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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mixed oxide mox" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

An integrated approach for the verification of fresh mixed oxide fuel (MOX) assemblies at light water reactor MOX recycle reactors  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents an integrated approach for the verification of mixed oxide (MOX) fuel assemblies prior to their being loaded into the reactor. There is a coupling of the verification approach that starts at the fuel fabrication plant and stops with the transfer of the assemblies into the thermal reactor. The key measurement points are at the output of the fuel fabrication plant, the receipt at the reactor site, and the storage in the water pool as fresh fuel. The IAEA currently has the capability to measure the MOX fuel assemblies at the output of the fuel fabrication plants using a passive neutron coincidence counting systems of the passive neutron collar (PNCL) type. Also. at the MOX reactor pool, the underwater coincidence counter (UWCC) has been developed to measure the MOX assemblies in the water. The UWCC measurement requires that the fuel assembly be lifted about two meters up in the storage rack to avoid interference from the fuel that is stored in the rack. This paper presents a new method to verify the MOX fuel assemblies that are in the storage rack without the necessity of moving the fuel. The detector system is called the Underwater MOX Verification System (UMVS). The integration and relationship of the three measurements systems is described.

Menlove, Howard O [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Lee, Sang - Yoon [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

Remote-controlled NDA (nondestructive assay) systems for feed and product storage at an automated MOX (mixed oxide) facility  

SciTech Connect

Nondestructive assay (NDA) systems have been developed for use in an automated mixed oxide (MOX) fabrication facility. Unique features have been developed for the NDA systems to accommodate robotic sample handling and remote operation. In addition, the systems have been designed to obtain International Atomic Energy Agency inspection data without the need for an inspector at the facility at the time of the measurements. The equipment is being designed to operate continuously in an unattended mode with data storage for periods of up to one month. The two systems described in this paper include a canister counter for the assay of MOX powder at the input to the facility and a capsule counter for the assay of complete liquid-metal fast breeder reactor fuel assemblies at the output of the plant. The design, performance characteristics, and authentication of the two systems will be described. The data related to reliability, precision, and stability will be presented. 5 refs., 10 figs., 4 tabs.

Menlove, H.O.; Augustson, R.H.; Ohtani, T.; Seya, M.; Takahashi, S.; Abedin-Zadeh, R.; Hassan, B.; Napoli, S.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Evaluation of existing United States` facilities for use as a mixed-oxide (MOX) fuel fabrication facility for plutonium disposition  

SciTech Connect

A number of existing US facilities were evaluated for use as a mixed-oxide fuel fabrication facility for plutonium disposition. These facilities include the Fuels Material Examination Facility (FMEF) at Hanford, the Washington Power Supply Unit 1 (WNP-1) facility at Hanford, the Barnwell Nuclear Fuel Plant (BNFP) at Barnwell, SC, the Fuel Processing Facility (FPF) at Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL), the Device Assembly Facility (DAF) at the Nevada Test Site (NTS), and the P-reactor at the Savannah River Site (SRS). The study consisted of evaluating each facility in terms of available process space, available building support systems (i.e., HVAC, security systems, existing process equipment, etc.), available regional infrastructure (i.e., emergency response teams, protective force teams, available transportation routes, etc.), and ability to integrate the MOX fabrication process into the facility in an operationally-sound manner that requires a minimum amount of structural modifications.

Beard, C.A.; Buksa, J.J.; Chidester, K.; Eaton, S.L.; Motley, F.E.; Siebe, D.A.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

4

An improved characterization method for international accountancy measurements of fresh and irradiated mixed oxide (MOX) fuel: helping achieve continual monitoring and safeguards through the fuel cycle  

SciTech Connect

Nuclear fuel accountancy measurements are conducted at several points through the nuclear fuel cycle to ensure continuity of knowledge (CofK) of special nuclear material (SNM). Non-destructive assay (NDA) measurements are performed on fresh fuel (prior to irradiation in a reactor) and spent nuclear fuel (SNF) post-irradiation. We have developed a fuel assembly characterization system, based on the novel concept of 'neutron fingerprinting' with multiplicity signatures to ensure detailed CofK of nuclear fuel through the entire fuel cycle. The neutron fingerprint in this case is determined by the measurement of the various correlated neutron signatures, specific to fuel isotopic composition, and therefore offers greater sensitivity to variations in fissile content among fuel assemblies than other techniques such as gross neutron counting. This neutron fingerprint could be measured at the point of fuel dispatch (e.g. from a fuel fabrication plant prior to irradiation, or from a reactor site post-irradiation), monitored during transportation of the fuel assembly, and measured at a subsequent receiving site (e.g. at the reactor site prior to irradiation, or reprocessing facility post-irradiation); this would confirm that no unexpected changes to the fuel composition or amount have taken place during transportation and/ or reactor operations. Changes may indicate an attempt to divert material for example. Here, we present the current state of the practice of fuel measurements for both fresh mixed oxide (MOX) fuel and SNF (both MOX and uranium dioxide). This is presented in the framework of international safeguards perspectives from the US and UK. We also postulate as to how the neutron fingerprinting concept could lead to improved fuel characterization (both fresh MOX and SNF) resulting in: (a) assured CofK of fuel across the nuclear fuel cycle, (b) improved detection of SNM diversion, and (c) greater confidence in safeguards of SNF transportation.

Evans, Louise G [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Croft, Stephen [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Swinhoe, Martyn T [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Tobin, S. J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Menlove, H. O. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Schear, M. A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Worrall, Andrew [U.K. NNL

2011-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

5

An improved characterization method for international accountancy measurements of fresh and irradiated mixed oxide (MOX) fuel: helping achieve continual monitoring and safeguards through the fuel cycle  

SciTech Connect

Nuclear fuel accountancy measurements are conducted at several points through the nuclear fuel cycle to ensure continuity of knowledge (CofK) of special nuclear material (SNM). Non-destructive assay (NDA) measurements are performed on fresh fuel (prior to irradiation in a reactor) and spent nuclear fuel (SNF) post-irradiation. We have developed a fuel assembly characterization system, based on the novel concept of 'neutron fingerprinting' with multiplicity signatures to ensure detailed CofK of nuclear fuel through the entire fuel cycle. The neutron fingerprint in this case is determined by the measurement of the various correlated neutron signatures, specific to fuel isotopic composition, and therefore offers greater sensitivity to variations in fissile content among fuel assemblies than other techniques such as gross neutron counting. This neutron fingerprint could be measured at the point of fuel dispatch (e.g. from a fuel fabrication plant prior to irradiation, or from a reactor site post-irradiation), monitored during transportation of the fuel assembly, and measured at a subsequent receiving site (e.g. at the reactor site prior to irradiation, or reprocessing facility post-irradiation); this would confirm that no unexpected changes to the fuel composition or amount have taken place during transportation and/or reactor operations. Changes may indicate an attempt to divert material for example. Here, we present the current state of the practice of fuel measurements for both fresh mixed oxide (MOX) fuel and SNF (both MOX and uranium dioxide). This is presented in the framework of international safeguards perspectives from the US and UK. We also postulate as to how the neutron fingerprinting concept could lead to improved fuel characterization (both fresh MOX and SNF) resulting in: (a) assured CofK of fuel across the nuclear fuel cycle, (b) improved detection of SNM diversion, and (c) greater confidence in safeguards of SNF transportation.

Evans, Louise G [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Croft, Stephen [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Swinhoe, Martyn T [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Tobin, S. J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Boyer, B. D. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Menlove, H. O. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Schear, M. A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Worrall, Andrew [U.K., NNL

2010-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

6

MOX  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

as MOX fuel will be significantly more expensive than anticipated. Given a lifecycle cost estimate for the program of approximately 30 billion or more and a challenging budget...

7

All About MOX  

SciTech Connect

In 1999, the Nuclear Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) signed a contract with a consortium, now called Shaw AREVA MOX Services, LLC to design, build, and operate a Mixed Oxide (MOX) Fuel Fabrication Facility. This facility will be a major component in the United States program to dispose of surplus weapon-grade plutonium. The facility will take surplus weapon-grade plutonium, remove impurities, and mix it with uranium oxide to form MOX fuel pellets for reactor fuel assemblies. These assemblies will be irradiated in commercial nuclear power reactors.

None

2009-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

8

All About MOX  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

In 1999, the Nuclear Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) signed a contract with a consortium, now called Shaw AREVA MOX Services, LLC to design, build, and operate a Mixed Oxide (MOX) Fuel Fabrication Facility. This facility will be a major component in the United States program to dispose of surplus weapon-grade plutonium. The facility will take surplus weapon-grade plutonium, remove impurities, and mix it with uranium oxide to form MOX fuel pellets for reactor fuel assemblies. These assemblies will be irradiated in commercial nuclear power reactors.

None

2014-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

9

LANL disassembles "pits," makes mixed-oxide fuel  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

at the MOX facility in South Carolina, the plutonium oxide from LANL will be blended with depleted uranium, fabricated into MOX fuel, and irradiated in domestic nuclear...

10

NNSA B-Roll: MOX Facility  

SciTech Connect

In 1999, the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) signed a contract with a consortium, now called Shaw AREVA MOX Services, LLC to design, build, and operate a Mixed Oxide (MOX) Fuel Fabrication Facility. This facility will be a major component in the United States program to dispose of surplus weapon-grade plutonium. The facility will take surplus weapon-grade plutonium, remove impurities, and mix it with uranium oxide to form MOX fuel pellets for reactor fuel assemblies. These assemblies will be irradiated in commercial nuclear power reactors.

2010-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

11

Risk analysis of shipping plutonium pits and mixed oxide fuel  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, one possible option that has been identified for disposition of excess U.S. weapons plutonium is the transformation into mixed oxide (MOX) fuel, that then would be used as fuel in a commercial nuclear power plant. Any such process will involve...

Caldwell, Amy Baker

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

12

Survey of Worldwide Light Water Reactor Experience with Mixed Uranium-Plutonium Oxide Fuel  

SciTech Connect

The US and the Former Soviet Union (FSU) have recently declared quantities of weapons materials, including weapons-grade (WG) plutonium, excess to strategic requirements. One of the leading candidates for the disposition of excess WG plutonium is irradiation in light water reactors (LWRs) as mixed uranium-plutonium oxide (MOX) fuel. A description of the MOX fuel fabrication techniques in worldwide use is presented. A comprehensive examination of the domestic MOX experience in US reactors obtained during the 1960s, 1970s, and early 1980s is also presented. This experience is described by manufacturer and is also categorized by the reactor facility that irradiated the MOX fuel. A limited summary of the international experience with MOX fuels is also presented. A review of MOX fuel and its performance is conducted in view of the special considerations associated with the disposition of WG plutonium. Based on the available information, it appears that adoption of foreign commercial MOX technology from one of the successful MOX fuel vendors will minimize the technical risks to the overall mission. The conclusion is made that the existing MOX fuel experience base suggests that disposition of excess weapons plutonium through irradiation in LWRs is a technically attractive option.

Cowell, B.S.; Fisher, S.E.

1999-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Licensing issues associated with the use of mixed-oxide fuel in US commercial nuclear reactors  

SciTech Connect

On January 14, 1997, the Department of Energy, as part of its Record of Decision on the storage and disposition of surplus nuclear weapons materials, committed to pursue the use of excess weapons-usable plutonium in the fabrication of mixed-oxide (MOX) fuel for consumption in existing commercial nuclear power plants. Domestic use of MOX fuel has been deferred since the late 1970s, principally due to nuclear proliferation concerns. This report documents a review of past and present literature (i.e., correspondence, reports, etc.) on the domestic use of MOX fuel and provides discussion on the technical and regulatory issues that must be addressed by DOE (and the utility/consortia selected by DOE to effect the MOX fuel consumption strategy) in obtaining approval from the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to use MOX fuel in one or a group of existing commercial nuclear power plants.

Williams, D.L. Jr.

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Energy Secretary Bodman Commends Key Milestone In MOX Program | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Commends Key Milestone In MOX Program Commends Key Milestone In MOX Program Energy Secretary Bodman Commends Key Milestone In MOX Program April 1, 2005 - 11:28am Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - In response to the Nuclear Regulatory Commission's (NRC) authorization of the construction of a U.S. Mixed-Oxide (MOX) Fuel Fabrication Facility at the Department of Energy's Savannah River Site in South Carolina, Secretary of Energy Samuel W. Bodman today released the following statement: "Issuing the permit for construction of a MOX facility in South Carolina is the crucial next step in the MOX program. It is a key milestone in our efforts to dispose of surplus weapons grade plutonium in the U.S. and Russia," Secretary Bodman said. "We look forward to proceeding with this nonproliferation program that will ultimately eliminate enough

15

Transmutation of Transuranic Elements in Advanced MOX and IMF Fuel Assemblies Utilizing Multi-recycling Strategies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of nuclear power plants worldwide. To do so efficiently, several new fuel assembly designs are proposed in this Thesis: these include (1) Mixed Oxide Fuel (MOX), (2) MOX fuel with Americium coating, (3) Inert-Matrix Fuel (IMF) with UOX as inner zone, and (4...

Zhang, Yunhuang

2011-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

16

The Use of Staff Augmentation Subcontracts at the National Nuclear Security Administration's Mixed Oxide Fuel Fabrication Facility, IG-0887  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

The Use of Staff Augmentation The Use of Staff Augmentation Subcontracts at National Nuclear Security Administration's Mixed Oxide Fuel Fabrication Facility DOE/IG-0887 May 2013 U.S. Department of Energy Office of Inspector General Office of Audits and Inspections Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 May 15, 2013 MEMORANDUM FOR THE SECRETARY FROM: Gregory H. Friedman Inspector General SUBJECT: INFORMATION: Audit Report on "The Use of Staff Augmentation Subcontracts at the National Nuclear Security Administration's Mixed Oxide Fuel Fabrication Facility" BACKGROUND Shaw AREVA MOX Services, LLC (MOX Services) is responsible for the design and construction of the National Nuclear Security Administration's (NNSA) nearly $5 billion Mixed

17

Theory of Antineutrino Monitoring of Burning MOX Plutonium Fuels  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This letter presents the physics and feasibility of reactor antineutrino monitoring to verify the burnup of plutonium loaded in the reactor as a Mixed Oxide (MOX) fuel. It examines the magnitude and temporal variation in the antineutrino signals expected for different MOX fuels, for the purposes of nuclear accountability and safeguards. The antineutrino signals from reactor-grade and weapons-grade MOX are shown to be distinct from those from burning low enriched uranium. Thus, antineutrino monitoring could be used to verify the destruction of plutonium in reactors, though verifying the grade of the plutonium being burned is found to be more challenging.

Hayes, A C; Nieto, Michael Martin; WIlson, W B

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Theory of Antineutrino Monitoring of Burning MOX Plutonium Fuels  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This letter presents the physics and feasibility of reactor antineutrino monitoring to verify the burnup of plutonium loaded in the reactor as a Mixed Oxide (MOX) fuel. It examines the magnitude and temporal variation in the antineutrino signals expected for different MOX fuels, for the purposes of nuclear accountability and safeguards. The antineutrino signals from reactor-grade and weapons-grade MOX are shown to be distinct from those from burning low enriched uranium. Thus, antineutrino monitoring could be used to verify the destruction of plutonium in reactors, though verifying the grade of the plutonium being burned is found to be more challenging.

A. C. Hayes; H. R. Trellue; Michael Martin Nieto; W. B. WIlson

2011-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

19

MOX fuel arrangement for nuclear core  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

In order to use up a stockpile of weapons-grade plutonium, the plutonium is converted into a mixed oxide (MOX) fuel form wherein it can be disposed in a plurality of different fuel assembly types. Depending on the equilibrium cycle that is required, a predetermined number of one or more of the fuel assembly types are selected and arranged in the core of the reactor in accordance with a selected loading schedule. Each of the fuel assemblies is designed to produce different combustion characteristics whereby the appropriate selection and disposition in the core enables the resulting equilibrium cycle to closely resemble that which is produced using urania fuel. The arrangement of the MOX rods and burnable absorber rods within each of the fuel assemblies, in combination with a selective control of the amount of plutonium which is contained in each of the MOX rods, is used to tailor the combustion characteristics of the assembly.

Kantrowitz, Mark L. (Portland, CT); Rosenstein, Richard G. (Windsor, CT)

2001-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

20

Mox fuel arrangement for nuclear core  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

In order to use up a stockpile of weapons-grade plutonium, the plutonium is converted into a mixed oxide (MOX) fuel form wherein it can be disposed in a plurality of different fuel assembly types. Depending on the equilibrium cycle that is required, a predetermined number of one or more of the fuel assembly types are selected and arranged in the core of the reactor in accordance with a selected loading schedule. Each of the fuel assemblies is designed to produce different combustion characteristics whereby the appropriate selection and disposition in the core enables the resulting equilibrium cycle to closely resemble that which is produced using urania fuel. The arrangement of the MOX rods and burnable absorber rods within each of the fuel assemblies, in combination with a selective control of the amount of plutonium which is contained in each of the MOX rods, is used to tailor the combustion. characteristics of the assembly.

Kantrowitz, Mark L. (Portland, CT); Rosenstein, Richard G. (Windsor, CT)

2001-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mixed oxide mox" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

MOX fuel arrangement for nuclear core  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

In order to use up a stockpile of weapons-grade plutonium, the plutonium is converted into a mixed oxide (MOX) fuel form wherein it can be disposed in a plurality of different fuel assembly types. Depending on the equilibrium cycle that is required, a predetermined number of one or more of the fuel assembly types are selected and arranged in the core of the reactor in accordance with a selected loading schedule. Each of the fuel assemblies is designed to produce different combustion characteristics whereby the appropriate selection and disposition in the core enables the resulting equilibrium cycle to closely resemble that which is produced using urania fuel. The arrangement of the MOX rods and burnable absorber rods within each of the fuel assemblies, in combination with a selective control of the amount of plutonium which is contained in each of the MOX rods, is used to tailor the combustion characteristics of the assembly. 38 figs.

Kantrowitz, M.L.; Rosenstein, R.G.

1998-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

22

MOX fuel arrangement for nuclear core  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

In order to use up a stockpile of weapons-grade plutonium, the plutonium is converted into a mixed oxide (MOX) fuel form wherein it can be disposed in a plurality of different fuel assembly types. Depending on the equilibrium cycle that is required, a predetermined number of one or more of the fuel assembly types are selected and arranged in the core of the reactor in accordance with a selected loading schedule. Each of the fuel assemblies is designed to produce different combustion characteristics whereby the appropriate selection and disposition in the core enables the resulting equilibrium cycle to closely resemble that which is produced using urania fuel. The arrangement of the MOX rods and burnable absorber rods within each of the fuel assemblies, in combination with a selective control of the amount of plutonium which is contained in each of the MOX rods, is used to tailor the combustion characteristics of the assembly.

Kantrowitz, Mark L. (Portland, CT); Rosenstein, Richard G. (Windsor, CT)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

New MOX Conservation Garden Features Federally Endangered Plant  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

is located, has been certified as a Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) Gold buildingNew MOX Conservation Garden Features Federally Endangered Plant Linda Lee, botanist for the Savannah River Ecology Lab (from left), Clay Ramsey , federal project director of the Mixed Oxide Fuel

Georgia, University of

24

Los Alamos National Laboratory summary plan to fabricate mixed oxide lead assemblies for the fissile material disposition program  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes an approach for using existing Los Alamos National Laboratory (Laboratory) mixed oxide (MOX) fuel-fabrication and plutonium processing capabilities to expedite and assure progress in the MOX/Reactor Plutonium Disposition Program. Lead Assembly MOX fabrication is required to provide prototypic fuel for testing in support of fuel qualification and licensing requirements. It is also required to provide a bridge for the full utilization of the European fabrication experience. In part, this bridge helps establish, for the first time since the early 1980s, a US experience base for meeting the safety, licensing, safeguards, security, and materials control and accountability requirements of the Department of Energy and Nuclear Regulatory Commission. In addition, a link is needed between the current research and development program and the production of disposition mission fuel. This link would also help provide a knowledge base for US regulators. Early MOX fabrication and irradiation testing in commercial nuclear reactors would provide a positive demonstration to Russia (and to potential vendors, designers, fabricators, and utilities) that the US has serious intent to proceed with plutonium disposition. This report summarizes an approach to fabricating lead assembly MOX fuel using the existing MOX fuel-fabrication infrastructure at the Laboratory.

Buksa, J.J.; Eaton, S.L.; Trellue, H.R.; Chidester, K.; Bowidowicz, M.; Morley, R.A.; Barr, M.

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Test plan for the Parallex CANDU-MOX irradiation  

SciTech Connect

One of several options being considered by the United States and the Russian Federation for the disposition of excess plutonium from dismantled weapons is to convert it to mixed-oxide (MOX) fuel for use in Canadian uranium-deuterium (CANDU) reactors. This report describes an irradiation test demonstrating the feasibility of this concept with laboratory quantities of MOX fuel placed in the pressurized loops of the National Research Universal test reactor at the Atomic Energy of Canada, Ltd., Chalk River Laboratories. The objective of the Parallex (for parallel experiment) test is to simultaneously test laboratory-produced quantities of US and R.F. MOX fuel in a test reactor under heat generation rates representing those expected in the CANDU reactors. The MOX fuel will be produced with plutonium from disassembled weapons at the Los Alamos National Laboratory in the United States and at the Bochvar Institute in the Russian Federation. Thus, the test will serve to demonstrate the accomplishment of many parts of the disposition mission: disassembly of weapons, conversion of the plutonium to oxide, fabrication of MOX fuel, assembly of fuel elements and bundles, shipment to a reactor, irradiation, and finally, storage of the spent fuel elements awaiting eventual disposition in a geologic repository in Canada.

Copeland, G.L.

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Plutonium Consumption Program, CANDU Reactor Project: Feasibility of BNFP Site as MOX Fuel Supply Facility. Final report  

SciTech Connect

An evaluation was made of the technical feasibility, cost, and schedule for converting the existing unused Barnwell Nuclear Fuel Facility (BNFP) into a Mixed Oxide (MOX) CANDU fuel fabrication plant for disposition of excess weapons plutonium. This MOX fuel would be transported to Ontario where it would generate electricity in the Bruce CANDU reactors. Because CANDU MOX fuel operates at lower thermal load than natural uranium fuel, the MOX program can be licensed by AECB within 4.5 years, and actual Pu disposition in the Bruce reactors can begin in 2001. Ontario Hydro will have to be involved in the entire program. Cost is compared between BNFP and FMEF at Hanford for converting to a CANDU MOX facility.

NONE

1995-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

27

Hot Cell Examination of Weapons-Grade MOX Fuel  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy has decided to dispose of a portion of the nation s surplus weapons-grade plutonium by reconstituting it into mixed oxide (MOX) fuel and irradiating it in commercial power reactors. Four lead assemblies were manufactured with weapons-grade MOX and irradiated to a maximum fuel rod burnup of 47.3 MWd/kg. As part of the fuel qualification process, five fuel rods with varying burnups and plutonium contents were selected from one of the assemblies and shipped to Oak Ridge National Laboratory for hot cell examination. This is the first hot cell examination of weapons-grade MOX fuel. The rods have been examined nondestructively with the ADEPT apparatus and are currently being destructively examined. Examinations completed to date include length measurements, visual examination, gamma scanning, profilometry, eddy-current testing, gas measurement and analysis, and optical metallography. Representative results of these examinations are reviewed and found to be consistent with predictions and with prior experience with reactor-grade MOX fuel. The results will be used to support licensing of weapons-grade MOX for batch use in commercial power reactors.

Morris, Robert Noel [ORNL; Bevard, Bruce Balkcom [ORNL; McCoy, Kevin [Areva NP

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

LLNL MOX fuel lead assemblies data report for the surplus plutonium disposition environmental impact statement  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this document is to support the US Department of Energy (DOE) Fissile Materials Disposition Program`s preparation of the draft surplus plutonium disposition environmental impact statement. This is one of several responses to data call requests for background information on activities associated with the operation of the lead assembly (LA) mixed-oxide (MOX) fuel fabrication facility. The DOE Office of Fissile Materials Disposition (DOE-MD) has developed a dual-path strategy for disposition of surplus weapons-grade plutonium. One of the paths is to disposition surplus plutonium through irradiation of MOX fuel in commercial nuclear reactors. MOX fuel consists of plutonium and uranium oxides (PuO{sub 2} and UO{sub 2}), typically containing 95% or more UO{sub 2}. DOE-MD requested that the DOE Site Operations Offices nominate DOE sites that meet established minimum requirements that could produce MOX LAs. LLNL has proposed an LA MOX fuel fabrication approach that would be done entirely inside an S and S Category 1 area. This includes receipt and storage of PuO{sub 2} powder, fabrication of MOX fuel pellets, assembly of fuel rods and bundles, and shipping of the packaged fuel to a commercial reactor site. Support activities will take place within a Category 1 area. Building 332 will be used to receive and store the bulk PuO{sub 2} powder, fabricate MOX fuel pellets, and assemble fuel rods. Building 334 will be used to assemble, store, and ship fuel bundles. Only minor modifications would be required of Building 332. Uncontaminated glove boxes would need to be removed, petition walls would need to be removed, and minor modifications to the ventilation system would be required.

O`Connor, D.G.; Fisher, S.E.; Holdaway, R. [and others

1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

MOX Lead Assembly Fabrication at the Savannah River Site  

SciTech Connect

The U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) announced its intent to prepare an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) under the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) on the disposition of the nations weapon-usable surplus plutonium.This EIS is tiered from the Storage and Disposition of Weapons-Usable Fissile Material Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement issued in December 1996,and the associated Record of Decision issued on January, 1997. The EIS will examine reasonable alternatives and potential environmental impacts for the proposed siting, construction, and operation of three types of facilities for plutonium disposition. The three types of facilities are: a pit disassembly and conversion facility, a facility to immobilize surplus plutonium in a glass or ceramic form for disposition, and a facility to fabricate plutonium oxide into mixed oxide (MOX) fuel.As an integral part of the surplus plutonium program, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) was tasked by the DOE Office of Fissile Material Disposition(MD) as the technical lead to organize and evaluate existing facilities in the DOE complex which may meet MD`s need for a domestic MOX fuel fabrication demonstration facility. The Lead Assembly (LA) facility is to produce 1 MT of usable test fuel per year for three years. The Savannah River Site (SRS) as the only operating plutonium processing site in the DOE complex, proposes two options to carry out the fabrication of MOX fuel lead test assemblies: an all Category I facility option and a combined Category I and non-Category I facilities option.

Geddes, R.L. [Westinghouse Savannah River Company, AIKEN, SC (United States); Spiker, D.L.; Poon, A.P.

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Characterization of candidate DOE sites for fabricating MOX fuel for lead assemblies  

SciTech Connect

The Office of Fissile Materials Disposition (MD) of the Department of Energy (DOE) is directing the program to disposition US surplus weapons-usable plutonium. For the reactor option for disposition of this surplus plutonium, MD is seeking to contract with a consortium, which would include a mixed-oxide (MOX) fuel fabricator and a commercial US reactor operator, to fabricate and burn MOX fuel in existing commercial nuclear reactors. This option would entail establishing a MOX fuel fabrication facility under the direction of the consortium on an existing DOE site. Because of the lead time required to establish a MOX fuel fabrication facility and the need to qualify the MOX fuel for use in a commercial reactor, MD is considering the early fabrication of lead assemblies (LAs) in existing DOE facilities under the technical direction of the consortium. The LA facility would be expected to produce a minimum of 1 metric ton heavy metal per year and must be operational by June 2003. DOE operations offices were asked to identify candidate sites and facilities to be evaluated for suitability to fabricate MOX fuel LAs. Savannah River Site, Argonne National Laboratory-West, Hanford, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, and Los Alamos National Laboratory were identified as final candidates to host the LA project. A Site Evaluation Team (SET) worked with each site to develop viable plans for the LA project. SET then characterized the suitability of each of the five plans for fabricating MOX LAs using 28 attributes and documented the characterization to aid DOE and the consortium in selecting the site for the LA project. SET concluded that each option has relative advantages and disadvantages in comparison with other options; however, each could meet the requirements of the LA project as outlined by MD and SET.

Holdaway, R.F.; Miller, J.W.; Sease, J.D.; Moses, R.J.; O`Connor, D.G. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Carrell, R.D. [Technical Resources International, Inc., Richland, WA (United States); Jaeger, C.D. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Thompson, M.L.; Strasser, A.A. [Delta-21 Resources, Inc., Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Process for etching mixed metal oxides  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An etching process using dicarboxylic and tricarboxylic acids as chelating etchants for mixed metal oxide films such as high temperature superconductors and ferroelectric materials. Undesirable differential etching rates between different metal oxides are avoided by selection of the proper acid or combination of acids. Feature sizes below one micron, excellent quality vertical edges, and film thicknesses in the 100 Angstom range may be achieved by this method.

Ashby, Carol I. H. (Edgewood, NM); Ginley, David S. (Evergreen, CO)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Surplus weapons plutonium: Technologies for pit disassembly/conversion and MOX fuel fabrication  

SciTech Connect

This paper will provide a description of the technologies involved in the disposition of plutonium from surplus nuclear weapon components (pits), based on pit disassembly and conversion and on fabrication of mixed oxide (MOX) fuel for disposition through irradiation in nuclear reactors. The MOX/Reactor option is the baseline disposition plan for both the US and russian for plutonium from pits and other clean plutonium metal and oxide. In the US, impure plutonium in various forms will be converted to oxide and immobilized in glass or ceramic, surrounded by vitrified high level waste to provide a radiation barrier. A similar fate is expected for impure material in Russia as well. The immobilization technologies will not be discussed. Following technical descriptions, a discussion of options for monitoring the plutonium during these processes will be provided.

Toevs, J.W.

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

33

Molten Salt Oxidation of mixed wastes  

SciTech Connect

Molten Salt Oxidation (MSO) can be characterized as a simple noncombustion process; the basic concept is to introduce air and wastes into a bed of molten salt, oxidize the organic wastes in the molten salt, use the heat of oxidation to keep the salt molten and remove the salt for disposal or processing and recycling. The process has been developed through bench-scale and pilot-scale testing, with successful destruction demonstration of a wide variety of hazardous and mixed (radioactive and hazardous) wastes including chemical warfare agents, combustible solids, halogenated solvents, polychlorinated biphenyls, plutonium-contaminated solids, uranium-contaminated solvents and fission product-contaminated oil. The MSO destruction efficiency of the hazardous organic constituents in the wastes exceeds 99.9999%. Radioactive species, such as actinides and rare earth fission products, are retained in the salt bath. These elements can be recovered from the spent salt using conventional chemical processes, such as ion exchange, to render the salt as nonradioactive and nonhazardous. This paper reviews the principles and capabilities of MSO, previous mixed waste studies, and a new US Department of Energy program to demonstrate the process for the treatment of mixed wastes.

Gay, R.L.; Navratil, J.D.; Newman, C. [Rockwell International Corp., Canoga Park, CA (United States). Rocketdyne Div.

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

34

A Validation Study of Pin Heat Transfer for MOX Fuel Based on the IFA-597 Experiments  

SciTech Connect

Abstract The IFA-597 (Integrated Fuel Assessment) experiments from the International Fuel Performance Experiments (IFPE) database were designed to study the thermal behavior of mixed oxide (MOX) fuel and the effects of an annulus on fission gas release in light-water-reactor fuel. An evaluation of nuclear fuel pin heat transfer in the FRAPCON-3.4 and Exnihilo codes for MOX fuel systems was performed, with a focus on the first 20 time steps ( 6 GWd/MT(iHM)) for explicit comparison between the codes. In addition, sensitivity studies were performed to evaluate the effect of the radial power shape and approximations to the geometry to account for the thermocouple hole, dish, and chamfer. The analysis demonstrated relative agreement for both solid (rod 1) and annular (rod 2) fuel in the experiment, demonstrating the accuracy of the codes and their underlying material models for MOX fuel, while also revealing a small energy loss artifact in how gap conductance is currently handled in Exnihilo for chamfered fuel pellets. The within-pellet power shape was shown to significantly impact the predicted centerline temperatures. This has provided an initial benchmarking of the pin heat transfer capability of Exnihilo for MOX fuel with respect to a well-validated nuclear fuel performance code.

Phillippe, Aaron M [ORNL; Clarno, Kevin T [ORNL; Banfield, James E [ORNL; Ott, Larry J [ORNL; Philip, Bobby [ORNL; Berrill, Mark A [ORNL; Sampath, Rahul S [ORNL; Allu, Srikanth [ORNL; Hamilton, Steven P [ORNL

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

MOX Fabrication Isolation Considerations  

SciTech Connect

This document provides a technical position on the preferred level of isolation to fabricate demonstration quantities of mixed oxide transmutation fuels. The Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative should design and construct automated glovebox fabrication lines for this purpose. This level of isolation adequately protects the health and safety of workers and the general public for all mixed oxide (and other transmutation fuel) manufacturing efforts while retaining flexibility, allowing parallel development and setup, and minimizing capital expense. The basis regulations, issues, and advantages/disadvantages of five potential forms of isolation are summarized here as justification for selection of the preferred technical position.

Eric L. Shaber; Bradley J Schrader

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

ANL-W MOX fuel lead assemblies data report for the surplus plutonium disposition environmental impact statement  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this document is to support the US Department of Energy (DOE) Fissile Materials Disposition Program`s preparation of the draft surplus plutonium disposition environmental impact statement (EIS). This is one of several responses to data call requests for background information on activities associated with the operation of the lead assembly (LA) mixed-oxide (MOX) fuel fabrication facility. The DOE Office of fissile Materials Disposition (DOE-MD) has developed a dual-path strategy for disposition of surplus weapons-grade plutonium. One of the paths is to disposition surplus plutonium through irradiation of MOX fuel in commercial nuclear reactors. MOX fuel consists of plutonium and uranium oxides (PuO{sub 2} and UO{sub 2}), typically containing 95% or more UO{sub 2}. DOE-MD requested that the DOE Site Operations Offices nominate DOE sites that meet established minimum requirements that could produce MOX LAs. The paper describes the following: Site map and the LA facility; process descriptions; resource needs; employment requirements; wastes, emissions, and exposures; accident analysis; transportation; qualitative decontamination and decommissioning; post-irradiation examination; LA fuel bundle fabrication; LA EIS data report assumptions; and LA EIS data report supplement.

O`Connor, D.G.; Fisher, S.E.; Holdaway, R. [and others

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Hanford MOX fuel lead assemblies data report for the surplus plutonium disposition environmental impact statement  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this document is to support the US Department of Energy (DOE) Fissile Materials Disposition Program`s preparation of the draft surplus plutonium disposition environmental impact statement. This is one of several responses to data call requests for background information on activities associated with the operation of the lead assembly (LA) mixed-oxide (MOX) fuel fabrication facility. DOE-MD requested that the DOE Site Operations Offices nominate DOE sites that meet established minimum requirements that could produce MOX LAs. Six initial site combinations were proposed: (1) Argonne National Laboratory-West (ANL-W) with support from Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL), (2) Hanford, (3) Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) with support from Pantex, (4) Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), (5) Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR), and (6) Savannah River Site (SRS). After further analysis by the sites and DOE-MD, five site combinations were established as possible candidates for producing MOX LAs: (1) ANL-W with support from INEEL, (2) Hanford, (3) LANL, (4) LLNL, and (5) SRS. Hanford has proposed an LA MOX fuel fabrication approach that would be done entirely inside an S and S Category 1 area. An alternate approach would allow fabrication of fuel pellets and assembly of fuel rods in an S and S Category 1 facility. In all, a total of three LA MOX fuel fabrication options were identified by Hanford that could accommodate the program. In every case, only minor modification would be required to ready any of the facilities to accept the equipment necessary to accomplish the LA program.

O`Connor, D.G.; Fisher, S.E.; Holdaway, R. [and others

1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Neutronics and safety characteristics of a 100% MOX fueled PWR using weapons grade plutonium  

SciTech Connect

Preliminary neutronics and safety studies, pertaining to the feasibility of using 100% weapons grade mixed-oxide (MOX) fuel in an advanced PWR Westinghouse design are presented in this paper. The preliminary results include information on boron concentration, power distribution, reactivity coefficients and xenon and control rode worth for the initial and the equilibrium cycle. Important safety issues related to rod ejection and steam line break accidents and shutdown margin requirements are also discussed. No significant change from the commercial design is needed to denature weapons-grade plutonium under the current safety and licensing criteria.

Biswas, D.; Rathbun, R.; Lee, Si Young [Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States); Rosenthal, P. [Westinghouse Electric Corp., Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

39

SMALL-SCALE TESTING OF PLUTONIUM (IV) OXALATE PRECIPITATION AND CALCINATION TO PLUTONIUM OXIDE TO SUPPORT THE MOX FEED MISSION  

SciTech Connect

The H-Canyon facility will be used to dissolve Pu metal for subsequent purification and conversion to plutonium dioxide (PuO{sub 2}) using Phase II of HB-Line. To support the new mission, SRNL conducted a series of experiments to produce calcined plutonium (Pu) oxide and measure the physical properties and water adsorption of that material. This data will help define the process operating conditions and material handling steps for HB-Line. An anion exchange column experiment produced 1.4 L of a purified 52.6 g/L Pu solution. Over the next nine weeks, seven Pu(IV) oxalate precipitations were performed using the same stock Pu solution, with precipitator feed acidities ranging from 0.77 M to 3.0 M nitric acid and digestion times ranging from 5 to 30 minutes. Analysis of precipitator filtrate solutions showed Pu losses below 1% for all precipitations. The four larger precipitation batches matched the target oxalic acid addition time of 44 minutes within 4 minutes. The three smaller precipitation batches focused on evaluation of digestion time and the oxalic acid addition step ranged from 25-34 minutes because of pump limitations in the low flow range. Following the precipitations, 22 calcinations were performed in the range of 610-690 C, with the largest number of samples calcined at either 650 or 635 C. Characterization of the resulting PuO{sub 2} batches showed specific surface areas in the range of 5-14 m{sup 2}/g, with 16 of the 22 samples in the range of 5-10 m2/g. For samples analyzed with typical handling (exposed to ambient air for 15-45 minutes with relative humidities of 20-55%), the moisture content as measured by Mass Spectrometry ranged from 0.15 to 0.45 wt % and the total mass loss at 1000 C, as measured by TGA, ranged from 0.21 to 0.58 wt %. For the samples calcined between 635 and 650 C, the moisture content without extended exposure ranged from 0.20 to 0.38 wt %, and the TGA mass loss ranged from 0.26 to 0.46 wt %. Of these latter samples, the samples calcined at 650 C generally had lower specific surface areas and lower moisture contents than the samples calcined at 635 C, which matches expectations from the literature. Taken together, the TGA-MS results for samples handled at nominally 20-50% RH, without extended exposure, indicate that the Pu(IV) oxalate precipitation process followed by calcination at 635-650 C appears capable of producing PuO{sub 2} with moisture content < 0.5 wt% as required by the 3013 Standard. Exposures of PuO{sub 2} samples to ambient air for 3 or more hours generally showed modest mass gains that were primarily gains in moisture content. These results point to the need for a better understanding of the moisture absorption of PuO{sub 2} and serve as a warning that extended exposure times, particularly above the 50% RH level observed in this study will make the production of PuO{sub 2} with less than 0.5 wt % moisture more challenging. Samples analyzed in this study generally contained approximately 2 monolayer equivalents of moisture. In this study, the bulk of the moisture released from samples below 300 C, as did a significant portion of the CO{sub 2}. Samples in this study consistently released a minor amount of NO in the 40-300 C range, but no samples released CO or SO{sub 2}. TGA-MS results also showed that MS moisture content accounted for 80 {+-} 8% of the total mass loss at 1000 C measured by the TGA. The PuO{sub 2} samples produced had particles sizes that typically ranged from 0.2-88 {micro}m, with the mean particle size ranging from 6.4-9.3 {micro}m. The carbon content of ten different calcination batches ranged from 190-480 {micro}g C/g Pu, with an average value of 290 {micro}g C/g Pu. A statistical review of the calcination conditions and resulting SSA values showed that in both cases tested, calcination temperature had a significant effect on SSA, as expected from literature data. The statistical review also showed that batch size had a significant effect on SSA, but the narrow range of batch sizes tested is a compelling reason to set aside that result until tests

Crowder, M.; Pierce, R.; Scogin, J.; Daniel, G.; King, W.

