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1

Public Service Co of NH | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

NH NH (Redirected from PSNH) Jump to: navigation, search Name Public Service Co of NH Place New Hampshire Service Territory New Hampshire Website www.psnh.com Green Button Landing Page www.psnh.com/SaveEnergyMo Green Button Reference Page www.psnh.com/SaveEnergyMo Green Button Implemented Yes Utility Id 15472 Utility Location Yes Ownership I NERC Location NPCC NERC NPCC Yes ISO NE Yes Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Generation Yes Activity Transmission Yes Activity Buying Transmission Yes Activity Distribution Yes Activity Wholesale Marketing Yes Activity Retail Marketing Yes Alt Fuel Vehicle Yes Alt Fuel Vehicle2 Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] Energy Information Administration Form 826[2] LinkedIn Connections

2

Public Service Co of NH | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Name Public Service Co of NH Name Public Service Co of NH Place New Hampshire Service Territory New Hampshire Website www.psnh.com Green Button Landing Page www.psnh.com/SaveEnergyMo Green Button Reference Page www.psnh.com/SaveEnergyMo Green Button Implemented Yes Utility Id 15472 Utility Location Yes Ownership I NERC Location NPCC NERC NPCC Yes ISO NE Yes Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Generation Yes Activity Transmission Yes Activity Buying Transmission Yes Activity Distribution Yes Activity Wholesale Marketing Yes Activity Retail Marketing Yes Alt Fuel Vehicle Yes Alt Fuel Vehicle2 Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] Energy Information Administration Form 826[2] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now!

3

NE-20  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

hi v. !&-2:. hi v. !&-2:. /qL lo 1 OCT 2 9 1984 NE-20 -. Authorization for Remedial Action of the Ashland 2 Site, Tonawanda, New York f! Joe LaGrone, Manager Oak Ridge Operations Office Based on the Aerial Radiological Survey (Attachment 1) and a "walk-on" radiologlcal survey (Attachment 2 , excerpted from the ORNL draft report "Ground-Level Investigation of Anomalous Gamma Radiation Levels in the Tonawanda, New York, Area," January 1980), the property identified as Ashland 2 is authorized for remedial action. It should be noted that the attached survey data are for designation purposes only and Bechtel National, Inc. (EM), should conduct appropriate comprehensive characterization surveys to determine the extent and magnitude of the

4

NE-23,  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

t:"'. ? - ' t:"'. ? - ' y5 NE-23, wk$& Dr. Joseph A. Warburton Chainnan, Radiological and Toxicological Safety Board University of Nevada System DRI/ASC, P.O. Box 60220 Reno, Nevada 89506 Dear Dr. Warburton: The Department of Energy (DOE), as part of its Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP), has reviewed information on the Mackay School of M ines facility at the University of Nevada, Reno, Nevada, to determine whether it contains residual radioactivity traceable to activities conducted on behalf of the Atomic Energy Commission (a predecessor to DOE). A radiological survey indicated that the radiation levels at the involved portion of the facility are at or near background levtrls. Therefore, no remedial action is required, and DGE is eliminating

5

NE-24  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

VW- VW- 50 "id AU6 3 1983 NE-24 .' . _ : ' : R&D Decontamination Projects Under the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Actlon Program (FUSRAP) '_ F .- ,: 'J,.LaGrone, Manager . Oak Ridge Operations Office As a result of the House-Senate Conference Report and the Energy and Water Appropriations Act for FY 1984, and based on the data in the attached reports indicating radioactive contamination in excess of acceptable guidelines, the sites listed in the attachment and their respective vicinity properties (contaminated with radioactive materials from these sites) are being designated as decontamination research and development projects under the FUSRAP. Each site and the associated vicinity properties should be treated as a separate project. The objective of each project is to decontaminate the vicinity properties

6

NE Blog Archive  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

ne/blog-archive 1000 Independence Ave. SWWashington DC ne/blog-archive 1000 Independence Ave. SWWashington DC 20585202-586-5000 en Generation IV International Forum Updates Technology Roadmap and Builds Future Collaboration http://energy.gov/ne/articles/generation-iv-international-forum-updates-technology-roadmap-and-builds-future ne/articles/generation-iv-international-forum-updates-technology-roadmap-and-builds-future" class="title-link">Generation IV International Forum Updates Technology Roadmap and Builds Future Collaboration

7

MiniBooNE  

SciTech Connect

To begin, we examine the relationship between MiniBooNE and the neutrino beam geometry at Fermilab. In Figure 1, a schematic representation is shown of the plan view of the location of MiniBooNE relative to SciBooNE and the NuMI target, where it can be seen that SciBooNE and MiniBooNE share the same beamline and neutrino flux, and therefore share some of the same systematic effects -- A combined analysis between the two experimental groups could yield a superior result compared to segregated individual analysis. MiniBooNE makes an angle of 6.3 degrees with the NuMI beamline, an off-axis measurement if you will, that provides a relatively high yield of electron neutrinos from kaon decay. Furthermore, the proton beam incident on the MiniBooNE target possesses a 53 MHz structure that will be important in timing studies related to the low energy excess. Let's review of the results of the MiniBooNE: As is well known, MiniBooNE, a test of the LSND effect [1], adds experimental inspiration to the possible existence of new phenomena; although two neutrino-family oscillations were shown to be an unlikely candidate to explain the LSND effect, a low energy excess of 3.0 sigma in the neutrino sector at energies between 200 to 475 MeV [2] - an effect that appears to have no counterpart in the antineutrino sector [3], combined with the 3.8 sigma LSND result - at roughly 50 MeV - strains phenomenology for insight. Miniboones continues to run and collect antineutrino data; will combine disappearance analysis with SciBooNE; take data from the NuMI target, an unusual source with a potentially new look at the low energy anomaly; and use beam timing techniques to further constrain phenomenological models. In this paper we will review current topics related to MiniBooNE and other associated experiments and phenomenology.

Stefanski, Ray; /Fermilab

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Eliyahu Ne'eman  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Eliyahu Ne'eman Eliyahu Ne'eman Consulting Engineer on Lighting and Daylighting Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory This speaker was a visiting speaker who delivered a talk or talks on the date(s) shown at the links below. This speaker is not otherwise associated with Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, unless specifically identified as a Berkeley Lab staff member. Eliyahu Ne'eman is a leading international expert on lighting and daylighting. He has been involved in education, research and practice for over 40 years while working in Israel, UK, Germany and the US(LBNL). He has worked extensively in the area of occupant response in luminous spaces and he has been leading the CIE Task Group that has revised the CIE Museum Lighting Guide. This Speaker's Seminars Control of Damage to Museum Objects by Optical Radiation

9

Category:Concord, NH | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Go Back to PV Economics By Location Go Back to PV Economics By Location Media in category "Concord, NH" The following 16 files are in this category, out of 16 total. SVFullServiceRestaurant Concord NH Public Service Co of NH.png SVFullServiceRestauran... 74 KB SVHospital Concord NH Public Service Co of NH.png SVHospital Concord NH ... 75 KB SVLargeHotel Concord NH Public Service Co of NH.png SVLargeHotel Concord N... 74 KB SVLargeOffice Concord NH Public Service Co of NH.png SVLargeOffice Concord ... 76 KB SVMediumOffice Concord NH Public Service Co of NH.png SVMediumOffice Concord... 74 KB SVMidriseApartment Concord NH Public Service Co of NH.png SVMidriseApartment Con... 71 KB SVOutPatient Concord NH Public Service Co of NH.png SVOutPatient Concord N... 72 KB SVPrimarySchool Concord NH Public Service Co of NH.png

10

Category:Omaha, NE | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Omaha, NE Omaha, NE Jump to: navigation, search Go Back to PV Economics By Location Media in category "Omaha, NE" The following 16 files are in this category, out of 16 total. SVFullServiceRestaurant Omaha NE Omaha Public Power District.png SVFullServiceRestauran... 63 KB SVHospital Omaha NE Omaha Public Power District.png SVHospital Omaha NE Om... 61 KB SVLargeHotel Omaha NE Omaha Public Power District.png SVLargeHotel Omaha NE ... 61 KB SVLargeOffice Omaha NE Omaha Public Power District.png SVLargeOffice Omaha NE... 63 KB SVMediumOffice Omaha NE Omaha Public Power District.png SVMediumOffice Omaha N... 65 KB SVMidriseApartment Omaha NE Omaha Public Power District.png SVMidriseApartment Oma... 62 KB SVOutPatient Omaha NE Omaha Public Power District.png SVOutPatient Omaha NE ...

11

NE-23 W  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

>:-1. ,- '"CC3 >:-1. ,- '"CC3 . ' NE-23 .+ W h itm~ l-l& Mr. Victor 3. Canilov, Director Museum of Science and Industry East 57th Street and Lake Shore Drive Chicago, Illinois 60037 Dear kr. Danilov: The Department of Energy (DOE), as part of its Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSPSIP), has reviewed information on the Museum cf Science and Industry, Chicago, Illinois, to determine whether it contains residual radioactivity traceable to activities conducted on behalf of the Manhattan Engineer District or the Atomic Energy C o m m ission (predecessors to DOE). A radiological survey indicated that the radiation levels are equal to natural background. Therefore, no remedial action is required, ant DOE is eliminating the Museum of Science and Industry from further

12

NH NH NH NH  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

- Grand Station Foyer Continental Breakfast - Grand Station iii PoSt-CoMbuStion MeMbrane-baS Moderator - Jos Figueroa, U.S. Department of Energy, National Energy Techno tueSday,...

13

Updated 6/10 Volunteer NH!  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Plant a garden 5 Hitchcock Hall Durham, NH 03824 Marianne Fortescue, Coordinator 603-862-2197 marianne.fortescue

Pohl, Karsten

14

US NE MA Site Consumption  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

NE MA NE MA Site Consumption million Btu $0 $500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 $3,000 US NE MA Expenditures dollars ALL ENERGY average per household (excl. transportation) 0 2,000 4,000 6,000 8,000 10,000 12,000 US NE MA Site Consumption kilowatthours $0 $250 $500 $750 $1,000 $1,250 $1,500 US NE MA Expenditures dollars ELECTRICITY ONLY average per household * Massachusetts households use 109 million Btu of energy per home, 22% more than the U.S. average. * The higher than average site consumption results in households spending 22% more for energy than the U.S. average. * Less reliance on electricity for heating, as well as cool summers, keeps average site electricity consumption in the state low relative to other parts of the U.S. However, spending on electricity is closer to the national average due to higher

15

US NE MA Site Consumption  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

NE MA NE MA Site Consumption million Btu $0 $500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 $3,000 US NE MA Expenditures dollars ALL ENERGY average per household (excl. transportation) 0 2,000 4,000 6,000 8,000 10,000 12,000 US NE MA Site Consumption kilowatthours $0 $250 $500 $750 $1,000 $1,250 $1,500 US NE MA Expenditures dollars ELECTRICITY ONLY average per household * Massachusetts households use 109 million Btu of energy per home, 22% more than the U.S. average. * The higher than average site consumption results in households spending 22% more for energy than the U.S. average. * Less reliance on electricity for heating, as well as cool summers, keeps average site electricity consumption in the state low relative to other parts of the U.S. However, spending on electricity is closer to the national average due to higher

16

CA Mr. Andrew Wallo, III, NE-23  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

?9OQ, 95.5 L'E&nt Plaza, SW.. W.ashin@.m, D.C. 20024.2174, Tekphone: (202) 488AQOO ?9OQ, 95.5 L'E&nt Plaza, SW.. W.ashin@.m, D.C. 20024.2174, Tekphone: (202) 488AQOO 7117-03.B7.cdy.43 23 September 1987 CA Mr. Andrew Wallo, III, NE-23 Division of Facility & Site Decommissioning Projects U.S. Oepartment of Energy Germantown, Maryland 20545 Dear Mr. Wallo: ELIMINATION RECOMMENDATION -- COLLEGES AND UNIVERSITIES zh/ ! o-01 lM!tl5 ML)!o-05 PI 77!0> The attached elimination recoannendation was prepared in accordance . -1 rlL.0~ with your suggestion during our meeting on 22 September. The recommendation flD.o-02 includes 26 colleges and universities identified~in Enclosure 4 to Aerospace letter subject: Status of Actions - FUSRAP Site List, dated MO.07. 27 May 1987; three institutions (Tufts College, University of Virginia, UCIIOJ and the University of Washington) currently identified on the FUSRAP

17

MoWitt  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

MoWiTT: Mobile Window Thermal Test Facility The window has come a long way since the days when it was a single pane of glass in a wood frame. Low-emissivity windows were designed...

18

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- R Brew Co - NH 01  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

R Brew Co - NH 01 R Brew Co - NH 01 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: R. BREW CO. (NH.01 ) Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: None Location: Concord , New Hampshire NH.01-1 Evaluation Year: 1994 NH.01-2 Site Operations: Conducted vacuum furnace tests using uranium and copper billets. NH.01-1 NH.01-3 Site Disposition: Eliminated - Potential for contamination remote NH.01-2 Radioactive Materials Handled: Yes Primary Radioactive Materials Handled: Uranium NH.01-1 NH.01-3 Radiological Survey(s): Yes - radiological monitoring during operations NH.01-3 Site Status: Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Also see Documents Related to R. BREW CO. NH.01-1 - Memorandum/Checklist; Landis to File; Subject: R. Brew

19

Overview of NE Research Programs  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

NE Research Programs NE Research Programs Sue Lesica Office of Nuclear Energy U.S. Department of Energy July 31, 2013 2 R&D Budgets FY 2013 FY 2014 Congressional Request House Mark Senate Mark SMR Licensing Technical Support 62,999 70,000 110,000 70,000 Small Modular Reactor R&D 23,958 20,000 20,000 20,000 Next Generation Nuclear Plant 38,720 0 0 0 LWR Sustainability 24,218 21,500 21,500 21,500 Advanced Reactor Concepts 21,178 31,000 45,000 21,000 Reactor Concepts RD&D 108,075 72,500 86,500 62,500 Modeling and Simulation Hub 24,588 24,300 24,300 24,300 Crosscutting Technology Development 17,242 13,901 27,885 25,437 NEAMS 13,646 9,536 National Scientific Users Facility 14,563 14,563 14,563 14,563 Nuclear Energy Enabling Technologies 70,040 62,300 66,748 62,300

20

NE - Nuclear Energy - Energy Conservation Plan  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

NUCLEAR ENERGY (NE) NUCLEAR ENERGY (NE) ENERGY CONSERVATION PLAN NE has heavily emphasized the use of flexiplace, both regular and situational. Since approximately 56 percent of NE staff use flexiplace, our plan is based on the Forrestal/Germantown (FORS/GTN) office spaces, and flexiplace office space. There are other common sense actions and policies that will be used to improve energy efficiency in the offices at both FORS and GTN. In the FORS/GTN office space: 1. Use flexiplace to the maximum extent possible. Saving an average of 1.5 gallons of gasoline per day per person (e.g., 13 miles per work x 2 = 26 miles, an average of 17 mpg), on a normal workday, NE employees save (56 percent of 145 = 71 times 1.2 days per pay period = 85.2 workdays x 1.5 gals = 127.8 gallons/pay

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mo ne nh" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

NH House Committee_April27 2005  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mercury Control Mercury Control Technology R&D Program for Coal-Fired Boilers Working Session of the New Hampshire House Science, Technology, & Energy Committee April 26, 2005 Concord, New Hampshire Thomas J. Feeley, III thomas.feeley@netl.doe.gov National Energy Technology Laboratory NH House Committee_April 2005 Mercury Control Technology Field Testing Program Performance/Cost Objectives * Have technologies ready for commercial demonstration by 2007 for all coals * Reduce "uncontrolled" Hg emissions by 50-70% * Reduce cost by 25-50% compared to baseline cost estimates Baseline Costs: $50,000 - $70,000 / lb Hg Removed 2000 Year Cost NH House Committee_April 2005 Stages of Mercury Control Technology Development DOE RD&D Model Lab/Bench/Pilot-Scale Testing Field Testing

22

Thermodynamic Assessment of Ce-Mo, Mo-La, Mo-Y, Ce-V, La-V ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this work, six binary systems, Ce-Mo, Mo-La, Mo-Y, Ce-V, La-V and V-Y were thermodynamically assessed based on available experimental data in the...

23

Interatomic Coulombic decay following Ne 1s Auger decay in NeAr  

SciTech Connect

Using momentum-resolved electron-ion multicoincidence spectroscopy, we have investigated interatomic Coulombic decay (ICD) in the heteronuclear NeAr dimer following Ne 1s Auger decay. The measured intensity ratio for the three ICD transitions Ne{sup 2+}(2s{sup -1}2p{sup -1} {sup 1}P)Ar to Ne{sup 2+}(2p{sup -2} {sup 1}S)-Ar{sup +}(3p{sup -1}), Ne{sup 2+}(2s{sup -1}2p{sup -1} {sup 1}P)Ar to Ne{sup 2+}(2p{sup -2} {sup 1}D)-Ar{sup +}(3p{sup -1}), and Ne{sup 2+}(2s{sup -1}2p{sup -1} {sup 3}P)Ar to Ne{sup 2+}(2p{sup -2} {sup 3}P)-Ar{sup +}(3p{sup -1}) reasonably agree with predictions. The kinetic energy release distribution for the fragmentation to Ne{sup 2+}(2p{sup -2} {sup 1}D)-Ar{sup +}(3p{sup -1}) after the ICD transition from singlet Ne{sup 2+}(2s{sup -1}2p{sup -1} {sup 1}P)Ar state, which is a mirror image of the kinetic energy distribution of the emitted ICD electrons, suggests that the corresponding ICD rate is roughly two times lower than predicted by ab initio calculations.

Ouchi, T.; Sakai, K.; Fukuzawa, H.; Ueda, K. [Institute of Multidisciplinary Research for Advanced Materials, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan); Higuchi, I.; Tamenori, Y. [Japan Synchrotron Radiation Research Institute, Sayo, Hyogo 679-5198 (Japan); Demekhin, Ph. V.; Chiang, Y.-C.; Stoychev, S. D.; Kuleff, A. I. [Theoretische Chemie, Universitaet Heidelberg, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Mazza, T. [Institute of Multidisciplinary Research for Advanced Materials, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan); Cimaina and Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita degli Studi di Milano, via Celoria 16, I-20133 Milano (Italy); Schoeffler, M. [Chemical Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Nagaya, K.; Yao, M. [Department of Physics, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan); Saito, N. [National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, National Meteorology Institute of Japan, Tsukuba 305-8568 (Japan)

2011-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

24

US WNC MO Site Consumption  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

WNC MO WNC MO Site Consumption million Btu $0 $500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 US WNC MO Expenditures dollars ALL ENERGY average per household (excl. transportation) 0 3,000 6,000 9,000 12,000 15,000 US WNC MO Site Consumption kilowatthours $0 $300 $600 $900 $1,200 $1,500 US WNC MO Expenditures dollars ELECTRICITY ONLY average per household * Missouri households consume an average of 100 million Btu per year, 12% more than the U.S. average. * Average household energy costs in Missouri are slightly less than the national average, primarily due to historically lower residential electricity prices in the state. * Missouri homes are typically larger than homes in other states and are more likely to be attached or detached single-family housing units.

25

MoS2  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

4 4 Myriam Perez De la Rosa1, Gilles Berhault2, Apurva Mehta3, and Russell R. Chianelli1 1University of Texas at El Paso, Materials Research Technology Institute, El Paso, TX 2Institut de Recherches sur la Catalyse, CNRS, Villeurbanne cedex, France 3Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory, Menlo Park, CA Figure 1: MoS2 layered structure. As the world economy continues to expand the demand for petroleum based fuel increases and the price of these fuels rises. The rising price of fuel has another consequence: refiners tend to purchase cheaper fuels of poorer quality. These poor quality fuels contain increasing amounts of sulfur and other pollutants leading to a decline in air quality worldwide. A recent New York Times article described the major impact a growing Chinese economy

26

NE SARE Arbuscular Mycorrhiza Research following canola  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

NE SARE Arbuscular Mycorrhiza Research Corn grown following canola Corn grown following soybeans The planting of canola, a non-mycorrhizal crop, has been shown to reduce arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi following canola. To address this problem, we intercropped canola with oats, a mycorrhizal crop

Kaye, Jason P.

27

,"Pittsburg, NH Natural Gas Pipeline Imports From Canada (MMcf...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Pittsburg, NH Natural Gas Pipeline Imports From Canada (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","172014" ,"Next...

28

NH Clean Power Act (New Hampshire) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

NH Clean Power Act (New Hampshire) NH Clean Power Act (New Hampshire) NH Clean Power Act (New Hampshire) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Industrial Investor-Owned Utility Municipal/Public Utility Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State New Hampshire Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider NH Department of Environmental Services The Act calls for annual reductions of multiple pollutants, including SO2, Nox, CO2, and mercury. The Act calls for an 87% reduction in SO2 emissions and a 70% reduction in Nox emissions from 1999 levels. CO2 emissions are to be reduced to 1990 levels by the end of 2006. Act is implemented under NH Rules Env-A 2900. This act applies specifically to three existing fossil

29

Verification of Allowable Stresses In ASME Section III Subsection NH For Grade 91 Steel & Alloy 800H  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The database for the creep-rupture of 9Cr-1Mo-V (Grade 91) steel was collected and reviewed to determine if it met the needs for recommending time-dependent strength values, S{sub t}, for coverage in ASME Section III Subsection NH (ASME III-NH) to 650 C (1200 F) and 600,000 hours. The accumulated database included over 300 tests for 1% total strain, nearly 400 tests for tertiary creep, and nearly 1700 tests to rupture. Procedures for analyzing creep and rupture data for ASME III-NH were reviewed and compared to the procedures used to develop the current allowable stress values for Gr 91 for ASME II-D. The criteria in ASME III-NH for estimating S{sub t} included the average strength for 1% total strain for times to 600,000 hours, 80% of the minimum strength for tertiary creep for times to 600,000 hours, and 67% of the minimum rupture strength values for times to 600,000 hours. Time-temperature-stress parametric formulations were selected to correlate the data and make predictions of the long-time strength. It was found that the stress corresponding to 1% total strain and the initiation of tertiary creep were not the controlling criteria over the temperature-time range of concern. It was found that small adjustments to the current values in III-NH could be introduced but that the existing values were conservative and could be retained. The existing database was found to be adequate to extend the coverage to 600,000 hours for temperatures below 650 C (1200 F).

R. W. Swindeman; M. J. Swindeman; B. W. Roberts; B. E. Thurgood; D. L. Marriott

2007-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

30

NE Blog Archive | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Blog Archive Blog Archive NE Blog Archive RSS December 31, 2013 GIF Policy Group Meeting in Brussels, Belgium, November 2013 Generation IV International Forum Updates Technology Roadmap and Builds Future Collaboration The Generation IV International Forum (GIF) held its 36th Policy Group (PG) meeting on November 21-22 in Brussels, Belgium. The PG reviewed progress on a number of on-going actions and received progress reports from the GIF Experts Group (EG) and the GIF Senior Industry Advisory Panel (SIAP). December 12, 2013 The basics of small modular reactor technology explained. | Infographic by Sarah Gerrity, Energy Department. Advancing Small Modular Reactors: How We're Supporting Next-Gen Nuclear

31

Microsoft PowerPoint - NE- Milton  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

University University Program (NEUP) Presentation to Vice Presidents of Research and Development of Historically Black Colleges and Universities Ingrid M. Milton Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy July 9, 2009 195725 (2) Overview The Office of Nuclear Energy (NE) is committed to strengthening the Nation's educational programs in nuclear science and engineering. * Established the Nuclear Energy University Program (NEUP). * Award grants and contracts through competitive selection process. NEUP enables universities to maintain and expand their nuclear science curriculum and programs to ensure future availability of technical experts for U.S. nuclear programs. * NEUP is managed by the Center for Advanced Energy Studies (CAES). 2 195725 (3) Nuclear Energy University Program -

32

Compaction and Sintering of Mo Powders  

SciTech Connect

To support the development of Mo-99 production by NorthStar Medical Technologies, LLC, Mo metal powders were evaluated for compaction and sintering characteristics as they relate to Mo-100 accelerator target disk fabrication. Powders having a natural isotope distribution and enriched Mo-100 powder were examined. Various powder characteristics are shown to have an effect on both the compaction and sintering behavior. Natural Mo powders could be cold pressed directly to >90% density. All of the powders, including the Mo-100 samples, could be sintered after cold pressing to >90% density. As an example, a compacted Mo-100 disk reached 89.7% density (9.52 g/cm3) after sintering at 1000 C for 1 hr. in flowing Ar/4%H2. Higher sintering temperatures were required for other powder samples. The relationships between processing conditions and the resulting densities of consolidated Mo disks will be presented.

Nunn, Stephen D [ORNL; Kiggans, Jim [ORNL; Bryan, Chris [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Effect of supplementation on vitamin A and zinc nutriture of children in northeast (NE) Thailand  

SciTech Connect

Previous surveys of the nutritional status of young children in NE Thailand suggested that they may benefit from vitamin A (VA) and/or zinc (Zn) supplementation. 140 children, with low plasma retinol concentrations were entered in a double-blind study. They were randomized and supplemented with either VA, Zn, VA + Zn or placebo each weekday for 6 mos. All subjects consumed their usual diet that provided adequate protein, less than recommended calories, fat, Zn and VA. Biochemical indices of VA and Zn status increased significantly. The children had adequate VA liver stores as assessed by relative dose response. Zn supplementation resulted in improvement of vision restoration time in dim light using rapid dark adaptometry. VA and Zn synergistically normalized conjunctival epithelium after a 6 mo supplementation. Data suggest that functional improvements of populations with suboptimal VA and Zn nutriture can be accomplished by supplementation with {lt}2 times of RDA of these nutrients.

Udomkesmalee, E.; Dhanamitta, S.; Charoenklatkul, S.; Tantipopipat, S.; Banjong, O.; Rojroongwasinkul, N.; Kramer, T.R.; Smith, J.C. Jr. (Mahidol Univ., Nakhon Pathom (Thailand) USDA, Beltsville, MD (United States))

1991-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

34

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- St Louis Airport - MO 01  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Airport - MO 01 Airport - MO 01 FUSRAP Considered Sites St. Louis Airport, MO Alternate Name(s): Airport Site St. Louis Airport Storage Site (SLAPS) Former Robertson Storage Area Robertson Airport MO.01-1 MO.01-2 Location: Brown Road, Robertson, Missouri MO.01-2 Historical Operations: Stored uranium process residues containing uranium, radium, and thorium for the MED and AEC. MO.01-2 MO.01-3 MO.01-4 Eligibility Determination: Eligible MO.01-1 MO.01-7 Radiological Survey(s): Assessment Surveys MO.01-4 MO.01-5 Site Status: Cleanup in progress by U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. MO.01-6 USACE Website Long-term Care Requirements: To be determined upon completion. Also see Documents Related to St. Louis Airport, MO MO.01-1 - DOE Memorandum; Coffman to LaGrone; Subject: Authorization

35

Mr. Andrew Wallo, III, NE-23  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

9% L'Enfam Plaza, S, W.. Warhin@on, D.C. 2002ijl74j Tekphow (202) 488ddO 9% L'Enfam Plaza, S, W.. Warhin@on, D.C. 2002ijl74j Tekphow (202) 488ddO 7117-03.87.cdy.'i3 23 September 1967 ~ s ~ Mr. Andrew Wallo, III, NE-23 Oivision of Facility & Site Decommissioning Projects U.S. Department of Energy Germantown, Maryland 20545 Dear Mr. Wallo: ELIMINATION RECOMMENDATION -- COLLEGES AND IJNIVFRSITIES , The attached elimination reconnnendation was prepar!ad in accordance with your suggestion during our meeting on 22 September! The recommendation includes 26 colleges and universities identified,in Enclosure 4 to Aerospace letter subject: Status of Actions - FUSRAP Site List, dated 27 May 1987; three institutions (Tufts College, University of Virginia, and the University of Washington) currently identified!on ithe FUSRAP list of sites under consideration; and six institutions recently iden-

36

REPLY TO ATTN OF NE-301  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

N\I&?' d,' g N\I&?' d,' g 4 DATE. fdov 2 5 1980 REPLY TO ATTN OF NE-301 .* - memoraadu SUBJECT Remedial Action for Linde Air Products Plant, Tonawanda, New York TO W. E. Mott, EV In view of the General Counsel's reconsideration of the authority to proceed with remedial action on this site and your determination that remedial action is needed to protect the public health and safety, we will include this site in our program for remedial action. of this memorandum. Oak Ridge is requested to do so by copy I am somewhat surprised at the urgency of remedial action which you implied in your memorandum since your previous memorandum designating this site stated that it has a low priority. The site radiological survey report DOE/EV-005/5 concludes that air and water contamination were below the non-occupational

37

NE Press Releases | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Press Releases Press Releases NE Press Releases RSS December 12, 2013 Energy Department Announces New Investment in Innovative Small Modular Reactor The Energy Department tannounced an award to NuScale Power LLC to support a new project to design, certify and help commercialize innovative small modular reactors in the United States. November 12, 2013 Public Invited to Comment on Draft Environmental Assessment for the Resumption of Transient Testing of Nuclear Fuels and Materials The U.S. Department of Energy invites the public to read and comment on a draft environmental assessment it has prepared for a proposal to resume transient testing of nuclear fuels and materials at either Idaho National Laboratory (INL) or Sandia National Laboratories (SNL). November 4, 2013 Factsheet: Second Meeting of the United States-Japan Bilateral Commission

38

Notices 888 First Street, NE., Washington, DC  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

11 Federal Register 11 Federal Register / Vol. 76, No. 122 / Friday, June 24, 2011 / Notices 888 First Street, NE., Washington, DC 20426. The filings in the above-referenced proceeding are accessible in the Commission's eLibrary system by clicking on the appropriate link in the above list. They are also available for review in the Commission's Public Reference Room in Washington, DC. There is an eSubscription link on the Web site that enables subscribers to receive e-mail notification when a document is added to a subscribed docket(s). For assistance with any FERC Online service, please e-mail FERCOnlineSupport@ferc.gov or call (866) 208-3676 (toll free). For TTY, call (202) 502-8659. Dated: June 20, 2011. Kimberly D. Bose, Secretary. [FR Doc. 2011-15859 Filed 6-23-11; 8:45 am]

39

Notices 888 First Street NE., Washington, DC  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

53 Federal Register 53 Federal Register / Vol. 78, No. 56 / Friday, March 22, 2013 / Notices 888 First Street NE., Washington, DC 20426. This filing is accessible on-line at http://www.ferc.gov, using the ''eLibrary'' link and is available for review in the Commission's Public Reference Room in Washington, DC. There is an ''eSubscription'' link on the Web site that enables subscribers to receive email notification when a document is added to a subscribed docket(s). For assistance with any FERC Online service, please email FERCOnlineSupport@ferc.gov, or call (866) 208-3676 (toll free). For TTY, call (202) 502-8659. Comment Date: 5:00 p.m. Eastern Time on April 2, 2013. Dated: March 15, 2013. Kimberly D. Bose, Secretary. [FR Doc. 2013-06602 Filed 3-21-13; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 6717-01-P

40

Mr. Andrew Wallo, III, NE-23  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

suite 7900,955 L%l/onr Plaza, S. W., Washingion, D.C. 20024.?174,, Telephone: (202) 488.~ suite 7900,955 L%l/onr Plaza, S. W., Washingion, D.C. 20024.?174,, Telephone: (202) 488.~ Mr. Andrew Wallo, III, NE-23 Division of Facility & Site Decommissioning Projects U.S. Department of Energy Germantown, Maryland 20545 7117~03.87.dy.43 23 September 1987 I j / Dear Mr. Wallo: I ELIMINATION RECOMMENDATION -- COLLEGES AND UN&ITIES I . The attached elimination recommendation was prepared in accordance with your suggestion during our meeting on 22 September!. The recommend includes 26 colleges and universities identified,in Enclosure 4 to Aerospace letter subject: Status of Actions 27 May 1987; three institutions (Tufts and the University of Washington) currently list of sites under consideration; and six institutions tified during a search of Hanford records.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mo ne nh" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

M r. Andrew Wallo, III, NE-23  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

300.955 L*Enfom Plaza, S. Iv.. Washrhington. D.C. 200242174, Tekphonc (202) 300.955 L*Enfom Plaza, S. Iv.. Washrhington. D.C. 200242174, Tekphonc (202) 7117-03.87.cdy.43 23 September 1987 M r. Andrew Wallo, III, NE-23 Division of Facility & Site Deconnnissioning Projects U.S. Department of Energy Germantown, Maryland 20545 Dear M r. Wallo: ELIMINATION RECOMMENDATION -- COLLEGES AND UNIVERSITIES The attached elimination recommendation was prepared in accordi with your suggestion during our meeting on 22 September. The reconu includes 26 colleges and universities identified.in Enclosure 4 to Aerospace letter subject: Status of Actions - FUSRAP Sites List, da: 27 May 1987; three institutions.(Tufts College, University of Virgil and the University of Washington) currently identified'on the FUSFN list of sites under consideration; and six.institutions recently idI

42

MiniBooNE Oscillation Results 2011  

SciTech Connect

The MiniBooNE neutrino oscillation search experiment at Fermilab has recently updated results from a search for {bar {nu}}{sub {mu}} {yields} {bar {nu}}{sub e} oscillations, using a data sample corresponding to 8.58 x 10{sup 20} protons on target in anti-neutrino mode. This high statistics result represent an increase in statistics of 52% compared to result published in 2010. An excess of 57.7 {+-} 28.5 events is observed in the energy range 200 MeV < E{sub {nu}} < 3000 MeV. The data favor LSND-like {bar {nu}}{sub {mu}} {yields} {bar {nu}}{sub e} oscillations over a background only hypothesis at 91.1% confidence level in the energy range 475 < E{sub {nu}} < 3000 MeV.

Djurcic, Zelimir

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Laser Welding and Post Weld Treatment of Modified 9Cr-1MoVNb Steel [Laser  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Laser Welding of Metals > Laser Welding of Metals > Laser Welding and Post Weld Treatment of Modified 9Cr-1MoVNb Steel Capabilities Engineering Experimentation Reactor Safety Experimentation Aerosol Experiments System Components Laser Applications Overview Laser Oil & Gas Well Drilling Laser Heat Treatment Laser Welding of Metals On-line Monitoring Laser Beam Delivery Laser Glazing of Railroad Rails High Power Laser Beam Delivery Decontamination and Decommissioning Refractory Alloy Welding Robots Applications Other Facilities Other Capabilities Work with Argonne Contact us For Employees Site Map Help Join us on Facebook Follow us on Twitter NE on Flickr Laser Applications Laboratory Laser Welding of Metals Laser Welding and Post Weld Treatment of Modified 9Cr-1MoVNb Steel Zhiyue Xu Nuclear Engineering Division of Argonne National Laboratory

44

NE-23 List of California Sites NE-23 Hattie Car-well, SAN/NSQA Division  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

NE-23 NE-23 Hattie Car-well, SAN/NSQA Division Attached for your information is the list of California sites we identified in our search of Manhattdn Engineer District records for the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP). None of the facilities listed qualified"fbr'FUSRAP:'~- The only site in California,that was included in FUSRAP was Gilman Hall on the University of California-Berkeley Campus. All California sites that are in our Surplus Facilities Management Prcgram are under San Francisco Operations and are at the Santa Susana Field Laboratory or the University of California-Davis. If you have questions on any of the sites on the list, please call me at FTS 233-5439. /ct( Andrew Walls III. Desiynation and Certification Manager

45

Version 1.0 Lithium hyper ne splitting  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Version 1.0 Lithium hyper#12;ne splitting Krzysztof Pachucki #3; Institute of Theoretical Physics approach for the calculation of relativistic m#11; 6 corrections to the lithium ground state hyper#12;ne problem. We will concentrate on lithium as the simplest alkali-metal atom, for which several precise

Pachucki, Krzysztof

46

Traffic Flow Measurement: Experiences with NeTraMet  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This memo records experiences in implementing and using the Traffic Flow Measurement Architecture and Meter MIB. It discusses the implementation of NeTraMet (a traffic meter) and NeMaC (a combined manager and meter reader), considers the writing of ...

N. Brownlee

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Nuclear deformation of {sup 20}Ne from {sup 20}Ne(105 MeV)+{sup 208}Pb scattering  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We have measured differential cross section for quasielastic scattering of {sup 20}Ne+{sup 208}Pb at a lab energy of 105 MeV. The data are analyzed by a rotational-model coupled-channels calculation including the 0{sup +} ground state, 2{sup +} and 4{sup +} states of {sup 20}Ne.

Strojek, I.; Czarnacki, W.; Keeley, N. [Department of Nuclear Reaction, The Andrzej Soltan Institute for Nuclear Studies, 00681 Warsaw (Poland); Kisielinski, M.; Piasecki, E.; Rusek, K. [Department of Nuclear Reaction, The Andrzej Soltan Institute for Nuclear Studies, 00681 Warsaw (Poland); Heavy Ion Laboratory, Warsaw University, 02093 Warsaw (Poland); Kliczewski, S.; Siudak, R. [Niewodniczanski Institute of Nuclear Physics PAN, 31342 Cracow (Poland); Kordiasz, A.; Trzcinska, A. [Heavy Ion Laboratory, Warsaw University, 02093 Warsaw (Poland); Koshchiy, E. [V. N. Karazin Kharkiv National University, 61077 Kharkiv (Ukraine); Kowalczyk, M. [Heavy Ion Laboratory, Warsaw University, 02093 Warsaw (Poland); Faculty of Physics, Warsaw University, 00681 Warsaw (Poland); Piorkowska, A.; Stuad, A. [University of Silesia, 40007 Katowice (Poland)

2010-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

48

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Latty Avenue Site - MO 04  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Latty Avenue Site - MO 04 Latty Avenue Site - MO 04 FUSRAP Considered Sites Latty Avenue Site, MO Alternate Name(s): Futura Coatings Futura Chemical Company Facility Hazelwood Interim Storage Site (HISS) Former Cotter Site, Latty Avenue Properties Contemporary Metals Corp. Continental Mining and Milling MO.04-1 MO.04-2 MO.04-5 MO.04-6 MO.06-8 MO.06-11 Location: 9200 Latty Avenue, Hazelwood, Missouri MO.04-1 Historical Operations: Received, stored, and processed uranium residues for the AEC. Storage and processing were licensed by the AEC and NRC and resulted in contamination of uranium and thorium. MO.04-5 MO.04-6 Eligibility Determination: Eligible MO.04-3 MO.04-4 Radiological Survey(s): Assessment Surveys MO.04-2 MO.04-7 MO.04-8 MO.04-9 MO.04-10 MO.04-11 Site Status: Cleanup in progress by U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. MO.04-12

49

Unprecedented {sup 1}/{sub {infinity}}[{beta}-Mo{sub 8}O{sub 26}]{sup 4-} polymeric chains and four novel organic-inorganic hybrids based on Mo-POMs and azaheterocycles templates  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstrct: Four novel organic-inorganic hybrid materials based on Mo-POMs and organic templates, namely [DEB] [{beta}-Mo{sub 8}O{sub 26}] [NH{sub 4}]{sub 2} (1), [BMIM] [{beta}-Mo{sub 8}O{sub 26}]{sub 0.5}{center_dot}H{sub 2}O (2), [BMIM] [1D-Mo{sub 8}O{sub 26}]{sub 0.5} (3) and {l_brace}3D-[Cu(DIE){sub 2}] [1D-Mo{sub 8}O{sub 26}]{sub 0.5}{r_brace}{sub {infinity}} (4) [DEB= 1,1 Prime -diethyl-4,4 Prime -bipyridinium, BMIM=1,1 Prime -bis(1-methylimidazolium)methylene, DIE=1,2-diimidazoloethane] have been hydrothermally synthesized and characterized by elemental analyses, IR spectroscopy, thermal gravimetric analysis(TGA) and single-crystal X-ray diffraction. Both compounds 1 and 2 are POMs-based supramolecular compounds consisted of independent [{beta}-Mo{sub 8}O{sub 26}]{sup 4-} anions and [DEB]{sup 2+} or [BMIM]{sup 2+} organic cations. Compound 3 is the first external template example of Mo-POMs-based supramolecular network incorporated with novel {sup 1}/{sub {infinity}}[{beta}-Mo{sub 8}O{sub 26}]{sup 4-} polymeric chains. Compound 4 is a rare supramolecular structure that contains octamolybdate {sup 1}/{sub {infinity}}[{beta}-Mo{sub 8}O{sub 26}]{sup 4-} polymeric chains interconnected via DIE ligands to form a 3D net. Moreover, it was indicated that these polyacid compounds had definite catalytic activities on the probe reaction of acetaldehyde oxidation to acetic acid with H{sub 2}O{sub 2}. - Graphical abstract: Four novel organic templated polyoxometalates comprising of 0D, 1D and 3D supramolecular frameworks together with the catalytic activities on the acetaldehyde oxidation to acetic acid were reported. Highlights: Using cation templated self-assembly four novel polyoxometalates were prepared. Compounds 1 and 2 consisted of independent [{beta}-Mo{sub 8}O{sub 26}]{sup 4-} anions and organic cations. Compound 3 is the first external template-assisted POMs with {sup 1}/{sub {infinity}}[{beta}-Mo{sub 8}O{sub 26}]{sup 4-} chain. Compound 4 is a rare 3D net containing {sup 1}/{sub {infinity}}[{beta}-Mo{sub 8}O{sub 26}]{sup 4-} 1D chain and DIE ligands. These compounds had definite catalytic activities on the acetaldehyde oxidation.

Du Haijuan; Zunzhe Shu [College of Chemistry and Molecular Engineering, Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou 450001 (China); Niu Yunyin, E-mail: niuyy@zzu.edu.cn [College of Chemistry and Molecular Engineering, Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou 450001 (China); Song Lisha; Zhu Yu [College of Chemistry and Molecular Engineering, Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou 450001 (China)

2012-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

50

Mr. Andrew Wallo, III, NE-23  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

300, 955 L'E~~MI Phm.SW.:. Washin@on. LX. 200242174, T~kphonc(202)48ll. 5 300, 955 L'E~~MI Phm.SW.:. Washin@on. LX. 200242174, T~kphonc(202)48ll. 5 7117-03.87.cdy.43 23 September 1987 cA Mr. Andrew Wallo, III, NE-23 Division of Facility & Site Decommissioning Projects U.S. Department of Energy Germantown, Maryland 20545 Dear Mr. Wallo: ELIMINATION RECOMMENDATION -- COLLEGES AND UNIVERSITIES M/).0-05 pl 0.0% The attached elimination recommendation was prepared in accordance ML.05 with your suggestion during our meeting on 22 September. The recommendation flD.o-02 includes 26 colleges and universities identified.in Enclosure 4 to Aerospace letter subject: Status of Actions - FUSRAP Site List, dated NO.03. 27 May 1987; three institutions (Tufts College, University of Virginia, rJc..of and the University of Washington) currently identified on the FUSRAP

51

Pion inelastic scattering from sup 20 Ne  

SciTech Connect

Angular distributions for {sup 20}Ne({pi}{sup {plus minus}}, {pi}{sup {plus minus}}{prime}) were measured on the Energetic Pion Channel and Spectrometer (EPICS) at the Clinton P. Anderson Meson Physics Facility (LAMPF). Data were taken with both {pi}{sup {plus}} and {pi}{sup {minus}} over an angular range of 12{degree} to 90{degree} for T{sub {pi}}=180 MeV and with {pi}{sup +} from 15{degree} to 90{degree} for T{sub {pi}}=120 MeV. The data were analyzed using both the distorted-wave impulse approximation (DWIA) and the coupled-channels impulse approximation (CCIA) with collective transition densities. In addition, microscopic transition densities were used in the DWIA analysis for states in the lowest rotational bands. The transitions to the 6.73-MeV 0{sup +} and several 1{sup {minus}} states, including the states at 5.79 MeV and 8.71 MeV, were studied using several models for the transition density. Strong evidence for the importance of two-step routes in pion inelastic scattering was seen in several angular distributions, including the 5.79-MeV 1{sup {minus}}, the first three 4{sup +} states, and the 8.78-MeV 6{sup +}. 100 refs., 81 figs., 33 tabs.

Burlein, M. (Pennsylvania Univ., Philadelphia, PA (USA). Dept. of Physics)

1989-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Energy for the future with Ris from nuclear power to sustainable energy Ris NatioNal laboRatoRy foR sustaiNable eNeRgy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy for the future ­ with Risø from nuclear power to sustainable energy Risø NatioNal laboRatoRy foR sustaiNable eNeRgy edited by MoRteN JastRup #12;Energy for the future #12;Energy for the future ­ with Risø from nuclear power to sustainable energy Translated from 'Energi til fremtiden ­ med Risø fra

53

Property:EIA/861/IsoNe | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

IsoNe IsoNe Jump to: navigation, search Property Name ISO_NE Property Type Boolean Description Indicates that the organization conducts operations in the New England ISO region [1] References ↑ "EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - 861 Webfile Layout for 2010.doc" Pages using the property "EIA/861/IsoNe" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) B Bangor Hydro-Electric Co + true + Barton Village, Inc (Utility Company) + true + Bozrah Light & Power Company + true + C Central Maine Power Co + true + Central Vermont Pub Serv Corp + true + CinCap IV, LLC + true + CinCap V LLC + true + Cinergy Capital & Trading, Inc + true + City of Chicopee, Massachusetts (Utility Company) + true + City of Holyoke, Massachusetts (Utility Company) + true +

54

Neutral Current Elastic Interactions in MiniBooNE  

SciTech Connect

Neutral Current Elastic (NCE) interactions in MiniBooNE are discussed. In the neutrino mode MiniBooNE reported: the flux averaged NCE differential cross section as a function of four-momentum transferred squared, an axial mass (M{sub A}) measurement, and a measurement of the strange quark spin content of the nucleon, {Delta}s. In the antineutrino mode we present the background-subtracted data which is compared with the Monte Carlo predictions.

Dharmapalan, Ranjan; /Alabama U.

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

D:\NE WEB Sites\NE\nerac\nov2001minutes.wpd  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

November 5-6, 2001, DoubleTree Hotel, Arlington, Virginia November 5-6, 2001, DoubleTree Hotel, Arlington, Virginia NERAC members present: John Ahearne Robert Long Joseph Comfort Warren F. Miller, Jr. Michael L. Corradini Benjamin F. Montoya Jose Luis Cortez Sekazi Mtingwa Allen Croff Lura Powell James Duderstadt (Chair) Richard Reba Marvin Fertel Joy Rempe Beverly Hartline John Taylor Andrew Klein Charles E. Till Dale Klein (Monday only) Neil Todreas NERAC members absent: Thomas Cochran Allen Sessoms Maureen S. Crandall Daniel C. Sullivan Steve Fetter C. Bruce Tarter Leslie Hartz Ashok Thadani (ad hoc) J. Bennett Johnston Joan Woodard Linda C. Knight Also present: Robert Card, Under Secretary, USDOE Nancy Carder, NERAC Staff Charles Forsberg, Researcher, Oak Ridge National Laboratory Norton Haberman, Senior Technical Advisor, NE, USDOE

56

Category:Kansas City, MO | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

MO MO Jump to: navigation, search Go Back to PV Economics By Location Media in category "Kansas City, MO" The following 16 files are in this category, out of 16 total. SVFullServiceRestaurant Kansas City MO Union Electric Co.png SVFullServiceRestauran... 74 KB SVHospital Kansas City MO Union Electric Co.png SVHospital Kansas City... 66 KB SVLargeHotel Kansas City MO Union Electric Co.png SVLargeHotel Kansas Ci... 66 KB SVLargeOffice Kansas City MO Union Electric Co.png SVLargeOffice Kansas C... 65 KB SVMediumOffice Kansas City MO Union Electric Co.png SVMediumOffice Kansas ... 65 KB SVMidriseApartment Kansas City MO Union Electric Co.png SVMidriseApartment Kan... 74 KB SVOutPatient Kansas City MO Union Electric Co.png SVOutPatient Kansas Ci... 66 KB SVPrimarySchool Kansas City MO Union Electric Co.png

57

Thermophysical Properties of U-10MO Alloy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides an overview of thermophysical properties of unirradiated uranium alloyed with ten weight percent molybdenum (U 10Mo), with particular focus on those material properties needed for modeling of new fuels for HPRRs (High Performance Research Reactors). The report contains both historical data available in the literature on U-10Mo, as well as more recent results conducted by the Global Threat Reduction Initiative fuel development program. The main use of the report is intended as a standard U-10Mo alloy properties reference for reactor models and simulations.

A. M. Phillips; G. S. Mickum; D. E. Burkes

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

An Audiomagnetotelluric Survey Over The Chaves Geothermal Field (Ne  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Page Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » An Audiomagnetotelluric Survey Over The Chaves Geothermal Field (Ne Portugal) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: An Audiomagnetotelluric Survey Over The Chaves Geothermal Field (Ne Portugal) Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: In an attempt to define the resistivity model of the Chaves geothermal field in NE Portugal, a detailed survey with scalar audiomagnetotelluric measurements was performed. The soundings were made in the frequency range from 2300 to 4.1 Hz. Electrical resistivity models were derived from the application of 1-D inversion, 2-D trial and error modeling and 2-D inversion procedures. The resistivities inside the geothermal field are low, reaching not more than 30 Ωm and increasing up to 60-150 Ωm

59

Municipal Energy Agency of NE | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Municipal Energy Agency of NE Municipal Energy Agency of NE Jump to: navigation, search Name Municipal Energy Agency of NE Place Nebraska Utility Id 21352 Utility Location Yes Ownership P NERC Location MRO NERC MRO Yes NERC SPP Yes NERC WECC Yes RTO SPP Yes ISO MISO Yes Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Generation Yes Activity Buying Transmission Yes Activity Wholesale Marketing Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png No rate schedules available. Average Rates No Rates Available References ↑ "EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a" Retrieved from

60

What is MoWiTT  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the net energy flow through two window samples in side-by-side tests using ambient weather conditions. MoWiTT characterizes the net energy flow as a function of time and...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mo ne nh" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Petrolite Corp - MO 08  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Petrolite Corp - MO 08 Petrolite Corp - MO 08 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: PETROLITE CORP (MO.08) Eliminated from further consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: None Location: St. Louis , Missouri MO.08-1 Evaluation Year: 1987 MO.08-4 Site Operations: Research involving test quantities of radioactive materials. MO.08-2 Site Disposition: Eliminated - Licensed - Potential for contamination remote MO.08-3 Radioactive Materials Handled: Yes Primary Radioactive Materials Handled: Uranium Flouride & Thorium Oxide MO.08-2 Radiological Survey(s): None Indicated Site Status: Eliminated from further consideration under FUSRAP Also see Documents Related to PETROLITE CORP MO.08-1 - Summary Paper; Title: License History for Petrolite Corporation, St. Louis (MO.8); dated 07/16/93; with three attachments (3

62

Characterization of the selective reduction of NO by NH/sub 3/  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The selective reduction of NO by NH/sub 3/ addition has been studied in a lean-burning oil-fired laboratory combustion tunnel as a function of equivalence ratio, NH/sub 3/ injection temperature, concentration of NH/sub 3/ added, and the source of NO. Ammonia breakthrough was found to depend strongly on the NH/sub 3/ addition temperature. The total concentration of nitrogen containing species other N/sub 2/, NO, and NH/sub 3/ was measured with a variety of techniques and was found to be less than 5 ppM over the range of conditions studied.

Lucas, D.; Brown, N.J.

1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

19Ne levels studied with the 18F(d,n)19Ne*(18F+p) reaction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A good understanding of the level structure of 19Ne around the proton threshold is critical to estimating the destruction of long-lived 18F in novae. Here we report the properties of levels in 19Ne in the excitation energy range of 6.9 Ex 8.4 MeV studied via the proton-transfer 18F(d, n)Ne reaction at the Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility. The populated 19Ne levels decay by breakup into p + 18F and + 15O particles. The results presented in this manuscript are those of levels that are simultaneously observed from the breakup into both channels. An s-wave state is observed at 1468 keV above the proton threshold, which is a potential candidate for a predicted broad J = 1/2+ state. The proton and partial widths are deduced to be p = 228 50 keV and = 130 30 keV for this state.

Adekola, A. S. [Ohio University, Athens; Brune, C. R. [Ohio University; Bardayan, Daniel W [ORNL; Blackmon, Jeffery C [Louisiana State University; Chae, K. Y. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Cizewski, J. A. [Rutgers University; Jones, K. L. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Kozub, R. L. [Tennessee Technological University; Massey, T. [Ohio University; Nesaraja, Caroline D [ORNL; Pain, Steven D [ORNL; ShrinerJr., J. F. [Tennessee Technological University; Smith, Michael Scott [ORNL; Thomas, J. S. [Rutgers University

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

MiniBooNE "Windows on the Universe"  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Progress in the last few decades has left neutrino physics with several vexing issues. Among them are the following questions: (1) Why are lepton mixing angles so different from those in the quark sector? (2) What is the most probable range of the reactor mixing angle? (3) Is the atmospheric mixing angle maximal? (4) What is the number of fermion generations? These are some of the issues that neutrino science hopes to study; this article will explore these questions as part of a more general scientific landscape, and will discuss the part MiniBooNE might play in this exploration. We discuss the current state of measurements taken by MiniBooNE, and emphasize the uniqueness of neutrino oscillations as an important probe into the 'Windows on the Universe.'

Stefanski, Ray; /Fermilab

2010-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

65

File:EIA-Williston-NE-Gas.pdf | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Williston-NE-Gas.pdf Williston-NE-Gas.pdf Jump to: navigation, search File File history File usage Williston Basin, Northeast Part By 2001 Gas Reserve Class Size of this preview: 776 × 600 pixels. Full resolution ‎(6,600 × 5,100 pixels, file size: 5.95 MB, MIME type: application/pdf) Description Williston Basin, Northeast Part By 2001 Gas Reserve Class Sources Energy Information Administration Authors Samuel H. Limerick; Lucy Luo; Gary Long; David F. Morehouse; Jack Perrin; Robert F. King Related Technologies Oil, Natural Gas Creation Date 2005-09-01 Extent Regional Countries United States UN Region Northern America States Montana, North Dakota, South Dakota File history Click on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. Date/Time Thumbnail Dimensions User Comment

66

Overview of DOE-NE Proliferation and Terrorism Risk Assessment  

SciTech Connect

Research objectives are: (1) Develop technologies and other solutions that can improve the reliability, sustain the safety, and extend the life of current reactors; (2) Develop improvements in the affordability of new reactors to enable nuclear energy; (3) Develop Sustainable Nuclear Fuel Cycles; and (4) Understand and minimize the risks of nuclear proliferation and terrorism. The goal is to enable the use of risk information to inform NE R&D program planning. The PTRA program supports DOE-NE's goal of using risk information to inform R&D program planning. The FY12 PTRA program is focused on terrorism risk. The program includes a mix of innovative methods that support the general practice of risk assessments, and selected applications.

