National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for mm sample format

  1. ARTIFACT FORMATION DURING NEUTRALIZATION OF TANK 50 SAMPLES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crump, S.; Young, J.

    2014-08-01

    Degradation products have been identified in the extracts of Tank 50 samples analyzed by semivolatile organic compound analysis (SVOA) using gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS). These materials, identified as short chain alkyl alcohols, were formed by acidification during sample preparation. A number of questions were raised about the formation of these and other materials reported in Tank 50 surface samples, and this report serves to address these questions.

  2. Examination of Hydrate Formation Methods: Trying to Create Representative Samples

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kneafsey, T.J.; Rees, E.V.L.; Nakagawa, S.; Kwon, T.-H.

    2011-04-01

    Forming representative gas hydrate-bearing laboratory samples is important so that the properties of these materials may be measured, while controlling the composition and other variables. Natural samples are rare, and have often experienced pressure and temperature changes that may affect the property to be measured [Waite et al., 2008]. Forming methane hydrate samples in the laboratory has been done a number of ways, each having advantages and disadvantages. The ice-to-hydrate method [Stern et al., 1996], contacts melting ice with methane at the appropriate pressure to form hydrate. The hydrate can then be crushed and mixed with mineral grains under controlled conditions, and then compacted to create laboratory samples of methane hydrate in a mineral medium. The hydrate in these samples will be part of the load-bearing frame of the medium. In the excess gas method [Handa and Stupin, 1992], water is distributed throughout a mineral medium (e.g. packed moist sand, drained sand, moistened silica gel, other porous media) and the mixture is brought to hydrate-stable conditions (chilled and pressurized with gas), allowing hydrate to form. This method typically produces grain-cementing hydrate from pendular water in sand [Waite et al., 2004]. In the dissolved gas method [Tohidi et al., 2002], water with sufficient dissolved guest molecules is brought to hydrate-stable conditions where hydrate forms. In the laboratory, this is can be done by pre-dissolving the gas of interest in water and then introducing it to the sample under the appropriate conditions. With this method, it is easier to form hydrate from more soluble gases such as carbon dioxide. It is thought that this method more closely simulates the way most natural gas hydrate has formed. Laboratory implementation, however, is difficult, and sample formation is prohibitively time consuming [Minagawa et al., 2005; Spangenberg and Kulenkampff, 2005]. In another version of this technique, a specified quantity of gas

  3. Sample Format

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    LNG Exports (Truck)" ,,,"Monthly Sales and Price Report" "Month/Year: _______________",,"Exporter (Authorization Holder):________________________________________________________________" "E-Mail Address:_____________________________",,,,"Address:_______________________________________________________" "Preparer of Report:__________________________",,,,"Telephone No.:______________________",,,"FAX

  4. Sample Format

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    LNG Imports (Truck)" ,,,"Monthly Sales and Price Report" "Month/Year: _______________",,"Importer (Authorization Holder):_________________________________________________________________" "E-Mail Address:_____________________________",,,,"Address:_______________________________________________________" "Preparer of Report:__________________________",,,,"Telephone No.:___________________",,,"FAX

  5. Sample Format

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    (5) (6) (7) (8) (9) Country of Destination International Point of Exit U.S. Departure Facility Volume (Mcf at U.S. Border) Price at U.S. Border (USMMBtu) Supplier LNG Transporter...

  6. Sample Format

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of Origin International Point of Entry U.S. Receiving Facility Volume (Mcf at U.S. Border) Price at U.S. Border (USMMBtu) Supplier LNG Transporter Markets Served - U.S. Area*...

  7. Sample Format

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7) (8) (9) Country of Destination International Point of Exit U.S. Departure Facility Volume (Mcf at U.S. Border) Price at U.S. Border (USMMBtu) Supplier CNG...

  8. Sample Format

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    LNG Imports (Truck)" ,,,"Monthly Sales and Price Report" "MonthYear: ... at U.S. Border (USMMBtu)","Supplier","LNG Transporter","Markets Served - U.S. Area* ...

  9. Sample Format

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    LNG Exports (Truck)" ,,,"Monthly Sales and Price Report" "MonthYear: ... at U.S. Border (USMMBtu)","Supplier","LNG Transporter","Specific Purchaser End ...

  10. CCM3 to MM5 Data Conversion

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2007-03-02

    The accompanying script (which uses the NCAR Command Language) ready output from the Community Climate Model Code, version 3 (CCM3) and converts it to input format for the Mesoscale Model, version 5 (MM5) code. The script utilizes a Fortran binary write routine.

  11. Coupling MM5 with ISOLSM:

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Yun (Helen) He 1 Coupling MM5 with ISOLSM: Development, Testing, and Application W.J. Riley, H.S. Cooley, Y. He*, M.S. Torn Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory June 2003 Yun (Helen) He 2 Outline ! Introduction ! Model Integration ! Model Configuration ! Model Testing ! Simulation and Impacts of Winter Wheat Harvest ! Conclusions ! Observations and Future Work June 2003 Yun (Helen) He 3 Introduction ! CO 2 fluxes and other trace-gas exchanges are tightly coupled to the surface water and energy

  12. {sup 13}C-METHYL FORMATE: OBSERVATIONS OF A SAMPLE OF HIGH-MASS STAR-FORMING REGIONS INCLUDING ORION-KL AND SPECTROSCOPIC CHARACTERIZATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Favre, Ccile; Bergin, Edwin A.; Crockett, Nathan R.; Neill, Justin L.; Carvajal, Miguel; Field, David; Jrgensen, Jes K.; Bisschop, Suzanne E.; Brouillet, Nathalie; Despois, Didier; Baudry, Alain; Kleiner, Isabelle; Marguls, Laurent; Huet, Thrse R.; Demaison, Jean E-mail: miguel.carvajal@dfa.uhu.es

    2015-01-01

    We have surveyed a sample of massive star-forming regions located over a range of distances from the Galactic center for methyl formate, HCOOCH{sub 3}, and its isotopologues H{sup 13}COOCH{sub 3} and HCOO{sup 13}CH{sub 3}. The observations were carried out with the APEX telescope in the frequency range 283.4-287.4GHz. Based on the APEX observations, we report tentative detections of the {sup 13}C-methyl formate isotopologue HCOO{sup 13}CH{sub 3} toward the following four massive star-forming regions: Sgr B2(N-LMH), NGC6334 IRS 1, W51 e2, and G19.61-0.23. In addition, we have used the 1mm ALMA science verification observations of Orion-KL and confirm the detection of the {sup 13}C-methyl formate species in Orion-KL and image its spatial distribution. Our analysis shows that the {sup 12}C/{sup 13}C isotope ratio in methyl formate toward the Orion-KL Compact Ridge and Hot Core-SW components (68.4 10.1 and 71.4 7.8, respectively) are, for both the {sup 13}C-methyl formate isotopologues, commensurate with the average {sup 12}C/{sup 13}C ratio of CO derived toward Orion-KL. Likewise, regarding the other sources, our results are consistent with the {sup 12}C/{sup 13}C in CO. We also report the spectroscopic characterization, which includes a complete partition function, of the complex H{sup 13}COOCH{sub 3} and HCOO{sup 13}CH{sub 3} species. New spectroscopic data for both isotopomers H{sup 13}COOCH{sub 3} and HCOO{sup 13}CH{sub 3}, presented in this study, have made it possible to measure this fundamentally important isotope ratio in a large organic molecule for the first time.

  13. ARM - Campaign Instrument - 5mm-mwr

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    mm-mwr Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign Instrument : 5mm Scanning Radiometer (5MM-MWR) Instrument Categories Atmospheric Profiling Campaigns Millimeter-wave Radiometric Arctic Winter Measurements Experiment [ Download Data ] North Slope Alaska, 1999.02.27 - 1999.03.30 Primary Measurements Taken The following measurements are those considered scientifically relevant. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers for the

  14. Star formation properties in barred galaxies. III. Statistical study of bar-driven secular evolution using a sample of nearby barred spirals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhou, Zhi-Min; Wu, Hong; Cao, Chen E-mail: hwu@bao.ac.cn

    2015-01-01

    Stellar bars are important internal drivers of secular evolution in disk galaxies. Using a sample of nearby spiral galaxies with weak and strong bars, we explore the relationships between the star formation feature and stellar bars in galaxies. We find that galaxies with weak bars tend coincide with low concentrical star formation activity, while those with strong bars show a large scatter in the distribution of star formation activity. We find enhanced star formation activity in bulges toward stronger bars, although not predominantly, consistent with previous studies. Our results suggest that different stages of the secular process and many other factors may contribute to the complexity of the secular evolution. In addition, barred galaxies with intense star formation in bars tend to have active star formation in their bulges and disks, and bulges have higher star formation densities than bars and disks, indicating the evolutionary effects of bars. We then derived a possible criterion to quantify the different stages of the bar-driven physical process, while future work is needed because of the uncertainties.

  15. Studies of the mechanism of the cluster formation in a thermally sampling atmospheric pressure ionization mass spectrometer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Albrecht, Sascha Stroh, Fred; Klopotowski, Sebastian Derpmann, Valerie Klee, Sonja Brockmann, Klaus J. Benter, Thorsten

    2014-01-15

    In this study a thermally sampling atmospheric pressure ionization mass spectrometer is described and characterized. The ion transfer stage offers the capability to sample cluster ions at thermal equilibrium and during this transfer fundamental processes possibly affecting the cluster distribution are also readily identified. Additionally, the transfer stage combines optional collision-induced dissociation (CID) analysis of the cluster composition with thermal equilibrium sampling of clusters. The performance of the setup is demonstrated with regard to the proton-bound water cluster system. The benefit of the studied processes is that they can help to improve future transfer stages and to understand cluster ion reactions in ion mobility tubes and high-pressure ion sources. In addition, the instrument allows for the identification of fragmentation and protonation reactions caused by CID.

  16. Summary of Decisions - MM DD, YYYY - MM DD, YYYY | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    MM DD, YYYY - MM DD, YYYY Summary of Decisions - MM DD, YYYY - MM DD, YYYY April 1, 2016 - 9:46am Addthis Personnel Security (10 CFR Part 710) On March 30, 2016, an OHA Administrative Judge issued a decision in which he determined that an individual's DOE access authorization should not be restored. The LSO had alleged that individual's history of three alcohol-related arrests and an opinion by a DOE psychiatrist that he suffered from alcohol abuse, a condition with caused or may cause a

  17. HIghMass-high H I mass, H I-rich galaxies at z ∼ 0 sample definition, optical and Hα imaging, and star formation properties

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huang, Shan; Matsushita, Satoki; Haynes, Martha P.; Giovanelli, Riccardo; Hallenbeck, Gregory; Jones, Michael G.; Adams, Elizabeth A. K.; Brinchmann, Jarle; Chengalur, Jayaram N.; Hunt, Leslie K.; Masters, Karen L.; Saintonge, Amelie; Spekkens, Kristine

    2014-09-20

    We present first results of the study of a set of exceptional H I sources identified in the 40% ALFALFA extragalactic H I survey catalog α.40 as both being H I massive (M{sub HI}>10{sup 10} M{sub ⊙}) and having high gas fractions for their stellar masses: the HIghMass galaxy sample. We analyze UV- and optical-broadband and Hα images to understand the nature of their relatively underluminous disks in optical and to test whether their high gas fractions can be tracked to higher dark matter halo spin parameters or late gas accretion. Estimates of their star formation rates (SFRs) based on spectral energy distribution fitting agree within uncertainties with the Hα luminosity inferred current massive SFRs. The H II region luminosity functions, parameterized as dN/dlog L∝L {sup α}, have standard slopes at the luminous end (α ∼ –1). The global SFRs demonstrate that the HIghMass galaxies exhibit active ongoing star formation (SF) with moderate SF efficiency but, relative to normal spirals, a lower integrated SFR in the past. Because the SF activity in these systems is spread throughout their extended disks, they have overall lower SFR surface densities and lower surface brightness in the optical bands. Relative to normal disk galaxies, the majority of HIghMass galaxies have higher Hα equivalent widths and are bluer in their outer disks, implying an inside-out disk growth scenario. Downbending double exponential disks are more frequent than upbending disks among the gas-rich galaxies, suggesting that SF thresholds exist in the downbending disks, probably as a result of concentrated gas distribution.

  18. Coupling MM5 with LSM1: Development, Testing, and Application - MM5_workshop

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    MM5 with ISOLSM: Development, Testing, and Applications W.J. Riley 1 , H.S. Cooley 1,2 , Y. He* 1 , M.S. Torn 1 1 Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 2 Energy and Resources Group, U.C. Berkeley, CA 1. INTRODUCTION Surface water and energy fluxes are tightly coupled with CO 2 exchanges between the ecosystem and atmosphere. Other surface-to- atmosphere trace-gas exchanges of interest in climate change research (e.g., N 2 O, CH 4 , C 18 OO, and H 2 18 O) are also strongly impacted

  19. Formation testers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brieger, E.

    1980-07-01

    A description is given of a method for use in obtaining multiple pressure tests of an earth formation traversed by a well bore by use of a sidewall fluid sampler well tool which has a fluid pressure sampling chamber in the well tool in open fluid communication with a pad sealing means, comprising the steps of: for one selected level in a well bore, moving a pad sealing means on the well tool into engagement with the wall of a well bore and isolating a wall segment of the earth formation; after the pad sealing means engges the wall segment of the earth formation, generating a hydraulic pressure in the well tool and applying said hydraulic pressure to said fluid pressure sampling chamber for increasing the volume of said fluid pressure sampling chamber thereby to dray a fluid sample from the earth formation engaged by the pad sealing means into the fluid pressure sampling chamber, sensing the pressure of said fluid sample as it is drawn into the fluid pressure sampling chamber while the volume of the sampling chamber is being increased, relieving the hydraulic pressure in the well tool with respect to said fluid pressur sampling chamber for decreasing the volume of said fluid pressure sampling chamber thereby to contact the sampling chamber to dischrge the fluid sample through the pad sealing means; retracting the sealing pad means and, after retrction of sealing pad means from engagement from the wall of the well bore, moving the well tool to a second location at another level in the well bore and, at the second location, repeating the steps of the method performed at the one selected level for obtaining another fluid sample and pressure sensing at said second location.

  20. 40 MM Grenade Launcher Qualification Requirements at Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    launcher, which utilizes high explosive ammunition to defeat adversary personnel and equipment. A number of Department sites have procured these weapons. PDF icon 40 MM...

  1. Formation testers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brieger, E.F.

    1981-09-08

    A formation tester apparatus is disclosed for use in a well bore for multiple testing of pressures of earth formation fluids and the taking of a fluid sample. Pad and shoe means are selectively operable for sealingly engaging a well bore. Upon sealing engagement of the pad with the wall of a well bore, a fluid sample is ingested into an expanding chamber while its pressure is sensed. Upon completion of the pressure test, the pad is retracted from the wall of a well bore, and the expanding chamber contracts to expel the fluid sample. The pressure test may be repeated any number of times. The expanding chamber includes a piston operated with fluid pressure used to actuate the pad. A choke delays the application of pressure to the piston until after the pad seals on the wall of the well bore. When a fluid sample is desired, the fluid pressure used to actuate the pad is increased to operate a first valve which connects the pad of a water cushion sampling chamber. After a fluid sample is collected, the fluid pressure is further increased to operate a second valve which closes off the sampling chamber. When the formations are unconsolidated a slidable probe in the pad extends outwardly into the wall and forms a mechanical filter. When the probe retracts the filter is self-cleaning.

  2. Replacing 16 mm film cameras with high definition digital cameras

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Balch, K.S.

    1995-12-31

    For many years 16 mm film cameras have been used in severe environments. These film cameras are used on Hy-G automotive sleds, airborne gun cameras, range tracking and other hazardous environments. The companies and government agencies using these cameras are in need of replacing them with a more cost effective solution. Film-based cameras still produce the best resolving capability, however, film development time, chemical disposal, recurring media cost, and faster digital analysis are factors influencing the desire for a 16 mm film camera replacement. This paper will describe a new camera from Kodak that has been designed to replace 16 mm high speed film cameras.

  3. 40 MM Grenade Launcher Qualification Requirements at Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Sites, IG-0806 | Department of Energy 40 MM Grenade Launcher Qualification Requirements at Department of Energy Sites, IG-0806 40 MM Grenade Launcher Qualification Requirements at Department of Energy Sites, IG-0806 The Department of Energy and its National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), operate some of the most sensitive Federal facilities in the United States. Because of the mission requirements, safeguards and security is a top priority at these sites. As part of its security

  4. LIGA-fabricated compact mm-wave linear accelerator cavities.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Song, J.J.; Bajikar, S.S.; DeCarlo, F.; Kang, Y.W.; Kustom, R.L.; Mancini, D.C.; Nassiri, A.; Lai, B.; Feinerman, A.D.; White, V.

    1998-03-23

    Millimeter-wave rf cavities for use in linear accelerators, free-electron lasers, and mm-wave undulatory are under development at Argonne National Laboratory. Typical cavity dimensions are in the 1000 mm range, and the overall length of the accelerator structure, which consists of 30-100 cavities, is about 50-100 mm. An accuracy of 0.2% in the cavity dimensions is necessary in order to achieve a high Q-factor of the cavity. To achieve this these structures are being fabricated using deep X-ray lithography, electroforming, and assembly (LIGA). The first prototype cavity structures are designed for 108 GHz and 2p/3-mode operation. Input and output couplers are integrated with the cavity structures. The cavities are fabricated on copper substrates by electroforming copper into 1-mm-thick PMMA resists patterned by deep x-ray lithography and polishing the copper down to the desired thickness. These are fabricated separately and subsequently assembled with precision spacing and alignment using microspheres, optical fibers, or microfabricated spacers/alignment pieces. Details of the fabrication process, alignment, and assembly work are presented in here.

  5. A 300-nm compact mm-wave linac FEL design

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nassiri, A.; Kustom, R.L.; Kang, Y.W.

    1995-12-31

    Microfabrication technology offers an alternative method for fabricating precision, miniature-size components suitable for use in accelerator physics and commercial applications. The original R&D work at Argonne, in collaboration with the University of Illinois at Chicago, has produced encouraging results in the area of rf accelerating structure design, optical and x-ray masks production, deep x-ray lithography (LIGA exposures), and precision structural alignments. In this paper we will present a design study for a compact single pass mm-linac FEL to produce short wavelength radiation. This system will consists of a photocathode rf gun operated at 30 GHz, a 50-MeV superconducting constant gradient structure operated at 60 GHz, and a microundulator with 1-mm period. Initial experimental results on a scale model rf gun and microundulator will be presented.

  6. CHEMISTRY IN INFRARED DARK CLOUD CLUMPS: A MOLECULAR LINE SURVEY AT 3 mm

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sanhueza, Patricio; Jackson, James M.; Foster, Jonathan B.; Finn, Susanna C.; Garay, Guido; Silva, Andrea

    2012-09-01

    We have observed 37 Infrared Dark Clouds (IRDCs), containing a total of 159 clumps, in high-density molecular tracers at 3 mm using the 22 m ATNF Mopra Telescope located in Australia. After determining kinematic distances, we eliminated clumps that are not located in IRDCs and clumps with a separation between them of less than one Mopra beam. Our final sample consists of 92 IRDC clumps. The most commonly detected molecular lines are (detection rates higher than 8%) N{sub 2}H{sup +}, HNC, HN{sup 13}C, HCO{sup +}, H{sup 13}CO{sup +}, HCN, C{sub 2}H, HC{sub 3}N, HNCO, and SiO. We investigate the behavior of the different molecular tracers and look for chemical variations as a function of an evolutionary sequence based on Spitzer IRAC and MIPS emission. We find that the molecular tracers behave differently through the evolutionary sequence and some of them can be used to yield useful relative age information. The presence of HNC and N{sub 2}H{sup +} lines does not depend on the star formation activity. On the other hand, HC{sub 3}N, HNCO, and SiO are predominantly detected in later stages of evolution. Optical depth calculations show that in IRDC clumps the N{sub 2}H{sup +} line is optically thin, the C{sub 2}H line is moderately optically thick, and HNC and HCO{sup +} are optically thick. The HCN hyperfine transitions are blended, and, in addition, show self-absorbed line profiles and extended wing emission. These factors combined prevent the use of HCN hyperfine transitions for the calculation of physical parameters. Total column densities of the different molecules, except C{sub 2}H, increase with the evolutionary stage of the clumps. Molecular abundances increase with the evolutionary stage for N{sub 2}H{sup +} and HCO{sup +}. The N{sub 2}H{sup +}/HCO{sup +} and N{sub 2}H{sup +}/HNC abundance ratios act as chemical clocks, increasing with the evolution of the clumps.