2012-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

40

LANL MOX fuel lead assemblies data report for the surplus plutonium disposition environmental impact statement  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this document is to support the US Department of Energy (DOE) Fissile Materials Disposition Program`s preparation of the draft surplus plutonium disposition environmental impact statement. This is one of several responses to data call requests for background information on activities associated with the operation of the lead assembly (LA) mixed-oxide (MOX) fuel fabrication facility. LANL has proposed an LA MOX fuel fabrication approach that would be done entirely inside an S and S Category 1 area. This includes receipt and storage of PuO{sub 2} powder, fabrication of MOX fuel pellets, assembly of fuel rods and bundles, and shipping of the packaged fuel to a commercial reactor site. Support activities will take place within both Category 1 and 2 areas. Technical Area (TA) 55/Plutonium Facility 4 will be used to store the bulk PuO{sub 2} powder, fabricate MOX fuel pellets, assemble rods, and store fuel bundles. Bundles will be assembled at a separate facility, several of which have been identified as suitable for that activity. The Chemistry and Metallurgy Research Building (at TA-3) will be used for analytical chemistry support. Waste operations will be conducted in TA-50 and TA-54. Only very minor modifications will be needed to accommodate the LA program. These modifications consist mostly of minor equipment upgrades. A commercial reactor operator has not been identified for the LA irradiation. Postirradiation examination (PIE) of the irradiated fuel will take place at either Oak Ridge National Laboratory or ANL-W. The only modifications required at either PIE site would be to accommodate full-length irradiated fuel rods. Results from this program are critical to the overall plutonium distribution schedule.

Fisher, S.E.; Holdaway, R.; Ludwig, S.B. [and others

1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mixed oxide mox" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

The behaviour of transuranic mixed oxide fuel in a Candu-900 reactor  

SciTech Connect

The production of transuranic actinide fuels for use in current thermal reactors provides a useful intermediary step in closing the nuclear fuel cycle. Extraction of actinides reduces the longevity, radiation and heat loads of spent material. The burning of transuranic fuels in current reactors for a limited amount of cycles reduces the infrastructure demand for fast reactors and provides an effective synergy that can result in a reduction of as much as 95% of spent fuel waste while reducing the fast reactor infrastructure needed by a factor of almost 13.5 [1]. This paper examines the features of actinide mixed oxide fuel, TRUMOX, in a CANDU{sup R}* nuclear reactor. The actinide concentrations used were based on extraction from 30 year cooled spent fuel and mixed with natural uranium in 3.1 wt% actinide MOX fuel. Full lattice cell modeling was performed using the WIMS-AECL code, super-cell calculations were analyzed in DRAGON and full core analysis was executed in the RFSP 2-group diffusion code. A time-average full core model was produced and analyzed for reactor coefficients, reactivity device worth and online fuelling impacts. The standard CANDU operational limits were maintained throughout operations. The TRUMOX fuel design achieved a burnup of 27.36 MWd/kg HE. A full TRUMOX fuelled CANDU was shown to operate within acceptable limits and provided a viable intermediary step for burning actinides. The recycling, reprocessing and reuse of spent fuels produces a much more sustainable and efficient nuclear fuel cycle. (authors)

Morreale, A. C.; Ball, M. R.; Novog, D. R.; Luxat, J. C. [Dept. of Engineering Physics, McMaster Univ., 1280 Main St. W, Hamilton, ON (Canada)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Calibration parameters from Monte Carlo simulations for neutron coincidence assay of MOX (mixed oxide) fuel elements: A substitute for standards  

SciTech Connect

Results from application of a calculational model for the two- parameter (singles and doubles) passive neutron coincidence assay of finished Fast Breeder Reactor (FBR) subassemblies are compared with calibration measurements. Two assay instruments are considered; the Universal Fast Breeder Reactor Subassembly Counter (UFBC) and the Capsule Counter installed at the Japanese Plutonium Fuel Production Facility (PFPF). In the case of US Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) fuel, the absolute ratio of calculations to measurements for the multiplication-corrected coincidence calibration constant is +1.1 /+-/ 1.0% (average of four subassemblies) for the UFBC and /minus/1.3 /+-/ 0.6% (average of five subassemblies) for the Capsule Counter. For initial measurements of Japanese fuel in the Capsule Counter, the absolute ratio is /minus/1.0 /+-/ 0.7% for three JOYO subassemblies and +0.8 /+-/ 0.7% for one MONJU subassembly. Calculations of relative effects such as the change in coincidence response from, for example, subassembly can thickness of U enrichment are more accurate (better than 0.5%) than absolute calibration parameters. This very good accuracy offers more effective and less costly inspector verification of finished FBR fuel elements by reducing reliance on physical standards to expand the cross-calibration databases. 11 refs., 8 figs., 5 tabs.

Stewart, J.E.; Ferran, R.R.; Simmonds, S.M.; Menlove, H.O.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

PRIVACY IMPACT ASSESSMENT: Shaw Areva MOX Services, LLC MOX  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

. . ,-) ')7 73?Â¥i5": )~"'f"YC-:;'~dt?f(~"'f9'FrrZ , . PRIVACY IMPACT ASSESSMENT: Shaw Areva MOX Services, LLC MOX Services Unclassified Information System Template - January 30, 2009, Version 2 Department of Energy Privacy Impact Assessment (pIA) Guidance is provided in the template. See DOE Order 206.1, Department of Energy Privacy Program, Appendix A, Privacy Impact Assessments, for requirements and additional guidance for conducting a PIA: hltp:llwww.directives.doe.gov/pdfs/doe/doetextlneword/206/o2061.pdf Please complete electronically: no hand-written submissions will be accepted. (803) 819-22700 Dstlnson@moxprolect.com Dave Stinson, President and Chief Executive Officer, Shaw AREVA MOX Services, LLC NNSA Shaw AREVA MOX Services Savannah River Site, Aiken SC .. .. . ": .' . ' .... .- ...: ......

44

A study of ZnxZryOz mixed oxides for direct conversion of ethanol...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

study of ZnxZryOz mixed oxides for direct conversion of ethanol to isobutene. A study of ZnxZryOz mixed oxides for direct conversion of ethanol to isobutene. Abstract: ZnxZryOz...

45

Irradiated test fuel shipment plan for the LWR MOX fuel irradiation test project  

SciTech Connect

This document outlines the responsibilities of DOE, DOE contractors, the commercial carrier, and other organizations participating in a shipping campaign of irradiated test specimen capsules containing mixed-oxide (MOX) fuel from the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) to the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The shipments described here will be conducted according to applicable regulations of the US Department of Transportation (DOT), US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), and all applicable DOE Orders. This Irradiated Test Fuel Shipment Plan for the LWR MOX Fuel Irradiation Test Project addresses the shipments of a small number of irradiated test specimen capsules and has been reviewed and agreed to by INEEL and ORNL (as participants in the shipment campaign). Minor refinements to data entries in this plan, such as actual shipment dates, exact quantities and characteristics of materials to be shipped, and final approved shipment routing, will be communicated between the shipper, receiver, and carrier, as needed, using faxes, e-mail, official shipping papers, or other backup documents (e.g., shipment safety evaluations). Any major changes in responsibilities or data beyond refinements of dates and quantities of material will be prepared as additional revisions to this document and will undergo a full review and approval cycle.

Shappert, L.B.; Dickerson, L.S.; Ludwig, S.B.

1998-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

46

Compared performances of ENDF/B-VI and JEF-2.2 for MOX core physics  

SciTech Connect

The United States is currently evaluating the use of mixed-oxide (MOX) fuel in commercial light water reactors for reducing weapons-grade Pu stockpiles. The design and licensing processes will require that the validity of the nuclear data libraries and codes used in the effort be demonstrated. Unfortunately, there are only a very limited number of relatively old and nonrepresentative integral experiments freely available to the US programs. This lack of adequate experimental data can be partially remediated by comparing the results of well-validated European codes with the results of candidate US codes. The authors have compared the performances of the JEF-2.2 and ENDF/B-VI.4 libraries for a series of benchmarks for k{sub eff}, void worth, and pin power distributions. Note that JEF-2.2 has been extensively validated for MOX applications. To obtain systematic comparisons between JEF-2.2 and ENDF/B-VI results, the two libraries were implemented with the same processing code options in two independent code systems: (1) VIM, a continuous-energy Monte Carlo code developed at Argonne National Laboratory, with its own processing codes independent of NJOY; and (2) DRAGON, a two-dimensional lattice code developed at Ecole Polytechnique de Montreal. A standard 172-energy-group structure was used in the NJOY processing code.

Finck, P.J.; Laurin-Kovitz, K.; Palmiotti, G.; Stenberg, C. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

47

SRS MOX fuel lead assemblies data report for the surplus plutonium disposition environmental impact statement  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this document is to support the US Department of Energy (DOE) Fissile Materials Disposition Program`s preparation of the draft surplus plutonium disposition environmental impact statement. This is one of several responses to data call requests for background information on activities associated with the operation of the lead assembly (LA) mixed-oxide (MOX) fuel fabrication facility. DOE-MD requested that the DOE Site Operations Offices nominate DOE sites that meet established minimum requirements that could produce MOX LAs. Six initial site combinations were proposed: (1) Argonne National Laboratory-West (ANL-W) with support from Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL), (2) Hanford, (3) Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) with support from Pantex, (4) Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), (5) Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR), and (6) Savannah River Site(SRS). After further analysis by the sites and DOE-MD, five site combinations were established as possible candidates for producing MOX LAs: (1) ANL-W with support from INEEL, (2) Hanford, (3) LANL, (4) LLNL, and (5) SRS. SRS has proposed an LA MOX fuel fabrication approach that would be done entirely inside an S and S Category 1 area. An alternate approach would allow fabrication of fuel pellets and assembly of fuel rods in an S and S Category 2 or 3 facility with storage of bulk PuO{sub 2} and assembly, storage, and shipping of fuel bundles in an S and S Category 1 facility. The total Category 1 approach, which is the recommended option, would be done in the 221-H Canyon Building. A facility that was never in service will be removed from one area, and a hardened wall will be constructed in another area to accommodate execution of the LA fuel fabrication. The non-Category 1 approach would require removal of process equipment in the FB-Line metal production and packaging glove boxes, which requires work in a contamination area. The Immobilization Hot Demonstration Program equipment in the Savannah River Technology Center would need to be removed to accommodate pellet fabrication. This work would also be in a contaminated area.

O`Connor, D.G.; Fisher, S.E.; Holdaway, R. [and others

1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

High-throughput synthesis and characterization of vanadium mixed metal oxide pigments using synchroton radiation.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??UNA range of inorganic vanadium mixed metal oxides, with potential applications as inorganic pigments, have been synthesised and characterised in terms of their crystal structure,… (more)

Russu, Sergio

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Spectroscopic Characterization of Mixed Fe-Ni Oxide Electrocatalysts for the Oxygen Evolution Reaction in Alkaline  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

reaction spectroscopy showed the mixed oxide surfaces also have superior oxidation activity for methanol of producing hydrogen is from water electrolysis which enables H2 production from renewable energy sources

Frenkel, Anatoly

50

Experiment Safety Assurance Package for the 40- to 52-GWd/MT Burnup Phase of Mixed Oxide Fuel Irradiation in Small I-hole Positions in the Advanced Test Reactor  

SciTech Connect

This experiment safety assurance package (ESAP) is a revision of the last mixed uranium and plutonium oxide (MOX) ESAP issued in June 2002). The purpose of this revision is to provide a basis to continue irradiation up to 52 GWd/MT burnup [as predicted by MCNP (Monte Carlo N-Particle) transport code The last ESAP provided basis for irradiation, at a linear heat generation rate (LHGR) no greater than 9 kW/ft, of the highest burnup capsule assembly to 50 GWd/MT. This ESAP extends the basis for irradiation, at a LHGR no greater than 5 kW/ft, of the highest burnup capsule assembly from 50 to 52 GWd/MT.

S. T. Khericha; R. C. Pedersen

2003-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Monte Carlo analysis of burnup-dependent plutonium concentration profiles in UO{sub 2} and MOX fuel pins  

SciTech Connect

The ability to accurately predict fuel performance is an essential requirement for fuel design studies. Prediction of plutonium concentration profiles in an irradiated fuel pin is important for fuel performance analysis and spent-fuel storage. The MCNP coupling with ORIGEN2 (MCWO) burnup calculation code as demonstrated in this paper can analyze the rim effect in UO{sub 2} and mixed-oxide (MOX) fuel pins. Acceptance of a code such as MCWO depends very strongly on its validation. Validation involves the benchmark of the code predictions to the in-pile experimental data and results of post-irradiation examinations (PIEs). In this paper, a validation was made by comparing the MCWO calculated results with the VIM-BURN code, which has been validated against PIE data. The validated MCWO can provide the best-estimate neutronic characteristics of fuel burnup performance analysis. In this paper, Pu concentration (wt%) and fission power profiles versus burnup of UO{sub 2} and reactor-grade (RG)-MOX fuel pins were calculated with MCWO, and results are discussed.

Chang, G.S. [Lockheed Martin Idaho Technologies, Idaho Falls, ID (United States). Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Lab.

1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Electrodepositionof Metal Alloyand Mixed Oxide Films Usinga Single-PrecursorTetranuclearCopper-NickelComplex  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Compositionally uniform mixed metals, metal oxides, and alloys are used extensively as corrosion protective and catalysts. I-~For example, nickel-containing oxides and alloys are used for oxidative protection of very. Although Cu-Ni alloy deposition has been stud- ied for many years, none of the previous approaches has led

Kounaves, Samuel P.

53

Development of an integrated, unattended assay system for LWR-MOX fuel pellet trays  

SciTech Connect

Four identical unattended plutonium assay systems have been developed for use at the new light-water-reactor mixed oxide (LWR-MOX) fuel fabrication facility at Hanau, Germany. The systems provide quantitative plutonium verification for all MOX pellet trays entering or leaving a large, intermediate store. Pellet-tray transport and storage systems are highly automated. Data from the ``I-Point`` (information point) assay systems will be shared by the Euratom and International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Inspectorates. The I-Point system integrates, for the first time, passive neutron coincidence counting (NCC) with electro-mechanical sensing (EMS) in unattended mode. Also, provisions have been made for adding high-resolution gamma spectroscopy. The system accumulates data for every tray entering or leaving the store between inspector visits. During an inspection, data are analyzed and compared with operator declarations for the previous inspection period, nominally one month. Specification of the I-point system resulted from a collaboration between the IAEA, Euratom, Siemens, and Los Alamos. Hardware was developed by Siemens and Los Alamos through a bilateral agreement between the German Federal Ministry of Research and Technology (BMFT) and the US DOE. Siemens also provided the EMS subsystem, including software. Through the USSupport Program to the IAEA, Los Alamos developed the NCC software (NCC COLLECT) and also the software for merging and reviewing the EMS and NCC data (MERGE/REVIEW). This paper describes the overall I-Point system, but emphasizes the NCC subsystem, along with the NCC COLLECT and MERGE/REVIEW codes. We also summarize comprehensive testing results that define the quality of assay performance.

Stewart, J.E.; Hatcher, C.R.; Pollat, L.L. [and others

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Evaluation of moisture limits for uranium and plutonium mixed oxides to support on-site transportation packaging  

SciTech Connect

This report contains supporting documentation for onsite shipment of uranium and plutonium mixed oxide materials in the 9975 package.

Livingston, R.R.

2000-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

55

Operation of mixed conducting metal oxide membrane systems under transient conditions  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Method of operating an oxygen-permeable mixed conducting membrane having an oxidant feed side, an oxidant feed surface, a permeate side, and a permeate surface, which method comprises controlling the differential strain between the permeate surface and the oxidant feed surface at a value below a selected maximum value by varying the oxygen partial pressure on either or both of the oxidant feed side and the permeate side of the membrane.

Carolan, Michael Francis (Allentown, PA)

2008-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

56

Neutron field characterisation at mixed oxide fuel plant  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......plutonium oxide (PuO2) and 70 % depleted uranium oxide (UO2) are blended together...and typical field conditions. Health Phys. (1990) 58(6):691-704...Power Plants Quality Assurance, Health Care Radiation Dosage Radiation......

C. Passmore; M. Million; M. Kirr; J. Bartz; M. S. Akselrod; A. Devita; J. Berard

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Progress on Acidic Zirconia Mixed Oxides for Efficient NH3-SCR...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

mixed oxides as promising new SCR catalyst materials and results of engine bench testing of full-size SCR prototype confirms Details progress on non-zeolitic zirconia-based...

58

PLUTONIUM LOADING CAPACITY OF REILLEX HPQ ANION EXCHANGE COLUMN - AFS-2 PLUTONIUM FLOWSHEET FOR MOX  

SciTech Connect

Radioactive plutonium (Pu) anion exchange column experiments using scaled HB-Line designs were performed to investigate the dependence of column loading performance on the feed composition in the H-Canyon dissolution process for plutonium oxide (PuO{sub 2}) product shipped to the Mixed Oxide (MOX) Fuel Fabrication Facility (MFFF). These loading experiments show that a representative feed solution containing {approx}5 g Pu/L can be loaded onto Reillex{trademark} HPQ resin from solutions containing 8 M total nitrate and 0.1 M KF provided that the F is complexed with Al to an [Al]/[F] molar ratio range of 1.5-2.0. Lower concentrations of total nitrate and [Al]/[F] molar ratios may still have acceptable performance but were not tested in this study. Loading and washing Pu losses should be relatively low (<1%) for resin loading of up to 60 g Pu/L. Loading above 60 g Pu/L resin is possible, but Pu wash losses will increase such that 10-20% of the additional Pu fed may not be retained by the resin as the resin loading approaches 80 g Pu/L resin.

Kyser, E.; King, W.; O'Rourke, P.

2012-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

59

Progress on Acidic Zirconia Mixed Oxides for Efficient NH3-SCR Catalysis  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Details progress on non-zeolitic zirconia-based mixed oxides as promising new SCR catalyst materials and results of engine bench testing of full-size SCR prototype confirms Details progress on non-zeolitic zirconia-based mixed oxides as promising new SCR catalyst materials and results of engine bench testing of full-size SCR prototype confirms potential for formulation of Euro 6 SCR catalysts

60

Control of differential strain during heating and cooling of mixed conducting metal oxide membranes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Method of operating an oxygen-permeable mixed conducting membrane having an oxidant feed side and a permeate side, which method comprises controlling the differential strain between the oxidant feed side and the permeate side by varying either or both of the oxygen partial pressure and the total gas pressure on either or both of the oxidant feed side and the permeate side of the membrane while changing the temperature of the membrane from a first temperature to a second temperature.

Carolan, Michael Francis (Allentown, PA)

2007-12-25T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mixed oxide mox" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Synergetic effects of mixed copper-iron oxides oxygen carriers in chemical looping combustion  

SciTech Connect

Chemical looping combustion (CLC) is an emerging technology for clean energy production from fuels. CLC produces sequestration-ready CO{sub 2}-streams without a significant energy penalty. Development of efficient oxygen carriers is essential to successfully operate a CLC system. Copper and iron oxides are promising candidates for CLC. Copper oxide possesses high reactivity but it has issues with particle agglomeration due to its low melting point. Even though iron oxide is an inexpensive oxygen carrier it has a slower reactivity. In this study, mixed metal oxide carriers containing iron and copper oxides were evaluated for coal and methane CLC. The components of CuO and Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} were optimized to obtain good reactivity while maintaining physical and chemical stability during cyclic reactions for methane-CLC and solid-fuel CLC. Compared with single metal oxygen carriers, the optimized Cu–Fe mixed oxide oxygen carriers demonstrated high reaction rate, better combustion conversion, greater oxygen usage and improved physical stability. Thermodynamic calculations, XRD, TGA, flow reactor studies and TPR experiments suggested that there is a strong interaction between CuO and Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} contributing to a synergistic effect during CLC reactions. The amount of oxygen release of the mixed oxide carrier in the absence of a fuel was similar to that of the single metal oxides. However, in the presence of fuels, the oxygen consumption and the reaction profiles of the mixed oxide carriers were significantly better than that of the single metal oxides. The nature of the fuel not only influenced the reactivity, but also the final reduction status of the oxygen carriers during chemical looping combustion. Cu oxide of the mixed oxide was fully reduced metallic copper with both coal and methane. Fe oxide of the mixed oxide was fully reduced Fe metal with methane but it was reduced to only FeO with coal. Possible mechanisms of how the presence of CuO enhances the reduction of Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} are discussed.

Siriwardane, Ranjani; Tian, Hanjing; Simonyi, Thomas; Poston, James

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

HB-LINE ANION EXCHANGE PURIFICATION OF AFS-2 PLUTONIUM FOR MOX  

SciTech Connect

Non-radioactive cerium (Ce) and radioactive plutonium (Pu) anion exchange column experiments using scaled HB-Line designs were performed to investigate the feasibility of using either gadolinium nitrate (Gd) or boric acid (B as H{sub 3}BO{sub 3}) as a neutron poison in the H-Canyon dissolution process. Expected typical concentrations of probable impurities were tested and the removal of these impurities by a decontamination wash was measured. Impurity concentrations are compared to two specifications - designated as Column A or Column B (most restrictive) - proposed for plutonium oxide (PuO{sub 2}) product shipped to the Mixed Oxide (MOX) Fuel Fabrication Facility (MFFF). Use of Gd as a neutron poison requires a larger volume of wash for the proposed Column A specification. Since boron (B) has a higher proposed specification and is more easily removed by washing, it appears to be the better candidate for use in the H-Canyon dissolution process. Some difficulty was observed in achieving the Column A specification due to the limited effectiveness that the wash step has in removing the residual B after ~4 BV's wash. However a combination of the experimental 10 BV's wash results and a calculated DF from the oxalate precipitation process yields an overall DF sufficient to meet the Column A specification. For those impurities (other than B) not removed by 10 BV's of wash, the impurity is either not expected to be present in the feedstock or process, or recommendations have been provided for improvement in the analytical detection/method or validation of calculated results. In summary, boron is recommended as the appropriate neutron poison for H-Canyon dissolution and impurities are expected to meet the Column A specification limits for oxide production in HB-Line.

Kyser, E. A.; King, W. D.

2012-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

63

HB-LINE ANION EXCHANGE PURIFICATION OF AFS-2 PLUTONIUM FOR MOX  

SciTech Connect

Non-radioactive cerium (Ce) and radioactive plutonium (Pu) anion exchange column experiments using scaled HB-Line designs were performed to investigate the feasibility of using either gadolinium nitrate (Gd) or boric acid (B as H{sub 3}BO{sub 3}) as a neutron poison in the H-Canyon dissolution process. Expected typical concentrations of probable impurities were tested and the removal of these impurities by a decontamination wash was measured. Impurity concentrations are compared to two specifications - designated as Column A or Column B (most restrictive) - proposed for plutonium oxide (PuO{sub 2}) product shipped to the Mixed Oxide (MOX) Fuel Fabrication Facility (MFFF). Use of Gd as a neutron poison requires a larger volume of wash for the proposed Column A specification. Since boron (B) has a higher proposed specification and is more easily removed by washing, it appears to be the better candidate for use in the H-Canyon dissolution process. Some difficulty was observed in achieving the Column A specification due to the limited effectiveness that the wash step has in removing the residual B after {approx}4 BV's wash. However a combination of the experimental 10 BV's wash results and a calculated DF from the oxalate precipitation process yields an overall DF sufficient to meet the Column A specification. For those impurities (other than B) not removed by 10 BV's of wash, the impurity is either not expected to be present in the feedstock or process, or recommendations have been provided for improvement in the analytical detection/method or validation of calculated results. In summary, boron is recommended as the appropriate neutron poison for H-Canyon dissolution and impurities are expected to meet the Column A specification limits for oxide production in HB-Line.

Kyser, E.; King, W.

2012-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

64

Catalyst support of mixed cerium zirconium titanium oxide, including use and method of making  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A durable catalyst support/catalyst is capable of extended water gas shift operation under conditions of high temperature, pressure, and sulfur levels. The support is a homogeneous, nanocrystalline, mixed metal oxide of at least three metals, the first being cerium, the second being Zr, and/or Hf, and the third importantly being Ti, the three metals comprising at least 80% of the metal constituents of the mixed metal oxide and the Ti being present in a range of 5% to 45% by metals-only atomic percent of the mixed metal oxide. The mixed metal oxide has an average crystallite size less than 6 nm and forms a skeletal structure with pores whose diameters are in the range of 4-9 nm and normally greater than the average crystallite size. The surface area of the skeletal structure per volume of the material of the structure is greater than about 240 m.sup.2/cm.sup.3. The method of making and use are also described.

Willigan, Rhonda R. (Manchester, CT); Vanderspurt, Thomas Henry (Glastonbury, CT); Tulyani, Sonia (Manchester, CT); Radhakrishnan, Rakesh (Vernon, CT); Opalka, Susanne Marie (Glastonbury, CT); Emerson, Sean C. (Broad Brook, CT)

2011-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

65

Mixed sulphide–oxide lead and zinc ores: Problems and solutions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Mixed sulphide–oxide lead and zinc ores are most often found in the transition, and occasionally in the oxidised, zones of lead–zinc ore-bodies. They are of great importance because there are numerous unexploited or abandoned reserves of these ores in the world. However they present difficulties for conventional mineral processing due to complex mineralogy. In this paper, the specific problems associated with these types of ores are described and methods for solving these problems, combining economic and technical considerations, are discussed. The results of experiments carried out at laboratory scale are presented, in which the dissolution of mixed ore in sulphuric acid without oxidising agents was investigated. The results show the feasibility of zinc recovery from mixed sulphide–oxide lead and zinc ores, which underlines the potential of this approach. We also propose a conceptual flow diagram for the hydrometallurgical processing of these ores.

S. Moradi; A.J. Monhemius

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

NNSA Holds Groundbreaking at MOX Facility | National Nuclear Security  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Groundbreaking at MOX Facility | National Nuclear Security Groundbreaking at MOX Facility | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > About Us > Our History > NNSA Timeline > NNSA Holds Groundbreaking at MOX Facility NNSA Holds Groundbreaking at MOX Facility October 14, 2005 Aiken, SC NNSA Holds Groundbreaking at MOX Facility

67

Mixed Waste Focus Area alternative oxidation technologies development and demonstration program  

SciTech Connect

The Mixed Waste Focus Area (MWFA) is currently supporting the development and demonstration of several alternative oxidation technology (AOT) processes for treatment of combustible mixed low-level wastes. The impetus for this support derives from regulatory and political hurdles frequently encountered by traditional thermal techniques, primarily incinerators. AOTs have been defined as technologies that destroy organic material without using open-flame reactions. Whether thermal or nonthermal, the processes have the potential advantages of relatively low-volume gaseous emissions, generation of few or no dioxin/furan compounds, and operation at low enough temperatures that metals (except mercury) and most radionuclides are not volatilized. Technology development and demonstration are needed to confirm and realize the potential of AOTs and to compare them on an equal basis with their fully demonstrated thermal counterparts. AOTs include both thermal and nonthermal processes that oxidize organic wastes but operate under significantly different physical and chemical conditions than incinerators. Nonthermal processes currently being studied include Delphi DETOX and acid digestion at the Savannah River Site, and direct chemical oxidation at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. All three technologies are at advanced stages of development or are entering the demonstration phase. Nonflame thermal processes include catalytic chemical oxidation, which is being developed and deployed at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, and team reforming, a commercial process being supported by Department of Energy. Related technologies include two low-flow, secondary oxidation processes (Phoenix and Thermatrix units) that have been tested at MSE, Inc., in Butte, Montana. Although testing is complete on some AOT technologies, most require additional support to complete some or all of the identified development objectives. Brief descriptions, status, and planned paths forward for each of the technologies are presented.

Borduin, L.C. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Fewell, T.; Gombert, D.; Priebe, S. [Lockheed Martin Idaho Technologies Co., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Preparation of extrusions of bulk mixed oxide compounds with high macroporosity and mechanical strength  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A simple and effective method for producing bulk single and mixed oxide absorbents and catalysts is disclosed. The method yields bulk single oxide and mixed oxide absorbent and catalyst materials which combine a high macroporosity with relatively high surface area and good mechanical strength. The materials are prepared in a pellet form using as starting compounds, calcined powders of the desired composition and physical properties these powders are crushed to broad particle size distribution, and, optionally may be combined with an inorganic clay binder. The necessary amount of water is added to form a paste which is extruded, dried and heat treated to yield and desired extrudate strength. The physical properties of the extruded materials (density, macroporosity and surface area) are substantially the same as the constituent powder is the temperature of the heat treatment of the extrudates is approximately the same as the calcination temperature of the powder. If the former is substantially higher than the latter, the surface area decreases, but the macroporosity of the extrusions remains essentially constant.

Flytzani-Stephanopoulos, Maria (Winchester, MA); Jothimurugesan, Kandaswami (Baton Rouge, LA)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Mixed Fuel Strategy for Carbon Deposition Mitigation in Solid Oxide Fuel Cells at Intermediate Temperatures  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Mixed Fuel Strategy for Carbon Deposition Mitigation in Solid Oxide Fuel Cells at Intermediate Temperatures ... (1-4) Although the concept of SOFCs was first reported more than one century ago,(5) major technological advances in cell materials, reactor configuration, operation mode, and balance of plant system integration and optimization were realized in the last 20–30 years only. ... The hybrid start-up process is optimized with respect to a specific setup as an example, but is of general nature and utility to similar systems. ...

Chao Su; Yubo Chen; Wei Wang; Ran Ran; Zongping Shao; João C. Diniz da Costa; Shaomin Liu

2014-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

70

Relationship between transport properties and phase transformations in mixed-conducting oxides  

SciTech Connect

To elucidate the relationship between transport properties and phase transformations in mixed-conducting oxides, Sr{sub 0.9}Ca{sub 0.1}Co{sub 0.89}Fe{sub 0.11}O{sub 3-} {sub {delta}} (SCCFO) and SrCoO{sub 3-} {sub {delta}} (SCO) were chosen as the model materials and have been investigated in detail. Oxygen permeation measurements verified that both oxides are well permeable to oxygen at elevated temperatures, e.g., at 900 deg. C during a cooling procedure, oxygen permeation rates as large as 1.5 and 2.0 mL/min/cm{sup 2} could be obtained with disk-shaped SCCFO and SCO membranes of thickness 1.5 mm, respectively. But when cooled to critical temperatures, the oxygen permeability of these kinds of oxides diminished sharply, which could be recovered by increasing the temperature again to certain values. Abrupt changes on electrical conductivity were also observed for both oxides around the same region of temperature as that of oxygen permeability. As indicated by high-temperature X-ray diffraction and thermal analysis, the SCCFO and SCO systems undergo phase transformation between a low-temperature orthorhombic brownmillerite structure (B) or a hexagonal 2H-type structure (H) and a high-temperature cubic perovskite structure (C), respectively. The present results suggest the observed abrupt changes in transport properties versus temperature are attributed to such phase transformation, which may be directly associated with the order-disorder transition of oxygen vacancies. Moreover, compared to the B/C transformation that mainly involves an order-disorder transition on the oxygen sublattice, the H/C one necessarily also involves the cooperative long-range reorganization on the cation sublattice. Therefore it occurs at a higher temperature and absorbs more heat quantity than those of B/C transformation.

Deng, Z.Q. [State Key Laboratory of Catalysis, Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Dalian 116023 (China)]. E-mail: dzqm@dicp.ac.cn; Yang, W.S. [State Key Laboratory of Catalysis, Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Dalian 116023 (China); Liu, W. [Laboratory of Advanced Functional Materials and Devices, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China); Chen, C.S. [Laboratory of Advanced Functional Materials and Devices, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China)

2006-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

71

Sorption of lithium from a geothermal brine by pelletized mixed aluminum-lithium hydrous oxides  

SciTech Connect

An inorganic ion exchanger was evaluated by the Bureau of Mines for recovering lithium from geothermal brines. The ion exchanger or sorbent was mixed hydrous oxide of aluminum and lithium that had been dried at 100 C. The dried precipitate was pelletized with a sodium silicate binder to improve flow rates in sorption tests. The sorbent was loaded to 2 mg Li/g of pellets and sorption from the solution was independent of the concentrations of Ca, Fe, Mn, and Zn. Manganese and zinc were sorbed by the pellets but did not suppress lithium sorption. Lithium was desorbed with water, but none of the washing solutions investigated removed entrained brine without stripping lithium. The complex nature of the sorption mechanisms is discussed.

Schultze, L.E.; Bauer, D.J.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Thermal Controls for the On-Site Transfer of Mixed Oxide Scrap  

SciTech Connect

Mixed oxide scrap consisting primarily of PuO{sub 2} and UO{sub 2} is stored in crimp-sealed product cans at Savannah River Site (SRS). The product cans are to be transported onsite to a processing facility for dissolution using an earlier version of the 9975 (prior to the redesigned drum closure) package called DDF-1. This paper compares the maximum plutonium temperatures inside the DDF-1 and the maximum temperatures when the product can is in a storage vault. The comparison shows that the maximum Pu temperature for low wattage cans are marginally higher during transport provided the drum packages are kept out of sunlight. At higher wattage the differences become significant. The application of this work is to provide guidance and an estimate of temperature sensitive chemical reactions during transport compared with storage.

Gupta, N.K.

2001-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

73

Shell Model for Atomistic Simulation of Lithium Diffusion in Mixed Mn/Ti Oxides  

SciTech Connect

Mixed Mn/Ti oxides present attractive physicochemical properties such as their ability to accommodate Li for application in Li-ion batteries. In this work, atomic parameters for Mn were developed to extend an existing shell model of the Li-Ti-O system and allow simulations of pure and lithiated Mn and mixed Mn/Ti oxide polymorphs. The shell model yielded good agreement with experimentally-derived structures (i.e. lattice parameters and inter-atomic distances) and represented an improvement over existing potential models. The shell model was employed in molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of Li diffusion in the 1×1 c direction channels of LixMn1 yTiyO2 with the rutile structure, where 0 ? x ? 0.25 and 0 ? y ? 1. In the infinite dilution limit, the arrangement of Mn and Ti ions in the lattice was found to have a significant effect on the activation energy for Li diffusion in the c channels due to the destabilization of half of the interstitial octahedral sites. Anomalous diffusion was demonstrated for Li concentrations as low as x = 0.125, with a single Li ion positioned in every other c channel. Further increase in Li concentration showed not only the substantial effect of Li-Li repulsive interactions on Li mobility but also their influence on the time dependence of Li diffusion. The results of the MD simulations can inform intrinsic structure-property relationships for the rational design of improved electrode materials for Li-ion batteries.

Kerisit, Sebastien N.; Chaka, Anne M.; Droubay, Timothy C.; Ilton, Eugene S.

2014-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

74

Heterogeneous Photocatalytic Remediation of Phenol by Platinized Titania–Silica Mixed Oxides under Solar-Simulated Conditions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Heterogeneous Photocatalytic Remediation of Phenol by Platinized Titania–Silica Mixed Oxides under Solar-Simulated Conditions ... In recent years, innovative research for the development of advanced products has realized nanomaterials that demonstrate the unique structural, mechanical, optical, electronic, and catalytic properties under light irradiation. ...

Harrison S. Kibombo; Ranjit T. Koodali

2011-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

75

Xanes Study of Hydrothermal Mo-V-Based Mixed Oxide M1-Phase Catalysts for the (Amm)oxidation of propane  

SciTech Connect

The hydrothermal Mo-V-based mixed oxide catalysts possessing the M1-phase structure were investigated by XANES and in situ X-ray diffraction under ambient and dynamic redox conditions in the presence of O{sub 2} and H{sub 2} at 693 K. Under ambient conditions, XANES, with the use of model compounds, suggested oxidation states of Nb, Te, Mo, and V close to 5+, 4+, 6+, and 4+, respectively, in the bulk M1 phase. The oxidation state changes of Nb, Te, and Mo were not detected under the dynamic redox conditions employed, while the pre-edge peak of vanadium in the M1 phase exhibited small, reproducible shifts, suggesting that VO{sub x} is the active catalytic species in the bulk M1-phase catalysts for selective (amm)oxidation of propane.

Shiju, N.R. [University of Cincinnati; Rondinone, Adam Justin [ORNL; Overbury, Steven {Steve} H [ORNL; Mullins, David R [ORNL; Schwartz, Viviane [ORNL; Guliants, Vadim V. [University of Cincinnati

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

XANES Study of Hydrothermal Mo-V-Based Mixed Oxide M1-Phase Catalysts for the (Amm)oxidation of Propane  

SciTech Connect

The hydrothermal Mo-V-based mixed oxide catalysts possessing the M1-phase structure were investigated by XANES and in situ X-ray diffraction under ambient and dynamic redox conditions in the presence of O{sub 2} and H{sub 2} at 693 K. Under ambient conditions, XANES, with the use of model compounds, suggested oxidation states of Nb, Te, Mo, and V close to 5+, 4+, 6+, and 4+, respectively, in the bulk M1 phase. The oxidation state changes of Nb, Te, and Mo were not detected under the dynamic redox conditions employed, while the pre-edge peak of vanadium in the M1 phase exhibited small, reproducible shifts, suggesting that VO{sub x} is the active catalytic species in the bulk M1-phase catalysts for selective (amm)oxidation of propane.

Shuju, N.; Rondinone, A; Mullins, D; Schwartz, V; Overbury, S; Gulaints, V

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Xanes Study of Hydrothermal Mo-V-Based Mixed Oxide M1-Phase Catalysts for the (Amm)oxidation of Propane  

SciTech Connect

The hydrothermal Mo-V-based mixed oxide catalysts possessing the M1-phase structure were investigated by XANES and in situ X-ray diffraction under ambient and dynamic redox conditions in the presence of O{sub 2} and H{sub 2} at 693 K. Under ambient conditions, XANES, with the use of model compounds, suggested oxidation states of Nb, Te, Mo, and V close to 5+, 4+, 6+, and 4+, respectively, in the bulk M1 phase. The oxidation state changes of Nb, Te, and Mo were not detected under the dynamic redox conditions employed, while the pre-edge peak of vanadium in the M1 phase exhibited small, reproducible shifts, suggesting that VO{sub x} is the active catalytic species in the bulk M1-phase catalysts for selective (amm)oxidation of propane.