Sadasivan, Pratap [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

67

Neutrino and Antineutrino Cross sections at MiniBooNE  

SciTech Connect

The MiniBooNE experiment has reported a number of high statistics neutrino and anti-neutrino cross sections -among which are the charged current quasi-elastic (CCQE) and neutral current elastic (NCE) neutrino scattering on mineral oil (CH2). Recently a study of the neutrino contamination of the anti-neutrino beam has concluded and the analysis of the anti-neutrino CCQE and NCE scattering is ongoing.

Dharmapalan, Ranjan; /Alabama U.

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Ne IX emission-line ratios in solar active regions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Emission-line ratios for Ne IX are derived and compared with observational data for solar active regions obtained with the SOLEX B spectrometer on the P78-1 satellite. Excellent agreement is obtained, providing support for the atomic data adopted in the calculations and resolving discrepancies between existing theoretical calculations and solar data. The calculated R-ratio for the low-density limit agrees well with the SOLEX observations. 47 references.

Keenan, F.P.; Mccann, S.M.; Kingston, A.E.; Mckenzie, D.L.

1987-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Mo Type Phase in Long-Term Aged INCONEL Alloy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

FORMATION OF A PtzMo TYPE PHASE IN LONG-TERM AGED lNCONEL@ ALLOY 686. Michael G. ... formation of a low-temperature iutermetallic Pt*Mo type .

70

MoWiTT: The Mobile Window Thermal Test Facility  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Airflow schematic MoWiTT: The Mobile Window Thermal Test Facility In the MoWiTT facility, efficient window-and-frame systems are measured to understand the flow of energy through...

71

Accelerator Production Options for 99MO  

SciTech Connect

Shortages of {sup 99}Mo, the most commonly used diagnostic medical isotope, have caused great concern and have prompted numerous suggestions for alternate production methods. A wide variety of accelerator-based approaches have been suggested. In this paper we survey and compare the various accelerator-based approaches.

Bertsche, Kirk; /SLAC

2010-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

72

Page 1 of 7 2013 NH 4-H HORSE QUIZ BOWL  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

at http://extension.unh.edu/4H/NH4-HHorseProject.htm or by sending an Excel document to Rhiannon.Beauregard

New Hampshire, University of

73

Vanishing N=20 Shell Gap: Study of Excited States in {sup 27,28}Ne  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Letter reports on the {sup 1}H({sup 28}Ne,{sup 28}Ne) and {sup 1}H({sup 28}Ne,{sup 27}Ne) reactions studied at intermediate energy using a liquid hydrogen target. From the cross section populating the first 2{sup +} excited state of {sup 28}Ne, and using the previously determined B(E2) value, the neutron quadrupole transition matrix element has been calculated to be M{sub n}=13.8{+-}3.7 fm{sup 2}. In the neutron knockout reaction, two low-lying excited states were populated in {sup 27}Ne. Only one of them can be interpreted by the sd shell model while the additional state may intrude from the fp shell. These experimental observations are consistent with the presence of fp shell configurations at low excitation energy in {sup 27,28}Ne nuclei caused by a vanishing N=20 shell gap at Z=10.

Dombradi, Zs.; Fueloep, Zs. [Institute of Nuclear Research of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 51, Debrecen, H-4001 (Hungary); Elekes, Z. [Institute of Nuclear Research of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 51, Debrecen, H-4001 (Hungary); Institute of Physical and Chemical Research, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Saito, A.; Baba, H.; Demichi, K.; Gomi, T.; Hasegawa, H.; Kanno, S.; Kawai, S.; Kurita, K.; Matsuyama, Y.; Sakai, H.K.; Takeshita, E.; Togano, Y.; Yamada, K. [Rikkyo University, 3 Nishi-Ikebukuro, Toshima, Tokyo 171 (Japan); Aoi, N.; Ishihara, M.; Kishida, T.; Kubo, T. [Institute of Physical and Chemical Research, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan)] (and others)

2006-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

74

Role of SrMoO{sub 4} in Sr{sub 2}MgMoO{sub 6} synthesis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Here we investigate the elemental and phase compositions during the solid-state synthesis of the promising SOFC-anode material, Sr{sub 2}MgMoO{sub 6}, and demonstrate that molybdenum does not notably evaporate under the normal synthesis conditions with temperatures up to 1200 {sup o}C due to the formation of SrMoO{sub 4} as an intermediate product at low temperatures, below 600 {sup o}C. However, partial decomposition of the Sr{sub 2}MgMoO{sub 6} phase becomes evident at the higher temperatures ({approx}1500 {sup o}C). The effect of SrMoO{sub 4} on the electrical conductivity of Sr{sub 2}MgMoO{sub 6} is evaluated by preparing a series of Sr{sub 2}MgMoO{sub 6} samples with different amounts of additional SrMoO{sub 4}. Under the reducing operation conditions of an SOFC anode the insulating SrMoO{sub 4} phase is apparently reduced to the highly conductive SrMoO{sub 3} phase. Percolation takes place with 20-30 wt% of SrMoO{sub 4} in a Sr{sub 2}MgMoO{sub 6} matrix, with a notable increase in electrical conductivity after reduction. Conductivity values of 14, 60 and 160 S/cm are determined at 800 {sup o}C in 5% H{sub 2}/Ar for the Sr{sub 2}MgMoO{sub 6} samples with 30, 40 and 50 wt% of added SrMoO{sub 4}, respectively. -- Graphical abstract: SrMoO{sub 4} is formed at low temperatures during the synthesis of Sr{sub 2}MgMoO{sub 6}, which prevents the volatilization of Mo from typical precursor mixtures of this promising SOFC anode material. SrMoO{sub 4} is insulating and it is often found as an impurity in Sr{sub 2}MgMoO{sub 6} samples. It is however readily reduced to highly conducting SrMoO{sub 3}. Composites of Sr{sub 2}MgMoO{sub 6} and SrMoO{sub 3} show increased electrical conductivities compared to pure Sr{sub 2}MgMoO{sub 6} under the reductive operation conditions of an SOFC anode. Display Omitted Highlights: {yields} Sr{sub 2}MgMoO{sub 6} is a promising SOFC anode material. {yields} During the Sr{sub 2}MgMoO{sub 6} synthesis SrMoO{sub 4} is formed at low temperatures. {yields} Formation of SrMoO{sub 4} effectively prevents volatilization of Mo at high temperatures. {yields} Insulating SrMoO{sub 4} reduces to highly conductive SrMoO{sub 3} under SOFC-anode conditions. {yields} Composites of Sr{sub 2}MgMoO{sub 6} and SrMoO{sub 3} show high electrical conductivities.

Vasala, S.; Yamauchi, H. [Laboratory of Inorganic Chemistry, Department of Chemistry, School of Chemical Technology, Aalto University, P.O. Box 16100, FI-00076 Aalto (Finland); Karppinen, M., E-mail: maarit.karppinen@aalto.f [Laboratory of Inorganic Chemistry, Department of Chemistry, School of Chemical Technology, Aalto University, P.O. Box 16100, FI-00076 Aalto (Finland)

2011-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

75

Missouri Department of National Resources Energy Center Mo DNR | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Department of National Resources Energy Center Mo DNR Department of National Resources Energy Center Mo DNR Jump to: navigation, search Name Missouri Department of National Resources Energy Center (Mo DNR) Place Jefferson City, Missouri Zip 65102 Product Mo DNR manages the Energy Revolving Fund which assists public organisations in Missouri in financing energy efficient projects for their facilities. References Missouri Department of National Resources Energy Center (Mo DNR)[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Missouri Department of National Resources Energy Center (Mo DNR) is a company located in Jefferson City, Missouri . References ↑ "Missouri Department of National Resources Energy Center (Mo

76

2013 Annual DOE-NE Materials Research Coordination Meeting | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2013 Annual DOE-NE Materials Research Coordination Meeting 2013 Annual DOE-NE Materials Research Coordination Meeting 2013 Annual DOE-NE Materials Research Coordination Meeting The Reactor Materials element of the Nuclear Energy Enabling Technologies (NEET) program conducted its FY 2013 coordination meeting as a series of four web-conferences to act as a forum for the nuclear materials research community. The purpose of this meeting was to report on current and planned nuclear materials research, identify new areas of collaboration and promote greater coordination among the various Office of Nuclear Energy (NE) programs. Currently, materials research is performed in several NE programs, including NE Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NEAMS), Fuel Cycle Research and Development (FCRD), Advanced Reactor Technologies

77

2013 Annual DOE-NE Materials Research Coordination Meeting | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2013 Annual DOE-NE Materials Research Coordination Meeting 2013 Annual DOE-NE Materials Research Coordination Meeting 2013 Annual DOE-NE Materials Research Coordination Meeting The Reactor Materials element of the Nuclear Energy Enabling Technologies (NEET) program conducted its FY 2013 coordination meeting as a series of four web-conferences to act as a forum for the nuclear materials research community. The purpose of this meeting was to report on current and planned nuclear materials research, identify new areas of collaboration and promote greater coordination among the various Office of Nuclear Energy (NE) programs. Currently, materials research is performed in several NE programs, including NE Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NEAMS), Fuel Cycle Research and Development (FCRD), Advanced Reactor Technologies

78

R-Process in Collapsing O/Ne/Mg Cores  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Several circumstantial arguments point to the formation of the third r-process peak at A about 190, near platinum, in stars of mass of about 8-10 solar masses: 1) The delayed production of europium with respect to iron imposes a time scale that restricts the progenitor stars to less than about 10 solar masses; 2) the r-process demands a dominant robust mechanism at least for barium and above, since the relative abundance pattern of those r-process elements in low-metallicity stars is consistent with the solar pattern; 3) stars of about 8-10 solar masses produce nearly identical degenerate O/Ne/Mg cores that collapse due to electron capture; and 4) the resulting low-mass cores may produce both an r-process in a prompt explosion and a subsequent r-process in a neutrino driven wind. The prompt explosion of an O/Ne/Mg core yields low entropy and low electron fraction, and hence may produce a reasonable r-process peak at A about 190 as well as all of the r-process elements with Z greater than 56. The possible diff...

Wheeler, J C; Hillebrandt, W; Cowan, John J.; Hillebrandt, Wolfgang

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

R-Process in Collapsing O/Ne/Mg Cores  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Several circumstantial arguments point to the formation of the third r-process peak at A about 190, near platinum, in stars of mass of about 8-10 solar masses: 1) The delayed production of europium with respect to iron imposes a time scale that restricts the progenitor stars to less than about 10 solar masses; 2) the r-process demands a dominant robust mechanism at least for barium and above, since the relative abundance pattern of those r-process elements in low-metallicity stars is consistent with the solar pattern; 3) stars of about 8-10 solar masses produce nearly identical degenerate O/Ne/Mg cores that collapse due to electron capture; and 4) the resulting low-mass cores may produce both an r-process in a prompt explosion and a subsequent r-process in a neutrino driven wind. The prompt explosion of an O/Ne/Mg core yields low entropy and low electron fraction, and hence may produce a reasonable r-process peak at A about 190 as well as all of the r-process elements with Z greater than 56. The possible differences in the neutrino-driven wind and associated r-process due to the low-mass neutron stars expected in this mass range are also discussed.

J. Craig Wheeler; John J. Cowan; Wolfgang Hillebrandt

1997-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

80

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- United Nuclear Corp - MO 0-03  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

United Nuclear Corp - MO 0-03 United Nuclear Corp - MO 0-03 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: UNITED NUCLEAR CORP. (MO.0-03) Eliminated from further consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: Mallinckrodt Chemical Works Mallinckrodt Nuclear Corporation MO.0-03-1 MO.0-03-2 Location: Hematite , Missouri MO.0-03-1 Evaluation Year: Circa 1987 MO.0-03-3 Site Operations: Commercial fuel fabrication operation. Licensed to reclaim unirradiated enriched uranium from scrap generated in fuel fabrication and fuel material preparation. MO.0-03-1 MO.0-03-2 MO.0-03-3 MO.0-03-4 Site Disposition: Eliminated - NRC licensed - Commercial operations MO.0-03-3 MO.0-03-5 Radioactive Materials Handled: Yes Primary Radioactive Materials Handled: Uranium MO.0-03-3 Radiological Survey(s): None Indicated

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mo ne nh" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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81

A Case Study For Geothermal Exploration In The Ne German Basin...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

icon Twitter icon A Case Study For Geothermal Exploration In The Ne German Basin- Integrated Interpretation Of Seismic Tomography, Litho-Stratigraphy, Salt Tectonics, And...

82

MoNDian Dark Matter, Entropic Gravity, and Infinite Statistics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We propose the concept of MoNDian dark matter which behaves like cold dark matter at cluster and cosmic scales but emulates modified Newtonian dynamics at the galactic scale. The connection between global physics and local galactic dynamics is implemented via entropic gravity. We also give an alternative formulation of MoNDian dark matter by using an effective gravitational Born-Infeld theory. In the latter approach, we show that the quanta of MoNDian dark matter obey infinite statistics.

Y. Jack Ng

2012-12-27T23:59:59.000Z

83

Microstructure Characterization and Processing of U-Mo Alloy Fuels ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

molybdenum (Mo) fuels have been identified as a potential replacement for highly enriched uranium (HEU) dispersion fuels in high performance research...

84

Interdiffusion between Zr Diffusion Barrier and U-Mo Alloy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

U-Mo alloys are being developed as low enrichment uranium fuels under the Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactor (RERTR) program. Significant reactions have been observed between U-Mo fuels and Al or Al alloy matrix. Refractory metal Zr has been proposed as barrier material to reduce the interactions. In order to investigate the compatibility and barrier effects between U-Mo alloy and Zr, solid-to-solid U-10wt.%Mo vs. Zr diffusion couples were assembled and annealed at 600, 700, 800, 900 and 1000 C for various times. The microstructures and concentration profiles due to interdiffusion and reactions were examined via scanning electron microscopy and electron probe microanalysis, respectively. Intermetallic phase Mo2Zr was found at the interface and its population increased when annealing temperature decreased. Diffusion paths were also plotted on the U-Mo-Zr ternary phase diagrams with good consistency. The growth rate of interdiffusion zone between U-10wt.%Mo and Zr was also calculated under the assumption of parabolic diffusion, and was determined to be about 103 times lower than the growth rate of diffusional interaction layer found in diffusion couples U-10wt.%Mo vs. Al or Al-Si alloy. Other desirable physical properties of Zr as barrier material, such as neutron adsorption rate, melting point and thermal conductivity are presented as supplementary information to demonstrate the great potential of Zr as the diffusion barrier for U-Mo fuel systems in RERTR.

K. Huang; Y. Park; Y. H. Sohn

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Balancing the Properties of Structural Mo-Borosilicide Alloys for ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Symposium, Advanced Protective Coatings for Refractory Metals and Alloys. Presentation Title, Balancing the Properties of Structural Mo-Borosilicide Alloys for...

86

Idaho National Laboratory DOE-NE's National Nuclear Capability-  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

4-2023 4-2023 Idaho National Laboratory DOE-NE's National Nuclear Capability- Developing and Maintaining the INL Infrastructure TEN-YEAR SITE PLAN DOE/ID-11474 Final June 2012 Sustainable INL continues to exceed DOE goals for reduction in the use of petroleum fuels - running its entire bus fleet on biodiesel while converting 75% of its light-duty fleet to E85 fuel. The Energy Systems Laboratory (ESL), slated for completion this year, will be a state-of-the-art laboratory with high-bay lab space where leading bioenergy feedstock processing, advanced battery testing, and hybrid energy systems integration research will be conducted. The Advanced Test Reactor is the world's most advanced nuclear research capability - crucial to (1) the ongoing development of safe, efficient

87

NE-24 Unlverslty of Chicayo Remedial Action Plan  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

(YJ 4 tlsj .?I2 (YJ 4 tlsj .?I2 416 17 1983 NE-24 Unlverslty of Chicayo Remedial Action Plan 22&d 7 IA +-- E. I.. Keller, Director Technical Services Division Oak Ridge Operations Ufflce In response to your memorandum dated July 29, 1983, the Field Task Proposal/Agreement (FTP/A) received frw Aryonne National Laboratory (ANL) appears to be satisfactory, and this office concurs in the use of ANL to provide the decontamination effort as noted in the FTP/A. The final decontaminatton report should Include the data needed for certiff- cation of the cleanup and any contamination left In place, e.g., sewer lines should be so documented in the permanent records of the University as well as the certification documents and reports. The remedial action to be conducted appears to be clearly InsIgnifIcant from an environmental

88

Participants: William Naughton, COHMED Bill Sherman, NE HLRW Task Force  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

conference call May 27, 1998 conference call May 27, 1998 Participants: William Naughton, COHMED Bill Sherman, NE HLRW Task Force Bob Fronczak, AAR Mike Butler, UETC Ray English, DOE-NR George Ruberg, UETC Kevin Blackwell, FRA Markus Popa, DOE-RW Sandy Covi, UP The Rail Topic Group is currently in a transitional mode, moving simultaneously toward closure of the two rail information matrices, Comparison of CVSA Recommended National Procedures and Out-Of-Service Criteria for the Enhanced Safety Inspection of Commercial Highway Vehicles Transporting Transuranics, Spent Nuclear Fuel, and High Level Waste to Rail Inspection Standards, and Rail and Highway Regulations Relative to the Transportation of Radioactive Materials and their Applicability to States, Tribes, Shippers, and Carriers, (both

89

EG&G SURVEY REPORT NE-F-003  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

EBJG EBJG -ENERGY MEASUREMENTS GROUP EG&G SURVEY REPORT NE-F-003 FEBRUARY 1983 NJT& THE REMOTE SENSING lRtlORlllORY OF THE UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY AN AERIAL RADIOLOGICAL SURVEY OF AN AREA SURROUNDING THE FORMER M IDDLESEX SAMPLING PLANT IN M IDDLESEX, N E W JERSEY DATE OF SURVEY: M A Y 1978 DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or

90

PNM Resources 2401 Aztec NE, MS-Z100  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

PNM Resources PNM Resources 2401 Aztec NE, MS-Z100 Albuquerque, NM 87107 505-241-2025 Fax 505 241-2384 PNMResources.com October 29, 2013 Mr. Christopher Lawrence Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability (OE-20) U.S. Department of Energy 1000 Independence Avenue, SW Washington, DC 20585 Submitted electronically via email to: Christopher.Lawrence@hq.doe.gov Dear Mr. Lawrence: Subject: Department of Energy (DOE)- Improving Performance of Federal Permitting and Review of Infrastructure Projects, Request for Information, 78 Fed. Reg. 53436 (Aug. 29, 2013) PNM Resources (PNMR) is an energy holding company with 2012 consolidated operating revenues of $1.3 billion. Through its regulated utilities, PNM and TNMP, PNMR serves electricity to more than 739,000 homes and businesses in New

91

CA M r. Andrew Wallo, III. NE-23  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

i5W 95.5 L' i5W 95.5 L' E&nt plom. S. W.:. Washingr on. D.C. ZOOX2i74, Tekphm: (202) 488-6OGb 7II7-03.87.cdy.43 23 September 1987. Ii CA M r. Andrew Wallo, III. NE-23 Division of Facility & Site Decommissioning Projects U.S. Department of Energy Germantown, Maryland 20545 Dear M r. Wallo: ELIMINATION RECOMMENDATION -- COLLEGES AND UNIVERSITIES pqq.0' 05 PI ;p.03- The attached elimination recommendation was prepared in accordance ,I ML.05 with your suggestion during our meeting on 22 September. The recommendation flO.O-02 includes 26 colleges and universities identified in Enclosure 4 to Aerospace letter subject: Status of Actions - FUSRAP Site List, dated 27 May 1987; three institutions (Tufts College, University of Virginia, and the University of Washington) currently identified on the FUSRAP

92

The DA{Phi}NE beam position monitors  

SciTech Connect

The beam diagnostics network of DA{Phi}NE, the Frascati {Phi}-factory, includes more than 110 beam position monitors divided between button monitors and striplines. The shape of the vacuum chamber changes along the accelerator implying several different geometries for these monitors. Moreover, in the two interaction regions of the collider where the electron and positron beams pass into the same chamber, a six-button configuration has been used. A bench calibration of each family of BPMs and striplines is being performed. A polynomial correction function has been derived by fitting the calibration results. An analytical-numerical analysis of the buttons` geometry has been done in order to compare the experimental with the theoretical results. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

Ghigo, A.; Sannibale, F.; Serio, M.; Vaccarezza, C. [INFN Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati-00044 Frascati (Roma)-Italy

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Charged-Current Interaction Measurements in MiniBooNE  

SciTech Connect

Neutrino oscillation is the only known phenomenon for physics beyond the standard model. To investigate this phenomenon, the understanding of low energy neutrino scattering (200NE finds that a simple Fermi gas model, with appropriate adjustments, accurately characterizes the CCQE events on carbon. The extracted parameters include an effective axial mass, MA=1.23 {+-} 0.20 GeV, and a Pauli-blocking parameter, kappa = 1.019 {+-} 0.011.

Katori, Teppei; /Indiana U.

2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Microsoft PowerPoint - NEAC Battelle NE Capabilities 062408.ppt  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

R&D Facility Requirements NEAC Meeting Progress Report June 24, 2008 2 Facilitization of U.S. Nuclear R&D Infrastructure Three-step study process: * First, ASNE requested Battelle Memorial Institute to develop Industry- and-University-supported list of capabilities and facilities necessary to conduct a comprehensive nuclear R&D program. (Draft, June 12, 2008) * Second, INL, using input from all DOE and other sources, will determine current facilities and their condition and availability to support next 20 years of nuclear R&D. (Draft, June 30, 2008) * Third, recommendations will be made on priorities and on existing facilities to be maintained/preserved or otherwise supported by NE regardless of location or ownership. (Executive Team Meeting, July 1, 2008)

95

CHARACTERIZATION STUDIES OF THE SELECTIVE REDUCTION OF NO by NH3  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Maloney, K.L. , "NOx Reduction with Ammonia: Laboratoryand Hashizawa, K. , "Reduction of NOx in Combustion ExhaustSelective Noncatalytic Reduction of NOx with NH3," EPRI NOx

Brown, N.J.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

EA-1909: South Table Wind Project, Kimball County, NE | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

09: South Table Wind Project, Kimball County, NE 09: South Table Wind Project, Kimball County, NE EA-1909: South Table Wind Project, Kimball County, NE Summary DOE's Western Area Power Administration is preparing this EA to evaluate the environmental impacts of interconnecting the proposed South Table Wind Project, which would generate approximately 60 megawatts from about 40 turbines, to Western's existing Archer-Sidney 115-kV Transmission Line in Kimball County, Nebraska. Public Comment Opportunities None available at this time. Documents Available for Download August 28, 2012 EA-1909: Finding of No Significant Impact South Table Wind Project, Kimball County, NE July 16, 2012 EA-1909: Final Environmental Assessment South Table Wind Project, Kimball County, NE February 29, 2012 EA-1909: Draft Environmental Assessment

97

The MiniBooNE detector technical design report  

SciTech Connect

The MiniBooNE experiment [1] is motivated by the LSND observation, [2] which has been interpreted as {nu}{sub {mu}} {yields} {nu}{sub e} oscillations, and by the atmospheric neutrino deficit, [3,4,5] which may be ascribed to {nu}{sub {mu}} oscillations into another type of neutrino. MiniBooNE is a single-detector experiment designed to: obtain {approx} 1000 {nu}{sub {mu}} {yields} {nu}{sub e} events if the LSND signal is due to {nu}{sub {mu}} {yields} {nu}{sub e} oscillations, establishing the oscillation signal at the > 5{sigma} level as shown in Fig. 1.1; extend the search for {nu}{sub {mu}} {yields} {nu}{sub e} oscillations significantly beyond what has been studied previously if no signal is observed; search for {nu}{sub {mu}} disappearance to address the atmospheric neutrino deficit with a signal that is a suppression of the rate of {nu}{sub {mu}}C {yields} {mu}N events from the expected 600,000 per year; measure the oscillation parameters as shown in Fig. 1.2 if oscillations are observed; and test CP conservation in the lepton sector if oscillations are observed by running with separate {nu}{sub {mu}} and {bar {nu}}{sub {mu}} beams. The detector will consist of a spherical tank 6.1 m (20 feet) in radius, as shown in Fig. 1.3, that stands in a 45-foot diameter cylindrical vault. An inner tank structure at 5.75 m radius will support 1280 8-inch phototubes (10% coverage) pointed inward and optically isolated from the outer region of the tank. The tank will be filled with 807 t of mineral oil, resulting in a 445 t fiducial volume. The outer tank volume will serve as a veto shield for identifying particles both entering and leaving the detector with 240 phototubes mounted on the tank wall. Above the detector tank will be an electronics enclosure that houses the fast electronics and data acquisition system and a utilities enclosure that houses the plumbing, overflow tank, and calibration laser. The detector will be located {approx} 550 m from the Booster neutrino source. The neutrino beam, produced using 8 GeV protons from the Booster at FNAL, will consist of a target within a focusing system, followed by a {approx}50 m long pion decay volume. The low energy, high intensity and 1 {micro}s time-structure of a neutrino beam produced from the Booster beam are ideal for this experiment. We assume that the Booster can reliably deliver protons for a typical run which is two-thirds of a calendar year. The sensitivities discussed above assume the experiment receives 5 x 10{sup 20} protons per year. This Booster experiment is compatible with the Fermilab collider and MI programs. The Booster must run at 7.5 Hz to accommodate the MiniBooNE and collider programs simultaneously. The current schedule calls for data-taking to begin by the end of calendar year 2001.

I. Stancu et al.

2003-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

98

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Rogers Iron Works Co - MO 10  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Rogers Iron Works Co - MO 10 Rogers Iron Works Co - MO 10 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: ROGERS IRON WORKS CO. (MO.10 ) Elimination from consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: Rogers Iron Co. MO.10-1 Location: Joplin , Missouri MO.10-1 Evaluation Year: 1990 MO.10-2 MO.10-3 Site Operations: Tested C-liner crushing methods. MO.10-1 Site Disposition: Eliminated - Potential for contamination considered remote based on limited quantities of material handled MO.10-3 MO.10-4 Radioactive Materials Handled: Yes Primary Radioactive Materials Handled: Uranium (Trace Amounts) MO.10-2 Radiological Survey(s): None Indicated Site Status: Elimination from consideration under FUSRAP Also see Documents Related to ROGERS IRON WORKS CO. MO.10-1 - National Lead Company of Ohio Analytical Data Sheet 9908;

99

Co-Mo Electric Cooperative - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Co-Mo Electric Cooperative - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Co-Mo Electric Cooperative - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Co-Mo Electric Cooperative - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Commercial Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heat Pumps Appliances & Electronics Water Heating Cooling Maximum Rebate Geothermal Heat Pumps: 10 ton maximum for Residential, 50 ton maximum for Commercial Program Info State Missouri Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Room AC: $50 Water Heater: $50 Air Source Heat Pumps: $150 per ton Dual Fuel Air Source Heat Pumps: $300 per ton Geothermal Heat Pumps (Closed Loop): up to $850 per ton Geothermal Heat Pumps (Open Loop or Replacement): $150 per ton Provider Co-Mo Electric Cooperative Co-Mo Electric Cooperative provides rebates to residential and commercial

100

Microsoft Word - Poster Abstract_2010_MO-SCI.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

* * Presenter High-Temperature Viscous Sealing Glasses for Solid Oxide Fuel Cells Cheol-Woon Kim * , Cindy L. Schwartz, Joe Szabo, Kevin S. Barr, and Ted E. Day MO-SCI Corporation, Rolla, MO 65401 * ckim@mo-sci.com; (573) 364-2338 Richard K. Brow ** and Zhongzhi Tang Department of Materials Science and Engineering and the Graduate Center for Materials Research, Missouri University of Science and Technology, Rolla, MO 65409-1170 ** brow@mst.edu; (573) 341-6812 MO-SCI Corporation and the Missouri University of Science and Technology successfully identified and tested several glass compositions that could be used as viscous seals for Solid Oxide Fuel Cells (SOFCs) through a SBIR Phase I project (DE-SC0002491). The glasses possess desirable viscosity characteristics- that is, they have softening points in the temperature range

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mo ne nh" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Continued investigations of the catalytic reduction of N? to NH? by molybdenum triamidoamine complexes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A study of the effects of employing different solvents and the introduction of dihydrogen during the catalytic reduction of dinitrogen to ammonia with [HIPTN 3N]Mo complexes was completed. During a catalytic reaction, the ...

Hanna, Brian S. (Brian Stewart)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Mo Year Report Period: EIA ID NUMBER:  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Version No: 2013.01 Mo Year Report Period: EIA ID NUMBER: http://www.eia.gov/survey/form/eia_14/instructions.pdf Mailing Address: Secure File Transfer option available at: (e.g., PO Box, RR) https://signon.eia.doe.gov/upload/noticeoog.jsp Electronic Transmission: The PC Electronic Zip Code - Data Reporting Option (PEDRO) is available. If interested in software, call (202) 586-9659. Email form to: OOG.SURVEYS@eia.doe.gov - - - - Fax form to: (202) 586-9772 Mail form to: Oil & Gas Survey Email address: U.S. Department of Energy Ben Franklin Station PO Box 279 Washington, DC 20044-0279 Questions? Call toll free: 1-800-638-8812 PADD 4 Type of Report (Check One ): (Thousands of dollars) (Thousands of barrels) PADD 2 PADD 3 PAD DISTRICT (a) Revision to Report:

103

MattssonMoVacPrague2009.ppt  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Thomas R Mattsson Thomas R Mattsson Sandia National Laboratories Albuquerque, NM, USA Nils Sandberg -- KTH, Stockholm Richard Armiento -- Univ. Bayreuth, Germany Ann Mattsson -- Sandia National Laboratories Self-diffusion in Mo using the AM05 density functional Sandia is a multiprogram laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, for the United States Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000. Joint U.S. Russia Conference on Advances in Materials Science Prague, Czech Republic Aug 31-Sept 3, 2009 SAND 2009-2197 C, 2009-3883 C, 2009-4713 C, and 2002-1323 P Vacancy mediated diffusion is the main mechanism for mass transport in solids *Vacancies are important for *Self-diffusion *Defect migration *Radiation damage/ swelling

104

CA CAIOlf Mr. Andrew Wallo. III, NE-23  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

kire 7900. 955 L*E,,fa,u PLUG S. W.. Washin@ on. D.C. 20024-2174, Tekphme: (202) 488-6000 kire 7900. 955 L*E,,fa,u PLUG S. W.. Washin@ on. D.C. 20024-2174, Tekphme: (202) 488-6000 7117-03.87.cdy.43 23 September 1987 CA CAIOlf Mr. Andrew Wallo. III, NE-23 Division of Facility & Site Decommissioning Projects U.S. Department of Energy Germantown, Maryland 20545 CT.05 FL .0-o/ lti.Ob id.Or Dear Mr. Wallo: In/. O-01 flA.05 ELIMINATION RECOMMENDATION -- COLLEGES AND UNIVERSITIES Mbj.o-03 I4 v.o+ The attached elimination recommendation was prepared in accordance ML.o= with your suggestion during our meeting on 22 September. The recommendation nO.O-02 includes 26 colleges and universities identified.in Enclosure 4 to Aerospace letter subject: Status of Actions - FUSRAP Site List, dated N0.63' 27 May 1987; three institutions (Tufts College, University of Virginia, kfC900

105

{sup 17}O({alpha},{gamma}){sup 21}Ne and {sup 17}O({alpha},n){sup 20}Ne for the weak s process  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The ratio of the reaction rates of the competing channels {sup 17}O({alpha}{gamma}){sup 21}Ne and {sup 17}O({alpha},n){sup 20}Ne determines the efficiency of {sup 16}O as a neutron poison in the s process in low metallicity rotating stars. It has a large impact on the element production, either producing elements to the mass range of A=90 in case of a significant poisoning effect or extending the mass range up to the region of A=150 if the {gamma} channel is of negligible strength. We present an improved study of the reaction {sup 17}O({alpha},n){sup 20}Ne, including an independent measurement of the {sup 17}O({alpha},n{sub 1}){sup 20}Ne channel. A simultaneous R-Matrix fit to both the n{sub 0} and the n{sub 1} channels has been performed. New reaction rates, including recent data on the {sup 17}O({alpha},{gamma}){sup 21}Ne reaction, have been calculated and used as input for stellar network calculations and their impact on the s process in rotating massive stars is discussed.

Best, A.; Goerres, J.; Beard, M.; Couder, M.; Boer, R. de; Falahat, S.; Gueray, R. T.; Kontos, A.; Kratz, K.-L.; LeBlanc, P. J.; Li, Q.; O'Brien, S.; Oezkan, N.; Pignatari, M.; Sonnabend, K.; Talwar, R.; Tan, W.; Uberseder, E.; Wiescher, M. [Department of Physics, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, IN 46556 (United States); Department of Physics, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, IN 46556 (United States) and Department for Biogeochemistry, Max-Planck-Institute for Chemistry, 55020 Mainz (Germany); Department of Physics, Kacaeli University, Umuttepe 41380, Kocaeli (Turkey); Department of Physics, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, IN 46556 (United States); Department for Biogeochemistry, Max-Planck-Institute for Chemistry, 55020 Mainz (Germany); Department of Physics, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, IN 46556 (United States); Department of Physics, Kacaeli University, Umuttepe 41380, Kocaeli (Turkey); Department of Physics, University of Basel, Basel 4056 (Switzerland); Institute for Applied Physics, Goethe-University Frankfurt, 60325 Frankfurt (Germany); Department of Physics, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, IN 46556 (United States)

2012-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

106

Level-resolved R-matrix calculations for the electron-impact excitation of Ne{sup 3+} and Ne{sup 6+}  

SciTech Connect

Large-scale R-matrix calculations are carried out for the electron-impact excitation of Ne{sup 3+} and Ne{sup 6+}. For Ne{sup 3+}, a 581-LSJ-level R-matrix intermediate coupling frame transformation calculation is made for excitations up to the n=4 shell. For some transitions, large effective collision strength differences are found with current 23-jKJ-level Breit-Pauli R-matrix and earlier 22-LSJ-level R-matrix jj omega (JAJOM) calculations. For Ne{sup 6+}, a 171-jKJ-level Breit-Pauli R-matrix calculation is made for excitations up to the n=5 shell. For some transitions, large effective collision strength differences are found with current 46-jKJ-level Breit-Pauli R-matrix and earlier 46-LSJ-level R-matrix JAJOM calculations. Together with existing R-matrix calculations for other ion stages, high-quality excitation data are now available for astrophysical and laboratory plasma modeling along the entire Ne isonuclear sequence.

Ludlow, J. A.; Lee, T. G.; Ballance, C. P.; Loch, S. D.; Pindzola, M. S. [Department of Physics, Auburn University, Auburn, Alabama 36849 (United States)

2011-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

107

Thermal Durability of Cu-CHA NH3-SCR Catalysts for Diesel NOx Reduction  

SciTech Connect

Multiple catalytic functions (NOx conversion, NO and NH3 oxidation, NH3 storage) of a commercial Cu-zeolite urea/NH3-SCR catalyst were assessed in a laboratory fixed-bed flow reactor system after differing degrees of hydrothermal aging. Catalysts were characterized by using x-ray diffraction (XRD), 27Al solid state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) / energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) spectroscopy to develop an understanding of the degradation mechanisms during catalyst aging. The catalytic reaction measurements of laboratory-aged catalysts were performed, which allows us to obtain a universal curve for predicting the degree of catalyst performance deterioration as a function of time at each aging temperature. Results show that as the aging temperature becomes higher, the zeolite structure collapses in a shorter period of time after an induction period. The decrease in SCR performance was explained by zeolite structure destruction and/or Cu agglomeration, as detected by XRD/27Al NMR and by TEM/EDX, respectively. Destruction of the zeolite structure and agglomeration of the active phase also results in a decrease in the NO/NH3 oxidation activity and the NH3 storage capacity of the catalyst. Selected laboratory aging conditions (16 h at 800oC) compare well with a 135,000 mile vehicle-aged catalyst for both performance and characterization criteria.

Schmieg, Steven J.; Oh, Se H.; Kim, Chang H.; Brown, David B.; Lee, Jong H.; Peden, Charles HF; Kim, Do Heui

2012-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

108

Photolysis of solid NH{sub 3} and NH{sub 3}-H{sub 2}O mixtures at 193 nm  

SciTech Connect

We have studied UV photolysis of solid ammonia and ammonia-dihydrate samples at 40 K, using infrared spectroscopy, mass spectrometry, and microgravimetry. We have shown that in the pure NH{sub 3} sample, the main species ejected are NH{sub 3}, H{sub 2}, and N{sub 2}, where the hydrogen and nitrogen increase with laser fluence. This increase in N{sub 2} ejection with laser fluence explains the increase in mass loss rate detected by a microbalance. In contrast, for the ammonia-water mixture, we see very weak signals of H{sub 2} and N{sub 2} in the mass spectrometer, consistent with the very small mass loss during the experiment and with a <5% decrease in the NH{sub 3} infrared absorption bands spectroscopy after a fluence of {approx}3 x 10{sup 19} photons/cm{sup 2}. The results imply that ammonia-ice mixtures in the outer solar system are relatively stable under solar irradiation.

Loeffler, M. J. [Astrochemistry Laboratory, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Code 691, Greenbelt, Maryland 20771 (United States); Laboratory for Atomic and Surface Physics, Engineering Physics, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Virginia 22904 (United States); Baragiola, R. A. [Laboratory for Atomic and Surface Physics, Engineering Physics, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Virginia 22904 (United States)

2010-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

109

Grants to Help N.H. Towns Conserve Energy | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Grants to Help N.H. Towns Conserve Energy Grants to Help N.H. Towns Conserve Energy Grants to Help N.H. Towns Conserve Energy March 19, 2010 - 4:17pm Addthis New Hampshire has a plan to lower expenses and create jobs, all while conserving energy. In all, the state has received $17.3 million in Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant (EECBG) funding. Of that, $9.6 million has been sent to the New Hampshire Office of Energy and Planning (NHOEP) to launch several energy saving projects. NHOEP established a subgrant program to award $6.6 million of the EECBG grant funding to local municipalities and counties. New Hampshire municipalities and counties submitted over 270 applications, totaling over $21 million in grant requests. "Substantial energy efficiency improvements will be made throughout the

110

Grants to Help N.H. Towns Conserve Energy | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Grants to Help N.H. Towns Conserve Energy Grants to Help N.H. Towns Conserve Energy Grants to Help N.H. Towns Conserve Energy March 19, 2010 - 4:17pm Addthis New Hampshire has a plan to lower expenses and create jobs, all while conserving energy. In all, the state has received $17.3 million in Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant (EECBG) funding. Of that, $9.6 million has been sent to the New Hampshire Office of Energy and Planning (NHOEP) to launch several energy saving projects. NHOEP established a subgrant program to award $6.6 million of the EECBG grant funding to local municipalities and counties. New Hampshire municipalities and counties submitted over 270 applications, totaling over $21 million in grant requests. "Substantial energy efficiency improvements will be made throughout the

111

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Tyson Valley Powder Farm - MO 11  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Tyson Valley Powder Farm - MO 11 Tyson Valley Powder Farm - MO 11 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: TYSON VALLEY POWDER FARM (MO.11) Eliminated from further consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: None Location: St. Louis County , Missouri MO.11-1 Evaluation Year: 1987 MO.11-2 Site Operations: Storage of C-Special material (residue from production of uranium metal). MO.11-1 MO.11-2 MO.11-3 Site Disposition: Eliminated - Referred to Army Corps of Engineers MO.11-2 Radioactive Materials Handled: Yes Primary Radioactive Materials Handled: Uranium MO.11-3 Radiological Survey(s): None Indicated Site Status: Eliminated from further consideration under FUSRAP Also see Documents Related to TYSON VALLEY POWDER FARM MO.11-1 - Letter; Dickenson to Duff; Subject: Granted continued use

112

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Spencer Chemical Co - MO 0-01  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

MO 0-01 MO 0-01 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: SPENCER CHEMICAL CO. (MO.0-01) Eliminated from further consideration under FUSRAP - an AEC licensed operation Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: Jayhawk Works MO.0-01-1 Location: Joplin , Missouri MO.0-01-1 Evaluation Year: 1985 MO.0-01-2 Site Operations: Processed enriched uranium (UF-6) and scrap to produce primarily uranium dioxide (UO-2) under AEC licenses. MO.0-01-3 MO.0-01-4 Site Disposition: Eliminated - No Authority MO.0-01-2 Radioactive Materials Handled: Yes Primary Radioactive Materials Handled: Normal and Enriched Uranium, Thorium MO.0-01-6 Radiological Survey(s): Yes MO.0-01-5 Site Status: Eliminated from further consideration under FUSRAP - an AEC licensed operation Also see Documents Related to SPENCER CHEMICAL CO.

113

A Case Study For Geothermal Exploration In The Ne German Basin- Integrated  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermal Exploration In The Ne German Basin- Integrated Geothermal Exploration In The Ne German Basin- Integrated Interpretation Of Seismic Tomography, Litho-Stratigraphy, Salt Tectonics, And Thermal Structure Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings: A Case Study For Geothermal Exploration In The Ne German Basin- Integrated Interpretation Of Seismic Tomography, Litho-Stratigraphy, Salt Tectonics, And Thermal Structure Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: Unavailable Author(s): K. Bauer, I. Moeck, B. Norden, A. Schulze, M. H. Weber Published: Publisher Unknown, 2009 Document Number: Unavailable DOI: Unavailable Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=A_Case_Study_For_Geothermal_Exploration_In_The_Ne_German_Basin-_Integrated_Interpretation_Of_Seismic_Tomography,_Litho-Stratigraphy,_Salt_Tectonics,_And_Thermal_Structure&oldid=390106"

114

EcoCAR: The NeXt Challenge | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

EcoCAR: The NeXt Challenge EcoCAR: The NeXt Challenge EcoCAR: The NeXt Challenge May 18, 2010 - 7:30am Addthis While most college students' experience with vehicles goes no further than the beater they picked up for a few thousand dollars, students participating in the EcoCAR: The NeXT Challenge competition get to experience the cutting-edge of driving technology. The competition, which was established by the U.S. Department of Energy and General Motors, is a three year advanced vehicle engineering contest. Yesterday, May 17, was the first day of their Year 2 judging sessions. In EcoCAR, students from 16 universities across North America are competing against each other to build the most environmentally sustainable and practical vehicle. This year's teams have adopted a number of advanced

115

(Mo,Cr) in HASTELLOY C-22HS Alloy, a  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

debate (with question marks in the phase diagrams) such as ?CrMo4Ni5, ? ... diagram at 500, 620 and 700C show the existence of P phase and. OP6 phase[5

116

9 Cr-- 1 Mo steel material for high temperature application  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

One or more embodiments relates to a high-temperature, titanium alloyed, 9 Cr-1 Mo steel exhibiting improved creep strength and oxidation resistance at service temperatures up to 650.degree. C. The 9 Cr-1 Mo steel has a tempered martensite microstructure and is comprised of both large (0.5-3 .mu.m) primary titanium carbides and small (5-50 nm) secondary titanium carbides in a ratio of. from about 1:1.5 to about 1.5:1. The 9 Cr-1 Mo steel may be fabricated using exemplary austenizing, rapid cooling, and tempering steps without subsequent hot working requirements. The 9 Cr-1 Mo steel exhibits improvements in total mass gain, yield strength, and time-to-rupture over ASTM P91 and ASTM P92 at the temperature and time conditions examined.

Jablonski, Paul D; Alman, David; Dogan, Omer; Holcomb, Gordon; Cowen, Christopher

2012-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

117

Future design mindful of the MoRAS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As human-computer interaction (HCI) expands its scope, the proper context for the design of information technology (IT) is increasingly an interconnected mosaic of responsive adaptive systems (MoRAS) including people's heads, organizations, communities, ...

George W. Furnas

2000-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Developments in realistic design for aperiodic Mo/Si multilayermirrors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Aperiodic multilayers have been designed for various applications, using numeric algorithms and analytical solutions, for many years with varying levels of success. This work developed a more realistic model for simulating aperiodic Mo/Si multilayers to be used in these algorithms by including the formation of MoSi{sub 2}. Using a genetic computer code we were able to optimize a 45{sup o} multilayer for a large bandpass reflection multilayer that gave good agreement with the model.

Aquila, A.L.; Salmassi, F.; Dollar, F.; Liu, Y.; Gullikson, E.M.

2006-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

119

Synthesis and Characterization of Th2N2(NH) Isomorphous to Th2N3  

SciTech Connect

Using a new, low-temperature, fluoride-based process, thorium nitride imide of the chemical formula Th{sub 2}N{sub 2}(NH) was synthesized from thorium dioxide via an ammonium thorium fluoride intermediate. The resulting product phase was characterized by powder X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis and was found to be crystallographically similar to Th{sub 2}N{sub 3}. Its unit cell was hexagonal with a space group of P3m{bar 1} and lattice parameters of a = b = 3.886(1) and c = 6.185(2) {angstrom}. The presence of -NH in the nitride phase was verified by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). Total energy calculations performed using all-electron scalar relativistic density functional theory (DFT) showed that the hydrogen atom in the Th{sub 2}N{sub 2}(NH) prefers to bond with nitrogen atoms occupying 1a Wyckoff positions of the unit cell. Lattice fringe disruptions observed in nanoparticle areas of the nitride species by high-resolution transmission electron microscopic (HRTEM) images also displayed some evidence for the presence of -NH group. As ThO{sub 2} was identified as an impurity, possible reaction mechanisms involving its formation are discussed.

Silva, G W Chinthaka M [ORNL; Yeamans, Charles B. [University of California, Berkeley; Hunn, John D [ORNL; Sattelberger, Alfred P [Argonne National Laboratory (ANL); Czerwinski, Ken R. [University of Nevada, Las Vegas; Weck, Dr. Phil F [University of Nevada, Las Vegas

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Page 1 of 16 2013 NH 4-H Horse Quiz Bowl  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

: 9:00 AM to 5:00 PM Location: Belmont Middle School, 38 School Street, Belmont NH 03220 Deadline Quiz Bowl is an event where youth demonstrate their knowledge of equine science in a contest similar to high school quiz bowls. Teams of four race to hit their buzzers and answer equine-related questions

New Hampshire, University of

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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

The comparison of sulfide CoMo/?-Al2O3 and NiMo/?-Al2O3 catalysts in methyl palmitate and methyl heptanoate hydrodeoxygenation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The hydrodeoxygenation of methyl palmitate and methyl heptanoate as the model compounds of bio-oil in the presence of sulfided CoMo/?-Al2O3 and NiMo/?-Al2O3 catalysts was studied at the temperature ... Keywords: CoMoS/?-Al2O3, NiMoS/?-Al2O3, biofuels, hydrodeoxygenation, methyl heptanoate, methyl palmitate

Irina V. Deliy; Evgenia N. Vlasova; Alexey L. Nuzhdin; Galina A. Bukhtiyarova

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Towards a study of the {sup 22}Ne(p,{gamma}){sup 23}Na reaction at LUNA  

SciTech Connect

The {sup 22}Ne(p,{gamma}){sup 23}Na reaction is a part of the hydrogen burning NeNa cycle. In second-generation stars hydrogen burning may proceed via this cycle. The rate of the {sup 22}Ne(p,{gamma}){sup 23}Na reaction depends on the strength of several resonances in the energy range of the LUNA 400 kV accelerator which have never been observed in direct experiments. A related study is under preparation at LUNA.

Cavanna, Francesca; Depalo, Rosanna; Menzel, Marie-Luise [Dipartimento di fisica, Universita di Genova, and INFN Sezione di Genova, Genova (Italy); Dipartimento di fisica, Universita di Padova, and INFN Sezione di Padova, Padova (Italy); Helmholtz Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Dresden (Germany); Collaboration: LUNA Collaboration

2012-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

123

Analysis of ISO NE Balancing Requirements: Uncertainty-based Secure Ranges for ISO New England Dynamic Inerchange Adjustments  

SciTech Connect

The document describes detailed uncertainty quantification (UQ) methodology developed by PNNL to estimate secure ranges of potential dynamic intra-hour interchange adjustments in the ISO-NE system and provides description of the dynamic interchange adjustment (DINA) tool developed under the same contract. The overall system ramping up and down capability, spinning reserve requirements, interchange schedules, load variations and uncertainties from various sources that are relevant to the ISO-NE system are incorporated into the methodology and the tool. The DINA tool has been tested by PNNL and ISO-NE staff engineers using ISO-NE data.

Etingov, Pavel V.; Makarov, Yuri V.; Wu, Di; Hou, Zhangshuan; Sun, Yannan; Maslennikov, S.; Luo, X.; Zheng, T.; George, S.; Knowland, T.; Litvinov, E.; Weaver, S.; Sanchez, E.

2013-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

124

Microsoft PowerPoint - Freeze.NE PA Overview_052511.ppt  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Used Fuel Disposition Campaign Used Fuel Disposition Campaign Summary of DOE-NE PA Modeling for Storage and Disposal of Used Nuclear Fuel (UNF), High-Level Radioactive Waste (HLW), and Low-Level Waste (LLW) Geoff Freeze Sandia National Laboratories PA Community of Practice Technical Exchange May 25-26, 2011 Print Close Used Fuel Disposition 2 DOE-Nuclear Energy (NE) - PA Modeling Activities NE Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NEAMS) Waste Integrated Performance and Safety Codes (Waste IPSC) Used Fuel Disposition (UFD) Generic Performance Assessment Model (GPAM) *** Initial modeling focus in both campaigns in on UNF/HLW disposal Print Close Used Fuel Disposition 3  UFD GPAM  Short time horizon (2-3 yrs) - Simplified generic system models (i.e., PA-fidelity using GoldSim) - Current computing capabilities

125

Skåne County, Sweden: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Skåne County, Sweden: Energy Resources Skåne County, Sweden: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Name Skåne County, Sweden Equivalent URI DBpedia GeoNames ID 3337385 Coordinates 55.98333°, 13.5° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":55.98333,"lon":13.5,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

126

DOE-NE Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program and EPRI Long-Term  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE-NE Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program and EPRI DOE-NE Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program and EPRI Long-Term Operations Program - Joint Research and Development Plan DOE-NE Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program and EPRI Long-Term Operations Program - Joint Research and Development Plan Nuclear power has contributed almost 20% of the total amount of electricity generated in the United States over the past two decades. High capacity factors and low operating costs make nuclear power plants (NPPs) some of the most economical power generators available. Further, nuclear power remains the single largest contributor (nearly 70%) of non-greenhouse gas-emitting electric power generation in the United States. Even when major refurbishments are performed to extend operating life, these plants continue to represent cost-effective, low-carbon assets to the nation's

127

DOE-NE Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program and EPRI Long-Term  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE-NE Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program and EPRI DOE-NE Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program and EPRI Long-Term Operations Program - Joint Research and Development Plan DOE-NE Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program and EPRI Long-Term Operations Program - Joint Research and Development Plan Nuclear power has contributed almost 20% of the total amount of electricity generated in the United States over the past two decades. High capacity factors and low operating costs make nuclear power plants (NPPs) some of the most economical power generators available. Further, nuclear power remains the single largest contributor (nearly 70%) of non-greenhouse gas-emitting electric power generation in the United States. Even when major refurbishments are performed to extend operating life, these plants continue to represent cost-effective, low-carbon assets to the nation's

128

ARM - Field Campaign - 1996 NARSTO Northeast Field Study (NARSTO-NE)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

6 NARSTO Northeast Field Study (NARSTO-NE) 6 NARSTO Northeast Field Study (NARSTO-NE) Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign : 1996 NARSTO Northeast Field Study (NARSTO-NE) 1996.07.01 - 1996.07.28 Lead Scientist : Larry Kleinman For data sets, see below. Description The DOE G-1 aircraft was deployed in the New York City metropolitan area as part of the North American Research Strategy for Tropospheric Ozone-Northeast effort to determine the causes of elevated ozone levels in the northeastern United States. Measurements of ozone, ozone precursors, and other photochemically active trace gases were made upwind and downwind of New York City with the objective of characterizing the ozone formation process and its dependence on ambient levels of NOx and volatile organic

129

Charged-Current Neutral Pion production at SciBooNE  

SciTech Connect

SciBooNE, located in the Booster Neutrino Beam at Fermilab, collected data from June 2007 to August 2008 to accurately measure muon neutrino and anti-neutrino cross sections on carbon below 1 GeV neutrino energy. SciBooNE is studying charged current interactions. Among them, neutral pion production interactions will be the focus of this poster. The experimental signature of neutrino-induced neutral pion production is constituted by two electromagnetic cascades initiated by the conversion of the {pi}{sup 0} decay photons, with an additional muon in the final state for CC processes. In this poster, I will present how we reconstruct and select charged-current muon neutrino interactions producing {pi}{sup 0}'s in SciBooNE.

Catala-Perez, J.; /Valencia U., IFIC

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

First Direct Measurement of the {sup 17}F(p,{gamma}){sup 18}Ne Cross Section  

SciTech Connect

The rate of the {sup 17}F(p,{gamma}){sup 18}Ne reaction is important in various astrophysical events. A previous {sup 17}F(p,p){sup 17}F measurement identified a 3{sup +} state providing the strongest resonance contribution, but the resonance strength was unknown. We have directly measured the {sup 17}F(p,{gamma}){sup 18}Ne reaction using a mixed beam of {sup 17}F and {sup 17}O at ORNL. The resonance strength for the 3{sup +} resonance in {sup 18}Ne was found to be {omega}{gamma}=33{+-}14(stat){+-}17(syst) meV, corresponding to a {gamma} width of {gamma}{sub {gamma}}=56{+-}24(stat){+-}30(syst) meV. An upper limit on the direct capture of S(E){<=}65 keV b was determined at an energy of 800 keV.