  7. Metrology issues for processing of 300 mm wafers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Watanabe, Kenji; Koike, Atsuyoshi

    1998-11-24

    Construction of IC lines using 300 mm wafers will begin in 1998-99 for pilot lines, with construction of mass production lines in 2000 or later. These lines will most likely be introduced with design rules in the range from 250 to 180 nm. Difficult challenges for these feature sizes include critical dimensions, registration, thin film measurement, and defect inspection. At the same time, metrology is expected to play a major role in controlling costs, increasing manufacturing flexibility, and decreasing cycle time in addition to assisting in the reduced emission of global warming gases.

  8. QM/MM Analysis of Cellulase Active Sites and Actions of the Enzymes on Substrates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saharay, Moumita; Guo, Hao-Bo; Smith, Jeremy C; Guo, Hong

    2010-01-01

    Biodegradation of cellulosic biomass requires the actions of three types of secreted enzymes; endoglucanase (EC 3.2.1.4), cellobiohydrolase or exoglucanase (EC 3.2.1.91), and -glucosidase (EC 4.2.1.21). These enzymes act synergistically to hydrolyse the -1,4 bonds of cellulose and converts it into simple sugar. Hydrolysis of the glycosidic bond can occur either by net retention or by inversion of anomeric configuration at the anomeric center. QM/MM simulations are useful tools to study the energetics of the reactions and analyze the active-site structures at different states of the catalysis, including the formation of unstable transition states. Here, a brief description of previous work on glycoside hydrolases is first given. The results of the QM/MM potential energy and free energy simulations corresponding to glycosylation and deglycosylation processes are then provided for two retaining endoglucanases, Cel12A and Cel5A. The active-site structural features are analyzed based on the QM/MM results. The role of different residues and hydrogen bonding interactions during the catalysis and the importance of the sugar ring distortion are discussed for these two enzymes.

  9. Sample manuscript showing style and formatting specifications...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... as the outputs in Figure 5. The extracted green areas are shown in Figure 6 (b). ... States to promote electricity generation from renewable energy sources such as solar. ...

  10. Porotomo Sample Interferogram in HDF5 Format

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tabrez Ali

    2015-01-01

    HDF5 file containing phase, filtered phase, unwrapped range change and correlation for the a TSX pair (Track 53) spanning time interval 12-23-2011 to 10-26-2012.

  11. SSC 50 mm dipole magnet cryostat thermal measurement results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boroski, W.N.; Nicol, T.H.; Ruschman, M.K.; Schoo, C.J.

    1993-05-01

    A prototype Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) 50 mm dipole magnet cryostat, DCA323, was instrumented at Fermilab and delivered to the SSC Laboratory for installation into the accelerator systems string test facility. In series with other magnets, the instrumented cryostat will be used to quantify and verify cryostat thermal performance with respect to design requirements. Prior to leaving Fermilab, DCA323 was subjected to magnetic testing at the Magnet Test Facility (MTF). This presented an opportunity to obtain preliminary thermal performance data under simulated operating conditions. It should be noted that measurements of overall cryostat thermal performance were not possible during the MTF measurements as the magnet test stands are designed for magnetic rather than thermal testing. They are not designed to limit heat inleak to the ends of the cryostat, which has been shown to have a significant effect on overall measured thermal performance. Nonetheless, these measurements do offer insight into the performance of several of the cryostat components and sub-systems.

  12. Fabrication and Analysis of 150-mm-Aperture Nb3Sn MQXF Coils

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Holik, E. F.; Ambrosio, G.; Anerella, M.; Bossert, R.; Cavanna, E.; Cheng, D.; Dietderich, D. R.; Ferracin, P.; Ghosh, A. K.; Bermudez, S. Izquierdo; et al

    2016-01-12

    The U.S. LHC Accelerator Research Program (LARP) and CERN are combining efforts for the HiLumi-LHC upgrade to design and fabricate 150-mm-aperture, interaction region quadrupoles with a nominal gradient of 130 T/m using Nb3Sn. To successfully produce the necessary long MQXF triplets, the HiLumi-LHC collaboration is systematically reducing risk and design modification by heavily relying upon the experience gained from the successful 120-mm-aperture LARP HQ program. First generation MQXF short (MQXFS) coils were predominately a scaling up of the HQ quadrupole design allowing comparable cable expansion during Nb3Sn formation heat treatment and increased insulation fraction for electrical robustness. A total ofmore » 13 first generation MQXFS coils were fabricated between LARP and CERN. Systematic differences in coil size, coil alignment symmetry, and coil length contraction during heat treatment are observed and likely due to slight variances in tooling and insulation/cable systems. Analysis of coil cross sections indicate that field-shaping wedges and adjacent coil turns are systematically displaced from the nominal location and the cable is expanding less than nominally designed. Lastly, a second generation MQXF coil design seeks to correct the expansion and displacement discrepancies by increasing insulation and adding adjustable shims at the coil pole and midplanes to correct allowed magnetic field harmonics.« less

  13. Sample Proficiency Test exercise

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alcaraz, A; Gregg, H; Koester, C

    2006-02-05

    The current format of the OPCW proficiency tests has multiple sets of 2 samples sent to an analysis laboratory. In each sample set, one is identified as a sample, the other as a blank. This method of conducting proficiency tests differs from how an OPCW designated laboratory would receive authentic samples (a set of three containers, each not identified, consisting of the authentic sample, a control sample, and a blank sample). This exercise was designed to test the reporting if the proficiency tests were to be conducted. As such, this is not an official OPCW proficiency test, and the attached report is one method by which LLNL might report their analyses under a more realistic testing scheme. Therefore, the title on the report ''Report of the Umpteenth Official OPCW Proficiency Test'' is meaningless, and provides a bit of whimsy for the analyses and readers of the report.

  14. Protections: Sampling

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Protections: Sampling Protections: Sampling Protection #3: Sampling for known and unexpected contaminants August 1, 2013 Monitoring stormwater in Los Alamos Canyon Monitoring stormwater in Los Alamos Canyon The Environmental Sampling Board, a key piece of the Strategy, ensures that LANL collects relevant and appropriate data to answer questions about the protection of human and environmental health, and to satisfy regulatory requirements. LANL must demonstrate the data are technically justified

  15. Evidence for ubiquitous high-equivalent-width nebular emission in z ∼ 7 galaxies: toward a clean measurement of the specific star-formation rate using a sample of bright, magnified galaxies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smit, R.; Bouwens, R. J.; Labbé, I.; Zheng, W.; Lemze, D.; Ford, H.; Bradley, L.; Coe, D.; Postman, M.; Donahue, M.; Moustakas, J.; Umetsu, K.; Zitrin, A.; Bartelmann, M.; Gonzalez, V.; Benítez, N.; Jimenez-Teja, Y.; Grillo, C.; Infante, L.; and others

    2014-03-20

    Growing observational evidence indicates that nebular line emission has a significant impact on the rest-frame optical fluxes of z ∼ 5-7 galaxies. This line emission makes z ∼ 5-7 galaxies appear more massive, with lower specific star-formation rates (sSFRs). However, corrections for this line emission have been difficult to perform reliably because of huge uncertainties on the strength of such emission at z ≳ 5.5. In this paper, we present the most direct observational evidence thus far for ubiquitous high-equivalent-width (EW) [O III] + Hβ line emission in Lyman-break galaxies at z ∼ 7, and we present a strategy for an improved measurement of the sSFR at z ∼ 7. We accomplish this through the selection of bright galaxies in the narrow redshift window z ∼ 6.6-7.0 where the Spitzer/Infrared Array Camera (IRAC) 4.5 μm flux provides a clean measurement of the stellar continuum light, in contrast with the 3.6 μm flux, which is contaminated by the prominent [O III] + Hβ lines. To ensure a high signal-to-noise ratio for our IRAC flux measurements, we consider only the brightest (H {sub 160} < 26 mag) magnified galaxies we have identified behind galaxy clusters. It is remarkable that the mean rest-frame optical color for our bright seven-source sample is very blue, [3.6]-[4.5] = –0.9 ± 0.3. Such blue colors cannot be explained by the stellar continuum light and require that the rest-frame EW of [O III] + Hβ is greater than 637 Å for the average source. The four bluest sources from our seven-source sample require an even more extreme EW of 1582 Å. We can also set a robust lower limit of ≳ 4 Gyr{sup –1} on the sSFR of our sample based on the mean spectral energy distribution.

  16. Protections: Sampling

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Protection 3: Sampling for known and unexpected contaminants August 1, 2013 Monitoring stormwater in Los Alamos Canyon Monitoring stormwater in Los Alamos Canyon The Environmental ...

  17. Protections: Sampling

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and unexpected contaminants August 1, 2013 Monitoring stormwater in Los Alamos Canyon Monitoring stormwater in Los Alamos Canyon The Environmental Sampling Board, a key piece...

  18. THE DISCOVERY OF RADIO STARS WITHIN 10'' OF SgrA* AT 7 mm

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yusef-Zadeh, F.; Roberts, D. A.; Royster, M.; Bushouse, H.; Wardle, M.; Cotton, W.; Van Moorsel, G.

    2014-09-01

    Very Large Array observations of the Galactic center at 7 mm have produced an image of the 30'' surrounding SgrA* with a resolution of ?82 42 milliarcseconds (mas). A comparison with IR images taken simultaneously with the Very Large Telescope identifies 41 radio sources with L-band (3.8 ?m) stellar counterparts. The well-known young, massive stars in the central SgrA* cluster (e.g., IRS 16C, IRS 16NE, IRS 16SE2, IRS 16NW, IRS 16SW, AF, AFNW, IRS 34W, and IRS 33E) are detected with peak flux densities between ?0.2 and 1.3 mJy. The origin of the stellar radio emission in the central cluster is discussed in terms of ionized stellar winds with mass-loss rates in the range ?0.8-5 10{sup 5} M {sub ?} yr{sup 1}. Radio emission from eight massive stars is used as a tool for registration between the radio and infrared frames with mas precision within a few arcseconds of SgrA* . This is similar to the established technique of aligning SiO masers and evolved stars except that radio stars lie within a few arcseconds of SgrA*. Our data show a scatter of ?6.5 mas in the positions of the eight radio sources that appear in both the L-band and 7 mm images. Last, we use the radio and IR data to argue that members of IRS 13N are young stellar objects rather than dust clumps, supporting the hypothesis that recent star formation has occurred near SgrA*.

  19. SAMPLING SYSTEM

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hannaford, B.A.; Rosenberg, R.; Segaser, C.L.; Terry, C.L.

    1961-01-17

    An apparatus is given for the batch sampling of radioactive liquids such as slurries from a system by remote control, while providing shielding for protection of operating personnel from the harmful effects of radiation.

  20. Sampling box

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Phillips, Terrance D.; Johnson, Craig

    2000-01-01

    An air sampling box that uses a slidable filter tray and a removable filter cartridge to allow for the easy replacement of a filter which catches radioactive particles is disclosed.

  1. SAMPLING OSCILLOSCOPE

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sugarman, R.M.

    1960-08-30

    An oscilloscope is designed for displaying transient signal waveforms having random time and amplitude distributions. The oscilloscopc is a sampling device that selects for display a portion of only those waveforms having a particular range of amplitudes. For this purpose a pulse-height analyzer is provided to screen the pulses. A variable voltage-level shifter and a time-scale rampvoltage generator take the pulse height relative to the start of the waveform. The variable voltage shifter produces a voltage level raised one step for each sequential signal waveform to be sampled and this results in an unsmeared record of input signal waveforms. Appropriate delay devices permit each sample waveform to pass its peak amplitude before the circuit selects it for display.

  2. Sampling apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gordon, Norman R.; King, Lloyd L.; Jackson, Peter O.; Zulich, Alan W.

    1989-01-01

    A sampling apparatus is provided for sampling substances from solid surfaces. The apparatus includes first and second elongated tubular bodies which telescopically and sealingly join relative to one another. An absorbent pad is mounted to the end of a rod which is slidably received through a passageway in the end of one of the joined bodies. The rod is preferably slidably and rotatably received through the passageway, yet provides a selective fluid tight seal relative thereto. A recess is formed in the rod. When the recess and passageway are positioned to be coincident, fluid is permitted to flow through the passageway and around the rod. The pad is preferably laterally orientable relative to the rod and foldably retractable to within one of the bodies. A solvent is provided for wetting of the pad and solubilizing or suspending the material being sampled from a particular surface.

  3. Sampling apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gordon, N.R.; King, L.L.; Jackson, P.O.; Zulich, A.W.

    1989-07-18

    A sampling apparatus is provided for sampling substances from solid surfaces. The apparatus includes first and second elongated tubular bodies which telescopically and sealingly join relative to one another. An absorbent pad is mounted to the end of a rod which is slidably received through a passageway in the end of one of the joined bodies. The rod is preferably slidably and rotatably received through the passageway, yet provides a selective fluid tight seal relative thereto. A recess is formed in the rod. When the recess and passageway are positioned to be coincident, fluid is permitted to flow through the passageway and around the rod. The pad is preferably laterally orientable relative to the rod and foldably retractable to within one of the bodies. A solvent is provided for wetting of the pad and solubilizing or suspending the material being sampled from a particular surface. 15 figs.

  4. Monte Carlo evaluation of CTDI{sub {infinity}} in infinitely long cylinders of water, polyethylene and PMMA with diameters from 10 mm to 500 mm

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhou Hong; Boone, John M.

    2008-06-15

    Monte Carlo simulations were used to evaluate the radiation dose to infinitely long cylinders of water, polyethylene, and poly(methylmethacrylate) (PMMA) from 10 to 500 mm in diameter. Radiation doses were computed by simulating a 10 mm divergent primary beam striking the cylinder at z=0, and the scattered radiation in the -z and +z directions was integrated out to infinity. Doses were assessed using the total energy deposited divided by the mass of the 10-mm-thick volume of material in the primary beam. This approach is consistent with the notion of the computed tomography dose index (CTDI) integrated over infinite z, which is equivalent to the dose near the center of an infinitely long CT scan. Monoenergetic x-ray beams were studied from 5 to 140 keV, allowing polyenergetic x-ray spectra to be evaluated using a weighted average. The radiation dose for a 10-mm-thick CT slice was assessed at the center, edge, and over the entire diameter of the phantom. The geometry of a commercial CT scanner was simulated, and the computed results were in good agreement with measured doses. The absorbed dose in water for 120 kVp x-ray spectrum with no bow tie filter for a 50 mm cylinder diameter was about 1.2 mGy per mGy air kerma at isocenter for both the peripheral and center regions, and dropped to 0.84 mGy/mGy for a 500-mm-diam water phantom at the periphery, where the corresponding value for the center location was 0.19 mGy/mGy. The influence of phantom composition was studied. For a diameter of 100 mm, the dose coefficients were 1.23 for water, 1.02 for PMMA, and 0.94 for polyethylene (at 120 kVp). For larger diameter phantoms, the order changed--for a 400 mm phantom, the dose coefficient of polyethylene (0.25) was greater than water (0.21) and PMMA (0.16). The influence of the head and body bow tie filters was also studied. For the peripheral location, the dose coefficients when no bow tie filter was used were high (e.g., for a water phantom at 120 kVp at a diameter of 300

  5. SiO2 Fracture: Chemomechanics with a Machine Learning Hybrid QM/MM Scheme |

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Argonne Leadership Computing Facility SiO2 Fracture: Chemomechanics with a Machine Learning Hybrid QM/MM Scheme SiO2 Fracture: Chemomechanics with a Machine Learning Hybrid QM/MM Scheme. Close-up of a crack tip in a multiscale quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical (QM/MM) simulation of "stress corrosion" cracking in amorphous silica glass. This project aims to elucidate the role of crack tip chemical reactions involving corrosive species such as water. Petascale computing

  6. Scavenging Elemental Sb Through Addition of NbSb to Mm0.9Fe3...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Title: Scavenging Elemental Sb Through Addition of NbSb to Mm0.9Fe3.5Co0.5S12 Skutterudites Authors: Zhang, Long ; Zhou, Chen ; Morelli, Donald T ; Sakamoto, Jeffrey Publication ...

  7. Feasibility study for a 10 MM GPY fuel ethanol plant, Brady Hot Springs,

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Nevada. Volume II. Geothermal resource, agricultural feedstock, markets and economic viability (Technical Report) | SciTech Connect MM GPY fuel ethanol plant, Brady Hot Springs, Nevada. Volume II. Geothermal resource, agricultural feedstock, markets and economic viability Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Feasibility study for a 10 MM GPY fuel ethanol plant, Brady Hot Springs, Nevada. Volume II. Geothermal resource, agricultural feedstock, markets and economic viability The issues

  8. Feasibility study for a 10-MM-GPY fuel ethanol plant, Brady Hot Springs,

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Nevada. Volume 1. Process and plant design (Technical Report) | SciTech Connect -MM-GPY fuel ethanol plant, Brady Hot Springs, Nevada. Volume 1. Process and plant design Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Feasibility study for a 10-MM-GPY fuel ethanol plant, Brady Hot Springs, Nevada. Volume 1. Process and plant design An investigation was performed to determine the technical and economic viability of constructing and operating a geothermally heated, biomass, motor fuel alcohol plant

  9. Development and application of QM/MM methods to study the solvation effects and surfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dibya, Pooja Arora

    2010-05-16

    Quantum mechanical (QM) calculations have the advantage of attaining high-level accuracy, however QM calculations become computationally inefficient as the size of the system grows. Solving complex molecular problems on large systems and ensembles by using quantum mechanics still poses a challenge in terms of the computational cost. Methods that are based on classical mechanics are an inexpensive alternative, but they lack accuracy. A good trade off between accuracy and efficiency is achieved by combining QM methods with molecular mechanics (MM) methods to use the robustness of the QM methods in terms of accuracy and the MM methods to minimize the computational cost. Two types of QM combined with MM (QM/MM) methods are the main focus of the present dissertation: the application and development of QM/MM methods for solvation studies and reactions on the Si(100) surface. The solvation studies were performed using a discreet solvation model that is largely based on first principles called the effective fragment potential method (EFP). The main idea of combining the EFP method with quantum mechanics is to accurately treat the solute-solvent and solvent-solvent interactions, such as electrostatic, polarization, dispersion and charge transfer, that are important in correctly calculating solvent effects on systems of interest. A second QM/MM method called SIMOMM (surface integrated molecular orbital molecular mechanics) is a hybrid QM/MM embedded cluster model that mimics the real surface.3 This method was employed to calculate the potential energy surfaces for reactions of atomic O on the Si(100) surface. The hybrid QM/MM method is a computationally inexpensive approach for studying reactions on larger surfaces in a reasonably accurate and efficient manner. This thesis is comprised of four chapters: Chapter 1 describes the general overview and motivation of the dissertation and gives a broad background of the computational methods that have been employed in this work

  10. Particulate Formation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Formation - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & Engineering Grid Modernization Battery Testing Nuclear Energy Defense Waste Management Programs Advanced Nuclear Energy

  11. New Measurements of the Cosmic Background Radiation Temperature at3.3 mm Wavelength

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Witebsky, C.; Smoot, G.; De Amici, G.; Friedman, S.D.

    1986-02-01

    We have measured the temperature of the cosmic background radiation (CBR) at 3.3 mm wavelength in 1982, 1983, and 1984 as part of a larger project to determine the CBR temperature at five wavelengths from 12 cm to 3.3 mm (Smoot et al. 1985). The 3.3-mm measurements yield a brightness temperature of 2.57 K with a 1{sigma} uncertainty of 20.12 K. This paper describes the instrument, the measurement techniques, and the data-analysis procedures used. Our result is in good agreement with recent measurements at comparable wavelengths by Meyer and Jura (1985) and by Peterson, Richards, and Timusk (1985), but it disagrees with the temperatures reported by Woody and Richards (1981).

