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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mm sample format" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

The W43-MM1 mini-starburst ridge, a test for star formation efficiency models  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Context: Star formation efficiency (SFE) theories are currently based on statistical distributions of turbulent cloud structures and a simple model of star formation from cores. They remain poorly tested, especially at the highest densities. Aims: We investigate the effects of gas density on the SFE through measurements of the core formation efficiency (CFE). With a total mass of $\\sim2\\times10^4$ M$_\\odot$, the W43-MM1 ridge is one of the most convincing candidate precursor of starburst clusters and thus one of the best place to investigate star formation. Methods: We used high-angular resolution maps obtained at 3 mm and 1 mm within W43-MM1 with the IRAM Plateau de Bure Interferometer to reveal a cluster of 11 massive dense cores (MDCs), and, one of the most massive protostellar cores known. An Herschel column density image provided the mass distribution of the cloud gas. We then measured the 'instantaneous' CFE and estimated the SFE and the star formation rate (SFR) within subregions of the W43-MM1 ridge. ...

Louvet, Fabien; Hennebelle, Patrick; Bonnell, Ian; Bontemps, Sylvain; Gusdorf, Antoine; Hill, Tracey; Gueth, Frédéric; Peretto, Nicolas; Duarte-Cabral, Ana; Stephan, Gwendoline; Schilke, Peter; Csengeri, Timéa; Luong, Quang Nguyen; Lis, Darek

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

ARTIFACT FORMATION DURING NEUTRALIZATION OF TANK 50 SAMPLES  

SciTech Connect

Degradation products have been identified in the extracts of Tank 50 samples analyzed by semivolatile organic compound analysis (SVOA) using gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS). These materials, identified as short chain alkyl alcohols, were formed by acidification during sample preparation. A number of questions were raised about the formation of these and other materials reported in Tank 50 surface samples, and this report serves to address these questions.

Crump, S.; Young, J.

2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Examination of Hydrate Formation Methods: Trying to Create Representative Samples  

SciTech Connect

Forming representative gas hydrate-bearing laboratory samples is important so that the properties of these materials may be measured, while controlling the composition and other variables. Natural samples are rare, and have often experienced pressure and temperature changes that may affect the property to be measured [Waite et al., 2008]. Forming methane hydrate samples in the laboratory has been done a number of ways, each having advantages and disadvantages. The ice-to-hydrate method [Stern et al., 1996], contacts melting ice with methane at the appropriate pressure to form hydrate. The hydrate can then be crushed and mixed with mineral grains under controlled conditions, and then compacted to create laboratory samples of methane hydrate in a mineral medium. The hydrate in these samples will be part of the load-bearing frame of the medium. In the excess gas method [Handa and Stupin, 1992], water is distributed throughout a mineral medium (e.g. packed moist sand, drained sand, moistened silica gel, other porous media) and the mixture is brought to hydrate-stable conditions (chilled and pressurized with gas), allowing hydrate to form. This method typically produces grain-cementing hydrate from pendular water in sand [Waite et al., 2004]. In the dissolved gas method [Tohidi et al., 2002], water with sufficient dissolved guest molecules is brought to hydrate-stable conditions where hydrate forms. In the laboratory, this is can be done by pre-dissolving the gas of interest in water and then introducing it to the sample under the appropriate conditions. With this method, it is easier to form hydrate from more soluble gases such as carbon dioxide. It is thought that this method more closely simulates the way most natural gas hydrate has formed. Laboratory implementation, however, is difficult, and sample formation is prohibitively time consuming [Minagawa et al., 2005; Spangenberg and Kulenkampff, 2005]. In another version of this technique, a specified quantity of gas is placed in a sample, then the sample is flooded with water and cooled [Priest et al., 2009]. We have performed a number of tests in which hydrate was formed and the uniformity of the hydrate formation was examined. These tests have primarily used a variety of modifications of the excess gas method to make the hydrate, although we have also used a version of the excess water technique. Early on, we found difficulties in creating uniform samples with a particular sand/ initial water saturation combination (F-110 Sand, {approx} 35% initial water saturation). In many of our tests we selected this combination intentionally to determine whether we could use a method to make the samples uniform. The following methods were examined: Excess gas, Freeze/thaw/form, Freeze/pressurize/thaw, Excess gas followed by water saturation, Excess water, Sand and kaolinite, Use of a nucleation enhancer (SnoMax), and Use of salt in the water. Below, each method, the underlying hypothesis, and our results are briefly presented, followed by a brief conclusion. Many of the hypotheses investigated are not our own, but were presented to us. Much of the data presented is from x-ray CT scanning our samples. The x-ray CT scanner provides a three-dimensional density map of our samples. From this map and the physics that is occurring in our samples, we are able to gain an understanding of the spatial nature of the processes that occur, and attribute them to the locations where they occur.

Kneafsey, T.J.; Rees, E.V.L.; Nakagawa, S.; Kwon, T.-H.

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Isopach map of black shale in the West Falls Formation (from well sample studies)  

SciTech Connect

Maps of western New York State and Lake Erie were prepared containing information on black shale deposits in the West Falls Formation from well sample studies. (DC)

Kamakaris, D.G.; Van Tyne, A.M.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Isopach map of black shale in the Java Formation (from well sample studies)  

SciTech Connect

A map of western New York State and Lake Erie was prepared containing information on black shale deposits in the Java Formation from well sample studies. (DC)

Kamakaris, D.G.; Van Tyne, A.M.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Microscopic observations of samples affected by delayed ettringite formation (DEF)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This article, which deals with the study of the microscopic modifications of DEF-affected materials, has two main objectives. The first one is to study the influence of sample preparation on the microcracks of sp...

Nordine Leklou; Jean-Emmanuel Aubert; Gilles Escadeillas

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Methane Hydrate Formation and Dissociation in a PartiallySaturated Core-Scale Sand Sample  

SciTech Connect

We performed a sequence of tests on a partiallywater-saturated sand sample contained in an x-ray transparent aluminumpressure vessel that is conducive to x-ray computed tomography (CT)observation. These tests were performed to gather data for estimation ofthermal properties of the sand/water/gas system and thesand/hydrate/water/gas systems, as well as data to evaluate the kineticnature of hydrate dissociation. The tests included mild thermalperturbations for the estimation of the thermal properties of thesand/water/gas system, hydrate formation, thermal perturbations withhydrate in the stability zone, hydrate dissociation through thermalstimulation, additional hydrate formation, and hydrate dissociationthrough depressurization with thermal stimulation. Density changesthroughout the sample were observed as a result of hydrate formation anddissociation, and these processes induced capillary pressure changes thataltered local water saturation.

Kneafsey, Timothy J.; Tomutsa, Liviu; Moridis, George J.; Seol,Yongkoo; Freifeld, Barry M.; Taylor, Charles E.; Gupta, Arvind

2005-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

8

INFRARED AND ULTRAVIOLET STAR FORMATION IN BRIGHTEST CLUSTER GALAXIES IN THE ACCEPT SAMPLE  

SciTech Connect

We present infrared (IR) and ultraviolet (UV) photometry for a sample of brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs). The BCGs are from a heterogeneous but uniformly characterized sample, the Archive of Chandra Cluster Entropy Profile Tables (ACCEPT), of X-ray galaxy clusters from the Chandra X-ray telescope archive with published gas temperature, density, and entropy profiles. We use archival Galaxy Evolution Explorer (GALEX), Spitzer Space Telescope, and Two Micron All Sky Survey (2MASS) observations to assemble spectral energy distributions (SEDs) and colors for BCGs. We find that while the SEDs of some BCGs follow the expectation of red, dust-free old stellar populations, many exhibit signatures of recent star formation in the form of excess UV or mid-IR emission, or both. We establish a mean near-UV (NUV) to 2MASS K color of 6.59 {+-} 0.34 for quiescent BCGs. We use this mean color to quantify the UV excess associated with star formation in the active BCGs. We use both fits to a template of an evolved stellar population and library of starburst models and mid-IR star formation relations to estimate the obscured star formation rates (SFRs). We show that many of the BCGs in X-ray clusters with low central gas entropy exhibit enhanced UV (38%) and mid-IR emission (43%) from 8 to 160 {mu}m, above that expected from an old stellar population. These excesses are consistent with ongoing star formation activity in the BCG, star formation that appears to be enabled by the presence of high-density, X-ray-emitting intergalactic gas in the core of the cluster of galaxies. This hot, X-ray-emitting gas may provide the enhanced ambient pressure and some of the fuel to trigger star formation. This result is consistent with previous works that showed that BCGs in clusters with low central gas entropies host H{alpha} emission-line nebulae and radio sources, while clusters with high central gas entropy exhibit none of these features. GALEX UV and Spitzer mid-IR measurements combined provide a complete picture of unobscured and obscured star formation occurring in these systems. We present IR and UV photometry and estimated equivalent continuous SFRs for a sample of BCGs.

Hoffer, Aaron S.; Donahue, Megan; Hicks, Amalia [Physics and Astronomy Department, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824-2320 (United States); Barthelemy, R. S., E-mail: hofferaa@msu.edu, E-mail: donahue@pa.msu.edu, E-mail: hicksam@msu.edu, E-mail: ramon.s.barthelemy@wmich.edu [Physics Department, Western Michigan University, Kalamazoo, MI 49008-5252 (United States)

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Coal petrography, mineralogy and geochemistry of lignite samples from the Ogwashi–Asaba Formation, Nigeria  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Organic sediments picked up randomly from seven small outcrops within the Ogwashi–Asaba Formation, southern Nigeria, are examined and evaluated by means of coal petrology and chemical and mineralogical analyses in order to determine the palaeoenvironmental conditions and the factors controlling their formation. Six samples proved to be low-rank coals C to B (lignite), one carbonaceous shale. The lignite samples display low ash yield, low telohuminite and high detrohuminite and liptinite contents; they contain small amounts of clastic minerals, mainly quartz and clays, which point to the topogenous character of the depositional palaeoenvironment. The palaeomires formed in a continental basin crossed by the mid-Tertiary palaeo-Niger River; the latter, as well as the tropical rainfall supplied the mires with water. The dense vegetation cover on the mire surface and the surroundings and/or the low relief energy of the broad area restricted the inorganic influx resulting in high-grade coal formation. As the outcrops are distributed over a distance of 60 km, the expected reserves of good quality lignite constitute a very promising exploration target.

Jude Ogala; George Siavalas; Kimon Christanis

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Annual Logging Symposium, June 21-24, 2009 Wireline and While-Drilling Formation-Tester Sampling with Oval, Focused,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

SPWLA 50th Annual Logging Symposium, June 21-24, 2009 1 Wireline and While-Drilling Formation-Tester Sampling with Oval, Focused, and Conventional Probe Types in the Presence of Water- and Oil-Base Mud existed since the introduction of formation pressure testing to the drilling environment in 2002

Torres-Verdín, Carlos

11

Methane hydrate distribution from prolonged and repeated formation in natural and compacted sand samples: X-ray CT observations  

SciTech Connect

To study physical properties of methane gas hydrate-bearing sediments, it is necessary to synthesize laboratory samples due to the limited availability of cores from natural deposits. X-ray computed tomography (CT) and other observations have shown gas hydrate to occur in a number of morphologies over a variety of sediment types. To aid in understanding formation and growth patterns of hydrate in sediments, methane hydrate was repeatedly formed in laboratory-packed sand samples and in a natural sediment core from the Mount Elbert Stratigraphic Test Well. CT scanning was performed during hydrate formation and decomposition steps, and periodically while the hydrate samples remained under stable conditions for up to 60 days. The investigation revealed the impact of water saturation on location and morphology of hydrate in both laboratory and natural sediments during repeated hydrate formations. Significant redistribution of hydrate and water in the samples was observed over both the short and long term.

Rees, E.V.L.; Kneafsey, T.J.; Seol, Y.

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

E-Print Network 3.0 - aureus biofilm formation Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

multiple important functions including virulence and biofilm formation1... -sensing inhibitor RNAIII-inhibiting peptide to prevent biofilm formation in vivo by drug-resistant...

13

Calculated and measured gas formation in beryllium samples irradiated in the high flux materials testing reactor BR2  

SciTech Connect

Beryllium samples have been irradiated in BR2, the materials testing reactor of the Nuclear Research Centre SCK/CEN at Mol, Belgium, up to fission fluence values of 5.2 10{sup 22} n/cm{sup 2} at low temperature. The gas formation (helium, tritium), as measured by SCK/CEN, as well as the induced swelling of the beryllium samples and the enhancement of the swelling due to annealing have been presented at the 17th SOFT Conference (Rome, 14--18 Sept., 1992). Since this conference, helium measurements on the same samples have been carried out at RI and calculations of the gas production have been performed, taking into account the various formation schemes. The experimental results from SCK/CEN and from RI are compared with the calculated gas formations.

De Raedt, C.M.; Sannen, L.F.; Vanmechelen, P.J. [SCK/CEN, Mol (Belgium); Oliver, B.M. [Rockwell International Corp., Canoga Park, CA (United States). Rocketdyne Div.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

14

Methane Hydrate Formation and Dissociation in a Partially Saturated Core-Scale Sand Sample  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

gas system and the sand/hydrate/water/gas systems, as wellproperties of the sand/water/gas system, hydrate formation,saturated sand/water/gas (s/w/g) system, hydrate formation,

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

E-Print Network 3.0 - array format 20khz Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3 Computation Visualization Summary: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 Version 5 MATLAB Array Data Element Formats . . . .10 Numeric Array and Character Array Data... Element...

16

Microsoft Word - BH-MM-1066,BM-MM-1067,WH-MM-1068.docx  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

, BM-MM-1067, WH-MM-1068 , BM-MM-1067, WH-MM-1068 Title: Pumping System for 100 MBD Cavern Capacity Maintenance - BH, BM, WH Description: Subcontractor shall provide all labor, tools, materials, equipment, services, transportation, storage and supervision required to install new Variable Frequency Drive (VFD) buildings at the BH, BM, and WH SPR sites. The buildings will house the VFD electrical system used to control the operation of the site pumps. Tasks include excavation for all foundations; construction of concrete foundation, steel support structure, and precast concrete deck; and installation of GFE pre-fabricated metal building on concrete deck. Subcontractor shall evaluate and implement Green Building Design where applicable. Regulatory Requirements: NEPA Implementing Procedures (10 CFR 1021)

17

E-Print Network 3.0 - aneuploid sperm formation Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

A. (2007). Caenorhabditis elegans Summary: to be costs associated with swimming in trains. While the trains can out-swim single sperm, train formation... species. The sperm of...

18

E-Print Network 3.0 - academic team formation Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

forward completely plausible explanations... of teams and their formation. The works of Phillip Cohen and Hector Levesque have been very influential... and therefore will receive...

19

E-Print Network 3.0 - asymmetry-driven structure formation Sample...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

fr Physik Theoriekolloquium Summary: mit dem Titel Fluctuation effects and cluster formation in kinetic thin film growth Solid structures... applied preparation method is...

20

E-Print Network 3.0 - amorphous layer formation Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Tin Anode Material for Lithium Secondary Battery Summary: , indicating the formation of an amorphous phase. The XRD pattern of Sn nanoparticles showed no impurity...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mm sample format" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

E-Print Network 3.0 - autophagosome-like vacuoles formation Sample...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Plant Physiologists1 Programmed Cell Death in Development and Defense Summary: and phosphorous. 2. Cell death is impor- tant in sculpting tissues such as the formation of...

22

E-Print Network 3.0 - abscess gas formation Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

if there is evidence of intestinal obstruction, abscess formation, perforation, fis... -old white woman with a history of gas- trointestinal problems presented with ab-...

23

E-Print Network 3.0 - attenuates neointimal formation Sample...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

was determined and expressed as bilirubin formation per mg proteinhour, as ... Source: Brand, Paul H. - Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, University of Toledo...

24

E-Print Network 3.0 - albicans biofilm formation Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and Summary: avium biofilm formation Henriette Geier, MSU-CBE PhD Candidate, Microbiology SESSION 6: Environmental... 9:00-9:50 Resistance, persistence and consistence...

25

E-Print Network 3.0 - average formation length Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

is reported... independently by each robot by averaging the x and y positions of all the robots involved in the formation. Each... maintenance. Three performance metrics are...

26

E-Print Network 3.0 - air toxics formation Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sciences and Ecology 40 Substance and perceptions of environmental impacts of Summary: dioxins in the feed and to minimizase formation on cooling. MACT: Air Pollution Control...

27

E-Print Network 3.0 - almond formation outcrops Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

reservoirs outside the GOM. Examples The world-class outcrops of the Permian Brushy Canyon Formation... Use of outcrop analogues to predict lithology influence on the seismic...

28

E-Print Network 3.0 - als promote formation Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of Root Hair Initiation and Expansin Gene Summary: al., 1995). However, the role of ethylene in root hair formation is questioned be- cause the ethylene... as they negatively...

29

E-Print Network 3.0 - ash formation transformations Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

chlorinated phenols because their presence in the ash could result in the formation of dioxins and furans... THE USE OF MUNICIPAL WASTE COMBUSTOR ASH AS A PARTIAL REPLACEMENT OF...

30

E-Print Network 3.0 - affecting radical formation Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of reactive species (radicals) 12;Chapter 1 9 to initiate... important in combustion processes. The formation of the radicals OH and O can lead to further chain... . As in...

31

E-Print Network 3.0 - amyloid fibril formation Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

amyloid fibril formation Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Dr. Igor Lednev Department of Chemistry Summary: , 2010 - March 31, 2015 Amount: 1,074,000 Structural Characterization of...

32

The consolidation characteristics of undisturbed soil samples of deep formations and their application to problems of regional subsidence  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

THE CONSOLIDATION CHARACTERISTICS OF UNDISTURBED SOII SAMPLES OF DEEP FORMATIONS AND THEIR APPLICATION TO PROBLEMS OF REGIONAL SUBSIDENCE LYLE ANTHONY WOLFSKILL Submitted to the Graduate School of the Agricultural and Mechanical College... of Texas in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE Sanuary, 1960 Ymjor Sub]ect: Civil Engineering THE CONSOLIDATION CHARACTERISTICS OF UNDISTURBED SOIL SAMPIZS OF DEEP FORYiATIONS AND THEIR APPLICATION TO PROBLENS...

Wolfskill, Lyle Anthony

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

33

Mechanistical studies on the formation of carbon dioxide in extraterrestrial carbon monoxide ice analog samples  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

be produced via radiolysis of carbon monoxide ices.5 Indeed, the effects of ionizing radiation on pure carbonMechanistical studies on the formation of carbon dioxide in extraterrestrial carbon monoxide ice901220f Binary ice mixtures of two carbon monoxide isotopomers, 13 C16 O and 12 C18 O, were subjected

Kaiser, Ralf I.

34

Methane hydrate formation and dissociation in a partially saturated core-scale sand sample  

SciTech Connect

We performed a series of experiments to provide data for validating numerical models of gas hydrate behavior in porous media. Methane hydrate was formed and dissociated under various conditions in a large X-ray transparent pressure vessel, while pressure and temperature were monitored. In addition, X-ray computed tomography (CT) was used to determine local density changes during the experiment. The goals of the experiments were to observe changes occurring due to hydrate formation and dissociation, and to collect data to evaluate the importance of hydrate dissociation kinetics in porous media. In the series of experiments, we performed thermal perturbations on the sand/water/gas system, formed methane hydrate, performed thermal perturbations on the sand/hydrate/water/gas system resulting in hydrate formation and dissociation, formed hydrate in the resulting partially dissociated system, and dissociated the hydrate by depressurization coupled with thermal stimulation. Our CT work shows significant water migration in addition to possible shifting of mineral grains in response to hydrate formation and dissociation. The extensive data including pressure, temperatures at multiple locations, and density from CT data is described.

Kneafsey, T.J. (LBNL); Tomutsa, L. (LBNL); Moridis, G.J. (LBNL); Seol, Y. (LBNL); Freifeld, B.M. (LBNL); Taylor, C.E.; Gupta, A. (Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO)

2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

DEFLECTION MEASUREMENTS OF 25 mm ALUMINUM COLLARS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

MEASUREMENTS OF 25 mm ALUMINUM COLLARS· C. Peters LawrenceMEASUREMENTS OF 25 mm ALUMINUM COLLARS" C. Peters Lawrenceinch thick 7075- T6 aluminum alloy plate. Inside corners

Peters, C.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

ARTIFACT FORMATION IN HIGH VOLUME SAMPLING OF VOC's AND SOLID ORGANIC COMPOUNDS.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

when sampling polluted air. Purified air containing 180 ppbv ozone seems to destroy PAH according Atmospheriques, Boite 7059, UNIVERSITE PARIS 7, 2, place Jussieu, 75251 PARIS Cedex 05 ABSTRACT Pollutants from well äs solid (SOC's) organic compounds. High volume samplers are commonly used m air quality

Boyer, Edmond

37

Methane hydrate formation and dissociationin a partially saturatedcore-scale sand sample  

SciTech Connect

We performed a series of experiments to provide data forvalidating numerical models of gas hydrate behavior in porous media.Methane hydrate was formed and dissociated under various conditions in alarge X-ray transparent pressure vessel, while pressure and temperaturewere monitored. In addition, X-ray computed tomography (CT) was used todetermine local density changes during the experiment. The goals of theexperiments were to observe changes occurring due to hydrate formationand dissociation, and to collect data to evaluate the importance ofhydrate dissociation kinetics in porous media. In the series ofexperiments, we performed thermal perturbations on the sand/water/gassystem, formed methane hydrate, performed thermal perturbations on thesand/hydrate/water/gas system resulting in hydrate formation anddissociation, formed hydrate in the resulting partially dissociatedsystem, and dissociated the hydrate by depressurization coupled withthermal stimulation. Our CT work shows significant water migration inaddition to possible shifting of mineral grains in response to hydrateformation and dissociation. The extensive data including pressure,temperatures at multiple locations, and density from CT data isdescribed.

Kneafsey, Timothy J.; Tomutsa, Liviu; Moridis, George J.; Seol,Yongkoo; Freifeld, Barry M.; Taylor, Charles E.; Gupta, Arvind

2006-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

38

RHAPSODY. I. STRUCTURAL PROPERTIES AND FORMATION HISTORY FROM A STATISTICAL SAMPLE OF RE-SIMULATED CLUSTER-SIZE HALOS  

SciTech Connect

We present the first results from the RHAPSODY cluster re-simulation project: a sample of 96 'zoom-in' simulations of dark matter halos of 10{sup 14.8{+-}0.05} h {sup -1} M {sub Sun }, selected from a 1 h {sup -3} Gpc{sup 3} volume. This simulation suite is the first to resolve this many halos with {approx}5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 6} particles per halo in the cluster mass regime, allowing us to statistically characterize the distribution of and correlation between halo properties at fixed mass. We focus on the properties of the main halos and how they are affected by formation history, which we track back to z = 12, over five decades in mass. We give particular attention to the impact of the formation history on the density profiles of the halos. We find that the deviations from the Navarro-Frenk-White (NFW) model and the Einasto model depend on formation time. Late-forming halos tend to have considerable deviations from both models, partly due to the presence of massive subhalos, while early-forming halos deviate less but still significantly from the NFW model and are better described by the Einasto model. We find that the halo shapes depend only moderately on formation time. Departure from spherical symmetry impacts the density profiles through the anisotropic distribution of massive subhalos. Further evidence of the impact of subhalos is provided by analyzing the phase-space structure. A detailed analysis of the properties of the subhalo population in RHAPSODY is presented in a companion paper.

Wu, Hao-Yi; Hahn, Oliver; Wechsler, Risa H.; Mao, Yao-Yuan; Behroozi, Peter S., E-mail: hywu@umich.edu [Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology, Physics Department, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States)

2013-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

39

a 3.37 mm length b 3.32 mm diameter  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

5.2 ml retinal subtense 300 µm/deg retinal arc 51 mm retinal area* 1024 ± 184 mm2 total.3 µl retinal subtense 31 µm/deg retinal arc 4.9 mm retinal area 15.6 mm2 cone:rod ratio 0/deg retinal arc 10.6 mm retinal area 52 mm2 cone:rod ratio mean cone density* mm-2 mean rod

Marc, Robert E.

40

RECORD OF CATEGORICAL EXCLUSION DETERMINATION Project ID No. BC-MM-1029, BH-MM-1030, BM-MM-1031, WH-MM-1032  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1029, BH-MM-1030, BM-MM-1031, WH-MM-1032 1029, BH-MM-1030, BM-MM-1031, WH-MM-1032 Title: Install Power Metering for SPR Site Buildings Description: Subcontractor shall provide all labor, tools, materials, equipment, and supervision required to install power metering at the four SPR sites. The meters will monitor energy consumption at the SPR site control, administrative, and maintenance buildings. Regulatory Requirements: NEPA Implementing Procedures (10 CFR 1021) 10 CFR 1021.410 (Application of Categorical Exclusions) (a) The actions listed in Appendices A and B of Subpart D are classes of actions that DOE has determined do not individually or cumulatively have a significant effect on the human environment (categorical exclusions). (b) To find that a proposal is categorically excluded, DOE shall determine the following:

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mm sample format" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Methane hydrate distribution from prolonged and repeated formation in natural and compacted sand samples: X-ray CT observations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

voxel contained sand, gas, hydrate (under proper conditions)of Gas Hydrate Formation in a Bed of Silica Sand Particles.Gas Hydrate Formation in a Variable Volume Bed of Silica Sand

Rees, E.V.L.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

E-Print Network 3.0 - antibiotic-loaded cement spacers Sample...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

in this study. Sealed Reference Sample Sample Cement Paste 10 mm 10 mm 11.5mm 8mm Plastic Spacers 5 mm... based on Stokes equation actually suggests that some of the...

43

Polarized mm And sub-mm Emission From Sgr A* At The Galactic Center  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The recent detection of significant linear polarization at mm and sub-mm wavelengths in the spectrum of Sgr A* (if confirmed) will be a useful probe of the conditions within several Schwarzschild radii ($r_S$) of the event horizon at the Galactic Center. Hydrodynamic simulations of gas flowing in the vicinity of this object suggest that the infalling gas circularizes when it approaches within $5-25 r_S$ of the black hole. We suggest that the sub-mm ``excess'' of emission seen in the spectrum of Sgr A* may be associated with radiation produced within the inner Keplerian region and that the observed polarization characteristics provide direct evidence for this phenomenon. The overall spectrum from this region, including the high-energy component due to bremsstrahlung and inverse Compton scattering processes, is at or below the recent {\\it Chandra} measurement, and may account for the X-ray source if it turns out to be the actual counterpart to Sgr A*.

Fulvio Melia; Siming Liu; Robert Coker

2001-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

44

direction. Three different pipette solutions were used: Cs-gluconate solution (150 mM CsOH, 5 mM CsCl, 135 mM sucrose, 10 mM HEPES, 1.5 mM EGTA and 1.5 mM EDTA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

was varied from 20 mM to 5 mM by addition of the corresponding amount of 1 M CaCl2 stock solution into one-Tris solution (205 mM HEPES (pH 7.2 with Trisma base)). Bath solution with 105 mM [Ca2þ ]c (105 mM CaCl2 solution) contained 105 mM CaCl2, 10 mM HEPES (pH 7.2 with Trisma base or NaOH). This solution

Scholey, Jonathan

45

Course Outline ENG 2MM3 Electrical Circuits & Power  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-Phase Induction Motor; 5. DC Generators & DC Motors; 6. Efficiency/Heating of Electric Machines; 7. ActiveCourse Outline ENG 2MM3 Electrical Circuits & Power Winter 2010 Instructor: Prof. Matiar Howlader Web Page: www.ece.mcmaster.ca/~mrhowlader/ENG2MM3Notes Text Books: 1. Electrical Power and Controls

Haykin, Simon

46

Course Outline ENG 2MM3 Electrical Circuits & Power  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-Phase Induction Motor; 5. DC Generators & DC Motors; 6. Efficiency/Heating of Electric Machines; 7. ActiveCourse Outline ENG 2MM3 Electrical Circuits & Power Fall 2010 Instructor: Prof. Matiar Howlader Web Page: www.ece.mcmaster.ca/~mrhowlader/ENG2MM3Notes Text Books: 1. Electrical Power and Controls

Haykin, Simon

47

1.25 mM NaH2PO4, 1 mM CaCl2, 1 mM MgCl2, 26 mM NaHCO3 and 10 mM dextrose, bubbled with 95% O2/5% CO2 (pH 7.4). Slices (300400 mm thick) were prepared with a  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1.25 mM NaH2PO4, 1 mM CaCl2, 1 mM MgCl2, 26 mM NaHCO3 and 10 mM dextrose, bubbled with 95% O2/5% CO cerebrospinal fluid (ACSF: 124 mM NaCl, 2 mM KCl, 1.5 mM MgSO4, 1.25 mM NaH2PO4, 2.5 mM CaCl2, 26 mM NaHCO3, 10

Zuker, Charles

48

40 MM Grenade Launcher Qualification Requirements at Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

40 MM Grenade Launcher Qualification Requirements at Department of 40 MM Grenade Launcher Qualification Requirements at Department of Energy Sites, IG-0806 40 MM Grenade Launcher Qualification Requirements at Department of Energy Sites, IG-0806 The Department of Energy and its National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), operate some of the most sensitive Federal facilities in the United States. Because of the mission requirements, safeguards and security is a top priority at these sites. As part of its security regime, the Department maintains a cadre of armed protective force officers to prevent and defend against malevolent acts. In recent years, the Department has worked to enhance security by increasing the capabilities of weapon systems used by the protective force officers. One such weapon is the 40 mm grenade launcher, which utilizes high explosive

49

40 MM Grenade Launcher Qualification Requirements at Department...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

years, the Department has worked to enhance security by increasing the capabilities of weapon systems used by the protective force officers. One such weapon is the 40 mm grenade...

50

M/M/1 Queueing System with Delayed Controlled Vacation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

M/M/1 Queueing System with Delayed Controlled Vacation Yonglu Deng , Zhongshan University W. John systems using a time division multiple access (TDMA) scheme (Frey and Takahashi, [7]). Researchers have that of a server's cold switch-on. The case of delayed vacation has also very recently been studied by Frey

Zhao, Yiqiang Q.

51

Design and testing of a dual 8-T 380-mm/12-T 220-mm split superconducting solenoid for ORNL  

SciTech Connect

A superconducting high field magnet facility has recently been prepared for operation at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The facility consists of a background NbTi coil and an insert coil made of Nb/sub 3/Sn tape. The background coil produces an 8-T central field, with a peak field of 8.8 T, in a bore of 380 mm and contains radial access ports of 67-mm diam. Details of magnet design both for the background coil and insert coil will be presented. The protection scheme will be discussed and test results will be given.

Ballou, J.K.; Brown, R.L.; Fietz, W.A.; Forseman, J.W.; Gray, W.H.; Kenney, W.J.; Wysor, R.B.; Markiewicz, W.D.; Van Alstyne, R.G.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Posters Surface Flux Intercomparison Between the MM5 Model  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Posters Surface Flux Intercomparison Between the MM5 Model and Observations During the Storm-Scale Observations Regional Measurement Program-Fronts Experiment Systems Test 1992 J. Dudhia and S. P. Oncley Mesoscale and Microscale Meteorology Division Atmospheric Technology Division National Center for Atmospheric Research Boulder, Colorado Introduction Mesoscale model 5 (MM5) is being used as a data assimilation tool for the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program. There is a need to verify that the model physics is consistent with observations under a range of conditions. Surface fluxes of heat, moisture, and momentum are a particular area of uncertainty in the model owing to their dependence on surface properties, some of which are time-dependent. The National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR)

53

RECORD OF CATEGORICAL EXCLUSION DETERMINATION Project ID No. BC-MM-669 and BC-MM-673  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

669 and BC-MM-673 669 and BC-MM-673 Title: BC Site Building Upgrades, Phases II and III Description: Subcontractor shall provide all labor, tools, materials, equipment, and supervision required to perform various building upgrades at BC Buildings 401, 402, 403, 408, 415, and 416 (Phase II) and BC Buildings 401, 402, 413, and 414 (Phase III). Subcontractor shall evaluate and implement Green Building Design where applicable. Regulatory Requirements: NEPA Implementing Procedures (10 CFR 1021) 10 CFR 1021.410 (Application of Categorical Exclusions) (a) The actions listed in Appendices A and B of Subpart D are classes of actions that DOE has determined do not individually or cumulatively have a significant effect on the human environment (categorical exclusions).

54

M/L{sub B} AND COLOR EVOLUTION FOR A DEEP SAMPLE OF M* CLUSTER GALAXIES AT z {approx} 1: THE FORMATION EPOCH AND THE TILT OF THE FUNDAMENTAL PLANE , ,  

SciTech Connect

We have measured velocity dispersions ({sigma}) for a sample of 36 galaxies with J < 21.2 or M{sub r} < -20.6 mag in MS 1054-03, a massive cluster of galaxies at z = 0.83. Our data are of uniformly high quality down to our selection limit, our 16 hr exposures typically yielding errors of only {delta}({sigma}) {approx} 10% for L* and fainter galaxies. By combining our measurements with data from the literature, we have 53 cluster galaxies with measured dispersions, and HST/ACS-derived sizes, colors and surface brightness. This sample is complete for the typical L* galaxy at z {approx} 1, unlike most previous z {approx} 1 cluster samples which are complete only for the massive cluster members (>10{sup 11} M{sub sun}). We find no evidence for a change in the tilt of the fundamental plane (FP). Nor do we find evidence for evolution in the slope of the color-{sigma} relation and M/L{sub B} -{sigma} relations; measuring evolution at a fixed {sigma} should minimize the impact of structural evolution found in other work. The M/L{sub B} at fixed {sigma} evolves by {Delta}log{sub 10} M/L{sub B} = -0.50 {+-} 0.03 between z = 0.83 and z = 0.02 or dlog{sub 10} M/L{sub B} = -0.60 {+-} 0.04 dz, and we find {Delta}(U - V){sub z} = -0.24 {+-} 0.02 mag at fixed {sigma} in the rest frame, matching the expected evolution in M/L{sub B} within 2.25 standard deviations. The implied formation redshift from both the color and M/L{sub B} evolution is z{sub *} = 2.0 {+-} 0.2 {+-} 0.3(sys), during the epoch in which the cosmic star formation activity peaked, with the systematic uncertainty showing the dependence of z{sub *} on the assumptions we make about the stellar populations. The lack of evolution in either the tilt of the FP or in the M/L-{sigma} and color-{sigma} relations imply that the formation epoch depends weakly on mass, ranging from z{sub *} = 2.3{sup +1.3}{sub -0.3} at {sigma} = 300 km s{sup -1} to z{sub *} = 1.7{sup +0.3}{sub -0.2} at {sigma} = 160 km s{sup -1} and implies that the initial mass function similarly varies slowly with galaxy mass.

Holden, B. P.; Illingworth, G. D. [UCO/Lick Observatories, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95065 (United States); Van der Wel, A. [Max-Planck Institute for Astronomy, Koenigstuhl 17, D-69117, Heidelberg (Germany); Kelson, D. D. [Observatories of the Carnegie Institution of Washington, Pasadena, CA 91101 (United States); Franx, M., E-mail: holden@ucolick.or, E-mail: gdi@ucolick.or, E-mail: vdwel@mpia.d, E-mail: kelson@obs.carnegiescience.ed, E-mail: franx@strw.leidenuniv.n [Sterrewacht Leiden, P.O. Box 9513, 2300 RA, Leiden (Netherlands)

2010-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

55

Microsoft Word - BM-MM-762A,GFE.docx  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

A A Title: Replace Brine Disposal System Header to BM Brine Tank, GFE Description: Manufacturer shall provide the piping and fittings associated with the replacement of the brine disposal system header to the BM Brine Tank as Government Furnished Equipment (GFE). The manufacturer shall load all materials onto transports supplied by others. Installation will be performed by others under BM-MM-762. Regulatory Requirements: NEPA Implementing Procedures (10 CFR 1021) 10 CFR 1021.410 (Application of Categorical Exclusions) (a) The actions listed in Appendices A and B of Subpart D are classes of actions that DOE has determined do not individually or cumulatively have a significant effect on the human environment (categorical exclusions).

56

Digital Frequency Domain Multiplexer for mm-Wavelength Telescopes  

SciTech Connect

An FPGA based digital signal processing (DSP) system for biasing and reading out multiplexed bolometric detectors for mm-wavelength telescopes is presented. This readout system is being deployed for balloon-borne and ground based cosmology experiments with the primary goal of measuring the signature of inflation with the Cosmic Microwave Background Radiation. The system consists of analog superconducting electronics running at 250 mK and 4 K, coupled to digital room temperature backend electronics described here. The digital electronics perform the real time functionality with DSP algorithms implemented in firmware. A soft embedded processor provides all of the slow housekeeping control and communications. Each board in the system synthesizes multi-frequency combs of 8 to 32 carriers in the MHz band to bias the detectors. After the carriers have been modulated with the sky-signal by the detectors, the same boards digitize the comb directly. The carriers are mixed down to base-band and low pass filtered. The signal bandwidth of 0.050Hz-100 Hz places extreme requirements on stability and requires powerful filtering techniques to recover the sky-signal from the MHz carriers.

Spieler, Helmuth G; Dobbs, Matt; Bissonnette, Eric; Spieler, Helmuth G.

2007-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

57

Latest developments with the 400 MM bore Pielstick engine  

SciTech Connect

For over forty years, S.E.M.T. Pielstick has been manufacturing the 400 mm bore, four-stroke, medium-speed PC diesel engine. The evolution has continued up to the present and the latest issue is the PC2-6B design, featuring an output of 615 kW per cylinder. This result was made possible by a multifold, ongoing development program. Experience, gained on the nearly 4000 PC engines built so far for marine and stationary applications, was combined with technological progress in engine design, materials and components. These elements all contribute to make the present engines, not only over three times as powerful, but also more reliable and more economical to run, featuring a lower specific fuel consumption and requiring less maintenance. The 1000 hours endurance test on the three-cylinder experimental engine has allowed tuning of the PC2-6B to the nominal power of 615 kW/cylinder at 500 r/min and verification of safety margins with the engine running at 600 r/min. The same program highlighted the low emission values of the new engine, summarized as: NO{sub x}, < 6 g/kWh; CO, $LS 0.6 g/kWh; HC, < 0.5 g/kWh; and smoke, < 0.15{degree} Bosch.

Chellini, R.

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Detection of significant cm to sub-mm band radio and gamma-ray correlated variability in Fermi bright blazars  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The exact location of the gamma-ray emitting region in blazars is still controversial. In order to attack this problem we present first results of a cross-correlation analysis between radio (11 cm to 0.8 mm wavelength, F-GAMMA program) and gamma-ray (0.1-300 GeV) ~ 3.5 year light curves of 54 Fermi-bright blazars. We perform a source stacking analysis and estimate significances and chance correlations using mixed source correlations. Our results reveal: (i) the first highly significant multi-band radio and gamma-ray correlations (radio lagging gamma rays) when averaging over the whole sample, (ii) average time delays (source frame: 76+/-23 to 7+/-9 days), systematically decreasing from cm to mm/sub-mm bands with a frequency dependence tau_r,gamma (nu) ~ nu^-1, in good agreement with jet opacity dominated by synchrotron self-absorption, (iii) a bulk gamma-ray production region typically located within/upstream of the 3 mm core region (tau_3mm,gamma=12+/-8 days), (iv) mean distances between the region of gamma-...

Fuhrmann, L; Chiang, J; Angelakis, E; Zensus, J A; Nestoras, I; Krichbaum, T P; Ungerechts, H; Sievers, A; Pavlidou, V; Readhead, A C S; Max-Moerbeck, W; Pearson, T J

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Data Formats  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This chapter provides a taxonomy of existing data formats for power power system analysis. These include most commonly used formats of free and proprietary software packages as well as the IEC common informati...

Federico Milano

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Sample Proficiency Test exercise  

SciTech Connect

The current format of the OPCW proficiency tests has multiple sets of 2 samples sent to an analysis laboratory. In each sample set, one is identified as a sample, the other as a blank. This method of conducting proficiency tests differs from how an OPCW designated laboratory would receive authentic samples (a set of three containers, each not identified, consisting of the authentic sample, a control sample, and a blank sample). This exercise was designed to test the reporting if the proficiency tests were to be conducted. As such, this is not an official OPCW proficiency test, and the attached report is one method by which LLNL might report their analyses under a more realistic testing scheme. Therefore, the title on the report ''Report of the Umpteenth Official OPCW Proficiency Test'' is meaningless, and provides a bit of whimsy for the analyses and readers of the report.

Alcaraz, A; Gregg, H; Koester, C

2006-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mm sample format" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Heat Transfer -2 A pure platinum wire with diameter D = 3 mm and length L = 20 mm is placed outside on a day when air temperature  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Heat Transfer - 2 A pure platinum wire with diameter D = 3 mm and length L = 20 mm is placed outside on a day when air temperature T = 10o C. The heat transfer coefficient at the wire's surface h equation that includes all heat transfer mechanisms involved in this problem. Write this energy balance

Virginia Tech

62

Episodic Performance and Sensitivity of the Urbanized MM5 (uMM5) to Perturbations in Surface Properties in Houston Texas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We present an application of a fine-resolution, meso-urban meteorological model (urbanized MM5; uMM5) to a multi-day episode in August 2000 in the Houston-Galveston Texas, USA region. The model’s episodic ... ini...