Chipps, K. A.; Greife, U. [Colorado School of Mines, Golden, Colorado 80401 (United States); Bardayan, D. W.; Smith, M. S. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States); Blackmon, J. C. [Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, Louisiana 70803 (United States); Chae, K. Y.; Moazen, B. H.; Pittman, S. T. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville, Tennessee 37996 (United States); Hatarik, R.; Peters, W. A. [Rutgers University, New Brunswick, New Jersey 08901 (United States); Kozub, R. L.; Shriner, J. F. Jr. [Tennessee Technological University, Cookeville, Tennessee 38505 (United States); Matei, C. [Oak Ridge Associated Universities, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37830 (United States); Nesaraja, C. D.; Pain, S. D. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States); University of Tennessee, Knoxville, Tennessee 37996 (United States)

2009-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

131

Page 1 of 16 2014 NH 4-H Horse Quiz Bowl  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

their knowledge of equine science in a contest similar to high school quiz bowls. Teams of four race to hitPage 1 of 16 2014 NH 4-H Horse Quiz Bowl Date: Saturday January 25, 2014 Time: 9:00 AM to 5:00 PM the day of the contest. The New Hampshire 4-H Quiz Bowl is an event where youth demonstrate

New Hampshire, University of

132

MoWiTT:Mobile Window Thermal Test Facility  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

0 0 MoWiTT: Mobile Window Thermal Test Facility The window has come a long way since the days when it was a single pane of glass in a wood frame. Low-emissivity windows were designed to help buildings retain some of the energy that would have leaked out of less efficient windows. Designing efficient window-and-frame systems requires accurate measurement of the flow of energy through windows in realistic conditions, a capability provided by the Mobile Window Thermal Test facility. Consisting of a pair of outdoor, room-sized calorimeters, MoWiTT measures the net energy flow through two window samples in side-by-side tests using ambient weather conditions. MoWiTT characterizes the net energy flow as a function of time and measures the temperatures, solar fluxes, and

133

Co-Mo Electric Coop Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Mo Electric Coop Inc Mo Electric Coop Inc Jump to: navigation, search Name Co-Mo Electric Coop Inc Place Missouri Utility Id 4063 Utility Location Yes Ownership C NERC Location SERC NERC MRO Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Commercial Multi-Phase Commercial Commercial Single-Phase Over 200 Amps Commercial Commercial Single-Phase Up To 200 Amps Commercial Industrial Industrial Outdoor Lighting HPS 100 W Lighting Outdoor Lighting HPS 150 W Lighting Outdoor Lighting HPS 400 W Lighting Residential Multi-Phase Residential Residential Single-Phase Over 200 Amps Residential

134

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Medart Co - MO 09  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Medart Co - MO 09 Medart Co - MO 09 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: MEDART CO. (MO.09 ) Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP - Facility believed to be torn down and the original site built over Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: None Location: 180 Potomoc Street , St. Louis , Missouri MA.09-4 Evaluation Year: Circa 1990 MA.09-3 Site Operations: Conducted test machining operations on uranium bar stock during the early 1950s. MA.09-2 Site Disposition: Eliminated - Potential for contamination considered remote due limited duration of operations and to site reconstruction MA.09-2 Radioactive Materials Handled: Yes Primary Radioactive Materials Handled: Uranium Metal (test quantities) MA.09-3 Radiological Survey(s): Health and safety monitoring during operations MA.09-3

135

Theoretical Investigations on the Formation and Dehydrogenation Reaction Pathways of H(NH2BH2)nH (n=1-4) Oligomers: Importance of Dihydrogen Interactions (DHI)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The H(NH2BH2)nH oligomers are possible products from dehydrogenation of ammonia borane (NH3BH3) and ammonium borohydride (NH4BH4), which belong to a class of boron-nitrogen-hydrogen (BNHx) compounds that are promising materials for chemical hydrogen storage. Understanding the kinetics and reaction pathways of formation of these oligomers and their further dehydrogenation is essential for developing BNHx-based hydrogen storage materials. We have performed computational modeling using density functional theory (DFT), ab initio wavefunction theory, and Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics (CPMD) simulations on the energetics and formation pathways for the H(NH2BH2)nH (n=1-4) oligomers, polyaminoborane (PAB), from NH3BH3 monomers and the subsequent dehydrogenation steps to form polyiminoborane (PIB). Through transition state searches and evaluation of the intrinsic reaction coordinates, we have investigated the B-N bond cleavage, the reactions of NH3BH3 molecule with intermediates, dihydrogen release through intra- and intermolecular hydrogen transfer, dehydrocoupling/cyclization of the oligomers, and the dimerization of NH3BH3 molecules. We discovered the formation mechanism of H(NH2BH2)n+1H oligomers through reactions of the H(NH2BH2)nH oligomers first with BH3 followed by reactions with NH3 and the release of H2, where the BH3 and NH3 intermediates are formed through dissociation of NH3BH3. We also found that the dimerization of the NH3BH3 molecules to form c-(NH2BH2)2 is slightly exothermic, with an unexpected transition state that leads to the simultaneous release of two H2 molecules. The dehydrogenations of the oligomers are also exothermic, typically by less than 10 kcal/(mol of H2), with the largest exothermicity for n=3. The transition state search shows that the one-step direct dehydrocoupling cyclization of the oligomers is not a favored pathway because of high activation barriers. The dihydrogen bonding, in which protic (HN) hydrogens interact with hydridic (HB) hydrogens, plays a vital role in stabilizing different structures of the reactants, transition states, and products. The dihydrogen interaction (DHI) within the -BH2(?2-H2) moiety accounts for both the formation mechanisms of the oligomers and for the dehydrogenation of ammonia borane. Support was provided from the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Chemical Sciences Division and from the U.S. Department of Energy, Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Chemical Hydrogen Storage Center of Excellence. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is operated by Battelle for the US Department of Energy.

Li, Jun; Kathmann, Shawn M.; Hu, Han-Shi; Schenter, Gregory K.; Autrey, Thomas; Gutowski, Maciej S.

2010-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

136

N NE EX XT T G GE EN NE ER RA AT TI IO ON N S SA AF FE EG  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NE NE EX XT T G GE EN NE ER RA AT TI IO ON N S SA AF FE EG GU UA AR RD DS S I IN NI IT TI IA AT TI IV VE E ( (N NG GS SI I) ) O OP PP PO OR RT TU UN NI IT TI IE ES S F FO OR R S ST TU UD DE EN NT TS S A AN ND D Y YO OU UN NG G P PR RO OF FE ES SS SI IO ON NA AL LS S I IN NT TE ER RE ES ST TE ED D I IN N S SA AF FE EG GU UA AR RD DS S/ /N NO ON NP PR RO OL LI IF FE ER RA AT TI IO ON N The Next Generation Safeguards Initiative (NGSI) was launched by the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) in FY 2008 to develop the policies, concepts, technologies, expertise, and infrastructure necessary to strengthen and sustain the international safeguards system as it evolves to meet new challenges over the next 25 years. NGSI's Human Capital Development subprogram 1 aims to revitalize and expand the international safeguards human capital base in the United States by attracting, educating, training, and retaining

137

MiniBooNE as related to Windows on the Universe  

SciTech Connect

The measurement of absolute neutrino and anti-neutrino cross-sections, the observation of a 'low energy anomaly' in the neutrino sector, the constraints placed on the LSND effect by a non-observation of neutrino oscillations, the search for neutrino and anti-neutrino appearance, and for the possible existence of new heavy particles makes MiniBooNE a major contributor to the current view of the Universe. This paper addresses specific model constraints set by the MiniBooNE data, and explores expectations for further remaining analysis of the data.

Stefanski, Ray; /Fermilab

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

U-Mo Plate Blister Anneal Interim Report  

SciTech Connect

Blister thresholds in fuel elements have been a longstanding performance parameter for fuel elements of all types. This behavior has yet to be fully defined for the RERTR U-Mo fuel types. Blister anneal studies that began in 2007 have been expanded to include plates from more recent RERTR experiments. Preliminary data presented in this report encompasses the early generations of the U-Mo fuel systems and the most recent but still developing fuel system. Included is an overview of relevant dispersion fuel systems for the purposes of comparison.

Francine J. Rice; Daniel M. Wachs; Adam B. Robinson; Dennis D. Keiser Jr.; Jan-Fong Jue; Danielle M. Perez; Ross Finlay

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

A WATER MASER AND NH{sub 3} SURVEY OF GLIMPSE EXTENDED GREEN OBJECTS  

SciTech Connect

We present the results of a Nobeyama 45 m H{sub 2}O maser and NH{sub 3} survey of all 94 northern GLIMPSE extended green objects (EGOs), a sample of massive young stellar objects (MYSOs) identified based on their extended 4.5 {mu}m emission. We observed the NH{sub 3}(1,1), (2,2), and (3,3) inversion lines, and detected emission toward 97%, 63%, and 46% of our sample, respectively (median rms {approx} 50 mK). The H{sub 2}O maser detection rate is 68% (median rms {approx} 0.11 Jy). The derived H{sub 2}O maser and clump-scale gas properties are consistent with the identification of EGOs as young MYSOs. To explore the degree of variation among EGOs, we analyze subsamples defined based on mid-infrared (MIR) properties or maser associations. H{sub 2}O masers and warm dense gas, as indicated by emission in the higher-excitation NH{sub 3} transitions, are most frequently detected toward EGOs also associated with both Class I and II CH{sub 3}OH masers. Ninety-five percent (81%) of such EGOs are detected in H{sub 2}O (NH{sub 3}(3,3)), compared to only 33% (7%) of EGOs without either CH{sub 3}OH maser type. As populations, EGOs associated with Class I and/or II CH{sub 3}OH masers have significantly higher NH{sub 3} line widths, column densities, and kinetic temperatures than EGOs undetected in CH{sub 3}OH maser surveys. However, we find no evidence for statistically significant differences in H{sub 2}O maser properties (such as maser luminosity) among any EGO subsamples. Combining our data with the 1.1 mm continuum Bolocam Galactic Plane Survey, we find no correlation between isotropic H{sub 2}O maser luminosity and clump number density. H{sub 2}O maser luminosity is weakly correlated with clump (gas) temperature and clump mass.

Cyganowski, C. J. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)] [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Koda, J.; Towers, S.; Meyer, J. Donovan [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY 11794 (United States)] [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY 11794 (United States); Rosolowsky, E. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of British Columbia, Okanagan, Kelowna BC V1V 1V7 (Canada)] [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of British Columbia, Okanagan, Kelowna BC V1V 1V7 (Canada); Egusa, F. [Institute of Space and Astronautical Science, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, Chuo-ku, Sagamihara, Kanagawa 252-5210 (Japan)] [Institute of Space and Astronautical Science, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, Chuo-ku, Sagamihara, Kanagawa 252-5210 (Japan); Momose, R. [Department of Astronomy, University of Tokyo, Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan)] [Department of Astronomy, University of Tokyo, Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Robitaille, T. P., E-mail: ccyganowski@cfa.harvard.edu [Max Planck Institute for Astronomy, Heidelberg (Germany)

2013-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

140

[(CH3)4N][(C5H5NH)0.8((CH3)3NH)0.2]U2Si9O23F4 (USH-8): An Organically Templated Open-Framework Uranium Silicate  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-Framework Uranium Silicate Xiqu Wang, Jin Huang, and Allan J. Jacobson* Department of Chemistry, Uni pyramids we obtained also a number of open-framework uranium silicates.18,19 These new compounds were-framework uranium fluorosilicate [(CH3)4N][(C5H5NH)0.8((CH3)3NH)0.2]U2Si9O23F4 (USH- 8) that has been synthesized

Wang, Xiqu

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mo ne nh" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Domestic production of medical isotope Mo-99 moves a step closer  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Domestic production of medical isotope Mo-99 Domestic production of medical isotope Mo-99 moves a step closer Irradiated uranium fuel has been recycled and reused for molybdenum-99...

142

Large-Scale Synthesis of MoS2/ Polymer Derived Ceramic ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Applications of MoS2 as lithium ion battery anode material are also being explored. Here, we demonstrate exfoliation of MoS2 into single and few layers.

143

Elevated Temperature Compression Testing of the U-10 wt% Mo Alloy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstract Scope, In order to satisfy non-proliferation treaties the metallic U-10 wt% Mo (U-10Mo) alloy in low enrichments is under development to replace highly...

144

¿Cómo funcionan los Híbridos?  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

¿Cómo funcionan los Híbridos? ¿Cómo funcionan los Híbridos? Diagrama de los componentes de un híbrido completo, incluyen (1) un motor de combustión interna (2) un motor eléctrico, (3) un generador, (4) una aparato de cambio de motor, and (5) una batería de gran capacidad. en inglés Flash Animation: ¿Cómo funcionan los Híbridos? (Requiere versión Flash 6.0 o superior) HTML Version: ¿Cómo funcionan los Híbridos? Los vehículos Híbridos-eléctricos (VHEs) combinan las ventajas de los motores de gasolina con los motores eléctricos y se pueden configurar para diferentes objetivos, como mejorar el ahorro de combustible, aumentar su fuerza, o proveer fuerza adicional para el uso del sistema eléctrico o los componentes electrónicos. Algunas de las tecnologías avanzadas que usan los híbridos típicamente

145

ProMoVer: modular verification of temporal safety properties  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes ProMoVer, a tool for fully automated procedure-modular verification of Java programs equipped with method-local and global assertions that specify safety properties of sequences of method invocations. Modularity at the procedure-level ...

Siavash Soleimanifard; Dilian Gurov; Marieke Huisman

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

36 SEPTEMBER | 2012 WiNd TURbiNE CAPACiTY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

36 SEPTEMBER | 2012 WiNd TURbiNE CAPACiTY FRONTiER FROM SCAdA ThE WORld hAS SEEN A significant contributor to this growth. The wind turbine generated energy depends on the wind potential and the turbine of wind turbines. Supervi- sory control and data acquisition (SCADA) systems record wind turbine

Kusiak, Andrew

147

Charged current single pion cross section measurement at MiniBooNE  

SciTech Connect

We present MiniBooNE's preliminary {nu}{sub {mu}} CC1{pi}{sup +} cross section measurement, calculated using the ratio of CC1{pi}{sup +} to CCQE events. We find the inclusive CC1{pi}{sup +} measurement to be below the nuance [1] and NEUGEN [2] expectations.

Wascko, M.O.; /Louisiana State U.

2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

A generic network interface architecture for a networked processor array (NePA)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recently Network-on-Chip (NoC) technique has been proposed as a promising solution for on-chip interconnection network. However, different interface specification of integrated components raises a considerable difficulty for adopting NoC techniques. ... Keywords: interconnection network, multiprocessor systemon-chip (MPSoC), network interface, network-on-chip (NoC), networked processor array (NePA)

Seung Eun Lee; Jun Ho Bahn; Yoon Seok Yang; Nader Bagherzadeh

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

THERMALIZATION OF THE ION KINETIC ENERGY IN A Ne GAS PUFF PINCH MODEL*  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

THERMALIZATION OF THE ION KINETIC ENERGY IN A Ne GAS PUFF PINCH MODEL* J. L. Giuliani, J. W Department of Energy/NNSA, Washington DC USA Full understanding of the dynamics, population kinetics, and energy budget of a K-shell radiating Z-pinch remains a challenging problem in high energy density plasma

150

Km3NeT, a Deep Sea Challenge for Neutrino Astronomy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The groups presently pursuing neutrino telescope projects in the Mediterranean Sea; ANTARES, NEMO, and NESTOR, have formed the new KM3NeT consortium to study the construction of a cubic kilometre-scale neutrino telescope for the Northern hemisphere. ...

Ciro Bigongiari

2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Nonuniformity of CBF response to NE-or ANG II-induced hypertension in rabbits  

SciTech Connect

The regional response of brain vasculature to moderate hypertension was investigated using two hypertensive drugs, norepinephrine (NE) and angiotensin II (ANG II), infused intravenously at low concentrations (increase in blood pressure 15-40 mmHg). Regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) was measured in unanesthetized and anesthetized rabbits using the (/sup 14/C)ethanol saturation technique. (1) In both groups of animals, NE and ANG II induced regional differences in the flow changes as compared with controls, confirming a regional (or segmental) heterogeneity in the regulatory mechanisms to hypertension. (2) The responses to identical rises in blood pressure (BP) in most of the structures analyzed depended on the drug used. In the unanesthetized rabbits, the increase in vascular resistance induced by NE was greater than that induced by ANG II. (3) With the two drugs, there was no correlation between the flow changes in any of the structures considered and either the BP increase or the BP level in unanesthetized animals. However, these flow changes were correlated with the BP increase in anesthetized animals, although differences between the effects of NE and ANG II were again observed. This study suggests that cerebrovascular regulatory mechanisms in hypertension are probably more complex than a simple myogenic reaction. Their heterogeneity and their dependence both on the cause of hypertension and on the presence of anesthetics suggest the intervention of an integrating pathway.

Reynier-Rebuffel, A.M.; Aubineau, P.; Issertial, O.; Seylaz, J.

1987-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

NE-Rank: A Novel Graph-Based Keyphrase Extraction in Twitter  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The massive growth of the micro-blogging service Twitter has shed the light on the challenging problem of summarizing a collection of large number of tweets. This paper attempts to extract topical key phrases that would represent topics in tweets. Due ... Keywords: Keyphrase Extraction, Graph-based Ranking, Hashtag, Twitter, PageRank, TextRank, NE-Rank

Abdelghani Bellaachia; Mohammed Al-Dhelaan

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Zwischenbericht zum DFG-Forschungsvorhaben NE 902/2-1 SCHR 570/6-1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.3 Anwendungsperspektiven. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 4 Arbeits- und Ergebnisbericht 10 4.3 Wissenschaftliche Mitarbeiter/in Dipl.-Ing. Vera Ebbing Besch¨aftigungszeitraum: seit 1. Oktober 2006 1.4 Fachgebiet;Zwischenbericht zum DFG-Forschungsvorhaben NE 902/2-1 SCHR 570/6-1 10 4 Arbeits- und Ergebnisbericht Basierend auf

Neff, Patrizio

154

Ammonia as a hydrogen energy-storage medium. [LH/sub 2/, MeOH, and NH/sub 3/  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Liquid Hydrogen (LH/sub 2/), Methanol (MeOH), and Ammonia (NH/sub 3/) are compared as hydrogen energy-storage media on the basis of reforming the MeOH to produce H/sub 2/ and dissociating (cracking) the NH/sub 3/ to release H/sub 2/. The factors important in this storage concept are briefly discussed. Results of the comparison show that, in terms of energy input for media manufacture from natural gas, hydrogen energy content of the medium, and energy cost ($/10/sup 6/ Btu), NH/sub 3/ has a wide advantage and comes the closest to matching gasoline. The tasks required in developing a safe and practicial hydrogen energy-storage system based on the storage and cracking of NH/sub 3/ are listed. Results of the technical and economic evaluation of this concept will provide the basis for continued development.

Strickland, G

1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

www.eia.gov  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

MO MT NE NV NH NJ NM NY NC ND OH OK OR PA RI SC SD TN TX UT VT VA WA WV WI WY U.S. Number of states in which marketer is licensed ... Service Tech & Research Corp

156

C:\\ANNUAL\\VENTCHAP.V8\\NGA.VP  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 NJ WY AK AL CA AR CO CT DE FL GA HI ID KS IL IN IA IA KY LA ME MI MA MD MN MS MT MO NE ND OH NV NM NY NH NC OK OR PA RI SC SD TN TX UT VT WA WV WI AZ VA DC 0.00-1.99 2.00-2.99...

157

Microsoft Word - NGAMaster_State_TablesNov12.doc  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

WI NE IA KS MO TX IL IN OH MI OK AR TN WV VA KY MD PA WI NY VT NH MA CT ME RI NJ DC NC SC GA AL MS LA FL HI AK DE 0 2 4 6 8 10 1980 1982 1984 1986 1988 1990 1992 1994 1996 1998...

158

C:\\ANNUAL\\VENTCHAP.V8\\NewNGA02.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

NE IA KS MO TX IL IN OH MI OK AR TN W VA KY MD PA WI NY VT NH MA CT ME RI NJ DE DC NC SC GA AL MS LA FL HI AK 15. Marketed Production of Natural Gas in the United States, 2001...

159

C:\\ANNUAL\\VENTCHAP.V8\\NGAla1109.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 NJ WY AK AL CA AR CO CT DE FL GA HI ID KS IL IN IA IA KY LA ME MI MA MD MN MS MT MO NE ND OH NV NM NY NH NC OK OR PA RI SC SD TN TX UT VT WA WV WI AZ VA DC Sources: Energy...

160

NGA98fin5.vp  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

NJ WY AK AL CA AR CO CT DE FL GA HI ID KS IL IN IA IA KY LA ME MI MA MD MN MS MT MO NE ND OH NV NM NY NH NC OK OR PA RI SC SD TN TX UT VT WA WV WI AZ VA DC 0.00-1.99 2.00-2.99...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mo ne nh" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Energy Outlook...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

3 Regional maps Figure F6. Coal supply regions WA ID OR CA NV UT TX OK AR MO LA MS AL GA FL TN SC NC KY VA WV WY CO SD ND MI MN WI IL IN OH MD PA NJ DE CT MA NH VT NY ME RI MT NE...

162

Metallicity of InN and GaN surfaces exposed to NH{sub 3}.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A systematic study of energies and structures of InN and GaN (0001) surfaces exposed to NH{sub 3} and its decomposition products was performed with first-principles methods. A phenomenological model including electron counting contributions is developed based on calculated DFT energies and is used to identify low-energy structures. These predictions are checked with additional DFT calculations. The equilibrium phase diagrams are found to contain structures that violate the electron counting rule. Densities of states for these structures indicate n-type conductivity, consistent with available experimental results.

Walkosz, W.; Zapol, P.; Stephenson, G. B. (Materials Science Division)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

On the Reaction Mechanism of Acetaldehyde Decomposition on Mo(110)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The strong Mo-O bond strength provides promising reactivity of Mo-based catalysts for the deoxygenation of biomass-derived oxygenates. Combining the novel dimer saddle point searching method with periodic spin-polarized density functional theory calculations, we investigated the reaction pathways of a acetaldehyde decomposition on the clean Mo(110) surface. Two reaction pathways were identified, a selective deoxygenation and a nonselective fragmentation pathways. We found that acetaldehyde preferentially adsorbs at the pseudo 3-fold hollow site in the ?2(C,O) configuration on Mo(110). Among four possible bond (?-C-H, ?-C-H, C-O and C-C) cleavages, the initial decomposition of the adsorbed acetaldehyde produces either ethylidene via the C-O bond scission or acetyl via the ?-C-H bond scission while the C-C and the ?-C-H bond cleavages of acetaldehyde leading to the formation of methyl (and formyl) and formylmethyl are unlikely. Further dehydrogenations of ethylidene into either ethylidyne or vinyl are competing and very facile with low activation barriers of 0.24 and 0.31 eV, respectively. Concurrently, the formed acetyl would deoxygenate into ethylidyne via the C-O cleavage rather than breaking the C-C or the C-H bonds. The selective deoxygenation of acetaldehyde forming ethylene is inhibited by relatively weaker hydrogenation capability of the Mo(110) surface. Instead, the nonselective pathway via vinyl and vinylidene dehydrogenations to ethynyl as the final hydrocarbon fragment is kinetically favorable. On the other hand, the strong interaction between ethylene and the Mo(110) surface also leads to ethylene decomposition instead of desorption into the gas phase. This work was financially supported by the National Advanced Biofuels Consortium (NABC). Computing time was granted by a user project (emsl42292) at the Molecular Science Computing Facility in the William R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL). This work was financially supported by the National Advanced Biofuels Consortium (NABC). Computing time was granted by a user project (emsl42292) at the Molecular Science Computing Facility in the William R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL). The EMSL is a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) national scientific user facility located at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and supported by the DOE Office of Biological and Environmental Research. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is operated by Battelle for the U.S. Department of Energy.

Mei, Donghai; Karim, Ayman M.; Wang, Yong

2012-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

164

Quasielastic neutron scattering of -NH3 and -BH3 rotational dynamics in orthorhombic ammonia borane  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Neutrons scattering techniques are ideally suited to directly probe H in materials due to the large incoherent scattering cross-section of hydrogen atom, and have been invaluable in providing direct insight into the local fluctuations and large amplitude motions in AB. Dihydrogen bonding may have a significant affect on materials to be used to store hydrogen for fuel-cell powered applications. We have noticed a trend of low temperature release of H2 in materials composed of hydridic and protonic hydrogen. This phenomenon has caught our attention and motivated our interest to gain more insight into dihydrogen bonding interactions in AB. We present results from a thorough Quasielastic Neutron Scattering (QENS) investigation of diffusive hydrogen motion in NH311BH3 and ND311BH3 to obtain (1) a direct measure of the rotational energy barriers the protonated species and (2) a confirmation of the 3-site jump model for rotational motion. The amplitude of the energy barrier of rotation of BH3 and NH3 determined by QENS are compared to those determined for BD3 and ND3 determined by 2H NMR studies.

Hess, Nancy J.; Hartman, Michael R.; Brown, Craig; Mamontov, Eugene; Karkamkar, Abhijeet J.; Heldebrant, David J.; Daemen, Luke L.; Autrey, Thomas

2008-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

165

Herschel / HIFI observations of CO, H2O and NH3 in Mon R2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Context. Mon R2 is the only ultracompact HII region (UCHII) where the associated photon-dominated region (PDR) can be resolved with Herschel. Due to its brightness and proximity, it is the best source to investigate the chemistry and physics of highly UV-irradiated PDRs. Aims. Our goal is to estimate the abundance of H2O and NH3 in this region and investigate their origin. Methods. We present new observations obtained with HIFI and the IRAM-30m telescope. Using a large velocity gradient approach, we model the line intensities and derive an average abundance of H2O and NH3 across the region. Finally, we model the line profiles with a non-local radiative transfer model and compare these results with the abundance predicted by the Meudon PDR code. Results. The variations of the line profiles and intensities indicate complex geometrical and kinematical patterns. The H2O lines present a strong absorption at the ambient velocity and emission in high velocity wings towards the HII region. The spatial distribution of...

Pilleri, P; Cernicharo, J; Ossenkopf, V; Bern, O; Gerin, M; Pety, J; Goicoechea, J R; Rizzo, J R; Montillaud, J; Gonzlez-Garca, M; Joblin, C; Bourlot, J Le; Petit, F Le; Kramer, C

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Searches for New Physics at MiniBooNE: Sterile Neutrinos and Mixing Freedom  

SciTech Connect

The MiniBooNE experiment was designed to perform a search for {nu}{sub {mu}} {yields} {nu}{sub e} oscillations in a region of {Delta}m{sup 2} and sin{sup 2} 2{theta} very different from that allowed by standard, three-neutrino oscillations, as determined by solar and atmospheric neutrino experiments. This search was motivated by the LSND experimental observation of an excess of {bar {nu}}{sub e} events in a {bar {nu}}{sub {mu}} beam which was found compatible with two-neutrino oscillations at {Delta}m{sup 2} {approx} 1 eV{sup 2} and sin{sup 2} 2{theta} < 1%. If confirmed, such oscillation signature could be attributed to the existence of a light, mostly-sterile neutrino, containing small admixtures of weak neutrino eigenstates. In addition to a search for {nu}{sub {mu}} {yields} {nu}{sub e} oscillations, MiniBooNE has also performed a search for {bar {nu}}{sub {mu}} {yields} {bar {nu}}{sub e} oscillations, which provides a test of the LSND two-neutrino oscillation interpretation that is independent of CP or CPT violation assumptions. This dissertation presents the MiniBooNE {nu}{sub {mu}} {yields} {nu}{sub e} and {bar {nu}}{sub {mu}} {yields} {bar {nu}}{sub e} analyses and results, with emphasis on the latter. While the neutrino search excludes the two-neutrino oscillation interpretation of LSND at 98% C.L., the antineutrino search shows an excess of events which is in agreement with the two-neutrino {bar {nu}}{sub {mu}} {yields} {bar {nu}}{sub e} oscillation interpretation of LSND, and excludes the no oscillations hypothesis at 96% C.L. Even though the neutrino and antineutrino oscillation results from MiniBooNE disagree under the single sterile neutrino oscillation hypothesis, a simple extension to the model to include additional sterile neutrino states and the possibility of CP violation allows for differences between neutrino and antineutrino oscillation signatures. In view of that, the viability of oscillation models with one or two sterile neutrinos is investigated in global fits to MiniBooNE and LSND data, with and without constraints from other oscillation experiments with similar sensitivities to those models. A general search for new physics scenarios which would lead to effective non-unitarity of the standard 3 x 3 neutrino mixing matrix, or mixing freedom, is also performed using neutrino and antineutrino data available from MiniBooNE.

Karagiorgi, Georgia S.; /MIT

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Strategic Plan for Nuclear Energy -- Knowledge Base for Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NE-KAMS)  

SciTech Connect

The Nuclear Energy Computational Fluid Dynamics Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NE-CAMS) system is being developed at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) in collaboration with Bettis Laboratory, Sandia National Laboratory (SNL), Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), Utah State University (USU), and other interested parties with the objective of developing and implementing a comprehensive and readily accessible data and information management system for computational fluid dynamics (CFD) verification and validation (V&V) in support of nuclear energy systems design and safety analysis. The two key objectives of the NE-CAMS effort are to identify, collect, assess, store and maintain high resolution and high quality experimental data and related expert knowledge (metadata) for use in CFD V&V assessments specific to the nuclear energy field and to establish a working relationship with the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) to develop a CFD V&V database, including benchmark cases, that addresses and supports the associated NRC regulations and policies on the use of CFD analysis. In particular, the NE-CAMS system will support the Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NEAMS) Program, which aims to develop and deploy advanced modeling and simulation methods and computational tools for reliable numerical simulation of nuclear reactor systems for design and safety analysis. Primary NE-CAMS Elements There are four primary elements of the NE-CAMS knowledge base designed to support computer modeling and simulation in the nuclear energy arena as listed below. Element 1. The database will contain experimental data that can be used for CFD validation that is relevant to nuclear reactor and plant processes, particularly those important to the nuclear industry and the NRC. Element 2. Qualification standards for data evaluation and classification will be incorporated and applied such that validation data sets will result in well-defined, well-characterized data. Element 3. Standards will be established for the design and operation of experiments for the generation of new validation data sets that are to be submitted to NE-CAMS that addresses the completeness and characterization of the dataset. Element 4. Standards will be developed for performing verification and validation (V&V) to establish confidence levels in CFD analyses of nuclear reactor processes; such processes will be acceptable and recognized by both CFD experts and the NRC.

Kimberlyn C. Mousseau

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Growth kinetics and micromorphology of NH{sub 4}Cl:Mn{sup 2+} crystals formed in the NH{sub 4}Cl-MnCl{sub 2}-H{sub 2}O-CONH{sub 3} system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The growth kinetics and elementary growth processes on the surface of NH{sub 4}Cl:Mn{sup 2+} heterogeneous crystals formed in the NH{sub 4}Cl-MnCl{sub 2}-H{sub 2}O-CONH{sub 3} system are experimentally studied. It is found that a change in the composition of complexes in an NH{sub 4}Cl crystal from Mn(NH{sub 4}){sub 2}Cl{sub 4} {center_dot} 2H{sub 2}O to MnCl{sub 2} {center_dot} 2CONH{sub 3} leads to the occurrence of a local maximum in the kinetic curve and a change in the shape of dislocation growth centers from flat to conical. The growth kinetics of {l_brace}100{r_brace} faces of heterogeneous NH{sub 4}Cl:Mn{sup 2+} crystals is described within the Bliznakov model using the Fowler-Guggenheim adsorption isotherm, which takes into account the lateral interaction of adsorbed particles.

Pyankova, L. A., E-mail: lyuba_pyan@mail.ru; Punin, Yu. O.; Bocharov, S. N.; Shtukenberg, A. G. [Petersburg State University (Russian Federation)

2012-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

169

Graphitization in C and C-Mo Steels  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Following the recent carbon (C) and carbon-molybdenum (C-Mo) steel graphitization experience reported by several Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) members, it became apparent that the industry could benefit from better predictive guidance to prioritize component inspections and examinations for graphitization. This research effort collected and analyzed the additional experience gained since the last EPRI project on the subject and focused on developing suitably conservative time-temperature predi...

2010-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

170

ANL/NE-13/9 SHARP Assembly-Scale Multiphysics Demonstration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NE-13/9 NE-13/9 SHARP Assembly-Scale Multiphysics Demonstration Simulations Mathematics and Computation Division & Nuclear Engineering Division About Argonne National Laboratory Argonne is a U.S. Department of Energy laboratory managed by UChicago Argonne, LLC under contract DE-AC02-06CH11357. The Laboratory's main facility is outside Chicago, at 9700 South Cass Avenue, Argonne, Illinois 60439. For information about Argonne and its pioneering science and technology programs, see www.anl.gov. Availability of This Report This report is available, at no cost, at http://www.osti.gov/bridge. It is also available on paper to the U.S. Department of Energy and its contractors, for a processing fee, from: U.S. Department of Energy Office of Scientific and Technical Information

171

Ronald E. Gill (NE), Scoville, ID - Level I Curtis Roth (EM), Idaho  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

E. Gill (NE), E. Gill (NE), Scoville, ID - Level I Curtis Roth (EM), Idaho Falls, ID - Level I Jared T. Howerton (NNSA), Oak Ridge, TN - Level I Richard L. Person (NNSA), DOE HQ - Level I Phillip (Tony) A. Polk (EM), Aiken, SC (Savannah River) - Level IV Jane Powell-Dolan (LM), Cincinnati, OH - Level I Eric M. Thompson (NNSA), Oak Ridge, TN - Level II Congratulations to our newly certified FPDs! The Certification Review Board (CRB or 'the Board') convened on Friday, Sep- tember 24 to review certifi- cation candidates and dis- cuss several topics. The Department of Energy (DOE) met the FY2010 tar- gets for the Root Cause Analysis, Corrective Action Plan metrics 7 and 8, as fol- lows: DOE surpassed the target for Metric #7 (95% of pro-

172

DOE-NE-STD-1004-92; Root Cause Analysis Guidance Document  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

NE-STD-1004-92 NE-STD-1004-92 DOE GUIDELINE ROOT CAUSE ANALYSIS GUIDANCE DOCUMENT February 1992 U.S. Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy Office of Nuclear Safety Policy and Standards Washington, D.C. 20585 ii ABSTRACT DOE Order 5000.3A, "Occurrence Reporting and Processing of Operations Information," investigation and reporting of occurrences (including the performance of root cause analysis) requires the and the selection, implementation, and follow-up of corrective actions. The level of effort expended should be based on the significance attached to the occurrence. Most off-normal occurrences need only a scaled- down effort while most emergency occurrences should be investigated using one or more of the formal analytical models. A discussion of methodologies, instructions, and worksheets in this document guides

173

File:USDA-CE-Production-GIFmaps-NE.pdf | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

NE.pdf NE.pdf Jump to: navigation, search File File history File usage Nebraska Ethanol Plant Locations Size of this preview: 776 × 600 pixels. Full resolution ‎(1,650 × 1,275 pixels, file size: 278 KB, MIME type: application/pdf) Description Nebraska Ethanol Plant Locations Sources United States Department of Agriculture Related Technologies Biomass, Biofuels, Ethanol Creation Date 2010-01-19 Extent State Countries United States UN Region Northern America States Nebraska External links http://www.nass.usda.gov/Charts_and_Maps/Ethanol_Plants/ File history Click on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. Date/Time Thumbnail Dimensions User Comment current 16:18, 27 December 2010 Thumbnail for version as of 16:18, 27 December 2010 1,650 × 1,275 (278 KB) MapBot (Talk | contribs) Automated bot upload

174

NE-23 Disposal of Offsite-Generated Defense Radioactive Waste, Ventron  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

pi/L +3 pi/L +3 *3L 52. NE-23 Disposal of Offsite-Generated Defense Radioactive Waste, Ventron FUSRAP Site Jill E. Lytle, DP-12 NE-23 The Office of Remedial Action and Waste Technology has received a request from the Technical Services Division, DOE-Oak Ridge Operations Office, for a determination of the appropriate disposal location for the material which will result from remedial action of the Ventron site in Beverly, Massachusetts. The Ventron site was used from 1942 to 1948 under contract to the ME0 and AEC for converting uranium oxide to uranium metal powder, as well as later operations involving recovery of uranium from scrap uranium and turnings from the fuel fabrication plant at Hanford, Washington. Full-scale remedial action, anticipated to result in approximately 5,000

175

Neutron Transfer Studied with a Radioactive beam of 24Ne, using TIARA at SPIRAL  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A general experimental technique for high resolution studies of nucleon transfer reactions using radioactive beams is briefly described, together with the first new physics results that have been obtained with the new TIARA array. These first results from TIARA are for the reaction 24Ne(d,p)25Ne, studied in inverse kinematics with a pure radioactive beam of 100,000 pps from the SPIRAL facility at GANIL. The reaction probes the energies of neutron orbitals relevant to very neutron rich nuclei in this mass region and the results highlight the emergence of the N=16 magic number for neutrons and the associated disappearance of the N=20 neutron magic number for the very neutron rich neon isotopes.

W. N. Catford; C. N. Timis; R. C. Lemmon; M. Labiche; N. A. Orr; L. Caballero; R. Chapman; M. Chartier; M. Rejmund; H. Savajols; for the TIARA Collaboration

2009-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

176

A combined muon-neutrino and electron-neutrino oscillation search at MiniBooNE  

SciTech Connect

MiniBooNE seeks to corroborate or refute the unconfirmed oscillation result from the LSND experiment. If correct, the result implies that a new kind of massive neutrino, with no weak interactions, participates in neutrino oscillations. MiniBooNE searches for {nu}{sub {mu}} {yields} {nu}{sub e} oscillations with the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory 8 GeV beam line, which produces a {nu}{sub {mu}} beam with an average energy of {approx} 0.8 GeV and an intrinsic {nu}{sub e} content of 0.4%. The neutrino detector is a 6.1 m radius sphere filled with CH{sub 2}, viewed by 1540 photo-multiplier tubes, and located 541 m downstream from the source. This work focuses on the estimation of systematic errors associated with the neutrino flux and neutrino interaction cross section predictions, and in particular, on constraining these uncertainties using in-situ MiniBooNE {nu}{sub {mu}} charged current quasielastic (CCQE) scattering data. A data set with {approx} 100,000 events is identified, with 91% CCQE purity. This data set is used to measure several parameters of the CCQE cross section: the axial mass, the Fermi momentum, the binding energy, and the functional dependence of the axial form factor on four-momentum transfer squared. Constraints on the {nu}{sub {mu}} and {nu}{sub e} fluxes are derived using the {nu}{sub {mu}} CCQE data set. A Monte Carlo study of a combined {nu}{sub {mu}} disappearance and {nu}{sub e} appearance oscillation fit is presented, which improves the {nu}{sub {mu}} {yields} {nu}{sub e} oscillation sensitivity of MiniBooNE with respect to a {nu}{sub e} appearance-only fit by 1.2-1.5{sigma}, depending on the value of {Delta}m{sup 2}.

Monroe, Jocelyn R.; /Columbia U.

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Constraints on electromagnetic properties of sterile neutrinos from MiniBooNE results  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Among the class of models with small mixing angles between sterile and active neutrinos, we place constraints on the effective muon-to-sterile neutrino magnetic and electric dipole transition moments from the combined MiniBooNE results for the sterile neutrino mass range of $10\\;\\mathrm{MeV}distribution as a function of polar angle. However, good agreement with the anomalous event distribution in reconstructed energy can be achieved for some values of magnetic and electric moments.

Alexander Radionov

2013-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

178

Collapse and expansion in the bright-rimmed cloud SFO 11NE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report the results of a search for the double-peaked blue-skewed infall signature in the bright-rimmed cloud core SFO 11NE SMM1. Observations of the optically thick HCO$^{+}$ and optically thin H$^{13}$CO$^{+}$ J=3--2 lines reveal that there is indeed a characteristic double-peaked line profile, but skewed to the red rather than the blue. Modelling of the dust continuum emission and line profiles show that the motions within SFO 11NE SMM1 are consistent with a collapsing central core surrounded by an expanding outer envelope. We show that the collapse is occurring at a similar rate to that expected onto a single solar-mass protostar and is unlikely to represent the large-scale collapse of gas onto the infrared cluster seen at the heart of SFO 11NE SMM1. The outer envelope is expanding at a much greater rate than that expected for a photoevaporated flow from the cloud surface. The modelled expansion is consistent with the bulk cloud re-expansion phase predicted by radiative-driven implosion models of cometary clouds.

M. A Thompson; G. J. White

2004-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

179

The Sound Emission Board of the KM3NeT Acoustic Positioning System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We describe the sound emission board proposed for installation in the acoustic positioning system of the future KM3NeT underwater neutrino telescope. The KM3NeT European consortium aims to build a multi-cubic kilometre underwater neutrino telescope in the deep Mediterranean Sea. In this kind of telescope the mechanical structures holding the optical sensors, which detect the Cherenkov radiation produced by muons emanating from neutrino interactions, are not completely rigid and can move up to dozens of meters in undersea currents. Knowledge of the position of the optical sensors to an accuracy of about 10 cm is needed for adequate muon track reconstruction. A positioning system based on the acoustic triangulation of sound transit time differences between fixed seabed emitters and receiving hydrophones attached to the kilometre-scale vertical flexible structures carrying the optical sensors is being developed. In this paper, we describe the sound emission board developed in the framework of KM3NeT project, whi...

Llorens, C D; Sogorb, T; Bou--Cabo, M; Martnez-Mora, J A; Larosa, G; Adrin-Martnez, S

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Single Phase Melt Processed Powellite (Ba,Ca) MoO{sub 4} For The Immobilization Of Mo-Rich Nuclear Waste  

SciTech Connect

Crystalline and glass composite materials are currently being investigated for the immobilization of combined High Level Waste (HLW) streams resulting from potential commercial fuel reprocessing scenarios. Several of these potential waste streams contain elevated levels of transition metal elements such as molybdenum (Mo). Molybdenum has limited solubility in typical silicate glasses used for nuclear waste immobilization. Under certain chemical and controlled cooling conditions, a powellite (Ba,Ca)MoO{sub 4} crystalline structure can be formed by reaction with alkaline earth elements. In this study, single phase BaMoO{sub 4} and CaMoO{sub 4} were formed from carbonate and oxide precursors demonstrating the viability of Mo incorporation into glass, crystalline or glass composite materials by a melt and crystallization process. X-ray diffraction, photoluminescence, and Raman spectroscopy indicated a long range ordered crystalline structure. In-situ electron irradiation studies indicated that both CaMoO{sub 4} and BaMoO{sub 4} powellite phases exhibit radiation stability up to 1000 years at anticipated doses with a crystalline to amorphous transition observed after 1 X 10{sup 13} Gy. Aqueous durability determined from product consistency tests (PCT) showed low normalized release rates for Ba, Ca, and Mo (<0.05 g/m{sup 2}).

Brinkman, Kyle [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States); Marra, James [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States); Fox, Kevin [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States); Reppert, Jason [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States); Crum, Jarrod [Paci fic Northwest National Laboratory , Richland, WA (United States); Tang, Ming [Los Alamos National Laboratory , Los Alamos, NM (United States)

2012-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mo ne nh" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Benthic biological and biogeochemical patterns and processes across an oxygen minimum zone (Pakistan margin, NE Arabian Sea)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(Pakistan margin, NE Arabian Sea) Gregory L. Cowie a,?, Lisa A. Levin b a The Sir John Murray Laboratories), and organic matter (OM) availability on benthic communities and processes across the Pakistan Margin

Levin, Lisa

182

Strategic Plan for Nuclear Energy -- Knowledge Base for Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NE-KAMS)  

SciTech Connect

NE-KAMS knowledge base will assist computational analysts, physics model developers, experimentalists, nuclear reactor designers, and federal regulators by: (1) Establishing accepted standards, requirements and best practices for V&V and UQ of computational models and simulations, (2) Establishing accepted standards and procedures for qualifying and classifying experimental and numerical benchmark data, (3) Providing readily accessible databases for nuclear energy related experimental and numerical benchmark data that can be used in V&V assessments and computational methods development, (4) Providing a searchable knowledge base of information, documents and data on V&V and UQ, and (5) Providing web-enabled applications, tools and utilities for V&V and UQ activities, data assessment and processing, and information and data searches. From its inception, NE-KAMS will directly support nuclear energy research, development and demonstration programs within the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), including the Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL), the Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NEAMS), the Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS), the Small Modular Reactors (SMR), and the Next Generation Nuclear Power Plant (NGNP) programs. These programs all involve computational modeling and simulation (M&S) of nuclear reactor systems, components and processes, and it is envisioned that NE-KAMS will help to coordinate and facilitate collaboration and sharing of resources and expertise for V&V and UQ across these programs. In addition, from the outset, NE-KAMS will support the use of computational M&S in the nuclear industry by developing guidelines and recommended practices aimed at quantifying the uncertainty and assessing the applicability of existing analysis models and methods. The NE-KAMS effort will initially focus on supporting the use of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) and thermal hydraulics (T/H) analysis for M&S of nuclear reactor systems, components and processes, and will later expand to include materials, fuel system performance and other areas of M&S as time and funding allow.

Rich Johnson; Kimberlyn C. Mousseau; Hyung Lee

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Fracture and fatigue properties of Mo-Mo{sub 3}Si-Mo{sub 5}SiB{sub 2} refractory intermetallic alloys at ambient to elevated temperatures (25-1300 degrees Centigrade)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The need for structural materials with high-temperature strength and oxidation resistance coupled with adequate lower-temperature toughness for potential use at temperatures above {approx} 1000 degrees C has remained a persistent challenge in materials science. In this work, one promising class of intermetallic alloys is examined, namely boron-containing molybdenum silicides, with compositions in the range Mo (bal), 12-17 at. percentSi, 8.5 at. percentB, processed using both ingot (I/M) and powder (P/M) metallurgy methods. Specifically, the oxidation (''pesting''), fracture toughness and fatigue-crack propagation resistance of four such alloys, which consisted of {approx}21 to 38 vol. percent a-Mo phase in an intermetallic matrix of Mo3Si and Mo5SiB2 (T2), were characterized at temperatures between 25 degrees and 1300 degrees C. The boron additions were found to confer superior ''pest'' resistance (at 400 degrees to 900 degrees C) as compared to unmodified molybdenum silicides, such as Mo5Si3. Moreover , although the fracture and fatigue properties of the finer-scale P/M alloys were only marginally better than those of MoSi2, for the I/M processed microstructures with coarse distributions of the a-Mo phase, fracture toughness properties were far superior, rising from values above 7 MPa sqrt m at ambient temperatures to almost 12 MPa sqrt m at 1300 degrees C.

Choe, Heeman; Schneibel, J.H.; Ritchie, R.O.

2002-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Astrophysically Important 19Ne States Studied with the 2H(18F,alpha+15O)n Reaction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The nuclear structure of {sup 19}Ne near the proton threshold is of interest for understanding the rates of proton-induced reactions on {sup 18}F in novae. Analogues for several states in the mirror nucleus {sup 19}F have not yet been identified in {sup 19}Ne indicating the level structure of {sup 19}Ne in this region is incomplete. The {sup 18}F(d;n){sup 19}Ne and {sup 18}F(d,p){sup 19}F reactions have been measured simultaneously at E{sub c.m.} = 14.9 MeV. The experiments were performed at the Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility (HRIBF) of Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) by bombarding a 720-mg/cm{sub 2} CD{sub 2} target with a radioactive {sup 18}F beam. The {sup 19}Ne states of interest near the proton threshold decay by breakup into a and {sup 15}O particles. These decay products were detected in coincidence with position-sensitive E-{Delta}E silicon telescopes. The {alpha} and {sup 15}N particles from the break up of the mirror nucleus {sup 19}F were also measured with these detectors. Particle identification, coincidence, and Q-value requirements enable us to distinguish the reaction of interest from other reactions. The reconstruction of relative energy of the detected particles reveals the excited states of {sup 19}Ne and {sup 19}F which are populated. The neutron (proton) angular distributions for states in {sup 19}Ne ({sup 19}F) were extracted using momentum conservation. The observed states in {sup 19}Ne and {sup 19}F will be presented.

Adekola, Aderemi S [ORNL; Bardayan, Daniel W [ORNL; Blackmon, Jeff C [ORNL; Brune, C. [Ohio University; Chae, K. Y. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Champagne, A. E. [University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill; Domizioli, Carlo P [ORNL; Greife, U. [Colorado School of Mines, Golden; Heinen, Z. [Ohio University; Hornish, M. [Ohio University; Johnson, Micah [ORNL; Jones, K. L. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Kapler, R. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Livesay, Jake [ORNL; Ma, Zhanwen [ORNL; Massey, T. [Ohio University; Moazen, Brian [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Nesaraja, Caroline D [ORNL; Pain, Steven D [ORNL; ShrinerJr., J. F. [Tennessee Technological University; Thomas, J. S. [Rutgers University; Smith, Nathan A [ORNL; Smith, Michael Scott [ORNL; Visser, D. W. [University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill; Voinov, A. [Ohio University

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

NE-24  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

the Bureau of Hines Site at Albany, Oregon, for Remedial the Bureau of Hines Site at Albany, Oregon, for Remedial Action Under the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program I L@ _I' J.-La&one, Manager Oak Ridge Operations Office Based on the data in the attached draft reports, it has been determined that the subject site is contaminated with residual radioactive material ' as a result of Manhattan Engineer District/Atomic Energy Commission operations P * at this site. The contamination is in excess of the acceptable guidelines and warrants some form of remedial action under the Fornlerly Utilized Sites Reriledial Action Program. It should be noted that the attached reports are draft reports and although subject to change, the changes expected will not effect the designation of the site; therefore, the reports are Suitable for -

186

NE-23  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

s,' s,' Whidd Pk. Yilljam West West Orange Tennis Club, Inc. 200 Pleasant Valley Way West Orange, New Jersey 07052 Dear Mr. West: The Department of Energy (DOE), as part of its Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP), has reviewed information on Vitro Laboratories, formerly located on what is now property of the West Orange Tennis Club, to determine whether it contains residual radioactivity traceable to activities conducted on behalf of the Atomic Energy Commission (a predecessor to DOE). A radiological survey indicated that the radiation levels and radionuclide concentrations are at or near natural background levels. Therefore, no remedial action is required, and DOE is eliminating the former Vitro site from further consideration under FL&RAP.

187

Statistical pairing fluctuation and phase transition in $^{94}Mo$  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In the framework of BCS model, we have applied the isothermal probability distribution to take into account the statistical fluctuations in calculation of thermodynamical properties of nuclei. The energy and the heat capacity are calculated in $^{94}Mo$ nucleus using the mean gap parameter. The results are compared with the values obtained based on the most probable values, experimental data as well as some other theoretical models. We have shown that heat capacity versus temperature behaves smoothly instead of singular behaviour predicted by the standard BCS model. Also a smooth peak in heat capacity is observed which is a signature of transition from normal to super fluid phase.

Z. Kargar; V. Dehghani

2013-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

188

Statistical pairing fluctuation and phase transition in $^{94}Mo$  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In the framework of BCS model, we have applied the isothermal probability distribution to take into account the statistical fluctuations in calculation of thermodynamical properties of nuclei. The energy and the heat capacity are calculated in $^{94}Mo$ nucleus using the mean gap parameter. The results are compared with the values obtained based on the most probable values, experimental data as well as some other theoretical models. We have shown that heat capacity versus temperature behaves smoothly instead of singular behaviour predicted by the standard BCS model. Also a smooth peak in heat capacity is observed which is a signature of transition from normal to super fluid phase.

Kargar, Z

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Greenfield Alternative Study LEU-Mo Fuel Fabrication Facility  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides the initial first look of the design of the Greenfield Alternative of the Fuel Fabrication Capability (FFC); a facility to be built at a Greenfield DOE National Laboratory site. The FFC is designed to fabricate LEU-Mo monolithic fuel for the 5 US High Performance Research Reactors (HPRRs). This report provides a pre-conceptual design of the site, facility, process and equipment systems of the FFC; along with a preliminary hazards evaluation, risk assessment as well as the ROM cost and schedule estimate.

Washington Division of URS

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Upper critical field of Mo-Ni heterostructures  

SciTech Connect

Upper critical field and its anisotropy have been measured on two very short wavelength Mo-Ni heterostructures of different degrees of perfection, lambda = 13.8A (disordered structure) and lambda = 16.6A (layered structure). In both cases the parallel critical field has an unexpected temperature dependence, a large and temperature dependent anisotropy, and over 60% enhancement over the Clogston-Chandrasekhar limit. Data are fit to the Werthamer-Helfand-Hohenberg theory and the spin-orbit scattering times are found to be 1.79 x 10 T s and 2 x 10 T s, respectively.

Uher, C.; Watson, W.J.; Cohn, J.L.; Schuller, I.K.

1985-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Studying the Effect of Carbon on DU-Mo Foil Fabrication for the ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In support of this program, efforts are ongoing to develop and validate a monolithic depleted uranium molybdenum (DU-Mo) foil fabrication process adaptable for...

192

Surface Structures of Cubo-octahedral Pt-Mo Catalyst Nanoparticles from Monte Carlo Simulations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Cubo-octahedral Pt-Mo Catalyst Nanoparticles from Montefuel cells, new electrode catalysts that have less preciousto designing Pt bimetallic catalysts is knowledge of the

Wang, Guofeng; Van Hove, M.A.; Ross, P.N.; Baskes, M.I.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Pressure Water Leaching Molybdenum and Nickel from Mo-Ni ore of ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Pressure Water Leaching Molybdenum and Nickel from Mo-Ni ore of Black Shale without Reagent. Author(s), Zhigan Deng. On-Site Speaker...

194

Disorder effects in half-metallic Sr 2 FeMoO 6 single crystals  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Double perovskites such as Sr 2 FeMoO 6 (SFMO) have been predicted to be half-metallic (100% spin polarized). However

Raghava P. Panguluri; Sheng Xu; Yutaka Moritomo; I. V. Solovyev; B. Nadgorny

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Synthesis of molybdenum disulfide (MoS{sub 2}) for lithium ion battery applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper reports the use of a rheological phase reaction method for preparing MoS{sub 2} nanoflakes. The characterization by powder X-ray diffraction indicated that MoS{sub 2} had been formed. High resolution electron microscopy observation revealed that the as-prepared MoS{sub 2} nanoflakes had started to curve and partly form MoS{sub 2} nanotubes. The lithium intercalation/de-intercalation behavior of as-prepared MoS{sub 2} nanoflake electrode was also investigated. It was found that the MoS{sub 2} nanoflake electrode exhibited higher specific capacity, with very high cycling stability, compared to MoS{sub 2} nanoparticle electrode. The possible reasons for the high electrochemical performance of the nanoflakes electrodes are also discussed. The outstanding electrochemical properties of MoS{sub 2} nanoflakes obtained by this method make it possible for MoS{sub 2} to be used as a promising anode material.

