National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for mktg augusta ks

  1. 32539,"AECTRA REFG & MKTG",1,133,"MOTOR GAS, FINISHED UNLEADED...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    REFG & MKTG",4,133,"MOTOR GAS, FINISHED UNLEADED",1001,"NEW YORK, NY","NEW YORK",1,830,"SPAIN",248,0,0,,,,, 32539,"AECTRA REFG & MKTG",5,134,"MOTOR GAS BLENDING...

  2. Augusta, Maine: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    US Recovery Act Smart Grid Projects in Augusta, Maine Central Maine Power Company Smart Grid Project Utility Companies in Augusta, Maine Central Maine Power Co References...

  3. 31808,"AECTRA REFG & MKTG",1,133,"MOTOR GAS, FINISHED UNLEADED...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    MKTG INC",7,134,"MOTOR GAS BLENDING COMPONENTS",1002,"ALBANY, NY","NEW YORK",1,830,"SPAIN",344,0,0,"UNKNOWN PROCESSOR-NJ","UNKNOWN PROCESSOR-NJ","NJ","NEW JERSEY",1...

  4. Augusta County, Virginia: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Augusta County, Virginia: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 38.2004562, -79.2451149 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mapp...

  5. City of Augusta, Arkansas (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Augusta Light & Power Place: Arkansas Phone Number: 870-347-2041 Outage Hotline: 870-347-2041 References: EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1a1 EIA Form 861 Data...

  6. North Augusta, South Carolina: Energy Resources | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. North Augusta is a city in Aiken County and Edgefield County, South Carolina. It falls under South Carolina's 3rd...

  7. Category:Wichita, KS | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Wichita KS ... 64 KB SVLargeHotel Wichita KS Westar Energy Inc.png SVLargeHotel Wichita K... 59 KB SVLargeOffice Wichita KS Westar Energy Inc.png SVLargeOffice Wichita ... 64 KB...

  8. Category:Goodland, KS | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    KS Jump to: navigation, search Go Back to PV Economics By Location Media in category "Goodland, KS" The following 16 files are in this category, out of 16 total....

  9. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Spencer Chemical Co - KS...

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    KS 0-01 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: SPENCER CHEMICAL CO. (KS.0-01 ) Eliminated from ... Also see Documents Related to SPENCER CHEMICAL CO. KS.0-01-1 - Spencer Chemical Company ...

  10. Preliminary assessment report for Fort Custer Training Center, Installation 26035, Augusta, Michigan. Installation Restoration Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Flaim, S.; Krokosz, M.

    1993-08-01

    This report presents the results of the preliminary assessment (PA) conducted by Argonne National Laboratory at the Michigan Army National Guard property near Augusta, Michigan. Preliminary assessments of federal facilities are being conducted to compile the information necessary for completing preremedial activities and to provide a basis for establishing corrective actions in response to releases of hazardous substances. The principal objective of the PA is to characterize the site accurately and determine the need for further action by examining site activities, quantities of hazardous substances present, and potential pathways by which contamination could affect public health and the environment. This PA satisfies, for the Fort Custer Training Center, phase I of the Department of Defense Installation Restoration Program. The environmentally significant operations associated with the property are (1) storage of hazardous materials and hazardous waste, (2) storage and dispensing of fuel, (3) washing of vehicles and equipment, and (4) weapons training ranges that may have accumulated lead.

  11. Control of Well KS-8 in the Kilauea Lower East Rift Zone | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Control of Well KS-8 in the Kilauea Lower East Rift Zone Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Paper: Control of Well KS-8 in the Kilauea...

  12. File:USDA-CE-Production-GIFmaps-KS.pdf | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    KS.pdf Jump to: navigation, search File File history File usage Kansas Ethanol Plant Locations Size of this preview: 776 600 pixels. Full resolution (1,650 1,275 pixels,...

  13. Climate Action Champions: Mid-America Regional Council, KS and MO |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Mid-America Regional Council, KS and MO Climate Action Champions: Mid-America Regional Council, KS and MO The Mid-America Regional Council (MARC) is a nonprofit association of city and county governments and the metropolitan planning organization for the bistate Kansas City region. They provide a forum for the region to work together to advance social, economic and environmental progress. MARC received the Climate Action Champion designation in consortium with the City

  14. EEOICPA Event- Augusta, GA

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Advisory Board is a presidentially appointed board that advises the Secretary of Health and Human Services on a number of issues related to the EEOICPA Program including Special Exposure Cohort (SEC) Petitions. *Public comment sessions may end before the times indicated, following the last call for comments. Members of the public who wish to provide public comments should plan to attend public comment sessions at the start times listed.

  15. MARS-KS code validation activity through the atlas domestic standard problem

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Choi, K. Y.; Kim, Y. S.; Kang, K. H.; Park, H. S.; Cho, S.

    2012-07-01

    The 2 nd Domestic Standard Problem (DSP-02) exercise using the ATLAS integral effect test data was executed to transfer the integral effect test data to domestic nuclear industries and to contribute to improving the safety analysis methodology for PWRs. A small break loss of coolant accident of a 6-inch break at the cold leg was determined as a target scenario by considering its technical importance and by incorporating interests from participants. Ten calculation results using MARS-KS code were collected, major prediction results were described qualitatively and code prediction accuracy was assessed quantitatively using the FFTBM. In addition, special code assessment activities were carried out to find out the area where the model improvement is required in the MARS-KS code. The lessons from this DSP-02 and recommendations to code developers are described in this paper. (authors)

  16. NREL Helps Greensburg, KS Launch GreenHome Partnership - News Releases |

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    NREL Helps Greensburg, KS Launch GreenHome Partnership KBIA's partnership with Greensburg is a model for communities needing to rebuild April 28, 2009 The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), in collaboration with the City Council of Greensburg, Kansas, and the Kansas Building Industry Association (KBIA), announce the launch of Greensburg GreenHome Residential Green Building Program. Greensburg GreenHome is a voluntary program with KBIA and supported

  17. TransCanada Power Mktg Ltd (Connecticut) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Connecticut Phone Number: 1.800.661.3805 Website: www.transcanada.compowermarke Twitter: @TransCanada Outage Hotline: 1-800-447-8066 References: EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data...

  18. Effects of finite volume on the KL – KS mass difference

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Christ, N.  H.; Feng, X.; Martinelli, G.; Sachrajda, C.  T.

    2015-06-24

    Phenomena that involve two or more on-shell particles are particularly sensitive to the effects of finite volume and require special treatment when computed using lattice QCD. In this paper we generalize the results of Lüscher and Lellouch and Lüscher, which determine the leading-order effects of finite volume on the two-particle spectrum and two-particle decay amplitudes to determine the finite-volume effects in the second-order mixing of the K⁰ and K⁰⁻ states. We extend the methods of Kim, Sachrajda, and Sharpe to provide a direct, uniform treatment of these three, related, finite-volume corrections. In particular, the leading, finite-volume corrections to the KLmore » – KS mass difference ΔMK and the CP-violating parameter εK are determined, including the potentially large effects which can arise from the near degeneracy of the kaon mass and the energy of a finite-volume, two-pion state.« less

  19. AmeriFlux US-KS2 Kennedy Space Center (scrub oak)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Drake, Bert [Smithsonian Environmental Research Center; Hinkle, Ross [University of Central Florida

    2016-01-01

    This is the AmeriFlux version of the carbon flux data for the site US-KS2 Kennedy Space Center (scrub oak). Site Description - The Kennedy Space Center Scrub Oak site is located within the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) on the east coast of central Florida. Situated in a 10 ha scrub oak ecosystem, the surrounding stand was completely burned by a prescribed fire in 1996. The purpose of the burn was to control understory fuel load, which has been a common practice since 1969. Within a few weeks of the 1996 burn, the stand began to naturally regenerate from roots and rhizomes. Most scrub oak stands in the region undergo a 7 to 10 year disturbance cycle, mostly related to fire or hurricane activity. A severe drought gripped most of Florida beginning in 1998 until the later half of 2001 resulting in four years of relatively low amount of annual rainfall. Exceptionally high annual rainfall amount in 2004 was the result of a pair of hurricanes that hit the area in August and September of 2004. Prevaling wind directions for the site are as follows: W to NW in the winter, afternoon E sea breeze in the summer.

  20. AmeriFlux US-KS1 Kennedy Space Center (slash pine)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Drake, Bert [Smithsonian Environmental Research Center; Hinkle, Ross [University of Central Florida

    2016-01-01

    This is the AmeriFlux version of the carbon flux data for the site US-KS1 Kennedy Space Center (slash pine). Site Description - The Kennedy Space Center Slash Pine Flatwoods site is located in the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) on the east coast of central Florida. Occupying 310 ha of local forest, the slash pine flatwoods ecosystem is managed as an uneven-aged stand with a sparsely populated overstory and a dense oak-dominated understory. Disturbances tend to occur on a 7 to 10 year cycle, mostly related to fire or hurricane activity. Prescribed fires have been conducted since 1969 to control understory fuel. The most recent burn was conducted in February of 1995. Following the burn, the stand was allowed to naturally regenerate into a open canopy of slash pines, less than 15% of canopy coverage ( on the order of 15-30 trees per ha), with a understory mostly composed of saw palmetto and scrub oak. There was a seasonally wet swale to the southeast that was on the margin of the flux tower footprint. A severe drought gripped most of Florida beginning in 1998 until the later half of 2001 resulting in four years of relatively low annual precipitation totals. Exceptionally high annual rainfall amounts in 2004 were the result of a pair of hurricanes that hit the area in August and September of 2004. Wind directions for the site are as follows: W and NW in the winter, afternoon E sea breeze in the summer.

  1. Observation of a narrow structure in 1H(?,KS0)X via interference with phi-meson production

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Amaryan, M J; Nepali, C; Polyakov, M V; Azimov, Ya; Briscoe, W J; Dodge, G E; Hyde, C E; Klein, F; Kuznetsov, V; Strakovsky, I

    2012-03-21

    We report observation of a narrow peak structure at ?1.54 GeV with a Gaussian width ? = 6 MeV in the missing mass of KS in the reaction ? + p ? pKSKL. The observed structure may be due to the interference between a strange (or antistrange) baryon resonance in the pKL system and the ?(KSKL) photoproduction leading to the same final state. The statistical significance of the observed excess of events estimated as the log-likelihood ratio of the resonant signal + background hypothesis and the ?-production-based background-only hypothesis corresponds to 5.3?.

  2. Observation of a narrow structure in 1 H( γ , KS0 ) X via interference with φ -meson production

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Amaryan, M. J.; Gavalian, G.; Nepali, C.; Polyakov, M. V.; Azimov, Ya.; Briscoe, W. J.; Dodge, G. E.; Hyde, C. E.; Klein, F.; Kuznetsov, V.; et al

    2012-03-01

    We report observation of a narrow peak structure at ≈1.54 GeV with a Gaussian width σ = 6 MeV in the missing mass of KS in the reaction γ + p → pKSKL. The observed structure may be due to the interference between a strange (or antistrange) baryon resonance in the pKL system and the φ(KSKL) photoproduction leading to the same final state. The statistical significance of the observed excess of events estimated as the log-likelihood ratio of the resonant signal + background hypothesis and the φ-production-based background-only hypothesis corresponds to 5.3σ.

  3. CONTINUED COOLING OF THE CRUST IN THE NEUTRON STAR LOW-MASS X-RAY BINARY KS 1731-260

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cackett, Edward M.; Miller, Jon M.; Brown, Edward F.; Cumming, Andrew; Degenaar, Nathalie; Wijnands, Rudy

    2010-10-20

    Some neutron star low-mass X-ray binaries have very long outbursts (lasting several years) which can generate a significant amount of heat in the neutron star crust. After the system has returned to quiescence, the crust then thermally relaxes. This provides a rare opportunity to study the thermal properties of neutron star crusts, putting constraints on the thermal conductivity and hence the structure and composition of the crust. KS 1731-260 is one of only four systems where this crustal cooling has been observed. Here, we present a new Chandra observation of this source approximately eight years after the end of the last outburst and four years since the last observation. We find that the source has continued to cool, with the cooling curve displaying a simple power-law decay. This suggests that the crust has not fully thermally relaxed yet and may continue to cool further. A simple power-law decay is in contrast to theoretical cooling models of the crust, which predict that the crust should now have cooled to the same temperature as the neutron star core.

  4. Augusta Mountains Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Date Decision Date Lead Agency Development Phase(s) Techniques NVN-89274 CU AltaRock Energy Inc 4 November 2010 2 December 2010 BLM GeothermalExploration Geophysical...

  5. Development Day Kroc Center - Augusta, GA

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Explore the possibilities of your nuclear future. Driving STEM Success Simona De Silvestro Driver of the No. 78 Nuclear Clean Air Energy IndyCar IndyCar racing and nuclear energy ...

  6. 33634,"AECTRA REFG & MKTG",1,133,"MOTOR GAS, FINISHED UNLEADED...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    CORP",36,508,"RESIDUAL FUEL, < 0.31% SULFUR",2101,"PORT ARTHUR, TX","TEXAS",3,830,"SPAIN",220,0.01,0,,,,, 33634,"CHEVRON CORP",38,510,"RESIDUAL FUEL, > 1.00%...

  7. 33269,"AECTRA REFG & MKTG",1,133,"MOTOR GAS, FINISHED UNLEADED...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    THE",19,840,"UNFINISHED OILS, HEAVY GAS OILS",1105,"PAULSBORO, NJ","NEW JERSEY",1,830,"SPAIN",218,0,0,"COASTAL EAGLE PT OIL CO","EAGLE PT PLT","NJ","NEW JERSEY",1 33269,"COASTAL...

  8. 36191,"AECTRA REFG & MKTG",1,152,"MOTOR GAS, OTHER FINISHED"...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    CO",35,840,"UNFINISHED OILS, HEAVY GAS OILS",1004,"PERTH AMBOY, NJ","NEW JERSEY",1,830,"SPAIN",110,0,0,"TOSCO REFG CO","BAYWAY","NJ","NEW JERSEY",1 36191,"TOSCO REFG...

  9. 36556,"AECTRA REFG & MKTG",1,152,"MOTOR GAS, OTHER FINISHED"...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    INC",9,134,"MOTOR GAS BLENDING COMPONENTS",1004,"PERTH AMBOY, NJ","NEW JERSEY",1,830,"SPAIN",245,0,0,"UNKNOWN PROCESSOR-NJ","UNKNOWN PROCESSOR-NJ","NJ","NEW JERSEY",1 36556,"BP...

  10. 32173,"AECTRA REFG & MKTG",1,133,"MOTOR GAS, FINISHED UNLEADED...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    CORP",3,133,"MOTOR GAS, FINISHED UNLEADED",0401,"BOSTON, MA","MASSACHUSETTS",1,830,"SPAIN",130,0,0,,,,, 32173,"CITGO PETRO CORP",4,133,"MOTOR GAS, FINISHED...

  11. 32904,"AECTRA REFG & MKTG",1,133,"MOTOR GAS, FINISHED UNLEADED...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    CORP",74,509,"RESIDUAL FUEL, 0.31-1.00% SULFUR",2101,"PORT ARTHUR, TX","TEXAS",3,830,"SPAIN",219,0.45,0,,,,, 32904,"CHEVRON CORP",75,133,"MOTOR GAS, FINISHED...

  12. 35461,"AECTRA REFG & MKTG",1,152,"MOTOR GAS, OTHER FINISHED"...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    CORP",26,840,"UNFINISHED OILS, HEAVY GAS OILS",5312,"CORPUS CHRIS, TX","TEXAS",3,830,"SPAIN",216,0,0,"CITGO REFG & CHEM INC","CORPUS CHRISTI","TX","TEXAS",3 35461,"CITGO PETRO...

  13. 31443,"AECTRA REFG & MKTG",1,840,"UNFINISHED OILS, HEAVY GAS...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    PETRO",1,133,"MOTOR GAS, FINISHED UNLEADED",1001,"NEW YORK, NY","NEW YORK",1,830,"SPAIN",192,0,0,,,,, 31443,"DELPHI PETRO",2,133,"MOTOR GAS, FINISHED UNLEADED",1002,"ALBANY,...

  14. TransCanada Power Mktg Ltd (New Hampshire) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Place: New Hampshire Phone Number: 1.800.661.3805 Website: www.transcanada.comindex.html Twitter: @TransCanada Outage Hotline: 1-800-447-8066 References: EIA Form EIA-861 Final...

  15. TransCanada Power Mktg Ltd (New York) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    York Phone Number: 1.800.661.3805 or 1.403.920.2000 Website: www.transcanada.com4779.html Outage Hotline: 1.800.661.3805 or 1.403.920.2000 References: EIA Form EIA-861 Final...

  16. EA-216-D TransAlta Energy Mktg (CN).pdf

    Energy Savers [EERE]

  17. SU-E-T-625: Use and Choice of Ionization Chambers for the Commissioning of Flattened and Flattening-Filter-Free Photon Beams: Determination of Recombination Correction Factor (ks)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stucchi, C; Mongioj, V; Carrara, M; Pignoli, E; Bonfantini, F; Bresolin, A

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the recombination effect for some ionization chambers to be used for linacs commissioning for Flattened Filter (FF) and Flattening Filter Free (FFF) photon beams. Methods: A Varian TrueBeam linac with five photon beams was used: 6, 10 and 15 MV FF and 6 and 10 MV FFF. Measurements were performed in a water tank and in a plastic water phantom with different chambers: a mini-ion chamber (IC CC01, IBA), a plane-parallel ion chamber (IC PPC05, IBA) and two Farmer chambers (NE2581 and FPC05-IBA). Measurement conditions were Source- Surface Distance of 100 cm, two field sizes (10x10 and 40x40 cm2) and five depths (1cm, maximum buildup, 5cm, 10cm and 20cm). The ion recombination factors (kS), obtained from the Jaffe's plots (voltage interval 50-400 V), were evaluated at the recommended operating voltage of +300V. Results: Dose Per Pulse (DPP) at dmax was 0.4 mGy/pulse for FF beams, 1.0 mGy/pulse and 1.9 mGy/pulse for 6MV and 10 MV FFF beams respectively. For all measurement conditions, kS ranged between 0.996 and 0.999 for IC PPC05, 0.997 and 1.008 for IC CC01. For the FPC05 IBA Farmer IC, kS varied from 1.001 to 1.011 for FF beams, from 1.004 to 1.015 for 6 MV FFF and from 1.009 to 1.025 for 10 MV FFF. Whereas, for NE2581 IC the values ranged from 1.002 to 1.009 for all energy beams and measurement conditions. Conclusion: kS depends on the chamber volume and the DPP, which in turn depends on energy beam but is independent of dose rate. Ion chambers with small active volume can be reliably used for dosimetry of FF and FFF beams even without kS correction. On the contrary, for absolute dosimetry of FFF beams by Farmer ICs it is necessary to evaluate and apply the kS correction. Partially supported by Lega Italiana Lotta contro i Tumori (LILT)

  18. Application to Export Electric Energy OE Docket No. EA-384 NRG...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Marketing LLC Application from NRG Power Mktg to export electric energy to Mexico. PDF icon EA-384 NRG Power Mktg (MX).pdf More Documents & Publications EA-384 NRG Power Marketing ...

  19. 0101,"SPRAGUE ENERGY CORP",1,150,"MOGAS, REFORMULATED",0131,...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    REFG & MKTG INC",2,152,"MOGAS, OTHER FINISHED",4908,"PONCE, PR","PR",600,830,"SPAIN",230,0,0 0101,"TEXACO REFG & MKTG INC",3,152,"MOGAS, OTHER FINISHED",1003,"NEWARK,...

  20. City of Augusta, Kansas (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    861 Data Utility Id 998 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location SPP NERC SPP Yes RTO SPP Yes Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Generation Yes Activity Buying...

  1. Amplitude Analysis and Measurement of the Time-dependent CP Asymmetry of B0 to KsKsKs Decays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lees, J.P.

    2012-04-11

    We present the first results on the Dalitz-plot structure and improved measurements of the time-dependent CP-violation parameters of the process B{sup 0} {yields} K{sub S}{sup 0}K{sub S}{sup 0}K{sub S}{sup 0} obtained using 468 x 10{sup 6} B{bar B} decays collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric-energy B factory at SLAC. The Dalitz-plot structure is probed by a time-integrated amplitude analysis that does not distinguish between B{sup 0} and {bar B}{sup 0} decays. We measure the total inclusive branching fraction {Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} K{sub S}{sup 0}K{sub S}{sup 0}K{sub S}{sup 0}) = (6.19 {+-} 0.48 {+-} 0.15 {+-} 0.12) x 10{sup -6}, where the first uncertainty is statistical, the second is systematic, and the third represents the Dalitz-plot signal model dependence. We also observe evidence for the intermediate resonant states f{sub 0}(980), f{sub 0}(1710), and f{sub 2}(2010). Their respective product branching fractions are measured to be (2.70{sub -1.19}{sup +1.25} {+-} 0.36 {+-} 1.17) x 10{sup -6}, (0.50{sub -0.24}{sup +0.46} {+-} 0.04 {+-} 0.10) x 10{sup -6}, and (0.54{sub -0.20}{sup +0.21} {+-} 0.03 {+-} 0.52) x 10{sup -6}. Additionally, we determine the mixing-induced CP-violation parameters to be S = -0.94{sub -0.21}{sup +0.24} {+-} 0.06 and C = -0.17 {+-} 0.18 {+-} 0.04, where the first uncertainty is statistical and the second is systematic. These values are in agreement with the standard model expectation.

  2. Microsoft Word - Gage-KS.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AL S-band Profiler and the ETL K-band Millimeter-Wave Cloud Radar on the RV Ronald H. Brown during Nauru99 K. S. Gage and D. A. Carter National Oceanic and Atmospheric...

  3. Federal Register Notices | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Register Notice Volume 77, No. 38 - Feb. 27, 2012 Application from NRG Power Mktg. to export electric energy to Mexico. Federal Register Notice. February 27, 2012 Application...

  4. Workplace Charging Challenge Partner: Westar Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Joined the Challenge: October 2014Headquarters: Topeka, KSCharging Locations: Wichita, KS; Wichita, KS; Topeka, KS; Topeka, KS; St. Marys, KS; Salina, KS; Newton, KS; Parsons, KS; Pittsburg, KS;...

  5. Application to Export Electric Energy OE Docket No. EA-384 NRG Power

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Marketing LLC | Department of Energy LLC Application to Export Electric Energy OE Docket No. EA-384 NRG Power Marketing LLC Application from NRG Power Mktg to export electric energy to Mexico. PDF icon EA-384 NRG Power Mktg (MX).pdf More Documents & Publications EA-384 NRG Power Marketing LLC Application to Export Electric Energy OE Docket No. EA-401 Lonestar Power Marketing LLC Application to Export Electric Energy OE Docket No. EA-403 Frontera Marketing, LLC

  6. Application to Export Electric Energy OE Docket No. EA-384 NRG Power

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Marketing LLC: Federal Register Notice Volume 77, No. 38 - Feb. 27, 2012 | Department of Energy LLC: Federal Register Notice Volume 77, No. 38 - Feb. 27, 2012 Application to Export Electric Energy OE Docket No. EA-384 NRG Power Marketing LLC: Federal Register Notice Volume 77, No. 38 - Feb. 27, 2012 Application from NRG Power Mktg. to export electric energy to Mexico. Federal Register Notice. PDF icon EA-384 NRG Power Mktg.pdf More Documents & Publications Application to export electric

  7. QA Corporate Board Meeting - September 2010 | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    8th EM Quality Assurance Corporate Board Meeting Meeting Location: Augusta Marriott Hotel & Suites, Two Tenth Street, Augusta, GA 30901 Room: Check Signs at the Hotel Draft...

  8. QA Corporate Board Meeting - March 2009 | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    2009 4thEM Quality Assurance Corporate Board Meeting Meeting Location: Augusta Marriott Hotel & Suites, Two Tenth Street, Augusta, Georgia 30901 Room: Lamar Ballroom A Draft Agenda...

  9. Demonstration Assessment of Light-Emitting Diode (LED) Parking Lot Lighting in Leavenworth, KS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Myer, Michael; Kinzey, Bruce R.; Curry, Ku'uipo

    2011-05-06

    This report describes the process and results of a demonstration of solid-state lighting (SSL) technology in a commercial parking lot lighting application, under the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Solid-State Lighting Technology GATEWAY Demonstration Program. The parking lot is for customers and employees of a Walmart Supercenter in Leavenworth, Kansas and this installation represents the first use of the LED Parking Lot Performance Specification developed by the DOE’s Commercial Building Energy Alliance. The application is a parking lot covering more than a half million square feet, lighted primarily by light-emitting diodes (LEDs). Metal halide wall packs were installed along the building facade. This site is new construction, so the installed baseline(s) were hypothetical designs. It was acknowledged early on that deviating from Walmart’s typical design would reduce the illuminance on the site. Walmart primarily uses 1000W pulse-start metal halide (PMH) lamps. In order to provide a comparison between both typical design and a design using conventional luminaires providing a lower illuminance, a 400W PMH design was also considered. As mentioned already, the illuminance would be reduced by shifting from the PMH system to the LED system. The Illuminating Engineering Society of North America (IES) provides recommended minimum illuminance values for parking lots. All designs exceeded the recommended illuminance values in IES RP-20, some by a wider margin than others. Energy savings from installing the LED system compared to the different PMH systems varied. Compared to the 1000W PMH system, the LED system would save 63 percent of the energy. However, this corresponds to a 68 percent reduction in illuminance as well. In comparison to the 400W PMH system, the LED system would save 44 percent of the energy and provide similar minimum illuminance values at the time of relamping. The LED system cost more than either of the PMH systems when comparing initial costs. However, when the life-cycle costs from energy and maintenance were factored into the scenario, the LED system had lower costs at the end of a 10-year analysis period. The LED system had a 6.1 year payback compared to the 1000W PMH system and a 7.5 year payback versus the 400W PMH system. The costs reflect high initial cost for the LED luminaire, plus more luminaires and (subsequently) more poles for the LED system. The other major issue affecting cost effectiveness was that Leavenworth, Kansas has very low electricity costs. The melded rate for this site was $0.056 per kWh for electricity. However, if the national electricity rate of $0.1022/kWh was used the payback would change to between four and five years for the LED system. This demonstration met the GATEWAY requirements of saving energy, matching or improving illumination, and being cost effective. The project also demonstrated that the Commercial Building Energy Alliance (CBEA) specification works in practice. Walmart appreciated having an entire site lighted by LEDs to gain more experience with the technology. Walmart is reviewing the results of the demonstration as they consider their entire real estate portfolio.

  10. Chemical composition analysis and product consistency tests to support Enhanced Hanford Waste Glass Models. Results for the Augusta and October 2014 LAW Glasses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fox, K. M.; Edwards, T. B.; Best, D. R.

    2015-07-07

    In this report, the Savannah River National Laboratory provides chemical analyses and Product Consistency Test (PCT) results for several simulated low activity waste (LAW) glasses (designated as the August and October 2014 LAW glasses) fabricated by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. The results of these analyses will be used as part of efforts to revise or extend the validation regions of the current Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant glass property models to cover a broader span of waste compositions.

  11. Maps and Directions | Savannah River Ecology Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Go under I-520 (Bobby Jones Expressway) and follow instructions (below) from Sandbar Ferry Rd. From AthensAtlanta, GA: Take I-20 east to Augusta, GA. Near Augusta, take I-520 ...

  12. SREL Reprint #3283

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and Susan Sanchez5 1Edgefield Veterinary Clinic, 218 Augusta Road, Edgefield, SC 29824, USA 2Field Entomologist, 2605 Peach Orchard Road, Augusta, GA 30906, USA 3Department of...

  13. EV Community Readiness projects: Delaware Valley Regional Planning Commission (PA); Metropolitan Energy Information Center, Inc. (KS, MO)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    2013 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting

  14. Application to Export Electric Energy OE Docket No. EA-258-D Brookefield

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Energy Marketing Inc. | Department of Energy D Brookefield Energy Marketing Inc. Application to Export Electric Energy OE Docket No. EA-258-D Brookefield Energy Marketing Inc. Application from Brookefield Energy to export electric energy to Canada. PDF icon EA-258-D Brookfield Energy Mktg (CN).pdf More Documents & Publications EA-258-D Brookfield Energy Marketing Inc. EA-258-D Brookfield Energy Marketing Inc. Application to Export Electric Energy OE Docket No. EA-216-D TransAlta Energy

  15. Record of Categorical Exclusion (CX) Determination, Office of Electricty

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Delivery and Energy Reliability (OE): EA-408 Nalcor Energy Marketing Corporation | Department of Energy Electricty Delivery and Energy Reliability (OE): EA-408 Nalcor Energy Marketing Corporation Record of Categorical Exclusion (CX) Determination, Office of Electricty Delivery and Energy Reliability (OE): EA-408 Nalcor Energy Marketing Corporation Application from NEMC to export electric energy to Canada. Record of Categorical Exclusion. PDF icon EA-408 Nalcor Energy Mktg..pdf More Documents

  16. Airports & Lodging | Savannah River Ecology Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Airports and Lodging AIRPORTS Augusta, GA Augusta Regional Airport (Bush Field) - closest commercial airport; Delta and U.S. Express. Daniel Field - private planes, rentals, or chartered flights. Columbia, SC Columbia Metropolitan Airport - all major carriers; 1.5-2h drive to SREL. Atlanta, GA Hartsfield Airport - all major carriers; 2.5-3 hour drive from Atlanta, GA, to Aiken, SC. LODGING No lodging is available at SREL. However, hotels and motels are available in Aiken, SC, and Augusta, GA.

  17. Quality Assurance Corporate Board | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    ... from meeting held in Augusta, GA. November 13, 2008 QA Corporate Board Meeting - November 2008 Board minutes, agenda, and presentations from meeting held in Atlanta, Georgia. ...

  18. SREL Reprint #3000

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    State University, 45 Johnson Hall, Pullman, WA 99164-6414, USA 3Center for Biotechnology and Genomic Medicine, Medical College of Georgia, Augusta, Georgia 30912-4060, USA ...

  19. Pennamaquan Tidal Power LLC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    LLC Jump to: navigation, search Name: Pennamaquan Tidal Power LLC Address: 45 Memorial Circle PO Box 1058 Place: Augusta Zip: 4332 Region: United States Sector: Marine and...

  20. FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Nettles announced the indictment of Aaron Vennefron of Hamilton, Ohio and Phillip Thompson of Augusta, Georgia for conspiracy to commit wire fraud, and theft of government funds. ...

  1. PowerPoint Presentation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    REFUGE AUGUSTA STUTTGART HELENA WHITE RIVER NATIONAL0 WILDLIFE REFUGE GREERS FERRY RESERVOIR N Little Rock District, Southwestern Division * Watershed Comprises -...

  2. Microsoft PowerPoint - SWL HPConf2012

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ROCK FORREST CITY CACHE RIVER LEGEND WILDLIFE REFUGE AUGUSTA LITTLE ROCK 10 EXISTING RESERVOIR OR LAKE WHITE RIVER NATIONAL WILDLIFE REFUGE CACHE RIVER WILDLIFE REFUGE WHITE...

  3. Microsoft PowerPoint - SWL HPConf2009 (final).ppt

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    REFUGE AUGUSTA STUTTGART HELENA WHITE RIVER NATIONAL0 WILDLIFE REFUGE GREERS FERRY RESERVOIR N Little Rock District, Southwestern Division *Watershed Comprises -...

  4. Butler County, Kansas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Andover, Kansas Augusta, Kansas Benton, Kansas Cassoday, Kansas Douglass, Kansas El Dorado, Kansas Elbing, Kansas Latham, Kansas Leon, Kansas Potwin, Kansas Rose Hill, Kansas...

  5. Board of Directors - SRSCRO

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of Columbia County Sanford Loyd, Vice Chair Sanford Loyd, CPA, PC Dr. Marc D. Miller, Immediate Past Chair Georgia Regents University-Augusta James M. Hull College of...

  6. 2013 Nuclear Workforce Development ...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    October 22, 2013 Welcome Opening Anna Johnson - Shaw AREVA MOX Services Dr. Marc Miller - SRS Community Reuse Organization Chair Mayor Deke Copenhaver - Augusta, Georgia...

  7. Georgia Power Compnay Three 30 MW Renewable Projects

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... Fort Stewart, and Fort Gordon 3 Project Description Fort Benning 374 acres near Columbus, Georgia 4 Fort Gordon 199 acres near Augusta, Georgia 5 Fort Stewart 227 acres ...

  8. Property:Purchasers | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Pass Geothermal Area Augusta Mountains Geothermal Area Aurora Geothermal Area B Bac-Man Laguna Geothermal Area Bailey Bay Hot Springs Geothermal Area Baker Hot Spring...

  9. Property:OtherUses | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Pass Geothermal Area Augusta Mountains Geothermal Area Aurora Geothermal Area B Bac-Man Laguna Geothermal Area Bad Blumau Geothermal Area Bailey Bay Hot Springs Geothermal...

  10. Category:Available for Case Study | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Pass Geothermal Area Augusta Mountains Geothermal Area Aurora Geothermal Area B Bac-Man Laguna Geothermal Area Bad Blumau Geothermal Area Bailey Bay Hot Springs Geothermal...

  11. Property:FirstWellFlowRate | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Pass Geothermal Area Augusta Mountains Geothermal Area Aurora Geothermal Area B Bac-Man Laguna Geothermal Area Bad Blumau Geothermal Area Bailey Bay Hot Springs Geothermal...

  12. OSTI, US Dept of Energy, Office of Scientific and Technical Informatio...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Meeting in Augusta, Georgia, Page, STIP Homepage, STIPworks Meetings 4 2013 STIP Working ... 2014 Meeting in Richland, Page, STIP Homepage, STIP Meetings, STIPworks, STIPworks ...

  13. SREL Reprint #3318

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Regents University, Augusta, GA 30904, USA 3Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Genetics, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, CO 80045, USA Abstract: We...

  14. Aiken County, South Carolina: Energy Resources | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Burnettown, South Carolina Clearwater, South Carolina Gloverville, South Carolina Jackson, South Carolina Monetta, South Carolina New Ellenton, South Carolina North Augusta,...

  15. Savannah River Site Workers Share Knowledge with Students in...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Edwards Elementary School, Williston, S.C.; Allison Childers, A. Brian Merry Elementary ... North Augusta, S.C.; and Wanda Wates, W.E. Parker Elementary School, Edgefield ...

  16. Independent Activity Report, Savannah River Site- June 2011

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board Public Meeting in Augusta, Ga, Regarding the Savannah River Site [HIAR-SRS-2011-06-16

  17. Woodruff County, Arkansas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Number 3 Climate Zone Subtype A. Places in Woodruff County, Arkansas Augusta, Arkansas Cotton Plant, Arkansas Hunter, Arkansas McCrory, Arkansas Patterson, Arkansas Retrieved from...

  18. State","County","NOAA Climate Division (Number)","NOAA Climate...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    CENTRAL",3 "KS","SHERIDAN",1,"NORTHWEST",2 "KS","SHERMAN",1,"NORTHWEST",2 "KS","SMITH",2,"NORTH CENTRAL",2 "KS","STAFFORD",8,"SOUTH CENTRAL",3 "KS","STANTON",7,"SOUTHWEST",...

  19. CX-001777: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    GA-City-Consolidated Government of Augusta-RichmondCX(s) Applied: A9, A11, B1.32, B2.5, B5.1Date: 08/07/2009Location(s): Augusta-Richmond, GeorgiaOffice(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy

  20. Study of CP violation in Dalitz-plot analyses of B0 to K K-KS, B to K K-K , and B to KSKSK

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lees, J.P.

    2012-03-20

    We perform amplitude analyses of the decays B{sup 0} {yields} K{sup +}K{sup -}K{sub s}{sup 0}, B{sup +} {yields} K{sup +}K{sup -}K{sup +}, and B{sup +} {yields}, and measure CP-violating parameters and partial branching fractions. The results are based on a data sample of approximately 470 x 10{sup 6} B{bar B} decays, collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric-energy B factory at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory. For B{sup +} {yields} K{sup +}K{sup -}K{sup +}, we find a direct CP asymmetry in B{sup +} {yields} {phi}(1020)K{sup +} of A{sub CP} = (12.8 {+-} 4.4 {+-} 1.3)%, which differs from zero by 2.8{sigma}. For B{sup 0} {yields} K{sup +}K{sup -}K{sub s}{sup 0}, we measure the CP-violating phase {beta}{sub eff} ({phi}(1020)K{sub s}{sup 0}) = (21 {+-} 6 {+-} 2){sup o}. For B{sup +} {yields} K{sub s}{sup 0}K{sub s}{sup 0}K{sup +}, we measure an overall direct CP asymmetry of A{sub CP} = (4{sub -5}{sup +4} {+-} 2)%. We also perform an angular-moment analysis of the three channels, and determine that the f{sub X}(1500) state can be described well by the sum of the resonances f{sub 0}(1500), f{prime}{sub 2}(1525), and f{sub 0}(1710).

  1. Application to Export Electric Energy OE Docket No. EA-216-D TransAlta

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Marketing (U.S.) Inc. | Department of Energy Application to Export Electric Energy OE Docket No. EA-216-D TransAlta Energy Marketing (U.S.) Inc. Application from TEMUS to export electric energy to Canada. PDF icon EA-216-D TransAlta Energy Mktg (CN).pdf More Documents & Publications EA-216-C TransAlta Energy Marketing (U.S.)Inc. EA-216-B TransAlta Energy Marketing (U.S) Inc Application to export electric energy OE Docket No. EA-216-C TransAlta Energy

  2. Application to Export Electric Energy OE Docket No. EA-216-D TransAlta

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Marketing (U.S.) Inc.: Federal Register Notice, Volume 81, No. 46 - March 9, 2016 | Department of Energy : Federal Register Notice, Volume 81, No. 46 - March 9, 2016 Application to Export Electric Energy OE Docket No. EA-216-D TransAlta Energy Marketing (U.S.) Inc.: Federal Register Notice, Volume 81, No. 46 - March 9, 2016 Application from TEMUS to export electric energy to Canada. Federal Register Notice. PDF icon EA-216-D TransAlta Energy Mktg U.S..pdf More Documents &

  3. BPA-2014-01713-FOIA Request

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Kiley Scott Email Kiley.Scott@SNCLavalin.com Organizatio SNC Lavalin T&D n Mailing 150 Whitten Rd Address City Augusta State ME Phone 315-842-0999 Ex. xxx-xxx-xxxx FAX Ex....

  4. BPA-2014-01713-FOIA Response

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    FOIA BPA-2014-01713-F SNC Lavalin Transmission & Distribution Attn: Kiley Scott 150 Whitten Rd Augusta, ME 04330 Dear Mr. Scott: We have received your request for records under...

  5. SRS Pods Bring Savannah River Site to Public

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    AUGUSTA, Ga. – Savannah River Site (SRS) projects and missions topped the agenda of the SRS Information Pods on the Georgia Regents University (GRU) Summerville Campus earlier this year.

  6. CX-001470: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    State Energy Program - Industrial Energy Efficiency GrantsCX(s) Applied: B5.1Date: 04/05/2010Location(s): Augusta, GeorgiaOffice(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory

  7. SREL Reprint #3140

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Aaliyah D. Green1, Kurt A. Buhlmann2, Cris Hagen2, Christopher Romanek2, and J. Whitfield Gibbons2 1Southeastern Natural Sciences Academy, 1858 Lock & Dam Road, Augusta, GA 30906, ...

  8. SR0007

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Environmental Cleanup Technology Conference To Be Held Flag Ribbon Art The Savannah River Operations Office of the Department of Energy is hosting the Environmental Restoration Technology End User Conference on June 6-8 at the Sheraton Augusta Hotel, in Augusta, Georgia. The principal purposes of the conference are to share cleanup successes and innovations from the two co-sponsoring federal agencies-the Department of Defense and the Environmental Protection Agency-and DOE sites; promote the

  9. SR0110

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    4, 2001 Media Contact: Bill Taylor (803) 725-2889 Energy Employees Compensation Center To Open In North Augusta, SC Flag Ribbon Art Aiken SC (July 24) -- A resource center where nuclear weapons workers can go for help to file claims for compensation under the Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act will begin operations with an opening ceremony at 11 a.m., Friday, July 27. The Energy Employees Compensation Center at 1708 Bunting Drive, North Augusta, SC, is sponsored

  10. EMAB Meeting - June 2013 | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    June 2013 EMAB Meeting - June 2013 ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT ADVISORY BOARD Double Tree by Hilton Hotel Augusta 2651 Perimeter Parkway, Augusta, Georgia 30909 Richmond I&III Documents Available for Download PDF icon EMAB Meeting Minutes for June 14, 2013 PDF icon Meeting Agenda PDF icon SRS CAB Presentation PDF icon EM FY 2013 Work Plans Update by Alice Williams PDF icon EMAB APMS Interim Report PDF icon EM Update Presentation by David Huizenga PDF icon Tank Waste Presentation by Ken Picha

  11. Microsoft Word - EMAB Minutes - Dec 2012 012212 Control Verions with Members Edits Included 013013 DPF signed Jan 31

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    DoubleTree by Hilton Hotel Augusta 2651 Perimeter Parkway * Augusta, Georgia 30909 Richmond I & II June 14, 2013 9:00 a.m. Welcome and Overview * Dennis Ferrigno, EMAB Vice Chair 9:10 a.m. Savannah River Site Welcome * Karen Guevara, Assistant Manager for Infrastructure and Environmental Stewardship * Don Bridges, SRS Citizens Advisory Board Chair 9:40 a.m. EM Update * David Huizenga, Senior Advisor for Environmental Management Roundtable Discussion * Discussion Leader: Dennis Ferrigno, EMAB

  12. Microsoft Word - EM SSAB Chairs Public Meeting Agenda - Spring SRS

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board Chairs Meeting April 22-23, 2015 Doubletree, 2651 Perimeter Parkway, Augusta, Georgia 30909 Wednesday, April 22 8:00 am Welcome and Opening Remarks * David Borak, EM SSAB Designated Federal Officer * Hardie Davis Jr., Mayor, City of Augusta * David Moody, Manager, Savannah River Site * Harold Simon, Chair, Savannah River Site Citizens Advisory Board 8:20 am Meeting Overview * Eric Roberts, Facilitator 8:30 am EM Program Update * Mark Whitney,

  13. Microsoft PowerPoint - Triay - EM Program Update

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Update on the Office of Environmental Management Office of Environmental Management Environmental Management Advisory Board Public Meeting Environmental Management Advisory Board Public Meeting September 30, 2009 September 30, 2009 Augusta, GA Augusta, GA Dr. In Dr. In é é s R. Triay s R. Triay Assistant Secretary Assistant Secretary Office of Environmental Management Office of Environmental Management 2 Presentation Topics Presentation Topics * Mission and Priorities * EM Organization *

  14. ARM - Instrument - smos

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    KS (ABLE) retired SGP A4 Browse Data Smileyberg, KS (ABLE) retired SGP A5 Browse Data Oxford, KS (ABLE) retired retired Originating instrument has been retired at this location...