  12. CHARMM-GUI Input Generator for NAMD, GROMACS, AMBER, OpenMM, and CHARMM/OpenMM Simulations Using the CHARMM36 Additive Force Field

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Lee, Jumin; Cheng, Xi; Swails, Jason M.; Yeom, Min Sun; Eastman, Peter K.; Lemkul, Justin A.; Wei, Shuai; Buckner, Joshua; Jeong, Jong Cheol; Qi, Yifei; et al

    2015-11-12

    Here we report that proper treatment of nonbonded interactions is essential for the accuracy of molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, especially in studies of lipid bilayers. The use of the CHARMM36 force field (C36 FF) in different MD simulation programs can result in disagreements with published simulations performed with CHARMM due to differences in the protocols used to treat the long-range and 1-4 nonbonded interactions. In this study, we systematically test the use of the C36 lipid FF in NAMD, GROMACS, AMBER, OpenMM, and CHARMM/OpenMM. A wide range of Lennard-Jones (LJ) cutoff schemes and integrator algorithms were tested to find themore » optimal simulation protocol to best match bilayer properties of six lipids with varying acyl chain saturation and head groups. MD simulations of a 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-phosphatidylcholine (DPPC) bilayer were used to obtain the optimal protocol for each program. MD simulations with all programs were found to reasonably match the DPPC bilayer properties (surface area per lipid, chain order parameters, and area compressibility modulus) obtained using the standard protocol used in CHARMM as well as from experiments. The optimal simulation protocol was then applied to the other five lipid simulations and resulted in excellent agreement between results from most simulation programs as well as with experimental data. AMBER compared least favorably with the expected membrane properties, which appears to be due to its use of the hard-truncation in the LJ potential versus a force-based switching function used to smooth the LJ potential as it approaches the cutoff distance. The optimal simulation protocol for each program has been implemented in CHARMM-GUI. This protocol is expected to be applicable to the remainder of the additive C36 FF including the proteins, nucleic acids, carbohydrates, and small molecules.« less

  13. A shallow convection parameterization for the non-hydrostatic MM5 mesoscale model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seaman, N.L.; Kain, J.S.; Deng, A.

    1996-04-01

    A shallow convection parameterization suitable for the Pennsylvannia State University (PSU)/National Center for Atmospheric Research nonhydrostatic mesoscale model (MM5) is being developed at PSU. The parameterization is based on parcel perturbation theory developed in conjunction with a 1-D Mellor Yamada 1.5-order planetary boundary layer scheme and the Kain-Fritsch deep convection model.

  14. A mm-wave planar microcavity structure for electron linear accelerator system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kang, Y.W.; Kustom, R.; Mills, F.; Mavrogenes, G.; Henke, H.

    1993-07-01

    The muffin-tin cavity structure is planar and well suited for mm-wave accelerator with silicon etching techniques. A constant impedance traveling-wave structure is considered for design simplicity. The RF parameters are calculated and the shunt impedance is compared with the shunt impedance of a disk loaded cylindrical structure.

  15. September 2004 Water Sampling

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Salmon, Mississippi, Site, Water Sampling Location Map .........5 Water Sampling Field Activities Verification ...

  16. September 2004 Water Sampling

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    .........1 Water Sampling Locations at the Rulison, .........3 Water Sampling Field Activities Verification ...

  17. September 2004 Water Sampling

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    4 Groundwater and Surface Water Sampling at the Slick Rock, Colorado, Processing Sites .........7 Water Sampling Field Activities Verification ...

  18. September 2004 Water Sampling

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    and Surface Water Sampling at the Green River, Utah, Disposal Site August 2014 LMSGRN.........7 Water Sampling Field Activities Verification ...

  19. September 2004 Water Sampling

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    and May 2014 Groundwater and Surface Water Sampling at the Shiprock, New Mexico, Disposal .........9 Water Sampling Field Activities Verification ...

  20. September 2004 Water Sampling

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    and Surface Water Sampling at the Rio Blanco, Colorado, Site October 2014 LMSRBLS00514 .........5 Water Sampling Field Activities Verification ...

  1. September 2004 Water Sampling

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Natural Gas and Produced Water Sampling at the Rulison, Colorado, Site November 2014 LMS.........3 Water Sampling Field Activities Verification ...

  2. September 2004 Water Sampling

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    5 Groundwater and Surface Water Sampling at the Rulison, Colorado, Site October 2015 LMS.........5 Water Sampling Field Activities Verification ...

  3. September 2004 Water Sampling

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    and Surface Water Sampling at the Monticello, Utah, Processing Site July 2015 LMSMNT.........7 Water Sampling Field Activities Verification ...

  4. September 2004 Water Sampling

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    2015 Groundwater and Surface Water Sampling at the Shiprock, New Mexico, Disposal Site .........9 Water Sampling Field Activities Verification ...

  5. September 2004 Water Sampling

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    and Surface Water Sampling at the Rio Blanco, Colorado, Site October 2015 LMSRBLS00515 .........5 Water Sampling Field Activities Verification ...

  6. September 2004 Water Sampling

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    5 Produced Water Sampling at the Rulison, Colorado, Site May 2015 LMSRULS00115 Available .........3 Water Sampling Field Activities Verification ...

  7. September 2004 Water Sampling

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Natural Gas and Produced Water Sampling at the Gasbuggy, New Mexico, Site December 2013 .........5 Water Sampling Field Activities Verification ...

  8. September 2004 Water Sampling

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Produced Water Sampling at the Rulison, Colorado, Site January 2016 LMSRULS00915 .........3 Water Sampling Field Activities Verification ...

  9. September 2004 Water Sampling

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    3 Groundwater and Surface Water Sampling at the Monument Valley, Arizona, Processing Site .........7 Water Sampling Field Activities Verification ...

  10. September 2004 Water Sampling

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    July 2015 Groundwater and Surface Water Sampling at the Gunnison, Colorado, Processing .........5 Water Sampling Field Activities Verification ...

  11. September 2004 Water Sampling

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    and Surface Water Sampling at the Monticello, Utah, Processing Site July 2014 LMSMNT.........7 Water Sampling Field Activities Verification ...

  12. September 2004 Water Sampling

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    3 Water Sampling at the Monticello, Utah, Processing Site January 2014 LMSMNTS01013 This .........7 Water Sampling Field Activities Verification ...

  13. September 2004 Water Sampling

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    and Surface Water Sampling at the Naturita, Colorado Processing Site October 2013 LMSNAP.........5 Water Sampling Field Activities Verification ...

  14. September 2004 Water Sampling

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    4 Groundwater and Surface Water Sampling at the Gunnison, Colorado, Processing Site .........5 Water Sampling Field Activities Verification ...

  15. September 2004 Water Sampling

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    and Surface Water Sampling at the Tuba City, Arizona, Disposal Site November 2013 LMSTUB.........9 Water Sampling Field Activities Verification ...

  16. September 2004 Water Sampling

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    5 Groundwater and Surface Water Sampling at the Monticello, Utah, Processing Site January .........7 Water Sampling Field Activities Verification ...

  17. Sample Format Natural Gas Imports by Pipeline Monthly Sales and...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    are: Northeast, Midwest, South, West Send to: The Office of Fossil Energy, Natural Gas Regulatory Activities, U.S. Dept. of Energy, FE-34, P.O. Box 44375 Washington, D.C....

  18. Sample Format In-Transit Natural Gas (Pipeline) Monthly Sales...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    (7) (8) (9) Origin & Final Destination Country (one country) Transit Country Initial Border Crossing Point Foreign Transporter at Initial Border Crossing U.S. Transporter at...

  19. Sample Format Natural Gas Exports by Pipeline Monthly Sales and...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    (4) (5) (6) (7) (8) Destination Country Point of EXIT from U.S. Volume (Mcf at U.S. Border) Avg. Price at U.S. Border (U.S.MMBtu) Supplier(s) Foreign Transporter U.S....

  20. Sample Format Natural Gas Imports by Pipeline Monthly Sales and...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    (4) (5) (6) (7) (8) (9) Country of Origin Point of ENTRY into U.S. Volume (Mcf at U.S. Border) Avg. Price at U.S. Border (U.S.MMBtu) Supplier(s) Foreign Transporter U.S....

  1. Design development for the 50mm Superconducting Super Collider dipole cryostat

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nicol, T.H.

    1991-03-01

    The cryostat of a Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) dipole magnet consists of all magnet components except the magnet assembly itself. It serves to support the magnet accurately and reliably within the vacuum vessel, provide all required cryogenic piping, and to insulate the cold mass from heat radiated and conducted from the environment. It must function reliably during storage, shipping and handling, normal magnet operation, quenches, and seismic excitations, and must be manufacturable at low cost. The major components of the cryostat are the vacuum vessel, thermal shields, multilayer insulation system, cryogenic piping, interconnections, and suspension system. The overall design of a cryostat for superconducting accelerator magnets requires consideration of fluid flow, proper selection of materials for their thermal and structural performance at both ambient and operating temperature, and knowledge of the environment to which the magnets will be subjected over the course their expected operating life. This paper describes the design of the current 50mm SSC collider dipole cryostat and includes discussions on the structural and thermal considerations involved in the development of each of the major systems. Where appropriate, comparisons will be made with the 40mm cryostat. 7 refs., 5 figs., 4 tabs.

  2. MM-Estimator and Adjusted Super Smoother based Simultaneous Prediction Confedenc

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2002-07-19

    A Novel Application of Regression Analysis (MM-Estimator) with Simultaneous Prediction Confidence Intervals are proposed to detect up- or down-regulated genes, which are outliers in scatter plots based on log-transformed red (Cy5 fluorescent dye) versus green (Cy3 fluorescent Dye) intensities. Advantages of the application: 1) Robust and Resistant MM-Estimator is a Reliable Method to Build Linear Regression In the presence of Outliers, 2) Exploratory Data Analysis Tools (Boxplots, Averaged Shifted Histograms, Quantile-Quantile Normal Plots and Scattermore » Plots) are Unsed to Test Visually underlying assumptions of linearity and Contaminated Normality in Microarray data), 3) Simultaneous prediction confidence intervals (SPCIs) Guarantee a desired confidence level across the whole range of the data points used for the scatter plots. Results of the outlier detection procedure is a set of significantly differentially expressed genes extracted from the employed microarray data set. A scatter plot smoother (super smoother or locally weighted regression) is used to quantify heteroscendasticity is residual variance (Commonly takes place in lower and higher intensity areas). The set of differentially expressed genes is quantified using interval estimates for P-values as a probabilistic measure of being outlier by chance. Monte Carlo simultations are used to adjust super smoother-based SPCIs.her.« less

  3. LCLS Sample Preparation Laboratory | Sample Preparation Laboratories

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    LCLS Sample Preparation Laboratory Kayla Zimmerman | (650) 926-6281 Lisa Hammon, LCLS Lab Coordinator Welcome to the LCLS Sample Preparation Laboratory. This small general use wet lab is located in Rm 109 of the Far Experimental Hall near the MEC, CXI, and XCS hutches. It conveniently serves all LCLS hutches and is available for final stage sample preparation. Due to space limitations, certain types of activities may be restricted and all access must be scheduled in advance. User lab bench

  4. September 2004 Water Sampling

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    ... Inductively Coupled Plasma (ICP) Interference Check Sample (ICS) Analysis ICP interference check samples ICSA and ICSAB were analyzed at the required frequency to verify the ...

  5. Visual Sample Plan Flyer

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    This flyer better explains that VSP is a free, easy-to-use software tool that supports development of optimal sampling plans based on statistical sampling theory.

  6. September 2004 Water Sampling

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    5 Groundwater and Surface Water Sampling at the Tuba City, Arizona Disposal Site June 2015 .........7 Water Sampling Field Activities Verification ...

  7. DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION OF A 15 T, 120 MM BORE IR QUADRUPOLE MAGNET FOR LARP

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Caspi, S.; Cheng, D.; Dietderich, D.; Felice, H.; Ferracin, P.; Hafalia, R.; Hannaford, R.; Sabbi, G. S.; Anerella, M.; Ghosh, A.; Schmalzle, J.; Wanderer, P.; Ambrosio, G.; Bossert, R.; Kashikhin, V.; Pasholk, D.; Zlobin, A.

    2009-05-04

    Pushing accelerator magnets beyond 10 T holds a promise of future upgrades to machines like the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN. Nb{sub 3}Sn conductor is at the present time the only practical superconductor capable of generating fields beyond 10 T. In support of the LHC Phase-II upgrade, the US LHC Accelerator Research Program (LARP) is developing a large bore (120 mm) IR quadrupole (HQ) capable of reaching 15 T at its conductor peak field and a peak gradient of 219 T/m at 1.9 K. While exploring the magnet performance limits in terms of gradient, forces and stresses the 1 m long two-layer coil will demonstrate additional features such as alignment and accelerator field quality. In this paper we summarize the design and report on the magnet construction progress.

  8. New 100 mm Gun Assembly Installation at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory High Explosives Applications Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vandersall, K S; Lee, R A; Chiao, P I; Garcia, F; Travis, J O; Forbes, J W

    2003-10-28

    A new 100mm gun assembly was recently installed and tested at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratories located in the High Explosives Applications Facility (HEAF). Thiot Ingenierie performed the design of the replacement barrel, based on improvements to the initial design. This design incorporated barrel and breech sections forged from CLARM series high-strength alloys obtained from Tecphy Corporation and machined by Manufacture de Forage. Part of the improvement of the design was implementing a laser alignment system for quick and accurate barrel alignment checks. This laser is also used to align the target assembly. This paper will detail the design changes incorporated into the installation, the testing process, and future direction of research for the new gun.

  9. Measurement of the large-scale anisotropy of the cosmic background radiation at 3mm

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Epstein, G.L.

    1983-12-01

    A balloon-borne differential radiometer has measured the large-scale anisotropy of the cosmic background radiation (CBR) with high sensitivity. The antenna temperature dipole anistropy at 90 GHz (3 mm wavelength) is 2.82 +- 0.19 mK, corresponding to a thermodynamic anistropy of 3.48 +- mK for a 2.7 K blackbody CBR. The dipole direction, 11.3 +- 0.1 hours right ascension and -5.7/sup 0/ +- 1.8/sup 0/ declination, agrees well with measurements at other frequencies. Calibration error dominates magnitude uncertainty, with statistical errors on dipole terms being under 0.1 mK. No significant quadrupole power is found, placing a 90% confidence-level upper limit of 0.27 mK on the RMS thermodynamic quadrupolar anistropy. 22 figures, 17 tables.

  10. Assessing the Performance of 5mm White LED Light Sources forDeveloping-Country Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mills, Evan

    2007-05-03

    Some white light-emitting diode (LED) light sources haverecently attained levels of efficiency and cost that allow them tocompete with fluorescent lighting for off-grid applications in thedeveloping world. Additional attributes (optics, size, ruggedness, andservice life) make them potentially superior products. Enormousreductions in energy use and greenhouse-gas emissions are thus possible,and system costs can be much lower given the ability to downsize thecharging and energy storage components compared to a fluorescentstrategy. However, there is a high risk of "market-spoiling" if inferiorproducts are introduced and result in user dissatisfaction. Completesystems involve the integration of light sources and optics, energysupply, and energy storage. A natural starting point for evaluatingproduct quality is to focus on the individual light sources. This reportdescribes testing results for batches of 10 5mm white LEDs from 26manufacturers. Efficacies and color properties are presented.

  11. A photocathode rf gun design for a mm-wave linac-based FEL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nassiri, A.; Berenc, T,; Foster, J.; Waldschmidt, G.; Zhou, J.

    1995-07-01

    In recent years, advances in the rf gun technology have made it possible to produce small beam emittances suitable for short period microundulators which take advantage of the low emittance beam to reduce the wavelength of FELs. At the Advanced Photon Source, we are studying the design of a compact 50-MeV superconducting mm-wave linac-based FEL for the production of short wavelengths ({approximately}300 nm) to carry out FEL demonstration experiments. The electron source considered for the linac is a 30- GHz, 3 1/2-cell {pi}-mode photocathode rf gun. For cold model rf measurements a 15-GHz prototype structure was fabricated. Here we report on the design, numerical modelling and the initial cold-model rf measurement results on the 15-GHz prototype structure.

  12. Fluid sampling tool

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Garcia, Anthony R.; Johnston, Roger G.; Martinez, Ronald K.

    2000-01-01

    A fluid-sampling tool for obtaining a fluid sample from a container. When used in combination with a rotatable drill, the tool bores a hole into a container wall, withdraws a fluid sample from the container, and seals the borehole. The tool collects fluid sample without exposing the operator or the environment to the fluid or to wall shavings from the container.

  13. September 2004 Water Sampling

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    .........5 Water Sampling Field Activities Verification ... Groundwater Quality Data Surface Water Quality Data Equipment Blank Data ...

  14. High quality draft genome sequence of Leucobacter chironomi strain MM2LBT (DSM 19883T) isolated from a Chironomus sp. egg mass

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Laviad, Sivan; Lapidus, Alla; Copeland, Alex; Reddy, T. B. K.; Huntemann, Marcel; Pati, Amrita; Ivanova, Natalia N.; Markowitz, Victor M.; Pukall, Rüdiger; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Woyke, Tanja; Kyrpides, Nikos C.; Halpern, Malka

    2015-05-08

    Leucobacter chironomi strain MM2LBT (Halpern et al., Int J Syst Evol Microbiol 59:665-70 2009) is a Gram-positive, rod shaped, non-motile, aerobic, chemoorganotroph bacterium. L. chironomi belongs to the family Microbacteriaceae, a family within the class Actinobacteria. Strain MM2LBT was isolated from a chironomid (Diptera; Chironomidae) egg mass that was sampled from a waste stabilization pond in northern Israel. In a phylogenetic tree based on 16S rRNA gene sequences, strain MM2LBT formed a distinct branch within the radiation encompassing the genus Leucobacter. Here we describe the features of this organism, together with the complete genome sequence and annotation. We find that the DNA GC content is 69.90%. The chromosome length is 2,964,712 bp. It encodes 2,690 proteins and 61 RNA genes. L. chironomi genome is part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Type Strains, Phase I: the one thousand microbial genomes (KMG) project.

  15. High quality draft genome sequence of Leucobacter chironomi strain MM2LBT (DSM 19883T) isolated from a Chironomus sp. egg mass

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Laviad, Sivan; Lapidus, Alla; Copeland, Alex; Reddy, T. B. K.; Huntemann, Marcel; Pati, Amrita; Ivanova, Natalia N.; Markowitz, Victor M.; Pukall, Rüdiger; Klenk, Hans-Peter; et al

    2015-05-08

    Leucobacter chironomi strain MM2LBT (Halpern et al., Int J Syst Evol Microbiol 59:665-70 2009) is a Gram-positive, rod shaped, non-motile, aerobic, chemoorganotroph bacterium. L. chironomi belongs to the family Microbacteriaceae, a family within the class Actinobacteria. Strain MM2LBT was isolated from a chironomid (Diptera; Chironomidae) egg mass that was sampled from a waste stabilization pond in northern Israel. In a phylogenetic tree based on 16S rRNA gene sequences, strain MM2LBT formed a distinct branch within the radiation encompassing the genus Leucobacter. Here we describe the features of this organism, together with the complete genome sequence and annotation. We find thatmore » the DNA GC content is 69.90%. The chromosome length is 2,964,712 bp. It encodes 2,690 proteins and 61 RNA genes. L. chironomi genome is part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Type Strains, Phase I: the one thousand microbial genomes (KMG) project.« less

  16. The Sample Preparation Laboratories | Sample Preparation Laboratories

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Cynthia Patty 1 Sam Webb 2 John Bargar 3 Arizona 4 Chemicals 5 Team Work 6 Bottles 7 Glass 8 Plan Ahead! See the tabs above for Laboratory Access and forms you'll need to complete. Equipment and Chemicals tabs detail resources already available on site. Avoid delays! Hazardous materials use may require a written Standard Operating Procedure (SOP) before you work. Check the Chemicals tab for more information. The Sample Preparation Laboratories The Sample Preparation Laboratories provide wet lab

  17. S-i-s mm-wave mixers and detectors. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jillie, D.W.; Kroger, H.; Smith, L.N.; Shaw, D.M.