Feng Chuanqi [Key Laboratory for Synthesis and Applications of Organic Functional Molecules, Hubei University, Wuhan 430062 (China); Institute for Superconducting and Electronic Materials, University of Wollongong, NSW 2522 (Australia); Ma Jun; Li Hua [Key Laboratory for Synthesis and Applications of Organic Functional Molecules, Hubei University, Wuhan 430062 (China); Zeng Rong [Institute for Superconducting and Electronic Materials, University of Wollongong, NSW 2522 (Australia); Guo Zaiping, E-mail: zguo@uow.edu.au [School of Mechanical, Materials and Mechatronic Engineering, University of Wollongong, NSW 2522 (Australia); Institute for Superconducting and Electronic Materials, University of Wollongong, NSW 2522 (Australia); ARC Centre of Excellence for Electromaterials Science, University of Wollongong, NSW 2522 (Australia); Liu Huakun [Institute for Superconducting and Electronic Materials, University of Wollongong, NSW 2522 (Australia); ARC Centre of Excellence for Electromaterials Science, University of Wollongong, NSW 2522 (Australia)

2009-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

196

Ageing and Toughness of a Mn-Ni-Mo PWR Steel  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstract Scope, Mn-Ni-Mo steels are widely used in the fabrication of pressurisers, steam generators and pressure vessels of pressurised water reactors (PWR).

197

Utilization of Recycled MoO3 and Mill Scale for Synthesis of High ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... by ammonia gas neutralization method and reduced by hydrogen to produce a high ... Molybdenum and Nickel from Mo-Ni ore of Black Shale without Reagent.

198

New limit on the neutrinoless double beta decay of /sup 100/Mo  

SciTech Connect

A search for the neutrinoless double beta decay of /sup 100/Mo was conducted using thin Mo films and solid state Si detectors. The experiment has collected 3500 hours of data operating underground in a deep silver mine (3290 M.W.E.). Only one event was found to be consistent with neutrinoless double beta decay. Using this one event, a limit of greater than or equal to 1 x 10/sup 22/ years (1 sigma) is set on the /sup 100/Mo half-life. This is approximately five times larger than the best previous /sup 100/Mo limit.

Krivicich, J.M.

1988-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Experimental activities supporting commercial U.S. accelerator production of 99-Mo  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

{sup 99m}Tc, the daughter product of {sup 99}Mo, is the most commonly used radioisotope for nuclear medicine in the U.S. Experiments are being performed at Los Alamos National Laboratory and Argonne National Laboratory to demonstrate production of {sup 99}Mo using accelerators. The {sup 100}Mo({gamma},n){sup 99}Mo reaction in an enriched {sup 100}Mo target is currently under investigation. Three scaled low-power production experiments using a 20-MeV electron linac at Argonne have been performed to date. Two of these experiments used natural Mo targets and produced a total of 613 {mu}C of {sup 99}Mo. The third experiment used an enriched {sup 100}Mo target and produced 10.5 mCi of {sup 99}Mo. Following irradiation the targets were dissolved and the low specific activity solution was processed through an ARSII generator from NorthStar Medical Radioisotopes. Yields of {sup 99m}Tc >95% have been observed.

Dale, Gregory E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Chemerisov, Sergey D [ANL; Vandegrift, George F [ANL

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

1 Summary: NE cod FSP survey 2003-08 The trawler Abbie Lee was  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

chartered in October/November 2008 to carry out the sixth in a series of FSP surveys of cod and other gadoids off the NE coast of England. Surveys since 2005 have utilised tows spread out over the survey area, with additional tows in defined areas with coarser seabed types (hard ground) where cod abundance is expected to be greatest. As in previous FSP surveys, cod were most abundant on or near the hard ground, whereas haddock were mainly on the softer seabed sediments offshore. Whiting distribution showed no clear relationship with seabed type. 6 5

Jos De Oliveira; Guy Pasco; Mike Armstrong; Peter Randall; Cefas Lowestoft

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mo ne nh" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Temperature Effects on the Perturber Induced Shift of Dopant Ionization Energies in He and Ne  

SciTech Connect

In this Letter, temperature effects on the perturber induced shift {Delta}{sub D}({rho}{sub P}) [{rho}{sub P} {equivalent_to} perturber number density] of the dopant ionization energy in the repulsive gases Ne and He are investigated at low to medium perturber densities (i.e., {rho}{sub P} {<=} 6.0 x 10{sup 21} cm{sup -3}). We show that these effects arise form changes in the ensemble averaged dopant/perturber polarization energy rather than from changes in the energy of the quasi-free electron.

C Evans; Y Lushtak; X Shi; L Li; G Findley

2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

202

Horn Operational Experience in K2K, MiniBooNE, NuMI and CNGS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper gives an overview of the operation and experience gained in the running of magnetic horns in conventional neutrino beam lines (K2K, MiniBooNE, NuMI and CNGS) over the last decade. Increasing beam power puts higher demands on horn conductors but even more on their hydraulic and electrical systems, while the horn environment itself becomes more hostile due to radiation. Experience shows that designing horns for remote handling and testing them extensively without beam become prerequisites for successful future neutrino beam lines.

Pardons, A

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

DOE-NE Proliferation and Terrorism Risk Assessment: FY12 Plans Update  

SciTech Connect

This presentation provides background information on FY12 plans for the DOE Office of Nuclear Energy Proliferation and Terrorism Risk Assessment program. Program plans, organization, and individual project elements are described. Research objectives are: (1) Develop technologies and other solutions that can improve the reliability, sustain the safety, and extend the life of current reactors; (2) Develop improvements in the affordability of new reactors to enable nuclear energy; (3) Develop Sustainable Nuclear Fuel Cycles; and (4) Understand and minimize the risks of nuclear proliferation and terrorism - Goal is to enable the use of risk information to inform NE R&D program planning.

Sadasivan, Pratap [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

204

Characterization of U-Mo Foils for AFIP-7  

SciTech Connect

Twelve AFIP in-process foil samples, fabricated by either Y-12 or LANL, were shipped from LANL to PNNL for potential characterization using optical and scanning electron microscopy techniques. Of these twelve, nine different conditions were examined to one degree or another using both techniques. For this report a complete description of the results are provided for one archive foil from each source of material, and one unirradiated piece of a foil of each source that was irradiated in the Advanced Test Reactor. Additional data from two other LANL conditions are summarized in very brief form in an appendix. The characterization revealed that all four characterized conditions contained a cold worked microstructure to different degrees. The Y-12 foils exhibited a higher degree of cold working compared to the LANL foils, as evidenced by the highly elongated and obscure U-Mo grain structure present in each foil. The longitudinal orientations for both of the Y-12 foils possesses a highly laminar appearance with such a distorted grain structure that it was very difficult to even offer a range of grain sizes. The U-Mo grain structure of the LANL foils, by comparison, consisted of a more easily discernible grain structure with a mix of equiaxed and elongated grains. Both materials have an inhomogenous grain structure in that all of the characterized foils possess abnormally coarse grains.

Edwards, Danny J.; Ermi, Ruby M.; Schemer-Kohrn, Alan L.; Overman, Nicole R.; Henager, Charles H.; Burkes, Douglas; Senor, David J.

2012-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

205

mo funcionan las Células de Combustible  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

mo funcionan las Células de Combustible Cómo funcionan las Células de Combustible Diagrama: Como funciona un MPE de combustible de célula. 1. El combustible de hidrógeno es canalizado a través de un campo de placas de flujo para el ánodo al otro lado de la pila de combustible, mientras que el oxígeno del aire se canaliza hacia el cátodo del otro lado de la celda. 2. En el ánodo, un catalizador de platino hace que el hidrógeno se divida en iones positivos de hidrógeno (protones) y electrones de carga negativa. 3. La Membrana de Electrolito Polimérico (MPE) sólo permite que los iones de carga positiva pasen a través de ella hacia el cátodo. Los electrones de carga negativa deben viajar a lo largo de un circuito externo hacia el cátodo, creando una corriente eléctrica. 4. En el cátodo, los electrones y los iones positivos de hidrógeno se combinan con el oxígeno para formar agua, que fluye fuera de la célula.

206

Effect of sulfated CaO on NO reduction by NH{sub 3} in the presence of excess oxygen  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The effect of sulfated CaO on NO reduction by NH{sub 3} in the presence of excess oxygen was investigated to evaluate the potential of simultaneous SO{sub 2} and NO removal at the temperature range of 700-850{sup o}C. The physical and chemical properties of the CaO sulfation products were analyzed to investigate the NO reduction mechanism. Experimental results showed that sulfated CaO had a catalytic effect on NO reduction by NH{sub 3} in the presence of excess O{sub 2} after the sulfation reaction entered the transition control stage. With the increase of CaO sulfation extent in this stage, the activity for NO reduction first increased and then decreased, and the selectivity of NH{sub 3} for NO reduction to N{sub 2} increased. The byproduct (NO{sub 2} and N{sub 2}O) formation during NO reduction experiments was negligible. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analysis showed that neither CaSO{sub 3} nor CaS was detected, indicating that the catalytic activity of NO reduction by NH{sub 3} in the presence of excess O{sub 2} over sulfated CaO was originated from the CaSO{sub 4} product. These results revealed that simultaneous SO{sub 2} and NOx control by injecting NH{sub 3} into the dry flue gas desulfurization process for NO reduction might be achieved. 38 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

Tianjin Li; Yuqun Zhuo; Yufeng Zhao; Changhe Chen; Xuchang Xu [Tsinghua University, Beijing (China). Key Laboratory for Thermal Science and Power Engineering of Ministry of Education

2009-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

207

Plasma-sprayed semiconductor electrodes: Photoelectrochemical characterization and NH sub 3 photoproduction by substoichiometric tungsten oxides  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Two substoichiometric tungsten oxide coatings have been obtained by plasma spray of WO{sub 3} powder on Ti substrates. The films are 40 {plus minus} 20 {mu}m thick and are yellow (WO{sub 2.99}) or dark blue (WO{sub 2.97}). WO{sub 2.99} coatings show a highly textured surface with a specific area 27.9 times the geometrical one. X-ray diffraction pattern reveals that their structure is a mixture of monoclinic and triclinic phases. The yellow films have been characterized photoelectrochemically in regenerative cells by using O{sub 2}/H{sub 2}O redox at pH 2.0. Under anodic polarization of 1.5 V (SCE) their quantum yield is between 10% and 20% in the wavelength range comprised between 270 and 430 nm with an indirect bandgap of 2.55 eV and a flatband potential of {minus}0.1 V. WO{sub 2.99} films have been tested for NH{sub 3} photoproduction.

Ladouceur, M.; Dodelet, J.P. (INRS-Energie, Varennes, Quebec (Canada)); Tourillon, G. (Universite Paris-Sud, Orsay (France)); Parent, L.; Dallaire, S. (IGM, Boucherville, Quebec (Canada))

1990-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

208

Development of FeNiMoB thin film materials for microfabricated magnetoelastic sensors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Metglas{sup TM} 2826MB foils of 25-30 {mu}m thickness with the composition of Fe{sub 40}Ni{sub 38}Mo{sub 4}B{sub 18} have been used for magnetoelastic sensors in various applications over many years. This work is directed at the investigation of {approx}3 {mu}m thick iron-nickel-molybdenum-boron (FeNiMoB) thin films that are intended for integrated microsystems. The films are deposited on Si substrate by co-sputtering of iron-nickel (FeNi), molybdenum (Mo), and boron (B) targets. The results show that dopants of Mo and B can significantly change the microstructure and magnetic properties of FeNi materials. When FeNi is doped with only Mo its crystal structure changes from polycrystalline to amorphous with the increase of dopant concentration; the transition point is found at about 10 at. % of Mo content. A significant change in anisotropic magnetic properties of FeNi is also observed as the Mo dopant level increases. The coercivity of FeNi films doped with Mo decreases to a value less than one third of the value without dopant. Doping the FeNi with B together with Mo considerably decreases the value of coercivity and the out-of-plane magnetic anisotropy properties, and it also greatly changes the microstructure of the material. In addition, doping B to FeNiMo remarkably reduces the remanence of the material. The film material that is fabricated using an optimized process is magnetically as soft as amorphous Metglas{sup TM} 2826MB with a coercivity of less than 40 Am{sup -1}. The findings of this study provide us a better understanding of the effects of the compositions and microstructure of FeNiMoB thin film materials on their magnetic properties.

Liang Cai; Gooneratne, Chinthaka; Cha, Dongkyu; Chen Long; Kosel, Jurgen [Computer Electrical and Mathematical Sciences and Engineering, King Abdullah University of Science and Technology, 4700 KAUST, Thuwal 23955 (Saudi Arabia); Gianchandani, Yogesh [Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, 1301 Beal Ave., University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States)

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Radiative rates and electron impact excitation rate coefficients for Ne-like selenium, Se XXV  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this article we report calculations of energy levels, radiative rates, electron impact collision strengths, and effective collision strengths for transitions among the 241 fine-structure levels arising from 2l{sup 8} and 2l{sup 7}n{sup '}l{sup '} (n{sup '{241 levels. The effective collision strengths are reported for all 28920 transitions among the 241 levels over a wide temperature range up to 10 keV. To assess the reliability and accuracy of the present collisional data, we have performed a 27-state close-coupling calculation, employing the Dirac R-matrix theory. The results from the close-coupling calculation and the independent-process calculation for the identical target states are found to be in good agreement. - Highlights: {yields} Radiative and collisional atomic data are presented for the lowest 241 fine-structure levels in Ne-like Se. {yields} Calculations are performed using the FAC package. {yields} Resonances enhance significantly a large amount of transitions. {yields} Radiative damping effects are significant for many transitions. {yields} Close-coupling effects are small in Ne-like Se.

Wang, K.; Chen, C.Y., E-mail: chychen@fudan.edu.cn; Huang, M.; Wang, Y.S.; Zou, Y.M.

2011-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

210

Photoionization-pumped, Ne II, x-ray laser studies project. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The energetics of this pumping scheme are shown. Short-pulse (50 to 100 ps) laser irradiation of an appropriate x-ray flashlamp medium generates broad-band emission in the range of 300 to 800 eV which preferentially photoionizes Ne to the /sup 2/S state of Ne II creating an inversion at approximately 27 eV. Although this approach does not depend on precise spectral overlap between the x-ray pump radiation and the medium to be pumped, it does require that the x-ray medium remain un-ionized prior to photoionization by the soft x-ray emission. Well-controlled focus conditions are required to ensure that the x-ray medium is not subjected to electron or x-ray preheat prior to irradiation by the soft x-ray source. The magnitude of the population inversion is predicted to be critically dependent upon rapid photoionization of the two states; therefore, ultra-short pulse irradiation of the laser flashlamps is required.

Richardson, M.C.; Hagelstein, P.L.; Eckart, M.J.; Forsyth, J.M.; Gerrassimenko, M.; Soures, J.M.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Helioseismic Constraints on the Solar Ne/O Ratio and Heavy Element Abundances  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We examine the constraints imposed by helioseismic data on the solar heavy element abundances. In prior work we argued that the measured depth of the surface convection zone R_CZ and the surface helium abundance Y_surf were good metallicity indicators which placed separable constraints on light metals (CNONe) and the heavier species with good relative meteoritic abundances. The resulting interiors-based abundance scale was higher than some published studies based on 3D model atmospheres at a highly significant level. In this paper we explore the usage of the solar sound speed in the radiative interior as an additional diagnostic, and find that it is sensitive to changes in the Ne/O ratio even for models constructed to have the same R_CZ and Y_surf. Three distinct helioseismic tests (opacity in the radiative core, ionization in the convection zone, and the core mean molecular weight) yield consistent results. Our preferred O, Ne and Fe abundances are 8.86 +/-0.04, 8.15 +/-0.17 and 7.50 +/-0.05 respectively. Th...

Delahaye, F; Pinsonneault, L; Zeippen, C J

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Light charged particle emission from hot $^{32}$S$^{*}$ formed in $^{20}$Ne + $^{12}$C reaction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Inclusive energy distributions for light charged particles ($p, d, t$ and $\\alpha$) have been measured in the $^{20}$Ne (158, 170, 180, 200 MeV) + $^{12}$C reactions in the angular range 10$^{o}$ -- 50$^{o}$. Exclusive light charged particle energy distribution measurements were also done for the same system at 158 MeV bombarding energy by in-plane light charged particle -- fragment coincidence. Pre-equilibrium components have been separated out from proton energy spectra using moving source model considering two sources. The data have been compared with the predictions of the statistical model code CASCADE. It has been observed that significant deformation effects were needed to be introduced in the compound nucleus in order to explain the shape of the evaporated $d, t$ energy spectra. For protons, evaporated energy spectra were rather insensitive to nuclear deformation, though angular distributions could not be explained without deformation. Decay sequence of the hot $^{32}$S nucleus has been investigated through exclusive light charged particle measurements using the $^{20}$Ne (158 MeV) + $^{12}$C reaction. Information on the sequential decay chain has been extracted through comparison of the experimental data with the predictions of the statistical model. It is observed from the present analysis that exclusive light charged particle data may be used as a powerful tool to probe the decay sequence of hot light compound systems.

Aparajita Dey; S. Bhattacharya; C. Bhattacharya; K. Banerjee; T. K. Rana; S. Kundu; S. R. Banerjee; S. Mukhopadhyay; D. Gupta; R. Saha

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Characterization of nonthermal Ne-N{sub 2} mixture radio frequency discharge  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper deals with optical emission spectroscopic studies of low pressure (p=0.1{yields}0.5 mbar) Ne-N{sub 2} capacitively coupled radio frequency (rf) plasma that can be used for plasma nitriding, etc. It reports the methods to calculate the electron temperature (T{sub e}) in nonthermal plasmas. Since, the selected Ne I lines, used to calculate electron temperature, are found in corona balance; therefore, it allows us to use modified Boltzmann technique to calculate electron temperature. Langmuir probe is also used to calculate electron temperature and electron energy distribution functions (EEDFs). The measurements are worked out for different discharge parameters like neon percentage, filling pressure and RF power. It is found that electron temperature increases with the increase in neon percentage and decreases with the increase in pressure, whereas excitation temperature (T{sub exc}) increases with power, neon percentage, and decreases with pressure. It is also observed that electron temperature measured by Langmuir probe technique is slightly greater than the one measured via modified Boltzmann plot method. The tails of the EEDFs gain height and extend toward the higher energy with the increase in neon percentage in the mixture.

Rehman, N. U.; Zakaullah, M. [Department of Physics, Quaid-i-Azam University, 45320 Islamabad (Pakistan); Khan, F. U. [Department of Physics, Gomal University, 29050 D.I. Khan (Pakistan); Naseer, S. [Department of Physics, Peshawar University, 25120 Peshawar (Pakistan)

2008-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

214

Electrodeposition and characterization of nanocrystalline Ni-Mo catalysts for hydrogen production  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ni-Mo nanocrystalline deposits (7-43 nm) with a nodular morphology were prepared by electrodeposition using direct current from citrate-ammonia solutions. They exhibited a single Ni-Mo solid solution phase. The size of the nodules increased as electroplating ...

J. Halim; R. Abdel-Karim; S. El-Raghy; M. Nabil; A. Waheed

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Domestic production of medical isotope Mo-99 moves a step closer  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Domestic production of medical isotope Mo-99 Domestic production of medical isotope Mo-99 Domestic production of medical isotope Mo-99 moves a step closer Irradiated uranium fuel has been recycled and reused for molybdenum-99 (Mo-99) production, with virtually no losses in Mo-99 yields or uranium recovery. May 13, 2013 From left, Los Alamos scientists Roy Copping, Sean Reilly, and Daniel Rios. Copping examines the Buchi Multivapor P-12 Evaporator, and Reilly and Rios are at the Agilent Technologies Cary 60 UV-Vis Spectrometer. From left, Los Alamos scientists Sean Reilly, Roy Copping, and Daniel Rios. Sean is looking at the Buchi Multivapor P-12 Evaporator, and Roy and Daniel are at the Agilent Technologies Cary 60 UV-Vis Spectrometer. Contact Nancy Ambrosiano Communications Office (505) 667-0471

216

Exfoliated MoS2 Nanocomposite as an Anode Material for Lithium Ion Batteries  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Nanocomposites of molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) and poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO) were prepared by the exfoliation/absorption method that involved the hydrolysis of lithiated MoS2 in an aqueous solution of PEO. The absorption and subsequent interaction of PEO on the colloidal MoS2 formed a nanocomposite which restacked into layered secondary particles. X-ray diffraction and high resolution TEM indicated that highly disordered nanocomposites were produced when the Lix(PEO)yMoS2 stoichiometry was limited to y < 1. An improvement of greater than 5x in capacity accompanied by high cycle stability and efficiency was observed for the disordered nanocomposites providing a novel approach to utilize low-cost MoS2 and similar materials for a high capacity energy storage system.

Xiao, Jie; Choi, Daiwon; Cosimbescu, Lelia; Koech, Phillip K.; Liu, Jun; Lemmon, John P.

2010-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

217

Development of LEU targets for {sup 99}Mo production and their chemical processing status 1993  

SciTech Connect

Most of the world`s supply of {sup 99m}{Tc} for medical purposes is currently produced from {sup 99}Mo derived from the fastening of high enriched uranium (HEU). Substitution of low enriched uranium (LEU) silicide fuel for the HEU alloy and aluminide fuels used in current target designs will allow equivalent {sup 99}Mo yields with little change in target geometries. Substitution of uranium metal for uranium oxide films in other target designs will also allow the substitution of LEU for HEU. In 1993, DOE renewed funding that was terminated in 1990 for development of LEU targets for {sup 99}Mo production. During the past year, our efforts were to (1) renew contact with {sup 99}Mo producers, (2) define the means to test our process for recovering {sup 99}Mo from irradiated LEU-silicide targets, and (3) begin to test our process on spent LEU-silicide miniplates stored at ANL from past fuel development studies.

Vandegrift, G.F.; Hutter, J.C.; Srinivasan, B.; Matos, J.E.; Snelgrove, J.L.

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Mo-containing tetrahedral amorphous carbon deposited by dual filtered cathodic vacuum arc with selective pulsed bias voltage  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

only. Fig.2 (a) Electrical resistivity of ta-C:Mo films as aC plasma pulses; (b) Electrical resistivity of the ta-C:MoIt found that the electrical resistivity decreases with an

Pasaja, Nitisak; Sansongsiri, Sakon; Anders, Andre; Vilaithong, Thiraphat; Intasiri, Sawate

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Structural evolution in crystalline MoO{sub 3} nanoparticles with tunable size  

SciTech Connect

In this study MoO{sub 3} nanoparticles were prepared in porous Vycor glass by impregnation-decomposition cycles (IDC) with molybdenum(VI) 2-ethylhexanoate. X-ray diffraction data show that the nanoparticles are crystalline and are in the orthorhombic {alpha}-MoO{sub 3} phase. Raman spectroscopy data also indicate the formation of this phase. The profiles in the Raman spectra changed with the number of IDC, indicating a structural evolution of the MoO{sub 3} nanoparticles. The IDC methodology promoted a linear mass increase and allowed tuning the nanoparticle size. Analysis of HRTEM images revealed that for 3, 5 and 7 IDC, the MoO{sub 3} nanoparticle average diameters are 3.2, 3.6 and 4.2 nm. Diffuse reflectance spectroscopy indicates a consistent red shift in the band gap from 3.35 to 3.29 eV as the size increases from 3.2 to 4.2 nm. This observed red shift in the band gap of the MoO{sub 3} nanoparticles is presumably due to quantum confinement effects. - Graphical abstract: Modification of profile Raman spectra for crystalline MoO{sub 3} nanoparticles in function of the particle size. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Structural evolution of the MoO{sub 3} nanoparticles as a function of the crystallite size. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Tunable optical properties by controlling the MoO{sub 3} nanoparticle size. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The impregnation-decomposition methodology allowed tuning the nanoparticle size. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The red shift in the band gap of the MoO{sub 3} nanoparticles is due to quantum size effect. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The short-distance order in MoO{sub 3} nanoparticle is function to area/volume ratio.

Barros Santos, Elias de; Aparecido Sigoli, Fernando [Functional Materials Laboratory, Institute of Chemistry, University of Campinas, UNICAMP, PO Box 6154, Zip Code 13083-970 Campinas, SP (Brazil); Odone Mazali, Italo, E-mail: mazali@iqm.unicamp.br [Functional Materials Laboratory, Institute of Chemistry, University of Campinas, UNICAMP, PO Box 6154, Zip Code 13083-970 Campinas, SP (Brazil)

2012-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

220

Mo-99/Tc-99m Separation: An Assessment of Technical Options  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Several strategies for the effective separation of 99mTc from 99Mo have been developed and validated. Due to the success of column chromatographic separation using acidic alumina coupled with high specific activity fission 99Mo (F 99Mo) for production of 99Mo/99mTc generators, however, most technologies until recently have generated little interest. The reduced availability of F 99Mo and consequently the shortage of 99Mo/99mTc column generators in the recent past have resurrected interest in the production of 99Mo as well as 99mTc by alternate routes. Most of these alternative production processes require separation techniques capable of providing clinical grade 99mTc from low specific activity 99Mo or irradiated Mo targets. For this reason there has been renewed interest in alternate separation routes. This paper reviews the reported separation technologies which include column chromatography, solvent extraction, sublimation and gel systems that have been traditionally used for the fabrication of 99Mo/99mTc generator systems. The comparative advantage, disadvantage, and technical challenges toward adapting the emerging requirements are discussed. New developments such as solid-phase column extraction, electrochemical separation, extraction chromatography, supported liquid membrane (SLM) and thermochromatographic techniques are also being evaluated for their potential application in the changed scenario of providing 99mTc from alternate routes. Based on the analysis provided in this review, it appears that some proven separation technologies can be quickly resurrected for the separation of clinical grade 99mTc from macroscopic levels of reactor or cyclotron irradiated molybdenum targets. Furthermore, emerging technologies can be developed further to respond to the expected changing modes of 99mTc production.

Dash, A [Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai, India; Pillai, M R A [Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai, India; Knapp Jr, Russ F [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mo ne nh" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Measurement of the nu(mu)-CCQE cross-section in the SciBooNE experiment  

SciTech Connect

SciBooNE is a neutrino and anti-neutrino cross-section experiment at Fermilab, USA. The SciBooNE experiment is summarized and two independent CCQE analyses are described. For one of the analyses, an absolute {nu}{sub {mu}}-CCQE cross section in the neutrino energy region (0.6-1.6) GeV is shown and the technique developed for such a purpose is also explained. The total cross section measured over this energy range agrees well with expectations, based on the NEUT event generator and using a value of 1.21 GeV for the CCQE axial mass.

Alcaraz-Aunion, Jose Luis; /Barcelona, IFAE; Walding, Joseph; /Imperial Coll., London

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

New Results from MiniBooNE Charged-Current Quasi-Elastic Anti-Neutrino Data  

SciTech Connect

MiniBooNE anti-neutrino charged-current quasi-elastic (CCQE) data is compared to model predictions. The main background of neutrino-induced events is examined first, where three independent techniques are employed. Results indicate the neutrino flux is consistent with a uniform reduction of {approx}20% relative to the largely uncertain prediction. After background subtraction, the Q{sup 2} shape of {bar v}{sub {mu}} CCQE events is consistent with the model parameter MA = 1.35 GeV determined from MiniBooNE v{sub {mu}} CCQE data, while the normalization is {approx} 20% high compared to the same prediction.

Grange, Joseph

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Capacitive deionization of NH{sub 4}CIO{sub 4} solutions with carbon aerogel electrodes. Revision 1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A process for capacitive deionization of water with a stack of carbon aerogel electrodes was developed. Unlike ion exchange, one of the more conventional deionization processes, no chemicals are required for regeneration of the system; electricity is used instead. An aqueous solution of NH{sub 4}ClO{sub 4} is pumped through the electrochemical cell. After polarization, NH{sub 4}{sup +} and ClO{sub 4}{sup -} ions are removed from the water by the imposed electric field and trapped in the extensive cathodic and anodic double layers. Thsi process produces one stream of purified water and a second stream of concentrate. Effects of cell voltage, salt concentration, and cycling on electrosorption capacity were studied and results reported.

Farmer, J.C.; Fix, D.V.; Mack, G.V.; Pekala, R.W.; Poco, J.F.

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

A reaction mechanism for titanium nitride CVD from TiCl{sub 4} and NH{sub 3}  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A gas-phase and surface reaction mechanism for the CVD of TiN from TiCl{sub 4} and NH{sub 3} is proposed. The only gas-phase process is complex formation, which can compete with deposition. The surface mechanism postulates the stepwise elimination of Cl and H atoms from TiCl{sub 4} and NH{sub 3}, respectively, to form solid TiN and gaseous HCl. The mechanism also accounts for the change in oxidation state of Ti by allowing for liberation of N{sub 2}. Provided that the surface composition is at steady state, the stoichiometry of the overall reaction is reproduced exactly. In addition, the global kinetic law predicted by the mechanism is successfully fit to new deposition data from a rotating disk reactor and is shown to be consistent with literature results.

Larson, R.S.; Allendorf, M.D.

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

The oxidation of Ba dosed Mo(100) surfaces with O/sub 2/ at moderately high temperatures  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The oxidation of Mo(100) and Ba-covered Mo(100) by O/sub 2/ have been examined at moderately high temperature (700 to 1400/sup 0/K) using x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Results indicate that the Ba or BaO overlayer retards but does not prevent oxidation of the underlying Mo surface. The high temperature surface chemistry of the O/Ba/Mo surface is described. 11 refs., 3 figs.

Rogers, J.W. Jr.; Blair, D.S.; Paffett, M.T.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Laser Rock Drilling on the History Channel - The NE Multimedia Collection  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Departments > System Technologies & Diagnostics > Videos Departments > System Technologies & Diagnostics > Videos Laser Oil & Gas Well Drilling: Laser Rock Drilling on the History Channel Argonne's Laser Applications Lab and researcher Claude Reed (NE) appeared in the History Channel program "Modern Marvels: Drilling" (May 10, 2006). "Modern Marvels" relates the ingenuity, invention and imagination behind everyday items, technological breakthroughs and man-made wonders. :: Please wait until video loads completely :: Argonne Experts Dr. Claude B. Reed is one of the Experts featured in the Argonne Experts Guide. The video is in mp4 format. Closed Captioning Transcript Live Closed captioning of the video is not available; however -as an alternative- we provide a transcript of the audio portion of this video as a separate web page.

227

Markus Popa, DOE (OCRWM) Bill Sherman, NE HLRW Task Force Robert Holden, NCAI  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Minutes Monday, November 3rd 2:00-3:00 p.m. (EST) Minutes Monday, November 3rd 2:00-3:00 p.m. (EST) Participants included: Markus Popa, DOE (OCRWM) Bill Sherman, NE HLRW Task Force Robert Holden, NCAI Mike Butler, UETC Bob Fronczak, AAR Kevin Blackwell, FRA Mike Butler (UETC) greeted participants and informed the group of previous notification by Robert Light (Mescalero Apache Tribe), Robert Centracco (FRA), and Mike Calhoun (FRA) that they would be unable to join the call. Mr. Butler began the call with a brief update on the status of Matrix 1, now entitled "Summary of Rail and Highway Regulations and their Applicability to States, Tribes, Shippers, and Carriers." He informed the group that he had completed an initial draft of the matrix, but that he was making substantial revisions to it and therefore he had not distributed it to the entire group for

228

NE-24 R&D Decontamination Projects Under the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

" _ ,' ,:.' : " _ ,' ,:.' : NE-24 R&D Decontamination Projects Under the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP) '. * * ,~~'.'J.' L.aGrone, Manager Oak Ridge Operations O fffce As a result of the House-Senate Conference Report and the Energy and W a ter Appropriations Act for FY 1984, and based on the data in the attached reports indicating radioactive contamination In excess of acceptable guidelines, the sites listed In the attachment and their respectfve vicinity properties (contaminated with radioactive materials from these sites) are being designated as decontamination research and development projects under the FUSRAP. Each site and the associated vicinity properties should be treated as a separate project. . . -_ The objectjve of each project is to decontaminate the vicinity properties

229

NE-23 Elimination of the Chupadera Mesa and Los Alamos County Industrial Waste  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

AM? 2 2 1986 AM? 2 2 1986 NE-23 Elimination of the Chupadera Mesa and Los Alamos County Industrial Waste Line Sites from Further Consideration for FUSRAP Inclusion Carlos E. Garcia, Director Environmental Safety and Health Division Albuquerque Operations Office The enclosed material is being provided to you to document the final actions taken under the Department's Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP) for the Chupadera Mesa area and the Los Alamos County Industrial Waste Lines, New Mexico. Copies of designation/ elimination reviews for each of the sites are enclosed for your records. We have determined that neither site warrants inclusion in the remedial action program. Primary sources of data for this determination were two survey reports prepared through your Division, LA-10256-MS, "Radiological

230

K-SHELL PHOTOIONIZATION AND PHOTOABSORPTION OF Ne, Mg, Si, S, Ar, AND Ca  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present extensive computations of photoabsorption and photoionization cross sections across the K-edge of Ne, Mg, Si, S, Ar, and Ca ions with less than 11 electrons. The calculations are performed using the Breit-Pauli R-matrix method and include the effects of radiative and Auger damping by means of an optical potential. The wave functions are constructed from single-electron orbital bases obtained using a Thomas-Fermi-Dirac statistical model potential. Configuration interaction is considered among all fine-structure levels within the n = 2 complex. The damping processes affect the resonances converging to the K thresholds causing them to display symmetric profiles of constant width that smear the otherwise sharp edge at the photoionization thresholds.

Witthoeft, M. C.; Kallman, T. R. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Code 662, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Bautista, M. A. [Department of Physics, Virginia Polytechnic and State University, Blacksburg, VA 24061 (United States); Mendoza, C. [Centro de Fisica, Instituto Venezolano de Investigaciones CientIficas (IVIC), Caracas 1020A (Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of); Palmeri, P.; Quinet, P. [Astrophysique et Spectroscopie, Universite de Mons-Hainaut, B-7000 Mons (Belgium)], E-mail: bautista@vt.edu

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

231

First direct measurement of resonance strengths in {sup 17}O({alpha},{gamma}){sup 21}Ne  

SciTech Connect

The reaction {sup 17}O({alpha},{gamma}){sup 21}Ne has been measured by in-beam {gamma} spectroscopy for the first time in the energy range E{sub {alpha}=}750-1650 keV using highly enriched anodized Ta{sub 2}({sup 17}O){sub 5} targets. Resonances were found at E{sub {alpha}=} 1002, 1386, and 1619 keV. Their strengths and primary {gamma}-ray branchings are given. The new results exclude the low reaction rate of Descouvemont and support the rate of Caughlan and Fowler. Implications for the neutron poisoning efficiency of {sup 16}O in the weak s-process are discussed.

Best, A.; Goerres, J.; Couder, M.; Boer, R. de; Falahat, S.; Kontos, A.; LeBlanc, P. J.; Li, Q.; O'Brien, S.; Sonnabend, K.; Talwar, R.; Uberseder, E.; Wiescher, M. [Department of Physics, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, Indiana 46556 (United States)

2011-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

232

KM3NeT:a large underwater neutrino telescope in the Mediterranean Sea  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

High energy neutrinos produced in astrophysical processes will allow for a new way of studying the universe. In order to detect the expected flux of high energy neutrinos from specific astrophysical sources, neutrino telescopes of a scale of a km^3 of water will be needed. A Northern Hemisphere detector is being proposed to be sited in a deep area of the Mediterranean Sea. This detector will provide complimentary sky coverage to the IceCube detector being built at the South Pole. The three neutrino telescope projects in the Mediterranean (ANTARES, NEMO and NESTOR) are partners in an effort to design, and build such a km^3 size neutrino telescope, the KM3NeT. The EU is funding a 3-year Design Study; the status of the Design Study is presented and some technical issues are discussed.

P. A. Rapidis; for the KM3NeT consortium

2008-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

233

Electrochemically Induced High Capacity Displacement Reaction of PEO/MoS2/Graphene Nanocomposites with Lithium  

SciTech Connect

MoS2/PEO/graphene composite is successfully prepared and the discharge mechanism of MoS2 as an anode material for Li-ion batteries has been investigated systematically in this work. The simultaneous formation of Li2S and Mo at deep discharge depth has been shown for the first time. The deposition of Mo metal with Li residing on the defects after the first discharge increases the intrinsic electronic conductivity of the electrode leading to a superior cycling stability for over 185 cycles. After the first discharge the amorphous Mo matrix allows a large amount of Li+ ions to repeatedly deposit and being oxidized during cycling while the transition between Li2S and S contribute to the capacity above 2.0 V. The interactions between as-formed Mo and S prevents the dissolution of the intermediate polysulfide thus providing clues to immobilize the soluble species in a Li-S battery. Excellent rate performances are achieved in this MoS2/PEO/graphene composite indicating a fast diffusion path of Li+ ions existing not only in the bulk material but also in the interface between the electrode and the electrolyte.

Xiao, Jie; Wang, Xaojian; Yang, Xiao-Qing; Xun, Shidi; Liu, Gao; Koech, Phillip K.; Liu, Jun; Lemmon, John P.

2011-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

234

Surface Structures of Cubo-octahedral Pt-Mo Catalyst Nanoparticles from Monte Carlo Simulations  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The surface structures of cubo-octahedral Pt-Mo nanoparticles have been investigated using the Monte Carlo method and modified embedded atom method potentials that we developed for Pt-Mo alloys. The cubo-octahedral Pt-Mo nanoparticles are constructed with disordered fcc configurations, with sizes from 2.5 to 5.0 nm, and with Pt concentrations from 60 to 90 at. percent. The equilibrium Pt-Mo nanoparticle configurations were generated through Monte Carlo simulations allowing both atomic displacements and element exchanges at 600 K. We predict that the Pt atoms weakly segregate to the surfaces of such nanoparticles. The Pt concentrations in the surface are calculated to be 5 to 14 at. percent higher than the Pt concentrations of the nanoparticles. Moreover, the Pt atoms preferentially segregate to the facet sites of the surface, while the Pt and Mo atoms tend to alternate along the edges and vertices of these nanoparticles. We found that decreasing the size or increasing the Pt concentration leads to higher Pt concentrations but fewer Pt-Mo pairs in the Pt-Mo nanoparticle surfaces.

Wang, Guofeng; Van Hove, M.A.; Ross, P.N.; Baskes, M.I.

2005-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

235

Systematics of magnetic dipole strength in the stable even-mass Mo isotopes  

SciTech Connect

The nuclides {sup 92}Mo, {sup 98}Mo, and {sup 100}Mo have been studied in photon-scattering experiments by using bremsstrahlung produced at an electron energy of 6 MeV at the ELBE accelerator of the Forschungszentrum Rossendorf and at electron energies from 3.2 to 3.8 MeV at the Dynamitron accelerator at the University of Stuttgart. Six dipole transitions in {sup 98}Mo and 19 in {sup 100}Mo were observed for the first time in the energy range from 2 to 4 MeV. The experimental results are compared with predictions of the shell model and with predictions of the quasiparticle random-phase approximation (QRPA) in a deformed basis. The latter show significant contributions of isovector-orbital and isovector-spin vibrations. The change of the magnetic dipole strength in the isotopic chain of the even-mass isotopes from {sup 92}Mo to {sup 100}Mo is discussed. The calculations within the QRPA are extrapolated to the particle-separation energies to estimate the possible influence of M1 strength on the stability of the nuclides against photodissociation in cosmic scenarios.

Rusev, G. [Institut fuer Kern- und Hadronenphysik, Forschungszentrum Rossendorf, D-01314 Dresden (Germany); Institute for Nuclear Research and Nuclear Energy, BAS, BG-1784 Sofia (Bulgaria); Schwengner, R.; Doenau, F.; Erhard, M.; Grosse, E.; Junghans, A.R.; Kaeubler, L.; Kosev, K.; Mallion, S.; Schilling, K.D.; Wagner, A. [Institut fuer Kern- und Hadronenphysik, Forschungszentrum Rossendorf, D-01314 Dresden (Germany); Frauendorf, S. [Institut fuer Kern- und Hadronenphysik, Forschungszentrum Rossendorf, D-01314 Dresden (Germany); Department of Physics, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, Indiana 46556 (United States); Kostov, L.K. [Institute for Nuclear Research and Nuclear Energy, BAS, BG-1784 Sofia (Bulgaria); Garrel, H. von; Kneissl, U.; Kohstall, C.; Kreutz, M.; Pitz, H.H.; Scheck, M.; Stedile, F. [Institut fuer Strahlenphysik, Universitaet Stuttgart, D-70569 Stuttgart (Germany)] (and others)

2006-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

236

BP Studentship* in the Department of Earth Sciences of the University of Oxford Tectonic evolution of the Parnaiba cratonic basin, NE Brazil  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the Parnaiba cratonic basin, NE Brazil Supervisors: Prof. A. B. Watts and Dr. M. Daly (BP) * Subject to funding structure and petroleum play. The focus will be on the Parnaiba basin in NE Brazil, one of the world in Brazil and the UK, will involve the acquisition of seismic reflection and refraction profile data along

237

Using MiniBooNE neutral current elastic cross section results to constrain 3+1 sterile neutrino models  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The MiniBooNE Neutral Current Elastic (NCEL) cross section results are used to extract limits in the $\\Delta m^{2}-\\sin^{2}\\vartheta_{\\mu s}$ plane for a 3+1 sterile neutrino model with a mass splitting $0.1 \\leq \\Delta m^{2} \\leq 10.0$ eV$^{2}$. GENIE is used with a cross section model close to the one employed by MiniBooNE to make event rate predictions using simulations on the MiniBooNE target material CH$_{2}$. The axial mass is a free parameter in all fits. Sterile modifications to the flux and changes to the cross section in the simulation relate the two and allow limits to be set on sterile neutrino mixing using cross section results. The large axial mass problem makes it necessary for experiments to perform their own axial mass fits, but a prior fit to the same dataset could mask a sterile oscillation signal. Results are given with and without a penalty term on the axial mass from a prior fit. We find that a simultaneous fit to the axial mass and the sterile neutrino parameters favours very high axial mass values. The general problems that the current uncertainty on charged-current quasi-elastic (CCQE) cross sections at MiniBooNE energies pose for sterile neutrino measurements are discussed.

Callum Wilkinson; Susan Cartwright; Lee Thompson

2013-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

238

Measurements of nuclear $?$-ray line emission in interactions of protons and $?$ particles with N, O, Ne and Si  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

$\\gamma$-ray production cross sections have been measured in proton irradiations of N, Ne and Si and $\\alpha$-particle irradiations of N and Ne. In the same experiment we extracted also line shapes for strong $\\gamma$-ray lines of $^{16}$O produced in proton and $\\alpha$-particle irradiations of O. For the measurements gas targets were used for N, O and Ne and a thick foil was used for Si. All targets were of natural isotopic composition. Beams in the energy range up to 26 MeV for protons and 39 MeV for $\\alpha$-particles have been delivered by the IPN-Orsay tandem accelerator. The $\\gamma$ rays have been detected with four HP-Ge detectors in the angular range 30$^{\\circ}$ to 135$^{\\circ}$. We extracted 36 cross section excitation functions for proton reactions and 14 for $\\alpha$-particle reactions. For the majority of the excitation functions no other data exist to our knowledge. Where comparison with existing data was possible usually a very good agreement was found. It is shown that these data are very interesting for constraining nuclear reaction models. In particular the agreement of cross section calculations in the nuclear reaction code TALYS with the measured data could be improved by adjusting the coupling schemes of collective levels in the target nuclei $^{14}$N, $^{20,22}$Ne and $^{28}$Si. The importance of these results for the modeling of nuclear $\\gamma$-ray line emission in astrophysical sites is discussed.

H. Benhabiles-Mezhoud; J. Kiener; J. -P. Thibaud; V. Tatischeff; I. Deloncle; A. Coc; J. Duprat; C. Hamadache; A. Lefebvre-Schuhl; J. -C. Dalouzy; F. De Grancey; F. De Oliveira; F. Dayras; N. De Srville; M. -G. Pellegriti; L. Lamia; S. Ouichaoui

2010-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

239

First Direct Measurement of the 17F(p,gamma)18Ne Cross Section  

SciTech Connect

The rate of the 17F(p,gamma)18Ne reaction is of significant importance in astrophysical events like novae and x-ray bursts. A previous 17F(p,p)17F measurement identified the 3+ state in 18Ne predicted to dominate the rate above 0.2 GK at a center of mass energy of 599.8 keV, but the resonance strength for proton capture was unknown. We have directly measured the 17F(p,gamma)18Ne reaction with the Daresbury Recoil Separator, using a mixed beam of radioactive 17F and stable 17O from the HRIBF at ORNL. The resonance strength for the 599.8 keV resonance in 18Ne was found to be = 33 14(stat) 17(sys) meV, corresponding to a width of = 56 24(stat) 30(sys) meV. Additionally, an upper limit on the direct capture S factor of S(E) < 65 keV b was determined at an intermediate energy of 800 keV.

Chipps, K. [Colorado School of Mines, Golden; Bardayan, Daniel W [ORNL; Blackmon, Jeff C [ORNL; Chae, K. Y. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Greife, U. [Colorado School of Mines, Golden; Hatarik, Robert [Rutgers University; Kozub, R. L. [Tennessee Technological University; Matei, Catalin [Oak Ridge Associated Universities (ORAU); Moazen, Brian [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Nesaraja, Caroline D [ORNL; Pain, Steven D [ORNL; Peters, W. A. [Rutgers University; Pittman, S. T. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); ShrinerJr., J. F. [Tennessee Technological University; Smith, Michael Scott [ORNL

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Reactor physics calculations for {sup 99}Mo production at the Annular Core Research Reactor  

SciTech Connect

The isotope {sup 99}Mo would be produced at Sandia using ACRR and the collocated Hot Cell Facility. {sup 99}Mo would be produced by irradiating targets coated with {sup 235}U in the form of highly enriched U{sub 3}O{sub 8}; after 7 days, the target would be removed and the isotope extracted using the Cintichem process. The Monte Carlo neutronics computer code MCNP was used to determine the optimum configuration for production, using various fractions of the US demand. Although ACRR operates at a low power level, the US demand for {sup 99}Mo can be easily met using a reasonable number of targets.

Parma, E.J.

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mo ne nh" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

UNH Cooperative Extension is an equal opportunity educator and employer, UNH, U.S. Dept. of Agriculture and NH counties cooperating.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-up of what you did to Rhiannon Beauregard, 4-H State Program Coordinator. Signature of Applicant Date: Rhiannon Beauregard, 4-H State Program Coordinator Moiles House, 180 Main Street, Durham, NH 03824 Rhiannon.beauregard

New Hampshire, University of

242

Forming 6061 Al HIP-Clad DU10Mo Monolithic Fuel Plates  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Small scale trials with multi-layer 6061 Al HIP-clad DU10Mo (depleted uranium), co-rolled with Zr, have been performed. Important results include springback...

243

NTT DoCoMo's competition strategy (before and) after the introduction of the flat rate  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

NTT DoCoMo, which was spun off from NTT in 1992, grew rapidly by increasing the number of subscribers and successfully implementing a new data communication, i-mode. However, when a competitor introduced a flat rate for ...

Yajima, Masaaki

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Solution-reactor-produced Mo-99 using activated carbon to remore I-131  

SciTech Connect

The production of {sup 99}Mo in a solution reactor was explored. Activated charcoal was used to filter the {sup 131}I contaminant from an irradiated fuel solution. Gamma spectroscopy confirmed that the activated carbon trapped a significant amount of {sup 131}I, as well as notable amounts of {sup 133}Xe, {sup 105}Rb, and {sup 140}Ba; the carbon trapped a diminutive amount of {sup 99}Mo. The results promote the idea of solution-reactor-produced {sup 99}Mo. Solution reactors are favorable both energetically and environmentally. A solution reactor could provide enough {sup 99}Mo/{sup 99m}Te to support both the current and future radiopharmaceutical needs of the U.S.

Kitten, S.; Cappiello, C.

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

The Thermodynamics of Titanium Formation in 95CrMo Steel  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... on the fatigue life of 95CrMo steel which was applied in producing drilling rod. ... Analysis of Residence Time Distribution (RTD) of Fluid Flows in a Four Strand ...

246

Production of Mixed Alcohols from Bio-syngas over Mo-based Catalyst  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A series of Mo-based catalysts prepared by sol-gel method using citric acid as complexant were successfully applied in the high efficient production of mixed alcohols from bio-syngas

Song-bai Qiu; Wei-wei Huang; Yong Xu; Lu Liu; Quan-xin Li

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Electrochemical properties of sputter-deposited MoO{sub 3} films in lithium microbatteries  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Molybdenum oxide (MoO{sub 3}) films were prepared by magnetron sputtering using an Mo target. The films were sputtered in the reactive atmosphere of an argon-oxygen gas mixture under various substrate temperatures, T{sub s}, and oxygen partial pressures, p(O{sub 2}). The effects of the growth conditions on the microstructure were examined using reflection high-energy electron diffraction and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The analyses indicate that stoichiometric and polycrystalline MoO{sub 3} films were obtained at T{sub s} = 445 Degree-Sign C and p(O{sub 2}) = 61%. The applicability of the sputtered MoO{sub 3} films for lithium microbattery application has been demonstrated. The discharge-charge profiles, the kinetics of lithium intercalation process in the film, and the cycling behavior have been investigated in detail to understand the effect of microstructure on the electrochemical performance.

Ramana, C. V.; Atuchin, V. V.; Groult, H.; Julien, C. M. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Texas at El Paso, El Paso, Texas 79968 (United States); Institute of Semiconductor Physics, SB RAS, Novosibirsk, 630090 (Russian Federation); Physicochimie des Electrolytes, Colloiedes et Systemes Analytiques (PECSA), Universite Pierre et Marie Curie-Paris 6, UMR 7195, 4 place Jussieu, 75005 Paris (France)

2012-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

248

U-EXTRACTION--IMPROVEMENTS IN ELIMINATION OF Mo BY USE OF FERRIC ION  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved solvent extraction process is described whereby U may be extracted by a water immiscible organic solvent from an aqueous solution of uranyl nitrate. It has been found that Mo in the presence of phosphate ions appears to form a complex with the phosphate which extracts along with the U. This extraction of Mo may be suppressed by providing ferric ion in the solution prior to the extraction step. The ferric ion is preferably provided in the form of ferric nitrate.

Clark, H.M.; Duffey, D.

1958-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

249

Demonstration Assessment of LED Roadway Lighting: NE Cully Boulevard Portland, OR  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new roadway lighting demonstration project was initiated in late 2010, which was planned in conjunction with other upgrades to NE Cully Boulevard, a residential collector road in the northeast area of Portland, OR. With the NE Cully Boulevard project, the Portland Bureau of Transportation hoped to demonstrate different light source technologies and different luminaires side-by-side. This report documents the initial performance of six different newly installed luminaires, including three LED products, one induction product, one ceramic metal halide product, and one high-pressure sodium (HPS) product that represented the baseline solution. It includes reported, calculated, and measured performance; evaluates the economic feasibility of each of the alternative luminaires; and documents user feedback collected from a group of local Illuminating Engineering Society (IES) members that toured the site. This report does not contain any long-term performance evaluations or laboratory measurements of luminaire performance. Although not all of the installed products performed equally, the alternative luminaires generally offered higher efficacy, more appropriate luminous intensity distributions, and favorable color quality when compared to the baseline HPS luminaire. However, some products did not provide sufficient illumination to all areasvehicular drive lanes, bicycle lanes, and sidewalksor would likely fail to meet design criteria over the life of the installation due to expected depreciation in lumen output. While the overall performance of the alternative luminaires was generally better than the baseline HPS luminaire, cost remains a significant barrier to widespread adoption. Based on the cost of the small quantity of luminaires purchased for this demonstration, the shortest calculated payback period for one of the alternative luminaire types was 17.3 years. The luminaire prices were notably higher than typical prices for currently available luminaires purchased in larger quantities. At prices that are more typical, the payback would be less than 10 years. In addition to the demonstration luminaires, a networked control system was installed for additional evaluation and demonstration purposes. The capability of control system to measure luminaire input power was explored in this study. A more exhaustive demonstration and evaluation of the control system will be the subject of future GATEWAY report(s).

Royer, Michael P.; Poplawski, Michael E.; Tuenge, Jason R.

2012-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

250

Photoluminescent BaMoO{sub 4} nanopowders prepared by complex polymerization method (CPM)  

SciTech Connect

The BaMoO{sub 4} nanopowders were prepared by the Complex Polymerization Method (CPM). The structure properties of the BaMoO{sub 4} powders were characterized by FTIR transmittance spectra, X-ray diffraction (XRD), Raman spectra, photoluminescence spectra (PL) and high-resolution scanning electron microscopy (HR-SEM). The XRD, FTIR and Raman data showed that BaMoO{sub 4} at 300 deg. C was disordered. At 400 deg. C and higher temperature, BaMoO{sub 4} crystalline scheelite-type phases could be identified, without the presence of additional phases, according to the XRD, FTIR and Raman data. The calculated average crystallite sizes, calculated by XRD, around 40 nm, showed the tendency to increase with the temperature. The crystallite sizes, obtained by HR-SEM, were around of 40-50 nm. The sample that presented the highest intensity of the red emission band was the one heat treated at 400 deg. C for 2 h, and the sample that displayed the highest intensity of the green emission band was the one heat treated at 700 deg. C for 2 h. The CPM was shown to be a low cost route for the production of BaMoO{sub 4} nanopowders, with the advantages of lower temperature, smaller time and reduced cost. The optical properties observed for BaMoO{sub 4} nanopowders suggested that this material is a highly promising candidate for photoluminescent applications.