  15. ARM - Instrument - sodar

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    KS (ABLE) retired SGP A2 Browse Data Beaumont, KS (ABLE) retired SGP A5 Browse Data Oxford, KS (ABLE) retired ARM Mobile Facility MAO S1 Browse Data Manacapuru, Amazonas,...

  16. NREL: Energy Analysis - Aaron Levine

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    KS, 2006 Prior work experience Regulatory Analysis RPP, National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, CO Law Clerk, Kansas Department of Health and Environment, Topeka, KS

  17. EIS-0407: Abengoa Biomass Bioenergy Project near Hugoton, Stevens...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    07: Abengoa Biomass Bioenergy Project near Hugoton, Stevens County, KS EIS-0407: Abengoa Biomass Bioenergy Project near Hugoton, Stevens County, KS August 20, 2010 EIS-0407: Final ...

  18. SR0107

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    4, 2001 Media Contact: Bill Taylor (803) 725-2889 DOE & DOL Hold Public Meetings For Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program At Flag Ribbon Art Aiken SC (June 14, 2001) - The U.S. Departments of Labor and Energy will hold two public meetings at 1 p.m. and 7 p.m., Tuesday, June 19 at the North Augusta Community Center, North Augusta, SC, for employees and families who may be eligible for compensation under the Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act.

  19. SR0908.docx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Tuesday, June 9, 2009 james-r.giusti@srs.gov Paivi Nettamo, SRNS, (803) 952-6938 paivi.nettamo@srs.gov North Augusta Man Starts Work at SRS Thanks to the Recovery Act AIKEN, S.C., June 9, 2009 - During these tough economic times, earning a paycheck has become increasingly challenging for many South Carolinians. For one North Augusta sheet-metal worker, a job and a return to economic stability is one result of the Department of Energy's Recovery Act funding at the Savannah River Site (SRS). James

  20. Microsoft Word - EMAB TWS Summary Report FINAL.docx

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    DoubleTree Hotel- Richmond I & II 2651 Perimeter Parkway-Augusta, GA 30909 June 14, 2013 2 Environmental Management Advisory Board - June 14, 2013 - Meeting Minutes TABLE OF CONTENTS The Environmental Management Advisory Board (EMAB) was convened at 9:00 a.m. EDT on Friday, June 14, 2013, at the DoubleTree by Hilton Hotel in Augusta, Georgia. Board Vice Chair Dennis Ferrigno introduced the Board members for the meeting. Board members present: Dr. Frank Coffman, AECOM Government Services Mr.

  1. Atkinson-Baker Court Reporters

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    depo.com Atkinson-Baker Court Reporters 1 1 U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY 2 PUBLIC SCOPING MEETING 3 4 ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT FOR THE ACCEPTANCE AND 5 DISPOSITION OF USED NUCLEAR FUEL CONTAINING 6 U.S.-ORIGIN HIGHLY ENRICHED URANIUM 7 FROM THE FEDERAL REPUBLIC OF GERMANY 8 9 DATE: February 4, 2016 10 7:04 p.m. 11 North Augusta Community Center 12 495 Brookside Avenue 13 North Augusta, SC 29841 14 15 16 Holmes Brown, Facilitator 17 Maxcine Maxted, Department of Energy, EA Document Manager 18

  2. Microsoft Word - EMAB Minutes _control version_ 081413

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    PUBLIC MEETING MINUTES DoubleTree Hotel- Richmond I & II 2651 Perimeter Parkway-Augusta, GA 30909 June 14, 2013 2 Environmental Management Advisory Board - June 14, 2013 - Meeting Minutes TABLE OF CONTENTS The Environmental Management Advisory Board (EMAB) was convened at 9:00 a.m. EDT on Friday, June 14, 2013, at the DoubleTree by Hilton Hotel in Augusta, Georgia. Board Vice Chair Dennis Ferrigno introduced the Board members for the meeting. Board members present: Dr. Frank Coffman, AECOM

  3. Savannah River Site Workers Share Knowledge with Students in Engineering

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Teach-Ins | Department of Energy Workers Share Knowledge with Students in Engineering Teach-Ins Savannah River Site Workers Share Knowledge with Students in Engineering Teach-Ins March 30, 2015 - 12:00pm Addthis SRNS engineer Missy Byrne, center, works with middle school students at a teach-in at Davidson Fine Arts in Augusta, Ga. SRNS engineer Missy Byrne, center, works with middle school students at a teach-in at Davidson Fine Arts in Augusta, Ga. AIKEN, S.C. - Employees of EM contractor

  4. ALL GRADE 5 AND GRADE 8 FASTENERS WHICH DO NOT BEAR ANY MANUFACTURERS'

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    ALL GRADE 5 AND GRADE 8 FASTENERS WHICH DO NOT BEAR ANY MANUFACTURERS' HEADMARKS Grade 5 Grade 8 GRADE 5 FASTENERS WITH THE FOLLOWING MANUFACTURERS' HEADMARKS: GRADE 8 FASTENERS WITH THE FOLLOWING MANUFACTURERS' HEADMARKS: MARK KS MARK J (CA TW JP YU) (Greater than 1/2 inch dia) MARK A NF H M MS Hollow Triangle E MARK KS RT FM KY J UNY A KS RT KY J UNY NF H M MS E FM GRADE 8.2 FASTENERS WITH THE FOLLOWING HEADMARKS: MARK KS KS J KS GRADE A325 FASTENERS WITH THE FOLLOWING HEADMARKS: MARK A325 KS

  5. CC locator map

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Augusta Savannah River Site Jackson New Ellenton Aiken 19 W h i s k e y R d 302 302 278 278 278 125 125 125 A 1 Barnwell 278 Williston Bush Field to I-20 & Columbia 1 1 78 Beech...

  6. Energy Matters - Spring 2002

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2002-03-01

    Quarterly newsletter from DOE's Industrial Technologies Program to promote the use of energy-efficient industrial systems. The focus of the Spring 2002 Issue of Energy Matters focuses on premium energy efficiency systems, with articles on new gas technologies, steam efficiency, the Augusta Newsprint Showcase, and more.

  7. DOE Sponsored College Night Draws Thousands

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    College recruiters from the Golden State to the Peach State gathered in a packed arena for the twentieth annual CSRA College Night in Augusta, Georgia. The event is a cooperative effort among Department of Energy (DOE), Savannah River Nuclear Solutions, LLC and its partners, local private schools, business and industry and local government.

  8. ARM - Datastreams - swats

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    KS (Extended) SGP E10 Browse Data Tyro, KS (Extended) retired SGP E11 Browse Data Byron, OK (Extended) SGP E12 Browse Data Pawhuska, OK (Extended) SGP E13 Browse Data Lamont, OK...

  9. ARM - Instrument - mfrsr

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Facility, Atqasuk AK Southern Great Plains SGP C1 Browse Data Central Facility, Lamont, OK SGP E1 Browse Data Larned, KS (Extended) retired SGP E3 Browse Data LeRoy, KS (Extended)...

  10. ARM - Datastreams - irt200ms

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    KS (Extended) SGP E10 Browse Data Tyro, KS (Extended) retired SGP E11 Browse Data Byron, OK (Extended) SGP E12 Browse Data Pawhuska, OK (Extended) SGP E13 Browse Data Lamont, OK...

  11. ARM - Instrument - swats

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    KS (Extended) SGP E10 Browse Data Tyro, KS (Extended) retired SGP E11 Browse Data Byron, OK (Extended) SGP E12 Browse Data Pawhuska, OK (Extended) SGP E13 Browse Data Lamont, OK...

  12. Solarcompetence GmbH | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    GmbH Place: Regensburg, Bavaria, Germany Zip: 93049 Sector: Solar Product: K&S Solarsysteme GmbH and Solarcompetence GmbH form the K&S group of companies that is...

  13. WAT TENBERG SPIN DLE EAT ON BONN Y GREELEY ROGGEN WAVERLY SH

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    CO 2001 Reserve Summary for All Denver Basin Fields KS NE CO NE WY KS SD Index Map For 3 ... Map created August 2005; projection is UTM-14, NAD-27. Authors: Sam Limerick (1), Lucy Luo ...

  14. National Nuclear Science Week 2013 - SRSCRO

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    NUCLEAR SCIENCE WEEK October 21-25, 2013 Click on the links below to view images from the Nuclear Workforce Development Day held at the Kroc Center - Augusta, GA. Sessions / Exhibits / Miscellaneous National Nuclear Science Week is a national, broadly observed week-long celebration to focus local, regional and national interest on all aspects of nuclear science. During the week, educators, students, employers and the community will participate in a national recognition of how nuclear science

  15. Biological & Environmental Research Abstracts Database

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Search Term(s) (supports AND and OR operators and phrase in "double quotes") Register Number Title Abstract Principal Investigator PI Lookup Institution Institution Lookup City Adelaide SA 5001 Aiken Albany Albuquerque Alcoa Center Alexandria Ames Amherst Anchorage Ann Arbor Ardmore Argonne Arlington Asheville Athens Atlanta Auburn Auburn University Augusta Aurora Austin Bailrigg, Lancaster UK, LA1 4Y Baltimore Bar Harbor Batavia Baton Rouge Beaufort Beaverton Belleville Bellevue

  16. Chairs Meeting - April 2015 | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    5 Chairs Meeting - April 2015 ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT SITE-SPECIFIC ADVISORY BOARD CHAIRS MEETING April 22-23, 2015 * Augusta, Georgia Documents Available for Download PDF icon EM SSAB Chairs' Meeting Agenda PDF icon Chairs' Round Robin: Topics, Activities, and Accomplishments PDF icon EM Budget Update PDF icon WIPP Recovery and Waste Disposition Update PDF icon Safety Culture Overview PDF icon Public Meeting Minutes More Documents & Publications EM SSAB Conference Calls - March 26, 2015

  17. Chairs Meetings | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Chairs Meetings Chairs Meetings September 2, 2015 Chairs Meeting - September 2015 EM SSAB minutes, agenda, and presentations from meeting held in Santa Fe, New Mexico. April 30, 2015 Chairs Meeting - April 2015 EM SSAB minutes, agenda, and presentations from meeting held in Augusta, Georgia. September 17, 2014 Chairs Meeting - September 2014 EM SSAB minutes, agenda, and presentations from meeting held in Idaho Falls, Idaho. April 28, 2014 Chairs Meeting - April 2014 EM SSAB minutes, agenda, and

  18. SR0010

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1, 2000 Media Contact: Jim Giusti (803) 725-2889 DOE Hosts Radioactive Materials Transportation Workshop Flag Ribbon Art Note To Editors And News Directors: Aiken, SC - The Department of Energy will host an informational transportation workshop tomorrow and Friday (June 22-23) in Augusta, GA. The workshop is part of an ongoing series to involve state and local officials, and is designed to help share information about DOE transportation of radioactive materials. The theme of this particular

  19. Women @ Energy: Simona E. Hunyadi Murph | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Simona E. Hunyadi Murph Women @ Energy: Simona E. Hunyadi Murph September 22, 2015 - 1:12pm Addthis Simona E. Hunyadi Murph is a principal scientist at Savannah River National Laboratory. She attended the University of South Carolina, studying chemistry/nanotechnology, Georgia Regents University (Augusta State University), and Babes-Bolyai University in Romania, studying chemistry/electrochemistry and physics with an education minor. She holds a Ph.D in chemistry/nanotechnology. Simona E.

  20. 2005 Hydrogen Pipeline Working Group Workshop | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    5 Hydrogen Pipeline Working Group Workshop 2005 Hydrogen Pipeline Working Group Workshop DOE held a Hydrogen Pipeline Working Group Workshop August 30-31, 2005 in Augusta, Ga. The workshop provided the opportunity for researchers to hear from industry experts about their field experiences with current in-service hydrogen pipelines (both new construction and converted). The group also explored research or other activities needed to improve costs and operability. Issues addressed by industry

  1. Final Report - Northeast Provider of Solar Instructor Training | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Energy Northeast Provider of Solar Instructor Training Final Report - Northeast Provider of Solar Instructor Training Awardee: Maine Community College System Location: Augusta, Maine Subprogram: Soft Costs Funding Program: Solar Instructor Training Network Kennebec Valley Community College served as the Northeast region training provider for the Department of Energy Solar Instructor Training Network (SITN) from July 1, 2012 to June 30, 2015. During that time we accomplished the following

  2. SRNS signs on as industry partner for Nuclear Engineering Technology

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Education | National Nuclear Security Administration SRNS signs on as industry partner for Nuclear Engineering Technology Education Tuesday, August 12, 2014 - 12:08pm Augusta Technical College recently announced a formal Agreement of Understanding with Georgia Power and Savannah River Site management and operating contractor Savannah River Nuclear Solutions (SRNS) in support of the College's Nuclear Engineering Technology Program. The agreement recognizes SRNS as an industry partner, which

  3. SRO-NERP

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Education | National Nuclear Security Administration SRNS signs on as industry partner for Nuclear Engineering Technology Education Tuesday, August 12, 2014 - 12:08pm Augusta Technical College recently announced a formal Agreement of Understanding with Georgia Power and Savannah River Site management and operating contractor Savannah River Nuclear Solutions (SRNS) in support of the College's Nuclear Engineering Technology Program. The agreement recognizes SRNS as an industry partner, which

  4. Microsoft Word - greeneCV.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    CURRICULUM VITAE Judith L. Greene ADDRESS: Savannah River Ecology Laboratory P. O. Drawer E Aiken, SC 29802 Office Phone: (803) 725-5988 Email: jgreene@srel.edu PERSONAL: Born October 20, 1953, Augusta, GA Married, 1 child EDUCATION: B.S. in Biology, Furman University, 1975 EMPLOYMENT HISTORY: 1992-Present Research Coordinator, Savannah River Ecology Laboratory, Aiken, SC 1976-1992 Research Technician, Savannah River Ecology Laboratory, Aiken, SC 1975-1976 Research Technician, Medical College of

  5. Meeting and Presentation Materials

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    QUALITY ASSURANCE CORPORATE BOARD MEETING Augusta, Georgia March 19, 2009 Key Workshop Objectives: 1. Provide Board Members a Summary of Actions Accomplished since the last Corporate Board Meeting in November 2008. 2. Review and Discuss the EM/EFCOG Project Action Plan Working Groups' Progress and Completed Deliverables. 3. Provide Briefings on Quality Assurance Lessons Learned for Discussion. Desired Outcomes: 1. Board Members Vote on EM/EFCOG Quality Assurance Improvement Initiative Project

  6. Advocate - Issue 58 - April 2015 | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    8 - April 2015 Advocate - Issue 58 - April 2015 Here are the topics in this issue: DOE Provides Figures on FY 2015 Cleanup Budget Conceptual Designs for K-25 Historic Preservation Unveiled Board Member Reports on Environmental Justice Conference EM SSAB Leadership Will Meet in Augusta, Ga. DOE Appoints Four New Members to ORSSAB PDF icon April 2015 Advocate Newsletter More Documents & Publications ORSSAB FY 2013 Annual Report ORSSAB FY 2015 Annual Report ORSSAB Meeting - September 2013

  7. Microsoft Word - SSAB Meeting Summary for April 2015.FINAL.docx

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    DoubleTree by Hilton Hotel 2651 Perimeter Parkway, Augusta, Georgia 30909 April 22-23, 2015 2 Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board - April 22-23, 2015 Meeting Minutes LIST OF ACRONYMS AIB - Accident Investigation Board AMWTP - Advanced Mixed Waste Treatment Project ANA - Alliance for Nuclear Accountability CAB - Citizens Advisory Board CROET - Community Reuse Organization of East Tennessee DDFO - Deputy Designated Federal Officer DOE - Department of Energy DUF6 - Depleted

  8. Meteorological Towers Display for Windows NT

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1999-05-20

    The Towers Display Program provides a convenient means of graphically depicting current wind speed and direction from a network of meteorological monitoring stations. The program was designed primarily for emergency response applications and, therefore, plots observed wind directions as a transport direction, i.e., the direction toward which the wind would transport a release of an atmospheric contaminant. Tabular summaries of wind speed and direction as well as temperature, relative humidity, and atmospheric turbulence measured atmore » each monitoring station can be displayed. The current implementation of the product at SRS displays data from eight Weather INformation and Display (WIND) System meteorological towers at SRS, meteorological stations established jointly by SRS/WSRC and the Augusta/Richmond County Emergency Management Agency in Augusta, GA, and National Weather Service stations in Augusta, GA. Wind speed and direction are plotted in a Beaufort scale format at the location of the station on a geographic map of the area. A GUI provides for easy specification of a desired date and time for the data to be displayed.« less

  9. Structure of the nocturnal boundary layer over a complex terrain

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parker, M.J.; Raman, S.

    1992-08-01

    The complex nature of the nocturnal boundary layer (NBL) has been shown extensively in the literature Project STABLE was conducted in 1988 to study NBL turbulence and diffusion over the complex terrain of the Savannah River Site (SRS) near Augusta, Georgia. The third night of the study was particularly interesting because of the unusual phenomena observed in the structure of the NBL. Further analyses of microscale and mesoscale data from this night are presented using data from SRS network of eight 61 m towers over 900 km{sup 2}, from six launches of an instrumented tethersonde, from permanent SRL meteorological instrumentation at seven levels of the 304 m (1,000 ft) WJBF-TV tower near SRS, and additional data collected at 36 m (CC) by North Carolina State University (NCSU) including a one dimensional sonic anemometer, fine wire thermocouple, and a three dimensional propeller anemometer. Also, data from the nearby Plant Vogtle nuclear power plant observation tower and the National Weather Service at Augusta`s Bush Field (AGS) are presented. The passage of a mesoscale phenomenon, defined as a microfront (with an explanation of the nomenclature used), and a vertical composite schematic of the NBL which shows dual low level wind maxima, dual inversions, and a persistent, elevated turbulent layer over a complex terrain are described.

  10. Demonstration Assessment of Light-Emitting Diode (LED) Parking Lot Lighting

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    in Leavenworth, KS (Technical Report) | SciTech Connect in Leavenworth, KS Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Demonstration Assessment of Light-Emitting Diode (LED) Parking Lot Lighting in Leavenworth, KS This report describes the process and results of a demonstration of solid-state lighting (SSL) technology in a commercial parking lot lighting application, under the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Solid-State Lighting Technology GATEWAY Demonstration Program. The parking lot is for

  11. EIS-0407: Abengoa Biomass Bioenergy Project near Hugoton, Stevens County,

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    KS | Department of Energy 07: Abengoa Biomass Bioenergy Project near Hugoton, Stevens County, KS EIS-0407: Abengoa Biomass Bioenergy Project near Hugoton, Stevens County, KS August 20, 2010 EIS-0407: Final Environmental Impact Statement Abengoa Biorefinery Project near Hugoton, Stevens County, Kansas October 6, 2011 EIS-0407: Record of Decision Issuance of a Loan Guarantee to Abengoa Bioenergy Biomass of Kansas, LLC for the Abengoa Biorefinery Project Near Hugoton, Stevens County, Kansas

  12. Public Utilities Specialist (Contracts- Senior Contract Administrator)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This position is located in the Contract Administration group of the Contract Management and Administration (KSC) organization, Customer Support Services (KS), Chief Operating Officer (K),...

  13. The Bowersock Mills and Power Company 1874

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Incremental Hydroelectric Energy The Bowersock Mills and Power Co., Lawrence, KS Hydroelectric Energy Potential for U.S. BMPC Plant At Forefront of Development Curve "In our ...

  14. ARM - Datastreams - precnet

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Measurement Variable Precipitation precipamt Locations Southern Great Plains SGP A1 Browse Data Whitewater, KS (ABLE) retired retired Originating instrument has been...

  15. ARM - Instrument - precnet

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    considered scientifically relevant. Precipitation Locations Southern Great Plains SGP A1 Browse Data Whitewater, KS (ABLE) retired retired Originating instrument has been...

  16. SAND78-0962 VOL 3

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Department (2) Wichita state University Wichita, KS 67208 Attn: M. Snyder W. Wentz Dr. Daniel K. Ai Senior Scientific Associate Alcoa Laboratories Aluminum Company of Amer ica...

  17. SAND78-0962 VOL 2

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Department (2) Wichita State University Wichita, KS 67208 Attn: M. Snyder W. Wentz Dr. Daniel K. Ai Senior Scientific Associate Alcoa Laboratories Aluminum Company of America...

  18. SAND78-0962 VOL 1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Department (2) Wichita State University wichita, KS 67208 Attn: M. Snyder W. Wentz Dr. Daniel K. Ai Senior Scientific Associate Alcoa Laboratories Aluminum Company of America...

  19. Public Utilities Specialist (Policy and System Governance)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This position is located in the Contract Management and Administration (KSC) organization of Customer Support Services (KS), Chief Operating Officer (K), Bonneville Power Administration (BPA)....

  20. Meridian Way Wind Farm | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Energy Developer Horizon Wind Energy Energy Purchaser Westar EnergyEmpire District Electric Location Cloud County KS Coordinates 39.43274, -97.545217 Show Map Loading map......

  1. Enertech | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Enertech Jump to: navigation, search Name: Enertech Place: Wichita, Kansas Zip: KS 67277-9022 Sector: Services, Wind energy Product: Enertech Wind provides consultation and...

  2. EIS-0407: EPA Notice of Availability of the Draft Environmental...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    To Support the Design, Construction, and Startup of a Commercial-Scale Integrated Biorefinery, Federal Funding, Located near the City Hugoton, Stevens County, KS Notice of...

  3. Elk River Wind Farm | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Inc Developer PPM Energy Inc Energy Purchaser Empire District Electric Co. Location Butler County KS Coordinates 37.586575, -96.547093 Show Map Loading map......

  4. KDOT Osborne Wind Project | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Jump to: navigation, search Name KDOT Osborne Wind Project Facility KDOT Osborne Sector Wind energy Facility Type Community Wind Location KS Coordinates 39.456077, -98.695613...

  5. Greenbush Kansas Wind Project | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    navigation, search Name Greenbush Kansas Wind Project Facility Greenbush Kansas Sector Wind energy Facility Type Community Wind Location KS Coordinates 37.51403, -94.987839...

  6. KDOT Grainfield Wind Project | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    to: navigation, search Name KDOT Grainfield Wind Project Facility KDOT Grainfield Sector Wind energy Facility Type Community Wind Location KS Coordinates 39.11006, -100.468124...

  7. Smoky Valley Wind Project | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Jump to: navigation, search Name Smoky Valley Wind Project Facility Smoky Valley Sector Wind energy Facility Type Community Wind Location KS Coordinates 38.578766, -97.683563...

  8. Kansas Corporation Commission Energy Division | Open Energy Informatio...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Commission Energy Division Jump to: navigation, search Name: Kansas Corporation Commission Energy Division Address: 1500 SW Arrowhead Road Place: Topeka, KS Zip: 66604-4074 Phone...

  9. Project Award Spreadsheets 2010 12 21 1232.xlsx

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    FL-022 35,513 130,000 Lakewood CO CO-007 140,989 195,000 Louisville-Jefferson County Metro Government KY KY-003 557,224 300,000 Manhattan KS KS-002 52,284 130,000 Mayville MI ...

  10. Calculated analysis of experiments in fast neutron reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davydov, V. K. Kalugina, K. M.; Gomin, E. A.

    2012-12-15

    In this paper, the results of computational simulation of experiments with the MK-I core of the JOYO fast neutron sodium-cooled reactor are presented. The MCU-KS code based on the Monte Carlo method was used for calculations. The research was aimed at additional verification of the MCU-KS code for systems with a fast neutron spectrum.

  11. WIPP News Releases - 1996

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    6 News Releases DOE to Hold Public Hearings Next Week in Albuquerque on WIPP SEIS - 12/31/96 DOE to Hold Public Hearings Next Week in Santa Fe on WIPP SEIS - 12/31/96 DOE Announces North Augusta Public Hearing for WIPP SEIS - 12/17/96 DOE Announces Denver Area Public Hearing for WIPP SEIS - 12/17/96 DOE Announces Richland Public Hearing for WIPP SEIS - 12/17/96 DOE Announces Santa Fe Public Hearings for WIPP SEIS - 12/17/96 DOE Announces Boise Public Hearing for WIPP SEIS - 12/17/96 DOE

  12. SR0209

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    4, 2002 Media Contact: Bill Taylor (803) 725-2889 DOE/NNSA to Host Modern Pit Facility Media Availability Flag Ribbon Art U. S. Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) representatives will host a media availability at 4 p.m. on Monday, October 28, 2002, to discuss the upcoming public scoping meeting for the development of a Modern Pit Facility. The media availability session will be held at 4 p.m. in the North Augusta Community Center, 101 Brookside Drive, North

  13. SR0913.docx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    NEWS MEDIA CONTACT: FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE Jim Giusti, DOE, (803) 952-7697 Wednesday, July 1, 2009 james-r.giusti@srs.gov Paivi Nettamo, SRNS, (803) 952-6938 paivi.nettamo@srs.gov SAVANNAH RIVER SITE SET DATES FOR RECOVERY ACT PROJECT TOWN HALL MEETINGS AND JOB FAIRS Aiken, S.C., July 7, 2009 * Augusta, G.A., July 20, 2009 Aiken, SC - The Department of Energy announced today that DOE's Savannah River Operations Office and Savannah River Nuclear Solutions, LLC, (SRNS) will host two town hall

  14. Implementation of a TMP Advanced Quality Control System at a Newsprint Manufacturing Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sebastien Kidd

    2006-02-14

    This project provided for the implementation of an advanced, model predictive multi-variant controller that works with the mill that has existing distributed control system. The method provides real time and online predictive models and modifies control actions to maximize quality and minimize energy costs. Using software sensors, the system can predict difficult-to-measure quality and process variables and make necessary process control decisions to accurately control pulp quality while minimizing electrical usage. This method of control has allowed Augusta Newsprint Company to optimize the operation of its Thermo Mechanical Pulp mill for lower energy consumption and lower pulp quality variance.

  15. Veteran Cooperative Program Sees Successful First Year at Savannah River

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Site | Department of Energy Veteran Cooperative Program Sees Successful First Year at Savannah River Site Veteran Cooperative Program Sees Successful First Year at Savannah River Site December 29, 2015 - 12:15pm Addthis U.S. Army veteran Ashley Dernberger is the most recent student to join Savannah River Remediation’s Veteran Cooperative Program. She works part time in public affairs while pursuing a marketing degree at Augusta University. U.S. Army veteran Ashley Dernberger is the most

  16. OI

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    rl 0 OI 4 a ) (v (v . . . d * . * . I METHOD FOR RECOVERING MATERIALS FROM WASTE Inventors: George G. Wicks 1586 Citation Drive North Augusta, South Carolina 29803 Citizen of U.S.A. David E. Clark University of Florida College of Engineering Dept. of Materials, Science & Eng. Gainesville, Florida 32611 Citizen of U.S.A. Rebecca L. Schulz University of Florida College of Engineering Dept. of Materials, Science &. Eng. Gainesville, Florida 32611 Citizen of U.S.A. This report was prepared

  17. OSTI, US Dept of Energy, Office of Scientific and Technical Information |

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Speeding access to science information from DOE and Beyond 2000's - Growth and Continued Success for OSTI in the New Millennium 2015-03-31 10:54 History, Page, STIPworks 2 2011 STIP Working Meeting 2015-05-18 17:00 2011 Meeting in Pleasanton, CA, Page, STIPworks, STIPworks Meetings 3 2012 STIP Working Meeting - "Embracing the Future" 2015-05-18 08:07 2012 Meeting in Augusta, Georgia, Page, STIP Homepage, STIPworks Meetings 4 2013 STIP Working Meeting - DOE's Public Access Solution

  18. SRS employees spend a day off working for the community | National Nuclear

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Security Administration SRS employees spend a day off working for the community Tuesday, May 13, 2014 - 10:29am More than 85 employees from the Savannah River Site M&O contractor Savannah River Nuclear Solutions, LLC (SRNS) volunteered to work on their day off at six United Way agencies located throughout the greater Augusta, Ga., area as part of this year's Project SERVE. Dan Armstrong of SRNS said most of the United Way agencies supported by this effort have limited budgets to support

  19. Structure of the nocturnal boundary layer over a complex terrain

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parker, M.J. ); Raman, S. . Dept. of Marine, Earth and Atmospheric Sciences)

    1992-01-01

    The complex nature of the nocturnal boundary layer (NBL) has been shown extensively in the literature Project STABLE was conducted in 1988 to study NBL turbulence and diffusion over the complex terrain of the Savannah River Site (SRS) near Augusta, Georgia. The third night of the study was particularly interesting because of the unusual phenomena observed in the structure of the NBL. Further analyses of microscale and mesoscale data from this night are presented using data from SRS network of eight 61 m towers over 900 km{sup 2}, from six launches of an instrumented tethersonde, from permanent SRL meteorological instrumentation at seven levels of the 304 m (1,000 ft) WJBF-TV tower near SRS, and additional data collected at 36 m (CC) by North Carolina State University (NCSU) including a one dimensional sonic anemometer, fine wire thermocouple, and a three dimensional propeller anemometer. Also, data from the nearby Plant Vogtle nuclear power plant observation tower and the National Weather Service at Augusta's Bush Field (AGS) are presented. The passage of a mesoscale phenomenon, defined as a microfront (with an explanation of the nomenclature used), and a vertical composite schematic of the NBL which shows dual low level wind maxima, dual inversions, and a persistent, elevated turbulent layer over a complex terrain are described.

  20. Prolonged experimental drought reduces plant hydraulic conductance and transpiration and increases mortality in a piñon–juniper woodland

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Pangle, Robert E.; Limousin, Jean -Marc; Plaut, Jennifer A.; Yepez, Enrico A.; Hudson, Patrick J.; Boutz, Amanda L.; Gehres, Nathan; Pockman, William T.; McDowell, Nate G.

    2015-03-23

    Plant hydraulic conductance (ks) is a critical control on whole-plant water use and carbon uptake and, during drought, influences whether plants survive or die. To assess long-term physiological and hydraulic responses of mature trees to water availability, we manipulated ecosystem-scale water availability from 2007 to 2013 in a piñon pine (Pinus edulis) and juniper (Juniperus monosperma) woodland. We examined the relationship between ks and subsequent mortality using more than 5 years of physiological observations, and the subsequent impact of reduced hydraulic function and mortality on total woody canopy transpiration (EC) and conductance (GC). For both species, we observed significant reductionsmore » in plant transpiration (E) and ks under experimentally imposed drought. Conversely, supplemental water additions increased E and ks in both species. Interestingly, both species exhibited similar declines in ks under the imposed drought conditions, despite their differing stomatal responses and mortality patterns during drought. Reduced whole-plant ks also reduced carbon assimilation in both species, as leaf-level stomatal conductance (gs) and net photosynthesis (An) declined strongly with decreasing ks. Finally, we observed that chronically low whole-plant ks was associated with greater canopy dieback and mortality for both piñon and juniper and that subsequent reductions in woody canopy biomass due to mortality had a significant impact on both daily and annual canopy EC and GC. Our data indicate that significant reductions in ks precede drought-related tree mortality events in this system, and the consequence is a significant reduction in canopy gas exchange and carbon fixation. Our results suggest that reductions in productivity and woody plant cover in piñon–juniper woodlands can be expected due to reduced plant hydraulic conductance and increased mortality of both piñon pine and juniper under anticipated future conditions of more frequent and persistent regional drought in the southwestern United States.« less

  1. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Monthly","112015" ,"Release Date:","1292016" ,"Next Release Date:","2292016" ,"Excel File Name:","n3020ks3m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http:tonto.eia.govdnavng...

  2. The Electronic Structure of a Two-Dimensional Pure Copper Oxide...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    S. Moser, L. Moreschini, H.-Y. Yang, D. Innocenti, F. Fuchs, N.H. Hansen, Y.J. Chang, K.S. Kim, A.L. Walter, A. Bostwick, E. Rotenberg, F. Mila, and M. Grioni,...

  3. BPA-2014-00650-FOIA Response

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Charles Patrick "Pat" Roberts (R-KS, 1997-present) The office of Congressman Brad Schneider (D-IL, 2013-present) The office of Congressman John Tierney (D-MA, 1997-present) We...

  4. City of Lakin, Kansas (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    of Lakin Place: Kansas Phone Number: (620) 355-6252 Website: www.lakinkansas.orgindex.php? Twitter: @CityofLakin Facebook: https:www.facebook.compagesCity-of-Lakin-KS...

  5. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Annual",2015 ,"Release Date:","4292016" ,"Next Release Date:","5312016" ,"Excel File Name:","n9050ks2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http:tonto.eia.govdnavnghist...

  6. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Monthly","22016" ,"Release Date:","4292016" ,"Next Release Date:","5312016" ,"Excel File Name:","n3010ks3m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http:tonto.eia.govdnavnghist...

  7. Melih Sener | Photosynthetic Antenna Research Center

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Melih Sener Melih Sener Melih Sener Visiting Scholar E-mail: melih@ks.uiuc.edu Website: University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Selected Publications ener M, Strmpfer J,...

  8. Greensburg, Kansas: A Better, Greener Place to Live

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2009-10-01

    The brochure highlights efforts to rebuild green in Greensburg, KS, and mentions DOE's role in rebuilding. The layout is designed to be used as a template for other cities in similar situations.

  9. Ensign | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Owner NextEra Energy Resources Developer NextEra Energy Resources Energy Purchaser KCP&L Greater Missouri Operations Location Ensign KS Coordinates 37.61259964, -100.3458595...

  10. Spearville 3 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner enXco Developer EnXco Energy Purchaser KCP&L Location Spearville KS Coordinates 37.864148, -99.7237587 Show Map Loading map......

  11. ARM - Datastreams - sondewrpn

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    SGP B1 Browse Data Hillsboro, KS (Boundary) retired SGP B4 Browse Data Vici, OK (Boundary) retired SGP B5 Browse Data Morris, OK (Boundary) retired SGP B6 Browse Data Purcell...

  12. This Week In Petroleum Printer-Friendly Version

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    per calendar day) Refinery 2008 Capacity 2009 Capacity Difference Frontier, El Dorado, KS 107,500 130,000 22,500 Chevron, El Segundo, CA 260,000 279,000 19,000 Calumet,...

  13. Comparison between MSW ash and RDF ash from incineration process...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Authors: Chang, Ni-Bin ; Wang, H.P. ; Lin, K.S. 1 + Show Author Affiliations National Cheng-Kung Univ., Tainan (Taiwan, Province of China) and others Publication Date: ...

  14. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Aeroprojects Inc - PA 22

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    December 18,1990 PA.22-3 - ORNL Survey Report (ORNLRASA-924); R.D. Foley and K.S. Brown; Results of the Radiological Survey at the ALCOA Research Laboratory, 600 Freeport...

  15. RADTRAN/RADCAT USER GUIDE

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    ... Volume 26, No. 1 of Annals of the ICRP. Smith, H., ed.. ICRP Publication 72. New York, New ... NM. Mills, G.S., K.S. Neuhauser, and J.D. Smith, 1995, "Evacuation Time Based on general ...

  16. Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Godfrey, A.T., B.S. Collins, K.S. Kim, R. Lee, J. Powers, R. Salko, S.G. Stimpson, W.A. ... Allison, L., R.C. Smith and B. Williams, An Information Theoretic Approach to Use ...

  17. untitled

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    2005 (Thousand Barrels) East Coast Appalachian No. 1 Total IN, IL, KY MN, WI, ND, SD OK, KS, MO Total Liquefied Refinery Gases 382 8 390 2,072 157 116 2,345 EthaneEthylene 10...

  18. ARM - Instrument - met

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Browse Data Browse Plots Ashton, KS (Extended) SGP E11 Browse Data Browse Plots Byron, OK (Extended) SGP E13 Browse Data Browse Plots Lamont, OK (Extended) SGP E15 Browse Data...

  19. untitled

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    2005 (Thousand Barrels) East Coast Appalachian No. 1 Total IN, IL, KY MN, WI, ND, SD OK, KS, MO Total Liquefied Refinery Gases 331 -18 313 2,398 -147 -220 2,031 EthaneEthylene...

  20. ARM - Datastreams - swatspcp

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    retired SGP E10 Browse Data Tyro, KS (Extended) retired SGP E12 Browse Data Pawhuska, OK (Extended) SGP E16 Browse Data Vici, OK (Extended) retired SGP E18 Browse Data Morris,...

  1. ARM - Datastreams - 5ebbr

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    retired SGP E9 Browse Data Ashton, KS (Extended) SGP E12 Browse Data Pawhuska, OK (Extended) SGP E13 Browse Data Lamont, OK (Extended) SGP E15 Browse Data Ringwood, OK...

  2. ARM - Instrument - ceil

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Plains SGP B1 Browse Data Hillsboro, KS (Boundary) retired SGP B4 Browse Data Vici, OK (Boundary) retired SGP B5 Browse Data Morris, OK (Boundary) retired SGP B6 Browse Data...

  3. ARM - Datastreams - sonde

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Plains SGP B1 Browse Data Hillsboro, KS (Boundary) retired SGP B4 Browse Data Vici, OK (Boundary) retired SGP B5 Browse Data Morris, OK (Boundary) retired SGP C1 Browse Data...

  4. Re-Building Greensburg

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Greensburg, KS - A town that was devastated by a tornado in 2007, yet came back to be one of the Nation's most energy-efficient, sustainable communities. Civic leaders and entrepreneurs helped...

  5. Microsoft Word - PMMDOC_B.doc

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Increases on U.S. Agricultural Production. Report 116. The Center for Agricultural and Rural Development, Ames, IA. 75. Tyson, K.S. 1990. Biomass Resource Potential of the United...

  6. EIA-816

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ...Parts1-3'O28","AND(LEN(zip)5,ISNUMBER(VALUE(zip)))","Enter a valid 5 digit zip code." ... methods:",,,..."KS","Kansas " "Doing Business As:",,,..."KY","Kent...

  7. EIA-820

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ...Parts1-2'O28","AND(LEN(zip)5,ISNUMBER(VALUE(zip)))","Enter a valid 5 digit zip code." ... methods:",,,..."KS","Kansas " "Doing Business As:",,,..."KY","Kent...

  8. Parity Violation in Moeller Scattering (Conference) | SciTech...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    abstract prepared. Authors: Kumar, K.S. ; Massachusetts U., Amherst Publication Date: 2006-02-15 OSTI Identifier: 876455 Report Number(s): SLAC-REPRINT-2005-154 TRN:...

  9. ,"Kansas Natural Gas Industrial Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    586-8800",,,"1292016 12:15:41 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Kansas Natural Gas Industrial Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" "Sourcekey","N3035KS3" "Date","Kansas...

  10. City of Baldwin City, Kansas (Utility Company) | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Kansas Phone Number: 785-594-6907 or (785) 594-6427 Website: www.baldwincity.orgcity-hall Facebook: https:www.facebook.compagesCity-of-Baldwin-City-KS65411212171 Outage...

  11. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Annual",2015 ,"Release Date:","03312016" ,"Next Release Date:","04292016" ,"Excel File Name:","n3020ks2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http:tonto.eia.govdnavnghist...

  12. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Annual",2015 ,"Release Date:","03312016" ,"Next Release Date:","04292016" ,"Excel File Name:","n3010ks2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http:tonto.eia.govdnavnghist...

  13. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Annual",2015 ,"Release Date:","03312016" ,"Next Release Date:","04292016" ,"Excel File Name:","n3010ks3a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http:tonto.eia.govdnavnghist...

  14. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Annual",2015 ,"Release Date:","03312016" ,"Next Release Date:","04292016" ,"Excel File Name:","n3020ks4a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http:tonto.eia.govdnavnghist...

  15. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Annual",2015 ,"Release Date:","03312016" ,"Next Release Date:","04292016" ,"Excel File Name:","n3020ks3a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http:tonto.eia.govdnavnghist...

  16. ,"Kansas Natural Gas Underground Storage Net Withdrawals (MMcf...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"01292016 2:35:47 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Kansas Natural Gas Underground Storage Net Withdrawals (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N5070KS2"...