    1983-10-01

    This program is an effort to achieve the ultimate goal of fabricating refractory superconducting S-I-S mixer devices for operation in mm-wave receivers in the quantum mode and in the 8-10 K temperature range. The following progress has been made toward the above goal: (1) development of in-house capability of depositing niobium carbonitride films (Nb (x) N(y) of device quality with transition temperatures to approx. 16 K; (2) development of NbC(x)N(y):aSi:Nb and NbC(x)N(y):Ge:Nb devices of very high quality; (3) fabrication and successful operation of niobium based S-I-S mixer chips; and (4) fabrication and evaluation of aSi and Ge barrier all-NbC(x)N(y) devices. NbC(x)N(y):Ge:Nb devices have been fabricated with chemical vapor deposited (CVD) polycrystalline arsenic-doped germanium barriers. All-Nb-S-I-S mixer chips were fabricated and sent to Goddard Institute for Space Studies to be evaluated. The noise temperature was approx. 60 K and the conversion loss of 5 dB. These results are comparable to Pb alloy junction results. A second-generation mixer was designed by GISS.

  18. Scanning measurement of Seebeck coefficient of a heated sample

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Snyder, G. Jeffrey; Iwanaga, Shiho

    2016-04-19

    A novel scanning Seebeck coefficient measurement technique is disclosed utilizing a cold scanning thermocouple probe tip on heated bulk and thin film samples. The system measures variations in the Seebeck coefficient within the samples. The apparatus may be used for two dimensional mapping of the Seebeck coefficient on the bulk and thin film samples. This technique can be utilized for detection of defective regions, as well as phase separations in the sub-mm range of various thermoelectric materials.

  19. Rain sampling device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nelson, D.A.; Tomich, S.D.; Glover, D.W.; Allen, E.V.; Hales, J.M.; Dana, M.T.

    1991-05-14

    The present invention constitutes a rain sampling device adapted for independent operation at locations remote from the user which allows rainfall to be sampled in accordance with any schedule desired by the user. The rain sampling device includes a mechanism for directing wet precipitation into a chamber, a chamber for temporarily holding the precipitation during the process of collection, a valve mechanism for controllably releasing samples of the precipitation from the chamber, a means for distributing the samples released from the holding chamber into vessels adapted for permanently retaining these samples, and an electrical mechanism for regulating the operation of the device. 11 figures.

  20. Rain sampling device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nelson, Danny A.; Tomich, Stanley D.; Glover, Donald W.; Allen, Errol V.; Hales, Jeremy M.; Dana, Marshall T.

    1991-01-01

    The present invention constitutes a rain sampling device adapted for independent operation at locations remote from the user which allows rainfall to be sampled in accordance with any schedule desired by the user. The rain sampling device includes a mechanism for directing wet precipitation into a chamber, a chamber for temporarily holding the precipitation during the process of collection, a valve mechanism for controllably releasing samples of said precipitation from said chamber, a means for distributing the samples released from the holding chamber into vessels adapted for permanently retaining these samples, and an electrical mechanism for regulating the operation of the device.

  1. Rhapsody: I. Structural Properties and Formation History from...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    I. Structural Properties and Formation History from a Statistical Sample of Re-simulated Cluster-size Halos Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Rhapsody: I. Structural...

  2. September 2004 Water Sampling

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    ... 100, 17B, 1A, 72, and 81 were classified as Category II. The sample results were qualified with a "Q" flag, indicating the data are qualitative because of the sampling technique. ...

  3. Water and Sediment Sampling

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    MDC Blank 7222014 Below MDC Below MDC Water Sampling Results Location Sample Date WIPP ... Tut Tank 3132014 Below MDC Below MDC Fresh Water Tank 3122014 Below MDC Below MDC Hill ...

  4. September 2004 Water Sampling

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    ... the applicable MDL. Inductively Coupled Plasma Interference Check Sample Analysis ... and background correction factors for all inductively coupled plasma instruments. ...

  5. September 2004 Water Sampling

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    .........7 Water Sampling Field Activities Verification ... Groundwater Quality Data Static Water Level Data Time-Concentration Graphs ...

  6. September 2004 Water Sampling

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    .........9 Water Sampling Field Activities Verification ... Data Durango Processing Site Surface Water Quality Data Equipment Blank Data Static ...

  7. September 2004 Water Sampling

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    .........3 Water Sampling Field Activities Verification ... Groundwater Quality Data Surface Water Quality Data Natural Gas Analysis Data ...

  8. September 2004 Water Sampling

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    .........5 Water Sampling Field Activities Verification ... Groundwater Quality Data Static Water Level Data Hydrographs Time-Concentration ...

  9. September 2004 Water Sampling

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    .........5 Water Sampling Field Activities Verification ... Groundwater Quality Data Static Water Level Data Hydrograph Time-Concentration ...

  10. September 2004 Water Sampling

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    .........5 Water Sampling Field Activities Verification ... Groundwater Quality Data Surface Water Quality Data Time-Concentration Graph ...

  11. September 2004 Water Sampling

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    .........5 Water Sampling Field Activities Verification ... Quality Data Equipment Blank Data Static Water Level Data Time-Concentration Graphs ...

  12. September 2004 Water Sampling

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    .........5 Water Sampling Field Activities Verification ... Groundwater Quality Data Static Water Level Data Time-Concentration Graphs ...

  13. September 2004 Water Sampling

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    .........9 Water Sampling Field Activities Verification ... Groundwater Quality Data Surface Water Quality Data Static Water Level Data ...

  14. September 2004 Water Sampling

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    .........3 Water Sampling Field Activities Verification ... Groundwater Quality Data Surface Water Quality Data Time-Concentration Graphs ...

  15. September 2004 Water Sampling

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    .........7 Water Sampling Field Activities Verification ... Groundwater Quality Data Surface Water Quality Data Equipment Blank Data Static ...

  16. September 2004 Water Sampling

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    .........5 Water Sampling Field Activities Verification ... Groundwater Quality Data Surface Water Quality Data Equipment Blank Data Static ...

  17. September 2004 Water Sampling

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Water Sampling at the Ambrosia Lake, New Mexico, Disposal Site February 2015 LMS/AMB/S01114 This page intentionally left blank U.S. Department of Energy DVP-November 2014, Ambrosia Lake, New Mexico February 2015 RIN 14116607 Page i Contents Sampling Event Summary ...............................................................................................................1 Ambrosia Lake, NM, Disposal Site Planned Sampling Map...........................................................3 Data

  18. September 2004 Water Sampling

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Sampling at the Ambrosia Lake, New Mexico, Disposal Site March 2016 LMS/AMB/S01215 This page intentionally left blank U.S. Department of Energy DVP-December 2015, Ambrosia Lake, New Mexico March 2016 RIN 15117494 Page i Contents Sampling Event Summary ...............................................................................................................1 Ambrosia Lake, NM, Disposal Site Planned Sampling Map...........................................................3 Data Assessment

  19. September 2004 Water Sampling

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    October 2013 Groundwater Sampling at the Bluewater, New Mexico, Disposal Site December 2013 LMS/BLU/S00813 This page intentionally left blank U.S. Department of Energy DVP-August and October 2013, Bluewater, New Mexico December 2013 RIN 13085537 and 13095651 Page i Contents Sampling Event Summary ...............................................................................................................1 Private Wells Sampled August 2013 and October 2013, Bluewater, NM, Disposal Site

  20. September 2004 Water Sampling

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    and Surface Water Sampling at the Monument Valley, Arizona, Processing Site February 2015 LMS/MON/S01214 This page intentionally left blank U.S. Department of Energy DVP-December 2014, Monument Valley, Arizona February 2015 RIN 14126645 Page i Contents Sampling Event Summary ...............................................................................................................1 Monument Valley, Arizona, Disposal Site Sample Location Map ..................................................5

  1. September 2004 Water Sampling

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    4 Alternate Water Supply System Sampling at the Riverton, Wyoming, Processing Site May 2014 LMS/RVT/S00314 This page intentionally left blank U.S. Department of Energy DVP-March 2014, Riverton, Wyoming May 2014 RIN 14035986 Page i Contents Sampling Event Summary ...............................................................................................................1 Riverton, WY, Processing Site, Sample Location Map ...................................................................3 Data

  2. September 2004 Water Sampling

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    February 2015 Groundwater and Surface Water Sampling at the Grand Junction, Colorado, Site April 2015 LMS/GJO/S00215 This page intentionally left blank U.S. Department of Energy DVP-February 2015, Grand Junction, Colorado, Site April 2015 RIN 15026795 Page i Contents Sampling Event Summary ...............................................................................................................1 Grand Junction, Colorado, Site Sample Location Map

  3. September 2004 Water Sampling

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Sampling at the Grand Junction, Colorado, Disposal Site November 2013 LMS/GRJ/S00813 This page intentionally left blank U.S. Department of Energy DVP-August 2013, Grand Junction, Colorado November 2013 RIN 13075515 Page i Contents Sampling Event Summary ...............................................................................................................1 Grand Junction, Colorado, Disposal Site Sample Location Map ....................................................3 Data Assessment

  4. September 2004 Water Sampling

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Old and New Rifle, Colorado, Processing Sites August 2013 LMS/RFN/RFO/S00613 This page intentionally left blank U.S. Department of Energy DVP-June 2013, Rifle, Colorado August 2013 RIN 13065380 Page i Contents Sampling Event Summary ...............................................................................................................1 Sample Location Map, New Rifle, Colorado, Processing Site ........................................................5 Sample Location Map, Old Rifle,

  5. September 2004 Water Sampling

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Groundwater and Surface Water Sampling at the Slick Rock East and West, Colorado, Processing Sites November 2013 LMS/SRE/SRW/S0913 This page intentionally left blank U.S. Department of Energy DVP-September 2013, Slick Rock, Colorado November 2013 RIN 13095593 Page i Contents Sampling Event Summary ...............................................................................................................1 Slick Rock East and West, Colorado, Processing Sites, Sample Location Map

  6. Aerosol sampling system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Masquelier, Donald A.

    2004-02-10

    A system for sampling air and collecting particulate of a predetermined particle size range. A low pass section has an opening of a preselected size for gathering the air but excluding particles larger than the sample particles. An impactor section is connected to the low pass section and separates the air flow into a bypass air flow that does not contain the sample particles and a product air flow that does contain the sample particles. A wetted-wall cyclone collector, connected to the impactor section, receives the product air flow and traps the sample particles in a liquid.

  7. September 2004 Water Sampling

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    and September 2013 Groundwater and Surface Water Sampling at the Durango, Colorado, Disposal and Processing Sites March 2014 LMS/DUD/DUP/S00613 This page intentionally left blank U.S. Department of Energy DVP-June and September 2013, Durango, Colorado March 2014 RIN 13055370 and 13085577 Page i Contents Sampling Event Summary ...............................................................................................................1 Durango, Colorado, Disposal Site Sample Location Map-June

  8. September 2004 Water Sampling

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    ... The gross alpha, gross beta, radium-226, and radium-228 method blank results were below the DLC. Inductively Coupled Plasma (ICP) Interference Check Sample (ICS) Analysis ICP ...

  9. September 2004 Water Sampling

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Groundwater, Surface Water, and Alternate Water Supply System Sampling at the Riverton, Wyoming, Processing Site December 2013 LMSRVTS00913 This page intentionally left blank ...

  10. Coke formation in visbreaking process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yan, T.Y. )

    1987-04-01

    Visbreaking is a mild cracking process primarily used to reduce residual oil viscosity and thus decrease the amount of cutter stock required for blending to heavy fuels specification. It can also be used to produce incremental quantities of gasoline, middle distillates and catalytic cracker feeds. This process was widely used in the 1930s and 1940s and became obsolete until a few years ago. When the need for increased conversion of residues to light products became desirable, visbreaking offered economic advantages to many refining schemes - especially in Western Europe. Between 1978-1981, Exxon brought on stream seven visbreakers ranging from 1900 to 9100 tons/SD capacity. In January 1983, the world-wide visbreaking capacity was over 2 MM B/SD. The visbreaking process and its application in refinery operations have been well described. In general, the process economics improve as the process severity is increased but it is limited by coke formation in the process. For this reason, they have studied the kinetics of coke formation in the visbreaking process.

  11. September 2004 Water Sampling

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Bluewater, New Mexico, Disposal Site February 2014 LMS/BLU/S01113 This page intentionally left blank U.S. Department of Energy DVP-November 2013, Bluewater, New Mexico February 2014 RIN 13115746 Page i Contents Sampling Event Summary ...............................................................................................................1 Bluewater, New Mexico, Disposal Site Sample Location Map.......................................................5 Data Assessment Summary

  12. September 2004 Water Sampling

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Burrell, Pennsylvania, Disposal Site January 2014 LMS/BUR/S01113 This page intentionally left blank U.S. Department of Energy DVP-November 2013, Burrell, Pennsylvania January 2014 RIN 13095638 Page i Contents Sampling Event Summary ...............................................................................................................1 Burrell, Pennsylvania, Disposal Site, Sample Location Map ..........................................................3 Data Assessment Summary

  13. September 2004 Water Sampling

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Canonsburg, Pennsylvania, Disposal Site February 2014 LMS/CAN/S01113 This page intentionally left blank U.S. Department of Energy DVP-November 2013, Canonsburg, Pennsylvania February 2014 RIN 13095639 Page i Contents Sampling Event Summary ...............................................................................................................1 Canonsburg, Pennsylvania, Disposal Site, Sample Location Map ..................................................3 Data Assessment Summary

  14. September 2004 Water Sampling

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Green River, Utah, Disposal Site August 2013 LMS/GRN/S00613 This page intentionally left blank U.S. Department of Energy DVP-June 2013, Green River, Utah August 2013 RIN 13065402 Page i Contents Sampling Event Summary ...............................................................................................................1 Data Assessment Summary ..............................................................................................................7 Water Sampling Field Activities

  15. September 2004 Water Sampling

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Disposal Site August 2014 LMS/LKD/S00514 This page intentionally left blank U.S. Department of Energy DVP-May 2014, Lakeview, Oregon, Disposal August 2014 RIN 14056157 Page i Contents Sampling Event Summary ...............................................................................................................1 Lakeview, Oregon, Disposal Site, Sample Location Map ...............................................................3 Data Assessment Summary

  16. September 2004 Water Sampling

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Processing Site August 2014 LMS/LKP/S00514 This page intentionally left blank U.S. Department of Energy DVP-May 2014, Lakeview, Oregon, Processing August 2014 RIN 14056157 and 14056158 Page i Contents Sampling Event Summary ...............................................................................................................1 Lakeview, Oregon, Processing Site, Sample Location Map ............................................................3 Data Assessment Summary

  17. September 2004 Water Sampling

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Riverton, Wyoming, Processing Site September 2013 LMS/RVT/S00613 This page intentionally left blank U.S. Department of Energy DVP-June 2013, Riverton, Wyoming September 2013 RIN 13065379 Page i Contents Sampling Event Summary ...............................................................................................................1 Riverton, Wyoming, Processing Site, Sample Location Map .........................................................5 Data Assessment Summary

  18. September 2004 Water Sampling

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Riverton, Wyoming, Processing Site February 2016 LMS/RVT/S00915 This page intentionally left blank U.S. Department of Energy DVP-September 2015, Riverton, Wyoming February 2016 RINs 15097345, 15097346, and 15097347 Page i Contents Sampling Event Summary ...............................................................................................................1 Riverton, Wyoming, Processing Site Planned Sampling Location Map .........................................7 Data Assessment Summary

  19. September 2004 Water Sampling

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Rifle, Colorado, New and Old Processing Sites January 2014 LMS/RFN/RFO/S01113 This page intentionally left blank U.S. Department of Energy DVP-November 2013, Rifle, Colorado January 2014 RIN 13115731 Page i Contents Sampling Event Summary ...............................................................................................................1 New Rifle, Colorado, Processing Site, Sample Location Map ........................................................5 Old Rifle, Colorado, Processing

  20. September 2004 Water Sampling

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Old and New Rifle, Colorado, Processing Sites January 2015 LMS/RFN/RFO/S01114 This page intentionally left blank U.S. Department of Energy DVP-November 2014, Rifle, Colorado January 2015 RINs 14106568 and 14106569 Page i Contents Sampling Event Summary ...............................................................................................................1 New Rifle, Colorado, Processing Site, Planned Sampling Map ......................................................3 Old Rifle,

  1. September 2004 Water Sampling

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Slick Rock, Colorado, Processing Sites January 2016 LMS/SRE/SRW/S00915 This page intentionally left blank U.S. Department of Energy DVP-September 2015, Slick Rock, Colorado January 2016 RINs 15087319 and 15107424 Page i Contents Sampling Event Summary ...............................................................................................................1 Slick Rock, Colorado, Processing Sites, Sample Location Map .....................................................5 Data Assessment

  2. Creating Sample Plans

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1999-03-24

    The program has been designed to increase the accuracy and reduce the preparation time for completing sampling plans. It consists of our files 1. Analyte/Combination (AnalCombo) A list of analytes and combinations of analytes that can be requested of the onsite and offsite labs. Whenever a specific combination of analytes or suite names appear on the same line as the code number, this indicates that one sample can be placed in one bottle to bemore » analyzed for these paremeters. A code number is assigned for each analyte and combination of analytes. 2. Sampling Plans Database (SPDb) A database that contains all of the analytes and combinations of analytes along with the basic information required for preparing a sample plan. That basic information includes the following fields; matrix, hold time, preservation, sample volume, container size, if the bottle caps are taped, acceptable choices. 3. Sampling plans create (SPcreate) a file that will lookup information from the Sampling Plans Database and the Job Log File (JLF98) A major database used by Sample Managemnet Services for recording more than 100 fields of information.« less

  3. Sampling system and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Decker, David L.; Lyles, Brad F.; Purcell, Richard G.; Hershey, Ronald Lee

    2013-04-16

    The present disclosure provides an apparatus and method for coupling conduit segments together. A first pump obtains a sample and transmits it through a first conduit to a reservoir accessible by a second pump. The second pump further conducts the sample from the reservoir through a second conduit.

  4. Adaptive Sampling Proxy Application

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2012-10-22

    ASPA is an implementation of an adaptive sampling algorithm [1-3], which is used to reduce the computational expense of computer simulations that couple disparate physical scales. The purpose of ASPA is to encapsulate the algorithms required for adaptive sampling independently from any specific application, so that alternative algorithms and programming models for exascale computers can be investigated more easily.

  5. Biological sample collector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Murphy, Gloria A.

    2010-09-07

    A biological sample collector is adapted to a collect several biological samples in a plurality of filter wells. A biological sample collector may comprise a manifold plate for mounting a filter plate thereon, the filter plate having a plurality of filter wells therein; a hollow slider for engaging and positioning a tube that slides therethrough; and a slide case within which the hollow slider travels to allow the tube to be aligned with a selected filter well of the plurality of filter wells, wherein when the tube is aligned with the selected filter well, the tube is pushed through the hollow slider and into the selected filter well to sealingly engage the selected filter well and to allow the tube to deposit a biological sample onto a filter in the bottom of the selected filter well. The biological sample collector may be portable.

  6. Clarification of the Mechanism of Acylation Reaction and Origin of Substrate Specificity of the Serine-Carboxyl Peptidase Sedolisin through QM/MM Free Energy Simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xu, Qin; Yao, Jianzhuang; Wiodawer, Alexander; Guo, Hong

    2011-01-01

    Quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical (QM/MM) free energy simulations are applied for understanding the mechanism of the acylation reaction catalyzed by sedolisin, a representative serine-carboxyl peptidase, leading to the acyl-enzyme (AE) and first product from the enzyme-catalyzed reaction. One of the interesting questions to be addressed in this work is the origin of the substrate specificity of sedolisin that shows a relatively high activity on the substrates with Glu at P1 site. It is shown that the bond making and breaking events of the acylation reaction involving a peptide substrate (LLE*FL) seem to be accompanied by local conformational changes, proton transfers as well as the formation of alternative hydrogen bonds. The results of the simulations indicate that the conformational change of Glu at P1 site and its formation of a low barrier hydrogen bond with Asp-170 (along with the transient proton transfer) during the acylation reaction might play a role in the relatively high specificity for the substrate with Glu at P1 site. The role of some key residues in the catalysis is confirmed through free energy simulations. Glu-80 is found to act as a general base to accept a proton from Ser-287 during the nucleophilic attack and then as a general acid to protonate the leaving group (N H of P1 -Phe) during the cleavage of the scissile peptide bond. Another acidic residue, Asp-170, acts as a general acid catalyst to protonate the carbonyl of P1-Glu during the formation of the tetrahedral intermediate and as a general base for the formation of the acyl-enzyme. The energetic results from the free energy simulations support the importance of proton transfer from Asp-170 to the carbonyl of P1-Glu in the stabilization of the tetrahedral intermediate and the formation of a low-barrier hydrogen bond between the carboxyl group of P1-Glu and Asp-170 in the lowering of the free energy barrier for the cleavage of the peptide bond. Detailed analyses of the proton transfers

  7. September 2004 Water Sampling

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    ... 10 pCiL Liquid Scintillation LMR-15 Uranium Vanadium Zinc Total No. of Analytes 4 0 ... 26, 2013 TO: Rick Findlay FROM: Jeff Price SUBJECT: Trip Report (LTHMP Sampling) ...

