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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mm sample format" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Viewing the Evolution of Massive Star Formation through FIR/Sub-mm/mm Eyes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper, we present an overview of our method of constructing a family of models for the far-infrared, sub-millimeter, and millimeter (FIR/sub-mm/mm) line emission of molecular and atomic gas surrounding massive star formation in starburst galaxies. We show the results of a case study, an expanding supershell centered around a massive star cluster with a particular set of input parameters and its application to nearby starburst galaxy M 82. This set of models can be used not only to interpret the observations of FIR/sub-mm/mm line emission from molecular and atomic gas, but also to investigate the physical environment and the initial cloud conditions in massive star forming regions as well as the ages of the starbursts through simulations for a wide range of input parameters. Finally, we discuss limitations of our models, and outline future work.

Lihong Yao; E. R. Seaquist

2006-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

2

SPURIOUS SULFATE FORMATION ON COLLECTED AMBIENT AEROSOL SAMPLES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

FORMATION ON COLLECTED AMBIENT AEROSOL SAMPLES B. W. Loo, R.FORMATION ON COLLECTED AMBIENT AEROSOL SAMPLES Billy W. Lao,ON COLLECTED AMBIENT AEROSOL SAMPLES* _B_il_l~y ___ W_. _L~o

Loo, B.W.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Examination of Hydrate Formation Methods: Trying to Create Representative Samples  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Forming representative gas hydrate-bearing laboratory samples is important so that the properties of these materials may be measured, while controlling the composition and other variables. Natural samples are rare, and have often experienced pressure and temperature changes that may affect the property to be measured [Waite et al., 2008]. Forming methane hydrate samples in the laboratory has been done a number of ways, each having advantages and disadvantages. The ice-to-hydrate method [Stern et al., 1996], contacts melting ice with methane at the appropriate pressure to form hydrate. The hydrate can then be crushed and mixed with mineral grains under controlled conditions, and then compacted to create laboratory samples of methane hydrate in a mineral medium. The hydrate in these samples will be part of the load-bearing frame of the medium. In the excess gas method [Handa and Stupin, 1992], water is distributed throughout a mineral medium (e.g. packed moist sand, drained sand, moistened silica gel, other porous media) and the mixture is brought to hydrate-stable conditions (chilled and pressurized with gas), allowing hydrate to form. This method typically produces grain-cementing hydrate from pendular water in sand [Waite et al., 2004]. In the dissolved gas method [Tohidi et al., 2002], water with sufficient dissolved guest molecules is brought to hydrate-stable conditions where hydrate forms. In the laboratory, this is can be done by pre-dissolving the gas of interest in water and then introducing it to the sample under the appropriate conditions. With this method, it is easier to form hydrate from more soluble gases such as carbon dioxide. It is thought that this method more closely simulates the way most natural gas hydrate has formed. Laboratory implementation, however, is difficult, and sample formation is prohibitively time consuming [Minagawa et al., 2005; Spangenberg and Kulenkampff, 2005]. In another version of this technique, a specified quantity of gas is placed in a sample, then the sample is flooded with water and cooled [Priest et al., 2009]. We have performed a number of tests in which hydrate was formed and the uniformity of the hydrate formation was examined. These tests have primarily used a variety of modifications of the excess gas method to make the hydrate, although we have also used a version of the excess water technique. Early on, we found difficulties in creating uniform samples with a particular sand/ initial water saturation combination (F-110 Sand, {approx} 35% initial water saturation). In many of our tests we selected this combination intentionally to determine whether we could use a method to make the samples uniform. The following methods were examined: Excess gas, Freeze/thaw/form, Freeze/pressurize/thaw, Excess gas followed by water saturation, Excess water, Sand and kaolinite, Use of a nucleation enhancer (SnoMax), and Use of salt in the water. Below, each method, the underlying hypothesis, and our results are briefly presented, followed by a brief conclusion. Many of the hypotheses investigated are not our own, but were presented to us. Much of the data presented is from x-ray CT scanning our samples. The x-ray CT scanner provides a three-dimensional density map of our samples. From this map and the physics that is occurring in our samples, we are able to gain an understanding of the spatial nature of the processes that occur, and attribute them to the locations where they occur.

Kneafsey, T.J.; Rees, E.V.L.; Nakagawa, S.; Kwon, T.-H.

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Hydrate Formation and Dissociation in Simulated and Field Samples  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

- High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) Instrument Scientist: Ovidiu Garlea General Structure Analysis System3009-S3015 (2005) #12;Sample Handling 23 Special Thanks to the HFIR sample environment team: Chris

5

MM5 Contrail Forecasting in Alaska  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The fifth-generation Pennsylvania State University–National Center for Atmospheric Research (PSU–NCAR) Mesoscale Model (MM5) is being used for forecasting the atmospheric layers of aircraft condensation trail (contrail) formation. Contrail ...

Martin Stuefer; Xiande Meng; Gerd Wendler

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Design and testing of a deep sea formation water and temeperature sampling probe for the Ocean Drilling Program  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Ocean Drilling Program is an international research consortium dedicated to exploring the structure and history of earth beneath the oceans. The program receives funds from the National Science Foundation and 18 member countries. Texas A&M University serves as the science operator, drill ship operator, and Gulf Coast Core Repository. The objective of the program is to learn about the geological makeup of the ocean floor and develop a better understanding of how it was formed. Fluid and temperature samples are one means of determining the chemistry of the formation. In order to obtain quality samples a tool must probe into the formation approximately 18 inches and capture a small volume of fluid and record temperatures. The Ocean Drilling Program has developed two such probes, the IPOD in situ Pore Water Sampling Probe (PWS) and the Water Sample and Temperature Probe (WSTP). These probes return samples at near in situ conditions; however, fluid samples typically encounter a pressure drop as they enter the tool. Samples collected using these probes are suspected of giving questionable results due to possible gas/fluid separation as the sample experiences a pressure drop upon entering the probe. Fluid returned at formation pressure is hoped to give scientist a more accurate picture of the formation conditions and allow comparison between samples returned at formation pressure and those returned under partial pressure. The objective of this project was to design, test, and manufacture a probe that would consistently-return fluid and temperature samples at in situ conditions, The project was broken down into two stages, namely the design stage and the testing and manufacturing stage. The design stage was governed by a regimented design methodology. Steps included in the methodology were 1) Need Analysis, 2) Conceptual Design, 3) Conceptual Design Evaluation, and 4) Embodiment Design. The manufacturing and testing stage of the project consisted of full sample system testing and supervision of the manufacturing process. the result of the design process was a sampling system that combined a back pressure piston and metering valve. Full testing of this sampling system showed the sampling system allowed sampling of formation fluid with minimal pressure drop between the formation and the probe. Favorable results of the sampling system allowed for the development of a new probe tip configuration, as well as, a new modularized electronics section. Machine drawings were generated for all components of the tool. Components were then fabricated by a local machine shop. All components under went quality inspection and were then assembled. Full scale testing at the Ocean Drilling Programs Annex is the next step. If successful, the probe is to undergo sea trials in October of 1995.

Fisseler, Patrick James

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Methane hydrate distribution from prolonged and repeated formation in natural and compacted sand samples: X-ray CT observations  

SciTech Connect

To study physical properties of methane gas hydrate-bearing sediments, it is necessary to synthesize laboratory samples due to the limited availability of cores from natural deposits. X-ray computed tomography (CT) and other observations have shown gas hydrate to occur in a number of morphologies over a variety of sediment types. To aid in understanding formation and growth patterns of hydrate in sediments, methane hydrate was repeatedly formed in laboratory-packed sand samples and in a natural sediment core from the Mount Elbert Stratigraphic Test Well. CT scanning was performed during hydrate formation and decomposition steps, and periodically while the hydrate samples remained under stable conditions for up to 60 days. The investigation revealed the impact of water saturation on location and morphology of hydrate in both laboratory and natural sediments during repeated hydrate formations. Significant redistribution of hydrate and water in the samples was observed over both the short and long term.

Rees, E.V.L.; Kneafsey, T.J.; Seol, Y.

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Microsoft Word - BH-MM-1066,BM-MM-1067,WH-MM-1068.docx  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

, BM-MM-1067, WH-MM-1068 , BM-MM-1067, WH-MM-1068 Title: Pumping System for 100 MBD Cavern Capacity Maintenance - BH, BM, WH Description: Subcontractor shall provide all labor, tools, materials, equipment, services, transportation, storage and supervision required to install new Variable Frequency Drive (VFD) buildings at the BH, BM, and WH SPR sites. The buildings will house the VFD electrical system used to control the operation of the site pumps. Tasks include excavation for all foundations; construction of concrete foundation, steel support structure, and precast concrete deck; and installation of GFE pre-fabricated metal building on concrete deck. Subcontractor shall evaluate and implement Green Building Design where applicable. Regulatory Requirements: NEPA Implementing Procedures (10 CFR 1021)

9

Annual Logging Symposium, May 25-28, 2008 COMPARISON OF WIRELINE FORMATION-TESTER SAMPLING  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

or an underbalanced drilling environment, there is no difference between the performances of focused or conventional-implicit compositional reservoir simulator is used to model both invasion and filtrate-cleanup processes. Comparison to a variety of circumstances, including the drilling environment, formation properties, and radial extent

Torres-Verdín, Carlos

10

MM Nashville Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Sign Up Search Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon MM Nashville Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name MM Nashville Biomass Facility Facility MM...

11

RECORD OF CATEGORICAL EXCLUSION DETERMINATION Project ID No. BC-MM-1029, BH-MM-1030, BM-MM-1031, WH-MM-1032  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1029, BH-MM-1030, BM-MM-1031, WH-MM-1032 1029, BH-MM-1030, BM-MM-1031, WH-MM-1032 Title: Install Power Metering for SPR Site Buildings Description: Subcontractor shall provide all labor, tools, materials, equipment, and supervision required to install power metering at the four SPR sites. The meters will monitor energy consumption at the SPR site control, administrative, and maintenance buildings. Regulatory Requirements: NEPA Implementing Procedures (10 CFR 1021) 10 CFR 1021.410 (Application of Categorical Exclusions) (a) The actions listed in Appendices A and B of Subpart D are classes of actions that DOE has determined do not individually or cumulatively have a significant effect on the human environment (categorical exclusions). (b) To find that a proposal is categorically excluded, DOE shall determine the following:

12

OOMMF/mmDisp Magnetization Display Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... mmDisp is written in C++ and Tcl/Tk, and should be portable to any platform with a recent C++ compiler and Tcl/Tk support. ...

2011-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

13

Radionuclide Activities in Contaminated Soils: Effects of Sampling Bias on Remediation of Coarse-Grained Soils in Hanford Formation  

SciTech Connect

Only a limited set of particle size-contaminant concentration data is available for soils from the Hanford Site. These data are based on bench-scale tests on single soil samples from one waste site each in operable units 100-BC-1, 100-DR-1, and 100-FR-1, and three samples from the North Pond 300-FF-1 operable unit. The objective of this study was to 1) examine available particle size-contaminant of concern activity and concentration data for 100 and 300 Area soils, 2) assess the effects of sampling bias, 3) suggest sampling protocols, and 4) formulate a method to determine the contaminant of concern activities and concentrations of the whole soil based on the measurements conducted on a finer size fraction of the whole soil.

Mattigod, Shas V.; Martin, Wayne J.

2001-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

14

Radionuclide Activities in Contaminated Soils: Effects of Sampling Bias on Remediation of Coarse-Grained Soils in Hanford Formation  

SciTech Connect

Only a limited set of particle size-contaminant concentration data is available for soils from the Hanford Site. These data are based on bench-scale tests on single soil samples from one waste site each in operable units 100-BC-1, 100-DR-1, and 100-FR-1, and three samples from the North Pond 300-FF-1 operable unit. The objective of this study was to (1) examine available particle size-contaminant of concern activity and concentration data for 100 and 300 Area soils, (2) assess the effects of sampling bias, (3) suggest sampling protocols, and (4) formulate a method to determine the contaminant of concern activities and concentrations of the whole soil based on the measurements conducted on a finer size fraction of the whole soil.

Mattigod, Shas V; Martin, Wayne J

2001-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

15

Length monitor for 1 mm SLC bunches  

SciTech Connect

A non-intercepting RF bunch length monitor for {sigma}{sub z} = 0.5 to 2.0 mm long electron and positron bunches in the Stanford Linear Collider (SLC) has been built with a design similar to a previous device for longer bunches. For this device, fields from the beam pass through a ceramic gap, enter receiving cavities, are the measured with power detectors, and finally are recorded by the SLC control computer. The designs of the receiving cavities (25 and 36 GHz) are described as well as the choice of the RF power distribution and measuring systems. Beam measurements have been taken as a function of bunch compressor RF voltage, bunch intensity, and beam position. Long term bunch length measurements were recorded during SLC colliding beam operation indicating that the bunch length is constant to about 3%. Thus, 1 mm length monitors operating at 25 and 36 GHz have successfully monitored long term bunch length changes at the few percent level in the SLC.

Babenko, E.; Jobe, R.K.; McCormick, D.; Seeman, J.T.

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Assessing the Performance of 5mm White LED Light Sources for Developing-Country Applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Stewart Craine collected the LED samples in Shenzen, China4. Variation in efficacy of LEDs tested. Figure 5. Figure 6.Performance of 5mm White LED Light Sources for Developing-

Mills, Evan

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

M.M. Handbook/August 2009 Graduate Handbook  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

M.M. Handbook/August 2009 Graduate Handbook Master of Music school of Music University of Kansas Revised 2009 #12;M.M. Handbook/August 2009ii TABLE OF CONTENTS PAGE HOW TO USE THIS HANDBOOK and voice students Level required in musicology and theory courses #12;M.M. Handbook/August 2009iii Course

Peterson, Blake R.

18

Rapid Variability: What do we learn from correlated mm-/gamma-ray variability in jets ?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Densely time sampled multi-frequency flux measurements of the extreme BL Lac object S5 0716+714 over the past three years allow us to study its broad-band variability, and the detailed underlying physics, with emphasis on the location and size of the emitting regions and the evolution with time. We study the characteristics of some prominent mm-/gamma-ray flares in the context of the shock-in-jet model and investigate the location of the high energy emission region. The rapid rise and decay of the radio flares is in agreement with the formation of a shock and its evolution, if a geometrical variation is included in addition to intrinsic variations of the source. We find evidence for a correlation between flux variations at gamma-ray and radio frequencies. A two month time-delay between gamma-ray and radio flares indicates a non-cospatial origin of gamma-rays and radio flux variations in S5 0716+714.

Rani, B; Fuhrmann, L; Lott, B; Boettcher, M; Zensus, J A

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Available Technologies: Rare Variant of Mucin, MM, Marks ...  

Biofuels; Biotechnology ... The MM marker might also be used as a cell-surface target for precision therapeutics designed to kill this particular subpopulation of ...

20

Microsoft Word - VP-MM-820 NEPA.docx  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

storage, and supervision required to install the Power Monitoring, Communication and Control system government furnished equipment (procured under VP-MM-802A) at the Bryan...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mm sample format" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

M.M. Handbook/August 2011 Graduate Handbook  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

M.M. Handbook/August 2011 Graduate Handbook Master of Music school of Music University of Kansas Revised 2011 #12;ii TABLE OF CONTENTS PAGE HOW TO USE THIS HANDBOOK Students.................36 #12;M.M. Handbook/August 20111 HOW TO USE THIS HANDBOOK The information

Peterson, Blake R.

22

40 MM Grenade Launcher Qualification Requirements at Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

40 MM Grenade Launcher Qualification Requirements at Department of 40 MM Grenade Launcher Qualification Requirements at Department of Energy Sites, IG-0806 40 MM Grenade Launcher Qualification Requirements at Department of Energy Sites, IG-0806 The Department of Energy and its National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), operate some of the most sensitive Federal facilities in the United States. Because of the mission requirements, safeguards and security is a top priority at these sites. As part of its security regime, the Department maintains a cadre of armed protective force officers to prevent and defend against malevolent acts. In recent years, the Department has worked to enhance security by increasing the capabilities of weapon systems used by the protective force officers. One such weapon is the 40 mm grenade launcher, which utilizes high explosive

23

GFDL-Type Typhoon Initialization in MM5  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory (GFDL) hurricane initialization algorithm is implemented in the community fifth-generation Pennsylvania State University–National Center for Atmospheric Research Mesoscale Model (MM5). This work is ...

H. Joe Kwon; Seong-Hee Won; Myung-Hwan Ahn; Ae-Sook Suh; Hyo-Sang Chung

2002-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Geothermal: Sponsored by OSTI -- Feasibility study for a 10-MM...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

study for a 10-MM-GPY fuel ethanol plant, Brady Hot Springs, Nevada. Volume 1. Process and plant design Geothermal Technologies Legacy Collection HelpFAQ | Site Map | Contact Us |...

25

Expansion of Bound-State Energies in Powers of m/M and (1-m/M)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Elaborating on a previous letter [1], we use a new approach to compute energy levels of a nonrelativistic bound-state of two constituents, with masses m and M, by systematic expansions--one in powers of m/M and another in powers of (1-m/M). Technical aspects of the calculations are described in detail. Theoretical predictions are given for {Omicron}({alpha}(Z{alpha}){sup 5}) radiative recoil and {Omicron}((Z{alpha}){sup 6}) pure recoil corrections to the average energy shift and hyperfine splitting relevant for hydrogen, muonic hydrogen, and muonium.

Melnikov, Kirill

2002-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

26

Posters Surface Flux Intercomparison Between the MM5 Model  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Posters Surface Flux Intercomparison Between the MM5 Model and Observations During the Storm-Scale Observations Regional Measurement Program-Fronts Experiment Systems Test 1992 J. Dudhia and S. P. Oncley Mesoscale and Microscale Meteorology Division Atmospheric Technology Division National Center for Atmospheric Research Boulder, Colorado Introduction Mesoscale model 5 (MM5) is being used as a data assimilation tool for the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program. There is a need to verify that the model physics is consistent with observations under a range of conditions. Surface fluxes of heat, moisture, and momentum are a particular area of uncertainty in the model owing to their dependence on surface properties, some of which are time-dependent. The National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR)

27

RECORD OF CATEGORICAL EXCLUSION DETERMINATION Project ID No. BC-MM-669 and BC-MM-673  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

669 and BC-MM-673 669 and BC-MM-673 Title: BC Site Building Upgrades, Phases II and III Description: Subcontractor shall provide all labor, tools, materials, equipment, and supervision required to perform various building upgrades at BC Buildings 401, 402, 403, 408, 415, and 416 (Phase II) and BC Buildings 401, 402, 413, and 414 (Phase III). Subcontractor shall evaluate and implement Green Building Design where applicable. Regulatory Requirements: NEPA Implementing Procedures (10 CFR 1021) 10 CFR 1021.410 (Application of Categorical Exclusions) (a) The actions listed in Appendices A and B of Subpart D are classes of actions that DOE has determined do not individually or cumulatively have a significant effect on the human environment (categorical exclusions).

28

Microsoft Word - BM-MM-762A,GFE.docx  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

A A Title: Replace Brine Disposal System Header to BM Brine Tank, GFE Description: Manufacturer shall provide the piping and fittings associated with the replacement of the brine disposal system header to the BM Brine Tank as Government Furnished Equipment (GFE). The manufacturer shall load all materials onto transports supplied by others. Installation will be performed by others under BM-MM-762. Regulatory Requirements: NEPA Implementing Procedures (10 CFR 1021) 10 CFR 1021.410 (Application of Categorical Exclusions) (a) The actions listed in Appendices A and B of Subpart D are classes of actions that DOE has determined do not individually or cumulatively have a significant effect on the human environment (categorical exclusions).

29

Sampling – Soil  

INL has developed a method for sampling soil to determine the presence of extremely fine particles such as absorbents.

30

NIST_1A 1024 sample_count -i 57202424 sample_n_bytes -i ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

NIST_1A 1024 sample_count -i 57202424 sample_n_bytes -i 2 channel_count -i 1 sample_byte_format -s2 01 sample_rate -i 16000 ...

2004-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

31

Anthrax Sampling  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Anthrax Anthrax Sampling and Decontamination: Technology Trade-Offs Phillip N. Price, Kristina Hamachi, Jennifer McWilliams, and Michael D. Sohn Environmental Energy Technologies Division Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Berkeley CA 94720 September 12, 2008 This work was supported by the Office of Science, Office of High Energy Physics, Homeland Security under the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC02-05CH1123. Contents 1 Executive Summary 3 1.1 How much sampling is needed to decide if a building is safe? . . . . . . . 3 1.1.1 Sampling Nomogram . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 1.2 How many characterization samples should be taken? . . . . . . . . . . . 7 1.3 What decontamination method should be used? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 1.4 Post-decontamination sampling . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 1.5 What are rules of thumb for cost and effort? . . . . . . . . . . . .

32

Sampling box  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An air sampling box that uses a slidable filter tray and a removable filter cartridge to allow for the easy replacement of a filter which catches radioactive particles is disclosed.

Phillips, Terrance D. (617 Chestnut Ct., Aiken, SC 29803); Johnson, Craig (100 Midland Rd., Oak Ridge, TN 37831-0895)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Polar MM5 Simulations of the Winter Climate of the Laurentide Ice Sheet at the LGM  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Optimized regional climate simulations are conducted using the Polar MM5, a version of the fifth-generation Pennsylvania State University–NCAR Mesoscale Model (MM5), with a 60-km horizontal resolution domain over North America during the Last ...

David H. Bromwich; E. Richard Toracinta; Helin Wei; Robert J. Oglesby; James L. Fastook; Terence J. Hughes

2004-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Sample Returns Missions in the Coming Decade  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the coming decade, several missions will attempt to return samples to Earth from varying parts of the solar system. These samples will provide invaluable insight into the conditions present during the early formation of the solar system, and possibly ...

Desai Prasun N.; Mitcheltree Robert A.; Cheatwood F. McNeil

2000-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Progresses in Ab Initio QM/MM Free Energy Simulations of Electrostatic Energies in Proteins: Accelerated QM/MM Studies of pKa, Redox Reactions and Solvation Free Energies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Hybrid quantum mechanical / molecular mechanical (QM/MM) approaches have been used to provide a general scheme for chemical reactions in proteins. However, such approaches still present a major challenge to computational chemists, not only because of the need for very large computer time in order to evaluate the QM energy but also because of the need for propercomputational sampling. This review focuses on the sampling issue in QM/MM evaluations of electrostatic energies in proteins. We chose this example since electrostatic energies play a major role in controlling the function of proteins and are key to the structure-function correlation of biological molecules. Thus, the correct treatment of electrostatics is essential for the accurate simulation of biological systems. Although we will be presenting here different types of QM/MM calculations of electrostatic energies (and related properties), our focus will be on pKa calculations. This reflects the fact that pKa of ionizable groups in proteins provide one of the most direct benchmarks for the accuracy of electrostatic models of macromolecules. While pKa calculations by semimacroscopic models have given reasonable results in many cases, existing attempts to perform pKa calculations using QM/MM-FEP have led to large discrepancies between calculated and experimental values. In this work, we accelerate our QM/MM calculations using an updated mean charge distribution and a classical reference potential. We examine both a surface residue (Asp3) of the bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor, as well as a residue buried in a hydrophobic pocket (Lys102) of the T4-lysozyme mutant. We demonstrate that by using this approach, we are able to reproduce the relevant sidechain pKas with an accuracy of 3 kcal/mol. This is well within the 7 kcal/mol energy difference observed in studies of enzymatic catalysis, and is thus sufficient accuracy to determine the main contributions to the catalytic energies of enzymes. We also provide an overall perspective of the potential of QM/MM calculations in general evaluations of electrostatic free energies, pointing out that our approach should provide a very powerful and accurate tool to predict the electrostatics of not only solution but also enzymatic reactions, as well as the solvation free energies of even larger systems, such as nucleic acid bases incorporated into DNA.

Kamerlin, Shina C. L.; Haranczyk, Maciej; Warshel, Arieh

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

ADIFOR working note No. 11: ADIFOR strategies related to POINTER usage in MM5  

SciTech Connect

POINTERs are nonstandard Fortran statements which cannot be processed by ADIFOR. We are interested in generating derivative code for MM5, a mesoscale model code which uses POINTERs extensively and in a particular structured manner. We briefly report on POINTERs and their role in MM5 and, for their particular usage in MM5, describe the three-step code transformation scheme consisting of pre-ADIFOR, ADIFOR, and post-ADIFOR transformations that result in the generation of correct derivative code for MM5.

Bischof, C.; Khademi, P.; Knauff, T.

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

File Formats  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Home Page Home Page File Formats MODIS Product Subsets Output Data File Format Descriptions The MODIS product subsets for North America and Worldwide are available in several formats, which are described in the following text. MODIS Land Product ASCII Data Image Data Files in ASCII Grid Format QC-Filtered Data and Statistics Generated for this Request Land Cover Data in ASCII Grid Format Statistical Data for MODIS Land Products in Comma Separated Format Underlying BRDF Parameters Used in Generating this Request (available with Albedo MOD43B and MCD43B only) MODIS Land Product ASCII Data Description of File File Content: Data as read from MODIS Land Product HDF-EOS data files. These data are the starting point for deriving the other subset data products. Data Type: As indicated by Land Product Code (e.g., MOD15A2).

38

Condensation heat transfer characteristics of R410A-oil mixture in 5 mm and 4 mm outside diameter horizontal microfin tubes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Condensation heat transfer characteristics of R410A-oil mixture in 5 mm and 4 mm outside diameter horizontal microfin tubes were investigated experimentally. The experimental condensing temperature is 40 C, and nominal oil concentration range is from 0% to 5%. The test results indicate that the presence of oil deteriorates the heat transfer. The deterioration effect is negligible at nominal oil concentration of 1%, and becomes obvious with the increase of nominal oil concentration. At 5% nominal oil concentration, the heat transfer coefficient of R410A-oil mixture is found to have a maximum reduction of 25.1% and 23.8% for 5 mm and 4 mm tubes, respectively. The predictabilities of the existing condensation heat transfer correlations were verified with the experimental data, and Yu and Koyama correlation shows the best predictability. By replacing the pure refrigerant properties with the mixture's properties, Yu and Koyama correlation has a deviation of -15% to + 20% in predicting the local condensation heat transfer coefficient of R410A-oil mixture. (author)

Huang, Xiangchao; Ding, Guoliang; Hu, Haitao; Zhu, Yu. [Institute of Refrigeration and Cryogenics, Shanghai Jiaotong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); Gao, Yifeng [International Copper Association Shanghai Office, Shanghai 200020 (China); Deng, Bin [Institute of Heat Transfer Technology, Golden Dragon Precise Copper Tube Group Inc., Shanghai 200135 (China)

2010-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

39

Evaluation of Meteorological Models MM5 and HOTMAC Using PAFEX-I Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Two meteorological models, the fifth-generation Pennsylvania State University–National Center for Atmospheric Research Mesoscale Model (MM5) and the hydrostatic version of the Higher-Order Turbulence Model for Atmospheric Circulation (HOTMAC), ...

Sang-Mi Lee; Harindra J. S. Fernando

2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Short-Term Performance of MM5 with Cloud-Cover Assimilation from Satellite Observations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study investigates the extent to which assimilating high-resolution remotely sensed cloud cover into the fifth-generation Pennsylvania State University–National Center for Atmospheric Research (PSU–NCAR) Mesoscale Model (MM5) provides an ...

Ismail Yucel; W. James Shuttleworth; X. Gao; S. Sorooshian

2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mm sample format" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Quantitative Spatiotemporal Evaluation of Dynamically Downscaled MM5 Precipitation Predictions over the Tampa Bay Region, Florida  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This research quantitatively evaluated the ability of the fifth-generation Pennsylvania State University–National Center for Atmospheric Research Mesoscale Model (MM5) to reproduce observed spatiotemporal variability of precipitation in the Tampa ...

Syewoon Hwang; Wendy Graham; José L. Hernández; Chris Martinez; James W. Jones; Alison Adams

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Upper-Troposphere MM5 and WRF Temperature Error and Vertical Velocity Coupling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The fifth-generation Pennsylvania State University–National Center for Atmospheric Research Mesoscale Model (MM5) and the Weather Research and Forecasting Model (WRF) have been employed to predict troposphere temperatures for atmospheric study and ...

Kelly Soich; Bernhard Rappenglueck

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Development and Tests of a New Distributed-Memory MM5 Adjoint  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Updated versions of the Tangent Linear Model (TLM) and adjoint of the fifth-generation Pennsylvania State University–National Center for Atmospheric Research Mesoscale Model (MM5) have been developed and are now available to the meteorological ...

Frank H. Ruggiero; John Michalakes; Thomas Nehrkorn; George D. Modica; Xiaolei Zou

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Sensitivity of MM5-Simulated Boundary Layer Characteristics to Turbulence Parameterizations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The sensitivity of high-resolution mesoscale simulations to boundary layer turbulence parameterizations is investigated using the fifth-generation Pennsylvania State University–NCAR Mesoscale Model (MM5) and observations from two field campaigns. ...

Larry K. Berg; Shiyuan Zhong

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Power supply switching for a mm-wave asymmetric multilevel outphasing power amplifier system  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis demonstrates power switches to be used in our new Asymmetric Multilevel Outphasing (AMO) transmitter architecture at mm-wave frequencies. The AMO topology breaks the linearity vs. efficiency design objective ...

Spaulding, Jonathon David

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Implementation of the CIP as the Advection Solver in the MM5  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A semi-Lagrangian-type advection scheme, cubic-interpolated pseudoparticle (CIP) method is implemented to the fifth-generation Pennsylvania State University–NCAR Mesoscale Model (MM5, version 3.4). A dimensional splitting CIP algorithm, with ...

Xindong Peng; Feng Xiao; Takashi Yabe; Keiji Tani

2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Excited states of the bacteriochlorophyll b dimer of rhodopseudomonas viridis. A QM/MM study of the photosynthetic reaction center that includes MM polarization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present a hybrid quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical (QM/MM) model for microscopic solvation effects that includes polarizability in the MM region (QM/MMpol). QM/MMpol treatment of both ground and excited states is presented in the formalism. We present QM/MMpol analysis of the ground and electronic excited states of the bacteriochlorophyll b dimer (P) of the photosynthetic reaction center (RC) of Rhodopseudomonas viridis using the INDO/S method. The static-charge potential from the MM model of the RC alone causes Q{sub y1} to have significantly better agreement with the Stark effect results than isolated P. However, consideration of the protein polarization potential is further required to obtain more complete agreement with Stark effect experiments. Thus, we calculate a Q{sub y1} transition energy at 10826 cm{sup -1} with a ground to excited state change in dipole moment of 4.8 D; an absorption Stark effect angle of 43{degree}; a net shift of 0.15 electrons from the L subunit to the M subunit of P; and a linear dichroism angle (between the transition moment of Q{sub y1} and the pseudo-C{sub 2} axis of the RC) of 81{degree}. These results are in good agreement with experiment. Interestingly, we find that net CT increase is greater for Q{sub y1} than for the second excited state of P (Q{sub y2}), a result that we anticipated in an early model dimer study. 77 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

Thompson, M.A.; Schenter, G.K. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

1995-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

48

Formation of Carbon Dwarfs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We consider the formation of dwarf carbon stars via accretion from a carbon AGB companion in light of the new 107 object sample of Downes et al. (2004). This sample is now large enough to allow good mass determination via comparison of a composite spectrum to theoretical atmospheric models. Carbon dwarfs of spectral type M are indeed main sequence M dwarfs with enhanced metallicity and carbon abundance. We also calculate the predicted abundance of both M and of F/G carbon dwarfs, and show that the latter should be falsifiable in the near future.

Charles L. Steinhardt; Dimitar D. Sasselov

2005-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

49

The Santa Cruz Eddy. Part II: Mechanisms of Formation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The formation mechanism of the Santa Cruz eddy (SCE) is investigated using the fifth-generation Pennsylvania State University–National Center for Atmospheric Research Mesoscale Model (MM5). Simulations of 25–26 August 2000 showed that two eddy ...

Cristina L. Archer; Mark Z. Jacobson

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Microsoft Word - NO-MM-827 New Orleans Emergency Generator Installation (900 building).docx  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

MM-827 MM-827 Title: New Orleans Emergency Generator Installation (900 Building) Description: Subcontractor shall provide all labor, tools, materials, equipment, and supervision required to relocate the New Orleans emergency generator at the 900 building, to install a new Automatic Transfer Switch, and to provide generator status alarms. Tasks includes construction of a new concrete slab foundation, relocation of the existing portable generator from the trailer to the foundation, electrical installation of the generator, installation of fencing around the generator, and miscellaneous architectural work. Some of the existing equipment and components being dismantled, removed or demolished have been designated for government salvage. Regulatory Requirements: NEPA Implementing Procedures (10 CFR 1021)

51

High-repetition-rate femtosecond optical parametric oscillator–amplifier system near 3 mm  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An ultrafast laser system for the chemically important 3-mm spectral region has been constructed by means of noncritically phased-matched KTiOPO4 optical parametric gain elements. An optical parametric oscillator, synchronously pumped by a mode-locked Ti:sapphire oscillator, generates high-quality seed pulses for an optical parametric amplifier. The optical parametric amplifier, pumped by a high-repetition-rate Ti:sapphire regenerative amplifier, amplifies the seed pulses by a factor of 520. Pulses with an energy of 550 nJ and a pulse width of 160 fs are produced at a 250-kHz repetition rate in the 3-mm region. 1.

Gary R. Holtom; Robert A. Crowell; X. Sunney Xie

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

On Sojourn Times in the Finite Capacity $M/M/1$ Queue with Processor Sharing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We consider a processor shared $M/M/1$ queue that can accommodate at most a finite number $K$ of customers. We give an exact expression for the sojourn time distribution in the finite capacity model, in terms of a Laplace transform. We then give the tail behavior, for the limit $K\\to\\infty$, by locating the dominant singularity of the Laplace transform.

Zhen, Qiang

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Prediction of ozone levels in London using the MM5-CMAQ modelling system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Air pollution in urban areas has important implications for health and environmental management. Consequently, various methodologies have been developed for its assessment. Traditionally, simple approaches such as the box model or the Gaussian plume ... Keywords: Atmospheric modelling, CMAQ, MM5, Ozone, Urban air quality

R. S. Sokhi; R. San José; N. Kitwiroon; E. Fragkou; J. L. Pérez; D. R. Middleton

2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

MM5 Ensemble Mean Forecasts in the Taiwan Area for the 2003 Mei-Yu Season  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents an evaluation study of a real-time fifth-generation Pennsylvania State University–NCAR Mesoscale Model (MM5) mesoscale ensemble prediction system in the Taiwan area during the 2003 mei-yu season. The ensemble system consists ...

Fang-Ching Chien; Yi-Chin Liu; Ben Jong-Dao Jou

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Purchasing Common Goods and Services: MM0001 Effective Date: May 7, 1997  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

) Maintenance/Replacement Work Order Physical Plant (Work Order Desk) Building alterations CFR P.P. & C. (Senior Services Short Form Agreement Materiel Management (Director of Materiel Management) Policy: MM0004 Management that (a) the goods or services are not available either from commercial sources or from

California at Santa Cruz, University of

56

Acceptance sampling methods for sample results verification  

SciTech Connect

This report proposes a statistical sampling method for use during the sample results verification portion of the validation of data packages. In particular, this method was derived specifically for the validation of data packages for metals target analyte analysis performed under United States Environmental Protection Agency Contract Laboratory Program protocols, where sample results verification can be quite time consuming. The purpose of such a statistical method is to provide options in addition to the ``all or nothing`` options that currently exist for sample results verification. The proposed method allows the amount of data validated during the sample results verification process to be based on a balance between risks and the cost of inspection.

Jesse, C.A.

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Sample Environment at SNAP | ORNL Neutron Sciences  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sample Environment at SNAP Sample Environment at SNAP Sample Mass Calculator Bulk Modulus (GPa) Density (g/cm3) Volume (mm3) Sample Mass Needed (mg) Custom Values NaCl 24.4 2.17 87.1 171.888 MnO 148.0 5.37 87.1 354.256 V 160.0 6.00 87.1 388.104 CoO 180.0 6.44 87.1 402.766 Bi 31.0 9.78 87.1 767.770 Sample Geometry Click below for illustration of sample shapes for use in the Paris-Edinburgh press Volume (mm3) Double-toroid, encapsulated 16.8 Double-toroid, non-encapsulated 31.1 Single-toroid, encapsulated 55.5 Single-toroid, non-encapsulated 87.1 Graphite furnace 68.1 If you see NaN in the "Sample Mass Needed (mg)" field, then one of your entries probably contains non-numeric data or is not a valid number, for example, entering 3.9.0 (double decimal points)

58

RECORD OF CATEGORICAL EXCLUSION DETERMINATION Project 10 No. BH-MM-746  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

BH-MM-746 BH-MM-746 Title: BH Anhydrite Pond Liner Replacement Description: Subcontractor shall provide all labor, tools, equipment, materials, consumables, services, insurance, transportation, storage and supervision required to replace the BH Anhydrite Pond Liner. Regulatory Requirements: NEPA Implementing Procedures (10 CFR 1021) 10 CFR 1021.410 (Application of Categorical Exclusions) (a) The actions listed in Appendices A and B of Subpart D are classes of actions that DOE has determined do not individually or cumulatively have a significant effect on the human environment (categorical exclusions). (b) To find that a proposal is categorically excluded, DOE shall determine the following: (1) The proposed action fits within a class of actions that is listed in Appendix A or B of Subpart D;

59

Microsoft Word - WH-MM-818B-819B NEPA.docx  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

8B & WH-MM-819B 8B & WH-MM-819B Title: Repair WH Brine Tanks, WHT-14 & WHT-15 Description: Subcontractor shall shall provide all materials, tools, equipment, supplies, transportation, facilities, labor, supervision, and services required to perform the work associated with the repair of the WH Brine Tanks, WHT-14 & WHT-15. Regulatory Requirements: NEPA Implementing Procedures (10 CFR 1021) 10 CFR 1021.410 (Application of Categorical Exclusions) (a) The actions listed in Appendices A and B of Subpart D are classes of actions that DOE has determined do not individually or cumulatively have a significant effect on the human environment (categorical exclusions). (b) To find that a proposal is categorically excluded, DOE shall determine the following:

60

RECORD OF CATEGORICAL EXCLUSION DETERMINATION Project ID No. WH-MM-1000  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

MM-1000 MM-1000 Title: Inspection and Repair of WH-SUN 42-inch Crude Oil Pipeline Description: Subcontractor shall provide all supervision, transportation, labor, materials and equipment required to locate, excavate, and inspect an internal corrosion anomaly at two locations on the WH to SUN Terminal 42-inch crude oil pipeline. Inspections will be performed by Automated Ultrasonic Testing. Repairs shall be performed based on the inspection results. All work will be performed on the DOE pipeline right-of-way. Regulatory Requirements: NEPA Implementing Procedures (10 CFR 1021) 10 CFR 1021.410 (Application of Categorical Exclusions) (a) The actions listed in Appendices A and B of Subpart D are classes of actions that DOE has determined do not individually or cumulatively have a significant effect on the human environment

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mm sample format" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

650 mm long liquid hydrogen target for use in a high intensity electron beam  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper describes a 650 mm long liquid hydrogen targetr constructed for use in the high intensity electron beam at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC). The main design problem was to construct a target that would permit the heat deposited by the electron beam to be removed rapidly without boiling the hydrogen so as to maintain constant target density for optimum data taking. Design requirements, cosntruction details and operating experience are discussed.

Mark, J.W.

1984-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

650 mm long liquid hydrogen target for use in a high intensity electron beam  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper describes a 650 mm long liquid hydrogen target constructed for use in the high intensity electron beam at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center. The main design problem was to construct a target that would permit the heat deposited by the electron beam to be removed rapidly without boiling the hydrogen so as to maintain constant target density for optimum data taking. Design requirements, construction details and operating experience are discussed.

Mark, J.W.

1983-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Sample Preparation Laboratory Training - Course 204 | Sample...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sample Preparation Laboratory Training - Course 204 Who Should Attend This course is mandatory for: SLAC employees and non-employees who need unescorted access to SSRL or LCLS...

64

Microsoft Word - Sample Abstract and Format Instructions.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Dearborn, MI 48128, Wayne State University 2 , Department of Physics and Astronomy, Detroit, MI 48202, Kettering University 3 , Flint, MI 48504, University of Paris-Sud 4 ,...

