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Sample records for mitigation actions copenhagen

  1. Mitigation Action Plan

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Mitigation Action Plan FutureGen 2.0 Project DOE/EIS-0460 U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory March 2014 DOE/EIS-0460 FUTUREGEN 2.0 PROJECT MITIGATION ACTION PLAN INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK DOE/EIS-0460 FUTUREGEN 2.0 PROJECT MITIGATION ACTION PLAN TABLE OF CONTENTS Introduction ................................................................................................................................................... 1 Purpose

  2. Mitigation Action Plan

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Mitigation Action Plan FutureGen 2.0 Project DOE/EIS-0460 U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory March 2014 DOE/EIS-0460 FUTUREGEN 2.0 PROJECT MITIGATION ACTION PLAN INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK DOE/EIS-0460 FUTUREGEN 2.0 PROJECT MITIGATION ACTION PLAN TABLE OF CONTENTS Introduction ................................................................................................................................................... 1 Purpose

  3. WREP Mitigation Action Plan

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Electrical Interconnection of the Whistling Ridge Energy Project 1 Mitigation Action Plan June 2015 Mitigation Action Plan for the Whistling Ridge Energy Project Measure Implementation Timeline Implementation Responsibility Earth (geology, soils, topography, and geologic hazards) Prior to Project construction, confirm subsurface soil and rock types and strength properties through a detailed geotechnical investigation of the specific locations of all wind Project elements, including wind

  4. Mitigation Action Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-02-01

    This Mitigation Action Plan (MAP) focuses on mitigation commitments stated in the Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement (SEIS) and the Record of Decision (ROD) for the Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 1 (NPR-1). Specific commitments and mitigation implementation actions are listed in Appendix A-Mitigation Actions, and form the central focus of this MAP. They will be updated as needed to allow for organizational, regulatory, or policy changes. It is the intent of DOE to comply with all applicable federal, state, and local environmental, safety, and health laws and regulations. Eighty-six specific commitments were identified in the SEIS and associated ROD which pertain to continued operation of NPR-1 with petroleum production at the Maximum Efficient Rate (MER). The mitigation measures proposed are expected to reduce impacts as much as feasible, however, as experience is gained in actual implementation of these measures, some changes may be warranted.

  5. EIS-0380: Mitigation Action Plan Annual Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Los Alamos National Laboratory Site-Wide Environmental Impact Statement Fiscal Year 2012 Mitigation Action Plan Annual Report

  6. EIS-0397: Mitigation Action Plan | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Mitigation Action Plan EIS-0397: Mitigation Action Plan Lyle Falls Fish Passage Project This Mitigation Action Plan identifies measures that are intended to avoid, reduce, or...

  7. Mitigation Action Implementation Network (MAIN) | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    of Nationally Appropriate Mitigation Actions (NAMAs) and Low-Carbon Development (LCD) strategies in developing countries through regionally based dialogues, web-based...

  8. EA-1923: Mitigation Action Plan | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Mitigation Action Plan EA-1923: Mitigation Action Plan Green Energy School Wind Turbine Project on Saipan, Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands This Mitgation Action Plan ...

  9. EA-1628: Mitigation Action Plan | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Lignocellulosic Biorefinery, Emmetsburg, Iowa This Mitigation Action Plan specifieis the methods for implementing mitigation measures that address the potential environmental...

  10. EA-1508: Mitigation Action Plan | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    and dewatering, landscape engineering, borrow pits and recommended procedures for Raptors and powerline construction. Mitigation Action Plan to Implement Mitigation...

  11. EIS-0422: Mitigation Action Plan | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Mitigation measures and estimated time of implementation within the Mitigation Action Plan for the Central Ferry-Lower Monumental 500-kilovolt Transmission Line Project. Mitigation...

  12. Mitigation Action Plans and Scenarios (MAPS) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Mitigation Action Plans and Scenarios (MAPS) (Redirected from CIFF-Chile-Mitigation Action Plans and Scenarios (MAPS)) Jump to: navigation, search Retrieved from "http:...

  13. EA-1595: Mitigation Action Plan | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Mitigation Action Plan EA-1595: Mitigation Action Plan Davis-Mead 230-kV Transmission Line Reconductor Project Western Area Power Administration proposes to reconductor ...

  14. Mitigation Action Plans (MAP) and Related Documents | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    November 25, 2014 EIS-0472: Mitigation Action Plan Uranium Leasing Program Mitigation Action Plan for the Final Uranium Leasing Program Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement ...

  15. EA-1706: Mitigation Action Plan | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Mitigation Action Plan EA-1706: Mitigation Action Plan West Tennessee Solar Farm Project Haywood County, Tennessee Based on the analyses in the Environmental Assessment, DOE...

  16. EIS-0380: Mitigation Action Plan | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    : Mitigation Action Plan EIS-0380: Mitigation Action Plan Continued Operation of Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico PDF icon Site-Wide Environmental Impact ...

  17. EIS-0380: Fiscal Year 2011 Mitigation Action Plan Annual Report...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Fiscal Year 2011 Mitigation Action Plan Annual Report for the 2008 Los Alamos Site-Wide Environmental Impact Statement EIS-0380: Fiscal Year 2011 Mitigation Action Plan Annual ...

  18. Angola-Nationally Appropriate Mitigation Actions (NAMAs) in the...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Angola-Nationally Appropriate Mitigation Actions (NAMAs) in the Congo Basin Jump to: navigation, search Name Angola-Nationally Appropriate Mitigation Actions (NAMAs) in the Congo...

  19. DOE Uranium Leasing Program 2015 Mitigation Action Plan Activity...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    DOE Uranium Leasing Program 2015 Mitigation Action Plan Activity Summary Report DOE Uranium Leasing Program 2015 Mitigation Action Plan Activity Summary Report DOE Uranium Leasing ...

  20. EA-1917: Mitigation Action Plan | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    7: Mitigation Action Plan EA-1917: Mitigation Action Plan Wave Energy Test Facility Project, Newport, OR Through the environmental review process, DOE determined, via consultations ...

  1. EIS-0218: Mitigation Action Plan | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Mitigation Action Plan EIS-0218: Mitigation Action Plan Implementation of a Nuclear Weapons Nonproliferation Policy Concerning Foreign Research Reactor Spent Nuclear Fuel The ...

  2. EIS-0486: Mitigation Action Plan | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Mitigation Action Plan EIS-0486: Mitigation Action Plan Plains & Eastern Clean Line Transmission Project DOE issued a Mitigation Action Plan that explains how mitigation measures, which have been designed to mitigate adverse environmental impacts associated with the course of action directed by the Record of Decision, will be planned and implemented. For more information visit the project page: http://energy.gov/node/583039. Download Document EIS-0486: Mitigation Action Plan (12.85 MB) More

  3. EIS-0419: Mitigation Action Plan | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Mitigation Action Plan EIS-0419: Mitigation Action Plan Whistling Ridge Energy Project; Skamania County, Washington Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) adopted all the mitigation measures described in the Whistling Ridge Energy Project EIS and prepared a mitigation action plan. The applicant will be responsible for executing the mitigation measures for the wind project, and BPA will be responsible for executing the mitigation measures for the BPA interconnection facilities. For more

  4. EIS-0350-S1: Mitigation Action Plan | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Los Alamos, NM This Mitigation Action Plan (MAP) describes mitigation and monitoring commitments for constructing and operating the Modified CMRR-NF. The commitments made in this ...

  5. EIS-0472: Mitigation Action Plan | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Mitigation Action Plan EIS-0472: Mitigation Action Plan Uranium Leasing Program Mitigation Action Plan for the Final Uranium Leasing Program Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement DOE LM issued the Final Uranium Leasing Program Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (DOE/EIS-0472) in March 2014 and issued the associated Record of Decision (ROD) on May 6, 2014; the ROD was published in the Federal Register on May 12, 2014. This Mitigation Action Plan addresses the mitigation commitments

  6. EA-1440-S1: Mitigation Action Plan | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Mitigation Action Plan EA-1440-S1: Mitigation Action Plan National Renewable Energy ... Biorefinery Pilot Plant (TBPP). EA-1440-S1-MAP-2008.pdf (3.04 MB) More Documents & ...

  7. EIS-0425: Record of Decision and Mitigation Action Plan

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Bonneville Power Administration Record of Decision and Mitigation Action Plan for the Mid-Columbia Restoration Project

  8. Peru-GEF Nationally Appropriate Mitigation Actions in the Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    (Redirected from UNDP-Peru GEF Nationally Appropriate Mitigation Actions in the Energy Generation and End-Use Sectors)...

  9. EIS-0464: Mitigation Action Plan | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Mitigation Action Plan EIS-0464: Mitigation Action Plan Lake Charles Carbon Capture and Sequestration Project, Lake Charles, Louisiana and Brazoria County, Texas This Mitigation Action Plan (MAP) briefly describes the mitigation actions and monitoring and reporting requirements the recipient must implement during the design, construction, and demonstration of the Lake Charles Carbon Capture and Sequestration Project. DOE prepared this MAP in accordance with 10 CFR 1021.331. EIS-0464-MAP-2014.pdf

  10. DOE Uranium Leasing Program 2015 Mitigation Action Plan Activity Summary

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Report | Department of Energy Uranium Leasing Program 2015 Mitigation Action Plan Activity Summary Report DOE Uranium Leasing Program 2015 Mitigation Action Plan Activity Summary Report DOE Uranium Leasing Program 2015 Mitigation Action Plan Activity Summary Report (447.33 KB) More Documents & Publications LM Annual NEPA Planning Summary 2014 EA-1535: Final Programmatic Environmental Assessment EA-1934: 2015 Annual Report for Mitigation Action

  11. EIS-0380: Annual Mitigation Action Plan Annual Report

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Los Alamos National Laboratory Site-Wide Environmental Impact Statement Fiscal Year 2013 Mitigation Action Plan Annual Report

  12. EIS-0389: Mitigation Action Plan | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Action Plan EIS-0389: Mitigation Action Plan Trinity Public Utilities District Direct Interconnection Project Western Area Power Administration (Western) proposes to...

  13. EA-1934: Mitigation Action Plan | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Mitigation Action Plan EA-1934: Mitigation Action Plan Expansion of Active Borrow Areas, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington This Mitigation Action Plan is an integral part of the Finding of No Significant Impact for the proposed action within the Expansion of Active Borrow Areas, Hanford Site. The proposed action would expand 11active borrow pits on the Hanford Site that were included in the previous Environmental Assessments (DOE/EA-1403, DOE/EA-1454), and establish 1 new borrow source. This

  14. EA-1704: Mitigation Action Plan | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    4: Mitigation Action Plan EA-1704: Mitigation Action Plan Construction and Operation of a Proposed Cellulosic Biorefinery, BlueFire Fulton Renewable Energy, LLC, Fulton, Mississippi This Mitigation Action Plan specifies the methods for implementing mitigation measures that address the potential environmental impacts associated with the construction and operation of a lignocellulosic ethanol refinery, BlueFire Fulton Renewable Energy, LLC in Fulton, Mississippi. EA-1704-MAP-2010.pdf (2.11 MB)

  15. EA-1915: Mitigation Action Plan | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Mitigation Action Plan EA-1915: Mitigation Action Plan Proposed Conveyance of Land at the Hanford Site, Richland, Washington DOE prepared a Mitigation Action Plan (MAP) as an integral part of the Finding of No Significant Impact for DOE's EA. For more information on this project, see the project webpage: http://energy.gov/nepa/ea-1915-proposed-conveyance-land-hanford-site-ric... EA-1915-MAP-2015.pdf (86.09 KB) More Documents & Publications EA-1915: Final Environmental Assessment EA-1915:

  16. EA-1855: Mitigation Action Plan | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Lincoln and Spokane Counties, Washington (aka DOEEA-4406) This Mitigation Action Plan (MAP) is part of the Finding of No Significant Impact for the Creston-Bell...

  17. EA-1591: Mitigation Action Plan | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Plan Palisades-Goshen Transmission Line Reconstruction Project This Mitigation Action Plan (MAP) is part of the Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI) for the...

  18. Mitigation Action Plans (MAP) and Related Documents | Department...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    EA-1704: Mitigation Action Plan Construction and Operation of a Proposed Cellulosic Biorefinery, BlueFire Fulton Renewable Energy, LLC, Fulton, Mississippi March 10, 2010...

  19. EA-1858: Mitigation Action Plan | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    boiler and a 20-megawatt steam turbine at its existing paper mill in Port Angeles, Washington. PDF icon Mitigation Action Plan for the Environmental Assessment for the...

  20. EIS-0323: Mitigation Action Plan | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Mitigation Action Plan for the Sacramento Area Voltage Support Project which is prepared to accompany the Sacramento Area Voltage Support Project Supplement Environmental Impact...

  1. EIS-0323: Mitigation Action Plan | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    approval is implemented. PDF icon Mitigation Action Plan for the Sacramento Area Voltage Support Project Prepared to Accompany The Sacramento Area Voltage Support Project...

  2. Mitigation Action Plans (MAP) and Related Documents | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Project, Grant and Okanogon Counties, Washington November 1, 2011 EIS-0350-S1: Mitigation Action Plan Nuclear Facility Portion of the Chemistry and Metallurgy Research Building...

  3. EA-1901: Mitigation Action Plan | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    White Sturgeon and Burbot Hatcheries Project, Bonners Ferry, Boundary County, Idaho This Mitigation Action Plan (MAP) is referenced in the Finding of No Significant Impact for the...

  4. Central African Republic-Nationally Appropriate Mitigation Actions...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Appropriate Mitigation Actions (NAMAs) in the Congo Basin AgencyCompany Organization Environment Canada, International Institute for Sustainable Development (IISD) Sector...

  5. Burundi-Nationally Appropriate Mitigation Actions (NAMAs) in...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Appropriate Mitigation Actions (NAMAs) in the Congo Basin AgencyCompany Organization Environment Canada, International Institute for Sustainable Development (IISD) Sector...

  6. Rwanda-Nationally Appropriate Mitigation Actions (NAMAs) in the...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Appropriate Mitigation Actions (NAMAs) in the Congo Basin AgencyCompany Organization Environment Canada, International Institute for Sustainable Development (IISD) Sector...

  7. Cameroon-Nationally Appropriate Mitigation Actions (NAMAs) in...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Appropriate Mitigation Actions (NAMAs) in the Congo Basin AgencyCompany Organization Environment Canada, International Institute for Sustainable Development (IISD) Sector...

  8. EIS-0332: Mitigation Action Plan | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    transmission line between Bonneville Power Administration's existing McNary and John Day substations. PDF icon Mitigation Action Plan for the McNary-John Day Transmission...

  9. EA-1739: Mitigation Action Plan | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    More Documents & Publications EA-1951: Finding of No Significant Impact and Mitigation Action Plan EA-1739: Finding of No Significant Impact EIS-0285-SA-117: Supplement Analysis

  10. Mitigation Action Plans (MAP) and Related Documents | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    EIS-0218: Mitigation Action Plan Implementation of a Nuclear Weapons Nonproliferation Policy Concerning Foreign Research Reactor Spent Nuclear Fuel May 1, 1994 EIS-0186:...

  11. EIS-0026: Mitigation Action Plan | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    EIS-0026: Mitigation Action Plan Waste Isolation Pilot Plant This MAP focuses on ... Action Plan, is the central focus of this MAP and will be updated as needed to allow for ...

  12. EA-1636: Mitigation Action Plan | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Burnt Woods and Santiam-Toledo Pole Replacement Project This Mitigation Action Plan (MAP) is part of the Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI) for the Albany-Burnt Woods and...

  13. EIS-0473: Mitigation Action Plan | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    EIS-0473: Mitigation Action Plan W.A. Parish Post-Combustion CO2 Capture and Sequestration ... demonstration of the W.A. Parish Post-Combustion CO2 Capture and Sequestration Project. ...

  14. EIS-0460: Mitigation Action Plan | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    FutureGen 2.0 Project, Morgan County, Illinois This Mitigation Action Plan (MAP) briefly ... DOE prepared this MAP in accordance with 10 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) 1021.331. ...

  15. EIS-0332: Mitigation Action Plan | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    kV transmission line between Bonneville Power Administration's existing McNary and John Day substations. PDF icon DOEEIS-0332: Mitigation Action Plan for the McNary-John Day...

  16. EA-1934: 2014 Annual Report for Mitigation Action Plan | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Hanford Site, Richland, Washington This annual report provides a summary of DOEEA-1934 Mitigation Action Plan implementation in calendar year 2014. PDF icon EA-1934-FEA-MAP-2014...

  17. Implementing mitigative actions on the Superconducting Super Collider project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sands, T.L. )

    1993-01-01

    The Super Collider is the first project for which a Mitigation Action Plan (MAP) was prepared under a DOE Order that became effective in 1990. The policy requires a MAP for any project where environmental findings were predicated on taking mitigative actions. The MAP must be approved prior to the start of preliminary design and thus cannot be site or facility-specific because the requisite level of detail would not be available. This gap is filled by a series of environmental compliance plans (ECP) that are prepared by the architect-engineer/constructions manager under the direction of the DOE Management and Operations Contractor for the Super Collider. A given ECP identifies the environmental protection measures applicable to the respective contract package. The designated design team uses the ECP as one of its requirements documents and the environmental staff uses it during design reviews to verify compliance with the MAP. Site audits and monitoring data are used to document compliance and verify the effectiveness of mitigative actions, or identify required corrective actions. The applicability of this process to other projects falling within the scope of the National Environmental Policy Act is discussed.

  18. EA-2006: Finding of No Significant Impact and Mitigation Action Plan |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Finding of No Significant Impact and Mitigation Action Plan EA-2006: Finding of No Significant Impact and Mitigation Action Plan Columbia Estuary Ecosystem Restoration Program Bonneville Power Administration issued a FONSI and a floodplain and wetland statement of findings for a proposed program of actions to help restore ecological structure, function, and biodiversity within the Columbia River estuary. The mitigation measures listed in the Mitigation Action Plan and

  19. EA-1440-S-I: Mitigation Action Plan Completion Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This report presents the U.S. Department of Energy’s completion of the May 2008 Mitigation Action Plan (MAP) for the Supplement to the Final Site-Wide Environmental Assessment of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory’s South Table Mountain Complex (DOE/EA-1440-S-I) . Since May 2008, DOE and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) have implemented various traffic mitigation measures and routinely monitored traffic at the NREL South Table Mountain (STM) campus in Golden, Colorado in accordance with the MAP. With the completion and occupancy of the new Research Support Facility (RSF) and Energy Systems Integration Facility (ESIF) and with offsite traffic impacts maintained below threshold levels, implementation of the MAP is hereby complete. NREL and DOE will continue to implement current traffic control measures and conduct informal traffic monitoring as part of standard operations and sustainability initiatives.

  20. EA-1950: Finding of No Significant Impact and Mitigation Action Plan |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy 0: Finding of No Significant Impact and Mitigation Action Plan EA-1950: Finding of No Significant Impact and Mitigation Action Plan Grand Coulee-Creston Transmission Line Rebuild; Grant and Lincoln Counties, Washington Bonneville Power Administration issued a finding of no significant impact and a mitigation action plan for rebuilding approximately 28 miles of the Grand Coulee-Creston No. 1 115-kilovolt (kV) transmission line between Coulee Dam in Grant County and

  1. Addendum to 2010 NREL Environmental Performance Report … Traffic Mitigation Action Plan Update

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Addendum to the National Renewable Energy Laboratory Environmental Performance Report for 2010 (Annual Site Environmental Report per the U.S. Department of Energy Order 231.1-1A Chg 2) Traffic Mitigation Action Plan Update November 2011 Page 1 of 4 Traffic Mitigation Action Plan 2010 Update Traffic Management A Mitigation Action Plan (MAP), finalized in May 2008, was developed to address potential environmental impacts from changes in traffic at NREL and to support a Finding of No Significant

  2. EIS-0380: Fiscal Year 2011 Mitigation Action Plan Annual Report for the

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    2008 Los Alamos Site-Wide Environmental Impact Statement | Department of Energy Fiscal Year 2011 Mitigation Action Plan Annual Report for the 2008 Los Alamos Site-Wide Environmental Impact Statement EIS-0380: Fiscal Year 2011 Mitigation Action Plan Annual Report for the 2008 Los Alamos Site-Wide Environmental Impact Statement Fiscal Year 2011 Mitigation Action Plan Annual Report for the 2008 Los Alamos Site-Wide Environmental Impact Statement This Annual Report summarizes the activities that

  3. EA-1934: 2015 Annual Report for Mitigation Action Plan | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy 2015 Annual Report for Mitigation Action Plan EA-1934: 2015 Annual Report for Mitigation Action Plan Expansion of Active Borrow Areas, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington This annual report provides a summary of DOE/EA-1934 Mitigation Action Plan implementation in calendar year 2015. For more information, see http://energy.gov/node/381343. EA-1934_FEA_MAP_2015 (1.33 MB) More Documents & Publications EA-1934: 2014 Annual Report for Mitigation Action Plan EA-1934: Final Environmental

  4. Dual Axis Radiographic Hydrodynamic Test Facility mitigation action plan. Annual report for 1998

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haagenstad, T.

