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1

Isotopic Mo Neutron Total Cross Section Measurements in the Energy Range 1 to 620 keV  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract A series of new total cross section measurements for the stable molybdenum isotopes of 92,94,95,96,98,100Mo covering the energy range between 1 keV and 620 keV was performed at the Gaerttner LINAC Center at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute. New high-accuracy resonance parameters were extracted from an analysis of the data using the multilevel R-matrix Bayesian code SAMMY. In the unresolved resonance region, average resonance parameters and fits to the total cross sections were obtained using the Bayesian Hauser-Feshbach statistical model code FITACS.

R. Bahran; D. Barry; G. Leinweber; M. Rapp; R. Block; A. Daskalakis; B. McDermott; S. Piela; E. Blain; Y. Danon

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

Category:Kansas City, MO | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

MO MO Jump to: navigation, search Go Back to PV Economics By Location Media in category "Kansas City, MO" The following 16 files are in this category, out of 16 total. SVFullServiceRestaurant Kansas City MO Union Electric Co.png SVFullServiceRestauran... 74 KB SVHospital Kansas City MO Union Electric Co.png SVHospital Kansas City... 66 KB SVLargeHotel Kansas City MO Union Electric Co.png SVLargeHotel Kansas Ci... 66 KB SVLargeOffice Kansas City MO Union Electric Co.png SVLargeOffice Kansas C... 65 KB SVMediumOffice Kansas City MO Union Electric Co.png SVMediumOffice Kansas ... 65 KB SVMidriseApartment Kansas City MO Union Electric Co.png SVMidriseApartment Kan... 74 KB SVOutPatient Kansas City MO Union Electric Co.png SVOutPatient Kansas Ci... 66 KB SVPrimarySchool Kansas City MO Union Electric Co.png

3

Energy Perspectives, Total Energy - Energy Information Administration  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Total Energy Total Energy Glossary › FAQS › Overview Data Monthly Annual Analysis & Projections this will be filled with a highchart PREVIOUSNEXT Energy Perspectives 1949-2011 September 2012 PDF | previous editions Release Date: September 27, 2012 Introduction Energy Perspectives is a graphical overview of energy history in the United States. The 42 graphs shown here reveal sweeping trends related to the Nation's production, consumption, and trade of energy from 1949 through 2011. Energy Flow, 2011 (Quadrillion Btu) Total Energy Flow diagram image For footnotes see here. Energy can be grouped into three broad categories. First, and by far the largest, is the fossil fuels-coal, petroleum, and natural gas. Fossil fuels have stored the sun's energy over millennia past, and it is primarily

4

Missouri Department of National Resources Energy Center Mo DNR | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Department of National Resources Energy Center Mo DNR Department of National Resources Energy Center Mo DNR Jump to: navigation, search Name Missouri Department of National Resources Energy Center (Mo DNR) Place Jefferson City, Missouri Zip 65102 Product Mo DNR manages the Energy Revolving Fund which assists public organisations in Missouri in financing energy efficient projects for their facilities. References Missouri Department of National Resources Energy Center (Mo DNR)[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Missouri Department of National Resources Energy Center (Mo DNR) is a company located in Jefferson City, Missouri . References ↑ "Missouri Department of National Resources Energy Center (Mo

5

total energy | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

total energy total energy Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 1, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses quadrillion BTUs, and quantifies the energy prices using U.S. dollars. The data is broken down into total production, imports, exports, consumption, and prices for energy types. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO consumption EIA export import production reference case total energy Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Total Energy Supply, Disposition, and Price Summary - Reference Case (xls, 112.8 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed

6

National Fuel Cell and Hydrogen Energy Overview: Total Energy...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

and Hydrogen Energy Overview: Total Energy USA 2012 National Fuel Cell and Hydrogen Energy Overview: Total Energy USA 2012 Presentation by Sunita Satyapal at the Total Energy USA...

7

Relation between total quanta and total energy for aquatic ...  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Jan 22, 1974 ... ment of the total energy and vice versa. From a measurement of spectral irradi- ance ... unit energy (for the wavelength region specified).

2000-01-02T23:59:59.000Z

8

Co-Mo Electric Cooperative - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Co-Mo Electric Cooperative - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Co-Mo Electric Cooperative - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Co-Mo Electric Cooperative - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Commercial Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heat Pumps Appliances & Electronics Water Heating Cooling Maximum Rebate Geothermal Heat Pumps: 10 ton maximum for Residential, 50 ton maximum for Commercial Program Info State Missouri Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Room AC: $50 Water Heater: $50 Air Source Heat Pumps: $150 per ton Dual Fuel Air Source Heat Pumps: $300 per ton Geothermal Heat Pumps (Closed Loop): up to $850 per ton Geothermal Heat Pumps (Open Loop or Replacement): $150 per ton Provider Co-Mo Electric Cooperative Co-Mo Electric Cooperative provides rebates to residential and commercial

9

Relation between total quanta and total energy for aquatic ...  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Jan 22, 1974 ... havior of the ratio of total quanta to total energy (Q : W) within the spectral region of photosynthetic ..... For blue-green waters, where hRmax lies.

2000-01-02T23:59:59.000Z

10

Solar total energy project Shenandoah  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document presents the description of the final design for the Solar Total Energy System (STES) to be installed at the Shenandoah, Georgia, site for utilization by the Bleyle knitwear plant. The system is a fully cascaded total energy system design featuring high temperature paraboloidal dish solar collectors with a 235 concentration ratio, a steam Rankine cycle power conversion system capable of supplying 100 to 400 kW(e) output with an intermediate process steam take-off point, and a back pressure condenser for heating and cooling. The design also includes an integrated control system employing the supervisory control concept to allow maximum experimental flexibility. The system design criteria and requirements are presented including the performance criteria and operating requirements, environmental conditions of operation; interface requirements with the Bleyle plant and the Georgia Power Company lines; maintenance, reliability, and testing requirements; health and safety requirements; and other applicable ordinances and codes. The major subsystems of the STES are described including the Solar Collection Subysystem (SCS), the Power Conversion Subsystem (PCS), the Thermal Utilization Subsystem (TUS), the Control and Instrumentation Subsystem (CAIS), and the Electrical Subsystem (ES). Each of these sections include design criteria and operational requirements specific to the subsystem, including interface requirements with the other subsystems, maintenance and reliability requirements, and testing and acceptance criteria. (WHK)

None

1980-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

11

National Fuel Cell and Hydrogen Energy Overview: Total Energy...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

National Fuel Cell and Hydrogen Energy Overview: Total Energy USA 2012 National Fuel Cell and Hydrogen Energy Overview: Total Energy USA 2012 Presentation by Sunita Satyapal at the...

12

Compare All CBECS Activities: Total Energy Use  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Total Energy Use Total Energy Use Compare Activities by ... Total Energy Use Total Major Fuel Consumption by Building Type Commercial buildings in the U.S. used a total of approximately 5.7 quadrillion Btu of all major fuels (electricity, natural gas, fuel oil, and district steam or hot water) in 1999. Office buildings used the most total energy of all the building types, which was not a surprise since they were the most common commercial building type and had an above average energy intensity. Figure showing total major fuel consumption by building type. If you need assistance viewing this page, please call 202-586-8800. Major Fuel Consumption per Building by Building Type Because there were relatively few inpatient health care buildings and they tend to be large, energy intensive buildings, their energy consumption per building was far above that of any other building type.

13

Total Cross Section Measurements of Highly Enriched Isotopic Mo in the Resolved and Unresolved Energy Regions R.M. Bahran, A.M. Daskalakis, B.J. McDermott, E.J. Blain and Y. Danon  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

section data in particular are important because molybdenum can exist in reactors as a high yield fission structure based on fluctuations in the data. The analysis in this paper is limited to the unresolved energy reflective surfaces. The modular design allows operational reliability, functional versatility, relatively

Danon, Yaron

14

TENESOL formerly known as TOTAL ENERGIE | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

TENESOL formerly known as TOTAL ENERGIE TENESOL formerly known as TOTAL ENERGIE Jump to: navigation, search Name TENESOL (formerly known as TOTAL ENERGIE) Place la Tour de Salvagny, France Zip 69890 Sector Solar Product Makes polycrystalline silicon modules, and PV-based products such as solar powered pumps. References TENESOL (formerly known as TOTAL ENERGIE)[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. TENESOL (formerly known as TOTAL ENERGIE) is a company located in la Tour de Salvagny, France . References ↑ "TENESOL (formerly known as TOTAL ENERGIE)" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=TENESOL_formerly_known_as_TOTAL_ENERGIE&oldid=352112" Categories:

15

Development of an energy-use estimation methodology for the revised Navy Manual MO-303  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Navy commissioned Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) to revise and/or update the Navy Utilities Targets Manual, NAVFAC MO-303 (U.S. Navy 1972b). The purpose of the project was to produce a current, applicable, and easy-to-use version of the manual for use by energy and facility engineers and staff at all Navy Public Works Centers (PWCs), Public Works Departments (PWDs), Engineering Field Divisions (EFDs), and other related organizations. The revision of the MO-303 manual involved developing a methodology for estimating energy consumption in buildings and ships. This methodology can account for, and equitably allocate, energy consumption within Navy installations. The analyses used to develop this methodology included developing end-use intensities (EUIs) from a vast collection of Navy base metering and billing data. A statistical analysis of the metering data, weather data, and building energy-use characteristics was used to develop appropriate EUI values for use at all Navy bases. A complete Navy base energy reconciliation process was also created for use in allocating all known energy consumption. Initial attempts to use total Navy base consumption values did not produce usable results. A parallel effort using individual building consumption data provided an estimating method that incorporated weather effects. This method produced a set of building EUI values and weather adjustments for use in estimating building energy use. A method of reconciling total site energy consumption was developed based on a {open_quotes}zero-sum{close_quotes} principle. This method provides a way to account for all energy use and apportion part or all of it to buildings and other energy uses when actual consumption is not known. The entire text of the manual was also revised to present a more easily read understood and usable document.

Richman, E.E.; Keller, J.M.; Wood, A.G.; Dittmer, A.L.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Total Energy - Data - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Total Energy Flow, (Quadrillion Btu) Total Energy Flow, (Quadrillion Btu) Total Energy Flow diagram image Footnotes: 1 Includes lease condensate. 2 Natural gas plant liquids. 3 Conventional hydroelectric power, biomass, geothermal, solar/photovoltaic, and wind. 4 Crude oil and petroleum products. Includes imports into the Strategic Petroleum Reserve. 5 Natural gas, coal, coal coke, biofuels, and electricity. 6 Adjustments, losses, and unaccounted for. 7 Natural gas only; excludes supplemental gaseous fuels. 8 Petroleum products, including natural gas plant liquids, and crude oil burned as fuel. 9 Includes 0.01 quadrillion Btu of coal coke net exports. 10 Includes 0.13 quadrillion Btu of electricity net imports. 11 Total energy consumption, which is the sum of primary energy consumption, electricity retail sales, and electrical system energy losses.

17

Total Energy Facilities Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Total Energy Facilities Biomass Facility Total Energy Facilities Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Total Energy Facilities Biomass Facility Facility Total Energy Facilities Sector Biomass Facility Type Non-Fossil Waste Location Los Angeles County, California Coordinates 34.3871821°, -118.1122679° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":34.3871821,"lon":-118.1122679,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

18

Total Energy - Data - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

September 2012 PDF | previous editions September 2012 PDF | previous editions Release Date: September 27, 2012 A report of historical annual energy statistics. For many series, data begin with the year 1949. Included are data on total energy production, consumption, and trade; overviews of petroleum, natural gas, coal, electricity, nuclear energy, renewable energy, as well as financial and environmental indicators; and data unit conversion tables. About the data Previous Editions + EXPAND ALL Annual Energy Review 2011 Edition PDF (Full issue) Annual Energy Review 2011 - Released on September 27, 2012 PDF Annual Energy Review 2010 Edition PDF (Full issue) Annual Energy Review 2010 - Released on October 19, 2011 PDF Annual Energy Review 2009 Edition PDF (Full issue) Annual Energy Review 2009 - Released on August 19, 2010 PDF

19

Residential Energy Consumption Survey Results: Total Energy Consumption,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Survey Results: Total Energy Consumption, Survey Results: Total Energy Consumption, Expenditures, and Intensities (2005) Dataset Summary Description The Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) is a national survey that collects residential energy-related data. The 2005 survey collected data from 4,381 households in housing units statistically selected to represent the 111.1 million housing units in the U.S. Data were obtained from residential energy suppliers for each unit in the sample to produce the Consumption & Expenditures data. The Consumption & Expenditures and Intensities data is divided into two parts: Part 1 provides energy consumption and expenditures by census region, population density, climate zone, type of housing unit, year of construction and ownership status; Part 2 provides the same data according to household size, income category, race and age. The next update to the RECS survey (2009 data) will be available in 2011.

20

Serck standard packages for total energy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Although the principle of combined heat and power generation is attractive, practical problems have hindered its application. In the U.K. the scope for small scale combined heat and power (total energy) systems has been improved markedly by the introduction of new Electricity Board regulations which allow the operation of small a.c. generators in parallel with the mains low voltage supply. Following this change, Serck have developed a standard total energy unit, the CG100, based on the 2.25 1 Land Rover gas engine with full engine (coolant and exhaust gas) heat recovery. The unit incorporates an asynchronous generator, which utilising mains power for its magnetising current and speed control, offers a very simple means of generating electricity in parallel with the mains supply, without the need for expensive synchronising controls. Nominal output is 15 kW 47 kW heat; heat is available as hot water at temperatures up to 85C, allowing the heat output to be utilised directly in low pressure hot water systems. The CG100 unit can be used in any application where an appropriate demand exists for heat and electricity, and the annual utilisation will give an acceptable return on capital cost; it produces base load heat and electricity, with LPHW boilers and the mains supply providing top-up/stand-by requirements. Applications include residential use (hospitals, hotels, boarding schools, etc.), swimming pools and industrial process systems. The unit also operates on digester gas produced by anaerobic digestion of organic waste. A larger unit based on a six cylinder Ford engine (45 kWe output) is now available.

R. Kelcher

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mo total energy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Total Energy - Data - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Total Energy Total Energy Glossary › FAQS › Overview Data Monthly Annual Analysis & Projections All Reports Most Requested Annual Monthly Projections U.S. States Annual Energy Review September 2012 PDF | previous editions Release Date: September 27, 2012 Important notes about the data Note: The emphasis of the Annual Energy Review (AER) is on long-term trends. Analysts may wish to use the data in this report in conjunction with EIA's monthly releases that offer updates to the most recent years' data. In particular, see the Monthly Energy Review for statistics that include updates to many of the annual series in this report. Data Years Displayed: For tables beginning in 1949, some early years (usually 1951-1954, 1956-1959, 1961-1964, 1966-1969, and 1971-1974) are not

22

Co-Mo Electric Coop Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Mo Electric Coop Inc Mo Electric Coop Inc Jump to: navigation, search Name Co-Mo Electric Coop Inc Place Missouri Utility Id 4063 Utility Location Yes Ownership C NERC Location SERC NERC MRO Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Commercial Multi-Phase Commercial Commercial Single-Phase Over 200 Amps Commercial Commercial Single-Phase Up To 200 Amps Commercial Industrial Industrial Outdoor Lighting HPS 100 W Lighting Outdoor Lighting HPS 150 W Lighting Outdoor Lighting HPS 400 W Lighting Residential Multi-Phase Residential Residential Single-Phase Over 200 Amps Residential

23

High-Resolution Neutron Capture and Total Cross-Section Measurements, and the Astrophysical 95Mo(n,gamma) Reaction Rate at s-process Temperatures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Abundances of Mo isotopes predicted by stellar models of the s process are, except for 95Mo, in good agreement with data from single grains of mainstream presolar SiC. Because the meteorite data seemed sound and no reasonable modification to stellar theory resulted in good agreement for 95Mo, it has been suggested that the recommended neutron capture reaction rate for this nuclide is 30% too low. Therefore, we have made a new determination of the 95Mo(n,gamma) reaction rate via high-resolution measurements of the neutron-capture and total cross sections of 95Mo at the Oak Ridge Electron Linear Accelerator. These data were analyzed with the R-matrix code SAMMY to obtain parameters for resonances up to En = 10 keV. Also, a small change to our capture apparatus allowed us to employ a new technique to vastly improve resonance spin and parity assignments. These new resonance parameters, together with our data in the unresolved range, were used to calculate the 95Mo(n,gamma) reaction rate at s-process temperatures. We compare the currently recommended rate to our new results and discuss their astrophysical impact.

P. E. Koehler; J. A. Harvey; K. H. Guber; D. Wiarda

2008-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

24

Achieving Total Employee Engagement in Energy Efficiency  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Ratheon and GM share their experiences with employee engagement to achieve energy efficiency and sustainability goals in this presentation.

25

M&O Contract 2008-2013, Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

Contract No. DE-AC36-08GO28308 M&O Contract 2008-2013, between the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC and the U.S. Department Of Energy. Part I, Section B, Supplies and Services and Price/Costs.

26

Achieving Total Employee Engagement in Energy Efficiency  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Raytheon Employee Engagement Raytheon Employee Engagement in Energy Conservation Department of Energy August 5, 2010 Steve Fugarazzo Raytheon Company Enterprise Energy Team Copyright © 2007 Raytheon Company. All rights reserved. Customer Success Is Our Mission is a trademark of Raytheon Company. Page 2 8/9/2010 Presentation Overview  Company Background  Communication & Outreach Initiatives - Internal Partnerships - Energy Champions - Energy Citizens - Energy Awareness Events & Contests Page 3 8/9/2010 Raytheon ... What We Do Raytheon is a global technology company that provides innovative solutions to customers in 80 nations. Through strategic vision, disciplined management and world-class talent, Raytheon is delivering operational advantages for customers every day while helping them prepare for the

27

Property:TotalValue | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

TotalValue TotalValue Jump to: navigation, search This is a property of type Number. Pages using the property "TotalValue" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) 4 44 Tech Inc. Smart Grid Demonstration Project + 10,000,000 + A ALLETE Inc., d/b/a Minnesota Power Smart Grid Project + 3,088,007 + Amber Kinetics, Inc. Smart Grid Demonstration Project + 10,000,000 + American Transmission Company LLC II Smart Grid Project + 22,888,360 + American Transmission Company LLC Smart Grid Project + 2,661,650 + Atlantic City Electric Company Smart Grid Project + 37,400,000 + Avista Utilities Smart Grid Project + 40,000,000 + B Baltimore Gas and Electric Company Smart Grid Project + 451,814,234 + Battelle Memorial Institute, Pacific Northwest Division Smart Grid Demonstration Project + 177,642,503 +

28

SolarTotal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

SolarTotal SolarTotal Jump to: navigation, search Name SolarTotal Place Bemmel, Netherlands Zip 6681 LN Sector Solar Product The company sells and installs PV solar instalations Coordinates 51.894112°, 5.89881° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":51.894112,"lon":5.89881,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

29

EQUUS Total Return Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

EQUUS Total Return Inc EQUUS Total Return Inc Jump to: navigation, search Name EQUUS Total Return Inc Place Houston, Texas Product A business development company and VC investor that trades as a closed-end fund. EQUUS is managed by MCC Global NV, a Frankfurt stock exchange listed management and merchant banking group. Coordinates 29.76045°, -95.369784° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":29.76045,"lon":-95.369784,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

30

Correlation Of Surface Heat Loss And Total Energy Production...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Correlation Of Surface Heat Loss And Total Energy Production For Geothermal Systems Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Paper: Correlation...

31

Total Pollution Effect and Total Energy Cost per Output of Different Products for Polish Industrial System  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

For many years a broad use has been made of the indices of total energy requirements in the whole large production system corresponding to unit output of particular goods (Boustead I., Hancock G.F., 1979). The...

Henryk W. Balandynowicz

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Solar Energy Materials & Solar Cells 58 (1999) 199}208 The behaviour of Na implanted into Mo thin "lms  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Solar Energy Materials & Solar Cells 58 (1999) 199}208 The behaviour of Na implanted into Mo thin, As ngstro( m Solar Center, P.O. Box 534, SE-751 21 Uppsala, Sweden Department of Materials Science Mo thin "lms used as back contacts for Cu(In,Ga)Se solar cells. The samples were analysed

Rockett, Angus

33

Estimating Total Energy Consumption and Emissions of China's Commercial and Office Buildings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Estimating Total Energy Consumption and Emissions of Chinasof Chinas total energy consumption mix. However, accuratelyof Chinas total energy consumption, while others estimate

Fridley, David G.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Estimating Total Energy Consumption and Emissions of China's Commercial and Office Buildings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ABORATORY Estimating Total Energy Consumption and Emissionscomponent of Chinas total energy consumption mix. However,about 19% of Chinas total energy consumption, while others

Fridley, David G.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Total and Peak Energy Consumption Minimization of Building HVAC Systems Using Model Predictive Control  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

combination of the total energy consumption and the peakalso reduces the total energy consumption of the occupancyTotal and Peak Energy Consumption Minimization of Building

Maasoumy, Mehdi; Sangiovanni-Vincentelli, Alberto

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Total Total .............. 16,164,874 5,967,376 22,132,249 2,972,552 280,370 167,519 18,711,808 1993 Total .............. 16,691,139 6,034,504 22,725,642 3,103,014 413,971 226,743 18,981,915 1994 Total .............. 17,351,060 6,229,645 23,580,706 3,230,667 412,178 228,336 19,709,525 1995 Total .............. 17,282,032 6,461,596 23,743,628 3,565,023 388,392 283,739 19,506,474 1996 Total .............. 17,680,777 6,370,888 24,051,665 3,510,330 518,425 272,117 19,750,793 Alabama Total......... 570,907 11,394 582,301 22,601 27,006 1,853 530,841 Onshore ................ 209,839 11,394 221,233 22,601 16,762 1,593 180,277 State Offshore....... 209,013 0 209,013 0 10,244 260 198,509 Federal Offshore... 152,055 0 152,055 0 0 0 152,055 Alaska Total ............ 183,747 3,189,837 3,373,584 2,885,686 0 7,070 480,828 Onshore ................ 64,751 3,182,782

37

Property:Geothermal/TotalProjectCost | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

TotalProjectCost TotalProjectCost Jump to: navigation, search Property Name Geothermal/TotalProjectCost Property Type Number Description Total Project Cost Pages using the property "Geothermal/TotalProjectCost" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) A A 3D-3C Reflection Seismic Survey and Data Integration to Identify the Seismic Response of Fractures and Permeable Zones Over a Known Geothermal Resource at Soda Lake, Churchill Co., NV Geothermal Project + 14,571,873 + A Demonstration System for Capturing Geothermal Energy from Mine Waters beneath Butte, MT Geothermal Project + 2,155,497 + A Geothermal District-Heating System and Alternative Energy Research Park on the NM Tech Campus Geothermal Project + 6,135,381 + A new analytic-adaptive model for EGS assessment, development and management support Geothermal Project + 1,629,670 +

38

Total Energy - Data - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

What's New in Monthly Energy Review What's New in Monthly Energy Review December 2013 PDF | previous editions Release Date: December 24, 2013 Next Update: January 28, 2014 Listed below are changes in Monthly Energy Review content. Only months with changes beyond the standard updates are shown. CONTENT CHANGES + EXPAND ALL Changes in 2013 December 2013 Release Electricity statistics have been revised in coordination with EIA's Electric Power Annual 2012. Revisions affect data series in Energy Overview, Energy Consumption, Petroleum, Natural Gas, Coal, Electricity, Nuclear Energy, Energy Prices, Renewable Energy, and Environment. Final 2012 heat content values for electricity (Table A6) have also been incorporated. October 2013 Release Excel and CSV files now include pre-1973 data for all series except for Section 12. The Excel files now have two worksheets, one for monthly data and one for annual data.

39

Total............................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Total................................................................... Total................................................................... 111.1 2,033 1,618 1,031 791 630 401 Total Floorspace (Square Feet) Fewer than 500............................................... 3.2 357 336 113 188 177 59 500 to 999....................................................... 23.8 733 667 308 343 312 144 1,000 to 1,499................................................. 20.8 1,157 1,086 625 435 409 235 1,500 to 1,999................................................. 15.4 1,592 1,441 906 595 539 339 2,000 to 2,499................................................. 12.2 2,052 1,733 1,072 765 646 400 2,500 to 2,999................................................. 10.3 2,523 2,010 1,346 939 748 501 3,000 to 3,499................................................. 6.7 3,020 2,185 1,401 1,177 851 546

40

Total...................  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4,690,065 52,331,397 2,802,751 4,409,699 7,526,898 209,616 1993 Total................... 4,956,445 52,535,411 2,861,569 4,464,906 7,981,433 209,666 1994 Total................... 4,847,702 53,392,557 2,895,013 4,533,905 8,167,033 202,940 1995 Total................... 4,850,318 54,322,179 3,031,077 4,636,500 8,579,585 209,398 1996 Total................... 5,241,414 55,263,673 3,158,244 4,720,227 8,870,422 206,049 Alabama ...................... 56,522 766,322 29,000 62,064 201,414 2,512 Alaska.......................... 16,179 81,348 27,315 12,732 75,616 202 Arizona ........................ 27,709 689,597 28,987 49,693 26,979 534 Arkansas ..................... 46,289 539,952 31,006 67,293 141,300 1,488 California ..................... 473,310 8,969,308 235,068 408,294 693,539 36,613 Colorado...................... 110,924 1,147,743

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mo total energy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

National Fuel Cell and Hydrogen Energy Overview: Total Energy USA 2012  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Presentation by Sunita Satyapal at the Total Energy USA 2012 meeting in Houston, Texas, on November 27, 2012.

42

Total Energy - Data - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Superseded -- see MER for key annual tables Superseded -- see MER for key annual tables Annual Energy Review archives for data year: 2011 2010 2009 2008 all archives Go CONTENT CHANGES + EXPAND ALL Changes in Annual Energy Review 2011 Annual Energy Review 2011 Release: September 27, 2012 1. Energy Consumption, Expenditures, and Emissions Indicators Estimates (Table 1.5) has been modified to include columns for Gross Output and Energy Expenditures as Share of Gross Output and remove Greenhouse Gas Emissions per Real Dollar of Gross Domestic Product. 2. Sales of Fossil Fuels Produced on Federal and American Indian Lands (Table 1.14) was previously titled "Fossil Fuel Production on Federally Administered Lands." It has been redesigned and now provides data on sales of fossil fuels from Federal and American Indian lands for fiscal years 2003 through 2011.

43

Total Energy - Data - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Primary Energy Consumption by Source and Sector, 2011 (Quadrillion Btu) Primary Energy Consumption by Source and Sector, 2011 (Quadrillion Btu) Primary Energy Consumption by Source and Sector diagram image Footnotes: 1 Does not include biofuels that have been blended with petroleum-biofuels are included in "Renewable Energy." 2 Excludes supplemental gaseous fuels. 3 Includes less than 0.1 quadrillion Btu of coal coke net exports. 4 Conventional hydroelectric power, geothermal, solar/PV, wind, and biomass. 5 Includes industrial combined-heat-and-power (CHP) and industrial electricity-only plants. 6 Includes commercial combined-heat-and-power (CHP) and commercial electricity-only plants. 7 Electricity-only and combined-heat-and-power (CHP) plants whose primary business is to sell electricity, or electricity and heat, to the public.

44

Potential Energy Total electric potential energy, U, of a system of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Potential Energy Total electric potential energy, U, of a system of charges is obtained from of work done by the field, W*= -W. Bring q1 from , W *= 0 since no electric F yet #12;Potential Energy Total electric potential energy, U, of a system of charges is obtained from the work done by an external

Bertulani, Carlos A. - Department of Physics and Astronomy, Texas A&M University

45

Total...........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Q Q Million U.S. Housing Units Renter- Occupied Housing Units (millions) Type of Renter-Occupied Housing Unit U.S. Housing Units (millions Single-Family Units Apartments in Buildings With-- Living Space Characteristics Detached Attached Table HC4.2 Living Space Characteristics by Renter-Occupied Housing Units, 2005 2 to 4 Units 5 or More Units Mobile Homes Energy Information Administration 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Preliminary Housing Characteristics Tables Million U.S. Housing Units Renter- Occupied Housing Units (millions) Type of Renter-Occupied Housing Unit U.S. Housing Units (millions Single-Family Units Apartments in Buildings With-- Living Space Characteristics Detached Attached Table HC4.2 Living Space Characteristics by Renter-Occupied Housing Units, 2005

46

Total...................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Single-Family Units Single-Family Units Detached Type of Housing Unit Table HC2.7 Air Conditioning Usage Indicators by Type of Housing Unit, 2005 Million U.S. Housing Units Air Conditioning Usage Indicators Attached 2 to 4 Units 5 or More Units Mobile Homes Apartments in Buildings With-- Housing Units (millions) Energy Information Administration 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Preliminary Housing Characteristics Tables Single-Family Units Detached Type of Housing Unit Table HC2.7 Air Conditioning Usage Indicators by Type of Housing Unit, 2005 Million U.S. Housing Units Air Conditioning Usage Indicators Attached 2 to 4 Units 5 or More Units Mobile Homes Apartments in Buildings With-- Housing Units (millions) At Home Behavior Home Used for Business

47

Total...........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Q Q Table HC3.2 Living Space Characteristics by Owner-Occupied Housing Units, 2005 2 to 4 Units 5 or More Units Mobile Homes Million U.S. Housing Units Owner- Occupied Housing Units (millions) Type of Owner-Occupied Housing Unit Housing Units (millions) Single-Family Units Apartments in Buildings With-- Living Space Characteristics Detached Attached Energy Information Administration 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Preliminary Housing Characteristics Tables Table HC3.2 Living Space Characteristics by Owner-Occupied Housing Units, 2005 2 to 4 Units 5 or More Units Mobile Homes Million U.S. Housing Units Owner- Occupied Housing Units (millions) Type of Owner-Occupied Housing Unit Housing Units (millions)

48

Total and partial capture cross sections in reactions with deformed nuclei at energies near and below the Coulomb barrier  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Within the quantum diffusion approach, the capture of a projectile nucleus by a target nucleus is studied at bombarding energies above and below the Coulomb barrier. The effects of deformation of interacting nuclei and neutron transfer between them on the total and partial capture cross sections and the mean angular momentum of the captured system are studied. The results obtained for the {sup 16}O + {sup 112}Cd, {sup 152}Sm, and {sup 184}W; {sup 19}F +{sup 175}Lu; {sup 28}Si +{sup 94,100}Mo and {sup 154}Sm; {sup 40}Ca +{sup 96}Zr; {sup 48}Ca+ {sup 90}Zr; and {sup 64}Ni +{sup 58,64}Ni, {sup 92,96}Zr, and {sup 100}Mo reactions are in good agreement with available experimental data.

Kuzyakin, R. A., E-mail: rkuzyakin@theor.jinr.ru; Sargsyan, V. V.; Adamian, G. G.; Antonenko, N. V. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (Russian Federation)

2013-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

49

Total..........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7.1 7.1 19.0 22.7 22.3 Floorspace (Square Feet) Total Floorspace 1 Fewer than 500................................................... 3.2 2.1 0.6 Q 0.4 500 to 999........................................................... 23.8 13.6 3.7 3.2 3.2 1,000 to 1,499..................................................... 20.8 9.5 3.7 3.4 4.2 1,500 to 1,999..................................................... 15.4 6.6 2.7 2.5 3.6 2,000 to 2,499..................................................... 12.2 5.0 2.1 2.8 2.4 2,500 to 2,999..................................................... 10.3 3.7 1.8 2.8 2.1 3,000 to 3,499..................................................... 6.7 2.0 1.4 1.7 1.6 3,500 to 3,999..................................................... 5.2 1.6 0.8 1.5 1.4 4,000 or More.....................................................

50

Total..........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0.7 0.7 21.7 6.9 12.1 Floorspace (Square Feet) Total Floorspace 1 Fewer than 500................................................... 3.2 0.9 0.6 Q Q 500 to 999........................................................... 23.8 9.0 4.2 1.5 3.2 1,000 to 1,499..................................................... 20.8 8.6 4.7 1.5 2.5 1,500 to 1,999..................................................... 15.4 6.0 2.9 1.2 1.9 2,000 to 2,499..................................................... 12.2 4.1 2.1 0.7 1.3 2,500 to 2,999..................................................... 10.3 3.0 1.8 0.5 0.7 3,000 to 3,499..................................................... 6.7 2.1 1.2 0.5 0.4 3,500 to 3,999..................................................... 5.2 1.5 0.8 0.3 0.4 4,000 or More.....................................................

51

Total..........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

25.6 25.6 40.7 24.2 Floorspace (Square Feet) Total Floorspace 1 Fewer than 500................................................... 3.2 0.9 0.5 0.9 1.0 500 to 999........................................................... 23.8 4.6 3.9 9.0 6.3 1,000 to 1,499..................................................... 20.8 2.8 4.4 8.6 5.0 1,500 to 1,999..................................................... 15.4 1.9 3.5 6.0 4.0 2,000 to 2,499..................................................... 12.2 2.3 3.2 4.1 2.6 2,500 to 2,999..................................................... 10.3 2.2 2.7 3.0 2.4 3,000 to 3,499..................................................... 6.7 1.6 2.1 2.1 0.9 3,500 to 3,999..................................................... 5.2 1.1 1.7 1.5 0.9 4,000 or More.....................................................

52

Total..........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4.2 4.2 7.6 16.6 Floorspace (Square Feet) Total Floorspace 1 Fewer than 500................................................... 3.2 1.0 0.2 0.8 500 to 999........................................................... 23.8 6.3 1.4 4.9 1,000 to 1,499..................................................... 20.8 5.0 1.6 3.4 1,500 to 1,999..................................................... 15.4 4.0 1.4 2.6 2,000 to 2,499..................................................... 12.2 2.6 0.9 1.7 2,500 to 2,999..................................................... 10.3 2.4 0.9 1.4 3,000 to 3,499..................................................... 6.7 0.9 0.3 0.6 3,500 to 3,999..................................................... 5.2 0.9 0.4 0.5 4,000 or More.....................................................

53

Total.........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Floorspace (Square Feet) Floorspace (Square Feet) Total Floorspace 2 Fewer than 500.................................................. 3.2 Q 0.8 0.9 0.8 0.5 500 to 999.......................................................... 23.8 1.5 5.4 5.5 6.1 5.3 1,000 to 1,499.................................................... 20.8 1.4 4.0 5.2 5.0 5.2 1,500 to 1,999.................................................... 15.4 1.4 3.1 3.5 3.6 3.8 2,000 to 2,499.................................................... 12.2 1.4 3.2 3.0 2.3 2.3 2,500 to 2,999.................................................... 10.3 1.5 2.3 2.7 2.1 1.7 3,000 to 3,499.................................................... 6.7 1.0 2.0 1.7 1.0 1.0 3,500 to 3,999.................................................... 5.2 0.8 1.5 1.5 0.7 0.7 4,000 or More.....................................................

54

Total..........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

. . 111.1 20.6 15.1 5.5 Floorspace (Square Feet) Total Floorspace 1 Fewer than 500................................................... 3.2 0.9 0.5 0.4 500 to 999........................................................... 23.8 4.6 3.6 1.1 1,000 to 1,499..................................................... 20.8 2.8 2.2 0.6 1,500 to 1,999..................................................... 15.4 1.9 1.4 0.5 2,000 to 2,499..................................................... 12.2 2.3 1.7 0.5 2,500 to 2,999..................................................... 10.3 2.2 1.7 0.6 3,000 to 3,499..................................................... 6.7 1.6 1.0 0.6 3,500 to 3,999..................................................... 5.2 1.1 0.9 0.3 4,000 or More.....................................................

55

Total..........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7.1 7.1 7.0 8.0 12.1 Floorspace (Square Feet) Total Floorspace 1 Fewer than 500................................................... 3.2 0.4 Q Q 0.5 500 to 999........................................................... 23.8 2.5 1.5 2.1 3.7 1,000 to 1,499..................................................... 20.8 1.1 2.0 1.5 2.5 1,500 to 1,999..................................................... 15.4 0.5 1.2 1.2 1.9 2,000 to 2,499..................................................... 12.2 0.7 0.5 0.8 1.4 2,500 to 2,999..................................................... 10.3 0.5 0.5 0.4 1.1 3,000 to 3,499..................................................... 6.7 0.3 Q 0.4 0.3 3,500 to 3,999..................................................... 5.2 Q Q Q Q 4,000 or More.....................................................

56

Total..........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

.. .. 111.1 24.5 1,090 902 341 872 780 441 Total Floorspace (Square Feet) Fewer than 500...................................... 3.1 2.3 403 360 165 366 348 93 500 to 999.............................................. 22.2 14.4 763 660 277 730 646 303 1,000 to 1,499........................................ 19.1 5.8 1,223 1,130 496 1,187 1,086 696 1,500 to 1,999........................................ 14.4 1.0 1,700 1,422 412 1,698 1,544 1,348 2,000 to 2,499........................................ 12.7 0.4 2,139 1,598 Q Q Q Q 2,500 to 2,999........................................ 10.1 Q Q Q Q Q Q Q 3,000 or More......................................... 29.6 0.3 Q Q Q Q Q Q Heated Floorspace (Square Feet) None...................................................... 3.6 1.8 1,048 0 Q 827 0 407 Fewer than 500......................................

57

Total...................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2,033 2,033 1,618 1,031 791 630 401 Total Floorspace (Square Feet) Fewer than 500............................................... 3.2 357 336 113 188 177 59 500 to 999....................................................... 23.8 733 667 308 343 312 144 1,000 to 1,499................................................. 20.8 1,157 1,086 625 435 409 235 1,500 to 1,999................................................. 15.4 1,592 1,441 906 595 539 339 2,000 to 2,499................................................. 12.2 2,052 1,733 1,072 765 646 400 2,500 to 2,999................................................. 10.3 2,523 2,010 1,346 939 748 501 3,000 to 3,499................................................. 6.7 3,020 2,185 1,401 1,177 851 546 3,500 to 3,999................................................. 5.2 3,549 2,509 1,508

58

Total...........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

26.7 26.7 28.8 20.6 13.1 22.0 16.6 38.6 Floorspace (Square Feet) Total Floorspace 1 Fewer than 500................................... 3.2 1.9 0.9 Q Q Q 1.3 2.3 500 to 999........................................... 23.8 10.5 7.3 3.3 1.4 1.2 6.6 12.9 1,000 to 1,499..................................... 20.8 5.8 7.0 3.8 2.2 2.0 3.9 8.9 1,500 to 1,999..................................... 15.4 3.1 4.2 3.4 2.0 2.7 1.9 5.0 2,000 to 2,499..................................... 12.2 1.7 2.7 2.9 1.8 3.2 1.1 2.8 2,500 to 2,999..................................... 10.3 1.2 2.2 2.3 1.7 2.9 0.6 2.0 3,000 to 3,499..................................... 6.7 0.9 1.4 1.5 1.0 1.9 0.4 1.4 3,500 to 3,999..................................... 5.2 0.8 1.2 1.0 0.8 1.5 0.4 1.3 4,000 or More...................................... 13.3 0.9 1.9 2.2 2.0 6.4 0.6 1.9 Heated Floorspace

59

Total...........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

14.7 14.7 7.4 12.5 12.5 18.9 18.6 17.3 9.2 Floorspace (Square Feet) Total Floorspace 1 Fewer than 500.................................... 3.2 0.7 Q 0.3 0.3 0.7 0.6 0.3 Q 500 to 999........................................... 23.8 2.7 1.4 2.2 2.8 5.5 5.1 3.0 1.1 1,000 to 1,499..................................... 20.8 2.3 1.4 2.4 2.5 3.5 3.5 3.6 1.6 1,500 to 1,999..................................... 15.4 1.8 1.4 2.2 2.0 2.4 2.4 2.1 1.2 2,000 to 2,499..................................... 12.2 1.4 0.9 1.8 1.4 2.2 2.1 1.6 0.8 2,500 to 2,999..................................... 10.3 1.6 0.9 1.1 1.1 1.5 1.5 1.7 0.8 3,000 to 3,499..................................... 6.7 1.0 0.5 0.8 0.8 1.2 0.8 0.9 0.8 3,500 to 3,999..................................... 5.2 1.1 0.3 0.7 0.7 0.4 0.5 1.0 0.5 4,000 or More...................................... 13.3

60

Total................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

.. .. 111.1 86.6 2,522 1,970 1,310 1,812 1,475 821 1,055 944 554 Total Floorspace (Square Feet) Fewer than 500............................. 3.2 0.9 261 336 162 Q Q Q 334 260 Q 500 to 999.................................... 23.8 9.4 670 683 320 705 666 274 811 721 363 1,000 to 1,499.............................. 20.8 15.0 1,121 1,083 622 1,129 1,052 535 1,228 1,090 676 1,500 to 1,999.............................. 15.4 14.4 1,574 1,450 945 1,628 1,327 629 1,712 1,489 808 2,000 to 2,499.............................. 12.2 11.9 2,039 1,731 1,055 2,143 1,813 1,152 Q Q Q 2,500 to 2,999.............................. 10.3 10.1 2,519 2,004 1,357 2,492 2,103 1,096 Q Q Q 3,000 or 3,499.............................. 6.7 6.6 3,014 2,175 1,438 3,047 2,079 1,108 N N N 3,500 to 3,999.............................. 5.2 5.1 3,549 2,505 1,518 Q Q Q N N N 4,000 or More...............................

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mo total energy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Total Energy - Data - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Electricity Flow, (Quadrillion Btu) Electricity Flow, (Quadrillion Btu) Electricity Flow diagram image Footnotes: 1 Blast furnace gas, propane gas, and other manufactured and waste gases derived from fossil fuels. 2 Batteries, chemicals, hydrogen, pitch, purchased steam, sulfur, miscellaneous technologies, and non-renewable waste (municipal solid waste from non-biogenic sources, and tire-derived fuels). 3 Data collection frame differences and nonsampling error. Derived for the diagram by subtracting the "T & D Losses" estimate from "T & D Losses and Unaccounted for" derived from Table 8.1. 4 Electric energy used in the operation of power plants. 5 Transmission and distribution losses (electricity losses that occur between the point of generation and delivery to the customer) are estimated

62

Total Energy - Data - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Petroleum Flow, (Million Barrels per Day) Petroleum Flow, (Million Barrels per Day) Petroleum Energy Flow diagram image Footnotes: 1 Unfinished oils, hydrogen/oxygenates/renewables/other hydrocarbons, and motor gasoline and aviation gasoline blending components. 2 Renewable fuels and oxygenate plant net production (0.972), net imports (1.164) and adjustments (0.122) minus stock change (0.019) and product supplied (0.001). 3 Finished petroleum products, liquefied petroleum gases, and pentanes plus. 4 Natural gas plant liquids. 5 Field production (2.183) and renewable fuels and oxygenate plant net production (-.019) minus refinery and blender net imputs (0.489). 6 Production minus refinery input. (s)= Less than 0.005. Notes: * Data are preliminary. * Values are derived from source data prior to rounding for publication.

63

High-Energy Cathode Materials (Li2MnO3LiMO2) for Lithium-Ion Batteries  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

High-Energy Cathode Materials (Li2MnO3LiMO2) for Lithium-Ion Batteries ... Fabrication of Nitrogen-Doped Holey Graphene Hollow Microspheres and Their Use as an Active Electrode Material for Lithium Ion Batteries ... Li-rich materials are considered the most promising for Li-ion battery cathodes, as high energy densities can be achieved. ...

Haijun Yu; Haoshen Zhou

2013-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

64

Estimating Total Energy Consumption and Emissions of China's Commercial and Office Buildings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

18 Figure 6 Primary Energy Consumption by End-Use in24 Figure 7 Primary Energy Consumption by Fuel in Commercialbased on total primary energy consumption (source energy),

Fridley, David G.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Temperature-dependent nanocrystal formation in Mo/Si multilayers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We investigated the nanocrystallinity of Mo/Si multilayers as a function of the Mo:Si ratio in the period using grazing incidence and wide angle x-ray diffraction, both for as-deposited samples and after thermal annealing up to 800 deg. C under UHV conditions. The research was performed on multilayers, as applied for extreme UV lithography with period thickness of approximately 7 nm. The as-deposited multilayer nanostructure was found to depend on the Mo to Si layer thickness ratio. For intermediate Mo fractions in the multilayer period, a four layer system is formed, with amorphous Si and polycrystalline Mo layers separated by silicide interfaces, while for low and high Mo fractions, a two component system is formed, respectively, consisting of a pure Mo layer (in the case of a high Mo fraction) or pure Si layer (low Mo fraction) separated by a single silicide interface. Using the crystallographic properties of the multilayer during annealing, we describe the continuous development of the multilayer structure and growth of the silicide interfaces. Our study has led to an explanatory model which is based on the total free energy minimization of the multilayer system. Finally, a phase transition to a crystalline silicide is observed at T>300 deg. C. This phase transition can also be explained by minimization of the total free energy.

