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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mitigation actions insights" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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1

Ecofys-Nationally Appropriate Mitigation Actions: Insights from Example  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ecofys-Nationally Appropriate Mitigation Actions: Insights from Example Ecofys-Nationally Appropriate Mitigation Actions: Insights from Example Development Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: National Appropriate Mitigation Actions: Insights from Example Development Agency/Company /Organization: Ecofys Sector: Energy, Land Topics: Low emission development planning, Policies/deployment programs Resource Type: Lessons learned/best practices Website: www.ecofys.com/com/publications/brochures_newsletters/documents/Report National Appropriate Mitigation Actions: Insights from Example Development Screenshot References: National Appropriate Mitigation Actions: Insights from Example Development[1] "Ecofys elaborated in several projects, concrete examples of NAMAs to understand the issues arising from this concept. This report summarizes the

2

MITIGATION ACTION PLAN  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

MITIGATION ACTION PLAN MITIGATION ACTION PLAN KEMPER COUNTY IGCC PROJECT KEMPER COUNTY, MISSISSIPPI U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory September 2010 2 INTRODUCTION The Department of Energy (DOE) issued a Final Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) for the Kemper County IGCC Project (Project) (DOE/EIS-0409) in May 2010 and a Record of Decision (ROD) in August 2010 (75 FR 51248). The ROD identified commitments to mitigate potential adverse impacts associated with the project. This Mitigation Action Plan (MAP) describes the monitoring and mitigation actions the recipient must implement during the design, construction, and demonstration of the Project. DOE prepared this MAP in accordance with 10 CFR § 1021.331. PURPOSE Section 1021.331 of the DOE regulations implementing NEPA (10 CFR Part 1021) provides

3

Mitigation Action Plan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Mitigation Action Plan (MAP) focuses on mitigation commitments stated in the Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement (SEIS) and the Record of Decision (ROD) for the Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 1 (NPR-1). Specific commitments and mitigation implementation actions are listed in Appendix A-Mitigation Actions, and form the central focus of this MAP. They will be updated as needed to allow for organizational, regulatory, or policy changes. It is the intent of DOE to comply with all applicable federal, state, and local environmental, safety, and health laws and regulations. Eighty-six specific commitments were identified in the SEIS and associated ROD which pertain to continued operation of NPR-1 with petroleum production at the Maximum Efficient Rate (MER). The mitigation measures proposed are expected to reduce impacts as much as feasible, however, as experience is gained in actual implementation of these measures, some changes may be warranted.

Not Available

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Mitigation Action Plan  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

212 212 Mitigation Action Plan for the Lease of Land for the Development of a Research Park at Los Alamos National Laboratory Departme~t of Energy Albuquerque Operations Office Los Alamos Area Office Los Alamos, New Mexico MITIGATION ACTION PLAN for the LEASE OF LAND FOR THE DEVELOPMENT OF A RESEARCH PARK AT LOS ALAMOS NATIONAL LABORATORY Background on the Lease of Land at Los Alamos National Laboratory: The U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) has approved an Environmental Assessment (EA) on the Lease of Land for the Development of a Research Park at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL)(DOE/EA-1212), Los Alamos, New Mexico. The DOE released a Predecisional Draft of this EA for State and Tribal review and made the draft document available to the public on July 24, 1997 for

5

EIS-0397: Mitigation Action Plan | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Mitigation Action Plan EIS-0397: Mitigation Action Plan Lyle Falls Fish Passage Project This Mitigation Action Plan identifies measures that are intended to avoid, reduce, or...

6

EA-1456: Mitigation Action Plan | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

456: Mitigation Action Plan EA-1456: Mitigation Action Plan Cheyenne-Miracle Mile and Ault-Cheyenne Transmission Line Rebuild Project Carbon, Albany and Laramie Counties, Wyoming...

7

EA-1617: Mitigation Action Plan | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mitigation Action Plan EA-1617: Mitigation Action Plan Lovell-Yellowtail and Basin-Lovell Transmission Line Rebuild Project, Big Horn County, Wyoming, Big Horn and Carbon Counties,...

8

EIS-0422: Mitigation Action Plan | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Action Plan EIS-0422: Mitigation Action Plan Central Ferry-Lower Monumental 500-kilovolt Transmission Line Project Mitigation measures and estimated time of implementation within...

9

EA-1611: Mitigation Action Plan | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Mitigation Action Plan EA-1611: Mitigation Action Plan Colorado Highlands Wind Project, Logan County, Colorado Colorado Highlands Wind LLC applied to Western Area Power...

10

EA-1934: Mitigation Action Plan | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Plan EA-1934: Mitigation Action Plan Expansion of Active Borrow Areas, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington This Mitigation Action Plan is an integral part of the Finding of No...

11

EA-1508: Mitigation Action Plan | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

508: Mitigation Action Plan 508: Mitigation Action Plan EA-1508: Mitigation Action Plan Beaver Creek-Hoyt-Erie Transmission Line Upgrade Project Morgan and Weld Counties, Colorado This is the mitigation action plan (MAP) for use during construction of the Beaver Creek-Hoyt-Erie transmission line upgrades, including right-of ways (ROWS), hydrology, vegetation, construction debris and dewatering, landscape engineering, borrow pits and recommended procedures for Raptors and powerline construction. Mitigation Action Plan to Implement Mitigation Requirements for Beaver Creek-Hoyt-Erie Transmission Line Upgrade Project Morgan and Weld Counties, Colorado November 2005 More Documents & Publications EA-1617: Mitigation Action Plan EA-1456: Mitigation Action Plan EA-1611: Mitigation Action Plan

12

Nationally Appropriate Mitigation Actions | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Page Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Nationally Appropriate Mitigation Actions Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Nationally Appropriate Mitigation Actions Agency/Company /Organization: United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change Sector: Energy, Land Focus Area: Energy Efficiency Topics: GHG inventory, Low emission development planning Resource Type: Publications, Lessons learned/best practices, Case studies/examples Website: unfccc.int/home/items/5265.php Country: Afghanistan, Antigua and Barbuda, Armenia, Benin, Bhutan, Botswana, Brazil, Cameroon, Central African Republic, China, Democratic Republic of Congo, Costa Rica, Ivory Coast, Ethiopia, Eritrea, Gabon, Georgia (country), Ghana, India, Indonesia, Israel, Jordan, Madagascar, Maldives, Marshall Islands, Mauritania, Mexico, Mongolia, Morocco, Papua New Guinea, Peru, South Korea, Moldova, San Marino, Sierra Leone, Singapore, South Africa, Republic of Macedonia, Togo, Tunisia

13

EA-1858: Mitigation Action Plan | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Action Plan EA-1858: Mitigation Action Plan Nippon Paper Industries USA Company Biomass Cogeneration Project The Department of Energy has prepared a final environmental...

14

EA-1592: Mitigation Action Plan | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Mitigation Action Plan Mitigation Action Plan EA-1592: Mitigation Action Plan Modernization of Facilities and Infrastructure for the Non-Nuclear Production Activities Conducted at the NNSA's Kansas City Plant Based on the analysis in the Environmental Assessment prepared for the proposal by the GSA and NNSA, neither the construction nor operation of the selected alternative wouldhave significant environmental impact. This MAP contains mitigation and monitoring commitments for the project, including commitments set in permits for the new facility. Mitigation Action Plan for the Modernization of Facilities and Infrastructure for the Non-Nuclear Production Activities Conducted at the NNSA's Kansas City Plant More Documents & Publications EA-1592: Finding of No Significant Impact

15

EIS-0409: Mitigation Action Plan | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Mitigation Action Plan Mitigation Action Plan EIS-0409: Mitigation Action Plan Kemper County Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle Project, Kemper County, Mississippi The Department of Energy (DOE) issued a Final Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) for the Kemper County Integrated Gasification Combine Cycle Project (Project) (DOE/EIS-0409) in May 2010 and a Record of Decision (ROD) in August 2010 (75 FR 51248). The ROD identified commitments to mitigate potential adverse impacts associated with the project. This Mitigation Action Plan (MAP) describes the monitoring and mitigation actions the recipient must implement during the design, construction, and demonstration of the Project. Mitigation Action Plan Kemper County Iintegrated Gasification Combined Cycle Project, Kemper County, Mississippi, DOE/EIS-0409 (September 2010)

16

Argentina-Mitigation Action Plans and Scenarios (MAPS) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Argentina-Mitigation Action Plans and Scenarios (MAPS) Argentina-Mitigation Action Plans and Scenarios (MAPS) Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Argentina-Mitigation Action Plans and Scenarios (MAPS) Name Argentina-Mitigation Action Plans and Scenarios (MAPS) Agency/Company /Organization The Children's Investment Fund Foundation, SouthSouthNorth, University of Cape Town-Energy Research Centre, Danish Government Sector Climate, Energy Topics Baseline projection, Low emission development planning, -LEDS, -NAMA, Pathways analysis Website http://www.mapsprogramme.org Program Start 2010 Program End 2013 Country Argentina South America References Mitigation Action Plans and Scenarios (MAPS)[1] Contents 1 Overview 2 MAPS Processes and Outcomes 2.1 Chile 2.2 Colombia 2.3 Peru 2.4 Brazil 2.5 Resources 2.5.1 Mitigation Action Country Studies

17

Colombia-Mitigation Action Plans and Scenarios (MAPS) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Colombia-Mitigation Action Plans and Scenarios (MAPS) Colombia-Mitigation Action Plans and Scenarios (MAPS) Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Colombia-Mitigation Action Plans and Scenarios (MAPS) Name Colombia-Mitigation Action Plans and Scenarios (MAPS) Agency/Company /Organization The Children's Investment Fund Foundation, SouthSouthNorth, University of Cape Town-Energy Research Centre, Danish Government Sector Climate, Energy Topics Baseline projection, Low emission development planning, -LEDS, -NAMA, Pathways analysis Website http://www.mapsprogramme.org Program Start 2010 Program End 2013 Country Colombia South America References Mitigation Action Plans and Scenarios (MAPS)[1] Contents 1 Overview 2 MAPS Processes and Outcomes 2.1 Chile 2.2 Colombia 2.3 Peru 2.4 Brazil 2.5 Resources 2.5.1 Mitigation Action Country Studies

18

Brazil-Mitigation Action Plans and Scenarios (MAPS) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Brazil-Mitigation Action Plans and Scenarios (MAPS) Brazil-Mitigation Action Plans and Scenarios (MAPS) Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Brazil-Mitigation Action Plans and Scenarios (MAPS) Name Brazil-Mitigation Action Plans and Scenarios (MAPS) Agency/Company /Organization The Children's Investment Fund Foundation, SouthSouthNorth, University of Cape Town-Energy Research Centre, Danish Government Sector Climate, Energy Topics Baseline projection, Low emission development planning, -LEDS, -NAMA, Pathways analysis Website http://www.mapsprogramme.org Program Start 2010 Program End 2013 Country Brazil South America References Mitigation Action Plans and Scenarios (MAPS)[1] Contents 1 Overview 2 MAPS Processes and Outcomes 2.1 Chile 2.2 Colombia 2.3 Peru 2.4 Brazil 2.5 Resources 2.5.1 Mitigation Action Country Studies

19

EIS-0128: Mitigation Action Plan | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

: Mitigation Action Plan : Mitigation Action Plan EIS-0128: Mitigation Action Plan Los Banos - Gates (Path 15) Transmission Project, Revision 2 Revision 2: This MAP addresses the construction, operation, and maintenance of the new 84-mile long 500-kV transmission line. Necessary work conducted by Pacific Gas and Electric (PG&E) at their substations will occur within the previously disturbed area inside the substation boundaries. Western or Trans Electric, Inc. will also not have a role in upgrading the various existing PG&E 230-kV system components. DOE-0128-MAP-02, Western Area Power Administration, Mitigation Action Plan for Los Banos - Gates (Path 15) Transmission Project, Revision 2 (December 2003) More Documents & Publications EIS-0128: Mitigation Action Plan EA-1456: Mitigation Action Plan

20

EIS-0128: Mitigation Action Plan | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

28: Mitigation Action Plan 28: Mitigation Action Plan EIS-0128: Mitigation Action Plan Los Banos - Gates (Path 15) Transmission Project, Revision 2 Revision 2: This MAP addresses the construction, operation, and maintenance of the new 84-mile long 500-kV transmission line. Necessary work conducted by Pacific Gas and Electric (PG&E) at their substations will occur within the previously disturbed area inside the substation boundaries. Western or Trans Electric, Inc. will also not have a role in upgrading the various existing PG&E 230-kV system components. DOE-0128-MAP-02, Western Area Power Administration, Mitigation Action Plan for Los Banos - Gates (Path 15) Transmission Project, Revision 2 (December 2003) More Documents & Publications EIS-0128: Mitigation Action Plan EA-1456: Mitigation Action Plan

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mitigation actions insights" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

EIS-0380: Mitigation Action Plan Annual Report | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mitigation Action Plan Annual Report Mitigation Action Plan Annual Report EIS-0380: Mitigation Action Plan Annual Report Los Alamos National Laboratory Site-Wide Environmental Impact Statement Fiscal Year 2012 Mitigation Action Plan Annual Report In Fiscal Year (FY) 2012, the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) Site-Wide Environmental Impact Statement (SWEIS) Project Office focused on tracking and managing mitigation action commitments and reporting. Highlights for FY 2012 include the following: completion and distribution of the FY 2011 SWEIS Mitigation Action Plan Annual Report (DOE 2012), which included a section for the Las Conchas Fire, completion and distribution of the calendar year (CY) 2010 SWEIS Yearbook in April 2012 (LANL 2012a), construction and operation of SERF-E, construction of an institutional

22

EA-1591: Mitigation Action Plan | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

91: Mitigation Action Plan 91: Mitigation Action Plan EA-1591: Mitigation Action Plan Palisades-Goshen Transmission Line Reconstruction Project This Mitigation Action Plan (MAP) is part of the Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI) for the Palisades-Goshen Transmission Line Reconstruction Project. The project involves reconstruction of the existing Palisades-Goshen 115-kV transmission line, which extends from Palisades Dam in eastern Idaho approximately 52 miles west to the Goshen Substation south of Idaho Falls, Idaho. Mitigation Action Plan for the Palisades-Goshen Transmission Line Reconstruction Project More Documents & Publications EA-1591: Final Environmental Assessment, Finding of No Significant Impact, and Mitigation Action Plan EA-1591: Finding of No Significant Impact

23

Mitigation Action Plans (MAP) and Related Documents | Department...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

University of Delaware Lewes Campus Onsite Wind Energy Project March 1, 2011 EIS-0422: Mitigation Action Plan Central Ferry-Lower Monumental 500-kilovolt Transmission...

24

Microsoft Word - Mitigation Action Plan.doc  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

782 782 MITIGATION ACTION PLAN FOR THE UNIVERSITY OF DELAWARE LEWES CAMPUS ONSITE WIND ENERGY PROJECT DECEMBER 2010 U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy 1000 Independence Avenue, SW Washington, D.C. 20585 1.0 INTRODUCTION The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared an Environmental Assessment (EA) to aid its decision whether to provide funding for the University of Delaware's construction and operation of a 2-megawatt wind turbine adjacent to the University's College of Earth, Ocean, and Environment Campus in Lewes, Delaware. The EA (DOE/EA-1782) for the University's Wind Energy Project was completed in compliance with the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) and implementing regulations issued by the Council on Environmental Quality and

25

Mitigation Action Plans (MAP) and Related Documents | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

December 1, 2010 December 1, 2010 EA-1782: Mitigation Action Plan University of Delaware Lewes Campus Onsite Wind Energy Project September 1, 2010 EIS-0409: Mitigation Action Plan Kemper County Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle Project, Kemper County, Mississippi August 24, 2010 EA-1736: Mitigation Action Plan Expansion of the Sanitary Effluent Reclamation Facility and Environmental Restoration of Reach S-2 of Sandia Canyon at Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, Los Alamos, New Mexico July 10, 2010 EIS-0026: 2010 Annual Mitigation Report Waste Isolation Pilot Plant June 4, 2010 EA-1704: Mitigation Action Plan Construction and Operation of a Proposed Cellulosic Biorefinery, BlueFire Fulton Renewable Energy, LLC, Fulton, Mississippi January 1, 2010 EA-1755: Mitigation Action Plan

26

EA-1901: Mitigation Action Plan | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1: Mitigation Action Plan 1: Mitigation Action Plan EA-1901: Mitigation Action Plan Kootenai River White Sturgeon and Burbot Hatcheries Project, Bonners Ferry, Boundary County, Idaho This Mitigation Action Plan (MAP) is referenced in the Finding of No Significant Impact for the Kootenai River White Sturgeon and Burbot Hatcheries Project (Department of Energy Environmental Assessment-1901). This MAP includes all of the mitigation measures recommended in the Final Environmental Assessment to mitigate adverse environmental impacts. It includes some measures that are essential to render the impacts of the Proposed Action not significant and other measures that will decrease impacts that did not reach a level to be considered significant. EA-1901-MAP-2013.pdf More Documents & Publications

27

EA-1923: Mitigation Action Plan | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Mitigation Action Plan Mitigation Action Plan EA-1923: Mitigation Action Plan Green Energy School Wind Turbine Project on Saipan, Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands This Mitgation Action Plan specifies the methods for implementing mitigation measures that address the potential environmental impacts identified in DOE/EA-1923 and by the USFWS Biological Opinion issued to DOE on February 1, 2012, in accordance with the Endangered Species Act (ESA) (16 U.S.C.1531 et seq.). The development of these measures and an implementation plan, are a necessary condition for the DOE FONSI, as described by 40 CFR 1021.331(b) Mitigation action plans. EA-1923-MAP-2013 More Documents & Publications EA-1923: Final Environmental Assessment EA-1923: Draft Environmental Assessment EA-1923: Mitigated Finding of No Significant Impact

28

EIS-0350-S1: Mitigation Action Plan | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Mitigation Action Plan Mitigation Action Plan EIS-0350-S1: Mitigation Action Plan Nuclear Facility Portion of the Chemistry and Metallurgy Research Building Replacement Project at Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM This Mitigation Action Plan (MAP) describes mitigation and monitoring commitments for constructing and operating the Modified CMRR-NF. The commitments made in this MAP are designed to mitigate potentially adverse environmental consequences associated with the CMRR-NF Project as the CMRR-NF is constructed and operated, and as direct, indirect, and cumulative impacts from these actions occur over time. EIS-0350-S1-MAP-2011.pdf More Documents & Publications EIS-0350-S1: Final Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement EIS-0350-S1: Draft Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement

29

WIPPAnnualMitigationActionReport2012  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2-3322 2-3322 2012 ANNUAL MITIGATION REPORT FOR THE WASTE ISOLATION PILOT PLANT JULY 10, 2012 DOE/CBFO-12-3322 2 TABLE OF CONTENTS ACRONYMS ................................................................................................................................. 3 INTRODUCTION......................................................................................................................... 4 THE 2012 ANNUAL MITIGATION REPORT ......................................................................... 5 REFERENCES ............................................................................................................................ 14 DOE/CBFO-12-3322 3 ACRONYMS AMR Annual Mitigation Report ASER Annual Site Environmental Report

30

EA-1736: Mitigation Action Plan | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Mitigation Action Plan Mitigation Action Plan EA-1736: Mitigation Action Plan Expansion of the Sanitary Effluent Reclamation Facility and Environmental Restoration of Reach S-2 of Sandia Canyon at Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, Los Alamos, New Mexico Based on the analysis of potential environmental impacts presented in the environmental assessment, neither the construction or operation of the expanded Sanitary Effluent Reclamation Facility considered in the two action alternatives for that facility, nor the environmental restoration action measures considered in the two action alternatives for reach S-2 of Sandia Canyon would have significant environmental impacts. Mitigation Action Plan for the Expansion of the Sanitary Effluent Reclamation Facility and Environmental Restoration of Reach S-2 of Sandia

31

Mitigation Action Plans and Scenarios (MAPS) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

(Redirected from CIFF-Chile-Mitigation Action Plans and Scenarios (MAPS)) (Redirected from CIFF-Chile-Mitigation Action Plans and Scenarios (MAPS)) Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Mitigation Action Plans and Scenarios (MAPS) Name Mitigation Action Plans and Scenarios (MAPS) Agency/Company /Organization The Children's Investment Fund Foundation, SouthSouthNorth, University of Cape Town-Energy Research Centre, Danish Government Sector Climate, Energy Topics Baseline projection, Low emission development planning, -LEDS, -NAMA, Pathways analysis Website http://www.mapsprogramme.org Program Start 2010 Program End 2013 Country Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Peru, South Africa South America, South America, South America, South America, South America, Southern Africa References Mitigation Action Plans and Scenarios (MAPS)[1]

32

EA-1636: Mitigation Action Plan | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Mitigation Action Plan Mitigation Action Plan EA-1636: Mitigation Action Plan Albany-Burnt Woods and Santiam-Toledo Pole Replacement Project This Mitigation Action Plan (MAP) is part of the Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI) for the Albany-Burnt Woods and Santiam-Toledo Pole Replacement Project. The project involves replacing wood pole structures on about 26 miles of the Albany-Burnt Woods single-circuit, 115-kilovolt (kV) transmission line and about 21 miles of the Santiam-Toledo single circuit, 230-kVtransmission line in Linn, Benton and Lincoln counties, Oregon. Mitigation Action Plan for the Albany-Burnt Woods and Santiam-Toledo Pole Replacement Project More Documents & Publications EA-1636: Final Environmental Assessment EA-1636: Finding of No Significant Impact

33

EIS-0128: Mitigation Action Plan | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

128: Mitigation Action Plan 128: Mitigation Action Plan EIS-0128: Mitigation Action Plan Los Banos-Gates (Path 15) Transmission Project This MAP addresses the construction, operation, and maintenance of the new 84-mile long 500-kV transmission line. Necessary work conducted by Pacific Gas and Electric (PG&E) at their substations will occur within the previously disturbed area inside the substation boundaries. Western or Trans Elect, Inc. will also not have a role in upgrading the various existing PG&E 230-kV system components. DOE/EIS-0128, Western Area Power Administration, Mitigation Action Plan for the Los Banos-Gates (Path 15) Transmission Project (January 2003) More Documents & Publications EIS-0128: Mitigation Action Plan FAQS Gap Analysis Qualification Card - Mechanical Systems

34

MITIGATION ACTION PLAN FOR THE FINAL ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT,  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

MITIGATION MITIGATION ACTION PLAN FOR THE FINAL ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT, NOTICE OF WETLAND INVOLVEMENT, AND FINDING OF NO SIGNIFICANT IMPACT FOR THE CONSTRUCTION AND OPERATION OF A LIGNOCELLULOSIC U.S. Department of Energy Golden Field Office 1617 Cole Boulevard Golden, Colorado 80401 1.0 Introd uction 1 1.1 Purpose of the Mitigation Action Plan 1 1.2 Structure of the Mitigation Action Plan 2 2.0 Ambient Ai r Quality 3 2.1 Potential Impacts 3 2.2 Mitigation Measures 3 2.3 Metrics for Determining Success or Failure of the Mitigation Measures 4 2.4 Monitoring Techniques for Mitigation Measures 4 3.0 Truck Traffic 4 3.1 Potential Impacts 4 3.2 Mitigation Measures 4 3.3 Metrics for Determining Success or Failure of the Mitigation Measures 5 3.4 Monitoring Techniques for Mitigation Measures 5 4.0 Genetically Modified Yeasts 6 4.1 Potential Impacts 6 4.2 Mitigation Measures 6 4.3 Metrics for Determining

35

EA-1870: Mitigation Action Plan | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

70: Mitigation Action Plan 70: Mitigation Action Plan EA-1870: Mitigation Action Plan Utah Coal and Biomass Fueled Pilot Plant, Kanab, UT The Department of Energy (DOE) issues this Mitigation Action Plan (MAP) in conjunction with its Finding of No Significant Impact as to the department's proposed action of providing costshared funding for the Utah Coal and Biomass Fueled Pilot Plant Project. Based on the analyses in the Environmental Assessment (DOE/EA-1870), DOE determined that its proposed action allowing Viresco Energy, LLC (Viresco) to use federal funding to design, construct and operate a coal and biomass gasification pilot plant (pilot plant) - would not result in any significant environmental impacts. The pilot plant would evaluate the technical feasibility of using steam hydrogasification to convert coal and biomass (such as agricultural

36

EA-1456: Mitigation Action Plan | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

6: Mitigation Action Plan 6: Mitigation Action Plan EA-1456: Mitigation Action Plan Cheyenne-Miracle Mile and Ault-Cheyenne Transmission Line Rebuild Project Carbon, Albany and Laramie Counties, Wyoming and Weld County, Colorado Western proposes to upgrade the existing 146 miles of CH-MM 115kB transmission line which crosses Carbon, Albany and Larmie Counties in Wyoming and 35 miles of the AU-CH transmission line which corsses portions of Laramie Counties, Wyoming and Weld County, Colorado. The upgrade would remove the existing 115-kV H-frame structures and replace them with new 230-Kv H-frame structures and single pole steel structures. Western also proposes to widen the existing right-of-way (ROW), where necessary to allow adequate electrical clearances. Mitigation Action Plan to Implement Mitigation Requirements for

37

EA-1755: Mitigation Action Plan | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Mitigation Action Plan Mitigation Action Plan EA-1755: Mitigation Action Plan Reconstruction of the South Access Road (CR 802) in Support of the Department of Energy, Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) in Eddy County, New Mexico EA prepared for the proposed reconstruction of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) South Access Road (County Road 802) located in Eddy County, New Mexico. Through the environmental review process, the Bureau of Land Management Carlsbad Field Office (BLM CFO) determined that there would be potential environmental impacts from the proposed project that would require mitigation to assure that the impacts would not become significant. Therefore, the Department of Energy Carlsbad Field Office (CBFO) prepared this Mitigation Action Plan (MAP) to establish conditions for issuing its

38

EA-1440-S1: Mitigation Action Plan | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Mitigation Action Plan Mitigation Action Plan EA-1440-S1: Mitigation Action Plan National Renewable Energy Laboratory's South Table Mountain Complex, Golden, Colorado ThIs Mitigation Action Plan implements the mitigation measures associated with the potential environmental impact of a DOE proposal that consists of three site development projects at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's (NREL) South Table Mountain (STM) site at Golden, Colorado: Construction of the Research Support Facilities (RSF), a new office building or multi-building office complex; Installation of Phase 1 of planned Site Infrastructure Improvements (Phase 1 of Full Site Development); Upgrades to the Thermochemical User Facility (TCUF), TCUF High Bay area, and addition of the Thermochemical Biorefinery Pilot Plant

39

EA-1706: Mitigation Action Plan | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

706: Mitigation Action Plan 706: Mitigation Action Plan EA-1706: Mitigation Action Plan West Tennessee Solar Farm Project Haywood County, Tennessee Based on the analyses in the Environmental Assessment, DOE determined that its proposed action - allowing the State of Tennessee to use some of its State Energy Program funds appropriated in the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act to construct and operate the West Tennessee Solar Farm Project - would not result in any significant environmental impacts. Mitigation Action Plan for the West Tennessee Solar farm Project Haywood County, Tennessee, DOE/EA-1706 More Documents & Publications EA-1706: Finding of No Significant Impact EA-1706: Final Environmental Assessment 2012 Annual Planning Summary for Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology

40

Mitigation Action Implementation Network (MAIN) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Mitigation Action Implementation Network (MAIN) Mitigation Action Implementation Network (MAIN) Jump to: navigation, search Name Mitigation Action Implementation Network (MAIN) Year founded 2011 Website http://www.ccap.org/index.php? References MAIN[1] LinkedIn Connections "CCAP is working in collaboration with the World Bank Institute (WBI) and INCAE Business School to support the design and implementation of Nationally Appropriate Mitigation Actions (NAMAs) and Low-Carbon Development (LCD) strategies in developing countries through regionally based dialogues, web-based exchanges, and practitioner networks. Recent UNFCCC negotiations have made it clear that climate protection will depend on actions on the ground in both developing and developed countries. In recent years, developing countries have shown a significant commitment to

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mitigation actions insights" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Democratic Republic of Congo-Nationally Appropriate Mitigation Actions  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Democratic Republic of Congo-Nationally Appropriate Mitigation Actions Democratic Republic of Congo-Nationally Appropriate Mitigation Actions (NAMAs) in the Congo Basin Jump to: navigation, search Name Democratic Republic of Congo-Nationally Appropriate Mitigation Actions (NAMAs) in the Congo Basin Agency/Company /Organization Environment Canada, International Institute for Sustainable Development (IISD) Sector Climate, Energy, Land, Water Focus Area Non-renewable Energy, Agriculture, Buildings, Economic Development, Energy Efficiency, Forestry, Greenhouse Gas, Grid Assessment and Integration, Industry, Land Use, Offsets and Certificates, Transportation Topics Adaptation, Background analysis, Baseline projection, GHG inventory, Low emission development planning, -NAMA, Pathways analysis, Policies/deployment programs

42

Burundi-Nationally Appropriate Mitigation Actions (NAMAs) in the Congo  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Burundi-Nationally Appropriate Mitigation Actions (NAMAs) in the Congo Burundi-Nationally Appropriate Mitigation Actions (NAMAs) in the Congo Basin Jump to: navigation, search Name Burundi-Nationally Appropriate Mitigation Actions (NAMAs) in the Congo Basin Agency/Company /Organization Environment Canada, International Institute for Sustainable Development (IISD) Sector Climate, Energy, Land, Water Focus Area Non-renewable Energy, Agriculture, Buildings, Economic Development, Energy Efficiency, Forestry, Greenhouse Gas, Grid Assessment and Integration, Industry, Land Use, Offsets and Certificates, Transportation Topics Adaptation, Background analysis, Baseline projection, GHG inventory, Low emission development planning, -NAMA, Pathways analysis, Policies/deployment programs Program Start 2012 Program End 2013 Country Burundia

43

Chile-Mitigation Action Plans and Scenarios (MAPS) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Page Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Chile-Mitigation Action Plans and Scenarios (MAPS) Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Chile-Mitigation Action Plans and Scenarios (MAPS) Name Chile-Mitigation Action Plans and Scenarios (MAPS) Agency/Company /Organization The Children's Investment Fund Foundation, SouthSouthNorth, University of Cape Town-Energy Research Centre, Danish Government Sector Climate, Energy Topics Baseline projection, Low emission development planning, -LEDS, -NAMA, Pathways analysis Website http://www.mapsprogramme.org Program Start 2010 Program End 2013 Country Chile South America References Mitigation Action Plans and Scenarios (MAPS)[1] Contents 1 Overview 2 MAPS Processes and Outcomes 2.1 Chile 2.2 Colombia 2.3 Peru

44

EA-1440: Mitigation Action Plan | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

440: Mitigation Action Plan 440: Mitigation Action Plan EA-1440: Mitigation Action Plan National Renewable Energy Laboratory's South Table Mountain Complex The Department of Energy has issued a Supplemental Environmental Assessment and has prepared a Finding of No Significant Impact for three site development projects at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's South Table Mountain site at Golden, Colorado. 1) Construction of the Research Support Facilities, a new office building or multi-building office complex; 2) Installation of phase 1 of planned Site Infrastructure Improvements (Phase 1 of Full Site Development); and 3) Upgrades to the Thermochemical User Facility (TCUF), TCUF High Bay area, and addition of the Thermochemical Biorefinery Pilot Plant. Mitigation Action Plan for the Supplement to the Final Site-Wide

45

Microsoft Word - Final Mitigated Action Plan - CNMI.docx  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

| P a g e MITIGATION ACTION PLAN FOR THE FINAL ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT FOR THE GREEN ENERGY SCHOOL WIND PROJECT SAIPAN, COMMONWEALTH OF THE NORTHERN MARIANA ISLANDS U.S....

46

MITIGATION ACTION PLAN FOR THE OREGON STATE UNIVERSITY WAVE ENERGY...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1 | P a g e MITIGATION ACTION PLAN FOR THE OREGON STATE UNIVERSITY WAVE ENERGY TEST PROJECT ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT AUGUST 15, 2012 PREPARED TO ACCOMPANY DOEEA 1917 U.S....

47

UNDP-Peru GEF Nationally Appropriate Mitigation Actions in the...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

in the Energy Generation and End-Use Sectors Jump to: navigation, search Name UNDP-Peru GEF Nationally Appropriate Mitigation Actions in the Energy Generation and End-Use...

48

Mitigation Action Implementation Network (MAIN) Feed | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Mitigation Action Implementation Network (MAIN) Feed Mitigation Action Implementation Network (MAIN) Feed Jump to: navigation, search Home | About | Inventory | Partnerships | Capacity Building | Webinars | Reports | Events | News | List Serve CLEAN Member Feeds Center for Environment and National Security at Scripps Centro de Energías Renovables (CER) The Children's Investment Fund Foundation (CIFF) Climate and Development Knowledge Network (CDKN) Climate Technology Initiative (CTI) ClimateWorks Foundation Coalition for Rainforest Nations (CfRN) Ecofys Energy Research Centre of the Netherlands (ECN) Energy Sector Management Assistance Program of the World Bank (ESMAP) Environment and Development Action in the Third World (ENDA-TM) German Aerospace Center (DLR) German Agency for International Cooperation (GIZ)

49

Nationally Appropriate Mitigation Actions (NAMAs) in the Congo Basin | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Nationally Appropriate Mitigation Actions (NAMAs) in the Congo Basin Nationally Appropriate Mitigation Actions (NAMAs) in the Congo Basin Jump to: navigation, search Name Nationally Appropriate Mitigation Actions (NAMAs) in the Congo Basin Agency/Company /Organization Environment Canada, International Institute for Sustainable Development (IISD) Sector Climate, Energy, Land, Water Focus Area Non-renewable Energy, Agriculture, Buildings, Economic Development, Energy Efficiency, Forestry, Greenhouse Gas, Grid Assessment and Integration, Industry, Land Use, Offsets and Certificates, Transportation Topics Adaptation, Background analysis, Baseline projection, GHG inventory, Low emission development planning, -NAMA, Pathways analysis, Policies/deployment programs Program Start 2012 Program End 2013 Country Angola, Burundi, Cameroon, Central African Republic, Democratic Republic of Congo, Republic of Congo, Rwanda

50

EIS-0186: Mitigation Action Plan | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

186: Mitigation Action Plan 186: Mitigation Action Plan EIS-0186: Mitigation Action Plan Alaska Industrial Development and Export Authority Healy Clean Coal Project In response to a Program Opportunity Notice issued in May 1989 by the Department of Energy (DOE) for the third solicitation of the Clean Coal Technology (CCT) Program, the Alaska Industrial Development and Export Authority (AIDEA) conceived, designed, and proposed the Healy Clean Coal Project (HCCP). The HCCP, a coal-fired power generating facility, would provide the necessary data for evaluating the commercial readiness of two promising technologies for decreasing emissions of sulfur dioxide (SO2), oxides of nitrogen (NOx), and particulate matter (PM). The two technologies to be demonstrated are the TRW Applied Technologies Division entrained

51

EIS-0186: Mitigation Action Plan | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

6: Mitigation Action Plan 6: Mitigation Action Plan EIS-0186: Mitigation Action Plan Alaska Industrial Development and Export Authority Healy Clean Coal Project In response to a Program Opportunity Notice issued in May 1989 by the Department of Energy (DOE) for the third solicitation of the Clean Coal Technology (CCT) Program, the Alaska Industrial Development and Export Authority (AIDEA) conceived, designed, and proposed the Healy Clean Coal Project (HCCP). The HCCP, a coal-fired power generating facility, would provide the necessary data for evaluating the commercial readiness of two promising technologies for decreasing emissions of sulfur dioxide (SO2), oxides of nitrogen (NOx), and particulate matter (PM). The two technologies to be demonstrated are the TRW Applied Technologies Division entrained

52

Microsoft Word - Mitigation Action Plan master.doc  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Palisades-Goshen Transmission Line Reconstruction Project Palisades-Goshen Transmission Line Reconstruction Project DOE/EA-1591 Summary This Mitigation Action Plan (MAP) is part of the Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI) for the Palisades-Goshen Transmission Line Reconstruction Project. The project involves reconstruction of the existing Palisades-Goshen 115-kV transmission line, which extends from Palisades Dam in eastern Idaho approximately 52 miles west to the Goshen Substation south of Idaho Falls, Idaho. This MAP is for the Proposed Action and includes all integral elements and commitments made in the Environmental Assessment (EA) to mitigate any potential adverse environmental impacts. No impacts reached the level to be considered significant even without these mitigation measures.

53

Microsoft Word - Final Mitigated Action Plan - CNMI.docx  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

| P | P a g e MITIGATION ACTION PLAN FOR THE FINAL ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT FOR THE GREEN ENERGY SCHOOL WIND PROJECT SAIPAN, COMMONWEALTH OF THE NORTHERN MARIANA ISLANDS U.S. Department of Energy Golden Service Center Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy DOE/EA-1923 2 | P a g e ACRONYMS AND ABBREVIATIONS AMC Adaptive Management Committee CFR Code of Federal Regulations DOE U.S. Department of Energy EA environmental assessment ESA Endangered Species Act FONSI finding of no significant impacts MAP mitigation action plan NEPA National Environmental Policy Act USFWS U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service 3 | P a g e 1.0 Introduction The United States Department of Energy (DOE) has issued a Final Environmental Assessment (EA) and a

54

Event:First Asia Regional Dialogue on the Development of Mitigation Actions  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

First Asia Regional Dialogue on the Development of Mitigation Actions First Asia Regional Dialogue on the Development of Mitigation Actions and Low-Carbon Development Strategies Day 3 Jump to: navigation, search Calendar.png First Asia Regional Dialogue on the Development of Mitigation Actions and Low-Carbon Development Strategies: on 2011/10/13 First Asia Regional Dialogue on the Development of Mitigation Actions and Low-Carbon Development Strategies Event Details Name First Asia Regional Dialogue on the Development of Mitigation Actions and Low-Carbon Development Strategies Date 2011/10/13 Location Thailand Organizer Mitigation Action Implementation Network (MAIN), Center for Clean Air Policy (CCAP) Tags LEDS, CLEAN, Capacity Building, Training Website Event Website Ret LikeLike UnlikeLike You like this.Sign Up to see what your friends like.

55

Event:First Asia Regional Dialogue on the Development of Mitigation Actions  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

First Asia Regional Dialogue on the Development of Mitigation Actions and First Asia Regional Dialogue on the Development of Mitigation Actions and Low-Carbon Development Strategies: on 2011/10/14 First Asia Regional Dialogue on the Development of Mitigation Actions and Low-Carbon Development Strategies Event Details Name First Asia Regional Dialogue on the Development of Mitigation Actions and Low-Carbon Development Strategies Date 2011/10/14 Location Thailand Organizer Mitigation Action Implementation Network (MAIN), Center for Clean Air Policy (CCAP) Tags LEDS, CLEAN, Capacity Building, Training Website Event Website Ret LikeLike UnlikeLike You like this.Sign Up to see what your friends like. rieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Event:First_Asia_Regional_Dialogue_on_the_Development_of_Mitigation_Actions_and_Low-Carbon_Development_Strategies_Day_4&oldid=385340

56

Event:First Asia Regional Dialogue on the Development of Mitigation Actions  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Asia Regional Dialogue on the Development of Mitigation Actions and Asia Regional Dialogue on the Development of Mitigation Actions and Low-Carbon Development Strategies: on 2011/10/12 First Asia Regional Dialogue on the Development of Mitigation Actions and Low-Carbon Development Strategies Event Details Name First Asia Regional Dialogue on the Development of Mitigation Actions and Low-Carbon Development Strategies Date 2011/10/12 Location Thailand Organizer Mitigation Action Implementation Network (MAIN), Center for Clean Air Policy (CCAP) Tags LEDS, CLEAN, Capacity Building, Training Website Event Website Ret LikeLike UnlikeLike You like this.Sign Up to see what your friends like. rieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Event:First_Asia_Regional_Dialogue_on_the_Development_of_Mitigation_Actions_and_Low-Carbon_Development_Strategies_Day_2&oldid=38533

57

Peru-Mitigation Action Plans and Scenarios (MAPS) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Peru-Mitigation Action Plans and Scenarios (MAPS) Peru-Mitigation Action Plans and Scenarios (MAPS) Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Peru-Mitigation Action Plans and Scenarios (MAPS) Name Peru-Mitigation Action Plans and Scenarios (MAPS) Agency/Company /Organization The Children's Investment Fund Foundation, SouthSouthNorth, University of Cape Town-Energy Research Centre, Danish Government Sector Climate, Energy Topics Baseline projection, Low emission development planning, -LEDS, -NAMA, Pathways analysis Website http://www.mapsprogramme.org Program Start 2010 Program End 2013 Country Peru South America References Mitigation Action Plans and Scenarios (MAPS)[1] Contents 1 Overview 2 MAPS Processes and Outcomes 2.1 Chile 2.2 Colombia 2.3 Peru 2.4 Brazil 2.5 Resources 2.5.1 Mitigation Action Country Studies

58

China-The Mitigation Action Implementation Network (MAIN) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

China-The Mitigation Action Implementation Network (MAIN) China-The Mitigation Action Implementation Network (MAIN) Jump to: navigation, search Name China-The Mitigation Action Implementation Network (MAIN) Agency/Company /Organization Center for Clean Air Policy (CCAP) Partner ICI, Environment Canada, BP, World Bank Institute, Thailand, Ministry of Energy Thailand, Ministry of Industry Thailand, Ministry of Natural Resources and Environment Thailand, Pollution Control Department, Ministry of Natural Resources and Environment Philippines, Climate Change Commission Philippines, Department of Environment and Natural Resources Vietnam, Ministry of Planning and Investment Vietnam, Sub-Institute of Hydrometeorology and Environment of South Vietnam, Ministry of Industry and Trade Vietnam, Ministry of Finance Indonesia, Ministry of Public Works Indonesia, Ministry of Transport Indonesia, Dept. of Clean & Efficient Energy Technology Implementation Indonesia, National Council on Climate Change Malaysia, Ministry of Natural Resources and Environment Malaysia, Dept. of Economic Planning Malaysia, Ministry of Green Technology, Energy and Water Malaysia, Land Public Transport Commission India, Central Electricity Regulatory Commission Pakistan, Dept. of Planning & Development Pakistan, Ministry of Finance Pakistan, Ministry of Foreign Affairs Pakistan, Ministry of Water and Power Germany, Federal Environment Ministry Argentina, Ministry of Energy Argentina, Ministry of Industry Chile, Ministry of Environment Chile, Ministry of Energy Chile, Ministry of Transport Chile, Ministry of Finance Colombia, Ministry of Environment Colombia, Ministry of Transport Colombia, Department of National Planning Colombia, Ministry of Housing Costa Rica, Climate Change Direction Costa Rica, Ministry of Agriculture Costa Rica, Ministry of Housing Costa Rica, Ministry of Energy Dominican Republic, National Climate Change Commission Dominican Republic, National Energy Commission Dominican Republic, Ministry of Environment and Natural Resources Dominican Republic, Ministry of Economy, Planning and Development Dominican Republic, Technical Office for Land Transport (OTTT) Panama Canal Authority Panama Maritime Authority Peru, Ministry of Environment Peru, Ministry of Energy and Mines Peru, Ministry of Transport and Communications Peru, Ministry of Energy and Mines Uruguay, Ministry of the Environment Uruguay, National Transport Directorate Uruguay, Ministry of Industry, Energy and Minerals Uruguay, Ministry of Agriculture Canada, Ministry of the Environment Norway, Ministry of the Environment Sweden, Department of the Environment UK, Department for Energy and Climate Change (DECC), Danish Government

59

The Mitigation Action Implementation Network (MAIN) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Mitigation Action Implementation Network (MAIN) Mitigation Action Implementation Network (MAIN) Jump to: navigation, search Name The Mitigation Action Implementation Network (MAIN) Agency/Company /Organization Center for Clean Air Policy (CCAP) Partner ICI, Environment Canada, BP, World Bank Institute, Thailand, Ministry of Energy Thailand, Ministry of Industry Thailand, Ministry of Natural Resources and Environment Thailand, Pollution Control Department, Ministry of Natural Resources and Environment Philippines, Climate Change Commission Philippines, Department of Environment and Natural Resources Vietnam, Ministry of Planning and Investment Vietnam, Sub-Institute of Hydrometeorology and Environment of South Vietnam, Ministry of Industry and Trade Vietnam, Ministry of Finance Indonesia, Ministry of Public Works Indonesia, Ministry of Transport Indonesia, Dept. of Clean & Efficient Energy Technology Implementation Indonesia, National Council on Climate Change Malaysia, Ministry of Natural Resources and Environment Malaysia, Dept. of Economic Planning Malaysia, Ministry of Green Technology, Energy and Water Malaysia, Land Public Transport Commission India, Central Electricity Regulatory Commission Pakistan, Dept. of Planning & Development Pakistan, Ministry of Finance Pakistan, Ministry of Foreign Affairs Pakistan, Ministry of Water and Power Germany, Federal Environment Ministry Argentina, Ministry of Energy Argentina, Ministry of Industry Chile, Ministry of Environment Chile, Ministry of Energy Chile, Ministry of Transport Chile, Ministry of Finance Colombia, Ministry of Environment Colombia, Ministry of Transport Colombia, Department of National Planning Colombia, Ministry of Housing Costa Rica, Climate Change Direction Costa Rica, Ministry of Agriculture Costa Rica, Ministry of Housing Costa Rica, Ministry of Energy Dominican Republic, National Climate Change Commission Dominican Republic, National Energy Commission Dominican Republic, Ministry of Environment and Natural Resources Dominican Republic, Ministry of Economy, Planning and Development Dominican Republic, Technical Office for Land Transport (OTTT) Panama Canal Authority Panama Maritime Authority Peru, Ministry of Environment Peru, Ministry of Energy and Mines Peru, Ministry of Transport and Communications Peru, Ministry of Energy and Mines Uruguay, Ministry of the Environment Uruguay, National Transport Directorate Uruguay, Ministry of Industry, Energy and Minerals Uruguay, Ministry of Agriculture Canada, Ministry of the Environment Norway, Ministry of the Environment Sweden, Department of the Environment UK, Department for Energy and Climate Change (DECC), Danish Government