    1999-01-15

    This Mitigation Action Plan Annual Report (MAPAR) has been prepared as part of implementing the Dual Axis Radiographic Hydrodynamic Test Facility (DARHT) Mitigation Action Plan (MAP) to protect workers, soils, water, and biotic and cultural resources in and around the facility.

  5. MITIGATION ACTION PLAN FOR THE PLAINS & EASTERN CLEAN LINE TRANSMISSION PROJECT

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    MITIGATION ACTION PLAN FOR THE PLAINS & EASTERN CLEAN LINE TRANSMISSION PROJECT DOE/EIS-0486 MARCH 2016 3 1 INTRODUCTION The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Implementing Procedures (Title 10 Code of Federal Regulations [CFR] 1021.331) require completion of a mitigation action plan (MAP) following each Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) and its associated Record of Decision (ROD) to address mitigation commitments expressed in the ROD. The DOE Notice

  6. Fiscal Year 2013 Trails Management Program Mitigation Action Plan Annual Report, October 2013

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pava, Daniel S.

    2015-03-25

    This Trails Management Program Mitigation Action Plan Annual Report (Trails MAPAR) has been prepared for the Department of Energy (DOE)/National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) as part of implementing the 2003 Final Environmental Assessment for the Proposed Los Alamos National Laboratory Trails Management Program (DOE 2003). The Trails Mitigation Action Plan (MAP) is now a part of the Site-Wide Environmental Impact Statement for the Continued Operation of Los Alamos National Laboratory (DOE/EIS 0380) Mitigation Action Plan (2008 SWEIS MAP) (DOE 2008). The MAP provides guidance for the continued implementation of the Trails Management Program at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) and integration of future mitigation actions into the 2008 SWEIS MAP to decrease impacts associated with recreational trails use at LANL. This eighth MAPAR includes a summary of Trails Management Program activities and actions during Fiscal Year (FY) 2013, from October 2012 through September 2013.

  7. Dual Axis Radiographic Hydrodynamic Test Facility mitigation action plan. Annual report for 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haagenstad, H.T.

    1998-01-15

    This Mitigation Action Plan Annual Report (MAPAR) has been prepared by the US Department of Energy (DOE) as part of implementing the Dual Axis Radiographic Hydrodynamic Test Facility (DARHT) Mitigation Action Plan (MAP). This MAPAR provides a status on specific DARHT facility design- and construction-related mitigation actions that have been initiated in order to fulfill DOE`s commitments under the DARHT MAP. The functions of the DARHT MAP are to (1) document potentially adverse environmental impacts of the Phased Containment Option delineated in the Final EIS, (2) identify commitments made in the Final EIS and ROD to mitigate those potential impacts, and (3) establish Action Plans to carry out each commitment (DOE 1996). The DARHT MAP is divided into eight sections. Sections 1--5 provide background information regarding the NEPA review of the DARHT project and an introduction to the associated MAP. Section 6 references the Mitigation Action Summary Table which summaries the potential impacts and mitigation measures; indicates whether the mitigation is design-, construction-, or operational-related; the organization responsible for the mitigation measure; and the projected or actual completion data for each mitigation measure. Sections 7 and 8 discuss the Mitigation Action Plan Annual Report and Tracking System commitment and the Potential Impacts, Commitments, and Action Plans respectively. Under Section 8, potential impacts are categorized into five areas of concern: General Environment, including impacts to air and water; Soils, especially impacts affecting soil loss and contamination; Biotic Resources, especially impacts affecting threatened and endangered species; Cultural/Paleontological Resources, especially impacts affecting the archeological site known as Nake`muu; and Human Health and Safety, especially impacts pertaining to noise and radiation. Each potential impact includes a brief statement of the nature of the impact and its cause(s). The commitment

  8. EA-1945: Finding of No Significant Impact and Mitigation Action Plan |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Finding of No Significant Impact and Mitigation Action Plan EA-1945: Finding of No Significant Impact and Mitigation Action Plan Northern Mid-Columbia Joint Project; Grant, Douglas, and Chelan Counties, Washington Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) issued a finding of no significant impact, which includes a floodplain statement of findings, for the proposed Northern Mid-Columbia Joint Project, a 230-kilvolt transmission line proposed by BPA and the Public Utility

  9. EIS-0425: Mitigation Action Plan | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Project BPA decided to implement the Proposed Action of the Mid-Columbia Coho Restoration Program as described in the Mid-Columbia Coho Restoration Program Final Environmental...

  10. EIS-0384: Mitigation Action Plan | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    project designers and reviewers minimized short-term and long-term environmental and social impacts of the Proposed Action through project design, consultation with regulatory...

  11. Mitigation Action Plan: Lease of Parcel ED-1 of the Oak Ridge Reservation by the East Tennessee Economic Council

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-04-01

    In April 1996, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) completed an environmental assessment (EA) (DOE/EA-1113) for the proposed lease of 957-16 acres (Parcel ED-1) of the Oak Ridge (Tennessee) Reservation (ORR) by the East Tennessee Economic Council (ETEC) for industrial development. DOE plans to issue a Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI) for the proposed action, conditional upon the implementation of mitigation and monitoring to protect environmental resources. According to DOE`s National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) regulations (10 CFR 1021.322), a FONSI shall include {open_quotes}any commitments to mitigations that are essential to render the impacts of the proposed action not significant, beyond those mitigations that are integral elements of the proposed action, and a reference to the Mitigation Action Plan prepared under 10 CTR 1021.331{close_quotes}. Terms of the lease offer DOE the option of terminating the lease with ETEC should the lessee and/or sublessees fail to implement the mitigation defined in the FONSI.

  12. Policy Agenda for Addressing Climate Change in Bangladesh: Copenhagen...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Agenda for Addressing Climate Change in Bangladesh: Copenhagen and Beyond Jump to: navigation, search Name Policy Agenda for Addressing Climate Change in Bangladesh: Copenhagen and...

  13. Final environmental impact statement for the Nevada Test Site and off-site locations in the state of Nevada: Mitigation action plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-02-01

    The DOE Notice of Availability for this environmental impact statement was published in the Federal Register on Friday, October 18, 1996 (61 FR 54437). The final environmental impact statement identifies potential adverse effects resulting from the four use alternatives evaluated and discusses measures that DOE considered for the mitigation of these potential adverse effects. The Secretary of Energy signed the Record of Decision on the management and operation of the Nevada Test Site and other DOE sites in the state of Nevada on December 9, 1996. These decisions will result in the continuation of the multipurpose, multi-program use of the Nevada Test Site, under which DOE will pursue a further diversification of interagency, private industry, and public-education uses while meeting its Defense Program, Waste Management, and Environmental Restoration mission requirements at the Nevada Test Site and other Nevada sites, including the Tonopah Test Range, the Project Shoal Site, the Central Nevada Test Area, and on the Nellis Air Force Range Complex. The Record of Decision also identifies specific mitigation actions beyond the routine day-to-day physical and administrative controls needed for implementation of the decisions. These specific mitigation actions are focused on the transportation of waste and on groundwater availability. This Mitigation Action Plan elaborates on these mitigation commitments.

  14. Mitigation action plan sale of Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 1 (Elk Hills) Kern County, California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-01-01

    Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 1 (NPR-1, also called {open_quotes}Elk Hills{close_quotes}), a Federally-owned oil and gas production field in Kern County, California, was created by an Executive Order issued by President Taft on September 2, 1912. He signed another Executive Order on December 13, 1912, to establish Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 2 (NPR-2), located immediately south of NPR-1 and containing portions of the town of Taft, California. NPR-1 was not developed until the 1973-74 oil embargo demonstrated the nation`s vulnerability to oil supply interruptions. Following the embargo, Congress passed the Naval Petroleum Reserves Production Act of 1976 which directed that the reserve be explored and developed to its fall economic potential at the {open_quotes}maximum efficient rate{close_quotes} (MER) of production. Since Elk Hills began full production in 1976, it has functioned as a commercial operation, with total revenues to the Federal government through FY 1996 of $16.4 billion, compared to total exploration, development and production costs of $3.1 billion. In February 1996, Title 34 of the National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 1996 (P.L. 104-106), referred to as the Elk Hills Sales Statute, directed the Secretary of Energy to sell NPR-1 by February 10, 1998.The Secretary was also directed to study options for enhancing the value of the other Naval Petroleum and Oil Shale Reserve properties such as NPR-2, located adjacent to NPR-1 in Kern County- Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 3 (NPR-3) located in Natrona County, Wyoming; Naval Oil Shale Reserves No. 1 and No. 3 (NOSR-1 and NOSR-3) located in Garfield County, Colorado; and Naval Oil Shale Reserve No. 2 (NOSR-2) located in Uintah and Carbon Counties, Utah. The purpose of these actions was to remove the Federal government from the inherently non-Federal function of operating commercial oil fields while making sure that the public would obtain the maximum value from the reserves.

  15. Experimental Investigation of the Root Cause Mechanism and Effectiveness of Mitigating Actions for Axial Offset Anomaly in Pressurized Water Reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Said Abdel-Khalik

    2005-07-02

    Axial offset anomaly (AOA) in pressurized water reactors refers to the presence of a significantly larger measured negative axial offset deviation than predicted by core design calculations. The neutron flux depression in the upper half of high-power rods experiencing significant subcooled boiling is believed to be caused by the concentration of boron species within the crud layer formed on the cladding surface. Recent investigations of the root-cause mechanism for AOA [1,2] suggest that boron build-up on the fuel is caused by precipitation of lithium metaborate (LiBO2) within the crud in regions of subcooled boiling. Indirect evidence in support of this hypothesis was inferred from operating experience at Callaway, where lithium return and hide-out were, respectively, observed following power reductions and power increases when AOA was present. However, direct evidence of lithium metaborate precipitation within the crud has, heretofore, not been shown because of its retrograde solubility. To this end, this investigation has been undertaken in order to directly verify or refute the proposed root-cause mechanism of AOA, and examine the effectiveness of possible mitigating actions to limit its impact in high power PWR cores.

  16. MITIGATION ACTION PLAN

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Georgia MITEC Small Business Boot Camp In Georgia October 4, 2016 9:00AM to 3:00PM EDT Atlanta, GA DOE's Clean Energy Manufacturing Initiative (CEMI) is hosting a MITEC Boot Camp in Atlanta, Georgia coordinated through the Manufacturing Impacts Through Energy and Commerce (MITEC) program. This boot camp is designed to help small- to medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) in advanced energy sectors access DOE national lab capabilities and assets; learn about DOE programs targeting SMEs including the

  17. Mitigation Action Plan

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... A11 Revegetate disturbed areas as soon as practicable after disturbance. On agricultural ... Contain and dispose of spill cleanup wastes and contaminated soils in accordance with ...

  18. EIS-0026: Annual Mitigation Report | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Annual Mitigation Report EIS-0026: Annual Mitigation Report The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Mitigation Action Plan was prepared to address commitments made in the RODs for...

  19. Mitigation Measures for Distributed PV Interconnection

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Mitigation Action Plans (MAP) and Related Documents Mitigation Action Plans (MAP) and Related Documents Mitigation Action Plans are documents DOE prepares in accordance with DOE NEPA regulations (10 CFR 1021.331) that describes the plan for implementing commitments made in a DOE environmental impact statement and its associated record of decision, or, when appropriate, an EA or FONSI, to mitigate adverse environmental impacts associated with an action. If you have any trouble finding a specific

  20. Copenhagen, New York: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Copenhagen is a village in Lewis County, New York. It falls under New York's 23rd congressional district.12...

  1. INL featured in video presented at Copenhagen conference

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    INL featured in video presented at Copenhagen conference IDAHO FALLS - Idaho National Laboratory footage and research are featured in a video presented at the World Climate Change Summit in Copenhagen today. President Obama introduced the video, which is titled "America's Response to Climate Change" and discusses how varied energy technologies can combat climate change. In October, the Department of Energy's Public Affairs office asked the national laboratories to suggest ideas about

  2. Making the Most of Mitigation

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Los Alamos Field Office uses a comprehensive Mitigation Action Plan to monitor and manage commitments to mitigate adverse environmental impacts associated with the 2008 Los Alamos National Laboratory Site-Wide Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) and multiple project-specific EISs and environmental assessments (EAs). The DOE NEPA Order requires a publicly available annual report on progress made in implementing mitigation commitments and the effectiveness of the mitigation.

  3. EIS-0026: Annual Mitigation Report | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    4 Annual Mitigation Report addresses those WIPP Project-related mitigation activities undertaken from the time of submittal of the 1994 Annual Mitigation Report in July 1994 through June 2014. EIS-0026-MAP-2014.pdf (1.05 MB) More Documents & Publications EIS-0026: Annual Mitigation Report EIS-0026: Annual Mitigation Report EIS-0026: Mitigation Action Plan

  4. EA-1679: Mitigation Action Plan

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Grand Coulee's Third Powerplant 500-kV Transmission Line Replacement Project, Grant and Okanogon Counties, Washington

  5. EA-1456: Mitigation Action Plan

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Cheyenne-Miracle Mile and Ault-Cheyenne Transmission Line Rebuild Project Carbon, Albany and Laramie Counties, Wyoming and Weld County, Colorado

  6. EA-1736: Mitigation Action Plan

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Expansion of the Sanitary Effluent Reclamation Facility and Environmental Restoration of Reach S-2 of Sandia Canyon at Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, Los Alamos, New Mexico

  7. EA-1755: Mitigation Action Plan

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Reconstruction of the South Access Road (CR 802) in Support of the Department of Energy, Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) in Eddy County, New Mexico

  8. EA-1617: Mitigation Action Plan

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Lovell-Yellowtail and Basin-Lovell Transmission Line Rebuild Project, Big Horn County, Wyoming, Big Horn and Carbon Counties, Montana

  9. EA-1212: Mitigation Action Plan

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Lease of Land for the Development of a Research Park at Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM

  10. EIS-0380: Mitigation Action Plan

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    2008 Site-Wide Environmental Impact Statement for the Continued Operation of Los Alamos National Laboratory

  11. Recommendation 195: Mitigation of Contamination in Bear Creek Burial Grounds

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The ORSSAB requests DOE provide possible remedial actions to mitigate releases of contamination from Bear Creek Burial Grounds.

  12. Climate Action Plan | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    actions that the administration believes will mitigate the environmental and economic costs of climate change. Obama's six Climate Action Initiatives: 1. Phasing out Fossil Fuels...

  13. CO2 emissions mitigation and fossil fuel markets: Dynamic and international aspects of climate policies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bauer, Nico; Bosetti, Valentina; Hamdi-Cherif, Meriem; Kitous, Alban; McCollum, David; Mejean, Aurelie; Rao, Shilpa; Turton, Hal; Paroussos, Leonidas; Ashina, Shuichi; Calvin, Katherine V.; Wada, Kenichi; Van Vuuren, Detlef

    2015-01-01

    This paper explores a multi-model scenario ensemble to assess the impacts of idealized and non-idealized climate change stabilization policies on fossil fuel markets. Under idealized conditions climate policies significantly reduce coal use in the short- and long-term. Reductions in oil and gas use are much smaller, particularly until 2030, but revenues decrease much more because oil and gas prices are higher and decrease with mitigation. A first deviation from the optimal transition pathway relaxes global emission targets until 2030, in accordance with the Copenhagen pledges and regionally-specific low-carbon technology targets. Fossil fuel markets revert back to the no-policy case: though coal use increases strongest, revenue gains are higher for oil and gas. To balance the carbon budget over the 21st century, the long-term reallocation of fossil fuels is significantly larger - twice and more - than the short-term distortion. This amplifying effect results from coal lock-in and inter-fuel substitution effects. The second deviation from the optimal transition pathway relaxes the global participation assumption. The result here is less clear cut across models, as we find carbon leakage effects ranging from positive to negative because leakage and substitution patterns of coal, oil, and gas differ. In summary, distortions of fossil fuel markets resulting from relaxed short-term global emission targets are more important and less uncertain than the issue of carbon leakage from early mover action.

  14. EA-1731: Mitigation Acton Plan | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Plan Walla Walla-Tucannon River Transmission Line Rebuild Project This Mitigation Action Plan (MAP) is part of the Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI) for the Walla...

  15. Democratic Republic of Congo-Nationally Appropriate Mitigation...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Appropriate Mitigation Actions (NAMAs) in the Congo Basin AgencyCompany Organization Environment Canada, International Institute for Sustainable Development (IISD) Sector...

  16. Mitigation of Vehicle Fast Charge Grid Impacts with Renewables and Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Mitigation Action Plan FutureGen 2.0 Project DOE/EIS-0460 U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory March 2014 DOE/EIS-0460 FUTUREGEN 2.0 PROJECT MITIGATION ACTION PLAN INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK DOE/EIS-0460 FUTUREGEN 2.0 PROJECT MITIGATION ACTION PLAN TABLE OF CONTENTS Introduction ................................................................................................................................................... 1 Purpose

  17. EIS-0026: Annual Mitigation Report | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    2010 Annual Mitigation Report EIS-0026: 2010 Annual Mitigation Report Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Guidance for the development of a Mitigation Action Plan (MAP) is contained in Department of Energy (DOE) Order 451.1B, National Environmental Policy Act Compliance Program, and 10 CFR 1021, National Environmental Policy Act Implementing Procedures. These documents specify that a MAP be prepared to mitigate environmental impacts resulting from the implementation of commitments made in the Record of

  18. Nationally Appropriate Mitigation Actions | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Topics: GHG inventory, Low emission development planning Resource Type: Publications, Lessons learnedbest practices, Case studiesexamples Website: unfccc.inthomeitems...

  19. Locked into Copenhagen pledges - Implications of short-term emission targets for the cost and feasibility of long-term climate goals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Riahi, Keywan; Kriegler, Elmar; Johnson, Nils; Bertram, Christoph; den Elzen, Michel; Eom, Jiyong; Schaeffer, Michiel; Edmonds, James A.; Isaac, Morna; Krey, Volker; Longden, Thomas; Luderer, Gunnar; Mejean, Aurelie; McCollum, David; Mima, Silvana; Turton, Hal; Van Vuuren, Detlef; Wada, Kenichi; Bosetti, Valentina; Capros, Pantelis; Criqui, Patrick; Hamdi-Cherif, Meriem; Kainuma, M.; Edenhofer, Ottmar

    2015-01-01

    This paper provides an overview of the AMPERE intermodeling comparison with focus on the implications of near-term policies for the costs and attainability of long-term climate objectives. Ten modeling teams participated in the project to explore the consequences of global emissions following the proposed policy stringency of the national pledges from the Copenhagen Accord and Cancún Agreements to 2030. Specific features compared to earlier assessments are the explicit consideration of near-term 2030 emissions targets as well as the systematic sensitivity analysis for the availability and potential of mitigation technologies. Our estimates show that a 2030 mitigation effort comparable to the pledges would result in a further "lock-in" of the energy system into fossil fuels and thus impede the required energy transformation to reach low greenhouse-gas stabilization levels (450ppm CO2e). Major implications include significant increases in mitigation costs, increased risk that low stabilization targets become unattainable, and reduced chances of staying below the proposed temperature change target of 2C. With respect to technologies, we find that following the pledge pathways to 2030 would narrow policy choices, and increases the risks that some currently optional technologies, such as nuclear or carbon capture and storage (CCS), will become "a must" by 2030.

  20. Neutralize & Mitigate

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Capabilities » Neutralize & Mitigate Neutralize & Mitigate Scientists are developing technologies designed to mitigate the effects of IEDs, protecting personnel and equipment from the detonation effects of these and other types of explosives. v Protecting personnel and equipment from the detonation effects At Los Alamos, scientists are developing technologies designed to mitigate the effects of IEDs, protecting personnel and equipment from the detonation effects of these and other types

  1. Mitigating Wildland Fires

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Mitigating Wildland Fires Mitigating Wildland Fires Our interactive wildland fire map displays the locations of wildland fire mitigation activities. Contact Environmental Communication & Public Involvement P.O. Box 1663 MS M996 Los Alamos, NM 87545 (505) 667-0216 Email View in Google Maps What we are doing to mitigate wildland fires Recent large wildfires in the area, including the La Mesa Fire (1977), the Dome Fire (1996), the Oso Fire (1998), the Cerro Grande Fire (2000), and the Las

  2. NEPA mitigation and monitoring activities on Army installations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reinke, D.C.; Robitaille, P.

    1995-12-01

    The Army National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) implementation regulation AR 200-2 (Army Regulation) requires only mitigation measures that can reasonably be accompanied as part of a proposed alternative be identified in the NEPA document. Failure of the identified mitigation actions to be executed or to perform as expected leads to a required reevaluation of the project and the significance of its impacts. The USAEC has undertaken a study of mitigation and monitoring actions listed in Army NEPA documents. As part of the USAEC NEPA program the study has outlined three major tasks (1) collection of a significant sample of Army NEPA documents, (2) review environmental documentation management and retention, and (3) review in detail a subsample of documents and follow-up with site visits. Some 242 Army NEPA documents, Environmental Assessments (EA) and Environmental Impact Statements (EIS) were collected and evaluated for mitigation requirements. Ninety seven of the 242 NEPA documents committed to one or more mitigation actions. While a wide array of mitigating activities have been identified in these documents, the four most common are (1) management plans and practices, (2) training actions, (3) revegetation actions, and (4) construction practices. Site visits to selected Army installations showed that mitigation practices were for the most part being done, but were poorly documented. No installation visited had a mitigation monitoring plan in place as required by AR 200-2.