65

Fe/Al2O3 C2H4 Hata mm/10 min  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fe/Al2O3 C2H4 () () () () () () () * () 1. (SWNT) SWNT (CVD) (CNT)[1] Hata mm/10 min SWNT (Super Growth)[2]Al2O3 Fe C2H4 SWNT Fe/Al2O3 C2H4 CVD SWNT CNT CNT 2 SiO2 Al2O3 20 (RBM) 1350 cm-1 (D-Band)Fe G/D RBM Fe SWNT Al 15 nm Fe 0.6 nm CVD TEM Fig. 3 3 nm SWNT

Maruyama, Shigeo

66

September 2004 Water Sampling  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Sampling at the Sampling at the Shirley Basin South, Wyoming, Disposal Site September 2013 LMS/SBS/S00613 This page intentionally left blank U.S. Department of Energy DVP-June 2013, Shirley Basin South, Wyoming September 2013 RIN 13065426 Page i Contents Sampling Event Summary ...............................................................................................................1 Shirley Basin South, Wyoming, Disposal Site Sample Location Map ............................................3 Data Assessment Summary ..............................................................................................................5 Water Sampling Field Activities Verification Checklist .............................................................7

67

86 GHz polarimetry of OVV1633+382 after a major mm flare  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The 18 mag QSO 1633+382 (4C38.41, z=1.807) showed a very pronounced outburst in 2001/2002. With a peak amplitude of more than 9 Jy at 90GHz, this flare was brighter than any known previous flare in this source (data available since 1980).During onset, the mm-flare was particulary fast, with an increase of more than 2 Jy at 230 GHz in less than 8 days. Since January 2002, the mm-flux of 1633+382 is decaying. During this decline, however, local flux variations with amplitudes of 1-3 Jy were seen, indicative of underlying and more rapid source activity on time scales of 1-2 months. After the main peak occurring in 2001.99, the 90 GHz flux showed secondary maxima at approximately half year intervals in 2002.3, 2002.7 and 2003.13. This kind of periodicity might be explained via the lighthouse model (Camenzind and Krockenberger 1992), which is based on the magnetic accelerator of Blanford and Payne (1982). At present the millimeter flux is nearly back to its quiescent level of 2-2.5 Jy, which the source had before ...

Sohn, B W; Agudo, I; Witzel, A; Zensus, J A; Ungerechts, H; Terasranta, H

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

POWGEN Sample Environment | ORNL Neutron Sciences  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sample Environment Sample Environment PAC Helium fill station for cans. PAC PAC stands for Powgen Automatic Changer. This is the second generation sample changer that was developed for POWGEN. The changer has a carousal that holds a maximum of 24 sample-filled vanadium cans and collects data in a temperature range of 10 to 300 K. The cool down temperature from room temperature to 10 K is 45 minutes. However, samples can be changed at 10 K, which takes about 20 minutes. PAC cans The OD (outer diameter) for the V part is 6.3, 7.86 and 9.42 mm The ID (inner diameter) for these to be 5.9, 7.46 and 9.02mm ILL Furnace ILL can ILL can for high temp The traditional ILL furnace built with vanadium heating elements is available for high-temperature measurements from room temperature to 1100°C. Cooling to 200°C takes 3-4 hours from highest temperature, and

69

Rain sampling device  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention constitutes a rain sampling device adapted for independent operation at locations remote from the user which allows rainfall to be sampled in accordance with any schedule desired by the user. The rain sampling device includes a mechanism for directing wet precipitation into a chamber, a chamber for temporarily holding the precipitation during the process of collection, a valve mechanism for controllably releasing samples of the precipitation from the chamber, a means for distributing the samples released from the holding chamber into vessels adapted for permanently retaining these samples, and an electrical mechanism for regulating the operation of the device. 11 figures.

Nelson, D.A.; Tomich, S.D.; Glover, D.W.; Allen, E.V.; Hales, J.M.; Dana, M.T.

1991-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

70

RECORD OF CATEGORICAL EXCLUSION DETERMINATION Project ID No. WH-MM-767A  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

A A Title: Replace Brine Disposal System Header to WH Brine Tanks, GFE Description: Manufacturer shall provide the piping and fittings associated with the replacement of the brine disposal system header to the WH Brine Tanks as Government Furnished Equipment (GFE). The manufacturer shall load all materials onto transports supplied by others. Installation will be performed by others under BM-MM-767. Regulatory Requirements: NEPA Implementing Procedures (10 CFR 1021) 10 CFR 1021.410 (Application of Categorical Exclusions) (a) The actions listed in Appendices A and B of Subpart D are classes of actions that DOE has determined do not individually or cumulatively have a significant effect on the human environment (categorical exclusions).

71

SiO2 Fracture: Chemomechanics with a Machine-Learning Hybrid QM/MM Scheme |  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Snapshot from a simulation of subcritical stress corrosion cracking in Snapshot from a simulation of subcritical stress corrosion cracking in silica in a wet environment, of the kind that will be carried out at the quantum mechanical level during this INCITE project. Silicon atoms are shown in grey, oxygen in red and hydrogen in white. The nanoscale mechanisms underlying stress corrosion cracking remain unclear and can only be elucidated with these kinds of non-uniform precision simulations, which will allow quantitative comparison with experiments for the first time. James Kermode, King's College London SiO2 Fracture: Chemomechanics with a Machine-Learning Hybrid QM/MM Scheme PI Name: James Kermode PI Email: King's College London Institution: james.kermode@kcl.ac.uk Allocation Program: INCITE Allocation Hours at ALCF: 125 Million

72

Customer Equilibrium and Optimal Strategies in an M/M/1 Queue with Dynamic Service Control  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We consider the problem of customer equilibrium strategies in an M/M/1 queue under dynamic service control. The service rate switches between a low and a high value depending on system congestion. Arriving customers do not observe the system state at the moment of arrival. We show that due to service rate variation, the customer equilibrium strategy is not generally unique, and derive an upper bound on the number of possible equilibria. For the problem of social welfare optimization, we numerically analyze the relationship between the optimal arrival rate, which maximizes the overall welfare of the customers, and the equilibrium ones as a function of various parameter values. We finally derive analytic solutions for the special case where the service rate switch occurs when the queue ceases to be empty.

Dimitrakopoulos, Y

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Expansion of Bound-State Energies in Powers of m/M  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We describe a new approach to computing energy levels of a non-relativistic bound-state of two constituents with masses M and m, by a systematic expansion in powers of m/M. After discussing the method, we demonstrate its potential with an example of the radiative recoil corrections to the Lamb shift and hyperfine splitting relevant for the hydrogen, muonic hydrogen, and muonium. A discrepancy between two previous calculations of O({alpha}(Z{alpha}){sup 5} m{sup 2}/M) radiative recoil corrections to the Lamb shift is resolved and several new terms of O({alpha}(Z{alpha}){sup 5} m{sup 4}/M{sup 3}) and higher are obtained.

Melnikov, Kirill

2001-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

74

Assessing the Performance of 5mm White LED Light Sources forDeveloping-Country Applications  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Some white light-emitting diode (LED) light sources haverecently attained levels of efficiency and cost that allow them tocompete with fluorescent lighting for off-grid applications in thedeveloping world. Additional attributes (optics, size, ruggedness, andservice life) make them potentially superior products. Enormousreductions in energy use and greenhouse-gas emissions are thus possible,and system costs can be much lower given the ability to downsize thecharging and energy storage components compared to a fluorescentstrategy. However, there is a high risk of "market-spoiling" if inferiorproducts are introduced and result in user dissatisfaction. Completesystems involve the integration of light sources and optics, energysupply, and energy storage. A natural starting point for evaluatingproduct quality is to focus on the individual light sources. This reportdescribes testing results for batches of 10 5mm white LEDs from 26manufacturers. Efficacies and color properties are presented.

Mills, Evan

2007-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

75

Quality Reference Samples  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Peer-reviewed fats and oils related performance-based control samples for lab quality assurance and quality control. Quality Reference Samples Certified Reference Materials (CRM) aocs certified Certified Reference Materials chemists CRM fat fats lab labo

76

September 2004 Water Sampling  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

information documented on the field data sheets? Yes 18. Was the presence or absence of ice in the cooler documented at every sample location? NA Sample chilling was not required....

77

September 2004 Water Sampling  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

3 3 Groundwater and Surface Water Sampling at the Slick Rock East and West, Colorado, Processing Sites November 2013 LMS/SRE/SRW/S0913 This page intentionally left blank U.S. Department of Energy DVP-September 2013, Slick Rock, Colorado November 2013 RIN 13095593 Page i Contents Sampling Event Summary ...............................................................................................................1 Slick Rock East and West, Colorado, Processing Sites, Sample Location Map .............................5 Data Assessment Summary ..............................................................................................................7 Water Sampling Field Activities Verification Checklist .............................................................9

78

September 2004 Water Sampling  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Old and New Rifle, Old and New Rifle, Colorado, Processing Sites August 2013 LMS/RFN/RFO/S00613 This page intentionally left blank U.S. Department of Energy DVP-June 2013, Rifle, Colorado August 2013 RIN 13065380 Page i Contents Sampling Event Summary ...............................................................................................................1 Sample Location Map, New Rifle, Colorado, Processing Site ........................................................5 Sample Location Map, Old Rifle, Colorado, Processing Site ..........................................................6 Data Assessment Summary ..............................................................................................................7 Water Sampling Field Activities Verification Checklist .............................................................9

79

September 2004 Water Sampling  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3 3 Groundwater and Surface Water Sampling at the Tuba City, Arizona, Disposal Site November 2013 LMS/TUB/S00813 This page intentionally left blank U.S. Department of Energy DVP-August 2013, Tuba City, Arizona November 2013 RIN 13085553 Page i Contents Sampling Event Summary ...............................................................................................................1 Tuba City, Arizona, Disposal Site, Sample Location Map ..............................................................7 Data Assessment Summary ..............................................................................................................9 Water Sampling Field Activities Verification Checklist ...........................................................11

80

September 2004 Water Sampling  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and October 2013 and October 2013 Groundwater Sampling at the Bluewater, New Mexico, Disposal Site December 2013 LMS/BLU/S00813 This page intentionally left blank U.S. Department of Energy DVP-August and October 2013, Bluewater, New Mexico December 2013 RIN 13085537 and 13095651 Page i Contents Sampling Event Summary ...............................................................................................................1 Private Wells Sampled August 2013 and October 2013, Bluewater, NM, Disposal Site ................3 Data Assessment Summary ..............................................................................................................5 Water Sampling Field Activities Verification Checklist .............................................................7

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mm sample format" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

September 2004 Water Sampling  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Riverton, Wyoming, Riverton, Wyoming, Processing Site September 2013 LMS/RVT/S00613 This page intentionally left blank U.S. Department of Energy DVP-June 2013, Riverton, Wyoming September 2013 RIN 13065379 Page i Contents Sampling Event Summary ...............................................................................................................1 Riverton, Wyoming, Processing Site, Sample Location Map .........................................................5 Data Assessment Summary ..............................................................................................................7 Water Sampling Field Activities Verification Checklist .............................................................9 Laboratory Performance Assessment ........................................................................................11

82

Sampling community structure  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We propose a novel method, based on concepts from expander graphs, to sample communities in networks. We show that our sampling method, unlike previous techniques, produces subgraphs representative of community structure in the original network. These ... Keywords: clustering, community detection, complex networks, graphs, sampling, social networks

Arun S. Maiya; Tanya Y. Berger-Wolf

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Sampling diffusive transition paths  

SciTech Connect

We address the problem of sampling double-ended diffusive paths. The ensemble of paths is expressed using a symmetric version of the Onsager-Machlup formula, which only requires evaluation of the force field and which, upon direct time discretization, gives rise to a symmetric integrator that is accurate to second order. Efficiently sampling this ensemble requires avoiding the well-known stiffness problem associated with sampling infinitesimal Brownian increments of the path, as well as a different type of stiffness associated with sampling the coarse features of long paths. The fine-features sampling stiffness is eliminated with the use of the fast sampling algorithm (FSA), and the coarse-feature sampling stiffness is avoided by introducing the sliding and sampling (S&S) algorithm. A key feature of the S&S algorithm is that it enables massively parallel computers to sample diffusive trajectories that are long in time. We use the algorithm to sample the transition path ensemble for the structural interconversion of the 38-atom Lennard-Jones cluster at low temperature.

F. Miller III, Thomas; Predescu, Cristian

2006-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

84

TITLE: AUTHOR(S) SUBMITTED TO: Mm EVOLUTIO:l C: S!LICIC  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

TITLE: TITLE: AUTHOR(S) SUBMITTED TO: Mm EVOLUTIO:l C: S!LICIC :s!:G:IIA CHAWERS AND THEIR RELATICNStiIP TO 9,1SJLTiC VOLCA~41!'O! John C. Eichelbercjer, R, Gooley "Syinposiuni on the Cr~st" sponsored by the Office of Naval ?esearch and Colorado Schoo' of Hines in Vail, CO, on fi/2-6/76. By occeplmc~ of this arricle for Wbliczrtion. the publisher recognizes tlw Gowxnmnt's (Iic+snsa} ri~htg in any copyright afid tha C+vernrmm and in authoriz% representatives IUIm unrestricted righr !oreprajum intiole or in pwt said article under any mpyrqhtw cured@ tlm publisher. The Los Alamos !kientifw L~boratot-y rsquems that rho publisher identify this article m work ~rformed undnrtha auspi?asof the U.S. Atomic EngWCommi~sion. of the university of California 105 AlAMOS, NEW MEXIC087544 /\ . . , ., UNITED GTATCS A't'5MlC ENE!fGY COM?-I15510N EVOLUTIOii CF SILICIC f!AGfMCiiA!WEF!S

85

September 2004 Water Sampling  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Green River, Utah, Disposal Site Green River, Utah, Disposal Site August 2013 LMS/GRN/S00613 This page intentionally left blank U.S. Department of Energy DVP-June 2013, Green River, Utah August 2013 RIN 13065402 Page i Contents Sampling Event Summary ...............................................................................................................1 Data Assessment Summary ..............................................................................................................7 Water Sampling Field Activities Verification Checklist .............................................................9 Laboratory Performance Assessment ........................................................................................11 Sampling Quality Control Assessment ......................................................................................18

86

Beacon Project - Unpredictable Sampling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... or undetected tampering), with the random number generator used for sampling can lead to erroneous estimates of the percentage of faulty parts. ...

2013-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

87

FANS - Sample Change  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... result of neutrons with incident energies higher than ... between the sample position and the detector bank. ... 60 to 300 seconds per energy point and ...

88

September 2004 Water Sampling  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

field procedures? Yes List any Program Directives or other documents, SOPs, instructions. Work Order Letter dated May 1, 2013. Program Directive SHL 2013 01. 2. Were the sampling...

89

FANS - Sample Change  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... This is achieved by placing a cadmium shield between the sample position and the detector bank. In order to place the ...

90

A Study of the Mechanisms of Acid Rain Formation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Samples of rain, snow, cloud water, aerosols and soil were collected in Colorado to study the mechanisms of acid rain formation. Chemical compositions of various types of samples were analyzed to investigate the stepwise incorporation of ...

Farn Parungo; Clarence Nagamoto; Robin Maddl

1987-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Sampling system and method  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present disclosure provides an apparatus and method for coupling conduit segments together. A first pump obtains a sample and transmits it through a first conduit to a reservoir accessible by a second pump. The second pump further conducts the sample from the reservoir through a second conduit.

Decker, David L.; Lyles, Brad F.; Purcell, Richard G.; Hershey, Ronald Lee

2013-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

92

2003 CBECS Sample Design  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Technical Information > Sample Design Technical Information > Sample Design How the Survey Was Conducted 2003 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey: Sample Design Introduction The Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) is conducted quadrennially by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) to provide basic statistical information about energy consumption and expenditures in U.S. commercial buildings and information about energy-related characteristics of these buildings. The survey is based upon a sample of commercial buildings selected according to the sample design requirements described below. A “building,” as opposed to an “establishment,” is the basic unit of analysis for the CBECS because the building is the energy-consuming unit. The 2003 CBECS was the eighth survey conducted since 1979

93

Biological sample collector  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A biological sample collector is adapted to a collect several biological samples in a plurality of filter wells. A biological sample collector may comprise a manifold plate for mounting a filter plate thereon, the filter plate having a plurality of filter wells therein; a hollow slider for engaging and positioning a tube that slides therethrough; and a slide case within which the hollow slider travels to allow the tube to be aligned with a selected filter well of the plurality of filter wells, wherein when the tube is aligned with the selected filter well, the tube is pushed through the hollow slider and into the selected filter well to sealingly engage the selected filter well and to allow the tube to deposit a biological sample onto a filter in the bottom of the selected filter well. The biological sample collector may be portable.

Murphy, Gloria A. (French Camp, CA)

2010-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

94

Sample push out fixture  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention generally relates to the remote removal of pelletized samples from cylindrical containment capsules. V-blocks are used to receive the samples and provide guidance to push out rods. Stainless steel liners fit into the v-channels on the v-blocks which permits them to be remotely removed and replaced or cleaned to prevent cross contamination between capsules and samples. A capsule holder securely holds the capsule while allowing manual up/down and in/out movement to align each sample hole with the v-blocks. Both end sections contain identical v-blocks; one that guides the drive out screw and rods or manual push out rods and the other to receive the samples as they are driven out of the capsule.

Biernat, John L.

2000-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

95

Sample Changes and Issues  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Sample and Model Issues Sample and Model Issues Summary Our comprehensive review of the EIA 914 has confirmed that discrepancies can arise between estimates for December of one year and January of the next. These are most evident for Texas estimates between December 2008 and January 2009. Reports now available from HPDI show that production for all the companies we sampled in both 2008 and 2009 rose by about 60 million cubic feet per day (MMcf/d) in January and that total production in Texas rose by a similar amount. Our estimate was a decrease of 360 MMcf/d. Why the difference? Computationally, EIA-914 estimates depend on two factors: * Reports from the companies in the survey sample * An expansion factor to estimate total production from the sample's reported

96

The Sensitivity of Idealized Hurricane Structure and Development to the Distribution of Vertical Levels in MM5  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the course of studying the development of hurricanes using the fifth-generation Pennsylvania State University–National Center for Atmospheric Research Mesoscale Model (MM5), a relationship between storm intensity and the distribution of ...

Sytske K. Kimball; F. Carroll Dougherty

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Value of Incorporating Satellite-Derived Land Cover Data in MM5/PLACE for Simulating Surface Temperatures  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Parameterization for Land–Atmosphere–Cloud Exchange (PLACE) module is used within the Fifth-Generation Pennsylvania State University–National Center for Atmospheric Research Mesoscale Model (MM5) to determine the importance of individual land ...

Todd M. Crawford; David J. Stensrud; Franz Mora; James W. Merchant; Peter J. Wetzel

2001-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

September 2004 Water Sampling  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

was not identified at many groundwater locations. 18. Was the presence or absence of ice in the cooler documented at every sample location? Yes 19. Were water levels measured...

99

Computer Science Sample Occupations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Computer Science Sample Occupations COMPUTER OPERATIONS Computer Hardware/ Software Engineer Computer Operator Database Manager/ Administrator Data Entry Operator Operations Manager DESIGN & MANUFACTURING, ENGINEERING Coder CAD Computer Applications Engineers Computer Research Scientist Computer

Ronquist, Fredrik

100

Upper-Tropospheric Aerosol Sampled during Project FIRE IFO II  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During the FIRE IFO II project, aircraft were available for airborne sampling in and around cirrus cloud. Aerosols can play a role in the cloud formation process through the heterogeneous nucleation mechanism, and in turn, once formed, cirrus ...

Donald E. Hagen; Josef Podzimek; Max B. Trueblood

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mm sample format" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

SAMPLING AND ANALYSIS PROTOCOLS  

SciTech Connect

Radiological sampling and analyses are performed to collect data for a variety of specific reasons covering a wide range of projects. These activities include: Effluent monitoring; Environmental surveillance; Emergency response; Routine ambient monitoring; Background assessments; Nuclear license termination; Remediation; Deactivation and decommissioning (D&D); and Waste management. In this chapter, effluent monitoring and environmental surveillance programs at nuclear operating facilities and radiological sampling and analysis plans for remediation and D&D activities will be discussed.

Jannik, T; P Fledderman, P

2007-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

102

Liquid sampling system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A conduit extends from a reservoir through a sampling station and back to the reservoir in a closed loop. A jet ejector in the conduit establishes suction for withdrawing liquid from the reservoir. The conduit has a self-healing septum therein upstream of the jet ejector for receiving one end of a double-ended cannula, the other end of which is received in a serum bottle for sample collection. Gas is introduced into the conduit at a gas bleed between the sample collection bottle and the reservoir. The jet ejector evacuates gas from the conduit and the bottle and aspirates a column of liquid from the reservoir at a high rate. When the withdrawn liquid reaches the jet ejector the rate of flow therethrough reduces substantially and the gas bleed increases the pressure in the conduit for driving liquid into the sample bottle, the gas bleed forming a column of gas behind the withdrawn liquid column and interrupting the withdrawal of liquid from the reservoir. In the case of hazardous and toxic liquids, the sample bottle and the jet ejector may be isolated from the reservoir and may be further isolated from a control station containing remote manipulation means for the sample bottle and control valves for the jet ejector and gas bleed.

Larson, Loren L. (Idaho Falls, ID)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Liquid sampling system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A conduit extends from a reservoir through a sampling station and back to the reservoir in a closed loop. A jet ejector in the conduit establishes suction for withdrawing liquid from the reservoir. The conduit has a self-healing septum therein upstream of the jet ejector for receiving one end of a double-ended cannula, the other end of which is received in a serum bottle for sample collection. Gas is introduced into the conduit at a gas bleed between the sample collection bottle and the reservoir. The jet ejector evacuates gas from the conduit and the bottle and aspirates a column of liquid from the reservoir at a high rate. When the withdrawn liquid reaches the jet ejector the rate of flow therethrough reduces substantially and the gas bleed increases the pressure in the conduit for driving liquid into the sample bottle, the gas bleed forming a column of gas behind the withdrawn liquid column and interrupting the withdrawal of liquid from the reservoir. In the case of hazardous and toxic liquids, the sample bottle and the jet ejector may be isolated from the reservoir and may be further isolated from a control station containing remote manipulation means for the sample bottle and control valves for the jet ejector and gas bleed. 5 figs.

Larson, L.L.

1984-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

104

The south central Texas heavy rain event of October 1998: an MM5 simulation and diagnosis of convective initiation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

During the weekend of 17-18 October 1998, extremely heavy rainfall over south central Texas resulted in widespread flash flooding and numerous river floods. Southern Hays County received 760 mm of rainfall, and an area of 18,000 km² recorded over 250 mm. The convection began in a weakly forced environment well ahead of a cold front that was forecast to trigger the storms. The Penn State University/NCAR Mesoscale Model version 5 (MM5) was used to diagnose the extent and magnitude of upward motion, the convective potential of the environment, and the causes of the upward motion that contributed to the convective initiation. A rainfall analysis constructed from all available observations and radar estimates was used for a quantitative comparision with the MM5-simulated rainfall. The MM5's success in simulating many aspects of the rainfall suggested that the atmospheric processes that brought about this heavy rain event were also present in the model simulation. Using a 48-km model grid, upward motion was found to be more than sufficient to cause deep convection in the conditionally unstable atmosphere of south Texas. The cause of the upward motion was attributed to differential warm advection focused by a low-level jet centered over the region where convection began.

Scott, Richard Kevin

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Fluid sampling system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An fluid sampling system allows sampling of radioactive liquid without spillage. A feed tank is connected to a liquid transfer jet powered by a pumping chamber pressurized by compressed air. The liquid is pumped upwardly into a sampling jet of a venturi design having a lumen with an inlet, an outlet, a constricted middle portion, and a port located above the constricted middle portion. The liquid is passed under pressure through the constricted portion causing its velocity to increase and its pressure to decreased, thereby preventing liquid from escaping. A septum sealing the port can be pierced by a two pointed hollow needle leading into a sample bottle also sealed by a pierceable septum affixed to one end. The bottle is evacuated by flow through the sample jet, cyclic variation in the sampler jet pressure periodically leaves the evacuated bottle with lower pressure than that of the port, thus causing solution to pass into the bottle. The remaining solution in the system is returned to the feed tank via a holding tank.

Houck, Edward D. (Idaho Falls, ID)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Fluid sampling system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention comprises a fluid sampling system which allows sampling of radioactive liquid without spillage. A feed tank is connected to a liquid transfer jet powered by a pumping chamber pressurized by compressed air. The liquid is pumped up into a sampling jet of venturi design having a lumen with an inlet, an outlet, a constricted middle portion, and a port located above the constricted middle portion. The liquid is passed under pressure through the constricted portion causing its velocity to increase and its pressure to decrease, thereby preventing liquid from escaping. A septum sealing the port can be pierced by a two pointed hollow needle leading into a sample bottle also sealed by a pierceable septum affixed to one end. The bottle is evacuated by flow through the sample jet, cyclic variation in the sampler jet pressure periodicially leaves the evacuated bottle with lower pressure than that of the port, thus causing solution to pass into the bottle. The remaining solution in the system is returned to the feed tank via a holding tank.

Houck, E.D.

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

107

Fluid sampling system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An fluid sampling system allows sampling of radioactive liquid without spillage. A feed tank is connected to a liquid transfer jet powered by a pumping chamber pressurized by compressed air. The liquid is pumped upwardly into a sampling jet of a venturi design having a lumen with an inlet, an outlet, a constricted middle portion, and a port located above the constricted middle portion. The liquid is passed under pressure through the constricted portion causing its velocity to increase and its pressure to be decreased, thereby preventing liquid from escaping. A septum sealing the port can be pierced by a two pointed hollow needle leading into a sample bottle also sealed by a pierceable septum affixed to one end. The bottle is evacuated by flow through the sample jet, cyclic variation in the sampler jet pressure periodically leaves the evacuated bottle with lower pressure than that of the port, thus causing solution to pass into the bottle. The remaining solution in the system is returned to the feed tank via a holding tank. 4 figs.

Houck, E.D.

1994-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

108

Viscous sludge sample collector  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A vertical core sample collection system for viscous sludge. A sample tube's upper end has a flange and is attached to a piston. The tube and piston are located in the upper end of a bore in a housing. The bore's lower end leads outside the housing and has an inwardly extending rim. Compressed gas, from a storage cylinder, is quickly introduced into the bore's upper end to rapidly accelerate the piston and tube down the bore. The lower end of the tube has a high sludge entering velocity to obtain a full-length sludge sample without disturbing strata detail. The tube's downward motion is stopped when its upper end flange impacts against the bore's lower end inwardly extending rim.

Beitel, George A. (Richland, WA)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

STR_ConvertFormats  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... 16. 17, True, AlngDat, dd-mmm-yy, ! Convert ... 18. 19, True, AlngDatTim, dd-mmm-yy hh:mm:ss, True, True, True, True, True, True, ! Display ...

2012-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

110

Clarification of the Mechanism of Acylation Reaction and Origin of Substrate Specificity of the Serine-Carboxyl Peptidase Sedolisin through QM/MM Free Energy Simulations  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical (QM/MM) free energy simulations are applied for understanding the mechanism of the acylation reaction catalyzed by sedolisin, a representative serine-carboxyl peptidase, leading to the acyl-enzyme (AE) and first product from the enzyme-catalyzed reaction. One of the interesting questions to be addressed in this work is the origin of the substrate specificity of sedolisin that shows a relatively high activity on the substrates with Glu at P1 site. It is shown that the bond making and breaking events of the acylation reaction involving a peptide substrate (LLE*FL) seem to be accompanied by local conformational changes, proton transfers as well as the formation of alternative hydrogen bonds. The results of the simulations indicate that the conformational change of Glu at P1 site and its formation of a low barrier hydrogen bond with Asp-170 (along with the transient proton transfer) during the acylation reaction might play a role in the relatively high specificity for the substrate with Glu at P1 site. The role of some key residues in the catalysis is confirmed through free energy simulations. Glu-80 is found to act as a general base to accept a proton from Ser-287 during the nucleophilic attack and then as a general acid to protonate the leaving group (N H of P1 -Phe) during the cleavage of the scissile peptide bond. Another acidic residue, Asp-170, acts as a general acid catalyst to protonate the carbonyl of P1-Glu during the formation of the tetrahedral intermediate and as a general base for the formation of the acyl-enzyme. The energetic results from the free energy simulations support the importance of proton transfer from Asp-170 to the carbonyl of P1-Glu in the stabilization of the tetrahedral intermediate and the formation of a low-barrier hydrogen bond between the carboxyl group of P1-Glu and Asp-170 in the lowering of the free energy barrier for the cleavage of the peptide bond. Detailed analyses of the proton transfers during acylation are also given.

Xu, Qin [ORNL; Yao, Jianzhuang [ORNL; Wiodawer, Alexander [SAIC-Frederick, Inc., National Cancer Institute at Frederick, Frederick, MD; Guo, Hong [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

A QM/MM Study on the Aqueous Solvation of the Tetrahydroxouranylate [UO?(OH)?]²? Complex Ion  

SciTech Connect

We report a QM augmented QM/MM study on the coordination of the tetrahydroxouranylate ion in aqueous solution. QM/MM geometry optimizations followed by full QM single-point calculations on the optimized structures show that a hexa-coordinated structure is more stable than the hepta-coordinated structure by 43 kJ/mol. Charge transfer of the tetrahydroxouranylate to the solvating water molecules is relatively modest, and can be modeled by including a solvation layer consisting of 12 explicit water molecules.

Infante, Ivan A.; van Stralen, Bas; Visscher, Lucas

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

ANNULAR IMPACTOR SAMPLING DEVICE  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A high-rate air sampler capable of sampling alphaemitting particles as small as 0.5 microns is described. The device is a cylindrical shaped cup that fits in front of a suction tube and which has sticky grease coating along its base. Suction forces contaminated air against the periodically monitored particle absorbing grease.

Tait, G.W.C.

1959-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

113

Chemical differentiation in regions of high mass star formation II. Molecular multiline and dust continuum studies of selected objects  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The aim of this study is to investigate systematic chemical differentiation of molecules in regions of high mass star formation. We observed five prominent sites of high mass star formation in HCN, HNC, HCO+, their isotopes, C18O, C34S and some other molecular lines, for some sources both at 3 and 1.3 mm and in continuum at 1.3 mm. Taking into account earlier obtained data for N2H+ we derive molecular abundances and physical parameters of the sources (mass, density, ionization fraction, etc.). The kinetic temperature is estimated from CH3C2H observations. Then we analyze correlations between molecular abundances and physical parameters and discuss chemical models applicable to these species. The typical physical parameters for the sources in our sample are the following: kinetic temperature in the range ~ 30-50 K (it is systematically higher than that obtained from ammonia observations and is rather close to dust temperature), masses from tens to hundreds solar masses, gas densities ~ 10^5 cm^{-3}, ionization...

Zinchenko, I; Pirogov, L

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Direct optoelectronic generation and detection of sub-ps-electrical pulses on sub-mm-coaxial transmission lines  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-mm-coaxial transmission lines Tae-In Jeona) and D. Grischkowskyb) School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, OklahomaDirect optoelectronic generation and detection of sub-ps-electrical pulses on sub efficient direct optoelectronic generation of sub-ps-THz pulses on 50 coaxial transmission lines with a 330

Oklahoma State University

115

Chinese Statement on Joint Declaration in ITER MM -2 in Moscow XU Guanhua, Minister of Science and Technology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Chinese Statement on Joint Declaration in ITER MM - 2 in Moscow XU Guanhua, Minister of Science step towards the Joint Implementation of ITER, after several long-term and tough bilateral discussions Negotiation with other parties so as to prepare for an efficient start of joint implementation of ITER after

116

Modeling the ENSO Modulation of Antarctic Climate in the Late 1990s with the Polar MM5  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Polar fifth-generation Pennsylvania State University–NCAR Mesoscale Model (MM5) is employed to examine the El Niño–Southern Oscillation (ENSO) modulation of Antarctic climate for July 1996–June 1999, which is shown to be stronger than for the ...

David H. Bromwich; Andrew J. Monaghan; Zhichang Guo

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Evaluation of MM5 and Eta-10 Precipitation Forecasts over the Pacific Northwest during the Cool Season  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Precipitation forecasts from the Pennsylvania State University–National Center for Atmospheric Research Mesoscale Model (MM5) and NCEP’s 10-km resolution Eta Model (Eta-10) are verified over the Pacific Northwest in order to show the effects of ...

Brian A. Colle; Kenneth J. Westrick; Clifford F. Mass

1999-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

THE ENVELOPE AND EMBEDDED DISK AROUND THE CLASS 0 PROTOSTAR L1157-mm: DUAL-WAVELENGTH INTERFEROMETRIC OBSERVATIONS AND MODELING  

SciTech Connect

We present dual-wavelength observations and modeling of the nearly edge-on Class 0 young stellar object L1157-mm. Using the Combined Array for Research in Millimeter-wave Astronomy, a nearly spherical structure is seen from the circumstellar envelope at the size scale of 10{sup 2}-10{sup 3} AU in both 1 mm and 3 mm dust emission. Radiative transfer modeling is performed to compare data with theoretical envelope models, including a power-law envelope model and the Terebey-Shu-Cassen model. Bayesian inference is applied for parameter estimation and information criterion is used for model selection. The results prefer the power-law envelope model against the Terebey-Shu-Cassen model. In particular, for the power-law envelope model, a steep density profile with an index of {approx}2 is inferred. Moreover, the dust opacity spectral index {beta} is estimated to be {approx}0.9, implying that grain growth has started at L1157-mm. Also, the unresolved disk component is constrained to be {approx}<40 AU in radius and {approx}<4-25 M{sub Jup} in mass. However, the estimate of the embedded disk component relies on the assumed envelope model.

Chiang, Hsin-Fang; Looney, Leslie W. [Department of Astronomy, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 1002 West Green Street, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Tobin, John J., E-mail: hchiang@ifa.hawaii.edu [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, Charlottesville, VA 22903 (United States)

2012-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

119

Evaluation of MM5 High-Resolution Real-Time Forecasts over the Urban Area of Athens, Greece  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper the fifth-generation Pennsylvania State University–National Center for Atmospheric Research Mesoscale Model (MM5) forecast skill over an area of complex terrain is evaluated. Namely, the model is verified over a period of 1 yr (2002)...

V. Kotroni; K. Lagouvardos

2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

ITOUGH2 sample problems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report contains a collection of ITOUGH2 sample problems. It complements the ITOUGH2 User`s Guide [Finsterle, 1997a], and the ITOUGH2 Command Reference [Finsterle, 1997b]. ITOUGH2 is a program for parameter estimation, sensitivity analysis, and uncertainty propagation analysis. It is based on the TOUGH2 simulator for non-isothermal multiphase flow in fractured and porous media [Preuss, 1987, 1991a]. The report ITOUGH2 User`s Guide [Finsterle, 1997a] describes the inverse modeling framework and provides the theoretical background. The report ITOUGH2 Command Reference [Finsterle, 1997b] contains the syntax of all ITOUGH2 commands. This report describes a variety of sample problems solved by ITOUGH2. Table 1.1 contains a short description of the seven sample problems discussed in this report. The TOUGH2 equation-of-state (EOS) module that needs to be linked to ITOUGH2 is also indicated. Each sample problem focuses on a few selected issues shown in Table 1.2. ITOUGH2 input features and the usage of program options are described. Furthermore, interpretations of selected inverse modeling results are given. Problem 1 is a multipart tutorial, describing basic ITOUGH2 input files for the main ITOUGH2 application modes; no interpretation of results is given. Problem 2 focuses on non-uniqueness, residual analysis, and correlation structure. Problem 3 illustrates a variety of parameter and observation types, and describes parameter selection strategies. Problem 4 compares the performance of minimization algorithms and discusses model identification. Problem 5 explains how to set up a combined inversion of steady-state and transient data. Problem 6 provides a detailed residual and error analysis. Finally, Problem 7 illustrates how the estimation of model-related parameters may help compensate for errors in that model.

Finsterle, S.

1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mm sample format" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

NID Copper Sample Analysis  

SciTech Connect

The current focal point of the nuclear physics program at PNNL is the MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR, and the follow-on Tonne-Scale experiment, a large array of ultra-low background high-purity germanium detectors, enriched in 76Ge, designed to search for zero-neutrino double-beta decay (0???). This experiment requires the use of germanium isotopically enriched in 76Ge. The MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR is a DOE and NSF funded project with a major science impact. The DEMONSTRATOR will utilize 76Ge from Russia, but for the Tonne-Scale experiment it is hoped that an alternate technology, possibly one under development at Nonlinear Ion Dynamics (NID), will be a viable, US-based, lower-cost source of separated material. Samples of separated material from NID require analysis to determine the isotopic distribution and impurities. DOE is funding NID through an SBIR grant for development of their separation technology for application to the Tonne-Scale experiment. The Environmental Molecular Sciences facility (EMSL), a DOE user facility at PNNL, has the required mass spectroscopy instruments for making isotopic measurements that are essential to the quality assurance for the MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR and for the development of the future separation technology required for the Tonne-Scale experiment. A sample of isotopically separated copper was provided by NID to PNNL in January 2011 for isotopic analysis as a test of the NID technology. The results of that analysis are reported here. A second sample of isotopically separated copper was provided by NID to PNNL in August 2011 for isotopic analysis as a test of the NID technology. The results of that analysis are also reported here.

Kouzes, Richard T.; Zhu, Zihua

2011-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

122

Sampling for Beryllium Surface Contamination using Wet, Dry and Alcohol Wipe Sampling  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This research project was conducted at the National Nuclear Security Administration's Kansas City Plant, operated by Honeywell Federal Manufacturing and Technologies, in conjunction with the Safety Sciences Department of Central Missouri State University, to compare relative removal efficiencies of three wipe sampling techniques currently used at Department of Energy facilities. Efficiencies of removal of beryllium contamination from typical painted surfaces were tested by wipe sampling with dry Whatman 42 filter paper, with water-moistened (Ghost Wipe) materials, and by methanol-moistened wipes. Test plates were prepared using 100 mm X 15 mm Pyrex Petri dishes with interior surfaces spray painted with a bond coat primer. To achieve uniform deposition over the test plate surface, 10 ml aliquots of solution containing 1 beryllium and 0.1 ml of metal working fluid were transferred to the test plates and subsequently evaporated. Metal working fluid was added to simulate the slight oiliness common on surfaces in metal working shops where fugitive oil mist accumulates over time. Sixteen test plates for each wipe method (dry, water, and methanol) were processed and sampled using a modification of wiping patterns recommended by OSHA Method 125G. Laboratory and statistical analysis showed that methanol-moistened wipe sampling removed significantly more (about twice as much) beryllium/oil-film surface contamination as water-moistened wipes (p< 0.001), which removed significantly more (about twice as much) residue as dry wipes (p <0.001). Evidence for beryllium sensitization via skin exposure argues in favor of wipe sampling with wetting agents that provide enhanced residue removal efficiency.

Kerr, Kent

2004-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

123

NID Copper Sample Analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The current focal point of the nuclear physics program at PNNL is the MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR, and the follow-on Tonne-Scale experiment, a large array of ultra-low background high-purity germanium detectors, enriched in 76Ge, designed to search for zero-neutrino double-beta decay (0???). This experiment requires the use of germanium isotopically enriched in 76Ge. The DEMONSTRATOR will utilize 76Ge from Russia, but for the Tonne-Scale experiment it is hoped that an alternate technology under development at Nonlinear Ion Dynamics (NID) will be a viable, US-based, lower-cost source of separated material. Samples of separated material from NID require analysis to determine the isotopic distribution and impurities. The MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR is a DOE and NSF funded project with a major science impact. DOE is funding NID through an SBIR grant for development of their separation technology for application to the Tonne-Scale experiment. The Environmental Molecular Sciences facility (EMSL), a DOE user facility at PNNL, has the required mass spectroscopy instruments for making these isotopic measurements that are essential to the quality assurance for the MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR and for the development of the future separation technology required for the Tonne-Scale experiment. A sample of isotopically separated copper was provided by NID to PNNL for isotopic analysis as a test of the NID technology. The results of that analysis are reported here.

Kouzes, Richard T.; Zhu, Zihua

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Fluid sampling apparatus and method  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Incorporation of a bellows in a sampling syringe eliminates ingress of contaminants, permits replication of amounts and compression of multiple sample injections, and enables remote sampling for off-site analysis.

Yeamans, David R. (Los Alamos, NM)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Decoupled Sampling for Graphics Pipelines  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We propose a generalized approach to decoupling shading from visibility sampling in graphics pipelines, which we call decoupled sampling. Decoupled sampling enables stochastic supersampling of motion and defocus blur at ...

Ragan-Kelley, Jonathan Millar

126

Magnetic Materials (MM)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Safety and Training Divisions APS Engineering Support Division AES Groups Accelerator Systems Division ASD Groups X-ray Science Division XSD Groups Industry Argonne Home ...

127

Groundwater Sampling | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Groundwater Sampling Groundwater Sampling Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Groundwater Sampling Details Activities (3) Areas (2) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Field Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Field Sampling Parent Exploration Technique: Water Sampling Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Stratigraphic/Structural: Hydrological: Water composition and source of fluids. Determination of mixing ratios between different fluid end-members. Determination of fluid recharge rates and residence times. Thermal: Water temperature. Dictionary.png Groundwater Sampling: Groundwater sampling is done to characterize the chemical, thermal, or hydrological properties of subsurface aqueous systems. Groundwater sampling

128

Water Sampling | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Water Sampling Water Sampling Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Water Sampling Details Activities (51) Areas (45) Regions (5) NEPA(2) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Field Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Field Sampling Parent Exploration Technique: Field Sampling Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Stratigraphic/Structural: Hydrological: Water composition and source of fluids Thermal: Water temperature Dictionary.png Water Sampling: Water sampling is done to characterize the chemical, thermal, or hydrological properties of a surface or subsurface aqueous system. Other definitions:Wikipedia Reegle Introduction Water sampling is done to characterize the geothermal system under investigation. A geothermal water typically has a unique chemical signature

129

Tropical Cyclone Formation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The physics of tropical cyclone formation is not well understood, and more is known about the mature hurricane than the formative mechanisms that produce it. It is believed part of the reason for this can be traced to insufficient upper-level ...