Haider Taha

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

A Polarizable QM/MM Explicit Solvent Model for Computational Electrochemistry in Water  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical (QM/MM) explicit solvent model for the computation of standard reduction potentials E[subscript 0]. The QM/MM model uses density functional theory (DFT) to model the ...

Wang, Lee-Ping

64

File Formats  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Home Page Home Page File Formats MODIS Product Subsets Output Data File Format Descriptions The MODIS product subsets for North America and Worldwide are available in several formats, which are described in the following text. MODIS Land Product ASCII Data Image Data Files in ASCII Grid Format QC-Filtered Data and Statistics Generated for this Request Land Cover Data in ASCII Grid Format Statistical Data for MODIS Land Products in Comma Separated Format Underlying BRDF Parameters Used in Generating this Request (available with Albedo MOD43B and MCD43B only) MODIS Land Product ASCII Data Description of File File Content: Data as read from MODIS Land Product HDF-EOS data files. These data are the starting point for deriving the other subset data products. Data Type: As indicated by Land Product Code (e.g., MOD15A2).

65

Breakdown of 2mm symmetry in electron diffraction from multiwalled carbon nanotubes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Breakdown of 2mm symmetry in electron diffraction from multiwalled carbon nanotubes Zejian Liu of single-walled carbon nanotubes always have 2mm symmetry regardless if the nanotubes them- selves have such symmetry. We here show that, for the case of multiwalled carbon nanotubes, the 2mm symmetry can break down

Qin, Lu-Chang

66

Utility Formation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

amounts See detailed discussion of these standards. For more information regarding tribal utility formation, contact the Power Service Line Account Executives: Eastern Power...

67

Beamline 9.3.2  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

radiation Detectors Channeltrons Spot size at sample 1 mm x 1 mm Sample format UHV-compatible solids up to 10 mm in diameter Sample preparation Sputtering, evaporation,...

68

HighFidelity Rapid Prototyping of 300mm Fabs through Discrete Event System Modeling #  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

High­Fidelity Rapid Prototyping of 300mm Fabs through Discrete Event System Modeling # Jonghun Park and control. Keywords: High­fidelity modeling, 300mm Fab, Flexible Automation, Colored Petri Nets, Web­based Simulation, Rapid Prototyping # A preliminary version of this paper appeared in [28]. + Corresponding author

Reveliotis, Spiridon "Spyros"

69

Evaluation of Offshore Wind Simulations with MM5 in the Japanese and Danish Coastal Waters  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Evaluation of Offshore Wind Simulations with MM5 in the Japanese and Danish Coastal Waters Teruo to evaluate the accuracy of offshore wind simulation with the mesoscale model MM5, long-term simulations to simulate offshore wind conditions in the Japanese coastal waters even using a mesoscale model, compared

Heinemann, Detlev

70

MECHANICAL TEST RESULTS ON DIPOLE MODEL C-l 25 mm ALUMINUM COLLARS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

P~. FI'9 . ~ C.C rv'IW\\ 707~-Th ALUMINUM ' ~LAI2.. o Pl.ATTDIPOLE MODEL C-1 25 mm ALUMINUM COLLARS C. Peters FebruaryON DIPOLE MODEL C-I 25 mm ALUMINUM COLLARS· Craig Peters

Peters, C.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Hayabusa-returned sample curation in the Planetary Material Sample Curation Facility of JAXA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

their origins, formation, and evolution processes. The Apollo missions accomplished six successful landings #12;successfully returned samples captured nearby comet Wild 2 (Brownlee et al. 2006). They prepared

72

Discrimination Report: A Multisensor system for detection andcharacterization of UXO, ESTCP Project MM-0437,  

SciTech Connect

The Berkeley UXO Discriminator (BUD) is an optimally designed active electromagnetic system that not only detects but also characterizes UXO. The performance of the system is governed by a target size-depth curve. BUD was designed to detect UXO in the 20 mm to 155 mm size range for depths between 0 and 1.5 m, and to characterize them in a depth range from 0 to 1.1 m. The system incorporates three orthogonal transmitters and eight pairs of differenced receivers. Eight receiver coils are placed horizontally along the two diagonals of the upper and lower planes of the two horizontal transmitter loops. These receiver coil pairs are located on symmetry lines through the center of the system and each pair sees identical fields during the on-time of the pulse in all of the transmitter coils. They are wired in opposition to produce zero output during the on-time of the pulses in three orthogonal transmitters. Moreover, this configuration dramatically reduces noise in the measurements by canceling the background electromagnetic fields (these fields are uniform over the scale of the receiver array and are consequently nulled by the differencing operation), and by canceling the noise contributed by the tilt motion of the receivers in the Earth's magnetic field, and greatly enhances receiver sensitivity to the gradients of the target response. BUD is mounted on a small cart to assure system mobility. System positioning is provided by a Real Time Kinematic (RTK) GPS receiver. The system has two modes of operation: (1) the search mode, in which BUD moves along a profile and exclusively detects targets in its vicinity providing target depth and horizontal location, and (2) the discrimination mode, in which BUD is stationary above a target, and determines three discriminating polarizability responses together with the object location and orientation from a single position of the system. The detection performance of the system is governed by a size-depth curve shown in Figure 2. This curve was calculated for BUD assuming that the receiver plane is 0.2 m above the ground. Figure 2 shows that, for example, BUD can detect an object with 0.1 m diameter down to the depth of 0.9 m with a depth uncertainty of 10%. Any objects buried at a depth of more than 1.3 m will have a low probability of detection. The discrimination performance of the system is governed by a size-depth curve shown in Figure 3. Again, this curve was calculated for BUD assuming that the receiver plane is 0.2 m above the ground. Figure 3 shows that, for example, BUD can determine the polarizability of an object with 0.1 m diameter down to the depth of 0.63 m with polarizability uncertainty of 10%. Any objects buried at the depth more than 0.9 m will have a low discrimination probability. Object orientation estimates and equivalent dipole polarizability estimates used for large and shallow UXO/scrap discrimination are more problematic as they are affected by higher order (non-dipole) terms induced in objects due to source field gradients along the length of the objects. For example, a vertical 0.4 m object directly below the system needs to be about 0.90 m deep for perturbations due to gradients along the length of the object to be of the order of 20% of the uniform field object response. Similarly, vertical objects 0.5 m, and 0.6 m long need to be 1.15 m, and 1.42 m, respectively, below the system. For horizontal objects the effect of gradients across the object diameter are much smaller. For example, 155 mm and 105 mm projectiles need to be only 0.30 m, and 0.19 m, respectively, below the system. A polarizability index (in cm{sup 3}), which is an average value of the product of time (in seconds) and polarizability rate (in m{sup 3}/s) over the 34 sample times logarithmically spaced from 143 to 1300 {micro}s, and three polarizabilities, can be calculated for any object. We used this polarizability index to decide when the object is in a uniform source field. Objects with the polarizability index smaller than 600 cm{sup 3} and deeper than 1.8 m below BUD, or smaller than 200

Gasperikova, Erika; Smith, J. Torquil; Morrison, H.Frank; Becker,Alex

2008-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

73

Anthrax Sampling  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Anthrax Anthrax Sampling and Decontamination: Technology Trade-Offs Phillip N. Price, Kristina Hamachi, Jennifer McWilliams, and Michael D. Sohn Environmental Energy Technologies Division Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Berkeley CA 94720 September 12, 2008 This work was supported by the Office of Science, Office of High Energy Physics, Homeland Security under the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC02-05CH1123. Contents 1 Executive Summary 3 1.1 How much sampling is needed to decide if a building is safe? . . . . . . . 3 1.1.1 Sampling Nomogram . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 1.2 How many characterization samples should be taken? . . . . . . . . . . . 7 1.3 What decontamination method should be used? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 1.4 Post-decontamination sampling . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 1.5 What are rules of thumb for cost and effort? . . . . . . . . . . . .

74

Of horseshoes and heliotropes: Dynamics of dust in the Encke Gap M.M. Hedman a,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Of horseshoes and heliotropes: Dynamics of dust in the Encke Gap M.M. Hedman a, , J.A. Burns a located within the Cassini Division's Laplace Gap demonstrates ``heliotropic'' behavior: its geometric

Hamilton, Douglas P.

75

MagLab - Cell 15: 45.1 Tesla / 32 mm Hybrid Magnet  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Magnets & Facilities Arrow Cell 15: 45.1 Tesla 32 mm Hybrid Magnet The labs flagship magnet, the 45 T Hybrid, is composed of a 33.5 T resistive magnet nested in an 11.5 T...

76

Optical rotation in RbTiOAsO4 (point group mm2) W. Kaminsky*, I  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Optical rotation in RbTiOAsO4 (point group mm2) W. Kaminsky*, I , P. A. ThomasII and A. M. Glazer, UK Received March 5, 2001; accepted September 13, 2001 Abstract. Measurement of optical rotation in RbTiOAsO4 (RTA) with the tilter method resulted in an optical rotation of r12 ¼ þ17ð3� /mm

Kaminsky, Werner

77

Test Results of HD2, A High Field Nb3Sn Dipole with A 36 MM Bore  

SciTech Connect

The Superconducting Magnet Program at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) has developed the 1 m long Nb{sub 3}Sn dipole magnet HD2. With tilted (flared) ends to avoid obstructing a 36 mm clear bore, HD2 represents a step towards the use of block-type coils in high-field accelerator magnets. The coil design has been optimized to minimize geometric harmonics and reduce the conductor peak field in the end region, resulting in an expected short sample dipole field of 15 T. The support structure is composed by an external aluminum shell pre-tensioned with pressurized bladders and interference keys, and by two stainless steel end plates compressing the coil ends through four aluminum axial rods. We report on magnet design, assembly, and test results, including training performance, quench locations, and strain gauge measurements.

Ferracin, Paolo

2008-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

78

ASSEMBLY AND TEST OF A 120 MM BORE 15 T NB3SN QUADRUPOLE FOR THE LHC UPGRADE  

SciTech Connect

In support of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) luminosity upgrade, the US LHC Accelerator Research Program (LARP) has been developing a 1-meter long, 120 mm bore Nb{sub 3}Sn IR quadrupole magnet (HQ). With a design short sample gradient of 219 T/m at 1.9 K and a peak field approaching 15 T, one of the main challenges of this magnet is to provide appropriate mechanical support to the coils. Compared to the previous LARP Technology Quadrupole and Long Quadrupole magnets, the purpose of HQ is also to demonstrate accelerator quality features such as alignment and cooling. So far, 8 HQ coils have been fabricated and 4 of them have been assembled and tested in HQ01a. This paper presents the mechanical assembly and test results of HQ01a.

Felice, H.; Caspi, S.; Cheng, D.; Dietderich, D.; Ferracin, P.; Hafalia, R.; Joseph, J.; Lizarazo, J.; Sabbi, G. L.; Wang, X.; Anerella, M.; Ghosh, A. K.; Schmalzle, J.; Wanderer, P.; Ambrosio, G.; Bossert, R.; Zlobin, A. V.

2010-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

79

Disclaimer: This Sample CV was compiled from 6 different student pharmacists' activities to demonstrate formatting of various CV components. A single student's CV would not be expected to contain all of these activities. List section contents in reverse c  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Disclaimer: This Sample CV was compiled from 6 different student pharmacists' activities@xxx.com ===================================================================== EDUCATION Month Yr ­ Present Skaggs School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences (SSPPS) University Skaggs School of Pharmacy & Pharmaceutical Sciences Year-Year Research Aspects of HIPAA Certification

Gleeson, Joseph G.

80

Development and application of QM/MM methods to study the solvation effects and surfaces  

SciTech Connect

Quantum mechanical (QM) calculations have the advantage of attaining high-level accuracy, however QM calculations become computationally inefficient as the size of the system grows. Solving complex molecular problems on large systems and ensembles by using quantum mechanics still poses a challenge in terms of the computational cost. Methods that are based on classical mechanics are an inexpensive alternative, but they lack accuracy. A good trade off between accuracy and efficiency is achieved by combining QM methods with molecular mechanics (MM) methods to use the robustness of the QM methods in terms of accuracy and the MM methods to minimize the computational cost. Two types of QM combined with MM (QM/MM) methods are the main focus of the present dissertation: the application and development of QM/MM methods for solvation studies and reactions on the Si(100) surface. The solvation studies were performed using a discreet solvation model that is largely based on first principles called the effective fragment potential method (EFP). The main idea of combining the EFP method with quantum mechanics is to accurately treat the solute-solvent and solvent-solvent interactions, such as electrostatic, polarization, dispersion and charge transfer, that are important in correctly calculating solvent effects on systems of interest. A second QM/MM method called SIMOMM (surface integrated molecular orbital molecular mechanics) is a hybrid QM/MM embedded cluster model that mimics the real surface.3 This method was employed to calculate the potential energy surfaces for reactions of atomic O on the Si(100) surface. The hybrid QM/MM method is a computationally inexpensive approach for studying reactions on larger surfaces in a reasonably accurate and efficient manner. This thesis is comprised of four chapters: Chapter 1 describes the general overview and motivation of the dissertation and gives a broad background of the computational methods that have been employed in this work. Chapter 2 illustrates the methodology of the interface of the EFP method with the configuration interaction with single excitations (CIS) method to study solvent effects in excited states. Chapter 3 discusses the study of the adiabatic electron affinity of the hydroxyl radical in aqueous solution and in micro-solvated clusters using a QM/EFP method. Chapter 4 describes the study of etching and diffusion of oxygen atom on a reconstructed Si(100)-2 x 1 surface using a hybrid QM/MM embedded cluster model (SIMOMM). Chapter 4 elucidates the application of the EFP method towards the understanding of the aqueous ionization potential of Na atom. Finally, a general conclusion of this dissertation work and prospective future direction are presented in Chapter 6.

Dibya, Pooja Arora

2010-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mm sample format" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

450 mm dual frequency capacitively coupled plasma sources: Conventional, graded, and segmented electrodes  

SciTech Connect

Wafer diameters for microelectronics fabrication will soon transition from 300 to 450 mm at a time when excitation frequencies for capacitively coupled plasmas (CCPs) are increasing to 200 MHz or higher. Already for 300 mm tools, there is evidence that wave behavior (i.e., propagation, constructive, and destructive interference) affects the uniformity of processing. The increase in diameter to 450 mm is likely to exacerbate these effects, perhaps requiring nontraditional tool designs. This is particularly important in dual frequency (DF) CCP tools in which there are potential interactions between frequencies. In this paper, results from a two-dimensional computational investigation of Ar plasma properties in a 450 mm DF-CCP reactor, incorporating a full-wave solution of Maxwell's equations, are discussed. As in 300 mm DF-CCP reactors, the electron density collapses toward the center of the reactor with increasing high frequency (HF), however, with more pronounced finite wavelength effects. Graded conductivity electrodes with multilayer of dielectrics are computationally demonstrated as a possible means to suppress wave effects thereby increasing plasma uniformity. Segmentation of the HF electrode also improves the plasma uniformity by making the electrical distance between the feeds and the sheath edges as uniform as possible.

Yang Yang [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Iowa State University, Ames, Iowa 50011 (United States); Kushner, Mark J. [Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, University of Michigan, 1301 Beal Avenue, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109-2122 (United States)

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Sampling apparatus  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A sampling apparatus is provided for sampling substances from solid surfaces. The apparatus includes first and second elongated tubular bodies which telescopically and sealingly join relative to one another. An absorbent pad is mounted to the end of a rod which is slidably received through a passageway in the end of one of the joined bodies. The rod is preferably slidably and rotatably received through the passageway, yet provides a selective fluid tight seal relative thereto. A recess is formed in the rod. When the recess and passageway are positioned to be coincident, fluid is permitted to flow through the passageway and around the rod. The pad is preferably laterally orientable relative to the rod and foldably retractable to within one of the bodies. A solvent is provided for wetting of the pad and solubilizing or suspending the material being sampled from a particular surface. 15 figs.

Gordon, N.R.; King, L.L.; Jackson, P.O.; Zulich, A.W.

1989-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

83

Sampling apparatus  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A sampling apparatus is provided for sampling substances from solid surfaces. The apparatus includes first and second elongated tubular bodies which telescopically and sealingly join relative to one another. An absorbent pad is mounted to the end of a rod which is slidably received through a passageway in the end of one of the joined bodies. The rod is preferably slidably and rotatably received through the passageway, yet provides a selective fluid tight seal relative thereto. A recess is formed in the rod. When the recess and passageway are positioned to be coincident, fluid is permitted to flow through the passageway and around the rod. The pad is preferably laterally orientable relative to the rod and foldably retractable to within one of the bodies. A solvent is provided for wetting of the pad and solubilizing or suspending the material being sampled from a particular surface.

Gordon, Norman R. (Kennewick, WA); King, Lloyd L. (Benton, WA); Jackson, Peter O. (Richland, WA); Zulich, Alan W. (Bel Air, MD)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Microsoft Word - NO-MM-827 New Orleans Emergency Generator Installation (900 building).docx  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

MM-827 MM-827 Title: New Orleans Emergency Generator Installation (900 Building) Description: Subcontractor shall provide all labor, tools, materials, equipment, and supervision required to relocate the New Orleans emergency generator at the 900 building, to install a new Automatic Transfer Switch, and to provide generator status alarms. Tasks includes construction of a new concrete slab foundation, relocation of the existing portable generator from the trailer to the foundation, electrical installation of the generator, installation of fencing around the generator, and miscellaneous architectural work. Some of the existing equipment and components being dismantled, removed or demolished have been designated for government salvage. Regulatory Requirements: NEPA Implementing Procedures (10 CFR 1021)

85

Name and Contact Information * Indicates a required field * Date of Birth (MM/DD/YYYY)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Name and Contact Information * Indicates a required field * Date of Birth (MM/DD/YYYY) * o Female o courses offered as part of a certificate or diploma program are exempt from GST, even if you are only certificates and diplomas for eligible students. If you have any questions or requests about the collection

86

Press Advertising 39x3col (390mm x 3 cols)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Press Advertising 39x3col (390mm x 3 cols) Total cost of ad Canberra Times $1,682.49 HES $4. 200 words Canberra Times $1,037.29 HES $2,785.00 STANDALONE Press advertising describes job advertisements in a printed medium such as newspapers, magazines and journals. We currently primarily advertised

Botea, Adi

87

Biological effects in unirradiated human tissue induced by radiation damage up to 1 mm away  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in extrapolating radiation risk estimates from epidemi- ologically accessible doses down to very low doses where) and for assessing the risk from a low-dose exposure to a carcinogen such as ionizing radiation, where only a smallBiological effects in unirradiated human tissue induced by radiation damage up to 1 mm away Oleg V

88

Polystyrene PS648 outlet optical birefringence pattern, piston speed 1.0mm/s  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The optical birefringence pattern obtained from polystyrene PS648 flowing through a narrow slit. Experiment conducted on the Cambridge Multi Pass Rheometer (MPR4) at a piston speed of 1.0 mm/s at 170C. Video shows the outlet flow (from top to bottom)....

Hassell, David

2008-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

89

Polystyrene PS648 inlet optical birefringence pattern, piston speed 1.4mm/s  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The optical birefringence pattern obtained from polystyrene PS648 flowing through a narrow slit. Experiment conducted on the Cambridge Multi Pass Rheometer (MPR4) at a piston speed of 1.4 mm/s at 170C. Video shows the inlet flow (from bottom to top)....

Hassell, David

2008-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

90

Polystyrene PS648 inlet optical birefringence pattern, piston speed 1.0mm/s  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The optical birefringence pattern obtained from polystyrene PS648 flowing through a narrow slit. Experiment conducted on the Cambridge Multi Pass Rheometer (MPR4) at a piston speed of 1.0 mm/s at 170C. Video shows the inlet flow (from bottom to top)....

Hassell, David

2008-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

91

Polystyrene PS648 outlet optical birefringence pattern, piston speed 1.4mm/s  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The optical birefringence pattern obtained from polystyrene PS648 flowing through a narrow slit. Experiment conducted on the Cambridge Multi Pass Rheometer (MPR4) at a piston speed of 1.4 mm/s at 170C. Video shows the outlet flow (from top to bottom)....

Hassell, David

2008-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

92

Polystyrene PS648 outlet optical birefringence pattern, piston speed 0.16mm/s  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The optical birefringence pattern obtained from polystyrene PS648 flowing through a narrow slit. Experiment conducted on the Cambridge Multi Pass Rheometer (MPR4) at a piston speed of 0.16 mm/s at 170C. Video shows the outlet flow (from top...

Hassell, David

2008-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

93

Polystyrene PS648 inlet optical birefringence pattern, piston speed 0.16mm/s  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The optical birefringence pattern obtained from polystyrene PS648 flowing through a narrow slit. Experiment conducted on the Cambridge Multi Pass Rheometer (MPR4) at a piston speed of 0.16 mm/s at 170C. Video shows the inlet flow (from bottom to top)....

Hassell, David

2008-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

94

Greenland ice sheet surface mass balance variability (1988-2004) from calibrated Polar MM5 output*  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Greenland ice sheet surface mass balance variability (1988-2004) from calibrated Polar MM5 output in Environmental Sciences, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO, USA 4 National Snow and Ice Data Center, University coherent regional patterns of Greenland ice sheet surface mass balance (SMB) change over a 17-year period

Howat, Ian M.

95

Spectral imaging of the Sagittarius B2 region in multiple 7-mm molecular lines  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......3-cm and 3-mm bands (combining their N and N into one source). We also include mid-IR fluxes from the MSX catalogue Baby Gator interface. 10 We have fitted data from our own observations with the ATCA at 1.54 GHz (Fig. A1) and 36 GHz (Fig. 2......

P. A. Jones; M. G. Burton; N. F. H. Tothill; M. R. Cunningham

2011-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

96

Spectral imaging of the Sagittarius B2 region in multiple 7-mm molecular lines  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......B2 region in multiple 7-mm molecular lines P. A. Jones 1 2 * M. G. Burton 1 N...EX4 4QL We have undertaken a spectral-line imaging survey of a 6 6 arcmin2 area around...velocity-integrated emission images for 47 lines: 38 molecular lines and nine radio recombination......

P. A. Jones; M. G. Burton; N. F. H. Tothill; M. R. Cunningham

2011-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

97

Corneal Topography of Excimer Laser Photorefractive Keratectomy Using a 6-mm Beam Diameter  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Objective: The purpose of the study is to define qualitative patterns of corneal topography after excimer laser photorefractive keratectomy (PRK) using a 6-mm beam diameter, investigate changes in patterns over time, and identify associations of topography patterns with clinical outcomes. Design: Multicenter, prospective cohort study. Participants: Ninety-eight eyes of 90 patients with myopia who had undergone PRK using the Summit Technology, Inc., excimer laser with a 6-mm beam diameter. Intervention: Computer-assisted videokeratography data were analyzed for eyes having undergone PRK. Topography patterns at 3, 6, and 12 months after surgery were classified and associations with clinical outcomes assessed. Main Outcomes Measured: Topography patterns after PRK were determined at 3, 6, and 12 months after surgery. Associations with preoperative characteristics of age and attempted correction, and postoperative outcomes of uncorrected and spectacle-corrected visual acuity, predictability, astigmatism, corneal haze, glare, halo, and patient satisfaction were analyzed. Results: At 1 year, 21.4% of corneas showed a homogeneous topography, 27.6% showed a toric-with-axis configuration, 10.2% showed a toric-against-axis configuration, 7.1% showed an irregularly irregular topography, 24.5% showed a keyhole/semicircular pattern, and 9.2% showed focal topographic variants. From 3 to 6 months, 40.1 % of maps changed; from 6 to 12 months, 53.1 % of maps changed, generally to optically smoother, regular patterns. Older age and higher attempted correction were associated with the development of more irregular patterns. The irregular groups showed worse predictability than did the regular groups and a tendency for slight overcorrection. The average reported glare/halo of 1.33 (scale = 0 to 5) in this study was less than in a previous study of the 4.5- to 5-mm treatment zone. However, of six patients expressing dissatisfaction with the results of surgery, three ranked their glare or halo at the maximum level. Conclusions: Topography patterns using a 6-mm beam diameter are identifiable, improve with time, and may affect clinical outcomes after photorefractive keratectomy (PRK). The keyhole/semicircular pattern is more prevalent with a 6 mm treatment zone than with smaller treatment zones. Although optical side effects of glare and halo appear to be reduced with the 6-mm treatment, a small number of patients still report substantial glare or halo after the procedure.

Peter S. Hersh; Shetal I. Shah

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

RECORD OF CATEGORICAL EXCLUSION DETERMINATION Project 10 No. BH-MM-746  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

BH-MM-746 BH-MM-746 Title: BH Anhydrite Pond Liner Replacement Description: Subcontractor shall provide all labor, tools, equipment, materials, consumables, services, insurance, transportation, storage and supervision required to replace the BH Anhydrite Pond Liner. Regulatory Requirements: NEPA Implementing Procedures (10 CFR 1021) 10 CFR 1021.410 (Application of Categorical Exclusions) (a) The actions listed in Appendices A and B of Subpart D are classes of actions that DOE has determined do not individually or cumulatively have a significant effect on the human environment (categorical exclusions). (b) To find that a proposal is categorically excluded, DOE shall determine the following: (1) The proposed action fits within a class of actions that is listed in Appendix A or B of Subpart D;

99

Microsoft Word - WH-MM-818B-819B NEPA.docx  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

8B & WH-MM-819B 8B & WH-MM-819B Title: Repair WH Brine Tanks, WHT-14 & WHT-15 Description: Subcontractor shall shall provide all materials, tools, equipment, supplies, transportation, facilities, labor, supervision, and services required to perform the work associated with the repair of the WH Brine Tanks, WHT-14 & WHT-15. Regulatory Requirements: NEPA Implementing Procedures (10 CFR 1021) 10 CFR 1021.410 (Application of Categorical Exclusions) (a) The actions listed in Appendices A and B of Subpart D are classes of actions that DOE has determined do not individually or cumulatively have a significant effect on the human environment (categorical exclusions). (b) To find that a proposal is categorically excluded, DOE shall determine the following:

100

RECORD OF CATEGORICAL EXCLUSION DETERMINATION Project ID No. WH-MM-1000  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

MM-1000 MM-1000 Title: Inspection and Repair of WH-SUN 42-inch Crude Oil Pipeline Description: Subcontractor shall provide all supervision, transportation, labor, materials and equipment required to locate, excavate, and inspect an internal corrosion anomaly at two locations on the WH to SUN Terminal 42-inch crude oil pipeline. Inspections will be performed by Automated Ultrasonic Testing. Repairs shall be performed based on the inspection results. All work will be performed on the DOE pipeline right-of-way. Regulatory Requirements: NEPA Implementing Procedures (10 CFR 1021) 10 CFR 1021.410 (Application of Categorical Exclusions) (a) The actions listed in Appendices A and B of Subpart D are classes of actions that DOE has determined do not individually or cumulatively have a significant effect on the human environment

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mm sample format" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

THE MAGNETIC FIELD MORPHOLOGY OF THE CLASS 0 PROTOSTAR L1157-mm  

SciTech Connect

We present the first detection of polarization around the Class 0 low-mass protostar L1157-mm at two different wavelengths. We show polarimetric maps at large scales (10'' resolution at 350 {mu}m) from the SHARC-II Polarimeter and at smaller scales (1.''2-4.''5 at 1.3 mm) from the Combined Array for Research in Millimeter-wave Astronomy (CARMA). The observations are consistent with each other and show inferred magnetic field lines aligned with the outflow. The CARMA observations suggest a full hourglass magnetic field morphology centered about the core; this is only the second well-defined hourglass detected around a low-mass protostar to date. We apply two different methods to CARMA polarimetric observations to estimate the plane-of-sky magnetic field magnitude, finding values of 1.4 and 3.4 mG.

Stephens, Ian W.; Looney, Leslie W.; Kwon, Woojin; Crutcher, Richard M. [Department of Astronomy, University of Illinois, 1002 West Green Street, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Hull, Charles L. H.; Plambeck, Richard L. [Astronomy Department and Radio Astronomy Laboratory, 601 Campbell Hall, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Chapman, Nicholas; Novak, Giles; Matthews, Tristan [Center for Interdisciplinary Exploration and Research in Astrophysics (CIERA) and Department of Physics and Astronomy, Northwestern University, 2145 Sheridan Road, Evanston, IL 60208 (United States); Davidson, Jacqueline [School of Physics, University of Western Australia, 35 Stirling Hwy, Crawley, WA 6009 (Australia); Vaillancourt, John E. [SOFIA Science Center, Universities Space Research Association, NASA Ames Research Center, MS 232-11, Moffett Field, CA 94035-0001 (United States); Shinnaga, Hiroko, E-mail: stephen6@illinois.edu [Subaru Telescope, National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 650 North A'ohoku Place, Hilo, HI 96720 (United States)

2013-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

102

A Magnetic Dynamo Origin For The Sub-mm Excess In Sgr A*  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The sub-mm bump observed in the spectrum of Sgr A* appears to indicate the existence of a compact emitting component within several Schwarzschild radii, $r_S$, of the nucleus at the Galactic Center. This is interesting in view of the predicted circularized flow within $\\sim 5-10 r_S$, based on detailed multi-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations of Bondi-Hoyle accretion onto this unusual object. In this paper, we examine the physics of magnetic field generation by a Keplerian dynamo subject to the conditions pertaining to Sgr A*, and show that the sub-mm bump can be produced by thermal synchrotron emission in this inner region. This spectral feature may therefore be taken as indirect evidence for the existence of this circularization. In addition, the self-Comptonization of the sub-mm bump appears to produce an X-ray flux exceeding that due to bremsstrahlung from this region, which may account for the X-ray counterpart to Sgr A* discovered recently by {\\it Chandra}. However, the required accretion rate in the Keplerian flow is orders of magnitude smaller than that predicted by the Bondi-Hoyle simulations. We speculate that rapid evaporation, in the form of a wind, may ensue from the heating associated with turbulent mixing of gas elements with large eccentricity as they settle down into a more or less circular (i.e., low eccentricity) trajectory. The spectrum of Sgr A* longward of $\\sim 1-2$ mm may be generated outside of the Keplerian flow, where the gas is making a transition from a quasi-spherical infall into a circularized pattern.

Fulvio Melia; Siming Liu; Robert Coker

2001-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

103

Correlated Sub-mm and X-ray Variability in Sgr A*  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PAPER WITHDRAWN. The recent detection of Sgr A* in the X-ray band, together with the radio polarization measurements conducted over the past few years, offer the best constraints yet for understanding the nature of the emitting gas within several Schwarzschild radii ($r_S$) of this supermassive black hole candidate at the Galactic Center. Earlier, we showed that the sub-mm radiation from this source may be associated with thermal synchrotron emission from an inner Keplerian region within the circularization radius of the accreting plasma. In this paper, we extend this analysis in a very important way, by calculating the implied high-energy emission of Sgr A* associated with the orbiting, hot, magnetized gas. We find that for the accretion rate inferred from the fits to the sub-mm data, the dominant contribution to Sgr A*'s X-ray flux is due to self-Comptonization of the radio photons, rather than from bremsstrahlung. The latter is a two-body process, which would produce significant X-ray emission only at much higher accretion rates. This picture leads to the testable prediction that the physical conditions within the inner $\\sim5r_S$ are variable on a time scale of order a year. In particular, the accretion rate $\\dot M$ appears to have changed by about 15% between the sub-mm measurements in 1996 and 1999. Given that the radio and self-Comptonized fluxes are strongly correlated in this picture, the upcoming second generation Chandra observations of Sgr A* may provide the direct evidence required to test this model.

Fulvio Melia; Siming Liu; Marco Fatuzzo

2002-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

104

L1448-MM OBSERVATIONS BY THE HERSCHEL KEY PROGRAM, ''DUST, ICE, AND GAS IN TIME'' (DIGIT)  

SciTech Connect

We present Herschel/Photodetector Array Camera and Spectrometer (PACS) observations of L1448-MM, a Class 0 protostar with a prominent outflow. Numerous emission lines are detected at 55 1000 K) environment, indicative of a shock origin. For OH, IR-pumping processes play an important role in the level population. The molecular emission in L1448-MM is better explained with a C-shock model, but the atomic emission of PACS [O I] and Spitzer/Infrared Spectrograph [Si II] emission is not consistent with C-shocks, suggesting multiple shocks in this region. Water is the major line coolant of L1448-MM in the PACS wavelength range, and the best-fit LVG models predict that H{sub 2}O and CO emit (50%-80%) of their line luminosity in the PACS wavelength range.

Lee, Jinhee; Lee, Jeong-Eun [Department of Astronomy and Space Science, Kyung Hee University, Yongin-shi, Kyungki-do 449-701 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Seokho [Astronomy Program, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of); Green, Joel D.; Evans, Neal J. II [Department of Astronomy, University of Texas at Austin, 2515 Speedway, Stop C1400, Austin, TX 78712-1205 (United States); Choi, Minho [Korea Astronomy and Space Science Institute, 776 Daedeokdaero, Yuseong, Daejeon 305-348 (Korea, Republic of); Kristensen, Lars [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, MS78, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Dionatos, Odysseas; Jørgensen, Jes K., E-mail: jeongeun.lee@khu.ac.kr [Centre for Star and Planet Formation, Natural History Museum of Denmark, University of Copenhagen, Øster Voldgade 5-7, 1350 Copenhagen (Denmark); Collaboration: DIGIT Team

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Sub-mm tests of the gravitational inverse-square law  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sub-mm tests of the gravitational inverse-square law are interesting from several quite different perspectives. This paper discusses work by the Eot-Wash group performed since the publication of our initial result in February 2001. We find no evidence for short-range Yukawa interactions. Our results provide an upper limit of 200 micrometers on the size of the largest ``extra'' dimension, and for the unification scenario with 2 large extra dimensions, set an upper limit of 150 micrometers on the size of those dimensions.

E. G. Adelberger

2002-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

106

Sub-mm disk waviness characteristics and slider flying dynamics under thermal FH control  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The flying dynamics and flying stability of a slider are the key issues at sub-5 nm flying height (FH) under thermal FH control. The resonant frequencies of current sliders are at 100 kHz level. At present linear disk velocities, the disk waviness at sub-mm level and 10 micron level can excite the resonant modes of the slider and induce FH modulation. This work uses the triple-harmonic method to monitor the dynamic FH signal during the process of thermal FH control. As the FH reduces, the same disk waviness characteristics excite larger dynamic FH modulation.

Zhi-Min Yuan; Siang Huei Leong; Sumitro Joyo Taslim; Ka Wei Ng; Bo Liu

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Fe/Al2O3 C2H4 Hata mm/10 min  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fe/Al2O3 C2H4 () () () () () () () * () 1. (SWNT) SWNT (CVD) (CNT)[1] Hata mm/10 min SWNT (Super Growth)[2]Al2O3 Fe C2H4 SWNT Fe/Al2O3 C2H4 CVD SWNT CNT CNT 2 SiO2 Al2O3 20 (RBM) 1350 cm-1 (D-Band)Fe G/D RBM Fe SWNT Al 15 nm Fe 0.6 nm CVD TEM Fig. 3 3 nm SWNT

Maruyama, Shigeo

108

Self-consistent QM/MM methodologies for structural refinement of photosystem II and other macromolecules of biological interest  

SciTech Connect

The combination of quantum mechanics and molecular mechanics (QM/MM) is one of the most promising approaches to study the structure, function, and properties of proteins and nucleic acids. However, there some instances in which the limitations of either the MM (lack of a proper electronic description) or QM (limited to a few number of atoms) methods prevent a proper description of the system. To address this issue, we review here our approach to fine-tune the structure of biological systems using post-QM/MM refinements. These protocols are based on spectroscopy data, and/or partitioning of the system to extend the QM description to a larger region of a protein. We illustrate these methodologies through applications to several biomolecules, which were pre-optimized at the QM/MM level and then further refined using postQM/MM refinement methodologies: mod(QM/MM), which refines the atomic charges of the residues included in the MM region accounting for polarization effects; mod(QM/MM)-opt that partition the MM region in smaller parts and optimizes each part in an iterative. self-consistent way, and the Polarized-Extended X-Ray Absorption Fine Structure (P-EXAFS) fitting procedure, which fine-tune the atomic coordinates to reproduce experimental polarized EXAFS spectra. The first two techniques were applied to the guanine quadruplex. while the P-EXAFS refinement was applied to the oxygen evolving complex of photosystem II.

Batista, Enrique R [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Sproviero, Eduardo M [YALE UNIV; Newcomer, Michael [YALE UNIV; Gascon, Jose A [YALE UNIV; Batista, Victor S [YALE UNIV

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Formate as an Auxiliary Substrate for Glucose-Limited Cultivation of Penicillium chrysogenum: Impact on Penicillin G Production and Biomass Yield  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...4.5 mol1, the residual formate concentrations...25C in 3-liter turbine-stirred bioreactors...type A/E; Pall Life Sciences). The...and 6 mM H3PO4. Gas analysis. The exhaust...Analytical). Off-gas flow rates were determined...up to 200 mM, the residual formate concentrations...

Diana M. Harris; Zita A. van der Krogt; Walter M. van Gulik; Johannes P. van Dijken; Jack T. Pronk

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

An 8-mm diameter Fiber Robot Positioner for Massive Spectroscopy Surveys  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Massive spectroscopic survey are becoming trendy in astrophysics and cosmology, as they can address new fundamental knowledge such as Galactic Archaeology and probe the nature of the mysterious Dark Energy. To enable massive spectroscopic surveys, new technology are being developed to place thousands of optical fibers at a given position on a focal plane. These technology needs to be: 1) accurate, with micrometer positional accuracy; 2) fast to minimize overhead; 3) robust to minimize failure; and 4) low cost. In this paper we present the development of a new 8-mm in diameter fiber positionner robot using two 4mm DC-brushless gearmotors, developed in the context of the Dark Energy Spectroscopic Instrument. This development was conducted by a Spanish-Swiss (ES-CH) team led by the Instituto de F\\'isica Te\\'orica (UAM-CSIC) and the Laboratoire d'Astrophysique (EPFL), in collaboration with the AVS company in Spain and the Faulhaber group (MPS & FAULHABER-MINIMOTOR) in Switzerland.

Fahim, Nasib; Kneib, Jean Paul

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Sample Environment at SNAP | ORNL Neutron Sciences  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sample Environment at SNAP Sample Environment at SNAP Sample Mass Calculator Bulk Modulus (GPa) Density (g/cm3) Volume (mm3) Sample Mass Needed (mg) Custom Values NaCl 24.4 2.17 87.1 171.888 MnO 148.0 5.37 87.1 354.256 V 160.0 6.00 87.1 388.104 CoO 180.0 6.44 87.1 402.766 Bi 31.0 9.78 87.1 767.770 Sample Geometry Click below for illustration of sample shapes for use in the Paris-Edinburgh press Volume (mm3) Double-toroid, encapsulated 16.8 Double-toroid, non-encapsulated 31.1 Single-toroid, encapsulated 55.5 Single-toroid, non-encapsulated 87.1 Graphite furnace 68.1 If you see NaN in the "Sample Mass Needed (mg)" field, then one of your entries probably contains non-numeric data or is not a valid number, for example, entering 3.9.0 (double decimal points)

112

The CR 2.0mm (.079") insulation displacement connector features a mounting height as low as  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

7 The CR 2.0mm (.079") insulation displacement connector features a mounting height as low as 6.9mm") pitch insulation displacement connector allows automatic harness production for connection of UL1007 of misinsertion without being permanently distorted. · Twin U-slot insulation displacement section The insulation

Wedeward, Kevin

113

A 16 mm3 autonomous solar-powered sensor node with bi-directional optical communication for distributed sensor net-  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract A 16 mm3 autonomous solar-powered sensor node with bi- directional optical communication for distributed sensor net- works has been demonstrated. The device digitizes inte- grated sensor signals, a 2.6 mm2 SOI solar cell array, and a micromachined four-quadrant corner-cube retroreflector (CCR

Kahn, Joseph M.

114

SiO2 Fracture: Chemomechanics with a Machine-Learning Hybrid QM/MM Scheme |  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Snapshot from a simulation of subcritical stress corrosion cracking in Snapshot from a simulation of subcritical stress corrosion cracking in silica in a wet environment, of the kind that will be carried out at the quantum mechanical level during this INCITE project. Silicon atoms are shown in grey, oxygen in red and hydrogen in white. The nanoscale mechanisms underlying stress corrosion cracking remain unclear and can only be elucidated with these kinds of non-uniform precision simulations, which will allow quantitative comparison with experiments for the first time. James Kermode, King's College London SiO2 Fracture: Chemomechanics with a Machine-Learning Hybrid QM/MM Scheme PI Name: James Kermode PI Email: King's College London Institution: james.kermode@kcl.ac.uk Allocation Program: INCITE Allocation Hours at ALCF: 125 Million

115

RECORD OF CATEGORICAL EXCLUSION DETERMINATION Project ID No. WH-MM-767A  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

A A Title: Replace Brine Disposal System Header to WH Brine Tanks, GFE Description: Manufacturer shall provide the piping and fittings associated with the replacement of the brine disposal system header to the WH Brine Tanks as Government Furnished Equipment (GFE). The manufacturer shall load all materials onto transports supplied by others. Installation will be performed by others under BM-MM-767. Regulatory Requirements: NEPA Implementing Procedures (10 CFR 1021) 10 CFR 1021.410 (Application of Categorical Exclusions) (a) The actions listed in Appendices A and B of Subpart D are classes of actions that DOE has determined do not individually or cumulatively have a significant effect on the human environment (categorical exclusions).

