Sample records for mm sample format

  1. Sub-mm clues to elliptical galaxy formation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    James S. Dunlop

    2000-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

    There is growing evidence that, at the S(850) 2.5, with a mean redshift z = 3.5. While radio selection raises concerns about bias, I argue that our current knowledge of the brightest (S(850) ~ 10 mJy) sub-mm sources detected in unbiased SCUBA imaging surveys indicates that they are also largely confined to this same high-z regime. Consequently, while the most recent number counts imply such extreme sources can contribute only 5-10% of the sub-mm background, their comoving number density (in the redshift band 3 < z < 5) is 1-2 x 10^{-5} per cubic megaparsec, sufficient to account for the formation of all ellipticals of comparable mass to radio galaxies (~4L-star) in the present-day universe.

  2. ARTIFACT FORMATION DURING NEUTRALIZATION OF TANK 50 SAMPLES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crump, S.; Young, J.

    2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Degradation products have been identified in the extracts of Tank 50 samples analyzed by semivolatile organic compound analysis (SVOA) using gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS). These materials, identified as short chain alkyl alcohols, were formed by acidification during sample preparation. A number of questions were raised about the formation of these and other materials reported in Tank 50 surface samples, and this report serves to address these questions.

  3. Annual Logging Symposium, June 21-24, 2009 Wireline and While-Drilling Formation-Tester Sampling with Oval, Focused,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Torres-Verdín, Carlos

    . Extending the existing wireline technology requires a new pumping system capable of removing invasion fluidsSPWLA 50th Annual Logging Symposium, June 21-24, 2009 1 Wireline and While-Drilling Formation about the potential of developing new fluid sampling methods with probe-type formation testers has

  4. Methane hydrate distribution from prolonged and repeated formation in natural and compacted sand samples: X-ray CT observations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rees, E.V.L.; Kneafsey, T.J.; Seol, Y.

    2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To study physical properties of methane gas hydrate-bearing sediments, it is necessary to synthesize laboratory samples due to the limited availability of cores from natural deposits. X-ray computed tomography (CT) and other observations have shown gas hydrate to occur in a number of morphologies over a variety of sediment types. To aid in understanding formation and growth patterns of hydrate in sediments, methane hydrate was repeatedly formed in laboratory-packed sand samples and in a natural sediment core from the Mount Elbert Stratigraphic Test Well. CT scanning was performed during hydrate formation and decomposition steps, and periodically while the hydrate samples remained under stable conditions for up to 60 days. The investigation revealed the impact of water saturation on location and morphology of hydrate in both laboratory and natural sediments during repeated hydrate formations. Significant redistribution of hydrate and water in the samples was observed over both the short and long term.

  5. The redshifts of bright sub-mm sources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    James S. Dunlop

    2001-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

    One of the key goals in observational cosmology over the next few years will be to establish the redshift distribution of the recently-discovered sub-mm source population. In this brief review I discuss and summarize the redshift information which has been gleaned to date for the ~ 50 bright sub-mm sources which have been uncovered via the six main classes of survey performed with SCUBA on the JCMT over the last 2-3 years. Despite the biases inherent in some of these surveys, and the crudeness of the redshift information available in others, I conclude that all current information suggests that only 10-15 % of luminous sub-mm sources lie at z < 2, and that the median redshift of this population is z ~ 3. I suggest that such a high median redshift is arguably not unexpected given current theories designed to explain the correlation between black-hole mass and spheroid mass found at low redshift. In such scenarios, peak AGN emission is expected to correspond to, or even to cause termination of major star-formation activity in the host spheroid. In contrast, maximum dust emission is expected to occur roughly half-way through the star-formation process. Given that optical emission from bright quasars peaks at z = 2.5, dust-emission from massive ellipticals might be reasonably expected to peak at some point in the preceding ~ 1 Gyr, at z ~ 3. Confirmation or refutation of this picture requires significantly-improved redshift information on bright samples of SCUBA sources.

  6. E-Print Network 3.0 - alloy formation process Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    that formation of eutectic alloys, along with the gold... investigation of stage of the formation of eutectic alloys in Si-Au and Si-Al systems *B. Bokhonov , M... microscopic...

  7. E-Print Network 3.0 - array format 20khz Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    3 Computation Visualization Summary: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 Version 5 MATLAB Array Data Element Formats . . . .10 Numeric Array and Character Array Data... Element...

  8. NIHAO project I: Reproducing the inefficiency of galaxy formation across cosmic time with a large sample of cosmological hydrodynamical simulations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Liang; Stinson, Gregory S; Macciò, Andrea V; Penzo, Camilla; Kang, Xi; Keller, Ben W; Wadsley, James

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We introduce project NIHAO (Numerical Investigation of a Hundred Astrophysical Objects), a set of 100 cosmological zoom-in hydrodynamical simulations performed using the GASOLINE code, with an improved implementation of the SPH algorithm. The haloes in our study range from dwarf to Milky Way masses, and represent an unbiased sampling of merger histories, concentrations and spin parameters. The particle masses and force softenings are chosen to resolve the mass profile to below 1% of the virial radius at all masses, ensuring that galaxy half-light radii are well resolved. Using the same treatment of star formation and stellar feedback for every object, the simulated galaxies reproduce the observed inefficiency of galaxy formation across cosmic time as expressed through the stellar mass vs halo mass relation, and the star formation rate vs stellar mass relation. We thus conclude that stellar feedback is the chief piece of physics required to limit the efficiency of star formation in galaxies less massive than t...

  9. E-Print Network 3.0 - aromatic hydrocarbon formation Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    By Abbas Firoozabadi Reservoir Engineering... Research Institute (RERI), Palo Alto Yale University, New Haven New phase formation is an ... Source: Saniie, Jafar -...

  10. E-Print Network 3.0 - academic team formation Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    forward completely plausible explanations... of teams and their formation. The works of Phillip Cohen and Hector Levesque have been very influential... and therefore will receive...

  11. E-Print Network 3.0 - aureus biofilm formation Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Environmental Sciences and Ecology 15 The Effect of Nondialyzable Material (NDM) Cranberry Extract on Formation of Contact Lens Biofilm by Summary: The Effect of Nondialyzable...

  12. E-Print Network 3.0 - albicans biofilm formation Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Biology and Medicine ; Biotechnology 63 The Effect of Nondialyzable Material (NDM) Cranberry Extract on Formation of Contact Lens Biofilm by Summary: The Effect of Nondialyzable...

  13. E-Print Network 3.0 - amorphous phase formation Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The Fe3B phase is metastable in a wide temperature range, and suppresses the formation... -132 IOSSBAUERSPECTROSCOPY OF AMORPHOUS Fe-B ALLOYS R. Oshima, F. E. ......

  14. E-Print Network 3.0 - asymmetry-driven structure formation Sample...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    fr Physik Theoriekolloquium Summary: mit dem Titel Fluctuation effects and cluster formation in kinetic thin film growth Solid structures... applied preparation method is...

  15. E-Print Network 3.0 - amorphous layer formation Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Tin Anode Material for Lithium Secondary Battery Summary: , indicating the formation of an amorphous phase. The XRD pattern of Sn nanoparticles showed no impurity...

  16. E-Print Network 3.0 - activity complex-formation reactions Sample...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Mountain Project, US EPA Collection: Environmental Sciences and Ecology 27 Definitions CaX(s) + 90 Summary: in crystalline form. Complexation (Complex Formation) - any...

  17. E-Print Network 3.0 - autophagosome-like vacuoles formation Sample...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Plant Physiologists1 Programmed Cell Death in Development and Defense Summary: and phosphorous. 2. Cell death is impor- tant in sculpting tissues such as the formation of...

  18. E-Print Network 3.0 - abscess gas formation Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    if there is evidence of intestinal obstruction, abscess formation, perforation, fis... -old white woman with a history of gas- trointestinal problems presented with ab-...

  19. E-Print Network 3.0 - attenuates neointimal formation Sample...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    was determined and expressed as bilirubin formation per mg proteinhour, as ... Source: Brand, Paul H. - Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, University of Toledo...

  20. E-Print Network 3.0 - affects biofilm formation Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    biofilm was N-(3... Biofilm formation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa on the surface of a reverse osmosis (RO) membrane was studied... osmosis; biofilms; Pseudomonas ... Source:...

  1. E-Print Network 3.0 - aeruginosa biofilm formation Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of reverse Summary: Biofilm formation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa on the surface of a reverse osmosis (RO) membrane was studied... osmosis; biofilms; Pseudomonas aeruginosa...

  2. E-Print Network 3.0 - alginate polymer formation Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Management and Restoration Technologies ; Chemistry 18 Relating Organic Fouling of Reverse Osmosis Membranes to Summary: ions indicated the formation of a crossed-linked...

  3. E-Print Network 3.0 - average formation length Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Leiden Collection: Physics ; Materials Science 28 High-performance, high-reliability tape storage for midrange and server-based environments Summary: ) Length C-format...

  4. E-Print Network 3.0 - air toxics formation Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Sciences and Ecology 40 Substance and perceptions of environmental impacts of Summary: dioxins in the feed and to minimizase formation on cooling. MACT: Air Pollution Control...

  5. E-Print Network 3.0 - almond formation outcrops Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    reservoirs outside the GOM. Examples The world-class outcrops of the Permian Brushy Canyon Formation... Use of outcrop analogues to predict lithology influence on the seismic...

  6. E-Print Network 3.0 - als promote formation Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of Root Hair Initiation and Expansin Gene Summary: al., 1995). However, the role of ethylene in root hair formation is questioned be- cause the ethylene... as they negatively...

  7. E-Print Network 3.0 - aneuploid sperm formation Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    A. (2007). Caenorhabditis elegans Summary: to be costs associated with swimming in trains. While the trains can out-swim single sperm, train formation... species. The sperm of...

  8. Sorption coefficients for radionuclides on samples from the water-bearing Magenta and Culebra members of the Rustler Formation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lynch, A. W.; Dosch, R. G.

    1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The sorbing characteristics of samples from the Magenta and Culebra dolomites of the Rustler Formation (which overlie the proposed site for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) in southeastern New Mexico) for various radionuclides have been studied. Core samples extracted from various depths and boreholes within a given formation were selected to provide a cross section of materials which are present in the formations. They varied in composition from pure dolomite to nearly pure anhydrite. The radionuclides used in the sorption coefficient measurements (isotopes of Cs, Sr, Tc, Eu, Am and Pu) were dissolved in a simulated Culebra groundwater at concentrations of 0.1 ..mu..Ci/m1 or less. The results indicate that the sorption coefficients (Kd's) of these water-bearing units may vary widely depending on the borehole area and over several feet in depth in a common borehole. Cesium Kd values from 0.6 to 218 ml/g and 1.2 to 68 on Magenta and Culebra samples, respectively. Strontium Kd values ranged from 1.1 to 30 on Magenta Samples and from 0.6 to 32 on Culebra samples. Variations of Eu, Pu and Am Kd's were generally less than an order of magnitude on both Culebra and Magenta samples. Technetium was not sorbed by any of the samples. With few exceptions, samples with high dolomite contents had higher sorption coefficients than those with high anhydrite concentrations. Clay content may also be a factor for some radionuclides, particularly Cs, which has been shown to sorb preferentially on clay particles in Magenta.

  9. E-Print Network 3.0 - azul formation ediacaran Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of Ediacaran ocean chemistry for the Doushantuo Formation in the Nanhua Basin, South China. We... www.sciencexpress.org 11 February 2010 Page 1 10.1126science. 1182369...

  10. E-Print Network 3.0 - adherens junction formation Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    search results for: adherens junction formation Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Molecular Biology of the Cell Vol. 12, 34653475, November 2001 Summary: and Is Required for Adherens...

  11. E-Print Network 3.0 - actin filament formation Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    search results for: actin filament formation Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Current Biology 16, 19241930, October 10, 2006 2006 Elsevier Ltd All rights reserved DOI 10.1016...

  12. E-Print Network 3.0 - ash formation transformations Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    chlorinated phenols because their presence in the ash could result in the formation of dioxins and furans... THE USE OF MUNICIPAL WASTE COMBUSTOR ASH AS A PARTIAL REPLACEMENT OF...

  13. E-Print Network 3.0 - amyloid fibril formation Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    amyloid fibril formation Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Dr. Igor Lednev Department of Chemistry Summary: , 2010 - March 31, 2015 Amount: 1,074,000 Structural Characterization of...

  14. The consolidation characteristics of undisturbed soil samples of deep formations and their application to problems of regional subsidence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wolfskill, Lyle Anthony

    1960-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    THE CONSOLIDATION CHARACTERISTICS OF UNDISTURBED SOII SAMPLES OF DEEP FORMATIONS AND THEIR APPLICATION TO PROBLEMS OF REGIONAL SUBSIDENCE LYLE ANTHONY WOLFSKILL Submitted to the Graduate School of the Agricultural and Mechanical College... OF REGIONAL SUBSIDENCE LYIZ ANTHONY WOLFSKILL Approved as to style and content hy: (C airman f Committee) (Head of Depar ent) ACKNONLEDGEMENTS The author is sincerely grateful for the tireless and expert leadership provided by Mr. Spencer J. Buchanan...

  15. Mechanistical studies on the formation of carbon dioxide in extraterrestrial carbon monoxide ice analog samples

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaiser, Ralf I.

    be produced via radiolysis of carbon monoxide ices.5 Indeed, the effects of ionizing radiation on pure carbonMechanistical studies on the formation of carbon dioxide in extraterrestrial carbon monoxide ice901220f Binary ice mixtures of two carbon monoxide isotopomers, 13 C16 O and 12 C18 O, were subjected

  16. mm-Wave Phase Shifters and Switches

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adabi Firouzjaei, Ehsan

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    4.1.1 Slow wave transmissioncombiners . . . . . . . . . . . 5.3 mm-Wave implementationfailed to predict current mm-wave design trend [1] . . . . .

  17. DEFLECTION MEASUREMENTS OF 25 mm ALUMINUM COLLARS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peters, C.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    MEASUREMENTS OF 25 mm ALUMINUM COLLARS· C. Peters LawrenceMEASUREMENTS OF 25 mm ALUMINUM COLLARS" C. Peters Lawrenceinch thick 7075- T6 aluminum alloy plate. Inside corners

  18. ARTIFACT FORMATION IN HIGH VOLUME SAMPLING OF VOC's AND SOLID ORGANIC COMPOUNDS.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    when sampling polluted air. Purified air containing 180 ppbv ozone seems to destroy PAH according Atmospheriques, Boite 7059, UNIVERSITE PARIS 7, 2, place Jussieu, 75251 PARIS Cedex 05 ABSTRACT Pollutants from well äs solid (SOC's) organic compounds. High volume samplers are commonly used m air quality

  19. Elemental analysis of Edwards Formation flint: a comparison of sample areas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McGinley, Ann Neil

    1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , and K. In order to test the reliability of this technique, USGS standard rocks, AVG-1, GSP-1, and G-2 were also analyzed. Means and standard deviations of each element determined were calculated. The elemental values ranged from . 03 ppm... and their advice concerning my work. I wish to thank Dr. H. Shafer for collecting the rock samples used in this work. I would also like to thank the reactor personnel for their assistance. My sincere appreciation goes to Dr. John NcGinley, Dr. David Moore, Mrs...

  20. a 3.37 mm length b 3.32 mm diameter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marc, Robert E.

    5.2 ml retinal subtense 300 µm/deg retinal arc 51 mm retinal area* 1024 ± 184 mm2 total.3 µl retinal subtense 31 µm/deg retinal arc 4.9 mm retinal area 15.6 mm2 cone:rod ratio 0/deg retinal arc 10.6 mm retinal area 52 mm2 cone:rod ratio mean cone density* mm-2 mean rod

  1. RHAPSODY. I. STRUCTURAL PROPERTIES AND FORMATION HISTORY FROM A STATISTICAL SAMPLE OF RE-SIMULATED CLUSTER-SIZE HALOS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, Hao-Yi; Hahn, Oliver; Wechsler, Risa H.; Mao, Yao-Yuan; Behroozi, Peter S., E-mail: hywu@umich.edu [Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology, Physics Department, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States)

    2013-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the first results from the RHAPSODY cluster re-simulation project: a sample of 96 'zoom-in' simulations of dark matter halos of 10{sup 14.8{+-}0.05} h {sup -1} M {sub Sun }, selected from a 1 h {sup -3} Gpc{sup 3} volume. This simulation suite is the first to resolve this many halos with {approx}5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 6} particles per halo in the cluster mass regime, allowing us to statistically characterize the distribution of and correlation between halo properties at fixed mass. We focus on the properties of the main halos and how they are affected by formation history, which we track back to z = 12, over five decades in mass. We give particular attention to the impact of the formation history on the density profiles of the halos. We find that the deviations from the Navarro-Frenk-White (NFW) model and the Einasto model depend on formation time. Late-forming halos tend to have considerable deviations from both models, partly due to the presence of massive subhalos, while early-forming halos deviate less but still significantly from the NFW model and are better described by the Einasto model. We find that the halo shapes depend only moderately on formation time. Departure from spherical symmetry impacts the density profiles through the anisotropic distribution of massive subhalos. Further evidence of the impact of subhalos is provided by analyzing the phase-space structure. A detailed analysis of the properties of the subhalo population in RHAPSODY is presented in a companion paper.

  2. Methane hydrate distribution from prolonged and repeated formation in natural and compacted sand samples: X-ray CT observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rees, E.V.L.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Deep Ocean Field Test of Methane Hydrate Formation from aW.J. , and Mason, D.H. , Methane Hydrate Formation inNatural and Laboratory--Formed Methane Gas Hydrate. American

  3. E-Print Network 3.0 - antibiotic-loaded cement spacers Sample...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    in this study. Sealed Reference Sample Sample Cement Paste 10 mm 10 mm 11.5mm 8mm Plastic Spacers 5 mm... based on Stokes equation actually suggests that some of the...

  4. ARM - Campaign Instrument - 5mm-mwr

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinanInformation Desert SouthwestTechnologies |NovemberARMContactsARMFacilitiesCERAgovInstruments5mm-mwr

  5. Studies of the mechanism of the cluster formation in a thermally sampling atmospheric pressure ionization mass spectrometer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Albrecht, Sascha, E-mail: s.albrecht@fz-juelich.de; Stroh, Fred, E-mail: f.stroh@fz-juelich.de [Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, Institute of Energy and Climate Research, Stratosphere (IEK-7), 52428 Jülich (Germany)] [Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, Institute of Energy and Climate Research, Stratosphere (IEK-7), 52428 Jülich (Germany); Klopotowski, Sebastian, E-mail: s.klopotowski@uni-wuppertal.de; Derpmann, Valerie, E-mail: v.derpmann@uni-wuppertal.de; Klee, Sonja, E-mail: s.klee@uni-wuppertal.de; Brockmann, Klaus J., E-mail: brockma@uni-wuppertal.de; Benter, Thorsten, E-mail: tbenter@uni-wuppertal.de [Physical and Theoretical Chemistry, Institute for Pure and Applied Mass Spectrometry, University of Wuppertal, 42097 Wuppertal (Germany)] [Physical and Theoretical Chemistry, Institute for Pure and Applied Mass Spectrometry, University of Wuppertal, 42097 Wuppertal (Germany)

    2014-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In this study a thermally sampling atmospheric pressure ionization mass spectrometer is described and characterized. The ion transfer stage offers the capability to sample cluster ions at thermal equilibrium and during this transfer fundamental processes possibly affecting the cluster distribution are also readily identified. Additionally, the transfer stage combines optional collision-induced dissociation (CID) analysis of the cluster composition with thermal equilibrium sampling of clusters. The performance of the setup is demonstrated with regard to the proton-bound water cluster system. The benefit of the studied processes is that they can help to improve future transfer stages and to understand cluster ion reactions in ion mobility tubes and high-pressure ion sources. In addition, the instrument allows for the identification of fragmentation and protonation reactions caused by CID.

  6. Comparison of QM-Only and QM/MM Models for the Mechanism of Tungsten-Dependent Acetylene Hydratase

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liao, Rongzhen

    Comparison of QM-Only and QM/MM Models for the Mechanism of Tungsten-Dependent Acetylene Hydratase study on the formation of vinyl alcohol in the catalytic cycle of tungsten-dependent acetylene hydratase

  7. CHEMICAL CLUES ON THE FORMATION OF PLANETARY SYSTEMS: C/O VERSUS Mg/Si FOR HARPS GTO SAMPLE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Delgado Mena, E.; Israelian, G.; Gonzalez Hernandez, J. I. [Instituto de Astrofisica de Canarias, 38200 La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain); Bond, J. C. [Planetary Science Institute, 1700 East Fort Lowell, Tucson, AZ 85719 (United States); Santos, N. C. [Centro de Astrofisica, Universidade do Porto, Rua das Estrelas, 4150-762 Porto (Portugal); Udry, S.; Mayor, M., E-mail: edm@iac.e [Observatoire de Geneve, Universite de Geneve, 51 Ch. des Mailletes, 1290 Sauverny (Switzerland)

    2010-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Theoretical studies suggest that C/O and Mg/Si are the most important elemental ratios in determining the mineralogy of terrestrial planets. The C/O ratio controls the distribution of Si among carbide and oxide species, while Mg/Si gives information about the silicate mineralogy. We present a detailed and uniform study of C, O, Mg, and Si abundances for 61 stars with detected planets and 270 stars without detected planets from the homogeneous high-quality unbiased HARPS GTO sample, together with 39 more planet-host stars from other surveys. We determine these important mineralogical ratios and investigate the nature of the possible terrestrial planets that could have formed in those planetary systems. We find mineralogical ratios quite different from those of the Sun, showing that there is a wide variety of planetary systems which are not similar to our solar system. Many planetary host stars present an Mg/Si value lower than 1, so their planets will have a high Si content to form species such as MgSiO{sub 3}. This type of composition can have important implications for planetary processes such as plate tectonics, atmospheric composition, or volcanism.

  8. Polarized mm And sub-mm Emission From Sgr A* At The Galactic Center

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fulvio Melia; Siming Liu; Robert Coker

    2001-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The recent detection of significant linear polarization at mm and sub-mm wavelengths in the spectrum of Sgr A* (if confirmed) will be a useful probe of the conditions within several Schwarzschild radii ($r_S$) of the event horizon at the Galactic Center. Hydrodynamic simulations of gas flowing in the vicinity of this object suggest that the infalling gas circularizes when it approaches within $5-25 r_S$ of the black hole. We suggest that the sub-mm ``excess'' of emission seen in the spectrum of Sgr A* may be associated with radiation produced within the inner Keplerian region and that the observed polarization characteristics provide direct evidence for this phenomenon. The overall spectrum from this region, including the high-energy component due to bremsstrahlung and inverse Compton scattering processes, is at or below the recent {\\it Chandra} measurement, and may account for the X-ray source if it turns out to be the actual counterpart to Sgr A*.

  9. direction. Three different pipette solutions were used: Cs-gluconate solution (150 mM CsOH, 5 mM CsCl, 135 mM sucrose, 10 mM HEPES, 1.5 mM EGTA and 1.5 mM EDTA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scholey, Jonathan

    was varied from 20 mM to 5 mM by addition of the corresponding amount of 1 M CaCl2 stock solution into one-Tris solution (205 mM HEPES (pH 7.2 with Trisma base)). Bath solution with 105 mM [Ca2þ ]c (105 mM CaCl2 solution) contained 105 mM CaCl2, 10 mM HEPES (pH 7.2 with Trisma base or NaOH). This solution

  10. The near-infrared Hubble diagram for sub-mm galaxies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    James S. Dunlop

    2002-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Determing the nature of the bright sub-mm sources and their role in the process of galaxy formation is likely to be a major focus of extra-galactic research over the next few years. In particular, we would like to know if these sources are the progenitors of today's massive elliptical galaxies, or alternatively arise from short-lived, albeit spectacular starbursts within haloes of unexceptional mass. This question can be addressed from a number of different directions, one of which is to compare the masses of sub-mm host galaxies with those of other known massive high-redshift objects. Here I make a first attempt to do this by exploring whether the few well-studied sub-mm/mm sources are consistent with the well-established K-z relation for powerful radio galaxies. Out to z = 3 this appears to be the case, providing evidence that bright sub-mm sources are indeed destined to be massive ellipticals. At higher redshifts there is a suggestion that sub-mm galaxies are signficantly fainter at K than their radio-selected counterparts, but at present it is unclear whether this indicates a significant difference in stellar mass or the increasing impact of dust obscuration on the rest-frame light from the sub-mm hosts.

  11. Summary of Decisions - MM DD YYYY - MM DD YYYY | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion |Energy Usage »of Energy Strain Rate4 RecoveryJuly 1, 2013 - July 5,3, 2013 - JuneMM DD

  12. 40 MM Grenade Launcher Qualification Requirements at Department...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    launcher, which utilizes high explosive ammunition to defeat adversary personnel and equipment. A number of Department sites have procured these weapons. 40 MM Grenade...

  13. Course Outline ENG 2MM3 Electrical Circuits & Power

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haykin, Simon

    -Phase Induction Motor; 5. DC Generators & DC Motors; 6. Efficiency/Heating of Electric Machines; 7. ActiveCourse Outline ENG 2MM3 Electrical Circuits & Power Winter 2010 Instructor: Prof. Matiar Howlader Web Page: www.ece.mcmaster.ca/~mrhowlader/ENG2MM3Notes Text Books: 1. Electrical Power and Controls

  14. Course Outline ENG 2MM3 Electrical Circuits & Power

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haykin, Simon

    -Phase Induction Motor; 5. DC Generators & DC Motors; 6. Efficiency/Heating of Electric Machines; 7. ActiveCourse Outline ENG 2MM3 Electrical Circuits & Power Fall 2010 Instructor: Prof. Matiar Howlader Web Page: www.ece.mcmaster.ca/~mrhowlader/ENG2MM3Notes Text Books: 1. Electrical Power and Controls

  15. 1.25 mM NaH2PO4, 1 mM CaCl2, 1 mM MgCl2, 26 mM NaHCO3 and 10 mM dextrose, bubbled with 95% O2/5% CO2 (pH 7.4). Slices (300400 mm thick) were prepared with a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zuker, Charles

    1.25 mM NaH2PO4, 1 mM CaCl2, 1 mM MgCl2, 26 mM NaHCO3 and 10 mM dextrose, bubbled with 95% O2/5% CO cerebrospinal fluid (ACSF: 124 mM NaCl, 2 mM KCl, 1.5 mM MgSO4, 1.25 mM NaH2PO4, 2.5 mM CaCl2, 26 mM NaHCO3, 10

  16. MATERIALS MANAGEMENT OFFICE SUPPLY REQUEST FORM -MM-4

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oliver, Douglas L.

    MATERIALS MANAGEMENT OFFICE SUPPLY REQUEST FORM - MM-4 REQUESTER'S NAME: DEPARTMENT: TTILE: MAIL. Include the justification with this form when faxing or mailing to Materials Management. Fax 679: ________________ University Director of Materials Management: _________________________________________________________ Date

  17. PHOTOSWITCHR Photoelectric Sensors General Purpose 18mm Cylindrical Style

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Allen, Gale

    (Sensor) DC Micro Ê Ê Ê For NPN type tie the load to Brown (+). For PNP type tie the load to Blue Beam Load Load Load Load Load Load Light Source Unit Protection Supply Voltage Current Consumption Photoelectric Sensors 42CA General Purpose 18mm Cylindrical Style R1­46 Typical Response Curve 100 1 0.1 0 1 (3

  18. M/M/1 Queueing System with Delayed Controlled Vacation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhao, Yiqiang Q.

    M/M/1 Queueing System with Delayed Controlled Vacation Yonglu Deng , Zhongshan University W. John systems using a time division multiple access (TDMA) scheme (Frey and Takahashi, [7]). Researchers have that of a server's cold switch-on. The case of delayed vacation has also very recently been studied by Frey

  19. Design and testing of a dual 8-T 380-mm/12-T 220-mm split superconducting solenoid for ORNL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ballou, J.K.; Brown, R.L.; Fietz, W.A.; Forseman, J.W.; Gray, W.H.; Kenney, W.J.; Wysor, R.B.; Markiewicz, W.D.; Van Alstyne, R.G.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A superconducting high field magnet facility has recently been prepared for operation at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The facility consists of a background NbTi coil and an insert coil made of Nb/sub 3/Sn tape. The background coil produces an 8-T central field, with a peak field of 8.8 T, in a bore of 380 mm and contains radial access ports of 67-mm diam. Details of magnet design both for the background coil and insert coil will be presented. The protection scheme will be discussed and test results will be given.

  20. Microsoft Word - BH-MM-746B NEPA.docx

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    of water, soil, rock, or contaminants; and sampling and characterization of water effluents, air emissions, or solid waste streams. Electronic approval via NEPA Workflow 92313 ....

  1. Evolution of complex organic molecules in hot molecular cores: Synthetic spectra at (sub-)mm wavebands

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Choudhury, Rumpa; Stéphan, Gwendoline; Bergin, Edwin A; Möller, Thomas; Schmiedeke, Anika; Zernickel, Alexander

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Hot molecular cores (HMCs) are intermediate stages of high-mass star formation and are also known for their rich emission line spectra at (sub-)mm wavebands. The observed spectral feature of HMCs such as total number of emission lines and associated line intensities are also found to vary with evolutionary stages. We developed various 3D models for HMCs guided by the evolutionary scenarios proposed by recent empirical and modeling studies. We then investigated the spatio-temporal variation of temperature and molecular abundances in HMCs by consistently coupling gas-grain chemical evolution with radiative transfer calculations. We explored the effects of varying physical conditions on molecular abundances including density distribution and luminosity evolution of the central protostar(s). The time-dependent temperature structure of the hot core models provides a realistic framework for investigating the spatial variation of ice mantle evaporation as a function of evolutionary timescales. With increasing protos...

  2. Digital Frequency Domain Multiplexer for mm-Wavelength Telescopes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spieler, Helmuth G; Dobbs, Matt; Bissonnette, Eric; Spieler, Helmuth G.

    2007-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

    An FPGA based digital signal processing (DSP) system for biasing and reading out multiplexed bolometric detectors for mm-wavelength telescopes is presented. This readout system is being deployed for balloon-borne and ground based cosmology experiments with the primary goal of measuring the signature of inflation with the Cosmic Microwave Background Radiation. The system consists of analog superconducting electronics running at 250 mK and 4 K, coupled to digital room temperature backend electronics described here. The digital electronics perform the real time functionality with DSP algorithms implemented in firmware. A soft embedded processor provides all of the slow housekeeping control and communications. Each board in the system synthesizes multi-frequency combs of 8 to 32 carriers in the MHz band to bias the detectors. After the carriers have been modulated with the sky-signal by the detectors, the same boards digitize the comb directly. The carriers are mixed down to base-band and low pass filtered. The signal bandwidth of 0.050Hz-100 Hz places extreme requirements on stability and requires powerful filtering techniques to recover the sky-signal from the MHz carriers.

  3. Detection of significant cm to sub-mm band radio and gamma-ray correlated variability in Fermi bright blazars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fuhrmann, L; Chiang, J; Angelakis, E; Zensus, J A; Nestoras, I; Krichbaum, T P; Ungerechts, H; Sievers, A; Pavlidou, V; Readhead, A C S; Max-Moerbeck, W; Pearson, T J

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The exact location of the gamma-ray emitting region in blazars is still controversial. In order to attack this problem we present first results of a cross-correlation analysis between radio (11 cm to 0.8 mm wavelength, F-GAMMA program) and gamma-ray (0.1-300 GeV) ~ 3.5 year light curves of 54 Fermi-bright blazars. We perform a source stacking analysis and estimate significances and chance correlations using mixed source correlations. Our results reveal: (i) the first highly significant multi-band radio and gamma-ray correlations (radio lagging gamma rays) when averaging over the whole sample, (ii) average time delays (source frame: 76+/-23 to 7+/-9 days), systematically decreasing from cm to mm/sub-mm bands with a frequency dependence tau_r,gamma (nu) ~ nu^-1, in good agreement with jet opacity dominated by synchrotron self-absorption, (iii) a bulk gamma-ray production region typically located within/upstream of the 3 mm core region (tau_3mm,gamma=12+/-8 days), (iv) mean distances between the region of gamma-...

  4. Heat Transfer -2 A pure platinum wire with diameter D = 3 mm and length L = 20 mm is placed outside on a day when air temperature

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Virginia Tech

    Heat Transfer - 2 A pure platinum wire with diameter D = 3 mm and length L = 20 mm is placed outside on a day when air temperature T = 10o C. The heat transfer coefficient at the wire's surface h equation that includes all heat transfer mechanisms involved in this problem. Write this energy balance

  5. A Polarizable QM/MM Explicit Solvent Model for Computational Electrochemistry in Water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Lee-Ping

    We present a quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical (QM/MM) explicit solvent model for the computation of standard reduction potentials E[subscript 0]. The QM/MM model uses density functional theory (DFT) to model the ...

  6. Breakdown of 2mm symmetry in electron diffraction from multiwalled carbon nanotubes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qin, Lu-Chang

    Breakdown of 2mm symmetry in electron diffraction from multiwalled carbon nanotubes Zejian Liu of single-walled carbon nanotubes always have 2mm symmetry regardless if the nanotubes them- selves have such symmetry. We here show that, for the case of multiwalled carbon nanotubes, the 2mm symmetry can break down

  7. 450 mm dual frequency capacitively coupled plasma sources: Conventional, graded, and segmented electrodes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kushner, Mark

    450 mm dual frequency capacitively coupled plasma sources: Conventional, graded, and segmented fabrication will soon transition from 300 to 450 mm at a time when excitation frequencies for capacitively of processing. The increase in diameter to 450 mm is likely to exacerbate these effects, perhaps requiring

  8. Progresses in Ab Initio QM/MM Free Energy Simulations of Electrostatic Energies in Proteins: Accelerated QM/MM Studies of pKa, Redox Reactions and Solvation Free Energies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kamerlin, Shina C. L.; Haranczyk, Maciej; Warshel, Arieh

    2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Hybrid quantum mechanical / molecular mechanical (QM/MM) approaches have been used to provide a general scheme for chemical reactions in proteins. However, such approaches still present a major challenge to computational chemists, not only because of the need for very large computer time in order to evaluate the QM energy but also because of the need for propercomputational sampling. This review focuses on the sampling issue in QM/MM evaluations of electrostatic energies in proteins. We chose this example since electrostatic energies play a major role in controlling the function of proteins and are key to the structure-function correlation of biological molecules. Thus, the correct treatment of electrostatics is essential for the accurate simulation of biological systems. Although we will be presenting here different types of QM/MM calculations of electrostatic energies (and related properties), our focus will be on pKa calculations. This reflects the fact that pKa of ionizable groups in proteins provide one of the most direct benchmarks for the accuracy of electrostatic models of macromolecules. While pKa calculations by semimacroscopic models have given reasonable results in many cases, existing attempts to perform pKa calculations using QM/MM-FEP have led to large discrepancies between calculated and experimental values. In this work, we accelerate our QM/MM calculations using an updated mean charge distribution and a classical reference potential. We examine both a surface residue (Asp3) of the bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor, as well as a residue buried in a hydrophobic pocket (Lys102) of the T4-lysozyme mutant. We demonstrate that by using this approach, we are able to reproduce the relevant sidechain pKas with an accuracy of 3 kcal/mol. This is well within the 7 kcal/mol energy difference observed in studies of enzymatic catalysis, and is thus sufficient accuracy to determine the main contributions to the catalytic energies of enzymes. We also provide an overall perspective of the potential of QM/MM calculations in general evaluations of electrostatic free energies, pointing out that our approach should provide a very powerful and accurate tool to predict the electrostatics of not only solution but also enzymatic reactions, as well as the solvation free energies of even larger systems, such as nucleic acid bases incorporated into DNA.

  9. The (anti)correlation of the sub-mm and X-ray background sources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. Severgnini

    2000-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The connection between the sub-mm and the hard X-ray backgrounds is studied by comparing data at 2-10 keV and at 850um for a sample of 34 sources at fluxes (or limiting fluxes) which resolve most of the background in the two bands. These data were obtained with new SCUBA observations and by correlating data sets available from the literature. None of the 11 hard X-ray (2-10 keV) sources has a counterpart at 850um, with the exception of a faint Chandra source, which is a candidate type 2 QSO at high redshift. These data indicate that 2-10 keV sources brighter than 10^-15 erg s-1 cm-2, which make at least 75% of the background in this band, contribute for less than 7% to the submillimetric background. Out of the 24 SCUBA sources 23 are undetected by Chandra. These data indicate that most of these SCUBA sources must be powered either by starburst activity, or by an AGN which is obscured by a column Nh > 10^25 cm-2, with a reflection efficiency in the hard X-rays significantly lower than 1% in most cases.

  10. Microsoft Word - WH-MM-818B-819B NEPA.docx

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    8B & WH-MM-819B Title: Repair WH Brine Tanks, WHT-14 & WHT-15 Description: Subcontractor shall shall provide all materials, tools, equipment, supplies, transportation, facilities,...

  11. Formation of Carbon Dwarfs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Charles L. Steinhardt; Dimitar D. Sasselov

    2012-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider the formation of dwarf carbon stars via accretion from a carbon AGB companion in light of the new 107 object sample of Downes et al. (2004). This sample is now large enough to allow good mass determination via comparison of a composite spectrum to theoretical atmospheric models. Carbon dwarfs of spectral type M are indeed main sequence M dwarfs with enhanced metallicity and carbon abundance. We also calculate the predicted abundance of both M and of F/G carbon dwarfs, and show that the latter should be falsifiable in the near future.