  17. Workplace Charging Challenge Partner: Black & Veatch | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Black & Veatch Workplace Charging Challenge Partner: Black & Veatch Workplace Charging Challenge Partner: Black & Veatch Joined the Challenge: November 2015 Headquarters: Overland Park, KS Charging Location: Overland Park, KS Domestic Employees: 7,120 Black & Veatch is an independent engineering, consulting, and construction firm working in water, energy and telecommunications. The company supported the design and construction of the world's largest DC fast charging network in

  18. Symmetry-adapted perturbation theory with Kohn-Sham orbitals using non-empirically tuned, long-range-corrected density functionals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lao, Ka Un; Herbert, John M.

    2014-01-28

    The performance of second-order symmetry-adapted perturbation theory (SAPT) calculations using Kohn-Sham (KS) orbitals is evaluated against benchmark results for intermolecular interactions. Unlike previous studies of this SAPT(KS) methodology, the present study uses non-empirically tuned long-range corrected (LRC) functionals for the monomers. The proper v{sub xc} (r)?0 asymptotic limit is achieved by tuning the range separation parameter in order to satisfy the condition that the highest occupied KS energy level equals minus the molecule's ionization energy, for each monomer unit. Tests for He{sub 2}, Ne{sub 2}, and the S22 and S66 data sets reveal that this condition is important for accurate prediction of the non-dispersion components of the energy, although errors in SAPT(KS) dispersion energies remain unacceptably large. In conjunction with an empirical dispersion potential, however, the SAPT(KS) method affords good results for S22 and S66, and also accurately predicts the whole potential energy curve for the sandwich isomer of the benzene dimer. Tuned LRC functionals represent an attractive alternative to other asymptotic corrections that have been employed in density-functional-based SAPT calculations, and we recommend the use of tuned LRC functionals in both coupled-perturbed SAPT(DFT) calculations and dispersion-corrected SAPT(KS) calculations.

  19. Green Schools Project Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Verdict, M.

    2000-09-27

    The Alliance to Save Energy has responded to interest in the Green Schools concept from the New England states of Maine, New Hampshire and Vermont. The Alliance conducted a train-the-trainers workshop in Augusta, Maine March 17--18, 1999. This work is part of a Green Schools replication project leveraged by funds from another source, NORDAX, which contributed $80,000 to provide partial support to staff at the Maine Energy Education Project (MEEP), Vermont Energy Education Program (VEEP), and New Hampshire Governor's Office to develop Green Schools Projects. DOE funds were used to conduct training, develop a network of state and local government, business and school partners to support school efficiency activities in those three states.

  20. WAT TENBERG SPIN DLE EAT ON BONN Y GREELEY ROGGEN WAVERLY SH

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    BOE Reserve Class No 2001 reserves 0.1 - 10 MBOE 10.1 - 100 MBOE 100.1 - 1,000 MBOE 1,000.1 - 10,000 MBOE 10,000.1 - 100,000 MBOE > 100,000 MBOE Denver Basin Outline 0 20 40 10 30 Miles ± CO 2001 Reserve Summary for All Denver Basin Fields KS NE CO NE WY KS SD Index Map For 3 Denver Basin Panels The mapped oil and gas field boundary outlines were created by the Reserves and Production Division, Office of Oil and Gas, Energy Information Administration pursuant to studies required by Section

  1. WAT TENBERG SPIN DLE EAT ON BONN Y GREELEY ROGGEN WAVERLY SH

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Gas Reserve Class No 2001 gas reserves 0.1 - 10 MMCF 10.1 - 100 MMCF 100.1 - 1,000 MMCF 1,000.1 - 10,000 MMCF 10,000.1 - 100,000 MMCF > 100,000 MMCF Denver Basin Outline 0 20 40 10 30 Miles ± CO 2001 Reserve Summary for All Denver Basin Fields KS NE CO NE WY KS SD 1 3 2 Index Map For 3 Denver Basin Panels The mapped oil and gas field boundary outlines were created by the Reserves and Production Division, Office of Oil and Gas, Energy Information Administration pursuant to studies required by

  2. WAT TENBERG SPIN DLE EAT ON BONN Y GREELEY ROGGEN WAVERLY SH

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Liquids Reserve Class No 2001 liquids reserves 0.1 - 10 Mbbl 10.1 - 100 Mbbl 100.1 - 1,000 Mbbl 1,000.1 - 10,000 Mbbl 10,000.1 - 100,000 Mbbl Denver Basin Outline 0 20 40 10 30 Miles ± CO 2001 Reserve Summary for All Denver Basin Fields KS NE CO NE WY KS SD Index Map For 3 Denver Basin Panels The mapped oil and gas field boundary outlines were created by the Reserves and Production Division, Office of Oil and Gas, Energy Information Administration pursuant to studies required by Section 604 of

  3. Published Papers - Joint Center for Energy Storage Research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Published Papers Cao, R., Chen, J., Han, K.S., Xu, W., Mei, D., Bhattacharya, P., Engelhard, M.H., Mueller, K.T., Liu, J., and Zhang, J-G, "Effect of the Anion Activity on the Stability of Li Metal Anode in Lithium-Sulfur Batteries", Advanced Functional Materials, March 29, 2016, DOI: 10.1002/adfm.201505074. View Chen, J., Han, K.S., Henderson, W.A., Vijayakumar, M., Lau, K.C., Dzwiniel, T., Pan, H., Curtiss, L.A., Xiao, J., Mueller,K.T., Shao, Y., Liu, J., "Restricting the

  4. Comparison of electron transport calculations in warm dense matter using the Ziman formula

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Burrill, D. J.; Feinblum, D. V.; Charest, M. R. J.; Starrett, C. E.

    2016-02-10

    The Ziman formulation of electrical conductivity is tested in warm and hot dense matter using the pseudo-atom molecular dynamics method. Several implementation options that have been widely used in the literature are systematically tested through a comparison to the accurate, but expensive Kohn–Sham density functional theory molecular dynamics (KS-DFT-MD) calculations. As a result, the comparison is made for several elements and mixtures and for a wide range of temperatures and densities, and reveals a preferred method that generally gives very good agreement with the KS-DFT-MD results, but at a fraction of the computational cost.

  5. Progress at the interface of wave-function and density-functional theories

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gidopoulos, Nikitas I.

    2011-04-15

    The Kohn-Sham (KS) potential of density-functional theory (DFT) emerges as the minimizing effective potential in a variational scheme that does not involve fixing the unknown single-electron density. Using Rayleigh Schroedinger (RS) perturbation theory (PT), we construct ab initio approximations for the energy difference, the minimization of which determines the KS potential directly - thereby bypassing DFT's traditional algorithm to search for the density that minimizes the total energy. From second-order RS PT, we obtain variationally stable energy differences to be minimized, solving the severe problem of variational collapse of orbital-dependent exchange-correlation functionals based on second-order RS PT.

  6. WCH_CMP_NOV2009.pdf

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    BOE Reserve Class No 2001 reserves 0.1 - 10 MBOE 10.1 - 100 MBOE 100.1 - 1,000 MBOE 1,000.1 - 10,000 MBOE 10,000.1 - 100,000 MBOE > 100,000 MBOE Denver Basin Outline 0 20 40 10 30 Miles ± CO 2001 Reserve Summary for All Denver Basin Fields KS NE CO NE WY KS SD Index Map For 3 Denver Basin Panels The mapped oil and gas field boundary outlines were created by the Reserves and Production Division, Office of Oil and Gas, Energy Information Administration pursuant to studies required by Section

  7. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Storage Capacity (Summary) " "Sourcekey","N5290US2","N5290AL2","NGMEPG0SACSALMMCF","N5290AR2","N5290CA2","N5290CO2","N5290IL2","N5290IN2","N5290IA2","N5290KS2","N529...

  8. High heating rate thermal desorption for molecular surface sampling

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ovchinnikova, Olga S.; Van Berkel, Gary J.

    2016-03-29

    A method for analyzing a sample having at least one analyte includes the step of heating the sample at a rate of at least 10.sup.6 K/s to thermally desorb at least one analyte from the sample. The desorbed analyte is collected. The analyte can then be analyzed.

  9. Hierarchy of model KohnSham potentials for orbital-dependent functionals: A practical alternative to the optimized effective potential method

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kohut, Sviataslau V.; Staroverov, Viktor N.; Ryabinkin, Ilya G.

    2014-05-14

    We describe a method for constructing a hierarchy of model potentials approximating the functional derivative of a given orbital-dependent exchange-correlation functional with respect to electron density. Each model is derived by assuming a particular relationship between the self-consistent solutions of KohnSham (KS) and generalized KohnSham (GKS) equations for the same functional. In the KS scheme, the functional is differentiated with respect to density, in the GKS schemewith respect to orbitals. The lowest-level approximation is the orbital-averaged effective potential (OAEP) built with the GKS orbitals. The second-level approximation, termed the orbital-consistent effective potential (OCEP), is based on the assumption that the KS and GKS orbitals are the same. It has the form of the OAEP plus a correction term. The highest-level approximation is the density-consistent effective potential (DCEP), derived under the assumption that the KS and GKS electron densities are equal. The analytic expression for a DCEP is the OCEP formula augmented with kinetic-energy-density-dependent terms. In the case of exact-exchange functional, the OAEP is the Slater potential, the OCEP is roughly equivalent to the localized HartreeFock approximation and related models, and the DCEP is practically indistinguishable from the true optimized effective potential for exact exchange. All three levels of the proposed hierarchy require solutions of the GKS equations as input and have the same affordable computational cost.

  10. CX-100179 Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Wind Energy Technology Project and Renewable Energy Center of Excellence Award Number: DE-FG36-08GO88013 CX(s) Applied: B5.18 Wind Program Date: 01/26/2015 Location(s): KS Office(s): Golden Field Office

  11. Sk---

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    +' -'a-- 'ZS cw..tn;i. .-- Zo cezU2?siataa kjcs AA3 ks*sti lffti S *Ab *T*,& tmld kv ;ia-eGd aa t;v ryrs d t:* -ticIs;: e c3 eaizw2-L &4?ia, x,qZ-' y s +.-w * & & A& b L*z&-...

  12. Microsoft Word - 45164 Final.doc

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    ... U.S. Department of Energy Report DOENV11718-582. p. 3-4. U.S. Environmental Protection ... Swadley, R.J. Laczniak, R.G. Warren, K.S. Green and C.M. Engle, 1997. Digital geologic map ...

  13. PSA Vol 1 Tables Revised Ver 2 Print.xls

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    2005 (Thousand Barrels) East Coast Appalachian No. 1 Total IN, IL, KY MN, WI, ND, SD OK, KS, MO Total Liquefied Refinery Gases 14,825 298 15,123 33,928 1,840 2,446 38,214...

  14. untitled

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    2005 (Thousand Barrels) East Coast Appalachian No. 1 Total IN, IL, KY MN, WI, ND, SD OK, KS, MO Total Total Net Input 16,465 108 16,573 10,405 2,208 1,923 14,536 Pentanes Plus...

  15. U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Energy Outlook...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    OH 1. NE 3. S1 4. S2 5. GF 6. OH 7. EN AL,MS MN,ND,SD IA,NE,MO,KS TX,LA,OK,AR MT,WY,ID CO,UT,NV AZ,NM 9. AM 11. C2 12. WS 13. MT 14. CU 15. ZN WV,MD,DC,DE 2. YP...

  16. PSA Vol 1 Tables Revised Ver 2 Print.xls

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    2005 (Thousand Barrels) East Coast Appalachian No. 1 Total IN, IL, KY MN, WI, ND, SD OK, KS, MO Total Natural Gas Liquids 359 5,914 6,273 26,874 4,786 77,174 108,834 Pentanes...

  17. PSA Vol 1 Tables Revised Ver 2 Print.xls

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Refining Districts, 2005 East Coast Appalachian No. 1 Total IN, IL, KY MN, WI, ND, SD OK, KS, MO Total Liquefied Refinery Gases 2.5 0.9 2.4 4.2 1.2 0.9 3.1 Finished Motor...

  18. untitled

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    2005 (Thousand Barrels) East Coast Appalachian No. 1 Total IN, IL, KY MN, WI, ND, SD OK, KS, MO Total Total Net Input 17,809 97 17,906 9,452 1,740 1,790 12,982 Pentanes Plus 0...

  19. untitled

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    2005 (Thousand Barrels) East Coast Appalachian No. 1 Total IN, IL, KY MN, WI, ND, SD OK, KS, MO Total Natural Gas Liquids 44 526 570 1,615 417 5,414 7,446 Pentanes Plus 5 89 94...

  20. F-1 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Energy Outlook...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Central West North Central East North Central Mountain AK WA MT WY ID NV UT CO AZ NM TX OK IA KS MO IL IN KY TN MS AL FL GA SC NC WV PA NJ MD DE NY CT VT ME RI MA NH VA WI MI OH...

  1. PSA Vol 1 Tables Revised Ver 2 Print.xls

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    2005 (Thousand Barrels) East Coast Appalachian No. 1 Total IN, IL, KY MN, WI, ND, SD OK, KS, MO Total Total Net Input 199,173 1,285 200,458 117,409 24,041 20,032 161,482...

  2. untitled

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    December 2005 East Coast Appalachian No. 1 Total IN, IL, KY MN, WI, ND, SD OK, KS, MO Total Liquefied Refinery Gases 0.7 -0.6 0.6 3.5 -1.1 -1.0 1.9 Finished Motor Gasoline a 50.3...

  3. untitled

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    2005 (Thousand Barrels) East Coast Appalachian No. 1 Total IN, IL, KY MN, WI, ND, SD OK, KS, MO Total Natural Gas Liquids 0 508 508 2,142 393 6,367 8,902 Pentanes Plus 0 90 90...

  4. F-5 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Energy Outlook...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Figure F4. Oil and Gas Supply Model Regions Atlantic WA MT WY ID NV UT CO AZ NM TX OK IA KS MO IL IN KY TN MS AL FL GA SC NC WV PA NJ MD DE NY CT ME RI MA NH VA WI MI OH NE...

  5. untitled

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    September 2005 East Coast Appalachian No. 1 Total IN, IL, KY MN, WI, ND, SD OK, KS, MO Total Liquefied Refinery Gases 0.7 0.3 0.7 2.9 1.3 0.5 2.2 Finished Motor Gasoline a 47.9...

  6. Cpl6: The New Extensible, High-Performance Parallel Coupler forthe...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Report Number(s): LBNL--58387 R&D Project: KS1501; BnR: KP1201010; TRN: US200608%%531 DOE Contract Number: DE-AC02-05CH11231; NSF:ATM-0404790 Resource Type: Journal Article ...

  7. Microsoft Word - figure_03.doc

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    IN OH TN WV VA KY MD PA NY VT NH MA CT ME RI DE DC NC SC GA FL NJ AL MS LA MO AR TX NM OK CO KS UT AZ WY NE IL IA MN WI ND SD ID MT WA OR NV CA HI AK MI Gulf of Mexico Volume

  8. Worksheet

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ... Energy Inc",56497,"Goodman Energy Center",22,1,8.4,8.2,8.2,,"IC","NG",,6,2008,"OP" "KS","Ellis",12524,"Midwest Energy Inc",56497,"Goodman Energy Center",22,2,8.4,8.2,8....

  9. untitled

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    MN, WI, ND, SD OK, KS, MO Total Liquefied Refinery Gases 382 8 390 2,072 157 116 2,345 EthaneEthylene 10 0 10 0 0 0 0 Ethane 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Ethylene 10 0 10 0 0 0 0 Propane...

  10. EngenuitySC Commercialization and Entrepreneurial Training Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hughes, Meghan; Hutton, Katherine R

    2012-12-31

    A team led by EngenuitySC has performed education and outreach on development of advanced energy markets that will enable wider use of clean energy technologies. This report details the efforts that have made significant advances to improve the market place through education, outreach, and increased communications between industry members. The project resulted in two self-funded industry clusters known as the Fuel Cell Collaborative and NuHub. This project has focused on building and strengthening the leading clean energy clusters in South Carolina: nuclear energy and fuel cell technologies. For the nuclear industry, a new cluster was developed that is now known as NuHub. This cluster has already engaged over 25 nuclear industry leaders or suppliers, four public sector partners, six community economic development foundations, and nearly ten academic partners in a 175 mile radius between Augusta, Georgia and Charlotte, North Carolina. Our outreach has touched over 2,000 stakeholders through the website alone, not including the public audiences and members of the business community reached through news stories and releases that were distributed to over 620 print and online publications. NuHub has established a formal leadership structure, developed subcommittees to focus on industry issues, instituted educational programs for the workforce, and created an industry funding structure that will sustain the industry cluster and mission. NuHub has participated in a wide-variety of community building and outreach activities since its formation under this grant. In the two years since its creation in 2010, we have initiated efforts focused in four main areas that correlate with the four NuHub subcommittees including: innovation, workforce development, industry engagement, and marketing and communications. NuHub successfully raised over $160,000 in both public and private funding, which has supported work to grow the cluster and engage partners including NuScale, Fluor, and Holtec International for research about deployment of advanced small modular reactor (SMR) technologies. The workforce training efforts from NuHub have focused on assisting existing industry to fill positions needed to construct and operate new nuclear plants being built at the VC Summer plant in Jenkinsville, SC and at Plant Votgle in Augusta, Georgia ?¢???? both of whom are constructing the first nuclear reactors (Westinghouse AP 1000 units), to be built in over 30 years. This includes a partnership with Midlands Technical College to train reactor operators and the development of training facilities to support workforce development activities. It is anticipated that approximately 70 students a year will be trained through these programs in the next five years, and it will be expanded to meet new industry needs.

  11. Annual review of cultural resource investigations by the Savannah River Archaeological Research Program. Fiscal year 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brooks, M.J.; Brooks, R.D.; Sassaman, K.E.; Crass, D.C.

    1995-10-01

    The Savannah River Archaeological Research Program (SRARP) continued through FY95 with the United States Department of Energy to fulfill a threefold mission of cultural resource management, research, and public education at the Savannah River Site. Over 2,300 acres of land on the SRS came under cultural resources review in FY95. This activity entailed 30 field surveys, resulting in the recording of 86 new sites. Twenty-two existing sites within survey tract boundaries were revisited to update site file records. Research conducted by SRARP was reported in 11 papers and monographs published during FY95. SRARP staff also presented research results in 18 papers at professional meetings. Field research included several testing programs, excavations, and remote sensing at area sites, as well as data collection abroad. Seven grants were acquired by SRARP staff to support off-site research. In the area of heritage education, the SRARP expanded its activities in FY95 with a full schedule of classroom education, public outreach, and on-site tours. Volunteer excavations at the Tinker Creek site were continued with the Augusta Archaeological Society and other avocational groups, and other off-site excavations provided a variety of opportunities for field experience. Some 80 presentations, displays and tours were provided for schools, historical societies, civic groups, and environmental and historical awareness day celebrations. Additionally, SRARP staff taught four anthropology courses at area colleges.

  12. An Aerial Radiological survey of the Alvin W. Vogtle Nuclear Plant and surrounding area, Waynesboro, Georgia: Date of survey: August--September 1988

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-09-01

    An Aerial Radiological Survey was conducted during the period of August 24 to September 14, 1988 over an area of approximately 310 square kilometers (120 square miles) surrounding the Alvin W. Vogtle Nuclear Plant. The Vogtle Nuclear Plant is located near Augusta, Georgia, along the Savannah River and adjacent to the Savannah River Site (SRS). Several anomalous areas were identified in the portion of the survey extending into the SRS perimeter. The dominant isotopes found in these areas were cesium-137 and cobalt-60. All of these man-made anomalies identified by the aerial measurements were attributed to SRS processing. For the remainder of the survey area, the inferred radiation exposure rates generally varied from 6 to 10 microroentgens per hour ({mu}R/h), which was found to be due to naturally occurring uranium, thorium, and radioactive potassium gamma emitters. The reported exposure rate values included an estimated cosmic ray contribution of 3.6 {mu}R/h. Soils samples and pressurized ion chamber measurements were obtained at three locations within the survey boundaries to support the aerial data. The exposure rate values obtained from these groundbased measurements were in agreement with the corresponding inferred aerial values. 6 refs., 13 figs., 4 tabs.

  13. Opening Doors of Opportunity to Develop the Future Nuclear Workforce - 13325

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mets, Mindy

    2013-07-01

    The United States' long-term demand for highly skilled nuclear industry workers is well-documented by the Nuclear Energy Institute. In addition, a study commissioned by the SRS Community Reuse Organization concludes that 10,000 new nuclear workers are needed in the two-state region of Georgia and South Carolina alone. Young adults interested in preparing for these nuclear careers must develop specialized skills and knowledge, including a clear understanding of the nuclear workforce culture. Successful students are able to enter well-paying career fields. However, the national focus on nuclear career opportunities and associated training and education programs has been minimal in recent decades. Developing the future nuclear workforce is a challenge, particularly in the midst of competition for similar workers from various industries. In response to regional nuclear workforce development needs, the SRS Community Reuse Organization established the Nuclear Workforce Initiative (NWI{sup R}) to promote and expand nuclear workforce development capabilities by facilitating integrated partnerships. NWI{sup R} achievements include a unique program concept called NWI{sup R} Academies developed to link students with nuclear career options through firsthand experiences. The academies are developed and conducted at Aiken Technical College and Augusta Technical College with support from workforce development organizations and nuclear employers. Programs successfully engage citizens in nuclear workforce development and can be adapted to other communities focused on building the future nuclear workforce. (authors)

  14. Safety evaluation of a hydrogen fueled transit bus

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coutts, D.A.; Thomas, J.K.; Hovis, G.L.; Wu, T.T.

    1997-12-31

    Hydrogen fueled vehicle demonstration projects must satisfy management and regulator safety expectations. This is often accomplished using hazard and safety analyses. Such an analysis has been completed to evaluate the safety of the H2Fuel bus to be operated in Augusta, Georgia. The evaluation methods and criteria used reflect the Department of Energy`s graded approach for qualifying and documenting nuclear and chemical facility safety. The work focused on the storage and distribution of hydrogen as the bus motor fuel with emphases on the technical and operational aspects of using metal hydride beds to store hydrogen. The safety evaluation demonstrated that the operation of the H2Fuel bus represents a moderate risk. This is the same risk level determined for operation of conventionally powered transit buses in the United States. By the same criteria, private passenger automobile travel in the United States is considered a high risk. The evaluation also identified several design and operational modifications that resulted in improved safety, operability, and reliability. The hazard assessment methodology used in this project has widespread applicability to other innovative operations and systems, and the techniques can serve as a template for other similar projects.

  15. SRS ECOLOGY ENVIRONMENTAL INFORMATION DOCUMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wike, L; Doug Martin, D; Eric Nelson, E; Nancy Halverson, N; John Mayer, J; Michael Paller, M; Rodney Riley, R; Michael Serrato, M

    2006-03-01

    The SRS Ecology Environmental Information Document (EEID) provides a source of information on the ecology of Savannah River Site (SRS). The SRS is a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)--owned property on the upper Atlantic Coastal Plain of South Carolina, centered approximately 40 kilometers (25 miles) southeast of Augusta, Georgia. The entire site was designated a National Environmental Research Park in 1972 by the Atomic Energy Commission, the predecessor of DOE. This document summarizes and synthesizes ecological research and monitoring conducted on the three main types of ecosystems found at SRS: terrestrial, wetland and aquatic. It also summarizes the available information on the threatened and endangered species found on the Savannah River Site. SRS is located along the Savannah River and encompasses an area of 80,267 hectares (310 square miles) in three South Carolina counties. It contains diverse habitats, flora, and fauna. Habitats include upland terrestrial areas, wetlands, streams, reservoirs, and the adjacent Savannah River. These diverse habitats support a variety of plants and animals, including many commercially or recreationally valuable species and several rare, threatened, or endangered species. Soils are the basic terrestrial resource, influencing the development of terrestrial biological communities. Many different soils exist on the SRS, from hydric to well-drained, and from sand to clay. In general, SRS soils are predominantly well-drained loamy sands.

  16. A climatological description of the Savannah River Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hunter, C.H.

    1990-05-22

    This report provides a general climatological description of the Savannah River Site. The description provides both regional and local scale climatology. The regional climatology includes a general regional climatic description and presents information on occurrence frequencies of the severe meteorological phenomena that are important considerations in the design and siting of a facility. These phenomena include tornadoes, thunderstorms, hurricanes, and ice/snow storms. Occurrence probabilities given for extreme tornado and non-tornado winds are based on previous site specific studies. Local climatological conditions that are significant with respect to the impact of facility operations on the environment are described using on-site or near-site meteorological data. Summaries of wind speed, wind direction, and atmospheric stability are primarily based on the most recently generated five-year set of data collected from the onsite meteorological tower network (1982--86). Temperature, humidity, and precipitation summaries include data from SRL's standard meteorological instrument shelter and the Augusta National Weather Service office at Bush Field through 1986. A brief description of the onsite meteorological monitoring program is also provided. 24 refs., 15 figs., 22 tabs.

  17. Final report on decommissioning boreholes and wellsite restoration, Gulf Coast Interior Salt Domes of Mississippi

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1989-04-01

    In 1978, eight salt domes in Texas, Louisiana, and Mississippi were identified for study as potential locations for a nuclear waste repository as part of the National Waste Terminal Storage (NWTS) program. Three domes were selected in Mississippi for ``area characterization`` phase study as follows: Lampton Dome near Columbia, Cypress Creek Dome near New Augusta, and Richton Dome near Richton. The purpose of the studies was to acquire geologic and geohydrologic information from shallow and deep drilling investigations to enable selection of sites suitable for more intensive study. Eleven deep well sites were selected for multiple-well installations to acquire information on the lithologic and hydraulic properties of regional aquifers. In 1986, the Gulf Coast salt domes were eliminated from further consideration for repository development by the selection of three candidate sites in other regions of the country. In 1987, well plugging and restoration of these deferred sites became a closeout activity. The primary objectives of this activity are to plug and abandon all wells and boreholes in accordance with state regulations, restore all drilling sites to as near original condition as feasible, and convey to landowners any wells on their property that they choose to maintain. This report describes the activities undertaken to accomplish these objectives, as outlines in Activity Plan 1--2, ``Activity Plan for Well Plugging and Site Restoration of Test Hole Sites in Mississippi.``

  18. phi-meson photoproduction on Hydrogen in the neutral decay mode

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seraydaryan, Helena; Amaryan, Moscov J.; Gavalian, Gagik; Baghdasaryan, Hovhannes A.; Weinstein, Larry

    2014-05-01

    We report the first measurement of the photoproduction cross section of the $\\phi$ meson in its neutral decay mode in the reaction $\\gamma p \\to p\\phi(K_SK_L)$. The experiment was performed with a tagged photon beam of energy $1.6 \\le E_\\gamma \\le 3.6$ GeV incident on a liquid hydrogen target of the CLAS spectrometer at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility. The $p \\phi$ final state is identified via reconstruction of $K_S$ in the invariant mass of two oppositely charged pions and by requiring the missing particle in the reaction $\\gamma p \\to p K_S X$ to be $K_L$. The presented results significantly enlarge the existing data on $\\phi$-photoproduction. These data, combined with the data from the charged decay mode, will help to constrain different mechanisms of $\\phi$ photoproduction.

  19. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Annual",2015 ,"Release Date:","4/29/2016" ,"Next Release Date:","5/31/2016" ,"Excel File Name:","n9010ks2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n9010ks2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"4/29/2016 7:01:08 AM" "Back to

  20. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Monthly","2/2016" ,"Release Date:","4/29/2016" ,"Next Release Date:","5/31/2016" ,"Excel File Name:","n9050ks2m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n9050ks2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"4/29/2016 7:02:04 AM" "Back to

  1. Development of interatomic potentials appropriate for simulation of devitrification of Al90Sm10 alloy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mendelev, M. I.; Zhang, F.; Ye, Z.; Sun, Y.; Nguyen, M. C.; Wilson, S. R.; Wang, C. Z.; Ho, K. M.

    2015-04-23

    In this study, a semi-empirical potential for the Al90Sm10 alloy is presented. The potential provides satisfactory reproduction of pure Al properties, the formation energies of a set of Al–Sm crystal phases with Sm content about 10%, and the structure of the liquid Al90Sm10 alloy. During molecular dynamics simulation in which the liquid alloy is cooled at a rate of 1010 K/s, the developed potential produces a glass structure with lower ab initio energy than that produced by ab initio molecular dynamics (AIMD) itself using a typical AIMD cooling rate of 8 ∙1013 K/s. Based on these facts the developed potential should be suitable for simulations of phase transformations in the Al90Sm10 alloy.

  2. Development of interatomic potentials appropriate for simulation of devitrification of Al90Sm10 alloy

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Mendelev, M. I.; Zhang, F.; Ye, Z.; Sun, Y.; Nguyen, M. C.; Wilson, S. R.; Wang, C. Z.; Ho, K. M.

    2015-04-23

    In this study, a semi-empirical potential for the Al90Sm10 alloy is presented. The potential provides satisfactory reproduction of pure Al properties, the formation energies of a set of Al–Sm crystal phases with Sm content about 10%, and the structure of the liquid Al90Sm10 alloy. During molecular dynamics simulation in which the liquid alloy is cooled at a rate of 1010 K/s, the developed potential produces a glass structure with lower ab initio energy than that produced by ab initio molecular dynamics (AIMD) itself using a typical AIMD cooling rate of 8 ∙1013 K/s. Based on these facts the developed potentialmore » should be suitable for simulations of phase transformations in the Al90Sm10 alloy.« less

  3. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Monthly","2/2016" ,"Release Date:","4/29/2016" ,"Next Release Date:","5/31/2016" ,"Excel File Name:","n9010ks2m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n9010ks2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"4/29/2016 7:01:08 AM" "Back to

  4. bib-sunflower | netl.doe.gov

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Integration of Low-NOx Burners with an Optimization Plan for Boiler Combustion - Project Brief [PDF-72KB] (Withdrawn) Sunflower Electric Power Corp., Garden City, Finney County, KS PROJECT FACT SHEET Achieving New Source Performance Standards (NSPS) Through Integration of Low-NOx Burners with an Optimization Plan for Boiler Combustion [PDF-260KB] (Oct 2008) PROGRAM PUBLICATIONS Final Report Achieving NSPS Emission Standards Through Integration of Low NOx Burners with an Optimization Plan for

  5. Research Highlight

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Arctic Haze: Effect of Anthropogenic and Biomass Burning Aerosols Transported from Europe to the Arctic Download a printable PDF Submitter: Fast, J. ., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Area of Research: Aerosol Properties Working Group(s): Cloud-Aerosol-Precipitation Interactions Journal Reference: Marelle L, J Raut, JL Thomas, KS Law, B Quennehen, G Ancellet, J Pelon, A Schwarzenboeck, and JD Fast. 2015. "Transport of anthropogenic and biomass burning aerosols from Europe to the

  6. Effect of oxygen on weld shape and crystallographic orientation of duplex stainless steel weld using advanced A-TIG (AA-TIG) welding method

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zou, Ying, E-mail: yingzou@jwri.osaka-u.ac.jp; Ueji, Rintaro; Fujii, Hidetoshi

    2014-05-01

    The double-shielded advanced A-TIG (AA-TIG) welding method was adopted in this study for the welding of the SUS329J4L duplex stainless steel with the shielding gases of different oxygen content levels. The oxygen content in the shielding gas was controlled by altering the oxygen content in the outer layer gas, while the inner layer remained pure argon to suppress oxidation on the tungsten electrode. As a result, a deep weld penetration was obtained due to the dissolution of oxygen into the weld metals. Additionally, the microstructure of the weld metal was changed by the dissolution of oxygen. The austenite phase at the ferrite grain boundary followed a KurdjumovSachs (KS) orientation relationship with the ferrite matrix phase at any oxide content. On the other hand, the orientation relationship between the intragranular austenite phase and the ferrite matrix phase exhibited different patterns under different oxygen content levels. When there was little oxide in the fusion zone, only a limited part of the intragranular austenite phase and the ferrite matrix phase followed the KS orientation relationship. With the increase of the oxide, the correspondence of the KS relationship increased and fit very well in the 2.5% O{sub 2} shielded sample. The investigation of this phenomenon was carried out along with the nucleation mechanisms of the intragranular austenite phases. - Highlights: Weld penetration increased with the increase of the oxygen content. Average diameter and number density of oxide were changed by the oxygen content. K-S relationship of Widmansttten austenite/ferrite wasnt varied by oxide. Orientation relationship of intragranular austenite/ferrite was varied by oxide.

  7. SREL Reprint #3055

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    5 Playing chicken with red junglefowl: identifying phenotypic markers of genetic purity in Gallus gallus I. L. Brisbin, Jr.1 and A. T. Peterson2 1Savannah River Ecology Laboratory, Drawer E, Aiken, SC, USA 2Natural History Museum, The University of Kansas, Lawrence, KS, USA Abstract: We report the results of a novel experiment, in which genetically pure male red junglefowl Gallus gallus (Richardson strain) were deliberately crossed with domestic female chickens to create contaminated lines of

  8. STEAB Meeting Minutes April 2007

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    State Energy Advisory Board Meeting April 8-10, 2007 Albuquerque, NM A Visit to the Sandia National Laboratory BOARD MEMBERS PRESENT Chris Benson (Chairman) (AR), Patricia Sobrero (Vice-Chair) (VA), Elliot Jacobson (Secretary) (MA), JamesEtta Reed (PA), Janet Streff (MN), Duane Hauck (ND), Peter Johnston (AZ), John Davies (KY), Jim Ploger (KS), Jim Nolan (MT), Susan Brown (WI), Steven Vincent (OR), Paul Gutierrez (NM), Daniel Zaweski (NY), and Robert Hoppie (ID). Others present were: Gary

  9. STEAB Meeting Minutes August 2007

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    State Energy Advisory Board Meeting August 14-16, 2007 Berkeley, CA. A Visit to the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory BOARD MEMBERS PRESENT Chris Benson (Chairman) (AR), Patricia Sobrero (Vice-Chair) (VA), Elliot Jacobson (Secretary) (MA), Robert Hoppie (ID), Janet Streff (MN), Duane Hauck (ND), Peter Johnston (AZ), John Davies (KY), William "Dub" Taylor (TX), Alexander Mack (FL), Jim Ploger (KS), Jim Nolan (MT), Susan Brown (WI), Paul Gutierrez (NM), and Steven Vincent (OR).

  10. Microsoft PowerPoint - SWPA Drought Presentation2007.ppt

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Cooperative Perspective Cooperative Perspective Southwest Hydro Power Conference June 13th, 2007 June 13th, 2007 June 13th, 2007 Western Farmers Electric Cooperative * Customer Owned Business * Serving Oklahomans for over 60 Years * Service Area in Two-Thirds of Oklahoma * Electric Service Infrastructure Serving 19 Distribution Co-ops, Altus Air Force Base and Providing Wholesale Energy to 6 Municipal Systems - Including Clarksville, AR and Anthony, KS WFEC'S Service Area WFEC's Generation Mix *

  11. ARM - Instrument - stamp

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    govInstrumentsstamp Documentation ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Instrument : Soil Temperature and Moisture Profiles (STAMP) Instrument Categories Surface/Subsurface Properties Primary Measurements The following measurements are those considered scientifically relevant. Precipitation Soil moisture Soil surface temperature Locations Southern Great Plains SGP E9 Browse Data Ashton, KS (Extended) SGP

  12. Deconvolving X-ray spectral variability components in the Seyfert 1.5 NGC 3227

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arvalo, P.; Markowitz, A.

    2014-03-10

    We present the variability analysis of a 100 ks XMM-Newton observation of the Seyfert 1.5 active galaxy, NGC 3227. The observation found NGC 3227 in a period where its hard power-law component displayed remarkably little long-term variability. This lucky event allows us to clearly observe a soft spectral component undergoing a large-amplitude but slow flux variation. Using combined spectral and timing analysis, we isolate two independent variable continuum components and characterize their behavior as a function of timescale. Rapid and coherent variations throughout the 0.2-10 keV band reveal a spectrally hard (photon index ? ? 1.7-1.8) power law, dominating the observed variability on timescales of 30 ks and shorter. Another component produces coherent fluctuations in the 0.2-2 keV range and is much softer (? ? 3); it dominates the observed variability on timescales greater than 30 ks. Both components are viewed through the same absorbers identified in the time-averaged spectrum. The combined spectral and timing analysis breaks the degeneracy between models for the soft excess: it is consistent with a power-law or thermal Comptonized component but not with a blackbody or an ionized reflection component. We demonstrate that the rapid variability in NGC 3227 is intrinsic to continuum-emitting components and is not an effect of variable absorption.

  13. Measurement of neutral strange particle production in the underlying event in proton-proton collisions at sqrt(s) = 7 TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chatrchyan, Serguei; et al.

    2013-09-01

    Measurements are presented of the production of primary K(S)0 and Lambda particles in proton-proton collisions at sqrt(s) = 7 TeV in the region transverse to the leading charged-particle jet in each event. The average multiplicity and average scalar transverse momentum sum of K(S)0 and Lambda particles measured at pseudorapidities abs(eta) < 2 rise with increasing charged-particle jet pt in the range 1-10 GeV and saturate in the region 10-50 GeV. The rise and saturation of the strange particle yields and transverse momentum sums in the underlying event are similar to those observed for inclusive charged particles, which confirms the impact-parameter picture of multiple parton interactions. The results are compared to recent tunes of the PYTHIA Monte Carlo event generator. The PYTHIA simulations underestimate the data by 15-30% for K(S)0 mesons and by about 50% for Lambda baryons, a deficit similar to that observed for the inclusive strange particle production in non-single-diffractive proton-proton collisions. The constant strange- to charged-particle activity ratios and the similar trends for mesons and baryons indicate that the multiparton-interaction dynamics is decoupled from parton hadronization, which occurs at a later stage.

  14. Passivating ligand and solvent contribution to the electronics properties of semiconductor nanocrystals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tretiak, Sergei; Crotty, Angela; Fischer, Sean; Kilina, Svetlana

    2010-10-04

    Expanding on previous work, we examine in detail the impact passivating ligands have on the electronic properties of CdSe quantum dots (QDs). We also explore the importance of the inclusion of solvent in simulating passivated QDs. Most ligand states are found well removed from the band edges, with pyridine being the exception and contributing states that sit right on the conduction band edge. Localized trap states are found for trimethylphosphine and pyridine capped QDs, with solvent helping to eliminate these. The effect of losing a ligand on the electronic properties of the system is observed to vary in proportion with the binding energy and steric bulk of the ligand. More disruption of the electronic properties is seen for tight-binding, sterically large ligands. We also look at the validity of using the single-particle Kohn-Sham (KS) representation to approximate optical absorption spectra. Besides a systematic blue-shift relative to the time-dependent density functional theory spectra, the KS spectra are in very good agreement with the more accurate method for these systems. Such agreement here justifies the use of the KS approach for calculating absorption spectra of QD systems.

  15. Orbital-free density functional theory implementation with the projector augmented-wave method

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lehtomki, Jouko; Makkonen, Ilja; Harju, Ari; Lopez-Acevedo, Olga; Caro, Miguel A.

    2014-12-21

    We present a computational scheme for orbital-free density functional theory (OFDFT) that simultaneously provides access to all-electron values and preserves the OFDFT linear scaling as a function of the system size. Using the projector augmented-wave method (PAW) in combination with real-space methods, we overcome some obstacles faced by other available implementation schemes. Specifically, the advantages of using the PAW method are twofold. First, PAW reproduces all-electron values offering freedom in adjusting the convergence parameters and the atomic setups allow tuning the numerical accuracy per element. Second, PAW can provide a solution to some of the convergence problems exhibited in other OFDFT implementations based on Kohn-Sham (KS) codes. Using PAW and real-space methods, our orbital-free results agree with the reference all-electron values with a mean absolute error of 10 meV and the number of iterations required by the self-consistent cycle is comparable to the KS method. The comparison of all-electron and pseudopotential bulk modulus and lattice constant reveal an enormous difference, demonstrating that in order to assess the performance of OFDFT functionals it is necessary to use implementations that obtain all-electron values. The proposed combination of methods is the most promising route currently available. We finally show that a parametrized kinetic energy functional can give lattice constants and bulk moduli comparable in accuracy to those obtained by the KS PBE method, exemplified with the case of diamond.

  16. Structural Model of the Basement in the Central Savannah River Area, South Carolina and Georgia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stephenson, D. [Westinghouse Savannah River Company, AIKEN, SC (United States); Stieve, A.

    1992-03-01

    Interpretation of several generations of seismic reflection data and potential field data suggests the presence of several crustal blocks within the basement beneath the Coastal Plain in the Central Savannah River Area (CSRA). The seismic reflection and refraction data include a grid of profiles that capture shallow and deep reflection events and traverse the Savannah River Site and vicinity. Potential field data includes aeromagnetic, ground magnetic surveys, reconnaissance and detailed gravity surveys. Subsurface data from recovered core are used to constrain the model.Interpretation of these data characteristically indicate a southeast dipping basement surface with some minor highs and lows suggesting an erosional pre-Cretaceous unconformity. This surface is interrupted by several basement faults, most of which offset only early Cretaceous sedimentary horizons overlying the erosional surface. The oldest fault is perhaps late Paleozoic because it is truncated at the basement/Coastal Plain interface. This fault is related in timing and mechanism to the underlying Augusta fault. The youngest faults deform Coastal Plain sediments of at least Priabonian age (40-36.6 Ma). One of these young faults is the Pen Branch faults, identified as the southeast dipping master fault for the Triassic Dunbarton basin. All the Cenozoic faults are probably related in time and mechanism to the nearby, well studied Belair fault.The study area thus contains a set of structures evolved from the Alleghanian orogeny through Mesozoic extension to Cenozoic readjustment of the crust. There is a metamorphosed crystalline terrane with several reflector/fault packages, a reactivated Triassic basin, a mafic terrane separating the Dunbarton basin from the large South Georgia basin to the southeast, and an overprint of reverse faults, some reactivated, and some newly formed.

