur within buildings containing RCRA regulated units and activities. The plan describes a new approach to achieving and maintaining compliance. This approach concentrates authority and accountability for compliance with the line operating personnel, with support provided from the programmatic functions. This approach requires a higher degree of integration and coordination between operating and program support organizations. The principal changes in emphases are; (1) increased line operations involvement, knowledge and accountability in compliance activities, (2) improved management systems to identify, correct and/or avoid deficiencies and (3) enhanced management attention and employee awareness of compliance related matters.

  6. Risk aggregation in Solvency II: How to converge the approaches of the internal models and those of the standard formula?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    of the standard formula? Laurent Devineau Université de Lyon, Université Lyon 1, Laboratoire de Science the Solvency II economic capital: the use of a standard formula or the use of an internal model (global demonstrate that the standard formula can be considered as a first order approximation of the result

  7. Non-Higgsable QCD and the Standard Model Spectrum in F-theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Antonella Grassi; James Halverson; Julius Shaneson; Washington Taylor

    2014-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Many four-dimensional supersymmetric compactifications of F-theory contain gauge groups that cannot be spontaneously broken through geometric deformations. These "non-Higgsable clusters" include realizations of $SU(3)$, $SU(2)$, and $SU(3) \\times SU(2)$, but no $SU(n)$ gauge groups or factors with $n> 3$. We study possible realizations of the standard model in F-theory that utilize non-Higgsable clusters containing $SU(3)$ factors and show that there are three distinct possibilities. In one, fields with the non-abelian gauge charges of the standard model matter fields are localized at a single locus where non-perturbative $SU(3)$ and $SU(2)$ seven-branes intersect; cancellation of gauge anomalies implies that the simplest four-dimensional chiral $SU(3)\\times SU(2)\\times U(1)$ model that may arise in this context exhibits standard model families. We identify specific geometries that realize non-Higgsable $SU(3)$ and $SU(3) \\times SU(2)$ sectors. This kind of scenario provides a natural mechanism that could explain the existence of an unbroken QCD sector, or more generally the appearance of light particles and symmetries at low energy scales.

  8. Search for the standard model Higgs boson in tau lepton pair final states

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D0 Collaboration

    2012-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a search for the standard model Higgs boson in final states with an electron or muon and a hadronically decaying tau lepton in association with zero, one, or two or more jets using data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of up to 7.3 fb^{-1} collected with the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron collider. The analysis is sensitive to Higgs boson production via gluon gluon fusion, associated vector boson production, and vector boson fusion, and to Higgs boson decays to tau lepton pairs or W boson pairs. Observed (expected) limits are set on the ratio of 95% C.L. upper limits on the cross section times branching ratio, relative to those predicted by the Standard Model, of 14 (22) at a Higgs boson mass of 115 GeV and 7.7 (6.8) at 165 GeV.

  9. Expected Precision of Higgs Boson Partial Widths within the Standard Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. Peter Lepage; Paul B. Mackenzie; Michael E. Peskin

    2015-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss the sources of uncertainty in calculations of the partial widths of the Higgs boson within the Standard Model. The uncertainties come from two sources: the truncation of perturbation theory and the uncertainties in input parameters. We review the current status of perturbative calculations and note that these are already reaching the parts-per-mil level of accuracy for the major decay modes. The main sources of uncertainty will then come from the parametric dependences on alpha_s, m_b, and m_c. Knowledge of these parameters is systematically improvable through lattice gauge theory calculations. We estimate the precision that lattice QCD will achieve in the next decade and the corresponding precision of the Standard Model predictions for Higgs boson partial widths.

  10. Search for the standard model Higgs boson in tau lepton final states

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abazov, Victor Mukhamedovich; et al.

    2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a search for the standard model Higgs boson in final states with an electron or muon and a hadronically decaying tau lepton in association with zero, one, or two or more jets using data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of up to 7.3 fb{sup -1} collected with the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron collider. The analysis is sensitive to Higgs boson production via gluon gluon fusion, associated vector boson production, and vector boson fusion, and to Higgs boson decays to tau lepton pairs or W boson pairs. Observed (expected) limits are set on the ratio of 95% C.L. upper limits on the cross section times branching ratio, relative to those predicted by the Standard Model, of 14 (22) at a Higgs boson mass of 115 GeV and 7.7 (6.8) at 165 GeV.

  11. e{sup +}e{sup -{yields}{mu}+{mu}-} scattering in the noncommutative standard model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Prakash, Abhishodh; Mitra, Anupam; Das, Prasanta Kumar [Birla Institute of Technology and Science-Pilani, KK Birla Goa Campus, NH-17B, Zuarinagar, Goa 403726 (India)

    2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We study muon pair production e{sup +}e{sup -{yields}{mu}+{mu}-} in the noncommutative (NC) extension of the standard model using the Seiberg-Witten maps of this to the second order of the noncommutative parameter {Theta}{sub {mu}{nu}}. Using O({Theta}{sup 2}) Feynman rules, we find the O({Theta}{sup 4}) cross section (with all other lower order contributions simply cancelled) for the pair production. The momentum dependent O({Theta}{sup 2}) NC interaction significantly modifies the cross section and angular distributions which are different from the commuting standard model. We study the collider signatures of the space-time noncommutativity at the International Linear Collider (ILC) and find that the process e{sup +}e{sup -{yields}{mu}+{mu}-} can probe the NC scale {Lambda} in the range 0.8-1.0 TeV for typical ILC energy ranges.

  12. Neutral Higgs boson pair production at the linear collider in the noncommutative standard model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Das, Prasanta Kumar; Prakash, Abhishodh; Mitra, Anupam [Birla Institute of Technology and Science-Pilani, K.K. Birla Goa Campus, NH-17B, Zuarinagar, Goa-403726 (India)

    2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the Higgs boson pair production at the linear collider in the noncommutative extension of the standard model using the Seiberg-Witten map of this to the first order of the noncommutative parameter {Theta}{sub {mu}{nu}}. Unlike the standard model (where the process is forbidden) here the Higgs boson pair directly interacts with the photon. We find that the pair production cross section can be quite significant for the noncommutative scale {Lambda} lying in the range 0.5 TeV to 1.0 TeV. Using the experimental (LEP 2, Tevatron, and global electroweak fit) bound on the Higgs mass, we obtain 626 GeV{<=}{Lambda}{<=}974 GeV.

  13. Expected Precision of Higgs Boson Partial Widths within the Standard Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. Peter Lepage; Paul B. Mackenzie; Michael E. Peskin

    2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss the sources of uncertainty in calculations of the partial widths of the Higgs boson within the Standard Model. The uncertainties come from two sources: the truncation of perturbation theory and the uncertainties in input parameters. We review the current status of perturbative calculations and note that these are already reaching the parts-per-mil level of accuracy for the major decay modes. The main sources of uncertainty will then come from the parametric dependences on alpha_s, m_b, and m_c. Knowledge of these parameters is systematically improvable through lattice gauge theory calculations. We estimate the precision that lattice QCD will achieve in the next decade and the corresponding precision of the Standard Model predictions for Higgs boson partial widths.

  14. Implications of a large B s ? ? + ? ? branching fraction for the minimal supersymmetric standard model

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Hooper, Dan; Kelso, Chris

    2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recently, the CDF Collaboration reported the first nonzero measurement of the Bs????? branching fraction. The LHCb, CMS and ATLAS, collaborations have reported upper limits that are in tension with the CDF result. We consider the implications of these measurements for the specific case of the minimal supersymmetric standard model. We also discuss the implications of these measurements for neutralino dark matter and the supersymmetric contribution to the anomalous magnetic moment of the muon.

  15. An Explicit Embedding of Gravity and the Standard Model in E8

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lisi, A Garrett

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The algebraic elements of gravitational and Standard Model gauge fields acting on a generation of fermions may be represented using real matrices. These elements match a subalgebra of spin(11,3) acting on a Majorana-Weyl spinor, consistent with GraviGUT unification. This entire structure embeds in the quaternionic real form of the largest exceptional Lie algebra, E8. These embeddings are presented explicitly and their implications discussed.

  16. An Explicit Embedding of Gravity and the Standard Model in E8

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Garrett Lisi

    2010-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The algebraic elements of gravitational and Standard Model gauge fields acting on a generation of fermions may be represented using real matrices. These elements match a subalgebra of spin(11,3) acting on a Majorana-Weyl spinor, consistent with GraviGUT unification. This entire structure embeds in the quaternionic real form of the largest exceptional Lie algebra, E8. These embeddings are presented explicitly and their implications discussed.

  17. Semi-leptonic Decay of Lambda-b in the Standard Model and with New Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wanwei Wu

    2015-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Heavy quark decays provide a very advantageous investigation to test the Standard Model (SM). Recently, promising experiments with \\textit{b} quark, as well as the analysis of the huge data sets produced at the B factories, have led to an increasing study and sensitive measurements of relative \\textit{b} quark decays. In this thesis, I calculate various observables in the semi-leptonic decay process $\\Lambda_{b}\\to \\Lambda_{c}\\tau\\bar{\

  18. Search for the Standard Model Higgs Boson in the $WH \\to \\ell \

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nagai, Yoshikazu; /Tsukuba U.

    2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have searched for the Standard Model Higgs boson in the WH {yields} lvbb channel in 1.96 TeV pp collisions at CDF. This search is based on the data collected by March 2009, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 4.3 fb-1. The W H channel is one of the most promising channels for the Higgs boson search at Tevatron in the low Higgs boson mass region.

  19. Testing the Standard Model by precision measurement of the weak charges of quarks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ross Young; Roger Carlini; Anthony Thomas; Julie Roche

    2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In a global analysis of the latest parity-violating electron scattering measurements on nuclear targets, we demonstrate a significant improvement in the experimental knowledge of the weak neutral-current lepton-quark interactions at low-energy. The precision of this new result, combined with earlier atomic parity-violation measurements, limits the magnitude of possible contributions from physics beyond the Standard Model - setting a model-independent, lower-bound on the scale of new physics at ~1 TeV.

  20. Seeking Texture Zeros in the Quark Mass Matrix Sector of the Standard Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giraldo, Yithsbey

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Here we show that the Weak Basis Transformation is an appropriate mathematical tool that can be used to find texture zeros in the quark mass matrix sector of the Standard Model. So, starting with the most general quark mass matrices and taking physical data into consideration, is possible to obtain more than three texture zeros by any weak basis transformation. Where the most general quark mass matrices considered in the model, were obtained through a special weak basis wherein the mass matrix $M_u$~(or $M_d$) has been taken to be diagonal and only the matrix $M_d$~(or $M_u$) is considered to be most general.

  1. 2008 Residential Building Efficiency Standards 1 Efficiency Ratings and Performance Modeling Inputs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Inputs for the Daiken AC (Americas), Inc. Altherma Air-to-Water Source Heat Pump System The Building-to-Water Source Heat Pump can provide space heating, space cooling and domestic water heating functions Required Compliance Software Inputs-- The Altherma Air-to-Water Source Heat Pump system is an electric heat

  2. Puerto Rico- Renewable Energy Portfolio Standard

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Note: Compliance for this standard does not begin until 2015. Additional rules and regulations are needed to implement this law; this record will be updated periodically as the rules are developed.

  3. Compliance Evaluation | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613PortsmouthBartlesville EnergyDepartment.Attachment FY2011-40 ChapterComplianceCompliance

  4. A Search for the Standard Model Higgs Boson Produced in Association with a $W$ Boson

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Frank, Martin Johannes; /Baylor U.

    2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a search for a standard model Higgs boson produced in association with a W boson using data collected with the CDF II detector from p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV. The search is performed in the WH {yields} {ell}{nu}b{bar b} channel. The two quarks usually fragment into two jets, but sometimes a third jet can be produced via gluon radiation, so we have increased the standard two-jet sample by including events that contain three jets. We reconstruct the Higgs boson using two or three jets depending on the kinematics of the event. We find an improvement in our search sensitivity using the larger sample together with this multijet reconstruction technique. Our data show no evidence of a Higgs boson, so we set 95% confidence level upper limits on the WH production rate. We set limits between 3.36 and 28.7 times the standard model prediction for Higgs boson masses ranging from 100 to 150 GeV/c{sup 2}.

  5. Search for the standard model Higgs boson produced in association with a standard W or a Z boson and decaying to bottom quarks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chatrchyan, Serguei; et al.,

    2014-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

    A search for the standard model Higgs boson (H) decaying to b b-bar when produced in association with a weak vector boson (V) is reported for the following channels: W(mu nu)H, W(e nu)H, W(tau nu)H, Z(mu mu)H, Z(e e)H, and Z(nu nu)H. The search is performed in data samples corresponding to integrated luminosities of up to 5.1 inverse femtobarns at sqrt(s) = 7 TeV and up to 18.9 inverse femtobarns at sqrt(s) = 8 TeV, recorded by the CMS experiment at the LHC. An excess of events is observed above the expected background with a local significance of 2.1 standard deviations for a Higgs boson mass of 125 GeV, consistent with the expectation from the production of the standard model Higgs boson. The signal strength corresponding to this excess, relative to that of the standard model Higgs boson, is 1.0 +/- 0.5.

  6. Standardization of information systems development processes and banking industry adaptations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tanrikulu, Zuhal

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper examines the current system development processes of three major Turkish banks in terms of compliance to internationally accepted system development and software engineering standards to determine the common process problems of banks. After an in-depth investigation into system development and software engineering standards, related process-based standards were selected. Questions were then prepared covering the whole system development process by applying the classical Waterfall life cycle model. Each question is made up of guidance and suggestions from the international system development standards. To collect data, people from the information technology departments of three major banks in Turkey were interviewed. Results have been aggregated by examining the current process status of the three banks together. Problematic issues were identified using the international system development standards.

  7. Export Controls Compliance Division of Research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Suzuki, Masatsugu

    Export Controls Compliance Division of Research of this document is to provide overall guidance on export control regulations and internal procedures information contained in their Export Control Compliance programs in the development of this document. #12

  8. 300 area TEDF permit compliance monitoring plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    BERNESKI, L.D.

    1998-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

    This document presents the permit compliance monitoring plan for the 300 Area Treated Effluent Disposal Facility (TEDF). It addresses the compliance with the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permit and Department of Natural Resources Aquatic Lands Sewer Outfall Lease.

  9. The College Station Residential Energy Compliance Code

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Claridge, D. E.; Schrock, D.

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The City of College Station, Texas adopted a new residential Energy Compliance Code in January, 1988. The code, which strengthens compliance requirements in several areas, has received broadly based support and acceptance from all major constituent...

  10. Innovative compliance and enforcement approaches in Minnesota`s air program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Biewen, T.; Lockwood, B.; Giddings, S. [Minnesota Pollution Control Agency, St. Paul, MN (United States). Air Quality Div.

    1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    As the universe of sources subject to air regulations continues to expand, traditional compliance and enforcement approaches that evaluate compliance status and address noncompliance one source at-a-time, are becoming less useful. In addition, increasing complexity of state and federal air regulations are a drain on resources as regulatory agencies try to manage Title V Permitting, new NESHAPS standards for hazardous air pollutants and new monitoring requirements associated with Title V Permits. In order to keep pace, regulatory agencies can use alternative approaches to compliance and enforcement that maximize resources while improving rates of compliance with state and federal air requirements. This paper discusses approaches used by the Minnesota Pollution Control Agency that are designed to improve compliance rates using non-conventional compliance and enforcement techniques. Approaches discussed include sector based initiatives, compliance assistance activities, and initiatives that encourage companies to conduct compliance self-assessments. Specific initiatives that have been used in 1996 and that are ongoing in 1997 are presented, including the purpose and outcome of these efforts.

  11. administration compliance program: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ...1-1 2.0 Overview and Strategy of Compliance Audit and Review Program...2 5 Compliance and Research...

  12. Threat Insight Quarterly Regulatory Compliance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    X-Force ® Threat Insight Quarterly Regulatory Compliance www.iss.netwww.iss.net October 2006 #12 Risk Index ..............................................11 Future X-Force Threat Insight Quarterly Internet Security Systems X-Force® Threat Insight Quarterly > October 2006 ©2006 Internet Security Systems

  13. Deans Audit Cover Environmental Compliance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pawlowski, Wojtek

    facilities in central New York to comply with a New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (DECDeans Audit Cover Environmental Compliance Guidance Document Approved by: (Pat McNally) Last electronically at: http://sp.ehs.cornell.edu/env/general-environmental-management/environmental

  14. Technical assessment of compliance with workplace air sampling requirements at WRAP

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    HACKWORTH, M.F.

    1999-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this Technical Assessment is to satisfy HSRCM-1, ''Hanford Site Radiological Control Manual'' Article 551.4 for a documented study of facility Workplace Air Monitoring (WAM) programs. HSRCM-1 is the primary guidance for radiological control at Waste Management Federal Services of Hanford, Inc. (WMH). The HSRCM-1 complies with Title 10. Part 835 of the Code of Federal Regulations (10CFR835). This document provides an evaluation of the compliance of the Waste Receiving and Processing facility (WRAP) WAM program to the criteria standards, requirements, and documents compliance with the requirements where appropriate. Where necessary, it also indicates changes needed to bring specific locations into compliance.

  15. Search for the standard model and a fermiophobic Higgs boson in diphoton final states

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D0 Collaboration

    2011-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a search for the standard model Higgs boson and a fermiophobic Higgs boson in the diphoton final states based on 8.2 fb-1 of ppbar collisions collected with the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. No excess of data above background predictions is observed and upper limits at the 95% C.L. on the cross section multiplied by the branching fraction are set which are the most restrictive to date. A fermiophobic Higgs boson with a mass below 112.9 GeV is excluded at the 95% C.L.

  16. Schrödinger-Pauli Equation for the Standard Model Extension CPT-Violating Dirac Equation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas D. Gutierrez

    2015-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

    It is instructive to investigate the non-relativistic limit of the simplest Standard Model Extension (SME) CPT-violating Dirac-like equation but with minimal coupling to the electromagnetic fields. In this limit, it becomes an intuitive Schr\\"odinger-Pauli-like equation. This is comparable to the free particle treatment as explored by Kostelecky and Lane, but this exercise only considers the $a$ and $b$ CPT-violating terms and $\\vec{p}/m$ terms to first order. Several toy systems are discussed.

  17. Schr\\"odinger-Pauli Equation for the Standard Model Extension CPT-Violating Dirac Equation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gutierrez, Thomas D

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    It is instructive to investigate the non-relativistic limit of the simplest Standard Model Extension (SME) CPT-violating Dirac-like equation but with minimal coupling to the electromagnetic fields. In this limit, it becomes an intuitive Schr\\"odinger-Pauli-like equation. This is comparable to the free particle treatment as explored by Kostelecky and Lane, but this exercise only considers the $a$ and $b$ CPT-violating terms and $\\vec{p}/m$ terms to first order. Several toy systems are discussed.

  18. Results on the search for the standard model Higgs boson at CMS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fabozzi, Francesco [INFN Sezione di Napoli, Complesso Univ. di Monte S. Angelo Via Cintia - 80126 Napoli (Italy) and Universita della Basilicata, Viale dell'Ateneo Lucano 10 - 85100 Potenza (Italy); Collaboration: CMS Collaboration

    2012-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

    A summary of the results from searches for the Standard Model Higgs Boson in the CMS experiment at LHC with data collected from proton-proton collisions at {radical}(s) = 7TeV is presented. The Higgs boson is searched in a multiplicity of decay channels using data samples corresponding to integrated luminosities in the range 4.6 - 4.8 fb{sup -1}. The investigated mass range is 110 - 600 GeV. Results are reported for each channel as well as for their combination.

  19. EPAct Alternative Fuel Transportation Program: State and Alternative Fuel Provider Fleet Compliance Annual Report, Fleet Compliance Results for MY 2009/FY 2010 (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This annual report summarizes the compliance results of state and alternative fuel provider fleets covered by the Energy Policy Act of 1992 (EPAct) for model year 2009/fiscal year 2010.

  20. Predicting and improving dietary compliance among participants of a dietary study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Devries, Suzanne Mishael

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . vi viii Predicting Compliant Behavior Neasuring Compliance. Improving Dietary Compliance. . Objectives. NETHODS. 3 8 ll 12 Subject Selection. Diet Prescription. Education, Feedback and Follor-up. Food Intake Analysis Survey and 24-hour... Recall. Dietary Adequacy Evaluation and Personalized Diet Portfolios. Feedback Questionnaire. Ethical Standards Data Interpretation. RESULTS 12 12 13 14 16 16 . . 17 19 19 28 21 Sample Description. Dietary Adequacy (controls vs...

  1. Estimating Loss-of-Coolant Accident Frequencies for the Standardized Plant Analysis Risk Models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    S. A. Eide; D. M. Rasmuson; C. L. Atwood

    2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission maintains a set of risk models covering the U.S. commercial nuclear power plants. These standardized plant analysis risk (SPAR) models include several loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) initiating events such as small (SLOCA), medium (MLOCA), and large (LLOCA). All of these events involve a loss of coolant inventory from the reactor coolant system. In order to maintain a level of consistency across these models, initiating event frequencies generally are based on plant-type average performance, where the plant types are boiling water reactors and pressurized water reactors. For certain risk analyses, these plant-type initiating event frequencies may be replaced by plant-specific estimates. Frequencies for SPAR LOCA initiating events previously were based on results presented in NUREG/CR-5750, but the newest models use results documented in NUREG/CR-6928. The estimates in NUREG/CR-6928 are based on historical data from the initiating events database for pressurized water reactor SLOCA or an interpretation of results presented in the draft version of NUREG-1829. The information in NUREG-1829 can be used several ways, resulting in different estimates for the various LOCA frequencies. Various ways NUREG-1829 information can be used to estimate LOCA frequencies were investigated and this paper presents two methods for the SPAR model standard inputs, which differ from the method used in NUREG/CR-6928. In addition, results obtained from NUREG-1829 are compared with actual operating experience as contained in the initiating events database.

  2. COMPLIANCE STUDIES: WHAT ABOUT THE FISH?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Woodley, Christa M.; Fischer, Eric S.; Wagner, Katie A.; Weiland, Mark A.; Eppard, M. B.; Carlson, Thomas J.

    2013-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

    ABSTRACT It is understood that operational and structural conditions at hydroelectric facilities along with environmental conditions of the migration corridors affect the passage conditions for fish. Hydropower fish survival assessments at the individual- and population-level have progressed over the past decade with development of turbine simulation software and improvements in telemetry systems, in particular, micro-transmitters, cabled and autonomous receivers, and advanced statistical designs that provide precise estimates of passage routes and dam-passage survival. However, these approaches often ignore fish condition as a variable in passage and survival analyses. To account for fish condition effects on survival results, compliance statistical models often require increased numbers of tagged fish. For example, prior to and during migration, fish encounter numerous stressors (e.g., disease, predation, contact with structures, decompression events), all of which can cause physical and physiological stress, altering the probability of survival after passage through a dam or a series of dams. In addition, the effects of surgical transmitter implantation process or the transmitter itself may cause physiological stress, alter behavior, and/or decrease survival. Careful physiological evaluations can augment survival model assumptions, resultant data, and predictive scenarios. To exemplify this, surgeons concurrently noted fish condition and surgical implantation during a multi-dam compliance study in 2011. The analyses indicted that surgeon observations on fish condition and surgical outcomes were related to 24 h holding mortalities and fish that never detected after release. Short reach and long reach survival were related to surgical outcomes and fish condition, respectively.

  3. Cogeneration of Dark Matter and Baryons by Non-Standard-Model Sphalerons in Unified Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. M. Barr; Heng-Yu Chen

    2013-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Sphalerons of a new gauge interaction can convert a primordial asymmetry in B or L into a dark matter asymmetry. From the equilibrium conditions for the sphalerons of both the electroweak and the new interactions, one can compute the ratios of B, L, and X, where X is the dark matter number, thus determining the mass of the dark matter particle fairly precisely. Such a scenario can arise naturally in the context of unification with larger groups. An illustrative model embeddable in $SU(6) \\times SU(2) \\subset E_6$ is described as well as an equally simple model based on SU(7).

  4. Efficiency of appliance models on the market before and after DOE standards

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meyers, Stephen

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    AHAM Directory Compared to DOE Standards June July 2002 2001Directory Compared to1990 DOE Standard March1991 Oct 1987Directory Compared to 2000 DOE Standard Sept 2001 March 1991

  5. Elliptical Solutions to the Standard Cosmology Model with Realistic Values of Matter Density

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ahmet Mecit Oztas; Michael L. Smith

    2015-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

    We have examined a solution to the FRW model of the Einstein and de Sitter Universe, often termed the standard model of cosmology, using wide values for the normalized cosmological constant Omega_L and spacetime curvature Omega_k with proposed values of normalized matter density. These solutions were evaluated using a combination of the third type of elliptical equations and were found to display critical points for redshift z, between 1 and 3, when Omega_L is positive. These critical points occur at values for normalized cosmological constant higher than those currently thought important, though we find this solution interesting because the Omega_L term may increase in dominance as the Universe evolves bringing this discontinuity into importance. We also find positive Omega_L tends towards attractive at values of z which are commonly observed for distant galaxies.

  6. The Standard model as a low-energy effective theory: what is triggering the Higgs mechanism?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fred Jegerlehner

    2014-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The discovery of the Higgs by ATLAS and CMS at the LHC not only provided the last missing building block of the electroweak Standard Model, the mass of the Higgs has been found to have a very peculiar value about 126 GeV, which is such that vacuum stability is extending up to the Planck scale. This may have much deeper drawback than anticipated so far. The impact on the running of the SM gauge, Yukawa and Higgs couplings up to the Planck scale has been discussed in several articles recently. Here we consider the impact on the running masses and we discuss the role of quadratic divergences within the Standard Model. The change of sign of the coefficient of the quadratically divergent terms showing up at about mu_0 ~ 1.4 x 10^16 GeV may be understood as a first order phase transition restoring the symmetric phase, while its large negative values at lower scales triggers the Higgs mechanism, running parameters evolve in such a way that the symmetry is restored two orders of magnitude before the Planck scale. Thus, the electroweak phase transition takes place at the scale mu_0 and not at the electroweak scale v ~ 250 GeV. The SM Higgs system and its phase transition could play a key role for the inflation of the early universe. Also baryogenesis has to be reconsidered under the aspect that perturbative arguments surprisingly work up to the Planck scale.

  7. Search for the Standard Model Higgs Boson in associated production with w boson at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chun, Xu; /Michigan U.

    2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A search for the Standard Model Higgs boson in proton-antiproton collisions with center-of-mass energy 1.96 TeV at the Tevatron is presented in this dissertation. The process of interest is the associated production of W boson and Higgs boson, with the W boson decaying leptonically and the Higgs boson decaying into a pair of bottom quarks. The dataset in the analysis is accumulated by the D0 detector from April 2002 to April 2008 and corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 2.7 fb{sup -1}. The events are reconstructed and selected following the criteria of an isolated lepton, missing transverse energy and two jets. The D0 Neural Network b-jet identification algorithm is further used to discriminate b jets from light jets. A multivariate analysis combining Matrix Element and Neural Network methods is explored to improve the Higgs boson signal significance. No evidence of the Higgs boson is observed in this analysis. In consequence, an observed (expected) limit on the ratio of {sigma} (p{bar p} {yields} WH) x Br (H {yields} b{bar b}) to the Standard Model prediction is set to be 6.7 (6.4) at 95% C.L. for the Higgs boson with a mass of 115 GeV.

  8. From Clifford Algebra of Nonrelativistic Phase Space to Quarks and Leptons of the Standard Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Piotr ?enczykowski

    2015-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

    We review a recently proposed Clifford-algebra approach to elementary particles. We start with: (1) a philosophical background that motivates a maximally symmetric treatment of position and momentum variables, and: (2) an analysis of the minimal conceptual assumptions needed in quark mass extraction procedures. With these points in mind, a variation on Born's reciprocity argument provides us with an unorthodox view on the problem of mass. The idea of space quantization suggests then the linearization of the nonrelativistic quadratic form ${\\bf p}^2 +{\\bf x}^2$ with position and momentum satisfying standard commutation relations. This leads to the 64-dimensional Clifford algebra ${Cl}_{6,0}$ of nonrelativistic phase space within which one identifies the internal quantum numbers of a single Standard Model generation of elementary particles (i.e. weak isospin, hypercharge, and color). The relevant quantum numbers are naturally linked to the symmetries of macroscopic phase space. It is shown that the obtained phase-space-based description of elementary particles gives a subquark-less explanation of the celebrated Harari-Shupe rishon model. Finally, the concept of additivity is used to form novel suggestions as to how hadrons are constructed out of quarks and how macroscopically motivated invariances may be restored at the hadron level.