Azevedo Marques, Ana Paula de [Laboratorio de Analise Termica e Materiais, Departamento de Quimica, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte, 59072-970 Natal, RN (Brazil)]. E-mail: apamarques@liec.ufscar.br; Melo, Dulce M.A. de [Laboratorio de Analise Termica e Materiais, Departamento de Quimica, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte, 59072-970 Natal, RN (Brazil); Paskocimas, Carlos A. [Departamento de Engenharia Mecanica, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte, 59072-970 Natal, RN (Brazil); Pizani, Paulo S. [Laboratorio de Semicondutores, Departamento de Fisica, Universidade Federal de Sao Carlos, 13565-905 Sao Carlos, SP (Brazil); Joya, Miryam R. [Laboratorio de Semicondutores, Departamento de Fisica, Universidade Federal de Sao Carlos, 13565-905 Sao Carlos, SP (Brazil); Leite, Edson R. [Laboratorio Interdisciplinar de Eletroquimica e Ceramica, CMDMC, Departamento de Quimica, Universidade Federal de Sao Carlos 13565-905, Sao Carlos, SP (Brazil); Longo, Elson [CMDMC, LIEC, Instituto de Quimica, Universidade Estadual Paulista, 14801-907 Araraquara, SP (Brazil)

2006-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

251

Solution-reactor-produced-{sup 99}Mo using activated carbon to remove {sup 131}I  

SciTech Connect

This research explores the idea of producing {sup 99}Mo in a solution reactor. The Solution High Energy Burst Assembly (SHEBA), located at the Los Alamos Critical Assembly Facility, was used to facilitate this study. The goal of this study was to build on work previously completed and to investigate a possible mode of radioactive contaminant removal prior to a {sup 99}Mo extraction process. Prior experiments, performed using SHEBA and a single-step sorption process, showed a significant amount of {sup 131}I present along with the {sup 99}Mo on the alumina that was used to isolate the {sup 99}Mo. A high concentration of {sup 131}I and/or other contaminants present in a sample prohibits the Food and Drug Administration from approving an extraction of that nature for radiopharmaceutical use. However, if it were possible to remove the {sup 131}I and other contaminants prior to a {sup 99}Mo extraction, a simple column extraction process might be feasible. Activated charcoal was used to try to filter the {sup 131}I contaminant from an irradiated fuel solution. Gamma spectroscopy confirmed that the activated carbon trapped a significant amount of the {sup 131}I, as well as notable amounts of {sup 133}Xe, {sup 105}Rb, and {sup 140}Ba. Most importantly, the carbon traps a diminutive amount of {sup 99}Mo.

Kitten, S.; Cappiello, C. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Substrate recovery of Mo-Si multilayer coated optics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Imaging optics in a soft x-ray projection lithography (SXPL) system must meet stringent requirements to achieve high throughput and diffraction limited performance. Errors in the surface figure must be kept to less than {approximately}1 nm and the rms surface roughness must be less than 0.1 nm. The ML coatings must provide high reflectivity (> 60%) at wavelengths in the vicinity of 13 nm. The reflectivity bandpasses of the optics must be aligned within 0.05 nm. Each coating must be uniform across the surface of the optic to within 0.5%. These specifications challenge the limits of the current capabilities in optics fabrication and ML deposition. Consequently a set of qualified SXPL imaging optics is expected to be expensive, costing in the range of 100--250 k$. If the lifetime of the imaging optics is short, the replacement cost could significantly impact the economic competitiveness of the technology. The most likely failure modes for the imaging optics are mechanisms that degrade the ML coatings, but which leave the substrates intact. A potentially low cost solution for salvaging the imaging optics could be to strip the damaged ML coating to recover the substrate and then deposit a new coating. In this paper the authors report on the use of reactive ion etching (RIE) to remove Mo-Si ML coatings from precision optical substrates. The goal of this work was to characterize the etching process both in the ML film and at the substrate, and to determine the effects of the etching on the surface figure and finish of the substrate.

Stearns, D.G.; Baker, S.L.

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Fine structure collision strengths and line ratios for [Ne V] in infrared and optical sources  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Improved collisions strengths for the mid-infrared and optical transitions in Ne V are presented. Breit-Pauli R-Matrix calculations for electron impact excitation are carried out with fully resolved near-threshold resonances at very low energies. In particular, the fine structure lines at 14 micron and 24 micron due to transitions among the ground state levels 1s^22s^22p^3 (^3P_{0,1,2}), and the optical/near-UV lines at 2973, 3346 and 3426 Angstrom transitions among the ^3P_{0,1,2}, ^1D_2, ^1S_0 levels are described. Maxwellian averaged collision strengths are tabulated for all forbidden transistion within the ground configuration. Significant differences are found in the low temperature range Te < 10000 K for both the FIR and the opitcal transitions compared to previous results. An analysis of the 14/24 line ratio in low-energy-density (LED) plasma conditions reveals considerable variation; the effective rate coefficient may be dominated by the very low-energy behaviour rather than the maxwellian averaged...

Dance, Michael; Nahar, Sultana N; Pradhan, Anil K

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Particle decay branching ratios for states of astrophysical importance in 19Ne  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We have measured proton and alpha-particle branching ratios of excited states in 19Ne formed using the 19F(3He,t) reaction at a beam energy of 25 MeV. These ratios have a large impact on the astrophysical reaction rates of 15O(alpha,gamma), 18F(p,gamma) and 18F(p,alpha), which are of interest in understanding energy generation in x-ray bursts and in interpreting anticipated gamma-ray observations of novae. We detect decay protons and alpha-particles using a silicon detector array in coincidence with tritons measured in the focal plane detector of our Enge split-pole spectrograph. The silicon array consists of five strip detectors of the type used in the Louvain-Edinburgh Detector Array, subtending angles from 130 degrees to 165 degrees with approximately 14% lab efficiency. The correlation angular distributions give additional confidence in some prior spin-parity assignments that were based on gamma branchings. We measure Gamma_p/Gamma=0.387+-0.016 for the 665 keV proton resonance, which agrees well with the direct measurement of Bardayan et al.

D. W. Visser; J. A. Caggiano; R. Lewis; W. B. Handler; A. Parikh; P. D. Parker

2003-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

255

Color transparency after the NE18 and E665 experiments: Outllok and perspectives at CEBAF  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CEBAF is a high-luminocity factory of virtual photons with variable virtuality $Q^{2}$ and transverse size. This makes CEBAF, in particular after the energy upgrade to (8-12)GeV, an ideal facility for uncovering new phenomena, and opening new windows, at the interface of the perturbative and nonperturbative QCD. We discuss color transparency as the case for a broad program on electroproduction of vector mesons $\\rho^{0},\\,\\omega^{0},\\,\\phi^{0}$ and their radial excitations $\\rho',\\,\\omega',\\,\\phi'$ at CEBAF. We also comment on the second generation of experiments on color transparency in $^{4}He(e,e'p)$ scattering, which are also feasible at CEBAF. In 1994, we can make more reliable projections into future because our understanding of the onset of color transparency has greatly been augmented by two experiments completed in 1993:\\\\ i) no effect of CT was seen in the SLAC NE18 experiment on $A(e,e'p)$ scattering at virtualities of the exchanged photon $Q^{2} \\lsim 7$ GeV$^{2}$, \\\\ ii) strong signal of CT was observed in the FNAL E665 experiment on exclusive $\\rho^{0}$- meson production in deep inelastic scattering in the same range of $Q^{2}$. \\\\ We discuss the impact of these observations on the CEBAF experimental program. We argue they both are good news, both were anticipated theoretically, and both rule in the correct QCD mechanism of the onset of CT.

J. Nemchik; N. N. Nikolaev; B. G. Zakharov

1994-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

256

An intensity-modulated dual-wavelength He-Ne laser for remote sensing of methane  

SciTech Connect

The differential absorption laser radar for methane sensing detects a leakage of methane gas by emitting into the atmosphere the light of a wavelength absorbable by methane, receiving the light returning after being reflected or scattered on a road or wall surface, etc., and measuring the light intensity lost during the travel. This methane detection system is highly practicable as it makes an instantaneous remote detection possible. The authors have developed a new He-Ne laser that could be used as the light source for the above system. This device emits a two-wavelength laser beam (one wavelength absorbable by methane and the other not absorbable by methane but used for referential purposes) from a single plasma tube, and there is no possibility of the axes of the two-wavelength component deviating from each other. Further, using this laser, they have developed a vehicle-mounted type differential absorption laser radar system which has successfully detected low density methane leakage while the vehicle was moving.

Ueki, T.; Tanaka, H.; Uehara, K.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Controlling the nonlinear intracavity dynamics of large He-Ne laser gyroscopes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A model based on Lamb's theory of gas lasers is applied to a He-Ne ring laser gyroscope in order to estimate and remove the laser dynamics contribution from the rotation measurements. The intensities of the counter-propagating laser beams exiting one cavity mirror are continuously observed together with a monitor of the laser population inversion. These observables, once properly calibrated with a dedicated procedure, allow us to estimate cold cavity and active medium parameters driving the main part of the nonlinearities of the system. The parameters identification and noise subtraction procedure has been verified by means of a Monte Carlo study of the system, and experimentally tested on the G-Pisa ring laser oriented with the normal to the ring plane almost parallel to the Earth rotation axis. In this configuration the Earth rotation-rate provides the maximum Sagnac effect while the contribution of the orientation error is reduced at minimum. After the subtraction of laser dynamics by a Kalman filter, the ...

Cuccato, Davide; Belfi, Jacopo; Beverini, Nicol; Ortolan, Antonello; Di Virgilio, Angela

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

A Measurement of the Neutrino Neutral Current Pi0 Cross Section at MiniBooNE  

SciTech Connect

The MiniBooNE neutrino beam and detector at Fermilab are used to study the production of neutral current {pi}{sup 0} events. The cross sections for neutrino interactions with mineral oil (CH{sub 2}) are reported for resonantly produced and coherently produced single {pi}{sup 0} events. We measure a resonant single {pi}{sup 0} cross section of {sigma}({nu}{sub {mu}} N {pi}{sup 0}) = (0.0129 {+-} 0.0011(stat.) {+-} 0.0043(syst.)) x 10{sup -36} cm{sup 2}/CH{sub 2} at a mean neutrino energy of 1.26 GeV. We measure a coherent single {pi}{sup 0} cross section of {sigma}({nu}{sub {mu}} A {yields} {nu}{sub {mu}} A {pi}{sup 0}) = (0.00077 {+-} 0.00016 (stat.) {+-} 0.00036 (syst.)) x 10{sup -36} cm{sup 2}/CH{sub 2} at mean neutrino energy 1.12 GeV.

Raaf, Jennifer Lynne; /Cincinnati U.

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

High Level Requirements for the Nuclear Energy -- Knowledge Base for Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NE-KAMS)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy, Office of Nuclear Energy (DOE-NE), has been tasked with the important mission of ensuring that nuclear energy remains a compelling and viable energy source in the U.S. The motivations behind this mission include cost-effectively meeting the expected increases in the power needs of the country, reducing carbon emissions and reducing dependence on foreign energy sources. In the near term, to ensure that nuclear power remains a key element of U.S. energy strategy and portfolio, the DOE-NE will be working with the nuclear industry to support safe and efficient operations of existing nuclear power plants. In the long term, to meet the increasing energy needs of the U.S., the DOE-NE will be investing in research and development (R&D) and working in concert with the nuclear industry to build and deploy new, safer and more efficient nuclear power plants. The safe and efficient operations of existing nuclear power plants and designing, licensing and deploying new reactor designs, however, will require focused R&D programs as well as the extensive use and leveraging of advanced modeling and simulation (M&S). M&S will play a key role in ensuring safe and efficient operations of existing and new nuclear reactors. The DOE-NE has been actively developing and promoting the use of advanced M&S in reactor design and analysis through its R&D programs, e.g., the Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NEAMS) and Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL) programs. Also, nuclear reactor vendors are already using CFD and CSM, for design, analysis, and licensing. However, these M&S tools cannot be used with confidence for nuclear reactor applications unless accompanied and supported by verification and validation (V&V) and uncertainty quantification (UQ) processes and procedures which provide quantitative measures of uncertainty for specific applications. The Nuclear Energy Knowledge base for Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NE-KAMS) is being developed at the Idaho National Laboratory in conjunction with Bettis Laboratory, Sandia National Laboratories, Argonne National Laboratory, Utah State University and others with the objective of establishing a comprehensive and web-accessible knowledge base that will provide technical services and resources for V&V and UQ of M&S in nuclear energy sciences and engineering. The knowledge base will serve as an important resource for technical exchange and collaboration that will enable credible and reliable computational models and simulations for application to nuclear reactor design, analysis and licensing. NE-KAMS will serve as a valuable resource for the nuclear industry, academia, the national laboratories, the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and the public and will help ensure the safe, economical and reliable operation of existing and future nuclear reactors. From its inception, NE-KAMS will directly support nuclear energy research, development and demonstration programs within the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), including the CASL, NEAMS, Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS), Small Modular Reactors (SMR), and Next Generation Nuclear Power Plant (NGNP) programs. These programs all involve M&S of nuclear reactor systems, components and processes, and it is envisioned that NE-KAMS will help to coordinate and facilitate collaboration and sharing of resources and expertise for V&V and UQ across these programs.

Rich Johnson; Hyung Lee; Kimberlyn C. Mousseau

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

The Search for Meterorites with Complex Exposure Histories Amoung Ordinary Chondrites with Low 3HE/21NE Ratios  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In calculating cosmic-ray exposure ages of meteorites it is generally assumed that the meteoroids were expelled from a shielded position within their parent body and then experienced a single stage exposure before colliding with Earth. The combination of noble gas and radionuclide measurements in several large meteorites, such as Jilin and Bur Ghelaui, have revealed complex exposure histories: i.e. an initial exposure on the surface of an asteroid (or within meter-sized meteoroid), followed by a second exposure as a smaller object. In fact, orbital dynamics calculations predicted that at least 30% of the meteorites arriving on Earth experienced two- or multiple-stage exposure histories [1]. More recently, after the recognition that the Yarkovsky effect plays an important role in delivering meteorites from the asteroid belt to Earth-crossing orbits, it was confirmed that complex exposure histories should be common [2]. Nevertheless, despite the ability to measure a wide range of radionuclides with accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS), only a few meteorites with complex exposure histories have been identified [e.g. 3,4]. The question is whether the relatively paucity of complex exposure histories is real or have we simply overlooked complex-exposure histories. In this work we focus on meteorites with low {sup 3}He/{sup 21}Ne ratios, since it is known that most meteorites with complex exposure histories have relatively low {sup 3}He/{sup 21}Ne ratios, i.e. the {sup 3}He/{sup 21}Ne ratio is below the ''Bern-line''. Several hypotheses have been suggested for these low {sup 3}He/{sup 21}Ne ratios, including solar heating in low-perihelion orbits, shock-related diffusion of He during the collision that ejected the meteoroid, or an artifact of high shielding conditions [4]. The first two hypotheses seem to be supported by low radiogenic {sup 4}He concentrations in samples with low {sup 3}He, whereas Monte Carlo calculations have shown that some of the low {sup 3}He/{sup 21}Ne ratios may be due to high shielding conditions in objects with radii > 1m [5]. To elucidate these issues, we selected 15 samples with known noble gas concentrations [6] for radionuclide studies and obtained aliquots of the samples adjacent to those measured for noble gases. The specific goal is the identification of complex exposure histories among samples having low {sup 3}He/{sup 21}Ne ratios. All samples have {sup 3}He deficiencies of >20% relative to the ''Bern-line'' (Table 1). Most of the selected samples also have low {sup 22}Ne/{sup 21}Ne ratios ({le}1.1), indicative of high shielding during most of their cosmic-ray exposure (Table 1), whereas one sample (Suizhou) was selected because of its relatively low {sup 81}Kr concentration [7]. In addition, we selected QUE 93021, for which initial radionuclide results suggested a short exposure age. Here we present cosmogenic {sup 10}Be, {sup 26}Al and {sup 36}Cl in stone and metal fractions for the 16 ordinary chondrites listed in Table 1.

Welton, K C; Nishiizumi, K; Caffee, M W

2001-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mo ne nh" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

DENSE GAS TRACERS IN PERSEUS: RELATING THE N{sub 2}H{sup +}, NH{sub 3}, AND DUST CONTINUUM PROPERTIES OF PRE- AND PROTOSTELLAR CORES  

SciTech Connect

We investigate 35 prestellar cores and 36 protostellar cores in the Perseus molecular cloud. We find a very tight correlation between the physical parameters describing the N{sub 2}H{sup +} and NH{sub 3} gas. Both the velocity centroids and the line widths of N{sub 2}H{sup +} and NH{sub 3} correlate much better than either species correlates with CO, as expected if the nitrogen-bearing species are probing primarily the dense core gas where the CO has been depleted. We also find a tight correlation in the inferred abundance ratio between N{sub 2}H{sup +} and para-NH{sub 3} across all cores, with N(p-NH{sub 3})/N(N{sub 2}H{sup +}) = 22 +- 10. We find a mild correlation between NH{sub 3} (and N{sub 2}H{sup +}) column density and the (sub)millimeter dust continuum derived H{sub 2} column density for prestellar cores, N(p-NH{sub 3})/N(H{sub 2}) {approx}10{sup -8}, but do not find a fixed ratio for protostellar cores. The observations suggest that in the Perseus molecular cloud the formation and destruction mechanisms for the two nitrogen-bearing species are similar, regardless of the physical conditions in the dense core gas. While the equivalence of N{sub 2}H{sup +} and NH{sub 3} as powerful tracers of dense gas is validated, the lack of correspondence between these species and the (sub)millimeter dust continuum observations for protostellar cores is disconcerting and presently unexplained.

Johnstone, Doug; Kirk, Helen [National Research Council Canada, Herzberg Institute of Astrophysics, 5071 West Saanich Road, Victoria, BC V9E 2E7 (Canada); Rosolowsky, Erik [University of British Columbia Okanagan, Kelowna, BC V1V 1V7 (Canada); Tafalla, Mario, E-mail: doug.johnstone@nrc-cnrc.gc.c [Observatorio Astronomico Nacional (IGN), Alfonso XII 3, E-28014 Madrid (Spain)

2010-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

262

MCNPX-CINDER'90 Simulation of Photonuclear Mo-99 Production Experiments  

SciTech Connect

The MCNPX and CINDER'90 codes were used to support design of experiments investigating Mo-99 production with a 20-MeV electron beam. Bremsstrahlung photons produced by the electron beam interacting with the target drive the desired Mo-100({gamma},n)Mo-99 reaction, as well as many undesired reactions important to accurate prediction of radiation hazards. MCNPX is a radiation transport code and CINDER'90 is a transmutation code. They are routinely used together for accelerator activation calculations. Low energy neutron fluxes and production rates for nonneutron and high energy neutron induced reactions computed using MCNPX are inputs to CINDER'90. CINDER'90 presently has only a neutron reaction cross section library up to 25 MeV and normally the other reaction rates come from MCNPX physics models. For this work MCNPX photon flux tallies modified by energy response functions prepared from evaluated photonuclear cross section data were used to tally the reaction rates for CINDER'90 input. The cross section evaluations do not provide isomer to ground state yield ratios so a spin based approximation was used. Post irradiation dose rates were calculated using MCNPX with CINDER'90 produced decay photon spectra. The sensitivity of radionuclide activities and dose rates to beam parameters including energy, position, and profile, as well as underlying isomer assumptions, was investigated. Three experimental production targets were irradiated, two natural Mo and one Mo-100 enriched. Natural Mo foils upstream of the targets were used to analyze beam position and profile by exposing Gafchromic film to the foils after each irradiation. Activation and dose rate calculations were rerun after the experiments using measured beam parameters for comparison with measured Mo-99 activities and dose rates.

Kelsey, Charles T. IV [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Chemerizov, Sergey D. [Argonne National Laboratory; Dale, Gregory E. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Harvey, James T. [NorthStar Medical Radioisotopes; Tkac, Peter [Argonne National Laboratory; Vandegrift, George R III [Argonne National Laboratory

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

A measurement of the neutral current neutrino-nucleon elastic cross section at MiniBooNE  

SciTech Connect

The neutral current neutrino-nucleon elastic interaction {nu} N {yields} {nu} N is a fundamental process of the weak interaction ideally suited for characterizing the structure of the nucleon neutral weak current. This process comprises {approx}18% of neutrino events in the neutrino oscillation experiment, MiniBooNE, ranking it as the experiment's third largest process. Using {approx}10% of MiniBooNE's available neutrino data, a sample of these events were identified and analyzed to determine the differential cross section as a function of the momentum transfer of the interaction, Q{sup 2}. This is the first measurement of a differential cross section with MiniBooNE data. From this analysis, a value for the nucleon axial mass M{sub A} was extracted to be 1.34 {+-} 0.25 GeV consistent with previous measurements. The integrated cross section for the Q{sup 2} range 0.189 {yields} 1.13 GeV{sup 2} was calculated to be (8.8 {+-} 0.6(stat) {+-} 0.2(syst)) x 10{sup -40} cm{sup 2}.

Cox, David Christopher; /Indiana U.

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Microsoft Word - figure_8.doc  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

T I D O R W Y ND SD C A N V U T CO NE KS A Z NM OK TX MN WI MI IA I L IN OH MO AR M S AL GA T N KY FL SC NC WV MD DE VA PA NJ NY CT RI MA VT NH ME LA HI A K J a p a n Mexico M e x...

265

Determination of the {sup 22}Ne{sub nucl}/{sup 4}He{sub rad} ratio in natural uranium-rich fluorite by mass spectrometry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A determination by noble gas mass spectrometry of {sup 22}Ne production through the combined reactions {sup 19}F({alpha},n){sup 22}Na({beta}{sup +}){sup 22}Ne and {sup 19}F({alpha},p){sup 22}Ne on natural calcium fluoride is made for the first time. Six samples of U-rich fluorite from a fluorspar deposit in Mexico were used to determine the {sup 22}Ne{sub nucl}/{sup 4}He{sub rad} ratio generated by the spontaneous decay of U during the last 32 Ma. The obtained ratio (1.33 {+-} 0.11) x10{sup -5} (95% confidence), is compared to other experimental data on natural uranium oxides and theoretical values.

Sole, Jesus; Pi, Teresa [Instituto de Geologia, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Cd. Universitaria, Coyoacan, 04510 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

2006-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

266

Elementary Steps of Syngas Reactions on Mo2C(001): Adsorption Thermochemistry and Bond Dissociation  

SciTech Connect

Density functional theory (DFT) and ab initio thermodynamics are applied in order to investigate the most stable surface and subsurface terminations of Mo{sub 2}C(001) as a function of chemical potential and in the presence of syngas. The Mo-terminated (001) surface is then used as a model surface to evaluate the thermochemistry and energetic barriers for key elementary steps in syngas reactions. Adsorption energy scaling relations and Broensted-Evans-Polanyi relationships are established and used to place Mo{sub 2}C into the context of transition metal surfaces. The results indicate that the surface termination is a complex function of reaction conditions and kinetics. It is predicted that the surface will be covered by either C{sub 2}H{sub 2} or O depending on conditions. Comparisons to transition metals indicate that the Mo-terminated Mo{sub 2}C(001) surface exhibits carbon reactivity similar to transition metals such as Ru and Ir, but is significantly more reactive towards oxygen.

Medford, Andrew

2012-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

267

FeAl and Mo-Si-B Intermetallic Coatings Prepared by Thermal Spraying  

SciTech Connect

FeAl and Mo-Si-B intermetallic coatings for elevated temperature environmental resistance were prepared using high-velocity oxy-fuel (HVOF) and air plasma spray (APS) techniques. For both coating types, the effect of coating parameters (spray particle velocity and temperature) on the microstructure and physical properties of the coatings was assessed. Fe-24Al (wt.%) coatings were prepared using HVOF thermal spraying at spray particle velocities varying from 540 m/s to 700 m/s. Mo-13.4Si-2.6B coatings were prepared using APS at particle velocities of 180 and 350 m/s. Residual stresses in the HVOF FeAl coatings were compressive, while stresses in the APS Mo-Si-B coatings were tensile. In both cases, residual stresses became more compressive with increasing spray particle velocity due to increased peening imparted by the spray particles. The hardness and elastic moduli of FeAl coatings also increased with increasing particle velocity, again due to an increased peening effect. For Mo-Si-B coatings, plasma spraying at 180 m/s resulted in significant oxidation of the spray particles and conversion of the T1 phase into amorphous silica and {alpha}-Mo. The T1 phase was retained after spraying at 350 m/s.

Totemeier, T.C.; Wright, R.N.; Swank, W.D.

2003-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

268

van der Waals Epitaxy of MoS2 Layers Using Graphene As Growth Templates  

SciTech Connect

We present a method for synthesizing MoS{sub 2}/Graphene hybrid heterostructures with a growth template of graphene-covered Cu foil. Compared to other recent reports, a much lower growth temperature of 400 C is required for this procedure. The chemical vapor deposition of MoS{sub 2} on the graphene surface gives rise to single crystalline hexagonal flakes with a typical lateral size ranging from several hundred nanometers to several micrometers. The precursor (ammonium thiomolybdate) together with solvent was transported to graphene surface by a carrier gas at room temperature, which was then followed by post annealing. At an elevated temperature, the precursor self-assembles to form MoS{sub 2} flakes epitaxially on the graphene surface via thermal decomposition. With higher amount of precursor delivered onto the graphene surface, a continuous MoS{sub 2} film on graphene can be obtained. This simple chemical vapor deposition method provides a unique approach for the synthesis of graphene heterostructures and surface functionalization of graphene. The synthesized two-dimensional MoS{sub 2}/Graphene hybrids possess great potential toward the development of new optical and electronic devices as well as a wide variety of newly synthesizable compounds for catalysts.

Shi, Yumeng [Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT); Zhou, Wu [Vanderbilt University; Lu, Ang-Yu [Academia Sinica, Hefei, China; Fang, Wenjing [Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT); Lee, Yi-Hsien [Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT); Hsu, Allen Long [Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT); Kim, Soo Min [Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT); Kim, Ki Kang [Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT); Yang, Hui Ying [Singapore University of Technology and Design; Liang, Lain-Jong [Academia Sinica, Hefei, China; Idrobo Tapia, Juan C [ORNL; Kong, Jing [Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Method for the production of {sup 99m}Tc compositions from {sup 99}Mo-containing materials  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved method is described for producing {sup 99m}Tc compositions from {sup 99}Mo compounds. {sup 100}Mo metal or {sup 100}MoO{sub 3} is irradiated with photons in a particle (electron) accelerator to ultimately produce {sup 99}MoO{sub 3}. This composition is then heated in a reaction chamber to form a pool of molten {sup 99}MoO{sub 3} with an optimum depth of 0.5--5 mm. A gaseous mixture thereafter evolves from the molten {sup 99}MoO{sub 3} which contains vaporized {sup 99}MoO{sub 3}, vaporized {sup 99m}TcO{sub 3}, and vaporized {sup 99m}TcO{sub 2}. This mixture is then combined with an oxidizing gas (O{sub 2(g)}) to generate a gaseous stream containing vaporized {sup 99m}Tc{sub 2}O{sub 7} and vaporized {sup 99}MoO{sub 3}. Next, the gaseous stream is cooled in a primary condensation stage in the reaction chamber to remove vaporized {sup 99}MoO{sub 3}. Cooling is undertaken at a specially-controlled rate to achieve maximum separation efficiency. The gaseous stream is then cooled in a sequential secondary condensation stage to convert vaporized {sup 99m}Tc{sub 2}O{sub 7} into a condensed {sup 99m}Tc-containing reaction product which is collected. 1 fig.

Bennett, R.G.; Christian, J.D.; Grover, S.B.; Petti, D.A.; Terry, W.K.; Yoon, W.Y.

1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

NOIlVUlSININdV NOIlVWdOdNI AOd3N3 ACTO3NH  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

NOIlVUlSININdV NOIlVWdOdNI AOd3N3 NOIlVUlSININdV NOIlVWdOdNI AOd3N3 ACTO3NH 0661 This publication may be purchased from the Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office. Purchasing in formation for this or other Energy Information Administration (EIA) publications may be obtained from the Government Printing Office or ElA's National Energy Information Center. Questions on energy statistics should be directed to the Center by mail, telephone, or telecommunications device for the hearing impaired. Addresses, telephone numbers, and hours are as follows: National Energy Information Center Energy Information Administration Forrestal Building, Room 1F-048 Washington, DC 20585 (202) 586-8800 Telecommunications Device for the Hearing Impaired Only: (202) 586-1181 8 a.m. - 5 p.m., eastern time, M-F

271

A model of the gas-phase chemistry of boron nitride CVC from BCl{sub 3} and NH{sub 3}  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The kinetics of gas-phase reactions occurring during the CVD of boron nitride (BN) from BCl{sub 3} and NH{sub 3} are investigated using an elementary reaction mechanism whose rate constants were obtained from theoretical predictions and literature sources. Plug-flow calculations using this mechanism predict that unimolecular decomposition of BCl{sub 3} is not significant under typical CVD conditions, but that some NH{sub 3} decomposition may occur, especially for deposition occurring at atmospheric pressure. Reaction of BCl{sub 3} with NH{sub 3} is rapid under CVD conditions and yields species containing both boron and nitrogen. One of these compounds, Cl{sub 2}BNH{sub 2}, is predicted to be a key gas-phase precursor to BN.

Allendorf, M.D.; Melius, C.F.; Osterheld, T.H.

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

EA-1947: Transfer of the Kansas City Plant, Kansas City, MO | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

EA-1947: Transfer of the Kansas City Plant, Kansas City, MO EA-1947: Transfer of the Kansas City Plant, Kansas City, MO EA-1947: Transfer of the Kansas City Plant, Kansas City, MO SUMMARY This EA evaluates potential environmental impacts of a proposal to transfer the NNSA's KCP property either in whole or in part. This includes considering the No Action Alternative, where NNSA relocates operations from the KCP and maintains ownership of its property; and the Proposed Action Alternative, where NNSA transfers the KCP property for mixed use (industrial, warehouse, commercial, office). Under the proposed action, the EA addresses the potential direct, indirect, and cumulative impacts of using the KCP property for uses consistent with current zoning. NNSA also analyzes the potential environmental impacts of partial and/or complete

273

EA-1947: Transfer of the Kansas City Plant, Kansas City, MO | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

EA-1947: Transfer of the Kansas City Plant, Kansas City, MO EA-1947: Transfer of the Kansas City Plant, Kansas City, MO EA-1947: Transfer of the Kansas City Plant, Kansas City, MO SUMMARY This EA evaluates potential environmental impacts of a proposal to transfer the NNSA's KCP property either in whole or in part. This includes considering the No Action Alternative, where NNSA relocates operations from the KCP and maintains ownership of its property; and the Proposed Action Alternative, where NNSA transfers the KCP property for mixed use (industrial, warehouse, commercial, office). Under the proposed action, the EA addresses the potential direct, indirect, and cumulative impacts of using the KCP property for uses consistent with current zoning. NNSA also analyzes the potential environmental impacts of partial and/or complete

274

EIS-0475: Disposition of the Bannister Federal Complex, Kansas City, MO |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

EIS-0475: Disposition of the Bannister Federal Complex, Kansas EIS-0475: Disposition of the Bannister Federal Complex, Kansas City, MO EIS-0475: Disposition of the Bannister Federal Complex, Kansas City, MO Summary NNSA/DOE announces its intent to prepare an EIS for the disposition of the Bannister Federal Complex, Kansas City, MO. NNSA previously decided in a separate NEPA review (EA-1592) to relocate its operations from the Bannister Federal Complex to a newly constructed industrial campus eight miles from the current location. NOTE: On November 30, 2012, DOE announced the cancellation of this EIS and its intent to prepare an Environmental Assessment (EA-1947). Public Comment Opportunities None available at this time. Documents Available for Download November 30, 2012 EA-1947: Notice of Intent to Prepare an Environmental Assessment and

275

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Weldon Spring Chemical Co - MO 03  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Weldon Spring Chemical Co - MO 03 Weldon Spring Chemical Co - MO 03 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: Weldon Spring Chemical Co. (MO.03) Designated Name: Alternate Name: Location: Evaluation Year: Site Operations: Site Disposition: Radioactive Materials Handled: Primary Radioactive Materials Handled: Radiological Survey(s): Site Status: Also see Weldon Spring, Missouri, Site Documents Related to Weldon Spring Chemical Co. Summary of Work Session - Focus Area: Monitoring and Maintenance. Summary of Weldon Spring Long-Term Stewardship Plan Public Workshop. Summary of Work Session - Focus Area: Communication and Public Involvement. Land Use and Institutional Controls and Homeland SecurityFocus Area Work SessionWeldon Spring SiteInterpretive CenterDecember 5, 20022 Agenda7:00 p.m.Welcome, Pam Thompson, Manager, Weldon SpringObjective of

276

The development of uranium foil farication technology utilizing twin roll method for Mo-99 irradiation target  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

MDS Nordion in Canada, occupying about 75% of global supply of Mo-99 isotope, has provided the irradiation target of Mo-99 using the rod-type UAl sub x alloys with HEU(High Enrichment Uranium). ANL (Argonne National Laboratory) through co-operation with BATAN in Indonesia, leading RERTR (Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors) program substantially for nuclear non-proliferation, has designed and fabricated the annular cylinder of uranium targets, and successfully performed irradiation test, in order to develop the fabrication technology of fission Mo-99 using LEU(Low Enrichment Uranium). As the uranium foils could be fabricated in laboratory scale, not in commercialized scale by hot rolling method due to significant problems in foil quality, productivity and economic efficiency, attention has shifted to the development of new technology. Under these circumstances, the invention of uranium foil fabrication technology utilizing twin-roll casting method in KAERI is found to be able to fabricate LEU or...

Kim, C K; Park, H D

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Progress in chemical processing of LEU targets for {sup 99}Mo production -- 1997  

SciTech Connect

Presented here are recent experimental results of the continuing development activities associated with converting current processes for producing fission-product {sup 99}Mo from targets using high-enriched uranium (HEU) to low-enriched uranium (LEU). Studies were focused in four areas: (1) measuring the chemical behavior of iodine, rhodium, and silver in the LEU-modified Cintichem process, (2) performing experiments and calculations to assess the suitability of zinc fission barriers for LEU metal foil targets, (3) developing an actinide separations method for measuring alpha contamination of the purified {sup 99}Mo product, and (4) developing a cooperation with Sandia National Laboratories and Los Alamos National Laboratory that will lead to approval by the US Federal Drug Administration for production of {sup 99}Mo from LEU targets. Experimental results continue to show the technical feasibility of converting current HEU processes to LEU.

Vandegrift, G.F.; Conner, C.; Sedlet, J.; Wygmans, D.G. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Wu, D. [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana, IL (United States); Iskander, F.; Landsberger, S. [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States)

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

An experimental investigation of double beta decay of /sup 100/Mo  

SciTech Connect

New limits on half-lives for several double beta decay modes of /sup 100/Mo were obtained with a novel experimental system which included thin source films interleaved with a coaxial array of windowless silicon detectors. Segmentation and timing information allowed backgrounds originating in the films to be studied in some detail. Dummy films containing /sup 96/Mo were used to assess remaining backgrounds. With 0.1 mole years of /sup 100/Mo data collected, the lower half-life limits at 90% confidence were 2.7 /times/ 10/sup 18/ years for decay via the two-neutrino mode, 5.2 /times/10/sup 19/ years for decay with the emission of a Majoron, and 1.6 /times/ 10/sup 20/ years and 2.2 /times/ 10/sup 21/ years for neutrinoless 0/sup +/ ..-->.. 2/sup +/ and 0/sup +/ ..-->.. 0/sup +/ transitions, respectively. 50 refs., 38 figs., 11 tabs.

Dougherty, B.L.

1988-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

279

FLUORESCENCE EXCITATION MODELS OF AMMONIA AND AMIDOGEN RADICAL (NH{sub 2}) IN COMETS: APPLICATION TO COMET C/2004 Q2 (MACHHOLZ)  

SciTech Connect

Ammonia is a major reservoir of nitrogen atoms in cometary materials. However, detections of ammonia in comets are rare, with several achieved at radio wavelengths. A few more detections were obtained through near-infrared observations (around the 3 {mu}m wavelength region), but moderate relative velocity shifts are required to separate emission lines of cometary ammonia from telluric absorption lines in the 3 {mu}m wavelength region. On the other hand, the amidogen radical (NH{sub 2}-a photodissociation product of ammonia in the coma) also shows rovibrational emission lines in the 3 {mu}m wavelength region. Thus, gas production rates for ammonia can be determined from the rovibrational emission lines of ammonia (directly) and amidogen radical (indirectly) simultaneously in the near-infrared. In this article, we present new fluorescence excitation models for cometary ammonia and amidogen radical in the near-infrared, and we apply these models to the near-infrared high-dispersion spectra of comet C/2004 Q2 (Machholz) to determine the mixing ratio of ammonia to water in the comet. Based on direct detection of NH{sub 3} lines, the mixing ratio of NH{sub 3}/H{sub 2}O is 0.46% {+-} 0.03% in C/2004 Q2 (Machholz), in agreement with other results. The mixing ratio of ammonia determined from the NH{sub 2} observations (0.31%-0.79%) is consistent but has relatively larger error, owing to uncertainty in the photodissociation rates of ammonia. At the present level of accuracy, we confirm that NH{sub 3} could be the sole parent of NH{sub 2} in this comet.

Kawakita, Hideyo [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Kyoto Sangyo University, Motoyama, Kamigamo, Kita-ku, Kyoto 603-8555 (Japan); Mumma, Michael J., E-mail: kawakthd@cc.kyoto-su.ac.jp [Solar System Exploration Division, Mailstop 690.3, NASA Godard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Short-term recovery of NH4-15N applied to a temperate forest inceptisol and ultisol in east Tennessee USA  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The short-term fate and retention of ammonium (NH4)-{sup 15}nitrogen (N) applied to two types of forest soils in east Tennessee was investigated. Four ridgetop forests, predominantly oak (Quercus spp.), were studied. Five applications of NH{sub 4}-{sup 15}N tracer were made to the forest floor at 2- to 4-week intervals over a 14-week period in 2004. Nitrogen-15 recovery in the forest floor, fine roots (100 weeks) indicated the forest floor is an effective filter for atmospheric N inputs.

Garten Jr, Charles T [ORNL; Brice, Deanne Jane [ORNL; Todd Jr, Donald E [ORNL

2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mo ne nh" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Substitution of modified 9 Cr-1 Mo steel for austentic stainless steels  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the current program to develop a high-strength ferritic-martensitic steel. The alloy is essentially Fe-9% Cr-1% Mo with small additions of V and Nb and is known as modifed 9 Cr-1 Mo steel. Its elevated-temperature properties and design allowable stresses match those of type 304 stainless steel for temperatures up to 600/sup 0/C and exceed those of other ferritic steels by factors of 2 to 3. The improved strength of this alloy permits its use in place of stainless steels for many applications.

Sikka, V. K.

1982-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Effect of Mo Back Contact on Na Out-Diffusion and Device Performance of Mo/Cu(In,Ga)Se2/CdS/ZnO Solar Cells: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This conference paper describes the molybdenum thin films that were deposited on soda lime glass (SLG) substrates using direct-current planar magnetron sputtering, with a sputtering power density of 1.2 W/cm2. The working gas (Ar) pressure was varied from 0.6 to 16 mtorr to induce changes in the Mo films' morphology and microstructure. Thin films of Cu(In,Ga)Se2 (CIGS) were deposited on the Mo-coated glass using the 3-stage co-evaporation process. The morphology of both the Mo-coated SLG and the CIGS thin films grown on it was examined using high-resolution scanning electron microscopy. Na was depth profiled in the Mo and CIGS films by secondary ion mass spectrometry. The device performance was evaluated under standard conditions of 1000 W/m2 and 25 C. Optimum device performance is found for an intermediate Mo sputtering pressure.

Al-Thani, H. A.; Hasoon, F. S.; Young, M.; Asher, S.; Alleman, J. L.; Al-Jassim, M. M.; Williamson, D. L.

2002-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Soft X-ray Spectroscopy of C60/Copper Phthalocyanine/MoO3 Interfaces: Role of Reduced MoO3 on Energetic Band Alignment and Improved Performance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The interfacial electronic structure of C{sub 60}/copper phthalocyanine (CuPc)/molybdenum trioxide (MoO{sub 3}) thin films grown in situ on indium tin oxide (ITO) substrates has been studied using synchrotron radiation-excited photoelectron spectroscopy in an attempt to understand the influence of oxide interlayers on the performance of small molecule organic photovoltaic devices. The MoO{sub 3} layer on ITO is found to significantly increase the work function of the substrate and induces large interface dipoles and band bending at the CuPc/MoO{sub 3} interface. The large band bending confirms the formation of an internal potential that assists hole extraction from the CuPc layer to the electrode. The electronic structure of the MoO{sub 3} layer on ITO was also examined using various soft X-ray spectroscopies to probe the conductive nature of the MoO{sub 3} thin film.

S Cho; L Piper; A DeMasi; A Preston; K Smith; K Chauhan; R Hatton; T Jones

2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

284

Semesterplan WS 2012/13 Chemie (VL) fr Zahnmediziner (1. FS) Stand. 02.10.2012 Mo 22. Okt.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Semesterplan WS 2012/13 Chemie (VL) für Zahnmediziner (1. FS) Stand. 02.10.2012 Mo 22. Okt;Semesterplan WS 2012/13 Chemie (VL) für Zahnmediziner (1. FS) Stand. 02.10.2012 Mo 17. Dez. 10.15 11

Gollisch, Tim

285

Measurement of the reaction O-17(?,n)Ne-20 and its impact on the s process in massive stars  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The ratio between the rates of the reactions O-17(\\alpha,n)Ne-20 and O-17(\\alpha,\\gamma)Ne-21 determines whether O-16 is an efficient neutron poison for the s process in massive stars, or if most of the neutrons captured by O-16(n,\\gamma) are recycled into the stellar environment. This ratio is of particular relevance to constrain the s process yields of fast rotating massive stars at low metallicity. Recent results on the (\\alpha,\\gamma) channel have made it necessary to measure the (\\alpha,n) reaction more precisely and investigate the effect of the new data on s process nucleosynthesis in massive stars. We present a new measurement of the O-17(\\alpha, n) reaction using a moderating neutron detector. In addition, the (\\alpha, n_1) channel has been measured independently by observation of the characteristic 1633 keV \\gamma-transition in Ne-20. The reaction cross section was determined with a simultaneous R-matrix fit to both channels. (\\alpha,n) and (\\alpha, \\gamma) resonance strengths of states lying below the covered energy range were estimated using their known properties from the literature. A new O-17(\\alpha,n) reaction rate was deduced for the temperature range 0.1 GK to 10 GK. It was found that in He burning conditions the (\\alpha,\\gamma) channel is strong enough to compete with the neutron channel. This leads to a less efficient neutron recycling compared to a previous suggestion of a very weak (\\alpha,\\gamma) channel. S process calculations using our rates confirm that massive rotating stars do play a significant role in the production of elements up to Sr, but they strongly reduce the s process contribution to heavier elements.

A. Best; M. Beard; J. Grres; M. Couder; R. deBoer; S. Falahat; R. T. Gray; A. Kontos; K. -L. Kratz; P. J. LeBlanc; Q. Li; S. O'Brien; N. zkan; M. Pignatari; K. Sonnabend; R. Talwar; W. Tan; E. Uberseder; M. Wiescher

2013-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

286

Small non-polar complexes exhibiting significant piezoelectric properties: Solvothermal synthesis and crystal structures of MO{sub 5}V(tren){center_dot}H{sub 2}O (M=Mo and W; tren=tris(2-aminoethyl)amine)  

SciTech Connect

The two isostructural complexes MO{sub 5}V(tren){center_dot}H{sub 2}O (M=Mo (1) and W (2)) were synthesized under solvothermal conditions at pH Almost-Equal-To 12 crystallizing in the non-centrosymmetric space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1}. The structures are constructed by a distorted tetrahedral [MO{sub 4}]{sup 2-} anion bound via one shared oxygen atom to a severely distorted [V{sup IV}N{sub 4}O]{sup 2+} complex completing the octahedral coordination around the V centre. The two O atoms in the VN{sub 4}O{sub 2} octahedron are in cis position. The two compounds represent rare examples where the [MO{sub 4}]{sup 2-} anion is acting as a ligand. Both compounds exhibit a piezoelectric effect which is more pronounced for M=Mo. The samples are further characterized with IR and UV/Vis spectroscopy and thermal analysis. - Graphical abstract: The complexes [(V(tren)O)(MO4)]{center_dot}H2O (M = Mo, W; tren = tris(2-aminoethyl)amine)) composed of vertex-linked [MO4]{sup 2-} tetrahedron and [VN4O6]{sup 2+}octahedron. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer [MO{sub 4}]{sup 2-} tetrahedron (M=Mo, W) acting as ligand. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Jahn-Teller and steric distortion of the [VN{sub 4}O{sub 2}]{sup 2+} octahedron. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Non-centrosymmetric complexes exhibiting pronounced piezoelectric effect.

Rasmussen, M.; Naether, C. [Institut fuer Anorganische Chemie, Christian-Albrechts-Universitaet Kiel, Max-Eyth-Str. 2, D-24118 Kiel (Germany)] [Institut fuer Anorganische Chemie, Christian-Albrechts-Universitaet Kiel, Max-Eyth-Str. 2, D-24118 Kiel (Germany); Bismayer, U. [Mineralogisch-Petrographisches Institut, Universitaet Hamburg, Grindelallee 48 20146 Hamburg (Germany)] [Mineralogisch-Petrographisches Institut, Universitaet Hamburg, Grindelallee 48 20146 Hamburg (Germany); Bensch, W., E-mail: wbensch@ac.uni-kiel.de [Institut fuer Anorganische Chemie, Christian-Albrechts-Universitaet Kiel, Max-Eyth-Str. 2, D-24118 Kiel (Germany)

2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

287

Aqueous Phase Glycerol Reforming by PtMo Bimetallic Nano-Particle Catalyst: Product Selectivity and Structural Characterization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A carbon supported PtMo aqueous phase reforming catalyst for producing hydrogen from glycerol was characterized by analysis of the reaction products and pathway, TEM, XPS and XAS spectroscopy. Operando X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) indicates the catalyst consists of bimetallic nano-particles with a Pt rich core and a Mo rich surface. XAS of adsorbed CO indicates that approximately 25% of the surface atoms are Pt. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy indicates that there is unreduced and partially reduced Mo oxide (MoO{sub 3} and MoO{sub 2}), and Pt-rich PtMo bimetallic nano-particles. The average size measured by transmission electron microscopy of the fresh PtMo nano-particles is about 2 nm, which increases in size to 5 nm after 30 days of glycerol reforming at 31 bar and 503 K. The catalyst structure differs from the most energetically stable structure predicted by density functional theory (DFT) calculations for metallic Pt and Mo atoms. However, DFT indicates that for nano-particles composed of metallic Pt and Mo oxide, the Mo oxide is at the particle surface. Subsequent reduction would lead to the experimentally observed structure. The aqueous phase reforming reaction products and intermediates are consistent with both C-C and C-OH bond cleavage to generate H{sub 2}/CO{sub 2} or the side product CH{sub 4}. While the H{sub 2} selectivity at low conversion is about 75%, cleavage of C-OH bonds leads to liquid products with saturated carbon atoms. At high conversions (to gas), these will produced additional CH{sub 4} reducing the H{sub 2} yield and selectivity.

Stach E. A.; Dietrich, P.J.; Lobo-Lapidus, R.J.; Wu, T.; Sumer, A.; Akatay, M.C.; Fingland, B.R.; Guo, N.; Dumesic, J.A.; Marshall, C.L.; Jellinek, J.; Delgass, W.N.; Ribeiro, F.H.; Miller, J.T.

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

MoSi2 and Other Silicides as High Temperature Structural Materials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... R.W. Stusrud, R.A. MacKay,. D.L. Anton, T. Khan, R.D. Kissinger, D.L. Klarstmm ..... 'I. 3 10-S d. 5. Q. H. 3 10= g. 5. E a. E m-7. 'E 5, .- z. 10-8 '. 5 c:3si MoSi2. //II.

289

MoCha-pi, an exogenous coordination calculus based on mobile channels  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper we present MoCha-?, an exogenous coordination calculus that is based on mobile channels. A mobile channel is a coordination primitive that allows anonymous point-to-point communication between processes. Our calculus is an extension ... Keywords: calculus, coordination, distributed mobile channels

Juan Guillen-Scholten; Farhad Arbab; Frank de Boer; Marcello Bonsangue

2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

The MoLE project: an international experiment about mobile learning environment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper aims to present an international project, called the MoLE Project, which provided learning resources and tools for personnel in disaster or emergency situations. Thus, it illustrates the interpenetration of e-Learning and field workers with ... Keywords: education, mobile technologies, system evaluation

Marie-Hlne Ferrer, Jacob Hodges, Nathalie Bonnardel

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

ON THE COMPETITION BETWEEN FERROMAGNETIC AND ANTIFERROMAGNETIC STATES IN Sr2MnMoO6  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

It is argued that the magnetic behavior of Sr2MnMoO6 is determined by the existence of two total energy minima corresponding to the metallic ferromagnetic and insulating antiferromagnetic states, which may be nearly degenerate depending on the magnitude of the breathing distortion. PACS: 71.20.Be; 71.70.Gm; 72.25.Ba; 75.30.Et

I. V. Solovyev

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

High-field superconductivity in some bcc Ti-Mo and Nb-Zr alloys  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Zero electrical resistance at unusually high magnetic field strengths has been observed in the bcc alloys Ti-16 a/o (atomic percent) Mo, Nb-12 a/o Zr, and Nb-25 a/o Zr. The maximum highfield zero-resistance current density, Jc, in these ...

R. R. Hake; T. G. Berlincourt; D. H. Leslie

1962-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Spectroscopy of low energy solar neutrinos by MOON -Mo Observatory Of Neutrinos-  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Spectroscopy of low energy solar neutrinos by MOON -Mo Observatory Of Neutrinos- R. Hazamaa , P Be solar 's. The present status of MOON for the low energy solar experiment is briefly discussed the pp solar flux with good accuracy. 1. INTRODUCTION Realtime studies of the high-energy component of 8

Washington at Seattle, University of

294

To appear in the ACM SIGGRAPH conference proceedings Jeong-Mo Hong  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

To appear in the ACM SIGGRAPH conference proceedings ? ??? ????? Ð? ? Jeong-Mo Hong£ Korea of viscosity influences the shape of air bubbles in water. In this paper, we extend previous fluid simulation

Frey, Pascal

295

Microstructural Analysis of Irradiated U-Mo Fuel Plates: Recent Results  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Microstructural characterization of irradiated dispersion and monolithic RERTR fuel plates using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) is being performed in the Electron Microscopy Laboratory at the Idaho National Laboratory. The SEM analysis of samples from U-Mo dispersion fuel plates focuses primarily on the behavior of the Si that has been added to the Al matrix to improve the irradiation performance of the fuel plate and on the overall behavior of fission gases (e.g., Xe and Kr) that develop as bubbles in the fuel microstructure. For monolithic fuel plates, microstructural features of interest, include those found in the U-Mo foil and at the U-Mo/Zr and Zr/6061 Al cladding interfaces. For both dispersion and monolithic fuel plates, samples have been produced using an SEM equipped with a Focused Ion Beam (FIB). These samples are of very high quality and can be used to uncover some very unique microstructural features that are typically not observed when characterizing samples produced using more conventional techniques. Overall, for the dispersion fuel plates with matrices that contained Si, narrower fuel/matrix interaction layers are typically observed compared to the fuel plates with pure Al matrix, and for the monolithic fuel plates microstructural features have been observed in the U-10Mo foil that are similar to what have been observed in the fuel particles found in U-Mo dispersion fuels. Most recently, more prototypic monolithic fuel samples have been characterized and this paper describes the microstructures that have been observed in these samples.

D. D. Keiser, Jr.; J. Jue; B. D. Miller; J. Gan; A. B. Robinson; P. V. Medvedev

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

A Measurement of the muon neutrino charged current quasielastic interaction and a test of Lorentz violation with the MiniBooNE experiment  

SciTech Connect

The Mini-Booster neutrino experiment (MiniBooNE) at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab) is designed to search for {nu}{sub {mu}} {yields} {nu}{sub e} appearance neutrino oscillations. Muon neutrino charged-current quasi-elastic (CCQE) interactions ({nu}{sub {mu}} + n {yields} {mu} + p) make up roughly 40% of our data sample, and it is used to constrain the background and cross sections for the oscillation analysis. Using high-statistics MiniBooNE CCQE data, the muon-neutrino CCQE cross section is measured. The nuclear model is tuned precisely using the MiniBooNE data. The measured total cross section is {sigma} = (1.058 {+-} 0.003 (stat) {+-} 0.111 (syst)) x 10{sup -38} cm{sup 2} at the MiniBooNE muon neutrino beam energy (700-800 MeV). {nu}{sub e} appearance candidate data is also used to search for Lorentz violation. Lorentz symmetry is one of the most fundamental symmetries in modern physics. Neutrino oscillations offer a new method to test it. We found that the MiniBooNE result is not well-described using Lorentz violation, however further investigation is required for a more conclusive result.

Katori, Teppei; /Indiana U.

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

The Uncertainties in the 22Ne + alpha-capture Reaction Rates and the Production of the Heavy Magnesium Isotopes in Asymptotic Giant Branch Stars of Intermediate Mass  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present new rates for the 22Ne(alpha, n)25Mg and 22Ne(alpha,gamma)26Mg reactions, with uncertainties that have been considerably reduced compared to previous estimates, and we study how these new rates affect the production of the heavy magnesium isotopes in models of intermediate mass Asymptotic Giant Branch (AGB) stars of different initial compositions. All the models have deep third dredge-up, hot bottom burning and mass loss. Calculations have been performed using the two most commonly used estimates of the 22Ne + alpha rates as well as the new recommended rates, and with combinations of their upper and lower limits. The main result of the present study is that with the new rates, uncertainties on the production of isotopes from Mg to P coming from the 22Ne + alpha-capture rates have been considerably reduced. We have therefore removed one of the important sources of uncertainty to effect models of AGB stars. We have studied the effects of varying the mass-loss rate on nucleosynthesis and discuss other uncertainties related to the physics employed in the computation of stellar structure, such as the modeling of convection, the inclusion of a partial mixing zone and the definition of convective borders. These uncertainties are found to be much larger than those coming from 22Ne + alpha-capture rates, when using our new estimates. Much effort is needed to improve the situation for AGB models.

A. Karakas; M. Lugaro; M. Wiescher; J. Goerres; C. Ugalde

2006-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

298

Measuring the speed of light using beating longitudinal modes in an open-cavity HeNe laser  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We describe an undergraduate laboratory that combines an accurate measurement of the speed of light, a fundamental investigation of a basic laser system, and a nontrivial use of statistical analysis. Students grapple with the existence of longitudinal modes in a laser cavity as they change the cavity length of an adjustable-cavity HeNe laser and tune the cavity to produce lasing in the TEM$_{00}$ mode. For appropriate laser cavity lengths, the laser gain curve of a HeNe laser allows simultaneous operation of multiple longitudinal modes. The difference frequency between the modes is measured using a self-heterodyne detection with a diode photodetector and a radio frequency spectrum analyzer. Asymmetric effects due to frequency pushing and frequency pulling, as well as transverse modes, are minimized by simultaneously monitoring and adjusting the mode structure as viewed with a Fabry-Perot interferometer. The frequency spacing of longitudinal modes is proportional to the inverse of the cavity length with a prop...