  17. Accelerating molecular property calculations with nonorthonormal Krylov space methods

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Furche, Filipp; Krull, Brandon T.; Nguyen, Brian D.; Kwon, Jake

    2016-05-03

    Here, we formulate Krylov space methods for large eigenvalue problems and linear equation systems that take advantage of decreasing residual norms to reduce the cost of matrix-vector multiplication. The residuals are used as subspace basis without prior orthonormalization, which leads to generalized eigenvalue problems or linear equation systems on the Krylov space. These nonorthonormal Krylov space (nKs) algorithms are favorable for large matrices with irregular sparsity patterns whose elements are computed on the fly, because fewer operations are necessary as the residual norm decreases as compared to the conventional method, while errors in the desired eigenpairs and solution vectors remainmore » small. We consider real symmetric and symplectic eigenvalue problems as well as linear equation systems and Sylvester equations as they appear in configuration interaction and response theory. The nKs method can be implemented in existing electronic structure codes with minor modifications and yields speed-ups of 1.2-1.8 in typical time-dependent Hartree-Fock and density functional applications without accuracy loss. The algorithm can compute entire linear subspaces simultaneously which benefits electronic spectra and force constant calculations requiring many eigenpairs or solution vectors. The nKs approach is related to difference density methods in electronic ground state calculations and particularly efficient for integral direct computations of exchange-type contractions. By combination with resolution-of-the-identity methods for Coulomb contractions, three- to fivefold speed-ups of hybrid time-dependent density functional excited state and response calculations are achieved.« less

  18. Buildings Energy Data Book: 3.9 Educational Facilities

    Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

    6 2010 Regional New Construction and Renovations Expenditures for Public K-12 Schools ($Million) Region New Schools Additions Renovation Total Region 1 (CT, MA, ME, NH, RI, VT) Region 2 (NJ, NY, PA) Region 3 (DE, MD, VA, WV) Region 4 (KY, NC, SC, TN) Region 5 (AL, FL, GA, MS) Region 6 (IN, MI, OH) Region 7 (IL, MN, WI) Region 8 (IA, KS, MO, NE) Region 9 (AR, LA, OK, TX) Region 10 (CO, MT, ND, NM, SD, UT, WY) Region 11 (AZ, CA, HI, NV) Region 12 (AK, ID, OR, WA) Total Source(s): School Planning

  19. Final Technical Report

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    1. DOE Award # and Name of the Recipient (Institution) DOE Award #: DE-SC0010385 Name of the Recipient: Prof. Shenqiang Ren University of Kansas Center for Research Chemistry Department/CLAS 1251 Wescoe Hall Drive Lawrence, KS 66045-7568 2. Project Title and Name of the PI Project Title: "Collaborative Research: Polymeric Multiferroics" Name of the PIs: Dr. Shenqiang Ren (The University of Kansas), PI 3. Date of the report and research period covered by the report Date of the Report:

  20. The Bowersock Mills and Power Company 1874

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Incremental Hydroelectric Energy The Bowersock Mills and Power Co., Lawrence, KS Hydroelectric Energy Potential for U.S. BMPC Plant At Forefront of Development Curve "In our estimates we have about 70 GW of additional hydro which would have minimal impact; and so where does this come from? It comes from putting in better turbines in existing dams, it comes from run-of-the-river turbines that don't create the minimal environmental impact and it comes from using water storage that was made

  1. Cooling rate and stress relaxation in silica melts and glasses via microsecond molecular dyanmics

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Lane, J. Matthew D.

    2015-07-22

    We have conducted extremely long molecular dynamics simulations of glasses to microsecond times, which close the gap between experimental and atomistic simulation time scales by two to three orders of magnitude. The static, thermal, and structural properties of silica glass are reported for glass cooling rates down to 5×109 K/s and viscoelastic response in silica melts and glasses are studied over nine decades of time. We finally present results from relaxation of hydrostatic compressive stress in silica and show that time-temperature superposition holds in these systems for temperatures from 3500 to 1000 K.

  2. HRC steel mill project. Volume 2. Final report. Export trade information

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-08-01

    The initial step in developing the design for a steel producing facility is the selection of the major processes to be used. This study investigated five steelmaking processes to determine the one(s) best suited for Grasim based on technical and cost performance. The processes were: Electric Arc Furnace; Induction Furnace/BOF; KS Furnace; Cupola; and Submerged Arc. This investigation determined that the electric arc furnace (EAF) was the most suitable melting process for the production of steel using DRI feed stock.

  3. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Consumption (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Kansas Natural Gas Industrial Consumption (MMcf)",1,"Monthly","2/2016" ,"Release Date:","4/29/2016" ,"Next Release Date:","5/31/2016" ,"Excel File Name:","n3035ks2m.xls"

  4. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Base Gas) (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Kansas Natural Gas in Underground Storage (Base Gas) (MMcf)",1,"Monthly","2/2016" ,"Release Date:","4/29/2016" ,"Next Release Date:","5/31/2016" ,"Excel File Name:","n5010ks2m.xls"

  5. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Gas Wells (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Kansas Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Gas Wells (MMcf)",1,"Monthly","2/2016" ,"Release Date:","4/29/2016" ,"Next Release Date:","5/31/2016" ,"Excel File Name:","n9011ks2m.xls"

  6. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Oil Wells (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Kansas Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Oil Wells (MMcf)",1,"Monthly","2/2016" ,"Release Date:","4/29/2016" ,"Next Release Date:","5/31/2016" ,"Excel File Name:","n9012ks2m.xls"

  7. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Repressuring (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Kansas Natural Gas Repressuring (MMcf)",1,"Monthly","2/2016" ,"Release Date:","4/29/2016" ,"Next Release Date:","5/31/2016" ,"Excel File Name:","n9020ks2m.xls" ,"Available

  8. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Vented and Flared (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Kansas Natural Gas Vented and Flared (MMcf)",1,"Monthly","2/2016" ,"Release Date:","4/29/2016" ,"Next Release Date:","5/31/2016" ,"Excel File Name:","n9040ks2m.xls"

  9. NERSC Jack Deslippe

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    BerkeleyGW at NERSC Jack Deslippe Part 1: Intro to GW/BSE DFT Kohn-Sham Formulation Minimize Energy Functional By Solving Kohn Sham Eqns Total energy is exact so long as approximation for V xc is good. Commonly use Local Density Approximation (LDA) and Gradient Approximations (GGA) - Hybrid functionals etc... Kohn, W.; Sham, L. J. Phys. Rev. A 1965, 140, 1133. Interpretation of KS Eigenvalues (states) Ordinary Kohn-Sham eigenvalues under-estimate the electronic gap "Band Gap Problem"

  10. Disorder-Driven Non-Fermi-Liquid Behavior in Kondo Alloys

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miranda, E.; Dobrosavljevic, V.; Kotliar, G.

    1997-01-01

    We show how a model of disordered Anderson lattices can account for many non-Fermi-liquid features observed in some Kondo alloys. Because of the exponential nature of the Kondo temperature scale T{sub K}, even moderate disorder leads to a rather broad distribution of Kondo temperatures, inducing strong {ital effective} disorder seen by the conduction electrons. Spins with very low T{sub K}`s remain unquenched and dominate the low-temperature properties.This single underlying mechanism leads to logarithmic divergences in thermodynamic quantities and a linear temperature dependence of the resistivity. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  11. Re-Building Greensburg

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Hewitt, Steven; Wallach, Daniel; Peterson, Stephanie;

    2013-05-29

    Greensburg, KS - A town that was devastated by a tornado in 2007, yet came back to be one of the Nation's most energy-efficient, sustainable communities. Civic leaders and entrepreneurs helped rally residents behind the idea of "greening" Greensburg, inspiring the construction of numerous energy-efficient buildings, some of which generate their own renewable power with solar panels and wind turbines. Many of the town's government buildings use cutting edge energy-saving technologies, saving the local taxpayers' money. Greensburg has demonstrated to the world that any city can reach its energy efficiency and renewable energy goals today using widely available technologies.

  12. Cooling rate and stress relaxation in silica melts and glasses via microsecond molecular dyanmics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lane, J. Matthew D.

    2015-07-22

    We have conducted extremely long molecular dynamics simulations of glasses to microsecond times, which close the gap between experimental and atomistic simulation time scales by two to three orders of magnitude. The static, thermal, and structural properties of silica glass are reported for glass cooling rates down to 5×109 K/s and viscoelastic response in silica melts and glasses are studied over nine decades of time. We finally present results from relaxation of hydrostatic compressive stress in silica and show that time-temperature superposition holds in these systems for temperatures from 3500 to 1000 K.

  13. Print

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    < 5k 0 < 50k < 100k < 250k < 500k < 1M > 1M > 5M > 10M DE MD DC MA RI NJ AZ UT WY ID OR WA CA TX OK KS CO NE SD ND MN WI IL IA MO AR LA MS AL FL GA TN KY IN OH MI ME NH CT VT NY PA WV VA NC SC MT AK HI NV NM Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory Procured Materials and Services 2015 (> $35M) Small business procurements in US: $14.73M

  14. ON THE KENNICUTT-SCHMIDT RELATION OF LOW-METALLICITY HIGH-REDSHIFT GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gnedin, Nickolay Y. [Particle Astrophysics Center, Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, Batavia, IL 60510 (United States); Kravtsov, Andrey V., E-mail: gnedin@fnal.go, E-mail: andrey@oddjob.uchicago.ed [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States)

    2010-05-01

    We present results of self-consistent, high-resolution cosmological simulations of galaxy formation at z {approx} 3. The simulations employ a recently developed recipe for star formation based on the local abundance of molecular hydrogen, which is tracked self-consistently during the course of simulation. The phenomenological H{sub 2} formation model accounts for the effects of dissociating UV radiation of stars in each galaxy, as well as self-shielding and shielding of H{sub 2} by dust, and therefore allows us to explore effects of lower metallicities and higher UV fluxes prevalent in high-redshift galaxies on their star formation. We compare stellar masses, metallicities, and star formation rates of the simulated galaxies to available observations of the Lyman break galaxies (LBGs) and find a reasonable agreement. We find that the Kennicutt-Schmidt (KS) relation exhibited by our simulated galaxies at z {approx} 3 is substantially steeper and has a lower amplitude than the z = 0 relation at {Sigma}{sub H} {approx_lt} 100 M{sub o-dot} pc{sup -2}. The predicted relation, however, is consistent with existing observational constraints for the z {approx} 3 damped Ly{alpha} and LBGs. Our tests show that the main reason for the difference from the local KS relation is lower metallicity of the interstellar medium in high-redshift galaxies. We discuss several implications of the metallicity-dependence of the KS relation for galaxy evolution and interpretation of observations. In particular, we show that the observed size of high-redshift exponential disks depends sensitively on their KS relation. Our results also suggest that significantly reduced star formation efficiency at low gas surface densities can lead to strong suppression of star formation in low-mass high-redshift galaxies and long gas consumption time scales over most of the disks in large galaxies. The longer gas consumption time scales could make disks more resilient to major and minor mergers and could help explain the prevalence of the thin stellar disks in the local universe.

  15. Annual Energy Outlook 2015 - Appendix B

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    5 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Energy Outlook 2015 Regional maps Figure F4. Oil and gas supply model regions F-5 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Energy Outlook 2014 Regional maps Figure F4. Oil and gas supply model regions Figure F4. Oil and Gas Supply Model Regions Atlantic WA MT WY ID NV UT CO AZ NM OK IA KS MO IL IN KY TN MS AL FL GA SC NC WV PA NJ MD DE NY CT ME RI MA NH VA WI MI OH NE SD MN ND AR OR CA VT East (1) Gulf of Mexico LA Gulf Coast (2)

  16. Annual Energy Outlook 2015 - Appendix F

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    1 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Energy Outlook 2015 Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Office of Energy Analysis. U.S. Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Outlook 2010 213 Appendix F Regional Maps Figure F1. United States Census Divisions Pacific South Atlantic Middle Atlantic New England West South Central West North Central East North Central Mountain AK WA MT WY ID NV UT CO AZ NM TX OK IA KS MO IL IN KY TN MS AL FL GA SC NC WV PA NJ MD DE NY CT VT

  17. Annual Energy Outlook 2015 - Appendix F

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    7 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Energy Outlook 2015 Regional maps Figure F6. Coal supply regions WA ID OR CA NV UT TX OK AR MO LA MS AL GA FL TN SC NC KY VA WV WY CO SD ND MI MN WI IL IN OH MD PA NJ DE CT MA NH VT NY ME RI MT NE IA KS MI AZ NM 500 0 SCALE IN MILES APPALACHIA Northern Appalachia Central Appalachia Southern Appalachia INTERIOR NORTHERN GREAT PLAINS Eastern Interior Western Interior Gulf Lignite Dakota Lignite Western Montana Wyoming, Northern Powder River Basin

  18. TITLE

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    RIDOH NArnONAL LABORATORY c- Results of the Independent Radiological Verification Survey I.* K . . . . 1 A . T I r n * at the Former Associate Aircraft Tool and Manufacturing Company Site, Fairfield, Ohio - (FOH001) D . E . Rice M . E . Murray K. S . Brown EEALTH SCIENCES RESEARCH DMSION E ' * I ~ m d w a s k M ~ t ~ ~ ~ ( ~ N o . E X Z D 2 0 0 1 O; AB131DM) Aircraft ~ o o l and Manrlaet~ring Company Site, Fiirfleld, Oh10 (FOH001) D. E. Rice, M. E. Mumy, K:S. Brown . . . . lmza@am Tam R D.

  19. ,"Kansas Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Capacity (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Kansas Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)",1,"Monthly","2/2016" ,"Release Date:","4/29/2016" ,"Next Release Date:","5/31/2016" ,"Excel File Name:","n5290ks2m.xls"

  20. ,"Kansas Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (MMcf)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Volume (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Kansas Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (MMcf)",1,"Monthly","2/2016" ,"Release Date:","4/29/2016" ,"Next Release Date:","5/31/2016" ,"Excel File Name:","n5030ks2m.xls"

  1. Wetting and Mechanical Performance of Zirconia Brazed with Silver/Copper Oxide and Silver/Vanadium Oxide Alloys

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sinnamon, Kathleen E.; Meier, Alan; Joshi, Vineet V.

    2014-12-01

    The wetting behavior and mechanical strength of silver/copper oxide and silver/vanadium oxide braze alloys were investigated for both magnesia-stabilized and yttria-stabilized (Mg-PSZ and Y-TZP) transformation toughened zirconia substrates. The temperatures investigated were 1000 to 1100°C, with oxide additions of 1 to 10 weight percent V2O5 or CuO, and hold times of 0.9 to 3.6 ks. Increasing either the isothermal hold temperature or time had a distinctly negative effect on the joint strength. The maximum strengths for both braze alloys were obtained for 5 wt. % oxide additions at 1050°C with a hold time of 0.9 ks. The Mg-PSZ/Ag-CuO system exhibited a average fracture strength of 255 MPa (45% of the reported monolithic strength), and the Y-TZP/Ag-CuO system had an average fracture strength of 540 MPa (30% of the reported monolithic strength). The fracture strengths were lower for the Ag-V2O5 braze alloys, with fracture strengths of approximately 180 MPa (30% of the monolithic strength) for Mg-PSZ versus approximately 160 MPa (10% of the monolithic strength) for Y-TZP. No interfacial products were observed in low magnification SEM analysis for the brazing alloys containing V2O5 additions, while there were interfacial products present for brazes prepared with CuO additions in the braze alloy.

  2. n-Alkanes on MgO(100). I: Coverage-Dependent Desorption Kinetics of n-Butane

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tait, Steven L.; Dohnalek, Zdenek; Campbell, C T.; Kay, Bruce D.

    2005-04-22

    High quality temperature programmed desorption (TPD) measurements of n-butane from MgO(100) have been made for a large number of initial butane coverages (0-3.70 ML) and a wide range of heating ramp rates (0.3-10 K/s). We present a TPD analysis technique which allows the coverage-dependent desorption energy to be accurately determined by mathematical inversion of a TPD spectrum, assuming only that the prefactor is coverage-independent. A variational method is used to determine the prefactor that minimizes the difference between a set of simulated TPD spectra and corresponding experimental data. The best fit for butane desorption from MgO is obtained with a prefactor of 1015.7?1.6 s-1. The desorption energy is 34.9?3.4 kJ/mol at 0.5 ML coverage, and varies with coverage. Simulations based on these results can accurately reproduce TPD experiments for submonolayer initial coverages over a wide range of heating ramp rates (0.3-10 K/s). Advantages and limitations of this method are discussed.

  3. CONSTRAINTS ON VERY HIGH ENERGY EMISSION FROM GRB 130427A

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aliu, E.; Errando, M.; Aune, T.; Barnacka, A.; Beilicke, M.; Buckley, J. H.; Bugaev, V.; Benbow, W.; Cerruti, M.; Berger, K.; Biteau, J.; Byrum, K.; Cardenzana, J. V; Dickinson, H. J.; Eisch, J. D.; Chen, X.; Ciupik, L.; Connaughton, V.; Cui, W.; Falcone, A. E-mail: sjzhu@umd.edu; and others

    2014-11-01

    Prompt emission from the very fluent and nearby (z = 0.34) gamma-ray burst GRB 130427A was detected by several orbiting telescopes and by ground-based, wide-field-of-view optical transient monitors. Apart from the intensity and proximity of this GRB, it is exceptional due to the extremely long-lived high-energy (100 MeV to 100 GeV) gamma-ray emission, which was detected by the Large Area Telescope on the Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope for ?70 ks after the initial burst. The persistent, hard-spectrum, high-energy emission suggests that the highest-energy gamma rays may have been produced via synchrotron self-Compton processes though there is also evidence that the high-energy emission may instead be an extension of the synchrotron spectrum. VERITAS, a ground-based imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescope array, began follow-up observations of GRB 130427A ?71 ks (?20 hr) after the onset of the burst. The GRB was not detected with VERITAS; however, the high elevation of the observations, coupled with the low redshift of the GRB, make VERITAS a very sensitive probe of the emission from GRB 130427A for E > 100 GeV. The non-detection and consequent upper limit derived place constraints on the synchrotron self-Compton model of high-energy gamma-ray emission from this burst.

  4. Phenomenology of reverse-shock emission in the optical afterglows of gamma-ray bursts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Japelj, J.; Kopa?, D.; Gomboc, A. [Faculty of Mathematics and Physics, University of Ljubljana, Jadranska ulica 19, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Kobayashi, S.; Harrison, R.; Virgili, F. J.; Mundell, C. G. [Astrophysics Research Institute, Liverpool John Moores University, Liverpool, L3 5RF (United Kingdom); Guidorzi, C. [Physics Departments, University of Ferrara, via Saragat 1, I-44122, Ferrara (Italy); Melandri, A., E-mail: jure.japelj@fmf.uni-lj.si, E-mail: andreja.gomboc@fmf.uni-lj.si [INAF Osservatorio Astronomico di Brera, via E. Bianchi 46, I-23807 Merate (Italy)

    2014-04-20

    We use a parent sample of 118 gamma-ray burst (GRB) afterglows, with known redshift and host galaxy extinction, to separate afterglows with and without signatures of dominant reverse-shock (RS) emission and to determine which physical conditions lead to a prominent reverse-shock emission. We identify 10 GRBs with reverse-shock signatures: 990123, 021004, 021211, 060908, 061126, 080319B, 081007, 090102, 090424, and 130427A. By modeling their optical afterglows with reverse- and forward-shock analytic light curves and using Monte Carlo simulations, we estimate the parameter space of the physical quantities describing the ejecta and circumburst medium. We find that physical properties cover a wide parameter space and do not seem to cluster around any preferential values. Comparing the rest-frame optical, X-ray, and high-energy properties of the larger sample of non-RS-dominated GRBs, we show that the early-time (<1 ks) optical spectral luminosity, X-ray afterglow luminosity, and ?-ray energy output of our reverse-shock dominated sample do not differ significantly from the general population at early times. However, the GRBs with dominant reverse-shock emission have fainter than average optical forward-shock emission at late times (>10 ks). We find that GRBs with an identifiable reverse-shock component show a high magnetization parameter R {sub B} = ?{sub B,r}/?{sub B,f} ? 2-10{sup 4}. Our results are in agreement with the mildly magnetized baryonic jet model of GRBs.

  5. Combining nanocalorimetry and dynamic transmission electron microscopy for in situ characterization of materials processes under rapid heating and cooling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grapes, Michael D.; LaGrange, Thomas; Reed, Bryan W.; Campbell, Geoffrey H.; Friedman, Lawrence H.; LaVan, David A.; Weihs, Timothy P.

    2014-08-15

    Nanocalorimetry is a chip-based thermal analysis technique capable of analyzing endothermic and exothermic reactions at very high heating and cooling rates. Here, we couple a nanocalorimeter with an extremely fast in situ microstructural characterization tool to identify the physical origin of rapid enthalpic signals. More specifically, we describe the development of a system to enable in situ nanocalorimetry experiments in the dynamic transmission electron microscope (DTEM), a time-resolved TEM capable of generating images and electron diffraction patterns with exposure times of 30 ns500 ns. The full experimental system consists of a modified nanocalorimeter sensor, a custom-built in situ nanocalorimetry holder, a data acquisition system, and the DTEM itself, and is capable of thermodynamic and microstructural characterization of reactions over a range of heating rates (10{sup 2} K/s10{sup 5} K/s) accessible by conventional (DC) nanocalorimetry. To establish its ability to capture synchronized calorimetric and microstructural data during rapid transformations, this work describes measurements on the melting of an aluminum thin film. We were able to identify the phase transformation in both the nanocalorimetry traces and in electron diffraction patterns taken by the DTEM. Potential applications for the newly developed system are described and future system improvements are discussed.

  6. A HOT COCOON IN THE ULTRALONG GRB 130925A: HINTS OF A POPIII-LIKE PROGENITOR IN A LOW-DENSITY WIND ENVIRONMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Piro, Luigi; Troja, Eleonora; Kidd, Lauren A.; Ghisellini, Gabriele; Ricci, Roberto; Bannister, Keith; Fiore, Fabrizio; Piranomonte, Silvia; Wieringa, Mark H.

    2014-08-01

    GRB 130925A is a peculiar event characterized by an extremely long gamma-ray duration (?7ks), as well as dramatic flaring in the X-rays for ?20ks. After this period, its X-ray afterglow shows an atypical soft spectrum with photon index ? ? 4, as observed by Swift and Chandra, until ?10{sup 7}s, when XMM-Newton observations uncover a harder spectral shape with ? ? 2.5, commonly observed in gamma-ray burst (GRB) afterglows. We find that two distinct emission components are needed to explain the X-ray observations: a thermal component, which dominates the X-ray emission for several weeks, and a non-thermal component, consistent with a typical afterglow. A forward shock model well describes the broadband (from radio to X-rays) afterglow spectrum at various epochs. It requires an ambient medium with a very low-density wind profile, consistent with that expected from a low-metallicity blue supergiant (BSG). The thermal component has a remarkably constant size and a total energy consistent with those expected by a hot cocoon surrounding the relativistic jet. We argue that the features observed in this GRB (its ultralong duration, the thermal cocoon, and the low-density wind environment) are associated with a low metallicity BSG progenitor and, thus, should characterize the class of ultralong GRBs.

  7. Sensitivity of the Properties of Ruthenium Blue Dimer to Method, Basis Set, and Continuum Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ozkanlar, Abdullah; Clark, Aurora E.

    2012-05-23

    The ruthenium blue dimer [(bpy)2RuIIIOH2]2O4+ is best known as the first well-defined molecular catalyst for water oxidation. It has been subject to numerous computational studies primarily employing density functional theory. However, those studies have been limited in the functionals, basis sets, and continuum models employed. The controversy in the calculated electronic structure and the reaction energetics of this catalyst highlights the necessity of benchmark calculations that explore the role of density functionals, basis sets, and continuum models upon the essential features of blue-dimer reactivity. In this paper, we report Kohn-Sham complete basis set (KS-CBS) limit extrapolations of the electronic structure of blue dimer using GGA (BPW91 and BP86), hybrid-GGA (B3LYP), and meta-GGA (M06-L) density functionals. The dependence of solvation free energy corrections on the different cavity types (UFF, UA0, UAHF, UAKS, Bondi, and Pauling) within polarizable and conductor-like polarizable continuum model has also been investigated. The most common basis sets of double-zeta quality are shown to yield results close to the KS-CBS limit; however, large variations are observed in the reaction energetics as a function of density functional and continuum cavity model employed.

  8. Preparation and structural characterization of FeCo epitaxial thin films on insulating single-crystal substrates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nishiyama, Tsutomu; Ohtake, Mitsuru; Futamoto, Masaaki; Kirino, Fumiyoshi

    2010-05-15

    FeCo epitaxial films were prepared on MgO(111), SrTiO{sub 3}(111), and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}(0001) single-crystal substrates by ultrahigh vacuum molecular beam epitaxy. The effects of insulating substrate material on the film growth process and the structures were investigated. FeCo(110){sub bcc} films grow on MgO substrates with two type domains, Nishiyama-Wassermann (NW) and Kurdjumov-Sachs (KS) relationships. On the contrary, FeCo films grown on SrTiO{sub 3} and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} substrates include FeCo(111){sub bcc} crystal in addition to the FeCo(110){sub bcc} crystals with NW and KS relationships. The FeCo(111){sub bcc} crystal consists of two type domains whose orientations are rotated around the film normal by 180 deg. each other. The out-of-plane and the in-plane lattice spacings of FeCo(110){sub bcc} and FeCo(111){sub bcc} crystals formed on the insulating substrates are in agreement with those of the bulk Fe{sub 50}Co{sub 50} (at. %) crystal with small errors ranging between +0.2% and +0.4%, showing that the strains in the epitaxial films are very small.

  9. The QUIET Instrument

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bischoff, C.; et al.

    2012-07-01

    The Q/U Imaging ExperimenT (QUIET) is designed to measure polarization in the Cosmic Microwave Background, targeting the imprint of inflationary gravitational waves at large angular scales ({approx}1{sup o}). Between 2008 October and 2010 December, two independent receiver arrays were deployed sequentially on a 1.4m side-fed Dragonian telescope. The polarimeters which form the focal planes use a highly compact design based on High Electron Mobility Transistors (HEMTs) that provides simultaneous measurements of the Stokes parameters Q, U, and I in a single module. The 17-element Q-band polarimeter array, with a central frequency of 43.1 GHz, has the best sensitivity (69 {mu}Ks{sup 1/2}) and the lowest instrumental systematic errors ever achieved in this band, contributing to the tensor-to-scalar ratio at r < 0:1. The 84-element W-band polarimeter array has a sensitivity of 87 {mu}Ks{sup 1/2} at a central frequency of 94.5 GHz. It has the lowest systematic errors to date, contributing at r < 0:01. The two arrays together cover multipoles in the range {ell} {approx} 25 -- 975. These are the largest HEMT-based arrays deployed to date. This article describes the design, calibration, performance of, and sources of systematic error for the instrument.

  10. Identification and environmental distribution of dcpA encoding the 1,2-dichloropropane-to-propene reductive dehalogenase in organohalide-respiring Chloroflexi

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Padilla-Crespo, Elizabeth; Yan, Jun; Swift, Cynthia M; Chourey, Karuna; Hettich, Robert {Bob} L; Ritalahti, Kirsti M; Loeffler, Frank E

    2014-01-01

    Dehalococcoides mccartyi (Dhc) strains KS and RC grow with 1,2-dichloropropane (1,2-D) as an electron acceptor in enrichment cultures derived from hydrocarbon-contaminated and pristine river sediments, respectively. Transcription, expression, enzymatic and PCR analyses implicated the reductive dehalogenase gene dcpA in 1,2-D dichloroelimination to propene and inorganic chloride. Quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) analyses demonstrated Dhc cell increase during growth with 1,2-D and suggested that both Dhc strains carried a single dcpA gene copy per genome. Dhc strain RC and strain KS produced 1.8 0.1 x 107 and 1.4 0.5 x 107 cells per mole of propene formed, respectively. The dcpA gene was identified in 1,2-D-to-propene-dechlorinating microcosms established with sediment samples collected from different geographical locations in Europe and North and South America. Clone library analysis revealed two distinct dcpA phylogenetic clusters, both of which the dcpA gene-targeted qPCR assay captured, suggesting the qPCR assay is useful for site assessment and bioremediation monitoring at 1,2-D-contaminated sites.

  11. Intermittent turbulence events observed with a sonic anemometer and minisodar during CASES99.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coulter, R. L.; Doran, J. C.

    2000-05-12

    The Cooperative Air Surface Exchange Study 1999 (CASES99), designed to investigate in detail the nocturnal boundary layer (NBL) of the atmosphere with particular emphasis on turbulence and turbulence events, took place during October 1999, within the Atmospheric Boundary Layer Experiments (ABLE) region east of Wichita KS. The principal measurement site was a heavily instrumented 2-km square located near Leon (LE), KS, but additional sites at Smileyberg (SM) and Beaumont (BE) were also used. The authors augmented the normal ABLE measurements at Beaumont (radar wind profiler, minisodar, 10-m meteorological tower, precipitation gauge) with a sonic anemometer mounted on the tower, 7 m above the surface. For this campaign, the minisodar data were saved in single-pulse mode with no averaging. The Beaumont site is within gently rolling rangeland used primarily for grazing. The site is on a flat plain rising gradually to the east.The Flint Hills escarpment, located approximately 2 km to the east, marks the highest point in, and the eastern boundary of, the Walnut River watershed. Although most terrain features are subtle, terrain effects on atmospheric flows are still possible, particularly in stable conditions. The intent was to observe turbulence and, hopefully, turbulence events with the sonic anemometer and minisodar. The horizontal extent of these occurrences can be studied by including the Beaumont data with those obtained at the Leon site. In this report the authors are concerned with the occurrence of intermittent turbulence.

  12. Characterization of self-propagating formation reactions in Ni/Zr multilayered foils using reaction heats, velocities, and temperature-time profiles

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Barron, S. C.; Knepper, R.; Walker, N.; Weihs, T. P.

    2011-01-11

    We report on intermetallic formation reactions in vapor-deposited multilayered foils of Ni/Zr with 70 nm bilayers and overall atomic ratios of Ni:Zr, 2 Ni:Zr, and 7 Ni:2 Zr. The sequence of alloy phase formation and the stored energy is evaluated at slow heating rates (~1 K/s) using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) traces to 725ºC. All three chemistries initially form a Ni-Zr amorphous phase which crystallizes first to the intermetallic NiZr. The heat of reaction to the final phase is 34-36 kJ/mol atom for all chemistries. Intermetallic formation reactions are also studied at rapid heating rates (greater than 105 K/s) inmore » high temperature, self-propagating reactions which can be ignited in these foils by an electric spark. We find that reaction velocities and maximum reaction temperatures (Tmax) are largely independent of foil chemistry at 0.6 ± 0.1 m/s and 1220 ± 50 K, respectively, and that the measured Tmax is more than 200 K lower than predicted adiabatic temperatures (Tad). The difference between Tmax and Tad is explained by the prediction that transformation to the final intermetallic phases occurs after Tmax and results in the release of 20-30 % of the total heat of reaction and a delay in rapid cooling.« less

  13. ARM - Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds (jensen-sonde)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Jensen, Mike; Comstock, Jennifer; Genio, Anthony Del; Giangrande, Scott; Kollias, Pavlos

    2012-01-19

    A major component of the Mid-latitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E) field campaign was the deployment of an enhanced radiosonde array designed to capture the vertical profile of atmospheric state variables (pressure, temperature, humidity wind speed and wind direction) for the purpose of deriving the large-scale forcing for use in modeling studies. The radiosonde array included six sites (enhanced Central Facility [CF-1] plus five new sites) launching radiosondes at 3-6 hour sampling intervals. The network will cover an area of approximately (300)2 km2 with five outer sounding launch sites and one central launch location. The five outer sounding launch sites are: S01 Pratt, KS [ 37.7oN, 98.75oW]; S02 Chanute, KS [37.674, 95.488]; S03 Vici, Oklahoma [36.071, -99.204]; S04 Morris, Oklahoma [35.687, -95.856]; and S05 Purcell, Oklahoma [34.985, -97.522]. Soundings from the SGP Central Facility during MC3E can be retrieved from the regular ARM archive. During routine MC3E operations 4 radiosondes were launched from each of these sites (approx. 0130, 0730, 1330 and 1930 UTC). On days that were forecast to be convective up to four additional launches were launched at each site (approx. 0430, 1030, 1630, 2230 UTC). There were a total of approximately 14 of these high frequency launch days over the course of the experiment.

  14. Quasi-free Cross Section Measurements at CLAS: ? D ? p ? ? ( p ) , ? D ? K ? ( 892 ) 0 ? ( p ) , ? D ? K + ? ? ( 1385 ) ? ( p )

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mattione, Paul

    2014-09-01

    Preliminary measurements of the quasi-free differential cross sections of the gD -->pp-(p), gD --> K*(892)0L(p), and gD --> K+S*(1385)?(p) reactions are shown using data from the Jefferson Lab Hall B CLAS g13 experiment. No experimental cross section data have yet been published on gD --> K*(892)0L(p), and the only published cross section data on gD --> K+S*(1385)?(p) are at forward angles, where t-channel K+ and K*+ exchanges are predicted to dominate. These data can be used to contribute to the search for the "missing" N* resonances, some of which are predicted to have non-negligible couplings to the excited strangeness channels. These cross sections are shown to be sizable compared to the ground-state channels, indicating that it is important to include excited channels in coupled-channels analyses used to extract the N* resonances. In addition, the gD --> pp?(p) data provide a significant increase to the world statistics, and will be used to study rescattering effects within the deuteron.

  15. MOLECULAR GAS, CO, AND STAR FORMATION IN GALAXIES: EMERGENT EMPIRICAL RELATIONS, FEEDBACK, AND THE EVOLUTION OF VERY GAS-RICH SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pelupessy, Federico I. [Leiden Observatory, Leiden University, P.O. Box 9513, 2300 RA Leiden (Netherlands); Papadopoulos, Padelis P. [Argelander Institut fuer Astronomie, Auf dem Huegel 71, D-53121 Bonn (Germany)

    2009-12-20

    We use time-varying models of the coupled evolution of the H I, H{sub 2} gas phases and stars in galaxy-sized numerical simulations to (1) test for the emergence of the Kennicutt-Schmidt (K-S) and the H{sub 2}-pressure relation, (2) explore a realistic H{sub 2}-regulated star formation recipe which brings forth a neglected and potentially significant SF-regulating factor, and (3) go beyond typical galactic environments (for which these galactic empirical relations are deduced) to explore the early evolution of very gas-rich galaxies. In this work, we model low-mass galaxies (M{sub baryon} <= 10{sup 9} M{sub sun}), while incorporating an independent treatment of CO formation and destruction, the most important tracer molecule of H{sub 2} in galaxies, along with that for the H{sub 2} gas itself. We find that both the K-S and the H{sub 2}-pressure empirical relations can robustly emerge in galaxies after a dynamic equilibrium sets in between the various interstellar medium (ISM) states, the stellar component and its feedback (T approx> 1 Gyr). The only significant dependence of these relations seems to be for the CO-derived (and thus directly observable) ones, which show a strong dependence on the ISM metallicity. The H{sub 2}-regulated star formation recipe successfully reproduces the morphological and quantitative aspects of previous numerical models while doing away with the star formation efficiency parameter. Most of the H I -> H{sub 2} mass exchange is found taking place under highly non-equilibrium conditions necessitating a time-dependent treatment even in typical ISM environments. Our dynamic models indicate that the CO molecule can be a poor, nonlinear, H{sub 2} gas tracer. Finally, for early evolutionary stages (T approx< 0.4 Gyr), we find significant and systematic deviations of the true star formation from that expected from the K-S relation, which are especially pronounced and prolonged for metal-poor systems. The largest such deviations occur for the very gas-rich galaxies, where deviations of a factor approx3-4 in global star formation rate (SFR) can take place with respect to those expected from the CO-derived K-S relation. This is particularly important since gas-rich systems at high redshifts could appear as having unusually high SFRs with respect to their CO-bright H{sub 2} gas reservoirs. This points to a possibly serious deficiency of K-S relations as elements of the sub-grid physics of star formation in simulations of structure formation in the early universe.

  16. Combined Grinding and Drying of Biomass in One Operation Phase I

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sokhansanj, S.

    2008-06-26

    First American Scientific Corporation (FASC) has developed a unique and innovative grinder/dryer called KDS Micronex. The KS (Kinetic Disintegration System) combines two operations of grinding and drying into a single operation which reduces dependence on external heat input. The machine captures the heat of comminution and combines it will centrifugal forces to expedite moisture extraction from wet biomass. Because it uses mechanical forces rather than providing direct heat to perform the drying operation, it is a simpler machine and uses less energy than conventional grinding and drying operations which occur as two separate steps. The entire compact unit can be transported on a flatbed trailer to the site where biomass is available. Hence, the KDS Micronex is a technology that enables inexpensive pretreatment of waste materials and biomass. A well prepared biomass can be used as feed, fuel or fertilizer instead of being discarded. Electricity and chemical feedstock produced from such biomass would displace the use of fossil fuels and no net greenhouse gas emissions would result from such bio-based operations. Organic fertilizers resulting from the KS Micronex grinding/drying process will be pathogen-free unlike raw animal manures. The feasibility tests on KS during Phase I showed that a prototype machine can be developed, field tested and the technology demonstrated for commercial applications. The present KDS machine can remove up to 400 kg/h of water from a wet feed material. Since biomass processors demand a finished product that is only 10% moist and most raw materials like corn stover, bagasse, layer manure, cow dung, and waste wood have moisture contents of the order of 50%, this water removal rate translates to a production rate of roughly half a ton per hour. this is too small for most processors who are unwilling to acquire multiple machines because of the added complexity to the feed and product removal systems. The economics suffer due to small production rates, because the labor costs are a much larger fraction of the production cost. The goal for further research and development work is to scale up the KDS technology incorporating findings from Phase I into a machine that has superior performance characteristics.

  17. Chemical aging of single and multicomponent biomass burning aerosol surrogate-particles by OH: implications for cloud condensation nucleus activity

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Slade, J. H.; Thalman, R.; Wang, J.; Knopf, D. A.

    2015-03-06

    Multiphase OH and O3 oxidation reactions with atmospheric organic aerosol (OA) can influence particle physicochemical properties including composition, morphology, and lifetime. Chemical aging of initially insoluble or low soluble single-component OA by OH and O3 can increase their water-solubility and hygroscopicity, making them more active as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) and susceptible to wet deposition. However, an outstanding problem is whether the effects of chemical aging on their CCN activity are preserved when mixed with other organic or inorganic compounds exhibiting greater water-solubility. In this work, the CCN activity of laboratory-generated biomass burning aerosol (BBA) surrogate-particles exposed to OH andmore » O3 is evaluated by determining the hygroscopicity parameter, κ, as a function of particle type, mixing state, and OH/O3 exposure applying a CCN counter (CCNc) coupled to an aerosol flow reactor (AFR). Levoglucosan (LEV), 4-methyl-5-nitrocatechol (MNC), and potassium sulfate (KS) serve as representative BBA compounds that exhibit different hygroscopicity, water solubility, chemical functionalities, and reactivity with OH radicals, and thus exemplify the complexity of mixed inorganic/organic aerosol in the atmosphere. The CCN activities of all of the particles were unaffected by O3 exposure. Following exposure to OH, κ of MNC was enhanced by an order of magnitude, from 0.009 to ~0.1, indicating that chemically-aged MNC particles are better CCN and more prone to wet deposition than pure MNC particles. No significant enhancement in κ was observed for pure LEV particles following OH exposure. κ of the internally-mixed particles was not affected by OH oxidation. Furthermore, the CCN activity of OH exposed MNC-coated KS particles is similar to the OH unexposed atomized 1 : 1 by mass MNC : KS binary-component particles. Our results strongly suggest that when OA is dominated by water-soluble organic carbon (WSOC) or inorganic ions, chemical aging has no significant impact on OA hygroscopicity. The organic compounds exhibiting low solubility behave as if they are infinitely soluble when mixed with a sufficient amount of water-soluble compounds. At and beyond this point, the particles' CCN activity is governed entirely by the water-soluble fraction and not influenced by the oxidized organic fraction. Our results have important implications for heterogeneous oxidation and its impact on cloud formation given that atmospheric aerosol is a complex mixture of organic and inorganic compounds exhibiting a wide-range of solubilities.« less

  18. Chemical aging of single and multicomponent biomass burning aerosol surrogate particles by OH: implications for cloud condensation nucleus activity

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Slade, J. H.; Thalman, R.; Wang, J.; Knopf, D. A.