  12. Evaluation of Offshore Wind Simulations with MM5 in the Japanese and Danish Coastal Waters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heinemann, Detlev

    Evaluation of Offshore Wind Simulations with MM5 in the Japanese and Danish Coastal Waters Teruo to evaluate the accuracy of offshore wind simulation with the mesoscale model MM5, long-term simulations to simulate offshore wind conditions in the Japanese coastal waters even using a mesoscale model, compared

  13. Hybrid QM/MM Car-Parrinello Simulations of Catalytic and Enzymatic Reactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guidoni, Leonardo

    1 Hybrid QM/MM Car-Parrinello Simulations of Catalytic and Enzymatic Reactions MariaCarola Colombo, we review some recent applications of hybrid Car-Parrinello simulations of chemical and biological recently developed a combination of these two techniques into a hybrid QM/MM Car-Parrinello scheme [4

  14. MECHANICAL TEST RESULTS ON DIPOLE MODEL C-l 25 mm ALUMINUM COLLARS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peters, C.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    P~. FI'9 . ~ C.C rv'IW\\ 707~-Th ALUMINUM ' ~LAI2.. o Pl.ATTDIPOLE MODEL C-1 25 mm ALUMINUM COLLARS C. Peters FebruaryON DIPOLE MODEL C-I 25 mm ALUMINUM COLLARS· Craig Peters

  15. Geometry Optimization with QM/MM, ONIOM, and Other Combined Methods. I. Microiterations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schlegel, H. Bernhard

    Geometry Optimization with QM/MM, ONIOM, and Other Combined Methods. I. Microiterations calculation, have been very successful in describing large systems. Geometry optimization methods can take). A series of microit- erations can be employed to fully optimize the MM region for each optimization step

  16. E-Print Network 3.0 - anastasiia kovtun kaire Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1994 Summary: : adiabatic sample surface (Ksample>> Kair ) : VT Ismpesurface 0 (2) Article published online by EDP... mm Is, KN I20 WImK; kair 20 mm2 Is, Kair 0.026 WlrnK...

  17. Isolating Triggered Star Formation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barton, Elizabeth J.; Arnold, Jacob A.; /UC, Irvine; Zentner, Andrew R.; /KICP, Chicago /Chicago U., EFI; Bullock, James S.; /UC, Irvine; Wechsler, Risa H.; /KIPAC, Menlo

    2007-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Galaxy pairs provide a potentially powerful means of studying triggered star formation from galaxy interactions. We use a large cosmological N-body simulation coupled with a well-tested semi-analytic substructure model to demonstrate that the majority of galaxies in close pairs reside within cluster or group-size halos and therefore represent a biased population, poorly suited for direct comparison to 'field' galaxies. Thus, the frequent observation that some types of galaxies in pairs have redder colors than 'field' galaxies is primarily a selection effect. We use our simulations to devise a means to select galaxy pairs that are isolated in their dark matter halos with respect to other massive subhalos (N= 2 halos) and to select a control sample of isolated galaxies (N= 1 halos) for comparison. We then apply these selection criteria to a volume-limited subset of the 2dF Galaxy Redshift Survey with M{sub B,j} {le} -19 and obtain the first clean measure of the typical fraction of galaxies affected by triggered star formation and the average elevation in the star formation rate. We find that 24% (30.5 %) of these L* and sub-L* galaxies in isolated 50 (30) h{sup -1} kpc pairs exhibit star formation that is boosted by a factor of {approx}> 5 above their average past value, while only 10% of isolated galaxies in the control sample show this level of enhancement. Thus, 14% (20 %) of the galaxies in these close pairs show clear triggered star formation. Our orbit models suggest that 12% (16%) of 50 (30) h{sup -1} kpc close pairs that are isolated according to our definition have had a close ({le} 30 h{sup -1} kpc) pass within the last Gyr. Thus, the data are broadly consistent with a scenario in which most or all close passes of isolated pairs result in triggered star formation. The isolation criteria we develop provide a means to constrain star formation and feedback prescriptions in hydrodynamic simulations and a very general method of understanding the importance of triggered star formation in a cosmological context.

  18. Discrimination Report: A Multisensor system for detection andcharacterization of UXO, ESTCP Project MM-0437,

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gasperikova, Erika; Smith, J. Torquil; Morrison, H.Frank; Becker,Alex

    2008-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The Berkeley UXO Discriminator (BUD) is an optimally designed active electromagnetic system that not only detects but also characterizes UXO. The performance of the system is governed by a target size-depth curve. BUD was designed to detect UXO in the 20 mm to 155 mm size range for depths between 0 and 1.5 m, and to characterize them in a depth range from 0 to 1.1 m. The system incorporates three orthogonal transmitters and eight pairs of differenced receivers. Eight receiver coils are placed horizontally along the two diagonals of the upper and lower planes of the two horizontal transmitter loops. These receiver coil pairs are located on symmetry lines through the center of the system and each pair sees identical fields during the on-time of the pulse in all of the transmitter coils. They are wired in opposition to produce zero output during the on-time of the pulses in three orthogonal transmitters. Moreover, this configuration dramatically reduces noise in the measurements by canceling the background electromagnetic fields (these fields are uniform over the scale of the receiver array and are consequently nulled by the differencing operation), and by canceling the noise contributed by the tilt motion of the receivers in the Earth's magnetic field, and greatly enhances receiver sensitivity to the gradients of the target response. BUD is mounted on a small cart to assure system mobility. System positioning is provided by a Real Time Kinematic (RTK) GPS receiver. The system has two modes of operation: (1) the search mode, in which BUD moves along a profile and exclusively detects targets in its vicinity providing target depth and horizontal location, and (2) the discrimination mode, in which BUD is stationary above a target, and determines three discriminating polarizability responses together with the object location and orientation from a single position of the system. The detection performance of the system is governed by a size-depth curve shown in Figure 2. This curve was calculated for BUD assuming that the receiver plane is 0.2 m above the ground. Figure 2 shows that, for example, BUD can detect an object with 0.1 m diameter down to the depth of 0.9 m with a depth uncertainty of 10%. Any objects buried at a depth of more than 1.3 m will have a low probability of detection. The discrimination performance of the system is governed by a size-depth curve shown in Figure 3. Again, this curve was calculated for BUD assuming that the receiver plane is 0.2 m above the ground. Figure 3 shows that, for example, BUD can determine the polarizability of an object with 0.1 m diameter down to the depth of 0.63 m with polarizability uncertainty of 10%. Any objects buried at the depth more than 0.9 m will have a low discrimination probability. Object orientation estimates and equivalent dipole polarizability estimates used for large and shallow UXO/scrap discrimination are more problematic as they are affected by higher order (non-dipole) terms induced in objects due to source field gradients along the length of the objects. For example, a vertical 0.4 m object directly below the system needs to be about 0.90 m deep for perturbations due to gradients along the length of the object to be of the order of 20% of the uniform field object response. Similarly, vertical objects 0.5 m, and 0.6 m long need to be 1.15 m, and 1.42 m, respectively, below the system. For horizontal objects the effect of gradients across the object diameter are much smaller. For example, 155 mm and 105 mm projectiles need to be only 0.30 m, and 0.19 m, respectively, below the system. A polarizability index (in cm{sup 3}), which is an average value of the product of time (in seconds) and polarizability rate (in m{sup 3}/s) over the 34 sample times logarithmically spaced from 143 to 1300 {micro}s, and three polarizabilities, can be calculated for any object. We used this polarizability index to decide when the object is in a uniform source field. Objects with the polarizability index smaller than 600 cm{sup 3} and deeper than 1.8 m below BUD, or smaller than 200

  19. Of horseshoes and heliotropes: Dynamics of dust in the Encke Gap M.M. Hedman a,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hamilton, Douglas P.

    Of horseshoes and heliotropes: Dynamics of dust in the Encke Gap M.M. Hedman a, , J.A. Burns a located within the Cassini Division's Laplace Gap demonstrates ``heliotropic'' behavior: its geometric

  20. MagLab - Cell 15: 45.1 Tesla / 32 mm Hybrid Magnet

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Magnets & Facilities Arrow Cell 15: 45.1 Tesla 32 mm Hybrid Magnet The labs flagship magnet, the 45 T Hybrid, is composed of a 33.5 T resistive magnet nested in an 11.5 T...

  1. Optical rotation in RbTiOAsO4 (point group mm2) W. Kaminsky*, I

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaminsky, Werner

    Optical rotation in RbTiOAsO4 (point group mm2) W. Kaminsky*, I , P. A. ThomasII and A. M. Glazer, UK Received March 5, 2001; accepted September 13, 2001 Abstract. Measurement of optical rotation in RbTiOAsO4 (RTA) with the tilter method resulted in an optical rotation of r12 ¼ þ17ð3� /mm

  2. Utility Formation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched Ferromagnetism inS-4500II Field EmissionFunctional MaterialsRobertUtility-Formation

  3. ASSEMBLY AND TEST OF A 120 MM BORE 15 T NB3SN QUADRUPOLE FOR THE LHC UPGRADE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Felice, H.; Caspi, S.; Cheng, D.; Dietderich, D.; Ferracin, P.; Hafalia, R.; Joseph, J.; Lizarazo, J.; Sabbi, G. L.; Wang, X.; Anerella, M.; Ghosh, A. K.; Schmalzle, J.; Wanderer, P.; Ambrosio, G.; Bossert, R.; Zlobin, A. V.

    2010-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

    In support of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) luminosity upgrade, the US LHC Accelerator Research Program (LARP) has been developing a 1-meter long, 120 mm bore Nb{sub 3}Sn IR quadrupole magnet (HQ). With a design short sample gradient of 219 T/m at 1.9 K and a peak field approaching 15 T, one of the main challenges of this magnet is to provide appropriate mechanical support to the coils. Compared to the previous LARP Technology Quadrupole and Long Quadrupole magnets, the purpose of HQ is also to demonstrate accelerator quality features such as alignment and cooling. So far, 8 HQ coils have been fabricated and 4 of them have been assembled and tested in HQ01a. This paper presents the mechanical assembly and test results of HQ01a.

  4. Test Results of HD2, A High Field Nb3Sn Dipole with A 36 MM Bore

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ferracin, Paolo

    2008-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The Superconducting Magnet Program at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) has developed the 1 m long Nb{sub 3}Sn dipole magnet HD2. With tilted (flared) ends to avoid obstructing a 36 mm clear bore, HD2 represents a step towards the use of block-type coils in high-field accelerator magnets. The coil design has been optimized to minimize geometric harmonics and reduce the conductor peak field in the end region, resulting in an expected short sample dipole field of 15 T. The support structure is composed by an external aluminum shell pre-tensioned with pressurized bladders and interference keys, and by two stainless steel end plates compressing the coil ends through four aluminum axial rods. We report on magnet design, assembly, and test results, including training performance, quench locations, and strain gauge measurements.

  5. Level Diagram Format Choice

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: VegetationEquipment Surfaces and Interfaces Sample6, 2011 LawrenceE C HLester toRecalcitrantWhich format

  6. Development and application of QM/MM methods to study the solvation effects and surfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dibya, Pooja Arora

    2010-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Quantum mechanical (QM) calculations have the advantage of attaining high-level accuracy, however QM calculations become computationally inefficient as the size of the system grows. Solving complex molecular problems on large systems and ensembles by using quantum mechanics still poses a challenge in terms of the computational cost. Methods that are based on classical mechanics are an inexpensive alternative, but they lack accuracy. A good trade off between accuracy and efficiency is achieved by combining QM methods with molecular mechanics (MM) methods to use the robustness of the QM methods in terms of accuracy and the MM methods to minimize the computational cost. Two types of QM combined with MM (QM/MM) methods are the main focus of the present dissertation: the application and development of QM/MM methods for solvation studies and reactions on the Si(100) surface. The solvation studies were performed using a discreet solvation model that is largely based on first principles called the effective fragment potential method (EFP). The main idea of combining the EFP method with quantum mechanics is to accurately treat the solute-solvent and solvent-solvent interactions, such as electrostatic, polarization, dispersion and charge transfer, that are important in correctly calculating solvent effects on systems of interest. A second QM/MM method called SIMOMM (surface integrated molecular orbital molecular mechanics) is a hybrid QM/MM embedded cluster model that mimics the real surface.3 This method was employed to calculate the potential energy surfaces for reactions of atomic O on the Si(100) surface. The hybrid QM/MM method is a computationally inexpensive approach for studying reactions on larger surfaces in a reasonably accurate and efficient manner. This thesis is comprised of four chapters: Chapter 1 describes the general overview and motivation of the dissertation and gives a broad background of the computational methods that have been employed in this work. Chapter 2 illustrates the methodology of the interface of the EFP method with the configuration interaction with single excitations (CIS) method to study solvent effects in excited states. Chapter 3 discusses the study of the adiabatic electron affinity of the hydroxyl radical in aqueous solution and in micro-solvated clusters using a QM/EFP method. Chapter 4 describes the study of etching and diffusion of oxygen atom on a reconstructed Si(100)-2 x 1 surface using a hybrid QM/MM embedded cluster model (SIMOMM). Chapter 4 elucidates the application of the EFP method towards the understanding of the aqueous ionization potential of Na atom. Finally, a general conclusion of this dissertation work and prospective future direction are presented in Chapter 6.

  7. 450 mm dual frequency capacitively coupled plasma sources: Conventional, graded, and segmented electrodes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang Yang [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Iowa State University, Ames, Iowa 50011 (United States); Kushner, Mark J. [Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, University of Michigan, 1301 Beal Avenue, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109-2122 (United States)

    2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Wafer diameters for microelectronics fabrication will soon transition from 300 to 450 mm at a time when excitation frequencies for capacitively coupled plasmas (CCPs) are increasing to 200 MHz or higher. Already for 300 mm tools, there is evidence that wave behavior (i.e., propagation, constructive, and destructive interference) affects the uniformity of processing. The increase in diameter to 450 mm is likely to exacerbate these effects, perhaps requiring nontraditional tool designs. This is particularly important in dual frequency (DF) CCP tools in which there are potential interactions between frequencies. In this paper, results from a two-dimensional computational investigation of Ar plasma properties in a 450 mm DF-CCP reactor, incorporating a full-wave solution of Maxwell's equations, are discussed. As in 300 mm DF-CCP reactors, the electron density collapses toward the center of the reactor with increasing high frequency (HF), however, with more pronounced finite wavelength effects. Graded conductivity electrodes with multilayer of dielectrics are computationally demonstrated as a possible means to suppress wave effects thereby increasing plasma uniformity. Segmentation of the HF electrode also improves the plasma uniformity by making the electrical distance between the feeds and the sheath edges as uniform as possible.

  8. Disclaimer: This Sample CV was compiled from 6 different student pharmacists' activities to demonstrate formatting of various CV components. A single student's CV would not be expected to contain all of these activities. List section contents in reverse c

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gleeson, Joseph G.

    Disclaimer: This Sample CV was compiled from 6 different student pharmacists' activities@xxx.com ===================================================================== EDUCATION Month Yr ­ Present Skaggs School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences (SSPPS) University Skaggs School of Pharmacy & Pharmaceutical Sciences Year-Year Research Aspects of HIPAA Certification

  9. Sampling box

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Phillips, Terrance D. (617 Chestnut Ct., Aiken, SC 29803); Johnson, Craig (100 Midland Rd., Oak Ridge, TN 37831-0895)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An air sampling box that uses a slidable filter tray and a removable filter cartridge to allow for the easy replacement of a filter which catches radioactive particles is disclosed.

  10. Polystyrene PS648 outlet optical birefringence pattern, piston speed 1.0mm/s

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hassell, David

    2008-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The optical birefringence pattern obtained from polystyrene PS648 flowing through a narrow slit. Experiment conducted on the Cambridge Multi Pass Rheometer (MPR4) at a piston speed of 1.0 mm/s at 170C. Video shows the outlet flow (from top to bottom)....

  11. Polystyrene PS648 inlet optical birefringence pattern, piston speed 1.4mm/s

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hassell, David

    2008-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The optical birefringence pattern obtained from polystyrene PS648 flowing through a narrow slit. Experiment conducted on the Cambridge Multi Pass Rheometer (MPR4) at a piston speed of 1.4 mm/s at 170C. Video shows the inlet flow (from bottom to top)....

  12. Polystyrene PS648 inlet optical birefringence pattern, piston speed 1.0mm/s

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hassell, David

    2008-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The optical birefringence pattern obtained from polystyrene PS648 flowing through a narrow slit. Experiment conducted on the Cambridge Multi Pass Rheometer (MPR4) at a piston speed of 1.0 mm/s at 170C. Video shows the inlet flow (from bottom to top)....

  13. Polystyrene PS648 outlet optical birefringence pattern, piston speed 1.4mm/s

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hassell, David

    2008-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The optical birefringence pattern obtained from polystyrene PS648 flowing through a narrow slit. Experiment conducted on the Cambridge Multi Pass Rheometer (MPR4) at a piston speed of 1.4 mm/s at 170C. Video shows the outlet flow (from top to bottom)....

  14. Polystyrene PS648 outlet optical birefringence pattern, piston speed 0.16mm/s

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hassell, David

    2008-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The optical birefringence pattern obtained from polystyrene PS648 flowing through a narrow slit. Experiment conducted on the Cambridge Multi Pass Rheometer (MPR4) at a piston speed of 0.16 mm/s at 170C. Video shows the outlet flow (from top...

  15. Polystyrene PS648 inlet optical birefringence pattern, piston speed 0.16mm/s

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hassell, David

    2008-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The optical birefringence pattern obtained from polystyrene PS648 flowing through a narrow slit. Experiment conducted on the Cambridge Multi Pass Rheometer (MPR4) at a piston speed of 0.16 mm/s at 170C. Video shows the inlet flow (from bottom to top)....

  16. Greenland ice sheet surface mass balance variability (1988-2004) from calibrated Polar MM5 output*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Howat, Ian M.

    1 Greenland ice sheet surface mass balance variability (1988-2004) from calibrated Polar MM5 output in Environmental Sciences, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO, USA 4 National Snow and Ice Data Center, University coherent regional patterns of Greenland ice sheet surface mass balance (SMB) change over a 17-year period

  17. ALUMINUM SITING IN THE ZSM-22 AND THETA-1 ZEOLITES REVISITED: A QM/MM STUDY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sklenak, Stepan

    ALUMINUM SITING IN THE ZSM-22 AND THETA-1 ZEOLITES REVISITED: A QM/MM STUDY Stepan SKLENAKa1. 73, Nos. 6­7, pp. 909­920 Aluminum Siting in the ZSM-22 and Theta-1 Zeolites Revisited 909 © 2008

  18. Name and Contact Information * Indicates a required field * Date of Birth (MM/DD/YYYY)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Name and Contact Information * Indicates a required field * Date of Birth (MM/DD/YYYY) * o Female o courses offered as part of a certificate or diploma program are exempt from GST, even if you are only certificates and diplomas for eligible students. If you have any questions or requests about the collection

  19. AbstractLarge (>458 mm) striped bass (Morone saxatilis) are dominant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    fishes and anadromous herrings (Alosa spp.) also contibuted large percentages of striped bass diet of striped Dorazio et al., 1994). After spawning, bass experienced drastic declines in the these fish leave414 Abstract­Large (>458 mm) striped bass (Morone saxatilis) are dominant predators in Chesapeake

  20. M.M. AbdouAbdou TBWGTBWG--13 Meeting13 Meeting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abdou, Mohamed

    M.M. AbdouAbdou TBWGTBWG--13 Meeting13 Meeting July 7July 7--9, 20049, 2004 Presentations from-TBM Abdou (5 min.) Wong (20 min.) Sze (10 min.) Ying (15 min.) Kurtz (10 min.) #12;TBM's and Port Allocation

  1. Comparative Theoretical Study of the Ring-Opening Polymerization of Caprolactam vs Caprolactone Using QM/MM Methods

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elsasser, Brigitta M.; Schoenen, Iris; Fels, Gregor

    2013-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Candida antarctica lipase B (CALB) efficiently catalyzes the ring-opening polymerization of lactones to high molecular weight products in good yield. In contrast, an efficient enzymatic synthesis of polyamides has so far not been described in the literature. This obvious difference in enzyme catalysis is the subject of our comparative study of the initial steps of a CALB catalyzed ring-opening polymerization of ?- caprolactone and ?-caprolactam. We have applied docking tools to generate the reactant state complex and performed quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical (QM/MM) calculations at the density functional theory (DFT) PBE0 level of theory to simulate the acylation of Ser105 by the lactone and the lactam, respectively, via the corresponding first tetrahedral intermediates. We could identify a decisive difference in the accessibility of the two substrates in the ring-opening to the respective acyl enzyme complex as the attack of ?-caprolactam is hindered because of an energetically disfavored proton transfer during this part of the catalytic reaction while ?-caprolactone is perfectly processed along the widely accepted pathway using the catalytic triade of Ser105, His224, and Asp187. Since the generation of an acylated Ser105 species is the crucial step of the polymerization procedure, our results give an explanation for the unsatisfactory enzymatic polyamide formation and opens up new possibilities for targeted rational catalyst redesign in hope of an experimentally useful CALB catalyzed polyamide synthesis.

  2. THE MAGNETIC FIELD MORPHOLOGY OF THE CLASS 0 PROTOSTAR L1157-mm

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stephens, Ian W.; Looney, Leslie W.; Kwon, Woojin; Crutcher, Richard M. [Department of Astronomy, University of Illinois, 1002 West Green Street, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Hull, Charles L. H.; Plambeck, Richard L. [Astronomy Department and Radio Astronomy Laboratory, 601 Campbell Hall, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Chapman, Nicholas; Novak, Giles; Matthews, Tristan [Center for Interdisciplinary Exploration and Research in Astrophysics (CIERA) and Department of Physics and Astronomy, Northwestern University, 2145 Sheridan Road, Evanston, IL 60208 (United States); Davidson, Jacqueline [School of Physics, University of Western Australia, 35 Stirling Hwy, Crawley, WA 6009 (Australia); Vaillancourt, John E. [SOFIA Science Center, Universities Space Research Association, NASA Ames Research Center, MS 232-11, Moffett Field, CA 94035-0001 (United States); Shinnaga, Hiroko, E-mail: stephen6@illinois.edu [Subaru Telescope, National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 650 North A'ohoku Place, Hilo, HI 96720 (United States)

    2013-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the first detection of polarization around the Class 0 low-mass protostar L1157-mm at two different wavelengths. We show polarimetric maps at large scales (10'' resolution at 350 {mu}m) from the SHARC-II Polarimeter and at smaller scales (1.''2-4.''5 at 1.3 mm) from the Combined Array for Research in Millimeter-wave Astronomy (CARMA). The observations are consistent with each other and show inferred magnetic field lines aligned with the outflow. The CARMA observations suggest a full hourglass magnetic field morphology centered about the core; this is only the second well-defined hourglass detected around a low-mass protostar to date. We apply two different methods to CARMA polarimetric observations to estimate the plane-of-sky magnetic field magnitude, finding values of 1.4 and 3.4 mG.

  3. A Magnetic Dynamo Origin For The Sub-mm Excess In Sgr A*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fulvio Melia; Siming Liu; Robert Coker

    2001-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The sub-mm bump observed in the spectrum of Sgr A* appears to indicate the existence of a compact emitting component within several Schwarzschild radii, $r_S$, of the nucleus at the Galactic Center. This is interesting in view of the predicted circularized flow within $\\sim 5-10 r_S$, based on detailed multi-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations of Bondi-Hoyle accretion onto this unusual object. In this paper, we examine the physics of magnetic field generation by a Keplerian dynamo subject to the conditions pertaining to Sgr A*, and show that the sub-mm bump can be produced by thermal synchrotron emission in this inner region. This spectral feature may therefore be taken as indirect evidence for the existence of this circularization. In addition, the self-Comptonization of the sub-mm bump appears to produce an X-ray flux exceeding that due to bremsstrahlung from this region, which may account for the X-ray counterpart to Sgr A* discovered recently by {\\it Chandra}. However, the required accretion rate in the Keplerian flow is orders of magnitude smaller than that predicted by the Bondi-Hoyle simulations. We speculate that rapid evaporation, in the form of a wind, may ensue from the heating associated with turbulent mixing of gas elements with large eccentricity as they settle down into a more or less circular (i.e., low eccentricity) trajectory. The spectrum of Sgr A* longward of $\\sim 1-2$ mm may be generated outside of the Keplerian flow, where the gas is making a transition from a quasi-spherical infall into a circularized pattern.

  4. A 15 15 mm, 1 A, Reliable Sensor-Net Module: Enabling Application-Specific Nodes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Savvides, Andreas

    -simokw, tanaka-t, kuriyama, kshimada, k_yano}@crl.hitachi.co.jp 1. INTRODUCTION ZN1 is an ultra-small, low-power sensor-net module. ZN1 integrates MCU, RF, and RTC into an ultra-small 15 � 15-mm module with an ultra-low standby current less than 1 µA. Its ultra- small feature enables application-specific sensor nodes

  5. Correlated Sub-mm and X-ray Variability in Sgr A*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fulvio Melia; Siming Liu; Marco Fatuzzo

    2002-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

    PAPER WITHDRAWN. The recent detection of Sgr A* in the X-ray band, together with the radio polarization measurements conducted over the past few years, offer the best constraints yet for understanding the nature of the emitting gas within several Schwarzschild radii ($r_S$) of this supermassive black hole candidate at the Galactic Center. Earlier, we showed that the sub-mm radiation from this source may be associated with thermal synchrotron emission from an inner Keplerian region within the circularization radius of the accreting plasma. In this paper, we extend this analysis in a very important way, by calculating the implied high-energy emission of Sgr A* associated with the orbiting, hot, magnetized gas. We find that for the accretion rate inferred from the fits to the sub-mm data, the dominant contribution to Sgr A*'s X-ray flux is due to self-Comptonization of the radio photons, rather than from bremsstrahlung. The latter is a two-body process, which would produce significant X-ray emission only at much higher accretion rates. This picture leads to the testable prediction that the physical conditions within the inner $\\sim5r_S$ are variable on a time scale of order a year. In particular, the accretion rate $\\dot M$ appears to have changed by about 15% between the sub-mm measurements in 1996 and 1999. Given that the radio and self-Comptonized fluxes are strongly correlated in this picture, the upcoming second generation Chandra observations of Sgr A* may provide the direct evidence required to test this model.

  6. L1448-MM OBSERVATIONS BY THE HERSCHEL KEY PROGRAM, ''DUST, ICE, AND GAS IN TIME'' (DIGIT)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, Jinhee; Lee, Jeong-Eun [Department of Astronomy and Space Science, Kyung Hee University, Yongin-shi, Kyungki-do 449-701 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Seokho [Astronomy Program, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of); Green, Joel D.; Evans, Neal J. II [Department of Astronomy, University of Texas at Austin, 2515 Speedway, Stop C1400, Austin, TX 78712-1205 (United States); Choi, Minho [Korea Astronomy and Space Science Institute, 776 Daedeokdaero, Yuseong, Daejeon 305-348 (Korea, Republic of); Kristensen, Lars [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, MS78, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Dionatos, Odysseas; Jørgensen, Jes K., E-mail: jeongeun.lee@khu.ac.kr [Centre for Star and Planet Formation, Natural History Museum of Denmark, University of Copenhagen, Øster Voldgade 5-7, 1350 Copenhagen (Denmark); Collaboration: DIGIT Team

    2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present Herschel/Photodetector Array Camera and Spectrometer (PACS) observations of L1448-MM, a Class 0 protostar with a prominent outflow. Numerous emission lines are detected at 55 1000 K) environment, indicative of a shock origin. For OH, IR-pumping processes play an important role in the level population. The molecular emission in L1448-MM is better explained with a C-shock model, but the atomic emission of PACS [O I] and Spitzer/Infrared Spectrograph [Si II] emission is not consistent with C-shocks, suggesting multiple shocks in this region. Water is the major line coolant of L1448-MM in the PACS wavelength range, and the best-fit LVG models predict that H{sub 2}O and CO emit (50%-80%) of their line luminosity in the PACS wavelength range.

  7. Fe/Al2O3 C2H4 Hata mm/10 min

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maruyama, Shigeo

    Fe/Al2O3 C2H4 () () () () () () () * () 1. (SWNT) SWNT (CVD) (CNT)[1] Hata mm/10 min SWNT (Super Growth)[2]Al2O3 Fe C2H4 SWNT Fe/Al2O3 C2H4 CVD SWNT CNT CNT 2 SiO2 Al2O3 20 (RBM) 1350 cm-1 (D-Band)Fe G/D RBM Fe SWNT Al 15 nm Fe 0.6 nm CVD TEM Fig. 3 3 nm SWNT

  8. Sub-mm tests of the gravitational inverse-square law

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E. G. Adelberger

    2002-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Sub-mm tests of the gravitational inverse-square law are interesting from several quite different perspectives. This paper discusses work by the Eot-Wash group performed since the publication of our initial result in February 2001. We find no evidence for short-range Yukawa interactions. Our results provide an upper limit of 200 micrometers on the size of the largest ``extra'' dimension, and for the unification scenario with 2 large extra dimensions, set an upper limit of 150 micrometers on the size of those dimensions.

  9. A QM/MM Study on the Aqueous Solvation of theTetrahydroxouranylate [UO(OH)]

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinanInformation Desert SouthwestTechnologies |November 2011A First LookMicroscopyComplex Ion. | EMSL QM/MM

  10. Self-consistent QM/MM methodologies for structural refinement of photosystem II and other macromolecules of biological interest

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Batista, Enrique R [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Sproviero, Eduardo M [YALE UNIV; Newcomer, Michael [YALE UNIV; Gascon, Jose A [YALE UNIV; Batista, Victor S [YALE UNIV

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The combination of quantum mechanics and molecular mechanics (QM/MM) is one of the most promising approaches to study the structure, function, and properties of proteins and nucleic acids. However, there some instances in which the limitations of either the MM (lack of a proper electronic description) or QM (limited to a few number of atoms) methods prevent a proper description of the system. To address this issue, we review here our approach to fine-tune the structure of biological systems using post-QM/MM refinements. These protocols are based on spectroscopy data, and/or partitioning of the system to extend the QM description to a larger region of a protein. We illustrate these methodologies through applications to several biomolecules, which were pre-optimized at the QM/MM level and then further refined using postQM/MM refinement methodologies: mod(QM/MM), which refines the atomic charges of the residues included in the MM region accounting for polarization effects; mod(QM/MM)-opt that partition the MM region in smaller parts and optimizes each part in an iterative. self-consistent way, and the Polarized-Extended X-Ray Absorption Fine Structure (P-EXAFS) fitting procedure, which fine-tune the atomic coordinates to reproduce experimental polarized EXAFS spectra. The first two techniques were applied to the guanine quadruplex. while the P-EXAFS refinement was applied to the oxygen evolving complex of photosystem II.

  11. ORIGINAL ARTICLE Diatom assemblages promote ice formation in large

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee Jr., Richard E.

    ORIGINAL ARTICLE Diatom assemblages promote ice formation in large lakes NA D'souza1,3 , Y evidence for the directed formation of ice by planktonic communities dominated by filamentous diatoms sampled from the ice-covered Laurentian Great Lakes. We hypothesize that ice formation promotes attachment

  12. Design development for the 50mm Superconducting Super Collider dipole cryostat

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nicol, T.H.

    1991-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The cryostat of a Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) dipole magnet consists of all magnet components except the magnet assembly itself. It serves to support the magnet accurately and reliably within the vacuum vessel, provide all required cryogenic piping, and to insulate the cold mass from heat radiated and conducted from the environment. It must function reliably during storage, shipping and handling, normal magnet operation, quenches, and seismic excitations, and must be manufacturable at low cost. The major components of the cryostat are the vacuum vessel, thermal shields, multilayer insulation system, cryogenic piping, interconnections, and suspension system. The overall design of a cryostat for superconducting accelerator magnets requires consideration of fluid flow, proper selection of materials for their thermal and structural performance at both ambient and operating temperature, and knowledge of the environment to which the magnets will be subjected over the course their expected operating life. This paper describes the design of the current 50mm SSC collider dipole cryostat and includes discussions on the structural and thermal considerations involved in the development of each of the major systems. Where appropriate, comparisons will be made with the 40mm cryostat. 7 refs., 5 figs., 4 tabs.

  13. Combustion characteristics of 24 lignite samples

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sensogut, C.; Ozsen, H.; Demirbas, A. [Selcuk University, Konya (Turkey)

    2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this study, the combustion characteristics such as thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and differential thermogravimetric analysis (DTGA), burning profile, ignition temperature, and peak temperature were analyzed for 24 lignite samples from different areas of Turkey. The samples were heated up to 900{sup o}C at a constant rate of 10{sup o} C/min in a 5 mL/min flow of dry air. The burning profiles of the samples studied, combined with proximate, sulfur analysis and calorimetry results, contribute to a clearer identification of lignite samples' structure and a better understanding of the coalification process. The lignite samples have been tested with particle size of 0-0.05 mm. Ignition temperatures of the samples have been determined from their burning profiles.

  14. A 16 mm3 autonomous solar-powered sensor node with bi-directional optical communication for distributed sensor net-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kahn, Joseph M.

    Abstract A 16 mm3 autonomous solar-powered sensor node with bi- directional optical communication for distributed sensor net- works has been demonstrated. The device digitizes inte- grated sensor signals, a 2.6 mm2 SOI solar cell array, and a micromachined four-quadrant corner-cube retroreflector (CCR

  15. The CR 2.0mm (.079") insulation displacement connector features a mounting height as low as

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wedeward, Kevin

    7 The CR 2.0mm (.079") insulation displacement connector features a mounting height as low as 6.9mm") pitch insulation displacement connector allows automatic harness production for connection of UL1007 of misinsertion without being permanently distorted. · Twin U-slot insulation displacement section The insulation

  16. Spray drift collector efficiency: Assessment of deposition on 2 mm diameter PVC line in a wind tunnel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Spray drift collector efficiency: Assessment of deposition on 2 mm diameter PVC line in a wind and Miller and Hadfield, 1989) and to trap it on passive collectors. This method is cheap and easy to set-up but the efficiency of the collectors has to be evaluated. The cylindrical collectors with a diameter of 2 mm

  17. DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION OF A 15 T, 120 MM BORE IR QUADRUPOLE MAGNET FOR LARP

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Caspi, S.; Cheng, D.; Dietderich, D.; Felice, H.; Ferracin, P.; Hafalia, R.; Hannaford, R.; Sabbi, G. S.; Anerella, M.; Ghosh, A.; Schmalzle, J.; Wanderer, P.; Ambrosio, G.; Bossert, R.; Kashikhin, V.; Pasholk, D.; Zlobin, A.

    2009-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Pushing accelerator magnets beyond 10 T holds a promise of future upgrades to machines like the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN. Nb{sub 3}Sn conductor is at the present time the only practical superconductor capable of generating fields beyond 10 T. In support of the LHC Phase-II upgrade, the US LHC Accelerator Research Program (LARP) is developing a large bore (120 mm) IR quadrupole (HQ) capable of reaching 15 T at its conductor peak field and a peak gradient of 219 T/m at 1.9 K. While exploring the magnet performance limits in terms of gradient, forces and stresses the 1 m long two-layer coil will demonstrate additional features such as alignment and accelerator field quality. In this paper we summarize the design and report on the magnet construction progress.

  18. Fluorescence of PRODAN in Water: a Computational QM/MM MD Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pederzoli, Marek; Sobek, Lukas; Brabec, Jiri; Kowalski, Karol; Cwiklik, Lukasz; Pittner, Jiri

    2014-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Fluorescent properties of PRODAN (6-propionyl-2-dimethylaminonaphthalene) in water were studied by means of excited state molecular dynamics simulations employing a combined quantum mechanical and molecular mechanical approach with the time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT QM/MM MD). The state of the art coupled cluster method was used to benchmark density functional theory calculations. The influence of the water environment on PRODAN emission was investigated by employing several computational schemes with varying description of the solvent. The issue of the molecular geometry of the excited state PRODAN molecule in water was addressed. The experimental emission spectrum was reproduced for the planar excited state conformer of PRODAN in the extended environment of 300 explicit water molecules. The planar conformer was shown to be predominantly responsible for fluorescence. The twisted isomer is strongly stabilized in water, but rapidly evolve towards a conical intersection, and hence the twisted conformer is fluorescently inactive.

  19. Operating the LCLS Gas Attenuator and Gas Detector System with Apertures of 6mm Diameter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ryutov, D.D.; Bionta, R.M.; Hau-Riege, S.P.; Kishiyama, K.I.; Roeben, M.D.; Shen, S.; /LLNL, Livermore; Stefan, P.M.; /SLAC; ,

    2010-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The possibility of increasing the apertures of the LCLS gas attenuator/gas detector system is considered. It is shown that increase of the apertures from 3 to 6 mm, together with 4-fold reduction of the operation pressure does not adversely affect the vacuum conditions upstream or downstream. No change of the pump speed and the lengths of the differential pumping cells is required. One minor modification is the use of 1.5 cm long tubular apertures in the end cells of the differential pumping system. Reduction of the pressure does not affect performance of the gas attenuator/gas detector system at the FEL energies below, roughly, 2 keV. Some minor performance degradation occurs at higher energies.

  20. Oct. 12, 2005 QM/MM: What have we learned, where are we, and where

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Truhlar, Donald G

    and electric embedding are contrasted. We consider methods applicable to gas-phase organic chemistry, liquid to computational chemists. At the same time, there is increasing interest in nanostructured materials, condensed advances in modeling potential energy surfaces, in statistical mechanical sampling, and in dynamics

  1. Examination of Hydrate Formation Methods: Trying to Create Representative Samples

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kneafsey, T.J.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    permeability measurements of gas hydrate-bearing sediments,International Conference on Gas Hydrates, edited, p. 1058,2009), Influence of gas hydrate morphology on the seismic

  2. Formatted: Footer, Left Formatted: Font: 10 pt

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Formatted: Space Before: 12 pt, Border: Bottom: (Single solid line, Auto, 0.5 pt Line width) Deleted: Angelis ­ Sacramento Municipal Utility District Anne Gillette ­ California Public Utilities Commission Steven Kelly

  3. Structure for an LHC 90mm Nb3Sn Quadrupole Magnet

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hafalia, A.R.; Caspi, S.; Bartlett, S.E.; Dietderich, D.R.; Ferracin, P.; Gourlay, S.A.; Hannaford, C.R.; Higley, H.; Lietzke, A.F.; Lau, B.; Liggins, N.; Mattafirri, S.; McInturff, A.D.; Nyman, M.; Sabbi,G.L.; Scanlan, R.M.; Swanson, J.

    2005-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

    A full-scale mechanical model of the LHC Nb{sub 3}Sn quadrupole magnet structure has been designed, built and tested. The structure will support a 90mm bore, 1m long magnet prototype as part of the US LHC Accelerator Research Program (LARP). The structure utilizes Bladder and Key Technology to control and transfer pre-stress from an outer aluminum shell to an inner coil. Axial aluminum rods take care of pre-stress at the ends--ensuring that the coil is fully constrained along all three axes. The outer aluminum shell and an inner ''dummy coil'' (aluminum tube) were extensively instrumented with strain gauges. The gauges were used to monitor and map the effectiveness of the stress relation between the loading structure and a ''dummy'' coil through varying mechanical load conditions --from bladder and key pre-stress at room temperature through cool-down. Test results of the stress distribution in the structure and the in dummy coil is reported and compared with expected results calculated with the structural analysis program ANSYS.