  9. Gauge Theory Model of the Neutrino and New Physics Beyond the Standard Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yue-Liang Wu

    2012-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Majorana features of neutrinos and SO(3) gauge symmetry of three families enable us to construct a gauge model of neutrino for understanding naturally the observed smallness of neutrino masses and the nearly tri-bimaximal neutrino mixing when combining together with the mechanism of approximate global U(1) family symmetry. The vacuum structure of SO(3) symmetry breaking is found to play an important role. The mixing angle $\\theta_{13}$ and CP-violating phases governed by the vacuum of spontaneous symmetry breaking are in general non-zero and testable experimentally at the allowed sensitivity. The model predicts the existence of vector-like SO(3) triplet charged leptons and vector-like SO(3) triplet Majorana neutrinos as well as SO(3) tri-triplet Higgs bosons, some of them can be light and explored at the colliders LHC and ILC.

  10. EPA 520/1-89-002 A GUIDE FOR DETERMINING COMPLIANCE WITH THE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    or its Agreement States. The proposed standard does not apply to disposal at facilities under 40 CFREPA 520/1-89-002 A GUIDE FOR DETERMINING COMPLIANCE WITH THE CLEAN AIR ACT STANDARDS FOR RADIONUCLIDE EMISSIONS FROM NRC-LICENSED AND NON-DOE FEDERAL FACILITIES (Revision 2) U.S. ENVIRONMENTAL

  11. Search for the Standard Model Higgs Boson Produced in Association with Top Quarks Using the Full CDF Data Set

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gomez-Ceballos, Guillelmo

    A search is presented for the standard model Higgs boson produced in association with top quarks using the full Run II proton-antiproton collision data set, corresponding to 9.45??fb[superscript -1], collected by the ...

  12. Combined results of searches for the standard model Higgs boson in pp collisions at ?s = 7 TeV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alver, B.

    Combined results are reported from searches for the standard model Higgs boson in proton–proton collisions at ?s = 7 TeV in five Higgs boson decay modes: ??, bb, ?? , WW, and ZZ. The explored Higgs boson mass range is ...

  13. Search for the Standard Model Higgs boson in the decay channel H?ZZ(*)?4? with the ATLAS detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taylor, Frank E.

    A search for the Standard Model Higgs boson in the decay channel H?ZZ(*)??[superscript +]?[superscript ?]??[superscript +]??[superscript ?], where ?=e,? is presented. Proton–proton collision data at ?s = 7 TeV recorded ...

  14. Combined Search for the Standard Model Higgs Boson Decaying to bb? Using the D0 Run II Data Set

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Abazov, V. M.; Abbott, B.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Alexeev, G. D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Alverson, G.; Askew, A.; et al

    2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the results of the combination of searches for the standard model Higgs boson produced in association with a W or Z boson and decaying into bb? using the data sample collected with the D0 detector in pp? collisions at ?s=1.96 TeV at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. We derive 95% C.L. upper limits on the Higgs boson cross section relative to the standard model prediction in the mass range 100 GeV?MH?150 GeV, and we exclude Higgs bosons with masses smaller than 102 GeV at the 95% C.L. In the mass range 120 GeV?MH?145 GeV, the data exhibit an excessmore »above the background prediction with a global significance of 1.5 standard deviations, consistent with the expectation in the presence of a standard model Higgs boson.« less

  15. Combined Search for the Standard Model Higgs Boson Decaying to bb? Using the D0 Run II Data Set

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Abazov, V. M.; Abbott, B.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Alexeev, G. D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Alverson, G.; Askew, A.; Atkins, S.; Augsten, K.; Avila, C.; Badaud, F.; Bagby, L.; Baldin, B.; Bandurin, D. V.; Banerjee, S.; Barberis, E.; Baringer, P.; Bartlett, J. F.; Bassler, U.; Bazterra, V.; Bean, A.; Begalli, M.; Bellantoni, L.; Beri, S. B.; Bernardi, G.; Bernhard, R.; Bertram, I.; Besançon, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Bhat, P. C.; Bhatia, S.; Bhatnagar, V.; Blazey, G.; Blessing, S.; Bloom, K.; Boehnlein, A.; Boline, D.; Boos, E. E.; Borissov, G.; Bose, T.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, O.; Brock, R.; Bross, A.; Brown, D.; Brown, J.; Bu, X. B.; Buehler, M.; Buescher, V.; Bunichev, V.; Burdin, S.; Buszello, C. P.; Camacho-Pérez, E.; Casey, B. C. K.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; Caughron, S.; Chakrabarti, S.; Chakraborty, D.; Chan, K. M.; Chandra, A.; Chapon, E.; Chen, G.; Chevalier-Théry, S.; Cho, D. K.; Cho, S. W.; Choi, S.; Choudhary, B.; Cihangir, S.; Claes, D.; Clutter, J.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, W. E.; Corcoran, M.; Couderc, F.; Cousinou, M.-C.; Croc, A.; Cutts, D.; Das, A.; Davies, G.; de Jong, S. J.; De La Cruz-Burelo, E.; Déliot, F.; Demina, R.; Denisov, D.; Denisov, S. P.; Desai, S.; Deterre, C.; DeVaughan, K.; Diehl, H. T.; Diesburg, M.; Ding, P. F.; Dominguez, A.; Dubey, A.; Dudko, L. V.; Duggan, D.; Duperrin, A.; Dutt, S.; Dyshkant, A.; Eads, M.; Edmunds, D.; Ellison, J.; Elvira, V. D.; Enari, Y.; Evans, H.; Evdokimov, A.; Evdokimov, V. N.; Facini, G.; Feng, L.; Ferbel, T.; Fiedler, F.; Filthaut, F.; Fisher, W.; Fisk, H. E.; Fortner, M.; Fox, H.; Fuess, S.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; García-González, J. A.; García-Guerra, G. A.; Gavrilov, V.; Gay, P.; Geng, W.; Gerbaudo, D.; Gerber, C. E.; Gershtein, Y.; Ginther, G.; Golovanov, G.; Goussiou, A.; Grannis, P. D.; Greder, S.; Greenlee, H.; Grenier, G.; Gris, Ph.; Grivaz, J.-F.; Grohsjean, A.; Grünendahl, S.; Grünewald, M. W.; Guillemin, T.; Gutierrez, G.; Gutierrez, P.; Hagopian, S.; Haley, J.; Han, L.; Harder, K.; Harel, A.; Hauptman, J. M.; Hays, J.; Head, T.; Hebbeker, T.; Hedin, D.; Hegab, H.; Heinson, A. P.; Heintz, U.; Hensel, C.; Heredia De La Cruz, I.; Herner, K.; Hesketh, G.; Hildreth, M. D.; Hirosky, R.; Hoang, T.; Hobbs, J. D.; Hoeneisen, B.; Hogan, J.; Hohlfeld, M.; Howley, I.; Hubacek, Z.; Hynek, V.; Iashvili, I.; Ilchenko, Y.; Illingworth, R.; Ito, A. S.; Jabeen, S.; Jaffré, M.; Jayasinghe, A.; Jeong, M. S.; Jesik, R.; Jiang, P.; Johns, K.; Johnson, E.; Johnson, M.; Jonckheere, A.; Jonsson, P.; Joshi, J.; Jung, A. W.; Juste, A.; Kaadze, K.; Kajfasz, E.; Karmanov, D.; Kasper, P. A.; Katsanos, I.; Kehoe, R.; Kermiche, S.; Khalatyan, N.; Khanov, A.; Kharchilava, A.; Kharzheev, Y. N.; Kiselevich, I.; Kohli, J. M.; Kozelov, A. V.; Kraus, J.; Kulikov, S.; Kumar, A.; Kupco, A.; Kur?a, T.; Kuzmin, V. A.; Lammers, S.; Landsberg, G.; Lebrun, P.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, S. W.; Lee, W. M.; Lei, X.; Lellouch, J.; Li, D.; Li, H.; Li, L.; Li, Q. Z.; Lim, J. K.; Lincoln, D.; Linnemann, J.; Lipaev, V. V.; Lipton, R.; Liu, H.; Liu, Y.; Lobodenko, A.; Lokajicek, M.; Lopes de Sa, R.; Lubatti, H. J.; Luna-Garcia, R.; Lyon, A. L.; Maciel, A. K. A.; Madar, R.; Magaña-Villalba, R.; Malik, S.; Malyshev, V. L.; Maravin, Y.; Martínez-Ortega, J.; McCarthy, R.; McGivern, C. L.; Meijer, M. M.; Melnitchouk, A.; Menezes, D.; Mercadante, P. G.; Merkin, M.; Meyer, A.; Meyer, J.; Miconi, F.; Mondal, N. K.; Mulhearn, M.; Nagy, E.; Naimuddin, M.; Narain, M.; Nayyar, R.; Neal, H. A.; Negret, J. P.; Neustroev, P.; Nguyen, H. T.; Nunnemann, T.; Orduna, J.; Osman, N.; Osta, J.; Padilla, M.; Pal, A.; Parashar, N.; Parihar, V.; Park, S. K.; Partridge, R.; Parua, N.; Patwa, A.; Penning, B.; Perfilov, M.; Peters, Y.; Petridis, K.; Petrillo, G.; Pétroff, P.; Pleier, M.-A.; Podesta-Lerma, P. L. M.; Podstavkov, V. M.; Popov, A. V.; Prewitt, M.; Price, D.; Prokopenko, N.; Qian, J.; Quadt, A.; Quinn, B.; Rangel, M. S.; Ranjan, K.; Ratoff, P. N.; Razumov, I.; Renkel, P.; Ripp-Baudot, I.; Rizatdinova, F.; Rominsky, M.; Ross, A.; Royon, C.; Rubinov, P.; Ruchti, R.; Sajot, G.; Salcido, P.; Sánchez-Hernández, A.; Sanders, M. P.; Santos, A. S.; Savage, G.; Sawyer, L.; Scanlon, T.; Schamberger, R. D.; Scheglov, Y.; Schellman, H.; Schlobohm, S.; Schwanenberger, C.; Schwienhorst, R.; Sekaric, J.; Severini, H.; Shabalina, E.; Shary, V.; Shaw, S.; Shchukin, A. A.; Shivpuri, R. K.; Simak, V.; Skubic, P.; Slattery, P.; Smirnov, D.; Smith, K. J.; Snow, G. R.; Snow, J.; Snyder, S.; Söldner-Rembold, S.; Sonnenschein, L.; Soustruznik, K.; Stark, J.; Stoyanova, D. A.; Strauss, M.; Suter, L.; Svoisky, P.; Takahashi, M.; Titov, M.; Tokmenin, V. V.; Tsai, Y.-T.; Tschann-Grimm, K.; Tsybychev, D.; Tuchming, B.; Tully, C.; Uvarov, L.; Uvarov, S.; Uzunyan, S.; Van Kooten, R.; van Leeuwen, W. M.; Varelas, N.; Varnes, E. W.

    2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the results of the combination of searches for the standard model Higgs boson produced in association with a W or Z boson and decaying into bb? using the data sample collected with the D0 detector in pp? collisions at ?s=1.96 TeV at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. We derive 95% C.L. upper limits on the Higgs boson cross section relative to the standard model prediction in the mass range 100 GeV?MH?150 GeV, and we exclude Higgs bosons with masses smaller than 102 GeV at the 95% C.L. In the mass range 120 GeV?MH?145 GeV, the data exhibit an excess above the background prediction with a global significance of 1.5 standard deviations, consistent with the expectation in the presence of a standard model Higgs boson.

  16. Search for Standard Model Higgs Boson in H to WW Channel at CDF

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Pursley; for the CDF Collaboration

    2009-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a search for standard model Higgs boson to WW(*) production in dilepton plus missing transverse energy final states in data collected by the CDF II detector corresponding to 4.8/fb of integrated luminosity. To maximize sensitivity, the multivariate discriminants used to separate signal from background in the opposite-sign dilepton event sample are independently optimized for final states with zero, one, or two or more identified jets. All significant Higgs boson production modes (gluon fusion, associated production with either a W or Z boson, and vector boson fusion) are considered in determining potential signal contributions. We also incorporate a separate analysis of the same-sign dilepton event sample which potentially contains additional signal events originating from associated Higgs boson production mechanisms. Cross section limits relative to the combined SM predictions are presented for a range of Higgs boson mass hypotheses between 110 and 200 GeV/c^2.

  17. D-Dbar Mixing in the Standard Model and Beyond from Nf=2 Twisted Mass QCD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    N. Carrasco; M. Ciuchini; P. Dimopoulos; R. Frezzotti; V. Gimenez; V. Lubicz; G. C. Rossi; F. Sanfilippo; L. Silvestrini; S. Simula; C. Tarantino

    2014-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the first unquenched lattice QCD results for the bag parameters controlling the short distance contribution to D meson oscillations in the Standard Model and beyond. We have used the gauge configurations produced by the European Twisted Mass Collaboration with Nf = 2 dynamical quarks, at four lattice spacings and light meson masses in the range 280-500 MeV. Renormalization is carried out non-perturbatively with the RI-MOM method. The bag-parameter results have been used to constrain New Physics effects in D-Dbar mixing, to put a lower bound to the generic New Physics scale and to constrain off-diagonal squark mass terms for TeV-scale Supersymmetry.

  18. Tritium beta decay, neutrino mass matrices, and interactions beyond the standard model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stephenson, G. J.; Goldman, T.; McKellar, B. H. J.

    2000-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The interference of charge changing interactions, weaker than the V-A standard model (SM) interaction and having a different Lorentz structure, with that SM interaction, can, in principle, produce effects near the end point of the tritium beta decay spectrum which are of a different character from those produced by the purely kinematic effect of neutrino mass expected in the simplest extension of the SM. We show that the existence of more than one mass eigenstate can lead to interference effects at the end point that are stronger than those occurring over the entire spectrum. We discuss these effects both for the special case of Dirac neutrinos and the more general case of Majorana neutrinos and show that, for the present precision of the experiments, one formula should suffice to express the interference effects in all cases. Implications for ''sterile'' neutrinos are noted.

  19. Survey of vector-like fermion extensions of the Standard Model and their phenomenological implications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ellis, Sebastian A R; Gopalakrishna, Shrihari; Wells, James D

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    With the renewed interest in vector-like fermion extensions of the Standard Model, we present here a study of multiple vector-like theories and their phenomenological implications. Our focus is mostly on minimal flavor conserving theories that couple the vector-like fermions to the SM gauge fields and mix only weakly with SM fermions so as to avoid flavor problems. We present calculations for precision electroweak and vector-like state decays, which are needed to investigate compatibility with currently known data. We investigate the impact of vector-like fermions on Higgs boson production and decay, including loop contributions, in a wide variety of vector-like extensions and their parameter spaces.

  20. Searches for a high mass Standard Model Higgs boson at the Tevatron

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Pagan Griso

    2009-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Higgs boson searches are commonly considered one of the main objectives of particle physics nowadays. The latest results obtained by the CDF and D0 collaborations are presented here when searching for Higgs boson decaying into a W-boson pair, currently the most sensitive channel for masses greater than 130 GeV. The presented results are based on an integrated luminosity that ranges from 3.0 to 4.2 fb^-1. No significant excess over expected background is observed and the 95% CL limits are set for a Standard Model (SM) Higgs boson for different mass hypotheses ranging from 100 GeV to 200 GeV. The combination of CDF and D0 results is also presented, which exclude for the first time a SM Higgs boson in the 160 < mH < 170 GeV mass range.

  1. Theoretical Standard Model Rates of Proton to Neutron Conversions Near Metallic Hydride Surfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Widom, A

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The process of radiation induced electron capture by protons or deuterons producing new ultra low momentum neutrons and neutrinos may be theoretically described within the standard field theoretical model of electroweak interactions. For protons or deuterons in the neighborhoods of surfaces of condensed matter metallic hydride cathodes, such conversions are determined in part by the collective plasma modes of the participating charged particles, e.g. electrons and protons. The radiation energy required for such low energy nuclear reactions may be supplied by the applied voltage required to push a strong charged current across a metallic hydride surface employed as a cathode within a chemical cell. The electroweak rates of the resulting ultra low momentum neutron production are computed from these considerations.

  2. Light supersymmetric axion in an anomalous Abelian extension of the standard model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coriano, Claudio; Guzzi, Marco; Mariano, Antonio; Morelli, Simone [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita del Salento Via Arnesano 73100 Lecce (Italy) and INFN Sezione di Lecce, Via Arnesano 73100 Lecce (Italy)

    2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a supersymmetric extension of the standard model (USSM-A) with an anomalous U(1) and Stueckelberg axions for anomaly cancellation, generalizing similar nonsupersymmetric constructions. The model, built by a bottom-up approach, is expected to capture the low-energy supersymmetric description of axionic symmetries in theories with gauged anomalous Abelian interactions, previously explored in the nonsupersymmetric case for scenarios with intersecting branes. The choice of a USSM-like superpotential, with one extra singlet superfield and an extra Abelian symmetry, allows a physical axionlike particle in the spectrum. We describe some general features of this construction and, in particular, the modification of the dark-matter sector which involves both the axion and several neutralinos with an axino component. The axion is expected to be very light in the absence of phases in the superpotential but could acquire a mass which can also be in the few GeV range or larger. In particular, the gauging of the anomalous symmetry allows independent mass/coupling interaction to the gauge fields of this particle, a feature which is absent in traditional (invisible) axion models. We comment on the general implications of our study for the signature of moduli from string theory due to the presence of these anomalous symmetries.

  3. Optimizing Higher-Order Lagrangian Perturbation Theory for Standard CDM and BSI models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arno G. Weiss; Stefan Gottloeber; Thomas Buchert

    1995-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the performance of Lagrangian perturbation theory up to the second order for two scenarios of cosmological large-scale structure formation, SCDM (standard cold dark matter) and BSI (broken scale invariance). The latter model we study as a representative of COBE-normalized CDM models which fit the small-scale power of galaxy surveys. In this context we optimize the performance of the Lagrangian perturbation schemes by smoothing the small-scale fluctuations in the initial data. The results of the so obtained Lagrangian mappings are computed for a set of COBE-normalized SCDM and BSI initial data of different sizes and at different times. We compare these results against those obtained with a numerical PM-code. We find an excellent performance of the optimized Lagrangian schemes down to scales close to the correlation length. This is explained by the counterintuitive fact that nonlinearities in the model can produce more small-scale power, if initially such power is removed. The optimization scheme can be expressed in a way which is independent of the type of fluctuation spectrum and of the size of the simulations.

  4. Classically conformal U(1)$^\\prime$ extended Standard Model and Higgs vacuum stability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oda, Satsuki; Takahashi, Dai-suke

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider the minimal U(1)$^\\prime$ extension of the Standard Model (SM) with conformal invariance at the classical level, where in addition to the SM particle contents, three generations of right-handed neutrinos and a U(1)$^\\prime$ Higgs field are introduced. In the presence of the three right-handed neutrinos, which are responsible for the seesaw mechanism, this model is free from all the gauge and gravitational anomalies. The U(1)$^\\prime$ gauge symmetry is radiatively broken via the Coleman-Weinberg mechanism, by which the U(1)$^\\prime$ gauge boson ($Z^\\prime$ boson) mass as well as the Majorana mass for the right-handed neutrinos are generated. The radiative U(1)$^\\prime$ symmetry breaking also induces a negative mass squared for the SM Higgs doublet to trigger the electroweak symmetry breaking. In this context, we investigate a possibility to solve the SM Higgs vacuum instability problem. The model includes only three free parameters (U(1)$^\\prime$ charge of the SM Higgs doublet, U(1)$^\\prime$ gauge ...

  5. Higgs Mass and Gravity Waves in Standard Model False Vacuum Inflation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alessio Notari

    2014-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

    In previous publications we have proposed that Inflation can be realized in a second minimum of the Standard Model Higgs potential at energy scales of about $10^{16}$ GeV, if the minimum is not too deep and if a mechanism which allows a transition to the radiation dominated era can be found. This is provided, {\\it e.g.}, by scalar-tensor gravity models or hybrid models. Using such ideas we had predicted the Higgs boson mass to be of about $126\\pm 3$ GeV, which has been confirmed by the LHC, and that a possibly measurable amount of gravity waves should be produced. Using more refined recent theoretical calculations of the RGE we show that such scenario has the right scale of Inflation only for small Higgs mass, lower than about 124 GeV, otherwise gravity waves are overproduced. The precise value is subject to some theoretical error and to experimental errors on the determination of the strong coupling constant. Such an upper bound corresponds also to the recent claimed measurement by BICEP2 of the scale of inflation through primordial tensor modes. Finally we show that introducing a moderately large non-minimal coupling for the Higgs field the bound can shift to larger values and be reconciled with the LHC measurements of the Higgs mass.

  6. Canonical Gauge Coupling Unification in the Standard Model with High-Scale Supersymmetry Breaking

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yun-Jie Huo; Tianjun Li; Dimitri V. Nanopoulos

    2011-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Inspired by the string landscape and the unified gauge coupling relation in the F-theory Grand Unified Theories (GUTs) and GUTs with suitable high-dimensional operators, we study the canonical gauge coupling unification and Higgs boson mass in the Standard Model (SM) with high-scale supersymmetry breaking. In the SM with GUT-scale supersymmetry breaking, we achieve the gauge coupling unification at about 5.3 x 10^{13} GeV, and the Higgs boson mass is predicted to range from 130 GeV to 147 GeV. In the SM with supersymmetry breaking scale from 10^4 GeV to 5.3 x 10^{13} GeV, gauge coupling unification can always be realized and the corresponding GUT scale M_U is from 10^{16} GeV to 5.3 x 10^{13} GeV, respectively. Also, we obtain the Higgs boson mass from 114.4 GeV to 147 GeV. Moreover, the discrepancies among the SM gauge couplings at the GUT scale are less than about 4-6%. Furthermore, we present the SU(5) and SO(10) models from the F-theory model building and orbifold constructions, and show that we do not have the dimension-five and dimension-six proton decay problems even if M_U \\le 5 x 10^{15} GeV.

  7. Incentive mechanisms as a strategic option for acid rain compliance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    South, D.W.; Bailey, K.A.; McDermott, K.A.

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Title IV of the Clean Air Act Amendments (CAAA) of 1990 (P.L. 101--549) establishes the use of flexible emission compliance strategies for electric utilities to reduce the emissions of add precursors (SO[sub 2], NO[sub 2]). To control SO[sub 2] emissions, tradeable emission allowances will be used; NO[sub 2] emissions will be controlled by an emission standard, but a utility is permitted to average NO[sub 2] emissions systemwide to meet the standard. Both of these policies promote flexibility and cost savings for the utility while achieving the prescribed emission reduction goals of P.L. 101--549. The use of SO[sub 2] emission allowances has two notable benefits: A utility has the choice of a wide range of compliance methods allowing it to minimize compliance costs and second; the use of transferable emission allowances promote technological innovation with respect to emissions reduction/control. This report discusses the use of regulatory incentives towards the achievement of a Title IV goal of cost reduction of SO[sub 2] emissions.

  8. Incentive mechanisms as a strategic option for acid rain compliance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    South, D.W.; Bailey, K.A.; McDermott, K.A.

    1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Title IV of the Clean Air Act Amendments (CAAA) of 1990 (P.L. 101--549) establishes the use of flexible emission compliance strategies for electric utilities to reduce the emissions of add precursors (SO{sub 2}, NO{sub 2}). To control SO{sub 2} emissions, tradeable emission allowances will be used; NO{sub 2} emissions will be controlled by an emission standard, but a utility is permitted to average NO{sub 2} emissions systemwide to meet the standard. Both of these policies promote flexibility and cost savings for the utility while achieving the prescribed emission reduction goals of P.L. 101--549. The use of SO{sub 2} emission allowances has two notable benefits: A utility has the choice of a wide range of compliance methods allowing it to minimize compliance costs and second; the use of transferable emission allowances promote technological innovation with respect to emissions reduction/control. This report discusses the use of regulatory incentives towards the achievement of a Title IV goal of cost reduction of SO{sub 2} emissions.

  9. Directory of Certificates of Compliance for radioactive materials packages: Certificates of Compliance. Volume 2, Revision 18

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this directory is to make available a convenient source of information on packagings which have been approved by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. To assist in identifying packaging, an index by Model Number and corresponding Certificate of Compliance Number is included at the front of Volumes 1 and 2. An alphabetical listing by user name is included in the back of Volume 3 of approved QA programs. The reports include a listing of all users of each package design and approved QA programs prior to the publication date.

  10. EO 12088: Federal Compliance with Pollution Control Standards

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny:RevisedAdvisory Board Contributions EMEM STAR CertifiedRed Lion

  11. Enforcement Policy Statement: Compliance Period for Regional Standards

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011AT&T,OfficeEnd of Year 2010 SNFEnergySession0-02 - December 23,

  12. Executive Order 12088: Federal Compliance with Pollution Control Standards

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011AT&T,OfficeEnd of Year 2010Salt | DepartmentExamination Report:ExcessChange ||

  13. Appliance Standards Update and Review of Certification, Compliance and

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directed off Energy.gov. Are you0 ARRA NewslettersPartnership of the Americasfor a CleanEnergy

  14. DOE standard: Radiological control

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has developed this Standard to assist line managers in meeting their responsibilities for implementing occupational radiological control programs. DOE has established regulatory requirements for occupational radiation protection in Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations, Part 835 (10 CFR 835), ``Occupational Radiation Protection``. Failure to comply with these requirements may lead to appropriate enforcement actions as authorized under the Price Anderson Act Amendments (PAAA). While this Standard does not establish requirements, it does restate, paraphrase, or cite many (but not all) of the requirements of 10 CFR 835 and related documents (e.g., occupational safety and health, hazardous materials transportation, and environmental protection standards). Because of the wide range of activities undertaken by DOE and the varying requirements affecting these activities, DOE does not believe that it would be practical or useful to identify and reproduce the entire range of health and safety requirements in this Standard and therefore has not done so. In all cases, DOE cautions the user to review any underlying regulatory and contractual requirements and the primary guidance documents in their original context to ensure that the site program is adequate to ensure continuing compliance with the applicable requirements. To assist its operating entities in achieving and maintaining compliance with the requirements of 10 CFR 835, DOE has established its primary regulatory guidance in the DOE G 441.1 series of Guides. This Standard supplements the DOE G 441.1 series of Guides and serves as a secondary source of guidance for achieving compliance with 10 CFR 835.

  15. EPAct Alternative Fuel Transportation Program: State and Alternative Fuel Provider Fleet Compliance Annual Report (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This annual report summarizes the compliance results of state and alternative fuel provider fleets covered by the Energy Policy Act of 1992 (EPAct) for model year 2008/fiscal year 2009.

  16. Combined upper limit on Standard Model Higgs boson production at CDF

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Buzatu Adrian

    2012-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

    The Higgs boson is the only elementary particle predicted by the Standard Model (SM) that has neither been confirmed nor refuted. The CDF collaboration has performed SM Higgs searches in many channels using $p\\pbar$ collisions at a centre-of-mass energy $\\sqrt{s}=1.96\\tev$. We present the latest combined Higgs boson search at CDF. Since the previous year's combination, the sensitivity is increased through the addition of new channels, the improvement of existing channels and the addition of new data samples. We also use the latest parton distribution functions and $gg \\rightarrow H$ theoretical cross sections when modelling the signal event yields. Using integrated luminosities of up to 8.2 $\\invfb$, we observe a good agreement between data and the background prediction. Since we do not see a Higgs boson excess, we set 95% CL upper limits on the Higgs boson cross section in the range between 100 and 200 $\\gevcc$, with 5 $\\gevcc$ increments. The observed (expected) limits for a 115 and a 165 $\\gevcc$ Higgs boson are 1.55 (1.49) and 0.75 (0.79) $\\times$ SM, respectively. Since last year, the Higgs boson excluded range by CDF is extended to 156.5 - 173.7 and 100 - 104.5 $\\gevcc$.

  17. Softened Gravity and the Extension of the Standard Model up to Infinite Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gian F. Giudice; Gino Isidori; Alberto Salvio; Alessandro Strumia

    2015-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Attempts to solve naturalness by having the weak scale as the only breaking of classical scale invariance have to deal with two severe difficulties: gravity and the absence of Landau poles. We show that solutions to the first problem require premature modifications of gravity at scales no larger than $10^{11}$ GeV, while the second problem calls for many new particles at the weak scale. To build models that fulfil these properties, we classify 4-dimensional Quantum Field Theories that satisfy Total Asymptotic Freedom (TAF): the theory holds up to infinite energy, where all coupling constants flow to zero. We develop a technique to identify such theories and determine their low-energy predictions. Since the Standard Model turns out to be asymptotically free only under the unphysical conditions $g_1 = 0$, $M_t = 186$ GeV, $M_\\tau = 0$, $M_h = 163$ GeV, we explore some of its weak-scale extensions that satisfy the requirements for TAF.

  18. Combined upper limit on Standard Model Higgs boson production at CDF

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adrian, Buzatu; /McGill U.