  3. Mitigating Greenhouse Gas Emissions: Voluntary Reporting 1996

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    1997-01-01

    Presents information on voluntary actions to reduce greenhouse gases or remove such gases from the atmosphere in 1995. It provides an overview of participation in the Voluntary Reporting Program, a perspective on the composition of activities reported, and a review of some key issues in interpreting and evaluating achievements associated with reported emissions mitigation initiatives.

  4. Hellsgate Winter Range : Wildlife Mitigation Project. Preliminary Environmental Assessment.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    1995-01-01

    The Bonneville Power Administration proposes funding the Hellsgate Winter Range Wildlife Mitigation Project in cooperation with the Colville Convederated Tribes and Bureau of Indian Affairs. This Preliminary Environmental Assessment examines the potential environmental effects of acquiring and managing property for wildlife and wildlife habitat within a large project area. The Propose action is intended to meet the need for mitigation of wildlife and wild life habitat that was adversely affected by the construction of Grand Coulee and Chief Joseph Dams and their reservoirs.

  5. Siting and Barrier Mitigation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Siting and Barrier Mitigation - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & Engineering Grid Modernization Battery Testing Nuclear Energy Defense Waste Management Programs

  6. Bonneville Power Administration Wildlife Mitigation Program : Draft Environmental Impact Statement.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    1996-08-01

    Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) is responsible for mitigating the loss of wildlife habitat caused by the development of the Federal Columbia River Power System. BPA accomplishes this mitigation by funding projects consistent with those recommended by the Northwest Power Planning Council (Council). The projects are submitted to the Council from Indian Tribes, state agencies, property owners, private conservation groups, and other Federal agencies. Future wildlife mitigation actions with potential environmental impacts are expected to include land acquisition and management, water rights acquisition and management, habitat restoration and enhancement, installation of watering devices, riparian fencing, and similar wildlife conservation actions. BPA needs to ensure that individual wildlife mitigation projects are planned and managed with appropriate consistency across projects, jurisdictions, and ecosystems, as well as across time. BPA proposes to standardize the planning and implementation of individual wildlife mitigation projects funded by BPA. Alternative 1 is the No Action alternative. Five standardizing alternatives are identified to represent the range of possible strategies, goals, and procedural requirements reasonably applicable to BPA-funded projects under a standardized approach to project planning and implementation. All action alternatives are based on a single project planning process designed to resolve site-specific issues in an ecosystem context and to adapt to changing conditions and information.

  7. EIS-0246: Wildlife Mitigation Program, Idaho, Montana, Nevada, Washington, Oregon

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    BPA has decided to adopt the set of prescriptions (goals, strategies, and procedural requirements) identified in the final EIS as “Alternative 6, Balanced Action (BPA’s Preferred Alternative).” This decision will standardize the planning and implementation process, while achieving balance among all decision factors: (1) meeting the biological objectives of wildlife mitigation projects, (2) achievement of cost and administrative efficiency, (3) compliance with all applicable laws and regulations, and (4) protection and improvement of other environmental resources when such actions would support wildlife mitigation.

  8. Mitigation measures and programs in Hungary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Molnar, S.

    1996-12-31

    In Hungary there are four main governmental programs, which may result in a decrease of emissions of anthropogenic greenhouse gases (GHGs): (1) National program of energy efficiency improvement and energy conservation, (2) Afforestation program, (3) Volatile organic compounds (VOC) emission reduction program, and (4) Program to reduce the use of ozone depleting substances. These ambitious programs were launched in the beginning of the 90`s, but they have been slowed down because of budgetary problems. The comprehensive action plan for mitigation of GHG emissions should be based on these ongoing programs. These programs should be expanded by further measures and programs in order to fulfill the requirements of the FCCC. In the next sections the results and prospects of the above mentioned programs will be summarized. Also the results of the mitigation study supported by the U.S. Country Studies Program are included.

  9. Hungry Horse Dam Fisheries Mitigation Implementation Plan, 1990-2003 Progress (Annual) Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Montana Department of Fish, Wildlife and Parks; Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes

    1993-03-10

    In this document the authors present mitigation implementation activities to protect and enhance resident fish and aquatic habitat affected by the construction and operation of Hungry Horse Dam. This plan only addresses non-operational actions (mitigation measures that do not affect dam operation) described in the 'Fisheries Mitigation Plan for Losses Attributable to the Construction and Operation of Hungry Horse Dam' (Mitigation Plan) submitted to the Northwest Power Planning Council (Council) in March 1991 and in accordance with subsequent Council action on that Mitigation Plan. Operational mitigation was deferred for consideration under the Columbia Basin System Operation Review (SOR) process. This document represents an implementation plan considered and conditionally approved by the Council in March of 1993.

  10. BIAS MITIGATION | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Diversity and Inclusion » BIAS MITIGATION BIAS MITIGATION BIAS MITIGATION The DOE has focused its efforts on eliminating implicit bias at the individual and institutional levels. At the individual level, the DOE's efforts to eliminate implicit bias include: conflict prevention and resolution; Ombudsman - which promotes the early identification and resolution of issues in order to promote morale and productivity through an informal process; workplace improvement forums; and an anti-harassment

  11. GHG emission mitigation measures and technologies in the Czech Republic

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tichy, M.

    1996-12-31

    The paper presents a short overview of main results in two fields: projection of GHG emission from energy sector in the Czech Republic and assessment of technologies and options for GHG mitigation. The last part presents an overview of measures that were prepared for potential inclusion to the Czech Climate Change Action Plan.

  12. Peaking of world oil production: Impacts, mitigation, & risk management

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hirsch, R.L.; Bezdek, Roger; Wendling, Robert

    2005-02-01

    The peaking of world oil production presents the U.S. and the world with an unprecedented risk management problem. As peaking is approached, liquid fuel prices and price volatility will increase dramatically, and, without timely mitigation, the economic, social, and political costs will be unprecedented. Viable mitigation options exist on both the supply and demand sides, but to have substantial impact, they must be initiated more than a decade in advance of peaking.... The purpose of this analysis was to identify the critical issues surrounding the occurrence and mitigation of world oil production peaking. We simplified many of the complexities in an effort to provide a transparent analysis. Nevertheless, our study is neither simple nor brief. We recognize that when oil prices escalate dramatically, there will be demand and economic impacts that will alter our simplified assumptions. Consideration of those feedbacks will be a daunting task but one that should be undertaken. Our aim in this study is to-- • Summarize the difficulties of oil production forecasting; • Identify the fundamentals that show why world oil production peaking is such a unique challenge; • Show why mitigation will take a decade or more of intense effort; • Examine the potential economic effects of oil peaking; • Describe what might be accomplished under three example mitigation scenarios. • Stimulate serious discussion of the problem, suggest more definitive studies, and engender interest in timely action to mitigate its impacts.

  13. Microsoft Word - Final Mitigated Action Plan - CNMI.docx

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... In addition, an initial report will be submitted six months after turbine operations begins. 6 | P a g e Dead Marian swiftlets found under a wind turbine will be collected by ...

  14. EA-1891: Mitigation Action Plan | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    The project would rebuild the aging 97.5-mile-long 230- kilovolt (kV) Alvey-Fairview transmission line in Lane, Douglas, and Coos counties, Oregon. This MAP is for the Proposed ...

  15. EA-1440: Mitigation Action Plan | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Impact for the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's South Table Mountain Complex, DOEEA-1440-S-1 (May 2008) More Documents & Publications EA-1440-S2: Final ...

  16. EIS-0186: Mitigation Action Plan | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Healy Clean Coal Project In response to a Program Opportunity Notice issued in May 1989 by the Department of Energy (DOE) for the third solicitation of the Clean Coal...

  17. Argentina-The Mitigation Action Implementation Network (MAIN...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Ministry of Energy Argentina Sector Climate, Energy, Land Focus Area Renewable Energy, Non-renewable Energy, Agriculture, Biomass, - Waste to Energy, Economic Development,...

  18. EA-1611: Mitigation Action Plan | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    LLC applied to Western Area Power Administration to interconnect a 90-megawatt wind power facility with Western's existing Sterling-Frenchman Creek 115-kV transmission line....

  19. EA-1562-SA-1: Mitigation Action Plan | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    subsequent loss of mature shrub-steppe habitat associated with Phase II build out ... loss of the areal extent of the priority habitat by replacement of the lost habitat value, ...

  20. EA-1870: Mitigation Action Plan | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    could be suitable for production of clean fuels such as substitute natural gas, sulfur-free Fischer-Tropsch diesel, jet fuel, dimethyl ether, and methane. This MAP identifies...

  1. Viresco-Mitigation-Action-Plan12-20-11.pdf

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

  2. EIS-0421: Record of Decision and Mitigation Action Plan | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    FEIS for this project, the Bonneville Power Administration has decided to construct the Big Eddy-Knight Transmission Project in Wasco County, Oregon and Klickitat County,...

  3. EA-1782: Mitigation Action Plan | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    to aid its decision whether to provide funding for the University of Delaware's construction and operation of a 2-megawatt wind turbine adjacent to the University's...

  4. EA-1912: Mitigation Action Plan | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Midway-Benton No. 1 transmission line and approximately 11 miles of the 115-kV Benton-Othello No. 1 transmission line between the existing Midway and Benton Substations, located...

  5. Colombia-The Mitigation Action Implementation Network (MAIN)...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    of Energy Thailand, Ministry of Industry Thailand, Ministry of Natural Resources and Environment Thailand, Pollution Control Department, Ministry of Natural Resources and...

  6. Thailand-The Mitigation Action Implementation Network (MAIN)...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    of Energy Thailand, Ministry of Industry Thailand, Ministry of Natural Resources and Environment Thailand, Pollution Control Department, Ministry of Natural Resources and...

  7. India-The Mitigation Action Implementation Network (MAIN) | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    of Energy Thailand, Ministry of Industry Thailand, Ministry of Natural Resources and Environment Thailand, Pollution Control Department, Ministry of Natural Resources and...

  8. Mexico-The Mitigation Action Implementation Network (MAIN) |...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    of Energy Thailand, Ministry of Industry Thailand, Ministry of Natural Resources and Environment Thailand, Pollution Control Department, Ministry of Natural Resources and...

  9. Panama-The Mitigation Action Implementation Network (MAIN) |...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    of Energy Thailand, Ministry of Industry Thailand, Ministry of Natural Resources and Environment Thailand, Pollution Control Department, Ministry of Natural Resources and...

  10. Costa Rica-The Mitigation Action Implementation Network (MAIN...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    of Energy Thailand, Ministry of Industry Thailand, Ministry of Natural Resources and Environment Thailand, Pollution Control Department, Ministry of Natural Resources and...

  11. Dominican Republic-The Mitigation Action Implementation Network...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Republic, National Energy Commission Dominican Republic, Ministry of Environment and Natural Resources Dominican Republic, Ministry of Economy, Planning and Development Dominican...

  12. Indonesia-The Mitigation Action Implementation Network (MAIN...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    of Energy Thailand, Ministry of Industry Thailand, Ministry of Natural Resources and Environment Thailand, Pollution Control Department, Ministry of Natural Resources and...

  13. Brazil-The Mitigation Action Implementation Network (MAIN) |...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    of Energy Thailand, Ministry of Industry Thailand, Ministry of Natural Resources and Environment Thailand, Pollution Control Department, Ministry of Natural Resources and...

  14. Philippines-The Mitigation Action Implementation Network (MAIN...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    of Energy Thailand, Ministry of Industry Thailand, Ministry of Natural Resources and Environment Thailand, Pollution Control Department, Ministry of Natural Resources and...

  15. China-The Mitigation Action Implementation Network (MAIN) | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    of Energy Thailand, Ministry of Industry Thailand, Ministry of Natural Resources and Environment Thailand, Pollution Control Department, Ministry of Natural Resources and...

  16. Vietnam-The Mitigation Action Implementation Network (MAIN) ...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    of Energy Thailand, Ministry of Industry Thailand, Ministry of Natural Resources and Environment Thailand, Pollution Control Department, Ministry of Natural Resources and...

  17. Malaysia-The Mitigation Action Implementation Network (MAIN)...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    of Energy Thailand, Ministry of Industry Thailand, Ministry of Natural Resources and Environment Thailand, Pollution Control Department, Ministry of Natural Resources and...

  18. Chile-The Mitigation Action Implementation Network (MAIN) | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    of Energy Thailand, Ministry of Industry Thailand, Ministry of Natural Resources and Environment Thailand, Pollution Control Department, Ministry of Natural Resources and...

  19. Pakistan-The Mitigation Action Implementation Network (MAIN)...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    of Energy Thailand, Ministry of Industry Thailand, Ministry of Natural Resources and Environment Thailand, Pollution Control Department, Ministry of Natural Resources and...

  20. Uruguay-The Mitigation Action Implementation Network (MAIN) ...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    of Energy Thailand, Ministry of Industry Thailand, Ministry of Natural Resources and Environment Thailand, Pollution Control Department, Ministry of Natural Resources and...

  1. Peru-The Mitigation Action Implementation Network (MAIN) | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    of Energy Thailand, Ministry of Industry Thailand, Ministry of Natural Resources and Environment Thailand, Pollution Control Department, Ministry of Natural Resources and...

  2. EIS-0409: Mitigation Action Plan | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Draft Environmental Impact Statement EIS-0409: Final Environmental Impact Statement Successful Field-Scale In Situ Thermal NAPL Remediation at the Young - Rainey STAR Center...

  3. EA-1974: Finding of No Significant Impact and Mitigation Action...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Bonneville Power Administration issued a finding of no significant impact (FONSI) for the proposed restoration of a tidal marsh in the Columbia River Estuary, near Astoria in ...

  4. EIS-0506: Record of Decision and Mitigation Action Plan | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    BPA decided to provide funding for implementing the project to improve tributary fish ... debris for bank structure and instream fish habitat, constructing side channels and ...

  5. MITIGATION ACTION PLAN FOR THE PLAINS & EASTERN CLEAN LINE TRANSMISSIO...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... or updated as required, issued by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service pursuant to Section 7 ... Recreation; Special Status Wildlife, Fish, Aquatic Invertebrate, and Amphibian ...

  6. Ecofys-Nationally Appropriate Mitigation Actions: Insights from...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Topics: Low emission development planning, Policiesdeployment programs Resource Type: Lessons learnedbest practices Website: www.ecofys.comcompublications...

  7. EA-1592: Mitigation Action Plan | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    NNSA's Kansas City Plant Based on the analysis in the Environmental Assessment prepared for the proposal by the GSA and NNSA, neither the construction nor operation of the selected...

  8. Mitigation Action Implementation Network (MAIN) Feed | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    US Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) UNEP-Risoe Centre on Energy, Climate and Sustainable Development United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) United Nations...

  9. EA-1973: Finding of No Significant Impact and Mitigation Action...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    the project webpage. PDF icon EA-1973-FONSI-MAP-2015 More Documents & Publications EA-1973: Draft Environmental Assessment EA-1901: Finding of No Significant Impact EA-1518: Final

  10. EA-1941: Mitigation Action Plan (MAP) | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    1 Transmission Line. PDF icon EA-1941-MAP-2014.pdf More Documents & Publications EA-1941: Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI) EA-1941: Final Environmental Assessment EA-1941

  11. EA-1931: Finding of No Significant Impact and Mitigation Action...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Bonneville Power Administration issued a finding of no significant impact and a ... More Documents & Publications EA-1931: Draft Environmental Assessment EA-1931: Final ...

  12. EA-1946: Finding of No Significant Impact and Mitigation Action...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    PDF icon EA-1946-FONSI-MAP-2014.pdf More Documents & Publications EA-1946: Draft Environmental Assessment EA-1946: Final Environmental Assessment EIS-0285-SA-140: Supplement ...

  13. Peru-Mitigation Action Plans and Scenarios (MAPS) | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    in an effort to build best practice, share tools and research and to create a growing body of knowledge, from a developing country perspective, that is accessible to the...

  14. Argentina-Mitigation Action Plans and Scenarios (MAPS) | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    in an effort to build best practice, share tools and research and to create a growing body of knowledge, from a developing country perspective, that is accessible to the...

  15. South Africa-Mitigation Action Plans and Scenarios (MAPS) | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    in an effort to build best practice, share tools and research and to create a growing body of knowledge, from a developing country perspective, that is accessible to the...

  16. Brazil-Mitigation Action Plans and Scenarios (MAPS) | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    in an effort to build best practice, share tools and research and to create a growing body of knowledge, from a developing country perspective, that is accessible to the...

  17. Chile-Mitigation Action Plans and Scenarios (MAPS) | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    in an effort to build best practice, share tools and research and to create a growing body of knowledge, from a developing country perspective, that is accessible to the...

  18. Colombia-Mitigation Action Plans and Scenarios (MAPS) | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    in an effort to build best practice, share tools and research and to create a growing body of knowledge, from a developing country perspective, that is accessible to the...

  19. Mitigation Monitoring and Reporting Program for continued operation of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-08-01

    A Mitigation Monitoring and Reporting Program, required by the California Environmental Quality Act, was developed by UC as part of the Final EIS/EIR process. This document describing the program is a companion to the Final Environmental Impact Statement/Environmental Impact Report (EIS/EIR) for the Continued Operation of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore (SNL, Livermore). The Final EIS/EIR analyzes the potential environmental impacts of the proposed action, which for the purposes of NEPA is: continued operation, including near-term (within 5 to 1 0 years) proposed projects, of LLNL and SNL, Livermore. The proposed action for the EIR is the renewal of the contract between DOE and UC for UC`s continued operation and management of LLNL. The Mitigation Monitoring and Reporting Program is for implementing and monitoring progress of measures taken to mitigate the significant impacts of the proposed action. A complete description of the impacts and proposed mitigations is in Section 5 of Volume I of the Final EIS/EIR. This report summarizes the mitigation measures, identifies the responsible party at the Laboratory for implementing the mitigation measure, states when monitoring will be implemented, when the mitigation measure will be in place and monitoring completed, and who will verify that the mitigation measure was implemented.

  20. Federal Interagency Wind Turbine Radar Interference Mitigation...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Federal Interagency Wind Turbine Radar Interference Mitigation Strategy Federal Interagency Wind Turbine Radar Interference Mitigation Strategy Cover of the Federal Interagency ...

  1. Technologies for Climate Change Mitigation: Transport Sector...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Technologies for Climate Change Mitigation: Transport Sector Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Technologies for Climate Change Mitigation: Transport Sector...

  2. Wildlife mitigation and monitoring report Gunnison, Colorado, site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-04-01

    The Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project is administered by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE); its purpose is to cleanup uranium mill tailings and other contaminated material at 24 UMTRA Project sites in 10 states. This report summarizes the wildlife mitigation and monitoring program under way at the Gunnison UMTRA Project, Gunnison, Colorado. Remedial action at the Gunnison site was completed in December 1995 and is described in detail in the Gunnison completion report. The impacts of this activity were analyzed in the Gunnison environmental assessment (EA). These impacts included two important game species: the pronghorn antelope (Antilocapra americans) and sage grouse (Wentrocerus urophasianus). Haul truck traffic was predicted to limit antelope access to water sources north of the Tenderfoot Mountain haul road and that truck traffic along this and other haul roads could result in antelope road kills. Clearing land at the disposal cell, haul road and borrow site activities, and the associated human activities also were predicted to negatively impact (directly and indirectly) sage grouse breeding, nesting, loafing, and wintering habitat. As a result, an extensive mitigation and monitoring plan began in 1992. Most of the monitoring studies are complete and the results of these studies, written by different authors, appear in numerous reports. This report will: (1) Analyze existing impacts and compare them to predicted impacts. (2) Summarize mitigation measures. (3) Summarize all existing monitoring data in one report. (4) Analyze the effectiveness of the mitigation measures.

  3. Enhanced Separation and Mitigated Plasticization in Membranes...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Enhanced Separation and Mitigated Plasticization in Membranes using Metal-Organic Framework Nanoparticles

  4. Priority mitigation measures in non-energy sector in Kazakstan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mizina, S.V.; Pilifosova, O.V.; Gossen, E.F.

    1996-12-31

    Fulfilling the Commitments on UN FCCC through the U.S. Country Studies Program, Kazakstan has developed the national GHG Inventory, vulnerability and adaptation assessment and estimated the possibility of mitigation measures in certain sectors. Next step is developing National Climate Change Action Plan. That process includes such major steps as setting priorities in mitigation measures and technologies, their comprehensive evaluation, preparation implementation strategies, developing the procedure of incorporation of the National Action Plan into other development plans and programs. This paper presents programs and measures that can reduce GHG emissions in non-energy sector. Measures in land-use change and forestry, agriculture and coal mining are considered. Current situation in non-energy sector of Kazakstan is discussed. The amount of GHG emissions reduction and cost analysis presented in this paper was developed with the use of IPCC recommendations.