    2015-09-14

    Multiphase OH and O3 oxidation reactions with atmospheric organic aerosol (OA) can influence particle physicochemical properties including composition, morphology, and lifetime. Chemical aging of initially insoluble or low-soluble single-component OA by OH and O3 can increase their water solubility and hygroscopicity, making them more active as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) and susceptible to wet deposition. However, an outstanding problem is whether the effects of chemical aging on their CCN activity are preserved when mixed with other organic or inorganic compounds exhibiting greater water solubility. In this work, the CCN activity of laboratory-generated biomass burning aerosol (BBA) surrogate particles exposed tomore » OH and O3 is evaluated by determining the hygroscopicity parameter, κ, as a function of particle type, mixing state, and OH and O3 exposure applying a CCN counter (CCNc) coupled to an aerosol flow reactor (AFR). Levoglucosan (LEV), 4-methyl-5-nitrocatechol (MNC), and potassium sulfate (KS) serve as representative BBA compounds that exhibit different hygroscopicity, water solubility, chemical functionalities, and reactivity with OH radicals, and thus exemplify the complexity of mixed inorganic/organic aerosol in the atmosphere. The CCN activities of all of the particles were unaffected by O3 exposure. Following exposure to OH, κ of MNC was enhanced by an order of magnitude, from 0.009 to ~ 0.1, indicating that chemically aged MNC particles are better CCN and more prone to wet deposition than pure MNC particles. No significant enhancement in κ was observed for pure LEV particles following OH exposure. κ of the internally mixed particles was not affected by OH oxidation. Furthermore, the CCN activity of OH-exposed MNC-coated KS particles is similar to the OH unexposed atomized 1 : 1 by mass MNC : KS binary-component particles. Our results strongly suggest that when OA is dominated by water-soluble organic carbon (WSOC) or inorganic ions, chemical aging has no significant impact on OA hygroscopicity. The organic compounds exhibiting low solubility behave as if they are infinitely soluble when mixed with a sufficient number of water-soluble compounds. At and beyond this point, the particles' CCN activity is governed entirely by the water-soluble fraction and is not influenced by the oxidized organic fraction. Our results have important implications for heterogeneous oxidation and its impact on cloud formation given that atmospheric aerosol is a complex mixture of organic and inorganic compounds exhibiting a wide range of solubilities.« less

  19. Table 26. Natural gas home customer-weighted heating degree days

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    96 Created on: 4/26/2016 6:14:01 PM Table 26. Natural gas home customer-weighted heating degree days Month/Year/Type of data New England Middle Atlantic East North Central West North Central South Atlantic CT, ME, MA, NH, RI, VT NJ, NY, PA IL, IN, MI, OH, WI IA, KS, MN, MO, ND, NE, SD DE, FL, GA, MD, DC, NC, SC, VA, WV November Normal 702 665 757 841 443 2014 749 742 909 1,002 562 2015 583 509 596 653 325 % Diff (normal to 2015) -17.0 -23.5 -21.3 -22.4 -26.6 % Diff (2014 to 2015) -22.2 -31.4

  20. Word Pro - Untitled1

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    State-Level Energy Consumption Estimates and Estimated Consumption per Capita, 2010 Consumption Consumption per Capita 14 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Review 2011 TX CA FL LA IL OH PA NY GA IN MI NC VA NJ TN WA KY AL MO MN WI SC OK CO IA MD AZ MA MS KS AR OR NE UT CT WV NM NV AK WY ID ND ME MT SD NH HI DE RI DC VT 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 0 2 4 6 8 10

  1. Low Noise Borehole Triaxial Seismometer Phase II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kerr, James D; McClung, David W

    2006-11-06

    This report describes the preliminary design and the effort to date of Phase II of a Low Noise Borehole Triaxial Seismometer for use in networks of seismic stations for monitoring underground nuclear explosions. The design uses the latest technology of broadband seismic instrumentation. Each parameter of the seismometer is defined in terms of the known physical limits of the parameter. These limits are defined by the commercially available components, and the physical size constraints. A theoretical design is proposed, and a preliminary prototype model of the proposed instrument has been built. This prototype used the sensor module of the KS2000. The installation equipment (hole locks, etc.) has been designed and one unit has been installed in a borehole. The final design of the sensors and electronics and leveling mechanism is in process. Noise testing is scheduled for the last quarter of 2006.

  2. Microsoft Word - figure_14.doc

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    42 Figure 14. Net interstate movements, imports, and exports of natural gas in the United States, 2014 (million cubic feet) Norway Trinidad/ Tobago Yemen Trinidad/ Tobago Interstate Movements Not Shown on Map From Volume To From Volume To CT RI Other TX IN MA RI MA MA CT VA DC MD DC VT MA NH MA WA M T I D O R W Y ND SD C A N V U T CO NE KS A Z NM OK TX MN WI MI IA I L IN OH MO AR M S AL GA T N KY FL SC NC WV MD DE VA PA NJ NY CT RI MA VT NH ME LA HI A K Mexico C a n a d a C a n a d a Canada

  3. Microsoft Word - figure_99.doc

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    7 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Natural Gas Annual Figure 6. Natural gas processing in the United States and the Gulf of Mexico, 2014 (million cubic feet) None 1-15,000 15,001-100,000 100,001-200,000 200,001-500,000 500,001 and over Sources: Energy Information Administration (EIA), Form EIA-64A, "Annual Report of the Origin of Natural Gas Liquids Production." IN OH TN WV VA KY MD PA NY VT NH MA CT ME RI DE DC NC SC GA FL NJ AL MS LA MO AR TX NM OK CO KS UT AZ WY NE IL IA MN

  4. Retorting of oil shale followed by solvent extraction of spent shale: Experiment and kinetic analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khraisha, Y.H.

    2000-05-01

    Samples of El-Lajjun oil shale were thermally decomposed in a laboratory retort system under a slow heating rate (0.07 K/s) up to a maximum temperature of 698--773 K. After decomposition, 0.02 kg of spent shale was extracted by chloroform in a Soxhlet extraction unit for 2 h to investigate the ultimate amount of shale oil that could be produced. The retorting results indicate an increase in the oil yields from 3.24% to 9.77% of oil shale feed with retorting temperature, while the extraction results show a decrease in oil yields from 8.10% to 3.32% of spent shale. The analysis of the data according to the global first-order model for isothermal and nonisothermal conditions shows kinetic parameters close to those reported in literature.

  5. pr_a.indd

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    FL PADD 4: Rocky Mountain PADD 5: West Coast PADD 2: Midwest PADD 1: East Coast PADD 3: Gulf Coast PADD1A: New England PADD1B: Central Atlantic PADD1C: Lower Atlantic Petroleum Administration for Defense Districts AK HI WA OR CA NV AZ MT WY CO UT ID ND SD NE KS OK MO MN WI MI IL IN OH KY TN IA NM TX AR LA AL MS WV VA NC SC GA FL ME NH VT NY PA NJ MD DE MA CT RI

    9 A P P E N D I X A This appendix contains alphabetical listings of the variables used in the price and expenditure module of the

  6. Petroleum Marketing Monthly

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Prices U.S. Energy Information Administration | Petroleum Marketing Monthly Table 18. Domes c crude oil fi rst purchase prices dollars per barrel Year month U.S. Average PAD District 1 PAD District 2 U.S. Average Less AK North Slope Average NY PA WV Average IL IN KS KY MI NE 1990 20.03 21.57 22.06 23.32 23.00 22.16 22.88 23.36 23.46 23.21 23.20 22.92 21.94 1991 16.54 18.16 19.01 19.67 19.48 W 19.58 20.19 20.20 19.84 19.84 19.88 18.78 1992 15.99 17.38 18.52 19.05 19.01 18.09 18.63 19.26 19.27

  7. The characterization of shape memory effect for low elastic modulus biomedical {beta}-type titanium alloy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang Liqiang; Lu Weijie; Qin Jining; Zhang Fan; Zhang Di

    2010-05-15

    This work investigates the textures of biomedical TiNbTaZr alloy rolled by 99% cold reduction ratios in thickness. The relationship between textures and superelasticity of the specimens treated at 873 K and 1223 K for 1.2 ks is studied. The microstructure of tensile specimen is investigated by transmission electron microscopy. Textures of cold-rolled and heat-treated specimens are studied. During unloading, the anisotropy of superelastic strain and pure elastic strain in the heat-treated specimens is observed. Superelastic strain along rolling direction and transverse direction is larger than those along 45 deg. from rolling direction while pure elastic strain shows the highest value along 45 deg. from rolling direction in the specimen treated at 873 K. For the specimen treated at 1223 K, higher pure elastic strain is obtained along rolling direction. The maximum recovered strain around 2.11% is obtained along rolling direction.

  8. Horn-coupled, commercially-fabricated aluminum lumped-element kinetic inductance detectors for millimeter wavelengths

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCarrick, H. Flanigan, D.; Jones, G.; Johnson, B. R.; Araujo, D.; Limon, M.; Luu, V.; Miller, A.; Ade, P.; Doyle, S.; Tucker, C.; Bradford, K.; Che, G.; Cantor, R.; Day, P.; Leduc, H.; Mauskopf, P.; Mroczkowski, T.; Zmuidzinas, J.

    2014-12-15

    We discuss the design, fabrication, and testing of prototype horn-coupled, lumped-element kinetic inductance detectors (LEKIDs) designed for cosmic microwave background studies. The LEKIDs are made from a thin aluminum film deposited on a silicon wafer and patterned using standard photolithographic techniques at STAR Cryoelectronics, a commercial device foundry. We fabricated 20-element arrays, optimized for a spectral band centered on 150 GHz, to test the sensitivity and yield of the devices as well as the multiplexing scheme. We characterized the detectors in two configurations. First, the detectors were tested in a dark environment with the horn apertures covered, and second, the horn apertures were pointed towards a beam-filling cryogenic blackbody load. These tests show that the multiplexing scheme is robust and scalable, the yield across multiple LEKID arrays is 91%, and the measured noise-equivalent temperatures for a 4 K optical load are in the range 266 ?K?(s)

  9. Physical Market Conditions, Paper Market Activity,

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Prices U.S. Energy Information Administration | Petroleum Marketing Monthly Table 18. Domes c crude oil fi rst purchase prices dollars per barrel Year month U.S. Average PAD District 1 PAD District 2 U.S. Average Less AK North Slope Average NY PA WV Average IL IN KS KY MI NE 1990 20.03 21.57 22.06 23.32 23.00 22.16 22.88 23.36 23.46 23.21 23.20 22.92 21.94 1991 16.54 18.16 19.01 19.67 19.48 W 19.58 20.19 20.20 19.84 19.84 19.88 18.78 1992 15.99 17.38 18.52 19.05 19.01 18.09 18.63 19.26 19.27

  10. Annual Energy Outlook 2015 - Appendix F

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    8 Regional maps Figure F7. Coal demand regions Figure F7. Coal Demand Regions CT,MA,ME,NH,RI,VT OH 1. NE 3. S1 4. S2 5. GF 6. OH 7. EN AL,MS MN,ND,SD IA,NE,MO,KS TX,LA,OK,AR MT,WY,ID CO,UT,NV AZ,NM 9. AM 11. C2 12. WS 13. MT 14. CU 15. ZN WV,MD,DC,DE 2. YP Region Content Region Code NY,PA,NJ VA,NC,SC GA,FL IN,IL,MI,WI Region Content Region Code 14. CU 13. MT 16. PC 15. ZN 12. WS 11. C2 9. AM 5. GF 8. KT 4. S2 7. EN 6. OH 2. YP 1. NE 3. S1 10. C1 KY,TN 8. KT 16. PC AK,HI,WA,OR,CA 10. C1

  11. Basin Play State(s) Production Reserves Williston Bakken ND, MT, SD

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    tight oil plays: production and proved reserves, 2013-14 million barrels 2013 2013 Basin Play State(s) Production Reserves Williston Bakken ND, MT, SD 270 4,844 387 5,972 1,128 Western Gulf Eagle Ford TX 351 4,177 497 5,172 995 Permian Bone Spring, Wolfcamp NM, TX 21 335 53 722 387 Denver-Julesberg Niobrara CO, KS, NE, WY 2 17 42 512 495 Appalachian Marcellus* PA, WV 7 89 13 232 143 Fort Worth Barnett TX 9 58 9 47 -11 Sub-total 660 9,520 1,001 12,657 3,137 Other tight oil 41 523 56 708 185 U.S.

  12. Electronic and optical properties of pure and modified diamondoids studied by many-body perturbation theory and time-dependent density functional theory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Demján, Tamás; Vörös, Márton; Palummo, Maurizia; Gali, Adam

    2014-08-14

    Diamondoids are small diamond nanoparticles (NPs) that are built up from diamond cages. Unlike usual semiconductor NPs, their atomic structure is exactly known, thus they are ideal test-beds for benchmarking quantum chemical calculations. Their usage in spintronics and bioimaging applications requires a detailed knowledge of their electronic structure and optical properties. In this paper, we apply density functional theory (DFT) based methods to understand the electronic and optical properties of a few selected pure and modified diamondoids for which accurate experimental data exist. In particular, we use many-body perturbation theory methods, in the G{sub 0}W{sub 0} and G{sub 0}W{sub 0}+BSE approximations, and time-dependent DFT in the adiabatic local density approximation. We find large quasiparticle gap corrections that can exceed thrice the DFT gap. The electron-hole binding energy can be as large as 4 eV but it is considerably smaller than the GW corrections and thus G{sub 0}W{sub 0}+BSE optical gaps are about 50% larger than the Kohn-Sham (KS) DFT gaps. We find significant differences between KS time-dependent DFT and GW+BSE optical spectra on the selected diamondoids. The calculated G{sub 0}W{sub 0} quasiparticle levels agree well with the corresponding experimental vertical ionization energies. We show that nuclei dynamics in the ionization process can be significant and its contribution may reach about 0.5 eV in the adiabatic ionization energies.

  13. Towards an Optimal Gradient-dependent Energy Functional of the PZ-SIC Form

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jónsson, Elvar Örn; Lehtola, Susi; Jónsson, Hannes

    2015-06-01

    Results of Perdew–Zunger self-interaction corrected (PZ-SIC) density functional theory calculations of the atomization energy of 35 molecules are compared to those of high-level quantum chemistry calculations. While the PBE functional, which is commonly used in calculations of condensed matter, is known to predict on average too high atomization energy (overbinding of the molecules), the application of PZ-SIC gives a large overcorrection and leads to significant underestimation of the atomization energy. The exchange enhancement factor that is optimal for the generalized gradient approximation within the Kohn-Sham (KS) approach may not be optimal for the self-interaction corrected functional. The PBEsol functional, where the exchange enhancement factor was optimized for solids, gives poor results for molecules in KS but turns out to work better than PBE in PZ-SIC calculations. The exchange enhancement is weaker in PBEsol and the functional is closer to the local density approximation. Furthermore, the drop in the exchange enhancement factor for increasing reduced gradient in the PW91 functional gives more accurate results than the plateaued enhancement in the PBE functional. A step towards an optimal exchange enhancement factor for a gradient dependent functional of the PZ-SIC form is taken by constructing an exchange enhancement factor that mimics PBEsol for small values of the reduced gradient, and PW91 for large values. The average atomization energy is then in closer agreement with the high-level quantum chemistry calculations, but the variance is still large, the F2 molecule being a notable outlier.

  14. Initial results from NuSTAR observations of the Norma Arm

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bodaghee, Arash; Tomsick, John A.; Krivonos, Roman; Barrire, Nicolas; Boggs, Steven E.; Craig, William W.; Stern, Daniel; Bauer, Franz E.; Fornasini, Francesca M.; Christensen, Finn E.; Gotthelf, Eric V.; Hailey, Charles J.; Mori, Kaya; Harrison, Fiona A.; Hong, Jaesub; Zhang, William W.

    2014-08-10

    Results are presented for an initial survey of the Norma Arm gathered with the focusing hard X-Ray Telescope NuSTAR. The survey covers 0.2 deg{sup 2} of sky area in the 3-79 keV range with a minimum and maximum raw depth of 15 ks and 135 ks, respectively. Besides a bright black-hole X-ray binary in outburst (4U 163047) and a new X-ray transient (NuSTAR J163433473841), NuSTAR locates three sources from the Chandra survey of this region whose spectra are extended above 10 keV for the first time: CXOU J163329.5473332, CXOU J163350.9474638, and CXOU J163355.1473804. Imaging, timing, and spectral data from a broad X-ray range (0.3-79 keV) are analyzed and interpreted with the aim of classifying these objects. CXOU J163329.5473332 is either a cataclysmic variable or a faint low-mass X-ray binary. CXOU J163350.9474638 varies in intensity on year-long timescales, and with no multi-wavelength counterpart, it could be a distant X-ray binary or possibly a magnetar. CXOU J163355.1473804 features a helium-like iron line at 6.7 keV and is classified as a nearby cataclysmic variable. Additional surveys are planned for the Norma Arm and Galactic Center, and those NuSTAR observations will benefit from the lessons learned during this pilot study.

  15. The Search for High Energy Extended Emission by Fermi-LAT from Swift-Localized Gamma-Ray Bursts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chiang, J.; /Stanford U., HEPL /SLAC; Racusin, J.L.; /NASA, Goddard

    2012-05-01

    The brighter Fermi-LAT bursts have exhibited emission at energies >0.1 GeV that persists as late as {approx}2 ks after the prompt phase has nominally ended. This so-called 'extended emission' could arise from continued activity of the prompt burst mechanism or it could be the start of a high energy afterglow component. The high energy extended emission seen by the LAT has typically followed a t{sup -}{gamma} power-law temporal decay where {gamma} {approx} 1.2-1.7 and has shown no strong indication of spectral evolution. In contrast, the prompt burst emission generally displays strong spectral variability and more complex temporal changes in the LAT band. This differing behavior suggests that the extended emission likely corresponds to an early afterglow phase produced by an external shock. In this study, we look for evidence of high energy extended emission from 145 Swift-localized GRBs that have occurred since the launch of Fermi. A majority of these bursts were either outside of the LAT field-of-view or were otherwise not detected by the LAT during the prompt phase. However, because of the scanning operation of the Fermi satellite, the long-lived extended emission of these bursts may be detectable in the LAT data on the {approx}few ks time scale. We will look for emission from individual bursts and will perform a stacking analysis in order to set bounds on this emission for the sample as a whole. The detection of such emission would have implications for afterglow models and for the overall energy budget of GRBs.

  16. A comparative theoretical study on core-hole excitation spectra of azafullerene and its derivatives

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deng, Yunfeng; Department of Physics, Guizhou University, Guiyang 550025 ; Gao, Bin; Centre for Theoretical and Computational Chemistry , Department of Chemistry, University of Tromsø—The Arctic University of Norway, N-9037 Tromsø ; Deng, Mingsen; Luo, Yi; Department of Theoretical Chemistry, School of Biotechnology, Royal Institute of Technology, SE-10691 Stockholm

    2014-03-28

    The core-hole excitation spectra—near-edge x-ray absorption spectroscopy (NEXAFS), x-ray emission spectroscopy (XES), and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) shake-up satellites have been simulated at the level of density functional theory for the azafullerene C{sub 59}N and its derivatives (C{sub 59}N){sup +}, C{sub 59}HN, (C{sub 59}N){sub 2}, and C{sub 59}N–C{sub 60}, in which the XPS shake-up satellites were simulated using our developed equivalent core hole Kohn-Sham (ECH-KS) density functional theory approach [B. Gao, Z. Wu, and Y. Luo, J. Chem. Phys. 128, 234704 (2008)] which aims for the study of XPS shake-up satellites of large-scale molecules. Our calculated spectra are generally in good agreement with available experimental results that validates the use of the ECH-KS method in the present work. The nitrogen K-edge NEXAFS, XES, and XPS shake-up satellites spectra in general can be used as fingerprints to distinguish the azafullerene C{sub 59}N and its different derivatives. Meanwhile, different carbon K-edge spectra could also provide detailed information of (local) electronic structures of different molecules. In particular, a peak (at around 284.5 eV) in the carbon K-edge NEXAFS spectrum of the heterodimer C{sub 59}N–C{sub 60} is confirmed to be related to the electron transfer from the C{sub 59}N part to the C{sub 60} part in this charge-transfer complex.

  17. Towards an Optimal Gradient-dependent Energy Functional of the PZ-SIC Form

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Jónsson, Elvar Örn; Lehtola, Susi; Jónsson, Hannes

    2015-06-01

    Results of Perdew–Zunger self-interaction corrected (PZ-SIC) density functional theory calculations of the atomization energy of 35 molecules are compared to those of high-level quantum chemistry calculations. While the PBE functional, which is commonly used in calculations of condensed matter, is known to predict on average too high atomization energy (overbinding of the molecules), the application of PZ-SIC gives a large overcorrection and leads to significant underestimation of the atomization energy. The exchange enhancement factor that is optimal for the generalized gradient approximation within the Kohn-Sham (KS) approach may not be optimal for the self-interaction corrected functional. The PBEsol functional, wheremore » the exchange enhancement factor was optimized for solids, gives poor results for molecules in KS but turns out to work better than PBE in PZ-SIC calculations. The exchange enhancement is weaker in PBEsol and the functional is closer to the local density approximation. Furthermore, the drop in the exchange enhancement factor for increasing reduced gradient in the PW91 functional gives more accurate results than the plateaued enhancement in the PBE functional. A step towards an optimal exchange enhancement factor for a gradient dependent functional of the PZ-SIC form is taken by constructing an exchange enhancement factor that mimics PBEsol for small values of the reduced gradient, and PW91 for large values. The average atomization energy is then in closer agreement with the high-level quantum chemistry calculations, but the variance is still large, the F2 molecule being a notable outlier.« less

  18. Passivating ligand and solvent contributions to the electronic properties of semiconductor nanocrystals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fischer, S.; Crotty, A.; Kilina, S.; Ivanov, I.; Tretiak, S

    2012-01-01

    We examine in detail the impact of passivating ligands (i.e., amines, phosphines, phosphine oxides and pyridines) on the electronic and optical spectra of Cd{sub 33}Se{sub 33} quantum dots (QDs) using density functional theory (DFT) and time-dependent DFT (TDDFT) quantum-chemical methodologies. Most ligand orbitals are found deep inside in the valence and conduction bands of the QD, with pyridine being an exception by introducing new states close to the conduction band edge. Importantly, all ligands contribute states which are highly delocalized over both the QD surface and ligands, forming hybridized orbitals rather than ligand-localized trap states. In contrast, the states close to the band gap are delocalized over the QD atoms only and define the lower energy absorption spectra. The random detachment of one of ligands from the QD surface results in the appearance of a highly localized unoccupied state inside the energy gap of the QD. Such changes in the electronic structure are correlated with the respective QD-ligand binding energy and steric ligand-ligand interactions. Polar solvent significantly reduces both effects leading to delocalization and stabilization of the surface states. Thus, trap and surface states are substantially eliminated by the solvent. Polar solvent also blue-shifts (e.g., 0.3-0.4 eV in acetonitrile) the calculated absorption spectra. This shift increases with an increase of the dielectric constant of the solvent. We also found that the approximate single-particle Kohn-Sham (KS) approach is adequate for calculating the absorption spectra of the ligated QDs. Besides a systematic blue-shift, the KS spectra are in very good agreement with their respective counterparts calculated with the more accurate TDDFT method.

  19. A Chandra-HETG view of MCG +8-11-11

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Murphy, K. D.; Nowak, M. A.

    2014-12-10

    We present a spectral analysis of the 118 ks Chandra High Energy Transmission Gratings (HETG) observation of the X-ray bright Seyfert 1.5 galaxy MCG +8-11-11, in conjunction with 100 ks of archival Suzaku data, aimed at investigating the signatures of warm absorption and Compton reflection reported from previous Suzaku and XMM-Newton studies of the source. Contrary to previous results, we find that warm absorption is not required by the data. Instead, we report upper limits on absorption lines that are below previous (marginal) detections. Fe K? line emission is clearly detected and is likely resolved with ? ? 0.02 keV with the HETG data. We applied self-consistent, broadband spectral-fitting models to the Chandra and Suzaku data to investigate this and other signatures of distant absorption and reflection. Utilizing in particular the MYTorus model, we find that the data are consistent with reprocessing by a distant, neutral torus that is marginally Compton-thick ( N {sub H} ?10{sup 24}cm{sup 2}) and out of the line of sight. However, we do not find compelling evidence of a relativistically broadened Fe K emission line, which is often expected from type 1 active galactic nuclei. This is consistent with some, although not all, previous studies of MCG +8-11-11. A well-measured edge is identified by the HETG near 0.5 keV, indicating neutral absorption in the line of sight that is consistent with galactic absorption; however, the absorption may be partially intrinsic to the source. The HETG data are consistent with the presence of a soft excess, a feature that may be missed by considering the Suzaku data alone.

  20. Density functional theory based generalized effective fragment potential method

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nguyen, Kiet A. E-mail: ruth.pachter@wpafb.af.mil; Pachter, Ruth E-mail: ruth.pachter@wpafb.af.mil; Day, Paul N.

    2014-06-28

    We present a generalized Kohn-Sham (KS) density functional theory (DFT) based effective fragment potential (EFP2-DFT) method for the treatment of solvent effects. Similar to the original Hartree-Fock (HF) based potential with fitted parameters for water (EFP1) and the generalized HF based potential (EFP2-HF), EFP2-DFT includes electrostatic, exchange-repulsion, polarization, and dispersion potentials, which are generated for a chosen DFT functional for a given isolated molecule. The method does not have fitted parameters, except for implicit parameters within a chosen functional and the dispersion correction to the potential. The electrostatic potential is modeled with a multipolar expansion at each atomic center and bond midpoint using Stone's distributed multipolar analysis. The exchange-repulsion potential between two fragments is composed of the overlap and kinetic energy integrals and the nondiagonal KS matrices in the localized molecular orbital basis. The polarization potential is derived from the static molecular polarizability. The dispersion potential includes the intermolecular D3 dispersion correction of Grimme et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 132, 154104 (2010)]. The potential generated from the CAMB3LYP functional has mean unsigned errors (MUEs) with respect to results from coupled cluster singles, doubles, and perturbative triples with a complete basis set limit (CCSD(T)/CBS) extrapolation, of 1.7, 2.2, 2.0, and 0.5 kcal/mol, for the S22, water-benzene clusters, water clusters, and n-alkane dimers benchmark sets, respectively. The corresponding EFP2-HF errors for the respective benchmarks are 2.41, 3.1, 1.8, and 2.5 kcal/mol. Thus, the new EFP2-DFT-D3 method with the CAMB3LYP functional provides comparable or improved results at lower computational cost and, therefore, extends the range of applicability of EFP2 to larger system sizes.

  1. Experimental and first-principles studies on the elastic properties of α-hafnium metal under pressure

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Qi, Xintong; Wang, Xuebing; Chen, Ting; Li, Baosheng

    2016-03-30

    Compressional and shear wave velocities of the α phase of hafnium have been measured up to 10.4 GPa at room temperature using ultrasonic interferometry in a multi-anvil apparatus. A finite strain equation of state analysis yielded Ks0 = 110.4 (5) GPa, G0 = 54.7(5) GPa,Ks0' = 3.7 and G0' = 0.6 for the elastic bulk and shear moduli and their pressure derivatives at ambient conditions. Complementary to the experimental data, the single crystal elastic constants, elastic anisotropy and the unit cell axial ratio c/a of α-hafnium at high pressures were investigated by Density Functional Theory (DFT) based first principles calculations.more » A c/a value of 1.605 is predicted for α-Hf at 40 GPa, which is in excellent agreement with previous experimental results. The low-pressure derivative of the shear modulus observed in our experimental data up to 10 GPa was found to originate from the elastic constant C44 which exhibits negligible pressure dependence within the current experimental pressure range. At higher pressures (>10 GPa), C44 was predicted to soften and the shear wave velocity νS trended to decrease with pressure, which can be interpreted as a precursor to the α-ω transition similar to that observed in other group IV elements (titanium and zirconium). Here, the acoustic velocities, bulk and shear moduli, and the acoustic Debye temperature (θD = 240.1 K) determined from the current experiments were all compared well with those predicted by our theoretical DFT calculations.« less

  2. Interim Final Report for the Strengthening Retrofit Markets for Comprehensive Savings in Multifamily Buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meinking, Rick; Adamson, Joy M

    2013-12-20

    Energy efficiency is vitally important in Maine. Nearly 70% of Maine households rely on fuel oil as their primary energy source for home heating, a higher share than in any other state. Coupled with the state's long, cold winters, Maine's dependence on oil renders homeowners particularly vulnerable to fluctuating fuel costs. With $4.5 million in seed funding from the Energy Department's Better Buildings Neighborhood Program, the Governor's Energy Office (GEO), through Efficiency Maine Trust (the Trust), is spurring Maine landlords to lower their monthly energy bills and improve comfort for their tenants during the state's cold winter months and increasingly warmer summers. Maine's aging multifamily housing stock can be expensive to heat and costly to maintain. It is not unusual to find buildings with little or no insulation, drafty windows, and significant air leaks, making them ideal candidates for energy efficiency upgrades. Maine modeled its Multifamily Efficiency Program (MEP) after the state's highly successful Home Energy Savings Program (HESP) for single?family homes. HESP provided cash incentives and financing opportunities to owners of one? to four?unit structures, which resulted in thousands of energy assessments and whole?house energy upgrades in 225 communities. Maine's new MEP multifamily energy efficiency upgrade and weatherization initiative focuses on small to medium?sized (i.e., five to 20 units) apartment buildings. The program's energy efficiency upgrades will provide at least 20% energy savings for each upgraded multifamily unit. The Trusts MEP relies on a network of approved program partners who help move projects through the pipeline from assessment to upgrade. MEP has two components: benchmarking and development of an Energy Reduction Plan (ERP). Using the ENERGY STAR Portfolio Manager benchmarking tool, MEP provides an assessment of current energy usage in the building, establishes a baseline for future energy efficiency improvements, and enables tracking and monitoring of future energy usage at the building all at no cost to the building owner. The ERP is developed by a program partner using either the Trusts approved modeling or prescriptive tools; it provides detailed information about the current energyrelated conditions in the building and recommends energy efficiency, health, and safety improvements. The Trust's delivery contractor provides quality assurance and controls throughout the process. Through this effort, MEP's goal is to establish a self?sustaining, market?driven program, demonstrating the value of energy efficiency to other building owners. The increasing value of properties across the state will help incentivize these owners to continue upgrades after the grant period has ended. Targeting urban areas in Maine with dense clusters of multifamily unitssuch as Portland, Lewiston? Auburn, Bangor, and AugustaMEP engaged a variety of stakeholder groups early on to design its multifamily program. Through direct emails and its website, program officials invited lending institutions, building professionals, engineering firms, equipment distributors, and local property owners associations to attend open meetings around the state to learn about the goals of the multifamily program and to help define its parameters. These meetings helped program administrators understand the diversity of the customer base: some owners are individuals with a single building, while other owners are groups of people or management companies with an entire portfolio of multifamily buildings. The diversity of the customer base notwithstanding, owners see MEP as an opportunity to make gains in their respective properties. Consistently high turnouts at stakeholder meetings fueled greater customer interest as awareness of the program spread through word of mouth. The program also gained traction by utilizing the program partner networks and building on the legacy of the Trusts successful HESP for single?family residences. MEP offers significant incentives for building owners to p

  3. A test of star formation laws in disk galaxies. II. Dependence on dynamical properties

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Suwannajak, Chutipong; Tan, Jonathan C.; Leroy, Adam K.

    2014-05-20

    We use the observed radial profiles of the mass surface densities of total, ? {sub g}, and molecular, ?{sub H2}, gas, rotation velocity, and star formation rate (SFR) surface density, ?{sub sfr}, of the molecular-rich (?{sub H2} ? ?{sub HI}/2) regions of 16 nearby disk galaxies to test several star formation (SF) laws: a 'Kennicutt-Schmidt (K-S)' law, ?{sub sfr}=A{sub g}?{sub g,2}{sup 1.5}; a 'Constant Molecular' law, ?{sub sfr} = A {sub H2}?{sub H2,2}; the turbulence-regulated laws of Krumholz and McKee (KM05) and Krumholz, McKee, and Tumlinson (KMT09); a 'Gas-?' law, ?{sub sfr}=B{sub ?}?{sub g}?; and a shear-driven 'giant molecular cloud (GMC) Collision' law, ?{sub sfr} = B {sub CC}? {sub g}?(1-0.7?), where ? ? d ln v {sub circ}/d ln r. If allowed one free normalization parameter for each galaxy, these laws predict the SFR with rms errors of factors of 1.4-1.8. If a single normalization parameter is used by each law for the entire galaxy sample, then rms errors range from factors of 1.5-2.1. Although the Constant Molecular law gives the smallest rms errors, the improvement over the KMT, K-S, and GMC Collision laws is not especially significant, particularly given the different observational inputs that the laws utilize and the scope of included physics, which ranges from empirical relations to detailed treatment of interstellar medium processes. We next search for systematic variation of SF law parameters with local and global galactic dynamical properties of disk shear rate (related to ?), rotation speed, and presence of a bar. We demonstrate with high significance that higher shear rates enhance SF efficiency per local orbital time. Such a trend is expected if GMC collisions play an important role in SF, while an opposite trend would be expected if the development of disk gravitational instabilities is the controlling physics.

  4. Collaborative research. Study of aerosol sources and processing at the GVAX Pantnagar Supersite

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Worsnop, Doug; Volkamer, Rainer

    2012-08-13

    The Two Column Aerosol Project (TCAP) investigated uncertainties in the aerosol direct effect in the northern hemisphere mid-latitudes. The University of Colorado 2D-MAX-DOAS and LED-CE-DOAS instruments were collocated with DOE’s Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Mobile Facility (AMF) and Mobile Aerosol Observing System (MAOS) during the TCAP-1 campaign at Cape Cod, MA (1 July to 13 August 2012). We have performed atmospheric radiation closure studies to evaluate the use of a novel parameter, i.e., the Raman Scattering Probability (RSP). We have performed first measurements of RSP almucantar scans, and measure RSP in spectra of scattered solar photons at 350nm and 430nm. Radiative Transfer Modelling of RSP demonstrate that the RSP measurement is maximally sensitive to infer even extremely low aerosol optical depth (AOD < 0.01) reliably by DOAS at low solar relative azimuth angles. We further assess the role of elevated aerosol layers on near surface observations of oxygen collision complexes, O 2-O2. Elevated aerosol layers modify the near surface absorption of O2-O2 and RSP. The combination of RSP and O2-O2 holds largely unexplored potential to better constrain elevated aerosol layers and measure column aerosol optical properties such as aerosol effective radius, extinction, aerosol phase functions and refractive indices. The TCAP deployment also provides a time series of reactive trace gas vertical profiles, i.e., nitrogen dioxide (NO2) and glyoxal (C2H2O2), which are measured simultaneously with the aerosol optical properties by DOAS. NO2 is an important precursor for ozone (O3) that modifies oxidative capacity. Glyoxal modifies oxidative capacity and is a source for brown carbon by forming secondary organic aerosol (SOA) via multiphase reactions in aerosol and cloud water. We have performed field measurements of these gases during TCAP, and conducted laboratory experiments to quantify for the first time the Setschenow salting constant, KS, of glyoxal in sulfate aerosols. Knowledge about KS is prerequisite to predict how increasing sulfate concentrations since pre-industrial times have modified the formation of SOA from biogenic gases in atmospheric models.

  5. Molecular hydrogen regulated star formation in cosmological smoothed particle hydrodynamics simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thompson, Robert; Nagamine, Kentaro; Jaacks, Jason; Choi, Jun-Hwan

    2014-01-10

    Some observations have shown that star formation (SF) correlates tightly with the presence of molecular hydrogen (H{sub 2}); therefore, it is important to investigate its implication on galaxy formation in a cosmological context. In the present work, we implement a sub-grid model (hereafter H{sub 2}-SF model) that tracks the H{sub 2} mass fraction within our cosmological smoothed particle hydrodynamics code GADGET-3 by using an equilibrium analytic model of Krumholz et al. This model allows us to regulate the SF in our simulation by the local abundance of H{sub 2} rather than the total cold gas density, which naturally introduces the dependence of SF on metallicity. We investigate the implications of the H{sub 2}-SF model on galaxy population properties, such as the stellar-to-halo mass ratio (SHMR), baryon fraction, cosmic star formation rate density (SFRD), galaxy specific SFR, galaxy stellar mass functions (GSMF), and Kennicutt-Schmidt (KS) relationship. The advantage of our work over the previous ones is having a large sample of simulated galaxies in a cosmological volume from high redshift to z = 0. We find that low-mass halos with M {sub DM} < 10{sup 10.5} M {sub ?} are less efficient in producing stars in the H{sub 2}-SF model at z ? 6, which brings the simulations into better agreement with the observational estimates of the SHMR and GSMF at the low-mass end. This is particularly evident by a reduction in the number of low-mass galaxies at M {sub *} ? 10{sup 8} M {sub ?} in the GSMF. The overall SFRD is also reduced at high z in the H{sub 2} run, which results in slightly higher SFRD at low redshift due to more abundant gas available for SF at later times. This new H{sub 2} model is able to reproduce the empirical KS relationship at z = 0 naturally, without the need for setting its normalization by hand, and overall it seems to have more advantages than the previous pressure-based SF model.

  6. Structural characteristics and elevated temperature mechanical properties of AJ62 Mg alloy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kubsek, J., E-mail: Jiri.Kubasek@vscht.cz; Vojt?ch, D.; Martnek, M.

    2013-12-15

    Structure and mechanical properties of the novel casting AJ62 (Mg6Al2Sr) alloy developed for elevated temperature applications were studied. The AJ62 alloy was compared to commercial casting AZ91 (Mg9Al1Zn) and WE43 (Mg4Y3RE) alloys. The structure was examined by scanning electron microscopy, x-ray diffraction and energy dispersive spectrometry. Mechanical properties were characterized by Viskers hardness measurements in the as-cast state and after a long-term heat treatment at 250 C/150 hours. Compressive mechanical tests were also carried out both at room and elevated temperatures. Compressive creep tests were conducted at a temperature of 250 C and compressive stresses of 60, 100 and 140 MPa. The structure of the AJ62 alloy consisted of primary ?-Mg dendrites and interdendritic nework of the Al{sub 4}Sr and massive Al{sub 3}Mg{sub 13}Sr phases. By increasing the cooling rate during solidification from 10 and 120 K/s the average dendrite arm thickness decreased from 18 to 5 ?m and the total volume fraction of the interdendritic phases from 20% to 30%. Both factors slightly increased hardness and compressive strength. The room temperature compressive strength and hardness of the alloy solidified at 30 K/s were 298 MPa and 50 HV 5, i.e. similar to those of the as-cast WE43 alloy and lower than those of the AZ91 alloy. At 250 C the compressive strength of the AJ62 alloy decreased by 50 MPa, whereas those of the AZ91 and WE43 alloys by 100 and 20 MPa, respectively. The creep rate of the AJ62 alloy was higher than that of the WE43 alloy, but significantly lower in comparison with the AZ91 alloy. Different thermal stabilities of the alloys were discussed and related to structural changes during elevated temperature expositions. - Highlights: Small effect of cooling rate on the compressive strength and hardness of AJ 62 A bit lower compressive strength of AJ 62 compared to AZ91 at room temperature Higher resistance of the AJ 62 alloy to the creep process in compression compared to AZ91 Excellent thermal stability and creep resistance of the alloy WE 43 Improved thermal stability and creep resistance in order WE43 > AJ62 >> AZ91.

  7. TH-A-18C-09: Ultra-Fast Monte Carlo Simulation for Cone Beam CT Imaging of Brain Trauma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sisniega, A; Zbijewski, W; Stayman, J; Yorkston, J; Aygun, N; Koliatsos, V; Siewerdsen, J

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Application of cone-beam CT (CBCT) to low-contrast soft tissue imaging, such as in detection of traumatic brain injury, is challenged by high levels of scatter. A fast, accurate scatter correction method based on Monte Carlo (MC) estimation is developed for application in high-quality CBCT imaging of acute brain injury. Methods: The correction involves MC scatter estimation executed on an NVIDIA GTX 780 GPU (MC-GPU), with baseline simulation speed of ~1e7 photons/sec. MC-GPU is accelerated by a novel, GPU-optimized implementation of variance reduction (VR) techniques (forced detection and photon splitting). The number of simulated tracks and projections is reduced for additional speed-up. Residual noise is removed and the missing scatter projections are estimated via kernel smoothing (KS) in projection plane and across gantry angles. The method is assessed using CBCT images of a head phantom presenting a realistic simulation of fresh intracranial hemorrhage (100 kVp, 180 mAs, 720 projections, source-detector distance 700 mm, source-axis distance 480 mm). Results: For a fixed run-time of ~1 sec/projection, GPU-optimized VR reduces the noise in MC-GPU scatter estimates by a factor of 4. For scatter correction, MC-GPU with VR is executed with 4-fold angular downsampling and 1e5 photons/projection, yielding 3.5 minute run-time per scan, and de-noised with optimized KS. Corrected CBCT images demonstrate uniformity improvement of 18 HU and contrast improvement of 26 HU compared to no correction, and a 52% increase in contrast-tonoise ratio in simulated hemorrhage compared to “oracle” constant fraction correction. Conclusion: Acceleration of MC-GPU achieved through GPU-optimized variance reduction and kernel smoothing yields an efficient (<5 min/scan) and accurate scatter correction that does not rely on additional hardware or simplifying assumptions about the scatter distribution. The method is undergoing implementation in a novel CBCT dedicated to brain trauma imaging at the point of care in sports and military applications. Research grant from Carestream Health. JY is an employee of Carestream Health.