    2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Higgs boson is the only elementary particle predicted by the Standard Model (SM) that has neither been confirmed nor refuted. The CDF collaboration has performed SM Higgs searches in many channels using p{bar p} collisions at a centre-of-mass energy {radical}s = 1.96 TeV. We present the latest combined Higgs boson search at CDF. Since the previous year's combination, the sensitivity is increased through the addition of new channels, the improvement of existing channels and the addition of new data samples. We also use the latest parton distribution functions and gg {yields} H theoretical cross sections when modelling the signal event yields. Using integrated luminosities of up to 8.2 fb{sup -1}, we observe a good agreement between data and the background prediction. Since we do not see a Higgs boson excess, we set 95% CL upper limits on the Higgs boson cross section in the range between 100 and 200 GeV/c{sup 2}, with 5 GeV/c{sup 2} increments. The observed (expected) limits for a 115 and a 165 GeV/c{sup 2} Higgs boson are 1.55 (1.49) and 0.75 (0.79) x SM, respectively. Since last year, the Higgs boson excluded range by CDF is extended to 156.5 - 173.7 and 100 - 104.5 GeV/c{sup 2}.

  19. Softened Gravity and the Extension of the Standard Model up to Infinite Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gian F. Giudice; Gino Isidori; Alberto Salvio; Alessandro Strumia

    2015-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Attempts to solve naturalness by having the weak scale as the only breaking of classical scale invariance have to deal with two severe difficulties: gravity and the absence of Landau poles. We show that solutions to the first problem require premature modifications of gravity at scales no larger than $10^{11}$ GeV, while the second problem calls for many new particles at the weak scale. To build models that fulfil these properties, we classify 4-dimensional Quantum Field Theories that satisfy Total Asymptotic Freedom (TAF): the theory holds up to infinite energy, where all coupling constants flow to zero. We develop a technique to identify such theories and determine their low-energy predictions. Since the Standard Model turns out to be asymptotically free only under the unphysical conditions $g_1 = 0$, $M_t = 186$ GeV, $M_\\tau = 0$, $M_h = 163$ GeV, we explore some of its weak-scale extensions that satisfy the requirements for TAF.

  20. Using the Standard Solar Model to Constrain Composition and S-Factors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aldo Serenelli; Carlos Pena-Garay; W. C. Haxton

    2012-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

    While standard solar model (SSM) predictions depend on approximately 20 input parameters, SSM neutrino flux predictions are strongly correlated with a single model output parameter, the core temperature $T_c$. Consequently, one can extract physics from solar neutrino flux measurements while minimizing the consequences of SSM uncertainties, by studying flux ratios with appropriate power-law weightings tuned to cancel this $T_c$ dependence. We re-examine an idea for constraining the primordial C+N content of the solar core from a ratio of CN-cycle $^{15}$O to pp-chain $^8$B neutrino fluxes, showing that nonnuclear SSM uncertainties in the ratio are small and effectively governed by a single parameter, the diffusion coefficient. We point out that measurements of both CN-I cycle neutrino branches -- $^{15}$O and $^{13}$N $\\beta$-decay -- could in principle lead to separate determinations of the core C and N abundances, due to out-of-equilibrium CN-cycle burning in the cooler outer layers of the solar core. Finally, we show that the strategy of constructing "minimum uncertainty" neutrino flux ratios can also test other properties of the SSM. In particular, we demonstrate that a weighted ratio of $^7$Be and $^8$B fluxes constrains a product of S-factors to the same precision currently possible with laboratory data.

  1. Search for the Standard Model Higgs boson in the decay channel H->ZZ(*)->4l with the ATLAS detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ATLAS Collaboration

    2011-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

    A search for the Standard Model Higgs boson in the decay channel H->ZZ(*)->l+l-l+l-, where l=e,mu, is presented. Proton-proton collision data at sqrt(s)=7 TeV recorded with the ATLAS detector and corresponding to an average integrated luminosity of 2.1 fb-1 are compared to the Standard Model expectations. Upper limits on the production cross section of a Standard Model Higgs boson with a mass between 110 and 600 GeV are derived. The observed (expected) 95% confidence level upper limit on the production cross section for a Higgs boson with a mass of 194 GeV, the region with the best expected sensitivity for this search, is 0.99 (1.01) times the Standard Model prediction. The Standard Model Higgs boson is excluded at 95% confidence level in the mass ranges 191-197, 199-200 and 214-224 GeV.

  2. Texas Energy Code Compliance Collaborative

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Herbert, C.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    document these practices? What is the role of alternative code compliance programs like EnergyStar? What is the role of third party inspectors? 15 ESL-KT-13-12-29 CATEE 2013: Clean Air Through Energy Efficiency Conference, San Antonio, Texas Dec... Conference, San Antonio, Texas Dec. 16-18 7 Source: ACEEE Building Energy Codes Program 2010 ESL-KT-13-12-29 CATEE 2013: Clean Air Through Energy Efficiency Conference, San Antonio, Texas Dec. 16-18 Residential (Single Family Residences And Duplexes...

  3. Compliance Documents | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the YouTube platformBuildingCoalComplex Flow Workshop Report January 17-18, 2012Compliance

  4. II. GENERAL COMPLIANCE SUPPLEMENT INTRODUCTION

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directed off Energy.gov.Energy02.pdf7 OPAM Flash2011-37EnergySubmit ait'sII. GENERAL COMPLIANCE

  5. Technical Assistance: Increasing Code Compliance

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn'tOriginEducationVideoStrategic| Department ofGeneralWind »Assistance: Increasing Code Compliance

  6. FUEL ECONOMY AND CO2 EMISSIONS STANDARDS, MANUFACTURER PRICING STRATEGIES, AND FEEBATES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Changzheng [ORNL] [ORNL; Greene, David L [ORNL] [ORNL; Bunch, Dr David S. [University of California, Davis] [University of California, Davis

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Corporate Average Fuel Economy (CAFE) standards and CO2 emissions standards for 2012 to 2016 have significantly increased the stringency of requirements for new light-duty vehicle fuel efficiency. This study investigates the role of technology adoption and pricing strategies in meeting new standards, as well as the impact of feebate policies. The analysis is carried out by means of a dynamic optimization model that simulates manufacturer decisions with the objective of maximizing social surplus while simultaneously considering consumer response and meeting CAFE and emissions standards. The results indicate that technology adoption plays the major role and that the provision of compliance flexibility and the availability of cost-effective advanced technologies help manufacturers reduce the need for pricing to induce changes in the mix of vehicles sold. Feebates, when implemented along with fuel economy and emissions standards, can bring additional fuel economy improvement and emissions reduction, but the benefit diminishes with the increasing stringency of the standards.

  7. Search for the standard model Higgs boson produced in association with top quarks using the full CDF data set

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aaltonen, T.; /Helsinki Inst. of Phys.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; /Oviedo U. /Cantabria Inst. of Phys.; Amerio, S.; /INFN, Padua; Amidei, D.; /Michigan U.; Anastassov, A.; /Northwestern U. /Fermilab; Annovi, A.; /Frascati; Antos, J.; /Comenius U.; Apollinari, G.; /Fermilab; Appel, J.A.; /Fermilab; Arisawa, T.; /Waseda U.; Artikov, A.; /Dubna, JINR /Texas A-M

    2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A search is presented for the standard model Higgs boson produced in association with top quarks using the full Run II proton-antiproton collision data set, corresponding to 9.45 fb{sup -1}, collected by the Collider Detector at Fermilab. No significant excess over the expected background is observed, and 95% credibility-level upper bounds are placed on the cross section {sigma}(t{bar t}H {yields} lepton + missing transverse energy + jets). For a Higgs boson mass of 125 GeV/c{sup 2}, we expect to set a limit of 12.6, and observe a limit of 20.5 times the standard model rate. This represents the most sensitive search for a standard model Higgs boson in this channel to date.

  8. Combined search for the standard model Higgs boson decaying to b bbar using the D0 Run II data set

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D0 Collaboration

    2012-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the results of the combination of searches for the standard model Higgs boson produced in association with a W or Z boson and decaying into b bbar using the data sample collected with the D0 detector in p pbar collisions at sqrt{s}=1.96 TeV at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. We derive 95% CL upper limits on the Higgs boson cross section relative to the standard model prediction in the mass range 100 GeV Higgs boson.

  9. General approach to assure compliance with ALARA guidelines on direct radiation from a nuclear power plant, January 1979-January 1982

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harding, W; Silver, C

    1983-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Nuclear Regulatory Commission guide lines specify 10 mrad per reactor as the total yearly direct (gamma) radiation dose at any point external to a nuclear power facility site boundary. Typically a nuclear utility submits only thermoluminescence dosimetry (TLD) data unaccompanied by corresponding core sample, ion chamber or other data or analyses to demonstrate compliance. This study considers a standard approach for analyzing the TLD data in terms of semiempirical physical constructs which allow the use of correlations among certain preoperational TLD data to predict or model operational period TLD measures (expected values) in the absence of the source (nuclear facility). These apriori models depend only upon their fit to the observed nonimpacted data for their verification. They are not veridical. The models are used to analyze a CaSO/sub 4/ (TM) thermoluminescence dosimetry system set up in a matrix about the nuclear plant and which records the terrestrial and cosmic radiation background as well as the nuclear plant contribution.

  10. Unlocking the Standard Model. IV. N=1 AND 2 generations of quarks : spectrum and mixing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bruno Machet

    2013-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Using a one-to-one correspondence between its complex Higgs doublet and very specific quadruplets of bilinear quark operators, the Glashow-Salam-Weinberg model for 2 generations is extended, without adding any extra fermion, to 8 composite Higgs multiplets. 8 is the minimal number required to suitably account, simultaneously, for the pseudoscalar mesons that can be built with 4 quarks and for the mass of the W gauge bosons. Their masses being used as input, together with elementary low energy considerations for the pions, we calculate all other parameters, masses and couplings. We focus in this work on the spectrum of the 8 Higgs bosons, and on the two u-c and d-s mixing angles, showing that this is very fine-tuned physics. We show in particular that the u-c mixing angle cannot be safely tuned to 0. Symmetries are investigated in detail. We leave the study of couplings and of their content of non-standard physics to a forthcoming work.

  11. Finite temperature corrections and embedded strings in noncommutative geometry and the standard model with neutrino mixing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martins, R. A. [Centro de Analise Matematica, Geometria e Sistemas Dinamicos, Departamento de Matematica, Instituto Superior Tecnico, Avenida Rovisco Pais, 1049-001 Lisbon (Portugal)

    2007-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The recent extension of the standard model to include massive neutrinos in the framework of noncommutative geometry and the spectral action principle involves new scalar fields and their interactions with the usual complex scalar doublet. After ensuring that they bring no unphysical consequences, we address the question of how these fields affect the physics predicted in the Weinberg-Salam theory, particularly in the context of the electroweak phase transition. Applying the Dolan-Jackiw procedure, we calculate the finite temperature corrections, and find that the phase transition is first order. The new scalar interactions significantly improve the stability of the electroweak Z string, through the 'bag' phenomenon described by Vachaspati and Watkins ['Bound states can stabilize electroweak strings', Phys. Lett. B 318, 163-168 (1993)]. (Recently, cosmic strings have climbed back into interest due to a new evidence.) Sourced by static embedded strings, an internal space analogy of Cartan's torsion is drawn, and a possible Higgs-force-like 'gravitational' effect of this nonpropagating torsion on the fermion masses is described. We also check that the field generating the Majorana mass for the {nu}{sub R} is nonzero in the physical vacuum.

  12. Search for the Standard Model Higgs boson in final states with $b$ quarks at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Potamianos, Karolos

    2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the result of searches for a low mass Standard Model Higgs boson produced in association with a W or a Z boson at a center-of-mass energy of {radical}s = 1.96 TeV with the CDF and D0 detectors at the Fermilab Tevatron collider. The search is performed in events containing one or two b tagged jets in association with either two leptons, or one lepton and an imbalance in transverse energy, or simply a large imbalance in transverse energy. Datasets corresponding to up to 8.5 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity are considered in the analyses. These are the most powerful channels in the search for a low mass Higgs boson at the Tevatron. Recent sensitivity improvements are discussed. For a Higgs mass of 115 GeV/c{sup 2}, the expected sensitivity for the most sensitive individual analyses reaches 2.3 times the SM prediction at 95% confidence level (C.L.), with all limits below 5 times the SM. Additionally, a WZ/ZZ cross-section measurement is performed to validate the analysis techniques deployed for searching for the Higgs.

  13. The Higgs mass range from Standard Model false vacuum Inflation in scalar-tensor gravity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Isabella Masina; Alessio Notari

    2012-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

    If the Standard Model is valid up to very high energies it is known that the Higgs potential can develop a local minimum at field values around $10^{15}-10^{17}$ GeV, for a narrow band of values of the top quark and Higgs masses. We show that in a scalar-tensor theory of gravity such Higgs false vacuum can give rise to viable inflation if the potential barrier is very shallow, allowing for tunneling and relaxation into the electroweak scale true vacuum. The amplitude of cosmological density perturbations from inflation is directly linked to the value of the Higgs potential at the false minimum. Requiring the top quark mass, the amplitude and spectral index of density perturbations to be compatible with observations, selects a narrow range of values for the Higgs mass, $m_H=126.0\\pm 3.5$ GeV, where the error is mostly due to the theoretical uncertainty of the 2-loop RGE. This prediction could be soon tested at the Large Hadron Collider. Our inflationary scenario could also be further checked by better constraining the spectral index and the tensor-to-scalar ratio.

  14. Electroweak stars: how nature may capitalize on the standard model's ultimate fuel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    De-Chang Dai; Arthur Lue; Glenn Starkman; Dejan Stojkovic

    2011-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the possible existence of an electroweak star - a compact stellar-mass object whose central core temperature is higher than the electroweak symmetry restoration temperature. We found a solution to the Tolman-Oppenheimer-Volkoff equations describing such an object. The parameters of such a star are not substantially different from a neutron star - its mass is around 1.3 Solar masses while its radius is around 8 km. What is different is the existence of a small electroweak core. The source of energy in the core that can at least temporarily balance gravity are standard-model non-perturbative baryon number (B) and lepton number (L) violating processes that allow the chemical potential of $B+L$ to relax to zero. The energy released at the core is enormous, but gravitational redshift and the enhanced neutrino interaction cross section at these energies make the energy release rate moderate at the surface of the star. The lifetime of this new quasi-equilibrium can be more than ten million years. This is long enough to represent a new stage in the evolution of a star if stellar evolution can take it there.

  15. Search for the Standard Model Higgs boson in the missing energy topology with D0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Christoudias, Theodoros; /Imperial Coll., London

    2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A search for the Standard Model Higgs boson in the missing energy and acoplanar b-jet topology is reported, using an integrated luminosity of 0.93 fb{sup -1} recorded by the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron p{bar p} Collider. The analysis includes signal contributions from p{bar p} {yields} ZH {yields} {nu}{bar {nu}}b{bar b}, as well as from WH production in which the charged lepton from the W boson decay is undetected. Neural networks are used to separate signal from background. In the absence of a signal, limits are set on {sigma}(p{bar p} {yields} VH) x B(H {yields} b{bar b}) at the 95% C.L. of 2.6-2.3 pb, for Higgs boson masses in the range 105-135 GeV, where V = W, Z. The corresponding expected limits range from 2.8 to 2.0 pb. Potential improvements to the analysis with an extended dataset totalling 4 fb{sup -1} are also discussed. Essential maintenance related to the increased luminosity and RunIIb upgrade was carried out on the impact parameter (IP) based b-tagging trigger tool and the effect of the changes on the b-tagger's performance was investigated.

  16. Deemed Export Compliance at SLAC National

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wechsler, Risa H.

    Deemed Export Compliance at SLAC National Accelerator Center Presentation to the SLAC Directorates Summer 2010 Steve Eisner Export Control Compliance Officer Stanford University and the SLAC National export control "safe harbor" It's SLAC/SU Research Policy ­ See RPH 2.6 and 10.2 States

  17. Continuous and Automated Measuring of Compliance of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsouri, Gill

    Commission, all recommend or de- mand that hospitals monitor hand hygiene compliance. Basic research hy- giene practices by the WHO and the CDC, compliance rates among healthcare staff remains low measured com- pliance of staff members on the floor. The method proved to be reliable and provided

  18. Environmental Compliance Audit& Assessment Program Manual

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thorson, Patrick; Baskin, David; Borglin, Ned; Fox, Robert; Wahl, Linnea; Hatayama, Howard; Pauer, Ronald

    2009-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

    This document describes the elements, schedule, roles, and responsibilities of the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) Environmental Compliance Audit & Assessment Program (ECAAP). The ECAAP has been developed to meet the requirements of DOE Order 450.1A,1 and Executive Order 13423.2 These referenced Orders stipulate that government agencies must develop environmental compliance audit programs to monitor and improve compliance with environmental regulations. As stated specifically in the DOE Order, as a part of a DOE facility's Environmental Management System (EMS), 'An environmental compliance audit and review program that identifies compliance deficiencies and root causes of non-compliance' shall be developed and implemented. The ECAAP has also been developed to satisfy LBNL's institutional technical assurance assessment requirements promulgated in the Environment, Safety and Health (ES&H) Self-Assessment Program (LBNL/PUB-5344) and described by the ES&H Technical Assurance Program (TAP) Manual (LBNL/PUB-913E). The ES&H TAP Manual provides the framework for systematic reviews of ES&H programs with the intent to provide assurance that these programs comply with their guiding regulations, are effective, and are properly implemented. As required by the DOE and Executive Orders and by LBNL's TAP, the goal of the ECAAP is to identify environmental regulatory compliance deficiencies and to determine their respective causes. The ECAAP then provides a means of correcting any deficiencies identified, and leads to continually improving environmental compliance performance.

  19. Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Biennial Environmental Compliance Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Washington Regulatory and Environmental Services

    2006-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

    This Biennial Environmental Compliance Report (BECR) documents compliance with environmental regulations at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), a facility designed and authorized for the safe disposal of transuranic (TRU) radioactive waste. This BECR covers the reporting period from April 1, 2004, to March 31, 2006. As required by the WIPP Land Withdrawal Act (LWA) (Public Law [Pub. L.] 102-579, as amended by Pub. L. 104-201), the BECR documents United States (U.S.) Department of Energy (DOE) compliance with regulations and permits issued pursuant to the following: (1) Title 40 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 191, Subpart A, "Environmental Standards for Management and Storage"; (2) Clean Air Act (CAA) (42 United States Code [U.S.C.] §7401, et seq.); (3) Solid Waste Disposal Act (SWDA) (42 U.S.C. §§6901-6992, et seq.); (4) Safe Drinking Water Act (SDWA) (42 U.S.C. §§300f, et seq.); (5) Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) (15 U.S.C. §§2601, et seq.); (6) Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) (42 U.S.C. §§9601, et seq.); and all other federal and state of New Mexico laws pertaining to public health and safety or the environment.

  20. Emissions trading and compliance: Regulatory incentives and barriers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    South, D.W.; Bailey, K.A. (Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)); McDermott, K.A. (Illinois State Univ., Normal, IL (United States). Center for Regulatory Studies)

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Title IV of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 (P.L. 101-549) authorizes the use of transferable emission allowances to achieve reductions in the power generating industry's SO{sub 2} emissions at a minimum possible cost. All electricity generators (greater than 25 MW) are required to hold emissions allowances equal to the amount (tons) of SO{sub 2} emitted during a given year, and meet NO{sub x} reduction levels indicated by the Revised New Source Performance Standards (NSPS). This paper will examine the multifaceted goals and problems of states and utilities relative to compliance with Title IV, and in particular as they pertain to the development and functioning of the allowance market together with utility pollution control and power generation technology choice. Section 2 presents possible utility compliance strategies along with possible barriers that utilities may confront regarding the development of a SO{sub 2} allowance market. Section 3 discusses current regulatory barriers and requirements being implemented by state public utility commissions, and Section 4 offers some policy recommendations to achieve the goals of Title IV. Finally, Section 5 presents a summary and conclusions; Appendix A provides programs/mandates developed to data by high sulfur coal states in response to Title IV compliance requirements.

  1. Emissions trading and compliance: Regulatory incentives and barriers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    South, D.W.; Bailey, K.A. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); McDermott, K.A. [Illinois State Univ., Normal, IL (United States). Center for Regulatory Studies

    1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Title IV of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 (P.L. 101-549) authorizes the use of transferable emission allowances to achieve reductions in the power generating industry`s SO{sub 2} emissions at a minimum possible cost. All electricity generators (greater than 25 MW) are required to hold emissions allowances equal to the amount (tons) of SO{sub 2} emitted during a given year, and meet NO{sub x} reduction levels indicated by the Revised New Source Performance Standards (NSPS). This paper will examine the multifaceted goals and problems of states and utilities relative to compliance with Title IV, and in particular as they pertain to the development and functioning of the allowance market together with utility pollution control and power generation technology choice. Section 2 presents possible utility compliance strategies along with possible barriers that utilities may confront regarding the development of a SO{sub 2} allowance market. Section 3 discusses current regulatory barriers and requirements being implemented by state public utility commissions, and Section 4 offers some policy recommendations to achieve the goals of Title IV. Finally, Section 5 presents a summary and conclusions; Appendix A provides programs/mandates developed to data by high sulfur coal states in response to Title IV compliance requirements.

  2. Energy Code Compliance and Enforcement Best Practices (Text Version...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Energy Code Compliance and Enforcement Best Practices (Text Version) Energy Code Compliance and Enforcement Best Practices (Text Version) Curtis Framel: Good afternoon, and good...

  3. POLICY GUIDANCE MEMORANDUM #35 Procedures for Compliance with...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    POLICY GUIDANCE MEMORANDUM 35 Procedures for Compliance with Nepotism and Misuse of Position POLICY GUIDANCE MEMORANDUM 35 Procedures for Compliance with Nepotism and Misuse of...

  4. DOE Steps Lead to Significant Increase in Compliance with Energy...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Steps Lead to Significant Increase in Compliance with Energy Efficiency Reporting Requirements DOE Steps Lead to Significant Increase in Compliance with Energy Efficiency Reporting...

  5. Taking the cure: Control and compliance in American medicine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gosland, Melissa S

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and compliance in American medicine by Melissa Susan Goslandand compliance in American medicine ©1993 by Melissa Susancentury, however, that medicine began to consolidate its

  6. Search for a heavy Standard Model Higgs boson in the channel H->ZZ->llqq using the ATLAS detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The ATLAS Collaboration

    2011-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

    A search for a heavy Standard Model Higgs boson decaying via H->ZZ->llqq, where l=e,mu, is presented. The search is performed using a data set of pp collisions at sqrt(s)=7 TeV, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 1.04 fb^-1 collected in 2011 by the ATLAS detector at the CERN LHC collider. No significant excess of events above the estimated background is found. Upper limits at 95% confidence level on the production cross section (relative to that expected from the Standard Model) of a Higgs boson with a mass in the range between 200 and 600 GeV are derived. Within this mass range, there is at present insufficient sensitivity to exclude a Standard Model Higgs boson. For a Higgs boson with a mass of 360 GeV, where the sensitivity is maximal, the observed and expected cross section upper limits are factors of 1.7 and 2.7, respectively, larger than the Standard Model prediction.

  7. Search for standard model Higgs boson production in association with a W boson using a neural network discriminant at CDF

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xie, Si

    We present a search for standard model Higgs boson production in association with a W boson in proton-antiproton collisions (pp??W[superscript ±]H???bb?) at a center of mass energy of 1.96 TeV. The search employs data ...

  8. Searches for Physics Beyond the Standard Model and Triggering on Proton-Proton Collisions at 14 TEV LHC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wittich, Peter

    2011-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

    This document describes the work achieved under the OJI award received May 2008 by Peter Wittich as Principal Investigator. The proposal covers experimental particle physics project searching for physics beyond the standard model at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at the European Organization for Nuclear Research.

  9. First Search for the Standard Model Higgs Boson Using the Semileptonic Decay Channel: H --> WW --> mu bar nu jj

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zelitch, Shannon Maura; /Virginia U.

    2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This dissertation presents the first search for the standard model Higgs boson (H) in decay topologies containing a muon, an imbalance in transverse momentum (E{sub T}) and jets, using p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV with an integrated luminosity of 4.3 fb{sup -1} recorded with the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. This analysis is sensitive primary to contributions from Higgs bosons produced through gluon fusion, with subsequent decay H {yields} WW {yields} {mu}{nu}jj where W represents a real or virtual W boson. In the absence of signal, limits are set at 95% confidence on the production and decay of the standard model Higgs boson for M{sub H} in the range of 115-200 GeV. For M{sub H} = 165 GeV, the observed and expected limits are factors of 11.2 larger than the standard model value. Combining this channel with e{nu}jj final states and including earlier data to increase the integrated luminosity to 5.4 fb{sup -1} produces observed(expected) limits of 5.5(3.8) times the standard model value.

  10. Search for the Standard Model Higgs boson in the two photon decay channel with the ATLAS detector at the LHC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taylor, Frank E.

    A search for the Standard Model Higgs boson in the two photon decay channel is reported, using 1.08 fb?11.08 fb[superscript ?1] of proton–proton collision data at a centre-of-mass energy of 7 TeV recorded by the ATLAS ...

  11. Commissioning of CMS and early standard model measurements with jets, missing transverse energy and photons at the LHC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. Christiansen

    2008-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on the status and history of the CMS commissioning, together with selected results from cosmic-ray muon data. The second part focuses on strategies for optimizing the reconstruction of jets, missing transverse energy and photons for early standard model measurements at ATLAS and CMS with the first collision data from the Large Hadron Collider at CERN.

  12. Search for a Standard Model Higgs Boson in the H?ZZ??+?-??? Decay Channel with the ATLAS Detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taylor, Frank E.

    A search for a heavy standard model Higgs boson decaying via H?ZZ??+?-??? , where ?=e, ?, is presented. It is based on proton-proton collision data at ?s=7??TeV, collected by the ATLAS experiment at the LHC in the first ...

  13. Search for the standard model Higgs boson decaying to bottom quarks in pp collisions at ?s = 7 TeV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alver, B.

    A search for the standard model Higgs boson (H) decaying to b[bar over b] when produced in association with weak vector bosons (V) is reported for the following modes: W(??)H, W(e?)H, Z(??)H, Z(ee)H and Z(??)H. The search ...

  14. Combined Search for the Standard Model Higgs Boson Decaying to a bb? Pair Using the Full CDF Data Set

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gomez-Ceballos, Guillelmo

    We combine the results of searches for the standard model (SM) Higgs boson based on the full CDF Run II data set obtained from ?s=1.96??TeV pp? collisions at the Fermilab Tevatron corresponding to an integrated luminosity ...

  15. Search for the Associated Production of the Standard-Model Higgs Boson in the All-Hadronic Channel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Makhoul, K.

    We report on a search for the standard-model Higgs boson in pp? collisions at ?s=1.96??TeV using an integrated luminosity of 2.0??fb[superscript -1]. We look for production of the Higgs boson decaying to a pair of bottom ...

  16. Inclusive Search for Standard Model Higgs Boson Production in the WW Decay Channel Using the CDF II Detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xie, Si

    We present a search for standard model (SM) Higgs boson production using pp? collision data at ?s=1.96??TeV, collected with the CDF II detector and corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 4.8??fb[superscript -1]. We ...

  17. Les Houches Physics at TeV Colliders 2005 Beyond the Standard Model Working Group: Summary Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allanach, B.C.; /Cambridge U., DAMTP; Grojean, C.; /Saclay, SPhT /CERN; Skands, P.; /Fermilab; Accomando, E.; Azuelos, G.; Baer, H.; Balazs, C.; Belanger, G.; Benakli, K.; Boudjema, F.; Brelier, B.; Bunichev, V.; Cacciapaglia, G.; Carena, M.; Choudhury, D.; Delsart, P.-A.; De Sanctis, U.; Desch, K.; Dobrescu, B.A.; Dudko, L.; El Kacimi, M.; /Saclay,

    2006-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The work contained herein constitutes a report of the ''Beyond the Standard Model'' working group for the Workshop ''Physics at TeV Colliders'', Les Houches, France, 2-20 May, 2005. We present reviews of current topics as well as original research carried out for the workshop. Supersymmetric and non-supersymmetric models are studied, as well as computational tools designed in order to facilitate their phenomenology.

  18. From Standard Model of particle physics to room-temperature superconductivity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. E. Volovik

    2015-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Topological media are gapped or gapless fermionic systems, whose properties are protected by topology, and thus are robust to deformations of parameters of the system and generic. We discuss the class of gapless topological media, which contains the quantum vacuum of Standard Model in its symmetric phase, and condensed matter systems with zeroes in the energy spectrum, which form Fermi surfaces, Weyl and Dirac points, Dirac lines, Khodel-Shaginyan flat bands, etc. Some zeroes are topologically protected, being characterized by topological invariants, expressed in terms of Green's function. For stability of the others the ${\\bf p}$-space topology must be accompanied by symmetry. Vacua with Weyl points serve as a source of effective relativistic quantum fields emerging at low energy: chiral fermions, effective gauge fields and tetrad gravity emerge together in the vicinity of a Weyl point. The accompanying effects, such as chiral anomaly, electroweak baryo-production and chiral vortical effect, are expressed via the symmetry protected ${\\bf p}$-space invariants. The gapless topological media exhibit the bulk-surface and bulk-vortex correspondence: which in particular may lead to the flat band on the surface of the system or in the core of topological defects. The materials with flat band in bulk, on the surface or within the dislocations have singular density of states, which crucially influences the critical temperature of the superconducting transition in such media. While in all the known superconductors the transition temperature is exponentially suppressed as a function of the pairing interaction, in the flat band the transition temperature is proportional to the pairing interaction, and can be essentially higher. The ${\\bf p}$-space topology may give us the general recipe for search or artificial fabrication of the room-temperature superconductors.

