Sample records for mixed phase cloud

  1. Intercomparison of cloud model simulations of Arctic mixed-phase boundary layer clouds observed during

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zuidema, Paquita

    /crystal concentration also suggests the need for improved understanding of ice nucleation and its parameterizationIntercomparison of cloud model simulations of Arctic mixed-phase boundary layer clouds observed is presented. This case study is based on observations of a persistent mixed-phase boundary layer cloud

  2. Intercomparison of model simulations of mixed-phase clouds observed during the ARM Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment. Part II: Multi-layered cloud

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morrison, H; McCoy, R B; Klein, S A; Xie, S; Luo, Y; Avramov, A; Chen, M; Cole, J; Falk, M; Foster, M; Genio, A D; Harrington, J; Hoose, C; Khairoutdinov, M; Larson, V; Liu, X; McFarquhar, G; Poellot, M; Shipway, B; Shupe, M; Sud, Y; Turner, D; Veron, D; Walker, G; Wang, Z; Wolf, A; Xu, K; Yang, F; Zhang, G

    2008-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Results are presented from an intercomparison of single-column and cloud-resolving model simulations of a deep, multi-layered, mixed-phase cloud system observed during the ARM Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment. This cloud system was associated with strong surface turbulent sensible and latent heat fluxes as cold air flowed over the open Arctic Ocean, combined with a low pressure system that supplied moisture at mid-level. The simulations, performed by 13 single-column and 4 cloud-resolving models, generally overestimate the liquid water path and strongly underestimate the ice water path, although there is a large spread among the models. This finding is in contrast with results for the single-layer, low-level mixed-phase stratocumulus case in Part I of this study, as well as previous studies of shallow mixed-phase Arctic clouds, that showed an underprediction of liquid water path. The overestimate of liquid water path and underestimate of ice water path occur primarily when deeper mixed-phase clouds extending into the mid-troposphere were observed. These results suggest important differences in the ability of models to simulate Arctic mixed-phase clouds that are deep and multi-layered versus shallow and single-layered. In general, models with a more sophisticated, two-moment treatment of the cloud microphysics produce a somewhat smaller liquid water path that is closer to observations. The cloud-resolving models tend to produce a larger cloud fraction than the single-column models. The liquid water path and especially the cloud fraction have a large impact on the cloud radiative forcing at the surface, which is dominated by the longwave flux for this case.

  3. Retrieval of Cloud Phase Using the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer Data during the Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spangenberg, D.; Minnis, P.; Shupe, M.; Uttal, T.; Poellot, M.

    2005-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Improving climate model predictions over Earth's polar regions requires a comprehensive knowledge of polar cloud microphysics. Over the Arctic, there is minimal contrast between the clouds and background snow surface, making it difficult to detect clouds and retrieve their phase from space. Snow and ice cover, temperature inversions, and the predominance of mixed-phase clouds make it even more difficult to determine cloud phase. Also, since determining cloud phase is the first step toward analyzing cloud optical depth, particle size, and water content, it is vital that the phase be correct in order to obtain accurate microphysical and bulk properties. Changes in these cloud properties will, in turn, affect the Arctic climate since clouds are expected to play a critical role in the sea ice albedo feedback. In this paper, the IR trispectral technique (IRTST) is used as a starting point for a WV and 11-{micro}m brightness temperature (T11) parameterization (WVT11P) of cloud phase using MODIS data. In addition to its ability to detect mixed-phase clouds, the WVT11P also has the capability to identify thin cirrus clouds overlying mixed or liquid phase clouds (multiphase ice). Results from the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) MODIS phase model (AMPHM) are compared to the surface-based cloud phase retrievals over the ARM North Slope of Alaska (NSA) Barrow site and to in-situ data taken from University of North Dakota Citation (CIT) aircraft which flew during the Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment (MPACE). It will be shown that the IRTST and WVT11P combined to form the AMPHM can achieve a relative high accuracy of phase discrimination compared to the surface-based retrievals. Since it only uses MODIS WV and IR channels, the AMPHM is robust in the sense that it can be applied to daytime, twilight, and nighttime scenes with no discontinuities in the output phase.

  4. Mesoscale Modeling During Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Avramov, A.; Harringston, J.Y.; Verlinde, J.

    2005-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Mixed-phase arctic stratus clouds are the predominant cloud type in the Arctic (Curry et al. 2000) and through various feedback mechanisms exert a strong influence on the Arctic climate. Perhaps one of the most intriguing of their features is that they tend to have liquid tops that precipitate ice. Despite the fact that this situation is colloidally unstable, these cloud systems are quite long lived - from a few days to over a couple of weeks. It has been hypothesized that mixed-phase clouds are maintained through a balance between liquid water condensation resulting from the cloud-top radiative cooling and ice removal by precipitation (Pinto 1998; Harrington et al. 1999). In their modeling study Harrington et al. (1999) found that the maintenance of this balance depends strongly on the ambient concentration of ice forming nucleus (IFN). In a follow-up study, Jiang et al. (2002), using only 30% of IFN concentration predicted by Meyers et al. (1992) IFN parameterization were able to obtain results similar to the observations reported by Pinto (1998). The IFN concentration measurements collected during the Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment (M-PACE), conducted in October 2004 over the North Slope of Alaska and the Beaufort Sea (Verlinde et al. 2005), also showed much lower values then those predicted (Prenne, pers. comm.) by currently accepted ice nucleation parameterizations (e.g. Meyers et al. 1992). The goal of this study is to use the extensive IFN data taken during M-PACE to examine what effects low IFN concentrations have on mesoscale cloud structure and coastal dynamics.

  5. Intercomparison of model simulations of mixed-phase clouds observed during the ARM Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment. Part I: Single layer cloud

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Klein, S A; McCoy, R B; Morrison, H; Ackerman, A; Avramov, A; deBoer, G; Chen, M; Cole, J; DelGenio, A; Golaz, J; Hashino, T; Harrington, J; Hoose, C; Khairoutdinov, M; Larson, V; Liu, X; Luo, Y; McFarquhar, G; Menon, S; Neggers, R; Park, S; Poellot, M; von Salzen, K; Schmidt, J; Sednev, I; Shipway, B; Shupe, M; Spangenberg, D; Sud, Y; Turner, D; Veron, D; Falk, M; Foster, M; Fridlind, A; Walker, G; Wang, Z; Wolf, A; Xie, S; Xu, K; Yang, F; Zhang, G

    2008-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Results are presented from an intercomparison of single-column and cloud-resolving model simulations of a cold-air outbreak mixed-phase stratocumulus cloud observed during the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program's Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment. The observed cloud occurred in a well-mixed boundary layer with a cloud top temperature of -15 C. The observed liquid water path of around 160 g m{sup -2} was about two-thirds of the adiabatic value and much greater than the mass of ice crystal precipitation which when integrated from the surface to cloud top was around 15 g m{sup -2}. The simulations were performed by seventeen single-column models (SCMs) and nine cloud-resolving models (CRMs). While the simulated ice water path is generally consistent with the observed values, the median SCM and CRM liquid water path is a factor of three smaller than observed. Results from a sensitivity study in which models removed ice microphysics indicate that in many models the interaction between liquid and ice-phase microphysics is responsible for the large model underestimate of liquid water path. Despite this general underestimate, the simulated liquid and ice water paths of several models are consistent with the observed values. Furthermore, there is some evidence that models with more sophisticated microphysics simulate liquid and ice water paths that are in better agreement with the observed values, although considerable scatter is also present. Although no single factor guarantees a good simulation, these results emphasize the need for improvement in the model representation of mixed-phase microphysics. This case study, which has been well observed from both aircraft and ground-based remote sensors, could be a benchmark for model simulations of mixed-phase clouds.

  6. Retrievals of mixed-phase cloud properties during the National Polar-Orbiting Operational Environmental

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liou, K. N.

    Retrievals of mixed-phase cloud properties during the National Polar-Orbiting Operational/Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) to retrieve pixel-level mixed-phase cloud optical thicknesses Satellite Observations Validation Project (C3VP), were analyzed. The performance of the mixed-phase

  7. LES Simulations of Roll Clouds Observed During Mixed- Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greenberg, S.D.; Harrington, J.Y.; Prenni, A.; DeMott, P.

    2005-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Roll clouds, and associated roll convection, are fairly common features of the atmospheric boundary layer. While these organized cumuliform clouds are found over many regions of the planet, they are quite ubiquitous near the edge of the polar ice sheets. In particular, during periods of off-ice flow, when cold polar air flows from the ice pack over the relatively warm ocean water, strong boundary layer convection develops along with frequent rolls. According to Bruemmer and Pohlman (2000), most of the total cloud cover in the Arctic is due to roll clouds. In an effort to examine the influences of mixed-phase microphysics on the boundary layer evolution of roll clouds during off-ice flow, Olsson and Harrington (2000) used a 2D mesoscale model coupled to a bulk microphysical scheme (see Section 2). Their results showed that mixed-phase clouds produced more shallow boundary layers with weaker turbulence than liquid-phase cases. Furthermore, their results showed that because of th e reduced turbulent drag on the atmosphere in the mixed-phase case, regions of mesoscale divergence in the marginal ice-zone were significantly affected. A follow-up 2D study (Harrington and Olsson 2001) showed that the reduced turbulent intensity in mixed-phase cases was due to precipitation. Ice precipitation caused downdraft stabilization which fed back and caused a reduction in the surface heat fluxes. In this work, we extend the work of Olsson and Harrington (2000) and Harrington and Olsson (2001) by examining the impacts of ice microphysics on roll convection. We will present results that illustrate how microphysics alters roll cloud structure and dynamics.

  8. Intercomparison of model simulations of mixed-phase clouds observed during the ARM Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment. Part I: Single layer cloud

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Klein, Stephen A.; McCoy, Renata B.; Morrison, Hugh; Ackerman, Andrew S.; Avramov, Alexander; de Boer, Gijs; Chen, Mingxuan; Cole, Jason N.S.; Del Genio, Anthony D.; Falk, Michael; Foster, Michael J.; Fridlind, Ann; Golaz, Jean-Christophe; Hashino, Tempei; Harrington, Jerry Y.; Hoose, Corinna; Khairoutdinov, Marat F.; Larson, Vincent E.; Liu, Xiaohong; Luo, Yali; McFarquhar, Greg M.; Menon, Surabi; Neggers, Roel A. J.; Park, Sungsu; Poellot, Michael R.; Schmidt, Jerome M.; Sednev, Igor; Shipway, Ben J.; Shupe, Matthew D.; Spangenberg, Douglas A.; Sud, Yogesh C.; Turner, David D.; Veron, Dana E.; von Salzen, Knut; Walker, Gregory K.; Wang, Zhien; Wolf, Audrey B.; Xie, Shaocheng; Xu, Kuan-Man; Yang, Fanglin; Zhang, Gong

    2009-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Results are presented from an intercomparison of single-column and cloud-resolving model simulations of a cold-air outbreak mixed-phase stratocumulus cloud observed during the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program's Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment. The observed cloud occurred in a well-mixed boundary layer with a cloud top temperature of -15 C. The observed average liquid water path of around 160 g m{sup -2} was about two-thirds of the adiabatic value and much greater than the average mass of ice crystal precipitation which when integrated from the surface to cloud top was around 15 g m{sup -2}. The simulations were performed by seventeen single-column models (SCMs) and nine cloud-resolving models (CRMs). While the simulated ice water path is generally consistent with the observed values, the median SCM and CRM liquid water path is a factor of three smaller than observed. Results from a sensitivity study in which models removed ice microphysics suggest that in many models the interaction between liquid and ice-phase microphysics is responsible for the large model underestimate of liquid water path. Despite this general underestimate, the simulated liquid and ice water paths of several models are consistent with the observed values. Furthermore, there is evidence that models with more sophisticated microphysics simulate liquid and ice water paths that are in better agreement with the observed values, although considerable scatter is also present. Although no single factor guarantees a good simulation, these results emphasize the need for improvement in the model representation of mixed-phase microphysics.

  9. FINAL REPORT: An Investigation of the Microphysical, Radiative, and Dynamical Properties of Mixed-Phase Clouds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shupe, Matthew D

    2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This final report summarizes the major accomplishments and products resulting from a three-year grant funded by the DOE, Office of Science, Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program titled: An Investigation of the Microphysical, Radiative, and Dynamical Properties of Mixed-Phase Clouds. Accomplishments are listed under the following subcategories: Mixed-phase cloud retrieval method development; Mixed-phase cloud characterization; ARM mixed-phase cloud retrieval review; and New ARM MICROBASE product. In addition, lists are provided of service to the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program, data products provided to the broader research community, and publications resulting from this grant.

  10. arctic mixed-phase clouds: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    low-level Arctic clouds in cold seasons and have a significant impact on the surface energy budget. However, the treatment of mixed-phase clouds in most current climate models...

  11. On the Microphysical Representation of Observed Arctic Mixed-Phase Clouds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zuidema, Paquita

    On the Microphysical Representation of Observed Arctic Mixed-Phase Clouds Paquita Zuidema, Paul Lawson, Hugh Morrison U of Miami/SPEC, Inc. Boulder CO/NCAR #12;Arctic clouds are often: mixed-phase (ie. both ice + supercooled water) yet long-lasting (despite disequilibrium) #12;why? - are ice nuclei over

  12. A Numerical Sensitivity Study of Aerosol Influence on Immersion Freezing in Mixed-Phase Stratiform Clouds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eloranta, Edwin W.

    freezing in a mixed-phase stratiform cloud. Immersion freez- ing is represented using a parameterization, and the larger droplets nucleate into ice particles through the immersion freezing process. In mixed-phaseA Numerical Sensitivity Study of Aerosol Influence on Immersion Freezing in Mixed-Phase Stratiform

  13. Simulating mixed-phase Arctic stratus clouds: sensitivity to ice initiation mechanisms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sednev, Igor; Sednev, I.; Menon, S.; McFarquhar, G.

    2008-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The importance of Arctic mixed-phase clouds on radiation and the Arctic climate is well known. However, the development of mixed-phase cloud parameterization for use in large scale models is limited by lack of both related observations and numerical studies using multidimensional models with advanced microphysics that provide the basis for understanding the relative importance of different microphysical processes that take place in mixed-phase clouds. To improve the representation of mixed-phase cloud processes in the GISS GCM we use the GISS single-column model coupled to a bin resolved microphysics (BRM) scheme that was specially designed to simulate mixed-phase clouds and aerosol-cloud interactions. Using this model with the microphysical measurements obtained from the DOE ARM Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment (MPACE) campaign in October 2004 at the North Slope of Alaska, we investigate the effect of ice initiation processes and Bergeron-Findeisen process (BFP) on glaciation time and longevity of single-layer stratiform mixed-phase clouds. We focus on observations taken during 9th-10th October, which indicated the presence of a single-layer mixed-phase clouds. We performed several sets of 12-h simulations to examine model sensitivity to different ice initiation mechanisms and evaluate model output (hydrometeors concentrations, contents, effective radii, precipitation fluxes, and radar reflectivity) against measurements from the MPACE Intensive Observing Period. Overall, the model qualitatively simulates ice crystal concentration and hydrometeors content, but it fails to predict quantitatively the effective radii of ice particles and their vertical profiles. In particular, the ice effective radii are overestimated by at least 50%. However, using the same definition as used for observations, the effective radii simulated and that observed were more comparable. We find that for the single-layer stratiform mixed-phase clouds simulated, process of ice phase initiation due to freezing of supercooled water in both saturated and undersaturated (w.r.t. water) environments is as important as primary ice crystal origination from water vapor. We also find that the BFP is a process mainly responsible for the rates of glaciation of simulated clouds. These glaciation rates cannot be adequately represented by a water-ice saturation adjustment scheme that only depends on temperature and liquid and solid hydrometeors contents as is widely used in bulk microphysics schemes and are better represented by processes that also account for supersaturation changes as the hydrometeors grow.

  14. Simulating mixed-phase Arctic stratus clouds: Sensitivity to ice initiationmechanisms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sednev, I.; Menon, S.; McFarquhar, G.

    2009-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The importance of Arctic mixed-phase clouds on radiation and the Arctic climate is well known. However, the development of mixed-phase cloud parameterization for use in large scale models is limited by lack of both related observations and numerical studies using multidimensional models with advanced microphysics that provide the basis for understanding the relative importance of different microphysical processes that take place in mixed-phase clouds. To improve the representation of mixed-phase cloud processes in the GISS GCM we use the GISS single-column model coupled to a bin resolved microphysics (BRM) scheme that was specially designed to simulate mixed-phase clouds and aerosol-cloud interactions. Using this model with the microphysical measurements obtained from the DOE ARM Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment (MPACE) campaign in October 2004 at the North Slope of Alaska, we investigate the effect of ice initiation processes and Bergeron-Findeisen process (BFP) on glaciation time and longevity of single-layer stratiform mixed-phase clouds. We focus on observations taken during October 9th-10th, which indicated the presence of a single-layer mixed-phase clouds. We performed several sets of 12-hour simulations to examine model sensitivity to different ice initiation mechanisms and evaluate model output (hydrometeors concentrations, contents, effective radii, precipitation fluxes, and radar reflectivity) against measurements from the MPACE Intensive Observing Period. Overall, the model qualitatively simulates ice crystal concentration and hydrometeors content, but it fails to predict quantitatively the effective radii of ice particles and their vertical profiles. In particular, the ice effective radii are overestimated by at least 50%. However, using the same definition as used for observations, the effective radii simulated and that observed were more comparable. We find that for the single-layer stratiform mixed-phase clouds simulated, process of ice phase initiation due to freezing of supercooled water in both saturated and subsaturated (w.r.t. water) environments is as important as primary ice crystal origination from water vapor. We also find that the BFP is a process mainly responsible for the rates of glaciation of simulated clouds. These glaciation rates cannot be adequately represented by a water-ice saturation adjustment scheme that only depends on temperature and liquid and solid hydrometeors contents as is widely used in bulk microphysics schemes and are better represented by processes that also account for supersaturation changes as the hydrometeors grow.

  15. Evaluation of Mixed-Phase Cloud Parameterizations in Short-Range Weather Forecasts with CAM3 and AM2 for Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xie, S; Boyle, J; Klein, S; Liu, X; Ghan, S

    2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    By making use of the in-situ data collected from the recent Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment, we have tested the mixed-phase cloud parameterizations used in the two major U.S. climate models, the National Center for Atmospheric Research Community Atmosphere Model version 3 (CAM3) and the Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory climate model (AM2), under both the single-column modeling framework and the U.S. Department of Energy Climate Change Prediction Program-Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Parameterization Testbed. An improved and more physically based cloud microphysical scheme for CAM3 has been also tested. The single-column modeling tests were summarized in the second quarter 2007 Atmospheric Radiation Measurement metric report. In the current report, we document the performance of these microphysical schemes in short-range weather forecasts using the Climate Chagne Prediction Program Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Parameterizaiton Testbest strategy, in which we initialize CAM3 and AM2 with realistic atmospheric states from numerical weather prediction analyses for the period when Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment was conducted.

  16. Microphysical Properties of Single and Mixed-Phase Arctic Clouds Derived from AERI Observations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Turner, David D.

    2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A novel new approach to retrieve cloud microphysical properties from mixed-phase clouds is presented. This algorithm retrieves cloud optical depth, ice fraction, and the effective size of the water and ice particles from ground-based, high-resolution infrared radiance observations. The theoretical basis is that the absorption coefficient of ice is stronger than that of liquid water from 10-13 mm, whereas liquid water is more absorbing than ice from 16-25 um. However, due to strong absorption in the rotational water vapor absorption band, the 16-25 um spectral region becomes opaque for significant water vapor burdens (i.e., for precipitable water vapor amounts over approximately 1 cm). The Arctic is characterized by its dry and cold atmosphere, as well as a preponderance of mixed-phase clouds, and thus this approach is applicable to Arctic clouds. Since this approach uses infrared observations, cloud properties are retrieved at night and during the long polar wintertime period. The analysis of the cloud properties retrieved during a 7 month period during the Surface Heat Budget of the Arctic (SHEBA) experiment demonstrates many interesting features. These results show a dependence of the optical depth on cloud phase, differences in the mode radius of the water droplets in liquid-only and mid-phase clouds, a lack of temperature dependence in the ice fraction for temperatures above 240 K, seasonal trends in the optical depth with the clouds being thinner in winter and becoming more optically thick in the late spring, and a seasonal trend in the effective size of the water droplets in liquid-only and mixed-phase clouds that is most likely related to aerosol concentration.

  17. Intercomparison of cloud model simulations of Arctic mixed-phase boundary layer clouds observed during SHEBA/FIRE-ACE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morrison, H.; Zuidema, Paquita; Ackerman, Andrew; Avramov, Alexander; de Boer, Gijs; Fan, Jiwen; Fridlind, Ann; Hashino, Tempei; Harrington, Jerry Y.; Luo, Yali; Ovchinnikov, Mikhail; Shipway, Ben

    2011-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

    An intercomparison of six cloud-resolving and large-eddy simulation models is presented. This case study is based on observations of a persistent mixed-phase boundary layer cloud gathered on 7 May, 1998 from the Surface Heat Budget of Arctic Ocean (SHEBA) and First ISCCP Regional Experiment - Arctic Cloud Experiment (FIRE-ACE). Ice nucleation is constrained in the simulations in a way that holds the ice crystal concentration approximately fixed, with two sets of sensitivity runs in addition to the baseline simulations utilizing different specified ice nucleus (IN) concentrations. All of the baseline and sensitivity simulations group into two distinct quasi-steady states associated with either persistent mixed-phase clouds or all-ice clouds after the first few hours of integration, implying the existence of multiple equilibria. These two states are associated with distinctly different microphysical, thermodynamic, and radiative characteristics. Most but not all of the models produce a persistent mixed-phase cloud qualitatively similar to observations using the baseline IN/crystal concentration, while small increases in the IN/crystal concentration generally lead to rapid glaciation and conversion to the all-ice state. Budget analysis indicates that larger ice deposition rates associated with increased IN/crystal concentrations have a limited direct impact on dissipation of liquid in these simulations. However, the impact of increased ice deposition is greatly enhanced by several interaction pathways that lead to an increased surface precipitation flux, weaker cloud top radiative cooling and cloud dynamics, and reduced vertical mixing, promoting rapid glaciation of the mixed-phase cloud for deposition rates in the cloud layer greater than about 1-2x10-5 g kg-1 s-1. These results indicate the critical importance of precipitation-radiative-dynamical interactions in simulating cloud phase, which have been neglected in previous fixed-dynamical parcel studies of the cloud phase parameter space. Large sensitivity to the IN/crystal concentration also suggests the need for improved understanding of ice nucleation and its parameterization in models.

  18. Fine-scale Horizontal Structure of Arctic Mixed-Phase Clouds.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rambukkange,M.; Verlinde, J.; Elorante, E.; Luke, E.; Kollias, P.; Shupe, M.

    2006-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent in situ observations in stratiform clouds suggest that mixed phase regimes, here defined as limited cloud volumes containing both liquid and solid water, are constrained to narrow layers (order 100 m) separating all-liquid and fully glaciated volumes (Hallett and Viddaurre, 2005). The Department of Energy Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program's (DOE-ARM, Ackerman and Stokes, 2003) North Slope of Alaska (NSA) ARM Climate Research Facility (ACRF) recently started collecting routine measurement of radar Doppler velocity power spectra from the Millimeter Cloud Radar (MMCR). Shupe et al. (2004) showed that Doppler spectra has potential to separate the contributions to the total reflectivity of the liquid and solid water in the radar volume, and thus to investigate further Hallett and Viddaurre's findings. The Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment (MPACE) was conducted along the NSA to investigate the properties of Arctic mixed phase clouds (Verlinde et al., 2006). We present surface based remote sensing data from MPACE to discuss the fine-scale structure of the mixed-phase clouds observed during this experiment.

  19. ARM - Field Campaign - Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth (AOD) by Microtops Atmospheric Optical Depth (AOD) by Microtops ARM Data(MC3E)govCampaignsMixed-Phase

  20. Simulations of Arctic Mixed-Phase Clouds in Forecasts with CAM3 and AM2 for M-PACE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xie, Shaocheng; Boyle, James; Klein, Stephen A.; Liu, Xiaohong; Ghan, Steven J.

    2008-02-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Simulations of mixed-phase clouds in short-range forecasts with the National Center for Atmospheric Research Community Atmosphere Model version 3 (CAM3) and the Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory (GFDL) climate model (AM2) for the Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment (M-PACE) are performed under the DOE CCPP-ARM Parameterization Testbed (CAPT), which initializes the climate models with analysis data produced from numerical weather prediction (NWP) centers. It is shown that CAM3 significantly underestimates the observed boundary layer mixed-phase clouds and cannot realistically simulate the variations with temperature and cloud height of liquid water fraction in the total cloud condensate based an oversimplified cloud microphysical scheme. In contrast, AM2 reasonably reproduces the observed boundary layer clouds while its clouds contain much less cloud condensate than CAM3 and the observations. Both models underestimate the observed cloud top and base for the boundary layer clouds. The simulation of the boundary layer mixed-phase clouds and their microphysical properties is considerably improved in CAM3 when a new physically based cloud microphysical scheme is used. The new scheme also leads to an improved simulation of the surface and top of the atmosphere longwave radiative fluxes in CAM3. It is shown that the Bergeron-Findeisen process, i.e., the ice crystal growth by vapor deposition at the expense of coexisting liquid water, is important for the models to correctly simulate the characteristics of the observed microphysical properties in mixed-phase clouds. Sensitivity tests show that these results are not sensitive to the analysis data used for model initializations. Increasing model horizontal resolution helps capture the subgrid-scale features in Arctic frontal clouds but does not help improve the simulation of the single-layer boundary layer clouds. Ice crystal number density has large impact on the model simulated mixed-phase clouds and their microphysical properties and needs to be accurately represented in climate models.

  1. Ice Formation in Arctic Mixed-Phase Clouds: Insights from a 3-D Cloud-Resolving Model with Size-Resolved Aerosol and Cloud Microphysics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fan, Jiwen; Ovtchinnikov, Mikhail; Comstock, Jennifer M.; McFarlane, Sally A.; Khain, Alexander

    2009-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The single-layer mixed-phase clouds observed during the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program’s Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment (MPACE) are simulated with a 3-dimensional cloud-resolving model the System for Atmospheric Modeling (SAM) coupled with an explicit bin microphysics scheme and a radar-lidar simulator. Two possible ice enhancement mechanisms – activation of droplet evaporation residues by condensation-followed-by-freezing and droplet freezing by contact freezing inside-out, are scrutinized by extensive comparisons with aircraft and radar and lidar measurements. The locations of ice initiation associated with each mechanism and the role of ice nuclei (IN) in the evolution of mixed-phase clouds are mainly addressed. Simulations with either mechanism agree well with the in-situ and remote sensing measurements on ice microphysical properties but liquid water content is slightly underpredicted. These two mechanisms give very similar cloud microphysical, macrophysical, dynamical, and radiative properties, although the ice nucleation properties (rate, frequency and location) are completely different. Ice nucleation from activation of evaporation nuclei is most efficient near cloud top areas concentrated on the edges of updrafts, while ice initiation from the drop freezing process has no significant location preference (occurs anywhere that droplet evaporation is significant). Both enhanced nucleation mechanisms contribute dramatically to ice formation with ice particle concentration of 10-15 times higher relative to the simulation without either of them. The contribution of ice nuclei (IN) recycling from ice particle evaporation to IN and ice particle concentration is found to be very significant in this case. Cloud can be very sensitive to IN initially and form a nonquilibrium transition condition, but become much less sensitive as cloud evolves to a steady mixed-phase condition. The parameterization of Meyers et al. [1992] with the observed MPACE IN concentration is able to predict the observed mixed-phase clouds reasonably well. This validation may facilitate the application of this parameterization in the cloud and climate models to simulate Arctic clouds.

  2. Evaluation of Mixed-Phase Cloud Microphysics Parameterizations with the NCAR Single Column Climate Model (SCAM) and ARM Observations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, X; Ghan, SJ; Xie, S

    2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Mixed-phase stratus clouds are ubiquitous in the Arctic and play an important role in climate in this region. However, climate models have generally proven unsuccessful at simulating the partitioning of condensed water into liquid droplets and ice crystals in these Arctic clouds, which affect modeled cloud phase, cloud lifetime and radiative properties. An ice nucleation parameterization and a vapor deposition scheme were developed that together provide a physically-consistent treatment of mixed-phase clouds in global climate models. These schemes have been implemented in the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) Community Atmospheric Model Version 3 (CAM3). This report documents the performance of these schemes against ARM Mixed-phase Arctic Cloud Experiment (M-PACE) observations using the CAM single column model version (SCAM). SCAM with our new schemes has a more realistic simulation of the cloud phase structure and the partitioning of condensed water into liquid droplets against observations during the M-PACE than the standard CAM simulations.

  3. Using Surface Remote Sensors to Derive Radiative Characteristics of Mixed-Phase Clouds: An Example from M-PACE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    de Boer, Gijs; Collins, William D.; Menon, Surabi; Long, Charles N.

    2011-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Measurements from ground-based cloud radar, high spectral resolution lidar and microwave radiometer are used in conjunction with a column version of the Rapid Radiative Transfer Model (RRTMG) and radiosonde measurements to derive the surface radiative properties under mixed-phase cloud conditions. These clouds were observed during the United States Department of Energy (US DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Mixed-Phase Arctic Clouds Experiment (M-PACE) between September and November of 2004. In total, sixteen half hour time periods are reviewed due to their coincidence with radiosonde launches. Cloud liquid (ice) water paths are found to range between 11.0-366.4 (0.5-114.1) gm-2, and cloud physical thicknesses fall between 286-2075 m. Combined with temperature and hydrometeor size estimates, this information is used to calculate surface radiative flux densities using RRTMG, which are demonstrated to generally agree with measured flux densities from surface-based radiometric instrumentation. Errors in longwave flux density estimates are found to be largest for thin clouds, while shortwave flux density errors are generally largest for thicker clouds. A sensitivity study is performed to understand the impact of retrieval assumptions and uncertainties on derived surface radiation estimates. Cloud radiative forcing is calculated for all profiles, illustrating longwave dominance during this time of year, with net cloud forcing generally between 50 and 90 Wm-2.

  4. Intercomparison of model simulations of mixed-phase clouds observed during the ARM Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment. Part I: Single layer cloud

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Klein, Stephen A.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    radiation calculations performed with an ice-free ocean orradiation calculations performed with an ice-free ocean orradiation. STREAMER calculations with the observed cloud, either over an ocean

  5. Evaluation of a New Mixed-Phase Cloud Microphysics Parameterization with CAM3 Single-Column Model and M-PACE Observations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Xiaohong; Xie, Shaocheng; Ghan, Steven J.

    2007-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Most global climate models generally prescribe the partitioning of condensed water into liquid droplets and ice crystals in mixed-phase clouds according to a temperature-dependent function, which affects modeled cloud phase, cloud lifetime and radiative properties. This study evaluates a new mixed-phase cloud microphysics parameterization (for ice nucleation and water vapor deposition) against the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Mixed-phase Arctic Cloud Experiment (M-PACE) observations using the NCAR Community Atmospheric Model Version 3 (CAM3) single column model (SCAM). It is shown that SCAM with the new scheme produces a more realistic simulation of the cloud phase structure and the partitioning of condensed waterinto liquid droplets against observations during the M-PACE than the standard CAM. Sensitivity test indicates that ice number concentration could play an important role in the simulated mixed-phase cloud microphysics, and thereby needs to be realistically represented in global climate models.

  6. Arctic Mixed-Phase Cloud Properties Derived from Surface-Based Sensors at SHEBA MATTHEW D. SHUPE AND SERGEY Y. MATROSOV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shupe, Matthew

    , cloud-top liquid layer from which ice particles formed and fell, although deep, multilayered mixed-phase. These values are all larger than those found in single-phase ice clouds at SHEBA. Vertically resolved cloud phases can coexist is in question. A re- view of model parameterizations shows the lower tem- perature

  7. Evaluation of A New Mixed-Phase Cloud Microphysics Parameterization with the NCAR Climate Atmospheric Model (CAM3) and ARM Observations Fourth Quarter 2007 ARM Metric Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    X Liu; SJ Ghan; S Xie; J Boyle; SA Klein

    2007-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Mixed-phase clouds are composed of a mixture of cloud droplets and ice crystals. The cloud microphysics in mixed-phase clouds can significantly impact cloud optical depth, cloud radiative forcing, and cloud coverage. However, the treatment of mixed-phase clouds in most current climate models is crude and the partitioning of condensed water into liquid droplets and ice crystals is prescribed as temperature dependent functions. In our previous 2007 ARM metric reports a new mixed-phase cloud microphysics parameterization (for ice nucleation and water vapor deposition) was documented and implemented in the NCAR Community Atmospheric Model Version 3 (CAM3). The new scheme was tested against the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Mixed-phase Arctic Cloud Experiment (M-PACE) observations using the single column modeling and short-range weather forecast approaches. In this report this new parameterization is further tested with CAM3 in its climate simulations. It is shown that the predicted ice water content from CAM3 with the new parameterization is in better agreement with the ARM measurements at the Southern Great Plain (SGP) site for the mixed-phase clouds.

  8. Mixed-phase clouds, thin cirrus clouds, and OLR over the tropics: observations, retrievals, and radiative impacts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Joonsuk

    2009-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

    to the inference of effective particle sizes and optical thicknesses are performed. Errors are calculated with respect to the assumption of a cloud containing solely liquid or ice phase particles. The analyses suggest that the effective particle size inferred for a...

  9. Remote Sensing and In-Situ Observations of Arctic Mixed-Phase and Cirrus Clouds Acquired During Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment: Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Uninhabited Aerospace Vehicle Participation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McFarquhar, G.M.; Freer, M.; Um, J.; McCoy, R.; Bolton, W.

    2005-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The Atmospheric Radiation Monitor (ARM) uninhabited aerospace vehicle (UAV) program aims to develop measurement techniques and instruments suitable for a new class of high altitude, long endurance UAVs while supporting the climate community with valuable data sets. Using the Scaled Composites Proteus aircraft, ARM UAV participated in Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment (M-PACE), obtaining unique data to help understand the interaction of clouds with solar and infrared radiation. Many measurements obtained using the Proteus were coincident with in-situ observations made by the UND Citation. Data from M-PACE are needed to understand interactions between clouds, the atmosphere and ocean in the Arctic, critical interactions given large-scale models suggest enhanced warming compared to lower latitudes is occurring.

  10. Ice Concentration Retrieval in Stratiform Mixed-phase Clouds Using Cloud Radar Reflectivity Measurements and 1D Ice Growth Model Simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Damao; Wang, Zhien; Heymsfield, Andrew J.; Fan, Jiwen; Luo, Tao

    2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Measurement of ice number concentration in clouds is important but still challenging. Stratiform mixed-phase clouds (SMCs) provide a simple scenario for retrieving ice number concentration from remote sensing measurements. The simple ice generation and growth pattern in SMCs offers opportunities to use cloud radar reflectivity (Ze) measurements and other cloud properties to infer ice number concentration quantitatively. To understand the strong temperature dependency of ice habit and growth rate quantitatively, we develop a 1-D ice growth model to calculate the ice diffusional growth along its falling trajectory in SMCs. The radar reflectivity and fall velocity profiles of ice crystals calculated from the 1-D ice growth model are evaluated with the Atmospheric Radiation Measurements (ARM) Climate Research Facility (ACRF) ground-based high vertical resolution radar measurements. Combining Ze measurements and 1-D ice growth model simulations, we develop a method to retrieve the ice number concentrations in SMCs at given cloud top temperature (CTT) and liquid water path (LWP). The retrieved ice concentrations in SMCs are evaluated with in situ measurements and with a three-dimensional cloud-resolving model simulation with a bin microphysical scheme. These comparisons show that the retrieved ice number concentrations are within an uncertainty of a factor of 2, statistically.

  11. Parameterization of the Extinction Coefficient in Ice and Mixed-Phase Arctic Clouds during the ISDAC Field Campaign

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Korolev, A; Shashkov, A; Barker, H

    2012-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents the history of attempts to directly measure cloud extinction, the current measurement device known as the Cloud Extinction Probe (CEP), specific problems with direct measurement of extinction coefficient, and the attempts made here to address these problems. Extinction coefficient is one of the fundamental microphysical parameters characterizing bulk properties of clouds. Knowledge of extinction coefficient is of crucial importance for radiative transfer calculations in weather prediction and climate models given that Earth's radiation budget (ERB) is modulated much by clouds. In order for a large-scale model to properly account for ERB and perturbations to it, it must ultimately be able to simulate cloud extinction coefficient well. In turn this requires adequate and simultaneous simulation of profiles of cloud water content and particle habit and size. Similarly, remote inference of cloud properties requires assumptions to be made about cloud phase and associated single-scattering properties, of which extinction coefficient is crucial. Hence, extinction coefficient plays an important role in both application and validation of methods for remote inference of cloud properties from data obtained from both satellite and surface sensors (e.g., Barker et al. 2008). While estimation of extinction coefficient within large-scale models is relatively straightforward for pure water droplets, thanks to Mie theory, mixed-phase and ice clouds still present problems. This is because of the myriad forms and sizes that crystals can achieve, each having their own unique extinction properties. For the foreseeable future, large-scale models will have to be content with diagnostic parametrization of crystal size and type. However, before they are able to provide satisfactory values needed for calculation of radiative transfer, they require the intermediate step of assigning single-scattering properties to particles. The most basic of these is extinction coefficient, yet it is rarely measured directly, and therefore verification of parametrizations is difficult. The obvious solution is to be able to measure microphysical properties and extinction at the same time and for the same volume. This is best done by in situ sampling by instruments mounted on either balloon or aircraft. The latter is the usual route and the one employed here. Yet the problem of actually measuring extinction coefficient directly for arbitrarily complicated particles still remains unsolved.

  12. The dependence of ice microphysics on aerosol concentration in arctic mixed-phase stratus clouds during ISDAC and M-PACE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jackson, Robert C.; McFarquhar, Greg; Korolev, Alexei; Earle, Michael; Liu, Peter S.; Lawson, R. P.; Brooks, Sarah D.; Wolde, Mengistu; Laskin, Alexander; Freer, Matthew

    2012-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Cloud and aerosol data acquired by the National Research Council of Canada (NRC) Convair-580 aircraft in, above, and below single-layer arctic stratocumulus cloud during the Indirect and Semi-Direct Aerosol Campaign (ISDAC) in April 2008 were used to test three aerosol indirect effects hypothesized to act in mixed-phase clouds: the riming indirect effect, the glaciation indirect effect, and the cold second indirect effect. The data showed a correlation of R= 0.75 between liquid drop number concentration, Nliq, inside cloud and ambient aerosol number concentration NPCASP below cloud. This, combined with increasing liquid water content LWC with height above cloud base and the nearly constant profile of Nliq, suggested that liquid drops were nucleated from aerosol at cloud base. No strong evidence of a riming indirect effect was observed, but a strong correlation of R = 0.69 between ice crystal number concentration Ni and NPCASP above cloud was noted. Increases in ice nuclei (IN) concentration with NPCASP above cloud combined with the subadiabatic LWC profiles suggest possible mixing of IN from cloud top consistent with the glaciation indirect effect. The higher Nice and lower effective radius rel for the more polluted ISDAC cases compared to data collected in cleaner single-layer stratocumulus conditions during the Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment is consistent with the operation of the cold second indirect effect. However, more data in a wider variety of meteorological and surface conditions, with greater variations in aerosol forcing, are required to identify the dominant aerosol forcing mechanisms in mixed-phase arctic clouds.

  13. Intercomparison of model simulations of mixed-phase clouds observed during

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsingFunInfrared Land SurfaceVirus-InfectedIntelligentCO2the ARM Mixed-Phase Arctic

  14. Studying Mixed-Phased Clouds Using Ground-Based Active and Passive Remote Sensors

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security AdministrationcontrollerNanocrystalline Gallium Oxide ThinIon Cooling and EjectionStudying Mixed-Phased

  15. Minimalist Model of Ice Microphysics in Mixed-phase Stratiform Clouds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, F.; Ovchinnikov, Mikhail; Shaw, Raymond A.

    2013-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The question of whether persistent ice crystal precipitation from super cooled layer clouds can be explained by time-dependent, stochastic ice nucleation is explored using an approximate, analytical model, and a large-eddy simulation (LES) cloud model. The updraft velocity in the cloud defines an accumulation zone, where small ice particles cannot fall out until they are large enough, which will increase the residence time of ice particles in the cloud. Ice particles reach a quasi-steady state between growth by vapor deposition and fall speed at cloud base. The analytical model predicts that ice water content (wi) has a 2.5 power law relationship with ice number concentration ni. wi and ni from a LES cloud model with stochastic ice nucleation also confirm the 2.5 power law relationship. The prefactor of the power law is proportional to the ice nucleation rate, and therefore provides a quantitative link to observations of ice microphysical properties.

  16. Simulating mixed-phase Arctic stratus clouds: Sensitivity to ice initiation mechanisms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sednev, I.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    parameterization in BRM scheme accounts for two general mech- anisms distinguishable according to the involvement of liquid phase in the ice

  17. DOE/SC-ARM-P-07-006 Evaluation of Mixed-Phase Cloud Microphysics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed Newcatalyst phases onOrganizationElectronic Reading2Q)38232 Revision 1SC6

  18. arm mixed-phase arctic: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    surface energy budget. However, the treatment of mixed-phase clouds in most current climate models is crude because the detailed microphysical processes involved in mixed-phase...

  19. Intercomparison of the Cloud Water Phase among Global Climate Models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Komurcu, Muge; Storelvmo, Trude; Tan, Ivy; Lohmann, U.; Yun, Yuxing; Penner, Joyce E.; Wang, Yong; Liu, Xiaohong; Takemura, T.

    2014-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Mixed-phase clouds (clouds that consist of both cloud droplets and ice crystals) are frequently present in the Earth’s atmosphere and influence the Earth’s energy budget through their radiative properties, which are highly dependent on the cloud water phase. In this study, the phase partitioning of cloud water is compared among six global climate models (GCMs) and with Cloud and Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization retrievals. It is found that the GCMs predict vastly different distributions of cloud phase for a given temperature, and none of them are capable of reproducing the spatial distribution or magnitude of the observed phase partitioning. While some GCMs produced liquid water paths comparable to satellite observations, they all failed to preserve sufficient liquid water at mixed-phase cloud temperatures. Our results suggest that validating GCMs using only the vertically integrated water contents could lead to amplified differences in cloud radiative feedback. The sensitivity of the simulated cloud phase in GCMs to the choice of heterogeneous ice nucleation parameterization is also investigated. The response to a change in ice nucleation is quite different for each GCM, and the implementation of the same ice nucleation parameterization in all models does not reduce the spread in simulated phase among GCMs. The results suggest that processes subsequent to ice nucleation are at least as important in determining phase and should be the focus of future studies aimed at understanding and reducing differences among the models.

  20. Final Technical Report for "Ice nuclei relation to aerosol properties: Data analysis and model parameterization for IN in mixed-phase clouds"Ă?Âť (DOE/SC00002354)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paul J. DeMott, Anthony J. Prenni; Sonia M. Kreidenweis

    2012-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Clouds play an important role in weather and climate. In addition to their key role in the hydrologic cycle, clouds scatter incoming solar radiation and trap infrared radiation from the surface and lower atmosphere. Despite their importance, feedbacks involving clouds remain as one of the largest sources of uncertainty in climate models. To better simulate cloud processes requires better characterization of cloud microphysical processes, which can affect the spatial extent, optical depth and lifetime of clouds. To this end, we developed a new parameterization to be used in numerical models that describes the variation of ice nuclei (IN) number concentrations active to form ice crystals in mixed-phase (water droplets and ice crystals co-existing) cloud conditions as these depend on existing aerosol properties and temperature. The parameterization is based on data collected using the Colorado State University continuous flow diffusion chamber in aircraft and ground-based campaigns over a 14-year period, including data from the DOE-supported Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment. The resulting relationship is shown to more accurately represent the variability of ice nuclei distributions in the atmosphere compared to currently used parameterizations based on temperature alone. When implemented in one global climate model, the new parameterization predicted more realistic annually averaged cloud water and ice distributions, and cloud radiative properties, especially for sensitive higher latitude mixed-phase cloud regions. As a test of the new global IN scheme, it was compared to independent data collected during the 2008 DOE-sponsored Indirect and Semi-Direct Aerosol Campaign (ISDAC). Good agreement with this new data set suggests the broad applicability of the new scheme for describing general (non-chemically specific) aerosol influences on IN number concentrations feeding mixed-phase Arctic stratus clouds. Finally, the parameterization was implemented into a regional cloud-resolving model to compare predictions of ice crystal concentrations and other cloud properties to those observed in two intensive case studies of Arctic stratus during ISDAC. Our implementation included development of a prognostic scheme of ice activation using the IN parameterization so that the most realistic treatment of ice nuclei, including their budget (gains and losses), was achieved. Many cloud microphysical properties and cloud persistence were faithfully reproduced, despite a tendency to under-predict (by a few to several times) ice crystal number concentrations and cloud ice mass, in agreement with some other studies. This work serves generally as the basis for improving predictive schemes for cloud ice crystal activation in cloud and climate models, and more specifically as the basis for such a scheme to be used in a Multi-scale Modeling Format (MMF) that utilizes a connected system of cloud-resolving models on a global grid in an effort to better resolve cloud processes and their influence on climate.

  1. A High Resolution Hydrometer Phase Classifier Based on Analysis of Cloud Radar Doppler Spectra.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Luke,E.; Kollias, P.

    2007-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The lifecycle and radiative properties of clouds are highly sensitive to the phase of their hydrometeors (i.e., liquid or ice). Knowledge of cloud phase is essential for specifying the optical properties of clouds, or else, large errors can be introduced in the calculation of the cloud radiative fluxes. Current parameterizations of cloud water partition in liquid and ice based on temperature are characterized by large uncertainty (Curry et al., 1996; Hobbs and Rangno, 1998; Intriery et al., 2002). This is particularly important in high geographical latitudes and temperature ranges where both liquid droplets and ice crystal phases can exist (mixed-phase cloud). The mixture of phases has a large effect on cloud radiative properties, and the parameterization of mixed-phase clouds has a large impact on climate simulations (e.g., Gregory and Morris, 1996). Furthermore, the presence of both ice and liquid affects the macroscopic properties of clouds, including their propensity to precipitate. Despite their importance, mixed-phase clouds are severely understudied compared to the arguably simpler single-phase clouds. In-situ measurements in mixed-phase clouds are hindered due to aircraft icing, difficulties distinguishing hydrometeor phase, and discrepancies in methods for deriving physical quantities (Wendisch et al. 1996, Lawson et al. 2001). Satellite-based retrievals of cloud phase in high latitudes are often hindered by the highly reflecting ice-covered ground and persistent temperature inversions. From the ground, the retrieval of mixed-phase cloud properties has been the subject of extensive research over the past 20 years using polarization lidars (e.g., Sassen et al. 1990), dual radar wavelengths (e.g., Gosset and Sauvageot 1992; Sekelsky and McIntosh, 1996), and recently radar Doppler spectra (Shupe et al. 2004). Millimeter-wavelength radars have substantially improved our ability to observe non-precipitating clouds (Kollias et al., 2007) due to their excellent sensitivity that enables the detection of thin cloud layers and their ability to penetrate several non-precipitating cloud layers. However, in mixed-phase clouds conditions, the observed Doppler moments are dominated by the highly reflecting ice crystals and thus can not be used to identify the cloud phase. This limits our ability to identify the spatial distribution of cloud phase and our ability to identify the conditions under which mixed-phase clouds form.