  4. The orifice expansion correction for a 50 mm line size at various diameter ratios

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seidl, W. [Colorado Engineering Experiment Station, Inc., Nunn, CO (United States)

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The expansion coefficient or factor for a compressible flowmeter corrects for the change in pressure and density as the fluid is accelerated through the flowmeter. The expansion correction currently in use in the United States and also in other countries was developed over fifty years ago by Buckingham and Bean. More recent work reported by Kinghorn shows the equation currently in use to be in error. This paper describes the results of a test program to determine the expansion factors for flange-tapped sharp-edged orifices with diameter ratios between 0.242 and 0.726 in a nominal 50 mm (2 inch) line. Critical flow Venturis are used as the reference standards and dry air as the flowing fluid. The ratio of differential pressure to inlet static pressure is varied over a range of zero to about 0.2 at a constant Reynolds number. The expansion factor is determined form the apparent change in discharge coefficient at a constant Reynolds number.

  5. Fabrication and characterization of a 0.5-mm lutetium oxyorthosilicate detector array for high-resolution PET applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stickel, Jennifer R; Qi, Jinyi; Cherry, Simon R

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    for a high resolution PET detector using position sensitive51:2131–2142. 0.5- MM LSO A RRAY FOR PET • Stickel et al.Instrumentation aspects of animal PET. Annu Rev Biomed Eng.

  6. LS Note 339 - Calculated Shims' Signatures with the 17.2 mm Period New Undulator

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: VegetationEquipment Surfaces and Interfaces Sample6, 2011 LOS ALAMOS, NewattractsDamping of PlasmaMethod9

  7. LS Note 340 - New Design for a 27-mm Period Undulator for the MBA Lattice

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: VegetationEquipment Surfaces and Interfaces Sample6, 2011 LOS ALAMOS, NewattractsDamping of

  8. Formation of Hydrogen, Oxygen, and Hydrogen Peroxide in Electron Irradiated Crystalline Water Ice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weijun Zheng; David Jewitt; Ralf I. Kaiser

    2005-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Water ice is abundant both astrophysically, for example in molecular clouds, and in planetary systems. The Kuiper belt objects, many satellites of the outer solar system, the nuclei of comets and some planetary rings are all known to be water-rich. Processing of water ice by energetic particles and ultraviolet photons plays an important role in astrochemistry. To explore the detailed nature of this processing, we have conducted a systematic laboratory study of the irradiation of crystalline water ice in an ultrahigh vacuum setup by energetic electrons holding a linear energy transfer of 4.3 +/- 0.1 keV mm-1. The irradiated samples were monitored during the experiment both on line and in situ via mass spectrometry (gas phase) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (solid state). We observed the production of hydrogen and oxygen, both molecular and atomic, and of hydrogen peroxide. The likely reaction mechanisms responsible for these species are discussed. Additional formation routes were derived from the sublimation profiles of molecular hydrogen (90-140 K), molecular oxygen (147 -151 K) and hydrogen peroxide (170 K). We also present evidence on the involvement of hydroxyl radicals and possibly oxygen atoms as building blocks to yield hydrogen peroxide at low temperatures (12 K) and via a diffusion-controlled mechanism in the warming up phase of the irradiated sample.

  9. Subsurface horizontal microfracture propagation within the middle member of the Bakken Formation, Williston Basin, North Dakota.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Warner, Travis Blackburn.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ??The Devonian-Mississippian Bakken Formation of the Williston basin does not outcrop. All rock samples are obtained by coring. Open, uncemented, horizontal mode I (joints, with… (more)

  10. Sub-mm and X-ray background two unrelated phenomena?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Severgnini, P; Salvati, M; Axon, D J; Cimatti, A; Fiore, F; Gilli, R; La Franca, F; Marconi, A; Matt, G; Risaliti, G; Vignali, C

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Obscured AGNs are thought to contribute a large fraction of the hard X-ray background (2-10 keV), and have also been proposed as the powerhouse of a fraction of the SCUBA sources which make most of the background at 850um, thus providing a link between the two spectral windows. We have tackled this issue by comparing data at 2-10 keV and at 850um for a sample of 34 sources at fluxes (or limiting fluxes) which resolve most of the background in the two bands. We present here new SCUBA observations, and new correlations between separate data sets retrieved from the literature. Similar correlations presented by others are added for completeness. None of the 11 hard X-ray (2-10 keV) sources has a counterpart at 850um, with the exception of a Chandra source in the SSA13 field, which is a candidate type 2, heavily absorbed QSO at high redshift. The ratios F(850um)/F(5keV) (mostly upper limits) of the X-ray sources are significantly lower than the value observed for the cosmic background. In particular, we obtain tha...

  11. The south central Texas heavy rain event of October 1998: an MM5 simulation and diagnosis of convective initiation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scott, Richard Kevin

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    During the weekend of 17-18 October 1998, extremely heavy rainfall over south central Texas resulted in widespread flash flooding and numerous river floods. Southern Hays County received 760 mm of rainfall, and an area of 18,000 km² recorded over...

  12. FINE-SCALE STRUCTURE OF THE QUASAR 3C 279 MEASURED WITH 1.3 mm VERY LONG BASELINE INTERFEROMETRY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lu Rusen; Fish, Vincent L.; Doeleman, Sheperd S.; Crew, Geoffrey; Cappallo, Roger J. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Haystack Observatory, Route 40, Westford, MA 01886 (United States); Akiyama, Kazunori; Honma, Mareki [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, Osawa 2-21-1, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); Algaba, Juan C.; Ho, Paul T. P.; Inoue, Makoto [Institute of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Academia Sinica, P.O. Box 23-141, Taipei 10617, Taiwan, R.O.C. (China); Bower, Geoffrey C.; Dexter, Matt [Department of Astronomy, Radio Astronomy Laboratory, University of California Berkeley, 601 Campbell, Berkeley, CA 94720-3411 (United States); Brinkerink, Christiaan [Department of Astrophysics, IMAPP, Radboud University Nijmegen, P.O. Box 9010, 6500-GL Nijmegen (Netherlands); Chamberlin, Richard [Caltech Submillimeter Observatory, 111 Nowelo Street, Hilo, HI 96720 (United States); Freund, Robert [Arizona Radio Observatory, Steward Observatory, University of Arizona, 933 North Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85721-0065 (United States); Friberg, Per [James Clerk Maxwell Telescope, Joint Astronomy Centre, 660 North A'ohoku Place, University Park, Hilo, HI 96720 (United States); Gurwell, Mark A. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Jorstad, Svetlana G. [Institute for Astrophysical Research, Boston University, Boston, MA 02215 (United States); Krichbaum, Thomas P. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Radioastronomie, Auf dem Huegel 69, D-53121 Bonn (Germany); Loinard, Laurent, E-mail: rslu@haystack.mit.edu [Centro de Radiostronomia y Astrofisica, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, 58089 Morelia, Michoacan (Mexico); and others

    2013-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We report results from five day very long baseline interferometry observations of the well-known quasar 3C 279 at 1.3 mm (230 GHz) in 2011. The measured nonzero closure phases on triangles including stations in Arizona, California, and Hawaii indicate that the source structure is spatially resolved. We find an unusual inner jet direction at scales of {approx}1 pc extending along the northwest-southeast direction (P.A. = 127 Degree-Sign {+-} 3 Degree-Sign ), as opposed to other (previously) reported measurements on scales of a few parsecs showing inner jet direction extending to the southwest. The 1.3 mm structure corresponds closely with that observed in the central region of quasi-simultaneous super-resolution Very Long Baseline Array images at 7 mm. The closure phase changed significantly on the last day when compared with the rest of observations, indicating that the inner jet structure may be variable on daily timescales. The observed new direction of the inner jet shows inconsistency with the prediction of a class of jet precession models. Our observations indicate a brightness temperature of {approx}8 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 10} K in the 1.3 mm core, much lower than that at centimeter wavelengths. Observations with better uv coverage and sensitivity in the coming years will allow the discrimination between different structure models and will provide direct images of the inner regions of the jet with 20-30 {mu}as (5-7 light months) resolution.

  13. A Note on the M/M/ Queue in Random Environment and Uri Yechiali 1,2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yechiali, Uri

    environment, the joint prob- ability distribution function (pdf) of the two variables: random phase and number random environment and show that the joint probability distribution function (pdf) of the environment. 2 The model and balance equations Consider an M/M/ type queue operating in 'random environment

  14. NIST Mobility and Manipulation Project Needs and Plans The NIST Mobility and Manipulation (MM) Project is seeking government, industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Perkins, Richard A.

    . The project testbed includes an industrial robot mounted on a linear rail. The MM Project also plans characterizing components of the new NIST robot testbed, which includes a six-axis industrial robot arm under that are of concern to industry. Real world applications are also highly beneficial for developing and evaluating

  15. A mineralogy of extrasolar silicate dust from 10-mm spectra J. E. Bowey1,2P

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bowey, Janet

    A mineralogy of extrasolar silicate dust from 10-mm spectra J. E. Bowey1,2P and A. J. Adamson1,3 1 in amorphous silicates, since the spectra of crystalline silicates are narrow and highly structured. The standard approach to the interpretation of astronomical spectra is to assume that the silicates

  16. Sub-mm and X-ray background: two unrelated phenomena?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. Severgnini; R. Maiolino; M. Salvati; D. Axon; A. Cimatti; F. Fiore; R. Gilli; F. La Franca; A. Marconi; G. Matt; G. Risaliti; C. Vignali

    2000-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Obscured AGNs are thought to contribute a large fraction of the hard X-ray background (2-10 keV), and have also been proposed as the powerhouse of a fraction of the SCUBA sources which make most of the background at 850um, thus providing a link between the two spectral windows. We have tackled this issue by comparing data at 2-10 keV and at 850um for a sample of 34 sources at fluxes (or limiting fluxes) which resolve most of the background in the two bands. We present here new SCUBA observations, and new correlations between separate data sets retrieved from the literature. Similar correlations presented by others are added for completeness. None of the 11 hard X-ray (2-10 keV) sources has a counterpart at 850um, with the exception of a Chandra source in the SSA13 field, which is a candidate type 2, heavily absorbed QSO at high redshift. The ratios F(850um)/F(5keV) (mostly upper limits) of the X-ray sources are significantly lower than the value observed for the cosmic background. In particular, we obtain that 2-10 keV sources brighter than 10^-15 erg s^-1 cm^-2, which make at least 75% of the background in this band, contribute for less than 7% to the submillimeter background. Out of the 24 SCUBA sources, 23 are undetected by Chandra. The ratios F(850um)/F(5keV) (mostly lower limits) of these SCUBA sources indicate that most of them must be powered either by starburst activity, or by an AGN which is obscured by a column Nh > 10^25 cm^-2, with a reflection efficiency in the hard X rays significantly lower than 1% in most cases. However, AGNs of this type could not contribute significantly to the 2-10 keV background.

  17. Formation and retention of methane in coal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hucka, V.J.; Bodily, D.M.; Huang, H.

    1992-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The formation and retention of methane in coalbeds was studied for ten Utah coal samples, one Colorado coal sample and eight coal samples from the Argonne Premium Coal Sample Bank.Methane gas content of the Utah and Colorado coals varied from zero to 9 cm{sup 3}/g. The Utah coals were all high volatile bituminous coals. The Colorado coal was a gassy medium volatile bituminous coal. The Argonne coals cover a range or rank from lignite to low volatile bituminous coal and were used to determine the effect of rank in laboratory studies. The methane content of six selected Utah coal seams and the Colorado coal seam was measured in situ using a special sample collection device and a bubble desorbometer. Coal samples were collected at each measurement site for laboratory analysis. The cleat and joint system was evaluated for the coal and surrounding rocks and geological conditions were noted. Permeability measurements were performed on selected samples and all samples were analyzed for proximate and ultimate analysis, petrographic analysis, {sup 13}C NMR dipolar-dephasing spectroscopy, and density analysis. The observed methane adsorption behavior was correlated with the chemical structure and physical properties of the coals.

  18. E-Print Network 3.0 - acetylene isotopomers calculated Sample...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Mechanistical studies on the formation of carbon dioxide in extraterrestrial carbon monoxide ice analog samples Summary: 901220f Binary ice mixtures of two carbon monoxide...

  19. E-Print Network 3.0 - application au procede Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    procede Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: application au procede Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Departement de formation doctorale en...

  20. ESPC IDIQ Contract Sample

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Document displays a sample indefinite delivery, indefinite quantity (IDIQ) energy savings performance contract (ESPC).

  1. Accelerator Quality HTS Dipole Magnet Demonstrator Designs for the EuCARD-2, 5 Tesla 40 mm Clear Aperture Magnet

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kirby, GA; Ballarino, A; Bottura, L; Chouika, N; Clement, S; Datskov, V; Fajardo, L; Fleiter, J; Gauthier, R; Gentini, L; Lambert, L; Lopes, M; Perez, JC; de Rijk, G; Rijllart, A; Rossi, L; ten Kate, H; Durante, M; Fazilleau, P; Lorin, C; Härö, E; Stenvall, A; Caspi, S; Marchevsky, M; Goldacker, W; Kario, A

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Future high-energy accelerators will need very high magnetic fields in the range of 20 T. The EuCARD-2 work-package-10 is a collaborative push to take HTS materials into an accelerator quality demonstrator magnet. The demonstrator will produce 5 T standalone and between 17 T and 20 T, when inserted into the 100 mm aperture of Fresca-2 high field out-sert magnet. The HTS magnet will demonstrate the field strength and field quality that can be achieved. An effective quench detection and protection system will have to be developed to operate with the HTS superconducting materials. This paper presents a ReBCO magnet design using multi strand Roebel cable that develops a stand-alone field of 5 T in a 40 mm clear aperture and discusses the challenges associated with good field quality using this type of material. A selection of magnet designs is presented as result of a first phase of development.

  2. Accelerator Quality HTS Dipole Magnet Demonstrator designs for the EuCARD-2, 5 Tesla 40 mm Clear Aperture Magnet

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kirby, G; Ballarino, A; Bottura, L; Chouika, N; Clement, S; Datskov, V; Fajardo, L; Fleiter, J; Gauthier, R; Lambert, L; Lopes, M; Perez, J; DeRijk, G; Rijllart, A; Rossi, L; Ten Kate, H; Durante, M; Fazilleau, P; Lorin, C; Haro, E; Stenvall, A; Caspi, S; Marchevsky, M; Goldacker, W; Kario, A

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Future high-energy accelerators will need very high magnetic fields in the range of 20 T. The EuCARD-2 work-package-10 is a collaborative push to take HTS materials into an accelerator quality demonstrator magnet. The demonstrator will produce 5 T standalone and between 17 T and 20 T, when inserted into the 100 mm aperture of Fresca-2 high field out-sert magnet. The HTS magnet will demonstrate the field strength and field quality that can be achieved. An effective quench detection and protection system will have to be developed to operate with the HTS superconducting materials. This paper presents a ReBCO magnet design using multi strand Roebel cable that develops a stand-alone field of 5 T in a 40 mm clear aperture and discusses the challenges associated with good field quality using this type of material. A selection of magnet designs is presented as result of a first phase of development.

  3. mm-WAVE Op-Amps FOR LOW DISTORTION AMPLIFICATION WITH HIGH OIP3/PDC RATIO > 100 AT 2 GHz

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rodwell, Mark J. W.

    mm-WAVE Op-Amps FOR LOW DISTORTION AMPLIFICATION WITH HIGH OIP3/PDC RATIO > 100 AT 2 GHz Zach in bandwidth for an op-amp of any kind, as well as 3Ã? betterment in OIP3/PDC ratio at fs = 2-3 GHz, when dissipation PDC. This very high ratio of third-order-intercept power to DC power consumption POIP 3/PDC > 100

  4. Star Formation Histories in the Local Group

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas M. Brown

    2004-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Deep color magnitude diagrams extending to the main sequence provide the most direct measure of the detailed star formation history in a stellar population. With large investments of observing time, HST can obtain such data for populations out to 1 Mpc, but its field of view is extremely small in comparison to the size of Local Group galaxies. This limitation severely constrains our understanding of galaxy formation. For example, the largest galaxy in the Local Group, Andromeda, offers an ideal laboratory for studying the formation of large spiral galaxies, but the galaxy shows substructure on a variety of scales, presumably due to its violent merger history. Within its remaining lifetime, HST can only sample a few sight-lines through this complex galaxy. In contrast, a wide field imager could provide a map of Andromeda's halo, outer disk, and tidal streams, revealing the spatially-dependent star formation history in each structure. The same data would enable many secondary studies, such as the age variation in Andromeda's globular cluster system, gigantic samples of variable stars, and microlensing tracers of the galaxy's dark matter distribution.

  5. Kinetics of Mixed Ni-Al Precipitate Formation on a Soil Clay Fraction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sparks, Donald L.

    Kinetics of Mixed Ni-Al Precipitate Formation on a Soil Clay Fraction D A R R Y L R . R O B E R Management Laboratory, Paul Scherrer Institute, CH-5232 Villigen PSI, Switzerland The kinetics of mixed Ni-Al Ni- Al LDH formation. The initial Ni concentration was 3 mM with a solid/solution ratio of 10 g L-1

  6. Observing Massive Galaxy Formation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christopher J. Conselice

    2002-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

    A major goal of contemporary astrophysics is understanding the origin of the most massive galaxies in the universe, particularly nearby ellipticals and spirals. Theoretical models of galaxy formation have existed for many decades, although low and high redshift observations are only beginning to put constraints on different ideas. We briefly describe these observations and how they are revealing the methods by which galaxies form by contrasting and comparing fiducial rapid collapse and hierarchical formation model predictions. The available data show that cluster ellipticals must have rapidly formed at z > 2, and that up to 50% of all massive galaxies at z ~ 2.5 are involved in major mergers. While the former is consistent with the monolithic collapse picture, we argue that hierarchal formation is the only model that can reproduce all the available observations.

  7. JPEG File Interchange Format

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hamilton, Eric

    2004-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

    interchange format compressed image representation • PC or Mac or Unix workstation compatible • Standard color space: one or three components. For three components, YCbCr (CCIR 601-256 levels) • APP0 marker used to specify Units, X pixel density, Y pixel... by the Macintosh but not by PCs or workstations. JPEG File Interchange Format, Version 1.02 2 Standard color space The color space to be used is YCbCr as defined by CCIR 601 (256 levels). The RGB components calculated by linear conversion from YCbCr shall...

  8. Rain sampling device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nelson, D.A.; Tomich, S.D.; Glover, D.W.; Allen, E.V.; Hales, J.M.; Dana, M.T.

    1991-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention constitutes a rain sampling device adapted for independent operation at locations remote from the user which allows rainfall to be sampled in accordance with any schedule desired by the user. The rain sampling device includes a mechanism for directing wet precipitation into a chamber, a chamber for temporarily holding the precipitation during the process of collection, a valve mechanism for controllably releasing samples of the precipitation from the chamber, a means for distributing the samples released from the holding chamber into vessels adapted for permanently retaining these samples, and an electrical mechanism for regulating the operation of the device. 11 figures.

  9. Rain sampling device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nelson, Danny A. (Richland, WA); Tomich, Stanley D. (Richland, WA); Glover, Donald W. (Prosser, WA); Allen, Errol V. (Benton City, WA); Hales, Jeremy M. (Kennewick, WA); Dana, Marshall T. (Richland, WA)

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention constitutes a rain sampling device adapted for independent operation at locations remote from the user which allows rainfall to be sampled in accordance with any schedule desired by the user. The rain sampling device includes a mechanism for directing wet precipitation into a chamber, a chamber for temporarily holding the precipitation during the process of collection, a valve mechanism for controllably releasing samples of said precipitation from said chamber, a means for distributing the samples released from the holding chamber into vessels adapted for permanently retaining these samples, and an electrical mechanism for regulating the operation of the device.

  10. Introduction Format Proprietaire -Standard

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Monnier, Stefan

    Code for Information Interchange) 4. Unicode IFT-1215 Stefan Monnier 7 #12;BCD IFT-1215 Stefan MonnierSOMMAIRE Introduction Format Propri´etaire -Standard Code Alphanum´erique Entr´ee Alphanum : !, ?, ", (, . . . · Caract`eres sp´eciaux : *, $, ¿, . . . Quelques standards utilis´es pour les coder en binaires 1. BCD

  11. Hair follicle Formation of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chuong, Cheng-Ming

    Hair follicle Formation of new follicles Bud Healed skin Hair bulge Open wound Epidermis a b Dermis 1950s and help to explain the controversy. What is the origin of the cells that make up these new hair follicles? Are they derived from existing hair follicles located at the wound edge

  12. COMPUTER SCIENCE SAMPLE PROGRAM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gering, Jon C.

    COMPUTER SCIENCE SAMPLE PROGRAM (First Math Course MATH 198) This sample program suggests one way CS 181: Foundations of Computer Science II CS 180: Foundations of Computer Science I CS 191

  13. Magnetic Materials (MM)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: VegetationEquipment Surfaces and InterfacesAdministration -Lowell L.FallU . S .ofFieldMagnetic Materials

  14. Fabrication and Test of 90-mm Nb3Sn Quadrupole Model Based on Dipole-type Collar

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bossert, R.; Andreev, N.; Chlachidze, G.; Kashikhin, V.S.; Kashikhin, V.V.; Lamm, M.J.; Nobrega, F.; Novitski, I.; Tartaglia, M.; Velev, G.; Zlobin, A.V.; /Fermilab

    2010-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

    A series of 90-mm TQC quadrupole models with a collar-based mechanical structure has been fabricated and tested within the framework of the US-LHC Accelerator Research Program (LARP) using quadrupole-symmetric stainless steel collar laminations. This paper describes the design features, construction and test of TQC02Eb, the first TQC made with dipole-type collar and collaring techniques. Magnet test includes quench performance and field quality measurements at 4.5 and 1.9 K. Results of model performance for TQC quadrupoles based on dipole-type and quadrupole-type collars are compared and discussed.

  15. Vapor-liquid equilibria of coal-derived liquids; 3: Binary systems with tetralin at 200 mmHg

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blanco, B.; Beltran, S.; Cabezas, J.L. (University Coll., Burgos (Spain). Dept. of Chemical Engineering); Coca, J. (Univ. of Oviedo (Spain). Dept. of Chemical Engineering)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Isobaric vapor-liquid equilibrium data are reported for binary systems of tetralin with p-xylene, [gamma]-picoline, piperidine, and pyridine; all systems were measured at 26.66 kPa (200 mmHg) with a recirculation still. Liquid-phase activity coefficients were correlated using the Van Laar, Wilson, NRTL, and UNIQUAC equations. Vapor-phase nonidealities were found negligible under the experimental conditions of this work, and deviations of the liquid phase from the ideal behavior, as described by Raoult's law, were found to be slightly positive for all the systems.

  16. Proposal for the award of a contract for the supply of 5 mm depleted-uranium plates for the UA1 calorimeter upgrading

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Proposal for the award of a contract for the supply of 5 mm depleted-uranium plates for the UA1 calorimeter upgrading

  17. Proposal for the award of a contract for the supply of 5 mm depleted-uranium plates for the UA1 experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Proposal for the award of a contract for the supply of 5 mm depleted-uranium plates for the UA1 experiment

  18. On-line microdialysis sample cleanup for electrospray ionization mass spectrometry of nucleic acid samples

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, C.; Wu, Q.; Harms, A.C.; Smith, R.D. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States)] [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    1996-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A major limitation of electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) for oligonucleotide analysis arises due to sodium adduction, a problem that increases with molecular weight. Sodium adduction can preclude useful measurements when limited sample sizes prevent off-line cleanup. A novel and generally useful on-line microdialysis technique is described for the rapid (nearly 1-5 min) DNA sample cleanup for ESI-MS. Mass spectra of oligonucleotides of different size and sequence showing no significant sodium adduct peaks were obtained using the on-line microdialysis system with sodium chloride concentrations as high as 250 mM. Signal-to-noise ratios were also greatly enhanced compared to direct infusion of the original samples. By using ammonium acetate as the dialysis buffer, it was also found that the noncovalent association of double-stranded oligonucleotides could be preserved during the microdialysis process, allowing analysis by ESI-MS. 33 refs., 6 figs.

  19. The Ability of MM5 to Simulate Ice Clouds: Systematic Comparison between Simulated and Measured Fluxes and Lidar/Radar Profiles at the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Protat, Alain

    to produce too much solid water (ice and snow) and not enough liquid water. 1. Introduction Ice clouds playThe Ability of MM5 to Simulate Ice Clouds: Systematic Comparison between Simulated and Measured­NCAR Mesoscale Model (MM5) to simulate midlatitude ice clouds is evaluated. Model outputs are compared to long

  20. A REDSHIFT SURVEY OF HERSCHEL FAR-INFRARED SELECTED STARBURSTS AND IMPLICATIONS FOR OBSCURED STAR FORMATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Casey, C. M.; Budynkiewicz, J. [Institute for Astronomy, University of Hawaii, 2680 Woodlawn Drive, Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States); Berta, S.; Lutz, D.; Magnelli, B. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Extraterrestrische Physik, Giessenbachstrasse, 85748 Garching (Germany); Bethermin, M.; Le Floc'h, E.; Magdis, G. [Laboratoire AIM-Paris-Saclay, CEA/DSM/Irfu - CNRS - Universite Paris Diderot, CE-Saclay, pt courrier 131, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Bock, J.; Bridge, C. [California Institute of Technology, 1200 E. California Blvd., Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Burgarella, D. [Laboratoire d'Astrophysique de Marseille - LAM, Universite d'Aix-Marseille and CNRS, UMR7326, 38 rue F. Joliot-Curie, 13388 Marseille Cedex 13 (France); Chapin, E. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of British Columbia, 6224 Agricultural Road, Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z1 (Canada); Chapman, S. C. [Institute of Astronomy, University of Cambridge, Madingley Road, Cambridge CB3 0HA (United Kingdom); Clements, D. L. [Astrophysics Group, Imperial College London, Blackett Laboratory, Prince Consort Road, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Conley, A. [Center for Astrophysics and Space Astronomy 389-UCB, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO 80309 (United States); Conselice, C. J. [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Nottingham, NG7 2RD (United Kingdom); Cooray, A. [Dept. of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Irvine, CA 92697 (United States); Farrah, D. [Department of Physics, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA 24061 (United States); Hatziminaoglou, E. [ESO, Karl-Schwarzschild-Str. 2, 85748 Garching bei Muenchen (Germany); Ivison, R. J. [UK Astronomy Technology Centre, Royal Observatory, Blackford Hill, Edinburgh EH9 3HJ (United Kingdom); and others

    2012-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We present Keck spectroscopic observations and redshifts for a sample of 767 Herschel-SPIRE selected galaxies (HSGs) at 250, 350, and 500 {mu}m, taken with the Keck I Low Resolution Imaging Spectrometer and the Keck II DEep Imaging Multi-Object Spectrograph. The redshift distribution of these SPIRE sources from the Herschel Multitiered Extragalactic Survey peaks at z = 0.85, with 731 sources at z < 2 and a tail of sources out to z {approx} 5. We measure more significant disagreement between photometric and spectroscopic redshifts (({Delta}z/(1 + z{sub spec})) = 0.29) than is seen in non-infrared selected samples, likely due to enhanced star formation rates and dust obscuration in infrared-selected galaxies. The infrared data are used to directly measure integrated infrared luminosities and dust temperatures independent of radio or 24 {mu}m flux densities. By probing the dust spectral energy distribution (SED) at its peak, we estimate that the vast majority (72%-83%) of z < 2 Herschel-selected galaxies would drop out of traditional submillimeter surveys at 0.85-1 mm. We find that dust temperature traces infrared luminosity, due in part to the SPIRE wavelength selection biases, and partially from physical effects. As a result, we measure no significant trend in SPIRE color with redshift; if dust temperature were independent of luminosity or redshift, a trend in SPIRE color would be expected. Composite infrared SEDs are constructed as a function of infrared luminosity, showing the increase in dust temperature with luminosity, and subtle change in near-infrared and mid-infrared spectral properties. Moderate evolution in the far-infrared (FIR)/radio correlation is measured for this partially radio-selected sample, with q{sub IR}{proportional_to}(1 + z){sup -0.30{+-}0.02} at z < 2. We estimate the luminosity function and implied star formation rate density contribution of HSGs at z < 1.6 and find overall agreement with work based on 24 {mu}m extrapolations of the LIRG, ULIRG, and total infrared contributions. This work significantly increased the number of spectroscopically confirmed infrared-luminous galaxies at z >> 0 and demonstrates the growing importance of dusty starbursts for galaxy evolution studies and the build-up of stellar mass throughout cosmic time.

  1. Sampled data lattice filters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thrift, William Terry

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    SAMPLED DATA LATTICE FILTERS A Thesis by WILLIAM TERRY THRIFT III Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1979 Major Subfect...: Electrical Engineering SAMPLED DATA LATTICE FILTERS A Thesis by WILLIAM TERRY THRIFT III Approved as to style and content by: (Chair an of Committee) (Hea f Department) (Member) (Member) (Member) (Member) December 1979 ABSTRACT Sampled Data...

  2. Simultaneous Radio to (Sub-) Mm-Monitoring of Variability and Spectral Shape Evolution of Potential GLAST Blazars

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fuhrmann, L.; Zensus, J.A.; Krichbaum, T.P.; Angelakis, E.; /Bonn, Max Planck Inst., Radioastron.; Readhead, A.C.S.; /Caltech

    2011-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The Large Area Telescope (LAT) instrument onboard GLAST offers a tremendous opportunity for future blazar studies. In order to fully benefit from its capabilities and to maximize the scientific return from the LAT, it is of great importance to conduct dedicated multi-frequency monitoring campaigns that will result comprehensive observations. Consequently, we initiated an effort to conduct a GLAST-dedicated, quasi-simultaneous, broad-band flux-density (and polarization) monitoring of potential GLAST blazars with the Effelsberg and OVRO radio telescopes (11 cm to 7mm wavelength). Here, we present a short overview of these activities which will complement the multi-wavelengths activities of the GLAST/LAT collaboration towards the 'low-energy' radio bands. Further we will give a brief outlook including the extension of this coordinated campaign towards higher frequencies and future scientific aims.

  3. Description and commissioning of NEXT-MM prototype: first results from operation in a Xenon-Trimethylamine gas mixture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Álvarez, V; Borges, F I G M; Calvet, D; Cárcel, S; Castel, J; Cebrián, S; Cervera, A; Conde, C A N; Dafni, T; Dias, T H V T; Díaz, J; Druillole, F; Egorov, M; Esteve, R; Evtoukhovitch, P; Fernandes, L M P; Ferrario, P; Ferreira, A L; Ferrer-Ribas, E; Freitas, E D C; Gehman, V M; Gil, A; Giomataris, I; Goldschmidt, A; Gómez, H; Gómez-Cadenas, J J; González-Díaz, D; Gutiérrez, R M; Hauptman, J; Morata, J A Hernando; Herrera, D C; Iguaz, F J; Irastorza, I G; Jinete, M A; Labarga, L; Laing, A; Coguie, A Le; Liubarsky, I; Lopes, J A M; Lorca, D; Losada, M; Luzón, G; Marí, A; Martín-Albo, J; Martínez, A; Martínez-Lema, G; Miller, T; Moiseenko, A; Mols, J P; Monrabal, F; Monteiro, C M B; Mora, F J; Moutinho, L M; Vidal, J Muñoz; da Luz, H Natal; Navarro, G; Nebot-Guinot, M; Nygren, D; Oliveira, C A B; Palma, R; Pérez, J; Aparicio, J L Pérez; Renner, J; Ripoll, L; Rodríguez, A; Rodríguez, J; Santos, P; Santos, J M F dos; Segui, L; Serra, L; Shuman, D; Simón, A; Sofka, C; Sorel, M; Toledo, J F; Tomás, A; Torrent, J; Tsamalaidze, Z; Veloso, J F C A; Villar, J A; Webb, R C; White, J T; Yahlali, N

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A technical description of NEXT-MM and its commissioning and first performance is reported. Having an active volume of ~35 cm drift $\\times$ 28 cm diameter, it constitutes the largest Micromegas-read TPC operated in Xenon ever constructed, made by a sectorial arrangement of the 4 largest single wafers manufactured with the Microbulk technique to date. It is equipped with a suitably pixelized readout and with a sufficiently large sensitive volume (~23 l) so as to contain long (~20 cm) electron tracks. First results obtained at 1 bar for Xenon and trimethylamine (Xe-(2 %)TMA) mixture are presented. The TPC can accurately reconstruct extended background tracks. An encouraging full-width half-maximum of 11.6 % was obtained for ~29 keV gammas without resorting to any data post-processing.

  4. Electron dynamics in complex environments with real-time time dependent density functional theory in a QM-MM framework

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morzan, Uriel N.; Ramírez, Francisco F.; Scherlis, Damián A., E-mail: damian@qi.fcen.uba.ar, E-mail: mcgl@qb.ffyb.uba.ar [Departamento de Química Inorgánica, Analítica y Química Física/INQUIMAE, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Universidad de Buenos Aires, Ciudad Universitaria, Pab. II, Buenos Aires (C1428EHA) (Argentina); Oviedo, M. Belén; Sánchez, Cristián G. [Departamento de Matemática y Física, Facultad de Ciencias Químicas, INFIQC, Universidad Nacional de Córdoba, Ciudad Universitaria, X5000HUA Córdoba (Argentina)] [Departamento de Matemática y Física, Facultad de Ciencias Químicas, INFIQC, Universidad Nacional de Córdoba, Ciudad Universitaria, X5000HUA Córdoba (Argentina); Lebrero, Mariano C. González, E-mail: damian@qi.fcen.uba.ar, E-mail: mcgl@qb.ffyb.uba.ar [Instituto de Química y Fisicoquímica Biológicas, IQUIFIB, CONICET (Argentina)] [Instituto de Química y Fisicoquímica Biológicas, IQUIFIB, CONICET (Argentina)

    2014-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

    This article presents a time dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) implementation to propagate the Kohn-Sham equations in real time, including the effects of a molecular environment through a Quantum-Mechanics Molecular-Mechanics (QM-MM) hamiltonian. The code delivers an all-electron description employing Gaussian basis functions, and incorporates the Amber force-field in the QM-MM treatment. The most expensive parts of the computation, comprising the commutators between the hamiltonian and the density matrix—required to propagate the electron dynamics—, and the evaluation of the exchange-correlation energy, were migrated to the CUDA platform to run on graphics processing units, which remarkably accelerates the performance of the code. The method was validated by reproducing linear-response TDDFT results for the absorption spectra of several molecular species. Two different schemes were tested to propagate the quantum dynamics: (i) a leap-frog Verlet algorithm, and (ii) the Magnus expansion to first-order. These two approaches were confronted, to find that the Magnus scheme is more efficient by a factor of six in small molecules. Interestingly, the presence of iron was found to seriously limitate the length of the integration time step, due to the high frequencies associated with the core-electrons. This highlights the importance of pseudopotentials to alleviate the cost of the propagation of the inner states when heavy nuclei are present. Finally, the methodology was applied to investigate the shifts induced by the chemical environment on the most intense UV absorption bands of two model systems of general relevance: the formamide molecule in water solution, and the carboxy-heme group in Flavohemoglobin. In both cases, shifts of several nanometers are observed, consistently with the available experimental data.

  5. Fissile sample worths in the Uranium/Iron Benchmark

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schaefer, R.W.; Bucher, R.G.

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    One of the long-standing problems from LMFBR critical experiments is the central worth discrepancy, the consistent overprediction of the reactivity associated with introducing a small material sample near the center of an assembly. Reactivity (sample worth) experiments in ZPR-9, assembly 34, the Uranium/Iron Benchmark (U/Fe), were aimed at investigating this discrepancy. U/Fe had a large, single-region core whose neutronics was governed almost entirely by /sup 235/U and iron. The essentially one-dimensional plate unit cell had one 1.6 mm-wide column of 93% enriched uranium (U(93)) near the center, imbedded in about 50 mm of iron and stainless steel. The neutron spectrum was roughly comparable to that of an LMFBR, but the adjoint spectrum was much flatter than an LMFBR's. The worths of four different fissile materials were measured and the worth of U(93) was measured using several different experimental techniques.

  6. Planning and Search Exam format

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alechina, Natasha

    is the frame problem. Revision 5 #12;Exam topics: planning Classical planning. How the problem definitionPlanning and Search Revision Revision 1 #12;Outline Exam format Exam topics How to revise Revision 2 #12;Exam format 4 questions out of 6 same format as 2010-2011 and 2011-2012 exams (on G52PAS

  7. Sampling for Beryllium Surface Contamination using Wet, Dry and Alcohol Wipe Sampling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kerr, Kent

    2004-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

    This research project was conducted at the National Nuclear Security Administration's Kansas City Plant, operated by Honeywell Federal Manufacturing and Technologies, in conjunction with the Safety Sciences Department of Central Missouri State University, to compare relative removal efficiencies of three wipe sampling techniques currently used at Department of Energy facilities. Efficiencies of removal of beryllium contamination from typical painted surfaces were tested by wipe sampling with dry Whatman 42 filter paper, with water-moistened (Ghost Wipe) materials, and by methanol-moistened wipes. Test plates were prepared using 100 mm X 15 mm Pyrex Petri dishes with interior surfaces spray painted with a bond coat primer. To achieve uniform deposition over the test plate surface, 10 ml aliquots of solution containing 1 beryllium and 0.1 ml of metal working fluid were transferred to the test plates and subsequently evaporated. Metal working fluid was added to simulate the slight oiliness common on surfaces in metal working shops where fugitive oil mist accumulates over time. Sixteen test plates for each wipe method (dry, water, and methanol) were processed and sampled using a modification of wiping patterns recommended by OSHA Method 125G. Laboratory and statistical analysis showed that methanol-moistened wipe sampling removed significantly more (about twice as much) beryllium/oil-film surface contamination as water-moistened wipes (p< 0.001), which removed significantly more (about twice as much) residue as dry wipes (p <0.001). Evidence for beryllium sensitization via skin exposure argues in favor of wipe sampling with wetting agents that provide enhanced residue removal efficiency.