  5. Action Items

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    ACTION ITEMS Presentation to the DOE High Level Waste Corporate Board July 29, 2009 Kurt Gerdes Office of Waste Processing DOE-EM Office of Engineering & Technology 2 ACTION ITEMS...

  6. ACTION PLAN

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    -1 ACTION PLAN 1.0 INTRODUCTION 1.1 PURPOSE The purpose of this action plan is to establish the overall plan for hazardous waste permitting, meeting closure and postclosure requirements, and remedial action under the Federal Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) and Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA), and the Washington State Hazardous Waste Management Act. All actions required to be taken pursuant to this Agreement shall be taken in accordance

  7. Blue Creek Winter Range : Wildlife Mitigation Project : Preliminary Environmental Assessment.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration; United States. Bureau of Indian Affairs; Spokane Tribe of the Spokane Reservation, Washington

    1994-11-01

    This preliminary Environmental Assessment examines the potential environmental effects of securing land and conducting wildlife habitat enhancement and long term management activities within the boundaries of the Spokane Indian Reservation. Four proposed activities are analyzed: Habitat protection; Habitat enhancement; Operation and maintenance; and Monitoring and evaluation. The proposed action is intended to meet the need for mitigation of wildlife and wildlife habitat adversely affected by the construction of Grand Coulee Dam and its reservoir.

  8. Libby Mitigation Program, 2007 Annual Progress Report: Mitigation for the Construction and Operation of Libby Dam.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dunnigan, James; DeShazer, J.; Garrow, L.

    2009-05-26

    basin streams and lakes. 'Mitigation for the Construction and Operation of Libby Dam' is part of the Northwest Power and Conservation Council's (NPCC) resident fish and wildlife program. The program was mandated by the Northwest Planning Act of 1980, and is responsible for mitigating damages to fish and wildlife caused by hydroelectric development in the Columbia River Basin. The objective of Phase I of the project (1983 through 1987) was to maintain or enhance the Libby Reservoir fishery by quantifying seasonal water levels and developing ecologically sound operational guidelines. The objective of Phase II of the project (1988 through 1996) was to determine the biological effects of reservoir operations combined with biotic changes associated with an aging reservoir. The objectives of Phase III of the project (1996 through present) are to implement habitat enhancement measures to mitigate for dam effects, to provide data for implementation of operational strategies that benefit resident fish, monitor reservoir and river conditions, and monitor mitigation projects for effectiveness. This project completes urgent and high priority mitigation actions as directed by the Kootenai Subbasin Plan.

  9. Generalized Comprehensive Mitigation Assessment Process (GCOMAP...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Generalized Comprehensive Mitigation Assessment Process (GCOMAP) (Redirected from GCOMAP) Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Generalized Comprehensive...

  10. Generalized Comprehensive Mitigation Assessment Process (GCOMAP...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Generalized Comprehensive Mitigation Assessment Process (GCOMAP) AgencyCompany Organization: Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory...

  11. EIS-0026: 2009 Annual Mitigation Report | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Annual Mitigation Report (AMR) addresses those WIPP-related mitigation activities undertaken from the time of submittal of the 1994 Annual Mitigation Report in July 1994 through...

  12. EIS-0026: Annual Mitigation Report | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Annual Mitigation Report addresses those WIPP Project-related mitigation activities undertaken from the time of submittal of the 1994 Annual Mitigation Report in July 1994 through...

  13. EIS-0026: Annual Mitigation Report | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    7 Annual Mitigation Report (2007 AMR) addresses those WIPP- related mitigation activities undertaken from the time of submittal of the 1994 Annual Mitigation Report in July 1994...

  14. EIS-0026: Annual Mitigation Report | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    8 Annual Mitigation Report (AMR) addresses those WIPP-related mitigation activities undertaken from the time of submittal of the 1994 Annual Mitigation Report in July 1994 through...

  15. Appropriate Use of Mitigation and Monitoring and Clarifying the...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Appropriate Use of Mitigation and Monitoring and Clarifying the Appropriate Use of Mitigated Findings of No Significant Impact Appropriate Use of Mitigation and Monitoring and ...

  16. Wildlife Protection, Mitigation, and Enhancement Planning Phase II, Dworshak Reservoir, Final Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hansen, H. Jerome; Martin, Robert C.

    1989-11-01

    The Pacific Northwest Electric Power Planning and Conservation Act of 1980 directed that measures be implemented to protect, mitigate, and enhance fish and wildlife to the extent affected by development and operation of hydropower projects on the Columbia River System. This Act created the Northwest Power Planning Council, which in turn developed the Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program. This program established a four-part process: wildlife mitigation status reports; wildlife impact assessments; wildlife protection, mitigation, and enhancement plans; and implementation of protection, mitigation, and enhancement projects. This mitigation plan for the Dworshak Reservoir Hydroelectric Facility was developed to fulfill requirements of Sections 1003(b)(2) and (3) of the Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program. Specific objectives of wildlife protection, mitigation, and enhancement planning for Dworshak Reservoir included: quantify net impacts to target wildlife species affected by hydroelectric development and operation of Dworshak Dam and Reservoir; develop protection, mitigation, and enhancement goals and objectives for the target wildlife species; recommend protection, mitigation, and enhancement actions for the target wildlife species; and coordination of project activities. 46 refs., 4 figs., 31 tabs.

  17. White House Highlights Climate Action Champions' Achievements

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    After a competitive application process, the Department of Energy designated 16 communities as Climate Action Champions, including two tribes: the Sault Ste. Marie Tribe of Chippewa Indians (Michigan) and the Blue Lake Rancheria Tribe (California). These tribes were selected for their local leadership in climate mitigation and adaptation.

  18. Corrective Action

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of Corrective Action Complete is demonstrated by one of the following: Eliminate Exposure (11 SMAs, 16 Sites) SMA SITE Submittal Date Document 2M-SMA-2.2 03-003(k) September...

  19. EIS-0026: Annual Mitigation Report | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    6 Annual Mitigation Report addresses those WIPP Project-related mitigation activities undertaken since time of submittal of the 1994 Annual Mitigation Report in July 1994 through June 2016. Download Document EIS-0026: Annual Mitigation Report - 2016 (139.49 KB) More Documents & Publications EIS-0026: Annual Mitigation Report EIS-0026: Annual Mitigation Report EIS-0026: 2010

  20. EIS-0026: Annual Mitigation Report | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    5 Annual Mitigation Report addresses those WIPP Project-related mitigation activities undertaken since time of submittal of the 1994 Annual Mitigation Report in July 1994 through June 2015. EIS-0026: Annual Mitigation Report - 2015 (133.54 KB) More Documents & Publications EIS-0026: Annual Mitigation Report EIS-0026: Annual Mitigation Report EIS-0026:

  1. L-325 Sagebrush Habitat Mitigation Project: Final Compensation Area Monitoring Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Durham, Robin E.; Becker, James M.

    2013-09-26

    This document provides a review and status of activities conducted in support of the Fluor Daniel Hanford Company (Fluor), now Mission Support Alliance (MSA), Mitigation Action Plan (MAP) for Project L-325, Electrical Utility Upgrades (2007). Three plantings have been installed on a 4.5-hectare mitigation area to date. This review provides a description and chronology of events, monitoring results, and mitigative actions through fiscal year (FY) 2012. Also provided is a review of the monitoring methods, transect layout, and FY 2012 monitoring activities and results for all planting years. Planting densities and performance criteria stipulated in the MAP were aimed at a desired future condition (DFC) of 10 percent mature sagebrush (Artemisia tridentata ssp wyomingensis) cover. Current recommendations for yielding this DFC are based upon a conceptual model planting of 1000 plants/ha (400/ac) exhibiting a 60-percent survival rate after 5 monitoring years (DOE 2003). Accordingly, a DFC after 5 monitoring years would not be less than 600 plants/ha (240/ac). To date, about 8700 sagebrush plants have been grown and transplanted onto the mitigation site. Harsh site conditions and low seedling survival have resulted in an estimated 489 transplants/ha on the mitigation site, which is 111 plants/ha short of the target DFC. Despite this apparent shortcoming, 71, 91, and 24 percent of the surviving seedlings planted in FY 2007 and FY 2008 and FY 2010, respectively, showed signs of blooming in FY 2012. Blooming status may be a positive indication of future sagebrush recruitment, and is therefore a potential source for reaching the target DFC of 600 plants/ha on this mitigation site over time. Because of the difficulty establishing small transplants on this site, we propose that no additional plantings be considered for this mitigation area and to rely upon the potential recruitment by established seedlings to achieve the mitigation commitment set forth in the MAP of 600 plants/ha.

  2. Environmental Mitigation Technology (Innovative System Testing...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Fish-Friendly Turbine Environmental Mitigation Technology (Innovative System Testing)-Deployment and Testing of the Alden Hydropower Fish-Friendly Turbine Environmental ...

  3. Federal Interagency Wind Turbine Radar Interference Mitigation...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Interagency Wind Turbine Radar Interference Mitigation Strategy January 2016 This report ... First, the authors would like to thank the entire Wind Turbine Radar Interference Working ...

  4. Implantation, Activation, Characterization and Prevention/Mitigation...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Internal Short Circuits in Lithium-Ion Cells Implantation, Activation, Characterization and PreventionMitigation of Internal Short Circuits in Lithium-Ion Cells 2012 ...

  5. Federal Interagency Wind Turbine Radar Interference Mitigation...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Interagency Wind Turbine Radar Interference Mitigation Strategy January 2016 This report ... from the advice and comments of two wind industry and trade association ...

  6. Advanced Technology Development and Mitigation | National Nuclear...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The Advanced Technology Development and Mitigation (ATDM) subprogram includes laboratory code and computer engineering and science projects that pursue long-term simulation and ...

  7. Technical Assistance to Kansas City Plant: Mitigation of Polychlorinated Biphenyl Discharges

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Looney, B.B.

    2003-04-21

    Soil and storm water discharges from the Department of Energy Kansas City Plant (KCP) contain polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) resulting from past spills and discharges. KCP has implemented a range of actions to mitigate the soil contamination and to reduce the measured PCB releases.

  8. Blue Creek Winter Range : Wildlife Mitigation Project : Final Environmental Assessment.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration; United States. Bureau of Indian Affairs; Spokane Tribe of the Spokane Reservation, Washington

    1994-11-01

    Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) proposes to fund that portion of the Washington Wildlife Agreement pertaining to the Blue Creek Winter Range Wildlife Mitigation Project (Project) in a cooperative effort with the Spokane Tribe, Upper Columbia United Tribes, and the Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA). If fully implemented, the proposed action would allow the sponsors to protect and enhance 2,631 habitat units of big game winter range and riparian shrub habitat on 2,185 hectares (5,400 acres) of Spokane Tribal trust lands, and to conduct long term wildlife management activities within the Spokane Indian Reservation project area. This Final Environmental Assessment (EA) examines the potential environmental effects of securing land and conducting wildlife habitat enhancement and long term management activities within the boundaries of the Spokane Indian Reservation. Four proposed activities (habitat protection, habitat enhancement, operation and maintenance, and monitoring and evaluation) are analyzed. The proposed action is intended to meet the need for mitigation of wildlife and wildlife habitat adversely affected by the construction of Grand Coulee Dam and its reservoir.

  9. Hellsgate Winter Range : Wildlife Mitigation Project. Final Environmental Assessment.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    1995-03-01

    Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) proposes to fund the Hellsgate Winter Range Wildlife Mitigation Project (Project) in a cooperative effort with the Colville Confederated Tribes and the Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA). The proposed action would allow the sponsors to secure property and conduct wildlife management activities within the boundaries of the Colville Indian Reservation. This Final Environmental Assessment (EA) examines the potential environmental effects of acquiring and managing property for wildlife and wildlife habitat within a large project area. This area consists of several separated land parcels, of which 2,000 hectares (4,943 acres) have been purchased by BPA and an additional 4,640 hectares (11,466 acres) have been identified by the Colville Confederated Tribes for inclusion in the Project. Four proposed activities (habitat protection, habitat enhancement, operation and maintenance, and monitoring and evaluation) are analyzed. The proposed action is intended to meet the need for mitigation of wildlife and wildlife habitat that was adversely affected by the construction of Grand Coulee and Chief Joseph Dams and their reservoirs.

  10. Mitigation Measures for Distributed PV Interconnection

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Mitigation Measures for Distributed Interconnection" Michael Coddington with National Renewable Energy Laboratory and Robert Broderick with Sandia National Laboratories July 9, 2014 2 Speakers Michael Coddington Principal Investigator Distributed Grid Integration NREL Robert Broderick Technical Lead Distributed Grid Integration Programs Sandia National Laboratories Kristen Ardani Solar Analyst, (today's moderator) NREL 3 INTERCONNECTION, SCREENING & MITIGATION PRACTICES OF 21 UTILITIES

  11. Mitigation assessment results and priorities in China

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu Zongxin; Wei Zhihong

    1996-12-31

    In this paper energy related CO2 emission projections of China by 2030 are given. CO2 mitigation potential and technology options in main fields of energy conservation and energy substitution are analyzed. CO2 reduction costs of main mitigation technologies are estimated and the AHP approach is used for helping assessment of priority technologies.

  12. CO₂ emission mitigation and fossil fuel markets: Dynamic and international aspects of climate policies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bauer, Nico; Bosetti, Valentina; Hamdi-Cherif, Meriem; Kitous, Alban; McCollum, David; Mejean, Aurelie; Rao, Shilpa; Turton, Hal; Paroussos, Leonidas; Ashina, Shuichi; Calvin, Katherine; Wada, Kenichi; van Vuuren, Detlef

    2015-01-01

    This paper explores a multi-model scenario ensemble to assess the impacts of idealized and non-idealized climate change stabilization policies on fossil fuel markets. Under idealized conditions climate policies significantly reduce coal use in the short- and long-term. Reductions in oil and gas use are much smaller, particularly until 2030, but revenues decrease much more because oil and gas prices are higher than coal prices. A first deviation from optimal transition pathways is delayed action that relaxes global emission targets until 2030 in accordance with the Copenhagen pledges. Fossil fuel markets revert back to the no-policy case: though coal use increases strongest, revenue gains are higher for oil and gas. To balance the carbon budget over the 21st century, the long-term reallocation of fossil fuels is significantly larger—twice and more—than the short-term distortion. This amplifying effect results from coal lock-in and inter-fuel substitution effects to balance the full-century carbon budget. The second deviation from the optimal transition pathway relaxes the global participation assumption. The result here is less clear-cut across models, as we find carbon leakage effects ranging from positive to negative because trade and substitution patterns of coal, oil, and gas differ across models. In summary, distortions of fossil fuel markets resulting from relaxed short-term global emission targets are more important and less uncertain than the issue of carbon leakage from early mover action.

  13. U.S. Postal Service radon assessment and mitigation program. Progress report, September 1993--November 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Velazquez, L.E.; Petty, J.L. Jr.

    1994-12-31

    In 1992, the US Postal Service (USPS) entered into an Interagency Agreement with the Department of Energy (DOE) whereby DOE would provide technical assistance in support of the USPS Radon Assessment and Mitigation Program. To aid in this effort, DOE tasked the Hazardous Waste Remedial Actions Program (HAZWRAP), which is managed by Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., for DOE under contract AC05-84OR21400. Since that time, HAZWRAP has developed and finalized the sampling protocol, mitigation diagnostic protocol, and the quality assurance and quality control procedures. These procedures were validated during the Protocol Validation (1992-1993) and Pilot Study (1993-1994) phases of the program. To date, HAZWRAP has performed approximately 16,000 radon measurements in 250 USPS buildings. Mitigation diagnostics have been performed in 27 buildings. Thus far, 13% of the measurements have been above the Environmental Protection Agency action level of 4 pCi/L. This report summarizes the pilot program radon testing data and mitigation diagnostic data for 22 sites and contains recommendations for mitigation diagnostics.

  14. 2009 River Corridor Closure Contractor Revegetation and Mitigation Monitoring Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    C. T. Lindsey; K. A. Gano; R. D. Teel

    2009-09-30

    This document details the results of revegetation and mitigation monitoring conducted in 2009, including 25 revegetation/restoration projects, one revegetation/mitigation project, and three bat mitigation projects.

  15. Improving Department of Energy Capabilities for Mitigating Beyond...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Improving Department of Energy Capabilities for Mitigating Beyond Design Basis Events Improving Department of Energy Capabilities for Mitigating Beyond Design Basis Events April ...

  16. Oregon Fish and Wildlife Mitigation Policy | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Fish and Wildlife Mitigation Policy Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Reference: Oregon Fish and Wildlife Mitigation Policy Published Publisher Not...

  17. Recent Diesel Engine Emission Mitigation Activities of the Maritime...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Diesel Engine Emission Mitigation Activities of the Maritime Administration Energy Technologies Program Recent Diesel Engine Emission Mitigation Activities of the Maritime ...

  18. Mitigating Breakdown in High Energy Density Perovskite Polymer...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Mitigating Breakdown in High Energy Density Perovskite Polymer Nanocomposite Capacitors Mitigating Breakdown in High Energy Density Perovskite Polymer Nanocomposite Capacitors 2012 ...

  19. National and Sectoral GHG Mitigation Potential: A Comparison...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    and Sectoral GHG Mitigation Potential: A Comparison Across Models Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: National and Sectoral GHG Mitigation Potential: A...

  20. EA-1923: Mitigated Finding of No Significant Impact | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Mitigated Finding of No Significant Impact EA-1923: Mitigated Finding of No Significant Impact Green Energy School Wind Turbine Project on Saipan, Commonwealth of the Northern ...

  1. Nanoparticles to Mitigate Biofilm Growth. (Conference) | SciTech...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Nanoparticles to Mitigate Biofilm Growth. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Nanoparticles to Mitigate Biofilm Growth. Abstract not provided. Authors: Altman, Susan Jeanne ...

  2. National integrated mitigation planning in agriculture: A review...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    National integrated mitigation planning in agriculture: A review paper This review of national greenhouse gas (GHG) mitigation planning in the agriculture sector has two...

  3. Property:Environmental Monitoring and Mitigation Efforts | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Environmental Monitoring and Mitigation Efforts Jump to: navigation, search Property Name Environmental Monitoring and Mitigation Efforts Property Type String Retrieved from...

  4. Exploring changes in solar model physics to mitigate the solar...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Exploring changes in solar model physics to mitigate the solar abundance problem Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Exploring changes in solar model physics to mitigate the ...

  5. Procedures for Interagency Consultation to Avoid or Mitigate...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    or Mitigate Adverse Effects on Rivers in the Nationwide Inventory (CEQ, 1980) Procedures for Interagency Consultation to Avoid or Mitigate Adverse Effects on Rivers in the ...

  6. Korea's Green Growth Strategy: Mitigating Climate Change and...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Korea's Green Growth Strategy: Mitigating Climate Change and Developing New Growth Engines Jump to: navigation, search Name Korea's Green Growth Strategy: Mitigating Climate Change...

  7. Financing Global Climate Change Mitigation | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Global Climate Change Mitigation Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Financing Global Climate Change Mitigation AgencyCompany Organization: United Nations...

  8. Information Needs for Energy Mitigation and Siting

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    esources University o f W yoming QUADRENNIAL ENERGY REVIEW - Aug. 21,2014 1. A shared language 2. Solid baseline data to guide planning and siting 3. Mitigation best practices -...

  9. Mitigating the Impacts of Glint and Glare

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hillesheim, Michael; Kandt, Alicen; Phillips, Steven

    2015-09-01

    The National Renewable Energy Laboratory, supporting the Department of the Navy Renewable Energy Program Office, has developed an innovative glint/glare analysis and visualization methodology to understand and mitigate the possible impacts of light reflecting off solar photovoltaic arrays.

  10. Willow Creek Wildlife Mitigation Project. Final Environmental Assessment.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-04-01

    Today`s notice announces BPA`s proposal to fund land acquisition or acquisition of a conservation easement and a wildlife management plan to protect and enhance wildlife habitat at the Willow Creek Natural Area in Eugene, Oregon. This action would provide partial mitigation for wildlife and wildlife habitat lost by the development of Federal hydroelectric projects in the Willamette River Basin. The project is consistent with BPA`s obligations under provisions of the Pacific Northwest Electric Power Planning and Conservation Act of 1980 as outlined by the Northwest Power Planning Council`s 1994 Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program. BPA has prepared an environmental assessment (DOE/EA-1023) evaluating the proposed project. Based on the analysis in the EA, BPA has determined that the proposed action is not a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment, within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969. Therefore, the preparation of an environmental impact statement (EIS) is not required and BPA is issuing this FONSI.

  11. Assessment of GHG mitigation technology measures in Ukraine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Raptsoun, N.; Parasiouk, N.