D'Orazio, Daniel J; Schultz, Justin T; Sidor, Daniel; Best, Micheal; Goodfellow, Kenneth; Scholten, Robert E; White, James D; 10.1119/1.3299281

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Microstructural Characterization of U-7Mo/Al-Si Alloy Matrix Dispersion Fuel Plates Fabricated at 500C  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The starting microstructure of a dispersion fuel plate will impact the overall performance of the plate during irradiation. To improve the understanding of the as-fabricated microstructures of UMo dispersion fuel plates, particularly the interaction layers that can form between the fuel particles and the matrix, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analyses have been performed on samples from depleted U7Mo (U7Mo) dispersion fuel plates with either Al2 wt.% Si(Al2Si) or AA4043 alloy matrix. It was observed that in the thick interaction layers, U(Al, Si)3 and U6Mo4Al43 were present, and in the thin interaction layers, (U, Mo) (Al, Si)3, U(Al, Si)4, U3Si3Al2, U3Si5, and possibly USi-type phases were observed. The U3Si3Al2 phase contained some Mo. Based on the results of this investigation, the time that a dispersion fuel plate is exposed to a relatively high temperature during fabrication will impact the nature of the interaction layers around the fuel particles. Uniformly thin, Si-rich layers will develop around the U7Mo particles for shorter exposure times, and thicker, Si-depleted layers will develop for the longer exposure times.

Dennis D. Keiser, Jr.; Jan-Fong Jue; Bo Yao; Emmanuel Perez; Yongho Sohn; Curtis R. Clark

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Direct Total Cross Section Measurement of the 16O(?,?)20Ne Reaction at Ec.m. = 2.26 MeV  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In stellar helium burning, (16)O represents the endpoint of the helium-burning sequence due to the low rate of (16)O(alpha,gamma)(20)Ne. We present a new direct measurement of the total capture reaction rate of (16)O(alpha,gamma)(20)Ne at E(c.m.) = 2.26MeV employing the DRAGON recoil separator. For the first time, the total S factor and its contributing direct capture transitions could be determined in one experiment.

Hager, Ulrike; Brown, James R.; Buchmann, Lothar R.; Carmona-Gallardo, Mariano; Erikson, Luke E.; Fallis, Jennifer S.; Greife, Uwe; Hutcheon, Dave; Ottewell, Dave; Ruiz, Chris; Sjue, Sky; Vockenhuber, Cristof

2011-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mo ne nh" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

File:USDA-CE-Production-GIFmaps-MO.pdf | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

MO.pdf MO.pdf Jump to: navigation, search File File history File usage Missouri Ethanol Plant Locations Size of this preview: 776 × 600 pixels. Full resolution ‎(1,650 × 1,275 pixels, file size: 377 KB, MIME type: application/pdf) Description Missouri Ethanol Plant Locations Sources United States Department of Agriculture Related Technologies Biomass, Biofuels, Ethanol Creation Date 2010-01-19 Extent State Countries United States UN Region Northern America States Missouri External links http://www.nass.usda.gov/Charts_and_Maps/Ethanol_Plants/ File history Click on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. Date/Time Thumbnail Dimensions User Comment current 16:16, 27 December 2010 Thumbnail for version as of 16:16, 27 December 2010 1,650 × 1,275 (377 KB) MapBot (Talk | contribs) Automated bot upload

302

Improved performance of U-Mo dispersion fuel by Si addition in Al matrix.  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this report is to collect in one publication and fit together work fragments presented in many conferences in the multi-year time span starting 2002 to the present dealing with the problem of large pore formation in U-Mo/Al dispersion fuel plates first observed in 2002. Hence, this report summarizes the excerpts from papers and reports on how we interpreted the relevant results from out-of-pile and in-pile tests and how this problem was dealt with. This report also provides a refined view to explain in detail and in a quantitative manner the underlying mechanism of the role of silicon in improving the irradiation performance of U-Mo/Al.

Kim, Y S; Hofman, G L [Nuclear Engineering Division

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Mo-6%Nb single crystal alloy creep strength demonstration for long life thermionic power systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Experimental results of one- and two-dimensional creep testing for single crystal Mo-6%Nb alloy are presented. Three 1-D specimens were creep-tested for up to 3000 hours at 1873 to 1973 K and 5 to 15 MPa. One 2-D specimen tube was creep-tested for 2000 hours at 1873 K/15MPa. Results confirm the high creep strength of Mo-6%Nb for long life (10 to 15 year) TFE emitter application in thermionic space nuclear power systems. After the initial transition stage (about 1000 hours), quasi-steady state 1-D and 2-D creep rates were within 20% of each other suggesting little significant effect of anisotropy. More data points will be needed to define the Sherby-Dom parameters with statistical accuracy. {copyright} 1995 {ital American} {ital Institute} {ital of} {ital Physics}

Rhee, H.S.; Zheng, C.; Kent Koester, J. [Space Power, Inc., 621 River Oaks Parkway, San Jose, California 95134 (United States); Yastrebkov, A.; Nikolaev, Y.; Gontar, A. [Scientific Industrial Association Lutch, Podolsk, Moscow Region (Russian Federation)

1995-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

304

35 COFibE, Series A. U. S. ATOXIC ENERGY CCMMISSION r'C Cj NE# YORK OPERATIONS OFFICE  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

COFibE, Series A. COFibE, Series A. - U. S. ATOXIC ENERGY CCMMISSION r'C Cj NE# YORK OPERATIONS OFFICE HEkLTH AND SAFETY DIVISION (Merril Eicsnbud, Dirsator) MONTHLY REPORT OF FIELD ACTIVITIES (This report%v,rs%~~~nth period) Indusorial Ii~iene Branoh m a . . 0 . . c . . . o W. B. Harris, Chief Radiation Branch . y y e 0e . e . e . . . . e . . . Hanson Blatz, Chief Fi:e and Accident Branch D e a o o . . . ..s . . B. J. Kehoe, Chief Medical Advioer, Dr. J. A. Quiglsy Siometrician, Dr. A. E. Brandt TABLF OF COEpTmS PRODUCTION COWTRACTORS ._ Feed Nabrlals Production Centor '$iiddlcsexSampling Plnnt Harshaw ChuoicalCompa~ Wlin&rodt Chen!icrl Works tie. Ontario Storage Area b Vit*o Mnufacturing CompaW B4ikhem Steel F'lrnt - IpcknuMnr Clifton Roducts CompvIy Drush Bcx@.Uun~ Company - Luckcy

305

REP&V TO ATTNJF: NE-23 SUWECC Commercial Facilities Used by National Lead Company of Ohio in Support  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

REP&V TO REP&V TO ATTNJF: NE-23 SUWECC Commercial Facilities Used by National Lead Company of Ohio in Support 'of FMPC Operations TO: Robert E. Lynch Procuresnent and CorXracts Division, AD-42 Oak Ridge Operations Office The Division of Facility and Site Decormnissioning Projects (DFSP) is responsible for managing the Department's Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP). The purposes of FUSRAP are (1) to identify facilities formerly operated for or by the Manhattan Engineer District (NED) and Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) which may have been radioactively contaminated as a result of these operations, (2) to determine if the facilities require remedial action, and (3) where DOE has authority, to conduct the remedial action. Authority for remedial action under FUSRAP is

306

REP&V TO ATTNOF: NE-23 SUBJECT: Commercial Facilities Used by National Lead Company of Ohio in Support  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

x:Y" x:Y" . .' 3023 I\ \ 'a' '. Unita? -&&s Coverament , ,Q,.l. ),&, ,(>.. Department of Energy riGmorandum / d6a 2/. $3 DATE: JL(L 2 8 ;;$5 co. /3 .-J/ co,/3 REP&V TO ATTNOF: NE-23 SUBJECT: Commercial Facilities Used by National Lead Company of Ohio in Support of FMPC Operations TO: Robert E. Lynch Procuremnent and Contracts Division, AD-42 Oak Ridge Operations Office The Division of Facility and Site Decommissioning Projects (DFSD) is responsible for managing the Department's Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FuSRAP). The purposes of FUSRAP are (1) to identify facilities formerly operated for or by the Manhattan Engineer District (NED) and Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) which may have been radioactively contaminated as a result of these operations, (2) to determine if the

307

Continuing investigations for technology assessment of /sup 99/Mo production from LEU (low enriched Uranium) targets  

SciTech Connect

Currently much of the world's supply of /sup 99m/Tc for medical purposes is produced from /sup 99/Mo derived from the fissioning of high enriched uranium (HEU). The need for /sup 99m/Tc is continuing to grow, especially in developing countries, where needs and national priorities call for internal production of /sup 99/Mo. This paper presents the results of our continuing studies on the effects of substituting low enriched Uranium (LEU) for HEU in targets for the production of fission product /sup 99/Mo. Improvements in the electrodeposition of thin films of uranium metal are reported. These improvements continue to increase the appeal for the substitution of LEU metal for HEU oxide films in cylindrical targets. The process is effective for targets fabricated from stainless steel or hastaloy. A cost estimate for setting up the necessary equipment to electrodeposit uranium metal on cylindrical targets is reported. Further investigations on the effect of LEU substitution on processing of these targets are also reported. Substitution of uranium silicides for the uranium-aluminum alloy or uranium aluminide dispersed fuel used in other current target designs will allow the substitution of LEU for HEU in these targets with equivalent /sup 99/Mo-yield per target and no change in target geometries. However, this substitution will require modifications in current processing steps due to (1) the insolubility of uranium silicides in alkaline solutions and (2) the presence of significant quantities of silicate in solution. Results to date suggest that both concerns can be handled and that substitution of LEU for HEU can be achieved.

Vandergrift, G.F.; Kwok, J.D.; Marshall, S.L.; Vissers, D.R.; Matos, J.E.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Production and Characterization of Atomized U-Mo Powder by the Rotating Electrode Process  

SciTech Connect

In order to produce feedstock fuel powder for irradiation testing, the Idaho National Laboratory has produced a rotating electrode type atomizer to fabricate uranium-molybdenum alloy fuel. Operating with the appropriate parameters, this laboratory-scale atomizer produces fuel in the desired size range for the RERTR dispersion experiments. Analysis of the powder shows a homogenous, rapidly solidified microstructure with fine equiaxed grains. This powder has been used to produce irradiation experiments to further test adjusted matrix U-Mo dispersion fuel.

C.R. Clark; B.R. Muntifering; J.F. Jue

2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

High strength Sn-Mo-Nb-Zr alloy tubes and method of making same  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Tubes for use in nuclear reactors fabricated from a quaternary alloy comprising 2.5-4.0 wt% Sn, 0.5-1.5 wt% Mo, 0.5-1.5 wt% Nb, balance essentially Zr. The tubes are fabricated by a process of hot extrusion, heat treatment, cold working to size and age hardening, so as to produce a microstructure comprising elongated .alpha. grains with an acicular transformed .beta. grain boundary phase.

Cheadle, Brian A. (Deep River, CA)

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Using the X-FEL to photo-pump X-ray laser transitions in He-like Ne  

SciTech Connect

Nearly four decades ago H-like and He-like resonantly photo-pumped laser schemes were proposed for producing X-ray lasers. However, demonstrating these schemes in the laboratory has proved to be elusive because of the difficulty of finding a strong resonant pump line. With the advent of the X-ray free electron laser (X-FEL) at the SLAC Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) we now have a tunable X-ray laser source that can be used to replace the pump line in previously proposed laser schemes and allow researchers to study the physics and feasibility of resonantly photo-pumped laser schemes. In this paper we use the X-FEL at 1174 eV to photo-pump the singly excited 1s2p state of He-like Ne to the doubly excited 2p3p state and model gain on the 2p3p-2p2s transition at 175 eV and the 2p3p-1s3p transition at 1017 eV. One motivation for studying this scheme is to explore possible quenching of the gain due to strong non-linear coupling effects from the intense X-FEL beam We compare this scheme with photo-pumping the He-like Ne ground state to the 1s3p singly excited state followed by lasing on the 3p-2s and 3d-2p transitions at 158 and 151 eV. Experiments are being planned at LCLS to study these laser processes and coherent quantum effects.

Nilsen, J; Rohringer, N

2011-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

311

Ni6Cr5MoO18: A compensated half metal predicted from first-principles  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

NiCrO3 is semiconducting. It contains six molecular units in the conventional cell. By substituting one of the six Cr atoms with Mo in the conventional cell

Jing Wang; Ningning Zu; Zhijian Wu

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Electrical tuning of valley magnetic moment through symmetry control in bilayer MoS2  

SciTech Connect

Crystal symmetry governs the nature of electronic Bloch states. For example, in the presence of time-reversal symmetry, the orbital magnetic moment and Berry curvature of the Bloch states must vanish unless inversion symmetry is broken1. In certain two-dimensional electron systems such as bilayer graphene, the intrinsic inversion symmetry can be broken simply by applying a perpendicular electric field2,3. In principle, this offers the possibility of switching on/off and continuously tuning the magnetic moment and Berry curvature near the Dirac valleys by reversible electrical control4,5. Here we investigate this possibility using polarization-resolved photoluminescence of bilayer MoS2, which has the same symmetry as bilayer graphene but has a bandgap in the visible spectrum6,7 allowing direct optical probing5,8 12. We find that in bilayer MoS2 the circularly polarized photoluminescence can be continuously tuned from 15% to 15% as a function of gate voltage, whereas in structurally non-centrosymmetric monolayer MoS2 the photoluminescence polarization is gate independent. The observations are well explained as resulting from the continuous variation of orbital magnetic moments between positive and negative values through symmetry control.

Wu, Sanfeng [University of Washington, Seattle; Ross, Jason [University of Washington, Seattle; Liu, G. B. [University of Hong Kong, The; Aivazian, Grant [University of Washington, Seattle; Jones, Aaron [University of Washington, Seattle; Fei, Zaiyao [University of Washington, Dept Phys, Seattle, WA; Zhu, Wenguang [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Xiao, Di [ORNL; Yao, Wang [University of Hong Kong, The; Cobden, David [University of Washington, Dept Phys, Seattle, WA; Xu, Xiaodong [University of Washington

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Electrical properties of a-C:Mo films produced by dual-cathode filtered cathodic arc plasma deposition  

SciTech Connect

Molybdenum-containing amorphous carbon (a-C:Mo) thin films were prepared using a dual-cathode filtered cathodic arc plasma source with a molybdenum and a carbon (graphite) cathode. The Mo content in the films was controlled by varying the deposition pulse ratio of Mo and C. Film sheet resistance was measured in situ at process temperature, which was close to room temperature, as well as ex situ as a function of temperature (300-515 K) in ambient air. Film resistivity and electrical activation energy were derived for different Mo and C ratios and substrate bias. Film thickness was in the range 8-28 nm. Film resistivity varied from 3.55x10-4 Omega m to 2.27x10-6 Omega m when the Mo/C pulse ratio was increased from 0.05 to 0.4, with no substrate bias applied. With carbon-selective bias, the film resistivity was in the range of 4.59x10-2 and 4.05 Omega m at a Mo/C pulse ratio of 0.05. The electrical activation energy decreased from 3.80x10-2 to 3.36x10-4 eV when the Mo/C pulse ratio was increased in the absence of bias, and from 0.19 to 0.14 eV for carbon-selective bias conditions. The resistivity of the film shifts systematically with the amounts of Mo and upon application of substrate bias voltage. The intensity ratio of the Raman D-peak and G-peak (ID/IG) correlated with the pre-exponential factor (sigma 0) which included charge carrier density and density of states.

Sansongsiri, Sakon; Anders, Andre; Yodsombat, Banchob

2008-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

314

TEM Characterization of U-7Mo/Al-2Si Dispersion Fuel Irradiated to Intermediate and High Fission Densities  

SciTech Connect

This paper will discuss the results of TEM analysis that was performed on two samples taken from the low flux and high flux sides of the fuel plate with U-7Mo fuel particles dispersed in U-2Si matrix. The corresponding local fission density of the fuel particles and the peak fuel plate centerline temperature between the low flux and high flux samples are 3.32 x 10{sup 27} f/m{sup 3} and 90 C, and 6.31 x 10{sup 27} f/m{sup 3} and 120 C, respectively. The results of this work showed the presence of a bubble superlattice within the U-7Mo grains that accommodated fission gases (e.g., Xe). The presence of this structure helps the U-7Mo exhibit a stable swelling behavior during irradiation. The Si-rich interaction layers that develop around the fuel particles at the U-7Mo/matrix interface during fuel plate fabrication and irradiation become amorphous during irradiation. The change in bubble distribution at the high fission density suggests that the bubble superlattice is stable as the U-7Mo matrix remains crystalline. It appears that there is a threshold Si content in the fuel particle above which the U-Mo turns to amorphous under irradiation. The threshold Si content is approximately 8 at.% and 4 at.% for low flux and high flux condition, respectively.

J. Gan; D.D. Keiser, Jr.; B.D. Miller; A.B. Robinson; J-F. Jue; P.G. Medvedev; D.M. Wachs

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

A practical grinding-assisted dry synthesis of nanocrystalline NiMoO{sub 4} polymorphs for oxidative dehydrogenation of propane  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A practical two-stage reactive grinding-assisted pathway waste-free and cost-effective for the synthesis of NiMoO{sub 4} has been successfully developed. It was demonstrated that proper design in synthetic strategy for grinding plays a crucial role in determining the ultimate polymorph of NiMoO{sub 4}. Specifically, direct grinding (DG) of MoO{sub 3} and NiO rendered {alpha}-NiMoO{sub 4} after annealing, whereas sequential grinding (SG) of the two independently pre-ground oxides followed by annealing generated {beta}-NiMoO{sub 4} solid solution. Characterizations in terms of Raman and X-ray diffraction suggest the creation of {beta}-NiMoO{sub 4} precursor in the latter alternative is the key aspect for the formation of {beta}-NiMoO{sub 4}. The DG-derived {alpha}-NiMoO{sub 4} tested by oxidative dehydrogenation of propane exhibited superior activity in contrast to its analog synthesized via conventional coprecipitation. It is suggested that the favorable chemical composition facilely obtained via grinding in contrast to that by coprecipitation was essential for achieving a more selective production of propylene. - Graphical Abstract: Grinding-assisted synthesis of NiMoO{sub 4} offers higher and more reproducible activities in contrast to coprecipitation for oxidative dehydrogenation of propane, and both {alpha}- and {beta}-NiMoO{sub 4} can be synthesized. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer NiMoO{sub 4} was prepared through grinding-assisted pathway. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Direct/sequential grinding rendered {alpha}-, {beta}-NiMoO{sub 4}, respectively. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Grinding-derived {alpha}-NiMoO{sub 4} showed high and reproducible activity for oxidative dehydrogenation of propane.

Chen Miao, E-mail: chenmiao@sinochem.com [Shanghai Key Laboratory of Molecular Catalysis and Innovative Materials, Department of Chemistry, Fudan University, Shanghai 200433 (China); Zhejiang Chemical Industry Research Institute, Hangzhou 310023 (China); Wu Jialing; Liu Yongmei [Shanghai Key Laboratory of Molecular Catalysis and Innovative Materials, Department of Chemistry, Fudan University, Shanghai 200433 (China); Cao Yong, E-mail: yongcao@fudan.edu.cn [Shanghai Key Laboratory of Molecular Catalysis and Innovative Materials, Department of Chemistry, Fudan University, Shanghai 200433 (China); Guo Li [Zhejiang Chemical Industry Research Institute, Hangzhou 310023 (China); He Heyong; Fan Kangnian [Shanghai Key Laboratory of Molecular Catalysis and Innovative Materials, Department of Chemistry, Fudan University, Shanghai 200433 (China)

2011-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

316

Mkha' 'gro dbang mo'i rnam that, the biography of the gter ston ma bde chen chos kyi dbang mo (1868-1927?)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, for example, A 'dzom 'Brug pa 'Gro 'dul dPa' bo rDo rje (1842-1924), a famous rdzogs chen master and treasure revealer (see Namkhai 1986, p. 153), who bestowed upon her a long life empowerment when she was 26 (1893); see dBang mo'i rnam thar, p. 824, passim... , Kvrne and Nagano eds., 2003, p. 323), gCod, A khrid (see Kvrne and Rikey, 1996), Phur pa (see Bon Kanjur, op.cit., pp. 295-297), rDzogs chen Yang rtse Klong chen (Sherab Wangyal, TBMC, New Delhi, 1973), Khro bo rGyud drug gSang ba bSen thub (see Bon...

Rossi, Donatella

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Mo Zhou  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and regional government on appliance standard achievement; evaluate the social impact of appliance labeling program; and analysis of appliance price trend and learning rate to...

318

MO: ZL  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Tonawanda, New York," May 1978 (DOEEV-00056). 2. "Radiological Survey of the Ashland Oil Co. (Former Waist Property), Tonewanda, Kew York," May 1978 (DOEEV-00054). 3....

319

Stability and Lifetime of K-CoMoSx Mixed Alcohol Catalysts  

SciTech Connect

Researchers have studied sulfide-type catalysts for the production of mixed alcohols from synthesis gas for several decades. Despite many advances in the art, these processes are not yet commercial, due in large part to mediocre economics and the added risk associated with uncertainty in catalyst lifetime. This talk will outline some recent studies in the lifetime and stability of K-CoMoSx-type mixed alcohol catalysts. Specifically, studies of long term operation (> 3000h), sulfiding agents, simulated methanol recycle, and morphology (probed via XRD and XPS) will be discussed, with the conclusion that these materials are likely to exhibit acceptable lifetimes in continuous operation.

Hensley, J. E.; Ruddy, D.; Schaidle, J.; Ferrell, J.; Thibodeaux, J.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

FULL SIZE U-10MO MONOLITHIC FUEL FOIL AND FUEL PLATE FABRICATION-TECHNOLOGY DEVELOPMENT  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Full-size U10Mo foils are being developed for use in high density LEU monolithic fuel plates. The application of a zirconium barrier layer too the foil is applied using a hot co-rolling process. Aluminum clad fuel plates are fabricated using Hot Isostatic Pressing (HIP) or a Friction Bonding (FB) process. An overview is provided of ongoing technology development activities, including: the co-rolling process, foil shearing/slitting and polishing, cladding bonding processes, plate forming, plate-assembly swaging, and fuel plate characterization. Characterization techniques being employed include, Ultrasonic Testing (UT), radiography, and microscopy.

G. A. Moore; J-F Jue; B. H. Rabin; M. J. Nilles

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mo ne nh" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Beta-decay properties of Zr and Mo neutron-rich isotopes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Gamow-Teller strength distributions, beta-decay half-lives, and beta-delayed neutron emission are investigated in neutron-rich Zr and Mo isotopes within a deformed quasiparticle random-phase approximation. The approach is based on a self-consistent Skyrme Hartree-Fock mean field with pairing correlations and residual separable particle-hole and particle-particle forces. Comparison with recent measurements of half-lives stresses the important role that nuclear deformation plays in the description of beta-decay properties in this mass region.

Sarriguren, P

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

PETROPHYSICAL INVESTIGATION OF THE SECONDARY RECOVERY POTENTIAL IN THE CHERRY CANYON FORMATION NE LEA FIELD LEA COUNTY, NEW MEXICO  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Read and Stevens has proposed the evaluation of the waterflood potential from the Cherry Canyon formation in the NE Lea Field in lea County, New Mexico. Much of the development in this area is approaching primary recovery limitations; additional recovery of remaining oil reserves by waterflood needs to be evaluated. The Cherry Canyon formation is composed of fine grained sandstone, containing clay material which results in high water saturation, and also has the tendency to swell and reduce reservoir permeability--the ability of fluid to flow through the rock pores and fractures. There are also abundant organic materials that interfere with obtaining reliable well logs. These complications have limited oil in place calculations and identification of net pay zones, presenting a challenge to the planned waterflood. Core analysis of the Cherry Canyon should improve the understanding of existing well logs and possibly indicate secondary recovery measures, such as waterflood, to enhance field recovery. Lacking truly representative core to provide accurate analyses, Read and Stevens will obtain and preserve fresh core. The consulting firm of T. Scott Hickman and Associates will then collaborate on special core analyses and obtain additional well logs for a more detailed analysis of reservoir properties. The log interpretation will be compared to the core analysis results, and the entire collected data set will be used to assess the potential and economic viability of successfully waterflooding the identified oil zones. Successful results from the project will improve accuracy of log interpretation and establish a methodology for evaluating secondary recovery by waterflood.

T. Scott Hickman

2002-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Regulatory Safety Issues in the Structural Design Criteria of ASME Section III Subsection NH and for Very High Temperatures for VHTR & GEN IV  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this task is to identify issues relevant to ASME Section III, Subsection NH [1], and related Code Cases that must be resolved for licensing purposes for VHTGRs (Very High Temperature Gas Reactor concepts such as those of PBMR, Areva, and GA); and to identify the material models, design criteria, and analysis methods that need to be added to the ASME Code to cover the unresolved safety issues. Subsection NH was originally developed to provide structural design criteria and limits for elevated-temperature design of Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor (LMFBR) systems and some gas-cooled systems. The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and its Advisory Committee for Reactor Safeguards (ACRS) reviewed the design limits and procedures in the process of reviewing the Clinch River Breeder Reactor (CRBR) for a construction permit in the late 1970s and early 1980s, and identified issues that needed resolution. In the years since then, the NRC and various contractors have evaluated the applicability of the ASME Code and Code Cases to high-temperature reactor designs such as the VHTGRs, and identified issues that need to be resolved to provide a regulatory basis for licensing. This Report describes: (1) NRC and ACRS safety concerns raised during the licensing process of CRBR , (2) how some of these issues are addressed by the current Subsection NH of the ASME Code; and (3) the material models, design criteria, and analysis methods that need to be added to the ASME Code and Code Cases to cover unresolved regulatory issues for very high temperature service.

William J. ODonnell; Donald S. Griffin

2007-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

324

Effects of gaseous NH{sub 3} and SO{sub 2} on the concentration profiles of PCDD/F in flyash under post-combustion zone conditions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Influence of NH{sub 3} and SO{sub 2} on 2378-PCDD/F in flyash and flue gases was investigated. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer NH{sub 3} decreased the concentration of PCDD and PCDF by 34-75% in the flyash. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer NH{sub 3} decreased the concentration of PCDD and PCDF by 21-40% from the flue gases. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer SO{sub 2} led to 99% PCDD and 93% PCDF reductions in the flyash. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer SO{sub 2} led to 89% PCDD and 76% PCDF reductions in the flue gases. - Abstract: The influence of gaseous ammonia and sulphur dioxide on the formation of 2378-substituted PCDD/F on a reference flyash from a municipal waste incinerator has been investigated using a laboratory scale fixed-bed reactor. The reference flyash samples (BCR-490) was reacted under a simulated flue gas stream at temperatures of 225 and 375 Degree-Sign C for 96 h. The experiments were carried out in two series: first with simulated flue gas alone, and then with injection of NH{sub 3} or SO{sub 2} gas into the flue gas just before the reactor inlet. It was found that the injection of gaseous ammonia into the flue gas could decrease the concentration of both PCDD and PCDF by 34-75% from the solid phase and by 21-40% from the gas phase. Converting the results to I-TEQ values, it could reduce the total I-TEQ values of PCDD and PCDF in the sum of the flyash and exhaust flue gas by 42-75% and 24-57% respectively. The application of SO{sub 2} led to 99% and 93% reductions in the PCDD and PCDF average congener concentrations, respectively in the solid phase. In the gas phase, the total reductions were 89% and 76% for PCDD and PCDF, respectively. Moreover, addition of SO{sub 2} reduced the total I-TEQ value of PCDD and PCDF in the flyash and exhaust flue gas together by 60-86% and 72-82% respectively. Sulphur dioxide was more effective than ammonia in suppressing PCDD/F formation in flyash under the conditions investigated.

Hajizadeh, Yaghoub; Onwudili, Jude A. [Energy Research Institute, University of Leeds, Leeds LS2 9JT (United Kingdom); Williams, Paul T., E-mail: p.t.williams@leeds.ac.uk [Energy Research Institute, University of Leeds, Leeds LS2 9JT (United Kingdom)

2012-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

325

Decomposition of NH3BH3 at sub-ambient pressures: A combined thermogravimetry-differential thermal analysis-mass spectrometry study  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We report a systematic study of the isothermal decomposition of ammonia borane, NH3BH3, at 363 K as a function of argon pressure ranging between 50 and 1040 mbar using thermogravimetry and differential thermal analysis coupled with mass analysis of the volatile species. During thermal aging at 363 K, evolution of hydrogen, aminoborane and borazine is monitored, with the relative mass loss strongly depending on the pressure in the reaction chamber. Furthermore, the induction period required for hydrogen release at 363 K decreases with decreasing pressure.

Palumbo, Oriele; Paolone, Annalisa; Rispoli, Pasquale; Cantelli, Rosario; Autrey, Thomas

2010-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

326

Properties of DU-10wt%Mo Alloys Subjected to Various Post-Rolling Heat Treatments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mechanical properties of depleted uranium-molybdenum (U-Mo) alloys subjected to different post-processing treatments have been obtained using microhardness, quasi-static tensile tests, and scanning electron microscopy failure analysis. U-Mo alloy foils are currently under investigation for potential fuel conversion of high power research reactors to low enriched uranium fuel. Although mechanical properties take on a secondary effect during irradiation, an understanding of the alloy behavior during fabrication and the effects of irradiation on the integrity of the fuel is essential. In general, the microhardness was insensitive to annealing temperature but decreased with annealing duration. Yield strength, Youngs modulus and ultimate tensile strength improved with both increasing annealing temperature and duration. The failure mode was also insensitive to annealing conditions, but was significantly controlled by the impurity concentration of the alloy, especially carbon. Values obtained from literature are also provided with reasonable agreement based on extrapolation of annealing duration, even though processing conditions and applications were quite different in some instances.

Douglas E. Burkes; Ramprashad Prabhakaran; Thomas Hartmann; Jan-Fong Jue; Francine J. Rice

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Development and processing of LEU targets for {sup 99}Mo production  

SciTech Connect

Most of the world`s supply of {sup 99m}Tc for medical purposes is currently produced from the decay of {sup 99}Mo derived from the fissioning of high-enriched uranium (HEU). Substantial progress has been made in developing targets and chemical processes for producing {sup 99}Mo using low-enriched uranium (LEU). Target development has been focused on a uranium-metal foil target as a replacement for the coated-UO{sub 2} Cintichem-type target. Although the first designs were not successful because of ion mixing-induced bonding of the uranium foil to the target tubes, recent irradiations of modified targets have proven successful. Only minor modifications of the Cintichem chemical process are required for the uranium-metal foil targets. A demonstration using prototypically irradiated targets is anticipated in February 1997. Progress has also been made in basic dissolution of both uranium-metal foil and aluminum-clad U{sub 3}Si{sub 2} dispersion fuel targets.

Snelgrove, J.L.; Vandegrift, G.F.; Hofman, G.L.

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Thermal shock behavior of alumina/MoSi2 plasma sprayed laminated composites  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Alumina (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}) is very susceptible to thermal shock, which leads to strength degradation. By reinforcing Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} with molybdenum disilicide (MoSi{sub 2}) layers, the tolerance to damage caused by thermal shock can be improved. The thermal shock resistance of plasma sprayed Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/MoSi{sub 2} laminated composites were investigated. Three laminate microstructures having different layer thickness were fabricated by atmospheric plasma spraying while maintaining a 50/50-volume fraction. Quenching experiments done on 4-point bend bars showed a gradual decrease in the strength as the change in temperature ({Delta}T) increased. Thermal shock resistant parameters (R{prime} and R-quadruple prime) provided a representative numerical value of the thermal shock resistance for the laminated composites. The corresponding material properties for the different microstructures were determined experimentally in order to calculate the R{prime} and R quadruple prime values. The intermediate layered composite showed the highest R-quadruple prime va1ue at 1061 {micro}m, while the thin layered composite had the highest R{prime} value at 474 W/m.

Castro, R. G. (Richard G.); Petrovic, J. J.; Vaidya, R. U. (Rajendra U.); Mendoza, D. (Daniel)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Experimental study of the electric dipole strength in the even Mo nuclei and its deformation dependence  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Two methods based on bremsstrahlung were applied to the stable even Mo isotopes for the experimental determination of the photon strength function covering the high excitation energy range above 4 MeV with its increasing level density. Photon scattering was used up to the neutron separation energies Sn and data up to the maximum of the isovector giant resonance(GDR) were obtained by photo-activation. After a proper correction for multi-step processes the observed quasi-continuous spectra of scattered photons show a remarkably good match to the photon strengths derived from nuclear photo effect data obtained previously by neutron detection and corrected in absolute scale using the new activation results. The combined data form an excellent basis to derive a shape dependence of the E1 strength in the even Mo isotopes with increasing deviation from the N = 50 neutron shell, i.e. with the impact of quadrupole deformation and triaxiality. The wide energy coverage of the data allows for a stringent assessment of the dipole sum-rule, and a test of a novel parameterization developed previously which is based upon. This parameterization for the electric dipole strength function in nuclei with A>80 deviates significantly from prescriptions generally used previously. In astrophysical network calculations it may help to quantify the role the p-process plays in the cosmic nucleosynthesis. It also has impact on the accurate analysis of neutron capture data of importance for future nuclear energy systems and waste transmutation.

M. Erhard; A. R. Junghans; C. Nair; R. Schwengner; R. Beyer; J. Klug; K. Kosev; A. Wagner; E. Grosse

2010-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

330

Relationships between processing, microstructure, and properties of a Co-Cr-Mo alloy  

SciTech Connect

STELLITE alloy No. 21 was produced via rapid solidification processing (RSP) in a variety of particulate morphologies (coarse and fine powder, flakes, fibers, and ribbons). The various RSP forms showed similar, fine microstructures with only a slight difference in the scale of the microstructural features. These RSP particulates were consolidated by extrusion, dynamic compaction, and rapid omnidirectional compaction (ROC) at two processing temperatures (1077/sup 0/C and 1121/sup 0/C). Dynamic compaction proved to be unacceptable for this alloy because of non-uniform porosity and the inability to develop a metallurgical bond between particulates. A plot of elongation versus yield strength depicted two yield strength/ductility relationships for the Co-Cr-Mo type alloys. As-ROC'd samples had a low yield strength/ductility relationship. Atomized powder size also affected the strength/ductility relationships of the extruded products. Decreasing powder size increased ductility without effecting yield strength. Processing temperature did not affect the yield strength/ductility relationship. Electrochemical polarization tests were not successful in delineating fine differences between the various types of Co-Cr-Mo alloy while immersion-pitting temperature tests were capable of distinguishing between samples processed from fine and coarse powders. These materials proved susceptible to stress corrosion cracking (SCC) in boiling 30% MgCl/sub 2/.

Anand, V.; Hickl, A.J.; Kumar, P.; Boeck, B.A.; Sanders, T.H. Jr.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

/sup 238/PuO/sub 2//Mo-50 wt% Re compatibility at 800 and 1000/sup 0/C  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The compatibility of Mo-50 wt % Re with /sup 238/PuO/sub 2/ was investigated after heat treatments of up to 720 days at 800/sup 0/C and 180 days at 1000/sup 0/C. At 800/sup 0/C, a 1-..mu..m thick, continuous layer of molybdenum oxide resulted. At 1000/sup 0/C, the oxide reaction product contained some plutonium and did not appear continuous. At 1000/sup 0/C, a layer of intermetallic formed at the Mo-Re edge, beneath the oxide layer, creating a barrier between the Mo-50 wt % Re and the /sup 238/PuO/sub 2/. The intermetallic layer was promoted by the iron impurity in the /sup 238/PuO/sub 2/.

Schaeffer, D.R.; Teaney, P.E.

1980-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

332

Measurements of nuclear $\\gamma$-ray line emission in interactions of protons and $\\alpha$ particles with N, O, Ne and Si  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

$\\gamma$-ray production cross sections have been measured in proton irradiations of N, Ne and Si and $\\alpha$-particle irradiations of N and Ne. In the same experiment we extracted also line shapes for strong $\\gamma$-ray lines of $^{16}$O produced in proton and $\\alpha$-particle irradiations of O. For the measurements gas targets were used for N, O and Ne and a thick foil was used for Si. All targets were of natural isotopic composition. Beams in the energy range up to 26 MeV for protons and 39 MeV for $\\alpha$-particles have been delivered by the IPN-Orsay tandem accelerator. The $\\gamma$ rays have been detected with four HP-Ge detectors in the angular range 30$^{\\circ}$ to 135$^{\\circ}$. We extracted 36 cross section excitation functions for proton reactions and 14 for $\\alpha$-particle reactions. For the majority of the excitation functions no other data exist to our knowledge. Where comparison with existing data was possible usually a very good agreement was found. It is shown that these data are very in...

Benhabiles-Mezhoud, H; Thibaud, J -P; Tatischeff, V; Deloncle, I; Coc, A; Duprat, J; Hamadache, C; Lefebvre-Schuhl, A; Dalouzy, J -C; De Grancey, F; De Oliveira, F; Dayras, F; De Srville, N; Pellegriti, M -G; Lamia, L; Ouichaoui, S

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

THE INFLUENCE OF UNCERTAINTIES IN THE {sup 15}O({alpha}, {gamma}){sup 19}Ne REACTION RATE ON MODELS OF TYPE I X-RAY BURSTS  

SciTech Connect

We present a Monte Carlo calculation of the astrophysical rate of the {sup 15}O({alpha}, {gamma}){sup 19}Ne reaction based on an evaluation of published experimental data. By considering the likelihood distributions of individual resonance parameters derived from measurements, estimates of upper and lower limits on the reaction rate at the 99.73% confidence level are derived in addition to the recommended, median value. These three reaction rates are used as input for three separate calculations of Type I X-ray bursts (XRBs) using spherically symmetric, hydrodynamic simulations of an accreting neutron star. In this way the influence of the {sup 15}O({alpha}, {gamma}){sup 19}Ne reaction rate on the peak luminosity, recurrence time, and associated nucleosynthesis in models of Type I XRBs is studied. Contrary to previous findings, no substantial effect on any of these quantities is observed in a sequence of four bursts when varying the reaction rate between its lower and upper limits. Rather, the differences in these quantities are comparable to the burst-to-burst variations with a fixed reaction rate, indicating that uncertainties in the {sup 15}O({alpha}, {gamma}){sup 19}Ne reaction rate do not strongly affect the predictions of this Type I XRB model.

Davids, Barry [TRIUMF, Vancouver, BC V6T 2A3 (Canada); Cyburt, Richard H. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Astrophysics and National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI (United States); Jose, Jordi [Departament de Fisica i Enginyeria Nuclear, Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya and Institut d'Estudis Espacials de Catalunya, Barcelona (Spain); Mythili, Subramanian [Physics Department, George Mason University, Fairfax, VA (United States)

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Quantum wells on 3C-SiC/NH-SiC heterojunctions. Calculation of spontaneous polarization and electric field strength in experiments  

SciTech Connect

The results of experiments with quantum wells on 3C-SiC/4H-SiC and 3C-SiC/6H-SiC heterojunctions obtained by various methods are reconsidered. Spontaneous polarizations, field strengths, and energies of local levels in quantum wells on 3C-SiC/NH-SiC heterojunctions were calculated within a unified model. The values obtained are in agreement with the results of all considered experiments. Heterojunction types are determined. Approximations for valence band offsets on heterojunctions between silicon carbide polytypes and the expression for calculating local levels in quantum wells on the 3C-SiC/NH-SiC heterojunction are presented. The spontaneous polarizations and field strengths induced by spontaneous polarization on 3C-SiC/4H-SiC and 3C-SiC/6H-SiC heterojunctions were calculated as 0.71 and 0.47 C/m{sup 2} and 0.825 and 0.55 MV/cm, respectively.

Sbruev, I. S.; Sbruev, S. B., E-mail: science@yandex.ru [Moscow Aviation Institute (Russian Federation)

2010-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

335

HfO2 Gate Dielectric on (NH4)2S Passivated (100) GaAs Grown by Atomic Layer Deposition  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The interface between hafnium oxide grown by atomic layer deposition and (100) GaAs treated with HCl cleaning and (NH{sub 4}){sub 2}S passivation has been characterized. Synchrotron radiation photoemission core level spectra indicated successful removal of the native oxides and formation of passivating sulfides on the GaAs surface. Layer-by-layer removal of the hafnia film revealed a small amount of As{sub 2}O{sub 3} formed at the interface during the dielectric deposition. Traces of arsenic and sulfur out-diffusion into the hafnia film were observed after a 450 C post-deposition anneal, and may be the origins for the electrically active defects. Transmission electron microscopy cross section images showed thicker HfO{sub 2} films for a given precursor exposure on S-treated GaAs versus the non-treated sample. In addition, the valence-band and the conduction-band offsets at the HfO{sub 2}/GaAs interface were deduced to be 3.18 eV and a range of 0.87-0.97 eV, respectively. It appears that HCl+(NH{sub 4})2{sub S} treatments provide a superior chemical passivation for GaAs and initial surface for ALD deposition.

Chen, P.T.; /Stanford U., Materials Sci. Dept.; Sun, Y.; /SLAC, SSRL; Kim, E.; McIntyre, P.C.; /Stanford U., Materials Sci. Dept.; Tsai, W.; Garner, M.; /Intel, Santa Clara; Pianetta, P.; /SLAC, SSRL; Nishi, Y.; /Stanford U., Elect. Eng. Dept.; Chui, C.O.; /UCLA

2007-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

336

AFFECTS OF MECHANICAL MILLING AND METAL OXIDE ADDITIVES ON SORPTION KINETICS OF 1:1 LiNH2/MgH2 MIXTURE  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The destabilized complex hydride system composed of LiNH{sub 2}:MgH{sub 2} (1:1 molar ratio) is one of the leading candidates of hydrogen storage with a reversible hydrogen storage capacity of 8.1 wt%. A low sorption enthalpy of {approx}32 kJ/mole H{sub 2} was first predicted by Alapati et al. utilizing first principle density function theory (DFT) calculations and has been subsequently confirmed empirically by Lu et al. through differential thermal analysis (DTA). This enthalpy suggests that favorable sorption kinetics should be obtainable at temperatures in the range of 160 C to 200 C. Preliminary experiments reported in the literature indicate that sorption kinetics are substantially lower than expected in this temperature range despite favorable thermodynamics. Systematic isothermal and isobaric sorption experiments were performed using a Sievert's apparatus to form a baseline data set by which to compare kinetic results over the pressure and temperature range anticipated for use of this material as a hydrogen storage media. Various material preparation methods and compositional modifications were performed in attempts to increase the kinetics while lowering the sorption temperatures. This paper outlines the results of these systematic tests and describes a number of beneficial additions which influence kinetics as well as NH{sub 3} formation.

Erdy, C.; Anton, D.; Gray, J.

2010-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

337

MoO3 as combined hole injection layer and tapered spacer in combinatorial multicolor microcavity organic light emitting diodes  

SciTech Connect

Multicolor microcavity ({mu}C) organic light-emitting diode (OLED) arrays were fabricated simply by controlling the hole injection and spacer MoO{sub 3} layer thickness. The normal emission was tunable from {approx}490 to 640 nm and can be further expanded. A compact, integrated spectrometer with two-dimensional combinatorial arrays of {mu}C OLEDs was realized. The MoO{sub 3} yields more efficient and stable devices, revealing a new breakdown mechanism. The pixel current density reaches {approx}4 A/cm{sup 2} and a maximal normal brightness {approx}140 000 Cd/m{sup 2}, which improves photoluminescence-based sensing and absorption measurements.

Liu, R.; Xu, Chun; Biswas, Rana; Shinar, Joseph; Shinar, Ruth

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Low-spin structure of {sup 96}Mo studied with the (n,n{sup '}{gamma}) reaction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Extensive studies of the low-spin excited states in {sub 42}{sup 96}Mo{sub 54} with the (n,n{sup '}{gamma}) reaction have clarified the level scheme below 3.7 MeV excitation energy and determined detailed information about {sup 96}Mo, including lifetimes from the Doppler-shift attenuation method, branching ratios, and multipole mixing ratios. Also, B(E2) and B(M1) values were determined for many transitions, multiphonon states were identified, and several low-spin states were characterized in terms of collective, mixed-symmetry states.

Lesher, S. R.; Yates, S. W. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Kentucky, Lexington, Kentucky 40506-0055 (United States); Department of Physics, University of Richmond, Richmond, Virginia 23173 (United States); McKay, C. J.; Bandyopadhyay, D.; Boukharouba, N.; Fransen, C.; Orce, J. N.; McEllistrem, M. T. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Kentucky, Lexington, Kentucky 40506-0055 (United States); Mynk, M. [Department of Chemistry, University of Kentucky, Lexington, Kentucky 40506-0055 (United States)

2007-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

339

Measurement of Neutrino-Nucleon Neutral-Current Elastic Scattering Cross-section at SciBooNE  

SciTech Connect

In this thesis, results of neutrino-nucleon neutral current (NC) elastic scattering analysis are presented. Neutrinos interact with other particles only with weak force. Measurement of cross-section for neutrino-nucleon reactions at various neutrino energy are important for the study of nucleon structure. It also provides data to be used for beam flux monitor in neutrino oscillation experiments. The cross-section for neutrino-nucleon NC elastic scattering contains the axial vector form factor G{sub A}(Q{sup 2}) as well as electromagnetic form factors unlike electromagnetic interaction. G{sub A} is propotional to strange part of nucleon spin ({Delta}s) in Q{sup 2} {yields} 0 limit. Measurement of NC elastic cross-section with smaller Q{sup 2} enables us to access {Delta}s. NC elastic cross-sections of neutrino-nucleon and antineutrino-nucleon were measured earlier by E734 experiment at Brookheaven National Laboratory (BNL) in 1987. In this experiment, cross-sections were measured in Q{sup 2} > 0.4 GeV{sup 2} region. Result from this experiment was the only published data for NC elastic scattering cross-section published before our experiment. SciBooNE is an experiment for the measurement of neutrino-nucleon scattering cross-secitons using Booster Neutrino Beam (BNB) at FNAL. BNB has energy peak at 0.7 GeV. In this energy region, NC elastic scattering, charged current elastic scattering, charged current pion production, and neutral current pion production are the major reaction branches. SciBar, electromagnetic calorimeter, and Muon Range Detector are the detectors for SciBooNE. The SciBar consists of finely segmented scintillators and 14336 channels of PMTs. It has a capability to reconstruct particle track longer than 8 cm and separate proton from muons and pions using energy deposit information. Signal of NC elastic scattering is a single proton track. In {nu}p {yields} {nu}p process, the recoil proton is detected. On the other hand, most of {nu}n {yields} {nu}n is invisible because there are only neutral particles in final state, but sometimes recoil neutron is scattered by proton and recoil proton is detected. Signal of this event is also single proton track. Event selection for the single proton track events using geometrical and dE/dx information of reconstructed track is performed. After the event selection, NC elastic scattering data sample is obtained. They includes {nu}p {yields} {nu}p and {nu}n {yields} {nu}n is obtained. Absolute cross-section as a function of Q{sup 2} is evaluated from this NC elastic scattering data sample.

Takei, Hideyuki; /Tokyo Inst. Tech.

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

The eects of CO2, CO and H2 co-reactants on methane reactions catalyzed by Mo/H-ZSM-5  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

partial oxidation and autothermal or steam reforming is currently practiced [1±4]. Catalytic pyrolysisThe eects of CO2, CO and H2 co-reactants on methane reactions catalyzed by Mo/H-ZSM-5 Zheng Liu-reactants; methane reactions; Mo/H-ZSM-5 catalyst. 1. Introduction The direct conversion of natural gas

Iglesia, Enrique

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341

Effects of Cr-Mo Infiltration Source Structure on the Thickness of Alloy Layer by Double Glow Plasma Surface Metallurgy Technology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To strengthen the growth characteristics of layer on Q235 steel, a new source structure of Cr-Mo infiltration was proposed by plasma surface metallurgy technology. Comparative experiments were carried out on source polar of scrubbing brush structure ... Keywords: Surface alloying, Cr-Mo infiltrated, Plasma surface metallurgy technology, Thickness of layer

Jinyong Xu; Jingchun Zhang; Yajuan Liu; Cheng Gao

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

High-throughput and in situ EDXRD investigation on the formation of two new metal aminoethylphosphonates - Ca(O{sub 3}PC{sub 2}H{sub 4}NH{sub 2}) and Ca(OH)(O{sub 3}PC{sub 2}H{sub 4}NH{sub 3}){center_dot}2H{sub 2}O  

SciTech Connect

The system Ca{sup 2+}/2-aminoethylphosphonic acid/H{sub 2}O/NaOH was systematically investigated using high-throughput methods. The experiments led to one new compound Ca(O{sub 3}PC{sub 2} H{sub 4}NH{sub 2}) (1) and the crystal structure was determined using in house X-ray powder diffraction data (monoclinic, P2{sub 1}/c, a=9.7753(3), b=6.4931(2), c=8.4473(2) A, {beta}=106.46(2) Degree-Sign , V=514.20(2) A{sup 3}, Z=4). The formation of 1 was investigated by in situ energy dispersive X-ray diffraction measurements (EDXRD) at beamline F3 at HASYLAB (light source DORIS III), DESY, Hamburg. An intermediate, Ca(OH)(O{sub 3}PC{sub 2}H{sub 4}NH{sub 3}){center_dot}2H{sub 2}O (2), was observed and could be isolated from the reaction mixture at ambient temperatures by quenching the reaction. The crystal structure of 2 was determined from XRPD data using synchrotron radiation (monoclinic, P2{sub 1}/m, a=11.2193(7), b=7.1488(3), c=5.0635(2) A, {beta}=100.13(4) Degree-Sign , V=399.78(3) A{sup 3}, Z=2). - Graphical abstarct: The detailed in situ energy dispersive X-ray diffraction (EDXRD) investigation on the formation of the new inorganic-organic hybrid compound Ca(O{sub 3}PC{sub 2}H{sub 4}NH{sub 2}) leads to the discovery of a new crystalline intermediate phase. Both crystal structures were elucidated using X-ray powder diffraction data. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer High-throughput investigation led to new metal aminoethylphosphonate Ca(O{sub 3}PC{sub 2}H{sub 4}NH{sub 2}). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The formation of Ca(O{sub 3}PC{sub 2}H{sub 4}NH{sub 2}) was followed by in situ EDXRD measurements. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The crystalline intermediate Ca(O{sub 3}PC{sub 2}H{sub 4}NH{sub 3})(OH){center_dot}2H{sub 2}O was discovered. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Isolation of Ca(O{sub 3}PC{sub 2}H{sub 4}NH{sub 3})(OH){center_dot}2H{sub 2}O was accomplished by quenching experiments. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The structures were determined using X-ray powder diffraction data.

Schmidt, Corinna; Feyand, Mark [Institut fuer Anorganische Chemie, Christian-Albrechts-Universitaet, Max-Eyth Strasse 2, D 24118 Kiel (Germany); Rothkirch, Andre [HASYLAB, DESY Hamburg, Notkestrasse 85, 22607 Hamburg (Germany); Stock, Norbert, E-mail: stock@ac.uni-kiel.de [Institut fuer Anorganische Chemie, Christian-Albrechts-Universitaet, Max-Eyth Strasse 2, D 24118 Kiel (Germany)

2012-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

343

Preparation and structural study from neutron diffraction data of Pr{sub 5}Mo{sub 3}O{sub 16}  

SciTech Connect

The title compound has been prepared as polycrystalline powder by thermal treatments of mixtures of Pr{sub 6}O{sub 11} and MoO{sub 2} in air. In the literature, an oxide with a composition Pr{sub 2}MoO{sub 6} has been formerly described to present interesting catalytic properties, but its true stoichiometry and crystal structure are reported here for the first time. It is cubic, isostructural with CdTm{sub 4}Mo{sub 3}O{sub 16} (space group Pn-3n, Z=8), with a=11.0897(1) A. The structure contains MoO{sub 4} tetrahedral units, with Mo-O distances of 1.788(2) A, fully long-range ordered with PrO{sub 8} polyhedra; in fact it can be considered as a superstructure of fluorite (M{sub 8}O{sub 16}), containing 32 MO{sub 2} fluorite formulae per unit cell, with a lattice parameter related to that of cubic fluorite (a{sub f}=5.5 A) as a{approx}2a{sub f}. A bond valence study indicates that Mo exhibits a mixed oxidation state between 5+ and 6+ (perhaps accounting for the excellent catalytic properties). One kind of Pr atoms is trivalent whereas the second presents a mixed Pr{sup 3+}-Pr{sup 4+} oxidation state. The similarity of the XRD pattern with that published for Ce{sub 2}MoO{sub 6} suggests that this compound also belongs to the same structural type, with an actual stoichiometry Ce{sub 5}Mo{sub 3}O{sub 16}. -- Graphical Abstract: Formerly formulated as Pr{sub 2}MoO{sub 6}, the title compound is a cubic superstructure of fluorite (a=11.0897(1) A, space group Pn-3n) due to the long-range ordering of PrO{sub 8} scalenohedra and MoO{sub 4} tetrahedral units, showing noticeable shifts of the oxygen positions in order to provide a tetrahedral coordination for Mo ions. A mixed valence Mo{sup 5+}-Mo{sup 6+} is identified, which could account for the excellent catalytic properties of this material. Display Omitted

Martinez-Lope, M.J. [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Madrid, C.S.I.C., Cantoblanco, E-28049 Madrid, Spain. (Spain); Alonso, J.A., E-mail: ja.alonso@icmm.csic.e [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Madrid, C.S.I.C., Cantoblanco, E-28049 Madrid, Spain. (Spain); Sheptyakov, D.; Pomjakushin, V. [Laboratory for Neutron Scattering, Paul Scherrer Institut, CH-5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland)

2010-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

344

NE Press Releases  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

press-releases 1000 Independence Ave. SWWashington DC press-releases 1000 Independence Ave. SWWashington DC 20585202-586-5000 en Energy Department Announces New Investment in Innovative Small Modular Reactor http://energy.gov/articles/energy-department-announces-new-investment-innovative-small-modular-reactor Energy Department Announces New Investment in Innovative Small Modular Reactor

345

NE photo galleries  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Analysis (11) Programs: Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (6) Engineering and Structural Mechanics (3) Heat Transfer and Fluid Mechanics (6) Risk Methodology and Evaluation (2)...