116

Operating the LCLS Gas Attenuator and Gas Detector System with Apertures of 6mm Diameter  

SciTech Connect

The possibility of increasing the apertures of the LCLS gas attenuator/gas detector system is considered. It is shown that increase of the apertures from 3 to 6 mm, together with 4-fold reduction of the operation pressure does not adversely affect the vacuum conditions upstream or downstream. No change of the pump speed and the lengths of the differential pumping cells is required. One minor modification is the use of 1.5 cm long tubular apertures in the end cells of the differential pumping system. Reduction of the pressure does not affect performance of the gas attenuator/gas detector system at the FEL energies below, roughly, 2 keV. Some minor performance degradation occurs at higher energies.

Ryutov, D.D.; Bionta, R.M.; Hau-Riege, S.P.; Kishiyama, K.I.; Roeben, M.D.; Shen, S.; /LLNL, Livermore; Stefan, P.M.; /SLAC; ,

2010-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

117

Fluorescence of PRODAN in Water: a Computational QM/MM MD Study  

SciTech Connect

Fluorescent properties of PRODAN (6-propionyl-2-dimethylaminonaphthalene) in water were studied by means of excited state molecular dynamics simulations employing a combined quantum mechanical and molecular mechanical approach with the time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT QM/MM MD). The state of the art coupled cluster method was used to benchmark density functional theory calculations. The influence of the water environment on PRODAN emission was investigated by employing several computational schemes with varying description of the solvent. The issue of the molecular geometry of the excited state PRODAN molecule in water was addressed. The experimental emission spectrum was reproduced for the planar excited state conformer of PRODAN in the extended environment of 300 explicit water molecules. The planar conformer was shown to be predominantly responsible for fluorescence. The twisted isomer is strongly stabilized in water, but rapidly evolve towards a conical intersection, and hence the twisted conformer is fluorescently inactive.

Pederzoli, Marek; Sobek, Lukas; Brabec, Jiri; Kowalski, Karol; Cwiklik, Lukasz; Pittner, Jiri

2014-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

118

PROGRESS IN 2 mm GLOW DISCHARGE POLYMER MANDREL DEVELOPMENT FOR NIF  

SciTech Connect

OAK-B135 All planned National Ignition Facility (NIF) capsule targets except machined beryllium require a glow discharge polymer (GDP) mandrel upon which the albator is applied. This mandrel, {approx} 2 mm in diameter, must at least meet if not exceed the symmetry and surface finish requirements of the final capsule. Such mandrels are currently produced by the three-step depolymerizable mandrel technique. The quality of the final mandrel depends upon precise optimization and execution of each of the three steps. They had shown previously that fabrication of a mandrel which met the symmetry and surface finish requirements was feasible using this technique. In this paper they will discuss recent progress towards converting this process into a high yield, production scale process.

NIKROO,A; BOUSQUET,J; COOK,R; McQUILLAN,B.W; PAGUIO,R; TAKAGI,M

2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Examination of Hydrate Formation Methods: Trying to Create Representative Samples  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

gas hydrate morphology on the seismic velocities of sands,sand does not distribute water and gas evenly. Resultant hydrateHydrate Using Excess Gas Method Followed by Water Saturation Description In this method, moist sand

Kneafsey, T.J.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Oct. 12, 2005 QM/MM: What have we learned, where are we, and where  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and electric embedding are contrasted. We consider methods applicable to gas-phase organic chemistry, liquid to computational chemists. At the same time, there is increasing interest in nanostructured materials, condensed advances in modeling potential energy surfaces, in statistical mechanical sampling, and in dynamics

Truhlar, Donald G

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mm sample format" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Hybrid QM/MM Car-Parrinello Simulations of Catalytic and Enzymatic Reactions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-Parrinello simulations paired with enhanced sampling techniques [5] are especially attractive for the in situ small systems in the gas phase whereas complex chemical and biochemical processes usually occur in heterogeneous condensed phase environments consisting of thousands of atoms. One possible solution

Guidoni, Leonardo

122

TITLE: AUTHOR(S) SUBMITTED TO: Mm EVOLUTIO:l C: S!LICIC  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

TITLE: TITLE: AUTHOR(S) SUBMITTED TO: Mm EVOLUTIO:l C: S!LICIC :s!:G:IIA CHAWERS AND THEIR RELATICNStiIP TO 9,1SJLTiC VOLCA~41!'O! John C. Eichelbercjer, R, Gooley "Syinposiuni on the Cr~st" sponsored by the Office of Naval ?esearch and Colorado Schoo' of Hines in Vail, CO, on fi/2-6/76. By occeplmc~ of this arricle for Wbliczrtion. the publisher recognizes tlw Gowxnmnt's (Iic+snsa} ri~htg in any copyright afid tha C+vernrmm and in authoriz% representatives IUIm unrestricted righr !oreprajum intiole or in pwt said article under any mpyrqhtw cured@ tlm publisher. The Los Alamos !kientifw L~boratot-y rsquems that rho publisher identify this article m work ~rformed undnrtha auspi?asof the U.S. Atomic EngWCommi~sion. of the university of California 105 AlAMOS, NEW MEXIC087544 /\ . . , ., UNITED GTATCS A't'5MlC ENE!fGY COM?-I15510N EVOLUTIOii CF SILICIC f!AGfMCiiA!WEF!S

123

The orifice expansion correction for a 50 mm line size at various diameter ratios  

SciTech Connect

The expansion coefficient or factor for a compressible flowmeter corrects for the change in pressure and density as the fluid is accelerated through the flowmeter. The expansion correction currently in use in the United States and also in other countries was developed over fifty years ago by Buckingham and Bean. More recent work reported by Kinghorn shows the equation currently in use to be in error. This paper describes the results of a test program to determine the expansion factors for flange-tapped sharp-edged orifices with diameter ratios between 0.242 and 0.726 in a nominal 50 mm (2 inch) line. Critical flow Venturis are used as the reference standards and dry air as the flowing fluid. The ratio of differential pressure to inlet static pressure is varied over a range of zero to about 0.2 at a constant Reynolds number. The expansion factor is determined form the apparent change in discharge coefficient at a constant Reynolds number.

Seidl, W. [Colorado Engineering Experiment Station, Inc., Nunn, CO (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

124

Structure for an LHC 90mm Nb3Sn Quadrupole Magnet  

SciTech Connect

A full-scale mechanical model of the LHC Nb{sub 3}Sn quadrupole magnet structure has been designed, built and tested. The structure will support a 90mm bore, 1m long magnet prototype as part of the US LHC Accelerator Research Program (LARP). The structure utilizes Bladder and Key Technology to control and transfer pre-stress from an outer aluminum shell to an inner coil. Axial aluminum rods take care of pre-stress at the ends--ensuring that the coil is fully constrained along all three axes. The outer aluminum shell and an inner ''dummy coil'' (aluminum tube) were extensively instrumented with strain gauges. The gauges were used to monitor and map the effectiveness of the stress relation between the loading structure and a ''dummy'' coil through varying mechanical load conditions --from bladder and key pre-stress at room temperature through cool-down. Test results of the stress distribution in the structure and the in dummy coil is reported and compared with expected results calculated with the structural analysis program ANSYS.

Hafalia, A.R.; Caspi, S.; Bartlett, S.E.; Dietderich, D.R.; Ferracin, P.; Gourlay, S.A.; Hannaford, C.R.; Higley, H.; Lietzke, A.F.; Lau, B.; Liggins, N.; Mattafirri, S.; McInturff, A.D.; Nyman, M.; Sabbi,G.L.; Scanlan, R.M.; Swanson, J.

2005-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

125

Unveiling the Nature of Coronae in Active Galactic Nuclei through Sub-mm Observations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The heating mechanism of a corona above an accretion disk in active galactic nuclei (AGNs) is still unknown. One possible mechanism is magnetic reconnection heating requiring energy equipartition between magnetic energy and gas energy in the disk. Here, we investigate the expected observed properties in radio band from such a magnetized corona. A magnetized corona can generate synchrotron radiation since a huge amount of electrons exists. Although most of radiation would be absorbed by synchrotron self-absorption, high-frequency end of synchrotron emission can escape from a corona and appears at the sub-mm range. If only thermal electrons exist in a corona, the expected flux from nearby Seyferts is below the Atacama Large Millimeter/ submillimeter Array (ALMA) sensitivity. However, if non-thermal electrons coexist in a corona, ALMA can measure the non-thermal tail of the synchrotron radiation from a corona. Such non-thermal population is naturally expected to exist if the corona is heated by magnetic reconnec...

Inoue, Yoshiyuki

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Coding the Beams: Improving Beamforming Training in mmWave Communication System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The mmWave communication system is operating at a regime with high number of antennas and very limited number of RF analog chains. Large number of antennas are used to extend the communication range for recovering the high path loss while fewer RF analog chains are designed to reduce transmit and processing power and hardware complexity. In this regime, typical MIMO algorithms are not applicable. Before any communication starts, devices are needed to align their beam pointing angles towards each other. An efficient searching protocol to obtain the best beam angle pair is therefore needed. It is called BeamForming (BF) training protocol. This paper presents a fast BF training protocol called beam coding. Each beam angle is assigned unique signature code. By coding multiple beam angles and steering at their angles simultaneously in a training packet, the best beam angle pair can be obtained in a few packets. This faster BF training protocol not only shows the robustness in non-line-of-sight, multi-user and movi...

Tsang, Y Ming; Addepalli, Sateesh

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

POWGEN Sample Environment | ORNL Neutron Sciences  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sample Environment Sample Environment PAC Helium fill station for cans. PAC PAC stands for Powgen Automatic Changer. This is the second generation sample changer that was developed for POWGEN. The changer has a carousal that holds a maximum of 24 sample-filled vanadium cans and collects data in a temperature range of 10 to 300 K. The cool down temperature from room temperature to 10 K is 45 minutes. However, samples can be changed at 10 K, which takes about 20 minutes. PAC cans The OD (outer diameter) for the V part is 6.3, 7.86 and 9.42 mm The ID (inner diameter) for these to be 5.9, 7.46 and 9.02mm ILL Furnace ILL can ILL can for high temp The traditional ILL furnace built with vanadium heating elements is available for high-temperature measurements from room temperature to 1100°C. Cooling to 200°C takes 3-4 hours from highest temperature, and

128

RNA Extraction and Labeling 1. To IP pellet (~ 25 l vol), add 175 l of: 10 mM HEPES-NaOH, pH 7.5  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

mg/ml stock) 2. Incubate 15 minutes at 37°C. Vortex every 2-3 minutes. 3. Extract twice with an equal (ultrapure) 0.1 mg/ml BSA (NEB) 10 units RNase inhibitor (0.25 µl RNasin) 10 units NEB RNA Ligase (0.5 µl) 5 µl of DEPC-treated ddH2O. Keep samples on ice. 13. Add 5 µl of: 96 µl Formamide 1 µl 500 mM EDTA, p

Aris, John P.

129

Water Formatics Engineered formation of nanobubbles networks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of nanobubbles [3,4,11,14]. 2. A decrease in surface tension from 72 to 68 dyn/cm [11]. 3. Increase nanobubble network is the out come of a self organization process due to the collective effect of bubble-bubble term stability of water structure is resulted from the formation of dense array of stable gas

Jacob, Eshel Ben

130

sediment samples | EMSL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

sediment samples sediment samples Leads No leads are available at this time. Diffusional Motion of Redox Centers in Carbonate Electrolytes . Abstract: Ferrocene (Fc) and...

131

Water and Sediment Sampling  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

analytical laboratory limit below which any level present cannot be determined) Note: Sediment sample locations are co-located with off-site surface water sample locations. Surface...

132

Subsurface horizontal microfracture propagation within the middle member of the Bakken Formation, Williston Basin, North Dakota.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The Devonian-Mississippian Bakken Formation of the Williston basin does not outcrop. All rock samples are obtained by coring. Open, uncemented, horizontal mode I (joints, with… (more)

Warner, Travis Blackburn.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Formation of Hydrogen, Oxygen, and Hydrogen Peroxide in Electron Irradiated Crystalline Water Ice  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Water ice is abundant both astrophysically, for example in molecular clouds, and in planetary systems. The Kuiper belt objects, many satellites of the outer solar system, the nuclei of comets and some planetary rings are all known to be water-rich. Processing of water ice by energetic particles and ultraviolet photons plays an important role in astrochemistry. To explore the detailed nature of this processing, we have conducted a systematic laboratory study of the irradiation of crystalline water ice in an ultrahigh vacuum setup by energetic electrons holding a linear energy transfer of 4.3 +/- 0.1 keV mm-1. The irradiated samples were monitored during the experiment both on line and in situ via mass spectrometry (gas phase) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (solid state). We observed the production of hydrogen and oxygen, both molecular and atomic, and of hydrogen peroxide. The likely reaction mechanisms responsible for these species are discussed. Additional formation routes were derived from the sublimation profiles of molecular hydrogen (90-140 K), molecular oxygen (147 -151 K) and hydrogen peroxide (170 K). We also present evidence on the involvement of hydroxyl radicals and possibly oxygen atoms as building blocks to yield hydrogen peroxide at low temperatures (12 K) and via a diffusion-controlled mechanism in the warming up phase of the irradiated sample.

Weijun Zheng; David Jewitt; Ralf I. Kaiser

2005-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

134

ESPC IDIQ Contract Sample  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Document displays a sample indefinite delivery, indefinite quantity (IDIQ) energy savings performance contract (ESPC).

135

Large-scale cross-media retrieval of WikipediaMM images with textual and visual query expansion  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this paper, we present our approaches for the WikipediaMM task at ImageCLEF 2008. We first experimented with a text-based image retrieval approach with query expansion, where the extension terms were automatically selected from a knowledge base that ... Keywords: cross-media re-ranking, image retrieval, query-dependent visual concept detection, textual query expansion

Zhi Zhou; Yonghong Tian; Yuanning Li; Tiejun Huang; Wen Gao

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

The south central Texas heavy rain event of October 1998: an MM5 simulation and diagnosis of convective initiation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

During the weekend of 17-18 October 1998, extremely heavy rainfall over south central Texas resulted in widespread flash flooding and numerous river floods. Southern Hays County received 760 mm of rainfall, and an area of 18,000 km² recorded over...

Scott, Richard Kevin

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

September 2004 Water Sampling  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Sampling at the Sampling at the Shirley Basin South, Wyoming, Disposal Site September 2013 LMS/SBS/S00613 This page intentionally left blank U.S. Department of Energy DVP-June 2013, Shirley Basin South, Wyoming September 2013 RIN 13065426 Page i Contents Sampling Event Summary ...............................................................................................................1 Shirley Basin South, Wyoming, Disposal Site Sample Location Map ............................................3 Data Assessment Summary ..............................................................................................................5 Water Sampling Field Activities Verification Checklist .............................................................7

138

E-Print Network 3.0 - anisotropy probe 5-yr Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SAMPLING Summary: probe, including permeability, porosity, anisotropy, presence of a shale boundary, rate of mud... and probe pressures to estimate formation permeability,...

139

E-Print Network 3.0 - anisotropy probe five-year Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SAMPLING Summary: probe, including permeability, porosity, anisotropy, presence of a shale boundary, rate of mud... and probe pressures to estimate formation permeability,...

140

E-Print Network 3.0 - anisotropy probe wmapobservations Sample...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SAMPLING Summary: probe, including permeability, porosity, anisotropy, presence of a shale boundary, rate of mud... and probe pressures to estimate formation permeability,...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mm sample format" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Ettringite formation and behaviour in clayey soils  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Failures in soil stabilization have been reported previously as being due to the formation of ettringite, an expansive mineral which develops in the presence of sulfate, calcium, and aluminum compounds of clay fraction in high pH levels between 10.36 and 14. By comparing the pattern of formation of ettringite, formed from different possible sources and specifically in stabilized soil, it is expected that a clearer picture of the kinetics of ettringite formation from different sources will be obtained. In this paper, a set of physico-chemical experiments and XRD tests were performed to investigate the process of ettringite formation and to explore its possible performance in clayey soils. The growth of the ettringite XRD peaks was used as a measure of the rate and its formation pattern. It is shown that the rate of ettringite formation in soil stabilization is much slower than that of artificial ettringite. Furthermore, it is shown that ettringite swells to the order of 50% and its fluid retention is significantly higher (by as much as 400%) than that of the soil sample studied in this research.

Vahid R. Ouhadi; Raymond N. Yong

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Formation and retention of methane in coal  

SciTech Connect

The formation and retention of methane in coalbeds was studied for ten Utah coal samples, one Colorado coal sample and eight coal samples from the Argonne Premium Coal Sample Bank.Methane gas content of the Utah and Colorado coals varied from zero to 9 cm{sup 3}/g. The Utah coals were all high volatile bituminous coals. The Colorado coal was a gassy medium volatile bituminous coal. The Argonne coals cover a range or rank from lignite to low volatile bituminous coal and were used to determine the effect of rank in laboratory studies. The methane content of six selected Utah coal seams and the Colorado coal seam was measured in situ using a special sample collection device and a bubble desorbometer. Coal samples were collected at each measurement site for laboratory analysis. The cleat and joint system was evaluated for the coal and surrounding rocks and geological conditions were noted. Permeability measurements were performed on selected samples and all samples were analyzed for proximate and ultimate analysis, petrographic analysis, {sup 13}C NMR dipolar-dephasing spectroscopy, and density analysis. The observed methane adsorption behavior was correlated with the chemical structure and physical properties of the coals.

Hucka, V.J.; Bodily, D.M.; Huang, H.

1992-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

143

Gas Sampling Considerations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Gas sampling is carried out to measure the quality of a gas. Gas samples are sometimes acquired by in situ observation within the main gas body by using remote or visual observation for specific properties. A mor...

Alvin Lieberman

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

September 2004 Water Sampling  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

event. Sampling Protocol Wells USGS-4 and USGS-8 were sampled using dedicated bladder pumps. Data from these wells are qualified with an "F" flag in the database indicating the...

145

Interferometric Mapping of Magnetic Fields: The massive star forming region G34.4+0.23 MM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report millimeter interferometric observations of polarized continuum and line emission from the massive star forming region G34.4. Polarized thermal dust emission at 3 mm wavelength and CO $J=1 \\to 0$ line emission were observed using the Berkeley-Illinois-Maryland Association (BIMA) array. Our results show a remarkably uniform polarization pattern in both dust and in CO J=$1 \\to 0$ emission. In addition, the line emission presents a consistent uniform polarization pattern over most of the velocity channel maps. These uniform polarization patterns are aligned with the north-south main axis of the filament between the main millimeter source (MM) and the ultra-compact H {\\scriptsize II} region, which are the central sources in G34.4, suggesting a magnetic field orthogonal to this axis. This morphology is consistent with a magnetically supported disk seen roughly edge-on.

P. C. Cortes; R. M. Crutcher; D. Shepherd; L. Bronfman

2008-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

146

Accelerator Quality HTS Dipole Magnet Demonstrator designs for the EuCARD-2, 5 Tesla 40 mm Clear Aperture Magnet  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Future high-energy accelerators will need very high magnetic fields in the range of 20 T. The EuCARD-2 work-package-10 is a collaborative push to take HTS materials into an accelerator quality demonstrator magnet. The demonstrator will produce 5 T standalone and between 17 T and 20 T, when inserted into the 100 mm aperture of Fresca-2 high field out-sert magnet. The HTS magnet will demonstrate the field strength and field quality that can be achieved. An effective quench detection and protection system will have to be developed to operate with the HTS superconducting materials. This paper presents a ReBCO magnet design using multi strand Roebel cable that develops a stand-alone field of 5 T in a 40 mm clear aperture and discusses the challenges associated with good field quality using this type of material. A selection of magnet designs is presented as result of a first phase of development.

Kirby, G; Ballarino, A; Bottura, L; Chouika, N; Clement, S; Datskov, V; Fajardo, L; Fleiter, J; Gauthier, R; Lambert, L; Lopes, M; Perez, J; DeRijk, G; Rijllart, A; Rossi, L; Ten Kate, H; Durante, M; Fazilleau, P; Lorin, C; Haro, E; Stenvall, A; Caspi, S; Marchevsky, M; Goldacker, W; Kario, A

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

September 2004 Water Sampling  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Old and New Rifle, Old and New Rifle, Colorado, Processing Sites August 2013 LMS/RFN/RFO/S00613 This page intentionally left blank U.S. Department of Energy DVP-June 2013, Rifle, Colorado August 2013 RIN 13065380 Page i Contents Sampling Event Summary ...............................................................................................................1 Sample Location Map, New Rifle, Colorado, Processing Site ........................................................5 Sample Location Map, Old Rifle, Colorado, Processing Site ..........................................................6 Data Assessment Summary ..............................................................................................................7 Water Sampling Field Activities Verification Checklist .............................................................9

148

September 2004 Water Sampling  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3 3 Groundwater and Surface Water Sampling at the Tuba City, Arizona, Disposal Site November 2013 LMS/TUB/S00813 This page intentionally left blank U.S. Department of Energy DVP-August 2013, Tuba City, Arizona November 2013 RIN 13085553 Page i Contents Sampling Event Summary ...............................................................................................................1 Tuba City, Arizona, Disposal Site, Sample Location Map ..............................................................7 Data Assessment Summary ..............................................................................................................9 Water Sampling Field Activities Verification Checklist ...........................................................11

149

September 2004 Water Sampling  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and October 2013 and October 2013 Groundwater Sampling at the Bluewater, New Mexico, Disposal Site December 2013 LMS/BLU/S00813 This page intentionally left blank U.S. Department of Energy DVP-August and October 2013, Bluewater, New Mexico December 2013 RIN 13085537 and 13095651 Page i Contents Sampling Event Summary ...............................................................................................................1 Private Wells Sampled August 2013 and October 2013, Bluewater, NM, Disposal Site ................3 Data Assessment Summary ..............................................................................................................5 Water Sampling Field Activities Verification Checklist .............................................................7

150

September 2004 Water Sampling  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

3 3 Groundwater and Surface Water Sampling at the Slick Rock East and West, Colorado, Processing Sites November 2013 LMS/SRE/SRW/S0913 This page intentionally left blank U.S. Department of Energy DVP-September 2013, Slick Rock, Colorado November 2013 RIN 13095593 Page i Contents Sampling Event Summary ...............................................................................................................1 Slick Rock East and West, Colorado, Processing Sites, Sample Location Map .............................5 Data Assessment Summary ..............................................................................................................7 Water Sampling Field Activities Verification Checklist .............................................................9

151

Modeling Solvatochromism of a Quinolinium Betaine Dye in Water Solvent Using Sequential Hybrid QM/MM and Semicontinuum Approach  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Modeling Solvatochromism of a Quinolinium Betaine Dye in Water Solvent Using Sequential Hybrid QM/MM and Semicontinuum Approach ... These charges are obtained by fitting procedure to reproduce molecular electrostatic potential at number of points in a grid around the molecule. ... This work was supported by a grant from the Swedish Infrastructure Committee (SNIC) for the project “Multiphysics Modeling of Molecular Materials”, SNIC 023/07-18. ...

N. Arul Murugan

2011-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

152

September 2004 Water Sampling  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Riverton, Wyoming, Riverton, Wyoming, Processing Site September 2013 LMS/RVT/S00613 This page intentionally left blank U.S. Department of Energy DVP-June 2013, Riverton, Wyoming September 2013 RIN 13065379 Page i Contents Sampling Event Summary ...............................................................................................................1 Riverton, Wyoming, Processing Site, Sample Location Map .........................................................5 Data Assessment Summary ..............................................................................................................7 Water Sampling Field Activities Verification Checklist .............................................................9 Laboratory Performance Assessment ........................................................................................11

153

Star Formation Histories in the Local Group  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Deep color magnitude diagrams extending to the main sequence provide the most direct measure of the detailed star formation history in a stellar population. With large investments of observing time, HST can obtain such data for populations out to 1 Mpc, but its field of view is extremely small in comparison to the size of Local Group galaxies. This limitation severely constrains our understanding of galaxy formation. For example, the largest galaxy in the Local Group, Andromeda, offers an ideal laboratory for studying the formation of large spiral galaxies, but the galaxy shows substructure on a variety of scales, presumably due to its violent merger history. Within its remaining lifetime, HST can only sample a few sight-lines through this complex galaxy. In contrast, a wide field imager could provide a map of Andromeda's halo, outer disk, and tidal streams, revealing the spatially-dependent star formation history in each structure. The same data would enable many secondary studies, such as the age variation in Andromeda's globular cluster system, gigantic samples of variable stars, and microlensing tracers of the galaxy's dark matter distribution.

Thomas M. Brown

2004-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

154

Audio issues in MIR evaluation vOverview of audio formats  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Audio issues in MIR evaluation vOverview of audio formats vPreferred presentation of audio files in an MIR testbed vA set of simple recommendations Audio Formats I 1. Apple à AIFF (Audio Interchange File Sample rates � Channels · 2 most common uncompressed formats · Digital Audio Workstations support both

Reiss, Josh

155

Kinetics of Mixed Ni-Al Precipitate Formation on a Soil Clay Fraction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Kinetics of Mixed Ni-Al Precipitate Formation on a Soil Clay Fraction D A R R Y L R . R O B E R Management Laboratory, Paul Scherrer Institute, CH-5232 Villigen PSI, Switzerland The kinetics of mixed Ni-Al Ni- Al LDH formation. The initial Ni concentration was 3 mM with a solid/solution ratio of 10 g L-1

Sparks, Donald L.

156

On-line microdialysis sample cleanup for electrospray ionization mass spectrometry of nucleic acid samples  

SciTech Connect

A major limitation of electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) for oligonucleotide analysis arises due to sodium adduction, a problem that increases with molecular weight. Sodium adduction can preclude useful measurements when limited sample sizes prevent off-line cleanup. A novel and generally useful on-line microdialysis technique is described for the rapid (nearly 1-5 min) DNA sample cleanup for ESI-MS. Mass spectra of oligonucleotides of different size and sequence showing no significant sodium adduct peaks were obtained using the on-line microdialysis system with sodium chloride concentrations as high as 250 mM. Signal-to-noise ratios were also greatly enhanced compared to direct infusion of the original samples. By using ammonium acetate as the dialysis buffer, it was also found that the noncovalent association of double-stranded oligonucleotides could be preserved during the microdialysis process, allowing analysis by ESI-MS. 33 refs., 6 figs.

Liu, C.; Wu, Q.; Harms, A.C.; Smith, R.D. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States)] [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

1996-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

157

Systematic sampling with errors in sample locations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......truncation points 0 and 2 and standard deviation = 0 05 (middle...distributed with density h. Standard renewal theory yields...systematic sampling: a review of Matheron's transitive...Trans. Inst. Econ. Mining 59, 147. GUAL-ARNAU...methods. J. Statist. Plan. Infer. 77, 263279......

Johanna Ziegel; Adrian Baddeley; Karl-Anton Dorph-Petersen; Eva B. Vedel Jensen

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Introduction Format Proprietaire -Standard  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Code for Information Interchange) 4. Unicode IFT-1215 Stefan Monnier 7 #12;BCD IFT-1215 Stefan MonnierSOMMAIRE Introduction Format Propri´etaire -Standard Code Alphanum´erique Entr´ee Alphanum : !, ?, ", (, . . . · Caract`eres sp´eciaux : *, $, ¿, . . . Quelques standards utilis´es pour les coder en binaires 1. BCD

Monnier, Stefan

159

Hierarchical galaxy formation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......such as the cooling of gas in haloes, the formation...effects on interstellar gas of energy released by young stars, the production of heavy elements, the...dynamics of the cooling gas are calculated in full...relatively small computational cost. The major disadvantage......

Shaun Cole; Cedric G. Lacey; Carlton M. Baugh; Carlos S. Frenk

2000-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

160

Assessing respondent-driven sampling  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...convenience sampling through the internet versus respondent driven sampling...in Social Networks, Drug Abuse, and HIV Transmission , eds...5) MSM Tallinn, Estonia Internet convenience sampling...convenience sampling through the internet versus respondent driven sampling...

Sharad Goel; Matthew J. Salganik

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mm sample format" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Two-dimensional free-energy surface on the exchange reaction of alkyl chloride/chloride using the QM/MM-MC method  

SciTech Connect

Two-dimensional free-energy surfaces are calculated for alkyl chloride/chloride exchange/inversion reactions: Cl- + RCl (R = Me and t-Bu) surrounded by one hundred H2O molecules as a model of solvent. The methodology of free-energy calculation by perturbation theory based on a mixed-Hamiltonian model (QM/MM) combined with Monte Carlo sampling of the solvent configurations was used to obtain the changes in solvation free energy. We devised a special procedure to analyze the two-dimensional free-energy surfaces to gain unique insight into the differences in the reaction mechanisms between the two systems. The inversion reaction path for R = t-Bu on the free-energy surface is found to proceed in an asynchronous way within a concerted framework via the ion-pair region. This is in contrast to the R = Me system that proceeds as a typical SN2 reaction. This work was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Chemical Sciences program. The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is operated by Battelle for DOE.

Ohisa, M.; Yamataka, H.; Dupuis, Michel; Aida, Misako

2007-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

162

Magnetic Materials (MM)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Beam Time Contacts Calendars Community Scientific Access Site Access Training Science & Education Science & Research Highlights Conferences Seminars Publications Annual Reports...

163

September 2004 Water Sampling  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Green River, Utah, Disposal Site Green River, Utah, Disposal Site August 2013 LMS/GRN/S00613 This page intentionally left blank U.S. Department of Energy DVP-June 2013, Green River, Utah August 2013 RIN 13065402 Page i Contents Sampling Event Summary ...............................................................................................................1 Data Assessment Summary ..............................................................................................................7 Water Sampling Field Activities Verification Checklist .............................................................9 Laboratory Performance Assessment ........................................................................................11 Sampling Quality Control Assessment ......................................................................................18

164

Sampled data lattice filters  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

SAMPLED DATA LATTICE FILTERS A Thesis by WILLIAM TERRY THRIFT III Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1979 Major Subfect...: Electrical Engineering SAMPLED DATA LATTICE FILTERS A Thesis by WILLIAM TERRY THRIFT III Approved as to style and content by: (Chair an of Committee) (Hea f Department) (Member) (Member) (Member) (Member) December 1979 ABSTRACT Sampled Data...

Thrift, William Terry

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

165

September 2004 Water Sampling  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

sample recovery not within control limits. Organic: Tentatively identified compound (TIC). P > 25% difference in detected pesticide or Aroclor concentrations between 2 columns....

166

EMSL - sediment samples  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

sediment-samples en Diffusional Motion of Redox Centers in Carbonate Electrolytes . http:www.emsl.pnl.govemslwebpublicationsdiffusional-motion-redox-centers-carbonate-electrol...

167

September 2004 Water Sampling  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

conducted in accordance with the Sampling and Analysis Plan for the U. S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management Sites (LMSPROS04351, continually updated). Monitoring...

168

September 2004 Water Sampling  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

4 Groundwater and Surface Water Sampling at the Gunnison, Colorado, Processing Site September 2014 LMSGUPS00414 This page intentionally left blank U.S. Department of Energy...

169

September 2004 Water Sampling  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

4 Groundwater and Surface Water Sampling at the Slick Rock, Colorado, Processing Sites December 2014 LMSSRWSRES00914 This page intentionally left blank U.S. Department of Energy...

170

Proposal for the award of a contract for the supply of 5 mm depleted-uranium plates for the UA1 experiment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Proposal for the award of a contract for the supply of 5 mm depleted-uranium plates for the UA1 experiment

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Proposal for the award of a contract for the supply of 5 mm depleted-uranium plates for the UA1 calorimeter upgrading  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Proposal for the award of a contract for the supply of 5 mm depleted-uranium plates for the UA1 calorimeter upgrading

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Sampling system and method  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present disclosure provides an apparatus and method for coupling conduit segments together. A first pump obtains a sample and transmits it through a first conduit to a reservoir accessible by a second pump. The second pump further conducts the sample from the reservoir through a second conduit.

Decker, David L.; Lyles, Brad F.; Purcell, Richard G.; Hershey, Ronald Lee

2013-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

173

PRIMUS: The relationship between Star formation and AGN accretion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study the evidence for a symbiotic connection between active galactic nuclei (AGN) fueling and star formation by investigating the relationship between the X-ray luminosities of AGN and the star formation rates (SFRs) of their host galaxies. We identify a sample of 309 AGN with X-ray luminosities $10^{41}power-law distribution in the probability of hosting an AGN as a function of ...

Azadi, Mojegan; Coil, Alison; Moustakas, John; Mendez, Alexander; Blanton, Michael; Cool, Richard; Eisenstein, Daniel; Wong, Kenneth; Zhu, Guangtun

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

2003 CBECS Sample Design  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Technical Information > Sample Design Technical Information > Sample Design How the Survey Was Conducted 2003 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey: Sample Design Introduction The Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) is conducted quadrennially by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) to provide basic statistical information about energy consumption and expenditures in U.S. commercial buildings and information about energy-related characteristics of these buildings. The survey is based upon a sample of commercial buildings selected according to the sample design requirements described below. A “building,” as opposed to an “establishment,” is the basic unit of analysis for the CBECS because the building is the energy-consuming unit. The 2003 CBECS was the eighth survey conducted since 1979

175

Sample Changes and Issues  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Sample and Model Issues Sample and Model Issues Summary Our comprehensive review of the EIA 914 has confirmed that discrepancies can arise between estimates for December of one year and January of the next. These are most evident for Texas estimates between December 2008 and January 2009. Reports now available from HPDI show that production for all the companies we sampled in both 2008 and 2009 rose by about 60 million cubic feet per day (MMcf/d) in January and that total production in Texas rose by a similar amount. Our estimate was a decrease of 360 MMcf/d. Why the difference? Computationally, EIA-914 estimates depend on two factors: * Reports from the companies in the survey sample * An expansion factor to estimate total production from the sample's reported

176

Sampling for Beryllium Surface Contamination using Wet, Dry and Alcohol Wipe Sampling  

SciTech Connect

This research project was conducted at the National Nuclear Security Administration's Kansas City Plant, operated by Honeywell Federal Manufacturing and Technologies, in conjunction with the Safety Sciences Department of Central Missouri State University, to compare relative removal efficiencies of three wipe sampling techniques currently used at Department of Energy facilities. Efficiencies of removal of beryllium contamination from typical painted surfaces were tested by wipe sampling with dry Whatman 42 filter paper, with water-moistened (Ghost Wipe) materials, and by methanol-moistened wipes. Test plates were prepared using 100 mm X 15 mm Pyrex Petri dishes with interior surfaces spray painted with a bond coat primer. To achieve uniform deposition over the test plate surface, 10 ml aliquots of solution containing 1 beryllium and 0.1 ml of metal working fluid were transferred to the test plates and subsequently evaporated. Metal working fluid was added to simulate the slight oiliness common on surfaces in metal working shops where fugitive oil mist accumulates over time. Sixteen test plates for each wipe method (dry, water, and methanol) were processed and sampled using a modification of wiping patterns recommended by OSHA Method 125G. Laboratory and statistical analysis showed that methanol-moistened wipe sampling removed significantly more (about twice as much) beryllium/oil-film surface contamination as water-moistened wipes (p< 0.001), which removed significantly more (about twice as much) residue as dry wipes (p <0.001). Evidence for beryllium sensitization via skin exposure argues in favor of wipe sampling with wetting agents that provide enhanced residue removal efficiency.

Kerr, Kent

2004-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

177

Fissile sample worths in the Uranium/Iron Benchmark  

SciTech Connect

One of the long-standing problems from LMFBR critical experiments is the central worth discrepancy, the consistent overprediction of the reactivity associated with introducing a small material sample near the center of an assembly. Reactivity (sample worth) experiments in ZPR-9, assembly 34, the Uranium/Iron Benchmark (U/Fe), were aimed at investigating this discrepancy. U/Fe had a large, single-region core whose neutronics was governed almost entirely by /sup 235/U and iron. The essentially one-dimensional plate unit cell had one 1.6 mm-wide column of 93% enriched uranium (U(93)) near the center, imbedded in about 50 mm of iron and stainless steel. The neutron spectrum was roughly comparable to that of an LMFBR, but the adjoint spectrum was much flatter than an LMFBR's. The worths of four different fissile materials were measured and the worth of U(93) was measured using several different experimental techniques.

Schaefer, R.W.; Bucher, R.G.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

The Ability of MM5 to Simulate Ice Clouds: Systematic Comparison between Simulated and Measured Fluxes and Lidar/Radar Profiles at the  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to produce too much solid water (ice and snow) and not enough liquid water. 1. Introduction Ice clouds playThe Ability of MM5 to Simulate Ice Clouds: Systematic Comparison between Simulated and Measured­NCAR Mesoscale Model (MM5) to simulate midlatitude ice clouds is evaluated. Model outputs are compared to long

Protat, Alain

179

A REDSHIFT SURVEY OF HERSCHEL FAR-INFRARED SELECTED STARBURSTS AND IMPLICATIONS FOR OBSCURED STAR FORMATION  

SciTech Connect

We present Keck spectroscopic observations and redshifts for a sample of 767 Herschel-SPIRE selected galaxies (HSGs) at 250, 350, and 500 {mu}m, taken with the Keck I Low Resolution Imaging Spectrometer and the Keck II DEep Imaging Multi-Object Spectrograph. The redshift distribution of these SPIRE sources from the Herschel Multitiered Extragalactic Survey peaks at z = 0.85, with 731 sources at z < 2 and a tail of sources out to z {approx} 5. We measure more significant disagreement between photometric and spectroscopic redshifts (({Delta}z/(1 + z{sub spec})) = 0.29) than is seen in non-infrared selected samples, likely due to enhanced star formation rates and dust obscuration in infrared-selected galaxies. The infrared data are used to directly measure integrated infrared luminosities and dust temperatures independent of radio or 24 {mu}m flux densities. By probing the dust spectral energy distribution (SED) at its peak, we estimate that the vast majority (72%-83%) of z < 2 Herschel-selected galaxies would drop out of traditional submillimeter surveys at 0.85-1 mm. We find that dust temperature traces infrared luminosity, due in part to the SPIRE wavelength selection biases, and partially from physical effects. As a result, we measure no significant trend in SPIRE color with redshift; if dust temperature were independent of luminosity or redshift, a trend in SPIRE color would be expected. Composite infrared SEDs are constructed as a function of infrared luminosity, showing the increase in dust temperature with luminosity, and subtle change in near-infrared and mid-infrared spectral properties. Moderate evolution in the far-infrared (FIR)/radio correlation is measured for this partially radio-selected sample, with q{sub IR}{proportional_to}(1 + z){sup -0.30{+-}0.02} at z < 2. We estimate the luminosity function and implied star formation rate density contribution of HSGs at z < 1.6 and find overall agreement with work based on 24 {mu}m extrapolations of the LIRG, ULIRG, and total infrared contributions. This work significantly increased the number of spectroscopically confirmed infrared-luminous galaxies at z >> 0 and demonstrates the growing importance of dusty starbursts for galaxy evolution studies and the build-up of stellar mass throughout cosmic time.

Casey, C. M.; Budynkiewicz, J. [Institute for Astronomy, University of Hawaii, 2680 Woodlawn Drive, Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States); Berta, S.; Lutz, D.; Magnelli, B. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Extraterrestrische Physik, Giessenbachstrasse, 85748 Garching (Germany); Bethermin, M.; Le Floc'h, E.; Magdis, G. [Laboratoire AIM-Paris-Saclay, CEA/DSM/Irfu - CNRS - Universite Paris Diderot, CE-Saclay, pt courrier 131, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Bock, J.; Bridge, C. [California Institute of Technology, 1200 E. California Blvd., Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Burgarella, D. [Laboratoire d'Astrophysique de Marseille - LAM, Universite d'Aix-Marseille and CNRS, UMR7326, 38 rue F. Joliot-Curie, 13388 Marseille Cedex 13 (France); Chapin, E. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of British Columbia, 6224 Agricultural Road, Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z1 (Canada); Chapman, S. C. [Institute of Astronomy, University of Cambridge, Madingley Road, Cambridge CB3 0HA (United Kingdom); Clements, D. L. [Astrophysics Group, Imperial College London, Blackett Laboratory, Prince Consort Road, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Conley, A. [Center for Astrophysics and Space Astronomy 389-UCB, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO 80309 (United States); Conselice, C. J. [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Nottingham, NG7 2RD (United Kingdom); Cooray, A. [Dept. of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Irvine, CA 92697 (United States); Farrah, D. [Department of Physics, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA 24061 (United States); Hatziminaoglou, E. [ESO, Karl-Schwarzschild-Str. 2, 85748 Garching bei Muenchen (Germany); Ivison, R. J. [UK Astronomy Technology Centre, Royal Observatory, Blackford Hill, Edinburgh EH9 3HJ (United Kingdom); and others

2012-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

180

Simultaneous Radio to (Sub-) Mm-Monitoring of Variability and Spectral Shape Evolution of Potential GLAST Blazars  

SciTech Connect

The Large Area Telescope (LAT) instrument onboard GLAST offers a tremendous opportunity for future blazar studies. In order to fully benefit from its capabilities and to maximize the scientific return from the LAT, it is of great importance to conduct dedicated multi-frequency monitoring campaigns that will result comprehensive observations. Consequently, we initiated an effort to conduct a GLAST-dedicated, quasi-simultaneous, broad-band flux-density (and polarization) monitoring of potential GLAST blazars with the Effelsberg and OVRO radio telescopes (11 cm to 7mm wavelength). Here, we present a short overview of these activities which will complement the multi-wavelengths activities of the GLAST/LAT collaboration towards the 'low-energy' radio bands. Further we will give a brief outlook including the extension of this coordinated campaign towards higher frequencies and future scientific aims.