    1996-12-31

    In June 1992 the representatives of 176 countries including Ukraine met in Rio de Janeiro at the UN Conference to coordinate its efforts in protecting and guarding the environment. Signature of the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change by around 150 countries indicates that climate change is potentially a major threat to the world`s environment and economic development. The project {open_quotes}Country Study on Climate Change in Ukraine{close_quotes} coordinated by the Agency for Rational Energy Use and Ecology (ARENIA-ECO) and supported by the US Country Studies Program Support for Climate Change Studies. The aim of the project is to make the information related to climate change in Ukraine available for the world community by using the potential of Ukrainian research institutes for further concerted actions to solve the problem of climate change on the global scale. The project consists of four elements: (1) the development of the GHG Inventory in Ukraine; (2) assessments of ecosystems-vulnerability to climate change and adaptation options; and (3) mitigation options analysis; (4) public education and outreach activities. This paper contains the main results of the third element for the energy and non-energy sectors. Main tasks of the third element were: (1) to select, test and describe or develop the methodology for mitigation options assessment; (2) to analyze the main sources of GHG emissions in Ukraine; (3) to give the macro economic analysis of Ukrainian development and the development of main economical sectors industry, energy, transport, residential, forestry and agriculture; (4) to forecast GHG emissions for different scenarios of the economic development; and (5) to analyze the main measures to mitigate climate change.

  12. Advanced Mitigating Measures for the Cell Internal Short Risk (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Darcy, E.; Smith, K.

    2010-04-01

    This presentation describes mitigation measures for internal short circuits in lithium-ion battery cells.

  13. Wildlife Protection, Mitigation and Enhancement Planning for Grand Coulee Dam, Final Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Creveling, Jennifer

    1986-08-01

    The development and operation of Grand Coulee Dam inundated approximately 70,000 acres of wildlife habitat under the jurisdictions of the Colville Confederated Tribes, the Spokane Tribe, and the State of Washington. Under the provisions of the Pacific Northwest Electric Power Planning and Conservation Act of 1980, this study reviews losses to wildlife and habitat, and proposes mitigation for those losses. Wildlife loss estimates were developed from information available in the literature. Habitat losses and potential habitat gains through mitigation were estimated by a modified Habitat Evaluation Procedure. The mitigation plan proposes (1) acquisition of sufficient land or management rights to land to protect Habitat Units equivalent to those lost (approximately 73,000 acres of land would be required), (2) improvement and management of those lands to obtain and perpetuate target Habitat Units, and (3) protection and enhancement of suitable habitat for bald eagles. Mitigation is presented as four actions to be implemented over a 10-year period. A monitoring program is proposed to monitor mitigation success in terms of Habitat Units and wildlife population trends.

  14. Mitigation for the Construction and Operation of Libby Dam, 2004-2005 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dunnigan, James; DeShazer, Jay; Garrow, Larry (Montana Department of Fish, Wildlife and Parks, Libby, MT)

    2005-06-01

    ''Mitigation for the Construction and Operation of Libby Dam'' is part of the Northwest Power and Conservation Council's (NPCC) resident fish and wildlife program. The program was mandated by the Northwest Planning Act of 1980, and is responsible for mitigating damages to fish and wildlife caused by hydroelectric development in the Columbia River Basin. The objective of Phase I of the project (1983 through 1987) was to maintain or enhance the Libby Reservoir fishery by quantifying seasonal water levels and developing ecologically sound operational guidelines. The objective of Phase II of the project (1988 through 1996) was to determine the biological effects of reservoir operations combined with biotic changes associated with an aging reservoir. The objectives of Phase III of the project (1996 through present) are to implement habitat enhancement measures to mitigate for dam effects, to provide data for implementation of operational strategies that benefit resident fish, monitor reservoir and river conditions, and monitor mitigation projects for effectiveness. This project completes urgent and high priority mitigation actions as directed by the Kootenai Subbasin Plan. Montana Fish, Wildlife & Parks (MFWP) uses a combination of techniques to collect physical and biological data within the Kootenai River Basin. These data serve several purposes including: the development and refinement of models used in management of water resources and operation of Libby Dam; investigations into the limiting factors of native fish populations, gathering basic life history information, tracking trends in endangered and threatened species, and the assessment of restoration or management activities designed to restore native fishes and their habitats.

  15. On the road to HF mitigation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    VanZele, R.L.; Diener, R. )

    1990-06-01

    The hazards of hydrogen fluoride (HF) have long been recognized and industry performance reflects sound operating practices. However, full-scale industry-sponsored HF release test conducted at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) test site in 1986 caused concern in view of HF's toxicity. Ambient impacts were greater than anticipated. And diking, a primary mitigation technique, proved ineffective for releases of pressurized superheated HF. In partial response to these new technical data, an ad-hoc three-component Industry Cooperative Hydrogen Fluoride Mitigation Assessment Program (ICHMAP) was begun in late 1987 to study and test techniques for mitigating accidental releases of HF and alkylation unit acid (AUA) and to enhance capabilities to estimate ambient impacts from such releases. AUA is a mixture of HF and hydrocarbons. The program's mitigation components have recently been completed while work on the impact assessment component is nearing completion. This article describes the program and summarizes the objective, scope of work, structure, and conclusions from the program's two mitigation components. In addition, the objectives and scope of work of the impact assessment components are described.

  16. Disruption mitigation using high pressure gas jets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dennis G. Whyte

    2007-10-11

    The goal of this research is to establish credible disruption mitigation scenarios based on the technique of massive gas injection. Disruption mitigation seeks to minimize or eliminate damage to internal components that can occur due to the rapid dissipation of thermal and magnetic energy during a tokamak disruption. In particular, the focus of present research is extrapolating mitigation techniques to burning plasma experiments such as ITER, where disruption-caused damage poses a serious threat to the lifetime of internal vessel components. A majority of effort has focused on national and international collaborative research with large tokamaks: DIII-D, Alcator C-Mod, JET, and ASDEX Upgrade. The research was oriented towards empirical trials of gas-jet mitigation on several tokamaks, with the goal of developing and applying cohesive models to the data across devices. Disruption mitigation using gas jet injection has proven to be a viable candidate for avoiding or minimizing damage to internal components in burning plasma experiments like ITER. The physics understanding is progress towards a technological design for the required gas injection system in ITER.

  17. Platelet composite coatings for tin whisker mitigation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rohwer, Lauren E. S.; Martin, James E.

    2015-09-14

    In this study, reliable methods for tin whisker mitigation are needed for applications that utilize tin-plated commercial components. Tin can grow whiskers that can lead to electrical shorting, possibly causing critical systems to fail catastrophically. The mechanisms of tin whisker growth are unclear and this makes prediction of the lifetimes of critical components uncertain. The development of robust methods for tin whisker mitigation is currently the best approach to eliminating the risk of shorting. Current mitigation methods are based on unfilled polymer coatings that are not impenetrable to tin whiskers. In this paper we report tin whisker mitigation results for several filled polymer coatings. The whisker-penetration resistance of the coatings was evaluated at elevated temperature and high humidity and under temperature cycling conditions. The composite coatings comprised Ni and MgF2-coated Al/Ni/Al platelets in epoxy resin or silicone rubber. In addition to improved whisker mitigation, these platelet composites have enhanced thermal conductivity and dielectric constant compared with unfilled polymers.

  18. Platelet composite coatings for tin whisker mitigation

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Rohwer, Lauren E. S.; Martin, James E.

    2015-09-14

    In this study, reliable methods for tin whisker mitigation are needed for applications that utilize tin-plated commercial components. Tin can grow whiskers that can lead to electrical shorting, possibly causing critical systems to fail catastrophically. The mechanisms of tin whisker growth are unclear and this makes prediction of the lifetimes of critical components uncertain. The development of robust methods for tin whisker mitigation is currently the best approach to eliminating the risk of shorting. Current mitigation methods are based on unfilled polymer coatings that are not impenetrable to tin whiskers. In this paper we report tin whisker mitigation results formore » several filled polymer coatings. The whisker-penetration resistance of the coatings was evaluated at elevated temperature and high humidity and under temperature cycling conditions. The composite coatings comprised Ni and MgF2-coated Al/Ni/Al platelets in epoxy resin or silicone rubber. In addition to improved whisker mitigation, these platelet composites have enhanced thermal conductivity and dielectric constant compared with unfilled polymers.« less

  19. Compensatory mitigation and screening rules in environmental impact assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Macintosh, Andrew Waugh, Lauren

    2014-11-15

    . For urban development actions, the ratio between lawful and unlawful particular manner decisions was worse than 1:1. • The extent of non-compliance is explained on the basis of convenience. Budget and interest group pressures resulted in the development of an informal custom whereby the formal compensatory mitigation restrictions were ignored. • The results highlight the relative significance of formal and informal institutions in EIA. Formal EIA rules typically provide a mere outline of the process. The informal institutions adopted by administrators often have a greater influence on how the process operates and what it achieves.

  20. Ray Effect Mitigation Through Reference Frame Rotation

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Tencer, John

    2016-06-14

    The discrete ordinates method is a popular and versatile technique for solving the radiative transport equation, a major drawback of which is the presence of ray effects. Mitigation of ray effects can yield significantly more accurate results and enhanced numerical stability for combined mode codes. Moreover, when ray effects are present, the solution is seen to be highly dependent upon the relative orientation of the geometry and the global reference frame. It is an undesirable property. A novel ray effect mitigation technique of averaging the computed solution for various reference frame orientations is proposed.

  1. Mitigating PQ Problems in Legacy Data Centers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ilinets, Boris; /SLAC

    2011-06-01

    The conclusions of this presentation are: (1) Problems with PQ in legacy data centers still exist and need to be mitigated; (2) Harmonics generated by non-linear IT load can be lowered by passive, active and hybrid cancellation methods; (3) Harmonic study is necessary to find the best way to treat PQ problems; (4) AHF's and harmonic cancellation transformers proved to be very efficient in mitigating PQ problems; and (5) It is important that IT leaders partner with electrical engineering to appropriate ROI statements, justifying many of these expenditures.

  2. Gas powered fluid gun with recoil mitigation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Grubelich, Mark C; Yonas, Gerold

    2013-11-12

    A gas powered fluid gun for propelling a stream or slug of a fluid at high velocity toward a target. Recoil mitigation is provided that reduces or eliminates the associated recoil forces, with minimal or no backwash. By launching a quantity of water in the opposite direction, net momentum forces are reduced or eliminated. Examples of recoil mitigation devices include a cone for making a conical fluid sheet, a device forming multiple impinging streams of fluid, a cavitating venturi, one or more spinning vanes, or an annular tangential entry/exit.

  3. Gas powered fluid gun with recoil mitigation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Grubelich, Mark C.; Yonas, Gerold

    2016-03-01

    A gas powered fluid gun for propelling a stream or slug of a fluid at high velocity toward a target. Recoil mitigation is provided that reduces or eliminates the associated recoil forces, with minimal or no backwash. By launching a quantity of water in the opposite direction, net momentum forces are reduced or eliminated. Examples of recoil mitigation devices include a cone for making a conical fluid sheet, a device forming multiple impinging streams of fluid, a cavitating venturi, one or more spinning vanes, or an annular tangential entry/exit.

  4. Discovery in Action - Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Discovery in Action Discovery in Action

  5. Highly concentrated foam formulation for blast mitigation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tucker, Mark D.; Gao, Huizhen

    2010-12-14

    A highly concentrated foam formulation for blast suppression and dispersion mitigation for use in responding to a terrorism incident involving a radiological dispersion device. The foam formulation is more concentrated and more stable than the current blast suppression foam (AFC-380), which reduces the logistics burden on the user.

  6. CO₂ emission mitigation and fossil fuel markets: Dynamic and international aspects of climate policies

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Bauer, Nico; Bosetti, Valentina; Hamdi-Cherif, Meriem; Kitous, Alban; McCollum, David; Mejean, Aurelie; Rao, Shilpa; Turton, Hal; Paroussos, Leonidas; Ashina, Shuichi; et al

    2015-01-01

    This paper explores a multi-model scenario ensemble to assess the impacts of idealized and non-idealized climate change stabilization policies on fossil fuel markets. Under idealized conditions climate policies significantly reduce coal use in the short- and long-term. Reductions in oil and gas use are much smaller, particularly until 2030, but revenues decrease much more because oil and gas prices are higher than coal prices. A first deviation from optimal transition pathways is delayed action that relaxes global emission targets until 2030 in accordance with the Copenhagen pledges. Fossil fuel markets revert back to the no-policy case: though coal use increasesmore » strongest, revenue gains are higher for oil and gas. To balance the carbon budget over the 21st century, the long-term reallocation of fossil fuels is significantly larger—twice and more—than the short-term distortion. This amplifying effect results from coal lock-in and inter-fuel substitution effects to balance the full-century carbon budget. The second deviation from the optimal transition pathway relaxes the global participation assumption. The result here is less clear-cut across models, as we find carbon leakage effects ranging from positive to negative because trade and substitution patterns of coal, oil, and gas differ across models. In summary, distortions of fossil fuel markets resulting from relaxed short-term global emission targets are more important and less uncertain than the issue of carbon leakage from early mover action.« less

  7. Status of Corrective Actions

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    WIPP AIB Report Status of Corrective Actions Status of Corrective Actions at LANL Department of Energy Issues Accident Investigation Board (AIB) Report on February 14 Incident ...

  8. Mitigation and Remediation of Mercury Contamination at the Y...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Mitigation and Remediation of Mercury Contamination at the Y-12 Plant Oak Ridge Mitigation and Remediation of Mercury Contamination at the Y-12 Plant Oak Ridge Full Document and ...

  9. Market-Based Wildlife Mitigation in Wyoming | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    in Wyoming Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Report: Market-Based Wildlife Mitigation in Wyoming Abstract Covers the basics of mitigation...

  10. Siting: Wind Turbine/Radar Interference Mitigation (TSPEAR &...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... Wind TurbineRadar Interference Mitigation (TSPEAR & IFT&E) HomeStationary PowerEnergy Conversion EfficiencyWind EnergySiting and Barrier MitigationSiting: Wind TurbineRadar ...

  11. Wildfire Mitigation at Los Alamos National Laboratory | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Wildfire Mitigation at Los Alamos National Laboratory Wildfire Mitigation at Los Alamos National Laboratory The Laboratory's Fire Mitigation program is closely integrated with Los Alamos County, the U.S. Forest Service and the National Park Service to fight any wildfire in the region. The Laboratory's Fire Management posts daily Fire Danger Ratings on their website. Wildfire-Mitigation-at-Los-Alamos-National-Laboratory.pdf (2.69 MB) More Documents & Publications Remediated Nitrate

  12. 2008 River Corridor Closure Contractor Revegetation and Mitigation Monitoring Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    C. T. Lindsey; K. A. Gano

    2008-09-30

    The purpose of this report is to document the status of revegetation projects and natural resources mitigation efforts that have been conducted for remediated waste sites and other activities associated with the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act cleanup of National Priorities List waste sites at Hanford. This report documents the results of revegetation and mitigation monitoring conducted in 2008 and includes 22 revegetation/restoration projects, one revegetation/mitigation project, and two bat habitat mitigation projects.

  13. 2007 River Corridor Closure Contractor Revegetation and Mitigation Monitoring Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    K. A. Gano; C. T. Lindsey

    2007-09-27

    The purpose of this report is to document the status of revegetation projects and natural resources mitigation efforts that have been conducted for remediated waste sites and other activities associated with the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) cleanup of National Priorities List waste sites at Hanford. This report documents the results of revegetation and mitigation monitoring conducted in 2007 and includes 11 revegetation/restoration projects, one revegetation/mitigation project, and 3 bat habitat mitigation projects.

  14. Buildings GHG Mitigation Estimator Worksheet, Version 1

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Xcel document describes Version 1 of the the Buildings GHG Mitigation Estimator tool. This tool assists federal agencies in estimating the greenhouse gas mitigation reduction from implementing energy efficiency measures across a portfolio of buildings. It is designed to be applied to groups of office buildings, for example, at a program level (regional or site) that can be summarized at the agency level. While the default savings and cost estimates apply to office buildings, users can define their own efficiency measures, costs, and savings estimates for inclusion in the portfolio assessment. More information on user-defined measures can be found in Step 2 of the buildings emission reduction guidance. The output of this tool is a prioritized set of activities that can help the agency to achieve its greenhouse gas reduction targets most cost-effectively.

  15. 300 Area Building Retention Evaluation Mitigation Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D. J. McBride

    2007-07-03

    Evaluate the long-term retention of several facilities associated with the PNNL Capability Replacement Laboratory and other Hanfor mission needs. WCH prepared a mitigation plan for three scenarios with different release dates for specific buildings. The evaluations present a proposed plan for providing utility services to retained facilities in support of a long-term (+20 year) lifespan in addition to temporary services to buildings with specified delayed release dates.

  16. Explosive parcel containment and blast mitigation container

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sparks, Michael H.

    2001-06-12

    The present invention relates to a containment structure for containing and mitigating explosions. The containment structure is installed in the wall of the building and has interior and exterior doors for placing suspicious packages into the containment structure and retrieving them from the exterior of the building. The containment structure has a blast deflection chute and a blowout panel to direct over pressure from explosions away from the building, surrounding structures and people.

  17. Corrective Actions Process

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Community, Environment » Environmental Stewardship » Environmental Cleanup » Corrective Actions Corrective Actions Process The general process for evaluating and remediating potential release sites is called the corrective action process. Contact Environmental Communication & Public Involvement P.O. Box 1663 MS M996 Los Alamos, NM 87545 (505) 667-0216 Email Corrective actions The Laboratory's corrective actions process refers to the way in which the Laboratory investigates, stabilizes,

  18. Southern Idaho Wildlife Mitigation Implementation 2000 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bottum, Edward; Mikkelsen, Anders

    2001-03-01

    This report covers calendar year 2000 activities for the Southern Idaho Wildlife Mitigation Implementation project. This project, implemented by Idaho Department of Fish and Game and Shoshone Bannock Tribes wildlife mitigation staff, is designed to protect, enhance and maintain wildlife habitats to mitigate construction losses for Palisades, Anderson Ranch, Black Canyon and Minidoka hydroelectric projects. Additional project information is available in the quarterly reports.

  19. Southern idaho Wildlife Mitigation Implementation 1999 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bottum, Edward; Mikkelsen, Anders

    2000-04-01

    This report is for the Southern Idaho Wildlife Mitigation Implementation project. This project, implemented by IDFG and SBT wildlife mitigation staff, is designed to protect, enhance and maintain wildlife habitats to mitigate construction losses for Palisades, Anderson Ranch, Black Canyon and Minidoka hydroelectric projects. Additional project information is available in the quarterly reports.

  20. Mitigation for the Construction and Operation of Libby Dam, 2003-2004 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dunnigan, James; DeShazer, Jay; Garrow, Larry

    2004-06-01

    ''Mitigation for the Construction and Operation of Libby Dam'' is part of the Northwest Power and Conservation Council's (NPCC) resident fish and wildlife program. The program was mandated by the Northwest Planning Act of 1980, and is responsible for mitigating for damages to fish and wildlife caused by hydroelectric development in the Columbia River Basin. The objective of Phase I of the project (1983 through 1987) was to maintain or enhance the Libby Reservoir fishery by quantifying seasonal water levels and developing ecologically sound operational guidelines. The objective of Phase II of the project (1988 through 1996) was to determine the biological effects of reservoir operations combined with biotic changes associated with an aging reservoir. The objectives of Phase III of the project (1996 through present) are to implement habitat enhancement measures to mitigate for dam effects, to provide data for implementation of operational strategies that benefit resident fish, monitor reservoir and river conditions, and monitor mitigation projects for effectiveness. This project completes urgent and high priority mitigation actions as directed by the Kootenai Subbasin Plan. Montana FWP uses a combination of diverse techniques to collect a variety of physical and biological data within the Kootenai River Basin. These data serve several purposes including: the development and refinement of models used in management of water resources and operation of Libby Dam; investigations into the limiting factors of native fish populations, gathering basic life history information, tracking trends in endangered, threatened species, and the assessment of restoration or management activities intended to restore native fishes and their habitats.

  1. 2014 Joint Action Workshop

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Joint Action Workshop is an annual event for joint action agencies and their members to meet informally and discuss emerging policy, regulatory, and power supply issues, and other topics...

  2. The Climate Change Action Plan: Technical supplement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-03-01

    This Technical Annex documents the assumptions and parameters used in developing the supporting analysis for the Climate Change Action Plan (the Plan) issued by President Clinton on October 19, 1993. The Annex is intended to meet the needs of independent energy and environmental analysts who wish to better understand the Plan, its analytical underpinnings, and the events that need to transpire for the emissions reductions called for in the Plan to be realized. The Plan documented in this Annex reflects the outcome of a wide-ranging effort by Government agencies and interested members of the public to develop and implement actions that can reduce net greenhouse gas emissions in the year 2000 to their aggregate 1990 level. Based on agency and public input, the Climate Change Mitigation Group, chaired by the White House Office on Environmental Policy, developed the Plan`s content. Many of the actions called for in the Plan are now underway, while others are in advanced planning pending congressional action on the fiscal year 1995 budget. The analysis supporting the Plan represents the results of an interagency effort. The US Department of Energy (DOE) was responsible for the integrated analysis of energy-related options, based on the analysis of individual energy-related options by DOE, the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), and the US Department of Transportation (DOT). EPA led in providing analysis for actions related to methane, hydrofluorocarbons, and perfluorocarbons. The US Department of Agriculture (USDA) led the analysis of carbon sequestration actions and cooperated with EPA in the analysis of actions to reduce nitrous oxide emissions.