  8. Water Sample Concentrator

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Idaho National Laboratory

    2010-01-08

    Automated portable device that concentrates and packages a sample of suspected contaminated water for safe, efficient transport to a qualified analytical laboratory. This technology will help safeguard against pathogen contamination or chemical and biolog

  9. September 2004 Water Sampling

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Groundwater, Surface Water, Produced Water, and Natural Gas Sampling at the Gasbuggy, New Mexico, Site October 2014 LMSGSBS00614 Available for sale to the public from: U.S. ...

  10. SAMPLING AND ANALYSIS PROTOCOLS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jannik, T; P Fledderman, P

    2007-02-09

    Radiological sampling and analyses are performed to collect data for a variety of specific reasons covering a wide range of projects. These activities include: Effluent monitoring; Environmental surveillance; Emergency response; Routine ambient monitoring; Background assessments; Nuclear license termination; Remediation; Deactivation and decommissioning (D&D); and Waste management. In this chapter, effluent monitoring and environmental surveillance programs at nuclear operating facilities and radiological sampling and analysis plans for remediation and D&D activities will be discussed.

  11. Dissolution actuated sample container

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nance, Thomas A.; McCoy, Frank T.

    2013-03-26

    A sample collection vial and process of using a vial is provided. The sample collection vial has an opening secured by a dissolvable plug. When dissolved, liquids may enter into the interior of the collection vial passing along one or more edges of a dissolvable blocking member. As the blocking member is dissolved, a spring actuated closure is directed towards the opening of the vial which, when engaged, secures the vial contents against loss or contamination.

  12. Liquid sampling system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Larson, L.L.

    1984-09-17

    A conduit extends from a reservoir through a sampling station and back to the reservoir in a closed loop. A jet ejector in the conduit establishes suction for withdrawing liquid from the reservoir. The conduit has a self-healing septum therein upstream of the jet ejector for receiving one end of a double-ended cannula, the other end of which is received in a serum bottle for sample collection. Gas is introduced into the conduit at a gas bleed between the sample collection bottle and the reservoir. The jet ejector evacuates gas from the conduit and the bottle and aspirates a column of liquid from the reservoir at a high rate. When the withdrawn liquid reaches the jet ejector the rate of flow therethrough reduces substantially and the gas bleed increases the pressure in the conduit for driving liquid into the sample bottle, the gas bleed forming a column of gas behind the withdrawn liquid column and interrupting the withdrawal of liquid from the reservoir. In the case of hazardous and toxic liquids, the sample bottle and the jet ejector may be isolated from the reservoir and may be further isolated from a control station containing remote manipulation means for the sample bottle and control valves for the jet ejector and gas bleed. 5 figs.

  13. Liquid sampling system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Larson, Loren L.

    1987-01-01

    A conduit extends from a reservoir through a sampling station and back to the reservoir in a closed loop. A jet ejector in the conduit establishes suction for withdrawing liquid from the reservoir. The conduit has a self-healing septum therein upstream of the jet ejector for receiving one end of a double-ended cannula, the other end of which is received in a serum bottle for sample collection. Gas is introduced into the conduit at a gas bleed between the sample collection bottle and the reservoir. The jet ejector evacuates gas from the conduit and the bottle and aspirates a column of liquid from the reservoir at a high rate. When the withdrawn liquid reaches the jet ejector the rate of flow therethrough reduces substantially and the gas bleed increases the pressure in the conduit for driving liquid into the sample bottle, the gas bleed forming a column of gas behind the withdrawn liquid column and interrupting the withdrawal of liquid from the reservoir. In the case of hazardous and toxic liquids, the sample bottle and the jet ejector may be isolated from the reservoir and may be further isolated from a control station containing remote manipulation means for the sample bottle and control valves for the jet ejector and gas bleed.

  14. Evidence for fast positronium formation in glancing angle positron scattering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gidley, D.W.; Frieze, W.E.; Mayer, R.; Lynn, K.G.

    1985-01-01

    We have evidence for fast (10-100 eV) positronium formation when 30 to 300 eV positrons scatter off an Al(110) surface at glancing angles as low as 6/sup 0/ with respect to the surface. A doubly remoderated, brightness enhanced positron beam of 1 mm diameter and 1/sup 0/ opening angle is used. A position sensitive CEMA is biased to detect only neutral particles. As evidence of fast Ps formation, we will present incident beam energy scans of the neutral particle counting rate as well as position sensitive plots of the angular formation probability.

  15. Optimal sampling efficiency in Monte Carlo sampling with an approximat...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Journal Article: Optimal sampling efficiency in Monte Carlo sampling with an approximate potential Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Optimal sampling efficiency in Monte ...

  16. Colloid characterization and quantification in groundwater samples

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    K. Stephen Kung

    2000-06-01

    should be analyzed for colloid size and concentration shortly after they have been collected. A prolonged waiting period after sampling will affect the colloid size distribution as well as colloid concentration resulting from the changes of water chemical properties. The data also shows that sample containers, filter materials, and labware that are used for colloid analyses should be cleaned by specially treated low-colloid-containing water. Water used for sample dilution should be verified for total colloidal particle concentration. They then analyzed freshly collected groundwater from NTS wells ER-20-5{number_sign}1 and {number_sign}3. Results show that these groundwater samples have similar colloid concentrations and particle size distributions. For the particle size range between 50- and 200-nm, about ten trillion (1E10) colloidal particles per liter are present in these water samples. Most of these colloidal particles are less than 100 mm in size. For example, more than 98% of the colloids are smaller than 100 nm in size in the ER-20-5 {number_sign}1 sample. Furthermore, it was found that the smaller the sizes of colloid, the higher the colloid concentration present in the water. For another site at NTS, Cheshire, they had analyzed two zones of groundwater samples. For water samples collected from the lower water zone (near the underground detonation cavity about 3,700 feet of slanted depth from the surface), the colloid concentration was about 5E12 particles per liter. About 20 times less than the lower zone of total colloids was found in water samples collected from the upper aquifer (around 2,511 feet of slanted depth), although colloid size distributions from these two zones appear to be rather similar.

  17. Elimination of formate production in Clostridium thermocellum

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Rydzak, Thomas; Lynd, Lee R.; Guss, Adam M.

    2015-07-11

    We study the ability of Clostridium thermocellum to rapidly degrade cellulose and ferment resulting hydrolysis products into ethanol makes it a promising platform organism for cellulosic biofuel production via consolidated bioprocessing. Currently, however, ethanol yield are far below theoretical maximum due to branched product pathways that divert carbon and electrons towards formate, H2, lactate, acetate, and secreted amino acids. To redirect carbon and electron flux away from formate, pyruvate:formate lyase (pfl) and respective PFL-activating enzyme were deleted. Formate production in the resulting Δpfl strain was eliminated and acetate production decreased by 50% on both complex and defined medium. Growth ratemore » of Δpfl decreased by 2.9-fold on defined medium and diauxic growth was observed on complex medium. Supplementation of defined medium with 2 mM formate restored Δpfl growth rate to 80% of the parent strain. Finally, we discuss the role of pfl in metabolic engineering strategies and C1 metabolism.« less

  18. Fluid sampling system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Houck, Edward D.

    1994-01-01

    An fluid sampling system allows sampling of radioactive liquid without spillage. A feed tank is connected to a liquid transfer jet powered by a pumping chamber pressurized by compressed air. The liquid is pumped upwardly into a sampling jet of a venturi design having a lumen with an inlet, an outlet, a constricted middle portion, and a port located above the constricted middle portion. The liquid is passed under pressure through the constricted portion causing its velocity to increase and its pressure to decreased, thereby preventing liquid from escaping. A septum sealing the port can be pierced by a two pointed hollow needle leading into a sample bottle also sealed by a pierceable septum affixed to one end. The bottle is evacuated by flow through the sample jet, cyclic variation in the sampler jet pressure periodically leaves the evacuated bottle with lower pressure than that of the port, thus causing solution to pass into the bottle. The remaining solution in the system is returned to the feed tank via a holding tank.

  19. Fluid sampling system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Houck, E.D.

    1994-10-11

    An fluid sampling system allows sampling of radioactive liquid without spillage. A feed tank is connected to a liquid transfer jet powered by a pumping chamber pressurized by compressed air. The liquid is pumped upwardly into a sampling jet of a venturi design having a lumen with an inlet, an outlet, a constricted middle portion, and a port located above the constricted middle portion. The liquid is passed under pressure through the constricted portion causing its velocity to increase and its pressure to be decreased, thereby preventing liquid from escaping. A septum sealing the port can be pierced by a two pointed hollow needle leading into a sample bottle also sealed by a pierceable septum affixed to one end. The bottle is evacuated by flow through the sample jet, cyclic variation in the sampler jet pressure periodically leaves the evacuated bottle with lower pressure than that of the port, thus causing solution to pass into the bottle. The remaining solution in the system is returned to the feed tank via a holding tank. 4 figs.

  20. Visual Sample Plan

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2007-10-25

    VSP selects the appropriate number and location of environmental samples to ensure that the results of statistical tests performed to provide input to risk decisions have the required confidence and performance. VSP Version 5.0 provides sample-size equations or algorithms needed by specific statistical tests appropriate for specific environmental sampling objectives. It also provides data quality assessment and statistical analysis functions to support evaluation of the data and determine whether the data support decisions regarding sitesmore » suspected of contamination. The easy-to-use program is highly visual and graphic. VSP runs on personal computers with Microsoft Windows operating systems (98, NT, 2000, Millennium Edition, CE, and XP) Designed primarily for project managers and users without expertise in statistics, VSP is applicable to two- and three-dimensional populations to be sampled (e.g., rooms and buildings, surface soil, a defined layer of subsurface soil, water bodies, and other similar applications) for studies of environmental quality. VSP is also applicable for designing sampling plans for assessing chem./rad/bio threat and hazard identification within rooms and buildings, and for designing geophysical surveys for UXO identification.« less

  1. Viscous sludge sample collector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Beitel, George A [Richland, WA

    1983-01-01

    A vertical core sample collection system for viscous sludge. A sample tube's upper end has a flange and is attached to a piston. The tube and piston are located in the upper end of a bore in a housing. The bore's lower end leads outside the housing and has an inwardly extending rim. Compressed gas, from a storage cylinder, is quickly introduced into the bore's upper end to rapidly accelerate the piston and tube down the bore. The lower end of the tube has a high sludge entering velocity to obtain a full-length sludge sample without disturbing strata detail. The tube's downward motion is stopped when its upper end flange impacts against the bore's lower end inwardly extending rim.

  2. Sampling Report for August 15, 2014 WIPP Samples

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    X X X X X Sampling Report for August 15, 2014 WIPP Samples UNCLASSIFIED Forensic Science Center December 19, 2014 Sampling Report for August 15 2014 WIPP Samples Lawrence ...

  3. ANNULAR IMPACTOR SAMPLING DEVICE

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tait, G.W.C.

    1959-03-31

    A high-rate air sampler capable of sampling alphaemitting particles as small as 0.5 microns is described. The device is a cylindrical shaped cup that fits in front of a suction tube and which has sticky grease coating along its base. Suction forces contaminated air against the periodically monitored particle absorbing grease.

  4. A unique gun application for both high velocity and low velocity projectiles in a standard 155mm long tom gun

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garcia, J.R.

    1990-01-01

    The Terminal Ballistics Facility at Sandia National Laboratores in Albuquerque, New Mexico has developed an inexpensive and reliable capability for environmental testing of nuclear and kinetic energy weapon systems using the standard military 155 mm long tom gun. An unusual priming technique and charge configuration developed by Sandia National laboratories provides repeatable results such that payloads may be launched outside of the normal operating regime (both high and low) for the 155 mm gun. A 15 pound payload was reliably launched at 1000 fps with a breech pressure of 3000 psi. Another 20 pound payload was reliably launched to 5000 fps with a breech pressure of 50000 psi. A detailed description of charge configuration and test results is presented. 21 figs., 4 tabs.

  5. Field Sampling | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Field Mapping Hand-held X-Ray Fluorescence (XRF) Macrophotography Portable X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) Field Sampling Gas Sampling Gas Flux Sampling Soil Gas Sampling Surface Gas...

  6. Measurement of relative output factors for the 8 and 4 mm collimators of Leksell Gamma Knife Perfexion by film dosimetry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Novotny, Josef Jr.; Bhatnagar, Jagdish P.; Quader, Mubina A.; Bednarz, Greg; Lunsford, L. Dade; Huq, M. Saiful

    2009-05-15

    Three types of films, Kodak EDR2, Gafchromic EBT, and Gafchromic MD-V2-55, were used to measure relative output factors of 4 and 8 mm collimators of the Leksell Gamma Knife Perfexion. The optical density to dose calibration curve for each of the film types was obtained by exposing the films to a range of known doses. Ten data points were acquired for each of the calibration curves in the dose ranges from 0 to 4 Gy, 0 to 8 Gy, and 0 to 80 Gy for Kodak EDR2, Gafchromic EBT, and Gafchromic MD-V2-55 films, respectively. For the measurement of relative output factors, five films of each film type were exposed to a known dose. All films were scanned using EPSON EXPRESSION 10000 XL scanner with 200 dpi resolution in 16 bit gray scale for EDR2 film and 48 bit color scale for Gafchromic films. The scanned images were imported in the red channel for both Gafchromic films. The background corrections from an unexposed film were applied to all films. The output factors obtained from film measurements were in a close agreement both with the Monte Carlo calculated values of 0.924 and 0.805 for 8 and 4 mm collimators, respectively. These values are provided by the vendor and used as default values in the vendor's treatment planning system. The largest differences were noted for the Kodak EDR 2 films (-2.1% and -4.5% for 8 and 4 mm collimators, respectively). The best agreement observed was for EBT Gafchromic film (-0.8% and +0.6% differences for 8 and 4 mm collimators, respectively). Based on the present values, no changes in the default relative output factor values were made in the treatment planning system.

  7. Magnetic Materials (MM)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Contacts Calendars Community Scientific Access Site Access Training Science & Education Science & Research Highlights Conferences Seminars Publications Annual Reports APS Upgrade...

  8. Solvent Hold Tank Sample Results for MCU-15-556-557-558. March 2015 Monthly Sample

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fondeur, F.; Taylor-Pashow, K.

    2015-05-04

    Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) received one set of Solvent Hold Tank (SHT) samples (MCU-15-556, MCU-15-557, and MCU-15-558), pulled on 03/16/2015 for analysis. The samples were combined and analyzed for composition. Analysis of the composite sample MCU-15-556-557-558 indicated a low concentration (~ 78 % of nominal) of the suppressor (TiDG) and concentrations of the extractant (MaxCalix), and of the modifier (CS-7SB) in the solvent that were slightly lower than nominal. This analysis confirms the addition of TiDG, MaxCalix, and modifier to the solvent in February 2015. Based on the current monthly sample, the levels of TiDG, MaxCalix, and modifier are sufficient for continuing operation without adding a trim at this time. No impurities above the 1000 ppm level were found in this solvent by the Semi-Volatile Organic Analysis (SVOA). However, the p-nut vials that delivered the samples contained small (1 mm) droplets of oxidized modifier and amides (as detected by the FTIR analysis). In addition, up to 21 microgram of mercury per gram of solvent (or 17.4 µg/mL) was detected in this sample. The laboratory will continue to monitor the quality of the solvent in particular for any new impurities or degradation of the solvent components.

  9. Ability of the Confined Explosive Component Water Gap Test STANAG 4363 to Assess the Shock Sensitivity of MM-Scale Detonators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lefrancois, A S; Roeske, F; Benterou, J; Tarver, C M; Lee, R S; Hannah, B

    2006-02-10

    The Explosive Component Water Gap Test (ECWGT) has been validated to assess the shock sensitivity of lead and booster components having a diameter larger than 5 mm. Several countries have investigated by experiments and numerical simulations the effect of confinement on the go/no go threshold for Pentaerythritol Tetranitrate (PETN) pellets having a height and diameter of 3 mm, confined by a steel annulus of wall thickness 1-3.5 mm. Confinement of the PETN by a steel annulus of the same height of the pellet with 1-mm wall thickness makes the component more sensitive (larger gap). As the wall thickness is increased to 2-mm, the gap increases a lesser amount, but when the wall thickness is increased to 3.5-mm a decrease in sensitivity is observed (smaller gap). This decrease of the water gap has been reproduced experimentally. Recent numerical simulations using Ignition and Growth model [1] for the PETN Pellet have reproduced the experimental results for the steel confinement up to 2 mm thick [2]. The presence of a stronger re-shock following the first input shock from the water and focusing on the axis have been identified in the pellet due to the steel confinement. The double shock configuration is well-known to lead in some cases to shock desensitization. This work presents the numerical simulations using Ignition and Growth model for LX16 (PETN based HE) and LX19 (CL20 based HE) Pellets [3] in order to assess the shock sensitivity of mm-scale detonators. The pellets are 0.6 mm in diameter and 3 mm length with different type of steel confinement 2.2 mm thick and 4.7 mm thick. The influence of an aluminum confinement is calculated for the standard LX 16 pellet 3 mm in diameter and 3 mm in height. The question of reducing the size of the donor charge is also investigated to small scale the test itself.

  10. Sampling for Beryllium Surface Contamination using Wet, Dry and Alcohol Wipe Sampling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kerr, Kent

    2004-12-17

    This research project was conducted at the National Nuclear Security Administration's Kansas City Plant, operated by Honeywell Federal Manufacturing and Technologies, in conjunction with the Safety Sciences Department of Central Missouri State University, to compare relative removal efficiencies of three wipe sampling techniques currently used at Department of Energy facilities. Efficiencies of removal of beryllium contamination from typical painted surfaces were tested by wipe sampling with dry Whatman 42 filter paper, with water-moistened (Ghost Wipe) materials, and by methanol-moistened wipes. Test plates were prepared using 100 mm X 15 mm Pyrex Petri dishes with interior surfaces spray painted with a bond coat primer. To achieve uniform deposition over the test plate surface, 10 ml aliquots of solution containing 1 beryllium and 0.1 ml of metal working fluid were transferred to the test plates and subsequently evaporated. Metal working fluid was added to simulate the slight oiliness common on surfaces in metal working shops where fugitive oil mist accumulates over time. Sixteen test plates for each wipe method (dry, water, and methanol) were processed and sampled using a modification of wiping patterns recommended by OSHA Method 125G. Laboratory and statistical analysis showed that methanol-moistened wipe sampling removed significantly more (about twice as much) beryllium/oil-film surface contamination as water-moistened wipes (p< 0.001), which removed significantly more (about twice as much) residue as dry wipes (p <0.001). Evidence for beryllium sensitization via skin exposure argues in favor of wipe sampling with wetting agents that provide enhanced residue removal efficiency.