Mullins, David R [ORNL; Overbury, Steven {Steve} H [ORNL; Rondinone, Adam Justin [ORNL; Schwartz, Viviane [ORNL; Guliants, Vadim [ORNL; Shiju, N.R. [University of Cincinnati

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Slide 1  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

MOX Update Kelly Trice, President & COO Shaw AREVA MOX Services, LLC. 2 What is MOX? * Mission - Convert at least 34 metric tons of U.S. weapons-grade plutonium to mixed oxide...

79

Basic properties of the mixed oxides obtained by thermal decomposition of hydrotalcites containing different metallic compositions  

SciTech Connect

Carbonated layered double hydroxides (LDHs) containing Al, Fe, or Cr in a Mg(OH){sub 2} matrix or Al dissolved in hydroxides of Mg, Cu, Ni, Co, or Zn are used as precursors of basic catalysts. Decarbonation is studied by thermal analysis. The average basic strength, evaluated by the decarbonation temperature, is related to the partial charge of oxygen in the LDHs obtained from the Sanderson theory of electronegativity. The enthalpy of adsorption of CO{sub 2} on the resulting mixed oxides is measured by calorimetry. A homogeneous surface is generally observed for CO{sub 2} adsorption, with initial heats of adsorption close to those reported for MgO. The number of sites determined by this method is proportional to the rate constants for {beta}-isophorone isomerization, suggesting that both techniques measure surface properties. The layered structure in which OH{sup {minus}} is the compensating anion can be re-formed by hydration. This process does not appreciably change the adsorption of CO{sub 2}; thus, oxygens and hydroxyls show similar basic strengths in this case.

Valente, J.S.; Figueras, F.; Gravelle, M.; Kumbhar, P.; Lopez, J.; Besse, J.P.

2000-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

80

Integrated demonstration of molten salt oxidation with salt recycle for mixed waste treatment  

SciTech Connect

Molten Salt Oxidation (MSO) is a thermal, nonflame process that has the inherent capability of completely destroying organic constituents of mixed wastes, hazardous wastes, and energetic materials while retaining inorganic and radioactive constituents in the salt. For this reason, MSO is considered a promising alternative to incineration for the treatment of a variety of organic wastes. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has prepared a facility and constructed an integrated pilot-scale MSO treatment system in which tests and demonstrations are performed under carefully controlled (experimental) conditions. The system consists of a MSO processor with dedicated off-gas treatment, a salt recycle system, feed preparation equipment, and equipment for preparing ceramic final waste forms. This integrated system was designed and engineered based on laboratory experience with a smaller engineering-scale reactor unit and extensive laboratory development on salt recycle and final forms preparation. In this paper we present design and engineering details of the system and discuss its capabilities as well as preliminary process demonstration data. A primary purpose of these demonstrations is identification of the most suitable waste streams and waste types for MSO treatment.

Hsu, P.C.

1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mixed oxide mox" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Improved layered mixed transition metal oxides for Li-ion batteries  

SciTech Connect

Recent work in our laboratory has been directed towards development of mixed layered transition metal oxides with general composition Li[Ni, Co, M, Mn]O2 (M=Al, Ti) for Li ion battery cathodes. Compounds such as Li[Ni1/3Co1/3Mn1/3]O2 (often called NMCs) are currently being commercialized for use in consumer electronic batteries, but the high cobalt content makes them too expensive for vehicular applications such as electric vehicles (EV), plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs), or hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs). To reduce materials costs, we have explored partial or full substitution of Co with Al, Ti, and Fe. Fe substitution generally decreases capacity and results in poorer rate and cycling behavior. Interestingly, low levels of substitution with Al or Ti improve aspects of performance with minimal impact on energy densities, for some formulations. High levels of Al substitution compromise specific capacity, however, so further improvements require that the Ni and Mn content be increased and Co correspondingly decreased. Low levels of Al or Ti substitution can then be used offset negative effects induced by the higher Ni content. The structural and electrochemical characterization of substituted NMCs is presented in this paper.

Doeff, Marca M.; Conry, Thomas; Wilcox, James

2010-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

82

Transesterification of soybean oil catalyzed by Sr–Ti mixed oxides nanocomposite  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Sr–Ti mixed oxides as nanocomposite was prepared by sol–gel method and used as a basic heterogeneous catalyst for transesterification of soybean oil with methanol to methyl esters (biodiesel). The catalyst was characterized using X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA/DTA) and CO2-TPD techniques. It was found that reaction of methanol and soybean oil with the molar ratio of 15 in the presence of 1% Sr–Ti (based on the soybean oil weight) with the molar ratio of 0.8 and calcined at 965 °C as catalyst affords biodiesel in excess of 98% at 60 °C within 15 min. Effect of catalyst calcination temperature, Sr to Ti molar ratio, reaction temperature, catalyst amount, methanol to oil molar ratio and reaction time along with the key role of Sr2TiO4 phase in nanocomposite as an important factor on transesterification efficiency will be discussed in this presentation.

Elnaz Rashtizadeh; Faezeh Farzaneh

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Anodically electrodeposited Co+Ni mixed oxide electrode: preparation and electrocatalytic activity for oxygen evolution in alkaline media  

SciTech Connect

Co+Ni mixed oxides on Ni substrate were prepared through anodic electrodeposition from Co(NO{sub 3}){sub 2} and Ni(NO{sub 3}){sub 2} aqueous solutions with five different Co{sup 2+}/Ni{sup 2+} ratios beside only Co{sup 2+}. By the electrochemical measurements, the optimum performance in electrocatalytic activity for oxygen evolution reaction in alkaline media was obtained on the Co+Ni mixed oxide deposited from the solution containing Co{sup 2+}/Ni{sup 2+} ratio of 1:1. The mixed oxide is corresponding to about 68at% Co contents with spinel-type NiCo{sub 2}O{sub 4} phase and porosity surface structure. The electrochemical kinetic parameters including exchange current density, Tafel slopes, reaction order with respect to [OH{sup -}] and standard electrochemical enthalpy of activation were analyzed also. A possible mechanism involving the formation of a physisorbed hydrogen peroxide intermediate in a slow electrochemical step was presented, which accounts for the values of the experimental results.

Wu Gang [Innovative Catalysis Program, Key Lab of Organic Optoelectronics and Molecular Engineering, Department of Chemistry, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)]. E-mail: wugang@mail.tsinghua.edu.cn; Li Ning [Department of Applied Chemistry, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Zhou Derui [Department of Applied Chemistry, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Mitsuo, Kurachi [Faculty of Engineering, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8283 (Japan); Xu Boqing [Innovative Catalysis Program, Key Lab of Organic Optoelectronics and Molecular Engineering, Department of Chemistry, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)

2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Synthesis of metastable rare-earth-iron mixed oxide with the hexagonal crystal structure  

SciTech Connect

Rare-earth-iron mixed oxides with the rare earth/iron ratio=1 have either orthorhombic (o-REFeO{sub 3}) or hexagonal (h-REFeO{sub 3}) structure. h-REFeO{sub 3} is a metastable phase and the synthesis of h-REFeO{sub 3} is usually difficult. In this work, the crystallization process of the precursors obtained by co-precipitation and Pechini methods was investigated in detail to synthesize h-REFeO{sub 3}. It was found that the crystallization from amorphous to hexagonal phase and the phase transition from hexagonal to orthorhombic phase occurred at a similar temperature range for rare earth elements with small ionic radii (Er-Lu, Y). For both co-precipitation and Pechini methods, single-phase h-REFeO{sub 3} was obtained by shortening the heating time during calcination process. The hexagonal-to-orthorhombic phase transition took place by a nucleation growth mechanism and vermicular morphology of the thus-formed orthorhombic phase was observed. The hexagonal YbFeO{sub 3} had higher catalytic activity for C{sub 3}H{sub 8} combustion than orthorhombic YbFeO{sub 3}. - Graphical abstract: Although the synthesis of metastable hexagonal REFeO{sub 3} by the conventional method is difficult, we found that this phase is obtained by shortening the heating time of the precursor prepared by co-precipitation method. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Synthesis of metastable REFeO{sub 3} with hexagonal structure by the co-precipitation method. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Hexagonal REFeO{sub 3} is obtained for the rare earth elements with small ionic radii. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Hexagonal-to-orthorhombic transformation of REFeO{sub 3}. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Catalytic activity of hexagonal REFeO{sub 3} for C{sub 3}H{sub 8} combustion.

Nishimura, Tatsuya [Department of Energy and Hydrocarbon Chemistry, Graduate School of Engineering, Kyoto University, Katsura, Kyoto 615-8510 (Japan); Hosokawa, Saburo, E-mail: hosokawa@scl.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Department of Energy and Hydrocarbon Chemistry, Graduate School of Engineering, Kyoto University, Katsura, Kyoto 615-8510 (Japan); Masuda, Yuichi; Wada, Kenji; Inoue, Masashi [Department of Energy and Hydrocarbon Chemistry, Graduate School of Engineering, Kyoto University, Katsura, Kyoto 615-8510 (Japan)

2013-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

85

Zn(II)–Cr(III) mixed oxide as efficient bifunctional catalyst for dehydroisomerisation of ?-pinene to p-cymene  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Zn(II)–Cr(III) mixed oxide possessing acid and dehydrogenation functions is an efficient, noble-metal-free catalyst for the one-step dehydroisomerisation of ?-pinene to p-cymene. This reaction is a good example of the use of heterogeneous multifunctional catalysis for the conversion of renewable feedstock into value-added chemicals. It involves acid-catalysed ?-pinene isomerisation followed by dehydrogenation of p-cymene precursor(s). The reaction is carried out over a fixed catalyst bed in the gas phase at 350 °C. Amongst Zn–Cr oxides studied (Zn/Cr = 20:1–1:30), the preferred catalyst is Zn–Cr (1:1) oxide which produces p-cymene with a 78% yield at 100% ?-pinene conversion. This catalyst shows stable performance for over 30 h without co-feeding hydrogen to the reactor.

Fahd Al-Wadaani; Elena F. Kozhevnikova; Ivan V. Kozhevnikov

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Structural Characterization and Catalytic Activity of Nanosized CexM1-xO2 (M = Zr and Hf) Mixed Oxides  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

RS measurements suggest a defective structure of the mixed oxides resulting in the formation of oxygen vacancies. ... Improvements in such features are currently in demand for designing better catalytic cartridges for new-generation cleaner cars. ...

Benjaram M. Reddy; Pankaj Bharali; Pranjal Saikia; Sang-Eon Park; Maurits W. E. van den Berg; Martin Muhler; Wolfgang Grünert

2008-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

87

PII S0016-7037(98)00136-7 The kinetics of mixed Ni-Al hydroxide formation on clay and aluminum oxide minerals  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PII S0016-7037(98)00136-7 The kinetics of mixed Ni-Al hydroxide formation on clay and aluminum. This finding indicates that the dissolution of clay and aluminum oxide minerals can be promoted by metal ions

Sparks, Donald L.

88

The United States pit disassembly and conversion project -- Meeting the MOX fuel specification  

SciTech Connect

The US is actively involved in demonstrating the disassembly of nuclear weapons pits to an unclassified form readied for disposition. The MOX option is the most likely path forward for plutonium that originated from nuclear weapon pits. The US demonstration line for pit disassembly and conversion is known as ARIES, the advanced recovery and integrated extraction system. The ARIES demonstration line is being used to gather data in an integrated fashion of the technologies needed for pit disassembly and conversion. These activities include the following modules: pit bisection, hydride-dehydride, oxide conversion, canning, electrolytic decontamination, and nondestructive assay (NDA). Pit bisection swages in a pit in half. Hydride-dehydride converts the pit plutonium metal to an unclassified metal button. To convert the plutonium metal to an oxide the US is investigating a number of options. The primary oxide conversion approach involves variations of combining plutonium hydriding and subsequent oxidation. Another approach is to simply oxidize the metal under controlled conditions-direct metal oxidation (DMO). To remove the gallium from the plutonium oxide, a thermal distillation approach is being used. These pyrochemical approaches will substantially reduce the wastes produced for oxide conversion of weapon plutonium, compared to traditional aqueous processing. The packaging of either the plutonium metal or oxide to long term storage criteria involves the canning and electrolytic decontamination modules. The NDA suite of instruments is then used to assay the material in the containers, which enables international verification without the need to open the containers and repackage them. All of these processes are described.

Nelson, T.O.; James, C.A.; Kolman, D.G.

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

89

One-Step Conversion of Biomass-Derived 5-Hydroxymethylfurfural to 1,2,6-Hexanetriol Over Ni–Co–Al Mixed Oxide Catalysts Under Mild Conditions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

One-Step Conversion of Biomass-Derived 5-Hydroxymethylfurfural to 1,2,6-Hexanetriol Over Ni–Co–Al Mixed Oxide Catalysts Under Mild Conditions ... A sustainable process with a one-step conversion of biomass-derived 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF) to 1,2,6-hexanetriol is presented. ... The conversion of biomass-derived 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF) was examined over Ni–Co–Al mixed oxide catalysts derived from corresponding hydrotalcite-like compounds (HTlcs). ...

Shengxi Yao; Xicheng Wang; Yijun Jiang; Feng Wu; Xinguo Chen; Xindong Mu

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Hydrogen production by methane steam reforming over Ru supported on Ni–Mg–Al mixed oxides prepared via hydrotalcite route  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Catalytic performance of Ru/NixMg6?xAl2 800 800 mixed oxides, with x = 2, 4 and 6, x being the molar ratio, towards Methane Steam Reforming, was studied. NixMg6?xAl2 800 oxide, used as support, was prepared via hydrotalcite route. It was thermally stabilized at 800 °C, impregnated with 0.5 wt.% ruthenium using ruthenium (III) nitrosyl nitrate Ru(NO) (NO3)3 precursor and then calcined again at 800 °C under an air flow. Ruthenium impregnation significantly enhanced the reactivity of the oxides in Methane Steam Reforming. In fact, it was found, that even with a low ruthenium content (0.5 wt.%), ruthenium oxide particles are formed but are well dispersed over the surface of the oxide NixMg6?xAl2 800. Ru/Ni6Al2 800 800 showed better catalytic performances, towards Methane Steam Reforming, than ruthenium impregnated on the two other supports. Indeed, nickel content is higher in Ni6Al2 800 than in the other studied supports and therefore the probability of Ni–Ru interaction should be greater and consequently catalytic performances could be improved.

Mira Nawfal; Cédric Gennequin; Madona Labaki; Bilal Nsouli; Antoine Aboukaïs; Edmond Abi-Aad

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Cu–Zn–Al mixed metal oxides derived from hydroxycarbonate precursors for H2S removal at low temperature  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

One series of Cu–Zn and two series of Cu–Zn–Al hydroxycarbonate precursors with varying metal molar ratios were prepared via co-precipitation or multi-precipitation method, and the mixed metal oxides obtained by calcination of the precursor materials were used as adsorbents for H2S removal in the range of 25–100 °C. The results of H2S adsorption tests showed that these mixed oxides, especially two series of Cu–Zn–Al mixed metal oxides exhibited markedly high breakthrough sulfur capacities (ranging from 4.4 to 25.7 g S/100 g-sorbent with increase of Cu/Zn molar ratio) at 40 °C. Incorporation Cu and/or Al decreased the mean crystalline sizes of ZnO and CuO species in the Cu–Zn and Cu–Zn–Al mixed metal oxide adsorbents by decreasing of mean crystalline sizes of hydroxycarbanate phases mainly including hydrozincite, aurichalcite and malachite, segregation of Al phase, etc. Higher breakthrough sulfur capacity of each adsorbent in two ternary series than that of the corresponding adsorbent in binary series should be ascribed to the enhancement of the dispersion of ZnO and/or CuO species with incorporation of aluminum, thereby increasing the overall rate of reaction between the adsorbent and H2S by reducing the thickness of potential sulfide shell on the outer layer of the oxide crystalline grains and increasing the area of the interface for the exchange of HS?/S2? and O2?. For each series of adsorbents, the breakthrough sulfur capacity increased with the increase of Cu/Zn molar ratio regardless of changes of the dispersion of CuO and/or ZnO. This phenomenon might be mainly attributed to faster rate of the lattice diffusion of HS?, S2? and O2? or exchange of HS?/S2? and O2? during the sulfidation of CuO than that during the sulfidation of ZnO due to less rearrangement of the anion lattice.

Dahao Jiang; Lianghu Su; Lei Ma; Nan Yao; Xiaoliang Xu; Haodong Tang; Xiaonian Li

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Noise-like pulse based on dissipative four-wave-mixing with photonic crystal fiber filled by reduced graphene oxide  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A noise-like pulse based on dissipative four-wave-mixing in a fiber cavity with photonic crystal fiber filled by reduced graphene oxide is proposed. Due to large evanescent field provided by 3 cm photonic crystal fiber and ultrahigh nonlinearity of reduced graphene oxide, this mixed structure provides excellent saturable absorption and high nonlinearity, which are necessary for generating four-wave-mixing (FWM). We experimentally prove that the mode-locked laser transfers its energy from center wavelength to sidebands through degenerate FWM, and new frequencies are generated via cascaded FWM among those sidebands. During this process, the frequencies located in various orders of longitudinal modes of the ring cavity are supported, and others are suppressed due to destructive interference. As the longitudinal modes of the cavity with a spacing of 6.874 MHz are partially supported, the loosely fixed phase relationship results in noise-like pulse with a coherent peak of 530 fs locating on a pedestal of 730.693 p...

Gao, Lei; Huang, Wei

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

E-Print Network 3.0 - actinide mixed oxide Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fuels Mikael JOLKKONEN1;;y Summary: . Examples of such substances are molten actinide carbides and the gaseous forms of many metal oxides... , minor actinides, uranium-free nitride...

94

THERMAL DESTRUCTION OF HIGHLY CHLORINATED MIXED WASTES WITHOUT GENERATING CORROSIVE OFF-GASES USING MOLTEN SALT OXIDATION (1,2)  

SciTech Connect

A pilot-scale MSO (Molten Salt Oxidation) system was used to process 45-gallons of a halogenated mixed waste that is difficult to treat with other thermal systems. The mixed waste was a halogenated solvent that consisted mostly of methylchloroform. The 80 weight percent of waste consisting of highly corrosive chlorine was captured in the first process vessel as sodium chloride. The sodium chloride leached chrome from that process vessel and the solidified salt exhibited the toxicity characteristic for chrome as measured by TCLP (Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure) testing. The operating ranges for parameters such as salt bed temperature, off-gas temperature, and feed rate that enable sustained operation were identified. At feed rates below the sustainable limit, both processing capacity and maintenance requirements increased with feed rate. Design and operational modifications to increase the sustainable feed rate limit and reduce maintenance requirements reduced both salt carryover and volumetric gas flows.

Smith, W.; Feizollahi, F.

2002-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

95

The effects of nitrogen oxides on cytochrome P-450 mediated mixed-function oxidations in mammalian lung  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

schema for toxic inhalation of NO2 10 General representation of the proposed steps involved in substrate hydroxylation by cyto- chrome P-450 mediated mixed-function oxida- tions 13 Schematic diagram of the Isolated and Per- fused Lung Apparatus 22... and biochemical functions of the lung is pre- sented in Table 1. This summary is followed by a schematic with a more complete representation of the toxic effects of N02 inhalation (Fig. 1). Nany of the biochemical effects of nitrogen dioxide on the lung...

Tucker, Leo Dean

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

96

Process modeling of plutonium conversion and MOX fabrication for plutonium disposition  

SciTech Connect

Two processes are currently under consideration for the disposition of 35 MT of surplus plutonium through its conversion into fuel for power production. These processes are the ARIES process, by which plutonium metal is converted into a powdered oxide form, and MOX fuel fabrication, where the oxide powder is combined with uranium oxide powder to form ceramic fuel. This study was undertaken to determine the optimal size for both facilities, whereby the 35 MT of plutonium metal will be converted into fuel and burned for power. The bounding conditions used were a plutonium concentration of 3--7%, a burnup of 20,000--40,000 MWd/MTHM, a core fraction of 0.1 to 0.4, and the number of reactors ranging from 2--6. Using these boundary conditions, the optimal cost was found with a plutonium concentration of 7%. This resulted in an optimal throughput ranging from 2,000 to 5,000 kg Pu/year. The data showed minimal costs, resulting from throughputs in this range, at 3,840, 2,779, and 3,497 kg Pu/year, which results in a facility lifetime of 9.1, 12.6, and 10.0 years, respectively.

Schwartz, K.L. [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States). Dept. of Nuclear Engineering

1998-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

The effects of asphalt binder oxidation on hot mix asphalt concrete mixture rheology and fatigue performance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. The decline in mixture fatigue life (determined using the calibrated mechanistic fatigue analysis approach with surface energy measurement) due to oxidation is significant. Pavement service life is dependent on the mixture, but can be estimated by a cumulative...

Jung, Sung Hoon

2009-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

98

LITERATURE REVIEW FOR OXALATE OXIDATION PROCESSES AND PLUTONIUM OXALATE SOLUBILITY  

SciTech Connect

A literature review of oxalate oxidation processes finds that manganese(II)-catalyzed nitric acid oxidation of oxalate in precipitate filtrate is a viable and well-documented process. The process has been operated on the large scale at Savannah River in the past, including oxidation of 20 tons of oxalic acid in F-Canyon. Research data under a variety of conditions show the process to be robust. This process is recommended for oxalate destruction in H-Canyon in the upcoming program to produce feed for the MOX facility. Prevention of plutonium oxalate precipitation in filtrate can be achieved by concentrated nitric acid/ferric nitrate sequestration of oxalate. Organic complexants do not appear practical to sequester plutonium. Testing is proposed to confirm the literature and calculation findings of this review at projected operating conditions for the upcoming campaign. H Canyon plans to commence conversion of plutonium metal to low-fired plutonium oxide in 2012 for eventual use in the Mixed Oxide Fuel (MOX) Facility. The flowsheet includes sequential operations of metal dissolution, ion exchange, elution, oxalate precipitation, filtration, and calcination. All processes beyond dissolution will occur in HB-Line. The filtration step produces an aqueous filtrate that may have as much as 4 M nitric acid and 0.15 M oxalate. The oxalate needs to be removed from the stream to prevent possible downstream precipitation of residual plutonium when the solution is processed in H Canyon. In addition, sending the oxalate to the waste tank farm is undesirable. This report addresses the processing options for destroying the oxalate in existing H Canyon equipment.

Nash, C.

2012-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

99

INVESTIGATION OF MIXED METAL SORBENT/CATALYSTS FOR THE SIMULTANEOUS REMOVAL OF SULFUR AND NITROGEN OXIDES  

SciTech Connect

Simultaneous removal of SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} using a regenerable solid sorbent will constitute an important improvement over the use of separate processes for the removal of these two pollutants from stack gases and possibly eliminate several shortcomings of the individual SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} removal operations. The work done at PETC and the DOE-funded investigation of the investigators on the sulfation and regeneration of alumina-supported cerium oxide sorbents have shown that they can perform well at relatively high temperatures (823-900 K) as regenerable desulfurization sorbents. Survey of the recent literature shows that addition of copper oxide to ceria lowers the sulfation temperature of ceria down to 773 K, sulfated ceria-based sorbents can function as selective SCR catalysts even at elevated temperatures, SO{sub 2} can be directly reduced to sulfur by CO on CuO-ceria catalysts, and ceria-based catalysts may have a potential for selective catalytic reduction of NO{sub x} by methane. These observations indicate a possibility of developing a ceria-based sorbent/catalyst which can remove both SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} from flue gases within a relatively wide temperature window, produce significant amounts of elemental sulfur during regeneration, and use methane for the selective catalytic reduction of NO{sub x}. The objective of this research is to conduct kinetic and parametric studies of the selective catalytic reduction of NO{sub x} with NH{sub 3} and CH{sub 4} over alumina-supported cerium oxide and copper oxide-cerium oxide sorbent/catalysts; investigate SO{sub 2} removal at lower temperatures by supported copper oxide-cerium oxide sorbents; and investigate the possibility of elemental sulfur production during regeneration with CO or with CH{sub 4}-air mixtures.

Ates Akyurtlu; Jale F. Akyurtlu

2000-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

100

INVESTIGATION OF MIXED METAL SORBENT/CATALYSTS FOR THE SIMULTANEOUS REMOVAL OF SULFUR AND NITROGEN OXIDES  

SciTech Connect

Simultaneous removal of SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} using a regenerable solid sorbent will constitute an important improvement over the use of separate processes for the removal of these two pollutants from stack gases and possibly eliminate several shortcomings of the individual SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} removal operations. The work done at PETC and the DOE-funded research of the investigators on the sulfation and regeneration of alumina-supported cerium oxide sorbents have shown that they can perform well at relatively high temperatures (823-900 K) as regenerable desulfurization sorbents. Survey of the recent literature shows that addition of copper oxide to ceria lowers the sulfation temperature of ceria down to 773 K, sulfated ceria-based sorbents can function as selective SCR catalysts even at elevated temperatures, SO{sub 2} can be directly reduced to sulfur by CO on CuO-ceria catalysts, and ceria-based catalysts may have a potential for selective catalytic reduction of NO{sub x} by methane. These observations indicate a possibility of developing a ceria-based sorbent/catalyst which can remove both SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} from flue gases within a relatively wide temperature window, produce significant amounts of elemental sulfur during regeneration, and use methane for the selective catalytic reduction of NO{sub x}. The objective of this research is to conduct kinetic and parametric studies of the selective catalytic reduction of NO{sub x} with NH{sub 3} and CH{sub 4} over alumina-supported cerium oxide and copper oxide-cerium oxide sorbent/catalysts; investigate SO{sub 2} removal at lower temperatures by supported copper oxide-cerium oxide sorbents; and investigate the possibility of elemental sulfur production during regeneration with CO or with CH{sub 4} air mixtures.

Ates Akyurtlu; Jale F. Akyurtlu

1999-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mixed oxide mox" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Investigation of mixed metal sorbent/catalysts for the simultaneous removal of sulfur and nitrogen oxides  

SciTech Connect

Simultaneous removal of SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} using a regenerable solid sorbent will constitute an important improvement over the use of separate processes for the removal of these two pollutants from stack gases and possibly eliminate several shortcomings of the individual SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} removal operations. The work done at PETC and the DOE-funded investigation of the investigators on the sulfation and regeneration of alumina-supported cerium oxide sorbents have shown that they can perform well at relatively high temperatures (823-900 K) as regenerable desulfurization sorbents. Survey of the recent literature shows that addition of copper oxide to ceria lowers the sulfation temperature of ceria down to 773 K, sulfated ceria-based sorbents can function as selective SCR catalysts even at elevated temperatures, SO{sub 2} can be directly reduced to sulfur by CO on CuO-ceria catalysts, and ceria-based catalysts may have a potential for selective catalytic reduction of NO{sub x} by methane. These observations indicate a possibility of developing a ceria-based sorbent/catalyst which can remove both SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} from flue gases within a relatively wide temperature window, produce significant amounts of elemental sulfur during regeneration, and use methane for the selective catalytic reduction of NO{sub x}. The objective of this research is to conduct kinetic and parametric studies of the selective catalytic reduction of NO{sub x} with NH{sub 3} and CH{sub 4} over alumina-supported cerium oxide and copper oxide-cerium oxide sorbent/catalysts; investigate SO{sub 2} removal at lower temperatures by supported copper oxide-cerium oxide sorbents; and investigate the possibility of elemental sulfur production during regeneration with CO or with CH{sub 4}-air mixtures.

Akyurtlu, A.; Akyurtlu, J.F.

1999-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

102

A Neutronic Analysis of TRU Recycling in PWRs Loaded with MOX-UE Fuel (MOX with U-235 Enriched U Support)  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the results of a study dealing with the homogeneous recycling of either Pu or Pu+Np or Pu+Np+Am or Pu+Np+Am+Cm in PWRs using MOX-UE fuel, i.e. standard MOX fuel with a U235 enriched uranium support instead of the standard tail uranium (0.25%) for standard MOX fuel. This approach allows to multirecycle Pu or TRU (Pu+MA) as long as U235 is available, by keeping the Pu or TRU content in the fuel constant and at a value ensuring a negative moderator void coefficient (i.e. the loss of the coolant brings imperatively the reactor to a subcritical state). Once this value is determined, the U235 enrichment of the MOX-UE fuel is adjusted in order to reach the target burnup (51 GWd/t in this study).

G. Youinou; S. Bays

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

ANALYTICAL RESULTS FOR MOX COLEMANITE SAMPLES RECEIVED ON JULY 22, 2013  

SciTech Connect

The Mixed Oxide Fuel Fabrication Facility (MFFF) will use colemanite bearing concrete neutron absorber panels credited with attenuating neutron flux in the criticality design analyses and shielding operators from radiation. The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) is tasked with measuring the boron oxide content of the colemanite raw aggregate material prior to it being mixed into the concrete. SRNL received ten samples of colemanite for analysis on July 22, 2013. The elemental boron content of each sample was measured according to ASTM C 1301. The boron oxide content was calculated using the oxide conversion factor for boron.

Reigel, M.; Best, D.

2013-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

104

ANALYTICAL RESULTS FOR MOX COLEMANITE SAMPLES RECEIVED ON JULY 22, 2013  

SciTech Connect

The Mixed Oxide Fuel Fabrication Facility (MFFF) will use colemanite bearing concrete neutron absorber panels credited with attenuating neutron flux in the criticality design analyses and shielding operators from radiation. The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) is tasked with measuring the boron oxide content of the colemanite raw aggregate material prior to it being mixed into the concrete. SRNL received ten samples of colemanite for analysis on July 22, 2013. The elemental boron content of each sample was measured according to ASTM C 1301. The boron oxide content was calculated using the oxide conversion factor for boron.

Reigel, M.; Best, D.

2014-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

105

Use of impure inert gases in the controlled heating and cooling of mixed conducting metal oxide materials  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Method for processing an article comprising mixed conducting metal oxide material. The method comprises contacting the article with an oxygen-containing gas and either reducing the temperature of the oxygen-containing gas during a cooling period or increasing the temperature of the oxygen-containing gas during a heating period; during the cooling period, reducing the oxygen activity in the oxygen-containing gas during at least a portion of the cooling period and increasing the rate at which the temperature of the oxygen-containing gas is reduced during at least a portion of the cooling period; and during the heating period, increasing the oxygen activity in the oxygen-containing gas during at least a portion of the heating period and decreasing the rate at which the temperature of the oxygen-containing gas is increased during at least a portion of the heating period.

Carolan, Michael Francis (Allentown, PA); Bernhart, John Charles (Fleetwood, PA)

2012-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

106

Melting temperatures of the ZrO{sub 2}-MOX system  

SciTech Connect

Severe accidents occurred at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant Units 1-3 on March 11, 2011. MOX fuels were loaded in the Unit 3. For the thermal analysis of the severe accident, melting temperature and phase state of MOX corium were investigated. The simulated coriums were prepared from 4%Pu-containing MOX, 8%Pu-containing MOX and ZrO{sub 2}. Then X-ray diffraction, density and melting temperature measurements were carried out as a function of zirconium and plutonium contents. The cubic phase was observed in the 25%Zr-containing corium and the tetragonal phase was observed in the 50% and 75%Zr-containing coria. The lattice parameter and density monotonically changed with Pu content. Melting temperature increased with increasing Pu content; melting temperature were estimated to be 2932 K for 4%Pu MOX corium and 3012 K for 8%Pu MOX corium in the 25%ZrO{sub 2}-MOX system. The lowest melting temperature was observed for 50%Zr-containing corium. (authors)

Uchida, T.; Hirooka, S.; Kato, M.; Morimoto, K. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 4-33, Muramatsu, Tokai-mura, Naka-gun, Ibaraki 319-1194 (Japan); Sugata, H.; Shibata, K.; Sato, D. [Inspection Development Company, 4-33, Muramatsu, Tokai-mura, Naka-gun, Ibaraki 319-1194 (Japan)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Molybdenum-based additives to mixed-metal oxides for use in hot gas cleanup sorbents for the catalytic decomposition of ammonia in coal gases  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention relates to additives to mixed-metal oxides that act simultaneously as sorbents and catalysts in cleanup systems for hot coal gases. Such additives of this type, generally, act as a sorbent to remove sulfur from the coal gases while substantially simultaneously, catalytically decomposing appreciable amounts of ammonia from the coal gases.

Ayala, Raul E. (Clifton Park, NY)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Synthesis of Mixed Metal Oxides for Hydrodeoxygenation of Pyrolysis Oil for Alternative Fuels Sarah McNew, Tiorra Ross and Carsten Sievers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

· Flash pyrolysis on biomass [1] · Short residence times and flexible feed · Bio-oils produced are close to dissociate hydrogen Goal: synthesize metal free, sulfur free, catalysts for HDO Biomass Pyrolysis OilSynthesis of Mixed Metal Oxides for Hydrodeoxygenation of Pyrolysis Oil for Alternative Fuels Sarah

Das, Suman

109

Mixing effect of metal oxides on negative electrode reactions in the nickel-hydride battery  

SciTech Connect

Negative electrodes for use in nickel-hydride batteries were prepared from MmNi[sub 3.6]Mn[sub 0.4]Al[sub 0.3]Co[sub 0.7] (Mm = misch metal with the composition of 24.87% La, 52.56% Ce, 5.57% Pr, 16.86% Nd, and 0.14% Sm) alloy being mixed with RuO[sub 2] or Co[sub 3]O[sub 4] powder. Then the hydrogen evolution reactions at the electrodes were investigated by measuring the potential decay immediately after the interruption of an applied cathodic current. The reactions were found to proceed by the Volmer-Tafel mechanism. The total overvoltage ([eta]) was divided into two components ([eta][sub 1] and [eta][sub 2]) corresponding to the Tafel and Volmer reactions. The exchange current densities of the elementary reactions, i[sub 0V] and i[sub 0T], were then evaluated by extrapolating the Tafel lines for [eta][sub 1] and [eta][sub 2]. The Volmer reaction is much more accelerated by surface modification with RuO[sub 2] or Co[sub 3]O[sub 4] powder than the Tafel reaction, which results in the enrichment of adsorbed hydrogen, leading to higher charging efficiency.

Iwakura, Chiaki; Matsuoka, Masao; Kohno, Tatsuoki (Univ. of Osaka Prefecture (Japan). Dept. of Applied Chemistry)

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

US weapons-useable plutonium disposition policy: implementation of the MOX fuel option  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

US WEAPONS-USEABLE PLUTONIUM DISPOSITION POLICY: IMPLEMENTATION OF THE MOX FUEL OPTION A Thesis by VANESSA L. GONZALEZ Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas ARM University in partial fulfillment of the requirements... for the degree of MASTER OF ARTS August 1998 Major Subject: Political Science US WEAPONS-USEABLE PLUTONIUM DISPOSITION POLICY: IMPLEMENTATION OF THE MOX FUEL OPTION A Thesis by VANESSA L. GONZALEZ Submitted to Texas ARM University in partial fulfillment...

Gonzalez, Vanessa L

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

111

Neutronics Benchmarks for the Utilization of Mixed-Oxide Fuel: Joint US/Russian Progress Report for Fiscal 1997. Volume 3 - Calculations Performed in the Russian Federation  

SciTech Connect

This volume of the progress report provides documentation of reactor physics and criticality safety studies conducted in the Russian Federation during fiscal year 1997 and sponsored by the Fissile Materials Disposition Program of the US Department of Energy. Descriptions of computational and experimental benchmarks for the verification and validation of computer programs for neutron physics analyses are included. All benchmarks include either plutonium, uranium, or mixed uranium and plutonium fuels. Calculated physics parameters are reported for all of the contaminated benchmarks that the United States and Russia mutually agreed in November 1996 were applicable to mixed-oxide fuel cycles for light-water reactors.

NONE

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Evaluation of weapons-grade mixed oxide fuel performance in U.S. Light Water Reactors using COMETHE 4D release 23 computer code  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The COMETHE 4D Release 23 computer code was used to evaluate the thermal, chemical and mechanical performance of weapons-grade MOX fuel irradiated under U.S. light water reactor typical conditions. Comparisons were made to and UO? fuels exhibited...

Bellanger, Philippe

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

113

U.S. weapons-usable plutonium disposition policy: Implementation of the MOX fuel option  

SciTech Connect

A comprehensive case study was conducted on the policy problem of disposing of US weapons-grade plutonium, which has been declared surplus to strategic defense needs. Specifically, implementation of the mixed-oxide fuel disposition option was examined in the context of national and international nonproliferation policy, and in contrast to US plutonium policy. The study reveals numerous difficulties in achieving effective implementation of the mixed-oxide fuel option including unresolved licensing and regulatory issues, technological uncertainties, public opposition, potentially conflicting federal policies, and the need for international assurances of reciprocal plutonium disposition activities. It is believed that these difficulties can be resolved in time so that the implementation of the mixed-oxide fuel option can eventually be effective in accomplishing its policy objective.

Woods, A.L. [ed.] [Amarillo National Resource Center for Plutonium, TX (United States); Gonzalez, V.L. [Texas A and M Univ., College Station, TX (United States). Dept. of Political Science

1998-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Direct Conversion of Bio-ethanol to Isobutene on Nanosized ZnxZryOz Mixed Oxides with Balanced Acid–Base Sites  

SciTech Connect

Bio-mass conversion has attracted increasing research interests to produce bio-fuels with bio-ethanol being a major product. Development of advanced processes to further upgrade bio-ethanol to other value added fuels or chemicals are pivotal to improving the economics of biomass conversion and deversifying the utilization of biomass resources. In this paper, for the first time, we report the direct conversion of bio-ethanol to isobutene with high yield (~83%) on a multifunctional ZnxZryOz mixed oxide with a dedicated balance of surface acid-base properties. This work illustrates the significance of rational design of a multifunctional mixed oxide catalyst for one step bio-ethanol conversion to a value-added intermediate, isobutene, for chemical and fuel production. This work was supported by the US Department of Energy Basic Energy Sciences' Chemical Sciences, Geosciences & Biosciences Division. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is operated by Battelle for the US Department of Energy.

Sun, Junming; Zhu, Kake; Gao, Feng; Wang, Chong M.; Liu, Jun; Peden, Charles HF; Wang, Yong

2011-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

115

ZIRCONIA-BASED MIXED POTENTIAL CARBON MONOXIDE/HYDROCARBON SENSORS WITH LANTHANUM MAGNESIUM OXIDE, AND TERBIUM-DOPED YTTRIUM STABILIZED ZIRCONIA ELECTRODES  

SciTech Connect

We have investigated the performance of dual metal oxide electrode mixed potential sensors in an engine-out, dynamometer environment. Sensors were fabricated by sputtering thin films of LaMnO{sub 3} and Tb-doped YSZ onto YSZ electrolyte. Au gauze held onto the metal oxide thin films with Au ink was used for current collection. The exhaust gas from a 4.8L, V8 engine operated in open loop, steady-state mode around stoichiometry at 1500 RPM and 50 Nm. The sensor showed a stable EMF response (with no hysteresis) to varying concentrations of total exhaust gas HC content. The sensor response was measured at 620 and 670 C and shows temperature behavior characteristic of mixed potential-type sensors. The results of these engine-dynamometer tests are encouraging; however, the limitations associated with Au current collection present the biggest impediment to automotive use.

