National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for mitigation scheme emissions

  1. Recent Diesel Engine Emission Mitigation Activities of the Maritime...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Diesel Engine Emission Mitigation Activities of the Maritime Administration Energy Technologies Program Recent Diesel Engine Emission Mitigation Activities of the Maritime...

  2. Natural Gas Infrastructure R&D and Methane Emissions Mitigation...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Natural Gas Infrastructure R&D and Methane Emissions Mitigation Workshop Natural Gas Infrastructure R&D and Methane Emissions Mitigation Workshop The Advanced Manufacturing Office...

  3. Mitigating Greenhouse Gas Emissions: Voluntary Reporting 1996

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    1997-01-01

    Presents information on voluntary actions to reduce greenhouse gases or remove such gases from the atmosphere in 1995. It provides an overview of participation in the Voluntary Reporting Program, a perspective on the composition of activities reported, and a review of some key issues in interpreting and evaluating achievements associated with reported emissions mitigation initiatives.

  4. Monitoring and Assessment of Greenhouse Gas Emissions and Mitigation...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Monitoring and Assessment of Greenhouse Gas Emissions and Mitigation Potential in Agriculture (MAGHG) (Redirected from Monitoring and Assessment of Greenhouse Gas Emissions and...

  5. U.S. Agriculture's Role Greenhouse Gas Emission Mitigation World

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCarl, Bruce A.

    U.S. Agriculture's Role in a Greenhouse Gas Emission Mitigation World: An Economic Perspective the IMPAC project. #12;Abstract International agreements are likely to stimulate greenhouse gas mitigation Words Agricultural Sinks, Emissions Trading, Greenhouse Gas Emission Reductions, Kyoto Protocol #12

  6. CO2 Emissions Mitigation and Technological Advance: An

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    PNNL-18075 CO2 Emissions Mitigation and Technological Advance: An Updated Analysis of Advanced/2003) #12;PNNL-18075 CO2 Emissions Mitigation and Technological Advance: An Analysis of Advanced Technology, by itself, the scope or quantity of greenhouse gas emissions reductions needed to achiev

  7. Costa Rica-Mitigation of Greenhouse Gas Emissions through Avoided...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Costa Rica-Mitigation of Greenhouse Gas Emissions through Avoided Deforestation of Tropical Rainforests on Privately-owned Lands in High Conservation Value Areas Jump to:...

  8. Monitoring and Assessment of Greenhouse Gas Emissions and Mitigation...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Monitoring and Assessment of Greenhouse Gas Emissions and Mitigation Potential in Agriculture (MAGHG) Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Monitoring and Assessment of Greenhouse Gas...

  9. Distributed Energy Resources for Carbon Emissions Mitigation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Firestone, Ryan; Marnay, Chris

    2008-01-01

    Distributed Energy Resource Technology Characterizations. ”ABORATORY Distributed Energy Resources for Carbon Emissions5128 Distributed Energy Resources for Carbon Emissions

  10. Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Aviation and Marine Transportation: Mitigation Potential and Policies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCollum, David L; Gould, Gregory; Greene, David L

    2010-01-01

    Extending the EU Emissions Trading Scheme to Aviation.Air Transport Emissions Trading Scheme Workshop, UKaviation in its GHG emission trading system (i.e. , by

  11. Distributed Energy Resources for Carbon Emissions Mitigation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Firestone, Ryan; Marnay, Chris

    2008-01-01

    tax increases, larger solar collector/absorption chillerphotovoltaics, solar thermal collectors, and energy storagecapacity of solar thermal collectors carbon emissions

  12. Mitigating greenhouse gas emissions: Voluntary reporting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-10-01

    The Voluntary Reporting Program, developed pursuant to Section 1605(b) of the Energy Policy Act of 1992, permits corporations, government agencies, households, and voluntary organizations to report on their emissions of greenhouse gases, and on actions taken that have reduced or avoided emissions or sequestered carbon, to the Energy Information Administration (EIA). This, the second annual report of the Voluntary Reporting Program, describes information provided by the participating organizations on their aggregate emissions and emissions reductions, as well as their emissions reduction or avoidance projects, through 1995. This information has been compiled into a database that includes reports from 142 organizations and descriptions of 967 projects that either reduced greenhouse gas emissions or sequestered carbon. Fifty-one reporters also provided estimates of emissions, and emissions reductions achieved, for their entire organizations. The projects described actions taken to reduce emissions of carbon dioxide from energy production and use; to reduce methane and nitrous oxide emissions from energy use, waste management, and agricultural processes; to reduce emissions of halocarbons, such as CFCs and their replacements; and to increase carbon sequestration.

  13. Agricultural Sector Analysis on Greenhouse Gas Emission Mitigation in the United States 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schneider, Uwe A.

    2000-01-01

    This dissertation analyzes the economic potential of agriculture to participate in greenhouse gas emission mitigation efforts. Major agricultural mitigation strategies are included simultaneously to capture interactions. ...

  14. On mitigating emissions leakage under biofuel policies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rajagopal, D; Rajagopal, D

    2015-01-01

    that are applicable to biofuel policies and beyond. Thisso marginal land for biofuel crops is limited. EnergyIndirect emissions of biofuel policies Figure 1 provides a

  15. Distributed Energy Resources for Carbon Emissions Mitigation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Firestone, Ryan; Marnay, Chris

    2008-01-01

    photovoltaics, solar thermal collectors, and energy storagecapacity of solar thermal collectors carbon emissionsCHP investment. However, solar thermal collectors coupled to

  16. Contraction & Convergence: UK carbon emissions and the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watson, Andrew

    the EU's emissions trading scheme will do little to mitigate carbon emissions 4) Aviation growth must emissions. Keywords Contraction & Convergence; aviation; emissions trading; passengers; carbon dioxide #12

  17. Key words. Emissions markets, Cap-and-trade schemes, Equilibrium models, Environmental MARKET DESIGN FOR EMISSION TRADING SCHEMES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carmona, Rene

    Key words. Emissions markets, Cap-and-trade schemes, Equilibrium models, Environmental Finance. MARKET DESIGN FOR EMISSION TRADING SCHEMES REN´E CARMONA , MAX FEHR , JURI HINZ , AND ARNAUD PORCHET to help policy makers and regulators understand the pros and the cons of the emissions markets. We propose

  18. Distributed Energy Resources for Carbon Emissions Mitigation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Firestone, Ryan; Marnay, Chris

    2007-05-01

    The era of publicly mandated GHG emissions restrictions inthe United States has begun with recent legislation in California andseven northeastern states. Commercial and industrial buildings canimprove the carbon-efficiency of end-use energy consumption by installingtechnologies such as on-site cogeneration of electricity and useful heatin combined heat and power systems, thermally-activated cooling, solarelectric and thermal equipment, and energy storage -- collectively termeddistributed energy resources (DER). This research examines a collectionof buildings in California, the Northeast, and the southern United Statesto demonstrate the effects of regional characteristics such as the carbonintensity of central electricity grid, the climate-driven demand forspace heating and cooling, and the availability of solar insolation. Theresults illustrate that the magnitude of a realistic carbon tax ($100/tC)is too small to incent significant carbon-reducing effects oneconomically optimal DER adoption. In large part, this is because costreduction and carbon reduction objectives are roughly aligned, even inthe absence of a carbon tax.

  19. Towards an Emissions Trading Scheme for Air Pollutants in India

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duflo, Esther

    Emissions trading schemes have great potential to lower pollution while minimizing compliance costs for firms in many areas now subject to traditional command-and-control regulation. This paper connects experience with ...

  20. Timelines for mitigating methane emissions from energy technologies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roy, Mandira; Trancik, Jessika E

    2015-01-01

    Energy technologies emitting differing proportions of methane and carbon dioxide vary in their relative climate impacts over time, due to the different atmospheric lifetimes of the two gases. Standard technology comparisons using the global warming potential (GWP) emissions equivalency metric do not reveal these dynamic impacts, and may not provide the information needed to assess technologies and emissions mitigation opportunities in the context of broader climate policy goals. Here we formulate a portfolio optimization model that incorporates changes in technology impacts as a radiative forcing (RF) stabilization target is approached. An optimal portfolio, maximizing allowed energy consumption while meeting the RF target, is obtained by year-wise minimization of the marginal RF impact in an intended stabilization year. The optimal portfolio calls for using certain higher methane-emitting technologies prior to an optimal switching year, followed by methane-light technologies as the stabilization year approac...

  1. Economic Potential of Biomass Based Fuels for Greenhouse Gas Emission Mitigation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCarl, Bruce A.

    Economic Potential of Biomass Based Fuels for Greenhouse Gas Emission Mitigation Bruce A. Mc Potential of Biomass Based Fuels for Greenhouse Gas Emission Mitigation Today society faces important concentrations to stabilize once emissions have stabilized; and c) decades to fully retrofit and/or replace

  2. Leakage and Comparative Advantage Implications of Agricultural Participation in Greenhouse Gas Emission Mitigation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCarl, Bruce A.

    Emission Mitigation Heng-Chi Lee Assistant Professor Institute of Applied Economics National Taiwan Ocean greenhouse gas emissions. Reduction efforts may involve the agricultural sector through options emission reductions. As a consequence, emission reduction efforts in implementing countries may be offset

  3. Author's personal copy Congestion and emissions mitigation: A comparison of capacity, demand,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bertini, Robert L.

    Keywords: Congestion mitigation Emissions reductions Vehicle emissions Traffic management a b s t r a c t Capacity, demand, and vehicle based emissions reduction strategies are compared for sev- eral pollutants congested arterials. Advanced-efficiency vehicles with emissions rates that are less sensitive to congestion

  4. A bottom-up analysis of including aviation within theEU's Emissions Trading Scheme

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watson, Andrew

    A bottom-up analysis of including aviation within theEU's Emissions Trading Scheme Alice Bows-up analysis of including aviation within the EU's Emissions Trading Scheme Alice Bows & Kevin Anderson Tyndall's emissions trading scheme. Results indicate that unless the scheme adopts both an early baseline year

  5. Mitigation options for methane emissions from rice fields in the Philippines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lantin, R.S.; Buendia, L.V.; Wassmann, R.

    1996-12-31

    The contribution of Philippine rice production to global methane emission and breakthroughs in methane emission studies conducted in the country are presented in this paper. A significant impact in the reduction of GHG emissions from agriculture can be achieved if methane emissions from ricefields can be abated. This study presents the contribution of Philippine rice cultivation to global methane emission and breakthroughs in methane emission studies in the country which address the issue of mitigation. Using the derived emission factors from local measurements, rice cultivation contributes 566.6 Gg of methane emission in the Philippines. This value is 62% of the total methane emitted from the agriculture sector. The emission factors employed which are 78% of the IPCC value for irrigated rice and 95% for rainfed rice were derived from measurements with an automatic system taken during the growth duration in the respective ecosystems. Plots drained for 2 weeks at midtillering and before harvest gave a significant reduction in methane emission as opposed to continuously flooded plots and plots drained before harvest. The cultivar Magat reduced methane emission by 50% as compared to the check variety IR72. The application of ammonium sulfate instead of urea reduced methane emission by 10% to 34%. Addition of 6 t ha{sup {minus}1} phosphogypsum in combination with urea reduced emission by 74% as opposed to plots applied with urea alone. It is also from the results of such measurements that abatement strategies are based as regards to modifying treatments such as water management, fertilization, and choice of rice variety. It is not easy to identify and recommend mitigation strategies that will fit a particular cropping system. However, the identified mitigation options provide focus for the abatement of methane emission from ricefields.

  6. The Contribution of Biomass to Emissions Mitigation under a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    interactions among natural and human climate system components; objectively assess uncertainty in economic, monitor and verify greenhouse gas emissions and climatic impacts. This reprint is one of a series intended price, applied to all anthropogenic emissions except those from land-use change, that rises from $15 per

  7. The impact of the European Union Emissions Trading Scheme on US aviation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Malina, Robert

    We estimate the economic impacts on US airlines that may arise from the inclusion of aviation in the European Union Emissions Trading Scheme from 2012 to 2020. We find that the Scheme would only have a small impact on US ...

  8. Over-Allocation or Abatement? A Preliminary Analysis of the EU Emissions Trading Scheme Based on the 2005 Emissions Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ellerman, A. Denny.

    This paper provides an initial analysis of the European Union Emissions Trading Scheme (EU ETS) based on the installation-level data for verified emissions and allowance allocations in the first trading year. Those data, ...

  9. Predicting and mitigating the net greenhouse gas emissions of crop rotations in Western Europe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    balance; Agro-ecosystem model; CERES-EGC; Bayesian calibration; Green- house gases; Nitrous oxidePredicting and mitigating the net greenhouse gas emissions of crop rotations in Western Europe gases (GHG) con- tributing to net greenhouse gas balance of agro-ecosystems. Evaluating the impact

  10. Economic Potential of Biomass Based Fuels for Greenhouse Gas Emission Mitigation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCarl, Bruce A.

    Words): Use of biofuels diminishes fossil fuel combustion thereby also reducing net greenhouse gasEconomic Potential of Biomass Based Fuels for Greenhouse Gas Emission Mitigation Uwe A. Schneider policies or markets are simulated via hypothetical carbon prices. At each carbon price level

  11. Air Quality and Emissions Impacts of Heat Island Mitigation Strategies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    by generating fewer emissions from electricity production. These benefits, however, are difficult quality planning process. If a model were available to accurately predict the decrease in temperature and detailed manner is important if heat island control strategies are to be viewed as "quantifiable

  12. i i h i ffMeasures to mitigate the Negative Effects of Complex Hydropower Schemes on River Systemsp y p y

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lenstra, Arjen K.

    i i h i ffMeasures to mitigate the Negative Effects of Complex Hydropower Schemes on River Systemsp Temperature pp High-head storage hydropower Temperature Temperature Modelling plants in Alpine areas are able mental conditions downstream of hydropower schemes taken into account for producing the dominant

  13. Emissions mitigation of blended coals through systems optimization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Don Labbe [IOM Invensys Operations Management (United States)

    2009-10-15

    For coal fired power stations, such as those located in the US, that have installed NOx and SOx emissions abatement equipment substantial carbon dioxide reduction could be achieved by shifting from pure PRB coal to blended coals with local bituminous coal. Don Labbe explains how. The article is based on a presentation at Power-Gen Asia 2009, which takes place 7-9 October in Bangkok, Thailand and an ISA POWID 2009 paper (19th Annual Joint ISA POWID/EPRI Controlls and Instrumentation Conference, Chicago, Illinois, May 2009). 4 refs., 3 figs.

  14. MODEL PREDICTIVE CONTROL SCHEMES FOR THE MITIGATION OF NATU-RAL HAZARDS: THEORETICAL AND EXPERIMENTAL STUDIES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kareem, Ahsan

    the wind induced structural response. A shaking table and a small-scale structural model with an active reduction. Finally, a full-scale building for wind-excited benchmark problem was investigated to implement to enhance the performance of structures during earthquakes and strong winds. Efficient control schemes

  15. The impact of the European Union Emissions Trading Scheme on US aviation Robert Malina a,c

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The impact of the European Union Emissions Trading Scheme on US aviation Robert Malina a, Germany Keywords: European air transport policy Carbon emissions trading US airline industry a b s t r a c in the European Union Emissions Trading Scheme from 2012 to 2020. We find that the Scheme would only have a small

  16. A greenhouse-gas information system monitoring and validating emissions reporting and mitigation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jonietz, Karl K; Dimotakis, Paul E; Walker, Bruce C

    2011-09-26

    Current GHG-mitigating regimes, whether internationally agreed or self-imposed, rely on the aggregation of self-reported data, with limited checks for consistency and accuracy, for monitoring. As nations commit to more stringent GHG emissions-mitigation actions and as economic rewards or penalties are attached to emission levels, self-reported data will require independent confirmation that they are accurate and reliable, if they are to provide the basis for critical choices and actions that may be required. Supporting emissions-mitigation efforts and agreements, as well as monitoring energy- and fossil-fuel intensive national and global activities would be best achieved by a process of: (1) monitoring of emissions and emission-mitigation actions, based, in part, on, (2) (self-) reporting of pertinent bottom-up inventory data, (3) verification that reported data derive from and are consistent with agreed-upon processes and procedures, and (4) validation that reported emissions and emissions-mitigation action data are correct, based on independent measurements (top-down) derived from a suite of sensors in space, air, land, and, possibly, sea, used to deduce and attribute anthropogenic emissions. These data would be assessed and used to deduce and attribute measured GHG concentrations to anthropogenic emissions, attributed geographically and, to the extent possible, by economic sector. The validation element is needed to provide independent assurance that emissions are in accord with reported values, and should be considered as an important addition to the accepted MRV process, leading to a MRV&V process. This study and report focus on attributes of a greenhouse-gas information system (GHGIS) needed to support MRV&V needs. These needs set the function of such a system apart from scientific/research monitoring of GHGs and carbon-cycle systems, and include (not exclusively): the need for a GHGIS that is operational, as required for decision-support; the need for a system that meets specifications derived from imposed requirements; the need for rigorous calibration, verification, and validation (CV&V) standards, processes, and records for all measurement and modeling/data-inversion data; the need to develop and adopt an uncertainty-quantification (UQ) regimen for all measurement and modeling data; and the requirement that GHGIS products can be subjected to third-party questioning and scientific scrutiny. This report examines and assesses presently available capabilities that could contribute to a future GHGIS. These capabilities include sensors and measurement technologies; data analysis and data uncertainty quantification (UQ) practices and methods; and model-based data-inversion practices, methods, and their associated UQ. The report further examines the need for traceable calibration, verification, and validation processes and attached metadata; differences between present science-/research-oriented needs and those that would be required for an operational GHGIS; the development, operation, and maintenance of a GHGIS missions-operations center (GMOC); and the complex systems engineering and integration that would be required to develop, operate, and evolve a future GHGIS. Present monitoring systems would be heavily relied on in any GHGIS implementation at the outset and would likely continue to provide valuable future contributions to GHGIS. However, present monitoring systems were developed to serve science/research purposes. This study concludes that no component or capability presently available is at the level of technological maturity and readiness required for implementation in an operational GHGIS today. However, purpose-designed and -built components could be developed and implemented in support of a future GHGIS. The study concludes that it is possible to develop and provide a capability-driven prototype GHGIS, as part of a Phase-1 effort, within three years from project-funding start, that would make use of and integrate existing sensing and system capabilities. As part of a Phase-2 effort, a requirem

  17. An Analysis of the European Emission Trading Scheme

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reilly, John M.

    An international emissions trading system is a featured instrument in the Kyoto Protocol to the Framework Convention on Climate Change, designed to reduce emissions of greenhouse gases among major industrial countries. The ...

  18. The EU’s Emissions Trading Scheme: A Proto-Type Global System?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ellerman, A. Denny

    2008-01-01

    The European Union's Emission Trading Scheme (EU ETS) is the world's first multinational cap-and-trade system for greenhouse gases. As an agreement between sovereign nations with diverse historical, institutional, and ...

  19. The EU’s Emissions Trading Scheme: A Prototype Global System?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ellerman, A. Denny

    The European Union's Emission Trading Scheme (EU ETS) is the world's first multinational cap-and-trade system for greenhouse gases. As an agreement between sovereign nations with diverse historical, institutional, and ...

  20. Allocation and competitiveness in the EU emissions trading scheme: policy overview

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grubb, Michael; Neuhoff, Karsten

    The European emissions trading scheme (EU ETS) has an efficient and effective market design that risks being undermined by three interrelated problems: the approach to allocation; the absence of a credible commitment to post-2012 continuation...

  1. Economic impact of the European Union Emission Trading Scheme : evidence from the refining sector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lacombe, Romain H

    2008-01-01

    I study the economic impact of the European Union Emission Trading Scheme (EU ETS) on the refining industry in Europe. I contrast previous ex-ante studies with the lessons from a series of interviews I conducted with ...

  2. Waste-to-energy sector and the mitigation of greenhouse gas emissions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fotis, S.C. [Van Ness Feldman, Washington, DC (United States); Sussman, D. [Poubelle Associates, Washington, DC (United States)

    1997-12-01

    The waste-to-energy sector provides one important avenue for the United States to reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. The purpose of this paper is to highlight the significant GHG reductions capable of being achieved by the waste-to-energy (WTE) sector through avoided fossil generation and reduced municipal landfills. The paper begins with a review of the current voluntary reporting mechanism for {open_quotes}registering{close_quotes} GHG reduction credits under section 1605(b) of the Energy Policy Act of 1992. The paper then provides an overview of possible emerging international and domestic trends that could ultimately lead to mandatory targets and timetables for GHG mitigation in the United States and other countries. The paper ends with an analysis of the GHG benefits achievable by the WTE sector, based on the section 1605(b) report filed by the Integrated Waste Services Association IWSA on the GHG emissions avoided for year 1995.

  3. UNDERSTANDING METHANE EMISSIONS SOURCES AND VIABLE MITIGATION MEASURES IN THE NATURAL GAS TRANSMISSION SYSTEMS: RUSSIAN AND U.S. EXPERIENCE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ishkov, A.; Akopova, Gretta; Evans, Meredydd; Yulkin, Grigory; Roshchanka, Volha; Waltzer, Suzie; Romanov, K.; Picard, David; Stepanenko, O.; Neretin, D.

    2011-10-01

    This article will compare the natural gas transmission systems in the U.S. and Russia and review experience with methane mitigation technologies in the two countries. Russia and the United States (U.S.) are the world's largest consumers and producers of natural gas, and consequently, have some of the largest natural gas infrastructure. This paper compares the natural gas transmission systems in Russia and the U.S., their methane emissions and experiences in implementing methane mitigation technologies. Given the scale of the two systems, many international oil and natural gas companies have expressed interest in better understanding the methane emission volumes and trends as well as the methane mitigation options. This paper compares the two transmission systems and documents experiences in Russia and the U.S. in implementing technologies and programs for methane mitigation. The systems are inherently different. For instance, while the U.S. natural gas transmission system is represented by many companies, which operate pipelines with various characteristics, in Russia predominately one company, Gazprom, operates the gas transmission system. However, companies in both countries found that reducing methane emissions can be feasible and profitable. Examples of technologies in use include replacing wet seals with dry seals, implementing Directed Inspection and Maintenance (DI&M) programs, performing pipeline pump-down, applying composite wrap for non-leaking pipeline defects and installing low-bleed pneumatics. The research methodology for this paper involved a review of information on methane emissions trends and mitigation measures, analytical and statistical data collection; accumulation and analysis of operational data on compressor seals and other emission sources; and analysis of technologies used in both countries to mitigate methane emissions in the transmission sector. Operators of natural gas transmission systems have many options to reduce natural gas losses. Depending on the value of gas, simple, low-cost measures, such as adjusting leaking equipment components, or larger-scale measures, such as installing dry seals on compressors, can be applied.

  4. Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Aviation and Marine Transportation: Mitigation Potential and Policies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCollum, David L; Gould, Gregory; Greene, David L

    2010-01-01

    Aviation and Marine Transportation: Mitigation Potential and Policies Additional optimization of shipping logistics, routing and maintenance

  5. Strategies to Optimize Microbially-Mediated Mitigation of Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Landfill Cover Soils

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jeremy Semrau; Sung-Woo Lee; Jeongdae Im; Sukhwan Yoon; Michael Barcelona

    2010-09-30

    The overall objective of this project, 'Strategies to Optimize Microbially-Mediated Mitigation of Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Landfill Cover Soils' was to develop effective, efficient, and economic methodologies by which microbial production of nitrous oxide can be minimized while also maximizing microbial consumption of methane in landfill cover soils. A combination of laboratory and field site experiments found that the addition of nitrogen and phenylacetylene stimulated in situ methane oxidation while minimizing nitrous oxide production. Molecular analyses also indicated that methane-oxidizing bacteria may play a significant role in not only removing methane, but in nitrous oxide production as well, although the contribution of ammonia-oxidizing archaea to nitrous oxide production can not be excluded at this time. Future efforts to control both methane and nitrous oxide emissions from landfills as well as from other environments (e.g., agricultural soils) should consider these issues. Finally, a methanotrophic biofiltration system was designed and modeled for the promotion of methanotrophic activity in local methane 'hotspots' such as landfills. Model results as well as economic analyses of these biofilters indicate that the use of methanotrophic biofilters for controlling methane emissions is technically feasible, and provided either the costs of biofilter construction and operation are reduced or the value of CO{sub 2} credits is increased, can also be economically attractive.

  6. CO2 emissions mitigation and fossil fuel markets: Dynamic and international aspects of climate policies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bauer, Nico; Bosetti, Valentina; Hamdi-Cherif, Meriem; Kitous, Alban; McCollum, David; Mejean, Aurelie; Rao, Shilpa; Turton, Hal; Paroussos, Leonidas; Ashina, Shuichi; Calvin, Katherine V.; Wada, Kenichi; Van Vuuren, Detlef

    2015-01-01

    This paper explores a multi-model scenario ensemble to assess the impacts of idealized and non-idealized climate change stabilization policies on fossil fuel markets. Under idealized conditions climate policies significantly reduce coal use in the short- and long-term. Reductions in oil and gas use are much smaller, particularly until 2030, but revenues decrease much more because oil and gas prices are higher and decrease with mitigation. A first deviation from the optimal transition pathway relaxes global emission targets until 2030, in accordance with the Copenhagen pledges and regionally-specific low-carbon technology targets. Fossil fuel markets revert back to the no-policy case: though coal use increases strongest, revenue gains are higher for oil and gas. To balance the carbon budget over the 21st century, the long-term reallocation of fossil fuels is significantly larger - twice and more - than the short-term distortion. This amplifying effect results from coal lock-in and inter-fuel substitution effects. The second deviation from the optimal transition pathway relaxes the global participation assumption. The result here is less clear cut across models, as we find carbon leakage effects ranging from positive to negative because leakage and substitution patterns of coal, oil, and gas differ. In summary, distortions of fossil fuel markets resulting from relaxed short-term global emission targets are more important and less uncertain than the issue of carbon leakage from early mover action.

  7. Enduse Global Emissions Mitigation Scenarios (EGEMS): A New Generation of Energy Efficiency Policy Planning Models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McNeil, Michael A.; de la Rue du Can, Stephane; McMahon, James E.

    2009-05-29

    This paper presents efforts to date and prospective goals towards development of a modelling and analysis framework which is comprehensive enough to address the global climate crisis, and detailed enough to provide policymakers with concrete targets and achievable outcomes. In terms of energy efficiency policy, this requires coverage of the entire world, with emphasis on countries and regions with large and/or rapidly growing energy-related emissions, and analysis at the 'technology' level-building end use, transport mode or industrial process. These elements have not been fully addressed by existing modelling efforts, which usually take either a top-down approach, or concentrate on a few fully industrialized countries where energy demand is well-understood. Inclusion of details such as appliance ownership rates, use patterns and efficiency levels throughout the world allows for a deeper understanding of the demand for energy today and, more importantly, over the coming decades. This is a necessary next step for energy analysts and policy makers in assessment of mitigation potentials. The modelling system developed at LBNL over the past 3 years takes advantage of experience in end use demand and in forecasting markets for energy-consuming equipment, in combination with known technology-based efficiency opportunities and policy types. A particular emphasis has been placed on modelling energy growth in developing countries. Experiences to date include analyses covering individual countries (China and India), end uses (refrigerators and air conditioners) and policy types (standards and labelling). Each of these studies required a particular effort in data collection and model refinement--they share, however, a consistent approach and framework which allows comparison, and forms the foundation of a comprehensive analysis system leading to a roadmap to address the greenhouse gas mitigation targetslikely to be set in the coming years.

  8. Les dterminants du prix du carbone sur le march europen des quotas Carbon price drivers in the EU Emissions Trading Scheme

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    in the EU Emissions Trading Scheme Emilie Alberola1 et Julien Chevallier2 Résumé: L'article examine le prix des quotas durant la première période (2005-2007) de l'European Union Emissions Trading Scheme (EU

  9. A New Approach to Mitigate the Impact of Distributed Generation on the Overcurrent Protection Scheme of Radial Distribution Feeders 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Funmilayo, Hamed

    2010-01-14

    Increased Distributed Generation (DG) presence on radial distribution feeders is becoming a common trend. The existing Overcurrent Protection (OCP) scheme on such feeders consists mainly of overcurrent protection devices ...

  10. Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Aviation and Marine Transportation: Mitigation Potential and Policies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCollum, David L; Gould, Gregory; Greene, David L

    2010-01-01

    and the Environment. Greenhouse Gas Emissions from AviationD17): 4560. EPA (2006). Greenhouse Gas Emissions from theEPA (2008a). Inventory of U.S. Greenhouse Gas Emissions and

  11. Geologic carbon sequestration as a global strategy to mitigate CO2 emissions: Sustainability and environmental risk

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oldenburg, C.M.

    2011-04-01

    Fossil fuels are abundant, inexpensive to produce, and are easily converted to usable energy by combustion as demonstrated by mankind's dependence on fossil fuels for over 80% of its primary energy supply (13). This reliance on fossil fuels comes with the cost of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) emissions that exceed the rate at which CO{sub 2} can be absorbed by terrestrial and oceanic systems worldwide resulting in increases in atmospheric CO{sub 2} concentration as recorded by direct measurements over more than five decades (14). Carbon dioxide is the main greenhouse gas linked to global warming and associated climate change, the impacts of which are currently being observed around the world, and projections of which include alarming consequences such as water and food shortages, sea level rise, and social disruptions associated with resource scarcity (15). The current situation of a world that derives the bulk of its energy from fossil fuel in a manner that directly causes climate change equates to an energy-climate crisis. Although governments around the world have only recently begun to consider policies to avoid the direst projections of climate change and its impacts, sustainable approaches to addressing the crisis are available. The common thread of feasible strategies to the energy climate crisis is the simultaneous use of multiple approaches based on available technologies (e.g., 16). Efficiency improvements (e.g., in building energy use), increased use of natural gas relative to coal, and increased development of renewables such as solar, wind, and geothermal, along with nuclear energy, are all available options that will reduce net CO{sub 2} emissions. While improvements in efficiency can be made rapidly and will pay for themselves, the slower pace of change and greater monetary costs associated with increased use of renewables and nuclear energy suggests an additional approach is needed to help bridge the time period between the present and a future when low-carbon energy is considered cheap enough to replace fossil fuels. Carbon dioxide capture and storage (CCS) is one such bridging technology (1). CCS has been the focus of an increasing amount of research over the last 15-20 years and is the subject of a comprehensive IPCC report that thoroughly covers the subject (1). CCS is currently being carried out in several countries around the world in conjunction with natural gas extraction (e.g., 2, 3) and enhanced oil recovery (17). Despite this progress, widespread deployment of CCS remains the subject of research and future plans rather than present action on the scale needed to mitigate emissions from the perspective of climate change. The reasons for delay in deploying CCS more widely are concerns about cost (18), regulatory and legal uncertainty (19), and potential environmental impacts (21). This chapter discusses the long-term (decadal) sustainability and environmental hazards associated with the geologic CO{sub 2} storage (GCS) component of large-scale CCS (e.g., 20). Discussion here barely touches on capture and transport of CO{sub 2} which will occur above ground and which are similar to existing engineering, chemical processing, and pipeline transport activities and are therefore easier to evaluate with respect to risk assessment and feasibility. The focus of this chapter is on the more uncertain part of CCS, namely geologic storage. The primary concern for sustainability of GCS is whether there is sufficient capacity in sedimentary basins worldwide to contain the large of amounts of CO{sub 2} needed to address climate change. But there is also a link between sustainability and environmental impacts. Specifically, if GCS is found to cause unacceptable impacts that are considered worse than its climate-change mitigation benefits, the approach will not be widely adopted. Hence, GCS has elements of sustainability insofar as capacity of the subsurface for CO{sub 2} is concerned, and also in terms of whether the associated environmental risks are acceptable or not to the public.

  12. Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Aviation and Marine Transportation: Mitigation Potential and Policies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCollum, David L; Gould, Gregory; Greene, David L

    2010-01-01

    GIACC) Third Meeting. IEA (2008a). CO 2 Emissions from Fueland Development (OECD). IEA (2008b). Energy TechnologyCE Delft; Lew Fulton, IEA; Michael Rossell, UK Permanent

  13. Intelligent Bioreactor Management Information System (IBM-IS) for Mitigation of Greenhouse Gas Emissions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paul Imhoff; Ramin Yazdani; Don Augenstein; Harold Bentley; Pei Chiu

    2010-04-30

    Methane is an important contributor to global warming with a total climate forcing estimated to be close to 20% that of carbon dioxide (CO2) over the past two decades. The largest anthropogenic source of methane in the US is 'conventional' landfills, which account for over 30% of anthropogenic emissions. While controlling greenhouse gas emissions must necessarily focus on large CO2 sources, attention to reducing CH4 emissions from landfills can result in significant reductions in greenhouse gas emissions at low cost. For example, the use of 'controlled' or bioreactor landfilling has been estimated to reduce annual US greenhouse emissions by about 15-30 million tons of CO2 carbon (equivalent) at costs between $3-13/ton carbon. In this project we developed or advanced new management approaches, landfill designs, and landfill operating procedures for bioreactor landfills. These advances are needed to address lingering concerns about bioreactor landfills (e.g., efficient collection of increased CH4 generation) in the waste management industry, concerns that hamper bioreactor implementation and the consequent reductions in CH4 emissions. Collectively, the advances described in this report should result in better control of bioreactor landfills and reductions in CH4 emissions. Several advances are important components of an Intelligent Bioreactor Management Information System (IBM-IS).

  14. Dynamics of Implementation of Mitigating Measures to Reduce CO2 Emissions from Commercial Aviation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kar, Rahul

    2010-07-13

    Increasing demand for air transportation and growing environmental concerns motivate the need to implement measures to reduce CO2 emissions from aviation. Case studies of historical changes in the aviation industry have ...

  15. Dynamics of implementation of mitigating measures to reduce CO? emissions from commercial aviation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kar, Rahul, 1979-

    2010-01-01

    Increasing demand for air transportation and growing environmental concerns motivate the need to implement measures to reduce CO? emissions from aviation. Case studies of historical changes in the aviation industry have ...

  16. Incentive-based approaches for mitigating greenhouse gas emissions : issues and prospects for India

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gupta, Shreekant.

    As a consequence of the flexibility mechanisms incorporated in the Kyoto Protocol, incentive-based policies such as emissions trading and the clean development mechanism are being widely discussed in the context of greenhouse ...

  17. The Effect of Transaction Costs on Greenhouse Gas Emission Mitigation for Agriculture and Forestry 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Seong Woo

    2011-08-08

    of the activities of agricultural and forestry to EPA?s carbon prices: 40 percent from tillage practices, 30 percent from afforestation, 20 percent from methane capture, and 20 percent from production of bioenergy crops. Mooney et al. (2003................................ 14 III ECONOMIC POTENTIAL OF GHG EMISSION REDUCTIONS: EFFECTS OF INCLUDING TRANSACTION COSTS IN ELIGIBILITY ................................................................................. 19 Introduction...

  18. Radioactive air emissions notice of construction 241-SY-101 crust growth near term mitigation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    HOMAN, N.A.

    1999-04-12

    The following description and any attachments and references are provided to the Washington State Department of Health, Division of Radiation Protection, Air Emissions & Defense Waste Section as a notice of construction (NOC) in accordance with the Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 246-247, Radiation Protection - Air Emissions. The WAC 246-247-060, ''Applications, registration and licensing'', states ''This section describes the information requirements for approval to construct, modify, and operate an emission unit. Any NOC requires the submittal of the information listed in Appendix A.'' Appendix A (WAC 246-247-110), lists the requirements that must be addressed. Additionally, the following description, attachments and references are provided to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) as an NOC, in accordance with Title 40 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), Part 61, ''National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants.'' The information required for submittal to the EPA is specified in 40 CFR 61.07. The potential emissions from this activity are estimated to provide less than 0.1 mrem/year total effective dose equivalent to the hypothetical offsite maximally exposed individual, and commencement is needed within a short time frame. Therefore, this application is also intended to provide notification of the anticipated date of initial startup in accordance with the requirement listed in 40 CFR 61.09(a)(1), and it is requested that approval of this application will also constitute EPA acceptance of this 40 CFR 61.09(a)(1) notification. Written notification of the actual date of initial startup, in accordance with the requirement listed in 40 CFR 61.09(a)(2), will be provided at a later date.

  19. The potential for biomass to mitigate greenhouse gas emissions in the Northeastern US. Northeast Regional Biomass Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bernow, S.S.; Gurney, K.; Prince, G.; Cyr, M.