Michael T. Montgomery; Brian F. Farrell

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Sample holder with optical features  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A sample holder for holding a sample to be observed for research purposes, particularly in a transmission electron microscope (TEM), generally includes an external alignment part for directing a light beam in a predetermined beam direction, a sample holder body in optical communication with the external alignment part and a sample support member disposed at a distal end of the sample holder body opposite the external alignment part for holding a sample to be analyzed. The sample holder body defines an internal conduit for the light beam and the sample support member includes a light beam positioner for directing the light beam between the sample holder body and the sample held by the sample support member.

Milas, Mirko; Zhu, Yimei; Rameau, Jonathan David

2013-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

131

Sampling streaming data with replacement  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Simple random sampling is a widely accepted basis for estimation from a population. When data come as a stream, the total population size continuously grows and only one pass through the data is possible. Reservoir sampling is a method of maintaining ... Keywords: Data stream mining, Random sampling with replacement, Reservoir sampling

Byung-Hoon Park; George Ostrouchov; Nagiza F. Samatova

2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Gas Sampling | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Gas Sampling Gas Sampling Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Gas Sampling Details Activities (7) Areas (7) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Field Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Field Sampling Parent Exploration Technique: Field Sampling Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Stratigraphic/Structural: High flux can be indicative of conduits for fluid flow. Hydrological: Gas composition and source of fluids. Thermal: Anomalous flux is associated with active hydrothermal activity. Distinguish magmatic/mantle heat inputs. Can be used to estimate reservoir fluid temperatures. Dictionary.png Gas Sampling: Gas sampling is done to characterize the chemical, thermal, and hydrological properties of a surface or subsurface hydrothermal system.

133

On Sojourn Times in the $M/M/1$-PS Model, Conditioned on the Number of Other Users  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We consider the $M/M/1$-PS queue with processor sharing. We study the conditional sojourn time distribution of an arriving customer, conditioned on the number of other customers present. A new formula is obtained for the conditional sojourn time distribution, using a discrete Green's function. This is shown to be equivalent to some classic results of Pollaczeck and Vaulot from 1946. Then various asymptotic limits are studied, including large time and/or large number of customers present, and heavy traffic, where the arrival rate is only slightly less than the service rate.

Zhen, Qiang

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Critical heat flux and boiling heat transfer to water in a 3-mm-diameter horizontal tube.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Boiling of the coolant in an engine, by design or by circumstance, is limited by the critical heat flux phenomenon. As a first step in providing relevant engine design information, this study experimentally addressed both rate of boiling heat transfer and conditions at the critical point of water in a horizontal tube of 2.98 mm inside diameter and 0.9144 m heated length. Experiments were performed at system pressure of 203 kPa, mass fluxes in range of 50 to 200 kg/m{sup z}s, and inlet temperatures in range of ambient to 80 C. Experimental results and comparisons with predictive correlations are presented.

Yu, W.; Wambsganss, M. W.; Hull, J. R.; France, D. M.

2000-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

135

Demosaicing: image reconstruction from color ccd samples  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A simplified color image formation model is used to construct an algorithm for image reconstruction from CCD sensors samples. The proposed method involves two successive steps. The first is motivated by Cok’s template matching technique, while the second step uses steerable inverse diffusion in color. Classical linear signal processing techniques tend to oversmooth the image and result in noticeable color artifacts along edges and sharp features. The question is how should the different color channels support each other to form the best possible reconstruction. Our answer is to let the edges support the color information, and the color channels support the edges, and thereby achieve better perceptual results than those that are bounded by the sampling theoretical limit.

Ron Kimmel

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Multi-AUV control and adaptive sampling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract — Multi-AUV operations have much to offer a variety of underwater applications. With sensors to measure the environment and coordination that is appropriate to critical spatial and temporal scales, the group can perform important tasks such as adaptive ocean sampling. We describe a methodology for cooperative control of multiple vehicles based on virtual bodies and artificial potentials (VBAP). This methodology allows for adaptable formation control and can be used for missions such as gradient climbing and feature tracking in an uncertain environment. We discuss our implementation on a fleet of autonomous underwater gliders and present results from sea trials in Monterey Bay in August 2003. These at-sea demonstrations were performed as part of the Autonomous Ocean Sampling Network (AOSN) II project.

Monterey Bay; Edward Fiorelli; Naomi Ehrich Leonard; Pradeep Bhatta; Derek Paley; Ralf Bachmayer

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Sampling Distribution of the Time between Effectively Independent Samples  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The sampling distribution of the estimate of the “time between effectively independent samples,” T0, is investigated using Monte-Carlo techniques. It is found to be asymptotically unbiased and normally distributed. Agreement between empirical ...

Daniel Wilks

1987-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Proposal for the award of a contract for the supply of 5 mm depleted-uranium plates for the UA1 calorimeter upgrading  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Proposal for the award of a contract for the supply of 5 mm depleted-uranium plates for the UA1 calorimeter upgrading

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Proposal for the award of a contract for the supply of 5 mm depleted-uranium plates for the UA1 experiment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Proposal for the award of a contract for the supply of 5 mm depleted-uranium plates for the UA1 experiment

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Sampling Characteristics of Satellite Orbits  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The irregular space-time sampling of any finite region by an orbiting satellite raises difficult questions as to which frequencies and wavenumbers can be determined and which will alias into others. Conventional sampling theorems must be extended ...

Carl Wunsch

1989-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mm sample format" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Flux Measurement with Conditional Sampling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A method is proposed to measure scalar fluxes using conditional sampling. Only the mean concentrations of updraft and downdraft samples, the standard deviation of the vertical velocity, and a coefficient of proportionality, b, need to be known. ...

Joost A. Businger; Steven P. Oncley

1990-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Sampling Errors in Seasonal Forecasting  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The limited numbers of start dates and ensemble sizes in seasonal forecasts lead to sampling errors in predictions. Defining the magnitude of these sampling errors would be useful for end users as well as informing decisions on resource ...

Stephen Cusack; Alberto Arribas

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Sampling – Soil - Energy Innovation Portal  

INL has developed a method for sampling soil to determine the presence of extremely fine particles such as asbestos.

144

Formation of Hydrogen, Oxygen, and Hydrogen Peroxide in Electron Irradiated Crystalline Water Ice  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Water ice is abundant both astrophysically, for example in molecular clouds, and in planetary systems. The Kuiper belt objects, many satellites of the outer solar system, the nuclei of comets and some planetary rings are all known to be water-rich. Processing of water ice by energetic particles and ultraviolet photons plays an important role in astrochemistry. To explore the detailed nature of this processing, we have conducted a systematic laboratory study of the irradiation of crystalline water ice in an ultrahigh vacuum setup by energetic electrons holding a linear energy transfer of 4.3 +/- 0.1 keV mm-1. The irradiated samples were monitored during the experiment both on line and in situ via mass spectrometry (gas phase) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (solid state). We observed the production of hydrogen and oxygen, both molecular and atomic, and of hydrogen peroxide. The likely reaction mechanisms responsible for these species are discussed. Additional formation routes were derived from the sublimation profiles of molecular hydrogen (90-140 K), molecular oxygen (147 -151 K) and hydrogen peroxide (170 K). We also present evidence on the involvement of hydroxyl radicals and possibly oxygen atoms as building blocks to yield hydrogen peroxide at low temperatures (12 K) and via a diffusion-controlled mechanism in the warming up phase of the irradiated sample.

Weijun Zheng; David Jewitt; Ralf I. Kaiser

2005-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

145

Simultaneous Radio to (Sub-) Mm-Monitoring of Variability and Spectral Shape Evolution of Potential GLAST Blazars  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Large Area Telescope (LAT) instrument onboard GLAST offers a tremendous opportunity for future blazar studies. In order to fully benefit from its capabilities and to maximize the scientific return from the LAT, it is of great importance to conduct dedicated multi-frequency monitoring campaigns that will result comprehensive observations. Consequently, we initiated an effort to conduct a GLAST-dedicated, quasi-simultaneous, broad-band flux-density (and polarization) monitoring of potential GLAST blazars with the Effelsberg and OVRO radio telescopes (11 cm to 7mm wavelength). Here, we present a short overview of these activities which will complement the multi-wavelengths activities of the GLAST/LAT collaboration towards the 'low-energy' radio bands. Further we will give a brief outlook including the extension of this coordinated campaign towards higher frequencies and future scientific aims.

Fuhrmann, L.; Zensus, J.A.; Krichbaum, T.P.; Angelakis, E.; /Bonn, Max Planck Inst., Radioastron.; Readhead, A.C.S.; /Caltech

2011-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

146

Soil Sampling | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Soil Sampling Soil Sampling Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Soil Sampling Details Activities (10) Areas (9) Regions (1) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Field Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Field Sampling Parent Exploration Technique: Field Sampling Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Stratigraphic/Structural: Can reveal relatively high permeability zones Hydrological: Thermal: Used to locate active hydrothermal systems Dictionary.png Soil Sampling: Soil sampling is a method that can be used for exploration of geothermal resources that lack obvious surface manifestations. Soils that are above or adjacent to a "hidden" hydrothermal system will have a unique chemistry that can be indicative of a hydrothermal system at depth and a zone of

147

Sample Environment | ORNL Neutron Sciences  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Home › Instruments › SNS › Sample Environment Home › Instruments › SNS › Sample Environment Sample Environment The Sample Environment Group provides equipment and support for studying materials under controlled conditions (temperature, pressure, magnetic field, chemical environment, etc.). When you come to SNS to conduct an experiment, our front-line teams are there to support you. Although we currently offer a wide range of capabilities, we realize that these capabilities must continually grow. Therefore, we also have a busy research and development team, and we encourage you to partner with them to develop new equipment and techniques. The Sample Environment Equipment Database allows you to search for information about the sample environment equipment available for HFIR and SNS instruments. It will be available in the near future for SNS sample

148

Rock Sampling | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Rock Sampling Rock Sampling Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Rock Sampling Details Activities (13) Areas (13) Regions (1) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Field Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Field Sampling Parent Exploration Technique: Field Sampling Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Rock samples are used to define lithology. Field and lab analyses can be used to measure the chemical and isotopic constituents of rock samples. Stratigraphic/Structural: Provides information about the time and environment which formed a particular geologic unit. Microscopic rock textures can be used to estimate the history of stress and strain, and/or faulting. Hydrological: Isotope geochemistry can reveal fluid circulation of a geothermal system.

149

Primary Radiation Damage Formation  

SciTech Connect

The physical processes that give rise to changes in the microstructure, and the physical and mechanical properties of materials exposed to energetic particles are initiated by essentially elastic collisions between atoms in what has been called an atomic displacement cascade. The formation and evolution of this primary radiation damage mechanism are described to provide an overview of how stable defects are formed by displacement cascades, as well as the nature and morphology of the defects themselves. The impact of the primary variables cascade energy and irradiation temperature are discussed, along with a range of secondary factors that can influence damage formation.

Stoller, Roger E [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Warm Water Mass Formation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Poleward heat transport by the own implies warm Water mass formation, i.e., the retention by the tropical and subtropical ocean of some of its net radiant heat gain. Under what condition net heat retention becomes comparable to latent heat ...

G. T. Csanady

1984-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Sample page | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Sample page Sample page Jump to: navigation, search This page has been rated 13[1][2] on the scale of awesomness. This page is awesome! The above text is generated by the SampleTemplate. Try editing it and changing the level of awesomeness to see the template react. Hint: It says something different depending on whether or not the page is at least 5 awesome. This page is related to the following topics[3][4]: References Sample pages Help pages Additional Info Name Sample page Awesomeness 13 Topics (raw) References; Sample pages; Help pages; References ↑ Francis C. Monastero. 2002. An overview of industry-military cooperation in the development of power operations at the Coso geothermal field in southern California. GRC Bulletin. . ↑ EPRI. 12/12/2012. Assessment and Mapping of the Riverine

152

Acceptance sampling using judgmental and randomly selected samples  

SciTech Connect

We present a Bayesian model for acceptance sampling where the population consists of two groups, each with different levels of risk of containing unacceptable items. Expert opinion, or judgment, may be required to distinguish between the high and low-risk groups. Hence, high-risk items are likely to be identifed (and sampled) using expert judgment, while the remaining low-risk items are sampled randomly. We focus on the situation where all observed samples must be acceptable. Consequently, the objective of the statistical inference is to quantify the probability that a large percentage of the unsampled items in the population are also acceptable. We demonstrate that traditional (frequentist) acceptance sampling and simpler Bayesian formulations of the problem are essentially special cases of the proposed model. We explore the properties of the model in detail, and discuss the conditions necessary to ensure that required samples sizes are non-decreasing function of the population size. The method is applicable to a variety of acceptance sampling problems, and, in particular, to environmental sampling where the objective is to demonstrate the safety of reoccupying a remediated facility that has been contaminated with a lethal agent.

Sego, Landon H.; Shulman, Stanley A.; Anderson, Kevin K.; Wilson, John E.; Pulsipher, Brent A.; Sieber, W. Karl

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Sample  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... deficits by gouging California energy consumers, must ... to state of the art information technology. ... Industry and organization specific knowledge is ...

2010-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

154

Sample State and Local Ballots  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Sample State and Local Ballots. ... We thank the election officials who have contributed to this effort. State, County/Municipality, Ballot, Election, Date, ...

2010-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

155

IWTU Process Sample Analysis Report  

SciTech Connect

CH2M-WG Idaho (CWI) requested that Battelle Energy Alliance (BEA) analyze various samples collected during June – August 2012 at the Integrated Waste Treatment Facility (IWTU). Samples of IWTU process materials were collected from various locations in the process. None of these samples were radioactive. These samples were collected and analyzed to provide more understanding of the compositions of various materials in the process during the time of the process shutdown that occurred on June 16, 2012, while the IWTU was in the process of nonradioactive startup.

Nick Soelberg

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Homeowner Soil Sample Information Form  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Homeowners should submit this form with their soil samples when requesting a soil test from the Texas A&M Soil Testing Laboratory.

Provin, Tony

2007-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

157

HAP sampling at Tidd PFBC  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this project was to sample process streams of the Tidd PFBC plant and to characterize the HAPs associated with those various process streams. The data are comparable to HAP data collected by DOE and EPRI studies at conventional coal-fired utility plants. Twelve sampling locations throughout Tidd PFBC plant were selected to characterize the HAPs in the plant cycle. Sampling was conducted at the input and output of the combustor, before and after the hot gas clean-up (HGCU) and before and after the electrostatic precipitator (ESP). Seven solid process streams were sampled including coal and sorbent to the PFBC unit and ash from the PFBC bed and ash collection devices. Service water which is mixed with the coal to make coal paste was the only liquid process stream sampled. The four gas stream samples collected were the inlets and outlets of the HGCU and ESP. Lists are presented for field sampling requirements for gas streams; coal sorbent, and service water; and ash samples. Lists of elements and compounds (inorganic, organic, and radioactive) are also included. The samples have been collected and are being analyzed.

Mudd, M.J.; Dal Porto, P.A.

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Concentric micro-nebulizer for direct sample insertion  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A concentric micro-nebulizer and method for introducing liquid samples into a plasma established in a plasma torch including a first tube connected to a source of plasma gas. The concentric micro-nebulizer has inner and outer concentric tubes extending upwardly within the torch for connection to a source of nebulizer gas and to a source of liquid solvent and to a source of sample liquid. The inner tube is connected to the source of liquid solvent and to the source of sample liquid and the outer tube is connected to the source of nebulizer gas. The outer tube has an orifice positioned slightly below the plasma when it is established, with the inner and outer tubes forming an annulus therebetween with the annular spacing between the tubes at said orifice being less than about 0.05mm. The dead volume of the inner tube is less than about 5 microliters.

Fassel, V.A.; Rice, G.W.; Lawrence, K.E.

1984-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

159

Secondary Eyewall Formation and Eyewall Replacement Cycles in a Simulated Hurricane: Effect of the Net Radial Force in the Hurricane Boundary Layer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Multiple secondary eyewall formations (SEFs) and eyewall replacement cycles (ERCs) are simulated with the fifth-generation Pennsylvania State University (PSU)–National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) Mesoscale Model (MM5) at horizontal grid ...

Xingbao Wang; Yimin Ma; Noel E. Davidson

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

OpenXC sample driving data | OpenEI Community  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

OpenXC sample driving data OpenXC sample driving data Home > Groups > Developer Rmckeel's picture Submitted by Rmckeel(297) Contributor 24 September, 2012 - 10:29 OpenXC This file represents raw data from OpenXC, in the form of single-vehicle trace files. This may be accessed from any programming language or existing system you want, but a Python wrapper will soon be made available and linked to OpenEI's energy hackathon resources. A description of the format for each individual measurement: http://openxcplatform.com/vehicle-interface/output-format.html A description of the trace files (including the driving.txt file), which is simple a list of individual measurements with timestamps: http://openxcplatform.com/android/testing.html Note: when this sample data forms a more complete dataset of real driving

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mm sample format" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Multi-AUV control and adaptive sampling in Monterey Bay  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract—Operations with multiple autonomous underwater vehicles (AUVs) have a variety of underwater applications. For example, a coordinated group of vehicles with environmental sensors can perform adaptive ocean sampling at the appropriate spatial and temporal scales. We describe a methodology for cooperative control of multiple vehicles based on virtual bodies and artificial potentials (VBAP). This methodology allows for adaptable formation control and can be used for missions such as gradient climbing and feature tracking in an uncertain environment. We discuss our implementation on a fleet of autonomous underwater gliders and present results from sea trials in Monterey Bay in August, 2003. These at-sea demonstrations were performed as part of the Autonomous Ocean Sampling Network (AOSN) II project. Index Terms—Adaptive sampling, autonomous underwater vehicles (AUVs), cooperative control, formations, gradient climbing, underwater gliders. I.

Edward Fiorelli; Naomi Ehrich Leonard; Senior Member; Pradeep Bhatta; Derek A. Paley; Student Member; Ralf Bachmayer; David M. Fratantoni

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Using JCP format  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... general procedure was to add an excess quantity of 1,3-dichloro-1-propene to distilled de-ionized water, place the sample in a thermostat bath, and ...

2008-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

163

DOE Regional Partnership Begins Core Sampling for Large-Volume  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Regional Partnership Begins Core Sampling for Large-Volume Regional Partnership Begins Core Sampling for Large-Volume Sequestration Test DOE Regional Partnership Begins Core Sampling for Large-Volume Sequestration Test May 22, 2009 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - The Plains CO2 Reduction (PCOR) Partnership, one of seven members of the U.S. Department of Energy's Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships program, has begun collecting core samples from a new characterization well near Spectra Energy's Fort Nelson natural gas processing plant in British Columbia, Canada. Core sampling, along with a sophisticated well logging program that the partnership is conducting, is an important step in proving the viability of carbon storage in brine-saturated formations. The Fort Nelson project is on track to become one of the first

164

DOE Regional Partnership Begins Core Sampling for Large-Volume  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Regional Partnership Begins Core Sampling for Large-Volume Regional Partnership Begins Core Sampling for Large-Volume Sequestration Test DOE Regional Partnership Begins Core Sampling for Large-Volume Sequestration Test May 22, 2009 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - The Plains CO2 Reduction (PCOR) Partnership, one of seven members of the U.S. Department of Energy's Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships program, has begun collecting core samples from a new characterization well near Spectra Energy's Fort Nelson natural gas processing plant in British Columbia, Canada. Core sampling, along with a sophisticated well logging program that the partnership is conducting, is an important step in proving the viability of carbon storage in brine-saturated formations. The Fort Nelson project is on track to become one of the first

165

Field Sampling | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

form form View source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Field Sampling Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Field Sampling Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Field Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Field Sampling Parent Exploration Technique: Field Techniques Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Rock samples are used to define lithology. Field and lab analyses can be used to measure the chemical and isotopic constituents of rock samples. Stratigraphic/Structural: Can reveal relatively high permeability zones. Provides information about the time and environment which formed a particular geologic unit. Microscopic rock textures can be used to estimate the history of stress and strain, and/or faulting.

166

Heat transfer characteristics of R410A-oil mixture flow boiling inside a 7 mm straight smooth tube  

SciTech Connect

Two-phase flow patterns and heat transfer characteristics of R410A-oil mixture flow boiling inside a straight smooth tube with the outside diameter of 7.0 mm were investigated experimentally. The experimental conditions include the evaporation temperature of 5 C, the mass flux from 200 to 400 kg m{sup -2} s{sup -1}, the heat flux from 7.56 to 15.12 kW m{sup -2}, the inlet vapor quality from 0.2 to 0.7, nominal oil concentration from 0% to 5%. The test results show that the heat transfer coefficient of R410A-oil mixture increases with mass flux of refrigerant-oil mixture; the presence of oil enhances the heat transfer at the range of low and intermediate vapor qualities; there is a peak of local heat transfer coefficient at about 2-4% nominal oil concentration at higher vapor qualities, and the peak shifts to lower nominal oil concentration with the increasing of vapor qualities; higher nominal oil concentration gives more detrimental effect at high vapor qualities. The flow pattern map of R410A-oil mixture was developed based on refrigerant-oil mixture properties, and the observed flow patterns match well with the flow pattern map. New correlation to predict the local heat transfer of R410A-oil mixture flow boiling inside the straight smooth tube was developed based on flow patterns and local properties of refrigerant-oil mixture, and it agrees with 90% of the experiment data within the deviation of {+-}25%. (author)

Hu, Haitao; Ding, Guoliang; Wei, Wenjian; Wang, Zhence [Institute of Refrigeration and Cryogenics, Shanghai Jiaotong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); Wang, Kaijian [Fujitsu General Institute of Air-Conditioning Technology Limited, Kawasaki 213-8502 (Japan)

2008-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

167

Formation flow channel blocking  

SciTech Connect

A method is claimed for selectively blocking high permeability flow channels in an underground hydrocarbon material bearing formation having flow channels of high permeability and having flow channels of lesser permeability. The method includes the following steps: introducing a blocking material fluid comprising a blocking material in a carrier into the flow channels through an injection well in communication with the formation; introducing a buffer fluid into the formation through the injection well for the buffer fluid to displace the blocking material fluid away from the injection well; allowing the blocking material to settle in the channels to resist displacement by fluid flowing through the channels; introducing a quantity of an activating fluid into the channels through the injection well at a sufficient rate for the activating fluid to displace the buffer fluid and finger into the high permeability channels to reach the blocking material in the high permeability channels without reaching the blocking material in the low permeability channels, the activating fluid being adapted to activate the blocking material which it reaches to cause blocking of the high permeability channels.

Kalina, A.I.

1982-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

168

The Ability of MM5 to Simulate Ice Clouds: Systematic Comparison between Simulated and Measured Fluxes and Lidar/Radar Profiles at the SIRTA Atmospheric Observatory  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The ability of the fifth-generation Pennsylvania State University–NCAR Mesoscale Model (MM5) to simulate midlatitude ice clouds is evaluated. Model outputs are compared to long-term meteorological measurements by active (radar and lidar) and ...

M. Chiriaco; R. Vautard; H. Chepfer; M. Haeffelin; J. Dudhia; Y. Wanherdrick; Y. Morille; A. Protat

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

The 13–14 December 2001 IMPROVE-2 Event. Part II: Comparisons of MM5 Model Simulations of Clouds and Precipitation with Observations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper compares airborne in situ observations of cloud microphysical parameters with the fifth-generation Pennsylvania State University–National Center for Atmospheric Research (PSU–NCAR) Mesoscale Model (MM5) simulations, using the Reisner-2 ...

Matthew F. Garvert; Christopher P. Woods; Brian A. Colle; Clifford F. Mass; Peter V. Hobbs; Mark T. Stoelinga; Justin B. Wolfe

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

The Impact of GEM and MM5 Modeled Meteorological Conditions on CMAQ Air Quality Modeling Results in Eastern Canada and the Northeastern United States  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The fifth-generation Pennsylvania State University–National Center for Atmospheric Research Mesoscale Model (MM5) is currently the meteorological model most widely used as input into the Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) modeling system. In ...

Steven C. Smyth; Dazhong Yin; Helmut Roth; Weimin Jiang; Michael D. Moran; Louis-Philippe Crevier

2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Coupling between the University of California, Davis, Advanced Canopy–Atmosphere–Soil Algorithm (ACASA) and MM5: Preliminary Results for July 1998 for Western North America  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The University of California, Davis, Advanced Canopy–Atmosphere–Soil Algorithm (ACASA) is coupled to the fifth-generation Pennsylvania State University–National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) Mesoscale Model (MM5) as a land surface ...

R. David Pyles; Bryan C. Weare; Kyaw Tha Paw U; William Gustafson

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Origins of the extragalactic background at 1mm from a combined analysis of the AzTEC and MAMBO data in GOODS-N  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a study of the cosmic infrared background, which is a measure of the dust obscured activity in all galaxies in the Universe. We venture to isolate the galaxies responsible for the background at 1mm; with spectroscopic and photometric redshifts we constrain the redshift distribution of these galaxies. We create a deep 1.16mm map (sigma ~ 0.5mJy) by combining the AzTEC 1.1mm and MAMBO 1.2mm datasets in GOODS-N. This combined map contains 41 secure detections, 13 of which are new. By averaging the 1.16mm flux densities of individually undetected galaxies with 24um flux densities > 25uJy, we resolve 31--45 per cent of the 1.16mm background. Repeating our analysis on the SCUBA 850um map, we resolve a higher percentage (40--64 per cent) of the 850um background. A majority of the background resolved (attributed to individual galaxies) at both wavelengths comes from galaxies at z > 1.3. If the ratio of the resolved submillimeter to millimeter background is applied to a reasonable scenario for the origins o...

Penner, Kyle; Chapin, Edward L; Greve, Thomas R; Bertoldi, Frank; Brodwin, Mark; Chary, Ranga-Ram; Conselice, Christopher J; Coppin, Kristen; Giavalisco, Mauro; Hughes, David H; Ivison, Rob J; Perera, Thushara; Scott, Douglas; Scott, Kimberly; Wilson, Grant

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

J.A. Leenheer & M.M. Reddy, Annals of Environmental Science / 2008, Vol 2, 11-25 www.aes.northeastern.edu, ISSN 1939-2621 11  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, including the Green River Formation oil shale, which is well known as one the world's largest potential

174

Gas sampling in the DST  

SciTech Connect

Characterization of the rock-fluid interactions in the DST will play an important role in understanding the performance of waste package materials and radionuclide transport through the altered zone of a repository. Consequently, the chemistry of fluids and gases originating in the pore space of the rock and the changing compositions observed with time and temperature will be targeted for study in the chemistry boreholes of the DST. The chemical holes have been lined with SEAMIST (Science Engineering Associate Membrane In situ Sampling Technology) liners that allow gas and fluid from the pore spaces of the rock walls to be sampled on-site periodically. The concentrations of certain chemical species in the gases and fluids sampled at those locations will then be analyzed back in the laboratory. The baseline sampling of the rock-pore gases (prior to heater turn- on) is described.

DeLoach, L.; Chairappa, M.; Martinelli, R.; Glassley, B.

1998-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

175

Microfluidic Sample Preparation for Immunoassays  

SciTech Connect

Researchers at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory are developing means to collect and identify fluid-based biological pathogens in the forms of proteins, viruses, and bacteria. to support detection instruments, they are developing a flexible fluidic sample preparation unit. The overall goal of this Microfluidic Module is to input a fluid sample, containing background particulates and potentially target compounds, and deliver a processed sample for detection. They are developing techniques for sample purification, mixing, and filtration that would be useful to many applications including immunologic and nucleic acid assays. Many of these fluidic functions are accomplished with acoustic radiation pressure or dielectrophoresis. They are integrating these technologies into packaged systems with pumps and valves to control fluid flow through the fluidic circuit.

Visuri, S; Benett, W; Bettencourt, K; Chang, J; Fisher, K; Hamilton, J; Krulevitch, P; Park, C; Stockton, C; Tarte, L; Wang, A; Wilson, T

2001-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

176

BWR Fuel Deposit Sample Evaluation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

River Bend Nuclear Power Station, a boiling water reactor (BWR) plant, experienced fuel defects during Cycle 11. The failed fuel pins were identified during the subsequent refueling outage. To assist analysis of the fuel failure root cause, crud flake deposit samples were collected for analyses. Results on the morphology and distribution of chemical elements in four tenacious crud flakes that are associated with the fuel failures are reported in EPRI report 1009733, BWR Fuel Deposit Sample Evaluation–Riv...

2005-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

177

Duplex sampling apparatus and method  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved apparatus is provided for sampling a gaseous mixture and for measuring mixture components. The apparatus includes two sampling containers connected in series serving as a independently determine the amounts of condensable and noncondensable gases in admixture from a single sample. More specifically, a first container includes a first port capable of selectively connecting to and disconnecting from a sample source and a second port capable of selectively connecting to and disconnecting from a second container. A second container also includes a first port capable of selectively connecting to and disconnecting from the second port of the first container and a second port capable of either selectively connecting to and disconnecting from a differential pressure source. By cooling a mixture sample in the first container, the condensable vapors form a liquid, leaving noncondensable gases either as free gases or dissolved In the liquid. The condensed liquid is heated to drive out dissolved noncondensable gases, and all the noncondensable gases are transferred to the second container. Then the first and second containers are separated from one another in order to separately determine the amount of noncondensable gases and the amount of condensable gases in the sample.

Brown, P.E.; Lloyd, R.

1991-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

178

Hypervelocity impact jet formation  

SciTech Connect

The hypervelocity impact of a particle on a surface generates a jet of shocked material which is thrown from the impact site. A simple analytic model has been developed to obtain expressions for the evolution of this jet of ejecta. The analysis is based on applying the conservation equations of mass and momentum to the problem of a normal impact of a sphere against a semi-infinite flat target. Expressions are developed for the evolution of the jet velocity, jet release point and the locus of points which describe the ejecta envelope. These analytical ejecta profiles are compared with high speed photographs of impact jet formation. 6 refs., 7 figs.

Ang, J.A.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Improved sample size determination for attributes and variables sampling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Earlier INMM papers have addressed the attributes/variables problem and, under conservative/limiting approximations, have reported analytical solutions for the attributes and variables sample sizes. Through computer simulation of this problem, we have calculated attributes and variables sample sizes as a function of falsification, measurement uncertainties, and required detection probability without using approximations. Using realistic assumptions for uncertainty parameters of measurement, the simulation results support the conclusions: (1) previously used conservative approximations can be expensive because they lead to larger sample sizes than needed; and (2) the optimal verification strategy, as well as the falsification strategy, are highly dependent on the underlying uncertainty parameters of the measurement instruments. 1 ref., 3 figs.

Stirpe, D.; Picard, R.R.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Study of the macrozooplankton within the samples taken at the Mobile site from November 1977 through November 1978. A data report of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report brings together the results of a re-examination of zooplankton samples from the Mobile OTEC site (29/sup 0/N-88/sup 0/W) in the northern Gulf of Mexico for macrozooplankton larger than 15 mm.

Steen, J.; Gunter, G.

1981-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mm sample format" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Self-formation in Microelectronics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The external formation of integrated circuits based on lithographic processes is not the only possible method for manufacturing electron devices, either integrated circuits or photovoltaic cells. Planar technology, based on external formation, requires ... Keywords: Artificial Systems, Development, Microelectronics, Reproduction, Self-Formation

Stepas Janušonis

2000-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Optimal reorganization of agent formations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this article we address the problem of determining how a structured formation of autonomous undistinguishable agents can be reorganized into another, eventually non-rigid, formation based on changes in the environment, perhaps unforeseeable. The methodology ... Keywords: combinatorial optimization, dynamic programming, formation reorganization

Dalila B. M. M. Fontes; Fernando A. C. C. Fontes

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

CHARACTERIZATION OF TANK 16H ANNULUS SAMPLES  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The closure of Tank 16H will require removal of material from the annulus of the tank. Samples from Tank 16H annulus were characterized and tested to provide information to evaluate various alternatives for removing the annulus waste. The analysis found all four annulus samples to be composed mainly of Si, Na, and Al and lesser amounts of other elements. The XRD data indicate quartz (SiO{sub 2}) and sodium aluminum nitrate silicate hydrate (Na{sub 8}(Al{sub 6}Si{sub 6}O{sub 24})(NO{sub 3}){sub 2}.4H{sub 2}O) as the predominant crystalline mineral phases in the samples. The XRD data also indicate the presence of crystalline sodium nitrate, sodium nitrite, gibbsite, hydrated sodium bicarbonate, and muscovite. Based on the weight of solids remaining at the end of the test, the water leaching test results indicate approximately 20-35% of the solids dissolved after three contacts with an approximately 3:1 volume of water at 45 C. The chemical analysis of the leachates and the XRD results of the remaining solids indicate sodium salts of nitrate, nitrite, sulfate, and possibly carbonate/bicarbonate make up the majority of the dissolved material. The majority of these salts were dissolved in the first water contact and simply diluted with each subsequent water contact. The water leaching removed large amounts of the uranium in two of the samples and {approx}1/3 of the {sup 99}Tc from all four samples. Most of the other radionuclides analyzed showed low solubility in the water leaching test. The preliminary data on the oxalic acid leaching test indicate the three acid contacts at 45 C dissolved from {approx}34-47% of the solids. The somewhat higher dissolution found in the oxalic acid leaching test versus the water leaching test might be offset by the tendency of the oxalic acid solutions to take on a gel-like consistency. The filtered solids left behind after three oxalic acid contacts were sticky and formed large clumps after drying. These two observations could indicate potential processing difficulties with solutions and solids from oxalic acid leaching. The gel formation might be avoided by using larger volumes of the acid. Further testing would be recommended before using oxalic acid to dissolve the Tank 16H annulus waste to ensure no processing difficulties are encountered in the full scale process.

Hay, M.; Reboul, S.

2012-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

184

DOE Buildings Performance Database, sample Residential data | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Buildings Performance Database, sample Residential data Buildings Performance Database, sample Residential data Dataset Summary Description This is a non-proprietary subset of DOE's Buildings Performance Database. Buildings from the cities of Dayton, OH and Gainesville, FL areas are provided as an example of the data in full database. Sample data here is formatted as CSV The Buildings Performance Database will have an API that allows access to the statistics about the data without exposing private information about individual buildings. The data available in this sample is limited due to the nature of the original datasets; the Buildings Performance database combines data from multiple sources to improve overall robustness. Data fields stored in the database can be seen in the BPD taxonomy: http://www1.eere.energy.gov/buildings/buildingsperformance/taxonomy.html

185

A WISE VIEW OF STAR FORMATION IN LOCAL GALAXY CLUSTERS  

SciTech Connect

We present results from a systematic study of star formation in local galaxy clusters using 22 {mu}m data from the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE). The 69 systems in our sample are drawn from the Cluster Infall Regions Survey, and all have robust mass determinations. The all-sky WISE data enable us to quantify the amount of star formation, as traced by 22 {mu}m, as a function of radius well beyond R{sub 200}, and investigate the dependence of total star formation rate upon cluster mass. We find that the fraction of star-forming galaxies increases with cluster radius but remains below the field value even at 3R{sub 200}. We also find that there is no strong correlation between the mass-normalized total specific star formation rate and cluster mass, indicating that the mass of the host cluster does not strongly influence the total star formation rate of cluster members.

Chung, Sun Mi; Gonzalez, Anthony H. [Department of Astronomy, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611-2055 (United States); Eisenhardt, Peter R.; Stern, Daniel [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Stanford, Spencer A. [Department of Physics, University of California, Davis, CA 95616 (United States); Brodwin, Mark [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Jarrett, Thomas, E-mail: schung@astro.ufl.edu [Infrared Processing and Analysis Center, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States)

2011-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

186

Laboratory Access | Sample Preparation Laboratories  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Access Access Planning Ahead Planning Ahead Please complete the Beam Time Request (BTR) and Support Request forms thourgh the User Portal. Thorough chemical and sample information must be included in your BTR. Support Request forms include a list of collaborators that require laboratory access and your group's laboratory equipment requests. Researcher safety is taken seriously at SLAC. Please remember that radioactive materials, nanomaterials, and biohazardous materials have additional safety requirements. Refer to the SSRL or LCLS Safety Offices for further guidance. Upon Arrival Upon Arrival Once you arrive you must complete training and access forms before accessing the Sample Preparation Laboratories (SPL). All Sample Prep Lab doors are locked with access key codes. Once your SPL

187

Definition: Surface Water Sampling | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Water Sampling Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Surface Water Sampling Water sampling is done to characterize the chemical, thermal, or hydrological properties of a...

188

Definition: Water Sampling | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Sampling Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Water Sampling Water sampling is done to characterize the chemical, thermal, or hydrological properties of a surface or...

189

An Iterative Rejection Sampling Method.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ar X iv :0 80 7. 28 23 v1 [ he p- ph ] 17 Ju l 2 00 8 Preprint typeset in JHEP style - HYPER VERSION Cavendish-HEP-08/10 An Iterative Rejection Sampling Method A. Sherstnev Cavendish Laboratory, University of Cambridge, JJ Thomson Avenue... , Cambridge, CB3 0HE, UK and Scobeltsyn Institute of Nuclear Physics of Lomonosov Moscow State University, Moscow, Russia, 119992 (on leave) Abstract: In the note we consider an iterative generalisation of the rejection sampling method. In high energy physics...

Sherstnev, A

190

The Bolocam Galactic Plane Survey IV: 1.1 and 0.35 mm Dust Continuum Emission in the Galactic Center Region  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Bolocam Galactic Plane Survey (BGPS) data for a six square degree region of the Galactic plane containing the Galactic center is analyzed and compared to infrared and radio continuum data. The BGPS 1.1 mm emission consists of clumps interconnected by a network of fainter filaments surrounding cavities, a few of which are filled with diffuse near-IR emission indicating the presence of warm dust or with radio continuum characteristic of HII regions or supernova remnants. New 350 {\\mu}m images of the environments of the two brightest regions, Sgr A and B, are presented. Sgr B2 is the brightest mm-emitting clump in the Central Molecular Zone and may be forming the closest analog to a super star cluster in the Galaxy. The Central Molecular Zone (CMZ) contains the highest concentration of mm and sub-mm emitting dense clumps in the Galaxy. Most 1.1 mm features at positive longitudes are seen in silhouette against the 3.6 to 24 {\\mu}m background observed by the Spitzer Space Telescope. However, only a few clumps ...

Bally, John; Battersby, Cara; Bradley, Eric Todd; Cyganowski, Claudia; Dowell, Darren; Drosback, Meredith; Dunham, Miranda K; Evans, Neal J; Ginsburg, Adam; Glenn, Jason; Harvey, Paul; Mills, Elisabeth; Merello, Manuel; Rosolowsky, Erik; Schlingman, Wayne; Shirley, Yancy L; Stringfellow, Guy S; Walawender, Josh; Williams, Jonathan; 10.1088/0004-637X/721/1/137

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Star Formation History and Other Properties of the Northern HDF  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The original analysis of the star formation history in the NICMOS Deep images of the NHDF is extended to the entire NHDF utilizing NICMOS and WFPC2 archival data. The roughly constant star formation rate from redshifts 1 to 6 found in this study is consistent with the original results. Star formation rates from this study, Lyman break galaxies and sub-mm observations are now in concordance The spike of star formation at redshift 2 due to 2 ULIRGs in the small Deep NICMOS field is smoothed out in the larger area results presented here. The larger source base of this study allows comparison with predictions from hierarchical galaxy formation models. In general the observation are consistent with the predictions. The observed luminosity functions at redshifts 1-6 are presented for future comparisons with theoretical galaxy evolution calculations. Mid and far infrared properties of the sources are also calculated and compared with observations. A candidate for the VLA source VLA 3651+1221 is discussed.

Rodger I. Thompson

2003-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

192

AUTOMATING GROUNDWATER SAMPLING AT HANFORD  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Until this past October, Fluor Hanford managed Hanford's integrated groundwater program for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). With the new contract awards at the Site, however, the CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company (CHPRC) has assumed responsibility for the groundwater-monitoring programs at the 586-square-mile reservation in southeastern Washington State. These programs are regulated by the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) and the Comprehensive Environmental Response Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA). The purpose of monitoring is to track existing groundwater contamination from past practices, as well as other potential contamination that might originate from RCRA treatment, storage, and disposal (TSD) facilities. An integral part of the groundwater-monitoring program involves taking samples of the groundwater and measuring the water levels in wells scattered across the site. More than 1,200 wells are sampled each year. Historically, field personnel or 'samplers' have been issued pre-printed forms that have information about the well(s) for a particular sampling evolution. This information is taken from the Hanford Well Information System (HWIS) and the Hanford Environmental Information System (HEIS)--official electronic databases. The samplers used these hardcopy forms to document the groundwater samples and well water-levels. After recording the entries in the field, the samplers turned the forms in at the end of the day and the collected information was posted onto a spreadsheet that was then printed and included in a log book. The log book was then used to make manual entries of the new information into the software application(s) for the HEIS and HWIS databases. This is a pilot project for automating this tedious process by providing an electronic tool for automating water-level measurements and groundwater field-sampling activities. The automation will eliminate the manual forms and associated data entry, improve the accuracy of the information recorded, and enhance the efficiency and sampling capacity of field personnel. The goal of the effort is to eliminate 100 percent of the manual input to the database(s) and replace the management of paperwork by the field and clerical personnel with an almost entirely electronic process. These activities will include the following: scheduling the activities of the field teams, electronically recording water-level measurements, electronically logging and filing Groundwater Sampling Reports (GSR), and transferring field forms into the site-wide Integrated Document Management System (IDMS).