E. L. BROSHA; R. MUKUNDAN; ET AL

2000-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Changes in Nitrogen-Fixing and Ammonia-Oxidizing Bacterial Communities in Soil of a Mixed Conifer Forest after Wildfire  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Communities in Soil of a Mixed Conifer Forest after Wildfire Chris M. Yeager...severely burned soils of a mixed conifer forest. PCR results indicated that the...severely burned soils of a mixed conifer forest following the Cerro Grande Fire...

Chris M. Yeager; Diana E. Northup; Christy C. Grow; Susan M. Barns; Cheryl R. Kuske

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Obtaining Mixed Ionic/Electronic Conductivity in Perovskite Oxides in a Reducing Environment: A Computational Prediction for Doped SrTiO3  

SciTech Connect

The electronic conductivity and thermodynamic stability of mixed p- and n-doped SrTiO3 perovskites have been investigated under anodic solid oxide fuel cell conditions using density functional theory (DFT). In particular, constrained ab initio thermodynamic calculations have been performed to evaluate the phase stability of various Ga- and La-doped SrTiO3 at synthesized and anodic SOFC conditions. The density of states (DOS) of these materials was analyzed to determine the number of charge carriers and the degree of electronic conductivity. We find that a mixed ionic/electronic conductor can be obtained when doping SrTiO3 perovskite oxide with both p-type and n-type dopants. Calculations show that 10% Ga- and 20% La-doped SrTiO3 exhibit mixed ionic/electronic conductivity at high temperature and low oxygen partial pressure whereas doping with higher concentrations of Ga, e.g., 20%, diminishes the electronic conductivity of the material. Furthermore, changing the n-dopant from La (A-site) to Nb (B-site) does not significantly affect the reducibility and number of charge carriers in p- and n-doped SrTiO3. However, a higher degree of oxygen vacancy clustering is observed for the La-doped material which reduces the oxygen ion diffusion rate and traps electrons. Nevertheless, our findings suggest that independent of doping site, mixed ionic/ electronic conductivity can be obtained in SrTiO3 perovskite oxides under reducing conditions and high temperatures when using a mixed p- and n-type doping strategy that uses a p-dopant concentration smaller than the n-dopant concentration.

Suthirakun, Suwit; Ammal, Salai Cheettu; Xiao, Guoliang; Chen, Fanglin; Huang, Kevin; zur Loye, Hans-Conrad; Heyden, Andreas

2012-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

118

IDENTIFYING IMPURITIES IN SURPLUS NON PIT PLUTONIUM FEEDS FOR MOX OR ALTERNATIVE DISPOSITION  

SciTech Connect

This report provides a technical basis for estimating the level of corrosion products in materials stored in DOE-STD-3013 containers based on extrapolating available chemical sample results. The primary focus is to estimate the levels of nickel, iron, and chromium impurities in plutonium-bearing materials identified for disposition in the United States Mixed Oxide fuel process.

Allender, J; Moore, E

2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

119

RELAP5/MOD3.2 analysis of a VVER-1000 reactor with UO[2] fuel and MOX fuel  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.2 results showed a good agreement with calculations obtained with TECH-M computer program. The cladding temperatures of the MOX assembly have been compared with that of the hot UO? assembly. The peak cladding temperature of MOX assembly is about 55 K higher...

Fu, Chun

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

120

The design, construction, and testing of a nuclear fuel rod thermal simulation system to study gallium/Zircaloy interactions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

friends for their unending support and patience during this project. Thank you so much! NOMENCLATURE Abbreviations and Acronyms WGPu- weapons grade plutonium DOE- Department of Energy MOX- mixed oxide fuel WG MOX- weapons grade MOX fuel LWR- light... to be employed were immobilization and fissioning the WGPu as mixed oxide (MOX) fuel in commercial power reactors. Both approaches have many advantages and disadvantages and are currently being studied by scientists and engineers all over the world. The use...

Allison, Christopher Curtis

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mixed oxide mox" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Adsorption of propane, isopropyl, and hydrogen on cluster models of the M1 phase of Mo-V-Te-Nb-O mixed metal oxide catalyst  

SciTech Connect

The Mo-V-Te-Nb-O mixed metal oxide catalyst possessing the M1 phase structure is uniquely capable of directly converting propane into acrylonitrile. However, the mechanism of this complex eight-electron transformation, which includes a series of oxidative H-abstraction and N-insertion steps, remains poorly understood. We have conducted a density functional theory study of cluster models of the proposed active and selective site for propane ammoxidation, including the adsorption of propane, isopropyl (CH{sub 3}CHCH{sub 3}), and H which are involved in the first step of this transformation, that is, the methylene C-H bond scission in propane, on these active site models. Among the surface oxygen species, the telluryl oxo (Te=O) is found to be the most nucleophilic. Whereas the adsorption of propane is weak regardless of the MO{sub x} species involved, isopropyl and H adsorption exhibits strong preference in the order of Te=O > V=O > bridging oxygens > empty Mo apical site, suggesting the importance of TeO{sub x} species for H abstraction. The adsorption energies of isopropyl and H and consequently the reaction energy of the initial dehydrogenation of propane are strongly dependent on the number of ab planes included in the cluster, which points to the need to employ multilayer cluster models to correctly capture the energetics of surface chemistry on this mixed metal oxide catalyst.

Govindasamy, Agalya [University of Cincinnati; Muthukumar, Kaliappan [University of Cincinnati; Yu, Junjun [University of Cincinnati; Xu, Ye [ORNL; Guliants, Vadim V. [University of Cincinnati

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Redox cycle stability of mixed oxides used for hydrogen generation in the cyclic water gas shift process  

SciTech Connect

Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} modified with CaO, SiO{sub 2} and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} was studied in cyclic water gas shift reactor. • For the first time stability of such oxides were tested for 100 redox cycles. • Optimally added oxides significantly improved the activity and the stability of Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}. • Increased stability was attributed to the impediment of neck formation. - Abstract: Repeated cycles of the reduction of Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} with reductive gas, e.g. hydrogen and subsequent oxidation of the reduced iron material with water vapor can be harnessed as a process for the production of pure hydrogen. The redox behavior of iron oxide modified with various amounts of SiO{sub 2}, CaO and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} was investigated in the present study. The total amount of the additional metal oxides was always below 15 wt%. The samples were prepared by co-precipitation using urea hydrolysis method. The influence of various metal oxides on the hydrogen production capacity and the material stability was studied in detail in terms of temperature-programmed reduction (TPR), X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and BET analysis. Furthermore, the activity and the stability of the samples were tested in repeated reduction with diluted H{sub 2} and re-oxidation cycles with H{sub 2}O. The results indicate that combination of several oxides as promoter increases the stability of the iron oxide material by mitigating the sintering process. The positive influence of the oxides in stabilizing the iron oxide material is attributed to the impediment of neck formation responsible for sintering.

Datta, Pradyot, E-mail: pradyot.datta@gmail.com

2013-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

123

Selective production of methanol from syngas over LaTi1?xCuxO3 mixed oxides  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Carbon monoxide hydrogenation was studied over partially substituted copper-containing LaTi1?xCuxO3 oxides and on copper supported on La2O3. The unsubstituted (x = 0) oxide was weakly active for CO hydrogenation,...

R. van Grieken; J. L. Peña; A. Lucas; G. Calleja; M. L. Rojas…

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Stability of ruthenium catalysts supported by aerogel mixed oxides during the wet air oxidation of p-hydroxybenzoic acid in a continuous reactor  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Continuous catalytic wet air oxidation was investigated as a suitable treatment of p-hydroxybenzoic acid chosen as a phenolic compound typically found in olive mill wastewater. The reaction was conducted in a con...

Mohamed Triki; Anton Dafinov; Jordi Llorca…

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Water quality improvement of a lagoon containing mixed chemical industrial wastewater by micro-electrolysis-contact oxidization  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A lagoon in the New Binhai District, a high-speed developing area, Tianjin, China, has long been receiving the mixed chemical industrial wastewater from a chemical industrial park. This lagoon contained comple...

Ya-fei Zhou; Mao Liu; Qiong Wu

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Amperometric Biosensors Based on Carbon Paste Electrodes Modified with Nanostructured Mixed-valence Manganese Oxides and Glucose Oxidase  

SciTech Connect

Nanostructured multivalent manganese oxides octahedral molecular sieve (OMS), including cryptomelane-type manganese oxides and todorokite-type manganese oxides, were synthesized and evaluated for chemical sensing and biosensing at low operating potential. Both cryptomelane-type manganese oxides and todorokite-type manganese oxides are nanofibrous crystals with sub-nanometer open tunnels that provide a unique property for sensing applications. The electrochemical and electrocatalytic performance of OMS for the oxidation of H2O2 have been compared. Both cryptomelane-type manganese oxides and todorokite-type manganese oxides can be used to fabricate sensitive H2O2 sensors. Amperometric glucose biosensors are constructed by bulk modification of carbon paste electrodes (CPEs) with glucose oxidase as a biocomponent and nanostructured OMS as a mediator. A Nafion thin film was applied as an immobilization/encapsulation and protective layer. The biosensors were evaluated as an amperometric glucose detector at phosphate buffer solution with a pH 7.4 at an operating potential of 0.3 V (vs. Ag/AgCl). The biosensor is characterized by a well-reproducible amperometric response, linear signal-to-glucose concentration range up to 3.5 mM and 1.75 mM, and detection limits (S/N = 3) of 0.1 mM and 0.05 mM for todorokite-type manganese oxide and cryptomelane-type manganese oxide modified electrodes, respectively. The biosensors based on OMS exhibit considerable good reproducibility and stability, and the construction and renewal are simple and inexpensive.

Cui, Xiaoli; Liu, Guodong; Lin, Yuehe

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Multirecycling of Plutonium from LMFBR Blanket in Standard PWRs Loaded with MOX Fuel  

SciTech Connect

It is now well-known that, from a physics standpoint, Pu, or even TRU (i.e. Pu+M.A.), originating from LEU fuel irradiated in PWRs can be multirecycled also in PWRs using MOX fuel. However, the degradation of the isotopic composition during irradiation necessitates using enriched U in conjunction with the MOX fuel either homogeneously or heterogeneously to maintain the Pu (or TRU) content at a level allowing safe operation of the reactor, i.e. below about 10%. The study is related to another possible utilization of the excess Pu produced in the blanket of a LMFBR, namely in a PWR(MOX). In this case the more Pu is bred in the LMFBR, the more PWR(MOX) it can sustain. The important difference between the Pu coming from the blanket of a LMFBR and that coming from a PWR(LEU) is its isotopic composition. The first one contains about 95% of fissile isotopes whereas the second one contains only about 65% of fissile isotopes. As it will be shown later, this difference allows the PWR fed by Pu from the LMFBR blanket to operate with natural U instead of enriched U when it is fed by Pu from PWR(LEU)

Sonat Sen; Gilles Youinou

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Removal of hazardous pollutants from wastewaters: applications of TiO2-SiO2 mixed oxide materials  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The direct release of untreated wastewaters from various industries and households results in the release of toxic pollutants to the aquatic environment. Advanced oxidation processes (AOP) have gained wide attention owing to the prospect of complete ...

Shivatharsiny Rasalingam, Rui Peng, Ranjit T. Koodali

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

In situ Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy of adsorbed species on mixed metal oxide catalysts for higher alcohol synthesis  

SciTech Connect

Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy was utilized to identify adsorbed species on Zn/Cu/Cr oxide and potassium carbonate-promoted Zn/Cu/Cr oxide catalysts at 285/sup 0/C and atmospheric pressure. Adsorption of various molecules on catalysts provided information about the nature of the adsorbed species. As a result of CO/H/sub 2/ mixture, methanol and formaldehyde adsorption two types of species formed, namely a methoxy and a formate. The adsorption of ethanol, acetaldehyde and acetic acid at 285/sup 0/C revealed stable acetate species. Ethanol and acetaldehyde adsorption also produced an ethoxy species whose formation was much favored on promoted catalysts. 136 refs., 46 figs., 14 tabs.

Baysar, A.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Estimated airborne release of plutonium from the Exxon Nuclear Mixed Oxide Fuel Plant at Richland, Washington as a result of postulated damage from severe wind and earthquake hazard  

SciTech Connect

The potential airborne releases of plutonium from postulated damage sustained by the Exxon Nuclear Company's Mixed Oxide Fabrication Plant at Richland, Washington, as a result of various levels of wind and earthquake hazard, are estimated. The releases are based on damage scenarios that range up to 250 mph for wind hazard and in excess of 1.0 g ground acceleration for seismic hazard, which were developed by other specialists. The approaches and factors used to estimate the releases (inventories of dispersible materials at risk, damage levels and ratios, fractional airborne releases of dispersible materials under stress, atmosphere exchange rates, and source term ranges) are discussed. Release estimates range from less than 10/sup -7/ g to greater than 14 g of plutonium over a four-day period.

Mishima, J.; Schwendiman, L.C.; Ayer, J.E.; Owzarski, E.L.

1980-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Interaction of iron-copper mixed metal oxide oxygen carriers with simulated synthesis gas derived from steam gasification of coal  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this work was to prepare supported bimetallic Fe–Cu oxygen carriers and to evaluate their performance for the chemical-looping combustion (CLC) process with simulated synthesis gas derived from steam gasification of coal/air. Ten-cycle CLC tests were conducted with Fe–Cu oxygen carriers in an atmospheric thermogravimetric analyzer utilizing simulated synthesis gas derived from the steam gasification of Polish Janina coal and Illinois #6 coal as fuel. The effect of temperature on reaction rates, chemical stability, and oxygen transport capacity were determined. Fractional reduction, fractional oxidation, and global rates of reactions were calculated from the thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) data. The supports greatly affected reaction performance. Data showed that reaction rates and oxygen capacities were stable during the 10-cycle TGA tests for most Fe–Cu/support oxygen carriers. Bimetallic Fe–Cu/support oxygen carriers showed higher reduction rates than Fe-support oxygen carriers. The carriers containing higher Cu content showed better stabilities and better reduction rates. An increase in temperature from 800 °C to 900 °C did not have a significant effect on either the oxygen capacity or the reduction rates with synthesis gas derived from Janina coal. Oxidation reaction was significantly faster than reduction reaction for all supported Fe–Cu oxygen carriers. Carriers with higher Cu content had lower oxidation rates. Ten-cycle TGA data indicated that these oxygen carriers had stable performances at 800–900 °C and might be successfully used up to 900 °C for coal CLC reaction in the presence of steam.

Siriwardane, Ranjani V. [U.S. DOE; Ksepko, Ewelina; Tian, Hanging [URS

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

High-energy mechanical synthesis of nanophase fluorite-structured mixed oxide catalysts with a high redox activity  

SciTech Connect

A series of nanostructured, highly defective, ternary solid solutions containing CeO{sub 2}, ZrO{sub 2}, and MnO{sub 2} or CuO were prepared by high-energy mechanical milling of individual components. Morphological and redox properties were studied by XRD, HRTEM and temperature-programmed reduction techniques. It was shown that the introduction of small amounts of copper and manganese strongly promotes the redox behavior of cerium at lower temperatures in comparison with CeO{sub 2} and CeO{sub 2}-ZrO{sub 2}. High temperature treatment of up to 1,400 K was also shown to further promote overall redox capacity without affecting low-temperature redox behavior. Moreover, evidence is provided to show that Cu and Mn are dissolved within the CeO{sub 2} lattice structure. Addition of dopants enhances catalytic redox properties in the oxidation of CO at low temperatures, which is associated with the high concentration of oxygen vacancies that form on the introduction of aliovalent elements into the ceria-zirconia lattice.

Primavera, A.; Trovarelli, A.; Terribile, D.; Leitenburg, C. de; Dolcetti, G. [Univ. di Udine (Italy). Dipt. di Scienze e Tecnologie Chimiche; Llorca, J. [Univ. de Barcelona (Spain). Dept. de Quimica Inorganica

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

133

Waste Form Development for the Solidification of PDCF/MOX Liquid Waste Streams  

SciTech Connect

At the Savannah River Site, part of the Department of Energy's nuclear materials complex located in South Carolina, cementation has been selected as the solidification method for high-alpha and low-activity waste streams generated in the planned plutonium disposition facilities. A Waste Solidification Building (WSB) that will be used to treat and solidify three radioactive liquid waste streams generated by the Pit Disassembly and Conversion Facility) and the Mixed Oxide Fuel Fabrication Facility is in the preliminary design stage. The WSB is expected to treat a transuranic (TRU) waste stream composed primarily of americium and two low-level waste (LLW) streams. The acidic wastes will be concentrated in the WSB evaporator and neutralized in a cement head tank prior to solidification. A series of TRU mixes were prepared to produce waste forms exhibiting a range of processing and cured properties. The LLW mixes were prepared using the premix from the preferred TRU waste form. All of the waste forms tested passed the Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure. After processing in the WSB, current plans are to dispose of the solidified TRU waste at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant in New Mexico and the solidified LLW waste at an approved low-level waste disposal facility.

COZZI, ALEX

2004-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

134

Evaluation of fuel cycle scenarios on MOX fuel recycling in PWRs and SFRs  

SciTech Connect

Prospects on advanced fuel cycle scenario are considered for achieving a progressive integration of Sodium Fast Reactor (SFR) technology within the current French Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) nuclear fleet, in a view to benefit from fissile material multi-recycling capability. A step by step process is envisioned, and emphasis is put on its potential implementation through the nuclear mass inventory calculations with the COSAC code. The overall time scale is not optimized. The first step, already implemented in several countries, the plutonium coming from the reprocessing of used Light Water Reactor (LWR) fuels is recycled into a small number of LWRs. The second step is the progressive introduction of the first SFRs, in parallel with the continuation of step 1. This second step lets to prepare the optimized multi recycling of MOX fuel which is considered in step 3. Step 3 is characterized by the introduction of a greater number of SFR and MOX management between EPR reactors and SFRs. In the final step 4, all the fleet is formed with SFRs. This study assesses the viability of each step of the overall scenario. The switch from one step to the other one could result from different constrains related to issues such as resources, waste, experience feedback, public acceptance, country policy, etc.

Carlier, B.; Caron-Charles, M.; Van Den Durpel, L. [AREVA, 1 place Jean Millier, Paris La Defense (France); Senentz, G. [AREVA, 33 rue La Lafayette, 75009 Paris (France); Serpantie, J.P. [AREVA, 10 rue Juliette Recamier, Lyon (France)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Compared performances of ENDF/B-VI and JEF-2.2 for MOX core physics.  

SciTech Connect

The US is currently evaluating the use of MOX fuel in commercial LWR's for reducing weapons grade Pu stockpiles. The design and licensing processes will require that the validity of the nuclear data libraries and codes used in the effort be demonstrated. Unfortunately, there are only a very limited number of relatively old and non representative integral experiments' freely available to the US programs. This lack of adequate experimental data can be partially remediated by comparing the results of well validated European codes with the results of candidate US codes. The demonstration can actually be divided in two components: a code to code (Monte Carlo) comparison can easily demonstrate the validity and limits of the proposed algorithms; and the performances of nuclear data libraries should be compared, major trends should be observed, and their origins should be explained in terms of differences in evaluated nuclear data; In this paper, we have compared the performances of the JEF-2.2 and ENDF/B-VI.4 libraries for a series of benchmarks for k{sub eff}, void worth, and pin power distributions. Note that JEF-2.2 has been extensively validated for MOX applications.

Finck, P. J.

1998-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

136

ANALYTICAL RESULTS FOR MOX COLEMANITE CONCRETE SAMPLES RECEIVED ON NOVEMBER 21, 2013  

SciTech Connect

The Mixed Oxide Fuel Fabrication Facility (MFFF) will use colemanite bearing concrete neutron absorber panels credited with attenuating neutron flux in the criticality design analyses and shielding operators from radiation. The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) is tasked with measuring the total density, partial hydrogen density, and partial boron density of the colemanite concrete. SRNL received two samples of colemanite concrete for analysis on November 21, 2013. The average total density of each of the samples measured by the ASTM method C 642, the average partial hydrogen density was measured using method ASTM E 1131, and the average partial boron density of each sample was measured according to ASTM C 1301. The lower limits and measured values for the total density, hydrogen partial density, and boron partial density are presented. For all the samples tested, the total density and the boron partial density met or exceeded the specified limit. None of the samples met the lower limit for hydrogen partial density.

Reigel, M.

2014-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

137

ANALYTICAL RESULTS FOR MOX COLEMANITE CONCRETE SAMPLES RECEIVED ON SEPTEMBER 4, 2013  

SciTech Connect

The Mixed Oxide Fuel Fabrication Facility (MFFF) will use colemanite bearing concrete neutron absorber panels credited with attenuating neutron flux in the criticality design analyses and shielding operators from radiation. The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) is tasked with measuring the total density, partial hydrogen density, and partial boron density of the colemanite concrete. SRNL received three samples of colemanite concrete for analysis on September 4, 2013. The average total density of each of the samples measured by the ASTM method C 642, the average partial hydrogen density was measured using method ASTM E 1131, and the average partial boron density of each sample was measured according to ASTM C 1301. The lower limits and measured values for the total density, hydrogen partial density, and boron partial density are presented. For all the samples tested, the total density and the boron partial density met or exceeded the specified limit. None of the samples met the lower limit for hydrogen partial density.

Reigel, M.

2014-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

138

Single-Site Vanadyl Activation, Functionalization, and Reoxidation Reaction Mechanism for Propane Oxidative Dehydrogenation on the Cubic V4O10 Cluster  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, and mixed metal oxide (MMO) catalysts for selective oxidation and ammoxida- tion of propene to acrolein

Goddard III, William A.

139

Integration Strategy for DB-MHR TRISO Fuel production in conjunction with MOX Fuel production  

SciTech Connect

One of the nuclear power options for the future involves the evolution of gas cooled reactors to support the likely high temperature operations needed for commercial scale hydrogen production. One such proposed option is to use a Gas Turbine Modular Helium Reactor fueled with uranium based TRISO (coated particle) fuel. It has also been suggested that such a MHR could be operated in a ''Deep Burn'' manner fueled with TRISO fuel produced from recycle spent nuclear fuel. This concept known as a DBMHR must withstand significant development and fuel fabrication cost to be economically viable. The purpose of this report is to consider and propose a strategy where synergy with a parallel MOX fuel to LWR program provides economic or other advantage for either or both programs. A strategy involving three phases has been envisioned with potential for economic benefit relative to a stand-alone TRISO/DBMHR program. Such a strategy and related timing will ultimately be driven by economics, but is offered here for consideration of value to the total AFCI program. Phase I Near-term. Conventional spent fuel aqueous processing, MOX fuel fabrication, and use of present and future LWR/ALWR's with objective of a ''Continuous Recycle'' mode of fuel cycle management. Phase II Intermediate. Augmentation of LWR/ALWR industry with MHR deployment as justified by hydrogen economy and/or electrical demand. Phase III Long-term. Introduction of DBMHR's to offer alternative method for transuranic destruction and associated repository benefits, in addition to Phase II benefits. The basic philosophy of this strategy appears sound. However, the details of the technology plans and economic evaluations should receive additional detail and evaluation in the next fiscal year as funding can support.

MCGUIRE, DAVID

2005-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

140

Audit Report: IG-0887 | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

7 7 Audit Report: IG-0887 May 15, 2013 The Use of Staff Augmentation Subcontracts at the National Nuclear Security Administration's Mixed Oxide Fuel Fabrication Facility Shaw AREVA MOX Services, LLC (MOX Services) is responsible for the design and construction of the National Nuclear Security Administration's (NNSA) nearly $5 billion Mixed Oxide Fuel Fabrication Facility (MOX Project) at the Savannah River Site near Aiken, South Carolina. The facility will remove impurities from surplus weapons-grade plutonium and mix it with depleted uranium oxide to form fuel pellets for commercial nuclear power reactors. MOX Services used staff augmentation subcontracts to fill professional, technical and administrative support service positions on an as-needed basis on the MOX Project. According to MOX Services officials, a shortage

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mixed oxide mox" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Doped palladium containing oxidation catalysts  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A supported oxidation catalyst includes a support having a metal oxide or metal salt, and mixed metal particles thereon. The mixed metal particles include first particles including a palladium compound, and second particles including a precious metal group (PMG) metal or PMG metal compound, wherein the PMG metal is not palladium. The oxidation catalyst may also be used as a gas sensor.

Mohajeri, Nahid

2014-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

142

Impact of Pt loading methods over mesoporous-assembled TiO{sub 2}–ZrO{sub 2} mixed oxide nanocrystal on photocatalytic dye-sensitized H{sub 2} production activity  

SciTech Connect

Graphical abstract: The Pt loading on the synthesized mesoporous-assembled 0.95TiO{sub 2}–0.05ZrO{sub 2} mixed oxide nanocrystal photocatalyst was comparatively investigated by two methods: single-step sol–gel (SSSG) and photochemical deposition (PCD). The Pt loading by the PCD method was found to be superior to that by the SSSG method in enhancing photocatalytic sensitized hydrogen production under visible light irradiation. The Pt loading amount and PCD conditions, i.e. light irradiation time and light intensity, also had a strong effect on the photocatalytic hydrogen production activity. Highlights: ? Pt-loaded mesoporous-assembled 0.95TiO{sub 2}–0.05ZrO{sub 2} nanocrystals were synthesized. ? Pt loading was performed by single-step sol–gel and photochemical deposition. ? Pt loading by photochemical deposition more enhanced photocatalytic H{sub 2} production. ? Pt loading amount and photochemical deposition conditions were optimized. -- Abstract: In this work, the photocatalytic water splitting under visible light irradiation for hydrogen production was investigated by using Eosin Y-sensitized Pt-loaded mesoporous-assembled TiO{sub 2}–ZrO{sub 2} mixed oxide nanocrystal photocatalysts. The mesoporous-assembled TiO{sub 2}–ZrO{sub 2} mixed oxide with the TiO{sub 2}-to-ZrO{sub 2} molar ratio of 95:5 (i.e. 0.95TiO{sub 2}–0.05ZrO{sub 2}) was synthesized by using a sol–gel process with the aid of a structure-directing surfactant. The Pt loading was comparatively performed via two different effective methods: single-step sol–gel (SSSG) and photochemical deposition (PCD). The synthesized photocatalysts were methodically characterized by N{sub 2} adsorption–desorption, XRD, UV–visible spectroscopy, SEM–EDX, TEM–EDX, TPR, and H{sub 2} chemisorption analyses. The results revealed that the Pt loading by the PCD method greatly enhanced the photocatalytic hydrogen production activity of the synthesized mesoporous-assembled 0.95TiO{sub 2}–0.05ZrO{sub 2} mixed oxide photocatalyst more than that by the SSSG method. The optimum Pt loading by the PCD method was experimentally observed at 0.5 wt.%, which was well associated with the maximum Pt dispersion. In addition, the PCD conditions, i.e. UV light irradiation time and UV light intensity, were investigated and optimized to be 2 h and 44 W, respectively.

Sreethawong, Thammanoon, E-mail: tsreethawong@hotmail.com [Baan Klangmuang Luzern, Soi On-nut 46, Sukhumvit 77 Road, Suanluang, Bangkok 10250 (Thailand)] [Baan Klangmuang Luzern, Soi On-nut 46, Sukhumvit 77 Road, Suanluang, Bangkok 10250 (Thailand); Yoshikawa, Susumu [Institute of Advanced Energy, Kyoto University, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan)] [Institute of Advanced Energy, Kyoto University, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan)

2012-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

143

ANALYTICAL RESULTS FOR MOX COLEMANITE CONCRETE SAMPLES RECEIVED ON JANUARY 15, 2013  

SciTech Connect

The Mixed Oxide Fuel Fabrication Facility (MFFF) will use colemanite bearing concrete neutron absorber panels credited with attenuating neutron flux in the criticality design analyses and shielding operators from radiation. The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) is tasked with measuring the total density, partial hydrogen density, and partial boron density of the colemanite concrete. SRNL received twelve samples of colemanite concrete for analysis on January 15, 2013. The average total density of each of the samples measured by the ASTM method C 642, the average partial hydrogen density was measured using method ASTM E 1131, and the average partial boron density of each sample was measured according to ASTM C 1301. The lower limits and measured values for the total density, hydrogen partial density, and boron partial density are presented. For all the samples tested, the total density and the hydrogen partial density met or exceeded the specified limit. All of the samples met or exceeded the boron partial density lower bound with the exception of samples G3-M11-2000-H, G3-M11-3000-M, and G5-M1-3000-H which are below the limit of 1.65E-01 g/cm{sup 3}.

Reigel, M.

2014-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

144

ANALYTICAL RESULTS OF MOX COLEMANITE CONCRETE SAMPLE POURED MAY 4, 2012  

SciTech Connect

The Mixed Oxide Fuel Fabrication Facility (MFFF) will use Colemanite bearing concrete neutron absorber panels credited with attenuating neutron flux in the criticality design analyses. The Savannah River National Laboratory is tasked with measuring the total density, partial hydrogen density, and partial boron density of the colemanite concrete. Sample 04 May 12/Test/S1-1, S1-2, and S1-3 was received on 5/9/2012 and analyzed. The total density measure by the ASTM method C 642 was 2.00 g/cm{sup 3}, within the lower bound of 1.88 g/cm{sup 3}. The partial hydrogen density of 6.35E-02 g/cm{sup 3} as measured using method ASTM E 1311 met the lower bound of 6.04E-02 g/cm{sup 3}. The measured partial boron density of 1.88E-01 g/cm{sup 3} exceeded the lower bound of 1.65E-01 g/cm{sup 3} when the sodium peroxide fusion dissolution method was used in place of the prescribed ASTM C 1301 method.

Cozzi, A.; Best, D.; Reigel, M.

2012-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

145

Investigation of mixed metal sorbent/catalysts for the simultaneous removal of sulfur and nitrogen oxides. Semiannual report, Apr 1, 1998--Oct 31, 1998  

SciTech Connect

Simultaneous removal of SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} using a regenerable solid sorbent will constitute an important improvement over the use of separate processes for the removal of these two pollutants from stack gases and possibly eliminate several shortcomings of the individual SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} removal operations. The work done at PETC and the DOE-funded investigation of the investigators on the sulfation and regeneration of alumina-supported cerium oxide sorbents have shown that they can perform well at relatively high temperatures (823--900 K) as regenerable desulfurization sorbents. Survey of the recent literature shows that addition of copper oxide to ceria lowers the sulfation temperature of ceria down to 773 K, sulfated ceria-based sorbents can function as selective SCR catalysts even at elevated temperatures, SO{sub 2} can be directly reduced to sulfur by CO on CuO-ceria catalysts, and ceria-based catalysts may have a potential for selective catalytic reduction of NO{sub x} by methane. These observations indicate a possibility of developing a ceria-based sorbent/catalyst which can remove both SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} from flue gases within a relatively wide temperature window, produce significant amounts of elemental sulfur during regeneration, and use methane for the selective catalytic reduction of NO{sub x}. The objective of this research is to conduct kinetic and parametric studies of the selective catalytic reduction of NO{sub x} with NH{sub 3} and CH{sub 4} over alumina-supported cerium oxide and copper oxide-cerium oxide sorbent/catalysts; investigate SO{sub 2} removal at lower temperatures by supported copper oxide-cerium oxide sorbents; and investigate the possibility of elemental sulfur production during regeneration with CO or with CH{sub 4} air mixtures. The sorbents consisting of cerium oxide and copper oxide impregnated on alumina have been prepared and characterized. Their sulfation performance has been investigated in a TGA setup, studying mainly the effects of temperature and sorbent composition. The results of the sulfation experiments have been evaluated and presented in this report. A study to model the sulfation selectivity of the two constituents of the sorbents is also underway.

Dr. Ates Akyurtlu; Dr. Jale F. Akyurtlu

1998-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

146

Gold, Copper, and Platinum Nanoparticles Dispersed on CeOx/TiO2(110) Surfaces: High Water-Gas Shift Activity and the Nature of the Mixed-Metal Oxide at the Nanometer Level  

SciTech Connect

At small coverages of ceria on TiO{sub 2}(110), the CeO{sub x} nanoparticles have an unusual coordination mode. Scanning tunneling microscopy and density-functional calculations point to the presence of Ce{sub 2}O{sub 3} dimers, which form diagonal arrays that have specific orientations of 0, 24, and 42{sup o} with respect to the [1 -1 0] direction of the titania substrate. At high coverages of ceria on TiO{sub 2}(110), the surface exhibits two types of terraces. In one type, the morphology is not very different from that observed at low ceria coverage. However, in the second type of terrace, there is a compact array of ceria particles with structures that do not match the structures of CeO{sub 2}(111) or CeO{sub 2}(110). The titania substrate imposes on the ceria nanoparticles nontypical coordination modes, enhancing their chemical reactivity. This phenomenon leads to a larger dispersion of supported metal nanoparticles (M = Au, Cu, Pt) and makes possible the direct participation of the oxide in catalytic reactions. The M/CeO{sub x}/TiO{sub 2}(110) surfaces display an extremely high catalytic activity for the water-gas shift reaction that follows the sequence Au/CeO{sub x}/TiO{sub 2}(110) < Cu/CeO{sub x}/TiO{sub 2}(110) < Pt/CeO{sub x}/TiO{sub 2}(110). For low coverages of Cu and CeO{sub x}, Cu/CeO{sub x}/TiO{sub 2}(110) is 8-12 times more active than Cu(111) or Cu/ZnO industrial catalysts. In the M/CeO{sub x}/TiO{sub 2}(110) systems, there is a strong coupling of the chemical properties of the admetal and the mixed-metal oxide: The adsorption and dissociation of water probably take place on the oxide, CO adsorbs on the admetal nanoparticles, and all subsequent reaction steps occur at the oxide-admetal interface. The high catalytic activity of the M/CeO{sub x}/TiO{sub 2}(110) surfaces reflects the unique properties of the mixed-metal oxide at the nanometer level.

Park, J.; Graciani, J; Evans, J; Stacchiola, D; Senanayake, S; Barrio, L; Liu, P; Fdez. Sanz, J; Hrbek, J; Rodriguez, J

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Gold, Copper and Platinum Nanoparticles Dispersed on CeOx/TiO2(110) Surfaces: High Water-Gas Shift Activity and the Nature of the Mixed-Metal Oxide at the Nanometer Level  

SciTech Connect

At small coverages of ceria on TiO{sub 2}(110), the CeO{sub x} nanoparticles have an unusual coordination mode. Scanning tunneling microscopy and density-functional calculations point to the presence of Ce{sub 2}O{sub 3} dimers, which form diagonal arrays that have specific orientations of 0, 24, and 42{sup o} with respect to the [1 -1 0] direction of the titania substrate. At high coverages of ceria on TiO{sub 2}(110), the surface exhibits two types of terraces. In one type, the morphology is not very different from that observed at low ceria coverage. However, in the second type of terrace, there is a compact array of ceria particles with structures that do not match the structures of CeO{sub 2}(111) or CeO{sub 2}(110). The titania substrate imposes on the ceria nanoparticles nontypical coordination modes, enhancing their chemical reactivity. This phenomenon leads to a larger dispersion of supported metal nanoparticles (M = Au, Cu, Pt) and makes possible the direct participation of the oxide in catalytic reactions. The M/CeO{sub x}/TiO{sub 2}(110) surfaces display an extremely high catalytic activity for the water-gas shift reaction that follows the sequence Au/CeO{sub x}/TiO{sub 2}(110) < Cu/CeO{sub x}/TiO{sub 2}(110) < Pt/CeO{sub x}/TiO{sub 2}(110). For low coverages of Cu and CeO{sub x}, Cu/CeO{sub x}/TiO{sub 2}(110) is 8-12 times more active than Cu(111) or Cu/ZnO industrial catalysts. In the M/CeO{sub x}/TiO{sub 2}(110) systems, there is a strong coupling of the chemical properties of the admetal and the mixed-metal oxide: The adsorption and dissociation of water probably take place on the oxide, CO adsorbs on the admetal nanoparticles, and all subsequent reaction steps occur at the oxide-admetal interface. The high catalytic activity of the M/CeO{sub x}/TiO{sub 2}(110) surfaces reflects the unique properties of the mixed-metal oxide at the nanometer level.

Rodriguez, J.A.; Park, J.B.; Graciani, J.; Evans, J.; Stacchiola, D.; Senanayake, S.D.; Barrio, L.; Liu, P.; Sanz, J.F.; Hrbek, J.

2010-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

148

Verification Calculation Results to Validate the Procedures and Codes for Pin-by-Pin Power Computation in VVER Type Reactors with MOX Fuel Loading  

SciTech Connect

One of the important problems for ensuring the VVER type reactor safety when the reactor is partially loaded with MOX fuel is the choice of appropriate physical zoning to achieve the maximum flattening of pin-by-pin power distribution. When uranium fuel is replaced by MOX one provided that the reactivity due to fuel assemblies is kept constant, the fuel enrichment slightly decreases. However, the average neutron spectrum fission microscopic cross-section for {sup 239}Pu is approximately twice that for {sup 235}U. Therefore power peaks occur in the peripheral fuel assemblies containing MOX fuel which are aggravated by the interassembly water. Physical zoning has to be applied to flatten the power peaks in fuel assemblies containing MOX fuel. Moreover, physical zoning cannot be confined to one row of fuel elements as is the case with a uniform lattice of uranium fuel assemblies. Both the water gap and the jump in neutron absorption macroscopic cross-sections which occurs at the interface of fuel assemblies with different fuels make the problem of calculating space-energy neutron flux distribution more complicated since it increases nondiffusibility effects. To solve this problem it is necessary to update the current codes, to develop new codes and to verify all the codes including nuclear-physical constants libraries employed. In so doing it is important to develop and validate codes of different levels--from design codes to benchmark ones. This paper presents the results of the burnup calculation for a multiassembly structure, consisting of MOX fuel assemblies surrounded by uranium dioxide fuel assemblies. The structure concerned can be assumed to model a fuel assembly lattice symmetry element of the VVER-1000 type reactor in which 1/4 of all fuel assemblies contains MOX fuel.

Chizhikova, Z.N.; Kalashnikov, A.G.; Kapranova, E.N.; Korobitsyn, V.E.; Manturov, G.N.; Tsiboulia, A.A.