    1992-04-01

    This study, for the Northeast Regional Biomass Program (NRBP) of the Coalition of Northeast Governors (CONEG), evaluates the potential for local, state and regional biomass policies to contribute to an overall energy/biomass strategy for the reduction of greenhouse gas releases in the Northeastern United States. Biomass is a conditionally renewable resource that can play a dual role: by reducing emissions of greenhouse gases in meeting our energy needs; and by removing carbon from the atmosphere and sequestering it in standing biomass stocks and long-lived products. In this study we examine the contribution of biomass to the energy system in the Northeast and to the region`s net releases of carbon dioxide and methane, and project these releases over three decades, given a continuation of current trends and policies. We then compare this Reference Case with three alternative scenarios, assuming successively more aggressive efforts to reduce greenhouse gas emissions through strategic implementation of energy efficiency and biomass resources. Finally, we identify and examine policy options for expanding the role of biomass in the region`s energy and greenhouse gas mitigation strategies.

  20. Acting Globally: Potential Carbon Emissions Mitigation Impacts from an International Standards and Labelling Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McNeil, Michael A; Letschert, Virginie E.; de la Rue du Can, Stephane; Egan, Christine

    2009-05-29

    This paper presents an analysis of the potential impacts of an international initiative designed to support and promote the development and implementation of appliances standards and labelling programs throughout the world. As part of previous research efforts, LBNL developed the Bottom Up Energy Analysis System (BUENAS), an analysis framework that estimates impact potentials of energy efficiency policies on a global scale. In this paper, we apply this framework to an initiative that would result in the successful implementation of programs focused on high priority regions and product types, thus evaluating the potential impacts of such an initiative in terms of electricity savings and carbon mitigation in 2030. In order to model the likely parameters of such a program, we limit impacts to a five year period starting in 2009, but assume that the first 5 years of a program will result in implementation of 'best practice' minimum efficiency performance standards by 2014. The 'high priority' regions considered are: Brazil, China, the European Union,India, Mexico and the United States. The products considered are: refrigerators, air conditioners, lighting (both fluorescent and incandescent), standby power (for consumer electronics) and televisions in the residential sector, and air conditioning and lighting in commercial buildings. In 2020, these regions and enduses account for about 37percent of global residential electricity and 29percent of electricity in commercial buildings. We find that 850Mt of CO2 could be saved in buildings by 2030 compared to the baseline forecast.

  1. CO? emission mitigation and fossil fuel markets: Dynamic and international aspects of climate policies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bauer, Nico; Bosetti, Valentina; Hamdi-Cherif, Meriem; Kitous, Alban; McCollum, David; Méjean, Aurélie; Rao, Shilpa; Turton, Hal; Paroussos, Leonidas; Ashina, Shuichi; Calvin, Katherine; Wada, Kenichi; van Vuuren, Detlef

    2015-01-01

    This paper explores a multi-model scenario ensemble to assess the impacts of idealized and non-idealized climate change stabilization policies on fossil fuel markets. Under idealized conditions climate policies significantly reduce coal use in the short- and long-term. Reductions in oil and gas use are much smaller, particularly until 2030, but revenues decrease much more because oil and gas prices are higher than coal prices. A first deviation from optimal transition pathways is delayed action that relaxes global emission targets until 2030 in accordance with the Copenhagen pledges. Fossil fuel markets revert back to the no-policy case: though coal use increases strongest, revenue gains are higher for oil and gas. To balance the carbon budget over the 21st century, the long-term reallocation of fossil fuels is significantly larger—twice and more—than the short-term distortion. This amplifying effect results from coal lock-in and inter-fuel substitution effects to balance the full-century carbon budget. The second deviation from the optimal transition pathway relaxes the global participation assumption. The result here is less clear-cut across models, as we find carbon leakage effects ranging from positive to negative because trade and substitution patterns of coal, oil, and gas differ across models. In summary, distortions of fossil fuel markets resulting from relaxed short-term global emission targets are more important and less uncertain than the issue of carbon leakage from early mover action.

  2. CO? emission mitigation and fossil fuel markets: Dynamic and international aspects of climate policies

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Bauer, Nico; Bosetti, Valentina; Hamdi-Cherif, Meriem; Kitous, Alban; McCollum, David; Méjean, Aurélie; Rao, Shilpa; Turton, Hal; Paroussos, Leonidas; Ashina, Shuichi; et al

    2015-01-01

    This paper explores a multi-model scenario ensemble to assess the impacts of idealized and non-idealized climate change stabilization policies on fossil fuel markets. Under idealized conditions climate policies significantly reduce coal use in the short- and long-term. Reductions in oil and gas use are much smaller, particularly until 2030, but revenues decrease much more because oil and gas prices are higher than coal prices. A first deviation from optimal transition pathways is delayed action that relaxes global emission targets until 2030 in accordance with the Copenhagen pledges. Fossil fuel markets revert back to the no-policy case: though coal use increasesmore »strongest, revenue gains are higher for oil and gas. To balance the carbon budget over the 21st century, the long-term reallocation of fossil fuels is significantly larger—twice and more—than the short-term distortion. This amplifying effect results from coal lock-in and inter-fuel substitution effects to balance the full-century carbon budget. The second deviation from the optimal transition pathway relaxes the global participation assumption. The result here is less clear-cut across models, as we find carbon leakage effects ranging from positive to negative because trade and substitution patterns of coal, oil, and gas differ across models. In summary, distortions of fossil fuel markets resulting from relaxed short-term global emission targets are more important and less uncertain than the issue of carbon leakage from early mover action.« less

  3. CO2 emission mitigation and fossil fuel markets: Dynamic and international aspects of climate policies

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Bauer, Nico; Bosetti, Valentina; Hamdi-Cherif, Meriem; Kitous, Alban; McCollum, David; Méjean, Aurélie; Rao, Shilpa; Turton, Hal; Paroussos, Leonidas; Ashina, Shuichi; et al

    2015-01-01

    This paper explores a multi-model scenario ensemble to assess the impacts of idealized and non-idealized climate change stabilization policies on fossil fuel markets. Under idealized conditions climate policies significantly reduce coal use in the short- and long-term. Reductions in oil and gas use are much smaller, particularly until 2030, but revenues decrease much more because oil and gas prices are higher than coal prices. A first deviation from optimal transition pathways is delayed action that relaxes global emission targets until 2030 in accordance with the Copenhagen pledges. Fossil fuel markets revert back to the no-policy case: though coal use increasesmore »strongest, revenue gains are higher for oil and gas. To balance the carbon budget over the 21st century, the long-term reallocation of fossil fuels is significantly larger—twice and more—than the short-term distortion. This amplifying effect results from coal lock-in and inter-fuel substitution effects to balance the full-century carbon budget. The second deviation from the optimal transition pathway relaxes the global participation assumption. The result here is less clear-cut across models, as we find carbon leakage effects ranging from positive to negative because trade and substitution patterns of coal, oil, and gas differ across models. In summary, distortions of fossil fuel markets resulting from relaxed short-term global emission targets are more important and less uncertain than the issue of carbon leakage from early mover action.« less

  4. The Value of End-Use Energy Efficiency in Mitigation of U.S. Carbon Emissions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kyle, G. Page; Smith, Steven J.; Clarke, Leon E.; Kim, Son H.; Wise, Marshall A.

    2007-11-27

    This report documents a scenario analysis exploring the value of advanced technologies in the U.S. buildings, industrial, and transportation sectors in stabilizing atmospheric greenhouse gas concentrations. The analysis was conducted by staff members of Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), working at the Joint Global Change Research Institute (JGCRI) in support of the strategic planning process of the U.S. Department of Energy (U.S. DOE) Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE). The conceptual framework for the analysis is an integration of detailed buildings, industrial, and transportation modules into MiniCAM, a global integrated assessment model. The analysis is based on three technology scenarios, which differ in their assumed rates of deployment of new or presently available energy-saving technologies in the end-use sectors. These technology scenarios are explored with no carbon policy, and under two CO2 stabilization policies, in which an economic price on carbon is applied such that emissions follow prescribed trajectories leading to long-term stabilization of CO2 at roughly 450 and 550 parts per million by volume (ppmv). The costs of meeting the emissions targets prescribed by these policies are examined, and compared between technology scenarios. Relative to the reference technology scenario, advanced technologies in all three sectors reduce costs by 50% and 85% for the 450 and 550 ppmv policies, respectively. The 450 ppmv policy is more stringent and imposes higher costs than the 550 ppmv policy; as a result, the magnitude of the economic value of energy efficiency is four times greater for the 450 ppmv policy than the 550 ppmv policy. While they substantially reduce the costs of meeting emissions requirements, advanced end-use technologies do not lead to greenhouse gas stabilization without a carbon policy. This is due mostly to the effects of increasing service demands over time, the high consumption of fossil fuels in the electricity sector, and the use of unconventional feedstocks in the liquid fuel refining sector. Of the three end-use sectors, advanced transportation technologies have the greatest potential to reduce costs of meeting carbon policy requirements. Services in the buildings and industrial sectors can often be supplied by technologies that consume low-emissions fuels such as biomass or, in policy cases, electricity. Passenger transportation, in contrast, is especially unresponsive to climate policies, as the fuel costs are small compared to the time value of transportation and vehicle capital and operating costs. Delaying the transition from reference to advanced technologies by 15 years increases the costs of meeting 450 ppmv stabilization emissions requirements by 21%, but the costs are still 39% lower than the costs assuming reference technology. The report provides a detailed description of the end-use technology scenarios and provides a thorough analysis of the results. Assumptions are documented in the Appendix.

  5. Capital investment requirements for greenhouse gas emissions mitigation in power generation on near term to century time scales and global to regional spatial scales

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chaturvedi, Vaibhav; Clarke, Leon E.; Edmonds, James A.; Calvin, Katherine V.; Kyle, G. Page

    2014-11-01

    Electrification plays a crucial role in cost-effective greenhouse gas emissions mitigation strategies. Such strategies in turn carry implications for financial capital markets. This paper explores the implication of climate mitigation policy for capital investment demands by the electric power sector on decade to century time scales. We go further to explore the implications of technology performance and the stringency of climate policy for capital investment demands by the power sector. Finally, we discuss the regional distribution of investment demands. We find that stabilizing GHG emissions will require additional investment in the electricity generation sector over and above investments that would be need in the absence of climate policy, in the range of 16 to 29 Trillion US$ (60-110%) depending on the stringency of climate policy during the period 2015 to 2095 under default technology assumptions. This increase reflects the higher capital intensity of power systems that control emissions. Limits on the penetration of nuclear and carbon capture and storage technology could increase costs substantially. Energy efficiency improvements can reduce the investment requirement by 8 to21 Trillion US$ (default technology assumptions), depending on climate policy scenario with higher savings being obtained under the most stringent climate policy. The heaviest investments in power generation were observed in the China, India, SE Asia and Africa regions with the latter three regions dominating in the second half of the 21st century.

  6. Effects of mineral aerosols on the summertime climate of southwest Asia: Incorporating subgrid variability in a dust emission scheme

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marcella, Marc Pace

    [1] Improvements in modeling mineral aerosols over southwest Asia are made to the dust scheme in a regional climate model by representing subgrid variability of both wind speed and surface roughness length. The new module ...

  7. A Novel Paradigm in Greenhouse Gas Mitigation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Azad, Abdul-Majeed

    A Novel Paradigm in Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Abdul-Majeed Azad, Eric McDaniel, and Sirhan Al CO2 and H2O, two well- known greenhouse gases responsible for contributing considerably to the global for addressing the issue of mitigating the CO2-related greenhouse gas emission. The process uses either a fer

  8. China-Transportation Demand Management in Beijing: Mitigation...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    China-Transportation Demand Management in Beijing: Mitigation of Emissions in Urban Transport Jump to: navigation, search Name Transportation Demand Management in Beijing -...

  9. Climate change mitigation through forestry measures: potentials, options, practice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Climate change mitigation through forestry measures: potentials, options, practice Robert Matthews KINGDOM #12;18 May 2010 Climate change mitigation and forestry measures What I will cover · Inherent;18 May 2010 Climate change mitigation and forestry measures GHG dynamics in forest systems · Emissions

  10. Final Report. SFAA No. DEFC02-98CH10961. Technical assistance for joint implementation and other supporting mechanisms and measures for greenhouse gas emissions mitigation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Knight, Denise

    2001-10-15

    IIEC, a division of CERF, has developed an extensive base of experience implementing activities that support climate action by developing USIJI projects in transitional countries within Asia, Latin America, Central and Eastern Europe, and southern Africa. IIEC has been able to provide a range of technical and policy assistance to governments and industry in support of sustainable energy use. IIEC continues to work in key countries with local partners to develop and implement energy efficiency policies and standards, develop site-specific projects, and assist governing bodies to establish national priorities and evaluation criteria for approving GHG-mitigation projects. As part of this project, IIEC focused on promoting a series of activities in Thailand and South Africa in order to identify GHG mitigation projects and work within the national approval process of those countries. The sections of this report outline the activities conducted in each country in order to achieve that goal.

  11. Impacts of greenhouse gas mitigation policies on agricultural land

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Xiaodong, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2008-01-01

    Greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions are widely acknowledged to be responsible for much of the global warming in the past century. A number of approaches have been proposed to mitigate GHG emissions. Since the burning of ...

  12. Incomplete Environmental Regulation, Imperfect Competition, and Emissions Leakage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fowlie, Meredith

    2007-01-01

    regimes, such as the EU Emissions Trading Program. Annual COUnion Greenhouse Gas Emission Trading Scheme (EU ETS) begansector greenhouse gas emission trading scheme in the world.

  13. Climate Change Mitigation: Climate, Health, and Equity Implications of the Visible and the Hidden

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shonkoff, Seth Berrin

    2012-01-01

    assumptions behind emissions trading in non- market goods:The European Union Emissions Trading Scheme: origins,eliminate the need for emissions trading in comparison to

  14. Sources and Mitigation of CO and UHC Emissions in Low-temperature Diesel Combustion Regimes: Insights Obtained via Homogeneous Reactor Modeling

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given at 2007 Diesel Engine-Efficiency & Emissions Research Conference (DEER 2007). 13-16 August, 2007, Detroit, Michigan. Sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies (OFCVT).

  15. Strategic Behavior, Private Information, and Decentralization in the European Union Emissions Trading System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Malueg, David A.; Yates, Andrew J.

    2009-01-01

    in the European Union emissions trading scheme. Rev EnvironDecentralization in the EU emissions trading scheme andthe European Union Emissions Trading System David A. Malueg

  16. Emission

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would like submitKansas NuclearElectronic StructureEly M.Emilio Segrè About the LabEmission

  17. Drivers, Trends and Mitigation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blanco, Arthur S.; Gerlagh, Reyer; Suh, Sangwon; Barrett, John A.; de Coninck, Heleen; Diaz Morejon, Cristobal Felix; Mathur, Ritu; Nakicenovic, Nebojsa; Ahenkorah, Alfred Ofosu; Pan, Jiahua; Pathak, Himanshu; Rice, Jake; Richels, Richard G.; Smith, Steven J.; Stern, David; Toth, Ferenc L.; Zhou, Peter

    2014-12-01

    Chapter 5 analyzes the anthropogenic greenhouse gas (GHG) emission trends until the present and the main drivers that explain those trends. The chapter uses different perspectives to analyze past GHG-emissions trends, including aggregate emissions flows and per capita emissions, cumulative emissions, sectoral emissions, and territory-based vs. consumption-based emissions. In all cases, global and regional trends are analyzed. Where appropriate, the emission trends are contextualized with long-term historic developments in GHG emissions extending back to 1750.

  18. Mitigation Action Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-02-01

    This Mitigation Action Plan (MAP) focuses on mitigation commitments stated in the Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement (SEIS) and the Record of Decision (ROD) for the Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 1 (NPR-1). Specific commitments and mitigation implementation actions are listed in Appendix A-Mitigation Actions, and form the central focus of this MAP. They will be updated as needed to allow for organizational, regulatory, or policy changes. It is the intent of DOE to comply with all applicable federal, state, and local environmental, safety, and health laws and regulations. Eighty-six specific commitments were identified in the SEIS and associated ROD which pertain to continued operation of NPR-1 with petroleum production at the Maximum Efficient Rate (MER). The mitigation measures proposed are expected to reduce impacts as much as feasible, however, as experience is gained in actual implementation of these measures, some changes may be warranted.

  19. What Can China Do? China's Best Alternative Outcome for Energy Efficiency and CO2 Emissions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. Fridley, David

    2010-01-01

    CIS Total and Power Sector Carbon Dioxide Emissions, 2005-Power Sector CIS and AIS Carbon Dioxide Emissions, 2005-Inter-scenario Carbon Dioxide Emissions Mitigation Potential

  20. Carbon flows and economic evaluation of mitigation options in Tanzani's forest sector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Makundi, W.R.; Okinting'Ati, Aku

    1995-02-02

    This paper presents estimates of the rate of forest use, deforestation and forest degradation, as well as the corresponding carbon flows, in the Tanzanian forest sector. It is estimated that the country lost 525,000 ha of forests in 1990, with associated committed emissions of 31.5 Mt. Carbon (MtC), and 7.05 MtC of committed carbon sequestration. The paper then describes the possible response options in the forest sector to mitigate GHG emissions, and evaluates the most stable subset of these-i.e. forest conservation, woodfuel plantations and agroforestry. The conservation options were found to cost an average of U.S. $1.27 per tonne of carbon (tC) conserved. Five options for fuelwood plantations and agroforestry, with two different ownership regimes were evaluated. Each one of the options gives a positive net present value at low rates of discount, ranging from U.S. $1.06 to 3.4/1C of avoided emissions at 0 percent discount rate. At 10 percent discount, the eucalyptus and maize option has a highest PNV of U.S. $1.73 tC, and the government plantation gives a negative PNV (loss) of U.S. $0.13 tC sequestered. The options with a private/community type of ownership scheme fared better than government run options. This conclusion also held true when ranking the options by the BRAC indicator, with the government fuelwood plantation ranked the lowest, and the private agroforestry option of eucalyptus and corn performing best. The mitigation options evaluated here show that the forest sector in Tanzania has one of the most cost-effective GHG mitigation opportunities in the world, and they are within the developmental aspirations of the country.

  1. Low-Emission Development Strategies and National Appropriate...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Low-Emission Development Strategies and National Appropriate Mitigation Actions: Europe and CIS Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Low-Emission Development...

  2. Evaluation of Efficiency Activities in the Industrial Sector Undertaken in Response to Greenhouse Gas Emission Reduction Targets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Price, Lynn

    2010-01-01

    DEFRA), 2005a. UK Emissions Trading Scheme. London: DEFRA.Energy/GHG Tax Emissions trading Target Setting Penaltiesthe European Union Emissions Trading Scheme and a lack of

  3. Distributed Energy Resources for Carbon Emissions Mitigation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Firestone, Ryan; Marnay, Chris

    2008-01-01

    combined heat and power (CHP), thermally- activated cooling,electricity and heat from CHP. The economics of storage is1. installed capacity of CHP generators installed capacity (

  4. Distributed Energy Resources for Carbon Emissions Mitigation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Firestone, Ryan; Marnay, Chris

    2008-01-01

    carbon tax, combined heat and power, distributed energyuseful heat in combined heat and power systems, thermally-fossil-fuel based combined heat and power (CHP), thermally-

  5. On mitigating emissions leakage under biofuel policies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rajagopal, D; Rajagopal, D

    2015-01-01

    Same sector Energy Efficiency Rebound effect Own sector andand Gernot Wagner. Energy policy: The rebound effect isRichards, 2008). Rebound effects of energy efficiency and

  6. Distributed Energy Resources for Carbon Emissions Mitigation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Firestone, Ryan; Marnay, Chris

    2008-01-01

    activated cooling, photovoltaics, solar thermal collectors,thermal storage solar thermal photovoltaics absorptionbegin to invest in photovoltaics. Solar thermal collectors

  7. On mitigating emissions leakage under biofuel policies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rajagopal, D; Rajagopal, D

    2015-01-01

    than 1:1 replacement of oil products with biofuel, which isshow how different oil products are affected differently

  8. Distributed Energy Resources for Carbon Emissions Mitigation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Firestone, Ryan; Marnay, Chris

    2008-01-01

    and electrical and thermal storage. The electrical andcell Continuous Investments thermal storage solar thermalrespectively. Thermal storage was never purchased.

  9. On mitigating emissions leakage under biofuel policies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rajagopal, D

    2015-01-01

    Biofuel (and renewable energy) policies are multi-objective.renewable fuels standard: Economic and greenhouse gas implications. Energy Policy,

  10. On mitigating emissions leakage under biofuel policies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rajagopal, D; Rajagopal, D

    2015-01-01

    Article Steven T. Berry. Biofuels policy and the empiricaluse change impacts of biofuels in the gtap-bio framework.Genomics of cellulosic biofuels. Nature, 454(7206):841–845,

  11. Distributed Energy Resources for Carbon Emissions Mitigation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Firestone, Ryan; Marnay, Chris

    2008-01-01

    cooling, photovoltaics, solar thermal collectors, and energythermal storage solar thermal photovoltaics absorptionabsorption cooling, solar thermal collection, respectively.

  12. Distributed Energy Resources for Carbon Emissions Mitigation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Firestone, Ryan; Marnay, Chris

    2008-01-01

    2003. “Gas-Fired Distributed Energy Resource TechnologyATIONAL L ABORATORY Distributed Energy Resources for CarbonFirestone 5128 Distributed Energy Resources for Carbon

  13. Distributed Energy Resources for Carbon Emissions Mitigation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Firestone, Ryan; Marnay, Chris

    2008-01-01

    t) Figure 3. installed capacity of solar thermal collectorsinstalled capacity of fossil-fuel fired generation, absorption cooling, solar

  14. Distributed Energy Resources for Carbon Emissions Mitigation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Firestone, Ryan; Marnay, Chris

    2008-01-01

    Investments thermal storage solar thermal photovoltaicsphotovoltaics, solar thermal collectors, and energy storagesolar electric and thermal equipment, and energy storage -

  15. On mitigating emissions leakage under biofuel policies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rajagopal, D; Rajagopal, D

    2015-01-01

    gtap-bio framework. Climate Change Economics, 3( 03), 2012.Mustafa H. Babiker. Climate change policy, market structure,cost implications. Climate Change Economics, 3(03), 2012.

  16. The detection, prevention and mitigation of cascading outages in the power system 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Song, Hongbiao

    2009-05-15

    This dissertation studies the causes and mechanism of power system cascading outages and develops new methods and new tools to help detect, prevent and mitigate the outages. Three effective solutions: a steady state control scheme, a transient...

  17. Fast Detection and Mitigation of Cascading Outages in the Power System 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pang, Chengzong

    2012-02-14

    This dissertation studies the causes and mechanism of power system cascading outages and proposes the improved interactive scheme between system-wide and local levels of monitoring and control to quickly detect, classify and mitigate the cascading...

  18. Prioritizing Climate Change Mitigation Alternatives: Comparing Transportation Technologies to Options in Other Sectors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lutsey, Nicholas P.

    2008-01-01

    develop renewable energy credit-tracking and trading systemCO 2 emissions trading scheme, and an energy-based fee wouldenergy and emissions technologies, and development of emissions trading

  19. Global climate change and the mitigation challenge

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Frank Princiotta

    2009-10-15

    Anthropogenic emissions of greenhouse gases, especially carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}), have led to increasing atmospheric concentrations, very likely the primary cause of the 0.8{sup o}C warming the Earth has experienced since the Industrial Revolution. With industrial activity and population expected to increase for the rest of the century, large increases in greenhouse gas emissions are projected, with substantial global additional warming predicted. This paper examines forces driving CO{sub 2} emissions, a concise sector-by-sector summary of mitigation options, and research and development (R&D) priorities. To constrain warming to below approximately 2.5{sup o}C in 2100, the recent annual 3% CO{sub 2} emission growth rate needs to transform rapidly to an annual decrease rate of from 1 to 3% for decades. Furthermore, the current generation of energy generation and end-use technologies are capable of achieving less than half of the emission reduction needed for such a major mitigation program. New technologies will have to be developed and deployed at a rapid rate, especially for the key power generation and transportation sectors. Current energy technology research, development, demonstration, and deployment (RDD&D) programs fall far short of what is required. 20 refs., 18 figs., 4 tabs.

  20. Heat Waves, Global Warming, and Mitigation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carlson, Ann E.

    2008-01-01

    Heat Waves, Global Warming, and Mitigation Ann E. Carlson*2008]HEAT WAVES, GLOBAL WARMING, AND MITIGATION 175 stroke2001). 2008]HEAT WAVES, GLOBAL WARMING, AND MITIGATION 177

  1. Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Through Energy Crops in the U.S. With Implications for Asian-Pacific Countries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCarl, Bruce A.

    Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Through Energy Crops in the U.S. With Implications for Asian&M University Seniority of authorship is shared November 2001 #12;Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Through Energy Crops in greenhouse gas (GHG) emission mitigation efforts has increased in recent years. While the original text

  2. Making the Most of Mitigation

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Los Alamos Field Office uses a comprehensive Mitigation Action Plan to monitor and manage commitments to mitigate adverse environmental impacts associated with the 2008 Los Alamos National Laboratory Site-Wide Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) and multiple project-specific EISs and environmental assessments (EAs). The DOE NEPA Order requires a publicly available annual report on progress made in implementing mitigation commitments and the effectiveness of the mitigation.

  3. wind engineering & natural disaster mitigation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Denham, Graham

    wind engineering & natural disaster mitigation #12;wind engineering & natural disaster mitigation Investment WindEEE Dome at Advanced Manufacturing Park $31million Insurance Research Lab for Better Homes $8million Advanced Facility for Avian Research $9million #12;wind engineering & natural disaster mitigation

  4. Buildings GHG Mitigation Estimator Worksheet, Version 1

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Xcel document describes Version 1 of the the Buildings GHG Mitigation Estimator tool. This tool assists federal agencies in estimating the greenhouse gas mitigation reduction from implementing energy efficiency measures across a portfolio of buildings. It is designed to be applied to groups of office buildings, for example, at a program level (regional or site) that can be summarized at the agency level. While the default savings and cost estimates apply to office buildings, users can define their own efficiency measures, costs, and savings estimates for inclusion in the portfolio assessment. More information on user-defined measures can be found in Step 2 of the buildings emission reduction guidance. The output of this tool is a prioritized set of activities that can help the agency to achieve its greenhouse gas reduction targets most cost-effectively.

  5. The Role of Asia in Mitigating Climate Change: Results from the Asia Modeling Exercise

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Calvin, Katherine V.; Clarke, Leon E.; Krey, Volker; Blanford, Geoffrey J.; Jiang, Kejun; Kainuma, M.; Kriegler, Elmar; Luderer, Gunnar; Shukla, Priyadarshi R.

    2012-12-01

    In 2010, Asia accounted for 60% of global population, 39% of Gross World Product, 44% of global energy consumption and nearly half of the world’s energy system CO2 emissions. Thus, Asia is an important region to consider in any discussion of climate change or climate change mitigation. This paper explores the role of Asia in mitigating climate change, by comparing the results of 23 energy-economy and integrated assessment models. We focus our analysis on seven key areas: base year data, future energy use and emissions absent climate policy, the effect of urban and rural development on future energy use and emissions, the role of technology in emissions mitigation, regional emissions mitigation, and national climate policies

  6. Implications of simultaneously mitigating and adapting to climate change: Initial experiments using GCAM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Calvin, Katherine V.; Wise, Marshall A.; Clarke, Leon E.; Edmonds, James A.; Kyle, G. Page; Luckow, Patrick W.; Thomson, Allison M.

    2013-04-01

    Historically climate impacts research and climate mitigation research have been two separate and independent domains of inquiry. Climate mitigation research has investigated greenhouse gas emissions assuming that climate is unchanging. At the same time climate mitigation research has investigated the implications of climate change on the assumption that climate mitigation will proceed without affecting the degree of climate impacts or the ability of human and natural systems to adapt. The Global Change Assessment Model (GCAM) has largely been employed to study climate mitigation. Here we explore the development of capabilities to assess climate change impacts and adaptation within the GCAM model. These capabilities are being developed so as to be able to simultaneously reconcile the joint implications of climate change mitigation, impacts and adaptive potential. This is an important step forward in that it enables direct comparison between climate mitigation activities and climate impacts and the opportunity to understand interactions between the two.

  7. Mitigating Wildland Fires

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformationJessework uses concrete7 AssessmentBusiness andMissionMissionMitigating Wildland

  8. Multi-PRI Signal Processing for the Terminal Doppler Weather Radar. Part II: RangeVelocity Ambiguity Mitigation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cho, John Y. N.

    ­Velocity Ambiguity Mitigation JOHN Y. N. CHO Lincoln Laboratory, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Lexington of the multi-PRI RV ambiguity mitigation scheme is demonstrated using simulated and real weather radar data, with excellent results. Combined with the adaptive clutter filter, this technique will be used within the larger

  9. Center for Greenhouse Gas Mitigation through Natural Resource Management (CGGM)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MacDonald, Lee

    Center for Greenhouse Gas Mitigation through Natural Resource Management (CGGM) NREL Scientists Ngugi, Gabe Olchin, Catherine Stewart Summary Greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and climate change pose one-induced warming of the planet. Hence, improved management practices are essential for reducing greenhouse gas (CO2

  10. Economic and Emissions Implications of Load-Based, Source-based and First-seller Emissions Trading Programs under California AB32

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Yihsu; Liu, Andrew L.; Hobbs, Benjamin F.

    2008-01-01

    cates in a load-based emissions trading scheme. Technicaland First-seller Emissions Trading Programs under Californiaand First-seller Emissions Trading Programs under California

  11. Transportation and Greenhouse Gas Mitigation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lutsey, Nicholas P.; Sperling, Dan

    2008-01-01

    Summary of transportation greenhouse gas mitigation optionsof alternative fuels. Low greenhouse gas fuels Mixing ofMAC) refrigerant replacement. Greenhouse gas budgets for

  12. Mitigation Options in Forestry, Land-Use, Change and Biomass Burning in Africa

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Makundi, Willy R.

    1998-01-01

    reduces emissions. (iii) Bio-energy Initiatives These wouldThe mitigation options in the bio-energy field will mainlyof such programs in the bio-energy field. The experiences of

  13. Linking mitigation and adaptation in local climate change planning : the opportunity facing Somerville, Massachusetts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goldwasser, Mia R. (Mia Rebecca)

    2015-01-01

    As climate change impacts are beginning to be felt and scientists project unavoidable levels of future change-cities are beginning to adapt. Simultaneously, they are expanding their commitment to mitigate carbon emissions, ...

  14. Identification of Low Emissions Agricultural Pathways and Priorities...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Identification of Low Emissions Agricultural Pathways and Priorities for Mitigation in Agricultural Landscapes using Integrated Assessment Modeling and Scenarios Jump to:...

  15. How Does Wind Affect Coal? Cycling, Emissions, and Costs (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lew, D.; Brinkman, G.; Milligan, M.

    2011-05-01

    This presentation describes in general fashion what the emissions and economic impacts of wind power generation on fossil power plants looks like and also offers some mitigation ideas.

  16. Wind Engineering & Natural Disaster Mitigation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lennard, William N.

    Wind Engineering & Natural Disaster Mitigation For more than 45 years, Western University has been internationally recognized as the leading university for wind engineering and wind- related research. Its of environmental disaster mitigation, with specific strengths in wind and earthquake research. Boundary Layer Wind

  17. The Design of an Emissions Permit Market for RECLAIM: A Holistic Approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goldenberg, Evan

    1993-01-01

    31. EMISSIONS PERMIT MARKET DESIGN uities may arise because144. EMISSIONS PERMIT MARKET DESIGN schemes because it makesEMISSIONS PERMIT MARKET DESIGN auctions, it is impossible to

  18. Sandia Energy - Siting and Barrier Mitigation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Siting and Barrier Mitigation Home Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Wind Energy Siting and Barrier Mitigation Siting and Barrier MitigationTara Camacho-Lopez2015-08-12...

  19. Mitigation Options in Forestry, Land-Use, Change and Biomass Burning in Africa

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Makundi, Willy R.

    1998-06-01

    Mitigation options to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and sequester carbon in land use sectors are describe in some detail. The paper highlights those options in the forestry sector, which are more relevant to different parts of Africa. It briefly outlines a bottom-up methodological framework for comprehensively assessing mitigation options in land use sectors. This method emphasizes the application of end-use demand projections to construct a baseline and mitigation scenarios and explicitly addresses the carbon storage potential on land and in wood products, as well as use of wood to substitute for fossil fuels. Cost-effectiveness indicators for ranking mitigation options are proposed, including those, which account for non-carbon monetary benefits such as those derived from forest products, as well as opportunity cost of pursuing specific mitigation option. The paper finally surveys the likely policies, barriers and incentives to implement such mitigation options in African countries .

  20. Implantation, Activation, Characterization and Prevention/Mitigation...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Activation, Characterization and PreventionMitigation of Internal Short Circuits in Lithium-Ion Cells Implantation, Activation, Characterization and PreventionMitigation of...

  1. A Numerical Investigation of the Potential for Negative Emissions Leakage*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to reduce leakage included in the EU Emissions Trading Scheme and draft legislation in the United States

  2. The Energy and Economic Impacts of Expanding International Emissions Trading

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qi, Tianyu

    2013-08-21

    Emissions trading systems are recognized as a cost-effective way to facilitate emissions abatement and are expected to play an important role in international cooperation for global climate mitigation. Starting from the ...

  3. On-farm Assessment of Nitrogen Fertilizer application to corn on Nitrous Oxide Emissions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2009-01-01

    mitigation of greenhouse gas emissions by agriculture. Nutr.1998. Nitrous oxide emission in three years as affected by2008. Soil-surface gas emissions. p.851-861. In: M.R. Carter

  4. Climate Mitigation Policy Implications for Global Irrigation Water Demand

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chaturvedi, Vaibhav; Hejazi, Mohamad I.; Edmonds, James A.; Clarke, Leon E.; Kyle, G. Page; Davies, Evan; Wise, Marshall A.

    2013-08-22

    Energy, water and land are scarce resources, critical to humans. Developments in each affect the availability and cost of the others, and consequently human prosperity. Measures to limit greenhouse gas concentrations will inevitably exact dramatic changes on energy and land systems and in turn alter the character, magnitude and geographic distribution of human claims on water resources. We employ the Global Change Assessment Model (GCAM), an integrated assessment model to explore the interactions of energy, land and water systems in the context of alternative policies to limit climate change to three alternative levels: 2.5 Wm-2 (445 ppm CO2-e), 3.5 Wm-2 (535 ppm CO2-e) and 4.5 Wm-2 (645 ppm CO2-e). We explore the effects of alternative land-use emissions mitigation policy options—one which values terrestrial carbon emissions equally with fossil fuel and industrial emissions, and an alternative which places no penalty on land-use change emissions. We find that increasing populations and economic growth could be anticipated to lead to increased demand for water for agricultural systems (+200%), even in the absence of climate change. In general policies to mitigate climate change will increase agricultural demands for water, regardless of whether or not terrestrial carbon is valued or not. Burgeoning demands for water are driven by the demand for bioenergy in response to emissions mitigation policies. We also find that the policy matters. Increases in the demand for water when terrestrial carbon emissions go un-prices are vastly larger than when terrestrial system carbon emissions are prices at the same rate as fossil fuel and industrial emissions. Our estimates for increased water demands when terrestrial carbon systems go un-priced are larger than earlier studies. We find that the deployment of improved irrigation delivery systems could mitigate some of the increase in water demands, but cannot reverse the increases in water demands when terrestrial carbon emissions go un-priced. Finally we estimates that the geospatial pattern of water demands could stress some parts of the world, e.g. China, India and other countries in south and east Asia, earlier and more intensely than in other parts of the world, e.g. North America.

  5. IPCC WGIII Assessment Reprot: Chapter 6. Mitigation Options in Buildings 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Urge-Vorsatz, D.; Levine, M. D.

    2007-01-01

    • Shading devices • Multiple glazing layers, low-emissivity coatings • Spectrally selective windows • Electrochromic and thermochromic glazing – The rate of exchange of inside and outside air • In cold climates, air leakage can cause >1/2 of heat loss..., 2005 Co-benefits of GHG Mitigation 3. Improved quality of life and comfort #0;? Improved thermal comfort - Fewer cold surfaces such as windows #0;? Reduced level of outdoor noise infiltration and indoor pollution from outdoors - Triple glazed windows...

  6. Mitigating Pollution Concerns through Process Integration Technology Steps 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tripathi, P.; Shukla, D.; Smith, S.