60

Panama-The Mitigation Action Implementation Network (MAIN) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Panama-The Mitigation Action Implementation Network (MAIN) Panama-The Mitigation Action Implementation Network (MAIN) Jump to: navigation, search Name Panama-The Mitigation Action Implementation Network (MAIN) Agency/Company /Organization Center for Clean Air Policy (CCAP) Partner ICI, Environment Canada, BP, World Bank Institute, Thailand, Ministry of Energy Thailand, Ministry of Industry Thailand, Ministry of Natural Resources and Environment Thailand, Pollution Control Department, Ministry of Natural Resources and Environment Philippines, Climate Change Commission Philippines, Department of Environment and Natural Resources Vietnam, Ministry of Planning and Investment Vietnam, Sub-Institute of Hydrometeorology and Environment of South Vietnam, Ministry of Industry and Trade Vietnam, Ministry of Finance Indonesia, Ministry of Public Works Indonesia, Ministry of Transport Indonesia, Dept. of Clean & Efficient Energy Technology Implementation Indonesia, National Council on Climate Change Malaysia, Ministry of Natural Resources and Environment Malaysia, Dept. of Economic Planning Malaysia, Ministry of Green Technology, Energy and Water Malaysia, Land Public Transport Commission India, Central Electricity Regulatory Commission Pakistan, Dept. of Planning & Development Pakistan, Ministry of Finance Pakistan, Ministry of Foreign Affairs Pakistan, Ministry of Water and Power Germany, Federal Environment Ministry Argentina, Ministry of Energy Argentina, Ministry of Industry Chile, Ministry of Environment Chile, Ministry of Energy Chile, Ministry of Transport Chile, Ministry of Finance Colombia, Ministry of Environment Colombia, Ministry of Transport Colombia, Department of National Planning Colombia, Ministry of Housing Costa Rica, Climate Change Direction Costa Rica, Ministry of Agriculture Costa Rica, Ministry of Housing Costa Rica, Ministry of Energy Dominican Republic, National Climate Change Commission Dominican Republic, National Energy Commission Dominican Republic, Ministry of Environment and Natural Resources Dominican Republic, Ministry of Economy, Planning and Development Dominican Republic, Technical Office for Land Transport (OTTT) Panama Canal Authority Panama Maritime Authority Peru, Ministry of Environment Peru, Ministry of Energy and Mines Peru, Ministry of Transport and Communications Peru, Ministry of Energy and Mines Uruguay, Ministry of the Environment Uruguay, National Transport Directorate Uruguay, Ministry of Industry, Energy and Minerals Uruguay, Ministry of Agriculture Canada, Ministry of the Environment Norway, Ministry of the Environment Sweden, Department of the Environment UK, Department for Energy and Climate Change (DECC), Danish Government

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61

Malaysia-The Mitigation Action Implementation Network (MAIN) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Malaysia-The Mitigation Action Implementation Network (MAIN) Malaysia-The Mitigation Action Implementation Network (MAIN) Jump to: navigation, search Name Malaysia-The Mitigation Action Implementation Network (MAIN) Agency/Company /Organization Center for Clean Air Policy (CCAP) Partner ICI, Environment Canada, BP, World Bank Institute, Thailand, Ministry of Energy Thailand, Ministry of Industry Thailand, Ministry of Natural Resources and Environment Thailand, Pollution Control Department, Ministry of Natural Resources and Environment Philippines, Climate Change Commission Philippines, Department of Environment and Natural Resources Vietnam, Ministry of Planning and Investment Vietnam, Sub-Institute of Hydrometeorology and Environment of South Vietnam, Ministry of Industry and Trade Vietnam, Ministry of Finance Indonesia, Ministry of Public Works Indonesia, Ministry of Transport Indonesia, Dept. of Clean & Efficient Energy Technology Implementation Indonesia, National Council on Climate Change Malaysia, Ministry of Natural Resources and Environment Malaysia, Dept. of Economic Planning Malaysia, Ministry of Green Technology, Energy and Water Malaysia, Land Public Transport Commission India, Central Electricity Regulatory Commission Pakistan, Dept. of Planning & Development Pakistan, Ministry of Finance Pakistan, Ministry of Foreign Affairs Pakistan, Ministry of Water and Power Germany, Federal Environment Ministry Argentina, Ministry of Energy Argentina, Ministry of Industry Chile, Ministry of Environment Chile, Ministry of Energy Chile, Ministry of Transport Chile, Ministry of Finance Colombia, Ministry of Environment Colombia, Ministry of Transport Colombia, Department of National Planning Colombia, Ministry of Housing Costa Rica, Climate Change Direction Costa Rica, Ministry of Agriculture Costa Rica, Ministry of Housing Costa Rica, Ministry of Energy Dominican Republic, National Climate Change Commission Dominican Republic, National Energy Commission Dominican Republic, Ministry of Environment and Natural Resources Dominican Republic, Ministry of Economy, Planning and Development Dominican Republic, Technical Office for Land Transport (OTTT) Panama Canal Authority Panama Maritime Authority Peru, Ministry of Environment Peru, Ministry of Energy and Mines Peru, Ministry of Transport and Communications Peru, Ministry of Energy and Mines Uruguay, Ministry of the Environment Uruguay, National Transport Directorate Uruguay, Ministry of Industry, Energy and Minerals Uruguay, Ministry of Agriculture Canada, Ministry of the Environment Norway, Ministry of the Environment Sweden, Department of the Environment UK, Department for Energy and Climate Change (DECC), Danish Government

62

Peru-The Mitigation Action Implementation Network (MAIN) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Peru-The Mitigation Action Implementation Network (MAIN) Peru-The Mitigation Action Implementation Network (MAIN) Jump to: navigation, search Name Peru-The Mitigation Action Implementation Network (MAIN) Agency/Company /Organization Center for Clean Air Policy (CCAP) Partner ICI, Environment Canada, BP, World Bank Institute, Thailand, Ministry of Energy Thailand, Ministry of Industry Thailand, Ministry of Natural Resources and Environment Thailand, Pollution Control Department, Ministry of Natural Resources and Environment Philippines, Climate Change Commission Philippines, Department of Environment and Natural Resources Vietnam, Ministry of Planning and Investment Vietnam, Sub-Institute of Hydrometeorology and Environment of South Vietnam, Ministry of Industry and Trade Vietnam, Ministry of Finance Indonesia, Ministry of Public Works Indonesia, Ministry of Transport Indonesia, Dept. of Clean & Efficient Energy Technology Implementation Indonesia, National Council on Climate Change Malaysia, Ministry of Natural Resources and Environment Malaysia, Dept. of Economic Planning Malaysia, Ministry of Green Technology, Energy and Water Malaysia, Land Public Transport Commission India, Central Electricity Regulatory Commission Pakistan, Dept. of Planning & Development Pakistan, Ministry of Finance Pakistan, Ministry of Foreign Affairs Pakistan, Ministry of Water and Power Germany, Federal Environment Ministry Argentina, Ministry of Energy Argentina, Ministry of Industry Chile, Ministry of Environment Chile, Ministry of Energy Chile, Ministry of Transport Chile, Ministry of Finance Colombia, Ministry of Environment Colombia, Ministry of Transport Colombia, Department of National Planning Colombia, Ministry of Housing Costa Rica, Climate Change Direction Costa Rica, Ministry of Agriculture Costa Rica, Ministry of Housing Costa Rica, Ministry of Energy Dominican Republic, National Climate Change Commission Dominican Republic, National Energy Commission Dominican Republic, Ministry of Environment and Natural Resources Dominican Republic, Ministry of Economy, Planning and Development Dominican Republic, Technical Office for Land Transport (OTTT) Panama Canal Authority Panama Maritime Authority Peru, Ministry of Environment Peru, Ministry of Energy and Mines Peru, Ministry of Transport and Communications Peru, Ministry of Energy and Mines Uruguay, Ministry of the Environment Uruguay, National Transport Directorate Uruguay, Ministry of Industry, Energy and Minerals Uruguay, Ministry of Agriculture Canada, Ministry of the Environment Norway, Ministry of the Environment Sweden, Department of the Environment UK, Department for Energy and Climate Change (DECC), Danish Government

63

Thailand-The Mitigation Action Implementation Network (MAIN) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Thailand-The Mitigation Action Implementation Network (MAIN) Thailand-The Mitigation Action Implementation Network (MAIN) Jump to: navigation, search Name Thailand-The Mitigation Action Implementation Network (MAIN) Agency/Company /Organization Center for Clean Air Policy (CCAP) Partner ICI, Environment Canada, BP, World Bank Institute, Thailand, Ministry of Energy Thailand, Ministry of Industry Thailand, Ministry of Natural Resources and Environment Thailand, Pollution Control Department, Ministry of Natural Resources and Environment Philippines, Climate Change Commission Philippines, Department of Environment and Natural Resources Vietnam, Ministry of Planning and Investment Vietnam, Sub-Institute of Hydrometeorology and Environment of South Vietnam, Ministry of Industry and Trade Vietnam, Ministry of Finance Indonesia, Ministry of Public Works Indonesia, Ministry of Transport Indonesia, Dept. of Clean & Efficient Energy Technology Implementation Indonesia, National Council on Climate Change Malaysia, Ministry of Natural Resources and Environment Malaysia, Dept. of Economic Planning Malaysia, Ministry of Green Technology, Energy and Water Malaysia, Land Public Transport Commission India, Central Electricity Regulatory Commission Pakistan, Dept. of Planning & Development Pakistan, Ministry of Finance Pakistan, Ministry of Foreign Affairs Pakistan, Ministry of Water and Power Germany, Federal Environment Ministry Argentina, Ministry of Energy Argentina, Ministry of Industry Chile, Ministry of Environment Chile, Ministry of Energy Chile, Ministry of Transport Chile, Ministry of Finance Colombia, Ministry of Environment Colombia, Ministry of Transport Colombia, Department of National Planning Colombia, Ministry of Housing Costa Rica, Climate Change Direction Costa Rica, Ministry of Agriculture Costa Rica, Ministry of Housing Costa Rica, Ministry of Energy Dominican Republic, National Climate Change Commission Dominican Republic, National Energy Commission Dominican Republic, Ministry of Environment and Natural Resources Dominican Republic, Ministry of Economy, Planning and Development Dominican Republic, Technical Office for Land Transport (OTTT) Panama Canal Authority Panama Maritime Authority Peru, Ministry of Environment Peru, Ministry of Energy and Mines Peru, Ministry of Transport and Communications Peru, Ministry of Energy and Mines Uruguay, Ministry of the Environment Uruguay, National Transport Directorate Uruguay, Ministry of Industry, Energy and Minerals Uruguay, Ministry of Agriculture Canada, Ministry of the Environment Norway, Ministry of the Environment Sweden, Department of the Environment UK, Department for Energy and Climate Change (DECC), Danish Government

64

Uruguay-The Mitigation Action Implementation Network (MAIN) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Uruguay-The Mitigation Action Implementation Network (MAIN) Uruguay-The Mitigation Action Implementation Network (MAIN) Jump to: navigation, search Name Uruguay-The Mitigation Action Implementation Network (MAIN) Agency/Company /Organization Center for Clean Air Policy (CCAP) Partner ICI, Environment Canada, BP, World Bank Institute, Thailand, Ministry of Energy Thailand, Ministry of Industry Thailand, Ministry of Natural Resources and Environment Thailand, Pollution Control Department, Ministry of Natural Resources and Environment Philippines, Climate Change Commission Philippines, Department of Environment and Natural Resources Vietnam, Ministry of Planning and Investment Vietnam, Sub-Institute of Hydrometeorology and Environment of South Vietnam, Ministry of Industry and Trade Vietnam, Ministry of Finance Indonesia, Ministry of Public Works Indonesia, Ministry of Transport Indonesia, Dept. of Clean & Efficient Energy Technology Implementation Indonesia, National Council on Climate Change Malaysia, Ministry of Natural Resources and Environment Malaysia, Dept. of Economic Planning Malaysia, Ministry of Green Technology, Energy and Water Malaysia, Land Public Transport Commission India, Central Electricity Regulatory Commission Pakistan, Dept. of Planning & Development Pakistan, Ministry of Finance Pakistan, Ministry of Foreign Affairs Pakistan, Ministry of Water and Power Germany, Federal Environment Ministry Argentina, Ministry of Energy Argentina, Ministry of Industry Chile, Ministry of Environment Chile, Ministry of Energy Chile, Ministry of Transport Chile, Ministry of Finance Colombia, Ministry of Environment Colombia, Ministry of Transport Colombia, Department of National Planning Colombia, Ministry of Housing Costa Rica, Climate Change Direction Costa Rica, Ministry of Agriculture Costa Rica, Ministry of Housing Costa Rica, Ministry of Energy Dominican Republic, National Climate Change Commission Dominican Republic, National Energy Commission Dominican Republic, Ministry of Environment and Natural Resources Dominican Republic, Ministry of Economy, Planning and Development Dominican Republic, Technical Office for Land Transport (OTTT) Panama Canal Authority Panama Maritime Authority Peru, Ministry of Environment Peru, Ministry of Energy and Mines Peru, Ministry of Transport and Communications Peru, Ministry of Energy and Mines Uruguay, Ministry of the Environment Uruguay, National Transport Directorate Uruguay, Ministry of Industry, Energy and Minerals Uruguay, Ministry of Agriculture Canada, Ministry of the Environment Norway, Ministry of the Environment Sweden, Department of the Environment UK, Department for Energy and Climate Change (DECC), Danish Government

65

Dominican Republic-The Mitigation Action Implementation Network (MAIN) |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Dominican Republic-The Mitigation Action Implementation Network (MAIN) Dominican Republic-The Mitigation Action Implementation Network (MAIN) Jump to: navigation, search Name Dominican Republic-The Mitigation Action Implementation Network (MAIN) Agency/Company /Organization Center for Clean Air Policy (CCAP) Partner ICI, Environment Canada, BP, World Bank Institute, Thailand, Ministry of Energy Thailand, Ministry of Industry Thailand, Ministry of Natural Resources and Environment Thailand, Pollution Control Department, Ministry of Natural Resources and Environment Philippines, Climate Change Commission Philippines, Department of Environment and Natural Resources Vietnam, Ministry of Planning and Investment Vietnam, Sub-Institute of Hydrometeorology and Environment of South Vietnam, Ministry of Industry and Trade Vietnam, Ministry of Finance Indonesia, Ministry of Public Works Indonesia, Ministry of Transport Indonesia, Dept. of Clean & Efficient Energy Technology Implementation Indonesia, National Council on Climate Change Malaysia, Ministry of Natural Resources and Environment Malaysia, Dept. of Economic Planning Malaysia, Ministry of Green Technology, Energy and Water Malaysia, Land Public Transport Commission India, Central Electricity Regulatory Commission Pakistan, Dept. of Planning & Development Pakistan, Ministry of Finance Pakistan, Ministry of Foreign Affairs Pakistan, Ministry of Water and Power Germany, Federal Environment Ministry Argentina, Ministry of Energy Argentina, Ministry of Industry Chile, Ministry of Environment Chile, Ministry of Energy Chile, Ministry of Transport Chile, Ministry of Finance Colombia, Ministry of Environment Colombia, Ministry of Transport Colombia, Department of National Planning Colombia, Ministry of Housing Costa Rica, Climate Change Direction Costa Rica, Ministry of Agriculture Costa Rica, Ministry of Housing Costa Rica, Ministry of Energy Dominican Republic, National Climate Change Commission Dominican Republic, National Energy Commission Dominican Republic, Ministry of Environment and Natural Resources Dominican Republic, Ministry of Economy, Planning and Development Dominican Republic, Technical Office for Land Transport (OTTT) Panama Canal Authority Panama Maritime Authority Peru, Ministry of Environment Peru, Ministry of Energy and Mines Peru, Ministry of Transport and Communications Peru, Ministry of Energy and Mines Uruguay, Ministry of the Environment Uruguay, National Transport Directorate Uruguay, Ministry of Industry, Energy and Minerals Uruguay, Ministry of Agriculture Canada, Ministry of the Environment Norway, Ministry of the Environment Sweden, Department of the Environment UK, Department for Energy and Climate Change (DECC), Danish Government

66

Costa Rica-The Mitigation Action Implementation Network (MAIN) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Costa Rica-The Mitigation Action Implementation Network (MAIN) Costa Rica-The Mitigation Action Implementation Network (MAIN) Jump to: navigation, search Name Costa Rica-The Mitigation Action Implementation Network (MAIN) Agency/Company /Organization Center for Clean Air Policy (CCAP) Partner ICI, Environment Canada, BP, World Bank Institute, Thailand, Ministry of Energy Thailand, Ministry of Industry Thailand, Ministry of Natural Resources and Environment Thailand, Pollution Control Department, Ministry of Natural Resources and Environment Philippines, Climate Change Commission Philippines, Department of Environment and Natural Resources Vietnam, Ministry of Planning and Investment Vietnam, Sub-Institute of Hydrometeorology and Environment of South Vietnam, Ministry of Industry and Trade Vietnam, Ministry of Finance Indonesia, Ministry of Public Works Indonesia, Ministry of Transport Indonesia, Dept. of Clean & Efficient Energy Technology Implementation Indonesia, National Council on Climate Change Malaysia, Ministry of Natural Resources and Environment Malaysia, Dept. of Economic Planning Malaysia, Ministry of Green Technology, Energy and Water Malaysia, Land Public Transport Commission India, Central Electricity Regulatory Commission Pakistan, Dept. of Planning & Development Pakistan, Ministry of Finance Pakistan, Ministry of Foreign Affairs Pakistan, Ministry of Water and Power Germany, Federal Environment Ministry Argentina, Ministry of Energy Argentina, Ministry of Industry Chile, Ministry of Environment Chile, Ministry of Energy Chile, Ministry of Transport Chile, Ministry of Finance Colombia, Ministry of Environment Colombia, Ministry of Transport Colombia, Department of National Planning Colombia, Ministry of Housing Costa Rica, Climate Change Direction Costa Rica, Ministry of Agriculture Costa Rica, Ministry of Housing Costa Rica, Ministry of Energy Dominican Republic, National Climate Change Commission Dominican Republic, National Energy Commission Dominican Republic, Ministry of Environment and Natural Resources Dominican Republic, Ministry of Economy, Planning and Development Dominican Republic, Technical Office for Land Transport (OTTT) Panama Canal Authority Panama Maritime Authority Peru, Ministry of Environment Peru, Ministry of Energy and Mines Peru, Ministry of Transport and Communications Peru, Ministry of Energy and Mines Uruguay, Ministry of the Environment Uruguay, National Transport Directorate Uruguay, Ministry of Industry, Energy and Minerals Uruguay, Ministry of Agriculture Canada, Ministry of the Environment Norway, Ministry of the Environment Sweden, Department of the Environment UK, Department for Energy and Climate Change (DECC), Danish Government

67

Pakistan-The Mitigation Action Implementation Network (MAIN) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Pakistan-The Mitigation Action Implementation Network (MAIN) Pakistan-The Mitigation Action Implementation Network (MAIN) Jump to: navigation, search Name Pakistan-The Mitigation Action Implementation Network (MAIN) Agency/Company /Organization Center for Clean Air Policy (CCAP) Partner ICI, Environment Canada, BP, World Bank Institute, Thailand, Ministry of Energy Thailand, Ministry of Industry Thailand, Ministry of Natural Resources and Environment Thailand, Pollution Control Department, Ministry of Natural Resources and Environment Philippines, Climate Change Commission Philippines, Department of Environment and Natural Resources Vietnam, Ministry of Planning and Investment Vietnam, Sub-Institute of Hydrometeorology and Environment of South Vietnam, Ministry of Industry and Trade Vietnam, Ministry of Finance Indonesia, Ministry of Public Works Indonesia, Ministry of Transport Indonesia, Dept. of Clean & Efficient Energy Technology Implementation Indonesia, National Council on Climate Change Malaysia, Ministry of Natural Resources and Environment Malaysia, Dept. of Economic Planning Malaysia, Ministry of Green Technology, Energy and Water Malaysia, Land Public Transport Commission India, Central Electricity Regulatory Commission Pakistan, Dept. of Planning & Development Pakistan, Ministry of Finance Pakistan, Ministry of Foreign Affairs Pakistan, Ministry of Water and Power Germany, Federal Environment Ministry Argentina, Ministry of Energy Argentina, Ministry of Industry Chile, Ministry of Environment Chile, Ministry of Energy Chile, Ministry of Transport Chile, Ministry of Finance Colombia, Ministry of Environment Colombia, Ministry of Transport Colombia, Department of National Planning Colombia, Ministry of Housing Costa Rica, Climate Change Direction Costa Rica, Ministry of Agriculture Costa Rica, Ministry of Housing Costa Rica, Ministry of Energy Dominican Republic, National Climate Change Commission Dominican Republic, National Energy Commission Dominican Republic, Ministry of Environment and Natural Resources Dominican Republic, Ministry of Economy, Planning and Development Dominican Republic, Technical Office for Land Transport (OTTT) Panama Canal Authority Panama Maritime Authority Peru, Ministry of Environment Peru, Ministry of Energy and Mines Peru, Ministry of Transport and Communications Peru, Ministry of Energy and Mines Uruguay, Ministry of the Environment Uruguay, National Transport Directorate Uruguay, Ministry of Industry, Energy and Minerals Uruguay, Ministry of Agriculture Canada, Ministry of the Environment Norway, Ministry of the Environment Sweden, Department of the Environment UK, Department for Energy and Climate Change (DECC), Danish Government

68

Mexico-The Mitigation Action Implementation Network (MAIN) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Mexico-The Mitigation Action Implementation Network (MAIN) Mexico-The Mitigation Action Implementation Network (MAIN) Jump to: navigation, search Name Mexico-The Mitigation Action Implementation Network (MAIN) Agency/Company /Organization Center for Clean Air Policy (CCAP) Partner ICI, Environment Canada, BP, World Bank Institute, Thailand, Ministry of Energy Thailand, Ministry of Industry Thailand, Ministry of Natural Resources and Environment Thailand, Pollution Control Department, Ministry of Natural Resources and Environment Philippines, Climate Change Commission Philippines, Department of Environment and Natural Resources Vietnam, Ministry of Planning and Investment Vietnam, Sub-Institute of Hydrometeorology and Environment of South Vietnam, Ministry of Industry and Trade Vietnam, Ministry of Finance Indonesia, Ministry of Public Works Indonesia, Ministry of Transport Indonesia, Dept. of Clean & Efficient Energy Technology Implementation Indonesia, National Council on Climate Change Malaysia, Ministry of Natural Resources and Environment Malaysia, Dept. of Economic Planning Malaysia, Ministry of Green Technology, Energy and Water Malaysia, Land Public Transport Commission India, Central Electricity Regulatory Commission Pakistan, Dept. of Planning & Development Pakistan, Ministry of Finance Pakistan, Ministry of Foreign Affairs Pakistan, Ministry of Water and Power Germany, Federal Environment Ministry Argentina, Ministry of Energy Argentina, Ministry of Industry Chile, Ministry of Environment Chile, Ministry of Energy Chile, Ministry of Transport Chile, Ministry of Finance Colombia, Ministry of Environment Colombia, Ministry of Transport Colombia, Department of National Planning Colombia, Ministry of Housing Costa Rica, Climate Change Direction Costa Rica, Ministry of Agriculture Costa Rica, Ministry of Housing Costa Rica, Ministry of Energy Dominican Republic, National Climate Change Commission Dominican Republic, National Energy Commission Dominican Republic, Ministry of Environment and Natural Resources Dominican Republic, Ministry of Economy, Planning and Development Dominican Republic, Technical Office for Land Transport (OTTT) Panama Canal Authority Panama Maritime Authority Peru, Ministry of Environment Peru, Ministry of Energy and Mines Peru, Ministry of Transport and Communications Peru, Ministry of Energy and Mines Uruguay, Ministry of the Environment Uruguay, National Transport Directorate Uruguay, Ministry of Industry, Energy and Minerals Uruguay, Ministry of Agriculture Canada, Ministry of the Environment Norway, Ministry of the Environment Sweden, Department of the Environment UK, Department for Energy and Climate Change (DECC), Danish Government

69

Colombia-The Mitigation Action Implementation Network (MAIN) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Colombia-The Mitigation Action Implementation Network (MAIN) Colombia-The Mitigation Action Implementation Network (MAIN) Jump to: navigation, search Name Colombia-The Mitigation Action Implementation Network (MAIN) Agency/Company /Organization Center for Clean Air Policy (CCAP) Partner ICI, Environment Canada, BP, World Bank Institute, Thailand, Ministry of Energy Thailand, Ministry of Industry Thailand, Ministry of Natural Resources and Environment Thailand, Pollution Control Department, Ministry of Natural Resources and Environment Philippines, Climate Change Commission Philippines, Department of Environment and Natural Resources Vietnam, Ministry of Planning and Investment Vietnam, Sub-Institute of Hydrometeorology and Environment of South Vietnam, Ministry of Industry and Trade Vietnam, Ministry of Finance Indonesia, Ministry of Public Works Indonesia, Ministry of Transport Indonesia, Dept. of Clean & Efficient Energy Technology Implementation Indonesia, National Council on Climate Change Malaysia, Ministry of Natural Resources and Environment Malaysia, Dept. of Economic Planning Malaysia, Ministry of Green Technology, Energy and Water Malaysia, Land Public Transport Commission India, Central Electricity Regulatory Commission Pakistan, Dept. of Planning & Development Pakistan, Ministry of Finance Pakistan, Ministry of Foreign Affairs Pakistan, Ministry of Water and Power Germany, Federal Environment Ministry Argentina, Ministry of Energy Argentina, Ministry of Industry Chile, Ministry of Environment Chile, Ministry of Energy Chile, Ministry of Transport Chile, Ministry of Finance Colombia, Ministry of Environment Colombia, Ministry of Transport Colombia, Department of National Planning Colombia, Ministry of Housing Costa Rica, Climate Change Direction Costa Rica, Ministry of Agriculture Costa Rica, Ministry of Housing Costa Rica, Ministry of Energy Dominican Republic, National Climate Change Commission Dominican Republic, National Energy Commission Dominican Republic, Ministry of Environment and Natural Resources Dominican Republic, Ministry of Economy, Planning and Development Dominican Republic, Technical Office for Land Transport (OTTT) Panama Canal Authority Panama Maritime Authority Peru, Ministry of Environment Peru, Ministry of Energy and Mines Peru, Ministry of Transport and Communications Peru, Ministry of Energy and Mines Uruguay, Ministry of the Environment Uruguay, National Transport Directorate Uruguay, Ministry of Industry, Energy and Minerals Uruguay, Ministry of Agriculture Canada, Ministry of the Environment Norway, Ministry of the Environment Sweden, Department of the Environment UK, Department for Energy and Climate Change (DECC), Danish Government

70

Philippines-The Mitigation Action Implementation Network (MAIN) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Philippines-The Mitigation Action Implementation Network (MAIN) Philippines-The Mitigation Action Implementation Network (MAIN) Jump to: navigation, search Name Philippines-The Mitigation Action Implementation Network (MAIN) Agency/Company /Organization Center for Clean Air Policy (CCAP) Partner ICI, Environment Canada, BP, World Bank Institute, Thailand, Ministry of Energy Thailand, Ministry of Industry Thailand, Ministry of Natural Resources and Environment Thailand, Pollution Control Department, Ministry of Natural Resources and Environment Philippines, Climate Change Commission Philippines, Department of Environment and Natural Resources Vietnam, Ministry of Planning and Investment Vietnam, Sub-Institute of Hydrometeorology and Environment of South Vietnam, Ministry of Industry and Trade Vietnam, Ministry of Finance Indonesia, Ministry of Public Works Indonesia, Ministry of Transport Indonesia, Dept. of Clean & Efficient Energy Technology Implementation Indonesia, National Council on Climate Change Malaysia, Ministry of Natural Resources and Environment Malaysia, Dept. of Economic Planning Malaysia, Ministry of Green Technology, Energy and Water Malaysia, Land Public Transport Commission India, Central Electricity Regulatory Commission Pakistan, Dept. of Planning & Development Pakistan, Ministry of Finance Pakistan, Ministry of Foreign Affairs Pakistan, Ministry of Water and Power Germany, Federal Environment Ministry Argentina, Ministry of Energy Argentina, Ministry of Industry Chile, Ministry of Environment Chile, Ministry of Energy Chile, Ministry of Transport Chile, Ministry of Finance Colombia, Ministry of Environment Colombia, Ministry of Transport Colombia, Department of National Planning Colombia, Ministry of Housing Costa Rica, Climate Change Direction Costa Rica, Ministry of Agriculture Costa Rica, Ministry of Housing Costa Rica, Ministry of Energy Dominican Republic, National Climate Change Commission Dominican Republic, National Energy Commission Dominican Republic, Ministry of Environment and Natural Resources Dominican Republic, Ministry of Economy, Planning and Development Dominican Republic, Technical Office for Land Transport (OTTT) Panama Canal Authority Panama Maritime Authority Peru, Ministry of Environment Peru, Ministry of Energy and Mines Peru, Ministry of Transport and Communications Peru, Ministry of Energy and Mines Uruguay, Ministry of the Environment Uruguay, National Transport Directorate Uruguay, Ministry of Industry, Energy and Minerals Uruguay, Ministry of Agriculture Canada, Ministry of the Environment Norway, Ministry of the Environment Sweden, Department of the Environment UK, Department for Energy and Climate Change (DECC), Danish Government

71

Vietnam-The Mitigation Action Implementation Network (MAIN) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Vietnam-The Mitigation Action Implementation Network (MAIN) Vietnam-The Mitigation Action Implementation Network (MAIN) Jump to: navigation, search Name Vietnam-The Mitigation Action Implementation Network (MAIN) Agency/Company /Organization Center for Clean Air Policy (CCAP) Partner ICI, Environment Canada, BP, World Bank Institute, Thailand, Ministry of Energy Thailand, Ministry of Industry Thailand, Ministry of Natural Resources and Environment Thailand, Pollution Control Department, Ministry of Natural Resources and Environment Philippines, Climate Change Commission Philippines, Department of Environment and Natural Resources Vietnam, Ministry of Planning and Investment Vietnam, Sub-Institute of Hydrometeorology and Environment of South Vietnam, Ministry of Industry and Trade Vietnam, Ministry of Finance Indonesia, Ministry of Public Works Indonesia, Ministry of Transport Indonesia, Dept. of Clean & Efficient Energy Technology Implementation Indonesia, National Council on Climate Change Malaysia, Ministry of Natural Resources and Environment Malaysia, Dept. of Economic Planning Malaysia, Ministry of Green Technology, Energy and Water Malaysia, Land Public Transport Commission India, Central Electricity Regulatory Commission Pakistan, Dept. of Planning & Development Pakistan, Ministry of Finance Pakistan, Ministry of Foreign Affairs Pakistan, Ministry of Water and Power Germany, Federal Environment Ministry Argentina, Ministry of Energy Argentina, Ministry of Industry Chile, Ministry of Environment Chile, Ministry of Energy Chile, Ministry of Transport Chile, Ministry of Finance Colombia, Ministry of Environment Colombia, Ministry of Transport Colombia, Department of National Planning Colombia, Ministry of Housing Costa Rica, Climate Change Direction Costa Rica, Ministry of Agriculture Costa Rica, Ministry of Housing Costa Rica, Ministry of Energy Dominican Republic, National Climate Change Commission Dominican Republic, National Energy Commission Dominican Republic, Ministry of Environment and Natural Resources Dominican Republic, Ministry of Economy, Planning and Development Dominican Republic, Technical Office for Land Transport (OTTT) Panama Canal Authority Panama Maritime Authority Peru, Ministry of Environment Peru, Ministry of Energy and Mines Peru, Ministry of Transport and Communications Peru, Ministry of Energy and Mines Uruguay, Ministry of the Environment Uruguay, National Transport Directorate Uruguay, Ministry of Industry, Energy and Minerals Uruguay, Ministry of Agriculture Canada, Ministry of the Environment Norway, Ministry of the Environment Sweden, Department of the Environment UK, Department for Energy and Climate Change (DECC), Danish Government

72

Brazil-The Mitigation Action Implementation Network (MAIN) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Brazil-The Mitigation Action Implementation Network (MAIN) Brazil-The Mitigation Action Implementation Network (MAIN) Jump to: navigation, search Name Brazil-The Mitigation Action Implementation Network (MAIN) Agency/Company /Organization Center for Clean Air Policy (CCAP) Partner ICI, Environment Canada, BP, World Bank Institute, Thailand, Ministry of Energy Thailand, Ministry of Industry Thailand, Ministry of Natural Resources and Environment Thailand, Pollution Control Department, Ministry of Natural Resources and Environment Philippines, Climate Change Commission Philippines, Department of Environment and Natural Resources Vietnam, Ministry of Planning and Investment Vietnam, Sub-Institute of Hydrometeorology and Environment of South Vietnam, Ministry of Industry and Trade Vietnam, Ministry of Finance Indonesia, Ministry of Public Works Indonesia, Ministry of Transport Indonesia, Dept. of Clean & Efficient Energy Technology Implementation Indonesia, National Council on Climate Change Malaysia, Ministry of Natural Resources and Environment Malaysia, Dept. of Economic Planning Malaysia, Ministry of Green Technology, Energy and Water Malaysia, Land Public Transport Commission India, Central Electricity Regulatory Commission Pakistan, Dept. of Planning & Development Pakistan, Ministry of Finance Pakistan, Ministry of Foreign Affairs Pakistan, Ministry of Water and Power Germany, Federal Environment Ministry Argentina, Ministry of Energy Argentina, Ministry of Industry Chile, Ministry of Environment Chile, Ministry of Energy Chile, Ministry of Transport Chile, Ministry of Finance Colombia, Ministry of Environment Colombia, Ministry of Transport Colombia, Department of National Planning Colombia, Ministry of Housing Costa Rica, Climate Change Direction Costa Rica, Ministry of Agriculture Costa Rica, Ministry of Housing Costa Rica, Ministry of Energy Dominican Republic, National Climate Change Commission Dominican Republic, National Energy Commission Dominican Republic, Ministry of Environment and Natural Resources Dominican Republic, Ministry of Economy, Planning and Development Dominican Republic, Technical Office for Land Transport (OTTT) Panama Canal Authority Panama Maritime Authority Peru, Ministry of Environment Peru, Ministry of Energy and Mines Peru, Ministry of Transport and Communications Peru, Ministry of Energy and Mines Uruguay, Ministry of the Environment Uruguay, National Transport Directorate Uruguay, Ministry of Industry, Energy and Minerals Uruguay, Ministry of Agriculture Canada, Ministry of the Environment Norway, Ministry of the Environment Sweden, Department of the Environment UK, Department for Energy and Climate Change (DECC), Danish Government

73

Chile-The Mitigation Action Implementation Network (MAIN) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Chile-The Mitigation Action Implementation Network (MAIN) Chile-The Mitigation Action Implementation Network (MAIN) Jump to: navigation, search Name Chile-The Mitigation Action Implementation Network (MAIN) Agency/Company /Organization Center for Clean Air Policy (CCAP) Partner ICI, Environment Canada, BP, World Bank Institute, Thailand, Ministry of Energy Thailand, Ministry of Industry Thailand, Ministry of Natural Resources and Environment Thailand, Pollution Control Department, Ministry of Natural Resources and Environment Philippines, Climate Change Commission Philippines, Department of Environment and Natural Resources Vietnam, Ministry of Planning and Investment Vietnam, Sub-Institute of Hydrometeorology and Environment of South Vietnam, Ministry of Industry and Trade Vietnam, Ministry of Finance Indonesia, Ministry of Public Works Indonesia, Ministry of Transport Indonesia, Dept. of Clean & Efficient Energy Technology Implementation Indonesia, National Council on Climate Change Malaysia, Ministry of Natural Resources and Environment Malaysia, Dept. of Economic Planning Malaysia, Ministry of Green Technology, Energy and Water Malaysia, Land Public Transport Commission India, Central Electricity Regulatory Commission Pakistan, Dept. of Planning & Development Pakistan, Ministry of Finance Pakistan, Ministry of Foreign Affairs Pakistan, Ministry of Water and Power Germany, Federal Environment Ministry Argentina, Ministry of Energy Argentina, Ministry of Industry Chile, Ministry of Environment Chile, Ministry of Energy Chile, Ministry of Transport Chile, Ministry of Finance Colombia, Ministry of Environment Colombia, Ministry of Transport Colombia, Department of National Planning Colombia, Ministry of Housing Costa Rica, Climate Change Direction Costa Rica, Ministry of Agriculture Costa Rica, Ministry of Housing Costa Rica, Ministry of Energy Dominican Republic, National Climate Change Commission Dominican Republic, National Energy Commission Dominican Republic, Ministry of Environment and Natural Resources Dominican Republic, Ministry of Economy, Planning and Development Dominican Republic, Technical Office for Land Transport (OTTT) Panama Canal Authority Panama Maritime Authority Peru, Ministry of Environment Peru, Ministry of Energy and Mines Peru, Ministry of Transport and Communications Peru, Ministry of Energy and Mines Uruguay, Ministry of the Environment Uruguay, National Transport Directorate Uruguay, Ministry of Industry, Energy and Minerals Uruguay, Ministry of Agriculture Canada, Ministry of the Environment Norway, Ministry of the Environment Sweden, Department of the Environment UK, Department for Energy and Climate Change (DECC), Danish Government

74

India-The Mitigation Action Implementation Network (MAIN) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

India-The Mitigation Action Implementation Network (MAIN) India-The Mitigation Action Implementation Network (MAIN) Jump to: navigation, search Name India-The Mitigation Action Implementation Network (MAIN) Agency/Company /Organization Center for Clean Air Policy (CCAP) Partner ICI, Environment Canada, BP, World Bank Institute, Thailand, Ministry of Energy Thailand, Ministry of Industry Thailand, Ministry of Natural Resources and Environment Thailand, Pollution Control Department, Ministry of Natural Resources and Environment Philippines, Climate Change Commission Philippines, Department of Environment and Natural Resources Vietnam, Ministry of Planning and Investment Vietnam, Sub-Institute of Hydrometeorology and Environment of South Vietnam, Ministry of Industry and Trade Vietnam, Ministry of Finance Indonesia, Ministry of Public Works Indonesia, Ministry of Transport Indonesia, Dept. of Clean & Efficient Energy Technology Implementation Indonesia, National Council on Climate Change Malaysia, Ministry of Natural Resources and Environment Malaysia, Dept. of Economic Planning Malaysia, Ministry of Green Technology, Energy and Water Malaysia, Land Public Transport Commission India, Central Electricity Regulatory Commission Pakistan, Dept. of Planning & Development Pakistan, Ministry of Finance Pakistan, Ministry of Foreign Affairs Pakistan, Ministry of Water and Power Germany, Federal Environment Ministry Argentina, Ministry of Energy Argentina, Ministry of Industry Chile, Ministry of Environment Chile, Ministry of Energy Chile, Ministry of Transport Chile, Ministry of Finance Colombia, Ministry of Environment Colombia, Ministry of Transport Colombia, Department of National Planning Colombia, Ministry of Housing Costa Rica, Climate Change Direction Costa Rica, Ministry of Agriculture Costa Rica, Ministry of Housing Costa Rica, Ministry of Energy Dominican Republic, National Climate Change Commission Dominican Republic, National Energy Commission Dominican Republic, Ministry of Environment and Natural Resources Dominican Republic, Ministry of Economy, Planning and Development Dominican Republic, Technical Office for Land Transport (OTTT) Panama Canal Authority Panama Maritime Authority Peru, Ministry of Environment Peru, Ministry of Energy and Mines Peru, Ministry of Transport and Communications Peru, Ministry of Energy and Mines Uruguay, Ministry of the Environment Uruguay, National Transport Directorate Uruguay, Ministry of Industry, Energy and Minerals Uruguay, Ministry of Agriculture Canada, Ministry of the Environment Norway, Ministry of the Environment Sweden, Department of the Environment UK, Department for Energy and Climate Change (DECC), Danish Government

75

Indonesia-The Mitigation Action Implementation Network (MAIN) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Indonesia-The Mitigation Action Implementation Network (MAIN) Indonesia-The Mitigation Action Implementation Network (MAIN) Jump to: navigation, search Name Indonesia-The Mitigation Action Implementation Network (MAIN) Agency/Company /Organization Center for Clean Air Policy (CCAP) Partner ICI, Environment Canada, BP, World Bank Institute, Thailand, Ministry of Energy Thailand, Ministry of Industry Thailand, Ministry of Natural Resources and Environment Thailand, Pollution Control Department, Ministry of Natural Resources and Environment Philippines, Climate Change Commission Philippines, Department of Environment and Natural Resources Vietnam, Ministry of Planning and Investment Vietnam, Sub-Institute of Hydrometeorology and Environment of South Vietnam, Ministry of Industry and Trade Vietnam, Ministry of Finance Indonesia, Ministry of Public Works Indonesia, Ministry of Transport Indonesia, Dept. of Clean & Efficient Energy Technology Implementation Indonesia, National Council on Climate Change Malaysia, Ministry of Natural Resources and Environment Malaysia, Dept. of Economic Planning Malaysia, Ministry of Green Technology, Energy and Water Malaysia, Land Public Transport Commission India, Central Electricity Regulatory Commission Pakistan, Dept. of Planning & Development Pakistan, Ministry of Finance Pakistan, Ministry of Foreign Affairs Pakistan, Ministry of Water and Power Germany, Federal Environment Ministry Argentina, Ministry of Energy Argentina, Ministry of Industry Chile, Ministry of Environment Chile, Ministry of Energy Chile, Ministry of Transport Chile, Ministry of Finance Colombia, Ministry of Environment Colombia, Ministry of Transport Colombia, Department of National Planning Colombia, Ministry of Housing Costa Rica, Climate Change Direction Costa Rica, Ministry of Agriculture Costa Rica, Ministry of Housing Costa Rica, Ministry of Energy Dominican Republic, National Climate Change Commission Dominican Republic, National Energy Commission Dominican Republic, Ministry of Environment and Natural Resources Dominican Republic, Ministry of Economy, Planning and Development Dominican Republic, Technical Office for Land Transport (OTTT) Panama Canal Authority Panama Maritime Authority Peru, Ministry of Environment Peru, Ministry of Energy and Mines Peru, Ministry of Transport and Communications Peru, Ministry of Energy and Mines Uruguay, Ministry of the Environment Uruguay, National Transport Directorate Uruguay, Ministry of Industry, Energy and Minerals Uruguay, Ministry of Agriculture Canada, Ministry of the Environment Norway, Ministry of the Environment Sweden, Department of the Environment UK, Department for Energy and Climate Change (DECC), Danish Government

76

DOE/EIS-0397: Mitigation Action Plan for the Lyle Falls Fish...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

MITIGATION ACTION PLAN Lyle Falls Fish Passage Project Bonneville Power Administration Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Nation Washington Department of Fish and...

77

EIS-0425: Record of Decision and Mitigation Action Plan | Department of  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5: Record of Decision and Mitigation Action Plan 5: Record of Decision and Mitigation Action Plan EIS-0425: Record of Decision and Mitigation Action Plan Bonneville Power Administration Record of Decision and Mitigation Action Plan for the Mid-Columbia Restoration Project BPA decided to implement the Proposed Action of the Mid-Columbia Coho Restoration Program as described in the Mid-Columbia Coho Restoration Program Final Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) (DOE/EIS-0425, March 2012). BPA will fund the construction, operation, and maintenance of a coho slamon restoration program sponsored by the Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Nation to help mitigate impacts to fish affected by the Federal Columbia River Power System dams on the Columbia River. The Proposed Action will involve building a new, small, in-basin adult

78

Ecofys-How to get Nationally Appropriate Mitigation Actions (NAMAs) to work  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ecofys-How to get Nationally Appropriate Mitigation Actions (NAMAs) to work Ecofys-How to get Nationally Appropriate Mitigation Actions (NAMAs) to work Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: How to get Nationally Appropriate Mitigation Actions (NAMAs) to work Agency/Company /Organization: Ecofys Sector: Energy, Land Topics: Low emission development planning, Pathways analysis Resource Type: Guide/manual Website: prod-http-80-800498448.us-east-1.elb.amazonaws.com/w/images/4/49/Ecofy How to get Nationally Appropriate Mitigation Actions (NAMAs) to work Screenshot References: How to get Nationally Appropriate Mitigation Actions (NAMAs) to work[1] "This short paper identifies three types of issues as potential obstacles for NAMAs in this early stage of development. First, it highlights the importance of dealing with local ownership, which is quite time intensive.

79

Event:First Asia Regional Dialogue on the Development of Mitigation Actions  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Event Event Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Event:First Asia Regional Dialogue on the Development of Mitigation Actions and Low-Carbon Development Strategies Jump to: navigation, search Calendar.png First Asia Regional Dialogue on the Development of Mitigation Actions and Low-Carbon Development Strategies: on 2011/10/11 First Asia Regional Dialogue on the Development of Mitigation Actions and Low-Carbon Development Strategies Event Details Name First Asia Regional Dialogue on the Development of Mitigation Actions and Low-Carbon Development Strategies Date 2011/10/11 Location Thailand Organizer Mitigation Action Implementation Network (MAIN), Center for Clean Air Policy (CCAP) Tags LEDS, CLEAN, Capacity Building, Training Website Event Website

80

EA-1855: Mitigation Action Plan | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Action Plan (MAP) is part of the Finding of No Significant Impact for the Creston-Bell Transmission Line Rebuild Project (Proposed Action). The Proposed Action involves...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mitigation actions insights" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Mitigation Action Plan Phase I Lovell Yellowtail and Basin-Lovell Transmission Line Rebuild Project  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Mitigation Action Plan Phase I Lovell Yellowtail and Basin-Lovell Transmission Line Rebuild Project Big Horn and Carbon Counties, Montana and Big Horn County, Wyoming MITIGATION ACTION IDENTIFIER RESPONSIBLE PARTY FOR IMPLEMENTING MITIGATION ACTION LOCATION IF AVAILABLE/ STRUCTURE NUMBERS PARTY RESPONSIBLE FOR MONITORING AND ENSURING COMPLIANCE 1 Construction Contractor Western Maintenance Standard Construction Project Practices will be implemented through Phases I of Project construction and operation (Table 2.1-3 in the Final EA.) Western Construction (during Construction Phase) Western Maintenance (During maintenance of facility) NPS - WESTERN INTERAGENCY AGREEMENT FOR BIGHORN CANYON NRA 2 NPS, Western The Interagency Agreement between United

82

Republic of Congo-Nationally Appropriate Mitigation Actions (NAMAs) in the  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Republic of Congo-Nationally Appropriate Mitigation Actions (NAMAs) in the Republic of Congo-Nationally Appropriate Mitigation Actions (NAMAs) in the Congo Basin Jump to: navigation, search Name Republic of Congo-Nationally Appropriate Mitigation Actions (NAMAs) in the Congo Basin Agency/Company /Organization Environment Canada, International Institute for Sustainable Development (IISD) Sector Climate, Energy, Land, Water Focus Area Non-renewable Energy, Agriculture, Buildings, Economic Development, Energy Efficiency, Forestry, Greenhouse Gas, Grid Assessment and Integration, Industry, Land Use, Offsets and Certificates, Transportation Topics Adaptation, Background analysis, Baseline projection, GHG inventory, Low emission development planning, -NAMA, Pathways analysis, Policies/deployment programs Program Start 2012 Program End 2013

83

Angola-Nationally Appropriate Mitigation Actions (NAMAs) in the Congo Basin  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Angola-Nationally Appropriate Mitigation Actions (NAMAs) in the Congo Basin Angola-Nationally Appropriate Mitigation Actions (NAMAs) in the Congo Basin Jump to: navigation, search Name Angola-Nationally Appropriate Mitigation Actions (NAMAs) in the Congo Basin Agency/Company /Organization Environment Canada, International Institute for Sustainable Development (IISD) Sector Climate, Energy, Land, Water Focus Area Non-renewable Energy, Agriculture, Buildings, Economic Development, Energy Efficiency, Forestry, Greenhouse Gas, Grid Assessment and Integration, Industry, Land Use, Offsets and Certificates, Transportation Topics Adaptation, Background analysis, Baseline projection, GHG inventory, Low emission development planning, -NAMA, Pathways analysis, Policies/deployment programs Website http://www.iisd.org/climate/de Program Start 2012

84

South Africa-Mitigation Action Plans and Scenarios (MAPS) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Page Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » South Africa-Mitigation Action Plans and Scenarios (MAPS) Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Argentina-Mitigation Action Plans and Scenarios (MAPS) Name Argentina-Mitigation Action Plans and Scenarios (MAPS) Agency/Company /Organization The Children's Investment Fund Foundation, SouthSouthNorth, University of Cape Town-Energy Research Centre, Danish Government Sector Climate, Energy Topics Baseline projection, Low emission development planning, -LEDS, -NAMA, Pathways analysis Website http://www.mapsprogramme.org Program Start 2010 Program End 2013 Country South Africa Southern Africa References Mitigation Action Plans and Scenarios (MAPS)[1] Contents 1 Overview 2 MAPS Processes and Outcomes 2.1 Chile

85

DOE/EIS-0332: Mitigation Action Plan for th eMcNary-John Day...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

McNary-John Day Transmission Line Project This Mitigation Action Plan (MAP) is for the McNary-John Day Transmission Line Project, which involves construction and operation of a new...