  3. Wildfre Mitigation at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Wildfre Mitigation at Los Alamos National Laboratory Background Established in 1943, Los Alamos National Laboratory consists of 1,280 buildings in 47 technical areas spread out over 37 square miles. The complex includes 11 nuclear facilities and more than 10,000 workers. In the past, large wildfres in the area, including the La Mesa Fire (1977), the Dome Fire (1996), the Oso Fire (1998), the Cerro Grande Fire (2000), and the Las Conchas Fire (2011) demonstrate that forests on and surrounding the

  4. Industrial Energy Efficiency and Climate Change Mitigation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Worrell, Ernst; Bernstein, Lenny; Roy, Joyashree; Price, Lynn; de la Rue du Can, Stephane; Harnisch, Jochen

    2009-02-02

    Industry contributes directly and indirectly (through consumed electricity) about 37% of the global greenhouse gas emissions, of which over 80% is from energy use. Total energy-related emissions, which were 9.9 GtCO2 in 2004, have grown by 65% since 1971. Even so, industry has almost continuously improved its energy efficiency over the past decades. In the near future, energy efficiency is potentially the most important and cost-effective means for mitigating greenhouse gas emissions from industry. This paper discusses the potential contribution of industrial energy efficiency technologies and policies to reduce energy use and greenhouse gas emissions to 2030.

  5. Security Informatics Research Challenges for Mitigating Cyber Friendly Fire

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carroll, Thomas E.; Greitzer, Frank L.; Roberts, Adam D.

    2014-09-30

    This paper addresses cognitive implications and research needs surrounding the problem of cyber friendly re (FF). We dene cyber FF as intentional o*ensive or defensive cyber/electronic actions intended to protect cyber systems against enemy forces or to attack enemy cyber systems, which unintentionally harms the mission e*ectiveness of friendly or neutral forces. We describe examples of cyber FF and discuss how it ts within a general conceptual framework for cyber security failures. Because it involves human failure, cyber FF may be considered to belong to a sub-class of cyber security failures characterized as unintentional insider threats. Cyber FF is closely related to combat friendly re in that maintaining situation awareness (SA) is paramount to avoiding unintended consequences. Cyber SA concerns knowledge of a system's topology (connectedness and relationships of the nodes in a system), and critical knowledge elements such as the characteristics and vulnerabilities of the components that comprise the system and its nodes, the nature of the activities or work performed, and the available defensive and o*ensive countermeasures that may be applied to thwart network attacks. We describe a test bed designed to support empirical research on factors a*ecting cyber FF. Finally, we discuss mitigation strategies to combat cyber FF, including both training concepts and suggestions for decision aids and visualization approaches.

  6. Global climate change and the mitigation challenge

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Frank Princiotta

    2009-10-15

    Anthropogenic emissions of greenhouse gases, especially carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}), have led to increasing atmospheric concentrations, very likely the primary cause of the 0.8{sup o}C warming the Earth has experienced since the Industrial Revolution. With industrial activity and population expected to increase for the rest of the century, large increases in greenhouse gas emissions are projected, with substantial global additional warming predicted. This paper examines forces driving CO{sub 2} emissions, a concise sector-by-sector summary of mitigation options, and research and development (R&D) priorities. To constrain warming to below approximately 2.5{sup o}C in 2100, the recent annual 3% CO{sub 2} emission growth rate needs to transform rapidly to an annual decrease rate of from 1 to 3% for decades. Furthermore, the current generation of energy generation and end-use technologies are capable of achieving less than half of the emission reduction needed for such a major mitigation program. New technologies will have to be developed and deployed at a rapid rate, especially for the key power generation and transportation sectors. Current energy technology research, development, demonstration, and deployment (RDD&D) programs fall far short of what is required. 20 refs., 18 figs., 4 tabs.

  7. DOE/EA-1915 MITIGATION ACTION PLAN PROPOSED CONVEYANCE OF LAND...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    ... including extraction or production of any coal, oil, gas, geothermal steam, associated ... to protect property (e.g., wildlands, buildings, and equipment) by minimizing fire risk. ...

  8. EA-1951: Finding of No Significant Impact and Mitigation Action Plan

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Midway-Moxee Rebuild and Midway-Grandview Upgrade Transmission Line Project; Benton and Yakima Counties, Washington

  9. DOE/EA-1915 MITIGATION ACTION PLAN PROPOSED CONVEYANCE OF LAND...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... Indian Policy and Order 144.1, Department of Energy Grantor requires Grantee's acoustic and noise signature on the premises will not exceed current Washington State standards and ...

  10. Mitigation of Syngas Cooler Plugging and Fouling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bockelie, Michael J.

    2015-06-29

    This Final Report summarizes research performed to develop a technology to mitigate the plugging and fouling that occurs in the syngas cooler used in many Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) plants. The syngas cooler is a firetube heat exchanger located downstream of the gasifier. It offers high thermal efficiency, but its’ reliability has generally been lower than other process equipment in the gasification island. The buildup of ash deposits that form on the fireside surfaces in the syngas cooler (i.e., fouling) lead to reduced equipment life and increased maintenance costs. Our approach to address this problem is that fouling of the syngas cooler cannot be eliminated, but it can be better managed. The research program was funded by DOE using two budget periods: Budget Period 1 (BP1) and Budget Period 2 (BP2). The project used a combination of laboratory scale experiments, analysis of syngas cooler deposits, modeling and guidance from industry to develop a better understanding of fouling mechanisms and to develop and evaluate strategies to mitigate syngas cooler fouling and thereby improve syngas cooler performance. The work effort in BP 1 and BP 2 focused on developing a better understanding of the mechanisms that lead to syngas cooler plugging and fouling and investigating promising concepts to mitigate syngas cooler plugging and fouling. The work effort focused on the following: • analysis of syngas cooler deposits and fuels provided by an IGCC plant collaborating with this project; • performing Jet cleaning tests in the University of Utah Laminar Entrained Flow Reactor to determine the bond strength between an ash deposit to a metal plate, as well as implementing planned equipment modifications to the University of Utah Laminar Entrained Flow Reactor and the one ton per day, pressurized Pilot Scale Gasifier; • performing Computational Fluid Dynamic modeling of industrially relevant syngas cooler configurations to develop a better

  11. Climate Action Champions: Southeast Florida Regional Climate Change

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Compact, FL | Department of Energy Southeast Florida Regional Climate Change Compact, FL Climate Action Champions: Southeast Florida Regional Climate Change Compact, FL The Southeast Florida Regional Climate Change Compact was executed by Broward, Miami-Dade, Monroe, and Palm Beach Counties in January 2010 to coordinate mitigation and adaptation efforts across county lines. The Compact represents a new form of regional climate governance designed to allow local governments to set the agenda

  12. Transformational Energy Action Management (TEAM) Wireless Energy Efficiency Keys Initiative

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    by Transformational Energy Action Management (TEAM) Wireless Energy Efficiency Keys Initiative *Ways of Using Wireless Technology to Help You Reduce Energy Usage at your Facility Together with our industry partners, we strive to: * Accelerate adoption of the many energy-efficient technologies and practices available today * Conduct vigorous technology innovation to radically improve future energy diversity, resource efficiency, and carbon mitigation * Promote a corporate culture of energy

  13. A safety assessment for proposed pump mixing operations to mitigate episodic gas releases in tank 241-SY-101: Hanford Site,Richland, Washington

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lentsch, J.W.

    1996-07-01

    This safety assessment addresses each of the elements required for the proposed action to remove a slurry distributor and to install, operate, and remove a mixing pump in Tank 241-SY-101,which is located within the Hanford Site, Richland, Washington.The proposed action is required as part of an ongoing evaluation of various mitigation concepts developed to eliminate episodic gas releases that result in hydrogen concentrations in the tank dome space that exceed the lower flammability limit.

  14. Safety assessment for proposed pump mixing operations to mitigate episodic gas releases in tank 241-101-SY: Hanford Site, Richland, Washington

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lentsch, J.W., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-05-16

    This safety assessment addresses each of the elements required for the proposed action to remove a slurry distributor and to install, operate, and remove a mixing pump in Tank 241-SY-101, which is located within the Hanford Site, Richland, Washington. The proposed action is required as part of an ongoing evaluation of various mitigation concepts developed to eliminate episodic gas releases that result in hydrogen concentrations in the tank dome space that exceed the lower flammability limit.

  15. Action Item Review and Status

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Board Action Items Action Item Resolution Action Item Strategic Planning Initiative Optimization Study Resolution Presentation by S. Schneider (HLW System Integrated Project...

  16. TOP 10 VULNERABILITIES OF CONTROL SYSTEMS AND THEIR ASSOCIATED MITIGATIONS

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    | Department of Energy TOP 10 VULNERABILITIES OF CONTROL SYSTEMS AND THEIR ASSOCIATED MITIGATIONS TOP 10 VULNERABILITIES OF CONTROL SYSTEMS AND THEIR ASSOCIATED MITIGATIONS This document provides practices that can help mitigate the potential risks that can occur to some electricity sector organizations. Each organization decides for itself the risks it can accept and the practices it deems appropriate to manage those risks. TOP 10 VULNERABILITIES OF CONTROL SYSTEMS AND THEIR ASSOCIATED

  17. Improving Department of Energy Capabilities for Mitigating Beyond Design

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Basis Events | Department of Energy Improving Department of Energy Capabilities for Mitigating Beyond Design Basis Events Improving Department of Energy Capabilities for Mitigating Beyond Design Basis Events April 2013 OE-1: 2013-01 Improving Department of Energy Capabilities for Mitigating Beyond Design Basis Events The purpose of this Operating Experience (OE) document is to: provide results from U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), including the National Nuclear Security Administration,

  18. Buildings Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Estimator Worksheet | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Buildings Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Estimator Worksheet Buildings Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Estimator Worksheet Excel tool helps agencies estimate the greenhouse gas (GHG) mitigation reduction from implementing energy efficiency measures across a portfolio of buildings. It is designed to be applied to groups of office buildings. For example, at a program level (regional or site) that can be summarized at the agency level. While the default savings and cost estimates apply to office

  19. International perspectives on mitigating laboratory biorisks.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pinard, William J.; Salazar, Carlos A.

    2010-11-01

    The International Perspectives on Mitigating Laboratory Biorisks workshop, held at the Renaissance Polat Istanbul Hotel in Istanbul, Republic of Turkey, from October 25 to 27, 2010, sought to promote discussion between experts and stakeholders from around the world on issues related to the management of biological risk in laboratories. The event was organized by Sandia National Laboratories International Biological Threat Reduction program, on behalf of the US Department of State Biosecurity Engagement Program and the US Department of Defense Cooperative Biological Engagement Program. The workshop came about as a response to US Under Secretary of State Ellen O. Tauscher's statements in Geneva on December 9, 2009, during the Annual Meeting of the States Parties to the Biological Weapons Convention (BWC). Pursuant to those remarks, the workshop was intended to provide a forum for interested countries to share information on biorisk management training, standards, and needs. Over the course of the meeting's three days, participants discussed diverse topics such as the role of risk assessment in laboratory biorisk management, strategies for mitigating risk, measurement of performance and upkeep, international standards, training and building workforce competence, and the important role of government and regulation. The meeting concluded with affirmations of the utility of international cooperation in this sphere and recognition of positive prospects for the future. The workshop was organized as a series of short presentations by international experts on the field of biorisk management, followed by breakout sessions in which participants were divided into four groups and urged to discuss a particular topic with the aid of a facilitator and a set of guiding questions. Rapporteurs were present during the plenary session as well as breakout sessions and in particular were tasked with taking notes during discussions and reporting back to the assembled participants a brief

  20. Environmental Assessment and Finding of No Significant Impact: Implementation of the Wetland Mitigation Bank Program at the Savannah River Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    N /A

    1999-04-28

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared an environmental assessment (EA) (DOE/EA-1205) for the proposed implementation of a wetland mitigation bank program at the Savannah River Site (SRS), located near Aiken, South Carolina. Based on the analyses in the EA, DOE has determined that the proposed action is not a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA). Therefore, the preparation of an environmental impact statement (EIS) is not required, and DOE is issuing this Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI) and Floodplain Statement of Findings.

  1. Urban Surfaces and Heat Island Mitigation Potentials (Journal...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Journal Article: Urban Surfaces and Heat Island Mitigation Potentials Citation Details ... and urban vegetation (trees, grass, shrubs) on the meteorology and air quality of a city. ...

  2. MCA 22-3-430 - Montana Antiquities Avoidance and Mitigation ...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    MCA 22-3-430 - Montana Antiquities Avoidance and MitigationLegal Abstract Sets forth a principle of preferred avoidance of heritage properties or paleontological remains,...

  3. RAPID/Best Practices/Landscape-Scale Mitigation | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    features that minimize impacts (for example, the best types of materials and structure types for visual mitigation or avian-safe structure design) would have been identified...

  4. Mitigations for Security Vulnerabilities Found in Control System...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Mitigations for Security Vulnerabilities Found in Control System Networks (425.98 KB) More Documents & Publications Cyber Assessment Methods for SCADA Security Introduction SCADA ...

  5. Oregon Willamette River Basin Mitigation Agreement | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    River Basin Mitigation Agreement Author State of Oregon Recipient Bonneville Power Administration Published Publisher Not Provided, 10222010 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI...

  6. Monitoring and Assessment of Greenhouse Gas Emissions and Mitigation...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Monitoring and Assessment of Greenhouse Gas Emissions and Mitigation Potential in Agriculture) Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Monitoring and Assessment of Greenhouse Gas...

  7. UNEP-Ethiopia-Facilitating Implementation and Readiness for Mitigation...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    UNEP-Ethiopia-Facilitating Implementation and Readiness for Mitigation (FIRM) Redirect page Jump to: navigation, search REDIRECT Facilitating Implementation and Readiness for...

  8. Exploring changes in solar model physics to mitigate the solar...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Exploring changes in solar model physics to mitigate the solar abundance problem Citation ... Visit OSTI to utilize additional information resources in energy science and technology. A ...

  9. Property:NEPA Resource Imposed Mitigation | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Protection) for applicable mitigation measures. Antelope Valley NesetNEPAImpactwithAirQuality + See http:ww2.wapa.govsiteswesternbusinesssellingDocuments...

  10. Wind Turbine Radar Interference Mitigation Working Group Releases...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Wind Turbine Radar Interference Mitigation Working Group to address these challenges. This new report lays out the plan for how the working group will address wind turbine radar ...

  11. Game-Changing Process Mitigates CO2 Emissions Using Renewable...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Game-Changing Process Mitigates CO2 Emissions Using Renewable Energy Gold nanoparticles ... Researchers developed a special form of gold nanoparticle that contains exactly 25 gold ...

  12. Mitigation of Vehicle Fast Charge Grid Impacts with Renewables...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Vehicle Fast Charge Grid Impacts with Renewables and Energy Storage Mitigation of Vehicle Fast ... AVTA: 2010 Honda Civic HEV with Experimental Ultra Lead Acid Battery Testing Results

  13. Climate Change Adaptation and Mitigation in the Tourism Sector...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    their decision making processes and operations. It presents an overview of the current science and policy of climate change, followed by self-guidance material on mitigation and...

  14. Characterizing Uncertainty for Regional Climate Change Mitigation and Adaptation Decisions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Unwin, Stephen D.; Moss, Richard H.; Rice, Jennie S.; Scott, Michael J.

    2011-09-30

    This white paper describes the results of new research to develop an uncertainty characterization process to help address the challenges of regional climate change mitigation and adaptation decisions.

  15. Micro-Structural Mitigation Strategies for PEM Fuel Cells

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Download presentation slides from the DOE Fuel Cell Technologies Office webinar Micro-Structural Mitigation Strategies for PEM Fuel Cells held on November 19, 2013.

  16. International Partnership on Mitigation and MRV | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    climate experts from a variety of countries, the Partnership seeks to: foster mutual learning between peers identify best practices establish a shared mitigation-related knowledge...

  17. Webinar: Micro-Structural Mitigation Strategies for PEM Fuel Cells

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Video recording of the Fuel Cell Technologies Office webinar, Micro-Structural Mitigation Strategies for PEM Fuel Cells, originally presented on November 19, 2013.

  18. Microsoft PowerPoint - Financial Plan Risk Mitigation Master...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    within acceptable bounds BPA Financial Plan Workshop 5 Financial Plan Risk Metrics Agenda Origin of the Risk Metrics Issue History of risk mitigation measures and origin of...

  19. Monitoring and Assessment of Greenhouse Gas Emissions and Mitigation...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    the MAGHG project is to support developing countries assess and report their greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from agriculture, including assessment of mitigation options for...

  20. Greenhouse Gas Training Program for Inventory and Mitigation...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    divisionsfuture-perfect Country: South Korea Eastern Asia Language: English References: Greenhouse Gas Training Program for Inventory and Mitigation Modeling1...

  1. Mitigation of Vehicle Fast Charge Grid Impacts with Renewables...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Charge Grid Impacts with Renewables and Energy Storage Mike Simpson National Renewable Energy ... Grid Impact Mitigation * Identify system benefits - Add efficient, electric ...

  2. Chile-Climate Change Mitigation and Agriculture in Latin America...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Agriculture in Latin America and the Caribbean Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Chile-Climate Change Mitigation and Agriculture in Latin America and the Caribbean Name...

  3. Climate Change Mitigation in the Energy and Forestry Sectors...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    of Developing Countries Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Climate Change Mitigation in the Energy and Forestry Sectors of Developing Countries...

  4. Development based climate change adaptation and mitigation-conceptual...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    based climate change adaptation and mitigation-conceptual issues and lessons learned in studies in developing countries Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name:...

  5. Agricultural Technologies for Climate Change Mitigation and Adaptation...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Technologies for Climate Change Mitigation and Adaptation in Developing Countries: Policy Options for Innovations and Technology Diffusion Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary...

  6. Site mitigation issues along the Alameda Corridor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ripaldi, C.P.

    1996-12-31

    The Alameda Corridor is a consolidated railroad link between the Ports of Los Angeles and Long Beach and the regional and national rail systems linking the nation. A joint Environmental Impacts Report/Environmental Impact Statement (EIR/EIS) was prepared for the project. The Final EIS was issued in February 1996, and a record of decision was issued in May, 1996. Various Phase 1 and Phase 2 Environmental Site Assessments have provided extensive historical documentation of environmental contamination in the vicinity of the Alameda Corridor Transportation Project. A Site Mitigation Master Plan provides guidance and direction for the clean-up activities. Samples will be analyzed for metals, PCB`s TRPH, BTEX, and VOCs.

  7. Mitigation of radiation induced surface contamination

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Klebanoff, Leonard E.; Stulen, Richard H.

    2003-01-01

    A process for mitigating or eliminating contamination and/or degradation of surfaces having common, adventitious atmospheric contaminants adsorbed thereon and exposed to radiation. A gas or a mixture of gases is introduced into the environment of a surface(s) to be protected. The choice of the gaseous species to be introduced (typically a hydrocarbon gas, water vapor, or oxygen or mixtures thereof) is dependent upon the contaminant as well as the ability of the gaseous species to bind to the surface to be protected. When the surface and associated bound species are exposed to radiation reactive species are formed that react with surface contaminants such as carbon or oxide films to form volatile products (e.g., CO, CO.sub.2) which desorb from the surface.

  8. Action Plan - Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Agreement Action Plan Tri-Party Agreement The Agreement Action Plan Announcements List of Approved Changes TPA Project Manager's Lists Modifications for Public Comment Data Management MP-14 WIDS Information Hanford Site Waste Management Units Report Hanford Public Involvement Plan Administrative Record (AR) Related Links Action Plan Email Email Page | Print Print Page | Text Increase Font Size Decrease Font Size Executive Summary 1.0 Introduction 1.1 Purpose 1.2 Regulatory Authorities 1.3

  9. Protective Actions and Reentry

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1997-08-21

    This volume defines appropriate protective actions and reentry of a site following an emergency. Canceled by DOE G 151.1-4.

  10. Mitigation for one & all: An integrated framework for mitigation of development impacts on biodiversity and ecosystem services

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tallis, Heather; Kennedy, Christina M.; Ruckelshaus, Mary; Goldstein, Joshua; Kiesecker, Joseph M.