  2. Scale dependence of entrainment-mixing mechanisms in cumulus clouds

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Lu, Chunsong [Nanjing Univ. of Information Science and Technology (China). Collaborative Innovation Center on Forecast and Evaluation of Meteorological Disasters; Chinese Acadamy of Sciences, Beijing (China); Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Biological, Environmental and Climate Science Dept.; Liu, Yangang [Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Biological, Environmental and Climate Science Dept.; Niu, Shengjie [Nanjing Univ. of Information Science and Technology (China). Collaborative Innovation Center on Forecast and Evaluation of Meteorological Disasters; Endo, Satoshi [Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Biological, Environmental and Climate Science Dept.

    2014-12-27T23:59:59.000Z

    This work empirically examines the dependence of entrainment-mixing mechanisms on the averaging scale in cumulus clouds using in situ aircraft observations during the Routine Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Aerial Facility Clouds with Low Optical Water Depths Optical Radiative Observations (RACORO) field campaign. A new measure of homogeneous mixing degree is defined that can encompass all types of mixing mechanisms. Analysis of the dependence of the homogenous mixing degree on the averaging scale shows that, on average, the homogenous mixing degree decreases with increasing averaging scales, suggesting that apparent mixing mechanisms gradually approach from homogeneous mixing to extreme inhomogeneous mixing with increasing scales. The scale dependence can be well quantified by an exponential function, providing first attempt at developing a scale-dependent parameterization for the entrainment-mixing mechanism. The influences of three factors on the scale dependence are further examined: droplet-free filament properties (size and fraction), microphysical properties (mean volume radius and liquid water content of cloud droplet size distributions adjacent to droplet-free filaments), and relative humidity of entrained dry air. It is found that the decreasing rate of homogeneous mixing degree with increasing averaging scales becomes larger with larger droplet-free filament size and fraction, larger mean volume radius and liquid water content, or higher relative humidity. The results underscore the necessity and possibility of considering averaging scale in representation of entrainment-mixing processes in atmospheric models.

  3. A THREE-DIMENSIONAL MODELING STUDY OF THE EFFECTS OF SOLID-PHASE HYDROMETEOR-CHEMICAL INTERACTIONS IN CUMULONIMBUS CLOUDS ON TROPOSPHERIC CHEMICAL DISTRIBUTIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stuart, Amy L.

    - and mixed-phase hydrometeors (cloud ice, snow, graupel, and hail) are often excluded or limited due of interactions of ice-phase cloud hydrometeors with volatile chemicals have found that they may significantly. 2. ICE- AND MIXED-PHASE CHEMISTRY 2.1 Gas-Solid Transfer Gas-phase chemical species can diffuse

  4. Charm -- a thermometer of the mixed phase

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benjamin Svetitsky; Asher Uziel

    1997-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

    A charmed quark experiences drag and diffusion in the quark-gluon plasma, as well as strong interaction with the plasma surface. Our simulations indicate that charmed quarks created in heavy ion collisions will be trapped in the mixed phase and will come to equilibrium in it. Their momentum distribution will thus reflect the temperature at the confinement phase transition.

  5. Cloud condensation nucleus activity of secondary organic aerosol particles mixed with sulfate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cloud condensation nucleus activity of secondary organic aerosol particles mixed with sulfate 2007; revised 30 July 2007; accepted 15 October 2007; published 21 December 2007. [1] The cloud-sulfate particles may be reliably omitted in the treatment of cloud droplet formation. Citation: King, S. M., T

  6. MIXING OF CLUMPY SUPERNOVA EJECTA INTO MOLECULAR CLOUDS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pan Liubin; Desch, Steven J.; Scannapieco, Evan; Timmes, F. X. [School of Earth and Space Exploration, Arizona State University, P.O. Box 871404, Tempe, AZ 85287-1404 (United States)

    2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Several lines of evidence, from isotopic analyses of meteorites to studies of the Sun's elemental and isotopic composition, indicate that the solar system was contaminated early in its evolution by ejecta from a nearby supernova. Previous models have invoked supernova material being injected into an extant protoplanetary disk, or isotropically expanding ejecta sweeping over a distant (>10 pc) cloud core, simultaneously enriching it and triggering its collapse. Here, we consider a new astrophysical setting: the injection of clumpy supernova ejecta, as observed in the Cassiopeia A supernova remnant, into the molecular gas at the periphery of an H II region created by the supernova's progenitor star. To track these interactions, we have conducted a suite of high-resolution (1500{sup 3} effective) three-dimensional numerical hydrodynamic simulations that follow the evolution of individual clumps as they move into molecular gas. Even at these high resolutions, our simulations do not quite achieve numerical convergence, due to the challenge of properly resolving the small-scale mixing of ejecta and molecular gas, although they do allow some robust conclusions to be drawn. Isotropically exploding ejecta do not penetrate into the molecular cloud or mix with it, but, if cooling is properly accounted for, clumpy ejecta penetrate to distances {approx}10{sup 18} cm and mix effectively with large regions of star-forming molecular gas. In fact, the {approx}2 M{sub Sun} of high-metallicity ejecta from a single core-collapse supernova is likely to mix with {approx}2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 4} M{sub Sun} of molecular gas material as it is collapsing. Thus, all stars forming late ( Almost-Equal-To 5 Myr) in the evolution of an H II region may be contaminated by supernova ejecta at the level {approx}10{sup -4}. This level of contamination is consistent with the abundances of short-lived radionuclides and possibly some stable isotopic shifts in the early solar system and is potentially consistent with the observed variability in stellar elemental abundances. Supernova contamination of forming planetary systems may be a common, universal process.

  7. Dry powder mixes comprising phase change materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Salyer, Ival O. (Dayton, OH)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A free flowing, conformable powder-like mix of silica particles and a phase change material (PCM) is provided. The silica particles have a critical size of about 0.005 to about 0.025 microns and the PCM must be added to the silica in an amount of 75% or less PCM per combined weight of silica and PCM. The powder-like mix can be used in tableware items, medical wraps, tree wraps, garments, quilts and blankets, and particularly in applications for heat protection for heat sensitive items, such as aircraft flight recorders, and for preventing brake fade in automobiles, buses, trucks and aircraft.

  8. Dry powder mixes comprising phase change materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Salyer, I.O.

    1995-12-26T23:59:59.000Z

    A free flowing, conformable powder-like mix of silica particles and a phase change material (PCM) is provided. The silica particles have a critical size of about 0.005 to about 0.025 microns and the PCM must be added to the silica in an amount of 75% or less PCM per combined weight of silica and PCM. The powder-like mix can be used in tableware items, medical wraps, tree wraps, garments, quilts and blankets, and particularly in applications for heat protection for heat sensitive items, such as aircraft flight recorders, and for preventing brake fade in automobiles, buses, trucks and aircraft. 3 figs.

  9. Dry powder mixes comprising phase change materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Salyer, I.O.

    1994-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

    A free flowing, conformable powder-like mix of silica particles and a phase change material (PCM) is provided. The silica particles have a critical size of about 0.005 to about 0.025 microns and the PCM must be added to the silica in an amount of 75% or less PCM per combined weight of silica and PCM. The powder-like mix can be used in tableware items, medical wraps, tree wraps, garments, quilts and blankets, and particularly in applications for heat protection for heat sensitive items, such as aircraft flight recorders, and for preventing brake fade in automobiles, buses, trucks and aircraft. 3 figures.

  10. Dry powder mixes comprising phase change materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Salyer, Ival O. (Dayton, OH)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A free flowing, conformable powder-like mix of silica particles and a phase change material (PCM) is provided. The silica particles have a critical size of about 0.005 to about 0.025 microns and the PCM must be added to the silica in an amount of 75% or less PCM per combined weight of silica and PCM. The powder-like mix can be used in tableware items, medical wraps, tree wraps, garments, quilts and blankets, and particularly in applications for heat protection for heat sensitive items, such as aircraft flight recorders, and for preventing brake fade in automobiles, buses, trucks and aircraft.

  11. Dry powder mixes comprising phase change materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Salyer, I.O.

    1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Free flowing, conformable powder-like mix of silica particles and a phase change material (PCM) is provided. The silica particles have a critical size of about 0.005 to about 0.025 microns and the PCM must be added to the silica in an amount of 75% or less PCM per combined weight of silica and PCM. The powder-like mix can be used in tableware items, medical wraps, tree wraps, garments, quilts and blankets, and in cementitious compositions of the type in which it is beneficial to use a PCM material. The silica-PCM mix can also be admixed with soil to provide a soil warming effect and placed about a tree, flower, or shrub. 2 figures.

  12. Dry powder mixes comprising phase change materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Salyer, I.O.

    1993-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Free flowing, conformable powder-like mix of silica particles and a phase change material (p.c.m.) is disclosed. The silica particles have a critical size of about 7[times]10[sup [minus]3] to about 7[times]10[sup [minus]2] microns and the p.c.m. must be added to the silica in an amount of 80 wt. % or less p.c.m. per combined weight of silica and p.c.m. The powder-like mix can be used in tableware items, medical wraps, tree wraps, garments, quilts and blankets, and in cementitious compositions of the type in which it is beneficial to use a p.c.m. material. The silica-p.c.m. mix can also be admixed with soil to provide a soil warming effect and placed about a tree, flower, or shrub.

  13. Dry powder mixes comprising phase change materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Salyer, I.O.

    1992-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

    A free flowing, conformable powder-like mix of silica particles and a phase change material (p.c.m.) is disclosed. The silica particles have a critical size of about 7 [times] 10[sup [minus]3] to about 7 [times] 10[sup [minus]2] microns and the pcm must be added to the silica in an amount of 80 wt. % or less pcm per combined weight of silica and pcm. The powder-like mix can be used in tableware items, medical wraps, tree wraps, garments, quilts and blankets, and in cementitious compositions of the type in which it is beneficial to use a pcm material. The silica-pcm mix can also be admixed with soil to provide a soil warming effect and placed about a tree, flower, or shrub. 9 figs.

  14. Dry powder mixes comprising phase change materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Salyer, Ival O. (Dayton, OH)

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Free flowing, conformable powder-like mix of silica particles and a phase change material (p.c.m.) is disclosed. The silica particles have a critical size of about 7.times.10.sup.-3 to about 7.times.10.sup.-2 microns and the pcm must be added to the silica in an amount of 80 wt. % or less pcm per combined weight of silica and pcm. The powder-like mix can be used in tableware items, medical wraps, tree wraps, garments, quilts and blankets, and in cementitious compositions of the type in which it is beneficial to use a pcm material. The silica-pcm mix can also be admixed with soil to provide a soil warming effect and placed about a tree, flower, or shrub.

  15. Dry powder mixes comprising phase change materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Salyer, Ival O. (Dayton, OH)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Free flowing, conformable powder-like mix of silica particles and a phase change material (PCM) is provided. The silica particles have a critical size of about 0.005 to about 0.025 microns and the PCM must be added to the silica in an amount of 75% or less PCM per combined weight of silica and PCM. The powder-like mix can be used in tableware items, medical wraps, tree wraps, garments, quilts and blankets, and in cementitious compositions of the type in which it is beneficial to use a PCM material. The silica-PCM mix can also be admixed with soil to provide a soil warming effect and placed about a tree, flower, or shrub.

  16. Dry powder mixes comprising phase change materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Salyer, Ival O. (Dayton, OH)

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Free flowing, conformable powder-like mix of silica particles and a phase change material (p.c.m.) is disclosed. The silica particles have a critical size of about 7.times.10.sup.-3 to about 7.times.10.sup.-2 microns and the pcm must be added to the silica in an amount of 80 wt. % or less pcm per combined weight of silica and pcm. The powder-like mix can be used in tableware items, medical wraps, tree wraps, garmets, quilts and blankets, and in cementitious compositions of the type in which it is beneficial to use a pcm material. The silica-pcm mix can also be admixed with soil to provide a soil warming effect and placed about a tree, flower, or shrub.

  17. Dry powder mixes comprising phase change materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Salyer, Ival O. (Dayton, OH)

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Free flowing, conformable powder-like mix of silica particles and a phase change material (p.c.m.) is disclosed. The silica particles have a critical size of about 7.times.10.sup.-3 to about 7.times.10.sup.-2 microns and the pcm must be added to the silica in an amount of 80 wt. % or less pcm per combined weight of silica and pcm. The powder-like mix can be used in tableware items, medical wraps, tree wraps, garments, quilts and blankets, and in cementitious compositions of the type in which it is beneficial to use a pcm material. The silica-pcm mix can also be admixed with soil to provide a soil warming effect and placed about a tree, flower, or shrub.

  18. Electrically Controllable Spontaneous Magnetism in Nanoscale Mixed Phase Multiferroics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    He, Q.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Controllable Spontaneous Magnetism in Nanoscale Mixed Phase2001). Chakhalian, J. et al. Magnetism at the interfacelocal nature of this magnetism. We find that the spontaneous

  19. The Mixed Phase of Charged AdS Black holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Piyabut Burikham; Chatchai Promsiri

    2014-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the mixed phase of charged AdS black hole and radiation when the total energy is fixed below the threshold to produce a stable charged black hole branch. The phase diagram of the mixed phase is demonstrated for both fixed potential and charge ensemble. In the dual gauge picture, they correspond to the mixed phase of quark-gluon plasma~(QGP) and hadron gas in the fixed chemical potential and density ensemble respectively. In the nuclei and heavy ion collisions at intermediate energies, the mixed phase of exotic QGP and hadron gas could be produced. The mixed phase will condensate and evaporate into the hadron gas as the fireball expands.

  20. The Mixed Phase of Charged AdS Black holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Piyabut Burikham; Chatchai Promsiri

    2015-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the mixed phase of charged AdS black hole and radiation when the total energy is fixed below the threshold to produce a stable charged black hole branch. The coexistence conditions for the charged AdS black hole and radiation are derived for the generic case when radiation particles carry charge. The phase diagram of the mixed phase is demonstrated for both fixed potential and charge ensemble. In the dual gauge picture, they correspond to the mixed phase of quark-gluon plasma~(QGP) and hadron gas in the fixed chemical potential and density ensemble respectively. In the nuclei and heavy ion collisions at intermediate energies, the mixed phase of exotic QGP and hadron gas could be produced. The mixed phase will condensate and evaporate into the hadron gas as the fireball expands.

  1. An annual cycle of Arctic cloud characteristics observed by radar and lidar at SHEBA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shupe, Matthew

    distribution of cloud boundary heights, and occurrence of liquid phase in clouds are determined from radar-observed clouds containing liquid was 73% for the year. The least amount of liquid water phase was observed during-detected clouds. Liquid was distributed in a combination of all-liquid and mixed phase clouds, and was detected

  2. Geometric phases for non-degenerate and degenerate mixed states

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    K. Singh; D. M. Tong; K. Basu; J. L. Chen; J. F. Du

    2003-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper focuses on the geometric phase of general mixed states under unitary evolution. Here we analyze both non-degenerate as well as degenerate states. Starting with the non-degenerate case, we show that the usual procedure of subtracting the dynamical phase from the total phase to yield the geometric phase for pure states, does not hold for mixed states. To this end, we furnish an expression for the geometric phase that is gauge invariant. The parallelity conditions are shown to be easily derivable from this expression. We also extend our formalism to states that exhibit degeneracies. Here with the holonomy taking on a non-abelian character, we provide an expression for the geometric phase that is manifestly gauge invariant. As in the case of the non-degenerate case, the form also displays the parallelity conditions clearly. Finally, we furnish explicit examples of the geometric phases for both the non-degenerate as well as degenerate mixed states.

  3. Non-stoichiometric mixed-phase titania photocatalyst

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chen, Le (Lakewood, CO); Gray, Kimberly A. (Evanston, IL); Graham, Michael E. (Evanston, IL)

    2012-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

    A mixed anatase-rutile phase, non-stoichiometric titania photocatalyst material is a highly reactive and is a UV and visible light responsive photocastalyst in the as-deposited condition (i.e. without the need for a subsequent thermal treatment). The mixed phase, non-stoichiometric titania thin film material is non-stoichiometric in terms of its oxygen content such that the thin film material shows a marked red-shift in photoresponse.

  4. Evaluation of Cloud-Phase Retrieval Methods for SEVIRI on Meteosat-8 Using Ground-Based Lidar and Cloud Radar Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stoffelen, Ad

    Evaluation of Cloud-Phase Retrieval Methods for SEVIRI on Meteosat-8 Using Ground-Based Lidar and Cloud Radar Data ERWIN L. A. WOLTERS, ROBERT A. ROEBELING, AND ARNOUT J. FEIJT Royal Netherlands 2007) ABSTRACT Three cloud-phase determination algorithms from passive satellite imagers are explored

  5. Modeling clouds observed at SHEBA using a bulk microphysics parameterization implemented into a single-column model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shupe, Matthew

    cloud fraction, that is, underpredicting the frequency of liquid- or mixed-phase clouds. The mean ice associated with leads, ``clear-sky'' ice crystal precipitation, and persis- tent mixed-phase clouds. BiasesModeling clouds observed at SHEBA using a bulk microphysics parameterization implemented

  6. Mixed-Phase Cloud Retrievals Using Doppler Radar Spectra

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: VegetationEquipment SurfacesResource Program PreliminaryA3,0Statements

  7. Towards a Characterization of Arctic Mixed-Phase Clouds

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched Ferromagnetism in Layered NbS2Topo II: An EnzymePersonal Computerso wSolution

  8. Simulating Arctic mixed-phase clouds: Sensitivity to environmental

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administrationcontroller systemsBi (2)Sharing Smart GridShiftMethod for

  9. arctic cloud experiment: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    low-level Arctic clouds in cold seasons and have a significant impact on the surface energy budget. However, the treatment of mixed-phase clouds in most current climate models...

  10. A New Double-Moment Microphysics Parameterization for Application in Cloud and Climate Models. Part II: Single-Column Modeling of Arctic Clouds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shupe, Matthew

    of the arctic bound- ary layer, the presence of leads (cracks) in the sea ice surface, the persistence of mixed-phaseA New Double-Moment Microphysics Parameterization for Application in Cloud and Climate Models. Part- dicted cloud boundaries and total cloud fraction compare reasonably well with observations. Cloud phase

  11. Nanopatterns by phase separation of patterned mixed polymer monolayers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Huber, Dale L; Frischknecht, Amalie

    2014-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Micron-size and sub-micron-size patterns on a substrate can direct the self-assembly of surface-bonded mixed polymer brushes to create nanoscale patterns in the phase-separated mixed polymer brush. The larger scale features, or patterns, can be defined by a variety of lithographic techniques, as well as other physical and chemical processes including but not limited to etching, grinding, and polishing. The polymer brushes preferably comprise vinyl polymers, such as polystyrene and poly(methyl methacrylate).

  12. Using Radar, Lidar, and Radiometer measurements to Classify Cloud Type and Study Middle-Level Cloud Properties

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Zhien

    2010-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The project is mainly focused on the characterization of cloud macrophysical and microphysical properties, especially for mixed-phased clouds and middle level ice clouds by combining radar, lidar, and radiometer measurements available from the ACRF sites. First, an advanced mixed-phase cloud retrieval algorithm will be developed to cover all mixed-phase clouds observed at the ACRF NSA site. The algorithm will be applied to the ACRF NSA observations to generate a long-term arctic mixed-phase cloud product for model validations and arctic mixed-phase cloud processes studies. To improve the representation of arctic mixed-phase clouds in GCMs, an advanced understanding of mixed-phase cloud processes is needed. By combining retrieved mixed-phase cloud microphysical properties with in situ data and large-scale meteorological data, the project aim to better understand the generations of ice crystals in supercooled water clouds, the maintenance mechanisms of the arctic mixed-phase clouds, and their connections with large-scale dynamics. The project will try to develop a new retrieval algorithm to study more complex mixed-phase clouds observed at the ACRF SGP site. Compared with optically thin ice clouds, optically thick middle level ice clouds are less studied because of limited available tools. The project will develop a new two wavelength radar technique for optically thick ice cloud study at SGP site by combining the MMCR with the W-band radar measurements. With this new algorithm, the SGP site will have a better capability to study all ice clouds. Another area of the proposal is to generate long-term cloud type classification product for the multiple ACRF sites. The cloud type classification product will not only facilitates the generation of the integrated cloud product by applying different retrieval algorithms to different types of clouds operationally, but will also support other research to better understand cloud properties and to validate model simulations. The ultimate goal is to improve our cloud classification algorithm into a VAP.

  13. Comparison of POLDER Cloud Phase Retrievals to Active Remote Sensors Measurements at the ARM SGP Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Riedi, J.; Goloub, P.; Marchand, Roger T.

    2001-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In our present study, cloud boundaries derived from a combination of active remote sensors at the ARM SGP site are compared to POLDER cloud top phase index which is derived from polarimetric measurements using an innovative method. This approach shows the viability of the POLDER phase retrieval algorithm, and also leads to interesting results. In particular, the analysis demonstrates the sensitivity of polarization measurements to ice crystal shape and indicates that occurrence of polycrystalline ice clouds has to be taken into account in order to improve the POLDER phase retrieval algorithm accuracy. Secondly, the results show that a temperature threshold of 240 K could serve for cloud top particle phase classification. Considering the limitations of the analysis, the temperature threshold could be biased high, but not by more than about 5 degrees.

  14. Atomic oxygen flux determined by mixed-phase Ag/Ag2O deposition...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    oxygen flux determined by mixed-phase AgAg2O deposition. Atomic oxygen flux determined by mixed-phase AgAg2O deposition. Abstract: The flux of atomic oxygen generated in a...

  15. A Simplified Model of the Walker Circulation with an Interactive Ocean Mixed Layer and Cloud-Radiative Feedbacks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bretherton, Chris

    A Simplified Model of the Walker Circulation with an Interactive Ocean Mixed Layer and Cloud-Radiative, to leading order, these are set by the horizontally varying ocean heat transport and clear-sky radiative on the radiation budget, are strongly coupled to the large-scale circulation of both the atmosphere and ocean

  16. Phase Mixing in Unperturbed and Perturbed Hamiltonian Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Henry E. Kandrup; Steven J. Novotny

    2002-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper summarises a numerical investigation of phase mixing in time-independent Hamiltonian systems that admit a coexistence of regular and chaotic phase space regions, allowing also for low amplitude perturbations idealised as periodic driving, friction, and/or white and colored noise. The evolution of initially localised ensembles of orbits was probed through lower order moments and coarse-grained distribution functions. In the absence of time-dependent perturbations, regular ensembles disperse initially as a power law in time and only exhibit a coarse-grained approach towards an invariant equilibrium over comparatively long times. Chaotic ensembles generally diverge exponentially fast on a time scale related to a typical finite time Lyapunov exponent, but can exhibit complex behaviour if they are impacted by the effects of cantori or the Arnold web. Viewed over somewhat longer times, chaotic ensembles typical converge exponentially towards an invariant or near-invariant equilibrium. This, however, need not correspond to a true equilibrium, which may only be approached over very long time scales. Time-dependent perturbations can dramatically increase the efficiency of phase mixing, both by accelerating the approach towards a near-equilibrium and by facilitating diffusion through cantori or along the Arnold web so as to accelerate the approach towards a true equilibrium. The efficacy of such perturbations typically scales logarithmically in amplitude, but is comparatively insensitive to most other details, a conclusion which reinforces the interpretation that the perturbations act via a resonant coupling.

  17. Boundary Circles of Mixed Phase Space, Hamiltonian Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Or Alus; Shmuel Fishman; James D. Meiss

    2014-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The phase space of an area-preserving map typically contains infinitely many elliptic islands embedded in a chaotic sea. Orbits near the boundary of a chaotic region have been observed to stick for long times, strongly influencing their transport properties. The boundary is composed of invariant circles, called "Boundary circles." We investigate the distribution of rotation numbers of boundary circles for the Henon quadratic map and show that the probability of occurrence of small elements of their continued fraction expansions is larger than would be expected for a number chosen at random. However, large elements occur with probabilities distributed proportionally to the random case. These results have implications for models of transport in mixed phase space.

  18. Retrieval of Cloud Phase and Ice Crystal Habit from Satellite Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McFarlane, Sally A.; Marchand, Roger T.; Ackerman, Thomas P.

    2004-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Knowledge of cloud phase (liquid or ice) and crystal habit are of fundamental importance to both remote sensing and climate simulations. Using water droplets instead of ice crystals in retrieving cloud properties from satellite data can lead to errors in the retrieval of cloud height, optical thickness, and microphysical properties. Satellite retrievals of microphysical properties are also influenced by the crystal habit used in the retrieval, either indirectly via an assumed phase function or directly via assumed profiles of ice crystal habits. Realistic treatment of ice cloud radiative and microphysical properties, which depend on crystal habit, is important in climate simulations, especially in tropical anvil regions. In this work, we present a method for retrieving cloud phase and the dominant ice crystal habit from radiances measured by the Multi-angle Imaging Spectro-Radiometer (MISR) and the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS). The shape of an atmospheric particle affects the scattering of light such that water droplets and ice crystals of various habits have somewhat different phase functions. Consequently the radiances measured by the MISR instrument, which observes light scattered from the same cloud at nine different viewing angles, are functions of the crystal shape. In principle, the measured angular radiance pattern can be used to infer the crystal shape. In this work, we present initial results from a cloud phase and ice crystal habit retrieval based on combining the MISR multi-angular visible wavelength measurements with MODIS shortwave infrared measurements. The nine angular measurements provided by the MISR cameras allow a wide range of scattering angles to be viewed in a single scene, which provides sensitivity to particle habit. The presence of the MODIS instrument on the same satellite allows additional information on particle size to be incorporated into the retrievals. Results of the retrieval method are presented for several case studies over the continental United States. Cloud phase can be determined from the MISR angular measurements alone, due to the large differences in the phase functions of water droplets and ice crystals. By combining the MISR and MODIS measurements, crystal habit, effective radius, and optical depth can be inferred simultaneously for ice clouds. Comparisons with ground-based retrieval methods and semi-coincident in situ data illustrate that the retrieved crystal habits and sizes are reasonable.

  19. Modulation of mixed-phase titania photoluminescence by oxygen adsorption

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pallotti, D.; Orabona, E.; Amoruso, S.; Maddalena, P. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universitá degli Studi di Napoli “Federico II,” Via Cintia, I-80126 Napoli (Italy); Institute for Superconductors, Oxides and Innovative Materials and Devices, CNR-SPIN, U.O.S. Napoli, Via Cintia, I-80126 Napoli (Italy); Lettieri, S., E-mail: stefano.lettieri@spin.cnr.it [Institute for Superconductors, Oxides and Innovative Materials and Devices, CNR-SPIN, U.O.S. Napoli, Via Cintia, I-80126 Napoli (Italy)

    2014-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the effect of oxygen (O{sub 2}) adsorption on photoluminescence properties of mixed-phase titania nanoparticle films deposited by femtosecond pulsed laser deposition, aiming to assess preliminary conclusions about the feasibility of opto-chemical sensing based on titania. We evidence that O{sub 2} produces opposite responses in rutile and anatase photoluminescence efficiency, highlighting interesting potentialities for future double-parametric optical sensing based on titania. The results evidence an important role of lattice oxygen atoms, suggesting that the standard Schottky barrier mechanism driving the response toward gas species in most used metal-oxide sensors (e.g., tin dioxide) is not the only active mechanism in titania.

  20. Global simulations of ice nucleation and ice supersaturation with an improved cloud scheme in the Community

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gettelman, Andrew

    and supersaturation in CAM. The new model is able to reproduce field observations of ice mass and mixed phase cloud are sensitive to the parameterization of ice clouds. These results indicate that ice clouds are potentiallyGlobal simulations of ice nucleation and ice supersaturation with an improved cloud scheme

  1. DRAFT, last update 5 January 2012 Aerosol cloud-mediated radiative forcing: highly uncertain and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wood, Robert

    phase and ice processes. Respectively, the parameterization of these processes for GCMs is further away and aerosol parameterizations, but intense research efforts aimed at improving the realism of cloud lower than for the shallow clouds, as the deep clouds are much more complicated, because mixed phase

  2. INFLUENCE OF ARCTIC CLOUD THERMODYNAMIC PHASE ON SURFACE SHORTWAVE FLUX

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -phase" category, can affect the surface energy balance at the same order of magnitude as greenhouse gas increases. The publisher by accepting the manuscript for publication acknowledges that the United States Government retains of this manuscript, or allow others to do so, for United States Government purposes. BNL-90978-2010-CP #12;

  3. Phase-mixing of electrostatic modes in a cold magnetized electron-positron plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maity, Chandan; Chakrabarti, Nikhil [Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, 1/AF Bidhannagar, Kolkata 700 064 (India)] [Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, 1/AF Bidhannagar, Kolkata 700 064 (India); Sengupta, Sudip [Institute for Plasma Research, Bhat, Gandhinagar 382 428 (India)] [Institute for Plasma Research, Bhat, Gandhinagar 382 428 (India)

    2013-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In a fluid description, we study space-time evolution of electrostatic oscillations in a cold magnetized electron-positron plasma. Nonlinear results up to third order, obtained by employing a simple perturbation technique, indicate phase-mixing and thus breaking of excited oscillations, and provide an expression for the phase-mixing time. It is shown that an increase in the strength of ambient magnetic field results in an increase in the phase-mixing time. The results of our investigation will be of relevance to astrophysical environments as well as laboratory experiments.

  4. Cloud-Scale Vertical Velocity and Turbulent Dissipation Rate Retrievals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shupe, Matthew

    2013-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Time-height fields of retrieved in-cloud vertical wind velocity and turbulent dissipation rate, both retrieved primarily from vertically-pointing, Ka-band cloud radar measurements. Files are available for manually-selected, stratiform, mixed-phase cloud cases observed at the North Slope of Alaska (NSA) site during periods covering the Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment (MPACE, late September through early November 2004) and the Indirect and Semi-Direct Aerosol Campaign (ISDAC, April-early May 2008). These time periods will be expanded in a future submission.

  5. Cloud-Scale Vertical Velocity and Turbulent Dissipation Rate Retrievals

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Shupe, Matthew

    Time-height fields of retrieved in-cloud vertical wind velocity and turbulent dissipation rate, both retrieved primarily from vertically-pointing, Ka-band cloud radar measurements. Files are available for manually-selected, stratiform, mixed-phase cloud cases observed at the North Slope of Alaska (NSA) site during periods covering the Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment (MPACE, late September through early November 2004) and the Indirect and Semi-Direct Aerosol Campaign (ISDAC, April-early May 2008). These time periods will be expanded in a future submission.

  6. Photon echoes and related four-wave-mixing spectroscopies using phase-locked pulses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scherer, Norbert F.

    . Combining two phase-locked pulse excitation with time-resolved detection of the spontaneous light emissionPhoton echoes and related four-wave-mixing spectroscopies using phase-locked pulses Minhaeng ChoRochester, Rochester, New York 14627 (Received 3 December 1991; accepted 6 January 1992) The use of phase-locked pulses

  7. Investigation of Microphysical Parameterizations of Snow and Ice in Arctic Clouds during M-PACE through ModelObservation Comparisons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Solomon, Amy

    Investigation of Microphysical Parameterizations of Snow and Ice in Arctic Clouds during M the microphysical properties of Arctic mixed-phase stratocumulus. Intensive measurements taken during the Department of Energy Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment (M

  8. Testing cloud microphysics parameterizations in NCAR CAM5 with ISDAC and M-PACE observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Testing cloud microphysics parameterizations in NCAR CAM5 with ISDAC and M-PACE observations October 2011; accepted 26 October 2011; published 24 December 2011. [1] Arctic clouds simulated-Direct Aerosol Campaign (ISDAC) and Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment (M-PACE), which were conducted at its

  9. P2.11 AN ANNUAL CYCLE OF ARCTIC CLOUD MICROPHYSICS Matthew D. Shupe*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shupe, Matthew

    to classify cloud scenes as all- ice, all-liquid, mixed-phase, or precipitating so that the appropriate ice/snow-covered surfaces. Several studies have demonstrated the importance of specific cloud microphysical properties on cloud-radiation and ice-albedo feedback mechanisms; these in turn have bearing

  10. Registered and antiregistered phase separation of mixed amphiphilic bilayers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    John J. Williamson; Peter D. Olmsted

    2014-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

    We derive a mean-field free energy for phase separation in coupled bilayer leaflets. Our model accounts for amphiphile-level structure, in particular hydrophobic mismatch, which promotes $\\textit{antiregistration}$ (AR), in competition with the `direct' trans-midplane coupling usually studied, promoting registration (R). For phospholipid parameters equilibrium demixing is typically R, but hydrophobic mismatch favours metastable AR phases, which can cause a bilayer in the `spinodal region' to require nucleation in order to equilibrate. This provides a framework for understanding existing observations, elucidating a subtle, often overlooked competition of couplings, and a key role for phase transition kinetics in determining domain registration/antiregistration.

  11. Phase-mixing of Langmuir oscillations in cold electron-positron-ion plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maity, Chandan [Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, 1/AF Bidhannagar, Kolkata 700 064 (India)

    2014-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Space-time evolution of Langmuir oscillations in a cold homogeneous electron-positron-ion plasma has been analyzed by employing a straightforward perturbation expansion method, showing phase-mixing and, thus, wave-breaking of excited oscillations at arbitrary amplitudes. Within an assumption of infinitely massive ions, an approximate phase-mixing time is found to scale as ?{sub pe}t{sub mix}?[(6/?{sup 2})((2??){sup 5/2}/(1??))]{sup 1/3}, where “?” and “?” (= n{sub 0i}/n{sub 0e}) are the amplitude of perturbation and the ratio of equilibrium ion density to equilibrium electron density, respectively, and ?{sub pe}??(4?n{sub 0e}e{sup 2}/m) is the electron plasma frequency. The results presented on phase-mixing of Langmuir modes in multispecies plasmas are expected to be relevant to laboratory and astrophysical environments.

  12. Process-model Simulations of Cloud Albedo Enhancement by Aerosols in the Arctic

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kravitz, Benjamin S.; Wang, Hailong; Rasch, Philip J.; Morrison, H.; Solomon, Amy

    2014-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

    A cloud-resolving model is used to simulate the effectiveness of Arctic marine cloud brightening via injection of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN). An updated cloud microphysical scheme is employed, with prognostic CCN and cloud particle numbers in both liquid and mixed-phase marine low clouds. Injection of CCN into the marine boundary layer can delay the collapse of the boundary layer and increase low-cloud albedo. Because nearly all of the albedo effects are in the liquid phase due to the removal of ice water by snowfall when ice processes are involved, albedo increases are stronger for pure liquid clouds than mixed-phase clouds. Liquid precipitation can be suppressed by CCN injection, whereas ice precipitation (snow) is affected less; thus the effectiveness of brightening mixed-phase clouds is lower than for liquid-only clouds. CCN injection into a clean regime results in a greater albedo increase than injection into a polluted regime, consistent with current knowledge about aerosol-cloud interactions. Unlike previous studies investigating warm clouds, dynamical changes in circulation due to precipitation changes are small.

  13. Registered and antiregistered phase separation of mixed amphiphilic bilayers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    John J. Williamson; Peter D. Olmsted

    2015-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

    We derive a mean-field free energy for the phase behaviour of coupled bilayer leaflets, which is implicated in cellular processes and important to the design of artificial membranes. Our model accounts for amphiphile-level structural features, particularly hydrophobic mismatch, which promotes antiregistration (AR), in competition with the `direct' trans-midplane coupling usually studied, promoting registration (R). We show that the phase diagram of coupled leaflets allows multiple \\textit{metastable} coexistences, then illustrate the kinetic implications with a detailed study of a bilayer of equimolar overall composition. For approximate parameters estimated to apply to phospholipids, equilibrium coexistence is typically registered, but metastable antiregistered phases can be kinetically favoured by hydrophobic mismatch. Thus a bilayer in the spinodal region can require nucleation to equilibrate, in a novel manifestation of Ostwald's `rule of stages'. Our results provide a framework for understanding disparate existing observations, elucidating a subtle competition of couplings, and a key role for phase transition kinetics in bilayer phase behaviour.

  14. Mixed quark-nucleon phase in neutron stars and nuclear symmetry energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Kutschera; J. Niemiec

    2000-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The influence of the nuclear symmetry energy on the formation of a mixed quark-nucleon phase in neutron star cores is studied. We use simple parametrizations of the nuclear matter equation of state, and the bag model for the quark phase. The behavior of nucleon matter isobars, which is responsible for the existence of the mixed phase, is investigated. The role of the nuclear symmetry energy changes with the value of the bag constant B. For lower values of B the properties of the mixed phase do not depend strongly on the symmetry energy. For larger B we find that a critical pressure for the first quark droplets to form is strongly dependent on the nuclear symmetry energy, but the pressure at which last nucleons disappear is independent of it.

  15. Unraveling the origins of electromechanical response in mixed-phase Bismuth Ferrite

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vasudevan, Rama K [ORNL; Okatan, M. B. [University of New South Wales; Liu, Y. Y. [University of Washington, Seattle; Jesse, Stephen [ORNL; Yang, J.-C. [University of California, Berkeley; Liang, W. -I. [National Chiao Tung University, Hsinchu, Taiwan; Chu, Ying-Hao [National Chiao Tung University, Hsinchu, Taiwan; Li, J. Y. [University of Washington, Seattle; Kalinin, Sergei V [ORNL; Valanoor, Nagarajan V [ORNL

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The origin of giant electromechanical response in a mixed-phase rhombohedral-tetragonal BiFeO3 thin film is probed using sub-coercive scanning probe microscopy based multiple-harmonic measurements. Significant contributions to the strain arise from a second-order harmonic response localized at the phase boundaries. Strain and dissipation data, backed by thermodynamic calculations suggest that the source of the enhanced electromechanical response is the motion of phase boundaries. These findings elucidate the key role of labile phase boundaries, both natural and artificial, in achieving thin films with giant electromechanical properties.

  16. A Coordinated Effort to Improve Parameterization of High-Latitude Cloud and Radiation Processes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. O. Pinto, A.H. Lynch

    2005-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of this project is the development and evaluation of improved parameterization of arctic cloud and radiation processes and implementation of the parameterizations into a climate model. Our research focuses specifically on the following issues: (1) continued development and evaluation of cloud microphysical parameterizations, focusing on issues of particular relevance for mixed phase clouds; and (2) evaluation of the mesoscale simulation of arctic cloud system life cycles.

  17. Neutrino mixing and CP violation phases in Zee-Babu model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Van Vien, Vo; Thu, Pham Ngoc

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We show that the neutrino mass matrix of the Zee-Babu model is able to fit the most recent data on neutrino masses and mixing with large $\\theta_{13}$ and provides %the values of the Dirac and Majorana CP violation phases. For the normal hierarchy, the Majorana phases ($\\al_{2 1}, \\al_{3 1}$) are equal to zero, while for the inverted pattern, one phase ($\\al_{3 1}$) takes the value $2 \\pi$. The Dirac phase ($\\de$) is predicted to either $0$ or $\\pi$. The effective mass governing neutrinoless double beta decay and the sum of neutrino masses are consistent with the recent analysis. The model gives some regions of the parameters of neutrino mixing angles in both normal and inverted neutrino mass hierarchy.

  18. Volume I of the roadmap marks the completion of the first phase of the NIST Cloud Computing program and initiative to collaboratively build a USG Cloud Computing Technology Roadmap. This milestone is

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Next Steps Volume I of the roadmap marks the completion of the first phase of the NIST Cloud Computing program and initiative to collaboratively build a USG Cloud Computing Technology Roadmap, and with the program time line presented in November 2010. As described previously, this roadmap document

  19. Mixed Waste Focus Area integrated technical baseline report, Phase 1: Volume 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The Department of Energy (DOE) established the Mixed Waste Characterization, Treatment, and Disposal Focus Area (MWFA) to develop and facilitate implementation of technologies required to meet the Department`s commitments for treatment of mixed low-level and transuranic wastes. The mission of the MWFA is to provide acceptable treatment systems, developed in partnership with users and with participation of stakeholders, tribal governments, and regulators, that are capable of treating DOE`s mixed waste. These treatment systems include all necessary steps such as characterization, pretreatment, and disposal. To accomplish this mission, a technical baseline is being established that forms the basis for determining which technology development activities will be supported by the MWFA. The technical baseline is the prioritized list of deficiencies, and the resulting technology development activities needed to overcome these deficiencies. This document presents Phase I of the technical baseline development process, which resulted in the prioritized list of deficiencies that the MWFA will address. A summary of the data and the assumptions upon which this work was based is included, as well as information concerning the DOE Office of Environmental Management (EM) mixed waste technology development needs. The next phase in the technical baseline development process, Phase II, will result in the identification of technology development activities that will be conducted through the MWFA to resolve the identified deficiencies.

  20. Cloud Services Cloud Services

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cloud Services Cloud Services In 2012 UCD IT Services launched an exciting new set of cloud solutions called CloudEdu, which includes cloud servers, cloud storage, cloud hosting and cloud network. The CloudEdu package includes a consultancy service in design, deployment, management and utilisation

  1. Application of Stochastic Radiative Transfer Theory to the ARM Cloud-Radiative Parameterization Problem

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dana E. Veron

    2012-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

    This project had two primary goals: (1) development of stochastic radiative transfer as a parameterization that could be employed in an AGCM environment, and (2) exploration of the stochastic approach as a means for representing shortwave radiative transfer through mixed-phase layer clouds. To achieve these goals, climatology of cloud properties was developed at the ARM CART sites, an analysis of the performance of the stochastic approach was performed, a simple stochastic cloud-radiation parameterization for an AGCM was developed and tested, a statistical description of Arctic mixed phase clouds was developed and the appropriateness of stochastic approach for representing radiative transfer through mixed-phase clouds was assessed. Significant progress has been made in all of these areas and is detailed in the final report.

  2. In situ Study of the Formation of Silicide Phases in Amorphous Ni-Si Mixed Layers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Van Bockstael, C.; Detavernier, C; Van Meirhaeghe, R; Jordan-Sweet, J; Lavoie, C

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, we investigated Ni silicide phase formation when Si is added within an as deposited 50 nm Ni film. A series of 22 samples with a Si content varying from 0 to 50 at.% was prepared and systematically investigated with in situ x-ray diffraction. The inert oxide substrate was used to identify the phases which first crystallize in an amorphous Ni-Si mixture of a given concentration. The noncongruent silicides Ni{sub 3}Si and Ni{sub 3}Si{sub 2} are never observed to crystallize readily out of the mixture. A remarkable observation is the initial crystallization at low temperature of a hexagonal Ni-silicide, observed over a broad mixed layer composition [35-49%Si]; this hexagonal phase nucleates readily as a single phase [39-47%Si] or together with Ni{sub 2}Si [35-38%Si] or NiSi [49%Si]. This low-temperature phase is related to the high temperature {theta}-phase, but covers a wide composition range up to 47%Si. For the same Ni-Si films deposited on Si(100), the initial nucleation of the Ni(Si) mixture is similar as for the samples deposited on SiO{sub 2}, such that the complex sequence of metal-rich Ni-silicide phases typically observed during Ni/Si reactions is modified. For samples containing more than 21%Si, a simpler sequential phase formation was observed upon annealing. From pole figures, the phase formation sequence was observed to have a significant influence on the texture of the technologically relevant NiSi phase. For mixture composition ranging from 38% to 43%Si, the initial transient {theta}-phase appears extremely textured on Si(100). The observed transient appearance of a hexagonal phase is of importance in understanding the phase formation mechanisms in the Ni-Si system.

  3. Testing cloud microphysics parameterizations in NCAR CAM5 with ISDAC and M-PACE observations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu X.; Lin W.; Xie, S.; Boyle, J.; Klein, S. A.; Shi, X.; Wang, Z.; Ghan, S. J.; Earle, M.; Liu, P. S. K.; Zelenyuk, A.

    2011-12-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Arctic clouds simulated by the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) Community Atmospheric Model version 5 (CAM5) are evaluated with observations from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Indirect and Semi-Direct Aerosol Campaign (ISDAC) and Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment (M-PACE), which were conducted at its North Slope of Alaska site in April 2008 and October 2004, respectively. Model forecasts for the Arctic spring and fall seasons performed under the Cloud-Associated Parameterizations Testbed framework generally reproduce the spatial distributions of cloud fraction for single-layer boundary-layer mixed-phase stratocumulus and multilayer or deep frontal clouds. However, for low-level stratocumulus, the model significantly underestimates the observed cloud liquid water content in both seasons. As a result, CAM5 significantly underestimates the surface downward longwave radiative fluxes by 20-40 W m{sup -2}. Introducing a new ice nucleation parameterization slightly improves the model performance for low-level mixed-phase clouds by increasing cloud liquid water content through the reduction of the conversion rate from cloud liquid to ice by the Wegener-Bergeron-Findeisen process. The CAM5 single-column model testing shows that changing the instantaneous freezing temperature of rain to form snow from -5 C to -40 C causes a large increase in modeled cloud liquid water content through the slowing down of cloud liquid and rain-related processes (e.g., autoconversion of cloud liquid to rain). The underestimation of aerosol concentrations in CAM5 in the Arctic also plays an important role in the low bias of cloud liquid water in the single-layer mixed-phase clouds. In addition, numerical issues related to the coupling of model physics and time stepping in CAM5 are responsible for the model biases and will be explored in future studies.