Fuhrmann, L.; Zensus, J.A.; Krichbaum, T.P.; Angelakis, E.; /Bonn, Max Planck Inst., Radioastron.; Readhead, A.C.S.; /Caltech

2011-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mm sample format" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Electron dynamics in complex environments with real-time time dependent density functional theory in a QM-MM framework  

SciTech Connect

This article presents a time dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) implementation to propagate the Kohn-Sham equations in real time, including the effects of a molecular environment through a Quantum-Mechanics Molecular-Mechanics (QM-MM) hamiltonian. The code delivers an all-electron description employing Gaussian basis functions, and incorporates the Amber force-field in the QM-MM treatment. The most expensive parts of the computation, comprising the commutators between the hamiltonian and the density matrix—required to propagate the electron dynamics—, and the evaluation of the exchange-correlation energy, were migrated to the CUDA platform to run on graphics processing units, which remarkably accelerates the performance of the code. The method was validated by reproducing linear-response TDDFT results for the absorption spectra of several molecular species. Two different schemes were tested to propagate the quantum dynamics: (i) a leap-frog Verlet algorithm, and (ii) the Magnus expansion to first-order. These two approaches were confronted, to find that the Magnus scheme is more efficient by a factor of six in small molecules. Interestingly, the presence of iron was found to seriously limitate the length of the integration time step, due to the high frequencies associated with the core-electrons. This highlights the importance of pseudopotentials to alleviate the cost of the propagation of the inner states when heavy nuclei are present. Finally, the methodology was applied to investigate the shifts induced by the chemical environment on the most intense UV absorption bands of two model systems of general relevance: the formamide molecule in water solution, and the carboxy-heme group in Flavohemoglobin. In both cases, shifts of several nanometers are observed, consistently with the available experimental data.

Morzan, Uriel N.; Ramírez, Francisco F.; Scherlis, Damián A., E-mail: damian@qi.fcen.uba.ar, E-mail: mcgl@qb.ffyb.uba.ar [Departamento de Química Inorgánica, Analítica y Química Física/INQUIMAE, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Universidad de Buenos Aires, Ciudad Universitaria, Pab. II, Buenos Aires (C1428EHA) (Argentina); Oviedo, M. Belén; Sánchez, Cristián G. [Departamento de Matemática y Física, Facultad de Ciencias Químicas, INFIQC, Universidad Nacional de Córdoba, Ciudad Universitaria, X5000HUA Córdoba (Argentina)] [Departamento de Matemática y Física, Facultad de Ciencias Químicas, INFIQC, Universidad Nacional de Córdoba, Ciudad Universitaria, X5000HUA Córdoba (Argentina); Lebrero, Mariano C. González, E-mail: damian@qi.fcen.uba.ar, E-mail: mcgl@qb.ffyb.uba.ar [Instituto de Química y Fisicoquímica Biológicas, IQUIFIB, CONICET (Argentina)] [Instituto de Química y Fisicoquímica Biológicas, IQUIFIB, CONICET (Argentina)

2014-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

182

September 2004 Water Sampling  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

3-Sampling and Analysis Work Orders Attachment 4-Trip Reports DVP-June and September 2013, Durango, Colorado U.S. Department of Energy RIN 13055370 and 13085577 March 2014 Page...

183

September 2004 Water Sampling  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

agency thereof or its contractors or subcontractors. U.S. Department of Energy DVP-May 2013, Rulison, Colorado October 2013 RIN 13055300 Page i Contents Sampling Event Summary...

184

September 2004 Water Sampling  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

analyses were conducted as specified in the 2004 Monticello Mill Tailings Site Operable Unit III Post-Record of Decision Monitoring Plan, Draft Final and Sampling and Analysis Plan...

185

September 2004 Water Sampling  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

2014 Groundwater, Surface Water, Produced Water, and Natural Gas Sampling at the Gasbuggy, New Mexico, Site October 2014 LMSGSBS00614 Available for sale to the public from: U.S....

186

September 2004 Water Sampling  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Site August 2014 LMSGRNS00614 This page intentionally left blank U.S. Department of Energy DVP-June 2014, Green River, Utah August 2014 RIN 14066228 Page i Contents Sampling...

187

Climatic data, sample of  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The representative sample data given below is derived from Climates of the World (Environmental Data Service, 1972). To facilitate conversion from degrees Fahrenheit, inches of precipitation, and elevation in fee...

John E. Oliver

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Dissolution actuated sample container  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A sample collection vial and process of using a vial is provided. The sample collection vial has an opening secured by a dissolvable plug. When dissolved, liquids may enter into the interior of the collection vial passing along one or more edges of a dissolvable blocking member. As the blocking member is dissolved, a spring actuated closure is directed towards the opening of the vial which, when engaged, secures the vial contents against loss or contamination.

Nance, Thomas A.; McCoy, Frank T.

2013-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

189

Liquid sampling system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A conduit extends from a reservoir through a sampling station and back to the reservoir in a closed loop. A jet ejector in the conduit establishes suction for withdrawing liquid from the reservoir. The conduit has a self-healing septum therein upstream of the jet ejector for receiving one end of a double-ended cannula, the other end of which is received in a serum bottle for sample collection. Gas is introduced into the conduit at a gas bleed between the sample collection bottle and the reservoir. The jet ejector evacuates gas from the conduit and the bottle and aspirates a column of liquid from the reservoir at a high rate. When the withdrawn liquid reaches the jet ejector the rate of flow therethrough reduces substantially and the gas bleed increases the pressure in the conduit for driving liquid into the sample bottle, the gas bleed forming a column of gas behind the withdrawn liquid column and interrupting the withdrawal of liquid from the reservoir. In the case of hazardous and toxic liquids, the sample bottle and the jet ejector may be isolated from the reservoir and may be further isolated from a control station containing remote manipulation means for the sample bottle and control valves for the jet ejector and gas bleed. 5 figs.

Larson, L.L.

1984-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

190

Liquid sampling system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A conduit extends from a reservoir through a sampling station and back to the reservoir in a closed loop. A jet ejector in the conduit establishes suction for withdrawing liquid from the reservoir. The conduit has a self-healing septum therein upstream of the jet ejector for receiving one end of a double-ended cannula, the other end of which is received in a serum bottle for sample collection. Gas is introduced into the conduit at a gas bleed between the sample collection bottle and the reservoir. The jet ejector evacuates gas from the conduit and the bottle and aspirates a column of liquid from the reservoir at a high rate. When the withdrawn liquid reaches the jet ejector the rate of flow therethrough reduces substantially and the gas bleed increases the pressure in the conduit for driving liquid into the sample bottle, the gas bleed forming a column of gas behind the withdrawn liquid column and interrupting the withdrawal of liquid from the reservoir. In the case of hazardous and toxic liquids, the sample bottle and the jet ejector may be isolated from the reservoir and may be further isolated from a control station containing remote manipulation means for the sample bottle and control valves for the jet ejector and gas bleed.

Larson, Loren L. (Idaho Falls, ID)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Fluid sampling system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An fluid sampling system allows sampling of radioactive liquid without spillage. A feed tank is connected to a liquid transfer jet powered by a pumping chamber pressurized by compressed air. The liquid is pumped upwardly into a sampling jet of a venturi design having a lumen with an inlet, an outlet, a constricted middle portion, and a port located above the constricted middle portion. The liquid is passed under pressure through the constricted portion causing its velocity to increase and its pressure to be decreased, thereby preventing liquid from escaping. A septum sealing the port can be pierced by a two pointed hollow needle leading into a sample bottle also sealed by a pierceable septum affixed to one end. The bottle is evacuated by flow through the sample jet, cyclic variation in the sampler jet pressure periodically leaves the evacuated bottle with lower pressure than that of the port, thus causing solution to pass into the bottle. The remaining solution in the system is returned to the feed tank via a holding tank. 4 figs.

Houck, E.D.

1994-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

192

Wyko Optical Profiler This machine investigates variations in topography for surfaces ranging from very smooth to 2mm step  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Wyko Optical Profiler Purpose This machine investigates variations in topography for surfaces as the interferometric objective moves vertically through sample focus. The vertical position of the optics at peak. · Adjust the tip/tilt to orient the optic head until the rings spread into one large ring (nulling). DO

193

Formation, characterization and reactivity of adsorbed oxygen...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Formation, characterization and reactivity of adsorbed oxygen on BaOPt(111). Formation, characterization and reactivity of adsorbed oxygen on BaOPt(111). Abstract: The formation...

194

Viscous sludge sample collector  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A vertical core sample collection system for viscous sludge. A sample tube's upper end has a flange and is attached to a piston. The tube and piston are located in the upper end of a bore in a housing. The bore's lower end leads outside the housing and has an inwardly extending rim. Compressed gas, from a storage cylinder, is quickly introduced into the bore's upper end to rapidly accelerate the piston and tube down the bore. The lower end of the tube has a high sludge entering velocity to obtain a full-length sludge sample without disturbing strata detail. The tube's downward motion is stopped when its upper end flange impacts against the bore's lower end inwardly extending rim.

Beitel, George A [Richland, WA

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Investigation of Ultrafine Particle Formation during Diesel Exhaust Dilution  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Investigation of Ultrafine Particle Formation during Diesel Exhaust Dilution ... In on-road exhaust studies with a heavy duty diesel vehicle and in laboratory studies with two gasoline-fueled passenger cars, we found that ... ... Analyses of Turbulent Flow Fields and Aerosol Dynamics of Diesel Engine Exhaust Inside Two Dilution Sampling Tunnels Using the CTAG Model ...

Ji Ping Shi; Roy M. Harrison

1999-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

196

A 0.042 mm^2 programmable biphasic stimulator for cochlear implants suitable for a large number of channels  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper presents a compact programmable biphasic stimulator for cochlear implants. By employing double-loop negative feedback, the output impedance of the current generator is increased, while maximizing the voltage compliance of the output transistor. To make the stimulator circuit compact, the stimulation current is set by scaling a reference current using a two stage binary-weighted transistor DAC (comprising a 3 bit high-voltage transistor DAC and a 4 bit low-voltage transistor DAC). With this structure the power consumption and the area of the circuit can be minimized. The proposed circuit has been implemented in AMS 0.18um high-voltage CMOS IC technology, using an active chip area of about 0.042mm^2. Measurement results show that proper charge balance of the anodic and cathodic stimulation phases is achieved and a dc blocking capacitor can be omitted. The resulting reduction in the required area makes the proposed system suitable for a large number of channels.

Ngamkham, W; Serdijn, W A; Bes, C J; Briaire, J J; Frijns, J H M

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Dried-Blood Sampling for Epstein-Barr Virus Immunoglobulin G (IgG) and IgA Serology in Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma Screening  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...paper puncher, 25-mm2 BS disks were cut. One disk...immunoblot strips containing nuclear antigens from HH514...the stability of stored BS samples on filter paper...filter paper, with its low cost, local availability...samples-either FP or BS samples-could be detected...

J. Fachiroh; P. R. Prasetyanti; D. K. Paramita; A. T. Prasetyawati; D. W. Anggrahini; S. M. Haryana; J. M. Middeldorp

2008-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

198

Coupling between the University of California, Davis, Advanced Canopy–Atmosphere–Soil Algorithm (ACASA) and MM5: Preliminary Results for July 1998 for Western North America  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The University of California, Davis, Advanced Canopy–Atmosphere–Soil Algorithm (ACASA) is coupled to the fifth-generation Pennsylvania State University–National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) Mesoscale Model (MM5) as a land surface ...

R. David Pyles; Bryan C. Weare; Kyaw Tha Paw U; William Gustafson

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Of Horseshoes and Heliotropes: Dynamics of Dust in the Encke Gap M.M. Hedmana,, J.A. Burnsb, D.P. Hamiltonc, M.R. Showalterd  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Of Horseshoes and Heliotropes: Dynamics of Dust in the Encke Gap M.M. Hedmana,, J.A. Burnsb, D demonstrates "heliotropic" behavior: its geometric center is displaced away from Saturn's center towards

Hamilton, Douglas P.

200

A Phase I Study of MM-302, a HER2-targeted Liposomal Doxorubicin, in Patients with Advanced, HER2- Positive Breast Cancer  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...of MM-302, a HER2-targeted Liposomal Doxorubicin, in Patients with Advanced, HER- Positive Breast Cancer T Wickham K Futch Merrimack Pharmmaceuticals; Merrimack Pharmaceuticals Background: Anthracyclines have been an effective backbone of breast...

T Wickham and K Futch

2012-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mm sample format" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Mesophase Formation in Heavy Oil.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Coke formation is a major problem in the petroleum industry because of its effect on liquid yield, catalyst deactivation, and fouling of reactor internals and… (more)

Bagheri, Seyed Reza

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

J.A. Leenheer & M.M. Reddy, Annals of Environmental Science / 2008, Vol 2, 11-25 www.aes.northeastern.edu, ISSN 1939-2621 11  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, including the Green River Formation oil shale, which is well known as one the world's largest potential

203

Decoupled Sampling for Graphics Pipelines  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We propose a generalized approach to decoupling shading from visibility sampling in graphics pipelines, which we call decoupled sampling. Decoupled sampling enables stochastic supersampling of motion and defocus blur at ...

Ragan-Kelley, Jonathan Millar

204

Fluid sampling apparatus and method  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Incorporation of a bellows in a sampling syringe eliminates ingress of contaminants, permits replication of amounts and compression of multiple sample injections, and enables remote sampling for off-site analysis. 3 figs.

Yeamans, D.R.

1998-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

205

The potential of hydrocarbons generation in the Chia Gara Formation at Amadia area, north of Iraq  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Sixteen rock samples of outcrop of Chia Gara Formations from the type locality area, south of Amadia, North Iraq showed evidences for hydrocarbon generation potential by...1986) which contain brazinophyte algae,

Sahar Y. Jasim

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Early Channel Evolution in the Middle Permian Brushy Canyon Formation, West Texas, USA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

measured at both locations. A total of 16 samples were collected for petrographic analysis and X-ray fluorescence (XRF) imaging. Spectacular outcrop quality makes the Middle Permian Brushy Canyon Formation in Guadalupe Mountains National Park an ideal...

Gunderson, Spencer

2011-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

207

Soil sampling kit and a method of sampling therewith  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A soil sampling device and a sample containment device for containing a soil sample is disclosed. In addition, a method for taking a soil sample using the soil sampling device and soil sample containment device to minimize the loss of any volatile organic compounds contained in the soil sample prior to analysis is disclosed. The soil sampling device comprises two close fitting, longitudinal tubular members of suitable length, the inner tube having the outward end closed. With the inner closed tube withdrawn a selected distance, the outer tube can be inserted into the ground or other similar soft material to withdraw a sample of material for examination. The inner closed end tube controls the volume of the sample taken and also serves to eject the sample. The soil sample containment device has a sealing member which is adapted to attach to an analytical apparatus which analyzes the volatile organic compounds contained in the sample. The soil sampling device in combination with the soil sample containment device allows an operator to obtain a soil sample containing volatile organic compounds and minimizing the loss of the volatile organic compounds prior to analysis of the soil sample for the volatile organic compounds. 11 figures.

Thompson, C.V.

1991-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

208

Groundwater Sampling | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Groundwater Sampling Groundwater Sampling Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Groundwater Sampling Details Activities (3) Areas (2) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Field Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Field Sampling Parent Exploration Technique: Water Sampling Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Stratigraphic/Structural: Hydrological: Water composition and source of fluids. Determination of mixing ratios between different fluid end-members. Determination of fluid recharge rates and residence times. Thermal: Water temperature. Dictionary.png Groundwater Sampling: Groundwater sampling is done to characterize the chemical, thermal, or hydrological properties of subsurface aqueous systems. Groundwater sampling

209

Water Sampling | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Water Sampling Water Sampling Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Water Sampling Details Activities (51) Areas (45) Regions (5) NEPA(2) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Field Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Field Sampling Parent Exploration Technique: Field Sampling Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Stratigraphic/Structural: Hydrological: Water composition and source of fluids Thermal: Water temperature Dictionary.png Water Sampling: Water sampling is done to characterize the chemical, thermal, or hydrological properties of a surface or subsurface aqueous system. Other definitions:Wikipedia Reegle Introduction Water sampling is done to characterize the geothermal system under investigation. A geothermal water typically has a unique chemical signature

210

THE STAR FORMATION LAW AT LOW SURFACE DENSITY  

SciTech Connect

We investigate the nature of the star formation law at low gas surface densities using a sample of 19 low surface brightness (LSB) galaxies with existing H I maps in the literature, UV imaging from the Galaxy Evolution Explorer satellite, and optical images from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. All of the LSB galaxies have (NUV - r) colors similar to those for higher surface brightness star-forming galaxies of similar luminosity indicating that their average star formation histories are not very different. Based upon four LSB galaxies with both UV and far-infrared (FIR) data, we find FIR/UV ratios significantly less than 1, implying low amounts of internal UV extinction in LSB galaxies. We use the UV images and H I maps to measure the star formation rate (SFR) and hydrogen gas surface density within the same region for all the galaxies. The LSB galaxy star formation rate surface densities lie below the extrapolation of the power law fit to the SFR surface density as a function of the total gas density for higher surface brightness galaxies. Although there is more scatter, the LSB galaxies also lie below a second version of the star formation law in which the SFR surface density is correlated with the gas density divided by the orbital time in the disk. The downturn seen in both star formation laws is consistent with theoretical models that predict lower star formation efficiencies in LSB galaxies due to the declining molecular fraction with decreasing density.

Wyder, Ted K.; Martin, D. Christopher; Barlow, Tom A.; Foster, Karl; Friedman, Peter G.; Morrissey, Patrick; Neill, James D. [California Institute of Technology, MC 278-17, 1200 E. California Blvd., Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Neff, Susan G. [Laboratory for Astronomy and Solar Physics, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD, 20771 (United States); Schiminovich, David [Department of Astronomy, Columbia University, New York, NY 10027 (United States); Seibert, Mark; Madore, Barry F. [Observatories of the Carnegie Institution of Washington, 813 Santa Barbara Street, Pasadena, CA 91101 (United States); Bianchi, Luciana [Center for Astrophysical Sciences, Johns Hopkins University, 3400 N. Charles Street, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Donas, Jose; Milliard, Bruno [Laboratoire d'Astrophysique de Marseille, BP 8, Traverse du Siphon, 13376 Marseille Cedex 12 (France); Heckman, Timothy M.; Szalay, Alex S. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Johns Hopkins University, Homewood Campus, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Lee, Young-Wook; Yi, Sukyoung K. [Center for Space Astrophysics, Yonsei University, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of); Rich, R. Michael [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States)

2009-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

211

formatting | OpenEI Community  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

formatting formatting Home Jweers's picture Submitted by Jweers(83) Contributor 7 August, 2013 - 18:23 New Robust References! citation citing developer formatting reference Semantic Mediawiki wiki Check out the new Reference Form. Adding a reference object to OpenEI using this form is the most complete way to cite a reference. After providing the name of your reference, the form will ask for your document type. Rmckeel's picture Submitted by Rmckeel(297) Contributor 25 June, 2013 - 07:39 How to create formatted blocks to hold OpenEI wiki content content formatting user interface wiki The OpenEI wiki frontpage uses "boxes" that help organize content. These boxes are frequently re-used across the site. Syndicate content 429 Throttled (bot load) Error 429 Throttled (bot load)

212

NON-DESTRUCTIVE IDENTIFICATION OF MICROMETER-SCALE MINERALS AND THEIR POSITION WITHIN A BULK SAMPLE  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...hollow brass pin (diameter 3.15 mm) that had been filled with wax. The brass pin was mounted on the sample stage of the instrument...Isenegger, A. Stampanoni, M. (2010): Image processing pipeline for synchrotron-radiation- based tomographic microscopy...

Henning O. Sørensen; Sepide S. Hakim; Stefan Pedersen; Bo C. Christiansen; Zoltan I. Balogh; Caroline P. Hem; Ivan S. Pasarin; Søren Schmidt; Ulrik L. Olsen; Jette Oddershede; Cathrine Frandsen; Robert Feidenhans’L; Susan L.S. Stipp

213

Concentric micro-nebulizer for direct sample insertion  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A concentric micro-nebulizer and method for introducing liquid samples into a plasma established in a plasma torch including a first tube connected to a source of plasma gas. The concentric micro-nebulizer has inner and outer concentric tubes extending upwardly within the torch for connection to a source of nebulizer gas and to a source of liquid solvent and to a source of sample liquid. The inner tube is connected to the source of liquid solvent and to the source of sample liquid and the outer tube is connected to the source of nebulizer gas. The outer tube has an orifice positioned slightly below the plasma when it is established, with the inner and outer tubes forming an annulus therebetween with the annular spacing between the tubes at said orifice being less than about 0.05mm. The dead volume of the inner tube is less than about 5 microliters.

Fassel, V.A.; Rice, G.W.; Lawrence, K.E.

1984-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

214

Controls on Gas Hydrate Formation and Dissociation  

SciTech Connect

The main objectives of the project were to monitor, characterize, and quantify in situ the rates of formation and dissociation of methane hydrates at and near the seafloor in the northern Gulf of Mexico, with a focus on the Bush Hill seafloor hydrate mound; to record the linkages between physical and chemical parameters of the deposits over the course of one year, by emphasizing the response of the hydrate mound to temperature and chemical perturbations; and to document the seafloor and water column environmental impacts of hydrate formation and dissociation. For these, monitoring the dynamics of gas hydrate formation and dissociation was required. The objectives were achieved by an integrated field and laboratory scientific study, particularly by monitoring in situ formation and dissociation of the outcropping gas hydrate mound and of the associated gas-rich sediments. In addition to monitoring with the MOSQUITOs, fluid flow rates and temperature, continuously sampling in situ pore fluids for the chemistry, and imaging the hydrate mound, pore fluids from cores, peepers and gas hydrate samples from the mound were as well sampled and analyzed for chemical and isotopic compositions. In order to determine the impact of gas hydrate dissociation and/or methane venting across the seafloor on the ocean and atmosphere, the overlying seawater was sampled and thoroughly analyzed chemically and for methane C isotope ratios. At Bush hill the pore fluid chemistry varies significantly over short distances as well as within some of the specific sites monitored for 440 days, and gas venting is primarily focused. The pore fluid chemistry in the tub-warm and mussel shell fields clearly documented active gas hydrate and authigenic carbonate formation during the monitoring period. The advecting fluid is depleted in sulfate, Ca Mg, and Sr and is rich in methane; at the main vent sites the fluid is methane supersaturated, thus bubble plumes form. The subsurface hydrology exhibits both up-flow and down-flow of fluid at rates that range between 0.5 to 214 cm/yr and 2-162 cm/yr, respectively. The fluid flow system at the mound and background sites are coupled having opposite polarities that oscillate episodically between 14 days to {approx}4 months. Stability calculations suggest that despite bottom water temperature fluctuations, of up to {approx}3 C, the Bush Hill gas hydrate mound is presently stable, as also corroborated by the time-lapse video camera images that did not detect change in the gas hydrate mound. As long as methane (and other hydrocarbon) continues advecting at the observed rates the mound would remain stable. The {_}{sup 13}C-DIC data suggest that crude oil instead of methane serves as the primary electron-donor and metabolic substrate for anaerobic sulfate reduction. The oil-dominated environment at Bush Hill shields some of the methane bubbles from being oxidized both anaerobically in the sediment and aerobically in the water column. Consequently, the methane flux across the seafloor is higher at Bush hill than at non-oil rich seafloor gas hydrate regions, such as at Hydrate Ridge, Cascadia. The methane flux across the ocean/atmosphere interface is as well higher. Modeling the methane flux across this interface at three bubble plumes provides values that range from 180-2000 {_}mol/m{sup 2} day; extrapolating it over the Gulf of Mexico basin utilizing satellite data is in progress.

Miriam Kastner; Ian MacDonald

2006-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

215

E-Print Network 3.0 - aged 80 and over Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Search Sample search results for: aged 80 and over Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Fra Mauro Formation,Apollo 14: 11. r - rAges of Apollo 14 Rocks F. J. stadennannl, E....

216

E-Print Network 3.0 - activite le procede Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

le procede Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: activite le procede Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Departement de formation doctorale en...

217

E-Print Network 3.0 - albumin solutions implications Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

20 l for biomarker detection, using 2D - PAGE or LCMS analysis... albumin removal. The bulk resin format does not limit the albumin depletion to a specific sample volume... ....

218

E-Print Network 3.0 - air pollution lessons Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

lessons Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: air pollution lessons Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Global Ozone Project Ozone Formation in...

219

E-Print Network 3.0 - antimicrobial hybrid peptide Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

hybrid peptide Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: antimicrobial hybrid peptide Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Pore formation by the MG-H2...

220

Gas Sampling | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Gas Sampling Gas Sampling Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Gas Sampling Details Activities (7) Areas (7) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Field Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Field Sampling Parent Exploration Technique: Field Sampling Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Stratigraphic/Structural: High flux can be indicative of conduits for fluid flow. Hydrological: Gas composition and source of fluids. Thermal: Anomalous flux is associated with active hydrothermal activity. Distinguish magmatic/mantle heat inputs. Can be used to estimate reservoir fluid temperatures. Dictionary.png Gas Sampling: Gas sampling is done to characterize the chemical, thermal, and hydrological properties of a surface or subsurface hydrothermal system.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mm sample format" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Stack sampling apparatus  

SciTech Connect

An apparatus for obtaining samples from a structure includes a support member, at least one stabilizing member, and at least one moveable member. The stabilizing member has a first portion coupled to the support member and a second portion configured to engage with the structure to restrict relative movement between the support member and the structure. The stabilizing member is radially expandable from a first configuration where the second portion does not engage with a surface of the structure to a second configuration where the second portion engages with the surface of the structure.

Lind, Randall F; Lloyd, Peter D; Love, Lonnie J; Noakes, Mark W; Pin, Francois G; Richardson, Bradley S; Rowe, John C

2014-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

222

OpenXC sample driving data | OpenEI Community  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

OpenXC sample driving data OpenXC sample driving data Home > Groups > Developer Rmckeel's picture Submitted by Rmckeel(297) Contributor 24 September, 2012 - 10:29 OpenXC This file represents raw data from OpenXC, in the form of single-vehicle trace files. This may be accessed from any programming language or existing system you want, but a Python wrapper will soon be made available and linked to OpenEI's energy hackathon resources. A description of the format for each individual measurement: http://openxcplatform.com/vehicle-interface/output-format.html A description of the trace files (including the driving.txt file), which is simple a list of individual measurements with timestamps: http://openxcplatform.com/android/testing.html Note: when this sample data forms a more complete dataset of real driving

223

Fluid sampling tool  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A fluid sampling tool is described for sampling fluid from a container. The tool has a fluid collecting portion which is drilled into the container wall, thereby affixing it to the wall. The tool may have a fluid extracting section which withdraws fluid collected by the fluid collecting section. The fluid collecting section has a fluted shank with an end configured to drill a hole into a container wall. The shank has a threaded portion for tapping the borehole. The shank is threadably engaged to a cylindrical housing having an inner axial passageway sealed at one end by a septum. A flexible member having a cylindrical portion and a bulbous portion is provided. The housing can be slid into an inner axial passageway in the cylindrical portion and sealed to the flexible member. The bulbous portion has an outer lip defining an opening. The housing is clamped into the chuck of a drill, the lip of the bulbous section is pressed against a container wall until the shank touches the wall, and the user operates the drill. Wall shavings (kerf) are confined in a chamber formed in the bulbous section as it folds when the shank advances inside the container. After sufficient advancement of the shank, an o-ring makes a seal with the container wall. 6 figs.

Garcia, A.R.; Johnston, R.G.; Martinez, R.K.

1999-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

224

DOE Regional Partnership Begins Core Sampling for Large-Volume  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Regional Partnership Begins Core Sampling for Large-Volume Regional Partnership Begins Core Sampling for Large-Volume Sequestration Test DOE Regional Partnership Begins Core Sampling for Large-Volume Sequestration Test May 22, 2009 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - The Plains CO2 Reduction (PCOR) Partnership, one of seven members of the U.S. Department of Energy's Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships program, has begun collecting core samples from a new characterization well near Spectra Energy's Fort Nelson natural gas processing plant in British Columbia, Canada. Core sampling, along with a sophisticated well logging program that the partnership is conducting, is an important step in proving the viability of carbon storage in brine-saturated formations. The Fort Nelson project is on track to become one of the first

225

DOE Regional Partnership Begins Core Sampling for Large-Volume  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Regional Partnership Begins Core Sampling for Large-Volume Regional Partnership Begins Core Sampling for Large-Volume Sequestration Test DOE Regional Partnership Begins Core Sampling for Large-Volume Sequestration Test May 22, 2009 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - The Plains CO2 Reduction (PCOR) Partnership, one of seven members of the U.S. Department of Energy's Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships program, has begun collecting core samples from a new characterization well near Spectra Energy's Fort Nelson natural gas processing plant in British Columbia, Canada. Core sampling, along with a sophisticated well logging program that the partnership is conducting, is an important step in proving the viability of carbon storage in brine-saturated formations. The Fort Nelson project is on track to become one of the first

226

Star formation trends in high-redshift galaxy surveys: the elephant or the tail?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Star formation rate and accummulated stellar mass are two fundamental physical quantities that describe the evolutionary state of a forming galaxy. Two recent attempts to determine the relationship between these quantities, by interpreting a sample of star-forming galaxies at redshift of z~4, have led to opposite conclusions. We use a model galaxy population to investigate possible causes for this discrepancy and conclude that minor errors in the conversion from observables to physical quantities can lead to major misrepresentation when applied without awareness of sample selection. We also investigate, in a general way, the physical origin of the correlation between star formation rate and stellar mass within hierarchical galaxy formation theory.

Stringer, Martin; Frenk, Carlos S; Stark, Daniel P

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Solvatochromism in a Pyridinium Cyclopentadienylide: Insights from a Sequential Car–Parrinello QM/MM and TD-DFT/Semicontinuum Approach  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In particular, the structure modeling has been carried out using a Car–Parrinello hybrid QM/MM molecular dynamics approach, while the excitation energies were computed using time dependent density functional theory. ... We also aim to investigate the contribution from solvent-induced geometry (indirect solvent effect) and the direct solvent effect on the excitation energy and to characterize the nature of the solvatochromic band. ... This takes into account the polarization of the QM region due to the instantaneous electric field generated by the atomic charges of MM atoms. ...

N. Arul Murugan

2014-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

228

Treating tar sands formations with karsted zones  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Methods for treating a tar sands formation are described herein. The tar sands formation may have one or more karsted zones. Methods may include providing heat from one or more heaters to one or more karsted zones of the tar sands formation to mobilize fluids in the formation. At least some of the mobilized fluids may be produced from the formation.

Vinegar, Harold J. (Bellaire, TX); Karanikas, John Michael (Houston, TX)

2010-03-09T23:59:59.000Z

229

Magnetic study of metamorphosed sedimentary rocks of the Hatrurim formation, Israel  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......samples 9 and 10 from the lens of bituminous carbonate (oil shale) of the Mishash formation from the Hatrurim basin; samples...very small coercive forces (5 mT). In comparison, the oil shale (A-D/4) shows homogeneous results for similar distant......

Boris Khesin; Shimon Feinstein; Yevgeny Vapnik; Sophia Itkis; Roman Leonhardt

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Formation and retention of methane in coal. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The formation and retention of methane in coalbeds was studied for ten Utah coal samples, one Colorado coal sample and eight coal samples from the Argonne Premium Coal Sample Bank.Methane gas content of the Utah and Colorado coals varied from zero to 9 cm{sup 3}/g. The Utah coals were all high volatile bituminous coals. The Colorado coal was a gassy medium volatile bituminous coal. The Argonne coals cover a range or rank from lignite to low volatile bituminous coal and were used to determine the effect of rank in laboratory studies. The methane content of six selected Utah coal seams and the Colorado coal seam was measured in situ using a special sample collection device and a bubble desorbometer. Coal samples were collected at each measurement site for laboratory analysis. The cleat and joint system was evaluated for the coal and surrounding rocks and geological conditions were noted. Permeability measurements were performed on selected samples and all samples were analyzed for proximate and ultimate analysis, petrographic analysis, {sup 13}C NMR dipolar-dephasing spectroscopy, and density analysis. The observed methane adsorption behavior was correlated with the chemical structure and physical properties of the coals.

Hucka, V.J.; Bodily, D.M.; Huang, H.

1992-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

231

SIMULATION OF THE FORMATION OF A SOLAR ACTIVE REGION  

SciTech Connect

We present a radiative magnetohydrodynamics simulation of the formation of an active region (AR) on the solar surface. The simulation models the rise of a buoyant magnetic flux bundle from a depth of 7.5 Mm in the convection zone up into the solar photosphere. The rise of the magnetic plasma in the convection zone is accompanied by predominantly horizontal expansion. Such an expansion leads to a scaling relation between the plasma density and the magnetic field strength such that B {proportional_to} rhov{sup 1/2}. The emergence of magnetic flux into the photosphere appears as a complex magnetic pattern, which results from the interaction of the rising magnetic field with the turbulent convective flows. Small-scale magnetic elements at the surface first appear, followed by their gradual coalescence into larger magnetic concentrations, which eventually results in the formation of a pair of opposite polarity spots. Although the mean flow pattern in the vicinity of the developing spots is directed radially outward, correlations between the magnetic field and velocity field fluctuations allow the spots to accumulate flux. Such correlations result from the Lorentz-force-driven, counterstreaming motion of opposite polarity fragments. The formation of the simulated AR is accompanied by transient light bridges between umbrae and umbral dots. Together with recent sunspot modeling, this work highlights the common magnetoconvective origin of umbral dots, light bridges, and penumbral filaments.

Cheung, M. C. M.; Title, A. M. [Lockheed Martin Solar and Astrophysics Laboratory, Palo Alto, CA 94304 (United States); Rempel, M. [High Altitude Observatory, NCAR, P.O. Box 3000, Boulder, CO 80307 (United States); Schuessler, M. [Max Planck Institute for Solar System Research, Katlenburg-Lindau, 37191 (Germany)

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

DILUTE SURFACTANT METHODS FOR CARBONATE FORMATIONS  

SciTech Connect

There are many carbonate reservoirs in US (and the world) with light oil and fracture pressure below its minimum miscibility pressure (or reservoir may be naturally fractured). Many carbonate reservoirs are naturally fractured. Waterflooding is effective in fractured reservoirs, if the formation is water-wet. Many fractured carbonate reservoirs, however, are mixed-wet and recoveries with conventional methods are low (less than 10%). Thermal and miscible tertiary recovery techniques are not effective in these reservoirs. Surfactant flooding (or huff-n-puff) is the only hope, yet it was developed for sandstone reservoirs in the past. The goal of this research is to evaluate dilute (hence relatively inexpensive) surfactant methods for carbonate formations and identify conditions under which they can be effective. We have acquired field oil and core samples and field brine compositions from Marathon. We have conducted preliminary adsorption and wettability studies. Addition of Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} decreases anionic surfactant adsorption on calcite surface. Receding contact angles increase with surfactant adsorption. Plans for the next quarter include conducting adsorption, phase behavior and wettability studies.

Kishore K. Mohanty

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Complete one form for each person seeking Wisconsin COMMERCIAL Pesticide Applicator Certification. Last Name First Name Middle Initial Date of Birth (mm/dd/yyyy)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Complete one form for each person seeking Wisconsin COMMERCIAL Pesticide Applicator Certification. Last Name First Name Middle Initial Date of Birth (mm/dd/yyyy) Company Name Company Unit taking the pesticide applicator certification exam. A personalized training/reference manual

Mladenoff, David

234

Use of a Genetically Enhanced, Pediocin-Producing Starter Culture, Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis MM217, To Control Listeria monocytogenes in Cheddar Cheese  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...been used in Cheddar cheese manufacturing (). The electrotransformed...strain MM210 during cheese manufacturing, indicating that the presence...thus, was not considered an additive. The use of genetically...advice on Cheddar cheese manufacturing, Al Degnan and Gene Hehl...

Nurliza Buyong; Jan Kok; John B. Luchansky

1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Characterization of hydrogen dissociation over aluminium-doped zinc oxide using an efficient massively parallel framework for QM/MM calculations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...evaluations, the new methods result in a two-level...dissociation of a hydrogen molecule over a...physisorbed atomic hydrogen. parallelization...catalysis|zinc oxide|hydrogen dissociation| 1...electronics, energy production, conversion and...user. The QM/MM method (Warshel Levitt...

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

IEEE JOURNAL OF SOLID-STATE CIRCUITS, VOL. 48, NO. 1, JANUARY 2013 229 A Modular 1 mm Die-Stacked Sensing Platform  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

IEEE JOURNAL OF SOLID-STATE CIRCUITS, VOL. 48, NO. 1, JANUARY 2013 229 A Modular 1 mm Die with compatibility to commercial C protocols. A self-adapting power management unit is proposed for efficient battery voltage down conversion for wide range of battery voltages and load current. The power man- agement unit

Dutta, Prabal

237

570 2008 IEEE International Solid-State Circuits Conference ISSCC 2008 / SESSION 31 / RF & mm-WAVE POWER AMPLIFIERS / 31.7  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

570 · 2008 IEEE International Solid-State Circuits Conference ISSCC 2008 / SESSION 31 / RF & mm supply voltages that is very useful for a low-battery-voltage solution. However, it is not compatible with the higher voltages presented by the Li-ion batteries which under charging situations can present supply

Hajimiri, Ali

238

HDPE (CM1) optical birefringence pattern in cross-slot flow, piston speed 1.76mm/s, 175C  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Rheometer (MPR4) at a piston speed of 1.76 mm/s at 175C. The geometry generates a flow field with an extensional component at the centreline. If the no slip condition at a solid surface is satisfied, the side walls are high shear rate regions...

Hassell, David

2008-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

239

HDPE (CM1) optical birefringence pattern in cross-slot flow, piston speed 0.22mm/s, 155C  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Rheometer (MPR4) at a piston speed of 0.22 mm/s at 155C. The geometry generates a flow field with an extensional component at the centreline. If the no slip condition at a solid surface is satisfied, the side walls are high shear rate regions...

Hassell, David

2008-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

240

HDPE (CM1) optical birefringence pattern in cross-slot flow, piston speed 1.76mm/s, 155C  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Rheometer (MPR4) at a piston speed of 1.76 mm/s at 155C. The geometry generates a flow field with an extensional component at the centreline. If the no slip condition at a solid surface is satisfied, the side walls are high shear rate regions...

Hassell, David

2008-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mm sample format" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

HDPE (CM1) optical birefringence pattern in cross-slot flow, piston speed 4.4mm/s, 175C  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Rheometer (MPR4) at a piston speed of 4.4 mm/s at 175C. The geometry generates a flow field with an extensional component at the centreline. If the no slip condition at a solid surface is satisfied, the side walls are high shear rate regions. The experiments...

Hassell, David

2008-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

242

HDPE (CM1) optical birefringence pattern in cross-slot flow, piston speed 1.32mm/s, 155C  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Rheometer (MPR4) at a piston speed of 1.32 mm/s at 155C. The geometry generates a flow field with an extensional component at the centreline. If the no slip condition at a solid surface is satisfied, the side walls are high shear rate regions...

Hassell, David

2008-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

243

HDPE (CM1) optical birefringence pattern in cross-slot flow, piston speed 0.88mm/s, 175C  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Rheometer (MPR4) at a piston speed of 0.88 mm/s at 175C. The geometry generates a flow field with an extensional component at the centreline. If the no slip condition at a solid surface is satisfied, the side walls are high shear rate regions...

Hassell, David

2008-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

244

HDPE (CM1) optical birefringence pattern in cross-slot flow, piston speed 2.2mm/s, 175C  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Rheometer (MPR4) at a piston speed of 2.2 mm/s at 175C. The geometry generates a flow field with an extensional component at the centreline. If the no slip condition at a solid surface is satisfied, the side walls are high shear rate regions. The experiments...

Hassell, David

2008-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

245

HDPE (CM1) optical birefringence pattern in cross-slot flow, piston speed 0.088mm/s, 175C  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Rheometer (MPR4) at a piston speed of 0.088 mm/s at 175C. The geometry generates a flow field with an extensional component at the centreline. If the no slip condition at a solid surface is satisfied, the side walls are high shear rate regions...

Hassell, David

2008-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

246

HDPE (CM1) optical birefringence pattern in cross-slot flow, piston speed 0.44mm/s, 175C  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Rheometer (MPR4) at a piston speed of 0.44 mm/s at 175C. The geometry generates a flow field with an extensional component at the centreline. If the no slip condition at a solid surface is satisfied, the side walls are high shear rate regions...

Hassell, David

2008-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

247

HDPE (CM1) optical birefringence pattern in cross-slot flow, piston speed 0.088mm/s, 155C  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Rheometer (MPR4) at a piston speed of 0.088 mm/s at 155C. The geometry generates a flow field with an extensional component at the centreline. If the no slip condition at a solid surface is satisfied, the side walls are high shear rate regions...