    1991-01-01

    dioxide occur primarily due to the burning of natural gas, coal, petroleum and wood chips. One of the ways of mitigating the pollution problem is through waste minimization measures. Sometimes, the introduction of waste minimization measures require...' C02 and x which results in the acid rain and greenhouse effect. The emission of S02 in this country can almost exclusively be traced to the stationary combustion of coal. The oxides of Nitrogen and Carbon dioxide occur primarily due to the burning...

  7. The Gambit Scheme manual.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2008-01-22

    REPL is then entered after displaying a message which describes the next step of ..... (add-hook 'inferior-scheme-mode-hook (function gambit-inferior-mode)). (

  8. Optimal Pollution Mitigation in Monterey Bay Based on Coastal Radar Data and Nonlinear

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marsden, Jerrold

    Optimal Pollution Mitigation in Monterey Bay Based on Coastal Radar Data and Nonlinear Dynamics run-off which is a typical source of pollution in the bay. We show that a HF radar-based pollution release scheme using this flow structure reduces the impact of pollution on the coastal envi- ronment

  9. International Experience with Key Program Elements of Industrial Energy Efficiency or Greenhouse Gas Emissions Reduction Target-Setting Programs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Price, Lynn; Galitsky, Christina; Kramer, Klaas Jan

    2008-01-01

    Affairs (DEFRA), 2005. UK Emissions Trading Scheme. http://targets through the UK Emissions Trading Scheme. 6 Table 1is to be adjusted for emissions trading. The reports must be

  10. Greenhouse gases mitigation options and strategies for Tanzania

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mwandosya, M.J.; Meena, H.E.

    1996-12-31

    Tanzania became a party to the United Nations Framework on Climate Change (UN FCCC) when she ratified the Convention in March, 1996. Now that Tanzania and other developing countries are Parties to the UN FCCC, compliance with its provisions is mandatory. The legal requirements therefore provide a basis for their participation in climate change studies and policy formulation. All parties to the Convention are required by Article 4.1 of the United Nations Convention on Climate Change (UN FCCC) to develop, periodically update, publish, and make available national inventories of anthropogenic emissions and removal of greenhouse gases that are not controlled by the Montreal Protocol. This study on possible options for the mitigation of greenhouse gases in Tanzania is a preliminary effort towards the fulfilment of the obligation. In order to fulfil their obligations under the UN FCCC and have a meaningful mitigation assessment, identification and quantification of anthropogenic sources of atmospheric emissions of greenhouse gases in the country was undertaken. In this respect, the study of anthropogenic emissions by source and removals by sink of GHGs in Tanzania was done with the main objective of increasing the quantity and quality of base-line data available in order to further scientific understanding of the relationship of greenhouse gas emissions to climate change. Furthermore, the study facilitated identification of national policy and technological options that could reduce the level of emissions in the country.

  11. Emissions Trading with Profit-Neutral Permit Allocations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hepburn, Cameron J.; Quah, John K.-H.; Ritz, Robert A.

    2012-08-17

    This paper examines the impact of an emissions trading scheme (ETS) on equilibrium emissions, output, price, market concentration, and profits in a generalized Cournot model. We develop formulae for the number of emissions permits that have...

  12. Saving Lives and Mitigating Losses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duchowski, Andrew T.

    Saving Lives and Mitigating Losses Wind and Structural Engineering Research Facility #12;Clemson University's Wind and Structural Engineering Research (WiSER) Facility is a premier laboratory for the study of wind effects on structures. Testing to assess the structural performance of buildings and bridges can

  13. Greenhouse gas mitigation options for Washington State

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garcia, N.

    1996-04-01

    President Clinton, in 1993, established a goal for the United States to return emissions of greenhouse gases to 1990 levels by the year 2000. One effort established to help meet this goal was a three part Environmental Protection Agency state grant program. Washington State completed part one of this program with the release of the 1990 greenhouse gas emissions inventory and 2010 projected inventory. This document completes part two by detailing alternative greenhouse gas mitigation options. In part three of the program EPA, working in partnership with the States, may help fund innovative greenhouse gas reduction strategies. The greenhouse gas control options analyzed in this report have a wide range of greenhouse gas reductions, costs, and implementation requirements. In order to select and implement a prudent mix of control strategies, policy makers need to have some notion of the potential change in climate, the consequences of that change and the uncertainties contained therein. By understanding the risks of climate change, policy makers can better balance the use of scarce public resources for concerns that are immediate and present against those that affect future generations. Therefore, prior to analyzing alternative greenhouse gas control measures, this report briefly describes the phenomenon and uncertainties of global climate change, and then projects the likely consequences for Washington state.

  14. Sensitivity of climate mitigation strategies to natural disturbances

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Le Page, Yannick LB; Hurtt, George; Thomson, Allison M.; Bond-Lamberty, Benjamin; Patel, Pralit L.; Wise, Marshall A.; Calvin, Katherine V.; Kyle, G. Page; Clarke, Leon E.; Edmonds, James A.; Janetos, Anthony C.

    2013-02-19

    The present and future concentration of atmospheric carbon dioxide depends on both anthropogenic and natural sources and sinks of carbon. Most proposed climate mitigation strategies rely on a progressive transition to carbon12 efficient technologies to reduce industrial emissions, substantially supported by policies to maintain or enhance the terrestrial carbon stock in forests and other ecosystems. This strategy may be challenged if terrestrial sequestration capacity is affected by future climate feedbacks, but how and to what extent is little understood. Here, we show that climate mitigation strategies are highly sensitive to future natural disturbance rates (e.g. fires, hurricanes, droughts), because of potential effect of disturbances on the terrestrial carbon balance. Generally, altered disturbance rates affect the pace of societal and technological transitions required to achieve the mitigation target, with substantial consequences on the energy sector and on the global economy. Understanding the future dynamics and consequences of natural disturbances on terrestrial carbon balance is thus essential for developing robust climate mitigation strategies and policies

  15. CHALLENGE 2015 WALL OF WIND MITIGATION CHALLENGE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Shu-Ching

    with the development of the building model. Is wind mitigation being addressed by your solution? What is wind science, sociology, and urban planning when discussing wind mitigation and your solution. WrittenW W! CHALLENGE 2015 WALL OF WIND MITIGATION CHALLENGE Competition at FIU's Engineering & Computing

  16. Compact Spreader Schemes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Placidi, M.; Jung, J. -Y.; Ratti, A.; Sun, C.

    2014-07-25

    This paper describes beam distribution schemes adopting a novel implementation based on low amplitude vertical deflections combined with horizontal ones generated by Lambertson-type septum magnets. This scheme offers substantial compactness in the longitudinal layouts of the beam lines and increased flexibility for beam delivery of multiple beam lines on a shot-to-shot basis. Fast kickers (FK) or transverse electric field RF Deflectors (RFD) provide the low amplitude deflections. Initially proposed at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) as tools for beam diagnostics and more recently adopted for multiline beam pattern schemes, RFDs offer repetition capabilities and a likely better amplitude reproducibility when compared to FKs, which, in turn, offer more modest financial involvements both in construction and operation. Both solutions represent an ideal approach for the design of compact beam distribution systems resulting in space and cost savings while preserving flexibility and beam quality.

  17. Co-benefits of mitigating global greenhouse gas emissions for...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    future might be justified by air quality and health co-benefits. Authors: West, Jason ; Smith, Steven J. ; Silva, Raquel ; Naik, Vaishali ; Zhang, Yuqiang ; Adelman, Zacariah ;...

  18. DOE/AMO NG Infrastructure R & D & Methane emissions Mitigation...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    of PE pipe with self-healing characteristics * Nanocomposite material, with PE as the matrix material * Completed Feasibility Study to determine proof-of-concept * Currently...

  19. China-Transportation Demand Management in Beijing: Mitigation of Emissions

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX E LISTStar Energy LLCLtd Jump to:ChangingCNE Jump to:NewCooperation

  20. Low-Emission Development Strategies and National Appropriate Mitigation

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX E LISTStar2-0057-EAInvervarLeeds,Asia-Pacific Developing

  1. Monitoring and Assessment of Greenhouse Gas Emissions and Mitigation

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoop Inc Jump to: navigation,Mereg GmbH JumpLLCMohavePotential in Agriculture (MAGHG) |

  2. Monitoring and Assessment of Greenhouse Gas Emissions and Mitigation

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoop Inc Jump to: navigation,Mereg GmbH JumpLLCMohavePotential in Agriculture (MAGHG)

  3. Monitoring and Assessment of Greenhouse Gas Emissions and Mitigation

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsourceII Jump to: navigation, searchsource History ViewMoe Wind FarmMona

  4. Costa Rica-Mitigation of Greenhouse Gas Emissions through Avoided

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoopButtePower VenturesInformation EU-UNDP Climate Change Capacity

  5. The Treatment of Renewable Energy Certificates, Emissions Allowances, and Green Power Programs in State Renewables Portfolio Standards

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holt, Edward A.; Wiser, Ryan H.

    2007-01-01

    Renewable Energy Certificates and Air Emissions Benefits:risk mitigation benefits of renewable energy are achievedenvironmental benefits from renewable energy in general

  6. International Experience with Key Program Elements of Industrial Energy Efficiency or Greenhouse Gas Emissions Reduction Target-Setting Programs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Price, Lynn; Galitsky, Christina; Kramer, Klaas Jan

    2008-01-01

    Berkeley National Laboratory’s Energy Analysis Program forare often national-level energy or GHG programs that combinea national-level energy or GHG emissions mitigation program

  7. Integrating Agricultural and Forestry GHG Mitigation Response into General Economy Frameworks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCarl, Bruce A.

    for characterizing potential responses to greenhouse gas mitigation policies by the agriculture and forestry can be achieved through AF efforts by employing sink strategies, biofuel production or emissions management relative to carbon, methane (CH4) or nitrous oxide (N2O). Agricultural and forestry participation

  8. Urban Surfaces and Heat Island Mitigation Potentials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Akbari, Hashem

    2008-01-01

    Finster. 2000. “The Urban Heat Island, Photochemical Smog,2001. “EPA/NASA Urban Heat Island Pilot Project,” GlobalSystem Urban Surfaces and Heat Island Mitigation Potentials

  9. Estimating Mitigation Potential of Agricultural Projects: an...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Tool (EX-ACT) Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Brazil-Estimating Mitigation Potential of Agricultural Projects: an Application of the...

  10. Industrial Energy Efficiency and Climate Change Mitigation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Worrell, Ernst

    2009-01-01

    mitigate 21 MtCO 2 . Cogeneration (also called Combined Heatefficiencies. Industrial cogeneration is an important partpotential for industrial cogeneration is estimated at almost

  11. Environmental Mitigation Technology (Innovative System Testing...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Technology (Innovative System Testing)-Deployment and Testing of the Alden Hydropower Fish-Friendly Turbine Environmental Mitigation Technology (Innovative System...

  12. Climate Change 2007: Mitigation of Climate Change.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schiavon, Stefano; Zecchin, Roberto

    2007-01-01

    2007: Mitigation of Climate Change. Full report. WorkingIntergovernmental Panel on Climate Change www.webcda.it LaIntergovernmental Panel on Climate Change”. Il Rapporto

  13. ForPeerReview An Efficient Adaptive Distributed Space-Time Coding Scheme for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Waterloo, University of

    networks is to mitigate the effect of the multipath fading. Exploiting techniques such as time, frequency received signal. The main goal of this paper is to investigate a power allocation strategy in relay-destination link, it is shown that a threshold-based power allocation scheme (i.e., the relay remains silent if its

  14. Can land management and biomass utilization help mitigate global warming?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schlamadinger, B.; Lauer, M.

    1996-12-31

    With rising concern about the increase of the CO{sub 2} concentration in the earth`s atmosphere there is considerable interest in various land-use based mitigation options, like afforestation of surplus agricultural land with or without subsequent harvest; improved forest management; strategies that rely on wood plantations managed in short rotation or agricultural crops with high yields to produce bioenergy, timber and other biomass products. In the first step of this study, the net carbon benefits of such strategies will be calculated per unit of land, i.e., per hectare, because it is assumed that land is the limiting resource for such strategies in the future, and thus, the benefits per unit land need to be optimized. For these calculations a computer model has been developed. The results take into account the time dependence of carbon storage in the biosphere and are shown graphically both for land and for plantation systems with constant output of biomass over time. In the second step, these results will be combined with data on available land for Austria. The potential contribution of each of the above strategies towards mitigating the Austrian CO{sub 2} emissions will be demonstrated. A comparison to other renewable mitigation options, like solar thermal or photovoltaics, will be drawn in terms of available land resources and overall CO{sub 2} reductions.

  15. Restoration As Mitigation: Analysis of Stream Mitigation for Coal Mining Impacts in Southern Appalachia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gruner, Daniel S.

    ,2 This vulnerability is particularly conspicuous in the coal mining regions of the Appalachians, U.S. where surfaceRestoration As Mitigation: Analysis of Stream Mitigation for Coal Mining Impacts in Southern of information about 434 stream mitigation projects from 117 permits for surface mining in Appalachia. Data from

  16. Jet Schemes and Truncated Wedge Schemes Cornelia O. Yuen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Karen E.

    Jet Schemes and Truncated Wedge Schemes by Cornelia O. Yuen A dissertation submitted in partial of jets and arcs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 1.2 A higher dimension analog of arcs and jets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 1.3 History

  17. 12 Absolute versus Intensity Limits for CO2 Emission

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    as a component of cli- mate policy in the UK Emissions Trading Scheme (UK DEFRA 2001),2 and in 2001 the Bush

  18. European Greenhouse Gas Emissions Trading: A System in Transition*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    methane emissions between 1996 and 2001 using a three-dimensional global chemical transport model, Yu and ecosystem impacts, and analysis of mitigation strategies, need to be based on realistic evaluation

  19. Beyond Scheme F

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elliott, C.J.; Fisher, H.; Pepin, J.; Gillmann, R.

    1996-07-01

    Traffic classification techniques were evaluated using data from a 1993 investigation of the traffic flow patterns on I-20 in Georgia. First we improved the data by sifting through the data base, checking against the original video for questionable events and removing and/or repairing questionable events. We used this data base to critique the performance quantitatively of a classification method known as Scheme F. As a context for improving the approach, we show in this paper that scheme F can be represented as a McCullogh-Pitts neural network, oar as an equivalent decomposition of the plane. We found that Scheme F, among other things, severely misrepresents the number of vehicles in Class 3 by labeling them as Class 2. After discussing the basic classification problem in terms of what is measured, and what is the desired prediction goal, we set forth desirable characteristics of the classification scheme and describe a recurrent neural network system that partitions the high dimensional space up into bins for each axle separation. the collection of bin numbers, one for each of the axle separations, specifies a region in the axle space called a hyper-bin. All the vehicles counted that have the same set of in numbers are in the same hyper-bin. The probability of the occurrence of a particular class in that hyper- bin is the relative frequency with which that class occurs in that set of bin numbers. This type of algorithm produces classification results that are much more balanced and uniform with respect to Classes 2 and 3 and Class 10. In particular, the cancellation of errors of classification that occurs is for many applications the ideal classification scenario. The neural network results are presented in the form of a primary classification network and a reclassification network, the performance matrices for which are presented.

  20. CARBON MITIGATION HS 2014 Prof. Nicolas Gruber

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fischlin, Andreas

    CARBON MITIGATION HS 2014 Prof. Nicolas Gruber Mondays 10-12, CHN E42 (nicolas & Introduction (Gruber) Introduction to the carbon mitigation problem 9/22 2 Geological CO2 sequestration (Mazzotti) Putting the CO2 underground... 9/29 3 No class ­ group formation 10/06 4 Carbon sinks on land

  1. Modeling radio communication blackout and blackout mitigation in hypersonic vehicles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kundrapu, Madhusudhan; Beckwith, Kristian; Stoltz, Peter; Shashurin, Alexey; Keidar, Michael

    2014-01-01

    A procedure for the modeling and analysis of radio communication blackout of hypersonic vehicles is presented. A weakly ionized plasma generated around the surface of a hypersonic reentry vehicle traveling at Mach 23 was simulated using full Navier-Stokes equations in multi-species single fluid form. A seven species air chemistry model is used to compute the individual species densities in air including ionization - plasma densities are compared with experiment. The electromagnetic wave's interaction with the plasma layer is modeled using multi-fluid equations for fluid transport and full Maxwell's equations for the electromagnetic fields. The multi-fluid solver is verified for a whistler wave propagating through a slab. First principles radio communication blackout over a hypersonic vehicle is demonstrated along with a simple blackout mitigation scheme using a magnetic window.

  2. 2009 River Corridor Closure Contractor Revegetation and Mitigation Monitoring Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    C. T. Lindsey; K. A. Gano; R. D. Teel

    2009-09-30

    This document details the results of revegetation and mitigation monitoring conducted in 2009, including 25 revegetation/restoration projects, one revegetation/mitigation project, and three bat mitigation projects.

  3. New LNG process scheme

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Foglietta, J.H.

    1999-07-01

    A new LNG cycle has been developed for base load liquefaction facilities. This new design offers a different technical and economical solution comparing in efficiency with the classical technologies. The new LNG scheme could offer attractive business opportunities to oil and gas companies that are trying to find paths to monetize gas sources more effectively; particularly for remote or offshore locations where smaller scale LNG facilities might be applicable. This design offers also an alternative route to classic LNG projects, as well as alternative fuel sources. Conceived to offer simplicity and access to industry standard equipment, This design is a hybrid result of combining a standard refrigeration system and turboexpander technology.

  4. Mexico-Standard Assessment of Mitigation Potential and Livelihoods...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Mexico-Standard Assessment of Mitigation Potential and Livelihoods in Smallholder Systems (SAMPLES) Jump to: navigation, search Name Mexico-Standard Assessment of Mitigation...

  5. Validation of techniques to mitigate copper surface contamination...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Validation of techniques to mitigate copper surface contamination in CUORE Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Validation of techniques to mitigate copper surface...

  6. Climate Change Mitigation in the Energy and Forestry Sectors...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Climate Change Mitigation in the Energy and Forestry Sectors of Developing Countries Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Climate Change Mitigation in the...

  7. Korea's Green Growth Strategy: Mitigating Climate Change and...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Korea's Green Growth Strategy: Mitigating Climate Change and Developing New Growth Engines Jump to: navigation, search Name Korea's Green Growth Strategy: Mitigating Climate Change...

  8. Improving Department of Energy Capabilities for Mitigating Beyond...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Improving Department of Energy Capabilities for Mitigating Beyond Design Basis Events Improving Department of Energy Capabilities for Mitigating Beyond Design Basis Events April...

  9. Transmission/Resource Library/Enviromental Resources and Mitigation...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Enviromental Resources and Mitigation < Transmission | Resource Library(Redirected from TransmissionResource LibraryMitigation) Redirect page Jump to: navigation, search...

  10. Mitigating Breakdown in High Energy Density Perovskite Polymer...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Mitigating Breakdown in High Energy Density Perovskite Polymer Nanocomposite Capacitors Mitigating Breakdown in High Energy Density Perovskite Polymer Nanocomposite Capacitors 2012...

  11. Sandia Energy - Siting: Wind Turbine/Radar Interference Mitigation...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Mitigation (TSPEAR & IFT&E) Home Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Wind Energy Siting and Barrier Mitigation Siting: Wind TurbineRadar Interference...

  12. November 18 PSERC Webinar: Quantifying and Mitigating the Impacts...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    18 PSERC Webinar: Quantifying and Mitigating the Impacts of PV in Distribution Systems November 18 PSERC Webinar: Quantifying and Mitigating the Impacts of PV in Distribution...

  13. Equity and Emissions Trading in China

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, D.

    China has embarked on an ambitious pathway for establishing a national carbon market in the next five to ten years. In this study, we analyze the distributional aspects of a Chinese emissions-trading scheme from ethical, ...

  14. Place-based Mitigation of Climate Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Place-based Mitigation of Climate Change Robert Socolow Princeton University socolow should provide at least one wedge. #12;"The Wedge Model is the iPod of climate change: You fill

  15. The Influence of a CO2 Pricing Scheme on Distributed Energy Resources in California's Commercial Buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stadler, Michael

    2010-01-01

    to all DER technologies, PV adoption increases, but only in2 Pricing Scheme on CHP/PV adoption and CO 2 emissions SinceCO 2 price, PV and solar thermal adoption increases in all

  16. A DAW lockout scheme

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Landeche, D.A. [Entergy Operations, Inc., Killona, LA (United States)

    1996-10-01

    In it`s document TR-105834, Project 24414 dated November 1995 and titled {open_quotes}Zero Plastics and the Radiologically Protected Area Low Level Waste Lockout Program{close_quotes}, EPRI describes DAW lockout as a {open_quotes}very advanced{close_quotes} and {open_quotes}perhaps the most powerful of all approaches to LLW minimization.{close_quotes} The report discusses implementation of a lockout program at Kewaunee, LaSalle and Zion stations but states that {open_quotes}no quantifiable results{close_quotes} were available at time of report printing. Waterford 3 Nuclear Station began implementing a limited lockout scheme in 1993. This paper presents Waterford`s experience and results achieved through the lockout approach.

  17. Application of an online-coupled regional climate model, WRF-CAM5, over East Asia for examination of ice nucleation schemes. Part II. Sensitivity to heterogeneous ice nucleation parameterizations and dust emissions

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Zhang, Yang; Chen, Ying; Fan, Jiwen; Leung, Lai -Yung

    2015-09-14

    Aerosol particles can affect cloud microphysical properties by serving as ice nuclei (IN). Large uncertainties exist in the ice nucleation parameterizations (INPs) used in current climate models. In this Part II paper, to examine the sensitivity of the model predictions to different heterogeneous INPs, WRF-CAM5 simulation using the INP of Niemand et al. (N12) [1] is conducted over East Asia for two full years, 2006 and 2011, and compared with simulation using the INP of Meyers et al. (M92) [2], which is the original INP used in CAM5. M92 calculates the nucleated ice particle concentration as a function of icemore »supersaturation, while N12 represents the nucleated ice particle concentration as a function of temperature and the number concentrations and surface areas of dust particles. Compared to M92, the WRF-CAM5 simulation with N12 produces significantly higher nucleated ice crystal number concentrations (ICNCs) in the northern domain where dust sources are located, leading to significantly higher cloud ice number and mass concentrations and ice water path, but the opposite is true in the southern domain where temperatures and moistures play a more important role in ice formation. Overall, the simulation with N12 gives lower downward shortwave radiation but higher downward longwave radiation, cloud liquid water path, cloud droplet number concentrations, and cloud optical depth. The increase in cloud optical depth and the decrease in downward solar flux result in a stronger shortwave and longwave cloud forcing, and decreases temperature at 2-m and precipitation. Changes in temperature and radiation lower surface concentrations of OH, O?, SO?²?, and PM2.5, but increase surface concentrations of CO, NO?, and SO? over most of the domain. By acting as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) and IN, dust particles have different impacts on cloud water and ice number concentrations, radiation, and temperature at 2-m and precipitation depending on whether the dominant role of dust is CCN or IN. These results indicate the importance of the heterogeneous ice nucleation treatments and dust emissions in accurately simulating regional climate and air quality.« less

  18. Lessons learnt from post EIS evaluations of national road schemes in Ireland

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    King, E.A.; O'Malley, V.P.

    2012-01-15

    The Irish National Roads Authority (NRA) recently completed over twenty post environmental impact assessment evaluations of noise chapters prepared as part of Environmental Impact Statements (EISs) for new national road schemes in Ireland. The study focused on a range of issues including a review of noise monitoring procedures, noise prediction methodologies and an assessment of the effectiveness of noise mitigation measures currently in use on national road schemes. This review was carried out taking cognisance of best international practices for noise assessment and methodologies used to mitigate road traffic noise. The primary focus of the study was to assess the actual noise impacts of national road scheme developments and to revise, where necessary, methodologies recommended in the current NRA guidance document describing the treatment of noise on national road schemes. This paper presents a summary of the study and identifies a number of key areas that should be considered prior to the development of future guidance documents. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Presents a post-EIS evaluation of noise assessments for national roads in Ireland. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The effectiveness of some noise mitigation measures is critically evaluated. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Issues related to the current EIS noise assessment methodologies are discussed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Implications for alterations to the NRA noise guidelines.

  19. Advanced Mitigating Measures for the Cell Internal Short Risk (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Darcy, E.; Smith, K.

    2010-04-01

    This presentation describes mitigation measures for internal short circuits in lithium-ion battery cells.

  20. Greenhouse gas mitigation by agricultural intensification

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burney, J. A; Davis, S. J; Lobell, D. B

    2010-01-01

    IPCC Guidelines for National Greenhouse Gas Inventories. (Laboratory (2009) The Greenhouse Gases, Regulated Emissions,Anthropogenic Non-CO2 Greenhouse Gas Emissions, 1990–2020.

  1. Near-Term Climate Mitigation by Short-Lived Forcers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, Steven J.; Mizrahi, Andrew H.

    2013-08-12

    Emissions reductions focused on anthropogenic climate forcing agents with relatively short atmospheric lifetimes such as methane (CH4) and black carbon (BC) have been suggested as a strategy to reduce the rate of climate change over the next several decades. We find that reductions of methane and BC would likely have only a modest impact on near-term climate warming. Even with maximally feasible reductions phased in from 2015 to 2035, global mean temperatures in 2050 are reduced by 0.16 °C, with an uncertainty range of 0.04-0.36°C, with the high end of this range only possible if total historical aerosol forcing is small. More realistic mitigation scenarios would likely provide a smaller climate benefit. The climate benefits from targeted reductions in short-lived forcing agents are smaller than previously estimated and are not substantially different in magnitude from the benefits due to a comprehensive climate policy.

  2. Imaging an event horizon: mitigation of scattering toward Sagittarius A*

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fish, Vincent L.; Lu, Ru-Sen; Doeleman, Sheperd S.; Pankratius, Victor [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Haystack Observatory, Route 40, Westford, MA 01886 (United States); Johnson, Michael D.; Narayan, Ramesh; Vertatschitsch, Laura E. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Bouman, Katherine L.; Zoran, Daniel; Freeman, William T. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory, 32 Vassar Street, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Psaltis, Dimitrios [Astronomy and Physics Departments, University of Arizona, 933 North Cherry Street, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Broderick, Avery E. [Perimeter Institute for Theoretical Physics, 31 Caroline Street North, Waterloo, ON N2L 2Y5 (Canada); Gwinn, Carl R., E-mail: vfish@haystack.mit.edu [Department of Physics, University of California, Santa Barbara, CA 93106 (United States)

    2014-11-10

    The image of the emission surrounding the black hole in the center of the Milky Way is predicted to exhibit the imprint of general relativistic (GR) effects, including the existence of a shadow feature and a photon ring of diameter ?50 ?as. Structure on these scales can be resolved by millimeter-wavelength very long baseline interferometry. However, strong-field GR features of interest will be blurred at ? ? 1.3 mm due to scattering by interstellar electrons. The scattering properties are well understood over most of the relevant range of baseline lengths, suggesting that the scattering may be (mostly) invertible. We simulate observations of a model image of Sgr A* and demonstrate that the effects of scattering can indeed be mitigated by correcting the visibilities before reconstructing the image. This technique is also applicable to Sgr A* at longer wavelengths.

  3. Mitigation of cache memory using an embedded hard-core PPC440 processor in a Virtex-5 Field Programmable Gate Array.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Learn, Mark Walter

    2010-02-01

    Sandia National Laboratories is currently developing new processing and data communication architectures for use in future satellite payloads. These architectures will leverage the flexibility and performance of state-of-the-art static-random-access-memory-based Field Programmable Gate Arrays (FPGAs). One such FPGA is the radiation-hardened version of the Virtex-5 being developed by Xilinx. However, not all features of this FPGA are being radiation-hardened by design and could still be susceptible to on-orbit upsets. One such feature is the embedded hard-core PPC440 processor. Since this processor is implemented in the FPGA as a hard-core, traditional mitigation approaches such as Triple Modular Redundancy (TMR) are not available to improve the processor's on-orbit reliability. The goal of this work is to investigate techniques that can help mitigate the embedded hard-core PPC440 processor within the Virtex-5 FPGA other than TMR. Implementing various mitigation schemes reliably within the PPC440 offers a powerful reconfigurable computing resource to these node-based processing architectures. This document summarizes the work done on the cache mitigation scheme for the embedded hard-core PPC440 processor within the Virtex-5 FPGAs, and describes in detail the design of the cache mitigation scheme and the testing conducted at the radiation effects facility on the Texas A&M campus.

  4. CECC'08 L. Csirmaz: Secret Sharing Schemes 1 / 35 Secret Sharing Schemes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Csirmaz, László

    CECC'08 L. Csirmaz: Secret Sharing Schemes 1 / 35 Secret Sharing Schemes: Solved & Unsolved Schemes 2 / 35 Secret Sharing Scheme { the beginning Contents 1 Secret Sharing Scheme { the beginning 2 De Schemes 3 / 35 Secret Sharing Scheme { the beginning The beginning What Who When Secret Sharing Shamir [23

  5. Regional-Scale Assessment of Nitrous Oxide Emissions within the US Corn Belt: The Impact of Precipitation and Agricultural Drainage on Indirect Emissions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    Regional-Scale Assessment of Nitrous Oxide Emissions within the US Corn Belt: The Impact of Precipitation and Agricultural Drainage on Indirect Emissions Tim Griffis1, Xuhui Lee2, John Baker3, Peter, but mitigation strategies have been limited by the large uncertainties in both direct and indirect emission

  6. Disruption mitigation using high pressure gas jets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dennis G. Whyte

    2007-10-11

    The goal of this research is to establish credible disruption mitigation scenarios based on the technique of massive gas injection. Disruption mitigation seeks to minimize or eliminate damage to internal components that can occur due to the rapid dissipation of thermal and magnetic energy during a tokamak disruption. In particular, the focus of present research is extrapolating mitigation techniques to burning plasma experiments such as ITER, where disruption-caused damage poses a serious threat to the lifetime of internal vessel components. A majority of effort has focused on national and international collaborative research with large tokamaks: DIII-D, Alcator C-Mod, JET, and ASDEX Upgrade. The research was oriented towards empirical trials of gas-jet mitigation on several tokamaks, with the goal of developing and applying cohesive models to the data across devices. Disruption mitigation using gas jet injection has proven to be a viable candidate for avoiding or minimizing damage to internal components in burning plasma experiments like ITER. The physics understanding is progress towards a technological design for the required gas injection system in ITER.

  7. Intertemporal Emissions Trading and Market Power: A Dominant Firm with Competitive Fringe Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    1 Intertemporal Emissions Trading and Market Power: A Dominant Firm with Competitive Fringe Model Julien Chevallier1 May 26, 2009 Abstract In international emissions trading schemes such as the Kyoto Protocol and the European Union Emissions Trading Scheme, the suboptimal negotiation of the cap

  8. Short term effects of moderate carbon prices on land use in the New Zealand emissions trading

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Silver, Whendee

    Short term effects of moderate carbon prices on land use in the New Zealand emissions trading Zealand Emissions Trading Scheme (NZ ETS) was introduced through the Climate Change Response Act............................................................................ 14 #12;1 1 Introduction The New Zealand Emissions Trading Scheme (NZ ETS) was legislated through

  9. Gas powered fluid gun with recoil mitigation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grubelich, Mark C; Yonas, Gerold

    2013-11-12

    A gas powered fluid gun for propelling a stream or slug of a fluid at high velocity toward a target. Recoil mitigation is provided that reduces or eliminates the associated recoil forces, with minimal or no backwash. By launching a quantity of water in the opposite direction, net momentum forces are reduced or eliminated. Examples of recoil mitigation devices include a cone for making a conical fluid sheet, a device forming multiple impinging streams of fluid, a cavitating venturi, one or more spinning vanes, or an annular tangential entry/exit.

  10. Operational Signature Schemes Michael Backes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Operational Signature Schemes Michael Backes CISPA, Saarland University ¨Ozg¨ur Dagdelen TU] transferred the idea of functional encryption to signatures. They basically say that, with knowledge

  11. Integrated assessment of global water scarcity over the 21st century under multiple climate change mitigation policies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hejazi, Mohamad I.; Edmonds, James A.; Clarke, Leon E.; Kyle, G. Page; Davies, Evan; Chaturvedi, Vaibhav; Wise, Marshall A.; Patel, Pralit L.; Eom, Jiyong; Calvin, Katherine V.

    2014-08-01

    Water scarcity conditions over the 21st century both globally and regionally are assessed in the context of climate change and climate mitigation policies, by estimating both water availability and water demand within the Global Change Assessment Model (GCAM), a leading community integrated assessment model of energy, agriculture, climate, and water. To quantify changes in future water availability, a new gridded water-balance global hydrologic model – namely, the Global Water Availability Model (GWAM) – is developed and evaluated. Global water demands for six major demand sectors (irrigation, livestock, domestic, electricity generation, primary energy production, and manufacturing) are modeled in GCAM at the regional scale (14 geopolitical regions, 151 sub-regions) and then spatially downscaled to 0.5 o x 0.5o resolution to match the scale of GWAM. Using a baseline scenario (i.e., no climate change mitigation policy) with radiative forcing reaching 8.8 W/m2 (equivalent to the SRES A1Fi emission scenario) and three climate policy scenarios with increasing mitigation stringency of 7.7, 5.5, and 4.2 W/m2 (equivalent to the SRES A2, B2, and B1 emission scenarios, respectively), we investigate the effects of emission mitigation policies on water scarcity. Two carbon tax regimes (a universal carbon tax (UCT) which includes land use change emissions, and a fossil fuel and industrial emissions carbon tax (FFICT) which excludes land use change emissions) are analyzed. The baseline scenario results in more than half of the world population living under extreme water scarcity by the end of the 21st century. Additionally, in years 2050 and 2095, 36% (28%) and 44% (39%) of the global population, respectively, is projected to live in grid cells (in basins) that will experience greater water demands than the amount of available water in a year (i.e., the water scarcity index (WSI) > 1.0). When comparing the climate policy scenarios to the baseline scenario while maintaining the same baseline socioeconomic assumptions, water scarcity declines under a UCT mitigation policy but increases with a FFICT mitigation scenario by the year 2095 particularly with more stringent climate mitigation targets. Under the FFICT scenario, water scarcity is projected to increase driven by higher water demands for bio-energy crops.

  12. Sardinia 2007, Eleventh International Waste Management and Landfill Symposium Potential for Reducing Global Methane Emissions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Columbia University

    for Reducing Global Methane Emissions From Landfills, 2000-2030 E. MATTHEWS1 , N. J. THEMELIS2 1 NASA Goddard methane (CH4 )annually to the world's total CH4 emission of ~550 Tg/yr. Recycling and thermal treatment destined for landfills and to mitigating CH4 emission. Waste generation is estimated to more than double

  13. Rapid energy savings in London's households to mitigate an energy crisis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Julien, Aurore; Barrett, Mark; Croxford, Ben

    2011-01-01

    to mitigate an energy crisis Wood, G. & Newborough, M. ,households to mitigate an energy crisis Chen, A. , 2008.households to mitigate an energy crisis Rapid energy savings

  14. Emissions trading: principles and practice. 2nd

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tietenberg, T.H.

    2006-02-15

    The author demonstrates how emissions trading became an attractive alternative to command-and-control policies that would have required the EPA to disallow the opening of new plants in the middle of the recession-burdened 1970s. His examination of the evolution of this system includes, among other applications, the largest multinational trading system ever conceived, the European Union's Greenhouse Gas Emission Trading Scheme (EUETG), and the use of emissions trading in the Kyoto Protocol.

  15. Enhanced Practical Photosynthetic CO2 Mitigation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gregory Kremer; David J. Bayless; Morgan Vis; Michael Prudich; Keith Cooksey; Jeff Muhs

    2004-07-15

    This report highlights significant achievements in the Enhanced Practical Photosynthetic CO{sub 2} Mitigation Project for the period ending 06/30/2004. The major accomplishment was the modification of the header and harvesting work, with a system designed to distribute algae at startup, sustain operations and harvest in one unit.

  16. Mitigation and Adaptation Strategies for Global Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    concerns about rising energy demand and cost, diminishing oil reserves, and climate change, Central a critical analysis of this experience focusing on non-technical barriers to investment. Survey results America . Caribbean basin initiative . Trade and investment . Energy security Mitig Adapt Strateg Glob

  17. Highly concentrated foam formulation for blast mitigation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tucker, Mark D. (Albuquerque, NM); Gao, Huizhen (Albuquerque, NM)

    2010-12-14

    A highly concentrated foam formulation for blast suppression and dispersion mitigation for use in responding to a terrorism incident involving a radiological dispersion device. The foam formulation is more concentrated and more stable than the current blast suppression foam (AFC-380), which reduces the logistics burden on the user.