  4. Testing Cloud Microphysics Parameterizations in NCAR CAM5 with ISDAC and M-PACE Observations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Xiaohong; Xie, Shaocheng; Boyle, James; Klein, Stephen A.; Shi, Xiangjun; Wang, Zhien; Lin, Wuyin; Ghan, Steven J.; Earle, Michael; Liu, Peter; Zelenyuk, Alla

    2011-12-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Arctic clouds simulated by the NCAR Community Atmospheric Model version 5 (CAM5) are evaluated with observations from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Indirect and Semi-Direct Aerosol Campaign (ISDAC) and Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment (M-PACE), which were conducted at its North Slope of Alaska site in April 2008 and October 2004, respectively. Model forecasts for the Arctic Spring and Fall seasons performed under the Cloud- Associated Parameterizations Testbed (CAPT) framework generally reproduce the spatial distributions of cloud fraction for single-layer boundary layer mixed-phase stratocumulus, and multilayer or deep frontal clouds. However, for low-level clouds, the model significantly underestimates the observed cloud liquid water content in both seasons and cloud fraction in the Spring season. As a result, CAM5 significantly underestimates the surface downward longwave (LW) radiative fluxes by 20-40 W m-2. The model with a new ice nucleation parameterization moderately improves the model simulations by increasing cloud liquid water content in mixed-phase clouds through the reduction of the conversion rate from cloud liquid to ice by the Wegener-Bergeron- Findeisen (WBF) process. The CAM5 single column model testing shows that change in the homogeneous freezing temperature of rain to form snow from -5 C to -40 C has a substantial impact on the modeled liquid water content through the slowing-down of liquid and rain-related processes. In contrast, collections of cloud ice by snow and cloud liquid by rain are of minor importance for single-layer boundary layer mixed-phase clouds in the Arctic.

  5. Mixed waste focus area integrated technical baseline report. Phase I, Volume 2: Revision 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

    This document (Volume 2) contains the Appendices A through J for the Mixed Waste Focus Area Integrated Technical Baseline Report Phase I for the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. Included are: Waste Type Managers` Resumes, detailed information on wastewater, combustible organics, debris, unique waste, and inorganic homogeneous solids and soils, and waste data information. A detailed list of technology deficiencies and site needs identification is also provided.

  6. Magnetohydrodynamic kink waves in nonuniform solar flux tubes: phase mixing and energy cascade to small scales

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Soler, Roberto

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) kink waves are ubiquitously observed in the solar atmosphere. The propagation and damping of these waves may play relevant roles for the transport and dissipation of energy in the solar atmospheric medium. However, in the atmospheric plasma dissipation of transverse MHD wave energy by viscosity or resistivity needs very small spatial scales to be efficient. Here, we theoretically investigate the generation of small scales in nonuniform solar magnetic flux tubes due to phase mixing of MHD kink waves. We go beyond the usual approach based on the existence of a global quasi-mode that is damped in time due to resonant absorption. Instead, we use a modal expansion to express the MHD kink wave as a superposition of Alfv\\'en continuum modes that are phase mixed as time evolves. The comparison of the two techniques evidences that the modal analysis is more physically transparent and describes both the damping of global kink motions and the building up of small scales due to phase mixing. In ...

  7. Radiative Influences on Glaciation Time-Scales of Mixed-Phase Clouds

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 -the Mid-Infrared at 278, 298, and 323Program Accomplishments of the

  8. Microphysical Properties of Single and Mixed-Phase Arctic Clouds Derived from AERI Observations

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: VegetationEquipment Surfaces andMapping theEnergyInnovationMichaelGE

  9. Retrieval of Cloud Phase and Crystal Habit from Multiangle Imaging Spectroradiometer (MISR) and Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McFarlane, Sally A.; Marchand, Roger T.; Ackerman, Thomas P.

    2005-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of retrieving cloud phase and the dominant ice crystal habit from radiances measured by the Multi-angle Imaging Spectro-Radiometer (MISR) and the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) has been developed. The retrieval method takes advantage of the differences in the phase function of various particle shapes as a function of scattering angle. Three case studies are presented which illustrate the retrieval method. A comparison with semi-coincident in situ observations for one case study indicates that the retrieved crystal habits are consistent with the observations.

  10. Investigations of cloud altering effects of atmospheric aerosols using a new mixed Eulerian-Lagrangian aerosol model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Steele, Henry Donnan, 1974-

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Industry, urban development, and other anthropogenic influences have substantially altered the composition and size-distribution of atmospheric aerosol particles over the last century. This, in turn, has altered cloud ...

  11. Phase mixing of upper hybrid oscillations in a cold inhomogeneous plasma placed in an inhomogeneous magnetic field

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sarkar, Anwesa; Maity, Chandan; Chakrabarti, Nikhil [Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, 1/AF Bidhannagar, Kolkata 700 064 (India)] [Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, 1/AF Bidhannagar, Kolkata 700 064 (India)

    2013-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We study phase mixing/wave breaking phenomena of upper hybrid modes in a cold inhomogeneous plasma placed in an inhomogeneous magnetic field. Inhomogeneities both in the background ion density and magnetic field profile are treated as periodic in space but independent in time. The Lagrangian fluid description is employed to obtain an exact solution of this fully nonlinear problem. It is demonstrated that the upper hybrid modes, excited by an initial local charge imbalance, break via phase mixing, induced by the inhomogeneities. It is also shown that it is possible to avoid phase mixing in excited upper hybrid oscillations in an inhomogeneous plasma containing a finite amplitude ion density fluctuation. The choice of external magnetic field is shown to have a key role in avoiding phase mixing in such oscillations. The relevance of our investigation regarding the particle acceleration in an inhomogeneous plasma has also been discussed.

  12. Mixing angle and phase correlations from A5 with generalised CP and their prospects for discovery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ballett, Peter; Turner, Jessica

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The observed leptonic mixing pattern could be explained by the presence of a discrete flavour symmetry broken into residual subgroups at low energies. In this scenario, a residual generalised CP symmetry allows the parameters of the PMNS matrix, including Majorana phases, to be predicted in terms of a small set of input parameters. In this article, we study the mixing parameter correlations arising from the symmetry group A5 including generalised CP subsequently broken into all of its possible residual symmetries. Focusing on those patterns which satisfy present experimental bounds, we then provide a detailed analysis of the measurable signatures accessible to the planned reactor, superbeam and neutrinoless double beta decay experiments. We also discuss the role which could be played by high-precision measurements from longer term projects such as the Neutrino Factory. This work provides a concrete example of how the synergies of the upcoming experimental programme allow flavour symmetric models to be thoroug...

  13. Parameterizing Size Distribution in Ice Clouds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeSlover, Daniel; Mitchell, David L.

    2009-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

    PARAMETERIZING SIZE DISTRIBUTIONS IN ICE CLOUDS David L. Mitchell and Daniel H. DeSlover ABSTRACT An outstanding problem that contributes considerable uncertainty to Global Climate Model (GCM) predictions of future climate is the characterization of ice particle sizes in cirrus clouds. Recent parameterizations of ice cloud effective diameter differ by a factor of three, which, for overcast conditions, often translate to changes in outgoing longwave radiation (OLR) of 55 W m-2 or more. Much of this uncertainty in cirrus particle sizes is related to the problem of ice particle shattering during in situ sampling of the ice particle size distribution (PSD). Ice particles often shatter into many smaller ice fragments upon collision with the rim of the probe inlet tube. These small ice artifacts are counted as real ice crystals, resulting in anomalously high concentrations of small ice crystals (D < 100 µm) and underestimates of the mean and effective size of the PSD. Half of the cirrus cloud optical depth calculated from these in situ measurements can be due to this shattering phenomenon. Another challenge is the determination of ice and liquid water amounts in mixed phase clouds. Mixed phase clouds in the Arctic contain mostly liquid water, and the presence of ice is important for determining their lifecycle. Colder high clouds between -20 and -36 oC may also be mixed phase but in this case their condensate is mostly ice with low levels of liquid water. Rather than affecting their lifecycle, the presence of liquid dramatically affects the cloud optical properties, which affects cloud-climate feedback processes in GCMs. This project has made advancements in solving both of these problems. Regarding the first problem, PSD in ice clouds are uncertain due to the inability to reliably measure the concentrations of the smallest crystals (D < 100 µm), known as the “small mode”. Rather than using in situ probe measurements aboard aircraft, we employed a treatment of ice cloud optical properties formulated in terms of PSD parameters in combination with remote measurements of thermal radiances to characterize the small mode. This is possible since the absorption efficiency (Qabs) of small mode crystals is larger at 12 µm wavelength relative to 11 µm wavelength due to the process of wave resonance or photon tunneling more active at 12 µm. This makes the 12/11 µm absorption optical depth ratio (or equivalently the 12/11 µm Qabs ratio) a means for detecting the relative concentration of small ice particles in cirrus. Using this principle, this project tested and developed PSD schemes that can help characterize cirrus clouds at each of the three ARM sites: SGP, NSA and TWP. This was the main effort of this project. These PSD schemes and ice sedimentation velocities predicted from them have been used to test the new cirrus microphysics parameterization in the GCM known as the Community Climate Systems Model (CCSM) as part of an ongoing collaboration with NCAR. Regarding the second problem, we developed and did preliminary testing on a passive thermal method for retrieving the total water path (TWP) of Arctic mixed phase clouds where TWPs are often in the range of 20 to 130 g m-2 (difficult for microwave radiometers to accurately measure). We also developed a new radar method for retrieving the cloud ice water content (IWC), which can be vertically integrated to yield the ice water path (IWP). These techniques were combined to determine the IWP and liquid water path (LWP) in Arctic clouds, and hence the fraction of ice and liquid water. We have tested this approach using a case study from the ARM field campaign called M-PACE (Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment). This research led to a new satellite remote sensing method that appears promising for detecting low levels of liquid water in high clouds typically between -20 and -36 oC. We hope to develop this method in future research.

  14. Thermodynamically Anomalous Regions and Possible New Signals of Mixed Phase Formation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    K. A. Bugaev; A. I. Ivanytskyi; D. R. Oliinychenko; V. V. Sagun; I. N. Mishustin; D. H. Rischke; L. M. Satarov; G. M. Zinovjev

    2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Using an advanced version of the hadron resonance gas model we have found remarkable irregularities of relativistic heavy-ion collisions at chemical freeze-out. They include an abrupt change of the effective number of degrees of freedom at laboratory energies 8.9-11.6 AGeV and plateaus in the collision-energy dependence of the entropy per baryon, total pion number per baryon, and thermal pion number per baryon at laboratory energies 6.9-11.6 AGeV. Also at chemical freeze-out we observe a sharp peak in the dimensionless trace anomaly at laboratory energy 11.6 AGeV. On the basis of the generalized shock-adiabat model we demonstrate that these observations give evidence for the anomalous thermodynamic properties of the mixed phase at its boundary to the quark-gluon plasma. We argue that the trace anomaly peak and the local minimum of the generalized specific volume observed at a laboratory energy of 11.6 AGeV provide a signal for the formation of a mixed phase between the quark-gluon plasma and the hadron phase.

  15. Broken and inhomogeneous cloud impact on satellite cloud particle effective radius and cloudphase retrievals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stoffelen, Ad

    on the particle size distribution, height, and thermo- dynamic phase of clouds. Water and ice clouds have parameterizations is the global dis- tribution of cloud thermodynamic phase, i.e., whether a cloud is composed on satellitederived cloud particle effective radius (re) and cloud phase (CPH) for broken and overcast inhomogeneous

  16. Application of Stochastic Radiative Transfer Theory to the ARM Cloud-Radiative Parameterization Problem

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Veron, Dana E

    2009-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

    This project had two primary goals: 1) development of stochastic radiative transfer as a parameterization that could be employed in an AGCM environment, and 2) exploration of the stochastic approach as a means for representing shortwave radiative transfer through mixed-phase layer clouds. To achieve these goals, an analysis of the performance of the stochastic approach was performed, a simple stochastic cloud-radiation parameterization for an AGCM was developed and tested, a statistical description of Arctic mixed phase clouds was developed and the appropriateness of stochastic approach for representing radiative transfer through mixed-phase clouds was assessed. Significant progress has been made in all of these areas and is detailed below.

  17. Characterization of the Polymer Energy Landscape in Polymer:Fullerene Bulk Heterojunctions with Pure and Mixed Phases

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McGehee, Michael

    Characterization of the Polymer Energy Landscape in Polymer:Fullerene Bulk Heterojunctions with Pure and Mixed Phases Sean Sweetnam, Kenneth R. Graham,, Guy O. Ngongang Ndjawa, Thomas Heumuller offsets between the charge transport energy levels in different morphological phases of polymer

  18. Condensed phase spectroscopy from mixed-order semiclassical molecular dynamics: Absorption, emission, and resonant Raman spectra of I2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Apkarian, V. Ara

    Condensed phase spectroscopy from mixed-order semiclassical molecular dynamics: Absorption, as a prototype of spectroscopy in condensed media in general. The method relies on constructing quantum correlations into system and bath are used to provide perspectives about condensed phase spectroscopy

  19. CONTINENTAL LIQUID-PHASE STRATUS CLOUDS AT SGP: METEOROLOGICAL INFLUENCES AND RELATIONSHIP TO ADIABACITY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of New York at Albany For Presentation at the ARM Science Team Meeting, Albuquerque, NM March 27-31, 2006, such as static stability and updraft velocity. These influences may contribute to the observed weak correlation with entrainment processes around cloud top. These processes would be expected to decrease the amount of column

  20. Assessment of the mixing state and cloud nucleating efficiency of Asian aerosols using aircraft-based measurements of hygroscopicity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas, Timothy William

    2006-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

    to cloud droplet size. Although this is a direct measure of CCN, it does not permit rapid characterization of the spectrum of critical supersaturations within an aerosol population. The approach taken here uses measurement of hygroscopic... uniform substance, generally a salt solution (Svenningsson et al. 1992). However, studies have shown that individual aerosol particles are composed of multiple species (Quinn et al. 2000, Raymond & Pandis 2003), and are often non-spherical (Crouzet...

  1. Absence of Thermophoretic Flow in Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collisions as an Indicator for the Absence of a Mixed Phase

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Markus H. Thoma

    2002-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    If a quark-gluon plasma is formed in relativistic heavy-ion collisions, there may or may not be a mixed phase of quarks, gluons and hadronic clusters when the critical temperature is reached in the expansion of the fireball. If there is a temperature gradient in the fireball, the hadronic clusters, embedded in the heat bath of quarks and gluons, are subjected to a thermophoretic force. It is shown that even for small temperature gradients and short lifetimes of the mixed phase, thermophoresis would lead to a flow essentially stronger than the observed one. The absence of this strong flow provides support for a rapid or sudden hadronization mechanism without a mixed phase.

  2. Relationship between transport properties and phase transformations in mixed-conducting oxides

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deng, Z.Q. [State Key Laboratory of Catalysis, Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Dalian 116023 (China)]. E-mail: dzqm@dicp.ac.cn; Yang, W.S. [State Key Laboratory of Catalysis, Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Dalian 116023 (China); Liu, W. [Laboratory of Advanced Functional Materials and Devices, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China); Chen, C.S. [Laboratory of Advanced Functional Materials and Devices, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China)

    2006-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    To elucidate the relationship between transport properties and phase transformations in mixed-conducting oxides, Sr{sub 0.9}Ca{sub 0.1}Co{sub 0.89}Fe{sub 0.11}O{sub 3-} {sub {delta}} (SCCFO) and SrCoO{sub 3-} {sub {delta}} (SCO) were chosen as the model materials and have been investigated in detail. Oxygen permeation measurements verified that both oxides are well permeable to oxygen at elevated temperatures, e.g., at 900 deg. C during a cooling procedure, oxygen permeation rates as large as 1.5 and 2.0 mL/min/cm{sup 2} could be obtained with disk-shaped SCCFO and SCO membranes of thickness 1.5 mm, respectively. But when cooled to critical temperatures, the oxygen permeability of these kinds of oxides diminished sharply, which could be recovered by increasing the temperature again to certain values. Abrupt changes on electrical conductivity were also observed for both oxides around the same region of temperature as that of oxygen permeability. As indicated by high-temperature X-ray diffraction and thermal analysis, the SCCFO and SCO systems undergo phase transformation between a low-temperature orthorhombic brownmillerite structure (B) or a hexagonal 2H-type structure (H) and a high-temperature cubic perovskite structure (C), respectively. The present results suggest the observed abrupt changes in transport properties versus temperature are attributed to such phase transformation, which may be directly associated with the order-disorder transition of oxygen vacancies. Moreover, compared to the B/C transformation that mainly involves an order-disorder transition on the oxygen sublattice, the H/C one necessarily also involves the cooperative long-range reorganization on the cation sublattice. Therefore it occurs at a higher temperature and absorbs more heat quantity than those of B/C transformation.

  3. Two phase mixing comparison, oil contamination comparison and manufacturing accuracy effect on calibration of slotted orifice meters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sparks, Sara A.

    2004-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    are visually documented. The effect of manufacturing accuracy on the slotted orifice plates is investigated as to the effect on the coefficient of discharge, percent change in pressure, and Reynolds number. The slotted orifice plate mixes two-phase flow better...

  4. Two-moment Bulk Stratiform Cloud Microphysics in the Grid-point Atmospheric Model of IAP LASG (GAMIL)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shi, Xiangjun; Wang, Bin; Liu, Xiaohong; Wang, Minghuai

    2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A two-moment bulk stratiform microphysics scheme, including recently developed physically-based droplet activation/ice nucleation parameterizations has been implemented into the Grid-point Atmospheric Model of IAP LASG (GAMIL) as an effort to enhance the model capability for studying aerosol indirect effects. Unlike the previous one-moment cloud microphysics scheme, the new scheme produces reasonable representation of cloud particle size and number concentration. This scheme captures the observed spatial variations in cloud droplet number concentrations. Simulated ice crystal number concentrations in cirrus clouds qualitatively agree with in-situ observations. The longwave and shortwave cloud forcing are in better agreement with observations. Sensitivity tests show that the column cloud droplet number concentrations calculated from two different droplet activation parameterizations are similar. However, ice crystal number concentration in mixed-phased clouds is sensitive to different heterogeneous freezing formulations. The simulation with high ice crystal number concentration in mixed-phase clouds has less liquid water path and weaker cloud forcing. Furthermore, ice crystal number concentration in cirrus clouds is sensitive to different ice nucleation parameterizations. Sensitivity tests also suggest that impact of pre-existing ice crystals on homogeneous freezing in old clouds should be taken into account.

  5. Phase Transformations of the Ternary System (NH4)2SO4-H2SO4-H2O and the Implications for Cirrus Cloud Formation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the presence of NH4 + ions in the aerosol of the upper troposphere. Low-temperature ternary phase diagrams distribution alters the cloud's radiative properties, persistence, and surface area available for heterogeneous radiation, which insulates or warms Earth, and scattering the sun's visible radiation upward, thus cooling

  6. Longevity of the quark-gluon plasma and the mixed phase from intensity interferometry of high energy photons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dinesh K. Srivastava; Charles Gale

    1993-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Two-photon intensity interferometry is shown to provide an accurate measurement of lifetime of quark-gluon plasma created in ultra-relativistic heavy ion collisions via the difference of outward and sidewardcorrelation radii. Under the assumption of a longitudinal, boost invariant expansion of the plasma, we obtain analytical expressions for the correlations from the quark-gluon plasma phase. A $3+1$ dimensional expansion of the plasma along with a first order phase transition to hadrons is next considered, and, leads to a source with two characteristic lifetimes, one for the quark-gluon plasma phase, and the other for the longer lived mixed phase. This may even help us to {\\em experimentally} determine the order of the phase transition.

  7. Phase I chemical speciation modeling of stream mixing in the LAW/HLW Envelope A Treatment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kaplan, D.I.

    2000-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The intent of this work was to provide a first approximation of the effect of stream mixing and waste stream composition on precipitation.

  8. Solvent-refined-coal (SRC) process. Hydrodynamics and axial mixing in a three-phase bubble column

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kara, S.; Kelkar, B.G.; Shah, Y.T.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The hydrodynamics and the mixing properties in a 15.2 cm diameter x 335.3 cm high stainless steel column with three phases (air, water and coal) in cocurrent upflow were studied. The effect of solids particles size, solids concentration, slurry velocity and gas velocity on gas holdup and heat dispersion coefficients were determined. All the experimental data were correlated empirically and the results were compared with other published literature. Theoretical explanations of some results were provided.

  9. Improvements in Representations of Cloud Microphysics for BBHRP and Models using Data Collected during M-PACE and TWP-ICE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greg M. McFarquhar

    2010-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    In our research we proposed to use data collected during the 2004 Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment (MPACE) and the 2006 Tropical Warm Pool International Cloud Experiment (TWP-ICE) to improve retrievals of ice and mixed-phase clouds, to improve our understanding of how cloud and radiative processes affect cloud life cycles, and to develop and test methods for using ARM data more effectively in model. In particular, we proposed to: 1) use MPACE in-situ data to determine how liquid water fraction and cloud ice and liquid effective radius (r{sub ei} and r{sub ew}) vary with temperature, normalized cloud altitude and other variables for Arctic mixed-phase clouds, and to use these data to evaluate the performance of model parameterization schemes and remote sensing retrieval algorithms; 2) calculate rei and size/shape distributions using TWP-ICE in-situ data, investigate their dependence on cirrus type (oceanic or continental anvils or cirrus not directly traced to convection), and develop and test representations for MICROBASE; 3) conduct fundamental research enhancing our understanding of cloud/radiative interactions, concentrating on effects of small crystals and particle shapes and sizes on radiation; and 4) improve representations of microphysical processes for models (fall-out, effective density, mean scattering properties, rei and rew) and provide them to ARM PIs. In the course of our research, we made substantial progress on all four goals.

  10. Supplemental design requirements document enhanced radioactive and mixed waste storage Phase V Project W-112

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ocampo, V.P.; Boothe, G.F.; Greager, T.M.; Johnson, K.D.; Kooiker, S.L.; Martin, J.D.

    1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document provides additional and supplemental information to WHC-SD-W112-FDC-001, Project W-112 for radioactive and mixed waste storage. It provides additional requirements for the design and summarizes Westinghouse Hanford Company key design guidance and establishes the technical baseline agreements to be used for definitive design of the Project W-112 facilities.

  11. Evaluating cloud retrieval algorithms with the ARM BBHRP framework

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mlawer,E.; Dunn,M.; Mlawer, E.; Shippert, T.; Troyan, D.; Johnson, K. L.; Miller, M. A.; Delamere, J.; Turner, D. D.; Jensen, M. P.; Flynn, C.; Shupe, M.; Comstock, J.; Long, C. N.; Clough, S. T.; Sivaraman, C.; Khaiyer, M.; Xie, S.; Rutan, D.; Minnis, P.

    2008-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Climate and weather prediction models require accurate calculations of vertical profiles of radiative heating. Although heating rate calculations cannot be directly validated due to the lack of corresponding observations, surface and top-of-atmosphere measurements can indirectly establish the quality of computed heating rates through validation of the calculated irradiances at the atmospheric boundaries. The ARM Broadband Heating Rate Profile (BBHRP) project, a collaboration of all the working groups in the program, was designed with these heating rate validations as a key objective. Given the large dependence of radiative heating rates on cloud properties, a critical component of BBHRP radiative closure analyses has been the evaluation of cloud microphysical retrieval algorithms. This evaluation is an important step in establishing the necessary confidence in the continuous profiles of computed radiative heating rates produced by BBHRP at the ARM Climate Research Facility (ACRF) sites that are needed for modeling studies. This poster details the continued effort to evaluate cloud property retrieval algorithms within the BBHRP framework, a key focus of the project this year. A requirement for the computation of accurate heating rate profiles is a robust cloud microphysical product that captures the occurrence, height, and phase of clouds above each ACRF site. Various approaches to retrieve the microphysical properties of liquid, ice, and mixed-phase clouds have been processed in BBHRP for the ACRF Southern Great Plains (SGP) and the North Slope of Alaska (NSA) sites. These retrieval methods span a range of assumptions concerning the parameterization of cloud location, particle density, size, shape, and involve different measurement sources. We will present the radiative closure results from several different retrieval approaches for the SGP site, including those from Microbase, the current 'reference' retrieval approach in BBHRP. At the NSA, mixed-phase clouds and cloud with a low optical depth are prevalent; the radiative closure studies using Microbase demonstrated significant residuals. As an alternative to Microbase at NSA, the Shupe-Turner cloud property retrieval algorithm, aimed at improving the partitioning of cloud phase and incorporating more constrained, conditional microphysics retrievals, also has been evaluated using the BBHRP data set.

  12. A mixed mean-field/BCS phase with an energy gap at high $T_c$

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    N. Ilieva; W. Thirring

    2000-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

    We construct a pair potential which in a scaling limit leads to a Hamiltonian that generates co-existing mean-field and superconducting phases. Depending on the relative values of the coupling constants, the superconducting phase may exist at arbitrarily high temperatures.

  13. Gain-assisted superluminal microwave pulse propagation via four-wave mixing in superconducting phase quantum circuits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Z. Amini Sabegh; A. Vafafard; M. A. Maleki; M. Mahmoudi

    2015-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the propagation and amplification of a microwave field in a four-level cascade quantum system which is realized in a superconducting phase quantum circuit. It is shown that by increasing the microwave pump tones feeding the system, the normal dispersion switches to the anomalous and the gain-assisted superluminal microwave propagation is obtained in this system. Moreover, it is demonstrated that the stimulated microwave field is generated via four-wave mixing without any inversion population in the energy levels of the system (amplification without inversion) and the group velocity of the generated pulse can be controlled by the external oscillating magnetic fluxes. We also show that in some special set of parameters, the absorption-free superluminal generated microwave propagation is obtained in superconducting phase quantum circuit system.

  14. Gain-assisted superluminal microwave pulse propagation via four-wave mixing in superconducting phase quantum circuits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sabegh, Z Amini; Maleki, M A; Mahmoudi, M

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the propagation and amplification of a microwave field in a four-level cascade quantum system which is realized in a superconducting phase quantum circuit. It is shown that by increasing the microwave pump tones feeding the system, the normal dispersion switches to the anomalous and the gain-assisted superluminal microwave propagation is obtained in this system. Moreover, it is demonstrated that the stimulated microwave field is generated via four-wave mixing without any inversion population in the energy levels of the system (amplification without inversion) and the group velocity of the generated pulse can be controlled by the external oscillating magnetic fluxes. We also show that in some special set of parameters, the absorption-free superluminal generated microwave propagation is obtained in superconducting phase quantum circuit system.

  15. International Cloud Workshop, Locarno, Switzerland, 3 Feb 2009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haak, Hein

    International Cloud Workshop, Locarno, Switzerland, 3 Feb 2009 Impact of broken and inhomogeneous clouds on satellite cloud-phase retrieval Erwin Wolters ­ KNMI Hartwig Deneke ­ KNMI/University of Bonn;Contents Introduction CM-SAF cloud-phase retrieval method The problem ­ research question Broken clouds

  16. ARM - Measurement - Cloud phase

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc Documentation RUC : XDCResearch Related InformationAciddroplet size ARM Dataicesize

  17. Realisation of four-wave mixing phase matching for frequency components at intracavity stimulated Raman scattering in a calcite crystal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smetanin, Sergei N; Fedin, Aleksandr V; Shurygin, Anton S

    2013-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The possibilities of implementing four-wave mixing (FWM) phase matching at stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) in a birefringent SRS-active crystal placed in a cavity with highly reflecting mirrors have been theoretically and experimentally investigated. Phase-matching angles providing conditions for five types of phase matching are determined for a calcite crystal. These types are characterised by different combinations of polarisation directions for the interacting waves and ensure FWM generation of either an anti-Stokes wave or the second Stokes SRS component. In agreement with the calculation results, low-threshold generation of the second Stokes SRS component with a wavelength 0.602 {mu}m was observed at angles of incidence on a calcite crystal of 4.8 Degree-Sign and 18.2 Degree-Sign , under SRS pumping at a wavelength of 0.532 {mu}m. This generation is due to the FWM coupling of the first and second Stokes SRS components with the SRS-pump wave. (nonlinear optical phenomena)

  18. Optoelectronic down-conversion by four-wave mixing in a highly nonlinear fiber for millimeter-wave and THz phase-locking

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rolland, Antoine; Brunel, Marc; Alouini, Mehdi

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Optoelectronic down-conversion of a THz optical beatnote to a RF intermediate frequency is performed with a standard Mach-Zehnder modulator followed by a zero dispersion-slope fiber. The two interleaved optical spectra obtained by four-wave mixing are shown to contain more than 75 harmonics enabling to conveniently recover the phase noise of a beatnote at 770 GHz at around 500 MHz. This four-wave mixing down-conversion technique is implemented in a two-frequency solid-state laser in order to directly phase-lock its 168 GHz beatnote to a 10 MHz local oscillator.

  19. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Data from Steamboat Springs, Colorado, for the Storm Peak Laboratory Cloud Property Validation Experiment (STORMVEX)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    In October 2010, the initial deployment of the second ARM Mobile Facility (AMF2) took place at Steamboat Springs, Colorado, for the Storm Peak Laboratory Cloud Property Validation Experiment (STORMVEX). The objective of this field campaign was to obtain data about liquid and mixed-phase clouds using AMF2 instruments in conjunction with Storm Peak Laboratory (located at an elevation of 3220 meters on Mt. Werner), a cloud and aerosol research facility operated by the Desert Research Institute. STORMVEX datasets are freely available for viewing and download. Users are asked to register with the ARM Archive; the user's email address is used from that time forward as the login name.

  20. Studies of high temperature ternary phases in mixed-metal-rich early transition metal sulfide and phosphide systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marking, G.A.

    1994-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Investigations of ternary mixed early transition metal-rich sulfide and phosphide systems resulted in the discovery of new structures and new phases. A new series of Zr and Hf - group V transition metal - sulfur K-phases was synthesized and crystallographically characterized. When the group V transition metal was Nb or Ta, the unit cell volume was larger than any previously reported K-phase. The presence of adventitious oxygen was determined in two K-phases through a combination of neutron scattering and X-ray diffraction experiments. A compound Hf{sub 10}Ta{sub 3}S{sub 3} was found to crystallize in a new-structure type similar to the known gamma brasses. This structure is unique in that it is the only reported {open_quotes}stuffed{close_quotes} gamma-brass type structure. The metal components, Hf and Ta, are larger in size and more electropositive than the metals found in normal gamma brasses (e.g. Cu and Zn) and because of the larger metallic radii, sulfur can be incorporated into the structure where it plays an integral role in stabilizing this phase relative to others. X-ray single-crystal, X-ray powder and neutron powder refinements were performed on this structure. A new structure was found in the ternary Nb-Zr-P system which has characteristics in common with many known early transition metal-rich sulfides, selenides, and phosphides. This structure has the simplest known interconnection of the basic building blocks known for this structural class. Anomalous scattering was a powerful tool for differentiating between Zr and Nb when using Mo K{alpha} X-radiation. The compounds ZrNbP and HfNbP formed in the space group Prima with the simple Co{sub 2}Si structure which is among the most common structures found for crystalline solid materials. Solid solution compounds in the Ta-Nb-P, Ta-Zr-P, Nb-Zr-P, Hf-Nb-P, and Hf-Zr-S systems were crystallographically characterized. The structural information corroborated ideas about bonding in metal-rich compounds.

  1. Screening of mixed surfactant systems: Phase behavior studies and CT imaging of surfactant-enhanced oil recovery experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Llave, F.M.; Gall, B.L.; Lorenz, P.B.; Cook, I.M.; Scott, L.J.

    1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A systematic chemical screening study was conducted on selected anionic-nonionic and nonionic-nonionic systems. The objective of the study was to evaluate and determine combinations of these surfactants that would exhibit favorable phase behavior and solubilization capacity. The effects of different parameters including (a) salinity, (b) temperature, (c) alkane carbon number, (c) hydrophilic/lipophilic balance (HLB) of nonionic component, and (d) type of surfactant on the behavior of the overall chemical system were evaluated. The current work was conducted using a series of ethoxylated nonionic surfactants in combinations of several anionic systems with various hydrocarbons. Efforts to correlate the behavior of these mixed systems led to the development of several models for the chemical systems tested. The models were used to compare the different systems and provided some guidelines for formulating them to account for variations in salinity, oil hydrocarbon number, and temperature. The models were also evaluated to determine conformance with the results from experimental measurements. The models provided good agreement with experimental results. X-ray computed tomography (CT) was used to study fluid distributions during chemical enhanced oil recovery experiments. CT-monitored corefloods were conducted to examine the effect of changing surfactant slug size injection on oil bank formation and propagation. Reducing surfactant slug size resulted in lower total oil production. Oil recovery results, however, did not correlate with slug size for the low-concentration, alkaline, mixed surfactant system used in these tests. The CT measurements showed that polymer mobility control and core features also affected the overall oil recovery results.

  2. Model independent determination of the CKM phase $?$ using input from $D^0-\\bar{D}^0$ mixing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Samuel Harnew; Jonas Rademacker

    2014-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a new, amplitude model-independent method to measure the CP violation parameter $\\gamma$ in $B^- \\to DK^-$ and related decays. Information on charm interference parameters, usually obtained from charm threshold data, is obtained from charm mixing. By splitting the phase space of the $D$ meson decay into several bins, enough information can be gained to measure $\\gamma$ without input from the charm threshold. We demonstrate the feasibility of this approach with a simulation study of $B^- \\to DK^-$ with $D \\to K^+ \\pi^- \\pi^+ \\pi^-$. We compare the performance of our novel approach to that of a previously proposed binned analysis which uses charm interference parameters obtained from threshold data. While both methods provide useful constraints, the combination of the two by far outperforms either of them applied on their own. Such an analysis would provide a highly competitive measurement of $\\gamma$. Our simulation studies indicate, subject to assumptions about data yields and the amplitude structure of $D^0 \\to K^+ \\pi^- \\pi^+ \\pi^-$, a statistical uncertainty on $\\gamma$ of $\\sim 13^{\\circ}$ with existing data and $4^{\\circ}$ for the LHCb-upgrade.

  3. Cloud Computing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pete Beckman and Ian Foster

    2009-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Chicago Matters: Beyond Burnham (WTTW). Chicago has become a world center of "cloud computing." Argonne experts Pete Beckman and Ian Foster explain what "cloud computing" is and how you probably already use it on a daily basis.

  4. Parameterizations of Cloud Microphysics and Indirect Aerosol Effects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tao, Wei-Kuo [NASA/GSFC] [NASA/GSFC

    2014-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

    1. OVERVIEW Aerosols and especially their effect on clouds are one of the key components of the climate system and the hydrological cycle [Ramanathan et al., 2001]. Yet, the aerosol effect on clouds remains largely unknown and the processes involved not well understood. A recent report published by the National Academy of Science states "The greatest uncertainty about the aerosol climate forcing - indeed, the largest of all the uncertainties about global climate forcing - is probably the indirect effect of aerosols on clouds [NRC, 2001]." The aerosol effect on clouds is often categorized into the traditional "first indirect (i.e., Twomey)" effect on the cloud droplet sizes for a constant liquid water path [Twomey, 1977] and the "semi-direct" effect on cloud coverage [e.g., Ackerman et al., 2000]. Enhanced aerosol concentrations can also suppress warm rain processes by producing a narrow droplet spectrum that inhibits collision and coalescence processes [e.g., Squires and Twomey, 1961; Warner and Twomey, 1967; Warner, 1968; Rosenfeld, 1999]. The aerosol effect on precipitation processes, also known as the second type of aerosol indirect effect [Albrecht, 1989], is even more complex, especially for mixed-phase convective clouds. Table 1 summarizes the key observational studies identifying the microphysical properties, cloud characteristics, thermodynamics and dynamics associated with cloud systems from high-aerosol continental environments. For example, atmospheric aerosol concentrations can influence cloud droplet size distributions, warm-rain process, cold-rain process, cloud-top height, the depth of the mixed phase region, and occurrence of lightning. In addition, high aerosol concentrations in urban environments could affect precipitation variability by providing an enhanced source of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN). Hypotheses have been developed to explain the effect of urban regions on convection and precipitation [van den Heever and Cotton, 2007 and Shepherd, 2005]. Recently, a detailed spectral-bin microphysical scheme was implemented into the Goddard Cumulus Ensemble (GCE) model. Atmospheric aerosols are also described using number density size-distribution functions. A spectral-bin microphysical model is very expensive from a computational point of view and has only been implemented into the 2D version of the GCE at the present time. The model is tested by studying the evolution of deep tropical clouds in the west Pacific warm pool region and summertime convection over a mid-latitude continent with different concentrations of CCN: a low "clean" concentration and a high "dirty" concentration. The impact of atmospheric aerosol concentration on cloud and precipitation will be investigated. 2. MODEL DESCRIPTION AND CASE STUDIES 2.1 GCE MODEL The model used in this study is the 2D version of the GCE model. Modeled flow is anelastic. Second- or higher-order advection schemes can produce negative values in the solution. Thus, a Multi-dimensional Positive Definite Advection Transport Algorithm (MPDATA) has been implemented into the model. All scalar variables (potential temperature, water vapor, turbulent coefficient and all five hydrometeor classes) use forward time differencing and the MPDATA for advection. Dynamic variables, u, v and w, use a second-order accurate advection scheme and a leapfrog time integration (kinetic energy semi-conserving method). Short-wave (solar) and long-wave radiation as well as a subgrid-scale TKE turbulence scheme are also included in the model. Details of the model can be found in Tao and Simpson (1993) and Tao et al. (2003). 2.2 Microphysics (Bin Model) The formulation of the explicit spectral-bin microphysical processes is based on solving stochastic kinetic equations for the size distribution functions of water droplets (cloud droplets and raindrops), and six types of ice particles: pristine ice crystals (columnar and plate-like), snow (dendrites and aggregates), graupel and frozen drops/hail. Each type is described by a special size distribution function containing 33 categories (bin

  5. Development and testing of an aerosol/stratus cloud parameterization scheme for middle and high latitudes. Final technical progress report, November 1, 1994--October 31, 1998

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kreidenweis, S.M.; Cotton, W.R.

    1999-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

    At the present time, general circulation models (GCMs) poorly represent clouds, to the extent that they cannot be relied upon to simulate the climatic effects of increasing concentrations of greenhouse gases, or of anthropogenic perturbations to concentrations of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) or ice nuclei (IN). The long-term objective of this research was the development of an aerosol/cloud microphysics parameterization of mixed-phase stratus and boundary-layer clouds which responds to variations in CCN and IN. The work plan was to perform simulations of these cloud systems to gain understanding of their dynamics and microphysics, especially how aerosols affect cloud development and properties, that cold then be used to guide parameterizations. Several versions of the CSU RAMS (Regional Atmospheric Modeling System), modified to treat Arctic clouds, have been used during the course of this work. The authors also developed a new modeling system, the Trajectory Ensemble Model, to perform detailed chemical and microphysical simulations off-line from the host LES model. The increased understanding of the cloud systems investigated in this research can be applied to a single-column cloud model, designed as an adaptive grid model which can interface into a GCM vertical grid through distinct layers of the troposphere where the presence of layer clouds is expected.

  6. Cloud Computing.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Siddiqui, Muhammad Anas

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ?? Cloud computing has been given a great deal of attention during recent years. Almost all the technology market leaders and leading hosting service providers… (more)

  7. Global Simulations of Ice nucleation and Ice Supersaturation with an Improved Cloud Scheme in the Community Atmosphere Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gettelman, A.; Liu, Xiaohong; Ghan, Steven J.; Morrison, H.; Park, Sungsu; Conley, Andrew; Klein, Stephen A.; Boyle, James; Mitchell, David; Li, J-L F.

    2010-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

    A process-based treatment of ice supersaturation and ice-nucleation is implemented in the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) Community Atmosphere Model (CAM). The new scheme is designed to allow (1) supersaturation with respect to ice, (2) ice nucleation by aerosol particles and (3) ice cloud cover consistent with ice microphysics. The scheme is implemented with a 4-class 2 moment microphysics code and is used to evaluate ice cloud nucleation mechanisms and supersaturation in CAM. The new model is able to reproduce field observations of ice mass and mixed phase cloud occurrence better than previous versions of the model. Simulations indicate heterogeneous freezing and contact nucleation on dust are both potentially important over remote areas of the Arctic. Cloud forcing and hence climate is sensitive to different formulations of the ice microphysics. Arctic radiative fluxes are sensitive to the parameterization of ice clouds. These results indicate that ice clouds are potentially an important part of understanding cloud forcing and potential cloud feedbacks, particularly in the Arctic.

  8. Cloud Condensation Nuclei (CCN) Analysis of Biogenic Secondary Organic Aerosol

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collins, Gary S.

    Cloud Condensation Nuclei (CCN) Analysis of Biogenic Secondary Organic Aerosol Rachel L. Atlas1' gas-phase emissions and the aerosols they form (figure 6), including a cloud condensation nuclei Cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) are particles which water vapor condenses onto to form cloud droplets

  9. Cloud Point of Aqueous Solutions of Tetrabutylammonium Dodecyl Sulfate Is a Function of the Concentration of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bales, Barney

    Cloud Point of Aqueous Solutions of Tetrabutylammonium Dodecyl Sulfate Is a Function: December 3, 2003 The cloud point of the surfactant tetrabutylammonium dodecyl sulfate is shown surfactant dissociates 17% of its counterions to aqueous phase. Introduction Clouding is a phenomenon

  10. Phase coexistence in the mixed crystal Rb[sub 1-x](NH[sub 4])[sub x]H[sub 2]AsO[sub 4

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pinto, N.J.

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A study of the coexistence phenomenon in mixed crystals of rubidium ammonium dihydrogen arsenate has been done. Coexistence in this study refers to the simultaneous presence of ferroelectric and proton glass phases as temperature is lowered below the ferroelectric phase transition temperature T[sub c]. Such coexistence is found to exist in these mixed crystals only for small ammonium concentrations. The results show that coexistence exists for lower ammonium concentration than previously suggested. A study was also done on crystals with larger ammonium concentrations that show pure proton glass behavior and the results compared with the coexistence phenomenon. Dielectric, spontaneous polarization and nuclear magnetic resonance experiments on mixed crystals with small ammonium concentrations show that at low temperatures there exists intimate coexistence of ferroelectric clusters with proton glass clusters below the glass transition temperature T[sub g]. In the proton glass phase, it is observed that a spread of relaxation times due to the creation and annihilation of HAsO[sub 4] and H[sub 3]AsO[sub 4] pairs as they diffuse through the crystal. Spin lattice relaxation times for the acid deuterons in a 10% ammoniated sample show a broad T[sub 1] minimum near the glass transition temperature which is characteristic of proton glasses. Field-cooling experiments were also done on the pure proton glass. The results are consistent with dielectric measurements, but the remanent polarization was found to be extremely small. This polarization was found to depend on the rate of heating and cooling the sample while performing the experiment.

  11. Nondegenerate parametric generation of 2.2-mJ, few-cycle 2.05-?m pulses using a mixed phase matching scheme

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xu, Guibao; Wandel, Scott F.; Jovanovic, Igor, E-mail: ijovanovic@psu.edu [Department of Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania 16802 (United States)] [Department of Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania 16802 (United States)

    2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We describe the production of 2.2-mJ, ?6 optical-cycle-long mid-infrared laser pulses with a carrier wavelength of 2.05 ?m in a two-stage ?-BaB{sub 2}O{sub 4} nondegenerate optical parametric amplifier design with a mixed phase matching scheme, which is pumped by a standard Ti:sapphire chirped-pulse amplification system. It is demonstrated that relatively high pulse energies, short pulse durations, high stability, and excellent beam profiles can be obtained using this simple approach, even without the use of optical parametric chirped-pulse amplification.

  12. Dynamic Cloud Infrastructure.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gundersen, Espen

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ??This thesis will explore and investigate the possibility of implementing nested clouds to increase flexibility. A nested cloud is a private cloud running inside another… (more)

  13. Securing Cloud Storage Service.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zapolskas, Vytautas

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ?? Cloud computing brought flexibility, scalability, and capital cost savings to the IT industry. As more companies turn to cloud solutions, securing cloud based services… (more)

  14. Cloud Computing Adam Barker

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    St Andrews, University of

    Cloud Computing 1 Adam Barker #12;Overview · Introduction to Cloud computing · Enabling technologies · Di erent types of cloud: IaaS, PaaS and SaaS · Cloud terminology · Interacting with a cloud: management consoles · Launching an instance · Connecting to an instance · Running your application · Clouds

  15. Mixed cation phases in sputter deposited HfO{sub 2}-TiO{sub 2} nanolaminates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cisneros-Morales, M. C.; Aita, C. R. [Advanced Coatings Experimental Laboratory, College of Engineering and Applied Science, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, P.O. Box 784, Milwaukee, Wisconsin 53201 (United States)

    2008-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Nanolaminate HfO{sub 2}-TiO{sub 2} films are grown by reactive sputter deposition on unheated fused SiO{sub 2}, sequentially annealed at 573 to 973 K, and studied by x-ray diffraction. A nanocrystalline structure of orthorhombic (o) HfTiO{sub 4} adjacent to an interface followed by monoclinic (m) Hf{sub 1-x}Ti{sub x}O{sub 2} is identified. m-Hf{sub 1-x}Ti{sub x}O{sub 2}, a metastable phase, is isomorphous with m-HfO{sub 2} and a high pressure phase, m-HfTiO{sub 4}. A Vegard's law analysis shows that the Ti atomic fraction in m-Hf{sub 1-x}Ti{sub x}O{sub 2} is much greater than Ti equilibrium solubility in m-HfO{sub 2}. A space group-subgroup argument proposes that m-Hf{sub 1-x}Ti{sub x}O{sub 2} arises from an o/m-HfTiO{sub 4} second order phase transition to accommodate the larger Hf atom.

  16. Development and testing of an aerosol/stratus cloud parameterization scheme for middle and high latitudes. Year 3 technical progress report, November 1, 1996--August 31, 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kreidenweis, S.M.; Cotton, W.R.

    1997-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

    At the present time, general circulation models (GCMs) poorly represent clouds, to the extent that they cannot be relied upon to simulate the climatic effects of increasing concentrations of greenhouse gases, or of anthropogenic perturbations to concentrations of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) or ice nuclei (IN). The net radiative forcing of clouds varies strongly with latitude. Poleward of 30 degrees in both hemispheres, low-level clouds create a net cooling effect corresponding to radiative divergences of {minus}50 to {minus}100 W/m{sup 2}. It is likely that a combination of fogs, boundary-layer stratocumulus, and stratus clouds are the main contributors to this forcing. Models of the response of the microphysical and radiative properties of clouds to changes in aerosol abundance, for a variety of large-scale meteorological forcings, are important additions to GCMs used for the study of the role of Arctic systems in global climate. The overall objective of this research is the development of an aerosol/cloud microphysics parameterization of mixed-phase stratus and boundary-layer clouds which responds to variations in CCN and IN. The parameterization is to be designed for ultimate use in GCM simulations as a tool in understanding the role of CCN, IN, and Arctic clouds in radiation budgets. Several versions of the CSU RAMS (Regional Atmospheric Modeling System) will be used during the course of this work. The parameterizations developed in this research are intended for application in a single-column cloud model, designed as an adaptive grid model which can interface into a GCM vertical grid through distinct layers of the troposphere where the presence of layer clouds is expected.