Nedelcu, I.; Kruijs, R. W. E. van de; Yakshin, A. E.; Bijkerk, F. [FOM-Institute for Plasma Physics Rijnhuizen, P.O. Box. 1207, 3430 BE Nieuwegein (Netherlands)

2007-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

66

Table 16. Total Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Total Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual" Total Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual" "Projected" " (quadrillion Btu)" ,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,2011 "AEO 1994",88.02,89.53,90.72,91.73,92.71,93.61,94.56,95.73,96.69,97.69,98.89,100,100.79,101.7,102.7,103.6,104.3,105.23 "AEO 1995",,89.21,89.98,90.57,91.91,92.98,93.84,94.61,95.3,96.19,97.18,98.38,99.37,100.3,101.2,102.1,102.9,103.88 "AEO 1996",,,90.6,91.26,92.54,93.46,94.27,95.07,95.94,96.92,97.98,99.2,100.38,101.4,102.1,103.1,103.8,104.69,105.5 "AEO 1997",,,,92.64,93.58,95.13,96.59,97.85,98.79,99.9,101.2,102.4,103.4,104.7,105.8,106.6,107.2,107.9,108.6 "AEO 1998",,,,,94.68,96.71,98.61027527,99.81855774,101.254303,102.3907928,103.3935776,104.453476,105.8160553,107.2683716,108.5873566,109.8798981,111.0723877,112.166893,113.0926208

67

The Excitation Energy Dependence of the Total Kinetic Energy Release in 235U(n,f)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The total kinetic energy release in the neutron induced fission of $^{235}$U was measured (using white spectrum neutrons from LANSCE) for neutron energies from E$_{n}$ = 3.2 to 50 MeV. In this energy range the average post-neutron total kinetic energy release drops from 167.4 $\\pm$ 0.7 to 162.1 $\\pm$ 0.8 MeV, exhibiting a local dip near the second chance fission threshold. The values and the slope of the TKE vs. E$_{n}$ agree with previous measurements but do disagree (in magnitude) with systematics. The variances of the TKE distributions are larger than expected and apart from structure near the second chance fission threshold, are invariant for the neutron energy range from 11 to 50 MeV. We also report the dependence of the total excitation energy in fission, TXE, on neutron energy.

R. Yanez; L. Yao; J. King; W. Loveland; F. Tovesson; N. Fotiades

2014-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

68

Estimating Total Energy Consumption and Emissions of China's Commercial and Office Buildings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

were used to calculate the energy mix in manufacturing,of Chinas total energy consumption mix. However, accuratelyof Chinas total energy consumption mix. However, accurately

Fridley, David G.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Surface-Energy-Assisted Perfect Transfer of Centimeter-Scale Monolayer and Few-Layer MoS2 Films onto Arbitrary Substrates  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Surface-Energy-Assisted Perfect Transfer of Centimeter-Scale Monolayer and Few-Layer MoS2 Films onto Arbitrary Substrates ... The different surface energies can drive water molecules to penetrate underneath the film, and this is why our process is termed surface-energy-assisted transfer. ... While the water may have a natural tendency to penetrate between the MoS2 film and the substrate due to different surface energies, the penetration actually cannot start by itself. ...

Alper Gurarslan; Yifei Yu; Liqin Su; Yiling Yu; Francisco Suarez; Shanshan Yao; Yong Zhu; Mehmet Ozturk; Yong Zhang; Linyou Cao

2014-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

70

"Table A15. Selected Energy Operating Ratios for Total Energy Consumption for"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Selected Energy Operating Ratios for Total Energy Consumption for" Selected Energy Operating Ratios for Total Energy Consumption for" " Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation by Census Region and Economic" " Characteristics of the Establishment, 1991" ,,,"Consumption","Major" " "," ","Consumption","per Dollar","Byproducts(b)","Fuel Oil(c)"," " " ","Consumption","per Dollar","of Value","as a Percent","as a Percent","RSE" " ","per Employee","of Value Added","of Shipments","of Consumption","of Natural Gas","Row" "Economic Characteristics(a)","(million Btu)","(thousand Btu)","(thousand Btu)","(percent)","(percent)","Factors"

71

"Table A45. Selected Energy Operating Ratios for Total Energy Consumption"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5. Selected Energy Operating Ratios for Total Energy Consumption" 5. Selected Energy Operating Ratios for Total Energy Consumption" " for Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation by Industry Group," " Selected Industries, and Value of Shipment Categories, 1994" ,,,,,"Major" ,,,"Consumption","Consumption per","Byproducts(c)","Fuel Oil(d)" ,,"Consumption","per Dollar","Dollar of Value","as a Percent","as a Percent","RSE" "SIC",,"per Employee","of Value Added","of Shipments","of Consumption","of Natural Gas","Row" "Code(a)","Economic Characteristics(b)","(million Btu)","(thousand Btu)","(thousand Btu)","(percents)","(percents)","Factors"

72

"Table A46. Selected Energy Operating Ratios for Total Energy Consumption"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Selected Energy Operating Ratios for Total Energy Consumption" Selected Energy Operating Ratios for Total Energy Consumption" " for Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation by Industry Group," " Selected Industries, and Employment Size Categories, 1994" ,,,,,"Major" ,,,"Consumption","Consumption per","Byproducts(c)","Fuel Oil(d)" ,,"Consumption","per Dollar","Dollar of Value","as a Percent","as a Percent","RSE" "SIC",,"per Employee","of Value Added","of Shipments","of Consumption","of Natural Gas","Row" "Code(a)","Economic Characteristics(b)","(million Btu)","(thousand Btu)","(thousand Btu)","(percents)","(percents)","Factors"

73

"Table A48. Selected Energy Operating Ratios for Total Energy Consumption for"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8. Selected Energy Operating Ratios for Total Energy Consumption for" 8. Selected Energy Operating Ratios for Total Energy Consumption for" " Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation by Census Region, Census Division, and Economic" " Characteristics of the Establishment, 1994" ,,,"Consumption","Major" " "," ","Consumption","per Dollar","Byproducts(b)","Fuel Oil(c)"," " " ","Consumption","per Dollar","of Value","as a Percent","as a Percent","RSE" " ","per Employee","of Value Added","of Shipments","of Consumption","of Natural Gas","Row"

74

"Table A8. Selected Energy Operating Ratios for Total Energy Consumption for"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

A8. Selected Energy Operating Ratios for Total Energy Consumption for" A8. Selected Energy Operating Ratios for Total Energy Consumption for" " Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation by Census Region, Industry Group, and" " Selected Industries, 1991" ,,,,,"Major" ,,,,"Consumption","Byproducts(b)" ,,,"Consumption","per Dollar","as a","Fuel Oil(c) as" ,,"Consumption","per Dollar","of Value","Percent of","a Percent of","RSE" "SIC"," ","per Employee","of Value Added","of Shipments","Consumsption","Natural Gas","Row" "Code(a)","Industry Groups and Industry","(million Btu)","(thousand Btu)","(thousand Btu)","(PERCENT)","(percent)","Factors"

75

"Table A51. Selected Energy Operating Ratios for Total Energy Consumption for"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1. Selected Energy Operating Ratios for Total Energy Consumption for" 1. Selected Energy Operating Ratios for Total Energy Consumption for" " Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation by Census Region and Economic" " Characteristics of the Establishment, 1991 " ,,,,,"Major" ,,,"Consumption","Consumption per","Byproducts(c)","Fuel Oil(d)" ,,"Consumption","per Dollar","Dollar of Value","as a Percent","as a Percent","RSE" "SIC",,"per Employee","of Value Added","of Shipments","of Consumption","of Natural Gas","Row" "Code(a)","Economic Characteristics(b)","(million Btu)","(thousand Btu)","(thousand Btu)","(percent)","(percent)","Factors"

76

"Table A47. Selected Energy Operating Ratios for Total Energy Consumption for"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7. Selected Energy Operating Ratios for Total Energy Consumption for" 7. Selected Energy Operating Ratios for Total Energy Consumption for" " Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation by Census Region, Census Division, Industry Group, and" " Selected Industries, 1994" ,,,,,"Major" ,,,,"Consumption","Byproducts(b)" ,,,"Consumption","per Dollar","as a","Fuel Oil(c) as" ,,"Consumption","per Dollar","of Value","Percent of","a Percent of","RSE" "SIC"," ","per Employee","of Value Added","of Shipments","Consumption","Natural Gas","Row" "Code(a)","Industry Group and Industry","(million Btu)","(thousand Btu)","(thousand Btu)","(percents)","(percents)","Factors"

77

"Table A50. Selected Energy Operating Ratios for Total Energy Consumption for"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0. Selected Energy Operating Ratios for Total Energy Consumption for" 0. Selected Energy Operating Ratios for Total Energy Consumption for" " Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation by Industry Group," " Selected Industries, and Economic Characteristics of the" " Establishment, 1991 (Continued)" ,,,,,"Major" ,,,"Consumption","Consumption per","Byproducts(c)","Fuel Oil(d)" ,,"Consumption","per Dollar","Dollar of Value","as a Percent of","as a Percent","RSE" "SIC",,"per Employee","of Value Added","of Shipments","of Consumption","of Natural Gas","Row" "Code(a)","Economic Characteristics(b)","(million Btu)","(thousand Btu)","(thousand Btu)","(Percent)","(percent)","Factors"

78

Table 18. Total Delivered Commercial Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Total Delivered Commercial Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual Total Delivered Commercial Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual Projected (quadrillion Btu) 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 AEO 1994 6.8 6.9 6.9 7.0 7.1 7.1 7.2 7.2 7.3 7.3 7.4 7.4 7.4 7.5 7.5 7.5 7.5 7.6 AEO 1995 6.9 6.9 7.0 7.0 7.0 7.1 7.1 7.1 7.1 7.1 7.2 7.2 7.2 7.2 7.3 7.3 7.3 AEO 1996 7.1 7.2 7.2 7.3 7.3 7.4 7.4 7.5 7.6 7.6 7.7 7.7 7.8 7.9 8.0 8.0 8.1 AEO 1997 7.4 7.4 7.4 7.5 7.5 7.6 7.7 7.7 7.8 7.8 7.9 7.9 8.0 8.1 8.1 8.2 AEO 1998 7.5 7.6 7.7 7.8 7.9 8.0 8.0 8.1 8.2 8.3 8.4 8.4 8.5 8.6 8.7 AEO 1999 7.4 7.8 7.9 8.0 8.1 8.2 8.2 8.3 8.4 8.5 8.6 8.7 8.8 8.9 AEO 2000 7.7 7.8 7.9 8.0 8.1 8.2 8.3 8.4 8.5 8.5 8.7 8.7 8.8 AEO 2001 7.8 8.1 8.3 8.6 8.7 8.9 9.0 9.2 9.3 9.5 9.6 9.7 AEO 2002 8.2 8.4 8.7 8.9 9.0 9.2 9.4 9.6 9.7 9.9 10.1

79

Table 16. Total Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual Projected  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Total Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual Total Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual Projected (quadrillion Btu) 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 AEO 1994 88.0 89.5 90.7 91.7 92.7 93.6 94.6 95.7 96.7 97.7 98.9 100.0 100.8 101.7 102.7 103.6 104.3 105.2 AEO 1995 89.2 90.0 90.6 91.9 93.0 93.8 94.6 95.3 96.2 97.2 98.4 99.4 100.3 101.2 102.1 102.9 103.9 AEO 1996 90.6 91.3 92.5 93.5 94.3 95.1 95.9 96.9 98.0 99.2 100.4 101.4 102.1 103.1 103.8 104.7 105.5 AEO 1997 92.6 93.6 95.1 96.6 97.9 98.8 99.9 101.2 102.4 103.4 104.7 105.8 106.6 107.2 107.9 108.6 AEO 1998 94.7 96.7 98.6 99.8 101.3 102.4 103.4 104.5 105.8 107.3 108.6 109.9 111.1 112.2 113.1 AEO 1999 94.6 97.0 99.2 100.9 102.0 102.8 103.6 104.7 106.0 107.2 108.5 109.7 110.8 111.8

80

Table 19. Total Delivered Industrial Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Total Delivered Industrial Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual Total Delivered Industrial Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual Projected (quadrillion Btu) 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 AEO 1994 25.4 25.9 26.3 26.7 27.0 27.1 26.8 26.6 26.9 27.2 27.7 28.1 28.3 28.7 29.1 29.4 29.7 30.0 AEO 1995 26.2 26.3 26.5 27.0 27.3 26.9 26.6 26.8 27.1 27.5 27.9 28.2 28.4 28.7 29.0 29.3 29.6 AEO 1996 26.5 26.6 27.3 27.5 26.9 26.5 26.7 26.9 27.2 27.6 27.9 28.2 28.3 28.5 28.7 28.9 29.2 AEO 1997 26.2 26.5 26.9 26.7 26.6 26.8 27.1 27.4 27.8 28.0 28.4 28.7 28.9 29.0 29.2 29.4 AEO 1998 27.2 27.5 27.2 26.9 27.1 27.5 27.7 27.9 28.3 28.7 29.0 29.3 29.7 29.9 30.1 AEO 1999 26.7 26.4 26.4 26.8 27.1 27.3 27.5 27.9 28.3 28.6 28.9 29.2 29.5 29.7 AEO 2000 25.8 25.5 25.7 26.0 26.5 26.9 27.4 27.8 28.1 28.3 28.5 28.8 29.0

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mo total energy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Table 17. Total Delivered Residential Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Total Delivered Residential Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual Total Delivered Residential Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual Projected (quadrillion Btu) 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 AEO 1994 10.3 10.4 10.4 10.4 10.4 10.4 10.4 10.4 10.4 10.4 10.4 10.5 10.5 10.5 10.5 10.5 10.6 10.6 AEO 1995 11.0 10.8 10.8 10.8 10.8 10.8 10.8 10.7 10.7 10.7 10.7 10.7 10.7 10.7 10.8 10.8 10.9 AEO 1996 10.4 10.7 10.7 10.7 10.8 10.8 10.9 10.9 11.0 11.2 11.2 11.3 11.4 11.5 11.6 11.7 11.8 AEO 1997 11.1 10.9 11.1 11.1 11.2 11.2 11.2 11.3 11.4 11.5 11.5 11.6 11.7 11.8 11.9 12.0 AEO 1998 10.7 11.1 11.2 11.4 11.5 11.5 11.6 11.7 11.8 11.9 11.9 12.1 12.1 12.2 12.3 AEO 1999 10.5 11.1 11.3 11.3 11.4 11.5 11.5 11.6 11.6 11.7 11.8 11.9 12.0 12.1 AEO 2000 10.7 10.9 11.0 11.1 11.2 11.3 11.4 11.5 11.6 11.7 11.8 11.9 12.0

82

Table 20. Total Delivered Transportation Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Total Delivered Transportation Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual Total Delivered Transportation Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual Projected (quadrillion Btu) 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 AEO 1994 23.6 24.1 24.5 24.7 25.1 25.4 25.7 26.2 26.5 26.9 27.2 27.6 27.9 28.3 28.6 28.9 29.2 29.5 AEO 1995 23.3 24.0 24.2 24.7 25.1 25.5 25.9 26.2 26.5 26.9 27.3 27.7 28.0 28.3 28.5 28.7 28.9 AEO 1996 23.9 24.1 24.5 24.8 25.3 25.7 26.0 26.4 26.7 27.1 27.5 27.8 28.1 28.4 28.6 28.9 29.1 AEO 1997 24.7 25.3 25.9 26.4 27.0 27.5 28.0 28.5 28.9 29.4 29.8 30.3 30.6 30.9 31.1 31.3 AEO 1998 25.3 25.9 26.7 27.1 27.7 28.3 28.8 29.4 30.0 30.6 31.2 31.7 32.3 32.8 33.1 AEO 1999 25.4 26.0 27.0 27.6 28.2 28.8 29.4 30.0 30.6 31.2 31.7 32.2 32.8 33.1 AEO 2000 26.2 26.8 27.4 28.0 28.5 29.1 29.7 30.3 30.9 31.4 31.9 32.5 32.9

83

AB INITIO Modeling of Thermomechanical Properties of Mo-Based Alloys for Fossil Energy Conversion  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this final scientific/technical report covering the period of 3.5 years started on July 1, 2011, we report the accomplishments on the study of thermo-mechanical properties of Mo-based intermetallic compounds under NETL support. These include computational method development, physical properties investigation of Mo-based compounds and alloys. The main focus is on the mechanical and thermo mechanical properties at high temperature since these are the most crucial properties for their potential applications. In particular, recent development of applying ab initio molecular dynamic (AIMD) simulations to the T1 (Mo{sub 5}Si{sub 3}) and T2 (Mo{sub 5}SiB{sub 2}) phases are highlighted for alloy design in further improving their properties.

Ching, Wai-Yim

2013-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

84

Estimating Total Energy Consumption and Emissions of China's Commercial and Office Buildings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Central Government Buildings. Available at: http://Energy Commission, PIER Building End-Use Energy Efficiencythe total lifecycle of a building such as petroleum and

Fridley, David G.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

An Adaptive Tree Code for Computing Total Potential Energy in Classical Molecular Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An Adaptive Tree Code for Computing Total Potential Energy in Classical Molecular Systems Zhong, 2000 Abstract A tree code algorithm is presented for rapid computation of the total potential energy are presented for a variety of systems. Keywords: adaptive tree code; total potential energy; nonbonded

Duan, Zhong-Hui

86

THE USE OF TRUST REGIONS IN KOHN-SHAM TOTAL ENERGY MINIMIZATION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-consistent and the Kohn-Sham (KS) total energy function associated with the system reaches the global minimum. It has longTHE USE OF TRUST REGIONS IN KOHN-SHAM TOTAL ENERGY MINIMIZATION CHAO YANG , JUAN C. MEZA , AND LIN system, is viewed in this paper as an optimization procedure that minimizes the Kohn- Sham total energy

Geddes, Cameron Guy Robinson

87

Total China Investment Co Ltd | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Total China Investment Co Ltd Total China Investment Co Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name Total (China) Investment Co. Ltd. Place Beijing, China Zip 100004 Product Total has been present in China for about 30 years through its activities of Exploration & Production, Gas & Power, Refining & Marketing, and Chemicals. Coordinates 39.90601°, 116.387909° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.90601,"lon":116.387909,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

88

Property:Building/TotalFloorArea | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Property Property Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Property:Building/TotalFloorArea Jump to: navigation, search This is a property of type Number. Total floor area (BRA), m2 Pages using the property "Building/TotalFloorArea" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) S Sweden Building 05K0001 + 19,657 + Sweden Building 05K0002 + 7,160 + Sweden Building 05K0003 + 4,855 + Sweden Building 05K0004 + 25,650 + Sweden Building 05K0005 + 2,260 + Sweden Building 05K0006 + 13,048 + Sweden Building 05K0007 + 24,155 + Sweden Building 05K0008 + 7,800 + Sweden Building 05K0009 + 34,755 + Sweden Building 05K0010 + 437 + Sweden Building 05K0011 + 15,310 + Sweden Building 05K0012 + 22,565 + Sweden Building 05K0013 + 19,551 +

89

Property:RenewableFuelStandard/Total | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Total Total Jump to: navigation, search This is a property of type Number. Pages using the property "RenewableFuelStandard/Total" Showing 15 pages using this property. R Renewable Fuel Standard Schedule + 13.95 + Renewable Fuel Standard Schedule + 26 + Renewable Fuel Standard Schedule + 15.2 + Renewable Fuel Standard Schedule + 28 + Renewable Fuel Standard Schedule + 16.55 + Renewable Fuel Standard Schedule + 30 + Renewable Fuel Standard Schedule + 18.15 + Renewable Fuel Standard Schedule + 9 + Renewable Fuel Standard Schedule + 33 + Renewable Fuel Standard Schedule + 20.5 + Renewable Fuel Standard Schedule + 11.1 + Renewable Fuel Standard Schedule + 36 + Renewable Fuel Standard Schedule + 22.25 + Renewable Fuel Standard Schedule + 12.95 + Renewable Fuel Standard Schedule + 24 +

90

"Table A28. Total Expenditures for Purchased Energy Sources by Census Region"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Total Expenditures for Purchased Energy Sources by Census Region" Total Expenditures for Purchased Energy Sources by Census Region" " and Economic Characteristics of the Establishment, 1991" " (Estimates in Million Dollars)" " "," "," "," ",," "," "," "," "," ","RSE" " "," "," ","Residual","Distillate","Natural"," "," ","Coke"," ","Row" "Economic Characteristics(a)","Total","Electricity","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(b)","Gas(c)","LPG","Coal","and Breeze","Other(d)","Factors"

91

Property:Building/FloorAreaTotal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

FloorAreaTotal FloorAreaTotal Jump to: navigation, search This is a property of type Number. Total Pages using the property "Building/FloorAreaTotal" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) S Sweden Building 05K0001 + 19,657 + Sweden Building 05K0002 + 7,160 + Sweden Building 05K0003 + 4,454 + Sweden Building 05K0004 + 25,650 + Sweden Building 05K0005 + 2,260 + Sweden Building 05K0006 + 14,348 + Sweden Building 05K0007 + 24,155 + Sweden Building 05K0008 + 7,800 + Sweden Building 05K0009 + 34,755 + Sweden Building 05K0010 + 437 + Sweden Building 05K0011 + 15,300 + Sweden Building 05K0012 + 22,565 + Sweden Building 05K0013 + 19,551 + Sweden Building 05K0014 + 1,338.3 + Sweden Building 05K0015 + 1,550 + Sweden Building 05K0016 + 2,546 +

92

Property:Building/SPElectrtyUsePercTotal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

SPElectrtyUsePercTotal SPElectrtyUsePercTotal Jump to: navigation, search This is a property of type String. Total Pages using the property "Building/SPElectrtyUsePercTotal" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) S Sweden Building 05K0001 + 100.0 + Sweden Building 05K0002 + 100.0 + Sweden Building 05K0003 + 100.0 + Sweden Building 05K0004 + 100.0 + Sweden Building 05K0005 + 100.0 + Sweden Building 05K0006 + 100.0 + Sweden Building 05K0007 + 100.0 + Sweden Building 05K0008 + 100.0 + Sweden Building 05K0009 + 100.0 + Sweden Building 05K0010 + 100.0 + Sweden Building 05K0011 + 100.0 + Sweden Building 05K0012 + 100.0 + Sweden Building 05K0013 + 100.0 + Sweden Building 05K0014 + 100.0 + Sweden Building 05K0015 + 100.0 + Sweden Building 05K0016 + 100.0 +

93

AEO2011: Total Energy Supply, Disposition, and Price Summary | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Total Energy Supply, Disposition, and Price Summary Total Energy Supply, Disposition, and Price Summary Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 1, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses quadrillion BTUs, and quantifies the energy prices using U.S. dollars. The data is broken down into total production, imports, exports, consumption, and prices for energy types. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO consumption EIA export import production reference case total energy Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Total Energy Supply, Disposition, and Price Summary - Reference Case (xls, 112.8 KiB) Quality Metrics

94

IEP - Water-Energy Interface: Total Maximum Daily Load Page  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Total Maximum Daily Loads (TMDLs) Total Maximum Daily Loads (TMDLs) The overall goal of the Clean Water Act is to "restore and maintain the chemical, physical, and biological integrity of the Nation’s waters." In 1999, EPA proposed changes to Section 303(d), to establish Total Maximum Daily Loads (TMDLs) for watersheds that do not meet this goal. The TMDL is the highest amount of a given pollutant that is permissible in that body of water over a given period of time. TMDLs include both waste load allocation (WLA) for point sources and load allocations for non-point sources. In Appalachia, acid mine drainage (AMD) is the single most damaging non-point source. There is also particular concern of the atmospheric deposition of airborne sulfur, nitrogen, and mercury compounds. States are currently in the process of developing comprehensive lists of impaired waters and establishing TMDLs for those waters. EPA has recently proposed a final rule that will require states to develop TMDLs and implement plans for improving water quality within the next 10 years. Under the new rule, TMDL credits could be traded within a watershed.

95

"Table A36. Total Expenditures for Purchased Energy Sources by Census Region,"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6. Total Expenditures for Purchased Energy Sources by Census Region," 6. Total Expenditures for Purchased Energy Sources by Census Region," " Census Division, Industry Group, and Selected Industries, 1994" " (Estimates in Million Dollars)" ,,,,,,,,,,,"RSE" "SIC"," "," "," ","Residual","Distillate ","Natural"," "," ","Coke"," ","Row" "Code(a)","Industry Group and Industry","Total","Electricity","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(b)","Gas(c)","LPG","Coal","and Breeze","Other(d)","Factors" ,,"Total United States"

96

Toward understanding the exchange-correlation energy and total-energy density functionals  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

If an accurate ground-state electron density ?0 for a system is known, it is shown from calculations on atoms that a strikingly good estimate for the total electronic energy of atoms is provided by the formula E[?0]=tsumi?i-(1-1/N)J[?0], where N is the number of electrons, J[?0] is the classical Coulomb repulsion energy for ?0, and the ?i are the Kohn-Sham orbital energies determined by the Zhao-Morrison-Parr procedure [Phys. Rev. A 50, 2138 (1994)] for implementation of the Levy-constrained search determination of the Kohn-Sham kinetic energy. The surprising accuracy of this formula is attributed to the fact that the exchange-correlation functional is equal to -J/N plus a functional that behaves as if it were approximately homogeneous, of degree 1 in the electron density. A corresponding exact formula is given, and various approximate models are constructed.

Robert G. Parr and Swapan K. Ghosh

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

File:USDA-CE-Production-GIFmaps-MO.pdf | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

MO.pdf MO.pdf Jump to: navigation, search File File history File usage Missouri Ethanol Plant Locations Size of this preview: 776 × 600 pixels. Full resolution ‎(1,650 × 1,275 pixels, file size: 377 KB, MIME type: application/pdf) Description Missouri Ethanol Plant Locations Sources United States Department of Agriculture Related Technologies Biomass, Biofuels, Ethanol Creation Date 2010-01-19 Extent State Countries United States UN Region Northern America States Missouri External links http://www.nass.usda.gov/Charts_and_Maps/Ethanol_Plants/ File history Click on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. Date/Time Thumbnail Dimensions User Comment current 16:16, 27 December 2010 Thumbnail for version as of 16:16, 27 December 2010 1,650 × 1,275 (377 KB) MapBot (Talk | contribs) Automated bot upload

98

Table A10. Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0. Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation" " by Fuel Type, Industry Group, Selected Industries, and End Use, 1994:" " Part 2" " (Estimates in Trillion...

99

A Constrained Optimization Algorithm for Total Energy Minimization in Electronic Structure Calculation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Functionals for Electronic Structure Calculations. J. Comp.Minimization in Electronic Structure Calculation ? ChaoKey words: electronic structure calculation, total energy

Yang, Chao; Meza, Juan C.; Wang, Lin-Wang

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Modal and Nonmodal Symmetric Perturbations. Part II: Nonmodal Growths Measured by Total Perturbation Energy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Maximum nonmodal growths of total perturbation energy are computed for symmetric perturbations constructed from the normal modes presented in Part I. The results show that the maximum nonmodal growths are larger than the energy growth produced by ...

Qin Xu; Ting Lei; Shouting Gao

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mo total energy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Total electron and proton energy input during auroral substorms: Remote sensing with IMAGE-FUV  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, it is found that the most critical factor is the assumption made on the energy of the auroral protonsTotal electron and proton energy input during auroral substorms: Remote sensing with IMAGE-FUV B and proton energy fluxes. The proton energy flux is derived from the Lyman a measurements on the basis

California at Berkeley, University of

102

"Table A37. Total Expenditures for Purchased Energy Sources by Census Region,"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7. Total Expenditures for Purchased Energy Sources by Census Region," 7. Total Expenditures for Purchased Energy Sources by Census Region," " Census Division, and Economic Characteristics of the Establishment, 1994" " (Estimates in Million Dollars)" " "," "," "," ",," "," "," "," "," ","RSE" " "," "," ","Residual","Distillate","Natural"," "," ","Coke"," ","Row" "Economic Characteristics(a)","Total","Electricity","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(b)","Gas(c)","LPG","Coal","and Breeze","Other(d)","Factors"

103

Table A14. Total First Use (formerly Primary Consumption) of Energy for All P  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4. Total First Use (formerly Primary Consumption) of Energy for All Purposes" 4. Total First Use (formerly Primary Consumption) of Energy for All Purposes" " by Value of Shipment Categories, Industry Group, and Selected Industries, 1994" " (Estimates in Trillion Btu)" ,,,," Value of Shipments and Receipts(b)" ,,,," "," (million dollars)" ,,,,,,,,,"RSE" "SIC"," "," "," "," "," "," "," ",500,"Row"," "," "," ",," "," "," "," " "Code(a)","Industry Group and Industry","Total","Under 20","20-49","50-99","100-249","250-499","and Over","Factors"," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," ",," "

104

Table A45. Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation" Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation" " by Enclosed Floorspace, Percent Conditioned Floorspace, and Presence of Computer" " Controls for Building Environment, 1991" " (Estimates in Trillion Btu)" ,,"Presence of Computer Controls" ,," for Buildings Environment",,"RSE" "Enclosed Floorspace and"," ","--------------","--------------","Row" "Percent Conditioned Floorspace","Total","Present","Not Present","Factors" " "," " "RSE Column Factors:",0.8,1.3,0.9 "ALL SQUARE FEET CATEGORIES" "Approximate Conditioned Floorspace"

105

Table A30. Total Primary Consumption of Energy for All Purposes by Value of  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0. Total Primary Consumption of Energy for All Purposes by Value of" 0. Total Primary Consumption of Energy for All Purposes by Value of" "Shipment Categories, Industry Group, and Selected Industries, 1991" " (Estimates in Trillion Btu)" ,,,," Value of Shipments and Receipts(b)" ,,,," ","(million dollars)" ,,,"-","-","-","-","-","-","RSE" "SIC"," "," "," "," "," "," "," ",500,"Row"," "," "," ",," "," "," "," " "Code(a)","Industry Groups and Industry","Total","Under 20","20-49","50-99","100-249","250-499","and Over","Factors"," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," ",," "

106

Table A31. Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation" Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation" " by Value of Shipment Categories, Industry Group, and Selected Industries, 1991" " (Continued)" " (Estimates in Trillion Btu)",,,,"Value of Shipments and Receipts(b)" ,,,," (million dollars)" ,,,"-","-","-","-","-","-","RSE" "SIC"," "," "," "," "," "," "," ",500,"Row" "Code(a)","Industry Groups and Industry","Total","Under 20","20-49","50-99","100-249","250-499","and Over","Factors"

107

"Table A11. Total Primary Consumption of Combustible Energy for Nonfuel"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1. Total Primary Consumption of Combustible Energy for Nonfuel" 1. Total Primary Consumption of Combustible Energy for Nonfuel" " Purposes by Census Region and Economic Characteristics of the Establishment," 1991 " (Estimates in Btu or Physical Units)" " "," "," "," ","Natural"," "," ","Coke"," "," " " ","Total","Residual","Distillate","Gas(c)"," ","Coal","and Breeze","Other(d)","RSE" " ","(trillion","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(b)","(billion","LPG","(1000","(1000","(trillion","Row"

108

Table 21. Total Transportation Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Transportation Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual Transportation Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual (quadrillion Btu) 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 AEO 1982 18.6 18.2 17.7 17.3 17.0 16.9 AEO 1983 19.8 20.1 20.4 20.4 20.5 20.5 20.7 AEO 1984 19.2 19.0 19.0 19.0 19.1 19.2 20.1 AEO 1985 20.0 19.8 20.0 20.0 20.0 20.1 20.3 AEO 1986 20.5 20.8 20.8 20.6 20.7 20.3 21.0 AEO 1987 21.3 21.5 21.6 21.7 21.8 22.0 22.0 22.0 21.9 22.3 AEO 1989* 21.8 22.2 22.4 22.4 22.5 22.5 22.5 22.5 22.6 22.7 22.8 23.0 23.2 AEO 1990 22.0 22.4 23.2 24.3 25.5 AEO 1991 22.1 21.6 21.9 22.1 22.3 22.5 22.8 23.1 23.4 23.8 24.1 24.5 24.8 25.1 25.4 25.7 26.0 26.3 26.6 26.9 AEO 1992 21.7 22.0 22.5 22.9 23.2 23.4 23.6 23.9 24.1 24.4 24.8 25.1 25.4 25.7 26.0 26.3 26.6 26.9 27.1 AEO 1993 22.5 22.8 23.4 23.9 24.3 24.7 25.1 25.4 25.7 26.1 26.5 26.8 27.2 27.6 27.9 28.1 28.4 28.7 AEO 1994 23.6

109

Table 17. Total Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual (quadrillion Btu) 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 AEO 1982 79.1 79.6 79.9 80.8 82.1 83.3 AEO 1983 78.0 79.5 81.0 82.4 83.9 84.6 89.0 AEO 1984 78.5 79.4 81.2 83.1 85.1 86.4 93.0 AEO 1985 77.6 78.5 79.8 81.2 82.7 83.3 84.2 85.0 85.7 86.3 87.2 AEO 1986 77.0 78.8 79.8 80.7 81.5 82.9 83.8 84.6 85.3 86.0 86.6 87.4 88.3 89.4 90.2 AEO 1987 78.9 80.0 82.0 82.8 83.9 85.1 86.2 87.1 87.9 92.5 AEO 1989* 82.2 83.8 84.5 85.4 86.2 87.1 87.8 88.7 89.5 90.4 91.4 92.4 93.5 AEO 1990 84.2 85.4 91.9 97.4 102.8 AEO 1991 84.4 85.0 86.0 87.0 87.9 89.1 90.4 91.8 93.1 94.3 95.6 97.1 98.4 99.4 100.3 101.4 102.5 103.6 104.7 105.8 AEO 1992 84.7 87.0 88.0 89.2 90.5 91.4 92.4 93.4 94.5 95.6 96.9 98.0 99.0 100.0 101.2 102.2 103.2 104.3 105.2 AEO 1993 87.0 88.3 89.8 91.4 92.7 94.0 95.3 96.3 97.5 98.6

110

Table 20. Total Industrial Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Industrial Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual Industrial Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual (quadrillion Btu) 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 AEO 1982 24.0 24.1 24.4 24.9 25.5 26.1 AEO 1983 23.2 23.6 23.9 24.4 24.9 25.0 25.4 AEO 1984 24.1 24.5 25.4 25.5 27.1 27.4 28.7 AEO 1985 23.2 23.6 23.9 24.4 24.8 24.8 24.4 AEO 1986 22.2 22.8 23.1 23.4 23.4 23.6 22.8 AEO 1987 22.4 22.8 23.7 24.0 24.3 24.6 24.6 24.7 24.9 22.6 AEO 1989* 23.6 24.0 24.1 24.3 24.5 24.3 24.3 24.5 24.6 24.8 24.9 24.4 24.1 AEO 1990 25.0 25.4 27.1 27.3 28.6 AEO 1991 24.6 24.5 24.8 24.8 25.0 25.3 25.7 26.2 26.5 26.1 25.9 26.2 26.4 26.6 26.7 27.0 27.2 27.4 27.7 28.0 AEO 1992 24.6 25.3 25.4 25.6 26.1 26.3 26.5 26.5 26.0 25.6 25.8 26.0 26.1 26.2 26.4 26.7 26.9 27.2 27.3 AEO 1993 25.5 25.9 26.2 26.8 27.1 27.5 27.8 27.4 27.1 27.4 27.6 27.8 28.0 28.2 28.4 28.7 28.9 29.1 AEO 1994 25.4 25.9

111

Table 18. Total Residential Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Residential Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual Residential Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual (quadrillion Btu) 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 AEO 1982 10.1 10.1 10.1 10.1 10.2 10.2 AEO 1983 9.8 9.9 10.0 10.1 10.2 10.1 10.0 AEO 1984 9.9 9.9 10.0 10.2 10.3 10.3 10.5 AEO 1985 9.8 10.0 10.1 10.3 10.6 10.6 10.9 AEO 1986 9.6 9.8 10.0 10.3 10.4 10.8 10.9 AEO 1987 9.9 10.2 10.3 10.3 10.4 10.5 10.5 10.5 10.5 10.6 AEO 1989* 10.3 10.5 10.4 10.5 10.5 10.5 10.5 10.5 10.5 10.5 10.5 10.5 10.5 AEO 1990 10.4 10.7 10.8 11.0 11.3 AEO 1991 10.2 10.7 10.7 10.8 10.8 10.8 10.9 10.9 10.9 11.0 11.0 11.0 11.1 11.2 11.2 11.3 11.4 11.4 11.5 11.6 AEO 1992 10.6 11.1 11.1 11.1 11.1 11.1 11.2 11.2 11.3 11.3 11.4 11.5 11.5 11.6 11.7 11.8 11.8 11.9 12.0 AEO 1993 10.7 10.9 11.0 11.0 11.0 11.1 11.1 11.1 11.1 11.2 11.2 11.2 11.2 11.3 11.3 11.4 11.4 11.5 AEO 1994 10.3 10.4 10.4 10.4

112

Table 19. Total Commercial Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Commercial Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual Commercial Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual (quadrillion Btu) 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 AEO 1982 6.6 6.7 6.8 6.8 6.8 6.9 AEO 1983 6.4 6.6 6.8 6.9 7.0 7.1 7.2 AEO 1984 6.2 6.4 6.5 6.7 6.8 6.9 7.3 AEO 1985 5.9 6.1 6.2 6.3 6.4 6.5 6.7 AEO 1986 6.2 6.3 6.4 6.4 6.5 7.1 7.4 AEO 1987 6.1 6.1 6.3 6.4 6.6 6.7 6.8 6.9 6.9 7.3 AEO 1989* 6.6 6.7 6.9 7.0 7.0 7.1 7.2 7.3 7.3 7.4 7.5 7.6 7.7 AEO 1990 6.6 6.8 7.1 7.4 7.8 AEO 1991 6.7 6.9 7.0 7.1 7.1 7.2 7.3 7.4 7.5 7.6 7.7 7.8 7.9 8.0 8.1 8.2 8.3 8.4 8.6 8.7 AEO 1992 6.8 7.1 7.2 7.3 7.3 7.4 7.5 7.6 7.7 7.8 7.9 8.0 8.1 8.2 8.3 8.4 8.5 8.6 8.7 AEO 1993 7.2 7.3 7.4 7.4 7.5 7.6 7.7 7.7 7.8 7.9 7.9 8.0 8.0 8.1 8.1 8.1 8.2 8.2 AEO 1994 6.8 6.9 6.9 7.0 7.1 7.1 7.2 7.2 7.3 7.3 7.4 7.4 7.4 7.5 7.5 7.5 7.5 AEO 1995 6.94 6.9 7.0 7.0 7.0 7.1 7.1 7.1 7.1 7.1 7.2 7.2 7.2 7.2 7.3 7.3 AEO 1996 7.1 7.2 7.2 7.3 7.3 7.4 7.4 7.5 7.6 7.6 7.7 7.7 7.8 7.9 8.0

113

Table A54. Number of Establishments by Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Powe  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Number of Establishments by Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation," Number of Establishments by Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation," " by Industry Group, Selected Industries, and" " Presence of General Technologies, 1994: Part 2" ,," "," ",," "," ",," "," "," "," " ,,,,"Computer Control" ,," "," ","of Processes"," "," ",," "," ",," " ,," ","Computer Control","or Major",,,"One or More"," ","RSE" "SIC"," ",,"of Building","Energy-Using","Waste Heat"," Adjustable-Speed","General Technologies","None","Row"

114

"Table A24. Total Expenditures for Purchased Energy Sources by Census Region,"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4. Total Expenditures for Purchased Energy Sources by Census Region," 4. Total Expenditures for Purchased Energy Sources by Census Region," " Industry Group, and Selected Industries, 1991" " (Estimates in Million Dollars)" ,,,,,,,,,,,"RSE" "SIC"," "," "," ","Residual","Distillate ","Natural"," "," ","Coke"," ","Row" "Code(a)","Industry Groupsc and Industry","Total","Electricity","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(b)","Gas(c)","LPG","Coal","and Breeze","Other(d)","Factors" ,,"Total United States" ,"RSE Column Factors:","0.6 ",0.6,1.3,1.3,0.7,1.2,1.2,1.5,1.1

115

Table A50. Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity Generatio  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

A50. Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation" A50. Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation" " by Census Region, Industry Group, Selected Industries, and Type of" " Energy-Management Program, 1994" " (Estimates in Trillion Btu)" ,,,," Census Region",,,"RSE" "SIC",,,,,,,"Row" "Code(a)","Industry Group and Industry","Total","Northeast","Midwest","South","West","Factors" ,"RSE Column Factors:",0.7,1.2,1.1,0.9,1.2 "20-39","ALL INDUSTRY GROUPS" ,"Participation in One or More of the Following Types of Programs",12605,1209,3303,6386,1706,2.9

116

Table A20. Total First Use (formerly Primary Consumption) of Energy for All P  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Total First Use (formerly Primary Consumption) of Energy for All Purposes by Census" Total First Use (formerly Primary Consumption) of Energy for All Purposes by Census" " Region, Census Division, and Economic Characteristics of the Establishment, 1994" " (Estimates in Btu or Physical Units)" ,,,,,,,,"Coke",,"Shipments" " "," ","Net","Residual","Distillate","Natural Gas(e)"," ","Coal","and Breeze"," ","of Energy Sources","RSE" " ","Total(b)","Electricity(c)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(d)","(billion","LPG","(1000","(1000","Other(f)","Produced Onsite(g)","Row"

117

Table A41. Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

A41. Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity" A41. Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity" " Generation by Census Region, Industry Group, Selected Industries, and Type of" " Energy Management Program, 1991" " (Estimates in Trillion Btu)" ,,," Census Region",,,,"RSE" "SIC","Industry Groups",," -------------------------------------------",,,,"Row" "Code(a)","and Industry","Total","Northeast","Midwest","South","West","Factors" ,"RSE Column Factors:",0.7,1.3,1,0.9,1.2 "20-39","ALL INDUSTRY GROUPS" ,"Participation in One or More of the Following Types of Programs",10743,1150,2819,5309,1464,2.6,,,"/WIR{D}~"

118

AEO2011:Total Energy Supply, Disposition, and Price Summary | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Total Energy Supply, Disposition, and Price Summary Total Energy Supply, Disposition, and Price Summary Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 1, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses quadrillion Btu and the U.S. Dollar. The data is broken down into production, imports, exports, consumption and price. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO consumption disposition energy exports imports Supply Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011:Total Energy Supply, Disposition, and Price Summary- Reference Case (xls, 112.8 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage

119

Estimating Total Energy Consumption and Emissions of China's Commercial and Office Buildings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Buildings represent an increasingly important component of China's total energy consumption mix. However, accurately assessing the total volume of energy consumed in buildings is difficult owing to deficiencies in China's statistical collection system and a lack of national surveys. Official statistics suggest that buildings account for about 19% of China's total energy consumption, while others estimate the proportion at 23%, rising to 30% over the next few years. In addition to operational energy, buildings embody the energy used in the in the mining, extraction, harvesting, processing, manufacturing and transport of building materials as well as the energy used in the construction and decommissioning of buildings. This embodied energy, along with a building's operational energy, constitutes the building's life-cycle energy and emissions footprint. This report first provides a review of international studies on commercial building life-cycle energy use from which data are derived to develop an assessment of Chinese commercial building life-cycle energy use, then examines in detail two cases for the development of office building operational energy consumption to 2020. Finally, the energy and emissions implications of the two cases are presented.

Fridley, David; Fridley, David G.; Zheng, Nina; Zhou, Nan

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Ab initio total energy study of brucite, diaspore and hypothetical hydrous wadsleyite  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Ab initio total energy calculations based on the local density approximation (LDA) and the generalised gradient approximation (GGA) of density functional theory have been performed for brucite, Mg(OH)2, diaspore,...

B. Winkler; V. Milman; B. Hennion; M. C. Payne

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mo total energy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

E-Print Network 3.0 - ab-initio total energy Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

ab-initio total energy Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 INSTITUTE OF PHYSICS PUBLISHING MEASUREMENT SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY Meas. Sci. Technol. 16 (2005) 296301 doi:10.10880957-0233...

122

US WNC MO Site Consumption  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

WNC MO WNC MO Site Consumption million Btu $0 $500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 US WNC MO Expenditures dollars ALL ENERGY average per household (excl. transportation) 0 3,000 6,000 9,000 12,000 15,000 US WNC MO Site Consumption kilowatthours $0 $300 $600 $900 $1,200 $1,500 US WNC MO Expenditures dollars ELECTRICITY ONLY average per household * Missouri households consume an average of 100 million Btu per year, 12% more than the U.S. average. * Average household energy costs in Missouri are slightly less than the national average, primarily due to historically lower residential electricity prices in the state. * Missouri homes are typically larger than homes in other states and are more likely to be attached or detached single-family housing units.