  19. Neutrino masses and mixings in a Minimal S3-invariant Extension of the Standard Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Felix, O.; Mondragon, A.; Mondragon, M.; Peinado, E. [Departamento de Fisica Teorica, Instituto de Fisica, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Apdo. Postal 20-364, 01000 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    2007-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The mass matrices of the charged leptons and neutrinos, that had been derived in the framework of a Minimal S3-invariant Extension of the Standard Model, are here reparametrized in terms of their eigenvalues. The neutrino mixing matrix, VPMNS, is then computed and exact, explicit analytical expressions for the neutrino mixing angles as functions of the masses of the neutrinos and charged leptons are obtained. The reactor, {theta}13, and the atmosferic, {theta}23, mixing angles are found to be functions only of the masses of the charged leptons. The numerical values of {theta}{sub 13}{sup th} and {theta}{sub 23}{sup th} computed from our theoretical expressions are found to be in excellent agreement with the latest experimental determinations. The solar mixing angle, {theta}{sub 12}{sup th}, is found to be a function of both, the charged lepton and neutrino masses, as well as of a Majorana phase {phi}{nu}. A comparison of our theoretical expression for the solar angle {theta}{sub 12}{sup th} with the latest experimental value {theta}{sub 13}{sup exp} {approx_equal} 34 deg. allowed us to fix the scale and origin of the neutrino mass spectrum and obtain the mass values |m{nu}2| = 0.0507eV, |m{nu}1| = 0.0499eV and |m{nu}3| = 0.0193eV, in very good agreement with the observations of neutrino oscillations, the bounds extracted from neutrinoless double beta decay and the precision cosmological measurements of the CMB.

  20. An Instability of the Standard Model Creates the Anomalous Acceleration Without Dark Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Joel Smoller; Blake Temple; Zeke Vogler

    2014-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

    We introduce a new asymptotic ansatz for spherical perturbations of the Standard Model of Cosmology (SM) which applies during the $p=0$ epoch, and prove that these perturbations trigger instabilities in the SM on the scale of the supernova data. These instabilities create a large, central region of uniform under-density which expands faster than the SM, and this central region of accelerated uniform expansion introduces into the SM {\\it precisely} the same range of corrections to redshift vs luminosity as are produced by the cosmological constant in the theory of Dark Energy. A universal behavior is exhibited because all sufficiently small perturbations evolve to a single stable rest point. Moreover, we prove that these perturbations are consistent with, and the instability is triggered by, the one parameter family of self-similar waves which the authors previously proposed as possible time-asymptotic wave patterns for perturbations of the SM at the end of the radiation epoch. Using numerical simulations, we calculate the unique wave in the family that accounts for the same values of the Hubble constant and quadratic correction to redshift vs luminosity as in a universe with seventy percent Dark Energy, $\\Omega_{\\Lambda}\\approx.7$. A numerical simulation of the third order correction associated with that unique wave establishes a testable prediction that distinguishes this theory from the theory of Dark Energy. This explanation for the anomalous acceleration, based on instabilities in the SM together with simple wave perturbations from the radiation epoch that trigger them, provides perhaps the simplest mathematical explanation for the anomalous acceleration of the galaxies that does not invoke Dark Energy.

  1. Carrots and Sticks: A Comprehensive Business Model for the Successful Achievement of Energy Efficiency Resource Standards

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Satchwell, Andrew

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    energy efficiency business model on utility earnings EES w/energy efficiency business model on utility ROE EES w/RPCSticks: A Comprehensive Business Model for the Successful

  2. Carrots and Sticks: A Comprehensive Business Model for the Successful Achievement of Energy Efficiency Resource Standards

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Satchwell, Andrew

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    a comprehensive energy efficiency business model on utilitya comprehensive energy efficiency business model on utilityframework of the energy efficiency business model. The

  3. A postmortem assessment of environmental compliance of a high-level radioactive waste repository, Hanford Site, Washington

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Petrini, Rudolf Harald Wilhelm

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    to the accessible environment, a period of time during which the waste must be contained within the barrier, and acceptable release rates from the barrier. Based on these generic standards, a postmortem assessment of the potential for environmental compliance... regulatory time frame. The degree of regulatory geochemical retardation needed in the system in order to guarantee compliance with cumulative mass release limits at the accessible environment over a period of 10, 000 years is evaluated for the nuclides...

  4. Sign Lighting Overview Page 7-1 2008 Nonresidential Compliance Manual July 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sign Lighting ­ Overview Page 7-1 2008 Nonresidential Compliance Manual July 2010 7 Sign Lighting 7.1 Overview The Sign Lighting Standards conserve energy, reduce peak electric demand, and are technically and minimum efficacy requirements. 7.1.1 History and Background Regulations for lighting have been in effect

  5. The RICORDO approach to semantic interoperability for biomedical data and models: strategy, standards and solutions.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Bono, Bernard; Hoehndorf, Robert; Wimalaratne, Sarala; Gkoutos, George; Grenon, Pierre

    2011-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

    different words: for example the labels “Blood Flow to the Lungs” and “Pulmonary Cardiac Output” have very similar meaning but their textual representation is very divergent. B. Controlled vocabularies provide a standard set of Uniform Resource Identifiers...

  6. National Green Building Standard Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NAHB Research Center, Upper Marlboro, Maryland

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    DOE's Building America Program is a research and development program to improve the energy performance of new and existing homes. The ultimate goal of the Building America Program is to achieve examples of cost-effective, energy efficient solutions for all U.S. climate zones. Periodic maintenance of an ANSI standard by review of the entire document and action to revise or reaffirm it on a schedule not to exceed five years is required by ANSI. In compliance, a consensus group has once again been formed and the National Green Building Standard is currently being reviewed to comply with the periodic maintenance requirement of an ANSI standard.

  7. Got Standards? "Got Standards?"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vardeman, Stephen B.

    certifications available. Some of these certifications include ISO 9002 1994, ISO 9003 1994 and ISO 9001 in order to bring harmony to global standards for international trade. Enter ISO 9000. The Basics In order to fully understand the concept of ISO 9000, it is very important to have a good idea of what a standard is

  8. Impact of the U.S. National Building Information Model Standard (NBIMS) on Building Energy Performance Simulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bazjanac, Vladimir

    2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. National Institute for Building Sciences (NIBS) started the development of the National Building Information Model Standard (NBIMS). Its goal is to define standard sets of data required to describe any given building in necessary detail so that any given AECO industry discipline application can find needed data at any point in the building lifecycle. This will include all data that are used in or are pertinent to building energy performance simulation and analysis. This paper describes the background that lead to the development of NBIMS, its goals and development methodology, its Part 1 (Version 1.0), and its probable impact on building energy performance simulation and analysis.

  9. Analysis of Potential Benefits and Costs of Adopting a Commercial Building Energy Standard in South Dakota

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Belzer, David B.; Cort, Katherine A.; Winiarski, David W.; Richman, Eric E.

    2005-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

    The state of South Dakota is considering adopting a commercial building energy standard. This report evaluates the potential costs and benefits to South Dakota residents from requiring compliance with the most recent edition of the ANSI/ASHRAE/IESNA 90.1-2001 Energy Standard for Buildings except Low-Rise Residential Buildings. These standards were developed in an effort to set minimum requirements for the energy efficient design and construction of new commercial buildings. The quantitative benefits and costs of adopting a commercial building energy code are modeled by comparing the characteristics of assumed current building practices with the most recent edition of the ASHRAE Standard, 90.1-2001. Both qualitative and quantitative benefits and costs are assessed in this analysis. Energy and economic impacts are estimated using results from a detailed building simulation tool (Building Loads Analysis and System Thermodynamics [BLAST] model) combined with a Life-Cycle Cost (LCC) approach to assess corresponding economic costs and benefits.

  10. FAQS Qualification Card – Environment Compliance

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A key element for the Department’s Technical Qualification Programs is a set of common Functional Area Qualification Standards (FAQS) and associated Job Task Analyses (JTA). These standards are developed for various functional areas of responsibility in the Department, including oversight of safety management programs identified as hazard controls in Documented Safety Analyses (DSA).

  11. Reducing EnergyPlus Run Time For Code Compliance Tools

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Athalye, Rahul A.; Gowri, Krishnan; Schultz, Robert W.; Glazer, Jason

    2014-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Integration of the EnergyPlus ™ simulation engine into performance-based code compliance software raises a concern about simulation run time, which impacts timely feedback of compliance results to the user. EnergyPlus annual simulations for proposed and code baseline building models, and mechanical equipment sizing result in simulation run times beyond acceptable limits. This paper presents a study that compares the results of a shortened simulation time period using 4 weeks of hourly weather data (one per quarter), to an annual simulation using full 52 weeks of hourly weather data. Three representative building types based on DOE Prototype Building Models and three climate zones were used for determining the validity of using a shortened simulation run period. Further sensitivity analysis and run time comparisons were made to evaluate the robustness and run time savings of using this approach. The results of this analysis show that the shortened simulation run period provides compliance index calculations within 1% of those predicted using annual simulation results, and typically saves about 75% of simulation run time.

  12. STATE OF CALIFORNIA CERTIFICATE OF COMPLIANCE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    STATE OF CALIFORNIA CERTIFICATE OF COMPLIANCE CEC-RWH-1C (Revised 08/09) CALIFORNIA ENERGY Project Name: Climate Zone: Conditioned Floor Area: Project Address: Date: General Information Building Warehouse space is Efficiency Regulations (Title 20) for walk

  13. Idaho CERCLA Disposal Facility Complex Compliance Demonstration for DOE Order 435.1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Simonds, J.

    2007-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

    This compliance demonstration document provides an analysis of the Idaho CERCLA Disposal Facility (ICDF) Complex compliance with DOE Order 435.1. The ICDF Complex includes the disposal facility (landfill), evaporation pond, administration facility, weigh scale, and various staging/storage areas. These facilities were designed and constructed to be compliant with DOE Order 435.1, Resource Conservation and Recovery act Subtitle C, and Toxic Substances Control Act polychlorinated biphenyl design and construction standards. The ICDF Complex is designated as the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) facility for the receipt, staging/storage, treatment, and disposal of INL Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA) waste streams.

  14. Background and Derivation of ANS-5.4 Standard Fission Product Release Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beyer, Carl E.; Turnbull, Andrew J.

    2010-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

    This background report describes the technical basis for the newly proposed American Nuclear Society (ANS) 5.4 standard, Methods for Calculating the Fractional Release of Volatile Fission Products from Oxide Fuels. The proposed ANS 5.4 standard provides a methodology for determining the radioactive fission product releases from the fuel for use in assessing radiological consequences of postulated accidents that do not involve abrupt power transients. When coupled with isotopic yields, this method establishes the 'gap activity,' which is the inventory of volatile fission products that are released from the fuel rod if the cladding are breached.

  15. Electronic Compliance and Approval Project (ECAP)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morgan, Hope; Varela, Richard A.; LaHood, Deborah; Cisco, Susan; Benavides, Mary Ann; Burks, Donna

    2002-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The Texas Railroad Commission (RRC), working in partnership with the United States Department of Energy and the oil and gas industry it regulates, implemented a strategy for improving efficiency in regulations and significantly reducing administrative operating costs through the Electronic Compliance and Approval Process (ECAP). This project streamlined regulatory compliance and reporting by providing the ability to electronically submit, process, and query oil and gas applications and reports through the Internet-based ECAP system.

  16. Compliance, Inventory, and Surveys LSUHSC's Office of Compliance functions under the direction of the Vice Chancellor for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Compliance, Inventory, and Surveys Compliance LSUHSC's Office of Compliance functions under of Compliance. Inventory Tagged equipment is currently defined as having a purchase price of $1,000.00 or greater; shipping costs do count toward reaching this threshold. For inventory purposes, LSUHSC

  17. A wave equation including leptons and quarks for the standard model of quantum physics in Clifford Algebra

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Claude Daviau; Jacques Bertrand

    2014-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

    A wave equation with mass term is studied for all particles and antiparticles of the first generation: electron and its neutrino, positron and antineutrino, quarks $u$ and $d$ with three states of color and antiquarks $\\overline{u}$ and $\\overline{d}$. This wave equation is form invariant under the $Cl_3^*$ group generalizing the relativistic invariance. It is gauge invariant under the $U(1)\\times SU(2) \\times SU(3)$ group of the standard model of quantum physics. The wave is a function of space and time with value in the Clifford algebra $Cl_{1,5}$. All features of the standard model, charge conjugation, color, left waves, Lagrangian formalism, are linked to the geometry of this extended space-time.

  18. Proposed new energy standard for commercial buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reilly, R.W.

    1983-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A project was established to develop a new energy standard for commercial buildings, using the widely accepted ASHRAE/IES Standard 90A-1980, Energy Conservation in New Building Design, as a starting point and general pattern. Under this project, 90A-1980 was analyzed to determine its effectiveness and to define shortcomings; research was conducted to develop a technical/economic basis for setting improved cost-effective requirements for energy conservation; recommendations were developed for an improved standard; and the recommendations were tested across a suite of 10 building types in 8 climates. Preliminary results from these tests indicate that design compliance with the recommendations provides 15 to 30% annual energy savings in office buildings and smaller but significant savings in other building categories (as compared to buildings designed in compliance with 90A-1980). The recommendations also provide for expanded design freedom in demonstrating compliance, especially compliance with envelope requirements. The recommendations and technical support information were presented to ASHRAE to assist in its periodic upgrading of Standard 90, and to the US Department of Energy as major input to its Congressionally-mandated process of developing minimum design standards for federal buildings and voluntary guidelines for the private sector.

  19. Discovery Potential of the Standard Model Higgs Boson Through H -> WW Decay Mode with the ATLAS Detector at LHC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hai-Jun Yang; for the ATLAS Collaboration

    2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report results of a study of the Standard Model Higgs boson discovery potential through the W-pair leptonic decay modes with the ATLAS detector at LHC at 14 TeV center-of-mass energy. We used MC samples with full detector simulation and reconstruction of the ATLAS experiment to estimate the ATLAS detection sensitivity for the reaction of pp -> H -> WW -> e\

  20. A problem of hypothetical emerging of cosmic background radiation photons on horizon in the standard model of universe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. Skalsky

    2000-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The present temperature of cosmic background radiation and the present number density of photons of cosmic background radiation in the observed expansive and isotropic relativistic Universe is in the standard model of universe explained by the assumption of emergence of the photons of cosmic background radiation on the horizon (of the most remote visibility). However, the physical analysis shows unambiguously that this assumption contradicts the special theory of relativity and the quantum mechanics.

  1. Sterile neutrino dark matter in B-L extension of the standard model and galactic 511 keV line

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khalil, Shaaban [Centre for Theoretical Physics, The British University in Egypt, El Sherouk City, Postal No. 11837, PO Box 43 (Egypt)] [Centre for Theoretical Physics, The British University in Egypt, El Sherouk City, Postal No. 11837, PO Box 43 (Egypt); Seto, Osamu, E-mail: skhalil@bue.edu.eg, E-mail: seto@physics.umn.edu [Instituto de Fisica Teorica UAM/CSIC, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Cantoblanco, Madrid 28049 (Spain)] [Instituto de Fisica Teorica UAM/CSIC, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Cantoblanco, Madrid 28049 (Spain)

    2008-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Sterile right-handed neutrinos can be naturally embedded in a low scale gauged U(1){sub B-L} extension of the standard model. We show that, within a low reheating scenario, such a neutrino is an interesting dark matter candidate. We emphasize that if the neutrino mass is of the order of MeV, then it accounts for the measured dark matter relic density and also accommodates the observed flux of 511 keV photons from the galactic bulge.

  2. Does $K_L-K_S$ mass difference constraints or \\\\ claims new physics beyond the Standard Model?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. Pisano; V. Pleitez

    1993-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The ratio $\\Delta m_K/m_K$ within the standard model with 3 generations is calculated as a function of the CP nonconserving phase $\\delta_{13}$ and the quark masses $m_c,m_t$ assuming the current values of the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa mixing angles. We have found that varying $\\delta_{13}$ and $m_c$ within the allowed range, not all the values for the top quark mass fit the experimental value for that ratio.

  3. Regulatory issues for WIPP long-term compliance with EPA 40 CFR 191B and 268

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anderson, D.R.; Marietta, M.G. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Higgins, P.J. Jr. [USDOE Albuquerque Operations Office, NM (United States). Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Project Office

    1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Before disposing of transuranic radioactive waste at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), the United States Department of Energy (DOE) must evaluate compliance with long-term regulations of the United States Envirorunental Protection Agency (EPA), specifically the Environmental Standards for the Management and disposal of Spent Nuclear Fuel, High-Level and Transuranic Radioactive Wastes (40 CFR 191), and the Land Disposal Restrictions (40 CFR 268) of the Hazardous and Solid Waste Amendments to the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) is conducting iterative performance assessments (PAs) of the WIPP for the DOE to provide interim guidance while preparing for final compliance evaluations. This paper provides background information on the regulations, describes the SNL WIPP PA Department`s approach to developing a defensible technical basis for consistent compliance evaluations, and summarizes the major observations and conclusions drawn from the 1991 and 1992 PAs.

  4. Status and Trends in U.S. Compliance and Voluntary Renewable Energy Certificate Markets (2010 Data)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heeter, J.; Bird, L.

    2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents the status and trends of 'compliance'--renewable energy certificate (REC) markets used to meet state renewable portfolio standard (RPS) requirements--and 'voluntary' markets--those in which consumers and institutions purchase renewable energy to match their electricity needs on a voluntary basis. Today, 29 states and the District of Columbia have an RPS, more than half of all U.S. electricity customers have an option to purchase some type of green power product directly from a retail electricity provider, and all consumers have the option to purchase RECs. This report documents REC activities and trends in the United States. The compliance REC market analysis includes analysis of REC trading, regional REC markets, REC tracking systems, types of compliance RECs, compliance REC pricing trends, and an overview of compliance with RPS polices. The voluntary REC analysis presents data and analysis on voluntary market sales and customer participation, products and premiums, green pricing marketing and administrative expenses, voluntary REC pricing, and the voluntary carbon offsets market. The report concludes with a discussion of upcoming guidance from the Federal Trade Commission on green marketing claims, the emergence of community solar programs, and the potential impact of Dodd-Frank regulations on the REC market.

  5. Carrots and Sticks: A Comprehensive Business Model for the Successful Achievement of Energy Efficiency Resource Standards

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Satchwell, Andrew

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    business model for energy efficiency Historically, utilities in Arizona have been allowed to recover prudently incurred EE program costs;costs. We presented a comprehensive business model to achieve aggressive energyCosts Net Benefits Figure 1 Flowchart for analyzing impacts of portfolio of energy efficiency programs on stakeholders Model Inputs Business-

  6. Renewable Energy Requirements for Future Building Codes: Options for Compliance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dillon, Heather E.; Antonopoulos, Chrissi A.; Solana, Amy E.; Russo, Bryan J.

    2011-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    As the model energy codes are improved to reach efficiency levels 50 percent greater than current codes, use of on-site renewable energy generation is likely to become a code requirement. This requirement will be needed because traditional mechanisms for code improvement, including envelope, mechanical and lighting, have been pressed to the end of reasonable limits. Research has been conducted to determine the mechanism for implementing this requirement (Kaufman 2011). Kaufmann et al. determined that the most appropriate way to structure an on-site renewable requirement for commercial buildings is to define the requirement in terms of an installed power density per unit of roof area. This provides a mechanism that is suitable for the installation of photovoltaic (PV) systems on future buildings to offset electricity and reduce the total building energy load. Kaufmann et al. suggested that an appropriate maximum for the requirement in the commercial sector would be 4 W/ft{sup 2} of roof area or 0.5 W/ft{sup 2} of conditioned floor area. As with all code requirements, there must be an alternative compliance path for buildings that may not reasonably meet the renewables requirement. This might include conditions like shading (which makes rooftop PV arrays less effective), unusual architecture, undesirable roof pitch, unsuitable building orientation, or other issues. In the short term, alternative compliance paths including high performance mechanical equipment, dramatic envelope changes, or controls changes may be feasible. These options may be less expensive than many renewable systems, which will require careful balance of energy measures when setting the code requirement levels. As the stringency of the code continues to increase however, efficiency trade-offs will be maximized, requiring alternative compliance options to be focused solely on renewable electricity trade-offs or equivalent programs. One alternate compliance path includes purchase of Renewable Energy Credits (RECs). Each REC represents a specified amount of renewable electricity production and provides an offset of environmental externalities associated with non-renewable electricity production. The purpose of this paper is to explore the possible issues with RECs and comparable alternative compliance options. Existing codes have been examined to determine energy equivalence between the energy generation requirement and the RECs alternative over the life of the building. The price equivalence of the requirement and the alternative are determined to consider the economic drivers for a market decision. This research includes case studies that review how the few existing codes have incorporated RECs and some of the issues inherent with REC markets. Section 1 of the report reviews compliance options including RECs, green energy purchase programs, shared solar agreements and leases, and other options. Section 2 provides detailed case studies on codes that include RECs and community based alternative compliance methods. The methods the existing code requirements structure alternative compliance options like RECs are the focus of the case studies. Section 3 explores the possible structure of the renewable energy generation requirement in the context of energy and price equivalence. The price of RECs have shown high variation by market and over time which makes it critical to for code language to be updated frequently for a renewable energy generation requirement or the requirement will not remain price-equivalent over time. Section 4 of the report provides a maximum case estimate for impact to the PV market and the REC market based on the Kaufmann et al. proposed requirement levels. If all new buildings in the commercial sector complied with the requirement to install rooftop PV arrays, nearly 4,700 MW of solar would be installed in 2012, a major increase from EIA estimates of 640 MW of solar generation capacity installed in 2009. The residential sector could contribute roughly an additional 2,300 MW based on the same code requirement levels of 4 W/ft{sup 2} of r

  7. Search for the standard model Higgs boson produced through vector boson fusion and decaying to $\\mathrm{ b \\bar{b} }$

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Khachatryan, Vardan; CMS Collaboration; Tumasyan, Armen; Adam, Wolfgang; A??lar, Ece; Bergauer, Thomas; Brandstetter, Johannes; Brondolin, Erica; Dragicevic, Marko; Erö, Janos; Flechl, Martin; Friedl, Markus; Fruehwirth, Rudolf; Ghete, Vasile Mihai; Hartl, Christian; Hörmann, Natascha; Hrubec, Josef; Jeitler, Manfred; Knünz, Valentin; König, Axel; Krammer, Manfred; Krätschmer, Ilse; Liko, Dietrich; Matsushita, Takashi; Mikulec, Ivan; Rabady, Dinyar; Rahbaran, Babak; Rohringer, Herbert; Schieck, Jochen; Schöfbeck, Robert; Strauss, Josef; Treberer-Treberspurg, Wolfgang; Waltenberger, Wolfgang; Wulz, Claudia-Elisabeth; Mossolov, Vladimir; Shumeiko, Nikolai; Suarez Gonzalez, Juan; Alderweireldt, Sara; Cornelis, Tom; De Wolf, Eddi A; Janssen, Xavier; Knutsson, Albert; Lauwers, Jasper; Luyckx, Sten; Ochesanu, Silvia; Rougny, Romain; Van De Klundert, Merijn; Van Haevermaet, Hans; Van Mechelen, Pierre; Van Remortel, Nick; Van Spilbeeck, Alex; Abu Zeid, Shimaa; Blekman, Freya; D'Hondt, Jorgen; Daci, Nadir; De Bruyn, Isabelle; Deroover, Kevin; Heracleous, Natalie; Keaveney, James; Lowette, Steven; Moreels, Lieselotte; Olbrechts, Annik; Python, Quentin; Strom, Derek; Tavernier, Stefaan; Van Doninck, Walter; Van Mulders, Petra; Van Onsem, Gerrit Patrick; Van Parijs, Isis; Barria, Patrizia; Caillol, Cécile; Clerbaux, Barbara; De Lentdecker, Gilles; Delannoy, Hugo; Dobur, Didar; Fasanella, Giuseppe; Favart, Laurent; Gay, Arnaud; Grebenyuk, Anastasia; Lenzi, Thomas; Léonard, Alexandre; Maerschalk, Thierry; Marinov, Andrey; Mohammadi, Abdollah; Perniè, Luca; Randle-conde, Aidan; Reis, Thomas; Seva, Tomislav; Vander Velde, Catherine; Vanlaer, Pascal; Yonamine, Ryo; Zenoni, Florian; Zhang, Fengwangdong; Beernaert, Kelly; Benucci, Leonardo; Cimmino, Anna; Crucy, Shannon; Fagot, Alexis; Garcia, Guillaume; Gul, Muhammad; Mccartin, Joseph; Ocampo Rios, Alberto Andres; Poyraz, Deniz; Ryckbosch, Dirk; Salva Diblen, Sinem; Sigamani, Michael; Strobbe, Nadja; Tytgat, Michael; Van Driessche, Ward; Yazgan, Efe; Zaganidis, Nicolas; Basegmez, Suzan; Beluffi, Camille; Bondu, Olivier; Bruno, Giacomo; Castello, Roberto; Caudron, Adrien; Ceard, Ludivine; Da Silveira, Gustavo Gil; Delaere, Christophe; Favart, Denis; Forthomme, Laurent; Giammanco, Andrea; Hollar, Jonathan; Jafari, Abideh; Jez, Pavel; Komm, Matthias; Lemaitre, Vincent; Mertens, Alexandre; Nuttens, Claude; Perrini, Lucia; Pin, Arnaud; Piotrzkowski, Krzysztof; Popov, Andrey; Quertenmont, Loic; Selvaggi, Michele; Vidal Marono, Miguel; Beliy, Nikita; Hammad, Gregory Habib; Aldá Júnior, Walter Luiz; Alves, Gilvan; Brito, Lucas; Correa Martins Junior, Marcos; Dos Reis Martins, Thiago; Hensel, Carsten; Mora Herrera, Clemencia; Moraes, Arthur; Pol, Maria Elena; Rebello Teles, Patricia; Belchior Batista Das Chagas, Ewerton; Carvalho, Wagner; Chinellato, Jose; Custódio, Analu; Da Costa, Eliza Melo; De Jesus Damiao, Dilson; De Oliveira Martins, Carley; Fonseca De Souza, Sandro; Huertas Guativa, Lina Milena; Malbouisson, Helena; Matos Figueiredo, Diego; Mundim, Luiz; Nogima, Helio; Prado Da Silva, Wanda Lucia; Santoro, Alberto; Sznajder, Andre; Tonelli Manganote, Edmilson José; Vilela Pereira, Antonio; Ahuja, Sudha; Bernardes, Cesar Augusto; De Souza Santos, Angelo; Dogra, Sunil; Tomei, Thiago; De Moraes Gregores, Eduardo; Mercadante, Pedro G; Moon, Chang-Seong; Novaes, Sergio F; Padula, Sandra; Romero Abad, David; Ruiz Vargas, José Cupertino; Aleksandrov, Aleksandar; Genchev, Vladimir; Hadjiiska, Roumyana; Iaydjiev, Plamen; Piperov, Stefan; Rodozov, Mircho; Stoykova, Stefka; Sultanov, Georgi; Vutova, Mariana; Dimitrov, Anton; Glushkov, Ivan; Litov, Leander; Pavlov, Borislav; Petkov, Peicho; Ahmad, Muhammad; Bian, Jian-Guo; Chen, Guo-Ming; Chen, He-Sheng; Chen, Mingshui; Cheng, Tongguang; Du, Ran; Jiang, Chun-Hua; Plestina, Roko; Romeo, Francesco; Shaheen, Sarmad Masood; Tao, Junquan; Wang, Chunjie; Wang, Zheng; Zhang, Huaqiao; Asawatangtrakuldee, Chayanit; Ban, Yong; Li, Qiang; Liu, Shuai; Mao, Yajun; Qian, Si-Jin; Wang, Dayong; Xu, Zijun; Zou, Wei; Avila, Carlos; Cabrera, Andrés; Chaparro Sierra, Luisa Fernanda; Florez, Carlos; Gomez, Juan Pablo; Gomez Moreno, Bernardo; Sanabria, Juan Carlos; Godinovic, Nikola; Lelas, Damir; Polic, Dunja; Puljak, Ivica; Antunovic, Zeljko; Kovac, Marko; Brigljevic, Vuko; Kadija, Kreso; Luetic, Jelena; Sudic, Lucija; Attikis, Alexandros; Mavromanolakis, Georgios; Mousa, Jehad; Nicolaou, Charalambos; Ptochos, Fotios; Razis, Panos A; Rykaczewski, Hans; Bodlak, Martin; Finger, Miroslav; Finger Jr, Michael; Aly, Reham; Aly, Shereen

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A first search is reported for a standard model Higgs boson (H) that is produced through vector boson fusion and decays to a bottom-quark pair. Two data samples, corresponding to integrated luminosities of 19.8 fb$^{-1}$ and 18.3 fb$^{-1}$ of proton-proton collisions at $\\sqrt{s} =$ 8 TeV were selected for this channel at the CERN LHC. The observed significance in these data samples for a $ \\mathrm{ H \\to b\\bar{b} }$ signal at a mass of 125 GeV is 2.2 standard deviations, whilst the expected significance is 0.8 standard deviations. The fitted signal strength $\\mu=\\sigma/\\sigma_\\mathrm{SM}= 2.8 ^{+1.6}_{-1.4}$. The combination of this result with other CMS searches for the Higgs boson decaying to a b-quark pair, yields a signal strength of 1.0 $\\pm$ 0.4, corresponding to a signal significance of 2.6 standard deviations for a Higgs boson mass of 125 GeV.