346

A survey of Existing V&V, UQ and M&S Data and Knowledge Bases in Support of the Nuclear Energy - Knowledge base for Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NE-KAMS)  

SciTech Connect

The Nuclear Energy - Knowledge base for Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NE-KAMS) is being developed at the Idaho National Laboratory in conjunction with Bettis Laboratory, Sandia National Laboratories, Argonne National Laboratory, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Utah State University and others. The objective of this consortium is to establish a comprehensive knowledge base to provide Verification and Validation (V&V) and Uncertainty Quantification (UQ) and other resources for advanced modeling and simulation (M&S) in nuclear reactor design and analysis. NE-KAMS will become a valuable resource for the nuclear industry, the national laboratories, the U.S. NRC and the public to help ensure the safe operation of existing and future nuclear reactors. A survey and evaluation of the state-of-the-art of existing V&V and M&S databases, including the Department of Energy and commercial databases, has been performed to ensure that the NE-KAMS effort will not be duplicating existing resources and capabilities and to assess the scope of the effort required to develop and implement NE-KAMS. The survey and evaluation have indeed highlighted the unique set of value-added functionality and services that NE-KAMS will provide to its users. Additionally, the survey has helped develop a better understanding of the architecture and functionality of these data and knowledge bases that can be used to leverage the development of NE-KAMS.

Hyung Lee; Rich Johnson, Ph.D.; Kimberlyn C. Moussesau

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Toluene 4-Monooxygenase and its Complex with Effector Protein T4moD  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Toluene 4-monooxygenase (T4MO) is a multiprotein diiron enzyme complex that catalyzes the regiospecific oxidation of toluene to p-cresol. Catalytic function requires the presence of a small protein, called the effector protein. Effector protein exerts substantial control on the diiron hydroxylase catalytic cycle through protein-protein interactions. High-resolution crystal structures of the stoichometric hydroxylase and effector protein complex described here reveal how protein-protein interactions and reduction of the diiron center produce an active site configuration poised for reaction with O{sub 2}. Further information from crystal structures of mutated isoforms of the hydroxylase and a peroxo adduct is combined with catalytic results to give a fuller picture of the geometry of the enzyme-substrate complex used for the high fidelity oxidation of hydrocarbon substrates.

Bailey, Lucas J.; Fox, Brian G. (UW)

2012-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

348

Structure and composition of clean and hydrogen covered MoRe surfaces  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The clean and hydrogen covered (100) and (110) faces of Mo{sub 0.75}Re{sub 0.23} alloy single crystals show 1x1 structures. By means of LEED structure analyses we have determined the interlayer distances as well as the layer concentrations down to the sixth layer. While the clean (110) surface turns out to be nearly bulklike terminated, the clean (100) face is found to exhibit both an extended oscillatory layer relaxation and composition profile. Hydrogen adsorption at low temperatures does not alter the composition profile and removes the small remaining relaxation for the (110) surface. In case of the (100) face a substancial reduction of the relaxation is observed for the outermost layer distances as well, while deeper layer relaxations are preserved indicating a strong coupling off relaxation and composition profiles. Hydrogen is found to adsorb in quasi-threefold coordinated sites for the (110) and bridge sites for the (100) face.

Hammer, L.; Meyer, S.; Rath, C. [and others

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Small-scale Specimen Testing of Monolithic U-Mo Fuel Foils  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this investigation is to develop a shear punch testing (SPT) procedure and standardize it to evaluate the mechanical properties of irradiated fuels in a hot-cell so that the tensile behavior can be predicted using small volumes of material and at greatly reduced irradiation costs. This is highly important in the development of low-enriched uranium fuels for nuclear research and test reactors. The load-displacement data obtained using SPT can be interpreted in terms of and correlated with uniaxial mechanical properties. In order to establish a correlation between SPT and tensile data, sub-size tensile and microhardness testing were performed on U-Mo alloys. In addition, efforts are ongoing to understand the effect of test parameters (such as specimen thickness, surface finish, punch-die clearance, crosshead velocity and carbon content) on the measured mechanical properties, in order to rationalize the technique, prior to employing it on a material of unknown strength.

Ramprashad Prabhakaran; Douglas E. Burkes; James I. Cole; Indrajit Charit; Daniel M. Wachs

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Synthesis and optical properties of MoS{sub 2} nanoclusters  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Highly crystalline nanoclusters of MoS{sub 2} were synthesized and their optical absorption and photoluminescence spectra were investigated. Key results include: (1) strong quantum confinement effects with decreasing size; (2) preservation of the quasiparticle (or excitonic) nature of the optical response for clusters down to {approximately} 2.5 nm in size which are only two unit cells thick; (3) demonstration that 3-D confinement produces energy shifts which are over an order of magnitude larger than those due to 1-D confinement; (4) observation of large increases in the spin-orbit splittings at the top of the valence band at the K and M points of the Brillouin zone with decreasing cluster size; and (5) observation of photoluminescence due to both direct and surface recombination. Application is to photocatalysts for solar fuel production and detoxification of chemical waste.

Wilcoxon, J.P.; Newcomer, P.P.; Samara, G.A.

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Nuclear Sturcture Along the Neutron Dripline: MoNa-LISA and the dinueutron system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nuclei with extreme neutron-to-proton ratios were found to present different structures from what was known for the stable ones. With the current facilities we can now study nuclei that lie even beyond the neutron drip line. At the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory at Michigan State University we use the MoNA/Sweeper setup to perform such studies of neutron unbound nuclei. In a typical experiment, a radioactive beam is employed to produce the nucleus of interest. This unbound nucleus immediately decays into a neutron and a remaining charged fragment, both of which are detected and used to reconstruct the original nucleus and study its properties. In this Colloquium, new exciting findings from recent experiments will be presented. These include the first observation of a dineutron decay from 16Be, the exploration of the south shore of the Island of Inversion and the first evidence of the decay of the troubling nucleus 26O.

Spyou, Artemis [Michigan State Univeristy

2012-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

352

Thermodynamic modeling and experimental validation of the Fe-Al-Ni-Cr-Mo alloy system  

SciTech Connect

NiAl-type precipitate-strengthened ferritic steels have been known as potential materials for the steam turbine applications. In this study, thermodynamic descriptions of the B2-NiAl type nano-scaled precipitates and body-centered-cubic (BCC) Fe matrix phase for four alloys based on the Fe-Al-Ni-Cr-Mo system were developed as a function of the alloy composition at the aging temperature. The calculated phase structure, composition, and volume fraction were validated by the experimental investigations using synchrotron X-ray diffraction and atom probe tomography. With the ability to accurately predict the key microstructural features related to the mechanical properties in a given alloy system, the established thermodynamic model in the current study may significantly accelerate the alloy design process of the NiAl-strengthened ferritic steels.

Teng, Zhenke [ORNL; Zhang, F [CompuTherm LLC, Madison, WI; Miller, Michael K [ORNL; Liu, Chain T [Hong Kong Polytechnic University; Huang, Shenyan [ORNL; Chou, Y.T. [Multi-Phase Services Inc., Knoxville; Tien, R [Multi-Phase Services Inc., Knoxville; Chang, Y A [ORNL; Liaw, Peter K [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Development and processing of LEU targets for {sup 99}Mo production  

SciTech Connect

Substituting LEU for HEU in targets for producing fission-product {sup 99}Mo requires changes in target design and chemical processing. We have made significant progress in developing targets and chemical processes for this purpose. Target development was concentrated on a U- metal foil target as a replacement for the coated-UO{sub 2} Cintichem- type target. Although the first designs were not successful because of ion mixing-induced bonding of the U foil to the target tubes, recent irradiations of modified targets have proven successful. It was shown that only minor modifications of the Cintichem chemical process are required for the U-metal foil targets. A demonstration using prototypically irradiated targets is anticipated by the end of 1996. Progress was also made in basic dissolution of both U-metal foil and Al-clad U{sub 3}Si{sub 2} dispersion fuel targets, and work in this area is also continuing.

Snelgrove, J.L.; Vandergrift, G.F.; Hofman, G.L.

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Microstructural characterization of as-cast biocompatible Co-Cr-Mo alloys  

SciTech Connect

The microstructure of a cobalt-base alloy (Co-Cr-Mo) obtained by the investment casting process was studied. This alloy complies with the ASTM F75 standard and is widely used in the manufacturing of orthopedic implants because of its high strength, good corrosion resistance and excellent biocompatibility properties. This work focuses on the resulting microstructures arising from samples poured under industrial environment conditions, of three different Co-Cr-Mo alloys. For this purpose, we used: 1) an alloy built up from commercial purity constituents, 2) a remelted alloy and 3) a certified alloy for comparison. The characterization of the samples was achieved by using optical microscopy (OM) with a colorant etchant to identify the present phases and scanning electron microscopy (SE-SEM) and energy dispersion spectrometry (EDS) techniques for a better identification. In general the as-cast microstructure is a Co-fcc dendritic matrix with the presence of a secondary phase, such as the M{sub 23}C{sub 6} carbides precipitated at grain boundaries and interdendritic zones. These precipitates are the main strengthening mechanism in this type of alloys. Other minority phases were also reported and their presence could be linked to the cooling rate and the manufacturing process variables and environment. - Research Highlights: {yields}The solidification microstructure of an ASTM-F75 type alloy were studied. {yields}The alloys were poured under an industrial environment. {yields}Carbides and sigma phase identified by color metallography and scanning microscopy (SEM and EDS). {yields}Two carbide morphologies were detected 'blocky type' and 'pearlite type'. {yields}Minority phases were also detected.

Giacchi, J.V., E-mail: jgiacchi@exa.unicen.edu.ar [Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cientificas y Tecnicas (CONICET), Av. Rivadavia 1917, C1033AAJ Buenos Aires (Argentina); Instituto de Fisica de Materiales Tandil (IFIMAT-FCE-CICPBA) Facultad de Ciencias Exactas, Universidad Nacional del Centro de la Provincia de Buenos Aires, Pinto 399 B7000GHG Tandil (Argentina); Morando, C.N.; Fornaro, O. [Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cientificas y Tecnicas (CONICET), Av. Rivadavia 1917, C1033AAJ Buenos Aires (Argentina); Instituto de Fisica de Materiales Tandil (IFIMAT-FCE-CICPBA) Facultad de Ciencias Exactas, Universidad Nacional del Centro de la Provincia de Buenos Aires, Pinto 399 B7000GHG Tandil (Argentina); Palacio, H.A. [Comision de Investigaciones Cientificas de la Provincia de Buenos Aires (CICPBA), Calle 526 e/10 y 11 B1096APP La Plata (Argentina); Instituto de Fisica de Materiales Tandil (IFIMAT-FCE-CICPBA) Facultad de Ciencias Exactas, Universidad Nacional del Centro de la Provincia de Buenos Aires, Pinto 399 B7000GHG Tandil (Argentina)

2011-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

355

NUMERICAL SIMULATION FOR MECHANICAL BEHAVIOR OF U10MO MONOLITHIC MINIPLATES FOR RESEARCH AND TEST REACTORS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This article presents assessment of the mechanical behavior of U-10wt% Mo (U10Mo) alloy based monolithic fuel plates subject to irradiation. Monolithic, plate-type fuel is a new fuel form being developed for research and test reactors to achieve higher uranium densities within the reactor core to allow the use of low-enriched uranium fuel in high-performance reactors. Identification of the stress/strain characteristics is important for understanding the in-reactor performance of these plate-type fuels. For this work, three distinct cases were considered: (1) fabrication induced residual stresses (2) thermal cycling of fabricated plates; and finally (3) transient mechanical behavior under actual operating conditions. Because the temperatures approach the melting temperature of the cladding during the fabrication and thermal cycling, high temperature material properties were incorporated to improve the accuracy. Once residual stress fields due to fabrication process were identified, solution was used as initial state for the subsequent simulations. For thermal cycling simulation, elasto-plastic material model with thermal creep was constructed and residual stresses caused by the fabrication process were included. For in-service simulation, coupled fluid-thermal-structural interaction was considered. First, temperature field on the plates was calculated and this field was used to compute the thermal stresses. For time dependent mechanical behavior, thermal creep of cladding, volumetric swelling and fission induced creep of the fuel foil were considered. The analysis showed that the stresses evolve very rapidly in the reactor. While swelling of the foil increases the stress of the foil, irradiation induced creep causes stress relaxation.

Hakan Ozaltun & Herman Shen

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Development of an energy-use estimation methodology for the revised Navy Manual MO-303  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Navy commissioned Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) to revise and/or update the Navy Utilities Targets Manual, NAVFAC MO-303 (U.S. Navy 1972b). The purpose of the project was to produce a current, applicable, and easy-to-use version of the manual for use by energy and facility engineers and staff at all Navy Public Works Centers (PWCs), Public Works Departments (PWDs), Engineering Field Divisions (EFDs), and other related organizations. The revision of the MO-303 manual involved developing a methodology for estimating energy consumption in buildings and ships. This methodology can account for, and equitably allocate, energy consumption within Navy installations. The analyses used to develop this methodology included developing end-use intensities (EUIs) from a vast collection of Navy base metering and billing data. A statistical analysis of the metering data, weather data, and building energy-use characteristics was used to develop appropriate EUI values for use at all Navy bases. A complete Navy base energy reconciliation process was also created for use in allocating all known energy consumption. Initial attempts to use total Navy base consumption values did not produce usable results. A parallel effort using individual building consumption data provided an estimating method that incorporated weather effects. This method produced a set of building EUI values and weather adjustments for use in estimating building energy use. A method of reconciling total site energy consumption was developed based on a {open_quotes}zero-sum{close_quotes} principle. This method provides a way to account for all energy use and apportion part or all of it to buildings and other energy uses when actual consumption is not known. The entire text of the manual was also revised to present a more easily read understood and usable document.

Richman, E.E.; Keller, J.M.; Wood, A.G.; Dittmer, A.L.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Role of Si on the Diffusional Interactions between U-Mo and Al-Si Alloys at 823 K (550 degrees C)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

U-Mo dispersions in Al-alloy matrix and monolithic fuels encased in Al-alloy are under development to fulfill the requirements for research and test reactors to use low-enriched molybdenum stabilized uranium alloys fuels. Significant interaction takes place between the U-Mo fuel and Al during manufacturing and in-reactor irradiation. The interactions products are Al-rich phases with physical and thermal characteristics that adversely affect fuel performance and lead to premature failure. Detailed analysis of the interdiffusion and microstructural development of this system was carried through diffusion couples consisting of U-7wt.%Mo, U-10wt.%Mo and U-12wt.%Mo in contact with pure Al, Al-2wt.%Si, and Al-5wt.%Si, annealed at 823K for 1, 5 and 20 hours. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) were employed for the analysis. Diffusion couples consisting of U-Mo vs. pure Al contained UAl3, UAl4, U6Mo4Al43, and UMo2Al20 phases. The addition of Si to the Al significantly reduced the thickness of the interdiffusion zone. The interdiffusion zones developed Al and Si enriched regions, whose locations and size depended on the Si and Mo concentrations in the terminal alloys. In the couples, the (U,Mo)(Al,Si)3 phase was observed throughout interdiffusion zone, and the U6Mo4Al43 and UMo2Al20 phases were observed only where the Si concentrations were low.

E. Perez; Y.H. Sohn; D.D. Keiser, Jr.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Characterization of the Microstructure of Irradiated U-Mo Dispersion Fuel with a Matrix that Contains Si  

SciTech Connect

RERTR U-Mo dispersion fuel plates are being developed for application in research reactors throughout the world. Of particular interest is the irradiation performance of U-Mo dispersion fuels with Si added to the Al matrix. Si is added to improve the performance of U-Mo dispersion fuels. Microstructural examinations have been performed on fuel plates with Al-2Si matrix after irradiation to around 50% LEU burnup. Si-rich layers were observed in many areas around the various U-7Mo fuel particles. In one local area of one of the samples, where the Si-rich layer had developed into a layer devoid of Si, relatively large fission gas bubbles were observed in the interaction phase. There may be a connection between the growth of these bubbles and the amount of Si present in the interaction layer. Overall, it was found that having Si-rich layers around the fuel particles after fuel plate fabrication positively impacted the overall performance of the fuel plate.

D. D. Keiser, Jr.; A. B. Robinson; J. F. Jue; P. Medvedev; M. R. Finlay

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Characterization and Hydrodesulfurization Activity of CoMo Catalysts Supported on Boron-Doped Sol-Gel Alumina  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

desulfurization character of the CoMo catalysts supported on the B- Al2O3 supports, because high hydrogenation, the catalysts were kept in a closed vessel during two hours for aging, and then dried overnight in an oven.29 in the HDS of Kuwait gas oil [14], heavy Kuwait residue oil [15], and Kuwait crude oil [25]. They correlated

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

360

Determining the Specificity of Terms based on Information Theoretic Pum-Mo Ryu and Key-Sun Choi  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Determining the Specificity of Terms based on Information Theoretic Measures Pum-Mo Ryu and Key@world.kaist.ac.kr, kschoi@world.kaist.ac.kr Abstract This paper introduces new specificity determining methods for terms based on information theoretic measures. The specificity of terms represents the quantity of domain

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361

Gd/sub 2/ (MoO/sub 4/)/sub 3/ longitudinal electrooptic modulator at 6328 A  

SciTech Connect

A Gd/sub 2/(MoO/sub 4/)/sub 3/ light modulator operating at low frequencies, from 100 Hz up to 1 MHz, is examined. Experimental results concerning the thermal behavior and stability, frequency response, and linearity performance characteristics of the system are presented. Advantages and disadvantages of the modulator are discussed.

Theophanous, N.G.

1976-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

M5Si3(M=Ti, Nb, Mo) Based Transition-Metal Silicides for High Temperature Applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Transition metal silicides are being considered for future engine turbine components at temperatures up to 1600 C. Although significant improvement in high temperature strength, room temperature fracture toughness has been realized in the past decade, further improvement in oxidation resistance is needed. Oxidation mechanism of Ti{sub 5}Si{sub 3}-based alloys was investigated. Oxidation behavior of Ti{sub 5}Si{sub 3}-based alloy strongly depends on the atmosphere. Presence of Nitrogen alters the oxidation behavior of Ti{sub 5}Si{sub 3} by nucleation and growth of nitride subscale. Ti{sub 5}Si{sub 3.2} and Ti{sub 5}Si{sub 3}C{sub 0.5} alloys exhibited an excellent oxidation resistance in nitrogen bearing atmosphere due to limited dissolution of nitrogen and increased Si/Ti activity ratio. MoSi{sub 2} coating developed by pack cementation to protect Mo-based Mo-Si-B composites was found to be effective up to 1500 C. Shifting coating composition to T1+T2+Mo{sub 3}Si region showed the possibility to extend the coating lifetime above 1500 C by more than ten times via formation of slow growing Mo{sub 3}Si or T2 interlayer without sacrificing the oxidation resistance of the coating. The phase equilibria in the Nb-rich portion of Nb-B system has been evaluated experimentally using metallographic analysis and differential thermal analyzer (DTA). It was shown that Nb{sub ss} (solid solution) and NbB are the only two primary phases in the 0-40 at.% B composition range, and the eutectic reaction L {leftrightarrow} Nb{sub SS} + NbB was determined to occur at 2104 {+-} 5 C by DTA.

Zhihong Tang

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

High external quantum efficiency and fill-factor InGaN/GaN heterojunction solar cells grown by NH{sub 3}-based molecular beam epitaxy  

SciTech Connect

High external quantum efficiency (EQE) p-i-n heterojunction solar cells grown by NH{sub 3}-based molecular beam epitaxy are presented. EQE values including optical losses are greater than 50% with fill-factors over 72% when illuminated with a 1 sun AM0 spectrum. Optical absorption measurements in conjunction with EQE measurements indicate an internal quantum efficiency greater than 90% for the InGaN absorbing layer. By adjusting the thickness of the top p-type GaN window contact layer, it is shown that the short-wavelength (<365 nm) quantum efficiency is limited by the minority carrier diffusion length in highly Mg-doped p-GaN.

Lang, J. R.; Hurni, C. A.; Cruz, S. C.; Matioli, E.; Speck, J. S. [Department of Materials, University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106 (United States); Neufeld, C. J.; Mishra, U. K. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106 (United States)

2011-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

364

QM/MM Lineshape Simulation of the Hydrogen-bonded Uracil NH Stretching Vibration of the Adenine:Uracil Base Pair in CDCl$_3$  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A hybrid Car-Parrinello QM/MM molecular dynamics simulation has been carried out for the Watson-Crick base pair of 9-ethyl-8-phenyladenine and 1-cyclohexyluracil in deuterochloroform solution at room temperature. The resulting trajectory is analyzed putting emphasis on the N-H$...$N Hydrogen bond geometry. Using an empirical correlation between the $\\NN$-distance and the fundamental NH-stretching frequency, the time-dependence of this energy gap along the trajectory is obtained. From the gap-correlation function we determine the infrared absorption spectrum using lineshape theory in combination with a multimode oscillator model. The obtained average transition frequency and the width of the spectrum is in reasonable agreement with recent experimental data.

Yan, Yun-an; Khn, Oliver

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) of nitric oxide with ammonia using Cu-ZSM-5 and Va-based honeycomb monolith catalysts: effect of H2 pretreatment, NH3-to-NO ratio, O2, and space velocity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this work, the steady-state performance of zeolite-based (Cu-ZSM-5) and vanadium-based honeycomb monolith catalysts was investigated in the selective catalytic reduction process (SCR) for NO removal using NH3. The aim was to delineate the effect of various parameters including pretreatment of the catalyst sample with H2, NH3-to-NO ratio, inlet oxygen concentration, and space velocity. The concentrations of the species (e.g. NO, NH3, and others) were determined using a Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectrometer. The temperature was varied from ambient (25 C) to 500 C. The investigation showed that all of the above parameters (except pre-treatment with H2) significantly affected the peak NO reduction, the temperature at which peak NO reduction occurred, and residual ammonia left at higher temperatures (also known as 'NH3 slip'). Depending upon the particular values of the parameters, a peak NO reduction of around 90% was obtained for both the catalysts. However, an accompanied generation of N2O and NO2 species was observed as well, being much higher for the vanadium-based catalyst than for the Cu-ZSM-5 catalyst. For both catalysts, the peak NO reduction decreased with an increase in space velocity, and did not change significantly with an increase in oxygen concentration. The temperatures at which peak NO reduction and complete NH3 removal occurred increased with an increase in space velocity but decreased with an increase in oxygen concentration. The presence of more ammonia at the inlet (i.e. higher NH3-to-NO ratio) improved the peak NO reduction but simultaneously resulted in an increase in residual ammonia. Pretreatment of the catalyst sample with H2 (performed only for the Cu-ZSM-5 catalyst) did not produce any perceivable difference in any of the results for the conditions of these experiments.

Gupta, Saurabh

2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Method for generating a crystalline {sup 99}MoO{sub 3} product and the isolation {sup 99m}Tc compositions therefrom  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved method is described for producing {sup 99m}Tc compositions. {sup 100}Mo metal is irradiated with photons in a particle (electron) accelerator to produce {sup 99}Mo metal which is dissolved in a solvent. A solvated {sup 99}Mo product is then dried to generate a supply of {sup 99}MoO{sub 3} crystals. The crystals are thereafter heated at a temperature which will sublimate the crystals and form a gaseous mixture containing vaporized {sup 99m}TcO{sub 3} and vaporized {sup 99m}TcO{sub 2} but will not cause the production of vaporized {sup 99}MoO{sub 3}. The mixture is then combined with an oxidizing gas to generate a gaseous stream containing vaporized {sup 99m}Tc{sub 2}O{sub 7}. Next, the gaseous stream is cooled to a temperature sufficient to convert the vaporized {sup 99m}Tc{sub 2}O{sub 7} into a condensed {sup 99m}Tc-containing product. The product has high purity levels resulting from the use of reduced temperature conditions and ultrafine crystalline {sup 99}MoO{sub 3} starting materials with segregated {sup 99m}Tc compositions therein which avoid the production of vaporized {sup 99}MoO{sub 3} contaminants. 1 fig.

Bennett, R.G.; Christian, J.D.; Kirkham, R.J.; Tranter, T.J.

1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Indianapolis, Indiana  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Indianapolis, Indianapolis, Indiana to someone by E-mail Share Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Indianapolis, Indiana on Facebook Tweet about Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Indianapolis, Indiana on Twitter Bookmark Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Indianapolis, Indiana on Google Bookmark Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Indianapolis, Indiana on Delicious Rank Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Indianapolis, Indiana on Digg Find More places to share Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Indianapolis, Indiana on AddThis.com... Better Buildings Residential Network Progress Stories Interviews Videos Events Quick Links to Partner Information AL | AZ | CA | CO | CT FL | GA | IL | IN | LA ME | MD | MA | MI | MO NE | NV | NH | NJ | NY NC | OH | OR | PA | SC

368

Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Better Buildings Partners  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Better Better Buildings Partners to someone by E-mail Share Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Better Buildings Partners on Facebook Tweet about Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Better Buildings Partners on Twitter Bookmark Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Better Buildings Partners on Google Bookmark Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Better Buildings Partners on Delicious Rank Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Better Buildings Partners on Digg Find More places to share Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Better Buildings Partners on AddThis.com... Better Buildings Residential Network Progress Stories Interviews Videos Events Quick Links to Partner Information AL | AZ | CA | CO | CT FL | GA | IL | IN | LA ME | MD | MA | MI | MO NE | NV | NH | NJ | NY

369

Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Jacksonville, Florida  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Jacksonville, Jacksonville, Florida to someone by E-mail Share Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Jacksonville, Florida on Facebook Tweet about Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Jacksonville, Florida on Twitter Bookmark Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Jacksonville, Florida on Google Bookmark Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Jacksonville, Florida on Delicious Rank Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Jacksonville, Florida on Digg Find More places to share Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Jacksonville, Florida on AddThis.com... Better Buildings Residential Network Progress Stories Interviews Videos Events Quick Links to Partner Information AL | AZ | CA | CO | CT FL | GA | IL | IN | LA ME | MD | MA | MI | MO NE | NV | NH | NJ | NY NC | OH | OR | PA | SC

370

Adsorption of Potassium on the MoS2(100) Surface: A First-Principles Investigation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Periodic density functional theory calculations were performed to investigate the interaction that potassium with the Mo and S edges of the MoS2(100) surface. Both neutral and cationic (+1) charged potassium-promoted systems at different sulfur coverages were considered. Our calculations indicate that the potassium atom readily donates its single 4s valence electron to the MoS2 structure for the neutral potassium-promoted system, and the neutral and cationic potassium-promoted systems demonstrate a similar adsorption behavior. Moreover, potassium changes the magnetic properties known to occur at the metallic edge surface, which have implications for electron spin dependent surface characterization methods (i.e., electron spin/paramagnetic spectroscopy). Potassium in both the neutral and cationic systems tends to maximize its interactions with the available sulfur atoms at the edge surface, preferring sites over four-fold S hollows on fully sulfided Mo and S edges and over the interstitial gap where two to four edge surface S atoms are available for coordination. As the potassium coverage increases, the adsorption energy per potassium atom, surface work function, and transfer of the K 4s electron to the MoS2(100) surface decreases, which is in line with an increased metallization of the potassium adlayer. The potassium adlayer tends to form chains along the interstitial with K-K distances ~1 , which is notably less than those of bulk bcc K metal (4.61 ). Density of states for the potassium-saturated surface suggests enhanced involvement of broad K 3d states beginning just above the Fermi level. Potassium-promotion of MoS2(100) has implications for alcohol catalysis: increasing the surface basicity by increasing the electron charge of the surface, providing hydrogenation-promoting CO site, blocking edge surface that dissociate CO and lead to methanation, and limiting H2 dissociative adsorption to the edge surface and possibly inhibiting the H2 dissociative adsorption via s character electron repulsion. This research was performed in part using the Molecular Science Computing Facility in the William R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) national scientific user facility located at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). PNNL is operated by Battelle for DOE.

Andersen, Amity; Kathmann, Shawn M.; Lilga, Michael A.; Albrecht, Karl O.; Hallen, Richard T.; Mei, Donghai

2011-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

371

Microstructural evolution during solution treatment of Co-Cr-Mo-C biocompatible alloys  

SciTech Connect

Three different Co-Cr-Mo-C alloys conforming to ASTM F75 standard were poured in an industrial environment and subjected to a conventional solution treatment at 1225 Degree-Sign C for several time intervals. The microstructural changes and transformations were studied in each case in order to evaluate the way in which treatment time influences the secondary phase fraction and clarify the microstructural changes that could occur. To assess how treatment time affects microstructure, optical microscopy and image analyzer software, scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersion spectrometry analysis were employed. The main phases detected in the as-cast state were: {sigma}-phase, M{sub 6}C, and M{sub 23}C{sub 6} carbides. The latter presented two different morphologies, blocky type and lamellar type. Despite being considered the most detrimental feature to mechanical properties, {sigma}-phase and lamellar carbides dissolution took place in the early stages of solution treatment. M{sub 23}C{sub 6} carbides featured two different behaviors. In the alloy obtained by melting an appropriate quantity of alloyed commercial materials, a decrease in size, spheroidization and transformation into M{sub 6}C carbides were simultaneously observed. In the commercial ASTM F75 alloy, in turn, despite being the same phase, only a marked decrease in precipitates size was noticed. These different behaviors could be ascribed to the initial presence of other phases in the alloy obtained from alloyed materials, such as {sigma}-phase and 'pearlitic' carbides, or to the initial precipitate size which was much larger in the first than in the commercial ASTM F75 alloy studied. M{sub 6}C carbides dissolved directly in the matrix as they could not be detected in samples solution-treated for 15 min. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Three different Co-Cr-Mo alloys were poured under an industrial environment. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Transformation of existing phases followed during conventional solution treatment. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer In as-cast/treated samples, phases were identified by color metallography, SEM and EDS. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer M{sub 23}C{sub 6} {yields} M{sub 6}C transformation was corroborated by SEM and EDS analysis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Carbide spheroidization was also detected prior a noticeably carbide size decreasing.

Giacchi, J.V., E-mail: jgiacchi@exa.unicen.edu.ar [IFIMAT, Instituto de Fisica de Materiales Tandil, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas, Universidad Nacional del Centro de la Provincia de Buenos Aires, Pinto 399, B7000GHG Tandil (Argentina); Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cientificas y Tecnicas (CONICET), Av. Rivadavia 1917, C1033AA, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Fornaro, O. [IFIMAT, Instituto de Fisica de Materiales Tandil, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas, Universidad Nacional del Centro de la Provincia de Buenos Aires, Pinto 399, B7000GHG Tandil (Argentina); Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cientificas y Tecnicas (CONICET), Av. Rivadavia 1917, C1033AA, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Palacio, H. [IFIMAT, Instituto de Fisica de Materiales Tandil, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas, Universidad Nacional del Centro de la Provincia de Buenos Aires, Pinto 399, B7000GHG Tandil (Argentina); Comision de Investigaciones Cientificas de la Provincia de Buenos Aires (CICPBA), Calle 526 e/10 y 11, B1096APP, La Plata (Argentina)

2012-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

372

U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Energy Outlook 2013  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 Regional maps Figure F7. Coal demand regions Figure F7. Coal Demand Regions CT,MA,ME,NH,RI,VT OH 1. NE 3. S1 4. S2 5. GF 6. OH 7. EN AL,MS MN,ND,SD IA,NE,MO,KS TX,LA,OK,AR MT,WY,ID CO,UT,NV AZ,NM 9. AM 11. C2 12. WS 13. MT 14. CU 15. ZN WV,MD,DC,DE 2. YP Region Content Region Code NY,PA,NJ VA,NC,SC GA,FL IN,IL,MI,WI Region Content Region Code 14. CU 13. MT 16. PC 15. ZN 12. WS 11. C2 9. AM 5. GF 8. KT 4. S2 7. EN 6. OH 2. YP 1. NE 3. S1 10. C1 KY,TN 8. KT 16. PC AK,HI,WA,OR,CA 10. C1 CT,MA,ME,NH,RI,VT OH 1. NE 3. S1 4. S2 5. GF 6. OH 7. EN AL,MS MN,ND,SD IA,NE,MO,KS TX,LA,OK,AR MT,WY,ID CO,UT,NV AZ,NM 9. AM 11. C2 12. WS 13. MT 14. CU 15. ZN WV,MD,DC,DE 2. YP Region Content Region Code NY,PA,NJ VA,NC,SC GA,FL IN,IL,MI,WI Region Content Region Code 14. CU 13. MT

373

U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Energy Outlook 2011  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 Regional maps Figure F7. Coal demand regions Figure F7. Coal Demand Regions CT,MA,ME,NH,RI,VT OH 1. NE 3. S1 4. S2 5. GF 6. OH 7. EN AL,MS MN,ND,SD IA,NE,MO,KS TX,LA,OK,AR MT,WY,ID CO,UT,NV AZ,NM 9. AM 11. C2 12. WS 13. MT 14. CU 15. ZN WV,MD,DC,DE 2. YP Region Content Region Code NY,PA,NJ VA,NC,SC GA,FL IN,IL,MI,WI Region Content Region Code 14. CU 13. MT 16. PC 15. ZN 12. WS 11. C2 9. AM 5. GF 8. KT 4. S2 7. EN 6. OH 2. YP 1. NE 3. S1 10. C1 KY,TN 8. KT 16. PC AK,HI,WA,OR,CA 10. C1 CT,MA,ME,NH,RI,VT OH 1. NE 3. S1 4. S2 5. GF 6. OH 7. EN AL,MS MN,ND,SD IA,NE,MO,KS TX,LA,OK,AR MT,WY,ID CO,UT,NV AZ,NM 9. AM 11. C2 12. WS 13. MT 14. CU 15. ZN WV,MD,DC,DE 2. YP Region Content Region Code NY,PA,NJ VA,NC,SC GA,FL IN,IL,MI,WI Region Content Region Code 14. CU 13. MT

374

Glass forming ability of the Mo-Pd system studied by thermodynamic modeling and ion beam mixing  

SciTech Connect

Glass forming ability/range of the Mo-Pd binary metal system was studied by thermodynamic calculations employing Miedema's model and ion beam mixing of multiple metal layers. The thermodynamic calculations predict a narrow composition range of 8-26 at% Pd, within which metallic glass formation is energetically favored, whereas the experimental results showed that ion beam mixing was able to synthesize metallic glasses within a composition range 13-30 at% Pd, which was well in accordance with the prediction. Besides, in the Mo{sub 70}Pd{sub 30} multilayered films, with varying the irradiation dose, a dual-phase metallic glass was formed, and it could be considered as an intermediate state. The possible mechanism for the formation of the metallic glasses was also discussed in terms of the atomic collision theory.

Ding, N.; Li, J. H.; Liu, B. X.

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Feasibility study Part I - Thermal hydraulic analysis of LEU target for {sup 99}Mo production in Tajoura reactor  

SciTech Connect

The Renewable Energies and Water Desalination Research Center (REWDRC), Libya, will implement the technology for {sup 99}Mo isotope production using LEU foil target, to obtain new revenue streams for the Tajoura nuclear research reactor and desiring to serve the Libyan hospitals by providing the medical radioisotopes. Design information is presented for LEU target with irradiation device and irradiation Beryllium (Be) unit in the Tajoura reactor core. Calculated results for the reactor core with LEU target at different level of power are presented for steady state and several reactivity induced accident situations. This paper will present the steady state thermal hydraulic design and transient analysis of Tajoura reactor was loaded with LEU foil target for {sup 99}Mo production. The results of these calculations show that the reactor with LEU target during the several cases of transient are in safe and no problems will occur. (author)

Bsebsu, F.M.; Abotweirat, F. [Reactor Department, Renewable Energies and Water Desalination Research Cente, P.O. Box 30878 Tajoura, Tripoli (Libyan Arab Jamahiriya)], E-mail: Bsebso@yahoo.com, E-mail: abutweirat@yahoo.com; Elwaer, S. [Radiochemistry Department, Renewable Energies and Water Desalination Research Cente, P.O. Box 30878 Tajoura, Tripoli (Libyan Arab Jamahiriya)], E-mail: samiwer@yahoo.com

2008-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

376

Research Needs for Magnetic Fusion Energy Sciences. Report of the Research Needs Workshop (ReNeW) Bethesda, Maryland, June 8-12, 2009  

SciTech Connect

Nuclear fusion - the process that powers the sun - offers an environmentally benign, intrinsically safe energy source with an abundant supply of low-cost fuel. It is the focus of an international research program, including the ITE R fusion collaboration, which involves seven parties representing half the world's population. The realization of fusion power would change the economics and ecology of energy production as profoundly as petroleum exploitation did two centuries ago. The 21st century finds fusion research in a transformed landscape. The worldwide fusion community broadly agrees that the science has advanced to the point where an aggressive action plan, aimed at the remaining barriers to practical fusion energy, is warranted. At the same time, and largely because of its scientific advance, the program faces new challenges; above all it is challenged to demonstrate the timeliness of its promised benefits. In response to this changed landscape, the Office of Fusion Energy Sciences (OFES ) in the US Department of Energy commissioned a number of community-based studies of the key scientific and technical foci of magnetic fusion research. The Research Needs Workshop (ReNeW) for Magnetic Fusion Energy Sciences is a capstone to these studies. In the context of magnetic fusion energy, ReNeW surveyed the issues identified in previous studies, and used them as a starting point to define and characterize the research activities that the advance of fusion as a practical energy source will require. Thus, ReNeW's task was to identify (1) the scientific and technological research frontiers of the fusion program, and, especially, (2) a set of activities that will most effectively advance those frontiers. (Note that ReNeW was not charged with developing a strategic plan or timeline for the implementation of fusion power.) This Report presents a portfolio of research activities for US research in magnetic fusion for the next two decades. It is intended to provide a strategic framework for realizing practical fusion energy. The portfolio is the product of ten months of fusion-community study and discussion, culminating in a Workshop held in Bethesda, Maryland, from June 8 to June 12, 2009. The Workshop involved some 200 scientists from Universities, National Laboratories and private industry, including several scientists from outside the US. Largely following the Basic Research Needs model established by the Office of Basic Energy Sciences (BES ), the Report presents a collection of discrete research activities, here called 'thrusts.' Each thrust is based on an explicitly identified question, or coherent set of questions, on the frontier of fusion science. It presents a strategy to find the needed answers, combining the necessary intellectual and hardware tools, experimental facilities, and computational resources into an integrated, focused program. The thrusts should be viewed as building blocks for a fusion program plan whose overall structure will be developed by OFES , using whatever additional community input it requests. Part I of the Report reviews the issues identified in previous fusion-community studies, which systematically identified the key research issues and described them in considerable detail. It then considers in some detail the scientific and technical means that can be used to address these is sues. It ends by showing how these various research requirements are organized into a set of eighteen thrusts. Part II presents a detailed and self-contained discussion of each thrust, including the goals, required facilities and tools for each. This Executive Summary focuses on a survey of the ReNeW thrusts. The following brief review of fusion science is intended to provide context for that survey. A more detailed discussion of fusion science can be found in an Appendix to this Summary, entitled 'A Fusion Primer.'

None

2009-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

377

Research Needs for Magnetic Fusion Energy Sciences. Report of the Research Needs Workshop (ReNeW) Bethesda, Maryland, June 8-12, 2009  

SciTech Connect

Nuclear fusion - the process that powers the sun - offers an environmentally benign, intrinsically safe energy source with an abundant supply of low-cost fuel. It is the focus of an international research program, including the ITE R fusion collaboration, which involves seven parties representing half the world's population. The realization of fusion power would change the economics and ecology of energy production as profoundly as petroleum exploitation did two centuries ago. The 21st century finds fusion research in a transformed landscape. The worldwide fusion community broadly agrees that the science has advanced to the point where an aggressive action plan, aimed at the remaining barriers to practical fusion energy, is warranted. At the same time, and largely because of its scientific advance, the program faces new challenges; above all it is challenged to demonstrate the timeliness of its promised benefits. In response to this changed landscape, the Office of Fusion Energy Sciences (OFES ) in the US Department of Energy commissioned a number of community-based studies of the key scientific and technical foci of magnetic fusion research. The Research Needs Workshop (ReNeW) for Magnetic Fusion Energy Sciences is a capstone to these studies. In the context of magnetic fusion energy, ReNeW surveyed the issues identified in previous studies, and used them as a starting point to define and characterize the research activities that the advance of fusion as a practical energy source will require. Thus, ReNeW's task was to identify (1) the scientific and technological research frontiers of the fusion program, and, especially, (2) a set of activities that will most effectively advance those frontiers. (Note that ReNeW was not charged with developing a strategic plan or timeline for the implementation of fusion power.) This Report presents a portfolio of research activities for US research in magnetic fusion for the next two decades. It is intended to provide a strategic framework for realizing practical fusion energy. The portfolio is the product of ten months of fusion-community study and discussion, culminating in a Workshop held in Bethesda, Maryland, from June 8 to June 12, 2009. The Workshop involved some 200 scientists from Universities, National Laboratories and private industry, including several scientists from outside the US. Largely following the Basic Research Needs model established by the Office of Basic Energy Sciences (BES ), the Report presents a collection of discrete research activities, here called 'thrusts.' Each thrust is based on an explicitly identified question, or coherent set of questions, on the frontier of fusion science. It presents a strategy to find the needed answers, combining the necessary intellectual and hardware tools, experimental facilities, and computational resources into an integrated, focused program. The thrusts should be viewed as building blocks for a fusion program plan whose overall structure will be developed by OFES , using whatever additional community input it requests. Part I of the Report reviews the issues identified in previous fusion-community studies, which systematically identified the key research issues and described them in considerable detail. It then considers in some detail the scientific and technical means that can be used to address these is sues. It ends by showing how these various research requirements are organized into a set of eighteen thrusts. Part II presents a detailed and self-contained discussion of each thrust, including the goals, required facilities and tools for each. This Executive Summary focuses on a survey of the ReNeW thrusts. The following brief review of fusion science is intended to provide context for that survey. A more detailed discussion of fusion science can be found in an Appendix to this Summary, entitled 'A Fusion Primer.'

2009-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

378

Overview of a Welding Development Program for a Ni-Cr-Mo-Gd Alloy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The National Spent Nuclear Fuel Program (NSNFP), located at the Idaho National Laboratory, coordinates and integrates management and disposal of U.S. Department of Energy-owned spent nuclear fuel. These management functions include using the DOE standardized canister for packaging, storage, treatment, transport, and long-term disposal in the Yucca Mountain Repository. Nuclear criticality must be prevented in the postulated event where a waste package is breached and water (neutron moderator) is introduced into the waste package. Criticality control will be implemented by using a new, weldable, corrosion-resistant, neutron-absorbing material to fabricate the welded structural inserts (fuel baskets) that will be placed in the standardized canister. The new alloy is based on the Ni-Cr-Mo alloy system with a gadolinium addition. Gadolinium was chosen as the neutron absorption alloying element because of its high thermal neutron absorption cross section. This paper describes a weld development program to qualify this new material for American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) welding procedures, develop data to extend the present ASME Code Case (unwelded) for welded construction, and understand the weldability and microstructural factors inherent to this alloy.

W. L. Hurt; R. E. Mizia; D. E. Clark

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Coupled spin and valley physics in monolayer MoS2 and group-VI dichalcogenides  

SciTech Connect

We show that inversion symmetry breaking together with spin-orbit coupling leads to coupled spin and valley physics in monolayer MoS2 and group-VI dichalcogenides, making possible controls of spin and valley in these 2D materials. The spin-valley coupling at the valence band edges suppresses spin and valley relaxation, as flip of each index alone is forbidden by the 0.1 eV valley contrasting spin splitting. Valley Hall and spin Hall effects coexist in both electron-doped and hole-doped systems. Optical interband transitions have frequency-dependent polarization selection rules which allow selective photoexcitation of carriers with various combination of valley and spin indices. Photo-induced spin Hall and valley Hall effects can generate long lived spin and valley accumulations on sample boundaries. The physics discussed here provides a route towards the integration of valleytronics and spintronics in multi-valley materials with strong spin-orbit coupling and inversion symmetry breaking.

Xiao, Di [ORNL; Liu, G. B. [University of Hong Kong, The; Feng, wanxiang [Chinese Academy of Sciences; Xu, Xiaodong [University of Washington; Yao, Wang [University of Hong Kong, The

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Window nighttime U-values: A comparison between computer calculations and MoWiTT measurements  

SciTech Connect

The proper specification of window U-values has been a controversial area for many years, and current attempts to incorporate more careful treatment of windows into building standards and utility conservation programs and to define window energy labels has heightened the controversy. In a previous paper (Klems 1979) it was argued that current calculation techniques, as embodied in the computer program WINDOW, accurately represented field-measured window U-values, provided frame corrections and surface heat transfer coefficients were correctly estimated, and that in most cases the calculations were also consistent with test laboratory measurements on the same windows. This means that the calculation could serve both as a standard for deriving calculated U-values and as a method of comparing measurements made under different conditions to determine their consistency. This work has now been extended to form a joint US/Canadian collaborative effort to test current computer programs. For six windows the U-values measured with the MoWiTT under field conditions are compared with detailed U-value calculations for the same conditions using the programs WINDOW and ANSYS. There is good agreement between measurements and calculations. 7 refs., 3 figs., 4 tabs.

Klems, J.H.; Reilly, S.

1989-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

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381

Progress in converting {sup 99}Mo production from high- to low-enriched uranium--1999.  

SciTech Connect

Over this past year, extraordinary progress has been made in executing our charter to assist in converting Mo-99 production worldwide from HEU to LEU. Building on the successful development of the experimental LEU-foil target, we have designed a new, economical irradiation target. We have also successfully demonstrated, in collaboration with BATAN in Indonesia, that LEU can be substituted for HEU in the Cintichem target without loss of product yield or purity; in fact, conversion may make economic sense. We are interacting with a number of commercial producers--we have begun active collaborations with the CNEA and ANSTO; we are working to define the scope of collaborations with MDS Nordion and Mallinckrodt; and IRE has offered its services to irradiate and test a target at the appropriate time. Conversion of the CNEA process is on schedule. Other papers presented at this meeting will present specific results on the demonstration of the LEU-modified Cintichem process, the development of the new target, and progress in converting the CNEA process.

Snelgrove, J. L.; Vandegrift, G. F.; Conner, C.; Wiencek, T. C.; Hofman, G. L.

1999-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

382

11/11/2002 1AVS 49th Int'l Symp. MS-MoA7 (Oct. 29, 2002) -Cho Dynamic Simulation and Optimization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

'l Symp. MS-MoA7 (Oct. 29, 2002) - Cho Scope & Strategy Multilevel modeling & simulation incorporating dynamics &Multilevel modeling & simulation incorporating dynamics & stochasticsstochastics ESH fluctuations Incorporate capability in models for dynamics & stochastics Process & tool Fundamental science Si

Rubloff, Gary W.

383

Presented at the ASHRAE 2003 Annual Meeting, June 28 July 2, 2003, in Kansas City, MO, and published in ASHRAE Transactions 109, part 2: 733-739  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

LBNL-50219 Presented at the ASHRAE 2003 Annual Meeting, June 28 ­ July 2, 2003, in Kansas City, MO, and published in ASHRAE Transactions 109, part 2: 733-739 The research reported here was funded, in part

384

1: Mass asymmetric fission barriers for {sup 98}Mo; 2: Synthesis and characterization of actinide-specific chelating agents  

SciTech Connect

Excitation functions have been measured for complex fragment emission from the compound nucleus {sup 98}Mo, produced by the reaction of {sup 86}Kr with {sup 12}C. Mass asymmetric fission barriers have been obtained by fitting the excitation functions with a transition state formalism. The extracted barriers are {approximately} 5.7 MeV higher, on average, than the calculations of the Rotating Finite Range Model (RFRM). These data clearly show an isospin dependence of the conditional barriers when compared with the extracted barriers from {sup 90}Mo and {sup 94}Mo. Eleven different liquid/liquid extractants were synthesized based upon the chelating moieties 3,2-HOPO and 3,4-HOPO; additionally, two liquid/liquid extractants based upon the 1,2-HOPO chelating moiety were obtained for extraction studies. The Pu(IV) extractions, quite surprisingly, yielded results that were very different from the Fe(III) extractions. The first trend remained the same: the 1,2-HOPOs were the best extractants, followed closely by the 3,2-HOPOs, followed by the 3,4-HOPOs; but in these Pu(IV) extractions the 3,4-HOPOs performed much better than in the Fe(III) extractions. 129 refs.

Veeck, A.C. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry]|[Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States). Glenn T. Seaborg Inst. for Transactinium Science]|[Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States). Nuclear Science Div.

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Field Evaluation of the Comanagement of Utility Low-Volume Wastes with High-Volume Coal Combustion By-Products: MO Site  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents an investigation into the effects of comanagement of low-volume wastes with high-volume coal combustion by-products at the MO site. The MO site is one of 14 investigated by EPRI to provide background information to the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) for the 2000 Regulatory Determination on comanagement under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA).

2003-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

386

A high temperature neutron diffraction study of the double perovskite Ba{sub 2}{sup 154}SmMoO{sub 6}  

SciTech Connect

Ba{sub 2}LnMoO{sub 6} double perovskites have been recently shown to display a wide range of interesting magnetic and structural properties; Ba{sub 2}{sup 154}SmMoO{sub 6} exhibits simultaneous antiferromagnetic order and a Jahn-Teller distortion. Here we report a high temperature neutron diffraction study of Ba{sub 2}{sup 154}SmMoO{sub 6} from 353 to 877 K. The results evidence a tetragonal to cubic phase transition at 423 K. Above this temperature the thermal displacement parameters of the oxygen atoms are modelled anisotropically as a result of a transverse vibration of the bridging oxygen. A smooth increase in the cell parameter a is observed with temperature for Ba{sub 2}{sup 154}SmMoO{sub 6}. - Graphical abstract: The high temperature crystal structure of Ba{sub 2}{sup 154}SmMoO{sub 6} evidencing a transverse oxygen vibration. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A high temperature neutron diffraction study has been performed on an isotopically enriched sample of Ba{sub 2}{sup 154}SmMoO{sub 6}. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A cubic-tetragonal phase transition occurs below 423 K. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The thermal displacement parameters of the bridging oxygens are modelled anisotropically. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer There is a transverse vibration of the bridging oxygen.

Wallace, Thomas K. [Department of Chemistry, University of Aberdeen, Meston Walk, Aberdeen AB24 3UE (United Kingdom)] [Department of Chemistry, University of Aberdeen, Meston Walk, Aberdeen AB24 3UE (United Kingdom); Ritter, Clemens [Institut Laue Langevin, 6 rue Jules Horowitz, BP 156, F-38042 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France)] [Institut Laue Langevin, 6 rue Jules Horowitz, BP 156, F-38042 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); Mclaughlin, Abbie C., E-mail: a.c.mclaughlin@abdn.ac.uk [Department of Chemistry, University of Aberdeen, Meston Walk, Aberdeen AB24 3UE (United Kingdom)

2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

387

Preparation of anisotropic Nd(Fe,Mo){sub 12}N{sub 1.0} magnetic materials by strip casting technique and direct nitrogenation for the strips  

SciTech Connect

The Nd(Fe,Mo){sub 12}-type alloys are prepared by strip casting technique, and direct nitrogenation of the strips without precrushing is executed in this paper. It is found that 6 h annealing treatment at 1050 deg. C for the strips is enough to obtain the single-phase Nd(Fe,Mo){sub 12} compounds. The strips can be directly nitrogenated at 620 deg. C to obtain interstitial Nd(Fe,Mo){sub 12}N{sub 1.0} materials, and a spontaneous pulverization phenomenon in the strips induced by nitrogenation is found. The results indicate that the nitrogenation process of the strips can be used to prepare Nd(Fe,Mo){sub 12}N{sub 1.0} interstitial nitrides and pulverize the casted strips into fine particles simultaneously. Base on this, we propose a new technical route of preparing Nd(Fe,Mo){sub 12}N{sub X} magnetic powders without precrushing and obtain anisotropic NdFe{sub 10.5}Mo{sub 1.5}N{sub 1.0} powders with a remanence of B{sub r} = 1.08 T, a coercivity of {sub i}H{sub c} = 400 kA/m, and a maximum energy product of (BH){sub max} = 144 kJ/m{sup 3}.

Han Jingzhi; Liu Shunquan; Xing Meiying; Lin Zhong; Kong Xiangpeng; Wang Changsheng; Du Honglin; Yang Yingchang [School of Physics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Yang Jinbo [School of Physics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); State Key Laboratory for Artificial Microstructure and Mesoscopic Physics, School of Physics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China)

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

A low-temperature extraction-solvothermal route to the fabrication of micro-sized MoS{sub 2} spheres modified by Cyanex 301  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mono-dispersed molybdenum disulfide micro-spheres with the diameter of 1-3 {mu}m have been successfully synthesized via extraction-solvothermal method at 150 deg. C. The extractant Cyanex 301 (di-(2,4,4-trimethylpentyl) dithiophosphinic acid) acted as phase transferring agent, reductant, sulfur source and morphology-controlling agent in the whole procedure. The obtained MoS{sub 2} micro-spheres were characterized by XRD, EDS, SEM, TEM, HRTEM, IR, UV-Vis and TG, respectively. The influences of reaction conditions were discussed while a mechanism was proposed to explain the formation of the micro-spheres. Moreover, the tribological properties of liquid paraffin (LP) containing Cyanex 301-modified MoS{sub 2} micro-spheres were also evaluated on a four-ball machine, showing that the obtained MoS{sub 2} product was an excellent oil additive in LP and such lubricant had good anti-wear and friction-reducing properties. - Graphical abstract: Mono-dispersed MoS{sub 2} micro-spheres with the diameter of 1-3 {mu}m were synthesized in gasoline via extraction-solvothermal method at 150 deg. C. The MoS{sub 2} product could be well dispersed into organic solvents again and the tribological properties of liquid paraffin (LP) containing MoS{sub 2} micro-spheres were improved.

Shi Huaqiang [Qingdao University of Science and Technology, Qingdao, Shandong 266042 (China); Fu Xun [Qingdao University of Science and Technology, Qingdao, Shandong 266042 (China)]. E-mail: fuxun4483@163.com; Zhou Xiaodong [Qingdao University of Science and Technology, Qingdao, Shandong 266042 (China); Wang Debao [Qingdao University of Science and Technology, Qingdao, Shandong 266042 (China); Hu Zhengshui [Qingdao University of Science and Technology, Qingdao, Shandong 266042 (China)

2006-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

389

LOW-TEMPERATURE ION TRAP STUDIES OF N{sup +}({sup 3} P{sub ja} ) + H{sub 2}(j) {yields} NH{sup +} + H  

SciTech Connect

Using a low-temperature 22-pole ion trap apparatus, detailed measurements for the title reaction have been performed between 10 K and 100 K in order to get some state specific information about this fundamental hydrogen abstraction process. The relative population of the two lowest H{sub 2} rotational states, j = 0 and 1, has been varied systematically. NH{sup +} formation is nearly thermo-neutral; however, to date, the energetics are not known with the accuracy required for low-temperature astrochemistry. Additional complications arise from the fact that, so far, there is no reliable theoretical or experimental information on how the reactivity of the N{sup +} ion depends on its fine-structure (FS) state {sup 3} P{sub ja} . Since in the present trapping experiment, thermalization of the initially hot FS population competes with hydrogen abstraction, the evaluation of the decay of N{sup +} ions over long storage times and at various He and H{sub 2} gas densities provides information on these processes. First assuming strict adiabatic behavior, a set of state specific rate coefficients is derived from the measured thermal rate coefficients. In addition, by recording the disappearance of the N{sup +} ions over several orders of magnitude, information on nonadiabatic transitions is extracted including FS-changing collisions.