123

"Table A22. Total Quantity of Purchased Energy Sources by Census Region,"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2. Total Quantity of Purchased Energy Sources by Census Region," 2. Total Quantity of Purchased Energy Sources by Census Region," " Industry Group, and Selected Industries, 1991" " (Estimates in Btu or Physical Units)" ,,,,,,"Natural",,,"Coke" " "," ","Total","Electricity","Residual","Distillate","Gas(c)"," ","Coal","and Breeze"," ","RSE" "SIC"," ","(trillion","(million","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(b)","(billion","LPG","(1000","(1000","Other(d)","Row" "Code(a)","Industry Groups and Industry","Btu)","kWh)","(1000 bbls)","(1000 bbls)","cu ft)","(1000 bbls)","short tons)","short tons)","(trillion Btu)","Factors"

124

Table A9. Total Primary Consumption of Energy for All Purposes by Census  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

A9. Total Primary Consumption of Energy for All Purposes by Census" A9. Total Primary Consumption of Energy for All Purposes by Census" " Region and Economic Characteristics of the Establishment, 1991" " (Estimates in Btu or Physical Units)" ,,,,,,,,"Coke" " "," ","Net","Residual","Distillate","Natural Gas(d)"," ","Coal","and Breeze"," ","RSE" " ","Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(c)","(billion","LPG","(1000","(1000","Other(e)","Row" "Economic Characteristics(a)","(trillion Btu)","(million kWh)","(1000 bbls)","(1000 bbls)","(cu ft)","(1000 bbls)","short tons)","short tons)","(trillion Btu)","Factors"

125

Table A56. Number of Establishments by Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Powe  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Number of Establishments by Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation," Number of Establishments by Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation," " by Industry Group, Selected Industries, and" " Presence of Industry-Specific Technologies for Selected Industries, 1994: Part 2" ,,,"RSE" "SIC",,,"Row" "Code(a)","Industry Group and Industry","Total(b)","Factors" ,"RSE Column Factors:",1 20,"FOOD and KINDRED PRODUCTS" ,"Industry-Specific Technologies" ,"One or More Industry-Specific Technologies Present",2353,9 ," Infrared Heating",607,13 ," Microwave Drying",127,21 ," Closed-Cycle Heat Pump System Used to Recover Heat",786,19

126

Table A17. Total First Use (formerly Primary Consumption) of Energy for All P  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Total First Use (formerly Primary Consumption) of Energy for All Purposes" Total First Use (formerly Primary Consumption) of Energy for All Purposes" " by Employment Size Categories, Industry Group, and Selected Industries, 1994" " (Estimates in Trillion Btu)" ,,,," "," Employment Size(b)" ,,,,,,,,,"RSE" "SIC"," "," "," "," "," "," "," ",1000,"Row" "Code(a)","Industry Group and Industry","Total","Under 50","50-99","100-249","250-499","500-999","and Over","Factors" ,"RSE Column Factors:",0.6,1.5,1.5,1,0.9,0.9,0.9 , 20,"Food and Kindred Products",1193,119,207,265,285,195,122,6

127

Table A15. Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation" Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation" " by Value of Shipment Categories, Industry Group, and Selected Industries, 1994" " (Estimates in Trillion Btu)" ,,,," Value of Shipments and Receipts(b)" ,,,," "," (million dollars)" ,,,,,,,,,"RSE" "SIC"," "," "," "," "," "," "," ",500,"Row" "Code(a)","Industry Group and Industry","Total","Under 20","20-49","50-99","100-249","250-499","and Over","Factors" ,"RSE Column Factors:",0.6,1.3,1,1,0.9,1.2,1.2

128

U.S. Department of Energy Releases Revised Total System Life Cycle Cost  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Releases Revised Total System Life Cycle Releases Revised Total System Life Cycle Cost Estimate and Fee Adequacy Report for Yucca Mountain Project U.S. Department of Energy Releases Revised Total System Life Cycle Cost Estimate and Fee Adequacy Report for Yucca Mountain Project August 5, 2008 - 2:40pm Addthis WASHINGTON, DC -The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today released a revised estimate of the total system life cycle cost for a repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. The 2007 total system life cycle cost estimate includes the cost to research, construct and operate Yucca Mountain during a period of 150 years, from the beginning of the program in 1983 through closure and decommissioning in 2133. The new cost estimate of $79.3 billion, when updated to 2007 dollars comes to $96.2 billion, a 38 percent

129

Benchmark quality total atomization energies of small polyatomic Jan M. L. Martin  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Benchmark quality total atomization energies of small polyatomic molecules Jan M. L. Martin Successive coupled-cluster CCSD T calculations in basis sets of spdf, spdfg, and spdfgh quality, combined with separate Schwartz-type extrapolations A B/(l 1/2) of the self-consistent field SCF and correlation energies

Martin, Jan M.L.

130

Table A33. Total Primary Consumption of Energy for All Purposes by Employment  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Primary Consumption of Energy for All Purposes by Employment" Primary Consumption of Energy for All Purposes by Employment" " Size Categories, Industry Group, and Selected Industries, 1991 (Continued)" " (Estimates in Trillion Btu)" ,,,,,"Employment Size" ,,,"-","-","-","-","-","-","RSE" "SIC"," "," "," "," "," "," ",,500,"Row" "Code(a)","Industry Groups and Industry","Total","Under 20","20-49","50-99","100-249","250-499","and Over","Factors"," "," "," "," "," "," "," "

131

Low-energy positron scattering from methanol and ethanol: Total cross sections  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We report total cross sections for positron scattering from two primary alcohols, methanol (CH3OH) and ethanol (C2H5OH). The energy range of the present study is 0.140eV. The ethanol measurement appears to be original while for methanol we compare our data to the only previous result from Kimura and colleagues [Adv. Chem. Phys. 111, 537 (2000)], with a significant discrepancy between them being found at the lower energies. Positronium formation threshold energies for both species, deduced from the present respective total cross section data sets, are found to be consistent with those expected on the basis of their known ionization energies. There are currently no theoretical results against which we can compare our total cross sections.

Antonio Zecca, Luca Chiari, A. Sarkar, Kate L. Nixon, and Michael J. Brunger

2008-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

132

Table A55. Number of Establishments by Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Powe  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Number of Establishments by Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation," Number of Establishments by Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation," " by Industry Group, Selected Industries, and" " Presence of Cogeneration Technologies, 1994: Part 2" ,,,"Steam Turbines",,,,"Steam Turbines" ,," ","Supplied by Either","Conventional",,,"Supplied by","One or More",," " " "," ",,"Conventional","Combustion ","Combined-Cycle","Internal Combustion","Heat Recovered from","Cogeneration",,"RSE" "SIC"," ",,"or Fluidized","Turbines with","Combustion","Engines with","High-Temperature","Technologies","None","Row"

133

A Total Quality Management (TQM) Approach for Energy Savings Through Employee Awareness and Building Upgrades to Improve Energy Efficiency  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A TOTAL QUALIn' MANAGEMENT (TQM) APPROACH FOR ENERGY SAVINGS THROUGH EMPLOYEE AWARENESS AND BUILDING UPGRADES TO IMPROVE ENERGY EFFICIENCY Daniel H. Stewart, Principal Engineer, Facilities Department, Rh6oe-Poulenc. Inc., Cranbury, NJ...) approach depends on the input from the end-users, clients, employees, power companies, various consultants and site operation management. This paper discusses the energy efficiency projects that are currently in progress at Rhone Poulenc's Corporate...

Stewart, D. H.

134

Table A32. Total Consumption of Offsite-Produced Energy for Heat, Power, and  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Consumption of Offsite-Produced Energy for Heat, Power, and" Consumption of Offsite-Produced Energy for Heat, Power, and" " Electricity Generation by Value of Shipment Categories, Industry Group, and" " Selected Industries, 1991" " (Estimates in Trillion Btu)" ,,,,"Value of Shipments and Receipts(b)" ,,,," (million dollars)" ,," ","-","-","-","-","-","-","RSE" ," "," "," ",,,,,500,"Row" "Code(a)","Industry Groups and Industry","Total","Under 20","20-49","50-99","100-249","250-499","and Over","Factors"," "," "," "," "," "

135

Total electron scattering cross sections for methanol and ethanol at intermediate energies  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Absolute total cross section (TCS) measurements of electron scattering from gaseous methanol and ethanol molecules are reported for impact energies from 60 to 500 eV, using the linear transmission method. The attenuation of intensity of a collimated electron beam through the target volume is used to determine the absolute TCS for a given impact energy, using the BeerLambert law to first approximation. Besides these experimental measurements, we have also determined TCS using the additivity rule.

D G M Silva; T Tejo; J Muse; D Romero; M A Khakoo; M C A Lopes

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Table A52. Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity Generatio  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2. Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation by Employment Size" 2. Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation by Employment Size" " Categories and Presence of General Technologies and Cogeneration Technologies, 1994" " (Estimates in Trillion Btu)" ,,,,"Employment Size(a)" ,,,,,,,,"RSE" ,,,,,,,"1000 and","Row" "General/Cogeneration Technologies","Total","Under 50","50-99","100-249","250-499","500-999","Over","Factors" "RSE Column Factors:",0.5,2,2.1,1,0.7,0.7,0.9 "One or More General Technologies Present",14601,387,781,2054,2728,3189,5462,3.1 " Computer Control of Building Environment (b)",5079,64,116,510,802,1227,2361,5

137

Table A1. Total First Use (formerly Primary Consumption) of Energy for All Pu  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2" 2" " (Estimates in Trillion Btu)" " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," ",," " " "," "," ",," "," ",," "," ",," ","Shipments","RSE" "SIC"," ",,"Net","Residual","Distillate",," ",,"Coke and"," ","of Energy Sources","Row" "Code(a)","Industry Group and Industry","Total(b)","Electricity(c)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(d)","Natural Gas(e)","LPG","Coal","Breeze","Other(f)","Produced Onsite(g)","Factors"

138

Accelerating the convergence of the total energy evaluation in density functional theory calculations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Accelerating the convergence of the total energy evaluation in density functional theory.1063/1.2821101 I. INTRODUCTION Density functional theory DFT ,1,2 one of the most widely used first functional theory OO-DFT B. Zhou and Y. A. Wang, J. Chem. Phys. 124, 081107 2006 is that the second

Wang, Yan Alexander

139

Total cross section of neutron-proton scattering at low energies in quark-gluon model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We show that analysis of nonrelativistic neutron-proton scattering in a framework of relativistic QCD based quark model can give important information about QCD vacuum structure. In this model we describe total cross section of neutron-proton scattering at kinetic energies of projectile neutron from 1 eV up to 1 MeV.

V. A. Abramovsky; N. V. Radchenko

2011-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

140

Table A1. Total First Use (formerly Primary Consumption) of Energy for All Pu  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 " 1 " " (Estimates in Btu or Physical Units)" " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," ",," " " "," "," ",," "," ",," "," ","Coke and"," ","Shipments"," " " "," ",,"Net","Residual","Distillate","Natural Gas(e)"," ","Coal","Breeze"," ","of Energy Sources","RSE" "SIC"," ","Total(b)","Electricity(c)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(d)","(billion","LPG","(1000","(1000","Other(f)","Produced Onsite(g)","Row"

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mo total energy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Measurement of the total energy of an isolated system by an internal observer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We consider the situation in which an observer internal to an isolated system wants to measure the total energy of the isolated system (this includes his own energy, that of the measuring device and clocks used, etc...). We show that he can do this in an arbitrarily short time, as measured by his own clock. This measurement is not subjected to a time-energy uncertainty relation. The properties of such measurements are discussed in detail with particular emphasis on the relation between the duration of the measurement as measured by internal clocks versus external clocks.

S. Massar; S. Popescu

2004-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

142

"Table 21. Total Energy Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions, Projected vs. Actual"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Total Energy Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions, Projected vs. Actual" Total Energy Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions, Projected vs. Actual" "Projected" " (million metric tons)" ,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,2011 "AEO 1994",5060,5129.666667,5184.666667,5239.666667,5287.333333,5335,5379,5437.666667,5481.666667,5529.333333,5599,5657.666667,5694.333333,5738.333333,5797,5874,5925.333333,5984 "AEO 1995",,5137,5173.666667,5188.333333,5261.666667,5309.333333,5360.666667,5393.666667,5441.333333,5489,5551.333333,5621,5679.666667,5727.333333,5775,5841,5888.666667,5943.666667 "AEO 1996",,,5181.817301,5223.645142,5294.776326,5354.687297,5416.802205,5463.67395,5525.288005,5588.52771,5660.226888,5734.87972,5812.398031,5879.320068,5924.814575,5981.291626,6029.640422,6086.804077,6142.120972

143

Correlation Of Surface Heat Loss And Total Energy Production For Geothermal  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Correlation Of Surface Heat Loss And Total Energy Production For Geothermal Systems Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Paper: Correlation Of Surface Heat Loss And Total Energy Production For Geothermal Systems Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Geothermal systems lose their heat by a site-specific combination of conduction (heat flow) and advection (surface discharge). The conductive loss at or near the surface (shallow heat flow) is a primary signature and indication of the strength of a geothermal system. Using a database of

144

"Table A32. Total Quantity of Purchased Energy Sources by Census Region,"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Quantity of Purchased Energy Sources by Census Region," Quantity of Purchased Energy Sources by Census Region," " Census Division, Industry Group, and Selected Industries, 1994" " (Estimates in Btu or Physical Units)" ,,,,,,"Natural",,,"Coke" " "," ","Total","Electricity","Residual","Distillate","Gas(c)"," ","Coal","and Breeze"," ","RSE" "SIC"," ","(trillion","(million","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(b)","(billion","LPG","(1000","(1000","Other(d)","Row" "Code(a)","Industry Group and Industry","Btu)","kWh)","(1000 bbl)","(1000 bbl)","cu ft)","(1000 bbl)","short tons)","short tons)","(trillion Btu)","Factors"

145

Total energy and band structure of the 3d, 4d, and 5d metals  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We performed total-energy calculations by the scalar-relativistic augmented-plane-wave method in the local-density and muffin-tin approximations for all 3d, 4d, and 5d transition metals in the fcc and bcc structures. These calculations predict the correct equilibrium structure and give good agreement with experiment and other calculations for lattice constants and bulk moduli.

M. Sigalas; D. A. Papaconstantopoulos; N. C. Bacalis

1992-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

146

Abstract--Numerous studies have shown that households' consumption is an important part of the total energy consumed  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

appropriate strategies of giving households' effective feedback on their energy consumption. This study, Energy efficiency. I. INTRODUCTION HE energy consumption of households in buildings attracts a lot in the housing sector. Energy consumption in buildings accounts for 39% of Sweden's total final energy

Beigl, Michael

147

Sorting through the many total-energy-cycle pathways possible with early plug-in hybrids.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Using the 'total energy cycle' methodology, we compare U.S. near term (to {approx}2015) alternative pathways for converting energy to light-duty vehicle kilometers of travel (VKT) in plug-in hybrids (PHEVs), hybrids (HEVs), and conventional vehicles (CVs). For PHEVs, we present total energy-per-unit-of-VKT information two ways (1) energy from the grid during charge depletion (CD); (2) energy from stored on-board fossil fuel when charge sustaining (CS). We examine 'incremental sources of supply of liquid fuel such as (a) oil sands from Canada, (b) Fischer-Tropsch diesel via natural gas imported by LNG tanker, and (c) ethanol from cellulosic biomass. We compare such fuel pathways to various possible power converters producing electricity, including (i) new coal boilers, (ii) new integrated, gasified coal combined cycle (IGCC), (iii) existing natural gas fueled combined cycle (NGCC), (iv) existing natural gas combustion turbines, (v) wood-to-electricity, and (vi) wind/solar. We simulate a fuel cell HEV and also consider the possibility of a plug-in hybrid fuel cell vehicle (FCV). For the simulated FCV our results address the merits of converting some fuels to hydrogen to power the fuel cell vs. conversion of those same fuels to electricity to charge the PHEV battery. The investigation is confined to a U.S. compact sized car (i.e. a world passenger car). Where most other studies have focused on emissions (greenhouse gases and conventional air pollutants), this study focuses on identification of the pathway providing the most vehicle kilometers from each of five feedstocks examined. The GREET 1.7 fuel cycle model and the new GREET 2.7 vehicle cycle model were used as the foundation for this study. Total energy, energy by fuel type, total greenhouse gases (GHGs), volatile organic compounds (VOC), carbon monoxide (CO), nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}), fine particulate (PM2.5) and sulfur oxides (SO{sub x}) values are presented. We also isolate the PHEV emissions contribution from varying kWh storage capability of battery packs in HEVs and PHEVs from {approx}16 to 64 km of charge depleting distance. Sensitivity analysis is conducted with respect to the effect of replacing the battery once during the vehicle's life. The paper includes one appendix that examines several recent studies of interactions of PHEVs with patterns of electric generation and one that provides definitions, acronyms, and fuel consumption estimation steps.

Gaines, L.; Burnham, A.; Rousseau, A.; Santini, D.; Energy Systems

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Table ET1. Primary Energy, Electricity, and Total Energy Price and Expenditure Estimates, Selected Years, 1970-2011, United States  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

ET1. Primary Energy, Electricity, and Total Energy Price and Expenditure Estimates, Selected Years, 1970-2011, United States ET1. Primary Energy, Electricity, and Total Energy Price and Expenditure Estimates, Selected Years, 1970-2011, United States Year Primary Energy Electric Power Sector h,j Retail Electricity Total Energy g,h,i Coal Coal Coke Natural Gas a Petroleum Nuclear Fuel Biomass Total g,h,i,j Coking Coal Steam Coal Total Exports Imports Distillate Fuel Oil Jet Fuel b LPG c Motor Gasoline d Residual Fuel Oil Other e Total Wood and Waste f,g Prices in Dollars per Million Btu 1970 0.45 0.36 0.38 1.27 0.93 0.59 1.16 0.73 1.43 2.85 0.42 1.38 1.71 0.18 1.29 1.08 0.32 4.98 1.65 1975 1.65 0.90 1.03 2.37 3.47 1.18 2.60 2.05 2.96 4.65 1.93 2.94 3.35 0.24 1.50 2.19 0.97 8.61 3.33 1980 2.10 1.38 1.46 2.54 3.19 2.86 6.70 6.36 5.64 9.84 3.88 7.04 7.40 0.43 2.26 4.57 1.77 13.95 6.89 1985 2.03 1.67 1.69 2.76 2.99 4.61 7.22 5.91 6.63 9.01 4.30 R 7.62 R 7.64 0.71 2.47 4.93 1.91 19.05

149

Total Neutron Cross Section of Xe135 as a Function of Energy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The total neutron cross section of Xe135 as a function of energy has been remeasured at Oak Ridge National Laboratory under more favorable conditions than obtained in earlier measurements. A sample thickness of 2.51018 atoms of Xe135 gas per cm2 was procured from the gases generated in a homogeneous reactor. A mechanical time-of-flight chopper was used to select neutrons in the energy range from 0.01 ev to several thousand ev. The number of Xe135 atoms in the sample was determined by means of mass spectrometer measurements on the long-lived daughter, Cs135. The data of the low-energy resonance were fitted to the single-level Breit-Wigner formula, taking into account Doppler corrections, equally well with the following two sets of parameters: statistical weight factor g=38; resonance energy ?0=0.084720.00027 ev; neutron width at energy ?0, ?n0=0.034770.00021 ev; capture width, ??=0.0833030.00062 ev; for g=58, ?0=0.084150.00028 ev; ?n0=0.020570.00012 ev; ?a=0.094930.00071 ev. The errors quoted are the standard deviations derived from the statistics of the measurements. Systematic errors are discussed in the body of the paper. No evidence for resonances at energies greater than 0.085 ev was observed. The results described are interpreted in terms of recent considerations on the statistics of the properties of nuclear energy levels.

E. C. Smith, G. S. Pawlicki, P. E. F. Thurlow, G. W. Parker, W. J. Martin, G. E. Creek, P. M. Lantz, and S. Bernstein

1959-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

150

"Table 20. Total Delivered Transportation Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Total Delivered Transportation Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual" Total Delivered Transportation Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual" "Projected" " (quadrillion Btu)" ,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,2011 "AEO 1994",23.62,24.08,24.45,24.72,25.06,25.38,25.74,26.16,26.49,26.85,27.23,27.55,27.91,28.26,28.61,28.92,29.18,29.5 "AEO 1995",,23.26,24.01,24.18,24.69,25.11,25.5,25.86,26.15,26.5,26.88,27.28,27.66,27.99,28.25,28.51,28.72,28.94 "AEO 1996",,,23.89674759,24.08507919,24.47502899,24.84881783,25.25887871,25.65527534,26.040205,26.38586426,26.72540092,27.0748024,27.47158241,27.80837631,28.11616135,28.3992157,28.62907982,28.85912895,29.09081459 "AEO 1997",,,,24.68686867,25.34906006,25.87225533,26.437994,27.03513145,27.52499771,27.96490097,28.45482063,28.92999458,29.38239861,29.84147453,30.26097488,30.59760475,30.85550499,31.10873222,31.31938744

151

"Table 19. Total Delivered Industrial Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Total Delivered Industrial Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual" Total Delivered Industrial Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual" "Projected" " (quadrillion Btu)" ,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,2011 "AEO 1994",25.43,25.904,26.303,26.659,26.974,27.062,26.755,26.598,26.908,27.228,27.668,28.068,28.348,28.668,29.068,29.398,29.688,30.008 "AEO 1995",,26.164,26.293,26.499,27.044,27.252,26.855,26.578,26.798,27.098,27.458,27.878,28.158,28.448,28.728,29.038,29.298,29.608 "AEO 1996",,,26.54702756,26.62236823,27.31312376,27.47668697,26.90313339,26.47577946,26.67685979,26.928811,27.23795407,27.58448499,27.91057103,28.15050595,28.30145734,28.518,28.73702901,28.93001263,29.15872662 "AEO 1997",,,,26.21291769,26.45981795,26.88483478,26.67847443,26.55107968,26.78246968,27.07367604,27.44749539,27.75711339,28.02446072,28.39156621,28.69999783,28.87316602,29.01207631,29.19475644,29.37683575

152

"Table 18. Total Delivered Commercial Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Total Delivered Commercial Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual" Total Delivered Commercial Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual" "Projected" " (quadrillion Btu)" ,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,2011 "AEO 1994",6.82,6.87,6.94,7,7.06,7.13,7.16,7.22,7.27,7.32,7.36,7.38,7.41,7.45,7.47,7.5,7.51,7.55 "AEO 1995",,6.94,6.9,6.95,6.99,7.02,7.05,7.08,7.09,7.11,7.13,7.15,7.17,7.19,7.22,7.26,7.3,7.34 "AEO 1996",,,7.059859276,7.17492485,7.228339195,7.28186655,7.336973667,7.387932777,7.442782879,7.501244545,7.561584473,7.623688221,7.684037209,7.749266148,7.815915108,7.884147644,7.950204372,8.016282082,8.085801125 "AEO 1997",,,,7.401538849,7.353548527,7.420701504,7.48336792,7.540113449,7.603093624,7.663851738,7.723834991,7.783358574,7.838726044,7.89124918,7.947964668,8.008976936,8.067288399,8.130317688,8.197405815

153

Nuclear Physics A 772 (2006) 113137 Total prompt energy release in the neutron-induced  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This study addresses, for the first time, the total prompt energy release and its components for the fission of 235U, 238U, and 239Pu as a function of the kinetic energy of the neutron inducing the fission. The components are extracted from experimental measurements, where they exist, together with model-dependent calculation, interpolation, and extrapolation. While the components display clear dependencies upon the incident neutron energy, their sums display only weak, yet definite, energy dependencies. Also addressed is the total prompt energy deposition in fission for the same three systems. Results are presented in equation form. New measurements are recommended as a consequence of this study.

D. G. Madland

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Reduced Total Energy Requirements For The Original Alcubierre and Natario Warp Drive Spacetimes-The Role Of Warp Factors.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Reduced Total Energy Requirements For The Original Alcubierre and Natario Warp Drive Spacetimes Alcubierre and Natario themselves the Warp Drive violates all the known energy conditions because the stress energy momentum tensor(the right side of the Einstein Field Equations) for the Einstein tensor G00

Boyer, Edmond

155

Estimating Total Energy Consumption and Emissions of China's Commercial and Office Buildings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

material intensity, energy intensity of materials, buildingtypes manufacturing energy intensity (how much energy itthe manufacturing energy intensity of each type of building

Fridley, David G.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Development of CaMoO4 crystal scintillators for double beta decay experiment with 100-Mo  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Energy resolution, alpha/beta ratio, pulse-shape discrimination for gamma rays and alpha particles, temperature dependence of scintillation properties, and radioactive contamination were studied with CaMoO4 crystal scintillators. A high sensitivity experiment to search for neutrinoless double beta decay of 100-Mo by using CaMoO4 scintillators is discussed.

A. N. Annenkov; O. A. Buzanov; F. A. Danevich; A. Sh. Georgadze; S. K. Kim; H. J. Kim; Y. D. Kim; V. V. Kobychev; V. N. Kornoukhov; M. Korzhik; J. I. Lee; O. Missevitch; V. M. Mokina; S. S. Nagorny; A. S. Nikolaiko; D. V. Poda; R. B. Podviyanuk; D. J. Sedlak; O. G. Shkulkova; J. H. So; I. M. Solsky; V. I. Tretyak; S. S. Yurchenko

2007-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

157

TOTAL Full-TOTAL Full-  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Conducting - Orchestral 6 . . 6 5 1 . 6 5 . . 5 Conducting - Wind Ensemble 3 . . 3 2 . . 2 . 1 . 1 Early- X TOTAL Full- Part- X TOTAL Alternative Energy 6 . . 6 11 . . 11 13 2 . 15 Biomedical Engineering 52 English 71 . 4 75 70 . 4 74 72 . 3 75 Geosciences 9 . 1 10 15 . . 15 19 . . 19 History 37 1 2 40 28 3 3 34

Portman, Douglas

158

First bolometric measurement of the two neutrino double beta decay of $^{100}$Mo with a ZnMoO$_4$ crystals array  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The large statistics collected during the operation of a ZnMoO$_4$ array, for a total exposure of 1.3 kg $\\cdot$ day of $^{100}$Mo, allowed the first bolometric observation of the two neutrino double beta decay of $^{100}$Mo. The observed spectrum of each crystal was reconstructed taking into account the different background contributions due to environmental radioactivity and internal contamination. The analysis of coincidences between the crystals allowed the assignment of constraints to the intensity of the different background sources, resulting in a reconstruction of the measured spectrum down to an energy of $\\sim$300 keV. The half-life extracted from the data is T$_{1/2}^{2\

L. Cardani; L. Gironi; N. Ferreiro Iachellini; L. Pattavina; J. W. Beeman; F. Bellini; N. Casali; O. Cremonesi; I. Dafinei; S. Di Domizio; F. Ferroni; E. Galashov; C. Gotti; S. Nagorny; F. Orio; G. Pessina; G. Piperno; S. Pirro; E. Previtali; C. Rusconi; C. Tomei; M. Vignati

2014-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

159

Parametric analysis of total costs and energy efficiency of 2G enzymatic ethanol production  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This paper presents an analysis of total costs (TPC) and energy efficiency of enzymatic ethanol production. The analysis is parametrized with respect to plant capacity and polysaccharides content (pc) of lignocellulosic feedstock. The feedstock is based on wheat straw whose price is proportional to its pc ranging from new straw with high pc and high cost to agro-wastes with limited pc but lower cost. The plant flowsheet was built using a conventional biochemical platform with co-saccharification and fermentation (SHF) technologies. A parametric analysis of TPC as a function of plant capacity (1002100ton DB/day) and pc (i.e. feedstock price) (80% (75 USD/ton DB)35% (6 USD/ton DB)) was performed with Net Present Value (NPV) techniques. Current data from Mexican economics and the agro-industrial sector were used as an illustrative case. A quasi-linear section of the TCP surface was identified delimited by (3001100ton DB/day) and (8055% pc) with increments no larger than 21% of the minimum TPC obtained (0.99 USD/l etOH for 2100ton DB/day and 80% pc). Major cost contributions are detailed and quantified for boundary cases of this surface. Energy consumption and production were also calculated for all the plant capacity and feedstock pc cases, taking into consideration the Maximum Energy Recovery (MER) obtained from a Pinch analysis. The end-use energy index eer was less than 0.82 for all cases, thus stressing the need to use process equipment with lower energy requirements. TPC are compared against previously published results for SHF technology between 500 and 2100ton DB/day plant capacities. These values were updated and normalized with respect to feedstock and enzyme costs employed in this work. Differences among TPC and recently published normalized results are within a 5% range, thus confirming the dependence of TPC from feedstock and enzyme prices, regardless of flowsheet technology and economic conditions.

A. Sanchez; V. Sevilla-Gitrn; G. Magaa; L. Gutierrez

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Total energy loss to fast ablator-ions and target capacitance of direct-drive implosions on OMEGA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Energetics, Rochester, New York 14623, USA 3 Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545Total energy loss to fast ablator-ions and target capacitance of direct-drive implosions on OMEGA N 19, 093101 (2012) Target normal sheath acceleration sheath fields for arbitrary electron energy

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mo total energy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Beryllium and Graphite High-Accuracy Total Cross-Section Measurements in the Energy Range from 24 to 900 keV  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Beryllium and Graphite High-Accuracy Total Cross-Section Measurements in the Energy Range from 24 new measurements of the carbon and beryllium neutron total cross section in the energy range of 24 the measurement of the energy-dependent total cross section st ~Ei ! by applying Eq. ~1! for every TOF channel i

Danon, Yaron

162

"Table B29. Primary Space-Heating Energy Sources, Total Floorspace for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

9. Primary Space-Heating Energy Sources, Total Floorspace for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003" 9. Primary Space-Heating Energy Sources, Total Floorspace for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003" ,"Total Floorspace (million square feet)" ,"All Buildings*","Buildings with Space Heating","Primary Space-Heating Energy Source Used a" ,,,"Electricity","Natural Gas","Fuel Oil","District Heat" "All Buildings* ...............",64783,60028,15996,32970,3818,4907 "Building Floorspace" "(Square Feet)" "1,001 to 5,000 ...............",6789,5668,1779,2672,484,"Q" "5,001 to 10,000 ..............",6585,5786,1686,3068,428,"Q" "10,001 to 25,000 .............",11535,10387,3366,5807,536,"Q" "25,001 to 50,000 .............",8668,8060,2264,4974,300,325

163

FY 2007 Total System Life Cycle Cost, Pub 2008 | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

FY 2007 Total System Life Cycle Cost, Pub 2008 FY 2007 Total System Life Cycle Cost, Pub 2008 FY 2007 Total System Life Cycle Cost, Pub 2008 The Analysis of the Total System Life Cycle Cost (TSLCC) of the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Program presents the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management's (OCRWM) May 2007 total system cost estimate for the disposal of the Nation's spent nuclear fuel (SNF) and high-level radioactive waste (HLW). The TSLCC analysis provides a basis for assessing the adequacy of the Nuclear Waste Fund (NWF) Fee as required by Section 302 of the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 (NWPA), as amended. In addition, the TSLCC analysis provides a basis for the calculation of the Government's share of disposal costs for government-owned and managed SNF and HLW. The TSLCC estimate includes both historical costs and

164

Free-energy profiles along reduction pathways of MoS2 M-edge and S-edge by dihydrogen: a first-principles study  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present the results of DFT calculations of free energy profiles along the reaction pathways starting from 50% coverage of MoS2 M-edge and 100% coverage of S-edge by sulfur, and leading to 37% coverage, i.e. creation of anionic vacancies, upon reduction by dihydrogen and production of H2S. Significant entropic and enthalpic corrections to electronic energies are deduced from the sets of normal modes vibration frequencies computed for all stationary and transition states. On that basis, we revisit and discuss the surface phase diagrams for M- and S- edges as a function of temperature, H2 partial pressure and H2S/H2 molar ratio, with respect to ranges of conditions relevant to industrial hydrotreating operations. We show that in such conditions, anionic vacancies on the M-edge, and surface SH groups on the M- and S- edges, may coexist at equilibrium. Moderate activation barriers connect stationary states along all paths explored.

Prodhomme, Pierre-Yves; Toulhoat, Herv; 10.1016/j.jcat.2011.03.017

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Total fission cross section of {sup 181}Ta and {sup 208}Pb induced by protons at relativistic energies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Total fission cross section induced by protons in {sup 181}Ta and {sup 208}Pb at energies in the range of 300 to 1000 A MeV have been measured at GSI (Germany) using the inverse kinematics technique. A dedicated setup with high efficiency made it possible to determine these cross sections with high accuracy. The new data seed light in the controversial results obtained so far and contribute to the understanding of the fission process at high excitation energies. (authors)

Ayyad, Y.; Benlliure, J.; Casarejos, E. [Group GENP, Dpto. Fisica de Particulas, Universidade de Santiago de Compostela, 15782 Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Schmidt, K. H. [GSI, Planckstrasse 1, 64941, Darmstadt (Germany); Jurado, B. [Universite Bordeaux I, CNRS/IN2 P3, CENBG, BP 120, F-33175 Gradignan (France); Kelic-Heil, A. [GSI, Planckstrasse 1, 64941, Darmstadt (Germany); Pol, H. A. [Group GENP, Dpto. Fisica de Particulas, Universidade de Santiago de Compostela, 15782 Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Ricciardi, M. V.; Pleskac, R. [GSI, Planckstrasse 1, 64941, Darmstadt (Germany); Enqvist, T. [CUPP Project, P.O. Box 22, FI-86801, Pyhsalmi (Finland); Rejmund, F. [Grand Accelerateur National D Ions Lourds, BP 55027, F-14076 Caen Cedex 05 (France); Giot, L. [Subatech - Ecole des Mines de Nantes (France); Henzl, V. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology, 77, Massachusetts Ave, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Lukic, S. [Karlsruhe Inst. of Technology, D-76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); Ngoc, S. N. [Dept. of Nuclear Physics, Inst. of Physics, National Centre for Natural Science and Technology, NgiaDo-TuLiem, Hanoi (Viet Nam); Boudard, A. [DSM/IRFU/CEA, 91191 Gif-sur-Ivette (France); Universite Louis Pasteur, Strasbourg (France); Leray, S. [DSM/IRFU/CEA, 91191 Gif-sur-Ivette (France); Fernandez, M. [Entro de Investigaciones Energticas Medioambientales Y Tecnolgicas, Madrid (Spain); Kurtukian, T. [Universite Bordeaux I, CNRS/IN2 P3, CENBG, BP 120, F-33175 Gradignan (France); Nadtochy, P. [Omsk State Univ., Dept. of Theoretical Physics, RU-644077 Omsk (Russian Federation); Schmitt, C. [Grand Accelerateur National D'Ions Lourds, BP 55027, F-14076 Caen Cedex 05 (France); Henzlova, D. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Safeguards Science and Technology Group N-1, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Paradela, C. [Group GENP, Dpto. Fisica de Particulas, Universidade de Santiago de Compostela, 15782 Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Bacquias, A. [DSM/IRFU/CEA, 91191 Gif-sur-Ivette (France); Universite Louis Pasteur, Strasbourg (France); Loureiro, D. P. [Group GENP, Dpto. Fisica de Particulas, Universidade de Santiago de Compostela, 15782 Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Foehr, V. [GSI, Planckstrasse 1, 64941, Darmstadt (Germany); Tarrio, D. [Group GENP, Dpto. Fisica de Particulas, Universidade de Santiago de Compostela, 15782 Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Kezzar, K. [DSM/IRFU/CEA, 91191 Gif-sur-Ivette (France)

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Table A37. Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2" 2" " (Estimates in Trillion Btu)" ,,,,,,,"Coal" ,,,,"Distillate",,,"(excluding" ,,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"Coal Coke",,"RSE" ,,"Net","Residual","and Diesel",,,"and",,"Row" "End-Use Categories","Total","Electricity(a)","Fuel Oil","Fuel(b)","Natural Gas(c)","LPG","Breeze)","Other(d)","Factors" "Total United States" "RSE Column Factors:","NF",0.4,1.6,1.5,0.7,1,1.6,"NF" "TOTAL INPUTS",15027,2370,414,139,5506,105,1184,5309,3 "Boiler Fuel","--","W",296,40,2098,18,859,"--",3.6

167

Table A11. Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity Generatio  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2" 2" " (Estimates in Trillion Btu)" ,,,,,,,"Coal" ,,,,"Distillate",,,"(excluding" ,,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"Coal Coke",,"RSE" ,,"Net","Residual","and Diesel",,,"and",,"Row" "End-Use Categories","Total","Electricity(a)","Fuel Oil","Fuel(b)","Natural Gas(c)","LPG","Breeze)","Other(d)","Factors" ,"Total United States" "RSE Column Factors:"," NF",0.5,1.3,1.4,0.8,1.2,1.2," NF" "TOTAL INPUTS",16515,2656,441,152,6141,99,1198,5828,2.7 "Indirect Uses-Boiler Fuel"," --",28,313,42,2396,15,875," --",4

168

Effect of window type, size and orientation on the total energy demand for a building in Indian climatic conditions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Windows in a building allow daylight to enter a building space but simultaneously they also result in heat gains and losses affecting energy balance. This requires an optimisation of window area from the point of view of total energy demand viz., for lighting and cooling/heating. This paper is devoted to this kind of study for Indian climatic conditions, which are characterised by six climatic zones varying from extreme cold to hot, dry and humid conditions. Different types of windows have been considered because the optimised size will also depend on the thermo-optical parameters like heat transfer coefficient (U-value), solar heat gain coefficient (g), visual (?), and total transmittance (T) of the glazing in the window. It is observed that in a non-insulated building, cooling/heating energy demand far exceeds lighting energy demand, making the optimisation of window area a futile exercise from the point of view of total energy demand. Only for buildings with U-value below 0.6 W/m²K can optimisation be achieved. The optimised window area and the corresponding specific energy consumption have been calculated for different climates in India, for different orientations, and for three different advanced window systems.

Inderjeet Singh; N.K. Bansal

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Property:Building/SPPurchasedEngyPerAreaKwhM2ElctrtyTotal | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

ElctrtyTotal ElctrtyTotal Jump to: navigation, search This is a property of type String. Electricity, total Pages using the property "Building/SPPurchasedEngyPerAreaKwhM2ElctrtyTotal" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) S Sweden Building 05K0001 + 71.2214478303 + Sweden Building 05K0002 + 95.9357541899 + Sweden Building 05K0003 + 72.2496632241 + Sweden Building 05K0004 + 65.8830409357 + Sweden Building 05K0005 + 54.2477876106 + Sweden Building 05K0006 + 58.7608028994 + Sweden Building 05K0007 + 61.5607534672 + Sweden Building 05K0008 + 40.3846153846 + Sweden Building 05K0009 + 56.4810818587 + Sweden Building 05K0010 + 152.219679634 + Sweden Building 05K0011 + 25.5555555556 + Sweden Building 05K0012 + 35.8807888323 + Sweden Building 05K0013 + 61.3267863536 +

170

Total Facility Control - Applying New Intelligent Technologies to Energy Efficient Green Buildings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

lighting, co-generation stations, and much more. This paper will discuss some of the basic concepts, architectures, and technologies that are being used today to implement a Total Facility Control model....

Bernstein, R.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Table A36. Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

"Net","Residual","and Diesel",,,"and",,"Row" "Code(a)","End-Use Categories","Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Fuel(c)","Natural Gas(d)","LPG","Breeze)","Other(e)","Factors" ,...

172

Table A10. Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,,,"Net","Residual","and Diesel",,,"Coal Coke",,"RSE" "SIC",,"Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Fuel(c)","Natural Gas(d)","LPG","and Breeze)","Other(e)","Row"...

173

Table A11. Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity Generatio  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1" 1" " (Estimates in Btu or Physical Units)" ,,,,"Distillate",,,"Coal" ,,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"(excluding" ,,"Net","Residual","and Diesel",,,"Coal Coke",,"RSE" ,"Total","Electricity(a)","Fuel Oil","Fuel(b)","Natural Gas(c)","LPG","and Breeze)","Other(d)","Row" "End-Use Categories","(trillion Btu)","(million kWh)","(1000 bbls)","(1000 bbls)","(billion cu ft)","(1000 bbls)","(1000 short tons)","(trillion Btu)","Factors" ,,,,,,,,,,, ,"Total United States"

174

Property:Building/SPPurchasedEngyNrmlYrMwhYrElctrtyTotal | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Property Property Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Property:Building/SPPurchasedEngyNrmlYrMwhYrElctrtyTotal Jump to: navigation, search This is a property of type String. Electricity, total Pages using the property "Building/SPPurchasedEngyNrmlYrMwhYrElctrtyTotal" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) S Sweden Building 05K0001 + 1400.0 + Sweden Building 05K0002 + 686.9 + Sweden Building 05K0003 + 321.8 + Sweden Building 05K0004 + 1689.9 + Sweden Building 05K0005 + 122.6 + Sweden Building 05K0006 + 843.1 + Sweden Building 05K0007 + 1487.0 + Sweden Building 05K0008 + 315.0 + Sweden Building 05K0009 + 1963.0 + Sweden Building 05K0010 + 66.52 + Sweden Building 05K0011 + 391.0 + Sweden Building 05K0012 + 809.65 +

175

Table A1. Total Primary Consumption of Energy for All Purposes by Census  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 " 1 " " (Estimates in Btu or Physical Units)" " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," " " "," "," ",," "," ",," "," ","Coke and"," "," " " "," ",,"Net","Residual","Distillate","Natural Gas(d)"," ","Coal","Breeze"," ","RSE" "SIC"," ","Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(c)","(billion","LPG","(1000","(1000","Other(e)","Row"

176

Table A4. Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2" 2" " (Estimates in Trillion Btu)" " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," " " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," ","RSE" "SIC"," "," ","Net","Residual","Distillate"," "," "," ","Coke"," ","Row" "Code(a)","Industry Groups and Industry","Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(c)","Natural Gas(d)","LPG","Coal","and Breeze","Other(e)","Factors"

177

Property:Building/SPPurchasedEngyNrmlYrMwhYrTotal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

SPPurchasedEngyNrmlYrMwhYrTotal SPPurchasedEngyNrmlYrMwhYrTotal Jump to: navigation, search This is a property of type String. Total Pages using the property "Building/SPPurchasedEngyNrmlYrMwhYrTotal" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) S Sweden Building 05K0001 + 4355.0 + Sweden Building 05K0002 + 1530.1 + Sweden Building 05K0003 + 872.1 + Sweden Building 05K0004 + 4466.9 + Sweden Building 05K0005 + 768.6 + Sweden Building 05K0006 + 3031.1 + Sweden Building 05K0007 + 3479.0 + Sweden Building 05K0008 + 1336.0 + Sweden Building 05K0009 + 4876.0 + Sweden Building 05K0010 + 131.52 + Sweden Building 05K0011 + 1501.0 + Sweden Building 05K0012 + 2405.65 + Sweden Building 05K0013 + 3436.6002445 + Sweden Building 05K0014 + 389.66 + Sweden Building 05K0015 + 270.0 +

178

Property:Building/SPPurchasedEngyForPeriodMwhYrTotal | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

SPPurchasedEngyForPeriodMwhYrTotal SPPurchasedEngyForPeriodMwhYrTotal Jump to: navigation, search This is a property of type String. Total Pages using the property "Building/SPPurchasedEngyForPeriodMwhYrTotal" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) S Sweden Building 05K0001 + 4228.0 + Sweden Building 05K0002 + 1501.1 + Sweden Building 05K0003 + 847.1 + Sweden Building 05K0004 + 4360.9 + Sweden Building 05K0005 + 727.6 + Sweden Building 05K0006 + 2915.1 + Sweden Building 05K0007 + 3385.0 + Sweden Building 05K0008 + 1282.0 + Sweden Building 05K0009 + 4739.0 + Sweden Building 05K0010 + 127.52 + Sweden Building 05K0011 + 1436.0 + Sweden Building 05K0012 + 2334.65 + Sweden Building 05K0013 + 3323.0 + Sweden Building 05K0014 + 381.66 + Sweden Building 05K0015 + 257.0 +

179

Property:Building/SPPurchasedEngyForPeriodMwhYrElctrtyTotal | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

SPPurchasedEngyForPeriodMwhYrElctrtyTotal SPPurchasedEngyForPeriodMwhYrElctrtyTotal Jump to: navigation, search This is a property of type String. Electricity, total Pages using the property "Building/SPPurchasedEngyForPeriodMwhYrElctrtyTotal" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) S Sweden Building 05K0001 + 1399.0 + Sweden Building 05K0002 + 686.9 + Sweden Building 05K0003 + 321.8 + Sweden Building 05K0004 + 1689.9 + Sweden Building 05K0005 + 122.6 + Sweden Building 05K0006 + 843.1 + Sweden Building 05K0007 + 1487.0 + Sweden Building 05K0008 + 315.0 + Sweden Building 05K0009 + 1963.0 + Sweden Building 05K0010 + 66.52 + Sweden Building 05K0011 + 391.0 + Sweden Building 05K0012 + 809.65 + Sweden Building 05K0013 + 1199.0 + Sweden Building 05K0014 + 227.66 +

180

Bounds on the Solar Antineutrino total Flux and Energy spectrum from the SK experiment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A search for inverse beta decay electron antineutrinos has been carried out using the 825 days sample of solar data obtained at SK. The absence of a significant signal, that is, contributions to the total SK background and their angular variations has set upper bounds on a) the absolute flux of solar antineutrinos originated from ${}^8 B$ neutrinos $\\Phi_{\\bar{\

E. Torrente-Lujan

1999-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mo total energy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Table A1. Total Primary Consumption of Energy for All Purposes by Census  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2" 2" " (Estimates in Trillion Btu)" " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," " " "," ",," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," ","RSE" "SIC"," ",,"Net","Residual","Distillate "," "," "," ","Coke"," ","Row" "Code(a)","Industry Groups and Industry"," Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(c)","Natural Gas(d)","LPG","Coal","and Breeze","Other(e)","Factors"

182

Total and Peak Energy Consumption Minimization of Building HVAC Systems Using Model Predictive Control  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

inputs. The idea of modeling building thermal behavior usingThe detail of building thermal modeling is pre- sented in [Modeling and optimal control algorithm design for hvac systems in energy efficient buildings,

Maasoumy, Mehdi; Sangiovanni-Vincentelli, Alberto

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Estimating Total Energy Consumption and Emissions of China's Commercial and Office Buildings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

rate of technology penetration and rate of intensity change,energy. In addition, the penetration rate of each end-use isinstalled base (i.e. penetration rate) for each end-use set

Fridley, David G.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Asymptotic High Energy Total Cross Sections and Theories with Extra Dimensions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The rate at which cross sections grow with energy is sensitive to the presence of extra dimensions in a rather model-independent fashion. We examine how rates would be expected to grow if there are more spatial dimensions than 3 which appear at some energy scale, making connections with black hole physics and string theory. We also review what is known about the corresponding generalization of the Froissart-Martin bound and the experimental status of high energy hadronic cross sections which appear to saturate it up to the experimentally accessible limit of 100 TeV. We discuss how extra dimensions can be searched for in high energy cross section data and find no room for large extra dimensions in present data. Any apparent signatures of extra dimensions at the LHC may have to be interpreted as due to some other form of new physics.