  8. Rehabilitation Services Sample Occupations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ronquist, Fredrik

    /Industries Correction Agencies Drug Treatment Centers Addiction Counselor Advocacy Occupations Art Therapist BehavioralRehabilitation Services Sample Occupations Sample Work Settings Child & Day Care Centers Clinics................................ IIB 29-1000 E4 Careers in Counseling and Human Services .........IIB 21-1010 C7 Careers in Health Care

  9. Sampling system and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Decker, David L.; Lyles, Brad F.; Purcell, Richard G.; Hershey, Ronald Lee

    2013-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The present disclosure provides an apparatus and method for coupling conduit segments together. A first pump obtains a sample and transmits it through a first conduit to a reservoir accessible by a second pump. The second pump further conducts the sample from the reservoir through a second conduit.

  10. Biological sample collector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Murphy, Gloria A. (French Camp, CA)

    2010-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

    A biological sample collector is adapted to a collect several biological samples in a plurality of filter wells. A biological sample collector may comprise a manifold plate for mounting a filter plate thereon, the filter plate having a plurality of filter wells therein; a hollow slider for engaging and positioning a tube that slides therethrough; and a slide case within which the hollow slider travels to allow the tube to be aligned with a selected filter well of the plurality of filter wells, wherein when the tube is aligned with the selected filter well, the tube is pushed through the hollow slider and into the selected filter well to sealingly engage the selected filter well and to allow the tube to deposit a biological sample onto a filter in the bottom of the selected filter well. The biological sample collector may be portable.

  11. Waste classification sampling plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Landsman, S.D.

    1998-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this sampling is to explain the method used to collect and analyze data necessary to verify and/or determine the radionuclide content of the B-Cell decontamination and decommissioning waste stream so that the correct waste classification for the waste stream can be made, and to collect samples for studies of decontamination methods that could be used to remove fixed contamination present on the waste. The scope of this plan is to establish the technical basis for collecting samples and compiling quantitative data on the radioactive constituents present in waste generated during deactivation activities in B-Cell. Sampling and radioisotopic analysis will be performed on the fixed layers of contamination present on structural material and internal surfaces of process piping and tanks. In addition, dose rate measurements on existing waste material will be performed to determine the fraction of dose rate attributable to both removable and fixed contamination. Samples will also be collected to support studies of decontamination methods that are effective in removing the fixed contamination present on the waste. Sampling performed under this plan will meet criteria established in BNF-2596, Data Quality Objectives for the B-Cell Waste Stream Classification Sampling, J. M. Barnett, May 1998.

  12. Wyko Optical Profiler This machine investigates variations in topography for surfaces ranging from very smooth to 2mm step

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wyko Optical Profiler Purpose This machine investigates variations in topography for surfaces as the interferometric objective moves vertically through sample focus. The vertical position of the optics at peak. · Adjust the tip/tilt to orient the optic head until the rings spread into one large ring (nulling). DO

  13. Formation, characterization and reactivity of adsorbed oxygen...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Formation, characterization and reactivity of adsorbed oxygen on BaOPt(111). Formation, characterization and reactivity of adsorbed oxygen on BaOPt(111). Abstract: The formation...

  14. A 0.042 mm^2 programmable biphasic stimulator for cochlear implants suitable for a large number of channels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ngamkham, W; Serdijn, W A; Bes, C J; Briaire, J J; Frijns, J H M

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents a compact programmable biphasic stimulator for cochlear implants. By employing double-loop negative feedback, the output impedance of the current generator is increased, while maximizing the voltage compliance of the output transistor. To make the stimulator circuit compact, the stimulation current is set by scaling a reference current using a two stage binary-weighted transistor DAC (comprising a 3 bit high-voltage transistor DAC and a 4 bit low-voltage transistor DAC). With this structure the power consumption and the area of the circuit can be minimized. The proposed circuit has been implemented in AMS 0.18um high-voltage CMOS IC technology, using an active chip area of about 0.042mm^2. Measurement results show that proper charge balance of the anodic and cathodic stimulation phases is achieved and a dc blocking capacitor can be omitted. The resulting reduction in the required area makes the proposed system suitable for a large number of channels.

  15. Water Sample Concentrator

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Idaho National Laboratory

    2010-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Automated portable device that concentrates and packages a sample of suspected contaminated water for safe, efficient transport to a qualified analytical laboratory. This technology will help safeguard against pathogen contamination or chemical and biolog

  16. Of Horseshoes and Heliotropes: Dynamics of Dust in the Encke Gap M.M. Hedmana,, J.A. Burnsb, D.P. Hamiltonc, M.R. Showalterd

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hamilton, Douglas P.

    Of Horseshoes and Heliotropes: Dynamics of Dust in the Encke Gap M.M. Hedmana,, J.A. Burnsb, D demonstrates "heliotropic" behavior: its geometric center is displaced away from Saturn's center towards

  17. (Non) formation of methanol by direct hydrogenation of formate...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    produces significant quantities of methanol, although decomposition of formate to carbon dioxide and hydrogen remains the dominant reaction pathway. Simultaneous production...

  18. Dissolution actuated sample container

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nance, Thomas A.; McCoy, Frank T.

    2013-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

    A sample collection vial and process of using a vial is provided. The sample collection vial has an opening secured by a dissolvable plug. When dissolved, liquids may enter into the interior of the collection vial passing along one or more edges of a dissolvable blocking member. As the blocking member is dissolved, a spring actuated closure is directed towards the opening of the vial which, when engaged, secures the vial contents against loss or contamination.

  19. SAMPLING AND ANALYSIS PROTOCOLS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jannik, T; P Fledderman, P

    2007-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Radiological sampling and analyses are performed to collect data for a variety of specific reasons covering a wide range of projects. These activities include: Effluent monitoring; Environmental surveillance; Emergency response; Routine ambient monitoring; Background assessments; Nuclear license termination; Remediation; Deactivation and decommissioning (D&D); and Waste management. In this chapter, effluent monitoring and environmental surveillance programs at nuclear operating facilities and radiological sampling and analysis plans for remediation and D&D activities will be discussed.

  20. Liquid sampling system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Larson, L.L.

    1984-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

    A conduit extends from a reservoir through a sampling station and back to the reservoir in a closed loop. A jet ejector in the conduit establishes suction for withdrawing liquid from the reservoir. The conduit has a self-healing septum therein upstream of the jet ejector for receiving one end of a double-ended cannula, the other end of which is received in a serum bottle for sample collection. Gas is introduced into the conduit at a gas bleed between the sample collection bottle and the reservoir. The jet ejector evacuates gas from the conduit and the bottle and aspirates a column of liquid from the reservoir at a high rate. When the withdrawn liquid reaches the jet ejector the rate of flow therethrough reduces substantially and the gas bleed increases the pressure in the conduit for driving liquid into the sample bottle, the gas bleed forming a column of gas behind the withdrawn liquid column and interrupting the withdrawal of liquid from the reservoir. In the case of hazardous and toxic liquids, the sample bottle and the jet ejector may be isolated from the reservoir and may be further isolated from a control station containing remote manipulation means for the sample bottle and control valves for the jet ejector and gas bleed. 5 figs.

  1. J.A. Leenheer & M.M. Reddy, Annals of Environmental Science / 2008, Vol 2, 11-25 www.aes.northeastern.edu, ISSN 1939-2621 11

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , including the Green River Formation oil shale, which is well known as one the world's largest potential

  2. FORMATION GESTION DU STRESS CONTEXTE, PUBLIC, FINALITE DE LA FORMATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brest, Université de

    FORMATION GESTION DU STRESS CONTEXTE, PUBLIC, FINALITE DE LA FORMATION La vie moderne et le stress : mettre en place des stratégies de gestion , étudier quelques aspects essentiels de la et cas cliniques composés par les participants ou fournis par le formateur . - Jeux de rôle en sous

  3. Fluid sampling system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Houck, E.D.

    1994-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

    An fluid sampling system allows sampling of radioactive liquid without spillage. A feed tank is connected to a liquid transfer jet powered by a pumping chamber pressurized by compressed air. The liquid is pumped upwardly into a sampling jet of a venturi design having a lumen with an inlet, an outlet, a constricted middle portion, and a port located above the constricted middle portion. The liquid is passed under pressure through the constricted portion causing its velocity to increase and its pressure to be decreased, thereby preventing liquid from escaping. A septum sealing the port can be pierced by a two pointed hollow needle leading into a sample bottle also sealed by a pierceable septum affixed to one end. The bottle is evacuated by flow through the sample jet, cyclic variation in the sampler jet pressure periodically leaves the evacuated bottle with lower pressure than that of the port, thus causing solution to pass into the bottle. The remaining solution in the system is returned to the feed tank via a holding tank. 4 figs.

  4. Fluid sampling system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Houck, Edward D. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An fluid sampling system allows sampling of radioactive liquid without spillage. A feed tank is connected to a liquid transfer jet powered by a pumping chamber pressurized by compressed air. The liquid is pumped upwardly into a sampling jet of a venturi design having a lumen with an inlet, an outlet, a constricted middle portion, and a port located above the constricted middle portion. The liquid is passed under pressure through the constricted portion causing its velocity to increase and its pressure to decreased, thereby preventing liquid from escaping. A septum sealing the port can be pierced by a two pointed hollow needle leading into a sample bottle also sealed by a pierceable septum affixed to one end. The bottle is evacuated by flow through the sample jet, cyclic variation in the sampler jet pressure periodically leaves the evacuated bottle with lower pressure than that of the port, thus causing solution to pass into the bottle. The remaining solution in the system is returned to the feed tank via a holding tank.

  5. Early Channel Evolution in the Middle Permian Brushy Canyon Formation, West Texas, USA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gunderson, Spencer

    2011-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    measured at both locations. A total of 16 samples were collected for petrographic analysis and X-ray fluorescence (XRF) imaging. Spectacular outcrop quality makes the Middle Permian Brushy Canyon Formation in Guadalupe Mountains National Park an ideal...

  6. Visualization of Domain Formation in the Inner and Outer Leaflets of a Phospholipid Bilayer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Doris M. Haverstick; Michael Glaser

    Abstract. Large vesicles (5-10-~tm in diameter) were formed in the presence of phospholipids fluorescently labeled on the acyl chain and visualized using a fluorescence microscope, charge-coupled-device camera and digital image processor. When such vesicles contained a fluorescent phosphatidic acid (PA) and were exposed to 2 mM CaC12 or 0.5 mM PrCI3, it was possible to visualize PA-enriched domains within the vesicles. Calcium-induced domain formation was reversible in the presence of 4 mM EGTA. Vesicles were formed containing fluorescent PA on either the inner or outer leaflet of the bilayer and the patching and dissolution of patching were studied under conditions where calcium was present on the outside of the vesicle and where calcium was distributed across the

  7. Viscous sludge sample collector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Beitel, George A [Richland, WA

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A vertical core sample collection system for viscous sludge. A sample tube's upper end has a flange and is attached to a piston. The tube and piston are located in the upper end of a bore in a housing. The bore's lower end leads outside the housing and has an inwardly extending rim. Compressed gas, from a storage cylinder, is quickly introduced into the bore's upper end to rapidly accelerate the piston and tube down the bore. The lower end of the tube has a high sludge entering velocity to obtain a full-length sludge sample without disturbing strata detail. The tube's downward motion is stopped when its upper end flange impacts against the bore's lower end inwardly extending rim.

  8. THE STAR FORMATION LAW AT LOW SURFACE DENSITY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wyder, Ted K.; Martin, D. Christopher; Barlow, Tom A.; Foster, Karl; Friedman, Peter G.; Morrissey, Patrick; Neill, James D. [California Institute of Technology, MC 278-17, 1200 E. California Blvd., Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Neff, Susan G. [Laboratory for Astronomy and Solar Physics, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD, 20771 (United States); Schiminovich, David [Department of Astronomy, Columbia University, New York, NY 10027 (United States); Seibert, Mark; Madore, Barry F. [Observatories of the Carnegie Institution of Washington, 813 Santa Barbara Street, Pasadena, CA 91101 (United States); Bianchi, Luciana [Center for Astrophysical Sciences, Johns Hopkins University, 3400 N. Charles Street, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Donas, Jose; Milliard, Bruno [Laboratoire d'Astrophysique de Marseille, BP 8, Traverse du Siphon, 13376 Marseille Cedex 12 (France); Heckman, Timothy M.; Szalay, Alex S. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Johns Hopkins University, Homewood Campus, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Lee, Young-Wook; Yi, Sukyoung K. [Center for Space Astrophysics, Yonsei University, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of); Rich, R. Michael [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States)

    2009-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the nature of the star formation law at low gas surface densities using a sample of 19 low surface brightness (LSB) galaxies with existing H I maps in the literature, UV imaging from the Galaxy Evolution Explorer satellite, and optical images from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. All of the LSB galaxies have (NUV - r) colors similar to those for higher surface brightness star-forming galaxies of similar luminosity indicating that their average star formation histories are not very different. Based upon four LSB galaxies with both UV and far-infrared (FIR) data, we find FIR/UV ratios significantly less than 1, implying low amounts of internal UV extinction in LSB galaxies. We use the UV images and H I maps to measure the star formation rate (SFR) and hydrogen gas surface density within the same region for all the galaxies. The LSB galaxy star formation rate surface densities lie below the extrapolation of the power law fit to the SFR surface density as a function of the total gas density for higher surface brightness galaxies. Although there is more scatter, the LSB galaxies also lie below a second version of the star formation law in which the SFR surface density is correlated with the gas density divided by the orbital time in the disk. The downturn seen in both star formation laws is consistent with theoretical models that predict lower star formation efficiencies in LSB galaxies due to the declining molecular fraction with decreasing density.

  9. Star Formation and Galaxy Environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H. K. C. Yee

    2000-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The dependence of star formation rate on galaxian environment is a key issue in the understanding of galaxy formation and evolution. However, the study of this subject is complex and observationally challenging. This paper reviews some of the current results, drawing mostly from recent large redshift surveys such the LCRS, the MORPH collaboration, and the CNOC1 and CNOC2 redshift surveys.

  10. Environmental Science: Sample Pathway

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goldberg, Bennett

    Environmental Science: Sample Pathway Semester I Semester II Freshman Year CGS Core CGS Core GE 100 Intro to Env Science ES 105 Env Earth Science Sophomore Year CGS Core (CGS NS201 will fulfill CAS BI107 & 124) MA 115 Statistics Summer Environmental Internship Junior Year CH 171 Chem for Health Sciences CH

  11. Decoupled Sampling for Graphics Pipelines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ragan-Kelley, Jonathan Millar

    We propose a generalized approach to decoupling shading from visibility sampling in graphics pipelines, which we call decoupled sampling. Decoupled sampling enables stochastic supersampling of motion and defocus blur at ...

  12. Fluid sampling apparatus and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yeamans, D.R.

    1998-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Incorporation of a bellows in a sampling syringe eliminates ingress of contaminants, permits replication of amounts and compression of multiple sample injections, and enables remote sampling for off-site analysis. 3 figs.

  13. Sample introducing apparatus and sample modules for mass spectrometer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thompson, Cyril V. (Knoxville, TN); Wise, Marcus B. (Kingston, TN)

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus for introducing gaseous samples from a wide range of environmental matrices into a mass spectrometer for analysis of the samples is described. Several sample preparing modules including a real-time air monitoring module, a soil/liquid purge module, and a thermal desorption module are individually and rapidly attachable to the sample introducing apparatus for supplying gaseous samples to the mass spectrometer. The sample-introducing apparatus uses a capillary column for conveying the gaseous samples into the mass spectrometer and is provided with an open/split interface in communication with the capillary and a sample archiving port through which at least about 90 percent of the gaseous sample in a mixture with an inert gas that was introduced into the sample introducing apparatus is separated from a minor portion of the mixture entering the capillary discharged from the sample introducing apparatus.

  14. Sample introducing apparatus and sample modules for mass spectrometer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thompson, C.V.; Wise, M.B.

    1993-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus for introducing gaseous samples from a wide range of environmental matrices into a mass spectrometer for analysis of the samples is described. Several sample preparing modules including a real-time air monitoring module, a soil/liquid purge module, and a thermal desorption module are individually and rapidly attachable to the sample introducing apparatus for supplying gaseous samples to the mass spectrometer. The sample-introducing apparatus uses a capillary column for conveying the gaseous samples into the mass spectrometer and is provided with an open/split interface in communication with the capillary and a sample archiving port through which at least about 90 percent of the gaseous sample in a mixture with an inert gas that was introduced into the sample introducing apparatus is separated from a minor portion of the mixture entering the capillary discharged from the sample introducing apparatus. 5 figures.

  15. Soil sampling kit and a method of sampling therewith

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thompson, Cyril V. (Knoxville, TN)

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A soil sampling device and a sample containment device for containing a soil sample is disclosed. In addition, a method for taking a soil sample using the soil sampling device and soil sample containment device to minimize the loss of any volatile organic compounds contained in the soil sample prior to analysis is disclosed. The soil sampling device comprises two close fitting, longitudinal tubular members of suitable length, the inner tube having the outward end closed. With the inner closed tube withdrawn a selected distance, the outer tube can be inserted into the ground or other similar soft material to withdraw a sample of material for examination. The inner closed end tube controls the volume of the sample taken and also serves to eject the sample. The soil sample containment device has a sealing member which is adapted to attach to an analytical apparatus which analyzes the volatile organic compounds contained in the sample. The soil sampling device in combination with the soil sample containment device allow an operator to obtain a soil sample containing volatile organic compounds and minimizing the loss of the volatile organic compounds prior to analysis of the soil sample for the volatile organic compounds.

  16. Soil sampling kit and a method of sampling therewith

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thompson, C.V.

    1991-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

    A soil sampling device and a sample containment device for containing a soil sample is disclosed. In addition, a method for taking a soil sample using the soil sampling device and soil sample containment device to minimize the loss of any volatile organic compounds contained in the soil sample prior to analysis is disclosed. The soil sampling device comprises two close fitting, longitudinal tubular members of suitable length, the inner tube having the outward end closed. With the inner closed tube withdrawn a selected distance, the outer tube can be inserted into the ground or other similar soft material to withdraw a sample of material for examination. The inner closed end tube controls the volume of the sample taken and also serves to eject the sample. The soil sample containment device has a sealing member which is adapted to attach to an analytical apparatus which analyzes the volatile organic compounds contained in the sample. The soil sampling device in combination with the soil sample containment device allows an operator to obtain a soil sample containing volatile organic compounds and minimizing the loss of the volatile organic compounds prior to analysis of the soil sample for the volatile organic compounds. 11 figures.

  17. Concentric micro-nebulizer for direct sample insertion

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fassel, V.A.; Rice, G.W.; Lawrence, K.E.

    1984-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

    A concentric micro-nebulizer and method for introducing liquid samples into a plasma established in a plasma torch including a first tube connected to a source of plasma gas. The concentric micro-nebulizer has inner and outer concentric tubes extending upwardly within the torch for connection to a source of nebulizer gas and to a source of liquid solvent and to a source of sample liquid. The inner tube is connected to the source of liquid solvent and to the source of sample liquid and the outer tube is connected to the source of nebulizer gas. The outer tube has an orifice positioned slightly below the plasma when it is established, with the inner and outer tubes forming an annulus therebetween with the annular spacing between the tubes at said orifice being less than about 0.05mm. The dead volume of the inner tube is less than about 5 microliters.

  18. Broadband sample holder for microwave spectroscopy of superconducting qubits

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Averkin, A. S.; Karpov, A.; Glushkov, E.; Abramov, N. [National University of Science and Technology (MISIS), Leninskiy prosp. 4, Moscow, 119049 (Russian Federation); Shulga, K. [National University of Science and Technology (MISIS), Leninskiy prosp. 4, Moscow, 119049 (Russian Federation); Russian Quantum Center (RQC), 100 Novaya St., Skolkovo, Moscow region, 143025 (Russian Federation); Huebner, U. [Leibniz Institute of Photonic Technology (IPHT), PO Box 100239, D-07702 Jena (Germany); Il'ichev, E. [Russian Quantum Center (RQC), 100 Novaya St., Skolkovo, Moscow region, 143025 (Russian Federation); Leibniz Institute of Photonic Technology (IPHT), PO Box 100239, D-07702 Jena (Germany); Ustinov, A. V. [National University of Science and Technology (MISIS), Leninskiy prosp. 4, Moscow, 119049 (Russian Federation); Russian Quantum Center (RQC), 100 Novaya St., Skolkovo, Moscow region, 143025 (Russian Federation); Physikalisches Institut, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), D-76131 Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2014-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a practical design and implementation of a broadband sample holder suitable for microwave experiments with superconducting integrated circuits at millikelvin temperatures. Proposed design can be easily integrated in standard dilution cryostats, has flat pass band response in a frequency range from 0 to 32 GHz, allowing the RF testing of the samples with substrate size up to 4 × 4 mm{sup 2}. The parasitic higher modes interference in the holder structure is analyzed and prevented via design considerations. The developed setup can be used for characterization of superconducting parametric amplifiers, bolometers, and qubits. We tested the designed sample holder by characterizing of a superconducting flux qubit at 20 mK temperature.

  19. E-Print Network 3.0 - albumin solutions implications Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    20 l for biomarker detection, using 2D - PAGE or LCMS analysis... albumin removal. The bulk resin format does not limit the albumin depletion to a specific sample volume... ....

  20. E-Print Network 3.0 - activite le procede Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    le procede Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: activite le procede Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Departement de formation doctorale en...

  1. E-Print Network 3.0 - air pollution lessons Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    lessons Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: air pollution lessons Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Global Ozone Project Ozone Formation in...

  2. E-Print Network 3.0 - advanced laser dentistry Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: advanced laser dentistry Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Credit: 4.25 Hours Course Format: Lecture...

  3. E-Print Network 3.0 - antimicrobial hybrid peptide Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    hybrid peptide Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: antimicrobial hybrid peptide Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Pore formation by the MG-H2...

  4. Star formation trends in high-redshift galaxy surveys: the elephant or the tail?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stringer, Martin; Frenk, Carlos S; Stark, Daniel P

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Star formation rate and accummulated stellar mass are two fundamental physical quantities that describe the evolutionary state of a forming galaxy. Two recent attempts to determine the relationship between these quantities, by interpreting a sample of star-forming galaxies at redshift of z~4, have led to opposite conclusions. We use a model galaxy population to investigate possible causes for this discrepancy and conclude that minor errors in the conversion from observables to physical quantities can lead to major misrepresentation when applied without awareness of sample selection. We also investigate, in a general way, the physical origin of the correlation between star formation rate and stellar mass within hierarchical galaxy formation theory.

  5. Sample holder with optical features

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Milas, Mirko; Zhu, Yimei; Rameau, Jonathan David

    2013-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

    A sample holder for holding a sample to be observed for research purposes, particularly in a transmission electron microscope (TEM), generally includes an external alignment part for directing a light beam in a predetermined beam direction, a sample holder body in optical communication with the external alignment part and a sample support member disposed at a distal end of the sample holder body opposite the external alignment part for holding a sample to be analyzed. The sample holder body defines an internal conduit for the light beam and the sample support member includes a light beam positioner for directing the light beam between the sample holder body and the sample held by the sample support member.

  6. Treating tar sands formations with karsted zones

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vinegar, Harold J. (Bellaire, TX); Karanikas, John Michael (Houston, TX)

    2010-03-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods for treating a tar sands formation are described herein. The tar sands formation may have one or more karsted zones. Methods may include providing heat from one or more heaters to one or more karsted zones of the tar sands formation to mobilize fluids in the formation. At least some of the mobilized fluids may be produced from the formation.

  7. Use-driven concept formation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roberts, Jennifer M. (Jennifer Marie)

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    When faced with a complex task, humans often identify domain-specific concepts that make the task more tractable. In this thesis, I investigate the formation of domain-specific concepts of this sort. I propose a set of ...

  8. SIMULATION OF THE FORMATION OF A SOLAR ACTIVE REGION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cheung, M. C. M.; Title, A. M. [Lockheed Martin Solar and Astrophysics Laboratory, Palo Alto, CA 94304 (United States); Rempel, M. [High Altitude Observatory, NCAR, P.O. Box 3000, Boulder, CO 80307 (United States); Schuessler, M. [Max Planck Institute for Solar System Research, Katlenburg-Lindau, 37191 (Germany)

    2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a radiative magnetohydrodynamics simulation of the formation of an active region (AR) on the solar surface. The simulation models the rise of a buoyant magnetic flux bundle from a depth of 7.5 Mm in the convection zone up into the solar photosphere. The rise of the magnetic plasma in the convection zone is accompanied by predominantly horizontal expansion. Such an expansion leads to a scaling relation between the plasma density and the magnetic field strength such that B {proportional_to} rhov{sup 1/2}. The emergence of magnetic flux into the photosphere appears as a complex magnetic pattern, which results from the interaction of the rising magnetic field with the turbulent convective flows. Small-scale magnetic elements at the surface first appear, followed by their gradual coalescence into larger magnetic concentrations, which eventually results in the formation of a pair of opposite polarity spots. Although the mean flow pattern in the vicinity of the developing spots is directed radially outward, correlations between the magnetic field and velocity field fluctuations allow the spots to accumulate flux. Such correlations result from the Lorentz-force-driven, counterstreaming motion of opposite polarity fragments. The formation of the simulated AR is accompanied by transient light bridges between umbrae and umbral dots. Together with recent sunspot modeling, this work highlights the common magnetoconvective origin of umbral dots, light bridges, and penumbral filaments.

  9. Sigma phase formation kinetics in stainless steel laminate composites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wenmen, D.W.; Olson, D.L.; Matlock, D.K. [Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO (United States)] [and others

    1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Stainless steel laminate composites were made to simulate weld microstructures. The use of laminates with variations in chemical composition allows for one dimensional analysis of phase transformation associated with the more complex three-dimensional solidification experience of weld metal. Alternate layers of austenitic (304L and 316L) and ferritic (Ebrite) stainless steels allowed for the study of sigma phase formation at the austenite-ferrite interface in duplex stainless steel. Two austenitic stainless steels, 304L (18.5Cr-9.2Ni-0.3Mo) and 316L (16.2Cr-10.1Ni-2.6Mo), and one ferritic stainless steel, Ebrite (26.3Cr-0Ni-1.0Mo) were received in the form of sheet which was laboratory cold rolled to a final thickness of 0.25 mm (0.030 in.). Laminate composites were prepared by laboratory hot rolling a vacuum encapsulated compact of alternating layers of the ferrite steel with either 304L or 316L stainless steel sheets. Laminate composite specimens, which simulate duplex austenite-ferrite weld metal structure, were used to establish the kinetics of nucleation and growth of sigma phase. The factors affecting sigma phase formation were identified. The effects of time, temperature, and transport of chromium and nickel were evaluated and used to establish a model for sigma phase formation in the austenite-ferrite interfacial region. Information useful for designing stainless steel welding consumables to be used for high temperature service was determined.

  10. Sample Environment Plans and Progress

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pennycook, Steve

    Sample Environment Plans and Progress at the SNS & HFIR SNS HFIR User Group Meeting American Conference on Neutron Scattering Ottawa, Canada June 26 ­ 30, 2010 Lou Santodonato Sample Environment Group our sample environment capabilities Feedback SHUG meetings User surveys Sample Environment Steering

  11. Formation and retention of methane in coal. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hucka, V.J.; Bodily, D.M.; Huang, H.

    1992-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The formation and retention of methane in coalbeds was studied for ten Utah coal samples, one Colorado coal sample and eight coal samples from the Argonne Premium Coal Sample Bank.Methane gas content of the Utah and Colorado coals varied from zero to 9 cm{sup 3}/g. The Utah coals were all high volatile bituminous coals. The Colorado coal was a gassy medium volatile bituminous coal. The Argonne coals cover a range or rank from lignite to low volatile bituminous coal and were used to determine the effect of rank in laboratory studies. The methane content of six selected Utah coal seams and the Colorado coal seam was measured in situ using a special sample collection device and a bubble desorbometer. Coal samples were collected at each measurement site for laboratory analysis. The cleat and joint system was evaluated for the coal and surrounding rocks and geological conditions were noted. Permeability measurements were performed on selected samples and all samples were analyzed for proximate and ultimate analysis, petrographic analysis, {sup 13}C NMR dipolar-dephasing spectroscopy, and density analysis. The observed methane adsorption behavior was correlated with the chemical structure and physical properties of the coals.

  12. IEEE JOURNAL OF SOLID-STATE CIRCUITS, VOL. 48, NO. 1, JANUARY 2013 229 A Modular 1 mm Die-Stacked Sensing Platform

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dutta, Prabal

    IEEE JOURNAL OF SOLID-STATE CIRCUITS, VOL. 48, NO. 1, JANUARY 2013 229 A Modular 1 mm Die with compatibility to commercial C protocols. A self-adapting power management unit is proposed for efficient battery voltage down conversion for wide range of battery voltages and load current. The power man- agement unit

  13. 570 2008 IEEE International Solid-State Circuits Conference ISSCC 2008 / SESSION 31 / RF & mm-WAVE POWER AMPLIFIERS / 31.7

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hajimiri, Ali

    570 · 2008 IEEE International Solid-State Circuits Conference ISSCC 2008 / SESSION 31 / RF & mm supply voltages that is very useful for a low-battery-voltage solution. However, it is not compatible with the higher voltages presented by the Li-ion batteries which under charging situations can present supply

  14. 12A.4 VERTICAL VELOCITY AND BUOYANCY CHARACTERISTICS OF ECHO PLUMES DETECTED BY AN AIRBORNE MM-WAVE RADAR IN THE CONVECTIVE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Geerts, Bart

    12A.4 VERTICAL VELOCITY AND BUOYANCY CHARACTERISTICS OF ECHO PLUMES DETECTED BY AN AIRBORNE MM-WAVE, is the availability of in situ thermodynamic and kinematic observations, and the direct observation of horizontal, as part of IHOP_02 (The International Water Vapor Project, Weckwerth et al 2003). The key radar

  15. MM 7/2011 (rev from JB) When writing a paper or conducting academic research, you'll often come across many different

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MM 7/2011 (rev from JB) When writing a paper or conducting academic research, you'll often come across many different types of sources. Most of the time, these sources will include periodical articles. Periodical articles can be comprised of news accounts, opinion, commentary, scholarly analysis, and

  16. To obtain representative temperatures, sensors were made with a length of 35 cm. The stainless steel needles have a diameter of 3 mm. Inside are five

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haak, Hein

    To obtain representative temperatures, sensors were made with a length of 35 cm. The stainless steel needles have a diameter of 3 mm. Inside are five Platinum Pt-100 sensors, that are cascaded in series to obtain a Pt-500 sensor. The sensors are calibrated to retrieve individual calibration

  17. HDPE (CM1) optical birefringence pattern in cross-slot flow, piston speed 1.76mm/s, 175C

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hassell, David

    2008-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Rheometer (MPR4) at a piston speed of 1.76 mm/s at 175C. The geometry generates a flow field with an extensional component at the centreline. If the no slip condition at a solid surface is satisfied, the side walls are high shear rate regions...

  18. HDPE (CM1) optical birefringence pattern in cross-slot flow, piston speed 0.22mm/s, 155C

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hassell, David

    2008-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Rheometer (MPR4) at a piston speed of 0.22 mm/s at 155C. The geometry generates a flow field with an extensional component at the centreline. If the no slip condition at a solid surface is satisfied, the side walls are high shear rate regions...

  19. HDPE (CM1) optical birefringence pattern in cross-slot flow, piston speed 1.76mm/s, 155C

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hassell, David

    2008-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Rheometer (MPR4) at a piston speed of 1.76 mm/s at 155C. The geometry generates a flow field with an extensional component at the centreline. If the no slip condition at a solid surface is satisfied, the side walls are high shear rate regions...

  20. HDPE (CM1) optical birefringence pattern in cross-slot flow, piston speed 4.4mm/s, 175C

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hassell, David

    2008-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Rheometer (MPR4) at a piston speed of 4.4 mm/s at 175C. The geometry generates a flow field with an extensional component at the centreline. If the no slip condition at a solid surface is satisfied, the side walls are high shear rate regions. The experiments...

  1. HDPE (CM1) optical birefringence pattern in cross-slot flow, piston speed 1.32mm/s, 155C

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hassell, David

    2008-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Rheometer (MPR4) at a piston speed of 1.32 mm/s at 155C. The geometry generates a flow field with an extensional component at the centreline. If the no slip condition at a solid surface is satisfied, the side walls are high shear rate regions...

  2. HDPE (CM1) optical birefringence pattern in cross-slot flow, piston speed 0.88mm/s, 175C

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hassell, David

    2008-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Rheometer (MPR4) at a piston speed of 0.88 mm/s at 175C. The geometry generates a flow field with an extensional component at the centreline. If the no slip condition at a solid surface is satisfied, the side walls are high shear rate regions...

  3. HDPE (CM1) optical birefringence pattern in cross-slot flow, piston speed 2.2mm/s, 175C

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hassell, David

    2008-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Rheometer (MPR4) at a piston speed of 2.2 mm/s at 175C. The geometry generates a flow field with an extensional component at the centreline. If the no slip condition at a solid surface is satisfied, the side walls are high shear rate regions. The experiments...

  4. HDPE (CM1) optical birefringence pattern in cross-slot flow, piston speed 0.088mm/s, 175C

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hassell, David

    2008-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Rheometer (MPR4) at a piston speed of 0.088 mm/s at 175C. The geometry generates a flow field with an extensional component at the centreline. If the no slip condition at a solid surface is satisfied, the side walls are high shear rate regions...

  5. HDPE (CM1) optical birefringence pattern in cross-slot flow, piston speed 0.44mm/s, 175C

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hassell, David

    2008-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Rheometer (MPR4) at a piston speed of 0.44 mm/s at 175C. The geometry generates a flow field with an extensional component at the centreline. If the no slip condition at a solid surface is satisfied, the side walls are high shear rate regions...

  6. HDPE (CM1) optical birefringence pattern in cross-slot flow, piston speed 0.088mm/s, 155C

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hassell, David

    2008-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Rheometer (MPR4) at a piston speed of 0.088 mm/s at 155C. The geometry generates a flow field with an extensional component at the centreline. If the no slip condition at a solid surface is satisfied, the side walls are high shear rate regions...

  7. HDPE (CM1) optical birefringence pattern in cross-slot flow, piston speed 0.044mm/s, 175C

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hassell, David

    2008-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Rheometer (MPR4) at a piston speed of 0.044 mm/s at 175C. The geometry generates a flow field with an extensional component at the centreline. If the no slip condition at a solid surface is satisfied, the side walls are high shear rate regions...

  8. HDPE (CM1) optical birefringence pattern in cross-slot flow, piston speed 2.2mm/s, 155C

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hassell, David

    2008-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Rheometer (MPR4) at a piston speed of 2.2 mm/s at 155C. The geometry generates a flow field with an extensional component at the centreline. If the no slip condition at a solid surface is satisfied, the side walls are high shear rate regions. The experiments...

  9. HDPE (CM1) optical birefringence pattern in cross-slot flow, piston speed 2.64mm/s, 175C

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hassell, David

    2008-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Rheometer (MPR4) at a piston speed of 2.64 mm/s at 175C. The geometry generates a flow field with an extensional component at the centreline. If the no slip condition at a solid surface is satisfied, the side walls are high shear rate regions...

  10. HDPE (CM1) optical birefringence pattern in cross-slot flow, piston speed 1.32mm/s, 175C

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hassell, David

    2008-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Rheometer (MPR4) at a piston speed of 1.32 mm/s at 175C. The geometry generates a flow field with an extensional component at the centreline. If the no slip condition at a solid surface is satisfied, the side walls are high shear rate regions...

  11. HDPE (CM1) optical birefringence pattern in cross-slot flow, piston speed 0.88mm/s, 155C

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hassell, David

    2008-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Rheometer (MPR4) at a piston speed of 0.88 mm/s at 155C. The geometry generates a flow field with an extensional component at the centreline. If the no slip condition at a solid surface is satisfied, the side walls are high shear rate regions...

  12. HDPE (CM1) optical birefringence pattern in cross-slot flow, piston speed 0.044mm/s, 155C

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hassell, David

    2008-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Rheometer (MPR4) at a piston speed of 0.044 mm/s at 155C. The geometry generates a flow field with an extensional component at the centreline. If the no slip condition at a solid surface is satisfied, the side walls are high shear rate regions...

  13. HDPE (CM1) optical birefringence pattern in cross-slot flow, piston speed 0.44mm/s, 155C

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hassell, David

    2008-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Rheometer (MPR4) at a piston speed of 0.44 mm/s at 155C. The geometry generates a flow field with an extensional component at the centreline. If the no slip condition at a solid surface is satisfied, the side walls are high shear rate regions...

  14. HDPE (CM1) optical birefringence pattern in cross-slot flow, piston speed 0.22mm/s, 175C

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hassell, David

    2008-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Rheometer (MPR4) at a piston speed of 0.22 mm/s at 175C. The geometry generates a flow field with an extensional component at the centreline. If the no slip condition at a solid surface is satisfied, the side walls are high shear rate regions...

  15. July 1, 1997 / Vol. 22, No. 13 / OPTICS LETTERS 991 Passively Q-switched 1.34-mm Nd:YVO4 microchip laser with

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keller, Ursula

    -pumped 1.34-mm Nd:YVO4 microchip laser. We achieved single- frequency, 230-ps pulses by using an InGaAsP Nd:YVO4 microchip laser that uses InGaAsP semiconductor saturable- absorber mirrors (SESAM's).1 ­ 3 mode spacing exceeds the gain bandwidth. In addition, a short absorption length is needed for efficient

  16. Complete one form for each person seeking Wisconsin COMMERCIAL Pesticide Applicator Certification. Last Name First Name Middle Initial Date of Birth (mm/dd/yyyy)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mladenoff, David

    Complete one form for each person seeking Wisconsin COMMERCIAL Pesticide Applicator Certification. Last Name First Name Middle Initial Date of Birth (mm/dd/yyyy) Company Name Company Unit taking the pesticide applicator certification exam. A personalized training/reference manual

  17. Mon. Not. R. Astron. Soc. 320, 131138 (2001) Discs and the 10-mm silicate spectra of young stellar objects with non-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bowey, Janet

    Mon. Not. R. Astron. Soc. 320, 131±138 (2001) Discs and the 10-mm silicate spectra of young stellar and Taurus-Elias 7 (Haro6-10, GV Tau) is distinguished from foreground silicate absorption using a simple that of Elias 7 is optically thick. We suggest that HL Tau's optically thin component arises from silicate dust

  18. Stack sampling apparatus

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lind, Randall F; Lloyd, Peter D; Love, Lonnie J; Noakes, Mark W; Pin, Francois G; Richardson, Bradley S; Rowe, John C

    2014-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus for obtaining samples from a structure includes a support member, at least one stabilizing member, and at least one moveable member. The stabilizing member has a first portion coupled to the support member and a second portion configured to engage with the structure to restrict relative movement between the support member and the structure. The stabilizing member is radially expandable from a first configuration where the second portion does not engage with a surface of the structure to a second configuration where the second portion engages with the surface of the structure.