  17. Why do mixed quantum-classical methods describe short-time dynamics through conical intersections so well? Analysis of geometric phase effects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gherib, Rami; Izmaylov, Artur F

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Adequate simulation of non-adiabatic dynamics through conical intersection requires account for a non-trivial geometric phase (GP) emerging in electronic and nuclear wave-functions in the adiabatic representation. Popular mixed quantum-classical (MQC) methods, surface hopping and Ehrenfest, do not carry a nuclear wave-function to be able to incorporate the GP into nuclear dynamics. Surprisingly, the MQC methods reproduce ultra-fast interstate crossing dynamics generated with the exact quantum propagation so well as if they contained information about the GP. Using two-dimensional linear vibronic coupling models we unravel how the MQC methods can effectively mimic the most significant dynamical GP effects: 1) compensation for repulsive diagonal second order non-adiabatic couplings and 2) transfer enhancement for a fully cylindrically symmetric component of a nuclear distribution.

  18. Adsorption of propane, isopropyl, and hydrogen on cluster models of the M1 phase of Mo-V-Te-Nb-O mixed metal oxide catalyst

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Govindasamy, Agalya [University of Cincinnati; Muthukumar, Kaliappan [University of Cincinnati; Yu, Junjun [University of Cincinnati; Xu, Ye [ORNL; Guliants, Vadim V. [University of Cincinnati

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Mo-V-Te-Nb-O mixed metal oxide catalyst possessing the M1 phase structure is uniquely capable of directly converting propane into acrylonitrile. However, the mechanism of this complex eight-electron transformation, which includes a series of oxidative H-abstraction and N-insertion steps, remains poorly understood. We have conducted a density functional theory study of cluster models of the proposed active and selective site for propane ammoxidation, including the adsorption of propane, isopropyl (CH{sub 3}CHCH{sub 3}), and H which are involved in the first step of this transformation, that is, the methylene C-H bond scission in propane, on these active site models. Among the surface oxygen species, the telluryl oxo (Te=O) is found to be the most nucleophilic. Whereas the adsorption of propane is weak regardless of the MO{sub x} species involved, isopropyl and H adsorption exhibits strong preference in the order of Te=O > V=O > bridging oxygens > empty Mo apical site, suggesting the importance of TeO{sub x} species for H abstraction. The adsorption energies of isopropyl and H and consequently the reaction energy of the initial dehydrogenation of propane are strongly dependent on the number of ab planes included in the cluster, which points to the need to employ multilayer cluster models to correctly capture the energetics of surface chemistry on this mixed metal oxide catalyst.

  19. Retrieval of Cloud Microphysical Properties from MODIS and AIRS JUN LI,* HUNG-LUNG HUANG,* CHIAN-YI LIU,* PING YANG, TIMOTHY J. SCHMIT,# HELI WEI,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Jun

    Retrieval of Cloud Microphysical Properties from MODIS and AIRS JUN LI,* HUNG-LUNG HUANG,* CHIAN monitoring of the distribution of clouds during day and night. The MODIS is able to provide a high-spatial-resolution (1­5 km) cloud mask, cloud classification mask, cloud-phase mask, cloud-top pressure (CTP

  20. Ice cloud single-scattering property models with the full phase matrix at wavelengths from 0.2 to 100 mm

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baum, Bryan A.

    W. Dayton Street, Madison, WI 53706, United States b Texas A&M University, College Station, TX February 2014 Available online 11 March 2014 Keywords: Ice clouds Light scattering Remote sensing Radiative agreement between solar and infrared optical thicknesses. Finally, spectral results are presented

  1. CGILS: Results from the First Phase of an International Project to Understand the Physical Mechanisms of Low Cloud Feedbacks in Single Column Models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Minghua; Bretherton, Christopher S.; Blossey, Peter; Austin, Phillip A.; Bacmeister, J.; Bony, Sandrine; Brient, Florent; Cheedela, Suvarchal K.; Cheng, Anning; Del Genio, Anthony D.; De Roode, Stephan R.; Endo , Satoshi; Franklin, Charmaine N.; Golaz, Jean-Christophe; Hannay, Cecile; Heus, Thijs; Isotta, Francesco A.; Jean-Louis, Dufresne; Kang, In-Sik; Kawai, Hideaki; Koehler, M.; Larson, Vincent E.; Liu, Yangang; Lock, Adrian; Lohmann, U.; Khairoutdinov, Marat; Molod, Andrea M.; Neggers, Roel; Rasch, Philip J.; Sandu, Irina; Senkbeil, Ryan; Siebesma, A. P.; Siegenthaler-Le Drian, Colombe; Stevens, Bjorn; Suarez, Max; Xu, Kuan-Man; Von Salzen, Knut; Webb, Mark; Wolf, Audrey; Zhao, M.

    2013-12-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Large Eddy Models (LES) and Single Column Models (SCM) are used in a surrogate climate change 101 to investigate the physical mechanism of low cloud feedbacks in climate models. Enhanced surface-102 driven boundary layer turbulence and shallow convection in a warmer climate are found to be 103 dominant mechanisms in SCMs.

  2. Cloud Controlling Factors --Low Clouds BJORN STEVENS,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stevens, Bjorn

    Cloud Controlling Factors -- Low Clouds BJORN STEVENS, Department of Atmospheric and Oceanic) clouds is reviewed, with an emphasis on factors that may be expected to change in a changing climate of low-cloud control- ling processes are offered: these include renewing our focus on theory, model

  3. Cloud Tracking in Cloud-Resolving Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Plant, Robert

    Cloud Tracking in Cloud-Resolving Models RMetS Conference 4th September 2007 Bob Plant Department of Meteorology, University of Reading, UK #12;Introduction Obtain life cycle statistics for clouds in CRM simulations What is the distribution of cloud lifetimes? What factors determine the lifetime of an individual

  4. Cloud Controlling Factors --Low Clouds BJORN STEVENS,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stevens, Bjorn

    Cloud Controlling Factors -- Low Clouds BJORN STEVENS, Department of Atmospheric and Oceanic conspire to determine the statistics and cli- matology of layers of shallow (boundary layer) clouds of low-cloud control- ling processes are offered: these include renewing our focus on theory, model

  5. Cloud Computing: Rain-Clouds System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harinder Kaur

    Abstract — Cloud Computing is the on demand service can be provided to the users at any time. It delivers the software, data access, computing as a service rather than the product. The Cloud application simplifies the computing technology by providing pay-per-use customer relationship. It is the theory that familiar to cheaper devices with low processing power, lower storage capacities, great flexibility and many more things. The security of cloud computing is a major factor as users store sensitive and confidential information with cloud storage providers. The range of these providers may be un trusted and harmful. The purpose of adopting cloud computing in an organization is to decide between a „public cloud ? and „private cloud ? by means of privacy. Public clouds often known as provider clouds are administrated by third parties and services are offered on pay-per-use basis. Private clouds or internal clouds are owned by the single firm but it has some metrics such as lacking of availability of services (such as memory, server) and network resources which leads it to down. Due to this, technology moves toward the concept of “Multi clouds ” or “Rain Clouds”. This paper displays the use of multi-clouds or rain clouds due to its ability to handle the huge amount of data traffic that affect the cloud computing user.

  6. ATS 620: Thermodynamics and Cloud Physics Dr. Sonia Kreidenweis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van den Heever, Susan C.

    ATS 620: Thermodynamics and Cloud Physics Fall 2013 Dr. Sonia Kreidenweis Dr. Susan van den Heever graduate students to key concepts in cloud physics and thermodynamics as applied to the atmosphere. These concepts include energy variables and energy calculations, thermodynamic diagrams, phase changes, and cloud

  7. Cloud Security by Max Garvey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tolmach, Andrew

    Cloud Security Survey by Max Garvey #12;Cloudy Cloud is Cloudy What is the cloud? On Demand Service Network access Resource pooling Elasticity of Resources Measured Service #12;Cloud Types/Variants Iaa Cloud Public Cloud Hybrid Cloud combination. Private cloud with overflow going to public cloud. #12

  8. Cloud Computing For Bioinformatics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ferrara, Katherine W.

    Cloud Computing For Bioinformatics #12;Cloud Computing: what is it? · Cloud Computing is a distributed infrastructure where resources, software, and data are provided in an on-demand fashion. · Cloud Computing abstracts infrastructure from application. · Cloud Computing should save you time the way software

  9. Cloud Computing og availability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christensen, Henrik Bærbak

    Cloud Computing og availability Projekt i pålidelighed Henrik Lavdal - 20010210 Søren Bardino Kaa - 20011654 Gruppe 8 19-03-2010 #12;Cloud Computing og availability Side 2 af 28 Indholdsfortegnelse ...........................................................................................5 Cloud computing

  10. On Demand Surveillance Service in Vehicular Cloud

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weng, Jui-Ting

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Toward Vehicular Service Cloud . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4.2 Open Mobile Cloud Requirement . . . . .3.1 Mobile Cloud

  11. Cloud Computing For Bioinformatics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ferrara, Katherine W.

    Cloud Computing For Bioinformatics EC2 and AMIs #12;Quick-starting an EC2 instance (let's get our feet wet!) Cloud Computing #12;Cloud Computing: EC2 instance Quick Start · On EC2 console, we can click on Launch Instance · This will let us get up and going quickly #12;Cloud Computing: EC2 instance

  12. Depolarisation cooling of an atomic cloud

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Hensler; A. Greiner; J. Stuhler; T. Pfau

    2005-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose a cooling scheme based on depolarisation of a polarised cloud of trapped atoms. Similar to adiabatic demagnetisation, we suggest to use the coupling between the internal spin reservoir of the cloud and the external kinetic reservoir via dipolar relaxation to reduce the temperature of the cloud. By optical pumping one can cool the spin reservoir and force the cooling process. In case of a trapped gas of dipolar chromium atoms, we show that this cooling technique can be performed continuously and used to approach the critical phase space density for BEC

  13. SURFACE CLOUD RADIATIVE FORCING, CLOUD FRACTION AND CLOUD ALBEDO: THEIR RELATIONSHIP AND MULTISCALE VARIATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    SURFACE CLOUD RADIATIVE FORCING, CLOUD FRACTION AND CLOUD ALBEDO: THEIR RELATIONSHIP AND MULTISCALE/Atmospheric Sciences Division Brookhaven National Laboratory P.O. Box, Upton, NY www.bnl.gov ABSTRACT Cloud-induced climate change. Cloud-radiative forcing, cloud fraction, and cloud albedo are three key quantities

  14. Cloud Property Retrieval Products for Graciosa Island, Azores

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Dong, Xiquan

    The motivation for developing this product was to use the Dong et al. 1998 method to retrieve cloud microphysical properties, such as cloud droplet effective radius, cloud droplets number concentration, and optical thickness. These retrieved properties have been used to validate the satellite retrieval, and evaluate the climate simulations and reanalyses. We had been using this method to retrieve cloud microphysical properties over ARM SGP and NSA sites. We also modified the method for the AMF at Shouxian, China and some IOPs, e.g. ARM IOP at SGP in March, 2000. The ARSCL data from ARM data archive over the SGP and NSA have been used to determine the cloud boundary and cloud phase. For these ARM permanent sites, the ARSCL data was developed based on MMCR measurements, however, there were no data available at the Azores field campaign. We followed the steps to generate this derived product and also include the MPLCMASK cloud retrievals to determine the most accurate cloud boundaries, including the thin cirrus clouds that WACR may under-detect. We use these as input to retrieve the cloud microphysical properties. Due to the different temporal resolutions of the derived cloud boundary heights product and the cloud properties product, we submit them as two separate netcdf files.

  15. Cloud Property Retrieval Products for Graciosa Island, Azores

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dong, Xiquan

    2014-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The motivation for developing this product was to use the Dong et al. 1998 method to retrieve cloud microphysical properties, such as cloud droplet effective radius, cloud droplets number concentration, and optical thickness. These retrieved properties have been used to validate the satellite retrieval, and evaluate the climate simulations and reanalyses. We had been using this method to retrieve cloud microphysical properties over ARM SGP and NSA sites. We also modified the method for the AMF at Shouxian, China and some IOPs, e.g. ARM IOP at SGP in March, 2000. The ARSCL data from ARM data archive over the SGP and NSA have been used to determine the cloud boundary and cloud phase. For these ARM permanent sites, the ARSCL data was developed based on MMCR measurements, however, there were no data available at the Azores field campaign. We followed the steps to generate this derived product and also include the MPLCMASK cloud retrievals to determine the most accurate cloud boundaries, including the thin cirrus clouds that WACR may under-detect. We use these as input to retrieve the cloud microphysical properties. Due to the different temporal resolutions of the derived cloud boundary heights product and the cloud properties product, we submit them as two separate netcdf files.

  16. Development of advanced cloud parameterizations to examine air quality, cloud properties, and cloud-radiation feedback in mesoscale models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, In Young

    1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The distribution of atmospheric pollutants is governed by dynamic processes that create the general conditions for transport and mixing, by microphysical processes that control the evolution of aerosol and cloud particles, and by chemical processes that transform chemical species and form aerosols. Pollutants emitted into the air can undergo homogeneous gas reactions to create a suitable environment for the production by heterogeneous nucleation of embryos composed of a few molecules. The physicochemical properties of preexisting aerosols interact with newly produced embryos to evolve by heteromolecular diffusion and coagulation. Hygroscopic particles wig serve as effective cloud condensation nuclei (CCN), while hydrophobic particles will serve as effective ice-forming nuclei. Clouds form initially by condensation of water vapor on CCN and evolve in a vapor-liquid-solid system by deposition, sublimation, freezing, melting, coagulation, and breakup. Gases and aerosols that enter the clouds undergo aqueous chemical processes and may acidity hydrometer particles. Calculations for solar and longwave radiation fluxes depend on how the respective spectra are modified by absorbers such as H{sub 2}O, CO{sub 2}, O{sub 3}, CH{sub 4}, N{sub 2}O, chlorofruorocarbons, and aerosols. However, the flux calculations are more complicated for cloudy skies, because the cloud optical properties are not well defined. In this paper, key processes such as tropospheric chemistry, cloud microphysics parameterizations, and radiation schemes are reviewed in terms of physicochemical processes occurring, and recommendations are made for the development of advanced modules applicable to mesoscale models.

  17. XSEDE Cloud Survey Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walter, M.Todd

    XSEDE Cloud Survey Report David Lifka, Cornell Center for Advanced Computing Ian Foster, ANL, ANL and The University of Chicago A National Science Foundation-sponsored cloud user survey was conducted from September 2012 to April 2013 by the XSEDE Cloud Integration Investigation Team to better

  18. Research Cloud Computing Recommendations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qian, Ning

    Research Cloud Computing Recommendations SRCPAC December 3, 2014 #12;Mandate and Membership SRCPAC convened this committee in Sept 2014 to investigate the role that cloud computing should play in our & Academic Affairs (Social Work) #12;Questions discussed · What cloud resources are available? · Which kinds

  19. ADVANCED MIXING MODELS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, S.; Dimenna, R.; Tamburello, D.

    2011-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The process of recovering and processing High Level Waste (HLW) the waste in storage tanks at the Savannah River Site (SRS) typically requires mixing the contents of the tank with one to four mixers (pumps) located within the tank. The typical criteria to establish a mixed condition in a tank are based on the number of pumps in operation and the time duration of operation. To ensure that a mixed condition is achieved, operating times are typically set conservatively long. This approach results in high operational costs because of the long mixing times and high maintenance and repair costs for the same reason. A significant reduction in both of these costs might be realized by reducing the required mixing time based on calculating a reliable indicator of mixing with a suitably validated computer code. The focus of the present work is to establish mixing criteria applicable to miscible fluids, with an ultimate goal of addressing waste processing in HLW tanks at SRS and quantifying the mixing time required to suspend sludge particles with the submersible jet pump. A single-phase computational fluid dynamics (CFD) approach was taken for the analysis of jet flow patterns with an emphasis on the velocity decay and the turbulent flow evolution for the farfield region from the pump. Literature results for a turbulent jet flow are reviewed, since the decay of the axial jet velocity and the evolution of the jet flow patterns are important phenomena affecting sludge suspension and mixing operations. The work described in this report suggests a basis for further development of the theory leading to the identified mixing indicators, with benchmark analyses demonstrating their consistency with widely accepted correlations. Although the indicators are somewhat generic in nature, they are applied to Savannah River Site (SRS) waste tanks to provide a better, physically based estimate of the required mixing time. Waste storage tanks at SRS contain settled sludge which varies in height from zero to 10 ft. The sludge has been characterized and modeled as micron-sized solids, typically 1 to 5 microns, at weight fractions as high as 20 to 30 wt%, specific gravities to 1.4, and viscosities up to 64 cp during motion. The sludge is suspended and mixed through the use of submersible slurry jet pumps. To suspend settled sludge, water is added to the tank as a slurry medium and stirred with the jet pump. Although there is considerable technical literature on mixing and solid suspension in agitated tanks, very little literature has been published on jet mixing in a large-scale tank. One of the main objectives in the waste processing is to provide feed of a uniform slurry composition at a certain weight percentage (e.g. typically {approx}13 wt% at SRS) over an extended period of time. In preparation of the sludge for slurrying, several important questions have been raised with regard to sludge suspension and mixing of the solid suspension in the bulk of the tank: (1) How much time is required to prepare a slurry with a uniform solid composition? (2) How long will it take to suspend and mix the sludge for uniform composition in any particular waste tank? (3) What are good mixing indicators to answer the questions concerning sludge mixing stated above in a general fashion applicable to any waste tank/slurry pump geometry and fluid/sludge combination?

  20. Dynamic Cloud Resource Reservation via Cloud Brokerage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Baochun

    Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Toronto Department of Electrical@eecg.toronto.edu, liang@utoronto.ca Abstract--Infrastructure-as-a-Service clouds offer diverse pric- ing options

  1. Cirrus cloud formation and the role of heterogeneous ice nuclei

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Froyd, Karl D.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Composition, size, and phase are key properties that define the ability of an aerosol particle to initiate ice in cirrus clouds. Properties of cirrus ice nuclei (IN) have not been well constrained due to a lack of systematic ...

  2. The Chemistry of Cold Interstellar Cloud Cores Eric Herbst

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Millar, Tom

    Chapter 1 The Chemistry of Cold Interstellar Cloud Cores Eric Herbst Department of Physics and Their Chemistry . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 1.2 Gas-Phase Chemical Processes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 1.2.4 Organic Chemistry . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16 1.2.5 Negative

  3. On Symmetric Lepton Mixing Matrices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hochmuth, K A; Hochmuth, Kathrin A.; Rodejohann, Werner

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Contrary to the quark mixing matrix, the lepton mixing matrix could be symmetric. We study the phenomenological consequences of this possibility. In particular, we find that symmetry would imply that |U_{e3}| is larger than 0.16, i.e., above its current 2 sigma limit. The other mixing angles are also constrained and CP violating effects in neutrino oscillations are suppressed, even though |U_{e3}| is sizable. Maximal atmospheric mixing is only allowed if the other observables are outside their current 3 sigma ranges, and sin^2 theta_{23} lies typically below 0.5. The Majorana phases are not affected, but the implied values of the solar neutrino mixing angle have some effect on the predictions for neutrinoless double beta decay. We further discuss some formal properties of a symmetric mixing matrix.

  4. pCloud: A Cloud-based Power Market Simulation Environment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rudkevich, Aleksandr; Goldis, Evgeniy

    2012-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

    This research conducted by the Newton Energy Group, LLC (NEG) is dedicated to the development of pCloud: a Cloud-based Power Market Simulation Environment. pCloud is offering power industry stakeholders the capability to model electricity markets and is organized around the Software as a Service (SaaS) concept -- a software application delivery model in which software is centrally hosted and provided to many users via the internet. During the Phase I of this project NEG developed a prototype design for pCloud as a SaaS-based commercial service offering, system architecture supporting that design, ensured feasibility of key architecture's elements, formed technological partnerships and negotiated commercial agreements with partners, conducted market research and other related activities and secured funding for continue development of pCloud between the end of Phase I and beginning of Phase II, if awarded. Based on the results of Phase I activities, NEG has established that the development of a cloud-based power market simulation environment within the Windows Azure platform is technologically feasible, can be accomplished within the budget and timeframe available through the Phase II SBIR award with additional external funding. NEG believes that pCloud has the potential to become a game-changing technology for the modeling and analysis of electricity markets. This potential is due to the following critical advantages of pCloud over its competition: - Standardized access to advanced and proven power market simulators offered by third parties. - Automated parallelization of simulations and dynamic provisioning of computing resources on the cloud. This combination of automation and scalability dramatically reduces turn-around time while offering the capability to increase the number of analyzed scenarios by a factor of 10, 100 or even 1000. - Access to ready-to-use data and to cloud-based resources leading to a reduction in software, hardware, and IT costs. - Competitive pricing structure, which will make high-volume usage of simulation services affordable. - Availability and affordability of high quality power simulators, which presently only large corporate clients can afford, will level the playing field in developing regional energy policies, determining prudent cost recovery mechanisms and assuring just and reasonable rates to consumers. - Users that presently do not have the resources to internally maintain modeling capabilities will now be able to run simulations. This will invite more players into the industry, ultimately leading to more transparent and liquid power markets.

  5. Finance Idol Word Cloud

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This word cloud represents the topics discussed during the Big and Small Ideas: How to Lower Solar Financing Costs breakout session at the SunShot Grand Challenge.

  6. Neutrino Mixing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carlo Giunti; Marco Laveder

    2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this review we present the main features of the current status of neutrino physics. After a review of the theory of neutrino mixing and oscillations, we discuss the current status of solar and atmospheric neutrino oscillation experiments. We show that the current data can be nicely accommodated in the framework of three-neutrino mixing. We discuss also the problem of the determination of the absolute neutrino mass scale through Tritium beta-decay experiments and astrophysical observations, and the exploration of the Majorana nature of massive neutrinos through neutrinoless double-beta decay experiments. Finally, future prospects are briefly discussed.

  7. Relationship between cloud radiative forcing, cloud fraction and cloud albedo, and new surface-based approach for determining cloud albedo

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Y.; Wu, W.; Jensen, M. P.; Toto, T.

    2011-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper focuses on three interconnected topics: (1) quantitative relationship between surface shortwave cloud radiative forcing, cloud fraction, and cloud albedo; (2) surface-based approach for measuring cloud albedo; (3) multiscale (diurnal, annual and inter-annual) variations and covariations of surface shortwave cloud radiative forcing, cloud fraction, and cloud albedo. An analytical expression is first derived to quantify the relationship between cloud radiative forcing, cloud fraction, and cloud albedo. The analytical expression is then used to deduce a new approach for inferring cloud albedo from concurrent surface-based measurements of downwelling surface shortwave radiation and cloud fraction. High-resolution decade-long data on cloud albedos are obtained by use of this surface-based approach over the US Department of Energy's Atmospheric Radiaton Measurement (ARM) Program at the Great Southern Plains (SGP) site. The surface-based cloud albedos are further compared against those derived from the coincident GOES satellite measurements. The three long-term (1997-2009) sets of hourly data on shortwave cloud radiative forcing, cloud fraction and cloud albedo collected over the SGP site are analyzed to explore the multiscale (diurnal, annual and inter-annual) variations and covariations. The analytical formulation is useful for diagnosing deficiencies of cloud-radiation parameterizations in climate models.

  8. Cloud Computing: An Architectural Perspective .

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pandya, Hetalben

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ??Cloud Computing is a term heavily used in today's world. Not even a day passes by without hearing the words "Cloud Computing". It has become… (more)

  9. CONTRIBUTED Green Cloud Computing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tucker, Rod

    to manage energy consumption across the entire information and communications technology (ICT) sector. While considers both public and private clouds, and includes energy consumption in switching and transmission to energy consumption and cloud computing seems to be an alternative to office-based computing. By Jayant

  10. Cloud Properties and Radiative Heating Rates for TWP

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Comstock, Jennifer

    A cloud properties and radiative heating rates dataset is presented where cloud properties retrieved using lidar and radar observations are input into a radiative transfer model to compute radiative fluxes and heating rates at three ARM sites located in the Tropical Western Pacific (TWP) region. The cloud properties retrieval is a conditional retrieval that applies various retrieval techniques depending on the available data, that is if lidar, radar or both instruments detect cloud. This Combined Remote Sensor Retrieval Algorithm (CombRet) produces vertical profiles of liquid or ice water content (LWC or IWC), droplet effective radius (re), ice crystal generalized effective size (Dge), cloud phase, and cloud boundaries. The algorithm was compared with 3 other independent algorithms to help estimate the uncertainty in the cloud properties, fluxes, and heating rates (Comstock et al. 2013). The dataset is provided at 2 min temporal and 90 m vertical resolution. The current dataset is applied to time periods when the MMCR (Millimeter Cloud Radar) version of the ARSCL (Active Remotely-Sensed Cloud Locations) Value Added Product (VAP) is available. The MERGESONDE VAP is utilized where temperature and humidity profiles are required. Future additions to this dataset will utilize the new KAZR instrument and its associated VAPs.

  11. Cloud Properties and Radiative Heating Rates for TWP

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Comstock, Jennifer

    2013-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

    A cloud properties and radiative heating rates dataset is presented where cloud properties retrieved using lidar and radar observations are input into a radiative transfer model to compute radiative fluxes and heating rates at three ARM sites located in the Tropical Western Pacific (TWP) region. The cloud properties retrieval is a conditional retrieval that applies various retrieval techniques depending on the available data, that is if lidar, radar or both instruments detect cloud. This Combined Remote Sensor Retrieval Algorithm (CombRet) produces vertical profiles of liquid or ice water content (LWC or IWC), droplet effective radius (re), ice crystal generalized effective size (Dge), cloud phase, and cloud boundaries. The algorithm was compared with 3 other independent algorithms to help estimate the uncertainty in the cloud properties, fluxes, and heating rates (Comstock et al. 2013). The dataset is provided at 2 min temporal and 90 m vertical resolution. The current dataset is applied to time periods when the MMCR (Millimeter Cloud Radar) version of the ARSCL (Active Remotely-Sensed Cloud Locations) Value Added Product (VAP) is available. The MERGESONDE VAP is utilized where temperature and humidity profiles are required. Future additions to this dataset will utilize the new KAZR instrument and its associated VAPs.

  12. Detection of supercooled liquid in mixedphase clouds using radar Doppler spectra

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shupe, Matthew

    in the temperature range from 0 to -40°C, where both liquid and ice hydrometeor phases are sustainable of their hydrometeors (i.e., liquid or ice). Current cloud parameterizations that parti- tion water into liquid and ice 2010; published 1 October 2010. [1] Cloud phase identification from active remote sensors

  13. Analysis of In situ Observations of Cloud Microphysics from M-PACE Final Report, DOE Grant Agreement No. DE-FG02-06ER64168

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michael R. Poellot

    2009-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the findings and accomplishments of work performed under DOE Grant Agreement No. DE-FG02-06ER64168. The focus of the work was the analysis of in situ observations collected by the University of North Dakota Citation research aircraft during the Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment (M-PACE). This project was conducted in 2004 along the North Slope of Alaska. The objectives of the research were: to characterize certain microphysical properties of clouds sampled during M-PACE, including spatial variability, precipitation formation, ice multiplication; to examine instrument performance and certain data processing algorithms; and to collaborate with other M-PACE investigators on case study analyses. A summary of the findings of the first two objectives is given here in parts 1 and 2; full results are contained in reports listed in part 3 of this report. The collaborative efforts are described in the publications listed in part 3.

  14. Cloud-Scale Datacenters Page 1 Cloud-Scale

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chaudhuri, Surajit

    Cloud-Scale Datacenters Page 1 Cloud-Scale Datacenters #12;Cloud-Scale Datacenters Page 2, and operating datacenters. When software applications are built as distributed systems, every aspect brief will explore how cloud workloads have changed the way datacenters are designed and operated

  15. Attribution Analysis of Cloud Feedback

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Chen

    2014-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    -term global warming. If the EIS-low cloud fraction relationship holds under global warming, it is likely that the tropical low cloud fraction change is non-negative. Climate models without significant negative low cloud fraction change suggest that the cloud...

  16. Chapter Three Thermodynamics, Cloud Microphysics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xue, Ming

    and rainwater. The raindrops differ from cloud water in that they sediment at a parameterized terminal speed. The fall-out of the rainwater from the cloud in which it forms is recognized as a major factor-conversion) from these cloud droplets and are then allowed to collect smaller cloud droplets (accretion

  17. Convective Cloud Lifecycles Lunchtime seminar

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Plant, Robert

    Convective Cloud Lifecycles Lunchtime seminar 19th May 2009 Bob Plant Department of Meteorology, University of Reading, UK #12;Introduction Obtain life cycle statistics for clouds in CRM simulations Why Conclusions Convective Cloud Lifecycles ­ p.1/3 #12;Why bother? Convective Cloud Lifecycles ­ p.2/3 #12;Some

  18. Do Gamma-Ray Bursts Come from the Oort Cloud?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. E. Clarke; O. Blaes; adn S. Tremaine

    1993-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

    We examine the possibility that gamma-ray bursts arise from sources in the Oort comet cloud, basing most of our arguments on accepted models for the formation and spatial distribution of the cloud. We identify three severe problems with such models: (1) There is no known mechanism for producing bursts that can explain the observed burst rate and energetics without violating other observational constraints. (2) The bright source counts cannot be reconciled with standard models for the phase-space distribution of objects in the Oort cloud. (3) The observed isotropy of the available burst data is inconsistent with the expected angular distribution of sources in the Oort cloud. We therefore assert that Oort cloud models of gamma-ray bursts are extremely implausible.

  19. Moving into the Cloud.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mikalsen, Christian

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ??Cloud computing is the notion of abstracting and outsourcing hardware or software resources over the Internet, often to a third party on a pay-as-you-go basis.… (more)

  20. FORMATION OF MASSIVE MOLECULAR CLOUD CORES BY CLOUD-CLOUD COLLISION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Inoue, Tsuyoshi [Department of Physics and Mathematics, Aoyama Gakuin University, Sagamihara, Kanagawa 252-5258 (Japan); Fukui, Yasuo, E-mail: inouety@phys.aoyama.ac.jp [Department of Physics, Graduate School of Science, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8602 (Japan)

    2013-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent observations of molecular clouds around rich massive star clusters including NGC 3603, Westerlund 2, and M20 revealed that the formation of massive stars could be triggered by a cloud-cloud collision. By using three-dimensional, isothermal, magnetohydrodynamics simulations with the effect of self-gravity, we demonstrate that massive, gravitationally unstable, molecular cloud cores are formed behind the strong shock waves induced by cloud-cloud collision. We find that the massive molecular cloud cores have large effective Jeans mass owing to the enhancement of the magnetic field strength by shock compression and turbulence in the compressed layer. Our results predict that massive molecular cloud cores formed by the cloud-cloud collision are filamentary and threaded by magnetic fields perpendicular to the filament.

  1. INFERENCE OF INHOMOGENEOUS CLOUDS IN AN EXOPLANET ATMOSPHERE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Demory, Brice-Olivier; De Wit, Julien; Lewis, Nikole; Zsom, Andras; Seager, Sara [Department of Earth, Atmospheric and Planetary Sciences, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States)] [Department of Earth, Atmospheric and Planetary Sciences, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Fortney, Jonathan [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States)] [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Knutson, Heather; Desert, Jean-Michel [Division of Geological and Planetary Sciences, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States)] [Division of Geological and Planetary Sciences, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Heng, Kevin [Center for Space and Habitability, University of Bern, Sidlerstrasse 5, CH-3012, Bern (Switzerland)] [Center for Space and Habitability, University of Bern, Sidlerstrasse 5, CH-3012, Bern (Switzerland); Madhusudhan, Nikku [Department of Physics and Department of Astronomy, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06520 (United States)] [Department of Physics and Department of Astronomy, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06520 (United States); Gillon, Michael [Institut d'Astrophysique et de Géophysique, Université de Ličge, Allée du 6 Aoűt, 17, Bat. B5C, B-4000 Ličge 1 (Belgium)] [Institut d'Astrophysique et de Géophysique, Université de Ličge, Allée du 6 Aoűt, 17, Bat. B5C, B-4000 Ličge 1 (Belgium); Barclay, Thomas [NASA Ames Research Center, M/S 244-30, Moffett Field, CA 94035 (United States)] [NASA Ames Research Center, M/S 244-30, Moffett Field, CA 94035 (United States); Parmentier, Vivien [Laboratoire J.-L. Lagrange, UMR 7293, Université de Nice-Sophia Antipolis, CNRS, Observatoire de la Côte d'Azur B.P. 4229, F-06304 Nice Cedex 4 (France)] [Laboratoire J.-L. Lagrange, UMR 7293, Université de Nice-Sophia Antipolis, CNRS, Observatoire de la Côte d'Azur B.P. 4229, F-06304 Nice Cedex 4 (France); Cowan, Nicolas B., E-mail: demory@mit.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Northwestern University, 2145 Sheridan Road, F165, Evanston, IL 60208 (United States)

    2013-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We present new visible and infrared observations of the hot Jupiter Kepler-7b to determine its atmospheric properties. Our analysis allows us to (1) refine Kepler-7b's relatively large geometric albedo of Ag = 0.35 ± 0.02, (2) place upper limits on Kepler-7b thermal emission that remains undetected in both Spitzer bandpasses and (3) report a westward shift in the Kepler optical phase curve. We argue that Kepler-7b's visible flux cannot be due to thermal emission or Rayleigh scattering from H{sub 2} molecules. We therefore conclude that high altitude, optically reflective clouds located west from the substellar point are present in its atmosphere. We find that a silicate-based cloud composition is a possible candidate. Kepler-7b exhibits several properties that may make it particularly amenable to cloud formation in its upper atmosphere. These include a hot deep atmosphere that avoids a cloud cold trap, very low surface gravity to suppress cloud sedimentation, and a planetary equilibrium temperature in a range that allows for silicate clouds to potentially form in the visible atmosphere probed by Kepler. Our analysis does not only present evidence of optically thick clouds on Kepler-7b but also yields the first map of clouds in an exoplanet atmosphere.

  2. Migrating enterprise storage applications to the cloud

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vrable, Michael Daniel

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2.1 Cloud Providers . . . . . . . . . . . .2.1.1 Cloud Storage . . . . . . . . .2.1.2 Cloud Computation . . . . . . 2.2 Enterprise Storage

  3. Thin Cloud Length Scales Using CALIPSO and CloudSat Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Solbrig, Jeremy E.

    2010-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Thin clouds are the most difficult cloud type to observe. The recent availability of joint cloud products from the active remote sensing instruments aboard CloudSat and the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite (CALIPSO) facilitates...

  4. Observing Warm Clouds in 3D Using ARM Scanning Cloud

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Observing Warm Clouds in 3D Using ARM Scanning Cloud Radars and a Novel Ensemble Method For original submission and image(s), see ARM Research Highlights http:www.arm.gov...

  5. Cloud Based Applications and Platforms (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brodt-Giles, D.

    2014-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Presentation to the Cloud Computing East 2014 Conference, where we are highlighting our cloud computing strategy, describing the platforms on the cloud (including Smartgrid.gov), and defining our process for implementing cloud based applications.

  6. Mixing in a liquid metal electrode

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kelley, Douglas H.

    Fluid mixing has first-order importance for many engineering problems in mass transport, including design and optimization of liquid-phase energy storage devices. Liquid metal batteries are currently being commercialized ...

  7. Cloud Condensation Nuclei Retrievals at Cloud Base in North Dakota

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Delene, David J.

    Cloud Condensation Nuclei Retrievals at Cloud Base in North Dakota · Mariusz Starzec #12;Motivation Compare University of Wyoming (UWyo) and Droplet Measurement Technologies (DMT) cloud condensation nuclei condensation nuclei concentration (CCNC) at any supersaturation (SS) #12;Background Aerosols act as nuclei

  8. HNCO in molecular clouds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jackson, J.M.; Armstrong, J.T.; Barrett, A.H.

    1984-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In a survey of 18 molecular clouds, HNCO J/sub K/-1K1..-->..J'/sub K/'-1K'1 = 5/sub 05/..-->..4/sub 05/ and 4/sub 04/..-->..3/sub 03/ emission was etected in seven clouds, and possibly in one other. Emission in these transitions originates in high-density regions (n> or approx. =10/sup 6/ cm/sup -3/). The molecule's excitation requirements allow us to derive limits to excitation temperatures an optical depths. We discuss the possibility of clumping with respect to the beam and compare our results with data from other molecular species. The HNCO emission from Sgr A is an ordder of magnitude larger than the other detected sources as is the ratio ..delta..T +- /sub A/(HNCO 5/sub 05/..-->..4/sub 04/)/..delta..T +- /sub A/(C/sup 18/O 1..-->..0). HNCO is probably a constituent of most molecular clouds.

  9. Opaque cloud detection

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Roskovensky, John K. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2009-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of detecting clouds in a digital image comprising, for an area of the digital image, determining a reflectance value in at least three discrete electromagnetic spectrum bands, computing a first ratio of one reflectance value minus another reflectance value and the same two values added together, computing a second ratio of one reflectance value and another reflectance value, choosing one of the reflectance values, and concluding that an opaque cloud exists in the area if the results of each of the two computing steps and the choosing step fall within three corresponding predetermined ranges.

  10. 5, 60136039, 2005 FRESCO cloud

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    ACPD 5, 6013­6039, 2005 FRESCO cloud algorithm N. Fournier et al. Title Page Abstract Introduction cloud information over deserts from SCIAMACHY O2 A-band N. Fournier 1 , P. Stammes 1 , M. de Graaf 1 , R, 6013­6039, 2005 FRESCO cloud algorithm N. Fournier et al. Title Page Abstract Introduction Conclusions

  11. 3, 33013333, 2003 Cirrus cloud

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    ACPD 3, 3301­3333, 2003 Cirrus cloud occurrence as function of ambient relative humidity J. Str and Physics Discussions Cirrus cloud occurrence as function of ambient relative humidity: A comparison¨om (johan@itm.su.se) 3301 #12;ACPD 3, 3301­3333, 2003 Cirrus cloud occurrence as function of ambient

  12. 8, 96979729, 2008 FRESCO+ cloud

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    ACPD 8, 9697­9729, 2008 FRESCO+ cloud retrieval algorithm P. Wang et al. Title Page Abstract Chemistry and Physics Discussions FRESCO+: an improved O2 A-band cloud retrieval algorithm for tropospheric on behalf of the European Geosciences Union. 9697 #12;ACPD 8, 9697­9729, 2008 FRESCO+ cloud retrieval

  13. Cloud Formation, Evolution and Destruction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Estalella, Robert

    Chapter 4 Cloud Formation, Evolution and Destruction We now begin to trace the journey towards a star. How long does this take? The answer is surprisingly short: a good many clouds already contain new stars and these stars tend to be young. The typical cloud cannot spend long, if any time at all

  14. Cloud Formation and Acceleration in a Radiative Environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Proga, Daniel

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In a radiatively heated and cooled medium, the thermal instability is a plausible mechanism for forming clouds, while the radiation force provides a natural acceleration, especially when ions recombine and opacity increases. Here we extend Field's theory to self-consistently account for a radiation force resulting from bound-free and bound-bound transitions in the optically thin limit. We present physical arguments for clouds to be significantly accelerated by a radiation force due to lines during a nonlinear phase of the instability. To qualitatively illustrate our main points, we perform both one and two-dimensional (1-D/2-D) hydrodynamical simulations that allow us to study the nonlinear outcome of the evolution of thermally unstable gas subjected to this radiation force. Our 1-D simulations demonstrate that the thermal instability can produce long-lived clouds that reach a thermal equilibrium between radiative processes and thermal conduction, while the radiation force can indeed accelerate the clouds to ...

  15. Stratocumulus Clouds ROBERT WOOD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wood, Robert

    by latent heating in updrafts and cooling in downdrafts. Turbulent eddies and evaporative cooling drives, stratification of the STBL, and in some cases cloud breakup. Feedbacks between radiative cooling, precipitation- way interactions may be a key driver of aerosol concentrations over the remote oceans. Aerosol

  16. IONIZATION IN ATMOSPHERES OF BROWN DWARFS AND EXTRASOLAR PLANETS. III. BREAKDOWN CONDITIONS FOR MINERAL CLOUDS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Helling, Ch.; Jardine, M.; Stark, C. [SUPA, School of Physics and Astronomy, University of St. Andrews, St. Andrews KY16 9SS (United Kingdom); Diver, D., E-mail: ch@leap2010.eu [SUPA, School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Glasgow, Glasgow G12 8QQ (United Kingdom)

    2013-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Electric discharges were detected directly in the cloudy atmospheres of Earth, Jupiter, and Saturn, are debatable for Venus, and indirectly inferred for Neptune and Uranus in our solar system. Sprites (and other types of transient luminous events) have been detected only on Earth, and are theoretically predicted for Jupiter, Saturn, and Venus. Cloud formation is a common phenomenon in ultra-cool atmospheres such as in brown dwarf and extrasolar planetary atmospheres. Cloud particles can be expected to carry considerable charges which may trigger discharge events via small-scale processes between individual cloud particles (intra-cloud discharges) or large-scale processes between clouds (inter-cloud discharges). We investigate electrostatic breakdown characteristics, like critical field strengths and critical charge densities per surface, to demonstrate under which conditions mineral clouds undergo electric discharge events which may trigger or be responsible for sporadic X-ray emission. We apply results from our kinetic dust cloud formation model that is part of the DRIFT-PHOENIX model atmosphere simulations. We present a first investigation of the dependence of the breakdown conditions in brown dwarf and giant gas exoplanets on the local gas-phase chemistry, the effective temperature, and primordial gas-phase metallicity. Our results suggest that different intra-cloud discharge processes dominate at different heights inside mineral clouds: local coronal (point discharges) and small-scale sparks at the bottom region of the cloud where the gas density is high, and flow discharges and large-scale sparks near, and maybe above, the cloud top. The comparison of the thermal degree of ionization and the number density of cloud particles allows us to suggest the efficiency with which discharges will occur in planetary atmospheres.

  17. Neutrino Mixing and CP Phase Correlations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ma, Ernest; Popov, Oleg

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A special form of the $3 \\times 3$ Majorana neutrino mass matrix derivable from $\\mu - \\tau$ interchange symmetry accompanied by a generalized $CP$ transformation was obtained many years ago. It predicts $\\theta_{23} = \\pi/4$ as well as $\\delta_{CP} = \\pm \\pi/2$, with $\\theta_{13} \

  18. MIXED PHASE COMPRESSION HIGH EFFICIENCY HEAT PUMP.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chan, WenYen

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ??The objective of this thesis is the design and realization of a higher efficiency air source heat pump. The improved pump???s operating cost must rival… (more)

  19. Pulse Jet Mixing Tests With Noncohesive Solids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meyer, Perry A.; Bamberger, Judith A.; Enderlin, Carl W.; Fort, James A.; Wells, Beric E.; Sundaram, S. K.; Scott, Paul A.; Minette, Michael J.; Smith, Gary L.; Burns, Carolyn A.; Greenwood, Margaret S.; Morgen, Gerald P.; Baer, Ellen BK; Snyder, Sandra F.; White, Michael K.; Piepel, Gregory F.; Amidan, Brett G.; Heredia-Langner, Alejandro

    2012-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes results from pulse jet mixing (PJM) tests with noncohesive solids in Newtonian liquid. The tests were conducted during FY 2007 and 2008 to support the design of mixing systems for the Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). Tests were conducted at three geometric scales using noncohesive simulants, and the test data were used to develop models predicting two measures of mixing performance for full-scale WTP vessels. The models predict the cloud height (the height to which solids will be lifted by the PJM action) and the critical suspension velocity (the minimum velocity needed to ensure all solids are suspended off the floor, though not fully mixed). From the cloud height, the concentration of solids at the pump inlet can be estimated. The predicted critical suspension velocity for lifting all solids is not precisely the same as the mixing requirement for 'disturbing' a sufficient volume of solids, but the values will be similar and closely related. These predictive models were successfully benchmarked against larger scale tests and compared well with results from computational fluid dynamics simulations. The application of the models to assess mixing in WTP vessels is illustrated in examples for 13 distinct designs and selected operational conditions. The values selected for these examples are not final; thus, the estimates of performance should not be interpreted as final conclusions of design adequacy or inadequacy. However, this work does reveal that several vessels may require adjustments to design, operating features, or waste feed properties to ensure confidence in operation. The models described in this report will prove to be valuable engineering tools to evaluate options as designs are finalized for the WTP. Revision 1 refines data sets used for model development and summarizes models developed since the completion of Revision 0.

  20. THE INFLUENCE OF CLOUD PROCESSES ON THE DISTRIBUTION OF CHEMICAL SPECIES FOR THE 10 JULY 1996 STERAO/DEEP CONVECTION STORM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stuart, Amy L.

    - tenuation of solar radiation. The cloud hydromete- ors may serve as locations for aqueous and ice-phase be captured by the precipitating ice particles. Photolysis rates are altered by the scattering and at vapor, cloud water, rain, cloud ice, snow, grau- pel or hail, and scalars. A second order Runge

  1. Capture of field stars by giant interstellar clouds: the formation of moving stellar groups

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Olano, Carlos A

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the solar neighbourhood, there are moving groups of stars with similar ages and others of stars with heterogeneous ages as the field stars. To explain these facts, we have constructed a simple model of three phases. Phase A: a giant interstellar cloud is uniformly accelerated (or decelerated) with respect to the field stars during a relatively short period of time (10 Myr) and the cloud's mass is uniformly increased; phase B: the acceleration (or deceleration) and mass accretion of the cloud cease. The star formation spreads throughout the cloud, giving origin to stellar groups of similar ages; and phase C: the cloud loses all its gaseous component at a constant rate and in parallel is uniformly decelerated (or accelerated) until reaching the initial velocity of phase A (case 1) or the velocity of the gas cloud remains constant (case 2). Both cases give equivalent results. The system equations for the star motions governed by a time-dependent gravitational potential of the giant cloud and referred to a coo...

  2. A Catalog of HI Clouds in the Large Magellanic Cloud

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Kim; E. Rosolowsky; Y. Lee; Y. Kim; Y. C. Jung; M. A. Dopita; B. G. Elmegreen; K. C. Freeman; R. J. Sault; M. J. Kesteven; D. McConnell; Y. -H. Chu

    2007-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

    A 21 cm neutral hydrogen interferometric survey of the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) combined with the Parkes multi-beam HI single-dish survey clearly shows that the HI gas is distributed in the form of clumps or clouds. The HI clouds and clumps have been identified using a thresholding method with three separate brightness temperature thresholds ($T_b$). Each catalog of HI cloud candidates shows a power law relationship between the sizes and the velocity dispersions of the clouds roughly following the Larson Law scaling $\\sigma_v \\propto R^{0.5}$, with steeper indices associated with dynamically hot regions. The clouds in each catalog have roughly constant virial parameters as a function mass suggesting that that the clouds are all in roughly the same dynamical state, but the values of the virial parameter are significantly larger than unity showing that turbulent motions dominate gravity in these clouds. The mass distribution of the clouds is a power law with differential indices between -1.6 and -2.0 for the three catalogs. In contrast, the distribution of mean surface densities is a log-normal distribution.