Hassell, David

2008-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

248

HDPE (CM1) optical birefringence pattern in cross-slot flow, piston speed 0.044mm/s, 175C  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Rheometer (MPR4) at a piston speed of 0.044 mm/s at 175C. The geometry generates a flow field with an extensional component at the centreline. If the no slip condition at a solid surface is satisfied, the side walls are high shear rate regions...

Hassell, David

2008-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

249

HDPE (CM1) optical birefringence pattern in cross-slot flow, piston speed 2.2mm/s, 155C  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Rheometer (MPR4) at a piston speed of 2.2 mm/s at 155C. The geometry generates a flow field with an extensional component at the centreline. If the no slip condition at a solid surface is satisfied, the side walls are high shear rate regions. The experiments...

Hassell, David

2008-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

250

HDPE (CM1) optical birefringence pattern in cross-slot flow, piston speed 2.64mm/s, 175C  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Rheometer (MPR4) at a piston speed of 2.64 mm/s at 175C. The geometry generates a flow field with an extensional component at the centreline. If the no slip condition at a solid surface is satisfied, the side walls are high shear rate regions...

Hassell, David

2008-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

251

HDPE (CM1) optical birefringence pattern in cross-slot flow, piston speed 1.32mm/s, 175C  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Rheometer (MPR4) at a piston speed of 1.32 mm/s at 175C. The geometry generates a flow field with an extensional component at the centreline. If the no slip condition at a solid surface is satisfied, the side walls are high shear rate regions...

Hassell, David

2008-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

252

HDPE (CM1) optical birefringence pattern in cross-slot flow, piston speed 0.88mm/s, 155C  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Rheometer (MPR4) at a piston speed of 0.88 mm/s at 155C. The geometry generates a flow field with an extensional component at the centreline. If the no slip condition at a solid surface is satisfied, the side walls are high shear rate regions...

Hassell, David

2008-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

253

HDPE (CM1) optical birefringence pattern in cross-slot flow, piston speed 0.044mm/s, 155C  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Rheometer (MPR4) at a piston speed of 0.044 mm/s at 155C. The geometry generates a flow field with an extensional component at the centreline. If the no slip condition at a solid surface is satisfied, the side walls are high shear rate regions...

Hassell, David

2008-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

254

HDPE (CM1) optical birefringence pattern in cross-slot flow, piston speed 0.44mm/s, 155C  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Rheometer (MPR4) at a piston speed of 0.44 mm/s at 155C. The geometry generates a flow field with an extensional component at the centreline. If the no slip condition at a solid surface is satisfied, the side walls are high shear rate regions...

Hassell, David

2008-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

255

HDPE (CM1) optical birefringence pattern in cross-slot flow, piston speed 0.22mm/s, 175C  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Rheometer (MPR4) at a piston speed of 0.22 mm/s at 175C. The geometry generates a flow field with an extensional component at the centreline. If the no slip condition at a solid surface is satisfied, the side walls are high shear rate regions...

Hassell, David

2008-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

256

July 1, 1997 / Vol. 22, No. 13 / OPTICS LETTERS 991 Passively Q-switched 1.34-mm Nd:YVO4 microchip laser with  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-pumped 1.34-mm Nd:YVO4 microchip laser. We achieved single- frequency, 230-ps pulses by using an InGaAsP Nd:YVO4 microchip laser that uses InGaAsP semiconductor saturable- absorber mirrors (SESAM's).1 ­ 3 mode spacing exceeds the gain bandwidth. In addition, a short absorption length is needed for efficient

Keller, Ursula

257

Kernel density in the use of the strong stability method to evaluate the proximity of G/M/1 and M/M/1 systems  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Bouallouche [3] has applied the strong stability method to study the proximity of the G/M/1 and M/M/1 systems when the general distribution of arrivals G is assumed to be hyper-exponantial. In this paper, we show the applicability of the strong stability ... Keywords: approximation, bandwidth, boundary effects, kernel density, queueing systems, strnog stability

Aïcha Bareche; Djamil Aïssani

2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Tank 241-SY-102 January 2000 Compatibility Grab Samples Analytical Results for the Final Report [SEC 1 and 2  

SciTech Connect

This document is the format IV, final report for the tank 241-SY-102 (SY-102) grab samples taken in January 2000 to address waste compatibility concerns. Chemical, radiochemical, and physical analyses on the tank SY-102 samples were performed as directed in Comparability Grab Sampling and Analysis Plan for Fiscal Year 2000 (Sasaki 1999). No notification limits were exceeded. Preliminary data on samples 2SY-99-5, -6, and -7 were reported in ''Format II Report on Tank 241-SY-102 Waste Compatibility Grab Samples Taken in January 2000'' (Lockrem 2000). The data presented here represent the final results.

BELL, K.E.

2000-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

259

Friction Factor Measurement, Analysis, and Modeling for Flat-Plates with 12.15 mm Diameter Hole-Pattern, Tested with Air at Different Clearances, Inlet Pressures, and Pressure Ratios  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and 2 (hd = 2.9 mm, Cpl = 0.254 mm, Pin = 84 bar, Re= 32500 (maximum)) .................................................................. 76 Figure 50. Dynamic pressure at locations 3 and 4 (hd = 2.9 mm, Cpl = 0.254 mm, Pin = 84 bar, Re= 32500...)) .................................................................................................... 79 Figure 52. Dynamic pressure looked separately at location 1 and 2 ................................ 80 Figure 53. Dynamic pressure looked separately at location 3 and 4 ................................ 81 Figure 54. Dynamic pressure data (hd = 0...

Deva Asirvatham, Thanesh

2011-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

260

Quantum Metropolis Sampling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The original motivation to build a quantum computer came from Feynman who envisaged a machine capable of simulating generic quantum mechanical systems, a task that is believed to be intractable for classical computers. Such a machine would have a wide range of applications in the simulation of many-body quantum physics, including condensed matter physics, chemistry, and high energy physics. Part of Feynman's challenge was met by Lloyd who showed how to approximately decompose the time-evolution operator of interacting quantum particles into a short sequence of elementary gates, suitable for operation on a quantum computer. However, this left open the problem of how to simulate the equilibrium and static properties of quantum systems. This requires the preparation of ground and Gibbs states on a quantum computer. For classical systems, this problem is solved by the ubiquitous Metropolis algorithm, a method that basically acquired a monopoly for the simulation of interacting particles. Here, we demonstrate how to implement a quantum version of the Metropolis algorithm on a quantum computer. This algorithm permits to sample directly from the eigenstates of the Hamiltonian and thus evades the sign problem present in classical simulations. A small scale implementation of this algorithm can already be achieved with today's technology

K. Temme; T. J. Osborne; K. G. Vollbrecht; D. Poulin; F. Verstraete

2009-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mm sample format" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Sample Environment | ORNL Neutron Sciences  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Home › Instruments › SNS › Sample Environment Home › Instruments › SNS › Sample Environment Sample Environment The Sample Environment Group provides equipment and support for studying materials under controlled conditions (temperature, pressure, magnetic field, chemical environment, etc.). When you come to SNS to conduct an experiment, our front-line teams are there to support you. Although we currently offer a wide range of capabilities, we realize that these capabilities must continually grow. Therefore, we also have a busy research and development team, and we encourage you to partner with them to develop new equipment and techniques. The Sample Environment Equipment Database allows you to search for information about the sample environment equipment available for HFIR and SNS instruments. It will be available in the near future for SNS sample

262

Rock Sampling | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Rock Sampling Rock Sampling Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Rock Sampling Details Activities (13) Areas (13) Regions (1) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Field Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Field Sampling Parent Exploration Technique: Field Sampling Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Rock samples are used to define lithology. Field and lab analyses can be used to measure the chemical and isotopic constituents of rock samples. Stratigraphic/Structural: Provides information about the time and environment which formed a particular geologic unit. Microscopic rock textures can be used to estimate the history of stress and strain, and/or faulting. Hydrological: Isotope geochemistry can reveal fluid circulation of a geothermal system.

263

Soil Sampling | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Soil Sampling Soil Sampling Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Soil Sampling Details Activities (10) Areas (9) Regions (1) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Field Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Field Sampling Parent Exploration Technique: Field Sampling Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Stratigraphic/Structural: Can reveal relatively high permeability zones Hydrological: Thermal: Used to locate active hydrothermal systems Dictionary.png Soil Sampling: Soil sampling is a method that can be used for exploration of geothermal resources that lack obvious surface manifestations. Soils that are above or adjacent to a "hidden" hydrothermal system will have a unique chemistry that can be indicative of a hydrothermal system at depth and a zone of

264

Metamorphic evidence for rapid (2 mm/yr) uplift of a portion of the Central Gneiss Complex, Coast Mountains, B.C.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Perkins & Newton (1981) and the composition data for sample C2U (Table 1), the reaction for this sample would pass through...from the pure Mg system; the Mn content of the garnet sample C2U exceedsthe limit recom-mended by Perkins & Newton for use of...

L. S. Hollister

265

DOE Buildings Performance Database, sample Residential data | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Buildings Performance Database, sample Residential data Buildings Performance Database, sample Residential data Dataset Summary Description This is a non-proprietary subset of DOE's Buildings Performance Database. Buildings from the cities of Dayton, OH and Gainesville, FL areas are provided as an example of the data in full database. Sample data here is formatted as CSV The Buildings Performance Database will have an API that allows access to the statistics about the data without exposing private information about individual buildings. The data available in this sample is limited due to the nature of the original datasets; the Buildings Performance database combines data from multiple sources to improve overall robustness. Data fields stored in the database can be seen in the BPD taxonomy: http://www1.eere.energy.gov/buildings/buildingsperformance/taxonomy.html

266

Brine Sampling and Evaluation Program, 1991 report  

SciTech Connect

The data presented in this report are the result of Brine Sampling and Evaluation Program (BSEP) activities at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plan (WIPP) during 1991. These BSEP activities document and investigate the origins, hydraulic characteristics, extent, and composition of brine occurrences in the Permian Salado Formation and seepage of that brine into the excavations at the WIPP. When excavations began at the WIPP in 1982, small brine seepages (weeps) were observed on the walls. Brine studies began as part of the Site Validation Program and were formalized as a program in its own right in 1985. During nine years of observations (1982--1991), evidence has mounted that the amount of brine seeping into the WIPP excavations is limited, local, and only a small fraction of that required to produce hydrogen gas by corroding the metal in the waste drums and waste inventory. The data through 1990 is discussed in detail and summarized by Deal and others (1991). The data presented in this report describes progress made during the calendar year 1991 and focuses on four major areas: (1) quantification of the amount of brine seeping across vertical surfaces in the WIPP excavations (brine ``weeps); (2) monitoring of brine inflow, e.g., measuring brines recovered from holes drilled downward from the underground drifts (downholes), upward from the underground drifts (upholes), and from subhorizontal holes; (3) further characterization of brine geochemistry; and (4) preliminary quantification of the amount of brine that might be released by squeezing the underconsolidated clays present in the Salado Formation.

Deal, D.E.; Abitz, R.J.; Myers, J.; Martin, M.L.; Milligan, D.J.; Sobocinski, R.W.; Lipponer, P.P.J. [International Technology Corp., Albuquerque, NM (United States)] [International Technology Corp., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Belski, D.S. [Westinghouse Electric Corp., Carlsbad, NM (United States). Waste Isolation Div.] [Westinghouse Electric Corp., Carlsbad, NM (United States). Waste Isolation Div.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

The Era of Star Formation in Galaxy Clusters  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We analyze the star formation properties of 16 infrared-selected, spectroscopically confirmed galaxy clusters at $1 1.35$. Using infrared luminosities measured with deep Spitzer/MIPS observations at 24 $\\mu$m, along with robust optical+IRAC photometric redshifts and SED-fitted stellar masses, we present the dust-obscured star-forming fractions, star formation rates and specific star formation rates in these clusters as functions of redshift and projected clustercentric radius. We find that $z\\sim 1.4$ represents a transition redshift for the ISCS sample, with clear evidence of an unquenched era of cluster star formation at earlier times. Beyond this redshift the fraction of star-forming cluster members increases monotonically toward the cluster centers. Indeed, the specific star formation rate in the cores of these distant clusters is consistent with field values at similar redshifts, indicating that at $z>1.4$ environment-dependent quenching had not yet been established in ISCS clusters. Combining these obse...

Brodwin, M; Gonzalez, Anthony H; Zeimann, G R; Snyder, G F; Mancone, C L; Pope, A; Eisenhardt, P R; Stern, D; Alberts, S; Ashby, M L N; Brown, M J I; Chary, R -R; Dey, Arjun; Galametz, A; Gettings, D P; Jannuzi, B T; Miller, E D; Moustakas, J; Moustakas, L A

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Measurement of Boundary-Layer Temperature Profiles by a Scanning 5-MM Radiometer During the 1999 Winter NSA/AAO Radiometer Exp  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Boundary-Layer Temperature Profiles by Boundary-Layer Temperature Profiles by a Scanning 5-MM Radiometer During the 1999 Winter NSA/AAO Radiometer Experiment and WVIOP 2000 V. Y. Leuski and E. R. Westwater Cooperative Institute for Research in the Environmental Sciences National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Environmental Technology Laboratory University of Colorado Boulder, Colorado Introduction A scanning 5-mm-wavelength radiometer was deployed during two Intensive Operational Periods (IOPs) at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program's Cloud and Radiation Testbed (CART) facilities. The first was conducted at the North Slope of Alaska (NSA) and Adjacent arctic Ocean (AAO) site near Barrow, Alaska, during March 1999. One goal was to evaluate the ability of an

269

Verification of the Astrometric Performance of the Korean VLBI Network, using comparative SFPR studies with the VLBA at 14/7 mm  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Korean VLBI Network (KVN) is a new mm-VLBI dedicated array with capability for simultaneous observations at multiple frequencies, up to 129 GHz. The innovative multi-channel receivers present significant benefits for astrometric measurements in the frequency domain. The aim of this work is to verify the astrometric performance of the KVN using a comparative study with the VLBA, a well established instrument. For that purpose, we carried out nearly contemporaneous observations with the KVN and the VLBA, at 14/7 mm, in April 2013. The KVN observations consisted of simultaneous dual frequency observations, while the VLBA used fast frequency switching observations. We used the Source Frequency Phase Referencing technique for the observational and analysis strategy. We find that having simultaneous observations results in a superior performance for compensation of all atmospheric terms in the observables, in addition to offering other significant benefits for astrometric analysis. We have compared the KVN astr...

Rioja, Mar\\'\\ia J; Jung, TaeHyun; Sohn, Bong Won; Byun, Do-Young; Agudo, Iván; Cho, Se-Hyung; Lee, Sang-Sung; Kim, Jongsoo; Kim, Kee-Tae; Oh, Chung Sik; Han, Seog-Tae; Je, Do-Heung; Chung, Moon-Hee; Wi, Seog-Oh; Kang, Jiman; Lee, Jung-Won; Chung, Hyunsoo; Kim, Hyo Ryoung; Kim, Hyun-Goo; Lee, Chang-Hoon; Roh, Duk-Gyoo; Oh, Se-Jin; Yeom, Jae-Hwan; Song, Min-Gyu; Kang, Yong-Woo

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Comparación entre cirugía retrógrada intrarrenal y litotricia extracorpórea para el tratamiento de la litiasis de polo inferior renal de hasta 15 mm. Estudio prospectivo aleatorizado  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

ResumenIntroducción La litrotricia extracorpórea (LEC) es el tratamiento más recomendado para la litiasis renal menor de 2 cm. Sin embargo, las bajas tasas libre de cálculos (SFR) en litiasis de polo renal inferior hace plantear nuevas técnicas que ofrezcan mejores resultados, como la cirugía intrarrenal retrógrada (CRIR). Objetivo Comparar la eficacia del tratamiento con LEC vs la CRIR en términos de SFR postratamiento en pacientes con litiasis renal de polo inferior de menos de 15 mm. Material y métodos Se realizó un estudio prospectivo aleatorizado para evaluar los resultados de LEC y CRIR en pacientes portadores de litiasis renal de polo inferior menor a 15 mm. De un total de 55 pacientes en 31 se realizaron LEC (grupo 1) y 24 CRIR (grupo 2). Se evaluó el tamaño de la litiasis, lateralidad, tiempo operatorio, complicaciones de las técnicas según escala de Clavien, SFR y litiasis residuales a los 2 meses evaluado por tomografía computarizada de abdomen y pelvis sin contraste. Se realizó análisis estadístico para comparar las variables utilizando el programa Stata 11. Resultados Los grupos no mostraron diferencias significativas en sus características generales, a excepción del tiempo operatorio (mayor para CRIR). CRIR mostró tener mayor proporción de SFR y de litiasis menor de 3 mm. Además CRIR mostró menor tasa de litiasis clínicamente significativa, siendo esta asociación estadísticamente significativa (0% vs 42,3%; p  3 mm (0% vs. 58.8%), being statistically significant (P < .05). Clavien III or higher complications were not reported in any of the groups. Conclusions In the treatment of lower pole stone RIRS has the same results than ESWL in terms of SFR. Regard

R.M. Vilches; A. Aliaga; D. Reyes; F. Sepulveda; A. Mercado; F. Moya; R. Ledezma; J.P. Hidalgo; T. Olmedo; F. Marchant

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Sample page | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Sample page Sample page Jump to: navigation, search This page has been rated 13[1][2] on the scale of awesomness. This page is awesome! The above text is generated by the SampleTemplate. Try editing it and changing the level of awesomeness to see the template react. Hint: It says something different depending on whether or not the page is at least 5 awesome. This page is related to the following topics[3][4]: References Sample pages Help pages Additional Info Name Sample page Awesomeness 13 Topics (raw) References; Sample pages; Help pages; References ↑ Francis C. Monastero. 2002. An overview of industry-military cooperation in the development of power operations at the Coso geothermal field in southern California. GRC Bulletin. . ↑ EPRI. 12/12/2012. Assessment and Mapping of the Riverine

272

Method to inhibit deposit formation  

SciTech Connect

A process is described for inhibiting deposit formation on the contact surfaces of structures confining heated hydrocarbon fluid which exhibits substantial fouling. The process consists of introducing into the hydrocarbon fluid at least an inhibiting amount of thiophene-containing polycondensed aromatic/naphthenic compounds of number average molecular weight (M-bar n) from 200 to 1,000.

Dickakian, G.B.

1986-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

273

Plasma Rotation during Spheromak Formation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We observe Doppler shifts of a CIII impurity line in a spheromak plasma showing toroidal rotation during the formation phase of the spheromak configuration but not during the equilibrium or decay phase. The evolution of the velocity fields is consistent with the estimated rate of cross-helicity decay given the viscosity and resistivity of the plasma.

T. Peyser and G. C. Goldenbaum

1988-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

274

Cloud Formation, Evolution and Destruction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Chapter 4 Cloud Formation, Evolution and Destruction We now begin to trace the journey towards a star. How long does this take? The answer is surprisingly short: a good many clouds already contain new stars and these stars tend to be young. The typical cloud cannot spend long, if any time at all

Estalella, Robert

275

Method of protecting a permeable formation  

SciTech Connect

This patent describes a method of drilling a well bore through subsurface formations including a permeable formation. It comprises: drilling a well bore through the permeable formation to at least the lower boundary thereof; filling the bore in the permeable formation with liquid composition capable of gelling, the liquid composition containing a gel breaker; allowing the gel to mature; drilling through the gel so as to open the well bore in the permeable formation, some of the gel remaining to plug the permeable formation in the well bore; installing a casing in the well bore in the permeable formation; and allowing the remaining gel to revert to a liquid.

Falk, D.O.

1990-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

276

Method of fracturing a geological formation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved method of fracturing a geological formation surrounding a well bore is disclosed. A relatively small explosive charge is emplaced in a well bore and the bore is subsequently hydraulically pressurized to a pressure less than the formation breakdown pressure and preferably greater than the fracture propagation pressure of the formation. The charge is denoted while the bore is so pressurized, resulting in the formation of multiple fractures in the surrounding formation with little or no accompanying formation damage. Subsequent hydraulic pressurization can be used to propagate and extend the fractures in a conventional manner. The method is useful for stimulating production of oil, gas and possibly water from suitable geologic formations.

Johnson, James O. (2679-B Walnut, Los Alamos, NM 87544)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Effect of silica sand size on the formation kinetics of CO2 hydrate in porous media in the presence of pure water and seawater relevant for CO2 sequestration  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Understanding the kinetics of carbon dioxide (CO2) hydrate formation in pure water, seawater and porous media aids in developing technologies for CO2 gas storage, carbon capture and sequestration (CCS) and potentially for methane production from methane hydrates. The present work is focused on understanding the kinetics of CO2 hydrate formation in pure water and seawater at an initial formation pressure of 6 MPa (providing a driving force of about 4.0 MPa) and a formation temperature of 276.15 K with 75% water saturation in three silica sand particle sizes (0.16 mm, 0.46 mm and 0.92 mm). The seawater (3.3 wt% salinity) used in the present study is obtained from sea coast of Chennai (India). It is observed that the gas consumption of CO2 in hydrate is more for smaller silica sand particle and decreases as the size of the sand increases. The total gas consumed at the end of the seawater experiment is found to be less than the gas consumed at the end of the pure water experiment. This is due to the fact that salts in seawater act as a thermodynamic inhibitor resulting in lower gas consumption of CO2 in hydrate. The average rate of hydrate formation observed is optimum in 0.46 mm particles and is observed to be higher as compared to 0.16 and 0.92 mm particles over 10 h experimental time. This indicates that 0.46 mm silica sand provides an optimum environment for efficient hydrate formation. The study can be useful to understand the suitability of potential sandstone reservoir for CO2 sequestration in the form of hydrate in the presence of saline formation water.

Prathyusha Mekala; Marc Busch; Deepjyoti Mech; Rachit S. Patel; Jitendra S. Sangwai

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

A MID-INFRARED CENSUS OF STAR FORMATION ACTIVITY IN BOLOCAM GALACTIC PLANE SURVEY SOURCES  

SciTech Connect

We present the results of a search for mid-infrared signs of star formation activity in the 1.1 mm sources in the Bolocam Galactic Plane Survey (BGPS). We have correlated the BGPS catalog with available mid-IR Galactic plane catalogs based on the Spitzer Space Telescope GLIMPSE legacy survey and the Midcourse Space Experiment (MSX) Galactic plane survey. We find that 44% (3712 of 8358) of the BGPS sources contain at least one mid-IR source, including 2457 of 5067 (49%) within the area where all surveys overlap (10 deg. < l < 65 deg.). Accounting for chance alignments between the BGPS and mid-IR sources, we conservatively estimate that 20% of the BPGS sources within the area where all surveys overlap show signs of active star formation. We separate the BGPS sources into four groups based on their probability of star formation activity. Extended Green Objects and Red MSX Sources make up the highest probability group, while the lowest probability group is comprised of 'starless' BGPS sources which were not matched to any mid-IR sources. The mean 1.1 mm flux of each group increases with increasing probability of active star formation. We also find that the 'starless' BGPS sources are the most compact, while the sources with the highest probability of star formation activity are on average more extended with large skirts of emission. A subsample of 280 BGPS sources with known distances demonstrates that mass and mean H{sub 2} column density also increase with probability of star formation activity.

Dunham, Miranda K. [Department of Astronomy, Yale University, P.O. Box 208101, New Haven, CT 06520-8101 (United States); Robitaille, Thomas P.; Evans, Neal J. II [Department of Astronomy, University of Texas at Austin, 1 University Station C1400, Austin, Texas 78712-0259 (United States); Schlingman, Wayne M. [Steward Observatory, University of Arizona, 933 North Cherry Ave., Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Cyganowski, Claudia J. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Urquhart, James, E-mail: miranda.dunham@yale.edu [Australia Telescope National Facility, CSIRO Astronomy and Space Science, P.O. Box 76, Epping, NSW 1710 (Australia)

2011-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

279

Adaptive Sampling for Environmental Robotics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

186, 2003. S. Thrun, “Robotics Mapping: A survey”, Exploringtechnique to environmental robotics applications includingSampling for Environmental Robotics Mohammad Rahimi †,‡‡ ,

Mohammad Rahimi; Richard Pon; Deborah Estrin; William J. Kaiser; Mani Srivastava; Gaurav S. Sukhatme

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Sample Residential Program Term Sheet  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

A sample for defining and elaborating on the specifics of a clean energy loan program. Author: U.S. Department of Energy

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mm sample format" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Defining And Characterizing Sample Representativeness For DWPF Melter Feed Samples  

SciTech Connect

Representative sampling is important throughout the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) process, and the demonstrated success of the DWPF process to achieve glass product quality over the past two decades is a direct result of the quality of information obtained from the process. The objective of this report was to present sampling methods that the Savannah River Site (SRS) used to qualify waste being dispositioned at the DWPF. The goal was to emphasize the methodology, not a list of outcomes from those studies. This methodology includes proven methods for taking representative samples, the use of controlled analytical methods, and data interpretation and reporting that considers the uncertainty of all error sources. Numerous sampling studies were conducted during the development of the DWPF process and still continue to be performed in order to evaluate options for process improvement. Study designs were based on use of statistical tools applicable to the determination of uncertainties associated with the data needs. Successful designs are apt to be repeated, so this report chose only to include prototypic case studies that typify the characteristics of frequently used designs. Case studies have been presented for studying in-tank homogeneity, evaluating the suitability of sampler systems, determining factors that affect mixing and sampling, comparing the final waste glass product chemical composition and durability to that of the glass pour stream sample and other samples from process vessels, and assessing the uniformity of the chemical composition in the waste glass product. Many of these studies efficiently addressed more than one of these areas of concern associated with demonstrating sample representativeness and provide examples of statistical tools in use for DWPF. The time when many of these designs were implemented was in an age when the sampling ideas of Pierre Gy were not as widespread as they are today. Nonetheless, the engineers and statisticians used carefully thought out designs that systematically and economically provided plans for data collection from the DWPF process. Key shared features of the sampling designs used at DWPF and the Gy sampling methodology were the specification of a standard for sample representativeness, an investigation that produced data from the process to study the sampling function, and a decision framework used to assess whether the specification was met based on the data. Without going into detail with regard to the seven errors identified by Pierre Gy, as excellent summaries are readily available such as Pitard [1989] and Smith [2001], SRS engineers understood, for example, that samplers can be biased (Gy?s extraction error), and developed plans to mitigate those biases. Experiments that compared installed samplers with more representative samples obtained directly from the tank may not have resulted in systematically partitioning sampling errors into the now well-known error categories of Gy, but did provide overall information on the suitability of sampling systems. Most of the designs in this report are related to the DWPF vessels, not the large SRS Tank Farm tanks. Samples from the DWPF Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME), which contains the feed to the DWPF melter, are characterized using standardized analytical methods with known uncertainty. The analytical error is combined with the established error from sampling and processing in DWPF to determine the melter feed composition. This composition is used with the known uncertainty of the models in the Product Composition Control System (PCCS) to ensure that the wasteform that is produced is comfortably within the acceptable processing and product performance region. Having the advantage of many years of processing that meets the waste glass product acceptance criteria, the DWPF process has provided a considerable amount of data about itself in addition to the data from many special studies. Demonstrating representative sampling directly from the large Tank Farm tanks is a difficult, if not unsolvable enterprise due to li

Shine, E. P.; Poirier, M. R.

2013-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

282

Tank 241-AP-103 08/1999 Compatibility Grab Samples and Analytical Results for the Final Report  

SciTech Connect

This document is the format IV, final report for the tank 241-AP-103 (AP-103) grab samples taken in August 1999 to address waste compatibility concerns. Chemical, radiochemical, and physical analyses on the tank AP-103 samples were performed as directed in ''Compatibility Grub Sampling and Analysis Plan for Fiscal Year 1999'' (Sasaki 1999a). Any deviations from the instructions provided in the tank sampling and analysis plan (TSAP) were discussed in this narrative. No notification limits were exceeded.

BELL, K.E.

1999-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

283

Field Sampling | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

form form View source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Field Sampling Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Field Sampling Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Field Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Field Sampling Parent Exploration Technique: Field Techniques Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Rock samples are used to define lithology. Field and lab analyses can be used to measure the chemical and isotopic constituents of rock samples. Stratigraphic/Structural: Can reveal relatively high permeability zones. Provides information about the time and environment which formed a particular geologic unit. Microscopic rock textures can be used to estimate the history of stress and strain, and/or faulting.

284

Help:Formatting | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Formatting Formatting Jump to: navigation, search You can format your text using wiki markup. This consists of normal characters like asterisks, single quotes or equation marks which have a special function in the wiki, sometimes depending on their position. For example, to format a word in italic, you include it in two single quotes like ''this'' Contents 1 Text formatting markup 2 Paragraphs 3 HTML 4 Other formatting Text formatting markup Description You type You get character formatting - applies anywhere Italic text ''italic'' italic Bold text '''bold''' bold Bold and italic '''''bold & italic''''' bold & italic Escape wiki markup no ''markup'' no ''markup'' section formatting - only at the beginning of the line Headings of different levels

285

Notices Accessible Format: Individuals with  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

472 Federal Register 472 Federal Register / Vol. 77, No. 83 / Monday, April 30, 2012 / Notices Accessible Format: Individuals with disabilities can obtain this document in an accessible format (e.g., braille, large print, audiotape, or computer diskette) on request to the program contact person listed under FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT. Electronic Access to This Document: The official version of this document is the document published in the Federal Register. Free Internet access to the official edition of the Federal Register and the Code of Federal Regulations is available via the Federal Digital System at: www.gpo.gov/fdsys. At this site you can view this document, as well as all other documents of this Department published in the Federal Register, in text or Adobe Portable Document

286

Formation control for cooperative surveillance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

>>> >>>> >>> >>>> >>>> >>> >>>> >>> >>>: _xi = vi cos i cos`i _yi = vi sin i cos`i _zi = vi sinfii _ i = !i _`i = ?i _vi = ui (2.10) Formation Constraints can be deflned by Qi = [r?i]I ?[bi]I = 0 and formation errors are represented byEi = [ri]I?[r?i]I. Let us deflne the error vector... velocity of the second virtual agent was determined 24 from Eq.(2.17). Also, Fig.6 shows that all errors are stabilized exponentially by the controllers ui in Eq.(2.9). The ith row in Fig.6 shows the errors between [ri]I and [r?i]I. The convergence rate...

Woo, Sang-Bum

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

287

E-Print Network 3.0 - aerial hypha formation Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

University of Exeter Collection: Biology and Medicine 4 Number 50, 2003 17 Different cell types in Neurospora crassa Summary: other fusion or trunk hyphae and anastomosing with...

288

E-Print Network 3.0 - artemisinin-induced radical formation Sample...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Study of Radical and Neutral Intermediates of Artemisinin Decomposition Mirian S. C. Pereira, Rudolf Kiralj, and Marcia M. C. Ferreira* Summary: -catalyzed reduction of the...

289

E-Print Network 3.0 - aspect pattern formation Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

0103-9741 Monografias em Cincia da Computao Summary: -9741 Editor: Prof. Carlos Jos Pereira de Lucena October, 2005 Aspect-Oriented Composition of Design Patterns... , namely...

290

E-Print Network 3.0 - aerosol particle formation Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of aerosol over many orders-of-magnitude of particle size range, from subcritical clusters on the molecular... of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC02-98CH10886....

291

Elemental analysis of Edwards Formation flint: a comparison of sample areas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Georgetown Elemental Concentrations Rock 1 Rock 2 Rock 3 Rock 4 Rock 5 Rock 6 Conc. 4. 84 5. 23 6. 22 7. 81 1. 01 1. 10 . 78 3. 00 2. 91 1. 34 1 a7 5. 24 5. 88 1. 83 1. 23 1. 24 7 . 68 2. 12 2. 34 1. 07 1. 18 A~v 6. 02 . 96 2. 20 4... 1810 1404 Al A~v 1663 1454 1304 1196 1878 1586 Aopendix I. (Continued) Rock 7 Rock 8 Rock 9 Rock 10 Rock 11 Rock 12 Conc. 2. 39 2. 24 1. 12 1. 45 1. 77 1. 84 2. 05 1. 21 1. 12 1. 00 1. 42 . 92 . 68 1. 77 2. 08 1. 80 l. 09 l...

McGinley, Ann Neil

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

292

E-Print Network 3.0 - antihydrogen formation dynamics Sample...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of - Department of Physics, Non-Neutral Plasma Project Collection: Plasma Physics and Fusion 25 Production of Cold Antihydrogen during the Positron Cooling of Antiprotons...

293

E-Print Network 3.0 - atherosclerotic plaque formation Sample...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Collection: Biology and Medicine 93 --H.U. Lemke, M.W. Vannier, Inamura, A.G. Farman, & J.H.C. Reiber (Editors) Summary: growth atherosclerotic plaques. Time-dependent...

294

E-Print Network 3.0 - assessment item format Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NJ... at 50 ms( s) Loss concentrated at midplane v Action Items Calculate power density of prompt loss Source: Fusiongnition Research Experiment (FIRE) Collection: Plasma...

295

E-Print Network 3.0 - atherosclerotic lesion formation Sample...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Department of Biomedical Engineering, Laboratory for Bionanotechnology and Nanomedicine Collection: Biology and Medicine 23 B e t w e e n B e d s i d e an d B e n c h...

296

E-Print Network 3.0 - abscess formation mimicking Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Collection: Biology and Medicine ; Environmental Sciences and Ecology 57 Uricase for gout treatment Chapter 5.1 Summary: cause lesions mimicking malignancy, purulent abscesses,...

297

E-Print Network 3.0 - amorphous phase formation Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mathematics 4 Influence of the synthesis conditions on the anatase-rutile phase transition of TiO2 Summary: obtained at 400 C, so that probably the amorphous structure is a...

298

E-Print Network 3.0 - aberrant crypt formation Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

aberrant crypts, by elimination of cells. Scand J Gastroenterol xxxx Background: Polyethylene glycol (PEG... from precancerous lesions. Key words: aberrant-crypt-foci, ACF, ......

299

E-Print Network 3.0 - atane formation cretaceous Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Kidd, William S. F. - Department of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences, State University of New York at Albany; UCLA, Ion Microprobe Facility Collection: Geosciences 58 Mammalian...

300

E-Print Network 3.0 - abanico formation andes Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Department of Atmospheric and Environmental Sciences, State University of New York at Albany Collection: Environmental Sciences and Ecology ; Geosciences 31 UNIVERSITE DE TOULOUSE...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mm sample format" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

E-Print Network 3.0 - aortic aneurysm formation Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Source: Papaharilaou, Yannis - Institute of Applied and Computational Mathematics, Foundation of Research and Technology, Hellas Collection: Computer Technologies and Information...

302

E-Print Network 3.0 - aberration formation interaction Sample...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

University of Rochester Collection: Engineering 46 Modeling Measuring and Correcting the LCA of theModeling Measuring and Correcting the LCA of the Human EyeHuman Eye Summary: be...

303

E-Print Network 3.0 - avoiding by-product formation Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

78 By-Products Utilization Summary: Center for By-Products Utilization ECONOMICAL SELF-CONSOLIDATING CONCRETE FOR THE WISCONSIN... production using by-product materials to...

304

E-Print Network 3.0 - acceptor center formation Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

to Measure Clustering of Ligand-Receptor Summary: ,z Ammasi Periasamy,*y and Margarida Barroso* *Department of Biology; y W. M. Keck Center for Cellular... on donor and acceptor...

305

E-Print Network 3.0 - alveolar bone formation Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sutures to Deciduous Dentition in Nonhuman Primates K... .D., E.R. Dumont, Ph.D., T.D. Smith, Ph.D. Objective: The relationship of the human premaxillary bone Source: Dumont,...

306

Sample-based collection and adjustment algorithm for metadata extraction parameter of flexible format document  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We propose an algorithm for automatically generating metadata extraction parameters. It first enumerates candidates on the basis of metadata occurrence in training documents, and then examines these candidates to avoid side effects and to maximize effectiveness. ... Keywords: keyword extraction, layout characteristics, logical structure analysis, metadata extraction

Toshiko Matsumoto; Mitsuharu Oba; Takashi Onoyama

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

E-Print Network 3.0 - antitumour activity complex-formation Sample...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

antiangiogenic and antitumour activity of the combination of the natural flavonoid fisetin and Summary: 1 Improved antiangiogenic and antitumour activity of the combination of...

308

E-Print Network 3.0 - arterial thrombus formation Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

a venous pressure)? 4 Source: Prestwich, Ken - Biology Department, College of the Holy Cross Collection: Environmental Sciences and Ecology ; Biology and Medicine 15...

309

Methane Hydrate Formation and Dissociation in a Partially Saturated Core-Scale Sand Sample  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy Technology Laboratory Methane Hydrates Research Group USA Arvind Gupta Colorado School of Mines Center for Hydrate Research USA ABSTRACT

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

E-Print Network 3.0 - anisn format dot Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Rob - Sterrenkundig Instituut, Universiteit Utrecht Collection: Physics 65 p s scurrent topics in solid state physics www.pss-c.com Summary: Probing the interaction between a...

311

E-Print Network 3.0 - asbestos body formation Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

MANAGEMENT PROGRAM Prepared: May... Mechanical Rooms 8 3.4 Asbestos Free Labels 8 4.0 Lockout Areas 8 5.0 Training 9 5.1 Overview 9 5.2 Asbestos... Awareness 9 6.0 Negative...

312

E-Print Network 3.0 - abomasal curd formation Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Meal Summary: , at least in part, be substrate driven. Responses of cows to abomasal infusion of protein or AA have shown... of Schwab et al. (19). The efficiency with which...

313

E-Print Network 3.0 - acidizing subterranean formations Sample...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

subterranean estuary along Florida's (USA) Atlantic coast for analysis of the rare earth elements... within the study area. Concentrations of REEs in porewaters from the...

314

E-Print Network 3.0 - autonomous formation flying Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

issue, we wish... : " Omnidirectional sensors for robotics " Omnidirectional vision for mobile robots, ... Source: Menegatti, Emanuele - Department of Information Engineering,...

315

E-Print Network 3.0 - aeruginosa biofilm formation Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Chair... of Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms by quorum sensing inhibition Caol Huff, CBE PhD Candidate, Chemistry 10... :30-10:50 Break 10:50-11:10 Dormant cells in Pseudomonas ......

316

E-Print Network 3.0 - authigenic carbonate formation Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

in the flux of carbon... to the deep sea. However, the accumulation rate of authigenic uranium depends not only on the organic carbon... into an organic carbon rain rate (export...

317

E-Print Network 3.0 - aluminate spinel formation Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Columbia: insights from heavy minerals in stream sediments Summary: , spinel and titanite. Our results suggest that detritus from a horizon of coarse pebble conglomerate......

318

E-Print Network 3.0 - alkyl-alkyl bond formation Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Molecular Physics, Vol. 105, Nos. 23, 20 January10 February 2007, 261272 Summary: -SAFT-VR approach In the SAFT-VR approach molecules are modelled as chains of tangentially...

319

E-Print Network 3.0 - azul formation ediacaran Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Geosciences 85 UN CASO PARA DESARROLLAR CON TRABAJO COOPERATIVO: EL PINZN AZUL EN GRAN CANARIA Summary: UN CASO PARA DESARROLLAR CON TRABAJO COOPERATIVO: EL PINZN AZUL EN...

320

Formation Testing Techniques | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Formation Testing Techniques Formation Testing Techniques Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Formation Testing Techniques Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Downhole Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Formation Testing Techniques Parent Exploration Technique: Downhole Techniques Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Stratigraphic/Structural: Hydrological: Thermal: Dictionary.png Formation Testing Techniques: No definition has been provided for this term. Add a Definition References No exploration activities found. Print PDF Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Formation_Testing_Techniques&oldid=601973" Categories: Downhole Techniques Exploration Techniques

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mm sample format" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Coupling MM5 with ISOLSM:  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

16 to 64 GB memory per node 375 MHz per CPU 10 Tflopsec peak speed 44 TB disk space in GPFS Revise MPP library and MPP object files for ISOLSM. Investigate...

322

Wasted Paper in Pharmaceutical Samples  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...of pills and packaging in one of each brand of drug samples stored in the clinic. All pills were packaged in either foil blister packs or plastic bottles; these were contained in paper-product boxes and accompanied by paper package inserts. Ninety-two packages contained 665 pills (mean [±SD], 7.2±6... To the Editor: Clinicians give pharmaceutical samples provided to clinics by industry sales representatives to patients who are unable to afford medicines or use them as starter packs for patients initiating a new treatment. These samples are usually ...

1999-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

323

Geomechanical Study of Bakken Formation for Improved Oil Recovery  

SciTech Connect

On October 1, 2008 US DOE-sponsored research project entitled “Geomechanical Study of Bakken Formation for Improved Oil Recovery” under agreement DE-FC26-08NT0005643 officially started at The University of North Dakota (UND). This is the final report of the project; it covers the work performed during the project period of October 1, 2008 to December 31, 2013. The objectives of this project are to outline the methodology proposed to determine the in-situ stress field and geomechanical properties of the Bakken Formation in Williston Basin, North Dakota, USA to increase the success rate of horizontal drilling and hydraulic fracturing so as to improve the recovery factor of this unconventional crude oil resource from the current 3% to a higher level. The success of horizontal drilling and hydraulic fracturing depends on knowing local in-situ stress and geomechanical properties of the rocks. We propose a proactive approach to determine the in-situ stress and related geomechanical properties of the Bakken Formation in representative areas through integrated analysis of field and well data, core sample and lab experiments. Geomechanical properties are measured by AutoLab 1500 geomechanics testing system. By integrating lab testing, core observation, numerical simulation, well log and seismic image, drilling, completion, stimulation, and production data, in-situ stresses of Bakken formation are generated. These in-situ stress maps can be used as a guideline for future horizontal drilling and multi-stage fracturing design to improve the recovery of Bakken unconventional oil.