  8. A model for large non-standard interactions of neutrinos leading to the LMA-Dark solution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farzan, Yasaman

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    It is well-known that in addition to the standard LMA solution to solar anomaly, there is another solution called LMA-Dark which requires Non-Standard Interactions (NSI) with effective couplings as large as the Fermi coupling. Although this solution satisfies all the bounds from various neutrino oscillation observations and even provides a better fit to low energy solar neutrino spectrum, it is not as popular as the LMA solution mainly because no model compatible with the existing bounds has been so far constructed to give rise to this solution. We introduce a model that provides a foundation for such large NSI with strength and flavor structure required for the LMA-Dark solution. This model is based on a new $U(1)^\\prime$ gauge interaction with a gauge boson of mass $\\sim 10$ MeV under which quarks as well as the second and third generations of leptons are charged. We show that observable effects can appear in the spectrum of supernova and high energy cosmic neutrinos. Our model predicts a new contribution t...

  9. Predicting the Frequency of Water Quality Standard Violations Using Bayesian Calibration of Eutrophication Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arhonditsis, George B.

    of Eutrophication Models Weitao Zhang1 and George B. Arhonditsis1, 2,* 1Department of Geography University using three synthetic datasets that represent oligo-, meso- and eutrophic lake conditions. Scientific in the Laurentian Great Lakes region. INDEX WORDS: Environmental management, process-based models, eutrophication

  10. Communication Centric Modelling of System on Chip Devices Targeting Multi-Standard Telecommunication Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arslan, Tughrul

    part of tool is system modelling, which is used for quick simulation and system verification. In orderCommunication Centric Modelling of System on Chip Devices Targeting Multi characteristics e.g. throughput, power consumption of a reconfigurable WiMAX compliant system on chip. The four

  11. Why does the Standard GARCH(1,1) model work well?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. R. Jafari; A. Bahraminasab; P. Norouzzadeh

    2007-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The AutoRegressive Conditional Heteroskedasticity (ARCH) and its generalized version (GARCH) family of models have grown to encompass a wide range of specifications, each of them is designed to enhance the ability of the model to capture the characteristics of stochastic data, such as financial time series. The existing literature provides little guidance on how to select optimal parameters, which are critical in efficiency of the model, among the infinite range of available parameters. We introduce a new criterion to find suitable parameters in GARCH models by using Markov length, which is the minimum time interval over which the data can be considered as constituting a Markov process. This criterion is applied to various time series and results support the known idea that GARCH(1,1) model works well.

  12. Ecological Monitoring and Compliance Program 2013 Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hall, Derek B.; Anderson, David C.; Greger, Paul D.

    2014-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The Ecological Monitoring and Compliance Program (EMAC), funded through the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Field Office (NNSA/NFO, formerly Nevada Site Office), monitors the ecosystem of the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) and ensures compliance with laws and regulations pertaining to NNSS biota. This report summarizes the program’s activities conducted by National Security Technologies, LLC (NSTec), during calendar year 2013. Program activities included (a) biological surveys at proposed activity sites, (b) desert tortoise compliance, (c) ecosystem monitoring, (d) sensitive plant species monitoring, (e) sensitive and protected/regulated animal monitoring, and (f) habitat restoration monitoring. During 2013, all applicable laws, regulations, and permit requirements were met, enabling EMAC to achieve its intended goals and objectives.

  13. Ecological Monitoring and Compliance Program 2012 Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hall, Derek B.; Anderson, David C.; Greger, Paul D.; Ostler, W. Kent; Hansen, Dennis J.

    2013-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The Ecological Monitoring and Compliance Program (EMAC), funded through the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Field Office (NNSA/NFO, formerly Nevada Site Office), monitors the ecosystem of the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) and ensures compliance with laws and regulations pertaining to NNSS biota. This report summarizes the program’s activities conducted by National Security Technologies, LLC (NSTec), during calendar year 2012. Program activities included (a) biological surveys at proposed construction sites, (b) desert tortoise compliance, (c) ecosystem monitoring, (d) sensitive plant species monitoring, (e) sensitive and protected/regulated animal monitoring, (f) habitat restoration monitoring, and (g) monitoring of the Nonproliferation Test and Evaluation Complex (NPTEC). During 2012, all applicable laws, regulations, and permit requirements were met, enabling EMAC to achieve its intended goals and objectives.

  14. Ecological Monitoring and Compliance Program 2010 Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hansen, D.J.; Anderson, D.C.; Hall, D.B.; Greger, P.D.; Ostler, W.K.

    2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Ecological Monitoring and Compliance (EMAC) Program, funded through the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO), monitors the ecosystem of the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) and ensures compliance with laws and regulations pertaining to NNSS biota. This report summarizes the program’s activities conducted by National Security Technologies, LLC (NSTec), during calendar year 2010. Program activities included (a) biological surveys at proposed construction sites, (b) desert tortoise compliance, (c) ecosystem monitoring, (d) sensitive plant species monitoring, (e) sensitive and protected/regulated animal monitoring, (f) habitat restoration monitoring, and (g) monitoring of the Nonproliferation Test and Evaluation Complex (NPTEC). During 2010, all applicable laws, regulations, and permit requirements were met, enabling EMAC to achieve its intended goals and objectives.

  15. Ecological Monitoring and Compliance Program 2011 Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hansen, D. J., Anderson, D. C., Hall, D. B., Greger, P. D., Ostler, W. K.

    2012-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The Ecological Monitoring and Compliance (EMAC) Program, funded through the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office, monitors the ecosystem of the Nevada National Security Site and ensures compliance with laws and regulations pertaining to NNSS biota. This report summarizes the program's activities conducted by National Security Technologies, LLC, during calendar year 2011. Program activities included (a) biological surveys at proposed construction sites, (b) desert tortoise compliance, (c) ecosystem monitoring, (d) sensitive plant species monitoring, (e) sensitive and protected/regulated animal monitoring, (f) habitat restoration monitoring, and (g) monitoring of the Nonproliferation Test and Evaluation Complex. During 2011, all applicable laws, regulations, and permit requirements were met, enabling EMAC to achieve its intended goals and objectives.

  16. Ecological Monitoring and Compliance Program 2008 Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dennis J. Hansen, David C. Anderson, Derek B. Hall, Paul D. Greger, W. Kent Ostler

    2009-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The Ecological Monitoring and Compliance Program, funded through the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO), monitors the ecosystem of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and ensures compliance with laws and regulations pertaining to NTS biota. This report summarizes the program’s activities conducted by National Security Technologies, LLC (NSTec), during calendar year 2008. Program activities included (a) biological surveys at proposed construction sites, (b) desert tortoise compliance, (c) ecosystem mapping and data management, (d) sensitive plant species monitoring, (e) sensitive and protected/regulated animal monitoring, (f) habitat monitoring, (g) habitat restoration monitoring, and (h) monitoring of the Nonproliferation Test and Evaluation Complex (NPTEC).

  17. Ecological Monitoring and Compliance Program 2009 Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dennis J. Hansen, David C. Anderson, Derek B. Hall, Paul D. Greger, and W. Kent Ostler

    2010-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The Ecological Monitoring and Compliance Program (EMAC), funded through the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office, monitors the ecosystem of the Nevada Test Site and ensures compliance with laws and regulations pertaining to NTS biota. This report summarizes the program’s activities conducted by National Security Technologies, LLC, during calendar year 2009. Program activities included (a) biological surveys at proposed construction sites, (b) desert tortoise compliance, (c) ecosystem mapping and data management, (d) sensitive plant species monitoring, (e) sensitive and protected/regulated animal monitoring, (f) habitat monitoring, (g) habitat restoration monitoring, and (h) monitoring of the Nonproliferation Test and Evaluation Complex. During 2009, all applicable laws, regulations, and permit requirements were met, enabling EMAC to achieve its intended goals and objectives.

  18. Programmer`s manual for CAMCON: Compliance Assessment Methodology CONtroller

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rechard, R.P. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Gilkey, A.P.; Rudeen, D.K.; Byle, K.A. [New Mexico Engineering Research Inst., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Iuzzolino, H.J. [Geo-Centers, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    CAMCON, the Compliance Assessment Methodology CONtroller, is an analysis system that assists in assessing the compliance of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) with applicable long-term regulations of the US Environmental Protection Agency, including Subpart B of the Environmental Standards for the Management and Disposal of spent Nuclear Fuel, High-Level and Transuranic Radioactive Wastes, 40 CFR 191 and 40CFR268.6, which is the portion of the Land Disposal Restrictions implementing the Resource, Conservative, and Recovery Act of 1976, as amended that states the conditions for disposal of hazardous chemical wastes. This manual provides an architectural overview of the CAMCON system. Furthermore this manual presents guidelines and presents suggestions for programmers developing the many different types of software necessary to investigate various events and physical processes of the WIPP. These guidelines include user interface requirements, minimum quality assurance requirements, coding style suggestions, and the use of numerous software libraries developed specifically for or adapted for the CAMCON system.

  19. Standard Model False Vacuum Inflation: Correlating the Tensor-to-Scalar Ratio to the Top Quark and Higgs Boson masses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Isabella Masina; Alessio Notari

    2012-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

    For a narrow band of values of the top quark and Higgs boson masses, the Standard Model Higgs potential develops a false minimum at energies of about $10^{16}$ GeV, where primordial Inflation could have started in a cold metastable state. A graceful exit to a radiation-dominated era is provided, e.g., by scalar-tensor gravity models. We pointed out that if Inflation happened in this false minimum, the Higgs boson mass has to be in the range $126.0 \\pm 3.5$ GeV, where ATLAS and CMS subsequently reported excesses of events. Here we show that for these values of the Higgs boson mass, the inflationary gravitational wave background has be discovered with a tensor-to-scalar ratio at hand of future experiments. We suggest that combining cosmological observations with measurements of the top quark and Higgs boson masses represents a further test of the hypothesis that the Standard Model false minimum was the source of Inflation in the Universe.

  20. HEATMAP©CHP - The International Standard for Modeling Combined Heat and Power Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bloomquist, R. G.; O'Brien, R. G.

    , regional, or national planners in defining all aspects of developing, evaluating, and justifying a new CHP project or upgrading an existing thermal system for CHP. Program output may be used to evaluate existing system performance or model the effects...

  1. Combination of Tevatron searches for the standard model Higgs boson in the W+W- decay mode

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aaltonen, T.; Abazov, V.M.; Gregores, E.M.; Mercadante, P.G.; /ABC Federal U.; Hebbeker, T.; Kirsch, M.; Meyer, A.; Sonnenschein, L.; /Aachen, Tech. Hochsch.; Avila, C.; Gomez, B.; Mendoza, L.; /Andes U., Bogota /Argonne /Arizona U. /Athens U. /Barcelona, IFAE /Baylor U. /Bonn U. /Boston U. /Brandeis U.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We combine searches by the CDF and D0 collaborations for a Higgs boson decaying to W{sup +}W{sup -}. The data correspond to an integrated total luminosity of 4.8 (CDF) and 5.4 (D0) fb{sup -1} of p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV at the Fermilab Tevatron collider. No excess is observed above background expectation, and resulting limits on Higgs boson production exclude a standard-model Higgs boson in the mass range 162-166 GeV at the 95% C.L.

  2. Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF): Data from Standard Model and Supersymmetric Higgs Bosons Research of the Higgs Group

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    The Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF) is a Tevatron experiment at Fermilab. The Tevatron, a powerful particle accelerator, accelerates protons and antiprotons close to the speed of light, and then makes them collide head-on inside the CDF detector. The CDF detector is used to study the products of such collisions. The CDF Physics Group at Fermilab is organized into six working groups, each with a specific focus. The Higgs group searches for Standard Model and Supersymmetric Higgs bosons. Their public web page makes data and numerous figures available from both CDF Runs I and II.

  3. The Utility of Naturalness, and how its Application to Quantum Electrodynamics envisages the Standard Model and Higgs Boson

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wells, James D

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    With the Higgs boson discovery and no new physics found at the LHC, confidence in Naturalness as a guiding principle for particle physics is under increased pressure. We wait to see if it proves its mettle in the LHC upgrades ahead, and beyond. In the meantime, in a series of "realistic intellectual leaps" I present a justification {\\it a posteriori} of the Naturalness criterion by suggesting that uncompromising application of the principle to quantum electrodynamics leads toward the Standard Model and Higgs boson without additional experimental input. Potential lessons for today and future theory building are commented upon.

  4. The Utility of Naturalness, and how its Application to Quantum Electrodynamics envisages the Standard Model and Higgs Boson

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    James D. Wells

    2013-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    With the Higgs boson discovery and no new physics found at the LHC, confidence in Naturalness as a guiding principle for particle physics is under increased pressure. We wait to see if it proves its mettle in the LHC upgrades ahead, and beyond. In the meantime, in a series of "realistic intellectual leaps" I present a justification {\\it a posteriori} of the Naturalness criterion by suggesting that uncompromising application of the principle to quantum electrodynamics leads toward the Standard Model and Higgs boson without additional experimental input. Potential lessons for today and future theory building are commented upon.

  5. The gauge factor increase and the hypothetical emerging of the matter objects on the horizon in the standard model of universe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. Skalsky

    2000-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

    In the standard model of universe the increase in mass of our observed expansive and isotropic relativistic Universe is explained by the hypothetical assumption of matter objects emerging on the horizon (of the most remote visibility). However, the mathematical-physical analysis of the increase of Universe gauge factor shows that this hypothetical assumption is non-compatible with the variants of the standard model of universe by which - according to the standard model of universe - can be described the expansive evolution of the Universe.

  6. Apply: Increase Residential Energy Code Compliance Rates (DE...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Apply: Increase Residential Energy Code Compliance Rates (DE-FOA-0000953) Apply: Increase Residential Energy Code Compliance Rates (DE-FOA-0000953) April 21, 2014 - 12:32pm Addthis...

  7. Development of DOE-2 Based Simulation Models for the Code-Compliant Commercial Construction Based on the ASHRAE Standard 90.1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, S.; Haberl, J.; Liu, Z.

    Conservation Code. Since most of the commercial portion of the 2000/2001 International Energy Conservation Code refers to ASHRAE Standard 90.1-1999 as the current code requirement for commercial construction, the simulation models based on the ASHRAE Standard...

  8. The Model 5000-16C 1000 WATT FEL Lamp Standard pro-vides absolute calibration of spectral irradiance from 250 nm to

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Model 5000-16C 1000 WATT FEL Lamp Standard pro- vides absolute calibration of spectral irradiance from 250 nm to 2.5 microns.This Tungsten-Halogen Lamp Standard bears the ANSI designation of FEL might be discernible at the crossover point of the two referenced NIST Scales. 5000 FEL 1000Watt Lamp

  9. Modelling Geospatial Application Databases using UML-based Repositories Aligned with International Standards in Geomatics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Modelling Geospatial Application Databases using UML-based Repositories Aligned with International Abstract: This paper presents the result of recent work on the use of geospatial repositories to store and database concepts, a geospatial repository can be defined as a collection of (meta) data structured

  10. 2Documenting Social Simulation Models: 3The ODD Protocol as a Standard

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tesfatsion, Leigh

    articles. Popular among ecologists, 10it is also increasingly used in the social simulation community. Here individual- and agent-based simulation models 26 (ABMs), especially for journal articles, conference papers, and other academic 27 literature. It consists of seven elements which can be grouped into three blocks: 28

  11. Neutrino mass and oscillation as probes of physics beyond the Standard Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Khalil, S

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a review of the present status of the problem of neutrino masses and mixing including a survey of theoretical motivations and models, experimental searches and implications of recently appeared solar and atmospheric neutrino data, which strongly indicate nonzero neutrino masses and mixing angles.

  12. air toxics compliance: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Paper: Improving Browsing Environment Compliance Evaluations for Websites Cyntrica Eaton heterogeneous browsing environments, the browser, browser version, and operating...

  13. acid rain compliance: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Paper: Improving Browsing Environment Compliance Evaluations for Websites Cyntrica Eaton heterogeneous browsing environments, the browser, browser version, and operating...

  14. air permit compliance: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Paper: Improving Browsing Environment Compliance Evaluations for Websites Cyntrica Eaton heterogeneous browsing environments, the browser, browser version, and operating...

  15. arterial compliance volume: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Paper: Improving Browsing Environment Compliance Evaluations for Websites Cyntrica Eaton heterogeneous browsing environments, the browser, browser version, and operating...

  16. Least-Order Torsion-Gravity for Fermion Fields, and the Non-Linear Potentials in the Standard Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Luca Fabbri

    2014-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We will consider the least-order torsional completion of gravity for a spacetime filled with fermionic Dirac matter fields, and we study the effects of the background-induced non-linear potentials for the matter field themselves in view of their effects for both standard models of physics: from the one of cosmology to that of particles, we will discuss the mechanisms of generation of the cosmological constant and particle masses as well as the phenomenology of leptonic weak-like forces and neutrino oscillations, the problem of zero-point energy, how there can be neutral massive fields as candidates for dark matter, and avoidance of gravitational singularity formation; we will show the way in which all these different effects can nevertheless be altogether described in terms of just a single model, which will be thoroughly discussed in the end.

  17. Phenomenology of the minimal B-L extension of the standard model: Z{sup '} and neutrinos

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Basso, Lorenzo; Belyaev, Alexander; Moretti, Stefano [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Southampton, Highfield, Southampton SO17 1BJ (United Kingdom); Particle Physics Department, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Chilton Didcot, Oxon OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Shepherd-Themistocleous, Claire H. [Particle Physics Department, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Chilton Didcot, Oxon OX11 0QX (United Kingdom)

    2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) discovery potential in the Z{sup '} and heavy neutrino sectors of a U(1){sub B-L} enlarged standard model also encompassing 3 heavy Majorana neutrinos. This model exhibits novel signatures at the LHC, the most interesting arising from a Z{sup '} decay chain involving heavy neutrinos, eventually decaying into leptons and jets. In particular, this signature allows one to measure the Z{sup '} and heavy neutrino masses involved. In addition, over a large region of the parameter space, the heavy neutrinos are rather long-lived particles producing distinctive displaced vertices that can be seen in the detectors. Lastly, the simultaneous measurement of both the heavy neutrino mass and decay length enables an estimate of the absolute mass of the parent light neutrino.

  18. Environmental protection and regulatory compliance at the Elk Hills Field

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chappelle, H.H. (BCM Engineers, Inc., Plymouth Meeting, PA (United States)); Donahoe, R.L. (Bechtel Petroleum Operations, Inc., Tupman, CA (United States)); Kato, T.T. (EG and G Energy Measurements, Inc., Las Vegas, NV (United States)); Ordway, H.E. (Chevron U.S.A., Inc., San Francisco, CA (United States))

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Environmental protection has played an integral role in the development and operation of the Elk Hills field since production at the maximum efficient rate was authorized in 1976. The field is located in a non-attainment area for California and National Ambient Air Quality Standards for two criteria pollutants and their associated precursors, is home to four endangered species, and operates within the California regulatory framework. Environmental protection and regulatory compliance is a multi-faceted program carried out through a substantial commitment of resources and workforce involvement. This paper describes the actions taken and resources employed to protect the environment, specific technologies and projects implement, and the ongoing nature of these efforts at Elk Hills.

  19. Environmental protection and regulatory compliance at the Elk Hills Field

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chappelle, H.H. [BCM Engineers, Inc., Plymouth Meeting, PA (United States); Donahoe, R.L. [Bechtel Petroleum Operations, Inc., Tupman, CA (United States); Kato, T.T. [EG and G Energy Measurements, Inc., Las Vegas, NV (United States); Ordway, H.E. [Chevron U.S.A., Inc., San Francisco, CA (United States)

    1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Environmental protection has played an integral role in the development and operation of the Elk Hills field since production at the maximum efficient rate was authorized in 1976. The field is located in a non-attainment area for California and National Ambient Air Quality Standards for two criteria pollutants and their associated precursors, is home to four endangered species, and operates within the California regulatory framework. Environmental protection and regulatory compliance is a multi-faceted program carried out through a substantial commitment of resources and workforce involvement. This paper describes the actions taken and resources employed to protect the environment, specific technologies and projects implement, and the ongoing nature of these efforts at Elk Hills.

  20. CRIS Project Internal DASNR Compliance Checklist

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ghajar, Afshin J.

    CRIS Project Internal DASNR Compliance Checklist Researcher's Name: Department: Address / Phone: Project Title: Does this project involve research with: Human Subjects Yes No If yes, attach copy of IRB to Animals, Plants, or Humans Radioactive Materials or Yes No If yes, attach copy of Radiation Sa X

  1. Environmental Compliance Audit & Assessment Program Manual

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    LBNL-1636E Environmental Compliance Audit & Assessment Program Manual Prepared by: Environment Berkeley National Laboratory Berkeley, CA 94720 This work was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor The Regents of the University

  2. Bulk Storage Program Compliance Written Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pawlowski, Wojtek

    Bulk Storage Program Compliance Written Program Cornell University 5/8/2013 #12;Bulk Storage.......................................................... 5 4.2.2 Aboveground Petroleum Storage Tanks­ University activities/operations designed to prevent releases of oil from Aboveground Petroleum Storage Tanks (ASTs) required to comply with following

  3. Rocky Flats Compliance Program; Technology summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Department of Energy (DOE) established the Office of Technology Development (EM-50) (OTD) as an element of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (EM) in November 1989. The primary objective of the Office of Technology Development, Rocky Flats Compliance Program (RFCP), is to develop altemative treatment technologies for mixed low-level waste (wastes containing both hazardous and radioactive components) to use in bringing the Rocky Flats Plant (RFP) into compliance with Federal and state regulations and agreements. Approximately 48,000 cubic feet of untreated low-level mixed waste, for which treatment has not been specified, are stored at the RFP. The cleanup of the Rocky Flats site is driven by agreements between DOE, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), and the Colorado Department of Health (CDH). Under these agreements, a Comprehensive Treatment and Management Plan (CTMP) was drafted to outline the mechanisms by which RFP will achieve compliance with the regulations and agreements. This document describes DOE`s strategy to treat low-level mixed waste to meet Land Disposal Restrictions and sets specific milestones related to the regulatory aspects of technology development. These milestones detail schedules for the development of technologies to treat all of the mixed wastes at the RFP. Under the Federal Facilities Compliance Act (FFCA), the CTMP has been incorporated into Rocky Flats Plant Conceptual Site Treatment Plan (CSTP). The CSTP will become the Rocky Flats Plant site Treatment Plan in 1995 and will supersede the CTMP.

  4. Research Integrity & Compliance Review Office (RICRO)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stephens, Graeme L.

    Research Integrity & Compliance Review Office (RICRO) · Animal Subjects · Human Subjects of bringing a problem forward? · You may as well begin to develop these skills now, because they are part, as well as the scientific dimensions." - Dr. Bernard Rollin, University Bioethicist #12;Research

  5. 3Compliance Status 2003 SITE ENVIRONMENTAL REPORT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Homes, Christopher C.

    reported to the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (NYSDEC). Twenty-two reportable3-1 3Compliance Status 2003 SITE ENVIRONMENTAL REPORT Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) is subject to more than 100 sets of federal, state, and local environmental regulations; numerous site

  6. COMPLIANCE OVERVIEW 1. General and administrative changes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Davis, University of

    and lighting power density allowances. SLIDE 2010/31/2014 COMPLIANCE OVERVIEW #12;SECTION 2 PERMITTING Power Density requirements. · Alterations that replace more than 50% of the luminaires in a space requirements These requirements set a maximum lighting power allowance a building or an area within a building

  7. Ecological Monitoring and Compliance Program 2007 Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dennis Hansen, David Anderson, Derek Hall, Paul Greger, W. Kent Ostler

    2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In accordance with U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 450.1, 'Environmental Protection Program', the Office of the Assistant Manager for Environmental Management of the DOE, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) requires ecological monitoring and biological compliance support for activities and programs conducted at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). National Security Technologies, LLC (NSTec), Ecological Services has implemented the Ecological Monitoring and Compliance (EMAC) Program to provide this support. EMAC is designed to ensure compliance with applicable laws and regulations, delineate and define NTS ecosystems, and provide ecological information that can be used to predict and evaluate the potential impacts of proposed projects and programs on those ecosystems. This report summarizes the EMAC activities conducted by NSTec during calendar year 2007. Monitoring tasks during 2007 included eight program areas: (a) biological surveys, (b) desert tortoise compliance, (c) ecosystem mapping and data management, (d) sensitive plant monitoring, (e) sensitive and protected/regulated animal monitoring, (f) habitat monitoring, (g) habitat restoration monitoring, and (h) biological monitoring at the Nonproliferation Test and Evaluation Complex (NPTEC). The following sections of this report describe work performed under these eight areas.

  8. Can Affirmative Motivations Improve Compliance in Emissions Trading Leigh Raymond

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Can Affirmative Motivations Improve Compliance in Emissions Trading Programs?* Leigh Raymond be inferred. #12;Can Affirmative Motivations Improve Compliance in Emissions Trading Programs? Abstract Early emissions trading programs have obtained a very high rate of compliance, in part by using continuous

  9. Search for the Standard Model Higgs Boson Decaying to a bb? Pair in Events with Two Oppositely Charged Leptons Using the Full CDF Data Set

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gomez-Ceballos, Guillelmo

    We present a search for the standard model Higgs boson produced in association with a Z boson in data collected with the CDF II detector at the Tevatron, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 9.45??fb[superscript ...

  10. An ultra-compact virtual source FET model for deeply-scaled devices: Parameter extraction and validation for standard cell libraries and digital circuits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mysore, Omar

    In this paper, we present the first validation of the virtual source (VS) charge-based compact model for standard cell libraries and large-scale digital circuits. With only a modest number of physically meaningful parameters, ...

  11. Observation of a new particle in the search for the Standard Model Higgs boson with the ATLAS detector at the LHC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taylor, Frank E.

    A search for the Standard Model Higgs boson in proton–proton collisions with the ATLAS detector at the LHC is presented. The datasets used correspond to integrated luminosities of approximately 4.8 fb[superscript ?1] ...

  12. Higher order corrections and unification in the minimal supersymmetric standard model: SOFTSUSY3.5

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Allanach, B. C.; Bednyakov, A.; Ruiz de Austri, R.

    2014-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

    -familymixing) in the limit of real parameters and some leading two-loop threshold corrections are incorporated to the third family Yukawa couplings and the strong gauge coupling. 2 2. Introduction The recent discovery of the Higgs boson [2, 3... conversely, to see if there is statistically significant evidence for a signal). The accurate measurement of a Higgs boson now has become an important constraint upon any supersymmetric model. In order for this constraint to be as useful and as accurate...

  13. Interconnection Standards

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    New York first adopted uniform interconnection standards in 1999 (see history below). The Standard Interconnection Requirements (SIR) have subsequently been amended several times since, most...

  14. Interconnection Standards

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The North Carolina Utilities Commission (NCUC) adopted comprehensive interconnection standards for distributed generation in June 2008. The NCUC standards, which are similar to the Federal Energy...

  15. Interconnection Standards

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Michigan Public Service Commission (PSC) first adopted interconnection standards for distributed generation (DG) in September 2003. The original standards provided for 5 levels of...

  16. Interconnection Standards

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Pennsylvania Public Utilities Commission was required to adopt interconnection standards and net-metering rules by the Alternative Energy Portfolio Standards Act of 2004.The PUC subsequently...