  19. September 2004 Water Sampling

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartment ofDepartment ofofOxford SiteToledoSampling at the Grand Junction, Colorado, Disposal

  20. September 2004 Water Sampling

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartment ofDepartment ofofOxford SiteToledoSampling at the Grand Junction, Colorado,

  1. September 2004 Water Sampling

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartment ofDepartment ofofOxford SiteToledoSampling at the Grand Junction, Colorado,and

  2. September 2004 Water Sampling

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartment ofDepartment ofofOxford SiteToledoSampling at the Grand Junction, Colorado,andOld

  3. September 2004 Water Sampling

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartment ofDepartment ofofOxford SiteToledoSampling at the Grand Junction, Colorado,andOld

  4. September 2004 Water Sampling

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartment ofDepartment ofofOxford SiteToledoSampling at the Grand Junction, Colorado,andOldOld

  5. September 2004 Water Sampling

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartment ofDepartment ofofOxford SiteToledoSampling at the Grand Junction,

  6. September 2004 Water Sampling

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartment ofDepartment ofofOxford SiteToledoSampling at the Grand Junction,Groundwater and

  7. Sample Changes and Issues

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines AboutDecemberSteamYear Jan FebThousand Cubic Feet)Year JanC.9.3. Receipts8.160Sample

  8. September 2004 Water Sampling

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartment ofDepartment ofof EnergyYou$0.C.Green River, Utah, DisposalRulison,Sampling at

  9. September 2004 Water Sampling

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartment ofDepartment ofof EnergyYou$0.C.Green River, Utah, DisposalRulison,Sampling at4

  10. September 2004 Water Sampling

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartment ofDepartment ofof EnergyYou$0.C.Green River, Utah, DisposalRulison,Sampling

  11. September 2004 Water Sampling

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartment ofDepartment ofof EnergyYou$0.C. 20545 OCT 28Sacandaga SiteSep NovWater Sampling

  12. September 2004 Water Sampling

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartment ofDepartment ofof EnergyYou$0.C. 20545 OCT 28Sacandaga SiteSep NovWaterSampling

  13. Microchannel formation in seaice as habitat for microalgae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    K. Morawetz; S. Thoms; B. Kutschan

    2014-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The formation of saline brine channels in seaice is described by two coupled order parameters, the tetrahedricity as structure of ice and the salinity. Their evolution equations follow from a Ginzburg-Landau-functional in the form of a phase-field theory conserving salinity. The stability analysis provides the phase diagram in terms of two parameters, one describing the velocity of the freezing process and the other one characterizing the velocity of structure formation. In thermodynamics these parameters determine the supercooling or superheating region and the specific heat respectively. In contrast to the Turing model the diffusivity does not enter this phase diagram but determines only the structure size. The numerical solution shows a microstructure formation of brine inclusions in agreement with the measured samples dependent on the salinity and temperature.

  14. Fluid sampling tool

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Garcia, A.R.; Johnston, R.G.; Martinez, R.K.

    1999-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

    A fluid sampling tool is described for sampling fluid from a container. The tool has a fluid collecting portion which is drilled into the container wall, thereby affixing it to the wall. The tool may have a fluid extracting section which withdraws fluid collected by the fluid collecting section. The fluid collecting section has a fluted shank with an end configured to drill a hole into a container wall. The shank has a threaded portion for tapping the borehole. The shank is threadably engaged to a cylindrical housing having an inner axial passageway sealed at one end by a septum. A flexible member having a cylindrical portion and a bulbous portion is provided. The housing can be slid into an inner axial passageway in the cylindrical portion and sealed to the flexible member. The bulbous portion has an outer lip defining an opening. The housing is clamped into the chuck of a drill, the lip of the bulbous section is pressed against a container wall until the shank touches the wall, and the user operates the drill. Wall shavings (kerf) are confined in a chamber formed in the bulbous section as it folds when the shank advances inside the container. After sufficient advancement of the shank, an o-ring makes a seal with the container wall. 6 figs.

  15. Ice Formation in Gas-Diffusion Layers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dursch, Thomas

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the University of California. Ice Formation in Gas-Diffusionsub-freezing conditions, ice forms in the gas-diffusionstrategies exist to prevent ice formation, there is little

  16. Tank 241-SY-102 January 2000 Compatibility Grab Samples Analytical Results for the Final Report [SEC 1 and 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    BELL, K.E.

    2000-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

    This document is the format IV, final report for the tank 241-SY-102 (SY-102) grab samples taken in January 2000 to address waste compatibility concerns. Chemical, radiochemical, and physical analyses on the tank SY-102 samples were performed as directed in Comparability Grab Sampling and Analysis Plan for Fiscal Year 2000 (Sasaki 1999). No notification limits were exceeded. Preliminary data on samples 2SY-99-5, -6, and -7 were reported in ''Format II Report on Tank 241-SY-102 Waste Compatibility Grab Samples Taken in January 2000'' (Lockrem 2000). The data presented here represent the final results.

  17. Fluid sampling tool

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Johnston, Roger G. (Los Alamos, NM); Garcia, Anthony R. E. (Espanola, NM); Martinez, Ronald K. (Santa Cruz, NM)

    2001-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention includes a rotatable tool for collecting fluid through the wall of a container. The tool includes a fluid collection section with a cylindrical shank having an end portion for drilling a hole in the container wall when the tool is rotated, and a threaded portion for tapping the hole in the container wall. A passageway in the shank in communication with at least one radial inlet hole in the drilling end and an opening at the end of the shank is adapted to receive fluid from the container. The tool also includes a cylindrical chamber affixed to the end of the shank opposite to the drilling portion thereof for receiving and storing fluid passing through the passageway. The tool also includes a flexible, deformable gasket that provides a fluid-tight chamber to confine kerf generated during the drilling and tapping of the hole. The invention also includes a fluid extractor section for extracting fluid samples from the fluid collecting section.

  18. Specified assurance level sampling procedure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Willner, O.

    1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the nuclear industry design specifications for certain quality characteristics require that the final product be inspected by a sampling plan which can demonstrate product conformance to stated assurance levels. The Specified Assurance Level (SAL) Sampling Procedure has been developed to permit the direct selection of attribute sampling plans which can meet commonly used assurance levels. The SAL procedure contains sampling plans which yield the minimum sample size at stated assurance levels. The SAL procedure also provides sampling plans with acceptance numbers ranging from 0 to 10, thus, making available to the user a wide choice of plans all designed to comply with a stated assurance level.

  19. Hydrodynamic Simulations of Galaxy Formation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. A. Thoul

    1994-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

    We have developed an accurate, one-dimensional, spherically symmetric, Lagrangian hydrodynamics/gravity code, designed to study the effects of radiative cooling and photo-ionization on the formation of protogalaxies. We examine the ability of collapsing perturbations to cool within the age of the universe. In contrast to some studies based on order-of-magnitude estimates, we find that cooling arguments alone cannot explain the sharp upper cutoff observed in the galaxy luminosity function. We also look at the effect of a photoionizing background on the formation of low-mass galaxies.

  20. The Era of Star Formation in Galaxy Clusters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brodwin, M; Gonzalez, Anthony H; Zeimann, G R; Snyder, G F; Mancone, C L; Pope, A; Eisenhardt, P R; Stern, D; Alberts, S; Ashby, M L N; Brown, M J I; Chary, R -R; Dey, Arjun; Galametz, A; Gettings, D P; Jannuzi, B T; Miller, E D; Moustakas, J; Moustakas, L A

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We analyze the star formation properties of 16 infrared-selected, spectroscopically confirmed galaxy clusters at $1 1.35$. Using infrared luminosities measured with deep Spitzer/MIPS observations at 24 $\\mu$m, along with robust optical+IRAC photometric redshifts and SED-fitted stellar masses, we present the dust-obscured star-forming fractions, star formation rates and specific star formation rates in these clusters as functions of redshift and projected clustercentric radius. We find that $z\\sim 1.4$ represents a transition redshift for the ISCS sample, with clear evidence of an unquenched era of cluster star formation at earlier times. Beyond this redshift the fraction of star-forming cluster members increases monotonically toward the cluster centers. Indeed, the specific star formation rate in the cores of these distant clusters is consistent with field values at similar redshifts, indicating that at $z>1.4$ environment-dependent quenching had not yet been established in ISCS clusters. Combining these obse...

  1. Sampling for Bacteria in Wells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lesikar, Bruce J.

    2001-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This publication will instruct you on the proper procedures for collecting a sample from a water well for bacteriological analysis....

  2. Sample Residential Program Term Sheet

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Goal DRAFT U.S. DOE Sample Residential Program Term Sheet - DRAFT Introduction is seeking to develop an energy...

  3. Structurally Electromagnetic Formation Flight (EMFF)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Weck, Olivier L.

    Structurally connected secondary mirror EMFF secondary mirror EMFF Design Electromagnetic Formation for a smaller, simpler system. µEMFF investigates the use of conventional conductors, capacitors, and solar propellants that often limit lifetime, the EMFF system uses solar power to energize a magnetic field

  4. Earth and Terrestrial Planet Formation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jacobson, Seth A

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The growth and composition of Earth is a direct consequence of planet formation throughout the Solar System. We discuss the known history of the Solar System, the proposed stages of growth and how the early stages of planet formation may be dominated by pebble growth processes. Pebbles are small bodies whose strong interactions with the nebula gas lead to remarkable new accretion mechanisms for the formation of planetesimals and the growth of planetary embryos. Many of the popular models for the later stages of planet formation are presented. The classical models with the giant planets on fixed orbits are not consistent with the known history of the Solar System, fail to create a high Earth/Mars mass ratio, and, in many cases, are also internally inconsistent. The successful Grand Tack model creates a small Mars, a wet Earth, a realistic asteroid belt and the mass-orbit structure of the terrestrial planets. In the Grand Tack scenario, growth curves for Earth most closely match a Weibull model. The feeding zon...

  5. Cloud Formation, Evolution and Destruction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Estalella, Robert

    Chapter 4 Cloud Formation, Evolution and Destruction We now begin to trace the journey towards a star. How long does this take? The answer is surprisingly short: a good many clouds already contain new stars and these stars tend to be young. The typical cloud cannot spend long, if any time at all

  6. VEHICLE NETWORKS: ACHIEVING REGULAR FORMATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    VEHICLE NETWORKS: ACHIEVING REGULAR FORMATION MADALENA CHAVES, ROBERT DAY, LUCIA GOMEZ a network of vehicles exchanging information among themselves with the intention of achieving a specified the performance of the vehicle network. A stochastic model for information flow is also considered, allowing

  7. Method to inhibit deposit formation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dickakian, G.B.

    1986-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

    A process is described for inhibiting deposit formation on the contact surfaces of structures confining heated hydrocarbon fluid which exhibits substantial fouling. The process consists of introducing into the hydrocarbon fluid at least an inhibiting amount of thiophene-containing polycondensed aromatic/naphthenic compounds of number average molecular weight (M-bar n) from 200 to 1,000.

  8. Method of fracturing a geological formation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Johnson, James O. (2679-B Walnut, Los Alamos, NM 87544)

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved method of fracturing a geological formation surrounding a well bore is disclosed. A relatively small explosive charge is emplaced in a well bore and the bore is subsequently hydraulically pressurized to a pressure less than the formation breakdown pressure and preferably greater than the fracture propagation pressure of the formation. The charge is denoted while the bore is so pressurized, resulting in the formation of multiple fractures in the surrounding formation with little or no accompanying formation damage. Subsequent hydraulic pressurization can be used to propagate and extend the fractures in a conventional manner. The method is useful for stimulating production of oil, gas and possibly water from suitable geologic formations.

  9. Formation,

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    observed graphitization of nanodiamonds into multi-shell onion like carbon nano-structures, also called carbon onions, using reactive force-fields, which include...

  10. Treating tar sands formations with dolomite

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vinegar, Harold J.; Karanikas, John Michael

    2010-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods for treating a tar sands formation are described herein. The tar sands formation may include dolomite and hydrocarbons. Methods may include providing heat at less than the decomposition temperature of dolomite from one or more heaters to at least a portion of the formation. At least some of the hydrocarbon fluids are mobilized in the formation. At least some of the hydrocarbon fluids may be produced from the formation.

  11. IUPILLiadTNz427447"mum""nmm'mm"mm

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    measured, and measured spectra were compared with those predicted by the seismic displacement discontinuity theory. Results are compared with those ...

  12. Brine Sampling and Evaluation Program, 1991 report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deal, D.E.; Abitz, R.J.; Myers, J.; Martin, M.L.; Milligan, D.J.; Sobocinski, R.W.; Lipponer, P.P.J. [International Technology Corp., Albuquerque, NM (United States)] [International Technology Corp., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Belski, D.S. [Westinghouse Electric Corp., Carlsbad, NM (United States). Waste Isolation Div.] [Westinghouse Electric Corp., Carlsbad, NM (United States). Waste Isolation Div.

    1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The data presented in this report are the result of Brine Sampling and Evaluation Program (BSEP) activities at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plan (WIPP) during 1991. These BSEP activities document and investigate the origins, hydraulic characteristics, extent, and composition of brine occurrences in the Permian Salado Formation and seepage of that brine into the excavations at the WIPP. When excavations began at the WIPP in 1982, small brine seepages (weeps) were observed on the walls. Brine studies began as part of the Site Validation Program and were formalized as a program in its own right in 1985. During nine years of observations (1982--1991), evidence has mounted that the amount of brine seeping into the WIPP excavations is limited, local, and only a small fraction of that required to produce hydrogen gas by corroding the metal in the waste drums and waste inventory. The data through 1990 is discussed in detail and summarized by Deal and others (1991). The data presented in this report describes progress made during the calendar year 1991 and focuses on four major areas: (1) quantification of the amount of brine seeping across vertical surfaces in the WIPP excavations (brine ``weeps); (2) monitoring of brine inflow, e.g., measuring brines recovered from holes drilled downward from the underground drifts (downholes), upward from the underground drifts (upholes), and from subhorizontal holes; (3) further characterization of brine geochemistry; and (4) preliminary quantification of the amount of brine that might be released by squeezing the underconsolidated clays present in the Salado Formation.

  13. Post-Award Deliverables Sample (Second Part of Sample Deliverables...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Task Orders (IDIQ Attachment. J-4) Sample Statement of Work - Standard Service Offerings for Contractor-Identified Project ESPC TASK ORDER REQUEST FOR PROPOSAL (TO RFP) TEMPLATE...

  14. Photophoresis boosts giant planet formation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Teiser, Jens

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the core accretion model of giant planet formation, a solid protoplanetary core begins to accrete gas directly from the nebula when its mass reaches about 5 earth masses. The protoplanet has at most a few million years to reach runaway gas accretion, as young stars lose their gas disks after 10 million years at the latest. Yet gas accretion also brings small dust grains entrained in the gas into the planetary atmosphere. Dust accretion creates an optically thick protoplanetary atmosphere that cannot efficiently radiate away the kinetic energy deposited by incoming planetesimals. A dust-rich atmosphere severely slows down atmospheric cooling, contraction, and inflow of new gas, in contradiction to the observed timescales of planet formation. Here we show that photophoresis is a strong mechanism for pushing dust out of the planetary atmosphere due to the momentum exchange between gas and dust grains. The thermal radiation from the heated inner atmosphere and core is sufficient to levitate dust grains and to ...

  15. Formation of polar ring galaxies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. Bournaud; F. Combes

    2003-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Polar ring galaxies are peculiar systems in which a gas rich, nearly polar ring surrounds an early-type or elliptical host galaxy. Two formation scenarios for these objects have been proposed: they are thought to form either in major galaxy mergers or by tidal accretion of the polar material from a gas rich donor galaxy. Both scenarios are studied through N-body simulations including gas dynamics and star formation. Constraints on physical parameters are drawn out, in order to determine which scenario is the most likely to occur. Polar ring galaxies from each scenario are compared with observations and we discuss whether the accretion scenario and the merging scenario account for observational properties of polar ring galaxies. The conclusion of this study is that the accretion scenario is both the most likely and the most supported by observations. Even if the merging scenario is rather robust, most polar ring galaxies are shown to be the result of tidal gas accretion events.

  16. Rapid gas hydrate formation process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brown, Thomas D.; Taylor, Charles E.; Unione, Alfred J.

    2013-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The disclosure provides a method and apparatus for forming gas hydrates from a two-phase mixture of water and a hydrate forming gas. The two-phase mixture is created in a mixing zone which may be wholly included within the body of a spray nozzle. The two-phase mixture is subsequently sprayed into a reaction zone, where the reaction zone is under pressure and temperature conditions suitable for formation of the gas hydrate. The reaction zone pressure is less than the mixing zone pressure so that expansion of the hydrate-forming gas in the mixture provides a degree of cooling by the Joule-Thompson effect and provides more intimate mixing between the water and the hydrate-forming gas. The result of the process is the formation of gas hydrates continuously and with a greatly reduced induction time. An apparatus for conduct of the method is further provided.

  17. Kinetic models of opinion formation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. Toscani

    2006-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

    We introduce and discuss certain kinetic models of (continuous) opinion formation involving both exchange of opinion between individual agents and diffusion of information. We show conditions which ensure that the kinetic model reaches non trivial stationary states in case of lack of diffusion in correspondence of some opinion point. Analytical results are then obtained by considering a suitable asymptotic limit of the model yielding a Fokker-Planck equation for the distribution of opinion among individuals.

  18. Coupling MM5 with ISOLSM:

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed Newcatalyst phases on &gamma;-Al2O3. |ID#: 19834Costsincludingincludinga Yun

  19. GAMMA RAYS FROM STAR FORMATION IN CLUSTERS OF GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Storm, Emma M.; Jeltema, Tesla E.; Profumo, Stefano [Department of Physics, University of California, 1156 High Street, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States)

    2012-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Star formation in galaxies is observed to be associated with gamma-ray emission, presumably from non-thermal processes connected to the acceleration of cosmic-ray nuclei and electrons. The detection of gamma rays from starburst galaxies by the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) has allowed the determination of a functional relationship between star formation rate and gamma-ray luminosity. Since star formation is known to scale with total infrared (8-1000 {mu}m) and radio (1.4 GHz) luminosity, the observed infrared and radio emission from a star-forming galaxy can be used to quantitatively infer the galaxy's gamma-ray luminosity. Similarly, star-forming galaxies within galaxy clusters allow us to derive lower limits on the gamma-ray emission from clusters, which have not yet been conclusively detected in gamma rays. In this study, we apply the functional relationships between gamma-ray luminosity and radio and IR luminosities of galaxies derived by the Fermi Collaboration to a sample of the best candidate galaxy clusters for detection in gamma rays in order to place lower limits on the gamma-ray emission associated with star formation in galaxy clusters. We find that several clusters have predicted gamma-ray emission from star formation that are within an order of magnitude of the upper limits derived in Ackermann et al. based on non-detection by Fermi-LAT. Given the current gamma-ray limits, star formation likely plays a significant role in the gamma-ray emission in some clusters, especially those with cool cores. We predict that both Fermi-LAT over the course of its lifetime and the future Cerenkov Telescope Array will be able to detect gamma-ray emission from star-forming galaxies in clusters.

  20. a. Lngsamt & adiabatiskt reversibel, dvs en isentropisk process V1 = nRT1 / p1 = (m/M) RT1/p1 , massa m = 1 kg

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zevenhoven, Ron

    Svar 1303: a. Långsamt & adiabatiskt reversibel, dvs en isentropisk process V1 = n·R·T1 / p1 = (m/M) ·R·T1/p1 , massa m = 1 kg H2 : M = 0.002 kg/mol; CO : M = 0.028 kg/mol; CO2 : M = 0.044 kg/mol p1 = z bar V1 = (R/M) · (300 + 50·a) / z m3 . t.ex. 30066 : p = 3 bar, gas = CO, T1 = 450 K V1 = 0.445 m3

  1. Acceptance sampling using judgmental and randomly selected samples

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sego, Landon H.; Shulman, Stanley A.; Anderson, Kevin K.; Wilson, John E.; Pulsipher, Brent A.; Sieber, W. Karl

    2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a Bayesian model for acceptance sampling where the population consists of two groups, each with different levels of risk of containing unacceptable items. Expert opinion, or judgment, may be required to distinguish between the high and low-risk groups. Hence, high-risk items are likely to be identifed (and sampled) using expert judgment, while the remaining low-risk items are sampled randomly. We focus on the situation where all observed samples must be acceptable. Consequently, the objective of the statistical inference is to quantify the probability that a large percentage of the unsampled items in the population are also acceptable. We demonstrate that traditional (frequentist) acceptance sampling and simpler Bayesian formulations of the problem are essentially special cases of the proposed model. We explore the properties of the model in detail, and discuss the conditions necessary to ensure that required samples sizes are non-decreasing function of the population size. The method is applicable to a variety of acceptance sampling problems, and, in particular, to environmental sampling where the objective is to demonstrate the safety of reoccupying a remediated facility that has been contaminated with a lethal agent.

  2. Adaptive Sampling for Environmental Robotics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohammad Rahimi; Richard Pon; Deborah Estrin; William J. Kaiser; Mani Srivastava; Gaurav S. Sukhatme

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    186, 2003. S. Thrun, “Robotics Mapping: A survey”, Exploringtechnique to environmental robotics applications includingSampling for Environmental Robotics Mohammad Rahimi †,‡‡ ,

  3. Sample Residential Program Term Sheet

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A sample for defining and elaborating on the specifics of a clean energy loan program. Author: U.S. Department of Energy

  4. Homeowner Soil Sample Information Form

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Provin, Tony

    2007-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Homeowners should submit this form with their soil samples when requesting a soil test from the Texas A&M Soil Testing Laboratory....

  5. Geomechanical Study of Bakken Formation for Improved Oil Recovery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ling, Kegang; Zeng, Zhengwen; He, Jun; Pei, Peng; Zhou, Xuejun; Liu, Hong; Huang, Luke; Ostadhassan, Mehdi; Jabbari, Hadi; Blanksma, Derrick; Feilen, Harry; Ahmed, Salowah; Benson, Steve; Mann, Michael; LeFever, Richard; Gosnold, Will

    2013-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    On October 1, 2008 US DOE-sponsored research project entitled “Geomechanical Study of Bakken Formation for Improved Oil Recovery” under agreement DE-FC26-08NT0005643 officially started at The University of North Dakota (UND). This is the final report of the project; it covers the work performed during the project period of October 1, 2008 to December 31, 2013. The objectives of this project are to outline the methodology proposed to determine the in-situ stress field and geomechanical properties of the Bakken Formation in Williston Basin, North Dakota, USA to increase the success rate of horizontal drilling and hydraulic fracturing so as to improve the recovery factor of this unconventional crude oil resource from the current 3% to a higher level. The success of horizontal drilling and hydraulic fracturing depends on knowing local in-situ stress and geomechanical properties of the rocks. We propose a proactive approach to determine the in-situ stress and related geomechanical properties of the Bakken Formation in representative areas through integrated analysis of field and well data, core sample and lab experiments. Geomechanical properties are measured by AutoLab 1500 geomechanics testing system. By integrating lab testing, core observation, numerical simulation, well log and seismic image, drilling, completion, stimulation, and production data, in-situ stresses of Bakken formation are generated. These in-situ stress maps can be used as a guideline for future horizontal drilling and multi-stage fracturing design to improve the recovery of Bakken unconventional oil.

  6. E-Print Network 3.0 - acceptor center formation Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    to Measure Clustering of Ligand-Receptor Summary: ,z Ammasi Periasamy,*y and Margarida Barroso* *Department of Biology; y W. M. Keck Center for Cellular... on donor and acceptor...

  7. E-Print Network 3.0 - abanico east formation Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Collection: Geosciences ; Engineering 6 Ahorro EnergAhorro Energticotico Summary: emisiones de bixido de carbono al ambiente. Un abanico en la ventana atrae el aire fresco de...

  8. E-Print Network 3.0 - abomasal curd formation Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Meal Summary: , at least in part, be substrate driven. Responses of cows to abomasal infusion of protein or AA have shown... of Schwab et al. (19). The efficiency with which...

  9. E-Print Network 3.0 - amide bond formation Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Irvine Collection: Chemistry 3 J. Am. Chem. SOC.1994,116,2149-2150 Amide-Amide and Amide-Water Hydrogen Bonds Summary: of hydrogen bonds observed here therefore suggests that...

  10. E-Print Network 3.0 - alveolar bone formation Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Sutures to Deciduous Dentition in Nonhuman Primates K... .D., E.R. Dumont, Ph.D., T.D. Smith, Ph.D. Objective: The relationship of the human premaxillary bone Source: Dumont,...

  11. E-Print Network 3.0 - aerosol formation durint Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Collection: Environmental Sciences and Ecology 5 A Simple Numerical Algorithm and Software for Solution of Nucleation, Surface Growth and Coagulation Problems Summary: to be in...

  12. E-Print Network 3.0 - anodic film formation Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    their thin-film expertise from window technology research and applied it to a solid-state, thin-film lithium battery. The researchers Summary: . Planar Energy researcher Binh...

  13. E-Print Network 3.0 - amide formation capacity Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    24... partially inactivates the oxygen evolution process. Nevertheless, the oxygen evolving capacity can... recent study showed that a similar C. reinhardtii mutant has low...

  14. E-Print Network 3.0 - actin ring formation Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    into a closed ring (Fig 2b). As demonstrated... , of an F-actin bundle in a ... Source: Frey, Erwin - Arnold Sommerfeld Center for Theoretical Physics, Ludwig-Maximilians-Univers...

  15. E-Print Network 3.0 - amyloid-type fiber formation Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    University Collection: Biology and Medicine 25 Carbon 39 (2001) 19952001 Silane-treated carbon fiber for reinforcing cement Summary: and silica fume on carbon and particles after...

  16. E-Print Network 3.0 - anisn format dot Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the ANISN (Ref. 8), DOT (Ref. 9), and TWOTRAN (Ref. 10) codes. The continuous energy VIM Monte Carlo code... in Sec. VIII a r e derived from three- dimensional calculations....

  17. E-Print Network 3.0 - asbestos body formation Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    MANAGEMENT PROGRAM Prepared: May... Mechanical Rooms 8 3.4 Asbestos Free Labels 8 4.0 Lockout Areas 8 5.0 Training 9 5.1 Overview 9 5.2 Asbestos... Awareness 9 6.0 Negative...

  18. E-Print Network 3.0 - aqueous solution formation Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Mountain Project, US EPA Collection: Environmental Sciences and Ecology 64 Definitions CaX(s) + 90 Summary: phases that includes an aqueous solution, such as the mass change...

  19. E-Print Network 3.0 - av canal formation Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Andrew Schneider 2010 All rights reserved... 12;II. History of the Miami and Erie Canal in Cincinnati Dreams of a canal system that would cross... canals were being...

  20. E-Print Network 3.0 - aberrant crypt formation Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    aberrant crypts, by elimination of cells. Scand J Gastroenterol xxxx Background: Polyethylene glycol (PEG... from precancerous lesions. Key words: aberrant-crypt-foci, ACF, ......

  1. E-Print Network 3.0 - abanico formation andes Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Department of Atmospheric and Environmental Sciences, State University of New York at Albany Collection: Environmental Sciences and Ecology ; Geosciences 31 UNIVERSITE DE TOULOUSE...

  2. E-Print Network 3.0 - aortic aneurysm formation Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Source: Papaharilaou, Yannis - Institute of Applied and Computational Mathematics, Foundation of Research and Technology, Hellas Collection: Computer Technologies and Information...

  3. E-Print Network 3.0 - antihydrogen formation dynamics Sample...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of - Department of Physics, Non-Neutral Plasma Project Collection: Plasma Physics and Fusion 25 Production of Cold Antihydrogen during the Positron Cooling of Antiprotons...

  4. E-Print Network 3.0 - assessment item format Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    NJ... at 50 ms( s) Loss concentrated at midplane v Action Items Calculate power density of prompt loss Source: Fusiongnition Research Experiment (FIRE) Collection: Plasma...

  5. E-Print Network 3.0 - abnormal macropore formation Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of silica glass can be easily obtained... -desorption experiments performed on silica aerogels showed that the macropores sinter first and pores of ... Source: Ecole Polytechnique,...

  6. E-Print Network 3.0 - affecting radical formation Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    40 Determination of the Barrier Height for Acetyl Radical Dissociation from Acetyl Chloride Photodissociation at 235 nm Using Velocity Map Imaging Summary: Determination of the...

  7. E-Print Network 3.0 - aberration formation interaction Sample...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    interact strongly in determining subjective... . Experiment 1. We used adaptive optics to demonstrate the interactions between pairs of aberrations in real... that do not...

  8. E-Print Network 3.0 - acidizing subterranean formations Sample...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    subterranean estuary along Florida's (USA) Atlantic coast for analysis of the rare earth elements... within the study area. Concentrations of REEs in porewaters from the...

  9. E-Print Network 3.0 - abscess formation mimicking Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Collection: Biology and Medicine ; Environmental Sciences and Ecology 57 Uricase for gout treatment Chapter 5.1 Summary: cause lesions mimicking malignancy, purulent abscesses,...

  10. E-Print Network 3.0 - alkaline band formation Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of Mechanical Engineering, Hong Kong University of Science and Technology Collection: Energy Storage, Conversion and Utilization ; Chemistry 51 Residual alkalinity as tracer to...

  11. E-Print Network 3.0 - artemisinin-induced radical formation Sample...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Study of Radical and Neutral Intermediates of Artemisinin Decomposition Mirian S. C. Pereira, Rudolf Kiralj, and Marcia M. C. Ferreira* Summary: -catalyzed reduction of the...

  12. E-Print Network 3.0 - aspect pattern formation Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    0103-9741 Monografias em Cincia da Computao Summary: -9741 Editor: Prof. Carlos Jos Pereira de Lucena October, 2005 Aspect-Oriented Composition of Design Patterns... , namely...

  13. E-Print Network 3.0 - aerosol particle formation Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of aerosol over many orders-of-magnitude of particle size range, from subcritical clusters on the molecular... of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC02-98CH10886....

  14. E-Print Network 3.0 - adventitious shoot formation Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the action of cutting the crop... is a forest stand composed of stools that produce coppice shoots which form the major part of ... Source: Forest Research Agency of the UK...

  15. E-Print Network 3.0 - adventitious root formation Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Page 1 of 8 Summary: stools consist of the roots and stumps, which give rise to the coppice shoots that are cut at regular... buds at the base of the stump. Less frequently they...

  16. E-Print Network 3.0 - adventitious bud formation Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Less frequently they grow from adventitious buds which develop from... intervals. New coppice shoots can develop from two types of bud. Most commonly they originate from...

  17. E-Print Network 3.0 - asmari formation zagros Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    over the latest... : Evolution tectonique et croissance de la chane du Zagros (Fars, Iran): contraintes magntostratigraphiques... , sdimentologiques et thermochronomtrique...

  18. E-Print Network 3.0 - avoiding by-product formation Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    78 By-Products Utilization Summary: Center for By-Products Utilization ECONOMICAL SELF-CONSOLIDATING CONCRETE FOR THE WISCONSIN... production using by-product materials to...

  19. E-Print Network 3.0 - abiotic ammonium formation Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    T ransport6. Abiotic flux: Sensitivity to M... and biogeochemistry" The abiotic DIC transport varies with latitude just like the heat transport, transporting DIC... northward S...

  20. E-Print Network 3.0 - authigenic carbonate formation Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    in the flux of carbon... to the deep sea. However, the accumulation rate of authigenic uranium depends not only on the organic carbon... into an organic carbon rain rate (export...

  1. E-Print Network 3.0 - aluminate spinel formation Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Columbia: insights from heavy minerals in stream sediments Summary: , spinel and titanite. Our results suggest that detritus from a horizon of coarse pebble conglomerate......

  2. Defining And Characterizing Sample Representativeness For DWPF Melter Feed Samples

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shine, E. P.; Poirier, M. R.

    2013-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Representative sampling is important throughout the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) process, and the demonstrated success of the DWPF process to achieve glass product quality over the past two decades is a direct result of the quality of information obtained from the process. The objective of this report was to present sampling methods that the Savannah River Site (SRS) used to qualify waste being dispositioned at the DWPF. The goal was to emphasize the methodology, not a list of outcomes from those studies. This methodology includes proven methods for taking representative samples, the use of controlled analytical methods, and data interpretation and reporting that considers the uncertainty of all error sources. Numerous sampling studies were conducted during the development of the DWPF process and still continue to be performed in order to evaluate options for process improvement. Study designs were based on use of statistical tools applicable to the determination of uncertainties associated with the data needs. Successful designs are apt to be repeated, so this report chose only to include prototypic case studies that typify the characteristics of frequently used designs. Case studies have been presented for studying in-tank homogeneity, evaluating the suitability of sampler systems, determining factors that affect mixing and sampling, comparing the final waste glass product chemical composition and durability to that of the glass pour stream sample and other samples from process vessels, and assessing the uniformity of the chemical composition in the waste glass product. Many of these studies efficiently addressed more than one of these areas of concern associated with demonstrating sample representativeness and provide examples of statistical tools in use for DWPF. The time when many of these designs were implemented was in an age when the sampling ideas of Pierre Gy were not as widespread as they are today. Nonetheless, the engineers and statisticians used carefully thought out designs that systematically and economically provided plans for data collection from the DWPF process. Key shared features of the sampling designs used at DWPF and the Gy sampling methodology were the specification of a standard for sample representativeness, an investigation that produced data from the process to study the sampling function, and a decision framework used to assess whether the specification was met based on the data. Without going into detail with regard to the seven errors identified by Pierre Gy, as excellent summaries are readily available such as Pitard [1989] and Smith [2001], SRS engineers understood, for example, that samplers can be biased (Gy?s extraction error), and developed plans to mitigate those biases. Experiments that compared installed samplers with more representative samples obtained directly from the tank may not have resulted in systematically partitioning sampling errors into the now well-known error categories of Gy, but did provide overall information on the suitability of sampling systems. Most of the designs in this report are related to the DWPF vessels, not the large SRS Tank Farm tanks. Samples from the DWPF Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME), which contains the feed to the DWPF melter, are characterized using standardized analytical methods with known uncertainty. The analytical error is combined with the established error from sampling and processing in DWPF to determine the melter feed composition. This composition is used with the known uncertainty of the models in the Product Composition Control System (PCCS) to ensure that the wasteform that is produced is comfortably within the acceptable processing and product performance region. Having the advantage of many years of processing that meets the waste glass product acceptance criteria, the DWPF process has provided a considerable amount of data about itself in addition to the data from many special studies. Demonstrating representative sampling directly from the large Tank Farm tanks is a difficult, if not unsolvable enterprise due to li

  3. Formation damage in underbalanced drilling operations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reyes Serpa, Carlos Alberto

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Formation damage has long been recognized as a potential source of reduced productivity and injectivity in both horizontal and vertical wells. From the moment that the pay zone is being drilled until the well is put on production, a formation...

  4. SAR polar format implementation with MATLAB.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martin, Grant D.; Doerry, Armin Walter

    2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Traditional polar format image formation for Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) requires a large amount of processing power and memory in order to accomplish in real-time. These requirements can thus eliminate the possible usage of interpreted language environments such as MATLAB. However, with trapezoidal aperture phase history collection and changes to the traditional polar format algorithm, certain optimizations make MATLAB a possible tool for image formation. Thus, this document's purpose is two-fold. The first outlines a change to the existing Polar Format MATLAB implementation utilizing the Chirp Z-Transform that improves performance and memory usage achieving near realtime results for smaller apertures. The second is the addition of two new possible image formation options that perform a more traditional interpolation style image formation. These options allow the continued exploration of possible interpolation methods for image formation and some preliminary results comparing image quality are given.

  5. Proportional structural effects of formative indicators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Franke, George R.; Preacher, K. J.; Rigdon, Ed E.

    2009-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Formative constructs must influence two or more distinct outcome variables for meaningful tests of the formative conceptualization. Because the construct mediates the effects of its indicators, the indicators must have ...

  6. Structure formation: Models, Dynamics and Status

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. Padmanabhan

    1995-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The constraints on the models for the structure formation arising from various cosmological observations at different length scales are reviewed. The status of different models for structure formation is examined critically in the light of these observations.

  7. Deposition of TiN and HfO{sub 2} in a commercial 200 mm remote plasma atomic layer deposition reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heil, S. B. S.; Hemmen, J. L. van; Hodson, C. J.; Singh, N.; Klootwijk, J. H.; Roozeboom, F.; Sanden, M. C. M. van de; Kessels, W. M. M. [Department of Applied Physics, Eindhoven University of Technology, P.O. Box 513, 5600 MB Eindhoven (Netherlands); Oxford Instruments Plasma Technology, North End, Yatton BS49 4AP (United Kingdom); Philips Research Laboratories, High Tech Campus 4, 5656 AE Eindhoven (Netherlands); NXP Semiconductors Research, High Tech Campus 4, 5656 AE Eindhoven (Netherlands); Department of Applied Physics, Eindhoven University of Technology, P.O. Box 513, 5600 MB Eindhoven (Netherlands)

    2007-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The authors describe a remote plasma atomic layer deposition reactor (Oxford Instruments FlexAL trade mark sign ) that includes an inductively coupled plasma source and a load lock capable of handling substrates up to 200 mm in diameter. The deposition of titanium nitride (TiN) and hafnium oxide (HfO{sub 2}) is described for the combination of the metal-halide precursor TiCl{sub 4} and H{sub 2}-N{sub 2} plasma and the combination of the metallorganic precursor Hf[N(CH{sub 3})(C{sub 2}H{sub 5})]{sub 4} and O{sub 2} plasma, respectively. The influence of the plasma exposure time and substrate temperature has been studied and compositional, structural, and electrical properties are reported. TiN films with a low Cl impurity content were obtained at 350 deg. C at a growth rate of 0.35 A /cycle with an electrical resistivity as low as 150 {mu}{omega} cm. Carbon-free (detection limit <2 at. %) HfO{sub 2} films were obtained at a growth rate of 1.0 A /cycle at 290 deg. C. The thickness and resisitivity nonuniformity was <5% for the TiN and the thickness uniformality was <2% for the HfO{sub 2} films as determined over 200 mm wafers.