  18. Bias Temperature Instability Analysis, Monitoring and Mitigation for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bias Temperature Instability Analysis, Monitoring and Mitigation for Nano-scaled Circuits Seyab #12;#12;Bias Temperature Instability Analysis, Monitoring and Mitigation for Nano-scaled Circuits Proefschrift: Semiconductor reliability, Failure mechanisms, Negative Bias Temperature Instability, Failure monitoring, Static

  19. Market-Based Emissions Regulation and Industry Dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fowlie, Meredith

    . The authors gratefully acknowledge the support of NSF grant SES-0922401. 1 #12;Emissions Trading Scheme (ETS) in the European Union and California's greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions trading program. In these "cap is that, provided a series of conditions are met, an emissions trading program designed to equate marginal

  20. Emissions Trading: What Makes It Work? Julien Chevallier1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1 Emissions Trading: What Makes It Work? Julien Chevallier1 04 July 2009 Abstract: At the stage permits markets. Keywords: climate change policy; emissions trading; banking borrowing; initial allocation-4Jul2009 #12;2 Review of current climate policies The European Union Emissions Trading Scheme (EU ETS

  1. Research Summary The EU Emissions Trading System: Opportunities for Forests?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Research Summary The EU Emissions Trading System: Opportunities for Forests? European forestry has sequestration provided by European forests has not been recognised by markets. The EU Emissions Trading System as part of a wider review covering emerging carbon markets. Background The EU Emissions Trading Scheme

  2. Market-Based Emissions Regulation and Industry Dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fowlie, Meredith

    . Examples include the Emissions Trading Scheme (ETS) in the European Union and California's greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions trading program. In these "cap-and-trade" (CAT) programs, regulators impose a cap- sions is that, provided a series of conditions are met, an emissions trading program designed to equate

  3. 2008 River Corridor Closure Contractor Revegetation and Mitigation Monitoring Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    C. T. Lindsey; K. A. Gano

    2008-09-30

    The purpose of this report is to document the status of revegetation projects and natural resources mitigation efforts that have been conducted for remediated waste sites and other activities associated with the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act cleanup of National Priorities List waste sites at Hanford. This report documents the results of revegetation and mitigation monitoring conducted in 2008 and includes 22 revegetation/restoration projects, one revegetation/mitigation project, and two bat habitat mitigation projects.

  4. 2007 River Corridor Closure Contractor Revegetation and Mitigation Monitoring Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    K. A. Gano; C. T. Lindsey

    2007-09-27

    The purpose of this report is to document the status of revegetation projects and natural resources mitigation efforts that have been conducted for remediated waste sites and other activities associated with the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) cleanup of National Priorities List waste sites at Hanford. This report documents the results of revegetation and mitigation monitoring conducted in 2007 and includes 11 revegetation/restoration projects, one revegetation/mitigation project, and 3 bat habitat mitigation projects.

  5. Recommendation 195: Mitigation of Contamination in Bear Creek Burial Grounds

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The ORSSAB requests DOE provide possible remedial actions to mitigate releases of contamination from Bear Creek Burial Grounds.

  6. A MULTI-MODEL ANALYSIS OF POST-2020 MITIGATION EFFORTS OF FIVE MAJOR ECONOMIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    van Sluisveld, Mariesse; Gernaat, David; Ashina, Shuichi; Calvin, Katherine V.; Garg, Amit; Isaac, Morna; Lucas, Paul; Mouratiadou, Ioanna; Otto, Sander A.; Rao, Shilpa; Shukla, Priyadarshi R.; Van Vliet, Jasper; Van Vuuren, Detlef

    2013-11-01

    This paper looks into the regional mitigation strategies of five major economies (China, EU, India, Japan, and USA) in the context of the 2°C target, using a multi-model comparison. In order to stay in line with the 2°C target, a tripling or quadrupling of mitigation ambitions is required in all regions by 2050, employing vigorous decarbonization of the energy supply system and achieving negative emissions during the second half of the century. In all regions looked at, decarbonization of energy supply (and in particular power generation) is more important than reducing energy demand. Some differences in abatement strategies across the regions are projected: In India and the USA the emphasis is on prolonging fossil fuel use by coupling conventional technologies with carbon storage, whereas the other main strategy depicts a shift to carbon-neutral technologies with mostly renewables (China, EU) or nuclear power (Japan). Regions with access to large amounts of biomass, such as the USA, China, and the EU, can make a trade-off between energy related emissions and land related emissions, as the use of bioenergy can lead to a net increase in land use emissions. After supply-side changes, the most important abatement strategy focuses on end-use efficiency improvements, leading to considerable emission reductions in both the industry and transport sectors across all regions. Abatement strategies for non-CO2 emissions and land use emissions are found to have a smaller potential. Inherent model, as well as collective, biases have been observed affecting the regional response strategy or the available reduction potential in specific (end-use) sectors.

  7. THE POTENTIAL FOR CO2 EMISSIONS TRADING IN TRANSPORT: THE CASE OF PERSONAL VEHICLES AND FREIGHT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1 THE POTENTIAL FOR CO2 EMISSIONS TRADING IN TRANSPORT: THE CASE OF PERSONAL VEHICLES AND FREIGHT, it is of some interest to explore the inclusion of road transport in emission trading schemes. Starting from

  8. Prioritizing Climate Change Mitigation Alternatives: Comparing Transportation Technologies to Options in Other Sectors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lutsey, Nicholas P.

    2008-01-01

    Anderson, J. (Ambien Climate Technologies), 2003. Personalon climate change mitigation technology alternatives fromregrets” climate change mitigation technologies – where the

  9. Alternative subtraction scheme using Nagy Soper dipoles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. Robens; C. H. Chung

    2010-01-15

    We present an alternative subtraction scheme for the treatment of infrared divergences in NLO QCD calculations. In this scheme, the number of transformations is greatly reduced with respect to the standard subtraction scheme by Catani and Seymour. We discuss the general setup of the scheme as well as first applications to NLO processes at hadron and lepton colliders.

  10. Iron beam acceleration using direct plasma injection scheme

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Okamura, M.; Kanesue, T.; Yamamoto, T.; Fuwa, Y.; RIKEN, Wako, Saitama 351-0198

    2014-02-15

    A new set of vanes of radio frequency quadrupole (RFQ) accelerator was commissioned using highly charged iron beam. To supply high intensity heavy ion beams to the RFQ, direct plasma injection scheme (DPIS) with a confinement solenoid was adopted. One of the difficulties to utilize the combination of DPIS and a solenoid field is a complexity of electro magnetic field at the beam extraction region, since biasing high static electric field for ion extraction, RFQ focusing field, and the solenoid magnetic field fill the same space simultaneously. To mitigate the complexity, a newly designed magnetic field clamps were used. The intense iron beam was observed with bunched structure and the total accelerated current reached 2.5 nC.

  11. Explosive parcel containment and blast mitigation container

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sparks, Michael H. (Frederick County, MD)

    2001-06-12

    The present invention relates to a containment structure for containing and mitigating explosions. The containment structure is installed in the wall of the building and has interior and exterior doors for placing suspicious packages into the containment structure and retrieving them from the exterior of the building. The containment structure has a blast deflection chute and a blowout panel to direct over pressure from explosions away from the building, surrounding structures and people.

  12. 300 Area Building Retention Evaluation Mitigation Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D. J. McBride

    2007-07-03

    Evaluate the long-term retention of several facilities associated with the PNNL Capability Replacement Laboratory and other Hanfor mission needs. WCH prepared a mitigation plan for three scenarios with different release dates for specific buildings. The evaluations present a proposed plan for providing utility services to retained facilities in support of a long-term (+20 year) lifespan in addition to temporary services to buildings with specified delayed release dates.

  13. Property:EnvironmentalMitigation | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to: navigation, searchEnvironmentalMitigation Jump to: navigation, search

  14. Model-Predictive Cascade Mitigation in Electric Power Systems With Storage and Renewables-Part II: Case-Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Almassalkhi, MR; Hiskens, IA

    2015-01-01

    The novel cascade-mitigation scheme developed in Part I of this paper is implemented within a receding-horizon model predictive control (MPC) scheme with a linear controller model. This present paper illustrates the MPC strategy with a case-study that is based on the IEEE RTS-96 network, though with energy storage and renewable generation added. It is shown that the MPC strategy alleviates temperature overloads on transmission lines by rescheduling generation, energy storage, and other network elements, while taking into account ramp-rate limits and network limitations. Resilient performance is achieved despite the use of a simplified linear controller model. The MPC scheme is compared against a base-case that seeks to emulate human operator behavior.

  15. nature geoscience | VOL 2 | NOVEMBER 2009 | www.nature.com/naturegeoscience 737 CO2 emissions from forest loss

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jackson, Robert B.

    emissions from forest loss G. R. van der Werf,D. C. Morton, R. S. DeFries, J. G. J. Olivier, P. S as a notable carbon dioxide source. P rogrammes that aim to reduce the emissions from deforestation and forest degradation are being considered as a cost-effective way to mitigate anthropogenic greenhouse-gas emissions1

  16. Fossil fuel decarbonization technology for mitigating global warming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steinberg, M.

    1998-09-01

    It has been understood that production of hydrogen from fossil and carbonaceous fuels with reduced CO{sub 2} emission to the atmosphere is key to the production of hydrogen-rich fuels for mitigating the CO{sub 2} greenhouse gas climate change problem. The conventional methods of hydrogen production from fossil fuels (coal, oil, gas and biomass) include steam reforming and water gas shift mainly of natural gas (SRM). In order to suppress CO{sub 2} emission from the steam reforming process, CO{sub 2} must be concentrated and sequestered either in or under the ocean or underground (in aquifers, or depleted oil or gas wells). Up to about 40% of the energy is lost in this process. An alternative process is the pyrolysis or the thermal decomposition of methane, natural gas (TDM) to hydrogen and carbon. The carbon can either be sequestered or sold on the market as a materials commodity or used as a fuel at a later date under less severe CO{sub 2} restraints. The energy sequestered in the carbon amounts to about 42% of the energy in the natural gas resource which is stored and not destroyed. A comparison is made between the well developed conventional SRM and the less developed TDM process including technological status, efficiency, carbon management and cost. The TDM process appears to have advantages over the well developed SRM process. It is much easier to sequester carbon as a stable solid than CO{sub 2} as a reactive gas or low temperature liquid. It is also possible to reduce cost by marketing the carbon as a filler or construction material. The potential benefits of the TDM process justifies its further efficient development. The hydrogen can be used as a transportation fuel or converted to methanol by reaction with CO{sub 2} from fossil fuel fired power plant stack gases, thus allowing reuse of the carbon in conventional IC automobile engines or in advanced fuel cell vehicles.

  17. Fossil fuel decarbonization technology for mitigating global warming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steinberg, M.

    1998-07-01

    It has been understood that production of hydrogen from fossil and carbonaceous fuels with reduced CO{sub 2} emission to the atmosphere is key to the production of hydrogen-rich fuels for mitigating the CO{sub 2} greenhouse gas climate change problem. The conventional methods of hydrogen production from fossil fuels (coal, oil, gas and biomass) include steam reforming and water gas shift mainly of natural gas (SRM). In order to suppress CO{sub 2} emission from the steam reforming process, CO{sub 2} must be concentrated and sequestered either in or under the ocean or in or underground (in aquifers, or depleted oil or gas wells). Up to about 40% of the energy is lost in this process. An alternative process is the pyrolysis or the thermal decomposition of methane, natural gas (TDM) to hydrogen and carbon. The carbon can either be sequestered or sold on the market as a materials commodity or used as a fuel at a later date under less severe CO{sub 2} restraints. The energy sequestered in the carbon amounts to about 42% of the energy in the natural gas resource which is stored and not destroyed. A comparison is made between the well developed conventional SRB and the less developed TDM process including technological status, efficiency, carbon management and cost. The TDM process appears to have advantages over the well developed SRM process. It is much easier to sequester carbon as a stable solid than CO{sub 2} as a reactive gas or low temperature liquid. It is also possible to reduce cost by marketing the carbon as a filler or construction material. The potential benefits of the TDM process justifies its further efficient development. The hydrogen can be used as a transportation fuel or converted to methanol by reaction with CO{sub 2} from fossil fuel fired power plant stack gases, thus allowing reuse of the carbon in conventional IC automobile engines or in advanced fuel cell vehicles.

  18. Fossil fuel decarbonization technology for mitigating global warming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steinberg, M.

    1998-04-01

    It has been understood that production of hydrogen from fossil and carbonaceous fuels with reduced CO{sub 2} emission to the atmosphere is key to the production of hydrogen-rich fuels for mitigating the CO{sub 2} greenhouse gas climate change problem. The conventional methods of hydrogen production from fossil fuels (coal, oil, gas and biomass) include steam reforming process, mainly of natural gas (SRM). In order to suppress CO{sub 2} emission from the steam reforming process, CO{sub 2} must be concentrated and sequestered either in or under the ocean or in or underground (in aquifers, or depleted oil or gas wells). Up to about 40% of the energy is lost in this process. An alternative process is the pyrolysis or the thermal decomposition of methane, natural gas (TDM) to hydrogen and carbon. The carbon can either be sequestered or sold on the market as a materials commodity or used as a fuel at a later date under less severe CO{sub 2} restraints. The energy sequestered in the carbon amounts to about 42% of the energy in the natural gas resource which is stored and not destroyed. A comparison is made between the well developed conventional SRM and the less developed TDM process including technological status, efficiency, carbon management and cost. The TDM process appears to have advantages over the well developed SRM process. It is much easier to sequester carbon as a stable solid than CO{sub 2} as a reactive gas or low temperature liquid. It is also possible to reduce cost by marketing the carbon as a filler or construction material. The potential benefits of the TDM process justifies its further efficient development. The hydrogen can be used as a transportation fuel or converted to methanol by reaction with CO{sub 2} from fossil fuel fired power plant stack gases, thus allowing reuse of the carbon in conventional IC automobile engines or in advanced fuel cell vehicles.

  19. Sensitivity of Multi-gas Climate Policy to Emission Metrics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, Steven J.; Karas, Joseph F.; Edmonds, James A.; Eom, Jiyong; Mizrahi, Andrew H.

    2013-04-01

    Multi-gas greenhouse emission targets require that different emissions be combined into an aggregate total. The Global Warming Potential (GWP) index is currently used for this purpose, despite various criticisms of the underlying concept. It is not possible to uniquely define a single metric that perfectly captures the different impacts of emissions of substances with widely disparate atmospheric lifetimes, which leads to a wide range of possible index values. We examine the sensitivity of emissions and climate outcomes to the value of the index used to aggregate methane emissions using a technologically detailed integrated assessment model. We find that the sensitivity to index value is of order 4-14% in terms of methane emissions and 2% in terms of total radiative forcing, using index values between 4 and 70 for methane, with larger regional differences in some cases. The sensitivity to index value is much higher in economic terms, with total 2-gas mitigation cost decreasing 4-5% for a lower index and increasing 10-13% for a larger index, with even larger changes if the emissions reduction targets are small. The sensitivity to index value also depends on the assumed maximum amount of mitigation available in each sector. Evaluation of the maximum mitigation potential for major sources of non-CO2 greenhouse gases would greatly aid analysis

  20. Evaluation of Efficiency Activities in the Industrial Sector Undertaken in Response to Greenhouse Gas Emission Reduction Targets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Price, Lynn

    2010-01-01

    Avoided Energy/GHG Tax Emissions trading Target Settingexits • Calculating trading group targets • Measuring energyemissions trading scheme, and a “light touch” on energy

  1. Carbon Sequestration to Mitigate Climate Change Human activities, especially the burning of fossil fuels such as coal, oil, and gas, have caused a substantial increase

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carbon Sequestration to Mitigate Climate Change Human activities, especially the burning of fossil-caused CO2 emissions and to remove CO2 from the atmosphere. 2.0 What is carbon sequestration? The term "carbon sequestration" is used to describe both natural and deliberate CARBON,INGIGATONSPERYEAR 1.5 Fossil

  2. Inoculating Multivariate Schemes Against Differential Attacks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    International Association for Cryptologic Research (IACR)

    Inoculating Multivariate Schemes Against Differential Attacks Jintai Ding and Jason E. Gower scheme the Perturbed Matsumoto-Imai-Plus (PMI+) cryptosystem. Keywords: multivariate, public key resources. Multivariate public key cryptography provides one alternative since computations in small finite

  3. Regular differentials and equidimensional scheme-maps.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1910-30-30

    Now fix a base scheme S, and restrict attention to those S-schemes Z whose ... g is smooth at f(x); and since all the relevant data are compatible with flat base.

  4. Webinar: Micro-Structural Mitigation Strategies for PEM Fuel Cells

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Video recording of the Fuel Cell Technologies Office webinar, Micro-Structural Mitigation Strategies for PEM Fuel Cells, originally presented on November 19, 2013.

  5. Mitigation of Vehicle Fast Charge Grid Impacts with Renewables...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Vehicle Fast Charge Grid Impacts with Renewables and Energy Storage Mitigation of Vehicle Fast Charge Grid Impacts with Renewables and Energy Storage 2012 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel...

  6. Passive injection: A strategy for mitigating reservoir pressurization...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Passive injection: A strategy for mitigating reservoir pressurization, induced seismicity and brine migration in geologic CO2 storage Citation Details In-Document Search Title:...

  7. Appropriate Use of Mitigation and Monitoring and Clarifying the...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    the appropriate use of mitigated "Findings of No Significant Impact" under the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA). The guidance explains the requirements of NEPA and the...

  8. Blast damage mitigation of steel structures from near- contact charges

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wolfson, Janet Crumrine

    2008-01-01

    OF CALIFORNIA, SAN DIEGO Blast Damage Mitigation of Steel35  Damage Levels Observed in LaboratoryFigure 3.34: Progression of damage for a Ballistic Loading

  9. Indonesia-Bringing a Range of Supported Mitigation Activities...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Indonesia-Bringing a Range of Supported Mitigation Activities in Selected Countries to the Next Level Jump to: navigation, search Name Indonesia-Bringing a Range of Supported...

  10. FAO Global Inventory of Agricultural Mitigation Projects in Developing...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Agricultural Mitigation Projects in Developing Countries AgencyCompany Organization: Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations Sector: Land Focus Area: Agriculture...

  11. Agricultural Technologies for Climate Change Mitigation and Adaptation...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Technologies for Climate Change Mitigation and Adaptation in Developing Countries: Policy Options for Innovations and Technology Diffusion Jump to: navigation, search Tool...

  12. Financing Climate Adaptation and Mitigation in Rural Areas of...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Financing Climate Adaptation and Mitigation in Rural Areas of Developing Countries Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Financing Climate Adaptation and...

  13. Characterizing Uncertainty for Regional Climate Change Mitigation and Adaptation Decisions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Unwin, Stephen D.; Moss, Richard H.; Rice, Jennie S.; Scott, Michael J.

    2011-09-30

    This white paper describes the results of new research to develop an uncertainty characterization process to help address the challenges of regional climate change mitigation and adaptation decisions.

  14. Natural hazard phenomena and mitigation -- 1995; PVP-Volume 308...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    hazard phenomena and mitigation -- 1995; PVP-Volume 308. DOE facilities programsdesign criteria and methods for: Impact, wave, high frequency, and seismic loads Citation...

  15. Mitigation Plans for the Microbunching-Instability-Related COTR at ASTA/FNAL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lumpkin, A. H.; Johnson, A. M.

    2013-05-01

    At the Advanced Superconducting Test Accelerator (ASTA) now under construction at Fermilab, we anticipate the appearance of the microbunching instability related to the longitudinal space charge (LSC) impedances. With a photoinjector source and up to two chicane compressors planned, the conditions should result in the shift of some microbunched features into the visible light regime. The presence of longitudinal microstructures (microbunching) in the electron beam or the leading edge spikes can result in strong, spatially localized coherent enhancements of optical transition radiation (COTR) that mask the actual beam profile. Several efforts on mitigation of the effects in the diagnostics task have been identified. At ASTA we have designed the beam profiling stations to have mitigation features based on spectral filtering, scintillator choice, and the timing of the trigger to the digital camera's CCD chip. Since the COTR is more intense in the NIR than UV we have selectable bandpass filters centered at 420 nm which also overlap the spectral emissions of the LYSO:Ce scintillators. By delaying the CCD trigger timing of the integration window by 40-50 ns, we can reject the prompt OTR signal and integrate on the delayed scintillator light predominately. This combination of options should allow mitigation of COTR enhancements of order 100-1000 in the distribution.

  16. Industrial Energy Efficiency and Climate Change Mitigation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Worrell, Ernst

    2009-01-01

    Emissions in the U.S. Pulp and Paper Industry. Berkeley, CA:for the cement and pulp and paper industries. Area b 2030opportunities in the pulp and paper industry consist of

  17. Optimization of the MOVA Undeniable Signature Scheme

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Optimization of the MOVA Undeniable Signature Scheme Jean Monnerat1 , Yvonne Anne Oswald2. This article presents optimization results on the recent MOVA undeniable signature scheme presented by Monnerat of the MOVA scheme depending on the group homomor- phism. Our optimizations focus on the quartic residue

  18. Hybrid Signcryption Schemes With Outsider Security

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dent, Alexander W.

    Hybrid Signcryption Schemes With Outsider Security (Extended Abstract) Alexander W. Dent.dent@rhul.ac.uk Abstract. This paper expands the notion of a KEM­DEM hybrid en- cryption scheme to the signcryption setting by introducing the notion of a signcryption KEM, a signcryption DEM and a hybrid signcryption scheme. We present

  19. Carbon offsets as a cost containment instrument : a case study of reducing emissions from deforestation and forest degradation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Jieun, S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2010-01-01

    Carbon offset is one type of flexibility mechanism in greenhouse gas emission trading schemes that helps nations meet their emission commitments at lower costs. Carbon offsets take advantage of lower abatement cost ...

  20. International perspectives on mitigating laboratory biorisks.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pinard, William J.; Salazar, Carlos A.

    2010-11-01

    The International Perspectives on Mitigating Laboratory Biorisks workshop, held at the Renaissance Polat Istanbul Hotel in Istanbul, Republic of Turkey, from October 25 to 27, 2010, sought to promote discussion between experts and stakeholders from around the world on issues related to the management of biological risk in laboratories. The event was organized by Sandia National Laboratories International Biological Threat Reduction program, on behalf of the US Department of State Biosecurity Engagement Program and the US Department of Defense Cooperative Biological Engagement Program. The workshop came about as a response to US Under Secretary of State Ellen O. Tauscher's statements in Geneva on December 9, 2009, during the Annual Meeting of the States Parties to the Biological Weapons Convention (BWC). Pursuant to those remarks, the workshop was intended to provide a forum for interested countries to share information on biorisk management training, standards, and needs. Over the course of the meeting's three days, participants discussed diverse topics such as the role of risk assessment in laboratory biorisk management, strategies for mitigating risk, measurement of performance and upkeep, international standards, training and building workforce competence, and the important role of government and regulation. The meeting concluded with affirmations of the utility of international cooperation in this sphere and recognition of positive prospects for the future. The workshop was organized as a series of short presentations by international experts on the field of biorisk management, followed by breakout sessions in which participants were divided into four groups and urged to discuss a particular topic with the aid of a facilitator and a set of guiding questions. Rapporteurs were present during the plenary session as well as breakout sessions and in particular were tasked with taking notes during discussions and reporting back to the assembled participants a brief summary of points discussed. The presentations and breakout sessions were divided into five topic areas: 'Challenges in Biorisk Management,' 'Risk Assessment and Mitigation Measures,' 'Biorisk Management System Performance,' 'Training,' and 'National Oversight and Regulations.' The topics and questions were chosen by the organizers through consultation with US Government sponsors. The Chattham House Rule on non-attribution was in effect during question and answer periods and breakout session discussions.

  1. America's Bottom-Up Climate Change Mitigation Policy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lutsey, Nicholas P.; Sperling, Dan

    2008-01-01

    and developing emissions trading mechanisms to connect andand development of emissions trading or cap-and-tradesector market-based emissions trading system in the Western

  2. Mitigation potential and cost in tropical forestry - relative role for agroforestry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Makundi, Willy R.; Sathaye, Jayant A.

    2004-01-01

    This paper summarizes studies of carbon mitigation potential (MP) and costs of forestry options in seven developing countries with a focus on the role of agroforestry. A common methodological approach known as comprehensive mitigation assessment process (COMAP) was used in each study to estimate the potential and costs between 2000 and 2030. The approach requires the projection of baseline and mitigation land-use scenarios derived from the demand for forest products and forestland for other uses such as agriculture and pasture. By using data on estimated carbon sequestration, emission avoidance, costs and benefits, the model enables one to estimate cost effectiveness indicators based on monetary benefit per t C, as well as estimates of total mitigation costs and potential when the activities are implemented at equilibrium level. The results show that about half the MP of 6.9 Gt C (an average of 223 Mt C per year) between 2000 and 2030 in the seven countries could be achieved at a negative cost, and the other half at costs not exceeding $100 per t C. Negative cost indicates that non-carbon revenue is sufficient to offset direct costs of about half of the options. The agroforestry options analyzed bear a significant proportion of the potential at medium to low cost per t C when compared to other options. The role of agroforestry in these countries varied between 6% and 21% of the MP, though the options are much more cost effective than most due to the low wage or opportunity cost of rural labor. Agroforestry options are attractive due to the large number of people and potential area currently engaged in agriculture, but they pose unique challenges for carbon and cost accounting due to the dispersed nature of agricultural activities in the tropics, as well as specific difficulties arising from requirements for monitoring, verification, leakage assessment and the establishment of credible baselines.

  3. A fast stratospheric ozone chemistry schemeA fast stratospheric ozone chemistry scheme Michel Bourqui1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bourqui, Michel

    A fast stratospheric ozone chemistry schemeA fast stratospheric ozone chemistry scheme Michel a computationally efficient chemical scheme, the FAst STratospheric Ozone Chemistry (FASTOC) scheme, which has advantages over many existing fast methods, as it does not rely on relaxation to assumed conditions, does

  4. Meeting the Demand for Biofuels: Impact on Land Use and Carbon Mitigation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khanna, Madhu; Jain, Atul; Onal, Hayri; Scheffran, Jurgen; Chen, Xiaoguang; Erickson, Matt; Huang, Haixiao; Kang, Seungmo.

    2011-08-14

    The purpose of this research was to develop an integrated, interdisciplinary framework to investigate the implications of large scale production of biofuels for land use, crop production, farm income and greenhouse gases. In particular, we examine the mix of feedstocks that would be viable for biofuel production and the spatial allocation of land required for producing these feedstocks at various gasoline and carbon emission prices as well as biofuel subsidy levels. The implication of interactions between energy policy that seeks energy independence from foreign oil and climate policy that seeks to mitigate greenhouse gas emissions for the optimal mix of biofuels and land use will also be investigated. This project contributes to the ELSI research goals of sustainable biofuel production while balancing competing demands for land and developing policy approaches needed to support biofuel production in a cost-effective and environmentally friendly manner.

  5. Mitigation of Malicious Attacks on Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schneider, Christian M; Andrade, Jose S; Havlin, Shlomo; Herrmann, Hans J; 10.1073/pnas.1009440108

    2011-01-01

    Terrorist attacks on transportation networks have traumatized modern societies. With a single blast, it has become possible to paralyze airline traffic, electric power supply, ground transportation or Internet communication. How and at which cost can one restructure the network such that it will become more robust against a malicious attack? We introduce a unique measure for robustness and use it to devise a method to mitigate economically and efficiently this risk. We demonstrate its efficiency on the European electricity system and on the Internet as well as on complex networks models. We show that with small changes in the network structure (low cost) the robustness of diverse networks can be improved dramatically while their functionality remains unchanged. Our results are useful not only for improving significantly with low cost the robustness of existing infrastructures but also for designing economically robust network systems.

  6. Mitigation of radiation induced surface contamination

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Klebanoff, Leonard E. (Dublin, CA); Stulen, Richard H. (Livermore, CA)

    2003-01-01

    A process for mitigating or eliminating contamination and/or degradation of surfaces having common, adventitious atmospheric contaminants adsorbed thereon and exposed to radiation. A gas or a mixture of gases is introduced into the environment of a surface(s) to be protected. The choice of the gaseous species to be introduced (typically a hydrocarbon gas, water vapor, or oxygen or mixtures thereof) is dependent upon the contaminant as well as the ability of the gaseous species to bind to the surface to be protected. When the surface and associated bound species are exposed to radiation reactive species are formed that react with surface contaminants such as carbon or oxide films to form volatile products (e.g., CO, CO.sub.2) which desorb from the surface.

  7. Pre-Disaster Mitigation Plan Montana State University -Bozeman

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maxwell, Bruce D.

    ) - Bozeman PDM Plan identifies the potential hazards that the campus faces and assesses the vulnerability Projects Database and FCI Reports as they relate to life safety issues #12;Pre-Disaster Mitigation Plan-structural mitigation practices. Install seismic shut-off valves on buildings with natural gas. Develop plans

  8. Tillman Creek Mitigation Site As-Build Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gresham, Doug [Otak, Inc.

    2009-05-29

    This as-built report describes site conditions at the Tillman Creek mitigation site in South Cle Elum, Washington. This mitigation site was constructed in 2006-2007 to compensate for wetland impacts from the Yakama Nation hatchery. This as-built report provides information on the construction sequence, as-built survey, and establishment of baseline monitoring stations.

  9. Mitigation of Sounding Pilot Contamination in Massive MIMO Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bahk, Saewoong

    Mitigation of Sounding Pilot Contamination in Massive MIMO Systems Taeseop Lee, Hyung-Sin Kim contamination of cell edge users or a lowered number of serviced users in a multi-cell scenario. In this paper the quality of service (QoS) of mobile users by mitigating the pilot contamination as well as minimize

  10. Numerical modelling of tsunami mitigation by mangroves Putu Harry Gunawan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mancini, Simona

    Numerical modelling of tsunami mitigation by mangroves Putu Harry Gunawan LAMA (Laboratoire d'Analyse et de Mathmatiques Appliques) UPEM putu-harry.gunawan@univ.paris-est.fr Abstract Figure 1: Mangrove-Tsunami Model. The role of mangroves (coastal forests) in the mitigation of tsunami impacts is a debated topic

  11. Innovative Grid Technologies Applied to Bioinformatics and Hurricane Mitigation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sadjadi, S. Masoud

    Innovative Grid Technologies Applied to Bioinformatics and Hurricane Mitigation Rosa BADIA a Gargi and hurricane mitigation. This paper describes some of these innovative technologies, such as the support to provide solutions to pharmagenomics problems and hurricane prediction ensemble simulations. Keywords. Meta

  12. Libby Mitigation Program, 2007 Annual Progress Report: Mitigation for the Construction and Operation of Libby Dam.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dunnigan, James; DeShazer, J.; Garrow, L.

    2009-05-26

    Libby Reservoir was created under an International Columbia River Treaty between the United States and Canada for cooperative water development of the Columbia River Basin (Columbia River Treaty 1964). Libby Reservoir inundated 109 stream miles of the mainstem Kootenai River in the United States and Canada, and 40 miles of tributary streams in the U.S. that provided habitat for spawning, juvenile rearing, and migratory passage (Figure 1). The authorized purpose of the dam is to provide power (91.5%), flood control (8.3%), and navigation and other benefits (0.2%; Storm et al. 1982). The Pacific Northwest Power Act of 1980 recognized possible conflicts stemming from hydroelectric projects in the northwest and directed Bonneville Power Administration to 'protect, mitigate, and enhance fish and wildlife to the extent affected by the development and operation of any hydroelectric project of the Columbia River and its tributaries' (4(h)(10)(A)). Under the Act, the Northwest Power Planning Council was created and recommendations for a comprehensive fish and wildlife program were solicited from the region's federal, state, and tribal fish and wildlife agencies. Among Montana's recommendations was the proposal that research be initiated to quantify acceptable seasonal minimum pool elevations to maintain or enhance the existing fisheries (Graham et al. 1982). Research to determine how operations of Libby Dam affect the reservoir and river fishery and to suggest ways to lessen these effects began in May 1983. The framework for the Libby Reservoir Model (LRMOD) was completed in 1989. Development of Integrated Rule Curves (IRCs) for Libby Dam operation was completed in 1996 (Marotz et al. 1996). The Libby Reservoir Model and the IRCs continue to be refined (Marotz et al 1999). Initiation of mitigation projects such as lake rehabilitation and stream restoration began in 1996. The primary focus of the Libby Mitigation project now is to restore the fisheries and fish habitat in basin streams and lakes. 'Mitigation for the Construction and Operation of Libby Dam' is part of the Northwest Power and Conservation Council's (NPCC) resident fish and wildlife program. The program was mandated by the Northwest Planning Act of 1980, and is responsible for mitigating damages to fish and wildlife caused by hydroelectric development in the Columbia River Basin. The objective of Phase I of the project (1983 through 1987) was to maintain or enhance the Libby Reservoir fishery by quantifying seasonal water levels and developing ecologically sound operational guidelines. The objective of Phase II of the project (1988 through 1996) was to determine the biological effects of reservoir operations combined with biotic changes associated with an aging reservoir. The objectives of Phase III of the project (1996 through present) are to implement habitat enhancement measures to mitigate for dam effects, to provide data for implementation of operational strategies that benefit resident fish, monitor reservoir and river conditions, and monitor mitigation projects for effectiveness. This project completes urgent and high priority mitigation actions as directed by the Kootenai Subbasin Plan.

  13. The lifetime of carbon capture and storage as a climate-change mitigation technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Juanes, Ruben

    2013-12-30

    In carbon capture and storage (CCS), CO2 is captured at power plants and then injected underground into reservoirs like deep saline aquifers for long-term storage. While CCS may be critical for the continued use of fossil fuels in a carbon-constrained world, the deployment of CCS has been hindered by uncertainty in geologic storage capacities and sustainable injection rates, which has contributed to the absence of concerted government policy. Here, we clarify the potential of CCS to mitigate emissions in the United States by developing a storage-capacity supply curve that, unlike current large-scale capacity estimates, is derived from the fluid mechanics of CO2 injection and trapping and incorporates injection-rate constraints. We show that storage supply is a dynamic quantity that grows with the duration of CCS, and we interpret the lifetime of CCS as the time for which the storage supply curve exceeds the storage demand curve from CO2 production. We show that in the United States, if CO2 production from power generation continues to rise at recent rates, then CCS can store enough CO2 to stabilize emissions at current levels for at least 100 years. This result suggests that the large-scale implementation of CCS is a geologically viable climate-change mitigation option in the United States over the next century.

  14. List of Texas Fuel Mitigation Vendors This list of fuel mitigation vendors that offer services in Texas is divided into two groups

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    List of Texas Fuel Mitigation Vendors This list of fuel mitigation vendors that offer services as a service to communities and landowners seeking assistance with fuel mitigation practices on their land/5/2015 #12;List of Fuel Mitigation Vendorscontinued Texas A&M Forest Service Austin Land Service Austin Wod

  15. Kyotoforcommuters Offset schemes are a small but potentially useful addition to the carbon balance sheet.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cai, Long

    Kyotoforcommuters Offset schemes are a small but potentially useful addition to the carbon balance emissions in regions of the world where it is inexpensive to do so: for example, households in India or Peru address the issue. Consumers of goods and services that depend on the burning of fossil fuels also have

  16. An Economic Exploration of Biofuel basedAn Economic Exploration of Biofuel based Greenhouse Gas Emission MitigationGreenhouse Gas Emission Mitigation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCarl, Bruce A.

    Economics Texas A&M University Presented at Workshop on Agriculture as a Producer and Consumer of Energy El-Halwgi, TAMU Heng-Chi Lee, University of Western Ontario Dhazn Gillig, AMEX Xiaoyun Qin , TAMU #12, Crop mix Look at market and time conditions under which strategies dominate Educate on needed scope

  17. America's Bottom-Up Climate Change Mitigation Policy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lutsey, Nicholas P.; Sperling, Dan

    2008-01-01

    develop renewable energy credit-tracking and trading systemenergy and emissions technologies, and development of emissions trading

  18. The role of US agricultural and forest activities in global climate change mitigation 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhu, En

    2009-05-15

    cost strategies to help with this mitigation principally through carbon sequestration but must be competitive with mitigation costs in the rest of the economy. A general equilibrium approach is used herein to evaluate the role of AF mitigation...

  19. Wildlife and Wildlife Habitat Mitigation Plan for Libby Hydroelectric Project, Final Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mundinger, John

    1985-01-01

    This report describes the proposed mitigation plan for wildlife losses attributable to the construction of the Libby hydroelectric project. Mitigation objectives and alternatives, the recommended mitigation projects, and the crediting system for each project are described by each target species. The report describes mitigation that has already taken place and 8 recommended mitigation projects designed to complete total wildlife mitigation. 8 refs., 2 figs., 12 tabs.