Ling, Kegang; Zeng, Zhengwen; He, Jun; Pei, Peng; Zhou, Xuejun; Liu, Hong; Huang, Luke; Ostadhassan, Mehdi; Jabbari, Hadi; Blanksma, Derrick; Feilen, Harry; Ahmed, Salowah; Benson, Steve; Mann, Michael; LeFever, Richard; Gosnold, Will

2013-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

324

Comparison of critical current density in SiC-doped in situ MgB2 coils and straight wire samples processed by HIP  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Unreacted MgB2 wires fabricated from SiC-doped precursor material by Hyper Tech Research, Inc. have been used to make small-diameter (14 mm) superconducting coils. All coils made of 500 mm length wires were subjected to hot isostatic pressure (HIP) treatment. The critical current density (Jc) parameters of coils were compared to straight samples characteristics. Both types of samples have been measured in perpendicular magnetic field configuration for Jc and pinning force density (Fp) evaluation. No significant Jc difference between the long wires on coils and straight wires was found. These results suggest that the critical current (Ic) for coils can be determined for straight samples (25 mm). SEM analysis indicated that a small diameter of the coil does not influence the structure of in situ MgB2 wire.

D Gajda; A Morawski; A Zaleski; T Cetner; M Ma?ecka; A Presz; M Rindfleisch; M Tomsic; C J Thong; P Surdacki

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Category:Gas Sampling | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Gas Sampling page? For detailed information on Gas Sampling as exploration techniques, click here. Category:Gas Sampling Add.png Add a new Gas Sampling Technique Subcategories This...

326

Help:FormattingResults | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

FormattingResults FormattingResults Jump to: navigation, search Contents 1 UL 2 Google Pie Charts 3 Outline 4 Calendar 5 Timeline 6 Gallery 7 Google Map 8 Geochart Ask Queries are used to pull results from semantic wiki content and can be displayed in a variety of formats. This page lists examples of the more common formats with the code used to generate them and when applicable, links to eternal help documents describing the options available for each format. When writing an ask query, one specifies the format with |format=. The examples below contain the ask query code used to generate them, including the format declaration. UL BioPower Atlas and BioFuels Atlas Biomass Energy Data Book CLIMWAT 2.0 CROPWAT 8.0 {{#ask:[[Category:Tools]] [[ProgramTopics::Resource assessment]] [[ProgramResources::Dataset]]

327

SAR polar format implementation with MATLAB.  

SciTech Connect

Traditional polar format image formation for Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) requires a large amount of processing power and memory in order to accomplish in real-time. These requirements can thus eliminate the possible usage of interpreted language environments such as MATLAB. However, with trapezoidal aperture phase history collection and changes to the traditional polar format algorithm, certain optimizations make MATLAB a possible tool for image formation. Thus, this document's purpose is two-fold. The first outlines a change to the existing Polar Format MATLAB implementation utilizing the Chirp Z-Transform that improves performance and memory usage achieving near realtime results for smaller apertures. The second is the addition of two new possible image formation options that perform a more traditional interpolation style image formation. These options allow the continued exploration of possible interpolation methods for image formation and some preliminary results comparing image quality are given.

Martin, Grant D.; Doerry, Armin Walter

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Proportional structural effects of formative indicators  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Formative constructs must influence two or more distinct outcome variables for meaningful tests of the formative conceptualization. Because the construct mediates the effects of its indicators, the indicators must have ...

Franke, George R.; Preacher, K. J.; Rigdon, Ed E.

2009-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

329

Formation damage in underbalanced drilling operations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Formation damage has long been recognized as a potential source of reduced productivity and injectivity in both horizontal and vertical wells. From the moment that the pay zone is being drilled until the well is put on production, a formation...

Reyes Serpa, Carlos Alberto

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

330

Structure formation: Models, Dynamics and Status  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The constraints on the models for the structure formation arising from various cosmological observations at different length scales are reviewed. The status of different models for structure formation is examined critically in the light of these observations.

T. Padmanabhan

1995-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

331

Interchange format for hybrid systems: abstract semantics  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In [1] we advocated the need for an interchange format for hybrid systems that enables the integration of design tools coming from many different research communities. In deriving such interchange format the main challenge is to define a language that, ...

Alessandro Pinto; Luca P. Carloni; Roberto Passerone; Alberto Sangiovanni-Vincentelli

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Sampling based on local bandwidth  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The sampling of continuous-time signals based on local bandwidth is considered in this thesis. In an intuitive sense, local bandwidth refers to the rate at which a signal varies locally. One would expect that signals should ...

Wei, Dennis

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Sample Business Plan Framework 3  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

U.S. Department of Energy Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Sample Business Plan Framework 1: A program seeking to continue operations in the post-grant period as a not-for-profit (NGO) entity.

334

Sample Business Plan Framework 5  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

U.S. Department of Energy Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Sample Business Plan Framework 1: A program seeking to continue operations in the post-grant period as a not-for-profit (NGO) entity.

335

Sample Business Plan Framework 2  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

U.S. Department of Energy Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Sample Business Plan Framework 1: A program seeking to continue operations in the post-grant period as a not-for-profit (NGO) entity.

336

Sample Business Plan Framework 1  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

U.S. Department of Energy Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Sample Business Plan Framework 1: A program seeking to continue operations in the post-grant period as a not-for-profit (NGO) entity.

337

Sample Business Plan Framework 4  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

U.S. Department of Energy Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Sample Business Plan Framework 1: A program seeking to continue operations in the post-grant period as a not-for-profit (NGO) entity.

338

Deposition of TiN and HfO{sub 2} in a commercial 200 mm remote plasma atomic layer deposition reactor  

SciTech Connect

The authors describe a remote plasma atomic layer deposition reactor (Oxford Instruments FlexAL trade mark sign ) that includes an inductively coupled plasma source and a load lock capable of handling substrates up to 200 mm in diameter. The deposition of titanium nitride (TiN) and hafnium oxide (HfO{sub 2}) is described for the combination of the metal-halide precursor TiCl{sub 4} and H{sub 2}-N{sub 2} plasma and the combination of the metallorganic precursor Hf[N(CH{sub 3})(C{sub 2}H{sub 5})]{sub 4} and O{sub 2} plasma, respectively. The influence of the plasma exposure time and substrate temperature has been studied and compositional, structural, and electrical properties are reported. TiN films with a low Cl impurity content were obtained at 350 deg. C at a growth rate of 0.35 A /cycle with an electrical resistivity as low as 150 {mu}{omega} cm. Carbon-free (detection limit <2 at. %) HfO{sub 2} films were obtained at a growth rate of 1.0 A /cycle at 290 deg. C. The thickness and resisitivity nonuniformity was <5% for the TiN and the thickness uniformality was <2% for the HfO{sub 2} films as determined over 200 mm wafers.

Heil, S. B. S.; Hemmen, J. L. van; Hodson, C. J.; Singh, N.; Klootwijk, J. H.; Roozeboom, F.; Sanden, M. C. M. van de; Kessels, W. M. M. [Department of Applied Physics, Eindhoven University of Technology, P.O. Box 513, 5600 MB Eindhoven (Netherlands); Oxford Instruments Plasma Technology, North End, Yatton BS49 4AP (United Kingdom); Philips Research Laboratories, High Tech Campus 4, 5656 AE Eindhoven (Netherlands); NXP Semiconductors Research, High Tech Campus 4, 5656 AE Eindhoven (Netherlands); Department of Applied Physics, Eindhoven University of Technology, P.O. Box 513, 5600 MB Eindhoven (Netherlands)

2007-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

339

Scanning slit for HIE-ISOLDE: vibrational test (linear motion actuator from UHV design, speed = 2.5 mm/s)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This report summarizes the results of a series of tests performed on the prototype HIE-ISOLDE diagnostic box (HIE-DB) regarding the vibrations and drifts in the transverse position of the scanning blade while moving inside or outside the box. To monitor the transverse position of the blade, a series of 0.1 mm diameter holes were drilled on it and their positions were tracked with an optical system. The linear motion actuator was acquired from UHV design (model LSM38-150-SS), is driven by a stepper motor and has all the guiding mechanisms outside vacuum. The maximum speed of the scanning blade during the tests was 2.5 mm/s. The transverse movement of the slit in the direction perpendicular to the movement was lower than 50 m, and is dominated by the displacement of the contact point of the applied force on the lead-screw. An offset on the slit position was observed while changing the direction of movement of the blade, its amplitude being of the order of 30 m. The amplitudes of the displacements of the transve...

Bravin, E; Sosa, A

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Role of nucleation sites on the formation of nanoporous Ge  

SciTech Connect

The role of nucleation sites on the formation of nanoporous Ge was investigated. Three Ge films with different spherical or columnar pore morphologies to act as inherent nucleation sites were sputtered on (001) Ge. Samples were implanted 90 Degree-Sign from incidence at 300 keV with fluences ranging from 3.0 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 15} to 3.0 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 16} Ge{sup +}/cm{sup 2}. Electron microscopy investigations revealed varying thresholds for nanoporous Ge formation and exhibited a stark difference in the evolution of the Ge layers based on the microstructure of the initial film. The results suggest that the presence of inherent nucleation sites significantly alters the onset and evolution of nanoporous Ge.

Yates, B. R.; Darby, B. L.; Jones, K. S. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611-6400 (United States); Elliman, R. G. [Department of Electronic Materials Engineering, Research School of Physical Sciences and Engineering, Australian National University, Canberra, Australian Capital Territory 0200 (Australia)

2012-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mm sample format" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

TEM studies of Ge nanocrystal formation in PECVD grown  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We investigate the effect of annealing on the Ge nanocrystal formation in multilayered germanosilicate–oxide films grown on Si substrates by plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition (PECVD). The multilayered samples were annealed at temperatures ranging from 750 to 900?°C for 5 min under nitrogen atmosphere. The onset of formation of Ge nanocrystals, at 750?°C, can be observed via high resolution TEM micrographs. The diameters of Ge nanocrystals were observed to be between 5 and 14 nm. As the annealing temperature is raised to 850?°C, a second layer of Ge nanocrystals forms next to the original precipitation band, positioning itself closer to the substrate SiO2 interface. High resolution cross section TEM images, electron diffraction and electron energy-loss spectroscopy as well as energy-dispersive x-ray analysis (EDAX) data all indicate that Ge nanocrystals are present in each layer.

S A?an; A Dana; A Aydinli

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Treating nahcolite containing formations and saline zones  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for treating a nahcolite containing subsurface formation includes removing water from a saline zone in or near the formation. The removed water is heated using a steam and electricity cogeneration facility. The heated water is provided to the nahcolite containing formation. A fluid is produced from the nahcolite containing formation. The fluid includes at least some dissolved nahcolite. At least some of the fluid is provided to the saline zone.

Vinegar, Harold J

2013-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

343

Formation Flying and Deformable Instruments  

SciTech Connect

Astronomers have always attempted to build very stable instruments. They fight all that can cause mechanical deformation or image motion. This has led to well established technologies (autoguide, active optics, thermal control, tip/tilt correction), as well as observing methods based on the use of controlled motion (scanning, micro scanning, shift and add, chopping and nodding). Formation flying disturbs this practice. It is neither possible to reduce the relative motion to very small amplitudes, nor to control it at will. Some impacts on Simbol-X instrument design, and operation are presented.

Rio, Yvon [CEA/IRFU/Sap, CEA Saclay, 91191 Gif sur Yvette (France)

2009-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

344

Petrophysical evaluation of subterranean formations  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Methods and systems are provided for evaluating petrophysical properties of subterranean formations and comprehensively evaluating hydrate presence through a combination of computer-implemented log modeling and analysis. Certain embodiments include the steps of running a number of logging tools in a wellbore to obtain a variety of wellbore data and logs, and evaluating and modeling the log data to ascertain various petrophysical properties. Examples of suitable logging techniques that may be used in combination with the present invention include, but are not limited to, sonic logs, electrical resistivity logs, gamma ray logs, neutron porosity logs, density logs, NRM logs, or any combination or subset thereof.

Klein, James D; Schoderbek, David A; Mailloux, Jason M

2013-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

345

Experimental studies of spheromak formation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Studies in the PS?1 spheromak configuration can be effectively formed by a combined z? and ??pinch technique on both a fast (?formation??Alfvén) and a much slower timescale. The gross tilt and shift instability of the toroid can be suppressed by a combination of conduction walls shaping the separatrix by externally applied fields and the use of ‘‘figure?eight’’ coils. Optimum stabilty is obtained for almost spherical toroids. Maximum field?reversal times for stable well?confined toroids are ?40 /?sec consistent with resistive decay. Temperatures during the stable decay are 5–10 eV; impurity radiation is an important energy?loss mechanism.

H. Bruhns; C. Chin?Fatt; Y. P. Chong; A. W. DeSilva; G. C. Goldenbaum; H. R. Griem; G. W. Hart; R. A. Hess; J. H. Irby; R. S. Shaw

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Bar Formation, Evolution and Destruction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

I review the various mechanisms for creating bars in rotating stellar disks, and conclude that the swing-amplified feed-back loop, which produces rapidly tumbling bars, remains the most probable. The bar continues to evolve after its formation in a number of ways; here I discuss what appears to be inevitable thickening normal to the plane, continued spiral activity in the outer disk and also underscore the increasingly important problem presented by angular momentum loss to the halo. Finally, I examine possible means, excluding interaction, by which bars in galaxies could be destroyed.

J A Sellwood

1995-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

347

Zonal flow as pattern formation  

SciTech Connect

Zonal flows are well known to arise spontaneously out of turbulence. We show that for statistically averaged equations of the stochastically forced generalized Hasegawa-Mima model, steady-state zonal flows, and inhomogeneous turbulence fit into the framework of pattern formation. There are many implications. First, the wavelength of the zonal flows is not unique. Indeed, in an idealized, infinite system, any wavelength within a certain continuous band corresponds to a solution. Second, of these wavelengths, only those within a smaller subband are linearly stable. Unstable wavelengths must evolve to reach a stable wavelength; this process manifests as merging jets.

Parker, Jeffrey B.; Krommes, John A. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States)] [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States)

2013-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

348

Electrochemical formation of field emitters  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Electrochemical formation of field emitters, particularly useful in the fabrication of flat panel displays. The fabrication involves field emitting points in a gated field emitter structure. Metal field emitters are formed by electroplating and the shape of the formed emitter is controlled by the potential imposed on the gate as well as on a separate counter electrode. This allows sharp emitters to be formed in a more inexpensive and manufacturable process than vacuum deposition processes used at present. The fabrication process involves etching of the gate metal and the dielectric layer down to the resistor layer, and then electroplating the etched area and forming an electroplated emitter point in the etched area.

Bernhardt, Anthony F. (Berkeley, CA)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Improved sample size determination for attributes and variables sampling  

SciTech Connect

Earlier INMM papers have addressed the attributes/variables problem and, under conservative/limiting approximations, have reported analytical solutions for the attributes and variables sample sizes. Through computer simulation of this problem, we have calculated attributes and variables sample sizes as a function of falsification, measurement uncertainties, and required detection probability without using approximations. Using realistic assumptions for uncertainty parameters of measurement, the simulation results support the conclusions: (1) previously used conservative approximations can be expensive because they lead to larger sample sizes than needed; and (2) the optimal verification strategy, as well as the falsification strategy, are highly dependent on the underlying uncertainty parameters of the measurement instruments. 1 ref., 3 figs.

Stirpe, D.; Picard, R.R.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

E-Print Network 3.0 - assurance sampling method Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Process Design 6.0 Sampling Procedures B2 Sampling Methods Requirements 6.0 Sampling... Procedures B3 Sample Handling and Custody Requirements 7.0 Sample Custody B4 Analytical...

351

Heating tar sands formations while controlling pressure  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Methods for treating a tar sands formation are described herein. Methods may include heating at least a section of a hydrocarbon layer in the formation from a plurality of heaters located in the formation. A pressure in the majority of the section may be maintained below a fracture pressure of the formation. The pressure in the majority of the section may be reduced to a selected pressure after the average temperature reaches a temperature that is above 240.degree. C. and is at or below pyrolysis temperatures of hydrocarbons in the section. At least some hydrocarbon fluids may be produced from the formation.

Stegemeier, George Leo (Houston, TX) [Houston, TX; Beer, Gary Lee (Houston, TX) [Houston, TX; Zhang, Etuan (Houston, TX) [Houston, TX

2010-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

352

ORNL DAAC, global climate data, GIS formats  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Data in GIS Formats Data in GIS Formats ORNL DAAC has re-released a key climatology data set in two additional formats especially suitable for geographic information system (GIS) users. Version 2.1 of "Global 30-Year Mean Monthly Climatology, 1930-1960 (Cramer and Leemans)" now offers the data in ASCII GRID format and binary format. These formats can be read directly into software packages such as ESRI's ARC/INFO and ERDAS' IMAGINE. The Cramer and Leemans climatology data set contains monthly averages of mean temperature, temperature range, precipitation, rain days, and sunshine hours for the terrestrial surface of the globe. It is gridded at a 0.5-degree longitude/latitude resolution. The Cramer and Leemans data are also available in the original ASCII format, which can be read in FORTRAN or with programs such as SAS.

353

Constraining the Star Formation Histories of Spiral Bulges  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Long-slit spectroscopic observations of line-strengths and kinematics made along the minor axes of four spiral bulges are reported. Comparisons are made between central line-strengths in spiral bulges and those in other morphological types. The bulges are found to have central line-strengths comparable with those of single stellar populations (SSPs) of approximately solar abundance or above. Negative radial gradients are observed in line-strengths, similar to those in elliptical galaxies. The bulge data are consistent with correlations between Mg2, and central velocity dispersion observed in elliptical galaxiess. In contrast to elliptical galaxies, central line-strengths lie within the loci defining the range of and Mg2 achieved by Worthey's (1994) solar abundance ratio, SSPs. The implication of solar abundance ratios indicates differences in the star formation histories of spiral bulges and elliptical galaxies. A ``single zone with in- fall'' model of galactic chemical evolution, using Worthey's (1994) SSPs, is used to constrain possible star formation histories in our sample. We show that , Mg2 and Hbeta line-strengths observed in these bulges cannot be reproduced using primordial collapse models of formation but can be reproduced by models with extended in-fall of gas and star formation (2-17 Gyr) in the region modelled. One galaxy (NGC 5689) shows a central population with luminosity weighted average age of ~5 Gyr, supporting the idea of extended star formation. Kinematic substructure, possibly associated with a central spike in metallicity, is observed at the centre of the Sa galaxy NGC 3623.

R. N. Proctor; A. E. Sansom

1999-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

354

SOLVENT HOLD TANK SAMPLE RESULTS FOR MCU-14-667-672 AND MCU-14-846-847: AUGUST AND SEPTEMBER 2014 MONTHLY SAMPLES  

SciTech Connect

SRNL received two sets of SHT samples (MCU-14-667-672, pulled 8/27/2014 and MCU-14-846-847, pulled on 9/22/2014) for analysis. The samples were analyzed for composition. It is recommended that the solvent receives Isopar® L and TiDG trimming at this time. Analysis of sample MCU-14-846-847 indicates the solvent has evaporated Isopar®L and has lost TiDG to a level below the recommended minimum 1 mM level. Since the addition of MaxCalix to the SHT in early July 2014, the MaxCalix concentration in the solvent has reached nominal values. The laboratory will continue to monitor the quality of the solvent in particular for any new impurity or degradation of the solvent components.

Fondeur, F.; Taylor-Pashow, K.

2014-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

355

Laboratory Access | Sample Preparation Laboratories  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Access Access Planning Ahead Planning Ahead Please complete the Beam Time Request (BTR) and Support Request forms thourgh the User Portal. Thorough chemical and sample information must be included in your BTR. Support Request forms include a list of collaborators that require laboratory access and your group's laboratory equipment requests. Researcher safety is taken seriously at SLAC. Please remember that radioactive materials, nanomaterials, and biohazardous materials have additional safety requirements. Refer to the SSRL or LCLS Safety Offices for further guidance. Upon Arrival Upon Arrival Once you arrive you must complete training and access forms before accessing the Sample Preparation Laboratories (SPL). All Sample Prep Lab doors are locked with access key codes. Once your SPL

356

Helium ion distributions in a 4 kJ plasma focus device by 1 mm-thick large-size polycarbonate detectors  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Helium ion beam profile, angular and iso-ion beam distributions in 4 kJ Amirkabir plasma focus (APF) device were effectively observed by the unaided eyes and studied in single 1 mm-thick large-diameter (20 cm) polycarbonate track detectors (PCTD). The \\{PCTDs\\} were processed by 50 Hz–HV electrochemical etching using a large-size ECE chamber. The results show that helium ions produced in the APF device have a ring-shaped angular distribution peaked at an angle of ? ± 60 ° with respect to the top of the anode. Some information on the helium ion energy and distributions is also provided. The method is highly effective for ion beam studies.

M. Sohrabi; M. Habibi; V. Ramezani

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Inertial impaction air sampling device  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An inertial impactor to be used in an air sampling device for collection of respirable size particles in ambient air which may include a graphite furnace as the impaction substrate in a small-size, portable, direct analysis structure that gives immediate results and is totally self-contained allowing for remote and/or personal sampling. The graphite furnace collects suspended particles transported through the housing by means of the air flow system, and these particles may be analyzed for elements, quantitatively and qualitatively, by atomic absorption spectrophotometry. 3 figs.

Dewhurst, K.H.

1987-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

358

Inertial impaction air sampling device  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An inertial impactor to be used in an air sampling device for collection of respirable size particles in ambient air which may include a graphite furnace as the impaction substrate in a small-size, portable, direct analysis structure that gives immediate results and is totally self-contained allowing for remote and/or personal sampling. The graphite furnace collects suspended particles transported through the housing by means of the air flow system, and these particles may be analyzed for elements, quantitatively and qualitatively, by atomic absorption spectrophotometry.

Dewhurst, Katharine H. (13150 Wenonah SE. Apt. 727, Albuquerque, NM 87123)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Inertial impaction air sampling device  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An inertial impactor is designed which is to be used in an air sampling device for collection of respirable size particles in ambient air. The device may include a graphite furnace as the impaction substrate in a small-size, portable, direct analysis structure that gives immediate results and is totally self-contained allowing for remote and/or personal sampling. The graphite furnace collects suspended particles transported through the housing by means of the air flow system, and these particles may be analyzed for elements, quantitatively and qualitatively, by atomic absorption spectrophotometry. 3 figs.

Dewhurst, K.H.

1990-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

360

Ultrasonic velocity measurements for synthetic gas?hydrate samples  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Laboratory ultrasonic methods offer a way of studying acoustic velocity of a gas?hydrate bearing formation. By measuringultrasonic velocities of the gas?hydrate samples in various temperature and pressure conditions more effective inversion techniques can be developed to quantitatively evaluate gas?hydrate concentration and distributions. Low?temperature laboratory measurements of compressional velocities in compacted samples are conducted. These gas?hydrate samples are synthesized by using various densities at various pressures and temperatures. At ?10°C the compressional velocities of the compacted gas?hydrate samples are from 2440 to 3570 m/s with the density range from 475 to 898 kg/m3. Compressional velocity measurements are made where the temperature and pressure can be controlled. When the pore pressure increases from 10 to 40 MPa the compressional velocities of the sample increases from 2340 to 2600 m/s at 1.5°C. When the temperature decreases from 10° to ?13°C the compressional velocity will increase from 3600 to 3800 m/s at a pore pressure of 6 MPa. Our experimental results are qualitatively in agreement with those of weighted average model and the Biot?Gassmanns model when the gas?hydrate concentration in a sediment bearing sand is about 20%. [Work supported by National Natural Science Fundation of China No. 10534040.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mm sample format" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Galaxy Formation, Bars and QSOs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A model that accounts for the brief flaring of QSOs in the early stages of galaxy formation is proposed. I argue that a bar must develop early in the life of nearly every galaxy and that gas to create and fuel the QSO is driven into the center of the galaxy by the bar. The QSO lifetime, and the mass of its central engine, are also controlled by large-scale dynamics, since the fuel supply is shut off after a short period by the development of an inner Lindblad resonance. This resonance causes the gas inflow along the bar to stall at a distance of a few hundred parsecs from the center. The ILR develops as a result of previous inflow, making quasar activity self-limiting. The bars are weakened and can be destroyed by the central mass concentration formed in this way.

J. A. Sellwood

1999-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

362

The dynamics of fragment formation  

SciTech Connect

We demonstrate that in the Quantum Molecular Dynamics model, dynamical correlations can result in the production rate for final state nucleon clusters (and hence composite fragments) being higher than would be expected if statistics and the available phase space were dominant in determining composite formation. An intranuclear cascade or a Boltzmann-Uehling-Uhlenbeck model, combined with a statistical approach in the late stage of the collision to determine composites, provides an equivalent description only under limited conditions of centrality and beam energy. We use data on participant fragment production in Au + Au collisions in the Bevalac`s BOS time projection chamber to map out the parameter space where statistical clustering provides a good description. In particular, we investigate momentum-space densities of fragments up to {sup 4}He as a function of fragment transverse momentum, azimuth relative to the reaction plane, rapidity, multiplicity and beam energy.

Keane, D. [Kent State Univ., OH (United States); EOS Collaboration

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Electrochemical formation of field emitters  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Electrochemical formation of field emitters, particularly useful in the fabrication of flat panel displays is disclosed. The fabrication involves field emitting points in a gated field emitter structure. Metal field emitters are formed by electroplating and the shape of the formed emitter is controlled by the potential imposed on the gate as well as on a separate counter electrode. This allows sharp emitters to be formed in a more inexpensive and manufacturable process than vacuum deposition processes used at present. The fabrication process involves etching of the gate metal and the dielectric layer down to the resistor layer, and then electroplating the etched area and forming an electroplated emitter point in the etched area. 12 figs.

Bernhardt, A.F.

1999-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

364

The Regulation of Cooling and Star Formation in Luminous Galaxies by AGN Feedback and the Cooling-Time/Entropy Threshold for the Onset of Star Formation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Using broadband optical imaging and Chandra X-ray data for a sample of 46 cluster central dominant galaxies (CDGs), we investigate the connection between star formation, the intracluster medium (ICM), and the central active galactic nucleus (AGN). We report the discovery of a remarkably sharp threshold for the onset of star formation that occurs when the central cooling time of the hot atmosphere falls below ~ 5x10^8 yr, or equivalently when the central entropy falls below ~ 30 keV cm^2. In addition to this criterion, star formation in cooling flows also appears to require that the X-ray and galaxy centroids lie within ~ 20 kpc of each other, and that the jet (cavity) power is smaller than the X-ray cooling luminosity. These three criteria, together with the high ratio of cooling time to AGN outburst (cavity) age across our sample, directly link the presence of star formation and AGN activity in CDGs to cooling instabilities in the intracluster plasma. Our results provide compelling evidence that AGN feedback into the hot ICM is largely responsible for regulating cooling and star formation in the cores of clusters, leading to the significant growth of supermassive black holes in CDGs at late times.

David Rafferty; Brian McNamara; Paul Nulsen

2008-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

365

Core analyses for selected samples from the Culebra Dolomite at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant site  

SciTech Connect

Two groups of core samples from the Culebra Dolomite Member of the Rustler Formation at and near the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant were analyzed to provide estimates of hydrologic parameters for use in flow-and-transport modeling. Whole-core and core-plug samples were analyzed by helium porosimetry, resaturation and porosimetry, mercury-intrusion porosimetry, electrical-resistivity techniques, and gas-permeability methods. 33 refs., 25 figs., 10 tabs.

Kelley, V.A.; Saulnier, G.J. Jr. (INTERA, Inc., Austin, TX (USA))

1990-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Formation of attribute spaces using wavelets in automatic classification of explosives  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The non-contact automatic on-line classification of explosives is a multi-aspect task. It involves choosing the method of information gathering, planning and conduction of experiments, choosing a classifier, formation of training and control samples, ... Keywords: automatic classification, explosives, piezoelectric transducer, symptoms, ultrasonic waves, wavelet transformation

Nikolai Shopov; Rajcho Ilarionov; Ivan Simeonov; Hristo Kilifarev

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Roughening transition and formation of bicontinuous structures of immiscible solvents embedded in surfactant diblock copolymers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

L-967 Roughening transition and formation of bicontinuous structures of immiscible solvents The roughening transition of the interface in a model mixture of amphiphilic diblock copolymers, two immiscible has a random nonperiodic structure throughout the sample volume. The roughening transition associated

Boyer, Edmond

368

Induced water condensation and bridge formation by electric fieldsin Atomic Force Microscopy  

SciTech Connect

We present an analytical model that explains how in humidenvironments the electric field near a sharp tip enhances the formationof water meniscii and bridges between tip and sample. The predictions ofthe model are compared with experimental measurements of the criticaldistance where the field strength causes bridge formation.

Sacha, G.M.; Verdaguer, A.; Salmeron, M.

2006-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

369

The Argonne Premium Coal Sample Program  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The Argonne Premium Coal Sample Program ... Direct Determination of Sulfur Species in Coals from the Argonne Premium Sample Program by Solid Sampling Electrothermal Vaporization Inductively Coupled Plasma Optical Emission Spectrometry ... Direct Determination of Sulfur Species in Coals from the Argonne Premium Sample Program by Solid Sampling Electrothermal Vaporization Inductively Coupled Plasma Optical Emission Spectrometry ...

Karl S. Vorres

1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Automation of sample mounting for macromolecular crystallography  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A sample holder standard for use with robotic sample changers is defined. The standard includes a system for sample identification, tracking and management of data flow in a macromolecular structure-determination pipeline. A robotic sample changer designed for use with the sample standard is described.

Cipriani, F.

2006-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

371

Environmental surveillance master sampling schedule  

SciTech Connect

This document contains the planned 1994 schedules for routine collection of samples for the Surface Environmental Surveillance Project (SESP), Drinking Water Project, and Ground-Water Surveillance Project. Samples are routinely collected for the SESP and analyzed to determine the quality of air, surface water, soil, sediment, wildlife, vegetation, foodstuffs, and farm products at Hanford Site and surrounding communities. The responsibility for monitoring the onsite drinking water falls outside the scope of the SESP. The Hanford Environmental Health Foundation is responsible for monitoring the nonradiological parameters as defined in the National Drinking Water Standards while PNL conducts the radiological monitoring of the onsite drinking water. PNL conducts the drinking water monitoring project concurrent with the SESP to promote efficiency and consistency, utilize the expertise developed over the years, and reduce costs associated with management, procedure development, data management, quality control and reporting. The ground-water sampling schedule identifies ground-water sampling events used by PNL for environmental surveillance of the Hanford Site.

Bisping, L.E.

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Design of bioaerosol sampling inlets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An experimental investigation involving the design, fabrication, and testing of an ambient sampling inlet and two additional Stokes-scaled inlets is presented here. Testing of each inlet was conducted at wind speeds of 2, 8, and 24 km/h (0.55, 2...

Nene, Rohit Ravindra

2007-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

373

Sample Environment Plans and Progress  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Conference on Neutron Scattering Ottawa, Canada June 26 � 30, 2010 Lou Santodonato Sample Environment Group Leader Neutron Scattering Science Division #12;2 Managed by UT-Battelle for the U.S. Department of Energy-stage CCR for Reflectometry � SNAP-customized CCR rig � Vulcan furnace, baby load frame � Low-Q air furnace

Pennycook, Steve

374

Real-time quadrupole mass spectrometer analysis of gas in boreholefluid samples acquired using the U-Tube sampling methodology  

SciTech Connect

Sampling of fluids in deep boreholes is challenging becauseof the necessity to minimize external contamination and maintain sampleintegrity during recovery. The U-tube sampling methodology was developedto collect large volume, multiphase samples at in situ pressures. As apermanent or semi-permanent installation, the U-tube can be used forrapidly acquiring multiple samples or it may be installed for long-termmonitoring applications. The U-tube was first deployed in Liberty County,TX to monitor crosswell CO2 injection as part of the Frio CO2sequestration experiment. Analysis of gases (dissolved or separate phase)was performed in the field using a quadrupole mass spectrometer, whichserved as the basis for determining the arrival of the CO2 plume. Thepresence of oxygen and argon in elevated concentrations, along withreduced methane concentration, indicate sample alteration caused by theintroduction of surface fluids during borehole completion. Despiteproducing the well to eliminate non-native fluids, measurementsdemonstrate that contamination persists until the immiscible CO2injection swept formation fluid into the observationwellbore.

Freifeld, Barry M.; Trautz, Robert C.

2006-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

375

EMP Attachment 1 DOE-SC PNNL Site Sampling and Analysis Plan  

SciTech Connect

This Sampling and Analysis Plan (SAP) is written for the radiological environmental air surveillance program for the DOE-SC PNNL Site, Richland Washington. It provides the requirements for planning sampling events, and the requirements imposed on the analytical laboratory analyzing the air samples. The actual air sampling process is in procedure EPRP-AIR-029. The rationale for analyte selection, media, and sampling site location has been vetted through the data quality objectives (DQO) process (Barnett et al. 2010). The results from the DQO process have been reviewed and approved by the Washington State Department of Health. The DQO process (Barnett et al. 2010) identified seven specific radionuclides for analysis along with the need for gross alpha and gross beta radiological analyses. The analytes are {sup 241}Am, {sup 243}Am, {sup 244}Cm, {sup 60}Co, {sup 238}Pu, {sup 239}Pu, and {sup 233}U. The report also determined that air samples for particulates are the only sample matrix required for the monitoring program. These samples are collected on 47-mm glass-fiber filters.

Meier, Kirsten M.

2011-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

376

Methane Hydrate Formation and Dissocation in a Partially Saturated Sand--Measurements and Observations  

SciTech Connect

We performed a sequence of tests on a partially water-saturated sand sample contained in an x-ray transparent aluminum pressure vessel that is conducive to x-ray computed tomography (CT) observation. These tests were performed to gather data for estimation of thermal properties of the sand/water/gas system and the sand/hydrate/water/gas systems, as well as data to evaluate the kinetic nature of hydrate dissociation. The tests included mild thermal perturbations for the estimation of the thermal properties of the sand/water/gas system, hydrate formation, thermal perturbations with hydrate in the stability zone, hydrate dissociation through thermal stimulation, additional hydrate formation, and hydrate dissociation through depressurization with thermal stimulation. Density changes throughout the sample were observed as a result of hydrate formation and dissociation, and these processes induced capillary pressure changes that altered local water saturation.

Kneafsey, Timothy J.; Tomutsa, Liviu; Moridis, George J.; Seol, Yongkoo; Freifeld, Barry; Taylor, Charles E.; Gupta, Arvind

2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Methane hydrate formation and dissociation in a partially saturated sand  

SciTech Connect

To predict the behavior of hydrate-bearing sediments and the economic extractability of natural gas from reservoirs containing gas hydrates, we need reservoir simulators that properly represent the processes that occur, as well as accurate parameters. Several codes are available that represent some or all of the expected processes, and values for some parameters are available. Where values are unavailable, modelers have used estimation techniques to help with their predictions. Although some of these techniques are well respected, measurements are needed in many cases to verify the parameters. We have performed a series of experiments in a partially water saturated silica sand sample. The series included methane hydrate formation, and dissociation by both thermal stimulation and depressurization. The sample was 7.6 cm in diameter and 25 cm in length. In addition to measuring the system pressure and temperatures at four locations in the sample, we measured local density within the sample using x-ray computed tomography. Our goals in performing the experiment were to gather information for estimating thermal properties of the medium and to examine nonequilibrium processes.

Kneafsey, Timothy J.; Tomutsa, Liviu; Taylor, Charles E.; Gupta, Arvind; Moridis, George; Freifeld, Barry; Seol, Yongkoo

2004-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

378

AUTOMATING GROUNDWATER SAMPLING AT HANFORD  

SciTech Connect

Until this past October, Fluor Hanford managed Hanford's integrated groundwater program for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). With the new contract awards at the Site, however, the CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company (CHPRC) has assumed responsibility for the groundwater-monitoring programs at the 586-square-mile reservation in southeastern Washington State. These programs are regulated by the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) and the Comprehensive Environmental Response Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA). The purpose of monitoring is to track existing groundwater contamination from past practices, as well as other potential contamination that might originate from RCRA treatment, storage, and disposal (TSD) facilities. An integral part of the groundwater-monitoring program involves taking samples of the groundwater and measuring the water levels in wells scattered across the site. More than 1,200 wells are sampled each year. Historically, field personnel or 'samplers' have been issued pre-printed forms that have information about the well(s) for a particular sampling evolution. This information is taken from the Hanford Well Information System (HWIS) and the Hanford Environmental Information System (HEIS)--official electronic databases. The samplers used these hardcopy forms to document the groundwater samples and well water-levels. After recording the entries in the field, the samplers turned the forms in at the end of the day and the collected information was posted onto a spreadsheet that was then printed and included in a log book. The log book was then used to make manual entries of the new information into the software application(s) for the HEIS and HWIS databases. This is a pilot project for automating this tedious process by providing an electronic tool for automating water-level measurements and groundwater field-sampling activities. The automation will eliminate the manual forms and associated data entry, improve the accuracy of the information recorded, and enhance the efficiency and sampling capacity of field personnel. The goal of the effort is to eliminate 100 percent of the manual input to the database(s) and replace the management of paperwork by the field and clerical personnel with an almost entirely electronic process. These activities will include the following: scheduling the activities of the field teams, electronically recording water-level measurements, electronically logging and filing Groundwater Sampling Reports (GSR), and transferring field forms into the site-wide Integrated Document Management System (IDMS).

CONNELL CW; HILDEBRAND RD; CONLEY SF; CUNNINGHAM DE

2009-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

379

NETL: NATCARB - CO2 Storage Formations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Storage Formations Storage Formations NATCARB CO2 Storage Formations CO2 Storage Resource Methodology NATCARB Viewer The NATCARB Viewer is available at: http://www.natcarbviewer.com. 2012 Atlas IV DOE's Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships (RCSPs) were charged with providing a high-level, quantitative estimate of carbon dioxide (CO2) storage resource available in subsurface environments of their regions. Environments considered for CO2 storage were categorized into five major geologic systems: oil and gas reservoirs, unmineable coal areas, saline formations, shale, and basalt formations. Where possible, CO2 storage resource estimates have been quantified for oil and gas reservoirs, saline formations, and unmineable coal in the fourth edition of the United States Carbon Utilization and Storage Atlas (Atlas IV). Shale and basalt

380

A Connection between Obscuration and Star Formation in Luminous Quasars  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a measurement of the star formation properties of a uniform sample of mid-IR selected, unobscured and obscured quasars (QSO1s and QSO2s) in the Bo\\"otes survey region. We use an spectral energy distribution (SED) analysis for photometric data spanning optical to far-IR wavelengths to decompose AGN and host galaxy components. We find that when compared to a matched sample of QSO1s, the QSO2s have higher far-IR detection fractions, far-IR fluxes and infrared star formation luminosities ($L_{\\rm IR}^{\\rm SF}$) by a factor of $\\sim2$. Correspondingly, we show that the AGN obscured fraction rises from 0.3 to 0.7 between $4-40\\times10^{11}L_\\odot$. We also find evidence associating the absorption in the X-ray emission with the presence of far-IR emitting dust. Overall, these results are consistent with galaxy evolution models in which quasar obscurations can be associated with a dust-enshrouded starburst galaxies.

Chen, Chien-Ting J; Alberts, Stacey; Harrison, Chris M; Alexander, David M; Assef, Roberto; Brown, Michael J I; Del Moro, Agnese; Forman, William R; Gorjian, Varoujan; Goulding, Andrew D; Hainline, Kevin N; Jones, Christine; Kochanek, Christopher S; Murray, Stephen S; Pope, Alexandra; Rovilos, Emmanouel; Stern, Daniel

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mm sample format" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

E-Print Network 3.0 - arbitrarily distributed samples Sample...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

distributed samples Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: arbitrarily distributed samples Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Robust Statistics...

382

Hydrocarbon potential of Spearfish Formation in eastern Williston basin  

SciTech Connect

More than 36 million bbl of oil have been produced from stratigraphic traps in sandstones of the Triassic-Jurassic Spearfish Formation in the eastern part of the Williston basin. Newburg field has produced 32 million bbl of oil and Waskada field, discovered in 1980, is estimated to have over 10 million bbl of oil in reserves. A binocular microscopic and petrographic examination of cores from each of the fields has revealed considerable differences in the characteristics of producing sandstones. Cores and sample cuttings from 30 wells in the US and Canada form the basis for this comparison of the two fields. The Spearfish Formation consists of porous, permeable, well-sorted, very fine-grained sandstones with a sucrosic dolomite matrix that are interbedded with impermeable sandstones, siltstones, and shale. The environment of deposition is believed to be the intertidal zone (tidal flat). Sediments of the Spearfish Formation were deposited by a transgressive sea on an eroded Mississippian carbonate section. Oil found in the Spearfish sandstones is derived from the Mississippian.

Dodge C.J.N.; Reid, F.S.