  8. Treating nahcolite containing formations and saline zones

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vinegar, Harold J

    2013-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for treating a nahcolite containing subsurface formation includes removing water from a saline zone in or near the formation. The removed water is heated using a steam and electricity cogeneration facility. The heated water is provided to the nahcolite containing formation. A fluid is produced from the nahcolite containing formation. The fluid includes at least some dissolved nahcolite. At least some of the fluid is provided to the saline zone.

  9. Database Sampling with Functional Dependencies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Riera, Jesús Bisbal

    Database Sampling with Functional Dependencies Jes´us Bisbal, Jane Grimson Department of Computer there is a need to prototype the database which the applications will use when in operation. A prototype database can be built by sampling data from an existing database. Including relevant semantic information when

  10. Role of nucleation sites on the formation of nanoporous Ge

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yates, B. R.; Darby, B. L.; Jones, K. S. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611-6400 (United States); Elliman, R. G. [Department of Electronic Materials Engineering, Research School of Physical Sciences and Engineering, Australian National University, Canberra, Australian Capital Territory 0200 (Australia)

    2012-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The role of nucleation sites on the formation of nanoporous Ge was investigated. Three Ge films with different spherical or columnar pore morphologies to act as inherent nucleation sites were sputtered on (001) Ge. Samples were implanted 90 Degree-Sign from incidence at 300 keV with fluences ranging from 3.0 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 15} to 3.0 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 16} Ge{sup +}/cm{sup 2}. Electron microscopy investigations revealed varying thresholds for nanoporous Ge formation and exhibited a stark difference in the evolution of the Ge layers based on the microstructure of the initial film. The results suggest that the presence of inherent nucleation sites significantly alters the onset and evolution of nanoporous Ge.

  11. Optimization of Hydride Rim Formation in Unirradiated Zr 4 Cladding

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shimskey, Rick W.; Hanson, Brady D.; MacFarlan, Paul J.

    2013-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this work is to build on the results reported in the M2 milestone M2FT 13PN0805051, document number FCRD-USED-2013-000151 (Hanson, 2013). In that work, it was demonstrated that unirradiated samples of zircaloy-4 cladding could be pre-hydrided at temperatures below 400°C in pure hydrogen gas and that the growth of hydrides on the surface could be controlled by changing the surface condition of the samples and form a desired hydride rim on the outside diameter of the cladding. The work performed at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory since the issuing of the M2 milestone has focused its efforts to optimize the formation of a hydride rim on available zircaloy-4 cladding samples by controlling temperature variation and gas flow control during pre-hydriding treatments. Surface conditioning of the outside surface was also examined as a variable. The results of test indicate that much of the variability in the hydride thickness is due to temperature variation occurring in the furnaces as well as how hydrogen gas flows across the sample surface. Efforts to examine other alloys, gas concentrations, and different surface conditioning plan to be pursed in the next FY as more cladding samples become available

  12. Sample push-out fixture

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Biernat, John L. (Scotia, NY)

    2002-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

    This invention generally relates to the remote removal of pelletized samples from cylindrical containment capsules. V-blocks are used to receive the samples and provide guidance to push out rods. Stainless steel liners fit into the v-channels on the v-blocks which permits them to be remotely removed and replaced or cleaned to prevent cross contamination between capsules and samples. A capsule holder securely holds the capsule while allowing manual up/down and in/out movement to align each sample hole with the v-blocks. Both end sections contain identical v-blocks; one that guides the drive out screw and rods or manual push out rods and the other to receive the samples as they are driven out of the capsule.

  13. Petrophysical evaluation of subterranean formations

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Klein, James D; Schoderbek, David A; Mailloux, Jason M

    2013-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods and systems are provided for evaluating petrophysical properties of subterranean formations and comprehensively evaluating hydrate presence through a combination of computer-implemented log modeling and analysis. Certain embodiments include the steps of running a number of logging tools in a wellbore to obtain a variety of wellbore data and logs, and evaluating and modeling the log data to ascertain various petrophysical properties. Examples of suitable logging techniques that may be used in combination with the present invention include, but are not limited to, sonic logs, electrical resistivity logs, gamma ray logs, neutron porosity logs, density logs, NRM logs, or any combination or subset thereof.

  14. Gas Cooling Through Galaxy Formations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mariwan A. Rasheed; Mohamad A. Brza

    Abstract-- Gas cooling was studied in two different boxes of sizes and by simulation at same redshifts. The gas cooling is shown in four different redshifts (z=1.15, 0.5, 0.1 and 0). In the simulation the positions of the clumps of cooled gas were studied with slices of the two volumes and also the density of cooled gas of the two volumes shown in the simulation. From the process of gas cooling it is clear that this process gives different results in the two cases. Index Term- Gas Cooling, Simulation, galaxy Formation. I.

  15. Format for Federal Register Notice

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: AlternativeEnvironment, Safety and HealthDepartmentFindings of NoFleetFood andDepartment ofFormat

  16. Electrochemical formation of field emitters

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bernhardt, Anthony F. (Berkeley, CA)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Electrochemical formation of field emitters, particularly useful in the fabrication of flat panel displays. The fabrication involves field emitting points in a gated field emitter structure. Metal field emitters are formed by electroplating and the shape of the formed emitter is controlled by the potential imposed on the gate as well as on a separate counter electrode. This allows sharp emitters to be formed in a more inexpensive and manufacturable process than vacuum deposition processes used at present. The fabrication process involves etching of the gate metal and the dielectric layer down to the resistor layer, and then electroplating the etched area and forming an electroplated emitter point in the etched area.

  17. Autonomous Helicopter Formation using Model Predictive Control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sastry, S. Shankar

    Autonomous Helicopter Formation using Model Predictive Control Hoam Chung and S. Shankar Sastry are required to fly in tight formations and under harsh conditions. The starting point for safe autonomous into a formation, so that each vehicle can safely maintain sufficient space between it and all other vehicles

  18. Electromagnetic Formation Flight of Satellite Arrays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Electromagnetic Formation Flight of Satellite Arrays Daniel W. Kwon and David W. Miller February 2005 SSL # 2-05 #12;#12;Electromagnetic Formation Flight of Satellite Arrays By DANIEL W. KWON S;#12;Electromagnetic Formation Flight of Satellite Arrays by DANIEL W. KWON Submitted to the Department of Aeronautics

  19. Phase formation in Zr/Fe multilayers during Kr ion irradiation.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Motta, A. T.

    1998-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

    A detailed study has been conducted of the effect of Kr ion irradiation on phase formation in Zr-Fe metallic multilayers, using the Intermediate Voltage Electron Microscopy (IVEM) at Argonne National Laboratory. Metallic multilayers were prepared with different overall compositions (near 50-50 and Fe-rich), and with different wavelengths (repetition thicknesses). These samples were irradiated with 300 keV Kr ions at various temperatures to investigate the final products, as well as the kinetics of phase formation. For the shorter wavelength samples, the final product was in all cases an amorphous Zr-Fe phase, in combination with Fe, while specially for the larger wavelength samples, in the Fe-rich samples the intermetallic compounds ZrFe{sub 2} and Zr{sub 3}Fe were formed in addition to the amorphous phase. The dose to full reaction decreases with temperature, and with wavelength in a manner consistent with a diffusion-controlled reaction.

  20. Shallow meteoric alteration and burial diagenesis of massive dolomite in the Castle Reef Formation, northwest Montana

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Whitsitt, Philip Mark

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ), Sawmill Creek (SC), Half Dome Crag (HDC), Morningstar Mountain (MM), Mount Field (MF), Gateway Pass (GP), North Fork of Dupuyer Creek (NFD), South Fork of Dupuyer Creek (SFD), Volcano Reef (VR), North Fork of Teton River (NFT), Teton River (TR), Cave...SHALLOW METEORIC ALTERATION AND BURIAL DIAGENESIS OF MASSIVE DOLOM I TE I N THE CASTLE REEF FORMAT I ON ~ NORTHWEST MONTANA A Thesis by PHILIP MARK WHITSITT Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial...

  1. Formation of Metallic Copper Nanoparticles at the Soil-Root Interface

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-SeriesFlickr Flickr Editor's note: SincePlant Name: (MM)) (YYYY) PlantFormation

  2. Formation of Metallic Copper Nanoparticles at the Soil-Root Interface

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-SeriesFlickr Flickr Editor's note: SincePlant Name: (MM)) (YYYY)Formation of

  3. A Comparison of "Total Dust" and Inhalable Personal Sampling for Beryllium Exposure.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carter, C M

    2012-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    In 2009, the American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists (ACGIH) reduced the Beryllium (Be) 8-hr Time Weighted Average Threshold Limit Value (TLV-TWA) from 2.0 {micro}g/m{sup 3} to 0.05 {micro}g/m{sup 3} with an inhalable 'I' designation in accordance with ACGIH's particle size-selective criterion for inhalable mass. Currently, per the Department of Energy (DOE) requirements, the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is following the Occupational Health and Safety Administration (OSHA) Permissible Exposure Limit (PEL) of 2.0 {micro}g/m{sup 3} as an 8-hr TWA, which is also the 2005 ACGIH TLV-TWA, and an Action Level (AL) of 0.2 {micro}g/m{sup 3} and sampling is performed using the 37mm (total dust) sampling method. Since DOE is considering adopting the newer 2009 TLV guidelines, the goal of this study was to determine if the current method of sampling using the 37mm (total dust) sampler would produce results that are comparable to what would be measured using the IOM (inhalable) sampler specific to the application of high energy explosive work at LLNL's remote experimental test facility at Site 300. Side-by-side personal sampling using the two samplers was performed over an approximately two-week period during chamber re-entry and cleanup procedures following detonation of an explosive assembly containing Beryllium (Be). The average ratio of personal sampling results for the IOM (inhalable) vs. 37-mm (total dust) sampler was 1.1:1 with a P-value of 0.62, indicating that there was no statistically significant difference in the performance of the two samplers. Therefore, for the type of activity monitored during this study, the 37-mm sampling cassette would be considered a suitable alternative to the IOM sampler for collecting inhalable particulate matter, which is important given the many practical and economic advantages that it presents. However, similar comparison studies would be necessary for this conclusion to be applied to other types of activities, where earlier studies have shown that the IOM sampler tends to collect higher concentrations of Be compared to the 37-mm cassette, which could complicate compliance with what is already an extremely low exposure limit.

  4. Coring in deep hardrock formations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Drumheller, D.S.

    1988-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The United States Department of Energy is involved in a variety of scientific and engineering feasibility studies requiring extensive drilling in hard crystalline rock. In many cases well depths extend from 6000 to 20,000 feet in high-temperature, granitic formations. Examples of such projects are the Hot Dry Rock well system at Fenton Hill, New Mexico and the planned exploratory magma well near Mammoth Lakes, California. In addition to these programs, there is also continuing interest in supporting programs to reduce drilling costs associated with the production of geothermal energy from underground sources such as the Geysers area near San Francisco, California. The overall progression in these efforts is to drill deeper holes in higher temperature, harder formations. In conjunction with this trend is a desire to improve the capability to recover geological information. Spot coring and continuous coring are important elements in this effort. It is the purpose of this report to examine the current methods used to obtain core from deep wells and to suggest projects which will improve existing capabilities. 28 refs., 8 figs., 2 tabs.

  5. Heating tar sands formations while controlling pressure

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Stegemeier, George Leo (Houston, TX) [Houston, TX; Beer, Gary Lee (Houston, TX) [Houston, TX; Zhang, Etuan (Houston, TX) [Houston, TX

    2010-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods for treating a tar sands formation are described herein. Methods may include heating at least a section of a hydrocarbon layer in the formation from a plurality of heaters located in the formation. A pressure in the majority of the section may be maintained below a fracture pressure of the formation. The pressure in the majority of the section may be reduced to a selected pressure after the average temperature reaches a temperature that is above 240.degree. C. and is at or below pyrolysis temperatures of hydrocarbons in the section. At least some hydrocarbon fluids may be produced from the formation.

  6. Sample rotating turntable kit for infrared spectrometers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Eckels, Joel Del (Livermore, CA); Klunder, Gregory L. (Oakland, CA)

    2008-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

    An infrared spectrometer sample rotating turntable kit has a rotatable sample cup containing the sample. The infrared spectrometer has an infrared spectrometer probe for analyzing the sample and the rotatable sample cup is adapted to receive the infrared spectrometer probe. A reflectance standard is located in the rotatable sample cup. A sleeve is positioned proximate the sample cup and adapted to receive the probe. A rotator rotates the rotatable sample cup. A battery is connected to the rotator.

  7. Sample Business Plan Framework 3

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    U.S. Department of Energy Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Sample Business Plan Framework 1: A program seeking to continue operations in the post-grant period as a not-for-profit (NGO) entity.

  8. Sample Business Plan Framework 2

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    U.S. Department of Energy Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Sample Business Plan Framework 1: A program seeking to continue operations in the post-grant period as a not-for-profit (NGO) entity.

  9. Sample Business Plan Framework 4

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    U.S. Department of Energy Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Sample Business Plan Framework 1: A program seeking to continue operations in the post-grant period as a not-for-profit (NGO) entity.

  10. Sample Business Plan Framework 1

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    U.S. Department of Energy Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Sample Business Plan Framework 1: A program seeking to continue operations in the post-grant period as a not-for-profit (NGO) entity.

  11. Sampling based on local bandwidth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wei, Dennis

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The sampling of continuous-time signals based on local bandwidth is considered in this thesis. In an intuitive sense, local bandwidth refers to the rate at which a signal varies locally. One would expect that signals should ...

  12. A Random Walk through Star and Planet Formation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maness, Holly

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and its Neptune-Mass Planet 3.1 Introduction . . . . . . .of Low Mass Star Formation . . . . . 1.3 Planet FormationConstraining Theories of Planet Formation and Evolution .

  13. Depth-discrete sampling port

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pemberton, Bradley E. (Aiken, SC); May, Christopher P. (Columbia, MD); Rossabi, Joseph (Aiken, SC); Riha, Brian D. (Augusta, GA); Nichols, Ralph L. (North Augusta, SC)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A sampling port is provided which has threaded ends for incorporating the port into a length of subsurface pipe. The port defines an internal receptacle which is in communication with subsurface fluids through a series of fine filtering slits. The receptacle is in further communication through a bore with a fitting carrying a length of tubing there which samples are transported to the surface. Each port further defines an additional bore through which tubing, cables, or similar components of adjacent ports may pass.

  14. Depth-discrete sampling port

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pemberton, Bradley E. (Aiken, SC); May, Christopher P. (Columbia, MD); Rossabi, Joseph (Aiken, SC); Riha, Brian D. (Augusta, GA); Nichols, Ralph L. (North Augusta, SC)

    1998-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

    A sampling port is provided which has threaded ends for incorporating the port into a length of subsurface pipe. The port defines an internal receptacle which is in communication with subsurface fluids through a series of fine filtering slits. The receptacle is in further communication through a bore with a fitting carrying a length of tubing there which samples are transported to the surface. Each port further defines an additional bore through which tubing, cables, or similar components of adjacent ports may pass.

  15. Zonal Flow as Pattern Formation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Parker, Jeffrey B

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this section, we examine the transition from statistically homogeneous turbulence to inhomogeneous turbulence with zonal flows. Statistical equations of motion can be derived from the quasilinear approximation to the Hasegawa-Mima equation. We review recent work that finds a bifurcation of these equations and shows that the emergence of zonal flows mathematically follows a standard type of pattern formation. We also show that the dispersion relation of modulational instability can be extracted from the statistical equations of motion in a certain limit. The statistical formulation can thus be thought to offer a more general perspective on growth of coherent structures, namely through instability of a full turbulent spectrum. Finally, we offer a physical perspective on the growth of large-scale structures.

  16. The dynamics of fragment formation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Keane, D. [Kent State Univ., OH (United States); EOS Collaboration

    1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We demonstrate that in the Quantum Molecular Dynamics model, dynamical correlations can result in the production rate for final state nucleon clusters (and hence composite fragments) being higher than would be expected if statistics and the available phase space were dominant in determining composite formation. An intranuclear cascade or a Boltzmann-Uehling-Uhlenbeck model, combined with a statistical approach in the late stage of the collision to determine composites, provides an equivalent description only under limited conditions of centrality and beam energy. We use data on participant fragment production in Au + Au collisions in the Bevalac`s BOS time projection chamber to map out the parameter space where statistical clustering provides a good description. In particular, we investigate momentum-space densities of fragments up to {sup 4}He as a function of fragment transverse momentum, azimuth relative to the reaction plane, rapidity, multiplicity and beam energy.

  17. Adaptive Optics in Star Formation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wolfgang Brandner

    2003-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Over the past ten years, the concept of adaptive optics has evolved from early experimental stages to a standard observing tool now available at almost all major optical and near-infrared telescope facilities. Adaptive optics will also be essential in exploiting the full potential of the large optical/infrared interferometers currently under construction. Both observations with high-angular resolution and at high contrast, and with a high point source sensitivity are facilitated by adaptive optics. Among the areas which benefit most from the use of adaptive optics are studies of the circumstellar environment (envelopes, disks, outflows), substellar companions and multiple systems, and dense young stellar populations. This contribution highlights some of the recent advances in star formation studies facilitated by adaptive optics, and gives a brief tutorial on optimized observing and data reduction strategies.

  18. Electrochemical formation of field emitters

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bernhardt, A.F.

    1999-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Electrochemical formation of field emitters, particularly useful in the fabrication of flat panel displays is disclosed. The fabrication involves field emitting points in a gated field emitter structure. Metal field emitters are formed by electroplating and the shape of the formed emitter is controlled by the potential imposed on the gate as well as on a separate counter electrode. This allows sharp emitters to be formed in a more inexpensive and manufacturable process than vacuum deposition processes used at present. The fabrication process involves etching of the gate metal and the dielectric layer down to the resistor layer, and then electroplating the etched area and forming an electroplated emitter point in the etched area. 12 figs.

  19. Effect of Plating Variables on Whisker Formation in Pure Tin Films

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collins, Gary S.

    Effect of Plating Variables on Whisker Formation in Pure Tin Films Stephanie Miller Advisors & Materials Engineering, Washington State University Introduction Tin whiskers are single-crystal filaments the effect of plating variables on whisker growth in tin-plated copper samples, with the goal of finding

  20. SOLVENT HOLD TANK SAMPLE RESULTS FOR MCU-14-667-672 AND MCU-14-846-847: AUGUST AND SEPTEMBER 2014 MONTHLY SAMPLES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fondeur, F.; Taylor-Pashow, K.

    2014-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

    SRNL received two sets of SHT samples (MCU-14-667-672, pulled 8/27/2014 and MCU-14-846-847, pulled on 9/22/2014) for analysis. The samples were analyzed for composition. It is recommended that the solvent receives Isopar® L and TiDG trimming at this time. Analysis of sample MCU-14-846-847 indicates the solvent has evaporated Isopar®L and has lost TiDG to a level below the recommended minimum 1 mM level. Since the addition of MaxCalix to the SHT in early July 2014, the MaxCalix concentration in the solvent has reached nominal values. The laboratory will continue to monitor the quality of the solvent in particular for any new impurity or degradation of the solvent components.

  1. Reference Potential source Data type Sampling site Type of samples Number of samples Method of source

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meskhidze, Nicholas

    samples for Saharan dust from Libya back trajectory analysis Kandler et al. 2009 PSA NAF-2 Illite NAF-4 Illite/kaolinite ratio Chlorite/kaolinite ratio Carbonate content Libya (here: central

  2. The foraminiferal and lithologic characteristics of the Reklaw formation of Leon, Robertson and Milam counties, Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davis, Kenneth Eugene

    1961-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    with the power auger was a piece of tubing four inches ln diameter, with two "Ln shaped cutting':teeth at the base. 15 As the teeth cut on the bottom of the hole the material was forced irrto the tubing preventing contamination 6f' strata. from"bbove. Samples... the portable power auger to obtain samples from unexposed local- ities and who critically read the manuscript. The writer is grateful to Mr. C. M. Maggio and Mr. D. I. Miller for their aid in collecting samples . ABSTRACT The Reklaw formation of Leon...

  3. Radio Triggered Star Formation in Cooling Flows

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. R. McNamara

    1999-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The giant galaxies located at the centers of cluster cooling flows are frequently sites of vigorous star formation. In some instances, star formation appears to have been triggered by the galaxy's radio source. The colors and spectral indices of the young populations are generally consistent with short duration bursts or continuous star formation for durations much less than 1 Gyr, which is less than the presumed ages of cooling flows. The star formation properties are inconsistent with fueling by a continuously accreting cooling flow, although the prevalence of star formation is consistent with repeated bursts and periodic refueling. Star formation may be fueled, in some cases, by cold material stripped from neighboring cluster galaxies.

  4. A Connection between Obscuration and Star Formation in Luminous Quasars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Chien-Ting J; Alberts, Stacey; Harrison, Chris M; Alexander, David M; Assef, Roberto; Brown, Michael J I; Del Moro, Agnese; Forman, William R; Gorjian, Varoujan; Goulding, Andrew D; Hainline, Kevin N; Jones, Christine; Kochanek, Christopher S; Murray, Stephen S; Pope, Alexandra; Rovilos, Emmanouel; Stern, Daniel

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a measurement of the star formation properties of a uniform sample of mid-IR selected, unobscured and obscured quasars (QSO1s and QSO2s) in the Bo\\"otes survey region. We use an spectral energy distribution (SED) analysis for photometric data spanning optical to far-IR wavelengths to decompose AGN and host galaxy components. We find that when compared to a matched sample of QSO1s, the QSO2s have higher far-IR detection fractions, far-IR fluxes and infrared star formation luminosities ($L_{\\rm IR}^{\\rm SF}$) by a factor of $\\sim2$. Correspondingly, we show that the AGN obscured fraction rises from 0.3 to 0.7 between $4-40\\times10^{11}L_\\odot$. We also find evidence associating the absorption in the X-ray emission with the presence of far-IR emitting dust. Overall, these results are consistent with galaxy evolution models in which quasar obscurations can be associated with a dust-enshrouded starburst galaxies.

  5. ON THE ESTIMATION OF RANDOM UNCERTAINTIES OF STAR FORMATION HISTORIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dolphin, Andrew E., E-mail: adolphin@raytheon.com [Raytheon Company, Tucson, AZ, 85734 (United States)

    2013-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The standard technique for measurement of random uncertainties of star formation histories (SFHs) is the bootstrap Monte Carlo, in which the color-magnitude diagram (CMD) is repeatedly resampled. The variation in SFHs measured from the resampled CMDs is assumed to represent the random uncertainty in the SFH measured from the original data. However, this technique systematically and significantly underestimates the uncertainties for times in which the measured star formation rate is low or zero, leading to overly (and incorrectly) high confidence in that measurement. This study proposes an alternative technique, the Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC), which samples the probability distribution of the parameters used in the original solution to directly estimate confidence intervals. While the most commonly used MCMC algorithms are incapable of adequately sampling a probability distribution that can involve thousands of highly correlated dimensions, the Hybrid Monte Carlo algorithm is shown to be extremely effective and efficient for this particular task. Several implementation details, such as the handling of implicit priors created by parameterization of the SFH, are discussed in detail.

  6. Star-formation histories of local luminous infrared galaxies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pereira-Santaella, Miguel; Colina, Luis; Miralles-Caballero, Daniel; Pérez-González, Pablo G; Arribas, Santiago; Bellocchi, Enrica; Cazzoli, Sara; Díaz-Santos, Tanio; López, Javier Piqueras

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the analysis of the integrated spectral energy distribution (SED) from the ultraviolet (UV) to the far-infrared and H$\\alpha$ of a sample of 29 local systems and individual galaxies with infrared (IR) luminosities between 10^11 Lsun and 10^11.8 Lsun. We have combined new narrow-band H$\\alpha$+[NII] and broad-band g, r optical imaging taken with the Nordic Optical Telescope (NOT), with archival GALEX, 2MASS, Spitzer, and Herschel data. The SEDs (photometry and integrated H$\\alpha$ flux) have been fitted with a modified version of the MAGPHYS code using stellar population synthesis models for the UV-near-IR range and thermal emission models for the IR emission taking into account the energy balance between the absorbed and re-emitted radiation. From the SED fits we derive the star-formation histories (SFH) of these galaxies. For nearly half of them the star-formation rate appears to be approximately constant during the last few Gyrs. In the other half, the current star-formation rate seems to be enha...

  7. Hydrocarbon potential of Spearfish Formation in eastern Williston basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dodge C.J.N.; Reid, F.S.

    1986-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    More than 36 million bbl of oil have been produced from stratigraphic traps in sandstones of the Triassic-Jurassic Spearfish Formation in the eastern part of the Williston basin. Newburg field has produced 32 million bbl of oil and Waskada field, discovered in 1980, is estimated to have over 10 million bbl of oil in reserves. A binocular microscopic and petrographic examination of cores from each of the fields has revealed considerable differences in the characteristics of producing sandstones. Cores and sample cuttings from 30 wells in the US and Canada form the basis for this comparison of the two fields. The Spearfish Formation consists of porous, permeable, well-sorted, very fine-grained sandstones with a sucrosic dolomite matrix that are interbedded with impermeable sandstones, siltstones, and shale. The environment of deposition is believed to be the intertidal zone (tidal flat). Sediments of the Spearfish Formation were deposited by a transgressive sea on an eroded Mississippian carbonate section. Oil found in the Spearfish sandstones is derived from the Mississippian.

  8. Floating insulated conductors for heating subsurface formations

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Burns, David; Goodwin, Charles R.

    2014-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

    A heating system for a subsurface formation includes a conduit located in a first opening in the subsurface formation. Three electrical conductors are located in the conduit. A return conductor is located inside the conduit. The return conductor is electrically coupled to the ends of the electrical conductors distal from the surface of the formation. Insulation is located inside the conduit. The insulation electrically insulates the three electrical conductors, the return conductor, and the conduit from each other.

  9. The Evolutionary Status of Isolated Dwarf Irregular Galaxies II. Star Formation Histories and Gas Depletion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    L. van Zee

    2001-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

    The results of UBV and H alpha imaging of a large sample of isolated dwarf irregular galaxies are interpreted in the context of composite stellar population models. The observed optical colors are best fit by composite stellar populations which have had approximately constant star formation rates for at least 10 Gyr. The galaxies span a range of central surface brightness, from 20.5 to 25.0 mag arcsec^{-2}; there is no correlation between surface brightness and star formation history. Although the current star formation rates are low, it is possible to reproduce the observed luminosities without a major starburst episode. The derived gas depletion timescales are long, typically ~20 Gyr. These results indicate that dwarf irregular galaxies will be able to continue with their slow, but constant, star formation activity for at least another Hubble time. The sample of isolated dIs is compared to a sample of star bursting dwarf galaxies taken from the literature. The star bursting dwarf galaxies have many similar properties; the main difference between these two types of gas-rich dwarf galaxies is that the current star formation is concentrated in the center of the star bursting systems while it is much more distributed in the quiescent dIs. This results in pronounced color gradients for the starbursting dwarf galaxies, while the majority of the quiescent dwarf irregular galaxies have minor or non-existent color gradients. Thus, the combination of low current star formation rates, blue colors, and the lack of significant color gradients indicates that star formation percolates slowly across the disk of normal dwarf galaxies in a quasi-continuous manner.

  10. Sample preparation method for glass welding by ultrashort laser pulses yields higher seam strength

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cvecek, K.; Miyamoto, I.; Strauss, J.; Wolf, M.; Frick, T.; Schmidt, M.

    2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Glass welding by ultrashort laser pulses allows joining without the need of an absorber or a preheating and postheating process. However, cracks generated during the welding process substantially impair the joining strength of the welding seams. In this paper a sample preparation method is described that prevents the formation of cracks. The measured joining strength of samples prepared by this method is substantially higher than previously reported values.

  11. Core analyses for selected samples from the Culebra Dolomite at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kelley, V.A.; Saulnier, G.J. Jr. (INTERA, Inc., Austin, TX (USA))

    1990-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Two groups of core samples from the Culebra Dolomite Member of the Rustler Formation at and near the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant were analyzed to provide estimates of hydrologic parameters for use in flow-and-transport modeling. Whole-core and core-plug samples were analyzed by helium porosimetry, resaturation and porosimetry, mercury-intrusion porosimetry, electrical-resistivity techniques, and gas-permeability methods. 33 refs., 25 figs., 10 tabs.

  12. Theoretical Investigations on the Formation and Dehydrogenation...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of boron-nitrogen-hydrogen (BNHx) compounds that are promising materials for chemical hydrogen storage. Understanding the kinetics and reaction pathways of formation of these...

  13. Heating systems for heating subsurface formations

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nguyen, Scott Vinh (Houston, TX); Vinegar, Harold J. (Bellaire, TX)

    2011-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods and systems for heating a subsurface formation are described herein. A heating system for a subsurface formation includes a sealed conduit positioned in an opening in the formation and a heat source. The sealed conduit includes a heat transfer fluid. The heat source provides heat to a portion of the sealed conduit to change phase of the heat transfer fluid from a liquid to a vapor. The vapor in the sealed conduit rises in the sealed conduit, condenses to transfer heat to the formation and returns to the conduit portion as a liquid.

  14. Threshold displacement energies and defect formation energies...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    energies and defect formation energies in Y2Ti2O7. Abstract: Ab initio molecular dynamics simulations have been carried out to determine both the threshold displacement...

  15. Heating tar sands formations to visbreaking temperatures

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Karanikas, John Michael (Houston, TX); Colmenares, Tulio Rafael (Houston, TX); Zhang, Etuan (Houston, TX); Marino, Marian (Houston, TX); Roes, Augustinus Wilhelmus Maria (Houston, TX); Ryan, Robert Charles (Houston, TX); Beer, Gary Lee (Houston, TX); Dombrowski, Robert James (Houston, TX); Jaiswal, Namit (Houston, TX)

    2009-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods for treating a tar sands formation are described herein. Methods may include heating at least a section of a hydrocarbon layer in the formation from a plurality of heaters located in the formation. The heat may be controlled so that at least a majority of the section reaches an average temperature of between 200.degree. C. and 240.degree. C., which results in visbreaking of at least some hydrocarbons in the section. At least some visbroken hydrocarbon fluids may be produced from the formation.

  16. Nonequilibrium Atmospheric Secondary Organic Aerosol Formation...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Aerosol Formation and Growth. Abstract: Airborne particles play a critical role in air quality, human health effects, visibility and climate. Secondary organic aerosols (SOA)...

  17. Standard Format and Content for Emergency Plans

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1997-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

    This volume addresses recommended emergency plan format and content for Operational Emergency Base Programs and Operational Emergency Hazardous Material Programs. Canceled by DOE G 151.1-3.

  18. Hydrogen Adsorption Induces Interlayer Carbon Bond Formation...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Hydrogen Adsorption Induces Interlayer Carbon Bond Formation in Supported Few-Layer Graphene Friday, February 28, 2014 Among the allotropes of carbon, diamond has some of the most...

  19. Brine Sampling and Evaluation Program, 1990 report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deal, D.E.; Abitz, R.J.; Myers, J.; Case, J.B.; Martin, M.L.; Roggenthen, W.M. [International Technology Corp., Albuquerque, NM (United States)] [International Technology Corp., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Belski, D.S. [Westinghouse Electric Corp., Carlsbad, NM (United States). Waste Isolation Div.] [Westinghouse Electric Corp., Carlsbad, NM (United States). Waste Isolation Div.

    1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The data presented in this report are the result of Brine Sampling and Evaluation Program (BSEP) activities at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) during 1990. When excavations began in 1982, small brine seepages (weeps) were observed on the walls. These brine occurrences were initially described as part of the Site Validation Program. Brine studies were formalized in 1985. The BSEP activities document and investigate the origins, hydraulic characteristics, extent, and composition of brine occurrences in the Permian Salado Formation and seepage of that brine into the excavations at the WIPP. The brine chemistry is important because it assists in understanding the origin of the brine and because it may affect possible chemical reactions in the buried waste after sealing the repository. The volume of brine and the hydrologic system that drives the brine seepage also need to be understood to assess the long-term performance of the repository. After more than eight years of observations (1982--1990), no credible evidence exists to indicate that enough naturally occurring brine will seep into the WIPP excavations to be of practical concern. The detailed observations and analyses summarized herein and in previous BSEP reports confirm the evidence apparent during casual visits to the underground workings -- that the excavations are remarkably dry.

  20. EARLY-STAGE MASSIVE STAR FORMATION NEAR THE GALACTIC CENTER: Sgr C

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kendrew, S.; Johnston, K.; Beuther, H. [Max-Planck-Institut für Astronomie, Königstuhl 17, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany)] [Max-Planck-Institut für Astronomie, Königstuhl 17, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Ginsburg, A.; Bally, J.; Battersby, C. [CASA, University of Colorado at Boulder, UCB 389, Boulder, CO 80309 (United States)] [CASA, University of Colorado at Boulder, UCB 389, Boulder, CO 80309 (United States); Cyganowski, C. J., E-mail: kendrew@mpia.de [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)

    2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present near-infrared spectroscopy and 1 mm line and continuum observations of a recently identified site of high mass star formation likely to be located in the Central Molecular Zone (CMZ) near Sgr C. Located on the outskirts of the massive evolved H II region associated with Sgr C, the area is characterized by an Extended Green Object (EGO) measuring ?10'' in size (0.4 pc), whose observational characteristics suggest the presence of an embedded massive protostar driving an outflow. Our data confirm that early-stage star formation is taking place on the periphery of the Sgr C H II region, with detections of two protostellar cores and several knots of H{sub 2} and Brackett ? emission alongside a previously detected compact radio source. We calculate the cores' joint mass to be ?10{sup 3} M {sub ?}, with column densities of 1-2 × 10{sup 24} cm{sup –2}. We show the host molecular cloud to hold ?10{sup 5} M {sub ?} of gas and dust with temperatures and column densities favorable for massive star formation to occur, however, there is no evidence of star formation outside of the EGO, indicating that the cloud is predominantly quiescent. Given its mass, density, and temperature, the cloud is comparable to other remarkable non-star-forming clouds such as G0.253 in the eastern CMZ.

  1. EMP Attachment 1 DOE-SC PNNL Site Sampling and Analysis Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meier, Kirsten M.

    2011-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

    This Sampling and Analysis Plan (SAP) is written for the radiological environmental air surveillance program for the DOE-SC PNNL Site, Richland Washington. It provides the requirements for planning sampling events, and the requirements imposed on the analytical laboratory analyzing the air samples. The actual air sampling process is in procedure EPRP-AIR-029. The rationale for analyte selection, media, and sampling site location has been vetted through the data quality objectives (DQO) process (Barnett et al. 2010). The results from the DQO process have been reviewed and approved by the Washington State Department of Health. The DQO process (Barnett et al. 2010) identified seven specific radionuclides for analysis along with the need for gross alpha and gross beta radiological analyses. The analytes are {sup 241}Am, {sup 243}Am, {sup 244}Cm, {sup 60}Co, {sup 238}Pu, {sup 239}Pu, and {sup 233}U. The report also determined that air samples for particulates are the only sample matrix required for the monitoring program. These samples are collected on 47-mm glass-fiber filters.

  2. Inertial impaction air sampling device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dewhurst, K.H.

    1987-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

    An inertial impactor to be used in an air sampling device for collection of respirable size particles in ambient air which may include a graphite furnace as the impaction substrate in a small-size, portable, direct analysis structure that gives immediate results and is totally self-contained allowing for remote and/or personal sampling. The graphite furnace collects suspended particles transported through the housing by means of the air flow system, and these particles may be analyzed for elements, quantitatively and qualitatively, by atomic absorption spectrophotometry. 3 figs.

  3. Spent nuclear fuel sampling strategy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bergmann, D.W.

    1995-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

    This report proposes a strategy for sampling the spent nuclear fuel (SNF) stored in the 105-K Basins (105-K East and 105-K West). This strategy will support decisions concerning the path forward SNF disposition efforts in the following areas: (1) SNF isolation activities such as repackaging/overpacking to a newly constructed staging facility; (2) conditioning processes for fuel stabilization; and (3) interim storage options. This strategy was developed without following the Data Quality Objective (DQO) methodology. It is, however, intended to augment the SNF project DQOS. The SNF sampling is derived by evaluating the current storage condition of the SNF and the factors that effected SNF corrosion/degradation.

  4. Inertial impaction air sampling device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dewhurst, Katharine H. (13150 Wenonah SE. Apt. 727, Albuquerque, NM 87123)

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An inertial impactor to be used in an air sampling device for collection of respirable size particles in ambient air which may include a graphite furnace as the impaction substrate in a small-size, portable, direct analysis structure that gives immediate results and is totally self-contained allowing for remote and/or personal sampling. The graphite furnace collects suspended particles transported through the housing by means of the air flow system, and these particles may be analyzed for elements, quantitatively and qualitatively, by atomic absorption spectrophotometry.

  5. Inertial impaction air sampling device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dewhurst, K.H.

    1990-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

    An inertial impactor is designed which is to be used in an air sampling device for collection of respirable size particles in ambient air. The device may include a graphite furnace as the impaction substrate in a small-size, portable, direct analysis structure that gives immediate results and is totally self-contained allowing for remote and/or personal sampling. The graphite furnace collects suspended particles transported through the housing by means of the air flow system, and these particles may be analyzed for elements, quantitatively and qualitatively, by atomic absorption spectrophotometry. 3 figs.

  6. Sample Licensing Agreements | Partnerships | ORNL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 -the Mid-Infrared0 ResourceAwardsSafeguards and SecuritySafety Salt LakeSampleSample

  7. Guidelines for Optimizing Wireline Formation Testing and Downhole Fluid Analysis to Address Fault Transmissivity in the Context of Reservoir Compartment Connectivity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pfeiffer, Thomas

    2011-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    process in the design phase of the project. Assessing reservoir compartment connectivity is of paramount importance for a optimal field development. Recent technological advances in wireline formation testing and sampling provide asset teams with a new...