  20. Diesel engine emissions reduction by multiple injections having increasing pressure

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Reitz, Rolf D. (Madison, WI); Thiel, Matthew P. (Madison, WI)

    2003-01-01

    Multiple fuel charges are injected into a diesel engine combustion chamber during a combustion cycle, and each charge after the first has successively greater injection pressure (a higher injection rate) than the prior charge. This injection scheme results in reduced emissions, particularly particulate emissions, and can be implemented by modifying existing injection system hardware. Further enhancements in emissions reduction and engine performance can be obtained by using known measures in conjunction with the invention, such as Exhaust Gas Recirculation (EGR).

  1. Climate Change Mitigation Through Land-Use Measures in the Agriculture...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Climate Change Mitigation Through Land-Use Measures in the Agriculture and Forestry Sectors Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Climate Change Mitigation...

  2. DISTINGUISHING SCHEMES AND TASKS IN CHILDREN'S ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pedro Gomez

    2013-03-27

    links among schemes—conceptual structures and operations children ..... blueprint supports curriculum design can be found in the software that we have.

  3. High-Order Energy Stable WENO Schemes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A third-order Energy Stable Weighted Essentially Non--Oscillatory (ESWENO) finite difference scheme developed by the authors of the paper [N. K. Yamaleev ...

  4. ENHANCED PRACTICAL PHOTOSYNTHETIC CO2 MITIGATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dr. David J. Bayless; Dr. Morgan Vis; Dr. Gregory Kremer; Dr. Michael Prudich; Dr. Keith Cooksey; Dr. Jeff Muhs

    2001-01-16

    This is the first quarterly report of the project Enhanced Practical Photosynthetic CO{sub 2} Mitigation. The official project start date, 10/02/2000, was delayed until 10/31/2000 due to an intellectual property dispute that was resolved. However, the delay forced a subsequent delay in subcontracting with Montana State University, which then delayed obtaining a sampling permit from Yellowstone National Park. However, even with these delays, the project moved forward with some success. Accomplishments for this quarter include: Culturing of thermophilic organisms from Yellowstone; Testing of mesophilic organisms in extreme CO{sub 2} conditions; Construction of a second test bed for additional testing; Purchase of a total carbon analyzer dedicated to the project; Construction of a lighting container for Oak Ridge National Laboratory optical fiber testing; Modified lighting of existing test box to provide more uniform distribution; Testing of growth surface adhesion and properties; Experimentation on water-jet harvesting techniques; and Literature review underway regarding uses of biomass after harvesting. Plans for next quarter's work and an update on the project's web page are included in the conclusions.

  5. Equity and Emissions Trading in China Da Zhang, Marco Springmann and Valerie Karplus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Equity and Emissions Trading in China Da Zhang, Marco Springmann and Valerie Karplus Report No. 257 and Emissions Trading in China Da Zhang* , Marco Springmann§ , and Valerie Karplus Abstract China has embarked analyze the distributional aspects of a Chinese emissions-trading scheme from ethical, economic

  6. Carbon permit prices in the European emissions trading system : a stochastic analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    See, Wee Chiang

    2005-01-01

    The Emission Trading Scheme (ETS) is a cornerstone for European efforts to reduce greenhouse gas emissions, and in its test phase will operate from 2005-2007. It is a cap-and-trade system where an aggregate cap on emissions ...

  7. Price relationships in the EU emissions trading system Julien Chevallier1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1 Price relationships in the EU emissions trading system Julien Chevallier1 Université Paris Dauphine Abstract The Emissions Trading Scheme (ETS) constrains industrial polluters to buy/sell CO2 the price relationships in the EU emissions trading system. The United Nations Framework Convention

  8. Briefing Note 2010 -2 Tax Fraud from Emissions Trading in the European Union

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pedersen, Tom

    Briefing Note 2010 - 2 7 May 2010 Tax Fraud from Emissions Trading in the European Union Neil Tansey and Ivan Watson Issue The European Union Emissions Trading Scheme (EU ETS) began in 2005 as the largest multi-country and multi-sector greenhouse gas emissions trading system in the world by volume

  9. Carbon Permit Prices in the European Emissions Trading System: A Stochastic Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carbon Permit Prices in the European Emissions Trading System: A Stochastic Analysis By Wee Chiang, Technology and Policy Program 1 #12;Carbon Permit Prices in the European Emissions Trading System Abstract The Emission Trading Scheme (ETS) is a cornerstone for European efforts to reduce greenhouse gas

  10. The Clean Development Mechanism and CER Price Formation in the Carbon Emission

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carmona, Rene

    . The first is emission trading. Based on the success of the SOx and NOx markets set up in the US in the 1980sThe Clean Development Mechanism and CER Price Formation in the Carbon Emission Markets Ren such as the European Union Emissions Trading Scheme (EU ETS) and offset certificates such as CERs generated within

  11. Impact of Geoengineering Schemes on the Global Hydrological Cycle

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bala, G; Duffy, P; Taylor, K

    2007-12-07

    The rapidly rising CO{sub 2} level in the atmosphere has led to proposals of climate stabilization via 'Geoengineering' schemes that would mitigate climate change by intentionally reducing the solar radiation incident on earth's surface. In this paper, we address the impact of these climate stabilization schemes on the global hydrological cycle, using equilibrium simulations from an atmospheric general circulation model coupled to a slab ocean model. We show that insolation reductions sufficient to offset global-scale temperature increases lead to a decrease in the intensity of the global hydrologic cycle. This occurs because solar forcing is more effective in driving changes in global mean evaporation than is CO{sub 2} forcing of a similar magnitude. In the model used here, the hydrologic sensitivity, defined as the percentage change in global mean precipitation per degree warming, is 2.4% for solar forcing, but only 1.5% for CO{sub 2} forcing. Although other models and the climate system itself may differ quantitatively from this result, the conclusion can be understood based on simple considerations of the surface energy budget and thus is likely to be robust. Compared to changing temperature by altering greenhouse gas concentrations, changing temperature by varying insolation results in larger changes in net radiative fluxes at the surface; these are compensated by larger changes in latent and sensible heat fluxes. Hence the hydrological cycle is more sensitive to temperature adjustment via changes in insolation than changes in greenhouse gases. This implies that an alteration in solar forcing might offset temperature changes or hydrological changes from greenhouse warming, but could not cancel both at once.

  12. Local Promise for Climate Mitigation: An Empirical Assessment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feiock, Richard C.; Outka, Uma

    2012-01-01

    This interdisciplinary work contributes empirical grounding to the growing literature in law and public policy on local governments and climate mitigation. Much of the recent scholarship presents an optimistic view of the potential in local climate...

  13. Gearbox Typical Failure Modes, Detection, and Mitigation Methods (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sheng, S.

    2014-01-01

    This presentation was given at the AWEA Operations & Maintenance and Safety Seminar and focused on what the typical gearbox failure modes are, how to detect them using detection techniques, and strategies that help mitigate these failures.

  14. EA-1096: Washington Wildlife Mitigation Projects (Programmatic), Washington

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of the proposal for the U.S. Department of Energy Bonneville Power Administration to fund the portion of the Washington Wildlife Mitigation Agreement...

  15. Analysis and Design of New Harmonic Mitigation Approaches 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aeloiza Matus, Eddy 1972-

    2012-11-01

    are analyzed. Finally, some methods to mitigate the low frequency circulating currents based on eliminating the zero-sequence component, and the introduction of common mode inductors to reduce the high frequency circulating current are studied. Without a doubt...

  16. Centrifuge Modelling of the Performance of Liquefaction Mitigation Measures for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Centrifuge Modelling of the Performance of Liquefaction Mitigation Measures for Shallow Foundations Centrifuge Stored Angular Momentum Actuator Equivalent Shear Beam Container Automatic Sand Pourer Hostun Sand Methylcellulose 3 #12;Experimental Techniques and Materials 10 m Turner Beam Centrifuge Stored

  17. Introduction to Administrative Programs that Mitigate the Insider Threat

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gerke, Gretchen K.; Rogers, Erin; Landers, John; DeCastro, Kara

    2012-09-01

    This presentation begins with the reality of the insider threat, then elaborates on these tools to mitigate the insider threat: Human Reliability Program (HRP); Nuclear Security Culture (NSC) Program; Employee Assistance Program (EAP).

  18. Finite volume renormalization scheme for fermionic operators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Monahan, Christopher; Orginos, Kostas [JLAB

    2013-11-01

    We propose a new finite volume renormalization scheme. Our scheme is based on the Gradient Flow applied to both fermion and gauge fields and, much like the Schr\\"odinger functional method, allows for a nonperturbative determination of the scale dependence of operators using a step-scaling approach. We give some preliminary results for the pseudo-scalar density in the quenched approximation.

  19. Year in Industry Scheme The Year in Industry Scheme allows you to spend

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haase, Markus

    Year in Industry Scheme The Year in Industry Scheme allows you to spend your third year in full whether or not to transfer to this scheme during your second year. To be allowed to make the transfer, you must do sufficiently well in your year 1 and 2 examinations; a typical grade average of at least 55

  20. 2011 River Corridor Closure Contractor Revegetation and Mitigation Monitoring Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    West, W. J.; Lucas, J. G.; Gano, K. A.

    2011-11-14

    This report documents the status of revegetation projects and natural resources mitigation efforts conducted for remediated waste sites and other activities associated with the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 cleanup of National Priorities List waste sites at Hanford. This report contains the vegetation monitoring data that was collected in the spring and summer of 2011 from the River Corridor Closure Contractor’s revegetation and mitigation areas on the Hanford Site.

  1. 2010 River Corridor Closure Contractor Revegetation and Mitigation Monitoring Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    C. T. Lindsey, A. L. Johnson

    2010-09-30

    This report documents eh status of revegetation projects and natural resources mitigation efforts conducted for remediated waste sites and other activities associated with CERLA cleanup of National Priorities List waste sites at Hanford. This report contains vegetation monitoring data that were collected in the spring and summer of 2010 from the River Corridor Closure Contract’s revegetation and mitigation areas on the Hanford Site.

  2. Peaking of world oil production: Impacts, mitigation, & risk management

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hirsch, R.L.; Bezdek, Roger; Wendling, Robert

    2005-02-01

    The peaking of world oil production presents the U.S. and the world with an unprecedented risk management problem. As peaking is approached, liquid fuel prices and price volatility will increase dramatically, and, without timely mitigation, the economic, social, and political costs will be unprecedented. Viable mitigation options exist on both the supply and demand sides, but to have substantial impact, they must be initiated more than a decade in advance of peaking.... The purpose of this analysis was to identify the critical issues surrounding the occurrence and mitigation of world oil production peaking. We simplified many of the complexities in an effort to provide a transparent analysis. Nevertheless, our study is neither simple nor brief. We recognize that when oil prices escalate dramatically, there will be demand and economic impacts that will alter our simplified assumptions. Consideration of those feedbacks will be a daunting task but one that should be undertaken. Our aim in this study is to-- • Summarize the difficulties of oil production forecasting; • Identify the fundamentals that show why world oil production peaking is such a unique challenge; • Show why mitigation will take a decade or more of intense effort; • Examine the potential economic effects of oil peaking; • Describe what might be accomplished under three example mitigation scenarios. • Stimulate serious discussion of the problem, suggest more definitive studies, and engender interest in timely action to mitigate its impacts.

  3. Release mitigation spray safety systems for chemical demilitarization applications.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leonard, Jonathan; Tezak, Matthew Stephen; Brockmann, John E.; Servantes, Brandon; Sanchez, Andres L.; Tucker, Mark David; Allen, Ashley N.; Wilson, Mollye C.; Lucero, Daniel A.; Betty, Rita G.

    2010-06-01

    Sandia National Laboratories has conducted proof-of-concept experiments demonstrating effective knockdown and neutralization of aerosolized CBW simulants using charged DF-200 decontaminant sprays. DF-200 is an aqueous decontaminant, developed by Sandia National Laboratories, and procured and fielded by the US Military. Of significance is the potential application of this fundamental technology to numerous applications including mitigation and neutralization of releases arising during chemical demilitarization operations. A release mitigation spray safety system will remove airborne contaminants from an accidental release during operations, to protect personnel and limit contamination. Sandia National Laboratories recently (November, 2008) secured funding from the US Army's Program Manager for Non-Stockpile Chemical Materials Agency (PMNSCMA) to investigate use of mitigation spray systems for chemical demilitarization applications. For non-stockpile processes, mitigation spray systems co-located with the current Explosive Destruction System (EDS) will provide security both as an operational protective measure and in the event of an accidental release. Additionally, 'tented' mitigation spray systems for native or foreign remediation and recovery operations will contain accidental releases arising from removal of underground, unstable CBW munitions. A mitigation spray system for highly controlled stockpile operations will provide defense from accidental spills or leaks during routine procedures.

  4. A statistical approach to designing mitigation for induced ac voltages

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dabkowski, J. [Electro Sciences, Inc., Crystal Lake, IL (United States)

    1996-08-01

    Induced voltage levels on buried pipelines collocated with overhead electric power transmission lines are usually mitigated by means of grounding the pipeline. Maximum effectiveness is obtained when grounds are placed at discrete locations along the pipeline where the peak induced voltages occur. The degree of mitigation achieved is dependent upon the local soil resistivity at these locations. On occasion it may be necessary to employ an extensive distributed grounding system, for example, a parallel buried wire connected to the pipe at periodic intervals. In this situation the a priori calculation of mitigated voltage levels is sometimes made assuming an average value for the soil resistivity. Over long distances, however, the soil resistivity generally varies as a log-normally distributed random variable. The effect of this variability upon the predicted mitigated voltage levels is examined. It is found that the predicted levels exhibit a statistical variability which precludes a precise determination of the mitigated voltage levels. Thus, post commissioning testing of the emplaced mitigation system is advisable.

  5. Enhanced practical photosynthetic CO2 mitigation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bayless, David J.; Vis-Chiasson, Morgan L.; Kremer, Gregory G.

    2003-12-23

    This process is unique in photosynthetic carbon sequestration. An on-site biological sequestration system directly decreases the concentration of carbon-containing compounds in the emissions of fossil generation units. In this process, photosynthetic microbes are attached to a growth surface arranged in a containment chamber that is lit by solar photons. A harvesting system ensures maximum organism growth and rate of CO.sub.2 uptake. Soluble carbon and nitrogen concentrations delivered to the cyanobacteria are enhanced, further increasing growth rate and carbon utilization.

  6. Massive Gas Injection Experiments at JET – Performance and Characterisation of the Disruption Mitigation Valve

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massive Gas Injection Experiments at JET – Performance and Characterisation of the Disruption Mitigation Valve

  7. An International Environmental Agreement for Space Debris Mitigation Among Asymmetric Nations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Singer, Michael Jay

    2012-01-01

    IEA model . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .IEA model framework . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Application of IEA Model to Debris Mitigation Elements of

  8. Hellsgate Big Game Winter Range Wildlife Mitigation Site Specific Management Plan for the Hellsgate Project.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berger, Matthew T.; Judd, Steven L.

    1999-01-01

    This report contains a detailed site-specific management plan for the Hellsgate Winter Range Wildlife Mitigation Project. The report provides background information about the mitigation process, the review process, mitigation acquisitions, Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) and mitigation crediting, current habitat conditions, desired future habitat conditions, restoration/enhancements efforts and maps.

  9. Spectral Emission of Moving Atom

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. X. Zheng-Johansson

    2008-03-17

    A renewed analysis of the H.E. Ives and G.R. Stilwell's experiment on moving hydrogen canal rays (J. Opt. Soc. Am., 1938, v.28, 215) concludes that the spectral emission of a moving atom exhibits always a redshift which informs not the direction of the atom's motion. The conclusion is also evident from a simple energy relation: atomic spectral radiation is emitted as an orbiting electron consumes a portion of its internal energy on transiting to a lower-energy state which however has in a moving atom an additional energy gain; this results in a redshift in the emission frequency. Based on auxiliary experimental information and a scheme for de Broglie particle formation, we give a vigorous elucidation of the mechanism for deceleration radiation of atomic electron; the corresponding prediction of the redshift is in complete agreement with the Ives and Stilwell's experimental formula.

  10. Can reducing black carbon emissions counteract global warming?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tami C. Bond; Haolin Sun

    2005-08-15

    Field measurements and model results have recently shown that aerosols may have important climatic impacts. One line of inquiry has investigated whether reducing climate-warming soot or black carbon aerosol emissions can form a viable component of mitigating global warming. Black carbon is produced by poor combustion, from our example hard coal cooking fires for and industrial pulverized coal boilers. The authors review and acknowledge scientific arguments against considering aerosols and greenhouse gases in a common framework, including the differences in the physical mechanisms of climate change and relevant time scales. It is argued that such a joint consideration is consistent with the language of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change. Results from published climate-modeling studies are synthesized to obtain a global warming potential for black carbon relative to that of CO{sub 2} (680 on a 100 year basis). This calculation enables a discussion of cost-effectiveness for mitigating the largest sources of black carbon. It is found that many emission reductions are either expensive or difficult to enact when compared with greenhouse gases, particularly in Annex I countries. Finally, a role for black carbon in climate mitigation strategies is proposed that is consistent with the apparently conflicting arguments raised during the discussion. Addressing these emissions is a promising way to reduce climatic interference primarily for nations that have not yet agreed to address greenhouse gas emissions and provides the potential for a parallel climate agreement. 31 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  11. Saving Fuel, Reducing Emissions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kammen, Daniel M.; Arons, Samuel M.; Lemoine, Derek M.; Hummel, Holmes

    2009-01-01

    lower greenhouse gas emissions from electricity productionAssessment of Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Plug-in Hybridof national greenhouse gas emissions. Both motor vehicle

  12. Simulation of tokamak SOL and divertor region including heat flux mitigation by gas puffing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Park, Jin Woo [Seoul National University, Seoul, S. Korea; Na, Y. S. [Seoul National University, Seoul, S. Korea; Hong, S. H. [National Fusion Research Institute, Daejon, South Korea; Ahn, J.W. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Kim, D. K. [Agency Def Dev, Taejon, South Korea; Han, Hyunsun [National Fusion Research Institute, Taejon, South Korea; Shim, Seong Bo [Pusan National University, Busan, Korea; Lee, Hae June [Pusan National University, Busan, Korea

    2012-01-01

    Two-dimensional (2D), scrape-off layer (SOL)-divertor transport simulations are performed using the integrated plasma-neutral-impurity code KTRAN developed at Seoul National University. Firstly, the code is applied to reproduce a National Spherical Torus eXperiment (NSTX) discharge by using the prescribed transport coefficients and the boundary conditions obtained from the experiment. The plasma density, the heat flux on the divertor plate, and the D (alpha) emission rate profiles from the numerical simulation are found to follow experimental trends qualitatively. Secondly, predictive simulations are carried out for the baseline operation mode in Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research (KSTAR) to predict the heat flux on the divertor target plates. The stationary peak heat flux in the KSTAR baseline operation mode is expected to be 6.5 MW/m(2) in the case of an orthogonal divertor. To study the mitigation of the heat flux, we investigated the puffing effects of deuterium and argon gases. The puffing position is assumed to be in front of the strike point at the outer lower divertor plate. In the simulations, mitigation of the peak heat flux at the divertor target plates is found to occur when the gas puffing rate exceeds certain values, similar to 1.0 x 10(20) /s and similar to 5.0 x 10(18) /s for deuterium and argon, respectively. Multi-charged impurity transport is also investigated for both NSTX and KSTAR SOL and divertor regions.

  13. Effect of Wind Intermittency on the Electric Grid: Mitigating the Risk of Energy Deficits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    George, Sam O; Nguyen, Scott V

    2010-01-01

    Successful implementation of California's Renewable Portfolio Standard (RPS) mandating 33 percent renewable energy generation by 2020 requires inclusion of a robust strategy to mitigate increased risk of energy deficits (blackouts) due to short time-scale (sub 1 hour) intermittencies in renewable energy sources. Of these RPS sources, wind energy has the fastest growth rate--over 25% year-over-year. If these growth trends continue, wind energy could make up 15 percent of California's energy portfolio by 2016 (wRPS15). However, the hour-to-hour variations in wind energy (speed) will create large hourly energy deficits that require installation of other, more predictable, compensation generation capacity and infrastructure. Compensating for the energy deficits of wRPS15 could potentially cost tens of billions in additional dollar-expenditure for fossil and / or nuclear generation capacity. There is a real possibility that carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gas (GHG) emission reductions will miss the California ...

  14. Topology optimization of building bracing schemes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goo, Zhen John

    2013-01-01

    The thesis presents a technique for producing economical solutions for conventional structural steel frames using topology optimization on the lateral bracing scheme. The study focuses mainly on minimizing the amount of ...

  15. AN ASYMPTOTIC-PRESERVING SCHEME FOR THE ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2015-07-06

    We present a new asymptotic-preserving scheme for the semicon- ductor Boltzmann ... we propose an alternative based on a splitting approach. It has the ... depending on the device structure. ?(k) is the energy-band diagram given by (

  16. Bonneville Power Administration Wildlife Mitigation Program : Draft Environmental Impact Statement.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    1996-08-01

    Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) is responsible for mitigating the loss of wildlife habitat caused by the development of the Federal Columbia River Power System. BPA accomplishes this mitigation by funding projects consistent with those recommended by the Northwest Power Planning Council (Council). The projects are submitted to the Council from Indian Tribes, state agencies, property owners, private conservation groups, and other Federal agencies. Future wildlife mitigation actions with potential environmental impacts are expected to include land acquisition and management, water rights acquisition and management, habitat restoration and enhancement, installation of watering devices, riparian fencing, and similar wildlife conservation actions. BPA needs to ensure that individual wildlife mitigation projects are planned and managed with appropriate consistency across projects, jurisdictions, and ecosystems, as well as across time. BPA proposes to standardize the planning and implementation of individual wildlife mitigation projects funded by BPA. Alternative 1 is the No Action alternative. Five standardizing alternatives are identified to represent the range of possible strategies, goals, and procedural requirements reasonably applicable to BPA-funded projects under a standardized approach to project planning and implementation. All action alternatives are based on a single project planning process designed to resolve site-specific issues in an ecosystem context and to adapt to changing conditions and information.

  17. Adaptive Resource Management Schemes for Web Services 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Heung Ki

    2011-02-22

    MANAGEMENT SCHEMES FOR WEB SERVICES A Dissertation by HEUNG KI LEE Submitted to the O?ce of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulflllment of the requirements for the degree of DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY December 2009 Major Subject: Computer...: Chair of Committee, Eun Jung Kim Committee Members, Riccardo Bettati Rabi N. Mahapatra Deepa Kundur Ki Hwan Yum Head of Department, Valerie E. Taylor December 2009 Major Subject: Computer Science iii ABSTRACT Adaptive Resource Management Schemes for Web...

  18. ENHANCED PRACTICAL PHOTOSYNTHETIC CO2 MITIGATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dr. Gregory Kremer; Dr. David J. Bayless; Dr. Morgan Vis; Dr. Michael Prudich; Dr. Keith Cooksey; Dr. Jeff Muhs

    2001-10-15

    This report documents significant achievements in the Enhanced Practical Photosynthetic CO{sub 2} Mitigation project during the period from 10/03/2000 through 10/02/2001. Most of the achievements are milestones in our efforts to complete the tasks and subtasks that constitute the project objectives. This is the fourth quarterly report for this project, so it also serves as a year-1 project review. We have made significant progress on our Phase I objectives, and our current efforts are focused on fulfilling these research objectives ''on time'' relative to the project timeline. Overall, we believe that we are on schedule to complete Phase I activities by 10/2002, which is the milestone date from the original project timeline. Our results to date concerning the individual factors which have the most significant effect on CO{sub 2} uptake are inconclusive, but we have gathered useful information about the effects of lighting, temperature and CO{sub 2} concentration on one particular organism (Nostoc) and significant progress has been made in identifying other organisms that are more suitable for use in the bioreactor due to their better tolerance for the high temperatures likely to be encountered in the flue gas stream. Our current tests are focused on one such thermophilic organism (Cyanidium), and an enlarged bioreactor system (CRF-2) has been prepared for testing this organism. Tests on the enhanced mass transfer CO{sub 2} absorption technique are underway and useful information is currently being collected concerning pressure drop. The solar collectors for the deep-penetration hybrid solar lighting system have been designed and a single solar collector tracking unit is being prepared for installation in the pilot scale bioreactor system currently under construction. Much progress has been made in designing the fiber optic light delivery system, but final selection of the ''optimum'' delivery system design depends on many factors, most significantly the configuration and orientation of the growth surfaces in the bioreactor. For the growth surface subsystem we have identified advantages and disadvantages for several candidate growth surface materials, we have built and tested various ''screen'' systems and fluid delivery systems, and we continue to test compatibility of the candidate materials with the organisms and with the moisture delivery and harvesting system designs. These tests will be ongoing until an ''optimum'' combination of growth surface material/organism type/harvesting system is identified. For the harvesting system, a nozzle-based water jet system has been shown to be effective, but it has disadvantages for the overall system design in terms of space utilization. A streamlined and integrated screen wetting/harvesting system design is currently under development and will be the focus of harvesting system tests in the foreseeable future. This report addresses each of the key project tasks as defined in the statement of work, giving both a summary of key accomplishments over the past year and a plan for future work.

  19. ENHANCED PRACTICAL PHOTOSYNTHETIC CO2 MITIGATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dr. Gregory Kremer; Dr. David J. Bayless; Dr. Morgan Vis; Dr. Michael Prudich; Dr. Keith Cooksey; Dr. Jeff Muhs

    2002-01-15

    This quarterly report documents significant achievements in the Enhanced Practical Photosynthetic CO{sub 2} Mitigation project during the period from 10/3/2001 through 1/02/2002. Most of the achievements are milestones in our efforts to complete the tasks and subtasks that constitute the project objectives. Our research team has made significant progress towards completion of our Phase I objectives, and our current efforts remain focused on fulfilling these research objectives in accordance with the project timeline. Overall, we believe that we are on schedule to complete Phase I activities by 10/2002, which is the milestone date from the original project timeline. Specific results and accomplishments for the fourth quarter of 2001 include: (1) New procedures and protocols have been developed to increase the chances of successful implementation in the bioreactor of organisms that perform well in the lab. The new procedures include pre-screening of organisms for adhesion characteristics and a focus on identifying the organisms with maximum growth rate potential. (2) Preliminary results show an increase in adhesion to glass and a decrease in overall growth rates when using growth media prepared with tap water rather than distilled water. (3) Several of the organisms collected from Yellowstone National Park using the new procedures are currently being cultured in preparation for bioreactor tests. (4) One important result from a test of growth surface temperature distribution as a function of gas stream and drip-fluid temperatures showed a high dependence of membrane temperature on fluid temperature, with gas stream temperature having minimal effect. This result indicates that bioreactor growth surface temperatures can be controlled using fluid delivery temperature. The possible implications for implementation of the bioreactor concept are encouraging, since it may be possible to use the bioreactor with very high gas stream temperatures by controlling the temperature of the organisms with the fluid temperature. (5) Investigation of growth surface materials continues, with Omnisil and Scotch Brite emerging as the leading candidates. More investigation of these and other material types is still needed to determine the best material for particular combinations of organisms and harvesting methods. (6) Tests of harvesting methods and harvesting system designs have shown that desirable levels of ''percentage algae removal'' can be achieved for particular organisms and growth surface materials, for example Cyanidium on polyester felt. Additional testing continues to better characterize sensitivity of the ''percentage removal'' to various system design parameters, but these tests have been delayed due to the lack of suitable organisms for the tests. (7) The solar collectors and the pilot-scale bioreactor light distribution panels for the deep-penetration hybrid solar lighting system have been designed. One solar lighting system (solar collector tracking unit, fiber optic light transmission cables, light distribution panels) is almost completely prepared for installation during the next quarter in the pilot scale bioreactor system. (8) Pressure drop results from tests on the enhanced mass transfer CO{sub 2} absorption technique (the translating slug flow reactor) are encouraging, with reasonable values of 2.5 psi maximum over an 11.48 meter distance between pressure taps for test conditions of 0.6 m/sec slug velocity and approximately 10 m/sec gas velocity. Preparations are under way for CO{sub 2} scrubbing tests.

  20. Climate policy and the airline industry : emissions trading and renewable jet fuel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McConnachie, D. (Dominic Alistair)

    2012-01-01

    In this thesis, I assess the impact of the current EU Emissions Trading Scheme and a hypothetical renewable jet fuel mandate on US airlines. I find that both the EU Scheme up until 2020 and a renewable jet fuel mandate of ...

  1. Benefits of Greenhouse Gas Mitigation on the Supply, Management, and Use of Water Resources in the United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Strzepek, K.; Neumann, Jim; Smith, Joel; Martinich, Jeremy; Boehlert, Brent; Hejazi, Mohamad I.; Henderson, Jim; Wobus, Cameron; Jones, Russ; Calvin, Katherine V.; Johnson, D.; Monier, Erwan; Strzepek, J.; Yoon, Jin-Ho

    2014-11-29

    Climate change impacts on water resources in the U.S. are likely to be far-reaching and substantial, because the water sector spans many parts of the economy, from supply and demand for agriculture, industry, energy production, transportation and municipal use to damages from natural hazards. This paper provides impact and damage estimates from five water resource-related models in the CIRA frame work, addressing drought risk, flooding damages, water supply and demand, and global water scarcity. The four models differ in the water system assessed, their spatial scale, and the units of assessment, but together they provide a quantitative and descriptive richness in characterizing water resource sector effects of climate change that no single model can capture. The results also address the sensitivity of these estimates to greenhouse gas emission scenarios, climate sensitivity alternatives, and global climate model selection. While calculating the net impact of climate change on the water sector as a whole may be impractical, because each of the models applied here uses a consistent set of climate scenarios, broad conclusions can be drawn regarding the patterns of change and the benefits of GHG mitigation policies for the water sector. Two key findings emerge: 1) climate mitigation policy substantially reduces the impact of climate change on the water sector across multiple dimensions; and 2) the more managed the water resources system, the more tempered the climate change impacts and the resulting reduction of impacts from climate mitigation policies.

  2. Benefits of Greenhouse Gas Mitigation on the Supply, Management, and Use of Water Resources in the United States

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Strzepek, K.; Neumann, Jim; Smith, Joel; Martinich, Jeremy; Boehlert, Brent; Hejazi, Mohamad I.; Henderson, Jim; Wobus, Cameron; Jones, Russ; Calvin, Katherine V.; et al

    2014-11-29

    Climate change impacts on water resources in the U.S. are likely to be far-reaching and substantial, because the water sector spans many parts of the economy, from supply and demand for agriculture, industry, energy production, transportation and municipal use to damages from natural hazards. This paper provides impact and damage estimates from five water resource-related models in the CIRA frame work, addressing drought risk, flooding damages, water supply and demand, and global water scarcity. The four models differ in the water system assessed, their spatial scale, and the units of assessment, but together they provide a quantitative and descriptive richnessmore »in characterizing water resource sector effects of climate change that no single model can capture. The results also address the sensitivity of these estimates to greenhouse gas emission scenarios, climate sensitivity alternatives, and global climate model selection. While calculating the net impact of climate change on the water sector as a whole may be impractical, because each of the models applied here uses a consistent set of climate scenarios, broad conclusions can be drawn regarding the patterns of change and the benefits of GHG mitigation policies for the water sector. Two key findings emerge: 1) climate mitigation policy substantially reduces the impact of climate change on the water sector across multiple dimensions; and 2) the more managed the water resources system, the more tempered the climate change impacts and the resulting reduction of impacts from climate mitigation policies.« less

  3. Efficient energy stable numerical schemes for a phase field moving ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jie Shen

    2015-01-21

    Jan 7, 2015 ... In this paper, we present two efficient energy stable schemes to solve a ... we obtain a linear coupled energy stable scheme for systems with ...

  4. Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Aviation and Marine Transportation: Mitigation Potential and Policies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCollum, David L; Gould, Gregory; Greene, David L

    2010-01-01

    Is Investment in High Speed Rail Socially Profitable? ”4. 15. Latest California High Speed Rail Authority estimate,and marine shipping. High speed rail could replace some

  5. Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Aviation and Marine Transportation: Mitigation Potential and Policies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCollum, David L; Gould, Gregory; Greene, David L

    2010-01-01

    coal) and production of a synthetic crude oil, which cancoal) and production of a synthetic crude oil, which can

  6. Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Aviation and Marine Transportation: Mitigation Potential and Policies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCollum, David L; Gould, Gregory; Greene, David L

    2010-01-01

    cycle or diesel-electric engines, and optimized hull andcycle or diesel-electric engines, and optimized hull andof smaller diesel-electric engines, each optimized for a

  7. A Greenhouse-Gas Information System: Monitoring and Validating Emissions Reporting and Mitigation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jonietz, Karl K.; Dimotakis, Paul E.; Walker, Bruce C.

    2011-09-26

    This study and report focus on attributes of a greenhouse-gas information system (GHGIS) needed to support MRV&V needs. These needs set the function of such a system apart from scientific/research monitoring of GHGs and carbon-cycle systems, and include (not exclusively): the need for a GHGIS that is operational, as required for decision-support; the need for a system that meets specifications derived from imposed requirements; the need for rigorous calibration, verification, and validation (CV&V) standards, processes, and records for all measurement and modeling/data-inversion data; the need to develop and adopt an uncertainty-quantification (UQ) regimen for all measurement and modeling data; and the requirement that GHGIS products can be subjected to third-party questioning and scientific scrutiny. This report examines and assesses presently available capabilities that could contribute to a future GHGIS. These capabilities include sensors and measurement technologies; data analysis and data uncertainty quantification (UQ) practices and methods; and model-based data-inversion practices, methods, and their associated UQ. The report further examines the need for traceable calibration, verification, and validation processes and attached metadata; differences between present science-/research-oriented needs and those that would be required for an operational GHGIS; the development, operation, and maintenance of a GHGIS missions-operations center (GMOC); and the complex systems engineering and integration that would be required to develop, operate, and evolve a future GHGIS.

  8. Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Aviation and Marine Transportation: Mitigation Potential and Policies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCollum, David L; Gould, Gregory; Greene, David L

    2010-01-01

    Reducing the Carbon Footprint—What Works. Transportationmitigation, the lifecycle carbon footprints of these fuelsenergy intensity and carbon footprint of HSR depend strongly

  9. Mitigating Carbon Emissions: the Potential of Improving Efficiency of Household Appliances in China

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, Jiang

    2006-01-01

    electric water heaters, and solar water heaters. The mostby electric water heaters (31.3%), and solar water heaters (

  10. Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Aviation and Marine Transportation: Mitigation Potential and Policies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCollum, David L; Gould, Gregory; Greene, David L

    2010-01-01

    fossil fuels (e.g. , liquefied natural gas and marine dieseldiesel oil (MDO), Liquefied natural gas (LNG), Wind power (marine diesel oil or liquefied natural gas for heavy fuel

  11. Mitigating emissions and energy consumption for urban transportation networks : simulation-based signal control strategies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nanduri, Kanchana

    2013-01-01

    Microscopic urban traffic simulators embed the most detailed traveler behavior and network supply models. They represent individual vehicles and can therefore account for vehicle-specific technologies. These simulators can ...

  12. Mitigating Carbon Emissions: the Potential of Improving Efficiency of Household Appliances in China

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, Jiang

    2006-01-01

    heaters, electric water heaters, and solar water heaters.by electric water heaters (31.3%), and solar water heaters (

  13. Mitigating Carbon Emissions: the Potential of Improving Efficiency of Household Appliances in China

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, Jiang

    2006-01-01

    and Management Standards is a technical committee under CNISthe technical support organization for standard developmentcertain technical challenges in raising standard levels much

  14. Contribution of Anaerobic Digesters to Emissions Mitigation and Electricity Generation Under U.S. Climate Policy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zaks, David P. M.

    Livestock husbandry in the U.S. significantly contributes to many environmental problems, including the release of methane, a potent greenhouse gas (GHG). Anaerobic digesters (ADs) break down organic wastes using bacteria ...

  15. Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Aviation and Marine Transportation: Mitigation Potential and Policies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCollum, David L; Gould, Gregory; Greene, David L

    2010-01-01

    limitations for shipping applications are fuel storagefuel, or possibly the inclusion of aviation and shipping andfuels used in international aviation and maritime shipping),

  16. Acting Globally: Potential Carbon Emissions Mitigation Impacts from an International Standards and Labelling Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Letschert, Virginie E.