CONNELL CW; HILDEBRAND RD; CONLEY SF; CUNNINGHAM DE

2009-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

193

Model-Based Sampling, Inference and Imputation  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Picking a sample through some randomization mechanism, such as random sampling withingroups (stratified random sampling), or, say, sampling every fifth item (systematic randomsampling), may be familiar to a lot of people.

Information Center

2012-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

194

Model-Based Sampling, Inference and Imputation  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Picking a sample through some randomization mechanism, such as random sampling withingroups (stratified random sampling), or, say, sampling every fifth item (systematic randomsampling), may be familiar to a lot of people.

Neal Davis

2013-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

195

An Iterative Rejection Sampling Method  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In the note we consider an iterative generalisation of the rejection sampling method. In high energy physics, this sampling is frequently used for event generation, i.e. preparation of phase space points distributed according to a matrix element squared $|M|^2$ for a scattering process. In many realistic cases $|M|^2$ is a complicated multi-dimensional function, so, the standard von Neumann procedure has quite low efficiency, even if an error reducing technique, like VEGAS, is applied. As a result of that, many of the $|M|^2$ calculations go to ``waste''. The considered iterative modification of the procedure can extract more ``unweighted'' events, i.e. distributed according to $|M|^2$. In several simple examples we show practical benefits of the technique and obtain more events than the standard von Neumann method, without any extra calculations of $|M|^2$.

A. Sherstnev

2008-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

196

Chemical Resources | Sample Preparation Laboratories  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Chemical Resources Chemical Resources Chemical Inventory All Sample Preparation Labs are stocked with an assortment of common solvents, acids, bases, buffers, and other reagents. See our Chemical Inventories for a list of available reagents. If you need large quantities of any chemicals, please order or bring your own supply (see below). Chemical Inventories Standard Operating Procedures (SOPs) If you will be working with any samples or reagents that are significantly toxic, reactive, corrosive, flammable, or otherwise especially hazardous, we may require an approved SOP before you can begin work. Examples: Reagents with an NFPA Rating of 3 or 4 in any category, nanomaterials, heavy metals, pyrophoric materials, water reactive materials. BLANK SOP SSRL BLANK SOP LCLS Ordering Chemicals

197

Sample-based collection and adjustment algorithm for metadata extraction parameter of flexible format document  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We propose an algorithm for automatically generating metadata extraction parameters. It first enumerates candidates on the basis of metadata occurrence in training documents, and then examines these candidates to avoid side effects and to maximize effectiveness. ... Keywords: keyword extraction, layout characteristics, logical structure analysis, metadata extraction

Toshiko Matsumoto; Mitsuharu Oba; Takashi Onoyama

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Prediction of Formation-Tester Fluid-Sample Quality in Highly-Deviated Wells  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Engineering, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TXTX 78712-0228; Emails: rangeles@ mail.utexas.edu, cverdin@mail.utexas.edu, kamys@mail.utexas.edu 2 Formerly with The University of Texas at Austin, currently with Chevron Energy Technology Company, Houston, TX 77099; Email: mmalik@chevron.com ©2009 Society

Torres-Verdín, Carlos

199

Techniques for multivariate sample design  

SciTech Connect

In this report we consider sampling methods applicable to the multi-product Annual Fuel Oil and Kerosene Sales Report (Form EIA-821) Survey. For years prior to 1989, the purpose of the survey was to produce state-level estimates of total sales volumes for each of five target variables: residential No. 2 distillate, other retail No. 2 distillate, wholesale No. 2 distillate, retail residual, and wholesale residual. For the year 1989, the other retail No. 2 distillate and wholesale No. 2 distillate variables were replaced by a new variable defined to be the maximum of the two. The strata for this variable were crossed with the strata for the residential No. 2 distillate variable, resulting in a single stratified No. 2 distillate variable. Estimation for 1989 focused on the single No. 2 distillate variable and the two residual variables. Sampling accuracy requirements for each product were specified in terms of the coefficients of variation (CVs) for the various estimates based on data taken from recent surveys. The target population for the Form EIA-821 survey includes companies that deliver or sell fuel oil or kerosene to end-users. The Petroleum Product Sales Identification Survey (Form EIA-863) data base and numerous state and commercial lists provide the basis of the sampling frame, which is updated as new data become available. In addition, company/state-level volumes for distillates fuel oil, residual fuel oil, and motor gasoline are added to aid the design and selection process. 30 refs., 50 figs., 10 tabs.

Williamson, M.A.

1990-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Internationalization of a Talking Head Ouni, S. Massaro, D.W., Cohen, M.M., Young, K. & Jesse, A.(2003). Internationalization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Internationalization of a Talking Head Ouni, S. Massaro, D.W., Cohen, M.M., Young, K. & Jesse, A and providing the test facilities. REFERENCES [1] D.W. Massaro, Perceiving Talking Faces, From Speech Perception to a Behavioral Principle, MIT Press, 1998. [2] A. Bosseler and D.W. Massaro, "Development and Evaluation

Cohen, Michael M.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mm sample format" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

On the nonexistence of $[\\binom{2m}{m-1}, 2m, \\binom{2m-1}{m-1}]$, $m$ odd, complex orthogonal design  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Complex orthogonal designs (CODs) are used to construct space-time block codes. COD $\\mathcal{O}_z$ with parameter $[p, n, k]$ is a $p\\times n$ matrix, where nonzero entries are filled by $\\pm z_i$ or $\\pm z^*_i$, $i = 1, 2,..., k$, such that $\\mathcal{O}^H_z \\mathcal{O}_z = (|z_1|^2+|z_2|^2+...+|z_k|^2)I_{n \\times n}$. Adams et al. in "The final case of the decoding delay problem for maximum rate complex orthogonal designs," IEEE Trans. Inf. Theory, vol. 56, no. 1, pp. 103-122, Jan. 2010, first proved the nonexistence of $[\\binom{2m}{m-1}, 2m, \\binom{2m-1}{m-1}]$, $m$ odd, COD. Combining with the previous result that decoding delay should be an integer multiple of $\\binom{2m}{m-1}$, they solved the final case $n \\equiv 2 \\pmod 4$ of the decoding delay problem for maximum rate complex orthogonal designs. In this paper, we give another proof of the nonexistence of COD with parameter $[\\binom{2m}{m-1}, 2m, \\binom{2m-1}{m-1}]$, $m$ odd. Our new proof is based on the uniqueness of $[\\binom{2m}{m-1}, 2m-1, \\binom{...

Li, Yuan

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Coupling an Advanced Land Surface–Hydrology Model with the Penn State–NCAR MM5 Modeling System. Part II: Preliminary Model Validation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A number of short-term numerical experiments conducted by the Penn State–NCAR fifth-generation Mesoscale Model (MM5) coupled with an advanced land surface model, alongside the simulations coupled with a simple slab model, are verified with ...

Fei Chen; Jimy Dudhia

2001-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Coupling an Advanced Land Surface–Hydrology Model with the Penn State–NCAR MM5 Modeling System. Part I: Model Implementation and Sensitivity  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper addresses and documents a number of issues related to the implementation of an advanced land surface–hydrology model in the Penn State–NCAR fifth-generation Mesoscale Model (MM5). The concept adopted here is that the land surface model ...

Fei Chen; Jimy Dudhia

2001-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

A self-consistent MoD-WM/MM structural refinement method: characterization of hydrogen bonding in the orytricha nova G-1uar  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper generalizes the MoD-QM/MM hybrid method, developed for ab initio computations of protein electrostatic potentials [Gasc6n, l.A.; Leung, S.S.F.; Batista, E.R.; Batista, V.S. J. Chem. Theory Comput. 2006,2, 175-186], as a practical algorithm for structural refinement of extended systems. The computational protocol involves a space-domain decomposition scheme for the formal fragmentation of extended systems into smaller, partially overlapping, molecular domains and the iterative self-consistent energy minimization of the constituent domains by relaxation of their geometry and electronic structure. The method accounts for mutual polarization of the molecular domains, modeled as Quantum-Mechanical (QM) layers embedded in the otherwise classical Molecular-Mechanics (MM) environment according to QM/MM hybrid methods. The method is applied to the description of benchmark models systems that allow for direct comparisons with full QM calculations, and subsequently applied to the structural characterization of the DNA Oxytricha nova Guanine quadruplex (G4). The resulting MoD-QM/MM structural model of the DNA G4 is compared to recently reported highresolution X-ray diffraction and NMR models, and partially validated by direct comparisons between {sup 1}H NMR chemical shifts that are highly sensitive to hydrogen-bonding and stacking interactions and the corresponding theoretical values obtained at the density functional theory DFT QM/MM (BH&H/6-31 G*:Amber) level in conjunction with the gauge independent atomic orbital (GIAO) method for the ab initio self consistent-field (SCF) calculation of NMR chemical shifts.

Batista, Enrique R [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Newcomer, Micharel B [YALE UNIV; Raggin, Christina M [YALE UNIV; Gascon, Jose A [YALE UNIV; Loria, J Patrick [YALE UNIV; Batista, Victor S [YALE UNIV

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Market Structure Across Retail Formats  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We study how market structure within a product category varies across retail formats. Building on the literature on internal market structure, we estimate a joint store and brand choice model where the loading matrix of brand attributes are allowed to ... Keywords: brand maps, heterogeniety, market structure, retail formats

Karsten Hansen; Vishal Singh

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

formatting | OpenEI Community  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

formatting formatting Home Jweers's picture Submitted by Jweers(83) Contributor 7 August, 2013 - 18:23 New Robust References! citation citing developer formatting reference Semantic Mediawiki wiki Check out the new Reference Form. Adding a reference object to OpenEI using this form is the most complete way to cite a reference. After providing the name of your reference, the form will ask for your document type. Rmckeel's picture Submitted by Rmckeel(297) Contributor 25 June, 2013 - 07:39 How to create formatted blocks to hold OpenEI wiki content content formatting user interface wiki The OpenEI wiki frontpage uses "boxes" that help organize content. These boxes are frequently re-used across the site. Syndicate content 429 Throttled (bot load) Error 429 Throttled (bot load)

207

Magnetometry with entangled atomic samples  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a theory for the estimation of a scalar or a vector magnetic field by its influence on an ensemble of trapped spin polarized atoms. The atoms interact off-resonantly with a continuous laser field, and the measurement of the polarization rotation of the probe light, induced by the dispersive atom-light coupling, leads to spin-squeezing of the atomic sample which enables an estimate of the magnetic field which is more precise than that expected from standard counting statistics. For polarized light and polarized atoms, a description of the non-classical components of the collective spin angular momentum for the atoms and the collective Stokes vectors of the light-field in terms of effective gaussian position and momentum variables is practically exact. The gaussian formalism describes the dynamics of the system very effectively and accounts explicitly for the back-action on the atoms due to measurement and for the estimate of the magnetic field. Multi-component magnetic fields are estimated by the measurement of suitably chosen atomic observables and precision and efficiency is gained by dividing the atomic gas in two or more samples which are entangled by the dispersive atom-light interaction.

Vivi Petersen; Lars Bojer Madsen; Klaus Molmer

2004-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

208

The SCUBA Bright Quasar Survey (SBQS): 850micron observations of the z>4 sample  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present initial results of a new, systematic search for massive star-formation in the host galaxies of the most luminous and probably most massive z>=4 radio-quiet quasars (M(B) 10^13Lsun). A total of 38 z>=4 radio-quiet quasars have been observed at the JCMT using SCUBA at 850microns: 8 were detected (>3sigma) with S(850microns)>~ 10mJy (submillimetre-loud). The new detections almost triple the number of optically selected, submillimetre-loud z>~4 radio-quiet quasars known to date. We include a detailed description of how our quasar sample is defined in terms of radio and optical properties. There is no strong evidence for trends in either detectability or 850microns flux with absolute magnitude, M(B). We find that the weighted mean flux of the undetected sources is 2.0 +/- 0.6mJy, consistent with an earlier estimate of \\~3mJy based on more sensitive observations of a sample z>~4 radio-quiet quasars (McMahon et al., 1999). This corresponds to an inferred starformation rate of \\~1000Msun/yr, similar to Arp220. The typical starformation timescale for the submillimetre-bright sources is ~1Gyr, 10 times longer than the typical accretion-driven e-folding timescale of ~5x10^7 years. Our 850micron detection of the z=4.4 quasar PSS J1048+4407 when analysed in conjunction with 1.2mm single-dish and interferometric observations suggests that this source is resolved on angular scales of 1-2" (6-12 kpc). In addition, we present a new optical spectrum of this source, identifying it as a broad absorption line (BAL) quasar. The new redshift is outside that covered in a recent CO line search by Guilloteau et al., (1999), highlighting the need for accurate redshifts for the obervation and interpretation of high-redshift line studies.

Kate G. Isaak; Robert S. Priddey; Richard G. McMahon; Alain Omont; Celine Peroux; Robert G. Sharp; Stafford Withington

2001-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

209

Model-Based Sampling and Inference  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Model-Based Sampling, Inference and Imputation Model-Based Sampling, Inference and Imputation James R. Knaub, Jr., Energy Information Administration, EI-53.1 James.Knaub@eia.doe.gov Key Words: Survey statistics, Randomization, Conditionality, Random sampling, Cutoff sampling Abstract: Picking a sample through some randomization mechanism, such as random sampling within groups (stratified random sampling), or, say, sampling every fifth item (systematic random sampling), may be familiar to a lot of people. These are design-based samples. Estimates of means and totals for an entire population may be inferred from such a sample, along with estimation of the amount of error that might be expected. However, inference based on a sample and its (modeled) relationship to other data may be less familiar. If there is enough

210

Definition: Gas Flux Sampling | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Gas Flux Sampling Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Gas Flux Sampling Gas flux sampling measures the flow of volatile gas emissions from a specific location and compares...

211

Licensing Guide and Sample License  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

TEI:HNOL06Y TRANSFER WORKIN6 6ROUP TEI:HNOL06Y TRANSFER WORKIN6 6ROUP Lic:en!iing Guide and Sample Lic:en!ie ·~ ICan.u City Plan I OFermilab ~OAK ~RIDGE Nuioul~.

212

Measurement of Boundary-Layer Temperature Profiles by a Scanning 5-MM Radiometer During the 1999 Winter NSA/AAO Radiometer Exp  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Boundary-Layer Temperature Profiles by Boundary-Layer Temperature Profiles by a Scanning 5-MM Radiometer During the 1999 Winter NSA/AAO Radiometer Experiment and WVIOP 2000 V. Y. Leuski and E. R. Westwater Cooperative Institute for Research in the Environmental Sciences National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Environmental Technology Laboratory University of Colorado Boulder, Colorado Introduction A scanning 5-mm-wavelength radiometer was deployed during two Intensive Operational Periods (IOPs) at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program's Cloud and Radiation Testbed (CART) facilities. The first was conducted at the North Slope of Alaska (NSA) and Adjacent arctic Ocean (AAO) site near Barrow, Alaska, during March 1999. One goal was to evaluate the ability of an

213

Surface Water Sampling | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Surface Water Sampling Surface Water Sampling Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Surface Water Sampling Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Field Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Field Sampling Parent Exploration Technique: Water Sampling Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Stratigraphic/Structural: Hydrological: Water composition and source of fluids Thermal: Water temperature Dictionary.png Surface Water Sampling: Water sampling is done to characterize the chemical, thermal, or hydrological properties of a surface or subsurface aqueous system. Other definitions:Wikipedia Reegle Introduction Surface water sampling of hot and cold spring discharges has traditionally

214

Definition: Groundwater Sampling | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Dictionary.png Groundwater Sampling Groundwater sampling is done to characterize the chemical, thermal, or hydrological properties of subsurface aqueous systems. Groundwater...

215

Definition: Surface Gas Sampling | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

search Dictionary.png Surface Gas Sampling Gas sampling is done to characterize the chemical, thermal, or hydrological properties of a surface or subsurface hydrothermal system....

216

Water Sampling (Healy, 1970) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Water Sampling (Healy, 1970) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Water Sampling (Healy, 1970) Exploration Activity Details Location...

217

Water-Gas Sampling | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon Water-Gas Sampling (Redirected from Water-Gas Samples) Redirect page Jump to: navigation,...

218

Grid Points (GridSampleSet)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... OOF2: The Manual. Grid Points (GridSampleSet). ... Name. Grid Points (GridSampleSet) — Evaluate data on a rectangular grid of points. Synopsis. ...

2013-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

219

Grid Points (StatGridSampleSet)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... OOF2: The Manual. Grid Points (StatGridSampleSet). ... Name. Grid Points (StatGridSampleSet) — Evaluate data on a rectangular grid of points. ...

2013-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

220

Water-Gas Sampling | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Water-Gas Sampling Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Water-Gas Sampling edit Details Activities (21) Areas (18) Regions (1)...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mm sample format" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Category:SamplePages | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Category Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon Category:SamplePages Jump to: navigation, search This category uses the form SampleForm. Note the pluralization. Category names...

222

Controls on Gas Hydrate Formation and Dissociation  

SciTech Connect

The main objectives of the project were to monitor, characterize, and quantify in situ the rates of formation and dissociation of methane hydrates at and near the seafloor in the northern Gulf of Mexico, with a focus on the Bush Hill seafloor hydrate mound; to record the linkages between physical and chemical parameters of the deposits over the course of one year, by emphasizing the response of the hydrate mound to temperature and chemical perturbations; and to document the seafloor and water column environmental impacts of hydrate formation and dissociation. For these, monitoring the dynamics of gas hydrate formation and dissociation was required. The objectives were achieved by an integrated field and laboratory scientific study, particularly by monitoring in situ formation and dissociation of the outcropping gas hydrate mound and of the associated gas-rich sediments. In addition to monitoring with the MOSQUITOs, fluid flow rates and temperature, continuously sampling in situ pore fluids for the chemistry, and imaging the hydrate mound, pore fluids from cores, peepers and gas hydrate samples from the mound were as well sampled and analyzed for chemical and isotopic compositions. In order to determine the impact of gas hydrate dissociation and/or methane venting across the seafloor on the ocean and atmosphere, the overlying seawater was sampled and thoroughly analyzed chemically and for methane C isotope ratios. At Bush hill the pore fluid chemistry varies significantly over short distances as well as within some of the specific sites monitored for 440 days, and gas venting is primarily focused. The pore fluid chemistry in the tub-warm and mussel shell fields clearly documented active gas hydrate and authigenic carbonate formation during the monitoring period. The advecting fluid is depleted in sulfate, Ca Mg, and Sr and is rich in methane; at the main vent sites the fluid is methane supersaturated, thus bubble plumes form. The subsurface hydrology exhibits both up-flow and down-flow of fluid at rates that range between 0.5 to 214 cm/yr and 2-162 cm/yr, respectively. The fluid flow system at the mound and background sites are coupled having opposite polarities that oscillate episodically between 14 days to {approx}4 months. Stability calculations suggest that despite bottom water temperature fluctuations, of up to {approx}3 C, the Bush Hill gas hydrate mound is presently stable, as also corroborated by the time-lapse video camera images that did not detect change in the gas hydrate mound. As long as methane (and other hydrocarbon) continues advecting at the observed rates the mound would remain stable. The {_}{sup 13}C-DIC data suggest that crude oil instead of methane serves as the primary electron-donor and metabolic substrate for anaerobic sulfate reduction. The oil-dominated environment at Bush Hill shields some of the methane bubbles from being oxidized both anaerobically in the sediment and aerobically in the water column. Consequently, the methane flux across the seafloor is higher at Bush hill than at non-oil rich seafloor gas hydrate regions, such as at Hydrate Ridge, Cascadia. The methane flux across the ocean/atmosphere interface is as well higher. Modeling the methane flux across this interface at three bubble plumes provides values that range from 180-2000 {_}mol/m{sup 2} day; extrapolating it over the Gulf of Mexico basin utilizing satellite data is in progress.

Miriam Kastner; Ian MacDonald

2006-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

223

Identification of calcium chromate samples  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Anhydrous calcium chromate (CaCrO/sub 4/), produced by Allied Chemical Corporation, has been employed as the active cathode material in Sandia thermal batteries for many years. After being informed by Allied that they would no longer manufacture CaCrO/sub 4/, Sandia placed a contract with General Electric Neutron Devices Department (GEND) to develop a procedure for the synthesis of anhydrous calcium chromate. During this development, a study of washing procedures used indicated that the GEND-made calcium chromate was not anhydrous. Even though chemical analyses of the GEND material after heating at 400/sup 0/C indicated it was similar to the Allied CaCrO/sub 4/, the solubility of GEND calcium chromate in water before heating was 4 to 5 times that of Allied CaCrO/sub 4/. Emission spectroscopy of GEND calcium chromate showed no unusual results. Thermogravimetry and mass spectroscopy experiments showed a water loss of nearly 8 percent between 150 and 200/sup 0/C for the GEND material. X-ray diffractometry gave a pattern very different from that for anhydrous CaCrO/sub 4/ but similar to a calculated pattern for CaCrO/sub 4/ . H/sub 2/O. These results plus important literature information resulted in the conclusion that the material produced by the GEND procedure is primarily CaCrO/sub 4/ . H/sub 2/O with a small amount (less than 25 percent) of CaCrO/sub 4/ present. Heating the material to 200/sup 0/C results in the rapid formation of anhydrous CaCrO/sub 4/.

Clark, R.P.

1977-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Method of correlating a core sample with its original position in a borehole  

SciTech Connect

A method of correlating a core sample with its original position in a borehole. The borehole is logged to determine the bulk density of the formation surrounding the borehole. The core sample is scanned with a computerized axial tomographic scanner (CAT) to determine the attenuation coefficients at a plurality of points in a plurality of cross sections along the core sample. The bulk density log is then compared with the attenuation coefficients to determine the position to which the core sample correlates in the borehole. Alternatively, the borehole can be logged to determine the photoelectric absorption of the formation surrounding the borehole, and this log can be compared with data derived from scanning the core sample with a CAT at two different energy levels.

Vinegar, H. J.; Wellington, S. L.

1985-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

225

Category:Field Sampling | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Category Category Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Category:Field Sampling Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermalpower.jpg Looking for the Field Sampling page? For detailed information on Field Sampling as exploration techniques, click here. Category:Field Sampling Add.png Add a new Field Sampling Technique Subcategories This category has the following 2 subcategories, out of 2 total. G [×] Gas Sampling‎ 3 pages W [×] Water Sampling‎ 2 pages Pages in category "Field Sampling" The following 4 pages are in this category, out of 4 total. G Gas Sampling R Rock Sampling S Soil Sampling W Water Sampling Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Category:Field_Sampling&oldid=689818" Category: Field Techniques

226

The Formation and Fate of Trihalomethanes in Power Plant Cooling Water Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Trihalomethanes (THMs) are semi-volatile compounds that form in water when chlorine or bromine reacts with dissolved organic carbon. This report investigates the formation and fate of THM compounds in power plant cooling water systems, THM health risks, a generalized mechanism of THM formation, and the applicability of existing THM research to power plant cooling. The report presents results of a two-site sampling and analytical program designed to identify THM formation potential in cooling towers using...

2004-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

227

OOMMF/mmDisp Distributions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Notes: All builds are against Tcl/Tk 7.6/4.2. ... The binary distributions are problematic because they require an appropriate Tcl/Tk library to run. ...

2011-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

228

35 mm sales con background  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Page 8. © Marketing Dept 2005 All Rights Reserved 1988 Piper-Alpha North Sea ? July 6th 1988 ? World's worst ever off-shore oil disaster ...

229

Uranium favorability of tertiary sedimentary rocks of the Pend Oreille River valley, Washington. [Measurement and sampling of surface sections, collection of samples from isolated outcrops, chemical and mineralogical analyses of samples, and examination of available water logs  

SciTech Connect

Tertiary sedimentary rocks in the Pend Oreille River valley were investigated in a regional study to determine the favorability for potential uranium resources of northeastern Washington. This project involved measurement and sampling of surface sections, collection of samples from isolated outcrops, chemical and mineralogical analyses of samples, and examination of available water well logs. The Box Canyon Dam area north of Ione is judged to have very high favorability. Thick-bedded conglomerates interbedded with sandstones and silty sandstones compose the Tiger Formation in this area, and high radioactivity levels are found near the base of the formation. Uranophane is found along fracture surfaces or in veins. Carbonaceous material is present throughout the Tiger Formation in the area. Part of the broad Pend Oreille valley surrounding Cusick, Washington, is an area of high favorability. Potential host rocks in the Tiger Formation, consisting of arkosic sandstones interbedded with radioactive shales, probably extend throughout the subsurface part of this area. Carbonaceous material is present and some samples contain high concentrations of uranium. In addition, several other possible chemical indicators were found. The Tiger-Lost Creek area is rated as having medium favorability. The Tiger Formation contains very hard, poorly sorted granite conglomerate with some beds of arkosic sandstone and silty sandstone. The granite conglomerate was apparently derived from source rocks having relatively high uranium content. The lower part of the formation is more favorable than the upper part because of the presence of carbonaceous material, anomalously high concentrations of uranium, and other possible chemical indicators. The area west of Ione is judged to have low favorability, because of the very low permeability of the rocks and the very low uranium content. (auth)

Marjaniemi, D.K.; Robins, J.W.

1975-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Investigation of surface inhomogeneity and estimation of the GOES skin temperature assimilation errors of the MM5 implied by the inhomogeneity over Houston metropolitan area  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This study developed a parameterization method to investigate the impacts of inhomogeneous land surfaces on mesoscale model simulations using a high-resolution 1-d PBL model. Then, the 1-d PBL model was used to investigate the inhomogeneity-caused model errors in applying the GOES satellite skin temperature assimilation technique into the MM5 over the Houston metropolitan area (HOU). In order to investigate the surface inhomogeneity impacts on the surface fluxes and PBL variables over HOU, homo- and inhomogeneous 1-d PBL model simulations were performed over HOU and compared to each other. The 1-d PBL model was constructed so that the surface inhomogeneities were able to be represented within model grid elements using a methodology similar to Avissar and Pielke (1989). The surface inhomogeneities over HOU were defined using 30-m resolution land cover data produced by Global Environment Management (GEM), Inc. The inhomogeneity parameterization method developed in the 1-d model was applied to a standard MM5 simulation to test the applicability of the parameterization to 3-d mesoscale model simulations. From the 1-d simulations it was inferred that the surface inhomogeneities would enhance the sensible heat flux by about 36 % and reduce the latent heat flux by about 25 %, thereby inducing the warmer (0.7 %) and drier (-1.0 %) PBL and the colder and moister PBL top induced by greater turbulent diffusivities. The 3-d application of the inhomogeneity parameterization indicated consistent results with the 1-d in general, with additional effects of advection and differential local circulation. The original GOES simulation was warmer compared to observations over HOU than over surrounding areas. The satellite data assimilation itself would lead to a warm bias due to erroneous estimation of gridpoint-mean skin temperature by the satellite, but 1-d simulations indicate that the impact of this error should be much weaker than what was observed. It seems that, unless the already existing warm and dry bias of the MM5 is corrected, the inhomogeneity parameterization in the MM5 would adversely affect the MM5 performance. Therefore, consideration of the surface inhomogeneities in the urban area needs to be confined to the GOES skin temperature retrieval errors at the moment.

Han, Sang-Ok

2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Mechanisms of Banner Cloud Formation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Banner clouds are clouds in the lee of steep mountains or sharp ridges. Their formation has previously been hypothesized as due to three different mechanisms: (i) vertical uplift in a lee vortex (which has a horizontal axis), (ii) adiabatic ...

Matthias Voigt; Volkmar Wirth

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Hail Formation via Microphysical Recycling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

It is suggested that alternation of low-density riming and wet growth processes play a role in hailstone formation. Such alternation of growth processes, which has been called microphysical recycling, is envisioned to operate in the following ...

John C. Pflaum

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Electrphoretic Sample Excitation Light Assembly.  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An automated electrophoretic system is disclosed. The system employs a capillary cartridge having a plurality of capillary tubes. The cartridge has a first array of capillary ends projecting from one side of a plate. The first array of capillary ends are spaced apart in substantially the same manner as the wells of a microtitre tray of standard size. This allows one to simultaneously perform capillary electrophoresis on samples present in each of the wells of the tray. The system includes a stacked, dual carrousel arrangement to eliminate cross-contamination resulting from reuse of the same buffer tray on consecutive executions from electrophoresis. The system also has a gel delivery module containing a gel syringe/a stepper motor or a high pressure chamber with a pump to quickly and uniformly deliver gel through the capillary tubes. The system further includes a multi-wavelength beam generator to generate a laser beam which produces a beam with a wide range of wavelengths. An off-line capillary reconditioner thoroughly cleans a capillary cartridge to enable simultaneous execution of electrophoresis with another capillary cartridge. The streamlined nature of the off-line capillary reconditioner offers the advantage of increased system throughput with a minimal increase in system cost.

Li, Qingbo (State College, PA); Liu, Changsheng (State College, PA)

2002-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

234

Sample storage/disposal study  

SciTech Connect

Radioactive waste from defense operations has accumulated at the Hanford Site`s underground waste tanks since the late 1940`s. Each tank must be analyzed to determine whether it presents any harm to the workers at the Hanford Site, the public or the environment. Analyses of the waste aids in the decision making process in preparation of future tank waste stabilization procedures. Characterization of the 177 waste tanks on the Hanford Site will produce a large amount of archived material. This also brings up concerns as to how the excess waste tank sample material from 325 and 222-S Analytical Laboratories will be handled. Methods to archive and/or dispose of the waste have been implemented into the 222-S and 325 Laboratory procedures. As the amount of waste characterized from laboratory analysis grows, an examination of whether the waste disposal system will be able to compensate for this increase in the amount of waste needs to be examined. Therefore, the need to find the safest, most economically sound method of waste storage/disposal is important.

Valenzuela, B.D.

1994-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

235

STAR FORMATION IN THE OUTER DISK OF SPIRAL GALAXIES  

SciTech Connect

We combine new deep and wide field of view H{alpha} imaging of a sample of eight nearby (d Almost-Equal-To 17 Mpc) spiral galaxies with new and archival H I and CO imaging to study the star formation and the star formation regulation in the outer disk. We find that, in agreement with previous studies, star formation in the outer disk has low covering fractions, and star formation is typically organized into spiral arms. The star formation in the outer disk is at extremely low levels, with typical star formation rate surface densities of {approx}10{sup -5} to 10{sup -6} M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1} kpc{sup -2}. We find that the ratio of the radial extent of detected H II regions to the radius of the H I disk is typically {approx}>85%. This implies that in order to further our understanding of the implications of extended star formation, we must further our understanding of the formation of extended H I disks. We measure the gravitational stability of the gas disk, and find that the outer gaseous disk is typically a factor of {approx}2 times more stable than the inner star-forming disk. We measure the surface density of outer disk H I arms, and find that the disk is closer to gravitational instability along these arms. Therefore, it seems that spiral arms are a necessary, but not sufficient, requirement for star formation in the outer disk. We use an estimation of the flaring of the outer gas disk to illustrate the effect of flaring on the Schmidt power-law index; we find that including flaring increases the agreement between the power-law indices of the inner and outer disks.

Barnes, Kate L.; Van Zee, Liese [Department of Astronomy, Indiana University, Bloomington, IN 47405 (United States); Cote, Stephanie [Canadian Gemini Office, Herzberg Institute of Astrophysics, National Research Council of Canada, Victoria (Canada); Schade, David, E-mail: barneskl@astro.indiana.edu, E-mail: vanzee@astro.indiana.edu, E-mail: Stephanie.Cote@nrc-cnrc.gc.ca, E-mail: David.Schade@nrc-cnrc.gc.ca [Herzberg Institute of Astrophysics, National Research Council of Canada, Victoria (Canada)

2012-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

236

Multi-class blue noise sampling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Sampling is a core process for a variety of graphics applications. Among existing sampling methods, blue noise sampling remains popular thanks to its spatial uniformity and absence of aliasing artifacts. However, research so far has been mainly focused ... Keywords: blue noise, dart throwing, multi-class, poisson hard/soft disk, relaxation, sampling

Li-Yi Wei

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Soil Gas Sampling | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Soil Gas Sampling Soil Gas Sampling Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Soil Gas Sampling Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Field Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Field Sampling Parent Exploration Technique: Gas Sampling Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Stratigraphic/Structural: Identify concealed faults that act as conduits for hydrothermal fluids. Hydrological: Identify hydrothermal gases of magmatic origin. Thermal: Differentiate between amagmatic or magmatic sources heat. Dictionary.png Soil Gas Sampling: Soil gas sampling is sometimes used in exploration for blind geothermal resources to detect anomalously high concentrations of hydrothermal gases

238

Gas Flux Sampling | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Gas Flux Sampling Gas Flux Sampling Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Gas Flux Sampling Details Activities (26) Areas (20) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Field Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Field Sampling Parent Exploration Technique: Gas Sampling Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Stratigraphic/Structural: High flux can be indicative of conduits for fluid flow. Hydrological: Thermal: Anomalous flux is associated with active hydrothermal activity. Dictionary.png Gas Flux Sampling: Gas flux sampling measures the flow of volatile gas emissions from a specific location and compares it to average background emissions. Anomalously high gas flux can be an indication of hydrothermal activity.

239

Surface Gas Sampling | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Surface Gas Sampling Surface Gas Sampling Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Surface Gas Sampling Details Activities (12) Areas (10) Regions (1) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Field Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Field Sampling Parent Exploration Technique: Gas Sampling Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Stratigraphic/Structural: Hydrological: Gas composition and source of fluids. Thermal: Distinguish magmatic/mantle heat inputs. Can be used to estimate reservoir fluid temperatures. Dictionary.png Surface Gas Sampling: Gas sampling is done to characterize the chemical, thermal, or hydrological properties of a surface or subsurface hydrothermal system. Other definitions:Wikipedia Reegle Introduction

240

A Comparison of "Total Dust" and Inhalable Personal Sampling for Beryllium Exposure.  

SciTech Connect

In 2009, the American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists (ACGIH) reduced the Beryllium (Be) 8-hr Time Weighted Average Threshold Limit Value (TLV-TWA) from 2.0 {micro}g/m{sup 3} to 0.05 {micro}g/m{sup 3} with an inhalable 'I' designation in accordance with ACGIH's particle size-selective criterion for inhalable mass. Currently, per the Department of Energy (DOE) requirements, the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is following the Occupational Health and Safety Administration (OSHA) Permissible Exposure Limit (PEL) of 2.0 {micro}g/m{sup 3} as an 8-hr TWA, which is also the 2005 ACGIH TLV-TWA, and an Action Level (AL) of 0.2 {micro}g/m{sup 3} and sampling is performed using the 37mm (total dust) sampling method. Since DOE is considering adopting the newer 2009 TLV guidelines, the goal of this study was to determine if the current method of sampling using the 37mm (total dust) sampler would produce results that are comparable to what would be measured using the IOM (inhalable) sampler specific to the application of high energy explosive work at LLNL's remote experimental test facility at Site 300. Side-by-side personal sampling using the two samplers was performed over an approximately two-week period during chamber re-entry and cleanup procedures following detonation of an explosive assembly containing Beryllium (Be). The average ratio of personal sampling results for the IOM (inhalable) vs. 37-mm (total dust) sampler was 1.1:1 with a P-value of 0.62, indicating that there was no statistically significant difference in the performance of the two samplers. Therefore, for the type of activity monitored during this study, the 37-mm sampling cassette would be considered a suitable alternative to the IOM sampler for collecting inhalable particulate matter, which is important given the many practical and economic advantages that it presents. However, similar comparison studies would be necessary for this conclusion to be applied to other types of activities, where earlier studies have shown that the IOM sampler tends to collect higher concentrations of Be compared to the 37-mm cassette, which could complicate compliance with what is already an extremely low exposure limit.

Carter, C M

2012-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mm sample format" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Sample introduction apparatus for a flow cytometer  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A sample introduction system for a flow cytometer allows easy change of sample containers such as test tubes and facilitates use in high pressure environments. The sample container includes a cap having a pressure supply chamber and a sample container attachment cavity. A sample container may be automatically positioned into the attachment cavity so as to sealably engage the end of the sample container as its outer surface. This positioning may be accomplished through some sample introduction mechanism. To facilitate cleaning HPLC tubing and fittings may be used in a manner which facilitates removable of the entire tubing from both the nozzle container and other sample container cap to permit its replacement to avoid contamination. The sample container support may include horizontal stops which loosely limit the movement of the sample container and thus avoid further stresses upon it.

Van den Engh, Ger (Seattle, WA)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Sample introduction system for a flow cytometer  

SciTech Connect

A sample introduction system for a flow cytometer allows easy change of sample containers such as test tubes and facilitates use in high pressure environments. The sample container includes a cap having a pressure supply chamber and a sample container attachment cavity. A sample container may be automatically positioned into the attachment cavity so as to sealably engage the end of the sample container as its outer surface. This positioning may be accomplished through some sample introduction mechanism. To facilitate cleaning, HPLC tubing and fittings may be used in a manner which facilitates removing of the entire tubing from both the nozzle container and other sample container cap to permit its replacement to avoid contamination. The sample container support may include horizontal stops which loosely limit the movement of the sample container and thus avoid further stresses upon it.

Van den Engh, Ger (Seattle, WA)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Sample introduction system for a flow cytometer  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A sample introduction system for a flow cytometer allows easy change of sample containers such as test tubes and facilitates use in high pressure environments. The sample container includes a cap having a pressure supply chamber and a sample container attachment cavity. A sample container may be automatically positioned into the attachment cavity so as to sealably engage the end of the sample container as its outer surface. This positioning may be accomplished through some sample introduction mechanism. To facilitate cleaning, HPLC tubing and fittings may be used in a manner which facilitates removing of the entire tubing from both the nozzle container and other sample container cap to permit its replacement to avoid contamination. The sample container support may include horizontal stops which loosely limit the movement of the sample container and thus avoid further stresses upon it. 3 figs.

Engh, G. van den

1997-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

244

Sample introduction apparatus for a flow cytometer  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A sample introduction system for a flow cytometer allows easy change of sample containers such as test tubes and facilitates use in high pressure environments. The sample container includes a cap having a pressure supply chamber and a sample container attachment cavity. A sample container may be automatically positioned into the attachment cavity so as to sealably engage the end of the sample container as its outer surface. This positioning may be accomplished through some sample introduction mechanism. To facilitate cleaning HPLC tubing and fittings may be used in a manner which facilitates removable of the entire tubing from both the nozzle container and other sample container cap to permit its replacement to avoid contamination. The sample container support may include horizontal stops which loosely limit the movement of the sample container and thus avoid further stresses upon it. 3 figs.

Van den Engh, G.

1998-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

245

Casingless down-hole for sealing an ablation volume and obtaining a sample for analysis  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A casing-less down hole sampling system for acquiring a subsurface sample for analysis using an inductively coupled plasma system is disclosed. The system includes a probe which is pushed into the formation to be analyzed using a hydraulic ram system. The probe includes a detachable tip member which has a soil point and a barb, with the soil point aiding the penetration of the earth, and the barb causing the tip member to disengage from the probe and remain in the formation when the probe is pulled up. The probe is forced into the formation to be tested, and then pulled up slightly, to disengage the tip member and expose a column of the subsurface formation to be tested. An instrumentation tube mounted in the probe is then extended outward from the probe to longitudinally extend into the exposed column. A balloon seal mounted on the end of the instrumentation tube allows the bottom of the column to be sealed. A source of laser radiation is emitted from the instrumentation tube to ablate a sample from the exposed column. The instrumentation tube can be rotated in the probe to sweep the laser source across the surface of the exposed column. An aerosol transport system carries the ablated sample from the probe to the surface for testing in an inductively coupled plasma system. By testing at various levels in the down-hole as the probe is extracted from the soil, a profile of the subsurface formation may be obtained. 9 figs.

Noble, D.T.; Braymen, S.D.; Anderson, M.S.

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Casingless down-hole for sealing an ablation volume and obtaining a sample for analysis  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A casing-less down hole sampling system for acquiring a subsurface sample for analysis using an inductively coupled plasma system is disclosed. The system includes a probe which is pushed into the formation to be analyzed using a hydraulic ram system. The probe includes a detachable tip member which has a soil point mad a barb, with the soil point aiding the penetration of the earth, and the barb causing the tip member to disengage from the probe and remain in the formation when the probe is pulled up. The probe is forced into the formation to be tested, and then pulled up slightly, to disengage the tip member and expose a column of the subsurface formation to be tested. An instrumentation tube mounted in the probe is then extended outward from the probe to longitudinally extend into the exposed column. A balloon seal mounted on the end of the instrumentation tube allows the bottom of the column to be sealed. A source of laser radiation is emitted from the instrumentation tube to ablate a sample from the exposed column. The instrumentation tube can be rotated in the probe to sweep the laser source across the surface of the exposed column. An aerosol transport system carries the ablated sample from the probe to the surface for testing in an inductively coupled plasma system. By testing at various levels in the down-hole as the probe is extracted from the soil, a profile of the subsurface formation may be obtained.