  3. Changes in Cloud Cover and Cloud Types Over the Ocean from Surface

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hochberg, Michael

    atmosphere) #12;Clouds, Radiation, and SST Low Clouds - Cool the ocean surface High Clouds - WarmingChanges in Cloud Cover and Cloud Types Over the Ocean from Surface Observations, 1954-2008 Ryan Eastman Stephen G. Warren Carole J. Hahn #12;Clouds Over the Ocean The ocean is cloudy, more-so than land

  4. Declarative Automated Cloud Resource Orchestration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Plotkin, Joshua B.

    orchestration · Cloud resource orchestration constraint optimization problems 4 Provider operational] · Orchestration procedures Transactions · Either commit or abort Distributed communication and optimization

  5. Cicada: Predictive Guarantees for Cloud Network Bandwidth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    LaCurts, Katrina

    2014-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

    In cloud-computing systems, network-bandwidth guarantees have been shown to improve predictability of application performance and cost. Most previous work on cloud-bandwidth guarantees has assumed that cloud tenants know ...

  6. DIRSIG Cloud Modeling Capabilities; A Parametric Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Salvaggio, Carl

    1 DIRSIG Cloud Modeling Capabilities; A Parametric Study Kristen Powers powers:................................................................................................................... 13 Calculation of Sensor Reaching Radiance Truth Values for Cloudless & Stratus Cloud Scenes and Atmospheric Database Creation for Stratus Cloud Scene & Calculation of Associated Sensor Reaching Radiance

  7. Magellan: experiences from a Science Cloud

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ramakrishnan, Lavanya

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2010. From Clusters To Clouds: xCAT 2 Is Out Of The Bag.Cost of Doing Science on the Cloud: The Montage Example. Incost of doing science on the cloud: the montage example. In

  8. Electron-Cloud Build-Up: Summary

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Furman, M.A.

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Properties In?uencing Electron Cloud Phenomena,” Appl. Surf.Dissipation of the Electron Cloud,” Proc. PAC03 (Portland,is no signi?cant electron-cloud under nominal operating

  9. ARM - Cloud and Rain

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinanInformationbudapest Comments? We would love to heartotdngovInstrumentswrf-chemHistoryListCloud and Rain

  10. A TRUSTED STORAGE SYSTEM FOR THE CLOUD.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karumanchi, Sushama

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ??Data stored in third party storage systems like the cloud might not be secure since confidentiality and integrity of data are not guaranteed. Though cloud… (more)

  11. Fraunhofer ISST CLOUD COMPUTING APPLICATIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rajamani, Sriram K.

    #12;© Fraunhofer ISST Fraunhofer Innovation Cluster »Cloud Computing for Logistics« Budget 3 * 3 Mio© Fraunhofer ISST CLOUD COMPUTING APPLICATIONS FOR LOGISTICS Jakob Rehof Professor, Chair of Software Engineering, Technical University of Dortmund Director, Fraunhofer-ISST Dortmund and Berlin First

  12. Transitions of cloud-topped marine boundary layers characterized by AIRS, MODIS, and a large eddy simulation model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yue, Qing; Kahn, Brian; Xiao, Heng; Schreier, Mathias; Fetzer, E. J.; Teixeira, J.; Suselj, Kay

    2013-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Cloud top entrainment instability (CTEI) is a hypothesized positive feedback between entrainment mixing and evaporative cooling near the cloud top. Previous theoretical and numerical modeling studies have shown that the persistence or breakup of marine boundary layer (MBL) clouds may be sensitive to the CTEI parameter. Collocated thermodynamic profile and cloud observations obtained from the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) and Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) instruments are used to quantify the relationship between the CTEI parameter and the cloud-topped MBL transition from stratocumulus to trade cumulus in the northeastern Pacific Ocean. Results derived from AIRS and MODIS are compared with numerical results from the UCLA large eddy simulation (LES) model for both well-mixed and decoupled MBLs. The satellite and model results both demonstrate a clear correlation between the CTEI parameter and MBL cloud fraction. Despite fundamental differences between LES steady state results and the instantaneous snapshot type of observations from satellites, significant correlations for both the instantaneous pixel-scale observations and the long-term averaged spatial patterns between the CTEI parameter and MBL cloud fraction are found from the satellite observations and are consistent with LES results. This suggests the potential of using AIRS and MODIS to quantify global and temporal characteristics of the cloud-topped MBL transition.

  13. Lidar Investigation of Tropical Nocturnal Boundary Layer Aerosols and Cloud Macrophysics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Manoj, M. G.; Devara, PC S.; Taraphdar, Sourav

    2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Observational evidence of two-way association between nocturnal boundary layer aerosols and cloud macrophysical properties under different meteorological conditions is reported in this paper. The study has been conducted during 2008-09 employing a high space-time resolution polarimetric micro-pulse lidar over a tropical urban station in India. Firstly, the study highlights the crucial role of boundary layer aerosols and background meteorology on the formation and structure of low-level stratiform clouds in the backdrop of different atmospheric stability conditions. Turbulent mixing induced by the wind shear at the station, which is associated with a complex terrain, is found to play a pivotal role in the formation and structural evolution of nocturnal boundary layer clouds. Secondly, it is shown that the trapping of energy in the form of outgoing terrestrial radiation by the overlying low-level clouds can enhance the aerosol mixing height associated with the nocturnal boundary layer. To substantiate this, the long-wave heating associated with cloud capping has been quantitatively estimated in an indirect way by employing an Advanced Research Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF-ARW) model version 2.2 developed by National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR), Colorado, USA, and supplementary data sets; and differentiated against other heating mechanisms. The present investigation as well establishes the potential of lidar remote-sensing technique in exploring some of the intriguing aspects of the cloud-environment relationship.

  14. Using a cloud resolving model to generate the beam-filling correction for microwave retrieval of oceanic rainfall

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feng, Kai

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ), respectively. They have a parameterized two-class liquid water (cloud water and rain) and a parameterized three-class ice-phase scheme (cloud ice, snow, and graupel). A tropical squall line has been observed on 29 August 1999 during the Kwajalein Experiment...

  15. Evaluating the Performance of Planetary Boundary Layer and Cloud Microphysical Parameterization Schemes in Convection-Permitting Ensemble Forecasts using

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xue, Ming

    uncertainty in how to include various processes (e.g., drop breakup and ice-phase categories 1 Evaluating the Performance of Planetary Boundary Layer and Cloud Microphysical Parameterization In this study, the ability of several cloud microphysical and planetary boundary layer parameterization schemes

  16. IBM Software Solution Brief Safeguarding the cloud

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    IBM Software Solution Brief Safeguarding the cloud with IBM Security solutions Maintain visibility and control with proven security solutions for public, private and hybrid clouds Highlights Address cloud internal and external users, data, applications and workloads as they move to and from the cloud Regain

  17. CLOUD COMPUTING INFRASTRUCTURE AND OPERATIONS PROGRAM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schaefer, Marcus

    CLOUD COMPUTING INFRASTRUCTURE AND OPERATIONS PROGRAM A six-week in-depth program in the architectures, infrastructure, and operations of Cloud Computing DePaul University's Cloud Computing Infrastructure and Operations Program provides specialized knowledge in Cloud infrastructure with emphasis

  18. Locus Technologies 2014 Lost in the Cloud?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, University of

    © Locus Technologies 2014 Lost in the Cloud? There's an App for That David McConaughy Locus Technologies 1997-2014 4 #12;Cloud-based EMIS 2014© Locus Technologies 1997-2014 5 #12; Cloud Synch data back to EIM cloud for analysis 2014© Locus Technologies 1997-2014 9 #12;Mobile Apps for Data

  19. 7, 1711717146, 2007 Dependence of cloud

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    ACPD 7, 17117­17146, 2007 Dependence of cloud fraction and cloud height on temperature T. Wagner et a Creative Commons License. Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics Discussions Dependence of cloud fraction and cloud top height on surface temperature derived from spectrally resolved UV/vis satellite observations T

  20. Cloud Computing An enterprise perspective Raghavan Subramanian

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rajamani, Sriram K.

    Cloud Computing ­ An enterprise perspective Raghavan Subramanian Infosys Technologies Limited #12;2Infosys Confidential Overview of cloud computing? Cloud computing* Computing in which dynamically scalable of cloud computing 1. On-demand self-service 2. Ubiquitous network access 3. Location independent resource

  1. Changes in Cloud Cover and Cloud Types over the Ocean from Surface Observations,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hochberg, Michael

    1 Changes in Cloud Cover and Cloud Types over the Ocean from Surface Observations, 1954-2008 Ryan and Infrared Radiation (IR) #12;5 Low Clouds and Sea Surface Temperature #12;6 Cloud Data To better understand of this information with the longest continuous period of record #12;7 Surface Observed Cloud Climatology Ocean data

  2. Cloud Futures Workshop 2010 Cloud Computing Support for Massively Social Gaming Alexandru Iosup

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Iosup, Alexandru

    1 Cloud Futures Workshop 2010 ­ Cloud Computing Support for Massively Social Gaming Alexandru Iosup Pierre (Vrije U.). Cloud Computing Support for Massively Social Gaming (Rain for the Thirsty) #12;Cloud Futures Workshop 2010 ­ Cloud Computing Support for Massively Social Gaming 2 Intermezzo: Tips on how

  3. CLOUD, DRIZZLE, AND TURBULENCE OBSERVATIONS IN MARINE STRATOCUMULUS CLOUDS IN THE AZORES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CLOUD, DRIZZLE, AND TURBULENCE OBSERVATIONS IN MARINE STRATOCUMULUS CLOUDS IN THE AZORES Jasmine at the Azores provided a unique, long-term record (May 2009 to December 2010) of cloud observations in a regime dominated by low-level stratiform clouds. First, a comprehensive cloud classification scheme that utilizes

  4. Cloud radar Doppler spectra in drizzling stratiform clouds: 2. Observations and microphysical modeling of drizzle evolution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cloud radar Doppler spectra in drizzling stratiform clouds: 2. Observations and microphysical I, the influence of cloud microphysics and dynamics on the shape of cloud radar Doppler spectra in warm stratiform clouds was discussed. The traditional analysis of radar Doppler moments was extended

  5. Vision: Cloud-Powered Sight for All Showing the Cloud What You See

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhong, Lin

    Vision: Cloud-Powered Sight for All Showing the Cloud What You See Paramvir Bahl Matthai Philipose argue that for computers to do more for us, we need to show the cloud what we see and embrace cloud General Terms Algorithms, Design, Human Factors, Languages, Performance, Security Keywords Camera, cloud

  6. On the Formation of Binary Stars and Small Stellar Groups in Magnetically Subcritical Clouds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fumitaka Nakamura; Zhi-Yun Li

    2002-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the standard scenario of isolated low-mass star formation, strongly magnetized molecular clouds are envisioned to condense gradually into cores, driven by ambipolar diffusion. Once the cores become magnetically supercritical, they collapse to form stars. Most previous studies based on this scenario are limited to axisymmetric calculations leading to single supercritical core formation. The assumption of axisymmetry has precluded a detailed investigation of cloud fragmentation, generally thought to be a necessary step in the formation of binary and multiple stars. In this contribution, we describe the non-axisymmetric evolution of initially magnetically subcritical clouds using a newly-developed MHD code. It is shown that non-axisymmetric perturbations of modest fractional amplitude ($\\sim 5%$) can grow nonlinearly in such clouds during the supercritical phase of cloud evolution, leading to the production of either a highly elongated bar or a set of multiple dense cores.

  7. THE KELVIN-HELMHOLTZ INSTABILITY IN ORION: A SOURCE OF TURBULENCE AND CHEMICAL MIXING

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berne, O. [Universite de Toulouse, UPS-OMP, IRAP, F-31400 Toulouse (France); Matsumoto, Y. [Department of Physics, Chiba University, 1-33 Yayoi-cho, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8522 (Japan)

    2012-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Hydrodynamical instabilities are believed to power some of the small scale (0.1-10 pc) turbulence and chemical mixing in the interstellar medium. Identifying such instabilities has always been difficult, but recent observations of a wavelike structure (the Ripples) in the Orion nebula have been interpreted as a signature of the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability (KHI), occurring at the interface between the H II region and the molecular cloud. However, this has not been verified theoretically. In this Letter, we investigate theoretically the stability of this interface using observational constraints for the local physical conditions. A linear analysis shows that the H II/molecular cloud interface is indeed KH unstable for a certain range of magnetic field orientation. We find that the maximal growth rates correspond to typical timescales of a few 10{sup 4} years and instability wavelengths of 0.06-0.6 pc. We predict that after 2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 5} years the KHI saturates and forms a turbulent layer of about 0.5 pc. The KHI can remain in linear phase over a maximum distance of 0.75 pc. These spatial and timescales are compatible with the Ripples representing the linear phase of the KHI. These results suggest that the KHI may be crucial to generate turbulence and to bring heavy elements injected by the winds of massive stars in H II regions to colder regions where planetary systems around low-mass stars are being formed. This could apply to the transport of {sup 26}Al injected by a massive star in an H II region to the nascent solar system.

  8. UNDERSTANDING TRENDS ASSOCIATED WITH CLOUDS IN IRRADIATED EXOPLANETS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heng, Kevin [University of Bern, Center for Space and Habitability, Sidlerstrasse 5, CH-3012 Bern (Switzerland); Demory, Brice-Olivier, E-mail: kevin.heng@csh.unibe.ch, E-mail: demory@mit.edu [Department of Earth, Atmospheric and Planetary Sciences, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States)

    2013-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Unlike previously explored relationships between the properties of hot Jovian atmospheres, the geometric albedo and the incident stellar flux do not exhibit a clear correlation, as revealed by our re-analysis of Q0-Q14 Kepler data. If the albedo is primarily associated with the presence of clouds in these irradiated atmospheres, a holistic modeling approach needs to relate the following properties: the strength of stellar irradiation (and hence the strength and depth of atmospheric circulation), the geometric albedo (which controls both the fraction of starlight absorbed and the pressure level at which it is predominantly absorbed), and the properties of the embedded cloud particles (which determine the albedo). The anticipated diversity in cloud properties renders any correlation between the geometric albedo and the stellar flux weak and characterized by considerable scatter. In the limit of vertically uniform populations of scatterers and absorbers, we use an analytical model and scaling relations to relate the temperature-pressure profile of an irradiated atmosphere and the photon deposition layer and to estimate whether a cloud particle will be lofted by atmospheric circulation. We derive an analytical formula for computing the albedo spectrum in terms of the cloud properties, which we compare to the measured albedo spectrum of HD 189733b by Evans et al. Furthermore, we show that whether an optical phase curve is flat or sinusoidal depends on whether the particles are small or large as defined by the Knudsen number. This may be an explanation for why Kepler-7b exhibits evidence for the longitudinal variation in abundance of condensates, while Kepler-12b shows no evidence for the presence of condensates despite the incident stellar flux being similar for both exoplanets. We include an 'observer's cookbook' for deciphering various scenarios associated with the optical phase curve, the peak offset of the infrared phase curve, and the geometric albedo.

  9. Millimeter Wave Cloud Radar (MMCR) Handbook

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    KB Widener; K Johnson

    2005-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The millimeter cloud radar (MMCR) systems probe the extent and composition of clouds at millimeter wavelengths. The MMCR is a zenith-pointing radar that operates at a frequency of 35 GHz. The main purpose of this radar is to determine cloud boundaries (e.g., cloud bottoms and tops). This radar will also report radar reflectivity (dBZ) of the atmosphere up to 20 km. The radar possesses a doppler capability that will allow the measurement of cloud constituent vertical velocities.

  10. Cloud Computing for Telecom Systems.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sapkota, Sagar

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ??Context: Cloud computing is reshaping the service-delivery and business-models in Information and Communications Technology (ICT). The Information Technology (IT) sector has benefited from it in… (more)

  11. Behavior of nanoparticle clouds around a magnetized microsphere under magnetic and flow fields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    2, France. 4 UNESCO Chair "Energy Conservation and Renewable Energies", Belarusian National interactions, the ensemble of nanoparticles may undergo a gas-liquid or gas-solid phase transition and condense into highly concentrated domains (clouds) adhered to the microparticle surface [6-7]. Such a phase transition

  12. Symmetrical parametrizations of the lepton mixing matrix

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rodejohann, W. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Postfach 103980, 69029 Heidelberg (Germany); Valle, J. W. F. [AHEP Group, Institut de Fisica Corpuscular--C.S.I.C./Universitat de Valencia, Edificio Institutos de Paterna, Apt 22085, E-46071 Valencia (Spain)

    2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Advantages of the original symmetrical form of the parametrization of the lepton mixing matrix are discussed. It provides a conceptually more transparent description of neutrino oscillations and lepton number violating processes like neutrinoless double beta decay, clarifying the significance of Dirac and Majorana phases. It is also ideal for parametrizing scenarios with light sterile neutrinos.

  13. SCALED EXPERIMENTS EVALUATING PULSE JET MIXING OF SLURRIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bamberger, Judith A.; Meyer, Perry A.; Enderlin, Carl W.; Fort, James A.; Wells, Beric E.; Minette, Michael J.; Burns, Carolyn A.; Baer, Ellen BK; Eakin, David E.; Elmore, Monte R.; Snyder, Sandra F.

    2009-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Pulse jet mixing (PJM) tests with noncohesive solids in Newtonian liquid were conducted at three geometric scales to support the design of mixing systems for the Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant. The test data will be used to develop mixing models. The models predict the cloud height (the height to which solids will be lifted by the PJM action) and the critical suspension velocity (the minimum velocity needed to ensure all solids have been lifted from the floor. From the cloud height estimate, the concentration of solids near the vessel floor and the minimum velocity predicted to lift solids can be calculated. The test objective was to observe the influence of vertically downward-directed jets on noncohesive solids in a series of scaled tanks with several bottom shapes. The test tanks and bottom shapes included small-and large-scale tanks with elliptical bottoms, a mid-scale tank with a spherical bottom, and a large-scale tank with an F&D bottom. During testing, the downward-directed jets were operated in either a steady flow condition or a pulsed (periodic) flow condition. The mobilization of the solids resulting from the jets was evaluated based on: the motion/agitation of the particulate on the tank floor and the elevation the solids reach within the tank; the height the solids material reaches in the tank is referred to as the cloud height (HC).

  14. Title: Networking the Cloud: Enabling Enterprise Computing and Storage Cloud computing has been changing how enterprises run and manage their IT systems. Cloud

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Title: Networking the Cloud: Enabling Enterprise Computing and Storage Abstract: Cloud computing has been changing how enterprises run and manage their IT systems. Cloud computing platforms provide introduction on Cloud Computing. We propose a Virtual Cloud Pool abstraction to logically unify cloud

  15. Mixed oxide solid solutions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Magno, Scott (Dublin, CA); Wang, Ruiping (Fremont, CA); Derouane, Eric (Liverpool, GB)

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention is a mixed oxide solid solution containing a tetravalent and a pentavalent cation that can be used as a support for a metal combustion catalyst. The invention is furthermore a combustion catalyst containing the mixed oxide solid solution and a method of making the mixed oxide solid solution. The tetravalent cation is zirconium(+4), hafnium(+4) or thorium(+4). In one embodiment, the pentavalent cation is tantalum(+5), niobium(+5) or bismuth(+5). Mixed oxide solid solutions of the present invention exhibit enhanced thermal stability, maintaining relatively high surface areas at high temperatures in the presence of water vapor.

  16. Fuel Mix Disclosure

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In January 1999, the Colorado Public Utility Commission (PUC) adopted regulations requiring the state's utilities to disclose information regarding their fuel mix to retail customers. Utilities are...

  17. The Evolution of Cloud Computing in ATLAS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taylor, Ryan P.; The ATLAS collaboration; Love, Peter; Leblanc, Matthew Edgar; Di Girolamo, Alessandro; Paterson, Michael; Gable, Ian; Sobie, Randall; Field, Laurence

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The ATLAS experiment has successfully incorporated cloud computing technology and cloud resources into its primarily grid-based model of distributed computing. Cloud R&D activities continue to mature and transition into stable production systems, while ongoing evolutionary changes are still needed to adapt and refine the approaches used, in response to changes in prevailing cloud technology. In addition, completely new developments are needed to handle emerging requirements. This work will describe the overall evolution of cloud computing in ATLAS. The current status of the VM management systems used for harnessing IAAS resources will be discussed. Monitoring and accounting systems tailored for clouds are needed to complete the integration of cloud resources within ATLAS' distributed computing framework. We are developing and deploying new solutions to address the challenge of operation in a geographically distributed multi-cloud scenario, including a system for managing VM images across multiple clouds, ...

  18. Tropical Warm Pool International Cloud Experiment (TWP-ICE): Cloud and Rain Characteristics in the Australian Monsoon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    PT May; C Jakob; JH Mather

    2004-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The impact of oceanic convection on its environment and the relationship between the characteristics of the convection and the resulting cirrus characteristics is still not understood. An intense airborne measurement campaign combined with an extensive network of ground-based observations is being planned for the region near Darwin, Northern Australia, during January-February, 2006, to address these questions. The Tropical Warm Pool – International Cloud Experiment (TWP-ICE) will be the first field program in the tropics that attempts to describe the evolution of tropical convection, including the large scale heat, moisture, and momentum budgets, while at the same time obtaining detailed observations of cloud properties and the impact of the clouds on the environment. The emphasis will be on cirrus for the cloud properties component of the experiment. Cirrus clouds are ubiquitous in the tropics and have a large impact on their environment but the properties of these clouds are poorly understood. A crucial product from this experiment will be a dataset suitable to provide the forcing and testing required by cloud-resolving models and parameterizations in global climate models. This dataset will provide the necessary link between cloud properties and the models that are attempting to simulate them. The experiment is a collaboration between the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program, the Bureau of Meteorology (BoM), the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), the European Commission DG RTD-1.2, and several United States, Australian, Canadian, and European Universities. This experiment will be undertaken over a 4-week period in early 2006. January and February corresponds to the wet phase of the Australia monsoon. This season has been selected because, despite Darwin’s coastal location, the convection that occurs over and near Darwin at this time is largely of maritime origin with a large fetch over water. Based on previous experiments, the convection appears typical of maritime convection with widespread convection that has complex organization, but is not as deep or as intense as continental or coastal convection. Therefore, it is expected that the convection and cloud characteristics will be representative of conditions typical for wide areas of the tropics.

  19. Coherent flash of light emitted by a cold atomic cloud

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chalony, M. [Institut Non Lineaire de Nice, Universite de Nice Sophia-Antipolis, CNRS, F-06560 Valbonne (France); Pierrat, R. [Institut Langevin, ESPCI ParisTech, CNRS UMR 7587, 10 rue Vauquelin, F-75005 Paris (France); Delande, D. [Laboratoire Kastler Brossel, UPMC-Paris 6, ENS, CNRS, 4 Place Jussieu, F-75005 Paris (France); Wilkowski, D. [Institut Non Lineaire de Nice, Universite de Nice Sophia-Antipolis, CNRS, F-06560 Valbonne (France); Centre for Quantum Technologies, National University of Singapore, 117543 Singapore (Singapore)

    2011-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    When a resonant laser sent on an optically thick cold atomic cloud is abruptly switched off, a coherent flash of light is emitted in the forward direction. This transient phenomenon is observed due to the highly resonant character of the atomic scatterers. We analyze quantitatively its temporal properties and show very good agreement with theoretical predictions. Based on complementary experiments, the phase of the coherent field is reconstructed without interferometric tools.

  20. Microwave and Millimeter-Wave Radiometric Studies of Temperature, Water Vapor and Clouds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Westwater, Edgeworth

    2011-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The importance of accurate measurements of column amounts of water vapor and cloud liquid has been well documented by scientists within the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program. At the North Slope of Alaska (NSA), both microwave radiometers (MWR) and the MWRProfiler (MWRP), been used operationally by ARM for passive retrievals of the quantities: Precipitable Water Vapor (PWV) and Liquid Water Path (LWP). However, it has been convincingly shown that these instruments are inadequate to measure low amounts of PWV and LWP. In the case of water vapor, this is especially important during the Arctic winter, when PWV is frequently less than 2 mm. For low amounts of LWP (< 50 g/m{sup 2}), the MWR and MWRP retrievals have an accuracy that is also not acceptable. To address some of these needs, in March-April 2004, NOAA and ARM conducted the NSA Arctic Winter Radiometric Experiment - Water Vapor Intensive Operational Period at the ARM NSA/Adjacent Arctic Ocean (NSA/AAO) site. After this experiment, the radiometer group at NOAA moved to the Center for Environmental Technology (CET) of the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering of the University of Colorado at Boulder. During this 2004 experiment, a total of 220 radiosondes were launched, and radiometric data from 22.235 to 380 GHz were obtained. Primary instruments included the ARM MWR and MWRP, a Global Positioning System (GPS), as well as the CET Ground-based Scanning Radiometer (GSR). We have analyzed data from these instruments to answer several questions of importance to ARM, including: (a) techniques for improved water vapor measurements; (b) improved calibration techniques during cloudy conditions; (c) the spectral response of radiometers to a variety of conditions: clear, liquid, ice, and mixed phase clouds; and (d) forward modeling of microwave and millimeter wave brightness temperatures from 22 to 380 GHz. Many of these results have been published in the open literature. During the third year of this contract, we participated in another ARM-sponsored experiment at the NSA during February-March 2007. This experiment is called the Radiative Heating in Underexplored Bands Campaign (RHUBC) and the GSR was operated successfully for the duration of the campaign. One of the principal goals of the experiment was to provide retrievals of water vapor during PWV amounts less than 2 mm and to compare GSR data with ARM radiometers and radiosondes. A secondary goal was to compare the radiometric response of the microwave and millimeter wavelength radiometers to water and ice clouds. In this final report, we will include the separate progress reports for each of the three years of the project and follow with a section on major accomplishments of the project.

  1. Understanding and Improving CRM and GCM Simulations of Cloud Systems with ARM Observations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, Xiaoqing

    2014-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The works supported by this ASR project lay the solid foundation for improving the parameterization of convection and clouds in the NCAR CCSM and the climate simulations. We have made a significant use of CRM simulations and ARM observations to produce thermodynamically and dynamically consistent multi-year cloud and radiative properties; improve the GCM simulations of convection, clouds and radiative heating rate and fluxes using the ARM observations and CRM simulations; and understand the seasonal and annual variation of cloud systems and their impacts on climate mean state and variability. We conducted multi-year simulations over the ARM SGP site using the CRM with multi-year ARM forcing data. The statistics of cloud and radiative properties from the long-term CRM simulations were compared and validated with the ARM measurements and value added products (VAP). We evaluated the multi-year climate simulations produced by the GCM with the modified convection scheme. We used multi-year ARM observations and CRM simulations to validate and further improve the trigger condition and revised closure assumption in NCAR GCM simulations that demonstrate the improvement of climate mean state and variability. We combined the improved convection scheme with the mosaic treatment of subgrid cloud distributions in the radiation scheme of the GCM. The mosaic treatment of cloud distributions has been implemented in the GCM with the original convection scheme and enables the use of more realistic cloud amounts as well as cloud water contents in producing net radiative fluxes closer to observations. A physics-based latent heat (LH) retrieval algorithm was developed by parameterizing the physical linkages of observed hydrometeor profiles of cloud and precipitation to the major processes related to the phase change of atmospheric water.

  2. Guidelines for mixed waste minimization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Owens, C.

    1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Currently, there is no commercial mixed waste disposal available in the United States. Storage and treatment for commercial mixed waste is limited. Host States and compacts region officials are encouraging their mixed waste generators to minimize their mixed wastes because of management limitations. This document provides a guide to mixed waste minimization.

  3. Mixed ionic and electronic conducting ceramic membranes for hydrocarbon processing

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Van Calcar, Pamela (Superior, CO); Mackay, Richard (Lafayette, CO); Sammells, Anthony F. (Boulder, CO)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention relates to mixed phase materials for the preparation of catalytic membranes which exhibit ionic and electronic conduction and which exhibit improved mechanical strength compared to single phase ionic and electronic conducting materials. The mixed phase materials are useful for forming gas impermeable membranes either as dense ceramic membranes or as dense thin films coated onto porous substrates. The membranes and materials of this invention are useful in catalytic membrane reactors in a variety of applications including synthesis gas production. One or more crystalline second phases are present in the mixed phase material at a level sufficient to enhance the mechanical strength of the mixture to provide membranes for practical application in CMRs.

  4. Experiment Safety Assurance Package for the 40- to 50-GWd/MT Burnup Phase of Mixed Oxide Fuel Irradiation in Small I-Hole Positions in the Advanced Test Reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khericha, S.T.

    2002-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This experiment safety assurance package (ESAP) is a revision of the last MOX ESAP issued in February 2001(Khericha 2001). The purpose of this revision is to identify the changes in the loading pattern and to provide a basis to continue irradiation up to {approx}42 GWd/MT burnup (+ 2.5%) as predicted by MCNP (Monte Carlo N-Particle) transport code before the preliminary postirradiation examination (PIE) results for 40 GWd/MT burnup are available. Note that the safety analysis performed for the last ESAP is still applicable and no additional analysis is required (Khericha 2001). In July 2001, it was decided to reconfigure the test assembly using the loading pattern for Phase IV, Part 3, at the end of Phase IV, Part 1, as the loading pattern for Phase IV, Parts 2 and 3. Three capsule assemblies will be irradiated until the highest burnup capsule assembly accumulates: {approx}50 GWd/MT burnup, based on the MCNP code predictions. The last ESAP suggests that at the end of Phase IV, Part 1, we remove the two highest burnup capsule assemblies ({at} {approx}40 GWd/MT burnup) and send them to ORNL for PIE. Then, irradiate the test assembly using the loading pattern for Phase IV, Part 2, until the highest burnup capsule reaches {approx}40 GWd/MT burnup per MCNP-predicted values.

  5. Experiment Safety Assurance Package for the 40- to 50-GWd/MT Burnup Phase of Mixed Oxide Fuel Irradiation in Small I-Hole Positions in the Advanced Test Reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khericha, Soli T

    2002-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This experiment safety assurance package (ESAP) is a revision of the last MOX ESAP issued in February 2001(Khericha 2001). The purpose of this revision is to identify the changes in the loading pattern and to provide a basis to continue irradiation up to ~42 GWd/MT burnup (+ 2.5% as predicted by MCNP (Monte Carlo N-Particle) transport code before the preliminary postirradiation examination (PIE) results for 40 GWd/MT burnup are available. Note that the safety analysis performed for the last ESAP is still applicable and no additional analysis is required (Khericha 2001). In July 2001, it was decided to reconfigure the test assembly using the loading pattern for Phase IV, Part 3, at the end of Phase IV, Part 1, as the loading pattern for Phase IV, Parts 2 and 3. Three capsule assemblies will be irradiated until the highest burnup capsule assembly accumulates: ~50 GWd/MT burnup, based on the MCNP code predictions. The last ESAP suggests that at the end of Phase IV, Part 1, we remove the two highest burnup capsule assemblies (@ ~40 GWd/MT burnup) and send them to ORNL for PIE. Then, irradiate the test assembly using the loading pattern for Phase IV, Part 2, until the highest burnup capsule reaches ~40 GWd/MT burnup per MCNP-predicted values.

  6. Disruptive technology business models in cloud computing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krikos, Alexis Christopher

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Cloud computing, a term whose origins have been in existence for more than a decade, has come into fruition due to technological capabilities and marketplace demands. Cloud computing can be defined as a scalable and flexible ...

  7. Socially Optimal Pricing of Cloud Computing Resources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Menache, Ishai

    The cloud computing paradigm offers easily accessible computing resources of variable size and capabilities. We consider a cloud-computing facility that provides simultaneous service to a heterogeneous, time-varying ...

  8. Cloud seeding as a technique for studying aerosol-cloud interactions in marine stratocumulus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miami, University of

    Cloud seeding as a technique for studying aerosol-cloud interactions in marine stratocumulus hygroscopic aerosols were introduced into a solid marine stratocumulus cloud (200 m thick) by burning hygroscopic flares mounted on an aircraft. The cloud microphysical response in two parallel seeding plumes

  9. Cloud Tracking in Cloud-Resolving Models R. S. Plant1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Plant, Robert

    Cloud Tracking in Cloud-Resolving Models R. S. Plant1 1 Department of Meteorology, University. INTRODUCTION In recent years Cloud Resolving Models (CRMs) have become an increasingly important tool for CRM data, which allows one to investigate statistical prop- erties of the lifecycles of the "clouds

  10. HPI Cloud Symposium ,Operating The Cloud` 25.09.2013, Hasso-Plattner-Institut, Auditorium Building

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weske, Mathias

    Agenda HPI Cloud Symposium ,Operating The Cloud` 25.09.2013, Hasso-Plattner-Institut, Auditorium Building 09:30h Registration 10:00h Opening Prof. Dr. Christoph Meinel, HPI Potsdam 10:30h Cloud-RAID: Eine Methode zur Bereitstellung zuverlässiger Speicherressourcen in �ffentlichen Clouds Maxim Schnajkin, HPI

  11. The Cloud Adoption Toolkit: Supporting Cloud Adoption Decisions in the Enterprise

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sommerville, Ian

    1 The Cloud Adoption Toolkit: Supporting Cloud Adoption Decisions in the Enterprise Ali Khajeh-Hosseini, David Greenwood, James W. Smith, Ian Sommerville Cloud Computing Co-laboratory, School of Computer Science University of St Andrews, UK {akh, dsg22, jws7, ifs}@cs.st-andrews.ac.uk Abstract Cloud computing

  12. Cloud Verifier: Verifiable Auditing Service for IaaS Clouds Joshua Schiffman

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jaeger, Trent

    Cloud Verifier: Verifiable Auditing Service for IaaS Clouds Joshua Schiffman Security Architecture University Park, PA, USA yus138,hvijay,tjaeger@cse.psu.edu Abstract--Cloud computing has commoditized compute paradigm, its adoption has been stymied by cloud platform's lack of trans- parency, which leaves customers

  13. Cloud radar Doppler spectra in drizzling stratiform clouds: 1. Forward modeling and remote sensing applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cloud radar Doppler spectra in drizzling stratiform clouds: 1. Forward modeling and remote sensing broadening and drizzle growth in shallow liquid clouds remain not well understood. Detailed, cloudscale. Profiling, millimeterwavelength (cloud) radars can provide such observations. In particular, the first three

  14. CLOUD COMPUTING AND INFORMATION POLICY 1 Cloud Computing and Information Policy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, Jimmy

    CLOUD COMPUTING AND INFORMATION POLICY 1 Cloud Computing and Information Policy: Computing in a Policy Cloud? Forthcoming in the Journal of Information Technology and Politics, 5(3). Paul T. Jaeger University of Maryland Jimmy Lin University of Maryland Justin M. Grimes University of Maryland #12;CLOUD

  15. Cloud networking and communications Cloud computing is having an important impact on

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boutaba, Raouf

    Editorial Cloud networking and communications Cloud computing is having an important impact attention has been devoted to system aspects of Cloud computing. More recently, however, the focus is shifting towards Cloud net- working and communications with evolutionary and revo- lutionary propositions

  16. ARM - Field Campaign - Cloud IOP

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLasDelivered‰PNGExperience4AJ01)3,Cloud OD Sensor TWSTCampaign 2govCampaignsCloud IOP ARM

  17. Microsoft Private Cloud Title of document

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chaudhuri, Surajit

    Microsoft Private Cloud Title of document 1 1 Microsoft Private Cloud A Comparative Look at Functionality, Benefits, and Economics November2012 #12;Microsoft Private Cloud Title of document 2 2 Copyright Information © 2012 Microsoft Corporation. All rights reserved. This document is provided "as-is." Information

  18. 6, 93519388, 2006 Aerosol-cloud

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    ACPD 6, 9351­9388, 2006 Aerosol-cloud interaction inferred from MODIS and models G. Myhre et al Chemistry and Physics Discussions Aerosol-cloud interaction inferred from MODIS satellite data and global 6, 9351­9388, 2006 Aerosol-cloud interaction inferred from MODIS and models G. Myhre et al. Title

  19. Cloud Microphysics Spring 2013 **odd years?**

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ATS724 Cloud Microphysics (2-0-0) Spring 2013 **odd years?** Prerequisites: ATS620, ATS621; Ph, as the class will involve designing and building a simple cloud microphysical model. Course Description: **Sue and observations of nucleation, mechanisms of cloud droplet-spectra broadening, precipitation particle growth

  20. Level Set Implementations on Unstructured Point Cloud

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duncan, James S.

    Level Set Implementations on Unstructured Point Cloud by HO, Hon Pong A Thesis Submitted;Level Set Implementations on Unstructured Point Cloud by HO, Hon Pong This is to certify that I have implementations on unstructured point cloud 15 3.1 Level set initialization

  1. Cloud Security: Issues and Concerns Pierangela Samarati*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Samarati, Pierangela

    1 Cloud Security: Issues and Concerns Authors Pierangela Samarati* UniversitĂ  degli Studi di Milano, Italy sabrina.decapitani@unimi.it Keywords cloud security confidentiality integrity availability secure data storage and processing Summary The cloud has emerged as a successful computing paradigm

  2. Cloud Computing: Centralization and Data Sovereignty

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1 Cloud Computing: Centralization and Data Sovereignty Primavera De Filippi, Smari McCarthy Abstract: Cloud computing can be defined as the provision of computing resources on-demand over and elasticity of costs, problems arise concerning the collection of personal information in the Cloud

  3. Interactive physically-based cloud simulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Overby, Derek Robert

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of digital artistic media. Previous methods for modeling the growth of clouds do not account for the fluid interactions that are responsible for cloud formation in the physical atmosphere. We propose a model for simulating cloud formation based on a basic...

  4. Dynamics of Clouds Fall Semester 2012

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ATS712 Dynamics of Clouds Fall Semester 2012 Meeting Times: T/Th: 9-10:15am Room: ATS 101-2pm Course Description: This class focuses on the general dynamics of cloud systems. Models of fog and other Tools / Skills Cotton, W.R., G.H. Bryan, and S.C. van den Heever, 2010: Storm and Cloud Dynamics

  5. Pulse Jet Mixing Tests With Noncohesive Solids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meyer, Perry A.; Bamberger, Judith A.; Enderlin, Carl W.; Fort, James A.; Wells, Beric E.; Sundaram, S. K.; Scott, Paul A.; Minette, Michael J.; Smith, Gary L.; Burns, Carolyn A.; Greenwood, Margaret S.; Morgen, Gerald P.; Baer, Ellen BK; Snyder, Sandra F.; White, Michael; Piepel, Gregory F.; Amidan, Brett G.; Heredia-Langner, Alejandro; Bailey, Sharon A.; Bower, John C.; Denslow, Kayte M.; Eakin, David E.; Elmore, Monte R.; Gauglitz, Phillip A.; Guzman, Anthony D.; Hatchell, Brian K.; Hopkins, Derek F.; Hurley, David E.; Johnson, Michael D.; Kirihara, Leslie J.; Lawler, Bruce D.; Loveland, Jesse S.; Mullen, O Dennis; Pekour, Mikhail S.; Peters, Timothy J.; Robinson, Peter J.; Russcher, Michael S.; Sande, Susan; Santoso, Christian; Shoemaker, Steven V.; Silva, Steve M.; Smith, Devin E.; Su, Yin-Fong; Toth, James J.; Wiberg, John D.; Yu, Xiao-Ying; Zuljevic, Nino

    2009-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes results from pulse jet mixing (PJM) tests with noncohesive solids in Newtonian liquid conducted during FY 2007 and 2008 to support the design of mixing systems for the Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). Tests were conducted at three geometric scales using noncohesive simulants. The test data were used to independently develop mixing models that can be used to predict full-scale WTP vessel performance and to rate current WTP mixing system designs against two specific performance requirements. One requirement is to ensure that all solids have been disturbed during the mixing action, which is important to release gas from the solids. The second requirement is to maintain a suspended solids concentration below 20 weight percent at the pump inlet. The models predict the height to which solids will be lifted by the PJM action, and the minimum velocity needed to ensure all solids have been lifted from the floor. From the cloud height estimate we can calculate the concentration of solids at the pump inlet. The velocity needed to lift the solids is slightly more demanding than "disturbing" the solids, and is used as a surrogate for this metric. We applied the models to assess WTP mixing vessel performance with respect to the two perform¬ance requirements. Each mixing vessel was evaluated against these two criteria for two defined waste conditions. One of the wastes was defined by design limits and one was derived from Hanford waste characterization reports. The assessment predicts that three vessel types will satisfy the design criteria for all conditions evaluated. Seven vessel types will not satisfy the performance criteria used for any of the conditions evaluated. The remaining three vessel types provide varying assessments when the different particle characteristics are evaluated. The assessment predicts that three vessel types will satisfy the design criteria for all conditions evaluated. Seven vessel types will not satisfy the performance criteria used for any of the conditions evaluated. The remaining three vessel types provide varying assessments when the different particle characteristics are evaluated. The HLP-022 vessel was also evaluated using 12 m/s pulse jet velocity with 6-in. nozzles, and this design also did not satisfy the criteria for all of the conditions evaluated.

  6. Developmental of a Vapor Cloud Explosion Risk Analysis Tool Using Exceedance Methodology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alghamdi, Salem

    2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    cloud explosions [4]. Lenoir and Davenport [5] have presented a review of many major incidents involving vapor cloud explosions worldwide from 1921 to 1991. Hydrocarbon materials such as ethane, ethylene, propane, and butane, which have been involved... are typically either in the form of gas, liquid, or two-phase. Examples of hydrocarbon gas releases are methane through butane, while liquid releases could be crude oil, diesel, jet fuel, or others. An example of a two-phase leak is condensate since it is a...

  7. Fuel Mix Disclosure

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    California's retail electricity suppliers must disclose to all customers the fuel mix used in the generation of electricity. Utilities must use a standard label created by the California Energy...

  8. Brush Busters Mixing Guide

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McGinty, Allan; Ueckert, Darrell

    2004-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

    This easy-to-use guide gives mixing instructions for sprays to control huisache, mesquite, redberry cedar, saltcedar, tallowtree and yucca and to treat hardwood cut stumps. It can easily be attached to a sprayer if desired...

  9. Fuel Mix Disclosure

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Hawaii requires the state’s retail electric suppliers to disclose details regarding the fuel mix of their electric generation to retail customers. Such information must be provided on customers’...

  10. Fuel Mix Disclosure

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Washington’s retail electric suppliers must disclose details regarding the fuel mix of their electric generation to customers. Electric suppliers must provide such information in a standard format...

  11. The Microbase Value-Added Product: A Baseline Retrieval of Cloud Microphysical Properties

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dunn, M; Johnson, K; Jensen, M

    2011-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility baseline cloud microphysical properties (MICROBASE) value-added product (VAP). MICROBASE uses a combination of millimeter-wavelength cloud radar, microwave radiometer, and radiosonde observations to estimate the vertical profiles of the primary microphysical parameters of clouds including the liquid/ice water content and liquid/ice cloud particle effective radius. MICROBASE is a baseline algorithm designed to apply to most conditions and locations using a single set of parameterizations and a simple determination of water phase based on temperature. This document provides the user of this product with guidelines to assist in determining the accuracy of the product under certain conditions. Quality control flags are designed to identify outliers and indicate instances where the retrieval assumptions may not be met. The overall methodology is described in this report through a detailed description of the input variables, algorithms, and output products.

  12. Cloud and Autonomic Computing Center

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gelfond, Michael

    boundary layers and wind turbine aerodynamics Siva Parameswarn, Ph.D. Professor in the Department vehicles » Wake development behind wind turbines PHYSICS Ismael Regis de Farias Jr., Ph.D. Associate in cloud environments » Intelligent data management & understanding » Automated web service composition

  13. Cloud Seeding By: Julie Walter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Toohey, Darin W.

    , smoke, that then are cooled because of the high altitudes. As the water or condensation nuclei cool more pushed up enough the warm air that is filled with moisture should reach an optimum cooling point-based Western Weather Consultants, whose company supplied Vail Resorts with the cloud seeding generators

  14. RADIATION AND CLOUD MONITORING STATIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reeves, Geoffrey D.

    how they affect the energy balance between incoming solar radiation and heat re-radiated from Earth, and moisture content; area cloud coverage; solar and terrestrial radia- tion; and standard meteorological region and the North Slope of Alaska. ARCS sites are a component of the Department of Energy

  15. Experiment Safety Assurance Package for the 40- to 52-GWd/MT Burnup Phase of Mixed Oxide Fuel Irradiation in Small I-hole Positions in the Advanced Test Reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    S. T. Khericha; R. C. Pedersen

    2003-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This experiment safety assurance package (ESAP) is a revision of the last mixed uranium and plutonium oxide (MOX) ESAP issued in June 2002). The purpose of this revision is to provide a basis to continue irradiation up to 52 GWd/MT burnup [as predicted by MCNP (Monte Carlo N-Particle) transport code The last ESAP provided basis for irradiation, at a linear heat generation rate (LHGR) no greater than 9 kW/ft, of the highest burnup capsule assembly to 50 GWd/MT. This ESAP extends the basis for irradiation, at a LHGR no greater than 5 kW/ft, of the highest burnup capsule assembly from 50 to 52 GWd/MT.

  16. Separating Cloud Forming Nuclei from Interstitial Aerosol

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kulkarni, Gourihar R.

    2012-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

    It has become important to characterize the physicochemical properties of aerosol that have initiated the warm and ice clouds. The data is urgently needed to better represent the aerosol-cloud interaction mechanisms in the climate models. The laboratory and in-situ techniques to separate precisely the aerosol particles that act as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) and ice nuclei (IN), termed as cloud nuclei (CN) henceforth, have become imperative in studying aerosol effects on clouds and the environment. This review summarizes these techniques, design considerations, associated artifacts and challenges, and briefly discusses the need for improved designs to expand the CN measurement database.

  17. The Formation and Fragmentation of Primordial Molecular Clouds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abel, T; Norman, M L; Abel, Tom; Bryan, Greg L.; Norman, Michael L.

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Many questions in physical cosmology regarding the thermal history of the intergalactic medium, chemical enrichment, reionization, etc. are thought to be intimately related to the nature and evolution of pregalactic structure. In particular the efficiency of primordial star formation and the primordial IMF are of special interest. We present results from high resolution three-dimensional adaptive mesh refinement simulations that follow the collapse of primordial molecular clouds and their subsequent fragmentation within a cosmologically representative volume. Comoving scales from 128 kpc down to 0.5 pc are followed accurately. Dark matter dynamics, hydrodynamics and all relevant chemical and radiative processes (cooling) are followed self-consistently for a cluster normalized CDM structure formation model. Primordial molecular clouds with ~100,000 solar masses are assembled by mergers of multiple objects that have formed hydrogen molecules in the gas phase with a fractional abundance of 11eV is very small.