86

EIS-0380: Mitigation Action Plan | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Action Plan Continued Operation of Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico Site-Wide Environmental Impact Statement for the Continued Operation of Los Alamos...

87

UNDP-Peru GEF Nationally Appropriate Mitigation Actions in the Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GEF Nationally Appropriate Mitigation Actions in the Energy GEF Nationally Appropriate Mitigation Actions in the Energy Generation and End-Use Sectors Jump to: navigation, search Name UNDP-Peru GEF Nationally Appropriate Mitigation Actions in the Energy Generation and End-Use Sectors Agency/Company /Organization United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) Sector Climate Focus Area People and Policy Topics Low emission development planning, -LEDS Country Peru South America References UNDP - Latin America & the Caribbean[1] Contents 1 Program Overview 1.1 Program Focus 1.2 Environment and Sustainable Development 2 References Program Overview "Across Latin America and the Caribbean, UNDP helps countries build and share their own solutions to urgent development challenges, supporting coalitions for change and connecting individuals and institutions so they

88

Rwanda-Nationally Appropriate Mitigation Actions (NAMAs) in the Congo Basin  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

form form View source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Rwanda-Nationally Appropriate Mitigation Actions (NAMAs) in the Congo Basin Jump to: navigation, search Name Rwanda-Nationally Appropriate Mitigation Actions (NAMAs) in the Congo Basin Agency/Company /Organization Environment Canada, International Institute for Sustainable Development (IISD) Sector Climate, Energy, Land, Water Focus Area Non-renewable Energy, Agriculture, Buildings, Economic Development, Energy Efficiency, Forestry, Greenhouse Gas, Grid Assessment and Integration, Industry, Land Use, Offsets and Certificates, Transportation

89

Mitigation Action Implementation Plan To Implement Mitigation Requirements for Cheyenne-Miracle Mile and Ault-Cheyenne Transmission Line Rebuild Project, Carbon, Albany and Laramie Counties, Wyoming, and Weld County, Colorado  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Mitigation Action Plan Mitigation Action Plan To Implement Mitigation Requirements for Cheyenne-Miracle Mile and Ault-Cheyenne Transmission Line Rebuild Project, Carbon, Albany, and Laramie Counties, Wyoming, and Weld County, Colorado September 2006 CH-MM and AU-CH Mitigation Action Plan Sept. 2006 1 Action Plan for Standard Project Practices and Mitigation Mitigation Action Identifier Resources for Which the Mitigation Will Be Implemented Responsible Party for Implementing Mitigation Action Party Responsible for Monitoring and Ensuring Compliance Land use, transportation Construction Contractor Western Maintenance The contractor will limit the movement of crews and equipment to the ROW, including access routes. The contractor will limit movement on the ROW to minimize damage to

90

Mitigation action plan for remedial action at the Uranium Mill Tailing Sites and Disposal Site, Rifle, Colorado  

SciTech Connect

The Estes Gulch disposal site is approximately 10 kilometers (6 miles) north of the town of Rifle, off State Highway 13 on Federal land administered by the Bureau of Land Management. The Department of Energy (DOE) will transport the residual radioactive materials (RRM) by truck to the Estes Gulch disposal site via State Highway 13 and place it in a partially below-grade disposal cell. The RRM will be covered by an earthen radon barrier, frost protection layers, and a rock erosion protection layer. A toe ditch and other features will also be constructed to control erosion at the disposal site. After removal of the RRM and disposal at the Estes Gulch site, the disturbed areas at all three sites will be backfilled with clean soils, contoured to facilitate surface drainage, and revegetated. Wetlands areas destroyed at the former Rifle processing sites will be compensated for by the incorporation of now wetlands into the revegetation plan at the New Rifle site. The UMTRA Project Office, supported by the Remedial Action Contractor (RAC) and the Technical Assistance Contractor (TAC), oversees the implementation of the MAP. The RAC executes mitigation measures in the field. The TAC provides monitoring of the mitigation actions in cases where mitigation measures are associated with design features. Site closeout and inspection compliance will be documented in the site completion report.

Not Available

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

EIS-0380: Fiscal Year 2011 Mitigation Action Plan Annual Report for the 2008 Los Alamos Site-Wide Environmental Impact Statement  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Fiscal Year 2011 Mitigation Action Plan Annual Report for the 2008 Los Alamos Site-Wide Environmental Impact Statement

92

DOE/EA-1636: Albany-Burnt Woods and Santiam-Toledo Pole Replacement Project Mitigation Action Plan (March 2009)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Burnt Woods and Santiam-Toledo Pole Replacement Project Burnt Woods and Santiam-Toledo Pole Replacement Project DOE/EA-1636 Summary This Mitigation Action Plan (MAP) is part of the Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI) for the Albany-Burnt Woods and Santiam-Toledo Pole Replacement Project. The project involves replacing wood pole structures on about 26 miles of the Albany-Burnt Woods single-circuit, 115- kilovolt (kV) transmission line and about 21 miles of the Santiam-Toledo single circuit, 230-kV transmission line in Linn, Benton and Lincoln counties, Oregon. This MAP is for the Proposed Action and includes all of the integral elements and commitments made in the Environmental Assessment (EA) to mitigate any potential adverse environmental impacts. The purpose of this MAP is to explain how the mitigation measures will be

93

DOE/EA-1611: Mitigation Action Plan for the Colorado Highlands Wind Project, Logan County, Colorado (01/19/09)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

January 19, 2009 January 19, 2009 Mitigation Action Plan Colorado Highlands Wind Project Logan County, Colorado Project Overview. Western Area Power Administration (Western) a power marketing agency of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) proposes to approve interconnection of the Project with Western's transmission system and the connected action of the Project. Colorado Highlands Wind LLC (CHWP) applied (via predecessor project owner Wind Energy Prototypes) to Western to interconnect a 90-megawatt (MW) wind power facility with Western's existing Sterling-Frenchman Creek 115-kV transmission line. Approval of the Interconnection Agreement would allow the Project to interconnect with Western's proposed Wildhorse Creek Switchyard. In accordance with the DOE NEPA

94

(DOE/EIS-0128): Mitigation Action Plan for the Los Banos-Gates Transmission project 1/28/03  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Date: ____________________________ 1 Date: ____________________________ 1 Western Area Power Administration Mitigation Action Plan for the Los Banos - Gates (Path 15) Transmission Project 1.0 INTRODUCTION 1.1 HISTORY AND BACKGROUND In May 2001, Secretary of Energy Spencer Abraham directed the Western Area Power Administration (Western) to take the first steps, including the preparation of environmental studies, toward developing the Los Banos - Gates Transmission Project, also known as the Path 15 Project. This directive was issued to carry out a recommendation in the May 2001 National Energy Policy. Western is a Power Marketing Administration within the Department of Energy (DOE) whose role is to market and transmit electricity from multi- use water projects in the western United States, including California. The

95

Mitigation Action Plan for Los Banos - Gates (Path 15) Transmission Project (DOE/EIS-0128) (12/3/03)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2 Date: December 3, 2003 1 2 Date: December 3, 2003 1 Western Area Power Administration Mitigation Action Plan for the Los Banos - Gates (Path 15) Transmission Project 1.0 INTRODUCTION 1.1 HISTORY AND BACKGROUND In May 2001, Secretary of Energy Spencer Abraham directed the Western Area Power Administration (Western) to take the first steps, including the preparation of environmental studies, toward developing the Los Banos - Gates Transmission Project, also known as the Path 15 Project. This directive was issued to carry out a recommendation in the May 2001 National Energy Policy. Western is a power marketing administration within the Department of Energy (DOE) whose role is to market and transmit electricity from multi-use water projects in the western United States, including California. The Path 15 Project, located in California's western

96

Mitigation action plan sale of Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 1 (Elk Hills) Kern County, California  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 1 (NPR-1, also called {open_quotes}Elk Hills{close_quotes}), a Federally-owned oil and gas production field in Kern County, California, was created by an Executive Order issued by President Taft on September 2, 1912. He signed another Executive Order on December 13, 1912, to establish Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 2 (NPR-2), located immediately south of NPR-1 and containing portions of the town of Taft, California. NPR-1 was not developed until the 1973-74 oil embargo demonstrated the nation`s vulnerability to oil supply interruptions. Following the embargo, Congress passed the Naval Petroleum Reserves Production Act of 1976 which directed that the reserve be explored and developed to its fall economic potential at the {open_quotes}maximum efficient rate{close_quotes} (MER) of production. Since Elk Hills began full production in 1976, it has functioned as a commercial operation, with total revenues to the Federal government through FY 1996 of $16.4 billion, compared to total exploration, development and production costs of $3.1 billion. In February 1996, Title 34 of the National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 1996 (P.L. 104-106), referred to as the Elk Hills Sales Statute, directed the Secretary of Energy to sell NPR-1 by February 10, 1998.The Secretary was also directed to study options for enhancing the value of the other Naval Petroleum and Oil Shale Reserve properties such as NPR-2, located adjacent to NPR-1 in Kern County- Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 3 (NPR-3) located in Natrona County, Wyoming; Naval Oil Shale Reserves No. 1 and No. 3 (NOSR-1 and NOSR-3) located in Garfield County, Colorado; and Naval Oil Shale Reserve No. 2 (NOSR-2) located in Uintah and Carbon Counties, Utah. The purpose of these actions was to remove the Federal government from the inherently non-Federal function of operating commercial oil fields while making sure that the public would obtain the maximum value from the reserves.

NONE

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

DOE/EIS-0380: 2008 Site-Wide Environmental Impact Statement for the Continued Operation of Los Alamos National Laboratory Mitigation Action Plan (December 2008)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Title: Title: 2008 Site-Wide Environmental Impact Statement for the Continued Operation of Los Alamos National Laboratory (DOE/EIS 0380) Mitigation Action Plan U.S. Department of Energy Date: December 2008 Los Alamos National Laboratory, an affirmative action/equal opportunity employer, is operated by the Los Alamos National Security, LLC for the National Nuclear Security Administration of the U.S. Department of Energy under contract DE-AC52-06NA25396. By acceptance of this article, the publisher recognizes that the U.S. Government retains a nonexclusive, royalty-free license to publish or reproduce the published form of this contribution, or to allow others to do so, for U.S. Government purposes. Los Alamos National Laboratory requests that the publisher identify this

98

EA-1704: Mitigation Action Plan  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Construction and Operation of a Proposed Cellulosic Biorefinery, BlueFire Fulton Renewable Energy, LLC, Fulton, Mississippi

99

A $70/tCO2 greenhouse gas mitigation backstop for Chinas industrial and electric power sectors: insights from a comprehensive CCS cost curve  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As one of the world's fastest growing economies with abundant coal reserves, China's carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions have doubled in the last decade and are expected to continue growing for the foreseeable future. While the Central Government has been promoting development and growth of cleaner and more efficient energy systems, efforts to reduce carbon emissions from the heavily coal-based economy may require continued and increased development and deployment of carbon dioxide capture and storage (CCS) technologies. This paper presents the first detailed, national-scale assessment of CCS potential across the diverse geographic, geologic, and industrial landscape of China, through the lens of an integrated CCS cost curve. It summarizes the development of a cost curve representing the full chain of components necessary for the capture and geologic storage of CO2 from China's power generation and industrial sectors. Individual component cost estimates are described, along with the optimized source-sink matching of over 1,600 large stationary CO2 sources and 2300 gigatons of CO2 storage capacity within 90 major deep geologic onshore sedimentary sub-basins, to develop a cost curve incorporating CO2 capture, compression, transport, and storage. Results suggest that CCS can provide an important greenhouse gas mitigation option for most regions and industrial sectors in China, able to store more than 80% of emissions from these large CO2 sources (2900 million tons of CO2 annually) at costs less than $70/tCO2 for perhaps a century or more.

Dahowski, Robert T.; Davidson, Casie L.; Li, Xiaochun; Wei, Ning

2012-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

100

Ultrasonic mitigation investigation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The suggestion was made that the introduction of ultrasound into Tank 101-SY might serve to release the hydrogen bubbles trapped in the slurry. This would cause a continuous release of bubbles and thereby prevent the turnover phenomenon. Two major considerations were (1) the method for delivering the energy into the slurry and (2) the effective volume of action. In this study, we attached the former by designing and testing a liquid-filled waveguide and radiator, and the latter by making ultrasonic property measurements on synthetic waste. Our conclusion is that ultrasonic mitigation may not be feasible, primarily because of the very high attenuation (1000 to 50000 dB/m) factor to 10 to 30 kHz. Such a high attenuation would restrict the action volume to such a low value as to make the method impractical. Further investigations are recommended to identify the cause of this effect and determine if this same effect will be seen in real 101-SY waste.

Hildebrand, B.P.; Shepard, C.L.

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mitigation actions insights" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Technologies for Climate Change Mitigation: Transport Sector | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Technologies for Climate Change Mitigation: Transport Sector Technologies for Climate Change Mitigation: Transport Sector Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Technologies for Climate Change Mitigation: Transport Sector Agency/Company /Organization: Global Environment Facility, United Nations Environment Programme Sector: Energy, Climate Focus Area: Transportation Topics: Low emission development planning Resource Type: Guide/manual Website: tech-action.org/Guidebooks/TNAhandbook_Transport.pdf Cost: Free Technologies for Climate Change Mitigation: Transport Sector Screenshot References: Technologies for Climate Change Mitigation: Transport Sector[1] "The options outlined in this guidebook are designed to assist you in the process of developing transport services and facilities in your countries

102

Microsoft Word - Mitigation Action Plan.doc  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

identified, and there is no designated critical habitat within the project area. Electrocution hazards will be minimized by line spacing, conductor layout, utility pole...

103

Passive versus active mitigation cost analysis  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The scope of this task is to assess the impact of mitigation alternatives for Tanks 241-SY-101 and 241-SY-103 on the Project W-236A Multi-Function Waste Tank Facility. This assessment and other related tasks are part of an Action Plan Path Forward prepared by the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) Life Extension and Transition Program. Task 3.7 of the Action Plan for Project W-236A MWTF analyzed the comparative cost/risk of two hydrogen gas mitigation alternatives (active versus passive) to recommend the most appropriate course of action to resolve the hydrogen gas safety issue. The qualitative success of active mitigation has been demonstrated through Tank 241-SY-101 testing. Passive mitigation has not been demonstrated but will be validated by laboratory test work performed under Task 3.1 of the Action Plan. It is assumed for this assessment that the uncertainties associated with the performance of either alternative is comparable. Determining alternative specific performance measures beyond those noted are not in the scope of this effort.

Parazin, R.J.; Galbraith, J.D.

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Mitigating Greenhouse Gas Emissions: Voluntary Reporting 1996  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Presents information on voluntary actions to reduce greenhouse gases or remove such gases from the atmosphere in 1995. It provides an overview of participation in the Voluntary Reporting Program, a perspective on the composition of activities reported, and a review of some key issues in interpreting and evaluating achievements associated with reported emissions mitigation initiatives.

Information Center

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

EIS-0026: Annual Mitigation Report | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Waste Isolation Pilot Plant The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Mitigation Action Plan was prepared to address commitments made in the RODs for the WIPP FEIS, and the WIPP Final...

106

EIS-0026: Annual Mitigation Report | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Mitigation Action Plan was prepared to address commitments made in the RODs for the WIPP FEIS, and the WIPP Final SEIS. This 2012 Annual...

107

Mitigation Efforts Calculator (MEC)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Mitigation Efforts Calculator (MEC) has been developed by the International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis (IIASA) as an online tool to compare greenhouse gas (GHG) mitigation proposals by various countries for the year 2020. In this paper, ... Keywords: Business intelligence, Cost curves, Decision model, Interactive system, Optimisation

Thanh Binh Nguyen; Lena Hoeglund-Isaksson; Fabian Wagner; Wolfgang Schoepp

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

EIS-0026: 2010 Annual Mitigation Report | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

10 Annual Mitigation Report 10 Annual Mitigation Report EIS-0026: 2010 Annual Mitigation Report Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Guidance for the development of a Mitigation Action Plan (MAP) is contained in Department of Energy (DOE) Order 451.1B, National Environmental Policy Act Compliance Program, and 10 CFR 1021, National Environmental Policy Act Implementing Procedures. These documents specify that a MAP be prepared to mitigate environmental impacts resulting from the implementation of commitments made in the Record of Decision (ROD) for an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS). The Order further requires that an annual report be prepared to demonstrate the progress made in implementing the commitments and effectiveness of any mitigation activity until the activity has been completed. The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) MAP was prepared to

109

EIS-0026: 2009 Annual Mitigation Report | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

026: 2009 Annual Mitigation Report 026: 2009 Annual Mitigation Report EIS-0026: 2009 Annual Mitigation Report Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Guidance for the development of a Mitigation Action Plan (MAP) is contained in Department of Energy (DOE) Order 451.1B, National Environmental Policy Act Compliance Program, and 10 CFR 1021, National Environmental Policy Act Implementing Procedures. These documents specify that a MAP be prepared to mitigate environmental impacts resulting from the implementation of commitments made in the Record of Decision (ROD) for an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS). The Order further requires that an annual report be prepared to demonstrate the progress made in implementing the commitments and effectiveness of any mitigation activity until the activity has been

110

EIS-0026: 2009 Annual Mitigation Report | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

09 Annual Mitigation Report 09 Annual Mitigation Report EIS-0026: 2009 Annual Mitigation Report Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Guidance for the development of a Mitigation Action Plan (MAP) is contained in Department of Energy (DOE) Order 451.1B, National Environmental Policy Act Compliance Program, and 10 CFR 1021, National Environmental Policy Act Implementing Procedures. These documents specify that a MAP be prepared to mitigate environmental impacts resulting from the implementation of commitments made in the Record of Decision (ROD) for an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS). The Order further requires that an annual report be prepared to demonstrate the progress made in implementing the commitments and effectiveness of any mitigation activity until the activity has been completed. The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) MAP was prepared to

111

EA-1731: Mitigation Acton Plan | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1: Mitigation Acton Plan 1: Mitigation Acton Plan EA-1731: Mitigation Acton Plan Walla Walla-Tucannon River Transmission Line Rebuild Project This Mitigation Action Plan (MAP) is part of the Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI) for the Walla Walla-Tucannon River Transmission Line Rebuild Project (Proposed Action). The Proposed Action involves rebuilding the 47-mile-long 115-kilovolt (kV) transmission line from the existing Walla Walla Substation, located in the city of Walla Walla, Washington, to the existing Tucannon River Substation, located near the town of Dayton, Washington. Walla Walla-Tucannon River Transmission Line Rebuild Project, DOE/EA-1731, (May 2011) More Documents & Publications EA-1731: Finding of No Significant Impact EA-1731: Final Environmental Assessment

112

Chicago Climate Action Plan | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Action Plan Action Plan Jump to: navigation, search Name Chicago Climate Action Plan Agency/Company /Organization City of Chicago Focus Area Buildings, Energy Efficiency - Central Plant, Greenhouse Gas, Other, Non-renewable Energy, Transportation, Renewable Energy Phase Prepare a Plan Topics Low emission development planning Resource Type Case studies/examples Availability Free Website http://www.chicagoclimateactio Locality Chicago, IL References Chicago Climate Action Plan[1] Overview Chicago's Climate Action Plan addresses both mitigation of and adaptation to climate change and encompasses the entire city (rather than only City operations). The plan contains a high-level overview of Chicago's climate action initiatives, including 26 mitigation strategies and nine adaptation

113

Monitoring and Mitigation of  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mitigation of Mitigation of Sustained Localized Pitting Corrosion FINAL REPORT DOE FEW 49297 YuPo J. Lin, Edward J. St.Martin, and James R. Frank Argonne National Laboratory Argonne, IL 60439 January 2003 Argonne National Laboratory 9700 S. Cass Avenue Argonne, IL 60439 Monitoring and Mitigation of Sustained Localized Pitting Corrosion Submitted to: Nancy C. Comstock U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) National Petroleum Technology Office By: YuPo J. Lin, Edward J. St.Martin, and James R. Frank Argonne National Laboratory Argonne, IL 60439 January 2003 The submitted manuscript has been created by the University of Chicago as Operator of Argonne National Laboratory ("Argonne") under Contract No. W-31-109-Eng-38 with the U.S. Department of Energy. The U.S. Government retains for itself, and others acting on

114

Hellsgate Winter Range : Wildlife Mitigation Project. Preliminary Environmental Assessment.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Bonneville Power Administration proposes funding the Hellsgate Winter Range Wildlife Mitigation Project in cooperation with the Colville Convederated Tribes and Bureau of Indian Affairs. This Preliminary Environmental Assessment examines the potential environmental effects of acquiring and managing property for wildlife and wildlife habitat within a large project area. The Propose action is intended to meet the need for mitigation of wildlife and wild life habitat that was adversely affected by the construction of Grand Coulee and Chief Joseph Dams and their reservoirs.

United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

SO3 Mitigation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides a summary of current utility operating experience in control of gas phase sulfuric acid emissions. It provides guidance for those contemplating the installation of an SO3 mitigation technology based on experience and lessons learned from utilities that have retrofitted different technologies.

2006-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

116

Bonneville Power Administration Wildlife Mitigation Program : Draft Environmental Impact Statement.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) is responsible for mitigating the loss of wildlife habitat caused by the development of the Federal Columbia River Power System. BPA accomplishes this mitigation by funding projects consistent with those recommended by the Northwest Power Planning Council (Council). The projects are submitted to the Council from Indian Tribes, state agencies, property owners, private conservation groups, and other Federal agencies. Future wildlife mitigation actions with potential environmental impacts are expected to include land acquisition and management, water rights acquisition and management, habitat restoration and enhancement, installation of watering devices, riparian fencing, and similar wildlife conservation actions. BPA needs to ensure that individual wildlife mitigation projects are planned and managed with appropriate consistency across projects, jurisdictions, and ecosystems, as well as across time. BPA proposes to standardize the planning and implementation of individual wildlife mitigation projects funded by BPA. Alternative 1 is the No Action alternative. Five standardizing alternatives are identified to represent the range of possible strategies, goals, and procedural requirements reasonably applicable to BPA-funded projects under a standardized approach to project planning and implementation. All action alternatives are based on a single project planning process designed to resolve site-specific issues in an ecosystem context and to adapt to changing conditions and information.

United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

wind engineering & natural disaster mitigation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

wind engineering & natural disaster mitigation #12;wind engineering & natural disaster mitigation Investment WindEEE Dome at Advanced Manufacturing Park $31million Insurance Research Lab for Better Homes $8million Advanced Facility for Avian Research $9million #12;wind engineering & natural disaster mitigation

Sinnamon, Gordon J.

118

Risk Mitigation Strategies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This technical update builds upon the development of attack/failure and cyber-physical attack scenarios focused on combined cyber-physical attacks. These scenarios include threats and vulnerabilities that may be exploited by well-financed and motivated entities. It also leverages risk assessment processes developed to address combined cyber-physical attack scenarios. The framework in this update supports the further development of risk mitigation strategies focused on combined cyber-physical ...

2012-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

119

Hungry Horse Dam Fisheries Mitigation Implementation Plan, 1990-2003 Progress (Annual) Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In this document the authors present mitigation implementation activities to protect and enhance resident fish and aquatic habitat affected by the construction and operation of Hungry Horse Dam. This plan only addresses non-operational actions (mitigation measures that do not affect dam operation) described in the 'Fisheries Mitigation Plan for Losses Attributable to the Construction and Operation of Hungry Horse Dam' (Mitigation Plan) submitted to the Northwest Power Planning Council (Council) in March 1991 and in accordance with subsequent Council action on that Mitigation Plan. Operational mitigation was deferred for consideration under the Columbia Basin System Operation Review (SOR) process. This document represents an implementation plan considered and conditionally approved by the Council in March of 1993.

Montana Department of Fish, Wildlife and Parks; Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes

1993-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

120

Prioritize Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Strategies | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Prioritize Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Strategies Prioritize Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Strategies Prioritize Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Strategies October 7, 2013 - 10:20am Addthis Once a Federal agency understands what greenhouse gas (GHG) reductions are feasible and at what cost, proposed GHG reduction activities may be prioritized. While it may be useful for personnel responsible for managing GHG emissions to prioritize actions within emission categories-for example, prioritizing building emission reduction measures-prioritization should also occur across all major emission Scope 1 and 2 emission sources and all Scope 3 emission sources. Guidance on prioritizing strategies for specific emission sources includes: Buildings Vehicles and mobile equipment Business travel Employee commuting. Prioritizing actions across fleet, facility, and fugitive sources will

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mitigation actions insights" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Low-Emission Development Strategies and National Appropriate Mitigation  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Low-Emission Development Strategies and National Appropriate Mitigation Low-Emission Development Strategies and National Appropriate Mitigation Actions: Europe and CIS Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Low-Emission Development Strategies and Mitigation Actions: Europe and CIS Agency/Company /Organization: United Nations Development Programme Sector: Energy, Land Topics: Low emission development planning Resource Type: Guide/manual, Lessons learned/best practices Website: europeandcis.undp.org/home/show/96D0B2D4-F203-1EE9-B9A6CBCB9151BFFA UN Region: Central Asia, "Western & Eastern Europe" is not in the list of possible values (Eastern Africa, Middle Africa, Northern Africa, Southern Africa, Western Africa, Caribbean, Central America, South America, Northern America, Central Asia, Eastern Asia, Southern Asia, South-Eastern Asia, Western Asia, Eastern Europe, Northern Europe, Southern Europe, Western Europe, Australia and New Zealand, Melanesia, Micronesia, Polynesia, Latin America and the Caribbean) for this property.

122

Transportation and Greenhouse Gas Mitigation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Summary of transportation greenhouse gas mitigation optionsof alternative fuels. Low greenhouse gas fuels Mixing ofreplacement. Greenhouse gas budgets for households and

Lutsey, Nicholas P.; Sperling, Dan

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Wind Engineering & Natural Disaster Mitigation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Wind Engineering & Natural Disaster Mitigation For more than 45 years, Western University has been internationally recognized as the leading university for wind engineering and wind- related research. Its of environmental disaster mitigation, with specific strengths in wind and earthquake research. Boundary Layer Wind

Sinnamon, Gordon J.

124

Peaking of world oil production: Impacts, mitigation, & risk management  

SciTech Connect

The peaking of world oil production presents the U.S. and the world with an unprecedented risk management problem. As peaking is approached, liquid fuel prices and price volatility will increase dramatically, and, without timely mitigation, the economic, social, and political costs will be unprecedented. Viable mitigation options exist on both the supply and demand sides, but to have substantial impact, they must be initiated more than a decade in advance of peaking.... The purpose of this analysis was to identify the critical issues surrounding the occurrence and mitigation of world oil production peaking. We simplified many of the complexities in an effort to provide a transparent analysis. Nevertheless, our study is neither simple nor brief. We recognize that when oil prices escalate dramatically, there will be demand and economic impacts that will alter our simplified assumptions. Consideration of those feedbacks will be a daunting task but one that should be undertaken. Our aim in this study is to-- Summarize the difficulties of oil production forecasting; Identify the fundamentals that show why world oil production peaking is such a unique challenge; Show why mitigation will take a decade or more of intense effort; Examine the potential economic effects of oil peaking; Describe what might be accomplished under three example mitigation scenarios. Stimulate serious discussion of the problem, suggest more definitive studies, and engender interest in timely action to mitigate its impacts.

Hirsch, R.L. (SAIC); Bezdek, Roger (MISI); Wendling, Robert (MISI)

2005-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

EPA's Recommended Residential Radon Mitigation Standard of Practice EPA recommends the Standard Practice for Installing Radon Mitigation Systems in  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Existing Low-Rise Residential Buildings * for residential radon mitigation. This voluntary, consensus-based standard was developed and issued by the American Society for Testing and Materials International, and is identified as ASTM E-2121. The Agency first cited ASTM E-2121 in 2003 as a national consensus standard appropriate for reducing radon in homes as far as practicable below the national action level of 4 picocuries per liter (pCi/L) in indoor air. As of May 2006, EPA no longer recommends, and will no longer distribute its own, superseded Radon Mitigation Standards (EPA 402-R-93-

unknown authors

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Federal Energy Management Program: Greenhouse Gas Mitigation...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mitigation Planning The Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Mitigation Planning section of the FEMP website is designed to provide Federal agency personnel with guidance to achieve agency GHG...

127

Federal Energy Management Program: Greenhouse Gas Mitigation...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mitigation Planning to someone by E-mail Share Federal Energy Management Program: Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Planning on Facebook Tweet about Federal Energy Management Program:...

128

Mitigation analysis for Estonia  

SciTech Connect

The present report provides data on the mitigation analysis of Estonia. The results for energy, forest and agricultural sectors and macro-economic analysis are given. The Government of Estonia has identified the development of energy production as the main strategical means in the movement towards market economy. Now 99% of electricity generation and about 25% of heat production in Estonia is based on oil shale combustion. To increase the efficiency of oil shale-fired power plants and decrease CO{sub 2} emissions, the State Enterprise (SE) Eesti Energia (Estonian Energy) is planning to reconstruct these power plants and introduce the Circulating Fluidized Bed (CFB) combustion technology for oil shale burning to replace the Pulverized Combustion (PC). According to the Estonian Forest Policy, two general objectives are of importance: sustainability in forestry and efficiency in forest management. For the reduction of greenhouse gases (GHG) emissions from agriculture, it is necessary to increase the efficiency of production resource usage. The growth of the GDP in 1995 was 2.9% as a result of large-scale privatization activities in Estonia and re-introduction of the available, but unused production capacities with the help of foreign and domestic investments. It is assumed that the medium growth rate of GDP reaches 6% in 1998.

Martins, A.; Roos, J.; Pesur, A. [Inst. of Energy Research, Tallinn (Estonia)] [and others

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Urban Policies and Earthquake Risk Mitigation  

SciTech Connect

The paper aims at proposing some considerations about some recent experiences of research carried out on the theme of earthquake risk mitigation and combining policies and actions of mitigation with urban development strategies. The objective was to go beyond the classical methodological approach aiming at defining a 'technical' evaluation of the earthquake risk through a procedure which can correlate the three 'components' of danger, exposure and vulnerability. These researches experiment, in terms of methodology and application, with a new category of interpretation and strategy: the so-called Struttura Urbana Minima (Minimum urban structure).Actually, the introduction of the Struttura Urbana Minima establishes a different approach towards the theme of safety in the field of earthquake risk, since it leads to a wider viewpoint, combining the building aspect of the issue with the purely urban one, involving not only town planning, but also social and managerial implications.In this sense the constituent logic of these researches is strengthened by two fundamental issues:- The social awareness of earthquake;- The inclusion of mitigation policies in the ordinary strategies for town and territory management. Three main aspects of the first point, that is of the 'social awareness of earthquake', characterize this issue and demand to be considered within a prevention policy:- The central role of the risk as a social production,- The central role of the local community consent,- The central role of the local community capability to planTherefore, consent, considered not only as acceptance, but above all as participation in the elaboration and implementation of choices, plays a crucial role in the wider issue of prevention policies.As far as the second point is concerned, the inclusion of preventive mitigation policies in ordinary strategies for the town and territory management demands the identification of criteria of choice and priorities of intervention and, as a consequence, the opportunity to promote an approach to the theme of mitigation policies realized through strategic principles and systemic logics able to shift the problem from the building to the town. The critical aspects of this theme are tied to three main issues:- The sharing of the way of interpreting town planning,- The integration of multiple objectives in one intervention tool,- The measures which can be adopted for an effective prevention policy.The above-mentioned elements have inspired these researches experimented on Calabrian towns.In particular, in this paper the experience carried out on Reggio Calabria is proposed. Its cultural roots derive from the principles and criteria experimented in small Calabrian towns, but it modifies them according to the complexity of the urban settlement, introducing also some experimental concepts and methodological approaches.

Sarlo, Antonella [Department of Architecture and Analysis of Mediterranean City Mediterranea University, via Melissari-Feo di Vito, 89124 Reggio Calabria (Italy)

2008-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

130

Agricultural Carbon Mitigation in Europe  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Agricultural Carbon Mitigation in Europe Agricultural Carbon Mitigation in Europe Agricultural Carbon Mitigation in Europe Smith P, Powlson DS, Smith JU, Falloon P, and Coleman K. 2000. Meeting Europe's climate change commitments: Quantitative estimates of the potential for carbon mitigation by agriculture. Global Climate Change 6:525-539. Abstract Under the Kyoto Protocol, the European Union is committed to a reduction in CO2 emissions to 92% of baseline (1990) levels during the first commitment period (2008-2012). The Kyoto Protocol allows carbon emissions to be offset by demonstrable removal of carbon from the atmosphere. Thus, land-use / land-management change and forestry activities that are shown to reduce atmospheric CO2 levels can be included in the Kyoto targets. These activities include afforestation, reforestation and deforestation (article

131

Property:NEPA Resource Applicant Mitigation | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Resource Applicant Mitigation Resource Applicant Mitigation Jump to: navigation, search Property Name NEPA Resource Applicant Mitigation Property Type Text Description Applicant proposed mitigation plan to minimize the risk of a potential negative impact to a NEPA resource with a geothermal development effort. Pages using the property "NEPA Resource Applicant Mitigation" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) B BLM-NV-WN-ES-08-01-1310, NV-020-08-01#NEPAImpact_with_Noise + Construction noise would be minimized through practices which avoid or minimize actions which may typically generate greater noise levels, or generate distinctive impact noise. BLM-NV-WN-ES-08-01-1310, NV-020-08-01#NEPAImpact_with_Air_Quality + Water would be applied to the ground during the construction and utilization of the drill pads, access roads, and other disturbed areas as necessary to control dust. NGP would comply with any requirements prescribed by the NDEP-BAPC. NGP also proposes to water the ground to control dust during construction.

132

Mitigation Action Plans and Scenarios (MAPS) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

linking sectoral and economy-wide models, is progressing well and set for completion by August 2013. The MAPS Proposal, institutional framework and objectives are under...

133

MITIGATION ACTION PLAN FOR THE FINAL ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Plan prepared under 1021.331 of this part: 7. Wetland impacts from the proposed natural gas pipeline construction by Northern Natural Gas Company (NNG). 1.1 Purpose of the...

134

Hypoxia in the Northern Gulf of Mexico: Does the Science Support the Plan to Reduce, Mitigate, and Control Hypoxia?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Hypoxia in the Northern Gulf of Mexico: Does the Science Support the Plan to Reduce, Mitigate the 2001 Action Plan for Reducing, Mitigating, and Controlling Hypoxia in the Northern Gulf of Mexico (Mississippi River/Gulf of Mexico Watershed Nutrient Task Force 2001), incorporating data, publications

135

Supplement Analysis for the Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0246/SA-36)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

October 10, 2003 October 10, 2003 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEC-4 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for the Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0246/SA-36) Joe DeHerrera- KEWN-4 Fish and Wildlife Project Manager Proposed Action: Logan Valley Wildlife Mitigation Project-Implemetation of Wildlife Mitigation Plan Project No: 200000900 Wildlife Management Techniques or Actions Addressed Under This Supplement Analysis (See App. A of the Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS): 2.0 Plant Propagation Techniques; 4.0 Water Development and Management; 5.0 Water Distribution Techniques; 6.0 Fire Management Techniques (prompt fire suppression and fuels management, natural fire management), 7.0 Vegetation Management (herbicide, hand pulling, prescribed burns, water level manipulation); 8.0 Species Manangement

136

Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Planning | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Mitigation Mitigation Planning Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Planning October 7, 2013 - 10:08am Addthis The Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Mitigation Planning section provides Federal agency personnel with guidance to achieve agency GHG reduction goals in the most cost-effective way. Using a portfolio-based management approach for GHG mitigation planning, agencies will be able to prioritize strategies for GHG mitigation. Agencies can also use this guidance to set appropriate GHG reduction targets for different programs and sites within an agency. Learn more about the benefits of portfolio-based planning for GHG mitigation. Also see information about greenhouse gas mitigation planning data and tools. Step-by-Step The GHG mitigation planning process follows six key steps. Click on a step

137

Libby Mitigation Program, 2007 Annual Progress Report: Mitigation for the Construction and Operation of Libby Dam.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Libby Reservoir was created under an International Columbia River Treaty between the United States and Canada for cooperative water development of the Columbia River Basin (Columbia River Treaty 1964). Libby Reservoir inundated 109 stream miles of the mainstem Kootenai River in the United States and Canada, and 40 miles of tributary streams in the U.S. that provided habitat for spawning, juvenile rearing, and migratory passage (Figure 1). The authorized purpose of the dam is to provide power (91.5%), flood control (8.3%), and navigation and other benefits (0.2%; Storm et al. 1982). The Pacific Northwest Power Act of 1980 recognized possible conflicts stemming from hydroelectric projects in the northwest and directed Bonneville Power Administration to 'protect, mitigate, and enhance fish and wildlife to the extent affected by the development and operation of any hydroelectric project of the Columbia River and its tributaries' (4(h)(10)(A)). Under the Act, the Northwest Power Planning Council was created and recommendations for a comprehensive fish and wildlife program were solicited from the region's federal, state, and tribal fish and wildlife agencies. Among Montana's recommendations was the proposal that research be initiated to quantify acceptable seasonal minimum pool elevations to maintain or enhance the existing fisheries (Graham et al. 1982). Research to determine how operations of Libby Dam affect the reservoir and river fishery and to suggest ways to lessen these effects began in May 1983. The framework for the Libby Reservoir Model (LRMOD) was completed in 1989. Development of Integrated Rule Curves (IRCs) for Libby Dam operation was completed in 1996 (Marotz et al. 1996). The Libby Reservoir Model and the IRCs continue to be refined (Marotz et al 1999). Initiation of mitigation projects such as lake rehabilitation and stream restoration began in 1996. The primary focus of the Libby Mitigation project now is to restore the fisheries and fish habitat in basin streams and lakes. 'Mitigation for the Construction and Operation of Libby Dam' is part of the Northwest Power and Conservation Council's (NPCC) resident fish and wildlife program. The program was mandated by the Northwest Planning Act of 1980, and is responsible for mitigating damages to fish and wildlife caused by hydroelectric development in the Columbia River Basin. The objective of Phase I of the project (1983 through 1987) was to maintain or enhance the Libby Reservoir fishery by quantifying seasonal water levels and developing ecologically sound operational guidelines. The objective of Phase II of the project (1988 through 1996) was to determine the biological effects of reservoir operations combined with biotic changes associated with an aging reservoir. The objectives of Phase III of the project (1996 through present) are to implement habitat enhancement measures to mitigate for dam effects, to provide data for implementation of operational strategies that benefit resident fish, monitor reservoir and river conditions, and monitor mitigation projects for effectiveness. This project completes urgent and high priority mitigation actions as directed by the Kootenai Subbasin Plan.

Dunnigan, James; DeShazer, J.; Garrow, L.

2009-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

138

Hungarian climate change action plan  

SciTech Connect

In 1994--1996, within the framework of the US Country Studies Program, the Hungarian Country Study Team developed the national greenhouse gas emission inventory, and elaborated the mitigation options for the different sectors of the economy. In 1997, the development of a National Action Plan was begun as the continuation of this work. Results of the inventory study showed that greenhouse gas emissions decreased from the selected base level (i.e., from the yearly average emissions of 1985--1987) until 1994 by cca. 25%. However, this decrease was primarily caused by the deep economic recession. Therefore the policy makers have to face the problem of economic recovery without a relevant increase of greenhouse gas emissions in the near future. This is the main focus of the mitigation analysis and the National Action Plan.

Molnar, S.; Takacs, T. [Systemexpert Consulting Ltd., Budapest (Hungary); Arpasi, M. [MOL, Budapest (Hungary); Farago, T.; Palvoelgyi, T. [Ministry for Environment and Regional Policy, Budapest (Hungary); Harnos, Z. [Univ. of Horticulture, Budapest (Hungary); Lontay, Z. [EGI-Contracting Engineering Co. Ltd., Budapest (Hungary); Somogyi, Z. [Forest Research Inst., Budapest (Hungary); Tajthy, T. [Univ. of Technology, Budapest (Hungary)

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

139

Lube Oil System Leakage Mitigation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Lube Oil System Leakage Mitigation is the second in a series of training modules addressing leakage in nuclear power plants. The first planned modules in the leakage reduction series include leakage reduction program management, bolted joints with flat gaskets, valve packing, threaded joints, compression fittings, mechanical seals, and miscellaneous bolting issues.

1999-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

140

Supplement Analysis for the Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0246/SA-33)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1, 2003 1, 2003 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEC-4 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for the Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0246/SA-33) Ron Morinaka Fish and Wildlife Project Manager, KEWU-4 Proposed Action: Gooderich Bayou Culvert Replacement (Hungry Horse Fisheries Mitigation Program) Project No: 1991-019-03 Wildlife Management Techniques or Actions Addressed Under This Supplement Analysis (See App. A of the Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS): 8.2 Control of Predators and Nuisance Animals - Removal or Reduction of Undesirable Wildlife Species. Location: Flathead County, Montana Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and Montana Fish, Wildlife, and Parks (MFWP) Description of the Proposed Action: BPA is proposing to fund a fish barrier project with Montana Fish,

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mitigation actions insights" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Appropriate Use of Mitigation and Monitoring and Clarifying the...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Appropriate Use of Mitigation and Monitoring and Clarifying the Appropriate Use of Mitigated Findings of No Significant Impact Appropriate Use of Mitigation and Monitoring and...

142

Wildlife Protection, Mitigation, and Enhancement Planning Phase II, Dworshak Reservoir, Final Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Pacific Northwest Electric Power Planning and Conservation Act of 1980 directed that measures be implemented to protect, mitigate, and enhance fish and wildlife to the extent affected by development and operation of hydropower projects on the Columbia River System. This Act created the Northwest Power Planning Council, which in turn developed the Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program. This program established a four-part process: wildlife mitigation status reports; wildlife impact assessments; wildlife protection, mitigation, and enhancement plans; and implementation of protection, mitigation, and enhancement projects. This mitigation plan for the Dworshak Reservoir Hydroelectric Facility was developed to fulfill requirements of Sections 1003(b)(2) and (3) of the Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program. Specific objectives of wildlife protection, mitigation, and enhancement planning for Dworshak Reservoir included: quantify net impacts to target wildlife species affected by hydroelectric development and operation of Dworshak Dam and Reservoir; develop protection, mitigation, and enhancement goals and objectives for the target wildlife species; recommend protection, mitigation, and enhancement actions for the target wildlife species; and coordination of project activities. 46 refs., 4 figs., 31 tabs.

Hansen, H. Jerome; Martin, Robert C.

1989-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Worldwide Trends in Energy Use and Efficiency: Key Insights from...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Worldwide Trends in Energy Use and Efficiency: Key Insights from International Energy Agency (IEA) Indicator Analysis in Support of the Group of Eight (G8) Plan of Action Jump to:...

144

Aspen & Pitkin County - Renewable Energy Mitigation Program ...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Colorado Name Aspen & Pitkin County - Renewable Energy Mitigation Program Incentive Type Building Energy Code Applicable Sector Commercial, Residential Eligible Technologies...

145

Nuclear Maintenance Applications Center: The Physical Basis of Abnormal Seal Leakoff Mitigation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This technical update provides insights into the physical basis for the effectiveness of actions taken to address Westinghouse #1 seal leakoff anomalies (that is, when #1 seal leakoff exceeds manufacturer's maximum value or is less than manufacturer's minimum value).

2012-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

146

UNFCCC-Mitigation Assessments | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

UNFCCC-Mitigation Assessments UNFCCC-Mitigation Assessments Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: UNFCCC-Mitigation Assessments Agency/Company /Organization: United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change Sector: Energy, Land Topics: Pathways analysis Resource Type: Presentation, Training materials Website: unfccc.int/resource/cd_roms/na1/mitigation/index.htm UNFCCC-Mitigation Assessments Screenshot References: UNFCCC-Mitigation Assessments[1] "This training package (containing PowerPoint presentations and notes, a handbook and reference materials) is designed to facilitate the preparation of the mitigation component of the national communications by non-Annex I teams based on UNFCCC guidelines contained in the annex to decision 17/CP.8." References

147

VIOLENT FRAMES IN ACTION  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present a computational approach to radical rhetoric that leverages the co-expression of rhetoric and action features in discourse to identify violent intent. The approach combines text mining and machine learning techniques with insights from Frame Analysis and theories that explain the emergence of violence in terms of moral disengagement, the violation of sacred values and social isolation in order to build computational models that identify messages from terrorist sources and estimate their proximity to an attack. We discuss a specific application of this approach to a body of documents from and about radical and terrorist groups in the Middle East and present the results achieved.

Sanfilippo, Antonio P.; McGrath, Liam R.; Whitney, Paul D.