Noble, Donald T. (Ames, IA); Braymen, Steven D. (Ames, IA); Anderson, Marvin S. (Ames, IA)

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

From the Office Document Format Battlefield  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The two most common XML-based formats for office application suites are now international standards. Unfortunately, the Open Document Format and Office Open XML are similar but imperfectly compatible. Keywords: ODF, OOXML, XML, document format, office application

Jirka Kosek

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Definition: Rock Sampling | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Sampling Sampling Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Rock Sampling Systematic rock sampling can be used to characterize a geothermal reservoir. The physical and chemical properties of rock samples provide important information for determining whether a power generation or heat utilization facility can be developed. Some general rock properties can be measured by visual inspection, but detailed properties require laboratory techniques. View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition A core sample is a cylindrical section of (usually) a naturally occurring substance. Most core samples are obtained by drilling with special drills into the substance, for example sediment or rock, with a hollow steel tube called a core drill. The hole made for the core sample is called the "core hole". A variety of core samplers exist to sample

249

Method and apparatus for data sampling  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and apparatus for sampling radiation detector outputs and determining event data from the collected samples is described. The method uses high speed sampling of the detector output, the conversion of the samples to digital values, and the discrimination of the digital values so that digital values representing detected events are determined. The high speed sampling and digital conversion is performed by an A/D sampler that samples the detector output at a rate high enough to produce numerous digital samples for each detected event. The digital discrimination identifies those digital samples that are not representative of detected events. The sampling and discrimination also provides for temporary or permanent storage, either serially or in parallel, to a digital storage medium. 6 figures.

Odell, D.M.C.

1994-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

250

Fluid sampling system for a nuclear reactor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system of extracting fluid samples, either liquid or gas, from the interior of a nuclear reactor containment utilizes a jet pump. To extract the sample fluid, a nonradioactive motive fluid is forced through the inlet and discharge ports of a jet pump located outside the containment, creating a suction that draws the sample fluid from the containment through a sample conduit connected to the pump suction port. The mixture of motive fluid and sample fluid is discharged through a return conduit to the interior of the containment. The jet pump and means for removing a portion of the sample fluid from the sample conduit can be located in a shielded sample grab station located next to the containment. A non-nuclear grade active pump can be located outside the grab sampling station and the containment to pump the nonradioactive motive fluid through the jet pump. 1 fig.

Lau, L.K.; Alper, N.I.

1994-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

251

STAR FORMATION IN ATOMIC GAS  

SciTech Connect

Observations of nearby galaxies have firmly established, over a broad range of galactic environments and metallicities, that star formation occurs exclusively in the molecular phase of the interstellar medium (ISM). Theoretical models show that this association results from the correlation between chemical phase, shielding, and temperature. Interstellar gas converts from atomic to molecular only in regions that are well shielded from interstellar ultraviolet (UV) photons, and since UV photons are also the dominant source of interstellar heating, only in these shielded regions does the gas become cold enough to be subject to Jeans instability. However, while the equilibrium temperature and chemical state of interstellar gas are well correlated, the timescale required to reach chemical equilibrium is much longer than that required to reach thermal equilibrium, and both timescales are metallicity-dependent. Here I show that the difference in timescales implies that, at metallicities below a few percent of the solar value, well shielded gas will reach low temperatures and proceed to star formation before the bulk of it is able to convert from atomic to molecular. As a result, at extremely low metallicities, star formation will occur in a cold atomic phase of the ISM rather than a molecular phase. I calculate the observable consequences of this result for star formation in low-metallicity galaxies, and I discuss how some current numerical models for H{sub 2}-regulated star formation may need to be modified.

Krumholz, Mark R., E-mail: krumholz@ucolick.org [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States)

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

SIMULATION OF THE FORMATION OF A SOLAR ACTIVE REGION  

SciTech Connect

We present a radiative magnetohydrodynamics simulation of the formation of an active region (AR) on the solar surface. The simulation models the rise of a buoyant magnetic flux bundle from a depth of 7.5 Mm in the convection zone up into the solar photosphere. The rise of the magnetic plasma in the convection zone is accompanied by predominantly horizontal expansion. Such an expansion leads to a scaling relation between the plasma density and the magnetic field strength such that B {proportional_to} rhov{sup 1/2}. The emergence of magnetic flux into the photosphere appears as a complex magnetic pattern, which results from the interaction of the rising magnetic field with the turbulent convective flows. Small-scale magnetic elements at the surface first appear, followed by their gradual coalescence into larger magnetic concentrations, which eventually results in the formation of a pair of opposite polarity spots. Although the mean flow pattern in the vicinity of the developing spots is directed radially outward, correlations between the magnetic field and velocity field fluctuations allow the spots to accumulate flux. Such correlations result from the Lorentz-force-driven, counterstreaming motion of opposite polarity fragments. The formation of the simulated AR is accompanied by transient light bridges between umbrae and umbral dots. Together with recent sunspot modeling, this work highlights the common magnetoconvective origin of umbral dots, light bridges, and penumbral filaments.

Cheung, M. C. M.; Title, A. M. [Lockheed Martin Solar and Astrophysics Laboratory, Palo Alto, CA 94304 (United States); Rempel, M. [High Altitude Observatory, NCAR, P.O. Box 3000, Boulder, CO 80307 (United States); Schuessler, M. [Max Planck Institute for Solar System Research, Katlenburg-Lindau, 37191 (Germany)

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

ALARA ASSESSMENT OF SETTLER SLUDGE SAMPLING METHODS  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this assessment is to compare underwater and above water settler sludge sampling methods to determine if the added cost for underwater sampling for the sole purpose of worker dose reductions is justified. Initial planning for sludge sampling included container, settler and knock-out-pot (KOP) sampling. Due to the significantly higher dose consequence of KOP sludge, a decision was made to sample KOP underwater to achieve worker dose reductions. Additionally, initial plans were to utilize the underwater sampling apparatus for settler sludge. Since there are no longer plans to sample KOP sludge, the decision for underwater sampling for settler sludge needs to be revisited. The present sampling plan calls for spending an estimated $2,500,000 to design and construct a new underwater sampling system (per A21 C-PL-001 RevOE). This evaluation will compare and contrast the present method of above water sampling to the underwater method that is planned by the Sludge Treatment Project (STP) and determine if settler samples can be taken using the existing sampling cart (with potentially minor modifications) while maintaining doses to workers As Low As Reasonably Achievable (ALARA) and eliminate the need for costly redesigns, testing and personnel retraining.

NELSEN LA

2009-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

254

Definition: Field Sampling | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Field Sampling Field Sampling Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Field Sampling Systematic field sampling is critical for reliable characterize a geothermal resource. Some of the physical and chemical properties of rock samples can be estimated by visual inspection, but accurate determination of these properties requires detailed laboratory analysis. Surface or subsurface fluid sampling is also routinely performed to characterize the chemical, thermal, or hydrological properties of a hydrothermal system. Combinations of these sampling techniques have traditionally been used to obtain important information used to determine whether or not a viable power generation or heat utilization facility can be developed at a prospect. Soil sampling is a less commonly used method for exploration of

255

Climate Monitoring from Space: Asynoptic Sampling Considerations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Monitoring climate variability from space is considered from the standpoint of satellite sampling. Asynoptic sampling leads to well-defined limits in spatial and temporal resolution which are violated by behavior involving sufficiently small ...

Murry L. Salby

1989-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Metropolis photon sampling with optional user guidance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present Metropolis Photon Sampling (MPS), a visual importance-driven algorithm for populating photon maps. Photon Mapping and other particle tracing algorithms fail if the photons are poorly distributed. Our approach samples light transport paths ...

Shaohua Fan; Stephen Chenney; Yu-chi Lai

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Principles for Sampling Airborne Radioactivity from Stacks  

SciTech Connect

This book chapter describes the special processes involved in sampling the airborne effluents from nuclear faciities. The title of the book is Radioactive Air Sampling Methods. The abstract for this chapter was cleared as PNNL-SA-45941.

Glissmeyer, John A.

2010-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

258

Tenant data request: Sample letter | ENERGY STAR  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

government resources Tenant data request: Sample letter Use this sample letter to request energy data from your tenants. This is helpful for instances where you want whole-building...

259

TESTING HOMOGENEITY WITH GALAXY STAR FORMATION HISTORIES  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Observationally confirming spatial homogeneity on sufficiently large cosmological scales is of importance to test one of the underpinning assumptions of cosmology, and is also imperative for correctly interpreting dark energy. A challenging aspect of this is that homogeneity must be probed inside our past light cone, while observations take place on the light cone. The star formation history (SFH) in the galaxy fossil record provides a novel way to do this. We calculate the SFH of stacked luminous red galaxy (LRG) spectra obtained from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. We divide the LRG sample into 12 equal-area contiguous sky patches and 10 redshift slices (0.2 < z < 0.5), which correspond to 120 blocks of volume {approx}0.04 Gpc{sup 3}. Using the SFH in a time period that samples the history of the universe between look-back times 11.5 and 13.4 Gyr as a proxy for homogeneity, we calculate the posterior distribution for the excess large-scale variance due to inhomogeneity, and find that the most likely solution is no extra variance at all. At 95% credibility, there is no evidence of deviations larger than 5.8%.

Hoyle, Ben; Jimenez, Raul [Institut de Ciences del Cosmos (ICC), Universitat de Barcelona (IEEC-UB), Marti i Franques 1, E-08024 Barcelona (Spain); Tojeiro, Rita; Maartens, Roy [Institute of Cosmology and Gravitation, University of Portsmouth, Dennis Sciama Building, Portsmouth PO1 3FX (United Kingdom); Heavens, Alan [Imperial Centre for Inference and Cosmology, Astrophysics Group, Imperial College London, Blackett Laboratory, Prince Consort Road, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Clarkson, Chris [Astrophysics, Cosmology and Gravity Centre, and Department of Mathematics and Applied Mathematics, University of Cape Town, Rondebosch 7701 (South Africa)

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Sample preparation method for glass welding by ultrashort laser pulses yields higher seam strength  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Glass welding by ultrashort laser pulses allows joining without the need of an absorber or a preheating and postheating process. However, cracks generated during the welding process substantially impair the joining strength of the welding seams. In this paper a sample preparation method is described that prevents the formation of cracks. The measured joining strength of samples prepared by this method is substantially higher than previously reported values.

Cvecek, K.; Miyamoto, I.; Strauss, J.; Wolf, M.; Frick, T.; Schmidt, M.

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mm sample format" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Sample holder for x-ray diffractometry  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A sample holder for use with x-ray diffractometers with the capability to rotate the sample, as well as to adjust the position of the sample in the x, y, and z directions. Adjustment in the x direction is accomplished through loosening set screws, moving a platform, and retightening the set screws. Motion translators are used for adjustment in the y and z directions. An electric motor rotates the sample, and receives power from the diffractometer.

Hesch, V.L.

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

262

Aerosol Sampling from a Unmanned Aerial Vehicle  

Disclosure Number 201202873 Technology Summary ... The present invention enhances the ability to collect such samples, and enables collection of ...

263

Boiling Water Reactor Sampling Summary: 2012 Update  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents boiling water reactor (BWR) sampling practices for key reactor water and feedwater parameters. It includes information on analysis methods, sampling frequencies, and compliance with the recommended sampling frequencies in BWRVIP-190: BWR Vessels and Internals Project, BWR Water Chemistry Guidelines – 2008 Revision (EPRI report 1016579).

2013-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

264

On random sampling auctions for digital goods  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the context of auctions for digital goods, an interesting Random Sampling Optimal Price auction (RSOP) has been proposed by Goldberg, Hartline and Wright; this leads to a truthful mechanism. Since random sampling is a popular approach for auctions ... Keywords: auction, mechanism design, random sampling

Saeed Alaei; Azarakhsh Malekian; Aravind Srinivasan

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

EMP Attachment 1 DOE-SC PNNL Site Sampling and Analysis Plan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Sampling and Analysis Plan (SAP) is written for the radiological environmental air surveillance program for the DOE-SC PNNL Site, Richland Washington. It provides the requirements for planning sampling events, and the requirements imposed on the analytical laboratory analyzing the air samples. The actual air sampling process is in procedure EPRP-AIR-029. The rationale for analyte selection, media, and sampling site location has been vetted through the data quality objectives (DQO) process (Barnett et al. 2010). The results from the DQO process have been reviewed and approved by the Washington State Department of Health. The DQO process (Barnett et al. 2010) identified seven specific radionuclides for analysis along with the need for gross alpha and gross beta radiological analyses. The analytes are {sup 241}Am, {sup 243}Am, {sup 244}Cm, {sup 60}Co, {sup 238}Pu, {sup 239}Pu, and {sup 233}U. The report also determined that air samples for particulates are the only sample matrix required for the monitoring program. These samples are collected on 47-mm glass-fiber filters.

Meier, Kirsten M.

2011-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

266

Downhole Fluid Sampling | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Downhole Fluid Sampling Downhole Fluid Sampling Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Downhole Fluid Sampling Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Downhole Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Well Testing Techniques Parent Exploration Technique: Well Testing Techniques Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Stratigraphic/Structural: Hydrological: Water composition and source of fluids. Gas composition and source of fluids. Thermal: Water temperature. Distinguish magmatic/mantle heat inputs. Can be used to estimate reservoir fluid temperatures. Dictionary.png Downhole Fluid Sampling: Downhole fluid sampling is done to characterize the chemical, thermal, or hydrological properties of a surface or subsurface aqueous system. Downhole

267

Rotary Mode Core Sample System availability improvement  

SciTech Connect

The Rotary Mode Core Sample System (RMCSS) is used to obtain stratified samples of the waste deposits in single-shell and double-shell waste tanks at the Hanford Site. The samples are used to characterize the waste in support of ongoing and future waste remediation efforts. Four sampling trucks have been developed to obtain these samples. Truck I was the first in operation and is currently being used to obtain samples where the push mode is appropriate (i.e., no rotation of drill). Truck 2 is similar to truck 1, except for added safety features, and is in operation to obtain samples using either a push mode or rotary drill mode. Trucks 3 and 4 are now being fabricated to be essentially identical to truck 2.

Jenkins, W.W.; Bennett, K.L.; Potter, J.D. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States); Cross, B.T.; Burkes, J.M.; Rogers, A.C. [Southwest Research Institute (United States)

1995-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

268

Method of fracturing a geological formation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved method of fracturing a geological formation surrounding a well bore is disclosed. A relatively small explosive charge is emplaced in a well bore and the bore is subsequently hydraulically pressurized to a pressure less than the formation breakdown pressure and preferably greater than the fracture propagation pressure of the formation. The charge is denoted while the bore is so pressurized, resulting in the formation of multiple fractures in the surrounding formation with little or no accompanying formation damage. Subsequent hydraulic pressurization can be used to propagate and extend the fractures in a conventional manner. The method is useful for stimulating production of oil, gas and possibly water from suitable geologic formations.

Johnson, James O. (2679-B Walnut, Los Alamos, NM 87544)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

QM/MM Lineshape Simulation of the Hydrogen-bonded Uracil NH Stretching Vibration of the Adenine:Uracil Base Pair in CDCl$_3$  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A hybrid Car-Parrinello QM/MM molecular dynamics simulation has been carried out for the Watson-Crick base pair of 9-ethyl-8-phenyladenine and 1-cyclohexyluracil in deuterochloroform solution at room temperature. The resulting trajectory is analyzed putting emphasis on the N-H$...$N Hydrogen bond geometry. Using an empirical correlation between the $\\NN$-distance and the fundamental NH-stretching frequency, the time-dependence of this energy gap along the trajectory is obtained. From the gap-correlation function we determine the infrared absorption spectrum using lineshape theory in combination with a multimode oscillator model. The obtained average transition frequency and the width of the spectrum is in reasonable agreement with recent experimental data.

Yan, Yun-an; Kühn, Oliver

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Evaluating the influence of antecedent soil moisture on variability of the North American Monsoon precipitation in the coupled MM5/VIC modeling system  

SciTech Connect

The influence of antecedent soil moisture on North American monsoon system (NAMS) precipitation variability was explored using the MM5 mesoscale model coupled with the Variable Infiltration Capacity (VIC) land surface model. Sensitivity experiments were performed with extreme wet and dry initial soil moisture conditions for both the 1984 wet monsoon year and the 1989 dry year. The MM5-VIC model reproduced the key features of NAMS in 1984 and 1989 especially over northwestern Mexico. Our modeling results indicate that the land surface has memory of the initial soil wetness prescribed at the onset of the monsoon that persists over most of the region well into the monsoon season (e.g. until August). However, in contrast to the classical thermal contrast concept, where wetter soils lead to cooler surface temperatures, less land-sea thermal contrast, weaker monsoon circulations and less precipitation, the coupled model consistently demonstrated a positive soil moisture – precipitation feedback. Specifically, anomalously wet premonsoon soil moisture always lead to enhanced monsoon precipitation, and the reverse was also true. The surface temperature changes induced by differences in surface energy flux partitioning associated with pre-monsoon soil moisture anomalies changed the surface pressure and consequently the flow field in the coupled model, which in turn changed moisture convergence and, accordingly, precipitation patterns. Both the largescale circulation change and local land-atmospheric interactions in response to premonsoon soil moisture anomalies play important roles in the coupled model’s positive soil moisture monsoon precipitation feedback. However, the former may be sensitive to the strength and location of the thermal anomalies, thus leaving open the possibility of both positive and negative soil moisture precipitation feedbacks.

Zhu, Chunmei; Leung, Lai R.; Gochis, David; Qian, Yun; Lettenmaier, Dennis P.

2009-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

271

Molecular hydrogen regulated star formation in cosmological SPH simulations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

It has been shown observationally that star formation (SF) correlates tightly with the presence of molecular hydrogen (H2). Therefore it would be important to investigate its implication on galaxy formation in a cosmological context. In the present work, we track the H2 mass fraction within our cosmological smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) code GADGET-3 using an equilibrium analytic model by Krumholz et al. This model allows us to regulate the star formation in our simulation by the local abundance of H2 rather than the total cold gas density, and naturally introduce the dependence of star formation on metallicity. We investigate implications of the equilibrium H2-based SF model on galaxy population properties, such as the stellar-to-halo mass ratio (SHMR), baryon fraction, cosmic star formation rate density (SFRD), galaxy specific SFR, galaxy stellar mass functions (GSMF), and Kennicutt-Schmidt (KS) relationship. The advantage of our work over the previous ones is having a large sample of simulated gala...

Thompson, Robert; Jaacks, Jason; Choi, Jun-Hwan

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Space-radiation-induced point defect formation in optical materials. Ph.D. Thesis  

SciTech Connect

One of the central problems man has faced in his exploration of space is the long and short term effects of the space environment on the performance of spacecraft systems. The results presented in this dissertation represent the first time a definite connection has been made between the space-induced damage of optical systems and the microscopic mechanisms of point defect formation that lead to the damage. Point defect formation was observed in two, and possibly three different optical materials subjected to short-duration space exposure. Three calcium fluoride, two lithium fluoride, and three magnesium fluoride samples were flown on Space Shuttle flight STS-46 as part of the Evaluation of Oxygen Interactions with Materials - Third Phase experiment. Pre-flight and post-flight optical absorption measurements were performed on all of the samples. With the possible exception of the magnesium fluoride samples, every sample clearly showed the formation of F-centers in that section of the sample that was exposed to the low earth orbit environment. Analysis of the flight samples and laboratory experiments on control samples identify solar vacuum ultraviolet radiation as the most probable primary cause of the defect formation.

Allen, J.L.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Buildings characterization sampling plan, Weldon Spring Site  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of the Buildings Sampling Plan is to provide a systematic approach to characterizing radiological, asbestos and chemical contamination in and around the buildings and structures at the Weldon Spring Chemical Plant Site (WSCPS). This sampling plan reviews historical information; identifies data needs; and outlines sampling procedures, quality assurance, data documentation and reporting requirements for the buildings and equipment characterization at the Weldon Spring Site (WSS). The scope of this plan is limited to the buildings, structures, and equipment from the previous operation of the WSCPS. The Buildings Sampling Plan is divided into nine sections: introduction, background, data needs and sampling plan objectives, sampling rationale and procedure, sample analysis, quality assurance, data documentation, reporting requirements, and references. The data needs, sampling rationale and procedures and sample analysis sections of this work plan are subdivided into radiological, asbestos and chemical sections. Because different sampling techniques and analyses will be required for radiological, asbestos and chemical contamination, separate subsections are used. The investigations for each contaminant will be conducted independently. Similar historical and descriptive information is repeated in the subsections, but the perspective and information vary slightly. 24 refs., 5 figs., 14 tabs.

Not Available

1988-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Air sampling in the workplace. Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides technical information on air sampling that will be useful for facilities following the recommendations in the NRC`s Regulatory Guide 8.25, Revision 1, ``Air sampling in the Workplace.`` That guide addresses air sampling to meet the requirements in NRC`s regulations on radiation protection, 10 CFR Part 20. This report describes how to determine the need for air sampling based on the amount of material in process modified by the type of material, release potential, and confinement of the material. The purposes of air sampling and how the purposes affect the types of air sampling provided are discussed. The report discusses how to locate air samplers to accurately determine the concentrations of airborne radioactive materials that workers will be exposed to. The need for and the methods of performing airflow pattern studies to improve the accuracy of air sampling results are included. The report presents and gives examples of several techniques that can be used to evaluate whether the airborne concentrations of material are representative of the air inhaled by workers. Methods to adjust derived air concentrations for particle size are described. Methods to calibrate for volume of air sampled and estimate the uncertainty in the volume of air sampled are described. Statistical tests for determining minimum detectable concentrations are presented. How to perform an annual evaluation of the adequacy of the air sampling is also discussed.

Hickey, E.E.; Stoetzel, G.A.; Strom, D.J.; Cicotte, G.R. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Wiblin, C.M. [Advanced Systems Technology, Inc., Atlanta, GA (United States); McGuire, S.A. [Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC (United States). Div. of Regulatory Applications

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Notices Accessible Format: Individuals with  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

472 Federal Register 472 Federal Register / Vol. 77, No. 83 / Monday, April 30, 2012 / Notices Accessible Format: Individuals with disabilities can obtain this document in an accessible format (e.g., braille, large print, audiotape, or computer diskette) on request to the program contact person listed under FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT. Electronic Access to This Document: The official version of this document is the document published in the Federal Register. Free Internet access to the official edition of the Federal Register and the Code of Federal Regulations is available via the Federal Digital System at: www.gpo.gov/fdsys. At this site you can view this document, as well as all other documents of this Department published in the Federal Register, in text or Adobe Portable Document

276

APS Radioactive Sample Safety Review Committee  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Radioactive Sample Safety Review Committee Radioactive Sample Safety Review Committee March 6, 2012 1. Purpose The APS Safety Radioactive Sample Safety Review Committee (RSSRC) advises the AES Division Director on the radioactive samples to be used at the APS and the adequacy of controls in place for the duration of their use. The RSSRC reviews the radioactive material samples proposed to be run at the APS to ensure that they fall within established safety envelopes of the APS. 2. Membership The RSSRC members are appointed by the AES Division Director. The current members of the RSRC are: B. Glagola AES - Chair S. Davey AES G. Pile AES L. Soderholm CHM J. Vacca RSO W. VanWingeren AES M. Beno XSD E. Alp XSD M. Rivers PUC 3. Method The AES User Safety Coordinator will notify the RSSRC of any samples

277

SNS Sample Environment | ORNL Neutron Sciences  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Home › Instruments › SNS › Sample Environment Home › Instruments › SNS › Sample Environment SNS Sample Environment SNS Sample Environment Operations Group SNS Sample Environment Operations Group from left to right: (left to right): Bekki Mills, Mark Loguillo, Saad Elorfi, Randy Sexton, Leland Robbins, Matt Rucker, Cory Fletcher, Todd Sherline, Hans-Jochen Lauter, Ken Kroll The Sample Environment Group provides equipment and support for studying materials under controlled conditions (temperature, pressure, magnetic field, chemical environment, etc.). When you come to SNS to conduct an experiment, our front-line teams are there to support you. Although we currently offer a wide range of capabilities, we realize that these capabilities must continually grow. Therefore, we also have a busy research

278

Sample Environment Equipment Categories - ORNL Neutron Sciences  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Home › Instruments › Sample Environment Home › Instruments › Sample Environment Sample Environment: Categories of Equipment All Ancillary Equipment Auto Changer Closed Cycle Refrigerators Closed Cycle Refrigerators - Bottom Loading Closed Cycle Refrigerators - Top Loading Furnaces Gas Handling Gas Panel High Pressure Systems Liquid Helium Cryostats Magnet Systems Other Special Environments Sample Cell Sample Stick Ultra Low Temperature Devices Sample Environment: by Beam Line All BL-11A-POWGEN BL-11B-MANDI BL-12-TOPAZ BL-13-Fundamental Neutron Physics Beam Line BL-14A-BL-14A BL-14B-HYSPEC BL-15-Neutron Spin Echo (NSE) BL-16B-VISION BL-17-SEQUOIA BL-18-ARCS BL-1A-TOF-USANS BL-1B-NOMAD BL-2-BASIS BL-3-SNAP BL-4A-Magnetism Reflectometer BL-4B-Liquids Reflectometer BL-5-Cold Neutron Chopper Spectrometer (CNCS) BL-6-EQ-SANS

279

Sample Desorption/Ionization From Mesoporous Silica  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sample Desorption/Ionization From Mesoporous Silica Sample Desorption/Ionization From Mesoporous Silica Sample Desorption/Ionization From Mesoporous Silica Mesoporous silica is shown to be a sample holder for laser desorption/ionization of mass spectrometry. Available for thumbnail of Feynman Center (505) 665-9090 Email Sample Desorption/Ionization From Mesoporous Silica Mesoporous silica is shown to be a sample holder for laser desorption/ionization of mass spectrometry. Supported mesoporous silica was prepared by coating an ethanolic silicate solution having a removable surfactant onto a substrate to produce a self-assembled, ordered, nanocomposite silica thin film. The surfactant was chosen to provide a desired pore size between about 1 nanometer diameter and 50 nanometers diameter. Removal of the surfactant resulted in a mesoporous silica thin

280

HFIR Sample Environment | ORNL Neutron Sciences  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

HFIR Sample Environment HFIR Sample Environment The Sample Environment Group provides equipment and support for studying materials under controlled conditions (temperature, pressure, magnetic field, chemical environment, etc.). When you come to HFIR to conduct an experiment, our front-line teams are there to support you. Although we currently offer a wide range of capabilities, we realize that these capabilities must continually grow. Therefore, we also have a busy research and development team, and we encourage you to partner with them to develop new equipment and techniques. The online Sample Environment Equipment Database allows you to search for information about the sample environment equipment available for HFIR instruments. Contact HFIR Team Leader Chris Redmon Resources Sample Environment Equipment Database

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mm sample format" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

100 Area Columbia River sediment sampling  

SciTech Connect

Forty-four sediment samples were collected from 28 locations in the Hanford Reach of the Columbia River to assess the presence of metals and man-made radionuclides in the near shore and shoreline settings of the Hanford Site. Three locations were sampled upriver of the Hanford Site plutonium production reactors. Twenty-two locations were sampled near the reactors. Three locations were sampled downstream of the reactors near the Hanford Townsite. Sediment was collected from depths of 0 to 6 in. and between 12 to 24 in. below the surface. Samples containing concentrations of metals exceeding the 95 % upper threshold limit values (DOE-RL 1993b) are considered contaminated. Contamination by arsenic, chromium, copper, lead, and zinc was found. Man-made radionuclides occur in all samples except four collected opposite the Hanford Townsite. Man-made radionuclide concentrations were generally less than 1 pCi/g.

Weiss, S.G. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States)

1993-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

282

Systematic Sampling of Scanning Lidar Swaths  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Proof of concept lidar research has, to date, examined wall-to-wall models of forest ecosystems. While these studies have been important for verifying lidars efficacy for forest surveys, complete coverage is likely not the most cost effective means of using lidar as auxiliary data for operational surveys; sampling of some sort being the better alternative. This study examines the effectiveness of sampling with high point-density scanning lidar data and shows that systematic sampling is a better alternative to simple random sampling. It examines the bias and mean squared error of various estimators, and concludes that a linear-trend-based and especially an autocorrelation-assisted variance estimator perform better than the commonly used simple random sampling based-estimator when sampling is systematic.

Marcell, Wesley Tyler

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Techniques for geothermal liquid sampling and analysis  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A methodology has been developed that is particularly suited to liquid-dominated resources and adaptable to a variety of situations. It is intended to be a base methodology upon which variations can be made to meet specific needs or situations. The approach consists of recording flow conditions at the time of sampling, a specific insertable probe sampling system, a sample stabilization procedure, commercially available laboratory instruments, and data quality check procedures.

Kindle, C.H.; Woodruff, E.M.

1981-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Help:Formatting | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Formatting Formatting Jump to: navigation, search You can format your text using wiki markup. This consists of normal characters like asterisks, single quotes or equation marks which have a special function in the wiki, sometimes depending on their position. For example, to format a word in italic, you include it in two single quotes like ''this'' Contents 1 Text formatting markup 2 Paragraphs 3 HTML 4 Other formatting Text formatting markup Description You type You get character formatting - applies anywhere Italic text ''italic'' italic Bold text '''bold''' bold Bold and italic '''''bold & italic''''' bold & italic Escape wiki markup no ''markup'' no ''markup'' section formatting - only at the beginning of the line Headings of different levels

285

Sample ENERGY STAR performance documents | ENERGY STAR  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Verify and document your savings Sample ENERGY STAR performance documents Secondary menu About us Press room Contact Us Portfolio Manager Login Facility owners and managers...

286

Category:Gas Sampling | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Login | Sign Up Search Category Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon Category:Gas Sampling Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home...

287

Samples of Soil from Arco, Idaho  

SciTech Connect

Samples from a single drilling made at Arco, Idaho were submitted to determine the adsorptive capacity of soil at Arco, Idaho for radioactive elements.

Stewart, G. D.

1949-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

288

Sample Forms | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Sample Forms Home > About Us > Our Programs > Nuclear Security > Nuclear Materials Management &...

289

Investigation of formaldehyde and acetaldehyde sampling rate...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

formaldehyde and acetaldehyde sampling rate and ozone interference for passive deployment of Waters Sep-Pak XPoSure samplers Title Investigation of formaldehyde and acetaldehyde...

290

Current Projects: Rapid Sampling Tools - Vulnerability Assessment...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Applications include counter-terrorism, emergency response teams, drug and environmental raids, and waste management. For more information visit Rapid Sampling from Sealed...

291

Category:Water Sampling | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Login | Sign Up Search Category Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon Category:Water Sampling Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home...

292

Automated Surface Sampling Probe for Mass Spectrometry  

Dr. Gary Van Berkel and colleagues have developed a liquid microjunction surface sampling probe (LMJ?SSP). The LMJ?SSP provides mass spectrometry with ...

293

Method and apparatus for sampling atmospheric mercury  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of simultaneously sampling particulate mercury, organic mercurial vapors, and metallic mercury vapor in the working and occupational environment and determining the amount of mercury derived from each such source in the sampled air. A known volume of air is passed through a sampling tube containing a filter for particulate mercury collection, a first adsorber for the selective adsorption of organic mercurial vapors, and a second adsorber for the adsorption of metallic mercury vapor. Carbon black molecular sieves are particularly useful as the selective adsorber for organic mercurial vapors. The amount of mercury adsorbed or collected in each section of the sampling tube is readily quantitatively determined by flameless atomic absorption spectrophotometry.

Trujillo, Patricio E. (Santa Fe, NM); Campbell, Evan E. (Los Alamos, NM); Eutsler, Bernard C. (Los Alamos, NM)

1976-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

294

High order Parzen windows and randomized sampling.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

???In the thesis, high order Parzen windows are studied for understanding some algorithms in learning theory and randomized sampling in multivariate approximation. Our ideas are… (more)

Zhou, Xiangjun (???)

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Sample Forms | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Sample Forms | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our...

296

Guidance Concerning Applicable Sampling Plan for Certification...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sampling Plan for Certification of Consumer Product The Energy Policy and Conservation Act of 1975, as amended, authorizes the Department of Energy to enforce compliance...

297

Improved Gas Sampling Device - Available Technologies - PNNL  

Summary. This is an improved device for gas sampling and analysis in which the design of the device includes features for maximizing the surface area ...

298

Proper Oil Sampling Intervals and Sample Collection Techniques Gasoline/Diesel/Natural Gas Engines  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Proper Oil Sampling Intervals and Sample Collection Techniques Gasoline/Diesel/Natural Gas Engines: · Oil samples can be collected during oil changes. Follow manufacturers recommendations on frequency (hours, mileage, etc) of oil changes. · Capture a sample from the draining oil while the oil is still hot

299

Formation Testing Techniques | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Formation Testing Techniques Formation Testing Techniques Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Formation Testing Techniques Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Downhole Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Formation Testing Techniques Parent Exploration Technique: Downhole Techniques Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Stratigraphic/Structural: Hydrological: Thermal: Dictionary.png Formation Testing Techniques: No definition has been provided for this term. Add a Definition References No exploration activities found. Print PDF Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Formation_Testing_Techniques&oldid=601973" Categories: Downhole Techniques Exploration Techniques

300

Fine ash formation during pulverized coal combustion  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this study, 15 pulverized coal samples were burnt in a drop-tube furnace to investigate the formation of fine particulates and the influence of coal ash properties on their emission. Coal combustion was carried out at 1673 K in air. Fine particles were collected by a cyclone and a low-pressure impactor. The elemental compositions of the collected particles were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy with energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. We examined the chemical compositions of the fine particles as a function of particle diameter and examined the proportions of the elements in the parent coal samples. We determined that almost all particles less than 0.22 {mu}m in diameter were formed by means of volatilization-condensation of SiO{sub 2} and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} in the coal. We also demonstrated that the amount of SiO{sub 2} in particle size less than 0.22 {mu}m in diameter was related to the amount of fine included quartz and clay minerals in the parent coal. The primary components of particles greater than 0.76 {mu}m in diameter were SiO{sub 2} and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, and as the diameter of the particles decrease, the mass fractions of iron, magnesium, calcium, and phosphorus increased. However, the particle diameter at which this tendency commenced differed depending on the element. Particles between 0.22 and 0.76 {mu}m in diameter were thought to have been formed by the fragmentation and coalescence of particles in the coal and by the simultaneous condensation of volatilized elements onto other particles. 17 refs., 12 figs., 1 tab.

Tsuyoshi Teramae; Takayuki Takarada [Idemitsu Kosan Company, Limited, Chiba (Japan). Coal and Environmental Research Laboratory

2009-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mm sample format" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Disc valve for sampling erosive process streams  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This is a patent for a disc-type, four-port sampling valve for service with erosive high temperature process streams. Inserts and liners of ..cap alpha..-silicon carbide respectively, in the faceplates and in the sampling cavities, limit erosion while providing lubricity for a smooth and precise operation. 1 fig.

Mrochek, J.E.; Dinsmore, S.R.; Chandler, E.W.

1984-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

302

Efficient maximal poisson-disk sampling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We solve the problem of generating a uniform Poisson-disk sampling that is both maximal and unbiased over bounded non-convex domains. To our knowledge this is the first provably correct algorithm with time and space dependent only on the ... Keywords: Poisson disk, blue noise, linear complexity, maximal, provable convergence, sampling

Mohamed S. Ebeida; Andrew A. Davidson; Anjul Patney; Patrick M. Knupp; Scott A. Mitchell; John D. Owens

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

NMR Sample Policy Version: 20 Jul 2006  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

NMR Sample Policy Version: 20 Jul 2006 Task: NMR Sample Preparation Equipment Used: Centrifuge, pH meter, NMR spectrometers, fumehood, fridges, freezers, tube cleaner Location: Rooms G14, G16, G23 and G24 in the Henry Wellcome Building for Biomolecular NMR Spectroscopy, University of Birmingham Hazards

Birmingham, University of

304

The Ability of MM5 to Simulate Ice Clouds: Systematic Comparison between Simulated and Measured Fluxes and Lidar/Radar Profiles at SIRTA Atmospheric Observatory  

SciTech Connect

Ice clouds play a major role in the radiative energy budget of the Earth-atmosphere system (Liou 1986). Their radiative effect is governed primarily by the equilibrium between their albedo and greenhouse effects. Both macrophysical and microphysical properties of ice clouds regulate this equilibrium. For quantifying the effect of these clouds onto climate and weather systems, they must be properly characterized in atmospheric models. In this paper we use remote-sensing measurements from the SIRTA ground based atmospheric observatory (Site Instrumental de Recherche par Teledetection Atmospherique, http://sirta.lmd.polytechnique.fr). Lidar and radar observations taken over 18 months are used, in order to gain statistical confidence in the model evaluation. Along this period of time, 62 days are selected for study because they contain parts of ice clouds. We use the ''model to observations'' approach by simulating lidar and radar signals from MM5 outputs. Other more classical variables such as shortwave and longwave radiative fluxes are also used. Four microphysical schemes, among which that proposed by Reisner et al. (1998) with original or modified parameterizations of particle terminal fall velocities (Zurovac-Jevtic and Zhang 2003, Heymsfield and Donner 1990), and the simplified Dudhia (1989) scheme are evaluated in this study.

Chiriaco, M.; Vautard, R.; Chepfer, H.; Haeffelin, M.; Wanherdrick, Y.; Morille, Y.; Protat, A.; Dudhia, J.

2005-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

305

Inspection/Sampling Schedule | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Inspection/Sampling Schedule Inspection/Sampling Schedule Inspection/Sampling Schedule Site Inspection and Water Sampling Schedules Note: The following schedules are subject to change without prior notice and will be updated periodically. Site Name Inspection Date Sampling Week Ambrosia Lake, NM, Disposal Site August 18, 2014 November 20, 2013 Bluewater, NM, Disposal Site August 18, 2014 November 20, 2013 January 28, 2014 May 12, 2014 Boiling Nuclear Superheater (BONUS), PR, Decommissioned Reactor Site Next event 2017 Burrell, PA, Disposal Site December 9, 2013 November 20, 2013 Canonsburg, PA, Disposal Site December 9, 2013 November 19, 2013 Durango, CO, Disposal Site May 19, 2014 June 2, 2014 Durango, CO, Processing Site N/A June 2, 2014 September 1, 2014 Edgemont, SD, Disposal Site June 23, 2014 N/A

306

Radioactive Samples / Materials at the APS  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Using Radioactive Samples / Materials at the APS Using Radioactive Samples / Materials at the APS The use of radioactive samples requires additional information for review and approval. All proposed experiments involving radioactive samples will be reviewed by the APS Radioactive Sample Safety Review Committee (RSSRC). The review will be on a graded basis. Hence, the experimenters are strongly advised to send in the experiment proposal in detail at least 2 months before the expected scheduled date of the experiment. Previously approved containment, isotopes and weights can be submitted as late as 2 weeks in advance. If your ESAF was submitted less than seven (7) days in advance of its scheduled start date you may be delayed to allow time for a safety review. The following guidelines are to be followed for all experiments with

307

New Sampling Methods for Airborne Microorganisms  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

New Sampling Methods for Airborne Microorganisms New Sampling Methods for Airborne Microorganisms Speaker(s): Klaus Willeke Date: February 27, 2001 - 12:00pm Location: Bldg 90 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: David Faulkner Klaus Willeke and his international team of engineers, physicists, microbiologists, industrial hygienists and environmental scientists have worked for about 15 years on the development of new methods for sampling airborne microorganisms. The following topics will be highlighted: long-term bioaerosol sampling into liquid by swirling air motion ("Biosampler"); personal aerosol sampling with low wind sensitivity and highfilter deposit uniformity ("Button Aerosol Sampler"); collection of microorganisms by electrostatic means; source testing as a predictor for microorganism release from surfaces; particle concentrating from large air

308

NASA Stardust Samples Headed to BNL for Analysis  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Contact Us: Contact Us: Phone: 631 344-2345 Fax: 631 344-3368 E-mail: pubaf@bnl.gov Building 134 Brookhaven Nat'l Lab Upton, NY 11973 NSLS researchers reach for the stars(dust) Stardust spacecraft image Stardust Video See a video (in Real format) of researchers at the National Synchrotron Light Source discussing the analysis of the Stardust samples. Need RealPlayer? Space Studies at the NSLS The Stardust particles are not the first space-dust particles to be brought to the NSLS for analysis, nor are they the only type of extraterrestrial material to be studied there. For example, Mars meteorites and meteorites believed to originate from asteroids have also been analyzed at the facility. • The Origin of Organic Matter in the Solar System • Evidence of Ancient Water on an Asteroid

309

GAMMA RAYS FROM STAR FORMATION IN CLUSTERS OF GALAXIES  

SciTech Connect

Star formation in galaxies is observed to be associated with gamma-ray emission, presumably from non-thermal processes connected to the acceleration of cosmic-ray nuclei and electrons. The detection of gamma rays from starburst galaxies by the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) has allowed the determination of a functional relationship between star formation rate and gamma-ray luminosity. Since star formation is known to scale with total infrared (8-1000 {mu}m) and radio (1.4 GHz) luminosity, the observed infrared and radio emission from a star-forming galaxy can be used to quantitatively infer the galaxy's gamma-ray luminosity. Similarly, star-forming galaxies within galaxy clusters allow us to derive lower limits on the gamma-ray emission from clusters, which have not yet been conclusively detected in gamma rays. In this study, we apply the functional relationships between gamma-ray luminosity and radio and IR luminosities of galaxies derived by the Fermi Collaboration to a sample of the best candidate galaxy clusters for detection in gamma rays in order to place lower limits on the gamma-ray emission associated with star formation in galaxy clusters. We find that several clusters have predicted gamma-ray emission from star formation that are within an order of magnitude of the upper limits derived in Ackermann et al. based on non-detection by Fermi-LAT. Given the current gamma-ray limits, star formation likely plays a significant role in the gamma-ray emission in some clusters, especially those with cool cores. We predict that both Fermi-LAT over the course of its lifetime and the future Cerenkov Telescope Array will be able to detect gamma-ray emission from star-forming galaxies in clusters.