  18. The Formation and Fragmentation of Primordial Molecular Clouds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abel, T; Norman, M L; Abel, Tom; Bryan, Greg L.; Norman, Michael L.

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Many questions in physical cosmology regarding the thermal history of theintergalactic medium, chemical enrichment, reionization, etc. are thought to beintimately related to the nature and evolution of pregalactic structure. Inparticular the efficiency of primordial star formation and the primordial IMFare of special interest. We present results from high resolutionthree--dimensional adaptive mesh refinement simulations that follow thecollapse of primordial molecular clouds and their subsequent fragmentationwithin a cosmologically representative volume. Comoving scales from 128 kpcdown to 1 pc are followed accurately. Dark matter dynamics, hydrodynamics andall relevant chemical and radiative processes (cooling) are followedself-consistently for a cluster normalized CDM structure formation model.Primordial molecular clouds with ~10^5 solar masses are assembled by mergers ofmultiple objects that have formed hydrogen molecules in the gas phase with afractional abundance of ~10^-4. As the subclumps merge cooling ...

  19. ADVANCED MIXING MODELS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, S; Richard Dimenna, R; David Tamburello, D

    2008-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The process of recovering the waste in storage tanks at the Savannah River Site (SRS) typically requires mixing the contents of the tank with one to four dual-nozzle jet mixers located within the tank. The typical criteria to establish a mixed condition in a tank are based on the number of pumps in operation and the time duration of operation. To ensure that a mixed condition is achieved, operating times are set conservatively long. This approach results in high operational costs because of the long mixing times and high maintenance and repair costs for the same reason. A significant reduction in both of these costs might be realized by reducing the required mixing time based on calculating a reliable indicator of mixing with a suitably validated computer code. The work described in this report establishes the basis for further development of the theory leading to the identified mixing indicators, the benchmark analyses demonstrating their consistency with widely accepted correlations, and the application of those indicators to SRS waste tanks to provide a better, physically based estimate of the required mixing time. Waste storage tanks at SRS contain settled sludge which varies in height from zero to 10 ft. The sludge has been characterized and modeled as micron-sized solids, typically 1 to 5 microns, at weight fractions as high as 20 to 30 wt%, specific gravities to 1.4, and viscosities up to 64 cp during motion. The sludge is suspended and mixed through the use of submersible slurry jet pumps. To suspend settled sludge, water is added to the tank as a slurry medium and stirred with the jet pump. Although there is considerable technical literature on mixing and solid suspension in agitated tanks, very little literature has been published on jet mixing in a large-scale tank. If shorter mixing times can be shown to support Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) or other feed requirements, longer pump lifetimes can be achieved with associated operational cost and schedule savings. The focus of the present work is to establish mixing criteria associated with the waste processing at SRS and to quantify the mixing time required to suspend sludge particles with the submersible jet pump. Literature results for a turbulent jet flow are reviewed briefly, since the decay of the axial jet velocity and the evolution of the jet flow patterns are important phenomena affecting sludge suspension and mixing operations. One of the main objectives in the waste processing is to provide the DWPF a uniform slurry composition at a certain weight percentage (typically {approx}13 wt%) over an extended period of time. In preparation of the sludge for slurrying to DWPF, several important questions have been raised with regard to sludge suspension and mixing of the solid suspension in the bulk of the tank: (1) How much time is required to prepare a slurry with a uniform solid composition for DWPF? (2) How long will it take to suspend and mix the sludge for uniform composition in any particular waste tank? (3) What are good mixing indicators to answer the questions concerning sludge mixing stated above in a general fashion applicable to any waste tank/slurry pump geometry and fluid/sludge combination? Grenville and Tilton (1996) investigated the mixing process by giving a pulse of tracer (electrolyte) through the submersible jet nozzle and by monitoring the conductivity at three locations within the cylindrical tank. They proposed that the mixing process was controlled by the turbulent kinetic energy dissipation rate in the region far away from the jet entrance. They took the energy dissipation rates in the regions remote from the nozzle to be proportional to jet velocity and jet diameter at that location. The reduction in the jet velocity was taken to be proportional to the nozzle velocity and distance from the nozzle. Based on their analysis, a correlation was proposed. The proposed correlation was shown to be valid over a wide range of Reynolds numbers (50,000 to 300,000) with a relative standard deviation of {+-} 11.83%. An improved correlat

  20. Cloud speed impact on solar variability scaling â?? Application to the wavelet variability model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lave, Matthew; Kleissl, Jan

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Kleissl, J. , 2013. Deriving cloud velocity from an array ofCloud Speed Impact on Solar Variability Scaling -this work, we determine from cloud speeds. Cloud simulator

  1. Mixed waste: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moghissi, A.A.; Blauvelt, R.K.; Benda, G.A.; Rothermich, N.E. [eds.] [Temple Univ., Philadelphia, PA (United States). Dept. of Environmental Safety and Health

    1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This volume contains the peer-reviewed and edited versions of papers submitted for presentation a the Second International Mixed Waste Symposium. Following the tradition of the First International Mixed Waste Symposium, these proceedings were prepared in advance of the meeting for distribution to participants. The symposium was organized by the Mixed Waste Committee of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers. The topics discussed at the symposium include: stabilization technologies, alternative treatment technologies, regulatory issues, vitrification technologies, characterization of wastes, thermal technologies, laboratory and analytical issues, waste storage and disposal, organic treatment technologies, waste minimization, packaging and transportation, treatment of mercury contaminated wastes and bioprocessing, and environmental restoration. Individual abstracts are catalogued separately for the data base.

  2. Mixing by Swimming Algae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guasto, Jeffrey S; Gollub, J P; Pesci, Adriana I; Goldstein, Raymond E

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this fluid dynamics video, we demonstrate the microscale mixing enhancement of passive tracer particles in suspensions of swimming microalgae, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. These biflagellated, single-celled eukaryotes (10 micron diameter) swim with a "breaststroke" pulling motion of their flagella at speeds of about 100 microns/s and exhibit heterogeneous trajectory shapes. Fluorescent tracer particles (2 micron diameter) allowed us to quantify the enhanced mixing caused by the swimmers, which is relevant to suspension feeding and biogenic mixing. Without swimmers present, tracer particles diffuse slowly due solely to Brownian motion. As the swimmer concentration is increased, the probability density functions (PDFs) of tracer displacements develop strong exponential tails, and the Gaussian core broadens. High-speed imaging (500 Hz) of tracer-swimmer interactions demonstrates the importance of flagellar beating in creating oscillatory flows that exceed Brownian motion out to about 5 cell radii from the swimm...

  3. Continental Liquid-phase Stratus Clouds at SGP: Meteorological Influences

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed New SubstationCleanCommunity2Workshops 2008O"Program and Book ofand Relationship

  4. Mixed crystal organic scintillators

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zaitseva, Natalia P; Carman, M Leslie; Glenn, Andrew M; Hamel, Sebastien; Hatarik, Robert; Payne, Stephen A; Stoeffl, Wolfgang

    2014-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

    A mixed organic crystal according to one embodiment includes a single mixed crystal having two compounds with different bandgap energies, the organic crystal having a physical property of exhibiting a signal response signature for neutrons from a radioactive source, wherein the signal response signature does not include a significantly-delayed luminescence characteristic of neutrons interacting with the organic crystal relative to a luminescence characteristic of gamma rays interacting with the organic crystal. According to one embodiment, an organic crystal includes bibenzyl and stilbene or a stilbene derivative, the organic crystal having a physical property of exhibiting a signal response signature for neutrons from a radioactive source.

  5. TROPIC: Transactional Resource Orchestration Platform In the Cloud

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Plotkin, Joshua B.

    TROPIC: Transactional Resource Orchestration Platform In the Cloud Changbin Liu, Yun Mao*, Xu Chen ­ InfrastructureasaService (IaaS) Cloud · Provide cloud infrastructure services: virtual machines (VMs), virtual block devices, VPNs · Widely adopted, e.g. Amazon Elastic Compute Cloud (EC2) ­ Cloud resource

  6. HST SPECTRAL MAPPING OF L/T TRANSITION BROWN DWARFS REVEALS CLOUD THICKNESS VARIATIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Apai, Daniel [Department of Astronomy, University of Arizona, 933 N. Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Radigan, Jacqueline; Jayawardhana, Ray [Department of Astronomy, University of Toronto, 50 St. George Street, Toronto M5S 3H4 (Canada); Buenzli, Esther [Department of Astronomy and Steward Observatory, 933 N. Cherry Avenue, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Burrows, Adam [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, 105 Peyton Hall, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States); Reid, Iain Neill, E-mail: apai@as.arizona.edu [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21212 (United States)

    2013-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Most directly imaged giant exoplanets are fainter than brown dwarfs with similar spectra. To explain their relative underluminosity, unusually cloudy atmospheres have been proposed. However, with multiple parameters varying between any two objects, it remained difficult to observationally test this idea. We present a new method, sensitive time-resolved Hubble Space Telescope near-infrared spectroscopy, to study two rotating L/T transition brown dwarfs (2M2139 and SIMP0136). The observations provide spatially and spectrally resolved mapping of the cloud decks of the brown dwarfs. The data allow the study of cloud structure variations while other parameters are unchanged. We find that both brown dwarfs display variations of identical nature: J- and H-band brightness variations with minimal color and spectral changes. Our light curve models show that even the simplest surface brightness distributions require at least three elliptical spots. We show that for each source the spectral changes can be reproduced with a linear combination of only two different spectra, i.e., the entire surface is covered by two distinct types of regions. Modeling the color changes and spectral variations together reveal patchy cloud covers consisting of a spatially heterogeneous mix of low-brightness, low-temperature thick clouds and brighter, thin, and warm clouds. We show that the same thick cloud patches seen in our varying brown dwarf targets, if extended to the entire photosphere, predict near-infrared colors/magnitudes matching the range occupied by the directly imaged exoplanets that are cooler and less luminous than brown dwarfs with similar spectral types. This supports the models in which thick clouds are responsible for the near-infrared properties of these ''underluminous'' exoplanets.

  7. Determinating Timing Channels in Statistically Multiplexed Clouds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aviram, Amittai; Ford, Bryan; Gummadi, Ramakrishna

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Timing side-channels represent an insidious security challenge for cloud computing, because: (a) they enable one customer to steal information from another without leaving a trail or raising alarms; (b) only the cloud provider can feasibly detect and report such attacks, but the provider's incentives are not to; and (c) known general-purpose timing channel control methods undermine statistical resource sharing efficiency, and, with it, the cloud computing business model. We propose a new cloud architecture that uses provider-enforced deterministic execution to eliminate all timing channels internal to a shared cloud domain, without limiting internal resource sharing. A prototype determinism-enforcing hypervisor demonstrates that utilizing such a cloud might be both convenient and efficient. The hypervisor enables parallel guest processes and threads to interact via familiar shared memory and file system abstractions, and runs moderately coarse-grained parallel tasks as efficiently and scalably as current nond...

  8. CloudML : A DSL for model-based realization of applications in the cloud.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brandtzćg, Eirik

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ??Cloud Computing offers a vast amount of resources, available for end users on a pay-as-you-go basis. The opportunity to choose between several cloud providers is… (more)

  9. THE MAGELLANIC QUASARS SURVEY. III. SPECTROSCOPIC CONFIRMATION OF 758 ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI BEHIND THE MAGELLANIC CLOUDS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koz?owski, Szymon; Udalski, Andrzej; Szyma?ski, M. K.; Kubiak, M.; Pietrzy?ski, G.; Soszy?ski, I.; Wyrzykowski, ?.; Ulaczyk, K.; Poleski, R.; Pietrukowicz, P.; Skowron, J. [Warsaw University Observatory, Al. Ujazdowskie 4, 00-478 Warszawa (Poland); Onken, Christopher A. [Research School of Astronomy and Astrophysics, The Australian National University, Canberra 2611 (Australia); Kochanek, Christopher S. [Department of Astronomy, The Ohio State University, 140 West 18th Avenue, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Meixner, M. [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Bonanos, A. Z., E-mail: simkoz@astrouw.edu.pl, E-mail: onken@mso.anu.edu.au, E-mail: ckochanek@astronomy.ohio-state.edu [National Observatory of Athens, Institute of Astronomy, Astrophysics, Space Applications and Remote Sensing, I. Metaxa and Vas. Pavlou St., Palaia Penteli, 15236 Athens (Greece); Collaboration: OGLE Collaboration

    2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Magellanic Quasars Survey (MQS) has now increased the number of quasars known behind the Magellanic Clouds by almost an order of magnitude. All survey fields in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) and 70% of those in the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC) have been observed. The targets were selected from the third phase of the Optical Gravitational Lensing Experiment (OGLE-III) based on their optical variability, mid-IR, and/or X-ray properties. We spectroscopically confirmed 758 quasars (565 in the LMC and 193 in the SMC) behind the clouds, of which 94% (527 in the LMC and 186 in the SMC) are newly identified. The MQS quasars have long-term (12 yr and growing for OGLE), high-cadence light curves, enabling unprecedented variability studies of quasars. The MQS quasars also provide a dense reference grid for measuring both the internal and bulk proper motions of the clouds, and 50 quasars are bright enough (I ?< 18 mag) for absorption studies of the interstellar/intergalactic medium of the clouds.

  10. Aircraft Observations of Sub-cloud Aerosol and Convective Cloud Physical Properties

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Axisa, Duncan

    2011-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    of Department, Kenneth Bowman December 2009 Major Subject: Atmospheric Sciences iii iii ABSTRACT Aircraft Observations of Sub-Cloud Aerosol and Convective Cloud Physical Properties. (December 2009) Duncan Axisa, B.Ed., University of Malta; B... but for vertical velocity (ms-1). Negative values are updraft and positive values are downdraft ........................................... 30 18 Cloud droplet size distribution (dN/dlogD, cm-3) for 1Hz cloud penetration data...

  11. Analysis of cloud layer structure in Shouxian, China using RS92 radiosonde aided by 95 GHz cloud radar

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Zhanqing

    Analysis of cloud layer structure in Shouxian, China using RS92 radiosonde aided by 95 GHz cloud to analyze cloud vertical structure over this area by taking advantage of the first direct measurements of cloud vertical layers from the 95 GHz radar. Singlelayer, twolayer, and threelayer clouds account for 28

  12. The SILCC (SImulating the LifeCycle of molecular Clouds) project: I. Chemical evolution of the supernova-driven ISM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walch, S K; Naab, T; Gatto, A; Glover, S C O; Wünsch, R; Klessen, R S; Clark, P C; Peters, T; Baczynski, C

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The SILCC project (SImulating the Life-Cycle of molecular Clouds) aims at a more self-consistent understanding of the interstellar medium (ISM) on small scales and its link to galaxy evolution. We simulate the evolution of the multi-phase ISM in a 500 pc x 500 pc x 10 kpc region of a galactic disc, with a gas surface density of $\\Sigma_{_{\\rm GAS}} = 10 \\;{\\rm M}_\\odot/{\\rm pc}^2$. The Flash 4.1 simulations include an external potential, self-gravity, magnetic fields, heating and radiative cooling, time-dependent chemistry of H$_2$ and CO considering (self-) shielding, and supernova (SN) feedback. We explore SN explosions at different (fixed) rates in high-density regions (peak), in random locations (random), in a combination of both (mixed), or clustered in space and time (clustered). Only random or clustered models with self-gravity (which evolve similarly) are in agreement with observations. Molecular hydrogen forms in dense filaments and clumps and contributes 20% - 40% to the total mass, whereas most of ...

  13. The Magellan Final Report on Cloud Computing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coghlan, Susan

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    supported images and site security policies. A cloud systemcertain implications on site security policies. Our securityactivities—both in terms of site security policy as well as

  14. Automated Security Compliance Tool for the Cloud.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ullah, Kazi Wali

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ?? Security, especially security compliance, is a major concern that is slowing down the large scale adoption of cloud computing in the enterprise environment. Business… (more)

  15. Cloud Computing and Sustainability: Energy Efficiency Aspects.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gholamhosseinian, Ashkan

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ?? Cloud computing promises a new era of service delivery and deployment in such a way that every person can access any kind of services… (more)

  16. Cloud Computing Organizational Benefits: A Managerial concern.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mandala, Venkata

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ??Context: Software industry is looking for new methods and opportunities to reduce the project management problems and operational costs. Cloud Computing concept is providing answers… (more)

  17. Cloud Computing - Trends and Performance Issues.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Al-Refai, Ali

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ??Context: Cloud Computing is a very fascinating concept these days, it is attracting so many organiza-tions to move their utilities and applications into a dedicated… (more)

  18. Migrating enterprise storage applications to the cloud.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vrable, Michael Daniel

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ??Cloud computing has emerged as a model for hosting computing infrastructure and outsourcing management of that infrastructure. It offers the promise of simplified provisioning and… (more)

  19. Chapter Three Thermodynamics, Cloud Microphysics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xue, Ming

    ­lasting convection. Ice phase is currently not present in the model. The inclusion of it would in general change source and sink. However models without ice phase are still able to capture the essential dynamics systems such as mesoscale convective rainbands and squall lines, phase changes of water occur as mesoscale

  20. To Cloud or Not to Cloud: A Mobile Device Perspective on Energy Consumption of Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Namboodiri, Vinod

    To Cloud or Not to Cloud: A Mobile Device Perspective on Energy Consumption of Applications Vinod important criteria might be the energy consumed by the applications they run. The goal of this work is to characterize under what scenarios cloud-based applications would be relatively more energy-efficient for users

  1. Aircraft Microphysical Documentation from Cloud Base to Anvils of Hailstorm Feeder Clouds in Argentina

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daniel, Rosenfeld

    in Argentina DANIEL ROSENFELD The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Jerusalem, Israel WILLIAM L. WOODLEY Woodley, Argentina, with a cloud-physics jet aircraft penetrating the major feeder clouds from cloud base to the 45°C. Introduction The province of Mendoza in western Argentina (32°S, 68°W), which is known worldwide for its wine

  2. From Grid to private Clouds, to interClouds. Project Team

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vialle, Stéphane

    24/10/2011 1 From Grid to private Clouds, to interClouds. AlGorille Project Team An overviewGorille INRIA Project Team October 21, 2011 I Premise of Grid ComputingI Premise of Grid Computing... From Grid to private Clouds, to inter

  3. Investigating the Radiative Impact Clouds Using Retrieved Properties to Classify Cloud Type

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hogan, Robin

    of Reading, RG6 6AL, UK Abstract. Active remote sensing allows cloud properties such as ice and liquid water remote sensing, Cloud categorization, Cloud properties, Radiative impact. PACS: 92.60. Vb. INTRODUCTION in a radiation scheme which can simulate the radiation budget and heating rates throughout the atmospheric

  4. E-Cloud Build-up in Grooved Chambers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Venturini, Marco

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and F. Zimmermann, ”LC e-Cloud Activities at CERN”, talkal. , Simulations of the Electron Cloud for Vari- ous Con?E-CLOUD BUILD-UP IN GROOVED CHAMBERS ? M. Venturini † LBNL,

  5. A cloud-assisted design for autonomous driving

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Suresh Kumar, Swarun

    This paper presents Carcel, a cloud-assisted system for autonomous driving. Carcel enables the cloud to have access to sensor data from autonomous vehicles as well as the roadside infrastructure. The cloud assists autonomous ...

  6. Deriving cloud velocity from an array of solar radiation measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bosch, J.L.; Zheng, Y.; Kleissl, J.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    K. , 2011. US20110060475. Cloud tracking. U.S. Patent Bedka,technique for obtaining cloud motion from geosynchronouson advection of a frozen cloud field (Chow et al. (2011);

  7. Journal of Quantitative Spectroscopy & Radiative Transfer 7980 (2003) 11711188

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baum, Bryan A.

    .elsevier.com/locate/jqsrt The spectral signature of mixed-phase clouds composed of non-spherical ice crystals and spherical liquid and ice particles may be present. This is typically known as a "mixed-phase" cloud condition the bulk scattering properties of mixed-phase clouds by a linear weighting of the contributions of ice

  8. AEROSOL, CLOUDS, AND CLIMATE CHANGE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    SCHWARTZ, S.E.

    2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Earth's climate is thought to be quite sensitive to changes in radiative fluxes that are quite small in absolute magnitude, a few watts per square meter, and in relation to these fluxes in the natural climate. Atmospheric aerosol particles exert influence on climate directly, by scattering and absorbing radiation, and indirectly by modifying the microphysical properties of clouds and in turn their radiative effects and hydrology. The forcing of climate change by these indirect effects is thought to be quite substantial relative to forcing by incremental concentrations of greenhouse gases, but highly uncertain. Quantification of aerosol indirect forcing by satellite- or ground-based remote sensing has proved quite difficult in view of inherent large variation in the pertinent observables such as cloud optical depth, which is controlled mainly by liquid water path and only secondarily by aerosols. Limited work has shown instances of large magnitude of aerosol indirect forcing, with local instantaneous forcing upwards of 50 W m{sup 66}-2. Ultimately it will be necessary to represent aerosol indirect effects in climate models to accurately identify the anthropogenic forcing at present and over secular time and to assess the influence of this forcing in the context of other forcings of climate change. While the elements of aerosol processes that must be represented in models describing the evolution and properties of aerosol particles that serve as cloud condensation particles are known, many important components of these processes remain to be understood and to be represented in models, and the models evaluated against observation, before such model-based representations can confidently be used to represent aerosol indirect effects in climate models.

  9. The Giant Molecular Cloud Environments of Infrared Dark Clouds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hernandez, Audra K

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the GMC environments surrounding 10 IRDCs, based on 13CO molecular line emission from the Galactic Ring Survey. Using a range of physical scales, we measure the physical properties of the IRDCs and their surrounding molecular material extending out to radii, R, of 30pc. By comparing different methods for defining cloud boundaries and for deriving mass surface densities, Sigma, and velocity dispersions, sigma, we settled on a preferred "CE,tau,G" method of "Connected Extraction" in position-velocity space along with Gaussian fitting to opacity-corrected line profiles for velocity dispersion and mass estimation. We examine how cloud definition affects measurements of the magnitude and direction of line of sight velocity gradients and velocity dispersions, including the associated dependencies on size scale. CE,tau,G-defined IRDCs and GMCs show velocity gradient versus size relations that scale approximately as dv_0/ds~s^(-1/2) and velocity dispersion versus size relations sigma~s^(1/2), which are consi...

  10. Electron Cloud Effects in Accelerators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Furman, M.A.

    2012-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Abstract We present a brief summary of various aspects of the electron-cloud effect (ECE) in accelerators. For further details, the reader is encouraged to refer to the proceedings of many prior workshops, either dedicated to EC or with significant EC contents, including the entire ?ECLOUD? series [1?22]. In addition, the proceedings of the various flavors of Particle Accelerator Conferences [23] contain a large number of EC-related publications. The ICFA Beam Dynamics Newsletter series [24] contains one dedicated issue, and several occasional articles, on EC. An extensive reference database is the LHC website on EC [25].

  11. Profiling clouds' inner life | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas ConchasPassive Solar Home DesignPresentationsSRS RespondsLiftPetroleumProfiling clouds' inner

  12. ARM - Lesson Plans: Making Clouds

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc Documentation RUC : XDCResearch Related InformationAcid Rain Outreach HomeExpansionMaking Clouds

  13. From clusters to clouds | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsing ZirconiaPolicyFeasibilityFieldMinds"OfficeTourFrom clusters to clouds From

  14. Toward a Diurnal Climatology of Cold-Season Turbulence Statistics in Continental Stratocumulus as Observed by the Atmospheric Radiation Millimeter- Wavelength Cloud Radars

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mechem, D.B.; Kogan, Y.L.; Childers, M.E.; Donner, K.M.

    2005-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Numerous observational studies of marine stratocumulus have demonstrated a pronounced diurnal cycle. At night, longwave flux divergence at the top of the cloud drives negatively buoyant eddies that tend to keep the boundary layer well mixed. During the day, solar absorption by the cloud tends to reduce the turbulent intensity and often decouples the planetary boundary layer (PBL) into cloud- and sub-cloud circulations. The delicate balance between turbulent intensity, entrainment, and fluxes dictates cloud geometry and persistence, which can significantly impact the shortwave radiation budget. Millimeter-wavelength cloud radars (MMCRs) have been used to study the turbulent structure of boundary layer stratocumulus (e.g. Frisch et al. 1995; Kollias and Albrecht 2000). Analysis is confined to nondrizzling or lightly drizzling cloud systems for which precipitation contamination is negligible. Under such assumptions the Doppler velocity field becomes a proxy for vertical velocity. Prior research has mainly consisted of a few case studies of specific cloud systems using radar scan strategies optimized for this particular cloud type. The MMCR operating at the Southern Great Plains Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility is broadly configured to be able to detect many different cloud types over a broad range of reflectivities and altitudes, so it is not specifically optimized for PBL clouds. Being in more-or-less continuous operation since the end of 1996, it does, however, have the advantage of long data coverage, which suggests that statistically significant measures of the diurnal cycle of turbulence should be attainable. This abstract summarizes the first few steps toward this goal, using 7 months of cold season MMCR data.

  15. Accurate simulation of the electron cloud in the Fermilab Main Injector with VORPAL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lebrun, Paul L.G.; Spentzouris, Panagiotis; /Fermilab; Cary, John R.; Stoltz, Peter; Veitzer, Seth A.; /Tech-X, Boulder

    2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Precision simulations of the electron cloud at the Fermilab Main Injector have been studied using the plasma simulation code VORPAL. Fully 3D and self consistent solutions that includes E.M. field maps generated by the cloud and the proton bunches have been obtained, as well detailed distributions of the electron's 6D phase space. We plan to include such maps in the ongoing simulation of the space charge effects in the Main Injector. Simulations of the response of beam position monitors, retarding field analyzers and microwave transmission experiments are ongoing.

  16. Network Performance of a Video Application in the Cloud.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    NARISETTY, SHRAVAN

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ??Cloud computing is a technology that uses the internet and central remote servers to maintain data and applications. There are different cloud services of which… (more)

  17. Direct Numerical Simulations and Robust Predictions of Cloud...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the center of the bubble cloud. Credit: Computational Science and Engineering Laboratory, ETH Zurich, Switzerland Direct Numerical Simulations and Robust Predictions of Cloud...

  18. Magnetically coupled system for mixing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, III, Harlan; Meichel, George; Legere, Edward; Malkiel, Edwin; Woods, Robert Paul; Ashley, Oliver; Katz, Joseph; Ward, Jason; Petersen, Paul

    2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention provides a mixing system comprising a magnetically coupled drive system and a foil for cultivating algae, or cyanobacteria, in an open or enclosed vessel. The invention provides effective mixing, low energy usage, low capital expenditure, and ease of drive system component maintenance while maintaining the integrity of a sealed mixing vessel.

  19. Subcritical Fluctuations at the Electroweak Phase Transition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rudnei O. Ramos

    1996-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the importance of thermal fluctuations during the electroweak phase transition. We evaluate in detail the equilibrium number density of large amplitude subcritical fluctuations and discuss the importance of phase mixing to the dynamics of the phase transition. Our results show that, for realistic Higgs masses, the phase transition can be completed by the percolation of the true vacuum, induced by the presence of subcritical fluctuations.

  20. CloneCloud: Boosting Mobile Device Applications Through Cloud Clone Execution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chun, Byung-Gon; Maniatis, Petros; Naik, Mayur

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Mobile applications are becoming increasingly ubiquitous and provide ever richer functionality on mobile devices. At the same time, such devices often enjoy strong connectivity with more powerful machines ranging from laptops and desktops to commercial clouds. This paper presents the design and implementation of CloneCloud, a system that automatically transforms mobile applications to benefit from the cloud. The system is a flexible application partitioner and execution runtime that enables unmodified mobile applications running in an application-level virtual machine to seamlessly off-load part of their execution from mobile devices onto device clones operating in a computational cloud. CloneCloud uses a combination of static analysis and dynamic profiling to optimally and automatically partition an application so that it migrates, executes in the cloud, and re-integrates computation in a fine-grained manner that makes efficient use of resources. Our evaluation shows that CloneCloud can achieve up to 21.2x s...

  1. Cloud a particle beam facility to investigate the influence of cosmic rays on clouds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kirkby, Jasper

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Palaeoclimatic data provide extensive evidence for solar forcing of the climate during the Holocene and the last ice age, but the underlying mechanism remains a mystery. However recent observations suggest that cosmic rays may play a key role. Satellite data have revealed a surprising correlation between cosmic ray intensity and the fraction of the Earth covered by low clouds \\cite{svensmark97,marsh}. Since the cosmic ray intensity is modulated by the solar wind, this may be an important clue to the long-sought mechanism for solar-climate variability. In order to test whether cosmic rays and clouds are causally linked and, if so, to understand the microphysical mechanisms, a novel experiment known as CLOUD\\footnotemark\\ has been proposed \\cite{cloud_proposal}--\\cite{cloud_addendum_2}. CLOUD proposes to investigate ion-aerosol-cloud microphysics under controlled laboratory conditions using a beam from a particle accelerator, which provides a precisely adjustable and measurable artificial source of cosmic rays....

  2. Verifiable Resource Accounting for Cloud Computing Services

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maniatis, Petros

    Verifiable Resource Accounting for Cloud Computing Services Vyas Sekar Intel Labs Petros Maniatis Intel Labs ABSTRACT Cloud computing offers users the potential to reduce operating and capital expenses cause providers to incorrectly attribute resource consumption to customers or im- plicitly bear

  3. Cloud Properties and Precipitation Formation Processes Observed

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Delene, David J.

    of spring time precipitation that develops in the Riyadh, Saudi Arabia region. · What are the cloud properties for developing cloud in the Riyadh, Saudi Arabia region. Research Objective #12;#12;Quality is based on calibration conducted by Kelly bosch and Dennis Afseth at Weather Modification Inc. (WMI) on 22

  4. Taming the Energy Hog in Cloud Infrastructure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hunt, Galen

    energy consumption consumed 61 Billion kWh in 2006, enough to power 5.8 Million average US households constrained #12;Energy Expenditure of The Cloud The IT industry is on fire! constitutes about 2% of total USTaming the Energy Hog in Cloud Infrastructure Jie Liu Microsoft Research liuj@microsoft.com RTSS

  5. Public Cloud B CarbonEmission

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Buyya, Rajkumar

    Sensors, Demand Prediction Power Capping, Green Software Services such as energy-efficient scientific) Request a Cloud service 4) Allocate service 5) Request service allocation 3) Request energy efficiency information Green Offer Directory 2) Request any `Green Offer' Routers Internet Green Broker #12;Cloud

  6. The CloudNets Network Virtualization Architecture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schmid, Stefan

    Nets Network Virtualization Architecture Johannes Grassler jgrassler@inet.tu-berlin.de 05. Februar, 2014 Johannes Grassler jgrassler@inet.tu-berlin.de The CloudNets Network Virtualization Architecture #12;..... . .... . .... . ..... . .... . .... . .... . ..... . .... . .... . .... . ..... . .... . .... . .... . ..... . .... . ..... . .... . .... . Johannes Grassler jgrassler@inet.tu-berlin.de The CloudNets Network Virtualization Architecture #12

  7. MIX and Instability Growth from Oblique Shock

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Molitoris, J D; Batteux, J D; Garza, R G; Tringe, J W; Souers, P C; Forbes, J W

    2011-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

    We have studied the formation and evolution of shock-induced mix resulting from interface features in a divergent cylindrical geometry. In this research a cylindrical core of high-explosive was detonated to create an oblique shock wave and accelerate the interface. The interfaces studied were between the high-explosive/aluminum, aluminum/plastic, and finally plastic/air. Pre-emplaced surface features added to the aluminum were used to modify this interface. Time sequence radiographic imaging quantified the resulting instability formation from the growth phase to over 60 {micro}s post-detonation. Thus allowing the study of the onset of mix and evolution to turbulence. The plastic used here was porous polyethylene. Radiographic image data are compared with numerical simulations of the experiments.

  8. GIANT MOLECULAR CLOUD FORMATION IN DISK GALAXIES: CHARACTERIZING SIMULATED VERSUS OBSERVED CLOUD CATALOGS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Benincasa, Samantha M.; Pudritz, Ralph E.; Wadsley, James [Department of Physics and Astronomy, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON L8S 4M1 (Canada); Tasker, Elizabeth J. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Hokkaido University, Kita-ku, Sapporo 060-0810 (Japan)

    2013-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the results of a study of simulated giant molecular clouds (GMCs) formed in a Milky Way-type galactic disk with a flat rotation curve. This simulation, which does not include star formation or feedback, produces clouds with masses ranging between 10{sup 4} M{sub ?} and 10{sup 7} M{sub ?}. We compare our simulated cloud population to two observational surveys: the Boston University-Five College Radio Astronomy Observatory Galactic Ring Survey and the BIMA All-Disk Survey of M33. An analysis of the global cloud properties as well as a comparison of Larson's scaling relations is carried out. We find that simulated cloud properties agree well with the observed cloud properties, with the closest agreement occurring between the clouds at comparable resolution in M33. Our clouds are highly filamentary—a property that derives both from their formation due to gravitational instability in the sheared galactic environment, as well as to cloud-cloud gravitational encounters. We also find that the rate at which potentially star-forming gas accumulates within dense regions—wherein n{sub thresh} ? 10{sup 4} cm{sup –3}—is 3% per 10 Myr, in clouds of roughly 10{sup 6} M{sub ?}. This suggests that star formation rates in observed clouds are related to the rates at which gas can be accumulated into dense subregions within GMCs via filamentary flows. The most internally well-resolved clouds are chosen for listing in a catalog of simulated GMCs—the first of its kind. The cataloged clouds are available as an extracted data set from the global simulation.

  9. Radiation Parameterization for Three-Dimensional Inhomogeneous Cirrus Clouds Applied to ARM Data and Climate Models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kuo-Nan Liou

    2003-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

    OAK-B135 (a) We developed a 3D radiative transfer model to simulate the transfer of solar and thermal infrared radiation in inhomogeneous cirrus clouds. The model utilized a diffusion approximation approach (four-term expansion in the intensity) employing Cartesian coordinates. The required single-scattering parameters, including the extinction coefficient, single-scattering albedo, and asymmetry factor, for input to the model, were parameterized in terms of the ice water content and mean effective ice crystal size. The incorporation of gaseous absorption in multiple scattering atmospheres was accomplished by means of the correlated k-distribution approach. In addition, the strong forward diffraction nature in the phase function was accounted for in each predivided spatial grid based on a delta-function adjustment. The radiation parameterization developed herein is applied to potential cloud configurations generated from GCMs to investigate broken clouds and cloud-overlapping effects on the domain-averaged heating rate. Cloud inhomogeneity plays an important role in the determination of flux and heating rate distributions. Clouds with maximum overlap tend to produce less heating than those with random overlap. Broken clouds show more solar heating as well as more IR cooling as compared to a continuous cloud field (Gu and Liou, 2001). (b) We incorporated a contemporary radiation parameterization scheme in the UCLA atmospheric GCM in collaboration with the UCLA GCM group. In conjunction with the cloud/radiation process studies, we developed a physically-based cloud cover formation scheme in association with radiation calculations. The model clouds were first vertically grouped in terms of low, middle, and high types. Maximum overlap was then used for each cloud type, followed by random overlap among the three cloud types. Fu and Liou's 1D radiation code with modification was subsequently employed for pixel-by-pixel radiation calculations in the UCLA GCM. We showed that the simulated cloud cover and OLR fields without special tuning are comparable to those of ISCCP dataset and the results derived from radiation budget experiments. Use of the new radiation and cloud schemes enhances the radiative warming in the middle to upper tropical troposphere and alleviates the cold bias in the UCLA atmospheric GCM. We also illustrated that ice crystal size and cloud inhomogeneous are significant factors affecting the radiation budgets at the top of the atmosphere and the surface (Gu et al. 2003). (c) An innovative approach has been developed to construct a 3D field of inhomogeneous clouds in general and cirrus in particular in terms of liquid/ice water content and particle size on the basis of a unification of satellite and ground-based cloud radar data. Satellite remote sensing employing the current narrow-band spectro-radiometers has limitation and only the vertically integrated cloud parameters (optical depth and mean particle size) can be determined. However, by combining the horizontal cloud mapping inferred from satellites with the vertical structure derived from the profiling Doppler cloud radar, a 3D cloud field can be constructed. This represents a new conceptual approach to 3D remote sensing and imaging and offers a new perspective in observing the cloud structure. We applied this novel technique to AVHRR/NOAA satellite and mm-wave cloud radar data obtained from the ARM achieve and assessed the 3D cirrus cloud field with the ice crystal size distributions independently derived from optical probe measurements aboard the University of North Dakota Citation. The retrieved 3D ice water content and mean effective ice crystal size involving an impressive cirrus cloud occurring on April 18, 1997, are shown to be comparable to those derived from the analysis of collocated and coincident in situ aircraft measurements (Liou et al. 2002). (d) Detection of thin cirrus with optical depths less than 0.5, particularly those occurring i n the tropics remains a fundamental problem in remote sensing. We developed a new detection scheme for the

  10. Multi Cloud Architecture to Provide Data Security And Integrity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nikhil Dutta; Himanshu Bakshi; Mujammill Mulla; Viraj Shinde

    Abstract-- Cloud servers are being used to store data and application but its security is a major issue in current context. To solve the data security problems in public environment we propose an effective model for security and integrity of data stored in a cloud, through data segmentation followed by data encryption programs in a multiple cloud architecture. This architecture forms a multi cloud system where primary cloud is available for multiple users for data storage offering lesser load on client systems thereby using the cloud computing architecture. This architecture introduces a secondary cloud controlled by a single administrator which provides the data backup for primary cloud after undergoing specific segmentation and encryption algorithms to ensure security and integrity of data. The proposed system also offers protection against virus attacks by using linux as the base OS. Keywords-- Encryption, Linux, Multi cloud system, Primary cloud, Secondary cloud, Segmentation.

  11. Workload Classification & Software Energy Measurement for Efficient Scheduling on Private Cloud Platforms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, James W

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    At present there are a number of barriers to creating an energy efficient workload scheduler for a Private Cloud based data center. Firstly, the relationship between different workloads and power consumption must be investigated. Secondly, current hardware-based solutions to providing energy usage statistics are unsuitable in warehouse scale data centers where low cost and scalability are desirable properties. In this paper we discuss the effect of different workloads on server power consumption in a Private Cloud platform. We display a noticeable difference in energy consumption when servers are given tasks that dominate various resources (CPU, Memory, Hard Disk and Network). We then use this insight to develop CloudMonitor, a software utility that is capable of >95% accurate power predictions from monitoring resource consumption of workloads, after a "training phase" in which a dynamic power model is developed.

  12. Condensing Effect of Palmitic Acid on DPPC in Mixed Langmuir Gang Ma and Heather C. Allen*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Condensing Effect of Palmitic Acid on DPPC in Mixed Langmuir Monolayers Gang Ma and Heather C in the liquid-expanded and condensed phases is explored. A condensing effect of PA on DPPC is observed with VSFG ordering of DPPC chains and causes DPPC to transition from the expanded phase into the condensed phase

  13. How to Describe Neutrino Mixing and CP Violation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harald Fritzsch; Zhi-zhong Xing

    2001-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a classification of possible parametrizations of the 3x3 lepton flavor mixing matrix in terms of the rotation and phase angles. A particular parametrization, which is most convenient to describe the observables of neutrino oscillations and that of the neutrinoless double beta decay, is studied in detail. The possibility to determine the Dirac- and Majorana-type CP-violating phases are also discussed.

  14. Phases and Structures of Interstellar Gas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. Elmegreen

    1999-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The thermal and chemical phases of the cool component of interstellar gas are discussed. Variations with galactocentric radius and from galaxy to galaxy are mostly the result of changes in the ambient interstellar pressure and radiation field. Interstellar structure that is hierarchical or fractal in the cloudy parts and has large and connected empty regions between these clouds is probably the result of turbulence. Such structure opens up the disk to the transmission of OB star light into the halo, and it provides for a diffuse ionized component that tapers away gradually from each dense HII region. Fractal cloud structure may also produce the cloud and clump mass functions, and perhaps even the star cluster mass function.

  15. Cluster Formation in Contracting Molecular Clouds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eric Huff; Steven Stahler

    2007-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

    We explore, through a simplified, semi-analytic model, the formation of dense clusters containing massive stars. The parent cloud spawning the cluster is represented as an isothermal sphere. This sphere is in near force balance between self-gravity and turbulent pressure. Self-gravity, mediated by turbulent dissipation, drives slow contraction of the cloud, eventually leading to a sharp central spike in density and the onset of dynamical instability. We suggest that, in a real cloud, this transition marks the late and rapid production of massive stars. We also offer an empirical prescription, akin to the Schmidt law, for low-mass star formation in our contracting cloud. Applying this prescription to the Orion Nebula Cluster, we are able to reproduce the accelerating star formation previously inferred from the distribution of member stars in the HR diagram. The cloud turns about 10 percent of its mass into low-mass stars before becoming dynamically unstable. Over a cloud free-fall time, this figure drops to 1 percent, consistent with the overall star formation efficiency of molecular clouds in the Galaxy.

  16. Magnetic Fields in Molecular Cloud Cores

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shantanu Basu

    2004-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Observations of magnetic field strengths imply that molecular cloud fragments are individually close to being in a magnetically critical state, even though both magnetic field and column density measurements range over two orders of magnitude. The turbulent pressure also approximately balances the self-gravitational pressure. These results together mean that the one-dimensional velocity dispersion $\\sigv$ is proportional to the mean \\Alf speed of a cloud $\\va$. Global models of MHD turbulence in a molecular cloud show that this correlation is naturally satisfied for a range of different driving strengths of the turbulence. For example, an increase of turbulent driving causes a cloud expansion which also increases $\\va$. Clouds are in a time averaged balance but exhibit large oscillatory motions, particularly in their outer rarefied regions. We also discuss models of gravitational fragmentation in a sheet-like region in which turbulence has already dissipated, including the effects of magnetic fields and ion-neutral friction. Clouds with near-critical mass-to-flux ratios lead to subsonic infall within cores, consistent with some recent observations of motions in starless cores. Conversely, significantly supercritical clouds are expected to produce extended supersonic infall.

  17. ARM - Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Jensen, Mike; Bartholomew, Mary Jane; Genio, Anthony Del; Giangrande, Scott; Kollias, Pavlos

    Convective processes play a critical role in the Earth's energy balance through the redistribution of heat and moisture in the atmosphere and their link to the hydrological cycle. Accurate representation of convective processes in numerical models is vital towards improving current and future simulations of Earths climate system. Despite improvements in computing power, current operational weather and global climate models are unable to resolve the natural temporal and spatial scales important to convective processes and therefore must turn to parameterization schemes to represent these processes. In turn, parameterization schemes in cloud-resolving models need to be evaluated for their generality and application to a variety of atmospheric conditions. Data from field campaigns with appropriate forcing descriptors have been traditionally used by modelers for evaluating and improving parameterization schemes.

  18. Scanning ARM Cloud Radar Handbook

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Widener, K; Bharadwaj, N; Johnson, K

    2012-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The scanning ARM cloud radar (SACR) is a polarimetric Doppler radar consisting of three different radar designs based on operating frequency. These are designated as follows: (1) X-band SACR (X-SACR); (2) Ka-band SACR (Ka-SACR); and (3) W-band SACR (W-SACR). There are two SACRs on a single pedestal at each site where SACRs are deployed. The selection of the operating frequencies at each deployed site is predominantly determined by atmospheric attenuation at the site. Because RF attenuation increases with atmospheric water vapor content, ARM's Tropical Western Pacific (TWP) sites use the X-/Ka-band frequency pair. The Southern Great Plains (SGP) and North Slope of Alaska (NSA) sites field the Ka-/W-band frequency pair. One ARM Mobile Facility (AMF1) has a Ka/W-SACR and the other (AMF2) has a X/Ka-SACR.

  19. Proximity Graphs for Defining Surfaces over Point Clouds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Behnke, Sven

    over Point Clouds Gabriel Zachmann University of Bonn Germany Jan Klein University of Paderborn Germany

  20. Virtual Cloud: Rent Out the Rented Resources Sheheryar Malik

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Virtual Cloud: Rent Out the Rented Resources Sheheryar Malik Research Team OASIS INRIA Sophia.huet@inria.fr Abstract--With the advent in cloud computing technologies, use of cloud computing infrastructure to the cloud infrastructure. Over a small period of time, it has substantiated to be an attractive choice

  1. CLOUD PHYSICS From aerosol-limited to invigoration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Napp, Nils

    CLOUD PHYSICS From aerosol-limited to invigoration of warm convective clouds Ilan Koren,1 * Guy Dagan,1 Orit Altaratz1 Among all cloud-aerosol interactions, the invigoration effect is the most elusive. Most of the studies that do suggest this effect link it to deep convective clouds with a warm base

  2. CLOUD DROPLET NUCLEATION AND ITS CONNECTION TO AEROSOL PROPERTIES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CLOUD DROPLET NUCLEATION AND ITS CONNECTION TO AEROSOL PROPERTIES STEPHEN E. SCHWARTZ Environmental in cloud-free conditions and indirectly, by increasing concentratiol1S of cloud droplets thereby enhancing cloud shortwave reflectivity. These effecls are thought to be significant in the context of changes

  3. Low Cost, Scalable Proteomics Data Analysis Using Amazon's Cloud

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Low Cost, Scalable Proteomics Data Analysis Using Amazon's Cloud Computing Services and Open and maintain. #12;Cloud Computing · Distributed or Cloud computing allows for the use of virtual computers Web Services (AWS) · EC2 ­ Amazon Elastic Compute Cloud "a web service that provides resizable compute

  4. Securely Managing Cryptographic Keys used within a Cloud Environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , Co-tenancy, Distributed Management Cryptography essential to secure cloud operations Use of sound;Page 3 Cloud Service Provider (CSP) - Models Cloud Service Models Software as a Service (Saa CSP know who I am? How is my connection to cloud components protected? Administration Who

  5. Application of cellular automata approach for cloud simulation and rendering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Christopher Immanuel, W. [Department of Physics, Vel Tech High Tech Dr. Rangarajan Dr. Sakunthala Engineering College, Tamil Nadu, Chennai 600 062 (India)] [Department of Physics, Vel Tech High Tech Dr. Rangarajan Dr. Sakunthala Engineering College, Tamil Nadu, Chennai 600 062 (India); Paul Mary Deborrah, S. [Research Department of Physics, The American College, Tamil Nadu, Madurai 625 002 (India)] [Research Department of Physics, The American College, Tamil Nadu, Madurai 625 002 (India); Samuel Selvaraj, R. [Research Department of Physics, Presidency College, Tamil Nadu, Chennai 600 005 (India)] [Research Department of Physics, Presidency College, Tamil Nadu, Chennai 600 005 (India)

    2014-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Current techniques for creating clouds in games and other real time applications produce static, homogenous clouds. These clouds, while viable for real time applications, do not exhibit an organic feel that clouds in nature exhibit. These clouds, when viewed over a time period, were able to deform their initial shape and move in a more organic and dynamic way. With cloud shape technology we should be able in the future to extend to create even more cloud shapes in real time with more forces. Clouds are an essential part of any computer model of a landscape or an animation of an outdoor scene. A realistic animation of clouds is also important for creating scenes for flight simulators, movies, games, and other. Our goal was to create a realistic animation of clouds.