1986-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Model-Based Sampling and Inference  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Model-Based Sampling, Inference and Imputation Model-Based Sampling, Inference and Imputation James R. Knaub, Jr., Energy Information Administration, EI-53.1 James.Knaub@eia.doe.gov Key Words: Survey statistics, Randomization, Conditionality, Random sampling, Cutoff sampling Abstract: Picking a sample through some randomization mechanism, such as random sampling within groups (stratified random sampling), or, say, sampling every fifth item (systematic random sampling), may be familiar to a lot of people. These are design-based samples. Estimates of means and totals for an entire population may be inferred from such a sample, along with estimation of the amount of error that might be expected. However, inference based on a sample and its (modeled) relationship to other data may be less familiar. If there is enough

384

Floating insulated conductors for heating subsurface formations  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A heating system for a subsurface formation includes a conduit located in a first opening in the subsurface formation. Three electrical conductors are located in the conduit. A return conductor is located inside the conduit. The return conductor is electrically coupled to the ends of the electrical conductors distal from the surface of the formation. Insulation is located inside the conduit. The insulation electrically insulates the three electrical conductors, the return conductor, and the conduit from each other.

Burns, David; Goodwin, Charles R.

2014-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

385

Hydrogen Adsorption Induces Interlayer Carbon Bond Formation...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hydrogen Adsorption Induces Interlayer Carbon Bond Formation in Supported Few-Layer Graphene Friday, February 28, 2014 Among the allotropes of carbon, diamond has some of the most...

386

Standard Format and Content for Emergency Plans  

Directives, Delegations, and Requirements

This volume addresses recommended emergency plan format and content for Operational Emergency Base Programs and Operational Emergency Hazardous Material Programs. Canceled by DOE G 151.1-3.

1997-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

387

Heating systems for heating subsurface formations  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Methods and systems for heating a subsurface formation are described herein. A heating system for a subsurface formation includes a sealed conduit positioned in an opening in the formation and a heat source. The sealed conduit includes a heat transfer fluid. The heat source provides heat to a portion of the sealed conduit to change phase of the heat transfer fluid from a liquid to a vapor. The vapor in the sealed conduit rises in the sealed conduit, condenses to transfer heat to the formation and returns to the conduit portion as a liquid.

Nguyen, Scott Vinh (Houston, TX); Vinegar, Harold J. (Bellaire, TX)

2011-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

388

Heating tar sands formations to visbreaking temperatures  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Methods for treating a tar sands formation are described herein. Methods may include heating at least a section of a hydrocarbon layer in the formation from a plurality of heaters located in the formation. The heat may be controlled so that at least a majority of the section reaches an average temperature of between 200.degree. C. and 240.degree. C., which results in visbreaking of at least some hydrocarbons in the section. At least some visbroken hydrocarbon fluids may be produced from the formation.

Karanikas, John Michael (Houston, TX); Colmenares, Tulio Rafael (Houston, TX); Zhang, Etuan (Houston, TX); Marino, Marian (Houston, TX); Roes, Augustinus Wilhelmus Maria (Houston, TX); Ryan, Robert Charles (Houston, TX); Beer, Gary Lee (Houston, TX); Dombrowski, Robert James (Houston, TX); Jaiswal, Namit (Houston, TX)

2009-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

389

Surface Water Sampling | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Surface Water Sampling Surface Water Sampling Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Surface Water Sampling Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Field Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Field Sampling Parent Exploration Technique: Water Sampling Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Stratigraphic/Structural: Hydrological: Water composition and source of fluids Thermal: Water temperature Dictionary.png Surface Water Sampling: Water sampling is done to characterize the chemical, thermal, or hydrological properties of a surface or subsurface aqueous system. Other definitions:Wikipedia Reegle Introduction Surface water sampling of hot and cold spring discharges has traditionally

390

Sample Forms | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

NMMSS Information, Reports & Forms Sample Forms Sample Forms U.S. Department of Energy U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission Nuclear Materials Management & Safeguards...

391

Simulations of pulsar wind formation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present initial results of the first self-consistent numerical model of the outer magnetosphere of a pulsar. By using the relativistic ``particle-in-cell'' method with special boundary conditions to represent plasma dynamics in 3D, we are able to follow magnetospheric plasma through the light cylinder into the wind zone for arbitrary magnetic inclination angles. For aligned rotators we confirm the ``disk-dome'' charge-separated structure of the magnetosphere and find that this configuration is unstable to a 3D nonaxisymmetric diocotron instability. This instability allows plasma to move across the field lines and approach the corotating Goldreich-Julian solution within several rotation periods. For oblique rotators formation of the spiral ``striped wind'' in the equatorial direction is demonstrated and the acceleration of the wind and its magnetization is discussed. We find that the wind properties vary with stellar latitude; however, whether injection conditions at the pulsar are responsible for the observed jet-equator geometry of Crab and Vela is currently under investigation. We also comment on the electrodynamics of the simulated magnetospheres, their current closure, and future simulations.

Anatoly Spitkovsky; Jonathan Arons

2002-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

392

Chemical Resources | Sample Preparation Laboratories  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Chemical Resources Chemical Resources Chemical Inventory All Sample Preparation Labs are stocked with an assortment of common solvents, acids, bases, buffers, and other reagents. See our Chemical Inventories for a list of available reagents. If you need large quantities of any chemicals, please order or bring your own supply (see below). Chemical Inventories Standard Operating Procedures (SOPs) If you will be working with any samples or reagents that are significantly toxic, reactive, corrosive, flammable, or otherwise especially hazardous, we may require an approved SOP before you can begin work. Examples: Reagents with an NFPA Rating of 3 or 4 in any category, nanomaterials, heavy metals, pyrophoric materials, water reactive materials. BLANK SOP SSRL BLANK SOP LCLS Ordering Chemicals

393

Adaptive Sampling in Hierarchical Simulation  

SciTech Connect

We propose an adaptive sampling methodology for hierarchical multi-scale simulation. The method utilizes a moving kriging interpolation to significantly reduce the number of evaluations of finer-scale response functions to provide essential constitutive information to a coarser-scale simulation model. The underlying interpolation scheme is unstructured and adaptive to handle the transient nature of a simulation. To handle the dynamic construction and searching of a potentially large set of finer-scale response data, we employ a dynamic metric tree database. We study the performance of our adaptive sampling methodology for a two-level multi-scale model involving a coarse-scale finite element simulation and a finer-scale crystal plasticity based constitutive law.

Knap, J; Barton, N R; Hornung, R D; Arsenlis, A; Becker, R; Jefferson, D R

2007-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

394

Formation and Stability of Ni-Al Hydroxide Phases in Soils  

SciTech Connect

The formation of mixed metal-aluminum hydroxide surface precipitates is a potentially significant uptake route for trace metals (including Co, Ni, and Zn) in environmental systems. This paper investigates the effect of mixed Ni-Al hydroxide precipitate formation and aging on Ni solubility and bioavailability in laboratory contaminated soils. Two Delaware agricultural soils were reacted with a 3 mM Ni solution for 12 months at pH's above and below the threshold for mixed Ni-Al hydroxide formation. Ni speciation was determined at 1, 6, and 12 months using X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS). Precipitate solubility was examined through desorption experiments using HNO{sub 3} and EDTA as desorbing agents, whereas metal bioavailability was assessed using a Ni-specific bacterial biosensor. For both soils, the formation of Ni-Al hydroxide surface precipitates resulted in a reduction in the fraction of desorbed and bioavailable Ni. However, precipitate dissolution was greater, particularly with EDTA, than in published studies on isolated soil clay fractions, and less affected by aging processes. These results suggest that mixed Ni-Al hydroxide phases forming in real world environments may be both longer-lasting and more susceptible to ligand-promoted dissolution than previously expected.

Peltier, E.; Van Der Lelie, D; Sparks, D

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

EARLY-STAGE MASSIVE STAR FORMATION NEAR THE GALACTIC CENTER: Sgr C  

SciTech Connect

We present near-infrared spectroscopy and 1 mm line and continuum observations of a recently identified site of high mass star formation likely to be located in the Central Molecular Zone (CMZ) near Sgr C. Located on the outskirts of the massive evolved H II region associated with Sgr C, the area is characterized by an Extended Green Object (EGO) measuring ?10'' in size (0.4 pc), whose observational characteristics suggest the presence of an embedded massive protostar driving an outflow. Our data confirm that early-stage star formation is taking place on the periphery of the Sgr C H II region, with detections of two protostellar cores and several knots of H{sub 2} and Brackett ? emission alongside a previously detected compact radio source. We calculate the cores' joint mass to be ?10{sup 3} M {sub ?}, with column densities of 1-2 × 10{sup 24} cm{sup –2}. We show the host molecular cloud to hold ?10{sup 5} M {sub ?} of gas and dust with temperatures and column densities favorable for massive star formation to occur, however, there is no evidence of star formation outside of the EGO, indicating that the cloud is predominantly quiescent. Given its mass, density, and temperature, the cloud is comparable to other remarkable non-star-forming clouds such as G0.253 in the eastern CMZ.

Kendrew, S.; Johnston, K.; Beuther, H. [Max-Planck-Institut für Astronomie, Königstuhl 17, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany)] [Max-Planck-Institut für Astronomie, Königstuhl 17, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Ginsburg, A.; Bally, J.; Battersby, C. [CASA, University of Colorado at Boulder, UCB 389, Boulder, CO 80309 (United States)] [CASA, University of Colorado at Boulder, UCB 389, Boulder, CO 80309 (United States); Cyganowski, C. J., E-mail: kendrew@mpia.de [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

An assay for thiaminase I in complex biological samples Jeremiah W. Hanes a  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, USA b Department of Natural Resources, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853, USA Received 8 November format with complex biological samples. Published by Elsevier Inc. Keywords: Thiaminase I; Thiaminase II syndrome (EMS),1 which occurs in the offspring of large predatory fish (coho salmon, chinook salmon

Kraft, Clifford E.

397

Organic geochemistry of Gadvan and Kazhdumi formations (Cretaceous) in South Pars field, Persian Gulf, Iran  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In Southern Iran, Gadvan (Barremian-early Aptian) and Kazhdumi (Albian) formations are the most effective source rocks and have produced the majority of hydrocarbons reserved in the Zagros Basin especially in Dezful Embayment and Persian Gulf area. In this article, hydrocarbon potential of Gadvan and Kazhdumi formations is investigated in the South Pars field which is southern extension of the North field of Qatar Country. This field is located in Persian Gulf waters and is actually the northern extension of Qatar Arc Paleohigh where geological history of Gadvan and Kazhdumi formations is different from nearby area regarding depositional setting, burial history and source rock maturity. In this study, Gadvan and Kazhdumi formations as source rock candidates, which underlay Upper Dariyan and Mauddud members, respectively, were sampled in two drilled wells of the South Pars field for routine geochemical analysis to investigate hydrocarbon potential of these formations and source rock identification of trapped oil in the Upper Dariyan and Mauddud members. Several samples from top to the bottom of the formations were taken and analyzed by Rock-Eval pyrolysis. The average TOC content of Gadvan and Kazhdumi formations is 0.79 wt. % and 0.49 wt. %, respectively. Rock-Eval results (e.g. HI vs. Tmax) represent that TOC content of these formations contains type II-III kerogens which haven't suffered sufficient thermal maturity (Ro < 0.5%) in this study area. Moreover calculated S2/S3 ratio implies that these formations in central part of Qatar Arc, South Pars field couldn't produce noticeable liquid hydrocarbon. As it is believed, Gadvan and Kazhdumi formations to be source of trapped oil in the system, therefore, in the South Pars field reserved hydrocarbon in Upper Dariyan (Aptian) and Mauddud (late Albian) members which overlie Gadvan and Kazhdumi formations, respectively, are probably generated from Gadvan and Kazhdumi formations of the nearby through and flanks of the Qatar Arc where the burial depth and temperature increase then generated hydrocarbons in downdip area are migrated to the upper carbonate reservoirs in the crest part of the Qatar Arc. Long path migration of the hydrocarbon and source rock with lower organic matter are caused hydrocarbon accumulation in the South Pars Oil Layer (Al-Shaheen) which is approved by professional petrophysical and geological studies of the field.

Omeid Rahmani; Jafar Aali; Hassan Mohseni; Hossein Rahimpour-Bonab; Seddighe Zalaghaie

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Category:Field Sampling | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Category Category Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Category:Field Sampling Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermalpower.jpg Looking for the Field Sampling page? For detailed information on Field Sampling as exploration techniques, click here. Category:Field Sampling Add.png Add a new Field Sampling Technique Subcategories This category has the following 2 subcategories, out of 2 total. G [×] Gas Sampling‎ 3 pages W [×] Water Sampling‎ 2 pages Pages in category "Field Sampling" The following 4 pages are in this category, out of 4 total. G Gas Sampling R Rock Sampling S Soil Sampling W Water Sampling Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Category:Field_Sampling&oldid=689818" Category: Field Techniques

399

Absorption and elimination of formate following oral administration of calcium formate in female human subjects  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Published abstract: Calcium formate is a water-soluble salt of an essential mineral nutrient with potential for use as a dietary calcium supplement. Formate ion is a product of endogenous and xenobiotic metabolism, but ...

Hanzlik, Robert P.; Fowler, S. C.; Eells, J. T.

2005-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

cession Numb Main Entry Title Description Restrictions Material type Extent in container Location Slides Map Case M/A Date MM/DD/YY Accession date Notes Folder List 81-002 Froman, Lenore Photographs, 1959  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Slides Map Case M/A Date MM/DD/YY Accession date Notes Folder List 81-002 Froman, Lenore Photographs, 1959 Five color 35mm slides depicting the departure of R/V Stranger on Naga Expedition, 15 June 1959. Photographs 5 items Slides 1A 1A 7/21/1981 1981 Not Needed 81-003 SIO Ship Operations and Marine Technical

Russell, Lynn

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mm sample format" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

The dark side of galaxy formation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...formation. | I discuss the discovery of a population of extremely...rsta.2002.1088 The dark side of galaxy formation...October 2002 I discuss the discovery of a population of extremely...Galaxy which creates the dark lanes in our view of...schematic of the spectral energy distribution of a luminous...

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Bridge MBA ProgrAM Program Format  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bridge MBA ProgrAM Program Format Program Duration 12 months Program Format Cohort (lockstep) Class Requirements · Application Form and $55 fee. · Resume · Essay outlining why you wish to join the Bridge MBA program, and how you expect the Bridge to aid your future job search (500 words or less) · Official

Carter, John

403

Formation of $??$ atoms in $K_{?4} decay  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We derive the decay rate of $\\pi\\mu$ atom formation in $K_{\\mu 4}$ decay. Using the obtained expressions we calculate the decay rate of atom formation and point out that considered decay can give a noticeable contribution as a background to the fundamental decay $K^+\\to \\pi^+\

S. R. Gevorkyan; A. V. Tarasov; O. O. Voskresenskaya

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

The Star Formation History of NGC 6822  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Images of five fields in the Local Group dwarf irregular galaxy NGC 6822 obtained with the {\\it Hubble Space Telescope} in the F555W and F814W filters are presented. Photometry for the stars in these images was extracted using the Point-Spread-Function fitting program HSTPHOT/MULTIPHOT. The resulting color-magnitude diagrams reach down to $V\\approx26$, a level well below the red clump, and were used to solve quantitatively for the star formation history of NGC 6822. Assuming that stars began forming in this galaxy from low-metallicity gas and that there is little variation in the metallicity at each age, the distribution of stars along the red giant branch is best fit with star formation beginning in NGC 6822 12-15 Gyr ago. The best-fitting star formation histories for the old and intermediate age stars are similar among the five fields and show a constant or somewhat increasing star formation rate from 15 Gyr ago to the present except for a possible dip in the star formation rate from 3 to 5 Gyr ago. The main differences among the five fields are in the higher overall star formation rate per area in the bar fields as well as in the ratio of the recent star formation rate to the average past rate. These variations in the recent star formation rate imply that stars formed within the past 0.6 Gyr are not spatially very well mixed throughout the galaxy.

Ted K. Wyder

2001-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

405

Tafel Musik: Formatting algorithm of tables  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper provides a description on the formatting algorithm of tables that the authors have developed. This algorithm is an important component of the so called TafeMusik (Tafel Musik) environment. TafeMusikprovides the user with an environment to ... Keywords: First-fit algorithm, Linear programming, Optimization, Tables, Tabular formatting, Tabular layout

K. -H. Shin; K. Kobayashi; A. Suzuki

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Methods for forming wellbores in heated formations  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for forming a wellbore in a heated formation includes flowing liquid cooling fluid to a bottom hole assembly in a wellbore in a heated formation. At least a portion of the liquid cooling fluid is vaporized at or near a region to be cooled. Vaporizing the liquid cooling fluid absorbs heat from the region to be cooled.

Guimerans, Rosalvina Ramona; Mansure, Arthur James

2012-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

407

Le logiciel "Tigre" en formation PLC 1 Grtice J. Vincent Le logiciel Tigre en formation PLC  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

"Tigre" en formation PLC 1 Grétice J. Vincent Le logiciel « Tigre » en formation PLC J. Vincent Le;______________________________________________________________________________________ Le logiciel "Tigre" en formation PLC 2 Grétice J. Vincent 1.1. La lecture Voici l'écran d;______________________________________________________________________________________ Le logiciel "Tigre" en formation PLC 3 Grétice J. Vincent Figure 3 1.2. La démonstration Voici l

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

408

I/O Formats at NERSC  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

I/O Formats I/O Formats I/O Formats Software I/O continues to be one of the main bottlenecks for scientific applications. Here are two software packages that many application developers use to manage input/output of heterogeneous types of binary application data used on many different platforms. HDF5 and NETCDF are both implemented on top of MPI-IO and have gained popularity as alternatives to basic POSIX API. HDF5 is a machine-independent and self-documenting file format. Each HDF5 file "looks" like a directory tree, with subdirectories, and leaf nodes that contain the actual data. This means that data can be found in a file by referring to its name, rather than its location in the file. NetCDF is a file format and support library developed at the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR).

409

Sequentially Triggered Star Formation in OB Associations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We discuss observational evidence for sequential and triggered star formation in OB associations. We first review the star formation process in the Scorpius-Centaurus OB association, the nearest OB association to the Sun, where several recent extensive studies have allowed us to reconstruct the star formation history in a rather detailed way. We then compare the observational results with those obtained for other OB associations and with recent models of rapid cloud and star formation in the turbulent interstellar medium. We conclude that the formation of whole OB subgroups (each consisting of several thousand stars) requires large-scale triggering mechanisms such as shocks from expanding wind and supernova driven superbubbles surrounding older subgroups. Other triggering mechanisms, like radiatively driven implosion of globules, also operate, but seem to be secondary processes, forming only small stellar groups rather than whole OB subgroups with thousands of stars.

Thomas Preibisch; Hans Zinnecker

2006-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

410

CO2 Sequestration in Basalt Formations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CO CO 2 SequeStratiOn in BaSalt FOrmatiOnS Background There is growing concern that buildup of greenhouse gases, especially carbon dioxide (CO 2 ), in the atmosphere is contributing to global climate change. One option for mitigating this effect is to sequester CO 2 in geologic formations. Numerous site assessments for geologic sequestration of CO 2 have been conducted in virtually every region of the United States. For the most part, these studies have involved storing CO 2 in saline formation, deep coal seams, and depleted oil and gas reservoirs. Another option, however, is basalt formations. Basalt is a dark-colored, silica-rich, volcanic rock that contains cations-such as calcium, magnesium, and iron-that can combine with CO 2 to form carbonate minerals. Basalt formations have not received much

411

Special nuclear material inventory sampling plans  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents improved procedures for obtaining statistically valid sampling plans for nuclear facilities. The double sampling concept and methods for developing optimal double sampling plans are described. An algorithm is described that is satisfactory for finding optimal double sampling plans and choosing appropriate detection and false alarm probabilities. (ACR)

Vaccaro, H.S.; Goldman, A.S.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Soil Gas Sampling | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Soil Gas Sampling Soil Gas Sampling Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Soil Gas Sampling Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Field Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Field Sampling Parent Exploration Technique: Gas Sampling Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Stratigraphic/Structural: Identify concealed faults that act as conduits for hydrothermal fluids. Hydrological: Identify hydrothermal gases of magmatic origin. Thermal: Differentiate between amagmatic or magmatic sources heat. Dictionary.png Soil Gas Sampling: Soil gas sampling is sometimes used in exploration for blind geothermal resources to detect anomalously high concentrations of hydrothermal gases

413

Gas Flux Sampling | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Gas Flux Sampling Gas Flux Sampling Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Gas Flux Sampling Details Activities (26) Areas (20) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Field Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Field Sampling Parent Exploration Technique: Gas Sampling Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Stratigraphic/Structural: High flux can be indicative of conduits for fluid flow. Hydrological: Thermal: Anomalous flux is associated with active hydrothermal activity. Dictionary.png Gas Flux Sampling: Gas flux sampling measures the flow of volatile gas emissions from a specific location and compares it to average background emissions. Anomalously high gas flux can be an indication of hydrothermal activity.

414

Surface Gas Sampling | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Surface Gas Sampling Surface Gas Sampling Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Surface Gas Sampling Details Activities (12) Areas (10) Regions (1) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Field Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Field Sampling Parent Exploration Technique: Gas Sampling Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Stratigraphic/Structural: Hydrological: Gas composition and source of fluids. Thermal: Distinguish magmatic/mantle heat inputs. Can be used to estimate reservoir fluid temperatures. Dictionary.png Surface Gas Sampling: Gas sampling is done to characterize the chemical, thermal, or hydrological properties of a surface or subsurface hydrothermal system. Other definitions:Wikipedia Reegle Introduction

415

Physical sampling for site and waste characterization  

SciTech Connect

Physical sampling plays a basic role in site and waste characterization program effort. The term ``physical sampling`` used here means collecting tangible, physical samples of soil, water, air, waste streams, or other materials. The industry defines the term ``physical sampling`` broadly to include measurements of physical conditions such as temperature, wind conditions, and pH which are also often taken in a sample collection effort. Most environmental compliance actions are supported by the results of taking, recording, and analyzing physical samples and the measuring of physical conditions taken in association with sample collecting.

Bonnough, T.L.

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Just the Right Size for Small Sample Dialysis! Now available: Trial-size packages of our versatile Slide-A-Lyzer MINI  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Slide-A-Lyzer® MINI Dialysis Units Slide-A-Lyzer® Mini Tubes Slide-A-Lyzer® Mini Tubes Slide-A-Lyzer® Mini Units & Float For small-sample preparation (5-100 µl), nothing is more versatile than Pierce Slide new formats allow you to test the Slide-A-Lyzer® MINI Units as a single sample (microtube format

Lebendiker, Mario

417

Influence of shockwave obliquity on deformation twin formation in Ta  

SciTech Connect

Energetic loading subjects a material to a 'Taylor wave' (triangular wave) loading profile that experiences an evolving balance of hydrostatic (spherical) and deviatoric stresses. While much has been learned over the past five decades concerning the propensity of deformation twinning in samples shockloaded using 'square-topped' profiles as a function of peak stress, achieved most commonly via flyer plate loading, less is known concerning twinning propensity during non-I-dimensional sweeping detonation wave loading. Systematic small-scale energetically-driven shock loading experiments were conducted on Ta samples shock loaded with PEFN that was edge detonated. Deformation twinning was quantified in post-mortem samples as a function of detonation geometry and radial position. In the edge detonated loading geometry examined in this paper, the average volume fraction of deformation twins was observed to drastically increase with increasing shock obliquity. The results of this study are discussed in light of the formation mechanisms of deformation twins, previous literature studies of twinning in shocked materials, and modeling of the effects of shock obliquity on the evolution of the stress tensor during shock loading.

Gray, George T., III [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Livescu, V [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Cerreta, E K [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mason, T A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Maudlin, P J [RETIRED; Bingert, J F [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2009-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

418

THE FORMATION OF IRIS DIAGNOSTICS. II. THE FORMATION OF THE Mg II h and k LINES IN THE SOLAR ATMOSPHERE  

SciTech Connect

NASA's Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS) small explorer mission will study how the solar atmosphere is energized. IRIS contains an imaging spectrograph that covers the Mg II h and k lines as well as a slit-jaw imager centered at Mg II k. Understanding the observations requires forward modeling of Mg II h and k line formation from three-dimensional (3D) radiation-magnetohydrodynamic (RMHD) models. This paper is the second in a series where we undertake this modeling. We compute the vertically emergent h and k intensity from a snapshot of a dynamic 3D RMHD model of the solar atmosphere, and investigate which diagnostic information about the atmosphere is contained in the synthetic line profiles. We find that the Doppler shift of the central line depression correlates strongly with the vertical velocity at optical depth unity, which is typically located less than 200 km below the transition region (TR). By combining the Doppler shifts of the h and k lines we can retrieve the sign of the velocity gradient just below the TR. The intensity in the central line depression is anti-correlated with the formation height, especially in subfields of a few square Mm. This intensity could thus be used to measure the spatial variation of the height of the TR. The intensity in the line-core emission peaks correlates with the temperature at its formation height, especially for strong emission peaks. The peaks can thus be exploited as a temperature diagnostic. The wavelength difference between the blue and red peaks provides a diagnostic of the velocity gradients in the upper chromosphere. The intensity ratio of the blue and red peaks correlates strongly with the average velocity in the upper chromosphere. We conclude that the Mg II h and k lines are excellent probes of the very upper chromosphere just below the TR, a height regime that is impossible to probe with other spectral lines. They also provide decent temperature and velocity diagnostics of the middle chromosphere.

Leenaarts, J.; Pereira, T. M. D.; Carlsson, M.; De Pontieu, B. [Institute of Theoretical Astrophysics, University of Oslo, P.O. Box 1029 Blindern, NO-0315 Oslo (Norway); Uitenbroek, H., E-mail: jorritl@astro.uio.no, E-mail: tiago.pereira@astro.uio.no, E-mail: mats.carlsson@astro.uio.no, E-mail: bdp@lmsal.com, E-mail: huitenbroek@nso.edu [NSO/Sacramento Peak P.O. Box 62 Sunspot, NM 88349-0062 (United States)

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

TRU waste-sampling program  

SciTech Connect

As part of a TRU waste-sampling program, Los Alamos National Laboratory retrieved and examined 44 drums of /sup 238/Pu- and /sup 239/Pu-contaminated waste. The drums ranged in age from 8 months to 9 years. The majority of drums were tested for pressure, and gas samples withdrawn from the drums were analyzed by a mass spectrometer. Real-time radiography and visual examination were used to determine both void volumes and waste content. Drum walls were measured for deterioration, and selected drum contents were reassayed for comparison with original assays and WIPP criteria. Each drum tested at atmospheric pressure. Mass spectrometry revealed no problem with /sup 239/Pu-contaminated waste, but three 8-month-old drums of /sup 238/Pu-contaminated waste contained a potentially hazardous gas mixture. Void volumes fell within the 81 to 97% range. Measurements of drum walls showed no significant corrosion or deterioration. All reassayed contents were within WIPP waste acceptance criteria. Five of the drums opened and examined (15%) could not be certified as packaged. Three contained free liquids, one had corrosive materials, and one had too much unstabilized particulate. Eleven drums had the wrong (or not the most appropriate) waste code. In many cases, disposal volumes had been inefficiently used. 2 refs., 23 figs., 7 tabs.

Warren, J.L.; Zerwekh, A.

1985-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Short torch design for direct liquid sample introduction using conventional and micro-nebulizers for plasma spectrometry  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus and method for providing direct liquid sample introduction using a nebulizer are provided. The apparatus and method include a short torch having an inner tube and an outer tube, and an elongated adapter having a cavity for receiving the nebulizer and positioning a nozzle tip of the nebulizer a predetermined distance from a tip of the outer tube of the short torch. The predetermined distance is preferably about 2-5 mm.

Montaser, Akbar (Potomac, MD); Westphal, Craig S. (Landenberg, PA); Kahen, Kaveh (Montgomery Village, MD); Rutkowski, William F. (Arlington, VA)

2008-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mm sample format" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Formation of phases in the films of a Ag-In-Se system  

SciTech Connect

Processes of electron-diffraction structure analysis have been used to study the processes of phase formation and phase transitions in thin layers of a Ag-In-Se system. The phases formed at the onset of interaction between the films and phase transformations occurring during annealing of the samples in vacuum are established. It is found that thin films of the AgInSe{sub 2} compound formed as a result of simultaneous or consecutive deposition of components are amorphous, and crystallization brings about the formation of textured films with high structural quality

Ismayilov, D. I.; Kerimova, N. K., E-mail: kerimova-nurlana@mail.ru [Azerbaijan National Academy of Sciences, Institute of Physics (Azerbaijan)

2009-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

422

Calculation of the Aluminosilicate Half-Life Formation Time in the 2H Evaporator  

SciTech Connect

The 2H Evaporator contains large quantities of aluminosilicate solids deposited on internal fixtures. The proposed cleaning operations will dissolve the solids in nitric acid. Operations will then neutralize the waste prior to transfer to a waste tank. Combining recent calculations of heat transfer for the 2H Evaporator cleaning operations and laboratory experiments for dissolution of solid samples from the pot, the authors estimated the re-formation rate for aluminosilicates during cooling. The results indicate a half-life formation of 17 hours when evaporator solution cools from 60 degrees C and 9 hours when cooled from 90 degrees C.

Fondeur, F.F.

2000-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

423

Definition: Rock Sampling | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Sampling Sampling Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Rock Sampling Systematic rock sampling can be used to characterize a geothermal reservoir. The physical and chemical properties of rock samples provide important information for determining whether a power generation or heat utilization facility can be developed. Some general rock properties can be measured by visual inspection, but detailed properties require laboratory techniques. View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition A core sample is a cylindrical section of (usually) a naturally occurring substance. Most core samples are obtained by drilling with special drills into the substance, for example sediment or rock, with a hollow steel tube called a core drill. The hole made for the core sample is called the "core hole". A variety of core samplers exist to sample

424

Fluid sampling system for a nuclear reactor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system of extracting fluid samples, either liquid or gas, from the interior of a nuclear reactor containment utilizes a jet pump. To extract the sample fluid, a nonradioactive motive fluid is forced through the inlet and discharge ports of a jet pump located outside the containment, creating a suction that draws the sample fluid from the containment through a sample conduit connected to the pump suction port. The mixture of motive fluid and sample fluid is discharged through a return conduit to the interior of the containment. The jet pump and means for removing a portion of the sample fluid from the sample conduit can be located in a shielded sample grab station located next to the containment. A non-nuclear grade active pump can be located outside the grab sampling station and the containment to pump the nonradioactive motive fluid through the jet pump.

Lau, Louis K. (Monroeville, PA); Alper, Naum I. (Monroeville, PA)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Licensing Guide and Sample License  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

TEI:HNOL06Y TRANSFER WORKIN6 6ROUP TEI:HNOL06Y TRANSFER WORKIN6 6ROUP Lic:en!iing Guide and Sample Lic:en!ie ·~ ICan.u City Plan I OFermilab ~OAK ~RIDGE Nuioul~.

426

Rapid Gas Hydrate Formation Process Opportunity  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Gas Hydrate Formation Process Gas Hydrate Formation Process Opportunity The Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) is seeking collaborative research and licensing partners interested in implementing United States Non-provisional Patent Application entitled "Rapid Gas Hydrate Formation Process." Disclosed in this application is a method and device for producing gas hydrates from a two-phase mixture of water and a hydrate forming gas such as methane (CH 4 ) or carbon dioxide (CO 2 ). The two-phase mixture is created in a mixing zone, which may be contained within the body of the spray nozzle. The two-phase mixture is subsequently sprayed into a reaction vessel, under pressure and temperature conditions suitable for gas hydrate formation. The reaction

427

Modeling deposit formation in diesel injector nozzle  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Formation of deposit in the diesel injector nozzle affects the injection behavior and hinders performance. Under running condition, deposit precursors are washed away by the ensuing injection. However, during the cool down ...

Sudhiesh Kumar, Chintoo

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

MAES Project Review Procedures SEMINAR FORMAT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

MAES Project Review Procedures SEMINAR FORMAT The peer review seminar will be styled after oral the project's past accomplishments (if renewal) Discuss the new project proposal 2. Open Discussion ­ (approx

Maxwell, Bruce D.

429

Gas hydrate formation in fine sand  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Gas hydrate formation from two types of dissolved gas (methane and mixed gas) was studied under varying thermodynamic conditions in ... Sea. The testing media consisted of silica sand particles with diameters of ...

XiaoYa Zang; DeQing Liang; NengYou Wu

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Kinetics of acrylamide formation in potato chips  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in potato chips. Seven potato cultivars were analyzed to determine their influence on acrylamide formation during traditional and vacuum frying. The White Rose cultivar produced the highest level of acrylamide during both traditional and vacuum frying...

Granda, Claudia Esthela

2006-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

431

ALARA ASSESSMENT OF SETTLER SLUDGE SAMPLING METHODS  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this assessment is to compare underwater and above water settler sludge sampling methods to determine if the added cost for underwater sampling for the sole purpose of worker dose reductions is justified. Initial planning for sludge sampling included container, settler and knock-out-pot (KOP) sampling. Due to the significantly higher dose consequence of KOP sludge, a decision was made to sample KOP underwater to achieve worker dose reductions. Additionally, initial plans were to utilize the underwater sampling apparatus for settler sludge. Since there are no longer plans to sample KOP sludge, the decision for underwater sampling for settler sludge needs to be revisited. The present sampling plan calls for spending an estimated $2,500,000 to design and construct a new underwater sampling system (per A21 C-PL-001 RevOE). This evaluation will compare and contrast the present method of above water sampling to the underwater method that is planned by the Sludge Treatment Project (STP) and determine if settler samples can be taken using the existing sampling cart (with potentially minor modifications) while maintaining doses to workers As Low As Reasonably Achievable (ALARA) and eliminate the need for costly redesigns, testing and personnel retraining.

NELSEN LA

2009-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

432

Cyclic Imide Dioxime: Formation and Hydrolytic Stability  

SciTech Connect

Poly(acrylamidoximes) play an important role in the uranium extraction from seawater. The present work reports solution studies of simple analogs to address the formation and stability of two binding sites present in these polymers, open-chain amidoximes and cyclic imide dioximes, including: 1) conditions that maximize the formation of the cyclic form, 2) existence of a base-induced conversion from open-chain to cyclic form, and 3) degradation under acid and base conditions.

Kang, S.O. [University of Kansas; Vukovic, Sinisa [ORNL; Custelcean, Radu [ORNL; Hay, Benjamin [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Entanglement of formation from optimal decomposition  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a new method of analytically deriving the entanglement of formation of the bipartite mixed state. The method realizes the optimal decomposition families of states. Our method can lead to many new results concerning entanglement of formation, its additivity and entanglement cost. We illustrate it by investigating the two-qubit state, the separable state, the maximally correlated state, the isotropic state and the Werner state.

Lin Chen; Yi-Xin Chen

2007-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

434

Formation of FePt nanoparticles by organometallic synthesis  

SciTech Connect

Our interest in determining the mechanism of FePt nanoparticle formation has led to this study of the evolution of particle size and composition during synthesis. FePt nanoparticles were prepared by the simultaneous reduction of platinum acetylacetonate and thermal decomposition of iron pentacarbonyl. During the course of the reaction, samples were removed and the particle structure, size, and composition were determined using x-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and scanning electron microscopy-energy dispersive x-ray spectrometry. Early in the reaction the particles were Pt rich (greater than 95 at. % Pt) and as the reaction proceeded the Fe content increased to the target of 50%. The particle diameter increased from 3.1 to 4.6 nm during the reaction. Energy dispersive x-ray spectrometry measurements of individual particle compositions using a high resolution TEM showed a broad distribution of particle compositions with a standard deviation greater than 15% of the average composition.

Bagaria, H. G.; Johnson, D. T.; Srivastava, C.; Thompson, G. B.; Shamsuzzoha, M.; Nikles, D. E. [Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, The University of Alabama, P.O. Box 870203, Tuscaloosa, Alabama 35487 and Center for Materials for Information Technology, The University of Alabama, P.O. Box 870209, Tuscaloosa, Alabama 35487 (United States); Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, The University of Alabama, P.O. Box 870202, Tuscaloosa, Alabama 35487 and Center for Materials for Information Technology, The University of Alabama, P.O. Box 870209, Tuscaloosa, Alabama 35487 (United States); School of Mines and Energy Development, The University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, Alabama 35487 (United States); Department of Chemistry, The University of Alabama, P.O. Box 870336, Tuscaloosa, Alabama 35487 and Center for Materials for Information Technology, The University of Alabama, P.O. Box 870209, Tuscaloosa, Alabama 35487 (United States)

2007-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

435

Fully Automated Laser Ablation Liquid Capture Sample Analysis using NanoElectrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry  

SciTech Connect

RATIONALE: Laser ablation provides for the possibility of sampling a large variety of surfaces with high spatial resolution. This type of sampling when employed in conjunction with liquid capture followed by nanoelectrospray ionization provides the opportunity for sensitive and prolonged interrogation of samples by mass spectrometry as well as the ability to analyze surfaces not amenable to direct liquid extraction. METHODS: A fully automated, reflection geometry, laser ablation liquid capture spot sampling system was achieved by incorporating appropriate laser fiber optics and a focusing lens into a commercially available, liquid extraction surface analysis (LESA ) ready Advion TriVersa NanoMate system. RESULTS: Under optimized conditions about 10% of laser ablated material could be captured in a droplet positioned vertically over the ablation region using the NanoMate robot controlled pipette. The sampling spot size area with this laser ablation liquid capture surface analysis (LA/LCSA) mode of operation (typically about 120 m x 160 m) was approximately 50 times smaller than that achievable by direct liquid extraction using LESA (ca. 1 mm diameter liquid extraction spot). The set-up was successfully applied for the analysis of ink on glass and paper as well as the endogenous components in Alstroemeria Yellow King flower petals. In a second mode of operation with a comparable sampling spot size, termed laser ablation/LESA , the laser system was used to drill through, penetrate, or otherwise expose material beneath a solvent resistant surface. Once drilled, LESA was effective in sampling soluble material exposed at that location on the surface. CONCLUSIONS: Incorporating the capability for different laser ablation liquid capture spot sampling modes of operation into a LESA ready Advion TriVersa NanoMate enhanced the spot sampling spatial resolution of this device and broadened the surface types amenable to analysis to include absorbent and solvent resistant materials.

Lorenz, Matthias [ORNL] [ORNL; Ovchinnikova, Olga S [ORNL] [ORNL; Van Berkel, Gary J [ORNL] [ORNL

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Definition: Field Sampling | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Field Sampling Field Sampling Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Field Sampling Systematic field sampling is critical for reliable characterize a geothermal resource. Some of the physical and chemical properties of rock samples can be estimated by visual inspection, but accurate determination of these properties requires detailed laboratory analysis. Surface or subsurface fluid sampling is also routinely performed to characterize the chemical, thermal, or hydrological properties of a hydrothermal system. Combinations of these sampling techniques have traditionally been used to obtain important information used to determine whether or not a viable power generation or heat utilization facility can be developed at a prospect. Soil sampling is a less commonly used method for exploration of

437

Principles for Sampling Airborne Radioactivity from Stacks  

SciTech Connect

This book chapter describes the special processes involved in sampling the airborne effluents from nuclear faciities. The title of the book is Radioactive Air Sampling Methods. The abstract for this chapter was cleared as PNNL-SA-45941.

Glissmeyer, John A.

2010-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

438

Spatially Resolved Galaxy Star Formation and its Environmental Dependence I  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We use the photometric information contained in individual pixels of 44,964 (0.019effects of environment on galaxy star formation (SF). We use the pixel-z technique, which combines stellar population synthesis models with photometric redshift template fitting on the scale of individual pixels in galaxy images. Spectral energy distributions are constructed, sampling a wide range of properties such as age, star formation rate (SFR), dust obscuration and metallicity. By summing the SFRs in the pixels, we demonstrate that the distribution of total galaxy SFR shifts to lower values as the local density of surrounding galaxies increases, as found in other studies. The effect is most prominent in the galaxies with the highest star formation, and we see the break in the SFR-density relation at a local galaxy density of $\\approx 0.05 $(Mpc/h)$^{-3}$. Since our method allows us to spatially resolve the SF distribution within galaxies, we can calculate the mean SFR of each galaxy as a function of radius. We find that on average the mean SFR is dominated by SF in the central regions of galaxies, and that the trend for suppression of SFR in high density environments is driven by a reduction in this nuclear SF. We also find that the mean SFR in the outskirts is largely independent of environmental effects. This trend in the mean SFR is shared by galaxies which are highly star forming, while those which are weakly star forming show no statistically significant correlation between their environment and the mean SFR at any radius.