Storm, Emma M.; Jeltema, Tesla E.; Profumo, Stefano [Department of Physics, University of California, 1156 High Street, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States)

2012-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

310

Field guide to Muddy Formation outcrops, Crook County, Wyoming  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objectives of this research program are to (1) determine the reservoir characteristics and production problems of shoreline barrier reservoirs; and (2) develop methods and methodologies to effectively characterize shoreline bamer reservoirs to predict flow patterns of injected and produced fluids. Two reservoirs were selected for detailed reservoir characterization studies -- Bell Creek field, Carter County, Montana that produces from the Lower Cretaceous (Albian-Cenomanian) Muddy Formation, and Patrick Draw field, Sweetwater County, Wyoming that produces from the Upper Cretaceous (Campanian) Almond Formation of the Mesaverde Group. An important component of the research project was to use information from outcrop exposures of the producing formations to study the spatial variations of reservoir properties and the degree to which outcrop information can be used in the construction of reservoir models. This report contains the data and analyses collected from outcrop exposures of the Muddy Formation, located in Crook County, Wyoming, 40 miles south of Bell Creek oil field. The outcrop data set contains permeability, porosity, petrographic, grain size and geologic data from 1-inch-diameter core plugs chilled from the outcrop face, as well as geological descriptions and sedimentological interpretations of the outcrop exposures. The outcrop data set provides information about facies characteristics and geometries and the spatial distribution of permeability and porosity on interwell scales. Appendices within this report include a micropaleontological analyses of selected outcrop samples, an annotated bibliography of papers on the Muddy Formation in the Powder River Basin, and over 950 permeability and porosity values measured from 1-inch-diameter core plugs drilled from the outcrop. All data contained in this resort are available in electronic format upon request. The core plugs drilled from the outcrop are available for measurement.

Rawn-Schatzinger, V.

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Wormhole formation in dissolving fractures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We investigate the dissolution of artificial fractures with three-dimensional, pore-scale numerical simulations. The fluid velocity in the fracture space was determined from a lattice-Boltzmann method, and a stochastic solver was used for the transport of dissolved species. Numerical simulations were used to study conditions under which long conduits (wormholes) form in an initially rough but spatially homogeneous fracture. The effects of flow rate, mineral dissolution rate and geometrical properties of the fracture were investigated, and the optimal conditions for wormhole formation determined.

Szymczak, P

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Petrophysical evaluation of subterranean formations  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Methods and systems are provided for evaluating petrophysical properties of subterranean formations and comprehensively evaluating hydrate presence through a combination of computer-implemented log modeling and analysis. Certain embodiments include the steps of running a number of logging tools in a wellbore to obtain a variety of wellbore data and logs, and evaluating and modeling the log data to ascertain various petrophysical properties. Examples of suitable logging techniques that may be used in combination with the present invention include, but are not limited to, sonic logs, electrical resistivity logs, gamma ray logs, neutron porosity logs, density logs, NRM logs, or any combination or subset thereof.

Klein, James D; Schoderbek, David A; Mailloux, Jason M

2013-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

313

Help:FormattingResults | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

FormattingResults FormattingResults Jump to: navigation, search Contents 1 UL 2 Google Pie Charts 3 Outline 4 Calendar 5 Timeline 6 Gallery 7 Google Map 8 Geochart Ask Queries are used to pull results from semantic wiki content and can be displayed in a variety of formats. This page lists examples of the more common formats with the code used to generate them and when applicable, links to eternal help documents describing the options available for each format. When writing an ask query, one specifies the format with |format=. The examples below contain the ask query code used to generate them, including the format declaration. UL BioPower Atlas and BioFuels Atlas Biomass Energy Data Book CLIMWAT 2.0 CROPWAT 8.0 {{#ask:[[Category:Tools]] [[ProgramTopics::Resource assessment]] [[ProgramResources::Dataset]]

314

The Formation of Hurricane Frederic of 1979  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A high-resolution global model forecast of the formation of Hurricane Frederic of 1979 is analyzed by means of several diagnostic computations on the model's output history. The formation is addressed from an analysis of limited-area energetics ...

T. N. Krishnamurthi; H. S. Bedi; Darlene Oosterhof; Vivek Hardiker

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Western North Pacific Monsoon Depression Formation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Relatively few studies have been carried out as to the conditions leading to the formation of monsoon depressions in the western North Pacific. Two monsoon depression formations during July 2007 were analyzed using ECMWF analyses and satellite ...

Jodi C. Beattie; Russell L. Elsberry

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Dynamics and control of electromagnetic satellite formations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Satellite formation flying is an enabling technology for many space missions, especially for space-based telescopes. Usually there is a tight formation-keeping requirement that may need constant expenditure of fuel or at ...

Ahsun, Umair, 1972-

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Negative ion formation processes: A general review  

SciTech Connect

The principal negative ion formation processes will be briefly reviewed. Primary emphasis will be placed on the more efficient and universal processes of charge transfer and secondary ion formation through non-thermodynamic surface ionization. 86 refs., 20 figs.

Alton, G.D.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

SAR polar format implementation with MATLAB.  

SciTech Connect

Traditional polar format image formation for Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) requires a large amount of processing power and memory in order to accomplish in real-time. These requirements can thus eliminate the possible usage of interpreted language environments such as MATLAB. However, with trapezoidal aperture phase history collection and changes to the traditional polar format algorithm, certain optimizations make MATLAB a possible tool for image formation. Thus, this document's purpose is two-fold. The first outlines a change to the existing Polar Format MATLAB implementation utilizing the Chirp Z-Transform that improves performance and memory usage achieving near realtime results for smaller apertures. The second is the addition of two new possible image formation options that perform a more traditional interpolation style image formation. These options allow the continued exploration of possible interpolation methods for image formation and some preliminary results comparing image quality are given.

Martin, Grant D.; Doerry, Armin Walter

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Coordination of an underwater glider fleet for adaptive sampling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Prediction (ASAP) projects aim to develop a sustainable, portable, adaptive ocean observing and prediction system for use in coastal environments. These projects employ, among other observation platforms, autonomous underwater vehicles that carry sensors to measure physical and biological signals in the ocean. The measurements from all sensing platforms are assimilated in real-time into advanced ocean models. The objective is to coordinate the mobile assets in order to collect data of highest possible utility. Critical to this effort are reliable, efficient and adaptive control strategies to enable the mobile sensor platforms to collect data autonomously. In this paper, we summarize feedback control strategies that enable us to gather useful information over a wide spectrum of spatial and temporal scales. First, we design formation control strategies useful for sampling small spatial scale processes (less than 5 km). In this framework, the feedback control laws maintain a desired formation of vehicles and allow the group to locate interesting features in the ocean. Some of these control strategies were implemented on a group of underwater gliders in Monterey Bay in August 2003, as part of the AOSN-II project. Second, we direct mobile sensor networks to provide synoptic coverage to investigate

Pradeep Bhatta; Edward Fiorelli; Francois Lekien; Naomi E. Leonard; Derek A. Paley; Fumin Zhang; Ralf Bachmayer; Russ E. Davis; David M. Fratantoni; Rodolphe Sepulchre

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Testing and sampling procedures for geothermal-compressured wells. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Test wells to tap and sample geothermal-geopressured formations at 15,000 to 20,000 feet in the Gulf Coast area can be drilled routinely utilizing available equipment and methods. Electrical logs, surveys and fluid samplers can be used to obtain accurate and reliable information as to depths, temperatures, pressures, and fluid content of the geopressured formations before the well is completed. But it will be necessary to set casing and flow the well, at least temporarily, to secure fluid production volume and pressure data to evaluate the producibility of the geopressured resource. Electric logging and wireline survey methods are fully developed techniques for measuring the parameters needed to assess a geopressured zone before setting casing. Formation subsidence, though it may be slow to develop, can be measured during radioactivity tracer surveys. The following conclusions are drawn: existing well logging and surveying methods and equipment are generally satisfactory for testing and sampling a geothermal-geopressured resource; no significant areas of research are needed to predict, detect, and evaluate geopressured formations for their potential as geothermal resources. Static and dynamic testing procedures using existing technology are satisfactory to test, sample, and analyze a geopressured reservoir.

Boyd, W.E.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mm sample format" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Treating nahcolite containing formations and saline zones  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A method for treating a nahcolite containing subsurface formation includes removing water from a saline zone in or near the formation. The removed water is heated using a steam and electricity cogeneration facility. The heated water is provided to the nahcolite containing formation. A fluid is produced from the nahcolite containing formation. The fluid includes at least some dissolved nahcolite. At least some of the fluid is provided to the saline zone.

Vinegar, Harold J

2013-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

322

Unifying biological image formats with HDF5  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The biosciences need an image format capable of high performance and long-term maintenance. Is HDF5 the answer?

Matthew T. Dougherty; Michael J. Folk; Erez Zadok; Herbert J. Bernstein; Frances C. Bernstein; Kevin W. Eliceiri; Werner Benger; Christoph Best

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Automated collection and processing of environmental samples  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

For monitoring an environmental parameter such as the level of nuclear radiation, at distributed sites, bar coded sample collectors are deployed and their codes are read using a portable data entry unit that also records the time of deployment. The time and collector identity are cross referenced in memory in the portable unit. Similarly, when later recovering the collector for testing, the code is again read and the time of collection is stored as indexed to the sample collector, or to a further bar code, for example as provided on a container for the sample. The identity of the operator can also be encoded and stored. After deploying and/or recovering the sample collectors, the data is transmitted to a base processor. The samples are tested, preferably using a test unit coupled to the base processor, and again the time is recorded. The base processor computes the level of radiation at the site during exposure of the sample collector, using the detected radiation level of the sample, the delay between recovery and testing, the duration of exposure and the half life of the isotopes collected. In one embodiment, an identity code and a site code are optically read by an image grabber coupled to the portable data entry unit.

Troyer, Gary L. (Richland, WA); McNeece, Susan G. (Richland, WA); Brayton, Darryl D. (Richland, WA); Panesar, Amardip K. (Kennewick, WA)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

A metrics framework for evaluating group formation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Many approaches to learning and teaching rely upon students working in groups. So far, many Computer-Supported Group Formation systems have been designed to facilitate the formation of optimal groups in learning. However, evaluating the quality of automated ... Keywords: efficiency, group formation, optimization

Asma Ounnas; David E. Millard; Hugh C. Davis

2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Coring in deep hardrock formations  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The United States Department of Energy is involved in a variety of scientific and engineering feasibility studies requiring extensive drilling in hard crystalline rock. In many cases well depths extend from 6000 to 20,000 feet in high-temperature, granitic formations. Examples of such projects are the Hot Dry Rock well system at Fenton Hill, New Mexico and the planned exploratory magma well near Mammoth Lakes, California. In addition to these programs, there is also continuing interest in supporting programs to reduce drilling costs associated with the production of geothermal energy from underground sources such as the Geysers area near San Francisco, California. The overall progression in these efforts is to drill deeper holes in higher temperature, harder formations. In conjunction with this trend is a desire to improve the capability to recover geological information. Spot coring and continuous coring are important elements in this effort. It is the purpose of this report to examine the current methods used to obtain core from deep wells and to suggest projects which will improve existing capabilities. 28 refs., 8 figs., 2 tabs.

Drumheller, D.S.

1988-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Effects of Sample Geometry and Loading Rate onTensile Ductility of TRIP800 Steel  

SciTech Connect

The effects of sample geometry and loading rate on the tensile ductility of a commercial grade Transformation Induced Plasticity (TRIP) steel are examined in this paper. Quasistatic tensile tests were performed for the 1.2mm gauge TRIP800 steel sheets with two geometries: sub-sized ASTM E-8 and a custom designed miniature tensile sample. Sample geometry effects on post-uniform elongation are discussed together with other experimental data reported in the open literature. Further discussions on the effects of sample geometry are cast in the context of mesh-size dependent ductility in finite element-based engineering simulations. The quasi-static tensile curve for the miniature sample is then compared with the split Hopkinson bar results at the loading rates of 1700-S-1 and 2650-S-1 with the same sample design. In contrary to the typical strain rate sensitivity results for mild steel where the dynamic strength increase at high strain rate usually occurs at the price of ductility reduction, our results show that the TRIP800 under examination has positive strain rate sensitivity on both strength and ductility. Images of the deformation process captured by high speed camera together with scanning electron microscopy (SEM) near the fracture zone are also used to elucidate the different deformation modes at different loading rates.

Sun, Xin; Soulami, Ayoub; Choi, Kyoo Sil; Guzman, O.; Chen, Weinong W.

2012-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

327

Vapor port and groundwater sampling well  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and apparatus have been developed for combining groundwater monitoring wells with unsaturated-zone vapor sampling ports. The apparatus allows concurrent monitoring of both the unsaturated and the saturated zone from the same well at contaminated areas. The innovative well design allows for concurrent sampling of groundwater and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the vadose (unsaturated) zone from a single well, saving considerable time and money. The sample tubes are banded to the outer well casing during installation of the well casing. 10 figs.

Hubbell, J.M.; Wylie, A.H.

1996-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

328

Vapor port and groundwater sampling well  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and apparatus has been developed for combining groundwater monitoring wells with unsaturated-zone vapor sampling ports. The apparatus allows concurrent monitoring of both the unsaturated and the saturated zone from the same well at contaminated areas. The innovative well design allows for concurrent sampling of groundwater and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the vadose (unsaturated) zone from a single well, saving considerable time and money. The sample tubes are banded to the outer well casing during installation of the well casing.

Hubbell, Joel M. (Idaho Falls, ID); Wylie, Allan H. (Idaho Falls, ID)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Gas sampling system for a mass spectrometer  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention relates generally to a gas sampling system, and specifically to a gas sampling system for transporting a hazardous process gas to a remotely located mass spectrometer. The gas sampling system includes a capillary tube having a predetermined capillary length and capillary diameter in communication with the supply of process gas and the mass spectrometer, a flexible tube surrounding and coaxial with the capillary tube intermediate the supply of process gas and the mass spectrometer, a heat transfer tube surrounding and coaxial with the capillary tube, and a heating device in communication the heat transfer tube for substantially preventing condensation of the process gas within the capillary tube.

Taylor, Charles E; Ladner, Edward P

2003-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

330

Spectroscopic diagnostics for bacteria in biologic sample  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method to analyze and diagnose specific bacteria in a biologic sample using spectroscopy is disclosed. The method includes obtaining the spectra of a biologic sample of a non-infected patient for use as a reference, subtracting the reference from the spectra of an infected sample, and comparing the fingerprint regions of the resulting differential spectrum with reference spectra of bacteria in saline. Using this diagnostic technique, specific bacteria can be identified sooner and without culturing, bacteria-specific antibiotics can be prescribed sooner, resulting in decreased likelihood of antibiotic resistance and an overall reduction of medical costs.

El-Sayed, Mostafa A. (Atlanta, GA); El-Sayed, Ivan H. (Somerville, MA)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

The sensitivity of the PSU-NCAR model (MM5) to cumulus parameterization in simulating the mesoscale environment associated with 2 June 1995 West Texas tornado outbreak  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

On 2 June 1995, many supercede thunderstorms were graphics. observed in West Texas between Lubbock and Amarillo under the synoptic and mesoscale environment which was increasingly more supportive of severe convection. Of the storms, those which crossed a particular outflow boundary, generated by earlier convection, produced violent tornadoes near Friona and Dimmitt, Texas. As documented in numerous other studies, the outflow boundary generated from the earlier convection seemed to play a important role in producing tornadic supercedes. This study presents observational features of the event, performs model simulations with three disparate cumulus parameterization schemes, and does a careful comparison between the simulations and observations. This study tries to understand the sequence of events which preceded the severe storm outbreak. Particularly, mesoscale features such as the dry line and outflow boundaries are carefully documented. Because of the significant impact of the convective outflow boundaries, this study tries to examine the sensitivity of the PSU/NCAR three dimensional nonhydrostatic mesoscale model (MM5) to the choice of cumulus parameterization scheme. The schemes used in this study include Kain-Fritsch, Fritsch-Chappell, and Grell schemes. The model simulation has a 67 x 67 grid domain centered at 35[] N and 102[] W with 27 km grid spacing, and starts at 12 UTC 2 June for 12-h forecast. The simulation results showed that, even though the general features agreed well among the three different simulations, the mesoscale features such as the outflow boundary, convective rain, temperature gradient, and pressure gradient associated with tee convective outflow were somewhat different among the different cumulus parameterizations. It seemed that the different behavior of the simulations was strongly dependent on the components constructing each cumulus parameterization. Despite the limitation of evidence suggested in this study, the Kain-Fritsch scheme appeared to be most suitable for the simulation of meso-[] scale features.

Han, Sang-Ok

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Definition: Gas Sampling | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Definition Definition Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Definition: Gas Sampling Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Gas Sampling Gas sampling is done to characterize the chemical, thermal, and hydrological properties of a surface or subsurface hydrothermal system. Various methods are applied to obtain samples used for determination of the composition of gases present in soils or hydrothermal discharges. The flux of volatile gases emitted from a hydrothermal system can also be determined by measuring the flow of gases at specific locations and comparing it to average background emissions. Anomalously high gas flux can provide an indication of hydrothermal activity at depth that is otherwise not apparent. Ret LikeLike UnlikeLike You like this.Sign Up to see what your friends like.

333

LANSCE | Lujan Center | Chemical & Sample Prep  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Chemical & Sample Preparation Chemical & Sample Preparation For general questions, please contact the Lujan Center Chemical and Sample Preparation Laboratory responsible: Monika Hartl | hartl@lanl.gov | 505.665.2375 Sample and Equipment Shipping Instructions For questions regarding shipping procedures, contact Lujan Center Experiment Coordinator: Leilani Conradson | leilani@lanl.gov | 505.665.9505 Chemistry Laboratories High-Pressure Laboratory X-ray Laboratory Spectroscopy Laboratory Clean Room Glove box - He atmosphere High-purity water Diamond anvils Rotating anode generators (reflectometry, residual stress, powder diffraction) Zeiss microscope (with fluorescence abilities) Tube and box furnaces Ultrasonic bath ZAP-cell (for in situ diffraction at high P) Infrared spectrometer Brewster angle microscope

334

Definition: Downhole Fluid Sampling | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Definition Definition Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Definition: Downhole Fluid Sampling Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Downhole Fluid Sampling Downhole fluid sampling is done to characterize the chemical, thermal, or hydrological properties of a surface or subsurface aqueous system. Downhole fluid sampling is typically performed to monitor water quality, study recharge and flow in groundwater systems, and evaluate resource potential of geothermal reservoirs. Analysis of both the liquid and gas fractions of the reservoir fluid allows for detailed characterize the chemical, thermal, or hydrological properties of the subsurface hydrothermal system. View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition Ret Like Like You like this.Sign Up to see what your friends like.

335

Sampling Errors in Rawinsonde-Array Budgets  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Rawinsonde data used for sounding-array budget computations have random errors, both instrumental errors and errors of representativeness (here called sampling errors). The latter are associated with the fact that radiosondes do not measure large-...

Brian E. Mapes; Paul E. Ciesielski; Richard H. Johnson

2003-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Doppler Radar Sampling Limitations in Convective Storms  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Vertical air motion data from a T-28 aircraft were filtered and sampled to simulate Doppler radar measurements. The results suggest that multiple Doppler radar analyses are subject to potentially large spatial aliasing errors in deep convection ...

R. E. Carbone; M. J. Carpenter; C. D. Burghart

1985-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Boson Sampling on a Photonic Chip  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

While universal quantum computers ideally solve problems such as factoring integers exponentially more efficiently than classical machines, the formidable challenges in building such devices motivate the demonstration of simpler, problem-specific algorithms that still promise a quantum speedup. We construct a quantum boson sampling machine (QBSM) to sample the output distribution resulting from the nonclassical interference of photons in an integrated photonic circuit, a problem thought to be exponentially hard to solve classically. Unlike universal quantum computation, boson sampling merely requires indistinguishable photons, linear state evolution, and detectors. We benchmark our QBSM with three and four photons and analyze sources of sampling inaccuracy. Our studies pave the way to larger devices that could offer the first definitive quantum-enhanced computation.

Justin B. Spring; Benjamin J. Metcalf; Peter C. Humphreys; W. Steven Kolthammer; Xian-Min Jin; Marco Barbieri; Animesh Datta; Nicholas Thomas-Peter; Nathan K. Langford; Dmytro Kundys; James C. Gates; Brian J. Smith; Peter G. R. Smith; Ian A. Walmsley

2012-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

338

LIGHT EMITTING DIODE CHARACTERISTICS (SAMPLE LAB WRITEUP)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 LIGHT EMITTING DIODE CHARACTERISTICS (SAMPLE LAB WRITEUP) John A. McNeill ECE Box 000 January 19, 1997 ABSTRACT This lab investigates the V-I characteristic of a light-emitting diode (LED

McNeill, John A.

339

Surface sampling concentration and reaction probe  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of analyzing a chemical composition of a specimen is described. The method can include providing a probe comprising an outer capillary tube and an inner capillary tube disposed co-axially within the outer capillary tube, where the inner and outer capillary tubes define a solvent capillary and a sampling capillary in fluid communication with one another at a distal end of the probe; contacting a target site on a surface of a specimen with a solvent in fluid communication with the probe; maintaining a plug volume proximate a solvent-specimen interface, wherein the plug volume is in fluid communication with the probe; draining plug sampling fluid from the plug volume through the sampling capillary; and analyzing a chemical composition of the plug sampling fluid with an analytical instrument. A system for performing the method is also described.

Van Berkel, Gary J; Elnaggar, Mariam S

2013-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

340

Form:SampleForm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

SampleForm Jump to: navigation, search Input the name of a Test Page below. If the resource already exists, you will be able to edit its information. AddEdit a Test Page The text...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mm sample format" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Efficiently detecting webpage updates using samples  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Due to resource constraints, Web archiving systems and search engines usually have difficulties keeping the local repository completely synchronized with the Web. To address this problem, sampling-based techniques periodically poll a subset of webpages ...

Qingzhao Tan; Ziming Zhuang; Prasenjit Mitra; C. Lee Giles

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Microsoft Word - JWS Sample.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

7 7 SAMPLE ONLY REV2_02/10/05 SAMPLE ONLY Joint Work Statement For CRADA No. Sample BETWEEN U. S. Department of Energy Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 3 Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center AND Partner Name Project Name 1. Purpose 2. Scope A. TASKS: B. FINAL REPORT: At the end of the project, in accordance with Article XII of the CRADA, RMOTC and the Participant will jointly prepare a final report. 3. Personnel A. RMOTC will provide the following personnel: B. Partner will provide the following personnel: Page 2 of 7 SAMPLE ONLY REV2_02/10/05 4. Equipment A. RMOTC will provide the following equipment: B. Partner will provide the following equipment: 5. Materials A. RMOTC will provide the following materials: B. Partner will provide the following materials:

343

Laboratory E131 - Chemical Physics Sample Preparation ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A115 | A127 | B147 | E131 | E132 | E133 | E134 | E135 | E136 | E137 | E138. Laboratory E131 - Chemical Physics Sample Preparation Laboratory. ...

2013-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

344

Sample Exchange Evaluation (SEE) Report - Phase II  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the results from Phase II of the Sample Exchange Evaluation (SEE) Program, a joint effort to compare analytical laboratory performance on samples from the Hanford Site`s high-level waste tanks. In Phase II, the program has been expanded to include inorganic constituents in addition to radionuclides. Results from Phase II that exceeded 20% relative percent difference criteria are identified.

Winters, W.I.

1994-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

345

On sampling fractions and electron shower shapes  

SciTech Connect

We study the usage of various definitions of sampling fractions in understanding electron shower shapes in a sampling multilayer electromagnetic calorimeter. We show that the sampling fractions obtained by the conventional definition (I) of (average observed energy in layer)/(average deposited energy in layer) will not give the best energy resolution for the calorimeter. The reason for this is shown to be the presence of layer by layer correlations in an electromagnetic shower. The best resolution is obtained by minimizing the deviation from the total input energy using a least squares algorithm. The 'sampling fractions' obtained by this method (II) are shown to give the best resolution for overall energy. We further show that the method (II) sampling fractions are obtained by summing the columns of a non-local {lambda} tensor that incorporates the correlations. We establish that the sampling fractions (II) cannot be used to predict the layer by layer energies and that one needs to employ the full {lambda} tensor for this purpose. This effect is again a result of the correlations.

Peryshkin, Alexander; Raja, Rajendran; /Fermilab

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Mineralogic and compositional studies of barite samples  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Three barite samples of different provenance were studied using several characterization methods. The samples were initially examined as grain mounts by X-ray diffraction (XRD) to determine bulk mineralogy and grain sizes. Only barite (BaSO4) was observed in XRD patterns. Elemental abundance mapping by electron microprobe and x-ray microprobe were used to determine whether discrete phases contributed to the trace-metal composition of the bulk sediments. The samples included minute, broadly dispersed grains of lead sulfide, and an unidentified Pb phase that did not include sulfur or phosphorus. Hg was found within a subset of the Pb sulfide grains, along with Cu. A Sr sulfide was observed. Fe was present in all samples, as an oxide and a sulfide. The Fe sulfides were much less abundant in two of the samples. Cu was also observed as a sulfide without associated Pb. Finally, Cr was observed as sub-?m oxide particles and as a chromium oxide component of Fe-rich, >10 ?m lithic fragments. The detected trace metals in the barite samples were components of very minor discrete mineral phases within the more abundant barite grains. Abundant inclusions of Fe oxides, sulfides, and quartz were also observed.

McKinley, James P.

2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Optimization of Hydride Rim Formation in Unirradiated Zr 4 Cladding  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this work is to build on the results reported in the M2 milestone M2FT 13PN0805051, document number FCRD-USED-2013-000151 (Hanson, 2013). In that work, it was demonstrated that unirradiated samples of zircaloy-4 cladding could be pre-hydrided at temperatures below 400°C in pure hydrogen gas and that the growth of hydrides on the surface could be controlled by changing the surface condition of the samples and form a desired hydride rim on the outside diameter of the cladding. The work performed at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory since the issuing of the M2 milestone has focused its efforts to optimize the formation of a hydride rim on available zircaloy-4 cladding samples by controlling temperature variation and gas flow control during pre-hydriding treatments. Surface conditioning of the outside surface was also examined as a variable. The results of test indicate that much of the variability in the hydride thickness is due to temperature variation occurring in the furnaces as well as how hydrogen gas flows across the sample surface. Efforts to examine other alloys, gas concentrations, and different surface conditioning plan to be pursed in the next FY as more cladding samples become available

Shimskey, Rick W.; Hanson, Brady D.; MacFarlan, Paul J.

2013-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

348

ORNL DAAC, global climate data, GIS formats  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Data in GIS Formats Data in GIS Formats ORNL DAAC has re-released a key climatology data set in two additional formats especially suitable for geographic information system (GIS) users. Version 2.1 of "Global 30-Year Mean Monthly Climatology, 1930-1960 (Cramer and Leemans)" now offers the data in ASCII GRID format and binary format. These formats can be read directly into software packages such as ESRI's ARC/INFO and ERDAS' IMAGINE. The Cramer and Leemans climatology data set contains monthly averages of mean temperature, temperature range, precipitation, rain days, and sunshine hours for the terrestrial surface of the globe. It is gridded at a 0.5-degree longitude/latitude resolution. The Cramer and Leemans data are also available in the original ASCII format, which can be read in FORTRAN or with programs such as SAS.

349

A study of coal formation  

SciTech Connect

Coal is a solid, brittle, more or less distinctly stratified, combustible, carbonaceous rock. It is being rediscovered as a reliable energy source, which, historically provided the resource base for the industrialization of the United States economy. A firm understanding of growth in coal development is important to the national energy scene so that the implications of factors influencing coal growth upon the industry`s ability to realize national energy objectives may be determined. As a result, the future of coal development will be facilitated by compiling basic facts on coal reserves, production, and utilization. In view of this, a review and assessment of facts pertaining to the nature and origin of coal is presented. The various properties and uses of coal are then described, followed by a discussion of the process of coal formation.

Jubert, K.; Stevens, G.; Masudi, H.

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Transport in porous and fractured media of the Creede Formation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Direct measurement was made of the hydraulic conductivity of Creede Formation rocks using a new experimental method. The UFA{trademark} method employs open-flow centrifugation. Centrifugation, like gravity, has the effect on a material of a whole-body force exerting equal force at all points within the sample. The equivalent gravitational force exerted throughout the sample can be chosen to be from one to four orders of magnitude higher than earth gravity (from 10 to 10,000 g). The result is an increase in rate of fluid flow equally at all points throughout the sample so that hydraulic steady state is obtained in most geologic materials in hours, even under highly unsaturated conditions. This extraordinarily short time allows direct measurement of transport parameters, such as hydraulic conductivity, diffusion coefficient, and retardation factors, in any porous media over the complete range of field moisture contents. Hydraulic conductivities in the Creede Formation rocks ranged from 10{sup {minus}12} cm/s to 10{sup {minus}7} cm/s (10{sup {minus}9} Darcy to 10{sup {minus}4} Darcy) and showed no correlation with any other physical or mineralogical properties including porosity. The high degree of alteration to clay minerals appears to obscure any porosity/permeability relationship of the kind that occurs in many reservoir rocks. However, down-hole neutron porosities correlated well with laboratory-determined porosities. The objective of this investigation is to determine the hydrologic transport parameters of Creede Formation rocks for use in transport model development and for image analysis of transport pathways to produce a porosity/permeability evolution curve in support of geochemical and isotopic water/rock interaction models.

Conca, J.L.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

351

Experimental and Sampling Design for the INL-2 Sample Collection Operational Test  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the experimental and sampling design developed to assess sampling approaches and methods for detecting contamination in a building and clearing the building for use after decontamination. An Idaho National Laboratory (INL) building will be contaminated with BG (Bacillus globigii, renamed Bacillus atrophaeus), a simulant for Bacillus anthracis (BA). The contamination, sampling, decontamination, and re-sampling will occur per the experimental and sampling design. This INL-2 Sample Collection Operational Test is being planned by the Validated Sampling Plan Working Group (VSPWG). The primary objectives are: 1) Evaluate judgmental and probabilistic sampling for characterization as well as probabilistic and combined (judgment and probabilistic) sampling approaches for clearance, 2) Conduct these evaluations for gradient contamination (from low or moderate down to absent or undetectable) for different initial concentrations of the contaminant, 3) Explore judgment composite sampling approaches to reduce sample numbers, 4) Collect baseline data to serve as an indication of the actual levels of contamination in the tests. A combined judgmental and random (CJR) approach uses Bayesian methodology to combine judgmental and probabilistic samples to make clearance statements of the form "X% confidence that at least Y% of an area does not contain detectable contamination” (X%/Y% clearance statements). The INL-2 experimental design has five test events, which 1) vary the floor of the INL building on which the contaminant will be released, 2) provide for varying the amount of contaminant released to obtain desired concentration gradients, and 3) investigate overt as well as covert release of contaminants. Desirable contaminant gradients would have moderate to low concentrations of contaminant in rooms near the release point, with concentrations down to zero in other rooms. Such gradients would provide a range of contamination levels to challenge the sampling, sample extraction, and analytical methods to be used in the INL-2 study. For each of the five test events, the specified floor of the INL building will be contaminated with BG using a point-release device located in the room specified in the experimental design. Then quality control (QC), reference material coupon (RMC), judgmental, and probabilistic samples will be collected according to the sampling plan for each test event. Judgmental samples will be selected based on professional judgment and prior information. Probabilistic samples were selected with a random aspect and in sufficient numbers to provide desired confidence for detecting contamination or clearing uncontaminated (or decontaminated) areas. Following sample collection for a given test event, the INL building will be decontaminated. For possibly contaminated areas, the numbers of probabilistic samples were chosen to provide 95% confidence of detecting contaminated areas of specified sizes. For rooms that may be uncontaminated following a contamination event, or for whole floors after decontamination, the numbers of judgmental and probabilistic samples were chosen using the CJR approach. The numbers of samples were chosen to support making X%/Y% clearance statements with X = 95% or 99% and Y = 96% or 97%. The experimental and sampling design also provides for making X%/Y% clearance statements using only probabilistic samples. For each test event, the numbers of characterization and clearance samples were selected within limits based on operational considerations while still maintaining high confidence for detection and clearance aspects. The sampling design for all five test events contains 2085 samples, with 1142 after contamination and 943 after decontamination. These numbers include QC, RMC, judgmental, and probabilistic samples. The experimental and sampling design specified in this report provides a good statistical foundation for achieving the objectives of the INL-2 study.

Piepel, Gregory F.; Amidan, Brett G.; Matzke, Brett D.

2009-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

352

Atmospheric CO2 From Flask Air Samples at 10 Sites in the SIO Air Sampling  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Flask Air Samples, SIO Network Flask Air Samples, SIO Network Atmospheric CO2 From Flask Air Samples at 10 Sites in the SIO Air Sampling Network Scripps Institution of Oceanography Monitoring Sites Scripps Institution of Oceanography Monitoring Sites Mauna Loa, Hawaii Mauna Loa weekly average CO2 concentrations derived from continuous air samples Barrow, Alaska American Samoa South Pole Daily average CO2 concentrations derived from continuous air samples Alert, NWT, Canada Cape Kumukahi Christmas Island Baring Head Kermadec Island La Jolla Pier La Jolla Pier weekly average CO2 concentrations derived from continuous air samples PDF Documentation available as Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide Concentrations at 10 Locations Spanning Latitudes 82°N to 90°S, (NDP-001a) For information on calibration and some additional literature, go to

353

DISENTANGLING AGN AND STAR FORMATION IN SOFT X-RAYS  

SciTech Connect

We have explored the interplay of star formation and active galactic nucleus (AGN) activity in soft X-rays (0.5-2 keV) in two samples of Seyfert 2 galaxies (Sy2s). Using a combination of low-resolution CCD spectra from Chandra and XMM-Newton, we modeled the soft emission of 34 Sy2s using power-law and thermal models. For the 11 sources with high signal-to-noise Chandra imaging of the diffuse host galaxy emission, we estimate the luminosity due to star formation by removing the AGN, fitting the residual emission. The AGN and star formation contributions to the soft X-ray luminosity (i.e., L{sub x,AGN} and L{sub x,SF}) for the remaining 24 Sy2s were estimated from the power-law and thermal luminosities derived from spectral fitting. These luminosities were scaled based on a template derived from XSINGS analysis of normal star-forming galaxies. To account for errors in the luminosities derived from spectral fitting and the spread in the scaling factor, we estimated L{sub x,AGN} and L{sub x,SF} from Monte Carlo simulations. These simulated luminosities agree with L{sub x,AGN} and L{sub x,SF} derived from Chandra imaging analysis within a 3{sigma} confidence level. Using the infrared [Ne II]12.8 {mu}m and [O IV]26 {mu}m lines as a proxy of star formation and AGN activity, respectively, we independently disentangle the contributions of these two processes to the total soft X-ray emission. This decomposition generally agrees with L{sub x,SF} and L{sub x,AGN} at the 3{sigma} level. In the absence of resolvable nuclear emission, our decomposition method provides a reasonable estimate of emission due to star formation in galaxies hosting type 2 AGNs.

LaMassa, Stephanie M.; Heckman, T. M. [Johns Hopkins University, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Ptak, A. [NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)

2012-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

354

Practical reporting times for environmental samples  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Preanalytical holding times for environmental samples are specified because chemical and physical characteristics may change between sampling and chemical analysis. For example, the Federal Register prescribes a preanalytical holding time of 14 days for volatile organic compounds in soil stored at 4{degrees}C. The American Society for Testing Materials (ASTM) uses a more technical definition that the preanalytical holding time is the day when the analyte concentration for an environmental sample falls below the lower 99% confidence interval on the analyte concentration at day zero. This study reviews various holding time definitions and suggest a new preanalytical holding time approach using acceptable error rates for measuring an environmental analyte. This practical reporting time (PRT) approach has been applied to nineteen volatile organic compounds and four explosives in three environmental soil samples. A PRT nomograph of error rates has been developed to estimate the consequences of missing a preanalytical holding time. This nomograph can be applied to a large class of analytes with concentrations that decay linearly or exponentially with time regardless of sample matrices and storage conditions.

Bayne, C.K.; Schmoyer, D.D.; Jenkins, R.A.

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Amchitka Island, Alaska, special sampling project 1997  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This 1997 special sampling project represents a special radiobiological sampling effort to augment the 1996 Long-Term Hydrological Monitoring Program (LTHMP) for Amchitka Island in Alaska. Lying in the western portion of the Aleutian Islands arc, near the International Date Line, Amchitka Island is one of the southernmost islands of the Rat Island Chain. Between 1965 and 1971, the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission conducted three underground nuclear tests on Amchitka Island. In 1996, Greenpeace collected biota samples and speculated that several long-lived, man-made radionuclides detected (i.e., americium-241, plutonium-239 and -240, beryllium-7, and cesium-137) leaked into the surface environment from underground cavities created during the testing. The nuclides of interest are detected at extremely low concentrations throughout the environment. The objectives of this special sampling project were to scientifically refute the Greenpeace conclusions that the underground cavities were leaking contaminants to the surface. This was achieved by first confirming the presence of these radionuclides in the Amchitka Island surface environment and, second, if the radionuclides were present, determining if the source is the underground cavity or worldwide fallout. This special sampling and analysis determined that the only nonfallout-related radionuclide detected was a low level of tritium from the Long Shot test, which had been previously documented. The tritium contamination is monitored and continues a decreasing trend due to radioactive decay and dilution.

U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office

2000-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

356

Sample Project Execution Plan | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Sample Project Execution Plan Sample Project Execution Plan Sample Project Execution Plan The project execution plan (PEP) is the governing document that establishes the means to execute, monitor, and control projects. The plan serves as the main communication vehicle to ensure that everyone is aware and knowledgeable of project objectives and how they will be accomplished. The plan is the primary agreement between Headquarters and the federal project director and a preliminary plan should be developed and approved at Critical Decision-1. Project objectives are derived from the mission needs statement, and an integrated project team assists in development of the PEP. The plan is a living document and should be updated to describe current and future processes and procedures, such as integrating safety

357

Definition: Soil Gas Sampling | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Definition Definition Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Definition: Soil Gas Sampling Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Soil Gas Sampling Soil gas sampling is sometimes used in exploration for blind geothermal resources to detect anomalously high concentrations of hydrothermal gases in the near-surface environment. Identification of high concentrations of hydrothermal gas species may indicates the presence of enhanced permeability (faults) and high temperature hydrothermal activity at depth. Soil gas data may also be used to study other important aspects of the geothermal system, such as distinguishing between magmatic and amagmatic sources of heat. The technique may also be used for ongoing monitoring of the geothermal system during resource development and production.

358

Standard guide for sampling radioactive tank waste  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1.1 This guide addresses techniques used to obtain grab samples from tanks containing high-level radioactive waste created during the reprocessing of spent nuclear fuels. Guidance on selecting appropriate sampling devices for waste covered by the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) is also provided by the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) (1). Vapor sampling of the head-space is not included in this guide because it does not significantly affect slurry retrieval, pipeline transport, plugging, or mixing. 1.2 The values stated in inch-pound units are to be regarded as standard. No other units of measurement are included in this standard. 1.3 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use.

American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Template:SampleTemplate | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Template Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Template:SampleTemplate Jump to: navigation, search This is the SampleTemplate template. It is designed for use by Sample Pages. To define a test page, please use this form. Parameters Awesomeness - The numeric level of awesomeness that your test page will achieve. Topics - Topics this page discusses. (semicolon delimited) Note: References for the above parameters are generated automatically by the ReferenceForValue template and can be seen using the ShowRefFieldsButton. Dependencies Template:Cite Template:ReferenceForValue Widget:ShowRefFieldsButton Usage It should be invoked using the corresponding form.

360

Visual Sample Plan (VSP) 6.0 - Available Technologies - PNNL  

Summary. Visual Sample Plan—or VSP—is a software tool that helps users determine where sampling should be conducted and how many samples are needed ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mm sample format" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Single sample extraction and HPLC processing for quantification of NAD and NADH levels in Saccharomyces cerevisiae  

SciTech Connect

A robust redox extraction protocol for quantitative and reproducible metabolite isolation and recovery has been developed for simultaneous measurement of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD) and its reduced form, NADH, from Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Following culture in liquid media, approximately 10{sup 8} yeast cells were harvested by centrifugation and then lysed under non-oxidizing conditions by bead blasting in ice-cold, nitrogen-saturated 50-mM ammonium acetate. To enable protein denaturation, ice cold nitrogen-saturated CH{sub 3}CN + 50-mM ammonium acetate (3:1; v:v) was added to the cell lysates. After sample centrifugation to pellet precipitated proteins, organic solvent removal was performed on supernatants by chloroform extraction. The remaining aqueous phase was dried and resuspended in 50-mM ammonium acetate. NAD and NADH were separated by HPLC and quantified using UV-VIS absorbance detection. Applicability of this procedure for quantifying NAD and NADH levels was evaluated by culturing yeast under normal (2% glucose) and calorie restricted (0.5% glucose) conditions. NAD and NADH contents are similar to previously reported levels in yeast obtained using enzymatic assays performed separately on acid (for NAD) and alkali (for NADH) extracts. Results demonstrate that it is possible to perform a single preparation to reliably and robustly quantitate both NAD and NADH contents in the same sample. Robustness of the protocol suggests it will be (1) applicable to quantification of these metabolites in mammalian and bacterial cell cultures; and (2) amenable to isotope labeling strategies to determine the relative contribution of specific metabolic pathways to total NAD and NADH levels in cell cultures.