J. Swain; A. Widom; Y. Srivastava

2014-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

185

Estimating Total Energy Consumption and Emissions of China's Commercial and Office Buildings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of energy consumed from coal, coke, liquid fuels, naturalwas expressed in terms of coal equivalency. 2.1.8.1 Tnational fuel inputs of coal, natural gas and petroleum were

Fridley, David G.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Property:Building/SPBreakdownOfElctrcityUseKwhM2Total | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

SPBreakdownOfElctrcityUseKwhM2Total" SPBreakdownOfElctrcityUseKwhM2Total" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) S Sweden Building 05K0001 + 71.4577086539 + Sweden Building 05K0002 + 110.926946534 + Sweden Building 05K0003 + 72.9096074806 + Sweden Building 05K0004 + 66.0248923654 + Sweden Building 05K0005 + 54.8654809632 + Sweden Building 05K0006 + 65.291976787 + Sweden Building 05K0007 + 65.5403331042 + Sweden Building 05K0008 + 41.6418235453 + Sweden Building 05K0009 + 56.5413268466 + Sweden Building 05K0010 + 150.269021739 + Sweden Building 05K0011 + 27.5018481341 + Sweden Building 05K0012 + 37.9937990385 + Sweden Building 05K0013 + 68.8990371973 + Sweden Building 05K0014 + 166.794253904 + Sweden Building 05K0015 + 71.0813662687 + Sweden Building 05K0016 + 38.5267410327 +

187

Property:Building/SPPurchasedEngyPerAreaKwhM2Total | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

SPPurchasedEngyPerAreaKwhM2Total" SPPurchasedEngyPerAreaKwhM2Total" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) S Sweden Building 05K0001 + 221.549575215 + Sweden Building 05K0002 + 213.701117318 + Sweden Building 05K0003 + 195.801526718 + Sweden Building 05K0004 + 174.148148148 + Sweden Building 05K0005 + 340.088495575 + Sweden Building 05K0006 + 211.255924171 + Sweden Building 05K0007 + 144.028151521 + Sweden Building 05K0008 + 171.282051282 + Sweden Building 05K0009 + 140.296360236 + Sweden Building 05K0010 + 300.961098398 + Sweden Building 05K0011 + 98.1045751634 + Sweden Building 05K0012 + 106.609793929 + Sweden Building 05K0013 + 175.776187637 + Sweden Building 05K0014 + 291.160427408 + Sweden Building 05K0015 + 174.193548387 + Sweden Building 05K0016 + 145.793794187 +

188

Table A4. Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 " 1 " " (Estimates in Btu or Physical Units)" " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," ","Coke"," "," " " "," "," ","Net","Residual","Distillate","Natural Gas(d)"," ","Coal","and Breeze"," ","RSE" "SIC"," ","Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(c)","(billion","LPG","(1000","(1000","Other(e)","Row" "Code(a)","Industry Groups and Industry","(trillion Btu)","(million kWh)","(1000 bbls)","(1000 bbls)","cu ft)","(1000 bbls)","short tons)","short tons)","(trillion Btu)","Factors"

189

Table A37. Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1",,,,,,,"Coal" 1",,,,,,,"Coal" " (Estimates in Btu or Physical Units)",,,,,,,"(excluding" ,,,,"Distillate",,,"Coal Coke" ,,"Net",,"Fuel Oil",,,"and" ,,"Electricity(a)","Residual","and Diesel","Natural Gas",,"Breeze)",,"RSE" ,"Total","(million","Fuel Oil","Fuel","(billion","LPG","(1000 short","Other","Row" "End-Use Categories","(trillion Btu)","kWh)","(1000 bbls)","(1000 bbls)","cu ft)","(1000 bbls)","tons)","(trillion Btu)","Factors"

190

Table A36. Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,,,,,,,,"Coal" ,,,,,,,,"Coal" " Part 1",,,,,,,,"(excluding" " (Estimates in Btu or Physical Units)",,,,,"Distillate",,,"Coal Coke" ,,,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"and" ,,,"Net","Residual","and Diesel","Natural Gas",,"Breeze)",,"RSE" "SIC",,"Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Fuel","(billion","LPG","(1000 Short","Other","Row" "Code(a)","End-Use Categories","(trillion Btu)","(million kWh)","(1000 bbls)","(1000 bbls)","cu ft)","(1000 bbls)","tons)","(trillion Btu)","Factors",

191

Total energy study of the microscopic structure and electronic properties of tetragonal perovskite SrTiO{sub 3}  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To study the structural and electronic properties of cubic perovskite SrTiO{sub 3} and its stress-induced tetragonal phase, we have performed total energy calculations and studied the effect of oxygen vacancies on the electronic properties of tetragonal perovskite SrTiO{sub 3}. The method used was the relativistic full-potential linearized augmented plane wave (FLAPW) method. To obtain the geometry that minimizes the total energy, we relaxed the internal atomic sites of the tetragonal cell. As a result of this procedure, we have found that the titanium atoms move toward the plane of the vacancy by 0.03 , and the apical oxygen atoms move to the same plane by approximately 0.14 . These results are discussed in comparison with experimental data.

Rubio-Ponce, A. [Departamento de Ciencias Bsicas, Universidad Autnoma Metropolitana-Azcapotzalco, Av. San Pablo 180, 02200 Mxico, D.F. (Mexico); Olgun, D. [Departamento de Fsica, Centro de Investigacin y de Estudios Avanzados del Instituto Politcnico Nacional, A.P. 14740, Mxico, D.F. (Mexico)

2014-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

192

High energy Gamma-Ray Bursts as a result of the collapse and total annihilation of neutralino clumps  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Rare astrophysical events - cosmological gamma-ray bursts with energies over GeV - are considered as an origin of information about some SUSY parameters. The model of generation of the powerful gamma-ray bursts is proposed. According to this model the gamma-ray burst represents as a result of the collapse and the total annihilation of the neutralino clump. About 80 % of the clump mass radiates during about 100 second at the final stage of annihilation. The annihilation spectrum and its characteristic energies are calculated in the framework of Split Higgsino model.

R. S. Pasechnik; V. A. Beylin; V. I. Kuksa; G. M. Vereshkov

2006-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

193

"Table A33. Total Quantity of Purchased Energy Sources by Census Region, Census Division,"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Quantity of Purchased Energy Sources by Census Region, Census Division," Quantity of Purchased Energy Sources by Census Region, Census Division," " and Economic Characteristics of the Establishment, 1994" " (Estimates in Btu or Physical Units)" ,,,,,"Natural",,,"Coke" " ","Total","Electricity","Residual","Distillate","Gas(c)"," ","Coal","and Breeze","Other(d)","RSE" " ","(trillion","(million","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(b)","(billion","LPG","(1000 ","(1000","(trillion","Row" "Economic Characteristics(a)","Btu)","kWh)","(1000 bbl)","(1000 bbl)","cu ft)","(1000 bbl)","short tons)","short tons)","Btu)","Factors"

194

Total Space Heat-  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

Buildings Energy Consumption Survey: Energy End-Use Consumption Tables Total Space Heat- ing Cool- ing Venti- lation Water Heat- ing Light- ing Cook- ing Refrig- eration...

195

"State","Fossil Fuels",,,,,,"Nuclear Electric Power",,"Renewable Energy",,,,,,"Total Energy Production"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

P2. Energy Production Estimates in Trillion Btu, 2011 " P2. Energy Production Estimates in Trillion Btu, 2011 " "State","Fossil Fuels",,,,,,"Nuclear Electric Power",,"Renewable Energy",,,,,,"Total Energy Production" ,"Coal a",,"Natural Gas b",,"Crude Oil c",,,,"Biofuels d",,"Other e",,"Total" ,"Trillion Btu" "Alabama",468.671,,226.821,,48.569,,411.822,,0,,245.307,,245.307,,1401.191 "Alaska",33.524,,404.72,,1188.008,,0,,0,,15.68,,15.68,,1641.933 "Arizona",174.841,,0.171,,0.215,,327.292,,7.784,,107.433,,115.217,,617.734 "Arkansas",2.985,,1090.87,,34.087,,148.531,,0,,113.532,,113.532,,1390.004 "California",0,,279.71,,1123.408,,383.644,,25.004,,812.786,,837.791,,2624.553

196

Oxidation, Reduction, and Condensation of Alcohols over (MO3)3 (M=Mo, W) Nanoclusters  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The reactions of deuterated methanol, ethanol, 1-propanol, 1-butanol, 2-propanol, 2-butanol and t-butanol over cyclic (MO3)3 (M = Mo, W) clusters were studied experimentally with temperature programmed desorption (TPD) and theoretically with coupled cluster CCSD(T) theory and density functional theory. The reactions of two alcohols per M3O9 cluster are required to provide agreement with experiment for D2O release, dehydrogenation and dehydration. The reaction begins with the elimination of water by proton transfers and forms an intermediate dialkoxy species which can undergo further reaction. Dehydration proceeds by a ? hydrogen transfer to a terminal M=O. Dehydrogenation takes place via an ? hydrogen transfer to an adjacent MoVI = O atom or a WVI metal center with redox involved for M = Mo and no redox for M = W. The two channels have comparable activation energies. H/D exchange to produce alcohols can take place after olefin is released or via the dialkoxy species depending on the alcohol and the cluster. The Lewis acidity of the metal center with WVI being larger than MoVI results in the increased reactivity of W3O9 over Mo3O9 for dehydrogenation and dehydration.

Fang, Zongtang; Li, Zhenjun; Kelley, Matthew S.; Kay, Bruce D.; Li, Shenggang; Hennigan, Jamie M.; Rousseau, Roger J.; Dohnalek, Zdenek; Dixon, David A.

2014-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

197

Projections up for total energy demand by IEA nations in 1990  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The author reviews the most recent IEA projections for energy demand to the year 2000 in IEA countries. These show that the expectations for 1990 are now higher than estimates made last year. Production of solid fuels is expected to increase from 814 million toe in 1983 to 1044 million toe in 1990 and 1345 million toe by 2000. Nearly all the increase is expected in the US, Canada and Australia.

Vielvoye, R.

1985-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

198

Estimate the fraction of the total transported energy (in the form of gasoline) in the Trans-Alaska Pipeline that is consumed in pumping.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Estimate the fraction of the total transported energy (in the form of gasoline) in the Trans m). So we can toss this out. Now estimate the energy content of gasoline: Many of you tried figuring

Nimmo, Francis

199

Electron induced dissociation of trimethyl (methylcyclopentadienyl) platinum (IV): Total cross section as a function of incident electron energy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The total cross section has been measured for the electron induced dissociation of trimethyl (methylcyclopentadienyl) platinum (IV) [MeCpPt(IV)Me{sub 3}], a Pt precursor often used in focused electron beam induced processing (FEBIP), for incident electron energies ranging between 3-3 keV. Measurements were performed for the precursor in the adsorbed state under ultrahigh vacuum conditions. The techniques used in this study were temperature programmed desorption, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and mass spectrometry. Two surfaces were used in these experiments, amorphous carbon overlayers containing embedded Pt atoms (a:C-Pt), formed by the electron decomposition of the Pt precursor, and atomically clean Au. The results from these three experiments revealed a comparatively low total cross section at 8 eV (4.2+-0.3x10{sup -17} cm{sup 2} on the a:C-Pt and 1.4+-0.1x10{sup -17} cm{sup 2} on the Au) that increases with increasing incident electron energy, reaching a maximum at around 150 eV (4.1+-0.5x10{sup -16} cm{sup 2} on the a:C-Pt and 2.3+-0.2x10{sup -16} cm{sup 2} on the clean Au), before decreasing at higher incident electron energies, up to 3000 eV. Differences in the measured cross sections between Au and a:C-Pt surfaces demonstrate that the substrate can influence the reaction cross section of adsorbed species. Temperature programmed desorption was also used to measure the adsorption energy of MeCpPt(IV)Me{sub 3}, which was found to depend on both the substrate and the adsorbate coverage. The work in this paper demonstrates that surface science techniques can be used to quantitatively determine the total cross section of adsorbed FEBIP precursors for electron induced dissociation as a function of incident electron energy. These total cross section values are necessary to obtain quantitatively accurate information from FEBIP models and to compare the reaction efficiencies of different precursors on a quantitative basis.

Dorp, W. F. van [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Laboratory of Surface Modification, Rutgers, State University of New Jersey, Piscataway, New Jersey 08854-8019 (United States); Charged Particle Optics Group, Faculty of Applied Sciences, Delft University of Technology, Lorentzweg 1, 2628 CJ Delft (Netherlands); Wnuk, J. D.; Gorham, J. M.; Fairbrother, D. H. [Department of Chemistry, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21218 (United States); Madey, T. E. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Laboratory of Surface Modification, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, Piscataway, New Jersey 08854-8019 (United States); Hagen, C. W. [Charged Particle Optics Group, Faculty of Applied Sciences, Delft University of Technology, Lorentzweg 1, 2628 CJ Delft (Netherlands)

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Small modular HTGR nuclear power plant concept to meet the total energy needs of the developing nations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this paper, a small modular High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (HTGR) is described that can support the total energy needs of the developing nations by supplying electrical power, process steam, low-grade heat for desalination, and hydrogen production. Major features of the nuclear power plant concept, currently under development by GA Technologies Inc. (GA), are discussed with emphasis on (1) plant simplicity, (2) inherent safety, (3) ease of operation, (4) design and licensing standardization, and (5) acceptable power generation economics.

McDonald, C.F.

1983-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mo total energy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

An input-output approach to analyze the ways to increase total output of energy sectors: The case of Japan  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The purpose of this study is to analyze the ways to increase total output of Japanese energy sectors in future time. In this study, Input-Output (IO) analysis is employed as a tool of analysis. This study focuses on petroleum refinery products and non-ferrous metals as analyzed sectors. The results show that positive impact observed in export and outside households consumption modifications while opposite impact is given by modification of import. The recommendations suggested based on these results are Japanese government should make breakthroughs so analyzed sector's export activities can increase and they have to careful in conducting import activities related to these sectors.

Ubaidillah Zuhdi

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Skylarks trade size and energy content in weed seeds to maximize total ingested lipid biomass  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The trade-off between forage quality and quantity has been particularly studied in herbivore organisms, but much less for seed eating animals, in particular seed-eating birds which constitute the bulk of wintering passerines in European farmlands. The skylark is one of the commonest farmland birds in winter, mainly feeding on seeds. We focus on weed seeds for conservation and management purposes. Weed seeds form the bulk of the diet of skylarks during winter period, and although this is still a matter for discussion, weed seed predation by granivorous has been suggested as an alternative to herbicides used to regulate weed populations in arable crops. Our objectives were to identify whether weed seed traits govern foraging decisions of skylarks, and to characterize key seed traits with respect to size, which is related to searching and handling time, and lipid content, which is essential for migratory birds. We combined a single-offer experiment and a multiple-offer one to test for feeding preferences of the birds by estimating seed intake on weed seed species differing in their seed size and seed lipid content. Our results showed (1) a selective preference for smaller seeds above a threshold of seed size or seed size difference in the pair and, (2) a significant effect of seed lipid biomass suggesting a trade-off between foraging for smaller seeds and selecting seeds rich in lipids. Skylarks foraging decision thus seems to be mainly based on seed size, that is presumably a proxy for weed seed energy content. However, there are clearly many possible combinations of morphological and physiological traits that must play crucial role in the plantbird interaction such as toxic compound or seed coat.

Sabrina Gaba; Claire Collas; Thibaut Powolny; Franois Bretagnolle; Vincent Bretagnolle

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Measurement of low-energy Na^+ -- Na total collision rate in an ion--neutral hybrid trap  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present measurements of the total elastic and resonant charge-exchange ion-atom collision rate coefficient $k_\\mathrm{ia}$ of cold sodium (\\ce{Na}) with optically-dark low energy \\ce{Na+} ions in a hybrid ion-neutral trap. To determine $k_\\mathrm{ia}$, we measured the trap loading and loss from both a \\ce{Na} magneto-optical trap (MOT) and a linear radio frequency quadrupole Paul trap. We found the total rate coefficient to be $7.4 \\pm 1.9 \\times 10^{-8}$ cm$^3$/s for the type I \\ce{Na} MOT immersed within an $\\approx 140$ K ion cloud and $1.10 \\pm 0.25 \\times 10^{-7}$ cm$^3$/s for the type II \\ce{Na} MOT within an $\\approx 1070$ K ion cloud. Our measurements show excellent agreement with previously reported theoretical fully quantal \\textit{ab initio} calculations. In the process of determining the total rate coefficient, we demonstrate that a MOT can be used to probe an optically dark ion cloud's spatial distribution within a hybrid trap.

Goodman, D S; Kwolek, J M; Blmel, R; Narducci, F A; Smith, W W

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Ultrahigh-pressure structural phase transitions in Cr, Mo, and W  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

On the basis of first-principles total-energy calculations, we predict the ultrahigh-pressure destabilization of the bcc structure in the group-VIB elements Cr, Mo, and W through a bcc?hcp phase transition at pressures of about 7.0, 4.2, and 12.5 Mbar, respectively. In Mo and W, a subsequent hcp?fcc transition is also predicted at about 6.2 and 14.4 Mbar, respectively. The overall driving mechanism for these transitions is a continuous sp?d transfer of electrons upon compression, although other factors play an important quantitative role, especially the hard-core-like interaction between the large cores of these elements, which disfavors the bcc structure and serves to lower the bcc?hcp transition pressures. While the actual predicted transition pressures are sensitive to the details of the calculations, the qualitative trends are not, and the bcc?hcp transition in Mo should be within reach of static diamond-anvil-cell experiments. In this regard, we have also calculated accurate 300-K isotherms for bcc Cr, Mo, and W valid up to the 56-Mbar pressure range.

John A. Moriarty

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

The Total Energy Content  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The important message of RG theory [1] is that we have to attribute a specific symmetry to the continuous or infinite solid. Also, magnets with long range magnetic order show properties of an infinite system. Usi...

Dr. Ulrich Kbler; Dr. Andreas Hoser

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Electrical properties of a-C:Mo films produced by dual-cathode filtered cathodic arc plasma deposition  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Related Materials Electrical properties of a-C:Mo filmsNo. DE-AC02-05CH11231. Electrical properties of a-C:Mo filmsair. Film resistivity and electrical activation energy were

Sansongsiri, Sakon

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Total energy cycle assessment of electric and conventional vehicles: an energy and environmental analysis. Volume 2: appendices A-D to technical report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report compares the energy use, oil use and emissions of electric vehicles (EVs) with those of conventional, gasoline- powered vehicles (CVs) over the total life cycle of the vehicles. The various stages included in the vehicles` life cycles include vehicle manufacture, fuel production, and vehicle operation. Disposal is not included. An inventory of the air emissions associated with each stage of the life cycle is estimated. Water pollutants and solid wastes are reported for individual processes, but no comprehensive inventory is developed. Volume II contains additional details on the vehicle, utility, and materials analyses and discusses several details of the methodology.

NONE

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Total energy cycle assessment of electric and conventional vehicles: an energy and environmental analysis. Volume 4: peer review comments on technical report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report compares the energy use, oil use and emissions of electric vehicles (EVs) with those of conventional, gasoline-powered vehicles (CVs) over the total life cycle of the vehicles. The various stages included in the vehicles` life cycles include vehicle manufacture, fuel production, and vehicle operation. Disposal is not included. An inventory of the air emissions associated with each stage of the life cycle is estimated. Water pollutants and solid wastes are reported for individual processes, but no comprehensive inventory is developed. Volume IV includes copies of all the external peer review comments on the report distributed for review in July 1997.

NONE

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Structure in the energy dependence of the proton total reaction cross section for C and Si in the energy region 20-40 MeV  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Measurements of proton total reaction cross sections for Be9, C12, O16, and Si28 have been made in the energy range between 20-44 MeV. The cross sections show irregular energy variation for C12 at about 23.8 and 25.9 MeV, and for Si28 at 30.3 and 33.5 MeV; irregularities were not observed clearly for Be9 or O16.NUCLEAR REACTIONS Be9, C12, O16, Si28: 20MeV

I. laus; D. J. Margaziotis; R. F. Carlson; W. T. H. van Oers; J. Reginald Richardson

1975-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Intra-hour forecasting with a total sky imager at the UC San Diego solar energy testbed  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

solener.2011.02.014, Solar Energy. Lave, M. , Kleissl, J. ,smoothing. Submitted to Solar Energy. Linke, F. , 1922.24th European Photovoltaic Solar Energy Conference, Hamburg,

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Ethanol Conversion on Cyclic (MO3)3 (M = Mo, W) Clusters. | EMSL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Conversion on Cyclic (MO3)3 (M Mo, W) Clusters. Ethanol Conversion on Cyclic (MO3)3 (M Mo, W) Clusters. Abstract: Oxides of molybdenum and tungsten are an important class of...

212

9 Cr-- 1 Mo steel material for high temperature application  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

One or more embodiments relates to a high-temperature, titanium alloyed, 9 Cr-1 Mo steel exhibiting improved creep strength and oxidation resistance at service temperatures up to 650.degree. C. The 9 Cr-1 Mo steel has a tempered martensite microstructure and is comprised of both large (0.5-3 .mu.m) primary titanium carbides and small (5-50 nm) secondary titanium carbides in a ratio of. from about 1:1.5 to about 1.5:1. The 9 Cr-1 Mo steel may be fabricated using exemplary austenizing, rapid cooling, and tempering steps without subsequent hot working requirements. The 9 Cr-1 Mo steel exhibits improvements in total mass gain, yield strength, and time-to-rupture over ASTM P91 and ASTM P92 at the temperature and time conditions examined.

Jablonski, Paul D; Alman, David; Dogan, Omer; Holcomb, Gordon; Cowen, Christopher

2012-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

213

MoS2  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

4 4 Myriam Perez De la Rosa1, Gilles Berhault2, Apurva Mehta3, and Russell R. Chianelli1 1University of Texas at El Paso, Materials Research Technology Institute, El Paso, TX 2Institut de Recherches sur la Catalyse, CNRS, Villeurbanne cedex, France 3Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory, Menlo Park, CA Figure 1: MoS2 layered structure. As the world economy continues to expand the demand for petroleum based fuel increases and the price of these fuels rises. The rising price of fuel has another consequence: refiners tend to purchase cheaper fuels of poorer quality. These poor quality fuels contain increasing amounts of sulfur and other pollutants leading to a decline in air quality worldwide. A recent New York Times article described the major impact a growing Chinese economy

214

Combined iterative reconstruction and image-domain decomposition for dual energy CT using total-variation regularization  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: Dual-energy CT (DECT) is being increasingly used for its capability of material decomposition and energy-selective imaging. A generic problem of DECT, however, is that the decomposition process is unstable in the sense that the relative magnitude of decomposed signals is reduced due to signal cancellation while the image noise is accumulating from the two CT images of independent scans. Direct image decomposition, therefore, leads to severe degradation of signal-to-noise ratio on the resultant images. Existing noise suppression techniques are typically implemented in DECT with the procedures of reconstruction and decomposition performed independently, which do not explore the statistical properties of decomposed images during the reconstruction for noise reduction. In this work, the authors propose an iterative approach that combines the reconstruction and the signal decomposition procedures to minimize the DECT image noise without noticeable loss of resolution. Methods: The proposed algorithm is formulated as an optimization problem, which balances the data fidelity and total variation of decomposed images in one framework, and the decomposition step is carried out iteratively together with reconstruction. The noise in the CT images from the proposed algorithm becomes well correlated even though the noise of the raw projections is independent on the two CT scans. Due to this feature, the proposed algorithm avoids noise accumulation during the decomposition process. The authors evaluate the method performance on noise suppression and spatial resolution using phantom studies and compare the algorithm with conventional denoising approaches as well as combined iterative reconstruction methods with different forms of regularization. Results: On the Catphan600 phantom, the proposed method outperforms the existing denoising methods on preserving spatial resolution at the same level of noise suppression, i.e., a reduction of noise standard deviation by one order of magnitude. This improvement is mainly attributed to the high noise correlation in the CT images reconstructed by the proposed algorithm. Iterative reconstruction using different regularization, including quadratic orq-generalized Gaussian Markov random field regularization, achieves similar noise suppression from high noise correlation. However, the proposed TV regularization obtains a better edge preserving performance. Studies of electron density measurement also show that our method reduces the average estimation error from 9.5% to 7.1%. On the anthropomorphic head phantom, the proposed method suppresses the noise standard deviation of the decomposed images by a factor of ?14 without blurring the fine structures in the sinus area. Conclusions: The authors propose a practical method for DECT imaging reconstruction, which combines the image reconstruction and material decomposition into one optimization framework. Compared to the existing approaches, our method achieves a superior performance on DECT imaging with respect to decomposition accuracy, noise reduction, and spatial resolution.

Dong, Xue; Niu, Tianye; Zhu, Lei, E-mail: leizhu@gatech.edu [Nuclear and Radiological Engineering and Medical Physics Programs, The George W. Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia 30332 (United States)] [Nuclear and Radiological Engineering and Medical Physics Programs, The George W. Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia 30332 (United States)

2014-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

215

Performance of Mo/Au TES microcalorimeters  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We are developing X-ray calorimeters to meet the specifications of the Constellation-X mission. Each calorimeter consists of a transition-edge-sensor (TES) thermometer which is suspended on a silicon-nitride membrane. Our TES thermometers are Mo/Au bilayer films that are biased in the sharp phase transition between the superconducting and normal-metal states. These calorimeters have demonstrated very good energy resolutions: 2.4 eV at 1.5 keV and 3.7 eV at 3.3 keV. The energy resolutions are limited by thermal noise and Johnson noise (which are intrinsic to any resistive calorimeter) plus excess noise. The excess noise which is several times larger than the Johnson noise is consistent with frequency-independent voltage noise in the TES. Detailed measurements of one Mo/Au TES demonstrate that the excess noise is independent of the voltage applied to the TES over a range of biases at the same TES resistance. The magnitude of the excess noise is smallest at the high-resistance end of the phase transition. We also compared noise in square Mo/Au TESs ranging in size from 300 microns to 600 microns to learn how the excess noise is affected by the geometry of the TES.

Mark A. Lindeman; Regis P. Brekosky; Enectali Figueroa-Feliciano; Fred M. Finkbeiner; Mary Li; Caroline K. Stahle; Carl M. Stahle; Nilesh Tralshawala

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

MoWiTT:Mobile Window Thermal Test Facility  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

0 0 MoWiTT: Mobile Window Thermal Test Facility The window has come a long way since the days when it was a single pane of glass in a wood frame. Low-emissivity windows were designed to help buildings retain some of the energy that would have leaked out of less efficient windows. Designing efficient window-and-frame systems requires accurate measurement of the flow of energy through windows in realistic conditions, a capability provided by the Mobile Window Thermal Test facility. Consisting of a pair of outdoor, room-sized calorimeters, MoWiTT measures the net energy flow through two window samples in side-by-side tests using ambient weather conditions. MoWiTT characterizes the net energy flow as a function of time and measures the temperatures, solar fluxes, and

217

A Cubic Fe4Mo4 Oxo Framework and Its Reversible Four-Electron Redox Chemistry  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Max Planck Institute for Chemical Energy Conversion (formerly Bioinorganic Chemistry), Stiftstrae 34?36, 45470 Mlheim, Germany ... Indeed, a salt with a FeII2FeIII2MoVI4 constellation, [Fe4Mo4](TCNQ)2 (2), could be isolated after treatment with TCNQ. ... data indicate that the binding energies of all the elements in the title compds. ...

Jan P. Falkenhagen; Beatrice Braun; Eckhard Bill; Dominik Sattler; Christian Limberg

2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Relationship Between Surface Free Energy and Total Work of Fracture of Asphalt Binder and Asphalt Binder-Aggregate Interfaces  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

is the surface free energy of the asphalt binder and the aggregate. Surface free energy, which is a thermodynamic material property, is directly related to the adhesive bond energy between the asphalt binder and the aggregate as well as the cohesive bond energy...

Howson, Jonathan Embrey

2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

219

Energy Pro USA | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Pro USA Jump to: navigation, search Name: Energy Pro USA Place: Chesterfield, Missouri Zip: MO 63017 Product: Energy Pro funds and implements demand side energy savings programs to...

220

ESTIMATE OF THE TOTAL MECHANICAL FEEDBACK ENERGY FROM GALAXY CLUSTER-CENTERED BLACK HOLES: IMPLICATIONS FOR BLACK HOLE EVOLUTION, CLUSTER GAS FRACTION, AND ENTROPY  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The total feedback energy injected into hot gas in galaxy clusters by central black holes can be estimated by comparing the potential energy of observed cluster gas profiles with the potential energy of non-radiating, feedback-free hot gas atmospheres resulting from gravitational collapse in clusters of the same total mass. Feedback energy from cluster-centered black holes expands the cluster gas, lowering the gas-to-dark-matter mass ratio below the cosmic value. Feedback energy is unnecessarily delivered by radio-emitting jets to distant gas far beyond the cooling radius where the cooling time equals the cluster lifetime. For clusters of mass (4-11) x 10{sup 14} M{sub sun}, estimates of the total feedback energy, (1-3) x 10{sup 63} erg, far exceed feedback energies estimated from observations of X-ray cavities and shocks in the cluster gas, energies gained from supernovae, and energies lost from cluster gas by radiation. The time-averaged mean feedback luminosity is comparable to those of powerful quasars, implying that some significant fraction of this energy may arise from the spin of the black hole. The universal entropy profile in feedback-free gaseous atmospheres in Navarro-Frenk-White cluster halos can be recovered by multiplying the observed gas entropy profile of any relaxed cluster by a factor involving the gas fraction profile. While the feedback energy and associated mass outflow in the clusters we consider far exceed that necessary to stop cooling inflow, the time-averaged mass outflow at the cooling radius almost exactly balances the mass that cools within this radius, an essential condition to shut down cluster cooling flows.

Mathews, William G.; Guo Fulai, E-mail: mathews@ucolick.org [University of California Observatories/Lick Observatory, Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States)

2011-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mo total energy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Bis(4-methylanilinium) and bis(4-iodoanilinium) pentamolybdates from laboratory X-ray powder data and total energy minimization  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The crystal structures of bis(4-methylanilinium) and bis(4-iodoanilinium) pentamolybdates were determined using laboratory X-ray data and refined by total energy minimization methods. The obtained structures present alternating organic cation and inorganic polyanion layers bound by weak bonding (apart from ionic interactions).

Oszajca, M.

2013-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

222

Effects of Forest Management on Total Biomass Production and CO2 Emissions from use of Energy Biomass of Norway Spruce and Scots Pine  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The aim of this study was to analyze the effects of forest management on the total biomass production (t ha-1a-1) and CO2 emissions (kg CO2 MWh-1) from use of energy biomass of Norway spruce and Scots pine grown ...

Johanna Routa; Seppo Kellomki; Harri Strandman

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Total Imports  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Data Series: Imports - Total Imports - Crude Oil Imports - Crude Oil, Commercial Imports - by SPR Imports - into SPR by Others Imports - Total Products Imports - Total Motor Gasoline Imports - Finished Motor Gasoline Imports - Reformulated Gasoline Imports - Reformulated Gasoline Blended w/ Fuel Ethanol Imports - Other Reformulated Gasoline Imports - Conventional Gasoline Imports - Conv. Gasoline Blended w/ Fuel Ethanol Imports - Conv. Gasoline Blended w/ Fuel Ethanol, Ed55 & Ed55 Imports - Other Conventional Gasoline Imports - Motor Gasoline Blend. Components Imports - Motor Gasoline Blend. Components, RBOB Imports - Motor Gasoline Blend. Components, RBOB w/ Ether Imports - Motor Gasoline Blend. Components, RBOB w/ Alcohol Imports - Motor Gasoline Blend. Components, CBOB Imports - Motor Gasoline Blend. Components, GTAB Imports - Motor Gasoline Blend. Components, Other Imports - Fuel Ethanol Imports - Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Imports - Distillate Fuel Oil Imports - Distillate F.O., 15 ppm Sulfur and Under Imports - Distillate F.O., > 15 ppm to 500 ppm Sulfur Imports - Distillate F.O., > 500 ppm to 2000 ppm Sulfur Imports - Distillate F.O., > 2000 ppm Sulfur Imports - Residual Fuel Oil Imports - Propane/Propylene Imports - Other Other Oils Imports - Kerosene Imports - NGPLs/LRGs (Excluding Propane/Propylene) Exports - Total Crude Oil and Products Exports - Crude Oil Exports - Products Exports - Finished Motor Gasoline Exports - Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Exports - Distillate Fuel Oil Exports - Residual Fuel Oil Exports - Propane/Propylene Exports - Other Oils Net Imports - Total Crude Oil and Products Net Imports - Crude Oil Net Imports - Petroleum Products Period: Weekly 4-Week Avg.

224

High-Rate and High-Energy-Density Lithium-Ion Battery Anode Containing 2D MoS2 Nanowall and Cellulose Binder  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We thank National Centre for Photovolatic Research and Education (NCPRE)-Ministry of New and Renewable Energy, Government of India and IRCC-IIT Bombay for their support. ...

Uttam Kumar Sen; Sagar Mitra

2013-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

225

An Energy Based Fatigue Lifing Method for In-Service Components and Numerical Assessment of U10Mo Alloy Based Fuel Mini Plates.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??An energy based fatigue life prediction framework has been developed for calculation of remaining fatigue life of in service gas turbine materials. The purpose of (more)

Ozaltun, Hakan

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Reaction of SC+, Ti+, and V+ with CO. MC+ and MO+ bond energies D. E. Clemmer, J. L. Elkind,") N. Aristov,b) and P. B. Armentrout")  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the first-row diatomic transition- metal-oxide ions.' The most reliable bond energies for ScO+ , Ti beenmade previously.3*4Thesereaction systemsalso pro- vide bond energiesfor the ionic metal carbides function of translational energy in a guided-ion-beamtandemmassspectrometer.Formation of both metal

Clemmer, David E.

227

Electrodeposition of CIS films on the Mo back electrodes with different crystallinities  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Electrodeposition of copper indium diselenide (CuInSe2), which is an absorption layer for thin film solar cells, has been studied on a molybdenum (Mo)-coated glass with different crystallinities. Metastable FCC Mo and BCC Mo coatings were prepared by R.F. sputtering with varying R.F. power (100170W) and Ar pressure (311mTorr). Experimental results indicated that the Mo coating deposited at lower power and higher pressure had smaller crystallite size. Cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy showed that the Mo coating deficient in crystallinities contained micro voids residing in the boundaries of the columnar grains and had higher oxygen content, as measured by energy dispersive spectroscopy. The crystallinity of Mo coatings strongly influenced the open circuit potential in the electrolyte for CIS electrodeposition. Consequently, the Cu/In ratio of CIS deposits plated at a constant potential (?0.7 vs. SCE) varied with the distinct Mo coatings. Moreover, the CIS deposit on the various Mo-coated glasses displayed a different morphology. The effect of the crystallinity of Mo coatings on hydrogen evolution reaction at pH 1.55 was also explored. Hydrogen evolution during the CIS electrodeposition may be one of the key factors to influence the CIS morphology. How the crystallinity of the Mo coating affects the composition and morphology of the CIS deposits can be useful for device fabrication and deserves for further study.

Hsien-Chung Huang; Chao-Sung Lin; Wei-Che Chang

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Experimental activities supporting commercial U.S. accelerator production of 99-Mo  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

{sup 99m}Tc, the daughter product of {sup 99}Mo, is the most commonly used radioisotope for nuclear medicine in the U.S. Experiments are being performed at Los Alamos National Laboratory and Argonne National Laboratory to demonstrate production of {sup 99}Mo using accelerators. The {sup 100}Mo({gamma},n){sup 99}Mo reaction in an enriched {sup 100}Mo target is currently under investigation. Three scaled low-power production experiments using a 20-MeV electron linac at Argonne have been performed to date. Two of these experiments used natural Mo targets and produced a total of 613 {mu}C of {sup 99}Mo. The third experiment used an enriched {sup 100}Mo target and produced 10.5 mCi of {sup 99}Mo. Following irradiation the targets were dissolved and the low specific activity solution was processed through an ARSII generator from NorthStar Medical Radioisotopes. Yields of {sup 99m}Tc >95% have been observed.

Dale, Gregory E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Chemerisov, Sergey D [ANL; Vandegrift, George F [ANL

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Exploring Neutron-Rich Oxygen Isotopes with MoNA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Modular Neutron Array (MoNA) was used in conjunction with a large-gap dipole magnet (Sweeper) to measure neutron-unbound states in oxygen isotopes close to the neutron dripline. While no excited states were observed in 24O, a resonance at 45(2) keV above the neutron separation energy was observed in 23O.

N. Frank; T. Baumann; D. Bazin; J. Brown; P. A. DeYoung; J. E. Finck; A. Gade; J. Hinnefeld; R. Howes; J. -L. Lecouey; B. Luther; W. A. Peters; H. Scheit; A. Schiller; M. Thoennessen

2007-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

230

Phase transitions in the adsorption system Li/Mo(112)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Experimental studies of the phase transitions in the adsorption system Li/Mo(112) are presented. This system is a model system for highly anisotropic interactions. From measurements of the half-widths of the low-energy electron diffraction spot...

Fedorus, A.; Kolthoff, D.; Koval, V.; Lyuksyutov, Igor F.; Naumovets, AG; Pfnur, H.

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Hadronic Total Cross Sections (R) in E+E- Interactions: Data from DOE laboratory experiments as compiled in data reviews by the Durham High Energy Physics Database Group  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

A comprehensive compilation of experimental data on total hadronic cross sections, and R ratios, in e+e- interactions is presented. Published data from the Novosibirsk, Orsay, Frascati, SLAC, CORNELL, DESY, KEK and CERN e+e- colliders on both exclusive and inclusive final particle states are included from threshold energies to the highest LEP energies. The data are presented in tabular form supplemented by compilation plots of different exclusive final particle states and of different energy regions. (Taken from abstract of paper, A Compilation of Data on Hadronic Total Cross Sections in E+E- Interactions, M.R. Whalley, Journal of Physics G (Nuclear and Particle Physics), Volume 29, Number 12A, 2003). The Durham High Energy Physics (HEP) Database Group makes these data, extracted from papers and data reviews, available in one place in an easy-to-access format. The data are also included in the Durham HEP Reaction Data Database, which can be searched at http://hepdata.cedar.ac.uk/reaction

Whalley, M.R.

232

"YEAR","MONTH","STATE","UTILITY CODE","UTILITY NAME","RESIDENTIAL PHOTOVOLTAIC ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","COMMERCIAL PHOTOVOLTAIC ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","INDUSTRIAL PHOTOVOLTAIC ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","TRANSPORTATION PHOTOVOLTAIC ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","TOTAL PHOTOVOLTAIC ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","RESIDENTIAL PHOTOVOLTAIC INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","COMMERCIAL PHOTOVOLTAIC INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","INDUSTRIAL PHOTOVOLTAIC INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","TRANSPORTATION PHOTOVOLTAIC INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","TOTAL PHOTOVOLTAIC INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","RESIDENTIAL PHOTOVOLTAIC NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","COMMERCIAL PHOTOVOLTAIC NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","INDUSTRIAL PHOTOVOLTAIC NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","TRANSPORTATIONPHOTOVOLTAIC NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","TOTAL PHOTOVOLTAIC NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","RESIDENTIAL WIND ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","COMMERCIAL WIND ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","INDUSTRIAL WIND ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","TRANSPORTATION WIND ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","TOTAL WIND ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","RESIDENTIAL WIND INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","COMMERCIAL WIND INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","INDUSTRIAL WIND INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","TRANSPORTATION WIND INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","TOTAL WIND INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","RESIDENTIAL WIND NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","COMMERCIAL WIND NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","INDUSTRIAL WIND NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","TRANSPORTATION WIND NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","TOTAL WIND NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","RESIDENTIAL OTHER ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","COMMERCIAL OTHER ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","INDUSTRIAL OTHER ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","TRANSPORTATION OTHER ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","TOTAL OTHER ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","RESIDENTIAL OTHER INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","COMMERCIAL OTHER INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","INDUSTRIAL OTHER INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","TRANSPORTATION OTHER INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","TOTAL OTHER INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","RESIDENTIAL OTHER NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","COMMERCIAL OTHER NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","INDUSTRIAL OTHER NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","TRANSPORTATION OTHER NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","TOTAL OTHER NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","RESIDENTIAL TOTAL ENERGY SOLD BACK TO THE UTILITY (MWh)","COMMERCIAL TOTAL ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","INDUSTRIAL TOTAL ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","TRANSPORTATION TOTAL ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","TOTAL ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","RESIDENTIAL TOTAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","COMMERCIAL TOTAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","INDUSTRIAL TOTAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","TRANSPORTATION TOTAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","TOTAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","RESIDENTIAL TOTAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","COMMERCIAL TOTAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","INDUSTRIAL TOTAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","TRANSPORTATION TOTAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","TOTAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","RESIDENTIAL ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK TO THE UTILITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MWh)","COMMERCIAL ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK TO THE UTILITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MWh)","INDUSTRIAL ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK TO THE UTILITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MWh)","TRANSPORTATION ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK TO THE UTILITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MWh)","TOTAL ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK TO THE UTILITYFOR ALL STATES SERVED(MWh)","RESIDENTIAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MW)","COMMERCIAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MW)","INDUSTRIAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MW)","TRANSPORTATION INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MW)","INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MW)","RESIDENTIAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT FOR ALL STATES SERVED","COMMERCIAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT FOR ALL STATES SERVED","INDUSTRIAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT FOR ALL STATES SERVED","TRANSPORTATION NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT FOR ALL STATES SERVED","NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT FOR ALL STATES SERVED"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

TRANSPORTATIONPHOTOVOLTAIC NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","TOTAL PHOTOVOLTAIC NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","RESIDENTIAL WIND ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","COMMERCIAL WIND ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","INDUSTRIAL WIND ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","TRANSPORTATION WIND ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","TOTAL WIND ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","RESIDENTIAL WIND INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","COMMERCIAL WIND INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","INDUSTRIAL WIND INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","TRANSPORTATION WIND INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","TOTAL WIND INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","RESIDENTIAL WIND NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","COMMERCIAL WIND NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","INDUSTRIAL WIND NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","TRANSPORTATION WIND NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","TOTAL WIND NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","RESIDENTIAL OTHER ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","COMMERCIAL OTHER ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","INDUSTRIAL OTHER ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","TRANSPORTATION OTHER ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","TOTAL OTHER ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","RESIDENTIAL OTHER INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","COMMERCIAL OTHER INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","INDUSTRIAL OTHER INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","TRANSPORTATION OTHER INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","TOTAL OTHER INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","RESIDENTIAL OTHER NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","COMMERCIAL OTHER NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","INDUSTRIAL OTHER NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","TRANSPORTATION OTHER NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","TOTAL OTHER NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","RESIDENTIAL TOTAL ENERGY SOLD BACK TO THE UTILITY (MWh)","COMMERCIAL TOTAL ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","INDUSTRIAL TOTAL ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","TRANSPORTATION TOTAL ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","TOTAL ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","RESIDENTIAL TOTAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","COMMERCIAL TOTAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","INDUSTRIAL TOTAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","TRANSPORTATION TOTAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","TOTAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","RESIDENTIAL TOTAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","COMMERCIAL TOTAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","INDUSTRIAL TOTAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","TRANSPORTATION TOTAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","TOTAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","RESIDENTIAL ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK TO THE UTILITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MWh)","COMMERCIAL ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK TO THE UTILITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MWh)","INDUSTRIAL ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK TO THE UTILITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MWh)","TRANSPORTATION ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK TO THE UTILITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MWh)","TOTAL ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK TO THE UTILITYFOR ALL STATES SERVED(MWh)","RESIDENTIAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MW)","COMMERCIAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MW)","INDUSTRIAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MW)","TRANSPORTATION INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MW)","INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MW)","RESIDENTIAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT FOR ALL STATES SERVED","COMMERCIAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT FOR ALL STATES SERVED","INDUSTRIAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT FOR ALL STATES SERVED","TRANSPORTATION NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT FOR ALL STATES SERVED","NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT FOR ALL STATES SERVED"

233

Compaction and Sintering of Mo Powders  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To support the development of Mo-99 production by NorthStar Medical Technologies, LLC, Mo metal powders were evaluated for compaction and sintering characteristics as they relate to Mo-100 accelerator target disk fabrication. Powders having a natural isotope distribution and enriched Mo-100 powder were examined. Various powder characteristics are shown to have an effect on both the compaction and sintering behavior. Natural Mo powders could be cold pressed directly to >90% density. All of the powders, including the Mo-100 samples, could be sintered after cold pressing to >90% density. As an example, a compacted Mo-100 disk reached 89.7% density (9.52 g/cm3) after sintering at 1000 C for 1 hr. in flowing Ar/4%H2. Higher sintering temperatures were required for other powder samples. The relationships between processing conditions and the resulting densities of consolidated Mo disks will be presented.