  8. Testing Results for Nb-Ti, 120-mm-Aperture, Low-B Quadrupole Models for the LHC High-Luminosity Insertion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kirby, G A; Bajko, M; Charrondiere, M; Bourcey, N; Datskov, V I; Fessia, P; Feuvrier, J; Galbraith, P; Garcia Tabares, A; Garcia-Perez, J; Granieri, P; Hagen, P; Lorin, C; Perez, J C; Russenschuck, S; Sahner, T; Segreti, M; Todesco, E; Willering, G

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The design and construction of a 120 mm wide-aperture, Nb-Ti superconducting quadrupole magnet for the LHC insertion region is part of a study towards a luminosity upgrade of the LHC at CERN, envisaged for 2020-22. The main challenges for this accelerator quality magnet are to operate reliably with the high heat and radiation loads that are predicted in the insertion magnet regions. Calculations give approximately 500 Watts over the 30-m-long string of insertion magnets, while today LHC is operating for a nominal heat load of 12 Watts. To extract this heat, the model magnets incorporate new features: Open cable insulation, open ground insulation, open magnet structure, and a quench heater that has open channels to help extract the steady state heat load. This paper presents results from tests at room temperature and 1.8 K for the initial model magnet. We report magnet training, transfer function and field quality measurements, quench heater performance, and heat extraction studies using imbedded heaters to si...

  9. The Ability of MM5 to Simulate Ice Clouds: Systematic Comparison between Simulated and Measured Fluxes and Lidar/Radar Profiles at SIRTA Atmospheric Observatory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chiriaco, M.; Vautard, R.; Chepfer, H.; Haeffelin, M.; Wanherdrick, Y.; Morille, Y.; Protat, A.; Dudhia, J.

    2005-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Ice clouds play a major role in the radiative energy budget of the Earth-atmosphere system (Liou 1986). Their radiative effect is governed primarily by the equilibrium between their albedo and greenhouse effects. Both macrophysical and microphysical properties of ice clouds regulate this equilibrium. For quantifying the effect of these clouds onto climate and weather systems, they must be properly characterized in atmospheric models. In this paper we use remote-sensing measurements from the SIRTA ground based atmospheric observatory (Site Instrumental de Recherche par Teledetection Atmospherique, http://sirta.lmd.polytechnique.fr). Lidar and radar observations taken over 18 months are used, in order to gain statistical confidence in the model evaluation. Along this period of time, 62 days are selected for study because they contain parts of ice clouds. We use the ''model to observations'' approach by simulating lidar and radar signals from MM5 outputs. Other more classical variables such as shortwave and longwave radiative fluxes are also used. Four microphysical schemes, among which that proposed by Reisner et al. (1998) with original or modified parameterizations of particle terminal fall velocities (Zurovac-Jevtic and Zhang 2003, Heymsfield and Donner 1990), and the simplified Dudhia (1989) scheme are evaluated in this study.

  10. Offline solid phase microextraction sampling system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Harvey, Chris A. (French Camp, CA)

    2008-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

    An offline solid phase microextraction (SPME) sampling apparatus for enabling SPME samples to be taken a number of times from a previously collected fluid sample (e.g. sample atmosphere) stored in a fused silica lined bottle which keeps volatile organics in the fluid sample stable for weeks at a time. The offline SPME sampling apparatus has a hollow body surrounding a sampling chamber, with multiple ports through which a portion of a previously collected fluid sample may be (a) released into the sampling chamber, (b) SPME sampled to collect analytes for subsequent GC analysis, and (c) flushed/purged using a fluidically connected vacuum source and purging fluid source to prepare the sampling chamber for additional SPME samplings of the same original fluid sample, such as may have been collected in situ from a headspace.

  11. Friction Factor Measurement, Analysis, and Modeling for Flat-Plates with 12.15 mm Diameter Hole-Pattern, Tested with Air at Different Clearances, Inlet Pressures, and Pressure Ratios

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Deva Asirvatham, Thanesh

    2011-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    of 800, 1000, and 1200 psi respectively). These nine combinations of clearance and inlet pressure will give a range of friction factor. The following objectives are considered. 17 Figure 10. Detailed view of a 3.175 mm diameter hole...

  12. cession Numb Main Entry Title Description Restrictions Material type Extent in container Location Slides Map Case M/A Date MM/DD/YY Accession date Notes Folder List 81-002 Froman, Lenore Photographs, 1959

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Russell, Lynn

    Slides Map Case M/A Date MM/DD/YY Accession date Notes Folder List 81-002 Froman, Lenore Photographs, 1959 Five color 35mm slides depicting the departure of R/V Stranger on Naga Expedition, 15 June 1959. Photographs 5 items Slides 1A 1A 7/21/1981 1981 Not Needed 81-003 SIO Ship Operations and Marine Technical

  13. Waste tank characterization sampling limits

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tusler, L.A.

    1994-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

    This document is a result of the Plant Implementation Team Investigation into delayed reporting of the exotherm in Tank 241-T-111 waste samples. The corrective actions identified are to have immediate notification of appropriate Tank Farm Operations Shift Management if analyses with potential safety impact exceed established levels. A procedure, WHC-IP-0842 Section 12.18, ``TWRS Approved Sampling and Data Analysis by Designated Laboratories`` (WHC 1994), has been established to require all tank waste sampling (including core, auger and supernate) and tank vapor samples be performed using this document. This document establishes levels for specified analysis that require notification of the appropriate shift manager. The following categories provide numerical values for analysis that may indicate that a tank is either outside the operating specification or should be evaluated for inclusion on a Watch List. The information given is intended to translate an operating limit such as heat load, expressed in Btu/hour, to an analysis related limit, in this case cesium-137 and strontium-90 concentrations. By using the values provided as safety flags, the analytical laboratory personnel can notify a shift manager that a tank is in potential violation of an operating limit or that a tank should be considered for inclusion on a Watch List. The shift manager can then take appropriate interim measures until a final determination is made by engineering personnel.

  14. Sample Internship Posting Department Name

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bordenstein, Seth

    Sample Internship Posting Department Name: Internship Title: Location: Description of Organization are examples from other internship postings Interns will: · Analyze potential investments · Shadow team members(s) in ________ is desirable For a list of majors see http://admissions.vanderbilt.edu/major Internship Period: The following

  15. Environmental surveillance master sampling schedule

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bisping, L.E.

    1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document contains the planned 1994 schedules for routine collection of samples for the Surface Environmental Surveillance Project (SESP), Drinking Water Project, and Ground-Water Surveillance Project. Samples are routinely collected for the SESP and analyzed to determine the quality of air, surface water, soil, sediment, wildlife, vegetation, foodstuffs, and farm products at Hanford Site and surrounding communities. The responsibility for monitoring the onsite drinking water falls outside the scope of the SESP. The Hanford Environmental Health Foundation is responsible for monitoring the nonradiological parameters as defined in the National Drinking Water Standards while PNL conducts the radiological monitoring of the onsite drinking water. PNL conducts the drinking water monitoring project concurrent with the SESP to promote efficiency and consistency, utilize the expertise developed over the years, and reduce costs associated with management, procedure development, data management, quality control and reporting. The ground-water sampling schedule identifies ground-water sampling events used by PNL for environmental surveillance of the Hanford Site.

  16. Environmental Analysis & Policy: Sample Pathway

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goldberg, Bennett

    Environmental Analysis & Policy: Sample Pathway Semester I Semester II Freshman Year CGS Core CGS Sustainable Development OR Spring GE 425 U.S. Environmental Policy (Senior) GE 309 Intermediate Env Analysis (Fall) EAP Elective Summer Environmental Internship Senior Year GE 420 Env Policy Analysis 4 th Semester

  17. AUTOMATING GROUNDWATER SAMPLING AT HANFORD

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    CONNELL CW; HILDEBRAND RD; CONLEY SF; CUNNINGHAM DE

    2009-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Until this past October, Fluor Hanford managed Hanford's integrated groundwater program for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). With the new contract awards at the Site, however, the CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company (CHPRC) has assumed responsibility for the groundwater-monitoring programs at the 586-square-mile reservation in southeastern Washington State. These programs are regulated by the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) and the Comprehensive Environmental Response Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA). The purpose of monitoring is to track existing groundwater contamination from past practices, as well as other potential contamination that might originate from RCRA treatment, storage, and disposal (TSD) facilities. An integral part of the groundwater-monitoring program involves taking samples of the groundwater and measuring the water levels in wells scattered across the site. More than 1,200 wells are sampled each year. Historically, field personnel or 'samplers' have been issued pre-printed forms that have information about the well(s) for a particular sampling evolution. This information is taken from the Hanford Well Information System (HWIS) and the Hanford Environmental Information System (HEIS)--official electronic databases. The samplers used these hardcopy forms to document the groundwater samples and well water-levels. After recording the entries in the field, the samplers turned the forms in at the end of the day and the collected information was posted onto a spreadsheet that was then printed and included in a log book. The log book was then used to make manual entries of the new information into the software application(s) for the HEIS and HWIS databases. This is a pilot project for automating this tedious process by providing an electronic tool for automating water-level measurements and groundwater field-sampling activities. The automation will eliminate the manual forms and associated data entry, improve the accuracy of the information recorded, and enhance the efficiency and sampling capacity of field personnel. The goal of the effort is to eliminate 100 percent of the manual input to the database(s) and replace the management of paperwork by the field and clerical personnel with an almost entirely electronic process. These activities will include the following: scheduling the activities of the field teams, electronically recording water-level measurements, electronically logging and filing Groundwater Sampling Reports (GSR), and transferring field forms into the site-wide Integrated Document Management System (IDMS).

  18. Formation of $??$ atoms in $K_{?4} decay

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. R. Gevorkyan; A. V. Tarasov; O. O. Voskresenskaya

    2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We derive the decay rate of $\\pi\\mu$ atom formation in $K_{\\mu 4}$ decay. Using the obtained expressions we calculate the decay rate of atom formation and point out that considered decay can give a noticeable contribution as a background to the fundamental decay $K^+\\to \\pi^+\

  19. Methods for forming wellbores in heated formations

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Guimerans, Rosalvina Ramona; Mansure, Arthur James

    2012-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for forming a wellbore in a heated formation includes flowing liquid cooling fluid to a bottom hole assembly in a wellbore in a heated formation. At least a portion of the liquid cooling fluid is vaporized at or near a region to be cooled. Vaporizing the liquid cooling fluid absorbs heat from the region to be cooled.

  20. The Star Formation History of NGC 6822

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ted K. Wyder

    2001-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Images of five fields in the Local Group dwarf irregular galaxy NGC 6822 obtained with the {\\it Hubble Space Telescope} in the F555W and F814W filters are presented. Photometry for the stars in these images was extracted using the Point-Spread-Function fitting program HSTPHOT/MULTIPHOT. The resulting color-magnitude diagrams reach down to $V\\approx26$, a level well below the red clump, and were used to solve quantitatively for the star formation history of NGC 6822. Assuming that stars began forming in this galaxy from low-metallicity gas and that there is little variation in the metallicity at each age, the distribution of stars along the red giant branch is best fit with star formation beginning in NGC 6822 12-15 Gyr ago. The best-fitting star formation histories for the old and intermediate age stars are similar among the five fields and show a constant or somewhat increasing star formation rate from 15 Gyr ago to the present except for a possible dip in the star formation rate from 3 to 5 Gyr ago. The main differences among the five fields are in the higher overall star formation rate per area in the bar fields as well as in the ratio of the recent star formation rate to the average past rate. These variations in the recent star formation rate imply that stars formed within the past 0.6 Gyr are not spatially very well mixed throughout the galaxy.

  1. DISSERTATION FORMATION OF THE HURRICANE EYE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schubert, Wayne H.

    DISSERTATION FORMATION OF THE HURRICANE EYE Submitted by Jonathan L. Vigh Department of Atmospheric OF THE HURRICANE EYE BE ACCEPTED AS FULFILLING IN PART REQUIREMENTS FOR THE DEGREE OF DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY. Schubert Department Head: Richard H. Johnson ii #12;ABSTRACT OF DISSERTATION FORMATION OF THE HURRICANE EYE

  2. Shell Formation and Bone Strength Laying Hens

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shell Formation and Bone Strength in Laying Hens Effects of Age, Daidzein and Exogenous Estrogen Cover aquarelle: E. Spörndly-Nees #12;Shell Formation and Bone Strength in Laying Hens Effects of Age eggshells as shell quality declines with age during the laying period. This is a concern for food safety

  3. Le logiciel "Tigre" en formation PLC 1 Grtice J. Vincent Le logiciel Tigre en formation PLC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    "Tigre" en formation PLC 1 Grétice J. Vincent Le logiciel « Tigre » en formation PLC J. Vincent Le;______________________________________________________________________________________ Le logiciel "Tigre" en formation PLC 2 Grétice J. Vincent 1.1. La lecture Voici l'écran d;______________________________________________________________________________________ Le logiciel "Tigre" en formation PLC 3 Grétice J. Vincent Figure 3 1.2. La démonstration Voici l

  4. Sequentially Triggered Star Formation in OB Associations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas Preibisch; Hans Zinnecker

    2006-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss observational evidence for sequential and triggered star formation in OB associations. We first review the star formation process in the Scorpius-Centaurus OB association, the nearest OB association to the Sun, where several recent extensive studies have allowed us to reconstruct the star formation history in a rather detailed way. We then compare the observational results with those obtained for other OB associations and with recent models of rapid cloud and star formation in the turbulent interstellar medium. We conclude that the formation of whole OB subgroups (each consisting of several thousand stars) requires large-scale triggering mechanisms such as shocks from expanding wind and supernova driven superbubbles surrounding older subgroups. Other triggering mechanisms, like radiatively driven implosion of globules, also operate, but seem to be secondary processes, forming only small stellar groups rather than whole OB subgroups with thousands of stars.

  5. Hanford Site Environmental Surveillance Master Sampling Schedule

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bisping, Lynn E.

    2000-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

    This document contains the CY2000 schedules for the routine collection of samples for the Surface Environmental Surveillance Project (SESP) and Drinking Water Monitoring Project. Each section includes sampling locations, sample types, and analyses to be performed.

  6. An assay for thiaminase I in complex biological samples Jeremiah W. Hanes a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kraft, Clifford E.

    , USA b Department of Natural Resources, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853, USA Received 8 November format with complex biological samples. Published by Elsevier Inc. Keywords: Thiaminase I; Thiaminase II syndrome (EMS),1 which occurs in the offspring of large predatory fish (coho salmon, chinook salmon

  7. Tank farm backlog soil sample analysis plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ahlers, J.D., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

    This document describes the measures to collect samples, perform testing on samples, and make decisions to obtain a Contained- in Determination for tank farms backlog soil.

  8. Influence of shockwave obliquity on deformation twin formation in Ta

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gray, George T., III [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Livescu, V [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Cerreta, E K [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mason, T A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Maudlin, P J [RETIRED; Bingert, J F [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Energetic loading subjects a material to a 'Taylor wave' (triangular wave) loading profile that experiences an evolving balance of hydrostatic (spherical) and deviatoric stresses. While much has been learned over the past five decades concerning the propensity of deformation twinning in samples shockloaded using 'square-topped' profiles as a function of peak stress, achieved most commonly via flyer plate loading, less is known concerning twinning propensity during non-I-dimensional sweeping detonation wave loading. Systematic small-scale energetically-driven shock loading experiments were conducted on Ta samples shock loaded with PEFN that was edge detonated. Deformation twinning was quantified in post-mortem samples as a function of detonation geometry and radial position. In the edge detonated loading geometry examined in this paper, the average volume fraction of deformation twins was observed to drastically increase with increasing shock obliquity. The results of this study are discussed in light of the formation mechanisms of deformation twins, previous literature studies of twinning in shocked materials, and modeling of the effects of shock obliquity on the evolution of the stress tensor during shock loading.

  9. Adaptive Sampling in Hierarchical Simulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Knap, J; Barton, N R; Hornung, R D; Arsenlis, A; Becker, R; Jefferson, D R

    2007-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose an adaptive sampling methodology for hierarchical multi-scale simulation. The method utilizes a moving kriging interpolation to significantly reduce the number of evaluations of finer-scale response functions to provide essential constitutive information to a coarser-scale simulation model. The underlying interpolation scheme is unstructured and adaptive to handle the transient nature of a simulation. To handle the dynamic construction and searching of a potentially large set of finer-scale response data, we employ a dynamic metric tree database. We study the performance of our adaptive sampling methodology for a two-level multi-scale model involving a coarse-scale finite element simulation and a finer-scale crystal plasticity based constitutive law.

  10. Environmental surveillance master sampling schedule

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bisping, L E

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Environmental surveillance of the Hanford Site and surrounding areas is conducted by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) for the US Department of Energy (DOE). This document contains the planned schedule for routine sample collection for the Surface Environmental Surveillance Project (SESP) and Ground-Water Monitoring Project. Samples for radiological analyses include Air-Particulate Filter, gases and vapor; Water/Columbia River, Onsite Pond, Spring, Irrigation, and Drinking; Foodstuffs/Animal Products including Whole Milk, Poultry and Eggs, and Beef; Foodstuffs/Produce including Leafy Vegetables, Vegetables, and Fruit; Foodstuffs/Farm Products including Wine, Wheat and Alfalfa; Wildlife; Soil; Vegetation; and Sediment. Direct Radiation Measurements include Terrestrial Locations, Columbia River Shoreline Locations, and Onsite Roadway, Railway and Aerial, Radiation Surveys.

  11. Rock Sampling | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia:FAQ < RAPID Jump to: navigation, searchVirginia BlueRiverwoods,Rock Sampling Details Activities (18) Areas

  12. INCOHERENCE AND THE PARAMETRIC TEST FRAMEWORK: MISCONCEIVED RELATIONSHIPS AMONG SAMPLE, SAMPLING DISTRIBUTION, AND POPULATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu, Alex

    INCOHERENCE AND THE PARAMETRIC TEST FRAMEWORK: MISCONCEIVED RELATIONSHIPS AMONG SAMPLE, SAMPLING Keywords: Parametric test, sample, population, sampling distributions Parametric tests are frequently parametric tests, nor hold beliefs that are consistent with that framework. The parametric test framework

  13. Gamma-Ray Bursts Trace UV Metrics of Star Formation over 3 < z < 5

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greiner, Jochen; Schady, Patricia; Krühler, Thomas; Trenti, Michele; Cikota, Aleksandar; Bolmer, Jan; Elliott, Jonathan; Delvaux, Corentin; Perna, Rosalba; Afonso, Paulo; Kann, D Alexander; Klose, Sylvio; Savaglio, Sandra; Schmidl, Sebastian; Schweyer, Tassilo; Tanga, Mohit; Varela, Karla

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the first uniform treatment of long duration gamma-ray burst (GRB) host galaxy detections and upper limits over the redshift range 3-15.6 mag, and with extrapolations of the assumed Schechter-type LF well beyond this range. We review proposed astrophysical and observational biases for our sample, and find they are for the most part minimal. We therefore conclude, as the simplest interpretation of our results, that GRBs successfully trace UV metrics of cosmic star formation over the range 3formation processes from z ~3 out to the highest redshifts.

  14. Formation of phases in the films of a Ag-In-Se system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ismayilov, D. I.; Kerimova, N. K., E-mail: kerimova-nurlana@mail.ru [Azerbaijan National Academy of Sciences, Institute of Physics (Azerbaijan)

    2009-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Processes of electron-diffraction structure analysis have been used to study the processes of phase formation and phase transitions in thin layers of a Ag-In-Se system. The phases formed at the onset of interaction between the films and phase transformations occurring during annealing of the samples in vacuum are established. It is found that thin films of the AgInSe{sub 2} compound formed as a result of simultaneous or consecutive deposition of components are amorphous, and crystallization brings about the formation of textured films with high structural quality

  15. The Formation of the Hubble Sequence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christopher J. Conselice

    2003-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The history of galaxy formation via star formation and stellar mass assembly rates is now known with some certainty, yet the connection between high redshift and low redshift galaxy populations is not yet clear. By identifying and studying individual massive galaxies at high-redshifts, z > 1.5, we can possibly uncover the physical effects driving galaxy formation. Using the structures of high-z galaxies, as imaged with the Hubble Space Telescope, we argue that it is now possible to directly study the progenitors of ellipticals and disks. We also briefly describe early results that suggest many massive galaxies are forming at z > 2 through major mergers.

  16. Just the Right Size for Small Sample Dialysis! Now available: Trial-size packages of our versatile Slide-A-Lyzer MINI

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lebendiker, Mario

    Slide-A-Lyzer® MINI Dialysis Units Slide-A-Lyzer® Mini Tubes Slide-A-Lyzer® Mini Tubes Slide-A-Lyzer® Mini Units & Float For small-sample preparation (5-100 µl), nothing is more versatile than Pierce Slide new formats allow you to test the Slide-A-Lyzer® MINI Units as a single sample (microtube format

  17. Short torch design for direct liquid sample introduction using conventional and micro-nebulizers for plasma spectrometry

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Montaser, Akbar (Potomac, MD); Westphal, Craig S. (Landenberg, PA); Kahen, Kaveh (Montgomery Village, MD); Rutkowski, William F. (Arlington, VA)

    2008-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus and method for providing direct liquid sample introduction using a nebulizer are provided. The apparatus and method include a short torch having an inner tube and an outer tube, and an elongated adapter having a cavity for receiving the nebulizer and positioning a nozzle tip of the nebulizer a predetermined distance from a tip of the outer tube of the short torch. The predetermined distance is preferably about 2-5 mm.

  18. REVIEW ARTIC LE MICROSCALE THERMAL BUBBLE FORMATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, Liwei

    8 C a thermal diffusivity, m r s 8 C 2 F excess heat conduction shape factor e variable in the heat, and this article discusses microscale bubble formation by using polysilicon microheaters. Figure 1a shows

  19. MAES Project Review Procedures SEMINAR FORMAT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maxwell, Bruce D.

    MAES Project Review Procedures SEMINAR FORMAT The peer review seminar will be styled after oral the project's past accomplishments (if renewal) Discuss the new project proposal 2. Open Discussion ­ (approx

  20. Kinetics of acrylamide formation in potato chips

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Granda, Claudia Esthela

    2006-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

    in potato chips. Seven potato cultivars were analyzed to determine their influence on acrylamide formation during traditional and vacuum frying. The White Rose cultivar produced the highest level of acrylamide during both traditional and vacuum frying...

  1. Modeling deposit formation in diesel injector nozzle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sudhiesh Kumar, Chintoo

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Formation of deposit in the diesel injector nozzle affects the injection behavior and hinders performance. Under running condition, deposit precursors are washed away by the ensuing injection. However, during the cool down ...

  2. Electromagnetic formation flight of satellite arrays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kwon, Daniel W., 1980-

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Proposed methods of actuating spacecraft in sparse aperture arrays use propellant as a reaction mass. For formation flying systems, propellant becomes a critical consumable which can be quickly exhausted while maintaining ...

  3. Sample introduction apparatus for a flow cytometer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Van den Engh, Ger (Seattle, WA)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A sample introduction system for a flow cytometer allows easy change of sample containers such as test tubes and facilitates use in high pressure environments. The sample container includes a cap having a pressure supply chamber and a sample container attachment cavity. A sample container may be automatically positioned into the attachment cavity so as to sealably engage the end of the sample container as its outer surface. This positioning may be accomplished through some sample introduction mechanism. To facilitate cleaning HPLC tubing and fittings may be used in a manner which facilitates removable of the entire tubing from both the nozzle container and other sample container cap to permit its replacement to avoid contamination. The sample container support may include horizontal stops which loosely limit the movement of the sample container and thus avoid further stresses upon it.

  4. Sample introduction system for a flow cytometer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Engh, G. van den

    1997-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

    A sample introduction system for a flow cytometer allows easy change of sample containers such as test tubes and facilitates use in high pressure environments. The sample container includes a cap having a pressure supply chamber and a sample container attachment cavity. A sample container may be automatically positioned into the attachment cavity so as to sealably engage the end of the sample container as its outer surface. This positioning may be accomplished through some sample introduction mechanism. To facilitate cleaning, HPLC tubing and fittings may be used in a manner which facilitates removing of the entire tubing from both the nozzle container and other sample container cap to permit its replacement to avoid contamination. The sample container support may include horizontal stops which loosely limit the movement of the sample container and thus avoid further stresses upon it. 3 figs.

  5. Sample introduction system for a flow cytometer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Van den Engh, Ger (Seattle, WA)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A sample introduction system for a flow cytometer allows easy change of sample containers such as test tubes and facilitates use in high pressure environments. The sample container includes a cap having a pressure supply chamber and a sample container attachment cavity. A sample container may be automatically positioned into the attachment cavity so as to sealably engage the end of the sample container as its outer surface. This positioning may be accomplished through some sample introduction mechanism. To facilitate cleaning, HPLC tubing and fittings may be used in a manner which facilitates removing of the entire tubing from both the nozzle container and other sample container cap to permit its replacement to avoid contamination. The sample container support may include horizontal stops which loosely limit the movement of the sample container and thus avoid further stresses upon it.

  6. Sample introduction apparatus for a flow cytometer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Van den Engh, G.

    1998-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

    A sample introduction system for a flow cytometer allows easy change of sample containers such as test tubes and facilitates use in high pressure environments. The sample container includes a cap having a pressure supply chamber and a sample container attachment cavity. A sample container may be automatically positioned into the attachment cavity so as to sealably engage the end of the sample container as its outer surface. This positioning may be accomplished through some sample introduction mechanism. To facilitate cleaning HPLC tubing and fittings may be used in a manner which facilitates removable of the entire tubing from both the nozzle container and other sample container cap to permit its replacement to avoid contamination. The sample container support may include horizontal stops which loosely limit the movement of the sample container and thus avoid further stresses upon it. 3 figs.

  7. Synchronized sampling improves fault location

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kezunovic, M. [Texas A and M Univ., College Station, TX (United States)] [Texas A and M Univ., College Station, TX (United States); Perunicic, B. [Lamar Univ., Beaumont, TX (United States)] [Lamar Univ., Beaumont, TX (United States)

    1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Transmission line faults must be located accurately to allow maintenance crews to arrive at the scene and repair the faulted section as soon as possible. Rugged terrain and geographical layout cause some sections of power transmission lines to be difficult to reach. In the past, a variety of fault location algorithms were introduced as either an add-on feature in protective relays or stand-alone implementation in fault locators. In both cases, the measurements of current and voltages were taken at one terminal of a transmission line only. Under such conditions, it may become difficult to determine the fault location accurately, since data from other transmission line ends are required for more precise computations. In the absence of data from the other end, existing algorithms have accuracy problems under several circumstances, such as varying switching and loading conditions, fault infeed from the other end, and random value of fault resistance. Most of the one-end algorithms were based on estimation of voltage and current phasors. The need to estimate phasors introduces additional difficulty in high-speed tripping situations where the algorithms may not be fast enough in determining fault location accurately before the current signals disappear due to the relay operation and breaker opening. This article introduces a unique concept of high-speed fault location that can be implemented either as a simple add-on to the digital fault recorders (DFRs) or as a stand-alone new relaying function. This advanced concept is based on the use of voltage and current samples that are synchronously taken at both ends of a transmission line. This sampling technique can be made readily available in some new DFR designs incorporating receivers for accurate sampling clock synchronization using the satellite Global Positioning System (GPS).

  8. Licensing Guide and Sample License

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: VegetationEquipment Surfaces and Interfaces Sample6, 2011 LawrenceE CAnalytical InstrumentationEnergy

  9. Sample Environments at Sector 30

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 -the Mid-Infrared0 ResourceAwardsSafeguards and SecuritySafety Salt LakeSample

  10. Cyclic Imide Dioxime: Formation and Hydrolytic Stability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kang, S.O. [University of Kansas; Vukovic, Sinisa [ORNL; Custelcean, Radu [ORNL; Hay, Benjamin [ORNL

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Poly(acrylamidoximes) play an important role in the uranium extraction from seawater. The present work reports solution studies of simple analogs to address the formation and stability of two binding sites present in these polymers, open-chain amidoximes and cyclic imide dioximes, including: 1) conditions that maximize the formation of the cyclic form, 2) existence of a base-induced conversion from open-chain to cyclic form, and 3) degradation under acid and base conditions.

  11. Gas, Stars and Star Formation in ALFALFA Dwarf Galaxies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, S; Giovanelli, R; Brinchmann, J; Stierwalt, S; Neff, S G

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We examine the global properties of the stellar and HI components of 229 low HI mass dwarf galaxies extracted from the ALFALFA survey, including a complete sample of 176 galaxies with HI masses ALFALFA dwarfs are faint and of low surface brightness; only 56% of those within the SDSS footprint have a counterpart in the SDSS spectroscopic survey. A large fraction of the dwarfs have high specific star formation rates (SSFRs) and estimates of their SFRs and M_* obtained by SED fitting are systematically smaller than ones derived via standard formulae assuming a constant SFR. The increased dispersion of the SSFR distribution at M_* < 10^8 M_sun is driven by a set of dwarf galaxies that have low gas fractions and SSFRs; some of t...

  12. Triggered star formation in the Magellanic Clouds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. G. Elmegreen; J. Palous; Kenji Bekki

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Abstract. We discuss how tidal interaction between the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC), the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC), and the Galaxy triggers galaxy-wide star formation in the Clouds for the last ? 0.2 Gyr based on our chemodynamical simulations on the Clouds. Our simulations demonstrate that the tidal interaction induces the formation of asymmetric spiral arms with high gas densities and consequently triggers star formation within the arms in the LMC. Star formation rate in the present LMC is significantly enhanced just above the eastern edge of the LMC’s stellar bar owing to the tidal interaction. The location of the enhanced star formation is very similar to the observed location of 30 Doradus, which suggests that the formation of 30 Doradus is closely associated with the last Magellanic collision about 0.2 Gyr ago. The tidal interaction can dramatically compress gas initially within the outer part of the SMC so that new stars can be formed from the gas to become intergalactic young stars in the inter-Cloud region (e.g., the Magellanic Bridge). The metallicity distribution function of the newly formed stars in the Magellanic Bridge has a peak of [Fe/H] ? ?0.8, which is significantly lower than the stellar metallicity of the SMC.

  13. Si-on-Insulator formation using a line-source electron beam

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Knapp, J.A.

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A line-source electron beam has been used to melt and recrystallize isolated Si layers to form Si-on-Insulator structures, and the process is simulated by heat flow calculations. Using sample sweep speeds of 100 to 600 cm/s and peak power densities up to 75 kW/cm/sup 2/ in the 1 x 20 mm beam, we have obtained single-crystal areas as large as 50 x 350 ..mu..m. Seed openings to the substrate are used to control the orientation of the regrowth and the heat flow in the recrystallizing film. A finite-element heat flow code has been developed which correctly simulates the experimental results and which allows the calculation of untried sample configurations.

  14. Spatially Resolved Galaxy Star Formation and its Environmental Dependence I

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Niraj Welikala; Andrew J. Connolly; Andrew M. Hopkins; Ryan Scranton; Alberto Conti

    2007-12-25T23:59:59.000Z

    We use the photometric information contained in individual pixels of 44,964 (0.019effects of environment on galaxy star formation (SF). We use the pixel-z technique, which combines stellar population synthesis models with photometric redshift template fitting on the scale of individual pixels in galaxy images. Spectral energy distributions are constructed, sampling a wide range of properties such as age, star formation rate (SFR), dust obscuration and metallicity. By summing the SFRs in the pixels, we demonstrate that the distribution of total galaxy SFR shifts to lower values as the local density of surrounding galaxies increases, as found in other studies. The effect is most prominent in the galaxies with the highest star formation, and we see the break in the SFR-density relation at a local galaxy density of $\\approx 0.05 $(Mpc/h)$^{-3}$. Since our method allows us to spatially resolve the SF distribution within galaxies, we can calculate the mean SFR of each galaxy as a function of radius. We find that on average the mean SFR is dominated by SF in the central regions of galaxies, and that the trend for suppression of SFR in high density environments is driven by a reduction in this nuclear SF. We also find that the mean SFR in the outskirts is largely independent of environmental effects. This trend in the mean SFR is shared by galaxies which are highly star forming, while those which are weakly star forming show no statistically significant correlation between their environment and the mean SFR at any radius.

  15. TRU waste-sampling program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Warren, J.L.; Zerwekh, A.

    1985-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As part of a TRU waste-sampling program, Los Alamos National Laboratory retrieved and examined 44 drums of /sup 238/Pu- and /sup 239/Pu-contaminated waste. The drums ranged in age from 8 months to 9 years. The majority of drums were tested for pressure, and gas samples withdrawn from the drums were analyzed by a mass spectrometer. Real-time radiography and visual examination were used to determine both void volumes and waste content. Drum walls were measured for deterioration, and selected drum contents were reassayed for comparison with original assays and WIPP criteria. Each drum tested at atmospheric pressure. Mass spectrometry revealed no problem with /sup 239/Pu-contaminated waste, but three 8-month-old drums of /sup 238/Pu-contaminated waste contained a potentially hazardous gas mixture. Void volumes fell within the 81 to 97% range. Measurements of drum walls showed no significant corrosion or deterioration. All reassayed contents were within WIPP waste acceptance criteria. Five of the drums opened and examined (15%) could not be certified as packaged. Three contained free liquids, one had corrosive materials, and one had too much unstabilized particulate. Eleven drums had the wrong (or not the most appropriate) waste code. In many cases, disposal volumes had been inefficiently used. 2 refs., 23 figs., 7 tabs.

  16. Star Formation in a Complete Spectroscopic Survey of Galaxies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. J. Carter; D. G. Fabricant; M. J. Geller; M. J. Kurtz

    2001-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The 15R-North galaxy redshift survey is a uniform spectroscopic survey (S/N $\\sim $10) covering the range 3650---7400\\AA for 3149 galaxies with median redshift 0.05. The sample is 90% complete to $R=15.4$. The median slit covering fraction is 24% of the galaxy, apparently sufficient to minimize the effects of aperture bias on the EW(H$\\alpha$). Forty-nine percent of the galaxes in the survey have one or more emission lines detected at $\\geq 2 \\sigma$. In agreement with previous surveys, the fraction of absorption-line galaxies increases steeply with galaxy luminosity. We use H$\\beta$, O[III], H$\\alpha$, and [N\\II] to discriminate between star-forming galaxies and AGNs. We use the EW(H$\\alpha$ + [N\\II]) to estimate the Scalo birthrate parameter, $b$, the ratio of the current star formation rate to the time averaged star formation rate. Finally, we examine the way galaxies of different spectroscopic type trace the large-scale galaxy distribution.

  17. Star-formation history of the universe and its drivers 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sobral, David Ricardo Serrano

    2011-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Determining the cosmic star formation history of the Universe is fundamental for our understanding of galaxy formation and evolution. While surveys now suggest that the "epoch" of galaxy formation occurred more than 6 ...

  18. Absorption and elimination of formate following oral administration of calcium formate in female human subjects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hanzlik, Robert P.; Fowler, S. C.; Eells, J. T.

    2005-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Absorption and elimination of formate following oral administration of calcium formate in female human subjects Publisher version available: http://dmd.aspetjournals.org/content/33/2/282.full.pdf Author...’s accepted manuscript, available through PubMed Central: http://dmd.aspetjournals.org/content/early/2004/11/16/dmd.104.001289 Full Citation of published version: Hanzlik RP, Fowler SC, Eells JT. Absorption and elimination of formate following oral administration of calcium...

  19. Method and apparatus for data sampling

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Odell, Daniel M. C. (Aiken, SC)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and apparatus for sampling radiation detector outputs and determining event data from the collected samples. The method uses high speed sampling of the detector output, the conversion of the samples to digital values, and the discrimination of the digital values so that digital values representing detected events are determined. The high speed sampling and digital conversion is performed by an A/D sampler that samples the detector output at a rate high enough to produce numerous digital samples for each detected event. The digital discrimination identifies those digital samples that are not representative of detected events. The sampling and discrimination also provides for temporary or permanent storage, either serially or in parallel, to a digital storage medium.

  20. Method and apparatus for data sampling

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Odell, D.M.C.

    1994-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and apparatus for sampling radiation detector outputs and determining event data from the collected samples is described. The method uses high speed sampling of the detector output, the conversion of the samples to digital values, and the discrimination of the digital values so that digital values representing detected events are determined. The high speed sampling and digital conversion is performed by an A/D sampler that samples the detector output at a rate high enough to produce numerous digital samples for each detected event. The digital discrimination identifies those digital samples that are not representative of detected events. The sampling and discrimination also provides for temporary or permanent storage, either serially or in parallel, to a digital storage medium. 6 figures.

  1. Fluid sampling system for a nuclear reactor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lau, L.K.; Alper, N.I.

    1994-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

    A system of extracting fluid samples, either liquid or gas, from the interior of a nuclear reactor containment utilizes a jet pump. To extract the sample fluid, a nonradioactive motive fluid is forced through the inlet and discharge ports of a jet pump located outside the containment, creating a suction that draws the sample fluid from the containment through a sample conduit connected to the pump suction port. The mixture of motive fluid and sample fluid is discharged through a return conduit to the interior of the containment. The jet pump and means for removing a portion of the sample fluid from the sample conduit can be located in a shielded sample grab station located next to the containment. A non-nuclear grade active pump can be located outside the grab sampling station and the containment to pump the nonradioactive motive fluid through the jet pump. 1 fig.

  2. Fluid sampling system for a nuclear reactor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lau, Louis K. (Monroeville, PA); Alper, Naum I. (Monroeville, PA)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A system of extracting fluid samples, either liquid or gas, from the interior of a nuclear reactor containment utilizes a jet pump. To extract the sample fluid, a nonradioactive motive fluid is forced through the inlet and discharge ports of a jet pump located outside the containment, creating a suction that draws the sample fluid from the containment through a sample conduit connected to the pump suction port. The mixture of motive fluid and sample fluid is discharged through a return conduit to the interior of the containment. The jet pump and means for removing a portion of the sample fluid from the sample conduit can be located in a shielded sample grab station located next to the containment. A non-nuclear grade active pump can be located outside the grab sampling station and the containment to pump the nonradioactive motive fluid through the jet pump.