Sporty, J; Kabir, M M; Turteltaub, K; Ognibene, T; Lin, S; Bench, G

2008-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

362

Sampling artifacts from conductive silicone tubing  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sampling artifacts from conductive silicone tubing Sampling artifacts from conductive silicone tubing Title Sampling artifacts from conductive silicone tubing Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2009 Authors Timko, Michael T., Zhenhong Yu, Jesse Kroll, John T. Jayne, Douglas R. Worsnop, Richard C. Miake-Lye, Timothy B. Onasch, David Liscinsky, Thomas W. Kirchstetter, Hugo Destaillats, Amara L. Holder, Jared D. Smith, and Kevin R. Wilson Journal Aerosol Science and Technology Volume 43 Issue 9 Pagination 855-865 Date Published 06/03/2009 Abstract We report evidence that carbon impregnated conductive silicone tubing used in aerosol sampling systems can introduce two types of experimental artifacts: (1) silicon tubing dynamically absorbs carbon dioxide gas, requiring greater than 5 minutes to reach equilibrium and (2) silicone tubing emits organic contaminants containing siloxane that are adsorbed onto particles traveling through it and onto downstream quartz fiber filters. The consequence can be substantial for engine exhaust measurements as both artifacts directly impact calculations of particulate mass-based emission indices. The emission of contaminants from the silicone tubing can result in overestimation of organic particle mass concentrations based on real-time aerosol mass spectrometry and the off-line thermal analysis of quartz filters. The adsorption of siloxane contaminants can affect the surface properties of aerosol particles; we observed a marked reduction in the water-affinity of soot particles passed through conductive silicone tubing. These combined observations suggest that the silicone tubing artifacts may have wide consequence for the aerosol community and the tubing should, therefore, be used with caution. Contamination associated with the use of silicone tubing was observed at ambient temperature and, in some cases, was enhanced by mild heating (<70°C) or pre-exposure to a solvent (methanol). Further evaluation is warranted to quantify systematically how the contamination responds to variations in system temperature, physicochemical particle properties, exposure to solvent, sample contact time, tubing age, and sample flow rates.

363

RAPID DETERMINATION OF RADIOSTRONTIUM IN SEAWATER SAMPLES  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new method for the determination of radiostrontium in seawater samples has been developed at the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) that allows rapid preconcentration and separation of strontium and yttrium isotopes in seawater samples for measurement. The new SRNL method employs a novel and effective pre-concentration step that utilizes a blend of calcium phosphate with iron hydroxide to collect both strontium and yttrium rapidly from the seawater matrix with enhanced chemical yields. The pre-concentration steps, in combination with rapid Sr Resin and DGA Resin cartridge separation options using vacuum box technology, allow seawater samples up to 10 liters to be analyzed. The total {sup 89}Sr + {sup 90}Sr activity may be determined by gas flow proportional counting and recounted after ingrowth of {sup 90}Y to differentiate {sup 89}Sr from {sup 90}Sr. Gas flow proportional counting provides a lower method detection limit than liquid scintillation or Cerenkov counting and allows simultaneous counting of samples. Simultaneous counting allows for longer count times and lower method detection limits without handling very large aliquots of seawater. Seawater samples up to 6 liters may be analyzed using Sr Resin for {sup 89}Sr and {sup 90}Sr with a Minimum Detectable Activity (MDA) of 1-10 mBq/L, depending on count times. Seawater samples up to 10 liters may be analyzed for {sup 90}Sr using a DGA Resin method via collection and purification of {sup 90}Y only. If {sup 89}Sr and other fission products are present, then {sup 91}Y (beta energy 1.55 MeV, 58.5 day half-life) is also likely to be present. {sup 91}Y interferes with attempts to collect {sup 90}Y directly from the seawater sample without initial purification of Sr isotopes first and {sup 90}Y ingrowth. The DGA Resin option can be used to determine {sup 90}Sr, and if {sup 91}Y is also present, an ingrowth option with using DGA Resin again to collect {sup 90}Y can be performed. An MDA for {sup 90}Sr of <1 mBq/L for an 8 hour count may be obtained using 10 liter seawater sample aliquots.

Maxwell, S.

2013-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

364

Performance evaluation soil samples utilizing encapsulation technology  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Performance evaluation soil samples and method of their preparation uses encapsulation technology to encapsulate analytes which are introduced into a soil matrix for analysis and evaluation by analytical laboratories. Target analytes are mixed in an appropriate solvent at predetermined concentrations. The mixture is emulsified in a solution of polymeric film forming material. The emulsified solution is polymerized to form microcapsules. The microcapsules are recovered, quantitated and introduced into a soil matrix in a predetermined ratio to form soil samples with the desired analyte concentration. 1 fig.

Dahlgran, J.R.

1999-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

365

Performance evaluation soil samples utilizing encapsulation technology  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Performance evaluation soil samples and method of their preparation using encapsulation technology to encapsulate analytes which are introduced into a soil matrix for analysis and evaluation by analytical laboratories. Target analytes are mixed in an appropriate solvent at predetermined concentrations. The mixture is emulsified in a solution of polymeric film forming material. The emulsified solution is polymerized to form microcapsules. The microcapsules are recovered, quantitated and introduced into a soil matrix in a predetermined ratio to form soil samples with the desired analyte concentration.

Dahlgran, James R. (Idaho Falls, ID)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Mean estimation in highly skewed samples  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The problem of inference for the mean of a highly asymmetric distribution is considered. Even with large sample sizes, usual asymptotics based on normal theory give poor answers, as the right-hand tail of the distribution is often under-sampled. This paper attempts to improve performance in two ways. First, modifications of the standard confidence interval procedure are examined. Second, diagnostics are proposed to indicate whether or not inferential procedures are likely to be valid. The problems are illustrated with data simulated from an absolute value Cauchy distribution. 4 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

Pederson, S.P.

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Performance evaluation soil samples utilizing encapsulation technology  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Performance evaluation soil samples and method of their preparation are described using encapsulation technology to encapsulate analytes which are introduced into a soil matrix for analysis and evaluation by analytical laboratories. Target analytes are mixed in an appropriate solvent at predetermined concentrations. The mixture is emulsified in a solution of polymeric film forming material. The emulsified solution is polymerized to form microcapsules. The microcapsules are recovered, quantitated and introduced into a soil matrix in a predetermined ratio to form soil samples with the desired analyte concentration.

Dahlgran, James R.

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

NETL: NATCARB - CO2 Storage Formations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Storage Formations Storage Formations NATCARB CO2 Storage Formations CO2 Storage Resource Methodology NATCARB Viewer The NATCARB Viewer is available at: http://www.natcarbviewer.com. 2012 Atlas IV DOE's Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships (RCSPs) were charged with providing a high-level, quantitative estimate of carbon dioxide (CO2) storage resource available in subsurface environments of their regions. Environments considered for CO2 storage were categorized into five major geologic systems: oil and gas reservoirs, unmineable coal areas, saline formations, shale, and basalt formations. Where possible, CO2 storage resource estimates have been quantified for oil and gas reservoirs, saline formations, and unmineable coal in the fourth edition of the United States Carbon Utilization and Storage Atlas (Atlas IV). Shale and basalt

369

Minimizing formation damage during gravel pack operations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A method is described for minimizing formation damage caused by intrusive fluids prior to a gravel packing operation in loosely consolidated formations penetrated by at least one well. The method comprises: filling the casing of the well with an underbalanced completion fluid; placing within the well a removable packer capable of isolating the space between the casing and the formation from the downhole well pressure; setting through the packer a first tubing suitable for perforating and stabilizing the flow of fluids into the well; perforating the casing; and introducing a blocking agent into the formation via the perforations which agent upon solidification is sufficient to minimize formation damage by avoiding the introduction of formation fluids.

Jennings, A.R. Jr.

1987-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

370

STAR FORMATION IN DENSE CLUSTERS  

SciTech Connect

A model of core-clump accretion with equally likely stopping describes star formation in the dense parts of clusters, where models of isolated collapsing cores may not apply. Each core accretes at a constant rate onto its protostar, while the surrounding clump gas accretes as a power of protostar mass. Short accretion flows resemble Shu accretion and make low-mass stars. Long flows resemble reduced Bondi accretion and make massive stars. Accretion stops due to environmental processes of dynamical ejection, gravitational competition, and gas dispersal by stellar feedback, independent of initial core structure. The model matches the field star initial mass function (IMF) from 0.01 to more than 10 solar masses. The core accretion rate and the mean accretion duration set the peak of the IMF, independent of the local Jeans mass. Massive protostars require the longest accretion durations, up to 0.5 Myr. The maximum protostar luminosity in a cluster indicates the mass and age of its oldest protostar. The distribution of protostar luminosities matches those in active star-forming regions if protostars have a constant birthrate but not if their births are coeval. For constant birthrate, the ratio of young stellar objects to protostars indicates the star-forming age of a cluster, typically {approx}1 Myr. The protostar accretion luminosity is typically less than its steady spherical value by a factor of {approx}2, consistent with models of episodic disk accretion.

Myers, Philip C., E-mail: pmyers@cfa.harvard.edu [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)

2011-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

371

Re: Assessment of Groundwater Sampling Results Completed by the U.S. Geological Survey Summary  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The organic chemistry at MW01 has not changed substantially since the EPA sampled the well; some constituents have increased and some have decreased, as would be expected with organic contaminants discharging from a series of event, the hydraulic fracturing of natural gas wells. Because the water chemistry data at MW01 has essentially been replicated, the evidence supporting the hypothesis that natural gas drilling activities, including fracking, have contaminated the Wind River aquifer near Pavillion WY has been strengthened. The conclusions based on that analysis should be more widely accepted now that the water quality has been replicated. The concentrations of gas, including methane and ethane, have increased and that of propane has remained relatively constant. The ratio of ethane and propane to methane and the isotopic signature of methane all indicate that the gas source is thermogenic, meaning a deep formation. An increasing concentration indicates the formation is likely the source because the concentration will increase as more of the formation contributes to gas at the monitoring well. EPA monitoring well 2 was not sampled because it did not yield sufficient water. The EPA had been able to purge over a borehole’s volume of water, therefore they were clearly sampling formation water. There is no reason to consider that the current condition of MW02 negates the results of the EPA in 2011. The problems with MW02 however indicate other problems with the sampling of these wells. The USGS used standard purge techniques, not techniques designed to minimize losses of volatile organics to the atmosphere. Purging too fast or drawing the water level too low could cause the measurement to be biased too low.

Tom Myers Ph. D

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

ICE 62755 Standard N42 Data Format  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

IEC 62755 Standard N42 Data Format. Summary: The purpose ... The structure of the data is described by an XML schema. The schema ...

2013-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

373

result formats | OpenEI Community  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

result formats Home Jweers's picture Submitted by Jweers(83) Contributor 16 May, 2013 - 14:22 Multicolor Maps from Compound Queries ask queries compound queries developer Google...

374

Simplified Electrode Formation using Stabilized Lithium Metal ...  

A team of Berkeley Lab researchers led by Gao Liu has developed a doping process for lithium ion battery electrode formation that can boost a cell’s ...

375

Nanocrystal Formation in Glasses - Programmaster.org  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Nanocrystal Formation in Glasses ... copper have been treated in hydrogen atmospheres to form nanocrystals imbedded in a glassy matrix.

376

Heating systems for heating subsurface formations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Methods and systems for heating a subsurface formation are described herein. A heating system for a subsurface formation includes a sealed conduit positioned in an opening in the formation and a heat source. The sealed conduit includes a heat transfer fluid. The heat source provides heat to a portion of the sealed conduit to change phase of the heat transfer fluid from a liquid to a vapor. The vapor in the sealed conduit rises in the sealed conduit, condenses to transfer heat to the formation and returns to the conduit portion as a liquid.

Nguyen, Scott Vinh (Houston, TX); Vinegar, Harold J. (Bellaire, TX)

2011-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

377

Simultaneous Planet and Sun Formation Evidence  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Simultaneous Planet and Sun Formation Evidence Name: Christie Status: student Grade: 9-12 Location: SC Country: USA Date: May 2, 2011 Question: What specific evidence indicates...

378

Vapor and gas sampling of Single-Shell Tank 241-A-101 using the Vapor Sampling System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document presents sampling data resulting from the June 8, 1995, sampling of SST 241-A-101 using the Vapor Sampling System.

Caprio, G.S.

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Vapor and gas sampling of single-shell tank 241-SX-106 using the vapor sampling system  

SciTech Connect

This document presents sampling data resulting from the March 24, 1995, sampling of SST 241-SX-106 using the vapor sampling system.

Caprio, G.S.

1995-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

380

Sampling Methodologies for the Commercial Sector  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Designing a survey sample that accurately mirrors the target population is a key step toward a much-needed understanding of the factors affecting commercial electricity use. This thorough exploration of new and familiar methodologies is based on experience with five recent, large-scale utility surveys of commercial customers.

1984-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mm sample format" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Hanford Sampling Quality Management Plan (HSQMP)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document provides a management tool for evaluating and designing the appropriate elements of a field sampling program. This document provides discussion of the elements of a program and is to be used as a guidance document during the preparation of project and/or function specific documentation. This document does not specify how a sampling program shall be organized. The HSQMP is to be used as a companion document to the Hanford Analytical Services Quality Assurance Plan (HASQAP) DOE/RL-94-55. The generation of this document was enhanced by conducting baseline evaluations of current sampling organizations. Valuable input was received from members of field and Quality Assurance organizations. The HSQMP is expected to be a living document. Revisions will be made as regulations and or Hanford Site conditions warrant changes in the best management practices. Appendices included are: summary of the sampling and analysis work flow process, a user`s guide to the Data Quality Objective process, and a self-assessment checklist.

Hyatt, J.E.

1995-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

382

Automatic blood sampling in dairy cows  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Loose housing systems for dairy cows are becoming increasingly common, raising new questions in the area of animal health and welfare. Some of these questions can be addressed by studying the variation in blood parameters, such as glucocortistioids. ... Keywords: Blood, Dairy cows, IceSampler, Sampling, Stress

Anders Fønss; Lene Munksgaard

2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Sample-related peripheral equipment at IPNS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes samples environment equipment provided by IPNS to visiting users and staff scientists. Of the twelve horizontal neutron beam stations, (ten now operational, two under construction) all use one or more form of such support equipment. An in-house support group devotes a significant fraction of its time to development, calibration, and maintenance of this equipment.

Bohringer, D.E.; Crawford, R.K.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Monitoring Large Systems Via Statistical Sampling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As the trend in parallel systems scales toward petaflop performance tapped by advances in circuit density and by an increasingly available computational Grid, the development of efficient mechanisms for monitoring large systems becomes imperative. When ... Keywords: Large systems, performance monitoring, statistical sampling

Celso L. Mendes; Daniel A. Reed

2004-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Proceedings of the wellbore sampling workshop  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Representatives from academia, industry and research laboratories participated in an intensive two-day review to identify major technological limitations in obtaining solid and fluid samples from wellbores. Top priorities identified for further development include: coring of hard and unconsolidated materials; flow through fluid samplers with borehole measurements T, P and pH; and nonintrusive interrogation of pressure cores.

Traeger, R.K. (ed.); Harding, B.W.

1987-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Adaptive sampling for Bayesian variable selection  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Adaptive sampling for Bayesian variable selection DAVID J. NOTT Department of Statistics for variable selection and for dealing with model un- certainty have become increasingly popular in recent consider adaptive Markov chain Monte Carlo schemes for Bayesian variable selection in Gaussian linear

Blennerhassett, Peter

387

Efficient spatial sampling of large geographical tables  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Large-scale map visualization systems play an increasingly important role in presenting geographic datasets to end users. Since these datasets can be extremely large, a map rendering system often needs to select a small fraction of the data to visualize ... Keywords: data visualization, geographical databases, indexing, maps, query processing, spatial sampling

Anish Das Sarma; Hongrae Lee; Hector Gonzalez; Jayant Madhavan; Alon Halevy

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Zigzag Survey Designs in Line Transect Sampling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

survey lines are frequently used in shipboard and aerial line transect surveys of animal populations; Systematic designs; Zigzag designs. 1. INTRODUCTION Shipboard and aerial line transect surveys are widelyZigzag Survey Designs in Line Transect Sampling Samantha STRINDBERG and Stephen T. BUCKLAND Zigzag

Buckland, Steve

389

The Sampling Variations of Hailstone Size Distributions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The use of a shifted gamma size distribution for hailstone samples is proposed. This is shown to provide a better fit than the usual exponential form, using time-resolved Alberta data. It is also concluded that there is a dependence of the shape ...

Raymond K. W. Wong; Norman Chidambaram; Lawrence Cheng; Marianne English

1988-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Efficient sampling of information in social networks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As online social networking emerges, there has been increased interest to utilize the underlying social structure as well as the available social information to improve search. In this paper, we focus on improving the performance of information collection ... Keywords: personalization, sampling social networks, social search

Gautam Das; Nick Koudas; Manos Papagelis; Sushruth Puttaswamy

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Cost-Based Sampling of Individual Instances  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In many practical domains, misclassification costs can differ greatly and may be represented by class ratios, however, most learning algorithms struggle with skewed class distributions. The difficulty is attributed to designing classifiers to maximize ... Keywords: Class Imbalance, Cost-Based Learning, Sampling

William Klement; Peter Flach; Nathalie Japkowicz; Stan Matwin

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Sonochemical Digestion of Soil and Sediment Samples  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This work was performed as part of a broader effort to automate analytical methods for determination of plutonium and other radioisotopes in environmental samples. The work described here represented a screening study to determine the potential for applying ultrasonic irradiation to sample digestion. Two standard reference materials (SRMs) were used in this study: Columbia River Sediment and Rocky Flats Soil. The key experiments performed are listed below along with a summary of the results. The action of nitric acid, regardless of its concentration and liquid-to-solid ratio, did not achieve dissolution efficiency better that 20%. The major fraction of natural organic matter (NOM) remained undissolved by this treatment. Sonication did not result in improved dissolution for the SRMs tested. The action of hydrofluoric acid at concentrations of 8 M and higher achieved much more pronounced dissolution (up to 97% dissolved for the Rocky Flats soil sample and up to 78% dissolved for the Columbia River Sediment sample). Dissolution efficiency remains constant for solid-to-liquid ratios of up to 0.05 to 1 and decreases for the higher loadings of the solid phase. Sonication produced no measurable effect in improving the dissolution of the samples compared with the control digestion experiments. Combined treatment of the SRM by mixtures of HNO3 and HF showed inferior performance compared with the HF alone. An adverse effect of sonication was found for the Rocky Flats soil material, which became more noticeable at higher HF concentrations. Sonication of the Columbia River sediment samples had no positive effect in the mixed acid treatment. The results indicate that applying ultrasound in an isolated cup horn configuration does not offer any advantage over conventional ''heat and mix'' treatment for dissolution of the soil and sediment based on the SRM examined here. This conclusion, however, is based on an approach that uses gravimetric analysis to determine gross dissolution efficiency. This approach does not allow any conclusion regarding the possible advantage of sonication in selective dissolution of plutonium traces incorporated into an inorganic or organic fraction of the samples.

Sinkov, Sergei I.; Lumetta, Gregg J.

2006-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

393

A rugged continuous air monitor for sampling radionuclides  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A new rugged continuous air monitor (CAM) for sampling radionuclide has been developed. The sampler was designed for analyzing aerosols from occupied environments of laboratories and samples extracted from stacks and ducts. Experiments were conducted to characterize the collection efficiency of the aerosol sampler system and to characterize the uniformity of particulate deposition on the filter surface as affected by variations in particle size and sampler flow rates. An experimental parametric analysis was conducted to determine the best internal geometric flow configuration, in order to achieve optimum aerosol collection. The results showed that at a flow rate of 56.6 L/min, 90% of 10 []m aerodynamic diameter (AD) aerosol particles penetrated through the sampler. The 10% loss was attributed to particle impaction at the location where the aerosol stream is turned from the vertical direction and then enters a 4 mm gap between a sampler filter and a planar detector, both of which are horizontally oriented. The cut point for the sampler was 20 []m AD. Uniformity of aerosol collection on the filter, as characterized by the coefficient of variation of the areal density deposits, was less than 10% for 10 []m AD aerosol particles. The sampler sealing integrity with respect to air leaks was tested by placing the sampler in a pressurized container and operating the sampler with the pressure in the container higher than that in the sampler for in-leakage, and with the pressure in the container less than that in the sampler for out-leakage. The pressure inside the container did not exceed 10 inches of water. For in-leakage tests, sulfur hexafluoride (SF?) was diluted with air and released into the container, external to the sampler. The ratio of the SF? concentration in the sampler to the SF? concentration in the container was calculated to characterize the integrity of the sampler system. For pressure differences of 5 and 10 inches of water, the in-leakage was 0.03% and 0.02%, respectively. The same procedure was repeated for out-leakage except that the diluted SF? was released into the sampler. The leakage results for this procedure were 0.04% and 0.02% for pressure differences of 5 and 10 inches of water, respectively.

Martinez, Joseph Thaddeus

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

The star formation histories of low surface brightness galaxies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We have performed deep imaging of a diverse sample of 26 low surface brightness galaxies (LSBGs) in the optical and the near-infrared. Using stellar population synthesis models, we find that it is possible to place constraints on the ratio of young to old stars (which we parameterise in terms of the average age of the galaxy), as well as the metallicity of the galaxy, using optical and near-infrared colours. LSBGs have a wide range of morphologies and stellar populations, ranging from older, high metallicity earlier types to much younger and lower metallicity late type galaxies. Despite this wide range of star formation histories, we find that colour gradients are common in LSBGs. These are most naturally interpreted as gradients in mean stellar age, with the outer regions of LSBGs having younger ages than their inner regions. In an attempt to understand what drives the differences in LSBG stellar populations, we compare LSBG average ages and metallicities with their physical parameters. Strong correlations are seen between a LSBG's star formation history and its K band surface brightness, K band absolute magnitude and gas fraction. These correlations are consistent with a scenario in which the star formation history of a LSBG primarily correlates with its surface density and its metallicity correlates both with its mass and surface density.

Eric F. Bell; David Barnaby; Richard G. Bower; Roelof S. de Jong; Doyal A. Harper; Mark Hereld; Robert F. Loewenstein; Bernard J. Rauscher

1999-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

395

Galaxy Formation at z~3: Constraints from Spatial Clustering  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We use N-body simulations combined with semi-analytic models to compute the clustering properties of modeled galaxies at z~3, and confront these predictions with the clustering properties of the observed population of Lyman-break galaxies (LBGs). Several scenarios for the nature of LBGs are explored, which may be broadly categorized into models in which high-redshift star formation is driven by collisional starbursts and those in which quiescent star formation dominates. For each model, we make predictions for the LBG overdensity distribution, the variance of counts-in-cells, the correlation length, and close pair statistics. Models which assume a one-to-one relationship between massive dark-matter halos and galaxies are disfavored by close pair statistics, as are models in which colliding halos are associated with galaxies in a simplified way. However, when modeling of gas consumption and star formation is included using a semi-analytic treatment, the quiescent and collisional starburst models predict similar clustering properties and none of these models can be ruled out based on the available clustering data. None of the ``realistic'' models predict a strong dependence of clustering amplitude on the luminosity threshold of the sample, in apparent conflict with some observational results.

Risa H. Wechsler; Rachel S. Somerville; James S. Bullock; Tsafrir S. Kolatt; Joel R. Primack; George R. Blumenthal; Avishai Dekel

2000-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

396

Standard Electronic Format Specification for Tank Characterization Data Loader Version 3.5  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this document is to describe the standard electronic format for data files that will be sent for entry into the Tank Characterization Database (TCD). There are 2 different file types needed for each data load: (1) Analytical Results and (2) Sample Descriptions.

ADAMS, M.R.

2001-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

397

Water Sampling (Lewicki & Oldenburg, 2004) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Water Sampling (Lewicki & Oldenburg, 2004) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Water Sampling (Lewicki & Oldenburg, 2004) Exploration...

398

See a sample reprint in PDF format. Order a reprint of this article now SEPTEMBER 27, 2010  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. In the race toward off-the-grid, personalized power stations, Sun Catalytix Corp., of Cambridge, Mass to collect the sun's energy and convert it into radio waves for transmission to surface stations, where, then store both in tanks for use in generating power when the sun goes down. Meanwhile, Amyris Inc

Gracias, David

399

Annual Logging Symposium, June 21-24, 2009 Wireline and While-Drilling Formation-Tester Sampling with Oval, Focused,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

- Filtrate Invasion in Deviated Wells Abdolhamid Hadibeik, The University of Texas at Austin, Mark Proett, Halliburton Energy Services, Carlos Torres-Verdín, Kamy Sepehrnoori, and Renzo Angeles, The University of Texas at Austin Copyright 2009, held jointly by the Society of Petrophysicists and Well Log Analysts

Torres-Verdín, Carlos

400

Phenotypic Data Collection and Sample Preparation for Genomics of Wood Formation and Cellulosic Biomass Traits in Sunflower: Ames, IA location.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Three fields were planted in Ames in 2010, two association mapping fields, N3 and A, and a recombinant inbred line field, N13. Phenotype data and images were transferred to UGA to support genetic and genomic analyses of woody biomass-related traits.

Marek, Laura F.

2011-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mm sample format" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

TMS Proceedings Manuscript Instructions: One-Column Format  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

TMS ENERGY INITIATIVES · KNOWLEDGE RESOURCE CENTER · MATERIALS ... Formatting Guide (PDF) This file contains basic formatting instructions for ...

402

Deep Space Formation Flying Spacecraft Path Planning  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Efficient algorithms for collision-free energy sub-optimal path planning for formations of spacecraft flying in deep space are presented. The idea is to introduce a set of way-points through which the spacecraft are required to pass, combined with ... Keywords: formation flying spacecraft, path planning for multiple mobile robot systems, trajectory generation

Cornel Sultan; Sanjeev Seereram; Raman K. Mehra

2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Methods for forming wellbores in heated formations  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for forming a wellbore in a heated formation includes flowing liquid cooling fluid to a bottom hole assembly in a wellbore in a heated formation. At least a portion of the liquid cooling fluid is vaporized at or near a region to be cooled. Vaporizing the liquid cooling fluid absorbs heat from the region to be cooled.

Guimerans, Rosalvina Ramona; Mansure, Arthur James

2012-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

404

Concept formation using incremental Gaussian mixture models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents a new algorithm for incremental concept formation based on a Bayesian framework. The algorithm, called IGMM (for Incremental Gaussian Mixture Model), uses a probabilistic approach for modeling the environment, and so, it can rely ... Keywords: Bayesian methods, EM algorithm, clustering, concept formation, finite mixtures, incremental learning, unsupervised learning

Paulo Martins Engel; Milton Roberto Heinen

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Field Development Strategies for Bakken Shale Formation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

July 2010 Field Development Strategies for Bakken Shale Formation SPE 139032 S.Zargari, S Bakken Formation is comprised of 3 Members: · Upper Shale Member­ Source & Seal · Middle "Siltstone" Member­ Reservoir & Migration Conduit · Lower Shale Member- Source & Seal #12;July 2010 Reservoir

Mohaghegh, Shahab

406

Sample Results from the Interim Salt Disposition Program Macrobatch 6 Tank 21H Qualification Samples  

SciTech Connect

Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) analyzed samples from Tank 21H in support of qualification of Macrobatch (Salt Batch) 6 for the Interim Salt Disposition Project (ISDP). This document reports partial results of the analyses of samples of Tank 21H. No issues with the projected Salt Batch 6 strategy are identified.

Peters, T. B.; Fink, S. D.

2012-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

407

Sample Results From The Interim Salt Disposition Program Macrobatch 6 Tank 21H Qualification Samples  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) analyzed samples from Tank 21H in support of qualification of Macrobatch (Salt Batch) 6 for the Interim Salt Disposition Project (ISDP). This document reports partial results of the analyses of samples of Tank 21H. No issues with the projected Salt Batch 6 strategy are identified.

Peters, T. B.; Fink, S. D.

2012-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

408

Method and sample spinning apparatus for measuring the NMR spectrum of an orientationally disordered sample  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved NMR apparatus and method are described which substantially improve the resolution of NMR measurements made on powdered or amorphous or otherwise orientationally disordered samples. The apparatus spins the sample about an axis. The angle of the axis is mechanically varied such that the time average of two or more Legendre polynomials are zero.

Pines, Alexander (Berkeley, CA); Samoson, Ago (Tallinn, SU)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Well purge and sample apparatus and method  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention specifically permits purging and/or sampling of a well but only removing, at most, about 25% of the fluid volume compared to conventional methods and, at a minimum, removing none of the fluid volume from the well. The invention is an isolation assembly with a packer, pump and exhaust, that is inserted into the well. The isolation assembly is designed so that only a volume of fluid between the outside diameter of the isolation assembly and the inside diameter of the well over a fluid column height from the bottom of the well to the top of the active portion (lower annulus) is removed. The packer is positioned above the active portion thereby sealing the well and preventing any mixing or contamination of inlet fluid with fluid above the packer. Ports in the wall of the isolation assembly permit purging and sampling of the lower annulus along the height of the active portion.

Schalla, Ronald (Kennewick, WA); Smith, Ronald M. (Richland, WA); Hall, Stephen H. (Kennewick, WA); Smart, John E. (Richland, WA); Gustafson, Gregg S. (Redmond, WA)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Well purge and sample apparatus and method  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention specifically permits purging and/or sampling of a well but only removing, at most, about 25% of the fluid volume compared to conventional methods and, at a minimum, removing none of the fluid volume from the well. The invention is an isolation assembly with a packer, pump and exhaust, that is inserted into the well. The isolation assembly is designed so that only a volume of fluid between the outside diameter of the isolation assembly and the inside diameter of the well over a fluid column height from the bottom of the well to the top of the active portion (lower annulus) is removed. The packer is positioned above the active portion thereby sealing the well and preventing any mixing or contamination of inlet fluid with fluid above the packer. Ports in the wall of the isolation assembly permit purging and sampling of the lower annulus along the height of the active portion. 8 figs.

Schalla, R.; Smith, R.M.; Hall, S.H.; Smart, J.E.; Gustafson, G.S.

1995-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

411

Generic sequential sampling for metamodel approximations  

SciTech Connect

Metamodels approximate complex multivariate data sets from simulations and experiments. These data sets often are not based on an explicitly defined function. The resulting metamodel represents a complex system's behavior for subsequent analysis or optimization. Often an exhaustive data search to obtain the data for the metalnodel is impossible, so an intelligent sampling strategy is necessary. While inultiple approaches have been advocated, the majority of these approaches were developed in support of a particular class of metamodel, known as a Kriging. A more generic, cotninonsense approach to this problem allows sequential sampling techniques to be applied to other types of metamodeis. This research compares recent search techniques for Kriging inetamodels with a generic, inulti-criteria approach combined with a new type of B-spline metamodel. This B-spline metamodel is competitive with prior results obtained with a Kriging metamodel. Furthermore, the results of this research highlight several important features necessary for these techniques to be extended to more complex domains.

Turner, C. J. (Cameron J.); Campbell, M. I. (Matthew I.)

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Enhanced Chloride Monitoring for Steam Condensate Samples  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this project was to develop to the proof-of-concept stage a system that enables the quantification of chloride (Cl) in turbine steam condensate samples. The chloride quantification system is intended to serve as an alternative to online chromatography for chloride concentration monitoring. The conceptual approach was to concentrate the ions in the steam condensate, by a predetermined factor, to a level that allowed accurate detection of chloride by ion selective electrodes (ISEs). The ab...

2012-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

413

Mobile Variable Depth Sampling System Design Study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A design study is presented for a mobile, variable depth sampling system (MVDSS) that will support the treatment and immobilization of Hanford LAW and HLW. The sampler can be deployed in a 4-inch tank riser and has a design that is based on requirements identified in the Level 2 Specification (latest revision). The waste feed sequence for the MVDSS is based on Phase 1, Case 3S6 waste feed sequence. Technical information is also presented that supports the design study.

BOGER, R.M.

2000-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

414

Automated Sample collection and Analysis unit  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Autoramp is an atmospheric radionuclide collection and analysis unit designed for unattended operation. A large volume of air passes through one of 31 filter cartridges which is then moved from a sampling chamber and past a bar code reader, to a shielded enclosure. The collected dust-borne radionuclides are counted with a high resolution germanium gamma-ray detector. An analysis is made and the results are transmitted to a central station that can also remotely control the unit.

Latner, Norman; Sanderson, Colin G.; Negro, Vincent C.

1999-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

415

Apparatus for sampling and characterizing aerosols  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Apparatus for sampling and characterizing aerosols having a wide particle size range at relatively low velocities may comprise a chamber having an inlet and an outlet, the chamber including: a plurality of vertically stacked, successive particle collection stages; each collection stage includes a separator plate and a channel guide mounted transverse to the separator plate, defining a labyrinthine flow path across the collection stage. An opening in each separator plate provides a path for the aerosols from one collection stage t

Dunn, P.F.; Herceg, J.E.; Klocksieben, R.H.

1984-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

416

Field Evaluation of Debris Handling and Sediment Clogging of a 2.0-mm Fine-Mesh Traveling Water Screen at the Hawthorn Power Plant, Missouri River, in Kansas City, Missouri  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents results of an evaluation of the field performance of a fine-mesh (2.0-mm) traveling water screen (TWS) in a debris- and sediment-laden river. Fine-mesh overlay panels were installed on one intake screen at Kansas City Power and Light's Hawthorn Generating Station on the Missouri River, in Kansas City, Missouri. Its operation relative to an adjoining coarse-mesh (9.5-mm) screen was evaluated over a nearly 22-month period from December 2009 through August 2011.

2012-02-29T23:59:59.000Z

417

I/O Formats at NERSC  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

I/O Formats I/O Formats I/O Formats Software I/O continues to be one of the main bottlenecks for scientific applications. Here are two software packages that many application developers use to manage input/output of heterogeneous types of binary application data used on many different platforms. HDF5 and NETCDF are both implemented on top of MPI-IO and have gained popularity as alternatives to basic POSIX API. HDF5 is a machine-independent and self-documenting file format. Each HDF5 file "looks" like a directory tree, with subdirectories, and leaf nodes that contain the actual data. This means that data can be found in a file by referring to its name, rather than its location in the file. NetCDF is a file format and support library developed at the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR).

418

Method for laser drilling subterranean earth formations  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Laser drilling of subterranean earth formations is efficiently accomplished by directing a collimated laser beam into a bore hole in registry with the earth formation and transversely directing the laser beam into the earth formation with a suitable reflector. In accordance with the present invention, the bore hole is highly pressurized with a gas so that as the laser beam penetrates the earth formation the high pressure gas forces the fluids resulting from the drilling operation into fissures and pores surrounding the laser-drilled bore so as to inhibit deleterious occlusion of the laser beam. Also, the laser beam may be dynamically programmed with some time dependent wave form, e.g., pulsed, to thermally shock the earth formation for forming or enlarging fluid-receiving fissures in the bore.

Shuck, Lowell Z. (Morgantown, WV)

1976-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

419

CO2 Sequestration in Basalt Formations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CO CO 2 SequeStratiOn in BaSalt FOrmatiOnS Background There is growing concern that buildup of greenhouse gases, especially carbon dioxide (CO 2 ), in the atmosphere is contributing to global climate change. One option for mitigating this effect is to sequester CO 2 in geologic formations. Numerous site assessments for geologic sequestration of CO 2 have been conducted in virtually every region of the United States. For the most part, these studies have involved storing CO 2 in saline formation, deep coal seams, and depleted oil and gas reservoirs. Another option, however, is basalt formations. Basalt is a dark-colored, silica-rich, volcanic rock that contains cations-such as calcium, magnesium, and iron-that can combine with CO 2 to form carbonate minerals. Basalt formations have not received much

420

Gage for measuring displacements in rock samples  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A gage for measuring diametral displacement within a rock sample for use in a rock mechanics laboratory and in the field, comprises a support ring housing a linear variable differential transformer, a mounting screw, and a leaf spring. The mounting screw is adjustable and defines a first point of contact with the rock sample. The leaf spring has opposite ends fixed to the inner periphery of the mounting ring. An intermediate portion of the leaf spring projecting radially inward from the ring is formed with a dimple defining a second point of contact with the sample. The first and second points of contact are diametrically opposed to each other. The LVDT is mounted in the ring with its axis parallel to the line of measurement and its core rod received in the dimple of the leaf spring. Any change in the length of the line between the first and second support points is directly communicated to the LVDT. The leaf spring is rigid to completely support lateral forces so that the LVDT is free of all load for improved precision.

Holcomb, David J. (Albuquerque, NM); McNamee, Michael J. (Albuquerque, NM)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mm sample format" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Gage for measuring displacements in rock samples  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A gage for measuring diametral displacement within a rock sample for use in a rock mechanics laboratory and in the field, comprises a support ring housing a linear variable differential transformer (LVDT), a mounting screw, and a leaf spring. The mounting screw is adjustable and defines a first point of contact with the rock sample. The leaf spring has opposite ends fixed to the inner periphery of the mounting ring. An intermediate portion of the leaf spring projecting radially inward from the ring is formed with a dimple defining a second point of contact with the sample. The first and second points of contact are diametrically opposed to each other. The LVDT is mounted in the ring with its axis parallel to the line of measurement and its core rod received in the dimple of the leaf spring. Any change in the length of the line between the first and second support points is directly communicated to the LVDT. The leaf spring is rigid to completely support lateral forces so that the LVDT is free of all load for improved precision.

Holcomb, D.J.; McNamee, M.J.

1985-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

422

STAR FORMATION RATES IN MOLECULAR CLOUDS AND THE NATURE OF THE EXTRAGALACTIC SCALING RELATIONS  

SciTech Connect

In this paper, we investigate scaling relations between star formation rates and molecular gas masses for both local Galactic clouds and a sample of external galaxies. We specifically consider relations between the star formation rates and measurements of dense, as well as total, molecular gas masses. We argue that there is a fundamental empirical scaling relation that directly connects the local star formation process with that operating globally within galaxies. Specifically, the total star formation rate in a molecular cloud or galaxy is linearly proportional to the mass of dense gas within the cloud or galaxy. This simple relation, first documented in previous studies, holds over a span of mass covering nearly nine orders of magnitude and indicates that the rate of star formation is directly controlled by the amount of dense molecular gas that can be assembled within a star formation complex. We further show that the star formation rates and total molecular masses, characterizing both local clouds and galaxies, are correlated over similarly large scales of mass and can be described by a family of linear star formation scaling laws, parameterized by f{sub DG}, the fraction of dense gas contained within the clouds or galaxies. That is, the underlying star formation scaling law is always linear for clouds and galaxies with the same dense gas fraction. These considerations provide a single unified framework for understanding the relation between the standard (nonlinear) extragalactic Schmidt-Kennicutt scaling law, that is typically derived from CO observations of the gas, and the linear star formation scaling law derived from HCN observations of the dense gas.

Lada, Charles J.; Forbrich, Jan [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Lombardi, Marco [Department of Physics, University of Milan, via Celoria 16, I-20133 Milan (Italy); Alves, Joao F., E-mail: clada@cfa.harvard.edu, E-mail: jforbrich@cfa.harvard.edu, E-mail: marco.lombardi@gmail.com, E-mail: joao.alves@univie.ac.at [Institute for Astronomy, University of Vienna, Tuerkenschanzstrasse 17, A-1180 Vienna (Austria)

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

SAMPLE RESULTS FROM THE INTEGRATED SALT DISPOSITION PROGRAM MACROBATCH 5 TANK 21H QUALIFICATION SAMPLES  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) analyzed samples from Tank 21H in support of qualification of Macrobatch (Salt Batch) 5 for the Integrated Salt Disposition Project (ISDP). This document reports partial results of the analyses of samples of Tank 21H. No issues with the projected Salt Batch 5 strategy are identified. Results of the analyses of the Tank 21H samples from this report in conjunction with the findings of the previous report, indicates that the material does not display any unusual characteristics.

Peters, T.; Fink, S.

2012-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

424

Evaluation and Comparison of Noah and Pleim–Xiu Land Surface Models in MM5 Using GÖTE2001 Data: Spatial and Temporal Variations in Near-Surface Air Temperature  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this study, the performance of two advanced land surface models (LSMs; Noah LSM and Pleim–Xiu LSM) coupled with the fifth-generation Pennsylvania State University–National Center for Atmospheric Research Mesoscale Model (MM5), version 3.7.2, ...