  17. Energy Savings Modeling of Standard Commercial Building Re-tuning Measures: Large Office Buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fernandez, Nicholas; Katipamula, Srinivas; Wang, Weimin; Huang, Yunzhi; Liu, Guopeng

    2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Today, many large commercial buildings use sophisticated building automation systems (BASs) to manage a wide range of building equipment. While the capabilities of BASs have increased over time, many buildings still do not fully use the BAS's capabilities and are not properly commissioned, operated or maintained, which leads to inefficient operation, increased energy use, and reduced lifetimes of the equipment. This report investigates the energy savings potential of several common HVAC system retuning measures on a typical large office building prototype model, using the Department of Energy's building energy modeling software, EnergyPlus. The baseline prototype model uses roughly as much energy as an average large office building in existing building stock, but does not utilize any re-tuning measures. Individual re-tuning measures simulated against this baseline include automatic schedule adjustments, damper minimum flow adjustments, thermostat adjustments, as well as dynamic resets (set points that change continuously with building and/or outdoor conditions) to static pressure, supply air temperature, condenser water temperature, chilled and hot water temperature, and chilled and hot water differential pressure set points. Six combinations of these individual measures have been formulated - each designed to conform to limitations to implementation of certain individual measures that might exist in typical buildings. All of these measures and combinations were simulated in 16 cities representative of specific U.S. climate zones. The modeling results suggest that the most effective energy savings measures are those that affect the demand-side of the building (air-systems and schedules). Many of the demand-side individual measures were capable of reducing annual HVAC system energy consumption by over 20% in most cities that were modeled. Supply side measures affecting HVAC plant conditions were only modestly successful (less than 5% annual HVAC energy savings for most cities for all measures). Combining many of the retuning measures revealed deep savings potential. Some of the more aggressive combinations revealed 35-75% reductions in annual HVAC energy consumption, depending on climate and building vintage.

  18. Combined upper limit on standard model higgs boson production at D0 in $p \\bar{p}$ collisions at $\\sqrt{s} = 1.96-TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bernhard, Ralf; /Freiburg U.

    2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The latest searches for the Standard Model Higgs boson at a centre-of-mass energy of {radical}s = 1.96 TeV with the D0 and the CDF detectors at the Fermilab Tevatron collider are presented. For the first time since the LEP experiments the sensitivity for a Standard Model Higgs boson has been reached at a Higgs boson mass of 170 GeV/c{sup 2}.

  19. GUT and standard-like models in intersecting D-brane worlds 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Ching-Ming

    2006-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

    on Type IIA T6 orientifold. The complete gauge symmetry is U(5) ?U(1)4 ?USp(12) ?USp(8) ?USp(4). . . . . . . . . . . . . 81 XXVII The particle spectrum in the observable and Higgs sectors with the four global U(1)s from the Green-Schwarz mechanism.... The starprimed representations indicate vector-like matter. . . . . . . . . . . . . 83 XXVIII The SM fermions and Higgs fields in the U(4)C ?U(2)L ?U(1)prime ? U(1)primeprime ?U(1)e?U(1)f ?USp(4)2 model, with anomaly free U(1)I3R and U(1)X gauge symmetries...

  20. Cogeneration of Dark Matter and Baryons by Non-Standard-Model Sphalerons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barr, S M

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sphalerons of a new gauge interaction can convert a primordial asymmetry in B or L into a dark matter asymmetry. From the equilibrium conditions for the sphalerons of both the electroweak and the new interactions, one can compute the ratios of B, L, and X, where X is the dark matter number, thus determining the mass of the dark matter particle fairly precisely. Such a scenario can arise naturally in the context of unification with larger groups. An illustrative model embeddable in $SU(6) \\times SU(2) \\subset E_6$ is described.

  1. GUT and standard-like models in intersecting D-brane worlds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Ching-Ming

    2006-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

    on Type IIA T6 orientifold. The complete gauge symmetry is U(5) ?U(1)4 ?USp(12) ?USp(8) ?USp(4). . . . . . . . . . . . . 81 XXVII The particle spectrum in the observable and Higgs sectors with the four global U(1)s from the Green-Schwarz mechanism.... The starprimed representations indicate vector-like matter. . . . . . . . . . . . . 83 XXVIII The SM fermions and Higgs fields in the U(4)C ?U(2)L ?U(1)prime ? U(1)primeprime ?U(1)e?U(1)f ?USp(4)2 model, with anomaly free U(1)I3R and U(1)X gauge symmetries...

  2. The future of gas turbine compliance monitoring: The integration of PEMS and CEMS for regulatory compliance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Macak, J.J. III

    1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    When the New Source Performance Standards (NSPS) for Stationary Gas Turbines were first promulgated in 1979 (40 CFR 60, Subpart GG), continuous compliance monitoring for gas turbines was simply a parametric monitoring approach where a unit was tested at four load conditions. For those units where water or steam injection was used for NO{sub x} control, testing consisted of establishing a water (or steam injection) versus fuel flow curve to achieve permitted NO{sub x} emission levels across the load range. Since 1979, the growth in gas turbine popularity has encouraged the development of Predictive Emissions Monitoring Systems (PEMS) where gas turbine operating parameters and ambient conditions are fed into a prediction algorithm to predict, rather than monitor, emissions. However, permitting requirements and technological advances now have gas turbines emitting NO{sub x} in the single digits while the overall combined-cycle thermal efficiency has improved dramatically. The combination of supplemental duct-firing in heat recovery steam generators, pollution prevention technology, post-combustion emission controls, and EPA Continuous Emissions Monitoring System (CEMS) regulations for the power industry, resulted in a shift towards CEMS due to the complexity of the overall process. Yet, CEMS are often considered to be a maintenance nightmare with significant amounts of downtime. CEMS and PEMS have their own advantages and disadvantages. Thus evolved the need to find the optimum balance between CEMS and PEMS for gas turbine projects. To justify the cost of both PEMS and CEMS in the same installation, there must be an economic incentive to do so. This paper presents the application of a PEMS/CEMS monitoring system that integrates both PEMS and CEMS in order to meet, and exceed, all emissions monitoring requirements.

  3. Methods for verifying compliance with low-level radioactive waste acceptance criteria

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the methods that are currently employed and those that can be used to verify compliance with low-level radioactive waste (LLW) disposal facility waste acceptance criteria (WAC). This report presents the applicable regulations representing the Federal, State, and site-specific criteria for accepting LLW. Typical LLW generators are summarized, along with descriptions of their waste streams and final waste forms. General procedures and methods used by the LLW generators to verify compliance with the disposal facility WAC are presented. The report was written to provide an understanding of how a regulator could verify compliance with a LLW disposal facility`s WAC. A comprehensive study of the methodology used to verify waste generator compliance with the disposal facility WAC is presented in this report. The study involved compiling the relevant regulations to define the WAC, reviewing regulatory agency inspection programs, and summarizing waste verification technology and equipment. The results of the study indicate that waste generators conduct verification programs that include packaging, classification, characterization, and stabilization elements. The current LLW disposal facilities perform waste verification steps on incoming shipments. A model inspection and verification program, which includes an emphasis on the generator`s waste application documentation of their waste verification program, is recommended. The disposal facility verification procedures primarily involve the use of portable radiological survey instrumentation. The actual verification of generator compliance to the LLW disposal facility WAC is performed through a combination of incoming shipment checks and generator site audits.

  4. Compliance by Design: Industry Response to Energy Efficiency By KATE S. WHITEFOOT, MEREDITH FOWLIE, AND STEVEN J. SKERLOS*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fowlie, Meredith

    1 Compliance by Design: Industry Response to Energy Efficiency Standards* By KATE S. WHITEFOOT, MEREDITH FOWLIE, AND STEVEN J. SKERLOS* Policies designed to improve industrial environmental performance for household appliances, lighting products, light-duty and heavy-duty vehicles. How firms respond

  5. On beyond the standard model for high explosives: challenges & obstacles to surmount

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Menikoff, Ralph Ds [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Plastic-bonded explosives (PBX) are heterogeneous materials. Nevertheless, current explosive models treat them as homogeneous materials. To compensate, an empirically determined effective burn rate is used in place of a chemical reaction rate. A significant limitation of these models is that different burn parameters are needed for applications in different regimes; for example, shock initiation of a PBX at different initial temperatures or different initial densities. This is due to temperature fluctuations generated when a heterogeneous material is shock compressed. Localized regions of high temperatures are called hot spots. They dominate the reaction for shock initiation. The understanding of hot spot generation and their subsequent evolution has been limited by the inability to measure transients on small spatial ({approx} 1 {micro}m) and small temporal ({approx} 1 ns) scales in the harsh environment of a detonation. With the advances in computing power, it is natural to try and gain an understanding of hot-spot initiation with numerical experiments based on meso-scale simulations that resolve material heterogeneities and utilize realistic chemical reaction rates. However, to capture the underlying physics correctly, such high resolution simulations will require more than fast computers with a large amount of memory. Here we discuss some of the issues that need to be addressed. These include dissipative mechanisms that generate hot spots, accurate thermal propceties for the equations of state of the reactants and products, and controlling numerical entropy error from shock impedance mismatches at material interfaces. The later can generate artificial hot spots and lead to premature reaction. Eliminating numerical hot spots is critical for shock initiation simulations due to the positive feedback between the energy release from reaction and the hydrodynamic flow.

  6. Interconnection Standards

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Tier 1 systems must include an inverter certified to meet the Underwriters Laboratories (UL) 1741 standard

  7. Comparison of Standard 90.1-2007 and the 2009 IECC with Respect to Commercial Buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Conover, David R.; Bartlett, Rosemarie; Halverson, Mark A.

    2009-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE’s) Building Energy Codes Program (BECP) has been asked by some states and energy code stakeholders to address the comparability of the 2009 International Energy Conservation Code® (IECC) as applied to commercial buildings and ANSI/ASHRAE/IESNA Standard 90.1-2007 (hereinafter referred to as Standard 90.1-07). An assessment of comparability will help states respond to and implement conditions specified in the State Energy Program (SEP) Formula Grants American Recovery and Reinvestment Act Funding Opportunity, Number DE-FOA-0000052, and eliminate the need for the states individually or collectively to perform comparative studies of the 2009 IECC and Standard 90.1-07. The funding opportunity announcement contains the following conditions: (2) The State, or the applicable units of local government that have authority to adopt building codes, will implement the following: (A) A residential building energy code (or codes) that meets or exceeds the most recent International Energy Conservation Code, or achieves equivalent or greater energy savings. (B) A commercial building energy code (or codes) throughout the State that meets or exceeds the ANSI/ASHRAE/IESNA Standard 90.1-2007, or achieves equivalent or greater energy savings . (C) A plan to achieve 90 percent compliance with the above energy codes within eight years. This plan will include active training and enforcement programs and annual measurement of the rate of compliance. With respect to item (B) above, many more states, regardless of the edition date, directly adopt the IECC than Standard 90.1-07. This is predominately because the IECC is a model code and part of a coordinated set of model building codes that state and local government have historically adopted to regulate building design and construction. This report compares the 2009 IECC to Standard 90.1-07 with the intent of helping states address whether the adoption and application of the 2009 IECC for commercial buildings can be considered equivalent to the adoption and application of Standard 90.1-07. Based on this document, states adopting the 2009 IECC, which is the document cited in (A), above, for residential construction, can also determine if they are in compliance with the above provisions for commercial buildings in (B) above and if their code meets or exceeds the ANSI/ASHRAE/IESNA Standard 90.1-07.

  8. Updated Combination of Searches for the Standard Model Higgs Boson at the D0 Experiment in 9.7 fb-1 of Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D0 Collaboration

    2012-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Searches for standard model Higgs boson production at the D0 experiment in ppbar collisions at sqrt(s)=1.96 TeV are carried out for Higgs boson masses (m_H) in the range 100Higgs boson. In absence of a significant excess above the background expectation, 95% confidence level upper limits are set on the production cross section for a standard model Higgs boson. The upper limits are found to be a factor of 2.11 (0.73) times the predicted standard model cross section for m_H=115 (165) GeV. Under the background-only hypothesis, the corresponding expected limit is 1.46 (0.72) times the standard model prediction. At the same confidence level, these analyses exclude a standard model Higgs boson with a mass in the range 159standard deviations.

  9. Unlocking the Standard Model. IV. N=2 generations of quarks : spectrum and mixing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Machet, Bruno

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Glashow-Salam-Weinberg model for 2 generations of quarks is extended to 8 composite Higgs multiplets, with no adjunction of extra fermions. It is the minimal number of Higgs doublets required to suitably account, simultaneously, for the spectrum of pseudoscalar mesons that can be built with 4 quarks and for the mass of the W gauge bosons. These masses being used as input, together with elementary low energy considerations for the pions, we calculate all other parameters, masses and couplings. We focus in this work on the spectrum of the 8 Higgs bosons (which all potentially contribute to the W and quark masses), and on the mixing (Cabibbo) angle, leaving the study of couplings to a subsequent work. The Higgs bosons fall into one triplet, two doublets and one singlet. In the triplet stand three states with masses \\sqrt{2} x that of heaviest pseudoscalar meson D_s, which, for 2 generations, pushes them up to 2.80 GeV. The 2 components of the first doublet have masses close to 1.25 GeV. The singlet has a mas...

  10. A combined search for the standard model Higgs boson at sqrt(s) = 1.96 TeV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baringer, Philip S.; Bean, Alice; Hensel, Carsten; Moulik, Tania; Wilson, Graham Wallace; DØ Collaboration; Abazov, V. M.; Abbott, B.; Abolins, M.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Aguilo, E.; Ahn, S.

    2008-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    .L. (expected) upper limits on ?(pp¯ ? WH) × B(H ? b ¯b) ranging from 1.6 (2.2) pb to 1.9 (3.3) pb for Higgs boson masses between 5 and 145 GeV, to be compared to the theoretical prediction of 0.13 pb for a Standard Model (SM) Higgs boson with mass mH = 115 Ge...V. fter combination with the other D0 Higgs boson searches, we obtain for mH = 115 GeV an observed (expected) limit 8.5 (12.1) times higher an the SM predicted Higgs boson production cross section. For mH = 160 GeV, the corresponding observed (expected...

  11. Inclusive Search for Standard Model Higgs Boson Production in the WW Decay Channel using the CDF II Detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The CDF Collaboration; T. Aaltonen

    2010-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a search for standard model (SM) Higgs boson production using ppbar collision data at sqrt(s) = 1.96 TeV, collected with the CDF II detector and corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 4.8 fb-1. We search for Higgs bosons produced in all processes with a significant production rate and decaying to two W bosons. We find no evidence for SM Higgs boson production and place upper limits at the 95% confidence level on the SM production cross section (sigma(H)) for values of the Higgs boson mass (m_H) in the range from 110 to 200 GeV. These limits are the most stringent for m_H > 130 GeV and are 1.29 above the predicted value of sigma(H) for mH = 165 GeV.

  12. Top quark spin correlations and polarization at the LHC: standard model predictions and effects of anomalous top chromo moments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Werner Bernreuther; Zong-Guo Si

    2015-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

    A number of top-spin observables are computed within the Standard Model (SM), at next-to-leading order in the strong and weak gauge couplings for hadronic top-quark anti-quark (ttbar) production and decay at the LHC for center-of-mass energies 7 and 8 TeV. For dileptonic final states we consider the azimuthal angle correlation, the helicity correlation, and the opening angle distribution; for lepton plus jets final states we determine distributions and asymmetries that trace a longitudinal and transverse polarization, respectively, of the t and t-bar samples. In addition, we investigate the effects of a non-zero chromo-magnetic and chromo-electric dipole moment of the top quark on these and other top-spin observables and associated asymmetries. These observables allow to disentangle the contributions from the real and imaginary parts of these moments.

  13. GoSam-2.0: a tool for automated one-loop calculations within the Standard Model and beyond

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. Cullen; H. van Deurzen; N. Greiner; G. Heinrich; G. Luisoni; P. Mastrolia; E. Mirabella; G. Ossola; T. Peraro; J. Schlenk; J. F. von Soden-Fraunhofen; F. Tramontano

    2014-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the version 2.0 of the program package GoSam for the automated calculation of one-loop amplitudes. GoSam is devised to compute one-loop QCD and/or electroweak corrections to multi-particle processes within and beyond the Standard Model. The new code contains improvements in the generation and in the reduction of the amplitudes, performs better in computing time and numerical accuracy, and has an extended range of applicability. The extended version of the "Binoth-Les-Houches-Accord" interface to Monte Carlo programs is also implemented. We give a detailed description of installation and usage of the code, and illustrate the new features in dedicated examples.

  14. The Neutrinoless Double Beta Decay, Physics beyond the Standard Model and the Neutrino Mass

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Amand Faessler

    2012-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The Neutrinoless double beta Decay allows to determine the effectice Majorana electron neutrino mass. For this the following conditions have to be satisfied: (i) The neutrino must be a Majorana particle, i. e. identical to the antiparticle. (ii) The half life has to be measured. (iii)The transition matrix element must be reliably calculated. (iv) The leading mechanism must be the light Majorana neutrino exchange. The present contribution studies the accuracy with which one can calculate by different methods: (1) Quasi-Particle Random Phase Approach (QRPA), (2) the Shell Model (SM), (3) the (before the variation) angular momentum projected Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov method (PHFB)and the (4) Interacting Boson Approach (IBA). In the second part we investigate how to determine experimentally the leading mechanism for the Neutrinoless Double Beta Decay. Is it (a) the light Majorana neutrino exchange as one assumes to determine the effective Majorana neutrino mass, ist it the heavy left (b) or right handed (c) Majorana neutrino exchange allowed by left-right symmetric Grand Unified Theories (GUT's). Is it a mechanism due to Supersymmetry e.g. with gluino exchange and R-parity and lepton number violating terms. At the end we assume, that Klapdor et al. have indeed measured the Neutrinoless Double Beta Decay(, although contested,)and that the light Majorana neutrino exchange is the leading mechanism. With our matrix elements we obtain then an effective Majorana neutrino mass of: = 0.24 [eV], exp (pm) 0.02; theor. (pm) 0.01 [eV

  15. Modeling of capillary pressure behavior using standard open hole wireline log data: Demonstrated on carbonates from the Middle East

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ross, C.M. [Rice Univ., Houston, TX (United States); Callender, C.A.; Turbeville, J.B. [and others

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    A new technique was developed to model capillary pressure behavior from wireline log data and applied to carbonate reservoir rock from a Saudi Aramco field. The method utilizes image analysis of petrographic thin sections, capillary pressure measurements, and neural network analysis of standard open hole wireline log data. Twenty capillary pressure curves and their associated pore type proportions (identified in thin section) are the basis for the capillary pressure predictive model for the reservoir interval under study. Neural network analysis of the wireline log data was used to continuously predict pore type proportions downhole. The neural network-derived pore proportions were than applied in constructing wireline log-based capillary pressure curves using the capillary pressure predictive model. This method provides an accurate means of determining capillary pressure behavior from wireline log data and extends the applicability of the limited number of available capillary pressure curves. Once trained, the neural network may be applied to other wells in the field as long as the training set (both rock samples and wireline log types) is representative within the study area. The capillary pressure curves predicted from wireline log data can be used for the same purposes as capillary pressure curves measured on core samples, such as determining water saturation in intervals above and within the transition zone.

  16. RADIOACTIVE MATERIAL PACKAGING TORQUE REQUIREMENTS COMPLIANCE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Watkins, R.; Leduc, D.

    2011-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Shipping containers used to transport radioactive material (RAM) in commerce employ a variety of closure mechanisms. Often, these closure mechanisms require a specific amount of torque be applied to a bolt, nut or other threaded fastener. It is important that the required preload is achieved so that the package testing and analysis is not invalidated for the purpose of protecting the public. Torque compliance is a means of ensuring closure preload, is a major factor in accomplishing the package functions of confinement/containment, sub-criticality, and shielding. This paper will address the importance of applying proper torque to package closures, discuss torque value nomenclature, and present one methodology to ensure torque compliance is achieved.

  17. Interconnection Standards

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    West Virginia's interconnection standards include two levels of review. The qualifications and application fees for each level are as follows:...

  18. Search for the Standard Model Higgs boson in the decay channel H to ZZ(()asterisk()) to 4l with the ATLAS detector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B; Abdallah, J; Abdelalim, AA; Abdesselam, A; Abdinov, O; Abi, B; Abolin, M; Abramowicz, H; Abreu, H; Acerbi, E; Acharya, BS; Adams, DL; Addy, TN; Adelman, J; Aderholz, M; Adomeit, S; Adragna, P; Adye, T; Aefsky, S; Aguilar-Saavedra, JA; A

    2011-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

    A search for the Standard Model Higgs boson in the decay channel H {yields} ZZ{sup (*)} {yields} {ell}{sup +}{ell}{sup -}{ell}'{sup +}{ell}'{sup -}, where {ell} = e,{mu}, is presented. Proton-proton collision data at {radical}s = 7 TeV recorded with the ATLAS detector and corresponding to an average integrated luminosity of 2.1 fb{sup -1} are compared to the Standard Model expectations. Upper limits on the production cross section of a Standard Model Higgs boson with a mass between 110 and 600 GeV are derived. The observed (expected) 95% confidence level upper limit on the production cross section for a Higgs boson with a mass of 194 GeV, the region with the best expected sensitivity for this search, is 0.99 (1.01) times the Standard Model prediction. The Standard Model Higgs boson is excluded at 95% confidence level in the mass ranges 191-197, 199-200 and 214-224 GeV.

  19. RENEWABLES PORTFOLIO STANDARD 2006 PROCUREMENT VERIFICATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    .............................................................................................. 10 Flexible Compliance .................................................................................................... 14 Sources of Generation Data

  20. RENEWABLES PORTFOLIO STANDARD 2006 PROCUREMENT VERIFICATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ................................................................................................ 5 Flexible Compliance .................................................................................................... 10 Sources of Generation Data .....................................................................................

  1. STANDARD MODEL (>150K )

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    CRADA: AGMT-XXXX Public Law 99-502, the Federal Technology Transfer Act of 1986, as amended. COOPERATIVE RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT AGREEMENT (hereinafter "CRADA") No. AGMT-XXXX...

  2. Final Environmental Assessment and Finding of No Significant Impact: Ground Water Compliance at the Slick Rock, Colorado, UMTRA Project Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    N /A

    2003-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

    This environmental assessment addresses the environmental effects of a proposed action and the no action alternative to comply with U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) ground water standards at the Slick Rock, Colorado, Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project sites. The sites consist of two areas designated as the North Continent (NC) site and the Union Carbide (UC) site. In 1996, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) completed surface cleanup at both sites and encapsulated the tailings in a disposal cell 5 miles east of the original sites. Maximum concentration limits (MCLs) referred to in this environmental assessment are the standards established in Title 40 ''Code of Federal Regulations'' Part 192 (40 CFR 192) unless noted otherwise. Ground water contaminants of potential concern at the NC site are uranium and selenium. Uranium is more prevalent, and concentrations in the majority of alluvial wells at the NC site exceed the MCL of 0.044 milligram per liter (mg/L). Selenium contamination is less prevalent; samples from only one well had concentrations exceeding the MCL of 0.01 mg/L. To achieve compliance with Subpart B of 40 CFR 192 at the NC site, DOE is proposing the strategy of natural flushing in conjunction with institutional controls and continued monitoring. Ground water flow and transport modeling has predicted that concentrations of uranium and selenium in the alluvial aquifer will decrease to levels below their respective MCLs within 50 years.

  3. Search for the Standard Model Higgs Boson in Associated WH Production in 9.7 fb?¹ of pp? Collisions with the D0 Detector

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Abazov, V. M.; Abbott, B.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Alexeev, G. D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Alverson, G.; Askew, A.; Atkins, S.; Augsten, K.; Avila, C.; Badaud, F.; Bagby, L.; Baldin, B.; Bandurin, D. V.; Banerjee, S.; Barberis, E.; Baringer, P.; Bartlett, J. F.; Bassler, U.; Bazterra, V.; Bean, A.; Begalli, M.; Bellantoni, L.; Beri, S. B.; Bernardi, G.; Bernhard, R.; Bertram, I.; Besançon, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Bhat, P. C.; Bhatia, S.; Bhatnagar, V.; Blazey, G.; Blessing, S.; Bloom, K.; Boehnlein, A.; Boline, D.; Boos, E. E.; Borissov, G.; Bose, T.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, O.; Brock, R.; Bross, A.; Brown, D.; Brown, J.; Bu, X. B.; Buehler, M.; Buescher, V.; Bunichev, V.; Burdin, S.; Buszello, C. P.; Camacho-Pérez, E.; Casey, B. C. K.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; Caughron, S.; Chakrabarti, S.; Chakraborty, D.; Chan, K. M.; Chandra, A.; Chapon, E.; Chen, G.; Chevalier-Théry, S.; Cho, D. K.; Cho, S. W.; Choi, S.; Choudhary, B.; Cihangir, S.; Claes, D.; Clutter, J.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, W. E.; Corcoran, M.; Couderc, F.; Cousinou, M.-C.; Croc, A.; Cutts, D.; Das, A.; Davies, G.; de Jong, S. J.; De La Cruz-Burelo, E.; Déliot, F.; Demina, R.; Denisov, D.; Denisov, S. P.; Desai, S.; Deterre, C.; DeVaughan, K.; Diehl, H. T.; Diesburg, M.; Ding, P. F.; Dominguez, A.; Dubey, A.; Dudko, L. V.; Duggan, D.; Duperrin, A.; Dutt, S.; Dyshkant, A.; Eads, M.; Edmunds, D.; Ellison, J.; Elvira, V. D.; Enari, Y.; Evans, H.; Evdokimov, A.; Evdokimov, V. N.; Facini, G.; Feng, L.; Ferbel, T.; Fiedler, F.; Filthaut, F.; Fisher, W.; Fisk, H. E.; Fortner, M.; Fox, H.; Fuess, S.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; García-González, J. A.; García-Guerra, G. A.; Gavrilov, V.; Gay, P.; Geng, W.; Gerbaudo, D.; Gerber, C. E.; Gershtein, Y.; Ginther, G.; Golovanov, G.; Goussiou, A.; Grannis, P. D.; Greder, S.; Greenlee, H.; Grenier, G.; Gris, Ph.; Grivaz, J.-F.; Grohsjean, A.; Grünendahl, S.; Grünewald, M. W.; Guillemin, T.; Gutierrez, G.; Gutierrez, P.; Hagopian, S.; Haley, J.; Han, L.; Harder, K.; Harel, A.; Hauptman, J. M.; Hays, J.; Head, T.; Hebbeker, T.; Hedin, D.; Hegab, H.; Heinson, A. P.; Heintz, U.; Hensel, C.; Heredia-De La Cruz, I.; Herner, K.; Hesketh, G.; Hildreth, M. D.; Hirosky, R.; Hoang, T.; Hobbs, J. D.; Hoeneisen, B.; Hogan, J.; Hohlfeld, M.; Howley, I.; Hubacek, Z.; Hynek, V.; Iashvili, I.; Ilchenko, Y.; Illingworth, R.; Ito, A. S.; Jabeen, S.; Jaffré, M.; Jayasinghe, A.; Jeong, M. S.; Jesik, R.; Jiang, P.; Johns, K.; Johnson, E.; Johnson, M.; Jonckheere, A.; Jonsson, P.; Joshi, J.; Jung, A. W.; Juste, A.; Kaadze, K.; Kajfasz, E.; Karmanov, D.; Kasper, P. A.; Katsanos, I.; Kehoe, R.; Kermiche, S.; Khalatyan, N.; Khanov, A.; Kharchilava, A.; Kharzheev, Y. N.; Kiselevich, I.; Kohli, J. M.; Kozelov, A. V.; Kraus, J.; Kulikov, S.; Kumar, A.; Kupco, A.; Kur?a, T.; Kuzmin, V. A.; Lammers, S.; Landsberg, G.; Lebrun, P.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, S. W.; Lee, W. M.; Lei, X.; Lellouch, J.; Li, D.; Li, H.; Li, L.; Li, Q. Z.; Lim, J. K.; Lincoln, D.; Linnemann, J.; Lipaev, V. V.; Lipton, R.; Liu, H.; Liu, Y.; Lobodenko, A.; Lokajicek, M.; Lopes de Sa, R.; Lubatti, H. J.; Luna-Garcia, R.; Lyon, A. L.; Maciel, A. K. A.; Madar, R.; Magaña-Villalba, R.; Malik, S.; Malyshev, V. L.; Maravin, Y.; Martínez-Ortega, J.; McCarthy, R.; McGivern, C. L.; Meijer, M. M.; Melnitchouk, A.; Menezes, D.; Mercadante, P. G.; Merkin, M.; Meyer, A.; Meyer, J.; Miconi, F.; Mondal, N. K.; Mulhearn, M.; Nagy, E.; Naimuddin, M.; Narain, M.; Nayyar, R.; Neal, H. A.; Negret, J. P.; Neustroev, P.; Nguyen, H. T.; Nunnemann, T.; Orduna, J.; Osman, N.; Osta, J.; Padilla, M.; Pal, A.; Parashar, N.; Parihar, V.; Park, S. K.; Partridge, R.; Parua, N.; Patwa, A.; Penning, B.; Perfilov, M.; Peters, Y.; Petridis, K.; Petrillo, G.; Pétroff, P.; Pleier, M.-A.; Podesta-Lerma, P. L. M.; Podstavkov, V. M.; Popov, A. V.; Prewitt, M.; Price, D.; Prokopenko, N.; Qian, J.; Quadt, A.; Quinn, B.; Rangel, M. S.; Ranjan, K.; Ratoff, P. N.; Razumov, I.; Renkel, P.; Ripp-Baudot, I.; Rizatdinova, F.; Rominsky, M.; Ross, A.; Royon, C.; Rubinov, P.; Ruchti, R.; Sajot, G.; Salcido, P.; Sánchez-Hernández, A.; Sanders, M. P.; Santos, A. S.; Savage, G.; Sawyer, L.; Scanlon, T.; Schamberger, R. D.; Scheglov, Y.; Schellman, H.; Schlobohm, S.; Schwanenberger, C.; Schwienhorst, R.; Sekaric, J.; Severini, H.; Shabalina, E.; Shary, V.; Shaw, S.; Shchukin, A. A.; Shivpuri, R. K.; Simak, V.; Skubic, P.; Slattery, P.; Smirnov, D.; Smith, K. J.; Snow, G. R.; Snow, J.; Snyder, S.; Söldner-Rembold, S.; Sonnenschein, L.; Soustruznik, K.; Stark, J.; Stoyanova, D. A.; Strauss, M.; Suter, L.; Svoisky, P.; Takahashi, M.; Titov, M.; Tokmenin, V. V.; Tsai, Y.-T.; Tschann-Grimm, K.; Tsybychev, D.; Tuchming, B.; Tully, C.; Uvarov, L.; Uvarov, S.; Uzunyan, S.; Van Kooten, R.; van Leeuwen, W. M.; Varelas, N.; Varnes, E. W.