2011-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

148

L-325 Sagebrush Habitat Mitigation Project: FY2009 Compensation Area Monitoring Report  

SciTech Connect

Annual monitoring in support of the Fluor Daniel Hanford Company (Fluor) Mitigation Action Plan (MAP) for Project L-325, Electrical Utility Upgrades was conducted in June 2009. MAP guidelines defined mitigation success for this project as 3000 established sagebrush transplants on a 4.5 ha mitigation site after five monitoring years. Annual monitoring results suggest that an estimated 2130 sagebrush transplants currently grow on the site. Additional activities in support of this project included gathering sagebrush seed and securing a local grower to produce between 2250 and 2500 10-in3 tublings for outplanting during the early winter months of FY2010. If the minimum number of seedlings grown for this planting meets quality specifications, and planting conditions are favorable, conservative survival estimates indicate the habitat mitigation goals outlined in the MAP will be met in FY2014.

Durham, Robin E.; Sackschewsky, Michael R.

2009-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

149

L-325 Sagebrush Habitat Mitigation Project: Final Compensation Area Monitoring Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document provides a review and status of activities conducted in support of the Fluor Daniel Hanford Company (Fluor), now Mission Support Alliance (MSA), Mitigation Action Plan (MAP) for Project L-325, Electrical Utility Upgrades (2007). Three plantings have been installed on a 4.5-hectare mitigation area to date. This review provides a description and chronology of events, monitoring results, and mitigative actions through fiscal year (FY) 2012. Also provided is a review of the monitoring methods, transect layout, and FY 2012 monitoring activities and results for all planting years. Planting densities and performance criteria stipulated in the MAP were aimed at a desired future condition (DFC) of 10 percent mature sagebrush (Artemisia tridentata ssp wyomingensis) cover. Current recommendations for yielding this DFC are based upon a conceptual model planting of 1000 plants/ha (400/ac) exhibiting a 60-percent survival rate after 5 monitoring years (DOE 2003). Accordingly, a DFC after 5 monitoring years would not be less than 600 plants/ha (240/ac). To date, about 8700 sagebrush plants have been grown and transplanted onto the mitigation site. Harsh site conditions and low seedling survival have resulted in an estimated 489 transplants/ha on the mitigation site, which is 111 plants/ha short of the target DFC. Despite this apparent shortcoming, 71, 91, and 24 percent of the surviving seedlings planted in FY 2007 and FY 2008 and FY 2010, respectively, showed signs of blooming in FY 2012. Blooming status may be a positive indication of future sagebrush recruitment, and is therefore a potential source for reaching the target DFC of 600 plants/ha on this mitigation site over time. Because of the difficulty establishing small transplants on this site, we propose that no additional plantings be considered for this mitigation area and to rely upon the potential recruitment by established seedlings to achieve the mitigation commitment set forth in the MAP of 600 plants/ha.

Durham, Robin E.; Becker, James M.

2013-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

150

2007 Annual Mitigation Report for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (July 2007)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Carlsbad Field Office Carlsbad Field Office P. O. Box 3090 Carlsbad, New Mexico 88221 MEMORANDUM FOR: JAMES A. RISPOLI ASSISTANT SECRETARY FOR ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT THROUGH: DR. INES TRIAY CHIEF OPERATING OFFICER OFFICE OF ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT FROM: DR. DAVID C. MOODY MANAGER CARLSBAD FIELD OFFICE SUBJECT: 2007 Annual Mitigation Report for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant DO E Order 451.1 B Change 1 requires you to track and report annually to the Assistant Secretary for Environment, Safety and Health, progress made in implementing and the effectiveness ofmitigation action plans prepared pursuant to the Department's National Environmental Policy Act implementing regulations until mitigation is complete. The 2007 annual report for the WIPP site is attached. In order to avoid duplicating reporting requirements, this mitigation action report does not specifically

151

Supplement Analysis for the Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0246/SA-35)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

7, 2003 7, 2003 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEC-4 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for the Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0246/SA-35) Joe Deherrera Fish and Wildlife Project Manager Proposed Action: Malheur Wildlife Mitigation Project- Denny Jones Ranch Project No: 200002700 Wildlife Management Techniques or Actions Addressed Under This Supplement Analysis (See App. A of the Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS): 2.0 Plant Propagation Techniques; 4.0 Water Development and Management; 5.0 Water Distribution Techniques; 6.0 Fire Management Techniques (prompt fire suppression and fuels management, natural fire management), 7.0 Vegetation Management (herbicide, hand pulling, prescribed burns, water level manipulation); 8.2 Control of Predators and

152

Technical Assistance to Kansas City Plant: Mitigation of Polychlorinated Biphenyl Discharges  

SciTech Connect

Soil and storm water discharges from the Department of Energy Kansas City Plant (KCP) contain polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) resulting from past spills and discharges. KCP has implemented a range of actions to mitigate the soil contamination and to reduce the measured PCB releases.

Looney, B.B.

2003-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

153

EPRI Boiling Water Reactor Mitigation Performance Summary  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes the intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) mitigation performance of 44 BWRs with or without noble metal chemical addition or On-Line NobleChem. Results are categorized by chemistry regime and include data from the most recently completed and current operating cycles. BWRs continue to strive for high hydrogen water chemistry (HWC) availability for IGSCC mitigation, and most plants achieve an overall mitigation performance indicator in the green (excellent) or white (satisf...

2010-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

154

Generalized Comprehensive Mitigation Assessment Process (GCOMAP) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Generalized Comprehensive Mitigation Assessment Process (GCOMAP) Generalized Comprehensive Mitigation Assessment Process (GCOMAP) (Redirected from GCOMAP) Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Generalized Comprehensive Mitigation Assessment Process (GCOMAP) Agency/Company /Organization: Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Sector: Land Focus Area: Forestry Topics: GHG inventory, Pathways analysis Website: ies.lbl.gov/taxonomy/term/34 References: GCOMAP Project [1] Logo: Generalized Comprehensive Mitigation Assessment Process (GCOMAP) "The GCOMAP project reported on the global potential for carbon sequestration in forest plantations, and the reduction of carbon emissions from deforestation, in response to six carbon price scenarios from 2000 to 2100. These carbon price scenarios cover a range typically seen in global

155

Generalized Comprehensive Mitigation Assessment Process (GCOMAP) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Generalized Comprehensive Mitigation Assessment Process (GCOMAP) Generalized Comprehensive Mitigation Assessment Process (GCOMAP) Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Generalized Comprehensive Mitigation Assessment Process (GCOMAP) Agency/Company /Organization: Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Sector: Land Focus Area: Forestry Topics: GHG inventory, Pathways analysis Website: ies.lbl.gov/taxonomy/term/34 References: GCOMAP Project [1] Logo: Generalized Comprehensive Mitigation Assessment Process (GCOMAP) "The GCOMAP project reported on the global potential for carbon sequestration in forest plantations, and the reduction of carbon emissions from deforestation, in response to six carbon price scenarios from 2000 to 2100. These carbon price scenarios cover a range typically seen in global

156

Federal Energy Management Program: Greenhouse Gas Mitigation...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

GHG Mitigation Strategies Emissions & Generation Resource Integrated Database (eGRID) U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Environmental characteristics data on U.S....

157

Mitigating Climate Change through Energy Efficiency: Implications...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mitigating Climate Change through Energy Efficiency: Implications of China's 20 % Energy Intensity Reduction Target Speaker(s): Jiang Lin Date: March 13, 2007 - 12:00pm Location:...

158

Estimating Mitigation Potential of Agricultural Projects: an...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Tool (EX-ACT) Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Brazil-Estimating Mitigation Potential of Agricultural Projects: an Application of the...

159

Federal Energy Management Program: Greenhouse Gas Mitigation...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and Mobile Equipment to someone by E-mail Share Federal Energy Management Program: Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Planning for Vehicles and Mobile Equipment on Facebook Tweet...

160

Federal Energy Management Program: Greenhouse Gas Mitigation...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Business Travel to someone by E-mail Share Federal Energy Management Program: Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Planning for Business Travel on Facebook Tweet about Federal Energy...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mitigation actions insights" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Federal Energy Management Program: Greenhouse Gas Mitigation...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Employee Commuting to someone by E-mail Share Federal Energy Management Program: Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Planning for Employee Commuting on Facebook Tweet about Federal Energy...

162

Industrial Energy Efficiency and Climate Change Mitigation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

mitigate 21 MtCO 2 . Cogeneration (also called Combined Heatefficiencies. Industrial cogeneration is an important partpotential for industrial cogeneration is estimated at almost

Worrell, Ernst

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Action Items  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

ACTION ITEMS ACTION ITEMS Presentation to the DOE High Level Waste Corporate Board July 29, 2009 Kurt Gerdes Office of Waste Processing DOE-EM Office of Engineering & Technology 2 ACTION ITEMS Action Item Status * Approve Performance Assessment Community of Practice Charter * Charter approved 13 July 2009 by majority vote of Board (balloting conducted by e- mail). * Report on first Performance Assessment Community of Practice meeting * Meeting held on 13-14 July 2009. Report by David Kosson, PhD, Vanderbilt University and CRESP * Update of Tank Waste Corporate Board Charter to include changes resulting from changes in Office of Environmental Management * In progress (pending completion of any reorganization) * Update of Performance Assessment Community of Practice Charter to include

164

U.S. Postal Service radon assessment and mitigation program. Progress report, September 1993--November 1994  

SciTech Connect

In 1992, the US Postal Service (USPS) entered into an Interagency Agreement with the Department of Energy (DOE) whereby DOE would provide technical assistance in support of the USPS Radon Assessment and Mitigation Program. To aid in this effort, DOE tasked the Hazardous Waste Remedial Actions Program (HAZWRAP), which is managed by Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., for DOE under contract AC05-84OR21400. Since that time, HAZWRAP has developed and finalized the sampling protocol, mitigation diagnostic protocol, and the quality assurance and quality control procedures. These procedures were validated during the Protocol Validation (1992-1993) and Pilot Study (1993-1994) phases of the program. To date, HAZWRAP has performed approximately 16,000 radon measurements in 250 USPS buildings. Mitigation diagnostics have been performed in 27 buildings. Thus far, 13% of the measurements have been above the Environmental Protection Agency action level of 4 pCi/L. This report summarizes the pilot program radon testing data and mitigation diagnostic data for 22 sites and contains recommendations for mitigation diagnostics.

Velazquez, L.E.; Petty, J.L. Jr.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

165

Blue Creek Winter Range : Wildlife Mitigation Project : Final Environmental Assessment.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) proposes to fund that portion of the Washington Wildlife Agreement pertaining to the Blue Creek Winter Range Wildlife Mitigation Project (Project) in a cooperative effort with the Spokane Tribe, Upper Columbia United Tribes, and the Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA). If fully implemented, the proposed action would allow the sponsors to protect and enhance 2,631 habitat units of big game winter range and riparian shrub habitat on 2,185 hectares (5,400 acres) of Spokane Tribal trust lands, and to conduct long term wildlife management activities within the Spokane Indian Reservation project area. This Final Environmental Assessment (EA) examines the potential environmental effects of securing land and conducting wildlife habitat enhancement and long term management activities within the boundaries of the Spokane Indian Reservation. Four proposed activities (habitat protection, habitat enhancement, operation and maintenance, and monitoring and evaluation) are analyzed. The proposed action is intended to meet the need for mitigation of wildlife and wildlife habitat adversely affected by the construction of Grand Coulee Dam and its reservoir.

United States. Bonneville Power Administration; United States. Bureau of Indian Affairs; Spokane Tribe of the Spokane Reservation, Washington

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Hellsgate Winter Range : Wildlife Mitigation Project. Final Environmental Assessment.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) proposes to fund the Hellsgate Winter Range Wildlife Mitigation Project (Project) in a cooperative effort with the Colville Confederated Tribes and the Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA). The proposed action would allow the sponsors to secure property and conduct wildlife management activities within the boundaries of the Colville Indian Reservation. This Final Environmental Assessment (EA) examines the potential environmental effects of acquiring and managing property for wildlife and wildlife habitat within a large project area. This area consists of several separated land parcels, of which 2,000 hectares (4,943 acres) have been purchased by BPA and an additional 4,640 hectares (11,466 acres) have been identified by the Colville Confederated Tribes for inclusion in the Project. Four proposed activities (habitat protection, habitat enhancement, operation and maintenance, and monitoring and evaluation) are analyzed. The proposed action is intended to meet the need for mitigation of wildlife and wildlife habitat that was adversely affected by the construction of Grand Coulee and Chief Joseph Dams and their reservoirs.

United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Summary of Slagging and Fouling Mitigation Methods  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This is a report on novel slagging and fouling mitigation methods in the coal-fired power generation industry. The project was identified by EPRI in response to member needs to compile a snapshot of approaches to mitigating slagging and fouling of coal-fired boilers as the industry migrates to burning off design coal.

2009-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

168

Property:EnvironmentalMitigation | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

EnvironmentalMitigation EnvironmentalMitigation Jump to: navigation, search Property Name EnvironmentalMitigation Property Type Text Description Description of measures that could be used to mitigate environmental impact. Subproperties This property has the following 1 subproperty: E Exploration Drilling Pages using the property "EnvironmentalMitigation" Showing 24 pages using this property. 2 2-M Probe Survey + The use of off road vehicles should avoid overland travel during periods when soils are moist or wet. Backfilling of excavated probe holes. A Active Seismic Techniques + The environmental impacts of a seismic survey vary drastically and are survey-specific. Factors to consider are: terrain, land access, land usage, survey extent, seismic crew size, source (dynamite, vibroseis, etc.), accomodation for the crew, remoteness of survey location, among others.

169

Supplement Analysis for the Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0246/SA-25)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

June 11, 2002 June 11, 2002 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEC-4 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for the Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0246/SA-25) Ron Morinaka, KEWU-4 Fish and Wildlife Project Manager Proposed Action: Purchase of Fisher River Conservation Easement (Fiscal Years 2002-2004) Project No: 2002-044-00 Wildlife Management Techniques or Actions Addressed Under This Supplement Analysis (See App. A of the Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS): 1.2 Easement Acquisition Location: near Libby, Lincoln County, Montana Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and Montana Fish, Wildlife & Parks Description of the Proposed Action: BPA proposes to fund a portion of the cost of a conservation easement on 56,400 acres of land along the Fisher River to preclude development

170

Supplement Analysis for the Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0246/SA-29)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0246/SA-29) Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0246/SA-29) Charlie Craig - KEWU-4 TO: Fish and Wildlife Project Manager Proposed Action: Blue Creek Winter Range - Spokane Reservation (Acquisition of Smith and Parsons Properties) Project No: 1991-062-00 Watershed Management Techniques or Actions Addressed Under This Supplement Analysis (See App. A of the Watershed Management Program EIS): 1.1 Fee Title Acquisition and Transfer Location: On the Spokane Indian Reservation, near Wellpinit, Stevens County, Washington Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and the Spokane Tribe of Indians Description of the Proposed Action: BPA proposes to fund the purchase of three parcels of land within the boundaries of the Spokane Indian Reservation, totaling approximately 870 acres.

171

EIS (DOE/EIS-0246-SA-24) Supplement Analysis for the Wildlife MitigationProgram EIS  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3, 2002 3, 2002 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEC-4 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for the Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0246/SA-24) David Sill Fish and Wildlife Project Manager Proposed Action: Herbert Conservation Easement Project No: 1992-068-00 Wildlife Management Techniques or Actions Addressed Under This Supplement Analysis (See App. A of the Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS): 1.2 Easement Acquisition Location: Benton County, Oregon Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW) Description of the Proposed Action: BPA proposes to purchase a conservation easement on approximately 221 acres of the Herbert parcel in Benton County, Oregon for the protection of wetland, riparian, and riverine habitats. The Herbert parcel is located within the Willamette

172

DOE/EIS-0246-SA-16: Supplement Analysis for the Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS (8/9/01)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

9, 2001 9, 2001 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEC-4 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for the Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0246/SA-16) Brad Miller, KEWU-4 Fish and Wildlife Project Manager Proposed Action: Johnson Property Acquisition Project No: 1992-061-06 Wildlife Management Techniques or Actions Addressed Under This Supplement Analysis (See App. A of the Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS): 1.1 Fee-Title Acquisition. Location: Benewah Watershed on the Coeur d'Alene Indian Reservation, Idaho Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and the Coeur d'Alene Tribe Description of the Proposed Action: BPA proposes to purchase three parcels totaling 411 acres of private property on the Coeur d'Alene Indian Reservation as partial mitigation for

173

2009 River Corridor Closure Contractor Revegetation and Mitigation Monitoring Report  

SciTech Connect

This document details the results of revegetation and mitigation monitoring conducted in 2009, including 25 revegetation/restoration projects, one revegetation/mitigation project, and three bat mitigation projects.

C. T. Lindsey; K. A. Gano; R. D. Teel

2009-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

174

Transmission/Resource Library/Enviromental Resources and Mitigation...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Resources and Mitigation < Transmission | Resource Library(Redirected from TransmissionResource LibraryMitigation) Redirect page Jump to: navigation, search REDIRECT...

175

Microgrid Dispatch for Macrogrid Peak-Demand Mitigation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Dispatch for Macrogrid Peak- Demand Mitigation NicholasDispatch for Macrogrid Peak-Demand Mitigation Nicholasdetermine whether the peak demand on the substation feeder

DeForest, Nicholas

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

FAO Global Inventory of Agricultural Mitigation Projects in Developing...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

FAO Global Inventory of Agricultural Mitigation Projects in Developing Countries Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: FAO Global Inventory of Agricultural Mitigation...

177

Procedures for Interagency Consultation to Avoid or Mitigate...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Consultation to Avoid or Mitigate Adverse Effects on Rivers in the Nationwide Inventory Procedures for Interagency Consultation to Avoid or Mitigate Adverse Effects on...

178

Microgrid Dispatch for Macrogrid Peak-Demand Mitigation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Dispatch for Macrogrid Peak-Demand Mitigation Title Microgrid Dispatch for Macrogrid Peak-Demand Mitigation Publication Type Conference Proceedings Refereed Designation Refereed...

179

Integrating Efficiency Into Climate Change Mitigation Policy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Integrating Efficiency Into Climate Change Mitigation Policy Speaker(s): Steven R. Schiller Date: December 8, 2008 - 12:00pm Location: 90-4133 Seminar HostPoint of Contact:...

180

Economical solutions to blast mitigation on bridges  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Mitigating the energy created from a blast has been a topic of utmost importance in the terrorism-feared world of today. Main targets of concern are passageways that are significant to a specific area, such as bridges. ...

DeRogatis, Austin (Austin Patrick)

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mitigation actions insights" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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181

Choosing Carbon Mitigation Strategies Using Ethical Deliberation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Anthropogenic greenhouse gas emissions change earths climate by altering the planets radiative balance. An important first step in mitigation of climate change is to reduce annual increases in these emissions. However, the many suggested means ...

Rebecca Bendick; Kyla M. Dahlin; Brian V. Smoliak; Lori Kumler; Sierra J. Jones; Athena Aktipis; Ezekiel Fugate; Rachel Hertog; Claus Moberg; Dane Scott

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Mitigation of Anticipated Transients Without Scram in the ESBWR  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The ESBWR has robust ATWS performance due to the use of passive systems. The heatup of the suppression pool is minimized and the ATWS can be managed at high pressure. ATWS prevention/mitigation features of ESBWR include: An Alternate Rod Insertion (ARI) system that utilizes sensors, logic and valves that are diverse and independent of the Reactor Protection System RPS, Electrical insertion of Fine Motion Control Rod Drives (FMCRDs) that utilize sensors and logic which are diverse and independent of the RPS, Automatic feedwater run-back under conditions indicative of an ATWS An automatic Standby Liquid Control System (SLCS) with a capacity equivalent to 5.42 E-3 m{sup 3}/sec (86 gpm) of 13-weight percent sodium penta-borate solution. The boron is supplied by 2 accumulators and injection is triggered by Squib valves. The boron solution is piped inside the reactor to the core bypass, and discharges at several distribution points in high velocity jets. Several other ESBWR features help to mitigate an ATWS. The large steam volume in the chimney results in a reduced vessel pressurization rate. The isolation condensers terminate suppression pool heatup while there is still steam generation occurring in the core. Analysis with the TRACG computer code shows the ESBWR safety valve capacity is effective in limiting the pressure in the reactor vessel pressure. The automatic FW reduction reduces water level and core flow, which in turn reduces power to approximately one-quarter of the initial value. Finally the reactor is brought sub-critical by boron injection into the core bypass region from two Standby Liquid Control System accumulators. The results show that the mitigation systems are adequate to meet the acceptance criteria without operator action. (authors)

Marquino, Wayne; Shiralkar, Bharat; Sitaraman, Shivakumar [GE Energy (United States)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Wildlife Protection, Mitigation and Enhancement Planning for Grand Coulee Dam, Final Report.  

SciTech Connect

The development and operation of Grand Coulee Dam inundated approximately 70,000 acres of wildlife habitat under the jurisdictions of the Colville Confederated Tribes, the Spokane Tribe, and the State of Washington. Under the provisions of the Pacific Northwest Electric Power Planning and Conservation Act of 1980, this study reviews losses to wildlife and habitat, and proposes mitigation for those losses. Wildlife loss estimates were developed from information available in the literature. Habitat losses and potential habitat gains through mitigation were estimated by a modified Habitat Evaluation Procedure. The mitigation plan proposes (1) acquisition of sufficient land or management rights to land to protect Habitat Units equivalent to those lost (approximately 73,000 acres of land would be required), (2) improvement and management of those lands to obtain and perpetuate target Habitat Units, and (3) protection and enhancement of suitable habitat for bald eagles. Mitigation is presented as four actions to be implemented over a 10-year period. A monitoring program is proposed to monitor mitigation success in terms of Habitat Units and wildlife population trends.

Creveling, Jennifer

1986-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Willow Creek Wildlife Mitigation Project. Final Environmental Assessment.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Today`s notice announces BPA`s proposal to fund land acquisition or acquisition of a conservation easement and a wildlife management plan to protect and enhance wildlife habitat at the Willow Creek Natural Area in Eugene, Oregon. This action would provide partial mitigation for wildlife and wildlife habitat lost by the development of Federal hydroelectric projects in the Willamette River Basin. The project is consistent with BPA`s obligations under provisions of the Pacific Northwest Electric Power Planning and Conservation Act of 1980 as outlined by the Northwest Power Planning Council`s 1994 Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program. BPA has prepared an environmental assessment (DOE/EA-1023) evaluating the proposed project. Based on the analysis in the EA, BPA has determined that the proposed action is not a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment, within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969. Therefore, the preparation of an environmental impact statement (EIS) is not required and BPA is issuing this FONSI.

NONE

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Advanced Mitigating Measures for the Cell Internal Short Risk (Presentation)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This presentation describes mitigation measures for internal short circuits in lithium-ion battery cells.

Darcy, E.; Smith, K.

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

EA-1096: Washington Wildlife Mitigation Projects (Programmatic), Washington  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

6: Washington Wildlife Mitigation Projects (Programmatic), 6: Washington Wildlife Mitigation Projects (Programmatic), Washington EA-1096: Washington Wildlife Mitigation Projects (Programmatic), Washington SUMMARY This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of the proposal for the U.S. Department of Energy Bonneville Power Administration to fund the portion of the Washington Wildlife Mitigation Agreement pertaining to wildlife habitat mitigation projects to be undertaken in a cooperative effort with the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife. PUBLIC COMMENT OPPORTUNITIES None available at this time. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD July 30, 1996 EA-1096: Finding of No Significant Impact Washington Wildlife Mitigation Projects (Programmatic) July 30, 1996 EA-1096: Final Environmental Assessment Washington Wildlife Mitigation Projects (Programmatic)

187

Conforth Ranch (Wanaket) Wildlife Mitigation Project : Draft Management Plan and Draft Environmental Assessment.  

SciTech Connect

Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) proposes to mitigate for loss of wildlife habitat caused by the development of Columbia River Basin hydroelectric projects, including McNary dam. The proposed wildlife mitigation project involves wildlife conservation on 1140 hectares (ha)(2817 acres) of land (including water rights) in Umatilla County, Oregon. BPA has prepared an Environmental Assessment (EA)(DOE/EA- 1016) evaluating the proposed project. Based on the analysis in the EA, BPA has determined that the proposed action is not a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969. Therefore, the preparation of an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) is not required, and BPA is issuing this Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI).

United States. Bonneville Power Administration; Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Reservation, Oregon.

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Prioritize Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Strategies for Employee Commuting |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Employee Employee Commuting Prioritize Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Strategies for Employee Commuting October 7, 2013 - 2:29pm Addthis YOU ARE HERE Step 5 Proposed programs to reduce employee commute greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions should be prioritized at individual worksites and across agency worksites to help the agency understand what actions and worksites are most critical to reaching its goal. This section aims to help the employee transportation coordinators (ETCs) and telework coordinators to understand what commute reduction programs will yield the greatest "bang-for-the-buck" and what level of GHG reductions a site or program can achieve get with available resources. Criteria may include: GHG emission reduction potential by the 2020 target date Cost effectiveness ($ invested per MTCO2e avoided)

189

Cue effectiveness in mitigating postcompletion errors in a routine procedural task  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Postcompletion errors, which are omissions of actions required after the completion of a task's main goal, occur in a variety of everyday procedural tasks. Previous research has demonstrated the difficulty of reducing their frequency by means other than ... Keywords: ACT-R, Cognitive architecture, Error intervention, Error mitigation, Goal memory, Human error, Interface design, Modeling, Postcompletion error, Routine procedural task, Visual attention, Visual cue, Visual salience

Phillip H. Chung; Michael D. Byrne

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Global Insight Energy Group  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Outlook Outlook Mary Novak Managing Director IHS Global Insight Copyright © 2010 IHS Global Insight, Inc. Overview: Energy Sector Transformation Underway * The recession has hit energy demand hard, and aggregate energy demand is not expected to return to 2007 levels until 2018. * Oil and natural gas prices will both rise over the long-term, but the price trends will diverge with natural gas prices rising slowly due to the development of shale gas. * This forecast does not include a GHG cap-and-trade program. However, it is assumed that there will be continued improvement in equipment, appliance and building efficiencies that will reduce carbon emissions relative to past projections. * The forecast also includes the more than 30 state- level programs to increase efficiency and reduce

191

Climate change 2007 - mitigation of climate change  

SciTech Connect

This volume of the Fourth Assessment Report (AR4) of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) provides a comprehensive, state-of-the-art and worldwide overview of scientific knowledge related to the mitigation of climate change. It includes a detailed assessment of costs and potentials of mitigation technologies and practices, implementation barriers, and policy options for the sectors: energy supply, transport, buildings, industry, agriculture, forestry and waste management. It links sustainable development policies with climate change practices. This volume will again be the standard reference for all those concerned with climate change. Contents: Foreword; Preface; Summary for policymakers; Technical Summary; 1. Introduction; 2. Framing issues; 3. Issues related to mitigation in the long term context; 4. Energy supply; 5. Transport and its infrastructure; 6. Residential and commercial buildings; 7. Industry; 8. Agriculture; 9. Forestry; 10. Waste management; 11. Mitigation from a cross sectoral perspective; 12. Sustainable development and mitigation; 13. Policies, instruments and co-operative agreements. 300 figs., 50 tabs., 3 annexes.

Metz, B.; Davidson, O.; Bosch, P.; Dave, R.; Meyer, L. (eds.)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Update on INSIGHTS Development  

SciTech Connect

INSIGHTS is a transformational separate effects testing capability to perform in situ irradiation studies and characterization of the microscale behavior of nuclear fuel materials under a wide variety of in-pile conditions. Separate effects testing including growth, irradiation, and monitoring of these materials, and encompasses the full science based approach for fuels development from the nanoscale to the mesoscale behavior of the sample material and other defects driven by the modeling and simulation efforts of INL.

Not Listed; Eric Burgett

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Corrective Action Management Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Corrective Action Management Program (CAMP) Home CAMP Background DOE Directives Corrective Action Management Team Corrective Action Tracking System (CATS) CAMP Quarterly Reports...

194

Worldwide Trends in Energy Use and Efficiency: Key Insights from  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Worldwide Trends in Energy Use and Efficiency: Key Insights from Worldwide Trends in Energy Use and Efficiency: Key Insights from International Energy Agency (IEA) Indicator Analysis in Support of the Group of Eight (G8) Plan of Action Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Worldwide Trends in Energy Use and Efficiency: Key Insights from International Energy Agency (IEA) Indicator Analysis in Support of the Group of Eight (G8) Plan of Action Focus Area: Power Plant Efficiency Topics: Potentials & Scenarios Website: www.iea.org/papers/2008/indicators_2008.pdf Equivalent URI: cleanenergysolutions.org/content/worldwide-trends-energy-use-and-effic Language: English Policies: "Regulations,Deployment Programs" is not in the list of possible values (Deployment Programs, Financial Incentives, Regulations) for this property.

195

Integrating Efficiency Into Climate Change Mitigation Policy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Integrating Efficiency Into Climate Change Mitigation Policy Integrating Efficiency Into Climate Change Mitigation Policy Speaker(s): Steven R. Schiller Date: December 8, 2008 - 12:00pm Location: 90-4133 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Richard Diamond Steve will discuss policy options for deploying energy efficiency resources in electricity (non-transportation) end-use markets to meet needed GHG emission reduction levels. This discussion will include listing some barriers inherent to climate policy design, as well as energy markets, that inhibit efficiency investment as an emissions reduction strategy. However, the focus of the talk is on recommendations for effective mechanisms that incorporate end-use electricity energy efficiency into climate change mitigation efforts. In a recent ACEEE paper, Steve and his co-authors,

196

Paving materials for heat island mitigation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Paving materials for heat island mitigation Paving materials for heat island mitigation Title Paving materials for heat island mitigation Publication Type Report Year of Publication 1997 Authors Pomerantz, Melvin, Hashem Akbari, Allan Chen, Haider Taha, and Arthur H. Rosenfeld Keywords Cool Pavements, Heat Island Abstract This report summarizes paving materials suitable for urban streets, driveways, parking lots and walkways. The authors evaluate materials for their abilities to reflect sunlight, which will reduce their temperatures. This in turn reduces the excess air temperature of cities (the heat island effect). The report presents the compositions of the materials, their suitability for particular applications, and their approximate costs (in 1996). Both new and resurfacing are described. They conclude that, although light-colored materials may be more expensive than conventional black materials, a thin layer of light-colored pavement may produce energy savings and smog reductions whose long-term worth is greater than the extra cost.

197

Rainwater Wildlife Area, Watershed Management Plan, A Columbia Basin Wildlife Mitigation Project, 2002.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This Management Plan has been developed by the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR) to document how the Rainwater Wildlife Area (formerly known as the Rainwater Ranch) will be managed. The plan has been developed under a standardized planning process developed by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) for Columbia River Basin Wildlife Mitigation Projects (See Appendix A and Guiding Policies Section below). The plan outlines the framework for managing the project area, provides an assessment of existing conditions and key resource issues, and presents an array of habitat management and enhancement strategies. The plan culminates into a 5-Year Action Plan that will focus our management actions and prioritize funding during the Fiscal 2001-2005 planning period. This plan is a product of nearly two years of field studies and research, public scoping, and coordination with the Rainwater Advisory Committee. The committee consists of representatives from tribal government, state agencies, local government, public organizations, and members of the public. The plan is organized into several sections with Chapter 1 providing introductory information such as project location, purpose and need, project goals and objectives, common elements and assumptions, coordination efforts and public scoping, and historical information about the project area. Key issues are presented in Chapter 2 and Chapter 3 discusses existing resource conditions within the wildlife area. Chapter 4 provides a detailed presentation on management activities and Chapter 5 outlines a monitoring and evaluation plan for the project that will help assess whether the project is meeting the intended purpose and need and the goals and objectives. Chapter 6 displays the action plan and provides a prioritized list of actions with associated budget for the next five year period. Successive chapters contain appendices, references, definitions, and a glossary. The purpose of the project is to protect, enhance, and mitigate fish and wildlife resources impacted by Columbia River Basin hydroelectric development. The effort is one of several wildlife mitigation projects in the region developed to compensate for terrestrial habitat losses resulting from the construction of McNary and John Day Hydroelectric facilities located on the mainstem Columbia River. While this project is driven primarily by the purpose and need to mitigate for wildlife habitat losses, it is also recognized that management strategies will also benefit many other non-target fish and wildlife species and associated natural resources. The Rainwater project is much more than a wildlife project--it is a watershed project with potential to benefit resources at the watershed scale. Goals and objectives presented in the following sections include both mitigation and non-mitigation related goals and objectives.

Childs, Allen B.

2002-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Exascale Insights (2011) | National Nuclear Security Administration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > Media Room > Video Gallery > Exascale Insights (2011) Exascale Insights (2011) Exascale Insights (2011) From: NNSANews...

199

Annual Report on Wildlife Activities, 1985 Fiscal Year, Action Item 40.1, Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The report presents a brief synopsis and discussion of wildlife activities undertaken by Bonneville Power Administration. The objectives of the program were wildlife protection, mitigation, and enhancement planning; and implementation of actions to protect, mitigate, and enhance wildlife affected by development and operation of hydroelectric facilities in the Columbia River Basin. (ACR)

United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

1985-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

In April, SSPEED hosted nearly 140 attendees at a two-day conference: Gulf Coast Hurricanes, Mitigation & Response. The conference showcased speakers from various universities and international  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Davies provided insight to the restructuring of the British disaster response system, including the development of a common vocabulary to communicate the prediction of and response to disaster events among, Mitigation & Response. The conference showcased speakers from various universities and international

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mitigation actions insights" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Mitigating PQ Problems in Legacy Data Centers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The conclusions of this presentation are: (1) Problems with PQ in legacy data centers still exist and need to be mitigated; (2) Harmonics generated by non-linear IT load can be lowered by passive, active and hybrid cancellation methods; (3) Harmonic study is necessary to find the best way to treat PQ problems; (4) AHF's and harmonic cancellation transformers proved to be very efficient in mitigating PQ problems; and (5) It is important that IT leaders partner with electrical engineering to appropriate ROI statements, justifying many of these expenditures.

Ilinets, Boris; /SLAC

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Corrective Actions Process  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Stewardship Environmental Cleanup Corrective Actions Corrective Actions Process The general process for evaluating and remediating potential release sites is called...

203

Motivating Private Precaution with Public Programs: Insights from a Local Earthquake Mitigation Ordinance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the successful and cheap public-private partnership event ofor behavior in public or private institutions likeTotal Estimated Public Costs Private cost of completed

Rabinovici, Sharyl Jean Marie

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Motivating Private Precaution with Public Programs: Insights from a Local Earthquake Mitigation Ordinance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

relates to coordinating disaster response and relief effortstransition from a disaster response mode to recoverymore towards preparing for disaster response. It is thus no

Rabinovici, Sharyl Jean Marie

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Energy Insight | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Energy Insight Energy Insight Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Energy Insight Agency/Company /Organization: Tendril Connect Sector: Energy Focus Area: Energy Efficiency Resource Type: Software/modeling tools User Interface: Website Website: greenbuttonconnect.com/home Web Application Link: greenbuttonconnect.com/apps/energyinsight/? OpenEI Keyword(s): Green Button Apps Language: English Energy Insight Screenshot References: Tendril[1] Green Button Connect[2] Logo: Energy Insight An application that analyzes and presents your energy data in easy-to-understand charts. Energy Insight enables you to dynamically sort the chart data using a variety of time periods: hourly, daily, monthly. In addition to the charts, the Energy Insight application can display your

206

Mitigation Methods for Tubular Structures -- Interim Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This interim report describes the first year of a two-year testing program for methods to prevent or mitigate corrosion in the interior surfaces of steel tubular poles. Two methods are under study: cathodic protection that uses zinc or magnesium sacrificial anodes and rust inhibitors that protect interior surfaces.BackgroundUtilities have become increasingly aware of the potential problems associated with underground ...

2012-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

207

Dust Mitigation Methods for Coal Combustion Products  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Coal-fired power plants generate coal combustion products (CCPs) requiring management for storage and disposal. These products are often stored in facilities such as landfills or placed in temporary storage pads for short or long durations. At these facilities, there is a need to address dust mitigation concerns in order to comply with environmental permits, ...

2013-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

208

Autonomic fault mitigation in embedded systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Autonomy, particularly from a maintenance and fault-management perspective, is an increasingly desirable feature in embedded (and non-embedded) computer systems. The driving factors are several-including increasing pervasiveness of computer systems, ... Keywords: Autonomic computing, Embedded systems, Fault mitigation, Fault tolerance, Hierarchical concurrent finite-state machines, Model-based design

Sandeep Neema; Ted Bapty; Shweta Shetty; Steven Nordstrom

2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Enhanced Practical Photosynthetic CO2 Mitigation  

SciTech Connect

This report highlights significant achievements in the Enhanced Practical Photosynthetic CO{sub 2} Mitigation Project for the period ending 06/30/2004. The major accomplishment was the modification of the header and harvesting work, with a system designed to distribute algae at startup, sustain operations and harvest in one unit.

Gregory Kremer; David J. Bayless; Morgan Vis; Michael Prudich; Keith Cooksey; Jeff Muhs

2004-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

210

Wildlife Mitigation Program Record of Decision.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) has decided to adopt a set of Descriptions (goals, strategies, and procedural requirements) that apply to future BPA-funded wildlife mitigation projects. Various. sources-including Indian tribes, state agencies, property owners, private conservation groups, or other Federal agencies-propose wildlife mitigation projects to the Northwest Power Planning Council (Council) for BPA funding. Following independent scientific and public reviews, Council then selects projects to recommend for BPA funding. BPA adopts this set of prescriptions to standardize the planning and implementation of individual wildlife mitigation projects. This decision is based on consideration of potential environmental impacts evaluated in BPA`s Wildlife Mitigation Program Final Environmental Impact Statement (DOE/EIS-0246) published March, 20, 1997, and filed with the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) the week of March 24, 1997 (EPA Notice of Availability Published April 4, 1997, 62 FR 65, 16154). BPA will distribute this Record of Decision to all known interested and affected persons, groups, tribes, and agencies.

United States. Bonneville Power Administration

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

EIS(DOE/EIS-0246/SA-20) Supplement Analysis for the Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS 3/7/02  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

March 7, 2002 March 7, 2002 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEC-4 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for the Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0246/SA-20) Allyn Meuleman, KEWU-4 Fish and Wildlife Project Manager Proposed Action: Camas Prairie Acquisition, Anderson Ranch Dam Phase II Project No: 1995-057-00 Wildlife Management Techniques or Actions Addressed Under This Supplement Analysis (See App. A of the Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS): 1.1 Fee-Title Acquisition and Transfer Location: Camas and Elmore Counties, Idaho Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and the Idaho Department of Fish and Game (IDFG) Description of the Proposed Action: BPA proposes to purchase approximately 1,370 acres of

212

(DOE/EIS-0246/SA-26): Supplement Analysis for the Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS (07/3/02)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3, 2002 3, 2002 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEC-4 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for the Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0246/SA-26) David Sill Fish and Wildlife Project Manager Proposed Action: Windy Bay Property Acquisition Project No: 1990-044-03 Wildlife Management Techniques or Actions Addressed Under This Supplement Analysis (See App. A of the Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS): 1.1 Fee-Title Acquisition and Transfer Location: Kootenai County, Idaho Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and the Coeur d'Alene Tribe Description of the Proposed Action: BPA proposes to purchase approximately 150 acres of land located at the mouth of Lake Creek on Lake Coeur d'Alene on the Coeur d'Alene Indian Reservation in Kootenai County, Idaho. Title to the land will be held by the Coeur d'Alene

213

(DOE/EIS-0246/SA-23): Supplement Analysis for the Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS 5/15/02  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

15, 2002 15, 2002 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEC-4 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for the Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0246/SA-23) David Sill Fish and Wildlife Project Manager Proposed Action: Canby Ferry Conservation Easement Project No: 1992-068-00 Wildlife Management Techniques or Actions Addressed Under This Supplement Analysis (See App. A of the Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS): 1.2 Easement Acquisition Location: Clackamas County, Oregon Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW) Description of the Proposed Action: BPA proposes to purchase a conservation easement on approximately 16 acres of the Canby Ferry parcel in Clackamas County, Oregon for the protection

214

EIS(DOE/EIS-0246/SA-19) Supplement Analysis for the Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS 12/12/01  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

December 12, 2001 December 12, 2001 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEC-4 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for the Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0246/SA-19) David Sill, KEWU-4 Fish and Wildlife Project Manager Proposed Action: Bader Property Acquisition Project No: 1992-061-06 Wildlife Management Techniques or Actions Addressed Under This Supplement Analysis (See App. A of the Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS): 1.1 Fee-Title Acquisition. Location: St. Joe Watershed on the Coeur d'Alene Indian Reservation, Idaho Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and the Coeur d'Alene Tribe Description of the Proposed Action: BPA proposes to purchase approximately 650 acres of private property that border the St. Joe River near Goose Heaven Lake on the Coeur d'Alene Indian Reservation

215

(DOE/EIS-0246/SA-28): Supplement Analysis for the Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS 7/24/02  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

24, 24, 2002 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEC-4 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for the Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0246/SA-28) David Byrnes Fish and Wildlife Project Manager Proposed Action: Lower Naches River Land Acquisition, Yakima River Side Channels Project Project No: 1997-051-00 Wildlife Management Techniques or Actions Addressed Under This Supplement Analysis (See App. A of the Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS): 2.15 Acquisition of Sensitive Riparian Resources Location: Yakima County, Washington Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and The Yakama Nation Description of the Proposed Action: BPA proposes to purchase four parcels of private land that total approximately 125 acres located in south-central Washington along the Naches River in Yakima County. Following acquisition, title to the land will be held by The Yakama Nation. The goal of this project

216

Supplement Analysis for the Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0246/SA-32) 5/20/03  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

May 20, 2003 May 20, 2003 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEC-4 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for the Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0246/SA-32) Joe DeHerrera, KECU-4 TO: Fish and Wildlife Project Manager Proposed Action: Zumwalt Prairie Preserve Conservation Easement Project No: 2001-043-00 Wildlife Management Techniques or Actions Addressed Under This Supplement Analysis (See App. A of the Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS): Resource Acquisition Techniques-1.2 Easement Acquisition. Location: Wallowa County, Oregon Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and The Nature Conservancy Description of the Proposed Action: BPA proposes to purchase a conservation easement on the Zumwalt Prairie Preserve, which is currently owned by The Nature Conservancy. The

217

Modeling for Insights  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

System Dynamics is a computer-aided approach to evaluating the interrelationships of different components and activities within complex systems. Recently, System Dynamics models have been developed in areas such as policy design, biological and medical modeling, energy and the environmental analysis, and in various other areas in the natural and social sciences. The real power of System Dynamic modeling is gaining insights into total system behavior as time, and system parameters are adjusted and the effects are visualized in real time. System Dynamic models allow decision makers and stakeholders to explore long-term behavior and performance of complex systems, especially in the context of dynamic processes and changing scenarios without having to wait decades to obtain field data or risk failure if a poor management or design approach is used. The Idaho National Laboratory recently has been developing a System Dynamic model of the US Nuclear Fuel Cycle. The model is intended to be used to identify and understand interactions throughout the entire nuclear fuel cycle and suggest sustainable development strategies. This paper describes the basic framework of the current model and presents examples of useful insights gained from the model thus far with respect to sustainable development of nuclear power.

Jacob J. Jacobson; Gretchen Matthern

2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Mitigation and Remediation of Mercury Contamination at the Y...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Mitigation and Remediation of Mercury Contamination at the Y-12 Plant Oak Ridge Mitigation and Remediation of Mercury Contamination at the Y-12 Plant Oak Ridge Full Document and...

219

Agriculture, Forestry and Other Land Use Mitigation Project Database | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Agriculture, Forestry and Other Land Use Mitigation Project Database Agriculture, Forestry and Other Land Use Mitigation Project Database Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Agriculture, Forestry and Other Land Use Mitigation Project Database Agency/Company /Organization: Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations Sector: Land Focus Area: Forestry, Agriculture Resource Type: Dataset Website: www.fao.org/climatechange/67148/en/ RelatedTo: Mitigation of Climate Change in Agriculture (MICCA) Project Agriculture, Forestry and Other Land Use Mitigation Project Database Screenshot References: AFOLU Mitigation Database[1] Global Survey of Agricultural Mitigation Projects Paper[2] "The AFOLU MP database endeavors to gather information on all mitigation activities currently ongoing within the agricultural and forestry sectors

220

The Agricultural Sector and Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Model (ASMGHG)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Agricultural Sector and Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Model (ASMGHG) Uwe A. Schneider Bruce A. Mc Sector and Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Model (ASMGHG Taxes and Sequestration Subsidies...............................66 3.8.2.4 Special Greenhouse Gas

McCarl, Bruce A.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mitigation actions insights" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

The U.S. Country Studies Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Assessment...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

6 The U.S. Country Studies Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Assessment Workshop: A Report Participants in the first GHG Mitigation Assessment Workshop. On June 13-24, the Center's Energy...

222

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Congestion Mitigation and Air Quality (CMAQ)  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Congestion Mitigation Congestion Mitigation and Air Quality (CMAQ) Improvement Program to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Congestion Mitigation and Air Quality (CMAQ) Improvement Program on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Congestion Mitigation and Air Quality (CMAQ) Improvement Program on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Congestion Mitigation and Air Quality (CMAQ) Improvement Program on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Congestion Mitigation and Air Quality (CMAQ) Improvement Program on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Congestion Mitigation and Air Quality (CMAQ) Improvement Program on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Congestion Mitigation and Air Quality (CMAQ) Improvement Program on AddThis.com...

223

2007 River Corridor Closure Contractor Revegetation and Mitigation Monitoring Report  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this report is to document the status of revegetation projects and natural resources mitigation efforts that have been conducted for remediated waste sites and other activities associated with the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) cleanup of National Priorities List waste sites at Hanford. This report documents the results of revegetation and mitigation monitoring conducted in 2007 and includes 11 revegetation/restoration projects, one revegetation/mitigation project, and 3 bat habitat mitigation projects.

K. A. Gano; C. T. Lindsey

2007-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

224

2008 River Corridor Closure Contractor Revegetation and Mitigation Monitoring Report  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this report is to document the status of revegetation projects and natural resources mitigation efforts that have been conducted for remediated waste sites and other activities associated with the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act cleanup of National Priorities List waste sites at Hanford. This report documents the results of revegetation and mitigation monitoring conducted in 2008 and includes 22 revegetation/restoration projects, one revegetation/mitigation project, and two bat habitat mitigation projects.

C. T. Lindsey; K. A. Gano

2008-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

225

Southern Idaho Wildlife Mitigation Implementation 2000 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report covers calendar year 2000 activities for the Southern Idaho Wildlife Mitigation Implementation project. This project, implemented by Idaho Department of Fish and Game and Shoshone Bannock Tribes wildlife mitigation staff, is designed to protect, enhance and maintain wildlife habitats to mitigate construction losses for Palisades, Anderson Ranch, Black Canyon and Minidoka hydroelectric projects. Additional project information is available in the quarterly reports.