    2015-11-15

    Emerging development policies and lending standards call for consideration of ecosystem services when mitigating impacts from development, yet little guidance exists to inform this process. Here we propose a comprehensive framework for advancing both biodiversity and ecosystem service mitigation. We have clarified a means for choosing representative ecosystem service targets alongside biodiversity targets, identified servicesheds as a useful spatial unit for assessing ecosystem service avoidance, impact, and offset options, and discuss methods for consistent calculation of biodiversity and ecosystem service mitigation ratios. We emphasize the need to move away from area- and habitat-based assessment methods for both biodiversity and ecosystem services towards functional assessments at landscape or seascape scales. Such comprehensive assessments more accurately reflect cumulative impacts and variation in environmental quality, social needs and value preferences. The integrated framework builds on the experience of biodiversity mitigation while addressing the unique opportunities and challenges presented by ecosystem service mitigation. These advances contribute to growing potential for economic development planning and execution that will minimize impacts on nature and maximize human wellbeing. - Highlights: • This is the first framework for biodiversity and ecosystem service mitigation. • Functional, landscape scale assessments are ideal for avoidance and offsets. • Servicesheds define the appropriate spatial extent for ecosystem service mitigation. • Mitigation ratios should be calculated consistently and based on standard factors. • Our framework meets the needs of integrated mitigation assessment requirements.

  11. Stream Classification Tool User Manual: For Use in Applications in Hydropower-Related Evironmental Mitigation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McManamay, Ryan A.; Troia, Matthew J.; DeRolph, Christopher R.; Samu, Nicole M.

    2016-01-01

    Stream classifications are an inventory of different types of streams. Classifications help us explore similarities and differences among different types of streams, make inferences regarding stream ecosystem behavior, and communicate the complexities of ecosystems. We developed a nested, layered, and spatially contiguous stream classification to characterize the biophysical settings of stream reaches within the Eastern United States (~ 900,000 reaches). The classification is composed of five natural characteristics (hydrology, temperature, size, confinement, and substrate) along with several disturbance regime layers, and each was selected because of their relevance to hydropower mitigation. We developed the classification at the stream reach level using the National Hydrography Dataset Plus Version 1 (1:100k scale). The stream classification is useful to environmental mitigation for hydropower dams in multiple ways. First, it creates efficiency in the regulatory process by creating an objective and data-rich means to address meaningful mitigation actions. Secondly, the SCT addresses data gaps as it quickly provides an inventory of hydrology, temperature, morphology, and ecological communities for the immediate project area, but also surrounding streams. This includes identifying potential reference streams as those that are proximate to the hydropower facility and fall within the same class. These streams can potentially be used to identify ideal environmental conditions or identify desired ecological communities. In doing so, the stream provides some context for how streams may function, respond to dam regulation, and an overview of specific mitigation needs. Herein, we describe the methodology in developing each stream classification layer and provide a tutorial to guide applications of the classification (and associated data) in regulatory settings, such as hydropower (re)licensing.

  12. Hellsgate Winter Range Mitigation Project; Long-term Management Plan, Project Report 1993, Final Draft.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berger, Matthew T.

    1994-01-01

    A study was conducted on the Hellsgate Winter Range Mitigation Project area, a 4,943 acre ranch purchased for mitigating some habitat losses associated with the original construction of Grand Coulee Dam and innundation of habitat by Lake Roosevelt. A Habitat Evaluation Procedure (HEP) study was used to determine habitat quality and quantity baseline data and future projections. Target species used in the study were sharp-tailed grouse (Tympanuchus phasianellus), mule deer (Odocoileus hemoinus), mink (Mustela vison), spotted sandpiper (Actiius colchicus), bobcat (Felis reufs), blue grouse (Dendragapus obscurus), and mourning dove (Zenaida macroura). From field data collected, limiting life values or HSI's (Habitat Suitability Index's) for each indicator species was determined for existing habitats on project lands. From this data a long term management plan was developed. This report is designed to provide guidance for the management of project lands in relation to the habitat cover types discussed and the indicator species used to evaluate these cover types. In addition, the plan discusses management actions, habitat enhancements, and tools that will be used to enhance, protect and restore habitats to desired conditions. Through planned management actions biodiversity and vegetative structure can be optimized over time to reduce or eliminate, limiting HSI values for selected wildlife on project lands.

  13. Mitigation technologies and measures in energy sector of Kazakstan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pilifosova, O.; Danchuk, D.; Temertekov, T.

    1996-12-31

    An important commitment in the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change is to conduct mitigation analysis and to communicate climate change measures and policies. In major part reducing CO{sub 2} as well as the other greenhouse gas emissions in Kazakstan, can be a side-product of measures addressed to increasing energy efficiency. Since such measures are very important for the national economy, mitigation strategies in the energy sector of Kazakstan are directly connected with the general national strategy of the energy sector development. This paper outlines the main measures and technologies in energy sector of Kazakstan which can lead to GHG emissions reduction and presents the results of current mitigation assessment. The mitigation analysis is addressed to energy production sector. A baseline and six mitigation scenarios were developed to evaluate the most attractive mitigation options, focusing on specific technologies which have been already included in sustainable energy programs. According to the baseline projection, Kazakstan`s CO{sub 2} emissions will not exceed their 1990 level until 2005. The potential for CO{sub 2} emission reduction is estimated to be about 11 % of the base line emission level by the end of considered period (in 2020). The main mitigation options in the energy production sector in terms of mitigation potential and technical and economical feasibility include rehabilitation of thermal power plants aimed to increasing efficiency, use of nuclear energy and further expansion in the use of hydro energy based on small hydroelectric power plants.

  14. Greenhouse gas mitigation options for Washington State

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garcia, N.

    1996-04-01

    President Clinton, in 1993, established a goal for the United States to return emissions of greenhouse gases to 1990 levels by the year 2000. One effort established to help meet this goal was a three part Environmental Protection Agency state grant program. Washington State completed part one of this program with the release of the 1990 greenhouse gas emissions inventory and 2010 projected inventory. This document completes part two by detailing alternative greenhouse gas mitigation options. In part three of the program EPA, working in partnership with the States, may help fund innovative greenhouse gas reduction strategies. The greenhouse gas control options analyzed in this report have a wide range of greenhouse gas reductions, costs, and implementation requirements. In order to select and implement a prudent mix of control strategies, policy makers need to have some notion of the potential change in climate, the consequences of that change and the uncertainties contained therein. By understanding the risks of climate change, policy makers can better balance the use of scarce public resources for concerns that are immediate and present against those that affect future generations. Therefore, prior to analyzing alternative greenhouse gas control measures, this report briefly describes the phenomenon and uncertainties of global climate change, and then projects the likely consequences for Washington state.

  15. Notes and Action Items

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Notes and Action Items Notes and Action Items ERSUG Action Items from June 1996 meeting at Germantown, MD Get DOE staff on mailers for broadcast of ERSUG issues Responsibility: Kendall and Kitchens Review and comment on ERSUG Proposal to SAC Responsibility: All of ERSUG Comments to Rick Kendall by July 17th email: ra_kendall@pnl.gov Fax : (509) 375-6631 Review and comment on Requirements Document "Greenbook" Responsibility: All of ERSUG Comments to Rick Kendall by August 7th email:

  16. Hungry Horse Dam Fisheries Mitigation, 1992-1993 Progress Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DosSantos, Joe; Vashro, Jim; Lockard, Larry

    1994-06-01

    In February of 1900, over forty agency representatives and interested citizens began development of the 1991 Mitigation Plan. This effort culminated in the 1993 Implementation Plan for mitigation of fish losses attributable to the construction and operation of Hungry Horse Dam. The primary purpose of this biennial report is to inform the public of the status of ongoing mitigation activities resulting from those planning efforts. A habitat improvement project is underway to benefit bull trout in Big Creek in the North Fork drainage of the Flathead River and work is planned in Hay Creek, another North Fork tributary. Bull trout redd counts have been expanded and experimental programs involving genetic evaluation, outmigrant monitoring, and hatchery studies have been initiated, Cutthroat mitigation efforts have focused on habitat improvements in Elliott Creek and Taylor`s Outflow and improvements have been followed by imprint plants of hatchery fish and/or eyed eggs in those streams. Rogers Lake west of Kalispell and Lion Lake, near Hungry Horse, were chemically rehabilitated. Cool and warm water fish habitat has been improved in Halfmoon Lake and Echo Lake. Public education and public interest is important to the future success of mitigation activities. As part of the mitigation team`s public awareness responsibility we have worked with numerous volunteer groups, public agencies, and private landowners to stimulate interest and awareness of mitigation activities and the aquatic ecosystem. The purpose of this biennial report is to foster public awareness of, and support for, mitigation activities as we move forward in implementing the Hungry Horse Dam Fisheries Mitigation Implementation Plan.

  17. Status of Corrective Actions

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Report on February 14 Incident at the Waste Isolation Pilot Project in Carlsbad, New Mexico April 12, 2012 x x Contact Communication Office (505) 667-7000 Corrective Actions...

  18. Notices ACTION: Notice.

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    8867 Federal Register Vol. 80, No. 215 Friday, November 6, 2015 Notices ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This notice announces EPA's receipt of an application 91163-EUP-R from Texas...

  19. Notices ACTION: Notice.

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    867 Federal Register Vol. 80, No. 215 Friday, November 6, 2015 Notices ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This notice announces EPA's receipt of an application 91163-EUP-R from Texas...

  20. Mitigating Wind-Radar Interference | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Mitigating Wind-Radar Interference Mitigating Wind-Radar Interference April 1, 2013 - 12:54pm Addthis This is an excerpt from the First Quarter 2013 edition of the Wind Program R&D Newsletter. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and federal agency partners recently completed the final operational field test in a 2-year initiative to accelerate the deployment of the most promising new technologies for mitigating radar interference caused by the physical and electromagnetic effects of wind

  1. Insider Threat - Material Control and Accountability Mitigation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Powell, Danny H; Elwood Jr, Robert H; Roche, Charles T

    2011-01-01

    compensating mitigation can decrease the risk of an insider performing a malicious act without detection.

  2. Corrective Action Program Guide

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2006-03-02

    This Guide was developed to assist the Department of Energy (DOE) organizations and contractors in the development, implementation, and followup of corrective action programs utilizing the feedback and improvement core safety function within DOE's Integrated Safety Management System. This Guide outlines some of the basic principles, concepts, and lessons learned that DOE managers and contractors might consider when implementing corrective action programs based on their specific needs. Canceled by DOE G 414.1-2B. Does not cancel other directives.

  3. Climate Action Champion: Technical

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    energy.gov/betterbuildings Climate Action Champion: Technical Assistance to the City of Seattle Planning for Seattle's new Building Energy Code Overview The City of Seattle, identified as a Climate Action Champion (CAC) by the Department of Energy (DOE), is revising its 2012 Energy Code, already one of the most progressive in the country. Seattle has made a pledge to be carbon neutral by 2050. Seattle received technical assistance from the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory in order to

  4. Mitigating greenhouse gas emissions: Voluntary reporting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-10-01

    The Voluntary Reporting Program, developed pursuant to Section 1605(b) of the Energy Policy Act of 1992, permits corporations, government agencies, households, and voluntary organizations to report on their emissions of greenhouse gases, and on actions taken that have reduced or avoided emissions or sequestered carbon, to the Energy Information Administration (EIA). This, the second annual report of the Voluntary Reporting Program, describes information provided by the participating organizations on their aggregate emissions and emissions reductions, as well as their emissions reduction or avoidance projects, through 1995. This information has been compiled into a database that includes reports from 142 organizations and descriptions of 967 projects that either reduced greenhouse gas emissions or sequestered carbon. Fifty-one reporters also provided estimates of emissions, and emissions reductions achieved, for their entire organizations. The projects described actions taken to reduce emissions of carbon dioxide from energy production and use; to reduce methane and nitrous oxide emissions from energy use, waste management, and agricultural processes; to reduce emissions of halocarbons, such as CFCs and their replacements; and to increase carbon sequestration.

  5. Wildlife and Wildlife Habitat Mitigation Plan for Libby Hydroelectric Project, Final Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mundinger, John

    1985-01-01

    This report describes the proposed mitigation plan for wildlife losses attributable to the construction of the Libby hydroelectric project. Mitigation objectives and alternatives, the recommended mitigation projects, and the crediting system for each project are described by each target species. The report describes mitigation that has already taken place and 8 recommended mitigation projects designed to complete total wildlife mitigation. 8 refs., 2 figs., 12 tabs.

  6. Appropriate Use of Mitigation and Monitoring and Clarifying the Appropriate Use of Mitigated Findings of No Significant Impact (CEQ, 2011)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Council on Environmental Quality is issuing this guidance for Federal departments and agencies on establishing, implementing, and monitoring mitigation commitments identified and analyzed in Environmental Assessments, Environmental Impact Statements, and adopted in the final decision documents. This guidance also clarifies the appropriate use of mitigated "Findings of No Significant Impact" under the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA). The guidance explains the requirements of NEPA and the CEQ Regulations, describes CEQ policies, and recommends procedures for agencies to use to help them comply with the requirements of NEPA and the CEQ Regulations when they establish mitigation planning and implementation procedures

  7. Gearbox Typical Failure Modes, Detection, and Mitigation Methods (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sheng, S.

    2014-01-01

    This presentation was given at the AWEA Operations & Maintenance and Safety Seminar and focused on what the typical gearbox failure modes are, how to detect them using detection techniques, and strategies that help mitigate these failures.

  8. Market-based Wildlife Mitigation in Wyoming: A Primer | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    A Primer Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Report: Market-based Wildlife Mitigation in Wyoming: A Primer Abstract Covers the basics of...

  9. Introduction to Administrative Programs that Mitigate the Insider Threat

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gerke, Gretchen K.; Rogers, Erin; Landers, John; DeCastro, Kara

    2012-09-01

    This presentation begins with the reality of the insider threat, then elaborates on these tools to mitigate the insider threat: Human Reliability Program (HRP); Nuclear Security Culture (NSC) Program; Employee Assistance Program (EAP).

  10. National Mitigation Planning in Agriculture: Review and Guidelines...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Simple Website: www.fao.orgdocrep017i3237ei3237e.pdf Language: English This review of national greenhouse gas (GHG) mitigation planning in the agriculture sector provides...

  11. EA-1096: Washington Wildlife Mitigation Projects (Programmatic), Washington

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of the proposal for the U.S. Department of Energy Bonneville Power Administration to fund the portion of the Washington Wildlife Mitigation Agreement...

  12. Over-Pressurized Drums: Their Causes and Mitigation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Simmons, Fred; Kuntamukkula, Murty; Quigley, David; Robertson, Janeen; Freshwater, David

    2009-07-10

    Having to contend with bulging or over-pressurized drums is, unfortunately, a common event for people storing chemicals and chemical wastes. (Figure 1) The Department of Energy alone reported over 120 incidents of bulging drums between 1992 and 1999 (1). Bulging drums can be caused by many different mechanisms, represent a number of significant hazards and can be tricky to mitigate. In this article, we will discuss reasons or mechanisms by which drums can become over-pressurized, recognition of the hazards associated with and mitigation of over-pressurized drums, and methods that can be used to prevent drum over-pressurization from ever occurring. Drum pressurization can represent a significant safety hazard. Unless recognized and properly mitigated, improperly manipulated pressurized drums can result in employee exposure, employee injury, and environmental contamination. Therefore, recognition of when a drum is pressurized and knowledge of pressurized drum mitigation techniques is essential.

  13. Recent Developments in Field Response for Mitigation of Radiological

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Incidents | Department of Energy Developments in Field Response for Mitigation of Radiological Incidents Recent Developments in Field Response for Mitigation of Radiological Incidents Carlos Corredor*, Department of Energy; Charley Yu, Argonne National Labs Abstract: Since September 11, 2001, there has been a large effort by the government to develop new methods to reduce the consequence of potential radiological incidents. This is evident in the enhancement of technologies and methods to

  14. Recent Diesel Engine Emission Mitigation Activities of the Maritime

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Administration Energy Technologies Program | Department of Energy Diesel Engine Emission Mitigation Activities of the Maritime Administration Energy Technologies Program Recent Diesel Engine Emission Mitigation Activities of the Maritime Administration Energy Technologies Program 2003 DEER Conference Presentation: Maritime Administration 2003_deer_gore.pdf (759.73 KB) More Documents & Publications The Maritime Administration's Energy and Emissions Program - Part 2 Reduction of Emissions

  15. EERE Success Story-Mitigating Potential Environmental Impacts of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Development | Department of Energy Mitigating Potential Environmental Impacts of Energy Development EERE Success Story-Mitigating Potential Environmental Impacts of Energy Development April 15, 2013 - 12:00am Addthis Partnering with EERE, Normandeau Associates of Bedford, New Hampshire, developed a tool that characterizes the risk for bird and bat species that may be susceptible to collisions with wind turbines. This tool will be used in environmental decision-making for the planning,

  16. 2011 River Corridor Closure Contractor Revegetation and Mitigation Monitoring Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    West, W. J.; Lucas, J. G.; Gano, K. A.

    2011-11-14

    This report documents the status of revegetation projects and natural resources mitigation efforts conducted for remediated waste sites and other activities associated with the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 cleanup of National Priorities List waste sites at Hanford. This report contains the vegetation monitoring data that was collected in the spring and summer of 2011 from the River Corridor Closure Contractors revegetation and mitigation areas on the Hanford Site.

  17. Advanced Technology Development and Mitigation | National Nuclear Security

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Administration | (NNSA) Advanced Technology Development and Mitigation The Advanced Technology Development and Mitigation (ATDM) subprogram includes laboratory code and computer engineering and science projects that pursue long-term simulation and computing goals relevant to the broad national security missions of the NNSA. It addresses the need to adapt current integrated design codes and build new codes that are attuned to emerging computing technologies. Performing this work within the

  18. 2010 River Corridor Closure Contractor Revegetation and Mitigation Monitoring Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    C. T. Lindsey, A. L. Johnson

    2010-09-30

    This report documents eh status of revegetation projects and natural resources mitigation efforts conducted for remediated waste sites and other activities associated with CERLA cleanup of National Priorities List waste sites at Hanford. This report contains vegetation monitoring data that were collected in the spring and summer of 2010 from the River Corridor Closure Contract’s revegetation and mitigation areas on the Hanford Site.

  19. 2014 WIND POWER PROGRAM PEER REVIEW-MARKET BARRIER MITIGATION

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Market Barrier Mitigation March 6-27, 2014 Wind Energy Technologies PR-5000-62152 2 Contents Market Barrier Mitigation Siting, Environmental and Permitting- Karin Sinclair, National Renewable Energy Laboratory Developing high-resolution spatial data of migration corridors for avian species of concern in regions of high potential wind development- Todd Katzner, West Virginia University Deepwater Offshore Bat Monitoring Program-Steven K Pelletier, Stantec Consulting Services, Inc. A Synchronized

  20. ES H action plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-01-01

    This document contains planned actions to correct the deficiencies identified in the Pre-Tiger Team Self-Assessment (PTTSA), January 1991, of Sandia National Laboratories (SNL -- Albuquerque, New Mexico; Tonopah, Nevada; and Kauai, Hawaii). The Self-Assessment was conducted by a Self-Assessment Working Group consisting of 19 department managers, with support from Environment, Safety, and Health (ES H) professionals, from October through December 1990. Findings from other past audits, dating back to 1985, were reviewed and compared with the PTTSA findings to determine if additional findings, key findings, or root causes were warranted. The resulting ES H Action Plan and individual planned actions were prepared by the ES H Action Plan Project Group with assistance from the Program owners/authors during February and March 1991. The plan was reviewed by SNL Management in April 1991. This document serves as a planning instrument for the Laboratories to aid in the scoping and sizing of activities related to ES H compliance for the coming five years. It will be modified as required to ensure a workload/funding balance and to address the findings resulting from the Tiger Team assessment at SNL, Albuquerque. The process of producing this document has served well to prepare SNL, Albuquerque, for the coming task of producing the required post-Tiger Team action plan document. 8 tabs.

  1. A statistical approach to designing mitigation for induced ac voltages

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dabkowski, J. [Electro Sciences, Inc., Crystal Lake, IL (United States)

    1996-08-01

    Induced voltage levels on buried pipelines collocated with overhead electric power transmission lines are usually mitigated by means of grounding the pipeline. Maximum effectiveness is obtained when grounds are placed at discrete locations along the pipeline where the peak induced voltages occur. The degree of mitigation achieved is dependent upon the local soil resistivity at these locations. On occasion it may be necessary to employ an extensive distributed grounding system, for example, a parallel buried wire connected to the pipe at periodic intervals. In this situation the a priori calculation of mitigated voltage levels is sometimes made assuming an average value for the soil resistivity. Over long distances, however, the soil resistivity generally varies as a log-normally distributed random variable. The effect of this variability upon the predicted mitigated voltage levels is examined. It is found that the predicted levels exhibit a statistical variability which precludes a precise determination of the mitigated voltage levels. Thus, post commissioning testing of the emplaced mitigation system is advisable.

  2. Notes and Action Items

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Notes and Action Items Notes and Action Items Report on the NUGEX business meeting of June 6, 2000, in Oak Ridge Minute notes by Bas Braams First of all, many thanks to the organizers of the preceding NUG meeting: Roberta Boucher, David Dean, Brian Hingerty, Bill Kramer, Donald Spong and Malcolm Stocks. Likewise thanks to Brian Hingerty and Mike Minkoff for organizing the Users Helping Users events, and to Tom DeBoni, Osni Marques, Jeffrey Squyres and David Turner for the NERSC training classes.