1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Synthesis and Characterization of Mixed-Conducting Corrosion Resistant Oxide Supports - DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

8 8 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report Vijay K. Ramani (Primary Contact), Jai Prakash Illinois Institute of Technology (IIT) 10 W 33 rd Street 127 PH Chicago, IL 60616 Phone: (312) 567-3064 Email: ramani@iit.edu DOE Managers HQ: Kathi Epping Martin Phone: (202) 586-7425 Email: Kathi.Epping@ee.doe.gov GO: Katie Randolph Phone: (720) 356-1759 Email: Katie.Randolph@go.doe.gov Contract Number: DE-EE0000461 Subcontractor: Nissan Technical Center, North America (NTCNA) Farmington Hills, MI Project Start Date: September 1, 2010 Project End Date: August 31, 2013 Fiscal Year (FY) 2012 Objectives To develop and optimize innovative non-carbon mixed * conducting materials that will serve as corrosion resistant, high surface area supports for anode and

150

Disposition of weapons-grade plutonium in Westinghouse reactors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We have studied the feasibility of using weapons-grade plutonium in the form of mixed-oxide (MOX) fuel in existing Westinghouse reactors. We have designed three transition cycles from an all LEU core to a partial MOX core. We found that four...

Alsaed, Abdelhalim Ali

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

151

Microsoft Word - Document in Microsoft Internet Explorer  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Status of the Mixed Oxide Fuel Status of the Mixed Oxide Fuel Fabrication Facility DOE/IG-0713 December 2005 STATUS OF THE MIXED OXIDE FUEL FABRICATION FACILITY TABLE OF CONTENTS MOX Facility Design Costs Details of Finding 1 Recommendations 5 Comments 6 Appendices Objective, Scope, and Methodology 9 Prior Audit Reports 11 Management Comments 12 MOX Facility Design Costs Page 1 Details of Finding Design and The audit disclosed that the cost of the Mixed Oxide Fuel Construction Budget Facility (MOX) will significantly exceed the amounts reported to Congress. As of July 2005, the National Nuclear Security Administration's (NNSA's) unvalidated estimate for the design and construction of the MOX Facility was about $3.5 billion, which is

152

RADIATION DOSE ASPECTS IN THE HANDLING OF EMERGING NUCLEAR FUELS  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......Radiol. Prot. (2008) 28:161. 15 NUREG. Standard review plan for the review of an application for a Mixed Oxide (MOX) fuel...facilities specific safety guide. (2010) IAEA Safety Standards Series No. SSG-6, International Atomic Energy......

G. Nicolaou

2014-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

RADIATION DOSE ASPECTS IN THE HANDLING OF EMERGING NUCLEAR FUELS  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......Prot. (2008) 28:161. 15 NUREG. Standard review plan for the review of an application for a Mixed Oxide (MOX) fuel...fabrication facility. (2000) NUREG-1718, US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. 16 IAEA. Safety of uranium fuel fabrication......

G. Nicolaou

2014-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Performance testing and Bayesian Reliability Analysis of small diameter, high power electric heaters for the simulation of nuclear fuel rod temperatures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

proposed full test using prototypic mixed-oxide fuel (MOX) containing plutonium from converted nuclear weapons. Bayesian reliability analysis methods were used to determine the expected heater failure rate because of the expected short test duration...

O'Kelly, David Sean

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

155

Quantitative NDA Measurements of Advanced Reprocessing Product Materials Containing U, NP, PU, and AM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of this first principle technique have been identified: (1) quantitative measurement of uranium, neptunium, plutonium, and americium materials; (2) quantitative measurement of mixed oxide (MOX) materials; (3) quantitative measurement of uranium materials; and (4...

Goddard, Braden

2013-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

156

Neutrino Mixing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this review we present the main features of the current status of neutrino physics. After a review of the theory of neutrino mixing and oscillations, we discuss the current status of solar and atmospheric neutrino oscillation experiments. We show that the current data can be nicely accommodated in the framework of three-neutrino mixing. We discuss also the problem of the determination of the absolute neutrino mass scale through Tritium beta-decay experiments and astrophysical observations, and the exploration of the Majorana nature of massive neutrinos through neutrinoless double-beta decay experiments. Finally, future prospects are briefly discussed.

Carlo Giunti; Marco Laveder

2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

A global approach of the representativity concept: Application on a high-conversion light water reactor MOX lattice case  

SciTech Connect

The development of new types of reactor and the increase in the safety specifications and requirements induce an enhancement in both nuclear data knowledge and a better understanding of the neutronic properties of the new systems. This enhancement is made possible using ad hoc critical mock-up experiments. The main difficulty is to design these experiments in order to obtain the most valuable information. Its quantification is usually made by using representativity and transposition concepts. These theories enable to extract some information about a quantity of interest (an integral parameter) on a configuration, but generally a posteriori. This paper presents a more global approach of this theory, with the idea of optimizing the representativity of a new experiment, and its transposition a priori, based on a multiparametric approach. Using a quadratic sum, we show the possibility to define a global representativity which permits to take into account several quantities of interest at the same time. The maximization of this factor gives information about all quantities of interest. An optimization method of this value in relation to technological parameters (over-clad diameter, atom concentration) is illustrated on a high-conversion light water reactor MOX lattice case. This example tackles the problematic of plutonium experiment for the plutonium aging and a solution through the optimization of both the over-clad and the plutonium content. (authors)

Santos, N. D.; Blaise, P.; Santamarina, A. [CEA, DEN/DER/SPRC Cadarache, F-13108 Saint Paul-lez-Durance (France)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Metal oxide films on metal  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A structure including a thin film of a conductive alkaline earth metal oxide selected from the group consisting of strontium ruthenium trioxide, calcium ruthenium trioxide, barium ruthenium trioxide, lanthanum-strontium cobalt oxide or mixed alkaline earth ruthenium trioxides thereof upon a thin film of a noble metal such as platinum is provided.

Wu, Xin D. (Los Alamos, NM); Tiwari, Prabhat (Los Alamos, NM)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Investigation of Mixed Oxide Catalysts for NO Oxidation  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

2012 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting

160

Investigation of Mixed Oxide Catalysts for NO Oxidation  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

2013 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mixed oxide mox" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Introduction: mixing in microfluidics  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Wiggins Introduction: mixing in microfluidics Julio M. Ottino 1 Stephen...comprising the Theme Issue. Microfluidics|Mixing|Chaos|Diffusion...Introduction: mixing in microfluidics. | In this paper we briefly...

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Cation Defects and Conductivity in Transparent Oxides. | EMSL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

In this paper, we identify key parameters that promote conductivity in mixed metal spinel oxides and compare their behavior with that of the free carrier TCO’s....

163

Heterogeneous Reburning By Mixed Fuels  

SciTech Connect

Recent studies of heterogeneous reburning, i.e., reburning involving a coal-derived char, have elucidated its variables, kinetics and mechanisms that are valuable to the development of a highly efficient reburning process. Young lignite chars contain catalysts that not only reduce NO, but they also reduce HCN that is an important intermediate that recycles to NO in the burnout zone. Gaseous CO scavenges the surface oxides that are formed during NO reduction, regenerating the active sites on the char surface. Based on this mechanistic information, cost-effective mixed fuels containing these multiple features has been designed and tested in a simulated reburning apparatus. Remarkably high reduction of NO and HCN has been observed and it is anticipated that mixed fuel will remove 85% of NO in a three-stage reburning process.

Anderson Hall

2009-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

164

Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

approximately 5 mm in diameter by 5 mm tal/. Compositions measured ranged from depleted uranium oxide to mixtures of plutonium and depleted uranium oxide (MOX) and mixed oxides with small percentages of minor.1943 - - - Title: Resonant Ultrasound Spectroscopy Measurements of the Elastic Properties of Uranium

165

The Mixed Waste Management Facility monthly report August 1995  

SciTech Connect

The project is concerned with the design of a mixed waste facility to prepare solid and liquid wastes for processing by electrochemical oxidation, molten salt oxidation, wet oxidation, or UV photolysis. The facility will have a receiving and shipping unit, preparation and processing units, off-gas scrubbing, analytical services, water treatment, and transport and storage facilities. This monthly report give task summaries for 25 tasks which are part of the overall design effort.

Streit, R.D.

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Mixed Conifer Forest  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Mixed Conifer Forest occurs in an elevational band below Spruce-Fir Forest and above Ponderosa Pine Forest. It has diverse stands reflecting elevation, ... and others. A primary driver of Mixed Conifer Forest has...

John L. Vankat; John L. Vankat…

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Warm Mix Asphalt  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Warm Mix Asphalt (WMA) technologies have potential to reduce the application temperature of Hot Mix Asphalt (HMA) and improve workability without ... a reduction in greenhouse gas emissions, decreased energy cons...

Martins Zaumanis

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

An autonomous long-term fast reactor system and the principal design limitations of the concept  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Actinides MOX Mixed OXide MSR Molten-Salt Reactors NERI Nuclear Energy Research Initiative vii PWR Pressurized Water Reactor RGPu Reactor-Grade Plutonium SCNES Self-Consistent Nuclear Energy System STAR Secure Transportable Autonomous Reactor... of LWR?s, the drastic increase of Am and Cm inventories are observed after uranium fuel irradiation and the second recycling of MOX fuel.1 Therefore, partitioning and transmutation of the recovered MA?s could significantly reduce the long...

Tsvetkova, Galina Valeryevna

2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

169

HFAG Charm Mixing Averages  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Recently the first evidence for charm mixing has been reported by several experiments. To provide averages of these mixing results and other charm results, a new subgroup of the Heavy Flavor Averaging Group has been formed. We here report on the method and results of averaging the charm mixing results.

B. Aa. Petersen

2007-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

170

Fuel qualification issues and strategies for reactor-based surplus plutonium disposition  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy (DOE) has proposed irradiation of mixed-oxide (MOX) fuel in existing commercial reactors as a disposition method for surplus plutonium from the weapons program. The burning of MOX fuel in reactors is supported by an extensive technology base; however, the infrastructure required to implement reactor-based plutonium disposition does not exist domestically. This report identifies and examines the actions required to qualify and license weapons-grade (WG) plutonium-based MOX fuels for use in domestic commercial light-water reactors (LWRs).

Cowell, B.S.; Copeland, G.L.; Moses, D.L.

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Gallium interactions with Zircaloy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of weapons-grade plutonium (WGPu) in the United States is the conversion of weapons-grade plutonium into mixed-oxide (MOX) reactor fuel. MOX fuel fabricated in this way must be compatible with currently used nuclear fuel components. Since US WGPu contains... that gallium may have on zircaloy cladding during reactor operation. As a result of the reprocessing of spent fuel used in European nuclear programs, many studies have been conducted on the production and behavior of MOX fuel in traditional reactors [5...

West, Michael Keith

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

172

Mixing of Pseudoscalar Mesons  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Eta-eta' mixing is discussed in the quark-flavor basis with the hypothesis that the decay constants follow the pattern of particle state mixing. On exploiting the divergences of the axial vector currents - which embody the axial vector anomaly - all mixing parameters are fixed to first order of flavor symmetry breaking. An alternative set of parameters is obtained from a phenomenological analysis. We also discuss mixing in the octet-singlet basis and show how the relevant mixing parameters are related to those in the quark-flavor basis. The dependence of the mixing parameters on the strength of the anomaly and the amount of flavor symmetry breaking is investigated. Finally, we present a few applications of the quark-flavor mixing scheme, such as radiative decays of vector mesons, the photon-pseudoscalar meson transition form factors, the coupling constants of eta and eta' to nucleons, and the isospin-singlet admixtures to the pi^0 meson.

Th. Feldmann; P. Kroll

2002-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

173

Method of forming supported doped palladium containing oxidation catalysts  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of forming a supported oxidation catalyst includes providing a support comprising a metal oxide or a metal salt, and depositing first palladium compound particles and second precious metal group (PMG) metal particles on the support while in a liquid phase including at least one solvent to form mixed metal comprising particles on the support. The PMG metal is not palladium. The mixed metal particles on the support are separated from the liquid phase to provide the supported oxidation catalyst.

Mohajeri, Nahid

2014-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

174

LOS ALAMOS, New Mexico, October 7, 2011-Los Alamos National Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

at the MOX facility in South Carolina, the plutonium oxide from LANL will be blended with depleted uranium, fabricated into MOX fuel, and irradiated in domestic nuclear...

175

Experiences with treatment of mixed waste  

SciTech Connect

During its many years of research activities involving toxic chemicals and radioactive materials, Los Alamos National Laboratory (Los Alamos) has generated considerable amounts of waste. Much of this waste includes chemically hazardous components and radioisotopes. Los Alamos chose to use an electrochemical process for the treatment of many mixed waste components. The electro-chemical process, which the authors are developing, can treat a great variety of waste using one type of equipment built at a moderate expense. Such a process can extract heavy metals, destroy cyanides, dissolve contamination from surfaces, oxidize toxic organic compounds, separate salts into acids and bases, and reduce the nitrates. All this can be accomplished using the equipment and one crew of trained operating personnel. Results of a treatability study of chosen mixed wastes from Los Alamos Mixed Waste Inventory are presented. Using electrochemical methods cyanide and heavy metals bearing wastes were treated to below disposal limits.

Dziewinski, J.; Marczak, S.; Smith, W.H. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Nuttall, E. [Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States). Chemical and Nuclear Engineering Dept.

1996-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

176

Metal Oxides  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Metal oxides are the class of materials having the widest application in gas sensors. This chapter presents information related to the application of various metal oxides in gas sensors designed on different p...

Ghenadii Korotcenkov

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Mixed waste characterization reference document  

SciTech Connect

Waste characterization and monitoring are major activities in the management of waste from generation through storage and treatment to disposal. Adequate waste characterization is necessary to ensure safe storage, selection of appropriate and effective treatment, and adherence to disposal standards. For some wastes characterization objectives can be difficult and costly to achieve. The purpose of this document is to evaluate costs of characterizing one such waste type, mixed (hazardous and radioactive) waste. For the purpose of this document, waste characterization includes treatment system monitoring, where monitoring is a supplement or substitute for waste characterization. This document establishes a cost baseline for mixed waste characterization and treatment system monitoring requirements from which to evaluate alternatives. The cost baseline established as part of this work includes costs for a thermal treatment technology (i.e., a rotary kiln incinerator), a nonthermal treatment process (i.e., waste sorting, macronencapsulation, and catalytic wet oxidation), and no treatment (i.e., disposal of waste at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP)). The analysis of improvement over the baseline includes assessment of promising areas for technology development in front-end waste characterization, process equipment, off gas controls, and monitoring. Based on this assessment, an ideal characterization and monitoring configuration is described that minimizes costs and optimizes resources required for waste characterization.

NONE

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

SSA Mixed Canopy Site  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mixed Canopy Site (SSA-Mix) Mixed Canopy Site (SSA-Mix) The TE canopy tower The mixed trees Terrestrial Ecology canopy access tower at the SSA mixed coniferous/deciduous site. A picture taken looking down from the TE canopy access tower at the SSA mixed auxiliary site, showing the aspen and spruce canopies. Back to the BOREAS Photo Page Index Other Sites: NSA Photos ||NSA-BP Photos | NSA-Fen Photos | NSA-OA Photos | NSA-OBS Photos | NSA-OJP Photos | NSA-UBS Photos | NSA-YJP Photos | NSA-Ops Photos SSA Photos || SSA-Airport Photos | SSA-Fen Photos | SSA-Mix Photos | SSA-OA Photos | SSA-OBS Photos | SSA-OJP Photos | SSA-YA Photos | SSA-YJP Photos | SSA-Ops Photos | ORNL DAAC Home || ORNL Home || NASA || Privacy, Security, Notices || Data Citation || Rate Us || Help | User Services - Tel: +1 (865) 241-3952 or E-mail: uso@daac.ornl.gov

179

Actinide Burning in CANDU Reactors  

SciTech Connect

Actinide burning in CANDU reactors has been studied as a method of reducing the actinide content of spent nuclear fuel from light water reactors, and thereby decreasing the associated long term decay heat load. In this work simulations were performed of actinides mixed with natural uranium to form a mixed oxide (MOX) fuel, and also mixed with silicon carbide to form an inert matrix (IMF) fuel. Both of these fuels were taken to a higher burnup than has previously been studied. The total transuranic element destruction calculated was 40% for the MOX fuel and 71% for the IMF. (authors)

Hyland, B.; Dyck, G.R. [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Chalk River, Ontario, K0J 1J0 (Canada)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Comet whole-core solution to a stylized 3-dimensional pressurized water reactor benchmark problem with UO{sub 2}and MOX fuel  

SciTech Connect

A stylized pressurized water reactor (PWR) benchmark problem with UO{sub 2} and MOX fuel was used to test the accuracy and efficiency of the coarse mesh radiation transport (COMET) code. The benchmark problem contains 125 fuel assemblies and 44,000 fuel pins. The COMET code was used to compute the core eigenvalue and assembly and pin power distributions for three core configurations. In these calculations, a set of tensor products of orthogonal polynomials were used to expand the neutron angular phase space distribution on the interfaces between coarse meshes. The COMET calculations were compared with the Monte Carlo code MCNP reference solutions using a recently published an 8-group material cross section library. The comparison showed both the core eigenvalues and assembly and pin power distributions predicated by COMET agree very well with the MCNP reference solution if the orders of the angular flux expansion in the two spatial variables and the polar and azimuth angles on the mesh boundaries are 4, 4, 2 and 2. The mean and maximum differences in the pin fission density distribution ranged from 0.28%-0.44% and 3.0%-5.5%, all within 3-sigma uncertainty of the MCNP solution. These comparisons indicate that COMET can achieve accuracy comparable to Monte Carlo. It was also found that COMET's computational speed is 450 times faster than MCNP. (authors)

Zhang, D.; Rahnema, F. [Georgia Inst. of Technology, 770 State Street, Atlanta, GA 30332-0745 (United States)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mixed oxide mox" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Mixed Semiconductor Nanocrystal Compositions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mixed Semiconductor Nanocrystal Compositions Mixed Semiconductor Nanocrystal Compositions Mixed Semiconductor Nanocrystal Compositions Composition comprising one or more energy donors and one or more energy acceptors. Available for thumbnail of Feynman Center (505) 665-9090 Email Mixed Semiconductor Nanocrystal Compositions Composition comprising one or more energy donors and one or more energy acceptors, wherein energy is transferred from the energy donor to the energy acceptor and wherein: the energy acceptor is a colloidal nanocrystal having a lower band gap energy than the energy donor; the energy donor and the energy acceptor are separated by a distance of 40 nm or less; wherein the average peak absorption energy of the acceptor is at least 20 meV greater than the average peak emission energy of the energy donor; and

182

Fuel Mix Disclosure  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Hawaii requires the state’s retail electric suppliers to disclose details regarding the fuel mix of their electric generation to retail customers. Such information must be provided on customers’...

183

Brush Busters Mixing Guide  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This easy-to-use guide gives mixing instructions for sprays to control huisache, mesquite, redberry cedar, saltcedar, tallowtree and yucca and to treat hardwood cut stumps. It can easily be attached to a sprayer if desired...

McGinty, Allan; Ueckert, Darrell

2004-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

184

Fuel Mix Disclosure  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

California's retail electricity suppliers must disclose to all customers the fuel mix used in the generation of electricity. Utilities must use a standard label created by the California Energy...

185

Mixed Conduction in Rare-Earth Phosphates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

fundamentals   of   mixed   protonic   and   electronic  the  fundamentals  of  mixed  protonic  and  electronic  better  fundamental  understanding  of  mixed  electronic  

Ray, Hannah Leung

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

High-Affinity and Cooperative Binding of Oxidized Calmodulin by Methionine Sulfoxide Reductase  

SciTech Connect

Methionines play an important role in modulating protein-protein interactions associated with intracellular signaling, and their reversible oxidation to form methionine sulfoxides [Met(O)] in calmodulin (CaM) and other signaling proteins has been suggested to couple cellular redox changes to protein function changes through the action of methionine sulfoxide reductases (Msr). Prior measurements indicate the full recovery of target protein activation upon the stereospecific reduction of oxidized CaM by MsrA, where the formation of the S-stereoisomer of Met(O) selectively inhibits the CaM-dependent activation of the Ca-ATPase. However, the physiological substrates of MsrA remain unclear, as neither the binding specificities nor affinities of protein targets have been measured. To assess the specificity of binding and its possible importance in the maintenance of CaM function, we have measured the kinetics of repair and the binding affinity between oxidized CaM and MsrA. Reduction of Met(O) in fully oxidized CaM by MsrA is sensitive to protein folding, as repair of the intact protein is incomplete, with > 6 Met(O) remaining in each CaM following MsrA reduction. In contrast, following proteolytic digestion, MsrA is able to fully reduce one-half of the oxidized methionines, indicating that Met(O) within folded proteins are not substrates for MsrA repair. Further, in comparison to free Met(O), the turnover number and Km for oxidized CaM (CaMox) are substantially smaller, indicating that the binding interaction retards Msr recycling to reduce steady-state enzyme activity. Mutation of the active site (i.e., C72S) in MsrA permitted equilibrium-binding measurements using both ensemble and single-molecule measurements obtained by fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS). Multiple MsrA bind tightly to CaMox (Kd = 70 +- 10 nM) with an affinity that is three orders of magnitude greater than the Michaelis constant (KM = 71 +- 8 micromolar). These results indicate that MsrA selectively reduces surface-exposed Met(O) within unstructured sequences and suggest that only a small subset of oxidized proteins are substrates for MsrA, which may selectively modulate the function of key signaling proteins as part of an adaptive response to oxidative stress.

Xiong, Yijia; Chen, Baowei; Smallwood, Heather S.; Urbauer, Ramona J.; Markillie, Lye Meng; Galeva, Nadezhda A.; Williams, Todd D.; Squier, Thomas C.

2006-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

187

Evaporative oxidation treatability test report  

SciTech Connect

In 1992, Congress passed the Federal Facilities Compliance Act that requires the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to treat and dispose of its mixed waste in accordance with the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) land disposal restrictions (LDRs). In response to the need for mixed-waste treatment capacity where available off-site commercial treatment facilities do not exist or cannot be used, the DOE Albuquerque Operations Office (DOE-AL) organized a Treatment Selection Team to match mixed wastes with treatment options and develop a strategy for treatment of its mixed wastes. DOE-AL manages operations at nine sites with mixed-waste inventories. The Treatment Selection Team determined a need to develop mobile treatment capacity to treat wastes at the sites where the wastes are generated. Treatment processes used for mixed waste not only must address the hazardous component (i.e., meet LDRs) but also must contain the radioactive component in a form that allows final disposal while protecting workers, the public, and the environment. On the basis of recommendations of the Treatment Selection Team, DOE-AL assigned projects to the sites to bring mixed-waste treatment capacity on-line. The three technologies assigned to the DOE Grand Junction Projects Office (GJPO) are evaporative oxidation, thermal desorption, and treated wastewater evaporation. Rust Geotech, the DOE-GJPO prime contractor, was assigned to design and fabricate mobile treatment units (MTUs) for these three technologies and to deliver the MTUs to selected DOE-AL sites. To conduct treatability tests at the GJPO, Rust leased a pilot-scale evaporative oxidation unit from the Clemson Technical Center (CTC), Anderson, South Carolina. The purpose of this report is to document the findings and results of tests performed using this equipment.

NONE

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Cation Defects and Conductivity in Transparent Oxides  

SciTech Connect

High quality doped zinc oxide and mixed transition metal spinel oxide films have been deposited by means of sputter deposition from metal and metal oxide targets, and by spin casting from aqueous or alcoholic precursor solutions. Deposition conditions and post-deposition processing are found to alter cation oxidation states and their distributions in both oxide materials resulting in marked changes to both optical transmission and electrical response. For ZnO, partial reduction of the neat or doped material by hydrogen treatment of the heated film or by electrochemical processing renders the oxide n-type conducting. Continued reduction was found to diminish conductivity. In contrast, oxidation of the infrared transparent p-type spinel conductors typified by NiCo2O4 was found to increase conductivity. The disparate behavior of these two materials is caused in part by the sign of the charge carrier and by the existence of two different charge transport mechanisms that are identified as free carrier conduction and polaron hopping. While much work has been reported concerning structure/property relationships in the free carrier conducting oxides, there is a significantly smaller body of information on transparent polaron conductors. In this paper, we identify key parameters that promote conductivity in mixed metal spinel oxides and compare their behavior with that of the free carrier TCO’s.

Exarhos, Gregory J.; Windisch, Charles F.; Ferris, Kim F.; Owings, Robert R.

2007-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

189

ADVANCED MIXING MODELS  

SciTech Connect

The process of recovering the waste in storage tanks at the Savannah River Site (SRS) typically requires mixing the contents of the tank with one to four dual-nozzle jet mixers located within the tank. The typical criteria to establish a mixed condition in a tank are based on the number of pumps in operation and the time duration of operation. To ensure that a mixed condition is achieved, operating times are set conservatively long. This approach results in high operational costs because of the long mixing times and high maintenance and repair costs for the same reason. A significant reduction in both of these costs might be realized by reducing the required mixing time based on calculating a reliable indicator of mixing with a suitably validated computer code. The work described in this report establishes the basis for further development of the theory leading to the identified mixing indicators, the benchmark analyses demonstrating their consistency with widely accepted correlations, and the application of those indicators to SRS waste tanks to provide a better, physically based estimate of the required mixing time. Waste storage tanks at SRS contain settled sludge which varies in height from zero to 10 ft. The sludge has been characterized and modeled as micron-sized solids, typically 1 to 5 microns, at weight fractions as high as 20 to 30 wt%, specific gravities to 1.4, and viscosities up to 64 cp during motion. The sludge is suspended and mixed through the use of submersible slurry jet pumps. To suspend settled sludge, water is added to the tank as a slurry medium and stirred with the jet pump. Although there is considerable technical literature on mixing and solid suspension in agitated tanks, very little literature has been published on jet mixing in a large-scale tank. If shorter mixing times can be shown to support Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) or other feed requirements, longer pump lifetimes can be achieved with associated operational cost and schedule savings. The focus of the present work is to establish mixing criteria associated with the waste processing at SRS and to quantify the mixing time required to suspend sludge particles with the submersible jet pump. Literature results for a turbulent jet flow are reviewed briefly, since the decay of the axial jet velocity and the evolution of the jet flow patterns are important phenomena affecting sludge suspension and mixing operations. One of the main objectives in the waste processing is to provide the DWPF a uniform slurry composition at a certain weight percentage (typically {approx}13 wt%) over an extended period of time. In preparation of the sludge for slurrying to DWPF, several important questions have been raised with regard to sludge suspension and mixing of the solid suspension in the bulk of the tank: (1) How much time is required to prepare a slurry with a uniform solid composition for DWPF? (2) How long will it take to suspend and mix the sludge for uniform composition in any particular waste tank? (3) What are good mixing indicators to answer the questions concerning sludge mixing stated above in a general fashion applicable to any waste tank/slurry pump geometry and fluid/sludge combination? Grenville and Tilton (1996) investigated the mixing process by giving a pulse of tracer (electrolyte) through the submersible jet nozzle and by monitoring the conductivity at three locations within the cylindrical tank. They proposed that the mixing process was controlled by the turbulent kinetic energy dissipation rate in the region far away from the jet entrance. They took the energy dissipation rates in the regions remote from the nozzle to be proportional to jet velocity and jet diameter at that location. The reduction in the jet velocity was taken to be proportional to the nozzle velocity and distance from the nozzle. Based on their analysis, a correlation was proposed. The proposed correlation was shown to be valid over a wide range of Reynolds numbers (50,000 to 300,000) with a relative standard deviation of {+-} 11.83%. An improved correlat

Lee, S; Richard Dimenna, R; David Tamburello, D

2008-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

190

Environmental assessment for the manufacture and shipment of nuclear reactor fuel from the United States to Canada  

SciTech Connect

The US Department of Energy (DOE) has declared 41.9 tons (38 metric tons) of weapons-usable plutonium surplus to the United States` defense needs. A DOE Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement analyzed strategies for plutonium storage and dispositioning. In one alternative, plutonium as a mixed oxide (MOX) fuel would be irradiated (burned) in a reengineered heavy-water-moderated reactor, such as the Canadian CANDU design. In an Environmental Assessment (EA), DOE proposes to fabricate and transport to Canada a limited amount of MOX fuel as part of the Parallex (parallel experiment) Project. MOX fuel from the US and Russia would be used by Canada to conduct performance tests at Chalk River Laboratories. MOX fuel would be fabricated at Los Alamos National Laboratory and transported in approved container(s) to a Canadian port(s) of entry on one to three approved routes. The EA analyzes the environmental and human health effects from MOX fuel fabrication and transportation. Under the Proposed Action, MOX fuel fabrication would not result in adverse effects to the involved workers or public. Analysis showed that the shipment(s) of MOX fuel would not adversely affect the public, truck crew, and environment along the transportation routes.

Rangel, R.C.

1999-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

The Mixed Waste Management Facility monthly report, March 1995  

SciTech Connect

This document presents details of the monthly activities of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory in regards to the Mixed Waste Management Facility. Topics discussed include: quality assurance; regulations; program support; public participation; conceptual design; plant start-up; project management; feed preparation; molten salt, electrochemical, and wet oxidation; process transport and storage; and final waste forms.

Streit, R.D.

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

D^0 Mixing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An overview of selected experimental results in the field of $D^0$-$\\bar{D}^0$ oscillations is presented. The average results for the mixing parameters, $x=(0.89\\pm{0.26\\atop 0.27})%$ and $y=(0.75\\pm{0.17\\atop 0.18})%$, exclude the no-mixing hypothesis at the level of 6.7 standard deviations. No sign of CP violation in the $D^0$ system is observed. The measurements impose constraints on the parameter space of many New Physics models.

B. Golob

2009-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

193

Mixed crystal organic scintillators  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A mixed organic crystal according to one embodiment includes a single mixed crystal having two compounds with different bandgap energies, the organic crystal having a physical property of exhibiting a signal response signature for neutrons from a radioactive source, wherein the signal response signature does not include a significantly-delayed luminescence characteristic of neutrons interacting with the organic crystal relative to a luminescence characteristic of gamma rays interacting with the organic crystal. According to one embodiment, an organic crystal includes bibenzyl and stilbene or a stilbene derivative, the organic crystal having a physical property of exhibiting a signal response signature for neutrons from a radioactive source.

Zaitseva, Natalia P; Carman, M Leslie; Glenn, Andrew M; Hamel, Sebastien; Hatarik, Robert; Payne, Stephen A; Stoeffl, Wolfgang

2014-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

194

A mixed-valence copper coordination polymer generated by hydrothermal metal/ligand redox reactions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A mixed-valence copper coordination polymer generated by hydrothermal metal/ligand redox reactions A novel coordination polymer of mixed-valence copper(I,II) with 4,4A-bipyridine and in situ oxidized and crystallographically char- acterized to be a laminated structure via weak copper(II)­ oxygen interactions. Extended

Li, Jing

195

Introduction: mixing in microfluidics  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...droplet act like a tiny chemical reactor. The mixing is produced by...technological issues to do with the reliability of possible mechanisms. In...frontier developments about analysis take place. It is our belief...micromixer: three-dimensional analysis. Phil. Trans. R. Soc...

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Audit Report: IG-0713 | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3 3 Audit Report: IG-0713 December 21, 2005 Status of the Mixed Oxide Fuel Fabrication Facility The audit disclosed that the cost of the Mixed Oxide Fuel Facility (MOX) will significantly exceed the amounts reported to Congress. As of July 2005, the National Nuclear Security Administration's (NNSA's) unvalidated estimate for the design and construction of the MOX Facility was about $3.5 billion, which is $2.5 billion more than reported to Congress in 2002. NNSA's previous estimate of $1 billion for the facility's design and construction was reported in the February 2002 plutonium disposition plan presented to Congress. NNSA reported that it had a high degree of confidence in the estimate because the MOX technology was well-established and based on proven processes used in Europe since the 1960s, and it

197

A simple approach to synthesize nanosized sulfur/graphene oxide materials for high-performance lithium/sulfur batteries  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We report on a simple and facile synthesis route for the sulfur/graphene oxide composite via ultrasonic mixing of the nano-sulfur and graphene oxide aqueous suspensions followed by a low-temperature heat treat...

Yongguang Zhang; Yan Zhao; Zhumabay Bakenov

2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Regenerable Mixed Copper-Iron-Inert Support Oxygen Carriers  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mixed Copper-Iron-Inert Support Oxygen Carriers Mixed Copper-Iron-Inert Support Oxygen Carriers for Solid Fuel Chemical Looping Combustion Process Contact NETL Technology Transfer Group techtransfer@netl.doe.gov December 2012 This patent-pending technology, "Regenerable Mixed Copper-Iron-Inert Support Oxygen Carriers for Solid Fuel Chemical Looping Combustion Process," provides a metal-oxide oxygen carrier for application in fuel combustion processes that use oxygen. This technology is available for licensing and/or further collaborative research with the U.S. Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory. Overview Patent Details U.S. Non-Provisional Patent Application No. 13/159,553; titled "Regenerable Mixed Copper-Iron-Inert Support Oxygen Carriers for Solid

199

Is mixing a thermodynamic process?  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Mixing processes exist with positive entropy change and negative free energy change. However the idea that the i r r e v e r s i b i l i t y of the mixing processes is responsible for the so?called free energy and entropy of mixing is faulty. The mixing as well as the demixing processes may be associated with either reversible or irreversible phenomena depending on the particular conditions. For ideal gases the word ‘‘mixing’’ in the terms ‘‘mixing entropy’’ and ‘‘mixing free energy’’ may sometimes be used d e s c r i p t i v e l y but never c a u s a t i v e l y. The quantity ?? N i R?ln?X i usually referred to as ‘‘mixing entropy ’’ has nothing to do with the mixing phenomenon. Therefore the terms ‘‘mixing entropy’’ and ‘‘mixing free energy’’ are essentially misconceptions. In fact it is shown that the process of mixing of ideal gases has by itself no relevance to any thermodynamic quantity. Therefore in a thermodynamical sense it is a nonprocess. The concepts of assimilation and deassimilation are introduced. It is shown that the ‘‘deassimilation process is essentially irreversible.’’ This should replace the traditional principle that ‘‘the mixing process is essentially irreversible.’’

A. Ben?Naim

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Supercritical water oxidation data acquisition testing. Final report, Volume I  

SciTech Connect

This report discusses the phase one testing of a data acquisition system for a supercritical water waste oxidation system. The system is designed to destroy a wide range of organic materials in mixed wastes. The design and testing of the MODAR Oxidizer is discussed. An analysis of the optimized runs is included.

NONE

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mixed oxide mox" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

IT IS 5 MINUTES TO MIDNIGHT www.thebulletin.org  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in the environmental impact of uranium mining. Additionally, if the United States considers building fast reactors that the high cost of reprocessing spent fuel and fabricating mixed-oxide (MOX) fuel rods--a mixture of uranium volumetric reduction in nuclear waste, conservation of uranium re- sources, and a reduction

Holmes, Christopher D.

202

Development of a RELAP5-3D three-dimensional model of a VVER-1000 Nuclear Power Plant for analysis of a large-break loss-of-coolant accident  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

large-break loss-of-coolant accident (LB LOCA). A validated, one-dimensional control of the nuclear power plant, for the study of the effects of mixed oxide (MOX) fuel, was modified to include a standard fuel loading of UO?. The development...

Clarno, Kevin Taylor

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

203

Charm mixing and CP violation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Experimental results on charm mixing and CP violation searches are reviewed. This paper focus on results released after FPCP 2013.

Alberto Correa dos Reis

2014-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

204

Magnetically coupled system for mixing  

SciTech Connect

The invention provides a mixing system comprising a magnetically coupled drive system and a foil for cultivating algae, or cyanobacteria, in an open or enclosed vessel. The invention provides effective mixing, low energy usage, low capital expenditure, and ease of drive system component maintenance while maintaining the integrity of a sealed mixing vessel.

Miller, III, Harlan; Meichel, George; Legere, Edward; Malkiel, Edwin; Woods, Robert Paul; Ashley, Oliver; Katz, Joseph; Ward, Jason; Petersen, Paul

2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Cost and Schedule of the Mixed Oxide Fuel Fabrication Facility...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

at the Savannah River Site" BACKGROUND In September 2000, the United States and Russia signed a Plutonium Management and Disposition Agreement for the disposal of surplus...

206

The mixed waste management facility  

SciTech Connect

During FY96, the Mixed Waste Management Facility (MWMF) Project has the following major objectives: (1) Complete Project Preliminary Design Review (PDR). (2) Complete final design (Title II) of MWMF major systems. (3) Coordinate all final interfaces with the Decontamination and Waste Treatment Facility (DWTF) for facility utilities and facility integration. (4) Begin long-lead procurements. (5) Issue Project Baseline Revision 2-Preliminary Design (PB2), modifying previous baselines per DOE-requested budget profiles and cost reduction. Delete Mediated Electrochemical Oxidation (MEO) as a treatment process for initial demonstration. (6) Complete submittal of, and ongoing support for, applications for air permit. (7) Begin detailed planning for start-up, activation, and operational interfaces with the Laboratory`s Hazardous Waste Management Division (HWM). In achieving these objectives during FY96, the Project will incorporate and implement recent DOE directives to maximize the cost savings associated with the DWTF/MWMF integration (initiated in PB1.2); to reduce FY96 new Budget Authority to {approximately}$10M (reduced from FY97 Validation of $15.3M); and to keep Project fiscal year funding requirements largely uniform at {approximately}$10M/yr. A revised Project Baseline (i.e., PB2), to be issued during the second quarter of FY96, will address the implementation and impact of this guidance from an overall Project viewpoint. For FY96, the impact of this guidance is that completion of final design has been delayed relative to previous baselines (resulting from the delay in the completion of preliminary design); ramp-up in staffing has been essentially eliminated; and procurements have been balanced through the Project to help balance budget needs to funding availability.

Streit, R.D.

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Application of Direct Tension Testing to Laboratory Samples to Investigate the Effects of Hot Mix Asphalt Aging  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

While the oxidation of binders in hot mix asphalt (HMA) pavements and its subsequent detrimental effects on pavement life have been well recognized in the last few years, many important issues have not yet been investigated. Understanding how best...

Padigala, Meghana 1989-

2012-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

208

Oxidation of Propane by Doped Nickel Oxides  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... present study, however, indicate that in the absence of excess oxygen, direct oxidation of propane by the oxide lattice can occur.

D. W. McKEE

1964-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

209

fuel mix | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

mix mix Dataset Summary Description The UK Department of Energy and Climate Change (DECC) publishes an annual "fuel mix disclosure data table" as defined in the Electricity (Fuel Mix Disclosure) Regulations 2005. This dataset represents April 1, 2009 - March 31, 2010. Source UK Department of Energy and Climate Change (DECC) Date Released March 31st, 2010 (4 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords fuel mix UK Data application/vnd.openxmlformats-officedocument.spreadsheetml.sheet icon UK.fuel_.mix_.disclosure.4.2009.4.2010.xlsx (xlsx, 38.2 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Some Review Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Time Period License License Other or unspecified, see optional comment below Comment UK Open Government License (OGL)

210

On Symmetric Lepton Mixing Matrices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Contrary to the quark mixing matrix, the lepton mixing matrix could be symmetric. We study the phenomenological consequences of this possibility. In particular, we find that symmetry would imply that |U_{e3}| is larger than 0.16, i.e., above its current 2 sigma limit. The other mixing angles are also constrained and CP violating effects in neutrino oscillations are suppressed, even though |U_{e3}| is sizable. Maximal atmospheric mixing is only allowed if the other observables are outside their current 3 sigma ranges, and sin^2 theta_{23} lies typically below 0.5. The Majorana phases are not affected, but the implied values of the solar neutrino mixing angle have some effect on the predictions for neutrinoless double beta decay. We further discuss some formal properties of a symmetric mixing matrix.