Bottum, Edward; Mikkelsen, Anders

2001-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Southern idaho Wildlife Mitigation Implementation 1999 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report is for the Southern Idaho Wildlife Mitigation Implementation project. This project, implemented by IDFG and SBT wildlife mitigation staff, is designed to protect, enhance and maintain wildlife habitats to mitigate construction losses for Palisades, Anderson Ranch, Black Canyon and Minidoka hydroelectric projects. Additional project information is available in the quarterly reports.

Bottum, Edward; Mikkelsen, Anders

2000-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

EPR Severe Accident Threats and Mitigation  

SciTech Connect

Despite the extremely low EPR core melt frequency, an improved defence-in-depth approach is applied in order to comply with the EPR safety target: no stringent countermeasures should be necessary outside the immediate plant vicinity like evacuation, relocation or food control other than the first harvest in case of a severe accident. Design provisions eliminate energetic events and maintain the containment integrity and leak-tightness during the entire course of the accident. Based on scenarios that cover a broad range of physical phenomena and which provide a sound envelope of boundary conditions associated with each containment challenge, a selection of representative loads has been done, for which mitigation measures have to cope with. This paper presents the main critical threats and the approach used to mitigate those threats. (authors)

Azarian, G. [Framatome ANP SAS, Tour Areva, Place de la Coupole 92084 Paris la Defense (France); Kursawe, H.M.; Nie, M.; Fischer, M.; Eyink, J. [Framatome ANP GmbH, Freyeslebenstrasse, 1, D-91058 Erlangen (Germany); Stoudt, R.H. [Framatome ANP Inc. - 3315 Old Forest Rd, Lynchburgh, VA 24501 (United States)

2004-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Global Warming Mitigation Investments Optimized under Uncertainty  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Global Warming Mitigation Investments Optimized under Uncertainty Global Warming Mitigation Investments Optimized under Uncertainty Speaker(s): Hermann Held Date: July 9, 2010 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Thomas McKone The Copenhagen Accord (2009) recognizes that 'the increase in global temperature should be below 2 degrees Celsius' (compared to pre-industrial levels, '2° target'). In recent years, energy economics have derived welfare-optimal investment streams into low-emission energy mixes and associated costs. According to our analyses, auxiliary targets that are in line with the 2° target could be achieved at relatively low costs if energy investments were triggered rather swiftly. While such analyses assume 'perfect foresight' of a benevolent 'social planner', an accompanying suite of experiments explicitly

229

Decarbonization and Sequestration for Mitigating Global Warming  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

DECARBONIZATION AND SEQUESTRATION FOR DECARBONIZATION AND SEQUESTRATION FOR MITIGATING GLOBAL WARMING M. Steinberg (msteinbe@bnl.gov); 631-344-3036 Brookhaven National Laboratory 12 South Upton Street Upton, NY 11973-5000, USA ABSTRACT Mitigating the global warming greenhouse effect while maintaining a fossil fuel economy, requires improving efficiency of utilization of fossil fuels, use of high hydrogen content fossil fuels, decarbonization of fossil fuels, and sequestering of carbon and CO 2 applied to all the sectors of the economy, electric power generation, transportation, and industrial, and domestic power and heat generation. Decarbonization means removal of carbon as C or CO 2 either before or after fossil fuel combustion and sequestration means disposal of the recovered C or CO 2 including its utilization. Removal and recovery of CO

230

Supplement Analysis for the Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0246/SA-37)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

January 16, 2004 January 16, 2004 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEC-4 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for the Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0246/SA-37) Charlie Craig - KEWU-4 Fish and Wildlife Project Manager Proposed Action: Blue Creek Winter Range - Spokane Reservation (Acquisition of Sampson, Lantzy, Allotment #0065-C, and Allotment 154 Properties) Project No: 1991-062-00 Watershed Management Techniques or Actions Addressed Under This Supplement Analysis (See App. A of the Watershed Management Program EIS): 1.1 Fee Title Acquisition and Transfer Location: On the Spokane Indian Reservation, near Wellpinit, Stevens County, Washington Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and the Spokane Tribe of Indians Description of the Proposed Action: BPA proposes to fund the purchase of four parcels of land

231

ENHANCED PRACTICAL PHOTOSYNTHETIC CO2 MITIGATION  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This quarterly report documents significant achievements in the Enhanced Practical Photosynthetic CO{sub 2} Mitigation project during the period from 1/2/2003 through 4/01/2003. As indicated in the list of accomplishments below we are progressing with long-term model scale bioreactor tests and are completing final preparations for pilot scale bioreactor testing. Specific results and accomplishments for the first quarter of 2003 are included.

Dr. Gregory Kremer; Dr. David J. Bayless; Dr. Morgan Vis; Dr. Michael Prudich; Dr. Keith Cooksey; Dr. Jeff Muhs

2003-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

232

Enhanced Practical Photosynthetic CO2 Mitigation  

SciTech Connect

This report highlights significant achievements in the Enhanced Practical Photosynthetic CO{sub 2} Mitigation Project during the ending 12/31/2004. Specific results and accomplishments for the program include review of pilot scale testing and design of a new bioreactor. Testing confirmed that algae can be grown in a sustainable fashion in the pilot bioreactor, even with intermittent availability of sunlight. The pilot-scale tests indicated that algal growth rate followed photon delivery during productivity testing.

Gregory Kremer; David J. Bayless; Morgan Vis; Michael Prudich; Keith Cooksey; Jeff Muhs

2005-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

233

Explosive parcel containment and blast mitigation container  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention relates to a containment structure for containing and mitigating explosions. The containment structure is installed in the wall of the building and has interior and exterior doors for placing suspicious packages into the containment structure and retrieving them from the exterior of the building. The containment structure has a blast deflection chute and a blowout panel to direct over pressure from explosions away from the building, surrounding structures and people.

Sparks, Michael H. (Frederick County, MD)

2001-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

234

Procedures for Interagency Consultation to Avoid or Mitigate Adverse Effects on Rivers in the Nationwide Inventory  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Procedures for Interagency Consultation to Avoid or Mitigate Adverse Effects Procedures for Interagency Consultation to Avoid or Mitigate Adverse Effects on Rivers in the Nationwide Inventory These procedures are designed to assist federal officials in complying with the President's directive (attached) to protect rivers in the Nationwide Inventory through the normal environmental analysis process. NEOA, E.O. 1 15 14, CEQ's NEPA Regulations, and agency implementing procedures should be used to meet the President's directive. Although the steps outlined below pertain to wild and scenic river protection, they also fit clearly within agencies' existing environmental analysis processes. Agencies are already required: to identify and analyze the environmental effects of their actions; to consult with agencies with jurisdiction by law or special expertise (in this case, the National Park Service (NPS)); to

235

Costa Rica-Facilitating Implementation and Readiness for Mitigation (FIRM)  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Costa Rica-Facilitating Implementation and Readiness for Mitigation (FIRM) Costa Rica-Facilitating Implementation and Readiness for Mitigation (FIRM) Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Costa Rica-Facilitating Implementation and Readiness for Mitigation (FIRM) Name Costa Rica-Facilitating Implementation and Readiness for Mitigation (FIRM) Agency/Company /Organization United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) Partner Global Environment Facility (GEF), Government of Denmark Sector Climate, Energy, Land Topics Adaptation, Co-benefits assessment, - Environmental and Biodiversity, Finance, Implementation, Low emission development planning Website http://www.unep.org/climatecha Program Start 2011 Program End 2013 Country Costa Rica UN Region Central America References Facilitating Implementation and Readiness for Mitigation (FIRM)[1]

236

Ethiopia-Facilitating Implementation and Readiness for Mitigation (FIRM) |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ethiopia-Facilitating Implementation and Readiness for Mitigation (FIRM) Ethiopia-Facilitating Implementation and Readiness for Mitigation (FIRM) Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Ethiopia-Facilitating Implementation and Readiness for Mitigation (FIRM) Name Ethiopia-Facilitating Implementation and Readiness for Mitigation (FIRM) Agency/Company /Organization United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) Partner Global Environment Facility (GEF), Government of Denmark Sector Climate, Energy, Land Topics Adaptation, Co-benefits assessment, - Environmental and Biodiversity, Finance, Implementation, Low emission development planning Website http://www.unep.org/climatecha Program Start 2011 Program End 2013 Country Ethiopia UN Region Central America References Facilitating Implementation and Readiness for Mitigation (FIRM)[1]

237

UNEP-Facilitating Implementation and Readiness for Mitigation (FIRM) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

UNEP-Facilitating Implementation and Readiness for Mitigation (FIRM) UNEP-Facilitating Implementation and Readiness for Mitigation (FIRM) Jump to: navigation, search Logo: UNEP-Facilitating Implementation and Readiness for Mitigation (FIRM) Name UNEP-Facilitating Implementation and Readiness for Mitigation (FIRM) Agency/Company /Organization United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) Partner Global Environment Facility (GEF), Government of Denmark Sector Climate, Energy, Land Topics Adaptation, Co-benefits assessment, - Environmental and Biodiversity, Finance, Implementation, Low emission development planning Website http://www.unep.org/climatecha Program Start 2011 References Facilitating Implementation and Readiness for Mitigation (FIRM)[1] "The Government of Denmark will provide US$6 million to the new programme

238

Greenhouse Gas Training Program for Inventory and Mitigation Modeling |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Greenhouse Gas Training Program for Inventory and Mitigation Modeling Greenhouse Gas Training Program for Inventory and Mitigation Modeling Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Greenhouse Gas Training Program for Inventory and Mitigation Modeling Agency/Company /Organization: Future Perfect Sector: Climate Focus Area: GHG Inventory Development, Greenhouse Gas Topics: GHG inventory, Low emission development planning, -LEDS Resource Type: Case studies/examples, Training materials Website: www.gpstrategiesltd.com/divisions/future-perfect/ Country: South Korea Eastern Asia Language: English References: Greenhouse Gas Training Program for Inventory and Mitigation Modeling[1] Logo: Greenhouse Gas Training Program for Inventory and Mitigation Modeling Jointly sponsored by Greenhouse Gas Inventory & Research (GIR) Center of

239

Facilitating Implementation and Readiness for Mitigation (FIRM) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Facilitating Implementation and Readiness for Mitigation (FIRM) Facilitating Implementation and Readiness for Mitigation (FIRM) Jump to: navigation, search Logo: UNEP-Facilitating Implementation and Readiness for Mitigation (FIRM) Name UNEP-Facilitating Implementation and Readiness for Mitigation (FIRM) Agency/Company /Organization United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) Partner Global Environment Facility (GEF), Government of Denmark Sector Climate, Energy, Land Topics Adaptation, Co-benefits assessment, - Environmental and Biodiversity, Finance, Implementation, Low emission development planning Website http://www.unep.org/climatecha Program Start 2011 Program End 2013 Country Costa Rica, Ethiopia, Ghana, Indonesia, Mexico, Morocco, Senegal, South Africa, Vietnam UN Region Central America References Facilitating Implementation and Readiness for Mitigation (FIRM)[1]

240

Wildlife Mitigation Program Record of Decision; 06April1997  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Wildlife Mitigation Program Record of Decision Wildlife Mitigation Program Record of Decision SUMMARY Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) has decided to adopt a set of prescriptions (goals, strategies, and procedural requirements) that apply to future BPA-funded wildlife mitigation projects. Various sourcesincluding Indian tribes, state agencies, property owners, private conservation groups, or other Federal agenciespropose wildlife mitigation projects to the Northwest Power Planning Council (Council) for BPA funding. Following independent scientific and public reviews, Council then selects projects to recommend for BPA funding. BPA adopts this set of prescriptions to standardize the planning and implementation of individual wildlife mitigation projects. This decision is based on consideration of potential environmental

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mitigation actions insights" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

South Africa-Facilitating Implementation and Readiness for Mitigation  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

South Africa-Facilitating Implementation and Readiness for Mitigation South Africa-Facilitating Implementation and Readiness for Mitigation (FIRM) Jump to: navigation, search Logo: South Africa-Facilitating Implementation and Readiness for Mitigation (FIRM) Name South Africa-Facilitating Implementation and Readiness for Mitigation (FIRM) Agency/Company /Organization United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) Partner Global Environment Facility (GEF), Government of Denmark Sector Climate, Energy, Land Topics Adaptation, Co-benefits assessment, - Environmental and Biodiversity, Finance, Implementation, Low emission development planning Website http://www.unep.org/climatecha Program Start 2011 Program End 2013 Country South Africa UN Region Central America References Facilitating Implementation and Readiness for Mitigation (FIRM)[1]

242

The detection, prevention and mitigation of cascading outages in the power system  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This dissertation studies the causes and mechanism of power system cascading outages and develops new methods and new tools to help detect, prevent and mitigate the outages. Three effective solutions: a steady state control scheme, a transient stability control scheme, and an interactive system-wide and local scheme have been proposed using those new methods and tools. A steady state control scheme can help detect and prevent the possible cascading outage at its initial slow steady state progress stage. It uses new methods and new tools to solve the line overload, congestion or bus high/low voltage problems. New methods, such as vulnerability index (VI), margin index (MI), network contribution factor (NCF), topology processing and selected minimum load shedding (SMLS), and new tools, such as transmission network control based on a network contribution factor (NCF) method, generator control based on a generator distribution factor (GDF) method, and load control based on a load distribution factor (LDF) method have been proposed and developed. A transient stability control scheme can help prevent and mitigate the possible cascading outage at its transient progress stage if there is enough time to take action. It uses one Lyapunov direct method, potential energy boundary surface (PEBS) method, and sensitivity analysis of transient energy margin for fast stabilizing control. The results are verified by the accurate time-domain transient stability analysis method. The interactive scheme takes advantage of accurate system-wide and local information and analysis results, uses some techniques from both steady state control and transient stability control, works at both the system-wide level and local substation level, monitors the system all the time, and takes actions when needed to help detect, prevent and mitigate the possible cascading outage. Comprehensive simulation studies have been implemented using the IEEE 14- bus, 24-bus, 39-bus and 118-bus systems and promising results show the ability of the proposed solutions to help detect, prevent and mitigate cascading outages.

Song, Hongbiao

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

National and Sectoral GHG Mitigation Potential: A Comparison Across Models  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

National and Sectoral GHG Mitigation Potential: A Comparison Across Models National and Sectoral GHG Mitigation Potential: A Comparison Across Models Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: National and Sectoral GHG Mitigation Potential: A Comparison Across Models Agency/Company /Organization: Organisation for Economic Co-Operation and Development Topics: GHG inventory, Policies/deployment programs, Pathways analysis Resource Type: Software/modeling tools, Publications, Lessons learned/best practices Website: www.iea.org/papers/2009/Mitigation_potentials.pdf References: National and Sectoral GHG Mitigation Potential: A Comparison Across Models[1] Summary "This paper focuses on mitigation potential to provide a comparative assessment across key economies. GHG mitigation potential is defined here to be the level of GHG emission reductions that could be realised, relative

244

Appropriate Use of Mitigation and Monitoring and Clarifying the Appropriate  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Appropriate Use of Mitigation and Monitoring and Clarifying the Appropriate Use of Mitigation and Monitoring and Clarifying the Appropriate Use of Mitigated Findings of No Significant Impact Appropriate Use of Mitigation and Monitoring and Clarifying the Appropriate Use of Mitigated Findings of No Significant Impact The Council on Environmental Quality is issuing this guidance for Federal departments and agencies on establishing, implementing, and monitoring mitigation commitments identified and analyzed in Environmental Assessments, Environmental Impact Statements, and adopted in the final decision documents. This guidance also clarifies the appropriate use of mitigated "Findings of No Significant Impact" under the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA). The guidance explains the requirements of NEPA and the CEQ Regulations, describes CEQ policies, and recommends

245

Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Planning Data and Tools | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Planning Data and Tools Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Planning Data and Tools Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Planning Data and Tools October 7, 2013 - 10:27am Addthis These data and tools from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and other organizations can help Federal agencies with greenhouse gas (GHG) mitigation planning for: Buildings Vehicles and mobile equipment Business travel Employee commuting. Buildings Table 1 features data and tools to help with GHG mitigation planning for buildings. Table 1. GHG Mitigation Planning Data and Tools for Buildings Data or Tool Source Description Planning Use Buildings GHG Mitigation Worksheet Estimator Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) Estimates savings and costs from GHG reduction strategies Evaluate GHG Reduction Strategies Estimate Costs to Implement GHG Reduction Strategies

246

Assessment of alternative mitigation concepts for Hanford flammable gas tanks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides a review and assessment of four selected mitigation concepts: pump jet mixing, sonic vibration, dilution, and heating. Though the relative levels of development of these concepts are quite different, some definite conclusions are made on their comparative feasibility. Key findings of this report are as follows. A mixer pump has proven to be a safe and effective active mitigation method in Tank 241-SY-101, and the authors are confident that mixer pumps will effectively mitigate other tanks with comparable waste configurations and properties. Low-frequency sonic vibration is also predicted to be effective for mitigation. Existing data cannot prove that dilution can mitigate gas release event (GRE) behavior. However, dilution is the only concept of the four that potentially offers passive mitigation. Like dilution, heating the waste cannot be proven with available information to mitigate GRE behavior. The designs, analyses, and data from which these conclusions are derived are presented along with recommendations.

Stewart, C.W.; Schienbein, L.A.; Hudson, J.D.; Eschbach, E.J.; Lessor, D.L.

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Mitigation for the Construction and Operation of Libby Dam, 2003-2004 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect

''Mitigation for the Construction and Operation of Libby Dam'' is part of the Northwest Power and Conservation Council's (NPCC) resident fish and wildlife program. The program was mandated by the Northwest Planning Act of 1980, and is responsible for mitigating for damages to fish and wildlife caused by hydroelectric development in the Columbia River Basin. The objective of Phase I of the project (1983 through 1987) was to maintain or enhance the Libby Reservoir fishery by quantifying seasonal water levels and developing ecologically sound operational guidelines. The objective of Phase II of the project (1988 through 1996) was to determine the biological effects of reservoir operations combined with biotic changes associated with an aging reservoir. The objectives of Phase III of the project (1996 through present) are to implement habitat enhancement measures to mitigate for dam effects, to provide data for implementation of operational strategies that benefit resident fish, monitor reservoir and river conditions, and monitor mitigation projects for effectiveness. This project completes urgent and high priority mitigation actions as directed by the Kootenai Subbasin Plan. Montana FWP uses a combination of diverse techniques to collect a variety of physical and biological data within the Kootenai River Basin. These data serve several purposes including: the development and refinement of models used in management of water resources and operation of Libby Dam; investigations into the limiting factors of native fish populations, gathering basic life history information, tracking trends in endangered, threatened species, and the assessment of restoration or management activities intended to restore native fishes and their habitats.

Dunnigan, James; DeShazer, Jay; Garrow, Larry (Montana Department of Fish, Wildlife and Parks, Libby, MT)

2004-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

W-519 Sagebrush Mitigation Project FY-2004 Final Review and Status  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report summarizes activities conducted as mitigation for loss of sagebrush-steppe habitats due to Project W-519, the construction of the infrastructure for the Tank Waste Remediation System Vitrification Plant. The focus of this report is to provide a review and final status of mitigation actions performed through FY2004. Data collected since FY1999 have been included where appropriate. The Mitigation Action Plan (MAP) for Project W-519 prescribed three general actions to be performed as mitigation for the disturbance of approximately 40 ha (100 acres) of mature sagebrush-steppe habitat. These actions included: (1) transplanting approximately 130,000 sagebrush seedlings on the Fitzner-Eberhardt Arid Lands Ecology Reserve (ALE); (2) rectification of the new transmission line corridor via seeding with native grasses and sagebrush; and (3) research on native plant species with a goal of increasing species diversity in future mitigation or restoration actions. Nearly 130,000 Wyoming big sagebrush seedlings where planted on ALE during FY2000 and FY2001. About 39,000 of those seedlings were burned during the 24-Command Fire of June 2000. The surviving and subsequent replanting has resulted in about 91,000 seedlings that were planted across four general areas on ALE. A 50% survival rate at any monitoring period was defined as the performance standard in the MAP for this project. Data collected in 2004 indicate that of the over 5000 monitored plants, 51.1% are still alive, and of those the majority are thriving and blooming. These results support the potential for natural recruitment and the ultimate goal of wildlife habitat replacement. Thus, the basic performance standard for sagebrush survival within the habitat compensation planting has been met. Monitoring activities conducted in 2004 indicate considerable variation in seedling survival depending on the type of plant material, site conditions, and to a lesser extent, treatments performed at the time of planting. The principle findings include: (1) a clear indication that in most settings, bare-root seedling survival is considerably higher than tubling survival; (2) we can expect low plant survival at sites with a high cover of large native bunchgrasses--especially bluebunch wheatgrass; (3) mycorrhizal root treatments appeared to increase growth and survival at the Coppice Dune and 98-Burn Undisturbed sites, but appeared to have little effect at the 98-Burn Disturbed, 111-Road Sitanion, or Cold Creek sites; (4) use of a hydrogel dip at planting increases survival of bare-root plants compared to dipping roots in plain water; (5) reducing leaf area via clipping after planting did not increase survival of bare-root plants; (6) seedlings planted on a south-aspect hillside at the Lower Cold Creek planting area had higher survival than seedlings planted on the hilltop or northern-aspects although these survival rates were lower than the survival rate down on the flats at this same location. Rectification of the transmission line corridor occurred in early March 2001, with the broadcast seeding of Sandberg's bluegrass and sagebrush. Success criteria for this site-of-disturbance rectification required a grass establishment after four years with greater than 25% total canopy cover with 60% of the plant cover from planted species (DOE 1998). This planting met the total canopy criterion but failed the criterion of 60% relative coverage of planted species. Although the performance standard was not met, the planting is not necessarily a failure; the communities on the tower pads appear to be developing toward the desired end state. We feel that there are no reasonable mitigative actions that can be taken at this time that would significantly alter or speed up the plant community development on these sites. In fact, most options, such as overseeding, may cause damage to the currently establishing communities on those sites.

Durham, Robin E.; Sackschewsky, Michael R.

2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

249

CO2 MITIGATION VIA ACCELERATED LIMESTONE WEATHERING  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The climate and environmental impacts of our current, carbon-intensive energy usage demands that effective and practical energy alternatives and CO2 mitigation strategies be found. As part of this effort, various means of capturing and storing CO2 generated from fossil-fuel-based energy production are being investigated. One of the proposed methods involves a geochemistry-based capture and sequestration process that hydrates point-source, waste CO2 with water to produce a carbonic acid solution. This in turn is reacted and neutralized with limestone, thus converting the original CO2 gas to calcium bicarbonate in solution, the overall reaction being:

Rau, G H; Knauss, K G; Langer, W H; Caldeira, K G

2004-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

250

Industrial Energy Efficiency and Climate Change Mitigation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Industry contributes directly and indirectly (through consumed electricity) about 37% of the global greenhouse gas emissions, of which over 80% is from energy use. Total energy-related emissions, which were 9.9 GtCO2 in 2004, have grown by 65% since 1971. Even so, industry has almost continuously improved its energy efficiency over the past decades. In the near future, energy efficiency is potentially the most important and cost-effective means for mitigating greenhouse gas emissions from industry. This paper discusses the potential contribution of industrial energy efficiency technologies and policies to reduce energy use and greenhouse gas emissions to 2030.

Worrell, Ernst; Bernstein, Lenny; Roy, Joyashree; Price, Lynn; de la Rue du Can, Stephane; Harnisch, Jochen

2009-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

251

A safety assessment for proposed pump mixing operations to mitigate episodic gas releases in tank 241-SY-101: Hanford Site,Richland, Washington  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This safety assessment addresses each of the elements required for the proposed action to remove a slurry distributor and to install, operate, and remove a mixing pump in Tank 241-SY-101,which is located within the Hanford Site, Richland, Washington.The proposed action is required as part of an ongoing evaluation of various mitigation concepts developed to eliminate episodic gas releases that result in hydrogen concentrations in the tank dome space that exceed the lower flammability limit.

Lentsch, J.W.

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Safety assessment for proposed pump mixing operations to mitigate episodic gas releases in tank 241-101-SY: Hanford Site, Richland, Washington  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This safety assessment addresses each of the elements required for the proposed action to remove a slurry distributor and to install, operate, and remove a mixing pump in Tank 241-SY-101, which is located within the Hanford Site, Richland, Washington. The proposed action is required as part of an ongoing evaluation of various mitigation concepts developed to eliminate episodic gas releases that result in hydrogen concentrations in the tank dome space that exceed the lower flammability limit.

Lentsch, J.W., Westinghouse Hanford

1996-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

253

Functional design criteria for SY-101 hydrogen mitigation test project Data Acquisition and Control System (DACS-1)  

SciTech Connect

Early in 1990, the potential for a large quantity of hydrogen and nitrous oxide to exist as an explosive mixture within some Hanford waste tanks was declared an unreviewed safety question. The waste tank safety task team was established at that time to carry out safety evaluations and plan the means for mitigating this potential hazard. Action was promptly taken to identify those tanks with the highest hazard and to implement interim operating requirements to minimize ignition sources.

Truitt, R.W.

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Honda Insight Fleet and Accelerated Reliability Testing  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Gen II Insight HEV Accelerated Testing - August 2012 Two model year 2010 Honda Generation II Insight hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs) entered Accelerated testing during July 2009 in...

255

Building Energy Software Tools Directory : ecoInsight Energy...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ecoInsight Energy Audit & Analysis Software Back to Tool ecoInsight screenshot ecoInsight screenshot ecoInsight...

256

Global climate change and the mitigation challenge  

SciTech Connect

Anthropogenic emissions of greenhouse gases, especially carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}), have led to increasing atmospheric concentrations, very likely the primary cause of the 0.8{sup o}C warming the Earth has experienced since the Industrial Revolution. With industrial activity and population expected to increase for the rest of the century, large increases in greenhouse gas emissions are projected, with substantial global additional warming predicted. This paper examines forces driving CO{sub 2} emissions, a concise sector-by-sector summary of mitigation options, and research and development (R&D) priorities. To constrain warming to below approximately 2.5{sup o}C in 2100, the recent annual 3% CO{sub 2} emission growth rate needs to transform rapidly to an annual decrease rate of from 1 to 3% for decades. Furthermore, the current generation of energy generation and end-use technologies are capable of achieving less than half of the emission reduction needed for such a major mitigation program. New technologies will have to be developed and deployed at a rapid rate, especially for the key power generation and transportation sectors. Current energy technology research, development, demonstration, and deployment (RDD&D) programs fall far short of what is required. 20 refs., 18 figs., 4 tabs.

Frank Princiotta [U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States). Air Pollution Prevention and Control Division

2009-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

257

The Climate Change Action Plan: Technical supplement  

SciTech Connect

This Technical Annex documents the assumptions and parameters used in developing the supporting analysis for the Climate Change Action Plan (the Plan) issued by President Clinton on October 19, 1993. The Annex is intended to meet the needs of independent energy and environmental analysts who wish to better understand the Plan, its analytical underpinnings, and the events that need to transpire for the emissions reductions called for in the Plan to be realized. The Plan documented in this Annex reflects the outcome of a wide-ranging effort by Government agencies and interested members of the public to develop and implement actions that can reduce net greenhouse gas emissions in the year 2000 to their aggregate 1990 level. Based on agency and public input, the Climate Change Mitigation Group, chaired by the White House Office on Environmental Policy, developed the Plan`s content. Many of the actions called for in the Plan are now underway, while others are in advanced planning pending congressional action on the fiscal year 1995 budget. The analysis supporting the Plan represents the results of an interagency effort. The US Department of Energy (DOE) was responsible for the integrated analysis of energy-related options, based on the analysis of individual energy-related options by DOE, the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), and the US Department of Transportation (DOT). EPA led in providing analysis for actions related to methane, hydrofluorocarbons, and perfluorocarbons. The US Department of Agriculture (USDA) led the analysis of carbon sequestration actions and cooperated with EPA in the analysis of actions to reduce nitrous oxide emissions.

Not Available

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

International Partnership on Mitigation and Measuring, Reporting and  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Mitigation and Measuring, Reporting and Mitigation and Measuring, Reporting and Verification (MRV) Jump to: navigation, search Logo: International Partnership on Mitigation and Measuring, Reporting and Verification (MRV) Name International Partnership on Mitigation and Measuring, Reporting and Verification (MRV) Agency/Company /Organization German Federal Ministry for the Environment, Nature Conservancy and Nuclear Safety (BMU), German Agency for International Cooperation (GIZ) Sector Climate Focus Area Non-renewable Energy, Agriculture, Buildings, Energy Efficiency, Greenhouse Gas, Industry, People and Policy, Transportation Topics Background analysis, Baseline projection, Finance, GHG inventory, Implementation, Low emission development planning, -LEDS, -NAMA, Pathways analysis, Policies/deployment programs, Technology characterizations

259

Mitigation of Rare Earth Supply Risk Posed by Permanent Magnets ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

These include electric vehicles and wind generators. Volatility of the price of rare earth elements highlights the importance of a co-ordinated strategy to mitigate...

260

Monitoring and Assessment of Greenhouse Gas Emissions and Mitigation  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Greenhouse Gas Emissions and Mitigation Greenhouse Gas Emissions and Mitigation Potential in Agriculture Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Monitoring and Assessment of Greenhouse Gas Emissions and Mitigation Potential in Agriculture (MAGHG) Name Monitoring and Assessment of Greenhouse Gas Emissions and Mitigation Potential in Agriculture (MAGHG) Agency/Company /Organization Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations Sector Climate, Land Focus Area Agriculture, Greenhouse Gas Topics GHG inventory, Low emission development planning, -LEDS Resource Type Dataset, Technical report Website http://www.fao.org/climatechan References MICCA Website[1] The overall objective of the MAGHG project is to support developing countries assess and report their greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mitigation actions insights" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

2006 River Corridor Closure Contractor Revegetation and Mitigation Monitoring Report  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this report is to document the status of revegetation projects and natural resources mitigation efforts that have been conducted for remediated waste sites and other activities associated with the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act cleanup of National Priorities List waste sites at Hanford. One of the objectives of restoration is the revegetation of remediated waste sites to stabilize the soil and restore the land to native vegetation. The report documents the results of revegetation and mitigation monitoring conducted in 2006 and includes 11 revegetation/restoration projects, one revegetation/mitigation project, and 2 bat habitat mitigation projects.

A. L. Johnson; K. A. Gano

2006-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

262

Oregon Fish and Wildlife Mitigation Policy | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon Oregon Fish and Wildlife Mitigation Policy Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Reference Material:...

263

Improving Department of Energy Capabilities for Mitigating Beyond...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

DSA andor to disable important controls relied on to mitigate the release of radioactive material shall be evaluated. The types of BDB Es that should be evaluated include: *...

264

Characterizing Uncertainty for Regional Climate Change Mitigation and Adaptation Decisions  

SciTech Connect

This white paper describes the results of new research to develop an uncertainty characterization process to help address the challenges of regional climate change mitigation and adaptation decisions.

Unwin, Stephen D.; Moss, Richard H.; Rice, Jennie S.; Scott, Michael J.

2011-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

265

San Diego's carbon footprint : measuring and mitigating greenhouse gas emissions.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Climate Change is one of the most pressing issues of our time. The best way to measure and mitigate the greenhouse gas emissions causing climate (more)

Bushman, Tara Rose

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Poster: Thermal Energy Storage for Electricity Peak-demand Mitigation...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Poster: Thermal Energy Storage for Electricity Peak-demand Mitigation: A Solution in Developing and Developed World Alike Title Poster: Thermal Energy Storage for Electricity...

267

IDB-Climate Change Mitigation and Agriculture in Latin America...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Agriculture in Latin America and the Caribbean Jump to: navigation, search Logo: IDB-Argentina-Climate Change Mitigation and Agriculture in Latin America and the Caribbean Name...

268

Speeding up Mother Nature's very own CO2 mitigation process  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

in the journal Environmental Science & Technology. More Information "CO2 Mitigation via Capture and Chemical Conversion in Seawater," Environmental Science & Technology...

269

Indonesia-Bringing a Range of Supported Mitigation Activities...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon Indonesia-Bringing a Range of Supported Mitigation Activities in Selected Countries to the Next Level Jump to: navigation,...

270

China-Transportation Demand Management in Beijing: Mitigation...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

China-Transportation Demand Management in Beijing: Mitigation of Emissions in Urban Transport Jump to: navigation, search Name Transportation Demand Management in Beijing -...

271

title Thermal Energy Storage for Electricity Peakdemand Mitigation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

proceedings title Thermal Energy Storage for Electricity Peakdemand Mitigation A Solution in Developing and Developed World Alike journal ECEEE Summer Study textendash June...

272

EA-1923: Mitigated Finding of No Significant Impact | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Impact EA-1923: Mitigated Finding of No Significant Impact Green Energy School Wind Turbine Project on Saipan, Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands Based on the...

273

Climate Change Mitigation in the Energy and Forestry Sectors...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

studies also suggest that this would increase significantly the worldwide demand for natural gas and renewable technologies. Country studies show that the aggregate mitigation...

274

Microsoft Word - MitigationsForVulnerabilitiesInCSNetworks.doc  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Systems and Automation Society. Presented at 16th Annual Joint ISA POWIDEPRI Controls and Instrumentation Conference; http:www.isa.org Mitigations for Security...

275

Costa Rica-Mitigation of Greenhouse Gas Emissions through Avoided...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Avoided Deforestation of Tropical Rainforests on Privately-owned Lands in High Conservation Value Areas Jump to: navigation, search Name Costa Rica-Mitigation of Greenhouse...

276

Sustainable biochar to mitigate global climate change  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Production of biochar (the carbon-rich solid formed by pyrolysis of biomass), in combination with its storage in soils, has been suggested as a means to abate anthropogenic climate change, while simultaneously increasing crop yields. The climate mitigation potential stems primarily from the highly recalcitrant nature of biochar, which slows the rate at which photosynthetically fixed carbon is returned to the atmosphere. Significant uncertainties exist, however, regarding the impact, capacity, and sustainability of biochar for carbon capture and storage when scaled to the global level. Previous estimates, based on simple assumptions, vary widely. Here we show that, subject to strict environmental and modest economic constraints on biomass procurement and biochar production methods, annual net emissions of CO2, CH4 and N2O could be reduced by 1.1 - 1.9 Pg CO2-C equivalent (CO2-Ce)/yr (7 - 13% of current anthropogenic CO2-Ce emissions; 1Pg = 1 Gt). Over one century, cumulative net emissions of these gases could be reduced by 72-140 Pg CO2-Ce. The lower end of this range uses currently untapped residues and wastes; the upper end requires substantial alteration to global biomass management, but would not endanger food security, habitat or soil conservation. Half the avoided emissions are due to the net C sequestered as biochar, one-quarter to replacement of fossil-fuel energy by pyrolysis energy, and one-quarter to avoided emissions of CH4 and N2O. The total mitigation potential is 18-30% greater than if the same biomass were combusted to produce energy. Despite limited data for the decomposition rate of biochar in soils and the effects of biochar additions on soil greenhouse-gas fluxes, sensitivity within realistic ranges of these parameters is small, resulting in an uncertainty of 8% (1 s.d.) in our estimates. Achieving these mitigation results requires, however, that biochar production be performed using only low-emissions technologies and feedstocks obtained sustainably, with minimal carbon debt incurred from land-use change.

Woolf, Dominic; Amonette, James E.; Street-Perrott, F. A.; Lehmann, Johannes C.; Joseph, Stephen

2010-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

277

International perspectives on mitigating laboratory biorisks.  

SciTech Connect

The International Perspectives on Mitigating Laboratory Biorisks workshop, held at the Renaissance Polat Istanbul Hotel in Istanbul, Republic of Turkey, from October 25 to 27, 2010, sought to promote discussion between experts and stakeholders from around the world on issues related to the management of biological risk in laboratories. The event was organized by Sandia National Laboratories International Biological Threat Reduction program, on behalf of the US Department of State Biosecurity Engagement Program and the US Department of Defense Cooperative Biological Engagement Program. The workshop came about as a response to US Under Secretary of State Ellen O. Tauscher's statements in Geneva on December 9, 2009, during the Annual Meeting of the States Parties to the Biological Weapons Convention (BWC). Pursuant to those remarks, the workshop was intended to provide a forum for interested countries to share information on biorisk management training, standards, and needs. Over the course of the meeting's three days, participants discussed diverse topics such as the role of risk assessment in laboratory biorisk management, strategies for mitigating risk, measurement of performance and upkeep, international standards, training and building workforce competence, and the important role of government and regulation. The meeting concluded with affirmations of the utility of international cooperation in this sphere and recognition of positive prospects for the future. The workshop was organized as a series of short presentations by international experts on the field of biorisk management, followed by breakout sessions in which participants were divided into four groups and urged to discuss a particular topic with the aid of a facilitator and a set of guiding questions. Rapporteurs were present during the plenary session as well as breakout sessions and in particular were tasked with taking notes during discussions and reporting back to the assembled participants a brief summary of points discussed. The presentations and breakout sessions were divided into five topic areas: 'Challenges in Biorisk Management,' 'Risk Assessment and Mitigation Measures,' 'Biorisk Management System Performance,' 'Training,' and 'National Oversight and Regulations.' The topics and questions were chosen by the organizers through consultation with US Government sponsors. The Chattham House Rule on non-attribution was in effect during question and answer periods and breakout session discussions.

Pinard, William J.; Salazar, Carlos A.

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

International perspectives on mitigating laboratory biorisks.  

SciTech Connect

The International Perspectives on Mitigating Laboratory Biorisks workshop, held at the Renaissance Polat Istanbul Hotel in Istanbul, Republic of Turkey, from October 25 to 27, 2010, sought to promote discussion between experts and stakeholders from around the world on issues related to the management of biological risk in laboratories. The event was organized by Sandia National Laboratories International Biological Threat Reduction program, on behalf of the US Department of State Biosecurity Engagement Program and the US Department of Defense Cooperative Biological Engagement Program. The workshop came about as a response to US Under Secretary of State Ellen O. Tauscher's statements in Geneva on December 9, 2009, during the Annual Meeting of the States Parties to the Biological Weapons Convention (BWC). Pursuant to those remarks, the workshop was intended to provide a forum for interested countries to share information on biorisk management training, standards, and needs. Over the course of the meeting's three days, participants discussed diverse topics such as the role of risk assessment in laboratory biorisk management, strategies for mitigating risk, measurement of performance and upkeep, international standards, training and building workforce competence, and the important role of government and regulation. The meeting concluded with affirmations of the utility of international cooperation in this sphere and recognition of positive prospects for the future. The workshop was organized as a series of short presentations by international experts on the field of biorisk management, followed by breakout sessions in which participants were divided into four groups and urged to discuss a particular topic with the aid of a facilitator and a set of guiding questions. Rapporteurs were present during the plenary session as well as breakout sessions and in particular were tasked with taking notes during discussions and reporting back to the assembled participants a brief summary of points discussed. The presentations and breakout sessions were divided into five topic areas: 'Challenges in Biorisk Management,' 'Risk Assessment and Mitigation Measures,' 'Biorisk Management System Performance,' 'Training,' and 'National Oversight and Regulations.' The topics and questions were chosen by the organizers through consultation with US Government sponsors. The Chattham House Rule on non-attribution was in effect during question and answer periods and breakout session discussions.

Pinard, William J.; Salazar, Carlos A.

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Annual Report on Wildlife Activities, September 1985 - April 1986, Action item 40.1, Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This annual report addresses the status of wildlife projects Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) has implemented from September 1985 to April 1986 under the Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program (Program) established pursuant to the Northwest Power Act (P.L. 96-501). Wildlife projects implemented prior to September 1985 are discussed in BPA's September 1985 Annual Report on Wildlife Activities. This report provides a brief synopsis, review, and discussion of wildlife activities BPA has undertaken. When available, annual and final reports are listed for each project. The wildlife section of the Program establishes a process intended to achieve two objectives: wildlife protection, mitigation, and enhancement planning; and implementation of actions to protect, mitigate, and enhance wildlife affected by development and operation of hydroelectric facilities in the Columbia River Basin. The wildlife mitigation planning process developed by the Northwest Power Planning Council (Council) is a stepwise process that proceeds through the review of the status of wildlife mitigation at Columbia River Basin hydroelectric facilities [Measure 1004 (b)(l)]; estimates wildlife losses from hydroelectric development and operation [Measure 1004 (b)(2)]; and recommends actions for the protection, mitigation, or enhancement of wildlife [Measure 1004 (b)(3), Mitigation Plans]. Implementation of wildlife protection, mitigation, and enhancement will occur upon amendment of wildlife actions into the Program by the Council. The majority of BPA's effort to date has gone towards coordinating and implementing wildlife protection, mitigation, and enhancement planning projects.

United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

1986-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Preventive Action Number:  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

7 Corrective Action Report Planning Worksheet 11_0414 1 of 3 7 Corrective Action Report Planning Worksheet 11_0414 1 of 3 EOTA - Business Form Document Title: Corrective Action Report Planning Worksheet Document Number: F-017 Rev 11_0414 Document Owner: Elizabeth Sousa Backup Owner: Melissa Otero Approver(s): Melissa Otero Parent Document: P-008, Corrective/Preventive Action Notify of Changes: EOTA Employees Referenced Document(s): N/A F-017 Corrective Action Report Planning Worksheet 11_0414 2 of 3 Revision History: Rev. Description of Change 08_0613 Initial Release 11_0414 Added problem statement to first block. F-017 Corrective Action Report Planning Worksheet 11_0414 3 of 3 Corrective Action Report Planning Worksheet Corrective Action Number: Source: Details/Problem Statement: Raised By: Raised Date: Target Date:

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mitigation actions insights" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Mitigating Greenhouse Gas Emissions: Voluntary Reporting  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

08(96) 08(96) Distribution Category UC-950 Mitigating Greenhouse Gas Emissions: Voluntary Reporting October 1997 Energy Information Administration Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the Department of Energy. The information contained herein should not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy position of the Department of Energy or of any other organization. For More Information Individuals or members of organizations wishing to report reductions in emissions of greenhouse gases under the auspices of the Voluntary Reporting Program can contact the Energy Information Administration (EIA) at: Voluntary Reporting of Greenhouse Gases Energy Information Administration U.S. Department

282

Enhanced Practical Photosynthetic CO2 Mitigation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report highlights significant achievements in the Enhanced Practical Photosynthetic CO{sub 2} Mitigation Project for the period ending 09/30/2004. The primary effort of this quarter was focused on mass transfer of carbon dioxide into the water film to study the potential effects on the photosynthetic organisms that depend on the carbon. Testing of the carbon dioxide scrubbing capability (mass transfer capability) of flowing water film appears to be relatively high and largely unaffected by transport of the gas through the bioreactor. The implications are that the transfer of carbon dioxide into the film is nearly at maximum and that it is sufficient to sustain photosynthesis at whatever rate the organisms can sustain. This finding is key to assuming that the process is an energy (photon) limited reaction and not a nutrient limited reaction.

Gregory Kremer; David J. Bayless; Morgan Vis; Michael Prudich; Keith Cooksey; Jeff Muhs

2004-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

283

Momentum Dependent Fundamental Action  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The fundamental action is dependent on momentum. Some consequences are presented for matter waves and scalar quantum field theory.

Karl De Paepe

2005-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

284

About Gender Action  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Gender Action was established in 2002. It is the only organization dedicated to promoting gender justice and womens rights in all International Financial Institution (IFI) investments such as those of the World Bank. Gender Actions goal is to ensure that women and men equally participate in and benefit from all IFI investments.

unknown authors

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Methodology Formation Mitigation of Process Contaminants (3-MCPD)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

3-MCPD (3-Monochloropropane-1,2-diol )Methodology,Formation,and Mitigation reference papers. Methodology Formation Mitigation of Process Contaminants (3-MCPD) 3-MCPD 2-diol 3-MCPD 3-MCPD Esters 3-monochloropropane-1 acid analysis aocs april articles cert

286

Cost Analysis and Reduction of Power Quality Mitigation Equipment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Many power quality mitigation systems have been planned, designed, produced, and operated with very little concern for their cumulative life-cycle cost. This report describes how to conduct a life-cycle cost analysis to determine the financial implications of a chosen power quality mitigation technology versus other competing technologies.

2000-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

287

Underground Event Mitigation: State-of-Science Workshop Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes a workshop on underground event mitigation held in Phoenix, Arizona, in October 2002. EPRI sponsored the workshop to present a comprehensive review of the state of the science and knowledge of underground events and mitigation measures and to provide a forum for discussion of future needs of the utility industry and directions for further EPRI-sponsored work in this area.

2002-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

288

U.S. Agriculture's Role Greenhouse Gas Emission Mitigation World  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

U.S. Agriculture's Role in a Greenhouse Gas Emission Mitigation World: An Economic Perspective the IMPAC project. #12;Abstract International agreements are likely to stimulate greenhouse gas mitigation Words Agricultural Sinks, Emissions Trading, Greenhouse Gas Emission Reductions, Kyoto Protocol #12

McCarl, Bruce A.

289

Mitigation for the Endangered Wood Stork on Savannah River Site  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The wood stork is a recently classified federally endangered species. The species forages throughout the facility. The facility impact was mitigated by replacing the affected area with artificially created impoundment. Studies conducted in conjunction with the mitigation have assisted with the recovery effort for this species.

Bryan, A.L.; Coulter, M.C.; Brisbin, I.L.

2000-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Southern Idaho Wildlife Mitigation Implementation 2000 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report covers calendar year 2001 activities for the Southern Idaho Wildlife Mitigation Implementation project. This project, implemented by Idaho Department of Fish and Game and Shoshone Bannock Tribes, is designed to protect, enhance and maintain wildlife habitats to mitigate for construction losses associated with Anderson Ranch, Black Canyon, Deadwood, Minidoka and Palisades hydroelectric projects. Additional project information is available in the quarterly reports.

Bottum, Edward; Mikkelsen, Anders

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Tillman Creek Mitigation Site As-Build Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This as-built report describes site conditions at the Tillman Creek mitigation site in South Cle Elum, Washington. This mitigation site was constructed in 2006-2007 to compensate for wetland impacts from the Yakama Nation hatchery. This as-built report provides information on the construction sequence, as-built survey, and establishment of baseline monitoring stations.

Gresham, Doug [Otak, Inc.

2009-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

292

A Potential Cost Effective Liquefaction Mitigation Countermeasure: Induced Partial Saturation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This work is devoted to illustrate the potential liquefaction mitigation countermeasure: Induced Partial Saturation. Firstly the potential liquefaction mitigation method is briefly introduced. Then the numerical model for partially saturated sandy soil is presented. At last the dynamic responses of liquefiable free filed with different water saturation is given. It shows that the induced partial saturation is efficiency for preventing the liquefaction.