Nunn, Stephen D [ORNL] [ORNL; Kiggans, Jim [ORNL] [ORNL; Bryan, Chris [ORNL] [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Exploring alternative symmetry breaking mechanisms at the LHC with 7, 8 and 10 TeV total energy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In view of the annnouncement that in 2012 the LHC will run at 8 TeV, we study the possibility of detecting signals of alternative mechanisms of ElectroWeak Symmetry Breaking, described phenomenologically by unitarized models, at energies lower than 14 TeV. A complete calculation with six fermions in the final state is performed using the PHANTOM event generator. Our results indicate that at 8 TeV some of the scenarios with TeV scale resonances are likely to be identified while models with no resonances or with very heavy ones will be inaccessible, unless the available luminosity will be much higher than expected.

Alessandro Ballestrero; Diogo Buarque Franzosi; Ezio Maina

2012-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

235

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- St Louis Airport - MO 01  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Airport - MO 01 Airport - MO 01 FUSRAP Considered Sites St. Louis Airport, MO Alternate Name(s): Airport Site St. Louis Airport Storage Site (SLAPS) Former Robertson Storage Area Robertson Airport MO.01-1 MO.01-2 Location: Brown Road, Robertson, Missouri MO.01-2 Historical Operations: Stored uranium process residues containing uranium, radium, and thorium for the MED and AEC. MO.01-2 MO.01-3 MO.01-4 Eligibility Determination: Eligible MO.01-1 MO.01-7 Radiological Survey(s): Assessment Surveys MO.01-4 MO.01-5 Site Status: Cleanup in progress by U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. MO.01-6 USACE Website Long-term Care Requirements: To be determined upon completion. Also see Documents Related to St. Louis Airport, MO MO.01-1 - DOE Memorandum; Coffman to LaGrone; Subject: Authorization

236

MattssonMoVacPrague2009.ppt  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Thomas R Mattsson Thomas R Mattsson Sandia National Laboratories Albuquerque, NM, USA Nils Sandberg -- KTH, Stockholm Richard Armiento -- Univ. Bayreuth, Germany Ann Mattsson -- Sandia National Laboratories Self-diffusion in Mo using the AM05 density functional Sandia is a multiprogram laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, for the United States Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000. Joint U.S. Russia Conference on Advances in Materials Science Prague, Czech Republic Aug 31-Sept 3, 2009 SAND 2009-2197 C, 2009-3883 C, 2009-4713 C, and 2002-1323 P Vacancy mediated diffusion is the main mechanism for mass transport in solids *Vacancies are important for *Self-diffusion *Defect migration *Radiation damage/ swelling

237

Mo Year Report Period: EIA ID NUMBER:  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Version No: 2013.01 Mo Year Report Period: EIA ID NUMBER: http://www.eia.gov/survey/form/eia_14/instructions.pdf Mailing Address: Secure File Transfer option available at: (e.g., PO Box, RR) https://signon.eia.doe.gov/upload/noticeoog.jsp Electronic Transmission: The PC Electronic Zip Code - Data Reporting Option (PEDRO) is available. If interested in software, call (202) 586-9659. Email form to: OOG.SURVEYS@eia.doe.gov - - - - Fax form to: (202) 586-9772 Mail form to: Oil & Gas Survey Email address: U.S. Department of Energy Ben Franklin Station PO Box 279 Washington, DC 20044-0279 Questions? Call toll free: 1-800-638-8812 PADD 4 Type of Report (Check One ): (Thousands of dollars) (Thousands of barrels) PADD 2 PADD 3 PAD DISTRICT (a) Revision to Report:

238

Evaluation of Pre-sulfided NiMo/?-Al2O3 for Hydrodeoxygenation of Microalgae Oil to Produce Green-diesel  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Evaluation of Pre-sulfided NiMo/?-Al2O3 for Hydrodeoxygenation of Microalgae Oil to Produce Green-diesel ... Energy Fuels, Just Accepted Manuscript ...

Lin Zhou; Adeniyi Lawal

2014-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

239

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Latty Avenue Site - MO 04  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Latty Avenue Site - MO 04 Latty Avenue Site - MO 04 FUSRAP Considered Sites Latty Avenue Site, MO Alternate Name(s): Futura Coatings Futura Chemical Company Facility Hazelwood Interim Storage Site (HISS) Former Cotter Site, Latty Avenue Properties Contemporary Metals Corp. Continental Mining and Milling MO.04-1 MO.04-2 MO.04-5 MO.04-6 MO.06-8 MO.06-11 Location: 9200 Latty Avenue, Hazelwood, Missouri MO.04-1 Historical Operations: Received, stored, and processed uranium residues for the AEC. Storage and processing were licensed by the AEC and NRC and resulted in contamination of uranium and thorium. MO.04-5 MO.04-6 Eligibility Determination: Eligible MO.04-3 MO.04-4 Radiological Survey(s): Assessment Surveys MO.04-2 MO.04-7 MO.04-8 MO.04-9 MO.04-10 MO.04-11 Site Status: Cleanup in progress by U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. MO.04-12

240

B(E2) values and the search for the critical point symmetry X(5) in 104Mo and 106Mo  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Lifetimes of the first 4+ and 6+ states in 104Mo and 106Mo have been measured using the recoil distance method following spontaneous fission of 252Cf. The experiment was performed at the 88-inch cyclotron of the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory employing the Gammasphere array and the New Yale Plunger Device. Reduced transition probabilities in the ground state band of 104Mo are compared with predictions of the critical point symmetry X(5) for phase transitional nuclei between rotational and vibrational shape. While known level energies of 104Mo are in good agreement with the X(5) predictions, the analysis of the measured B(E2) values favors a rotor interpretation.

C. Hutter; R. Krcken; A. Aprahamian; C. J. Barton; C. W. Beausang; M. A. Caprio; R. F. Casten; W.-T. Chou; R. M. Clark; D. Cline; J. R. Cooper; M. Cromaz; A. A. Hecht; A. O. Macchiavelli; N. Pietralla; M. Shawcross; M. A. Stoyer; C. Y. Wu; N. V. Zamfir

2003-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mo total energy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Comparison of approaches to Total Quality Management. Including an examination of the Department of Energy`s position on quality management  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper presents a comparison of several qualitatively different approaches to Total Quality Management (TQM). The continuum ranges from management approaches that are primarily standards -- with specific guidelines, but few theoretical concepts -- to approaches that are primarily philosophical, with few specific guidelines. The approaches to TQM discussed in this paper include the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) 9000 Standard, the Malcolm Baldrige National Quality Award, Senge`s the Learning Organization, Watkins and Marsick`s approach to organizational learning, Covey`s Seven Habits of Highly Successful People, and Deming`s Fourteen Points for Management. Some of these approaches (Deming and ISO 9000) are then compared to the DOE`s official position on quality management and conduct of operations (DOE Orders 5700.6C and 5480.19). Using a tabular format, it is shown that while 5700.6C (Quality Assurance) maps well to many of the current approaches to TQM, DOE`s principle guide to management Order 5419.80 (Conduct of Operations) has many significant conflicts with some of the modern approaches to continuous quality improvement.

Bennett, C.T.

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Investigation of the optical properties of MoS{sub 2} thin films using spectroscopic ellipsometry  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE) characterization of layered transition metal dichalcogenide (TMD) thin films grown by vapor phase sulfurization is reported. By developing an optical dispersion model, the extinction coefficient and refractive index, as well as the thickness of molybdenum disulfide (MoS{sub 2}) films, were extracted. In addition, the optical band gap was obtained from SE and showed a clear dependence on the MoS{sub 2} film thickness, with thinner films having a larger band gap energy. These results are consistent with theory and observations made on MoS{sub 2} flakes prepared by exfoliation, showing the viability of vapor phase derived TMDs for optical applications.

Yim, Chanyoung; O'Brien, Maria; Winters, Sinad [School of Chemistry, Trinity College Dublin, Dublin 2 (Ireland); Centre for Research on Adaptive Nanostructures and Nanodevices (CRANN), Trinity College Dublin, Dublin 2 (Ireland); McEvoy, Niall [Centre for Research on Adaptive Nanostructures and Nanodevices (CRANN), Trinity College Dublin, Dublin 2 (Ireland); Mirza, Inam; Lunney, James G. [Centre for Research on Adaptive Nanostructures and Nanodevices (CRANN), Trinity College Dublin, Dublin 2 (Ireland); School of Physics, Trinity College Dublin, Dublin 2 (Ireland); Duesberg, Georg S., E-mail: duesberg@tcd.ie [School of Chemistry, Trinity College Dublin, Dublin 2 (Ireland); Centre for Research on Adaptive Nanostructures and Nanodevices (CRANN), Trinity College Dublin, Dublin 2 (Ireland); Advanced Materials and BioEngineering Research (AMBER) Centre, Trinity College Dublin, Dublin 2 (Ireland)

2014-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

243

Octupole collectivity in {sup 98,100,102}Mo  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Excited states in {sup 98,100,102}Mo have been studied via the {sup 30}Si+{sup 168}Er-induced fission reaction at a beam energy of 142 MeV. Prompt {gamma} rays were detected with the EUROBALL III multidetector array. The level schemes are extended with more than 20 new transitions and interpreted in the framework of a soft-octupole vibration model.

Lalkovski, S.; Ilieva, S.; Minkova, A.; Minkov, N.; Kutsarova, T.; Lopez-Martens, A.; Korichi, A.; Huebel, H.; Goergen, A.; Jansen, A.; Schoenwasser, G.; Herskind, B.; Bergstroem, M.; Podolyak, Zs. [Department of Physics, University of Sofia, 1164 Sofia (Bulgaria); Institute for Nuclear Research and Nuclear Energy, BAS, 1784 Sofia (Bulgaria); Centre de Spectrometrie Nucleaire et de Spectrometrie de Masse, F-91405 Orsay Campus (France); Helmholtz-Institut fuer Strahlen-und Kernphysik, Universitaet Bonn, Nussallee 14-16, D-53115 Bonn (Germany); The Niels Bohr Institut, Blegdamsvej 17, DK-2100 Copenhagen (Denmark); INFN, Laboratori Nationali di Legnaro (Italy)

2007-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

244

Monthly Energy Review - November 2013  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

N F N F N o v e mb e r 2 0 1 3 Mo n t h l y E n e r g y R e v i e w w w w K e i ~ K g o v L me r Monthly Energy Review The Monthly Energy Review (MER) is the U.S. Energy Information Administration's (EIA) primary report of recent and historical energy statistics. Included are statistics on total energy production, consumption, trade, and energy prices; overviews of petroleum, natural gas, coal, electricity, nuclear energy, renewable energy, and international petroleum; carbon dioxide emissions; and data unit conversions. Release of the MER is in keeping with responsibilities given to EIA in Public Law 95-91 (Depart- ment of Energy Organization Act), which states, in part, in Section 205(a)(2): "The Administrator shall be responsible for carrying out a central, comprehen-

245

Monthly Energy Review - March 2013  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

P F P F Ma r c h 2 0 1 3 Mo n t h l y E n e r g y R e v i e w w w w K e i ~ K g o v L me r Monthly Energy Review The Monthly Energy Review (MER) is the U.S. Energy Information Administration's (EIA) primary report of recent and historical energy statistics. Included are statistics on total energy production, consumption, trade, and energy prices; overviews of petroleum, natural gas, coal, electricity, nuclear energy, renewable energy, and international petroleum; carbon dioxide emissions; and data unit conversions. Release of the MER is in keeping with responsibilities given to EIA in Public Law 95-91 (Depart- ment of Energy Organization Act), which states, in part, in Section 205(a)(2): "The Administrator shall be responsible for carrying out a central, comprehen-

246

Monthly Energy Review - December 2011  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

O F O F D e c e mb e r 2 0 1 1 Mo n t h l y E n e r g y R e v i e w w w w K e i ~ K g o v L me r Monthly Energy Review The Monthly Energy Review (MER) is the U.S. Energy Information Administration's (EIA) primary report of recent and historical energy statistics. Included are statistics on total energy production, consumption, trade, and energy prices; overviews of petroleum, natural gas, coal, electricity, nuclear energy, renewable energy, and international petroleum; carbon dioxide emissions; and data unit conversions. Release of the MER is in keeping with responsibilities given to EIA in Public Law 95-91 (Depart- ment of Energy Organization Act), which states, in part, in Section 205(a)(2): "The Administrator shall be responsible for carrying out a central, comprehen-

247

Monthly Energy Review - April 2013  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Q F Q F A p r i l 2 0 1 3 Mo n t h l y E n e r g y R e v i e w w w w K e i ~ K g o v L me r Monthly Energy Review The Monthly Energy Review (MER) is the U.S. Energy Information Administration's (EIA) primary report of recent and historical energy statistics. Included are statistics on total energy production, consumption, trade, and energy prices; overviews of petroleum, natural gas, coal, electricity, nuclear energy, renewable energy, and international petroleum; carbon dioxide emissions; and data unit conversions. Release of the MER is in keeping with responsibilities given to EIA in Public Law 95-91 (Depart- ment of Energy Organization Act), which states, in part, in Section 205(a)(2): "The Administrator shall be responsible for carrying out a central, comprehen-

248

Monthly Energy Review - July 2013  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

T F T F J u l y 2 0 1 3 Mo n t h l y E n e r g y R e v i e w w w w K e i ~ K g o v L me r Monthly Energy Review The Monthly Energy Review (MER) is the U.S. Energy Information Administration's (EIA) primary report of recent and historical energy statistics. Included are statistics on total energy production, consumption, trade, and energy prices; overviews of petroleum, natural gas, coal, electricity, nuclear energy, renewable energy, and international petroleum; carbon dioxide emissions; and data unit conversions. Release of the MER is in keeping with responsibilities given to EIA in Public Law 95-91 (Depart- ment of Energy Organization Act), which states, in part, in Section 205(a)(2): "The Administrator shall be responsible for carrying out a central, comprehen-

249

Monthly Energy Review - January 2012  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

N F N F J a n u a r y 2 0 1 2 Mo n t h l y E n e r g y R e v i e w w w w K e i ~ K g o v L me r Monthly Energy Review The Monthly Energy Review (MER) is the U.S. Energy Information Administration's (EIA) primary report of recent and historical energy statistics. Included are statistics on total energy production, consumption, trade, and energy prices; overviews of petroleum, natural gas, coal, electricity, nuclear energy, renewable energy, and international petroleum; carbon dioxide emissions; and data unit conversions. Release of the MER is in keeping with responsibilities given to EIA in Public Law 95-91 (Depart- ment of Energy Organization Act), which states, in part, in Section 205(a)(2): "The Administrator shall be responsible for carrying out a central, comprehen-

250

Monthly Energy Review - September 2011  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

V F V F S e p t e mb e r 2 0 1 1 Mo n t h l y E n e r g y R e v i e w w w w K e i ~ K g o v L me r Monthly Energy Review The Monthly Energy Review (MER) is the U.S. Energy Information Administration's (EIA) primary report of recent and historical energy statistics. Included are statistics on total energy production, consumption, trade, and energy prices; overviews of petroleum, natural gas, coal, electricity, nuclear energy, renewable energy, and international petroleum; carbon dioxide emissions; and data unit conversions. Release of the MER is in keeping with responsibilities given to EIA in Public Law 95-91 (Depart- ment of Energy Organization Act), which states, in part, in Section 205(a)(2): "The Administrator shall be responsible for carrying out a central, comprehen-

251

Monthly Energy Review - August 2011  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

U F U F A u g u s t 2 0 1 1 Mo n t h l y E n e r g y R e v i e w w w w K e i ~ K g o v L me r Monthly Energy Review The Monthly Energy Review (MER) is the U.S. Energy Information Administration's (EIA) primary report of recent and historical energy statistics. Included are statistics on total energy production, consumption, trade, and energy prices; overviews of petroleum, natural gas, coal, electricity, nuclear energy, renewable energy, and international petroleum; carbon dioxide emissions; and data unit conversions. Release of the MER is in keeping with responsibilities given to EIA in Public Law 95-91 (Depart- ment of Energy Organization Act), which states, in part, in Section 205(a)(2): "The Administrator shall be responsible for carrying out a central, comprehen-

252

Monthly Energy Review - October 2011  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

M F M F Oc t o b e r 2 0 1 1 Mo n t h l y E n e r g y R e v i e w w w w K e i ~ K g o v L me r Monthly Energy Review The Monthly Energy Review (MER) is the U.S. Energy Information Administration's (EIA) primary report of recent and historical energy statistics. Included are statistics on total energy production, consumption, trade, and energy prices; overviews of petroleum, natural gas, coal, electricity, nuclear energy, renewable energy, and international petroleum; carbon dioxide emissions; and data unit conversions. Release of the MER is in keeping with responsibilities given to EIA in Public Law 95-91 (Depart- ment of Energy Organization Act), which states, in part, in Section 205(a)(2): "The Administrator shall be responsible for carrying out a central, comprehen-

253

Monthly Energy Review - June 2013  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

M S F M S F J u n e 2 0 1 3 Mo n t h l y E n e r g y R e v i e w w w w K e i ~ K g o v L me r Monthly Energy Review The Monthly Energy Review (MER) is the U.S. Energy Information Administration's (EIA) primary report of recent and historical energy statistics. Included are statistics on total energy production, consumption, trade, and energy prices; overviews of petroleum, natural gas, coal, electricity, nuclear energy, renewable energy, and international petroleum; carbon dioxide emissions; and data unit conversions. Release of the MER is in keeping with responsibilities given to EIA in Public Law 95-91 (Depart- ment of Energy Organization Act), which states, in part, in Section 205(a)(2): "The Administrator shall be responsible for carrying out a central, comprehen-

254

Monthly Energy Review - September 2013  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

V F V F S e p t e mb e r 2 0 1 3 Mo n t h l y E n e r g y R e v i e w w w w K e i ~ K g o v L me r Monthly Energy Review The Monthly Energy Review (MER) is the U.S. Energy Information Administration's (EIA) primary report of recent and historical energy statistics. Included are statistics on total energy production, consumption, trade, and energy prices; overviews of petroleum, natural gas, coal, electricity, nuclear energy, renewable energy, and international petroleum; carbon dioxide emissions; and data unit conversions. Release of the MER is in keeping with responsibilities given to EIA in Public Law 95-91 (Depart- ment of Energy Organization Act), which states, in part, in Section 205(a)(2): "The Administrator shall be responsible for carrying out a central, comprehen-

255

Monthly Energy Review - July 2011  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

T F T F J u l y 2 0 1 1 Mo n t h l y E n e r g y R e v i e w w w w K e i ~ K g o v L me r Monthly Energy Review The Monthly Energy Review (MER) is the U.S. Energy Information Administration's (EIA) primary report of recent and historical energy statistics. Included are statistics on total energy production, consumption, trade, and energy prices; overviews of petroleum, natural gas, coal, electricity, nuclear energy, renewable energy, and international petroleum; carbon dioxide emissions; and data unit conversions. Release of the MER is in keeping with responsibilities given to EIA in Public Law 95-91 (Depart- ment of Energy Organization Act), which states, in part, in Section 205(a)(2): "The Administrator shall be responsible for carrying out a central, comprehen-

256

Monthly Energy Review - October 2012  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

M F M F Oc t o b e r 2 0 1 2 Mo n t h l y E n e r g y R e v i e w w w w K e i ~ K g o v L me r Monthly Energy Review The Monthly Energy Review (MER) is the U.S. Energy Information Administration's (EIA) primary report of recent and historical energy statistics. Included are statistics on total energy production, consumption, trade, and energy prices; overviews of petroleum, natural gas, coal, electricity, nuclear energy, renewable energy, and international petroleum; carbon dioxide emissions; and data unit conversions. Release of the MER is in keeping with responsibilities given to EIA in Public Law 95-91 (Depart- ment of Energy Organization Act), which states, in part, in Section 205(a)(2): "The Administrator shall be responsible for carrying out a central, comprehen-

257

Monthly Energy Review - May 2013  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

R F R F Ma y 2 0 1 3 Mo n t h l y E n e r g y R e v i e w w w w K e i ~ K g o v L me r Monthly Energy Review The Monthly Energy Review (MER) is the U.S. Energy Information Administration's (EIA) primary report of recent and historical energy statistics. Included are statistics on total energy production, consumption, trade, and energy prices; overviews of petroleum, natural gas, coal, electricity, nuclear energy, renewable energy, and international petroleum; carbon dioxide emissions; and data unit conversions. Release of the MER is in keeping with responsibilities given to EIA in Public Law 95-91 (Depart- ment of Energy Organization Act), which states, in part, in Section 205(a)(2): "The Administrator shall be responsible for carrying out a central, comprehen-

258

Monthly Energy Review - July 2012  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

T F T F J u l y 2 0 1 2 Mo n t h l y E n e r g y R e v i e w w w w K e i ~ K g o v L me r Monthly Energy Review The Monthly Energy Review (MER) is the U.S. Energy Information Administration's (EIA) primary report of recent and historical energy statistics. Included are statistics on total energy production, consumption, trade, and energy prices; overviews of petroleum, natural gas, coal, electricity, nuclear energy, renewable energy, and international petroleum; carbon dioxide emissions; and data unit conversions. Release of the MER is in keeping with responsibilities given to EIA in Public Law 95-91 (Depart- ment of Energy Organization Act), which states, in part, in Section 205(a)(2): "The Administrator shall be responsible for carrying out a central, comprehen-

259

Monthly Energy Review - April 2012  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Q F Q F A p r i l 2 0 1 2 Mo n t h l y E n e r g y R e v i e w w w w K e i ~ K g o v L me r Monthly Energy Review The Monthly Energy Review (MER) is the U.S. Energy Information Administration's (EIA) primary report of recent and historical energy statistics. Included are statistics on total energy production, consumption, trade, and energy prices; overviews of petroleum, natural gas, coal, electricity, nuclear energy, renewable energy, and international petroleum; carbon dioxide emissions; and data unit conversions. Release of the MER is in keeping with responsibilities given to EIA in Public Law 95-91 (Depart- ment of Energy Organization Act), which states, in part, in Section 205(a)(2): "The Administrator shall be responsible for carrying out a central, comprehen-

260

Monthly Energy Review - February 2012  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

O F O F F e b r u a r y 2 0 1 2 Mo n t h l y E n e r g y R e v i e w w w w K e i ~ K g o v L me r Monthly Energy Review The Monthly Energy Review (MER) is the U.S. Energy Information Administration's (EIA) primary report of recent and historical energy statistics. Included are statistics on total energy production, consumption, trade, and energy prices; overviews of petroleum, natural gas, coal, electricity, nuclear energy, renewable energy, and international petroleum; carbon dioxide emissions; and data unit conversions. Release of the MER is in keeping with responsibilities given to EIA in Public Law 95-91 (Depart- ment of Energy Organization Act), which states, in part, in Section 205(a)(2): "The Administrator shall be responsible for carrying out a central, comprehen-

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mo total energy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Monthly Energy Review - September 2012  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

V F V F S e p t e mb e r 2 0 1 2 Mo n t h l y E n e r g y R e v i e w w w w K e i ~ K g o v L me r Monthly Energy Review The Monthly Energy Review (MER) is the U.S. Energy Information Administration's (EIA) primary report of recent and historical energy statistics. Included are statistics on total energy production, consumption, trade, and energy prices; overviews of petroleum, natural gas, coal, electricity, nuclear energy, renewable energy, and international petroleum; carbon dioxide emissions; and data unit conversions. Release of the MER is in keeping with responsibilities given to EIA in Public Law 95-91 (Depart- ment of Energy Organization Act), which states, in part, in Section 205(a)(2): "The Administrator shall be responsible for carrying out a central, comprehen-

262

Monthly Energy Review - June 2012  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

S F S F J u n e 2 0 1 2 Mo n t h l y E n e r g y R e v i e w w w w K e i ~ K g o v L me r Monthly Energy Review The Monthly Energy Review (MER) is the U.S. Energy Information Administration's (EIA) primary report of recent and historical energy statistics. Included are statistics on total energy production, consumption, trade, and energy prices; overviews of petroleum, natural gas, coal, electricity, nuclear energy, renewable energy, and international petroleum; carbon dioxide emissions; and data unit conversions. Release of the MER is in keeping with responsibilities given to EIA in Public Law 95-91 (Depart- ment of Energy Organization Act), which states, in part, in Section 205(a)(2): "The Administrator shall be responsible for carrying out a central, comprehen-

263

Monthly Energy Review - August 2012  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

U F U F A u g u s t 2 0 1 2 Mo n t h l y E n e r g y R e v i e w w w w K e i ~ K g o v L me r Monthly Energy Review The Monthly Energy Review (MER) is the U.S. Energy Information Administration's (EIA) primary report of recent and historical energy statistics. Included are statistics on total energy production, consumption, trade, and energy prices; overviews of petroleum, natural gas, coal, electricity, nuclear energy, renewable energy, and international petroleum; carbon dioxide emissions; and data unit conversions. Release of the MER is in keeping with responsibilities given to EIA in Public Law 95-91 (Depart- ment of Energy Organization Act), which states, in part, in Section 205(a)(2): "The Administrator shall be responsible for carrying out a central, comprehen-

264

Monthly Energy Review - November 2013  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

N N F N N F N o v e mb e r 2 0 1 3 Mo n t h l y E n e r g y R e v i e w w w w K e i ~ K g o v L me r Monthly Energy Review The Monthly Energy Review (MER) is the U.S. Energy Information Administration's (EIA) primary report of recent and historical energy statistics. Included are statistics on total energy production, consumption, trade, and energy prices; overviews of petroleum, natural gas, coal, electricity, nuclear energy, renewable energy, and international petroleum; carbon dioxide emissions; and data unit conversions. Release of the MER is in keeping with responsibilities given to EIA in Public Law 95-91 (Depart- ment of Energy Organization Act), which states, in part, in Section 205(a)(2): "The Administrator shall be responsible for carrying out a central, comprehen-

265

Monthly Energy Review - November 2011  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

N F N F N o v e mb e r 2 0 1 1 Mo n t h l y E n e r g y R e v i e w w w w K e i ~ K g o v L me r Monthly Energy Review The Monthly Energy Review (MER) is the U.S. Energy Information Administration's (EIA) primary report of recent and historical energy statistics. Included are statistics on total energy production, consumption, trade, and energy prices; overviews of petroleum, natural gas, coal, electricity, nuclear energy, renewable energy, and international petroleum; carbon dioxide emissions; and data unit conversions. Release of the MER is in keeping with responsibilities given to EIA in Public Law 95-91 (Depart- ment of Energy Organization Act), which states, in part, in Section 205(a)(2): "The Administrator shall be responsible for carrying out a central, comprehen-

266

Prompt ?-ray spectroscopy of the Mo104 and Mo108 fission fragments  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The level structures of the neutron-rich Mo104 and Mo108 nuclei have been investigated by observing prompt ? rays emitted in the spontaneous fission of Cm248 with the EUROGAM spectrometer. Levels with spins up to 12? have been observed and ? branching obtained. The data can be satisfactorily described when Mo104,108 are considered as axially symmetric nuclei: in Mo104, rotational bands based on the ground state, the one-phonon and the two-phonon ?-vibrational states and a quasiparticle state have been observed, whereas in Mo108 the information is limited to the yrast band and the one phonon ? band. 1996 The American Physical Society.

A. Guessous; N. Schulz; M. Bentaleb; E. Lubkiewicz; J. L. Durell; C. J. Pearson; W. R. Phillips; J. A. Shannon; W. Urban; B. J. Varley; I. Ahmad; C. J. Lister; L. R. Morss; K. L. Nash; C. W. Williams; S. Khazrouni

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

NO. REV. MO. ~ssessment of Two Year  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) 200 hours operation of LSPE Central Electronics, 90 hours on timers, 1 hour for thermal battery Operations ·· Thermal/Power Prediction vs Time ·· Qualification Levels #12;MO. ltiV. MO. Assessment of Two and items powered by battery. Is with all functions intact and in- cludes all 8 EPA's (active mode) · 2

Rathbun, Julie A.

268

1. [M] Estimate the fraction of the total transported energy (in the form of gasoline) in the Trans-Alaska Pipeline that is consumed in pumping. As always, try not to look anything up.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1. [M] Estimate the fraction of the total transported energy (in the form of gasoline) in the Trans to this (which is 1 bend per 10 m). So we can toss this out. Now estimate the energy content of gasoline: Many

Nimmo, Francis

269

On the Reaction Mechanism of Acetaldehyde Decomposition on Mo(110)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The strong Mo-O bond strength provides promising reactivity of Mo-based catalysts for the deoxygenation of biomass-derived oxygenates. Combining the novel dimer saddle point searching method with periodic spin-polarized density functional theory calculations, we investigated the reaction pathways of a acetaldehyde decomposition on the clean Mo(110) surface. Two reaction pathways were identified, a selective deoxygenation and a nonselective fragmentation pathways. We found that acetaldehyde preferentially adsorbs at the pseudo 3-fold hollow site in the ?2(C,O) configuration on Mo(110). Among four possible bond (?-C-H, ?-C-H, C-O and C-C) cleavages, the initial decomposition of the adsorbed acetaldehyde produces either ethylidene via the C-O bond scission or acetyl via the ?-C-H bond scission while the C-C and the ?-C-H bond cleavages of acetaldehyde leading to the formation of methyl (and formyl) and formylmethyl are unlikely. Further dehydrogenations of ethylidene into either ethylidyne or vinyl are competing and very facile with low activation barriers of 0.24 and 0.31 eV, respectively. Concurrently, the formed acetyl would deoxygenate into ethylidyne via the C-O cleavage rather than breaking the C-C or the C-H bonds. The selective deoxygenation of acetaldehyde forming ethylene is inhibited by relatively weaker hydrogenation capability of the Mo(110) surface. Instead, the nonselective pathway via vinyl and vinylidene dehydrogenations to ethynyl as the final hydrocarbon fragment is kinetically favorable. On the other hand, the strong interaction between ethylene and the Mo(110) surface also leads to ethylene decomposition instead of desorption into the gas phase. This work was financially supported by the National Advanced Biofuels Consortium (NABC). Computing time was granted by a user project (emsl42292) at the Molecular Science Computing Facility in the William R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL). This work was financially supported by the National Advanced Biofuels Consortium (NABC). Computing time was granted by a user project (emsl42292) at the Molecular Science Computing Facility in the William R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL). The EMSL is a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) national scientific user facility located at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and supported by the DOE Office of Biological and Environmental Research. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is operated by Battelle for the U.S. Department of Energy.

Mei, Donghai; Karim, Ayman M.; Wang, Yong

2012-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

270

Barge Truck Total  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

Barge Truck Total delivered cost per short ton Shipments with transportation rates over total shipments Total delivered cost per short ton Shipments with transportation rates over...

271

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- West Lake Landfill - MO...  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Lake Landfill - MO 05 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: West Lake Landfill (MO.05) Designated Name: Alternate Name: Location: Evaluation Year: Site Operations: Site Disposition:...

272

Phase Development in a U-7 wt.% Mo vs. Al-7 wt.% Ge Diffusion Couple  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Fuel development for the Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors (RERTR) program has demonstrated that U-Mo alloys in contact with Al develop interaction regions with phases that have poor irradiation behavior. The addition of Si to the Al has been considered with positive results. Compositional modification to replace Si with Ge is now under evaluation to attempt to further improve irradiation behavior. In this study, the microstructural and phase development of a diffusion couple of U-7 wt.% Mo in contact with Al-7 wt.% Ge was examined by transmission electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive spectroscopy. The interdiffusion zone developed a microstructure that included the cubic-UGe3 phase and amorphous phases. The UGe3 phase was observed with and without Mo and Al solid solutioning developing a (U,Mo)(Al,Ge)3 phase.

E. Perez; D.D. Keiser, Jr.; Y.H. Sohn

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Das Mischungsverhalten von Nb3Sn mit Mo3Si, Mo3Ge und Nb3Ge  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Mittels homogenisierter Sinter-und Schmelzproben wird die Bildung von lckenlosen Mischreihen zwischen Nb3Sn mit Mo3Si, Mo3Ge und Nb3Ge nachgewiesen.

H. Holleck; F. Benesovsky; H. Nowotny

1962-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Effects of graphene on MoO2-MoS2 composite as anode material for lithium-ion batteries  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The electrochemical properties of MoO2-MoS2/graphene electrode were compared with those of MoO2-MoS2, bulk MoS2, and graphene electrode. MoO2-MoS2 composite was prepared by a hydrothermal reaction of molybdenum (...

Moon-Jin Hwang; Kwang Man Kim; Kwang-Sun Ryu

2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Thermophysical Properties of U-10MO Alloy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report provides an overview of thermophysical properties of unirradiated uranium alloyed with ten weight percent molybdenum (U 10Mo), with particular focus on those material properties needed for modeling of new fuels for HPRRs (High Performance Research Reactors). The report contains both historical data available in the literature on U-10Mo, as well as more recent results conducted by the Global Threat Reduction Initiative fuel development program. The main use of the report is intended as a standard U-10Mo alloy properties reference for reactor models and simulations.

A. M. Phillips; G. S. Mickum; D. E. Burkes

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Use of the Predictive Sugars Biomarker to Evaluate Self-Reported Total Sugars Intake in the Observing Protein and Energy Nutrition (OPEN) Study  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Observing Protein and Energy Nutrition (OPEN...Human Nutrition Unit, Cambridge, United...biomarker to assess measurement error (ME) structure...Observing Protein and Energy Nutrition (OPEN...Schoeller DA .Measurement of energy expenditure in...

Nataa Tasevska; Douglas Midthune; Nancy Potischman; Amy F. Subar; Amanda J. Cross; Sheila A. Bingham; Arthur Schatzkin; and Victor Kipnis

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Petrolite Corp - MO 08  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Petrolite Corp - MO 08 Petrolite Corp - MO 08 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: PETROLITE CORP (MO.08) Eliminated from further consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: None Location: St. Louis , Missouri MO.08-1 Evaluation Year: 1987 MO.08-4 Site Operations: Research involving test quantities of radioactive materials. MO.08-2 Site Disposition: Eliminated - Licensed - Potential for contamination remote MO.08-3 Radioactive Materials Handled: Yes Primary Radioactive Materials Handled: Uranium Flouride & Thorium Oxide MO.08-2 Radiological Survey(s): None Indicated Site Status: Eliminated from further consideration under FUSRAP Also see Documents Related to PETROLITE CORP MO.08-1 - Summary Paper; Title: License History for Petrolite Corporation, St. Louis (MO.8); dated 07/16/93; with three attachments (3

278

Aboveground test of an advanced Li$_2$MoO$_4$ scintillating bolometer to search for neutrinoless double beta decay of $^{100}$Mo  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Large lithium molybdate (Li$_2$MoO$_4$) crystal boules were produced by using the low thermal gradient Czochralski growth technique from deeply purified molybdenum. A small sample from one of the boules was preliminary characterized in terms of X-ray-induced and thermally-excited luminescence. A large cylindrical crystalline element (with a size of $\\oslash 40\\times40$ mm) was used to fabricate a scintillating bolometer, which was operated aboveground at $\\sim 15$ mK by using a pulse-tube cryostat housing a high-power dilution refrigerator. The excellent detector performance in terms of energy resolution and $\\alpha$ background suppression along with preliminary positive indications on the radiopurity of this material show the potentiality of Li$_2$MoO$_4$ scintillating bolometers for low-counting experiment to search for neutrinoless double beta decay of $^{100}$Mo.

T. B. Bekker; N. Coron; F. A. Danevich; V. Ya. Degoda; A. Giuliani; V. D. Grigorieva; N. V. Ivannikova; M. Mancuso; P. de Marcillac; I. M. Moroz; C. Nones; E. Olivieri; G. Pessina; D. V. Poda; V. N. Shlegel; V. I. Tretyak; M. Velazquez

2014-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

279

Aboveground test of an advanced Li$_2$MoO$_4$ scintillating bolometer to search for neutrinoless double beta decay of $^{100}$Mo  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Large lithium molybdate (Li$_2$MoO$_4$) crystal boules were produced by using the low thermal gradient Czochralski growth technique from deeply purified molybdenum. A small sample from one of the boules was preliminary characterized in terms of X-ray-induced and thermally-excited luminescence. A large cylindrical crystalline element (with a size of $\\oslash 40\\times40$ mm) was used to fabricate a scintillating bolometer, which was operated aboveground at $\\sim 15$ mK by using a pulse-tube cryostat housing a high-power dilution refrigerator. The excellent detector performance in terms of energy resolution and $\\alpha$ background suppression along with preliminary positive indications on the radiopurity of this material show the potentiality of Li$_2$MoO$_4$ scintillating bolometers for low-counting experiment to search for neutrinoless double beta decay of $^{100}$Mo.

T. B. Bekker; N. Coron; F. A. Danevich; V. Ya. Degoda; A. Giuliani; V. D. Grigorieva; N. V. Ivannikova; M. Mancuso; P. de Marcillac; I. M. Moroz; C. Nones; E. Olivieri; G. Pessina; D. V. Poda; V. N. Shlegel; V. I. Tretyak; M. Velazquez

2014-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

280

Aboveground test of an advanced Li$_2$MoO$_4$ scintillating bolometer to search for neutrinoless double beta decay of $^{100}$Mo  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Large lithium molybdate (Li$_2$MoO$_4$) crystal boules were produced by using the low thermal gradient Czochralski growth technique from deeply purified molybdenum. A small sample from one of the boules was preliminary characterized in terms of X-ray-induced and thermally-excited luminescence. A large cylindrical crystalline element (with a size of $\\oslash 40\\times40$ mm) was used to fabricate a scintillating bolometer, which was operated aboveground at $\\sim 15$ mK by using a pulse-tube cryostat housing a high-power dilution refrigerator. The excellent detector performance in terms of energy resolution and $\\alpha$ background suppression along with preliminary positive indications on the radiopurity of this material show the potentiality of Li$_2$MoO$_4$ scintillating bolometers for low-counting experiment to search for neutrinoless double beta decay of $^{100}$Mo.

Bekker, T B; Danevich, F A; Degoda, V Ya; Giuliani, A; Grigorieva, V D; Ivannikova, N V; Mancuso, M; de Marcillac, P; Moroz, I M; Nones, C; Olivieri, E; Pessina, G; Poda, D V; Shlegel, V N; Tretyak, V I; Velazquez, M

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mo total energy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Use of the Predictive Sugars Biomarker to Evaluate Self-Reported Total Sugars Intake in the Observing Protein and Energy Nutrition (OPEN) Study  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Katan MB.Underestimation of energy intake by 3-d records compared with energy intake to maintain body weight...Multimodel Inference.2nd ed.New York:Springer;2002. Supplementary...the Observing Protein and Energy Nutrition (OPEN) study...

Nataa Tasevska; Douglas Midthune; Nancy Potischman; Amy F. Subar; Amanda J. Cross; Sheila A. Bingham; Arthur Schatzkin; and Victor Kipnis

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Use of the Predictive Sugars Biomarker to Evaluate Self-Reported Total Sugars Intake in the Observing Protein and Energy Nutrition (OPEN) Study  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...whereas in analysis with energy-adjusted intakes...epidemiology may have prevented us from detecting a causal...and overreporting of energy intake related to weight status and lifestyle in a nationwide...Elliott P.Who are the low energy reporters' in the dietary...

Nataa Tasevska; Douglas Midthune; Nancy Potischman; Amy F. Subar; Amanda J. Cross; Sheila A. Bingham; Arthur Schatzkin; and Victor Kipnis

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Alternative Energy Development and China's Energy Future  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of total primary energy consumption was also announced forenergy in total primary energy consumption to 10% by 2010coal in total primary energy consumption as well as slightly

Zheng, Nina

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Variations of Total Domination  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The study of locatingdominating sets in graphs was pioneered by Slater[186, 187...], and this concept was later extended to total domination in graphs. A locatingtotal dominating set, abbreviated LTD-set, in G

Michael A. Henning; Anders Yeo

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Total Crude by Pipeline  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Product: Total Crude by All Transport Methods Domestic Crude by All Transport Methods Foreign Crude by All Transport Methods Total Crude by Pipeline Domestic Crude by Pipeline Foreign Crude by Pipeline Total Crude by Tanker Domestic Crude by Tanker Foreign Crude by Tanker Total Crude by Barge Domestic Crude by Barge Foreign Crude by Barge Total Crude by Tank Cars (Rail) Domestic Crude by Tank Cars (Rail) Foreign Crude by Tank Cars (Rail) Total Crude by Trucks Domestic Crude by Trucks Foreign Crude by Trucks Period: Product: Total Crude by All Transport Methods Domestic Crude by All Transport Methods Foreign Crude by All Transport Methods Total Crude by Pipeline Domestic Crude by Pipeline Foreign Crude by Pipeline Total Crude by Tanker Domestic Crude by Tanker Foreign Crude by Tanker Total Crude by Barge Domestic Crude by Barge Foreign Crude by Barge Total Crude by Tank Cars (Rail) Domestic Crude by Tank Cars (Rail) Foreign Crude by Tank Cars (Rail) Total Crude by Trucks Domestic Crude by Trucks Foreign Crude by Trucks Period: Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Product Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View

286

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- St Louis University - MO...  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

St Louis University - MO 0-02 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: ST. LOUIS UNIVERSITY (MO.0-02) Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP - As of 1987 the facility operated under an...

287

Activation of the Sulfhydryl Group by Mo Centers: Kinetics of...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Mo(mu-SH)Mo Complex Abstract: This paper provides evidence from kinetic experiments and electronic structure calculations of a significantly reduced S-H bond strength in the...

288

Elementary Steps of Syngas Reactions on Mo2C(001): Adsorption Thermochemistry and Bond Dissociation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Density functional theory (DFT) and ab initio thermodynamics are applied in order to investigate the most stable surface and subsurface terminations of Mo{sub 2}C(001) as a function of chemical potential and in the presence of syngas. The Mo-terminated (001) surface is then used as a model surface to evaluate the thermochemistry and energetic barriers for key elementary steps in syngas reactions. Adsorption energy scaling relations and Broensted-Evans-Polanyi relationships are established and used to place Mo{sub 2}C into the context of transition metal surfaces. The results indicate that the surface termination is a complex function of reaction conditions and kinetics. It is predicted that the surface will be covered by either C{sub 2}H{sub 2} or O depending on conditions. Comparisons to transition metals indicate that the Mo-terminated Mo{sub 2}C(001) surface exhibits carbon reactivity similar to transition metals such as Ru and Ir, but is significantly more reactive towards oxygen.