  3. Formation of nanostructures at the glass-carbon surface exposed to laser radiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abramov, D V; Gerke, M N; Kucherik, A O; Kutrovskaya, S V; Prokoshev, V G; Arakelyan, S M [Vladimir State University, Vladimir (Russian Federation)

    2007-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

    An experimental technique for obtaining nanostructures in the field of high-power laser radiation at the surface of carbon materials is developed. A specific feature of this technique is the formation of liquid carbon inside the region of laser action in the sample exposed to radiation in air at a pressure of {approx}1 atm. Several types of nanostructures (quasi-domains and nanopeaks) are detected in the laser cavern and beyond the range of laser action. Mechanisms of formation of such structures are proposed. The formation of quasi-domains is related to crystallisation of the melt. The nanopeak groups are formed outside the laser action region during the deposition of hot vapours of the material escaping from this region. The dependences of the variation in morphological properties of the nanostructures on the duration of laser action and the radii of typical cavern zones on the laser radiation power are obtained. (interaction of laser radiation with matter. laser plasma)

  4. The star formation history inferred from long gamma-ray bursts with high pseudo-redshifts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tan, Wei-Wei; Yu, Yun-Wei

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    By employing a simple semi-analytical star formation model where the formation rates of Population (Pop) I/II and III stars can be calculated, respectively, we account for the number distribution of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) with high pseudo-redshifts that was derived from an empirical luminosity-indictor relationship. It is suggested that a considerable number of Pop III GRBs could exist in the present sample of Swift GRBs. By further combining the implication for the star formation history from the optical depth of the CMB photons, it is also suggested that only a very small fraction 0.6% of Pop III GRBs could have triggered the Swift BAT. These results could provide an useful basis for estimating future detectability of Pop III stars and their produced transient phenomena.

  5. Creating and maintaining a gas cap in tar sands formations

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vinegar, Harold J. (Bellaire, TX); Karanikas, John Michael (Houston, TX); Dinkoruk, Deniz Sumnu (Houston, TX); Wellington, Scott Lee (Bellaire, TX)

    2010-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods for treating a tar sands formation are disclosed herein. Methods for treating a tar sands formation may include providing heat to at least part of a hydrocarbon layer in the formation from one or more heaters located in the formation. Pressure may be allowed to increase in an upper portion of the formation to provide a gas cap in the upper portion. At least some hydrocarbons are produced from a lower portion of the formation.

  6. Fully Automated Laser Ablation Liquid Capture Sample Analysis using NanoElectrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lorenz, Matthias [ORNL] [ORNL; Ovchinnikova, Olga S [ORNL] [ORNL; Van Berkel, Gary J [ORNL] [ORNL

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    RATIONALE: Laser ablation provides for the possibility of sampling a large variety of surfaces with high spatial resolution. This type of sampling when employed in conjunction with liquid capture followed by nanoelectrospray ionization provides the opportunity for sensitive and prolonged interrogation of samples by mass spectrometry as well as the ability to analyze surfaces not amenable to direct liquid extraction. METHODS: A fully automated, reflection geometry, laser ablation liquid capture spot sampling system was achieved by incorporating appropriate laser fiber optics and a focusing lens into a commercially available, liquid extraction surface analysis (LESA ) ready Advion TriVersa NanoMate system. RESULTS: Under optimized conditions about 10% of laser ablated material could be captured in a droplet positioned vertically over the ablation region using the NanoMate robot controlled pipette. The sampling spot size area with this laser ablation liquid capture surface analysis (LA/LCSA) mode of operation (typically about 120 m x 160 m) was approximately 50 times smaller than that achievable by direct liquid extraction using LESA (ca. 1 mm diameter liquid extraction spot). The set-up was successfully applied for the analysis of ink on glass and paper as well as the endogenous components in Alstroemeria Yellow King flower petals. In a second mode of operation with a comparable sampling spot size, termed laser ablation/LESA , the laser system was used to drill through, penetrate, or otherwise expose material beneath a solvent resistant surface. Once drilled, LESA was effective in sampling soluble material exposed at that location on the surface. CONCLUSIONS: Incorporating the capability for different laser ablation liquid capture spot sampling modes of operation into a LESA ready Advion TriVersa NanoMate enhanced the spot sampling spatial resolution of this device and broadened the surface types amenable to analysis to include absorbent and solvent resistant materials.

  7. Development of Large Format Lithium Ion Cells with Higher Energy...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Large Format Lithium Ion Cells with Higher Energy Density Development of Large Format Lithium Ion Cells with Higher Energy Density 2013 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and...

  8. Cryogenic CO2 Formation on Oxidized Gold Clusters Synthesized...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Cryogenic CO2 Formation on Oxidized Gold Clusters Synthesized via Reactive Layer Assisted Deposition. Cryogenic CO2 Formation on Oxidized Gold Clusters Synthesized via Reactive...

  9. ash formation deposition: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    deep-water depositional systems : the upper Miocene Upper Mount messenger formation, Taranaki Basin, New Zealand and Pliocene Repetto and Pico formations, Ventura Basin,...

  10. ash deposit formation: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    deep-water depositional systems : the upper Miocene Upper Mount messenger formation, Taranaki Basin, New Zealand and Pliocene Repetto and Pico formations, Ventura Basin,...

  11. Atomistic Model for the Polyamide Formation from ?-Lactam...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Model for the Polyamide Formation from ?-Lactam Catalyzed by Candida Antarctica Lipase B. Atomistic Model for the Polyamide Formation from ?-Lactam Catalyzed by Candida...

  12. Biogenic formation of photoactive arsenic-sulfide nanotubes by...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    formation of photoactive arsenic-sulfide nanotubes by Shewanella sp. strain HN-41 . Biogenic formation of photoactive arsenic-sulfide nanotubes by Shewanella sp. strain HN-41 ....

  13. Multifunctional, Inorganic-Filled Separators for Large Format...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    & Publications Multifunctional, Inorganic-Filled Separators for Large Format, Li-ion Batteries Multifunctional, Inorganic-Filled Separators for Large Format, Li-ion Batteries...

  14. Multifunctional, Inorganic-Filled Separators for Large Format...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Multifunctional, Inorganic-Filled Separators for Large Format, Li-ion Batteries Multifunctional, Inorganic-Filled Separators for Large Format, Li-ion Batteries 2012 DOE Hydrogen...

  15. Control of Formation and Cellular Detachment from Shewanella...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Formation and Cellular Detachment from Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 Biofilms by Cyclic di-GMP. Control of Formation and Cellular Detachment from Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 Biofilms...

  16. Fayalite Dissolution and Siderite Formation in Water-Saturated...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Fayalite Dissolution and Siderite Formation in Water-Saturated Supercritical CO2. Fayalite Dissolution and Siderite Formation in Water-Saturated Supercritical CO2. Abstract:...

  17. Energy Secretary Moniz Announces Formation of Nuclear Energy...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Announces Formation of Nuclear Energy Tribal Working Group Energy Secretary Moniz Announces Formation of Nuclear Energy Tribal Working Group December 12, 2014 - 2:00pm Addthis News...

  18. Mixed-mode diesel HCCI with External Mixture Formation: Preliminary...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Mixed-mode diesel HCCI with External Mixture Formation: Preliminary Results Mixed-mode diesel HCCI with External Mixture Formation: Preliminary Results 2003 DEER Conference...

  19. Hydrogen Bubbles and Formation of Nanoporous Silicon during Electroche...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Bubbles and Formation of Nanoporous Silicon during Electrochemical Etching. Hydrogen Bubbles and Formation of Nanoporous Silicon during Electrochemical Etching. Abstract: Many...

  20. Brown carbon formation from ketoaldehydes of biogenic monoterpenes...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Brown carbon formation from ketoaldehydes of biogenic monoterpenes. Brown carbon formation from ketoaldehydes of biogenic monoterpenes. Abstract: Sources and chemical composition...

  1. Vertical stratification of subsurface microbial community composition across geological formations at the Hanford Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lin, Xueju; Kennedy, David W.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Bjornstad, Bruce N.; Konopka, Allan

    2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The microbial diversity in subsurface sediments at the Hanford Site's 300 Area in southeastern Washington State was investigated by analyzing 21 samples recovered from depths that ranged from 9 to 52 m. Approximately 8000 non-chimeric Bacterial and Archaeal 16S rRNA gene sequences were analyzed across geological strata that contain a natural redox transition zone. These strata included the oxic coarse-grained Hanford formation, fine-grained oxic and anoxic Ringold Formation sediments, and the weathered basalt group. We detected 1233 and 120 unique bacterial and archaeal OTUs (Operational Taxonomic Units, defined at the 97% identity level). Microbial community structure and richness varied substantially across the different geological strata. Bacterial OTU richness (based upon Chao1 estimator) was highest (>700) in the upper Hanford formation, and declined to about 120 at the bottom of the Hanford formation. Just above the Ringold oxic-anoxic transition zone, richness was about 325 and declined to less than 50 in the deeper reduced zones. The Bacterial community in the oxic Hanford and Ringold Formations contained members of 9 major well-recognized phyla as well 30 as unusually high proportions of 3 candidate divisions (GAL15, NC10, and SPAM). The deeper Ringold strata were characterized by low OTU richness and a very high preponderance (ca. 90%) of Proteobacteria. The study has greatly expanded the intralineage phylogenetic diversity within some major divisions. These subsurface sediments have been shown to contain a large number of phylogenetically novel microbes, with substantial heterogeneities between sediment samples from the same geological formation.

  2. The Formation and Evolution of Prestellar Cores

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Philippe André; Shantanu Basu; Shu-ichiro Inutsuka

    2008-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Improving our understanding of the initial conditions and earliest stages of star formation is crucial to gain insight into the origin of stellar masses, multiple systems, and protoplanetary disks. We review the properties of low-mass dense cores as derived from recent millimeter/submillimeter observations of nearby molecular clouds and discuss them in the context of various contemporary scenarios for cloud core formation and evolution. None of the extreme scenarios can explain all observations. Pure laminar ambipolar diffusion has relatively long growth times for typical ionization levels and has difficulty satisfying core lifetime constraints. Purely hydrodynamic pictures have trouble accounting for the inefficiency of core formation and the detailed velocity structure of individual cores. A possible favorable scenario is a mixed model involving gravitational fragmentation of turbulent molecular clouds close to magnetic criticality. The evolution of the magnetic field and angular momentum in individual cloud cores after the onset of gravitational collapse is also discussed. In particular, we stress the importance of radiation-magnetohydrodynamical processes and resistive MHD effects during the protostellar phase. We also emphasize the role of the formation of the short-lived first (protostellar) core in providing a chance for sub-fragmentation into binary systems and triggering MHD outflows. Future submillimeter facilities such as Herschel and ALMA will soon provide major new observational constraints in this field. On the theoretical side, an important challenge for the future will be to link the formation of molecular clouds and prestellar cores in a coherent picture.

  3. E-Print Network 3.0 - anemia na ancylostomose Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    (NETN without EDTA, supplemented with calcium: 20 mM Tris pH 8, 150 mM NaCl, 10 mM CaCl2, 0.1% NP... M NaCl, 10 mM imidazole, 10% glycerol, 1 mM AEBSF, 0.1% b-mercaptoethanol)...

  4. ALARA ASSESSMENT OF SETTLER SLUDGE SAMPLING METHODS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NELSEN LA

    2009-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this assessment is to compare underwater and above water settler sludge sampling methods to determine if the added cost for underwater sampling for the sole purpose of worker dose reductions is justified. Initial planning for sludge sampling included container, settler and knock-out-pot (KOP) sampling. Due to the significantly higher dose consequence of KOP sludge, a decision was made to sample KOP underwater to achieve worker dose reductions. Additionally, initial plans were to utilize the underwater sampling apparatus for settler sludge. Since there are no longer plans to sample KOP sludge, the decision for underwater sampling for settler sludge needs to be revisited. The present sampling plan calls for spending an estimated $2,500,000 to design and construct a new underwater sampling system (per A21 C-PL-001 RevOE). This evaluation will compare and contrast the present method of above water sampling to the underwater method that is planned by the Sludge Treatment Project (STP) and determine if settler samples can be taken using the existing sampling cart (with potentially minor modifications) while maintaining doses to workers As Low As Reasonably Achievable (ALARA) and eliminate the need for costly redesigns, testing and personnel retraining.

  5. FIELD DEMONSTRATION OF CARBON DIOXIDE MISCIBLE FLOODING IN THE LANSING-KANSAS CITY FORMATION, CENTRAL KANSAS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alan Byrnes; G. Paul Willhite; Don Green; Martin Dubois; Richard Pancake; Timothy Carr; W. Lynn Watney; John Doveton; Willard Guy; Rodney Reynolds; Dave Murfin; James Daniels; Russell Martin; William Flanders; Dave Vander Griend; Eric Mork; Paul Cantrell

    2004-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    A pilot carbon dioxide miscible flood was initiated in the Lansing Kansas City C formation in the Hall Gurney Field, Russell County, Kansas. Continuous carbon dioxide injection began on December 2, 2003. By the end of June 2004, 6.26 MM lb of carbon dioxide were injected into the pilot area. Carbon dioxide injection rates averaged about 250 MCFD. Carbon dioxide was detected in one production well near the end of May. The amount of carbon dioxide produced was small during this period. Wells in the pilot area produced 100% water at the beginning of the flood. Oil production began in February, increasing to an average of about 2.5 B/D in May and June. Operational problems encountered during the initial stages of the flood were identified and resolved.

  6. Green River Formation water flood demonstration project. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pennington, B.I.; Dyer, J.E.; Lomax, J.D. [Inland Resources, Inc. (United States); [Lomax Exploration Co., Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Deo, M.D. [Utah Univ., Salt Lake City, UT (United States). Dept. of Chemical and Fuels Engineering

    1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objectives of the project were to understand the oil production mechanisms in the Monument Butte unit via reservoir characterization and reservoir simulations and to transfer the water flooding technology to similar units in the vicinity, particularly the Travis and the Boundary units. The reservoir characterization activity in the project basically consisted of extraction and analysis of a full diameter core, Formation Micro Imaging (FMI) logs from several wells and Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) logs from two wells. In addition, several side-wall cores were drilled and analyzed, oil samples from a number of wells were physically and chemically characterized (using high-temperature gas chromatography), oil-water relative permeabilities were measured and pour points and cloud points of a few oil samples were determined. The reservoir modeling activity comprised of reservoir simulation of all the three units at different scales and near well-bore modeling of the wax precipitation effects. The reservoir simulation activities established the extent of pressurization of the sections of the reservoirs in the immediate vicinity of the Monument Butte unit. This resulted in a major expansion of the unit and the production from this expanded unit increased from about 300 barrels per day to about 2,000 barrels per day.

  7. Black hole accretion versus star formation rate: theory confronts observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Volonteri, Marta; Netzer, Hagai; Bellovary, Jillian; Dotti, Massimo; Governato, Fabio

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We use a suite of hydrodynamical simulations of galaxy mergers to compare star formation rate (SFR) and black hole accretion rate (BHAR) for galaxies before the interaction ('stochastic' phase), during the 'merger' proper, lasting ~0.2-0.3 Gyr, and in the 'remnant' phase. We calculate the bi-variate distribution of SFR and BHAR and define the regions in the SFR-BHAR plane that the three phases occupy. No strong correlation between BHAR and galaxy-wide SFR is found. A possible exception are galaxies with the highest SFR and the highest BHAR. We also bin the data in the same way used in several observational studies, by either measuring the mean SFR for AGN in different luminosity bins, or the mean BHAR for galaxies in bins of SFR. We find that the apparent contradiction or SFR versus BHAR for observed samples of AGN and star forming galaxies is actually caused by binning effects. The two types of samples use different projections of the full bi-variate distribution, and the full information would lead to unamb...

  8. Sample Residential Program Term Sheet | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Sample Residential Program Term Sheet Sample Residential Program Term Sheet A sample for defining and elaborating on the specifics of a clean energy loan program. Sample...

  9. mm-Wave Op-Amps employing simple-Miller compensation, with OIP3/PDC ratios of 211 (10 dB NF) and 144 (6.0 dB NF) at 2 GHz

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rodwell, Mark J. W.

    mm-Wave Op-Amps employing simple-Miller compensation, with OIP3/PDC ratios of 211 (10 dB NF/PDC ratio at fs = 2-3 GHz, compared to state-of-the-art. We address considerations important 1000 mW power dissipation PDC . This very high ratio of output-referred third-order-intercept power

  10. An introduction to boson-sampling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bryan T. Gard; Keith R. Motes; Jonathan P. Olson; Peter P. Rohde; Jonathan P. Dowling

    2014-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Boson-sampling is a simplified model for quantum computing that may hold the key to implementing the first ever post-classical quantum computer. Boson-sampling is a non-universal quantum computer that is significantly more straightforward to build than any universal quantum computer proposed so far. We begin this chapter by motivating boson-sampling and discussing the history of linear optics quantum computing. We then summarize the boson-sampling formalism, discuss what a sampling problem is, explain why boson-sampling is easier than linear optics quantum computing, and discuss the Extended Church-Turing thesis. Next, sampling with other classes of quantum optical states is analyzed. Finally, we discuss the feasibility of building a boson-sampling device using existing technology.

  11. Principles for Sampling Airborne Radioactivity from Stacks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Glissmeyer, John A.

    2010-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

    This book chapter describes the special processes involved in sampling the airborne effluents from nuclear faciities. The title of the book is Radioactive Air Sampling Methods. The abstract for this chapter was cleared as PNNL-SA-45941.

  12. General Sample Submission Form University of Utah

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hill, Chris

    in all applicable information as completely as possible Sample Information Sample ID / Description/MS/MS (FTMS) ______ Maldi/FTMS ______ Maldi/ToF ______ ESI/MS ______ ESI/FTMS _____ Location and Staff MS file

  13. Unveiling the Formation of Massive Galaxies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christopher J. Conselice

    2004-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Massive galaxies, such as nearby ellipticals, have relatively low number densities, yet they host the majority of the stellar mass in the universe. Understanding their origin is a central problem of galaxy formation. Age dating of stellar populations found in modern ellipticals, and observations of star formation in high redshift galaxies, allow us to determine roughly when these systems formed. These age diagnostics however do not tell us what triggered star formation, or how galaxies form as opposed to simply when. Recent analyses of the structures of z > 2 ultraviolet selected galaxies reveal that major galaxy mergers are a likely method for forming some massive galaxies. There are however galaxy populations at high redshift (z > 2), namely infrared and sub-millimeter bright systems, whose evolutionary relationship to modern ellipticals is still uncertain. An improved characterization of these and other high redshift galaxy populations is achievable with large infrared imaging and spectroscopic surveys.

  14. Galaxy formation with radiative and chemical feedback

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Graziani, L; Schneider, R; Kawata, D; de Bennassuti, M; Maselli, A

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Here we introduce GAMESH, a novel pipeline which implements self-consistent radiative and chemical feedback in a computational model of galaxy formation. By combining the cosmological chemical-evolution model GAMETE with the radiative transfer code CRASH, GAMESH can post process realistic outputs of a N-body simulation describing the redshift evolution of the forming galaxy. After introducing the GAMESH implementation and its features, we apply the code to a low-resolution N-body simulation of the Milky Way formation and we investigate the combined effects of self-consistent radiative and chemical feedback. Many physical properties, which can be directly compared with observations in the Galaxy and its surrounding satellites, are predicted by the code along the merger-tree assembly. The resulting redshift evolution of the Local Group star formation rates, reionisation and metal enrichment along with the predicted Metallicity Distribution Function of halo stars are critically compared with observations. We dis...

  15. In situ oxidation of subsurface formations

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Beer, Gary Lee (Houston, TX); Mo, Weijian (Sugar Land, TX); Li, Busheng (Houston, TX); Shen, Chonghui (Calgary, CA)

    2011-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods and systems for treating a hydrocarbon containing formation described herein include providing heat to a first portion of the formation from a plurality of heaters in the first portion, producing produced through one or more production wells in a second portion of the formation, reducing or turning off heat provided to the first portion after a selected time, providing an oxidizing fluid through one or more of the heater wells in the first portion, providing heat to the first portion and the second portion through oxidation of at least some hydrocarbons in the first portion, and producing fluids through at least one of the production wells in the second portion. The produced fluids may include at least some oxidized hydrocarbons produced in the first portion.

  16. Star formation bursts in isolated spiral galaxies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. Clarke; D. Gittins

    2006-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the response of the gaseous component of a galactic disc to the time dependent potential generated by N-body simulations of a spiral galaxy. The results show significant variation of the spiral structure of the gas which might be expected to result in significant fluctuations in the Star Formation Rate (SFR). Pronounced local variations of the SFR are anticipated in all cases. Bursty histories for the global SFR, however, require that the mean surface density is much less (around an order of magnitude less) than the putative threshold for star formation. We thus suggest that bursty star formation histories, normally attributed to mergers and/or tidal interactions, may be a normal pattern for gas poor isolated spiral galaxies.

  17. Formation of Cyanoformaldehyde in the interstellar space

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Das, Ankan; Chakrabarti, Sandip K; Saha, Rajdeep; Chakrabarti, Sonali

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Cyanoformaldehyde (HCOCN) molecule has recently been suspected towards the Sagittarius B2(N) by the Green Bank telescope, though a confirmation of this observation has not yet been made. In and around a star forming region, this molecule could be formed by the exothermic reaction between two abundant interstellar species, H$_2$CO and CN. Till date, the reaction rate coefficient for the formation of this molecule is unknown. Educated guesses were used to explain the abundance of this molecule by chemical modeling. In this paper, we carried out quantum chemical calculations to find out empirical rate coefficients for the formation of HCOCN and different chemical properties during the formation of HCOCN molecules. Though HCOCN is stable against unimolecular decomposition, this gas phase molecule could be destroyed by many other means, like: ion-molecular reactions or by the effect of cosmic rays. Ion-molecular reaction rates are computed by using the capture theories. We have also included the obtained rate coef...

  18. THE ACS NEARBY GALAXY SURVEY TREASURY. X. QUANTIFYING THE STAR CLUSTER FORMATION EFFICIENCY OF NEARBY DWARF GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cook, David O.; Dale, Daniel A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Wyoming, Laramie, WY 82071 (United States); Seth, Anil C. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT 84112 (United States); Johnson, L. Clifton; Weisz, Daniel R.; Fouesneau, Morgan; Dalcanton, Julianne J. [Department of Astronomy, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Olsen, Knut A. G. [National Optical Astronomy Observatory, Tucson, AZ 85719 (United States); Engelbracht, Charles W., E-mail: dcook12@uwyo.edu [Steward Observatory, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States)

    2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the relationship between the field star formation and cluster formation properties in a large sample of nearby dwarf galaxies. We use optical data from the Hubble Space Telescope and from ground-based telescopes to derive the ages and masses of the young (t{sub age} {approx}< 100 Myr) cluster sample. Our data provide the first constraints on two proposed relationships between the star formation rate (SFR) of galaxies and the properties of their cluster systems in the low SFR regime. The data show broad agreement with these relationships, but significant galaxy-to-galaxy scatter exists. In part, this scatter can be accounted for by simulating the small number of clusters detected from stochastically sampling the cluster mass function. However, this stochasticity does not fully account for the observed scatter in our data, suggesting that there may be true variations in the fraction of stars formed in clusters in dwarf galaxies. Comparison of the cluster formation and the brightest cluster in our sample galaxies also provide constraints on cluster destruction models.

  19. Astronomy 9603B -Star Formation Star Formation: Astronomy 9603B (Winter 2012)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lennard, William N.

    Astronomy 9603B - Star Formation Star Formation: Astronomy 9603B (Winter 2012) Lecturer: Prof below. Contact information: Martin Houde Associate Professor Department of Physics and Astronomy Room 207, Physics and Astronomy Building E-mail: mhoude2@uwo.ca Phone: (519) 661-2111 x: 86711 (office) Fax

  20. Planet Formation: Planet Formation: Evolution of The Solar NebulaEvolution of The Solar Nebula

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Herrick, Robert R.

    Planet Formation: Planet Formation: Evolution of The Solar NebulaEvolution of The Solar Nebula #12;Evolution of the Solar NebulaEvolution of the Solar Nebula 1.1. Nebula collapses into a disk 2000 KTemperatures near the Sun reach 2000 K #12;Evolution of the Solar NebulaEvolution of the Solar

  1. The Efficiency of Globular Cluster Formation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dean E. McLaughlin

    1999-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

    (Abridged): The total populations of globular cluster systems (GCSs) are discussed in terms of their connection to the efficiency of globular cluster formation---the mass fraction of star-forming gas that was able to form bound stellar clusters rather than isolated stars or unbound associations---in galaxy halos. Observed variations in GCS specific frequencies (S_N=N_gc/L_gal), both as a function of galactocentric radius in individual systems and globally between entire galaxies, are reviewed in this light. It is argued that trends in S_N do not reflect any real variation in the underlying efficiency of cluster formation; rather, they result from ignoring the hot gas in many large ellipticals. This claim is checked and confirmed in each of M87, M49, and NGC 1399, for which existing data are combined to show that the volume density profile of globular clusters, rho_cl, is directly proportional to the sum of (rho_gas+rho_stars) at large radii. The constant of proportionality is the same in each case: epsilon=0.0026 +/- 0.0005 in the mean. This is identified with the globular cluster formation efficiency. The implication that epsilon might have had a universal value is supported by data on the GCSs of 97 early-type galaxies, on the GCS of the Milky Way, and on the ongoing formation of open clusters. These results have specific implications for some issues in GCS and galaxy formation, and they should serve as a strong constraint on more general theories of star and cluster formation.

  2. Sample holder for X-ray diffractometry

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hesch, Victor L. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A sample holder for use with X-ray diffractometers with the capability to rotate the sample, as well as to adjust the position of the sample in the x, y, and z directions. Adjustment in the x direction is accomplished through loosening set screws, moving a platform, and retightening the set screws. Motion translators are used for adjustment in the y and z directions. An electric motor rotates the sample, and receives power from the diffractometer.

  3. E-Print Network 3.0 - air pollution sampling Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    sampling Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: air pollution sampling Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 griculture is in the spotlight as a...

  4. Aromatics oxidation and soot formation in flames

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Howard, J.B.; Pope, C.J.; Shandross, R.A.; Yadav, T. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge (United States)

    1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This project is concerned with the kinetics and mechanisms of aromatics oxidation and soot and fullerenes formation in flames. The scope includes detailed measurements of profiles of stable and radical species concentrations in low-pressure one-dimensional premixed flames. Intermediate species identifications and mole fractions, fluxes, and net reaction rates calculated from the measured profiles are used to test postulated reaction mechanisms. Particular objectives are to identify and to determine or confirm rate constants for the main benzene oxidation reactions in flames, and to characterize fullerenes and their formation mechanisms and kinetics.

  5. On Superheavy Element Formation and Beyond

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zagrebaev, Valery [Flerov Laboratory of Nuclear Reaction, JINR, 141980 Dubna (Russian Federation); Greiner, Walter [Frankfurt Institute for Advanced Studies, J.W. Goethe-Universitaet, 60325 Frankfurt (Germany)

    2007-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Low energy collisions of very heavy nuclei (238U+238U, 232Th+250Cf and 238U+248Cm) have been studied within the realistic dynamical model based on multi-dimensional Langevin equations. Large charge and mass transfer was found due to the ''inverse quasi-fission'' process leading to formation of survived superheavy long-lived neutron-rich nuclei. In many events lifetime of the composite system consisting of two touching nuclei turns out to be rather long; sufficient for spontaneous positron formation from super-strong electric field, a fundamental QED process.

  6. Induction heaters used to heat subsurface formations

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nguyen, Scott Vinh (Houston, TX); Bass, Ronald M. (Houston, TX)

    2012-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

    A heating system for a subsurface formation includes an elongated electrical conductor located in the subsurface formation. The electrical conductor extends between at least a first electrical contact and a second electrical contact. A ferromagnetic conductor at least partially surrounds and at least partially extends lengthwise around the electrical conductor. The electrical conductor, when energized with time-varying electrical current, induces sufficient electrical current flow in the ferromagnetic conductor such that the ferromagnetic conductor resistively heats to a temperature of at least about 300.degree. C.

  7. Parallel heater system for subsurface formations

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Harris, Christopher Kelvin (Houston, TX); Karanikas, John Michael (Houston, TX); Nguyen, Scott Vinh (Houston, TX)

    2011-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

    A heating system for a subsurface formation is disclosed. The system includes a plurality of substantially horizontally oriented or inclined heater sections located in a hydrocarbon containing layer in the formation. At least a portion of two of the heater sections are substantially parallel to each other. The ends of at least two of the heater sections in the layer are electrically coupled to a substantially horizontal, or inclined, electrical conductor oriented substantially perpendicular to the ends of the at least two heater sections.

  8. Creating fluid injectivity in tar sands formations

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Stegemeier, George Leo; Beer, Gary Lee; Zhang, Etuan

    2012-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods for treating a tar sands formation are described herein. Methods for treating a tar sands may include heating a portion of a hydrocarbon layer in the formation from one or more heaters located in the portion. The heat may be controlled to increase the permeability of at least part of the portion to create an injection zone in the portion with an average permeability sufficient to allow injection of a fluid through the injection zone. A drive fluid and/or an oxidizing fluid may be provided into the injection zone. At least some hydrocarbons including mobilized hydrocarbons are produced from the portion.

  9. Creating fluid injectivity in tar sands formations

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Stegemeier, George Leo; Beer, Gary Lee; Zhang, Etuan

    2010-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods for treating a tar sands formation are described herein. Methods for treating a tar sands may include heating a portion of a hydrocarbon layer in the formation from one or more heaters located in the portion. The heat may be controlled to increase the permeability of at least part of the portion to create an injection zone in the portion with an average permeability sufficient to allow injection of a fluid through the injection zone. A drive fluid and/or an oxidizing fluid may be provided into the injection zone. At least some hydrocarbons are produced from the portion.

  10. Computation of the free energy due to electron density fluctuation of a solute in solution: A QM/MM method with perturbation approach combined with a theory of solutions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Suzuoka, Daiki; Takahashi, Hideaki, E-mail: hideaki@m.tohoku.ac.jp; Morita, Akihiro [Department of Chemistry, Graduate School of Science, Tohoku University, Sendai Miyagi 980-8578 (Japan)] [Department of Chemistry, Graduate School of Science, Tohoku University, Sendai Miyagi 980-8578 (Japan)

    2014-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

    We developed a perturbation approach to compute solvation free energy ?? within the framework of QM (quantum mechanical)/MM (molecular mechanical) method combined with a theory of energy representation (QM/MM-ER). The energy shift ? of the whole system due to the electronic polarization of the solute is evaluated using the second-order perturbation theory (PT2), where the electric field formed by surrounding solvent molecules is treated as the perturbation to the electronic Hamiltonian of the isolated solute. The point of our approach is that the energy shift ?, thus obtained, is to be adopted for a novel energy coordinate of the distribution functions which serve as fundamental variables in the free energy functional developed in our previous work. The most time-consuming part in the QM/MM-ER simulation can be, thus, avoided without serious loss of accuracy. For our benchmark set of molecules, it is demonstrated that the PT2 approach coupled with QM/MM-ER gives hydration free energies in excellent agreements with those given by the conventional method utilizing the Kohn-Sham SCF procedure except for a few molecules in the benchmark set. A variant of the approach is also proposed to deal with such difficulties associated with the problematic systems. The present approach is also advantageous to parallel implementations. We examined the parallel efficiency of our PT2 code on multi-core processors and found that the speedup increases almost linearly with respect to the number of cores. Thus, it was demonstrated that QM/MM-ER coupled with PT2 deserves practical applications to systems of interest.

  11. STAR FORMATION IN LINER HOST GALAXIES AT z {approx} 0.3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tommasin, Silvia; Netzer, Hagai; Sternberg, Amiel [School of Physics and Astronomy, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv 69978 (Israel); Nordon, Raanan; Lutz, Dieter; Berta, Stefano; Magnelli, Benjamin [MPE, Postfach 1312, 85741 Garching (Germany); Bongiorno, Angela [INAF-Oservatorio Astronomico di Roma, via Frascati 33, 00040 Monte Porzio Catone (Roma) (Italy); Le Floc'h, Emeric; Riguccini, Laurie [Laboratoire AIM, CEA/DSM-CNRS-Universite Paris Diderot, IRFU/Service d'Astrophysique, Bat 709, CEA-Saclay, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France); Pozzi, Francesca [Dipartimento di Astronomia, Universita degli Studi di Bologna, via Ranzani 1, 40127 Bologna (Italy)

    2012-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the results of a Herschel-PACS study of a sample of 97 low-ionization nuclear emission-line regions (LINERs) at redshift z {approx} 0.3 selected from the zCOSMOS survey. Of these sources, 34 are detected in at least one PACS band, enabling reliable estimates of the far-infrared L{sub FIR} luminosities, and a comparison to the FIR luminosities of local LINERs. Many of our PACS-detected LINERs are also UV sources detected by GALEX. Assuming that the FIR is produced in young dusty star-forming regions, the typical star formation rates (SFRs) for the host galaxies in our sample are {approx}10 M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1}, 1-2 orders of magnitude larger than in many local LINERs. Given stellar masses inferred from optical/NIR photometry of the (unobscured) evolved stellar populations, we find that the entire sample lies close to the star-forming 'main sequence' for galaxies at redshift 0.3. For young star-forming regions, the H{alpha}- and UV-based estimates of the SFRs are much smaller than the FIR-based estimates, by factors {approx}30, even assuming that all of the H{alpha} emission is produced by O-star ionization rather than by the active galactic nuclei (AGNs). These discrepancies may be due to large (and uncertain) extinctions toward the young stellar systems. Alternatively, the H{alpha} and UV emissions could be tracing residual star formation in an older, less obscured population with decaying star formation. We also compare L{sub SF} and L(AGN) in local LINERs and in our sample. Finally, we comment on the problematic use of several line diagnostic diagrams in cases with an estimated obscuration similar to that in the sample under study.

  12. Sample storage/disposal study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Valenzuela, B.D.

    1994-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Radioactive waste from defense operations has accumulated at the Hanford Site`s underground waste tanks since the late 1940`s. Each tank must be analyzed to determine whether it presents any harm to the workers at the Hanford Site, the public or the environment. Analyses of the waste aids in the decision making process in preparation of future tank waste stabilization procedures. Characterization of the 177 waste tanks on the Hanford Site will produce a large amount of archived material. This also brings up concerns as to how the excess waste tank sample material from 325 and 222-S Analytical Laboratories will be handled. Methods to archive and/or dispose of the waste have been implemented into the 222-S and 325 Laboratory procedures. As the amount of waste characterized from laboratory analysis grows, an examination of whether the waste disposal system will be able to compensate for this increase in the amount of waste needs to be examined. Therefore, the need to find the safest, most economically sound method of waste storage/disposal is important.

  13. The Star Formation Reference Survey. I. Survey Description and Basic Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ashby, M L N; Smith, H A; Willner, S P; Fazio, G G; Raychaudhury, S; Zezas, A; Barmby, P; Bonfini, P; Cao, C; Gonzalez-Alfonso, E; Ishihara, D; Kaneda, H; Lyttle, V; Madden, S; Papovich, C; Sturm, E; Surace, J; Wu, H; Zhu, Y -N

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Star formation is arguably the most important physical process in the cosmos. It is a fundamental driver of galaxy evolution and the ultimate source of most of the energy emitted by galaxies. A correct interpretation of star formation rate (SFR) measures is therefore essential to our understanding of galaxy formation and evolution. Unfortunately, however, no single SFR estimator is universally available or even applicable in all circumstances: the numerous galaxies found in deep surveys are often too faint (or too distant) to yield significant detections with most standard SFR measures, and until now there have been no global, multi-band observations of nearby galaxies that span all the conditions under which star-formation is taking place. To address this need in a systematic way, we have undertaken a multi-band survey of all types of star-forming galaxies in the local Universe. This project, the Star Formation Reference Survey (SFRS), is based on a statistically valid sample of 369 nearby galaxies that span...

  14. Where the Blue Stragglers Roam: Searching for a Link Between Formation and Environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nathan Leigh; Alison Sills; Christian Knigge

    2008-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The formation of blue stragglers is still not completely understood, particularly the relationship between formation environment and mechanism. We use a large, homogeneous sample of blue stragglers in the cores of 57 globular clusters to investigate the relationships between blue straggler populations and their environments. We use a consistent definition of "blue straggler" based on position in the color-magnitude diagram, and normalize the population relative to the number of red giant branch stars in the core. We find that the previously determined anti-correlation between blue straggler frequency and total cluster mass is present in the purely core population. We find some weak correlations with central velocity dispersion and with half-mass relaxation time. The blue straggler frequency does not show any trend with any other cluster parameter. Even though collisions may be expected to be a dominant blue straggler formation process in globular cluster cores, we find no correlation between the frequency of blue stragglers and the collision rate in the core. We also investigated the blue straggler luminosity function shape, and found no relationship between any cluster parameter and the distribution of blue stragglers in the color-magnitude diagram. Our results are inconsistent with some recent models of blue straggler formation that include collisional formation mechanisms, and may suggest that almost all observed blue stragglers are formed in binary systems.

  15. E-Print Network 3.0 - air samples collected Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Collection NASA's Stardust sample return capsule successfully landed at the Summary: Aerogel: Stardust Collection Material 12;NASA's Stardust sample return capsule...

  16. E-Print Network 3.0 - adaptive sampling strategy Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ray tracing, Whitted Whi80 proposed an adaptive sampling strategy which first... (Eds.) Adaptive Sampling for Geometry-aware Reconstruction Filters Pablo Bauszat1 and Martin...

  17. E-Print Network 3.0 - assurance sampling method Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    for NRDA followed standard operating procedure (SOP), water sampling plans, Summary: procedures, and NOAA's Analytical Quality Assurance Project Plan (QAPP). Samples were sent to...

  18. Power systems utilizing the heat of produced formation fluid

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lambirth, Gene Richard (Houston, TX)

    2011-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Systems, methods, and heaters for treating a subsurface formation are described herein. At least one method includes treating a hydrocarbon containing formation. The method may include providing heat to the formation; producing heated fluid from the formation; and generating electricity from at least a portion of the heated fluid using a Kalina cycle.

  19. E-Print Network 3.0 - alkalimetall und schwefel Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Mm1 Cellular Networks: GSM, GPRS, and UMTS Mm2... Quality of Service Mm5 Reliability aspects www.kom.auc.dkhpsWirelessNetworksIISp05 Page 2 Hans Peter Schwefel...

  20. UAV Flight Formation Control Jose Alfredo GUERRERO

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    UAV Flight Formation Control Jose Alfredo GUERRERO Rogelio LOZANO Version 0.5, hal-00923127,version. Modeling and Control of Mini UAV . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 G. Flores , J.A. Guerrero , J2014 #12;x hal-00923127,version1-2Jan2014 #12;Chapter 1 Modeling and Control of Mini UAV This Chapter