    2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a search for the standard model Higgs boson in final states with a charged lepton (electron or muon), missing transverse energy, and two or three jets, at least one of which is identified as a b-quark jet. The search is primarily sensitive to WH?l?bb¯ production and uses data corresponding to 9.7 fb?¹ of integrated luminosity collected with the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron pp¯ Collider at ?s=1.96 TeV. We observe agreement between the data and the expected background. For a Higgs boson mass of 125 GeV, we set a 95% C.L. upper limit on the production of a standard model Higgs boson of 5.2×?SM, where ?SM is the standard model Higgs boson production cross section, while the expected limit is 4.7×?SM.

  4. Search for the Standard Model Higgs Boson in Associated WH Production in 9.7 fb?¹ of pp? Collisions with the D0 Detector

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Abazov, V. M.; Abbott, B.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Alexeev, G. D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Alverson, G.; Askew, A.; et al

    2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a search for the standard model Higgs boson in final states with a charged lepton (electron or muon), missing transverse energy, and two or three jets, at least one of which is identified as a b-quark jet. The search is primarily sensitive to WH?l?bb¯ production and uses data corresponding to 9.7 fb?¹ of integrated luminosity collected with the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron pp¯ Collider at ?s=1.96 TeV. We observe agreement between the data and the expected background. For a Higgs boson mass of 125 GeV, we set a 95% C.L. upper limit on the production ofmore »a standard model Higgs boson of 5.2×?SM, where ?SM is the standard model Higgs boson production cross section, while the expected limit is 4.7×?SM.« less

  5. Search for a Standard Model Higgs Boson in the H to ZZ to l(+)l(-)v(v)over-bar Decay Channel with the ATLAS Detector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B; Abdallah, J; Abdelalim, AA; Abdesselam, A; Abdinov, O; Abi, B; Abolins, M; Abramowicz, H; Abreu, H; Acerbi, E; Acharya, BS; Adams, DL; Addy, N; Adelman, J; Aderholz, M; Adomeit, S; Adragna, P; Adye, T; Aefsky, S; Aguilar-Saavedra, JA; A

    2011-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

    A search for a heavy standard model Higgs boson decaying via H {yields} ZZ {yields} {ell}{sup +}{ell}{sup -} {nu}{bar {nu}}, where {ell} = e, {mu}, is presented. It is based on proton-proton collision data at {radical}s = 7 TeV, collected by the ATLAS experiment at the LHC in the first half of 2011 and corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 1.04 fb{sup -1}. The data are compared to the expected standard model backgrounds. The data and the background expectations are found to be in agreement and upper limits are placed on the Higgs boson production cross section over the entire mass window considered; in particular, the production of a standard model Higgs boson is excluded in the region 340 < m{sub H} < 450 GeV at the 95% confidence level.

  6. Environmental Assessment of Ground Water Compliance at the Gunnison, Colorado, UMTRA Project Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    N /A

    2002-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is in the process of selecting a ground water compliance strategy for the Gunnison, Colorado, Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project site. This Environmental Assessment (EA) discusses two alternatives and the effects associated with each. The two alternatives are (1) natural flushing coupled with institutional controls and continued monitoring and (2) no action. The compliance strategy must meet U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) ground water standards defined in Title 40 ''Code of Federal Regulations'' Part 192, Subpart B, in areas where ground water beneath and around the site is contaminated as a result of past milling operations. It has been determined that contamination in the ground water at the Gunnison site consists of soluble residual radioactive material (RRM) as defined in the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act (UMTRCA).

  7. Ecological Monitoring and Compliance Program Fiscal Year 1999 Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cathy A. Wills

    1999-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Ecological and Compliance program, funded through the U. S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office, monitors the ecosystem of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and ensures compliance with laws and regulations pertaining to NTS biota. This report summarizes the program's activities conducted by Bechtel Nevada during fiscal year 1999. Program activities included: (1) biological surveys at proposed construction sites (2) desert tortoise compliance (3) ecosystem mapping (4) sensitive species and unique habitat monitoring and (5) biological monitoring at the HAZMAT Spill Center.

  8. Environmental Protection- Industrial Compliance (Newfoundland and Labrador, Canada)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Industrial Compliance Section develops and administers Certificates of Approval for the Construction and/or Operation of various industrial facilities. Industries with air emissions and/or...

  9. Technical Assistance: Increasing Code Compliance - 2014 BTO Peer...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Code Compliance - 2014 BTO Peer Review More Documents & Publications Building Energy Codes Program - 2014 BTO Peer Review Building Energy Codes Program Overview - 2014 BTO Peer...

  10. Table Contents Page i 2013 Nonresidential Compliance Manual January 2014

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    .................................................................................................28 8.8 Electrical Power Distribution Systems Compliance Documents......................................................................30 8.8.6 Instructions for Completing Electrical Power Distribution Systems Certificate. Electrical Power Distribution

  11. Learning & Development Policy/Compliance | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    & Development PolicyCompliance Searching for information on Department and Federal training policy and guidelines? The following websites can be of help: DOE Learning &...

  12. Report to the Legislature in Compliance with Public Utilities Code

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    "................................................................................................................................8 DISTRIBUTED GENERATION COSTS AND SAVINGSReport to the Legislature in Compliance with Public Utilities Code Section 910 March 2013 #12...................................................................17 Self-Generation Incentive Program (SGIP

  13. Exploring Partnerships to Further Building Code Compliance Enhancement

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This presentation, given through the DOE's Technical Assitance Program (TAP), identifies opportunities for municipal and state partnerships to ensure better building code compliance.

  14. DOE Publishes Notice of Proposed Rulemaking Regarding the Compliance...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    the compliance date for the dehumidifier test procedure. 78 FR 62488 (October 22, 2013). Find more information on the rulemaking, including milestones, statutory authority,...

  15. Preliminary Comments on Compliance Plan and Request for Clarification...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Preliminary Comments on Compliance Plan and Request for Clarification or, in the Alternative, Rehearing of the District of Columbia Public Service Commission Docket No....

  16. Second cancer incidence risk estimates using BEIR VII models for standard and complex external beam radiotherapy for early breast cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Donovan, E. M.; James, H.; Bonora, M.; Yarnold, J. R.; Evans, P. M. [Joint Department of Physics, Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust and Institute of Cancer Research, Sutton SM2 5PT (United Kingdom); Physics Department, Ipswich Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, Ipswich IP4 5PD (United Kingdom); Department of Academic Radiotherapy, Institute of Cancer Research and Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, Sutton SM2 5PT, United Kingdom and School of Radiotherapy, University of Milan, Milan 20122 (Italy); Department of Academic Radiotherapy, Institute of Cancer Research and Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, Sutton SM2 5PT (United Kingdom); Centre for Vision Speech and Signal Processing, University of Surrey, Guildford GU2 7XH (United Kingdom)

    2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To compare organ specific cancer incidence risks for standard and complex external beam radiotherapy (including cone beam CT verification) following breast conservation surgery for early breast cancer.Method: Doses from breast radiotherapy and kilovoltage cone beam CT (CBCT) exposures were obtained from thermoluminescent dosimeter measurements in an anthropomorphic phantom in which the positions of radiosensitive organs were delineated. Five treatment deliveries were investigated: (i) conventional tangential field whole breast radiotherapy (WBRT), (ii) noncoplanar conformal delivery applicable to accelerated partial beast irradiation (APBI), (iii) two-volume simultaneous integrated boost (SIB) treatment, (iv) forward planned three-volume SIB, and (v) inverse-planned three volume SIB. Conformal and intensity modulated radiotherapy methods were used to plan the complex treatments. Techniques spanned the range from simple methods appropriate for patient cohorts with a low cancer recurrence risk to complex plans relevant to cohorts with high recurrence risk. Delineated organs at risk included brain, salivary glands, thyroid, contralateral breast, left and right lung, esophagus, stomach, liver, colon, and bladder. Biological Effects of Ionizing Radiation (BEIR) VII cancer incidence models were applied to the measured mean organ doses to determine lifetime attributable risk (LAR) for ages at exposure from 35 to 80 yr according to radiotherapy techniques, and included dose from the CBCT imaging. Results: All LAR decreased with age at exposure and were lowest for brain, thyroid, liver, and bladder (<0.1%). There was little dependence of LAR on radiotherapy technique for these organs and for colon and stomach. LAR values for the lungs for the three SIB techniques were two to three times those from WBRT and APBI. Uncertainties in the LAR models outweigh any differences in lung LAR between the SIB methods. Constraints in the planning of the SIB methods ensured that contralateral breast doses and LAR were comparable to WBRT, despite their added complexity. The smaller irradiated volume of the ABPI plan contributed to a halving of LAR for contralateral breast compared with the other plan types. Daily image guided radiotherapy (IGRT) for a left breast protocol using kilovoltage CBCT contributed <10% to LAR for the majority of organs, and did not exceed 22% of total organ dose. Conclusions: Phantom measurements and calculations of LAR from the BEIR VII models predict that complex breast radiotherapy techniques do not increase the theoretical risk of second cancer incidence for organs distant from the treated breast, or the contralateral breast where appropriate plan constraints are applied. Complex SIB treatments are predicted to increase the risk of second cancer incidence in the lungs compared to standard whole breast radiotherapy; this is outweighed by the threefold reduction in 5 yr local recurrence risk for patients of high risk of recurrence, and young age, from the use of radiotherapy. APBI may have a favorable impact on risk of second cancer in the contralateral breast and lung for older patients at low risk of recurrence. Intensive use of IGRTincreased the estimated values of LAR but these are dominated by the effect of the dose from the radiotherapy, and any increase in LAR from IGRT is much lower than the models' uncertainties.

  17. Directory of certificates of compliance for radioactive materials packages

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this directory is to make available a convenient source of information on packagings approved by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission. To assist in identifying packaging, an index by Model Number and corresponding Certificate of Compliance Number is included at the front of Volumes 1 and 2. An alphabetical listing by user name is included in the back of Volume 3 for approved Quality Assurance programs. The reports include a listing of all users of each package design and approved Quality Assurance programs prior to the publication date of the directory. Comments to make future revisions of this directory more useful are invited and should be directed to the Spent Fuel Project Office, U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission.

  18. A combined search for the standard model Higgs boson at sqrt{s}=1.96 TeV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D0 Collaboration; V. M. Abazov

    2007-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

    We present new results of the search for WH to lepton neutrino b b production in ppbar collisions at a center of mass energy of sqrt{s}=1.96 TeV, based on a dataset with integrated luminosity of 0.44 fb-1. We combine these new results with previously published searches by the D0 collaboration, for WH and ZH production analyzed in the MET b b final state, for ZH (to l+l- b b) production, for WH (to WWW) production, and for H (to WW) direct production. No signal-like excess is observed either in the WH analysis or in the combination of all D0 Higgs boson analyses. We set 95% C.L. (expected) upper limits on to 1.9 (3.3) pb for Higgs boson masses between 105 and 145 GeV, to be compared to the theoretical prediction of 0.13 pb for a standard model (SM) Higgs boson with mass m_H=115 GeV. After combination with the other D0 Higgs boson searches, we obtain for m_H=115 GeV an observed (expected) limit 8.5 (12.1) times higher than the SM predicted Higgs boson production cross section. For m_H=160 GeV, the corresponding observed (expected) ratio is 10.2 (9.0).

  19. The Analytical One-Loop Contributions to Higgs Boson Mass in the Supersymmetric Standard Model with Vector-like Particles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Tianjun; Wang, Xiao-Chuan; Xiong, Zhao-Hua

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model (MSSM) with additional vector-like particles (VLPs), we for the first time derive the particle mass spectra and the Feynman rules, as well as analytically calculate the one-loop contributions to the Higgs boson mass from the fermions and sfermions. After discussing and numerically analysing a cases without bilinear terms and a case with a (partial) decoupling limit, we find: (i) The corrections depend on the mass splittings between quarks and squarks and between vector-like fermions and their sfermions; (ii) There exists the (partial) decoupling limit, where the VLPs decouple from the electrwoeak (EW) energy scale, even when one of the VLPs is light around the EW scale. The reason is that the contributions to Higgs mass can be suppressed by the (or partial) decoupling effects, which can make the EW phenomenology very different from the MSSM; (iii) The SM-like Higgs boson with mass around 125 GeV gives strong constraints on the VLPs if the top squarks are around 1~T...

  20. Implications of Direct Dark Matter Constraints for Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model Higgs Boson Searches at the Tevatron

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marcela Carena; Dan Hooper; Peter Skands

    2006-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Searches for the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model (MSSM) Higgs bosons are among the most promising channels for exploring new physics at the Tevatron. In particular, interesting regions of large $\\tan \\beta$ and small $m_A$ are probed by searches for heavy neutral Higgs bosons, A and H, when they decay to $\\tau^+ \\tau^-$ and $b\\bar{b}$. At the same time, direct searches for dark matter, such as CDMS, attempt to observe neutralino dark matter particles scattering elastically off nuclei. This can occur through t-channel Higgs exchange, which has a large cross section in the case of large $\\tan \\beta$ and small $m_A$. As a result, there is a natural interplay between the heavy, neutral Higgs searches at the Tevatron and the region of parameter space explored by CDMS. We show that if the lightest neutralino makes up the dark matter of our universe, current limits from CDMS strongly constrain the prospects of heavy, neutral MSSM Higgs discovery at the Tevatron (at 3 sigma with 4 fb^-1 per experiment) unless $|\\mu| \\gsim$ 400 GeV. The limits of CDMS projected for 2007 will increase this constraint to $|\\mu| \\gsim$ 800 GeV. On the other hand, if CDMS does observe neutralino dark matter in the near future, it will make the discovery of heavy, neutral MSSM Higgs bosons far more likely at the Tevatron.

  1. Compliance Certification Enforcement | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613PortsmouthBartlesville EnergyDepartment.Attachment FY2011-40 ChapterCompliance

  2. Environmental Compliance Performance | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the YouTube|6721 FederalTexas Energyof 2005Site-Level Exercise -FebruaryCompliance »

  3. Interconnection Standards

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The interconnection standards approved by the PUC also updated Nevada's net-metering policy, originally enacted in 1997. Previously, Nevada Revised Statute 704.774 addressed basic interconnection...

  4. Interconnection Standards

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    New Jersey's interconnection standards apply statewide to all electric distribution utilities, but not to the small number of municipal utilities and electric cooperatives in the state. The rules,...

  5. Interconnection Standards

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Virginia has two interconnection standards: one for net-metered systems and one for systems that are not net-metered.

  6. Interconnection Standards

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In December 2005, the Colorado Public Utilities Commission (PUC) adopted standards for net metering and interconnection, as required by Amendment 37, a renewable-energy ballot initiative approved...

  7. Interconnection Standards

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In September 2007, the Washington Utilities and Transportation Commission (UTC) adopted interconnection standards for distributed generation (DG) systems up to 20 megawatts (MW) in capacity. The...

  8. Search for the Standard Model Higgs boson produced in association with a vector boson and decaying to a b-quark pair with the ATLAS detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taylor, Frank E.

    This Letter presents the results of a direct search with the ATLAS detector at the LHC for a Standard Model Higgs boson of mass 110?m[subscript H]?130 GeV produced in association with a W or Z boson and decaying to b[bar ...

  9. Combined results of searches for the standard model Higgs boson in pp collisions at sqrt(s) = 7 TeV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CMS Collaboration

    2012-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Combined results are reported from searches for the standard model Higgs boson in proton-proton collisions at sqrt(s)=7 TeV in five Higgs boson decay modes: gamma pair, b-quark pair, tau lepton pair, W pair, and Z pair. The explored Higgs boson mass range is 110-600 GeV. The analysed data correspond to an integrated luminosity of 4.6-4.8 inverse femtobarns. The expected excluded mass range in the absence of the standard model Higgs boson is 118-543 GeV at 95% CL. The observed results exclude the standard model Higgs boson in the mass range 127-600 GeV at 95% CL, and in the mass range 129-525 GeV at 99% CL. An excess of events above the expected standard model background is observed at the low end of the explored mass range making the observed limits weaker than expected in the absence of a signal. The largest excess, with a local significance of 3.1 sigma, is observed for a Higgs boson mass hypothesis of 124 GeV. The global significance of observing an excess with a local significance greater than 3.1 sigma anywhere in the search range 110-600 (110-145) GeV is estimated to be 1.5 sigma (2.1 sigma). More data are required to ascertain the origin of this excess.

  10. Search for the standard model Higgs boson in associated $WH$ production in 9.7 fb$^{-1}$ of $p\\bar{p}$ collisions with the D0 detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The D0 Collaboration

    2012-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a search for the standard model Higgs boson in final states with a charged lepton (electron or muon), missing transverse energy, and two or three jets, at least one of which is identified as a $b$-quark jet. The search is primarily sensitive to $WH\\to\\ell\

  11. Search for Neutral Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model Higgs Bosons Decaying to Tau Pairs in pp Collisions at [sqrt]s=7??TeV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alver, Burak Han

    A search for neutral minimal supersymmetric standard model (MSSM) Higgs bosons in pp collisions at the LHC at a center-of-mass energy of 7 TeV is presented. The results are based on a data sample corresponding to an ...

  12. Search for the standard model Higgs boson decaying into two photons in pp collisions at sqrt(s)=7 TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chatrchyan, S. [Yerevan Physical Institute (Armenia); et al.,

    2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A search for a Higgs boson decaying into two photons is described. The analysis is performed using a dataset recorded by the CMS experiment at the LHC from pp collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of 7 TeV, which corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 4.8 inverse femtobarns. Limits are set on the cross section of the standard model Higgs boson decaying to two photons. The expected exclusion limit at 95% confidence level is between 1.4 and 2.4 times the standard model cross section in the mass range between 110 and 150 GeV. The analysis of the data excludes, at 95% confidence level, the standard model Higgs boson decaying into two photons in the mass range 128 to 132 GeV. The largest excess of events above the expected standard model background is observed for a Higgs boson mass hypothesis of 124 GeV with a local significance of 3.1 sigma. The global significance of observing an excess with a local significance greater than 3.1 sigma anywhere in the search range 110-150 GeV is estimated to be 1.8 sigma. More data are required to ascertain the origin of this excess.

  13. Combined results of searches for the standard model Higgs boson in pp collisions at sqrt(s) = 7 TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chatrchyan, Serguei [Yerevan Physics Inst. (Armenia); et al.

    2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Combined results are reported from searches for the standard model Higgs boson in proton-proton collisions at sqrt(s)=7 TeV in five Higgs boson decay modes: gamma pair, b-quark pair, tau lepton pair, W pair, and Z pair. The explored Higgs boson mass range is 110-600 GeV. The analysed data correspond to an integrated luminosity of 4.6-4.8 inverse femtobarns. The expected excluded mass range in the absence of the standard model Higgs boson is 118-543 GeV at 95% CL. The observed results exclude the standard model Higgs boson in the mass range 127-600 GeV at 95% CL, and in the mass range 129-525 GeV at 99% CL. An excess of events above the expected standard model background is observed at the low end of the explored mass range making the observed limits weaker than expected in the absence of a signal. The largest excess, with a local significance of 3.1 sigma, is observed for a Higgs boson mass hypothesis of 124 GeV. The global significance of observing an excess with a local significance greater than 3.1 sigma anywhere in the search range 110-600 (110-145) GeV is estimated to be 1.5 sigma (2.1 sigma). More data are required to ascertain the origin of this excess.

  14. Search for the b b ¯ decay of the Standard Model Higgs boson in associated ([W over Z])H production with the ATLAS detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taylor, Frank E.

    A search for the bb¯ decay of the Standard Model Higgs boson is performed with the ATLAS experiment using the full dataset recorded at the LHC in Run 1. The integrated luminosities used are 4.7 and 20.3 fb[superscript ?1] ...

  15. Search for the standard model Higgs boson produced in association with a W or a Z boson and decaying to bottom quarks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Apyan, Aram

    A search for the standard model Higgs boson (H) decaying to b[¯ over b] when produced in association with a weak vector boson (V) is reported for the following channels: W(??)H, W(e?)H, W(??)H, Z(??)H, Z(ee)H, and Z(??)H. ...

  16. Search for a Standard Model Higgs Boson in WH-->lvbb-bar in pp-bar Collisions at sqrt[s]=1.96 TeV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xie, Si

    We present a search for a standard model Higgs boson produced in association with a W boson using 2.7??fb[superscript -1] of integrated luminosity of pp? collision data taken at ?s=1.96??TeV. Limits on the Higgs boson ...

  17. Search for a heavy Standard Model Higgs boson in the channel H?ZZ??[superscript +]?[superscript ?]q[bar over q] using the ATLAS detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taylor, Frank E.

    A search for a heavy Standard Model Higgs boson decaying via View the H?ZZ??[superscript +]?[superscript ?]q[bar over q], where ?=e,? is presented. The search is performed using a data set of pp collisions at ?s = 7 TeV, ...

  18. Search for a Low-Mass Standard Model Higgs Boson in the ?? Decay Channel in pp? Collisions at ?s=1.96??TeV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bauer, Gerry P.

    We report on a search for the standard model Higgs boson decaying into pairs of ? leptons in pp? collisions produced by the Tevatron at ?s=1.96??TeV. The analyzed data sample was recorded by the CDFII detector and corresponds ...

  19. Combined search for the Standard Model Higgs boson in pp collisions at ?s=7??TeV with the ATLAS detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taylor, Frank E.

    A combined search for the Standard Model Higgs boson with the ATLAS detector at the LHC is presented. The data sets used correspond to integrated luminosities from 4.6??fb[superscript -1] to 4.9??fb[superscript -1] of ...

  20. Search for a non-standard-model Higgs boson decaying to a pair of new light bosons in four-muon final states

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chatrchyan, Serguei; et al.

    2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Results are reported from a search for non-standard-model Higgs boson decays to pairs of new light bosons, each of which decays into the ?+?? final state. The new bosons may be produced either promptly or via a decay chain. The data set corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 5.3 fb?1 of proton–proton collisions at View the MathML source, recorded by the CMS experiment at the LHC in 2011. Such Higgs boson decays are predicted in several scenarios of new physics, including supersymmetric models with extended Higgs sectors or hidden valleys. Thus, the results of the search are relevant for establishing whether the new particle observed in Higgs boson searches at the LHC has the properties expected for a standard model Higgs boson. No excess of events is observed with respect to the yields expected from standard model processes. A model-independent upper limit of 0.86±0.06 fb on the product of the cross section times branching fraction times acceptance is obtained. The results, which are applicable to a broad spectrum of new physics scenarios, are compared with the predictions of two benchmark models as functions of a Higgs boson mass larger than 86 GeV/c2 and of a new light boson mass within the range 0.25–3.55 GeV/c2

  1. ENVIRONMENTAL COMPLIANCE SERVICES CENTER FOR ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT OF MILITARY LANDS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ENVIRONMENTAL COMPLIANCE SERVICES CENTER FOR ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT OF MILITARY LANDS CEMML@cemml.colostate.edu | http://www.cemml.colostate.edu Environmental compliance and pollution prevention are critical aspects of any successful environmental program. The Center provides technical support in these key areas. CEMML

  2. COLORADO STATE UNIVERSITY Research Integrity & Compliance Review Office (RICRO)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    COLORADO STATE UNIVERSITY Research Integrity & Compliance Review Office (RICRO) Assistant of the Research Integrity and Compliance Review Office (RICRO) is responsible for a broad range of duties to the campus community and visitors to campus. #12; Ability to successfully plan and prepare for as well as set

  3. National Environmental Policy Act compliance guide. Volume II (reference book)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document (Volume II of the National Environmental Policy Act Compliance Guide) contains current copies of regulations and guidance from the Council on Environmental Quality, the Department of Energy, the Department of State, and the Environmental Protection Agency, related to compliance with the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA).

  4. 300 area TEDF NPDES Permit Compliance Monitoring Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Loll, C.M.

    1995-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

    This document presents the 300 Area Treated Effluent Disposal Facility (TEDF) National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) Permit Compliance Monitoring Plan (MP). The MP describes how ongoing monitoring of the TEDF effluent stream for compliance with the NPDES permit will occur. The MP also includes Quality Assurance protocols to be followed.

  5. Ecological Monitoring and Compliance Program Fiscal Year 2003 Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bechtel Nevada

    2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Ecological Monitoring and Compliance program, funded through the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office, monitors the ecosystem of the Nevada Test Site and ensures compliance with laws and regulations pertaining to Nevada Test Site biota. This report summarizes the program's activities conducted by Bechtel Nevada during fiscal year 2003.

  6. SOUND COMPLIANCE MONITORING FOR THE GAMESA WIND TURBINE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Firestone, Jeremy

    SOUND COMPLIANCE MONITORING FOR THE GAMESA WIND TURBINE UD - LEWES, DELAWARE January 2011 ` #12;SOUND COMPLIANCE MONITORING FOR THE GAMESA WIND TURBINE AT THE UNIVERSITY OF DELAWARE LEWES, DELAWARE A Gamesa G90 2.0-MW wind turbine operates at the University of Delaware (UD), Lewes campus on a parcel

  7. A Model for Analyzing Components of Uncertainty Encountered in {sup 3}H-Standard Efficiency Tracing in 4{pi}{beta} Liquid Scintillation Counting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brian E. Zimmerman; R. Colle

    2000-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Over the past decade, uniform conventions for assessing and reporting measurement uncertainties have been adopted by nearly every international metrological organization, as well as by many scientific and engineering associations and principal laboratories. This uncertainty approach is available as guidelines published by the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) and is used by the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) for the dissemination of all of its standards, calibrations, and measurement results. One of the most widely used techniques for the radioactivity standardizations at NIST is liquid scintillation (LS) spectrometry, mainly through the use of a {sup 3}H-standard efficiency tracing technique that has come to be known as the CIEMAT/NIST method. Although the method is relatively simple in concept and implementation, correct analysis of the uncertainties involved in applying the method using ISO guidelines is not. An initial requirement for a proper uncertainty analysis is the development of a model that explicitly specifies the relationship between the different input and output variables involved in the measurement that lead to an uncertainty in the final certified activity. The approach taken in this analysis is based on the fact that use of black-box computer codes as an integral part of the calculation of a final value makes a formal mathematical expression of the measurement model difficult, if not impossible. Therefore, many of the uncertainty components were estimated by propagating the uncertainty from each of the respective components through the data reduction equations using a spreadsheet.

  8. Diesel Passenger Car Technology for Low Emissions and CO2 Compliance...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Passenger Car Technology for Low Emissions and CO2 Compliance Diesel Passenger Car Technology for Low Emissions and CO2 Compliance Cost effective reduction of legislated emissions...

  9. ELECTRONIC COMPLIANCE AND APPROVAL PROJECT (ECAP)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hope Morgan; Richard A. Varela; Deborah LaHood; Susan Cisco; Mary Ann Benavides; Donna Burks

    2002-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Texas Railroad Commission (RRC), working in partnership with the United States Department of Energy and the oil and gas industry it regulates, is implementing a strategy for improving efficiency in regulations and significantly reducing administrative operating costs through the Electronic Compliance and Approval Process (ECAP). The project will streamline regulatory compliance and reporting by providing the ability to electronically submit, process, and query oil and gas applications and reports through the Internet-based ECAP system. Implementation of an ECAP drilling permit pilot project began September 1999 after funding resources were secured--a $700,000 grant from the U.S. Department of Energy and an appropriation of $1.4 million from the Texas Legislature. The pilot project involves creating the ability to file, review, and approve a well's drilling permit application through a completely electronic process. The pilot project solution will ultimately provide the infrastructure, technology, and electronic modules to enable the filing of all compliance permits and performance reports through the internet from a desktop computer. The pilot project was conducted in three phases. The first phase, implemented May 2000, provided the infrastructure that allows the electronic filing and approval of simple drilling permit applications, associated fees, and attachments. The official ''roll-out'' of ECAP and the first electronically filed drilling permit application occurred on May 11, 2000 in Dallas in conjunction with an Internet Workshop sponsored by the Petroleum Technology Transfer Council. After the completion of Phase I, the ECAP team conducted an extensive review of progress to date and analyzed requirements and opportunities for future steps. The technical team identified core infrastructure modifications that would facilitate and better support future development and expansion of the ECAP system and work began on database structure modifications. The second phase of the pilot project was implemented in October 2002. Phase II was the complete rewrite of the ECAP core system and included internal workflow processing capabilities and the ability to process more complex new drill permits such as horizontal, directional, pooled acreage and non-concurrent production restrictions all with additional attachments and reports. Phase III, completed in August 2003, concluded the ECAP pilot project. It allowed the processing of all types of drilling permits and completed the integration with existing geographic information systems, mainframe and electronic document management systems as well as the state payment portal. This report contains detailed information documenting accomplishments and problems encountered during the ECAP pilot project and plans for future steps.