Bian Hanbing; Jia Yun; Shahrour, Isam [Laboratoire de Mecanique de Lille (UMR 8107), Universite des Sciences et Technologies de Lille 59655 Villeneuve d'Ascq (France)

2008-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

293

Ghana-Facilitating Implementation and Readiness for Mitigation (FIRM) |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ghana-Facilitating Implementation and Readiness for Mitigation (FIRM) Ghana-Facilitating Implementation and Readiness for Mitigation (FIRM) Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Ghana-Facilitating Implementation and Readiness for Mitigation (FIRM) Name Ghana-Facilitating Implementation and Readiness for Mitigation (FIRM) Agency/Company /Organization United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) Partner Global Environment Facility (GEF), Government of Denmark Sector Climate, Energy, Land Topics Adaptation, Co-benefits assessment, - Environmental and Biodiversity, Finance, Implementation, Low emission development planning Website http://www.unep.org/climatecha Program Start 2011 Program End 2013 Country Ghana UN Region Central America References Facilitating Implementation and Readiness for Mitigation (FIRM)[1] "The Government of Denmark will provide US$6 million to the new programme

294

Policies and Measures to Realise Industrial Energy Efficiency and Mitigate  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Policies and Measures to Realise Industrial Energy Efficiency and Mitigate Policies and Measures to Realise Industrial Energy Efficiency and Mitigate Climate Change Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Policies and Measures to Realise Industrial Energy Efficiency and Mitigate Climate Change Agency/Company /Organization: United Nations Industrial Development Organization Sector: Energy Focus Area: Conventional Energy, Energy Efficiency, Industry Topics: GHG inventory, Low emission development planning, Policies/deployment programs Resource Type: Publications Website: www.unido.org/fileadmin/user_media/Publications/Pub_free/UNEnergy2009P Policies and Measures to Realise Industrial Energy Efficiency and Mitigate Climate Change Screenshot References: Policies and Measures to Realise Industrial Energy Efficiency and Mitigate Climate Change[1]

295

Morocco-Facilitating Implementation and Readiness for Mitigation (FIRM) |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Morocco-Facilitating Implementation and Readiness for Mitigation (FIRM) Morocco-Facilitating Implementation and Readiness for Mitigation (FIRM) Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Morocco-Facilitating Implementation and Readiness for Mitigation (FIRM) Name Morocco-Facilitating Implementation and Readiness for Mitigation (FIRM) Agency/Company /Organization United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) Partner Global Environment Facility (GEF), Government of Denmark Sector Climate, Energy, Land Topics Adaptation, Co-benefits assessment, - Environmental and Biodiversity, Finance, Implementation, Low emission development planning Website http://www.unep.org/climatecha Program Start 2011 Program End 2013 Country Morocco UN Region Central America References Facilitating Implementation and Readiness for Mitigation (FIRM)[1] "The Government of Denmark will provide US$6 million to the new programme

296

FAO Global Inventory of Agricultural Mitigation Projects in Developing  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

FAO Global Inventory of Agricultural Mitigation Projects in Developing FAO Global Inventory of Agricultural Mitigation Projects in Developing Countries Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: FAO Global Inventory of Agricultural Mitigation Projects in Developing Countries Agency/Company /Organization: Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations Sector: Land Focus Area: Agriculture Topics: Resource assessment, Background analysis Website: www.fao.org/climatechange/micca/en/ References: FAO Global Inventory of Agricultural Mitigation Projects in Developing Countries[1] "The aim of the project is to help realise the substantial mitigation potential of agriculture, especially that of smallholders in developing countries. If the right changes are implemented in production systems, emissions can be reduced and sinks created in biomass and soils while

297

Portfolio-Based Planning Process for Greenhouse Gas Mitigation | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Portfolio-Based Planning Process for Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Portfolio-Based Planning Process for Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Portfolio-Based Planning Process for Greenhouse Gas Mitigation October 7, 2013 - 10:10am Addthis The portfolio-based planning process for greenhouse gas (GHG) mitigation offers an approach to: Evaluating the GHG reduction potential at the site, program, and agency level Identifying strategies for reducing those emissions Prioritizing activities to achieve both GHG reduction and cost objectives. Portfolio-based management for GHG mitigation helps agencies move from "peanut-butter-spreading" obligations for meeting GHG reduction targets evenly across all agency operating units to strategic planning of GHG reduction activities based on each operating unit's potential and cost to reduce emissions. The result of this prioritization will lay the foundation

298

Financing Climate Adaptation and Mitigation in Rural Areas of Developing  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Financing Climate Adaptation and Mitigation in Rural Areas of Developing Financing Climate Adaptation and Mitigation in Rural Areas of Developing Countries Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Financing Climate Adaptation and Mitigation in Rural Areas of Developing Countries Agency/Company /Organization: U.S. Agency for International Development Topics: Adaptation, Co-benefits assessment, Finance Resource Type: Publications Website: pdf.usaid.gov/pdf_docs/PNADO826.pdf Financing Climate Adaptation and Mitigation in Rural Areas of Developing Countries Screenshot References: Financing Climate Adaptation and Mitigation in Rural Areas of Developing Countries[1] Summary "In order to determine how USAID assistance may help overcome barriers to financing these types of projects, this report addresses the following

299

Climate Change Adaptation and Mitigation in the Tourism Sector | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Climate Change Adaptation and Mitigation in the Tourism Sector Climate Change Adaptation and Mitigation in the Tourism Sector Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Climate Change Adaptation and Mitigation in the Tourism Sector Agency/Company /Organization: United Nations Environment Programme Topics: Adaptation, Co-benefits assessment Resource Type: Publications Website: www.unep.fr/shared/publications/pdf/DTIx1047xPA-ClimateChange.pdf Climate Change Adaptation and Mitigation in the Tourism Sector Screenshot References: Climate Change Adaptation and Mitigation in the Tourism Sector[1] Summary "This document forms part of the " UNEP Manuals on Sustainable Tourism" and the UNWTO sustainable tourism policy guidebooks publication series, aiming to provide guidance to tourism stakeholders to integrate

300

EIS-0026: Annual Mitigation Report | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

These documents specify that a MAP be prepared to mitigate environmental These documents specify that a MAP be prepared to mitigate environmental impacts resulting from the implementation of commitments made in the Record of Decision (ROD) for an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS). The Order further requires that an annual report be prepared to demonstrate the progress made in implementing the commitments and effectiveness of any mitigation activity until the activity has been completed. The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) MAP was prepared to address commitments made in the RODs for the WIPP Final Environmental Impact Statement (FEIS), and the WIPP Final Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement. This 2011 Annual Mitigation Report (2011 AMR) addresses those WIPP Project-related mitigation activities undertaken from the time of submittal of the 1994

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mitigation actions insights" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Vietnam-Facilitating Implementation and Readiness for Mitigation (FIRM) |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Vietnam-Facilitating Implementation and Readiness for Mitigation (FIRM) Vietnam-Facilitating Implementation and Readiness for Mitigation (FIRM) Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Vietnam-Facilitating Implementation and Readiness for Mitigation (FIRM) Name Vietnam-Facilitating Implementation and Readiness for Mitigation (FIRM) Agency/Company /Organization United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) Partner Global Environment Facility (GEF), Government of Denmark Sector Climate, Energy, Land Topics Adaptation, Co-benefits assessment, - Environmental and Biodiversity, Finance, Implementation, Low emission development planning Website http://www.unep.org/climatecha Program Start 2011 Program End 2013 Country Vietnam UN Region Central America References Facilitating Implementation and Readiness for Mitigation (FIRM)[1] "The Government of Denmark will provide US$6 million to the new programme

302

Buildings GHG Mitigation Estimator Worksheet, Version 1 | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Buildings GHG Mitigation Estimator Worksheet, Version 1 Buildings GHG Mitigation Estimator Worksheet, Version 1 Buildings GHG Mitigation Estimator Worksheet, Version 1 Xcel document describes Version 1 of the the Buildings GHG Mitigation Estimator tool. This tool assists federal agencies in estimating the greenhouse gas mitigation reduction from implementing energy efficiency measures across a portfolio of buildings. It is designed to be applied to groups of office buildings, for example, at a program level (regional or site) that can be summarized at the agency level. While the default savings and cost estimates apply to office buildings, users can define their own efficiency measures, costs, and savings estimates for inclusion in the portfolio assessment. More information on user-defined measures can be

303

Session: Avoiding, minimizing, and mitigating avian and bat impacts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This session at the Wind Energy and Birds/Bats workshop consisted of two presentations followed by a discussion/question answer period. The session addressed a variety of questions related to avoiding, minimizing, and mitigating the avian and bat impacts of wind power development including: what has been learned from operating turbines and mitigating impacts where they are unavoidable, such as at Altamont Pass WRA, and should there be mitigation measures such as habitat creation or land conservation where impacts occur. Other impact minimization and mitigation approaches discussed included: location and siting evaluations; options for construction and operation of wind facilities; turbine lighting; and the physical alignment/orientation. Titles and authors of the presentations were: 'Bird Fatalities in the Altamont Pass Wind Resource Area: A Case Study, Part II' by Carl Thelander and 'Prevention and Mitigation of Avian Impacts at Wind Power Facilities' by Paul Kerlinger.

Thelander, Carl; Kerlinger, Paul

2004-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Dominican Republic-Climate Change Mitigation and Agriculture in Latin  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Dominican Republic-Climate Change Mitigation and Agriculture in Latin Dominican Republic-Climate Change Mitigation and Agriculture in Latin America and the Caribbean Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Dominican Republic-Climate Change Mitigation and Agriculture in Latin America and the Caribbean Name Dominican Republic-Climate Change Mitigation and Agriculture in Latin America and the Caribbean Agency/Company /Organization Inter-American Development Bank, The Regional Fund for Agricultural Technology, Government of New Zealand Sector Climate, Land Focus Area Agriculture Topics Background analysis, GHG inventory, Low emission development planning Website http://www.iadb.org/en/news/ne Program Start 2011 Country Dominican Republic Caribbean References IDB, FONTAGRO, Government of New Zealand sign agreement on climate change mitigation and agriculture in Latin America and the Caribbean[1]

305

Supporting International Mitigation and MRV activities | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

International Mitigation and MRV activities International Mitigation and MRV activities Jump to: navigation, search Name Supporting International Mitigation and MRV activities Agency/Company /Organization Deutsche Gesellschaft für Internationale Zusammenarbeit (GIZ) GmbH Sector Climate Focus Area Renewable Energy, Energy Efficiency Topics Implementation, Low emission development planning, -LEDS, -NAMA, Policies/deployment programs Resource Type Lessons learned/best practices Website http://www.mitigationpartnersh Program End 2014 References International Partnership on Mitigation and MRV[1] Program Overview In the framework of the Petersberg Climate Dialogue in May 2010 in Bonn/Germany, South Africa, South Korea and Germany launched the International Partnership on Mitigation and MRV. The overall aim of the

306

Mexico-Facilitating Implementation and Readiness for Mitigation (FIRM) |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Mexico-Facilitating Implementation and Readiness for Mitigation (FIRM) Mexico-Facilitating Implementation and Readiness for Mitigation (FIRM) Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Mexico-Facilitating Implementation and Readiness for Mitigation (FIRM) Name Mexico-Facilitating Implementation and Readiness for Mitigation (FIRM) Agency/Company /Organization United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) Partner Global Environment Facility (GEF), Government of Denmark Sector Climate, Energy, Land Topics Adaptation, Co-benefits assessment, - Environmental and Biodiversity, Finance, Implementation, Low emission development planning Website http://www.unep.org/climatecha Program Start 2011 Program End 2013 Country Mexico UN Region Central America References Facilitating Implementation and Readiness for Mitigation (FIRM)[1] "The Government of Denmark will provide US$6 million to the new programme

307

Event:CCCCC and SPREP-Climate Change Mitigation | Open Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Calendar.png CCCCC and SPREP-Climate Change Mitigation: 1:30pm- on 20111130 CCCCC and SPREP-Climate Change Mitigation Event Details Name CCCCC and SPREP-Climate Change Mitigation...

308

Wildlife and Wildlife Habitat Mitigation Plan for Libby Hydroelectric Project, Final Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes the proposed mitigation plan for wildlife losses attributable to the construction of the Libby hydroelectric project. Mitigation objectives and alternatives, the recommended mitigation projects, and the crediting system for each project are described by each target species. The report describes mitigation that has already taken place and 8 recommended mitigation projects designed to complete total wildlife mitigation. 8 refs., 2 figs., 12 tabs.

Mundinger, John

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Preventing, Controlling and Mitigating Power System Separation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Large power system blackouts, although infrequent, may affect up to tens of millions of people and result in huge costs. A blackout is the result of a sequence of disturbances including initial events, consequent protective actions or additional failures, related vulnerability conditions, and accelerated cascading outages leading to the final blackout. Those disturbances may gradually weaken a power system's connections and result in growing angular oscillations between inter-connected control areas. If ...

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Hungry Horse Dam Fisheries Mitigation, 1992-1993 Progress Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In February of 1900, over forty agency representatives and interested citizens began development of the 1991 Mitigation Plan. This effort culminated in the 1993 Implementation Plan for mitigation of fish losses attributable to the construction and operation of Hungry Horse Dam. The primary purpose of this biennial report is to inform the public of the status of ongoing mitigation activities resulting from those planning efforts. A habitat improvement project is underway to benefit bull trout in Big Creek in the North Fork drainage of the Flathead River and work is planned in Hay Creek, another North Fork tributary. Bull trout redd counts have been expanded and experimental programs involving genetic evaluation, outmigrant monitoring, and hatchery studies have been initiated, Cutthroat mitigation efforts have focused on habitat improvements in Elliott Creek and Taylor`s Outflow and improvements have been followed by imprint plants of hatchery fish and/or eyed eggs in those streams. Rogers Lake west of Kalispell and Lion Lake, near Hungry Horse, were chemically rehabilitated. Cool and warm water fish habitat has been improved in Halfmoon Lake and Echo Lake. Public education and public interest is important to the future success of mitigation activities. As part of the mitigation team`s public awareness responsibility we have worked with numerous volunteer groups, public agencies, and private landowners to stimulate interest and awareness of mitigation activities and the aquatic ecosystem. The purpose of this biennial report is to foster public awareness of, and support for, mitigation activities as we move forward in implementing the Hungry Horse Dam Fisheries Mitigation Implementation Plan.

DosSantos, Joe; Vashro, Jim; Lockard, Larry

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

JICA's Assistance for Mitigation to Climate Change - The Co-Benefits...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

JICA's Assistance for Mitigation to Climate Change - The Co-Benefits Approach to Climate Change Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: JICA's Assistance for Mitigation to...

312

Climate Change Mitigation Through Land-Use Measures in the Agriculture...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Climate Change Mitigation Through Land-Use Measures in the Agriculture and Forestry Sectors Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Climate Change Mitigation Through...

313

WHC natural phenomena hazards mitigation implementation plan  

SciTech Connect

Natural phenomena hazards (NPH) are unexpected acts of nature which pose a threat or danger to workers, the public or to the environment. Earthquakes, extreme winds (hurricane and tornado),snow, flooding, volcanic ashfall, and lightning strike are examples of NPH at Hanford. It is the policy of U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to design, construct and operate DOE facilitiesso that workers, the public and the environment are protected from NPH and other hazards. During 1993 DOE, Richland Operations Office (RL) transmitted DOE Order 5480.28, ``Natural Phenomena Hazards Mitigation,`` to Westinghouse Hanford COmpany (WHC) for compliance. The Order includes rigorous new NPH criteria for the design of new DOE facilities as well as for the evaluation and upgrade of existing DOE facilities. In 1995 DOE issued Order 420.1, ``Facility Safety`` which contains the same NPH requirements and invokes the same applicable standards as Order 5480.28. It will supersede Order 5480.28 when an in-force date for Order 420.1 is established through contract revision. Activities will be planned and accomplished in four phases: Mobilization; Prioritization; Evaluation; and Upgrade. The basis for the graded approach is the designation of facilities/structures into one of five performance categories based upon safety function, mission and cost. This Implementation Plan develops the program for the Prioritization Phase, as well as an overall strategy for the implemention of DOE Order 5480.2B.

Conrads, T.J.

1996-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

314

ENHANCED PRACTICAL PHOTOSYNTHETIC CO2 MITIGATION  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This quarterly report documents significant achievements in the Enhanced Practical Photosynthetic CO{sub 2} Mitigation project during the period from 4/03/2001 through 7/02/2001. Most of the achievements are milestones in our efforts to complete the tasks and subtasks that constitute the project objectives. Note that this version of the quarterly technical report is a revision to add the reports from subcontractors Montana State and Oak Ridge National Laboratories The significant accomplishments for this quarter include: Development of an experimental plan and initiation of experiments to create a calibration curve that correlates algal chlorophyll levels with carbon levels (to simplify future experimental procedures); Completion of debugging of the slug flow reactor system, and development of a plan for testing the pressure drop of the slug flow reactor; Design and development of a new bioreactor screen design which integrates the nutrient delivery drip system and the harvesting system; Development of an experimental setup for testing the new integrated drip system/harvesting system; Completion of model-scale bioreactor tests examining the effects of CO{sub 2} concentration levels and lighting levels on Nostoc 86-3 growth rates; Completion of the construction of a larger model-scale bioreactor to improve and expand testing capabilities and initiation of tests; Substantial progress on construction of a pilot-scale bioreactor; and Preliminary economic analysis of photobioreactor deployment. Plans for next quarter's work are included in the conclusions. A preliminary economic analysis is included as an appendix.

Dr. Gregory Kremer; Dr. David J. Bayless; Dr. Morgan Vis; Dr. Michael Prudich; Dr. Keith Cooksey; Dr. Jeff Muhs

2001-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

315

Heat Exchanger Fouling- Prediction, Measurement and Mitigation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The U. S. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Industrial Programs (OIP) sponsors the development of innovative heat exchange systems. Fouling is a major and persistent cost associated with most industrial heat exchangers and nationally wastes an estimated 2.9 Quads per year. To predict and control fouling, three OIP projects are currently exploring heat exchanger fouling in specific industrial applications. A fouling probe has been developed to determine empirically the fouling potential of an industrial gas stream and to derive the fouling thermal resistance. The probe is a hollow metal cylinder capable of measuring the average heat flux along the length of the tube. The local heat flux is also measured by a heat flux meter embedded in the probe wall. The fouling probe has been successfully tested in the laboratory at flue gas temperatures up to 2200F and a local heat flux up to 41,000 BTU/hr-ft2. The probe has been field tested at a coal-fired boiler plant. Future tests at a municipal waste incinerator are planned. Two other projects study enhanced heat exchanger tubes, specifically the effect of enhanced surface geometries on tube bundle performance. Both projects include fouling in a liquid heat transfer fluid. Identifying and quantifying the factors affecting fouling in these enhanced heat transfer tubes will lead to techniques to mitigate fouling.

Peterson, G. R.

1989-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Greenhouse gas mitigation options for Washington State  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

President Clinton, in 1993, established a goal for the United States to return emissions of greenhouse gases to 1990 levels by the year 2000. One effort established to help meet this goal was a three part Environmental Protection Agency state grant program. Washington State completed part one of this program with the release of the 1990 greenhouse gas emissions inventory and 2010 projected inventory. This document completes part two by detailing alternative greenhouse gas mitigation options. In part three of the program EPA, working in partnership with the States, may help fund innovative greenhouse gas reduction strategies. The greenhouse gas control options analyzed in this report have a wide range of greenhouse gas reductions, costs, and implementation requirements. In order to select and implement a prudent mix of control strategies, policy makers need to have some notion of the potential change in climate, the consequences of that change and the uncertainties contained therein. By understanding the risks of climate change, policy makers can better balance the use of scarce public resources for concerns that are immediate and present against those that affect future generations. Therefore, prior to analyzing alternative greenhouse gas control measures, this report briefly describes the phenomenon and uncertainties of global climate change, and then projects the likely consequences for Washington state.

Garcia, N.

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

ENHANCED PRACTICAL PHOTOSYNTHETIC CO2 MITIGATION  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This is the first quarterly report of the project Enhanced Practical Photosynthetic CO{sub 2} Mitigation. The official project start date, 10/02/2000, was delayed until 10/31/2000 due to an intellectual property dispute that was resolved. However, the delay forced a subsequent delay in subcontracting with Montana State University, which then delayed obtaining a sampling permit from Yellowstone National Park. However, even with these delays, the project moved forward with some success. Accomplishments for this quarter include: Culturing of thermophilic organisms from Yellowstone; Testing of mesophilic organisms in extreme CO{sub 2} conditions; Construction of a second test bed for additional testing; Purchase of a total carbon analyzer dedicated to the project; Construction of a lighting container for Oak Ridge National Laboratory optical fiber testing; Modified lighting of existing test box to provide more uniform distribution; Testing of growth surface adhesion and properties; Experimentation on water-jet harvesting techniques; and Literature review underway regarding uses of biomass after harvesting. Plans for next quarter's work and an update on the project's web page are included in the conclusions.

Dr. David J. Bayless; Dr. Morgan Vis; Dr. Gregory Kremer; Dr. Michael Prudich; Dr. Keith Cooksey; Dr. Jeff Muhs

2001-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

318

A greenhouse-gas information system monitoring and validating emissions reporting and mitigation  

SciTech Connect

Current GHG-mitigating regimes, whether internationally agreed or self-imposed, rely on the aggregation of self-reported data, with limited checks for consistency and accuracy, for monitoring. As nations commit to more stringent GHG emissions-mitigation actions and as economic rewards or penalties are attached to emission levels, self-reported data will require independent confirmation that they are accurate and reliable, if they are to provide the basis for critical choices and actions that may be required. Supporting emissions-mitigation efforts and agreements, as well as monitoring energy- and fossil-fuel intensive national and global activities would be best achieved by a process of: (1) monitoring of emissions and emission-mitigation actions, based, in part, on, (2) (self-) reporting of pertinent bottom-up inventory data, (3) verification that reported data derive from and are consistent with agreed-upon processes and procedures, and (4) validation that reported emissions and emissions-mitigation action data are correct, based on independent measurements (top-down) derived from a suite of sensors in space, air, land, and, possibly, sea, used to deduce and attribute anthropogenic emissions. These data would be assessed and used to deduce and attribute measured GHG concentrations to anthropogenic emissions, attributed geographically and, to the extent possible, by economic sector. The validation element is needed to provide independent assurance that emissions are in accord with reported values, and should be considered as an important addition to the accepted MRV process, leading to a MRV&V process. This study and report focus on attributes of a greenhouse-gas information system (GHGIS) needed to support MRV&V needs. These needs set the function of such a system apart from scientific/research monitoring of GHGs and carbon-cycle systems, and include (not exclusively): the need for a GHGIS that is operational, as required for decision-support; the need for a system that meets specifications derived from imposed requirements; the need for rigorous calibration, verification, and validation (CV&V) standards, processes, and records for all measurement and modeling/data-inversion data; the need to develop and adopt an uncertainty-quantification (UQ) regimen for all measurement and modeling data; and the requirement that GHGIS products can be subjected to third-party questioning and scientific scrutiny. This report examines and assesses presently available capabilities that could contribute to a future GHGIS. These capabilities include sensors and measurement technologies; data analysis and data uncertainty quantification (UQ) practices and methods; and model-based data-inversion practices, methods, and their associated UQ. The report further examines the need for traceable calibration, verification, and validation processes and attached metadata; differences between present science-/research-oriented needs and those that would be required for an operational GHGIS; the development, operation, and maintenance of a GHGIS missions-operations center (GMOC); and the complex systems engineering and integration that would be required to develop, operate, and evolve a future GHGIS. Present monitoring systems would be heavily relied on in any GHGIS implementation at the outset and would likely continue to provide valuable future contributions to GHGIS. However, present monitoring systems were developed to serve science/research purposes. This study concludes that no component or capability presently available is at the level of technological maturity and readiness required for implementation in an operational GHGIS today. However, purpose-designed and -built components could be developed and implemented in support of a future GHGIS. The study concludes that it is possible to develop and provide a capability-driven prototype GHGIS, as part of a Phase-1 effort, within three years from project-funding start, that would make use of and integrate existing sensing and system capabilities. As part of a Phase-2 effort, a requirem

Jonietz, Karl K [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Dimotakis, Paul E [JPL/CAL TECH; Roman, Douglas A [LLNL; Walker, Bruce C [SNL

2011-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

319

Corrective and Preventive Action  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

8 Corrective/Preventive Action Process 11_0414 Page 1 of 8 8 Corrective/Preventive Action Process 11_0414 Page 1 of 8 EOTA - Business Process Document Title: Corrective/Preventive Action Process Document Number: P-008 Rev 11_0414 Document Owner: Elizabeth Sousa Backup Owner: Melissa Otero Approver(s): Melissa Otero Parent Document: Q-001, Quality Manual Notify of Changes: EOTA Employees Referenced Document(s): P-004 Business System Management Review, F-017 Corrective Action Report Planning Worksheet or F-018 Preventive Action Report Planning Worksheet P-008 Corrective/Preventive Action Process 11_0414 Page 2 of 8 Revision History: Rev. Description of Change A Initial Release 08_0310 Implemented Multiple reviewer of "Root Cause" into process. 08_0313 Changed verbiage in Process, Responsibility and Definitions for clarification. Assigned new Backup Document Owner.

320

Preventive Action Number:  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

8 Preventive Action Report Planning Worksheet 11_0414 1 of 3 8 Preventive Action Report Planning Worksheet 11_0414 1 of 3 EOTA - Business Form Document Title: Preventive Action Report Planning Worksheet Document Number: F-018 Rev 11_0414 Document Owner: Elizabeth Sousa Backup Owner: Melissa Otero Approver(s): Melissa Otero Parent Document: P-008, Corrective/Preventive Action Notify of Changes: EOTA Employees Referenced Document(s): N/A F-018 Preventive Action Report Planning Worksheet 11_0414 2 of 3 Revision History: Rev. Description of Change 08_0613 Initial Release 09_0924 Worksheet modified to reflect External Audit recommendation for identification of "Cause for Potential Nonconformance". Minor editing changes. 11_0414 Added Preventive Action Number block to match Q-Pulse

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mitigation actions insights" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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321

May 2006 Standards Actions  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Standards Actions 1 Standards Actions 1 New Projects and Technical Standards in Revision 1 DOE Technical Standards Posted in RevCom for TSP 1 DOE Technical Standards in Reaffirmation 1 DOE Technical Standards Change Notices 1 DOE Technical Standards Published 1 Non-Government Standards Actions 1 American National Standards Institute (ANSI) 1 American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) 2 ASTM International 2 American Nuclear Society (ANS) 2 National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) 2

322

Standard Assessment of Mitigation Potential and Livelihoods in Smallholder  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Mitigation Potential and Livelihoods in Smallholder Mitigation Potential and Livelihoods in Smallholder Systems (SAMPLES) Jump to: navigation, search Name Standard Assessment of Mitigation Potential and Livelihoods in Smallholder Systems (SAMPLES) Agency/Company /Organization CGIAR's Climate Change, Agriculture and Food Security (CCAFS), Canadian International Development Agency (CIDA), the European Union, International Fund for Agricultural Development (IFAD) Partner International Livestock Research Institute (ILRI), International Council for Research in Agroforestry (ICRAF), International Rice Research Institute (IRRI), Ministry of Agriculture Sector Climate, Land Focus Area Agriculture Topics Adaptation, Co-benefits assessment, - Environmental and Biodiversity, - Macroeconomic, GHG inventory, Low emission development planning, -LEDS, -TNA

323

Kenya-Standard Assessment of Mitigation Potential and Livelihoods in  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Kenya-Standard Assessment of Mitigation Potential and Livelihoods in Kenya-Standard Assessment of Mitigation Potential and Livelihoods in Smallholder Systems (SAMPLES) Jump to: navigation, search Name Kenya-Standard Assessment of Mitigation Potential and Livelihoods in Smallholder Systems (SAMPLES) Agency/Company /Organization CGIAR's Climate Change, Agriculture and Food Security (CCAFS), Canadian International Development Agency (CIDA), the European Union, International Fund for Agricultural Development (IFAD) Partner International Livestock Research Institute (ILRI), International Council for Research in Agroforestry (ICRAF), International Rice Research Institute (IRRI), Ministry of Agriculture Sector Climate, Land Focus Area Agriculture Topics Adaptation, Co-benefits assessment, - Environmental and Biodiversity, - Macroeconomic, GHG inventory, Low emission development planning, -LEDS, -TNA

324

Aspen and Pitkin County - Renewable Energy Mitigation Program | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Aspen and Pitkin County - Renewable Energy Mitigation Program Aspen and Pitkin County - Renewable Energy Mitigation Program Aspen and Pitkin County - Renewable Energy Mitigation Program < Back Eligibility Commercial Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Home Weatherization Construction Commercial Weatherization Commercial Heating & Cooling Design & Remodeling Other Solar Heating Buying & Making Electricity Water Heating Wind Program Info State Colorado Program Type Building Energy Code Provider Community Office for Resource Efficiency (CORE) The City of Aspen and Pitkin County have adopted the 2009 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC), with some amendments, as their official energy code effective March 9, 2010. The [http://www.aspenpitkin.com/Portals/0/docs/county/countycode/Building%20C...

325

Philippines-Standard Assessment of Mitigation Potential and Livelihoods in  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Philippines-Standard Assessment of Mitigation Potential and Livelihoods in Philippines-Standard Assessment of Mitigation Potential and Livelihoods in Smallholder Systems (SAMPLES) Jump to: navigation, search Name Philippines-Standard Assessment of Mitigation Potential and Livelihoods in Smallholder Systems (SAMPLES) Agency/Company /Organization CGIAR's Climate Change, Agriculture and Food Security (CCAFS), Canadian International Development Agency (CIDA), the European Union, International Fund for Agricultural Development (IFAD) Partner International Livestock Research Institute (ILRI), International Council for Research in Agroforestry (ICRAF), International Rice Research Institute (IRRI), Ministry of Agriculture Sector Climate, Land Focus Area Agriculture Topics Adaptation, Co-benefits assessment, - Environmental and Biodiversity, - Macroeconomic, GHG inventory, Low emission development planning, -LEDS, -TNA

326

Mexico-Standard Assessment of Mitigation Potential and Livelihoods in  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Mexico-Standard Assessment of Mitigation Potential and Livelihoods in Mexico-Standard Assessment of Mitigation Potential and Livelihoods in Smallholder Systems (SAMPLES) Jump to: navigation, search Name Mexico-Standard Assessment of Mitigation Potential and Livelihoods in Smallholder Systems (SAMPLES) Agency/Company /Organization CGIAR's Climate Change, Agriculture and Food Security (CCAFS), Canadian International Development Agency (CIDA), the European Union, International Fund for Agricultural Development (IFAD) Partner International Livestock Research Institute (ILRI), International Council for Research in Agroforestry (ICRAF), International Rice Research Institute (IRRI), Ministry of Agriculture Sector Climate, Land Focus Area Agriculture Topics Adaptation, Co-benefits assessment, - Environmental and Biodiversity, - Macroeconomic, GHG inventory, Low emission development planning, -LEDS, -TNA

327

Climate Action Plan (Kentucky)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Commonwealth of Kentucky established the Kentucky Climate Action Plan Council (KCAPC) process to identify opportunities for Kentucky to respond to the challenge of global climate change while...

328

SEAB Climate Action Plan  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

A presentation on the Climate Action Plan presented by Dr. Jonathan Pershing, Deputy Assistant Secretary for Climate Change at the U.S. Department of Energy.

329

Workforce Diversity Action Plans  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Workforce Diversity Action Plans Workforce Diversity Office Best Practices Diversity Council Compendium of Diversity Activities Principles for a Diverse Community Lawrence Berkeley...

330

Supplement Analysis for the Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0246/SA-30)(10/28/02)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

0) 0) Allyn Meuleman TO: Fish and Wildlife Project Manager Proposed Action: Horkley Property Fee Simple Acquisition Project No: 1995-057-00 Wildlife Management Techniques or Actions Addressed Under This Supplement Analysis (See App. A of the Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS): 1.1 Fee-Title Acquisition and Transfer Location: Jefferson County, Idaho Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), the U.S. Bureau of Land Management (BLM), and Idaho Department of Fish and Game (IDFG). Description of the Proposed Action: BPA proposes to fund the acquisition of approximately 120 acres of sagebrush steppe and agricultural lands in Jefferson County, Idaho. The property proposed for acquisition lies on the west slope of the Menan Butte Area of Critical

331

Supplement Analysis for the Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0246/SA-31)(10/28/02)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1) 1) Allyn Meuleman TO: Fish and Wildlife Project Manager Proposed Action: Allen Property Fee Simple Acquisition Project No: 1995-057-00 Wildlife Management Techniques or Actions Addressed Under This Supplement Analysis (See App. A of the Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS): 1.1 Fee-Title Acquisition and Transfer Location: Jefferson County, Idaho Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), the U.S. Bureau of Land Management (BLM), and Idaho Department of Fish and Game (IDFG). Description of the Proposed Action: BPA proposes to fund the acquisition of approximately 81 acres of forested wetlands and scrub shrub wetlands along the south bank of the South Fork of the Snake River in Jefferson County, Idaho. The property proposed for acquisition lies within

332

Honda Insight Fleet and Accelerated Reliability Testing  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Insight HEVs were driven less than 25,000 miles each (Fleet testing) and the fourth was driven 68,000 miles. During January 2005, the fifth Insight reached 160,000 miles...

333

Nuclear Physics meets Biophysics: New Insights into ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Nuclear Physics meets Biophysics: New Insights into Macromolecules. Frank Heinrich, Institut fr Experimentelle Physik II, Universitt Leipzig. ...

334

ENHANCED PRACTICAL PHOTOSYNTHETIC CO2 MITIGATION  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report documents significant achievements in the Enhanced Practical Photosynthetic CO{sub 2} Mitigation project during the period from 10/2/2001 through 10/01/2002. This report marks the end of year 2 of a three-year project as well as the milestone date for completion of Phase I activities. This report includes our current status and defines the steps being taken to ensure that we meet the project goals by the end of year 3. As indicated in the list of accomplishments below our current efforts are focused on evaluating candidate organisms and growth surfaces, preparing to conduct long-term tests in the bench-scale bioreactor test systems, and scaling-up the test facilities from bench scale to pilot scale. Specific results and accomplishments for the third quarter of 2002 include: Organisms and Growth Surfaces: (1) Test results continue to indicate that thermophilic cyanobacteria have significant advantages as agents for practical photosynthetic CO{sub 2} mitigation before mesophilic forms. (2) Additional thermal features with developed cyanobacterial mats, which might be calcium resistant, were found in YNP. (3) Back to back tests show that there is no detectable difference in the growth of isolate 1.2 s.c. (2) in standard and Ca-modified BG-11 medium. The doubling time for both cases was about 12 hours. (4) The cultivation of cyanobacteria in Ca-BG medium should proceed in the pH range between 7 and 7.4, but this suggestion requires additional experiments. (5) Cyanobacteria can be grown in media where sodium is present at trace levels. (6) Ca{sup 2+} enriched medium can be used as a sink for CO{sub 2} under alkaline conditions. (7) Cyanobacteria are able to generate cones of filaments on travertine surfaces. [Travertine is a mixture of CaCO{sub 3} and CaSO{sub 4}]. We hypothesize that SO{sub 4}{sup 2-} stimulates the generation of such cones, because they are not almost generated on CaCO3 surface. On the other hand, we know that plant gas contains elevated concentrations of SO{sub 4}{sup 2-}. We may speculate that the introduction of 11.2 isolate in CRF might significantly increase the productivity of such facility. It is possible that a higher colonization potential for the screens may allow a higher surface productivity than some of the other isolates. (8) The colonization of Omnisil surface is an auto-inducible and time-requiring process. (9) Omnisil coupons should be treated under pH control, preferably using KOH. Bioreactor support systems and test facilities: (1) The pilot-scale bioreactor construction and debugging is continuing on schedule. Tests of the ''natural'' lighting system have shown acceptable levels of illumination for the bioreactor screens using only collected sunlight. (2) Flow control inserts have been designed for the CRF-2 screens, which require header pipes for flow distribution and control. A staggered drilled-hole design and a thick shim design have both shown acceptable performance results (little to no clogging, uniform flow, ability to load algae on to the screen). They will both be tested in the CRF-2 to see which performs the best over long durations, and the best performing design will be used for the pilot scale bioreactor screens.

Dr. Gregory Kremer; Dr. David J. Bayless; Dr. Morgan Vis; Dr. Michael Prudich; Dr. Keith Cooksey; Dr. Jeff Muhs

2002-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

335

Use Renewable Energy in Buildings for Greenhouse Gas Mitigation |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Use Renewable Energy in Buildings for Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Use Renewable Energy in Buildings for Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Use Renewable Energy in Buildings for Greenhouse Gas Mitigation October 7, 2013 - 11:13am Addthis After all cost-effective energy efficiency projects have been explored as part of a Federal agency's planning efforts for greenhouse gas (GHG) mitigation in buildings, renewable energy may be considered as an option for meeting the agency's GHG reduction goals. Renewable energy can reduce emissions in all three GHG emission scopes by displacing conventional fossil fuel use. The focus of this guidance is prioritizing on-site renewable energy projects that will best support GHG reduction goals. It is intended to provide a high-level screening approach for on-site renewable energy projects to support agency- or program-level portfolio planning. General

336

Turkey - Analyzing Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Issues | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Turkey - Analyzing Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Issues Turkey - Analyzing Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Issues Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Turkey - Analyzing Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Issues Name Turkey - Analyzing Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Issues Agency/Company /Organization Argonne National Laboratory Partner Turkish Ministry of Energy and Natural Resources, Turkish Electricity Transmission-Generation Company Sector Energy Focus Area Energy Efficiency Topics Background analysis Website http://www.dis.anl.gov/pubs/39 Country Turkey Western Asia References http://www.dis.anl.gov/pubs/39156.pdf Abstract CEEESA trained a team of experts from Turkey's Ministry of Energy and Natural Resources (MENR) and the Turkish Electricity Transmission-Generation Company (TEAS) to use various ENPEP modules. CEEESA trained a team of experts from Turkey's Ministry of Energy and

337

Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Planning for Buildings | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Planning for Buildings Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Planning for Buildings Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Planning for Buildings October 7, 2013 - 10:29am Addthis Energy use in buildings represents the single largest source of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions in the Federal sector. Buildings can contribute to Scope 1 emissions from direct stationary combustion sources; Scope 2 from indirect electricity, heat, or steam purchases; and Scope 3 emissions from transmission and distribution losses. Also see Use Renewable Energy in Buildings for Greenhouse Gas Mitigation. Step 1: Assess Agency Size Changes Step 2: Evaluate Emissions Profile Step 3: Evaluate Reduction Strategies Step 4: Estimate Implementation Costs Step 5: Prioritize Strategies Helpful Data and Tools See GHG planning data and tools for buildings.

338

Thermal Energy Storage for Electricity Peakdemand Mitigation: A Solution in  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Thermal Energy Storage for Electricity Peakdemand Mitigation: A Solution in Thermal Energy Storage for Electricity Peakdemand Mitigation: A Solution in Developing and Developed World Alike Title Thermal Energy Storage for Electricity Peakdemand Mitigation: A Solution in Developing and Developed World Alike Publication Type Conference Proceedings Refereed Designation Refereed LBNL Report Number LBNL-6308E Year of Publication 2013 Authors DeForest, Nicholas, Gonçalo Mendes, Michael Stadler, Wei Feng, Judy Lai, and Chris Marnay Conference Name ECEEE 2013 Summer Study 3-8 June 2013, Belambra Les Criques, France Date Published 06/2013 Conference Location Belambra Les Criques, France Keywords electricity, energy storage, Energy System Planning & Grid Integration, peakdemand mitigation, thermal Abstract In much of the developed world, air-conditioning in buildings is the dominant driver of summer peak electricity

339

Estimate and Analyze Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Strategy Implementation  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Estimate and Analyze Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Strategy Estimate and Analyze Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Strategy Implementation Costs Estimate and Analyze Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Strategy Implementation Costs October 7, 2013 - 10:18am Addthis Analyzing the cost of implementing each greenhouse gas (GHG) mitigation measure provides an important basis for prioritizing different emission reduction strategies. While actual costs should be used when available, this guidance provides cost estimates or considerations for the major emission reduction measures to help agencies estimate costs without perfect information. Cost criteria the agency may consider when prioritizing strategies include: Lifecycle cost Payback Cost effectiveness ($ invested per MTCO2e, metric tonne carbon dioxide equivalent avoided). Implementation costs should be analyzed for each emissions source:

340

Agricultural Technologies for Climate Change Mitigation and Adaptation in  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Agricultural Technologies for Climate Change Mitigation and Adaptation in Agricultural Technologies for Climate Change Mitigation and Adaptation in Developing Countries: Policy Options for Innovations and Technology Diffusion Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Agricultural Technologies for Climate Change Mitigation and Adaptation in Developing Countries: Policy Options for Innovations and Technology Diffusion Agency/Company /Organization: International Centre for Trade and Sustainable Development Sector: Land Focus Area: Agriculture, Biomass Topics: Adaptation, Implementation, Policies/deployment programs Resource Type: Guide/manual, Publications Website: ictsd.org/downloads/2010/06/agricultural-technologies-for-climate-chan Language: English Agricultural Technologies for Climate Change Mitigation and Adaptation in Developing Countries: Policy Options for Innovations and Technology Diffusion Screenshot

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mitigation actions insights" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Carbon Mitigation in Europe Through No-till Farming  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Carbon Mitigation in European Soils Carbon Mitigation in European Soils Preliminary Estimates of the Potential for Carbon Mitigation in European Soils Through No-Till Farming DOI: 10.3334/CDIAC/tcm.003 Global Change Biology 4:679-685 (1998) P. Smith, D. Powlson, M. Glendining, J. Smith School of Biological Sciences University of Aberdeen Cruikshank Building, St Machar Drive Aberdeen, AB24 3UU, UK Sponsor: Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council of the United Kingdom Abstract In this paper we estimate the European potential for carbon mitigation of no-till farming using results from European tillage experiments. Our calculations suggest some potential in terms of (a) reduced agricultural fossil fuel emissions, and (b) increased soil carbon sequestration. We estimate that 100% conversion to no-till farming would be likely to

342

Impacts of greenhouse gas mitigation policies on agricultural land  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions are widely acknowledged to be responsible for much of the global warming in the past century. A number of approaches have been proposed to mitigate GHG emissions. Since the burning of ...

Wang, Xiaodong, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Design of innovative dynamic systems for seismic response mitigation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Rocking wall systems consist of shear walls, laterally connected to a building, that are moment-released in their strong plane. Their purpose is to mitigate seismic structural response by constraining a building primarily ...

Seymour, Douglas (Douglas Benjamin)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Mitigation of Climate Change in Agriculture (MICCA) Project | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Climate Change in Agriculture (MICCA) Project Climate Change in Agriculture (MICCA) Project Jump to: navigation, search Name Mitigation of Climate Change in Agriculture (MICCA) Project Agency/Company /Organization Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations Sector Land Focus Area Agriculture Topics Policies/deployment programs Website http://www.fao.org/climatechan Program Start 2010 References Mitigation of Climate Change in Agriculture (MICCA) Project[1] "The main goal of this project is to support efforts to mitigate climate change through agriculture in developing countries and move towards carbon friendly agricultural practices. The aim of the project is to help realise the substantial mitigation potential of agriculture, especially that of smallholders in developing countries. If the right changes are implemented in production systems,

345

Mitigations for Security Vulnerabilities Found in Control System Networks |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Mitigations for Security Vulnerabilities Found in Control System Mitigations for Security Vulnerabilities Found in Control System Networks Mitigations for Security Vulnerabilities Found in Control System Networks Industry is aware of the need for Control System (CS) security, but in on-site assessments, Idaho National Laboratory (INL) has observed that security procedures and devices are not consistently and effectively implemented. The Department of Homeland Security (DHS), National Cyber Security Division (NCSD), established the Control Systems Security Center (CSSC) at INL to help industry and government improve the security of the CSs used in the nation's critical infrastructures. One of the main CSSC objectives is to identify control system vulnerabilities and develop effective mitigations for them. This paper discusses common problems and vulnerabilities seen in

346

Prioritize Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Strategies for Buildings | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Buildings Buildings Prioritize Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Strategies for Buildings October 7, 2013 - 11:10am Addthis YOU ARE HERE: Step 5 After evaluating the cost to implement energy-savings measures and the greenhouse gas (GHG) reduction potential for buildings, the program or site may prioritize implementation of those measures using criteria of importance to the Federal agency. The Buildings GHG Mitigation Estimator summarizes energy savings and costs by program, site, building type, and mitigation measure. This can help users at different levels of the organization understand where the largest GHG reduction potential lies, and which mitigation measures are most common across programs and sites and then plan investments accordingly. Criteria for prioritization will vary by agency but may include:

347

Northwest Montana Wildlife Mitigation Habitat Protection : Advance Design : Final Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report summarizes the habitat protection process developed to mitigate for certain wildlife and wildlife habitat losses due to construction of Hungry Horse and Libby dams in northwestern Montana.

Wood, Marilyn A.

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

ENHANCED PRACTICAL PHOTOSYNTHETIC CO2 MITIGATION  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This quarterly report documents significant achievements in the Enhanced Practical Photosynthetic CO{sub 2} Mitigation project during the period from 1/03/2001 through 4/02/2001. Many of the activities and accomplishments are continuations of work initiated and reported in last quarter's status report. Major activities and accomplishments for this quarter include: Three sites in Yellowstone National Park have been identified that may contain suitable organisms for use in a bioreactor; Full-scale culturing of one thermophilic organism from Yellowstone has progressed to the point that there is a sufficient quantity to test this organism in the model-scale bioreactor; The effects of the additive monoethanolamine on the growth of one thermophilic organism from Yellowstone has been tested; Testing of growth surface adhesion and properties is continuing; Construction of a larger model-scale bioreactor to improve and expand testing capabilities is completed and the facility is undergoing proof tests; Model-scale bioreactor tests examining the effects of CO{sub 2} concentration levels and lighting levels on organism growth rates are continuing; Alternative fiber optic based deep-penetration light delivery systems for use in the pilot-scale bioreactor have been designed, constructed and tested; An existing slug flow reactor system has been modified for use in this project, and a proof-of-concept test plan has been developed for the slug flow reactor; Research and testing of water-jet harvesting techniques is continuing, and a harvesting system has been designed for use in the model-scale bioreactor; and The investigation of comparative digital image analysis as a means for determining the ''density'' of algae on a growth surface is continuing Plans for next quarter's work and an update on the project's web page are included in the conclusions.