Medford, Andrew

2012-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

289

China Energy Databook - Rev. 4  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

try. Calcium carbide and phosphorous intensities declined,total energy use Yellow phosphorous, total energy use W o ototal energy use Yellow phosphorous, total energy use Wood

Sinton Editor, J.E.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Monolayer MoS2 Heterojunction Solar Cells  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Monolayer MoS2 Heterojunction Solar Cells ... molybdenum disulfide; heterojunction solar cell; 2D material; monolayer; chemical vapor deposition ...

Meng-Lin Tsai; Sheng-Han Su; Jan-Kai Chang; Dung-Sheng Tsai; Chang-Hsiao Chen; Chih-I Wu; Lain-Jong Li; Lih-Juann Chen; Jr-Hau He

2014-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

291

Mo Supply Chain for Nuclear Medicine Ladimer S. Nagurney  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The 99 Mo Supply Chain for Nuclear Medicine Ladimer S. Nagurney Department of Electrical November 13, 2012 #12;Nuclear Medicine: Meeting Patient Needs with 99 Mo Ladimer S. Nagurney The 99 Mo Supply Chain #12;Background and Motivation Study of Nuclear Medicine Supply Chains is a combination

Nagurney, Anna

292

Missouri's 4th congressional district: Energy Resources | Open...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Energy LLC Missouri Department of National Resources Energy Center Mo DNR National Ethanol Vehicle Coalition NEVC US Ethanol Vehicle Coalition Retrieved from "http:...

293

Total quality management implementation guidelines  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

These Guidelines were designed by the Energy Quality Council to help managers and supervisors in the Department of Energy Complex bring Total Quality Management to their organizations. Because the Department is composed of a rich mixture of diverse organizations, each with its own distinctive culture and quality history, these Guidelines are intended to be adapted by users to meet the particular needs of their organizations. For example, for organizations that are well along on their quality journeys and may already have achieved quality results, these Guidelines will provide a consistent methodology and terminology reference to foster their alignment with the overall Energy quality initiative. For organizations that are just beginning their quality journeys, these Guidelines will serve as a startup manual on quality principles applied in the Energy context.

Not Available

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Processing, Microstructure, and Properties of Multiphase Mo Silicide Alloys  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Multiphase Mo silicide alloys containing T2 (Mo{sub 5}SiB{sub 2}), Mo{sub 3}Si and Mo phases where prepared by both melting and casting (M and C) and powder metallurgical (PM) processes. Glassy phases are observed in PM materials but not in M and C materials. Microstructural studies indicate that the primary phase is Mo-rich solid solution in alloys containing {le}(9.4Si+13.8B, at. %) and T2 in alloys with {ge}(9.8Si+14.6B). An eutectic composition is estimated to be close to Mo-9.6Si-14.2B. The mechanical properties of multiphase silicide alloys were determined by hardness, tensile and bending tests at room temperature. The multiphase alloy MSB-18 (Mo-9.4Si-13.8B) possesses a flexure strength distinctly higher than that of MoSi{sub 2} and other Mo{sub 5}Si{sub 3} silicide alloys containing no Mo particles. Also, MSB-18 is tougher than MoSi{sub 2} by a factor of 4.

Heatherly, L.; Liu, C.T.; Schneibel, J.H.

1998-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

295

Level: National Data and Regional Totals; Row: NAICS Codes, Value...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

0 Capability to Switch Coal to Alternative Energy Sources, 2006; Level: National Data and Regional Totals; Row: NAICS Codes, Value of Shipments and Employment Sizes; Column: Energy...

296

Level: National Data and Regional Totals; Row: NAICS Codes, Value...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 Capability to Switch LPG to Alternative Energy Sources, 2006; Level: National Data and Regional Totals; Row: NAICS Codes, Value of Shipments and Employment Sizes; Column: Energy...

297

Spectroscopy of Double-Beta and Inverse-Beta Decays from 100Mo for Neutrinos  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Spectroscopic studies of two beta-rays from 100Mo are shown to be of potential interest for investigating both the Majorana neutrino mass by neutrinoless double beta-decay and low energy solar neutrino's by inverse beta-decay. With a multi-ton 100Mo detector, coincidence studies of correlated beta-beta from neutrinoless double beta-decay, together with the large Q value, permit identification of the neutrino-mass term with a sensitivity of ~ 0.03 eV. Correlation studies of the inverse beta and the successive beta-decay of 100Tc, together with the large capture rates for low energy solar neutrino's, make it possible to detect in realtime individual low energy solar neutrino in the same detector.

H. Ejiri; J. Engel; R. Hazama; P. Krastev; N. Kudomi; R. G. H. Robertson

1999-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

298

Energy Production Over the Years | Department of Energy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

an energy source Total Energy Produced Coal Crude Oil Natural Gas Total Renewable Energy Non-Biofuel Renewable Energy Biofuels Nuclear Power Source: EIA State Energy Data Systems...

299

Thermodynamics of the solid solution of hydrogen in ?-titanium alloys: ?-TiMo and ?-TiRe  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The solid solution of hydrogen has been investigated in a series of random ?-TiMo alloys ranging from 065 atom % Mo via determination of pressure-composition-temperature relationships; additionally, one (?-TiRe alloy (Ti37 atom % Re) was investigated. The thermodynamic parameters of hydrogen solution were generated from the p-c-T data. The relative partial molar enthalpy at infinite dilution, ?H?Ho, exhibited by ?-TiMo alloys were adjusted to conditions of fixed volume, that of pure ?-Ti. It was found that variations in the resulting ?E?Ho correlated roughly with variations in the electron density of states at the Fermi level. The relative partial molar entropy at infinite dilution was found to vary linearly with Mo content and it is suggested that this trend reflects a blocking of potentially available interstitial sites to hydrogen occupation by Mo atoms at small hydrogen contents. Examination of the excess free energy vs hydrogen content relationships indicates that effects resulting from accommodation of hydrogen electrons by the metal conduction band are significant even at small hydrogen contents in the TiMo alloys; thus, explicit determination of the H-H interaction is not possible in the alloys. By contrast, electronic effects in pure ?-Ti are negligible at small HM and under fixed volume conditions, the H-H interactions in ?-Ti are attractive.

J.F. Lynch; J. Tanaka

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

The Bioenergetic Description of Light Energy Migration in Photoactive Membranes; Equivalence between the Theory of the Energy Fluxes and the Theory of the Proportion of Pigments Forms to Total Pigments  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The energy exchanges between pigments in biological membranes irradiated with light can be described in a number of ... , is equivalent to the theory of the energy exchange fluxes developed by Strasser (1978). .....

C. Sironval; R. Strasser; M. Brouers

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mo total energy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- United Nuclear Corp - MO 0-03  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

United Nuclear Corp - MO 0-03 United Nuclear Corp - MO 0-03 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: UNITED NUCLEAR CORP. (MO.0-03) Eliminated from further consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: Mallinckrodt Chemical Works Mallinckrodt Nuclear Corporation MO.0-03-1 MO.0-03-2 Location: Hematite , Missouri MO.0-03-1 Evaluation Year: Circa 1987 MO.0-03-3 Site Operations: Commercial fuel fabrication operation. Licensed to reclaim unirradiated enriched uranium from scrap generated in fuel fabrication and fuel material preparation. MO.0-03-1 MO.0-03-2 MO.0-03-3 MO.0-03-4 Site Disposition: Eliminated - NRC licensed - Commercial operations MO.0-03-3 MO.0-03-5 Radioactive Materials Handled: Yes Primary Radioactive Materials Handled: Uranium MO.0-03-3 Radiological Survey(s): None Indicated

302

TOTAL REFLUX OPERATION OF MULTIVESSEL BATCH DISTILLATION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

TOTAL REFLUX OPERATION OF MULTIVESSEL BATCH DISTILLATION BERND WITTGENS, RAJAB LITTO, EVA S RENSEN a generalization of previously proposed batch distillation schemes. A simple feedback control strategy for total re verify the simulations. INTRODUCTION Although batch distillation generally is less energy e cient than

Skogestad, Sigurd

303

Technological Implementation of Renewable Energy in Rural?Isolated Areas and Small?Medium Islands in Indonesia: Problem Mapping And Preliminary Surveys of Total People Participation in a Local Wind Pump Water Supply  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This article discusses a formulation of problem mapping and preliminary surveys of total people participation in a local wind pump (LWP) water supply in term of technological implementation of renewable energy (RE) in rural?isolated areas and small?medium islands in Indonesia. The formulation was constructed in order to enhance and to promote the local product of RE across Indonesia. It was also addressed to accommodate local potencies barriers and opportunities into a priority map. Moreover it was designed into five aspects such as (1) local technology of the RE: a case of pilot project of the LWP; (2) environmental?cultural aspects related to global issues of energy?renewable energy; (3) potencies and barriers corresponding to local national regional and international contents; (4) education and training and (5) gender participation. To focus the formulation serial preliminary surveys were conducted in five major areas namely: (1) survey on support and barrier factors of the aspects; (2) strategic planning model a concept A?B?G which stands for Academician?Business people?Government; (3) survey on background based knowledge on energy conservation; (4) survey on gender participation in energy conservation and (5) survey on local stakeholder involvement. Throughout the surveys it has been notified that the concept needs to be developed to any level of its component since its elements were identified in tolerance values such as high potency value of the LWP development (95%); a strong potency of rural area application (88%); a medium background of energy energy conservation (EC) identified in a range of 56%?72% sufficient support from local stakeholders and gender participation.

Ahmad Taufik

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

TV Energy Consumption Trends and Energy-Efficiency Improvement Options  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

a forecast for total energy consumption in network standbyconsiderable impact on total energy consumption from TVs.factors affecting total energy consumption. Although further

Park, Won Young

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Key China Energy Statistics 2012  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Consumption Total Primary Energy Consumption by Source AAGRFuel Wind Total Primary Energy Consumption by Source SharesFuel Wind Total Final Energy Consumption by Region Mtce East

Levine, Mark

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Key China Energy Statistics 2011  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Gas Consumption Total Primary Energy Consumption by Source (Nuclear Fuel Total Primary Energy Consumption by Fuel SharesNuclear Fuel Total Final Energy Consumption by Region (1995-

Levine, Mark

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Energy Efficiency Indicators Methodology Booklet  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in shaping total energy consumption. These changes may bethe reduction of total energy consumption is not due toimprovements on the total energy consumption is estimated by

Sathaye, Jayant

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Key China Energy Statistics 2011  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Growth of China's Total Primary Energy Production (TPE) byFuel (Mtce) Primary Energy Production (Mtce) AAGR Coal Rawof China's Total Primary Energy Production (Mtce) AAGR Total

Levine, Mark

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Thermal behavior of Al/MoO3 xerogel nanocomposites  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Solgel process using molybdenum alkoxides was employed to prepare Al/MoO3 xerogel nanocomposites as a thermite with better performance by improvement of interfacial contact area between the oxidizer and fuel. Micromorphology and thermite reaction characteristics of Al/MoO3 xerogel nanocomposites were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and thermogravimetry/differential scanning calorimetry (TG/DSC), respectively. In the present Al/MoO3 xerogel system, it was found that exothermic enthalpy increases as the Al/Mo mole ratio increases and then decreases when Al/Mo mole ratio is larger than 6 indicating that optimum mole ratio of Al/Mo is 6 with reaction enthalpy of 420.58J/g.

Han-Su Seo; Jae-Kyeong Kim; Jun-Woo Kim; Hyoun-Soo Kim; Kee-Kahb Koo

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Neutron Hole States of Mo-93,95  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

I I I0 IO 20 3040 50 60 0 I I I I I I IO 20 30 40 5Q 60 IO 2- 0 I I I lo 20 X) 40 50 60 I j I I I l 0 lo 20 30 4050 60 8, .(deg) 8,~. (deg) {deg) {deg) FIG. 2. Angular distributions for the +Mo(P, d)93Mo reaction. The errors sho....20 l X=2 0.769 2=4 0.8l6 2=2 Mo(d, t) Mo l IGO= P IQ IO? IG 10 IQ 10 IGO? IQ I I I I l.092 2=2+4 = IO IQ)- l.674 All the angular distributions obtained along mith the D%'BA fits for the states analyzed in the "Mo(d, t)9'Mo...

Bindal, P. K.; Youngblood, David H.; Kozub, R. L.

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

21 briefing pages total  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

briefing pages total p. 1 briefing pages total p. 1 Reservist Differential Briefing U.S. Office of Personnel Management December 11, 2009 p. 2 Agenda - Introduction of Speakers - Background - References/Tools - Overview of Reservist Differential Authority - Qualifying Active Duty Service and Military Orders - Understanding Military Leave and Earnings Statements p. 3 Background 5 U.S.C. 5538 (Section 751 of the Omnibus Appropriations Act, 2009, March 11, 2009) (Public Law 111-8) Law requires OPM to consult with DOD Law effective first day of first pay period on or after March 11, 2009 (March 15 for most executive branch employees) Number of affected employees unclear p. 4 Next Steps

312

Berkning av vrmeenergifrluster i flerbostadshus genom analys av den totala fjrrvrmeenergianvndningen; Calculation of the thermal energy losses in apartment buildings through analyze of the total district thermal energy consumption .  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

?? This thesis has been carried out on behalf of IV Produkt AB and intends to set an average ratio of thermal energy losses in (more)

Fredhav, Dennis

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Barge Truck Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Barge Barge Truck Total delivered cost per short ton Shipments with transportation rates over total shipments Total delivered cost per short ton Shipments with transportation rates over total shipments Year (nominal) (real) (real) (percent) (nominal) (real) (real) (percent) 2008 $6.26 $5.77 $36.50 15.8% 42.3% $6.12 $5.64 $36.36 15.5% 22.2% 2009 $6.23 $5.67 $52.71 10.8% 94.8% $4.90 $4.46 $33.18 13.5% 25.1% 2010 $6.41 $5.77 $50.83 11.4% 96.8% $6.20 $5.59 $36.26 15.4% 38.9% Annual Percent Change First to Last Year 1.2% 0.0% 18.0% - - 0.7% -0.4% -0.1% - - Latest 2 Years 2.9% 1.7% -3.6% - - 26.6% 25.2% 9.3% - - - = No data reported or value not applicable STB Data Source: The Surface Transportation Board's 900-Byte Carload Waybill Sample EIA Data Source: Form EIA-923 Power Plant Operations Report

314

Summary Max Total Units  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Max Total Units Max Total Units *If All Splits, No Rack Units **If Only FW, AC Splits 1000 52 28 28 2000 87 59 35 3000 61 33 15 4000 61 33 15 Totals 261 153 93 ***Costs $1,957,500.00 $1,147,500.00 $697,500.00 Notes: added several refrigerants removed bins from analysis removed R-22 from list 1000lb, no Glycol, CO2 or ammonia Seawater R-404A only * includes seawater units ** no seawater units included *** Costs = (total units) X (estimate of $7500 per unit) 1000lb, air cooled split systems, fresh water Refrig Voltage Cond Unit IF-CU Combos 2 4 5 28 References Refrig Voltage C-U type Compressor HP R-404A 208/1/60 Hermetic SA 2.5 R-507 230/1/60 Hermetic MA 2.5 208/3/60 SemiHerm SA 1.5 230/3/60 SemiHerm MA 1.5 SemiHerm HA 1.5 1000lb, remote rack systems, fresh water Refrig/system Voltage Combos 12 2 24 References Refrig/system Voltage IF only

315

Total Precipitable Water  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The simulation was performed on 64K cores of Intrepid, running at 0.25 simulated-years-per-day and taking 25 million core-hours. This is the first simulation using both the CAM5 physics and the highly scalable spectral element dynamical core. The animation of Total Precipitable Water clearly shows hurricanes developing in the Atlantic and Pacific.

None

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Total Sustainability Humber College  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Total Sustainability Management Humber College November, 2012 SUSTAINABILITY SYMPOSIUM Green An Impending Global Disaster #12;3 Sustainability is NOT Climate Remediation #12;Our Premises "We cannot, you cannot improve it" (Lord Kelvin) "First rule of sustainability is to align with natural forces

Thompson, Michael

317

Commissioning : The Total Process  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

that rely on electronic control. Very frequently these systems and design features have not performed as expected. This can result in energy-efficiency losses. occupant complaints about comfort, indoor air quality problems. high operating costs...

Kettler, G. J.

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Total isomerization gains flexibility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Isomerization extends refinery flexibility to meet changing markets. TIP (Total Isomerization Process) allows conversion of paraffin fractions in the gasoline boiling region including straight run naptha, light reformate, aromatic unit raffinate, and hydrocrackate. The hysomer isomerization is compared to catalytic reforming. Isomerization routes are graphed. Cost estimates and suggestions on the use of other feedstocks are given. TIP can maximize gas production, reduce crude runs, and complement cat reforming. In four examples, TIP reduces reformer severity and increases reformer yield.

Symoniak, M.F.; Holcombe, T.C.

1983-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Total Cross Sections for Neutron Scattering  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Measurements of neutron total cross-sections are both extensive and extremely accurate. Although they place a strong constraint on theoretically constructed models, there are relatively few comparisons of predictions with experiment. The total cross-sections for neutron scattering from $^{16}$O and $^{40}$Ca are calculated as a function of energy from $50-700$~MeV laboratory energy with a microscopic first order optical potential derived within the framework of the Watson expansion. Although these results are already in qualitative agreement with the data, the inclusion of medium corrections to the propagator is essential to correctly predict the energy dependence given by the experiment.

C. R. Chinn; Ch. Elster; R. M. Thaler; S. P. Weppner

1994-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

320

Effect of thin Mo2C layer on thermal stability of Si/SiO2/Ti/Cu system  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The effect of introducing a thin Mo2C (30 nm) layer between Ti and Cu on the thermal stability of Si/SiO2/Ti/Cu system was studied using four-point probe (FPP), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy-dispersi...

C. C. Tripathi; Mukesh Kumar; Dinesh Kumar

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mo total energy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Rogers Iron Works Co - MO 10  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Rogers Iron Works Co - MO 10 Rogers Iron Works Co - MO 10 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: ROGERS IRON WORKS CO. (MO.10 ) Elimination from consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: Rogers Iron Co. MO.10-1 Location: Joplin , Missouri MO.10-1 Evaluation Year: 1990 MO.10-2 MO.10-3 Site Operations: Tested C-liner crushing methods. MO.10-1 Site Disposition: Eliminated - Potential for contamination considered remote based on limited quantities of material handled MO.10-3 MO.10-4 Radioactive Materials Handled: Yes Primary Radioactive Materials Handled: Uranium (Trace Amounts) MO.10-2 Radiological Survey(s): None Indicated Site Status: Elimination from consideration under FUSRAP Also see Documents Related to ROGERS IRON WORKS CO. MO.10-1 - National Lead Company of Ohio Analytical Data Sheet 9908;

322

Buildings Energy Data Book: 9.1 ENERGY STAR  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

2 2 Home Performance with ENERGY STAR, Completed Jobs Rank Program Sponsor State 1 NY State Energy R&D Authority NY 2 National Grid MA 3 Austin Energy TX 4 Wisconsin Energy Conservation Corp. WI 5 New Jersey Board of Public Utilities NJ 6 Energy Trust of Oregon OR 7 Sacramento Municipal Utility District (1) CA 8 Long Island Power Authority NY 9 Metropolitan Energy Center MO 10 Efficiency Vermont VT Total Note(s): Source(s): Personal communication, Chandler Von Schrader, U.S. EPA, February 10, 2012. 11,647 13,549 24,818 35,012 110,922 1) Part of the California Building Performance Contractors Association. 2) Totals include homes completed since program's inception in 2001. 122 295 494 632 1594 43 138 703 930 1885 - 28 760 843 1631 560 1,040 767 777 3156 338 417 1,194 155 2104 840 1,012 1,944 2176 8717 17 163 1,138 4365

323

Microsoft Word - Poster Abstract_2010_MO-SCI.doc  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

* * Presenter High-Temperature Viscous Sealing Glasses for Solid Oxide Fuel Cells Cheol-Woon Kim * , Cindy L. Schwartz, Joe Szabo, Kevin S. Barr, and Ted E. Day MO-SCI Corporation, Rolla, MO 65401 * ckim@mo-sci.com; (573) 364-2338 Richard K. Brow ** and Zhongzhi Tang Department of Materials Science and Engineering and the Graduate Center for Materials Research, Missouri University of Science and Technology, Rolla, MO 65409-1170 ** brow@mst.edu; (573) 341-6812 MO-SCI Corporation and the Missouri University of Science and Technology successfully identified and tested several glass compositions that could be used as viscous seals for Solid Oxide Fuel Cells (SOFCs) through a SBIR Phase I project (DE-SC0002491). The glasses possess desirable viscosity characteristics- that is, they have softening points in the temperature range

324

Detailed characterization of Mo/Au TES microcalorimeters  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We are optimizing Mo/Au transition-edge-sensor (TES) calorimeters to meet the specifications of NASAs Constellation-X mission. Our calorimeters have already demonstrated very good energy resolution of X rays (2.4 eV at 1.5 keV). We wish to further improve the energy resolution by reducing excess noise in the calorimeters. Development of a detailed model and understanding of the noise is instrumental to reaching this goal. Towards that end we employ a linear model that describes the response of a calorimeter to signal and various sources of noise. The model is based on detailed measurements of the parameters that affect the calorimeters performance such as current-voltage characteristics of the TES thermal conductance of our silicon-nitride membranes and inductance in the electronic circuit used to bias the TES. We determine the sharpness of the superconducting phase transition by fitting the model to the measured responsivity of the calorimeter. The model relates sources of noise such as phonon noise Johnson noise and hypothetical sources of excess noise to measurements of noise in the TES. Based on this analysis we find that the excess noise is consistent with frequency-independent voltage noise in the TES

Mark A. Lindeman; Regis P. Brekosky; Enectali Figueroa-Feliciano; Fred M. Finkbeiner; Mary Li; Caroline K. Stahle; Carl M. Stahle; Nilesh Tralshawala

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Modelling the potential for industrial energy efficiency in IEAs World Energy Outlook  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The industry sector accounts for more than a third of global final energy consumption and nearly the same share of global energy-related CO2...emissions. Compared with other sectors, however, industrial energy mo...

Fabian Kesicki; Akira Yanagisawa

2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Total Sales of Kerosene  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

End Use: Total Residential Commercial Industrial Farm All Other Period: End Use: Total Residential Commercial Industrial Farm All Other Period: Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: End Use Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History U.S. 492,702 218,736 269,010 305,508 187,656 81,102 1984-2012 East Coast (PADD 1) 353,765 159,323 198,762 237,397 142,189 63,075 1984-2012 New England (PADD 1A) 94,635 42,570 56,661 53,363 38,448 15,983 1984-2012 Connecticut 13,006 6,710 8,800 7,437 7,087 2,143 1984-2012 Maine 46,431 19,923 25,158 24,281 17,396 7,394 1984-2012 Massachusetts 7,913 3,510 5,332 6,300 2,866 1,291 1984-2012 New Hampshire 14,454 6,675 8,353 7,435 5,472 1,977 1984-2012

327

Key China Energy Statistics 2012  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Total Primary Energy Production per GDP (MER*) (2009) *Total Primary Energy Production per GDP (PPP**) **PurchasingNorth West China's Energy Consumption per Unit of GDP Energy

Levine, Mark

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Results of U-xMo (x=7, 10, 12 wt.%) Alloy versus Al-6061 Cladding Diffusion Couple Experiments Performed at 500, 550 and 600 Degrees C  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors (RERTR) program has been developing low enrichment fuel systems encased in Al 6061 for use in research and test reactors. UMo alloys in contact with Al and Al alloys can undergo diffusional interactions that can result in the development of interdiffusion zones with complex fine-grained microstructures composed of multiple phases. A monolithic fuel currently being developed by the RERTR program has local regions where the UMo fuel plate is in contact with the Al 6061 cladding and, as a result, the program finds information about interdiffusion zone development at high temperatures of interest. In this study, the microstructural development of diffusion couples consisting of U-7wt.%Mo, U-10wt.%Mo, and U-12wt.%Mo vs. Al 6061 (or 6061 aluminum) cladding, annealed at 500, 550, 600 degrees C for 1, 5, 20, 24, or 132 hours, was analyzed by backscatter electron microscopy and x-ray energy dispersive spectroscopy on a scanning electron microscope. Concentration profiles were determined by standardized wavelength dispersive spectroscopy and standardless x-ray energy dispersive spectroscopy. The results of this work shows that the presence of surface layers at the UMo/Al 6061 interface can dramatically impact the overall interdiffusion behavior in terms of rate of interaction and uniformity of the developed interdiffusion zones. It further reveals that relatively uniform interaction layers with higher Si concentrations can develop in UMo/Al 6061 couples annealed at shorter times and that longer times at temperature result in the development of more non-uniform interaction layers with more areas that are enriched in Al. At longer annealing times and relatively high temperatures, UMo/Al 6061 couples can exhibit more interaction compared to UMo/pure Al couples. The minor alloying constituents in Al 6061 cladding can result in the development of many complex phases in the interaction layer of UMo/Al6061 cladding couples, and some phases in the interdiffusion zones of UMo/Al6061 cladding couples are likely similar to those observed for UMo/pure Al couples.

Emmanuel Perez; Dennis D. Keiser, Jr.; Yongho Sohn

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Determination of Total Solids in Biomass and Total Dissolved...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Total Solids in Biomass and Total Dissolved Solids in Liquid Process Samples Laboratory Analytical Procedure (LAP) Issue Date: 3312008 A. Sluiter, B. Hames, D. Hyman, C. Payne,...

330

Deformation and Fracture Properties in Neutron Irradiated Pure Mo and Mo Alloys  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The effect of neutron irradiation on the mechanical properties of select molybdenum materials, pure low carbon arc-cast (LCAC) Mo, Mo-0.5% Ti-0.1% Zr (TZM) alloy, and oxide dispersion-strengthened (ODS) Mo alloy, was characterized by analyzing the temperature dependence of mechanical properties. This study assembles the tensile test and analysis data obtained through multiple series of irradiation and post-irradiation experiments. Tensile specimens in stress-relieved conditions with longitudinal (LSR) and transverse (TSR) directions were irradiated in high flux isotope reactor (HFIR) at temperatures ranging 270 to 1100oC to 0.6 -13.1 dpa. Also, the recrystallized LCAC Mo specimens in the longitudinal direction (LR) were also irradiated up to 0.28 dpa at ~80oC. Tensile tests were performed at temperatures ranging from -194 oC to 1400oC. Analysis results indicate that the irradiation at temperatures below 700oC increased strength significantly, up to 170%, while the increase of yield stress by irradiations at higher temperature was not significant. The plastic instability stress was strongly dependent on test temperature but was nearly independent of irradiation dose and temperature. The true fracture stress was dependent on test temperature to a lesser degree than was the yield stress and plastic instability stress. It was also slightly impacted by irradiation, depending on both irradiation and test temperatures. Brittle fracture often occurred in the LSR specimens tested at room temperature or lower after low temperature irradiation, while it was observed in many irradiated TSR specimens over the whole test temperature range. The ODS-LSR specimens showed the highest resistance to irradiation embrittlement due to relatively higher fracture stress. The critical temperature for shear failure (CTSF) was defined and evaluated for the materials, and the CTSF values were compared with the ductile to brittle transition temperatures (DBTT) based on ductility data.

Byun, Thak Sang [ORNL; Li, Meimei [ORNL; Cockeram, Brian V [Bechtel-Bettis, Inc.; Snead, Lance Lewis [ORNL

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

U-Mo Foil/Cladding Interactions in Friction Stir Welded Monolithic RERTR Fuel Plates  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Interaction between U-Mo fuel and Al has proven to dramatically impact the overall irradiation performance of RERTR dispersion fuels. It is of interest to better understand how similar interactions may affect the performance of monolithic fuel plates, where a uranium alloy fuel is sandwiched between aluminum alloy cladding. The monolithic fuel plate removes the fuel matrix entirely, which reduces the total surface area of the fuel that is available to react with the aluminum and moves the interface between the fuel and cladding to a colder region of the fuel plate. One of the major fabrication techniques for producing monolithic fuel plates is friction stir welding. This paper will discuss the interactions that can occur between the U-Mo foil and 6061 Al cladding when applying this fabrication technique. It has been determined that the time at high temperatures should be limited as much as is possible during fabrication or any post-fabrication treatment to reduce as much as possible the interactions between the foil and cladding. Without careful control of the fabrication process, significant interaction between the U-Mo foil and Al alloy cladding can result. The reaction layers produced from such interactions can exhibit notably different morphologies vis--vis those typically observed for dispersion fuels.

D.D. Keiser; J.F. Jue; C.R. Clark

2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Policy Options for Encouraging Energy Efficiency Best Practices in Shandong Province's Cement Industry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

12 Figure 7 Total energy consumption and energy intensity ofonly data on total energy consumption or energy intensitytce) Figure 7 Total energy consumption and energy intensity

Price, Lynn

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Total Marketed Production ..............  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

billion cubic feet per day) billion cubic feet per day) Total Marketed Production .............. 68.95 69.77 70.45 71.64 71.91 71.70 71.46 71.57 72.61 72.68 72.41 72.62 70.21 71.66 72.58 Alaska ......................................... 1.04 0.91 0.79 0.96 1.00 0.85 0.77 0.93 0.97 0.83 0.75 0.91 0.93 0.88 0.87 Federal GOM (a) ......................... 3.93 3.64 3.44 3.82 3.83 3.77 3.73 3.50 3.71 3.67 3.63 3.46 3.71 3.70 3.62 Lower 48 States (excl GOM) ...... 63.97 65.21 66.21 66.86 67.08 67.08 66.96 67.14 67.92 68.18 68.02 68.24 65.58 67.07 68.09 Total Dry Gas Production .............. 65.46 66.21 66.69 67.79 68.03 67.83 67.61 67.71 68.69 68.76 68.50 68.70 66.55 67.79 68.66 Gross Imports ................................ 8.48 7.60 7.80 7.95 8.27 7.59 7.96 7.91 7.89 7.17 7.61 7.73 7.96 7.93 7.60 Pipeline ........................................

334

Total Light Management  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Light Management Light Management Why is saving Energy Important World Electricity Consumption (2007) Top 20 Countries 0 500 1000 1500 2000 2500 3000 3500 4000 4500 U n i t e d S t a t e s C h i n a J a p a n R u s s i a I n d i a G e r m a n y C a n a d a A f r i c a F r a n c e B r a z i l K o r e a , S o u t h U n i t e d K i n g d o m I t a l y S p a i n A u s t r a l i a T a i w a n S o u t h A f r i c a M e x i c o S a u d i A r a b i a I r a n Billion kWh Source: US DOE Energy Information Administration Lighting Control Strategies 4 5 6 Occupancy/Vacancy Sensing * The greatest energy savings achieved with any lighting fixture is when the lights are shut off * Minimize wasted light by providing occupancy sensing or vacancy sensing 7 8 Daylight Harvesting * Most commercial space has enough natural light flowing into it, and the amount of artificial light being generated can be unnecessary * Cut back on the production of artificial lighting by

335

Funding for state, city, and county governments in the state includes:  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

MO MO Missouri Total Sum City, County, and SEO Allocations All $43,779,300 MO Missouri State Energy Office $12,568,100 MO Blue Springs City $490,600 MO Cape Girardeau City $173,000 MO Chesterfield City $219,500 MO Columbia City $1,018,300 MO Florissant City $452,200 MO Independence City $1,014,100 MO Jefferson City City $205,400 MO Joplin City $236,500 MO Kansas City City $4,823,200 MO Lee's Summit City $762,700 MO O'Fallon City $681,200 MO Springfield City $1,664,600 MO St. Charles City $615,600 MO St. Joseph City $757,200 MO St. Louis City $3,717,500 MO St. Peters City $512,800 MO University City City $149,600 MO Cass County $378,500 MO Christian County $290,900 MO Clay County $447,800

336

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Spencer Chemical Co - MO 0-01  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

MO 0-01 MO 0-01 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: SPENCER CHEMICAL CO. (MO.0-01) Eliminated from further consideration under FUSRAP - an AEC licensed operation Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: Jayhawk Works MO.0-01-1 Location: Joplin , Missouri MO.0-01-1 Evaluation Year: 1985 MO.0-01-2 Site Operations: Processed enriched uranium (UF-6) and scrap to produce primarily uranium dioxide (UO-2) under AEC licenses. MO.0-01-3 MO.0-01-4 Site Disposition: Eliminated - No Authority MO.0-01-2 Radioactive Materials Handled: Yes Primary Radioactive Materials Handled: Normal and Enriched Uranium, Thorium MO.0-01-6 Radiological Survey(s): Yes MO.0-01-5 Site Status: Eliminated from further consideration under FUSRAP - an AEC licensed operation Also see Documents Related to SPENCER CHEMICAL CO.

337

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Tyson Valley Powder Farm - MO 11  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Tyson Valley Powder Farm - MO 11 Tyson Valley Powder Farm - MO 11 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: TYSON VALLEY POWDER FARM (MO.11) Eliminated from further consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: None Location: St. Louis County , Missouri MO.11-1 Evaluation Year: 1987 MO.11-2 Site Operations: Storage of C-Special material (residue from production of uranium metal). MO.11-1 MO.11-2 MO.11-3 Site Disposition: Eliminated - Referred to Army Corps of Engineers MO.11-2 Radioactive Materials Handled: Yes Primary Radioactive Materials Handled: Uranium MO.11-3 Radiological Survey(s): None Indicated Site Status: Eliminated from further consideration under FUSRAP Also see Documents Related to TYSON VALLEY POWDER FARM MO.11-1 - Letter; Dickenson to Duff; Subject: Granted continued use

338

Total Space Heat-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Released: September, 2008 Released: September, 2008 Total Space Heat- ing Cool- ing Venti- lation Water Heat- ing Light- ing Cook- ing Refrig- eration Office Equip- ment Com- puters Other All Buildings* ........................... 3,037 115 397 384 52 1,143 22 354 64 148 357 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ........................... 386 19 43 18 11 93 7 137 8 12 38 5,001 to 10,000 .......................... 262 12 35 17 5 83 4 56 6 9 35 10,001 to 25,000 ........................ 407 20 46 44 8 151 3 53 9 19 54 25,001 to 50,000 ........................ 350 15 55 50 9 121 2 34 7 16 42 50,001 to 100,000 ...................... 405 16 57 65 7 158 2 29 6 18 45 100,001 to 200,000 .................... 483 16 62 80 5 195 1 24 Q 31 56 200,001 to 500,000 .................... 361 8 51 54 5 162 1 9 8 19 43 Over 500,000 ............................. 383 8 47 56 3 181 2 12 8 23 43 Principal Building Activity

339

Level: National Data and Regional Totals; Row: NAICS Codes, Value...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 Capability to Switch Natural Gas to Alternative Energy Sources, 2006; Level: National Data and Regional Totals; Row: NAICS Codes, Value of Shipments and Employment Sizes; Column:...

340

Level: National Data and Regional Totals; Row: NAICS Codes, Value...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 Capability to Switch Residual Fuel Oil to Alternative Energy Sources, 2006; Level: National Data and Regional Totals; Row: NAICS Codes, Value of Shipments and Employment Sizes;...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mo total energy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Level: National Data and Regional Totals; Row: NAICS Codes, Value...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 Capability to Switch Electricity to Alternative Energy Sources, 2006; Level: National Data and Regional Totals; Row: NAICS Codes, Value of Shipments and Employment Sizes; Column:...

342

Level: National Data and Regional Totals; Row: NAICS Codes, Value...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

8 Capability to Switch Distillate Fuel Oil to Alternative Energy Sources, 2006; Level: National Data and Regional Totals; Row: NAICS Codes, Value of Shipments and Employment Sizes;...

343

Determination of Total Petroleum Hydrocarbons (TPH) Using Total Carbon Analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Several methods have been proposed to replace the Freon(TM)-extraction method to determine total petroleum hydrocarbon (TPH) content. For reasons of cost, sensitivity, precision, or simplicity, none of the replacement methods are feasible for analysis of radioactive samples at our facility. We have developed a method to measure total petroleum hydrocarbon content in aqueous sample matrixes using total organic carbon (total carbon) determination. The total carbon content (TC1) of the sample is measured using a total organic carbon analyzer. The sample is then contacted with a small volume of non-pokar solvent to extract the total petroleum hydrocarbons. The total carbon content of the resultant aqueous phase of the extracted sample (TC2) is measured. Total petroleum hydrocarbon content is calculated (TPH = TC1-TC2). The resultant data are consistent with results obtained using Freon(TM) extraction followed by infrared absorbance.

Ekechukwu, A.A.

2002-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

344

Total Space Heat-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Revised: December, 2008 Revised: December, 2008 Total Space Heat- ing Cool- ing Venti- lation Water Heat- ing Light- ing Cook- ing Refrig- eration Office Equip- ment Com- puters Other All Buildings ............................. 91.0 33.0 7.2 6.1 7.0 18.7 2.7 5.3 1.0 2.2 7.9 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ........................... 99.0 30.7 6.7 2.7 7.1 13.9 7.1 19.9 1.1 1.7 8.2 5,001 to 10,000 .......................... 80.0 30.1 5.5 2.6 6.1 13.6 5.2 8.2 0.8 1.4 6.6 10,001 to 25,000 ........................ 71.0 28.2 4.5 4.1 4.1 14.5 2.3 4.5 0.8 1.6 6.5 25,001 to 50,000 ........................ 79.0 29.9 6.8 5.9 6.3 14.9 1.7 3.9 0.8 1.8 7.1 50,001 to 100,000 ...................... 88.7 31.6 7.6 7.6 6.5 19.6 1.7 3.4 0.7 2.0 8.1 100,001 to 200,000 .................... 104.2 39.1 8.2 8.9 7.9 22.9 1.1 2.9 Q 3.2 8.7 200,001 to 500,000 ....................

345

Total Space Heat-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Revised: December, 2008 Revised: December, 2008 Total Space Heat- ing Cool- ing Venti- lation Water Heat- ing Light- ing Cook- ing Refrig- eration Office Equip- ment Com- puters Other All Buildings ............................. 91.0 33.0 7.2 6.1 7.0 18.7 2.7 5.3 1.0 2.2 7.9 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ........................... 99.0 30.7 6.7 2.7 7.1 13.9 7.1 19.9 1.1 1.7 8.2 5,001 to 10,000 .......................... 80.0 30.1 5.5 2.6 6.1 13.6 5.2 8.2 0.8 1.4 6.6 10,001 to 25,000 ........................ 71.0 28.2 4.5 4.1 4.1 14.5 2.3 4.5 0.8 1.6 6.5 25,001 to 50,000 ........................ 79.0 29.9 6.8 5.9 6.3 14.9 1.7 3.9 0.8 1.8 7.1 50,001 to 100,000 ...................... 88.7 31.6 7.6 7.6 6.5 19.6 1.7 3.4 0.7 2.0 8.1 100,001 to 200,000 .................... 104.2 39.1 8.2 8.9 7.9 22.9 1.1 2.9 Q 3.2 8.7 200,001 to 500,000 ....................

346

U.S. Total Exports  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Babb, MT Havre, MT Port of Morgan, MT Pittsburg, NH Grand Island, NY Massena, NY Niagara Falls, NY Waddington, NY Sumas, WA Sweetgrass, MT Total to Chile Sabine Pass, LA Total to China Kenai, AK Sabine Pass, LA Total to India Freeport, TX Sabine Pass, LA Total to Japan Cameron, LA Kenai, AK Sabine Pass, LA Total to Mexico Douglas, AZ Nogales, AZ Calexico, CA Ogilby Mesa, CA Otay Mesa, CA Alamo, TX Clint, TX Del Rio, TX Eagle Pass, TX El Paso, TX Hidalgo, TX McAllen, TX Penitas, TX Rio Bravo, TX Roma, TX Total to Portugal Sabine Pass, LA Total to Russia Total to South Korea Freeport, TX Sabine Pass, LA Total to Spain Cameron, LA Sabine Pass, LA Total to United Kingdom Sabine Pass, LA Period: Monthly Annual

347

Measured bremsstrahlung photonuclear production of 99Mo (99mTc) with 34MeV to 1.7GeV Electrons  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract 99Mo photonuclear yield was measured using high-energy electrons from Laser Plasma Accelerators and natural molybdenum. Spectroscopically resolved electron beams allow comparisons to Monte Carlo calculations using known 100Mo(?,n)99Mo cross sections. Yields are consistent with published low-energy data, and higher energy data are well predicted from the calculations. The measured yield is (15+/?2)10?5 atoms/electron (0.92+/?0.11GBq/?A) for 25mm targets at 33.7MeV, rising to (1391+/?20)10?5 atoms/electron (87+/?2GBq/?A) for 54mm/ 1.7GeV, with peak power-normalized yield at 150MeV.

A.D. Roberts; C.G.R. Geddes; N. Matlis; K. Nakamura; J.P. O'Neil; B.H. Shaw; S. Steinke; J. van Tilborg; W.P. Leemans

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Doping mechanisms in graphene-MoS{sub 2} hybrids  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present a joint theoretical and experimental investigation of charge doping and electronic potential landscapes in hybrid structures composed of graphene and semiconducting single layer molybdenum disulfide (MoS{sub 2}). From first-principles simulations, we find electron doping of graphene due to the presence of rhenium impurities in MoS{sub 2}. Furthermore, we show that MoS{sub 2} edges give rise to charge reordering and a potential shift in graphene, which can be controlled through external gate voltages. The interplay of edge and impurity effects allows the use of the graphene-MoS{sub 2} hybrid as a photodetector. Spatially resolved photocurrent signals can be used to resolve potential gradients and local doping levels in the sample.

Sachs, B., E-mail: bsachs@physnet.uni-hamburg.de; Lichtenstein, A. I. [I. Institut fr Theoretische Physik, Universitt Hamburg, Jungiusstrae 9, D-20355 Hamburg (Germany)] [I. Institut fr Theoretische Physik, Universitt Hamburg, Jungiusstrae 9, D-20355 Hamburg (Germany); Britnell, L.; Eckmann, A.; Novoselov, K. S. [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Manchester, M13 9PL Manchester (United Kingdom)] [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Manchester, M13 9PL Manchester (United Kingdom); Wehling, T. O. [Institut fr Theoretische Physik, Universitt Bremen, Otto-Hahn-Allee 1, D-28359 Bremen (Germany) [Institut fr Theoretische Physik, Universitt Bremen, Otto-Hahn-Allee 1, D-28359 Bremen (Germany); Bremen Center for Computational Materials Science, Universitt Bremen, Am Fallturm 1a, D-28359 Bremen (Germany); Jalil, R.; Belle, B. D. [Manchester Centre for Mesoscience and Nanotechnology, University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom)] [Manchester Centre for Mesoscience and Nanotechnology, University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Katsnelson, M. I. [Institute for Molecules and Materials, Radboud University of Nijmegen, Heijendaalseweg 135, 6525 AJ Nijmegen (Netherlands)] [Institute for Molecules and Materials, Radboud University of Nijmegen, Heijendaalseweg 135, 6525 AJ Nijmegen (Netherlands)

2013-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

349

EUV damage threshold measurements of Mo/Si multilayer mirrors  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

An EUV Schwarzschild objective consisting of two spherical, annular mirror substrates coated with Mo/Si multilayers (reflectivity...R?0.65@13.5nm) provides high EUV fluences [13]. The incidence angles on the sam...

Matthias Mller; Frank Barkusky; Torsten Feigl; Klaus Mann

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Q value of the 100Mo Double-Beta Decay  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Penning trap measurements using mixed beams of 100Mo - 100Ru and 76Ge - 76Se have been utilized to determine the double-beta decay Q-values of 100Mo and 76Ge with uncertainties less than 200 eV. The value for 76Ge, 2039.04(16) keV is in agreement with the published SMILETRAP value. The new value for 100Mo, 3034.40(17) keV is 30 times more precise than the previous literature value, sufficient for the ongoing neutrinoless double-beta decay searches in 100Mo. Moreover, the precise Q-value is used to calculate the phase-space integrals and the experimental nuclear matrix element of double-beta decay.

S. Rahaman; V. -V. Elomaa; T. Eronen; J. Hakala; A. Jokinen; J. Julin; A. Kankainen; A. Saastamoinen; J. Suhonen; C. Weber; J. yst

2007-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

351

Energy Use in China: Sectoral Trends and Future Outlook  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

structure. From 51% of total energy consumption in 1980, thefor 61% of total energy consumption. Industrial energy usethis scenario, Chinas total energy consumption by 2020 will

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Process-dependent electronic states at Mo/hafnium oxide/Si interfaces  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The authors have used low energy electron-excited nanoscale depth-resolved cathodoluminescence spectroscopy (DRCLS) to probe the bulk and interface defect states of ultrathin Mo/HfO{sub 2}/Si with eight different process sequences. After atomic layer deposition of 4 nm HfO{sub 2} on Si and an O{sub 2} post-treatment, they deposited 10 nm Mo using either plasma vapor or electron beam deposition, with or without a subsequent 1000 deg. C N{sub 2} anneal and with or without a forming gas anneal. DRCLS revealed pronounced gap state emissions within the ultrathin films and their interfaces with Mo and Si. There are multiple deep level emissions below the {approx}5.9 eV near band edge, including peak emissions at 3.4, 3.5, and 3.9-4.3 eV that can be associated with HfO{sub 2} oxygen vacancies in different charge states predicted theoretically. In addition, states at 2-2.6 eV that resemble known SiO{sub 2}-related nonbonding oxygen hole centers and E{sup '} (positively charged O vacancy) native defects increase with depth within the 4 nm HfO{sub 2} film, suggesting the formation of a Hf silicate at the HfO{sub 2}/Si interface. No metal-specific interface states at the HfO{sub 2}/Mo interface are evident. Furthermore, different process steps produce large changes in these states and for at least one sequence, a dramatic decrease in both types of defects. The differences between process sequences can be understood in terms of known reactions at HfO{sub 2}-Si interfaces.