  8. X-RAY OBSERVATIONS OF THE SUPERNOVA REMNANT CTB 87 (G74.9+1.2): AN EVOLVED PULSAR WIND NEBULA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matheson, H.; Safi-Harb, S.; Kothes, R. E-mail: samar@physics.umanitoba.ca

    2013-09-01

    Pulsar wind nebulae (PWNe) studies with the Chandra X-Ray Observatory have opened a new window to address the physics of pulsar winds, zoom on their interaction with their hosting supernova remnant (SNR) and interstellar medium, and identify their powering engines. We here present a new 70 ks, plus an archived 18 ks, Chandra ACIS observation of the SNR CTB 87 (G74.9+1.2), classified as a PWN with unusual radio properties and poorly studied in X-rays. We find that the peak of the X-ray emission is clearly offset from the peak of the radio emission by {approx}100'' and located at the southeastern edge of the radio nebula. We detect a point source-the putative pulsar-at the peak of the X-ray emission and study its spectrum separately from the PWN. This new point source, CXOU J201609.2+371110, is surrounded by a compact nebula displaying a torus-like structure and possibly a jet. A more extended diffuse nebula is offset from the radio nebula, extending from the point source to the northwest for {approx}250''. The spectra of the point source, compact nebula, and extended diffuse nebula are all well described by a power-law model with a photon index of 1.1 (0.7-1.6), 1.2 (0.9-1.4), and 1.7 (1.5-1.8), respectively, for a column density N{sub H} = 1.38 (1.21-1.57) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 22} cm{sup -2} (90% confidence). The total X-ray luminosity of the source is {approx}1.6 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 34} erg s{sup -1} at an assumed distance of 6.1 kpc, with {approx}2% and 6% contribution from the point source and compact nebula, respectively. The observed properties suggest that CTB 87 is an evolved ({approx}5-28 kyr) PWN, with the extended radio emission likely a ''relic'' PWN, as in Vela-X and G327.1-1.1. To date, however, there is no evidence for thermal X-ray emission from this SNR, and the SNR shell is still missing, suggesting expansion into a low-density medium (n{sub 0} < 0.2 D{sup -1/2}{sub 6.1} cm{sup -3}), likely caused by a stellar wind bubble blown by the progenitor star.

  9. ARM - Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Microwave Radiometer Profiler (jensen-mwr)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Jensen, Mike

    2012-02-01

    A major component of the Mid-latitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E) field campaign was the deployment of an enhanced radiosonde array designed to capture the vertical profile of atmospheric state variables (pressure, temperature, humidity wind speed and wind direction) for the purpose of deriving the large-scale forcing for use in modeling studies. The radiosonde array included six sites (enhanced Central Facility [CF-1] plus five new sites) launching radiosondes at 3-6 hour sampling intervals. The network will cover an area of approximately (300)2 km2 with five outer sounding launch sites and one central launch location. The five outer sounding launch sites are: S01 Pratt, KS [ 37.7oN, 98.75oW]; S02 Chanute, KS [37.674, 95.488]; S03 Vici, Oklahoma [36.071, -99.204]; S04 Morris, Oklahoma [35.687, -95.856]; and S05 Purcell, Oklahoma [34.985, -97.522]. Soundings from the SGP Central Facility during MC3E can be retrieved from the regular ARM archive. During routine MC3E operations 4 radiosondes were launched from each of these sites (approx. 0130, 0730, 1330 and 1930 UTC). On days that were forecast to be convective up to four additional launches were launched at each site (approx. 0430, 1030, 1630, 2230 UTC). There were a total of approximately 14 of these high frequency launch days over the course of the experiment. These files contain brightness temperatures observed at Purcell during MC3E. The measurements were made with a 5 channel (22.235, 23.035, 23.835, 26.235, 30.000GHz) microwave radiometer at one minute intervals. The results have been separated into daily files and the day of observations is indicated in the file name. All observations were zenith pointing. Included in the files are the time variables base_time and time_offset. These follow the ARM time conventions. Base_time is the number seconds since January 1, 1970 at 00:00:00 for the first data point of the file and time_offset is the offset in seconds from base_time.

  10. ARM - Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds - Ultra High Sensitivity Aerosol Spectrometer(tomlinson-uhsas)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Tomlinson, Jason; Jensen, Mike

    2012-02-28

    Ultra High Sensitivity Aerosol Spectrometer (UHSASA) A major component of the Mid-latitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E) field campaign was the deployment of an enhanced radiosonde array designed to capture the vertical profile of atmospheric state variables (pressure, temperature, humidity wind speed and wind direction) for the purpose of deriving the large-scale forcing for use in modeling studies. The radiosonde array included six sites (enhanced Central Facility [CF-1] plus five new sites) launching radiosondes at 3-6 hour sampling intervals. The network will cover an area of approximately (300)2 km2 with five outer sounding launch sites and one central launch location. The five outer sounding launch sites are: S01 Pratt, KS [ 37.7oN, 98.75oW]; S02 Chanute, KS [37.674, 95.488]; S03 Vici, Oklahoma [36.071, -99.204]; S04 Morris, Oklahoma [35.687, -95.856]; and S05 Purcell, Oklahoma [34.985, -97.522]. Soundings from the SGP Central Facility during MC3E can be retrieved from the regular ARM archive. During routine MC3E operations 4 radiosondes were launched from each of these sites (approx. 0130, 0730, 1330 and 1930 UTC). On days that were forecast to be convective up to four additional launches were launched at each site (approx. 0430, 1030, 1630, 2230 UTC). There were a total of approximately 14 of these high frequency launch days over the course of the experiment. These files contain brightness temperatures observed at Purcell during MC3E. The measurements were made with a 5 channel (22.235, 23.035, 23.835, 26.235, 30.000GHz) microwave radiometer at one minute intervals. The results have been separated into daily files and the day of observations is indicated in the file name. All observations were zenith pointing. Included in the files are the time variables base_time and time_offset. These follow the ARM time conventions. Base_time is the number seconds since January 1, 1970 at 00:00:00 for the first data point of the file and time_offset is the offset in seconds from base_time.

  11. Metallic glass alloys of Zr, Ti, Cu and Ni

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lin, Xianghong; Peker, Atakan; Johnson, William L.

    1997-01-01

    At least quaternary alloys form metallic glass upon cooling below the glass transition temperature at a rate less than 10.sup.3 K/s. Such alloys comprise titanium from 19 to 41 atomic percent, an early transition metal (ETM) from 4 to 21 atomic percent and copper plus a late transition metal (LTM) from 49 to 64 atomic percent. The ETM comprises zirconium and/or hafnium. The LTM comprises cobalt and/or nickel. The composition is further constrained such that the product of the copper plus LTM times the atomic proportion of LTM relative to the copper is from 2 to 14. The atomic percentage of ETM is less than 10 when the atomic percentage of titanium is as high as 41, and may be as large as 21 when the atomic percentage of titanium is as low as 24. Furthermore, when the total of copper and LTM are low, the amount of LTM present must be further limited. Another group of glass forming alloys has the formula (ETM.sub.1-x Ti.sub.x).sub.a Cu.sub.b (Ni.sub.1-y Co.sub.y).sub.c wherein x is from 0.1 to 0.3, y.cndot.c is from 0 to 18, a is from 47 to 67, b is from 8 to 42, and c is from 4 to 37. This definition of the alloys has additional constraints on the range of copper content, b.

  12. Fe-rich ejecta in the supernova remnant G352.70.1 with Suzaku

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sezer, A.; Gk, F.

    2014-07-20

    In this work, we present results from a ?201.6 ks observation of G352.70.1 using the X-ray Imaging Spectrometer on board Suzaku X-ray Observatory. The X-ray emission from the remnant is well described by two-temperature thermal models of non-equilibrium ionization with variable abundances with a column density of N{sub H} ? 3.3 10{sup 22} cm{sup 2}. The soft component is characterized by an electron temperature of kT{sub e} ? 0.6 keV, an ionization timescale of ? ? 3.4 10{sup 11} cm{sup 3} s, and enhanced Si, S, Ar, and Ca abundances. The hard component has kT{sub e} ? 4.3 keV, ? ? 8.8 10{sup 9} cm{sup 3} s, and enhanced Fe abundance. The elemental abundances of Si, S, Ar, Ca, and Fe are found to be significantly higher than the solar values that confirm the presence of ejecta. We detected strong Fe K-shell emission and determined its origin to be the ejecta for the first time. The detection of Fe ejecta with a lower ionization timescale favors a Type Ia origin for this remnant.

  13. XMM-NEWTON OBSERVATIONS OF LUMINOUS SOURCES IN NEARBY GALAXIES NGC 4395, NGC 4736, AND NGC 4258

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Akyuz, A.; Avdan, H.; Kayaci, S.; Ozel, M. E.; Sonbas, E.; Balman, S.

    2013-03-15

    We present the results of a study of non-nuclear discrete sources in a sample of three nearby spiral galaxies (NGC 4395, NGC 4736, and NGC 4258) based on XMM-Newton archival data supplemented with Chandra data for spectral and timing analyses. A total of 75 X-ray sources have been detected within the D{sub 25} regions of the target galaxies. The large collecting area of XMM-Newton makes the statistics sufficient to obtain spectral fitting for 16 (about 20%) of these sources. Compiling the extensive archival exposures available, we were able to obtain the detailed spectral shapes of diverse classes of point sources. We have also studied temporal properties of these luminous sources. Eleven of them are found to show short-term (less than 80 ks) variation while eight of them show long-term variation within factors of {approx}2-5 during a time interval of {approx}2-12 years. Timing analysis provides strong evidence that most of these sources are accreting X-ray binary systems. One source that has properties different from others was suspected to be a supernova remnant, and our follow-up optical observation confirmed this. Our results indicate that sources within the three nearby galaxies are showing a variety of source populations, including several ultraluminous X-ray sources, X-ray binaries, transients together with a super soft source, and a background active galactic nucleus candidate.

  14. Formation mechanisms of precursors of radiation-induced color centers during fabrication of silica optical fiber preform

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tomashuk, A. L.; Zabezhailov, M. O.

    2011-04-15

    Samples in the form of transverse slices of rods and optical fiber preforms made from the high-hydroxyl KU-1 and low-hydroxyl KS-4V silica by the plasma outside deposition (POD) method are {gamma}-irradiated to a dose of {approx}1 MGy (SiO{sub 2}). Next, the radial dependences of the radiation-induced nonbridging oxygen hole center (NBOHC) and E'-center (three-coordinated silicon) in the samples are constructed by measuring the amplitudes of their 4.8 and 5.8 eV absorption bands, respectively. Based on the analysis of these radial dependences and considering the temperature and duration of the preirradiation heat treatment of the rods and preforms at the POD-installation, we determine the ratio of the oscillator strengths of the above bands and the microscopic thermoinduced processes occurring during preform fabrication and producing precursors of the radiation-induced NBOHC and E'-center. These processes are found to be associated with the escape of either H{sub 2} or H{sub 2}O from neighboring hydroxyl groups, and, therefore, can occur in high-hydroxyl silica only. It is concluded that enhancement of the radiation resistance of high-hydroxyl silica optical fibers requires decreasing the temperature and duration of the preform fabrication process, in particular, changing from the POD-technology to the low-temperature plasmachemical vapor deposition (PCVD) or surface PCVD (SPCVD)-technology.

  15. NuSTAR REVEALS RELATIVISTIC REFLECTION BUT NO ULTRA-FAST OUTFLOW IN THE QUASAR PG 1211+143

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zoghbi, A.; Miller, J. M.; Walton, D. J.; Stern, D.; Harrison, F. A.; Fabian, A. C.; Reynolds, C. S.; Boggs, S. E.; Craig, W.; Christensen, F. E.; Hailey, C. J.; Zhang, W. W.

    2015-02-01

    We report on four epochs of observations of the quasar PG 1211+143 using NuSTAR. The net exposure time is 300 ks. Prior work on this source found suggestive evidence of an ultra-fast outflow (UFO) in the Fe K band with a velocity of approximately 0.1c. The putative flow would carry away a high-mass flux and kinetic power, with broad implications for feedback and black hole--galaxy co-evolution. NuSTAR detects PG 1211+143 out to 30 keV, meaning that the continuum is well-defined both through and above the Fe K band. A characteristic relativistic disk reflection spectrum is clearly revealed via a broad Fe K emission line and Compton back-scattering curvature. The data offer only weak constraints on the spin of the black hole. A careful search for UFOs shows no significant absorption feature above 90% confidence. The limits are particularly tight when relativistic reflection is included. We discuss the statistics and the implications of these results in terms of connections between accretion onto quasars, Seyferts, and stellar-mass black holes, and feedback into their host environments.

  16. Photoionized Features in the X-ray Spectrum of EX Hydrae

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Luna, G M; Raymond, J C; Brickhouse, N S; Mauche, C W; Proga, D; Steeghs, D; Hoogerwerf, R

    2009-09-28

    We present the first results from a long (496 ks) Chandra High Energy Transmission Grating observation of the intermediate polar EX Hydrae. In addition to the narrow emission lines from the cooling post-shock gas, for the first time we have detected a broad component in some of the X-ray emission lines, namely O VIII {lambda}18.97, Mg XII {lambda}8.42, Si XIV {lambda}6.18, and Fe XVII {lambda}16.78. The broad and narrow components have widths of {approx} 1600 km s{sup -1} and {approx} 150 km s{sup -1}, respectively. We also find that the flux of the broad component is modulated at the white dwarf spin period, constraining the region where the gas is formed. We propose a scenario where the broad component is formed in the pre-shock flow photoionized by radiation from the post-shock flow. Because the photoionized region has to be close to the radiation source in order to produce strong photoionized emission lines from ions like O VIII, Mg XII, and Si XIV, our photoionization model constrains the height of the standing shock above the white dwarf surface.

  17. Quinary metallic glass alloys

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lin, Xianghong; Johnson, William L.

    1998-01-01

    At least quinary alloys form metallic glass upon cooling below the glass transition temperature at a rate less than 10.sup.3 K/s. Such alloys comprise zirconium and/or hafnium in the range of 45 to 65 atomic percent, titanium and/or niobium in the range of 4 to 7.5 atomic percent, and aluminum and/or zinc in the range of 5 to 15 atomic percent. The balance of the alloy compositions comprise copper, iron, and cobalt and/or nickel. The composition is constrained such that the atomic percentage of iron is less than 10 percent. Further, the ratio of copper to nickel and/or cobalt is in the range of from 1:2 to 2:1. The alloy composition formula is: (Zr,Hf).sub.a (Al,Zn).sub.b (Ti,Nb).sub.c (Cu.sub.x Fe.sub.y (Ni,Co).sub.z).sub.d wherein the constraints upon the formula are: a ranges from 45 to 65 atomic percent, b ranges from 5 to 15 atomic percent, c ranges from 4 to 7.5 atomic percent, d comprises the balance, d.multidot.y is less than 10 atomic percent, and x/z ranges from 0.5 to 2.

  18. Quinary metallic glass alloys

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lin, X.; Johnson, W.L.

    1998-04-07

    At least quinary alloys form metallic glass upon cooling below the glass transition temperature at a rate less than 10{sup 3}K/s. Such alloys comprise zirconium and/or hafnium in the range of 45 to 65 atomic percent, titanium and/or niobium in the range of 4 to 7.5 atomic percent, and aluminum and/or zinc in the range of 5 to 15 atomic percent. The balance of the alloy compositions comprise copper, iron, and cobalt and/or nickel. The composition is constrained such that the atomic percentage of iron is less than 10 percent. Further, the ratio of copper to nickel and/or cobalt is in the range of from 1:2 to 2:1. The alloy composition formula is: (Zr,Hf){sub a}(Al,Zn){sub b}(Ti,Nb){sub c}(Cu{sub x}Fe{sub y}(Ni,Co){sub z}){sub d} wherein the constraints upon the formula are: a ranges from 45 to 65 atomic percent, b ranges from 5 to 15 atomic percent, c ranges from 4 to 7.5 atomic percent, d comprises the balance, d{hor_ellipsis}y is less than 10 atomic percent, and x/z ranges from 0.5 to 2.

  19. Comparison of diesel spray combustion in different high-temperature, high-pressure facilities.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Christiansen, Caspar; Hermant, Laurent; Malbec, Louis-Marie; Bruneaux, Gilles; Genzale, Caroline L.; Pickett, Lyle M.; Schramm, Jesper

    2010-05-01

    Diesel spray experiments at controlled high-temperature and high-pressure conditions offer the potential for an improved understanding of diesel combustion, and for the development of more accurate CFD models that will ultimately be used to improve engine design. Several spray chamber facilities capable of high-temperature, high-pressure conditions typical of engine combustion have been developed, but uncertainties about their operation exist because of the uniqueness of each facility. For the IMEM meeting, we describe results from comparative studies using constant-volume vessels at Sandia National Laboratories and IFP. Targeting the same ambient gas conditions (900 K, 60 bar, 22.8 kg/m{sup 3}, 15% oxygen) and sharing the same injector (common rail, 1500 bar, KS1.5/86 nozzle, 0.090 mm orifice diameter, n-dodecane, 363 K), we describe detailed measurements of the temperature and pressure boundary conditions at each facility, followed by observations of spray penetration, ignition, and combustion using high-speed imaging. Performing experiments at the same high-temperature, high-pressure operating conditions is an objective of the Engine Combustion Network (http://www.ca.sandia.gov/ECN/), which seeks to leverage the research capabilities and advanced diagnostics of all participants in the ECN. We expect that this effort will generate a high-quality dataset to be used for advanced computational model development at engine conditions.

  20. Arc-sprayed titanium anode for cathodic protection of reinforcing steel in coastal concrete bridges

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cramer, Stephen D.; Covino, Bernard S., Jr.; Holcomb, Gordon R.; Bullard, Sophie J.; Collins, W.K.; Govier, R.D.; Wilson, Rick D.; McGill, G.E.

    1997-01-01

    Stable operation of cobalt (Co) catalyzed thermal-sprayed titanium anodes for cathodic protection (CP) of bridge reinforcing steel was maintained in accelerated tests for a period equivalent to 23 years service at Oregon Department of Transportation (ODOT) bridge CP conditions. The Co catalyst migrated into the concrete near the anode-concrete interface with electrochemical aging. The titanium anode had a porous heterogeneous structure composed of alpha -Ti containing interstitial O and N, and a fcc phase thought to be Ti(O,N). Splat cooling rates were estimated to be on the order of 10 to 150 K/s, well below those that would lead to rapid solidification. Composition gradients within individual splats resulted in alpha -Ti-rich and Ti(O,N)-rich regions having microstructures produced by equilibrium processes at the solidification front. Use of nitrogen during thermal spraying produced a coating with more uniform composition, less cracking and lower resistivity than using air atomization. Shrouding of the spray gun is recommended for further improvement of anode composition and structure when using nitrogen atomization.

  1. Variations in Zircaloy-4 cladding deformation in replicate LOCA simulation tests. [PWR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Longest, A.W.; Crowley, J.L.; Chapman, R.H.

    1982-09-01

    Five single-rod, heated-shroud replicate burst tests were conducted to study statistical variations in Zircaloy cladding deformation under simulated loss-of-coolant accident conditions. The test conditions used (low steam coolant flow and a heating rate of approx. 10 K/s to tube failure at approx. 775/sup 0/C) were conductive to large deformation and matched those used in two of the Multirod Burst Test Program bundle tests so that the results could be used to aid in interpretation of differences observed for individual rods in bundle tests. The largest variation observed was in burst strain, which ranged from 50 to 96%. Burst temperature ranged from 767 to 779/sup 0/C, burst pressure from 9405 to 9870 kPa, average strain over the heated length from 18 to 23%, and tube volume increase from 39 to 51%. As expected, cladding deformation was influenced by small temperature gradients: the more uniform the temperature, the greater (and more uniform) the deformation.

  2. Boundary effects on Zircaloy-4 cladding deformation in LOCA simulation tests. [PWR; BWR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Longest, A.W.; Chapman, R.H.; Crowley, J.L.

    1982-01-01

    Deformation behavior of Zircaloy-4 cladding under simulated loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) conditions is being investigated in the Multirod Burst Test (MRBT) program in single rod and multirod tests. In these tests, internally-pressurized unirradiated Zircaloy-4 tubes containing internal electrical heaters are heated to failure in a low-pressure, superheated-steam environment (200 < Re < 800). The results provide a data base for evaluating deformation and blockage models employed with design-basis accident sequences to assess LWR core coolability for licensing purposes. Results of a recent 8 X 8 test indicate that models derived from smaller test arrays may not be representative of the behavior in large arrays, particularly for those temperature ranges in which large deformation can be expected. Two MRBT LOCA simulation tests conducted under the same nominal conditions (approx. 10 K/s heating rate from approx. 340/sup 0/C to failure at approx. 770/sup 0/C) were examined to determine the effects of array size and boundary conditions on deformation.

  3. High-temperature phase transformation in Cr added TiAl base alloy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abe, E.; Niinobe, K.; Nobuki, M.; Nakamura, M.; Tsujimoto, T.

    1999-07-01

    The authors have investigated a microstructure evolution of a Ti-48Al-3.5Cr (in at.%) alloy at high-temperatures ({gt} 1,473K). In the alloy annealed at 1673K for 1.8ks, followed by air-cooling, a characteristic microstructure with a feathery fashion was uniformly formed. From a cooling-rate-controlling study, it was found that formation of the feathery structure is accomplished during continuous cooling from 1673K to 1573K, within the {alpha} + {gamma} two-phase region. Transmission electron microscopy revealed that the feathery structure is composed of lamellar colonies (5--10{micro}m) which are crystallographically tilted slightly (a few degree) with their neighbors. A surprising fact is that lamellae in each colony are mostly the {gamma} phase with few {alpha}{sub 2} phase less than 5% in volume. This suggests that the feathery structure is a metastable product and has not resulted from the {alpha} {r{underscore}arrow} {alpha} + {gamma} transformation above 1,573 K. Instead, the feathery structure formation should be attributed to the non-equilibrium {alpha} {r{underscore}arrow} {gamma} transformation which occurs at high-temperatures with a small degree of supercooling. The authors discuss this interesting phase transformation in terms of the {alpha} {r{underscore}arrow} {gamma} massive transformation, based on the continuous-cooling-transformation (CCT) diagram constructed for the present alloy.

  4. XMM-NEWTON OBSERVATION OF THE NORTHWEST RADIO RELIC REGION IN A3667

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Finoguenov, Alexis; Sarazin, Craig L.; Wik, Daniel R.; Nakazawa, Kazuhiro; Clarke, Tracy E. E-mail: sarazin@virginia.ed E-mail: nakazawa@amaltha.phys.s.u-tokyo.j

    2010-06-01

    A3667 is the archetype of a merging cluster with radio relics. The northwest (NW) radio relic is the brightest cluster relic or halo known and is believed to be due to a strong merger shock. We have observed the NW relic for {approx}40 ks of net XMM-Newton time. We observe a global decline of temperature across the relic from 6 to 1 keV, similar to the Suzaku results. Our new observations reveal a sharp change of both temperature and surface brightness near the position of the relic. The increased X-ray emission on the relic can be equivalently well described by either a thermal or nonthermal spectral model. The parameters of the thermal model are consistent with a Mach number M{approx}2 shock and a shock speed of {approx}1200 km s{sup -1}. The energy content of the relativistic particles in the radio relic can be explained if they are (re)-accelerated by the shock with an efficiency of {approx}0.2%. Comparing the limit on the inverse Compton X-ray emission with the measured radio synchrotron emission, we set a lower limit to the magnetic field in the relic of 3 {mu}G. If the emission from the relic is nonthermal, this lower limit is in fact the required magnetic field.

  5. Stochastic Modeling of Overtime Occupancy and Its Application in Building Energy Simulation and Calibration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sun, Kaiyu; Yan , Da; Hong , Tianzhen; Guo, Siyue

    2014-02-28

    Overtime is a common phenomenon around the world. Overtime drives both internal heat gains from occupants, lighting and plug-loads, and HVAC operation during overtime periods. Overtime leads to longer occupancy hours and extended operation of building services systems beyond normal working hours, thus overtime impacts total building energy use. Current literature lacks methods to model overtime occupancy because overtime is stochastic in nature and varies by individual occupants and by time. To address this gap in the literature, this study aims to develop a new stochastic model based on the statistical analysis of measured overtime occupancy data from an office building. A binomial distribution is used to represent the total number of occupants working overtime, while an exponential distribution is used to represent the duration of overtime periods. The overtime model is used to generate overtime occupancy schedules as an input to the energy model of a second office building. The measured and simulated cooling energy use during the overtime period is compared in order to validate the overtime model. A hybrid approach to energy model calibration is proposed and tested, which combines ASHRAE Guideline 14 for the calibration of the energy model during normal working hours, and a proposed KS test for the calibration of the energy model during overtime. The developed stochastic overtime model and the hybrid calibration approach can be used in building energy simulations to improve the accuracy of results, and better understand the characteristics of overtime in office buildings.

  6. Kinetics of silicide formation over a wide range of heating rates spanning six orders of magnitude

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Molina-Ruiz, Manel; Lopeanda, Aitor F.; Gonzalez-Silveira, Marta; Garcia, Gemma; Clavaguera-Mora, Maria T. [Grup de Nanomaterials i Microsistemes, Departament de Fsica, Universitat Autnoma de Barcelona, 08193 Bellaterra (Spain); Peral, Inma [ALBA Synchrotron Light Facility, 08290 Cerdanyola del Valls (Spain); Rodrguez-Viejo, Javier, E-mail: javier.rodriguez@uab.cat [Grup de Nanomaterials i Microsistemes, Departament de Fsica, Universitat Autnoma de Barcelona, 08193 Bellaterra (Spain); MATGAS Research Centre, UAB Campus, 08193 Bellaterra (Spain)

    2014-07-07

    Kinetic processes involving intermediate phase formation are often assumed to follow an Arrhenius temperature dependence. This behavior is usually inferred from limited data over narrow temperature intervals, where the exponential dependence is generally fully satisfied. However, direct evidence over wide temperature intervals is experimentally challenging and data are scarce. Here, we report a study of silicide formation between a 12?nm film of palladium and 15?nm of amorphous silicon in a wide range of heating rates, spanning six orders of magnitude, from 0.1 to 10{sup 5?}K/s, or equivalently more than 300?K of variation in reaction temperature. The calorimetric traces exhibit several distinct exothermic events related to interdiffusion, nucleation of Pd{sub 2}Si, crystallization of amorphous silicon, and vertical growth of Pd{sub 2}Si. Interestingly, the thickness of the initial nucleation layer depends on the heating rate revealing enhanced mass diffusion at the fastest heating rates during the initial stages of the reaction. In spite of this, the formation of the silicide strictly follows an Arrhenius temperature dependence over the whole temperature interval explored. A kinetic model is used to fit the calorimetric data over the complete heating rate range. Calorimetry is complemented by structural analysis through transmission electron microscopy and both standard and in-situ synchrotron X-ray diffraction.

  7. CANDELS/GOODS-S, CDFS, and ECDFS: photometric redshifts for normal and X-ray-detected galaxies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hsu, Li-Ting; Salvato, Mara; Nandra, Kirpal; Brusa, Marcella; Bender, Ralf; Buchner, Johannes; Brightman, Murray; Georgakakis, Antonis; Donley, Jennifer L.; Kocevski, Dale D.; Guo, Yicheng; Barro, Guillermo; Faber, Sandra M.; Rangel, Cyprian; Willner, S. P.; Ashby, Matthew L. N.; Budavri, Tams; Szalay, Alexander S.; Dahlen, Tomas; and others

    2014-11-20

    We present photometric redshifts and associated probability distributions for all detected sources in the Extended Chandra Deep Field South (ECDFS). This work makes use of the most up-to-date data from the Cosmic Assembly Near-IR Deep Legacy Survey (CANDELS) and the Taiwan ECDFS Near-Infrared Survey (TENIS) in addition to other data. We also revisit multi-wavelength counterparts for published X-ray sources from the 4 Ms CDFS and 250 ks ECDFS surveys, finding reliable counterparts for 1207 out of 1259 sources (?96%). Data used for photometric redshifts include intermediate-band photometry deblended using the TFIT method, which is used for the first time in this work. Photometric redshifts for X-ray source counterparts are based on a new library of active galactic nuclei/galaxy hybrid templates appropriate for the faint X-ray population in the CDFS. Photometric redshift accuracy for normal galaxies is 0.010 and for X-ray sources is 0.014 and outlier fractions are 4% and 5.2%, respectively. The results within the CANDELS coverage area are even better, as demonstrated both by spectroscopic comparison and by galaxy-pair statistics. Intermediate-band photometry, even if shallow, is valuable when combined with deep broadband photometry. For best accuracy, templates must include emission lines.

  8. Glucose oxidase-graphene-chitosan modified electrode for direct electrochemistry and glucose sensing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kang, Xinhuang; Wang, Jun; Wu, Hong; Aksay, Ilhan A.; Liu, Jun; Lin, Yuehe

    2009-11-01

    Direct electrochemistry of a glucose oxidase (GOD)/graphene/chitosan nanocomposite was studied. The immobilized enzyme retains its bioactivity, exhibits a surface confined, reversible two-proton and two-electron transfer reaction, and has good stability, activity and a fast heterogeneous electron transfer rate with the rate constant (ks) of 2.83 s-1. A much higher enzyme loading (1.12 10-9 mol/cm2) is obtained as compared to the bare glass carbon surface. This GOD/graphene/chitosan nanocomposite film can be used for sensitive detection of glucose. The biosensor exhibits a wider linearity range from 0.08 mM to 12 mM glucose with a detection limit of 0.02 mM and much higher sensitivity (37.93 ?A mM-1 cm-2) as compared with other nanostructured supports. The excellent performance of the biosensor is attributed to large surface-to-volume ratio and high conductivity of graphene, and good biocompatibility of chitosan, which enhances the enzyme absorption and promotes direct electron transfer between redox enzymes and the surface of electrodes.

  9. Role of spall in microstructure evolution during laser-shock-driven rapid undercooling and resolidification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Colvin, Jeffrey D.; Jankowski, Alan F.; Kumar, Mukul; MoberlyChan, Warren J.; Reed, Bryan W.; Paisley, Dennis L.; Tierney, Thomas E.

    2009-01-01

    We previously reported [Colvin et al., J. Appl. Phys. 101, 084906 (2007)] on the microstructure morphology of pure Bi metal subjected to rapid laser-shock-driven melting and subsequent resolidification upon release of pressure, where the estimated effective undercooling rates were of the order of 10{sup 9}-10{sup 10} K/s. More recently, we repeated these experiments, but with a Bi/Zn alloy (Zn atomic fraction of 2%-4%) instead of elemental Bi and with a change in target design to suppress spall in the Bi/Zn samples. We observed a similar microstructure morphology in the two sets of experiments, with initially columnar grains recrystallizing to larger equiaxed grains. The Bi samples, however, exhibited micron-scale dendrites on the spall surfaces, whereas there were no dendritic structures anywhere in the nonspalled Bi/Zn, even down to the nanometer scale as observed by transmission electron microscopy. We present the simulations and the interferometry data that show that the samples in the two sets of experiments followed nearly identical hydrodynamic and thermodynamic paths apart from the presence of (probably partially liquid) spall in pure Bi. Simulations also show that the spall occurs right at the moving phase front and, hence, the spall itself cuts off the principal direction for latent heat dissipation across the phase boundary. We suggest that it is the liquid spall itself that creates the conditions for dendrite formation.

  10. Pre-ignition laser ablation of nanocomposite energetic materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stacy, S. C.; Massad, R. A.; Pantoya, M. L.

    2013-06-07

    Laser ignition of energetic material composites was studied for initiation with heating rates from 9.5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 4} to 1.7 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 7} K/s. This is a unique heating rate regime for laser ignition studies because most studies employ either continuous wave CO{sub 2} lasers to provide thermal ignition or pulsed Nd:YAG lasers to provide shock ignition. In this study, aluminum (Al) and molybdenum trioxide (MoO{sub 3}) nanoparticle powders were pressed into consolidated pellets and ignited using a Nd:YAG laser (1064 nm wavelength) with varied pulse energy. Results show reduced ignition delay times corresponding to laser powers at the ablation threshold for the sample. Heating rate and absorption coefficient were determined from an axisymmetric heat transfer model. The model estimates absorption coefficients from 0.1 to 0.15 for consolidated pellets of Al + MoO{sub 3} at 1064 nm wavelength. Ablation resulted from fracturing caused by a rapid increase in thermal stress and slowed ignition of the pellet.

  11. EXAFS of heavy metal coordination in acid mine drainage sediments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carroll, S.; O`Day, P.; Waychunas, G.; Phillips, B.

    1995-12-01

    We use extended x-ray adsorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy to examine the chemical environment of zinc (1-2 wt. %), lead (300-600 ppm) and cadmium (50-200 ppm) in complex acid mine drainage sediments from the Tri-State Mining District (KS, MO, OK). The sediments in streams draining tailings piles and open mine shafts are dominated by quartz or amorphous iron hydroxides; accessory minerals include calcite. The bulk water chemistry is buffered by the limestone geology and is undersaturated with respect to pure heavy metal carbonates and hydroxides. EXAFS spectra of the sediment samples were taken at SSRL with a fluorescence detector at low temperature ({approximately}10 K). Heavy metals do not form pure carbonate or hydroxide phases, nor do they appear to sorb to quartz surfaces. In sediments near the mine source, the metals are present primarily as sulfides, the original host mineral. With increasing distance from the source, second-neighbor backscattering from Fe indicates that the metals leached from the sulfides are taken up with amorphous iron hydroxides.

  12. Analysis of data from sensitive U.S. monitoring stations for the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear reactor accident

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Biegalski, Steven R.; Bowyer, Ted W.; Eslinger, Paul W.; Friese, Judah I.; Greenwood, Lawrence R.; Haas, Derek A.; Hayes, James C.; Hoffman, Ian; Keillor, Martin E.; Miley, Harry S.; Morin, Marc P.

    2012-12-01

    The March 11, 2011 9.0 magnitude undersea megathrust earthquake off the coast of Japan and subsequent tsunami waves triggered a major nuclear event at the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power station. At the time of the event, units 1, 2, and 3 were operating and units 4, 5, and 6 were in a shutdown condition for maintenance. Loss of cooling capacity to the plants along with structural damage caused by the earthquake and tsunami resulted in a breach of the nuclear fuel integrity and release of radioactive fission products to the environment. Fission products started to arrive in the United States via atmospheric transport on March 15, 2011 and peaked by March 23, 2011. Atmospheric activity concentrations of 131I reached levels of 3.0 * 10*2 Bqm*3 in Melbourne, FL. The noble gas 133Xe reached atmospheric activity concentrations in Ashland, KS of 17 Bqm*3. While these levels are not health concerns, they were well above the detection capability of the radionuclide monitoring systems within the International Monitoring System of the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty.

  13. SOURCE IDENTIFICATION IN THE IGR J17448-3232 FIELD: DISCOVERY OF THE SCORPIUS GALAXY CLUSTER

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barrire, Nicolas M.; Tomsick, John A.; Wik, Daniel R.; Chaty, Sylvain; Rodriguez, Jrome

    2015-01-20

    We use a 43 ks XMM-Newton observation to investigate the nature of sources first distinguished by a follow-up Chandra observation of the field surrounding INTEGRAL source IGR J17448-3232, which includes extended emission and a bright point source previously classified as a blazar. We establish that the extended emission is a heretofore unknown massive galaxy cluster hidden behind the Galactic bulge. The emission-weighted temperature of the cluster within the field of view is 8.8 keV, with parts of the cluster reaching temperatures of up to 12 keV; no cool core is evident. At a redshift of 0.055, the cluster is somewhat under-luminous relative to the X-ray luminosity-temperature relation, which may be attributable to its dynamical state. We present a preliminary analysis of its properties in this paper. We also confirm that the bright point source is a blazar, and we propose that it is either a flat spectrum radio quasar or a low-frequency peaked BL Lac object. We find four other fainter sources in the field, which we study and tentatively identify. Only one, which we propose is a foreground Galactic X-ray binary, is hard enough to contribute to IGR J17448-3232, but it is too faint to be significant. We thus determine that IGR J17448-3232 is in fact the galaxy cluster up to ?45 keV and the blazar beyond.

  14. WILD PIGS: BIOLOGY, DAMAGE, CONTROL TECHINQUES AND MANAGEMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mayer, John; Brisbin, I. Lehr

    2009-12-31

    The existence of problems with wild pigs (Sus scrofa) is nothing new to the Western Hemisphere. Damage by these introduced animals was reported as far back as 1505 by the early Spanish colonies in the Caribbean, where wild pigs were killing the colonists cattle. Droves of these animals also ravaged cultivated crops of maize and sugarcane on islands in the West Indies during this same time period. These wild pigs reportedly were very aggressive and often attacked Spanish soldiers hunting rebellious Indians or escaped slaves on these islands, especially when these animals were cornered. The documentation of such impacts by introduced populations of this species in the United States has subsequently increased in recent years, and continued up through the present (Towne and Wentworth. 1950, Wood and Barrett 1979, Mayer and Brisbin 1991, Dickson et al. 2001). In spite of a fairly constant history in this country since the early 1900s, wild pigs have had a dramatic recent increase in both distribution and numbers in the United States. Between 1989 and 2009, the number of states reporting the presence of introduced wild pigs went from 19 up to as many as 44. This increase, in part natural, but largely manmade, has caused an increased workload and cost for land and resource managers in areas where these new populations are found. This is the direct result of the damage that these introduced animals do. The cost of both these impacts and control efforts has been estimated to exceed a billion dollars annually (Pimentel 2007). The complexity of this problem has been further complicated by the widespread appeal and economic potential of these animals as a big game species (Tisdell 1982, Degner 1989). Wild pigs are a controversial problem that is not going away and will likely only get worse with time. Not only do they cause damage, but wild pigs are also survivors. They reproduce at a rate faster than any other mammal of comparable size, native or introduced; they can eat just about anything; and, they can live just about anywhere. On top of that, wild pigs are both very difficult to control and, with the possible exception of island ecosystems, almost impossible to eradicate (Dickson et al. 2001, Sweeney et al. 2003). The solution to the wild pig problem has not been readily apparent. The ultimate answer as to how to control these animals has not been found to date. In many ways, wild pigs are America's most successful large invasive species. All of which means that wild pigs are a veritable nightmare for land and resource managers trying to keep the numbers of these animals and the damage that they do under control. Since the more that one knows about an invasive species, the easier it is to deal with and hopefully control. For wild pigs then, it is better to 'know thy enemy' than to not, especially if one expects to be able to successfully control them. In an effort to better 'know thy enemy,' a two-day symposium was held in Augusta, Georgia, on April 21-22, 2004. This symposium was organized and sponsored by U.S.D.A. Forest Service-Savannah River (USFS-SR), U. S. Department of Energy-Savannah River Operations Office (DOE-SR), the Westinghouse Savannah River Company (WSRC), the South Carolina Chapter of the Soil & Water Conservation Society, and the Savannah River Ecology Laboratory (SREL). The goal of this symposium was to assemble researchers and land managers to first address various aspects of the biology and damage of wild pigs, and then review the control techniques and management of this invasive species. The result would then be a collected synopsis of what is known about wild pigs in the United States. Although the focus of the symposium was primarily directed toward federal agencies, presenters also included professionals from academic institutions, and private-sector control contractors and land managers. Most of the organizations associated with implementing this symposium were affiliated with the Savannah River Site (SRS), a 803 km{sup 2} federal nuclear facility, located in western South Carolina along the Savannah River. The SRS was a very appropriate facility to host this symposium. The SRS has been dealing with its wild pig problem since the early 1950s. A lot has been learned about these animals at the site over the ensuing decades. Between the USFS-SR, DOE-SR, SREL, and the site's management and operations contractor, which is currently Savannah River Nuclear Solutions, SRS organizations have conducted a wealth of research on this wild pig population, spanning a broad spectrum of topics and disciplines. In fact, the SRS wild pig population is among the most studied, and possibly is the best studied population of this invasive species found in the United States today. Unfortunately, with all of that work, the ultimate answer to controlling wild pigs and their impacts still has not been found. This volume represents the collected synopsis that was the goal of the aforementioned symposium.

  15. The Norma arm region Chandra survey catalog: X-ray populations in the spiral arms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fornasini, Francesca M. [Astronomy Department, University of California, 601 Campbell Hall, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Tomsick, John A.; Bodaghee, Arash; Krivonos, Roman A. [Space Sciences Laboratory, 7 Gauss Way, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); An, Hongjun [Department of Physics, McGill University, Rutherford Physics Building, 3600 University Street, Montreal, QC H3A 2T8 (Canada); Rahoui, Farid [European Southern Observatory, Karl Schwarzschild-Strasse 2, D-85748 Garching bei Mnchen (Germany); Gotthelf, Eric V. [Columbia Astrophysics Laboratory, Columbia University, 550 West 120th Street, New York, NY 10027 (United States); Bauer, Franz E. [Instituto de Astrofsica, Facultad de Fsica, Pontificia Universidad Catlica de Chile, 306, Santiago 22 (Chile); Stern, Daniel, E-mail: f.fornasini@berkeley.edu [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, 4800 Oak Grove Drive, MS 169-506, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States)

    2014-12-01

    We present a catalog of 1415 X-ray sources identified in the Norma Arm Region Chandra Survey (NARCS), which covers a 2 0.8 region in the direction of the Norma spiral arm to a depth of ?20 ks. Of these sources, 1130 are point-like sources detected with ?3? confidence in at least one of three energy bands (0.5-10, 0.5-2, and 2-10 keV), five have extended emission, and the remainder are detected at low significance. Since most sources have too few counts to permit individual classification, they are divided into five spectral groups defined by their quantile properties. We analyze stacked spectra of X-ray sources within each group, in conjunction with their fluxes, variability, and infrared counterparts, to identify the dominant populations in our survey. We find that ?50% of our sources are foreground sources located within 1-2 kpc, which is consistent with expectations from previous surveys. Approximately 20% of sources are likely located in the proximity of the Scutum-Crux and near Norma arm, while 30% are more distant, in the proximity of the far Norma arm or beyond. We argue that a mixture of magnetic and nonmagnetic cataclysmic variables dominates the Scutum-Crux and near Norma arms, while intermediate polars and high-mass stars (isolated or in binaries) dominate the far Norma arm. We also present the cumulative number count distribution for sources in our survey that are detected in the hard energy band. A population of very hard sources in the vicinity of the far Norma arm and active galactic nuclei dominate the hard X-ray emission down to f{sub X} ? 10{sup 14} erg cm{sup 2} s{sup 1}, but the distribution curve flattens at fainter fluxes. We find good agreement between the observed distribution and predictions based on other surveys.