    2010-01-01

    Letschert (2007). Future Air Conditioning Energy Consumptionrefrigerators, air conditioning, lighting, standby power,the residential sector, and air conditioning and lighting in

  17. Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Aviation and Marine Transportation: Mitigation Potential and Policies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCollum, David L; Gould, Gregory; Greene, David L

    2010-01-01

    Marine diesel oil (MDO), Liquefied natural gas (LNG), Winddiesel oil) or to other renewable energy sources, such as winddiesel oil), or to other renewable energy sources, such as wind

  18. Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Aviation and Marine Transportation: Mitigation Potential and Policies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCollum, David L; Gould, Gregory; Greene, David L

    2010-01-01

    ATA (2009). “ Alternative Aviation Fuels Q&A. ” Retrievedsectors, alternative aviation and marine fuels face numerousHRJ. The Commercial Aviation Alternative Fuels Initiative (

  19. Enduse Global Emissions Mitigation Scenarios (EGEMS): A New Generation of Energy Efficiency Policy Planning Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McNeil, Michael A.

    2010-01-01

    2008). The Boom of Electricity Demand in the residentialwith Residential Electricity Demand in India's Future - Howlevels could reduce electricity demand in IEA member country

  20. Acting Globally: Potential Carbon Emissions Mitigation Impacts from an International Standards and Labelling Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Letschert, Virginie E.

    2010-01-01

    2008). The Boom of Electricity Demand in the residential2005). Forecasting Electricity Demand in Developingwith Residential Electricity Demand in India's Future - How

  1. The Contribution of Biomass to Emissions Mitigation under a Global Climate Policy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Winchester, N.

    What will large-scale global bioenergy production look like? We investigate this question by developing a detailed representation of bioenergy in a global economy-wide model. We develop a scenario with a global carbon ...

  2. Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Aviation and Marine Transportation: Mitigation Potential and Policies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCollum, David L; Gould, Gregory; Greene, David L

    2010-01-01

    aboard ships (e.g. , heavy fuel oil and residual fuel oil)natural gas for heavy fuel oil (i.e. , residual fuel oil).fuels. Residual fuel oil (also called heavy fuel oil (HFO))

  3. Enduse Global Emissions Mitigation Scenarios (EGEMS): A New Generation of Energy Efficiency Policy Planning Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McNeil, Michael A.

    2010-01-01

    the great majority of residential demand, and that diffusion2007). Coping with Residential Electricity Demand in India'sBoom of Electricity Demand in the residential sector in the

  4. Geologic carbon sequestration as a global strategy to mitigate CO2 emissions: Sustainability and environmental risk

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oldenburg, C.M.

    2012-01-01

    equates to an energy-climate crisis. Although governmentsstrategies to the energy- climate crisis is the simultaneousin addressing the energy- climate crisis is CCS. There are

  5. AGRICULTURAL SECTOR ANALYSIS ON GREENHOUSE GAS EMISSION MITIGATION IN THE UNITED STATES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCarl, Bruce A.

    reductions of methane and nitrous oxide related strategies. Production of biomass feedstock for power plants University, Berlin; M.S., Texas A&M University Chair of Advisory Committee: Dr. Bruce A. Mc

  6. Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Aviation and Marine Transportation: Mitigation Potential and Policies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCollum, David L; Gould, Gregory; Greene, David L

    2010-01-01

    Liquefied natural gas (LNG), Wind power (sails) Aviationand Policies the use of LNG will result in a small 2 percentbe a much greater potential to use LNG aboard most ships if

  7. Mitigating Carbon Emissions: the Potential of Improving Efficiency of Household Appliances in China

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, Jiang

    2006-01-01

    coal’s dominance in power generation will decline somewhatthe carbon intensity of power generation in China from 0.230of fuel in China’s power generation. Coal will continue to

  8. Geologic carbon sequestration as a global strategy to mitigate CO2 emissions: Sustainability and environmental risk

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oldenburg, C.M.

    2012-01-01

    natural gas or mineral resources such as potash Saline water intrusion into potable water degrades water quality

  9. Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Aviation and Marine Transportation: Mitigation Potential and Policies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCollum, David L; Gould, Gregory; Greene, David L

    2010-01-01

    thermochemical gasification) can be produced from biomass orgasification of a carbon-containing feedstock (e.g. , biomass,gasification of a carbon-containing feedstock (e.g. , biomass,

  10. Enduse Global Emissions Mitigation Scenarios (EGEMS): A New Generation of Energy Efficiency Policy Planning Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McNeil, Michael A.

    2010-01-01

    and J. Sathaye (2009). India Energy Outlook: End Use Demandand Transport Energy Use in India: Past Trends and Futureenergy demand, forecasting, end use, bottom-up, China, India,

  11. Geologic carbon sequestration as a global strategy to mitigate CO2 emissions: Sustainability and environmental risk

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oldenburg, C.M.

    2012-01-01

    to GCS is natural gas storage, carried out at over 450 sitesFurthermore, the natural gas storage industry uses the samelearned from the natural gas storage industry, the scale of

  12. Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Aviation and Marine Transportation: Mitigation Potential and Policies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCollum, David L; Gould, Gregory; Greene, David L

    2010-01-01

    natural gas for heavy fuel oil (i.e. , residual fuel oil).fuel oil (also called heavy fuel oil (HFO)) can be replacedaboard ships (e.g. , heavy fuel oil and residual fuel oil)

  13. Geologic carbon sequestration as a global strategy to mitigate CO2 emissions: Sustainability and environmental risk

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oldenburg, C.M.

    2012-01-01

    associated with Enhanced Geothermal Systems, Geothermics 36(associated with enhanced geothermal systems. Report produced

  14. Acting Globally: Potential Carbon Emissions Mitigation Impacts from an International Standards and Labelling Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Letschert, Virginie E.

    2010-01-01

    2007). International Energy Outlook 2007, Energy Informationof Energy’s International Energy Outlook 2007 (USEIA, 2007).

  15. Enduse Global Emissions Mitigation Scenarios (EGEMS): A New Generation of Energy Efficiency Policy Planning Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McNeil, Michael A.

    2010-01-01

    2007). International Energy Outlook 2007, Energy InformationJ. Sathaye (2009). India Energy Outlook: End Use Demand inEnergy’s International Energy Outlook 2007 (USEIA, 2007). It

  16. Enduse Global Emissions Mitigation Scenarios (EGEMS): A New Generation of Energy Efficiency Policy Planning Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McNeil, Michael A.

    2010-01-01

    driver for the energy demand forecast. The basic assumptionglobal bottom-up energy demand forecasts, and a frameworkin modelling energy demand is to forecast activity. Activity

  17. Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Aviation and Marine Transportation: Mitigation Potential and Policies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCollum, David L; Gould, Gregory; Greene, David L

    2010-01-01

    aviation and marine travel are higher than energy efficiencyintensity of the energy sources used in aviation and marineand marine diesel oil) or to other renewable energy sources,

  18. Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Aviation and Marine Transportation: Mitigation Potential and Policies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCollum, David L; Gould, Gregory; Greene, David L

    2010-01-01

    More efficient turbofan (jet) engines, Advanced lightweightducted) turbofans (a type of jet engine). Propeller-drivenconsumption of modern jet engines can still be reduced by

  19. Geologic carbon sequestration as a global strategy to mitigate CO2 emissions: Sustainability and environmental risk

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oldenburg, C.M.

    2012-01-01

    from geologic carbon sequestration sites: unsaturated zone2 from geologic carbon sequestration sites: CO 2 migrationGeologic Carbon Sequestration as a Global Strategy to

  20. Potential for Biofuel-based Greenhouse Gas Emission Mitigation: Rationale and Potential

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCarl, Bruce A.

    product substitutes in liquid energy usages or used as a direct input to power plants substituting with maize-based ethanol being the dominant, but highly subsidized example. Power plant substitution has proven feasible, but only in areas with ready supplies of low cost feedstocks (generally cogeneration

  1. Natural Gas Infrastructure R&D and Methane Emissions Mitigation Workshop

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankADVANCED MANUFACTURING OFFICESpecialAPPENDIXConcentrating SolarEnergy First

  2. Natural Gas Infrastructure R&D and Methane Emissions Mitigation Workshop

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankADVANCED MANUFACTURING OFFICESpecialAPPENDIXConcentrating SolarEnergy First Gas Infrastructure

  3. Natural Gas Infrastructure R&D and Methane Emissions Mitigation Workshop

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankADVANCED MANUFACTURING OFFICESpecialAPPENDIXConcentrating SolarEnergy First Gas Infrastructure12-13,

  4. Natural Gas Infrastructure R&D and Methane Emissions Mitigation Workshop

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankADVANCED MANUFACTURING OFFICESpecialAPPENDIXConcentrating SolarEnergy First Gas Infrastructure12-13,

  5. Co-benefits of mitigating global greenhouse gas emissions for future air

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfate Reducing Bacteria (TechnicalTransmission,TextitSciTechinRequirementsor Heat

  6. DOE/AMO NG Infrastructure R & D & Methane emissions Mitigation workshop

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum Based| Department8, 20153 METHODS DERIVATION-2013, DevelopingDepartment

  7. Natural Gas Infrastructure R&D and Methane Emissions Mitigation Workshop |

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirley Ann JacksonDepartment ofOffice|in the subsurface is better6, 2015 2:00PM to 3:00PM EST

  8. Game-Changing Process Mitigates CO2 Emissions Using Renewable Energy |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuelsof Energy Services »Information ResourcesHeat &Department of Energy

  9. Method to prevent/mitigate steam explosions in casting pits

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Taleyarkhan, R.P.

    1996-12-24

    Steam explosions can be prevented or mitigated during a metal casting process by the placement of a perforated flooring system in the casting pit. An upward flow of compressed gas through this perforated flooring system is introduced during the casting process to produce a buffer layer between any spilled molten metal and the cooling water in the reservoir. This buffer layer provides a hydrodynamic layer which acts to prevent or mitigate steam explosions resulting from hot, molten metal being spilled into or onto the cooling water. 3 figs.

  10. Method to prevent/mitigate steam explosions in casting pits

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Taleyarkhan, Rusi P. (Knoxville, TN)

    1996-01-01

    Steam explosions can be prevented or mitigated during a metal casting process by the placement of a perforated flooring system in the casting pit. An upward flow of compressed gas through this perforated flooring system is introduced during the casting process to produce a buffer layer between any spilled molten metal and the cooling water in the reservoir. This buffer layer provides a hydrodynamic layer which acts to prevent or mitigate steam explosions resulting from hot, molten metal being spilled into or onto the cooling water.

  11. EIS-0246: Wildlife Mitigation Program, Idaho, Montana, Nevada, Washington, Oregon

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    BPA has decided to adopt the set of prescriptions (goals, strategies, and procedural requirements) identified in the final EIS as “Alternative 6, Balanced Action (BPA’s Preferred Alternative).” This decision will standardize the planning and implementation process, while achieving balance among all decision factors: (1) meeting the biological objectives of wildlife mitigation projects, (2) achievement of cost and administrative efficiency, (3) compliance with all applicable laws and regulations, and (4) protection and improvement of other environmental resources when such actions would support wildlife mitigation.

  12. This study explores how the EU Emissions Trading System (EU ETS) actually works on the ground affecting corporate climate strategies.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    This study explores how the EU Emissions Trading System (EU ETS) actually works on the ground@bookpoint.co.uk May 2013 322 pages Hardback 978-1-4094-6078-7 £60.00 Corporate Responses to EU Emissions Trading at The Fridtjof Nansen Institute, Norway `With greenhouse gas emissions trading schemes emerging worldwide

  13. Enhanced Practical Photosynthetic CO2 Mitigation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gregory Kremer; David J. Bayless; Morgan Vis; Michael Prudich; Keith Cooksey; Jeff Muhs

    2006-01-15

    This final report highlights significant achievements in the Enhanced Practical Photosynthetic CO{sub 2} Mitigation Project during the period from 10/1/2001 through 01/02/2006. As indicated in the list of accomplishments below, our efforts during this project were focused on the selection of candidate organisms and growth surfaces and initiating long-term tests in the bench-scale and pilot-scale bioreactor test systems. Specific results and accomplishments for the program include: (1) CRF-2 test system: (a) Sampling test results have shown that the initial mass of algae loaded into the Carbon Recycling Facility Version 2 (CRF-2) system can be estimated with about 3% uncertainty using a statistical sampling procedure. (b) The pressure shim header pipe insert design was shown to have better flow for harvesting than the drilled-hole design. (c) The CRF-2 test system has undergone major improvements to produce the high flow rates needed for harvesting (as determined by previous experiments). The main changes to the system are new stainless steel header/frame units, with increased flow capacity and a modified pipe-end-sealing method to improve flow uniformity, and installation and plumbing for a new high flow harvesting pump. Qualitative system tests showed that the harvesting system performed wonderfully, cleaning the growth surfaces within a matter of seconds. (d) Qualitative tests have shown that organisms can be repopulated on a harvested section of a bioreactor screen, demonstrating that continuous bioreactor operation is feasible, with continuous cycles of harvesting and repopulating screens. (e) Final preparations are underway for quantitative, long-term tests in the CRF-2 with weekly harvesting. (2) Pilot-scale test system: (a) The construction of the pilot-scale bioreactor was completed, including the solar collector and light distribution system. Over the course of the project, the solar collector used in the light delivery system showed some degradation, but performed well overall. (b) Testing confirmed that algae can be grown in a sustainable fashion in the pilot bioreactor, even with intermittent availability of sunlight. (c) The pilot-scale tests indicated that algal growth rate followed photon delivery during productivity testing. (3) Organisms and Growth Surfaces: (a) The aeration of growth media with 5% CO{sub 2} in air stimulates cyanobacterial growth 10-20 times over that with air alone. It is possible that the rate of the stimulation of cyanobacterial growth in the CRF will be higher because cyanobacteria will be grown as a biofilm. We plan to increase the concentration to 15% CO{sub 2} in air. (b) Tests have shown a doubling time of the cyanobacterial culture of about 7.5 hours with illumination of about 170 {micro}mol m{sup -2} sec{sup -1}. All lower levels of illumination led to a decrease in the cyanobacterial growth rate. (c) Macroscopical and microscopical observations suggest that the culture of this isolate undergoes significant morphological changes after 60-70 hours of incubation in the batch culture mode. First of all, the culture begins to clump. This clumping could lead to the decrease of effective illumination of culture and may reflect a medium alkalinization. (d) Organization of our collection of the thermophilic cyanobacteria isolated from Yellowstone National Park has resulted in 13 unialgal cultures of thermophilic cyanobacteria. (e) A new species (even probably a new genus) of cyanobacteria, 5.2 s. c. 1, isolated from LaDuke Spring in Great Yellowstone Basin, demonstrates an elevated resistance to some compounds of iron. This might be very important for our project, because plant gases may have elevated amount of iron. Our study of the effect of different concentration of FeCl{sub 3}* 6H{sub 2}O on the growth of the 5.2 s.c.1 isolate showed that iron additions stimulated rather then inhibited the growth of the isolate. Because of this we would recommend this isolate for further experiments. (f) The shape of the Chlorogloeopsis siderophila cells (cyanobacteria) was found to be affected b

  14. Hungry Horse Mitigation; Flathead Lake, 2003-2004 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hansen, Barry; Evarts, Les

    2005-06-01

    The Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes (CSKT) and Montana Fish Wildlife and Parks (MFWP) wrote the ''Fisheries Mitigation Plan for Losses Attributable to the Construction and Operation of Hungry Horse Dam'' in March 1991 to define the fisheries losses, mitigation alternatives and recommendations to protect, mitigate and enhance resident fish and aquatic habitat affected by Hungry Horse Dam. On November 12, 1991, the Northwest Power Planning Council (NPPC) approved the mitigation plan with minor modifications, called for a detailed implementation plan, and amended measures 903(h)(1) through (7). A long-term mitigation plan was submitted in August 1992, was approved by the Council in 1993, and the first contract for this project was signed on November 11, 1993. The problem this project addresses is the loss of habitat, both in quality and quantity, in the Flathead Lake and River basin resulting from the construction and operation of Hungry Horse Dam. The purpose of the project is to both implement mitigation measures and monitor the biological responses to those measures including those implemented by Project Numbers 9101903 and 9101904. Goals and objectives of the 1994 Fish and Wildlife Program (Section 10.1) addressed by this project are the rebuilding to sustainable levels weak, but recoverable, native populations injured by the hydropower system. The project mitigates the blockage of spawning runs by Hungry Horse Dam by restoring and even creating spawning habitats within direct drainages to Flathead Lake. The project also addresses the altered habitat within Flathead Lake resulting from species shifts and consequent dominance of new species that restricts the potential success of mitigation measures. Specific goals of this project are to create and restore habitat and quantitatively monitor changes in fish populations to verify the efficacy of our mitigation measures. The project consists of three components: monitoring, restoration and research. Monitoring, for example, includes a spring gillnetting series conducted annually in Flathead Lake and builds on an existing data set initiated in 1981. Monitoring of the experimental kokanee reintroduction was a primary activity of this project between 1992 and 1997. Lake trout, whose high densities have precluded successful mitigation of losses of other species in Flathead Lake, have been monitored since 1996 to measure several biological parameters. Results of this work have utility in determining the population status of this key predator in Flathead Lake. The project has also defined the baseline condition of the Flathead Lake fishery in 1992-1993 and has conducted annual lakewide surveys since 1998. The restoration component of the project has addressed several stream channel, riparian, and fish passage problems, and suppression of non-native fish. The research component of the project began in FY 2000 and measured trophic linkages between M. relicta and other species to assist in predicting the results of our efforts to suppress lake trout. Only Objective 1 in the workplan is funded entirely by Hungry Horse Mitigation funds. Additional funds are drawn from other sources to assist in completion of Objectives 2-8.

  15. X-ray tests of a two-dimensional stigmatic imaging scheme with variable magnifications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lu, J.; Bitter, M.; Hill, K. W.; Delgado-Aparicio, L. F.; Efthimion, P. C.; Pablant, N. A.; Beiersdorfer, P.; Caughey, T. A.; Brunner, J.

    2014-11-15

    A two-dimensional stigmatic x-ray imaging scheme, consisting of two spherically bent crystals, one concave and one convex, was recently proposed [M. Bitter et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 83, 10E527 (2012)]. The Bragg angles and the radii of curvature of the two crystals of this imaging scheme are matched to eliminate the astigmatism and to satisfy the Bragg condition across both crystal surfaces for a given x-ray energy. In this paper, we consider more general configurations of this imaging scheme, which allow us to vary the magnification for a given pair of crystals and x-ray energy. The stigmatic imaging scheme has been validated for the first time by imaging x-rays generated by a micro-focus x-ray source with source size of 8.4 ?m validated by knife-edge measurements. Results are presented from imaging the tungsten L?1 emission at 8.3976 keV, using a convex Si-422 crystal and a concave Si-533 crystal with 2d-spacings of 2.21707 Å and 1.65635 Å and radii of curvature of 500 ± 1 mm and 823 ± 1 mm, respectively, showing a spatial resolution of 54.9 ?m. This imaging scheme is expected to be of interest for the two-dimensional imaging of laser produced plasmas.

  16. Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Options in ISEEM Global Energy Model: 2010-2050 Scenario Analysis for Least-Cost Carbon Reduction in Iron and Steel Sector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Karali, Nihan; Xu, Tengfang; Sathaye, Jayant

    2013-12-01

    The goal of the modeling work carried out in this project was to quantify long-term scenarios for the future emission reduction potentials in the iron and steel sector. The main focus of the project is to examine the impacts of carbon reduction options in the U.S. iron and steel sector under a set of selected scenarios. In order to advance the understanding of carbon emission reduction potential on the national and global scales, and to evaluate the regional impacts of potential U.S. mitigation strategies (e.g., commodity and carbon trading), we also included and examined the carbon reduction scenarios in China’s and India’s iron and steel sectors in this project. For this purpose, a new bottom-up energy modeling framework, the Industrial Sector Energy Efficiency Modeling (ISEEM), (Karali et al. 2012) was used to provide detailed annual projections starting from 2010 through 2050. We used the ISEEM modeling framework to carry out detailed analysis, on a country-by-country basis, for the U.S., China’s, and India’s iron and steel sectors. The ISEEM model applicable to iron and steel section, called ISEEM-IS, is developed to estimate and evaluate carbon emissions scenarios under several alternative mitigation options - including policies (e.g., carbon caps), commodity trading, and carbon trading. The projections will help us to better understand emission reduction potentials with technological and economic implications. The database for input of ISEEM-IS model consists of data and information compiled from various resources such as World Steel Association (WSA), the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), China Steel Year Books, India Bureau of Mines (IBM), Energy Information Administration (EIA), and recent LBNL studies on bottom-up techno-economic analysis of energy efficiency measures in the iron and steel sector of the U.S., China, and India, including long-term steel production in China. In the ISEEM-IS model, production technology and manufacturing details are represented, in addition to the extensive data compiled from recent studies on bottom-up representation of efficiency measures for the sector. We also defined various mitigation scenarios including long-term production trends to project country-specific production, energy use, trading, carbon emissions, and costs of mitigation. Such analyses can provide useful information to assist policy-makers when considering and shaping future emissions mitigation strategies and policies. The technical objective is to analyze the costs of production and CO{sub 2} emission reduction in the U.S, China, and India’s iron and steel sectors under different emission reduction scenarios, using the ISEEM-IS as a cost optimization model. The scenarios included in this project correspond to various CO{sub 2} emission reduction targets for the iron and steel sector under different strategies such as simple CO{sub 2} emission caps (e.g., specific reduction goals), emission reduction via commodity trading, and emission reduction via carbon trading.

  17. Year in Industry Scheme The Year in Industry Scheme allows you to spend

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haase, Markus

    -time paid employment, returning to the University for a final fourth year. You are awarded a BSc (IndustryYear in Industry Scheme The Year in Industry Scheme allows you to spend your third year in full second year. To be allowed to make the transfer, you must do sufficiently well in your year 1 and 2

  18. Evaluation of the Hydro-Thermodynamic Soil Vegetation Scheme and implementation of a new numerical scheme

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moelders, Nicole

    ii Evaluation of the Hydro-Thermodynamic Soil Vegetation Scheme and implementation of a new.S. Fairbanks, Alaska August 2005 #12;iii Abstract The Hydro-Thermodynamic Soil-Vegetation Scheme (HTSVS........................................................................................................................... 24 Evaluation of snow depth and soil temperatures predicted by the Hydro- Thermodynamic Soil

  19. PEAKING OF WORLD OIL PRODUCTION: IMPACTS, MITIGATION, & RISK MANAGEMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laughlin, Robert B.

    PEAKING OF WORLD OIL PRODUCTION: IMPACTS, MITIGATION, & RISK MANAGEMENT Robert L. Hirsch, SAIC OF WORLD OIL PRODUCTION III. WHY TRANSITION WILL BE TIME CONSUMING IV. LESSONS FROM PAST EXPERIENCE V REMARKS APPENDICES #12;4 EXECUTIVE SUMMARY The peaking of world oil production presents the U

  20. Planning Tools For Seismic Risk Mitigation. Rules And Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    De Paoli, Rosa Grazia

    2008-07-08

    Recently, Italian urban planning research in the field of seismic risk mitigation are renewing. In particular, it promotes strategies that integrate urban rehabilitation and aseismic objectives, and also politicizes that are directed to revitalizes urban systems, coupling physical renewal and socio-economic development.In Italy the first law concerning planning for seismic mitigation dates back 1974, the law n. 64 'Regulation for buildings with particular rules for the seismic areas' where the rules for buildings in seismic areas concerning also the local hazard. This law, in fact, forced the municipalities to acquire, during the formation of the plans, a preventive opinion of compatibility between planning conditions and geomorphology conditions of the territory. From this date the conviction that the seismic risk must be considered inside the territorial planning especially in terms of strategies of mitigation has been strengthened.The town planners have started to take an interest in seismic risk in the [80]s when the Irpinia's earthquake took place. The researches developed after this earthquake have established that the principal cause of the collapse of buildings are due to from the wrong location of urban settlements (on slopes or crowns) After Irpinia's earthquake the first researches on seismic risk mitigation, in particular on the aspects related to the hazards and to the urban vulnerability were made.

  1. COMMUNICATION VULNERABILITIES AND MITIGATIONS IN WIND POWER SCADA SYSTEMS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 COMMUNICATION VULNERABILITIES AND MITIGATIONS IN WIND POWER SCADA SYSTEMS American Wind Energy/ Abstract This paper focuses on securing wind power Supervisory Control And Data Acquisition (SCADA) systems security vulnerabilities. To address these new vulnerabilities in wind power SCADA systems, we apply

  2. Lesson Summary Students will learn about a mitigation process

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mojzsis, Stephen J.

    -Offs The Designed World Energy Sources and Uses NSES Science Standards Unifying Concepts and Processes Systems The Carbon Mitigation Initiative is a joint project of Princeton University, BP, and Ford Motor Company of atmospheric carbon dioxide over pre-industrial levels. The following pages contain: · An introduction

  3. The Role of China in Mitigating Climate Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paltsev, S.

    We explore short- and long-term implications of several energy scenarios of China’s role in efforts to mitigate global climate risk. The focus is on the impacts on China’s energy system and GDP growth, and on global climate ...

  4. Interference Mitigation in Femtocell Network Using Anonymous Author(s)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Freitas, Nando de

    the power adaptation process of the FUEs and MUE to be a discrete multi agent Markov decision problem 050 051 052 053 Interference Mitigation in Femtocell Network Using Q-learning Anonymous Author problems is the so-called co-tier and cross-tier interference caused by the new femtocell network layer

  5. How can cities mitigate and adapt to climate change?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hunt, Julian

    in the follow-up to the World Summit on Sustainable Development held in Johannesburg in August 2002 change can be partially mitigated if the world's big cities sub- stantially reduce their environmental impact. Consequently, it is only through transformation of their infrastructure, especially transport

  6. Mitigated subsurface transfer line leak resulting in a surface pool

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    SCOTT, D.L.

    1999-02-08

    This analysis evaluates the mitigated consequences of a potential waste transfer spill from an underground pipeline. The spill forms a surface pool. One waste composite, a 67% liquid, 33% solid, from a single shell tank is evaluated. Even drain back from a very long pipeline (50,000 ft), does not pose dose consequences to the onsite or offsite individual above guideline values.

  7. Albeni Falls Wildlife Mitigation Project, 2008 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Soults, Scott

    2009-08-05

    The Albeni Falls Interagency Work Group (AFIWG) was actively involved in implementing wildlife mitigation activities in late 2007, but due to internal conflicts, the AFIWG members has fractionated into a smaller group. Implementation of the monitoring and evaluation program continued across protected lands. As of 2008, The Albeni Falls Interagency Work Group (Work Group) is a coalition comprised of wildlife managers from three tribal entities (Kalispel Tribe, Kootenai Tribe, Coeur d Alene Tribe) and the US Army Corps of Engineers. The Work Group directs where wildlife mitigation implementation occurs in the Kootenai, Pend Oreille and Coeur d Alene subbasins. The Work Group is unique in the Columbia Basin. The Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority (CBFWA) wildlife managers in 1995, approved what was one of the first two project proposals to implement mitigation on a programmatic basis. The maintenance of this kind of approach through time has allowed the Work Group to implement an effective and responsive habitat protection program by reducing administrative costs associated with site-specific project proposals. The core mitigation entities maintain approximately 9,335 acres of wetland/riparian habitats in 2008.

  8. Mitigating Market Power in Deregulated Electricity Markets Seth Blumsack1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blumsack, Seth

    or transmission, will increase costs past the point of efficiency savings from restructuring. Additional University Abstract Conventional measures of market structure used by economists, such as the Herfindahl will likely decrease system operating efficiency. Long-term contracts will not mitigate market power unless

  9. GNSS Multipath Mitigation using High-Frequency Antenna Motion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Psiaki, Mark L.

    GNSS Multipath Mitigation using High- Frequency Antenna Motion Tunc Ertan, Mark L. Psiaki, Brady W. O'Hanlon, Richard A. Merluzzi and Steven P. Powell, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY BIOGRAPHIES Tunc interests are in the areas of GNSS technologies, and nonlinear estimation and filtering. Mark L. Psiaki

  10. 1999 Leak Detection and Monitoring and Mitigation Strategy Update

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    OHL, P.C.

    1999-09-23

    This document is a complete revision of WHC-SD-WM-ES-378, Rev 1. This update includes recent developments in Leak Detection, Leak Monitoring, and Leak Mitigation technologies, as well as, recent developments in single-shell tank retrieval technologies. In addition, a single-shell tank retrieval release protection strategy is presented.

  11. Economic Consideration of Mitigation of Foreign Animal Disease Introduction *

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCarl, Bruce A.

    Economic Consideration of Mitigation of Foreign Animal Disease Introduction * Levan Elbakidze, Bruce A. McCarl Department of Agricultural Economics National Center for Foreign Animal and Zoonotic Disease Defense (FAZDD), Texas A&M University, College Station TX, USA The economic implications

  12. Mitigating Cascading Failures in Interdependent Power Grids and Communication Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hay, David

    -time monitoring and rapid control decisions for mitigating failures led to a catastrophic blackout which affected 50 million people in Northeast Amer- ica. According to the final report of the 2003 blackout [6 than 5 minutes and led to a full blackout in the Northeast United States and parts of Canada

  13. Exploring Complex Systems Aspects of Blackout Risk and Mitigation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Newman, David E [University of Alaska; Carreras, Benjamin A [ORNL; Lynch, Vickie E [ORNL; Dobson, Ian [University of Wisconsin, Madison

    2011-01-01

    Electric power transmission systems are a key infrastructure, and blackouts of these systems have major consequences for the economy and national security. Analyses of blackout data suggest that blackout size distributions have a power law form over much of their range. This result is an indication that blackouts behave as a complex dynamical system. We use a simulation of an upgrading power transmission system to investigate how these complex system dynamics impact the assessment and mitigation of blackout risk. The mitigation of failures in complex systems needs to be approached with care. The mitigation efforts can move the system to a new dynamic equilibrium while remaining near criticality and preserving the power law region. Thus, while the absolute frequency of blackouts of all sizes may be reduced, the underlying forces can still cause the relative frequency of large blackouts to small blackouts to remain the same. Moreover, in some cases, efforts to mitigate small blackouts can even increase the frequency of large blackouts. This result occurs because the large and small blackouts are not mutually independent, but are strongly coupled by the complex dynamics.

  14. SEMIACTIVE CONTROL OF CIVIL STRUCTURES FOR NATURAL HAZARD MITIGATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Spencer Jr., Billie F.

    will investigate innovative smart structures, including the seismic protection of buildings and the mitigation of these smart structures, identifying viable semiactive control strategies, assessing the mer- its building control is shown to be a viable method to protect tall buildings from seismic excitation. Various

  15. DISRUPTION MITIGATION WITH HIGH-PRESSURE NOBLE GAS INJECTION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    WHYTE, DG; JERNIGAN, TC; HUMPHREYS, DA; HYATT, AW; LASNIER, CJ; PARKS, PB; EVANS, TE; TAYLOR, PL; KELLMAN, AG; GRAY, DS; HOLLMANN, EM

    2002-10-01

    OAK A271 DISRUPTION MITIGATION WITH HIGH-PRESSURE NOBLE GAS INJECTION. High-pressure gas jets of neon and argon are used to mitigate the three principal damaging effects of tokamak disruptions: thermal loading of the divertor surfaces, vessel stress from poloidal halo currents and the buildup and loss of relativistic electrons to the wall. The gas jet penetrates as a neutral species through to the central plasma at its sonic velocity. The injected gas atoms increase up to 500 times the total electron inventory in the plasma volume, resulting in a relatively benign radiative dissipation of >95% of the plasma stored energy. The rapid cooling and the slow movement of the plasma to the wall reduce poloidal halo currents during the current decay. The thermally collapsed plasma is very cold ({approx} 1-2 eV) and the impurity charge distribution can include > 50% fraction neutral species. If a sufficient quantity of gas is injected, the neutrals inhibit runaway electrons. A physical model of radiative cooling is developed and validated against DIII-D experiments. The model shows that gas jet mitigation, including runaway suppression, extrapolates favorably to burning plasmas where disruption damage will be more severe. Initial results of real-time disruption detection triggering gas jet injection for mitigation are shown.

  16. Short communication Buried relic seawall mitigates Hurricane Sandy's impacts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lynett, Patrick

    Short communication Buried relic seawall mitigates Hurricane Sandy's impacts Jennifer L. Irish a Accepted 6 June 2013 Available online xxxx Keywords: Hurricanes Storm surge Waves Storm damage Seawalls of Hurricane Sandy revealed clear differences in patterns of the impact between two neighboring boroughs along

  17. Mitigating Climate Change with Managed Forests: Balancing Expectations,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vermont, University of

    Mitigating Climate Change with Managed Forests: Balancing Expectations, Opportunity, and Risk David and biomass energy) and di- rect substitution for more energy-intensive building mate- rials (e.g., concrete effect (but accounting for storage), intensive approaches do not ap- pear to compare favorably with more

  18. Cooling scheme for turbine hot parts

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hultgren, Kent Goran (Winter Park, FL); Owen, Brian Charles (Orlando, FL); Dowman, Steven Wayne (Orlando, FL); Nordlund, Raymond Scott (Orlando, FL); Smith, Ricky Lee (Oviedo, FL)

    2000-01-01

    A closed-loop cooling scheme for cooling stationary combustion turbine components, such as vanes, ring segments and transitions, is provided. The cooling scheme comprises: (1) an annular coolant inlet chamber, situated between the cylinder and blade ring of a turbine, for housing coolant before being distributed to the turbine components; (2) an annular coolant exhaust chamber, situated between the cylinder and the blade ring and proximate the annular coolant inlet chamber, for collecting coolant exhaust from the turbine components; (3) a coolant inlet conduit for supplying the coolant to said coolant inlet chamber; (4) a coolant exhaust conduit for directing coolant from said coolant exhaust chamber; and (5) a piping arrangement for distributing the coolant to and directing coolant exhaust from the turbine components. In preferred embodiments of the invention, the cooling scheme further comprises static seals for sealing the blade ring to the cylinder and flexible joints for attaching the blade ring to the turbine components.

  19. Modeling Impacts of Management on Carbon Sequestration and Trace Gas Emissions in Forested

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Modeling Impacts of Management on Carbon Sequestration and Trace Gas Emissions in Forested Wetland-DNDC, was modified to enhance its capacity to predict the impacts of management practices on carbon sequestration nonnegligible roles in mitigation in comparison with carbon sequestration. Forests are recognized for having

  20. Modelling and mitigating dose to firefighters from inhalation of radionuclides in wildland fire smoke

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Viner, Brian J.; Jannik, Tim; Stone, Daniel; Hepworth, Allan; Naeher, Luke; Adetona, Olorunfemi; Blake, John; Eddy, Teresa

    2015-06-12

    Firefighters responding to wildland fires where surface litter and vegetation contain radiological contamination will receive a radiological dose by inhaling resuspended radioactive material in the smoke. This may increase their lifetime risk of contracting certain types of cancer. Using published data, we modelled hypothetical radionuclide emissions, dispersion and dose for 70th and 97th percentile environmental conditions and for average and high fuel loads at the Savannah River Site. We predicted downwind concentration and potential dose to firefighters for radionuclides of interest (137Cs, 238Pu, 90Sr and 210Po). Predicted concentrations exceeded dose guidelines in the base case scenario emissions of 1.0 × 107 Bq ha–1 for 238Pu at 70th percentile environmental conditions and average fuel load levels for both 4- and 14-h shifts. Under 97th percentile environmental conditions and high fuel loads, dose guidelines were exceeded for several reported cases for 90Sr, 238Pu and 210Po. Potential for exceeding dose guidelines was mitigated by including plume rise (>2 m s–1) or moving a small distance from the fire owing to large concentration gradients near the edge of the fire. As a result, our approach can quickly estimate potential dose from airborne radionuclides in wildland fire and assist decision-making to reduce firefighter exposure.

  1. Modelling and mitigating dose to firefighters from inhalation of radionuclides in wildland fire smoke.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Viner, Brian J.

    2015-06-12

    Firefighters responding to wildland fires where surface litter and vegetation contain radiological contamination will receive a radiological dose by inhaling resuspended radioactive material in the smoke. This may increase their lifetime risk of contracting certain types of cancer. Using published data, we modelled hypothetical radionuclide emissions, dispersion and dose for 70th and 97th percentile environmental conditions and for average and high fuel loads at the Savannah River Site. We predicted downwind concentration and potential dose to firefighters for radionuclides of interest (137Cs, 238Pu, 90Sr and 210Po). Predicted concentrations exceeded dose guidelines in the base case scenario emissions of 1.0 x 107Bq ha-1 for 238Pu at 70th percentile environmental conditions and average fuel load levels for both 4- and 14-h shifts. Under 97th percentile environmental conditions and high fuel loads, dose guidelines were exceeded for several reported cases for 90Sr, 238Pu and 210Po. The potential for exceeding dose guidelines was mitigated by including plume rise (>2ms-1) or moving a small distance from the fire owing to large concentration gradients near the edge of the fire. This approach can quickly estimate potential dose from airborne radionuclides in wildland fire and assist decision-making to reduce firefighter exposure.