Walsh, S.; Fang, L.; Schaeffer, J. K.; Brillson, L. J. [Department of Physics, Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States); Technology Solutions Organization, Freescale Semiconductor, Inc., Austin, Texas 78721 (United States); Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Department of Physics and Center for Materials Research, Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States)

2007-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

353

ARM - Measurement - Net broadband total irradiance  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

govMeasurementsNet broadband total irradiance govMeasurementsNet broadband total irradiance ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Net broadband total irradiance The difference between upwelling and downwelling, covering longwave and shortwave radiation. Categories Radiometric Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. ARM Instruments EBBR : Energy Balance Bowen Ratio Station SEBS : Surface Energy Balance System External Instruments ECMWF : European Centre for Medium Range Weather Forecasts Model

354

" Level: National Data and Regional Totals;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 Capability to Switch Electricity to Alternative Energy Sources, 2006; " 6 Capability to Switch Electricity to Alternative Energy Sources, 2006; " " Level: National Data and Regional Totals;" " Row: NAICS Codes, Value of Shipments and Employment Sizes;" " Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Million Kilowatthours." ,,"Electricity Receipts",,,"Alternative Energy Sources(b)" ,,,,,,,,,,"Coal Coke" "NAICS"," ","Total"," ","Not","Natural","Distillate","Residual",,,"and" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Receipts(c)","Switchable","Switchable","Gas","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil","Coal","LPG","Breeze","Other(d)"," "

355

1 Mo 1 Do 1 Sa 1 Di 1 Fr 1 Fr 1 Mo 1 Mi 1 Sa 1 Mo 1 Do 1 So 2 Di 2 Fr 2 So 2 Mi 2 Sa 2 Sa 2 Di 2 Do 2 So 2 Di 2 Fr 2 Mo  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Mo 1 Do 1 Sa 1 Di 1 Fr 1 Fr 1 Mo 1 Mi 1 Sa 1 Mo 1 Do 1 So 2 Di 2 Fr 2 So 2 Mi 2 Sa 2 Sa 2 Di 2 Do 2 So 2 Di 2 Fr 2 Mo 3 Mi 3 Sa 3 Mo 3 Do 3 So 3 So 3 Mi 3 Fr 3 Mo 3 Mi 3 Sa 3 Di 4 Do 4 So 4 Di 4 Fr 4 Mo 4 Mo 4 Do 4 Sa 4 Di 4 Do P StAU4 So 4 Mi 5 Fr 5 Mo 5 Mi 5 Sa 5 Di 5 Di 5 Fr 5 So 5 Mi 5 Fr 5 Mo

Mayberry, Marty

356

Energy Audit Practices in China: National and Local Experiences and Issues  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

from operations, total energy consumption, energy use perof product and total energy consumption are ranked among thehow to assess total energy consumption, energy use relative

Shen, Bo

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Alternative Energy Development and China's Energy Future  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Corn Corn Wheat Cassava Source: Green Energy InformationTotal Energy Input EROEI Per MJ Fuel Output Corn-derived

Zheng, Nina

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Electronic structure of CdMoO{sub 4} using Compton scattering technique  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The first ever Compton profile of polycrystalline CdMoO{sub 4} has been measured using {sup 137}Cs spectrometer. The results are compared with theoretical Compton profiles deduced from free atom and linear combination of atomic orbitals (LCAO) methods. We have also computed the energy bands using density functional theory (DFT) within LCAO. The computed bands confirm the semiconducting behaviour of this compound. It is seen that the DFT theoretical profile (with local density approximation) gives a better agreement with the experimental Compton data than free atom Compton profile.

Sharma, Khushboo, E-mail: khushboo.phy@gmail.com; Ahuja, B. L. [Department of Physics, University College of Science, M.L. Sukhadia University, Udaipur-313001 (India); Sahariya, Jagrati [Department of Physics, Manipal University, Jaipur-303007 (India)

2014-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

359

The production of higher alcohols from syngas using potassium promoted Co/Mo/A12O3 and Rh/Co/Mo/A12O3  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The optimized compositions K(4.9)/Co(2.7)/Mo(6.4)/A1203(gamma) and K(1.2)/ Rh(1.1)/Co(0.6)/Mo(5.7)/A1203(gamma) are both productive catalysts for higher alcohols. The incorporation of rhodium into the K/Co/Mo/A12

D. A. Storm

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Coated U(Mo) Fuel: As-Fabricated Microstructures  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As part of the development of low-enriched uranium fuels, fuel plates have recently been tested in the BR-2 reactor as part of the SELENIUM experiment. These fuel plates contained fuel particles with either Si or ZrN thin film coating (up to 1 m thickness) around the U-7Mo fuel particles. In order to best understand irradiation performance, it is important to determine the starting microstructure that can be observed in as-fabricated fuel plates. To this end, detailed microstructural characterization was performed on ZrN and Si-coated U-7Mo powder in samples taken from AA6061-clad fuel plates fabricated at 500C. Of interest was the condition of the thin film coatings after fabrication at a relatively high temperature. Both scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy were employed. The ZrN thin film coating was observed to consist of columns comprised of very fine ZrN grains. Relatively large amounts of porosity could be found in some areas of the thin film, along with an enrichment of oxygen around each of the the ZrN columns. In the case of the pure Si thin film coating sample, a (U,Mo,Al,Si) interaction layer was observed around the U-7Mo particles. Apparently, the Si reacted with the U-7Mo and Al matrix during fuel plate fabrication at 500C to form this layer. The microstructure of the formed layer is very similar to those that form in U-7Mo versus Al-Si alloy diffusion couples annealed at higher temperatures and as-fabricated U-7Mo dispersion fuel plates with Al-Si alloy matrix fabricated at 500C.

Emmanuel Perez; Dennis D. Keiser, Jr.; Ann Leenaers; Sven Van den Berghe; Tom Wiencek

2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mo total energy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Key China Energy Statistics 2012  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Consumption Total Primary Energy Consumption by Source AAGRFuel Wind Total Primary Energy Consumption by Source SharesPrimary Energy Production per Capita (2009) tce/capita Electricity Consumption

Levine, Mark

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Key China Energy Statistics 2012  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of China's Total Primary Energy Production by Source (1950-AAGR EJ Primary Energy Production (Mtce) Coal Oil NaturalRenewables Total Primary Energy Production by Source Shares*

Levine, Mark

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Curriculum Vitae HyungMo Jeong  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

National Laboratory and Department of Chemistry, UC Berkeley. 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, California 94720 Development of energy storage & conversion systems including hydrogen energy, solar cell, and Li-ion battery Metal Decorated Graphene for High Power, Capacity Lithium Ion Battery Advisor: Prof. Jeungku Kang July

Yaghi, Omar M.

364

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

11 - 25220 of 28,904 results. 11 - 25220 of 28,904 results. Rebate Clark Energy- Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs Clark Energy offers a free energy audit to provide residential customers with suggestions on ways to improve the energy efficiency of participating homes. Rebates are available for customers who... http://energy.gov/savings/clark-energy-residential-energy-efficiency-rebate-programs Rebate Co-Mo Electric Cooperative- Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Co-Mo Electric Cooperative provides rebates to residential and commercial members who install air source, dual fuel, and/or geothermal heat pumps, and certain energy efficient appliances. The... http://energy.gov/savings/co-mo-electric-cooperative-residential-energy-efficiency-rebate-program Rebate ComEd- Smart Ideas for Your Home Efficiency Program

365

Mujeres Hombres Total Hombres Total 16 5 21 0 10  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Julio de 2011 Tipo de Discapacidad Sexo CENTRO 5-Distribución del estudiantado con discapacidad por centro, tipo de discapacidad, sexo y totales. #12;

Autonoma de Madrid, Universidad

366

Excitons in a mirror: Formation of optical bilayers using MoS{sub 2} monolayers on gold substrates  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We report coupling of excitons in monolayers of molybdenum disulphide to their mirror image in an underlying gold substrate. Excitons at the direct band gap are little affected by the substrate whereas strongly bound C-excitons associated with a van-Hove singularity change drastically. On quartz substrates only one C-exciton is visible (in the blue) but on gold substrates a strong red-shifted extra resonance in the green is seen. Exciton coupling to its image leads to formation of a mirror biexciton with enhanced binding energy. Estimates of this energy shift in an emitter-gold system match experiments well. The absorption spectrum of MoS{sub 2} on gold thus resembles a bilayer of MoS{sub 2} which has been created by optical coupling. Additional top-mirrors produce an optical bulk..

Mertens, Jan; Baumberg, Jeremy J., E-mail: jjb12@cam.ac.uk [Nanophotonics Centre, Cavendish Laboratory, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB3 0HE (United Kingdom); Shi, Yumeng; Yang, Hui Ying, E-mail: yanghuiying@sutd.edu.sg [Pillar of Engineering Product Development, Singapore University of Technology and Design, Singapore 138682 (Singapore); Molina-Snchez, Alejandro; Wirtz, Ludger [Physics and Materials Science Research Unit, University of Luxembourg, L-1511 Luxembourg (Luxembourg)

2014-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

367

Investigation of the reaction zone between TiAl and Mo  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Pure Mo was incorporated in TiAl matrix via two different routes: (1) hot pressing of alternately sandwiched Ti-Al sheets and Mo foils; and (2) coextrusion and heat treatment of Ti-Al green compact and Mo rod. The reaction zone between TiAl and Mo is found to contain two intermetallic phases: {beta}-(Mo,Ti)Al and {rho}-(Mo,Ti){sub 3}Al. The {beta}-{rho} boundary is incoherent, whereas the TiAl-{beta} and {rho}-Mo boundaries are semicoherent. The reaction zone grows with increasing heat-treatment time in a parabolic form. The incorporated Mo exhibits lower hardness than the TiAl matrix, implying that ductilizing and toughening of TiAl by introducing Mo as a ductile reinforcement are possible.

Hsu, F.Y.; Klaar, H.J. [Aachen Univ. of Technology (Germany); Wang, G.X. [Zhejiang Univ., Hangzhou (China). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering; Pirwitz, F. [GKSS Research Center, Geesthacht (Germany). Inst. for Materials Research

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Total.................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

49.2 49.2 15.1 15.6 11.1 7.0 5.2 8.0 Have Cooling Equipment............................... 93.3 31.3 15.1 15.6 11.1 7.0 5.2 8.0 Use Cooling Equipment................................ 91.4 30.4 14.6 15.4 11.1 6.9 5.2 7.9 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it............... 1.9 1.0 0.5 Q Q Q Q Q Do Not Have Cooling Equipment................... 17.8 17.8 N N N N N N Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System............................................. 65.9 3.9 15.1 15.6 11.1 7.0 5.2 8.0 Without a Heat Pump................................ 53.5 3.5 12.9 12.7 8.6 5.5 4.2 6.2 With a Heat Pump..................................... 12.3 0.4 2.2 2.9 2.5 1.5 1.0 1.8 Window/Wall Units........................................ 28.9 27.5 0.5 Q 0.3 Q Q Q 1 Unit......................................................... 14.5 13.5 0.3 Q Q Q N Q 2 Units.......................................................

369

Total........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7.1 7.1 7.0 8.0 12.1 Do Not Have Space Heating Equipment............... 1.2 Q Q Q 0.2 Have Main Space Heating Equipment.................. 109.8 7.1 6.8 7.9 11.9 Use Main Space Heating Equipment.................... 109.1 7.1 6.6 7.9 11.4 Have Equipment But Do Not Use It...................... 0.8 N Q N 0.5 Main Heating Fuel and Equipment Natural Gas.......................................................... 58.2 3.8 0.4 3.8 8.4 Central Warm-Air Furnace................................ 44.7 1.8 Q 3.1 6.0 For One Housing Unit................................... 42.9 1.5 Q 3.1 6.0 For Two Housing Units................................. 1.8 Q N Q Q Steam or Hot Water System............................. 8.2 1.9 Q Q 0.2 For One Housing Unit................................... 5.1 0.8 Q N Q For Two Housing Units.................................

370

Total........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5.6 5.6 17.7 7.9 Do Not Have Space Heating Equipment............... 1.2 Q Q N Have Main Space Heating Equipment.................. 109.8 25.6 17.7 7.9 Use Main Space Heating Equipment.................... 109.1 25.6 17.7 7.9 Have Equipment But Do Not Use It...................... 0.8 N N N Main Heating Fuel and Equipment Natural Gas.......................................................... 58.2 18.4 13.1 5.3 Central Warm-Air Furnace................................ 44.7 16.2 11.6 4.7 For One Housing Unit................................... 42.9 15.5 11.0 4.5 For Two Housing Units................................. 1.8 0.7 0.6 Q Steam or Hot Water System............................. 8.2 1.6 1.2 0.4 For One Housing Unit................................... 5.1 1.1 0.9 Q For Two Housing Units.................................

371

Total...........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4.2 4.2 7.6 16.6 Do Not Have Cooling Equipment............................. 17.8 10.3 3.1 7.3 Have Cooling Equipment.......................................... 93.3 13.9 4.5 9.4 Use Cooling Equipment........................................... 91.4 12.9 4.3 8.5 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it.......................... 1.9 1.0 Q 0.8 Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System........................................................ 65.9 10.5 3.9 6.5 Without a Heat Pump........................................... 53.5 8.7 3.2 5.5 With a Heat Pump............................................... 12.3 1.7 0.7 1.0 Window/Wall Units.................................................. 28.9 3.6 0.6 3.0 1 Unit................................................................... 14.5 2.9 0.5 2.4 2 Units.................................................................

372

Total....................................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Personal Computers Personal Computers Do Not Use a Personal Computer.................................. 35.5 14.2 7.2 2.8 4.2 Use a Personal Computer.............................................. 75.6 26.6 14.5 4.1 7.9 Most-Used Personal Computer Type of PC Desk-top Model......................................................... 58.6 20.5 11.0 3.4 6.1 Laptop Model............................................................. 16.9 6.1 3.5 0.7 1.9 Hours Turned on Per Week Less than 2 Hours..................................................... 13.6 5.0 2.6 1.0 1.3 2 to 15 Hours............................................................. 29.1 10.3 5.9 1.6 2.9 16 to 40 Hours........................................................... 13.5 4.1 2.3 0.6 1.2 41 to 167 Hours.........................................................

373

Total..............................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,171 ,171 1,618 1,031 845 630 401 Census Region and Division Northeast................................................... 20.6 2,334 1,664 562 911 649 220 New England.......................................... 5.5 2,472 1,680 265 1,057 719 113 Middle Atlantic........................................ 15.1 2,284 1,658 670 864 627 254 Midwest...................................................... 25.6 2,421 1,927 1,360 981 781 551 East North Central.................................. 17.7 2,483 1,926 1,269 999 775 510 West North Central................................. 7.9 2,281 1,930 1,566 940 796 646 South.......................................................... 40.7 2,161 1,551 1,295 856 615 513 South Atlantic......................................... 21.7 2,243 1,607 1,359 896 642 543 East South Central.................................

374

Total.........................................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

..... ..... 111.1 7.1 7.0 8.0 12.1 Personal Computers Do Not Use a Personal Computer...................................... 35.5 3.0 2.0 2.7 3.1 Use a Personal Computer.................................................. 75.6 4.2 5.0 5.3 9.0 Most-Used Personal Computer Type of PC Desk-top Model............................................................. 58.6 3.2 3.9 4.0 6.7 Laptop Model................................................................. 16.9 1.0 1.1 1.3 2.4 Hours Turned on Per Week Less than 2 Hours......................................................... 13.6 0.7 0.9 0.9 1.4 2 to 15 Hours................................................................. 29.1 1.7 2.1 1.9 3.4 16 to 40 Hours............................................................... 13.5 0.9 0.9 0.9 1.8 41 to 167 Hours.............................................................

375

Total.............................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Cooking Appliances Cooking Appliances Frequency of Hot Meals Cooked 3 or More Times A Day......................................... 8.2 2.6 0.7 1.9 2 Times A Day...................................................... 24.6 6.6 2.0 4.6 Once a Day........................................................... 42.3 8.8 2.9 5.8 A Few Times Each Week...................................... 27.2 4.7 1.5 3.1 About Once a Week.............................................. 3.9 0.7 Q 0.6 Less Than Once a Week....................................... 4.1 0.7 0.3 0.4 No Hot Meals Cooked........................................... 0.9 0.2 Q Q Conventional Oven Use an Oven......................................................... 109.6 23.7 7.5 16.2 More Than Once a Day..................................... 8.9 1.7 0.4 1.3 Once a Day.......................................................

376

Total..............................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0.7 0.7 21.7 6.9 12.1 Do Not Have Cooling Equipment................................ 17.8 1.4 0.8 0.2 0.3 Have Cooling Equipment............................................. 93.3 39.3 20.9 6.7 11.8 Use Cooling Equipment.............................................. 91.4 38.9 20.7 6.6 11.7 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it............................. 1.9 0.5 Q Q Q Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System........................................................... 65.9 32.1 17.6 5.2 9.3 Without a Heat Pump.............................................. 53.5 23.2 10.9 3.8 8.4 With a Heat Pump................................................... 12.3 9.0 6.7 1.4 0.9 Window/Wall Units..................................................... 28.9 8.0 3.4 1.7 2.9 1 Unit......................................................................

377

Total....................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

14.7 14.7 7.4 12.5 12.5 18.9 18.6 17.3 9.2 Household Size 1 Person.......................................................... 30.0 4.6 2.5 3.7 3.2 5.4 5.5 3.7 1.6 2 Persons......................................................... 34.8 4.3 1.9 4.4 4.1 5.9 5.3 5.5 3.4 3 Persons......................................................... 18.4 2.5 1.3 1.7 1.9 2.9 3.5 2.8 1.6 4 Persons......................................................... 15.9 1.9 0.8 1.5 1.6 3.0 2.5 3.1 1.4 5 Persons......................................................... 7.9 0.8 0.4 1.0 1.1 1.2 1.1 1.5 0.9 6 or More Persons........................................... 4.1 0.5 0.3 0.3 0.6 0.5 0.7 0.8 0.4 2005 Annual Household Income Category Less than $9,999............................................. 9.9 1.9 1.1 1.3 0.9 1.7 1.3 1.1 0.5 $10,000 to $14,999..........................................

378

Total....................................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

25.6 25.6 40.7 24.2 Personal Computers Do Not Use a Personal Computer.................................. 35.5 6.9 8.1 14.2 6.4 Use a Personal Computer.............................................. 75.6 13.7 17.5 26.6 17.8 Most-Used Personal Computer Type of PC Desk-top Model......................................................... 58.6 10.4 14.1 20.5 13.7 Laptop Model............................................................. 16.9 3.3 3.4 6.1 4.1 Hours Turned on Per Week Less than 2 Hours..................................................... 13.6 2.4 3.4 5.0 2.9 2 to 15 Hours............................................................. 29.1 5.2 7.0 10.3 6.6 16 to 40 Hours........................................................... 13.5 3.1 2.8 4.1 3.4 41 to 167 Hours.........................................................

379

Total....................................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4.2 4.2 7.6 16.6 Personal Computers Do Not Use a Personal Computer.................................. 35.5 6.4 2.2 4.2 Use a Personal Computer.............................................. 75.6 17.8 5.3 12.5 Most-Used Personal Computer Type of PC Desk-top Model......................................................... 58.6 13.7 4.2 9.5 Laptop Model............................................................. 16.9 4.1 1.1 3.0 Hours Turned on Per Week Less than 2 Hours..................................................... 13.6 2.9 0.9 2.0 2 to 15 Hours............................................................. 29.1 6.6 2.0 4.6 16 to 40 Hours........................................................... 13.5 3.4 0.9 2.5 41 to 167 Hours......................................................... 6.3

380

Total..................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

33.0 33.0 8.0 3.4 5.9 14.4 1.2 Do Not Have Cooling Equipment..................... 17.8 6.5 1.6 0.9 1.3 2.4 0.2 Have Cooling Equipment................................. 93.3 26.5 6.5 2.5 4.6 12.0 1.0 Use Cooling Equipment.................................. 91.4 25.7 6.3 2.5 4.4 11.7 0.8 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it................. 1.9 0.8 Q Q 0.2 0.3 Q Type of Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System.............................................. 65.9 14.1 3.6 1.5 2.1 6.4 0.6 Without a Heat Pump.................................. 53.5 12.4 3.1 1.3 1.8 5.7 0.6 With a Heat Pump....................................... 12.3 1.7 0.6 Q 0.3 0.6 Q Window/Wall Units....................................... 28.9 12.4 2.9 1.0 2.5 5.6 0.4 1 Unit.......................................................... 14.5 7.3 1.2 0.5 1.4 3.9 0.2 2 Units.........................................................

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mo total energy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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381

Total....................................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Cooking Appliances Cooking Appliances Frequency of Hot Meals Cooked 3 or More Times A Day................................................. 8.2 3.7 1.6 1.4 1.5 2 Times A Day.............................................................. 24.6 10.8 4.1 4.3 5.5 Once a Day................................................................... 42.3 17.0 7.2 8.7 9.3 A Few Times Each Week............................................. 27.2 11.4 4.7 6.4 4.8 About Once a Week..................................................... 3.9 1.7 0.6 0.9 0.8 Less Than Once a Week.............................................. 4.1 2.2 0.6 0.8 0.5 No Hot Meals Cooked................................................... 0.9 0.4 Q Q Q Conventional Oven Use an Oven................................................................. 109.6 46.2 18.8

382

Total.............................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Do Not Have Cooling Equipment............................... Do Not Have Cooling Equipment............................... 17.8 2.1 1.8 0.3 Have Cooling Equipment............................................ 93.3 23.5 16.0 7.5 Use Cooling Equipment............................................. 91.4 23.4 15.9 7.5 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it............................ 1.9 Q Q Q Type of Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System........................................................ 65.9 17.3 11.3 6.0 Without a Heat Pump............................................. 53.5 16.2 10.6 5.6 With a Heat Pump................................................. 12.3 1.1 0.8 0.4 Window/Wall Units.................................................. 28.9 6.6 4.9 1.7 1 Unit..................................................................... 14.5 4.1 2.9 1.2 2 Units...................................................................

383

Total..............................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

20.6 20.6 25.6 40.7 24.2 Do Not Have Cooling Equipment................................ 17.8 4.0 2.1 1.4 10.3 Have Cooling Equipment............................................. 93.3 16.5 23.5 39.3 13.9 Use Cooling Equipment.............................................. 91.4 16.3 23.4 38.9 12.9 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it............................. 1.9 0.3 Q 0.5 1.0 Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System........................................................... 65.9 6.0 17.3 32.1 10.5 Without a Heat Pump.............................................. 53.5 5.5 16.2 23.2 8.7 With a Heat Pump................................................... 12.3 0.5 1.1 9.0 1.7 Window/Wall Units..................................................... 28.9 10.7 6.6 8.0 3.6 1 Unit......................................................................

384

Total....................................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5.6 5.6 17.7 7.9 Personal Computers Do Not Use a Personal Computer.................................. 35.5 8.1 5.6 2.5 Use a Personal Computer.............................................. 75.6 17.5 12.1 5.4 Most-Used Personal Computer Type of PC Desk-top Model......................................................... 58.6 14.1 10.0 4.0 Laptop Model............................................................. 16.9 3.4 2.1 1.3 Hours Turned on Per Week Less than 2 Hours..................................................... 13.6 3.4 2.5 0.9 2 to 15 Hours............................................................. 29.1 7.0 4.8 2.3 16 to 40 Hours........................................................... 13.5 2.8 2.1 0.7 41 to 167 Hours......................................................... 6.3

385

Total...................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

15.2 15.2 7.8 1.0 1.2 3.3 1.9 For Two Housing Units............................. 0.9 Q N Q 0.6 N Heat Pump.................................................. 9.2 7.4 0.3 Q 0.7 0.5 Portable Electric Heater............................... 1.6 0.8 Q Q Q 0.3 Other Equipment......................................... 1.9 0.7 Q Q 0.7 Q Fuel Oil........................................................... 7.7 5.5 0.4 0.8 0.9 0.2 Steam or Hot Water System........................ 4.7 2.9 Q 0.7 0.8 N For One Housing Unit.............................. 3.3 2.9 Q Q Q N For Two Housing Units............................. 1.4 Q Q 0.5 0.8 N Central Warm-Air Furnace........................... 2.8 2.4 Q Q Q 0.2 Other Equipment......................................... 0.3 0.2 Q N Q N Wood..............................................................

386

Total...............................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Do Not Have Cooling Equipment................. Do Not Have Cooling Equipment................. 17.8 5.3 4.7 2.8 1.9 3.1 3.6 7.5 Have Cooling Equipment.............................. 93.3 21.5 24.1 17.8 11.2 18.8 13.0 31.1 Use Cooling Equipment............................... 91.4 21.0 23.5 17.4 11.0 18.6 12.6 30.3 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it............. 1.9 0.5 0.6 0.4 Q Q 0.5 0.8 Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System............................................ 65.9 11.0 16.5 13.5 8.7 16.1 6.4 17.2 Without a Heat Pump.............................. 53.5 9.4 13.6 10.7 7.1 12.7 5.4 14.5 With a Heat Pump................................... 12.3 1.7 2.8 2.8 1.6 3.4 1.0 2.7 Window/Wall Units...................................... 28.9 10.5 8.1 4.5 2.7 3.1 6.7 14.1 1 Unit....................................................... 14.5 5.8 4.3 2.0 1.1 1.3 3.4 7.4 2 Units.....................................................

387

Total.............................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Cooking Appliances Cooking Appliances Frequency of Hot Meals Cooked 3 or More Times A Day......................................... 8.2 1.4 1.0 0.4 2 Times A Day...................................................... 24.6 5.8 3.5 2.3 Once a Day........................................................... 42.3 10.7 7.8 2.9 A Few Times Each Week...................................... 27.2 5.6 4.0 1.6 About Once a Week.............................................. 3.9 0.9 0.6 0.3 Less Than Once a Week....................................... 4.1 1.1 0.7 0.4 No Hot Meals Cooked........................................... 0.9 Q Q N Conventional Oven Use an Oven......................................................... 109.6 25.3 17.6 7.7 More Than Once a Day..................................... 8.9 1.3 0.8 0.5 Once a Day.......................................................

388

Total...............................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

26.7 26.7 28.8 20.6 13.1 22.0 16.6 38.6 Personal Computers Do Not Use a Personal Computer ........... 35.5 17.1 10.8 4.2 1.8 1.6 10.3 20.6 Use a Personal Computer......................... 75.6 9.6 18.0 16.4 11.3 20.3 6.4 17.9 Number of Desktop PCs 1.......................................................... 50.3 8.3 14.2 11.4 7.2 9.2 5.3 14.2 2.......................................................... 16.2 0.9 2.6 3.7 2.9 6.2 0.8 2.6 3 or More............................................. 9.0 0.4 1.2 1.3 1.2 5.0 0.3 1.1 Number of Laptop PCs 1.......................................................... 22.5 2.2 4.6 4.5 2.9 8.3 1.4 4.0 2.......................................................... 4.0 Q 0.4 0.6 0.4 2.4 Q 0.5 3 or More............................................. 0.7 Q Q Q Q 0.4 Q Q Type of Monitor Used on Most-Used PC Desk-top

389

Total...............................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

20.6 20.6 25.6 40.7 24.2 Personal Computers Do Not Use a Personal Computer ........... 35.5 6.9 8.1 14.2 6.4 Use a Personal Computer......................... 75.6 13.7 17.5 26.6 17.8 Number of Desktop PCs 1.......................................................... 50.3 9.3 11.9 18.2 11.0 2.......................................................... 16.2 2.9 3.5 5.5 4.4 3 or More............................................. 9.0 1.5 2.1 2.9 2.5 Number of Laptop PCs 1.......................................................... 22.5 4.7 4.6 7.7 5.4 2.......................................................... 4.0 0.6 0.9 1.5 1.1 3 or More............................................. 0.7 Q Q Q 0.3 Type of Monitor Used on Most-Used PC Desk-top CRT (Standard Monitor)................... 45.0 7.9 11.4 15.4 10.2 Flat-panel LCD.................................

390

Total................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

111.1 26.7 28.8 20.6 13.1 22.0 16.6 38.6 Do Not Have Space Heating Equipment....... 1.2 0.5 0.3 0.2 Q 0.2 0.3 0.6 Have Main Space Heating Equipment.......... 109.8 26.2 28.5 20.4 13.0 21.8 16.3 37.9 Use Main Space Heating Equipment............ 109.1 25.9 28.1 20.3 12.9 21.8 16.0 37.3 Have Equipment But Do Not Use It.............. 0.8 0.3 0.3 Q Q N 0.4 0.6 Main Heating Fuel and Equipment Natural Gas.................................................. 58.2 12.2 14.4 11.3 7.1 13.2 7.6 18.3 Central Warm-Air Furnace........................ 44.7 7.5 10.8 9.3 5.6 11.4 4.6 12.0 For One Housing Unit........................... 42.9 6.9 10.3 9.1 5.4 11.3 4.1 11.0 For Two Housing Units......................... 1.8 0.6 0.6 Q Q Q 0.4 0.9 Steam or Hot Water System..................... 8.2 2.4 2.5 1.0 1.0 1.3 1.5 3.6 For One Housing Unit...........................

391

Total........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

25.6 25.6 40.7 24.2 Do Not Have Space Heating Equipment............... 1.2 Q Q Q 0.7 Have Main Space Heating Equipment.................. 109.8 20.5 25.6 40.3 23.4 Use Main Space Heating Equipment.................... 109.1 20.5 25.6 40.1 22.9 Have Equipment But Do Not Use It...................... 0.8 N N Q 0.6 Main Heating Fuel and Equipment Natural Gas.......................................................... 58.2 11.4 18.4 13.6 14.7 Central Warm-Air Furnace................................ 44.7 6.1 16.2 11.0 11.4 For One Housing Unit................................... 42.9 5.6 15.5 10.7 11.1 For Two Housing Units................................. 1.8 0.5 0.7 Q 0.3 Steam or Hot Water System............................. 8.2 4.9 1.6 1.0 0.6 For One Housing Unit................................... 5.1 3.2 1.1 0.4

392

Total...........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0.6 0.6 15.1 5.5 Do Not Have Cooling Equipment............................. 17.8 4.0 2.4 1.7 Have Cooling Equipment.......................................... 93.3 16.5 12.8 3.8 Use Cooling Equipment........................................... 91.4 16.3 12.6 3.7 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it.......................... 1.9 0.3 Q Q Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System........................................................ 65.9 6.0 5.2 0.8 Without a Heat Pump........................................... 53.5 5.5 4.8 0.7 With a Heat Pump............................................... 12.3 0.5 0.4 Q Window/Wall Units.................................................. 28.9 10.7 7.6 3.1 1 Unit................................................................... 14.5 4.3 2.9 1.4 2 Units.................................................................

393

Total.......................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4.2 4.2 7.6 16.6 Personal Computers Do Not Use a Personal Computer ................... 35.5 6.4 2.2 4.2 Use a Personal Computer................................ 75.6 17.8 5.3 12.5 Number of Desktop PCs 1.................................................................. 50.3 11.0 3.4 7.6 2.................................................................. 16.2 4.4 1.3 3.1 3 or More..................................................... 9.0 2.5 0.7 1.8 Number of Laptop PCs 1.................................................................. 22.5 5.4 1.5 3.9 2.................................................................. 4.0 1.1 0.3 0.8 3 or More..................................................... 0.7 0.3 Q Q Type of Monitor Used on Most-Used PC Desk-top CRT (Standard Monitor)...........................

394

Total....................................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

111.1 47.1 19.0 22.7 22.3 Personal Computers Do Not Use a Personal Computer.................................. 35.5 16.9 6.5 4.6 7.6 Use a Personal Computer.............................................. 75.6 30.3 12.5 18.1 14.7 Most-Used Personal Computer Type of PC Desk-top Model......................................................... 58.6 22.9 9.8 14.1 11.9 Laptop Model............................................................. 16.9 7.4 2.7 4.0 2.9 Hours Turned on Per Week Less than 2 Hours..................................................... 13.6 5.7 1.8 2.9 3.2 2 to 15 Hours............................................................. 29.1 11.9 5.1 6.5 5.7 16 to 40 Hours........................................................... 13.5 5.5 2.5 3.3 2.2 41 to 167 Hours.........................................................

395

Total........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7.1 7.1 19.0 22.7 22.3 Do Not Have Space Heating Equipment............... 1.2 0.7 Q 0.2 Q Have Main Space Heating Equipment.................. 109.8 46.3 18.9 22.5 22.1 Use Main Space Heating Equipment.................... 109.1 45.6 18.8 22.5 22.1 Have Equipment But Do Not Use It...................... 0.8 0.7 Q N N Main Heating Fuel and Equipment Natural Gas.......................................................... 58.2 27.0 11.9 14.9 4.3 Central Warm-Air Furnace................................ 44.7 19.8 8.6 12.8 3.6 For One Housing Unit................................... 42.9 18.8 8.3 12.3 3.5 For Two Housing Units................................. 1.8 1.0 0.3 0.4 Q Steam or Hot Water System............................. 8.2 4.4 2.1 1.4 0.3 For One Housing Unit................................... 5.1 2.1 1.6 1.0

396

Total........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

15.1 15.1 5.5 Do Not Have Space Heating Equipment............... 1.2 Q Q Q Have Main Space Heating Equipment.................. 109.8 20.5 15.1 5.4 Use Main Space Heating Equipment.................... 109.1 20.5 15.1 5.4 Have Equipment But Do Not Use It...................... 0.8 N N N Main Heating Fuel and Equipment Natural Gas.......................................................... 58.2 11.4 9.1 2.3 Central Warm-Air Furnace................................ 44.7 6.1 5.3 0.8 For One Housing Unit................................... 42.9 5.6 4.9 0.7 For Two Housing Units................................. 1.8 0.5 0.4 Q Steam or Hot Water System............................. 8.2 4.9 3.6 1.3 For One Housing Unit................................... 5.1 3.2 2.2 1.0 For Two Housing Units.................................

397

Total..........................................................  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

... 2.8 0.7 0.5 0.2 Million U.S. Housing Units Home Electronics Usage Indicators Table HC12.12 Home Electronics Usage Indicators by Midwest Census Region,...

398

Total..........................................................  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

... 13.2 1.8 1.2 0.5 Table HC11.10 Home Appliances Usage Indicators by Northeast Census Region, 2005 Million U.S. Housing Units Home Appliances...

399

Total..........................................................  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

... 2.8 1.1 0.7 Q 0.4 Million U.S. Housing Units Home Electronics Usage Indicators Table HC13.12 Home Electronics Usage Indicators by South Census Region,...

400

Total..........................................................  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

... 13.2 3.1 1.0 2.2 Table HC14.10 Home Appliances Usage Indicators by West Census Region, 2005 Million U.S. Housing Units Home Appliances...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mo total energy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Total..........................................................  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

States New York Florida Texas California Million U.S. Housing Units Home Electronics Usage Indicators Table HC15.12 Home Electronics Usage Indicators by Four Most Populated...

402

Total..........................................................  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

... 13.2 2.7 3.5 2.2 1.3 3.5 1.3 3.8 Table HC7.10 Home Appliances Usage Indicators by Household Income, 2005 Below Poverty Line Eligible for Federal...

403

Total..........................................................  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

... 13.2 3.4 2.0 1.4 Table HC12.10 Home Appliances Usage Indicators by Midwest Census Region, 2005 Million U.S. Housing Units Home Appliances...

404

Total..........................................................  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

Census Region Northeast Midwest South West Million U.S. Housing Units Home Electronics Usage Indicators Table HC10.12 Home Electronics Usage Indicators by U.S. Census Region, 2005...

405

Total..........................................................  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

(as Self-Reported) City Town Suburbs Rural Million U.S. Housing Units Home Electronics Usage Indicators Table HC8.12 Home Electronics Usage Indicators by UrbanRural Location,...

406

Total..........................................................  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

... 13.2 4.4 2.5 3.0 3.4 Table HC8.10 Home Appliances Usage Indicators by UrbanRural Location, 2005 Million U.S. Housing Units UrbanRural...

407

Total..........................................................  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

... 2.8 0.6 Q 0.5 Million U.S. Housing Units Home Electronics Usage Indicators Table HC14.12 Home Electronics Usage Indicators by West Census Region, 2005...

408

Total..........................................................  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

... 13.2 4.9 2.3 1.1 1.5 Table HC13.10 Home Appliances Usage Indicators by South Census Region, 2005 Million U.S. Housing Units South Census Region...

409

Total..........................................................  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

... 51.9 7.0 4.8 2.2 Not Asked (Mobile Homes or Apartment in Buildings with 5 or More Units)... 23.7...

410

Total..........................................................  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Housing Units Living Space Characteristics Attached 2 to 4 Units 5 or More Units Mobile Homes Apartments in Buildings With-- Housing Units (millions) Single-Family Units Detached...

411

Total..........................................................  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0.7 21.7 6.9 12.1 Do Not Have Space Heating Equipment... 1.2 Q Q N Q Have Main Space Heating Equipment... 109.8 40.3 21.4 6.9 12.0 Use Main Space Heating...

412

Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Normal ButaneButylene Other Liquids Oxygenates Fuel Ethanol MTBE Other Oxygenates Biomass-based Diesel Other Renewable Diesel Fuel Other Renewable Fuels Gasoline Blending...

413

Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Normal ButaneButylene Other Liquids Oxygenates Fuel Ethanol MTBE Other Oxygenates Biomass-based Diesel Fuel Other Renewable Diesel Fuel Other Renewable Fuels Gasoline Blending...

414

Total.............................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Cooking Appliances Cooking Appliances Frequency of Hot Meals Cooked 3 or More Times A Day......................................... 8.2 1.2 1.0 0.2 2 Times A Day...................................................... 24.6 4.0 2.7 1.2 Once a Day........................................................... 42.3 7.9 5.4 2.5 A Few Times Each Week...................................... 27.2 6.0 4.8 1.2 About Once a Week.............................................. 3.9 0.6 0.5 Q Less Than Once a Week....................................... 4.1 0.6 0.4 Q No Hot Meals Cooked........................................... 0.9 0.3 Q Q Conventional Oven Use an Oven......................................................... 109.6 20.3 14.9 5.4 More Than Once a Day..................................... 8.9 1.4 1.2 0.3 Once a Day.......................................................

415

Total...............................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

47.1 47.1 19.0 22.7 22.3 Personal Computers Do Not Use a Personal Computer ........... 35.5 16.9 6.5 4.6 7.6 Use a Personal Computer......................... 75.6 30.3 12.5 18.1 14.7 Number of Desktop PCs 1.......................................................... 50.3 21.1 8.3 10.7 10.1 2.......................................................... 16.2 6.2 2.8 4.1 3.0 3 or More............................................. 9.0 2.9 1.4 3.2 1.6 Number of Laptop PCs 1.......................................................... 22.5 9.1 3.6 6.0 3.8 2.......................................................... 4.0 1.5 0.6 1.3 0.7 3 or More............................................. 0.7 0.3 Q Q Q Type of Monitor Used on Most-Used PC Desk-top CRT (Standard Monitor)................... 45.0 17.7 7.5 10.2 9.6 Flat-panel LCD.................................

416

Total........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

111.1 24.5 1,090 902 341 872 780 441 Census Region and Division Northeast............................................. 20.6 6.7 1,247 1,032 Q 811 788 147 New England.................................... 5.5 1.9 1,365 1,127 Q 814 748 107 Middle Atlantic.................................. 15.1 4.8 1,182 978 Q 810 800 159 Midwest................................................ 25.6 4.6 1,349 1,133 506 895 810 346 East North Central............................ 17.7 3.2 1,483 1,239 560 968 842 351 West North Central........................... 7.9 1.4 913 789 329 751 745 337 South................................................... 40.7 7.8 881 752 572 942 873 797 South Atlantic................................... 21.7 4.9 875 707 522 1,035 934 926 East South Central........................... 6.9 0.7 Q Q Q 852 826 432 West South Central..........................

417

Total...............................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0.7 0.7 21.7 6.9 12.1 Personal Computers Do Not Use a Personal Computer ........... 35.5 14.2 7.2 2.8 4.2 Use a Personal Computer......................... 75.6 26.6 14.5 4.1 7.9 Number of Desktop PCs 1.......................................................... 50.3 18.2 10.0 2.9 5.3 2.......................................................... 16.2 5.5 3.0 0.7 1.8 3 or More............................................. 9.0 2.9 1.5 0.5 0.8 Number of Laptop PCs 1.......................................................... 22.5 7.7 4.3 1.1 2.4 2.......................................................... 4.0 1.5 0.9 Q 0.4 3 or More............................................. 0.7 Q Q Q Q Type of Monitor Used on Most-Used PC Desk-top CRT (Standard Monitor)................... 45.0 15.4 7.9 2.8 4.8 Flat-panel LCD.................................

418

Total.................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

26.7 26.7 28.8 20.6 13.1 22.0 16.6 38.6 Cooking Appliances Frequency of Hot Meals Cooked 3 or More Times A Day.............................. 8.2 2.9 2.5 1.3 0.5 1.0 2.4 4.6 2 Times A Day........................................... 24.6 6.5 7.0 4.3 3.2 3.6 4.8 10.3 Once a Day................................................ 42.3 8.8 9.8 8.7 5.1 10.0 5.0 12.9 A Few Times Each Week........................... 27.2 5.6 7.2 4.7 3.3 6.3 3.2 7.5 About Once a Week................................... 3.9 1.1 1.1 0.6 0.5 0.6 0.4 1.4 Less Than Once a Week............................ 4.1 1.3 1.0 0.9 0.5 0.4 0.7 1.4 No Hot Meals Cooked................................ 0.9 0.5 Q Q Q Q 0.2 0.5 Conventional Oven Use an Oven.............................................. 109.6 26.1 28.5 20.2 12.9 21.8 16.3 37.8 More Than Once a Day..........................

419

Total..................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

. . 111.1 14.7 7.4 12.5 12.5 18.9 18.6 17.3 9.2 Do Not Have Cooling Equipment..................... 17.8 3.9 1.8 2.2 2.1 3.1 2.6 1.7 0.4 Have Cooling Equipment................................. 93.3 10.8 5.6 10.3 10.4 15.8 16.0 15.6 8.8 Use Cooling Equipment.................................. 91.4 10.6 5.5 10.3 10.3 15.3 15.7 15.3 8.6 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it................. 1.9 Q Q Q Q 0.6 0.4 0.3 Q Type of Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System.............................................. 65.9 3.7 2.6 6.1 6.8 11.2 13.2 13.9 8.2 Without a Heat Pump.................................. 53.5 3.6 2.3 5.5 5.8 9.5 10.1 10.3 6.4 With a Heat Pump....................................... 12.3 Q 0.3 0.6 1.0 1.7 3.1 3.6 1.7 Window/Wall Units....................................... 28.9 7.3 3.2 4.5 3.7 4.8 3.0 1.9 0.7 1 Unit..........................................................

420

Total..............................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

111.1 86.6 2,720 1,970 1,310 1,941 1,475 821 1,059 944 554 Census Region and Division Northeast.................................... 20.6 13.9 3,224 2,173 836 2,219 1,619 583 903 830 Q New England.......................... 5.5 3.6 3,365 2,154 313 2,634 1,826 Q 951 940 Q Middle Atlantic........................ 15.1 10.3 3,167 2,181 1,049 2,188 1,603 582 Q Q Q Midwest...................................... 25.6 21.0 2,823 2,239 1,624 2,356 1,669 1,336 1,081 961 778 East North Central.................. 17.7 14.5 2,864 2,217 1,490 2,514 1,715 1,408 907 839 553 West North Central................. 7.9 6.4 2,729 2,289 1,924 1,806 1,510 1,085 1,299 1,113 1,059 South.......................................... 40.7 33.0 2,707 1,849 1,563 1,605 1,350 954 1,064 970 685 South Atlantic......................... 21.7 16.8 2,945 1,996 1,695 1,573 1,359 909 1,044 955

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mo total energy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Total.................................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

... ... 111.1 20.6 15.1 5.5 Do Not Have Cooling Equipment................................. 17.8 4.0 2.4 1.7 Have Cooling Equipment............................................. 93.3 16.5 12.8 3.8 Use Cooling Equipment............................................... 91.4 16.3 12.6 3.7 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it............................. 1.9 0.3 Q Q Type of Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System.......................................................... 65.9 6.0 5.2 0.8 Without a Heat Pump.............................................. 53.5 5.5 4.8 0.7 With a Heat Pump................................................... 12.3 0.5 0.4 Q Window/Wall Units.................................................... 28.9 10.7 7.6 3.1 1 Unit.......................................................................