  10. Interconnection Standards

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The PUC standards generally apply to investor-owned utilities (IOUs) with 40,000 or more customers and all electric cooperatives. Municipal utilities with 5,000 customers or more are required to ...

  11. Interconnection Standards

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Utah’s interconnection rules are based on the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission’s (FERC) interconnection standards for small generators, adopted in May 2005 by FERC Order 2006. Utah's rules for...

  12. Interconnection Standards

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Oregon has three separate interconnection standards: one for net-metered systems, one for small generator facilities (non-net metered systems) and one for large generator facilities (non-net...

  13. Interconnection Standards

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    NOTE: In Feb 2014, the PUC proposed changes to the State’s Alternative Energy Portfolio Standard, Interconnection, and Net-metering rules. The documents associated with the case can be accessed at...

  14. Interconnection Standards

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Vermont has adopted separate interconnection standards for net-metered energy systems that are 150 kW or less, and for all other distributed-generation (DG) systems.

  15. Clinical Compliance Manual This manual was developed to guide students, staff and faculty through the Clinical Compliance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ward, Karen

    mandates and thus responsive to research regarding the best practices in the profession, they are subjectClinical Compliance Manual This manual was developed to guide students, staff and faculty through in this manual is to provide the reader with a comprehensible view of the Clinical Compliance Office, its

  16. Comparative Study of summer, Winter and Quinox Sky Type of India Using Daylight Coefficient Method and Cie Standard General Sky Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sutapa Mukherjee M. Tech

    Abstract:- Energy efficiency provided by daylight requires an accurate estimation of the amount of daylight entering a building. The actual daylight illuminance of a room is mainly influenced by the luminance levels and patterns of the sky in the direction of view of the window at that time. The daylight coefficient concept, which considers the changes in the luminance of the sky elements, offers a more effective way of computing indoor daylight illuminances. Recently, Kittler et al. have proposed a new range of 15 standard sky luminance distributions including the CIE (International Commission onIllumination) standard clear sky. Lately, these 15 sky luminance models have been adopted as the CIE Standard General Skies.This paper aims to find out representative CIE (International Commission on Illumination) Standard Clear Sky model(s) for three different seasons-winter solstice, equinox, and summer solstice applicable for prevailing clear sky climatic conditions in India [Roorkee]. Indian measured sky luminance distribution database is available only for Roorkee[29 0 51 ' N; 77 0 53 ' E]. To find out the best match between Indian measured sky luminance distribution and each of five CIE Standard Clear sky models, only sky component of spatial illuminance distribution over the working plane of a room was simulated by MATLABfor three different seasons. Daylight Coefficient method has been applied for the simulation using Indian sky luminance database.The simulation has been done for the room with eight different window orientations ranging from 0 0 to 315 0 with an interval of 45 0 to generate data for the entire sky vault. To find out the

  17. Environmental Assessment of Ground Water Compliance at the Naturita, Colorado, UMTRA Project Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2003-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

    This Environmental Assessment addresses the environmental effects of a proposed action and the no action alternative to comply with U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) ground water standards at the Naturita, Colorado, Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project site. In 1998, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) completed surface cleanup at the site and encapsulated the tailings in a disposal cell 15 miles northwest near the former town of Uravan, Colorado. Ground water contaminants of potential concern at the Naturita site are uranium and vanadium. Uranium concentrations exceed the maximum concentration limit (MCL) of 0.044 milligram per liter (mg/L). Vanadium has no MCL; however, vanadium concentrations exceed the EPA Region III residential risk-based concentration of 0.33 mg/L (EPA 2002). The proposed compliance strategy for uranium and vanadium at the Naturita site is no further remediation in conjunction with the application of alternate concentration limits. Institutional controls with ground water and surface water monitoring will be implemented for these constituents as part of the compliance strategy. This compliance strategy will be protective of human health and the environment. The proposed monitoring program will begin upon regulatory concurrence with the Ground Water Compliance Action Plan (DOE 2002a). Monitoring will consist of verifying that institutional controls remain in place, collecting ground water samples to verify that concentrations of uranium and vanadium are decreasing, and collecting surface water samples to verify that contaminant concentrations do not exceed a regulatory limit or risk-based concentration. If these criteria are not met, DOE would reevaluate the proposed action and determine the need for further National Environmental Policy Act documentation. No comments were received from the public during the public comment period. Two public meetings were held during this period. Minutes of these meetings are included as Attachment 1.

  18. Compliance Monitoring of Subyearling Chinook Salmon Survival and Passage at The Dalles Dam, Summer 2012

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Skalski, J. R.; Townsend, Richard L.; Seaburg, Adam; Ploskey, Gene R.; Weiland, Mark A.; Hughes, James S.; Woodley, Christa M.; Deng, Zhiqun; Carlson, Thomas J.; Johnson, Gary E.

    2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this compliance study was to estimate dam passage survival of subyearling Chinook salmon at The Dalles Dam during summer 2012. Under the 2008 Federal Columbia River Power System Biological Opinion, dam passage survival is required to be greater than or equal to 0.93 and estimated with a standard error (SE) less than or equal to 0.015. The study also estimated survival from the forebay 2 km upstream of the dam and through the tailrace to 2 km downstream of the dam, forebay residence time, tailrace egress time, spill passage efficiency (SPE), and fish passage efficiency (FPE), as required by the 2008 Columbia Basin Fish Accords.

  19. Frequency dependence of mass flow gain factor and cavitation compliance of cavitating inducers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Otsuka, S.; Tsujimoto, Yoshinobu [Osaka Univ. (Japan); Kamijo, Kenjiro [National Aerospace Lab., Kakuda, Miyagi (Japan). Kakuda Research Center; Furuya, O. [AMP Technologies, Osaka (Japan)

    1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Unsteady cavitation characteristics are analyzed based on a closed cavity model in which the length of the cavity is allowed to oscillate. It is shown that the present model blends smoothly into quasisteady calculations in the low frequency limit, unlike fixed cavity length models. Effects of incidence angle and cavitation number on cavitation compliance and mass flow gain factor are shown as functions of reduce frequency. The cavity volume is evaluated by three methods and the results were used to confirm the accuracy and adequacy of the numerical calculation. By comparison with experimental data on inducers, it was shown that the present model can simulate the characteristics of unsteady cavitation qualitatively.

  20. Search for Physics Beyond the Standard Model in Opposite-Sign Dilepton Events at sqrt(s) = 7 TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chatrchyan, S. [Yerevan Physics Institute (Armenia); et al.,

    2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A search is presented for physics beyond the standard model (SM) in final states with opposite-sign isolated lepton pairs accompanied by hadronic jets and missing transverse energy. The search is performed using LHC data recorded with the CMS detector, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 34 inverse picobarns. No evidence for an event yield beyond SM expectations is found. An upper limit on the non-SM contribution to the signal region is deduced from the results. This limit is interpreted in the context of the constrained minimal supersymmetric model. Additional information is provided to allow testing the exclusion of specific models of physics beyond the SM.

  1. Search for physics beyond the standard model in dilepton mass spectra in proton-proton collisions at ? = 8 TeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Khachatryan, Vardan

    2015-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Dimuon and dielectron mass spectra, obtained from data resulting from proton-proton collisions at 8 TeV and recorded by the CMS experiment, are used to search for both narrow resonances and broad deviations from standard model predictions. The data correspond to an integrated luminosity of 20.6 (19.7) fb?¹ for the dimuon (dielectron) channel. No evidence for non-standard-model physics is observed and 95% confidence level limits are set on parameters from a number of new physics models. The narrow resonance analyses exclude a Sequential Standard Model Z'SSM resonance lighter than 2.90 TeV, a superstring-inspired Z'? lighter than 2.57 TeV and Randall-Sundrummore »Kaluza-Klein gravitons with masses below 2.73, 2.35, and 1.27 TeV for couplings of 0.10, 0.05, and 0.01, respectively. A notable feature is that the limits have been calculated in a model-independent way to enable straightforward reinterpretation in any model predicting a resonance structure. The observed events are also interpreted within the framework of two non-resonant analyses: one based on a large extra dimensions model and one based on a quark and lepton compositeness model with a left-left isoscalar contact interaction. Lower limits are established on MS, the scale characterizing the onset of quantum gravity, which range from 4.9 to 3.3 TeV, where the number of additional spatial dimensions varies from 3 to 7. Similarly, lower limits on ?, the energy scale parameter for the contact interaction, are found to be 12.0 (15.2) TeV for destructive (constructive) interference in the dimuon channel and 13.5 (18.3) TeV in the dielectron channel.« less

  2. The Kepco Models BOP 36-12ML and BOP 36-12DL have been modified from standard Kepco Models BOP 36-12M and BOP 36-12D, respectively, to be stable handling inductive loads up

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haller, Gary L.

    . All other specifications are identical to the standard BOP. (2) 10%-90%, short-circuit. (3) Short-circuit to operate in a stable manner in Current or Current Limit Mode for loads up to 1 Henry. They are also stable the standard model. Spec- ifications listed in Table 1 are for BOP 36-12ML and BOP 36-12DL in Current Mode. All

  3. The Higgs boson in the Standard Model theoretical constraints and a direct search in the wh channel at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huske, Nils Kristian; /Paris U., VI-VII

    2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have presented results in two different yet strongly linked aspects of Higgs boson physics. We have learned about the importance of the Higgs boson for the fate of the Standard Model, being either only a theory limited to explaining phenomena at the electroweak scale or, if the Higgs boson lies within a mass range of 130 < m{sub H} < 160 GeV the SM would remain a self consistent theory up to highest energy scales O(m{sub Pl}). This could have direct implications on theories of cosmological inflation using the Higgs boson as the particle giving rise to inflation in the very early Universe, if it couples non-minimally to gravity, an effect that would only become significant at very high energies. After understanding the immense meaning of proving whether the Higgs boson exists and if so, at which mass, we have presented a direct search for a Higgs boson in associated production with a W boson in a mass range 100 < m{sub H} < 150 GeV. A light Higgs boson is favored regarding constraints from electroweak precision measurements. As a single analysis is not yet sensitive for an observation of the Higgs boson using 5.3 fb{sup -1} of Tevatron data, we set limits on the production cross section times branching ratio. At the Tevatron, however, we are able to combine the sensitivity of our analyses not only across channels or analyses at a single experiment but also across both experiments, namely CDF and D0. This yields to the so-called Tevatron Higgs combination which, in total, combines 129 analyses from both experiments with luminosities of up to 6.7 fb{sup -1}. The results of a previous Tevatron combination led to the first exclusion of possible Higgs boson masses since the LEP exclusion in 2001. The latest Tevatron combination from July 2010 can be seen in Fig. 111 and limits compared to the Standard Model expectation are listed in Table 23. It excludes a SM Higgs boson in the regions of 100 < m{sub H} < 109 GeV as well as 158 < m{sub H} < 175 GeV based on the observed final limits at 95% C.L. In the most interesting low mass region between 115 and 135 GeV, even the full Tevatron combination is not yet sensitive enough to exclude a Higgs boson, or to even prove its existence with a meaningful significance. Fig. 112 shows a projection plot for sensitivity to the SM Higgs boson at the Tevatron as a measure of increasing luminosity. The 10 fb{sup -1} projection is a rather conservative outlook for the coming year of data taking as the Tevatron runs smoothly and the run till the end of 2011 is assured. By now, already 9 fb{sup -1} have been recorded by the two experiments. As the extrapolation plot shows, this amount of luminosity will allow to exclude the Higgs boson over a wide mass range at a 95% C.L. With the LHC at CERN now running and successfully collecting first data, it is worth looking at projections of Higgs boson sensitivity at the current center of mass energy of 7 TeV of the LHC accelerator. Fig. 113 shows a projection of a possible SM Higgs boson exclusion using 1 fb{sup -1} of LHC data collected by the ATLAS experiment. An exclusion is expected between 135 and 188 GeV at 95% C.L., combining the three decay channels H {yields} WW, H {yields} ZZ and H {yields} {gamma}{gamma}. A combination between LHC experiments would possibly yield an even broader range of excluded Higgs boson mass points. Therefore, whether at the Tevatron or the LHC, exciting times in the exclusion or possible discovery of the SM Higgs boson lie ahead.

  4. ORISE: Dose modeling and assessments

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    or state regulatory compliance requirements are being met during the decontamination and decommissioning of nuclear facilities. Dose modeling is an important step in the...

  5. ECOLOGICAL MONITORING AND COMPLIANCE PROGRAM CALENDAR YEAR 2005 REPORT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    BECHTEL NEVADA ECOLOGICAL SERVICES

    2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Ecological Monitoring and Compliance program (EMAC), funded through the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO), monitors the ecosystem of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and ensures compliance with laws and regulations pertaining to NTS biota. This report summarizes the program’s activities conducted by Bechtel Nevada (BN) during the Calendar Year 2005. Program activities included: (1) biological surveys at proposed construction sites, (2) desert tortoise compliance, (3) ecosystem mapping and data management, (4) sensitive and protected/regulated species and unique habitat monitoring, (5) habitat restoration monitoring, and (6) biological monitoring at the Non-Proliferation Test and Evaluation Complex (NPTEC).

  6. Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Biennial Environmental Compliance Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Washington Regulatory and Environmental Services (WRES)

    2004-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

    This Biennial Environmental Compliance Report (BECR) documents environmental regulatory compliance at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), a facility designed and authorized for the safe disposal of transuranic (TRU) radioactive waste, for the reporting period of April 1, 2002, to March 31, 2004. As required by the WIPP Land Withdrawal Act (LWA) (Public Law [Pub. L.] 102-579, as amended by Pub. L. 104-201), the BECR documents U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) compliance with applicable environmental protection laws and regulations implemented by agencies of the federal government and the state of New Mexico.

  7. Search for the standard model Higgs boson decaying to a bb pair in events with two oppositely-charged leptons using the full CDF data set

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CDF Collaboration

    2012-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a search for the standard model Higgs boson produced in association with a Z boson in data collected with the CDF II detector at the Tevatron, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 9.45/fb. In events consistent with the decay of the Higgs boson to a bottom-quark pair and the Z boson to electron or muon pairs, we set 95% credibility level upper limits on the ZH production cross section times the H -> bb branching ratio as a function of Higgs boson mass. At a Higgs boson mass of 125 GeV/c^2 we observe (expect) a limit of 7.1 (3.9) times the standard model value.

  8. The holographic mapping of the Standard Model onto the black hole horizon, Part I: Abelian vector field, scalar field and BEH Mechanism

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. 't Hooft

    2005-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Interactions between outgoing Hawking particles and ingoing matter are determined by gravitational forces and Standard Model interactions. In particular the gravitational interactions are responsible for the unitarity of the scattering against the horizon, as dictated by the holographic principle, but the Standard Model interactions also contribute, and understanding their effects is an important first step towards a complete understanding of the horizon's dynamics. The relation between in- and outgoing states is described in terms of an operator algebra. In this paper, the first of a series, we describe the algebra induced on the horizon by U(1) vector fields and scalar fields, including the case of an Englert-Brout-Higgs mechanism, and a more careful consideration of the transverse vector field components.

  9. Search for a standard model-like Higgs boson in the $\\mu^+\\mu^-$ and $\\mathrm{e^+e^-}$ decay channels at the LHC

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Khachatryan, Vardan [Yervan Physics Institute (Armenia); et al.,

    2015-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A search is presented for a standard model-like Higgs boson decaying to the $\\mu^+\\mu^-$ or $\\mathrm{e^+e^-}$ final states based on proton-proton collisions recorded by the CMS experiment at the CERN LHC. The data correspond to integrated luminosities of 5.0$~\\mathrm{fb}^{-1}$ at a centre-of-mass energy of $7~\\mathrm{TeV}$ and $19.7~\\mathrm{fb}^{-1}$ at $8~\\mathrm{TeV}$ for the $\\mu^+\\mu^-$ search, and of $19.7~\\mathrm{fb}^{-1}$ at a centre-of-mass energy of $8~\\mathrm{TeV}$ for the $\\mathrm{e^+e^-}$ search. To enhance the sensitivity of the search, events are categorized by topologies according to production process and dilepton invariant mass resolution. Upper limits on the production cross section times branching fraction at the 95% confidence level are reported for Higgs boson masses in the range from 120 to 150$~\\mathrm{GeV}$. For a Higgs boson with a mass of 125$~\\mathrm{GeV}$ decaying to $\\mu^+\\mu^-$, the observed (expected) upper limit on the production rate is found to be 7.4 ($6.5^{+2.8}_{-1.9}$) times the standard model value. This corresponds to an upper limit on the branching fraction of 0.0016. Similarly, for $\\mathrm{e^+e^-}$, an upper limit of 0.0019 is placed on the branching fraction, which is ${\\approx}3.7\\times10^5$ times the standard model value. These results, together with recent evidence of the 125$~\\mathrm{GeV}$ boson coupling to $\\tau$-leptons with a larger branching fraction consistent with the standard model, show for the first time that the leptonic couplings of the new boson are not flavour-universal.

  10. Search for a standard model-like Higgs boson in the $\\mu^+\\mu^-$ and $\\mathrm{e^+e^-}$ decay channels at the LHC

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Khachatryan, Vardan; et al.,

    2015-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A search is presented for a standard model-like Higgs boson decaying to the $\\mu^+\\mu^-$ or $\\mathrm{e^+e^-}$ final states based on proton-proton collisions recorded by the CMS experiment at the CERN LHC. The data correspond to integrated luminosities of 5.0$~\\mathrm{fb}^{-1}$ at a centre-of-mass energy of $7~\\mathrm{TeV}$ and $19.7~\\mathrm{fb}^{-1}$ at $8~\\mathrm{TeV}$ for the $\\mu^+\\mu^-$ search, and of $19.7~\\mathrm{fb}^{-1}$ at a centre-of-mass energy of $8~\\mathrm{TeV}$ for the $\\mathrm{e^+e^-}$ search. To enhance the sensitivity of the search, events are categorized by topologies according to production process and dilepton invariant mass resolution. Upper limits on the production cross section times branching fraction at the 95%more »confidence level are reported for Higgs boson masses in the range from 120 to 150$~\\mathrm{GeV}$. For a Higgs boson with a mass of 125$~\\mathrm{GeV}$ decaying to $\\mu^+\\mu^-$, the observed (expected) upper limit on the production rate is found to be 7.4 ($6.5^{+2.8}_{-1.9}$) times the standard model value. This corresponds to an upper limit on the branching fraction of 0.0016. Similarly, for $\\mathrm{e^+e^-}$, an upper limit of 0.0019 is placed on the branching fraction, which is ${\\approx}3.7\\times10^5$ times the standard model value. These results, together with recent evidence of the 125$~\\mathrm{GeV}$ boson coupling to $\\tau$-leptons with a larger branching fraction consistent with the standard model, show for the first time that the leptonic couplings of the new boson are not flavour-universal.« less

  11. Calculating Impacts of Energy Standards on Energy Demand in U.S. Buildings under Uncertainty with an Integrated Assessment Model: Technical Background Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scott, Michael J.; Daly, Don S.; Hathaway, John E.; Lansing, Carina S.; Liu, Ying; McJeon, Haewon C.; Moss, Richard H.; Patel, Pralit L.; Peterson, Marty J.; Rice, Jennie S.; Zhou, Yuyu

    2014-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents data and assumptions employed in an application of PNNL’s Global Change Assessment Model with a newly-developed Monte Carlo analysis capability. The model is used to analyze the impacts of more aggressive U.S. residential and commercial building-energy codes and equipment standards on energy consumption and energy service costs at the state level, explicitly recognizing uncertainty in technology effectiveness and cost, socioeconomics, presence or absence of carbon prices, and climate impacts on energy demand. The report provides a summary of how residential and commercial buildings are modeled, together with assumptions made for the distributions of state–level population, Gross Domestic Product (GDP) per worker, efficiency and cost of residential and commercial energy equipment by end use, and efficiency and cost of residential and commercial building shells. The cost and performance of equipment and of building shells are reported separately for current building and equipment efficiency standards and for more aggressive standards. The report also details assumptions concerning future improvements brought about by projected trends in technology.

  12. Ecological Monitoring and Compliance Program 2006 Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David C. Anderson; Paul D. Greger; Derek B. Hall; Dennis J. Hansen; William K. Ostler

    2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Ecological Monitoring and Compliance program (EMAC), funded through the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO), monitors the ecosystem of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and ensures compliance with laws and regulations pertaining to NTS biota. This report summarizes the program's activities conducted by National Security Technologies LLC (NSTec) during the Calendar Year 2006. Program activities included: (a) biological surveys at proposed construction sites, (b) desert tortoise compliance, (c) ecosystem mapping and data management, (d) sensitive plant species monitoring, (e) sensitive and protected/regulated animal monitoring, (f) habitat monitoring, (g) habitat restoration monitoring, and (h) monitoring of the Nonproliferation Test and Evaluation Complex (NPTEC). Sensitive and protected/regulated species of the NTS include 44 plants, 1 mollusk, 2 reptiles, over 250 birds, and 26 mammals protected, managed, or considered sensitive as per state or federal regulations and natural resource agencies and organizations. The threatened desert tortoise (Gopherus agassizii) is the only species on the NTS protected under the Endangered Species Act. Biological surveys for the presence of sensitive and protected/regulated species and important biological resources on which they depend were conducted for 34 projects. A total of 342.1 hectares (ha) (845.37 acres [ac]) was surveyed for these projects. Sensitive and protected/regulated species and important biological resources found included: 2 inactive tortoise burrows, 2 western burrowing owls (Athene cunicularia hypugaea), several horses (Equus caballus), 2 active predator burrows, mature Joshua trees (Yucca brevifolia), yuccas and cacti; and also 1 bird nest (2 eggs), 1 barn owl (Tyto alba) and 2 great-horned owls (Bubo virginianus). NSTec provided a written summary report of all survey findings and mitigation recommendations, where applicable. All flagged burrows were avoided during construction activities. Twenty one of the 34 projects had sites within the distribution range of the threatened desert tortoise. NNSA/NSO must comply with the terms and conditions of a permit (called a Biological Opinion) from the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) when conducting work in tortoise habitat. No tortoises were found in or displaced from project areas. No desert tortoises were accidentally injured or killed, nor were any captured or displaced from project sites. One desert tortoise was accidentally killed along a paved road. One site specific revegetation plan was submitted this year as required by the desert tortoise habitat revegetation plan approved in 2004. This year a total of 1.89 ha (4.69 ac) of tortoise habitat was disturbed. Revegetation of habitat at the Bren Tower burn was completed in the spring of 2006. In the summer of 2006, NSTec scientists prepared a Biological Assessment of the security activities that were being conducted at the Device Assembly Facility (DAF). NNSA requested a Biological Opinion from FWS in late 2006. Ecosystem mapping and data management in 2006 focused primarily on two tasks: (a) converting hardcopies of about 17 reports (EMAC annual reports and selected topical reports from 1996 to 2003) into electronic versions (Portable Document Format [PDF] files) to facilitate electronic document exchange, rapid retrieval, duplication, and printing, and (b) conducting an annual vegetation survey to determine wildland fire hazards on the NTS.

  13. Ecological Monitoring and Compliance Program 2006 Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David C. Anderson; Paul D. Greger; Derek B. Hall; Dennis J. Hansen; William K. Ostler

    2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Ecological Monitoring and Compliance program (EMAC), funded through the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO), monitors the ecosystem of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and ensures compliance with laws and regulations pertaining to NTS biota. This report summarizes the program's activities conducted by National Security Technologies LLC (NSTec) during the Calendar Year 2006. Program activities included: (a) biological surveys at proposed construction sites, (b) desert tortoise compliance, (c) ecosystem mapping and data management, (d) sensitive plant species monitoring, (e) sensitive and protected/regulated animal monitoring, (f) habitat monitoring, (g) habitat restoration monitoring, and (h) monitoring of the Nonproliferation Test and Evaluation Complex (NPTEC). Sensitive and protected/regulated species of the NTS include 44 plants, 1 mollusk, 2 reptiles, over 250 birds, and 26 mammals protected, managed, or considered sensitive as per state or federal regulations and natural resource agencies and organizations. The threatened desert tortoise (Gopherus agassizii) is the only species on the NTS protected under the Endangered Species Act. Biological surveys for the presence of sensitive and protected/regulated species and important biological resources on which they depend were conducted for 34 projects. A total of 342.1 hectares (ha) (845.37 acres [ac]) was surveyed for these projects. Sensitive and protected/regulated species and important biological resources found included: 2 inactive tortoise burrows, 2 western burrowing owls (Athene cunicularia hypugaea), several horses (Equus caballus), 2 active predator burrows, mature Joshua trees (Yucca brevifolia), yuccas and cacti; and also 1 bird nest (2 eggs), 1 barn owl (Tyto alba) and 2 great-horned owls (Bubo virginianus). NSTec provided a written summary report of all survey findings and mitigation recommendations, where applicable. All flagged burrows were avoided during construction activities. Twenty one of the 34 projects had sites within the distribution range of the threatened desert tortoise. NNSA/NSO must comply with the terms and conditions of a permit (called a Biological Opinion) from the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) when conducting work in tortoise habitat. No tortoises were found in or displaced from project areas. No desert tortoises were accidentally injured or killed, nor were any captured or displaced from project sites. One desert tortoise was accidentally killed along a paved road. One site specific re-vegetation plan was submitted this year as required by the desert tortoise habitat re-vegetation plan approved in 2004. This year a total of 1.89 ha (4.69 ac) of tortoise habitat was disturbed. Re-vegetation of habitat at the Bren Tower burn was completed in the spring of 2006. In the summer of 2006, NSTec scientists prepared a Biological Assessment of the security activities that were being conducted at the Device Assembly Facility (DAF). NNSA requested a Biological Opinion from FWS in late 2006. Ecosystem mapping and data management in 2006 focused primarily on two tasks: (a) converting hardcopies of about 17 reports (EMAC annual reports and selected topical reports from 1996 to 2003) into electronic versions (Portable Document Format [PDF] files) to facilitate electronic document exchange, rapid retrieval, duplication, and printing, and (b) conducting an annual vegetation survey to determine wildland fire hazards on the NTS. Copies of the PDF documents were sent to DOE's Office of Scientific and Technical Information website in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, and the DOE National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) Public Reading Facility.

  14. Knowledge discovery in corporate email : the compliance bot meets Enron

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Waterman, K. Krasnow

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    I propose the creation of a real-time compliance "bot" - software to momentarily pause each employee's email at the moment of sending and to electronically assess whether that email is likely to create liability or ...

  15. Compliance and Force Control for Computer Controlled Manipulators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mason, Matthew Thomas

    1979-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Compliant motion occurs when the manipulator position is constrained by the task geometry. Compliant motion may be produced either by a passive mechanical compliance built in to the manipulator, or by an active ...

  16. Combined Heat and Power: A Technical & Economical Compliance Strategy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McAllister, K.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ? Extensive assistance materials for Area Source rule available from EPA ? Tune-up guidance, fast facts, brochure, table of requirements, small entity compliance guide, etc. ? www.epa.gov/ttn/atw/boiler/boilerpg.html ? DOE technical assistance for Major...

  17. agarose mold compliance: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    CiteSeer Summary: submitted for filing revised sheets to its open access transmission tariff in compliance with a Commission order dated April 30, 2010, in this docket. 1 CAISO...

  18. Low Standby Power Product Purchasing Requirements and Compliance...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    and Compliance Resources A product consumers standby power when it is in the lowest power-consuming mode-typically when it is switched off. Federal agencies are required to...

  19. Table Contents Page i 2013 Nonresidential Compliance Manual January 2014

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ................................................................45 6.5.1 Outdoor Lighting Additions and Alterations ­ Mandatory and Lighting Power Density ...................................................22 6.4.5 Outdoor Lighting Power Compliance .......................................................................23 6.4.6 General Hardscape Lighting Power Allowance

  20. Office of NEPA Policy and Compliance, Staff Directory

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Office of NEPA Policy and Compliance, Staff Directory including phone number and areas of responsibility for the  Energy and Waste Management Unit, Western Energy and Waste Management Unit, and the...