J-F. Miao; D. Chen; K. Borne

2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Cosi, P., Cohen, M.M. & Massaro, D.W. (2002). Baldini: Baldi speaks Italian. In proceedings of 7th International Conference on Spoken Language Processing, (ICSLP`02) (pp.2349-2352). Denver, CO.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cosi, P., Cohen, M.M. & Massaro, D.W. (2002). Baldini: Baldi speaks Italian. In proceedings of 7th as a second language [24]. We look forward to similar successes for Baldini. 4. REFERENCES [1] Massaro D.W., Perceiving Talking Faces. From Speech Perception to a Behavioral Principle. MIT Press, 1998. [2] Massaro D.W

Cohen, Michael M.

426

Experimental study on the formation and dissociation conditions of methane hydrates in porous media  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Gas hydrates are crystalline compounds formed when gas and water molecules are combined under low temperature and high pressure conditions. This study experimentally investigates the conditions leading to the formation and dissociation of gas hydrates formed by methane gas and pure water in porous media. Methane gas hydrates were formed in a cell packed with 0.177-mm (0.007 in) diameter single sand (U.S. Sieve Series Designation Mesh No. 80) and 0.420-mm (0.017 in) diameter single sand (U.S. Sieve Series Designation Mesh No. 40), which were saturated with pure methane gas and distilled deionized water. From the plots of pressure and temperature curves for the formation and dissociation of methane hydrates in porous media, the beginning and ending points of hydrate formation as the cell was cooled are investigated. The ending point of hydrate dissociation occurs as the cell is heated, so that the cell pressure increases at the conditions of hydrate dissociation. The initial conditions in this experiment were in the range of 82.4 bars (1,200 psi) to 102.7 bars (1,497 psi) of pressure and in the range of 24.3?C (75.7?F) to 27.3?C (81.1?F) of temperature. At the end of hydrate dissociation, the conditions of equilibrium phase was found approximately at a pressure of 88.8 bars (1,294 psi) and temperature of 14.5oC (58.1?F) in Runs 1 to 10, at a pressure of 91.8 bars (1,337 psi) and temperature of 17.4?C (63.3?F) in Runs 11 and 12, at a pressure of 86.5 bars (1,260 psi) and temperature of 17.31oC (63.2?F) in Run 13, and at a pressure of 93.2 bars (1,359 psi) and temperature of 15.9?C (60.6?F) in Runs 14 to 16. Temperature jumping data at the beginning point of hydrate formation and the variation with time of pressure and temperature during hydrate formation and dissociation were recorded. These experimental data may be used to improve predictive thermodynamic models of methane hydrates in porous media. The accurate prediction of methane hydrates in porous media may remove a hazard to drilling from seafloor hydrate slides resulting from the dissociation of gas hydrates. A predictive thermodynamic model would also allow the prediction of the onset of hydrate formation conditions in porous media, and the evaluation of methods to recover methane gas from gas hydrate reservoirs.

Jung, Woodong

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Laboratory Equipment & Supplies | Sample Preparation Laboratories  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Equipment & Supplies Equipment & Supplies John Bargar, SSRL Scientist Equipment is available to serve disciplines from biology to material science. All laboratories contain the following standard laboratory equipment: pH meters with standard buffers, analytical balances, microcentrifuges, vortex mixers, ultrasonic cleaning baths, magnetic stirrers, hot plates, and glassware. Most laboratories offer ice machines and cold rooms. Specialty storage areas for samples include a -80 freezer, argon and nitrogen glove boxes, radiation contamination areas, inert atmosphere chambers, and cold rooms. For specific information please see: Equipment Inventory Checkout Equipment & Supplies To view equipment inventory by laboratory, refer to the following pages: Biology Chemistry & Material Science Laboratory 1 Inventory

428

Rapid Sampling Tools - Nuclear Engineering Multimedia  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nonproliferation and National Security Nonproliferation and National Security > Multimedia > Rapid Sampling Tools Director's Welcome Organization Achievements Highlights Fact Sheets, Brochures & Other Documents Multimedia Library About Nuclear Energy Nuclear Reactors Designed by Argonne Argonne's Nuclear Science and Technology Legacy Opportunities within NE Division Visit Argonne Work with Argonne Contact us For Employees Site Map Help Join us on Facebook Follow us on Twitter NE on Flickr Celebrating the 70th Anniversary of Chicago Pile 1 (CP-1) Argonne OutLoud on Nuclear Energy Argonne Energy Showcase 2012 Nonproliferation and National Security - Multimedia Bookmark and Share NPNS Multimedia, a collection of videos and audios featuring activities related to Nonproliferation and National Security

429

Sampling using a 'bank' of clues  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This is because for a fraction (1 ? ?) of the time the bank sampler is doing standard MHA anyway. Even if no bank-based proposal is ever accepted, the 4 We discuss a realistic example of the cost of overhead of obtaining the bank samples in section 3.5. 5 Fig. 1... that the Bank Sampler was designed to cope with. 5 We note that the preceding statements assume, in line with most realistic sce- narios in particle physics, that the cost of evaluating the “banked” Q-factors in equation (3) is negligible in comparison...

Allanach, B C; Lester, Christopher G

430

Ammonia Results Review for Retained Gas Sampling  

SciTech Connect

This report was prepared as part of a task supporting the deployment of the retained gas sampler (RGS) system in Flammable Gas Watch List Tanks. The emphasis of this report is on presenting supplemental information about the ammonia measurements resulting from retained gas sampling of Tanks 241-AW-101, A-101, AN-105, AN-104, AN-103, U-103, S-106, BY-101, BY-109, SX-106, AX-101, S-102, S-111, U-109, and SY-101. This information provides a better understanding of the accuracy of past RGS ammonia measurements, which will assist in determining flammable and toxicological hazards.

Mahoney, Lenna A.

2000-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

431

AC Loss Measurements with a Cryocooled Sample  

SciTech Connect

A new cryostat cooled by a closed-cycle Cryomech GB-37 cryocooler for superconductor measurements at temperatures down to 20 K is described. The sample is conductively coupled to the cold stage so as to minimize vibration and thermal stresses. AC losses have been measured calorimetrically in several HTSC coils that have been wound to simulate sub-scale transformer winding pairs. Stable temperatures down to 20 K were reached on these coils, allowing measurements at practical levels of ac current and I{sub c}. By using short ac current pulses, losses on individual turns could be resolved. Results are reported mainly to showcase the apparatus, measurement procedure and analytical approach.

Schwenterly, S.W.

2001-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

432

Apparatus for sampling and characterizing aerosols  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Apparatus for sampling and characterizing aerosols having a wide particle size range at relatively low velocities may comprise a chamber having an inlet and an outlet, the chamber including: a plurality of vertically stacked, successive particle collection stages; each collection stage includes a separator plate and a channel guide mounted transverse to the separator plate, defining a labyrinthine flow path across the collection stage. An opening in each separator plate provides a path for the aerosols from one collection stage to the next. Mounted within each collection stage are one or more particle collection frames.

Dunn, Patrick F. (Downers Grove, IL); Herceg, Joseph E. (Naperville, IL); Klocksieben, Robert H. (Park Forest, IL)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Treaty verification sample analysis program analytical results: UNSCOM 65 samples. Final report, December 1993-January 1994  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nineteen samples from the United Nations Special Commission 65 on Iraq (UNSCOM 65) were analyzed for chemical warfare (CW) related compounds using a variety of highly sophisticated spectroscopic and chromatographic techniques. The samples consisted of six water, six soil, two vegetation, one cloth, one wood, and two mortar shell crosscut sections. No sulfur or nitrogen mustards, Lewsite, or any of their degradation products were detected. No nerve agents were observed, and no tin was detected precluding the presence of stannic chloride, a component of NC, a World War I choking agent. Diethyl phosphoric acid was unambiguously identified in three water samples, and ethyl phosphoric acid was tentatively identified, at very low levels, in one water sample. These phosphoric acids are degradation products of Amiton, many commercially available pesticides, as well as Tabun, and impurities in munitions-grade Tabun. No definitive conclusions concerning the source of these two chemicals could be drawn from the analytical results.

Szafraniec, L.L.; Beaudry, W.T.; Bossle, P.C.; Durst, H.D.; Ellzy, M.W.

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Supplemental Text Analysis of the ice core samples  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

into a continuous sequence of samples (NIF2, 2197 samples; NIF3, 1980 samples; SIF1, 706 samples; SIF2, 834 samples and the sixth core, NIF1 (drilled one meter from NIF2) has been reserved for other measurements such as AMS 14 C. These comments follow the dating discussion in chronological order. The net down wasting of the NIF (as discussed

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

435

Constraints on SN Ia progenitor time delays from high-z SNe and the star formation history  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We re-assess the question of a systematic time delay between the formation of the progenitor and its explosion in a type Ia supernova (SN Ia) using the Hubble Higher-z Supernova Search sample (Strolger et al. 2004). While the previous analysis indicated a significant time delay, with a most likely value of 3.4 Gyr, effectively ruling out all previously proposed progenitor models, our analysis shows that the time-delay estimate is dominated by systematic errors, in particular due to uncertainties in the star-formation history. We find that none of the popular progenitor models under consideration can be ruled out with any significant degree of confidence. The inferred time delay is mainly determined by the peak in the assumed star-formation history. We show that, even with a much larger Supernova sample, the time delay distribution cannot be reliably reconstructed without better constraints on the star-formation history.

F. Förster; C. Wolf; Ph. Podsiadlowski; Z. Han

2006-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

436

From design experiments to formative interventions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The discussion of design experiments has largely ignored the Vygotskian tradition of formative interventions based on the principle of double stimulation. This tradition offers a radical approach to learning reasearch which focuses on the agency of the ...

Yrjö Engeström

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

Electromagnetic formation flight of satellite arrays  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Proposed methods of actuating spacecraft in sparse aperture arrays use propellant as a reaction mass. For formation flying systems, propellant becomes a critical consumable which can be quickly exhausted while maintaining ...

Kwon, Daniel W., 1980-

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Rapid Gas Hydrate Formation Process Opportunity  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Gas Hydrate Formation Process Gas Hydrate Formation Process Opportunity The Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) is seeking collaborative research and licensing partners interested in implementing United States Non-provisional Patent Application entitled "Rapid Gas Hydrate Formation Process." Disclosed in this application is a method and device for producing gas hydrates from a two-phase mixture of water and a hydrate forming gas such as methane (CH 4 ) or carbon dioxide (CO 2 ). The two-phase mixture is created in a mixing zone, which may be contained within the body of the spray nozzle. The two-phase mixture is subsequently sprayed into a reaction vessel, under pressure and temperature conditions suitable for gas hydrate formation. The reaction

439

Ice Formation in Gas-Diffusion Layers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of California. Ice Formation in Gas-Diffusion Layers Thomasconditions, ice forms in the gas-diffusion layer (GDL) of areaction of reactant gases (1). A number of strategies exist

Dursch, Thomas

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Thermodynamic Aspects of Tropical Cyclone Formation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The thermodynamic aspects of tropical cyclone (TC) formation near the center of the wave pouch, a region of approximately closed Lagrangian circulation within the wave critical layer, are examined through diagnoses of a high-resolution numerical ...

Zhuo Wang

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mm sample format" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Eddy Formation in 2½-Layer, Quasigeostrophic Jets  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The formation of nonlinear eddies in unstable 2½-layer, quasigeostrophic jets is investigated using a piecewise constant potential vorticity, “contour dynamical” model. Both infinite and semi-infinite jet dynamics are explored, considering a ...

Ilson C. A. da Silveira; Glenn R. Flierl

2002-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

Essential Dynamics of Secondary Eyewall Formation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The authors conduct an analysis of the dynamics of secondary eyewall formation in two modeling frameworks to obtain a more complete understanding of the phenomenon. The first is a full-physics, three-dimensional mesoscale model in which the ...

Sergio F. Abarca; Michael T. Montgomery

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Numerical Simulation of Macrosegregation Formation during ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Direct Numerical Simulation of Inclusion Turbulent Deposition at Liquid ... Flow and Shrinkage Pipe Formation on Macrosegregation of Investment Cast -TiAl Alloys ... Numerical Modeling of the Interaction between a Foreign Particle an ...

444

Interactive Cloud Formation and Climatic Temperature Perturbations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A one-dimensional climate model with an interactive cloud formation program is developed to investigate its effects on temperature perturbations due to various radiative forcings including doubling of CO2, a 2% increase of the solar constant and ...

Kuo-Nan Liou; S. C. S. Ou; P. J. Lu

1985-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

Does Format of Pricing Contract Matter?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Working Paper No. XL05-002 Does Format of Pricing Contractquantity discount contract does not include a fixed fee andtariff. Also, division equivalence does not hold because the

Ho, Teck H; Zhang, Juanjuan

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

Predicting Nepheline Formation with Artificial Neural Networks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... model has been developed to predict nepheline (NaAlSiO4) formation in compositions of interest for waste glasses projected to be formed at the Hanford Site.

447

Fuzzy coalition formation among rational cooperative agents  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Formation of coalitions in multi-agent systems (MAS) enables the development of efficient organizations. In the article, a model of fuzzy cooperative game with coalitions is described. It extends the model of the fuzzy coalition game with associated ...

Leonid B. Sheremetov; José C. Romero Cortés

2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

Modeling deposit formation in diesel injector nozzle  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Formation of deposit in the diesel injector nozzle affects the injection behavior and hinders performance. Under running condition, deposit precursors are washed away by the ensuing injection. However, during the cool down ...

Sudhiesh Kumar, Chintoo

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

The Formation of New England Coastal Fronts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Coastal fronts are a frequent late fall and early winter feature of eastern New England weather. Data from a mesoscale observing network is used to describe the process of coastal frontogenesis and to determine the causes of formation. Three ...

John W. Nielsen

1989-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

GASOLINE VEHICLE EXHAUST PARTICLE SAMPLING STUDY  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The University of Minnesota collaborated with the Paul Scherrer Institute, the University of Wisconsin (UWI) and Ricardo, Inc to physically and chemically characterize the exhaust plume from recruited gasoline spark ignition (SI) vehicles. The project objectives were: (1) Measure representative particle size distributions from a set of on-road SI vehicles and compare these data to similar data collected on a small subset of light-duty gasoline vehicles tested on a chassis dynamometer with a dilution tunnel using the Unified Drive Cycle, at both room temperature (cold start) and 0 C (cold-cold start). (2) Compare data collected from SI vehicles to similar data collected from Diesel engines during the Coordinating Research Council E-43 project. (3) Characterize on-road aerosol during mixed midweek traffic and Sunday midday periods and determine fleet-specific emission rates. (4) Characterize bulk- and size-segregated chemical composition of the particulate matter (PM) emitted in the exhaust from the gasoline vehicles. Particle number concentrations and size distributions are strongly influenced by dilution and sampling conditions. Laboratory methods were evaluated to dilute SI exhaust in a way that would produce size distributions that were similar to those measured during laboratory experiments. Size fractionated samples were collected for chemical analysis using a nano-microorifice uniform deposit impactor (nano-MOUDI). In addition, bulk samples were collected and analyzed. A mixture of low, mid and high mileage vehicles were recruited for testing during the study. Under steady highway cruise conditions a significant particle signature above background was not measured, but during hard accelerations number size distributions for the test fleet were similar to modern heavy-duty Diesel vehicles. Number emissions were much higher at high speed and during cold-cold starts. Fuel specific number emissions range from 1012 to 3 x 1016 particles/kg fuel. A simple relationship between number and mass emissions was not observed. Data were collected on-road to compare weekday with weekend air quality around the Twin Cities area. This portion of the study resulted in the development of a method to apportion the Diesel and SI contribution to on-road aerosol.

Kittelson, D; Watts, W; Johnson, J; Zarling, D Schauer,J Kasper, K; Baltensperger, U; Burtscher, H

2003-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

451

Hanford analytical sample projections FY 1998--FY 2002  

SciTech Connect

Sample projections are compiled for the Hanford site based on inputs from the major programs for the years 1998 through 2002. Sample projections are categorized by radiation level, protocol, sample matrix and Program. Analyses requirements are also presented.

Joyce, S.M.

1997-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

452

Two Sample T-Test for Comparing Genetic Sequence Diversity  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Two Sample T-Test for Comparing Genetic Sequence Diversity Two Sample T-Test for Comparing Genetic Sequence Diversity Given two samples of sequences the program performs a t-test...

453

STAR FORMATION EFFICIENCY IN THE COOL CORES OF GALAXY CLUSTERS  

SciTech Connect

We have assembled a sample of high spatial resolution far-UV (Hubble Space Telescope Advanced Camera for Surveys/Solar Blind Channel) and H{alpha} (Maryland-Magellan Tunable Filter) imaging for 15 cool core galaxy clusters. These data provide a detailed view of the thin, extended filaments in the cores of these clusters. Based on the ratio of the far-UV to H{alpha} luminosity, the UV spectral energy distribution, and the far-UV and H{alpha} morphology, we conclude that the warm, ionized gas in the cluster cores is photoionized by massive, young stars in all but a few (A1991, A2052, A2580) systems. We show that the extended filaments, when considered separately, appear to be star forming in the majority of cases, while the nuclei tend to have slightly lower far-UV luminosity for a given H{alpha} luminosity, suggesting a harder ionization source or higher extinction. We observe a slight offset in the UV/H{alpha} ratio from the expected value for continuous star formation which can be modeled by assuming intrinsic extinction by modest amounts of dust (E(B - V) {approx} 0.2) or a top-heavy initial mass function in the extended filaments. The measured star formation rates vary from {approx}0.05 M{sub sun} yr{sup -1} in the nuclei of non-cooling systems, consistent with passive, red ellipticals, to {approx}5 M{sub sun} yr{sup -1} in systems with complex, extended, optical filaments. Comparing the estimates of the star formation rate based on UV, H{alpha}, and infrared luminosities to the spectroscopically determined X-ray cooling rate suggests a star formation efficiency of 14{sup +18}{sub -8}%. This value represents the time-averaged fraction, by mass, of gas cooling out of the intracluster medium, which turns into stars and agrees well with the global fraction of baryons in stars required by simulations to reproduce the stellar mass function for galaxies. This result provides a new constraint on the efficiency of star formation in accreting systems.

McDonald, Michael; Veilleux, Sylvain; Mushotzky, Richard; Reynolds, Christopher [Department of Astronomy, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States); Rupke, David S. N., E-mail: mcdonald@astro.umd.edu, E-mail: veilleux@astro.umd.edu [Department of Physics, Rhodes College, Memphis, TN 38112 (United States)

2011-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

454

Salton Sea sampling program: baseline studies  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Baseline data are provided on three species of fish from the Salton Sea, California. The fishes considered were the orange mouth corvina (Cynoscion xanthulus), gulf croaker (Bairdiella icistius) and sargo (Anisotremus davidsonii). Morphometric and meristic data are presented as a baseline to aid in the evaluation of any physiological stress the fish may experience as a result of geothermal development. Analyses were made on muscle, liver, and bone of the fishes sampled to provide baseline data on elemental tissue burdens. The elements measured were: As, Br, Ca, Cu, Fe, Ga, K, Mn, Mi, Pb, Rb, Se, Sr, Zn, and Zr. These data are important if an environmentally sound progression of geothermal power production is to occur at the Salton Sea.

Tullis, R.E.; Carter, J.L.; Langlois, G.W.

1981-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

455

Microsoft Word - S09448_Sampling2012  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Mexico, Mexico, Natural Gas and Produced Water Sampling and Analysis Results for 2012 December 2012 Approved for public release; further dissemination unlimited LMS/GSB/S09448 Available for sale to the public from: U.S. Department of Commerce National Technical Information Service 5301 Shawnee Road Alexandria, VA 22312 Telephone: 800.553.6847 Fax: 703.605.6900 E-mail: orders@ntis.gov Online Ordering: http://www.ntis.gov/help/ordermethods.aspx Available electronically at http://www.osti.gov/bridge Available for a processing fee to U.S. Department of Energy and its contractors, in paper, from: U.S. Department of Energy Office of Scientific and Technical Information P.O. Box 62 Oak Ridge, TN 37831-0062 Phone: 865.576.8401 Fax: 865.576.5728

456

Subsurface steam sampling in Geysers wells  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A new downhole sampling tool has been built for use in steam wells at The Geysers geothermal reservoir. The tool condenses specimens into an initially evacuated vessel that is opened down hole at the direction of an on-board computer. The tool makes a temperature log of the well as it is deployed, and the pressure and temperature of collected specimens are monitored for diagnostic purposes. Initial tests were encouraging, and the Department of Energy has funded an expanded effort that includes data gathering needed to develop a three-dimensional model of The Geysers geochemical environment. Collected data will be useful for understanding the origins of hydrogen chloride and non-condensable gases in the steam, as well as tracking the effect of injection on the composition of produced steam. Interested parties are invited to observe the work and to join the program.

Lysne, P. [Lysne (Peter), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Koenig, B. [Unocal Geothermal and Power Operations Group, Santa Rose, CA (United States); Hirtz, P. [Thermochem, Inc., Santa Rosa, CA (United States); Normann, R.; Henfling, J. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

Sampling of Procedural Shaders Using Affine Arithmetic  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Procedural shaders have become popular tools for describing surface reflectance functions and other material properties. In comparison to fixed resolution textures they have the advantage of being resolution independent and storage e#cient. While procedural shaders provide an interface for evaluating the shader at a single point in parameter space, it is not easily possible to obtain an average value of the shader together with accurate error bounds over a finite area. Yet the ability to compute such error bounds is crucial for several interesting applications, most notably hierarchical area sampling for global illumination computations using the finite element approach and for the generation of textures used in interactive computer graphics. Using a#ne arithmetic for evaluating the shader over a finite area yields a tight, conservative error interval for the shader function. Compilers can automatically generate code for utilizing a#ne arithmetic from within shaders implemented in a ...

Heidrich

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

Synchrotron Mossbauer Spectroscopy of powder samples  

SciTech Connect

Synchrotron Mossbauer Spectroscopy, SMS, is an emerging technique that allows fast and accurate determination of hyperfine field parameters similar to conventional Mossbauer spectroscopy with radioactive sources. This new technique, however, is qualitatively different from Mossbauer spectroscopy in terms of equipment, methodology, and analysis to warrant a new name. In this paper, the authors report on isomer shift and quadrupole splitting measurements of Mohr`s salt, Fe(NH{sub 4}){sub 2}(SO{sub 4}){sub 2}{center_dot}6H{sub 2}O for demonstration purposes. Theoretical calculations were performed and compared to experiments both in energy and time domain to demonstrate the influence of thickness distribution and preferential alignment of powder samples. Such measurements may prove to be useful when the data collection times are reduced to few seconds in the third generation, undulator based synchrotron radiation sources.

Alp, E.E.; Sturhahn, W.; Toellner, T.

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

Flow cytometric detection method for DNA samples  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Disclosed herein are two methods for rapid multiplex analysis to determine the presence and identity of target DNA sequences within a DNA sample. Both methods use reporting DNA sequences, e.g., modified conventional Taqman.RTM. probes, to combine multiplex PCR amplification with microsphere-based hybridization using flow cytometry means of detection. Real-time PCR detection can also be incorporated. The first method uses a cyanine dye, such as, Cy3.TM., as the reporter linked to the 5' end of a reporting DNA sequence. The second method positions a reporter dye, e.g., FAM.TM. on the 3' end of the reporting DNA sequence and a quencher dye, e.g., TAMRA.TM., on the 5' end.

Nasarabadi,Shanavaz (Livermore, CA); Langlois, Richard G. (Livermore, CA); Venkateswaran, Kodumudi S. (Round Rock, TX)

2011-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

460

Flow cytometric detection method for DNA samples  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Disclosed herein are two methods for rapid multiplex analysis to determine the presence and identity of target DNA sequences within a DNA sample. Both methods use reporting DNA sequences, e.g., modified conventional Taqman.RTM. probes, to combine multiplex PCR amplification with microsphere-based hybridization using flow cytometry means of detection. Real-time PCR detection can also be incorporated. The first method uses a cyanine dye, such as, Cy3.TM., as the reporter linked to the 5' end of a reporting DNA sequence. The second method positions a reporter dye, e.g., FAM, on the 3' end of the reporting DNA sequence and a quencher dye, e.g., TAMRA, on the 5' end.

Nasarabadi, Shanavaz (Livermore, CA); Langlois, Richard G. (Livermore, CA); Venkateswaran, Kodumudi S. (Livermore, CA)

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mm sample format" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Flow cytometric detection method for DNA samples  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Disclosed herein are two methods for rapid multiplex analysis to determine the presence and identity of target DNA sequences within a DNA sample. Both methods use reporting DNA sequences, e.g., modified conventional Taqman.RTM. probes, to combine multiplex PCR amplification with microsphere-based hybridization using flow cytometry means of detection. Real-time PCR detection can also be incorporated. The first method uses a cyanine dye, such as, Cy3.TM., as the reporter linked to the 5' end of a reporting DNA sequence. The second method positions a reporter dye, e.g., FAM.TM. on the 3' end of the reporting DNA sequence and a quencher dye, e.g., TAMRA.TM., on the 5' end.

Nasarabadi,Shanavaz (Livermore, CA); Langlois, Richard G. (Livermore, CA); Venkateswaran, Kodumudi S. (Round Rock, TX)

2011-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

462

High throughput liquid absorption preconcentrator sampling instrument  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system for detecting trace concentrations of an analyte in air includes a preconcentrator for the analyte and an analyte detector. The preconcentrator includes an elongated tubular container comprising a wettable material. The wettable material is continuously wetted with an analyte-sorbing liquid which flows from one part of the container to a lower end. Sampled air flows through the container in contact with the wetted material with a swirling motion which results in efficient transfer of analyte vapors or aerosol particles to the sorbing liquid and preconcentration of traces of analyte in the liquid. The preconcentrated traces of analyte may be either detected within the container or removed therefrom for injection into a separate detection means or for subsequent analysis. 12 figs.

Zaromb, S.; Bozen, R.M.

1990-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

463

Formation of phases in the films of a Ag-In-Se system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Processes of electron-diffraction structure analysis have been used to study the processes of phase formation and phase transitions in thin layers of a Ag-In-Se system. The phases formed at the onset of interaction between the films and phase transformations occurring during annealing of the samples in vacuum are established. It is found that thin films of the AgInSe{sub 2} compound formed as a result of simultaneous or consecutive deposition of components are amorphous, and crystallization brings about the formation of textured films with high structural quality

Ismayilov, D. I.; Kerimova, N. K., E-mail: kerimova-nurlana@mail.ru [Azerbaijan National Academy of Sciences, Institute of Physics (Azerbaijan)

2009-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

464

Formation and Evolution of Planetary Systems: Placing Our Solar System in Context with Spitzer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We summarize the progress to date of our Legacy Science Program entitled "The Formation and Evolution of Planetary Systems" (FEPS) based on observations obtained with the Spitzer Space Telescope during its first year of operation. In addition to results obtained from our ground-based preparatory program and our early validation program, we describe new results from a survey for near-infrared excess emission from the youngest stars in our sample as well as a search for cold debris disks around sun-like stars. We discuss the implications of our findings with respect to current understanding of the formation and evolution of our own solar system.

Michael R. Meyer; the FEPS Legacy Science Team

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

465

THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN BLACK HOLE GROWTH AND STAR FORMATION IN SEYFERT GALAXIES  

SciTech Connect

We present estimates of black hole accretion rates (BHARs) and nuclear, extended, and total star formation rates for a complete sample of Seyfert galaxies. Using data from the Spitzer Space Telescope, we measure the active galactic nucleus (AGN) luminosity using the [O IV] {lambda}25.89 {mu}m emission line and the star-forming luminosity using the 11.3 {mu}m aromatic feature and extended 24 {mu}m continuum emission. We find that black hole growth is strongly correlated with nuclear (r < 1 kpc) star formation, but only weakly correlated with extended (r > 1 kpc) star formation in the host galaxy. In particular, the nuclear star formation rate (SFR) traced by the 11.3 {mu}m aromatic feature follows a relationship with the BHAR of the form SFR{proportional_to} M-dot{sub BH}{sup 0.8}, with an observed scatter of 0.5 dex. This SFR-BHAR relationship persists when additional star formation in physically matched r = 1 kpc apertures is included, taking the form SFR{proportional_to} M-dot{sub BH}{sup 0.6}. However, the relationship becomes almost indiscernible when total SFRs are considered. This suggests a physical connection between the gas on sub-kiloparsec and sub-parsec scales in local Seyfert galaxies that is not related to external processes in the host galaxy. It also suggests that the observed scaling between star formation and black hole growth for samples of AGNs will depend on whether the star formation is dominated by a nuclear or an extended component. We estimate the integrated black hole and bulge growth that occurs in these galaxies and find that an AGN duty cycle of 5%-10% would maintain the ratio between black hole and bulge masses seen in the local universe.

Diamond-Stanic, Aleksandar M. [Center for Astrophysics and Space Sciences, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA 92093 (United States); Rieke, George H. [Steward Observatory, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States)

2012-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

466

Gas Flux Sampling (Klein, 2007) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Gas Flux Sampling (Klein, 2007) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Gas Flux Sampling (Klein, 2007) Exploration Activity Details...

467

Tank Farm Mixing and Sampling to Support DWPF Operations  

Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) Requirements – Waste ... The Sample Request Form defines the conditions and type of sample. 12 LWO-LWP-2009-00021 SRAT ...

468

Novel Tube-in-Tube System Simplifies Subsurface Fluid Sampling ...  

* Retrieval of single or multiphase high-purity samples More Information Freifeld, B. M., 2009, “The U-tube: a new paradigm in borehole fluid sampling ...

469

Water Sampling At Hualalai Northwest Rift Area (Thomas, 1986...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Water Sampling At Hualalai Northwest Rift Area (Thomas, 1986) Exploration Activity Details Location Hualalai Northwest Rift Area Exploration Technique Water Sampling Activity Date...

470

Water Sampling At Lualualei Valley Area (Thomas, 1986) | Open...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Water Sampling At Lualualei Valley Area (Thomas, 1986) Exploration Activity Details Location Lualualei Valley Area Exploration Technique Water Sampling Activity Date Usefulness not...

471

The SSRL Biotechnology Sample Preparation Laboratory is available...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Preparation Laboratory User Agreement, C. PattyL. Hammon, 111411 SSRL Sample Preparation Laboratories User Access Agreement November 2011 Welcome to the SSRL sample preparation...

472

Gas Sampling At Colrado Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Gas Sampling At Colrado Area (DOE GTP) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Gas Sampling At Colrado Area (DOE GTP) Exploration...

473

Non-Darcy flow analysis through tight sand formations  

SciTech Connect

An experimental setup was designed and constructed to measure the flow parameters through tight sand porous media. The two kinds of coreholders being used are Hassler-type and one in which the core sample is encapsulated in layers of epoxy resin and metal alloy. A gas flow measuring system was also developed for accurately measuring very low gas flow rates. Using Darcy's Law as a tool for analysis of the experimental data, we obtained that the gas permeability of the SFE No. 3 (Staged Field Experiment No. 3) core samples is a linear function of reciprocal mean pressure, and decreases with overburden pressure. The water permeability is also decreased with overburden pressure and is about 6 times smaller than gas permeability for the samples that we have tested. No significant hysteresis effect was obtained for dry gas permeability after several two phase flow runs. We successfully tested our encapsulated coreholder and measured gas flow rate through a tight sand core sample at different pressure drops. The results showed that the experimental runs using Hassler-type coreholder at overburden pressures higher than 2000 psig will probably give us the reliable experimental data. The experimental data obtained from the two different types of tight sandstones were analyzed using the Non-Darcy flow equation. The results showed the importance and reliability of the Non-Darcy formulation for describing the flow behavior under different overburden and system pressures. Non-Darcy's velocity for both gas and liquid phase were incorporated into an existing FORTRAN code for simulation of the tight gas reservoirs. The modified program was tested to compare the initial production data of SFE No. 2 well. Our simulation showed in the case of local turbulence and non-uniformities in the tight sand formation, the value of [beta] increases and Non-Darcy effect becomes important.

Wang, Ching-Huei.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

474

Time-domain sampling of x-ray pulses using an ultrafast sample response  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We employ the ultrafast response of a 15.4 nm thin SrRuO{sub 3} layer grown epitaxially on a SrTiO{sub 3} substrate to perform time-domain sampling of an x-ray pulse emitted from a synchrotron storage ring. Excitation of the sample with an ultrashort laser pulse triggers coherent expansion and compression waves in the thin layer, which turn the diffraction efficiency on and off at a fixed Bragg angle during 5 ps. This is significantly shorter than the duration of the synchrotron x-ray pulse of 100 ps. Cross-correlation measurements of the ultrafast sample response and the synchrotron x-ray pulse allow to reconstruct the x-ray pulse shape.

Gaal, P.; Shayduk, R. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin fuer Materialien und Energie GmbH, Wilhelm-Conrad-Roentgen Campus, BESSY II, Albert-Einstein-Str. 15, 12489 Berlin (Germany); Schick, D.; Herzog, M.; Bojahr, A.; Goldshteyn, J.; Navirian, H. A.; Leitenberger, W. [Institut fuer Physik und Astronomie, Universitaet Potsdam, Karl-Liebknecht-Str. 24-25, 14476 Potsdam (Germany); Vrejoiu, I. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Mikrostrukturphysik, Weinberg 2, 06120 Halle (Germany); Khakhulin, D.; Wulff, M. [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF), 6 rue Jules Horowitz, 38000 Grenoble (France); Bargheer, M. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin fuer Materialien und Energie GmbH, Wilhelm-Conrad-Roentgen Campus, BESSY II, Albert-Einstein-Str. 15, 12489 Berlin (Germany); Institut fuer Physik und Astronomie, Universitaet Potsdam, Karl-Liebknecht-Str. 24-25, 14476 Potsdam (Germany)

2012-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

475

Formation damage in underbalanced drilling operations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Formation damage has long been recognized as a potential source of reduced productivity and injectivity in both horizontal and vertical wells. From the moment that the pay zone is being drilled until the well is put on production, a formation is exposed to a series of fluids and operations that can reduce its productive capacity. Any process that causes a loss in the productivity of an oil-, gas-, or water-saturated formation has a damaging effect on the reservoir. These damage mechanisms predominantly fall into three major classifications: mechanical, chemical, and biological. Underbalanced drilling operations involve drilling a portion of the wellbore at fluid pressures less than that of the target formation. This technology has been used to prevent or minimize problems associated with invasive formation damage, which often greatly reduces the productivity of oil and gas reservoirs, mainly in openhole horizontal-well applications. Underbalanced drilling is not a solution for all formation-damage problems. Damage caused by poorly designed and/or executed underbalanced drilling programs can equal or exceed that which may occur with a well-designed conventional overbalanced drilling program. Four techniques are currently available to achieve underbalanced conditions while drilling. These include using lightweight drilling fluids, injecting gas down the drillpipe, injecting gas into a parasite string, and using foam. This study provides an analysis of a number of potential damage mechanisms present when drilling underbalanced. It describes each one and its influence on the productivity of a well. Additionally it presents a general description of the different techniques that can be applied to carry out successful, cost-effective UBD operations, and discusses how these techniques may be used to reduce or eliminate formation damage.

Reyes Serpa, Carlos Alberto

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

476

Transmission electron microscope sample holder with optical features  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A sample holder for holding a sample to be observed for research purposes, particularly in a transmission electron microscope (TEM), generally includes an external alignment part for directing a light beam in a predetermined beam direction, a sample holder body in optical communication with the external alignment part and a sample support member disposed at a distal end of the sample holder body opposite the external alignment part for holding a sample to be analyzed. The sample holder body defines an internal conduit for the light beam and the sample support member includes a light beam positioner for directing the light beam between the sample holder body and the sample held by the sample support member.

Milas, Mirko (Port Jefferson, NY); Zhu, Yimei (Stony Brook, NY); Rameau, Jonathan David (Coram, NY)

2012-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

477

COSMIC EVOLUTION OF STAR FORMATION ENHANCEMENT IN CLOSE MAJOR-MERGER GALAXY PAIRS SINCE z = 1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The infrared (IR) emission of 'M {sub *} galaxies' (10{sup 10.4} {star} {star formation enhancement induced by galaxy-galaxy interaction. Both the mean IR spectral energy distribution and mean IR luminosity of star-forming galaxies (SFGs) in SFG+SFG (S+S) pairs in the redshift bin of 0.6 star formation enhancement. SFGs in S+S pairs in a lower redshift bin of 0.2 star formation enhancement. Together with the significant and strong sSFR enhancement shown by SFGs in a local sample of S+S pairs (obtained using previously published Spitzer observations), our results reveal a trend for the star formation enhancement in S+S pairs to decrease with increasing redshift. Between z = 0 and z = 1, this decline of interaction-induced star formation enhancement occurs in parallel with the dramatic increase (by a factor of {approx}10) of the sSFR of single SFGs, both of which can be explained by the higher gas fraction in higher-z disks. SFGs in mixed pairs (S+E pairs) do not show any significant star formation enhancement at any redshift. The difference between SFGs in S+S pairs and in S+E pairs suggests a modulation of the sSFR by the intergalactic medium (IGM) in the dark matter halos hosting these pairs.

Xu, C. K.; Shupe, D. L.; Bock, J.; Bridge, C.; Cooray, A.; Lu, N.; Schulz, B. [California Institute of Technology, 1200 East California Boulevard, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Bethermin, M.; Aussel, H.; Elbaz, D.; Le Floc'h, E.; Riguccini, L. [Laboratoire AIM-Paris-Saclay, CEA/DSM/Irfu, CNRS, Universite Paris Diderot, CE-Saclay, pt courrier 131, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Berta, S.; Lutz, D.; Magnelli, B. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Extraterrestrische Physik (MPE), Postfach 1312, D-85741 Garching (Germany); Conley, A. [Center for Astrophysics and Space Astronomy 389-UCB, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO 80309 (United States); Franceschini, A. [Dipartimento di Astronomia, Universita di Padova, vicolo Osservatorio, 3, I-35122 Padova (Italy); Marsden, G. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of British Columbia, 6224 Agricultural Road, Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z1 (Canada); Oliver, S. J. [Astronomy Centre, Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Sussex, Brighton BN1 9QH (United Kingdom); Pozzi, F. [INAF-Osservatorio Astronomico di Roma, via di Frascati 33, I-00040 Monte Porzio Catone (Italy); and others

2012-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

478

The U-tube: A new paradigm in borehole fluid sampling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fluid samples from deep boreholes can provide insights into subsurface physical, chemical, and biological conditions. Recovery of intact, minimally altered aliquots of subsurface fluids is required for analysis of aqueous chemistry, isotopic composition, and dissolved gases, and for microbial community characterization. Unfortunately, for many reasons, collecting geofluids poses a number of challenges, from formation contamination by drilling to maintaining integrity during recovery from depths. Not only are there substantial engineering issues in retrieval of a representative sample, but there is often the practical reality that fluid sampling is just one of many activities planned for deep boreholes. The U-tube geochemical sampling system presents a new paradigm for deep borehole fluid sampling. Because the system is small, its ability to integrate with other measurement systems and technologies opens up numerous possibilities for multifunctional integrated wellbore completions. To date, the U-tube has been successfully deployed at four different field sites, each with a different deployment modality, at depths from 260 m to 2 km. While the U-tube has proven to be highly versatile, these installations have resulted in data that provide additional insights for improving future U-tube deployments.

Freifeld, B. M.

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

479

In-situ sampling of a large-scale particle simulation for interactive visualization and analysis  

SciTech Connect

We propose storing a random sampling of data from large scale particle simulations, such as the Roadrunner Universe MC{sup 3} cosmological simulation, to be used for interactive post-analysis and visualization. Simulation data generation rates will continue to be far greater than storage bandwidth rates and other limiting technologies by many orders of magnitude. This implies that only a very small fraction of data generated by the simulation can ever be stored and subsequently post-analyzed. The limiting technology in this situation is analogous to the problem in many population surveys: there aren't enough human resources to query a large population. To cope with the lack of resources, statistical sampling techniques are used to create a representative data set of a large population. Mirroring that situation, we propose to store a simulation-time random sampling of the particle data to cope with the bOlllenecks and support interactive, exploratory post-analysis. The particle samples are immediately stored in a level-ol-detail format for post-visualization and analysis, which amortizes the cost of post-processing for interactive visualization. Additionally, we incorporate a system for recording and visualizing sample approximation error information for confidence and importance highlighting.

Woodring, Jonathan L [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Ahrens, James P [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Heitmann, Katrin [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2010-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

480

Liquid-absorption preconcentrator sampling instrument  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system for detecting trace concentrations of an analyte in air and includes a preconcentrator for the analyte and an analyte detector. The preconcentrator includes an elongated tubular container in which is disposed a wettable material extending substantially the entire length of the container. One end of the wettable material is continuously wetted with an analyte-sorbing liquid, which flows to the other end of the container. Sample air is flowed through the container in contact with the wetted material for trapping and preconcentrating the traces of analyte in the sorbing liquid, which is then collected at the other end of the container and discharged to the detector. The wetted material may be a wick comprising a bundle of fibers, one end of which is immersed in a reservoir of the analyte-sorbing liquid, or may be a liner disposed on the inner surface of the container, with the sorbing liquid being centrifugally dispersed onto the liner at one end thereof. The container is preferably vertically oriented so that gravity effects the liquid flow. 4 figs.

Zaromb, S.

1989-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mm sample format" from the National Library of EnergyBeta