Zymak, I.; Hejduk, M.; Mulin, D.; Plasil, R.; Glosik, J.; Gerlich, D. [Faculty of Mathematics and Physics, Charles University, Prague (Czech Republic)

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Imaging ion-molecule reactions: Charge transfer and C-N bond formation in the C{sup +}+ NH{sub 3} system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The velocity mapping ion imaging method is applied to the ion-molecule reactions occurring between C{sup +} and NH{sub 3}. The velocity space images are collected over the relative collision energy range from 1.5 to 3.3 eV, allowing both product kinetic energy distributions and angular distributions to be obtained from the data. The charge transfer process appears to be direct, dominated by long-range electron transfer that results in minimal deflection of the products. The product kinetic energy distributions are consistent with a process dominated by energy resonance. The kinetic energy distributions for C-N bond formation appear to scale with the total available energy, providing strong evidence that energy in the [CNH{sub 3}]{sup +} precursor to products is distributed statistically. The angular distributions for C-N bond formation show pronounced forward-backward symmetry, as expected for a complex that resembles a prolate symmetric top decaying along its symmetry axis.

Pei, Linsen; Farrar, James M. [Department of Chemistry, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14627 (United States)

2012-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

391

Detailed modeling and laser-induced fluorescence imaging of nitric oxide in a NH(i)-seeded non-premixed methane/air flame  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper we study the formation of NO in laminar, nitrogen diluted methane diffusion flames that are seeded with ammonia in the fuel stream. We have performed numerical simulations with detailed chemistry as well as laser-induced fluorescence imaging measurements for a range of ammonia injection rates. For comparison with the experimental data, synthetic LIF images are calculated based on the numerical data accounting for temperature and fluorescence quenching effects. We demonstrate good agreement between measurements and computations. The LIF corrections inferred from the simulation are then used to calculate absolute NO mole fractions from the measured signal.The NO formation in both doped and undoped flames occurs in the flame sheet. In the undoped flame, four different mechanisms including thermal and prompt NO appear to contribute to NO formation. As the NH3 seeding level increases, fuel-NO becomes the dominant mechanism and N2 shifts from being a net reactant to being a net product. Nitric oxide in the undoped flame as well as in the core region of the doped flames are underpredicted by the model; we attribute this mainly to inaccuracies in the NO recycling chemistry on the fuel-rich side of the flame sheet.

Bell, John B.; Day, Marcus S.; Grcar, Joseph F.; Bessler, Wolfgang G.; Schulz, Christof; Glarborg, Peter; Jensen, Anker D.

2001-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

392

Hydrothermal synthesis and luminescent properties of NaLa(MoO{sub 4}){sub 2}:Dy{sup 3+} phosphor  

SciTech Connect

Pompon-like NaLa(MoO{sub 4}){sub 2}:Dy{sup 3+} phosphors have been successfully prepared via a hydrothermal method using ammonia as pH value regulator. The hydrothermal process was carried out under aqueous condition without the use of any organic solvent, surfactant, and catalyst. The experimental results demonstrate that the obtained NaLa(MoO{sub 4}){sub 2}:Dy{sup 3+} phosphor powders are single-phase scheelite structure with tetragonal symmetry. Moreover, the phosphor under the excitation of 390 and 456 nm exhibited blue emission (486 nm) and yellow emission (574 nm), corresponding to the {sup 4}F{sub 9/2}{yields}{sup 6}H{sub 15/2} transition and {sup 4}F{sub 9/2}{yields}{sup 6}H{sub 13/2} transition of Dy{sup 3+} ions, respectively. In addition, the yellow-to-blue emission intensity ratio (Y/B) can be changed with the doped concentration of Dy{sup 3+} ions. All chromaticity coordinates of the obtained NaLa(MoO{sub 4}){sub 2}:Dy{sup 3+} phosphors are located in the white-light region. The results indicate that this kind of phosphor may has potential applications in the fields of near UV-excited and blue-excited white LEDs. - Graphical abstract: It can be seen from the SEM images that a pompon-like shape was obtained with an average diameter of about 1 {mu}m, and it is composed of many nanoflakes. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Pompon-like NaLa(MoO{sub 4}){sub 2}:Dy{sup 3+} phosphors have been successfully prepared via a hydrothermal method. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Blue emission at 486 nm and yellow emission at 574 nm were obtained from the samples. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The yellow-to-blue emission intensity ratio (Y/B) can be changed with the doped concentration of Dy{sup 3+} ions. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer NaLa(MoO{sub 4}){sub 2}:Dy{sup 3+} can be efficiently excited by the blue light and the near ultraviolet light.

Li Linlin; Zi Wenwen; Li Guanghuan; Lan Shi; Ji Guijuan [College of Chemistry, Jilin University, Changchun 130026 (China); Gan Shucai, E-mail: gansc@jlu.edu.cn [College of Chemistry, Jilin University, Changchun 130026 (China); Zou Haifeng [College of Chemistry, Jilin University, Changchun 130026 (China); Xu Xuechun [College of Earth Sciences, Jilin University, Changchun 130026 (China)

2012-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

393

Make Checks Payable to the 4-H Foundation of New Hampshire. For more information contact Rhiannon Beauregard at Rhiannon.Beauergard@unh.edu or (603) 862-2188. All of this information can be found at the NH 4-H State Horse Show Website  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Beauregard at Rhiannon.Beauergard@unh.edu or (603) 862-2188. All of this information can be found at the NH 4 Foundation of New Hampshire. For more information contact Rhiannon Beauregard at Rhiannon Exposition. Please notify Rhiannon Beauregard, NH 4-H Animal and Agricultural Science Education Coordinator

New Hampshire, University of

394

Direct total cross section measurement of the {sup 16}O({alpha}, {gamma}){sup 20}Ne reaction at E{sub c.m.}=2.26 MeV  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In stellar helium burning, {sup 16}O represents the endpoint of the helium-burning sequence due to the low rate of {sup 16}O({alpha},{gamma}){sup 20}Ne. We present a new direct measurement of the total capture reaction rate of {sup 16}O({alpha},{gamma}){sup 20}Ne at E{sub c.m.}=2.26 MeV employing the DRAGON recoil separator. For the first time, the total S factor and its contributing direct capture transitions could be determined in one experiment.

Hager, U.; Greife, U. [Colorado School of Mines, Golden, Colorado (United States); Brown, J. R. [Department of Physics, University of York, York, YO10 5DD (United Kingdom); Buchmann, L.; Fallis, J.; Hutcheon, D.; Ottewell, D.; Ruiz, C.; Sjue, S. [TRIUMF, Vancouver, Canada V6T 2A3 (Canada); Carmona-Gallardo, M. [Instituto de Estructura de la Materia, CSIC E-28006 Madrid (Spain); Erikson, L. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA (United States); Vockenhuber, C. [ETH Zurich, Zurich (Switzerland)

2011-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

395

Conformal growth of Mo/Si multilayers on grating substrates using collimated ion beam sputtering  

SciTech Connect

Deposition of multilayers on saw-tooth substrates is a key step in the fabrication of multilayer blazed gratings (MBG) for extreme ultraviolet and soft x-rays. Growth of the multilayers can be perturbed by shadowing effects caused by the highly corrugated surface of the substrates, which results in distortion of the multilayer stack structure and degradation of performance of MBGs. To minimize the shadowing effects we used an ionbeam sputtering machine with a highly collimated atomic flux to deposit Mo/Si multilayers on saw-tooth substrates. The sputtering conditions were optimized by finding a balance between smoothening and roughening processes in order to minimize degradation of the groove profile in the course of deposition and at the same time to keep the interfaces of a multilayer stack smooth enough for high efficiency. An optimal value of energy of 200 eV for sputtering Kr{sup +} ions was found by deposition of test multilayers on flat substrates at a range of ion energies. Two saw-tooth substrates were deposited at energies of 200 eV and 700 eV for the sputtering ions. It was found that reduction of the ion energy improved the blazing performance of the MBG and resulted in a 40% gain in the diffraction efficiency due to better replication of the groove profile by the multilayer. As a result of the optimization performed, an absolute diffraction efficiency of 28.8% was achieved for the 2nd blaze order of the MBG with a groove density of 7350 lines/mm at a wavelength of 13.5 nm. Details of the growth behavior of the multilayers on flat and saw-tooth substrates are discussed in terms of the Linear Continuous Model of film growth.

Gawlitza, Peter; Cambie, Rossana; Dhuey, Scott; Gullikson, Eric; Warwick, Tony; Braun, Stefan; Yashchuk, Valeriy; Padmore, Howard

2012-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

396

Laser welding and post weld treatment of modified 9Cr-1MoVNb steel.  

SciTech Connect

Laser welding and post weld laser treatment of modified 9Cr-1MoVNb steels (Grade P91) were performed in this preliminary study to investigate the feasibility of using laser welding process as a potential alternative to arc welding methods for solving the Type IV cracking problem in P91 steel welds. The mechanical and metallurgical testing of the pulsed Nd:YAG laser-welded samples shows the following conclusions: (1) both bead-on-plate and circumferential butt welds made by a pulsed Nd:YAG laser show good welds that are free of microcracks and porosity. The narrow heat affected zone has a homogeneous grain structure without conventional soft hardness zone where the Type IV cracking occurs in conventional arc welds. (2) The laser weld tests also show that the same laser welder has the potential to be used as a multi-function tool for weld surface remelting, glazing or post weld tempering to reduce the weld surface defects and to increase the cracking resistance and toughness of the welds. (3) The Vicker hardness of laser welds in the weld and heat affected zone was 420-500 HV with peak hardness in the HAZ compared to 240 HV of base metal. Post weld laser treatment was able to slightly reduce the peak hardness and smooth the hardness profile, but failed to bring the hardness down to below 300 HV due to insufficient time at temperature and too fast cooling rate after the time. Though optimal hardness of weld made by laser is to be determined for best weld strength, methods to achieve the post weld laser treatment temperature, time at the temperature and slow cooling rate need to be developed. (4) Mechanical testing of the laser weld and post weld laser treated samples need to be performed to evaluate the effects of laser post treatments such as surface remelting, glazing, re-hardening, or tempering on the strength of the welds.

Xu, Z. (Nuclear Engineering Division)

2012-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

397

Conformal growth of Mo/Si multilayers on grating substrates using collimated ion beam sputtering  

SciTech Connect

Deposition of multilayers on saw-tooth substrates is a key step in the fabrication of multilayer blazed gratings (MBG) for extreme ultraviolet and soft x-rays. Growth of the multilayers can be perturbed by shadowing effects caused by the highly corrugated surface of the substrates, which results in distortion of the multilayer stack structure and degradation of performance of MBGs. To minimize the shadowing effects, we used an ion-beam sputtering machine with a highly collimated atomic flux to deposit Mo/Si multilayers on saw-tooth substrates. The sputtering conditions were optimized by finding a balance between smoothening and roughening processes in order to minimize degradation of the groove profile in the course of deposition and at the same time to keep the interfaces of a multilayer stack smooth enough for high efficiency. An optimal value of energy of 200 eV for sputtering Kr{sup +} ions was found by deposition of test multilayers on flat substrates at a range of ion energies. Two saw-tooth substrates were deposited at energies of 200 eV and 700 eV for the sputtering ions. It was found that reduction of the ion energy improved the blazing performance of the MBG and resulted in a 40% gain in the diffraction efficiency due to better replication of the groove profile by the multilayer. As a result of the optimization performed, an absolute diffraction efficiency of 28.8% was achieved for the 2nd blaze order of the MBG with a groove density of 7350 lines/mm at a wavelength of 13.5 nm. Details of the growth behavior of the multilayers on flat and saw-tooth substrates are discussed in terms of the linear continuous model of film growth.

Voronov, D. L.; Cambie, R.; Dhuey, S.; Gullikson, E. M.; Warwick, T.; Yashchuk, V. V.; Padmore, H. A. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Gawlitza, P.; Braun, S. [Fraunhofer Institute for Material and Beam Technology, Winterbergstrasse 28, 01277 Dresden (Germany)

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Clouds, Aerosols and Precipitation in the Marine Boundary Layer (CAP-MBL) AMF Deployment Graciosa Island, Azores, NE Atlantic Ocean May 2009-December 2010  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the Marine Boundary Layer (CAP-MBL) Graciosa Island, Azores, NE Atlantic Ocean May 2009-December 2010 Rob Wood, University of Washington CAP-MBL Proposal Team AMF Deployment Team Thanks to Mark Miller: AMF Site Scientist Kim Nitschke: AMF Site Manager Importance of Low-Clouds for Climate Imperative that we understand the processes controlling the formation, maintenance and dissipation of low clouds in order to improve their representation in climate models. Which clouds matter for climate sensitivity? Climate Feedbacks Model Intercomparison Project (CFMIP) 12 slab ocean models 2xCO 2 - control Correlation of global mean CRF with local values Mark Webb, Hadley Center 90 N 45 N 0 45 S 90S 0 90 E 180 90 W 0

399

REP&" TO A~NOF: NE-23 SUBJECT: Commercial Facilities Used by National Lead Company of Ohio iin Support  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

tifr'itG!'l' &i&s Coverament tifr'itG!'l' &i&s Coverament --_ , ,&,.i +.&r, ,' ,T.L ' Department of Energy / REP&" TO A~NOF: NE-23 SUBJECT: Commercial Facilities Used by National Lead Company of Ohio iin Support of FMPC Operations TO: Robert E. Lynch Procuremnent and Contracts Division, AD-42 Oak Ridge Operations Office , / I I The Division of Facility and Site Oecomnissioning Projects (OF%) is responsible for managing the Department's Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP). The purposes of FUSRAP are (1) to identify facilities formerly operated for or by the Manhattan Engineer District (WED) and Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) which may have been'radioactively contaminated as a result of these operations, (5) to determine if the

400

Enhanced T-lymphocyte blastogenic response to tuberculin (PPD) in children of northeast (NE) Thailand supplemented with vitamin A (VA) and zinc (Zn)  

SciTech Connect

Beneficial effects of Va and/or Zn supplementation of children in NE Thailand are described in a companion abstract. In the same study, blastogenic response (BR) of T-lymphocytes to concanavalin-A (ConA) and PPD were assayed in cultures containing mononuclear cells (MNC) or whole blood (WB). Methods were previously described. Children were previously vaccinated with BCG. BR to ConA of MNC or WB from children supplemented with VA, Zn, VA + Zn or placebo were similar. BR to PPD of MNC was higher in children receiving VA + Zn than placebo, but not in children supplemented with VA or Zn alone. Data indicate that children with suboptimal VA and Zn nutriture supplemented with < 2 times RDA of these nutrients showed enhanced cellular immunity to PPD. This observation is relevant to BCG immunization program and thus may benefit public health.

Kramer, T.R.; Udomkesmalee, E.; Dhanamitta, S.; Sirisinha, S.; Charoenkiatkul, S.; Tantipopipat, S.; Banjong, O.; Rojroongwasinkul, N.; Smith, J.C. Jr. (Dept. of Agriculture, Beltsville, MD (United States) Mahidol Univ., Nakhon Pathom (Thailand))

1991-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mo ne nh" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Idaho National Laboratory Ten-year Site Plan (2012 through 2021) -- DOE-NE's National Nuclear Capability -- Developing and Maintaining the INL Infrastructure  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To meet long-term objectives to transform the Idaho National Laboratory (INL), we are providing an integrated, long-term vision of infrastructure requirements that support research, development and demonstration (RD&D) goals outlined in the DOE strategic plans, including the NE Roadmap and reports such as Facilities for the Future of Nuclear Energy Research: A Twenty-year Outlook. The goal of the INL Ten-year Site Plan (TYSP) is to clearly link RD&D mission goals and INL core capabilities with infrastructure requirements (single and multi-program), establish the 10-year end-state vision for INL complexes, identify and prioritize infrastructure and capability gaps, as well as the most efficient and economic approaches to closing those gaps.

Cal Ozaki

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Ne{sup +} ion sputtering effect on amorphous Ga-In-Zn-O thin-film surface investigated by high-resolution XPS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The effect of Ne{sup +} ion sputtering on amorphous Ga-In-Zn-O (a-GIZO) thin films was investigated by using surface-sensitive, synchrotron-radiation-based, high-resolution X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). a-GIZO thin films having different compositions (Ga{sub 2}O{sub 3}:In{sub 2}O{sub 3}:ZnO = 1:1:1, 2:2:1, 3:2:1, 4:2:1) were investigated. It was found out that the amounts of the In and Zn contents relative to that of Ga decreased noticeably after sufficient sputtering, and that there occurred a subgap state above the valence band maximum and metallic states at the In 3d and 4d core levels as well as at the Fermi edge.

Kang, Se-Jun; Lee, Mi Ji [Department of Physics, POSTECH, Pohang 790-784 (Korea, Republic of); Baik, Jae Yoon; Kim, Hyeong-Do; Thakur, Anup [Pohang Accelerator Laboratory, POSTECH, Pohang 790-784 (Korea, Republic of); Shin, Hyun-Joon [Department of Physics, POSTECH, Pohang 790-784 (Korea, Republic of); Pohang Accelerator Laboratory, POSTECH, Pohang 790-784 (Korea, Republic of); Chung, JaeGwan; Lee, Eunha; Lee, Jaecheol; Lee, JaeHak [A E Group, Samsung Advanced Institute of Technology, Yongin-si 440-712 (Korea, Republic of)

2011-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

403

NH_50m_Wind  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

UnitedStatesWindHighResolutionNewHampshireWindHighResolution.zip> Description: Abstract: Annual average wind resource potential for the state of New...

404

Progress and status of the IAEA coordinated research project: production of Mo-99 using LEU fission or neutron activation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Since late 2004, the IAEA has developed and implemented a Coordinated Research Project (CRP) to assist countries interested in initiating indigenous, small-scale production of Mo-99 to meet local nuclear medicine requirements. The objective of the CRP is to provide interested countries with access to non-proprietary technologies and methods to produce Mo-99 using LEU foil or LEU mini-plate targets, or for the utilization of n,gamma neutron activation, e.g. through the use of gel generators. The project has made further progress since the RERTR 2006 meeting, with a Technical Workshop on Operational Aspects of Mo99 Production held 28-30 November 2006 in Vienna and the Second Research Coordination Meeting held in Bucharest, Romania 16-20 April 2007. The paper describes activities carried out as noted above, and as well as the provision of LEU foils to a number of participants, and the progress by a number of groups in preparing for LEU target assembly and disassembly, irradiation, chemical processing, and waste management. The participants' progress in particular on thermal hydraulics computations required for using LEU targets is notable, as also the progress in gel generator plant operations in India and Kazakhstan. Poland has joined as a new research agreement holder and an application by Egypt to be a contract holder is undergoing internal review in the IAEA and is expected to be approved. The IAEA has also participated in several open meetings of the U.S. National Academy of Sciences Study on Producing Medical Radioisotopes without HEU, which will also be discussed in the paper. (author)

Goldman, Ira N.; Adelfang, Pablo [Division of Nuclear Fuel Cycle and Waste Technology, International Atomic Energy Agency, Wagramer Strasse 5, P.O. Box 100, A-1400 Vienna (Austria)], E-mail: I.Goldman@iaea.org, E-mail: P.Adelfang@iaea.org; Ramamoorthy, Natesan [Division of Physical and Chemical Sciences, International Atomic Energy Agency, Wagramer Strasse 5, P.O. Box 100, A-1400 Vienna (Austria)], E-mail: N.Ramamoorthy@iaea.org

2008-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

405

Effects of Irradiation on the Microstructure of U-7Mo Dispersion Fuel with Al-2Si Matrix  

SciTech Connect

The Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactor program is developing low-enriched uranium U-Mo dispersion fuels for application in research and test reactors around the world. As part of this development, fuel plates have been irradiated in the Advanced Test Reactor and then characterized using optical metallography (OM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) to determine the as-irradiated microstructure. To demonstrate the irradiation performance of U-7Mo dispersion fuel plates with 2 wt% Si added to the matrix, fuel plates were tested to medium burnups at intermediate fission rates as part of the RERTR-6 experiment. Further testing was performed to higher fission rates as part of the RERTR-7A experiment, and very aggressive testing (high temperature, high fission density, high fission rate) was performed in the RERTR-9A, RERTR-9B and AFIP-1 experiments. As-irradiated microstructures were compared to those observed after fabrication to determine the effects of irradiation on the microstructure. Based on comparison of the microstructural characterization results for each irradiated sample, some general conclusions can be drawn about how the microstructure evolves during irradiation: there is growth of the fuel/matrix interaction layer (FMI), which was present in the samples to some degree after fabrication, during irradiation; Si diffuses from the FMI layer to deeper depths in the U-7Mo particles as the irradiation conditions are made more aggressive; lowering of the Si content in the FMI layer results in an increase in the size of the fission gas bubbles; as the FMI layer grows during irradiation more Si diffuses from the matrix to the FMI layer/matrix interface, and interlinking of fission gas bubbles in the fuel plate microstructure that may indicate breakaway swelling is not observed.

Dennis D. Keiser, Jr.; Jan-Fong Jue; Adam B. Robinson; Pavel Medvedev; Jian Gan; Brandon D. Miller; Daniel M. Wachs; Glenn A. Moore; Curtis R. Clark; Mitchell K. Meyer; M. Ross Finlay

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Development and processing of LEU targets for {sup 99}Mo production-overview of the ANL program  

SciTech Connect

Most of the world`s supply of {sup 99m}Tc for medical purposes is currently produced from the decay of {sup 99}Mo derived from the fissioning of high-enriched uranium (HEU). Substitution of low-enriched uranium (LEU) silicide fuel for the HEU alloy and aluminide fuels used in most current target designs will allow equivalent {sup 99}Mo yields with little change in target geometries. Substitution of uranium metal for uranium oxide films in other target designs will also allow the substitution of LEU for HEU. During 1995, we have continued to study the modification of current targets and processes to allow the conversion from HEU to LEU. A uranium-metal-foil target was fabricated at ANL and irradiated to prototypic burnup in the Indonesian RSG-GAS reactor. Postirradiation examination indicated that minor design modifications will be required to allow the irradiated foil to be removed for chemical processing. Means to dissolve and process LEU foil have been developed, and a mock LEU foil target was processed in Indonesia. We have also developed means to dissolve the LEU foil in alkaline peroxide, where it can be used to replace HEU targets that are currently dissolved in base before recovering and purifying the {sup 99}Mo. We have also continued work on the dissolution of U{sub 3}Si{sub 2} and have a firm foundation on dissolving these targets in alkaline peroxide. The technology-exchange agreement with Indonesia is well underway, and we hope to expand our international cooperations in 1996.

Snelgrove, J.L.; Hofman, G.L.; Wiencek, T.C. [and others

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Mo-containing tetrahedral amorphous carbon deposited by dualfiltered cathodic vacuum arc with selective pulsed bias voltage  

SciTech Connect

Metal-containing tetrahedral amorphous carbon films were produced by dual filtered cathodic vacuum arc (FCVA) plasma sources operated in sequential pulsed mode. A negatively pulsed bias was applied to the substrate only when carbon plasma was generated. Films thickness was measured after deposition by profilometry. Glass slides with silver pads were used as substrate for the of the measurement sheet resistance. The microstructure and composition of the films were characterized by Raman spectroscopy and Rutherford backscattering, respectively. It found that the electrical resistivity decreases with an increase of the Mo content, which can be ascribed to an increase of sp2 content and an increase of the sp2 cluster size.

Pasaja, Nitisak; Sansongsiri, Sakon; Anders, Andre; Vilaithong,Thiraphat; Intasiri, Sawate

2006-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

408

Activation, Heating and Exposure Rates for Mo?99 Experiments with 25?Disk Targets  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An MCNPX model of the 25-disk target assembly inside the vacuum cube inside the shielded box was prepared. This was used to calculate heating and photon and neutron fluxes throughout the model. Production rates for photonuclear reaction products were calculated using the photon fluxes and ENDF/B-VII cross sections. Measured isomer to ground state yield ratios were used where available. Where not available the new correlation between spin deficit and isomer to ground state yield ratios presented at AccApp'11 was used. The photonuclear production rates and neutron fluxes were input to CINDER2008 for transmutation calculations. A cross section update file was used to supply (n,n') reactions missing from CINDER2008 libraries. Decay photon spectra produced by CINDER2008 were then used to calculate exposure rates using the MCNPX model. Two electron beam irradiations were evaluated. The first was for a thermal test at 15 MeV with 1300 {micro}A incident on one target end and the second was for a production test at 35 MeV with 350 {micro}A incident on both target ends (700 {micro}A total current on target). For the thermal test 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 and 6 h irradiation times were simulated, each followed by decay time steps out to 42 days. For the production test 6, 12, 18, 24, 30 and 36 h irradiation times were simulated followed by the same decay periods. For all simulations beam FWHMs in x and y were both assumed to be 6 mm. Simulations were run for Mo-100 enriched and natural Mo targets for both tests. It is planned that thermal test will be run for 4 h with natural target disks and production test will be run for 24 h with enriched target disks. Results for these two simulations only are presented in this report. Other results can be made available upon request. Post irradiation exposure rates were calculated at 30 cm distances from left, right, front and back of the following configurations: (1) Shielded box with everything in it (beam pipes, cooling pipes, vacuum cube, target housing weldment and target assembly), (2) Shielded box with everything in it except the target assembly, (3) Shielded box with nothing in it, (4) Target assembly taken outside of shielded box, (5) Target disks in cradle (target assembly with thermocouple weldment and flange removed), (6) Empty cradle, and (7) Target disks alone. Decay photon spectra from the CINDER2008 calculations were used as sources for the exposure rate calculations in the same model used for the flux calculations with beam on. As components were removed to simulate the seven cases considered the material compositions were changed to air and their respective sources were turned off. The MCNPX model geometry is plotted in Figure 1. The left and right detector locations for cases 1, 2 and 3 were 30 cm from the shielded box walls and 30 cm from the beam pipe openings in the left and right sides of the model (they are not in the beam line). A zoomed in plot of the target assembly alone is in Figure 2. Exposure rates for the seven cases are plotted as a function of time after irradiation in Figures 3, 4 and 5. To aid in comparison between the cases, all of these figures have been plotted using the same scale. Figures 3 and 4 are respectively the thermal and production test results for cases 1 through 6. Figure 5 includes case 7 results for both. Differences between cases 1 and 2 for both tests are not statistically significant showing that activation of components other than the target assembly, many of which are also shielding the target assembly, dominates exposure rates outside the shielded box. Case 3 shows the contribution from activation of the shield box itself. In front where shielded box wall is thickest box activation accounts for essentially all of the exposure rate outside. Differences between cases 4 and 5 are also minimal, showing that the contribution to target assembly exposure rates from the thermocouple flange and weldment are small compared to the target disks and cradle. From the numerical results the contribution is about 1%. Results for case 6, the cradle itself, are ini

Kelsey, Charles T. IV [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

409

Development of the local and average structure of a V?Mo?Nb oxide catalyst with Mo[subscript 5]O[subscript 14]-like structure during synthesis from nanostructured precursors  

SciTech Connect

A combination of X-ray and neutron PDF measurements with powder diffraction and EXAFS data was used to determine the structures of a V-Mo-Nb-oxide catalyst and its poorly crystallized precursors that exhibit the strongest catalytic activities. The crystalline material belongs to space group P{bar 4}2{sub 1}m, a = 22.8, c = 4.002, and is build up of pentagonal MeO{sub 7} bipyramids surrounded by edge sharing Me-octahedrons (Me = Mo, V, Nb). In the average structure all MeO{sub 7} units are at the same z-level, while the local structure analysis shows systematic shifts along [001]. Samples synthesized at 300 C and 400 C exhibit a nanostructure, whose local structure predates the final crystalline structure. Initial nanoparticles are spherical and grow predominantly along the c-axis. The successful analysis required a reverse analysis that took the crystalline material as starting model for the samples synthesized at lower temperatures.

Kardash, Tatyana Yu.; Plyasova, Ludmilla M.; Kochubey, Dmitry I.; Bondareva, Valentina M.; Neder, Reinhard B. (Boreskov); (Nurnbergand)

2012-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

410

NGA_99fin.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 NJ WY AK AL CA AR CO CT DE FL GA HI ID KS IL IN IA IA KY LA ME MI MA MD MN MS MT MO NE ND OH NV NM NY NH NC OK OR PA RI SC SD TN TX UT VT WA WV WI AZ VA DC 0.00-1.99 2.00-2.99 3.00-3.99 4.00-4.99 5.00-5.99 6.00-6.99 7.00+ NJ WY AK AL CA AR CO CT DE FL GA HI ID KS IL IN IA IA KY LA ME MI MA MD MN MS MT MO NE ND OH NV NM NY NH NC OK OR PA RI SC SD TN TX UT VT WA WV WI AZ VA DC 0.00-1.99 2.00-2.99 3.00-3.99 4.00-4.99 5.00-5.99 6.00-6.99 7.00+ 18. Average Price of Natural Gas Delivered to U.S. Onsystem Industrial Consumers, 1999 (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Figure 19. Average Price of Natural Gas Delivered to U.S. Electric Utilities, 1999 (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Figure Sources: Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC), Form FERC-423, "Monthly Report of Cost and Quality of Fuels for Electric Plants," and Energy Information Administration (EIA), Form EIA-176, "Annual Report of Natural and Supplemental

411

C:\ANNUAL\VENTCHAP.V8\NGAla1109.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Energy Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2000 NJ WY AK AL CA AR CO CT DE FL GA HI ID KS IL IN IA IA KY LA ME MI MA MD MN MS MT MO NE ND OH NV NM NY NH NC OK OR PA RI SC SD TN TX UT VT WA WV WI AZ VA DC Source: Energy Information Administration (EIA), Form EIA-176, "Annual Report of Natural and Supplemental Gas Supply and Disposition." NJ WY AK AL CA AR CO CT DE FL GA HI ID KS IL IN IA IA KY LA ME MI MA MD MN MS MT MO NE ND OH NV NM NY NH NC OK OR PA RI SC SD TN TX UT VT WA WV WI AZ VA DC Note: Commercial prices include natural gas delivered for use as vehicle fuel. Source: Energy Information Administration (EIA), Form EIA-176, "Annual Report of Natural and Supplemental Gas Supply and Disposition." 0.00-1.99 2.00-3.99 4.00-5.99 6.00-7.99 8.00-9.99 10.00-11.99 12.00+ 0.00-1.99 2.00-3.99 4.00-5.99 6.00-7.99 8.00-9.99 10.00-11.99 12.00+ 17. Average Price of Natural Gas Delivered to U.S. Residential

412

NGA98fin5.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 NJ WY AK AL CA AR CO CT DE FL GA HI ID KS IL IN IA IA KY LA ME MI MA MD MN MS MT MO NE ND OH NV NM NY NH NC OK OR PA RI SC SD TN TX UT VT WA WV WI AZ VA DC 0.00-1.99 2.00-2.99 3.00-3.99 4.00-4.99 5.00-5.99 6.00-6.99 7.00+ NJ WY AK AL CA AR CO CT DE FL GA HI ID KS IL IN IA IA KY LA ME MI MA MD MN MS MT MO NE ND OH NV NM NY NH NC OK OR PA RI SC SD TN TX UT VT WA WV WI AZ VA DC 0.00-1.99 2.00-2.99 3.00-3.99 4.00-4.99 5.00-5.99 6.00-6.99 7.00+ 18. Average Price of Natural Gas Delivered to U.S. Onsystem Industrial Consumers, 1998 (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Figure 19. Average Price of Natural Gas Delivered to U.S. Electric Utilities, 1998 (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Figure Sources: Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC), Form FERC-423, "Monthly Report of Cost and Quality of Fuels for Electric Plants," and Energy Information Administration (EIA), Form EIA-176, "Annual Report of Natural and Supplemental

413

C:\ANNUAL\VENTCHAP.V8\NGAla1109.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2000 2000 NJ WY AK AL CA AR CO CT DE FL GA HI ID KS IL IN IA IA KY LA ME MI MA MD MN MS MT MO NE ND OH NV NM NY NH NC OK OR PA RI SC SD TN TX UT VT WA WV WI AZ VA DC 0.00-1.99 2.00-3.99 4.00-5.99 6.00-7.99 8.00-9.99 10.00-11.99 12.00+ NJ WY AK AL CA AR CO CT DE FL GA HI ID KS IL IN IA IA KY LA ME MI MA MD MN MS MT MO NE ND OH NV NM NY NH NC OK OR PA RI SC SD TN TX UT VT WA WV WI AZ VA DC 0.00-1.99 2.00-3.99 4.00-5.99 6.00-7.99 8.00-99.99 10.00-11.99 12.00+ 19. Average Price of Natural Gas Delivered to U.S. Onsystem Industrial Consumers, 2000 (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Figure 20. Average Price of Natural Gas Delivered to U.S. Electric Utilities, 2000 (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Figure Sources: Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC), Form FERC-423, "Monthly Report of Cost and Quality of Fuels for Electric Plants," and Energy Information Administration (EIA), Form EIA-176, "Annual Report of Natural

414

C:\Annual\VENTCHAP.V8\NGA02.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2002 2002 0.00-1.99 2.00-3.99 4.00-5.99 6.00-7.99 8.00-9.99 10.00-11.99 12.00+ WA ID MT OR CA NV UT AZ NM CO WY ND SD MN WI NE IA KS MO TX IL IN OH MI OK AR TN W VA KY MD PA WI NY VT NH MA CT ME RI NJ DE DC NC SC GA AL MS LA FL HI AK Source: Energy Information Administration (EIA), Form EIA-176, "Annual Report of Natural and Supplemental Gas Supply and Disposition," and Form EIA 910, "Monthly Natural Gas Marketer Survey." 17. Average Price of Natural Gas Delivered to U.S. Commercial Consumers, 2002 (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Figure 0.00-1.99 2.00-3.99 4.00-5.99 6.00-7.99 8.00-9.99 10.00-11.99 12.00+ WA ID MT OR CA NV UT AZ NM CO WY ND SD MN WI NE IA KS MO TX IL IN OH MI OK AR TN W VA KY MD PA WI NY VT NH MA CT ME RI NJ DE DC NC SC GA AL MS LA FL HI AK 16. Average Price of Natural Gas Delivered to U.S. Residential Consumers, 2002 (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Figure Source: Energy Information Administration

415

Microsoft Word - Figure_18_19.doc  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 0.00-2.49 2.50-4.49 4.50-6.49 6.50-8.49 8.50-10.49 10.50+ WA ID MT OR CA NV UT AZ NM CO WY ND SD MN WI NE IA KS MO TX IL IN OH MI OK AR TN WV VA KY PA WI NY VT NH MA CT ME RI NJ DE DC NC SC GA AL MS LA FL HI AK MD 0.00-2.49 2.50-4.49 4.50-6.49 6.50-8.49 8.50-10.49 10.50+ WA ID MT OR CA NV UT AZ NM CO WY ND SD MN WI NE IA KS MO TX IL IN OH MI OK AR TN WV VA KY MD PA WI NY VT NH MA CT ME RI NJ DE DC NC SC GA AL MS LA FL HI AK Figure 18. Average Price of Natural Gas Delivered to U.S. Onsystem Industrial Consumers, 2004 (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Figure 19. Average Price of Natural Gas Delivered to U.S. Electric Power Consumers, 2004 (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Source: Energy Information Administration (EIA), Form EIA-176, "Annual Report of Natural and Supplemental Gas Supply and Disposition." Note: States where the electric power price has been withheld (see Table 23) are included in the $0.00-$2.49 price category.

416

Microsoft Word - NGAMaster_State_TablesNov12.doc  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

49 49 0.00-1.99 2.00-3.99 4.00-5.99 6.00-7.99 8.00-9.99 10.00-11.99 12.00+ WA ID MT OR CA NV UT AZ NM CO WY ND SD MN WI NE IA KS MO TX IL IN OH MI OK AR TN WV VA KY PA WI NY VT NH MA CT ME RI NJ DE DC NC SC GA AL MS LA FL HI AK MD 0.00-1.99 2.00-3.99 4.00-5.99 6.00-7.99 8.00-9.99 10.00-11.99 12.00+ WA ID MT OR CA NV UT AZ NM CO WY ND SD MN WI NE IA KS MO TX IL IN OH MI OK AR TN WV VA KY MD PA WI NY VT NH MA CT ME RI NJ DE DC NC SC GA AL MS LA FL HI AK Figure 18. Average Price of Natural Gas Delivered to U.S. Onsystem Industrial Consumers, 2003 (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Figure 19. Average Price of Natural Gas Delivered to U.S. Electric Power Consumers, 2003 (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Source: Energy Information Administration (EIA), Form EIA-176, "Annual Report of Natural and Supplemental Gas Supply and Disposition." Note: States where the electric power price has been withheld (see Table 23) are included in the $0.00-$1.99 price category.

417

C:\Annual\VENTCHAP.V8\NGA02.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 0.00-1.99 2.00-3.99 4.00-5.99 6.00-7.99 8.00-9.99 10.00-11.99 12.00+ WA ID MT OR CA NV UT AZ NM CO WY ND SD MN WI NE IA KS MO TX IL IN OH MI OK AR TN W VA KY MD PA WI NY VT NH MA CT ME RI NJ DE DC NC SC GA AL MS LA FL HI AK 18. Average Price of Natural Gas Delivered to U.S. Onsystem Industrial Consumers, 2002 (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Figure Source: Energy Information Administration (EIA), Form EIA-176, "Annual Report of Natural and Supplemental Gas Supply and Disposition." 0.00-1.99 2.00-3.99 4.00-5.99 6.00-7.99 8.00-9.99 10.00-11.99 12.00+ WA ID MT OR CA NV UT AZ NM CO WY ND SD MN WI NE IA KS MO TX IL IN OH MI OK AR TN W VA KY MD PA WI NY VT NH MA CT ME RI NJ DE DC NC SC GA AL MS LA FL HI AK 19. Average Price of Natural Gas Delivered to U.S. Electric Utilities, 2002 (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Figure Sources: Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC), Form FERC-423, "Monthly Report of Cost

418

NGA_99fin.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 NJ WY AK AL CA AR CO CT DE FL GA HI ID KS IL IN IA IA KY LA ME MI MA MD MN MS MT MO NE ND OH NV NM NY NH NC OK OR PA RI SC SD TN TX UT VT WA WV WI AZ VA DC Source: Energy Information Administration (EIA), Form EIA-176, "Annual Report of Natural and Supplemental Gas Supply and Disposition." NJ WY AK AL CA AR CO CT DE FL GA HI ID KS IL IN IA IA KY LA ME MI MA MD MN MS MT MO NE ND OH NV NM NY NH NC OK OR PA RI SC SD TN TX UT VT WA WV WI AZ VA DC Note: Commercial prices include natural gas delivered for use as vehicle fuel. Source: Energy Information Administration (EIA), Form EIA-176, "Annual Report of Natural and Supplemental Gas Supply and Disposition." 0.00-1.99 2.00-2.99 3.00-3.99 4.00-4.99 5.00-5.99 6.00-6.99 7.00+ 0.00-1.99 2.00-2.99 3.00-3.99 4.00-4.99 5.00-5.99 6.00-6.99 7.00+ 16. Average Price of Natural Gas Delivered to U.S. Residential Consumers, 1999 (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Figure

419

C:\ANNUAL\VENTCHAP.V8\NGA.VP  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 NJ WY AK AL CA AR CO CT DE FL GA HI ID KS IL IN IA IA KY LA ME MI MA MD MN MS MT MO NE ND OH NV NM NY NH NC OK OR PA RI SC SD TN TX UT VT WA WV WI AZ VA DC Source: Energy Information Administration (EIA), Form EIA-176, "Annual Report of Natural and Supplemental Gas Supply and Disposition." NJ WY AK AL CA AR CO CT DE FL GA HI ID KS IL IN IA IA KY LA ME MI MA MD MN MS MT MO NE ND OH NV NM NY NH NC OK OR PA RI SC SD TN TX UT VT WA WV WI AZ VA DC Note: Commercial prices include natural gas delivered for use as vehicle fuel. Source: Energy Information Administration (EIA), Form EIA-176, "Annual Report of Natural and Supplemental Gas Supply and Disposition." 0.00-1.99 2.00-2.99 3.00-3.99 4.00-4.99 5.00-5.99 6.00-6.99 7.00+ 0.00-1.99 2.00-2.99 3.00-3.99 4.00-4.99 5.00-5.99 6.00-6.99 7.00+ 16. Average Price of Natural Gas Delivered to U.S. Residential Consumers, 1997 (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Figure

420

C:\ANNUAL\VENTCHAP.V8\NewNGA02.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2001 2001 0.00-1.99 2.00-3.99 4.00-5.99 6.00-7.99 8.00-9.99 10.00-11.99 12.00+ WA ID MT OR CA NV UT AZ NM CO WY ND SD MN WI NE IA KS MO TX IL IN OH MI OK AR TN W VA KY MD PA WI NY VT NH MA CT ME RI NJ DE DC NC SC GA AL MS LA FL HI AK Source: Energy Information Administration (EIA), Form EIA-176, "Annual Report of Natural and Supplemental Gas Supply and Disposition." 28. Average Price of Natural Gas Delivered to U.S. Onsystem Residential Consumers, 2001 (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Figure 0.00-1.99 2.00-3.99 4.00-5.99 6.00-7.99 8.00-9.99 10.00-11.99 12.00+ WA ID MT OR CA NV UT AZ NM CO WY ND SD MN WI NE IA KS MO TX IL IN OH MI OK AR TN W VA KY MD PA WI NY VT NH MA CT ME RI NJ DE DC NC SC GA AL MS LA FL HI AK Note: Commercial prices include natural gas delivered for use as vehicle fuel. Source: Energy Information Administration (EIA), Form EIA-176, "Annual Report of Natural and Supplemental Gas Supply and Disposition."

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421

NGA98fin5.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1998 1998 NJ WY AK AL CA AR CO CT DE FL GA HI ID KS IL IN IA IA KY LA ME MI MA MD MN MS MT MO NE ND OH NV NM NY NH NC OK OR PA RI SC SD TN TX UT VT WA WV WI AZ VA DC Source: Energy Information Administration (EIA), Form EIA-176, "Annual Report of Natural and Supplemental Gas Supply and Disposition." NJ WY AK AL CA AR CO CT DE FL GA HI ID KS IL IN IA IA KY LA ME MI MA MD MN MS MT MO NE ND OH NV NM NY NH NC OK OR PA RI SC SD TN TX UT VT WA WV WI AZ VA DC Note: Commercial prices include natural gas delivered for use as vehicle fuel. Source: Energy Information Administration (EIA), Form EIA-176, "Annual Report of Natural and Supplemental Gas Supply and Disposition." 0.00-1.99 2.00-2.99 3.00-3.99 4.00-4.99 5.00-5.99 6.00-6.99 7.00+ 0.00-1.99 2.00-2.99 3.00-3.99 4.00-4.99 5.00-5.99 6.00-6.99 7.00+ 16. Average Price of Natural Gas Delivered to U.S. Residential Consumers, 1998 (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Figure

422

C:\ANNUAL\VENTCHAP.V8\NewNGA02.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2001 2001 0.00-1.99 2.00-3.99 4.00-5.99 6.00-7.99 8.00-9.99 10.00-11.99 12.00+ WA ID MT OR CA NV UT AZ NM CO WY ND SD MN WI NE IA KS MO TX IL IN OH MI OK AR TN W VA KY MD PA WI NY VT NH MA CT ME RI NJ DE DC NC SC GA AL MS LA FL HI AK Source: Energy Information Administration (EIA), Form EIA-176, "Annual Report of Natural and Supplemental Gas Supply and Disposition." 30. Average Price of Natural Gas Delivered to U.S. Onsystem Industrial Consumers, 2001 (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Figure 0.00-1.99 2.00-3.99 4.00-5.99 6.00-7.99 8.00-9.99 10.00-11.99 12.00+ WA ID MT OR CA NV UT AZ NM CO WY ND SD MN WI NE IA KS MO TX IL IN OH MI OK AR TN W VA KY MD PA WI NY VT NH MA CT ME RI NJ DE DC NC SC GA AL MS LA FL HI AK 31. Average Price of Natural Gas Delivered to U.S. Electric Utilities, 2001 (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Figure Sources: Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC), Form FERC-423, "Monthly Report of

423

Comparison of Crevice Corrosion of Fe-Based Amorphous Metal and Crystalline Ni-Cr-Mo Alloy  

SciTech Connect

The crevice corrosion behaviors of an Fe-based bulk metallic glass alloy (SAM1651) and a Ni-Cr-Mo crystalline alloy (C-22) were studied in 4M NaCl at 100 C with cyclic potentiodynamic polarization and constant potential tests. The corrosion damage morphologies, corrosion products and the compositions of corroded surfaces of these two alloys were studied with optical 3D reconstruction, Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy (EDS) and Auger Electron Spectroscopy (AES). It was found that the Fe-based bulk metallic glass (amorphous alloy) SAM1651 had a more positive breakdown potential and repassivation potential than crystalline alloy C-22 in cyclic potentiodynamic polarization tests and required a more positive oxidizing potential to initiate crevice corrosion in constant potential test. Once crevice corrosion initiated, the corrosion propagation of C-22 was more localized near the crevice border compared to SAM1651, and SAM1651 repassivated more readily than C-22. The EDS results indicated that the corrosion products of both alloys contained high amount of O and were enriched in Mo and Cr. The AES results indicated that a Cr-rich oxide passive film was formed on the surfaces of both alloys, and both alloys were corroded congruently.

Shan, X; Ha, H; Payer, J H

2008-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

424

Preliminary investigations for technology assessment of /sup 99/Mo production from LEU (low enriched uranium) targets. [For production of /sup 99m/Tc; by different methods  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents the results of preliminary studies on the effects of substituting low enriched uranium (LEU) for highly enriched uranium (HEU) in targets for the production of fission product /sup 99/Mo. Issues that were addressed are: (1) purity and yield of the /sup 99/Mo//sup 99m/Tc product, (2) fabrication of LEU targets and related concerns, and (3) radioactive waste. Laboratory experimentation was part of the efforts for issues (1) and (2); thus far, radioactive waste disposal has only been addressed in a paper study. Although the reported results are still preliminary, there is reason to be optimistic about the feasibility of utilizing LEU targets for /sup 99/Mo production. 37 refs., 1 fig., 5 tabs.

Vandegrift, G.F.; Chaiko, D.J.; Heinrich, R.R.; Kucera, E.T.; Jensen, K.J.; Poa, D.S.; Varma, R.; Vissers, D.R.

1986-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Examination of Na-Doped Mo Sputtering for CIGS Devices: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-10-375  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This work has investigated the use of Na doped Mo (MONA) sputtering targets for use in preparing CIGS devices. The Mo:Na material is doped to about 3% Na by weight, implying that a 40 nm layer on top of the standard Mo contact contains sufficient Na to dope a 2.5 ..mu..m CIGS film. The ability to control Na doping independent of both CIGS processing conditions and adhesion is an important gain for industry and research. Manufacturers gain a route to increased manufacturability and performance, while NREL researchers gain a tightened performance distribution of devices and increased process flexibility. Our immediate partner in this work, the Climax Molybdenum Technology Center, gains validation of their product.

Repins, I.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Nuclear Energy -- Knowledge Base for Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NE-KAMS) Code Verification and Validation Data Standards and Requirements: Fluid Dynamics Version 1.0  

SciTech Connect

V&V and UQ are the primary means to assess the accuracy and reliability of M&S and, hence, to establish confidence in M&S. Though other industries are establishing standards and requirements for the performance of V&V and UQ, at present, the nuclear industry has not established such standards or requirements. However, the nuclear industry is beginning to recognize that such standards are needed and that the resources needed to support V&V and UQ will be very significant. In fact, no single organization has sufficient resources or expertise required to organize, conduct and maintain a comprehensive V&V and UQ program. What is needed is a systematic and standardized approach to establish and provide V&V and UQ resources at a national or even international level, with a consortium of partners from government, academia and industry. Specifically, what is needed is a structured and cost-effective knowledge base that collects, evaluates and stores verification and validation data, and shows how it can be used to perform V&V and UQ, leveraging collaboration and sharing of resources to support existing engineering and licensing procedures as well as science-based V&V and UQ processes. The Nuclear Energy Knowledge base for Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NE-KAMS) is being developed at the Idaho National Laboratory in conjunction with Bettis Laboratory, Sandia National Laboratories, Argonne National Laboratory, Utah State University and others with the objective of establishing a comprehensive and web-accessible knowledge base to provide V&V and UQ resources for M&S for nuclear reactor design, analysis and licensing. The knowledge base will serve as an important resource for technical exchange and collaboration that will enable credible and reliable computational models and simulations for application to nuclear power. NE-KAMS will serve as a valuable resource for the nuclear industry, academia, the national laboratories, the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and the public and will help ensure the safe, economical and reliable operation of existing and future nuclear reactors.

Greg Weirs; Hyung Lee

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

In-situ small-angle X-ray scattering study of the precipitation behavior in a Fe-25 at.%Co-9 at.%Mo alloy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fe-Co-Mo alloys show extraordinary mechanical properties which make them potential candidates for various high-performance applications. In the present study, for the first time, the precipitation behavior in a Fe-25 at.%Co-9 at.%Mo alloy was studied by small-angle X-ray scattering using high-energy synchrotron radiation. The specimens were isothermally aged in an in-situ furnace. The small-angle X-ray scattering patterns showed scaling behavior and were evaluated by employing a model function from the literature. This approach provides information about the characteristic length scale and the volume fraction of the precipitates in the alloy.

Zickler, Gerald A. [Department of Physical Metallurgy and Materials Testing, Montanuniversitaet Leoben, Franz-Josef-Strasse 18, A-8700 Leoben (Austria); Christian Doppler Laboratory for Early Stages of Precipitation, Montanuniversitaet Leoben, Franz-Josef-Strasse 18, A-8700 Leoben (Austria)], E-mail: gerald.zickler@mu-leoben.at; Eidenberger, Elisabeth [Department of Physical Metallurgy and Materials Testing, Montanuniversitaet Leoben, Franz-Josef-Strasse 18, A-8700 Leoben (Austria); Leitner, Harald [Department of Physical Metallurgy and Materials Testing, Montanuniversitaet Leoben, Franz-Josef-Strasse 18, A-8700 Leoben (Austria); Christian Doppler Laboratory for Early Stages of Precipitation, Montanuniversitaet Leoben, Franz-Josef-Strasse 18, A-8700 Leoben (Austria); Stergar, Erich; Clemens, Helmut [Department of Physical Metallurgy and Materials Testing, Montanuniversitaet Leoben, Franz-Josef-Strasse 18, A-8700 Leoben (Austria); Staron, Peter; Lippmann, Thomas; Schreyer, Andreas [GKSS Research Center Geesthacht, Max-Planck-Strasse 1, D-21502 Geesthacht (Germany)

2008-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

428

A confirmative spin-parity assignment for the key 6.15 MeV state in $^{18}$Ne of astrophysical importance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Proton resonant states in $^{18}$Ne have been investigated by the resonant elastic scattering of $^{17}$F+$p$. The $^{17}$F beam was separated by the CNS radioactive ion beam separator (CRIB), and bombarded a thick H$_2$ gas target at 3.6 MeV/nucleon. The recoiled light particles were measured by using three sets of ${\\Delta}$E-E Si telescope at scattering angles of $\\theta$$_{lab}$$\\approx 3^\\circ$, 10$^\\circ$ and 18$^\\circ$, respectively. Four resonances, {\\it i.e.}, at $E_{x}$=6.15, 6.30, 6.85, and 7.05 MeV, were observed clearly. By $R$-matrix analysis of the excitation functions, $J^{\\pi}$=1$^-$ was firmly assigned to the 6.15 MeV state which is a key state in calculating the reaction rate of $^{14}$O($\\alpha$,$p$)$^{17}$F reaction. This reaction was thought to be one of the most probable key reactions for the breakout from the hot-CNO cycle to the $rp$-process in type I x-ray bursts In addition, a new excited state observed at $E_{x}$=6.85 MeV was tentatively assigned as 0$^{-}$, which could be the analog state of 6.880 MeV, 0$^{-}$ in mirror $^{18}$O.

J. Hu; J. J. He; S. W. Xu; H. Yamaguchi; K. David; P. Ma; J. Su; H. W. Wang; T. Nakao; Y. Wakabayashi; T. Teranishi; J. Y. Moon; H. S. Jung; T. Hashimoto; A. Chen; D. Irvine; S. Kubono

2013-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

429

Progress in developing processes for converting {sup 99}Mo production from high- to low-enriched uranium--1998.  

SciTech Connect

During 1998, the emphasis of our activities was focused mainly on target fabrication. Successful conversion requires a reliable irradiation target; the target being developed uses thin foils of uranium metal, which can be removed from the target hardware for dissolution and processing. This paper describes successes in (1) improving our method for heat-treating the uranium foil to produce a random-small grain structure, (2) improving electrodeposition of zinc and nickel fission-fragment barriers onto the foil, and (3) showing that these fission fragment barriers should be stable during transport of the targets following irradiation. A method was also developed for quantitatively electrodepositing uranium and plutonium contaminants in the {sup 99}Mo. Progress was also made in broadening international cooperation in our development activities.

Conner, C.

1998-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

430

Irradiation behavior of the interaction product of U-Mo fuel particle dispersion in an Al matrix.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Irradiation performance of U-Mo fuel particles dispersed in Al matrix is stable in terms of fuel swelling and is suitable for the conversion of research and test reactors from highly enriched uranium (HEU) to low enriched uranium (LEU). However, tests of the fuel at high temperatures and high burnups revealed obstacles caused by the interaction layers forming between the fuel particle and matrix. In some cases, fission gas filled pores grow and interconnect in the interdiffusion layer resulting in fuel plate failure. Postirradiation observations are made to examine the behavior of the interdiffusion layers. The interdiffusion layers show a fluid-like behavior characteristic of amorphous materials. In the amorphous interdiffusion layers, fission gas diffusivity is high and the material viscosity is low so that the fission gas pores readily form and grow. Based on the observations, a pore formation mechanism is proposed and potential remedies to suppress the pore growth are also introduced.

Kim, Y.S.; Hofman, G. (Nuclear Engineering Division)

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z