  2. Modelling and mitigating dose to firefighters from inhalation of radionuclides in wildland fire smoke

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Viner, Brian J.; Jannik, Tim; Stone, Daniel; Hepworth, Allan; Naeher, Luke; Adetona, Olorunfemi; Blake, John; Eddy, Teresa

    2015-06-12

    Firefighters responding to wildland fires where surface litter and vegetation contain radiological contamination will receive a radiological dose by inhaling resuspended radioactive material in the smoke. This may increase their lifetime risk of contracting certain types of cancer. Using published data, we modelled hypothetical radionuclide emissions, dispersion and dose for 70th and 97th percentile environmental conditions and for average and high fuel loads at the Savannah River Site. We predicted downwind concentration and potential dose to firefighters for radionuclides of interest (137Cs, 238Pu, 90Sr and 210Po). Predicted concentrations exceeded dose guidelines in the base case scenario emissions of 1.0 ×more »107 Bq ha–1 for 238Pu at 70th percentile environmental conditions and average fuel load levels for both 4- and 14-h shifts. Under 97th percentile environmental conditions and high fuel loads, dose guidelines were exceeded for several reported cases for 90Sr, 238Pu and 210Po. Potential for exceeding dose guidelines was mitigated by including plume rise (>2 m s–1) or moving a small distance from the fire owing to large concentration gradients near the edge of the fire. As a result, our approach can quickly estimate potential dose from airborne radionuclides in wildland fire and assist decision-making to reduce firefighter exposure.« less

  3. Model-Predictive Cascade Mitigation in Electric Power Systems With Storage and Renewables-Part I: Theory and Implementation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Almassalkhi, MR; Hiskens, IA

    2015-01-01

    A novel model predictive control (MPC) scheme is developed for mitigating the effects of severe line-overload disturbances in electrical power systems. A piece-wise linear convex approximation of line losses is employed to model the effect of transmission line power flow on conductor temperatures. Control is achieved through a receding-horizon model predictive control (MPC) strategy which alleviates line temperature overloads and thereby prevents the propagation of outages. The MPC strategy adjusts line flows by rescheduling generation, energy storage and controllable load, while taking into account ramp-rate limits and network limitations. In Part II of this paper, the MPC strategy is illustrated through simulation of the IEEE RTS-96 network, augmented to incorporate energy storage and renewable generation.

  4. Examining Local Jurisdictions' Capacity and Commitment For Hazard Mitigation Policies and Strategies along the Texas Coast 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Husein, Rahmawati

    2012-07-16

    the local capacity and commitment affect the adoption and implementation of land use and development regulations to mitigate any type of hazards in the coastal areas. This study investigates hazard mitigation policies and practices at municipal and county...

  5. Japan's Long-term Energy Demand and Supply Scenario to 2050 - Estimation for the Potential of Massive CO2 Mitigation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Komiyama, Ryoichi; Marnay, Chris; Stadler, Michael; Lai, Judy; Borgeson, Sam; Coffey, Brian; Azevedo, Ines Lima

    2009-09-01

    In this analysis, the authors projected Japan's energy demand/supply and energy-related CO{sub 2} emissions to 2050. Their analysis of various scenarios indicated that Japan's CO{sub 2} emissions in 2050 could be potentially reduced by 26-58% from the current level (FY 2005). These results suggest that Japan could set a CO{sub 2} emission reduction target for 2050 at between 30% and 60%. In order to reduce CO{sub 2} emissions by 60% in 2050 from the present level, Japan will have to strongly promote energy conservation at the same pace as an annual rate of 1.9% after the oil crises (to cut primary energy demand per GDP (TPES/GDP) in 2050 by 60% from 2005) and expand the share of non-fossil energy sources in total primary energy supply in 2050 to 50% (to reduce CO{sub 2} emissions per primary energy demand (CO{sub 2}/TPES) in 2050 by 40% from 2005). Concerning power generation mix in 2050, nuclear power will account for 60%, solar and other renewable energy sources for 20%, hydro power for 10% and fossil-fired generation for 10%, indicating substantial shift away from fossil fuel in electric power supply. Among the mitigation measures in the case of reducing CO{sub 2} emissions by 60% in 2050, energy conservation will make the greatest contribution to the emission reduction, being followed by solar power, nuclear power and other renewable energy sources. In order to realize this massive CO{sub 2} abatement, however, Japan will have to overcome technological and economic challenges including the large-scale deployment of nuclear power and renewable technologies.

  6. Cross-ontological analytics for alignment of different classification schemes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Posse, Christian (Seattle, WA); Sanfilippo, Antonio P (Richland, WA); Gopalan, Banu (Cleveland, OH); Riensche, Roderick M (Richland, WA); Baddeley, Robert L (Richland, WA)

    2010-09-28

    Quantification of the similarity between nodes in multiple electronic classification schemes is provided by automatically identifying relationships and similarities between nodes within and across the electronic classification schemes. Quantifying the similarity between a first node in a first electronic classification scheme and a second node in a second electronic classification scheme involves finding a third node in the first electronic classification scheme, wherein a first product value of an inter-scheme similarity value between the second and third nodes and an intra-scheme similarity value between the first and third nodes is a maximum. A fourth node in the second electronic classification scheme can be found, wherein a second product value of an inter-scheme similarity value between the first and fourth nodes and an intra-scheme similarity value between the second and fourth nodes is a maximum. The maximum between the first and second product values represents a measure of similarity between the first and second nodes.

  7. Wildlife and Wildlife Habitat Mitigation Plan for Hungry Horse Hydroelectric Project, Final Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bissell, Gael

    1985-01-01

    This report describes the proposed mitigation plan for wildlife losses attributable to the construction of the Hungry Horse hydroelectric project. In this report, mitigation objectives and alternatives, the recommended mitigation projects, and the crediting system for each project are described by each target species. Mitigation objectives for each species (group) were established based on the loss estimates but tailored to the recommended projects. 13 refs., 3 figs., 19 tabs.

  8. EIA - Greenhouse Gas Emissions - Methane Emissions

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    of U.S. methane emissions are energy production, distribution, and use; agriculture; and waste management (Figure 17). U.S. methane emissions in 2009 totaled 731 MMTCO2e, 0.9...

  9. Abstract--A mesochronous pipeline scheme is described in this paper. In a conventional pipeline scheme each pipeline stage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Delgado-Frias, José G.

    Abstract-- A mesochronous pipeline scheme is described in this paper. In a conventional pipeline scheme each pipeline stage operates on only one data set at a time. In the mesochronous scheme, pipeline stages operate on multiple data sets simultaneously. The clock period in conventional pipeline scheme

  10. Recent advances in carbon emissions reduction: policies, technologies, monitoring, assessment and modeling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moore, John

    energy systems Carbon capture and storage Geoengineering approaches Carbon trade/tax schemes a b s t r Keywords: Carbon emissions reduction Improved energy use efficiency Implementation of low-fossil carbon in this special volume assess alternative carbon emissions reduction approaches, such as carbon capture

  11. Sources of CO and UHC Emissions in Low-Temperature Diesel Combustion Systems

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The sources of unburned hydrocarbons and CO emissions from a PCI-like, early-injection low-temperature combustion system are examined through a combination of homogeneous reactor modeling employing detailed kinetics, multi-dimensional modeling using a reduced kinetic scheme, engine-out emissions measurements, and in-cylinder imaging of the spatial distributions of UHC and CO.

  12. INTEGRATING AGRICULTURAL AND FORESTRY GHG MITIGATION RESPONSE INTO GENEARL ECONOMY FRAMEWORKS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCarl, Bruce A.

    INTEGRATING AGRICULTURAL AND FORESTRY GHG MITIGATION RESPONSE INTO GENEARL ECONOMY FRAMEWORKS GHG MITIGATION RESPONSE INTO GENEARL ECONOMY FRAMEWORKS: DEVELOPING A FAMILY OF RESPONSE FUNCTIONS 1 of economy-wide analysis of greenhouse gas mitigation options can be found in a special issue of the Energy

  13. A Measurement Framework of Alert Characteristics for False Positive Mitigation Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Young, R. Michael

    : Section 2 provides related work on ACs used in other FP mitigation techniques, Section 3 describes describes the ACs used by other FP mitigation techniques. We include most of these ACs in this work to be unactionable. False positive mitigation techniques utilize information about static analysis alerts, called

  14. Cryptographic Schemes based on Elliptic Curve Pairings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paterson, Kenny

    on Elliptic Curve Pairings: Contributions to Public Key Cryptography and Key Agreement Protocols This thesis are then used to make concrete CL-PKC schemes and are also used to make other efficient key agreement protocols. It does rely on the use of a trusted authority (TA) who is in possession of a master key. In this respect

  15. Analysis of modulation scheme using GNU Radio

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu, Chansu

    1 Analysis of modulation scheme using GNU Radio By: Zeyu long Outline Introduce Project Goal QPSK CPFSK Resolute Project conclusion Project challenges Reference #12;2 Introduce (1) GNU radio: One of the most popular applications of Software Defined Radios Use C++ to write blocks Use python to connect

  16. AN ALGEBRAIC DESCRIPTION OF ITERATIVE DECODING SCHEMES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Soljanin, Emina

    AN ALGEBRAIC DESCRIPTION OF ITERATIVE DECODING SCHEMES ELKE OFFER AND EMINA SOLJANIN Abstract University of Technology, D- 80290 Munich, Germany, elke@lnt.e-technik.tu-muenchen.de Mathematical Sciences Research Center, Bell Labs, Lucent Technologies, Murray Hill, NJ 07974, USA. emina@lucent.com 1 #12;2 E

  17. BRAZIL VISITING FELLOWSHIP SCHEME Application Form

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Birmingham, University of

    BRAZIL VISITING FELLOWSHIP SCHEME Application Form APPLICATIONS SHOULD BE TYPEWRITTEN AND BOXES of attendance Qualifications awarded and class of Honours, etc. Principal Subject(s) taken #12;BRAZIL VISITING): Date(s) From To To Nature of work and Position held Name and address of employer #12;BRAZIL VISITING

  18. Embedded Correlated Wavefunction Schemes: Theory and Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Florian, Libisch

    of fuel cell catalysis (i.e., O2 reduction at metal surfaces) and plasmon-mediated photocatalysis by metalEmbedded Correlated Wavefunction Schemes: Theory and Applications Florian Libisch, Chen Huang, and Emily A. Carter*,§ Institute for Theoretical Physics, Vienna University of Technology, 1040 Vienna

  19. Extending PIC schemes for the study of physics in ultra-strong laser fields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gonoskov, A; Efimenko, E; Ilderton, A; Marklund, M; Meyerov, I; Muraviev, A; Surmin, I; Wallin, E

    2014-01-01

    Progress in laser technology has opened up possibilities using intense light to probe fundamental physics of ultra-strong electromagnetic fields. A commensurate interest has arisen in large-scale numerical simulations of laser-matter interactions, and here we describe the extension of particle-in-cell (PIC) schemes to account for strong field phenomena. We describe here the numerical implementation of strong-field processes such as quantized emission and electron-positron pair production, and provide solutions for related methodological and algorithmic problems of radiation double counting, low-energy cutoffs in particle emission, memory overload due to cascades of particle production, control of computational costs for statistical routines, and the limitations on time steps due to the quantized nature of emission. We also present a unified technical interface for including the processes of interest in different PIC implementations. The PIC codes PICADOR and ELMIS, which support this interface, are briefly re...

  20. Status of national CO{sub 2}-mitigation projects and initiatives in the Philippine energy sector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tupas, C.T.

    1996-12-31

    The Philippines has a huge energy requirement for the next 30 years in order to achieve its economic growth target. Based on an expected annual GDP growth rate of 6.9 percent, the Philippines total energy requirement is estimated to increase at an average of 6.6 percent annually from 1996 to 2025. Gross energy demand shall increase from 219.0 million barrels of fuel oil equivalent (MMBFOE) in 1996 to 552.4 MMBFOE in 2010 and 1,392.6 MMBFOE by 2025. These energy demand levels shall be driven primarily by the substantial increase in fuel requirements for power generation whose share of total energy requirement is 28.3 percent in 1996, 48.0 percent in 2010 and 55.0 percent in 2025. With the expected increase in energy demand, there will necessarily be adverse impacts on the environment. Energy projects and their supporting systems - from fuel extraction and storage to distribution - can and will be major contributors not only to local but also to regional and global environmental pollution and degradation. International experiences and trends in greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions inventory have shown that the energy sector has always been the dominant source of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) - the principal contributor to global climate change. The energy sector`s CO{sub 2} emissions come primarily from fossil fuels combustion. Since energy use is the dominant source of CO{sub 2} emissions, efforts should therefore be concentrated on designing a mitigation strategy in this sector.

  1. Quantum theory of amplified spontaneous emission: scaling properties

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garrison, J.C.; Nathel, H.; Chiao, R.Y.

    1988-07-01

    We formulate a second-quantized theory of propagation in laser-active media and apply it to the description of amplified spontaneous emission for the case of homogeneously broadened three-level atoms in a rodlike geometry with arbitrary Fresnel number. The electromagnetic field is treated in paraxial approximation by an ad hoc quantization scheme, and spontaneous emission into off-axis modes is described by noise operator methods. We show by a scaling (dimensional) analysis how to derive the characteristic fields and lengths for superfluorescence and amplified spontaneous emission. The results show that dye media can be used as experimental analogs for x-ray lasers.

  2. Composite Materials for Hazard Mitigation of Reactive Metal Hydrides.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pratt, Joseph William; Cordaro, Joseph Gabriel; Sartor, George B.; Dedrick, Daniel E.; Reeder, Craig L.

    2012-02-01

    In an attempt to mitigate the hazards associated with storing large quantities of reactive metal hydrides, polymer composite materials were synthesized and tested under simulated usage and accident conditions. The composites were made by polymerizing vinyl monomers using free-radical polymerization chemistry, in the presence of the metal hydride. Composites with vinyl-containing siloxane oligomers were also polymerized with and without added styrene and divinyl benzene. Hydrogen capacity measurements revealed that addition of the polymer to the metal hydride reduced the inherent hydrogen storage capacity of the material. The composites were found to be initially effective at reducing the amount of heat released during oxidation. However, upon cycling the composites, the mitigating behavior was lost. While the polymer composites we investigated have mitigating potential and are physically robust, they undergo a chemical change upon cycling that makes them subsequently ineffective at mitigating heat release upon oxidation of the metal hydride. Acknowledgements The authors would like to thank the following people who participated in this project: Ned Stetson (U.S. Department of Energy) for sponsorship and support of the project. Ken Stewart (Sandia) for building the flow-through calorimeter and cycling test stations. Isidro Ruvalcaba, Jr. (Sandia) for qualitative experiments on the interaction of sodium alanate with water. Terry Johnson (Sandia) for sharing his expertise and knowledge of metal hydrides, and sodium alanate in particular. Marcina Moreno (Sandia) for programmatic assistance. John Khalil (United Technologies Research Corp) for insight into the hazards of reactive metal hydrides and real-world accident scenario experiments. Summary In an attempt to mitigate and/or manage hazards associated with storing bulk quantities of reactive metal hydrides, polymer composite materials (a mixture of a mitigating polymer and a metal hydride) were synthesized and tested under simulated usage and accident conditions. Mitigating the hazards associated with reactive metal hydrides during an accident while finding a way to keep the original capability of the active material intact during normal use has been the focus of this work. These composites were made by polymerizing vinyl monomers using free-radical polymerization chemistry, in the presence of the metal hydride, in this case a prepared sodium alanate (chosen as a representative reactive metal hydride). It was found that the polymerization of styrene and divinyl benzene could be initiated using AIBN in toluene at 70 degC. The resulting composite materials can be either hard or brittle solids depending on the cross-linking density. Thermal decomposition of these styrene-based composite materials is lower than neat polystyrene indicating that the chemical nature of the polymer is affected by the formation of the composite. The char-forming nature of cross-linked polystyrene is low and therefore, not an ideal polymer for hazard mitigation. To obtain composite materials containing a polymer with higher char-forming potential, siloxane-based monomers were investigated. Four vinyl-containing siloxane oligomers were polymerized with and without added styrene and divinyl benzene. Like the styrene materials, these composite materials exhibited thermal decomposition behavior significantly different than the neat polymers. Specifically, the thermal decomposition temperature was shifted approximately 100 degC lower than the neat polymer signifying a major chemical change to the polymer network. Thermal analysis of the cycled samples was performed on the siloxane-based composite materials. It was found that after 30 cycles the siloxane-containing polymer composite material has similar TGA/DSC-MS traces as the virgin composite material indicating that the polymer is physically intact upon cycling. Hydrogen capacity measurements revealed that addition of the polymer to the metal hydride in the form of a composite material reduced the inherent hydrogen storage capacity of the material. This

  3. Validation of techniques to mitigate copper surface contamination in CUORE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. Alessandria; R. Ardito; D. R. Artusa; F. T. Avignone III; O. Azzolini; M. Balata; T. I. Banks; G. Bari; J. Beeman; F. Bellini; A. Bersani; M. Biassoni; T. Bloxham; C. Brofferio; C. Bucci; X. Z. Cai; L. Canonica; S. Capelli; L. Carbone; L. Cardani; M. Carrettoni; N. Casali; N. Chott; M. Clemenza; C. Cosmelli; O. Cremonesi; R. J. Creswick; I. Dafinei; A. Dally; V. Datskov; A. De Biasi; M. M. Deninno; S. Di Domizio; M. L. di Vacri; L. Ejzak; R. Faccini; D. Q. Fang; H. A. Farach; E. Ferri; F. Ferroni; E. Fiorini; M. A. Franceschi; S. J. Freedman; B. K. Fujikawa; A. Giachero; L. Gironi; A. Giuliani; J. Goett; A. Goodsell; P. Gorla; C. Gotti; E. Guardincerri; T. D. Gutierrez; E. E. Haller; K. Han; K. M. Heeger; H. Z. Huang; R. Kadel; K. Kazkaz; G. Keppel; L. Kogler; Yu. G. Kolomensky; D. Lenz; Y. L. Li; C. Ligi; X. Liu; Y. G. Ma; C. Maiano; M. Maino; M. Martinez; R. H. Maruyama; Y. Mei; N. Moggi; S. Morganti; T. Napolitano; S. Newman; S. Nisi; C. Nones; E. B. Norman; A. Nucciotti; F. Orio; D. Orlandi; J. L. Ouellet; M. Pallavicini; V. Palmieri; L. Pattavina; M. Pavan; M. Pedretti; G. Pessina; S. Pirro; E. Previtali; V. Rampazzo; R. Reil; F. Rimondi; C. Rosenfeld; C. Rusconi; S. Sangiorgio; N. D. Scielzo; M. Sisti; A. R. Smith; L. Sparks; F. Stivanello; L. Taffarello; M. Tenconi; W. D. Tian; C. Tomei; S. Trentalange; G. Ventura; M. Vignati; B. S. Wang; H. W. Wang; C. A. Whitten Jr; T. Wise; A. Woodcraft; L. Zanotti; C. Zarra; B. X. Zhu; S. Zucchelli

    2013-04-04

    In this article we describe the background challenges for the CUORE experiment posed by surface contamination of inert detector materials such as copper, and present three techniques explored to mitigate these backgrounds. Using data from a dedicated test apparatus constructed to validate and compare these techniques we demonstrate that copper surface contamination levels better than 10E-07 - 10E-08 Bq/cm2 are achieved for 238U and 232Th. If these levels are reproduced in the final CUORE apparatus the projected 90% C.L. upper limit on the number of background counts in the region of interest is 0.02-0.03 counts/keV/kg/y depending on the adopted mitigation technique.

  4. Carbon mitigation: A holistic approach to the issue

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Plasynski, S.I.; Bose, A.C.; Bergman, P.D.; Dorchak, T.P.; Hyman, D.M.; Loh, H.P.; Ness, H.M.

    1999-07-01

    One of the hottest topics currently is that of global warming that may be caused by the anthropogenic release of CO{sub 2} from burning fossil fuels. Within the Power and Environmental Systems Division at the Federal Energy Technology Center (FETC), a Greenhouse Gas Team has been assembled to implement a program for addressing the issues of greenhouse gases. This team is looking at the various questions of how to avoid, capture, utilize and/or sequester CO{sub 2} and other greenhouse gases. This paper will present an integrated approach to addressing the issue of carbon mitigation and will highlight some of the research work and projects being sponsored by FETC. The Greenhouse Gas Team has defined the component of carbon mitigation broadly as ocean sequestration, geological sequestration, capture, utilization, energy production, and analysis.

  5. Tank vapor mitigation requirements for Hanford Tank Farms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rakestraw, L.D.

    1994-11-15

    Westinghouse Hanford Company has contracted Los Alamos Technical Associates to listing of vapors and aerosols that are or may be emitted from the High Level Waste (HLW) tanks at Hanford. Mitigation requirements under Federal and State law, as well as DOE Orders, are included in the listing. The lists will be used to support permitting activities relative to tank farm ventilation system up-grades. This task is designated Task 108 under MJB-SWV-312057 and is an extension of efforts begun under Task 53 of Purchase Order MPB-SVV-03291 5 for Mechanical Engineering Support. The results of that task, which covered only thirty-nine tanks, are repeated here to provide a single source document for vapor mitigation requirements for all 177 HLW tanks.

  6. Ocean Fertilization and Other Climate Change Mitigation Strategies: An Overview

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huesemann, Michael H.

    2008-07-29

    In order to evaluate ocean fertilization in the larger context of other proposed strategies for reducing the threat of the global warming, a wide range of different climate change mitigation approaches are compared in terms of their long-term potential, stage of development, relative costs and potential risks, as well as public acceptance. This broad comparative analysis is carried out for the following climate change mitigation strategies: supply-side and end-use efficiency improvements, terrestrial and geological carbon sequestration, CO2 ocean disposal and iron fertilization, nuclear power, and renewable energy generation from biomass, passive solar, solar thermal, photovoltaics, hydroelectric and wind. In addition, because of the inherent problems of conducting an objective comparative cost-benefit analysis, two non-technological solutions to global warming are also discussed: curbing population growth and transitioning to a steady-state economy.

  7. EA-1617: Mitigation Action Plan | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum Based| Department8,DepartmentFinal EnvironmentalFinalMitigation Action Plan

  8. EA-1628: Mitigation Action Plan | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum Based| Department8,DepartmentFinal EnvironmentalFinalMitigation Action8:

  9. EA-1704: Mitigation Action Plan | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum Based| Department8,DepartmentFinalin Fairbault, MN8: Finding of NoofMitigation

  10. EA-1855: Mitigation Action Plan | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum Based| Department8,DepartmentFinalinDepartmentSaginaw,EnergyMitigation

  11. EIS-0380: Mitigation Action Plan | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum Based|Department of5 PeerRecordRecordStatementDepartmentMitigation Action Plan

  12. EIS-0409: Mitigation Action Plan | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum Based|Department of5Department oftoStatementMitigation Action Plan EIS-0409:

  13. EIS-0425: Mitigation Action Plan | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum Based|Department of5DepartmentStatement |Management and4:Statement |Mitigation

  14. Mitigation Action Plans (MAP) and Related Documents | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuelsof EnergyApril 2014 |Department ofMayMissionMitigation Action Plans (MAP) and

  15. Energy use and CO2 emissions of China’s industrial sector from a global perspective

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhou, Sheng; Kyle, G. Page; Yu, Sha; Clarke, Leon E.; Eom, Jiyong; Luckow, Patrick W.; Chaturvedi, Vaibhav; Zhang, Xiliang; Edmonds, James A.

    2013-07-10

    The industrial sector has accounted for more than 50% of China’s final energy consumption in the past 30 years. Understanding the future emissions and emissions mitigation opportunities depends on proper characterization of the present-day industrial energy use, as well as industrial demand drivers and technological opportunities in the future. Traditionally, however, integrated assessment research has handled the industrial sector of China in a highly aggregate form. In this study, we develop a technologically detailed, service-oriented representation of 11 industrial subsectors in China, and analyze a suite of scenarios of future industrial demand growth. We find that, due to anticipated saturation of China’s per-capita demands of basic industrial goods, industrial energy demand and CO2 emissions approach a plateau between 2030 and 2040, then decrease gradually. Still, without emissions mitigation policies, the industrial sector remains heavily reliant on coal, and therefore emissions-intensive. With carbon prices, we observe some degree of industrial sector electrification, deployment of CCS at large industrial point sources of CO2 emissions at low carbon prices, an increase in the share of CHP systems at industrial facilities. These technological responses amount to reductions of industrial emissions (including indirect emission from electricity) are of 24% in 2050 and 66% in 2095.

  16. Vehicle Emissions Review- 2012

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Reviews vehicle emission control highlighting representative studies that illustrate the state-of-the-art

  17. Multiwavelength Thermal Emission

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Cruz, University of

    Multiwavelength Astronomy NASA #12;Thermal Emission #12;Thermal Emission Non-thermal p-p collisions Optical IR Radio/ Microwave sources of emission massive stars, WHIM, Ly many dust, cool objects-ray ~GeV Gamma-ray ~TeV sources of emission AGN, clusters, SNR, binaries, stars AGN (obscured), shocks

  18. Diesel Emission Control Review

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Reviews regulatory requirements and technology approaches for diesel emission control for heavy and light duty applications

  19. The Scheme of Beam Synchronization in MEIC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Yuhong; Derbenev, Yaroslav S.; Hutton, Andrew M.

    2013-06-01

    Synchronizing colliding beams at single or multiple collision points is a critical R&D issue in the design of a medium energy electron-ion collider (MEIC) at Jefferson Lab. The path-length variation due to changes in the ion energy, which varies over 20 to 100 GeV, could be more than several times the bunch spacing. The scheme adopted in the present MEIC baseline is centered on varying the number of bunches (i.e., harmonic number) stored in the collider ring. This could provide a set of discrete energies for proton or ions such that the beam synchronization condition is satisfied. To cover the ion energy between these synchronized values, we further propose to vary simultaneously the electron ring circumference and the frequency of the RF systems in both collider rings. We also present in this paper the requirement of frequency tunability of SRF cavities to support the scheme.

  20. Exact scheme independence at two loops

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stefano Arnone; Antonio Gatti; Tim R. Morris; Oliver J. Rosten

    2003-11-11

    We further develop an algorithmic and diagrammatic computational framework for very general exact renormalization groups, where the embedded regularisation scheme, parametrised by a general cutoff function and infinitely many higher point vertices, is left unspecified. Calculations proceed iteratively,by integrating by parts with respect to the effective cutoff, thus introducing effective propagators, and differentials of vertices that can be expanded using the flow equations; many cancellations occur on using the fact that the effective propagator is the inverse of the classical Wilsonian two-point vertex. We demonstrate the power of these methods by computing the beta function up to two loops in massless four dimensional scalar field theory, obtaining the expected universal coefficients, independent of the details of the regularisation scheme.

  1. A new scheme of radiation transfer in H II regions including transient heating of grains

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. K. Ghosh; R. P. Verma

    2000-09-21

    A new scheme of radiation transfer for understanding infrared spectra of H II regions, has been developed. This scheme considers non-equilibrium processes (e. g. transient heating of the very small grains, VSG; and the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon, PAH) also, in addition to the equilibrium thermal emission from normal dust grains (BG). The spherically symmetric interstellar dust cloud is segmented into a large number of "onion skin" shells in order to implement the non-equilibrium processes. The scheme attempts to fit the observed SED originating from the dust component, by exploring the following parameters : (i) geometrical details of the dust cloud, (ii) PAH size and abundance, (iii) composition of normal grains (BG), (iv) radial distribution of all dust (BG, VSG & PAH). The scheme has been applied to a set of five compact H II regions (IRAS 18116- 1646, 18162-2048, 19442+2427, 22308+5812 & 18434-0242) whose spectra are available with adequate spectral resolution. The best fit models and inferences about the parameters for these sources are presented.

  2. Beyond the Inventory: An Interagency Collaboration to Reduce Greenhouse Gas Emissions in the Greater Yellowstone Area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kandt, A.; Hotchkiss, E.; Fiebig, M.

    2010-10-01

    As one of the largest, intact ecosystems in the continental United States, land managers within the Greater Yellowstone Area (GYA) have recognized the importance of compiling and understanding agency greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. The 10 Federal units within the GYA have taken an active role in compiling GHG inventories on a unit- and ecosystem-wide level, setting goals for GHG mitigation, and identifying mitigation strategies for achieving those goals. This paper details the processes, methodologies, challenges, solutions, and lessons learned by the 10 Federal units within the GYA throughout this ongoing effort.

  3. Publication in S. Sorrell and J. Skea (eds.) Pollution for Sale Emissions trading and joint implementation. Cheltenham, Edward Elgar, 1999, pp. 272-295

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Publication in S. Sorrell and J. Skea (eds.) Pollution for Sale ­Emissions trading and joint constraints: possible schemes for SO2 emissions trading in the EU Olivier Godard1 2 -Emissions trading and joint implementation. (1999) 272-295" #12;O. Godard - SO2 trading in the EU 2 long

  4. Controlling the emission properties of multimode vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers via polarization-and frequency-selective feedback

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fischer, Ingo

    Controlling the emission properties of multimode vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers via scheme to control the emission properties of multimode vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers. A joint measurements and numerical simulations also reveal that the emission and polarization dynamics can

  5. EIA - Greenhouse Gas Emissions - Nitrous Oxide Emissions

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    U.S. nitrous oxide emissions include agriculture, energy use, industrial processes, and waste management (Figure 22). The largest source is agriculture (73 percent), and the...

  6. Emissions Scenarios, Costs, and Implementation Considerations of REDD Programs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sathaye, Jayant; Andrasko, Ken; Chan, Peter

    2011-04-11

    Greenhouse gas emissions from the forestry sector are estimated to be 8.4 GtCO2-eq./year or about 17percent of the global emissions. We estimate that the cost forreducing deforestation is low in Africa and several times higher in Latin America and Southeast Asia. These cost estimates are sensitive to the uncertainties of how muchunsustainable high-revenue logging occurs, little understood transaction and program implementation costs, and barriers to implementation including governance issues. Due to lack of capacity in the affected countries, achieving reduction or avoidance of carbon emissions will require extensive REDD-plus programs. Preliminary REDD-plus Readiness cost estimates and program descriptions for Indonesia, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Ghana, Guyana and Mexico show that roughly one-third of potential REDD-plus mitigation benefits might come from avoided deforestation and the rest from avoided forest degradation and other REDD-plus activities.

  7. second-order convex splitting schemes for gradient flows with ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2011-11-08

    unconditional stability, second order scheme, convex-concave decomposition, epitaxial growth, Ehrlich-. Schwoebel type energy. AMS subject classifications.

  8. Optimal Multiple Assignments with (,)-Scheme for General Access Structures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    International Association for Cryptologic Research (IACR)

    Optimal Multiple Assignments with (,)-Scheme for General Access Structures Qiang Li, Xiangxue Li to construct an optimal multiple assignment with threshold schemes for general access structure. In this paper the values of either 0 or 1. We also show that given a complete access structure, an optimal scheme may

  9. Compiler Construction Using Scheme Erik Hilsdale J. Michael Ashley

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dybvig, R. Kent

    Compiler Construction Using Scheme Erik Hilsdale J. Michael Ashley R. Kent Dybvig Daniel P {ehilsdal,jashley,dyb,dfried}@cs.indiana.edu Abstract This paper describes a course in compiler design that focuses on the Scheme implementation of a Scheme compiler that generates native assembly code for a real

  10. Data Distribution Schemes of Sparse Arrays on Distributed Memory Multicomputers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chung, Yeh-Ching

    (CFS) and Encoding-Decoding (ED), for sparse array distribution. In the CFS scheme, the data are performed before and after the data distribution phase, respectively. To evaluate the CFS and the ED schemes. In theoretical analysis, we analyze the SFC, the CFS, and the ED schemes in terms of the data distribution time

  11. A Subject-Delegated Decryption Scheme with "Tightly" Limited Authority

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    International Association for Cryptologic Research (IACR)

    A Subject-Delegated Decryption Scheme with "Tightly" Limited Authority Lihua Wang1 , Takeshi@cs.tsukuba.ac.jp Abstract. In this paper, we present a new proxy cryptosystem named subject-delegated decryption scheme subjects. The advantage of our scheme is that the proxy authorities are tightly limited ("Tightly" Limited

  12. Jet schemes of rational double point singularities Hussein MOURTADA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jet schemes of rational double point singularities Hussein MOURTADA September 30, 2012 Abstract We prove that for m N, m big enough, the number of irreducble components of the schemes of m-jets centered of the jet schemes of an E6 singularity to its "minimal" embedded resolutions of singularities. 1

  13. Jet schemes of rational double point singularities Hussein Mourtada

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bodin, Arnaud

    Jet schemes of rational double point singularities Hussein Mourtada Abstract. We prove that for m N, m big enough, the number of irreducible compo- nents of the schemes of m-jets centered at a point on the minimal reso- lution of the singularity. We also relate some irreducible components of the jet schemes

  14. Performance Analysis of Bicycle Hire schemes Chris Guenther, Jeremy Bradley

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Imperial College, London

    Performance Analysis of Bicycle Hire schemes Chris Guenther, Jeremy Bradley Department of Computing, Imperial College London Bike hire schemes Over past few years, city bicycle hire schemes have emerged occu- pancy, i.e. Bicycle availability at starting stations Parking space availability at destinations

  15. Trading permanent and temporary carbon emissions credits

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marland, Gregg; Marland, Eric

    2009-08-01

    In this issue of Climatic Change, Van Kooten (2009) addresses an issue that has bedeviled negotiators since the drafting stage of the Kyoto Protocol. If we accept that increasing withdrawals of carbon dioxide from the atmpshere has the same net impact on the climate system as reducing emissions of carbon dioxide to the atmosphere, how do we design a system that allows trading of one for the other? As van Kooten expresses the challenge: 'The problem is that emissions reduction and carbon sequestration, while opposite sides of the same coin in some sense, are not directly comparable, thereby inhibiting their trade in carbon markets.' He explains: 'The difficulty centers on the length of time that mitigation strategies without CO{sub 2} from entering the atmosphere - the duration problem.' While reducing emissions of CO{sub 2} represents an essentially permanent benefit for the atmosphere, capturing CO{sub 2} that has been produced (whether capture is from the atmosphere or directly from, for example, the exhaust from power plants) there is the challenge of storing the carbon adn the risk that it will yet escape to the atmosphere. Permanent benefit to the atmosphere is often not assured for carbon sequestration activities. This is especially true if the carbon is taken up and stored in the biosphere - e.g. in forest trees or agricultural soils.

  16. iRESM INITIATIVE UNDERSTANDING DECISION SUPPORT NEEDS FOR CLIMATE CHANGE MITIGATION AND ADAPTATION --US Midwest Region—

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rice, Jennie S.; Runci, Paul J.; Moss, Richard H.; Anderson, Kate L.

    2010-10-01

    The impacts of climate change are already affecting human and environmental systems worldwide, yet many uncertainties persist in the prediction of future climate changes and impacts due to limitations in scientific understanding of relevant causal factors. In particular, there is mounting urgency to efforts to improve models of human and environmental systems at the regional scale, and to integrate climate, ecosystem and energy-economic models to support policy, investment, and risk management decisions related to climate change mitigation (i.e., reducing greenhouse gas emissions) and adaptation (i.e., responding to climate change impacts). The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is developing a modeling framework, the integrated Regional Earth System Model (iRESM), to address regional human-environmental system interactions in response to climate change and the uncertainties therein. The framework will consist of a suite of integrated models representing regional climate change, regional climate policy, and the regional economy, with a focus on simulating the mitigation and adaptation decisions made over time in the energy, transportation, agriculture, and natural resource management sectors.