  6. Radioactive mixed waste disposal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jasen, W.G.; Erpenbeck, E.G.

    1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Various types of waste have been generated during the 50-year history of the Hanford Site. Regulatory changes in the last 20 years have provided the emphasis for better management of these wastes. Interpretations of the Atomic Energy Act of 1954 (AEA), the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA), and the Hazardous and Solid Waste Amendments (HSWA) have led to the definition of radioactive mixed wastes (RMW). The radioactive and hazardous properties of these wastes have resulted in the initiation of special projects for the management of these wastes. Other solid wastes at the Hanford Site include low-level wastes, transuranic (TRU), and nonradioactive hazardous wastes. This paper describes a system for the treatment, storage, and disposal (TSD) of solid radioactive waste.

  7. Radiative Heating of the ISCCP Upper Level Cloud Regimes and its Impact on the Large-scale Tropical Circulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Wei; Schumacher, Courtney; McFarlane, Sally A.

    2013-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Radiative heating profiles of the International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project (ISCCP) cloud regimes (or weather states) were estimated by matching ISCCP observations with radiative properties derived from cloud radar and lidar measurements from the Department of Energy (DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) sites at Manus, Papua New Guinea, and Darwin, Australia. Focus was placed on the ISCCP cloud regimes containing the majority of upper level clouds in the tropics, i.e., mesoscale convective systems (MCSs), deep cumulonimbus with cirrus, mixed shallow and deep convection, and thin cirrus. At upper levels, these regimes have average maximum cloud occurrences ranging from 30% to 55% near 12 km with variations depending on the location and cloud regime. The resulting radiative heating profiles have maxima of approximately 1 K/day near 12 km, with equal heating contributions from the longwave and shortwave components. Upper level minima occur near 15 km, with the MCS regime showing the strongest cooling of 0.2 K/day and the thin cirrus showing no cooling. The gradient of upper level heating ranges from 0.2 to 0.4 K/(day?km), with the most convectively active regimes (i.e., MCSs and deep cumulonimbus with cirrus) having the largest gradient. When the above heating profiles were applied to the 25-year ISCCP data set, the tropics-wide average profile has a radiative heating maximum of 0.45Kday-1 near 250 hPa. Column-integrated radiative heating of upper level cloud accounts for about 20% of the latent heating estimated by the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) Precipitation Radar (PR). The ISCCP radiative heating of tropical upper level cloud only slightly modifies the response of an idealized primitive equation model forced with the tropics-wide TRMM PR latent heating, which suggests that the impact of upper level cloud is more important to large-scale tropical circulation variations because of convective feedbacks rather than direct forcing by the cloud radiative heating profiles. However, the height of the radiative heating maxima and gradient of the heating profiles are important to determine the sign and patterns of the horizontal circulation anomaly driven by radiative heating at upper levels.

  8. Prediction of Corrosion of Alloys in Mixed-Solvent Environments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    A. Anderko, P. Wang, R. D. Young, D. P. Riemer, P. McKenzie and M. M. Lencka (OLI Systems Inc.); S. S. Babu and P. Angelini (Oak Ridge National Laboratory)

    2003-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Corrosion is much less predictable in organic or mixed-solvent environments than in aqueous process environments. As a result, US chemical companies face greater uncertainty when selecting process equipment materials to manufacture chemical products using organic or mixed solvents than when the process environments are only aqueous. Chemical companies handle this uncertainty by overdesigning the equipment (wasting money and energy), rather than by accepting increased risks of corrosion failure (personnel hazards and environmental releases). Therefore, it is important to develop simulation tools that would help the chemical process industries to understand and predict corrosion and to develop mitigation measures. To create such tools, we have developed models that predict (1) the chemical composition, speciation, phase equilibria, component activities and transport properties of the bulk (aqueous, nonaqueous or mixed) phase that is in contact with the metal; (2) the phase equilibria and component activities of the alloy phase(s) that may be subject to corrosion and (3) the interfacial phenomena that are responsible for corrosion at the metal/solution or passive film/solution interface. During the course of this project, we have completed the following: (1) Development of thermodynamic modules for calculating the activities of alloy components; (2) Development of software that generates stability diagrams for alloys in aqueous systems; these diagrams make it possible to predict the tendency of metals to corrode; (3) Development and extensive verification of a model for calculating speciation, phase equilibria and thermodynamic properties of mixed-solvent electrolyte systems; (4) Integration of the software for generating stability diagrams with the mixed-solvent electrolyte model, which makes it possible to generate stability diagrams for nonaqueous or mixed-solvent systems; (5) Development of a model for predicting diffusion coefficients in mixed-solvent electrolyte systems; (6) Development of fundamentals of a detailed kinetic model of general corrosion, which includes a detailed treatment of local chemistry changes near the metal/solution interface coupled with transport through a liquid layer and solid phases at the interface; (7) Development of parameters for OLI's kinetic model of general corrosion of common engineering alloys in aqueous systems with a variety of solutes. With this model, the users will be able to predict the effect of various process conditions (such as environment composition, temperature, pressure) on the general corrosion of alloys; (8)Comprehensive review of the fundamentals of the models by an Academic Review Panel, which was performed in conjunction with three annual review meetings; (9)Development and commercial release of the Corrosion Analyzer, a Windows software product that encompasses the thermodynamic model, a facility for generating stability diagrams and the model for predicting the rates of general corrosion of selected alloys in aqueous systems.

  9. NIST Cloud Computing Strategy working paper, April 2011 1 of 25 NIST Strategy to build a USG Cloud Computing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    NIST Cloud Computing Strategy working paper, April 2011 1 of 25 NIST Strategy to build a USG Cloud of United States Government (USG) secure and effective adoption of the Cloud Computing2 model to reduce costs and improve services. The working document describes the NIST Cloud Computing program efforts

  10. Retrievals of Cloud Fraction and Cloud Albedo from Surface-based Shortwave Radiation Measurements: A Comparison of 16 Year Measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xie, Yu; Liu, Yangang; Long, Charles N.; Min, Qilong

    2014-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Ground-based radiation measurements have been widely conducted to gain information on clouds and the surface radiation budget; here several different techniques for retrieving cloud fraction (Long2006, Min2008 and XL2013) and cloud albedo (Min2008, Liu2011 and XL2013) from ground-based shortwave broadband and spectral radiation measurements are examined, and sixteen years of retrievals collected at the Department of Energy (DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Southern Great Plains (SGP) site are compared. The comparison shows overall good agreement between the retrievals of both cloud fraction and cloud albedo, with noted differences however. The Long2006 and Min2008 cloud fractions are greater on average than the XL2013 values. Compared to Min2008 and Liu2011, the XL2013 retrieval of cloud albedo tends to be greater for thin clouds but smaller for thick clouds, with the differences decreasing with increasing cloud fraction. Further analysis reveals that the approaches that retrieve cloud fraction and cloud albedo separately may suffer from mutual contamination of errors in retrieved cloud fraction and cloud albedo. Potential influences of cloud absorption, land-surface albedo, cloud structure, and measurement instruments are explored.

  11. Optimal broadcasting of mixed states

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dang Guifang; Fan Heng [Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100080 (China)

    2007-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The N to M (M{>=}N) universal quantum broadcasting of mixed states {rho}{sup xN} is proposed for a qubit system. The broadcasting of mixed states is universal and optimal in the sense that the shrinking factor is independent of the input state and achieves the upper bound. The quantum broadcasting of mixed qubits is a generalization of the universal quantum cloning machine for identical pure input states. A pure state decomposition of the identical mixed qubits {rho}{sup xN} is obtained.

  12. Fuel Mix and Emissions Disclosure

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    As part of the state's 1997 electric utility restructuring legislation, Illinois established provisions for the disclosure of fuel mix and emissions data. All electric utilities and alternative...

  13. Fuel Mix and Emissions Disclosure

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Virginia’s 1999 electric industry restructuring law requires the state's electricity providers to disclose -- "to the extent feasible" -- fuel mix and emissions data regarding electric generation....

  14. Fuel Mix and Emissions Disclosure

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Ohio's 1999 electric industry restructuring law requires the state's electricity suppliers to disclose details regarding their fuel mix and emissions to customers. Electric utilities and...

  15. Fuel Mix and Emissions Disclosure

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Maryland’s 1999 electric utility restructuring legislation requires all electric companies and electricity suppliers to provide customers with details regarding the fuel mix and emissions of...

  16. Fuel Mix and Emissions Disclosure

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Oregon's 1999 electric utility restructuring legislation requires electricity companies and electric service suppliers to disclose details regarding their fuel mix and emissions of electric...

  17. Halton Sequences for Mixed Logit

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Train, Kenneth

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Customers’ Choice Among Energy Supplier Simulation based oncustomers’ choice of energy supplier. Surveyed customerspreferences for energy suppliers, such that a mixed logit is

  18. Pre-Cloud Aerosol, Cloud Droplet Concentration, and Cloud Condensation Nuclei from the VAMOS Ocean-Cloud-Atmosphere Land Study (VOCALS) Field Campaign First Quarter 2010 ASR Program Metric Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kleinman, LI; Springston, SR; Daum, PH; Lee, Y-N; Sedlacek, AJ; Senum, G; Wang, J

    2011-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    In this, the first of a series of Program Metric Reports, we (1) describe archived data from the DOE G-1 aircraft, (2) illustrate several relations between sub-cloud aerosol, CCN, and cloud droplets pertinent to determining the effects of pollutant sources on cloud properties, and (3) post to the data archive an Excel spreadsheet that contains cloud and corresponding sub-cloud data.

  19. Cloud Service Analysis - Choosing between an on-premise resource and a cloud computing service.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Augustsson, Keith

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ??Cloud computing is a concept that has become increasingly popular in recent years through an increase in Internet connection capabilities, virtualization possibilities, and commercial successes.… (more)

  20. Prediction of Leptonic CP Phase in $A_4$ symmetric model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sin Kyu Kang; Morimitsu Tanimoto

    2015-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider minimal modifications to tribimaximal (TBM) mixing matrix which accommodate non-zero mixing angle $\\theta_{13}$ and CP violation. We derive four possible forms for the minimal modifications to TBM mixing in a model with $A_4$ flavor symmetry by incorporating symmetry breaking terms appropriately. We show how possible values of the Dirac-type CP phase $\\delta_D$ can be predicted with regards to two neutrino mixing angles in the standard parametrization of the neutrino mixing matrix. Carrying out numerical analysis based on the recent updated experimental results for neutrino mixing angles, we predict the values of the CP phase for all possible cases. We also confront our predictions of the CP phase with the updated fit.

  1. Evidence of two different types of short term solar modulation of regional surface temperature and cloud

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Edmonds, Ian

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent work indicates that 27 day variations in cosmic ray flux during 2007 2009 are phase locked to 27 day variations in cloud and surface temperature at Shetland. Here we extend the study to other regions including Central England, US and Australia and to several other annual intervals that exhibit strong 27 day variation in cosmic ray flux and sunspot area. Band pass filtering was used to obtain 27 day components of daily maximum temperature in each region and 27 day components of cloud variation were determined, in Australia only, from solar exposure records. When cosmic ray flux is the dominant influence phase locked variations in surface temperature occur in each of the regions with, however, in phase or anti phase variation in different regions. Similar phase locking of 27 day variation in surface temperature to sunspot area variation occurs when sunspot activity is the dominant influence with indications that changes from in phase to anti phase variation are linked to flipping of sunspot activity from...

  2. Mixing of Two Binary Nonequilibrium Phases in One Dimension

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Firoozabadi, Abbas

    , triggering secondary recovery mechanisms due to change in fluid properties. In fractured reservoirs, this may recovery. For instance, the petroleum industry uses gas injection to prevent reduction in reservoir lead to significant improvements in oil recovery. When dis- solution does not occur, gas injection

  3. Energy and water vapor transport across a simplified cloud-clear air interface

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gallana, Luca; De Santi, Francesca; Iovieno, Michele; Tordella, Daniela

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider a simplified physics of the could interface where condensation, evaporation and radiation are neglected and momentum, thermal energy and water vapor transport is represented in terms of the Boussinesq model coupled to a passive scalar transport equation for the vapor. The interface is modeled as a layer separating two isotropic turbulent regions with different kinetic energy and vapor concentration. In particular, we focus on the small scale part of the inertial range as well as on the dissipative range of scales which are important to the micro-physics of warm clouds. We have numerically investigated stably stratified interfaces by locally perturbing at an initial instant the standard temperature lapse rate at the cloud interface and then observing the temporal evolution of the system. When the buoyancy term becomes of the same order of the inertial one, we observe a spatial redistribution of the kinetic energy which produce a concomitant pit of kinetic energy within the mixing layer. In this sit...

  4. Exploiting weather forecast data for cloud detection 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mackie, Shona

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Accurate, fast detection of clouds in satellite imagery has many applications, for example Numerical Weather Prediction (NWP) and climate studies of both the atmosphere and of the Earth’s surface temperature. Most ...

  5. ARM Cloud Retrieval Ensemble Data Set (ACRED)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhao, C; Xie, S; Klein, SA; McCoy, R; Comstock, JM; Delanoë, J; Deng, M; Dunn, M; Hogan, RJ; Jensen, MP; Mace, GG; McFarlane, SA; O’Connor, EJ; Protat, A; Shupe, MD; Turner, D; Wang, Z

    2011-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

    This document describes a new Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) data set, the ARM Cloud Retrieval Ensemble Data Set (ACRED), which is created by assembling nine existing ground-based cloud retrievals of ARM measurements from different cloud retrieval algorithms. The current version of ACRED includes an hourly average of nine ground-based retrievals with vertical resolution of 45 m for 512 layers. The techniques used for the nine cloud retrievals are briefly described in this document. This document also outlines the ACRED data availability, variables, and the nine retrieval products. Technical details about the generation of ACRED, such as the methods used for time average and vertical re-grid, are also provided.

  6. HPC CLOUD APPLIED TO LATTICE OPTIMIZATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sun, Changchun; Nishimura, Hiroshi; James, Susan; Song, Kai; Muriki, Krishna; Qin, Yong

    2011-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

    As Cloud services gain in popularity for enterprise use, vendors are now turning their focus towards providing cloud services suitable for scientific computing. Recently, Amazon Elastic Compute Cloud (EC2) introduced the new Cluster Compute Instances (CCI), a new instance type specifically designed for High Performance Computing (HPC) applications. At Berkeley Lab, the physicists at the Advanced Light Source (ALS) have been running Lattice Optimization on a local cluster, but the queue wait time and the flexibility to request compute resources when needed are not ideal for rapid development work. To explore alternatives, for the first time we investigate running the Lattice Optimization application on Amazon's new CCI to demonstrate the feasibility and trade-offs of using public cloud services for science.

  7. Aircraft induced cirrus cloud First year report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oxford, University of

    and coagulation. A resulting size distribution of ice crystals is deemed indicative of contrail cirrus cloud model operates, simulating the life cycle of aerosol and ice particles: nucleation, condensation

  8. EVENT CLOUDS : lighter than air architectural structures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peydro Duclos, Ignacio

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    EVENT CLOUD is a versatile covering system that allows events to happen independently to weather conditions. It consists of a lighter than air pneumatic structure, filled either with helium or hot air, that covers spaces ...

  9. Uranus at equinox: Cloud morphology and dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sromovsky, Lawrence; Hammel, Heidi; Ahue, William; de Pater, Imke; Rages, Kathy; Showalter, Mark; van Dam, Marcos

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As the 7 December 2007 equinox of Uranus approached, ring and atmosphere observers produced a substantial collection of observations using the 10-m Keck telescope and the Hubble Space Telescope. Those spanning the period from 7 June 2007 through 9 September 2007 we used to identify and track cloud features, determine atmospheric motions, characterize cloud morphology and dynamics, and define changes in atmospheric band structure. We confirmed the existence of the suspected northern hemisphere prograde jet, locating its peak near 58 N, and extended wind speed measurements to 73 N. For 28 cloud features we obtained extremely high wind-speed accuracy through extended tracking times. The new results confirm a small N-S asymmetry in the zonal wind profile, and the lack of any change in the southern hemisphere between 1986 (near solstice) and 2007 (near equinox) suggests that the asymmetry may be permanent rather than seasonally reversing. In the 2007 images we found two prominent groups of discrete cloud features ...

  10. Marine Stratocumulus Clouds: Turbulence-Raidation- Thermodynamics...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    to the south. When viewed from space through satellites, these clouds appear as bright cotton balls as they reflect about 60 percent of sunlight back to space, while the ocean...

  11. Rate Effects for Mixed-Mode Fracture of Plastically Deforming, Adhesively-Bonded Structures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thouless, Michael

    from a commercial adhesive and a dual-phase steel has been studied under different rates. Since mixed- mode fracture occurs along the interface between the steel and adhesive, the cohesive- parameters

  12. MEASURED AND SIMULATED SF6 MIXING BEHAVIOUR R BINI, N T BASSE AND M SEEGER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Basse, Nils Plesner

    distribution of the gas during the post-arc phase. Understanding the details of the mixing process occurring to investigate the turbulent mixing of the hot gas coming from an arc inside a small volume. We successfully.seeger@ch.abb.com ABSTRACT The dielectric performance of SF6 high voltage gas circuit breakers depends on the temperature

  13. Atmospheric State, Cloud Microphysics and Radiative Flux

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Mace, Gerald

    Atmospheric thermodynamics, cloud properties, radiative fluxes and radiative heating rates for the ARM Southern Great Plains (SGP) site. The data represent a characterization of the physical state of the atmospheric column compiled on a five-minute temporal and 90m vertical grid. Sources for this information include raw measurements, cloud property and radiative retrievals, retrievals and derived variables from other third-party sources, and radiative calculations using the derived quantities.

  14. Cloud chamber visualization of primary cosmic rays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Earl, James A. [Department of Astronomy, University of Maryland, College Park MD (United States)

    2013-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

    From 1948 until 1963, cloud chambers were carried to the top of the atmosphere by balloons. From these flights, which were begun by Edward P. Ney at the University of Minnesota, came the following results: discovery of heavy cosmic ray nuclei, development of scintillation and cherenkov detectors, discovery of cosmic ray electrons, and studies of solar proton events. The history of that era is illustrated here by cloud chamber photographs of primary cosmic rays.

  15. Ignition of Aluminum Particles and Clouds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kuhl, A L; Boiko, V M

    2010-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Here we review experimental data and models of the ignition of aluminum (Al) particles and clouds in explosion fields. The review considers: (i) ignition temperatures measured for single Al particles in torch experiments; (ii) thermal explosion models of the ignition of single Al particles; and (iii) the unsteady ignition Al particles clouds in reflected shock environments. These are used to develop an empirical ignition model appropriate for numerical simulations of Al particle combustion in shock dispersed fuel explosions.

  16. Aerosol-Cloud-Precipitation Interactions in the Trade Wind Boundary Layer.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jung, Eunsil

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ??This dissertation includes an overview of aerosol, cloud, and precipitation properties associated with shallow marine cumulus clouds observed during the Barbados Aerosol Cloud Experiment (BACEX,… (more)

  17. STORMVEX: The Storm Peak Lab Cloud Property Validation Experiment Science and Operations Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mace, J; Matrosov, S; Shupe, M; Lawson, P; Hallar, G; McCubbin, I; Marchand, R; Orr, B; Coulter, R; Sedlacek, A; Avallone, L; Long, C

    2010-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

    During the Storm Peak Lab Cloud Property Validation Experiment (STORMVEX), a substantial correlative data set of remote sensing observations and direct in situ measurements from fixed and airborne platforms will be created in a winter season, mountainous environment. This will be accomplished by combining mountaintop observations at Storm Peak Laboratory and the airborne National Science Foundation-supported Colorado Airborne Multi-Phase Cloud Study campaign with collocated measurements from the second ARM Mobile Facility (AMF2). We describe in this document the operational plans and motivating science for this experiment, which includes deployment of AMF2 to Steamboat Springs, Colorado. The intensive STORMVEX field phase will begin nominally on 1 November 2010 and extend to approximately early April 2011.

  18. Scalable Networking for Cloud Datacenters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CERN. Geneva

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Andy will discuss the architectural evolution of Ethernet networks and switch architectures as they are being designed to address much larger cloud networking applications that require predictable throughput and latency.About the speakerAs Chief Development Officer, Andy Bechtolsheim is responsible for the overall product development and technical direction of Arista Networks.Previously Andy was a Founder and Chief System Architect at Sun Microsystems, where most recently he was responsible for industry standard server architecture. Andy was also a Founder and President of Granite Systems, a Gigabit Ethernet startup acquired by Cisco Systems in 1996. From 1996 until 2003 Andy served as VP/GM of the Gigabit Systems Business Unit at Cisco that developed the very successful Catalyst 4500 family of switches. Andy was also a Founder and President of Kealia, a next generation server company acquired by Sun in 2004.Andy received an M.S. in Computer Engineering from Carnegie Mellon University in 1976 and was a Ph.D. ...

  19. The Formation and Fragmentation of Primordial Molecular Clouds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tom Abel; Greg L. Bryan; Michael L. Norman

    2000-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Many questions in physical cosmology regarding the thermal history of the intergalactic medium, chemical enrichment, reionization, etc. are thought to be intimately related to the nature and evolution of pregalactic structure. In particular the efficiency of primordial star formation and the primordial IMF are of special interest. We present results from high resolution three--dimensional adaptive mesh refinement simulations that follow the collapse of primordial molecular clouds and their subsequent fragmentation within a cosmologically representative volume. Comoving scales from 128 kpc down to 1 pc are followed accurately. Dark matter dynamics, hydrodynamics and all relevant chemical and radiative processes (cooling) are followed self-consistently for a cluster normalized CDM structure formation model. Primordial molecular clouds with ~10^5 solar masses are assembled by mergers of multiple objects that have formed hydrogen molecules in the gas phase with a fractional abundance of ~10^-4. As the subclumps merge cooling lowers the temperature to ~200 Kelvin in a `cold pocket' at the center of the halo. Within this cold pocket, a quasi-hydrostatically contracting core with ~200 solar mass and number densities > 10^5 cm^-3 is found. We find that less than 1% of the primordial gas in such small scale structures cools and collapses to sufficiently high densities to be available for primordial star formation. Furthermore, it is worthwhile to note that this study achieved the highest dynamic range covered by structured adaptive mesh techniques in cosmological hydrodynamics to date.

  20. The Formation and Fragmentation of Primordial Molecular Clouds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tom Abel; Greg L. Bryan; Michael L. Norman

    1998-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Many questions in physical cosmology regarding the thermal history of the intergalactic medium, chemical enrichment, reionization, etc. are thought to be intimately related to the nature and evolution of pregalactic structure. In particular the efficiency of primordial star formation and the primordial IMF are of special interest. We present results from high resolution three-dimensional adaptive mesh refinement simulations that follow the collapse of primordial molecular clouds and their subsequent fragmentation within a cosmologically representative volume. Comoving scales from 128 kpc down to 0.5 pc are followed accurately. Dark matter dynamics, hydrodynamics and all relevant chemical and radiative processes (cooling) are followed self-consistently for a cluster normalized CDM structure formation model. Primordial molecular clouds with ~100,000 solar masses are assembled by mergers of multiple objects that have formed hydrogen molecules in the gas phase with a fractional abundance of 100,000/cm^3 are found. We find that less than 1% of the primordial gas in such small scale structures cools and collapses to sufficiently high densities to be available for primordial star formation. Furthermore, our results indicate that the formation of very massive objects, massive black holes, fragmentation of a large fraction of baryons into brown dwars or Jupiter size fragments seems, in contrast to various claims in the literature, very unlikely. The expected escape fraction of UV photons with (h nu) > 11eV is very small.

  1. Observation of cooperative Mie scattering from an ultracold atomic cloud

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bender, H.; Stehle, C.; Slama, S.; Zimmermann, C. [Physikalisches Institut, Eberhardt-Karls-Universitaet Tuebingen, D-72076 Tuebingen (Germany); Kaiser, R. [Institut Non Lineaire de Nice, CNRS, Universite de Nice Sophia-Antipolis, F-06560 Valbonne (France); Piovella, N. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita Degli Studi di Milano, Via Celoria 16, I-20133 Milano (Italy); Courteille, Ph. W. [Physikalisches Institut, Eberhardt-Karls-Universitaet Tuebingen, D-72076 Tuebingen (Germany); Institut Non Lineaire de Nice, CNRS, Universite de Nice Sophia-Antipolis, F-06560 Valbonne (France); Instituto de Fisica de Sao Carlos, Universidade de Sao Paulo, 13560-970 Sao Carlos, SP (Brazil)

    2010-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Scattering of light at a distribution of scatterers is an intrinsically cooperative process, which means that the scattering rate and the angular distribution of the scattered light are essentially governed by bulk properties of the distribution, such as its size, shape, and density, although local disorder and density fluctuations may have an important impact on the cooperativity. Via measurements of the radiation pressure force exerted by a far-detuned laser beam on a very small and dense cloud of ultracold atoms, we are able to identify the respective roles of superradiant acceleration of the scattering rate and of Mie scattering in the cooperative process. They lead, respectively, to a suppression or an enhancement of the radiation pressure force. We observe a maximum in the radiation pressure force as a function of the phase shift induced in the incident laser beam by the cloud's refractive index. The maximum marks the borderline of the validity of the Rayleigh-Debye-Gans approximation from a regime, where Mie scattering is more complex. Our observations thus help to clarify the intricate relationship between Rayleigh scattering of light at a coarse-grained ensemble of individual scatterers and Mie scattering at the bulk density distribution.

  2. Electron Cloud and Scrubbing Studies for the LHC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Iadarola, G; Baglin, V; Bartosik, H; Esteban Muller, J E; Rumolo, G; Shaposhnikova, E; Tavian, L; Zimmermann, F; Dominguez, O; Maury Cuna, GHI

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Electron cloud build-up resulting from beam-induced multipacting is one of the major limitations for the operation of the LHC with beams with close bunch spacing. Electron clouds induce unwanted pressure rise, heat loads on the beam screens of the superconducting magnets and beam instabilities. Operation with bunch spacing of 50 ns in 2011 and 2012 has required decreasing the Secondary Electron Yield of the beam screens below the multipacting threshold for beams with this bunch spacing. This was achieved by continuous electron bombardment induced by operating the machine with high intensity beams with 50 and 25 ns spacing during dedicated periods at injection energy (450 GeV) and at top energy (3.5 and 4 TeV). The evolution of the Secondary Electron Yield during these periods, in different sections of the machine, can be estimated by pressure rise, heat load and by bunch-by-bunch RF stable phase measurements. The experimental information on the scrubbing process will be discussed and a possible “scrubbing s...

  3. Micropulse Lidar Cloud Mask Value-Added Product Technical Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sivaraman, C; Comstock, J

    2011-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Lidar backscattered signal is a useful tool for identifying vertical cloud structure in the atmosphere in optically thin clouds. Cloud boundaries derived from lidar signals are a necessary input for popular ARM data products, such as the Active Remote Sensing of Clouds (ARSCL) product. An operational cloud boundary algorithm (Wang and Sassen 2001) has been implemented for use with the ARM Micropulse Lidar (MPL) systems. In addition to retrieving cloud boundaries above 500 m, the value-added product (VAP) named Micropulse Lidar Cloud Mask (MPLCMASK) applies lidar-specific corrections (i.e., range-square, background, deadtime, and overlap) as described in Campbell et al. (2002) to the measured backscattered lidar. Depolarization ratio is computed using the methodology developed by Flynn et al. (2007) for polarization-capable MPL systems. The cloud boundaries output from MPLCMASK will be the primary lidar cloud mask for input to the ARSCL product and will be applied to all MPL systems, including historical data sets.

  4. CloudCmp: Shopping for a Cloud Made Easy Ang Li Xiaowei Yang

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Ming

    benchmarking results on three representative cloud providers. These results show that the performance and costs interfaces, and benchmarks the performance and costs of these services. It then expresses an applicationCmp and highlight the main technical chal- lenges. CloudCmp includes a set of benchmarking tools that compare

  5. A Survey of Changes in Cloud Cover and Cloud Types over Land from Surface Observations, 197196

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hochberg, Michael

    , offsetting the small positive trend that had been found for the ocean, and resulting in no significant trend for the land­ocean average. Significant regional trends are found for many cloud types. The night trends agree of their effects on solar radiation, terrestrial radiation, and precipitation. These effects depend on cloud height

  6. X-1 ROEBELING ET AL.: SEVIRI & AVHRR CLOUD PROPERTY RETRIEVALS Cloud property retrievals for climate monitoring

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stoffelen, Ad

    Generation (METEOSAT-8) and the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) onboard the National Oceanic a consistent and high quality dataset of SEVIRI and AVHRR retrieved cloud properties for climate research studies. Clouds strongly modulate the energy balance of the Earth and its atmosphere through

  7. Fate of Acids in Clouds 1. Combination with bases dissolved in clouds: acids neutralized

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schofield, Jeremy

    problems. E#11;ects of Acid Rain 1. Vegetation: SO 2 is toxic to plants #15; Leaves damaged below pH 3 rain { Athens and Rome cathedrals and statues: pollution leads to acid rain #15; SteelFate of Acids in Clouds 1. Combination with bases dissolved in clouds: acids neutralized NH 3 (g

  8. JP2.3 CLOUD RADIATIVE HEATING RATE FORCING FROM PROFILES OF RETRIEVED ARCTIC CLOUD MICROPHYSICS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shupe, Matthew

    JP2.3 CLOUD RADIATIVE HEATING RATE FORCING FROM PROFILES OF RETRIEVED ARCTIC CLOUD MICROPHYSICS surface. In 1997-1998, a large multi-agency effort made the Surface Heat Budget of the Arctic (SHEBA with the ice pack in the Beaufort and Chukchi Seas for one year. Surface-based remote sensors generated

  9. The Hazardous Waste/Mixed Waste Disposal Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bailey, L.L.

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Hazardous Waste/Mixed Waste Disposal Facility (HW/MWDF) will provide permanent Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) permitted storage, treatment, and disposal for hazardous and mixed waste generated at the Department of Energy's (DOE) Savannah River Site (SRS) that cannot be disposed of in existing or planned SRS facilities. Final design is complete for Phase I of the project, the Disposal Vaults. The Vaults will provide RCRA permitted, above-grade disposal capacity for treated hazardous and mixed waste generated at the SRS. The RCRA Part B Permit application was submitted upon approval of the Permit application, the first Disposal Vault is scheduled to be operational in mid 1994. The technical baseline has been established for Phase II, the Treatment Building, and preliminary design work has been performed. The Treatment Building will provide RCRA permitted treatment processes to handle a variety of hazardous and mixed waste generated at SRS in preparation for disposal. The processes will treat wastes for disposal in accordance with the Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA's) Land Disposal Restrictions (LDR). A RCRA Part B Permit application has not yet been submitted to SCDHEC for this phase of the project. The Treatment Building is currently scheduled to be operational in late 1996.

  10. The Hazardous Waste/Mixed Waste Disposal Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bailey, L.L.

    1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The Hazardous Waste/Mixed Waste Disposal Facility (HW/MWDF) will provide permanent Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) permitted storage, treatment, and disposal for hazardous and mixed waste generated at the Department of Energy`s (DOE) Savannah River Site (SRS) that cannot be disposed of in existing or planned SRS facilities. Final design is complete for Phase I of the project, the Disposal Vaults. The Vaults will provide RCRA permitted, above-grade disposal capacity for treated hazardous and mixed waste generated at the SRS. The RCRA Part B Permit application was submitted upon approval of the Permit application, the first Disposal Vault is scheduled to be operational in mid 1994. The technical baseline has been established for Phase II, the Treatment Building, and preliminary design work has been performed. The Treatment Building will provide RCRA permitted treatment processes to handle a variety of hazardous and mixed waste generated at SRS in preparation for disposal. The processes will treat wastes for disposal in accordance with the Environmental Protection Agency`s (EPA`s) Land Disposal Restrictions (LDR). A RCRA Part B Permit application has not yet been submitted to SCDHEC for this phase of the project. The Treatment Building is currently scheduled to be operational in late 1996.

  11. Triggered star formation in the Magellanic Clouds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. G. Elmegreen; J. Palous; Kenji Bekki

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Abstract. We discuss how tidal interaction between the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC), the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC), and the Galaxy triggers galaxy-wide star formation in the Clouds for the last ? 0.2 Gyr based on our chemodynamical simulations on the Clouds. Our simulations demonstrate that the tidal interaction induces the formation of asymmetric spiral arms with high gas densities and consequently triggers star formation within the arms in the LMC. Star formation rate in the present LMC is significantly enhanced just above the eastern edge of the LMC’s stellar bar owing to the tidal interaction. The location of the enhanced star formation is very similar to the observed location of 30 Doradus, which suggests that the formation of 30 Doradus is closely associated with the last Magellanic collision about 0.2 Gyr ago. The tidal interaction can dramatically compress gas initially within the outer part of the SMC so that new stars can be formed from the gas to become intergalactic young stars in the inter-Cloud region (e.g., the Magellanic Bridge). The metallicity distribution function of the newly formed stars in the Magellanic Bridge has a peak of [Fe/H] ? ?0.8, which is significantly lower than the stellar metallicity of the SMC.

  12. Cloud Business Models and Sustainability: Impacts for businesses and e-Research Accepted by "Software Sustainability" Workshops

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    by Mathematica. This leads to development of Cloud Sustainability Framework (CSF), which measures cloud business

  13. Alpha phase precipitation from phase-separated beta phase in...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Alpha phase precipitation from phase-separated beta phase in a model Ti-Mo-Al alloy studied by direct coupling of transmission Alpha phase precipitation from phase-separated beta...

  14. Fuel Mix and Emissions Disclosure

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Rhode Island requires all entities that sell electricity in the state to disclose details regarding the fuel mix and emissions of their electric generation to end-use customers. This information...

  15. Mixed-mu superconducting bearings

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hull, John R. (Hinsdale, IL); Mulcahy, Thomas M. (Western Springs, IL)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A mixed-mu superconducting bearing including a ferrite structure disposed for rotation adjacent a stationary superconductor material structure and a stationary permanent magnet structure. The ferrite structure is levitated by said stationary permanent magnet structure.

  16. Fuel Mix and Emissions Disclosure

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In September 2002, the Minnesota Public Utilities Commission (PUC) issued an order requiring the state's regulated electric utilities to disclose to customers details on the fuel mix and emissions...

  17. Is the tribimaximal mixing accidental?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abbas, Mohammed [Ain Shams University, Faculty of Sciences, Abbassiyah 11566, Cairo (Egypt); Center for Theoretical Physics (CTP), British University in Egypt, BUE, El-Sherouk City, Cairo (Egypt); Abdus Salam International Centre for Theoretical Physics, Strada Costiera 11, I-34014 Trieste (Italy); Smirnov, A. Yu. [Abdus Salam International Centre for Theoretical Physics, Strada Costiera 11, I-34014 Trieste (Italy); Institute for Nuclear Research, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The tribimaximal (TBM) mixing is not accidental if structures of the corresponding leptonic mass matrices follow immediately from certain (residual or broken) flavor symmetry. We develop a simple formalism which allows one to analyze effects of deviations of the lepton mixing from TBM on the structure of the neutrino mass matrix and on the underlying flavor symmetry. We show that possible deviations from the TBM mixing can lead to strong modifications of the mass matrix and strong violation of the TBM-mass relations. As a result, the mass matrix may have an 'anarchical' structure with random values of elements or it may have some symmetry that differs from the TBM symmetry. Interesting examples include matrices with texture zeros, matrices with certain 'flavor alignment' as well as hierarchical matrices with a two-component structure, where the dominant and subdominant contributions have different symmetries. This opens up new approaches to understanding the lepton mixing.

  18. Mixed-mu superconducting bearings

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hull, J.R.; Mulcahy, T.M.

    1998-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

    A mixed-mu superconducting bearing is disclosed including a ferrite structure disposed for rotation adjacent a stationary superconductor material structure and a stationary permanent magnet structure. The ferrite structure is levitated by said stationary permanent magnet structure. 9 figs.

  19. Fuel Mix and Emissions Disclosure

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Iowa adopted regulations in 2003 that generally require rate-regulated electric utilities to disclose to customers the fuel mix and estimated emissions, in pounds per megawatt-hour (MWh), of...

  20. Fluid Mixing from Viscous Fingering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jha, Birendra

    Mixing efficiency at low Reynolds numbers can be enhanced by exploiting hydrodynamic instabilities that induce heterogeneity and disorder in the flow. The unstable displacement of fluids with different viscosities, or ...

  1. Fuel Mix and Emissions Disclosure

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Michigan's Customer Choice and Electric Reliability Act of 2000 (P.A. 141) requires electric suppliers to disclose to customers details related to the fuel mix and emissions, in pounds per megawatt...

  2. Fuel Mix and Emissions Disclosure

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In 2001, Nevada enacted legislation requiring the state’s electric utilities to provide details regarding the fuel mix and emissions of electric generation to their customers. Utilities must...

  3. Measurements of moisture suction in hot mix asphalt mixes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kassem, Emad Abdel-Rahman

    2006-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

    is to relate suction measurements to physical and chemical properties of the mixtures. The objectives were achieved in two phases. In the first phase, the total suction was measured in HMA specimens with different types of aggregates (limestone and granite...

  4. Quantum computing with mixed states

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michael Siomau; Stephan Fritzsche

    2011-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss a model for quantum computing with initially mixed states. Although such a computer is known to be less powerful than a quantum computer operating with pure (entangled) states, it may efficiently solve some problems for which no efficient classical algorithms are known. We suggest a new implementation of quantum computation with initially mixed states in which an algorithm realization is achieved by means of optimal basis independent transformations of qubits.

  5. Quantum computing with mixed states

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Siomau, Michael

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss a model for quantum computing with initially mixed states. Although such a computer is known to be less powerful than a quantum computer operating with pure (entangled) states, it may efficiently solve some problems for which no efficient classical algorithms are known. We suggest a new implementation of quantum computation with initially mixed states in which an algorithm realization is achieved by means of optimal basis independent transformations of qubits.

  6. Neutrino Masses and Flavor Mixing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fritzsch, Harald

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss the neutrino oscillations, using texture zero mass matrices for the leptons. The reactor mixing angle $\\theta^{}_{l}$ is calculated. The ratio of the masses of two neutrinos is determined by the solar mixing angle. We can calculate the masses of the three neutrinos: $m_1$ $\\approx$ 0.003 eV - $m_2$ $\\approx$ 0.012 eV - $m_3$ $\\approx$ 0.048 eV.

  7. Neutrino Masses and Flavor Mixing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harald Fritzsch

    2015-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss the neutrino oscillations, using texture zero mass matrices for the leptons. The reactor mixing angle $\\theta^{}_{l}$ is calculated. The ratio of the masses of two neutrinos is determined by the solar mixing angle. We can calculate the masses of the three neutrinos: $m_1$ $\\approx$ 0.003 eV - $m_2$ $\\approx$ 0.012 eV - $m_3$ $\\approx$ 0.048 eV.

  8. Electron Cloud observation in the LHC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rumolo, G; Baglin, V; Bartosik, H; Biancacci, N; Baudrenghien, P; Bregliozzi, G; Chiggiato, P; Claudet, S; De Maria, R; Esteban-Muller, J; Favier, M; Hansen, C; Höfle, W; Jimenez, J M; Kain, V; Lanza, G; Li, K S B; Maury Cuna, G H I; Métral, E; Papotti, G; Pieloni, T; Roncarolo, F; Salvant, B; Shaposhnikova, E N; Steinhagen, R J; Tavian, L J; Valuch, D; Venturini Delsolaro, W; Zimmermann, F; Iriso, U; Dominguez, O; Koukovini-Platia, E; Mounet, N; Zannini, C; Bhat, C M

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Operation of LHC with bunch trains at different spacings has revealed the formation of an electron cloud inside the machine. The main observations of electron cloud build up are the pressure rise measured at the vacuum gauges in the warm regions, as well as the increase of the beam screen temperature in the cold regions due to an additional heat load. The effects of the electron cloud were also visible as instability and emittance growth affecting the last bunches of longer trains, which could be improved running with higher chromaticity or larger transverse emittances. A summary of the 2010 and 2011 observations and measurements and a comparison with models will be presented. The efficiency of scrubbing to improve the machine running performance will be briefly discussed.

  9. High-velocity clouds: a diverse phenomenon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. P. Wakker

    2001-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

    In this contribution the current state of knowledge about the high-velocity clouds (HVCs) is summarized. Recent progress has shown that the HVCs are a diverse phenomenon. The intermediate-velocity clouds (IVCs) are likely to be part of a Galactic Fountain. The Magellanic Stream is a tidal remnant. HVC complex C (possibly complexes A and GCN) are low-metallicity clouds near the Galaxy; they could be remnants of the formation of the Galaxy or old tidal streams extracted from nearby dwarf galaxies. Having a substantial number of HI HVCs dispersed throughout the Local Group seems incompatible with the observed HI mass function of galaxies. Finally, FUSE finds high-velocity OVI, some of which is clearly associated with HI HVCs, but some which is not.

  10. LONG-LIVED MAGNETIC-TENSION-DRIVEN MODES IN A MOLECULAR CLOUD

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Basu, Shantanu; Dapp, Wolf B., E-mail: basu@uwo.c, E-mail: wdapp@uwo.c [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario N6A 3K7 (Canada)

    2010-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We calculate and analyze the longevity of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) wave modes that occur in the plane of a magnetic thin sheet. Initial turbulent conditions applied to a magnetically subcritical cloud are shown to lead to relatively rapid energy decay if ambipolar diffusion is introduced at a level corresponding to partial ionization primarily by cosmic rays. However, in the flux-freezing limit, as may be applicable to photoionized molecular cloud envelopes, the turbulence persists at 'nonlinear' levels in comparison with the isothermal sound speed c {sub s}, with one-dimensional rms material motions in the range of {approx} 2 c {sub s}-5 c {sub s} for cloud sizes in the range of {approx} 2 pc-16 pc. These fluctuations persist indefinitely, maintaining a significant portion of the initial turbulent kinetic energy. We find the analytic explanation for these persistent fluctuations. They are magnetic-tension-driven modes associated with the interaction of the sheet with the external magnetic field. The phase speed of such modes is quite large, allowing residual motions to persist without dissipation in the flux-freezing limit, even as they are nonlinear with respect to the sound speed. We speculate that long-lived large-scale MHD modes such as these may provide the key to understanding observed supersonic motions in molecular clouds.

  11. A study of the relationship between anthropogenic sulfate and cloud drop nucleation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chuang, C. C..; Penner, J. E.

    1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document investigates the relationship between anthropogenic sulfate-containing aerosols and the condensationally produced cloud drops. The changes in aerosol size distribution associated with anthropogenic sulfur emissions may increase the number of cloud drops with subsequent influence on cloud albedo and climate. It has been suggested that the increase in CCN in industrial regions might explain why the Northern Hemisphere has not been warming as rapidly as the Southern Hemisphere over the last 50 Years (Wigley, 1989). In reality, the aerosol size distribution is the result of processes working simultaneously and continuously with such sources as sulfur, soot, particulate organic carbon, nitrate, ammonium, etc. Instead of applying a complete aerosol model to investigate the effect of anthropogenic sulfur emissions on the aerosol size distribution, we simply derived the anthropogenic sulfate-containing aerosol distribution by assuming that 75% of the anthropogenic was formed through aqueous-phase oxidation and the remaining 25% condensed onto a Prescribed preexisting particle distribution. Uncertainties may arise from the assumed fraction of sulfate produced by condensation and in cloud oxidation. In addition, new particle formation through homogeneous nucleation of H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}/H{sub 2}O is ignored in this paper.

  12. CO and IRAS detection of an intermediate-velocity cloud

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Desert, F.X.; Bazell, D.; Blitz, L. (Paris Observatoire, Meudon (France) Space Telescope Science Institute, Baltimore, MD (USA) Maryland Univ., College Park (USA))

    1990-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the course of a radio survey of high-Galactic-latitude clouds, CO emission was detected at the position l = 210.8 deg and b = 63.1 deg with an LSR velocity of -39 km/sec. This molecular cloud constitutes the third one with an unusually large absolute velocity at these latitudes, as compared with the 5.4-km/sec cloud-to-cloud velocity dispersion of the high-latitude molecular clouds. The position is coincident with an H I intermediate-velocity cloud (GHL 11, Verschuur H, OLM 268) and the IR-excess cloud 306 in the list by Desert et al. (1988). This cloud is clearly detected at all four IRAS wavelengths and has warmer colors than the local ISM. 27 refs.

  13. Study of ice cloud properties using infrared spectral data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garrett, Kevin James

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The research presented in this thesis involves the study of ice cloud microphysical and optical properties using both hyperspectral and narrowband infrared spectral data. First, ice cloud models are developed for the Infrared Atmospheric Sounding...

  14. Cloud computing : implications for enterprise software vendors (ESV)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Francis, Leonard, S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    'Cloud computing', is a broad concept and in general is a term used for internet-based computing resources that are in an unspecified remote location or locations and that are flexible and fungible. Clouds provide a wide ...

  15. eScience, Semantic Computing and the Cloud

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    eScience, Semantic Computing and the Cloud Towards a Smart Cyberinfrastructure for eScience Tony vocabularies such as folksonomies and tag clouds #12;Mark Butler (2003) Is the semantic web hype? http:/www

  16. Cloud computing and its implications for organizational design and performance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farahani Rad, Ali

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Cloud computing has been at the center of attention for a while now. This attention is directed towards different aspects of this concept which concern different stakeholders from IT companies to cloud adopters to simple ...

  17. Merging Cloud and Precipitation Radar Data Provides a Better

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Merging Cloud and Precipitation Radar Data Provides a Better View of Tropical Rain Clouds For original submission and image(s), see ARM Research Highlights http:www.arm.gov...

  18. Cloud computing adoption model for governments and large enterprises

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Trivedi, Hrishikesh

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Cloud Computing has held organizations across the globe spell bound with its promise. As it moves from being a buzz word and hype into adoption, organizations are faced with question of how to best adopt cloud. Existing ...