Dr. David J. Bayless; Dr. Morgan Vis; Dr. Gregory Kremer; Dr. Michael Prudich; Dr. Keith Cooksey; Dr. Jeff Muhs

2001-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

349

ENHANCED PRACTICAL PHOTOSYNTHETIC CO2 MITIGATION  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This quarterly report documents significant achievements in the Enhanced Practical Photosynthetic CO{sub 2} Mitigation project during the period from 10/2/2003 through 1/1/2004. As indicated in the list of accomplishments below we have seen very encouraging results from the model scale tests in terms of organism growth rates and we have begun the final tests necessary to meet our project goals. Specific results and accomplishments for the fourth quarter of 2003 include: (1) Bioreactor support systems and test facilities--(A) The solar collector is working well and has survived the winter weather. (B) The improved high-flow CRF-2 test system has been used successfully to run several long-term growth tests with periodic harvesting events. The high flow harvesting system performed well. The mass measurement results after a 4-week test show 275% growth over the initial mass loading. This figure would have been higher had there been no leakage and handling losses. Carbon dating of biomass from this test is planned for carbon uptake estimation. The next test will include direct measurement of carbon uptake in addition to organism mass measurements. (C) Qualitative organism growth testing has begun in the pilot scale bioreactor. Some issues with uniformity of organism loading, fluid leakage and evaporation have surfaced and are currently being addressed, and quantitative testing will begin as soon as these problems are resolved. (2) Organisms and Growth Surfaces--(A) Montana State University (Subcontracted to do organism studies) submitted their final (3-year) project report. An abstract of the report in included in this quarterly report.

Gregory Kremer; David J. Bayless; Morgan Vis; Michael Prudich; Keith Cooksey; Jeff Muhs

2004-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

350

Enhanced Practical Photosynthetic CO2 Mitigation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This quarterly report documents significant achievements in the Enhanced Practical Photosynthetic CO{sub 2} Mitigation project during the period from 7/2/2003 through 10/01/2003. As indicated in the list of accomplishments below we are preparing for the final tests necessary to meet our project goals. Specific results and accomplishments for the third quarter of 2003 include: (1) Bioreactor support systems and test facilities: (A) The solar collector used in the light delivery system showed signs of degradation and hence had to be replaced by ORNL. A set of light readings were taken after the new solar collector was installed. The readings showed an acceptable light profile. (B) The CRF-2 test system has undergone major improvements to produce the high flow rates needed for harvesting (as determined by previous experiments). The main changes to the system are new stainless steel header/frame units with increased flow capacity and a modified pipe end sealing method to improve flow uniformity, and installation and plumbing for a new high flow harvesting pump. The improvements have been completed and the system is ready for testing. (C) The pilot scale bioreactor is ready for testing pending some information from the CRF-2 tests. (2) Organisms and Growth Surfaces: (A) The shape of the Chlorogloeopsis sp. cells (cyanobacteria) was found to be affected by environmental pH, which may be useful in culture quality control. Besides, the further investigation of this phenomenon suggested that the rate of cell adhesion to glass surface decreases upon medium alkalinization. Thus, harvesting effectiveness may be improved by increasing medium pH up to 9 before harvesting of cyanobacteria from a substratum.

Gregory Kremer; David J. Bayless; Morgan Vis; Michael Prudich; Keith Cooksey; Jeff Muhs

2003-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

351

Insider Threat - Material Control and Accountability Mitigation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The technical objectives of nuclear safeguards are (1) the timely detection of diversion of significant quantities of nuclear material from peaceful uses to the manufacture of nuclear weapons or other nuclear explosive devices or for purposes unknown and (2) the deterrence of such diversion by the risk of early detection. The safeguards and security program must address both outsider threats and insider threats. Outsider threats are primarily addressed by the physical protection system. Insider threats can be any level of personnel at the site including passive or active insiders that could attempt protracted or abrupt diversion. This could occur by an individual acting alone or by collusion between an individual with material control and accountability (MC&A) responsibilities and another individual who has responsibility or control within both the physical protection and the MC&A systems. The insider threat is one that must be understood and incorporated into the safeguards posture. There have been more than 18 documented cases of theft or loss of plutonium or highly enriched uranium. The insider has access, authority, and knowledge, as well as a set of attributes, that make him/her difficult to detect. An integrated safeguards program is designed as a defense-in-depth system that seeks to prevent the unauthorized removal of nuclear material, to provide early detection of any unauthorized attempt to remove nuclear material, and to rapidly respond to any attempted removal of nuclear material. The program is also designed to support protection against sabotage, espionage, unauthorized access, compromise, and other hostile acts that may cause unacceptable adverse impacts on national security, program continuity, the health and safety of employees, the public, or the environment. Nuclear MC&A play an essential role in the capabilities of an integrated safeguards system to deter and detect theft or diversion of nuclear material. An integrated safeguards system with compensating mitigation can decrease the risk of an insider performing a malicious act without detection.

Powell, Danny H [ORNL; Elwood Jr, Robert H [ORNL; Roche, Charles T [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Sagging Line Mitigator (SLiM) Full-Scale Demonstration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

High conductor temperature operations cause excessive sag on transmission lines and thus limit ampacity. The Sagging Line Mitigator (SLiM) is a new class of transmission line hardware that fixes this problem in real time. In response to high conductor temperatures, SLiM decreases the effective length of conductor in the span. This mitigates the thermal expansion experienced by the conductor and reduces or eliminates excess sag. In this demonstration study, a preproduction SLiM device reliably reduced exc...

2005-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

353

2011 River Corridor Closure Contractor Revegetation and Mitigation Monitoring Report  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the status of revegetation projects and natural resources mitigation efforts conducted for remediated waste sites and other activities associated with the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 cleanup of National Priorities List waste sites at Hanford. This report contains the vegetation monitoring data that was collected in the spring and summer of 2011 from the River Corridor Closure Contractors revegetation and mitigation areas on the Hanford Site.

West, W. J.; Lucas, J. G.; Gano, K. A.

2011-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

354

2010 River Corridor Closure Contractor Revegetation and Mitigation Monitoring Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents eh status of revegetation projects and natural resources mitigation efforts conducted for remediated waste sites and other activities associated with CERLA cleanup of National Priorities List waste sites at Hanford. This report contains vegetation monitoring data that were collected in the spring and summer of 2010 from the River Corridor Closure Contracts revegetation and mitigation areas on the Hanford Site.

C. T. Lindsey, A. L. Johnson

2010-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

355

Geo-magnetic Disturbances (GMD): Monitoring, Mitigation, and Next Steps  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The North American power grid may be increasingly susceptible to the effects of geo-magnetic disturbances (GMDs) caused by solar storms. Without adequate steps to mitigate these effects, severe GMDs may pose a risk to power system reliability. This report summarizes information that industry experts and North American utilities presented at a recent NERC workshop on GMD mitigation and related GMD topics. It supplements this information with a review of the latest GMD literature to provide an up-to-date s...

2011-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

356

Mitigating Flood Loss through Local Comprehensive Planning in Florida  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Planning researchers believe that property losses from natural hazards, such as floods can be reduced if governments address this issue and adopt appropriate policies in their plans. However, little empirical research has examined the relationship between plan quality and actual property loss from floods. My research addresses this critical gap in the planning and hazard research literature by evaluating the effectiveness of current plans and policies in mitigating property damage from floods. Specifically, this study: 1) assesses the extent to which local comprehensive plans integrate flood mitigation policies in Florida; and 2) it examines the impact of the quality of flood mitigation policies on actual insured flood damages. Study results show that fifty-three local plans in the sample received a mean score for total flood mitigation policy quality of 38.55, which represents 35.69% of the total possible points. These findings indicate that there is still considerable room for improvement by local governments on flooding issues. The scores of local plans varied widely, with coastal communities receiving significantly higher scores than non-coastal communities. While most communities adopted land use management tools, such as permitted land use and wetland permits as primary flood mitigation tools, incentive based tools/taxing tools and acquisition tools were rarely adopted. This study also finds that plan quality associated with flood mitigation policy had little discernible effect on reducing insured flood damage while controlling for biophysical, built environment and socio-economic variables. This result counters the assumption inherent in previous plan quality research that better plans mitigate the adverse effects associated with floods and other natural hazards. There are some possible explanations for this result in terms of plan implementation, land use management paradox and characteristics of insurance policies. The statistical analysis also suggests that insured flood loss is considerably affected by wetland alteration and a community's location on the coast. Another finding indicates that very strong leadership and dam construction are factors in mitigating flood loss.

Kang, Jung Eun

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Northeast Oregon Wildlife Mitigation Project : Final Environmental Assessment.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Development of the hydropower system in the Columbia River Basin has had far-reaching effects on many species of wildlife. The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) is responsible for mitigating the loss of wildlife habitat caused by the Federal portion of this system, as allocated to the purpose of power production. BPA needs to mitigate for loss of wildlife habitat in the Snake River Subbasin.

United States. Bonneville Power Administration; Nez Perce Tribe

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Fundamental limits and insights: from wireless communication to DNA sequencing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fundamental limits and insights: from wireless communicationDavid Aldous Fall 2012 Fundamental limits and insights: fromGuy Bresler Abstract Fundamental limits and insights: from

Bresler, Guy

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Release mitigation spray safety systems for chemical demilitarization applications.  

SciTech Connect

Sandia National Laboratories has conducted proof-of-concept experiments demonstrating effective knockdown and neutralization of aerosolized CBW simulants using charged DF-200 decontaminant sprays. DF-200 is an aqueous decontaminant, developed by Sandia National Laboratories, and procured and fielded by the US Military. Of significance is the potential application of this fundamental technology to numerous applications including mitigation and neutralization of releases arising during chemical demilitarization operations. A release mitigation spray safety system will remove airborne contaminants from an accidental release during operations, to protect personnel and limit contamination. Sandia National Laboratories recently (November, 2008) secured funding from the US Army's Program Manager for Non-Stockpile Chemical Materials Agency (PMNSCMA) to investigate use of mitigation spray systems for chemical demilitarization applications. For non-stockpile processes, mitigation spray systems co-located with the current Explosive Destruction System (EDS) will provide security both as an operational protective measure and in the event of an accidental release. Additionally, 'tented' mitigation spray systems for native or foreign remediation and recovery operations will contain accidental releases arising from removal of underground, unstable CBW munitions. A mitigation spray system for highly controlled stockpile operations will provide defense from accidental spills or leaks during routine procedures.

Leonard, Jonathan; Tezak, Matthew Stephen; Brockmann, John E.; Servantes, Brandon; Sanchez, Andres L.; Tucker, Mark David; Allen, Ashley N.; Wilson, Mollye C.; Lucero, Daniel A.; Betty, Rita G.

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Release mitigation spray safety systems for chemical demilitarization applications.  

SciTech Connect

Sandia National Laboratories has conducted proof-of-concept experiments demonstrating effective knockdown and neutralization of aerosolized CBW simulants using charged DF-200 decontaminant sprays. DF-200 is an aqueous decontaminant, developed by Sandia National Laboratories, and procured and fielded by the US Military. Of significance is the potential application of this fundamental technology to numerous applications including mitigation and neutralization of releases arising during chemical demilitarization operations. A release mitigation spray safety system will remove airborne contaminants from an accidental release during operations, to protect personnel and limit contamination. Sandia National Laboratories recently (November, 2008) secured funding from the US Army's Program Manager for Non-Stockpile Chemical Materials Agency (PMNSCMA) to investigate use of mitigation spray systems for chemical demilitarization applications. For non-stockpile processes, mitigation spray systems co-located with the current Explosive Destruction System (EDS) will provide security both as an operational protective measure and in the event of an accidental release. Additionally, 'tented' mitigation spray systems for native or foreign remediation and recovery operations will contain accidental releases arising from removal of underground, unstable CBW munitions. A mitigation spray system for highly controlled stockpile operations will provide defense from accidental spills or leaks during routine procedures.

Leonard, Jonathan; Tezak, Matthew Stephen; Brockmann, John E.; Servantes, Brandon; Sanchez, Andres L.; Tucker, Mark David; Allen, Ashley N.; Wilson, Mollye C.; Lucero, Daniel A.; Betty, Rita G.

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mitigation actions insights" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Mitigating greenhouse gas emissions: Voluntary reporting  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Voluntary Reporting Program, developed pursuant to Section 1605(b) of the Energy Policy Act of 1992, permits corporations, government agencies, households, and voluntary organizations to report on their emissions of greenhouse gases, and on actions taken that have reduced or avoided emissions or sequestered carbon, to the Energy Information Administration (EIA). This, the second annual report of the Voluntary Reporting Program, describes information provided by the participating organizations on their aggregate emissions and emissions reductions, as well as their emissions reduction or avoidance projects, through 1995. This information has been compiled into a database that includes reports from 142 organizations and descriptions of 967 projects that either reduced greenhouse gas emissions or sequestered carbon. Fifty-one reporters also provided estimates of emissions, and emissions reductions achieved, for their entire organizations. The projects described actions taken to reduce emissions of carbon dioxide from energy production and use; to reduce methane and nitrous oxide emissions from energy use, waste management, and agricultural processes; to reduce emissions of halocarbons, such as CFCs and their replacements; and to increase carbon sequestration.

NONE

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

President Obama presents new Climate Action Plan | OpenEI Community  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

President Obama presents new Climate Action Plan President Obama presents new Climate Action Plan Home > Blogs > Graham7781's blog Graham7781's picture Submitted by Graham7781(1992) Super contributor 27 June, 2013 - 12:39 Climate Action Plan obama OpenEI President President Obama layed out his much anticipated Climate Action Plan tuesday. The President's plan calls for major actions that the administration believes will mitigate the environmental and economic costs of climate change. Obama's six Climate Action Initiatives: 1. Phasing out Fossil Fuels The President stressed the need for higher standards on carbon emissions. The plan will call on the Environmental Protection Agency to work up carbon pollution standards, as well as the Department of Energy to receive up to $8 billion in loan guarantees for a wide array of advanced fossil fuel

363

Power Quality Mitigation Technology Demonstration at Industrial Customer Sites: Industrial and Utility Harmonic Mitigation Guideline s and Case Studies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

However the restructuring of the electric power industry shakes out, the commercial/industrial customer's need for quality power will increase; and customer service will remain a key to retaining current accounts and attracting new customers. The need for demonstrating new harmonics mitigation technologies will thus be an important factor for the wire side of the business as well as for energy service companies. This report provides guidelines for implementing harmonics mitigation demonstration projects ...

2000-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

364

October 2005 Standards Actions  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Standards Actions 1 Standards Actions 1 New Projects and DOE Technical Standards in Revision 1 DOE Technical Standards Posted in RevCom for TSP 1 DOE Technical Standards in Reaffirmation 1 DOE Technical Standards Change Notices 1 DOE Technical Standards Recently Published 1 Non-Government Standards Actions 1 American National Standards Institute (ANSI) 1 American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) 2 ASTM International 2 American Nuclear Society (ANS) 2 American Nuclear Society (ANS) 2 National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) 2 DOE Technical Standards Program

365

Standards Actions, July 2002  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Standards Program Document Status 07-01-2002 Activity Summary In Conversion - 4 In Preparation - 46 Out for Comment - 14 Published this Month - 2 5-year Review Status Revision in Progress - 11 Reaffirmation in Progress - 12 Cancellation Pending - 7 Cancellation in Progress - 1 No Current Action - 19 Inside this issue: DOE Technical Standards Projects Initiated 1 DOE Technical Standards Re- cently Sent for Coordination 1 DOE Technical Standards Re- cently Published 1 American National Standards Institute 2 American Society for Testing and Materials International 4 Visit the Technical Standards Program Web Site at http://tis.eh.doe.gov/techstds/. Standards Actions- July 2002 Standards Actions DOE Technical Standards Projects Initiated

366

Corrective Action Glossary  

SciTech Connect

The glossary of technical terms was prepared to facilitate the use of the Corrective Action Plan (CAP) issued by OSWER on November 14, 1986. The CAP presents model scopes of work for all phases of a corrective action program, including the RCRA Facility Investigation (RFI), Corrective Measures Study (CMS), Corrective Measures Implementation (CMI), and interim measures. The Corrective Action Glossary includes brief definitions of the technical terms used in the CAP and explains how they are used. In addition, expected ranges (where applicable) are provided. Parameters or terms not discussed in the CAP, but commonly associated with site investigations or remediations are also included.

Not Available

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

May 2007 Standards Actions  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Technical Technical Standards in Revision 1 DOE Technical Standards Posted in RevCom for TSP 1 DOE Technical Standards in Reaffirmation 1 DOE Technical Standards Change Notices 1 DOE Technical Standards Published 1 Non-Government Standards Actions 2

368

Climate Action Plan (Maine)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

In June 2003, the Maine State Legislature passed a bill charging the Department of Environmental Protection (DEP) with developing an action plan with the goal of reducing greenhouse gas (GHG)...

369

Climate Action Plan (Delaware)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Delaware Climate Change Action Plan (DCCAP) was prepared with funding from the Delaware State Energy Office and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agencys State and Local Climate Change Program...

370

Climate Action Plan (Maryland)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

On April 20, 2007, Governor Martin OMalley signed Executive Order 01.01.2007.07 establishing the Maryland Climate Change Commission (MCCC) charged with collectively developing an action plan to...

371

Interim Action Determination  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Interim Action Determination Interim Action Determination Processing of Plutonium Materials from the DOE Standard 3013 Surveillance Program in H-Canyon at the Savannah River Site The Department of Energy (DOE) is preparing the Surplus Plutonium Disposition Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement (SPD SEIS, DOE/EIS-0283-S2). DOE is evaluating alternatives for disposition of non-pit plutonium that is surplus to the national

372

ENHANCED PRACTICAL PHOTOSYNTHETIC CO2 MITIGATION  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This quarterly report documents significant achievements in the Enhanced Practical Photosynthetic CO{sub 2} Mitigation project during the period from 10/3/2001 through 1/02/2002. Most of the achievements are milestones in our efforts to complete the tasks and subtasks that constitute the project objectives. Our research team has made significant progress towards completion of our Phase I objectives, and our current efforts remain focused on fulfilling these research objectives in accordance with the project timeline. Overall, we believe that we are on schedule to complete Phase I activities by 10/2002, which is the milestone date from the original project timeline. Specific results and accomplishments for the fourth quarter of 2001 include: (1) New procedures and protocols have been developed to increase the chances of successful implementation in the bioreactor of organisms that perform well in the lab. The new procedures include pre-screening of organisms for adhesion characteristics and a focus on identifying the organisms with maximum growth rate potential. (2) Preliminary results show an increase in adhesion to glass and a decrease in overall growth rates when using growth media prepared with tap water rather than distilled water. (3) Several of the organisms collected from Yellowstone National Park using the new procedures are currently being cultured in preparation for bioreactor tests. (4) One important result from a test of growth surface temperature distribution as a function of gas stream and drip-fluid temperatures showed a high dependence of membrane temperature on fluid temperature, with gas stream temperature having minimal effect. This result indicates that bioreactor growth surface temperatures can be controlled using fluid delivery temperature. The possible implications for implementation of the bioreactor concept are encouraging, since it may be possible to use the bioreactor with very high gas stream temperatures by controlling the temperature of the organisms with the fluid temperature. (5) Investigation of growth surface materials continues, with Omnisil and Scotch Brite emerging as the leading candidates. More investigation of these and other material types is still needed to determine the best material for particular combinations of organisms and harvesting methods. (6) Tests of harvesting methods and harvesting system designs have shown that desirable levels of ''percentage algae removal'' can be achieved for particular organisms and growth surface materials, for example Cyanidium on polyester felt. Additional testing continues to better characterize sensitivity of the ''percentage removal'' to various system design parameters, but these tests have been delayed due to the lack of suitable organisms for the tests. (7) The solar collectors and the pilot-scale bioreactor light distribution panels for the deep-penetration hybrid solar lighting system have been designed. One solar lighting system (solar collector tracking unit, fiber optic light transmission cables, light distribution panels) is almost completely prepared for installation during the next quarter in the pilot scale bioreactor system. (8) Pressure drop results from tests on the enhanced mass transfer CO{sub 2} absorption technique (the translating slug flow reactor) are encouraging, with reasonable values of 2.5 psi maximum over an 11.48 meter distance between pressure taps for test conditions of 0.6 m/sec slug velocity and approximately 10 m/sec gas velocity. Preparations are under way for CO{sub 2} scrubbing tests.

Dr. Gregory Kremer; Dr. David J. Bayless; Dr. Morgan Vis; Dr. Michael Prudich; Dr. Keith Cooksey; Dr. Jeff Muhs

2002-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

373

Enhanced Practical Photosynthetic CO2 Mitigation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This quarterly report documents significant achievements in the Enhanced Practical Photosynthetic CO{sub 2} Mitigation project during the period from 4/2/2003 through 7/01/2003. As indicated in the list of accomplishments below we have completed some long-term model scale bioreactor tests and are prepared to begin pilot scale bioreactor testing. Specific results and accomplishments for the second quarter of 2003 include: (1) Bioreactor support systems and test facilities: (a) Qualitative long-term survivability tests for S.C.1.2(2) on Omnisil have been successfully completed and results demonstrate a growth rate that appears to be acceptable. (b) Quantitative tests of long-term growth productivity for S.C.1.2(2) on Omnisil have been completed and initial results are promising. Initial results show that the mass of organisms doubled (from 54.9 grams to 109.8 grams) in about 5 weeks. Full results will be available as soon as all membranes and filters are completely dried. The growth rate should increase significantly with the initiation of weekly harvesting during the long term tests. (c) The phase 1 construction of the pilot scale bioreactor has been completed, including the solar collector and light distribution system. We are now in the phase of system improvement as we wait for CRF-2 results in order to be able to finalize the design and construction of the pilot scale system. (d) A mass transfer experimental setup was constructed in order to measure the mass transfer rate from the gas to the liquid film flowing over a membrane and to study the hydrodynamics of the liquid film flowing over a membrane in the bioreactor. Results were reported for mass transfer coefficient, film thickness, and fluid velocity over an Omnisil membrane with a ''drilled hole'' header pipe design. (2) Organisms and Growth Surfaces: (a) A selectivity approach was used to obtain a cyanobacterial culture with elevated resistance to acid pH. Microlonies of ''3.2.2 S.C.1 Positive'' migrated towards light along a light gradient, and against acid gradient, in whole. Nonetheless, some microcolonies were able to generate ''secondary'' microcolonies with increased ability to move towards acid area. These microcolonies with elevated resistance to acidity have been isolated and inoculated in BG-11 with pH 6. They are still under incubation. (b) We have continued our work on the genotyping of unialgal cyanobacterial cultures isolated in YNP. Because partial sequence of 16S rRNA gene of the isolate 5.2 S.C.1 did not appear to be more than 93% identical to published cyanobacterial sequences, we carried out entire sequence of this gene using the combination of different primers. It appears that we have found a representative of putative new genus. We expect to publish all sequences. (c) The new species (even probably new genus) of cyanobacteria, 5.2 s. c. 1 that was isolated from La Duke Spring in Great Yellowstone Basin demonstrate an elevated resistance to some compounds of iron. This might be very important for our project, because plant gases may have elevated amount of iron. Our study of the effect of different concentration of FeCl3 6H2O on the growth of 5.2 S.C.1 isolate showed that iron additions stimulated rather then inhibited the growth of 5.2. S.C.1 isolate. Because of this we would recommend this isolate for further experiments.

Gregory Kremer; David J. Bayless; Morgan Vis; Michael Prudich; Keith Cooksey; Jeff Muhs

2003-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

374

ENHANCED PRACTICAL PHOTOSYNTHETIC CO2 MITIGATION  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This quarterly report documents significant achievements in the Enhanced Practical Photosynthetic CO{sub 2} Mitigation project during the period from 1/3/2001 through 4/02/2002. Most of the achievements are milestones in our efforts to complete the tasks and subtasks that constitute the project objectives, and we are currently on schedule to complete Phase I activities by 10/2002, the milestone date from the original project timeline. As indicated in the list of accomplishments below, we are continuing to evaluate candidate organisms and growth surfaces, and we are expanding the test facilities in preparation for scaled up system-level testing. Specific results and accomplishments for the first quarter of 2002 include: Organisms and Growth Surfaces: (1) Isolate 1.2 s.c. (2) has been selected for further investigations because of its favorable growth properties. (2) Research on optimal conditions for the growth of cyanobacterial isolates from YNP should be carried out using distilled water which has more stable chemical parameters, although tap water use may be permissible during full scale operations (at the cost of longer organism doubling times). (3) Tr. 9.4 WF is able to generate a biofilm on an Omnisil surface. Over the long term Omnisil does not inhibit the growth of TR 9.4 isolate, though it does elongate the lag phase of growth of this isolate. (4) Initial survivability tests for the TR 9.4 organism on Omnisil screens in the CRF2 modelscale bioreactor are underway. We have experienced problems keeping the organisms alive for more than three days, but we are currently investigating several possible causes for this unexpected result. (5) Accelerated materials testing have shown that Omnisil fabric has acceptable strength properties for use in a practical bioreactor system. Bioreactor support systems and test facilities: (1) Several CO{sub 2} scrubbing experiments have been completed in the translating slug flow test system, however the error introduced by the original process for measuring CO{sub 2} concentration in the solution was so big that the resulting data was unreasonable. A new sampling method to prevent degassing of the liquid sample is being implemented, and a new set of tests has been scheduled for the week of 4/15/2002. (2) Qualitative harvesting tests of TR 9.4 on Omnisil have been completed but the results are inconclusive. Very little harvesting effect was observed with the current harvesting system design, but the results were greatly impacted by the minimal amount of organism growth on the screens at the time of the harvesting tests. Measures are being taken to extend the colonization time to achieve a screen loading condition that represents a more realistic harvesting condition, and additional tests will be run in the near future with these screens. (3) Significant work has been completed in the design of a new up-flow bioreactor test facility, using a vertical flow as expected in practical applications as opposed to the horizontal flow used for convenience in our current CRF test systems. (4) A reasonably priced location has been selected for the pilot scale bioreactor system, and construction can now proceed in order to prepare for the installation of the solar collectors and the bioreactor.

Dr. Gregory Kremer; Dr. David J. Bayless; Dr. Morgan Vis; Dr. Michael Prudich; Dr. Keith Cooksey; Dr. Jeff Muhs

2002-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

375

ENHANCED PRACTICAL PHOTOSYNTHETIC CO2 MITIGATION  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This quarterly report documents significant achievements in the Enhanced Practical Photosynthetic CO{sub 2} Mitigation project during the period from 4/2/2001 through 7/01/2002. Most of the achievements are milestones in our efforts to complete the tasks and subtasks that constitute the project objectives, and we are currently on schedule to complete Phase I activities by 10/2002, the milestone date from the original project timeline. As indicated in the list of accomplishments below, our efforts are focused on improving the design of the bioreactor test system, evaluating candidate organisms and growth surfaces, and scaling-up the test facilities from bench scale to pilot scale. Specific results and accomplishments for the second quarter of 2002 include: Organisms and Growth Surfaces: (1) Our collection of cyanobacteria, isolated in YNP was increased to 15 unialgal cultures. (2) Illumination rate about 50 {micro}E/m{sup 2}/sec is not saturated for the growth of 1.2 s.c. (2) isolate. The decrease of illumination rate led to the decrease of doubling time of this isolate. (3) The positive effect of Ca{sup 2+} on the growth of isolate 1.2 s.c. (2) without Omnisil was revealed, though Ca{sup 2+} addition was indifferent for the growth of this isolate at the presence of Omnisil. (4) Calcium addition had a positive effect on the generation of cyanobacterial biofilm on Omnisil surface. (5) The survivability problems with the Tr9.4 organism on Omnisil screens in the CRF2 model-scale bioreactor have been solved. The problems were related to the method used to populate the growth surfaces. When pre-populated screens were placed in the bioreactor the microalgae died within 72 hours, but when the microalgae were cultured while in place in the bioreactor using a continuous-population method they grew well inside of the CRF2 test system and survived for the full 7-day test duration. CRF2 tests will continue as soon as the new combined drip system/harvesting system header pipe design is refined. Bioreactor support systems and test facilities: (1) A solar collector, fiber optic light cables, and 8 light distribution panels have been installed at the pilot-scale bioreactor site. The ''natural'' lighting system is ready for the pilot-scale bioreactor system-level debugging tests scheduled for early to mid July. (2) CO{sub 2} scrubbing tests were carried out to understand the CO{sub 2} scrubbing capability of translating slug flow under various conditions. Within experimental error, for liquid velocities of 0.6 m/s and 1m/s it was shown that different gas velocities (including 4.8, 6.6 and 9m/s) cause no significant change in CO{sub 2} concentration. (3) The harvesting tests were put on hold while an alternative loading method was developed and to concentrate our resources on the design of the new combined drip system/harvesting system header pipe. A new header pipe design has been completed and proof-of-concept tests have shown good performance in the drip loading mode. Tests have also shown that we can create preferable conditions for harvesting with this design, and actual harvesting tests will be run as soon as screens are available that have achieved a sufficiently ''thick'' growth state such that harvesting is desired.

Dr. Gregory Kremer; Dr. David J. Bayless; Dr. Morgan Vis; Dr. Michael Prudich; Dr. Keith Cooksey; Dr. Jeff Muhs

2002-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

376

ENHANCED PRACTICAL PHOTOSYNTHETIC CO2 MITIGATION  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report documents significant achievements in the Enhanced Practical Photosynthetic CO{sub 2} Mitigation project during the period from 10/03/2000 through 10/02/2001. Most of the achievements are milestones in our efforts to complete the tasks and subtasks that constitute the project objectives. This is the fourth quarterly report for this project, so it also serves as a year-1 project review. We have made significant progress on our Phase I objectives, and our current efforts are focused on fulfilling these research objectives ''on time'' relative to the project timeline. Overall, we believe that we are on schedule to complete Phase I activities by 10/2002, which is the milestone date from the original project timeline. Our results to date concerning the individual factors which have the most significant effect on CO{sub 2} uptake are inconclusive, but we have gathered useful information about the effects of lighting, temperature and CO{sub 2} concentration on one particular organism (Nostoc) and significant progress has been made in identifying other organisms that are more suitable for use in the bioreactor due to their better tolerance for the high temperatures likely to be encountered in the flue gas stream. Our current tests are focused on one such thermophilic organism (Cyanidium), and an enlarged bioreactor system (CRF-2) has been prepared for testing this organism. Tests on the enhanced mass transfer CO{sub 2} absorption technique are underway and useful information is currently being collected concerning pressure drop. The solar collectors for the deep-penetration hybrid solar lighting system have been designed and a single solar collector tracking unit is being prepared for installation in the pilot scale bioreactor system currently under construction. Much progress has been made in designing the fiber optic light delivery system, but final selection of the ''optimum'' delivery system design depends on many factors, most significantly the configuration and orientation of the growth surfaces in the bioreactor. For the growth surface subsystem we have identified advantages and disadvantages for several candidate growth surface materials, we have built and tested various ''screen'' systems and fluid delivery systems, and we continue to test compatibility of the candidate materials with the organisms and with the moisture delivery and harvesting system designs. These tests will be ongoing until an ''optimum'' combination of growth surface material/organism type/harvesting system is identified. For the harvesting system, a nozzle-based water jet system has been shown to be effective, but it has disadvantages for the overall system design in terms of space utilization. A streamlined and integrated screen wetting/harvesting system design is currently under development and will be the focus of harvesting system tests in the foreseeable future. This report addresses each of the key project tasks as defined in the statement of work, giving both a summary of key accomplishments over the past year and a plan for future work.

Dr. Gregory Kremer; Dr. David J. Bayless; Dr. Morgan Vis; Dr. Michael Prudich; Dr. Keith Cooksey; Dr. Jeff Muhs

2001-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

377

Property:NEPA Resource Imposed Mitigation | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Imposed Mitigation Imposed Mitigation Jump to: navigation, search Property Name NEPA Resource Imposed Mitigation Property Type Text Description Agency imposed mitigation plan to minimize the risk of a potential negative impact to a NEPA resource with a geothermal development effort. Pages using the property "NEPA Resource Imposed Mitigation" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) B BLM-NV-WN-ES-08-01-1310, NV-020-08-01#NEPAImpact_with_Migratory_Birds + Initial ground disturbing activities would not be conducted during the migratory bird nesting season (March through July) unless necessary, and then only after inventories for migratory birds and nests were conducted by a qualified biologist acceptable to the BLM. This survey would be conducted to identify either breeding adult birds or nest sites within the specific areas to be disturbed. If active nests are present within these areas to be disturbed, NGP would coordinate with the authorized officer to develop appropriate protection measures for these sites, which may include avoidance, construction constraints, and/or the establishment of buffers.

378

Staff policy regarding mitigation of school enrollment impacts  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Testimony in recent geothermal power plant siting cases in the Geysers-Calistoga KGRA has established that nine local school districts have reached or exceeded the design which induces immigration into these impacted districts will aggravate the situation. Several power plant applicants have agreed to provide annual mitigation payments to local school districts which can document adverse student enrollment impacts. The Lake County agreements with Occidental Geothermal, Inc. and the California Department of Water Resources require mitigation fees for students having at least one parent who either works directly with the power plant or works indirectly with the geothermal-service industry. An adjustment is made each year so that the applicant only pays a one-time fee for each student. An annual student survey is used to help identify students qualifying for mitigation payments. This paper presents an algorithms which CEC staff will propose to be used in the event that a power plant applicant and an impacted school district are unable to negotiate a mitigation agreement. The algorithm provides a basis for calculating an annual mitigation payment which would be used to help construct new permanent facilities and to purchase additional school buses.

Williams, D.S.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Climate Action Plan (North Carolina)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The North Carolina Department of Environmental and Natural Resources (DENR) has established a priority in the 2009 - 2013 Strategic Plan to respond to climate change using both mitigation and...

380

Transformational Energy Action Management (TEAM) Wireless Energy Efficiency Keys Initiative  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

by by Transformational Energy Action Management (TEAM) Wireless Energy Efficiency Keys Initiative *Ways of Using Wireless Technology to Help You Reduce Energy Usage at your Facility Together with our industry partners, we strive to: * Accelerate adoption of the many energy-efficient technologies and practices available today * Conduct vigorous technology innovation to radically improve future energy diversity, resource efficiency, and carbon mitigation * Promote a corporate culture of energy efficiency and carbon management What Is the Industrial Technologies Program ? The Industrial Technologies Program (ITP) is the lead federal agency responsible for improving energy efficiency in the largest energy-using sector of the country. Industrial Sector National Initiative

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mitigation actions insights" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Rainwater Wildlife Area Management Plan Executive Summary : A Columbia Basin Wildlife Mitigation Project.  

SciTech Connect

This Executive Summary provides an overview of the Draft Rainwater Wildlife Area Management Plan. The comprehensive plan can be viewed on the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR) website at: www.umatilla.nsn.us or requested in hard copy from the CTUIR at the address below. The wildlife area was established in September 1998 when the CTUIR purchased the Rainwater Ranch through Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) for purposes of fish and wildlife mitigation for the McNary and John Day dams. The Management Plan has been developed under a standardized planning process developed by BPA for Columbia River Basin Wildlife Mitigation Projects (See Guiding Policies Section below). The plan outlines the framework for managing the project area, provides an assessment of existing conditions and key resource issues, and presents an array of habitat management and enhancement strategies. The plan culminates into a 5-Year Action Plan that will focus management actions and prioritize funding during the 2002-2006 planning period. Since acquisition of the property in late 1998, the CTUIR has conducted an extensive baseline resource assessment in preparation for the management plan, initiated habitat restoration in the Griffin Fork drainage to address road-related resource damage caused by roads constructed for forest practices and an extensive flood event in 1996, and initiated infrastructure developments associated with the Access and Travel Management Plan (i.e., installed parking areas, gates, and public information signs). In addition to these efforts, the CTUIR has worked to set up a long-term funding mechanism with BPA through the NPPC Fish and Wildlife Program. The CTUIR has also continued to coordinate closely with local and state government organizations to ensure consistency with local land use laws and maintain open lines of communication regarding important issues such as big game hunting, tribal member exercise of treaty rights, and public access. During the past two years, non-Indian public concern over big game hunting issues has at times overwhelmed other issues related to the wildlife area. In 2001, the CTUIR Fish and Wildlife Committee closed the wildlife area to tribal branch antlered bull elk harvest in response to harvest data that indicated harvest rates were greater than expected. In addition, illegal harvest of mature bull elk in southeastern Washington during the 2001 season exceeded the legal tribal and nontribal harvest combined which has created a potential significant regression in the bull;cow ratio in the Blue Mountain Elk herd. CTUIR Fish and Wildlife Committee and staff and Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife Regional Director and staff have been coordinating regularly to develop strategies to address harvest rates and ensure protection of viable big game herds in southeastern Washington. The CTUIR Fish and Wildlife Committee and WDFW has jointly agreed to continue close coordination on this and other issues and continue working together to ensure the long-term vigor of the elk herd on the Rainwater Wildlife Area. The purpose of the project is to protect, enhance, and mitigate fish and wildlife resources impacted by Columbia River Basin hydroelectric development. The effort is one of several wildlife mitigation projects in the region developed to compensate for terrestrial habitat losses resulting from the construction of McNary and John Day Hydroelectric facilities located on the mainstem Columbia River. While this project is driven primarily by the purpose and need to mitigate for wildlife habitat losses, it is also recognized that management strategies will also benefit many other non-target fish and wildlife species and associated natural resources.

Childs, Allen B.

2002-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Establish Building Locations for Greenhouse Gas Mitigation | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Establish Building Locations for Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Establish Building Locations for Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Establish Building Locations for Greenhouse Gas Mitigation October 7, 2013 - 10:53am Addthis YOU ARE HERE Step 2 After estimating greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions by building type, building location is an important consideration in evaluating the relevance of energy-saving strategies due to variations in heating and cooling needs, and the GHG reduction potential due to variability of emissions factors across regions of the grid. If site-level energy use estimates are available for each of the program's key building types, the program can identify building locations with the greatest emission reduction potential by using the benchmarking approach. Locations with the worst energy performance relative to the benchmark are

383

Bringing a Range of Supported Mitigation Activities in Selected Countries  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Bringing a Range of Supported Mitigation Activities in Selected Countries Bringing a Range of Supported Mitigation Activities in Selected Countries to the Next Level Jump to: navigation, search Name Bringing a Range of Supported Mitigation Activities in Selected Countries to the Next Level Agency/Company /Organization Energy Research Centre of the Netherlands (ECN), Ecofys Sector Climate Focus Area Renewable Energy, Agriculture, People and Policy Topics Low emission development planning, Policies/deployment programs Website http://www.ecn.nl/docs/library Program Start 2011 Program End 2014 Country Chile, Indonesia, Kenya, Peru, Tunisia South America, South-Eastern Asia, Eastern Africa, South America, Northern Africa References ECN[1] Ecofys[2] Program Overview This project runs from March 2012 to December 2014, and is a collaboration

384

Prioritize Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Strategies Using Renewable Energy in  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Prioritize Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Strategies Using Renewable Prioritize Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Strategies Using Renewable Energy in Buildings Prioritize Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Strategies Using Renewable Energy in Buildings October 7, 2013 - 11:27am Addthis At this point in the analysis for using renewable energy in buildings, after estimating costs to implement strategies, there should be a list of sites and promising renewable energy technologies. The next step in the analysis is to prioritize those sites and technologies to achieve cost-effective reductions in greenhouse (GHG) emissions. In prioritizing the locations for cost-effective renewable energy project development, start with the sites that have the: Best resources Best financial incentives Highest energy rates. These factors are the most important for determining the economic viability

385

Integrating Sub-national Actors into National Mitigation Strategies Through  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Integrating Sub-national Actors into National Mitigation Strategies Through Integrating Sub-national Actors into National Mitigation Strategies Through Vertically Integrated NAMAs (V-NAMAs) Jump to: navigation, search Name Integrating Sub-national Actors into National Mitigation Strategies Through Vertically Integrated NAMAs (V-NAMAs) Agency/Company /Organization Deutsche Gesellschaft für Internationale Zusammenarbeit (GIZ) GmbH Sector Climate Focus Area Renewable Energy Topics Low emission development planning, -LEDS, -NAMA Program Start 2011 Program End 2014 Country Indonesia, South Africa South-Eastern Asia, Southern Africa References Deutsche Gesellschaft für Internationale Zusammenarbeit (GIZ)[1] Program Overview Many future NAMAs will only be successful to the extent that the sub-national players who also carry responsibility - such as provinces

386

Korea's Green Growth Strategy: Mitigating Climate Change and Developing New  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Korea's Green Growth Strategy: Mitigating Climate Change and Developing New Korea's Green Growth Strategy: Mitigating Climate Change and Developing New Growth Engines Jump to: navigation, search Name Korea's Green Growth Strategy: Mitigating Climate Change and Developing New Growth Engines Agency/Company /Organization Organisation for Economic Co-Operation and Development Topics Policies/deployment programs, Pathways analysis, Background analysis Resource Type Publications, Guide/manual Website http://www.oecd.org/officialdo Country South Korea UN Region Eastern Asia References Korea's Green Growth Strategy[1] Overview "Korea's greenhouse gas emissions almost doubled between 1990 and 2005, the highest growth rate in the OECD area. Korea recently set a target of reducing emissions by 30% by 2020 relative to a "business as usual"

387

Development based climate change adaptation and mitigation-conceptual  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Development based climate change adaptation and mitigation-conceptual Development based climate change adaptation and mitigation-conceptual issues and lessons learned in studies in developing countries Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Development based climate change adaptation and mitigation-conceptual issues and lessons learned in studies in developing countries Agency/Company /Organization: Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) Sector: Climate, Energy, Land, Water Topics: Adaptation, Co-benefits assessment, - Energy Access, - Energy Security, - Health Resource Type: Case studies/examples, Lessons learned/best practices, Publications Website: ies.lbl.gov/iespubs/2halsaes.pdf Country: India, China, South Africa, Brazil, Bangladesh, Senegal Cost: Free Southern Asia, Eastern Asia, Southern Africa, South America, Southern Asia, Western Africa

388

China-Transportation Demand Management in Beijing: Mitigation of Emissions  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

China-Transportation Demand Management in Beijing: Mitigation of Emissions China-Transportation Demand Management in Beijing: Mitigation of Emissions in Urban Transport Jump to: navigation, search Name Transportation Demand Management in Beijing - Mitigation of emissions in urban transport Agency/Company /Organization Deutsche Gesellschaft für Internationale Zusammenarbeit (GIZ) GmbH Sector Climate Focus Area Transportation Topics Low emission development planning, -LEDS, -NAMA Website http://www.tdm-beijing.org/ Program Start 2011 Program End 2014 Country China Eastern Asia References Transport Management in Beijing[1] Program Overview The project aims to improve transport demand management (TDM) in Beijing in order to manage the steadily increasing traffic density. The project provides capacity building for decision-makers and transport planners in

389

NETL: Gasification Systems - Mitigation of Syngas Cooler Plugging and  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mitigation of Syngas Cooler Plugging and Fouling Mitigation of Syngas Cooler Plugging and Fouling Project No.: DE-FE0007952 Reaction Engineering International (REI) is working to develop practical solutions to mitigate the plugging and fouling of syngas coolers (SC) - fire tube heat exchangers located between the coal gasifier and the combustion turbine. Syngas coolers used in Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) plants offer high efficiency, but their reliability is generally lower than other process equipment in the gasification island. The principle downtime events associated with syngas coolers are typically a result of ash deposits that: form on (wall) surfaces upstream of the syngas cooler, break loose, and then lodge in the tubes; or form on the fireside surface of the syngas cooler tubes that lead to fouling and reduced heat transfer. Both ash deposit mechanisms result in reduced equipment life and increased maintenance costs.

390

Transportation Demand Management in Beijing - Mitigation of emissions in  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Beijing - Mitigation of emissions in Beijing - Mitigation of emissions in urban transport Jump to: navigation, search Name Transportation Demand Management in Beijing - Mitigation of emissions in urban transport Agency/Company /Organization Deutsche Gesellschaft für Internationale Zusammenarbeit (GIZ) GmbH Sector Climate Focus Area Transportation Topics Low emission development planning, -LEDS, -NAMA Website http://www.tdm-beijing.org/ Program Start 2011 Program End 2014 Country China Eastern Asia References Transport Management in Beijing[1] Program Overview The project aims to improve transport demand management (TDM) in Beijing in order to manage the steadily increasing traffic density. The project provides capacity building for decision-makers and transport planners in Beijing to enable them to calculate baselines and assess reduction

391

Financing Global Climate Change Mitigation | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Financing Global Climate Change Mitigation Financing Global Climate Change Mitigation Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Financing Global Climate Change Mitigation Agency/Company /Organization: United Nations Economic Commission for Europe Sector: Energy Focus Area: Energy Efficiency, Renewable Energy Topics: Finance Resource Type: Publications, Guide/manual Website: www.unece.org/energy/se/pdfs/gee21/gee21_pub/GEE21_GlobalClimateChange UN Region: "Western & Eastern Europe" is not in the list of possible values (Eastern Africa, Middle Africa, Northern Africa, Southern Africa, Western Africa, Caribbean, Central America, South America, Northern America, Central Asia, Eastern Asia, Southern Asia, South-Eastern Asia, Western Asia, Eastern Europe, Northern Europe, Southern Europe, Western Europe, Australia and New Zealand, Melanesia, Micronesia, Polynesia, Latin America and the Caribbean) for this property.