422

Total.............................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Do Not Have Cooling Equipment............................... Do Not Have Cooling Equipment............................... 17.8 8.5 2.7 2.6 4.0 Have Cooling Equipment............................................ 93.3 38.6 16.2 20.1 18.4 Use Cooling Equipment............................................. 91.4 37.8 15.9 19.8 18.0 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it............................ 1.9 0.9 0.3 0.3 0.4 Type of Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System........................................................ 65.9 25.8 10.9 16.6 12.5 Without a Heat Pump............................................. 53.5 21.2 9.7 13.7 8.9 With a Heat Pump................................................. 12.3 4.6 1.2 2.8 3.6 Window/Wall Units.................................................. 28.9 13.4 5.6 3.9 6.1 1 Unit.....................................................................

423

Total.............................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Do Not Have Cooling Equipment............................... Do Not Have Cooling Equipment............................... 17.8 10.3 3.1 7.3 Have Cooling Equipment............................................ 93.3 13.9 4.5 9.4 Use Cooling Equipment............................................. 91.4 12.9 4.3 8.5 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it............................ 1.9 1.0 Q 0.8 Type of Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System........................................................ 65.9 10.5 3.9 6.5 Without a Heat Pump............................................. 53.5 8.7 3.2 5.5 With a Heat Pump................................................. 12.3 1.7 0.7 1.0 Window/Wall Units.................................................. 28.9 3.6 0.6 3.0 1 Unit..................................................................... 14.5 2.9 0.5 2.4 2 Units...................................................................

424

Total..................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

78.1 78.1 64.1 4.2 1.8 2.3 5.7 Do Not Have Cooling Equipment..................... 17.8 11.3 9.3 0.6 Q 0.4 0.9 Have Cooling Equipment................................. 93.3 66.8 54.7 3.6 1.7 1.9 4.8 Use Cooling Equipment.................................. 91.4 65.8 54.0 3.6 1.7 1.9 4.7 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it................. 1.9 1.1 0.8 Q N Q Q Type of Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System.............................................. 65.9 51.7 43.9 2.5 0.7 1.6 3.1 Without a Heat Pump.................................. 53.5 41.1 34.8 2.1 0.5 1.2 2.6 With a Heat Pump....................................... 12.3 10.6 9.1 0.4 Q 0.3 0.6 Window/Wall Units....................................... 28.9 16.5 12.0 1.3 1.0 0.4 1.7 1 Unit.......................................................... 14.5 7.2 5.4 0.5 0.2 Q 0.9 2 Units.........................................................

425

Total.............................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Do Not Have Cooling Equipment............................... Do Not Have Cooling Equipment............................... 17.8 1.4 0.8 0.2 0.3 Have Cooling Equipment............................................ 93.3 39.3 20.9 6.7 11.8 Use Cooling Equipment............................................. 91.4 38.9 20.7 6.6 11.7 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it............................ 1.9 0.5 Q Q Q Type of Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System........................................................ 65.9 32.1 17.6 5.2 9.3 Without a Heat Pump............................................. 53.5 23.2 10.9 3.8 8.4 With a Heat Pump................................................. 12.3 9.0 6.7 1.4 0.9 Window/Wall Units.................................................. 28.9 8.0 3.4 1.7 2.9 1 Unit.....................................................................

426

Total........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4.2 4.2 7.6 16.6 Do Not Have Space Heating Equipment............... 1.2 0.7 Q 0.7 Have Main Space Heating Equipment.................. 109.8 23.4 7.5 16.0 Use Main Space Heating Equipment.................... 109.1 22.9 7.4 15.4 Have Equipment But Do Not Use It...................... 0.8 0.6 Q 0.5 Main Heating Fuel and Equipment Natural Gas.......................................................... 58.2 14.7 4.6 10.1 Central Warm-Air Furnace................................ 44.7 11.4 4.0 7.4 For One Housing Unit................................... 42.9 11.1 3.8 7.3 For Two Housing Units................................. 1.8 0.3 Q Q Steam or Hot Water System............................. 8.2 0.6 0.3 0.3 For One Housing Unit................................... 5.1 0.4 0.2 0.1 For Two Housing Units.................................

427

Total..............................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Do Not Have Cooling Equipment................ Do Not Have Cooling Equipment................ 17.8 5.3 4.7 2.8 1.9 3.1 3.6 7.5 Have Cooling Equipment............................. 93.3 21.5 24.1 17.8 11.2 18.8 13.0 31.1 Use Cooling Equipment.............................. 91.4 21.0 23.5 17.4 11.0 18.6 12.6 30.3 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it............. 1.9 0.5 0.6 0.4 Q Q 0.5 0.8 Type of Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System.......................................... 65.9 11.0 16.5 13.5 8.7 16.1 6.4 17.2 Without a Heat Pump.............................. 53.5 9.4 13.6 10.7 7.1 12.7 5.4 14.5 With a Heat Pump................................... 12.3 1.7 2.8 2.8 1.6 3.4 1.0 2.7 Window/Wall Units................................... 28.9 10.5 8.1 4.5 2.7 3.1 6.7 14.1 1 Unit...................................................... 14.5 5.8 4.3 2.0 1.1 1.3 3.4 7.4 2 Units....................................................

428

Idle Operating Total Stream Day  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 3 Idle Operating Total Stream Day Barrels per Idle Operating Total Calendar Day Barrels per Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Capacity Idle Operating Total Operable Refineries Number of State and PAD District a b b 11 10 1 1,293,200 1,265,200 28,000 1,361,700 1,329,700 32,000 ............................................................................................................................................... PAD District I 1 1 0 182,200 182,200 0 190,200 190,200 0 ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................ Delaware......................................

429

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Medart Co - MO 09  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Medart Co - MO 09 Medart Co - MO 09 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: MEDART CO. (MO.09 ) Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP - Facility believed to be torn down and the original site built over Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: None Location: 180 Potomoc Street , St. Louis , Missouri MA.09-4 Evaluation Year: Circa 1990 MA.09-3 Site Operations: Conducted test machining operations on uranium bar stock during the early 1950s. MA.09-2 Site Disposition: Eliminated - Potential for contamination considered remote due limited duration of operations and to site reconstruction MA.09-2 Radioactive Materials Handled: Yes Primary Radioactive Materials Handled: Uranium Metal (test quantities) MA.09-3 Radiological Survey(s): Health and safety monitoring during operations MA.09-3

430

Total solar house description and performance  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The initial attempt to apply the Total Solar concept to a residence in the Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, area is described. A very large storage capacity has made it possible to use only solar energy for meeting the heating, cooling and hot water needs for the entire year, with a parasitic power penalty of about 3500 kWh. Winter temperatures were maintained at 68/sup 0/F with 60/sup 0/F night setback, summer at 76/sup 0/F. Occupant intervention was negligible and passive overheat was minimized. The extra cost for the system, approximately $30,000 is readily amortized by the savings in purchased energy.

Starobin, L. (Univ. of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia); Starobin, J.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Energy  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Energy newsroomassetsimagesenergy-icon.png Energy Research into alternative forms of energy, and improving and securing the power grid, is a major national security...

432

Structural stability of Fe[subscript 5]Si[subscript 3] and Ni[subscript 2]Si studied by high-pressure x-ray diffraction and ab initio total-energy calculations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We performed high-pressure angle dispersive x-ray diffraction measurements on Fe{sub 5}Si{sub 3} and Ni{sub 2}Si up to 75 GPa. Both materials were synthesized in bulk quantities via a solid-state reaction. In the pressure range covered by the experiments, no evidence of the occurrence of phase transitions was observed. On top of that, Fe{sub 5}Si{sub 3} was found to compress isotopically, whereas an anisotropic compression was observed in Ni{sub 2}Si. The linear incompressibility of Ni{sub 2}Si along the c axis is similar in magnitude to the linear incompressibility of diamond. This fact is related to the higher valence-electron charge density of Ni{sub 2}Si along the c axis. The observed anisotropic compression of Ni{sub 2}Si is also related to the layered structure of Ni{sub 2}Si, where hexagonal layers of Ni{sup 2+} cations alternate with graphite-like layers formed by (NiSi){sup 2-} entities. The experimental results are supported by ab initio total-energy calculations carried out using density functional theory and the pseudopotential method. For Fe{sub 5}Si{sub 3}, the calculations also predicted a phase transition at 283 GPa from the hexagonal P6{sub 3}/mcm phase to the cubic structure adopted by Fe and Si in the garnet Fe{sub 5}Si{sub 3}O{sub 12}. The room-temperature equations of state for Fe{sub 5}Si{sub 3} and Ni{sub 2}Si are also reported and a possible correlation between the bulk modulus of iron silicides and the coordination number of their minority element is discussed. Finally, we report additional descriptions of these structures, in particular, of the predicted high-pressure phase of Fe{sub 5}Si{sub 3} (the cation subarray in the garnet Fe{sub 5}Si{sub 3}O{sub 12}), which can be derived from spinel Fe{sub 2}SiO{sub 4} (Fe{sub 6}Si{sub 3}O{sub 12}).

Errandonea, D.; Santamaria-Perez, D.; Vegas, A.; Nuss, J.; Jansen, M.; Rodriguez-Hernandez, P.; Munoz, A. (MXPL-M); (Valencia); (IQ-FR); (Laguna); (MXPL-F)

2008-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

433

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

to totals. Source: Energy Information Administration, Office of Energy Markets and End Use, Forms EIA-871A, C, and E of the 2003 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey....

434

Investigation of the hydroconversion of rancid lard and lard-gas oil mixture on NiMo/Al2O3 catalyst in oxide and in sulphide state  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The necessity to maintain mobility and the increasing energy- and environmentally sound demands necessitated the research, development and utilization of engine fuels from renewable resources. Because of the negative features of the already and generally ... Keywords: NiMo/Al2O3, hydroconversion, hydrogenation, lard, triglyceride

P. Baladincz; J. Hancsk

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

E-Print Network 3.0 - ab initio total Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

into its algorithm. This approach is expected... -functional ab initio total-energy calculation software, SIESTA. 12;474 S. Jun et al. ground state energy... ....

436

In-situ small-angle X-ray scattering study of the precipitation behavior in a Fe-25 at.%Co-9 at.%Mo alloy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Fe-Co-Mo alloys show extraordinary mechanical properties which make them potential candidates for various high-performance applications. In the present study, for the first time, the precipitation behavior in a Fe-25 at.%Co-9 at.%Mo alloy was studied by small-angle X-ray scattering using high-energy synchrotron radiation. The specimens were isothermally aged in an in-situ furnace. The small-angle X-ray scattering patterns showed scaling behavior and were evaluated by employing a model function from the literature. This approach provides information about the characteristic length scale and the volume fraction of the precipitates in the alloy.

Zickler, Gerald A. [Department of Physical Metallurgy and Materials Testing, Montanuniversitaet Leoben, Franz-Josef-Strasse 18, A-8700 Leoben (Austria); Christian Doppler Laboratory for Early Stages of Precipitation, Montanuniversitaet Leoben, Franz-Josef-Strasse 18, A-8700 Leoben (Austria)], E-mail: gerald.zickler@mu-leoben.at; Eidenberger, Elisabeth [Department of Physical Metallurgy and Materials Testing, Montanuniversitaet Leoben, Franz-Josef-Strasse 18, A-8700 Leoben (Austria); Leitner, Harald [Department of Physical Metallurgy and Materials Testing, Montanuniversitaet Leoben, Franz-Josef-Strasse 18, A-8700 Leoben (Austria); Christian Doppler Laboratory for Early Stages of Precipitation, Montanuniversitaet Leoben, Franz-Josef-Strasse 18, A-8700 Leoben (Austria); Stergar, Erich; Clemens, Helmut [Department of Physical Metallurgy and Materials Testing, Montanuniversitaet Leoben, Franz-Josef-Strasse 18, A-8700 Leoben (Austria); Staron, Peter; Lippmann, Thomas; Schreyer, Andreas [GKSS Research Center Geesthacht, Max-Planck-Strasse 1, D-21502 Geesthacht (Germany)

2008-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

437

Residential Two-Stage Gas Furnaces - Do They Save Energy?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

looks at the total energy consumption for several efficiencyno difference in the total energy consumption at the samereduction in the total energy consumption. In contrast, the

Lekov, Alex; Franco, Victor; Lutz, James

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Sectoral trends in global energy use and greenhouse gas emissions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Approximately 30% of total energy consumption is residualrepresented 37% of total energy consumption globally inwe observed how the total energy consumption projected by A1

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Energy management in wireless healthcare systems using dynamic task assignment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to minimizing the total energy consumption and maximizingon reducing the total energy consumption and maximizingR such that i) the total energy consumption is minimized or

Aghera, Priti

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Domestic production of medical isotope Mo-99 moves a step closer  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Domestic production of medical isotope Mo-99 Domestic production of medical isotope Mo-99 moves a step closer Irradiated uranium fuel has been recycled and reused for molybdenum-99...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mo total energy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

In situ electron microscopy study of growth of WO3 and MoO3 nanowhiskers  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

WO3 and MoO3 nanowhiskers were grown from nanosize WO3 and MoO3 powders intensely irradiated with electrons in an electron microscope. Solid and hollow nanowhiskers of these materials were observed. A growth mech...

1 R. T. Malkhasyan; R. K. Karakhanyan; M. N. Nazaryan

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

Policy Flash 2013-71 AL 2013-11 NON M&O CONTRACTOR BUSINESS SYSTEMS...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

71 AL 2013-11 NON M&O CONTRACTOR BUSINESS SYSTEMS CLAUSES FOR SECTION H Policy Flash 2013-71 AL 2013-11 NON M&O CONTRACTOR BUSINESS SYSTEMS CLAUSES FOR SECTION H Policy Flash - AL...

443

Policy Flash 2013-71 AL 2013-11 NON M&O CONTRACTOR BUSINESS SYSTEMS...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

1 AL 2013-11 NON M&O CONTRACTOR BUSINESS SYSTEMS CLAUSES FOR SECTION H Policy Flash 2013-71 AL 2013-11 NON M&O CONTRACTOR BUSINESS SYSTEMS CLAUSES FOR SECTION H Policy Flash - AL...

444

Nanoscale Phase Separation In Epitaxial Cr-Mo and Cr-V Alloy...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Separation In Epitaxial Cr-Mo and Cr-V Alloy Thin Films Studied Using Atom Probe Tomography: Comparison Of Nanoscale Phase Separation In Epitaxial Cr-Mo and Cr-V Alloy Thin Films...

445

A Comparison of Iron and Steel Production Energy Use and Energy Intensity in China and the U.S.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

25 Table 18: Total Energy Consumption of China's Steelalmost doubled, but total energy consumption only increasedsources of total energy consumption data for Chinas iron

Hasanbeigi, Ali

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

¿Cómo funcionan los Híbridos?  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

¿Cómo funcionan los Híbridos? ¿Cómo funcionan los Híbridos? Diagrama de los componentes de un híbrido completo, incluyen (1) un motor de combustión interna (2) un motor eléctrico, (3) un generador, (4) una aparato de cambio de motor, and (5) una batería de gran capacidad. en inglés Flash Animation: ¿Cómo funcionan los Híbridos? (Requiere versión Flash 6.0 o superior) HTML Version: ¿Cómo funcionan los Híbridos? Los vehículos Híbridos-eléctricos (VHEs) combinan las ventajas de los motores de gasolina con los motores eléctricos y se pueden configurar para diferentes objetivos, como mejorar el ahorro de combustible, aumentar su fuerza, o proveer fuerza adicional para el uso del sistema eléctrico o los componentes electrónicos. Algunas de las tecnologías avanzadas que usan los híbridos típicamente

447

Hole Selective MoOx Contact for Silicon Solar Cells  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Hole Selective MoOx Contact for Silicon Solar Cells ... This work has important implications toward enabling a novel class of junctionless devices with applications for solar cells, light-emitting diodes, photodetectors, and transistors. ... Junctionless solar cells; silicon photovoltaics; heterojunctions; dopant-free contact; molybdenum trioxide ...

Corsin Battaglia; Xingtian Yin; Maxwell Zheng; Ian D. Sharp; Teresa Chen; Stephen McDonnell; Angelica Azcatl; Carlo Carraro; Biwu Ma; Roya Maboudian; Robert. M. Wallace; Ali Javey

2014-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

448

(Robert P. Biuk-Aghai), , , : robertb@umac.mo  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 * (Robert P. Biuk-Aghai), , , : robertb@umac.mo (GIS) TM 30 1111 (PC) (PDAs) (ITU) 2002 [1] (PDAs) (GIS) (GIS)- 2 34 5 * . #12;2 2222 2001 2002 (PDA) PalmOS Pocket Google Maps API 3333 GPS 3.13.13.13.1 1. 2. 3. . #12;3 Dijkstra [4] / 1 ("S", "D

Biuk-Aghai, Robert P.

449

Total Sky Imager (TSI) Handbook  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The total sky imager (TSI) provides time series of hemispheric sky images during daylight hours and retrievals of fractional sky cover for periods when the solar elevation is greater than 10 degrees.

Morris, VR

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

Nanotribology and Nanofabrication of MoO3 Structures by Atomic Force Microscopy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...MoS2) surfaces. Highly anisotropic friction was observed whereby...and Ni) typical of black shale environments. One of...MoS2) surfaces. Highly anisotropic friction was observed...measUred friction is extremely anisotropic, with MoO, crystals sliding...

Paul E. Sheehan; Charles M. Lieber

1996-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

451

Neutron Hole States of Mo-99  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

- tation energy of about 5 MeV in Fig. 1, actually extend up to about 16 MeV in order to extract information on the isobaric analog states, which are the subject of a future communication. Due to the high density of levels above 2 MeV, a multi- peak.... In the higher excitation region (E?~3 MeV) undoubtedly only the dominant strengths have been identified: for example, the small angle points for the E =4 levels (Fig. 5) at 3.483, 3.666, and 3.817 MeV are much higher than expected indicating the presence...

Bindal, P. K.; Youngblood, David H.; Kozub, R. L.; Hoffmannpinther, P. H.

1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

Influence of Mo on the Fe:Mo:C nanocatalyst thermodynamics for single-walled carbon nanotube growth  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ternary phases, such as the Fe,Mo 23C6 type carbides.37 The way in which carbon interacts with transition of metal carbide formation. Although relating C solubility and catalytic ability of metal catalysts,23 , metals which form carbides ca

Curtarolo, Stefano

453

Phonon and elastic instabilities in MoC and MoN Gus L. W. Hart* and Barry M. Klein  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

illustrating the rich behavior of carbo-nitride materials. The early transition metal carbides and nitrides high transition temperatures. We show that the elastic instability in B1-structure MoN, demonstrated the calculations re- ported here were performed with the linear-augmented- plane-wave method.2­4 The B1 carbides

Hart, Gus

454

NREL: News - NREL's Economic Benefit to Colorado totals $814...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

1413 NREL's Economic Benefit to Colorado totals 814.8 Million in FY 2012 Energy laboratory is one of Jefferson County's largest employers February 22, 2013 The net economic...

455

Optimal Combination of Distributed Energy System in an Eco-Campus of Japan  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

customer. 2) .The primary energy consumption and carbon e mo w s the annual primary energy consumption in e a c h c a se . T h e primary energy consumption of c a s e l is larger

Yang, Yongwen; Gao, Weijun; Zhou, Nan; Marnay, Chris

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

" Level: National Data and Regional Totals;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8 Capability to Switch Distillate Fuel Oil to Alternative Energy Sources, 2006; " 8 Capability to Switch Distillate Fuel Oil to Alternative Energy Sources, 2006; " " Level: National Data and Regional Totals;" " Row: NAICS Codes, Value of Shipments and Employment Sizes;" " Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Thousand Barrels." ,,"Distillate Fuel Oil",,,"Alternative Energy Sources(b)" ,,,,,,,,,,"Coal Coke" "NAICS"," ","Total"," ","Not","Electricity","Natural","Residual",,,"and" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Consumed(c)","Switchable","Switchable","Receipts(d)","Gas","Fuel Oil","Coal","LPG","Breeze","Other(e)"

457

" Level: National Data and Regional Totals;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 Capability to Switch Residual Fuel Oil to Alternative Energy Sources, 2002;" 4 Capability to Switch Residual Fuel Oil to Alternative Energy Sources, 2002;" " Level: National Data and Regional Totals;" " Row: NAICS Codes, Value of Shipments and Employment Sizes;" " Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Thousand Barrels." ,,"Residual Fuel Oil",,,"Alternative Energy Sources(b)" ,,,,,,,,,,"Coal Coke",,"RSE" "NAICS"," ","Total"," ","Not","Electricity","Natural","Distillate",,,"and",,"Row" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Consumed(c)","Switchable","Switchable","Receipts(d)","Gas","Fuel Oil","Coal","LPG","Breeze","Other(e)","Factors"

458

" Level: National Data and Regional Totals;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 Capability to Switch LPG to Alternative Energy Sources, 2002; " 2 Capability to Switch LPG to Alternative Energy Sources, 2002; " " Level: National Data and Regional Totals;" " Row: NAICS Codes, Value of Shipments and Employment Sizes;" " Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Thousand Barrels." ,,"LPG",,,"Alternative Energy Sources(b)" ,,,,,,,,,,"Coal Coke",,"RSE" "NAICS"," ","Total"," ","Not","Electricity","Natural","Distillate","Residual",,"and",,"Row" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Consumed(c)","Switchable","Switchable","Receipts(d)","Gas","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil","Coal","Breeze","Other(e)","Factors"

459

" Level: National Data and Regional Totals;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8 Capability to Switch Distillate Fuel Oil to Alternative Energy Sources, 2002; " 8 Capability to Switch Distillate Fuel Oil to Alternative Energy Sources, 2002; " " Level: National Data and Regional Totals;" " Row: NAICS Codes, Value of Shipments and Employment Sizes;" " Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Thousand Barrels." ,,"Distillate Fuel Oil",,,"Alternative Energy Sources(b)" ,,,,,,,,,,"Coal Coke",,"RSE" "NAICS"," ","Total"," ","Not","Electricity","Natural","Residual",,,"and",,"Row" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Consumed(c)","Switchable","Switchable","Receipts(d)","Gas","Fuel Oil","Coal","LPG","Breeze","Other(e)","Factors"

460

" Level: National Data and Regional Totals;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 Capability to Switch Natural Gas to Alternative Energy Sources, 2006;" 2 Capability to Switch Natural Gas to Alternative Energy Sources, 2006;" " Level: National Data and Regional Totals;" " Row: NAICS Codes, Value of Shipments and Employment Sizes;" " Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Billion Cubic Feet." ,,"Natural Gas",,,"Alternative Energy Sources(b)" ,,,,,,,,,,"Coal Coke" "NAICS"," ","Total"," ","Not","Electricity","Distillate","Residual",,,"and" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Consumed(c)","Switchable","Switchable","Receipts(d)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil","Coal","LPG","Breeze","Other(e)"

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mo total energy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

" Level: National Data and Regional Totals;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 Capability to Switch Residual Fuel Oil to Alternative Energy Sources, 2006;" 4 Capability to Switch Residual Fuel Oil to Alternative Energy Sources, 2006;" " Level: National Data and Regional Totals;" " Row: NAICS Codes, Value of Shipments and Employment Sizes;" " Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Thousand Barrels." ,,"Residual Fuel Oil",,,"Alternative Energy Sources(b)" ,,,,,,,,,,"Coal Coke" "NAICS"," ","Total"," ","Not","Electricity","Natural","Distillate",,,"and" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Consumed(c)","Switchable","Switchable","Receipts(d)","Gas","Fuel Oil","Coal","LPG","Breeze","Other(e)"

462

" Level: National Data and Regional Totals;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 Capability to Switch Natural Gas to Alternative Energy Sources, 2002;" 2 Capability to Switch Natural Gas to Alternative Energy Sources, 2002;" " Level: National Data and Regional Totals;" " Row: NAICS Codes, Value of Shipments and Employment Sizes;" " Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Billion Cubic Feet." ,,"Natural Gas",,,"Alternative Energy Sources(b)" ,,,,,,,,,,"Coal Coke",,"RSE" "NAICS"," ","Total"," ","Not","Electricity","Distillate","Residual",,,"and",,"Row" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Consumed(c)","Switchable","Switchable","Receipts(d)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil","Coal","LPG","Breeze","Other(e)","Factors"

463

" Level: National Data and Regional Totals;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 Capability to Switch LPG to Alternative Energy Sources, 2006; " 2 Capability to Switch LPG to Alternative Energy Sources, 2006; " " Level: National Data and Regional Totals;" " Row: NAICS Codes, Value of Shipments and Employment Sizes;" " Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Thousand Barrels." ,,"LPG",,,"Alternative Energy Sources(b)" ,,,,,,,,,,"Coal Coke" "NAICS"," ","Total"," ","Not","Electricity","Natural","Distillate","Residual",,"and" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Consumed(c)","Switchable","Switchable","Receipts(d)","Gas","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil","Coal","Breeze","Other(e)"

464

China Energy Databook - Rev. 4  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

GDP, 1970-1993 5. Total Energy Consumption by Sector forUrban Rural 3. Total Energy Consumption f Shares Year Mtceor about 6% of total energy consumption in 1992 (including

Sinton Editor, J.E.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

465

Carbon migration in 5Cr-0.5Mo/21Cr-12Ni dissimilar metal welds  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The carbon migration between a ferritic steel and an austenitic steel was studied in submerged arc-welded 5Cr-0.5Mo/21Cr-12Ni dissimilar metal welds (DMWs) after aging at 500 C for various times and after long-term service in technical practice. The distribution of carbon, chromium, nickel, and iron in the areas around the weld interface was determined by electron probe microanalysis, and the microstructural aspect in the carbon-depleted/enriched zone was characterized by optical microscopy and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Furthermore, the precipitation sequences and composition characteristics of the carbides were identified by diffraction pattern microanalysis and energy-dispersive X-ray (EDX) microanalysis. It was found (1) that there exists a coherent relationship between intracrystalline M{sub 23}C{sub 6} and the austenitic matrix; (2) that the composition of M{sub 23}C{sub 6} in the carbon-enriched zone is independent of the duration of aging and service; (3) that the maximum carbon concentration is determined by the carbide type, the composition characteristic of precipitated carbides, and the concentration of carbide-forming Cr adjacent to the weld interface in the carbon-enriched zone; and (4) that the carbon migration in the 5Cr-0.5Mo/21Cr-12Ni DMWs can be described by a diffusion model.

Huang, M.L.; Wang, L. [Dalian Univ. of Technology (China). Dept. of Materials Engineering

1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

466

Electronic structure and conductivity of nanocomposite metal (Au,Ag,Cu,Mo)-containing amorphous carbon films  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this work, we study the influence of the incorporation of different metals (Me = Au, Ag, Cu, Mo) on the electronic structure of amorphous carbon (a-C:Me) films. The films were produced at room temperature using a novel pulsed dual-cathode arc deposition technique. Compositional analysis was performed with secondary neutral mass spectroscopy whereas X-ray diffraction was used to identify the formation of metal nanoclusters in the carbon matrix. The metal content incorporated in the nanocomposite films induces a drastic increase in the conductivity, in parallel with a decrease in the band gap corrected from Urbach energy. The electronic structure as a function of the Me content has been monitored by x-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) at the C K-edge. XANES showed that the C host matrix has a dominant graphitic character and that it is not affected significantly by the incorporation of metal impurities, except for the case of Mo, where the modifications in the lineshape spectra indicated the formation of a carbide phase. Subtle modifications of the spectral lineshape are discussed in terms of nanocomposite formation.

Endrino, Jose L.; Horwat, David; Gago, Raul; Andersson, Joakim; Liu, Y.S.; Guo, Jinghua; Anders, Andre

2008-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

467

ARM - Measurement - Shortwave broadband total downwelling irradiance  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

downwelling irradiance downwelling irradiance ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Shortwave broadband total downwelling irradiance The total diffuse and direct radiant energy that comes from some continuous range of directions, at wavelengths between 0.4 and 4 {mu}m, that is being emitted downwards. Categories Radiometric Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. ARM Instruments AMC : Ameriflux Measurement Component BSRN : Baseline Solar Radiation Network

468

Tropical Africa: Total Forest Biomass (By Country)  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Tropical Africa: Total Forest Biomass (By Country) Tropical Africa: Total Forest Biomass (By Country) image Brown, S., and G. Gaston. 1996. Tropical Africa: Land Use, Biomass, and Carbon Estimates For 1980. ORNL/CDIAC-92, NDP-055. Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center, U.S. Department of Energy, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, U.S.A. More Maps Calculated Actual Aboveground Live Biomass in Forests (1980) Maximum Potential Biomass Density Land Use (1980) Area of Closed Forests (By Country) Mean Biomass of Closed Forests (By County) Area of Open Forests (By Country) Mean Biomass of Open Forests (By County) Percent Forest Cover (By Country) Population Density - 1990 (By Administrative Unit) Population Density - 1980 (By Administrative Unit) Population Density - 1970 (By Administrative Unit)

469

Total assessment audits (TAA) in Iowa  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Traditionally, energy, waste reduction and productivity audits are performed for a manufacturing facility independent of one another. Auditors generally deliver recommendations for improvement based on their specialized expertise (energy, waste reduction, productivity, etc.) without regard to how those recommendations may impact other, sometimes less obvious, subsystems or processes within the facility. The audits are typically performed in isolation from the plant upper management and commonly without adequate knowledge of how inherent interrelated operational constraints may directly or indirectly influence the success of audit recommendations. The Total Assessment Audit (TAA) concept originated from the belief that a manufacturing facility is better served using a holistic approach to problem solving rather than the more conventional isolated approach. The total assessment audit methodology partners the upper management team of a company with a multi-disciplined team of industry-specific specialists to collectively ascertain the core opportunities for improvement in the company and then to formulate a company oriented continuous improvement plan. Productivity, waste reduction, and energy efficiency objectives are seamlessly integrated into a single service delivery with the TAA approach. Nontraditional audit objectives that influence profitability and competitiveness such as business management practices, employee training, human resource issues, etc. are also subject to evaluation in a TAA. The underlying premise of this approach is that the objectives are interrelated and that simultaneous evaluation will province synergistic results. Ultimately, it is believed that the TAA approach can motivate a manufacturer to implement improvements it might not otherwise pursue if it were focused only on singular objectives.

Haman, W.G.

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

470

Scintillating bolometers based on ZnMoO$_4$ and Zn$^{100}$MoO$_4$ crystals to search for 0$\  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The technology of scintillating bolometers based on zinc molybdate (ZnMoO$_4$) crystals is under development within the LUMINEU project to search for 0$\

Poda, D V; Arnaud, Q; Augier, C; Benot, A; Berg, L; Boiko, R S; Bergmann, T; Blmer, J; Broniatowski, A; Brudanin, V; Camus, P; Cazes, A; Censier, B; Chapellier, M; Charlieux, F; Chernyak, D M; Coron, N; Coulter, P; Cox, G A; Danevich, F A; de Boissire, T; Decourt, R; De Jesus, M; Devoyon, L; Drillien, A -A; Dumoulin, L; Eitel, K; Enss, C; Filosofov, D; Fleischmann, A; Fourches, N; Gascon, J; Gastaldo, L; Gerbier, G; Giuliani, A; Gros, M; Hehn, L; Henry, S; Herv, S; Heuermann, G; Humbert, V; Ivanov, I M; Juillard, A; Kflian, C; Kleifges, M; Kluck, H; Kobychev, V V; Koskas, F; Kozlov, V; Kraus, H; Kudryavtsev, V A; Sueur, H Le; Loidl, M; Magnier, P; Makarov, E P; Mancuso, M; de Marcillac, P; Marnieros, S; Marrache-Kikuchi, C; Menshikov, A; Nasonov, S G; Navick, X-F; Nones, C; Olivieri, E; Pari, P; Paul, B; Penichot, Y; Pessina, G; Piro, M C; Plantevin, O; Redon, T; Robinson, M; Rodrigues, M; Rozov, S; Sanglard, V; Schmidt, B; Shlegel, V N; Siebenborn, B; Strazzer, O; Tcherniakhovski, D; Tenconi, M; Torres, L; Tretyak, V I; Vagneron, L; Vasiliev, Ya V; Velazquez, M; Viraphong, O; Walker, R J; Weber, M; Yakushev, E; Zhang, X; Zhdankov, V N

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

471

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

8A. Natural Gas Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Census Division for All Buildings, 2003: Part 2 Total Natural Gas Consumption (billion cubic feet) Total Floorspace...

472

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

2A. Natural Gas Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Year Constructed for All Buildings, 2003 Total Natural Gas Consumption (billion cubic feet) Total Floorspace of...

473

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

0A. Natural Gas Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Climate Zonea for All Buildings, 2003 Total Natural Gas Consumption (billion cubic feet) Total Floorspace of...

474

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

7A. Natural Gas Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Census Division for All Buildings, 2003: Part 1 Total Natural Gas Consumption (billion cubic feet) Total Floorspace...

475

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

Table C22. Electricity Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Year Constructed for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003 Total Electricity Consumption (billion kWh) Total Floorspace...

476

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5A. Electricity Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Census Region for All Buildings, 2003 Total Electricity Consumption (billion kWh) Total Floorspace of Buildings...

477

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5A. Natural Gas Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Census Region for All Buildings, 2003 Total Natural Gas Consumption (billion cubic feet) Total Floorspace of...

478

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

7A. Electricity Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Census Division for All Buildings, 2003: Part 1 Total Electricity Consumption (billion kWh) Total Floorspace of...

479

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

2A. Electricity Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Year Constructed for All Buildings, 2003 Total Electricity Consumption (billion kWh) Total Floorspace of Buildings...

480

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8A. Electricity Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Census Division for All Buildings, 2003: Part 2 Total Electricity Consumption (billion kWh) Total Floorspace of...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mo total energy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9A. Natural Gas Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Census Division for All Buildings, 2003: Part 3 Total Natural Gas Consumption (billion cubic feet) Total Floorspace...

482

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

9A. Electricity Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Census Division for All Buildings, 2003: Part 3 Total Electricity Consumption (billion kWh) Total Floorspace of...

483

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

0A. Electricity Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Climate Zonea for All Buildings, 2003 Total Electricity Consumption (billion kWh) Total Floorspace of Buildings...

484

Processing of Mo-Si-B intermetallics by extrusion and oxidation properties of the extruded Tl-MoSi{sub 2}-MoB System  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An extrusion process was developed that is able to consistently produce large quantities of Mo-Si-B rods without the presence of defects. Binder removal from the extruded rods was studied in detail and it was determined that heating rates on the order of 0.02{degree}/minute (1.2{degree}/hour) are necessary to remove the binder without the formation of defects. This low heating rate resulted in debinding times in excess of 70 hours (approximately 3 days). Wicking was investigated as a means to decrease the time necessary for binder removal. Using 0.05{micro}m alumina powder as a wicking agent, binder removal times were reduced to 10 hours with heating rates up to 1{degree}/minute employed without defect formation. Once the extrusion process was complete the oxidation properties of the Tl-MoSi{sub 2}-MoB extruded phase assemblage was investigated. It was determined that this composition exhibits catastrophic oxidation or pesting in the temperature range of 660--760 C, resulting in the material turning to dust. Outside of this temperature range the composition is oxidatively stable. Continuous mass measurements were taken at 1,300, 1,450, and 1,600 C to determine the oxidation rate constants of this material. Parabolic rate constants of 6.9 x 10{sup {minus}3}, 1.3 x 10{sup {minus}3}, and 9.1 x 10{sup {minus}3} mg{sup 2}/cm{sup 4}/hr were determined for 1,300, 1,450, and 1,600 C respectively.

Summers, Eric

1999-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

485

Energy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Energy ... Scientific Challenges in Sustainable Energy Technology, by Nathan S. Lewis of the California Institute of Technology, summarizes data on energy resources and analyses the implications for human society. ... ConfChem Conference on Educating the Next Generation: Green and Sustainable ChemistrySolar Energy: A Chemistry Course on Sustainability for General Science Education and Quantitative Reasoning ...

John W. Moore

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

486

Neutron Total Cross Sections at 20 Mev  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

With the T(d,n)He4 reaction as a monoenergetic source of neutrons of about 20 Mev, the total cross sections of 13 elements have been measured by a transmission experiment. These cross sections vary approximately as A23 as is to be expected from the continuum theory of nuclear reactions. The cross section for hydrogen at 19.93 Mev is 0.5040.01 barn. This result, together with other results at lower energies, seems to require a Yukawa potential in both the singlet and triplet n-p states and a singlet effective range that is lower than that obtained from p-p scattering data.

Robert B. Day and Richard L. Henkel

1953-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

487

Publications List Refereed: (78 Total)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Southern pine volume equations and associated conversion factors for southwest Georgia. FL. Agr. Exp. Sta: 19 27. Frampton, LJ, Jr., and DL Rockwood. 1983. Genetic variation in traits important for energy Series Bull. No. 275, p. 28 39. Roeder, KR, and DL Rockwood. 1983. Potential stem biomass and energy

Hill, Jeffrey E.

488

Selling Random Energy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

78% of total US energy consumption measured at 94.6 Quads38% of total US energy consumption is used for electricity1.3 Breakdown of U.S. Energy consumption in 2009. A quad is

Bitar, Eilyan Yamen

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

489

China Energy Databook - Rev. 4  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Consumption: Commercial and Biomass Energy, 1979 and 1987;Consumption: Commercial and Biomass Energy Energy IntensityEnd Use, Commercial and Biomass Energy Shares of Total

Sinton Editor, J.E.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

490

Investigation of (110)Mo, (110)W monocrystals and Nb polycrystal implanted by oxygen ions and used as TEC electrodes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In an effort to improve efficiency of a thermionic energy converter (TEC), converting thermal power into electric power, there were investigated collectors made of (110)Mo and (110)W monocrystals, and Nb polycrystal, all being implanted by oxygen ions with fluence of 1*10{sup 18} cm{sup {minus}2}. For emitters there were used (110)Mo and (110)W monocrystals, and Nb polycrystal implanted by oxygen ions, respectively. The performance of TEC with implanted electrode material is compared with this of TEC having electrodes of non-implanted materials. It is demonstrated that for emitter temperature range of 1,473 to 1,873 K employment of (110)Mo and (110)W monocrystals, implanted by oxygen ions, for TEC collector allows to increase the specific output power of a converter approximately by a factor of 1.6, and employment of implanted Nb for electrodes -- to increase this value approximately by a factor of 3, as compared with non-implanted electrode materials. The upgraded performance of TEC with implanted electrode materials is caused by the increase of minimum values of the collector working function by {approximately}0.15--0.2 eV as compared with non-implanted collectors, as well as by improvement of emitter emissive and adsorption properties due to oxygen supply from collectors at operating temperatures.

Tsakadze, L.M.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

491

Resonance Effects in Photoemission from TiO2-capped Mo/Si Multilayer Mirrors for Extreme Ultraviolet Applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the unbaked vacuum systems of extreme ultraviolet (EUV) lithography steppers, oxide formation and carbon growth on Mo/Si multilayer mirrors (MLMs) are competing processes leading to reflectivity loss. A major contribution to this mirror degradation is a series of surface reactions that are thought to be driven in large part by photoemitted electrons. In this paper, we focus on the resonance effects in photoemission from Mo/Si MLMs protected by thin TiO{sub 2} cap layers. In the vicinity of the resonant energy of the mirror, the energy flux of the EUV radiation forming standing wave oscillates throughout the multilayer stack. As a result, light absorption followed by the emission of photoelectrons becomes a complex process that varies rapidly with depth and photon energy. The electron emission is characterized as a function of the EUV photon energy, the angle of incidence, and the position of the standing wave with respect to the solid/vacuum interface. In our experiments, the position of the standing wave was controlled both by deliberately varying the thickness of the Si terminating layer (of the Mo/Si stack) and by depositing C films of various thicknesses on the TiO{sub 2}. The experimental data are compared with model simulations to examine the changes in photoemission yield due to the presence of carbon and to the changes in the position of the standing wave. We find that carbon deposition can have a dramatic impact on the yield and, therefore, on the rates of electron mediated reactions at the surface.

N Faradzhev; B Yakshinskiy; E Starodub; T Madey; S Hill; S Grantham; T Lucatorto; S Yulin; E Vescovo; J Keister

2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

492

IRRADIATION PERFORMANCE OF U-Mo MONOLITHIC FUEL  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

High-performance research reactors require fuel that operates at high specific power to high fission density, but at relatively low temperatures. Research reactor fuels are designed for efficient heat rejection, and are composed of assemblies of thin-plates clad in aluminum alloy. The development of low-enriched fuels to replace high-enriched fuels for these reactors requires a substantially increased uranium density in the fuel to offset the decrease in enrichment. Very few fuel phases have been identified that have the required combination of very-high uranium density and stable fuel behavior at high burnup. UMo alloys represent the best known tradeoff in these properties. Testing of aluminum matrix U-Mo aluminum matrix dispersion fuel revealed a pattern of breakaway swelling behavior at intermediate burnup, related to the formation of a molybdenum stabilized high aluminum intermetallic phase that forms during irradiation. In the case of monolithic fuel, this issue was addressed by eliminating, as much as possible, the interfacial area between U-Mo and aluminum. Based on scoping irradiation test data, a fuel plate system composed of solid U-10Mo fuel meat, a zirconium diffusion barrier, and Al6061 cladding was selected for development. Developmental testing of this fuel system indicates that it meets core criteria for fuel qualification, including stable and predictable swelling behavior, mechanical integrity to high burnup, and geometric stability. In addition, the fuel exhibits robust behavior during power-cooling mismatch events under irradiation at high power.

M.K. Meyer; J. Gan; J.-F. Jue; D.D. Keiser; E. Perez; A. Robinson; D.M. Wachs; N. Woolstenhulme; G.L. Hofman; Y.-S. Kim

2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

493

Oxidation of ethane to ethylene and acetic acid by MoVNbO catalysts M. Roussel1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Oxidation of ethane to ethylene and acetic acid by MoVNbO catalysts M. Roussel1 , M. Bouchard1 catalytic properties in the oxidation of ethane to ethylene and acetic acid is examined. Solids based on Mo and nanosize of MoO3 and (VNbMo)5O14 crystals. The high global selectivity to ethylene and acetic acid (90

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

494

LANL Data Profile 20122013 Total: 10,407  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for the Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration. Community Programs Office (505) 665% Environmental management 6% Safeguards and security 5% DOE Office of Science 4% Energy and related programs.......................$534,756,599 New Mexico total procurement..........$338,725,405 Los Alamos County

495

1 Di Neujahr 1 Fr 1 Fr 1 Mo Ostermontag 2 Mi 2 Sa 2 Sa 2 Di  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Di Neujahr 1 Fr 1 Fr 1 Mo Ostermontag 2 Mi 2 Sa 2 Sa 2 Di 3 Do 3 So 3 So 3 Mi 4 Fr 4 Mo 4 Mo 4 Do 5 Sa 5 Di 5 Di 5 Fr 6 So 6 Mi 6 Mi 6 Sa 7 Mo 7 Do 7 Do 7 So 8 Di 8 Fr 8 Fr 8 Mo 9 Mi 9 Sa 9 Sa 9 Di 10 Do 10 So 10 So 10 Mi 11 Fr 11 Mo 11 Mo 11 Do 12 Sa 12 Di 12 Di 12 Fr 13 So 13 Mi 13 Mi Power

Grübel, Rudolf

496

Performance Period Total Fee Paid  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Period Period Total Fee Paid 4/29/2012 - 9/30/2012 $418,348 10/1/2012 - 9/30/2013 $0 10/1/2013 - 9/30/2014 $0 10/1/2014 - 9/30/2015 $0 10/1/2015 - 9/30/2016 $0 Cumulative Fee Paid $418,348 Contract Type: Cost Plus Award Fee Contract Period: $116,769,139 November 2011 - September 2016 $475,395 $0 Fee Information Total Estimated Contract Cost $1,141,623 $1,140,948 $1,140,948 $5,039,862 $1,140,948 Maximum Fee $5,039,862 Minimum Fee Fee Available Portage, Inc. DE-DT0002936 EM Contractor Fee Site: MOAB Uranium Mill Tailings - MOAB, UT Contract Name: MOAB Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Contract September 2013 Contractor: Contract Number:

497

Buildings","Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

L1. Floorspace Lit by Lighting Type for Non-Mall Buildings, 1995" L1. Floorspace Lit by Lighting Type for Non-Mall Buildings, 1995" ,"Floorspace (million square feet)" ,"Total (Lit or Unlit) in All Buildings","Total (Lit or Unlit) in Buildings With Any Lighting","Lighted Area Only","Area Lit by Each Type of Light" ,,,,"Inca