  17. Development of a purpose built landfill system for the control of methane emissions from municipal solid waste

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Columbia University

    ) has been attempted for munici- pal solid waste management. Methane mitigation and energy generating solid waste Sudhakar Yedla*, Jyoti K. Parikh Indira Gandhi Institute of Development Research, Vaidya (PBLF) has been proposed for the control of methane emissions from municipal solid waste (MSW

  18. Proceedings of the Iowa Egg Industry Symposium, Ames, IA November 7, 2003 Updates on Ammonia Emission from Iowa Layer Houses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kentucky, University of

    -200±3 ppm; Pac III, Dräeger Safety, Inc., Pittsburg, PA) for NH3 measurement and infrared sensor (0 there is a pressing need for research-based data on aerial emissions and evaluation of mitigation techniques under representative U.S. poultry houses and evaluate the efficacy of certain management practices. Selected layer

  19. Computation of spontaneous emission dynamics in colored vacua

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohammad Hosain Teimourpour; Ramy El-Ganainy

    2014-12-25

    We present an efficient time domain numerical scheme for computing spontaneous emission dynamics in colored vacua. Starting from first principles, we map the unitary evolution of a dressed two-level quantum emitter onto the problem of electromagnetic radiation from a complex harmonic oscillator under self-interaction conditions. This latter oscillator-field system can be efficiently integrated by using finite difference time domain method without the need for calculating the photonic eigenmodes of the surrounding environment. In contrast to earlier investigations, our computational framework provides a unified numerical treatment for both weak and strong coupling regimes alike. We illustrate the versatility of our scheme by considering several different examples.

  20. BP's Perspective on Emissions Purdue Emissions Trading Workshop

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    BP's Perspective on Emissions Trading Purdue Emissions Trading Workshop April 30, 2010 Mark - Government policies can create a carbon price via three primary mechanisms: - Emissions trading (BP's strong

  1. Tritium Formation and Mitigation in High-Temperature Reactor Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Piyush Sabharwall; Carl Stoots; Hans A. Schmutz

    2013-03-01

    Tritium is a radiologically active isotope of hydrogen. It is formed in nuclear reactors by neutron absorption and ternary fission events and can subsequently escape into the environment. To prevent the tritium contamination of proposed reactor buildings and surrounding sites, this study examines the root causes and potential mitigation strategies for permeation of tritium (such as: materials selection, inert gas sparging, etc...). A model is presented that can be used to predict permeation rates of hydrogen through metallic alloys at temperatures from 450–750 degrees C. Results of the diffusion model are presented for a steady production of tritium

  2. Tritium Formation and Mitigation in High-Temperature Reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Piyush Sabharwall; Carl Stoots

    2012-10-01

    Tritium is a radiologically active isotope of hydrogen. It is formed in nuclear reactors by neutron absorption and ternary fission events and can subsequently escape into the environment. To prevent the tritium contamination of proposed reactor buildings and surrounding sites, this study examines the root causes and potential mitigation strategies for permeation of tritium (such as: materials selection, inert gas sparging, etc...). A model is presented that can be used to predict permeation rates of hydrogen through metallic alloys at temperatures from 450–750 degrees C. Results of the diffusion model are presented for a steady production of tritium

  3. Property:NEPA Resource Applicant Mitigation | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History ViewMayo,AltFuelVehicle2 Jump to: navigation, searchContDiv JumpTechDscTypeApplicant Mitigation

  4. EA-1915: Mitigation Action Plan | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergy A plug-in electricLaboratoryofNotices |DynegyPowerexMorganBigassesses theMitigation

  5. EIS-0380: Mitigation Action Plan Annual Report | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergy A plug-inPPL EnergyPlus, LLC to5USC787 Rhode2 Mitigation Action Plan Annual Report

  6. EIS-0380: Mitigation Action Plan | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergy A plug-inPPL EnergyPlus, LLC to5USC787 Rhode2 Mitigation Action Plan Annual

  7. EIS-0419: Mitigation Action Plan | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergy A plug-inPPL EnergyPlus, LLC to5USC787 Rhode2 Mitigation The Federal

  8. EIS-0460: Mitigation Action Plan | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergy A plug-inPPL EnergyPlus, LLC to5USC787 Rhode2 MitigationEISbriefly describes those

  9. EIS-0472: Mitigation Action Plan | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergy A plug-inPPL EnergyPlus, LLC to5USC787 Rhode2Conduct PublicDOE'sMitigation Action

  10. Brazil-Mitigation Action Plans and Scenarios (MAPS) | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX E LISTStar Energy LLC JumpBiossence JumpJersey Logo:BraxenergyInformation Mitigation

  11. Mitigation Action Plans and Scenarios (MAPS) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoop Inc Jump to: navigation,Mereg GmbH JumpLLC JumpMissouri EthanolMitigation Action

  12. Appropriate Use of Mitigation and Monitoring and Clarifying the Appropriate

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum Based Fuels Research at 1Comments|L.L.C.Whole-House SolutionsUse of Mitigated

  13. EA-1595: Mitigation Action Plan | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum Based| Department8,Department of2E:\BILLS\H6.PP91:Finding6:Mitigation Action

  14. EA-1636: Mitigation Action Plan | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum Based| Department8,DepartmentFinal EnvironmentalFinalMitigation1: Finding of5:6:

  15. EA-1870: Mitigation Action Plan | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum Based|Department of Energy 8: DOE Notice ofFinal70: DraftMitigation Action

  16. EA-1913: Mitigation Action Plan | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum Based|Department of Energy 8: DOEFinding of NoDraftFinalMitigation Action

  17. EIS-0323: Mitigation Action Plan | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum Based|Department of5 PeerRecord of3:2:-SA-01:Department ofof19:Mitigation Action

  18. EIS-0323: Mitigation Action Plan | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum Based|Department of5 PeerRecord of3:2:-SA-01:Department ofof19:Mitigation

  19. EIS-0384: Mitigation Action Plan | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum Based|Department of5Department of Energy Notice of Intent toMitigation

  20. EIS-0422: Mitigation Action Plan | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum Based|Department of5DepartmentStatement | Department ofEnergyFinalMitigation

  1. Exact scheme independence at one loop

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stefano Arnone; Antonio Gatti; Tim R. Morris

    2002-06-10

    The requirement that the quantum partition function be invariant under a renormalization group transformation results in a wide class of exact renormalization group equations, differing in the form of the kernel. Physical quantities should not be sensitive to the particular choice of the kernel. We demonstrate this scheme independence in four dimensional scalar field theory by showing that, even with a general kernel, the one-loop beta function may be expressed only in terms of the effective action vertices, and thus, under very general conditions, the universal result is recovered.

  2. Exact scheme independence at one loop

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arnone, S; Morris, T R; Arnone, Stefano; Gatti, Antonio; Morris, Tim R.

    2002-01-01

    The requirement that the quantum partition function be invariant under a renormalization group transformation results in a wide class of exact renormalization group equations, differing in the form of the kernel. Physical quantities should not be sensitive to the particular choice of the kernel. We demonstrate this scheme independence in four dimensional scalar field theory by showing that, even with a general kernel, the one-loop beta function may be expressed only in terms of the effective action vertices, and thus, under very general conditions, the universal result is recovered.

  3. Hungry Horse Dam Fisheries Mitigation Implementation Plan, 1990-2003 Progress (Annual) Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Montana Department of Fish, Wildlife and Parks; Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes

    1993-03-10

    In this document the authors present mitigation implementation activities to protect and enhance resident fish and aquatic habitat affected by the construction and operation of Hungry Horse Dam. This plan only addresses non-operational actions (mitigation measures that do not affect dam operation) described in the 'Fisheries Mitigation Plan for Losses Attributable to the Construction and Operation of Hungry Horse Dam' (Mitigation Plan) submitted to the Northwest Power Planning Council (Council) in March 1991 and in accordance with subsequent Council action on that Mitigation Plan. Operational mitigation was deferred for consideration under the Columbia Basin System Operation Review (SOR) process. This document represents an implementation plan considered and conditionally approved by the Council in March of 1993.

  4. Emissions Trading and Social Justice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farber, Daniel A

    2011-01-01

    David  M.  Driesen,  Does  Emissions  Trading  Encourage  Jason  Coburn,  Emissions  Trading   and   Environmental  Szambelan,  U.S.  Emissions  Trading  Markets  for  SO 2  

  5. Bonneville’s “Balanced Scorecard” Approach to Mitigation, Monitoring, and Adaptive Management

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This year Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), DOE’s power marketing organization in the Pacific Northwest, will spend more than $300 million on mitigation projects to meet its mandate under the 1980 Northwest Power Act to “protect, mitigate and enhance” fish and wildlife affected by construction and operation of the Federal Columbia River Power System. How is BPA meeting its responsibility to ratepayers to ensure that these mitigation funds are spent effectively?

  6. Coupling Schemes in Terahertz Planar Metamaterials

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Roy Chowdhury, Dibakar; Singh, Ranjan; Taylor, Antoinette J.; Chen, Hou-Tong; Zhang, Weili; Azad, Abul K.

    2012-01-01

    We present a review of the different coupling schemes in a planar array of terahertz metamaterials. The gap-to-gap near-field capacitive coupling between split-ring resonators in a unit cell leads to either blue shift or red shift of the fundamental inductive-capacitive (LC) resonance, depending on the position of the split gap. The inductive coupling is enhanced by decreasing the inter resonator distance resulting in strong blue shifts of theLCresonance. We observe theLCresonance tuning only when the split-ring resonators are in close proximity of each other; otherwise, they appear to be uncoupled. Conversely, the higher-order resonances are sensitive to the smallest changemore »in the inter particle distance or split-ring resonator orientation and undergo tremendous resonance line reshaping giving rise to a sharp subradiant resonance mode which produces hot spots useful for sensing applications. Most of the coupling schemes in a metamaterial are based on a near-field effect, though there also exists a mechanism to couple the resonators through the excitation of lowest-order lattice mode which facilitates the long-range radiative or diffractive coupling in the split-ring resonator plane leading to resonance line narrowing of the fundamental as well as the higher order resonance modes.« less

  7. Finite-difference schemes for anisotropic diffusion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Es, Bram van; Koren, Barry; Blank, Hugo J. de

    2014-09-01

    In fusion plasmas diffusion tensors are extremely anisotropic due to the high temperature and large magnetic field strength. This causes diffusion, heat conduction, and viscous momentum loss, to effectively be aligned with the magnetic field lines. This alignment leads to different values for the respective diffusive coefficients in the magnetic field direction and in the perpendicular direction, to the extent that heat diffusion coefficients can be up to 10{sup 12} times larger in the parallel direction than in the perpendicular direction. This anisotropy puts stringent requirements on the numerical methods used to approximate the MHD-equations since any misalignment of the grid may cause the perpendicular diffusion to be polluted by the numerical error in approximating the parallel diffusion. Currently the common approach is to apply magnetic field-aligned coordinates, an approach that automatically takes care of the directionality of the diffusive coefficients. This approach runs into problems at x-points and at points where there is magnetic re-connection, since this causes local non-alignment. It is therefore useful to consider numerical schemes that are tolerant to the misalignment of the grid with the magnetic field lines, both to improve existing methods and to help open the possibility of applying regular non-aligned grids. To investigate this, in this paper several discretization schemes are developed and applied to the anisotropic heat diffusion equation on a non-aligned grid.

  8. High Order Upwind Schemes for Multidimensional Magnetohydrodynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. Londrillo; L. Del Zanna

    1999-10-05

    A general method for constructing high order upwind schemes for multidimensional magnetohydrodynamics (MHD), having as a main built-in condition the divergence-free constraint $\\divb=0$ for the magnetic field vector $\\bb$, is proposed. The suggested procedure is based on {\\em consistency} arguments, by taking into account the specific operator structure of MHD equations with respect to the reference Euler equations of gas-dynamics. This approach leads in a natural way to a staggered representation of the $\\bb$ field numerical data where the divergence-free condition in the cell-averaged form, corresponding to second order accurate numerical derivatives, is exactly fulfilled. To extend this property to higher order schemes, we then give general prescriptions to satisfy a $(r+1)^{th}$ order accurate $\\divb=0$ relation for any numerical $\\bb$ field having a $r^{th}$ order interpolation accuracy. Consistency arguments lead also to a proper formulation of the upwind procedures needed to integrate the induction equations, assuring the exact conservation in time of the divergence-free condition and the related continuity properties for the $\\bb$ vector components. As an application, a third order code to simulate multidimensional MHD flows of astrophysical interest is developed using ENO-based reconstruction algorithms. Several test problems to illustrate and validate the proposed approach are finally presented.

  9. Can Quantum Entanglement Detection Schemes Improve Search?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Luís Tarrataca; Andreas Wichert

    2015-02-06

    Quantum computation, in particular Grover's algorithm, has aroused a great deal of interest since it allows for a quadratic speedup to be obtained in search procedures. Classical search procedures for an $N$ element database require at most $O(N)$ time complexity. Grover's algorithm is able to find a solution with high probability in $O(\\sqrt{N})$ time through an amplitude amplification scheme. In this work we draw elements from both classical and quantum computation to develop an alternative search proposal based on quantum entanglement detection schemes. In 2002, Horodecki and Ekert proposed an efficient method for direct detection of quantum entanglement. Our proposition to quantum search combines quantum entanglement detection alongside entanglement inducing operators. Grover's quantum search relies on measuring a quantum superposition after having applied a unitary evolution. We deviate from the standard method by focusing on fine-tuning a unitary operator in order to infer the solution with certainty. Our proposal sacrifices space for speed and depends on the mathematical properties of linear positive maps $\\Lambda$ which have not been operationally characterized. Whether such a $\\Lambda$ can be easily determined remains an open question.

  10. Evaluation of a vibration source detection scheme

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jendrzejczyk, J.A.; Wambsganss, M.W.; Smith, R.K.

    1992-04-01

    When the Advanced Photon Source (APS) facility is commissioned, there will be many potential sources of local ground motion excitation (near-field sources). Some of these may be of sufficient amplitude and at a specific frequency so as to be detrimental to the stability of the storage ring beamline. A sampling of possible sources is as follows: 2500-hp chillers in the utility building; six cooling-tower fans that are powered by 75-hp electric motors; various water circulation pumps; power supplies, controllers, and transformers; and air-handling units and associated fans. To detect equipment that causes excessive ground excitation at a site as large as the APS, it will be necessary to have a validated source detection scheme. When performing low-amplitude vibration testing in and around Building 335 of Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), we observed a cyclic 8-Hz vibration. The cyclic nature of the signal is apparent in Fig. 1, which represents data measured on the floor at the main level of Building 335 on March 31, 1992. A simple vibration source location scheme, based on triangulation, was evaluated as a means to locate the source of the 8-Hz vibration and is the subject of this technical note. 1 ref.

  11. Hellsgate Winter Range : Wildlife Mitigation Project. Final Environmental Assessment.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    1995-03-01

    Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) proposes to fund the Hellsgate Winter Range Wildlife Mitigation Project (Project) in a cooperative effort with the Colville Confederated Tribes and the Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA). The proposed action would allow the sponsors to secure property and conduct wildlife management activities within the boundaries of the Colville Indian Reservation. This Final Environmental Assessment (EA) examines the potential environmental effects of acquiring and managing property for wildlife and wildlife habitat within a large project area. This area consists of several separated land parcels, of which 2,000 hectares (4,943 acres) have been purchased by BPA and an additional 4,640 hectares (11,466 acres) have been identified by the Colville Confederated Tribes for inclusion in the Project. Four proposed activities (habitat protection, habitat enhancement, operation and maintenance, and monitoring and evaluation) are analyzed. The proposed action is intended to meet the need for mitigation of wildlife and wildlife habitat that was adversely affected by the construction of Grand Coulee and Chief Joseph Dams and their reservoirs.

  12. Misrepresentation of the IPCC CO2 emission scenarios

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Manning, Martin; Edmonds, James A.; Emori, S.; Grubler, Arnulf; Hibbard, Kathleen A.; Joos, Fortunat; Kainuma, M.; Keeling, Ralph; Kram, Tom; Manning, Andrew; Meinhausen, Malte; Moss, Richard H.; Nakicenovic, Nebojsa; Riahi, Keywan; Rose, Steven K.; Smith, Steven J.; Swart, Robert; Van Vuuren, Detlef

    2010-06-01

    Estimates of recent fossil fuel CO2 emissions have been compared with the IPCC SRES (Special Report on Emission Scenarios) emission scenarios that had been developed for analysis of future climate change, impacts and mitigation. In some cases this comparison uses averages across subgroups of SRES scenarios and for one category of greenhouse gases (industrial sources of CO2). That approach can be misleading and cause confusion as it is inconsistent with many of the papers on future climate change projections that are based on a specific subset of closely scrutinized SRES scenarios, known as illustrative marker scenarios. Here, we show that comparison between recent estimates of fossil fuel emissions trends and the SRES illustrative marker scenarios leads to the conclusion that recent trends are not outside the SRES range. Furthermore, the recent economic downturn appears to have brought actual emission back toward the middle of the SRES illustrative marker scenarios. We also note that SRES emission scenarios are designed to reflect potential alternative long-term trends in a world without climate policy intervention and the trend in the resulting climate change is not sensitive to short-term fluctuations.

  13. Prioritizing Climate Change Mitigation Alternatives: Comparing Transportation Technologies to Options in Other Sectors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lutsey, Nicholas P.

    2008-01-01

    Shipley, and E. Brown, 2003. CHP Five Years Later: Federaland Paper Industries by Applying CHP Technologies. Lawrence112 Table 27. Potential GHG mitigation from CHP

  14. Mitigating the Risks of Thresholdless Metrics in Machine Learning Kendrick Boyd

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Page Jr., C. David

    Mitigating the Risks of Thresholdless Metrics in Machine Learning Evaluation by Kendrick Boyd on Empirical Evaluation 24 3.1 Introduction 24 3.2

  15. Climate Change Mitigation: Climate, Health, and Equity Implications of the Visible and the Hidden

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shonkoff, Seth Berrin

    2012-01-01

    Climate Change and Urban Heat Island Mitigation: LocalisingCity size and the urban heat island." Atmos. Environ. 7:inequitable distribution of the heat island. equity and the

  16. Rapid energy savings in London's households to mitigate an energy crisis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Julien, Aurore; Barrett, Mark; Croxford, Ben

    2011-01-01

    3), pp.325-343. A. Julien, UCL Energy Institute, London, UKConference 2011, Washington Rapid energy savings in London'shouseholds to mitigate an energy crisis Wood, G. &

  17. Upcoming Webinar November 19: Micro-Structural Mitigation Strategies for PEM Fuel Cells

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    On November 19, the Energy Department will present a webinar on micro-structural mitigation strategies for PEM fuel cells focusing on morphological simulations and experimental approaches.

  18. JICA's Assistance for Mitigation to Climate Change - The Co-Benefits...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    JICA's Assistance for Mitigation to Climate Change - The Co-Benefits Approach to Climate Change Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: JICA's Assistance for...

  19. Sandia Energy - PV Arc-Fault and Ground Fault Detection and Mitigation...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Program Home Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Photovoltaics PV Systems Reliability PV Arc-Fault and Ground Fault Detection and Mitigation Program PV...

  20. Prioritizing Climate Change Mitigation Alternatives: Comparing Transportation Technologies to Options in Other Sectors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lutsey, Nicholas P.

    2008-01-01

    curve analysis for biofuel production. The study is not yetThis level of biofuel production would supply approximatelynullify some biofuel production methods as viable mitigation

  1. Regulation of GHG emissions from transportation fuels: Emission quota versus emission intensity standard

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rajagopal, Deepak

    2010-01-01

    Derivation of average cost of emission reduction by blending?) and ? respectively. GHG emissions per unit of blend is, ?+ ?? i Reduction in GHG emissions with respect to unblended

  2. China: Emissions pattern of the world leader in CO2 emissions from fossil fuel consumption and cement production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gregg, J; Andres, Robert Joseph; Marland, Gregg

    2008-01-01

    Release of carbon dioxide (CO2) from fossil fuel combustion and cement manufacture is the primary anthropogenic driver of climate change. Our best estimate is that China became the largest national source of CO2 emissions during 2006. Previously, the United States (US) had occupied that position. However, the annual emission rate in the US has remained relatively stable between 2001-2006 while the emission rate in China has more than doubled, apparently eclipsing that of the US in late 2006. Here we present the seasonal and spatial pattern of CO2 emissions in China, as well as the sectoral breakdown of emissions. Though our best point estimate places China in the lead position in terms of CO2 emissions, we qualify this statement in a discussion of the uncertainty in the underlying data (3-5% for the US; 15-20% for China). Finally, we comment briefly on the implications of China's new position with respect to international agreements to mitigate climate change.

  3. EIA - Greenhouse Gas Emissions - Carbon Dioxide Emissions

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    carbon-intensive fossil fuel, increased by 4.8 percent. 2.8. Carbon dioxide emissions and carbon sequestration from nonfuel uses of energy inputs Nonfuel uses of fossil fuels (for...

  4. The EU Emission Trading Scheme Insights from the First Trading Years

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Steininger, Karl W.

    observed in the Kyoto period. Price development in the EU ETS is mainly driven by the perceived stringency

  5. Decarbonization and the time-delay between peak CO2 emissions and concentrations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seshadri, Ashwin K

    2015-01-01

    Carbon-dioxide (CO2) is the main contributor to anthropogenic global warming, and the timing of its peak concentration in the atmosphere is likely to govern the timing of maximum radiative forcing. While dynamics of atmospheric CO2 is governed by multiple time-constants, we idealize this by a single time-constant to consider some of the factors describing the time-delay between peaks in CO2 emissions and concentrations. This time-delay can be understood as the time required to bring CO2 emissions down from its peak to a small value, and is governed by the rate of decarbonizaton of economic activity. This decarbonization rate affects how rapidly emissions decline after having achieved their peak, and a rapid decline in emissions is essential for limiting peak radiative forcing. Long-term mitigation goals for CO2 should therefore consider not only the timing of peak emissions, but also the rate of decarbonization. We discuss implications for mitigation of the fact that the emissions peak corresponds to small bu...

  6. Recycling scheme for twin BWRs reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ramirez-Sanchez, J. R.; Perry, R. T.; Gustavo Alonso, V.; Javier Palacios, H. [Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, La Marquesa s/n, Ocoyoacac 52750 (Mexico)

    2006-07-01

    To asses the advantages of reprocess and recycle the spent fuel from nuclear power reactors, against a once through policy, a MOX fuel design is proposed to match a generic scenario for twin BWRs and establish a fuel management scheme. Calculations for the amount of fuel that the plants will use during 40 years of operation were done, and an evaluation of costs using constant money method for each option applying current prices for uranium and services were made. Finally a comparison between the options was made, resulting that even the current high prices of uranium, still the recycling option is more expensive that the once through alternative. But reprocessing could be an alternative to reduce the amount of spent fuel stored in the reactor pools. (authors)

  7. Refined knot invariants and Hilbert schemes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eugene Gorsky; Andrei Negu?

    2015-02-13

    We consider the construction of refined Chern-Simons torus knot invariants by M. Aganagic and S. Shakirov from the DAHA viewpoint of I. Cherednik. We give a proof of Cherednik's conjecture on the stabilization of superpolynomials, and then use the results of O. Schiffmann and E. Vasserot to relate knot invariants to the Hilbert scheme of points on the plane. Then we use the methods of the second author to compute these invariants explicitly in the uncolored case. We also propose a conjecture relating these constructions to the rational Cherednik algebra, as in the work of the first author, A. Oblomkov, J. Rasmussen and V. Shende. Among the combinatorial consequences of this work is a statement of the m/n shuffle conjecture.

  8. Malheur River Wildlife Mitigation Project, Annual Report 2003.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ashley, Paul

    2004-01-01

    Hydropower development within the Columbia and Snake River Basins has significantly affected riparian, riverine, and adjacent upland habitats and the fish and wildlife species dependent upon them. Hydroelectric dams played a major role in the extinction or major loss of both anadromous and resident salmonid populations and altered instream and adjacent upland habitats, water quality, and riparian/riverine function. Hydroelectric facility construction and inundation directly affected fish and wildlife species and habitats. Secondary and tertiary impacts including road construction, urban development, irrigation, and conversion of native habitats to agriculture, due in part to the availability of irrigation water, continue to affect wildlife and fish populations throughout the Columbia and Snake River Basins. Fluctuating water levels resulting from facility operations have created exposed sand, cobble, and/or rock zones. These zones are generally devoid of vegetation with little opportunity to re-establish riparian plant communities. To address the habitat and wildlife losses, the United States Congress in 1980 passed the Pacific Northwest Electric Power Planning and Conservation Act (Act) (P.L. 96-501), which authorized the states of Idaho, Montana, Oregon, and Washington to create the Northwest Power Planning Council (Council). The Act directed the Council to prepare a program in conjunction with federal, state, and tribal wildlife resource authorities to protect, mitigate, and enhance fish and wildlife species affected by the construction, inundation and operation of hydroelectric dams in the Columbia River Basin (NPPC 2000). Under the Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Program (Program), the region's fish and wildlife agencies, tribes, non-government organizations (NGOs), and the public propose fish and wildlife projects that address wildlife and fish losses resulting from dam construction and subsequent inundation. As directed by the Council, project proposals are subjected to a rigorous review process prior to receiving final approval. An eleven-member panel of scientists referred to as the Independent Scientific Review Panel (ISRP) examines project proposals. The ISRP recommends project approval based on scientific merit. The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), the Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority (CBFWA), Council staff, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS), the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), and subbasin groups also review project proposals to ensure each project meets regional and subbasin goals and objectives. The Program also includes a public involvement component that gives the public an opportunity to provide meaningful input on management proposals. After a thorough review, the Burns Paiute Tribe (BPT) acquired the Malheur River Mitigation Project (Project) with BPA funds to compensate, in part, for the loss of fish and wildlife resources in the Columbia and Snake River Basins and to address a portion of the mitigation goals identified in the Council's Program (NPPC 2000).

  9. Prioritizing Climate Change Mitigation Alternatives: Comparing Transportation Technologies to Options in Other Sectors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lutsey, Nicholas P.

    2008-01-01

    and developing emissions trading mechanisms to connect andand development of emissions trading or cap-and-tradesector market-based emissions trading system in the Western

  10. Low Emissions Aftertreatment and Diesel Emissions Reduction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2005-05-27

    Detroit Diesel Corporation (DDC) has successfully completed a five-year Low Emissions Aftertreatment and Diesel Emissions Reduction (LEADER) program under a DOE project entitled: ''Research and Development for Compression-Ignition Direct-Injection Engines (CIDI) and Aftertreatment Sub-Systems''. The objectives of the LEADER Program were to: Demonstrate technologies that will achieve future federal Tier 2 emissions targets; and Demonstrate production-viable technical targets for engine out emissions, efficiency, power density, noise, durability, production cost, aftertreatment volume and weight. These objectives were successfully met during the course of the LEADER program The most noteworthy achievements in this program are listed below: (1) Demonstrated Tier 2 Bin 3 emissions target over the FTP75 cycle on a PNGV-mule Neon passenger car, utilizing a CSF + SCR system These aggressive emissions were obtained with no ammonia (NH{sub 3}) slip and a combined fuel economy of 63 miles per gallon, integrating FTP75 and highway fuel economy transient cycle test results. Demonstrated feasibility to achieve Tier 2 Bin 8 emissions levels without active NOx aftertreatment. (2) Demonstrated Tier 2 Bin 3 emissions target over the FTP75 cycle on a light-duty truck utilizing a CSF + SCR system, synergizing efforts with the DOE-DDC DELTA program. This aggressive reduction in tailpipe out emissions was achieved with no ammonia slip and a 41% fuel economy improvement, compared to the equivalent gasoline engine-equipped vehicle. (3) Demonstrated Tier 2 near-Bin 9 emissions compliance on a light-duty truck, without active NOx aftertreatment devices, in synergy with the DOE-DDC DELTA program. (4) Developed and applied advanced combustion technologies such as ''CLEAN Combustion{copyright}'', which yields simultaneous reduction in engine out NOx and PM emissions while also improving engine and aftertreatment integration by providing favorable exhaust species and temperature characteristics. These favorable emissions characteristics were obtained while maintaining performance and fuel economy. These aggressive emissions and performance results were achieved by applying a robust systems technology development methodology. This systems approach benefits substantially from an integrated experimental and analytical approach to technology development, which is one of DDCs core competencies Also, DDC is uniquely positioned to undertake such a systems technology development approach, given its vertically integrated commercial structure within the DaimlerChrysler organization. State-of-the-art analytical tools were developed targeting specific LEADER program objectives and were applied to guide system enhancements and to provide testing directions, resulting in a shortened and efficient development cycle. Application examples include ammonia/NO{sub x} distribution improvement and urea injection controls development, and were key contributors to significantly reduce engine out as well as tailpipe out emissions. Successful cooperation between DDC and Engelhard Corporation, the major subcontractor for the LEADER program and provider of state-of-the-art technologies on various catalysts, was another contributing factor to ensure that both passenger car and LD truck applications achieved Tier 2 Bin 3 emissions levels. Significant technical challenges, which highlight barriers of commercialization of diesel technology for passenger cars and LD truck applications, are presented at the end of this report.

  11. Trading places - an innovative SO{sub 2} trading program to mitigate potential adverse impacts on class I areas: part II. Mitigation plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Louis Militana; Cindy Huber; Christopher Colbert; Chris Arrington; Don Shepherd

    2005-08-01

    This is the second of two articles describing a plan that was developed to mitigate the effects of acid deposition and visibility impairment in four Class I areas from the proposed Longview Power Project. Part I (published in July 2005) discussed the air quality impacts of the proposed coal-fired power plant. Part II discusses the mitigation plan. 2 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  12. Invariant discretization schemes for the shallow-water equations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alexander Bihlo; Roman O. Popovych

    2013-01-03

    Invariant discretization schemes are derived for the one- and two-dimensional shallow-water equations with periodic boundary conditions. While originally designed for constructing invariant finite difference schemes, we extend the usage of difference invariants to allow constructing of invariant finite volume methods as well. It is found that the classical invariant schemes converge to the Lagrangian formulation of the shallow-water equations. These schemes require to redistribute the grid points according to the physical fluid velocity, i.e., the mesh cannot remain fixed in the course of the numerical integration. Invariant Eulerian discretization schemes are proposed for the shallow-water equations in computational coordinates. Instead of using the fluid velocity as the grid velocity, an invariant moving mesh generator is invoked in order to determine the location of the grid points at the subsequent time level. The numerical conservation of energy, mass and momentum is evaluated for both the invariant and non-invariant schemes.

  13. Electrodes mitigating effects of defects in organic electronic devices

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Heller, Christian Maria Anton (Albany, NY)

    2008-05-06

    A compound electrode for organic electronic devices comprises a thin first layer of a first electrically conducting material and a second electrically conducting material disposed on the first layer. In one embodiment, the second electrically conducting material is formed into a plurality of elongated members. In another embodiment, the second material is formed into a second layer. The elongated members or the second layer has a thickness greater than that of the first layer. The second layer is separated from the first layer by a conducting material having conductivity less than at least the material of the first layer. The compound electrode is capable of mitigating adverse effects of defects, such as short circuits, in the construction of the organic electronic devices, and can be included in light-emitting or photovoltaic devices.

  14. Characterizing and Mitigating Work Time Inflation in Task Parallel Programs

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Olivier, Stephen L.; de Supinski, Bronis R.; Schulz, Martin; Prins, Jan F.

    2013-01-01

    Task parallelism raises the level of abstraction in shared memory parallel programming to simplify the development of complex applications. However, task parallel applications can exhibit poor performance due to thread idleness, scheduling overheads, and work time inflation – additional time spent by threads in a multithreaded computation beyond the time required to perform the same work in a sequential computation. We identify the contributions of each factor to lost efficiency in various task parallel OpenMP applications and diagnose the causes of work time inflation in those applications. Increased data access latency can cause significant work time inflation in NUMAmore »systems. Our locality framework for task parallel OpenMP programs mitigates this cause of work time inflation. Our extensions to the Qthreads library demonstrate that locality-aware scheduling can improve performance up to 3X compared to the Intel OpenMP task scheduler. « less

  15. Pressurized water nuclear reactor system with hot leg vortex mitigator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lau, Louis K. S. (Monroeville, PA)

    1990-01-01

    A pressurized water nuclear reactor system includes a vortex mitigator in the form of a cylindrical conduit between the hot leg conduit and a first section of residual heat removal conduit, which conduit leads to a pump and a second section of residual heat removal conduit leading back to the reactor pressure vessel. The cylindrical conduit is of such a size that where the hot leg has an inner diameter D.sub.1, the first section has an inner diameter D.sub.2, and the cylindrical conduit or step nozzle has a length L and an inner diameter of D.sub.3 ; D.sub.3 /D.sub.1 is at least 0.55, D.sub.2 is at least 1.9, and L/D.sub.3 is at least 1.44, whereby cavitation of the pump by a vortex formed in the hot leg is prevented.

  16. Environmental Responses to Carbon Mitigation through Geological Storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cunningham, Alfred; Bromenshenk, Jerry

    2013-08-30

    In summary, this DOE EPSCoR project is contributing to the study of carbon mitigation through geological storage. Both deep and shallow subsurface research needs are being addressed through research directed at improved understanding of environmental responses associated with large scale injection of CO{sub 2} into geologic formations. The research plan has two interrelated research objectives. ? Objective 1: Determine the influence of CO{sub 2}-related injection of fluids on pore structure, material properties, and microbial activity in rock cores from potential geological carbon sequestration sites. ? Objective 2: Determine the Effects of CO{sub 2} leakage on shallow subsurface ecosystems (microbial and plant) using field experiments from an outdoor field testing facility.

  17. Mitigation of substrate defects in reticles using multilayer buffer layers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mirkarimi, Paul B. (Sunol, CA); Bajt, Sasa (Livermore, CA); Stearns, Daniel G. (Los Altos, CA)

    2001-01-01

    A multilayer film is used as a buffer layer to minimize the size of defects on a reticle substrate prior to deposition of a reflective coating on the substrate. The multilayer buffer layer deposited intermediate the reticle substrate and the reflective coating produces a smoothing of small particles and other defects on the reticle substrate. The reduction in defect size is controlled by surface relaxation during the buffer layer growth process and by the degree of intermixing and volume contraction of the materials at the multilayer interfaces. The buffer layers are deposited at near-normal incidence via a low particulate ion beam sputtering process. The growth surface of the buffer layer may also be heated by a secondary ion source to increase the degree of intermixing and improve the mitigation of defects.

  18. Malheur River Wildlife Mitigation Project : 2008 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kesling, Jason; Abel, Chad; Schwabe, Laurence

    2009-01-01

    In 1998, the Burns Paiute Tribe (BPT) submitted a proposal to Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) for the acquisition of the Malheur River Wildlife Mitigation Project (Project). The proposed mitigation site was for the Denny Jones Ranch and included Bureau of Land Management (BLM) and Oregon Division of State Lands (DSL) leases and grazing allotments. The Project approval process and acquisition negotiations continued for several years until the BPT and BPA entered into a Memorandum of Agreement, which allowed for purchase of the Project in November 2000. The 31,781 acre Project is located seven miles east of Juntura, Oregon and is adjacent to the Malheur River (Figure 1). Six thousand three hundred eighty-five acres are deeded to BPT, 4,154 acres are leased from DSL, and 21,242 acres are leased from BLM (Figure 2). In total 11 grazing allotments are leased between the two agencies. Deeded land stretches for seven miles along the Malheur River. It is the largest private landholding on the river between Riverside and Harper, Oregon. Approximately 938 acres of senior water rights are included with the Ranch. The Project is comprised of meadow, wetland, riparian and shrub-steppe habitats. The BLM grazing allotment, located south of the ranch, is largely shrub-steppe habitat punctuated by springs and seeps. Hunter Creek, a perennial stream, flows through both private and BLM lands. Similarly, the DSL grazing allotment, which lies north of the Ranch, is predominantly shrub/juniper steppe habitat with springs and seeps dispersed throughout the upper end of draws (Figure 2).

  19. Coastal and Waterfront Smart Growth and Hazard Mitigation Roundtable Report Coastal and Waterfront Smart Growth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Coastal and Waterfront Smart Growth and Hazard Mitigation Roundtable Report Coastal and Waterfront Smart Growth and Hazard Mitigation Roundtable Report Achieving Hazard-Resilient Coastal & Waterfront Smart Growth #12;2 Achieving Hazard-Resilient Coastal & Waterfront Smart Growth www

  20. COMPILATION AND REVIEW OF COMPLETED RESTORATION AND MITIGATION STUDIES IN DEVELOPING AN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    COMPILATION AND REVIEW OF COMPLETED RESTORATION AND MITIGATION STUDIES IN DEVELOPING;#12;COMPILATION AND REVIEW OF COMPLETED RESTORATION AND MITIGATION STUDIES IN DEVELOPING AN EVALUATION FRAMEWORK-R-5 Investments Research Program April 1995 #12;#12;Compilation and Review of Completed