  11. I/O Formats

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Formats I/O Formats Software I/O continues to be one of the main bottlenecks for scientific applications. Here are two software packages that many application developers use to manage input/output of heterogeneous types of binary application data used on many different platforms. HDF5 and NETCDF are both implemented on top of MPI-IO and have gained popularity as alternatives to basic POSIX API. HDF5 is a machine-independent and self-documenting file format. Each HDF5 file "looks" like

  12. Level Diagram Format Choice

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Which format should I use? There is no clear-cut answer to this question -- different solutions work better in different situations. In an effort to help you decide which will work best for you, we provide a discussion of the advantages and disadvantages of the three available formats. GIF: GIF stands for Graphic Interchange Format. It was developed by CompuServe as a device-independent way to store pictures. The files are well-compressed, so download time is relatively short. Most web browsers

  13. Sparse Image Format

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2007-04-12

    The Sparse Image Format (SIF) is a file format for storing spare raster images. It works by breaking an image down into tiles. Space is savid by only storing non-uniform tiles, i.e. tiles with at least two different pixel values. If a tile is completely uniform, its common pixel value is stored instead of the complete tile raster. The software is a library in the C language used for manipulating files in SIF format. Itmore » supports large files (> 2GB) and is designed to build in Windows and Linux environments.« less

  14. NID Copper Sample Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kouzes, Richard T.; Zhu, Zihua

    2011-09-12

    The current focal point of the nuclear physics program at PNNL is the MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR, and the follow-on Tonne-Scale experiment, a large array of ultra-low background high-purity germanium detectors, enriched in 76Ge, designed to search for zero-neutrino double-beta decay (0νββ). This experiment requires the use of germanium isotopically enriched in 76Ge. The MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR is a DOE and NSF funded project with a major science impact. The DEMONSTRATOR will utilize 76Ge from Russia, but for the Tonne-Scale experiment it is hoped that an alternate technology, possibly one under development at Nonlinear Ion Dynamics (NID), will be a viable, US-based, lower-cost source of separated material. Samples of separated material from NID require analysis to determine the isotopic distribution and impurities. DOE is funding NID through an SBIR grant for development of their separation technology for application to the Tonne-Scale experiment. The Environmental Molecular Sciences facility (EMSL), a DOE user facility at PNNL, has the required mass spectroscopy instruments for making isotopic measurements that are essential to the quality assurance for the MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR and for the development of the future separation technology required for the Tonne-Scale experiment. A sample of isotopically separated copper was provided by NID to PNNL in January 2011 for isotopic analysis as a test of the NID technology. The results of that analysis are reported here. A second sample of isotopically separated copper was provided by NID to PNNL in August 2011 for isotopic analysis as a test of the NID technology. The results of that analysis are also reported here.

  15. Stack sampling apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lind, Randall F; Lloyd, Peter D; Love, Lonnie J; Noakes, Mark W; Pin, Francois G; Richardson, Bradley S; Rowe, John C

    2014-09-16

    An apparatus for obtaining samples from a structure includes a support member, at least one stabilizing member, and at least one moveable member. The stabilizing member has a first portion coupled to the support member and a second portion configured to engage with the structure to restrict relative movement between the support member and the structure. The stabilizing member is radially expandable from a first configuration where the second portion does not engage with a surface of the structure to a second configuration where the second portion engages with the surface of the structure.

  16. Germanium-76 Sample Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kouzes, Richard T.; Engelhard, Mark H.; Zhu, Zihua

    2011-04-01

    The MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR is a large array of ultra-low background high-purity germanium detectors, enriched in 76Ge, designed to search for zero-neutrino double-beta decay (0???). The DEMONSTRATOR will utilize 76Ge from Russia, and the first one gram sample was received from the supplier for analysis on April 24, 2011. The Environmental Molecular Sciences facility, a DOE user facility at PNNL, was used to make the required isotopic and chemical purity measurements that are essential to the quality assurance for the MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR. The results of this first analysis are reported here.

  17. September 2004 Water Sampling

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    4 Groundwater Sampling at the Central Nevada Test Area February 2015 LMS/CNT/S01214 Available for sale to the public from: U.S. Department of Commerce National Technical Information Service 5301 Shawnee Road Alexandria, VA 22312 Telephone: 800.553.6847 Fax: 703.605.6900 E-mail: orders@ntis.gov Online Ordering: http://www.ntis.gov/help/ordermethods.aspx Available electronically at http://www.osti.gov/scitech/ Available for a processing fee to U.S. Department of Energy and its contractors, in

  18. Pulsed field sample neutralization

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Appelhans, Anthony D.; Dahl, David A.; Delmore, James E.

    1990-01-01

    An apparatus and method for alternating voltage and for varying the rate of extraction during the extraction of secondary particles, resulting in periods when either positive ions, or negative ions and electrons are extracted at varying rates. Using voltage with alternating charge during successive periods to extract particles from materials which accumulate charge opposite that being extracted causes accumulation of surface charge of opposite sign. Charge accumulation can then be adjusted to a ratio which maintains a balance of positive and negative charge emission, thus maintaining the charge neutrality of the sample.

  19. Post-Award Deliverables Sample (Part 2 of Sample Deliverables...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    J-4) Post-Award Deliverables Sample (Part 2 of Sample Deliverables for Task Orders, IDIQ Attachment. J-4) Document offers a post-award deliverables sample for an energy savings ...

  20. DOE/RA/50354 Volume II FEAS)IBILITY STUDY FOR A 10 MM GPY FUEL ETHANOL PLANT

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    DOE/RA/50354 Volume II FEAS)IBILITY STUDY FOR A 10 MM GPY FUEL ETHANOL PLANT BRADY HOT SPRINGS, NEVADA . Volume II - Geothermal Resource, Agricultural Feedstock, Markets and E c o q h i c Viability 8 *e _. - - * 7 , - - - September 1980 i Prepared by Geothermal Food Processors, Inc. Fernley, Nevada and The Andersen Group DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency Thereof,

  1. Fluid sampling tool

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Garcia, A.R.; Johnston, R.G.; Martinez, R.K.

    1999-05-25

    A fluid sampling tool is described for sampling fluid from a container. The tool has a fluid collecting portion which is drilled into the container wall, thereby affixing it to the wall. The tool may have a fluid extracting section which withdraws fluid collected by the fluid collecting section. The fluid collecting section has a fluted shank with an end configured to drill a hole into a container wall. The shank has a threaded portion for tapping the borehole. The shank is threadably engaged to a cylindrical housing having an inner axial passageway sealed at one end by a septum. A flexible member having a cylindrical portion and a bulbous portion is provided. The housing can be slid into an inner axial passageway in the cylindrical portion and sealed to the flexible member. The bulbous portion has an outer lip defining an opening. The housing is clamped into the chuck of a drill, the lip of the bulbous section is pressed against a container wall until the shank touches the wall, and the user operates the drill. Wall shavings (kerf) are confined in a chamber formed in the bulbous section as it folds when the shank advances inside the container. After sufficient advancement of the shank, an o-ring makes a seal with the container wall. 6 figs.

  2. NID Copper Sample Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kouzes, Richard T.; Zhu, Zihua

    2011-02-01

    The current focal point of the nuclear physics program at PNNL is the MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR, and the follow-on Tonne-Scale experiment, a large array of ultra-low background high-purity germanium detectors, enriched in 76Ge, designed to search for zero-neutrino double-beta decay (0νββ). This experiment requires the use of germanium isotopically enriched in 76Ge. The DEMONSTRATOR will utilize 76Ge from Russia, but for the Tonne-Scale experiment it is hoped that an alternate technology under development at Nonlinear Ion Dynamics (NID) will be a viable, US-based, lower-cost source of separated material. Samples of separated material from NID require analysis to determine the isotopic distribution and impurities. The MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR is a DOE and NSF funded project with a major science impact. DOE is funding NID through an SBIR grant for development of their separation technology for application to the Tonne-Scale experiment. The Environmental Molecular Sciences facility (EMSL), a DOE user facility at PNNL, has the required mass spectroscopy instruments for making these isotopic measurements that are essential to the quality assurance for the MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR and for the development of the future separation technology required for the Tonne-Scale experiment. A sample of isotopically separated copper was provided by NID to PNNL for isotopic analysis as a test of the NID technology. The results of that analysis are reported here.

  3. Fluid sampling tool

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Garcia, Anthony R.; Johnston, Roger G.; Martinez, Ronald K.

    1999-05-25

    A fluid sampling tool for sampling fluid from a container. The tool has a fluid collecting portion which is drilled into the container wall, thereby affixing it to the wall. The tool may have a fluid extracting section which withdraws fluid collected by the fluid collecting section. The fluid collecting section has a fluted shank with an end configured to drill a hole into a container wall. The shank has a threaded portion for tapping the borehole. The shank is threadably engaged to a cylindrical housing having an inner axial passageway sealed at one end by a septum. A flexible member having a cylindrical portion and a bulbous portion is provided. The housing can be slid into an inner axial passageway in the cylindrical portion and sealed to the flexible member. The bulbous portion has an outer lip defining an opening. The housing is clamped into the chuck of a drill, the lip of the bulbous section is pressed against a container wall until the shank touches the wall, and the user operates the drill. Wall shavings (kerf) are confined in a chamber formed in the bulbous section as it folds when the shank advances inside the container. After sufficient advancement of the shank, an o-ring makes a seal with the container wall.

  4. Sample introducing apparatus and sample modules for mass spectrometer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thompson, Cyril V.; Wise, Marcus B.

    1993-01-01

    An apparatus for introducing gaseous samples from a wide range of environmental matrices into a mass spectrometer for analysis of the samples is described. Several sample preparing modules including a real-time air monitoring module, a soil/liquid purge module, and a thermal desorption module are individually and rapidly attachable to the sample introducing apparatus for supplying gaseous samples to the mass spectrometer. The sample-introducing apparatus uses a capillary column for conveying the gaseous samples into the mass spectrometer and is provided with an open/split interface in communication with the capillary and a sample archiving port through which at least about 90 percent of the gaseous sample in a mixture with an inert gas that was introduced into the sample introducing apparatus is separated from a minor portion of the mixture entering the capillary discharged from the sample introducing apparatus.

  5. Sample introducing apparatus and sample modules for mass spectrometer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thompson, C.V.; Wise, M.B.

    1993-12-21

    An apparatus for introducing gaseous samples from a wide range of environmental matrices into a mass spectrometer for analysis of the samples is described. Several sample preparing modules including a real-time air monitoring module, a soil/liquid purge module, and a thermal desorption module are individually and rapidly attachable to the sample introducing apparatus for supplying gaseous samples to the mass spectrometer. The sample-introducing apparatus uses a capillary column for conveying the gaseous samples into the mass spectrometer and is provided with an open/split interface in communication with the capillary and a sample archiving port through which at least about 90 percent of the gaseous sample in a mixture with an inert gas that was introduced into the sample introducing apparatus is separated from a minor portion of the mixture entering the capillary discharged from the sample introducing apparatus. 5 figures.

  6. Soil sampling kit and a method of sampling therewith

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thompson, Cyril V.

    1991-01-01

    A soil sampling device and a sample containment device for containing a soil sample is disclosed. In addition, a method for taking a soil sample using the soil sampling device and soil sample containment device to minimize the loss of any volatile organic compounds contained in the soil sample prior to analysis is disclosed. The soil sampling device comprises two close fitting, longitudinal tubular members of suitable length, the inner tube having the outward end closed. With the inner closed tube withdrawn a selected distance, the outer tube can be inserted into the ground or other similar soft material to withdraw a sample of material for examination. The inner closed end tube controls the volume of the sample taken and also serves to eject the sample. The soil sample containment device has a sealing member which is adapted to attach to an analytical apparatus which analyzes the volatile organic compounds contained in the sample. The soil sampling device in combination with the soil sample containment device allow an operator to obtain a soil sample containing volatile organic compounds and minimizing the loss of the volatile organic compounds prior to analysis of the soil sample for the volatile organic compounds.

  7. Soil sampling kit and a method of sampling therewith

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thompson, C.V.

    1991-02-05

    A soil sampling device and a sample containment device for containing a soil sample is disclosed. In addition, a method for taking a soil sample using the soil sampling device and soil sample containment device to minimize the loss of any volatile organic compounds contained in the soil sample prior to analysis is disclosed. The soil sampling device comprises two close fitting, longitudinal tubular members of suitable length, the inner tube having the outward end closed. With the inner closed tube withdrawn a selected distance, the outer tube can be inserted into the ground or other similar soft material to withdraw a sample of material for examination. The inner closed end tube controls the volume of the sample taken and also serves to eject the sample. The soil sample containment device has a sealing member which is adapted to attach to an analytical apparatus which analyzes the volatile organic compounds contained in the sample. The soil sampling device in combination with the soil sample containment device allows an operator to obtain a soil sample containing volatile organic compounds and minimizing the loss of the volatile organic compounds prior to analysis of the soil sample for the volatile organic compounds. 11 figures.

  8. Fluid sampling apparatus and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yeamans, David R.

    1998-01-01

    Incorporation of a bellows in a sampling syringe eliminates ingress of contaminants, permits replication of amounts and compression of multiple sample injections, and enables remote sampling for off-site analysis.

  9. Fluid sampling apparatus and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yeamans, D.R.

    1998-02-03

    Incorporation of a bellows in a sampling syringe eliminates ingress of contaminants, permits replication of amounts and compression of multiple sample injections, and enables remote sampling for off-site analysis. 3 figs.

  10. Fluid sampling tool

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Johnston, Roger G.; Garcia, Anthony R. E.; Martinez, Ronald K.

    2001-09-25

    The invention includes a rotatable tool for collecting fluid through the wall of a container. The tool includes a fluid collection section with a cylindrical shank having an end portion for drilling a hole in the container wall when the tool is rotated, and a threaded portion for tapping the hole in the container wall. A passageway in the shank in communication with at least one radial inlet hole in the drilling end and an opening at the end of the shank is adapted to receive fluid from the container. The tool also includes a cylindrical chamber affixed to the end of the shank opposite to the drilling portion thereof for receiving and storing fluid passing through the passageway. The tool also includes a flexible, deformable gasket that provides a fluid-tight chamber to confine kerf generated during the drilling and tapping of the hole. The invention also includes a fluid extractor section for extracting fluid samples from the fluid collecting section.

  11. Rock Sampling | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    resource at depth. These hand samples can be collected using a rock hammer or sledge. Data Access and Acquisition Under a detailed investigation, a systematic sampling procedure...

  12. Water Sampling | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Water Sampling Details Activities (63) Areas (51) Regions (5) NEPA(2) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Field Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Field Sampling...

  13. Sample holder with optical features

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Milas, Mirko; Zhu, Yimei; Rameau, Jonathan David

    2013-07-30

    A sample holder for holding a sample to be observed for research purposes, particularly in a transmission electron microscope (TEM), generally includes an external alignment part for directing a light beam in a predetermined beam direction, a sample holder body in optical communication with the external alignment part and a sample support member disposed at a distal end of the sample holder body opposite the external alignment part for holding a sample to be analyzed. The sample holder body defines an internal conduit for the light beam and the sample support member includes a light beam positioner for directing the light beam between the sample holder body and the sample held by the sample support member.

  14. Enthalpy of formation of gallium nitride

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ranade, M.R.; Tessier, F.; Navrotsky, A.; Leppert, V.J.; Risbud, S.H.; DiSalvo, F.J.; Balkas, C.M.

    2000-05-04

    A major discrepancy in the literature concerning the enthalpy of formation of GaN has been resolved using oxidative oxide melt solution calorimetry. Four samples of differing nitrogen contents were measured by dropping them into molten 3Na{sub 2}O{center_dot}4MoO{sub 3} in a calorimeter at 975 K with oxygen gas bubbling through the solvent. The samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction, chemical analysis, transmission electron microscopy, particle size analysis, and BET measurements. The enthalpy of drop solution (kJ/g) varied approximately linearly with nitrogen content. Extrapolated to stoichiometric GaN, the data yield a value of {minus}156.8 {+-} 16.0 kJ/mol for the standard enthalpy of formation from the elements at 298 K. The relatively large error reflects the deviation of individual points from the straight line rather than uncertainties in each set of data for a given sample. This new directly measured enthalpy of formation is in excellent agreement with that obtained from the temperature dependence of the equilibrium pressure of nitrogen over GaN, {minus}157.7 kJ/mol, measured by Madar et al. and Karpinski and Porowski. This value of {minus}156.8 kJ/mol should replace the commonly tabulated value of {minus}110 kJ/mol determined by Hahn and Juza using combustion calorimetry on an uncharacterized sample over 50 years ago.

  15. Simultaneous Radio to (Sub-) mm-Monitoring of Variability and Spectral Shape Evolution of potential GLAST Blazars

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fuhrmann, L.; Zensus, J. A.; Krichbaum, T. P.; Angelakis, E.; Readhead, A. C. S.

    2007-07-12

    The Large Area Telescope (LAT) instrument onboard GLAST offers a tremendous opportunity for future blazar studies. In order to fully benefit from its capabilities and to maximize the scientific return from the LAT, it is of great importance to conduct dedicated multi-frequency monitoring campaigns that will result comprehensive observations. Consequently, we initiated an effort to conduct a GLAST-dedicated, quasi-simultaneous, broad-band flux-density (and polarization) monitoring of potential GLAST blazars with the Effelsberg and OVRO radio telescopes (11 cm to 7 mm wavelength). Here, we present a short overview of these activities which will complement the multi-wavelengths activities of the GLAST/LAT collaboration towards the 'low-energy' radio bands. Further we will give a brief outlook including the extension of this coordinated campaign towards higher frequencies and future scientific aims.

  16. Simultaneous Radio to (Sub-) Mm-Monitoring of Variability and Spectral Shape Evolution of Potential GLAST Blazars

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fuhrmann, L.; Zensus, J.A.; Krichbaum, T.P.; Angelakis, E.; Readhead, A.C.S.; /Caltech

    2011-11-29

    The Large Area Telescope (LAT) instrument onboard GLAST offers a tremendous opportunity for future blazar studies. In order to fully benefit from its capabilities and to maximize the scientific return from the LAT, it is of great importance to conduct dedicated multi-frequency monitoring campaigns that will result comprehensive observations. Consequently, we initiated an effort to conduct a GLAST-dedicated, quasi-simultaneous, broad-band flux-density (and polarization) monitoring of potential GLAST blazars with the Effelsberg and OVRO radio telescopes (11 cm to 7mm wavelength). Here, we present a short overview of these activities which will complement the multi-wavelengths activities of the GLAST/LAT collaboration towards the 'low-energy' radio bands. Further we will give a brief outlook including the extension of this coordinated campaign towards higher frequencies and future scientific aims.

  17. Electron dynamics in complex environments with real-time time dependent density functional theory in a QM-MM framework

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morzan, Uriel N.; Ramrez, Francisco F.; Scherlis, Damin A. E-mail: mcgl@qb.ffyb.uba.ar; Lebrero, Mariano C. Gonzlez E-mail: mcgl@qb.ffyb.uba.ar

    2014-04-28

    This article presents a time dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) implementation to propagate the Kohn-Sham equations in real time, including the effects of a molecular environment through a Quantum-Mechanics Molecular-Mechanics (QM-MM) hamiltonian. The code delivers an all-electron description employing Gaussian basis functions, and incorporates the Amber force-field in the QM-MM treatment. The most expensive parts of the computation, comprising the commutators between the hamiltonian and the density matrixrequired to propagate the electron dynamics, and the evaluation of the exchange-correlation energy, were migrated to the CUDA platform to run on graphics processing units, which remarkably accelerates the performance of the code. The method was validated by reproducing linear-response TDDFT results for the absorption spectra of several molecular species. Two different schemes were tested to propagate the quantum dynamics: (i) a leap-frog Verlet algorithm, and (ii) the Magnus expansion to first-order. These two approaches were confronted, to find that the Magnus scheme is more efficient by a factor of six in small molecules. Interestingly, the presence of iron was found to seriously limitate the length of the integration time step, due to the high frequencies associated with the core-electrons. This highlights the importance of pseudopotentials to alleviate the cost of the propagation of the inner states when heavy nuclei are present. Finally, the methodology was applied to investigate the shifts induced by the chemical environment on the most intense UV absorption bands of two model systems of general relevance: the formamide molecule in water solution, and the carboxy-heme group in Flavohemoglobin. In both cases, shifts of several nanometers are observed, consistently with the available experimental data.

  18. formatting | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    formatting Home Jweers's picture Submitted by Jweers(88) Contributor 7 August, 2013 - 18:23 New Robust References citation citing developer formatting reference Semantic Mediawiki...

  19. Gaussian entanglement of formation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wolf, M.M.; Giedke, G.; Krueger, O.; Werner, R. F.; Cirac, J.I.

    2004-05-01

    We introduce a Gaussian version of the entanglement of formation adapted to bipartite Gaussian states by considering decompositions into pure Gaussian states only. We show that this quantity is an entanglement monotone under Gaussian operations and provide a simplified computation for states of arbitrary many modes. For the case of one mode per site the remaining variational problem can be solved analytically. If the considered state is in addition symmetric with respect to interchanging the two modes, we prove additivity of the considered entanglement measure. Moreover, in this case and considering only a single copy, our entanglement measure coincides with the true entanglement of formation.

  20. Determination of the effective sample thickness via radiative capture

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hurst, A. M.; Summers, N. C.; Szentmiklosi, L.; Firestone, R. B.; Basunia, M. S.; Escher, J. E.; Sleaford, B. W.