392

Relative outcomes of climate change mitigation related to global  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Relative outcomes of climate change mitigation related to global Relative outcomes of climate change mitigation related to global temperature versus sea-level rise Submitted by mkaczmar on February 8, 2013 - 15:19 Authors: Gerald A. Meehl, Aixue Hu, Claudia Tebaldi, Julie M. Arblaster, Warren M. Washington, Haiyan Teng, Benjamin M. Sanderson, Toby Ault, Warren G. Strand & James B. White III There is a common perception that, if human societies make the significant adjustments necessary to substantively cut emissions of greenhouse gases, global temperature increases could be stabilized, and the most dangerous consequences of climate change could be avoided. Here we show results from global coupled climate model simulations with the new representative concentration pathway mitigation scenarios to 2300 to illustrate that, with

393

Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Planning for Employee Commuting | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Planning for Employee Commuting Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Planning for Employee Commuting Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Planning for Employee Commuting October 7, 2013 - 1:39pm Addthis Employee commuting is the single largest source of Scope 3 greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions accounted for by Federal agencies. The establishment of Federal telework and transportation coordination programs over the past decade creates a strong foundation for commute behavior change. However few agencies have achieved substantial commuting emissions reductions from their fiscal year 2008 baseline inventories. Effective planning for aggressive commute reductions starts with the location of agency facilities. Facility siting and design decisions should be made with public transportation access in mind to make it easier for

394

Hungry Horse Mitigation; Flathead Lake, 2001-2002 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes (CSKT) and Montana Fish Wildlife and Parks (MFWP) wrote ''Fisheries Mitigation Plan for Losses Attributable to the Construction and Operation of Hungry Horse Dam'' in March 1991 to define the fisheries losses, mitigation alternatives and recommendations to protect, mitigate and enhance resident fish and aquatic habitat affected by Hungry Horse Dam. On November 12, 1991, the Northwest Power Planning Council (NPPC) approved the mitigation plan with minor modifications, called for a detailed implementation plan, and amended measures 903(h)(1) through (7). A long-term mitigation plan was submitted in August 1992, was approved by the Council in 1993, and the first contract for this project was signed on November 11, 1993. The problem this project addresses is the loss of habitat, both in quality and quantity, in the interconnected Flathead Lake and River basin resulting from the construction and operation of Hungry Horse Dam. The purpose of the project is to both implement mitigation measures and monitor the biological responses to those measures including those implemented by Project Numbers 9101903 and 9101904. Goals and objectives of the 1994 Fish and Wildlife Program (Section 10.1) addressed by this project are the rebuilding to sustainable levels weak, but recoverable, native populations injured by the hydropower system. The project mitigates the blockage of spawning runs by Hungry Horse Dam by restoring and even creating spawning habitats within direct drainages to Flathead Lake. The project also addresses the altered habitat within Flathead Lake resulting from species shifts and consequent dominance of new species that restricts the potential success of mitigation measures. Specific goals of this project are to create and restore habitat and quantitatively monitor changes in fish populations to verify the efficacy of our mitigation measures. The project consists of three components: monitoring, restoration and research. Monitoring, for example, includes a spring gillnetting series conducted annually in Flathead Lake and builds on an existing data set initiated in 1981. Monitoring of the experimental kokanee reintroduction was a primary activity of this project between 1992 and 1997. Lake trout, whose high densities have precluded successful mitigation of losses of other species in Flathead Lake, have been monitored since 1996 to measure several biological parameters. Results of this work have utility in determining the population status of this key predator in Flathead Lake. The project has also defined the baseline condition of the Flathead Lake fishery in 1992-1993 and has conducted annual lakewide surveys since 1998. The restoration component of the project has addressed several stream channel, riparian, and fish passage problems. The research component of the project began in FY 2000 and measured trophic linkages between M. relicta and other species to assist in predicting the results of potential mitigation strategies. Only Objective 1 in the workplan is funded entirely by Hungry Horse Mitigation funds. Additional funds are drawn from other sources to assist in completion of Objectives 2-6.

Hansen, Barry (Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes of the Flathead Nation, Pablo, MT)

2003-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

395

Estimating Mitigation Potential of Agricultural Projects: an Application of  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Estimating Mitigation Potential of Agricultural Projects: an Application of Estimating Mitigation Potential of Agricultural Projects: an Application of the EX-Ante Carbon-balance Tool (EX-ACT) Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Brazil-Estimating Mitigation Potential of Agricultural Projects: an Application of the EX-Ante Carbon-balance Tool (EX-ACT) Agency/Company /Organization: Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations Sector: Energy, Land Focus Area: Agriculture Topics: Co-benefits assessment, GHG inventory, Implementation, Policies/deployment programs Resource Type: Publications, Software/modeling tools User Interface: Spreadsheet Website: www.fao.org/tc/exact/ex-act-tool/en/ Country: Brazil RelatedTo: Ex Ante Appraisal Carbon-Balance Tool (EX-ACT) Cost: Free South America Coordinates: -14.235004°, -51.92528°

396

Estimate Costs to Implement Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Strategies Using  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Costs to Implement Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Strategies Costs to Implement Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Strategies Using Renewable Energy in Buildings Estimate Costs to Implement Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Strategies Using Renewable Energy in Buildings October 7, 2013 - 11:25am Addthis After determining the best greenhouse gas (GHG) reduction strategies using renewable energy, a Federal agency should estimate the cost of implementing them in a building or buildings. There are several cost factors that need to be considered when developing a renewable energy project. Capital costs, fixed and variable operations and maintenance (O&M) costs and in the case of biomass and waste-to-energy projects, fuel costs all contribute to the total cost of operating a renewable energy system. The levelized system cost takes into account these

397

Albeni Falls Wildlife Mitigation Project, 2001 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Albeni Falls Interagency Work Group was actively engaged in implementing wildlife mitigation activities in 2001. The Work Group met quarterly to discuss management and budget issues affecting the Albeni Falls Wildlife Mitigation Program. Work Group members protected 851 acres of wetland habitat in 2001. Wildlife habitat protected to date for the Albeni Falls project is approximately 5,248.31 acres ({approx}4,037.48 Habitat Units). Approximately 14% of the total wildlife habitat lost has been mitigated. Administrative activities increased as funding was more evenly distributed among Work Group members and protection opportunities became more time consuming. In 2001, Work Group members focused on development and implementation of the monitoring and evaluation program as well as completion of site-specific management plans. With the implementation of the monitoring and evaluation program, and as management plans are reviewed and executed, on the ground management activities are expected to increase in 2002.

Terra-Burns, Mary (Idaho Department of Fish and Game, Albeni Falls Interagency Work Group, Boise, ID)

2002-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

398

Columbia Basin Wildlife Mitigation Project : Rainwater Wildlife Area Final Management Plan.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This Draft Management Plan has been developed by the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR) to document how the Rainwater Wildlife Area (formerly known as the Rainwater Ranch) will be managed. The plan has been developed under a standardized planning process developed by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) for Columbia River Basin Wildlife Mitigation Projects (See Appendix A and Guiding Policies Section below). The plan outlines the framework for managing the project area, provides an assessment of existing conditions and key resource issues, and presents an array of habitat management and enhancement strategies. The plan culminates into a 5-Year Action Plan that will focus our management actions and prioritize funding during the Fiscal 2001-2005 planning period. This plan is a product of nearly two years of field studies and research, public scoping, and coordination with the Rainwater Advisory Committee. The committee consists of representatives from tribal government, state agencies, local government, public organizations, and members of the public. The plan is organized into several sections with Chapter 1 providing introductory information such as project location, purpose and need, project goals and objectives, common elements and assumptions, coordination efforts and public scoping, and historical information about the project area. Key issues are presented in Chapter 2 and Chapter 3 discusses existing resource conditions within the wildlife area. Chapter 4 provides a detailed presentation on management activities and Chapter 5 outlines a monitoring and evaluation plan for the project that will help assess whether the project is meeting the intended purpose and need and the goals and objectives. Chapter 6 displays the action plan and provides a prioritized list of actions with associated budget for the next five year period. Successive chapters contain appendices, references, definitions, and a glossary.

Childs, Allen

2002-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Synthetic Cells Shed Biological Insights While Delivering ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Synthetic Cells Shed Biological Insights While Delivering Battery Power. ... Image of two artificial cells that can act as a tiny battery. ...

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Geothermal: Sponsored by OSTI -- Hydraulic fracturing: insights...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Hydraulic fracturing: insights from field, lab, and numerical studies Geothermal Technologies Legacy Collection HelpFAQ | Site Map | Contact Us | Admin Log On HomeBasic Search...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mitigation actions insights" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Method to prevent/mitigate steam explosions in casting pits  

SciTech Connect

Steam explosions can be prevented or mitigated during a metal casting process by the placement of a perforated flooring system in the casting pit. An upward flow of compressed gas through this perforated flooring system is introduced during the casting process to produce a buffer layer between any spilled molten metal and the cooling water in the reservoir. This buffer layer provides a hydrodynamic layer which acts to prevent or mitigate steam explosions resulting from hot, molten metal being spilled into or onto the cooling water.

Taleyarkhan, Rusi P. (Knoxville, TN)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Peaking World Oil Production: Impacts, Mitigation and Risk Management  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The peaking of world oil production presents the U.S. and the world with an unprecedented risk management problem. As peaking is approached, liquid fuel prices and price volatility will increase dramatically, and, without timely mitigation, the economic, social, and political costs will be unprecedented. Viable mitigation options exist on both the supply and demand sides, but to have substantial impact, they must be initiated more than a decade in advance of peaking. In 2003, the world consumed nearly 80 million barrels per day (MM bpd) of oil. U.S. consumption was almost 20 MM bpd,

Robert L. Hirsch; Roger H. Bezdek; Robert M. Wendling

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Method to prevent/mitigate steam explosions in casting pits  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Steam explosions can be prevented or mitigated during a metal casting process by the placement of a perforated flooring system in the casting pit. An upward flow of compressed gas through this perforated flooring system is introduced during the casting process to produce a buffer layer between any spilled molten metal and the cooling water in the reservoir. This buffer layer provides a hydrodynamic layer which acts to prevent or mitigate steam explosions resulting from hot, molten metal being spilled into or onto the cooling water. 3 figs.

Taleyarkhan, R.P.

1996-12-24T23:59:59.000Z

404

Enhanced Practical Photosynthetic CO2 Mitigation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This final report highlights significant achievements in the Enhanced Practical Photosynthetic CO{sub 2} Mitigation Project during the period from 10/1/2001 through 01/02/2006. As indicated in the list of accomplishments below, our efforts during this project were focused on the selection of candidate organisms and growth surfaces and initiating long-term tests in the bench-scale and pilot-scale bioreactor test systems. Specific results and accomplishments for the program include: (1) CRF-2 test system: (a) Sampling test results have shown that the initial mass of algae loaded into the Carbon Recycling Facility Version 2 (CRF-2) system can be estimated with about 3% uncertainty using a statistical sampling procedure. (b) The pressure shim header pipe insert design was shown to have better flow for harvesting than the drilled-hole design. (c) The CRF-2 test system has undergone major improvements to produce the high flow rates needed for harvesting (as determined by previous experiments). The main changes to the system are new stainless steel header/frame units, with increased flow capacity and a modified pipe-end-sealing method to improve flow uniformity, and installation and plumbing for a new high flow harvesting pump. Qualitative system tests showed that the harvesting system performed wonderfully, cleaning the growth surfaces within a matter of seconds. (d) Qualitative tests have shown that organisms can be repopulated on a harvested section of a bioreactor screen, demonstrating that continuous bioreactor operation is feasible, with continuous cycles of harvesting and repopulating screens. (e) Final preparations are underway for quantitative, long-term tests in the CRF-2 with weekly harvesting. (2) Pilot-scale test system: (a) The construction of the pilot-scale bioreactor was completed, including the solar collector and light distribution system. Over the course of the project, the solar collector used in the light delivery system showed some degradation, but performed well overall. (b) Testing confirmed that algae can be grown in a sustainable fashion in the pilot bioreactor, even with intermittent availability of sunlight. (c) The pilot-scale tests indicated that algal growth rate followed photon delivery during productivity testing. (3) Organisms and Growth Surfaces: (a) The aeration of growth media with 5% CO{sub 2} in air stimulates cyanobacterial growth 10-20 times over that with air alone. It is possible that the rate of the stimulation of cyanobacterial growth in the CRF will be higher because cyanobacteria will be grown as a biofilm. We plan to increase the concentration to 15% CO{sub 2} in air. (b) Tests have shown a doubling time of the cyanobacterial culture of about 7.5 hours with illumination of about 170 {micro}mol m{sup -2} sec{sup -1}. All lower levels of illumination led to a decrease in the cyanobacterial growth rate. (c) Macroscopical and microscopical observations suggest that the culture of this isolate undergoes significant morphological changes after 60-70 hours of incubation in the batch culture mode. First of all, the culture begins to clump. This clumping could lead to the decrease of effective illumination of culture and may reflect a medium alkalinization. (d) Organization of our collection of the thermophilic cyanobacteria isolated from Yellowstone National Park has resulted in 13 unialgal cultures of thermophilic cyanobacteria. (e) A new species (even probably a new genus) of cyanobacteria, 5.2 s. c. 1, isolated from LaDuke Spring in Great Yellowstone Basin, demonstrates an elevated resistance to some compounds of iron. This might be very important for our project, because plant gases may have elevated amount of iron. Our study of the effect of different concentration of FeCl{sub 3}* 6H{sub 2}O on the growth of the 5.2 s.c.1 isolate showed that iron additions stimulated rather then inhibited the growth of the isolate. Because of this we would recommend this isolate for further experiments. (f) The shape of the Chlorogloeopsis siderophila cells (cyanobacteria) was found to be affected b

Gregory Kremer; David J. Bayless; Morgan Vis; Michael Prudich; Keith Cooksey; Jeff Muhs

2006-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

405

Corrective Action Decision Document/Corrective Action Plan for Corrective Action Unit 447: Project Shoal Area, Subsurface, Nevada, Rev. No.: 3 with Errata Sheet  

SciTech Connect

This Corrective Action Decision Document/Corrective Action Plan (CADD/CAP) has been prepared for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 447, Project Shoal Area (PSA)-Subsurface, Nevada, in accordance with the ''Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order'' (FFACO) (1996). Corrective Action Unit 447 is located in the Sand Springs Mountains in Churchill County, Nevada, approximately 48 kilometers (30 miles) southeast of Fallon, Nevada. The CADD/CAP combines the decision document (CADD) with the Corrective Action Plan (CAP) and provides or references the specific information necessary to recommend corrective actions for CAU 447, as provided in the FFACO. Corrective Action Unit 447 consists of two corrective action sites (CASs): CAS 57-49-01, Emplacement Shaft, and CAS 57-57-001, Cavity. The emplacement shaft (CAS-57-49-01) was backfilled and plugged in 1996 and will not be evaluated further. The purpose of the CADD portion of the document (Section 1.0 to Section 4.0) is to identify and provide a rationale for the selection of a recommended corrective action alternative for the subsurface at PSA. To achieve this, the following tasks were required: (1) Develop corrective action objectives. (2) Identify corrective action alternative screening criteria. (3) Develop corrective action alternatives. (4) Perform detailed and comparative evaluations of the corrective action alternatives in relation to the corrective action objectives and screening criteria. (5) Recommend a preferred corrective action alternative for the subsurface at PSA. The original Corrective Action Investigation Plan (CAIP) for the PSA was approved in September 1996 and described a plan to drill and test four characterization wells, followed by flow and transport modeling (DOE/NV, 1996). The resultant drilling is described in a data report (DOE/NV, 1998e) and the data analysis and modeling in an interim modeling report (Pohll et al., 1998). After considering the results of the modeling effort, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) determined that the degree of uncertainty in transport predictions for PSA remained unacceptably large. As a result, a second CAIP was developed by DOE and approved by the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP) in December 1998 (DOE/NV, 1998a). This plan prescribed a rigorous analysis of uncertainty in the Shoal model and quantification of methods of reducing uncertainty through data collection. This analysis is termed a Data Decision Analysis (Pohll et al., 1999a) and formed the basis for a second major characterization effort at PSA (Pohll et al., 1999b). The details for this second field effort are presented in an Addendum to the CAIP, which was approved by NDEP in April 1999 (DOE/NV, 1999a). Four additional characterization wells were drilled at PSA during summer and fall of 1999; details of the drilling and well installation are in IT Corporation (2000), with testing reported in Mihevc et al. (2000). A key component of the second field program was a tracer test between two of the new wells (Carroll et al., 2000; Reimus et al., 2003). Based on the potential exposure pathways, two corrective action objectives were identified for CAU 447: Prevent or mitigate exposure to groundwater contaminants of concern at concentrations exceeding regulatory maximum contaminant levels or risk-based levels; and Reduce the risk to human health and the environment to the extent practicable. Based on the review of existing data, the results of the modeling, future use, and current operations at PSA, the following alternatives have been developed for consideration at CAU 447: Alternative 1--No Further Action; Alternative 2--Proof-of-Concept and Monitoring with Institutional Controls; and Alternative 3--Contaminant Control. The corrective action alternatives were evaluated based on the approach outlined in the ''Focused Evaluation of Selected Remedial Alternatives for the Underground Test Area'' (DOE/NV, 1998b). Each alternative was assessed against nine evaluation criteria. These criteria include overall protection of human health and the environment;

Tim Echelard

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Corrective Action Decision Document/Corrective Action Plan for Corrective Action Unit 447: Project Shoal Area, Subsurface, Nevada, Rev. No.: 3 with Errata Sheet  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Corrective Action Decision Document/Corrective Action Plan (CADD/CAP) has been prepared for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 447, Project Shoal Area (PSA)-Subsurface, Nevada, in accordance with the ''Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order'' (FFACO) (1996). Corrective Action Unit 447 is located in the Sand Springs Mountains in Churchill County, Nevada, approximately 48 kilometers (30 miles) southeast of Fallon, Nevada. The CADD/CAP combines the decision document (CADD) with the Corrective Action Plan (CAP) and provides or references the specific information necessary to recommend corrective actions for CAU 447, as provided in the FFACO. Corrective Action Unit 447 consists of two corrective action sites (CASs): CAS 57-49-01, Emplacement Shaft, and CAS 57-57-001, Cavity. The emplacement shaft (CAS-57-49-01) was backfilled and plugged in 1996 and will not be evaluated further. The purpose of the CADD portion of the document (Section 1.0 to Section 4.0) is to identify and provide a rationale for the selection of a recommended corrective action alternative for the subsurface at PSA. To achieve this, the following tasks were required: (1) Develop corrective action objectives. (2) Identify corrective action alternative screening criteria. (3) Develop corrective action alternatives. (4) Perform detailed and comparative evaluations of the corrective action alternatives in relation to the corrective action objectives and screening criteria. (5) Recommend a preferred corrective action alternative for the subsurface at PSA. The original Corrective Action Investigation Plan (CAIP) for the PSA was approved in September 1996 and described a plan to drill and test four characterization wells, followed by flow and transport modeling (DOE/NV, 1996). The resultant drilling is described in a data report (DOE/NV, 1998e) and the data analysis and modeling in an interim modeling report (Pohll et al., 1998). After considering the results of the modeling effort, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) determined that the degree of uncertainty in transport predictions for PSA remained unacceptably large. As a result, a second CAIP was developed by DOE and approved by the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP) in December 1998 (DOE/NV, 1998a). This plan prescribed a rigorous analysis of uncertainty in the Shoal model and quantification of methods of reducing uncertainty through data collection. This analysis is termed a Data Decision Analysis (Pohll et al., 1999a) and formed the basis for a second major characterization effort at PSA (Pohll et al., 1999b). The details for this second field effort are presented in an Addendum to the CAIP, which was approved by NDEP in April 1999 (DOE/NV, 1999a). Four additional characterization wells were drilled at PSA during summer and fall of 1999; details of the drilling and well installation are in IT Corporation (2000), with testing reported in Mihevc et al. (2000). A key component of the second field program was a tracer test between two of the new wells (Carroll et al., 2000; Reimus et al., 2003). Based on the potential exposure pathways, two corrective action objectives were identified for CAU 447: Prevent or mitigate exposure to groundwater contaminants of concern at concentrations exceeding regulatory maximum contaminant levels or risk-based levels; and Reduce the risk to human health and the environment to the extent practicable. Based on the review of existing data, the results of the modeling, future use, and current operations at PSA, the following alternatives have been developed for consideration at CAU 447: Alternative 1--No Further Action; Alternative 2--Proof-of-Concept and Monitoring with Institutional Controls; and Alternative 3--Contaminant Control. The corrective action alternatives were evaluated based on the approach outlined in the ''Focused Evaluation of Selected Remedial Alternatives for the Underground Test Area'' (DOE/NV, 1998b). Each alternative was assessed against nine evaluation criteria. These criteria include overall protection of human health and the environment;

Tim Echelard

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Bottom Up and Country Led: A New Framework for Climate Action | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Bottom Up and Country Led: A New Framework for Climate Action Bottom Up and Country Led: A New Framework for Climate Action Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Bottom Up and Country Led: A New Framework for Climate Action Agency/Company /Organization: Booz and Company Sector: Energy, Land, Climate Topics: Low emission development planning Resource Type: Publications Website: www.booz.com/global/home/what_we_think/reports_and_white_papers/ic-dis Cost: Free Bottom Up and Country Led: A New Framework for Climate Action Screenshot References: Bottom Up and Country Led: A New Framework for Climate Action[1] "As delegates gather for the Climate Change Conference in Cancun in late 2010, they can benefit from familiarizing themselves with the set of tools available for mitigation and adaptation, as well as how these tools can fit

408

Action-Oriented Benchmarking:  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Feb-2008 submitted to Energy Engineering Feb-2008 submitted to Energy Engineering Action-Oriented Benchmarking: Concepts and Tools Evan Mills, Paul Mathew & Mary Ann Piette, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Norman Bourassa & Martha Brook, California Energy Commission ABSTRACT Most energy benchmarking tools provide static feedback on how one building compares to a larger set of loosely similar buildings, without providing information at the end-use level or on what can be done to reduce consumption, cost, or emissions. In this article-Part 1 of a two-part series-we describe an "action-oriented benchmarking" approach, which extends whole-building energy benchmarking to include analysis of system and component energy use metrics and features. Action-oriented benchmarking thereby allows users to generate more meaningful

409

May 2010 Standards Actions  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

May 2010 U.S. Department of Energy Technical Standards Program (http://www.hss.energy.gov/nuclearsafety/ns/techstds/) Standards Actions 1.0 DOE STANDARDS ACTIONS The Department of Energy (DOE) Technical Standards Program (TSP) publishes Standards Actions on a monthly basis to provide DOE headquarters and field elements with current information on DOE and select non-government standards activities. The complete list of all DOE Technical Standards projects and their status is available on the TSP web page at: http://www.hss.energy.gov/nuclearsafety/ns/techstds/. To access these standards, go to our web page, click on "DOE Technical Standards," then choose Projects, Approved Standards, Recently Approved Standards, or Drafts for Review, as

410

Standards Actions, May 2002  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

4-29-2002 4-29-2002 Activity Summary In Conversion - 4 In Preparation - 47 Out for Comment - 12 Published this Month - 6 5-year Review Status Revision in Progress - 10 Reaffirmation in Progress - 12 Supersedure in Progress - 0 Cancellation Pending - 7 Cancellation in Progress - 1 No Current Action - 20 Inside this issue: DOE Technical Standards Proposed for Reaffirmation 1 DOE Technical Standards Re- cently Published 1 American National Standards Institute 2 American Society for Testing and Materials International 4 Visit the Technical Standards Program Web Site at http://tis.eh.doe.gov/techstds/. Standards Actions- May 2002 Standards Actions DOE Technical Standards Proposed for Reaffirmation The following documents are currently being reevaluated under the 5-year

411

May 2009 Standards Actions  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

May 2009 May 2009 U.S. Department of Energy Technical Standards Program (http://www.hss.energy.gov/nuclearsafety/ns/techstds/) Standards Actions 1.0 DOE STANDARDS ACTIONS The Department of Energy (DOE) Technical Standards Program (TSP) publishes Standards Actions on a monthly basis to provide DOE headquarters and field elements with current information on DOE and select non-government standards activities. The complete list of all DOE Technical Standards projects and their status is available on the TSP web page at: http://www.hss.energy.gov/nuclearsafety/ns/techstds/. To access these standards, go to our web page, click on "DOE Technical Standards," then choose Projects, Approved Standards, Recently Approved Standards, or Drafts for Review, as

412

February 2009 Standards Actions  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

February 2009 February 2009 U.S. Department of Energy Technical Standards Program (http://www.hss.energy.gov/nuclearsafety/ns/techstds/) Standards Actions 1.0 DOE STANDARDS ACTIONS The Department of Energy (DOE) Technical Standards Program (TSP) publishes Standards Actions on a monthly basis to provide DOE headquarters and field elements with current information on DOE and select non-government standards activities. The complete list of all DOE Technical Standards projects and their status is available on the TSP web page at: http://www.hss.energy.gov/nuclearsafety/ns/techstds/. To access these standards, go to our web page, click on "DOE Technical Standards," then choose Projects, Approved Standards, Recently Approved Standards, or Drafts for Review, as

413

Standards Actions - April 2002  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3-28-2002 3-28-2002 Activity Summary In Conversion - 4 In Preparation - 44 Out for Comment - 13 Published this Month - 2 5-year Review Status Revision in Progress - 4 Reaffirmation in Progress - 2 Supersedure in Progress - 6 Cancellation Pending - 8 Cancellation in Progress - 2 No Current Action - 35 Inside this issue: DOE Technical Standards Project Canceled 1 DOE Technical Standard Recently Sent for Coordination 1 DOE Technical Standards Re- cently Published 2 American National Standards Institute 2 American Society for Testing and Materials International 4 Visit the Technical Standards Program Web Site at http://tis.eh.doe.gov/techstds/. Standards Actions- April 2002 Standards Actions DOE Technical Standards Project Canceled

414

July 2009 Standards Actions  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

July 2009 U.S. Department of Energy Technical Standards Program (http://www.hss.energy.gov/nuclearsafety/ns/techstds/) Standards Actions 1.0 DOE STANDARDS ACTIONS The Department of Energy (DOE) Technical Standards Program (TSP) publishes Standards Actions on a monthly basis to provide DOE headquarters and field elements with current information on DOE and select non-government standards activities. The complete list of all DOE Technical Standards projects and their status is available on the TSP web page at: http://www.hss.energy.gov/nuclearsafety/ns/techstds/. To access these standards, go to our web page, click on "DOE Technical Standards," then choose Projects, Approved Standards, Recently Approved Standards, or Drafts for Review, as

415

Standards Actions, May 2001  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

30-2001 30-2001 Activity Summary In Conversion - 4 In Preparation - 39 Out for Comment - 19 Published this Month - 0 5-year Review Status Revision in Progress - 4 Reaffirmation in Progress - 23 Cancellation Pending - 9 Cancellation in Progress - 18 No Current Action - 12 Inside this issue: DOE Technical Standards Projects Initiated 1 DOE Technical Standards Proposed for Reaffirmation 1 Proposed Cancellation of DOE Technical Standards 2 Published DOE Technical Standards 3 American National Standards Institute 3 American National Standards 6 American Society for Testing and Materials 6 Visit the Technical Standards Program Web Site at http://tis.eh.doe.gov/techstds/. May 2001 Standards Actions DOE Technical Standards Projects Initiated

416

Hungry Horse Mitigation : Flathead Lake : Annual Progress Report 2008.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes (CSKT) and Montana Fish Wildlife and Parks (MFWP) wrote the 'Fisheries Mitigation Plan for Losses Attributable to the Construction and Operation of Hungry Horse Dam' in March 1991 to define the fisheries losses, mitigation alternatives and recommendations to protect, mitigate and enhance resident fish and aquatic habitat affected by Hungry Horse Dam. On November 12, 1991, the Northwest Power Planning Council (NPPC) approved the mitigation plan with minor modifications, called for a detailed implementation plan, and amended measures 903(h)(1) through (7). A long-term mitigation plan was submitted in August 1992, was approved by the Council in 1993, and the first contract for this project was signed on November 11, 1993. The problem this project addresses is the loss of habitat, both in quality and quantity, in the Flathead Lake and River basin resulting from the construction and operation of Hungry Horse Dam. The purpose of the project is to both implement mitigation measures and monitor the biological responses to those measures including those implemented by Project Numbers 9101903 and 9101904. Goals and objectives of the 1994 Fish and Wildlife Program (Section 10.1) addressed by this project are the rebuilding to sustainable levels weak, but recoverable, native populations injured by the hydropower system. The project mitigates the blockage of spawning runs by Hungry Horse Dam by restoring and even creating spawning habitats within direct drainages to Flathead Lake. The project also addresses the altered habitat within Flathead Lake resulting from species shifts and consequent dominance of new species that restricts the potential success of mitigation measures. Specific goals of this project are to create and restore habitat and quantitatively monitor changes in fish populations to verify the efficacy of our mitigation measures. The project consists of three components: monitoring, restoration and research. Monitoring, for example, includes a spring gillnetting series conducted annually in Flathead Lake and builds on an existing data set initiated in 1981. Monitoring of the experimental kokanee reintroduction was a primary activity of this project between 1992 and 1997. Lake trout, whose high densities have precluded successful mitigation of losses of other species in Flathead Lake, have been monitored since 1996 to measure several biological parameters. Results of this work have utility in determining the population status of this key predator in Flathead Lake. The project has also defined the baseline condition of the Flathead Lake fishery in 1992-1993 and has conducted annual lakewide surveys since 1998. The restoration component of the project has addressed several stream channel, riparian, and fish passage problems, and suppression of non-native fish. The research component of the project began in FY 2000 and measured trophic linkages between M. relicta and other species to assist in predicting the results of our efforts to suppress lake trout. Only Work Element A in the Statement of Work is funded entirely by Hungry Horse Mitigation funds. Additional funds are drawn from other sources to assist in completion of all remaining Work Elements.

Hansen, Barry; Evarts, Les [Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes

2009-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

417

Hungry Horse Mitigation : Flathead Lake : Annual Progress Report 2007.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes (CSKT) and Montana Fish Wildlife and Parks (MFWP) wrote the 'Fisheries Mitigation Plan for Losses Attributable to the Construction and Operation of Hungry Horse Dam' in March 1991 to define the fisheries losses, mitigation alternatives and recommendations to protect, mitigate and enhance resident fish and aquatic habitat affected by Hungry Horse Dam. On November 12, 1991, the Northwest Power Planning Council (NPPC) approved the mitigation plan with minor modifications, called for a detailed implementation plan, and amended measures 903(h)(1) through (7). A long-term mitigation plan was submitted in August 1992, was approved by the Council in 1993, and the first contract for this project was signed on November 11, 1993. The problem this project addresses is the loss of habitat, both in quality and quantity, in the Flathead Lake and River basin resulting from the construction and operation of Hungry Horse Dam. The purpose of the project is to both implement mitigation measures and monitor the biological responses to those measures including those implemented by Project Numbers 9101903 and 9101904. Goals and objectives of the 1994 Fish and Wildlife Program (Section 10.1) addressed by this project are the rebuilding to sustainable levels weak, but recoverable, native populations injured by the hydropower system. The project mitigates the blockage of spawning runs by Hungry Horse Dam by restoring and even creating spawning habitats within direct drainages to Flathead Lake. The project also addresses the altered habitat within Flathead Lake resulting from species shifts and consequent dominance of new species that restricts the potential success of mitigation measures. Specific goals of this project are to create and restore habitat and quantitatively monitor changes in fish populations to verify the efficacy of our mitigation measures. The project consists of three components: monitoring, restoration and research. Monitoring, for example, includes a spring gillnetting series conducted annually in Flathead Lake and builds on an existing data set initiated in 1981. Monitoring of the experimental kokanee reintroduction was a primary activity of this project between 1992 and 1997. Lake trout, whose high densities have precluded successful mitigation of losses of other species in Flathead Lake, have been monitored since 1996 to measure several biological parameters. Results of this work have utility in determining the population status of this key predator in Flathead Lake. The project has also defined the baseline condition of the Flathead Lake fishery in 1992-1993 and has conducted annual lakewide surveys since 1998. The restoration component of the project has addressed several stream channel, riparian, and fish passage problems, and suppression of non-native fish. The research component of the project began in FY 2000 and measured trophic linkages between M. relicta and other species to assist in predicting the results of our efforts to suppress lake trout. Only Work Element A in the Statement of Work is funded entirely by Hungry Horse Mitigation funds. Additional funds are drawn from other sources to assist in completion of all remaining Work Elements.

Hansen, Barry; Evarts, Les [Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes

2008-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

418

Hungry Horse Mitigation; Flathead Lake, 2004-2005 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes (CSKT) and Montana Fish Wildlife and Parks (MFWP) wrote the ''Fisheries Mitigation Plan for Losses Attributable to the Construction and Operation of Hungry Horse Dam'' in March 1991 to define the fisheries losses, mitigation alternatives and recommendations to protect, mitigate and enhance resident fish and aquatic habitat affected by Hungry Horse Dam. On November 12, 1991, the Northwest Power Planning Council (NPPC) approved the mitigation plan with minor modifications, called for a detailed implementation plan, and amended measures 903(h)(1) through (7). A long-term mitigation plan was submitted in August 1992, was approved by the Council in 1993, and the first contract for this project was signed on November 11, 1993. The problem this project addresses is the loss of habitat, both in quality and quantity, in the Flathead Lake and River basin resulting from the construction and operation of Hungry Horse Dam. The purpose of the project is to both implement mitigation measures and monitor the biological responses to those measures including those implemented by Project Numbers 9101903 and 9101904. Goals and objectives of the 1994 Fish and Wildlife Program (Section 10.1) addressed by this project are the rebuilding to sustainable levels weak, but recoverable, native populations injured by the hydropower system. The project mitigates the blockage of spawning runs by Hungry Horse Dam by restoring and even creating spawning habitats within direct drainages to Flathead Lake. The project also addresses the altered habitat within Flathead Lake resulting from species shifts and consequent dominance of new species that restricts the potential success of mitigation measures. Specific goals of this project are to create and restore habitat and quantitatively monitor changes in fish populations to verify the efficacy of our mitigation measures. The project consists of three components: monitoring, restoration and research. Monitoring, for example, includes a spring gillnetting series conducted annually in Flathead Lake and builds on an existing data set initiated in 1981. Monitoring of the experimental kokanee reintroduction was a primary activity of this project between 1992 and 1997. Lake trout, whose high densities have precluded successful mitigation of losses of other species in Flathead Lake, have been monitored since 1996 to measure several biological parameters. Results of this work have utility in determining the population status of this key predator in Flathead Lake. The project has also defined the baseline condition of the Flathead Lake fishery in 1992-1993 and has conducted annual lakewide surveys since 1998. The restoration component of the project has addressed several stream channel, riparian, and fish passage problems, and suppression of non-native fish. The research component of the project began in FY 2000 and measured trophic linkages between M. relicta and other species to assist in predicting the results of our efforts to suppress lake trout. Only Work Element A in the Statement of Work is funded entirely by Hungry Horse Mitigation funds. Additional funds are drawn from other sources to assist in completion of all remaining Work Elements.

Hansen, Barry; Evarts, Les (Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes of the Flathead Nation, Pablo, MT)

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Hungry Horse Mitigation; Flathead Lake, 2003-2004 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes (CSKT) and Montana Fish Wildlife and Parks (MFWP) wrote the ''Fisheries Mitigation Plan for Losses Attributable to the Construction and Operation of Hungry Horse Dam'' in March 1991 to define the fisheries losses, mitigation alternatives and recommendations to protect, mitigate and enhance resident fish and aquatic habitat affected by Hungry Horse Dam. On November 12, 1991, the Northwest Power Planning Council (NPPC) approved the mitigation plan with minor modifications, called for a detailed implementation plan, and amended measures 903(h)(1) through (7). A long-term mitigation plan was submitted in August 1992, was approved by the Council in 1993, and the first contract for this project was signed on November 11, 1993. The problem this project addresses is the loss of habitat, both in quality and quantity, in the Flathead Lake and River basin resulting from the construction and operation of Hungry Horse Dam. The purpose of the project is to both implement mitigation measures and monitor the biological responses to those measures including those implemented by Project Numbers 9101903 and 9101904. Goals and objectives of the 1994 Fish and Wildlife Program (Section 10.1) addressed by this project are the rebuilding to sustainable levels weak, but recoverable, native populations injured by the hydropower system. The project mitigates the blockage of spawning runs by Hungry Horse Dam by restoring and even creating spawning habitats within direct drainages to Flathead Lake. The project also addresses the altered habitat within Flathead Lake resulting from species shifts and consequent dominance of new species that restricts the potential success of mitigation measures. Specific goals of this project are to create and restore habitat and quantitatively monitor changes in fish populations to verify the efficacy of our mitigation measures. The project consists of three components: monitoring, restoration and research. Monitoring, for example, includes a spring gillnetting series conducted annually in Flathead Lake and builds on an existing data set initiated in 1981. Monitoring of the experimental kokanee reintroduction was a primary activity of this project between 1992 and 1997. Lake trout, whose high densities have precluded successful mitigation of losses of other species in Flathead Lake, have been monitored since 1996 to measure several biological parameters. Results of this work have utility in determining the population status of this key predator in Flathead Lake. The project has also defined the baseline condition of the Flathead Lake fishery in 1992-1993 and has conducted annual lakewide surveys since 1998. The restoration component of the project has addressed several stream channel, riparian, and fish passage problems, and suppression of non-native fish. The research component of the project began in FY 2000 and measured trophic linkages between M. relicta and other species to assist in predicting the results of our efforts to suppress lake trout. Only Objective 1 in the workplan is funded entirely by Hungry Horse Mitigation funds. Additional funds are drawn from other sources to assist in completion of Objectives 2-8.

Hansen, Barry; Evarts, Les (Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes of the Flathead Nation, Pablo, MT)

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Catalyzing Cooperative Action for Low Emissions Development Side Event in  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Side Event in Side Event in Bonn Jump to: navigation, search LEDSGP Logo.png Advancing climate-resilient low emission development around the world Home About Tools Expert Assistance Events Publications Join Us Bonn Event Agenda Presentations Catalyzing Cooperative Action for Low Emissions Development May 23, 2012 Bonn, Germany Dear Colleagues, We are delighted to invite you to participate in an event co-convened by the International Partnership on Mitigation and MRV and the Low Emissions Development Strategies (LEDS) Global Partnership. The event titled Catalyzing Cooperative Action for Low Emissions Development will take place on May 23, 2012 from 17:00-19:15 at the BMU Headquarters in Bonn, Room Number: 1.150 (first floor) and will be followed by a reception from 19:15-20:30 (same level). The purpose of the event is to share information

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mitigation actions insights" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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421

Catalyzing Cooperative Action for Low Emissions Development Presentations |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Catalyzing Cooperative Action for Low Emissions Development Presentations Catalyzing Cooperative Action for Low Emissions Development Presentations Jump to: navigation, search LEDSGP Logo.png Advancing climate-resilient low emission development around the world Home About Tools Expert Assistance Events Publications Join Us Bonn Event Agenda Presentations Presentation and Related Documents Documents Title LEDSGP.pdf LEDS Global Partnership MRV.pdf Case study from the International Partnership on Mitigation and MRV ALCDS.pdf African Low Carbon Development Society (ALCDS) Powered by OpenEI ledsgp.org is built on the same platform as the popular Wikipedia site. Like Wikipedia, it is a "wiki" or website developed collaboratively by a community of users. Thanks to our unique relationship with OpenEI.org, you can add or edit most content on ledsgp.org. For more information about this

422

May 2005 Standards Actions  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Notices 1 DOE Technical Standards Revisions 1 DOE Technical Standards Projects Initiated 1 Non-Government Standards Actions 1 American National Standards Institute (ANSI) 1 American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) 2 ASTM International 2 American Nuclear Society (ANS) 2 National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) 2 DOE Technical Standards Program Document Status 04-27-2005 Activity Summary In Conversion - 4 In Preparation - 25

423

The Role of China in Mitigating Climate Change  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We explore short- and long-term implications of several energy scenarios of Chinas role in efforts to mitigate global climate risk. The focus is on the impacts on Chinas energy system and GDP growth, and on global climate ...

Paltsev, S.

424

Unconventional Nuclear Warfare Defense (UNWD) containment and mitigation subtask.  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this subtask of the Unconventional Nuclear Warfare Design project was to demonstrate mitigation technologies for radiological material dispersal and to assist planners with incorporation of the technologies into a concept of operations. The High Consequence Assessment and Technology department at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) has studied aqueous foam's ability to mitigate the effects of an explosively disseminated radiological dispersal device (RDD). These benefits include particle capture of respirable radiological particles, attenuation of blast overpressure, and reduction of plume buoyancy. To better convey the aqueous foam attributes, SNL conducted a study using the Explosive Release Atmospheric Dispersion model, comparing the effects of a mitigated and unmitigated explosive RDD release. Results from this study compared health effects and land contamination between the two scenarios in terms of distances of effect, population exposure, and remediation costs. Incorporating aqueous foam technology, SNL created a conceptual design for a stationary containment area to be located at a facility entrance with equipment that could minimize the effects from the detonation of a vehicle transported RDD. The containment design was evaluated against several criteria, including mitigation ability (both respirable and large fragment particle capture as well as blast overpressure suppression), speed of implementation, cost, simplicity, and required space. A mock-up of the conceptual idea was constructed at SNL's 9920 explosive test site to demonstrate the containment design.

Wente, William Baker

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Severe Environment Qualification of SY-101 Hydrogen Mitigation Test Pump  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The purpose of WHC-SD-WM-TI-727, Rev. 0 Severe Environment Qualification of SY-101 Hydrogen Mitigation Test Pump is to determine the performance of essential components in the tank waste environment; radiation, thermal, and chemical conditions were evaluated.

SHAW, C.P.

1995-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

426

Mitigating sampling error when measuring internet client IPv6 capabilities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Despite the predicted exhaustion of unallocated IPv4 addresses between 2012 and 2014, it remains unclear how many current clients can use its successor, IPv6, to access the Internet. We propose a refinement of previous measurement studies that mitigates ... Keywords: banner-ad-based measurement, ipv6 deployment

Sebastian Zander; Lachlan L.H. Andrew; Grenville Armitage; Geoff Huston; George Michaelson

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Climate change mitigation through forestry measures: potentials, options, practice  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

is the FC doing? ­ Woodland carbon code and assessment protocols (3 slides) · Conclusions (2 slides). #12 2010 Climate change mitigation and forestry measures Global carbon balance c. 2000 Burning fossil fuels 23.1 GtCO2 yr-1 Land-use change (including deforestation) 5.9 GtCO2 yr -1 Vegetation growth 11.0 Gt

428

Mitigating Supply Risk: Dual Sourcing or Process Improvement?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Surveys suggest that supply chain risk is a growing issue for executives and that supplier reliability is of particular concern. A common mitigation strategy is for the buying firm to expend effort improving the reliability of its supply base. We explore ... Keywords: operations strategy, risk management, supply chain management

Yimin Wang; Wendell Gilland; Brian Tomlin

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

DISRUPTION MITIGATION WITH HIGH-PRESSURE NOBLE GAS INJECTION  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

OAK A271 DISRUPTION MITIGATION WITH HIGH-PRESSURE NOBLE GAS INJECTION. High-pressure gas jets of neon and argon are used to mitigate the three principal damaging effects of tokamak disruptions: thermal loading of the divertor surfaces, vessel stress from poloidal halo currents and the buildup and loss of relativistic electrons to the wall. The gas jet penetrates as a neutral species through to the central plasma at its sonic velocity. The injected gas atoms increase up to 500 times the total electron inventory in the plasma volume, resulting in a relatively benign radiative dissipation of >95% of the plasma stored energy. The rapid cooling and the slow movement of the plasma to the wall reduce poloidal halo currents during the current decay. The thermally collapsed plasma is very cold ({approx} 1-2 eV) and the impurity charge distribution can include > 50% fraction neutral species. If a sufficient quantity of gas is injected, the neutrals inhibit runaway electrons. A physical model of radiative cooling is developed and validated against DIII-D experiments. The model shows that gas jet mitigation, including runaway suppression, extrapolates favorably to burning plasmas where disruption damage will be more severe. Initial results of real-time disruption detection triggering gas jet injection for mitigation are shown.

WHYTE, DG; JERNIGAN, TC; HUMPHREYS, DA; HYATT, AW; LASNIER, CJ; PARKS, PB; EVANS, TE; TAYLOR, PL; KELLMAN, AG; GRAY, DS; HOLLMANN, EM

2002-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

GAINS: an interactive tool for assessing international GHG mitigation regimes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mitigating greenhouse gases (GHGs) is key to reducing the longterm impacts of climate change. In this paper we present the GAINS system, i.e. a data warehouse with an online integrated assessment model that is already used in various international policy ... Keywords: GAINS, data warehouse

Thanh Binh Nguyen; Fabian Wagner; Wolfgang Schoepp

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

The urban heat island Mitigation Impact Screening Tool (MIST)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A web-based software tool has been developed to assist urban planners and air quality management officials in assessing the potential of urban heat island mitigation strategies to affect the urban climate, air quality, and energy consumption within their ... Keywords: Air quality, Albedo, Atmospheric modeling, Urban climate, Urban forestry, Urban heat islands

David J. Sailor; Nikolaas Dietsch

2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Directory of Outage Mitigation and Recovery Products and Services  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Natural and man-caused disasters are inevitable, recurrent, and increasing in frequency and magnitude. They are taking a larger and larger economic and personal toll. This report identifies technologies and information that can assist utilities, their customers, and their communities in preventing, mitigating, and recovering from disasters.

2002-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

433

Disaster Planning and Mitigation Technologies: Interim Technology Inventory Report #6  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Natural and man-caused disasters are inevitable, recurrent, and increasing in frequency and magnitude. They are taking a larger and larger economic and personal toll. This report identifies technologies and information that can assist utilities, their customers, and their communities in preventing, mitigating, and recovering from disasters.

2001-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

434

Resource allocation for demand surge mitigation during disaster response  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Large-scale public health emergencies can result in an overwhelming demand for healthcare resources. Regional aid in the form of central stockpiles and resource redistribution can help mitigate the resulting demand surge. This paper discusses a resource ... Keywords: Decision support, Optimization, Pandemic flu, Resource allocation

Hina Arora; T. S. Raghu; Ajay Vinze

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

June 2008June 2008 77 Contributing to the Mitigation of  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, in contrast to adaptation, involves the reduction of greenhouse gas emissions and enhancement of greenhouse gas sinks.1 The goal of mitigation is to stabi- lize atmospheric greenhouse gas concentrations's energy needs while lowering greenhouse gas emissions include the use of both emission reduction

436

Transportation and Greenhouse Gas Emissions: Measurement, Causation and Mitigation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Transportation and Greenhouse Gas Emissions: Measurement, Causation and Mitigation Oak Ridge sector is believed to be responsible for 28.4% of our greenhouse gas emissions (see figure), including 33% of the carbon dioxide we produce. As such it is a leading candidate for greenhouse gas ((GHG) (CO2, NH4, HFCs

437

Planning Tools For Seismic Risk Mitigation. Rules And Applications  

SciTech Connect

Recently, Italian urban planning research in the field of seismic risk mitigation are renewing. In particular, it promotes strategies that integrate urban rehabilitation and aseismic objectives, and also politicizes that are directed to revitalizes urban systems, coupling physical renewal and socio-economic development.In Italy the first law concerning planning for seismic mitigation dates back 1974, the law n. 64 'Regulation for buildings with particular rules for the seismic areas' where the rules for buildings in seismic areas concerning also the local hazard. This law, in fact, forced the municipalities to acquire, during the formation of the plans, a preventive opinion of compatibility between planning conditions and geomorphology conditions of the territory. From this date the conviction that the seismic risk must be considered inside the territorial planning especially in terms of strategies of mitigation has been strengthened.The town planners have started to take an interest in seismic risk in the [80]s when the Irpinia's earthquake took place. The researches developed after this earthquake have established that the principal caus