Hochmuth, K A; Hochmuth, Kathrin A.; Rodejohann, Werner

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

The Mixed Waste Management Facility. Preliminary design review  

SciTech Connect

This document presents information about the Mixed Waste Management Facility. Topics discussed include: cost and schedule baseline for the completion of the project; evaluation of alternative options; transportation of radioactive wastes to the facility; capital risk associated with incineration; radioactive waste processing; scaling of the pilot-scale system; waste streams to be processed; molten salt oxidation; feed preparation; initial operation to demonstrate selected technologies; floorplans; baseline revisions; preliminary design baseline; cost reduction; and project mission and milestones.

NONE

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

212

Fuel Mix and Emissions Disclosure  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

As part of the state's 1997 electric utility restructuring legislation, Illinois established provisions for the disclosure of fuel mix and emissions data. All electric utilities and alternative...

213

Fuel Mix and Emissions Disclosure  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Oregon's 1999 electric utility restructuring legislation requires electricity companies and electric service suppliers to disclose details regarding their fuel mix and emissions of electric...

214

Halton Sequences for Mixed Logit  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Customers’ Choice Among Energy Supplier Simulation based oncustomers’ choice of energy supplier. Surveyed customerspreferences for energy suppliers, such that a mixed logit is

Train, Kenneth

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

AP-XPS Measures MIEC Oxides in Action  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

AP-XPS Measures MIEC Oxides in AP-XPS Measures MIEC Oxides in Action AP-XPS Measures MIEC Oxides in Action Print Wednesday, 25 May 2011 00:00 Oxide materials with mixed ionic-electronic conductivity (MIEC) can conduct both electrons and oxygen ions. MIEC oxides have broad applications, including use in solid-oxide fuel cells, high-temperature electrolysis for synthetic fuel production, and oxygen-separating membranes for chemical processes or NOx-free combustion; however, their surface activity under reaction conditions has been difficult, if not impossible, to ascertain, until recently. A team from the University of Maryland and Sandia National Laboratories joined ALS scientists on Beamlines 9.3.2 and 11.0.2 to overcome the vacuum limitations of conventional XPS instruments using ambient-pressure x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (AP-XPS), providing the first in situ measurements of local surface oxidation states and electric potential in active MIEC electrodes.

216

Catalytic oxidation of ethyl acetate over La-Co and La-Cu oxides  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Lanthanum-containing mixed oxides (La-Co and La-Cu) were synthesized by several methods: exotemplating, evaporation, glycine-nitrate and glycine-nitrate-exotemplating. Samples were characterized by thermogravimetry and differential scanning calorimetry, N2 adsorption, temperature programmed reduction, scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction. The materials obtained were tested as catalysts for ethyl acetate oxidation, as a model volatile organic compound. La-Cu samples showed poor catalytic performance, but La-Co materials were much more active than the individual components. Catalytic activity seems to be mainly determined by the easiness of reduction of the catalysts, which is related to the availability of oxygen from the lattice. Catalysts containing Co or Cu in excess of La (on a molar base) were more active than the corresponding mixed oxides consisting of equal amounts of La and the transition metal. Samples prepared by the evaporation method were more active than those prepared by exotemplating, for the same molar ratio. Samples prepared by evaporation and glycine-nitrate methods calcined at 600 °C had a better performance than the corresponding oxides calcined at 300 °C. The most active sample found in this study was the La-Co mixed oxide prepared by the glycine nitrate method and calcined at 600 °C, 100% conversion of ethyl acetate to H2O and CO2 being achieved at 230 °C.

X. Chen; S.A.C. Carabineiro; P.B. Tavares; J.J.M. Órfão; M.F.R. Pereira; J.L. Figueiredo

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

CP Violation and Flavor Mixing  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......July 2009 research-article Special Issue CP Violation and Flavor Mixing *) *) Copyright...Physics, Vol. 122, No. 1, July 2009 CP Violation and Flavor Mixing~) Makoto Kobayashi...proposed the six quark model to explain CP violation with Dr. Toshihide Maskawa in......

Makoto Kobayashi

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

CP violation and generation mixing  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We explore the possibility of defining maximal CP violation by requiring that generation mixing disappears when the CP-violating terms go to zero in the standard model. This leads to a family of cases related to ‘‘different CP operations being maximized’’ and corresponding to the existing variety of proposals for mixing matrix parametrizations. A favored choice, useful for model building, seems to emerge.

M. Gronau; V. Gupta; R. Johnson; J. Schechter

1986-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Mixed Waste Working Group report  

SciTech Connect

The treatment of mixed waste remains one of this country`s most vexing environmental problems. Mixed waste is the combination of radioactive waste and hazardous waste, as defined by the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). The Department of Energy (DOE), as the country`s largest mixed waste generator, responsible for 95 percent of the Nation`s mixed waste volume, is now required to address a strict set of milestones under the Federal Facility Compliance Act of 1992. DOE`s earlier failure to adequately address the storage and treatment issues associated with mixed waste has led to a significant backlog of temporarily stored waste, significant quantities of buried waste, limited permanent disposal options, and inadequate treatment solutions. Between May and November of 1993, the Mixed Waste Working Group brought together stakeholders from around the Nation. Scientists, citizens, entrepreneurs, and bureaucrats convened in a series of forums to chart a course for accelerated testing of innovative mixed waste technologies. For the first time, a wide range of stakeholders were asked to examine new technologies that, if given the chance to be tested and evaluated, offer the prospect for better, safer, cheaper, and faster solutions to the mixed waste problem. In a matter of months, the Working Group has managed to bridge a gap between science and perception, engineer and citizen, and has developed a shared program for testing new technologies.

Not Available

1993-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

220

Quantum ferroelectrics of mixed crystals  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The inverse dielectric susceptibility for quantum ferroelectrics in mixed crystals is computed. As in the perfect crystals we find a logarithmic correction to the quantum mean-field theory. For mixed crystals the correction increases faster in the vicinity of the critical point.

D. Schmeltzer

1984-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mixed oxide mox" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Measures on Mixing Angles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We address the problem of the apparently very small magnitude of CP violation in the standard model, measured by the Jarlskog invariant J. In order to make statements about probabilities for certain values of J, we seek to find a natural measure on the space of Kobayashi-Maskawa matrices, the double quotient U(1)^2\\SU(3)/U(1)^2. We review several possible, geometrically motivated choices of the measure, and compute expectation values for powers of J for these measures. We find that different choices of the measure generically make the observed magnitude of CP violation appear finely tuned. Since the quark masses and the mixing angles are determined by the same set of Yukawa couplings, we then do a second calculation in which we take the known quark mass hierarchy into account. We construct the simplest measure on the space of 3 x 3 Hermitian matrices which reproduces this known hierarchy. Calculating expectation values for powers of J in this second approach, we find that values of J close to the observed value are now rather likely, and there does not seem to be any fine tuning. Our results suggest that the choice of Kobayashi-Maskawa angles is closely linked to the observed mass hierarchy. We close by discussing the corresponding case of neutrinos.

Gary W. Gibbons; Steffen Gielen; C. N. Pope; Neil Turok

2008-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

222

Interactions of gallium with zircaloy cladding  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CHAPTER I INTRODUCTION The accepted options for the disposition of weapons-grade plutonium (WGPu) are immobilization or conversion to a mixed-oxide (MOX) reactor fuel. There are two benefits of conversion, one, the plutonium can't be converted back... into a viable weapon and two, the material could be used as an energy producing natural resource. Typical reactors use uranium dioxide enriched with about 3'le U-235. The proposed MOX fuel would consist of depleted uranium with WGPu. In order...

Mitchell, Lee Josey

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

223

Community D Mixed/Pine Hardwood D Bottomland Hardwood Mixed  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

D Bottomland Hardwood Mixed Swamp Forest Soils 540 Soils Soil Series and Phase DCh .OrC .Sh .Ta o 540 1080 Meters N A sc Figure 7-2. Plant communities and soils associated...

224

Planar ceramic membrane assembly and oxidation reactor system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Planar ceramic membrane assembly comprising a dense layer of mixed-conducting multi-component metal oxide material, wherein the dense layer has a first side and a second side, a porous layer of mixed-conducting multi-component metal oxide material in contact with the first side of the dense layer, and a ceramic channeled support layer in contact with the second side of the dense layer. The planar ceramic membrane assembly can be used in a ceramic wafer assembly comprising a planar ceramic channeled support layer having a first side and a second side; a first dense layer of mixed-conducting multi-component metal oxide material having an inner side and an outer side, wherein the inner side is in contact with the first side of the ceramic channeled support layer; a first outer support layer comprising porous mixed-conducting multi-component metal oxide material and having an inner side and an outer side, wherein the inner side is in contact with the outer side of the first dense layer; a second dense layer of mixed-conducting multi-component metal oxide material having an inner side and an outer side, wherein the inner side is in contact with the second side of the ceramic channeled layer; and a second outer support layer comprising porous mixed-conducting multi-component metal oxide material and having an inner side and an outer side, wherein the inner side is in contact with the outer side of the second dense layer.

Carolan, Michael Francis (Allentown, PA); Dyer, legal representative, Kathryn Beverly (Allentown, PA); Wilson, Merrill Anderson (West Jordan, UT); Ohm, Ted R. (Alliance, OH); Kneidel, Kurt E. (Alliance, OH); Peterson, David (Uniontown, OH); Chen, Christopher M. (Allentown, PA); Rackers, Keith Gerard (Louisville, OH); Dyer, deceased, Paul Nigel (Allentown, PA)

2007-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

225

Planar ceramic membrane assembly and oxidation reactor system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Planar ceramic membrane assembly comprising a dense layer of mixed-conducting multi-component metal oxide material, wherein the dense layer has a first side and a second side, a porous layer of mixed-conducting multi-component metal oxide material in contact with the first side of the dense layer, and a ceramic channeled support layer in contact with the second side of the dense layer. The planar ceramic membrane assembly can be used in a ceramic wafer assembly comprising a planar ceramic channeled support layer having a first side and a second side; a first dense layer of mixed-conducting multi-component metal oxide material having an inner side and an outer side, wherein the inner side is in contact with the first side of the ceramic channeled support layer; a first outer support layer comprising porous mixed-conducting multi-component metal oxide material and having an inner side and an outer side, wherein the inner side is in contact with the outer side of the first dense layer; a second dense layer of mixed-conducting multi-component metal oxide material having an inner side and an outer side, wherein the inner side is in contact with the second side of the ceramic channeled layer; and a second outer support layer comprising porous mixed-conducting multi-component metal oxide material and having an inner side and an outer side, wherein the inner side is in contact with the outer side of the second dense layer.

Carolan, Michael Francis (Allentown, PA); Dyer, legal representative, Kathryn Beverly (Allentown, PA); Wilson, Merrill Anderson (West Jordan, UT); Ohrn, Ted R. (Alliance, OH); Kneidel, Kurt E. (Alliance, OH); Peterson, David (Uniontown, OH); Chen, Christopher M. (Allentown, PA); Rackers, Keith Gerard (Louisville, OH); Dyer, Paul Nigel (Allentown, PA)

2009-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

226

Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Investigation of Mixed Oxide Catalysts for NO Oxidation  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Presentation given by Pacific Northwest National Lab at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about investigation...

227

ROLE OF CONSTITUENT ELEMENTS IN PROPANE OXIDATION OVER MIXED METAL OXIDES.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Recently discovered multi-component Mo-V-Te-Nb-O catalysts contain so-called “M1” and “M2” phases with orthorhombic and hexagonal structures, respectively, proposed to be active and selective in propane… (more)

BHANDARI, RISHABH

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

The Mixed Waste Management Facility monthly report and revised FY95 plan, May 1995  

SciTech Connect

This report contains the project summary, as well as the financial summary for the Mixed Waste Management Facility at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. Detailed accomplishments and milestone status are reported in the Task Summaries. The major accomplishments during this reporting period are included the following areas: preliminary design; systems integration; briefings for the Environmental Programs Scientific Advisory Committee; integrated cost/scheduling estimating system; feed preparation; mediated electrochemical oxidation; and molten salt oxidation.

Streit, R.D.

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Oxidation of No to No2 in Flue Gas Plumes of Power Stations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The oxidation of NO to NO2 in flue gas plumes takes place after release in the ... function of the turbulent mixing rate of flue gas plume and atmospheric air. The effects of ... are illustrated with the measurin...

A. J. Elshout; Dr. S. Beilke

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Asphalt Oxidation Kinetics and Pavement Oxidation Modeling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Most paved roads in the United States are surfaced with asphalt. These asphalt pavements suffer from fatigue cracking and thermal cracking, aggravated by the oxidation and hardening of asphalt. This negative impact of asphalt oxidation on pavement...

Jin, Xin

2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

231

Fuel Mix and Emissions Disclosure  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

In 2001, Nevada enacted legislation requiring the state’s electric utilities to provide details regarding the fuel mix and emissions of electric generation to their customers. Utilities must...

232

Mixed-mu superconducting bearings  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A mixed-mu superconducting bearing is disclosed including a ferrite structure disposed for rotation adjacent a stationary superconductor material structure and a stationary permanent magnet structure. The ferrite structure is levitated by said stationary permanent magnet structure. 9 figs.

Hull, J.R.; Mulcahy, T.M.

1998-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

233

Fuel Mix and Emissions Disclosure  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Iowa adopted regulations in 2003 that generally require rate-regulated electric utilities to disclose to customers the fuel mix and estimated emissions, in pounds per megawatt-hour (MWh), of...

234

Fuel Mix and Emissions Disclosure  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Rhode Island requires all entities that sell electricity in the state to disclose details regarding the fuel mix and emissions of their electric generation to end-use customers. This information...

235

Life cycle costs for the domestic reactor-based plutonium disposition option  

SciTech Connect

Projected constant dollar life cycle cost (LCC) estimates are presented for the domestic reactor-based plutonium disposition program being managed by the US Department of Energy Office of Fissile Materials Disposition (DOE/MD). The scope of the LCC estimate includes: design, construction, licensing, operation, and deactivation of a mixed-oxide (MOX) fuel fabrication facility (FFF) that will be used to purify and convert weapons-derived plutonium oxides to MOX fuel pellets and fabricate MOX fuel bundles for use in commercial pressurized-water reactors (PWRs); fuel qualification activities and modification of facilities required for manufacture of lead assemblies that will be used to qualify and license this MOX fuel; and modification, licensing, and operation of commercial PWRs to allow irradiation of a partial core of MOX fuel in combination with low-enriched uranium fuel. The baseline cost elements used for this document are the same as those used for examination of the preferred sites described in the site-specific final environmental impact statement and in the DOE Record of Decision that will follow in late 1999. Cost data are separated by facilities, government accounting categories, contract phases, and expenditures anticipated by the various organizations who will participate in the program over a 20-year period. Total LCCs to DOE/MD are projected at approximately $1.4 billion for a 33-MT plutonium disposition mission.

Williams, K.A.

1999-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

AP-XPS Measures MIEC Oxides in Action  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

AP-XPS Measures MIEC Oxides in Action Print AP-XPS Measures MIEC Oxides in Action Print Oxide materials with mixed ionic-electronic conductivity (MIEC) can conduct both electrons and oxygen ions. MIEC oxides have broad applications, including use in solid-oxide fuel cells, high-temperature electrolysis for synthetic fuel production, and oxygen-separating membranes for chemical processes or NOx-free combustion; however, their surface activity under reaction conditions has been difficult, if not impossible, to ascertain, until recently. A team from the University of Maryland and Sandia National Laboratories joined ALS scientists on Beamlines 9.3.2 and 11.0.2 to overcome the vacuum limitations of conventional XPS instruments using ambient-pressure x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (AP-XPS), providing the first in situ measurements of local surface oxidation states and electric potential in active MIEC electrodes.

237

AP-XPS Measures MIEC Oxides in Action  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

AP-XPS Measures MIEC Oxides in Action Print AP-XPS Measures MIEC Oxides in Action Print Oxide materials with mixed ionic-electronic conductivity (MIEC) can conduct both electrons and oxygen ions. MIEC oxides have broad applications, including use in solid-oxide fuel cells, high-temperature electrolysis for synthetic fuel production, and oxygen-separating membranes for chemical processes or NOx-free combustion; however, their surface activity under reaction conditions has been difficult, if not impossible, to ascertain, until recently. A team from the University of Maryland and Sandia National Laboratories joined ALS scientists on Beamlines 9.3.2 and 11.0.2 to overcome the vacuum limitations of conventional XPS instruments using ambient-pressure x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (AP-XPS), providing the first in situ measurements of local surface oxidation states and electric potential in active MIEC electrodes.

238

AP-XPS Measures MIEC Oxides in Action  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

AP-XPS Measures MIEC Oxides in Action Print AP-XPS Measures MIEC Oxides in Action Print Oxide materials with mixed ionic-electronic conductivity (MIEC) can conduct both electrons and oxygen ions. MIEC oxides have broad applications, including use in solid-oxide fuel cells, high-temperature electrolysis for synthetic fuel production, and oxygen-separating membranes for chemical processes or NOx-free combustion; however, their surface activity under reaction conditions has been difficult, if not impossible, to ascertain, until recently. A team from the University of Maryland and Sandia National Laboratories joined ALS scientists on Beamlines 9.3.2 and 11.0.2 to overcome the vacuum limitations of conventional XPS instruments using ambient-pressure x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (AP-XPS), providing the first in situ measurements of local surface oxidation states and electric potential in active MIEC electrodes.

239

Occupant satisfaction in mixed-mode buildings.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Strategies for Mixed-Mode Buildings, Summary Report, CenterCBE). 2006. Website: Mixed-Mode Building Case Studies.Department of Environmental Building Research Establishment

Brager, Gail; Baker, Lindsay

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Occupant satisfaction in mixed-mode buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Environmental Quality in Green Buildings”. Indoor Air; 14 (Strategies for Mixed-Mode Buildings, Summary Report, CenterCBE). 2006. Website: Mixed-Mode Building Case Studies.

Brager, Gail; Baker, Lindsay

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mixed oxide mox" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Delivery system for molten salt oxidation of solid waste  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention is a delivery system for safety injecting solid waste particles, including mixed wastes, into a molten salt bath for destruction by the process of molten salt oxidation. The delivery system includes a feeder system and an injector that allow the solid waste stream to be accurately metered, evenly dispersed in the oxidant gas, and maintained at a temperature below incineration temperature while entering the molten salt reactor.

Brummond, William A. (Livermore, CA); Squire, Dwight V. (Livermore, CA); Robinson, Jeffrey A. (Manteca, CA); House, Palmer A. (Walnut Creek, CA)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Development of ceramic mixed potential sensors for automotive application  

SciTech Connect

Mixed potential sensors that utilize Gd{sub 0.2}Ce{sub 0.8}O{sub 2} electrolytes and patterned dense 1 {micro}m-thick LaMnO{sub 3} thin films were studied at 600 C and 1%O{sub 2}. The response to C{sub 3}H{sub 6} and CO of two different sensor configurations were studied continuously for 1000 hrs versus an air reference. Although two different current collection schemes and two different metal oxide electrode geometries were employed, the magnitude of the mixed potential generated by both sensors was remarkably similar. From previous work with Au-ceria-Pt mixed potential sensors, this behavior is attributed to precisely controlling the metal oxide electrode/solid electrolyte interface unlike the random interface produced when Au electrodes are used. Although doped ceria is not a suitable electrolyte for automotive exhaust gas applications, this work serves to illustrate design goals for zirconia-based sensors.

Brasha, E. (Eric); Mukundan, R. (Rangachary); Brown, D. R. (David R.); Garzon, F. H. (Fernando H.); Visser, J. (Jaco)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Lifetime Assessment for Thermal Barrier Coatings: Tests for Measuring Mixed Mode Delamination Toughness  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the thermally grown oxide (TGO), and a porous ceramic topcoat which serves as the thermal insulation. DetailsLifetime Assessment for Thermal Barrier Coatings: Tests for Measuring Mixed Mode Delamination Mechanisms leading to degradation of the adherence of thermal barrier coatings (TBC) used in aircraft

Hutchinson, John W.

244

Mixed-Valence Minerals of Iron and Titanium: Correlations of Structural, Mössbauer and Electronic Spectral Data  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A large cariety of mixed-valence silicate and oxide minerals occur in rocks from the Earth, Moon and Meteorites, They frequently contain Fe2+ -Fe3+, Ti3+ -Ti4+ and Fe2+ -Ti4+ assemblages and often display anomalo...

Roger G. Burns; D. A. Nolet; K. M. Parkin; C. A. McCammon…

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Oxidation of propylene over copper oxide catalysts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to the study of propylene oxidation. Dunlop (17) reported that small quantities of iron compounds substantially enhanced the catalytic activity of chromia-alumina catalysts with respect to propylene oxidation, Woodharn (72) has suggested that under... between 360 C and 430oC the rate of propane oxidation decreases as the teznperature is increased, and the rate of conversion to olefins, especially propylene, becomes progressively greater. Above 430 C the proportion of propane converted to ethylene in...

Billingsley, David Stuart

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

246

Aspen Ecology in the MixedAspen Ecology in the Mixed Conifer TypeConifer Type  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Aspen Ecology in the MixedAspen Ecology in the Mixed Conifer TypeConifer Type Wayne D. Shepperd Colorado State University Fort Collins, CO Aspen Ecology in the MixedAspen Ecology in the Mixed ConiferAssumptions Mixed conifer forests are a collection of different species, each with different ecologic requirements

247

Advances in compressible turbulent mixing  

SciTech Connect

This volume includes some recent additions to original material prepared for the Princeton International Workshop on the Physics of Compressible Turbulent Mixing, held in 1988. Workshop participants were asked to emphasize the physics of the compressible mixing process rather than measurement techniques or computational methods. Actual experimental results and their meaning were given precedence over discussions of new diagnostic developments. Theoretical interpretations and understanding were stressed rather than the exposition of new analytical model developments or advances in numerical procedures. By design, compressibility influences on turbulent mixing were discussed--almost exclusively--from the perspective of supersonic flow field studies. The papers are arranged in three topical categories: Foundations, Vortical Domination, and Strongly Coupled Compressibility. The Foundations category is a collection of seminal studies that connect current study in compressible turbulent mixing with compressible, high-speed turbulent flow research that almost vanished about two decades ago. A number of contributions are included on flow instability initiation, evolution, and transition between the states of unstable flow onset through those descriptive of fully developed turbulence. The Vortical Domination category includes theoretical and experimental studies of coherent structures, vortex pairing, vortex-dynamics-influenced pressure focusing. In the Strongly Coupled Compressibility category the organizers included the high-speed turbulent flow investigations in which the interaction of shock waves could be considered an important source for production of new turbulence or for the enhancement of pre-existing turbulence. Individual papers are processed separately.

Dannevik, W.P.; Buckingham, A.C.; Leith, C.E. [eds.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Reactor-Based Plutonium Disposition: Opportunities, Options, and Issues  

SciTech Connect

The end of the Cold War has created a legacy of surplus fissile materials (plutonium and highly enriched uranium) in the United States (U.S.) and the former Soviet Union. These materials pose a danger to national and international security. During the past few years, the U.S. and Russia have engaged in an ongoing dialog concerning the safe storage and disposition of surplus fissile material stockpiles. In January 1997, the Department of Energy (DOE) announced the U. S. would pursue a dual track approach to rendering approximately 50 metric tons of plutonium inaccessible for use in nuclear weapons. One track involves immobilizing the plutonium by combining it with high-level radioactive waste in glass or ceramic ''logs''. The other method, referred to as reactor-based disposition, converts plutonium into mixed oxide (MOX) fuel for nuclear reactors. The U.S. and Russia are moving ahead rapidly to develop and demonstrate the technology required to implement the MOX option in their respective countries. U.S. MOX fuel research and development activities were started in the 1950s, with irradiation of MOX fuel rods in commercial light water reactors (LWR) from the 1960s--1980s. In all, a few thousand MOX fuel rods were successfully irradiated. Though much of this work was performed with weapons-grade or ''near'' weapons-grade plutonium--and favorable fuel performance was observed--the applicability of this data for licensing and use of weapons-grade MOX fuel manufactured with modern fuel fabrication processes is somewhat limited. The U.S. and Russia are currently engaged in an intensive research, development, and demonstration program to support implementation of the MOX option in our two countries. This paper focuses on work performed in the U.S. and provides a brief summary of joint U.S./Russian work currently underway.

Greene, S.R.

1999-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

249

Behavior of Zircaloy Cladding in the Presence of Gallium  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy has established a dual-track approach to the disposition of plutonium arising from the dismantling of nuclear weapons. Both immobilization and reactor-based mixed-oxide (MOX) fuel technologies are being evaluated. The reactor-based MOX fuel option requires assessment of the potential impact of concentrations of gallium (on the order of 1 to 10 ppm), not present in conventional MOX fuel, on cladding material performance. An experimental program was designed to evaluate the performance of prototypic Zircaloy cladding materials against (1) liquid gallium, and (2) various concentrations of G~03. Three types of tests were performed: (1) corrosion, (2) liquid metal embrittlement, and (3) corrosion-mechanical. These tests were to determine corrosion mechanisms, thresholds for temperature and concentration of gallium that delineate behavioral regimes, and changes in the mechanical properties of Zircaloy. Results have generally been favorable for the use of weapons-grade (WG) MOX fhel. The Zircaloy cladding does react with gallium to form intermetallic compounds at >3000 C; however, this reaction is limited by the mass of gallium and is therefore not expected to be significant with a low level (parts per million) of gallium in the MOX fuel. Furthermore, no evidence for grain boundary penetration by gallium or liquid metal embrittlement was observed.

DiStefano, J.R.; King, J.F.; Manneschmidt, E.T.; Strizak, J.P.; Wilson, D.F.

1998-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

250

Unit Operation Efficiency Improvement Through Motionless Mixing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

instances, the power consumption associated with mix ing operations constitutes the major energy demand of a plant or factory. Generally speaking, most industrial mixing occurs in a tank with a motor driven shaft and a mixing blade or paddle assembly... 1/4 inch in diameter, to units many feet in diameter weighing tons. (Figs. 4 and 5). MECHANICAL AND MOTIONLESS MIXERS COMPARED Figure 6 shows a typical mechanical mixing system when materials A and Bare pumped to a mix tank, and the mixed pro...

King, L. T.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Mixcoin Anonymity for Bitcoin with accountable mixes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract. We propose Mixcoin, a protocol to facilitate anonymous payments in Bitcoin and similar cryptocurrencies. We build on the emergent phenomenon of currency mixes, adding an accountability mechanism to expose theft. We demonstrate that incentives of mixes and clients can be aligned to ensure that rational mixes will not steal. Our scheme is efficient and fully compatible with Bitcoin. Against a passive attacker, our scheme provides an anonymity set of all other users mixing coins contemporaneously. This is an interesting new property with no clear analog in better-studied communication mixes. Against active attackers our scheme offers similar anonymity to traditional communication mixes. 1

Joseph Bonneau; Arvind Narayanan; Andrew Miller; Jeremy Clark; Joshua A. Kroll; Edward W. Felten

252

Solid Oxide Fuel Cells  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC) is typically composed of two porous electrodes, interposed between an electrolyte made of a particular solid oxide ceramic material. The system originates from the work of Nernst...

Nigel M. Sammes; Roberto Bove; Jakub Pusz

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Mixing  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

bandwidth <> Individual pulse sub-ps resolution Individual lines <> Train resolution improvement needed "Streak camera" :) Single-shot :( Low resolution (10 ps ) :) Train...

254

Internal Tides and Abyssal Mixing  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Generated where currents induced by surface tides flow over sloping bottoms, internal tides can transport energy over thousands of kilometers in the ocean. During the past decade, intensive field work, data analysis, and numerical modeling have revealed the ubiquitous nature of these flows and details of their generation and initial propagation. Attention is now turning to how and where these waves break to drive abyssal mixing.

M.C. Gregg

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Neutrino mixing, flavor states and dark energy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We shortly summarize the quantum field theory formalism for the neutrino mixing and report on recent results showing that the vacuum condensate induced by neutrino mixing can be interpreted as a dark energy component of the Universe.

M. Blasone; A. Capolupo; S. Capozziello; G. Vitiello

2007-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

256

Scanned Treatment of Mixed Incin. Waste  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Treatment of Mixed Incinerable Treatment of Mixed Incinerable Waste DOE/IG-0588 March 2003 Page 17 Page 18 Use of Treatment Resources Details of Finding ........................................................................1 Recommendations and Comments ............................................6 Appendices Prior Reports ...............................................................................8 Objective, Scope, and Methodology ...........................................9 Management Comments ...........................................................11 TREATMENT OF MIXED INCINERABLE WASTE TABLE OF CONTENTS Page 1 Waste Stored Rather Than Treated We found the Department of Energy (Department) was not treating its mixed incinerable solid waste expeditiously or cost-effectively.

257

Dark energy induced by neutrino mixing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The energy content of the vacuum condensate induced by the neutrino mixing is interpreted as dynamically evolving dark energy.

Antonio Capolupo; Salvatore Capozziello; Giuseppe Vitiello

2006-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

258

Sustainability Considerations in Spent Light-water Nuclear Fuel Retrievability  

SciTech Connect

This paper examines long-term cost differences between two competing Light Water Reactor (LWR) fuels: Uranium Oxide (UOX) and Mixed Uranium Oxide-Plutonium Oxide (MOX). Since these costs are calculated on a life-cycle basis, expected savings from lower future MOX fuel prices can be used to value the option of substituting MOX for UOX, including the value of maintaining access to the used UOX fuel that could be reprocessed to make MOX. The two most influential cost drivers are the price of natural uranium and the cost of reprocessing. Significant and sustained reductions in reprocessing costs and/or sustained increases in uranium prices are required to give positive value to the retrievability of Spent Nuclear Fuel. While this option has positive economic value, it might not be exercised for 50 to 200 years. Therefore, there are many years for a program during which reprocessing technology can be researched, developed, demonstrated, and deployed. Further research is required to determine whether the cost of such a program would yield positive net present value and/or increases the sustainability of LWR energy systems.

Wood, Thomas W.; Rothwell, Geoffrey

2012-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

259

MixedConifer Forests in Southwest Colorado  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

April 2010 Mixed­Conifer Forests in Southwest Colorado A Summary of Existing Knowledge and Considerations for Restoration and Management #12;Mixed Conifer Forests in Southwest Colorado 1Mixed-Conifer Forests in Southwest Colorado 1 ABOUT THE COLORADO FOREST RESTORATION INSTITUTE The Colorado Forest

260

SRS - Programs - Nonproliferation Programs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3/2012 3/2012 SEARCH GO spacer SRS Home Nonproliferation Programs In the crucial field of nuclear nonproliferation, SRS employee contributions helped to advance all three of the planned plutonium disposition facilities at the Savannah River Site: the Pit Disassembly and Conversion Facility (PDCF); Waste Solidification Building (WSB); and the Mixed Oxide (MOX) Fuel Fabrication Facility. A $345 million project, the WSB will process liquid waste from the MOX facility. After material is processed at the WSB, transuranic waste will be packaged and sent to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant in New Mexico, and low-level waste will be packaged and sent to onsite or commercial off-site low-level waste disposal facilities. The mixed oxide fuel fabrication facility will be a major component in the United States' program to dispose of excess weapons grade plutonium.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mixed oxide mox" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

CX-007663: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

63: Categorical Exclusion Determination 63: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-007663: Categorical Exclusion Determination Construction of a Connector Road Between the Construction Administration Complex (CAC) and the Mixed Oxide Administration Complex (MAC) Parking Lots CX(s) Applied: B1.13 Date: 11/21/2011 Location(s): South Carolina Offices(s): Savannah River Operations Office Mixed Oxide (MOX) Services proposes the construction of a road connecting the Construction Administration Complex (CAC) and the MOX Administration Complex (MAC) parking lots. The approximate dimensions of the proposed connector road are 160 feet in length and 17 feet in width, with a construction limits footprint of 0.4 acre. CX-007663.pdf More Documents & Publications CX-010852: Categorical Exclusion Determination

262

CX-007663: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

7663: Categorical Exclusion Determination 7663: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-007663: Categorical Exclusion Determination Construction of a Connector Road Between the Construction Administration Complex (CAC) and the Mixed Oxide Administration Complex (MAC) Parking Lots CX(s) Applied: B1.13 Date: 11/21/2011 Location(s): South Carolina Offices(s): Savannah River Operations Office Mixed Oxide (MOX) Services proposes the construction of a road connecting the Construction Administration Complex (CAC) and the MOX Administration Complex (MAC) parking lots. The approximate dimensions of the proposed connector road are 160 feet in length and 17 feet in width, with a construction limits footprint of 0.4 acre. CX-007663.pdf More Documents & Publications CX-010852: Categorical Exclusion Determination

263

Challenge in Urea Mixing Design | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

in Urea Mixing Design This project reviews existing urea mixing technologies for automobile applications and discusses some critical issues in urea mixing design using bench...

264

Urea Mixing Design -- Simulation and Test Investigation | Department...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Mixing Design -- Simulation and Test Investigation Urea Mixing Design -- Simulation and Test Investigation Effective urea mixing design should be based on the placement and nature...

265

Mixed Conifer ManagementMixed Conifer Management in Southwest Coloradoin Southwest Colorado  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Forest 1,864,839 Acres 93,600 215,500 1,555,739 Warm, Dry Mixed Conifer Cool, Moist Mixed Conifer OtherMixed Conifer ManagementMixed Conifer Management in Southwest Coloradoin Southwest Colorado Tom TroxelTom Troxel Intermountain Forest AssociationIntermountain Forest Association Colorado Timber

266

Comparison of the Catalytic Oxidation Reaction on Graphene Oxide and Reduced Graphene Oxide  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Comparison of the Catalytic Oxidation Reaction on Graphene Oxide and Reduced Graphene Oxide Laboratory (PAL), Pohang 790-784, Republic of Korea ABSTRACT: The capacities of graphene oxide (GO) and reduced graphene oxide (rGO) films grown on silicon substrate to cause the aniline to azobenzene oxidation

Kim, Sehun

267

Interactions of zircaloy cladding with gallium -- 1997 status  

SciTech Connect

A four phase program has been implemented to evaluate the effect of gallium in mixed oxide (MOX) fuel derived from weapons grade (WG) plutonium on Zircaloy cladding performance. The objective is to demonstrate that low levels of gallium will not compromise the performance of the MOX fuel system in LWR. This graded, four phase experimental program will evaluate the performance of prototypic Zircaloy cladding materials against: (1) liquid gallium (Phase 1), (2) various concentrations of Ga{sub 2}O{sub 3} (Phase 2), (3) centrally heated surrogate fuel pellets with expected levels of gallium (Phase 3), and (4) centrally heated prototypic MOX fuel pellets (Phase 4). This status report describes the results of an initial series of tests for phases 1 and 2. Three types of tests are being performed: (1) corrosion, (2) liquid metal embrittlement (LME), and (3) corrosion mechanical. These tests are designed to determine the corrosion mechanisms, thresholds for temperature and concentration of gallium that may delineate behavioral regimes, and changes in mechanical properties of Zircaloy. Initial results have generally been favorable for the use of WG-MOX fuel. The MOX fuel cladding, Zircaloy, does react with gallium to form intermetallic compounds at {ge} 300 C; however, this reaction is limited by the mass of gallium and is therefore not expected to be significant with a low level (in parts per million) of gallium in the MOX fuel. While continued migration of gallium into the initially formed intermetallic compound results in large stresses that can lead to distortion, this is also highly unlikely because of the low mass of gallium or gallium oxide present and expected clad temperatures below 400 C. Furthermore, no evidence for grain boundary penetration by gallium has been observed.

Wilson, D.F.; DiStefano, J.R.; King, J.F.; Manneschmidt, E.T.; Strizak, J.P.

1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Interactions of Zircaloy cladding with gallium: 1998 midyear status  

SciTech Connect

A program has been implemented to evaluate the effect of gallium in mixed-oxide (MOX) fuel derived from weapons-grade (WG) plutonium on Zircaloy cladding performance. The objective is to demonstrate that low levels of gallium will not compromise the performance of the MOX fuel system in a light-water reactor. The graded, four-phase experimental program was designed to evaluate the performance of prototypic Zircaloy cladding materials against (1) liquid gallium (Phase 1), (2) various concentrations of Ga{sub 2}O{sub 3} (Phase 2), (3) centrally heated surrogate fuel pellets with expected levels of gallium (Phase 3), and (4) centrally heated prototypic MOX fuel pellets (Phase 4). This status report describes the results of a series of tests for Phases 1 and 2. Three types of tests are being performed: (1) corrosion, (2) liquid metal embrittlement, and (3) corrosion-mechanical. These tests will determine corrosion mechanisms, thresholds for temperature and concentration of gallium that may delineate behavioral regimes, and changes in the mechanical properties of Zircaloy. Initial results have generally been favorable for the use of WG-MOX fuel. The MOX fuel cladding, Zircaloy, does react with gallium to form intermetallic compounds at {ge}300 C; however, this reaction is limited by the mass of gallium and is therefore not expected to be significant with a low level (parts per million) of gallium in the MOX fuel. Although continued migration of gallium into the initially formed intermetallic compound can result in large stresses that may lead to distortion, this was shown to be extremely unlikely because of the low mass of gallium or gallium oxide present and expected clad temperatures below 400 C. Furthermore, no evidence for grain boundary penetration by gallium has been observed.

Wilson, D.F.; DiStefano, J.R.; Strizak, J.P.; King, J.F.; Manneschmidt, E.T.

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Why sequence carbon monoxide oxidizing thermophiles?  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

carbon monoxide oxidizing thermophiles? carbon monoxide oxidizing thermophiles? Many microbes that use carbon monoxide as an energy source are found in high temperature environments such as geothermal areas. Researchers think that these carboxydotrophs may be involved in reducing potentially toxic carbon monoxide hotspots by combine with water to form hydrogen, carbon dioxide and acetate, which are in turn used for thermophilic energy conservation and carbon sequestration mechanisms. The project focuses on sequencing two closely related microbes, one of which is Carboxydothermus hydrogenformans. A strain of C. hydrogenformans has been grown in hydrogen-enriched synthesis gas (syngas), which contains a mix of hydrogen and carbon monoxide. Researchers are interested in sequencing both microbial strains to track the genome's evolution and

270

Oxidation Resistant Graphite Studies  

SciTech Connect

The Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) Graphite Research and Development Program is investigating doped nuclear graphite grades exhibiting oxidation resistance. During a oxygen ingress accident the oxidation rates of the high temperature graphite core region would be extremely high resulting in significant structural damage to the core. Reducing the oxidation rate of the graphite core material would reduce the structural effects and keep the core integrity intact during any air-ingress accident. Oxidation testing of graphite doped with oxidation resistant material is being conducted to determine the extent of oxidation rate reduction. Nuclear grade graphite doped with varying levels of Boron-Carbide (B4C) was oxidized in air at nominal 740°C at 10/90% (air/He) and 100% air. The oxidation rates of the boronated and unboronated graphite grade were compared. With increasing boron-carbide content (up to 6 vol%) the oxidation rate was observed to have a 20 fold reduction from unboronated graphite. Visual inspection and uniformity of oxidation across the surface of the specimens were conducted. Future work to determine the remaining mechanical strength as well as graphite grades with SiC doped material are discussed.