    2015-09-14

    Our procedure for determining the effective thickness of non-uniform irregular-shaped samples via radiative capture is described. In this technique, partial ?-ray production cross sections of a compound nucleus produced in a neutron-capture reaction are measured using Prompt Gamma Activation Analysis and compared to their corresponding standardized absolute values. For the low-energy transitions, the measured cross sections are lower than their standard values due to significant photoelectric absorption of the ? rays within the bulk-sample volume itself. Using standard theoretical techniques, the amount of ?-ray self absorption and neutron self shielding can then be calculated by iteratively varying the sample thickness until the observed cross sections converge with the known standards. The overall attenuation provides a measure of the effective sample thickness illuminated by the neutron beam. This procedure is illustrated through radiative neutron capture using powdered oxide samples comprising enriched 186W and 182W from which their tungsten-equivalent effective thicknesses are deduced to be 0.077(3) mm and 0.042(8) mm, respectively.

  1. Determination of the effective sample thickness via radiative capture

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Hurst, A. M.; Summers, N. C.; Szentmiklosi, L.; Firestone, R. B.; Basunia, M. S.; Escher, J. E.; Sleaford, B. W.

    2015-09-14

    Our procedure for determining the effective thickness of non-uniform irregular-shaped samples via radiative capture is described. In this technique, partial γ-ray production cross sections of a compound nucleus produced in a neutron-capture reaction are measured using Prompt Gamma Activation Analysis and compared to their corresponding standardized absolute values. For the low-energy transitions, the measured cross sections are lower than their standard values due to significant photoelectric absorption of the γ rays within the bulk-sample volume itself. Using standard theoretical techniques, the amount of γ-ray self absorption and neutron self shielding can then be calculated by iteratively varying the sample thicknessmore » until the observed cross sections converge with the known standards. The overall attenuation provides a measure of the effective sample thickness illuminated by the neutron beam. This procedure is illustrated through radiative neutron capture using powdered oxide samples comprising enriched 186W and 182W from which their tungsten-equivalent effective thicknesses are deduced to be 0.077(3) mm and 0.042(8) mm, respectively.« less

  2. Formation and retention of methane in coal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hucka, V.J.; Bodily, D.M.; Huang, H.

    1992-05-15

    The formation and retention of methane in coalbeds was studied for ten Utah coal samples, one Colorado coal sample and eight coal samples from the Argonne Premium Coal Sample Bank.Methane gas content of the Utah and Colorado coals varied from zero to 9 cm{sup 3}/g. The Utah coals were all high volatile bituminous coals. The Colorado coal was a gassy medium volatile bituminous coal. The Argonne coals cover a range or rank from lignite to low volatile bituminous coal and were used to determine the effect of rank in laboratory studies. The methane content of six selected Utah coal seams and the Colorado coal seam was measured in situ using a special sample collection device and a bubble desorbometer. Coal samples were collected at each measurement site for laboratory analysis. The cleat and joint system was evaluated for the coal and surrounding rocks and geological conditions were noted. Permeability measurements were performed on selected samples and all samples were analyzed for proximate and ultimate analysis, petrographic analysis, {sup 13}C NMR dipolar-dephasing spectroscopy, and density analysis. The observed methane adsorption behavior was correlated with the chemical structure and physical properties of the coals.

  3. Sampling Report for May-June, 2014 WIPP Samples

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    UNCLASSIFIED iii Table of Contents WIPP Panel 7 Sampling May-June, 2014 ... 15 LLNL-TR-667001 Section 1 WIPP Panel 7 Sampling May-June, 2014 1. Summary of ...

  4. Sampling Report for August 15, 2014 WIPP Samples

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    0 L L N L - X X X X - X X X X X Sampling Report for August 15, 2014 WIPP Samples UNCLASSIFIED Forensic Science Center December 19, 2014 Sampling Report for August 15 2014 WIPP Samples Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory UNCLASSIFIED ii Disclaimer This document was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States government. Neither the United States government nor Lawrence Livermore National Security, LLC, nor any of their employees makes any warranty, expressed or

  5. Specified assurance level sampling procedure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Willner, O.

    1980-11-01

    In the nuclear industry design specifications for certain quality characteristics require that the final product be inspected by a sampling plan which can demonstrate product conformance to stated assurance levels. The Specified Assurance Level (SAL) Sampling Procedure has been developed to permit the direct selection of attribute sampling plans which can meet commonly used assurance levels. The SAL procedure contains sampling plans which yield the minimum sample size at stated assurance levels. The SAL procedure also provides sampling plans with acceptance numbers ranging from 0 to 10, thus, making available to the user a wide choice of plans all designed to comply with a stated assurance level.

  6. Groundwater Sampling | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    500 mL), whereas analysis for stable isotopes that are present in greater abundance in natural samples requires less water to be sampled by a full order of magnitude (approximately...

  7. Geoscience Laboratory | Sample Preparation Laboratories

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    preparation and other relatively straight-forward laboratory manipulations. These include buffer preparations, solid sample grinding, solution concentration, filtration, and...

  8. TEMPORAL SELF-ORGANIZATION IN GALAXY FORMATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cen, Renyue

    2014-04-20

    We report on the discovery of a relation between the number of star formation (SF) peaks per unit time, ?{sub peak}, and the size of the temporal smoothing window function, ?t, used to define the peaks: ?{sub peak}??t {sup 1} {sup } {sup ?} (? ? 1.618). This relation holds over the range of ?t = 10-1000Myr that can be reliably computed here, using a large sample of galaxies obtained from a state-of-the-art cosmological hydrodynamic simulation. This means that the temporal distribution of SF peaks in galaxies as a population is fractal with a Hausdorff fractal dimension equal to ? 1. This finding reveals, for the first time, that the superficially chaotic process of galaxy formation is underlined by temporal self-organization up to at least one gigayear. It is tempting to suggest that, given the known existence of spatial fractals (such as the power-law two-point function of galaxies), there is a joint spatio-temporal self-organization in galaxy formation. From an observational perspective, it will be urgent to devise diagnostics to probe the SF histories of galaxies with good temporal resolution to facilitate a test of this prediction. If confirmed, it would provide unambiguous evidence for a new picture of galaxy formation that is interaction driven, cooperative, and coherent in and between time and space. Unravelling its origin may hold the key to understanding galaxy formation.

  9. Formate-assisted pyrolysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeSisto, William Joseph; Wheeler, Marshall Clayton; van Heiningen, Adriaan R. P.

    2015-03-17

    The present invention provides, among other thing, methods for creating significantly deoxygenated bio-oils form biomass including the steps of providing a feedstock, associating the feedstock with an alkali formate to form a treated feedstock, dewatering the treated feedstock, heating the dewatered treated feedstock to form a vapor product, and condensing the vapor product to form a pyrolysis oil, wherein the pyrolysis oil contains less than 30% oxygen by weight.

  10. SOLVENT HOLD TANK SAMPLE RESULTS FOR MCU-14-259/260/261 AND MCU-14-315/316/317: APRIL AND MAY 2014 MONTHLY SAMPLES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fondeur, F.; Taylor-Pashow, K.

    2014-08-05

    SRNL received two sets of SHT samples (MCU-14-259/260/261 in April 2014 and MCU-14- 315/316/317 in May 2014) for analysis. The samples were analyzed for composition. Both samples have similar chemical composition. As with the previous solvent sample results, these analyses indicate that the solvent does not require Isopar® L trimming at this time. Since an addition of TiDG and MaxCalix to the SHT was added in early July 2014, the solvent does not require TiDG addition at this time. The current TiDG level (1.5 mM) is above the minimum recommended operating level of 1 mM.

  11. Study of the performance of a novel 1 mm resolution dual-panel PET camera design dedicated to breast cancer imaging using Monte Carlo simulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang Jin; Olcott, Peter D.; Chinn, Garry; Foudray, Angela M. K.; Levin, Craig S.

    2007-02-15

    We studied the performance of a dual-panel positron emission tomography (PET) camera dedicated to breast cancer imaging using Monte Carlo simulation. The PET camera under development has two 10x15 cm{sup 2} plates that are constructed from arrays of 1x1x3 mm{sup 3} LSO crystals coupled to novel ultra-thin (<200 {mu}m) silicon position-sensitive avalanche photodiodes (PSAPD). In this design the photodetectors are configured ''edge-on'' with respect to incoming photons which encounter a minimum of 2 cm thick of LSO with directly measured photon interaction depth. Simulations predict that this camera will have 10-15% photon sensitivity, for an 8-4 cm panel separation. Detector measurements show {approx}1 mm{sup 3} intrinsic spatial resolution, <12% energy resolution, and {approx}2 ns coincidence time resolution. By performing simulated dual-panel PET studies using a phantom comprising active breast, heart, and torso tissue, count performance was studied as a function of coincident time and energy windows. We also studied visualization of hot spheres of 2.5-4.0 mm diameter and various locations within the simulated breast tissue for 1x1x3 mm{sup 3}, 2x2x10 mm{sup 3}, 3x3x30 mm{sup 3}, and 4x4x20 mm{sup 3} LSO crystal resolutions and different panel separations. Images were reconstructed by focal plane tomography with attenuation and normalization corrections applied. Simulation results indicate that with an activity concentration ratio of tumor:breast:heart:torso of 10:1:10:1 and 30 s of acquisition time, only the dual-plate PET camera comprising 1x1x3 mm{sup 3} crystals could resolve 2.5 mm diameter spheres with an average peak-to-valley ratio of 1.3.

  12. Direct Sampling and Analysis from Solid Phase Extraction Cards using an Automated Liquid Extraction Surface Analysis Nanoelectrospray Mass Spectrometry System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walworth, Matthew J; ElNaggar, Mariam S; Stankovich, Joseph J; WitkowskiII, Charles E.; Norris, Jeremy L; Van Berkel, Gary J

    2011-01-01

    Direct liquid extraction based surface sampling, a technique previously demonstrated with continuous flow and autonomous pipette liquid microjunction surface sampling probes, has recently been implemented as the Liquid Extraction Surface Analysis (LESA) mode on the commercially available Advion NanoMate chip-based infusion nanoelectrospray ionization system. In the present paper, the LESA mode was applied to the analysis of 96-well format custom solid phase extraction (SPE) cards, with each well consisting of either a 1 or 2 mm diameter monolithic hydrophobic stationary phase. These substrate wells were conditioned, loaded with either single or multi-component aqueous mixtures, and read out using the LESA mode of a TriVersa NanoMate or a Nanomate 100 coupled to an ABI/Sciex 4000QTRAPTM hybrid triple quadrupole/linear ion trap mass spectrometer and a Thermo LTQ XL linear ion trap mass spectrometer. Extraction conditions, including extraction/nanoESI solvent composition, volume, and dwell times, were optimized in the analysis of targeted compounds. Limit of detection and quantitation as well as analysis reproducibility figures of merit were measured. Calibration data was obtained for propranolol using a deuterated internal standard which demonstrated linearity and reproducibility. A 10x increase in signal and cleanup of micromolar Angiotensin II from a concentrated salt solution was demonstrated. Additionally, a multicomponent herbicide mixture at ppb concentration levels was analyzed using MS3 spectra for compound identification in the presence of isobaric interferences.

  13. Thermal regulation of tightly packed solid-state photodetectors in a 1 mm{sup 3} resolution clinical PET system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Freese, D. L.; Vandenbroucke, A.; Innes, D.; Lau, F. W. Y.; Hsu, D. F. C.; Reynolds, P. D.; Levin, Craig S.

    2015-01-15

    Purpose: Silicon photodetectors are of significant interest for use in positron emission tomography (PET) systems due to their compact size, insensitivity to magnetic fields, and high quantum efficiency. However, one of their main disadvantages is fluctuations in temperature cause strong shifts in gain of the devices. PET system designs with high photodetector density suffer both increased thermal density and constrained options for thermally regulating the devices. This paper proposes a method of thermally regulating densely packed silicon photodetectors in the context of a 1 mm{sup 3} resolution, high-sensitivity PET camera dedicated to breast imaging. Methods: The PET camera under construction consists of 2304 units, each containing two 8 × 8 arrays of 1 mm{sup 3} LYSO crystals coupled to two position sensitive avalanche photodiodes (PSAPD). A subsection of the proposed camera with 512 PSAPDs has been constructed. The proposed thermal regulation design uses water-cooled heat sinks, thermoelectric elements, and thermistors to measure and regulate the temperature of the PSAPDs in a novel manner. Active cooling elements, placed at the edge of the detector stack due to limited access, are controlled based on collective leakage current and temperature measurements in order to keep all the PSAPDs at a consistent temperature. This thermal regulation design is characterized for the temperature profile across the camera and for the time required for cooling changes to propagate across the camera. These properties guide the implementation of a software-based, cascaded proportional-integral-derivative control loop that controls the current through the Peltier elements by monitoring thermistor temperature and leakage current. The stability of leakage current, temperature within the system using this control loop is tested over a period of 14 h. The energy resolution is then measured over a period of 8.66 h. Finally, the consistency of PSAPD gain between independent

  14. FILAMENTARY STAR FORMATION: OBSERVING THE EVOLUTION TOWARD FLATTENED ENVELOPES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, Katherine; Looney, Leslie; Johnstone, Doug; Tobin, John E-mail: lwl@illinois.edu E-mail: jtobin@nrao.edu

    2012-12-20

    Filamentary structures are ubiquitous from large-scale molecular clouds (a few parsecs) to small-scale circumstellar envelopes around Class 0 sources ({approx}1000 AU to {approx}0.1 pc). In particular, recent observations with the Herschel Space Observatory emphasize the importance of large-scale filaments (a few parsecs) and star formation. The small-scale flattened envelopes around Class 0 sources are reminiscent of the large-scale filaments. We propose an observationally derived scenario for filamentary star formation that describes the evolution of filaments as part of the process for formation of cores and circumstellar envelopes. If such a scenario is correct, small-scale filamentary structures (0.1 pc in length) with higher densities embedded in starless cores should exist, although to date almost all the interferometers have failed to observe such structures. We perform synthetic observations of filaments at the prestellar stage by modeling the known Class 0 flattened envelope in L1157 using both the Combined Array for Research in Millimeter-wave Astronomy (CARMA) and the Atacama Large Millimeter/Submillimeter Array (ALMA). We show that with reasonable estimates for the column density through the flattened envelope, the CARMA D array at 3 mm wavelengths is not able to detect such filamentary structure, so previous studies would not have detected them. However, the substructures may be detected with the CARMA D+E array at 3 mm and the CARMA E array at 1 mm as a result of more appropriate resolution and sensitivity. ALMA is also capable of detecting the substructures and showing the structures in detail compared to the CARMA results with its unprecedented sensitivity. Such detection will confirm the new proposed paradigm of non-spherical star formation.

  15. Sampling Report for May-June, 2014 WIPP Samples

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    1 L L N L - X X X X - X X X X X Sampling Report for May- June, 2014 WIPP Samples UNCLASSIFIED Forensic Science Center January 8, 2015 Sampling Report for May-June, 2014 WIPP Samples Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory UNCLASSIFIED ii Disclaimer This document was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States government. Neither the United States government nor Lawrence Livermore National Security, LLC, nor any of their employees makes any warranty, expressed or

  16. Tribal Utility Formation

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    I L L E P O W E R A D M I N I S T R A T I O N Tribal Utility Formation in the Bonneville Power Administration Service Territory Ken Johnston Acting Tribal Affairs Manager BPA TRIBAL AFFAIRS DEPARTMENT JULY 2015 B O N N E V I L L E P O W E R A D M I N I S T R A T I O N 2 The Basics  BPA markets power from 31 Federal dams, the Columbia Generating Station Nuclear Plant, and several small non- Federal power plants  About 80% of the power BPA sells is hydroelectric  BPA accounts for about

  17. Measurement of Boundary-Layer Temperature Profiles by a Scanning 5-MM Radiometer During the 1999 Winter NSA/AAO Radiometer Exp

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Boundary-Layer Temperature Profiles by a Scanning 5-MM Radiometer During the 1999 Winter NSA/AAO Radiometer Experiment and WVIOP 2000 V. Y. Leuski and E. R. Westwater Cooperative Institute for Research in the Environmental Sciences National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Environmental Technology Laboratory University of Colorado Boulder, Colorado Introduction A scanning 5-mm-wavelength radiometer was deployed during two Intensive Operational Periods (IOPs) at the Atmospheric Radiation

  18. Concentric micro-nebulizer for direct sample insertion

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fassel, Velmer A.; Rice, Gary W.; Lawrence, Kimberly E.

    1986-03-11

    A concentric micro-nebulizer and method for introducing liquid samples into a plasma established in a plasma torch including a first tube connected to a source of plasma gas. The concentric micro-nebulizer has inner and outer concentric tubes extending upwardly within the torch for connection to a source of nebulizer gas and to a source of liquid solvent and to a source of sample liquid. The inner tube is connected to the source of liquid solvent and to the source of sample liquid and the outer tube is connected to the source of nebulizer gas. The outer tube has an orifice positioned slightly below the plasma when it is established, with the inner and outer tubes forming an annulus therebetween with the annular spacing between the tubes at said orifice being less than about 0.05 mm. The dead volume of the inner tube is less than about 5 microliters.

  19. Concentric micro-nebulizer for direct sample insertion

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fassel, V.A.; Rice, G.W.; Lawrence, K.E.

    1984-03-06

    A concentric micro-nebulizer and method for introducing liquid samples into a plasma established in a plasma torch including a first tube connected to a source of plasma gas. The concentric micro-nebulizer has inner and outer concentric tubes extending upwardly within the torch for connection to a source of nebulizer gas and to a source of liquid solvent and to a source of sample liquid. The inner tube is connected to the source of liquid solvent and to the source of sample liquid and the outer tube is connected to the source of nebulizer gas. The outer tube has an orifice positioned slightly below the plasma when it is established, with the inner and outer tubes forming an annulus therebetween with the annular spacing between the tubes at said orifice being less than about 0.05mm. The dead volume of the inner tube is less than about 5 microliters.

  20. Interim Basis for PCB Sampling and Analyses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    BANNING, D.L.

    2001-03-20

    This document was developed as an interim basis for sampling and analysis of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and will be used until a formal data quality objective (DQO) document is prepared and approved. On August 31, 2000, the Framework Agreement for Management of Polychlorinated Biphenyls (PCBs) in Hanford Tank Waste was signed by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), and the Washington State Department of Ecology (Ecology) (Ecology et al. 2000). This agreement outlines the management of double shell tank (DST) waste as Toxic Substance Control Act (TSCA) PCB remediation waste based on a risk-based disposal approval option per Title 40 of the Code of Federal Regulations 761.61 (c). The agreement calls for ''Quantification of PCBs in DSTs, single shell tanks (SSTs), and incoming waste to ensure that the vitrification plant and other ancillary facilities PCB waste acceptance limits and the requirements of the anticipated risk-based disposal approval are met.'' Waste samples will be analyzed for PCBs to satisfy this requirement. This document describes the DQO process undertaken to assure appropriate data will be collected to support management of PCBs and is presented in a DQO format. The DQO process was implemented in accordance with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency EPA QA/G4, Guidance for the Data Quality Objectives Process (EPA 1994) and the Data Quality Objectives for Sampling and Analyses, HNF-IP-0842, Rev. 1A, Vol. IV, Section 4.16 (Banning 1999).

  1. Interim Basis for PCB Sampling and Analyses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    BANNING, D.L.

    2001-01-18

    This document was developed as an interim basis for sampling and analysis of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and will be used until a formal data quality objective (DQO) document is prepared and approved. On August 31, 2000, the Framework Agreement for Management of Polychlorinated Biphenyls (PCBs) in Hanford Tank Waste was signed by the US. Department of Energy (DOE), the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), and the Washington State Department of Ecology (Ecology) (Ecology et al. 2000). This agreement outlines the management of double shell tank (DST) waste as Toxic Substance Control Act (TSCA) PCB remediation waste based on a risk-based disposal approval option per Title 40 of the Code of Federal Regulations 761.61 (c). The agreement calls for ''Quantification of PCBs in DSTs, single shell tanks (SSTs), and incoming waste to ensure that the vitrification plant and other ancillary facilities PCB waste acceptance limits and the requirements of the anticipated risk-based disposal approval are met.'' Waste samples will be analyzed for PCBs to satisfy this requirement. This document describes the DQO process undertaken to assure appropriate data will be collected to support management of PCBs and is presented in a DQO format. The DQO process was implemented in accordance with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency EPA QAlG4, Guidance for the Data Quality Objectives Process (EPA 1994) and the Data Quality Objectives for Sampling and Analyses, HNF-IP-0842, Rev. 1 A, Vol. IV, Section 4.16 (Banning 1999).