  16. Does the debris disk around HD 32297 contain cometary grains?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rodigas, Timothy J.; Hinz, Philip M.; Bailey, Vanessa; Defrere, Denis; Leisenring, Jarron; Schneider, Glenn; Skemer, Andrew J.; Vaitheeswaran, Vidhya; Debes, John H.; Mamajek, Eric E.; Pecaut, Mark J.; Currie, Thayne; De Rosa, Robert J.; Ward-Duong, Kimberly; Hill, John M.; Skrutskie, Michael

    2014-03-01

    We present an adaptive optics imaging detection of the HD 32297 debris disk at L' (3.8 ?m) obtained with the LBTI/LMIRcam infrared instrument at the Large Binocular Telescope. The disk is detected at signal-to-noise ratio per resolution element ?3-7.5 from ?0.''3 to 1.''1 (30-120 AU). The disk at L' is bowed, as was seen at shorter wavelengths. This likely indicates that the disk is not perfectly edge-on and contains highly forward-scattering grains. Interior to ?50 AU, the surface brightness at L' rises sharply on both sides of the disk, which was also previously seen at Ks band. This evidence together points to the disk containing a second inner component located at ?50 AU. Comparing the color of the outer (50

  17. Characterization of an aluminum alloy hemispherical shell fabricated via direct metal laser melting

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Holesinger, T. G.; Carpenter, J. S.; Lienert, T. J.; Patterson, B. M.; Papin, P. A.; Swenson, H.; Cordes, N. L.

    2016-01-11

    The ability of additive manufacturing to directly fabricate complex shapes provides characterization challenges for part qualification. The orientation of the microstructures produced by these processes will change relative to the surface normal of a complex part. In this work, the microscopy and x-ray tomography of an AlSi10Mg alloy hemispherical shell fabricated using powder bed metal additive manufacturing are used to illustrate some of these challenges. The shell was manufactured using an EOS M280 system in combination with EOS-specified powder and process parameters. The layer-by-layer process of building the shell with the powder bed additive manufacturing approach results in a position-dependentmore » microstructure that continuously changes its orientation relative to the shell surface normal. X-ray tomography was utilized to examine the position-dependent size and distribution of porosity and surface roughness in the 98.6% dense part. Optical and electron microscopy were used to identify global and local position-dependent structures, grain morphologies, chemistry, and precipitate sizes and distributions. The rapid solidification processes within the fusion zone (FZ) after the laser transit results in a small dendrite size. Cell spacings taken from the structure in the middle of the FZ were used with published relationships to estimate a cooling rate of ~9 × 105 K/s. Uniformly-distributed, nanoscale Si precipitates were found within the primary α-Al grains. A thin, distinct boundary layer containing larger α-Al grains and extended regions of the nanocrystalline divorced eutectic material surrounds the FZ. Moreover, subtle differences in the composition between the latter layer and the interior of the FZ were noted with scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) spectral imaging.« less

  18. To study of different level of nitrogen manure and density on yield and yield component of variety of K.S.C 704 in dry region of sistan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dahmardeh, M.; Forghani, F.; Khammari, E.

    2008-01-30

    Out of three grain of the world, Corn is one of the best, About 7 to 10 thousand years ago in south of Mexico corn become domesticated. In the year 1995 culfivation of corn in the world was 130 mil/ha, and to Total production of the world of corn is 507 M/Tons. Average yield of corn in the year 1995 Among Producer countries was 7.78 To 7.60 t/ha in fance and united state was state was 2.36 To 2.20 t/ha, but in Brazil and Mexico Production of corn was different. With this regards, special manner has been arranged for the suitable cultivation or suitable density plants in one heactar on cultivation variety of K.S.C 704 corn. Also suitable level of Nitrogen manure, this Protect in climatic condition of Sistan region done, sith complete block design with 3 replication. Experiment has been selected as split plot, the main plot with 4 different concentration level such as (200-250-3500 and 350 Kg/ha) and sub plot density with 3 different level such as 111000,83000 and 66000 plan/ha respectively. From stage growth up to harvesting of corn in this reache having Data for each treat. ment, After harvesting Analysis of variance and companion of Average of each treatment has been done by DunKan method. Results has been shown, Measurment of characteristics (yield component) seed yield effected different density level of manure, with increasing of manure weight of one thousand seed yield and also in high density showed high significant differente amoung each other. These are with suitable climatic condition of sistan region if enough water will be available ed using Amount of 350 ks/ha Nitrogen manure and with density 111000 plants/ha we can product suitable seed yield Biological yield.

  19. Digital I and C system upgrade integration technique

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huang, H. W.; Shih, C.; Wang, J. R.; Huang, K. C.

    2012-07-01

    This work developed an integration technique for digital I and C system upgrade, the utility can replace the I and C systems step by step systematically by this method. Inst. of Nuclear Energy Research (INER) developed a digital Instrumentation and Control (I and C) replacement integration technique on the basis of requirement of the three existing nuclear power plants (NPPs), which are Chin-Shan (CS) NPP, Kuo-Sheng (KS) NPP, and Maanshan (MS) NPP, in Taiwan, and also developed the related Critical Digital Review (CDR) Procedure. The digital I and C replacement integration technique includes: (I) Establishment of Nuclear Power Plant Digital Replacement Integration Guideline, (2) Preliminary Investigation on I and C System Digitalization, (3) Evaluation on I and C System Digitalization, and (4) Establishment of I and C System Digitalization Architectures. These works can be a reference for performing I and C system digital replacement integration of the three existing NPPs of Taiwan Power Company (TPC). A CDR is the review for a critical system digital I and C replacement. The major reference of this procedure is EPRI TR- 1011710 (2005) 'Handbook for Evaluating Critical Digital Equipment and Systems' which was published by the Electric Power Research Inst. (EPRI). With this document, INER developed a TPC-specific CDR procedure. Currently, CDR becomes one of the policies for digital I and C replacement in TPC. The contents of this CDR procedure include: Scope, Responsibility, Operation Procedure, Operation Flow Chart, CDR review items. The CDR review items include the comparison of the design change, Software Verification and Validation (SVandV), Failure Mode and Effects Analysis (FMEA), Evaluation of Diversity and Defense-in-depth (D3), Evaluation of Watchdog Timer, Evaluation of Electromagnetic Compatibility (EMC), Evaluation of Grounding for System/Component, Seismic Evaluation, Witness and Inspection, Lessons Learnt from the Digital I and C Failure Events. A solid review can assure the quality of the digital I and C system replacement. (authors)

  20. Identification of a jet-driven supernova remnant in the Small Magellanic Cloud: Possible evidence for the enhancement of bipolar explosions at low metallicity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lopez, Laura A.; Castro, Daniel; Slane, Patrick O.; Ramirez-Ruiz, Enrico; Badenes, Carles

    2014-06-10

    Recent evidence has suggested that the supernova remnant (SNR) 010472.3 in the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC) may be the result of a 'prompt' Type Ia SN on the basis of enhanced iron abundances and its association with a star-forming region. In this paper, we present evidence that SNR 010472.3 arose from a jet-driven bipolar core-collapse (CC) SN. Specifically, we use serendipitous Chandra data of SNR 010472.3 taken because of its proximity to the calibration source SNR E010272.3. We analyze 56 Advanced CCD Imaging Spectrometer (ACIS) observations of SNR 010472.3 to produce imaging and spectra with an effective exposure of 528.6 ks. We demonstrate that SNR 010472.3 is highly elliptical relative to other nearby young SNRs, suggesting a CC SN origin. Furthermore, we compare ejecta abundances derived from spectral fits to nucleosynthetic yields of Type Ia and CC SNe, and we find that the iron, neon, and silicon abundances are consistent with either a spherical CC SN of a 18-20 M {sub ?} progenitor or an aspherical CC SN of a 25 M {sub ?} progenitor. We show that the star formation history at the site of SNR 010472.3 is also consistent with a CC origin. Given the bipolar morphology of the SNR, we favor the aspherical CC SN scenario. This result may suggest jet-driven SNe occur frequently in the low-metallicity environment of the SMC, consistent with the observational and theoretical work on broad-line Type Ic SNe and long-duration gamma-ray bursts.

  1. A VERY DEEP CHANDRA OBSERVATION OF A1795: THE COLD FRONT AND COOLING WAKE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ehlert, Steven; McDonald, Michael; Miller, Eric D.; Bautz, Mark W.; David, Laurence P.

    2015-02-01

    We present a new analysis of very deep Chandra observations of the galaxy cluster A1795. Utilizing nearly 750 ks of net ACIS imaging, we are able to resolve the thermodynamic structure of the intracluster medium (ICM) on length scales of ∼1 kpc near the cool core. We find several previously unresolved structures, including a high pressure feature to the north of the Brightest Cluster Galaxy (BCG) that appears to arise from the bulk motion of A1795's cool core. To the south of the cool core, we find low temperature (∼3 keV), diffuse ICM gas extending for distances of ∼50 kpc spatially coincident with previously identified filaments of Hα emission. Gas at similar temperatures is also detected in adjacent regions without any Hα emission. The X-ray gas coincident with the Hα filament has been measured to be cooling spectroscopically at a rate of ∼1 M{sub ⊙} yr{sup −1}, consistent with measurements of the star formation rate in this region as inferred from ultraviolet (UV) observations, suggesting that the star formation in this filament as inferred by its Hα and UV emission can trace its origin to the rapid cooling of dense, X-ray emitting gas. The Hα filament is not a unique site of cooler ICM, however, as ICM at similar temperatures and even higher metallicities not cospatial with Hα emission is observed just to the west of the Hα filament, suggesting that it may have been uplifted by A1795's central active galaxy. Further simulations of cool core sloshing and active galactic nucleus feedback operating in concert with one another will be necessary to understand how such a dynamic cool core region may have originated and why the Hα emission is so localized with respect to the cool X-ray gas.

  2. High-Throughput Genetic Analysis and Combinatorial Chiral Separations Based on Capillary Electrophoresis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wenwan Zhong

    2003-08-05

    Capillary electrophoresis (CE) offers many advantages over conventional analytical methods, such as speed, simplicity, high resolution, low cost, and small sample consumption, especially for the separation of enantiomers. However, chiral method developments still can be time consuming and tedious. They designed a comprehensive enantioseparation protocol employing neutral and sulfated cyclodextrins as chiral selectors for common basic, neutral, and acidic compounds with a 96-capillary array system. By using only four judiciously chosen separation buffers, successful enantioseparations were achieved for 49 out of 54 test compounds spanning a large variety of pKs and structures. Therefore, unknown compounds can be screened in this manner to identify optimal enantioselective conditions in just one rn. In addition to superior separation efficiency for small molecules, CE is also the most powerful technique for DNA separations. Using the same multiplexed capillary system with UV absorption detection, the sequence of a short DNA template can be acquired without any dye-labels. Two internal standards were utilized to adjust the migration time variations among capillaries, so that the four electropherograms for the A, T, C, G Sanger reactions can be aligned and base calling can be completed with a high level of confidence. the CE separation of DNA can be applied to study differential gene expression as well. Combined with pattern recognition techniques, small variations among electropherograms obtained by the separation of cDNA fragments produced from the total RNA samples of different human tissues can be revealed. These variations reflect the differences in total RNA expression among tissues. Thus, this Ce-based approach can serve as an alternative to the DNA array techniques in gene expression analysis.

  3. Establishment of a Graduate Certificate Program in Biobased Industrial Products Final Technical Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John R. Schlup

    2005-11-04

    A certificate of graduate studies in Biobased Industrial Products is to be established at Kansas State University (KSU) along with the development of a similar program at Pittsburg State University, Pittsburg, KS. At KSU, the program of study will be coordinated through the steering committee of the Agricultural Products Utilization Forum (APUF); the certificate of graduate studies will be awarded through the Graduate School of Kansas State University. This certificate will establish an interdisciplinary program of study that will: (1) ensure participating students receive a broad education in several disciplines related to Biobased Industrial Products, (2) provide a documented course of study for students preferring a freestanding certificate program, and (3) provide a paradigm shift in student awareness away from petroleum-based feedstocks to the utilization of renewable resources for fuels and chemical feedstocks. The academic program described herein will accomplish this goal by: (1) providing exposure to several academic disciplines key to Biobased Industrial Products; (2) improving university/industry collaboration through an external advisory board, distance learning opportunities, and student internships; (3) expanding the disciplines represented on the students' supervisory committee; (4) establishing a seminar series on Biobased Industrial Products that draws upon expert speakers representing several disciplines; and (5) increasing collaboration between disciplines. Numerous research programs emphasizing Biobased Industrial Products currently exist at KSU and PSU. The certificate of graduate studies, the emphasis on interdisciplinary collaboration within the students? thesis research, the proposed seminar series, and formation of an industrial advisory board will: (1) provide an interdisciplinary academic experience that spans several departments, four colleges, four research centers, and two universities; (2) tangibly promote collaboration between KSU and PSU; (3) catalyze involvement of plant geneticists with researchers active in the development and utilization of biobased industrial products; and, (4) promote university/industry collaboration.

  4. NGC 1365: A low column density state unveiling a low ionization disk wind

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Braito, V.; Reeves, J. N.; Gofford, J.; Nardini, E.; Porquet, D.; Risaliti, G.

    2014-11-01

    We present the time-resolved spectral analysis of the XMM-Newton data of NGC 1365 collected during one XMM-Newton observation, which caught this 'changing-look' active galactic nucleus in a high flux state characterized also by a low column density (N {sub H} ? 10{sup 22} cm{sup 2}) of the X-ray absorber. During this observation, the low-energy photoelectric cut-off is at about ?1 keV and the primary continuum can be investigated with the XMM-Newton-RGS data, which show strong spectral variability that can be explained as a variable low N {sub H} that decreased from N {sub H} ? 10{sup 23} cm{sup 2} to 10{sup 22} cm{sup 2} in a 100 ks timescale. The spectral analysis of the last segment of the observation revealed the presence of several absorption features that can be associated with an ionized (log ? ? 2 erg cm s{sup 1}) outflowing wind (v {sub out} ? 2000 km s{sup 1}). We detected for the first time a possible P-Cygni profile of the Mg XII Ly? line associated with this mildly ionized absorber indicative of a wide angle outflowing wind. We suggest that this wind is a low ionization zone of the highly ionized wind present in NGC 1365, which is responsible for the iron K absorption lines and is located within the variable X-ray absorber. At the end of the observation, we detected a strong absorption line at E ? 0.76 keV most likely associated with a lower ionization zone of the absorber (log ? ? 0.2 erg cm s{sup 1}, N {sub H} ? 10{sup 22} cm{sup 2}), which suggests that the variable absorber in NGC 1365 could be a low ionization zone of the disk wind.

  5. Final Report of DOE Grant No. DE-FG02-04ER41306

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nandi, Satyanarayan; Babu, Kaladi S; Rizatdinova, Flera

    2013-12-10

    Project: Theoretical and Experimental Research in Weak, Electromagnetic and Strong Interactions: Investigators: S. Nandi, K.S. Babu, F. Rizatdinova Institution: Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, OK 74078 This completed project focused on the cutting edge research in theoretical and experimental high energy physics. In theoretical high energy physics, the two investigators (Nandi and Babu) worked on a variety of topics in model-building and phenomenological aspects of elementary particle physics. This includes unification of particles and forces, neutrino physics, Higgs boson physics, proton decay, supersymmetry, and collider physics. Novel physics ideas beyond the Standard Model with testable consequences at the LHC have been proposed. These ideas have stimulated the experimental community to look for new signals. The contributions of the experimental high energy physics group has been at the D0 experiment at the Fermilab Tevatraon and the ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider. At the D0 experiment, the main focus was search for the Higgs boson in the WH channel, where improved limits were obtained. At the LHC, the OSU group has made significant contributions to the top quark physics, and the calibration of the b-tagging algorithms. The group is also involved in the pixel detector upgrade. This DOE supported grant has resulted in 5 PhD degrees during the past three years. Three postdoctoral fellows were supported as well. In theoretical research over 40 refereed publications have resulted in the past three years, with several involving graduate students and postdoctoral fellows. It also resulted in over 30 conference presentations in the same time period. We are also involved in outreach activities through the Quarknet program, where we engage Oklahoma school teachers and students in our research.

  6. Electron density distribution in BaPb{sub 1-x}Sb{sub x}O{sub 3} superconducting oxides studied by double nuclear magnetic resonance methods

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Piskunov, Yu. V. Ogloblichev, V. V.; Arapova, I. Yu.; Sadykov, A. V.; Gerashchenko, A. P.; Verkhovskii, S. V.

    2011-11-15

    The effect of charge disorder on the formation of an inhomogeneous state of the electron system in the conduction band in BaPb{sub 1-x}Sb{sub x}O{sub 3} superconducting oxides is investigated experimentally by NMR methods. The NMR spectra of {sup 17}O are measured systematically, and the contributions from {sup 17}O atoms with different cation nearest surroundings are identified. It is found that microscopic regions with an elevated spin density of charge carriers are formed within two coordination spheres near antimony ions. Nuclei of the superconducting phase of the oxide (regions with an elevated antimony concentration) microscopically distributed over the sample are detected in compounds with x = 0.25 and 0.33. Experiments in which a double resonance signal of the spin echo of {sup 17}O-{sup 207}Pb and {sup 17}O-{sup 121}Sb are measured in the metal phase of BaPb{sub 1-x}Sb{sub x}O{sub 3} oxides are carried out for the first time. The constants of indirect heteronuclear spin-spin {sup 17}O-{sup 207}Pb interaction are determined as functions of the local Knight shift {sub 207}Ks. The estimates of the constants of the indirect interaction between the nuclei of the nearest neighbors (O-Pb and Pb-Pb atoms) and analysis of evolution of the NMR spectra of {sup 17}O upon a change in the antimony concentration are convincing evidence in favor of the development of a microscopically inhomogeneous state of the electron system in the metal phase of BaPb{sub 1-x}Sb{sub x}O{sub 3} oxides.

  7. Implementation of Army privatization directives at Forscom installations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Armstrong, R.C.; Patwardhan, S.

    1997-06-01

    {open_quotes}Privatization{close_quotes} has become the buzzword of the 1990s not only here in the United States but throughout the world. Privatization has been traditionally defined as the sale/transfer of state-owned (i.e. federal, state, county, city or public) assets to the private sector. Although there are numerous reasons for the privatization of state-owned assets, the primary reasons include the generation of a significant amount of cash to the state (Great Britain`s sale of electric power industry); capitalization of the formerly state-owned utility (sale of the utilities within many countries of the former Soviet Union); and state policy goals of eliminating monopolies, encouraging competition, and restructuring (Chile). Several year ago, the Department of Defense (DoD) and specifically the Department of Army (DoA) initiated its own `Privatization Process`. Coupled with shrinking budgets, workforce and funding resources from the Government, the Army was faced with antiquated utility infrastructure in need of significant upgrades and in some cases total replacements. Recognizing that the provision of utility services was not a core mission of the Army, DoA has encouraged its Installations throughout the country to consider the privatization of the Government-owned utility systems. In compliance with DoA policy, Forces Command (FORSCOM) has been at the forefront of the privatization process. To date, FORSCOM has initiated the process of analyzing the potential privatization of over 30 utility systems at 12 FORSCOM Installations located throughout the country. The FORSCOM Installations include Fort Irwin, CA; Fort Campbell, KY; Fort Bragg, NC; Fort McPherson, GA; Fort Hood, TX; Fort Polk, LA; Fort Lewis, WA; Fort Riley, KS; Fort Stewart, GA; Hunter Army Airfield, GA; Fort Carson, CO; Fort Devens, MA; Fort Dix, NJ; and Fort Gillem, GA.

  8. The Effects of Oxy-firing Conditions on Gas-phase Mercury Oxidation by Chlorine and Bromine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buitrago, Paula; Silcox, Geoffrey

    2010-06-30

    Bench-scale experiments were conducted in a quartz-lined, natural gas-fired reactor with the combustion air replaced with a blend of 27 mole percent oxygen, with the balance carbon dioxide. Quench rates of 210 and 440 K/s were tested. In the absence of sulfur dioxide, the oxy-firing environment caused a remarkable increase in oxidation of mercury by chlorine. At 400 ppm chlorine (as HCl equivalent), air-firing results in roughly 5 percent oxidation. At the same conditions with oxy-firing, oxidation levels are roughly 80 percent. Oxidation levels with bromine at 25 and 50 ppm (as HBr equivalent) ranged from 80 to 95 percent and were roughly the same for oxy- and air-firing conditions. Kinetic calculations of levels of oxidation at air- and oxy-conditions captured the essential features of the experimental results but have not revealed a mechanistic basis for the oxidative benefits of oxy-firing conditions. Mixtures of 25 ppm bromine and 100 and 400 ppm chlorine gave more than 90 percent oxidation. At all conditions, the effects of quench rate were not significant. The presence of 500 ppm SO2 caused a dramatic decline in the levels of oxidation at all oxy-fired conditions examined. This effect suggests that SO2 may be preventing oxidation in the gas phase or preventing oxidation in the wetconditioning system that was used in quantifying oxidized and elemental mercury concentrations. Similar effects of SO2 have been noted with air-firing. The addition of sodium thiosulfate to the hydroxide impingers that are part of wet conditioning systems may prevent liquid-phase oxidation from occurring.

  9. DISCOVERY OF EXTENDED X-RAY EMISSION AROUND THE HIGHLY MAGNETIC RRAT J1819-1458

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rea, N.; McLaughlin, M. A.; Gaensler, B. M.; Slane, P. O.; Stella, L.; Israel, G. L.; Reynolds, S. P.; Burgay, M.; Possenti, A.; Chatterjee, S.

    2009-09-20

    We report on the discovery of extended X-ray emission around the high magnetic field rotating radio transient J1819-1458. Using a 30 ks Chandra ACIS-S observation, we found significant evidence for extended X-ray emission with a peculiar shape: a compact region out to {approx}5.''5, and more diffuse emission extending out to {approx}13'' from the source. The most plausible interpretation is a nebula somehow powered by the pulsar, although the small number of counts prevents a conclusive answer on the nature of this emission. RRAT J1819-1458's spin-down energy loss rate (E-dot{sub rot}{approx}3 x 10{sup 32} erg s{sup -1}) is much lower than that of other pulsars with observed spin-down-powered pulsar wind nebulae (PWNe), and implies a rather high X-ray efficiency of eta{sub X}ident toL{sub pwn:0.5-8keV}/E-dot{sub rot}{approx}0.2 at converting spin-down power into the PWN X-ray emission. This suggests the need of an additional source of energy rather than the spin-down power alone, such as the high magnetic energy of this source. Furthermore, this Chandra observation allowed us to refine the positional accuracy of RRAT J1819-1458 to a radius of {approx}0.''3, and confirms the presence of X-ray pulsations and the {approx}1 keV absorption line, previously observed in the X-ray emission of this source.

  10. Q2122-444: A NAKED ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEUS FULLY DRESSED

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gliozzi, M.; Satyapal, S.; Panessa, F.; Franca, F. La; Saviane, I.; Monaco, L.; Foschini, L.; Kedziora-Chudczer, L.; Sambruna, R. M.

    2010-12-20

    Based on previous spectral and temporal optical studies, Q2122-444 has been classified as a naked active galactic nucleus (AGN) or true type 2 AGN, that is, an AGN that genuinely lacks a broad-line region (BLR). Its optical spectrum seemed to possess only narrow forbidden emission lines that are typical of type 2 (obscured) AGNs, but the long-term optical light curve, obtained from a monitoring campaign over more than two decades, showed strong variability, apparently ruling out the presence of heavy obscuration. Here we present the results from a {approx}40 ks XMM-Newton observation of Q2122-444 carried out to shed light on the energetics of this enigmatic AGN. The X-ray analysis was complemented with Australia Telescope Compact Array radio data to assess the possible presence of a jet, and with new NTT/EFOSC2 optical spectroscopic data to verify the actual absence of a BLR. The higher-quality optical data revealed the presence of strong and broad Balmer lines that are at odds with the previous spectral classification of this AGN. The lack of detection of radio emission rules out the presence of a jet. The X-ray data combined with simultaneous UV observations carried out by the Optical Monitor (OM) aboard XMM-Newton confirm that Q2122-444 is a typical type 1 AGN without any significant intrinsic absorption. New estimates of the black hole mass independently obtained from the broad Balmer lines and from a new scaling technique based on X-ray spectral data suggest that Q2122-444 is accreting at a relatively high rate in Eddington units.

  11. Metallic glass alloys of Zr, Ti, Cu and Ni

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lin, X.; Peker, A.; Johnson, W.L.

    1997-04-08

    At least quaternary alloys form metallic glass upon cooling below the glass transition temperature at a rate less than 10{sup 3} K/s. Such alloys comprise titanium from 19 to 41 atomic percent, an early transition metal (ETM) from 4 to 21 atomic percent and copper plus a late transition metal (LTM) from 49 to 64 atomic percent. The ETM comprises zirconium and/or hafnium. The LTM comprises cobalt and/or nickel. The composition is further constrained such that the product of the copper plus LTM times the atomic proportion of LTM relative to the copper is from 2 to 14. The atomic percentage of ETM is less than 10 when the atomic percentage of titanium is as high as 41, and may be as large as 21 when the atomic percentage of titanium is as low as 24. Furthermore, when the total of copper and LTM are low, the amount of LTM present must be further limited. Another group of glass forming alloys has the formula (ETM{sub 1{minus}x}Ti{sub x}){sub a} Cu{sub b} (Ni{sub 1{minus}y}Co{sub y}){sub c} wherein x is from 0.1 to 0.3, y{center_dot}c is from 0 to 18, a is from 47 to 67, b is from 8 to 42, and c is from 4 to 37. This definition of the alloys has additional constraints on the range of copper content, b. 2 figs.

  12. SU-E-J-191: Automated Detection of Anatomic Changes in H'N Patients

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Usynin, A; Ramsey, C [Thompson Cancer Survival Center Knoxville, TN (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To develop a novel statistics-based method for automated detection of anatomical changes using cone-beam CT data. A method was developed that can provide a reliable and automated early warning system that enables a just-in-time adaptation of the treatment plan. Methods: Anatomical changes were evaluated by comparing the original treatment planning CT with daily CBCT images taken prior treatment delivery. The external body contour was computed on a given CT slice and compared against the corresponding contour on the daily CBCT. In contrast to threshold-based techniques, a statistical approach was employed to evaluate the difference between the contours using a given confidence level. The detection tool used the two-sample Kolmogorov-Smirnov test, which is a non-parametric technique that compares two samples drawn from arbitrary probability distributions. 11 H'N patients were retrospectively selected from a clinical imaging database with a total of 186 CBCT images. Six patients in the database were confirmed to have anatomic changes during the course of radiotherapy. Five of the H'N patients did not have significant changes. The KS test was applied to the contour data using a sliding window analysis. The confidence level of 0.99 was used to moderate false detection. Results: The algorithm was able to correctly detect anatomical changes in 6 out of 6 patients with an excellent spatial accuracy as early as at the 14th elapsed day. The algorithm provided a consistent and accurate delineation of the detected changes. The output of the anatomical change tool is easy interpretable, and can be shown overlaid on a 3D rendering of the patient's anatomy. Conclusion: The detection method provides the basis for one of the key components of Adaptive Radiation Therapy. The method uses tools that are readily available in the clinic, including daily CBCT imaging, and image co-registration facilities.

  13. BENCHMARK TESTS FOR MARKOV CHAIN MONTE CARLO FITTING OF EXOPLANET ECLIPSE OBSERVATIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rogers, Justin; Lopez-Morales, Mercedes; Apai, Daniel; Adams, Elisabeth

    2013-04-10

    Ground-based observations of exoplanet eclipses provide important clues to the planets' atmospheric physics, yet systematics in light curve analyses are not fully understood. It is unknown if measurements suggesting near-infrared flux densities brighter than models predict are real, or artifacts of the analysis processes. We created a large suite of model light curves, using both synthetic and real noise, and tested the common process of light curve modeling and parameter optimization with a Markov Chain Monte Carlo algorithm. With synthetic white noise models, we find that input eclipse signals are generally recovered within 10% accuracy for eclipse depths greater than the noise amplitude, and to smaller depths for higher sampling rates and longer baselines. Red noise models see greater discrepancies between input and measured eclipse signals, often biased in one direction. Finally, we find that in real data, systematic biases result even with a complex model to account for trends, and significant false eclipse signals may appear in a non-Gaussian distribution. To quantify the bias and validate an eclipse measurement, we compare both the planet-hosting star and several of its neighbors to a separately chosen control sample of field stars. Re-examining the Rogers et al. Ks-band measurement of CoRoT-1b finds an eclipse 3190{sup +370}{sub -440} ppm deep centered at {phi}{sub me} = 0.50418{sup +0.00197}{sub -0.00203}. Finally, we provide and recommend the use of selected data sets we generated as a benchmark test for eclipse modeling and analysis routines, and propose criteria to verify eclipse detections.

  14. A merger shock in A2034

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Owers, Matt S.; Couch, Warrick J.; Hopkins, Andrew M.; Nulsen, Paul E. J.; Ma, Cheng-Jiun; David, Laurence P.; Forman, William R.; Jones, Christine; Van Weeren, Reinout J.

    2014-01-10

    We present a 250 ks Chandra observation of the cluster merger A2034 with the aim of understanding the nature of a sharp edge previously characterized as a cold front. The new data reveal that the edge is coherent over a larger opening angle and is significantly more bow-shock-shaped than previously thought. Within ?27 about the axis of symmetry of the edge, the density, temperature, and pressure drop abruptly by factors of 1.83{sub ?0.08}{sup +0.09}, 1.85{sub ?0.41}{sup +0.41}, and 3.4{sub ?0.7}{sup +0.8}, respectively. This is inconsistent with the pressure equilibrium expected of a cold front and we conclude that the edge is a shock front. We measure a Mach number M=1.59{sub ?0.07}{sup +0.06} and corresponding shock velocity v {sub shock} ? 2057 km s{sup 1}. Using spectra collected at the MMT with the Hectospec multi-object spectrograph, we identify 328 spectroscopically confirmed cluster members. Significantly, we find a local peak in the projected galaxy density associated with a bright cluster galaxy that is located just ahead of the nose of the shock. The data are consistent with a merger viewed within ?23 of the plane of the sky. The merging subclusters are now moving apart along a north-south axis approximately 0.3 Gyr after a small impact parameter core passage. The gas core of the secondary subcluster, which was driving the shock, appears to have been disrupted by the merger. Without a driving 'piston,' we speculate that the shock is dying. Finally, we propose that the diffuse radio emission near the shock is due to the revival of pre-existing radio plasma that has been overrun by the shock.

  15. NEW X-RAY OBSERVATIONS OF THE GEMINGA PULSAR WIND NEBULA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pavlov, George G.; Bhattacharyya, Sudip; Zavlin, Vyacheslav E. E-mail: sudip@tifr.res.i

    2010-05-20

    Previous observations of the middle-aged pulsar Geminga with XMM-Newton and Chandra have shown an unusual pulsar wind nebula (PWN), with a 20'' long central (axial) tail directed opposite to the pulsar's proper motion and two 2' long, bent lateral (outer) tails. Here, we report on a deeper Chandra observation (78 ks exposure) and a few additional XMM-Newton observations of the Geminga PWN. The new Chandra observation has shown that the axial tail, which includes up to three brighter blobs, extends at least 50'' (i.e., 0.06d{sub 250} pc) from the pulsar (d{sub 250} is the distance scaled to 250 pc). It also allowed us to image the patchy outer tails and the emission in the immediate vicinity of the pulsar with high resolution. The PWN luminosity, L{sub 0.3-8{sub keV}} {approx} 3 x 10{sup 29} d {sup 2}{sub 250} erg s{sup -1}, is lower than the pulsar's magnetospheric luminosity by a factor of 10. The spectra of the PWN elements are rather hard (photon index {Gamma} {approx} 1). Comparing the two Chandra images, we found evidence of PWN variability, including possible motion of the blobs along the axial tail. The X-ray PWN is the synchrotron radiation from relativistic particles of the pulsar wind (PW); its morphology is connected with the supersonic motion of Geminga. We speculate that the outer tails are either a sky projection of the limb-brightened boundary of a shell formed in the region of contact discontinuity, where the wind bulk flow is decelerated by shear instability, or polar outflows from the pulsar bent by the ram pressure from the interstellar medium. In the former case, the axial tail may be a jet emanating along the pulsar's spin axis, perhaps aligned with the direction of motion. In the latter case, the axial tail may be the shocked PW collimated by ram pressure.

  16. X-RAY OUTFLOWS AND SUPER-EDDINGTON ACCRETION IN THE ULTRALUMINOUS X-RAY SOURCE HOLMBERG IX X-1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walton, D. J.; Harrison, F. A.; Miller, J. M.; Reis, R. C.; Fabian, A. C.; Roberts, T. P.; Middleton, M. J.

    2013-08-10

    Studies of X-ray continuum emission and flux variability have not conclusively revealed the nature of ultraluminous X-ray sources (ULXs) at the high-luminosity end of the distribution (those with L{sub X} {>=} 10{sup 40} erg s{sup -1}). These are of particular interest because the luminosity requires either super-Eddington accretion onto a black hole of mass {approx}10 M{sub Sun} or more standard accretion onto an intermediate-mass black hole. Super-Eddington accretion models predict strong outflowing winds, making atomic absorption lines a key diagnostic of the nature of extreme ULXs. To search for such features, we have undertaken a long, 500 ks observing campaign on Holmberg IX X-1 with Suzaku. This is the most sensitive data set in the iron K bandpass for a bright, isolated ULX to date, yet we find no statistically significant atomic features in either emission or absorption; any undetected narrow features must have equivalent widths less than 15-20 eV at 99% confidence. These limits are far below the {approx}>150 eV lines expected if observed trends between mass inflow and outflow rates extend into the super-Eddington regime and in fact rule out the line strengths observed from disk winds in a variety of sub-Eddington black holes. We therefore cannot be viewing the central regions of Holmberg IX X-1 through any substantial column of material, ruling out models of spherical super-Eddington accretion. If Holmberg IX X-1 is a super-Eddington source, any associated outflow must have an anisotropic geometry. Finally, the lack of iron emission suggests that the stellar companion cannot be launching a strong wind and that Holmberg IX X-1 must primarily accrete via Roche-lobe overflow.

  17. SPATIALLY RESOLVING A STARBURST GALAXY AT HARD X-RAY ENERGIES: NuSTAR, CHANDRA, AND VLBA OBSERVATIONS OF NGC253

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wik, D. R.; Lehmer, B. D.; Hornschemeier, A. E.; Yukita, M.; Ptak, A.; Venters, T.; Zhang, W. W.; Zezas, A.; Antoniou, V.; Argo, M. K.; Bechtol, K.; Boggs, S.; Craig, W.; Krivonos, R.; Christensen, F.; Hailey, C.; Harrison, F.; Maccarone, T. J.; Stern, D.

    2014-12-20

    Prior to the launch of NuSTAR, it was not feasible to spatially resolve the hard (E > 10 keV) emission from galaxies beyond the Local Group. The combined NuSTAR data set, comprised of three ?165 ks observations, allows spatial characterization of the hard X-ray emission in the galaxy NGC253 for the first time. As a follow up to our initial study of its nuclear region, we present the first results concerning the full galaxy from simultaneous NuSTAR, Chandra, and Very Long Baseline Array monitoring of the local starburst galaxy NGC253. Above ?10 keV, nearly all the emission is concentrated within 100'' of the galactic center, produced almost exclusively by three nuclear sources, an off-nuclear ultraluminous X-ray source (ULX), and a pulsar candidate that we identify for the first time in these observations. We detect 21 distinct sources in energy bands up to 25 keV, mostly consisting of intermediate state black hole X-ray binaries. The global X-ray emission of the galaxydominated by the off-nuclear ULX and nuclear sources, which are also likely ULXsfalls steeply (photon index ? 3) above 10 keV, consistent with other NuSTAR-observed ULXs, and no significant excess above the background is detected at E > 40 keV. We report upper limits on diffuse inverse Compton emission for a range of spatial models. For the most extended morphologies considered, these hard X-ray constraints disfavor a dominant inverse Compton component to explain the ?-ray emission detected with Fermi and H.E.S.S. If NGC253 is typical of starburst galaxies at higher redshift, their contribution to the E > 10 keV cosmic X-ray background is <1%.

  18. Faint submillimeter galaxies revealed by multifield deep ALMA observations: number counts, spatial clustering, and a dark submillimeter line emitter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ono, Yoshiaki; Ouchi, Masami; Momose, Rieko; Kurono, Yasutaka

    2014-11-01

    We present the statistics of faint submillimeter/millimeter galaxies (SMGs) and serendipitous detections of a submillimeter/millimeter line emitter (SLE) with no multi-wavelength continuum counterpart revealed by the deep ALMA observations. We identify faint SMGs with flux densities of 0.1-1.0 mJy in the deep Band-6 and Band-7 maps of 10 independent fields that reduce cosmic variance effects. The differential number counts at 1.2 mm are found to increase with decreasing flux density down to 0.1 mJy. Our number counts indicate that the faint (0.1-1.0 mJy, or SFR{sub IR} ? 30-300 M {sub ?} yr{sup 1}) SMGs contribute nearly a half of the extragalactic background light (EBL), while the remaining half of the EBL is mostly contributed by very faint sources with flux densities of <0.1 mJy (SFR{sub IR} ? 30 M {sub ?} yr{sup 1}). We conduct counts-in-cells analysis with multifield ALMA data for the faint SMGs, and obtain a coarse estimate of galaxy bias, b {sub g} < 4. The galaxy bias suggests that the dark halo masses of the faint SMGs are ? 7 10{sup 12} M {sub ?}, which is smaller than those of bright (>1 mJy) SMGs, but consistent with abundant high-z star-forming populations, such as sBzKs, LBGs, and LAEs. Finally, we report the serendipitous detection of SLE-1, which has no continuum counterparts in our 1.2 mm-band or multi-wavelength images, including ultra deep HST/WFC3 and Spitzer data. The SLE has a significant line at 249.9 GHz with a signal-to-noise ratio of 7.1. If the SLE is not a spurious source made by the unknown systematic noise of ALMA, the strong upper limits of our multi-wavelength data suggest that the SLE would be a faint galaxy at z ? 6.

  19. EXAMINING THE RADIO-LOUD/RADIO-QUIET DICHOTOMY WITH NEW CHANDRA AND VLA OBSERVATIONS OF 13 UGC GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kharb, P.; Axon, D. J.; Robinson, A.; Capetti, A.; Balmaverde, B.; Chiaberge, M.; Macchetto, D.; Grandi, P.; Giovannini, G.; Montez, R.

    2012-04-15

    We present the results from new {approx}15 ks Chandra-ACIS and 4.9 GHz Very Large Array (VLA) observations of 13 galaxies hosting low-luminosity active galactic nuclei (AGNs). This completes the multiwavelength study of a sample of 51 nearby early-type galaxies described in Capetti and Balmaverde and Balmaverde and Capetti. The aim of the three previous papers was to explore the connection between the host galaxies and AGN activity in a radio-selected sample. We detect nuclear X-ray emission in eight sources and radio emission in all but one (viz., UGC 6985). The new VLA observations improve the spatial resolution by a factor of 10: the presence of nuclear radio sources in 12 of the 13 galaxies confirms their AGN nature. As previously indicated, the behavior of the X-ray and radio emission in these sources depends strongly on the form of their optical surface brightness profiles derived from Hubble Space Telescope imaging, i.e., on their classification as 'core', 'power-law', or 'intermediate' galaxies. With more than twice the number of 'power-law' and 'intermediate' galaxies compared to previous work, we confirm with a much higher statistical significance that these galaxies lie well above the radio-X-ray correlation established in Fanaroff-Riley type I radio galaxies and the low-luminosity 'core' galaxies. This result highlights the fact that the 'radio-loud/radio-quiet' dichotomy is a function of the host galaxy's optical surface brightness profile. We present radio-optical-X-ray spectral indices for all 51 sample galaxies. Survival statistics point to significant differences in the radio-to-optical and radio-to-X-ray spectral indices between the 'core' and 'power-law galaxies (Gehan's Generalized Wilcoxon test probability p for the two classes being statistically similar is <10{sup -5}), but not in the optical-to-X-ray spectral indices (p = 0.25). Therefore, the primary difference between the 'core' and 'power-law' galaxies is in their ability to launch powerful radio outflows. This result is consistent with the hypothesis of different formation processes and evolution histories in 'core' and 'power-law' galaxies: major mergers are likely to have created 'core' galaxies, while minor mergers were instrumental in the creation of 'power-law' galaxies.