W. Windes; R. Smith

2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Thermal-Hydraulic Analysis of Seed-Blanket Unit Duplex Fuel Assemblies with VIPRE-01  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

nucleate boiling ratio EFIT European Facility for Industrial Transmutation EMT Effective Medium Theory EOL end-of-life EURO-TRANS EUROpean research program for the TRANSmutation of high level nuclear waste in ADS EPRI Electric Power Research... MA minor actinides ME Maxwell-Eucken viii MDNBR minimum departure from nucleate boiling ratio MNFI modified Nuclear Fuels Industries Mo molybdenum MOX mixed-oxide M-R multi-recycling NFI Nuclear Fuels Industries Np neptunium NPP nuclear...

McDermott, Patrick 1987-

2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

272

Fuel Mix Disclosure | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Fuel Mix Disclosure Fuel Mix Disclosure Fuel Mix Disclosure < Back Eligibility Utility Program Info State Colorado Program Type Generation Disclosure Provider Colorado Public Utilities Commission In January 1999, the Colorado Public Utility Commission (PUC) adopted regulations requiring the state's utilities to disclose information regarding their fuel mix to retail customers. Utilities are required to provide this information as a bill insert or as a separate mailing twice annually, in April and October of every year. The PUC provides a suggested format for the disclosure. Fuel mix percentages are to be based on the power supply mix for the previous calendar year. Supporting documentation concerning the calculations used to determine the power supply mix percentages must be submitted to the PUC for approval.

273

Iron-Phosphate Ceramics for Solidification of Mixed Low-Level Waste  

SciTech Connect

A method of immobilizing mixed low-level waste is provided which uses low cost materials and has a relatively long hardening period. The method includes: forming a mixture of iron oxide powders having ratios, in mass %, of FeO: Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}: Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} equal to 25-40: 40-10: 35-50, or weighing a definite amount of magnitite powder. Metallurgical cinder can also be used as the source of iron oxides. A solution of the orthophosphoric acid, or a solution of the orthophosphoric acid and ferric oxide, is formed and a powder phase of low-level waste and the mixture of iron oxide powders or cinder (or magnetite powder) is also formed. The acid solution is mixed with the powder phase to form a slurry with the ratio of components (mass %) of waste: iron oxide powders or magnitite: acid solution = 30-60: 15-10: 55-30. The slurry is blended to form a homogeneous mixture which is cured at room temperature to form the final product.

Aloy, Albert S.; Kovarskaya, Elena N.; Koltsova, Tatiana I.; Macheret, Yevgeny; Medvedev, Pavel G.; Todd, Terry

1998-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

274

Iron-phosphate ceramics for solidification of mixed low-level waste  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of immobilizing mixed low-level waste is provided which uses low cost materials and has a relatively long hardening period. The method includes: forming a mixture of iron oxide powders having ratios, in mass %, of FeO:Fe.sub.2 O.sub.3 :Fe.sub.3 O.sub.4 equal to 25-40:40-10:35-50, or weighing a definite amount of magnetite powder. Metallurgical cinder can also be used as the source of iron oxides. A solution of the orthophosphoric acid, or a solution of the orthophosphoric acid and ferric oxide, is formed and a powder phase of low-level waste and the mixture of iron oxide powders or cinder (or magnetite powder) is also formed. The acid solution is mixed with the powder phase to form a slurry with the ratio of components (mass %) of waste:iron oxide powders or magnetite:acid solution=30-60:15-10:55-30. The slurry is blended to form a homogeneous mixture which is cured at room temperature to form the final product.

Aloy, Albert S. (St. Petersburg, RU); Kovarskaya, Elena N. (St. Petersburg, RU); Koltsova, Tatiana I. (St. Petersburg, RU); Macheret, Yevgeny (Idaho Falls, ID); Medvedev, Pavel G. (Ozersk, RU); Todd, Terry (Aberdeen, ID)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Biofilter for removal of nitrogen oxides from contaminated gases under aerobic conditions  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A biofilter for reducing concentrations of gaseous nitrogen oxides in a polluted gas comprises a porous organic filter bed medium disposed in a housing, the filter bed medium including a mixed culture of naturally occurring denitrifying bacteria for converting the nitrogen oxides to nitrogen gas, carbon dioxide, and water. A method of reducing concentrations of nitrogen oxides in polluted gas comprises conducting the polluted gas through the biofilter so that the denitrifying bacteria can degrade the nitrogen oxides. A preferred filter medium is wood compost, however composts of other organic materials are functional. Regulation of pH, moisture content, exogenous carbon sources, and temperature are described.

Apel, William A. (Idaho Falls, ID)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

METAL OXIDE NANOPARTICLES  

SciTech Connect

This chapter covers the fundamental science, synthesis, characterization, physicochemical properties and applications of oxide nanomaterials. Explains fundamental aspects that determine the growth and behavior of these systems, briefly examines synthetic procedures using bottom-up and top-down fabrication technologies, discusses the sophisticated experimental techniques and state of the art theory results used to characterize the physico-chemical properties of oxide solids and describe the current knowledge concerning key oxide materials with important technological applications.

FERNANDEZ-GARCIA,M.; RODGRIGUEZ, J.A.

2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Independent Oversight Inspection, Savannah River Site - December 2009 |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

December December 2009 Independent Oversight Inspection, Savannah River Site - December 2009 December 2009 Inspection of Reinforced Concrete Construction at the Savannah River Site Mixed Oxide Fuel Fabrication Facility The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Independent Oversight conducted a nuclear safety inspection at the Mixed Oxide (MOX) Fuel Fabrication Facility (MFFF) construction project, focusing on construction quality, specifically for reinforced concrete, at the MFFF construction project. This purpose of the inspection was to provide mission support to site management in determining whether the facility structure is constructed in accordance with the applicable requirements. The overall quality of concrete that has been placed in the MFFF to date is

278

Implications of Plutonium isotopic separation on closed fuel cycles and repository design  

SciTech Connect

Advances in laser enrichment may enable relatively low-cost plutonium isotopic separation. This would have large impacts on LWR closed fuel cycles and waste management. If Pu-240 is removed before recycling plutonium as mixed oxide (MOX) fuel, it would dramatically reduce the buildup of higher plutonium isotopes, Americium, and Curium. Pu-240 is a fertile material and thus can be replaced by U-238. Eliminating the higher plutonium isotopes in MOX fuel increases the Doppler feedback, simplifies reactor control, and allows infinite recycle of MOX plutonium in LWRs. Eliminating fertile Pu-240 and Pu-242 reduces the plutonium content in MOX fuel and simplifies fabrication. Reducing production of Pu-241 reduces production of Am-241 - the primary heat generator in spent nuclear fuels after several decades. Reducing heat generating Am-241 would reduce repository cost and waste toxicity. Avoiding Am- 241 avoids its decay product Np-237, a nuclide that partly controls long-term oxidizing repository performance. Most of these benefits also apply to LWR plutonium recycled into fast reactors. There are benefits for plutonium isotopic separation in fast reactor fuel cycles (particularly removal of Pu-242) but the benefits are less. (author)

Forsberg, C. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 77 Massachusetts Ave. Cambridge, MA 20129 (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Stabilized chromium oxide film  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Stabilized air-oxidized chromium films deposited on high-power klystron ceramic windows and sleeves having a thickness between 20 and 150.ANG. are useful in lowering secondary electron emission yield and in avoiding multipactoring and window failure due to overheating. The ceramic substrate for the film is chosen from alumina, sapphire or beryllium oxide.

Garwin, Edward L. (Los Altos, CA); Nyaiesh, Ali R. (Palo Alto, CA)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Stabilized chromium oxide film  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Stabilized air-oxidized chromium films deposited on high-power klystron ceramic windows and sleeves having a thickness between 20 and 150A are useful in lowering secondary electron emission yield and in avoiding multipactoring and window failure due to overheating. The ceramic substrate for the film is chosen from alumina, sapphire or beryllium oxide.

Nyaiesh, A.R.; Garwin, E.L.

1986-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mixed oxide mox" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Ethylene Oxide Explosions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... THE occasional occurrence of ethylene oxide explosions during the fumigation of dried fruit has led us to undertake a detailed ... yielded results somewhat like those for acetaldehyde1,2.. Cool flames can be initiated in ethylene oxide – air mixtures in the neighbourhood of 330° C. at atmospheric pressure. ...

J. H. BURGOYNE; F. A. BURDEN

1948-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

282

Lagrangian with U(1)-SU(2) mixing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Principal axis transformation is performed for a Lagrangian with a U(1)-SU(2) mixing term, that can cause a SU(2) deconfining transition.

Bernd A. Berg

2009-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

283

Lanthanide doped strontium barium mixed halide scintillators  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention provides for a composition comprising an inorganic scintillator comprising a lanthanide-doped strontium barium mixed halide useful for detecting nuclear material.

Gundiah, Gautam; Bizarri, Gregory; Hanrahan, Stephen M; Bourret-Courchesne, Edith; Derenzo, Stephen E

2013-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

284

TANK MIXING STUDY WITH FLOW RECIRCULATION  

SciTech Connect

The primary objective of this work is to quantify the mixing time when two miscible fluids are mixed by one recirculation pump and to evaluate adequacy of 2.5 hours of pump recirculation to be considered well mixed in SRS tanks, JT-71/72. The work scope described here consists of two modeling analyses. They are the steady state flow pattern analysis during pump recirculation operation of the tank liquid and transient species transport calculations based on the initial steady state flow patterns. The modeling calculations for the mixing time are performed by using the 99% homogeneity criterion for the entire domain of the tank contents.

Lee, S.

2014-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

285

Mixing in complex coastal hydrogeologic systems.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The mixing zone developed at freshwater-seawater interface is one of the most important features in complex coastal hydrogeologic systems, which controls subsurface flow and reactive… (more)

Lu, Chunhui

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Oxidative Degradation of Monoethanolamine  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Oxidative Degradation of Monoethanolamine Oxidative Degradation of Monoethanolamine Susan Chi Gary T. Rochelle* (gtr@che.utexas.edu, 512-471-7230) The University of Texas at Austin Department of Chemical Engineering Austin, Texas 78712 Prepared for presentation at the First National Conference on Carbon Sequestration, Washington, DC, May 14-17, 2001 Abstract Oxidative degradation of monoethanolamine (MEA) was studied under typical absorber condition of 55°C. The rate of evolution of NH 3 , which was indicative of the overall rate of degradation, was measured continuously in a batch system sparged with air. Dissolved iron from 0.0001 mM to 1 mM yields oxidation rates from 0.37 to 2 mM/hr in MEA solutions loaded with 0.4 mole CO 2 / mole MEA. Ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) and N,N-bis(2- hydroxyethyl)glycine effectively decrease the rate of oxidation in the presence of iron by 40 to

287

Microsoft Word - Poster Abstract_2010_GATech_Mixed Ionic-Electronic Conductors.docx  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Investigation of Oxygen Reduction Activity on Mixed Ionic-Electronic Conductors for Investigation of Oxygen Reduction Activity on Mixed Ionic-Electronic Conductors for SOFC Cathodes Matthew E. Lynch, Lei Yang, Meilin Liu Center for Innovative Fuel Cell and Battery Technologies School of Materials Science and Engineering Georgia Institute of Technology 771 Ferst Dr., Atlanta, GA 30332-0245 Telephone: 404-894-6114 Email: meilin.liu@mse.gatech.edu Porous cathodes are of primary importance to the electrochemical operation of a solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC). The compound La 1-x Sr x Co 1-y Fe y O 3-δ (LSCF) is a candidate material for the cathode, and shows good mixed ionic-electronic conductivity as well as good activity toward the oxygen reduction

288

Method for stabilizing low-level mixed wastes at room temperature  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method to stabilize solid and liquid waste at room temperature is provided comprising combining solid waste with a starter oxide to obtain a powder, contacting the powder with an acid solution to create a slurry, said acid solution containing the liquid waste, shaping the now-mixed slurry into a predetermined form, and allowing the now-formed slurry to set. The invention also provides for a method to encapsulate and stabilize waste containing cesium comprising combining the waste with Zr(OH){sub 4} to create a solid-phase mixture, mixing phosphoric acid with the solid-phase mixture to create a slurry, subjecting the slurry to pressure; and allowing the now pressurized slurry to set. Lastly, the invention provides for a method to stabilize liquid waste, comprising supplying a powder containing magnesium, sodium and phosphate in predetermined proportions, mixing said powder with the liquid waste, such as tritium, and allowing the resulting slurry to set. 4 figs.

Wagh, A.S.; Singh, D.

1997-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

289

Method for stabilizing low-level mixed wastes at room temperature  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method to stabilize solid and liquid waste at room temperature is provided comprising combining solid waste with a starter oxide to obtain a powder, contacting the powder with an acid solution to create a slurry, said acid solution containing the liquid waste, shaping the now-mixed slurry into a predetermined form, and allowing the now-formed slurry to set. The invention also provides for a method to encapsulate and stabilize waste containing cesium comprising combining the waste with Zr(OH).sub.4 to create a solid-phase mixture, mixing phosphoric acid with the solid-phase mixture to create a slurry, subjecting the slurry to pressure; and allowing the now pressurized slurry to set. Lastly, the invention provides for a method to stabilize liquid waste, comprising supplying a powder containing magnesium, sodium and phosphate in predetermined proportions, mixing said powder with the liquid waste, such as tritium, and allowing the resulting slurry to set.

Wagh, Arun S. (Joliet, IL); Singh, Dileep (Westmont, IL)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Fusion Techniques for the Oxidation of Refractory Actinide Oxides  

SciTech Connect

Small-scale experiments were performed to demonstrate the feasibility of fusing refractory actinide oxides with a series of materials commonly used to decompose minerals, glasses, and other refractories as a pretreatment to dissolution and subsequent recovery operations. In these experiments, 1-2 g of plutonium or neptunium oxide (PuO2 or NpO2) were calcined at 900 degrees Celsius, mixed and heated with the fusing reagent(s), and dissolved. For refractory PuO2, the most effective material tested was a lithium carbonate (Li2CO3)/sodium tetraborate (Na2B4O7) mixture which aided in the recovery of 90 percent of the plutonium. The fused product was identified as a lithium plutonate (Li3PuO4) by x-ray diffraction. The use of a Li2CO3/Na2B4O7 mixture to solubilize high-fired NpO2 was not as effective as demonstrated for refractory PuO2. In a small-scale experiment, 25 percent of the NpO2 was oxidized to a neptunium (VI) species that dissolved in nitric acid. The remaining neptunium was then easily recovered from the residue by fusing with sodium peroxide (Na2O2). Approximately 70 percent of the neptunium dissolved in water to yield a basic solution of neptunium (VII). The remainder was recovered as a neptunium (VI) solution by dissolving the residue in 8M nitric acid. In subsequent experiments with Na2O2, the ratio of neptunium (VII) to (VI) was shown to be a function of the fusion temperature, with higher temperatures (greater than approximately 400 degrees C) favoring the formation of neptunium (VII). The fusion of an actual plutonium-containing residue with Na2O2 and subsequent dissolution was performed to demonstrate the feasibility of a pretreatment process on a larger scale. Sodium peroxide was chosen due to the potential of achieving higher actinide recoveries from refractory materials. In this experiment, nominally 10 g of a graphite-containing residue generated during plutonium casting operations was initially calcined to remove the graphite. Removal of combustible material prior to a large-scale fusion with Na2O2 is needed due to the large amount of heat liberated during oxidation. Two successive fusions using the residue from the calcination and the residue generated from the initial dissolution allowed recovery of 98 percent of the plutonium. The fusion of the residue following the first dissolution was performed at a higher temperature (600 degrees Celsius versus 450 degrees Celsius during the first fusion). The ability to recover most of the remaining plutonium from the residue suggest the oxidation efficiency of the Na2O2 fusion improves with higher temperatures similar to results observed with NpO2 fusion.

Rudisill, T.S.

1999-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

291

Phase-Transfer-Catalyzed Oxidations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Phase-transfer catalysis (PTC) offers many excellent opportunities for conducting oxidation reactions using inexpensive primary oxidants such as oxygen, sodium hypochlorite, hydrogen peroxide, electrooxidation...

Charles M. Starks; Charles L. Liotta; Marc E. Halpern

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Impact of Fission Products Impurity on the Plutonium Content of Metal- and Oxide- Fuels in Sodium Cooled Fast Reactors  

SciTech Connect

This short report presents the neutronic analysis to evaluate the impact of fission product impurity on the Pu content of Sodium-cooled Fast Reactor (SFR) metal- and oxide- fuel fabrication. The similar work has been previously done for PWR MOX fuel [1]. The analysis will be performed based on the assumption that the separation of the fission products (FP) during the reprocessing of UOX spent nuclear fuel assemblies is not perfect and that, consequently, a certain amount of FP goes into the Pu stream used to fabricate SFR fuels. Only non-gaseous FPs have been considered (see the list of 176 isotopes considered in the calculations in Appendix 1 of Reference 1). Throughout of this report, we define the mixture of Pu and FPs as PuFP. The main objective of this analysis is to quantify the increase of the Pu content of SFR fuels necessary to maintain the same average burnup at discharge independently of the amount of FP in the Pu stream, i.e. independently of the PuFP composition. The FP losses are considered element-independent, i.e., for example, 1% of FP losses mean that 1% of all non-gaseous FP leak into the Pu stream.

Hikaru Hiruta; Gilles Youinou

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Regenerative catalytic oxidation  

SciTech Connect

Currently Regenerative Thermal Oxidizers (R.T.O.`s) are an accepted technology for the control of volatile organic compounds (VOC`s) and hazardous air pollutants (HAP`s). This control technology, when introduced, offered substantial reductions in operating costs, especially auxiliary fuel requirements when compared to existing control technologies such as recuperative thermal and recuperative catalytic oxidizers. While these savings still exist, there is a demand for control of new and/or hybrid technologies, one of which is Regenerative Catalytic Oxidizers (R.C.O.`s). This paper will explore the development of regenerative catalytic oxidation from the theoretical stage through pilot testing through a commercial installation. The operating cost of R.C.O.`s will be compared to R.T.O.`s to verify the savings that are achievable through the use of regenerative catalytic oxidation. In the development of this technology, which is a combination of two (2) existing technologies, R.T.O.`s and catalysis, a second hybrid technology was explored and pilot tested. This is a combination R.C.O. for VOC and HAP control and simultaneous SCR (Selective Catalytic Reduction) for NOx (Oxides of Nitrogen) control. Based on the pilot and full scale testing, both regenerative catalytic oxidizers and systems which combine R.C.O. with SCR for both VOC and NOx reduction are economically viable and are in fact commercially available. 6 figs., 2 tabs.

Gribbon, S.T. [Engelhard Process Emission Systems, South Lyon, MI (United States)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

294

B-B Mixing and CP Violation Observation of Mixing and CP Violation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

15 B-B Mixing and CP Violation Observation of Mixing and CP Violation Just as for K0 and K 0-strange B0 d = bd and the strange B0 s = bs. The mixing does not require CP violation, but depends only

Murayama, Hitoshi

295

Identifying Mixed Chemical and Radioactive Waste Mixed waste is: any waste material containing both radioactive materials  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Identifying Mixed Chemical and Radioactive Waste Mixed waste is: any waste material containing both as noted on the list, you do not have a mixed waste and it may be managed as a normal radioactive waste radioactive waste after initially dating the container, the hold for decay time is extended, but you cannot

Straight, Aaron

296

Stabilization of a mixed waste sludge for land disposal  

SciTech Connect

A solidification and stabilization technique was developed for a chemically complex mixed waste sludge containing nitrate processing wastes, sewage sludge and electroplating wastewaters, among other wastes. The sludge is originally from a solar evaporation pond and has high concentrations of nitrate salts; cadmium, chromium, and nickel concentrations of concern; and low levels of organic constituents and alpha and beta emitters. Sulfide reduction of nitrate and precipitation of metallic species, followed by evaporation to dryness and solidification of the dry sludge in recycled high density polyethylene with added lime was determined to be a satisfactory preparation for land disposal in a mixed waste repository. The application of post-consumer polyethylene has the added benefit of utilizing another problem-causing waste product. A modified Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure was used to determine required treatment chemical dosages and treatment effectiveness. The waste complexity prohibited use of standard chemical equilibrium methods for prediction of reaction products during treatment. Waste characterization followed by determination of thermodynamic feasibility of oxidation and reduction products. These calculations were shown to be accurate in laboratory testing. 13 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

Powers, S.E.; Zander, A.K. [Clarkson Univ., Potsdam, NY (United States)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

297

Neutrino mixing and oscillations in astrophysical environments  

SciTech Connect

A brief review of the current status of neutrino mixing and oscillations in astrophysical environments, with particular emphasis on the Sun and core-collapse supernovae, is given. Implications of the existence of sterile states which mix with the active neutrinos are discussed.

Balantekin, A. B. [Physics Department, University of Wisconsin, Madison WI 53706 (United States)

2014-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

298

Fuel Mix Disclosure | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Fuel Mix Disclosure Fuel Mix Disclosure Fuel Mix Disclosure < Back Eligibility Utility Program Info State Delaware Program Type Generation Disclosure Provider Delaware Public Service Commission Delaware's 1999 restructuring law (HB 10) authorized the state Public Service Commission (PSC) to develop environmental disclosure requirements and consumer protection standards for green power marketing. The PSC's rules require all electric suppliers to disclose to the commission aggregate proportions of fuel resource mix for the electricity supplied to customers in Delaware for each quarter. In addition, electric suppliers must disclose their fuel resource mix to retail electric customers annually via bill inserts and "each other quarter' on the supplier's web site or by customer request. A standard label is not required; however, the reports

299

Argonne CNM Highlight: Mixing up surface properties  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mixing up surface properties Mixing up surface properties Mixed self-assembled monolayers This image was selected for the "Back Scatter" back cover feature of Physics Today, Vol. 62, No. 2 (Feb. 2009) Mixed self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) offer the intriguing possibility of tailoring wetting properties, surface energy, and other interfacial characteristics by combining suitable molecular constituents. This atomic force micrograph, 800 nm tall, shows the onset of nanoscopic phase separation in an ideally mixed two-component SAM. The small domains of each material can be distinguished with topographic contrast because of their 2-Ã… length difference. The larger domains are due to atomic terracing of the underlying gold surface. Seth Darling (CNM) and Steven Sibener (University of Chicago) are working

300

Robertsons Ready Mix | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Robertsons Ready Mix Robertsons Ready Mix Jump to: navigation, search Name Robertsons Ready Mix Facility Robertsons Ready Mix Sector Wind energy Facility Type Community Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Foundation Windpower Developer Foundation Windpower Energy Purchaser Robertsons Ready Mix Location Cabazon CA Coordinates 33.915842°, -116.81325° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":33.915842,"lon":-116.81325,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mixed oxide mox" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

SOLID OXIDE PLANAR AND TUBULAR SOLID OXIDE FUEL  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

SOLID OXIDE PLANAR AND TUBULAR SOLID OXIDE FUEL CELLS Dynamic Simulation Approach Modular Approach · Parallel planes: PSOFC · Other: combustor, reformer Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Electrochemistry Cell Reactions · Slow pressure transients #12;Fuel Cell Assumptions · H2 electrochemically oxidized only · CO consumed

Mease, Kenneth D.

302

Syngas Oxidation Mechanism  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A comprehensive analysis of synthesis gas (syngas) oxidation kinetics in wide ranges of temperature ... on the basis of the reaction mechanism of syngas ignition and combustion in air. A vast set of experimental ...

A. M. Starik; N. S. Titova; A. S. Sharipov…

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Controlled CO preferential oxidation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Method is described for controlling the supply of air to a PROX (PReferential OXidation for CO cleanup) reactor for the preferential oxidation in the presence of hydrogen wherein the concentration of the hydrogen entering and exiting the PROX reactor is monitored, the difference there between correlated to the amount of air needed to minimize such difference, and based thereon the air supply to the PROX reactor adjusted to provide such amount and minimize such difference. 2 figs.

Meltser, M.A.; Hoch, M.M.

1997-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

304

Savannah River Site's H Canyon Begins 2012 with New and Continuing  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Site's H Canyon Begins 2012 with New and Site's H Canyon Begins 2012 with New and Continuing Missions - Transuranic waste remediation, new mission work are the focus of the nation's only active nuclear chemical separations facility in 2012 Savannah River Site's H Canyon Begins 2012 with New and Continuing Missions - Transuranic waste remediation, new mission work are the focus of the nation's only active nuclear chemical separations facility in 2012 January 1, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis H Canyon, above, and HB-Line are scheduled to soon begin dissolving and purifying plutonium currently stored at the Savannah River Site to demonstrate the capability to produce oxide material that meets the Mixed Oxide Facility (MOX) feedstock specifications. The production process at MOX, which is now under construction, will eventually create fuel pellets for U.S. commercial reactor fuel assemblies.

305

EM News | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

January 1, 2012 January 1, 2012 H Canyon, above, and HB-Line are scheduled to soon begin dissolving and purifying plutonium currently stored at the Savannah River Site to demonstrate the capability to produce oxide material that meets the Mixed Oxide Facility (MOX) feedstock specifications. The production process at MOX, which is now under construction, will eventually create fuel pellets for U.S. commercial reactor fuel assemblies. Savannah River Site's H Canyon Begins 2012 with New and Continuing Missions - Transuranic waste remediation, new mission work are the focus of the nation's only active nuclear chemical separations facility in 2012 AIKEN, S.C. - The Savannah River Site (SRS) is breathing new life into the H Canyon, the only active nuclear chemical separations facility still

306

Laboratory directed research and development on disposal of plutonium recovered from weapons. FY1994 final report  

SciTech Connect

This research project was conceived as a multi-year plan to study the use of mixed plutonium oxide-uranium oxide (MOX) fuel in existing nuclear reactors. Four areas of investigation were originally proposed: (1) study reactor physics including evaluation of control rod worth and power distribution during normal operation and transients; (2) evaluate accidents focusing upon the reduced control rod worth and reduced physical properties of PuO{sub 2}; (3) assess the safeguards required during fabrication and use of plutonium bearing fuel assemblies; and (4) study public acceptance issues associated with using material recovered from weapons to fuel a nuclear reactor. First year accomplishments are described. Appendices contain 2 reports entitled: development and validation of advanced computational capability for MOX fueled ALWR assembly designs; and long-term criticality safety concerns associated with weapons plutonium disposition.

Pitts, J.H.; Choi, J.S.

1994-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

307

Fabrication of solid oxide fuel cell by electrochemical vapor deposition  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

In a high temperature solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC), the deposition of an impervious high density thin layer of electrically conductive interconnector material, such as magnesium doped lanthanum chromite, and of an electrolyte material, such as yttria stabilized zirconia, onto a porous support/air electrode substrate surface is carried out at high temperatures (approximately 1100.degree.-1300.degree. C.) by a process of electrochemical vapor deposition. In this process, the mixed chlorides of the specific metals involved react in the gaseous state with water vapor resulting in the deposit of an impervious thin oxide layer on the support tube/air electrode substrate of between 20-50 microns in thickness. An internal heater, such as a heat pipe, is placed within the support tube/air electrode substrate and induces a uniform temperature profile therein so as to afford precise and uniform oxide deposition kinetics in an arrangement which is particularly adapted for large scale, commercial fabrication of SOFCs.

Brian, Riley (Willimantic, CT); Szreders, Bernard E. (Oakdale, CT)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Fabrication of solid oxide fuel cell by electrochemical vapor deposition  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

In a high temperature solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC), the deposition of an impervious high density thin layer of electrically conductive interconnector material, such as magnesium doped lanthanum chromite, and of an electrolyte material, such as yttria stabilized zirconia, onto a porous support/air electrode substrate surface is carried out at high temperatures (/approximately/1100/degree/ /minus/ 1300/degree/C) by a process of electrochemical vapor deposition. In this process, the mixed chlorides of the specific metals involved react in the gaseous state with water vapor resulting in the deposit of an impervious thin oxide layer on the support tube/air electrode substrate of between 20--50 microns in thickness. An internal heater, such as a heat pipe, is placed within the support tube/air electrode substrate and induces a uniform temperature profile therein so as to afford precise and uniform oxide deposition kinetics in an arrangement which is particularly adapted for large scale, commercial fabrication of SOFCs.

Riley, B.; Szreders, B.E.

1988-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

309

Mixed Waste Focus Area program management plan  

SciTech Connect

This plan describes the program management principles and functions to be implemented in the Mixed Waste Focus Area (MWFA). The mission of the MWFA is to provide acceptable technologies that enable implementation of mixed waste treatment systems developed in partnership with end-users, stakeholders, tribal governments and regulators. The MWFA will develop, demonstrate and deliver implementable technologies for treatment of mixed waste within the DOE Complex. Treatment refers to all post waste-generation activities including sampling and analysis, characterization, storage, processing, packaging, transportation and disposal.

Beitel, G.A.

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Marketing Mix for Next Generation Marketing  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Marketing mix has under gone a sea change in last few decades. Every stake holder involved in the marketing process looks for ‘Value’. The customer enters in the marketing process for better ‘value’ for his money through ‘Value to Customer’. The marketers would like to concentrate on the ‘valued customer’. The prime objective of any business is to sought value from the business ‘value to the marketer’. The marketer and customer would like to keep society's interest intact through ‘Value to society’. The new marketing mix model even though is at conceptual level but it certainly answers many questions of modern marketers which are not answered by traditional theories of marketing mix.

B.R. Londhe

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Modeling of Diesel Oxidation Catalyst  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Modeling of Diesel Oxidation Catalyst ... Optimization of hydrocarbon (HC) oxidation over a diesel oxidation catalyst (DOC) requires consideration of (i) HC gas diffusion into the catalyst layer, (ii) HC gas adsorption and desorption from catalyst sites, and (iii) kinetics of the oxidation reaction. ... Mutagenicity of Diesel Engine Exhaust Is Eliminated in the Gas Phase by an Oxidation Catalyst but Only Slightly Reduced in the Particle Phase ...

Yasushi Tanaka; Takashi Hihara; Makoto Nagata; Naoto Azuma; Akifumi Ueno

2005-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

312

Plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) method of forming vanadium oxide films and vanadium oxide thin-films prepared thereby  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is disclosed of forming a vanadium oxide film on a substrate utilizing plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition. The method includes positioning a substrate within a plasma reaction chamber and then forming a precursor gas comprised of a vanadium-containing chloride gas in an inert carrier gas. This precursor gas is then mixed with selected amounts of hydrogen and oxygen and directed into the reaction chamber. The amounts of precursor gas, oxygen and hydrogen are selected to optimize the final properties of the vanadium oxide film An rf plasma is generated within the reaction chamber to chemically react the precursor gas with the hydrogen and the oxygen to cause deposition of a vanadium oxide film on the substrate while the chamber deposition pressure is maintained at about one torr or less. Finally, the byproduct gases are removed from the plasma reaction chamber.

Zhang, Ji-Guang (Golden, CO); Tracy, C. Edwin (Golden, CO); Benson, David K. (Golden, CO); Turner, John A. (Littleton, CO); Liu, Ping (Lakewood, CO)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Decaking of coal or oil shale during pyrolysis in the presence of iron oxides  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for producing a fuel from the pyrolysis of coal or oil shale in the presence of iron oxide in an inert gas atmosphere is described. The method includes the steps of pulverizing feed coal or oil shale, pulverizing iron oxide, mixing the pulverized feed and iron oxide, and heating the mixture in a gas atmosphere which is substantially inert to the mixture so as to form a product fuel, which may be gaseous, liquid and/or solid. The method of the invention reduces the swelling of coals, such as bituminous coal and the like, which are otherwise known to swell during pyrolysis. 4 figs., 8 tabs.

Rashid Khan, M.

1988-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

314

Decaking of coal or oil shale during pyrolysis in the presence of iron oxides  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for producing a fuel from the pyrolysis of coal or oil shale in the presence of iron oxide in an inert gas atmosphere. The method includes the steps of pulverizing feed coal or oil shale, pulverizing iron oxide, mixing the pulverized feed and iron oxide, and heating the mixture in a gas atmosphere which is substantially inert to the mixture so as to form a product fuel, which may be gaseous, liquid and/or solid. The method of the invention reduces the swelling of coals, such as bituminous coal and the like, which are otherwise known to swell during pyrolysis.

Khan, M. Rashid (Morgantown, WV)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Mixed Conifer Forests of the Sierra Nevada  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The mixed conifer forest of the Sierra Nevada in California is ... States with visible symptoms of ozone injury to conifers (the other areas are the San Bernardino ... ]). The Sierra Nevada contains the largest forest

D. L. Peterson; M. J. Arbaugh

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Fast Transport of Mixed Ion-Chains  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We investigate the dynamics of mixed-species ion crystals during transport between spatially distinct locations in a linear Paul trap in the diabatic regime. In a general mixed-species crystal, all degrees of freedom along the direction of transport are excited by an accelerating well, so unlike the case of same-species ions, where only the center-of-mass-mode is excited, several degrees of freedom have to be simultaneously controlled by the transport protocol. We design protocols that lead to low final excitations in the diabatic regime using invariant-based inverse-engineering for two different-species ions and also show how to extend this approach to longer mixed-species ion strings. Fast transport of mixed-species ion strings can significantly reduce the time overhead in certain architectures for scalable quantum information processing with trapped ions.

M. Palmero; R. Bowler; J. P. Gaebler; D. Leibfried; J. G. Muga

2014-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

317

Particle mixing, flavor condensate and dark energy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The mixing of neutrinos and quarks generate a vacuum condensate that, at the present epoch, behaves as a cosmological constant. The value of the dark energy is constrained today by the very small breaking of the Lorentz invariance.

Massimo Blasone; Antonio Capolupo; Giuseppe Vitiello

2009-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

318

Processing-Morphology-Property Relationships and Composite Theory Analysis of Reduced Graphene Oxide/Natural Rubber  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-8 latex mixing could provide an effective means for production of graphene/rubber nanocomposites. Latex Oxide/Natural Rubber Nanocomposites Jeffrey R. Potts, Om Shankar, Ling Du, and Rodney S. Ruoff of Texas at Austin, 204 E. Dean Keeton St., Austin, Texas 78712, United States Goodyear Tire and Rubber

319

Robotics for mixed waste operations, demonstration description  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Technology Development (OTD) is developing technology to aid in the cleanup of DOE sites. Included in the OTD program are the Robotics Technology Development Program and the Mixed Waste Integrated Program. These two programs are working together to provide technology for the cleanup of mixed waste, which is waste that has both radioactive and hazardous constituents. There are over 240,000 cubic meters of mixed low level waste accumulated at DOE sites and the cleanup is expected to generate about 900,000 cubic meters of mixed low level waste over the next five years. This waste must be monitored during storage and then treated and disposed of in a cost effective manner acceptable to regulators and the states involved. The Robotics Technology Development Program is developing robotics technology to make these tasks safer, better, faster and cheaper through the Mixed Waste Operations team. This technology will also apply to treatment of transuranic waste. The demonstration at the Savannah River Site on November 2-4, 1993, showed the progress of this technology by DOE, universities and industry over the previous year. Robotics technology for the handling, characterization and treatment of mixed waste as well robotics technology for monitoring of stored waste was demonstrated. It was shown that robotics technology can make future waste storage and waste treatment facilities better, faster, safer and cheaper.

Ward, C.R.

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Investigating Jet Mixing Using Electrical Resistance Tomography  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Coaxial jet and side entry mixers are used in a wide range of industries for a variety of processes including precipitation polymerization and neutralization duties. Jet mixers are characterized by short contact times between the fluids and can be operated continuously or semi?batch. Coaxial and side entry jets can be designed in order to deliver rapid turbulent mixing using short sections of pipeline. As the energy required for mixing is provided by the addition stream the process?side pressure drop required for homogeneity is very low. A key design parameter for jet mixers is the mixing length the length of pipe downstream of the injection point required to achieve a given degree of homogeneity. The mixing length can be affected by the addition geometry (for example coaxial or side entry) orifice size and shape operating conditions and material properties. This paper presents the use of Electrical Resistance Tomography (ERT) to monitor jet mixing via the addition of a conductivity tracer through coaxial and side entry jets. Multiple ERT sensors are fitted along the pipe downstream of the jet addition point. The ERT sensors enable real time non?invasive measurement of conductivity within the pipe furnishing approximately 2500 conductivity measurements per ERT sensor when modeled independently in 3D. The effect of secondary (main pipe) flow rate and jet configuration on the nature of the tracer plume evolution and axial mixing is determined using this technique.

D. R. Stephenson; M. Cooke; A. Kowalski; T. A. York

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mixed oxide mox" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Mixing time for the Ising model and random walks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

3.2.2 The Ising model on trees . . . . . . . .I Mixing time for the Ising model 2 Mixing evolutionmean-field Ising model 2.1 Introduction . . . . . . . . . .

Ding, Jian

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Design Case Summary: Production of Mixed Alcohols from Municipal...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Design Case Summary: Production of Mixed Alcohols from Municipal Solid Waste via Gasification Design Case Summary: Production of Mixed Alcohols from Municipal Solid Waste via...

323

Mixing it up - Measuring diffusion in supercooled liquid solutions...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mixing it up - Measuring diffusion in supercooled liquid solutions of methanol and ethanol at temperatures near the glass Mixing it up - Measuring diffusion in supercooled liquid...

324

Mixed-mode diesel HCCI with External Mixture Formation: Preliminary...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Mixed-mode diesel HCCI with External Mixture Formation: Preliminary Results Mixed-mode diesel HCCI with External Mixture Formation: Preliminary Results 2003 DEER Conference...

325

Thermochemical Ethanol via Indirect Gasification and Mixed Alcohol...  

Energy Savers (EERE)

Ethanol via Indirect Gasification and Mixed Alcohol Synthesis of Lignocellulosic Biomass Thermochemical Ethanol via Indirect Gasification and Mixed Alcohol Synthesis of...

326

DOE intends to extend the Advanced Mixed Waste Treatment Project...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Advanced Mixed Waste Treatment Project contract for four months as competition for long-term contract continues. Scene from inside the Advanced Mixed Waste Treatment Facility....

327

SciTech Connect: Microsecond Microfluidic Mixing for Investigation...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Microsecond Microfluidic Mixing for Investigation of Protein Folding Kinetics Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Microsecond Microfluidic Mixing for Investigation of...