Niraj Welikala; Andrew J. Connolly; Andrew M. Hopkins; Ryan Scranton; Alberto Conti

2007-12-25T23:59:59.000Z

439

Multilayer roughness and image formation in the Schwarzschild objective  

SciTech Connect

We present a study of the effect of multilayer-surface-roughness-induced scattering in the image formation of the Schwarzschild objective (SO) used in the spectromicroscope MAXIMUM. The two mirrors comprising the SO are coated with Ru/B{sub 4}C multilayers that have a peak reflectivity at 130 eV. We had long observed that a diffuse x-ray background surrounds the focused x-ray spot. The spatial resolution remains at 0.1 {mu}m in spite of this. However, since a significant fraction of the flux is lost to the background, since too large an area of the sample is illuminated, and since the S/N ratio is degraded, the origins of this effect merit investigation. This diffuse background resulting from x-ray scattering at the surface of the mirrors was mapped out using bidirectional knife edge scans. Complementary surface roughness simulations were carried out with the ray-tracing program SHADOW. AFM experiments were also done to directly measure the surface roughness and power spectrum of representative multilayers. Following curve fitting, it was possible to classify Gaussian components in both the measured and simulated profiles as arising from scattering occurring at either the convex primary mirror or the concave secondary mirror. Together with geometrical analysis, these techniques permitted us to track the image formation process of an actual optical system in the presence of surface roughness. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

Singh, S.; Solak, H.; Cerrina, F. [University of Wisconsin, 3731 Schneider Drive, Stoughton, WI 53589 (United States)] [University of Wisconsin, 3731 Schneider Drive, Stoughton, WI 53589 (United States)

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Multilayer roughness and image formation in the Schwarzschild objective  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We present a study of the effect of multilayer?surface?roughness?induced scattering in the image formation of the Schwarzschild objective (SO) used in the spectromicroscope MAXIMUM. The two mirrors comprising the SO are coated with Ru/B4C multilayers that have a peak reflectivity at 130 eV. We had long observed that a diffuse x?ray background surrounds the focused x?ray spot. The spatial resolution remains at 0.1 ?m in spite of this. However since a significant fraction of the flux is lost to the background since too large an area of the sample is illuminated and since the S/N ratio is degraded the origins of this effect merit investigation. This diffuse background resulting from x?ray scattering at the surface of the mirrors was mapped out using bidirectional knife edge scans. Complementary surface roughness simulations were carried out with the ray?tracing program SHADOW. AFM experiments were also done to directly measure the surface roughness and power spectrum of representative multilayers. Following curve fitting it was possible to classify Gaussian components in both the measured and simulated profiles as arising from scattering occurring at either the convex primary mirror or the concave secondary mirror. Together with geometrical analysis these techniques permitted us to track the image formation process of an actual optical system in the presence of surface roughness.

S. Singh; H. Solak; F. Cerrina

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mm sample format" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Sample holder for X-ray diffractometry  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A sample holder for use with X-ray diffractometers with the capability to rotate the sample, as well as to adjust the position of the sample in the x, y, and z directions. Adjustment in the x direction is accomplished through loosening set screws, moving a platform, and retightening the set screws. Motion translators are used for adjustment in the y and z directions. An electric motor rotates the sample, and receives power from the diffractometer.

Hesch, Victor L. (Los Alamos, NM)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

An economic approach to acceptance sampling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

- tially reducing the cost of inspection. Evolution of Econom1c Sampling Plans The first attempt to develop a consistent approach to aoceptance sampling was conducted by Bell Telephone Labo- ratories during the 1920's. As a result of this research...- tially reducing the cost of inspection. Evolution of Econom1c Sampling Plans The first attempt to develop a consistent approach to aoceptance sampling was conducted by Bell Telephone Labo- ratories during the 1920's. As a result of this research...

Ruth, Robert Justin

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

443

E-Print Network 3.0 - air pollution sampling Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

sampling Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: air pollution sampling Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 griculture is in the spotlight as a...

444

Separation principle for a sampled bilinear system  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This work is a continuation of [2] and [1] in which the authors studied the preservation of the observability and observer under sampling. In this paper, by relaxing some hypotheses, we study the observability and stabilization problems for a sampled ... Keywords: 93B07, Sampled bilinear system, observability, observer, stabilization

S. Ammar; M. A. Hammami; H. Jerbi; J. C. Vivalda

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

Formation of nanostructures at the glass-carbon surface exposed to laser radiation  

SciTech Connect

An experimental technique for obtaining nanostructures in the field of high-power laser radiation at the surface of carbon materials is developed. A specific feature of this technique is the formation of liquid carbon inside the region of laser action in the sample exposed to radiation in air at a pressure of {approx}1 atm. Several types of nanostructures (quasi-domains and nanopeaks) are detected in the laser cavern and beyond the range of laser action. Mechanisms of formation of such structures are proposed. The formation of quasi-domains is related to crystallisation of the melt. The nanopeak groups are formed outside the laser action region during the deposition of hot vapours of the material escaping from this region. The dependences of the variation in morphological properties of the nanostructures on the duration of laser action and the radii of typical cavern zones on the laser radiation power are obtained. (interaction of laser radiation with matter. laser plasma)

Abramov, D V; Gerke, M N; Kucherik, A O; Kutrovskaya, S V; Prokoshev, V G; Arakelyan, S M [Vladimir State University, Vladimir (Russian Federation)

2007-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

446

The star formation history inferred from long gamma-ray bursts with high pseudo-redshifts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

By employing a simple semi-analytical star formation model where the formation rates of Population (Pop) I/II and III stars can be calculated, respectively, we account for the number distribution of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) with high pseudo-redshifts that was derived from an empirical luminosity-indictor relationship. It is suggested that a considerable number of Pop III GRBs could exist in the present sample of Swift GRBs. By further combining the implication for the star formation history from the optical depth of the CMB photons, it is also suggested that only a very small fraction 0.6% of Pop III GRBs could have triggered the Swift BAT. These results could provide an useful basis for estimating future detectability of Pop III stars and their produced transient phenomena.

Tan, Wei-Wei; Yu, Yun-Wei

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

Creating and maintaining a gas cap in tar sands formations  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Methods for treating a tar sands formation are disclosed herein. Methods for treating a tar sands formation may include providing heat to at least part of a hydrocarbon layer in the formation from one or more heaters located in the formation. Pressure may be allowed to increase in an upper portion of the formation to provide a gas cap in the upper portion. At least some hydrocarbons are produced from a lower portion of the formation.

Vinegar, Harold J. (Bellaire, TX); Karanikas, John Michael (Houston, TX); Dinkoruk, Deniz Sumnu (Houston, TX); Wellington, Scott Lee (Bellaire, TX)

2010-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

448

E-Print Network 3.0 - asynchronous optical sampling Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

monitoring method for NRZ-DPSK signals using asynchronous delay tap sampling... the photodiode (PD). The asynchronous sampling processes occur after the optical-electrical...

449

Downhole Fluid Sampling | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Downhole Fluid Sampling Downhole Fluid Sampling Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Downhole Fluid Sampling Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Downhole Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Well Testing Techniques Parent Exploration Technique: Well Testing Techniques Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Stratigraphic/Structural: Hydrological: Water composition and source of fluids. Gas composition and source of fluids. Thermal: Water temperature. Distinguish magmatic/mantle heat inputs. Can be used to estimate reservoir fluid temperatures. Dictionary.png Downhole Fluid Sampling: Downhole fluid sampling is done to characterize the chemical, thermal, or hydrological properties of a surface or subsurface aqueous system. Downhole

450

Sampling procedure for atmospheric geothermal brines  

SciTech Connect

Thermodynamic and chemical changes can alter the characteristics of geothermal brine samples significantly. A procedure which minimizes these changes has been developed for sampling atmospheric geothermal brines. The method is fast with minimal cooling and yields representative samples which have been stabilized to preserve their integrity. The procedure provides reliable suspended solids data and both the solid and liquid samples are suitable for elemental analysis. The procedure is also a valuable tool to aid in monitoring a geothermal brine conditioning system. Data are included from a flow test at an MCR Geothermal well in the Imperial Valley area of California to illustrate the utility of the sampling procedure.

Kochelek, J.T.; Zienty, D.F.

1981-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

Mixed-mode diesel HCCI with External Mixture Formation: Preliminary...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Mixed-mode diesel HCCI with External Mixture Formation: Preliminary Results Mixed-mode diesel HCCI with External Mixture Formation: Preliminary Results 2003 DEER Conference...

452

Multifunctional, Inorganic-Filled Separators for Large Format...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

& Publications Multifunctional, Inorganic-Filled Separators for Large Format, Li-ion Batteries Multifunctional, Inorganic-Filled Separators for Large Format, Li-ion Batteries...

453

Multifunctional, Inorganic-Filled Separators for Large Format...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Multifunctional, Inorganic-Filled Separators for Large Format, Li-ion Batteries Multifunctional, Inorganic-Filled Separators for Large Format, Li-ion Batteries 2012 DOE Hydrogen...

454

Fayalite Dissolution and Siderite Formation in Water-Saturated...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fayalite Dissolution and Siderite Formation in Water-Saturated Supercritical CO2. Fayalite Dissolution and Siderite Formation in Water-Saturated Supercritical CO2. Abstract:...

455

Control of Formation and Cellular Detachment from Shewanella...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Formation and Cellular Detachment from Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 Biofilms by Cyclic di-GMP. Control of Formation and Cellular Detachment from Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 Biofilms...

456

Biogenic formation of photoactive arsenic-sulfide nanotubes by...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

formation of photoactive arsenic-sulfide nanotubes by Shewanella sp. strain HN-41 . Biogenic formation of photoactive arsenic-sulfide nanotubes by Shewanella sp. strain HN-41 ....

457

Cryogenic CO2 Formation on Oxidized Gold Clusters Synthesized...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cryogenic CO2 Formation on Oxidized Gold Clusters Synthesized via Reactive Layer Assisted Deposition. Cryogenic CO2 Formation on Oxidized Gold Clusters Synthesized via Reactive...

458

Hydrogen Bubbles and Formation of Nanoporous Silicon during Electroche...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Bubbles and Formation of Nanoporous Silicon during Electrochemical Etching. Hydrogen Bubbles and Formation of Nanoporous Silicon during Electrochemical Etching. Abstract: Many...

459

Vertical stratification of subsurface microbial community composition across geological formations at the Hanford Site  

SciTech Connect

The microbial diversity in subsurface sediments at the Hanford Site's 300 Area in southeastern Washington State was investigated by analyzing 21 samples recovered from depths that ranged from 9 to 52 m. Approximately 8000 non-chimeric Bacterial and Archaeal 16S rRNA gene sequences were analyzed across geological strata that contain a natural redox transition zone. These strata included the oxic coarse-grained Hanford formation, fine-grained oxic and anoxic Ringold Formation sediments, and the weathered basalt group. We detected 1233 and 120 unique bacterial and archaeal OTUs (Operational Taxonomic Units, defined at the 97% identity level). Microbial community structure and richness varied substantially across the different geological strata. Bacterial OTU richness (based upon Chao1 estimator) was highest (>700) in the upper Hanford formation, and declined to about 120 at the bottom of the Hanford formation. Just above the Ringold oxic-anoxic transition zone, richness was about 325 and declined to less than 50 in the deeper reduced zones. The Bacterial community in the oxic Hanford and Ringold Formations contained members of 9 major well-recognized phyla as well 30 as unusually high proportions of 3 candidate divisions (GAL15, NC10, and SPAM). The deeper Ringold strata were characterized by low OTU richness and a very high preponderance (ca. 90%) of Proteobacteria. The study has greatly expanded the intralineage phylogenetic diversity within some major divisions. These subsurface sediments have been shown to contain a large number of phylogenetically novel microbes, with substantial heterogeneities between sediment samples from the same geological formation.

Lin, Xueju; Kennedy, David W.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Bjornstad, Bruce N.; Konopka, Allan

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

COSMIC EVOLUTION OF STAR FORMATION ENHANCEMENT IN CLOSE MAJOR-MERGER GALAXY PAIRS SINCE z = 1  

SciTech Connect

The infrared (IR) emission of 'M {sub *} galaxies' (10{sup 10.4} {<=} M {sub star} {<=} 10{sup 11.0} M {sub Sun }) in galaxy pairs, derived using data obtained in Herschel (PEP/HerMES) and Spitzer (S-COSMOS) surveys, is compared to that of single-disk galaxies in well-matched control samples to study the cosmic evolution of the star formation enhancement induced by galaxy-galaxy interaction. Both the mean IR spectral energy distribution and mean IR luminosity of star-forming galaxies (SFGs) in SFG+SFG (S+S) pairs in the redshift bin of 0.6 < z < 1 are consistent with no star formation enhancement. SFGs in S+S pairs in a lower redshift bin of 0.2 < z < 0.6 show marginal evidence for a weak star formation enhancement. Together with the significant and strong sSFR enhancement shown by SFGs in a local sample of S+S pairs (obtained using previously published Spitzer observations), our results reveal a trend for the star formation enhancement in S+S pairs to decrease with increasing redshift. Between z = 0 and z = 1, this decline of interaction-induced star formation enhancement occurs in parallel with the dramatic increase (by a factor of {approx}10) of the sSFR of single SFGs, both of which can be explained by the higher gas fraction in higher-z disks. SFGs in mixed pairs (S+E pairs) do not show any significant star formation enhancement at any redshift. The difference between SFGs in S+S pairs and in S+E pairs suggests a modulation of the sSFR by the intergalactic medium (IGM) in the dark matter halos hosting these pairs.

Xu, C. K.; Shupe, D. L.; Bock, J.; Bridge, C.; Cooray, A.; Lu, N.; Schulz, B. [California Institute of Technology, 1200 East California Boulevard, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Bethermin, M.; Aussel, H.; Elbaz, D.; Le Floc'h, E.; Riguccini, L. [Laboratoire AIM-Paris-Saclay, CEA/DSM/Irfu, CNRS, Universite Paris Diderot, CE-Saclay, pt courrier 131, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Berta, S.; Lutz, D.; Magnelli, B. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Extraterrestrische Physik (MPE), Postfach 1312, D-85741 Garching (Germany); Conley, A. [Center for Astrophysics and Space Astronomy 389-UCB, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO 80309 (United States); Franceschini, A. [Dipartimento di Astronomia, Universita di Padova, vicolo Osservatorio, 3, I-35122 Padova (Italy); Marsden, G. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of British Columbia, 6224 Agricultural Road, Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z1 (Canada); Oliver, S. J. [Astronomy Centre, Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Sussex, Brighton BN1 9QH (United Kingdom); Pozzi, F. [INAF-Osservatorio Astronomico di Roma, via di Frascati 33, I-00040 Monte Porzio Catone (Italy); and others

2012-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mm sample format" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Sample sizes for confidence limits for reliability.  

SciTech Connect

We recently performed an evaluation of the implications of a reduced stockpile of nuclear weapons for surveillance to support estimates of reliability. We found that one technique developed at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) under-estimates the required sample size for systems-level testing. For a large population the discrepancy is not important, but for a small population it is important. We found that another technique used by SNL provides the correct required sample size. For systems-level testing of nuclear weapons, samples are selected without replacement, and the hypergeometric probability distribution applies. Both of the SNL techniques focus on samples without defects from sampling without replacement. We generalized the second SNL technique to cases with defects in the sample. We created a computer program in Mathematica to automate the calculation of confidence for reliability. We also evaluated sampling with replacement where the binomial probability distribution applies.

Darby, John L.

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

462

Rotary Mode Core Sample System availability improvement  

SciTech Connect

The Rotary Mode Core Sample System (RMCSS) is used to obtain stratified samples of the waste deposits in single-shell and double-shell waste tanks at the Hanford Site. The samples are used to characterize the waste in support of ongoing and future waste remediation efforts. Four sampling trucks have been developed to obtain these samples. Truck I was the first in operation and is currently being used to obtain samples where the push mode is appropriate (i.e., no rotation of drill). Truck 2 is similar to truck 1, except for added safety features, and is in operation to obtain samples using either a push mode or rotary drill mode. Trucks 3 and 4 are now being fabricated to be essentially identical to truck 2.

Jenkins, W.W.; Bennett, K.L.; Potter, J.D. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States); Cross, B.T.; Burkes, J.M.; Rogers, A.C. [Southwest Research Institute (United States)

1995-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

463

Formation of a flux core spheromak  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

An alternate design for compact tori specifically of the spheromak type is studied. In this design the ‘‘flux core spheromak’’ [Nucl. Fusion 29 219 (1989)] the externally imposed bias field links the confinement region of closed flux surfaces. The advantages of this configuration are: (i) it enjoys greater stability to magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) modes particularly the tilt and shift; (ii) it has a poloidal divertor and an amount of poloidal flux separating the closed flux surface region from the walls; and (iii) it might be sustained by helicity injection. Results are presented showing the dependence of the geometry on the distribution of bias flux on the conducting walls and showing the optimization of the 2?D formation scheme to minimize the contact of the plasma with coils electrodes and walls. This last topic involves taking advantage of current sheet formation and subsequent tearing as in formation of the MS spheromak [Phys. Fluids 28 3154 (1985)]. The parameters which can be varied to produce this favorable formation scheme via tearing rather than a formation that proceeds off the reversal coils are explored. In addition it is found that there is strong viscous heating of the ions in this early reconnection phase.

John M. Finn; Parvez N. Guzdar

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

464

NASA Stardust Samples Headed to BNL for Analysis  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Contact Us: Contact Us: Phone: 631 344-2345 Fax: 631 344-3368 E-mail: pubaf@bnl.gov Building 134 Brookhaven Nat'l Lab Upton, NY 11973 NSLS researchers reach for the stars(dust) Stardust spacecraft image Stardust Video See a video (in Real format) of researchers at the National Synchrotron Light Source discussing the analysis of the Stardust samples. Need RealPlayer? Space Studies at the NSLS The Stardust particles are not the first space-dust particles to be brought to the NSLS for analysis, nor are they the only type of extraterrestrial material to be studied there. For example, Mars meteorites and meteorites believed to originate from asteroids have also been analyzed at the facility. • The Origin of Organic Matter in the Solar System • Evidence of Ancient Water on an Asteroid

465

The WiggleZ Dark Energy Survey: star formation in UV-luminous galaxies from their luminosity functions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......research-article Article The WiggleZ Dark Energy Survey: star formation in UV-luminous...data release of the WiggleZ Dark Energy Survey. Our sample consists of 39-996...observations of the WiggleZ Dark Energy Survey of UV-selected galaxies using......

Russell J. Jurek; Michael J. Drinkwater; Kevin Pimbblet; Karl Glazebrook; Chris Blake; Sarah Brough; Matthew Colless; Carlos Contreras; Warrick Couch; Scott Croom; Darren Croton; Tamara M. Davis; Karl Forster; David Gilbank; Mike Gladders; Ben Jelliffe; I-hui Li; Barry Madore; D. Christopher Martin; Gregory B. Poole; Michael Pracy; Rob Sharp; Emily Wisnioski; David Woods; Ted K. Wyder; H. K. C. Yee

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

466

Category:Formatting Templates | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Category Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Category:Formatting Templates Jump to: navigation, search Formatting Templates are Templates used primarily to achieve a certian layout or style on a wiki page. They can be generic, like Template:Clear or specific, like Template:Definition. For help on creating templates, see Help:Templates. Subcategories This category has only the following subcategory. Q [×] Query Results Templates‎ 4 pages Pages in category "Formatting Templates" The following 200 pages are in this category, out of 465 total. (previous 200) (next 200) A Abraham Hot Springs Geothermal Area

467

Star Formation in Las Campanas Compact Groups  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Compact groups (CGs) of galaxies offer an exceptional laboratory for the study of dense galaxian environments --- where interactions, tidally induced activity, and mergers are expected to be at their highest rate of occurrence. Here, we present first results from a new catalogue of compact groups, one based upon the Las Campanas Redshift Survey (LCRS). Using the equivalent width of [OII]3727, we have studied the star formation activity in LCRS CGs: we find strong evidence of depressed star formation in CGs relative to that in loose groups or the field. Although much of this effect can be ascribed to morphological mix (CGs contain a high fraction of early-type galaxies), there is some evidence that the star formation rate in late-type galaxies is particularly deficient --- perhaps only one-half to one-third that of field spirals. We conclude that gas stripping mechanisms may play a role in CG environments.

Sahar S. Allam; Douglas L. Tucker; Huan Lin; Yasuhiro Hashimoto

1999-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

468

In situ oxidation of subsurface formations  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Methods and systems for treating a hydrocarbon containing formation described herein include providing heat to a first portion of the formation from a plurality of heaters in the first portion, producing produced through one or more production wells in a second portion of the formation, reducing or turning off heat provided to the first portion after a selected time, providing an oxidizing fluid through one or more of the heater wells in the first portion, providing heat to the first portion and the second portion through oxidation of at least some hydrocarbons in the first portion, and producing fluids through at least one of the production wells in the second portion. The produced fluids may include at least some oxidized hydrocarbons produced in the first portion.

Beer, Gary Lee (Houston, TX); Mo, Weijian (Sugar Land, TX); Li, Busheng (Houston, TX); Shen, Chonghui (Calgary, CA)

2011-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

469

Deuteration and evolution in the massive star formation process: the role of surface chemistry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An ever growing number of observational and theoretical evidence suggests that the deuterated fraction (column density ratio between a species containing D and its hydrogenated counterpart, Dfrac) is an evolutionary indicator both in the low- and the high-mass star formation process. However, the role of surface chemistry in these studies has not been quantified from an observational point of view. In order to compare how the deuterated fractions of species formed only in the gas and partially or uniquely on grain surfaces evolve with time, we observed rotational transitions of CH3OH, 13CH3OH, CH2DOH, CH3OD at 3 and 1.3~mm, and of NH2D at 3~mm with the IRAM-30m telescope, and the inversion transitions (1,1) and (2,2) of NH3 with the GBT, towards most of the cores already observed by Fontani et al.~(2011, 2014) in N2H+, N2D+, HNC, DNC. NH2D is detected in all but two cores, regardless of the evolutionary stage. Dfrac(NH3) is on average above 0.1, and does not change significantly from the earliest to the most ...

Fontani, F; Palau, Aina; Caselli, P; A.,; Sanchez-Monge,; Tan, J C; Audard, M

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

470

Astronomy 9603B -Star Formation Star Formation: Astronomy 9603B (Winter 2012)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Astronomy 9603B - Star Formation Star Formation: Astronomy 9603B (Winter 2012) Lecturer: Prof below. Contact information: Martin Houde Associate Professor Department of Physics and Astronomy Room 207, Physics and Astronomy Building E-mail: mhoude2@uwo.ca Phone: (519) 661-2111 x: 86711 (office) Fax

Lennard, William N.

471

The simplest model of galaxy formation – I. A formation history model of galaxy stellar mass growth  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......parametrizing the physics function as a simple...derived star formation rates as a function of...simple form of the physics function provides...haloes grow, they pass through the region...of the peak of the physics function and its...the star formation rate-halo mass relation......

Simon J. Mutch; Darren J. Croton; Gregory B. Poole

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

472

Planet Formation: Planet Formation: Evolution of The Solar NebulaEvolution of The Solar Nebula  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Planet Formation: Planet Formation: Evolution of The Solar NebulaEvolution of The Solar Nebula #12;Evolution of the Solar NebulaEvolution of the Solar Nebula 1.1. Nebula collapses into a disk 2000 KTemperatures near the Sun reach 2000 K #12;Evolution of the Solar NebulaEvolution of the Solar

Herrick, Robert R.

473

Delayed ettringite formation (DEF) in mortars of white cement  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this study white cement CEM I-52.5 and white limestone cement CEM II-LL, A and B, with 15% and 25% limestone substitution, were studied. The way delayed ettringite forms, due to exposure to high temperatures (50 °C) and external sulphate attacks, was examined in the mortar samples. The mortars were immersed at 50 °C for 180 days in: (a) a saturated Ca(OH)2 solution and (b) a 5% Na2SO4 solution. During the experiment’s duration, the mortar samples were being observed visually on a regular basis while their expansion was estimated on a weekly basis by measuring the change of length with a micrometer. At the end of the experiment, the mortar samples’ compressive strength was determined and the deterioration products were identified through means of X-ray Diffraction (XRD), Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM-EDAX), Thermogravimetry (TG) and Infra-Red Spectroscopy (FT-IR). Concluding it is evident that the amount of ettringite is proportional to the C3A content of cement. Sulphates amount in cement is the controlling factor for heat induced ettringite formation since when they are consumed the reaction stops. On the other hand in the case of external sulphate attack another important controlling factor is the compressive strength of the cement; the higher compressive strength the lower the risk of expansion. Finally, in the case of external sulphate attack, limestone, when added to cement, was proved to enhance the durability against sulphates attack when compared to a cement of the same class.

M. Katsioti; N. Patsikas; P. Pipilikaki; N. Katsiotis; K. Mikedi; M. Chaniotakis

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

474

Uncertainty and sampling issues in tank characterization  

SciTech Connect

A defensible characterization strategy must recognize that uncertainties are inherent in any measurement or estimate of interest and must employ statistical methods for quantifying and managing those uncertainties. Estimates of risk and therefore key decisions must incorporate knowledge about uncertainty. This report focuses statistical methods that should be employed to ensure confident decision making and appropriate management of uncertainty. Sampling is a major source of uncertainty that deserves special consideration in the tank characterization strategy. The question of whether sampling will ever provide the reliable information needed to resolve safety issues is explored. The issue of sample representativeness must be resolved before sample information is reliable. Representativeness is a relative term but can be defined in terms of bias and precision. Currently, precision can be quantified and managed through an effective sampling and statistical analysis program. Quantifying bias is more difficult and is not being addressed under the current sampling strategies. Bias could be bounded by (1) employing new sampling methods that can obtain samples from other areas in the tanks, (2) putting in new risers on some worst case tanks and comparing the results from existing risers with new risers, or (3) sampling tanks through risers under which no disturbance or activity has previously occurred. With some bound on bias and estimates of precision, various sampling strategies could be determined and shown to be either cost-effective or infeasible.

Liebetrau, A.M.; Pulsipher, B.A.; Kashporenko, D.M. [and others

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

475

Proper Oil Sampling Intervals and Sample Collection Techniques Gasoline/Diesel/Natural Gas Engines  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Proper Oil Sampling Intervals and Sample Collection Techniques Gasoline/Diesel/Natural Gas Engines: · Oil samples can be collected during oil changes. Follow manufacturers recommendations on frequency (hours, mileage, etc) of oil changes. · Capture a sample from the draining oil while the oil is still hot

476

E-Print Network 3.0 - aceros con tratamientos Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

en la... , emplear los valores: t 10 mm, b 300 mm. y h 500 mm., sabiendo que la resistencia del acero empleado Source: Escolano, Francisco - Departamento de Ciencia de la...

477

E-Print Network 3.0 - acero inoxidable mediante Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

en la... , emplear los valores: t 10 mm, b 300 mm. y h 500 mm., sabiendo que la resistencia del acero empleado Source: Escolano, Francisco - Departamento de Ciencia de la...

478

Isotope Evidence for Ozone Formation on Surfaces  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Remarkably, the gas-phase recombination or association reaction of ozone has an unusually large (?10%) isotope effect and shows almost equal enrichments of the ozone molecules containing two different oxygen isotopes. ... For a better understanding of the pressure and temperature dependence of ozone isotopic composition in oxygen discharges, we developed a relatively simple isotope kinetic model that accounts for the processes of (i) heterogeneous ozone formation at the reactor walls, (ii) isotope exchange of oxygen atoms with O2 molecules, and (iii) ozone formation in the gas phase. ...

Christof Janssen; Béla Tuzson

2010-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

479

Aromatics oxidation and soot formation in flames  

SciTech Connect

This project is concerned with the kinetics and mechanisms of aromatics oxidation and soot and fullerenes formation in flames. The scope includes detailed measurements of profiles of stable and radical species concentrations in low-pressure one-dimensional premixed flames. Intermediate species identifications and mole fractions, fluxes, and net reaction rates calculated from the measured profiles are used to test postulated reaction mechanisms. Particular objectives are to identify and to determine or confirm rate constants for the main benzene oxidation reactions in flames, and to characterize fullerenes and their formation mechanisms and kinetics.

Howard, J.B.; Pope, C.J.; Shandross, R.A.; Yadav, T. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge (United States)

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

480

On Superheavy Element Formation and Beyond  

SciTech Connect

Low energy collisions of very heavy nuclei (238U+238U, 232Th+250Cf and 238U+248Cm) have been studied within the realistic dynamical model based on multi-dimensional Langevin equations. Large charge and mass transfer was found due to the ''inverse quasi-fission'' process leading to formation of survived superheavy long-lived neutron-rich nuclei. In many events lifetime of the composite system consisting of two touching nuclei turns out to be rather long; sufficient for spontaneous positron formation from super-strong electric field, a fundamental QED process.

Zagrebaev, Valery [Flerov Laboratory of Nuclear Reaction, JINR, 141980 Dubna (Russian Federation); Greiner, Walter [Frankfurt Institute for Advanced Studies, J.W. Goethe-Universitaet, 60325 Frankfurt (Germany)

2007-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mm sample format" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Modelling and control of satellite formations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

MODELLING AND CONTROL OF SATELLITE FORMATIONS A Dissertation by VEERA VENKATA SESHA SAI VADDI Submitted to the O±ce of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial ful¯llment of the requirements for the degree of DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY May 2003... Major Subject: Aerospace Engineering MODELLING AND CONTROL OF SATELLITE FORMATIONS A Dissertation by VEERA VENKATA SESHA SAI VADDI Submitted to Texas A&M University in partial ful¯llment of the requirements for the degree of DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY Approved...

Vaddi, Veera Venkata Sesha Sai

2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

482

Parallel heater system for subsurface formations  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A heating system for a subsurface formation is disclosed. The system includes a plurality of substantially horizontally oriented or inclined heater sections located in a hydrocarbon containing layer in the formation. At least a portion of two of the heater sections are substantially parallel to each other. The ends of at least two of the heater sections in the layer are electrically coupled to a substantially horizontal, or inclined, electrical conductor oriented substantially perpendicular to the ends of the at least two heater sections.

Harris, Christopher Kelvin (Houston, TX); Karanikas, John Michael (Houston, TX); Nguyen, Scott Vinh (Houston, TX)

2011-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

483

Induction heaters used to heat subsurface formations  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A heating system for a subsurface formation includes an elongated electrical conductor located in the subsurface formation. The electrical conductor extends between at least a first electrical contact and a second electrical contact. A ferromagnetic conductor at least partially surrounds and at least partially extends lengthwise around the electrical conductor. The electrical conductor, when energized with time-varying electrical current, induces sufficient electrical current flow in the ferromagnetic conductor such that the ferromagnetic conductor resistively heats to a temperature of at least about 300.degree. C.

Nguyen, Scott Vinh (Houston, TX); Bass, Ronald M. (Houston, TX)

2012-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

484

The Star Formation Reference Survey. I. Survey Description and Basic Data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Star formation is arguably the most important physical process in the cosmos. It is a fundamental driver of galaxy evolution and the ultimate source of most of the energy emitted by galaxies. A correct interpretation of star formation rate (SFR) measures is therefore essential to our understanding of galaxy formation and evolution. Unfortunately, however, no single SFR estimator is universally available or even applicable in all circumstances: the numerous galaxies found in deep surveys are often too faint (or too distant) to yield significant detections with most standard SFR measures, and until now there have been no global, multi-band observations of nearby galaxies that span all the conditions under which star-formation is taking place. To address this need in a systematic way, we have undertaken a multi-band survey of all types of star-forming galaxies in the local Universe. This project, the Star Formation Reference Survey (SFRS), is based on a statistically valid sample of 369 nearby galaxies that span...

Ashby, M L N; Smith, H A; Willner, S P; Fazio, G G; Raychaudhury, S; Zezas, A; Barmby, P; Bonfini, P; Cao, C; Gonzalez-Alfonso, E; Ishihara, D; Kaneda, H; Lyttle, V; Madden, S; Papovich, C; Sturm, E; Surace, J; Wu, H; Zhu, Y -N

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

485

Computation of the free energy due to electron density fluctuation of a solute in solution: A QM/MM method with perturbation approach combined with a theory of solutions  

SciTech Connect

We developed a perturbation approach to compute solvation free energy ?? within the framework of QM (quantum mechanical)/MM (molecular mechanical) method combined with a theory of energy representation (QM/MM-ER). The energy shift ? of the whole system due to the electronic polarization of the solute is evaluated using the second-order perturbation theory (PT2), where the electric field formed by surrounding solvent molecules is treated as the perturbation to the electronic Hamiltonian of the isolated solute. The point of our approach is that the energy shift ?, thus obtained, is to be adopted for a novel energy coordinate of the distribution functions which serve as fundamental variables in the free energy functional developed in our previous work. The most time-consuming part in the QM/MM-ER simulation can be, thus, avoided without serious loss of accuracy. For our benchmark set of molecules, it is demonstrated that the PT2 approach coupled with QM/MM-ER gives hydration free energies in excellent agreements with those given by the conventional method utilizing the Kohn-Sham SCF procedure except for a few molecules in the benchmark set. A variant of the approach is also proposed to deal with such difficulties associated with the problematic systems. The present approach is also advantageous to parallel implementations. We examined the parallel efficiency of our PT2 code on multi-core processors and found that the speedup increases almost linearly with respect to the number of cores. Thus, it was demonstrated that QM/MM-ER coupled with PT2 deserves practical applications to systems of interest.

Suzuoka, Daiki; Takahashi, Hideaki, E-mail: hideaki@m.tohoku.ac.jp; Morita, Akihiro [Department of Chemistry, Graduate School of Science, Tohoku University, Sendai Miyagi 980-8578 (Japan)] [Department of Chemistry, Graduate School of Science, Tohoku University, Sendai Miyagi 980-8578 (Japan)

2014-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

486

SNS Sample Environment | ORNL Neutron Sciences  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Home › Instruments › SNS › Sample Environment Home › Instruments › SNS › Sample Environment SNS Sample Environment SNS Sample Environment Operations Group SNS Sample Environment Operations Group from left to right: (left to right): Bekki Mills, Mark Loguillo, Saad Elorfi, Randy Sexton, Leland Robbins, Matt Rucker, Cory Fletcher, Todd Sherline, Hans-Jochen Lauter, Ken Kroll The Sample Environment Group provides equipment and support for studying materials under controlled conditions (temperature, pressure, magnetic field, chemical environment, etc.). When you come to SNS to conduct an experiment, our front-line teams are there to support you. Although we currently offer a wide range of capabilities, we realize that these capabilities must continually grow. Therefore, we also have a busy research

487

Sample Environment Equipment Categories - ORNL Neutron Sciences  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Home › Instruments › Sample Environment Home › Instruments › Sample Environment Sample Environment: Categories of Equipment All Ancillary Equipment Auto Changer Closed Cycle Refrigerators Closed Cycle Refrigerators - Bottom Loading Closed Cycle Refrigerators - Top Loading Furnaces Gas Handling Gas Panel High Pressure Systems Liquid Helium Cryostats Magnet Systems Other Special Environments Sample Cell Sample Stick Ultra Low Temperature Devices Sample Environment: by Beam Line All BL-11A-POWGEN BL-11B-MANDI BL-12-TOPAZ BL-13-Fundamental Neutron Physics Beam Line BL-14A-BL-14A BL-14B-HYSPEC BL-15-Neutron Spin Echo (NSE) BL-16B-VISION BL-17-SEQUOIA BL-18-ARCS BL-1A-TOF-USANS BL-1B-NOMAD BL-2-BASIS BL-3-SNAP BL-4A-Magnetism Reflectometer BL-4B-Liquids Reflectometer BL-5-Cold Neutron Chopper Spectrometer (CNCS) BL-6-EQ-SANS

488

Sample Desorption/Ionization From Mesoporous Silica  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sample Desorption/Ionization From Mesoporous Silica Sample Desorption/Ionization From Mesoporous Silica Sample Desorption/Ionization From Mesoporous Silica Mesoporous silica is shown to be a sample holder for laser desorption/ionization of mass spectrometry. Available for thumbnail of Feynman Center (505) 665-9090 Email Sample Desorption/Ionization From Mesoporous Silica Mesoporous silica is shown to be a sample holder for laser desorption/ionization of mass spectrometry. Supported mesoporous silica was prepared by coating an ethanolic silicate solution having a removable surfactant onto a substrate to produce a self-assembled, ordered, nanocomposite silica thin film. The surfactant was chosen to provide a desired pore size between about 1 nanometer diameter and 50 nanometers diameter. Removal of the surfactant resulted in a mesoporous silica thin

489

HFIR Sample Environment | ORNL Neutron Sciences  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

HFIR Sample Environment HFIR Sample Environment The Sample Environment Group provides equipment and support for studying materials under controlled conditions (temperature, pressure, magnetic field, chemical environment, etc.). When you come to HFIR to conduct an experiment, our front-line teams are there to support you. Although we currently offer a wide range of capabilities, we realize that these capabilities must continually grow. Therefore, we also have a busy research and development team, and we encourage you to partner with them to develop new equipment and techniques. The online Sample Environment Equipment Database allows you to search for information about the sample environment equipment available for HFIR instruments. Contact HFIR Team Leader Chris Redmon Resources Sample Environment Equipment Database

490

APS Radioactive Sample Safety Review Committee  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Radioactive Sample Safety Review Committee Radioactive Sample Safety Review Committee March 6, 2012 1. Purpose The APS Safety Radioactive Sample Safety Review Committee (RSSRC) advises the AES Division Director on the radioactive samples to be used at the APS and the adequacy of controls in place for the duration of their use. The RSSRC reviews the radioactive material samples proposed to be run at the APS to ensure that they fall within established safety envelopes of the APS. 2. Membership The RSSRC members are appointed by the AES Division Director. The current members of the RSRC are: B. Glagola AES - Chair S. Davey AES G. Pile AES L. Soderholm CHM J. Vacca RSO W. VanWingeren AES M. Beno XSD E. Alp XSD M. Rivers PUC 3. Method The AES User Safety Coordinator will notify the RSSRC of any samples

491

100 Area Columbia River sediment sampling  

SciTech Connect

Forty-four sediment samples were collected from 28 locations in the Hanford Reach of the Columbia River to assess the presence of metals and man-made radionuclides in the near shore and shoreline settings of the Hanford Site. Three locations were sampled upriver of the Hanford Site plutonium production reactors. Twenty-two locations were sampled near the reactors. Three locations were sampled downstream of the reactors near the Hanford Townsite. Sediment was collected from depths of 0 to 6 in. and between 12 to 24 in. below the surface. Samples containing concentrations of metals exceeding the 95 % upper threshold limit values (DOE-RL 1993b) are considered contaminated. Contamination by arsenic, chromium, copper, lead, and zinc was found. Man-made radionuclides occur in all samples except four collected opposite the Hanford Townsite. Man-made radionuclide concentrations were generally less than 1 pCi/g.

Weiss, S.G. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States)

1993-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

492

Techniques for geothermal liquid sampling and analysis  

SciTech Connect

A methodology has been developed that is particularly suited to liquid-dominated resources and adaptable to a variety of situations. It is intended to be a base methodology upon which variations can be made to meet specific needs or situations. The approach consists of recording flow conditions at the time of sampling, a specific insertable probe sampling system, a sample stabilization procedure, commercially available laboratory instruments, and data quality check procedures.

Kindle, C.H.; Woodruff, E.M.

1981-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

493

Cost Share-Cost Reimbursement Invoice Format Example | The Ames...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Share-Cost Reimbursement Invoice Format Example Effective Date: 102014 File (public): Cost Share-Cost...

494

Power systems utilizing the heat of produced formation fluid  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Systems, methods, and heaters for treating a subsurface formation are described herein. At least one method includes treating a hydrocarbon containing formation. The method may include providing heat to the formation; producing heated fluid from the formation; and generating electricity from at least a portion of the heated fluid using a Kalina cycle.

Lambirth, Gene Richard (Houston, TX)

2011-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

495

Erratum: Formation Control of Multiple Mobile Robots Systems  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The paper entitled “Formation Control of Multiple Mobile Robots Systems” by Zhanfeng Li, Youliang Ma...

Zhanfeng Li; Youliang Ma; Tong Ren

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

496

Density Measurements of Argonne Premium Coal Samples  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Density Measurements of Argonne Premium Coal Samples ... Constitution of Illinois No. 6 Argonne Premium Coal: A Review ... Constitution of Illinois No. 6 Argonne Premium Coal: A Review ...

He Huang; Keyu Wang; David M. Bodily; V. J. Hucka

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

497

Sample Template1 PROGRAM OPPORTUNITY NOTICE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sample Template1 PROGRAM OPPORTUNITY NOTICE INSERT TITLE HERE PON-XX-XXX http://www.energy.ca.gov/contracts/index ........................................................................................................12 Stage One: Administrative and Completeness Screening

498

PolyChord: nested sampling for cosmology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PolyChord is a novel nested sampling algorithm tailored for high dimensional parameter spaces. In addition, it can fully exploit a hierarchy of parameter speeds such as is found in CosmoMC and CAMB. It utilises slice sampling at each iteration to sample within the hard likelihood constraint of nested sampling. It can identify and evolve separate modes of a posterior semi-independently and is parallelised using openMPI. PolyChord is available for download at: http://ccpforge.cse.rl.ac.uk/gf/project/polychord/

Handley, W J; Lasenby, A N

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

499

Formation and Reactivity of Biogenic Iron Microminerals  

SciTech Connect

The overall purpose of the project is to explore and quantify the processes that control the formation and reactivity of biogenic iron microminerals and their impact on the solubility of metal contaminants. The research addresses how surface components of bacterial cells, extracellular organic material, and the aqueous geochemistry of the DIRB microenvironment impacts the mineralogy, chemical state and micromorphology of reduced iron phases.

Beveridge, Terrance J.; Glasauer, Susan; Korenevsky, Anton; Ferris, F. Grant

2000-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

500

Can Photo-Evaporation Trigger Planetesimal Formation?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Can Photo-Evaporation Trigger Planetesimal Formation? Henry Throop John Bally SWRI Univ.Colorado / CASA DPS 12-Oct-2004 #12;Orion Nebula Photo-evaporation by extr 4 O/B stars, UV-bright, 105 solar luminosities 2000 solar-type stars with disks Photo-evaporation (PE) by external O/B stars removes disks on 105

Throop, Henry