  20. Training toward Advanced 3D Seismic Methods for CO2 Monitoring, Verification, and Accounting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Christopher Liner

    2012-05-31

    The objective of our work is graduate and undergraduate student training related to improved 3D seismic technology that addresses key challenges related to monitoring movement and containment of CO{sub 2}, specifically better quantification and sensitivity for mapping of caprock integrity, fractures, and other potential leakage pathways. We utilize data and results developed through previous DOE-funded CO{sub 2} characterization project (DE-FG26-06NT42734) at the Dickman Field of Ness County, KS. Dickman is a type locality for the geology that will be encountered for CO{sub 2} sequestration projects from northern Oklahoma across the U.S. midcontinent to Indiana and Illinois. Since its discovery in 1962, the Dickman Field has produced about 1.7 million barrels of oil from porous Mississippian carbonates with a small structural closure at about 4400 ft drilling depth. Project data includes 3.3 square miles of 3D seismic data, 142 wells, with log, some core, and oil/water production data available. Only two wells penetrate the deep saline aquifer. In a previous DOE-funded project, geological and seismic data were integrated to create a geological property model and a flow simulation grid. We believe that sequestration of CO{sub 2} will largely occur in areas of relatively flat geology and simple near surface, similar to Dickman. The challenge is not complex geology, but development of improved, lower-cost methods for detecting natural fractures and subtle faults. Our project used numerical simulation to test methods of gathering multicomponent, full azimuth data ideal for this purpose. Our specific objectives were to apply advanced seismic methods to aide in quantifying reservoir properties and lateral continuity of CO{sub 2} sequestration targets. The purpose of the current project is graduate and undergraduate student training related to improved 3D seismic technology that addresses key challenges related to monitoring movement and containment of CO{sub 2}, specifically better quantification and sensitivity for mapping of caprock integrity, fractures, and other potential leakage pathways. Specifically, our focus is fundamental research on (1) innovative narrow-band seismic data decomposition and interpretation, and (2) numerical simulation of advanced seismic data (multi-component, high density, full azimuth data) ideal for mapping of cap rock integrity and potential leakage pathways.

  1. High-performance, low Pt content catalysts for the electroreduction of oxygen in polymer-electrolyte fuel cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fournier, J.; Faubert, G.; Tilquin, J.Y.; Cote, R.; Guay, D.; Dodelet, J.P.

    1997-01-01

    Pt-included and Pt-supported catalysts have been synthesized using graphite and carbon black supports of various specific areas. The graphites are KS6 (20 m{sup 2}/g), HS100 (110 m{sup 2}/g), and HS300 (305 m{sup 2}/g) from Lonza, and the carbon blacks are Vulcan (254 m{sup 2}/g) and Black Pearls (1475 m{sup 2}/g) from Cabot. The Pt-included and Pt-supported catalysts were used at the cathode of a H{sub 2}/O{sub 2} fuel cell, and their polarization curves were compared to each other and to those of various Pt-supported catalysts from E-TEK. In the high current region of interest to fuel cell developers, it is shown that Pt-supported catalysts perform better than Pt-included ones when the specific area of the support is small. The contrary is true when the specific area of the support is large. The best catalysts are HS300-Pti [8.3 weight percent (w/o) Pt included in HS300 graphite] and Vu-Pti (6.1 w/o Pt included in Vulcan XC-72R). These catalysts display very high mass and specific activities for O{sub 2} reduction. Furthermore, the iR-corrected polarization curves of both HS300-Pti (with a Pt loading of 0.110 mg/cm{sup 2}) and Vu-Pti (with a Pt loading of 0.070 mg/cm{sup 2}) cross at high current the polarization curve of the electrode prepared with E-TEK20 (20 w/o of supported Pt, with a Pt loading of 0.287 mg/cm{sup 2}). Pt inclusion in graphite or carbon black is therefore an interesting way of reducing the Pt loading of fuel cell cathodes without lowering electrochemical performance. HS300-Pti have been characterized by X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. These analyses indicate that they both contain metallic Pt and Pt(II and IV) oxides and/or hydroxides.

  2. Investigation of Integrated Subsurface Processing of Landfill Gas and Carbon Sequestration, Johnson County, Kansas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    K. David Newell; Timothy R. Carr

    2007-03-31

    The Johnson County Landfill in Shawnee, KS is operated by Deffenbaugh Industries and serves much of metropolitan Kansas City. Refuse, which is dumped in large plastic-underlined trash cells covering several acres, is covered over with shale shortly after burial. The landfill waste, once it fills the cell, is then drilled by Kansas City LFG, so that the gas generated by anaerobic decomposition of the refuse can be harvested. Production of raw landfill gas from the Johnson County landfill comes from 150 wells. Daily production is approximately 2.2 to 2.5 mmcf, of which approximately 50% is methane and 50% is carbon dioxide and NMVOCs (non-methane volatile organic compounds). Heating value is approximately 550 BTU/scf. A upgrading plant, utilizing an amine process, rejects the carbon dioxide and NMVOCs, and upgrades the gas to pipeline quality (i.e., nominally a heating value >950 BTU/scf). The gas is sold to a pipeline adjacent to the landfill. With coal-bearing strata underlying the landfill, and carbon dioxide a major effluent gas derived from the upgrading process, the Johnson County Landfill is potentially an ideal setting to study the feasibility of injecting the effluent gas in the coals for both enhanced coalbed methane recovery and carbon sequestration. To these ends, coals below the landfill were cored and then were analyzed for their thickness and sorbed gas content, which ranged up to 79 scf/ton. Assuming 1 1/2 square miles of land (960 acres) at the Johnson County Landfill can be utilized for coalbed and shale gas recovery, the total amount of in-place gas calculates to 946,200 mcf, or 946.2 mmcf, or 0.95 bcf (i.e., 985.6 mcf/acre X 960 acres). Assuming that carbon dioxide can be imbibed by the coals and shales on a 2:1 ratio compared to the gas that was originally present, then 1682 to 1720 days (4.6 to 4.7 years) of landfill carbon dioxide production can be sequestered by the coals and shales immediately under the landfill. Three coal--the Bevier, Fleming, and Mulberry coals--are the major coals of sufficient thickness (nominally >1-foot) that can imbibe carbon dioxide gas with an enhanced coalbed injection. Comparison of the adsorption gas content of coals to the gas desorbed from the coals shows that the degree of saturation decreases with depth for the coals.

  3. In-situ Study of Dynamic Phenomena at Metal Nanosolder Interfaces Using Aberration Corrected Scanning Transmission Electron Microcopy.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lu, Ping

    2014-10-01

    Controlling metallic nanoparticle (NP) interactions plays a vital role in the development of new joining techniques (nanosolder) that bond at lower processing temperatures but remain viable at higher temperatures. The pr imary objective of this project is t o develop a fundamental understanding of the actual reaction processes, associated atomic mechanisms, and the resulting microstructure that occur during thermally - driven bond formation concerning metal - metal nano - scale (<50nm) interfaces. In this LDRD pr oject, we have studied metallic NPs interaction at the elevated temperatures by combining in - situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM ) using an aberration - corrected scanning transmission electron microscope (AC - STEM) and atomic - scale modeling such as m olecular dynamic (MD) simulations. Various metallic NPs such as Ag, Cu and Au are synthesized by chemical routines. Numerous in - situ e xperiments were carried out with focus of the research on study of Ag - Cu system. For the first time, using in - situ STEM he ating experiments , we directly observed t he formation of a 3 - dimensional (3 - D) epitaxial Cu - Ag core - shell nanoparticle during the thermal interaction of Cu and Ag NPs at elevated temperatures (150 - 300 o C). The reaction takes place at temperatures as low as 150 o C and was only observed when care was taken to circumvent the effects of electron beam irradiation during STEM imaging. Atomic - scale modeling verified that the Cu - Ag core - shell structure is energetically favored, and indicated that this phenomenon is a nano - scale effect related to the large surface - to - volume ratio of the NPs. The observation potentially can be used for developing new nanosolder technology that uses Ag shell as the %22glue%22 that stic ks the particles of Cu together. The LDRD has led to several journal publications and numerous conference presentations, and a TA. In addition, we have developed new TEM characterization techniques and phase - field modeling tools that can be used for future materials research at Sandia. Acknowledgeme nts This work was supported by the Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) program of Sandia National Laboratories. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi - program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidia ry of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the US Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE - AC04 - 94AL85000.

  4. A delayed transition to the hard state for 4U 1630-47 at the end of its 2010 outburst

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tomsick, John A.; Yamaoka, Kazutaka; Corbel, Stephane; Kalemci, Emrah; Migliari, Simone; Kaaret, Philip

    2014-08-10

    Here we report on Swift and Suzaku observations near the end of an outburst from the black hole transient 4U 1630-47 and Chandra observations when the source was in quiescence. 4U 1630-47 made a transition from a soft state to the hard state ∼50 days after the main outburst ended. During this unusual delay, the flux continued to drop, and one Swift measurement found the source with a soft spectrum at a 2-10 keV luminosity of L = 1.07 × 10{sup 35} erg s{sup –1} for an estimated distance of 10 kpc. While such transients usually make a transition to the hard state at L/L{sub Edd} = 0.3%-3%, where L{sub Edd} is the Eddington luminosity, the 4U 1630-47 spectrum remained soft at L/L{sub Edd} = 0.008 M{sub 10}{sup −1}% (as measured in the 2-10 keV band), where M{sub 10} is the mass of the black hole in units of 10 M{sub ☉}. An estimate of the luminosity in the broader 0.5-200 keV bandpass gives L/L{sub Edd} = 0.03 M{sub 10}{sup −1}%, which is still an order of magnitude lower than typical. We also measured an exponential decay of the X-ray flux in the hard state with an e-folding time of 3.39 ± 0.06 days, which is much less than previous measurements of 12-15 days during decays by 4U 1630-47 in the soft state. With the ∼100 ks Suzaku observation, we do not see evidence for a reflection component, and the 90% confidence limits on the equivalent width of a narrow iron Kα emission line are <40 eV for a narrow line and <100 eV for a line of any width, which is consistent with a change of geometry (either a truncated accretion disk or a change in the location of the hard X-ray source) in the hard state. Finally, we report a 0.5-8 keV luminosity upper limit of <2 × 10{sup 32} erg s{sup –1} in quiescence, which is the lowest value measured for 4U 1630-47 to date.

  5. THE LARGE APEX BOLOMETER CAMERA SURVEY OF THE EXTENDED CHANDRA DEEP FIELD SOUTH

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weiss, A.; Kovacs, A.; Menten, K. M.; Coppin, K.; Smail, Ian; Greve, T. R.; Walter, F.; Dannerbauer, H.; Dunlop, J. S.; Ivison, R. J.; Knudsen, K. K.; Bertoldi, F.; Alexander, D. M.; Brandt, W. N.; Chapman, S. C.; Cox, P.; De Breuck, C.; Gawiser, E.; Lutz, D.; Koekemoer, A. M.

    2009-12-20

    We present a sensitive 870 mum survey of the Extended Chandra Deep Field South (ECDFS) combining 310 hr of observing time with the Large Apex BOlometer Camera (LABOCA) on the APEX telescope. The LABOCA ECDFS Submillimetre Survey (LESS) covers the full 30' x 30' field size of the ECDFS and has a uniform noise level of sigma{sub 870{sub m}}u{sub m} approx 1.2 mJy beam{sup -1}. LESS is thus the largest contiguous deep submillimeter survey undertaken to date. The noise properties of our map show clear evidence that we are beginning to be affected by confusion noise. We present a catalog of 126 submillimeter galaxies (SMGs) detected with a significance level above 3.7sigma, at which level we expect five false detections given our map area of 1260 arcmin{sup 2}. The ECDFS exhibits a deficit of bright SMGs relative to previously studied blank fields but not of normal star-forming galaxies that dominate the extragalactic background light (EBL). This is in line with the underdensities observed for optically defined high redshift source populations in the ECDFS (BzKs, DRGs, optically bright active galactic nucleus, and massive K-band-selected galaxies). The differential source counts in the full field are well described by a power law with a slope of alpha = -3.2, comparable to the results from other fields. We show that the shape of the source counts is not uniform across the field. Instead, it steepens in regions with low SMG density. Towards the highest overdensities we measure a source-count shape consistent with previous surveys. The integrated 870 mum flux densities of our source-count models down to S{sub 870{sub m}}u{sub m} = 0.5 mJy account for >65% of the estimated EBL from COBE measurements. We have investigated the clustering of SMGs in the ECDFS by means of a two-point correlation function and find evidence for strong clustering on angular scales <1' with a significance of 3.4sigma. Assuming a power-law dependence for the correlation function and a typical redshift distribution for the SMGs we derive a characteristic angular clustering scale of theta{sub 0} = 14'' +- 7'' and a spatial correlation length of r{sub 0} = 13 +- 6 h {sup -1} Mpc.

  6. Processing and Protection of Rare Earth Permanent Magnet Particulate for Bonded Magnet Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peter Kelly Sokolowski

    2007-12-01

    Rapid solidification of novel mixed rare earth-iron-boron, MRE{sub 2}Fe{sub 14}B (MRE = Nd, Y, Dy; currently), magnet alloys via high pressure gas atomization (HPGA) have produced similar properties and structures as closely related alloys produced by melt spinning (MS) at low wheel speeds. Recent additions of titanium carbide and zirconium to the permanent magnet (PM) alloy design in HPGA powder (using He atomization gas) have made it possible to achieve highly refined microstructures with magnetic properties approaching melt spun particulate at cooling rates of 10{sup 5}-10{sup 6}K/s. By producing HPGA powders with the desirable qualities of melt spun ribbon, the need for crushing ribbon was eliminated in bonded magnet fabrication. The spherical geometry of HPGA powders is more ideal for processing of bonded permanent magnets since higher loading fractions can be obtained during compression and injection molding. This increased volume loading of spherical PM powder can be predicted to yield a higher maximum energy product (BH){sub max} for bonded magnets in high performance applications. Passivation of RE-containing powder is warranted for the large-scale manufacturing of bonded magnets in applications with increased temperature and exposure to humidity. Irreversible magnetic losses due to oxidation and corrosion of particulates is a known drawback of RE-Fe-B based alloys during further processing, e.g. injection molding, as well as during use as a bonded magnet. To counteract these effects, a modified gas atomization chamber allowed for a novel approach to in situ passivation of solidified particle surfaces through injection of a reactive gas, nitrogen trifluoride (NF{sub 3}). The ability to control surface chemistry during atomization processing of fine spherical RE-Fe-B powders produced advantages over current processing methodologies. In particular, the capability to coat particles while 'in flight' may eliminate the need for post atomization treatment, otherwise a necessary step for oxidation and corrosion resistance. Stability of these thin films was attributed to the reduction of each RE's respective oxide during processing; recognizing that fluoride compounds exhibit a slightly higher (negative) free energy driving force for formation. Formation of RE-type fluorides on the surface was evidenced through x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Concurrent research with auger electron spectroscopy has been attempted to accurately quantify the depth of fluoride formation in order to grasp the extent of fluorination reactions with spherical and flake particulate. Gas fusion analysis on coated powders (dia. <45 {micro}m) from an optimized experiment indicated an as-atomized oxygen concentration of 343ppm, where typical, nonpassivated RE atomized alloys exhibit an average of 1800ppm oxygen. Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) on the same powder revealed a decreased rate of oxidation at elevated temperatures up to 300 C, compared to similar uncoated powder.

  7. Devitrification kinetics and phase selection mechanisms in Cu-Zr metallic glasses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kalay, Ilkay

    2010-12-15

    Metallic glasses have been a promising class of materials since their discovery in the 1960s. Indeed, remarkable chemical, mechanical and physical properties have attracted considerable attention, and several excellent reviews are available. Moreover, the special group of glass forming alloys known as the bulk metallic glasses (BMG) become amorphous solids even at relatively low cooling rates, allowing them to be cast in large cross sections, opening the scope of potential applications to include bulk forms and net shape structural applications. Recent studies have been reported for new bulk metallic glasses produced with lower cooling rates, from 0.1 to several hundred K/s. Some of the application products of BMGs include sporting goods, high performance springs and medical devices. Several rapid solidification techniques, including melt-spinning, atomization and surface melting have been developed to produce amorphous alloys. The aim of all these methods is to solidify the liquid phase rapidly enough to suppress the nucleation and growth of crystalline phases. Furthermore, the production of amorphous/crystalline composite (ACC) materials by partial crystallization of amorphous precursor has recently given rise to materials that provide better mechanical and magnetic properties than the monolithic amorphous or crystalline alloys. In addition, these advances illustrate the broad untapped potential of using the glassy state as an intermediate stage in the processing of new materials and nanostructures. These advances underlie the necessity of investigations on prediction and control of phase stability and microstructural dynamics during both solidification and devitrification processes. This research presented in this dissertation is mainly focused on Cu-Zr and Cu-Zr-Al alloy systems. The Cu-Zr binary system has high glass forming ability in a wide compositional range (35-70 at.% Cu). Thereby, Cu-Zr based alloys have attracted much attention according to fundamental research on the behaviors of glass forming alloys. Further motivation arising from the application of this system as a basis for many BMGs and ACC materials; the Cu-Zr system warrants this attention and offers great potential for the development of new materials. However, the prediction and control of microstructural evolution during devitrification remains challenging because of the complex devitrification behavior of the Cu-Zr binary alloy which is arising from the competition of metastable and stable phases and diversity of crystal structures. This dissertation details a systematic fundamental investigation into the mechanisms and kinetics of the various crystallization transformation processes involved in the overall devitrification response of Cu-Zr and Cu-Zr-Al glasses. Various isothermal and nonisothermal treatments are employed, and the structural response is characterized using bulk X-ray and thermal analysis methods as well as nanoscale microscopic analysis methods, revealing structural and chemical details down to the atomic-scale. By carefully combining techniques such as differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), in-situ synchrotron high energy X-ray diffraction (HEXRD), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) to quantify the characterization transformations, this research has uncovered numerous details concerning the atomistic mechanisms of crystallization and has provided much new understanding related to the dominant phases, the overall reaction sequences, and the rate-controlling mechanisms. As such this work represents a substantial step forward in understanding these transformations and provides a clear framework for further progress toward ultimate application of controlled devitrification processing for the production of new materials with remarkable properties.

  8. X-RAY CONSTRAINTS ON THE Ly{alpha} ESCAPE FRACTION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zheng Zhenya; Wang Junxian; Malhotra, Sangeeta; Rhoads, James E.; Finkelstein, Steven L.; Gawiser, Eric; Gronwall, Caryl; Ciardullo, Robin; Guaita, Lucia; Nilsson, Kim K.

    2012-02-10

    We have co-added the X-ray flux of all known Ly{alpha} emitters (LAEs) in the 4 Ms Chandra Deep Field South (CDF-S) region, achieving the tightest upper limits yet on the X-ray to Ly{alpha} ratio. We use the X-ray data to place sensitive upper limits on the average unobscured star formation rate (SFR{sub X}) in these galaxies. A very small fraction of Ly{alpha} galaxies in the field are individually detected in the X-rays, implying a low fraction of active galactic nucleus activity. After excluding the few X-ray-detected LAEs, we stack the undetected LAEs located in the 4 Ms CDF-S data and 250 ks Extended CDF-S (ECDF-S) data, and compute a 1{sigma} upper limit on SFR{sub X} < 1.6, 14, 28, 28, 140, 440, 880 M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1} for LAEs located at z {approx} 0.3 and z = 2.1, 3.1, 3.2, 4.5, 5.7, and 6.5, respectively. The upper limit of SFR{sub X} in LAEs can be then compared to SFR{sub Ly{alpha}} derived from Ly{alpha} line and thus can constrain on the Ly{alpha} escape fraction (f{sup Esc}{sub Ly{alpha}}). The f{sup Esc}{sub Ly{alpha}} from X-ray at z {approx} 0.3 is substantially larger than that from UV or H{alpha}. Three X-ray-detected LAE galaxies at z {approx} 0.3 show f{sup Esc}{sub Ly{alpha}} {approx} 3%-22%, and the average Ly{alpha} escape fraction from stacking the X-ray-undetected LAEs show f{sup Esc}{sub Ly{alpha}} > 28% at 3{sigma} significance level at the same redshift. We derive a lower limit on f{sup Esc}{sub Ly{alpha}} > 14% (84% confidence level, 1{sigma} lower limit) for LAEs at redshift z {approx} 2.1 and z {approx} 3.1-3.2. At z > 4, the current LAE samples are not of sufficient size to constrain SFR{sub X} well. By averaging all the LAEs at z > 2, the X-ray non-detection constrains f{sup Esc}{sub Ly{alpha}} > 17% (84% confidence level, 1{sigma} lower limit), and rejects f{sup Esc}{sub Ly{alpha}} < 5.7% at the 99.87% confidence level from 2.1 < z < 6.5.

  9. CHANDRA AND HST IMAGING OF THE QUASARS PKS B0106+013 AND 3C 345: INVERSE COMPTON X-RAYS AND MAGNETIZED JETS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kharb, P.; Lister, M. L.; Hogan, B. S.; Marshall, H. L.

    2012-04-01

    We present results from deep ({approx}70 ks) Chandra/ACIS observations and Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Advanced Camera for Surveys F475W observations of two highly optically polarized quasars belonging to the MOJAVE blazar sample, viz., PKS B0106+013 and 1641+399 (3C 345). These observations reveal X-ray and optical emissions from the jets in both sources. X-ray emission is detected from the entire length of the 0106+013 radio jet, which shows clear bends or wiggles-the X-ray emission is brightest at the first prominent kiloparsec jet bend. A picture of a helical kiloparsec jet with the first kiloparsec-scale bend representing a jet segment moving close(r) to our line of sight, and getting Doppler boosted at both radio and X-ray frequencies, is consistent with these observations. The X-ray emission from the jet end, however, peaks at about 0.''4 ({approx}3.4 kpc) upstream of the radio hot spot. Optical emission is detected both at the X-ray jet termination peak and at the radio hot spot. The X-ray jet termination peak is found upstream of the radio hot spot by around 0.''2 ({approx}1.3 kpc) in the short projected jet of 3C 345. HST optical emission is seen in an arc-like structure coincident with the bright radio hot spot, which we propose is a sharp (apparent) jet bend instead of a terminal point, that crosses our line of sight and consequently has a higher Doppler beaming factor. A weak radio hot spot is indeed observed less than 1'' downstream of the bright radio hot spot, but has no optical or X-ray counterpart. By making use of the parsec-scale radio and the kiloparsec-scale radio/X-ray data, we derive constraints on the jet Lorentz factors ({Gamma}{sub jet}) and inclination angles ({theta}): for a constant jet speed from parsec to kiloparsec scales, we obtain a {Gamma}{sub jet} of {approx}70 for 0106+013 and {approx}40 for 3C 345. On relaxing this assumption, we derive a {Gamma}{sub jet} of {approx}2.5 for both the sources. Upper limits on {theta} of {approx}13 Degree-Sign are obtained for the two quasars. Broadband (radio-optical-X-ray) spectral energy distribution (SED) modeling of individual jet components in both quasars suggests that the optical emission is from the synchrotron mechanism, while the X-rays are produced via the inverse Compton mechanism from relativistically boosted cosmic microwave background seed photons. The locations of the upstream X-ray termination peaks strongly suggest that the sites of bulk jet deceleration lie upstream (by a few kiloparsecs) of the radio hot spots in these quasars. These regions are also the sites of shocks or magnetic field dissipation, which reaccelerate charged particles and produce high-energy optical and X-ray photons. This is consistent with the best-fit SED modeling parameters of magnetic field strength and electron power-law indices being higher in the jet termination regions compared to the cores. The shocked jet regions upstream of the radio hot spots, the kiloparsec-scale jet wiggles and a 'nose cone'-like jet structure in 0106+013, and the V-shaped radio structure in 3C 345, are all broadly consistent with instabilities associated with Poynting-flux-dominated jets. A greater theoretical understanding and more sensitive numerical simulations of jets spanning parsec to kiloparsec scales are needed, however, to make direct quantitative comparisons.

  10. Saint Joseph's University Institute for Environmental Stewardship

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCann, Michael; Springer, Clint

    2014-06-18

    Task A: Examination of the physiological, morphological, and reproductive responses of Panicum virgatum (switchgrass) cultivars identified as potential biofuel producing cultivars as well as naturally-occurring varieties of switchgrass to projected changes in climate for the central portion of the United States. This project was a multi-year project set in a field site located at the Konza Prairie Biological Station near Manhattan, KS USA. The major objective of the study was to understand the physiological and growth responses of the important biofuel grass species, Panicum virgatum (switch grass) to simulated changes in precipitation expected for the Central Plains region of the United States. Population level adaptation to broad-scale regional climates or within-population variation in genome size of this genetically and phenotypically diverse C4 grass species may influence the responses to future precipitation variability associated with climate change. Therefore, we investigated switchgrass responses to water variability between natural populations collected across latitudinal gradient and populations. P. virgatum plants from natural populations originating from Kansas, Oklahoma, and Texas received frequent, small precipitation events (“ambient’) or infrequent, large precipitation events (‘altered”) to simulate contrasting rainfall variability expected from this region. We measured leaf-level physiology, aboveground biomass varied significantly by population origin but did not differ by genome size. Our results suggest that trait variation in P. virgatum is primarily attributed to population-level adaptation across latitudinal gradient, not genome size, and that neither population-level adaptation nor genome size may be important predictors of P. virgatum responses to future climatic conditions. Based solely on the data presented here, the most important consideration when deciding what varieties of switchgrass to cultivate for biofuel feedstocks under future climate scenarios is local adaptation and not necessarily genome size as has been hypothesized in the literature. Task B: Installation of an extensive green roof system on the Science Center at Saint Joseph's University for research, research-training and educational outreach activities. An experimental green roof system was designed and installed by an outside contractor (Roofmeadows) on the roof of the Science Center at Saint Joseph's University. The roof system includes four test plots, each with a different drainage system, instrumentation to monitor storm water retention, roof deck temperature, heat flux into and out of the building, rain fall, wind speed and direction, relative humidity and heat emission from the roof system. The vegetative roof was planted with 26 species of plants, distributed throughout the roof area, to assess species/variety growth and coverage characteristics, both in terms of the different drain layer systems, and in terms of the different exposures along the north to south axis of the building. Analysis of the drain layer performance, in terms of storm water retention, shows that the aggregate (stone) drainage layer system performed the best, with the moisture management mat system second, and the geotextile drain layer and reservoir sheet layer systems coming in last. This information is of value in the planning and design of vegetative roof systems since the different types of drainage layer systems have different installation costs and different weights. The different drainage layer systems also seem to be having an impact on plant growth and spread with the test plot with the reservoir sheet layer actually having the poorest plant coverage and plant spread of all areas of the roof studied. Plant growth performance analysis is ongoing, but significant differences have been observed in the third growing season ('13) along the north to south axis, with most species doing better towards the northern end of the roof (in terms of percent ground coverage and plant spread and reproduction). Interestingly, plant growth in all four of the test plots was reduced relative to the lower areas of the roof (the lower area was ca. 2 inches lower than the test plots, due to the space needed for sensors under the plots. The lower roof area uses an aggregate drain layer comparable to that in the third test plot), even when accounting for the north to south differences. The reasons for these differences are not clear and studies are underway to examine the impact of wind scour, drainage rates, temperature, and other factors. This information will be of value to planners of extensive vegetative roof systems in the Philadelphia (and broader) region, since plant growth and roof system overall performance is influenced by local climate, making broad generalizations of performance difficult. Task C: Education and community outreach efforts by the IES involving conferences at SJU, presentations by faculty and students off campus, and educational signage. The Institute for Environmental Stewardship hosted three storm water management workshops on the SJU campus in Philadelphia, in collaboration with the Lower Merion Conservancy, a not-for-profit organization located in Montgomery County, PA. These workshops were free and open to the public. The three workshops (held each year in March) drew more than 200 participants total. The presenters included local and state government agencies, not for profit organizations involved in storm water and open space preservation, designers, engineers, planners and others. Feedback was uniformly positive and we plan to continue the workshops for the foreseeable future. Educational signage has been installed at four locations on campus to explain campus infrastructure related to storm water (rain gardens, vegetative roof and green facades), as well as detailed signage installed on the Science Center roof for the vegetative roof system. More than 100 people (from in and outside of SJU) have thus far participated in tours of the roof system. A digital signage system has been installed in the adjacent library and this system provides information about the vegetative roof project and other efforts. A web camera system for the roof has also been installed and the video will be simulcast to the digital signage and with web site (www.sju.edu/ies) in the near future.

  11. Saint Joseph's University Institute for Environmental Stewardship

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCann, Micahel P.; Springer, Clint J.

    2014-06-03

    Task A: Examination of the physiological, morphological, and reproductive responses of Panicum virgatum (switchgrass) cultivars identified as potential biofuel producing cultivars as well as naturally-occurring varieties of switchgrass to projected changes in climate for the central portion of the United States. This project was a multi-year project set in a field site located at the Konza Prairie Biological Station near Manhattan, KS USA. The major objective of the study was to understand the physiological and growth responses of the important biofuel grass species, Panicum virgatum (switch grass) to simulated changes in precipitation expected for the Central Plains region of the United States. Population level adaptation to broad-scale regional climates or within-population variation in genome size of this genetically and phenotypically diverse C4 grass species may influence the responses to future precipitation variability associated with climate change. Therefore, we investigated switchgrass responses to water variability between natural populations collected across latitudinal gradient and populations. P. virgatum plants from natural populations originating from Kansas, Oklahoma, and Texas received frequent, small precipitation events (“ambient’) or infrequent, large precipitation events (‘altered”) to simulate contrasting rainfall variability expected from this region. We measured leaf-level physiology, aboveground biomass varied significantly by population origin but did not differ by genome size. Our results suggest that trait variation in P. virgatum is primarily attributed to population-level adaptation across latitudinal gradient, not genome size, and that neither population-level adaptation nor genome size may be important predictors of P. virgatum responses to future climatic conditions. Based solely on the data presented here, the most important consideration when deciding what varieties of switchgrass to cultivate for biofuel feedstocks under future climate scenarios is local adaptation and not necessarily genome size as has been hypothesized in the literature. Task B: Installation of an extensive green roof system on the Science Center at Saint Joseph's University for research, research-training and educational outreach activities. An experimental green roof system was designed and installed by an outside contractor (Roofmeadows) on the roof of the Science Center at Saint Joseph's University. The roof system includes four test plots, each with a different drainage system, instrumentation to monitor storm water retention, roof deck temperature, heat flux into and out of the building, rain fall, wind speed and direction, relative humidity and heat emission from the roof system. The vegetative roof was planted with 26 species of plants, distributed throughout the roof area, to assess species/variety growth and coverage characteristics, both in terms of the different drain layer systems, and in terms of the different exposures along the north to south axis of the building. Analysis of the drain layer performance, in terms of storm water retention, shows that the aggregate (stone) drainage layer system performed the best, with the moisture management mat system second, and the geotextile drain layer and reservoir sheet layer systems coming in last. This information is of value in the planning and design of vegetative roof systems since the different types of drainage layer systems have different installation costs and different weights. The different drainage layer systems also seem to be having an impact on plant growth and spread with the test plot with the reservoir sheet layer actually having the poorest plant coverage and plant spread of all areas of the roof studied. Plant growth performance analysis is ongoing, but significant differences have been observed in the third growing season ('13) along the north to south axis, with most species doing better towards the northern end of the roof (in terms of percent ground coverage and plant spread and reproduction). Interestingly, plant growth in all four of the test plots was reduced relative to the lower areas of the roof (the lower area was ca. 2 inches lower than the test plots, due to the space needed for sensors under the plots. The lower roof area uses an aggregate drain layer comparable to that in the third test plot), even when accounting for the north to south differences. The reasons for these differences are not clear and studies are underway to examine the impact of wind scour, drainage rates, temperature, and other factors. This information will be of value to planners of extensive vegetative roof systems in the Philadelphia (and broader) region, since plant growth and roof system overall performance is influenced by local climate, making broad generalizations of performance difficult. Task C: Education and community outreach efforts by the IES involving conferences at SJU, presentations by faculty and students off campus, and educational signage. The Institute for Environmental Stewardship hosted three storm water management workshops on the SJU campus in Philadelphia, in collaboration with the Lower Merion Conservancy, a not-for-profit organization located in Montgomery County, PA. These workshops were free and open to the public. The three workshops (held each year in March) drew more than 200 participants total. The presenters included local and state government agencies, not for profit organizations involved in storm water and open space preservation, designers, engineers, planners and others. Feedback was uniformly positive and we plan to continue the workshops for the foreseeable future. Educational signage has been installed at four locations on campus to explain campus infrastructure related to storm water (rain gardens, vegetative roof and green facades), as well as detailed signage installed on the Science Center roof for the vegetative roof system. More than 100 people (from in and outside of SJU) have thus far participated in tours of the roof system. A digital signage system has been installed in the adjacent library and this system provides information about the vegetative roof project and other efforts. A web camera system for the roof has also been installed and the video will be simulcast to the digital signage and with web site (www.sju.edu/ies) in the near future.

  12. Saint Joseph's University Institute for Environmental Stewardship

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCann, Michael P.; Springer, Clint J.

    2014-06-05

    Task A: Examination of the physiological, morphological, and reproductive responses of Panicum virgatum (switchgrass) cultivars identified as potential biofuel producing cultivars as well as naturally-occurring varieties of switchgrass to projected changes in climate for the central portion of the United States. This project was a multi-year project set in a field site located at the Konza Prairie Biological Station near Manhattan, KS USA. The major objective of the study was to understand the physiological and growth responses of the important biofuel grass species, Panicum virgatum (switch grass) to simulated changes in precipitation expected for the Central Plains region of the United States. Population level adaptation to broad-scale regional climates or within-population variation in genome size of this genetically and phenotypically diverse C4 grass species may influence the responses to future precipitation variability associated with climate change. Therefore, we investigated switchgrass responses to water variability between natural populations collected across latitudinal gradient and populations. P. virgatum plants from natural populations originating from Kansas, Oklahoma, and Texas received frequent, small precipitation events (“ambient’) or infrequent, large precipitation events (‘altered”) to simulate contrasting rainfall variability expected from this region. We measured leaf-level physiology, aboveground biomass varied significantly by population origin but did not differ by genome size. Our results suggest that trait variation in P. virgatum is primarily attributed to population-level adaptation across latitudinal gradient, not genome size, and that neither population-level adaptation nor genome size may be important predictors of P. virgatum responses to future climatic conditions. Based solely on the data presented here, the most important consideration when deciding what varieties of switchgrass to cultivate for biofuel feedstocks under future climate scenarios is local adaptation and not necessarily genome size as has been hypothesized in the literature. Task B: Installation of an extensive green roof system on the Science Center at Saint Joseph's University for research, research-training and educational outreach activities. An experimental green roof system was designed and installed by an outside contractor (Roofmeadows) on the roof of the Science Center at Saint Joseph's University. The roof system includes four test plots, each with a different drainage system, instrumentation to monitor storm water retention, roof deck temperature, heat flux into and out of the building, rain fall, wind speed and direction, relative humidity and heat emission from the roof system. The vegetative roof was planted with 26 species of plants, distributed throughout the roof area, to assess species/variety growth and coverage characteristics, both in terms of the different drain layer systems, and in terms of the different exposures along the north to south axis of the building. Analysis of the drain layer performance, in terms of storm water retention, shows that the aggregate (stone) drainage layer system performed the best, with the moisture management mat system second, and the geotextile drain layer and reservoir sheet layer systems coming in last. This information is of value in the planning and design of vegetative roof systems since the different types of drainage layer systems have different installation costs and different weights. The different drainage layer systems also seem to be having an impact on plant growth and spread with the test plot with the reservoir sheet layer actually having the poorest plant coverage and plant spread of all areas of the roof studied. Plant growth performance analysis is ongoing, but significant differences have been observed in the third growing season ('13) along the north to south axis, with most species doing better towards the northern end of the roof (in terms of percent ground coverage and plant spread and reproduction). Interestingly, plant growth in all four of the test plots was reduced relative to the lower areas of the roof (the lower area was ca. 2 inches lower than the test plots, due to the space needed for sensors under the plots. The lower roof area uses an aggregate drain layer comparable to that in the third test plot), even when accounting for the north to south differences. The reasons for these differences are not clear and studies are underway to examine the impact of wind scour, drainage rates, temperature, and other factors. This information will be of value to planners of extensive vegetative roof systems in the Philadelphia (and broader) region, since plant growth and roof system overall performance is influenced by local climate, making broad generalizations of performance difficult. Task C: Education and community outreach efforts by the IES involving conferences at SJU, presentations by faculty and students off campus, and educational signage. The Institute for Environmental Stewardship hosted three storm water management workshops on the SJU campus in Philadelphia, in collaboration with the Lower Merion Conservancy, a not-for-profit organization located in Montgomery County, PA. These workshops were free and open to the public. The three workshops (held each year in March) drew more than 200 participants total. The presenters included local and state government agencies, not for profit organizations involved in storm water and open space preservation, designers, engineers, planners and others. Feedback was uniformly positive and we plan to continue the workshops for the foreseeable future. Educational signage has been installed at four locations on campus to explain campus infrastructure related to storm water (rain gardens, vegetative roof and green facades), as well as detailed signage installed on the Science Center roof for the vegetative roof system. More than 100 people (from in and outside of SJU) have thus far participated in tours of the roof system. A digital signage system has been installed in the adjacent library and this system provides information about the vegetative roof project and other efforts. A web camera system for the roof has also been installed and the video will be simulcast to the digital signage and with web site (www.sju.edu/ies) in the near future.

  13. Saint Joseph's University Institute for Environmental Stewardship

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCann, Michael P; Springer, Clint

    2013-10-15

    Task A: Examination of the physiological, morphological, and reproductive responses of Panicum virgatum (switchgrass) cultivars identified as potential biofuel producing cultivars as well as naturally-occurring varieties of switchgrass to projected changes in climate for the central portion of the United States. This project was a multi-year project set in a field site located at the Konza Prairie Biological Station near Manhattan, KS USA. At the field site we planted switchgrass collected from regions in Kansas, Oklahoma, and Texas. After a year of establishment we implemented a set of two-year water treatments that examined the responses in physiology, growth and development of switchgrass to predicted changes in precipitation amount for the central United States. After this experiment was completed we performed a second set of experiments that examined the responses of switchgrass physiology, growth, and development to changes in precipitation frequency. We also included in this analysis how genome size of individuals influenced their responses to precipitation frequency changes. Generally, we found switchgrass to be unresponsive to realistic predictions of precipitation changes for the Central Plains of the United States. These studies have provided significant insight into how this important grassland species will respond to future climate change from both an ecological and applied biological perspective. Finally, we provided insight into the mechanism through which this species changes in the face of altered water availability by not supporting the hypothesis that the control of switchgrass responses to changes in precipitation is altered by genome size. Task B: Installation of an extensive green roof system on the Science Center at Saint Joseph's University for research, research-training and educational outreach activities. An experimental green roof system was designed and installed by an outside contractor (Roofmeadows) on the roof of the Science Center at Saint Joseph's University. The roof system includes four test plots, each with a different drainage system, instrumentation to monitor storm water retention, roof deck temperature, heat flux into and out of the building, rain fall, wind speed and direction, relative humidity and heat emission from the roof system. The vegetative roof was planted with 26 species of plants, distributed throughout the roof area, to assess species/variety growth and coverage characteristics, both in terms of the different drain layer systems, and in terms of the different exposures along the north to south axis of the building. Analysis of the drain layer performance, in terms of storm water retention, shows that the aggregate (stone) drainage layer system performed the best, with the moisture management mat system second, and the geotextile drain layer and reservoir sheet layer systems coming in last. Plant growth performance analysis is ongoing, but significant differences have been observed in the third growing season ('13) along the north to south axis, with most species doing better towards the northern end of the roof (in terms of percent ground coverage and plant spread and reproduction). Interestingly, plant growth in all four of the test plots was reduced relative to the lower areas of the roof (the lower area was ca. 2 inches lower than the test plots, due to the space needed for sensors under the plots. The lower roof area uses an aggregate drain layer comparable to that in the third test plot), even when accounting for the north to south differences. The reasons for these differences are not clear and studies are underway to examine the impact of wind scour, drainage rates, temperature, and other factors. Task C: Education and community outreach efforts by the IES involving conferences at SJU, presentations by faculty and students off campus, and educational signage. The Institute for Environmental Stewardship hosted three storm water management workshops on the SJU campus in Philadelphia, in collaboration with the Lower Merion Conservancy, a not-for-profit organization located in Montgomery County, PA. These workshops were free and open to the public. The three workshops (held each year in March) drew more than 200 participants total. The presenters included local and state government agencies, not for profit organizations involved in storm water and open space preservation, designers, engineers, planners and others. Feedback was uniformly positive and we plan to continue the workshops for the foreseeable future. Educational signage has been installed at four locations on campus to explain campus infrastructure related to storm water (rain gardens, vegetative roof and green facades), as well as detailed signage installed on the Science Center roof for the vegetative roof system. More than 100 people (from in and outside of SJU) have thus far participated in tours of the roof system. A digital signage system has been installed in the adjacent library and this system provides information about the vegetative roof project and other efforts. A web camera system for the roof has also been installed and the video will be simulcast to the digital signage and with web site (www.sju.edu/ies) in the near future.