328

Tropospheric Chemistry of Internally Mixed Sea Salt and Organic...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Tropospheric Chemistry of Internally Mixed Sea Salt and Organic Particles: Surprising Reactivity of NaCl with Weak Organic Acids Tropospheric Chemistry of Internally Mixed Sea Salt...

329

Advanced Mixed Waste Treatment Project Achieves Impressive Safety...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Advanced Mixed Waste Treatment Project Achieves Impressive Safety and Production Marks Advanced Mixed Waste Treatment Project Achieves Impressive Safety and Production Marks June...

330

Fuel Effects on Mixing-Controlled Combustion Strategies for High...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Fuel Effects on Mixing-Controlled Combustion Strategies for High-Efficiency Clean-Combustion Engines Fuel Effects on Mixing-Controlled Combustion Strategies for High-Efficiency...

331

Benchmarking Mixed Use Buildings in Portfolio Manager | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Benchmarking Mixed Use Buildings in Portfolio Manager Benchmarking Mixed Use Buildings in Portfolio Manager This presentation, given through the DOE's Technical Assitance Program...

332

BOUDREAU, BERNARD P. Mean mixed depth of sediments: The ...  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

bioturbation. Bioturbation is the mixing of surficial sediments as a re- sult of the activity .... that the mixed depth is limited by the increasing energy costs of deeper

2000-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

333

Thermally Oxidized Silicon  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Anneli Munkholm (Lumileds Lighting) and Sean Brennan (SSRL) Anneli Munkholm (Lumileds Lighting) and Sean Brennan (SSRL) Illustration of the silicon positions near the Si-SiO2 interface for a 4° miscut projected onto the ( ) plane. The silicon atoms in the substrate are blue and those in the oxide are red. The small black spots represent the translated silicon positions in the absence of static disorder. The silicon atoms in the oxide have been randomly assigned a magnitude and direction based on the static disorder value at that position in the lattice. The outline of four silicon unit cells is shown in black, whereas the outline of four expanded lattice cells in the oxide is shown in blue One of the most studied devices of modern technology is the field-effect transistor, which is the basis for most integrated circuits. At its heart

334

Oxidative Tritium Decontamination System  

SciTech Connect

The Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Tritium Systems Group has developed and fabricated an Oxidative Tritium Decontamination System (OTDS), which is designed to reduce tritium surface contamination on various components and items. The system is configured to introduce gaseous ozone into a reaction chamber containing tritiated items that require a reduction in tritium surface contamination. Tritium surface contamination (on components and items in the reaction chamber) is removed by chemically reacting elemental tritium to tritium oxide via oxidation, while purging the reaction chamber effluent to a gas holding tank or negative pressure HVAC system. Implementing specific concentrations of ozone along with catalytic parameters, the system is able to significantly reduce surface tritium contamination on an assortment of expendable and non-expendable items. This paper will present the results of various experimentation involving employment of this system.

Charles A. Gentile; John J. Parker; Gregory L. Guttadora; Lloyd P. Ciebiera

2002-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

335

Methanol partial oxidation reformer  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A partial oxidation reformer comprising a longitudinally extending chamber having a methanol, water and an air inlet and an outlet. An igniter mechanism is near the inlets for igniting a mixture of methanol and air, while a partial oxidation catalyst in the chamber is spaced from the inlets and converts methanol and oxygen to carbon dioxide and hydrogen. Controlling the oxygen to methanol mole ratio provides continuous slightly exothermic partial oxidation reactions of methanol and air producing hydrogen gas. The liquid is preferably injected in droplets having diameters less than 100 micrometers. The reformer is useful in a propulsion system for a vehicle which supplies a hydrogen-containing gas to the negative electrode of a fuel cell.

Ahmed, Shabbir (Bolingbrook, IL); Kumar, Romesh (Naperville, IL); Krumpelt, Michael (Naperville, IL)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Methanol partial oxidation reformer  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A partial oxidation reformer comprising a longitudinally extending chamber having a methanol, water and an air inlet and an outlet. An igniter mechanism is near the inlets for igniting a mixture of methanol and air, while a partial oxidation catalyst in the chamber is spaced from the inlets and converts methanol and oxygen to carbon dioxide and hydrogen. Controlling the oxygen to methanol mole ratio provides continuous slightly exothermic partial oxidation reactions of methanol and air producing hydrogen gas. The liquid is preferably injected in droplets having diameters less than 100 micrometers. The reformer is useful in a propulsion system for a vehicle which supplies a hydrogen-containing gas to the negative electrode of a fuel cell.

Ahmed, Shabbir (Bolingbrook, IL); Kumar, Romesh (Naperville, IL); Krumpelt, Michael (Naperville, IL)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Methanol partial oxidation reformer  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A partial oxidation reformer is described comprising a longitudinally extending chamber having a methanol, water and an air inlet and an outlet. An igniter mechanism is near the inlets for igniting a mixture of methanol and air, while a partial oxidation catalyst in the chamber is spaced from the inlets and converts methanol and oxygen to carbon dioxide and hydrogen. Controlling the oxygen to methanol mole ratio provides continuous slightly exothermic partial oxidation reactions of methanol and air producing hydrogen gas. The liquid is preferably injected in droplets having diameters less than 100 micrometers. The reformer is useful in a propulsion system for a vehicle which supplies a hydrogen-containing gas to the negative electrode of a fuel cell. 7 figs.

Ahmed, S.; Kumar, R.; Krumpelt, M.

1999-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

338

Methanol partial oxidation reformer  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A partial oxidation reformer is described comprising a longitudinally extending chamber having a methanol, water and an air inlet and an outlet. An igniter mechanism is near the inlets for igniting a mixture of methanol and air, while a partial oxidation catalyst in the chamber is spaced from the inlets and converts methanol and oxygen to carbon dioxide and hydrogen. Controlling the oxygen to methanol mole ratio provides continuous slightly exothermic partial oxidation reactions of methanol and air producing hydrogen gas. The liquid is preferably injected in droplets having diameters less than 100 micrometers. The reformer is useful in a propulsion system for a vehicle which supplies a hydrogen-containing gas to the negative electrode of a fuel cell. 7 figs.

Ahmed, S.; Kumar, R.; Krumpelt, M.

1999-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

339

Tetraalklylammonium polyoxoanionic oxidation catalysts  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Alkanes are catalytically oxidized in air or oxygen using iron-substituted polyoxoanions (POAs) of the formula: H{sub e{minus}z}[(n-C{sub 4}H{sub 9}){sub 4}N]{sub z}(XM{sub 11}M{prime}O{sub 39}){sup {minus}e}. The M{prime} (e.g., iron(III)/iron(II)) reduction potential of the POAs is affected by selection of the central atom X and the framework metal M, and by the number of tetrabutyl-ammonium groups. Decreased Fe(III)/Fe(II) reduction potential has been found to correlate to increased oxidation activity.

Ellis, P.E.; Lyons, J.E.; Myers, H.K. Jr.; Shaikh, S.N.

1998-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

340

Tetraalykylammonium polyoxoanionic oxidation catalysts  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Alkanes are catalytically oxidized in air or oxygen using iron-substituted polyoxoanions (POAs) of the formula: H.sub.e-z ›(n-C.sub.4 H.sub.9).sub.4 N!.sub.z (XM.sub.11 M'O.sub.39).sup.-e The M' (e.g., iron(III)/iron(II)) reduction potential of the POAs is affected by selection of the central atom X and the framework metal M, and by the number of tetrabutyl-ammonium groups. Decreased Fe(III)/Fe(II) reduction potential has been found to correlate to increased oxidation activity.

Ellis, Paul E. (Downingtown, PA); Lyons, James E. (Wallingford, PA); Myers, Jr., Harry K. (Cochranville, PA); Shaikh, Shahid N. (Media, PA)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mixed oxide mox" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Regenerable MgO promoted metal oxide oxygen carriers for chemical looping combustion  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The disclosure provides an oxygen carrier comprised of a plurality of metal oxide particles in contact with a plurality of MgO promoter particles. The MgO promoter particles increase the reaction rate and oxygen utilization of the metal oxide when contacting with a gaseous hydrocarbon at a temperature greater than about 725.degree. C. The promoted oxide solid is generally comprised of less than about 25 wt. % MgO, and may be prepared by physical mixing, incipient wetness impregnation, or other methods known in the art. The oxygen carrier exhibits a crystalline structure of the metal oxide and a crystalline structure of MgO under XRD crystallography, and retains these crystalline structures over subsequent redox cycles. In an embodiment, the metal oxide is Fe.sub.2O.sub.3, and the gaseous hydrocarbon is comprised of methane.

Siriwardane, Ranjani V.; Miller, Duane D.

2014-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

342

Innovative Powder Processing of Oxide Dispersion Strengthened ODS Ferritic Stainless Steels  

SciTech Connect

An innovative gas atomization reaction synthesis technique was employed as a viable method to dramatically lower the processing cost for precursor oxide dispersion forming ferritic stainless steel powders (i.e., Fe-Cr-(Hf,Ti)-Y). During this rapid solidification process the atomized powders were enveloped by a nano-metric Cr-enriched metastable oxide film. Elevated temperature heat treatment was used to dissociate this metastable oxide phase through oxygen exchange reactions with Y-(Hf,Ti) enriched intermetallic compound precipitates. These solid state reactions resulted in the formation of highly stable nano-metric mixed oxide dispersoids (i.e., Y-Ti-O or Y-Hf-O) throughout the alloy microstructure. Subsequent high temperature (1200 C) heat treatments were used to elucidate the thermal stability of each nano-metric oxide dispersoid phase. Transmission electron microscopy coupled with X-ray diffraction was used to evaluate phase evolution within the alloy microstructure.

Rieken, Joel; Anderson, Iver; Kramer, Matthew

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

TWO COUNTRIES - ONE MARKETING MIX? HOW TO ADOPT COMPANY’S MARKETING MIX TO FOREIGN MARKET - CASE STUDY OF VOLVO.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? The discussion about 4P’s marketing mix covers two aspects. On the one hand, marketing mix activities are used to apply product into market and… (more)

Szwejkowska, Aneta; Puczynski, Leszek

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

A Porphyrin-Stabilized Iridium Oxide Water Oxidation Catalyst  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

A Porphyrin-Stabilized Iridium Oxide Water Oxidation Catalyst Authors: Sherman, B. D., Pillai, S., Kodis, G., Bergkamp, J., Mallouk, T. E., Gust, D., Moore, T. A., and Moore, A. L....

345

Investigation of swirling flow mixing for application in an MHD pulverized coal combustor using isothermal modeling  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this study was to investigate combustor reactant mixing with swirling oxidizer flow. The combustor configuration that was considered was designed to simulate a 4 lbm/sec mas flow pulverized coal combustor being tested in The University of Tennessee Space Institute MHD Facility. A one-fourth dimensionally scaled combustor model was developed for isothermal flow testing. A comparison was made of cold flow tests using 3 swirler designs with a base case oxidizer injector design of perforated plated which demonstrated acceptable performance in the 4 lbm/sec MHD combustor. The three swirlers that were evaluated were designed to allow a wide range of swirl intensity to be investigated. The design criterion of the swirler was the swirl number which has been related to swirler geometry. The results of the study showed that the swirlers that were tested fell short of the mixing characteristics displayed with the perforated plate base case oxidizer injector. Test data obtained with the cold flow model established that the actual swirl numbers of two of the swirlers were much lower than the design swirl numbers. Recirculation zones were defined for all configurations that were tested, and a comparison of velocity profiles was made for the configurations.

Power, W. H.

1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

http://srsweb2.srs.gov/InSiteApp/assets/xml/articles/574.html  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Oxide Fuel Fabrication Facility for the National Nuclear Security Administration, and Kelly Trice, president and chief operating officer of Shaw AREVA MOX Services, place the...

347

Development of Nitric Oxide Oxidation Catalysts for the Fast SCR Reaction  

SciTech Connect

This study was undertaken in order to assess the potential for oxidizing NO to NO{sub 2} in flue gas environments, with the aim of promoting the so-called fast SCR reaction. In principle this can result in improved SCR kinetics and reduced SCR catalyst volumes. Prior to commencing experimental work, a literature study was undertaken to identify candidate catalysts for screening. Selection criteria comprised (1) proven (or likely) activity for NO oxidation, (2) low activity for SO2 oxidation (where data were available), and (3) inexpensive component materials. Catalysts identified included supported base metal oxides, supported and unsupported mixed metal oxides, and metal ion exchanged ZSM-5 (Fe, Co, Cu). For comparison purposes, several low loaded Pt catalysts (0.5 wt% Pt) were also included in the study. Screening experiments were conducted using a synthetic feed gas representative of flue gas from coal-fired utility boilers: [NO] = 250 ppm, [SO{sub 2}] = 0 or 2800 ppm, [H{sub 2}O] = 7%, [CO{sub 2}] = 12%, [O{sub 2}] = 3.5%, balance = N{sub 2}; T = 275-375 C. Studies conducted in the absence of SO{sub 2} revealed a number of supported and unsupported metal oxides to be extremely active for NO oxidation to NO{sub 2}. These included known catalysts (Co{sub 3}O{sub 4}/SiO{sub 2}, FeMnO{sub 3}, Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3}/TiO{sub 2}), as well as a new one identified in this work, CrFeO{sub x}/SiO{sub 2}. However, in the presence of SO{sub 2}, all the catalysts tested were found to be severely deactivated with respect to NO oxidation. Of these, Co{sub 3}O{sub 4}/SiO{sub 2}, Pt/ZSM-5 and Pt/CeO{sub 2} showed the highest activity for NO oxidation in the presence of SO{sub 2} (based on peak NO conversions to NO{sub 2}), although in no cases did the NO conversion exceed 7%. Reactor studies indicate there are two components to SO{sub 2}-induced deactivation of Co{sub 3}O{sub 4}/SiO{sub 2}, corresponding to an irreversible deactivation due to sulfation of the surface of the Co{sub 3}O{sub 4} phase, together with a reversible inhibition due to competitive adsorption of SO{sub 2} with NO on the catalyst. In an effort to minimize the deactivating effect of SO{sub 2} on Co{sub 3}O{sub 4}/SiO{sub 2}, two synthetic approaches were briefly examined. These consisted of (1) the incorporation of highly dispersed Co(II) ions in silica, as a non-sulfating matrix, via the sol-gel preparation of CoO-SiO{sub 2}; and (2) the sol-gel preparation of a mixed metal oxide, CoO-Nb{sub 2}O{sub 5}-SiO{sub 2}, with the aim of exploiting the acidity of the niobium oxide to minimize SO2 adsorption. While both catalysts showed almost no activity for NO oxidation in the absence of SO{sub 2}, when SO{sub 2} was present low activity was observed, indicating that SO{sub 2} acts as a promoter for NO oxidation over these materials. The kinetics of NO oxidation over Co{sub 3}O{sub 4}/SiO{sub 2}, Pt/SiO{sub 2} and Pt/CeO{sub 2} were also examined. Co{sub 3}O{sub 4}/SiO{sub 2} was found to exhibit a higher apparent activation energy for NO oxidation than the Pt catalysts, while the combined reaction order in NO and O{sub 2} for the three catalysts was very close to one. CO{sub 2} was found to have no effect on the kinetics of NO oxidation over these catalysts. The presence of H{sub 2}O caused a decrease in NO conversion for both Co{sub 3}O{sub 4}/SiO{sub 2} and Pt/CeO{sub 2} catalysts, while no effect was observed for Pt/SiO{sub 2}. The inhibiting effect of water was reversible and is attributed to competitive adsorption with the reactants. In sum, this study has shown that a variety of base metal catalysts are very active for NO oxidation. However, all of the catalysts studied are strongly deactivated in the presence of 2800 ppm SO{sub 2} at typical flue gas temperatures; consequently improving catalyst resistance to SO{sub x} will be a pre-requisite if the fast SCR concept is to be applied to coal-fired flue gas conditions.

Mark Crocker

2005-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

348

Structure-Activity Relationship in Nanostructured Copper-Ceria-Based Preferential CO Oxidation Catalysts  

SciTech Connect

Two series of nanostructured oxidized copper-cerium catalysts with varying copper loadings, and prepared, respectively, by impregnation of ceria and by coprecipitation of the two components within reverse microemulsions, have been characterized in detail at structural and electronic levels by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Raman spectroscopy, high-resolution electron microscopy (HREM), X-ray energy dispersive spectroscopy (XEDS), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) (including Ar{sup +}-sputtering), and X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS). These results have been correlated with analysis of their catalytic properties for preferential oxidation of CO in a H{sub 2}-rich stream (CO-PROX), complemented by Operando-DRIFTS. A relevant difference between the two series of catalysts concerns the nature of the support for the surface-dispersed copper oxide entities, which is essentially ceria for the samples prepared by impregnation and a Ce-Cu mixed oxide for those prepared by microemulsion-coprecipitation. The existence of copper segregation in the form of copper oxide or copper-enriched Cu-Ce mixed oxides for the latter type of samples is uniquely revealed by nanoprobe XEDS and XPS Ar{sup +}-sputtering experiments. The CO oxidation activity under CO-PROX conditions is correlated to the degree of support-promoted reduction achieved by the dispersed copper oxide particles under reaction conditions. Nevertheless, catalysts which display higher CO oxidation activity are generally more efficient also for the undesired H{sub 2} oxidation reaction. The balance between both reactions results in differences in the CO-PROX activity between the two series of catalysts which are examined on the basis of the structural differences found.

Gamarra,D.; Munuera, G.; Hungria, A.; Fernandez-Garcia, M.; Conesa, J.; Midgley, P.; Wang, X.; Hanson, J.; Rodriguez, J.; Martinez-Arias, A.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Oxidative Reforming of Biodiesel Over Molybdenum (IV) Oxide  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

as potential feedstock in solid oxide fuel cells. Petroleum based fuels become scarcer daily, and biodiesel for use in solid oxide fuel cells. This cutting edge area of research continues to be important as energy prove useful for solid oxide fuel cells. METHODS Commercial molybdenum dioxide was used for all tests

Collins, Gary S.

350

Downhole steam generator having a downhole oxidant compressor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Apparatus and method for generation of steam in a borehole for penetration into an earth formation wherein a downhole oxidant compressor is used to compress relatively low pressure (atmospheric) oxidant, such as air, to a relatively high pressure prior to mixing with fuel for combustion. The multi-stage compressor receives motive power through a shaft driven by a gas turbine powered by the hot expanding combustion gases. The main flow of compressed oxidant passes through a velocity increasing nozzle formed by a reduced central section of the compressor housing. An oxidant bypass feedpipe leading to peripheral oxidant injection nozzles of the combustion chamber are also provided. The downhole compressor allows effective steam generation in deep wells without need for high pressure surface compressors. Feedback preheater means are provided for preheating fuel in a preheat chamber. Preheating of the water occurs in both a water feed line running from aboveground and in a countercurrent water flow channel surrounding the combustor assembly. The countercurrent water flow channels advantageously serve to cool the combustion chamber wall. The water is injected through slotted inlets along the combustion chamber wall to provide an unstable boundary layer and stripping of the water from the wall for efficient steam generation. Pressure responsive doors are provided at the steam outlet for closing and sealing the combustion chamber from entry of reservoir fluids in the event of a flameout.

Fox, Ronald L. (Albuquerque, NM)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Highly oxidized superconductors  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Novel superconducting materials in the form of compounds, structures or phases are formed by performing otherwise known synthesis in a highly oxidizing atmosphere rather than that created by molecular oxygen at atmospheric pressure or below. This leads to the successful synthesis of novel superconducting compounds which are thermodynamically stable at the conditions under which they are formed. 16 figs.

Morris, D.E.

1994-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

352

Staged membrane oxidation reactor system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Ion transport membrane oxidation system comprising (a) two or more membrane oxidation stages, each stage comprising a reactant zone, an oxidant zone, one or more ion transport membranes separating the reactant zone from the oxidant zone, a reactant gas inlet region, a reactant gas outlet region, an oxidant gas inlet region, and an oxidant gas outlet region; (b) an interstage reactant gas flow path disposed between each pair of membrane oxidation stages and adapted to place the reactant gas outlet region of a first stage of the pair in flow communication with the reactant gas inlet region of a second stage of the pair; and (c) one or more reactant interstage feed gas lines, each line being in flow communication with any interstage reactant gas flow path or with the reactant zone of any membrane oxidation stage receiving interstage reactant gas.

Repasky, John Michael; Carolan, Michael Francis; Stein, VanEric Edward; Chen, Christopher Ming-Poh

2012-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

353

Staged membrane oxidation reactor system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Ion transport membrane oxidation system comprising (a) two or more membrane oxidation stages, each stage comprising a reactant zone, an oxidant zone, one or more ion transport membranes separating the reactant zone from the oxidant zone, a reactant gas inlet region, a reactant gas outlet region, an oxidant gas inlet region, and an oxidant gas outlet region; (b) an interstage reactant gas flow path disposed between each pair of membrane oxidation stages and adapted to place the reactant gas outlet region of a first stage of the pair in flow communication with the reactant gas inlet region of a second stage of the pair; and (c) one or more reactant interstage feed gas lines, each line being in flow communication with any interstage reactant gas flow path or with the reactant zone of any membrane oxidation stage receiving interstage reactant gas.

Repasky, John Michael; Carolan, Michael Francis; Stein, VanEric Edward; Chen, Christopher Ming-Poh

2014-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

354

Staged membrane oxidation reactor system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Ion transport membrane oxidation system comprising (a) two or more membrane oxidation stages, each stage comprising a reactant zone, an oxidant zone, one or more ion transport membranes separating the reactant zone from the oxidant zone, a reactant gas inlet region, a reactant gas outlet region, an oxidant gas inlet region, and an oxidant gas outlet region; (b) an interstage reactant gas flow path disposed between each pair of membrane oxidation stages and adapted to place the reactant gas outlet region of a first stage of the pair in flow communication with the reactant gas inlet region of a second stage of the pair; and (c) one or more reactant interstage feed gas lines, each line being in flow communication with any interstage reactant gas flow path or with the reactant zone of any membrane oxidation stage receiving interstage reactant gas.

Repasky, John Michael; Carolan, Michael Francis; Stein, VanEric Edward; Chen, Christopher Ming-Poh

2013-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

355

Test plan for immobilization of salt-containing surrogate mixed wastes using polyester resins  

SciTech Connect

Past operations at many Department of Energy (DOE) sites have resulted in the generation of several waste streams with high salt content. These wastes contain listed and characteristic hazardous constituents and are radioactive. The salts contained in the wastes are primarily chloride, sulfate, nitrate, metal oxides, and hydroxides. DOE has placed these types of wastes under the purview of the Mixed Waste Focus Area (MWFA). The MWFA has been tasked with developing and facilitating the implementation of technologies to treat these wastes in support of customer needs and requirements. The MWFA has developed a Technology Development Requirements Document (TDRD), which specifies performance requirements for technology owners and developers to use as a framework in developing effective waste treatment solutions. This project will demonstrate the use of polyester resins in encapsulating and solidifying DOE`s mixed wastes containing salts, as an alternative to conventional and other emerging immobilization technologies.

Biyani, R.K.; Douglas, J.C.; Hendrickson, D.W.

1997-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

356

Ultrafast Graphene Oxide Humidity Sensors  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Ultrafast Graphene Oxide Humidity Sensors ... Graphene oxide can be exploited in humidity and temperature sensors with a number of convenient features such as flexibility, transparency and suitability for large-scale manufacturing. ... Here we show that the two-dimensional nature of graphene oxide and its superpermeability to water combine to enable humidity sensors with unprecedented response speed (?30 ms response and recovery times). ...

Stefano Borini; Richard White; Di Wei; Michael Astley; Samiul Haque; Elisabetta Spigone; Nadine Harris; Jani Kivioja; Tapani Ryhänen

2013-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

357

Dry powder mixes comprising phase change materials  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Free flowing, conformable powder-like mix of silica particles and a phase change material (pcm) is disclosed. The silica particles have a critical size of about 7[times]10[sup [minus]3] to about 7[times]10[sup [minus]2] microns and the pcm must be added to the silica in an amount of 80 wt. % or less pcm per combined weight of silica and pcm. The powder-like mix can be used in tableware items, medical wraps, tree wraps, garments, quilts and blankets, and in cementitious compositions of the type in which it is beneficial to use a pcm material. The silica-pcm mix can also be admixed with soil to provide a soil warming effect and placed about a tree, flower, or shrub. 10 figures.

Salyer, I.O.

1993-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

358

Dry powder mixes comprising phase change materials  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A free flowing, conformable powder-like mix of silica particles and a phase change material (p.c.m.) is disclosed. The silica particles have a critical size of about 7 [times] 10[sup [minus]3] to about 7 [times] 10[sup [minus]2] microns and the pcm must be added to the silica in an amount of 80 wt. % or less pcm per combined weight of silica and pcm. The powder-like mix can be used in tableware items, medical wraps, tree wraps, garments, quilts and blankets, and in cementitious compositions of the type in which it is beneficial to use a pcm material. The silica-pcm mix can also be admixed with soil to provide a soil warming effect and placed about a tree, flower, or shrub. 9 figs.

Salyer, I.O.

1992-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

359

Mixing enhancement by use of swirling jets  

SciTech Connect

It has been proposed that the mixing of fuel with air in the combustor of scramjet engines might be enhanced by the addition of swirl to the fuel jet prior to injection. This study investigated the effects of swirl on the mixing of a 30 deg wall jet into a Mach 2 flow. Cases with swirl and without swirl were investigated, with both helium and air simulating the fuel. Rayleigh scattering was used to visualize the flow, and seeding the fuel with water allowed it to be traced through the main flow. The results show that the addition of swirl to the fuel jet causes the fuel to mix more rapidly with the main flow, that larger amounts of swirl increase this effect, and that helium spreads better into the main flow than air. 12 refs.

Kraus, D.K.; Cutler, A.D.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Transient multiwave mixing in a nonlinear medium  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We present a detailed quantitative theory of transient multiwave mixing effects in a nonlinear medium produced by two incident coherent laser beams. Our theory accounts for all the relevant parameters such as laser pulse widths, medium response times, nonlinearities, interaction length, intensities, beam ratio, phase-modulation effects, losses, side diffractions, and explicitly shows how the dynamics and the multiwave mixing processes are interrelated with these parameters. The crucial role played by the diffracted beams and the time-dependent phase shifts among the beams and the interplay among the various intensity and index gratings are explicitly evaluated. In particular, the gain experienced by a weak incident probe beam via these mixing effects from the incident strong pump beam is investigated as a function of the aforementioned parameters.

I. C. Khoo and Ping Zhou

1990-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mixed oxide mox" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Mixed Qubit Cannot Be Universally Broadcast  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We show that there does not exist any universal quantum cloning machine that can broadcast an arbitrary mixed qubit with a constant fidelity. Based on this result, we investigate the dependent quantum cloner in the sense that some parameter of the input qubit $\\rho_s(\\theta,\\omega,\\lambda)$ is regarded as constant in the fidelity. For the case of constant $\\omega$, we establish the $1\\to2$ optimal symmetric dependent cloner with a fidelity 1/2. It is also shown that the $1\\to M$ optimal quantum cloning machine for pure qubits is also optimal for mixed qubits, when $\\lambda$ is the unique parameter in the fidelity. For general $N\\to M$ broadcasting of mixed qubits, the situation is very different.

Lin Chen; Yi-Xin Chen

2006-12-25T23:59:59.000Z

362

Dry powder mixes comprising phase change materials  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Free flowing, conformable powder-like mix of silica particles and a phase change material (p.c.m.) is disclosed. The silica particles have a critical size of about 7[times]10[sup [minus]3] to about 7[times]10[sup [minus]2] microns and the p.c.m. must be added to the silica in an amount of 80 wt. % or less p.c.m. per combined weight of silica and p.c.m. The powder-like mix can be used in tableware items, medical wraps, tree wraps, garments, quilts and blankets, and in cementitious compositions of the type in which it is beneficial to use a p.c.m. material. The silica-p.c.m. mix can also be admixed with soil to provide a soil warming effect and placed about a tree, flower, or shrub.

Salyer, I.O.

1993-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

363

Dry powder mixes comprising phase change materials  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Free flowing, conformable powder-like mix of silica particles and a phase change material (PCM) is provided. The silica particles have a critical size of about 0.005 to about 0.025 microns and the PCM must be added to the silica in an amount of 75% or less PCM per combined weight of silica and PCM. The powder-like mix can be used in tableware items, medical wraps, tree wraps, garments, quilts and blankets, and in cementitious compositions of the type in which it is beneficial to use a PCM material. The silica-PCM mix can also be admixed with soil to provide a soil warming effect and placed about a tree, flower, or shrub. 2 figures.

Salyer, I.O.

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

CARBON BED MERCURY EMISSIONS CONTROL FOR MIXED WASTE TREATMENT  

SciTech Connect

Mercury has had various uses in nuclear fuel reprocessing and other nuclear processes, and so is often present in radioactive and mixed (both radioactive and hazardous according tohe Resource Conservation and Recovery Act) wastes. Depending on regulatory requirements, the mercury in the off-gas must be controlled with sometimes very high efficiencies. Compliance to the Hazardous Waste Combustor (HWC) Maximum Achievable Control Technology (MACT) standards can require off-gas mercury removal efficiencies up to 99.999% for thermally treating some mixed waste streams. Several test programs have demonstrated this level of off-gas mercury control using fixed beds of granular sulfur-impregnated activated carbon. Other results of these tests include: (a) The depth of the mercury control mass transfer zone was less than 15-30 cm for the operating conditions of these tests, (b) MERSORB® carbon can sorb Hg up to 19 wt% of the carbon mass, and (c) the spent carbon retained almost all (98 – 99.99%) of the Hg; but when even a small fraction of the total Hg dissolves, the spent carbon can fail the TCLP test when the spent carbon contains high Hg concentrations. Localized areas in a carbon bed that become heated through heat of adsorption, to temperatures where oxidation occurs, are referred to as “bed hot spots.” Carbon bed hot spots must be avoided in processes that treat radioactive and mixed waste. Key to carbon bed hot spot mitigation are (a) designing for sufficient gas velocity, for avoiding gas flow maldistribution, and for sufficient but not excessive bed depth, (b) monitoring and control of inlet gas flowrate, temperature, and composition, (c) monitoring and control of in-bed and bed outlet gas temperatures, and (d) most important, monitoring of bed outlet CO concentrations. An increase of CO levels in the off-gas downstream of the carbon bed to levels about 50-100 ppm higher than the inlet CO concentration indicate CO formation in the bed, caused by carbon bed hot spots. Corrective actions must be implemented quickly if bed hot spots are detected, using a graded approach and sequence starting with corrective actions that are simple, quick, cause the least impact to the process, and are easiest to recover from. Multiple high and high-high alarm levels should be used, with appropriate corrective actions for each level.

Nick Soelberg; Joe Enneking

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Audit Report: IG-0814 | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

4 4 Audit Report: IG-0814 April 23, 2009 The Procurement of Safety Class/Safety-Significant Items at the Savannah River Site The Department of Energy operates several nuclear facilities at its Savannah River Site, and several additional facilities are under construction. This includes the National Nuclear Security Administration's Tritium Extraction Facility (TEF) which is designated to help maintain the reliability of the U.S. nuclear stockpile. The Mixed Oxide Fuel Fabrication Facility (MOX Facility) is being constructed to manufacture commercial nuclear reactor fuel assemblies from weapon-grade plutonium oxide and depleted uranium. The Interim Salt Processing (ISP) project, managed by the Office of Environmental Management, will treat radioactive waste.

366

Charm CP violation and mixing at Belle  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present charm CP violation and mixing measurements at Belle. They are the first observation of $D^0-\\bar{D}^0$ mixing in $e^+e^-$ collisions from $D^0\\rightarrow K^+\\pi^-$ decays, the most precise mixing and indirect CP violation parameters from $D^0\\rightarrow K^0_S\\pi^+\\pi^-$ decays, and the time-integrated CP asymmetries in $D^0\\rightarrow\\pi^0\\pi^0$ and $D^0\\rightarrow K^0_S\\pi^0$ decays. Our mixing measurement in $D^0\\rightarrow K^+\\pi^-$ decays excludes the no-mixing hypothesis at the 5.1 standard deviation level. The mixing parameters $x=(0.56\\pm0.19^{+0.03+0.06}_{-0.09-0.09})%$, $y=(0.30\\pm0.15^{+0.04+0.03}_{-0.05-0.06})%$ and indirect CP violation parameters $|q/p|=(0.90^{+0.16+0.05+0.06}_{-0.15-0.04-0.05})$, arg$(q/p)=(-6\\pm11\\pm3^{+3}_{-4})^{\\circ}$ measured from $D^0\\rightarrow K^0_S\\pi^+\\pi^-$ decays, and the time-integrated CP asymmetries $A^{D^0\\rightarrow\\pi^0\\pi^0}_{CP}=(-0.03\\pm0.64\\pm0.10)%$ and $A^{D^0\\rightarrow K^0_S\\pi^0}_{CP}=(-0.21\\pm0.16\\pm0.07)%$ are the most precise measurements to date. Our measurements here are consistent with predictions of the standard model.

B. R. Ko; for the Belle Collaboration

2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Pulse Jet Mixing Tests With Noncohesive Solids  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes results from pulse jet mixing (PJM) tests with noncohesive solids in Newtonian liquid. The tests were conducted during FY 2007 and 2008 to support the design of mixing systems for the Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). Tests were conducted at three geometric scales using noncohesive simulants, and the test data were used to develop models predicting two measures of mixing performance for full-scale WTP vessels. The models predict the cloud height (the height to which solids will be lifted by the PJM action) and the critical suspension velocity (the minimum velocity needed to ensure all solids are suspended off the floor, though not fully mixed). From the cloud height, the concentration of solids at the pump inlet can be estimated. The predicted critical suspension velocity for lifting all solids is not precisely the same as the mixing requirement for 'disturbing' a sufficient volume of solids, but the values will be similar and closely related. These predictive models were successfully benchmarked against larger scale tests and compared well with results from computational fluid dynamics simulations. The application of the models to assess mixing in WTP vessels is illustrated in examples for 13 distinct designs and selected operational conditions. The values selected for these examples are not final; thus, the estimates of performance should not be interpreted as final conclusions of design adequacy or inadequacy. However, this work does reveal that several vessels may require adjustments to design, operating features, or waste feed properties to ensure confidence in operation. The models described in this report will prove to be valuable engineering tools to evaluate options as designs are finalized for the WTP. Revision 1 refines data sets used for model development and summarizes models developed since the completion of Revision 0.

Meyer, Perry A.; Bamberger, Judith A.; Enderlin, Carl W.; Fort, James A.; Wells, Beric E.; Sundaram, S. K.; Scott, Paul A.; Minette, Michael J.; Smith, Gary L.; Burns, Carolyn A.; Greenwood, Margaret S.; Morgen, Gerald P.; Baer, Ellen BK; Snyder, Sandra F.; White, Michael K.; Piepel, Gregory F.; Amidan, Brett G.; Heredia-Langner, Alejandro

2012-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

368

Dry powder mixes comprising phase change materials  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A free flowing, conformable powder-like mix of silica particles and a phase change material (PCM) is provided. The silica particles have a critical size of about 0.005 to about 0.025 microns and the PCM must be added to the silica in an amount of 75% or less PCM per combined weight of silica and PCM. The powder-like mix can be used in tableware items, medical wraps, tree wraps, garments, quilts and blankets, and particularly in applications for heat protection for heat sensitive items, such as aircraft flight recorders, and for preventing brake fade in automobiles, buses, trucks and aircraft. 3 figs.

Salyer, I.O.

1995-12-26T23:59:59.000Z

369

Dry powder mixes comprising phase change materials  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A free flowing, conformable powder-like mix of silica particles and a phase change material (PCM) is provided. The silica particles have a critical size of about 0.005 to about 0.025 microns and the PCM must be added to the silica in an amount of 75% or less PCM per combined weight of silica and PCM. The powder-like mix can be used in tableware items, medical wraps, tree wraps, garments, quilts and blankets, and particularly in applications for heat protection for heat sensitive items, such as aircraft flight recorders, and for preventing brake fade in automobiles, buses, trucks and aircraft. 3 figures.

Salyer, I.O.

1994-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

370

Supernova observations for neutrino mixing parameters  

SciTech Connect

The neutrino spectra from a future galactic core collapse supernova could reveal information on the neutrino mixing pattern, especially on {theta}{sub 13} and the mass hierarchy. I briefly outline our current understanding of neutrino flavor conversions inside a supernova, and point out possible signatures of various neutrino mixing scenarios that the neutrino detectors should look for. Supernova neutrinos provide a probe for {theta}{sub 13} and mass hierarchy that is complementary to, and sometimes even better than, the current and proposed terrestrial neutrino oscillation experiments.

Dighe, Amol [Department of Theoretical Physics, Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, 1, Homi Bhabha Road, Colaba, Mumbai 400005 (India)

2011-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

371

B^0_s mixing at CDF  

SciTech Connect

The Tevatron collider at Fermilab provides a very rich environment for the study of b-hadrons. One of the most important analyses within the B physics program of the CDF experiment is B{sub s}{sup 0} mixing. Since the time this school was held, several improvements in the B{sub s}{sup 0} mixing analysis have made possible the measurement of the B{sub s}{sup 0} oscillation frequency, result that has been presented at the FPCP 2006 Conference.

Piedra, Jonatan; /Paris U., VI-VII

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Graphene and Graphene Oxide: Biofunctionalization and Applications...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and Graphene Oxide: Biofunctionalization and Applications in Biotechnology. Graphene and Graphene Oxide: Biofunctionalization and Applications in Biotechnology. Abstract: Graphene...

373

What is this thing called MixedWhat is this thing called Mixed Conifer Forest?Conifer Forest?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

What is this thing called MixedWhat is this thing called Mixed Conifer Forest?Conifer Forest? Bill Conifer Forests of SW ColoradoConifer Forests of SW Colorado How to restore & maintain the natural of this ecosystemecosystem #12;What causes mixed conifer forestsWhat causes mixed conifer forests to be so diverse?to be so

374

The cycling and oxidation pathways of organic carbon in a shallow estuary along the Texas Gulf Coast  

SciTech Connect

The cycling and oxidation pathways of organic carbon were investigated at a single shallow water estuarine site in Trinity Bay, Texas, the uppermost lobe of Galveston Bay, during November 2000. Radio-isotopes were used to estimate sediment mixing and accumulation rates, and benthic chamber and pore water measurements were used to determine sediment-water exchange fluxes of oxygen, nutrients and metals, and infer carbon oxidation rates.

Warnken, Kent W.; Santschi, Peter H.; Roberts, Kimberly A.; Gill, Gary A.

2007-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

375

Determining the Behavior of RuO(x) Nanoparticles in Mixed-Metal Oxides:  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mechanism of Ethanol Synthesis from Syngas on Rh(111) Understanding of Mechanism of Ethanol Synthesis from Syngas on Rh(111) Understanding of ethanol decomposition on Rh(1 1 1) from density functional theory and kinetic Monte Carlo simulations Theoretical perspective of alcohol decomposition and synthesis from CO2 hydrogenation