  2. Acceptance sampling using judgmental and randomly selected samples

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sego, Landon H.; Shulman, Stanley A.; Anderson, Kevin K.; Wilson, John E.; Pulsipher, Brent A.; Sieber, W. Karl

    2010-09-01

    We present a Bayesian model for acceptance sampling where the population consists of two groups, each with different levels of risk of containing unacceptable items. Expert opinion, or judgment, may be required to distinguish between the high and low-risk groups. Hence, high-risk items are likely to be identifed (and sampled) using expert judgment, while the remaining low-risk items are sampled randomly. We focus on the situation where all observed samples must be acceptable. Consequently, the objective of the statistical inference is to quantify the probability that a large percentage of the unsampled items in the population are also acceptable. We demonstrate that traditional (frequentist) acceptance sampling and simpler Bayesian formulations of the problem are essentially special cases of the proposed model. We explore the properties of the model in detail, and discuss the conditions necessary to ensure that required samples sizes are non-decreasing function of the population size. The method is applicable to a variety of acceptance sampling problems, and, in particular, to environmental sampling where the objective is to demonstrate the safety of reoccupying a remediated facility that has been contaminated with a lethal agent.

  3. Sample page | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Sample pages; Help pages; References Francis C. Monastero. 2002. An overview of industry-military cooperation in the development of power operations at the Coso...

  4. Gas Sampling | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    of geothermometric calculations and geochemical modeling of the data. In the case of gas flux sampling, different measurement techniques and devices may disrupt or alter the...

  5. Chemical Resources | Sample Preparation Laboratories

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Chemical Resources Chemical Inventory All Sample Preparation Labs are stocked with an assortment of common solvents, acids, bases, buffers, and other reagents. See our Chemical ...

  6. Environmental surveillance master sampling schedule

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bisping, L.E.

    1995-02-01

    Environmental surveillance of the Hanford Site and surrounding areas is conducted by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). This document contains the planned 1994 schedules for routine collection of samples for the Surface Environmental Surveillance Project (SESP), Drinking Water Project, and Ground-Water Surveillance Project. Samples are routinely collected for the SESP and analyzed to determine the quality of air, surface water, soil, sediment, wildlife, vegetation, foodstuffs, and farm products at Hanford Site and surrounding communities. The responsibility for monitoring onsite drinking water falls outside the scope of the SESP. PNL conducts the drinking water monitoring project concurrent with the SESP to promote efficiency and consistency, utilize expertise developed over the years, and reduce costs associated with management, procedure development, data management, quality control, and reporting. The ground-water sampling schedule identifies ground-water sampling .events used by PNL for environmental surveillance of the Hanford Site. Sampling is indicated as annual, semi-annual, quarterly, or monthly in the sampling schedule. Some samples are collected and analyzed as part of ground-water monitoring and characterization programs at Hanford (e.g. Resources Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA), or Operational). The number of samples planned by other programs are identified in the sampling schedule by a number in the analysis column and a project designation in the Cosample column. Well sampling events may be merged to avoid redundancy in cases where sampling is planned by both-environmental surveillance and another program.

  7. Sample Preparation Report of the Fourth OPCW Confidence Building Exercise on Biomedical Sample Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Udey, R. N.; Corzett, T. H.; Alcaraz, A.

    2014-07-03

    Following the successful completion of the 3rd biomedical confidence building exercise (February 2013 – March 2013), which included the analysis of plasma and urine samples spiked at low ppb levels as part of the exercise scenario, another confidence building exercise was targeted to be conducted in 2014. In this 4th exercise, it was desired to focus specifically on the analysis of plasma samples. The scenario was designed as an investigation of an alleged use of chemical weapons where plasma samples were collected, as plasma has been reported to contain CWA adducts which remain present in the human body for several weeks (Solano et al. 2008). In the 3rd exercise most participants used the fluoride regeneration method to analyze for the presence of nerve agents in plasma samples. For the 4th biomedical exercise it was decided to evaluate the analysis of human plasma samples for the presence/absence of the VX adducts and aged adducts to blood proteins (e.g., VX-butyrylcholinesterase (BuChE) and aged BuChE adducts using a pepsin digest technique to yield nonapeptides; or equivalent). As the aging of VX-BuChE adducts is relatively slow (t1/2 = 77 hr at 37 °C [Aurbek et al. 2009]), soman (GD), which ages much more quickly (t1/2 = 9 min at 37 °C [Masson et al. 2010]), was used to simulate an aged VX sample. Additional objectives of this exercise included having laboratories assess novel OP-adducted plasma sample preparation techniques and analytical instrumentation methodologies, as well as refining/designating the reporting formats for these new techniques.

  8. Available for Checkout Equipment Inventory | Sample Preparation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Laboratories Available for Checkout Equipment Inventory « Equipment Resources Title Description Agate Mortar & Pestle Sets Agate mortar & pestle sets (100mm, 65 mm, & 50mm sizes). Buchi V-700 Vacuum Pump & condenser Chemically resistant vacuum pump, flow rate 1.8m^3/h, ultimate vacuum less than 10mbar. The secondary condenser (Buchi 047180) is a complete module with insulation and 500mL receiving flask. Campden Instruments Vibrating Manual Tissue Cutter HA 752 Campden

  9. 200 area TEDF sample schedule

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, M.J.

    1995-03-22

    This document summarizes the sampling criteria associated with the 200 Area Treatment Effluent Facility (TEDF) that are needed to comply with the requirements of the Washington State Discharge Permit No. WA ST 4502 and good engineering practices at the generator streams that feed into TEDF. In addition, this document Identifies the responsible parties for both sampling and data transference.

  10. Sample push-out fixture

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Biernat, John L.

    2002-11-05

    This invention generally relates to the remote removal of pelletized samples from cylindrical containment capsules. V-blocks are used to receive the samples and provide guidance to push out rods. Stainless steel liners fit into the v-channels on the v-blocks which permits them to be remotely removed and replaced or cleaned to prevent cross contamination between capsules and samples. A capsule holder securely holds the capsule while allowing manual up/down and in/out movement to align each sample hole with the v-blocks. Both end sections contain identical v-blocks; one that guides the drive out screw and rods or manual push out rods and the other to receive the samples as they are driven out of the capsule.

  11. Brine Sampling and Evaluation Program, 1991 report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deal, D.E.; Abitz, R.J.; Myers, J.; Martin, M.L.; Milligan, D.J.; Sobocinski, R.W.; Lipponer, P.P.J.; Belski, D.S.

    1993-09-01

    The data presented in this report are the result of Brine Sampling and Evaluation Program (BSEP) activities at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plan (WIPP) during 1991. These BSEP activities document and investigate the origins, hydraulic characteristics, extent, and composition of brine occurrences in the Permian Salado Formation and seepage of that brine into the excavations at the WIPP. When excavations began at the WIPP in 1982, small brine seepages (weeps) were observed on the walls. Brine studies began as part of the Site Validation Program and were formalized as a program in its own right in 1985. During nine years of observations (1982--1991), evidence has mounted that the amount of brine seeping into the WIPP excavations is limited, local, and only a small fraction of that required to produce hydrogen gas by corroding the metal in the waste drums and waste inventory. The data through 1990 is discussed in detail and summarized by Deal and others (1991). The data presented in this report describes progress made during the calendar year 1991 and focuses on four major areas: (1) quantification of the amount of brine seeping across vertical surfaces in the WIPP excavations (brine ``weeps); (2) monitoring of brine inflow, e.g., measuring brines recovered from holes drilled downward from the underground drifts (downholes), upward from the underground drifts (upholes), and from subhorizontal holes; (3) further characterization of brine geochemistry; and (4) preliminary quantification of the amount of brine that might be released by squeezing the underconsolidated clays present in the Salado Formation.

  12. Sample Preparation Laboratory Training - Course 204 | Sample Preparation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Laboratories Sample Preparation Laboratory Training - Course 204 Who Should Attend This course is mandatory for: SLAC employees and non-employees who need unescorted access to SSRL or LCLS Sample Preparation Laboratories Note: This course may be taken in lieu of Course 199, Laboratory CHP training for SLAC employees. Prerequisites 115 - General Employee Radiological Training (GERT) Take Training Please see the notes section below for information on how to take this training. Course Details

  13. Duplex sampling apparatus and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brown, Paul E.; Lloyd, Robert

    1992-01-01

    An improved apparatus is provided for sampling a gaseous mixture and for measuring mixture components. The apparatus includes two sampling containers connected in series serving as a duplex sampling apparatus. The apparatus is adapted to independently determine the amounts of condensable and noncondensable gases in admixture from a single sample. More specifically, a first container includes a first port capable of selectively connecting to and disconnecting from a sample source and a second port capable of selectively connecting to and disconnecting from a second container. A second container also includes a first port capable of selectively connecting to and disconnecting from the second port of the first container and a second port capable of either selectively connecting to and disconnecting from a differential pressure source. By cooling a mixture sample in the first container, the condensable vapors form a liquid, leaving noncondensable gases either as free gases or dissolved in the liquid. The condensed liquid is heated to drive out dissolved noncondensable gases, and all the noncondensable gases are transferred to the second container. Then the first and second containers are separated from one another in order to separately determine the amount of noncondensable gases and the amount of condensable gases in the sample.

  14. Environmental surveillance master sampling schedule

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bisping, L.E.

    1991-01-01

    Environmental surveillance of the Hanford Site and surrounding areas is conducted by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) for the US Department of Energy (DOE). This document contains the planned schedule for routine sample collection for the Surface Environmental Surveillance Project (SESP) and Ground-Water Monitoring Project. The routine sampling plan for the SESP has been revised this year to reflect changing site operations and priorities. Some sampling previously performed at least annually has been reduced in frequency, and some new sampling to be performed at a less than annual frequency has been added. Therefore, the SESP schedule reflects sampling to be conducted in calendar year 1991 as well as future years. The ground-water sampling schedule is for 1991. This schedule is subject to modification during the year in response to changes in Site operation, program requirements, and the nature of the observed results. Operational limitations such as weather, mechanical failures, sample availability, etc., may also require schedule modifications. Changes will be documented in the respective project files, but this plan will not be reissued. The purpose of these monitoring projects is to evaluate levels of radioactive and nonradioactive pollutants in the Hanford evirons.

  15. Defining And Characterizing Sample Representativeness For DWPF Melter Feed Samples

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shine, E. P.; Poirier, M. R.

    2013-10-29

    Representative sampling is important throughout the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) process, and the demonstrated success of the DWPF process to achieve glass product quality over the past two decades is a direct result of the quality of information obtained from the process. The objective of this report was to present sampling methods that the Savannah River Site (SRS) used to qualify waste being dispositioned at the DWPF. The goal was to emphasize the methodology, not a list of outcomes from those studies. This methodology includes proven methods for taking representative samples, the use of controlled analytical methods, and data interpretation and reporting that considers the uncertainty of all error sources. Numerous sampling studies were conducted during the development of the DWPF process and still continue to be performed in order to evaluate options for process improvement. Study designs were based on use of statistical tools applicable to the determination of uncertainties associated with the data needs. Successful designs are apt to be repeated, so this report chose only to include prototypic case studies that typify the characteristics of frequently used designs. Case studies have been presented for studying in-tank homogeneity, evaluating the suitability of sampler systems, determining factors that affect mixing and sampling, comparing the final waste glass product chemical composition and durability to that of the glass pour stream sample and other samples from process vessels, and assessing the uniformity of the chemical composition in the waste glass product. Many of these studies efficiently addressed more than one of these areas of concern associated with demonstrating sample representativeness and provide examples of statistical tools in use for DWPF. The time when many of these designs were implemented was in an age when the sampling ideas of Pierre Gy were not as widespread as they are today. Nonetheless, the engineers and

  16. Sample Business Plan Framework 5

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    U.S. Department of Energy Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Sample Business Plan Framework 5: A program that establishes itself as a government entity, then operates using a fee-based structure.

  17. Sample Business Plan Framework 2

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    U.S. Department of Energy Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Sample Business Plan Framework 1: A program seeking to continue operations in the post-grant period as a not-for-profit (NGO) entity.

  18. Sample Business Plan Framework 4

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    U.S. Department of Energy Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Sample Business Plan Framework 4: A program seeking to continue in the post-grant period as a marketing contractor to a utility.

  19. Sample Business Plan Framework 3

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    U.S. Department of Energy Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Sample Business Plan Framework 3: A government entity running a Commercial PACE program in the post-grant period.

  20. UNDERSTANDING THE AIR SAMPLING DATA

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    For more comparisons, see the millirem comparisons poster. Dose estimates have been calculated based on the low-volume air sampler results. Low-volume air samplers collect samples ...

  1. Air Sampling System Evaluation Template

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2000-05-09

    The ASSET1.0 software provides a template with which a user can evaluate an Air Sampling System against the latest version of ANSI N13.1 "Sampling and Monitoring Releases of Airborne Radioactive Substances from the Stacks and Ducts of Nuclear Facilities". The software uses the ANSI N13.1 PIC levels to establish basic design criteria for the existing or proposed sampling system. The software looks at such criteria as PIC level, type of radionuclide emissions, physical state ofmore » the radionuclide, nozzle entrance effects, particulate transmission effects, system and component accuracy and precision evaluations, and basic system operations to provide a detailed look at the subsystems of a monitoring and sampling system/program. A GAP evaluation can then be completed which leads to identification of design and operational flaws in the proposed systems. Corrective measures can then be limited to the GAPs.« less

  2. Sample Business Plan Framework 1

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    U.S. Department of Energy Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Sample Business Plan Framework 1: A program seeking to continue operations in the post-grant period as a not-for-profit (NGO) entity.

  3. Equipment Inventory | Sample Preparation Laboratories

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    21KBr Centrifuge Centrifuge SSRL BioChemMat Prep Lab 2 131 209 Saint Gobain K-104 Sanyo MIR-154 Cooled Incubator Temperature Control LCLS Sample Prep Lab 999 109 Sanyo MPR-215F...

  4. Depth-discrete sampling port

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pemberton, Bradley E.; May, Christopher P.; Rossabi, Joseph; Riha, Brian D.; Nichols, Ralph L.

    1999-01-01

    A sampling port is provided which has threaded ends for incorporating the port into a length of subsurface pipe. The port defines an internal receptacle which is in communication with subsurface fluids through a series of fine filtering slits. The receptacle is in further communication through a bore with a fitting carrying a length of tubing there which samples are transported to the surface. Each port further defines an additional bore through which tubing, cables, or similar components of adjacent ports may pass.

  5. Depth-discrete sampling port

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pemberton, Bradley E.; May, Christopher P.; Rossabi, Joseph; Riha, Brian D.; Nichols, Ralph L.

    1998-07-07

    A sampling port is provided which has threaded ends for incorporating the port into a length of subsurface pipe. The port defines an internal receptacle which is in communication with subsurface fluids through a series of fine filtering slits. The receptacle is in further communication through a bore with a fitting carrying a length of tubing there which samples are transported to the surface. Each port further defines an additional bore through which tubing, cables, or similar components of adjacent ports may pass.

  6. Help:Formatting | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    it in two single quotes like ''this'' Contents 1 Text formatting markup 2 Paragraphs 3 HTML 4 Other formatting Text formatting markup Description You type You get character...

  7. A REDSHIFT SURVEY OF HERSCHEL FAR-INFRARED SELECTED STARBURSTS AND IMPLICATIONS FOR OBSCURED STAR FORMATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Casey, C. M.; Budynkiewicz, J.; Berta, S.; Lutz, D.; Magnelli, B.; Bethermin, M.; Le Floc'h, E.; Magdis, G.; Burgarella, D.; Chapin, E.; Chapman, S. C.; Clements, D. L.; Conley, A.; Conselice, C. J.; Cooray, A.; Farrah, D.; Hatziminaoglou, E.; Ivison, R. J.; and others

    2012-12-20

    We present Keck spectroscopic observations and redshifts for a sample of 767 Herschel-SPIRE selected galaxies (HSGs) at 250, 350, and 500 {mu}m, taken with the Keck I Low Resolution Imaging Spectrometer and the Keck II DEep Imaging Multi-Object Spectrograph. The redshift distribution of these SPIRE sources from the Herschel Multitiered Extragalactic Survey peaks at z = 0.85, with 731 sources at z < 2 and a tail of sources out to z {approx} 5. We measure more significant disagreement between photometric and spectroscopic redshifts (({Delta}z/(1 + z{sub spec})) = 0.29) than is seen in non-infrared selected samples, likely due to enhanced star formation rates and dust obscuration in infrared-selected galaxies. The infrared data are used to directly measure integrated infrared luminosities and dust temperatures independent of radio or 24 {mu}m flux densities. By probing the dust spectral energy distribution (SED) at its peak, we estimate that the vast majority (72%-83%) of z < 2 Herschel-selected galaxies would drop out of traditional submillimeter surveys at 0.85-1 mm. We find that dust temperature traces infrared luminosity, due in part to the SPIRE wavelength selection biases, and partially from physical effects. As a result, we measure no significant trend in SPIRE color with redshift; if dust temperature were independent of luminosity or redshift, a trend in SPIRE color would be expected. Composite infrared SEDs are constructed as a function of infrared luminosity, showing the increase in dust temperature with luminosity, and subtle change in near-infrared and mid-infrared spectral properties. Moderate evolution in the far-infrared (FIR)/radio correlation is measured for this partially radio-selected sample, with q{sub IR}{proportional_to}(1 + z){sup -0.30{+-}0.02} at z < 2. We estimate the luminosity function and implied star formation rate density contribution of HSGs at z < 1.6 and find overall agreement with work based on 24 {mu}m extrapolations of the LIRG

  8. Ball assisted device for analytical surface sampling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    ElNaggar, Mariam S; Van Berkel, Gary J; Covey, Thomas R

    2015-11-03

    A system for sampling a surface includes a sampling probe having a housing and a socket, and a rolling sampling sphere within the socket. The housing has a sampling fluid supply conduit and a sampling fluid exhaust conduit. The sampling fluid supply conduit supplies sampling fluid to the sampling sphere. The sampling fluid exhaust conduit has an inlet opening for receiving sampling fluid carried from the surface by the sampling sphere. A surface sampling probe and a method for sampling a surface are also disclosed.

  9. Formatting PDFs for the Web

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    After you've created or have a PDF, follow these steps to format it according to Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) standards.

  10. CHARACTERIZATION OF TANK 16H ANNULUS SAMPLES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hay, M.; Reboul, S.

    2012-04-16

    The closure of Tank 16H will require removal of material from the annulus of the tank. Samples from Tank 16H annulus were characterized and tested to provide information to evaluate various alternatives for removing the annulus waste. The analysis found all four annulus samples to be composed mainly of Si, Na, and Al and lesser amounts of other elements. The XRD data indicate quartz (SiO{sub 2}) and sodium aluminum nitrate silicate hydrate (Na{sub 8}(Al{sub 6}Si{sub 6}O{sub 24})(NO{sub 3}){sub 2}.4H{sub 2}O) as the predominant crystalline mineral phases in the samples. The XRD data also indicate the presence of crystalline sodium nitrate, sodium nitrite, gibbsite, hydrated sodium bicarbonate, and muscovite. Based on the weight of solids remaining at the end of the test, the water leaching test results indicate approximately 20-35% of the solids dissolved after three contacts with an approximately 3:1 volume of water at 45 C. The chemical analysis of the leachates and the XRD results of the remaining solids indicate sodium salts of nitrate, nitrite, sulfate, and possibly carbonate/bicarbonate make up the majority of the dissolved material. The majority of these salts were dissolved in the first water contact and simply diluted with each subsequent water contact. The water leaching removed large amounts of the uranium in two of the samples and {approx}1/3 of the {sup 99}Tc from all four samples. Most of the other radionuclides analyzed showed low solubility in the water leaching test. The preliminary data on the oxalic acid leaching test indicate the three acid contacts at 45 C dissolved from {approx}34-47% of the solids. The somewhat higher dissolution found in the oxalic acid leaching test versus the water leaching test might be offset by the tendency of the oxalic acid solutions to take on a gel-like consistency. The filtered solids left behind after three oxalic acid contacts were sticky and formed large clumps after drying. These two observations could indicate