  19. Independent Oversight Review, Advanced Mixed Waste Treatment...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Review, Advanced Mixed Waste Treatment Project - April 2013 April 2013 Review of Radiation Protection Program Implementation at the Advanced Mixed Waste Treatment Project of...

  20. Occupant satisfaction in mixed-mode buildings.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brager, Gail; Baker, Lindsay

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Strategies for Mixed-Mode Buildings, Summary Report, CenterCBE). 2006. Website: Mixed-Mode Building Case Studies.Department of Environmental Building Research Establishment

  1. Occupant satisfaction in mixed-mode buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brager, Gail; Baker, Lindsay

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Environmental Quality in Green Buildings”. Indoor Air; 14 (Strategies for Mixed-Mode Buildings, Summary Report, CenterCBE). 2006. Website: Mixed-Mode Building Case Studies.

  2. Intrinsic Shapes of Molecular Cloud Cores

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. E. Jones; Shantanu Basu; John Dubinski

    2001-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

    We conduct an analysis of the shapes of molecular cloud cores using recently compiled catalogs of observed axis ratios of individual cores mapped in ammonia or through optical selection. We apply both analytical and statistical techniques to deproject the observed axis ratios in order to determine the true distribution of cloud core shapes. We find that neither pure oblate nor pure prolate cores can account for the observed distribution of core shapes. Intrinsically triaxial cores produce distributions which agree with observations. The best-fit triaxial distribution contains cores which are more nearly oblate than prolate.

  3. ARM - Field Campaign - Boundary Layer Cloud IOP

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLasDelivered‰PNGExperience4AJ01)3,Cloud OD Sensor TWST Cloud OD SensorgovCampaignsBoundary

  4. ARM - Field Campaign - Cloud Radar IOP

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLasDelivered‰PNGExperience4AJ01)3,Cloud OD Sensor TWSTCampaign 2govCampaignsCloud

  5. Transforming the representation of the boundary layer and low clouds for high-resolution regional climate modeling: Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huang, Hsin-Yuan; Hall, Alex

    2013-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Stratocumulus and shallow cumulus clouds in subtropical oceanic regions (e.g., Southeast Pacific) cover thousands of square kilometers and play a key role in regulating global climate (e.g., Klein and Hartmann, 1993). Numerical modeling is an essential tool to study these clouds in regional and global systems, but the current generation of climate and weather models has difficulties in representing them in a realistic way (e.g., Siebesma et al., 2004; Stevens et al., 2007; Teixeira et al., 2011). While numerical models resolve the large-scale flow, subgrid-scale parameterizations are needed to estimate small-scale properties (e.g. boundary layer turbulence and convection, clouds, radiation), which have significant influence on the resolved scale due to the complex nonlinear nature of the atmosphere. To represent the contribution of these fine-scale processes to the resolved scale, climate models use various parameterizations, which are the main pieces in the model that contribute to the low clouds dynamics and therefore are the major sources of errors or approximations in their representation. In this project, we aim to 1) improve our understanding of the physical processes in thermal circulation and cloud formation, 2) examine the performance and sensitivity of various parameterizations in the regional weather model (Weather Research and Forecasting model; WRF), and 3) develop, implement, and evaluate the advanced boundary layer parameterization in the regional model to better represent stratocumulus, shallow cumulus, and their transition. Thus, this project includes three major corresponding studies. We find that the mean diurnal cycle is sensitive to model domain in ways that reveal the existence of different contributions originating from the Southeast Pacific land-masses. The experiments suggest that diurnal variations in circulations and thermal structures over this region are influenced by convection over the Peruvian sector of the Andes cordillera, while the mostly dry mountain-breeze circulations force an additional component that results in semi-diurnal variations near the coast. A series of numerical tests, however, reveal sensitivity of the simulations to the choice of vertical grid, limiting the possibility of solid quantitative statements on the amplitudes and phases of the diurnal and semidiurnal components across the domain. According to our experiments, the Mellor-Yamada-Nakanishi-Niino (MYNN) boundary layer scheme and the WSM6 microphysics scheme is the combination of schemes that performs best. For that combination, mean cloud cover, liquid water path, and cloud depth are fairly wellsimulated, while mean cloud top height remains too low in comparison to observations. Both microphysics and boundary layer schemes contribute to the spread in liquid water path and cloud depth, although the microphysics contribution is slightly more prominent. Boundary layer schemes are the primary contributors to cloud top height, degree of adiabaticity, and cloud cover. Cloud top height is closely related to surface fluxes and boundary layer structure. Thus, our study infers that an appropriate tuning of cloud top height would likely improve the low-cloud representation in the model. Finally, we show that entrainment governs the degree of adiabaticity, while boundary layer decoupling is a control on cloud cover. In the intercomparison study using WRF single-column model experiments, most parameterizations show a poor agreement of the vertical boundary layer structure when compared with large-eddy simulation models. We also implement a new Total-Energy/Mass- Flux boundary layer scheme into the WRF model and evaluate its ability to simulate both stratocumulus and shallow cumulus clouds. Result comparisons against large-eddy simulation show that this advanced parameterization based on the new Eddy-Diffusivity/Mass-Flux approach provides a better performance than other boundary layer parameterizations.

  6. Flavor Mixing and CP Violation of Massive Neutrinos

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhi-zhong Xing

    2004-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

    We present an overview of recent progress in the phenomenological study of neutrino masses, lepton flavor mixing and CP violation. We concentrate on the model-independent properties of massive neutrinos, both in vacuum and in matter. Current experimental constraints on the neutrino mass spectrum and the lepton flavor mixing parameters are summarized. The Dirac- and Majorana-like phases of CP violation, which are associated respectively with the long-baseline neutrino oscillations and the neutrinoless double beta decay, are discussed in detail. The seesaw mechanism, the leptogenesis scenario and the strategies to construct lepton mass matrices are briefly described. The features of flavor mixing between one sterile neutrino and three active neutrinos are also explored.

  7. Scheduling in IaaS Cloud Computing Environments: Anything New?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Iosup, Alexandru

    ) Center IaaS Cloud Benchmarking Massivizing Online Social Games Gamification in Higher Education May 7 May

  8. 2012 MELLANOX TECHNOLOGIES 1 The Interconnect is the Cloud

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schuster, Assaf

    IT costs from CAPEX to OPEX IT Efficiency and Business Agility Hybrid Cloud Compute and Storage Resource

  9. How to Do/Evaluate Cloud Computing Research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hong,Seokhee

    ­ Simulations · Only when you can WELL justify, e.g., energy efficiency with realistic data like Google clusterS (Software as a Service) · Salesforce.com · Deployment Models ­ Private cloud ­ Public cloud ­ Hybrid cloud, theoretical and computational science (simulation), The Fourth Paradigm: Data-Intensive Scientific Discovery

  10. 8, 42674308, 2008 3-D retrieval of cloud

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    ACPD 8, 4267­4308, 2008 3-D retrieval of cloud particle profiles T. Zinner et al. Title Page.0 License. Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics Discussions Remote sensing of cloud sides of deep convection: towards a three-dimensional retrieval of cloud particle size profiles T. Zinner 1,2 , A. Marshak 1 , S

  11. CLOUD COVER REPORTING BIAS AT MAJOR AIRPORTS Richard Perez

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Perez, Richard R.

    CLOUD COVER REPORTING BIAS AT MAJOR AIRPORTS Richard Perez Joshua A. Bonaventura-Sparagna & Marek Kmiecik ASRC, SUNY, Albany, NY Ray George & David Renné NREL, Golden, CO ABSTRACT Cloud cover has been generated all or in part from cloud cover measurements [1,2]. This paper presents evidence

  12. Making Time-stepped Applications Tick in the Cloud

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keinan, Alon

    Making Time-stepped Applications Tick in the Cloud Tao Zou, Guozhang Wang, Marcos Vaz Salles · Iterative Graph Processing · Matrix Computation #12;Why Run Scientific Applications in the Cloud? · Elasticity · Cost Saving · Instant Availability 9 Avoid jobs queuing for days #12;What Does Cloud

  13. ENHANCED CLOUD REGIME CLASSIFICATION FOR EVALUATION OF MODEL FAST PHYSICS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ENHANCED CLOUD REGIME CLASSIFICATION FOR EVALUATION OF MODEL FAST PHYSICS Wuyin Lin1 , Yangang Liu1 of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC02-98CH10886 ABSTRACT Distinct cloud regimes exist locally and globally helps identify the meteorological conditions that are closely associated with specific cloud regimes

  14. Dynamics of Finite Dust Clouds in a Magnetized Anodic Plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Piel, A.; Pilch, I.; Trottenberg, T. [Institute for Experimental and Applied Physics, Christian-Albrechts University, D-24098 Kiel (Germany); Koepke, M. E. [Department of Physics, West Virginia University, Morgantown, West Virginia 26505-6315 (United States)

    2008-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The response to an external modulation voltage of small dust clouds confined in an anodic plasma is studied. Dust density waves are excited when the cloud is larger than a wavelength, whereas a sloshing and stretching motion is found for smaller clouds. The wave dispersion shows similarities with waveguide modes.

  15. Trusted End Host Monitors for Securing Cloud Datacenters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keinan, Alon

    Trusted End Host Monitors for Securing Cloud Datacenters Alan Shieh Srikanth Kandula Albert Greenberg #12;Cloud workload is dynamic and hostile Traditional datacenters Infrastructure supports small to audit app code Cloud datacenters Infrastructure is shared among many untrusted tenants ­ Rapidly

  16. Modeling, Characterizing, and Enhancing User Experience in Cloud Mobile Rendering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at San Diego, University of

    Modeling, Characterizing, and Enhancing User Experience in Cloud Mobile Rendering Yao Liu, Shaoxuan of California, San Diego {yal019, shaoxuan, dey}@ece.ucsd.edu Abstract--Cloud Mobile Rendering (CMR), where compute intensive rendering is performed on cloud servers instead of on mobile devices, can be a promising

  17. Electron-Cloud Build-up: Summary M. A. Furman,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Furman, Miguel

    LBNL-62849 Electron-Cloud Build-up: Summary M. A. Furman, Center for Beam Physics, LBNL, Berkeley, CA 94720-8211, USA Abstract I present a summary of topics relevant to the electron- cloud build-up and dissipation that were presented at the International Workshop on Electron-Cloud Effects "ECLOUD'07" (Daegu, S

  18. H I Self Absorption Toward Molecular Clouds: Theoretical Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    information and available data, visit the GRS web page at www.bu.eduwww.bu.edu/G/GRSRS References chemistry deep inside the molecular clouds. We study H I self- absorption toward molecular clouds is dominated by cold atomic hydrogen formed by cosmic ray chemistry deep in the interiors of clouds. If all

  19. Cumulus Clouds and Reflected Sunlight

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed Newcatalyst phases on &gamma;-Al2O3.WinterCrystalApplications

  20. Phase Transition Enhanced Thermoelectrics From the Resnick Sustainability Institute

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    class of thermoelectric materials, mixed ion-electron conductors. It examines a new method thermoelectric material, Cu2 Se, that shows enhanced efficiency near its structural phase transition temperature and enhancing the thermoelectric effect. Via material engineering, including electrochemical investigations

  1. Renormalization Group Evolution of Neutrino Parameters in Presence of Seesaw Threshold Effects and Majorana Phases

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shivani Gupta; Sin Kyu Kang; C. S. Kim

    2015-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We examine the renormalization group evolution (RGE) for different mixing scenarios in the presence of seesaw threshold effects from high energy scale (GUT) to the low electroweak (EW) scale in the Standard Model (SM) and Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model (MSSM). We consider four mixing scenarios namely Tri-Bimaximal Mixing, Bimaximal Mixing, Hexagonal Mixing and Golden Ratio Mixing which come from different flavor symmetries at the GUT scale. We find that the Majorana phases play an important role in the RGE running of these mixing patterns along with the seesaw threshold corrections. We present a comparative study of the RGE of all these mixing scenarios both with and without Majorana CP phases when seesaw threshold corrections are taken into consideration. We find that in the absence of these Majorana phases both the RGE running and seesaw effects may lead to $\\theta_{13}energies both in the SM and MSSM. However, if the Majorana phases are incorporated to the mixing matrix the running can be enhanced both in the SM and MSSM. Even by incorporating non zero Majorana CP phases in the SM, we do not get $\\theta_{13}$ in its present 3$\\sigma$ range. The current values of the two mass squared differences and mixing angles including $\\theta_{13}$ can be produced in the MSSM case with tan$\\beta$ = 10 and non zero Majorana CP phases at low energy. We also calculate the order of effective Majorana mass and Jarlskog Invariant for each scenario under consideration.

  2. The Structure of the Local Interstellar Medium IV: Dynamics, Morphology, Physical Properties, and Implications of Cloud-Cloud Interactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seth Redfield; Jeffrey L. Linsky

    2007-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

    We present an empirical dynamical model of the local interstellar medium based on 270 radial-velocity measurements for 157 sight lines toward nearby stars. Physical-parameter measurements (i.e., temperature, turbulent velocity, depletions) are available for 90 components, or one-third of the sample, enabling initial characterizations of the physical properties of LISM clouds. The model includes 15 warm clouds located within 15 pc of the Sun, each with a different velocity vector. We derive projected morphologies of all clouds and estimate the volume filling factor of warm partially ionized material in the LISM to be between ~5.5% and 19%. Relative velocities of potentially interacting clouds are often supersonic, consistent with heating, turbulent, and metal-depletion properties. Cloud-cloud collisions may be responsible for the filamentary morphologies found in ~1/3 of LISM clouds, the distribution of clouds along the boundaries of the two nearest clouds (LIC and G), the detailed shape and heating of the Mic Cloud, the location of nearby radio scintillation screens, and the location of a LISM cold cloud. Contrary to previous claims, the Sun appears to be located in the transition zone between the LIC and G Clouds.

  3. The Tropical Warm Pool International Cloud Experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    May, Peter T.; Mather, James H.; Vaughan, Geraint; Jakob, Christian; McFarquhar, Greg; Bower, Keith; Mace, Gerald G.

    2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    One of the most complete data sets describing tropical convection ever collected will result from the upcoming Tropical Warm Pool International Cloud Experiment (TWP-ICE) in the area around Darwin, Northern Australia in January and February 2006. The aims of the experiment, which will be operated in conjunction with the DOE Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) site in Darwin, will be to examine convective cloud systems from their initial stages through to the decay of the cirrus generated and to measure their impact on the environment. The experiment will include an unprecedented network of ground-based observations (soundings, active and passive remote sensors) combined with low, mid and high altitude aircraft for in-situ and remote sensing measurements. A crucial outcome of the experiment will be a data set suitable to provide the forcing and evaluation data required by cloud resolving and single column models as well as global climate models (GCMs) with the aim to contribute to parameterization development. This data set will provide the necessary link between the observed cloud properties and the models that are attempting to simulate them. The experiment is a large multi-agency experiment including substantial contributions from the United States DOE ARM program, ARM-UAV program, NASA, the Australian Bureau of Meteorology, CSIRO, EU programs and many universities.

  4. The Magellan Final Report on Cloud Computing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    ,; Coghlan, Susan; Yelick, Katherine

    2011-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of Magellan, a project funded through the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR), was to investigate the potential role of cloud computing in addressing the computing needs for the DOE Office of Science (SC), particularly related to serving the needs of mid- range computing and future data-intensive computing workloads. A set of research questions was formed to probe various aspects of cloud computing from performance, usability, and cost. To address these questions, a distributed testbed infrastructure was deployed at the Argonne Leadership Computing Facility (ALCF) and the National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center (NERSC). The testbed was designed to be flexible and capable enough to explore a variety of computing models and hardware design points in order to understand the impact for various scientific applications. During the project, the testbed also served as a valuable resource to application scientists. Applications from a diverse set of projects such as MG-RAST (a metagenomics analysis server), the Joint Genome Institute, the STAR experiment at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider, and the Laser Interferometer Gravitational Wave Observatory (LIGO), were used by the Magellan project for benchmarking within the cloud, but the project teams were also able to accomplish important production science utilizing the Magellan cloud resources.

  5. Workshop on Distributed Cloud Computing Dresden, Germany

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schmid, Stefan

    DCC 2013 Workshop on Distributed Cloud Computing Dresden, Germany December 9-12, 2013 (Submission Pan Hui, HKUST, Hong Kong Wolfgang Kellerer, TU Munich, Germany Ruben Montero, Uni Complutense de Waterloo, Canada Marco Canini, T-Labs & TU Berlin, Germany Paolo Costa, MSR & Imperial College, UK Xiaoming

  6. SECURING PROCESSES FOR OUTSOURCING INTO THE CLOUD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jurjens, Jan

    -sized enterprises (SMEs) to securely utilize cloud computing technology and thus gaining eco- nomic advantages. Our computing is yet one of the leading developments and depicts the biggest progress in web technologies is currently one of the most rapid growing trends and represents the technological de- velopment on the web

  7. Efficient Resource Management for Cloud Computing Environments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , the dependence on power also increases. Currently it is estimated that data centers consume 0.5 percent. In 2005, the total energy consumption for servers and their cooling units was projected at 1.2% the total such as the relatively high operating cost for both public and private Clouds. The area of Green computing is also

  8. Cost Efficient Datacenter Selection for Cloud Services

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Baochun

    Cost Efficient Datacenter Selection for Cloud Services Hong Xu, Baochun Li henryxu, bli and performance. They need an effective way to direct the user requests to a suitable datacenter, in a cost efficient manner. Previ- ous work focused mostly on the electricity cost of datacenters. The approaches

  9. Argonne's Magellan Cloud Computing Research Project

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Beckman, Pete

    2013-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Pete Beckman, head of Argonne's Leadership Computing Facility (ALCF), discusses the Department of Energy's new $32-million Magellan project, which designed to test how cloud computing can be used for scientific research. More information: http://www.anl.gov/Media_Center/News/2009/news091014a.html

  10. Laser transmissionbackscattering through inhomogeneous cirrus clouds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Takano, Yoshihide

    Laser transmission­backscattering through inhomogeneous cirrus clouds Szu-Cheng Ou, Yoshihide of the transmission and backscattering of high-energy laser beams. The 2D extinction-coefficient and mean effective and backscattering of high-energy laser beams in realistic atmospheres. The results of laser direct transmission

  11. 6, 43414373, 2006 Cloud-borne aerosol

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    .g., par- ticle nucleation, coagulation, gravitational settling, dry deposition); some involve AP attached to a single type of cloud/precipitation particle (e.g., aqueous and heteroge-25 neous chemistry), and some, transformation, and removal processes on the attachment state, one might expect that model simulations

  12. Reduction of Quantum Phase Fluctuations Implies Antibunching of Photon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prakash Gupta; Anirban Pathak

    2007-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

    A clear physical meaning of the Carruthers-Nieto symmetric quantum phase fluctuation parameter (U) has been provided in Susskind Glogower and Barnett Pegg formalism of quantum phase and it is shown that the reduction of phase fluctuation parameter U with respect to its coherent state value corresponds to an antibunched state. Thus nonclassicality of a state may be manifested through the phase fluctuation parameters. As examples, quantum phase fluctuations in different optical processes, such as four wave mixing, six wave mixing and second harmonic generation have been studied by using Carruthers-Nieto quantum phase fluctuation parameters. The operators required for the calculation of quantum phase fluctuations are expressed in closed analytical forms (up to second order in coupling constant). It is also found that the reduction of phase fluctuations compared to their initial values are possible in all three cases which means nonclassical (antibunched) state exists in all these cases.

  13. Cloud Scavenging Effects on Aerosol Radiative and Cloud-nucleating Properties - Final Technical Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ogren, John A.; Sheridan, Patrick S.; Andrews, Elisabeth

    2009-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The optical properties of aerosol particles are the controlling factors in determining direct aerosol radiative forcing. These optical properties depend on the chemical composition and size distribution of the aerosol particles, which can change due to various processes during the particles’ lifetime in the atmosphere. Over the course of this project we have studied how cloud processing of atmospheric aerosol changes the aerosol optical properties. A counterflow virtual impactor was used to separate cloud drops from interstitial aerosol and parallel aerosol systems were used to measure the optical properties of the interstitial and cloud-scavenged aerosol. Specifically, aerosol light scattering, back-scattering and absorption were measured and used to derive radiatively significant parameters such as aerosol single scattering albedo and backscatter fraction for cloud-scavenged and interstitial aerosol. This data allows us to demonstrate that the radiative properties of cloud-processed aerosol can be quite different than pre-cloud aerosol. These differences can be used to improve the parameterization of aerosol forcing in climate models.

  14. Satellite Remote Sensing of Mid-level Clouds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jin, Hongchun 1980-

    2012-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

    , the International Satellite Cloud Cli- matology Project (ISCCP, Rossow and Schi er 1999) and TIROS-N Observational Vertical Sounders Path-B (TOVS-B, Stubenrauch et al. 2006) are both long-term global climatologies that de ne mid-level clouds as having cloud top... devoted to establishing global cloud climatolo- gies, however, working de nitions or the classi cation of mid-level clouds vary with observational technique, region, and purpose (Poore et al. 1995; Hahn and Warren 1999; Rossow and Schi er 1999; Hahn...

  15. Chapter 3: Evaluating the impacts of carbonaceous aerosols on clouds and climate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Menon, Surabi; Del Genio, Anthony D.

    2007-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Any attempt to reconcile observed surface temperature changes within the last 150 years to changes simulated by climate models that include various atmospheric forcings is sensitive to the changes attributed to aerosols and aerosol-cloud-climate interactions, which are the main contributors that may well balance the positive forcings associated with greenhouse gases, absorbing aerosols, ozone related changes, etc. These aerosol effects on climate, from various modeling studies discussed in Menon (2004), range from +0.8 to -2.4 W m{sup -2}, with an implied value of -1.0 W m{sup -2} (range from -0.5 to -4.5 W m{sup -2}) for the aerosol indirect effects. Quantifying the contribution of aerosols and aerosol-cloud interactions remain complicated for several reasons some of which are related to aerosol distributions and some to the processes used to represent their effects on clouds. Aerosol effects on low lying marine stratocumulus clouds that cover much of the Earth's surface (about 70%) have been the focus of most of prior aerosol-cloud interaction effect simulations. Since cumulus clouds (shallow and deep convective) are short lived and cover about 15 to 20% of the Earth's surface, they are not usually considered as radiatively important. However, the large amount of latent heat released from convective towers, and corresponding changes in precipitation, especially in biomass regions due to convective heating effects (Graf et al. 2004), suggest that these cloud systems and aerosol effects on them, must be examined more closely. The radiative heating effects for mature deep convective systems can account for 10-30% of maximum latent heating effects and thus cannot be ignored (Jensen and Del Genio 2003). The first study that isolated the sensitivity of cumulus clouds to aerosols was from Nober et al. (2003) who found a reduction in precipitation in biomass burning regions and shifts in circulation patterns. Aerosol effects on convection have been included in other models as well (cf. Jacobson, 2002) but the relative impacts on convective and stratiform processes were not separated. Other changes to atmospheric stability and thermodynamical quantities due to aerosol absorption are also known to be important in modifying cloud macro/micro properties. Linkages between convection and boreal biomass burning can also impact the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere, radiation and cloud microphysical properties via transport of tropospheric aerosols to the lower stratosphere during extreme convection (Fromm and Servranckx 2003). Relevant questions regarding the impact of biomass aerosols on convective cloud properties include the effects of vertical transport of aerosols, spatial and temporal distribution of rainfall, vertical shift in latent heat release, phase shift of precipitation, circulation and their impacts on radiation. Over land surfaces, a decrease in surface shortwave radiation ({approx} 3-6 W m{sup -2} per decade) has been observed between 1960 to 1990, whereas, increases of 0.4 K in land temperature during the same period that occurred have resulted in speculations that evaporation and precipitation should also have decreased (Wild et al. 2004). However, precipitation records for the same period over land do not indicate any significant trend (Beck et al. 2005). The changes in precipitation are thought to be related to increased moisture advection from the oceans (Wild et al. 2004), which may well have some contributions from aerosol-radiation-convection coupling that could modify circulation patterns and hence moisture advection in specific regions. Other important aspects of aerosol effects, besides the direct, semi-direct, microphysical and thermodynamical impacts include alteration of surface albedos, especially snow and ice covered surfaces, due to absorbing aerosols. These effects are uncertain (Jacobson, 2004) but may produce as much as 0.3 W m{sup -2} forcing in the Northern hemisphere that could contribute to melting of ice and permafrost and change in the length of the season (e.g. early arrival of Spring

  16. Modeling Bright Gamma-ray and Radio Emission at Fast Cloud Shocks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Shiu-Hang; Raymond, John C; Nagataki, Shigehiro; Slane, Patrick O; Ellison, Donald C

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent observations by the Large Area Telescope (LAT) onboard the Fermi satellite have revealed bright gamma-ray emission from middle-aged supernova remnants (SNRs) inside our Galaxy. These remnants, which also possess bright non-thermal radio shells, are often found to be interacting directly with surrounding gas clouds. We explore the non-thermal emission mechanism at these dynamically evolved SNRs by constructing a hydrodynamical model. Two scenarios of particle acceleration, either a re-acceleration of Galactic cosmic rays (CRs) or an efficient nonlinear diffusive shock acceleration (NLDSA) of particles injected from downstream, are considered. Using parameters inferred from observations, our models are contrasted with the observed spectra of SNR W44. For the re-acceleration case, we predict a significant enhancement of radio and GeV emission as the SNR undergoes a transition into the radiative phase. If sufficiently strong magnetic turbulence is present in the molecular cloud, the re-acceleration scenari...

  17. A Compact, Backscattering Deplolarization Cloud Spectrometer for Ice and Water Discrimination

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomson, David

    2014-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This project was to develop a compact optical particle spectrometer, small enough for operation on UAVS, that measures the optical diameter of cloud hydrometeors and differentiates their water phase (liquid or solid). To reach this goal, a work plan was laid out that would complete three objectives: 1) Evaluation of designs for an optical particle spectrometer that measures the component of light backscattered at two polarization angles. 2) Testing of selected designs on an optical bench. 3) Construction and preliminary testing of a prototype instrument based on the selected, optimum design. A protoype instrument was developed and tested in an icing wind tunnel where the results showed good measurement of cloud droplets and ice particles.

  18. Bs Mixing at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gomez-Ceballos, Guillelmo; /Cantabria Inst. of Phys.

    2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Tevatron collider at Fermilab provides a very rich environment for the study of B{sub s} mesons. B{sub s} Mixing is the most important analysis within the B Physics program of both experiments. In this paper they summarize the most recent results on this topic from both D0 and CDF experiments. There were very important updates in both experiments after his last talk, hence the organizers warmly recommended me to include the latest available results on B{sub s} mixing, instead of what he presents there.

  19. Mixed ternary heterojunction solar cell

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chen, Wen S. (Seattle, WA); Stewart, John M. (Seattle, WA)

    1992-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

    A thin film heterojunction solar cell and a method of making it has a p-type layer of mixed ternary I-III-VI.sub.2 semiconductor material in contact with an n-type layer of mixed binary II-VI semiconductor material. The p-type semiconductor material includes a low resistivity copper-rich region adjacent the back metal contact of the cell and a composition gradient providing a minority carrier mirror that improves the photovoltaic performance of the cell. The p-type semiconductor material preferably is CuInGaSe.sub.2 or CuIn(SSe).sub.2.

  20. Acoustic clouds: standing sound waves around a black hole analogue

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carolina L. Benone; Luis C. B. Crispino; Carlos Herdeiro; Eugen Radu

    2015-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Under certain conditions sound waves in fluids experience an acoustic horizon with analogue properties to those of a black hole event horizon. In particular, a draining bathtub-like model can give rise to a rotating acoustic horizon and hence a rotating black hole (acoustic) analogue. We show that sound waves, when enclosed in a cylindrical cavity, can form stationary waves around such rotating acoustic black holes. These acoustic perturbations display similar properties to the scalar clouds that have been studied around Kerr and Kerr-Newman black holes; thus they are dubbed acoustic clouds. We make the comparison between scalar clouds around Kerr black holes and acoustic clouds around the draining bathtub explicit by studying also the properties of scalar clouds around Kerr black holes enclosed in a cavity. Acoustic clouds suggest the possibility of testing, experimentally, the existence and properties of black hole clouds, using analog models.

  1. Acoustic clouds: standing sound waves around a black hole analogue

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benone, Carolina L; Herdeiro, Carlos; Radu, Eugen

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Under certain conditions sound waves in fluids experience an acoustic horizon with analogue properties to those of a black hole event horizon. In particular, a draining bathtub-like model can give rise to a rotating acoustic horizon and hence a rotating black hole (acoustic) analogue. We show that sound waves, when enclosed in a cylindrical cavity, can form stationary waves around such rotating acoustic black holes. These acoustic perturbations display similar properties to the scalar clouds that have been studied around Kerr and Kerr-Newman black holes; thus they are dubbed acoustic clouds. We make the comparison between scalar clouds around Kerr black holes and acoustic clouds around the draining bathtub explicit by studying also the properties of scalar clouds around Kerr black holes enclosed in a cavity. Acoustic clouds suggest the possibility of testing, experimentally, the existence and properties of black hole clouds, using analog models.

  2. Phase and birefringence aberration correction

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bowers, Mark (Modesto, CA); Hankla, Allen (Livermore, CA)

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A Brillouin enhanced four wave mixing phase conjugate mirror corrects phase aberrations of a coherent electromagnetic beam and birefringence induced upon that beam. The stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS) phase conjugation technique is augmented to include Brillouin enhanced four wave mixing (BEFWM). A seed beam is generated by a main oscillator which arrives at the phase conjugate cell before the signal beams in order to initiate the Brillouin effect. The signal beam which is being amplified through the amplifier chain is split into two perpendicularly polarized beams. One of the two beams is chosen to be the same polarization as some component of the seed beam, the other orthogonal to the first. The polarization of the orthogonal beam is then rotated 90.degree. such that it is parallel to the other signal beam. The three beams are then focused into cell containing a medium capable of Brillouin excitation. The two signal beams are focused such that they cross the seed beam path before their respective beam waists in order to achieve BEFWM or the two signal beams are focused to a point or points contained within the focused cone angle of the seed beam to achieve seeded SBS, and thus negate the effects of all birefringent and material aberrations in the system.

  3. A Numerical Method for Two Phase Flow Consisting of Separate Compressible and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Soatto, Stefano

    can be limiting because of the di#11;erence in sound speed between the liquid phase and gas phases mixing of liquids. We use the level set method to track the interface between the compressible and incom with large density ratios, e.g. the combustion of fuel droplets or the shock induced mixing of liquids

  4. Aspen Ecology in the MixedAspen Ecology in the Mixed Conifer TypeConifer Type

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aspen Ecology in the MixedAspen Ecology in the Mixed Conifer TypeConifer Type Wayne D. Shepperd Colorado State University Fort Collins, CO Aspen Ecology in the MixedAspen Ecology in the Mixed ConiferAssumptions Mixed conifer forests are a collection of different species, each with different ecologic requirements

  5. Dark energy and particle mixing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Capolupo; S. Capozziello; G. Vitiello

    2008-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

    We show that the vacuum condensate due to particle mixing is responsible of a dynamically evolving dark energy. In particular, we show that values of the adiabatic index close to -1 for vacuum condensates of neutrinos and quarks imply, at the present epoch, contributions to the vacuum energy compatible with the estimated upper bound on the dark energy.

  6. Advances in compressible turbulent mixing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dannevik, W.P.; Buckingham, A.C.; Leith, C.E. [eds.

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This volume includes some recent additions to original material prepared for the Princeton International Workshop on the Physics of Compressible Turbulent Mixing, held in 1988. Workshop participants were asked to emphasize the physics of the compressible mixing process rather than measurement techniques or computational methods. Actual experimental results and their meaning were given precedence over discussions of new diagnostic developments. Theoretical interpretations and understanding were stressed rather than the exposition of new analytical model developments or advances in numerical procedures. By design, compressibility influences on turbulent mixing were discussed--almost exclusively--from the perspective of supersonic flow field studies. The papers are arranged in three topical categories: Foundations, Vortical Domination, and Strongly Coupled Compressibility. The Foundations category is a collection of seminal studies that connect current study in compressible turbulent mixing with compressible, high-speed turbulent flow research that almost vanished about two decades ago. A number of contributions are included on flow instability initiation, evolution, and transition between the states of unstable flow onset through those descriptive of fully developed turbulence. The Vortical Domination category includes theoretical and experimental studies of coherent structures, vortex pairing, vortex-dynamics-influenced pressure focusing. In the Strongly Coupled Compressibility category the organizers included the high-speed turbulent flow investigations in which the interaction of shock waves could be considered an important source for production of new turbulence or for the enhancement of pre-existing turbulence. Individual papers are processed separately.

  7. The effect of a finite mass reservoir on the collapse of spherical isothermal clouds and the evolution of protostellar accretion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E. I. Vorobyov; Shantanu Basu

    2005-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Motivated by recent observations which detect an outer boundary for starless cores, and evidence for time-dependent mass accretion in the Class 0 and Class I protostellar phases, we reexamine the case of spherical isothermal collapse in the case of a finite mass reservoir. The presence of a core boundary results in the generation of an inward propagating rarefaction wave. This steepens the gas density profile from r^{-2} to r^{-3} or steeper. After a protostar forms, the mass accretion rate \\dot{M} evolves through three distinct phases: (1) an early phase of decline in \\dot{M}, which is a non-self-similar effect due to spatially nonuniform infall in the prestellar phase; (2) for large cores, an intermediate phase of near-constant \\dot{M} from the infall of the outer part of the self-similar density profile; (3) a late phase of rapid decline in \\dot{M} when accretion occurs from the region affected by the inward propagating rarefaction wave. Our model clouds of small to intermediate size make a direct transition from phase (1) to phase (3) above. Both the first and second phase are characterized by a temporally increasing bolometric luminosity L_bol, while L_bol is decreasing in the third (final) phase. We identify the period of temporally increasing L_bol with the Class 0 phase, and the later period of terminal accretion and decreasing L_bol with the Class I phase. The peak in L_bol corresponds to the evolutionary time when 50% \\pm 10% of the cloud mass has been accreted by the protostar. This is in agreement with the classification scheme proposed by Andre et al. (1993). We show how our results can be used to explain tracks of envelope mass M_env versus L_bol for protostars in Taurus and Ophiuchus. We also develop an analytic formalism which reproduces the protostellar accretion rate.

  8. Nonlinear Hydromagnetic Wave Support of a Stratified Molecular Cloud

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. Kudoh; S. Basu

    2003-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

    We perform numerical simulations of nonlinear MHD waves in a gravitationally stratified molecular cloud that is bounded by a hot and tenuous external medium. We study the relation between the strength of the turbulence and various global properties of a molecular cloud, within a 1.5-dimensional approximation. Under the influence of a driving source of Alfvenic disturbances, the cloud is lifted up by the pressure of MHD waves and reaches a steady-state characterized by oscillations about a new time-averaged equilibrium state. The nonlinear effect results in the generation of longitudinal motions and many shock waves; however, the wave kinetic energy remains predominantly in transverse, rather than longitudinal, motions. There is an approximate equipartition of energy between the transverse velocity and fluctuating magnetic field (aspredicted by small-amplitude theory) in the region of the stratified cloud which contains most of the mass; however, this relation breaks down in the outer regions, particularly near the cloud surface, where the motions have a standing-wave character. This means that the Chandrasekhar-Fermi formula applied to molecular clouds must be significantly modified in such regions. Models of an ensemble of clouds show that, for various strengths of the input energy, the velocity dispersion in the cloud $\\sigma \\propto Z^{0.5}$, where $Z$ is a characteristic size of the cloud.Furthermore, $\\sigma$ is always comparable to the mean Alfven velocity of the cloud, consistent with observational results.

  9. Experiment to Characterize Tropical Cloud Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    May, Peter T.; Mather, Jim H.; Jakob, Christian

    2005-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

    A major experiment to study tropical convective cloud systems and their impacts will take place around Darwin, Northern Australia in early 2006. The Tropical Warm Pool International Cloud Experiment (TWP-ICE) is a collaboration including the DOE ARM (Atmospheric Radiation Measurement) and ARM-UAV programs, NASA centers, the Australian Bureau of Meteorology, CSIRO, and universities in the USA, Australia, Japan, the UK, and Canada. TWP-ICE will be preceded in November/December 2004 by a collaborating European aircraft campaign involving the EU SCOUT-O3 and UK NERC ACTIVE projects. Detailed atmospheric measurements will be made in the Darwin area through the whole Austral summer, giving unprecedented coverage through the pre-monsoon and monsoon periods.

  10. Dust Emission from the Perseus Molecular Cloud

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Schnee; J. Li; A. A. Goodman; A. I. Sargent

    2008-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Using far-infrared emission maps taken by IRAS and Spitzer and a near-infrared extinction map derived from 2MASS data, we have made dust temperature and column density maps of the Perseus molecular cloud. We show that the emission from transiently heated very small grains and the big grain dust emissivity vary as a function of extinction and dust temperature, with higher dust emissivities for colder grains. This variable emissivity can not be explained by temperature gradients along the line of sight or by noise in the emission maps, but is consistent with grain growth in the higher density and lower temperature regions. By accounting for the variations in the dust emissivity and VSG emission, we are able to map the temperature and column density of a nearby molecular cloud with better accuracy than has previously been possible.

  11. Pion cloud effects on baryon masses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Helios Sanchis-Alepuz; Christian S. Fischer; Stanislav Kubrak

    2014-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

    In this work we explore the effect of pion cloud contributions to the mass of the nucleon and the delta baryon. To this end we solve a coupled system of Dyson-Schwinger equations for the quark propagator, a Bethe-Salpeter equation for the pion and a three-body Faddeev equation for the baryons. In the quark-gluon interaction we explicitly resolve the term responsible for the back-coupling of the pion onto the quark, representing rainbow-ladder like pion cloud effects in bound states. We study the dependence of the resulting baryon masses on the current quark mass and discuss the internal structure of the baryons in terms of a partial wave decomposition. We furthermore determine values for the nucleon and delta sigma-terms.

  12. Tropical Cloud Properties and Radiative Heating Profiles

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Mather, James

    We have generated a suite of products that includes merged soundings, cloud microphysics, and radiative fluxes and heating profiles. The cloud microphysics is strongly based on the ARM Microbase value added product (Miller et al., 2003). We have made a few changes to the microbase parameterizations to address issues we observed in our initial analysis of the tropical data. The merged sounding product is not directly related to the product developed by ARM but is similar in that it uses the microwave radiometer to scale the radiosonde column water vapor. The radiative fluxes also differ from the ARM BBHRP (Broadband Heating Rate Profile) product in terms of the radiative transfer model and the sampling interval.

  13. MAGIC: Marine ARM GPCI Investigation of Clouds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lewis, ER; Wiscombe, WJ; Albrecht, BA; Bland, GL; Flagg, CN; Klein, SA; Kollias, P; Mace, G; Reynolds, RM; Schwartz, SE; Siebesma, AP; Teixeira, J; Wood, R; Zhang, M

    2012-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The second Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Mobile Facility (AMF2) will be deployed aboard the Horizon Lines cargo container ship merchant vessel (M/V) Spirit for MAGIC, the Marine ARM GPCI1 Investigation of Clouds. The Spirit will traverse the route between Los Angeles, California, and Honolulu, Hawaii, from October 2012 through September 2013 (except for a few months in the middle of this time period when the ship will be in dry dock). During this field campaign, AMF2 will observe and characterize the properties of clouds and precipitation, aerosols, and atmospheric radiation; standard meteorological and oceanographic variables; and atmospheric structure. There will also be two intensive observational periods (IOPs), one in January 2013 and one in July 2013, during which more detailed measurements of the atmospheric structure will be made.

  14. Smith's Cloud: A High-velocity Cloud Colliding with the Milky Way

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lockman, Felix J; Heroux, A J; Langston, Glen I

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    New 21cm HI observations made with the Green Bank Telescope show that the high-velocity cloud known as Smith's Cloud has a striking cometary appearance and many indications of interaction with the Galactic ISM. The velocities of interaction give a kinematic distance of 12.4 +/-1.3 kpc, consistent with the distance derived from other methods. The Cloud is >3 x 1 kpc in size and its tip at (l,b)=(39 deg,-13 deg) is 7.6 kpc from the Galactic center and 2.9 kpc below the Galactic plane. It has greater than 10^6 M solar masses in HI. Its leading section has a total space velocity near 300 km/s, is moving toward the Galactic plane with a velocity of 73+/-26 km/s, and is shedding material to the Galaxy. In the absence of drag the Cloud will cross the plane in about 27 Myr. Smith's Cloud may be an example of the accretion of gas by the Milky Way needed to explain certain persistent anomalies in Galactic chemical evolution.

  15. Smith's Cloud: A High-velocity Cloud Colliding with the Milky Way

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Felix J. Lockman; Robert A. Benjamin; A. J. Heroux; Glen I. Langston

    2008-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    New 21cm HI observations made with the Green Bank Telescope show that the high-velocity cloud known as Smith's Cloud has a striking cometary appearance and many indications of interaction with the Galactic ISM. The velocities of interaction give a kinematic distance of 12.4 +/-1.3 kpc, consistent with the distance derived from other methods. The Cloud is >3 x 1 kpc in size and its tip at (l,b)=(39 deg,-13 deg) is 7.6 kpc from the Galactic center and 2.9 kpc below the Galactic plane. It has greater than 10^6 M solar masses in HI. Its leading section has a total space velocity near 300 km/s, is moving toward the Galactic plane with a velocity of 73+/-26 km/s, and is shedding material to the Galaxy. In the absence of drag the Cloud will cross the plane in about 27 Myr. Smith's Cloud may be an example of the accretion of gas by the Milky Way needed to explain certain persistent anomalies in Galactic chemical evolution.

  16. Mixcoin Anonymity for Bitcoin with accountable mixes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Joseph Bonneau; Arvind Narayanan; Andrew Miller; Jeremy Clark; Joshua A. Kroll; Edward W. Felten

    Abstract. We propose Mixcoin, a protocol to facilitate anonymous payments in Bitcoin and similar cryptocurrencies. We build on the emergent phenomenon of currency mixes, adding an accountability mechanism to expose theft. We demonstrate that incentives of mixes and clients can be aligned to ensure that rational mixes will not steal. Our scheme is efficient and fully compatible with Bitcoin. Against a passive attacker, our scheme provides an anonymity set of all other users mixing coins contemporaneously. This is an interesting new property with no clear analog in better-studied communication mixes. Against active attackers our scheme offers similar anonymity to traditional communication mixes. 1

  17. Unit Operation Efficiency Improvement Through Motionless Mixing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    King, L. T.

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    instances, the power consumption associated with mix ing operations constitutes the major energy demand of a plant or factory. Generally speaking, most industrial mixing occurs in a tank with a motor driven shaft and a mixing blade or paddle assembly... 1/4 inch in diameter, to units many feet in diameter weighing tons. (Figs. 4 and 5). MECHANICAL AND MOTIONLESS MIXERS COMPARED Figure 6 shows a typical mechanical mixing system when materials A and Bare pumped to a mix tank, and the mixed pro...

  18. A SUB-GRID VOLUME-OF-FLUIDS (VOF) MODEL FOR MIXING IN RESOLVED SCALE AND IN UNRESOLVED SCALE COMPUTATIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    VOLD, ERIK L. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; SCANNAPIECO, TONY J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2007-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

    A sub-grid mix model based on a volume-of-fluids (VOF) representation is described for computational simulations of the transient mixing between reactive fluids, in which the atomically mixed components enter into the reactivity. The multi-fluid model allows each fluid species to have independent values for density, energy, pressure and temperature, as well as independent velocities and volume fractions. Fluid volume fractions are further divided into mix components to represent their 'mixedness' for more accurate prediction of reactivity. Time dependent conversion from unmixed volume fractions (denoted cf) to atomically mixed (af) fluids by diffusive processes is represented in resolved scale simulations with the volume fractions (cf, af mix). In unresolved scale simulations, the transition to atomically mixed materials begins with a conversion from unmixed material to a sub-grid volume fraction (pf). This fraction represents the unresolved small scales in the fluids, heterogeneously mixed by turbulent or multi-phase mixing processes, and this fraction then proceeds in a second step to the atomically mixed fraction by diffusion (cf, pf, af mix). Species velocities are evaluated with a species drift flux, {rho}{sub i}u{sub di} = {rho}{sub i}(u{sub i}-u), used to describe the fluid mixing sources in several closure options. A simple example of mixing fluids during 'interfacial deceleration mixing with a small amount of diffusion illustrates the generation of atomically mixed fluids in two cases, for resolved scale simulations and for unresolved scale simulations. Application to reactive mixing, including Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF), is planned for future work.

  19. A Community Atmosphere Model with Superparameterized Clouds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Randall, David; Branson, Mark; Wang, Minghuai; Ghan, Steven J.; Craig, Cheryl; Gettelman, A.; Edwards, Jim

    2013-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

    In 1999, National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) scientists Wojciech Grabowski and Piotr Smolarkiewicz created a "multiscale" atmospheric model in which the physical processes associated with clouds were represented by running a simple high-resolution model within each grid column of a lowresolution global model. In idealized experiments, they found that the multiscale model produced promising simulations of organized tropical convection, which other models had struggled to produce. Inspired by their results, Colorado State University (CSU) scientists Marat Khairoutdinov and David Randall created a multiscale version of the Community Atmosphere Model (CAM). They removed the cloud parameterizations of the CAM, and replaced them with Khairoutdinov's high-resolution cloud model. They dubbed the embedded cloud model a "super-parameterization," and the modified CAM is now called the "SP-CAM." Over the next several years, many scientists, from many institutions, have explored the ability of the SP-CAM to simulate tropical weather systems, the day-night changes of precipitation, the Asian and African monsoons, and a number of other climate processes. Cristiana Stan of the Center for Ocean-Land-Atmosphere Interactions found that the SP-CAM gives improved results when coupled to an ocean model, and follow-on studies have explored the SP-CAM's utility when used as the atmospheric component of the Community Earth System Model. Much of this research has been performed under the auspices of the Center for Multiscale Modeling of Atmospheric Processes, a National Science Foundation (NSF) Science and Technology Center for which the lead institution is CSU.

  20. Traversable wormholes in a string cloud

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martin Richarte; Claudio Simeone

    2007-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

    We study spherically symmetric thin-shell wormholes in a string cloud background in (3+1)-dimensional spacetime. The amount of exotic matter required for the construction, the traversability and the stability under radial perturbations, are analyzed as functions of the parameters of the model. Besides, in the Appendices a non perturbative approach to the dynamics and a possible extension of the analysis to a related model are briefly discussed.