  3. ENHANCED PRACTICAL PHOTOSYNTHETIC CO2 MITIGATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dr. Gregory Kremer; Dr. David J. Bayless; Dr. Morgan Vis; Dr. Michael Prudich; Dr. Keith Cooksey; Dr. Jeff Muhs

    2002-01-15

    This quarterly report documents significant achievements in the Enhanced Practical Photosynthetic CO{sub 2} Mitigation project during the period from 10/3/2001 through 1/02/2002. Most of the achievements are milestones in our efforts to complete the tasks and subtasks that constitute the project objectives. Our research team has made significant progress towards completion of our Phase I objectives, and our current efforts remain focused on fulfilling these research objectives in accordance with the project timeline. Overall, we believe that we are on schedule to complete Phase I activities by 10/2002, which is the milestone date from the original project timeline. Specific results and accomplishments for the fourth quarter of 2001 include: (1) New procedures and protocols have been developed to increase the chances of successful implementation in the bioreactor of organisms that perform well in the lab. The new procedures include pre-screening of organisms for adhesion characteristics and a focus on identifying the organisms with maximum growth rate potential. (2) Preliminary results show an increase in adhesion to glass and a decrease in overall growth rates when using growth media prepared with tap water rather than distilled water. (3) Several of the organisms collected from Yellowstone National Park using the new procedures are currently being cultured in preparation for bioreactor tests. (4) One important result from a test of growth surface temperature distribution as a function of gas stream and drip-fluid temperatures showed a high dependence of membrane temperature on fluid temperature, with gas stream temperature having minimal effect. This result indicates that bioreactor growth surface temperatures can be controlled using fluid delivery temperature. The possible implications for implementation of the bioreactor concept are encouraging, since it may be possible to use the bioreactor with very high gas stream temperatures by controlling the temperature

  4. Appendix VI Corrective Action Strategy

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    ......... 15 3.0 Underground Test Area............ 13 3-1 Underground Test Area Corrective Action ...

  5. Probability, consequences, and mitigation for lightning strikes to Hanford site high-level waste tanks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zach, J.J.

    1996-08-01

    The purpose of this report is to summarize selected lightning issues concerning the Hanford Waste Tanks. These issues include the probability of lightning discharge striking the area immediately adjacent to a tank including a riser, the consequences of significant energy deposition from a lightning strike in a tank, and mitigating actions that have been or are being taken. The major conclusion of this report is that the probability of a lightning strike depositing sufficient energy in a tank to cause an effect on employees or the public is unlikely;but there are insufficient, quantitative data on the tanks and waste to prove that. Protection, such as grounding of risers and air terminals on existing light poles, is recommended.

  6. Probability, consequences, and mitigation for lightning strikes of Hanford high level waste tanks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zach, J.J.

    1996-06-05

    The purpose of this report is to summarize selected lightning issues concerning the Hanford Waste Tanks. These issues include the probability of a lightning discharge striking the area immediately adjacent to a tank including a riser, the consequences of significant energy deposition from a lightning strike in a tank, and mitigating actions that have been or are being taken. The major conclusion of this report is that the probability of a lightning strike deposition sufficient energy in a tank to cause an effect on employees or the public is unlikely;but there are insufficient, quantitative data on the tanks and waste to prove that. Protection, such as grounding of risers and air terminals on existing light poles, is recommended.

  7. Hellsgate Big Game Winter Range Wildlife Mitigation Site Specific Management Plan for the Hellsgate Project.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berger, Matthew T.; Judd, Steven L.

    1999-01-01

    This report contains a detailed site-specific management plan for the Hellsgate Winter Range Wildlife Mitigation Project. The report provides background information about the mitigation process, the review process, mitigation acquisitions, Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) and mitigation crediting, current habitat conditions, desired future habitat conditions, restoration/enhancements efforts and maps.

  8. Estimating the potential of greenhouse gas mitigation in Kazakhstan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Monacrovich, E.; Pilifosova, O.; Danchuck, D.

    1996-09-01

    As part of the studies related to the obligations of the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change, the Republic of Kazakhstan started activities to inventory greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and assess of GHG mitigation options, The objective of this paper is to present an estimate of the possibility of mitigating GHG emissions and determine the mitigation priorities. It presents a compilation of the possible options and their assessment in terms of major criteria and implementation feasibility. Taking into account the structure of GHG emissions in Kazakhstan in 1990, preliminary estimates of the potential for mitigation are presented for eight options for the energy sector and agriculture and forestry sector. The reference scenario prepared by expert assessments assumes a reduction of CO{sub 2} emissions in 1996-1998 by about 26% from the 1990 level due to general economic decline, but then emissions increase. It is estimated that the total potential for the mitigation of CO{sub 2} emissions for the year 2000 is 3% of the CO{sub 2} emissions in the reference scenario. The annual reduction in methane emissions due to the estimated options can amount to 5%-6% of the 1990 level. 10 refs., 1 fig., 4 tabs.

  9. Status of research toward the ITER disruption mitigation system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hollmann, E. M.; Izzo, V. A.; Aleynikov, P. B.; Lehnen, M.; Snipes, J. A.; Fülöp, T.; Humphreys, D. A.; Lukash, V. E.; Papp, G.; Pautasso, G.; Saint-Laurent, F.

    2015-02-15

    An overview of the present status of research toward the final design of the ITER disruption mitigation system (DMS) is given. The ITER DMS is based on massive injection of impurities, in order to radiate the plasma stored energy and mitigate the potentially damaging effects of disruptions. The design of this system will be extremely challenging due to many physics and engineering constraints such as limitations on port access and the amount and species of injected impurities. Additionally, many physics questions relevant to the design of the ITER disruption mitigation system remain unsolved such as the mechanisms for mixing and assimilation of injected impurities during the rapid shutdown and the mechanisms for the subsequent formation and dissipation of runaway electron current.

  10. Fuel Flexibility: Landfill Gas Contaminant Mitigation for Power Generation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Storey, John Morse; Theiss, Timothy J; Kass, Michael D; FINNEY, Charles E A; Lewis, Samuel; Kaul, Brian C; Besmann, Theodore M; Thomas, John F; Rogers, Hiram; Sepaniak, Michael

    2014-04-01

    This research project focused on the mitigation of silica damage to engine-based renewable landfill gas energy systems. Characterization of the landfill gas siloxane contamination, combined with characterization of the silica deposits in engines, led to development of two new mitigation strategies. The first involved a novel method for removing the siloxanes and other heavy contaminants from the landfill gas prior to use by the engines. The second strategy sought to interrupt the formation of hard silica deposits in the engine itself, based on inspection of failed landfill gas engine parts. In addition to mitigation, the project had a third task to develop a robust sensor for siloxanes that could be used to control existing and/or future removal processes.

  11. SAVEnergy Action Plans

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mayo, K.; Westby, R.; deMonsabert, S.; Ginsberg, M.

    1994-04-01

    The Department of Energy`s Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) is charged with carrying out key sections of EPACT and Executive Order 12903, to make the Federal government operate more efficiently. A congressionally mandated energy and water conservation audit program is one component of this growing DOE program. This paper traces the SAVEnergy Action Plan program throughout its development from (1) identifying projects and Agency champions, (2) establishing a protocol and fitting auditors into the program, (3) developing a data base to track the audits and measure their success, and (4) evaluating the process, learning from mistakes, and charting and transferring successes. A major tenet of the SAVEnergy program is to proactively prescreen all audit activities to ensure that -- where audits are done and Action Plans completed -- projects will be done.

  12. Climate Action Champions: Metropolitan Washington Council of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    baseline regional greenhouse gas inventory, examines potential climate change impacts, evaluates mitigation and adaptation strategies, and establishes greenhouse gas emission ...

  13. Columbia Basin Wildlife Mitigation Project : Rainwater Wildlife Area Final Management Plan.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Childs, Allen

    2002-03-01

    This Draft Management Plan has been developed by the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR) to document how the Rainwater Wildlife Area (formerly known as the Rainwater Ranch) will be managed. The plan has been developed under a standardized planning process developed by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) for Columbia River Basin Wildlife Mitigation Projects (See Appendix A and Guiding Policies Section below). The plan outlines the framework for managing the project area, provides an assessment of existing conditions and key resource issues, and presents an array of habitat management and enhancement strategies. The plan culminates into a 5-Year Action Plan that will focus our management actions and prioritize funding during the Fiscal 2001-2005 planning period. This plan is a product of nearly two years of field studies and research, public scoping, and coordination with the Rainwater Advisory Committee. The committee consists of representatives from tribal government, state agencies, local government, public organizations, and members of the public. The plan is organized into several sections with Chapter 1 providing introductory information such as project location, purpose and need, project goals and objectives, common elements and assumptions, coordination efforts and public scoping, and historical information about the project area. Key issues are presented in Chapter 2 and Chapter 3 discusses existing resource conditions within the wildlife area. Chapter 4 provides a detailed presentation on management activities and Chapter 5 outlines a monitoring and evaluation plan for the project that will help assess whether the project is meeting the intended purpose and need and the goals and objectives. Chapter 6 displays the action plan and provides a prioritized list of actions with associated budget for the next five year period. Successive chapters contain appendices, references, definitions, and a glossary.

  14. Remedial Action Performed

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Aliquippa Forge Site in Aliquippa, Pennsylvania Department of Energy Former Sites Restoration Division Oak Ridge Operations Office November 1996 CERTIFICATION DOCKE.~ FOR THE REMEDIAL ACTION PERFORMED AT THE ALIQUIPPA FORGE SITE IN ALIQUIPPA, PENNSYLVANIA NOVEMBER 1996 Prepared for . UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Oak Ridge Operations Office Under Contract No. DE-AC05-9 1 OR2 1949 Bechtel National, Inc. Oak Ridge, Tennessee Bechtel Job No. 14501 CONTENTS Page FIGURES v . . . . . . . . . . .

  15. Remedial Action Performed

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Baker and Williams Warehouses Site in New York, New York, 7997 - 7993 Department of Energy Former Sites Restoration Division Oak Ridge Operations Office November 7 995 CERTIFICATION DOCKET FOR THE REMEDIAL ACTION PERFORMED AT THE BAKER AND WILLIAMS WAREHOUSES SITE IN NEW YORK, NEW YORK, 1991-1993 NOVEMBER 1995 Prepared for United States Department of Energy Oak Ridge Operations Office Under Contract No. DE-AC05-910R21949 BY Bechtel National, Inc. Oak Ridge, Tennessee Bechtel Job No. 14501 __

  16. Remedial Action Performed

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Alba Craft Laboratory and Vicinity Properties Site in Oxford, Ohio C Department of Energy Former Sites Restoration Division Oak Ridge Operations Office January 1997 $$@T Op% 3 @!B . i~d!l Ab Printed on recycled/recyclable paper. CERTIFICATION DOCKET FOR THE REMEDIAL ACTION PERFORMED AT THE FORMER ALBA CRAFT LABORATORY AND VICINITY PROPERTIES SITE IN OXFORD, OHIO JANUARY 1997 Prepared for United States Department of Energy Oak Ridge Operations Office Under Contract No. DE-AC0591 OR2 1949 Bechtel

  17. Environmental Assessment - Proposed Actions

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    availability of Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) facilities and infrastructure to scientists who wish to conduct experiments there. DOE would allow these experiments if they can be conducted without interfering with the WIPP's primary transuranic waste disposal mission and if they reflect contemporary budget priorities. This fact sheet presents questions and answers about the proposed action and its alternative. The deep geologic repository at the WIPP could provide a favorable environment for

  18. Interim Action Determination

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Interim Action Determination Processing of Plutonium Materials from the DOE Standard 3013 Surveillance Program in H-Canyon at the Savannah River Site The Department of Energy (DOE) is preparing the Surplus Plutonium Disposition Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement (SPD SEIS, DOE/EIS-0283-S2). DOE is evaluating alternatives for disposition of non-pit plutonium that is surplus to the national security needs of the United States. Although the Deputy Secretary of Energy approved Critical

  19. Method to prevent/mitigate steam explosions in casting pits

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Taleyarkhan, R.P.

    1996-12-24

    Steam explosions can be prevented or mitigated during a metal casting process by the placement of a perforated flooring system in the casting pit. An upward flow of compressed gas through this perforated flooring system is introduced during the casting process to produce a buffer layer between any spilled molten metal and the cooling water in the reservoir. This buffer layer provides a hydrodynamic layer which acts to prevent or mitigate steam explosions resulting from hot, molten metal being spilled into or onto the cooling water. 3 figs.

  20. Method to prevent/mitigate steam explosions in casting pits

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Taleyarkhan, Rusi P.

    1996-01-01

    Steam explosions can be prevented or mitigated during a metal casting process by the placement of a perforated flooring system in the casting pit. An upward flow of compressed gas through this perforated flooring system is introduced during the casting process to produce a buffer layer between any spilled molten metal and the cooling water in the reservoir. This buffer layer provides a hydrodynamic layer which acts to prevent or mitigate steam explosions resulting from hot, molten metal being spilled into or onto the cooling water.

  1. Hungry Horse Mitigation; Flathead Lake, 2003-2004 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hansen, Barry; Evarts, Les

    2005-06-01

    The Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes (CSKT) and Montana Fish Wildlife and Parks (MFWP) wrote the ''Fisheries Mitigation Plan for Losses Attributable to the Construction and Operation of Hungry Horse Dam'' in March 1991 to define the fisheries losses, mitigation alternatives and recommendations to protect, mitigate and enhance resident fish and aquatic habitat affected by Hungry Horse Dam. On November 12, 1991, the Northwest Power Planning Council (NPPC) approved the mitigation plan with minor modifications, called for a detailed implementation plan, and amended measures 903(h)(1) through (7). A long-term mitigation plan was submitted in August 1992, was approved by the Council in 1993, and the first contract for this project was signed on November 11, 1993. The problem this project addresses is the loss of habitat, both in quality and quantity, in the Flathead Lake and River basin resulting from the construction and operation of Hungry Horse Dam. The purpose of the project is to both implement mitigation measures and monitor the biological responses to those measures including those implemented by Project Numbers 9101903 and 9101904. Goals and objectives of the 1994 Fish and Wildlife Program (Section 10.1) addressed by this project are the rebuilding to sustainable levels weak, but recoverable, native populations injured by the hydropower system. The project mitigates the blockage of spawning runs by Hungry Horse Dam by restoring and even creating spawning habitats within direct drainages to Flathead Lake. The project also addresses the altered habitat within Flathead Lake resulting from species shifts and consequent dominance of new species that restricts the potential success of mitigation measures. Specific goals of this project are to create and restore habitat and quantitatively monitor changes in fish populations to verify the efficacy of our mitigation measures. The project consists of three components: monitoring, restoration and research. Monitoring

  2. October is Energy Action Month

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    President Obama declared October Energy Action Month, and we are sharing tips about how you can save energy.

  3. A greenhouse-gas information system monitoring and validating emissions reporting and mitigation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jonietz, Karl K; Dimotakis, Paul E; Walker, Bruce C

    2011-09-26

    Current GHG-mitigating regimes, whether internationally agreed or self-imposed, rely on the aggregation of self-reported data, with limited checks for consistency and accuracy, for monitoring. As nations commit to more stringent GHG emissions-mitigation actions and as economic rewards or penalties are attached to emission levels, self-reported data will require independent confirmation that they are accurate and reliable, if they are to provide the basis for critical choices and actions that may be required. Supporting emissions-mitigation efforts and agreements, as well as monitoring energy- and fossil-fuel intensive national and global activities would be best achieved by a process of: (1) monitoring of emissions and emission-mitigation actions, based, in part, on, (2) (self-) reporting of pertinent bottom-up inventory data, (3) verification that reported data derive from and are consistent with agreed-upon processes and procedures, and (4) validation that reported emissions and emissions-mitigation action data are correct, based on independent measurements (top-down) derived from a suite of sensors in space, air, land, and, possibly, sea, used to deduce and attribute anthropogenic emissions. These data would be assessed and used to deduce and attribute measured GHG concentrations to anthropogenic emissions, attributed geographically and, to the extent possible, by economic sector. The validation element is needed to provide independent assurance that emissions are in accord with reported values, and should be considered as an important addition to the accepted MRV process, leading to a MRV&V process. This study and report focus on attributes of a greenhouse-gas information system (GHGIS) needed to support MRV&V needs. These needs set the function of such a system apart from scientific/research monitoring of GHGs and carbon-cycle systems, and include (not exclusively): the need for a GHGIS that is operational, as required for decision-support; the need for a

  4. 3RS action plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    The goal of the Solid Waste Interim Steering Committee (SWISC) process is to develop a long-term waste management system for the Greater Toronto Area (GTA), to be in place by 1996, which is environmentally, socially, economically and technically sound. This background report is being released to the public and member Regional Councils to facilitate input to the SWISC planning process. The report documents current reduction, reuse and recycling initiatives in the GTA, identifies opportunities for coordination and collaboration among the GTA communities, and develops an action plan for improving the effectiveness of the reduction, reuse and recycling efforts within the GTA.

  5. VIOLENT FRAMES IN ACTION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sanfilippo, Antonio P.; McGrath, Liam R.; Whitney, Paul D.

    2011-11-17

    We present a computational approach to radical rhetoric that leverages the co-expression of rhetoric and action features in discourse to identify violent intent. The approach combines text mining and machine learning techniques with insights from Frame Analysis and theories that explain the emergence of violence in terms of moral disengagement, the violation of sacred values and social isolation in order to build computational models that identify messages from terrorist sources and estimate their proximity to an attack. We discuss a specific application of this approach to a body of documents from and about radical and terrorist groups in the Middle East and present the results achieved.

  6. Albeni Falls Wildlife Mitigation Project, 2008 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Soults, Scott

    2009-08-05

    The Albeni Falls Interagency Work Group (AFIWG) was actively involved in implementing wildlife mitigation activities in late 2007, but due to internal conflicts, the AFIWG members has fractionated into a smaller group. Implementation of the monitoring and evaluation program continued across protected lands. As of 2008, The Albeni Falls Interagency Work Group (Work Group) is a coalition comprised of wildlife managers from three tribal entities (Kalispel Tribe, Kootenai Tribe, Coeur d Alene Tribe) and the US Army Corps of Engineers. The Work Group directs where wildlife mitigation implementation occurs in the Kootenai, Pend Oreille and Coeur d Alene subbasins. The Work Group is unique in the Columbia Basin. The Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority (CBFWA) wildlife managers in 1995, approved what was one of the first two project proposals to implement mitigation on a programmatic basis. The maintenance of this kind of approach through time has allowed the Work Group to implement an effective and responsive habitat protection program by reducing administrative costs associated with site-specific project proposals. The core mitigation entities maintain approximately 9,335 acres of wetland/riparian habitats in 2008.

  7. DISRUPTION MITIGATION WITH HIGH-PRESSURE NOBLE GAS INJECTION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    WHYTE, DG; JERNIGAN, TC; HUMPHREYS, DA; HYATT, AW; LASNIER, CJ; PARKS, PB; EVANS, TE; TAYLOR, PL; KELLMAN, AG; GRAY, DS; HOLLMANN, EM

    2002-10-01

    OAK A271 DISRUPTION MITIGATION WITH HIGH-PRESSURE NOBLE GAS INJECTION. High-pressure gas jets of neon and argon are used to mitigate the three principal damaging effects of tokamak disruptions: thermal loading of the divertor surfaces, vessel stress from poloidal halo currents and the buildup and loss of relativistic electrons to the wall. The gas jet penetrates as a neutral species through to the central plasma at its sonic velocity. The injected gas atoms increase up to 500 times the total electron inventory in the plasma volume, resulting in a relatively benign radiative dissipation of >95% of the plasma stored energy. The rapid cooling and the slow movement of the plasma to the wall reduce poloidal halo currents during the current decay. The thermally collapsed plasma is very cold ({approx} 1-2 eV) and the impurity charge distribution can include > 50% fraction neutral species. If a sufficient quantity of gas is injected, the neutrals inhibit runaway electrons. A physical model of radiative cooling is developed and validated against DIII-D experiments. The model shows that gas jet mitigation, including runaway suppression, extrapolates favorably to burning plasmas where disruption damage will be more severe. Initial results of real-time disruption detection triggering gas jet injection for mitigation are shown.

  8. Unconventional Nuclear Warfare Defense (UNWD) containment and mitigation subtask.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wente, William Baker

    2005-06-01

    The objective of this subtask of the Unconventional Nuclear Warfare Design project was to demonstrate mitigation technologies for radiological material dispersal and to assist planners with incorporation of the technologies into a concept of operations. The High Consequence Assessment and Technology department at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) has studied aqueous foam's ability to mitigate the effects of an explosively disseminated radiological dispersal device (RDD). These benefits include particle capture of respirable radiological particles, attenuation of blast overpressure, and reduction of plume buoyancy. To better convey the aqueous foam attributes, SNL conducted a study using the Explosive Release Atmospheric Dispersion model, comparing the effects of a mitigated and unmitigated explosive RDD release. Results from this study compared health effects and land contamination between the two scenarios in terms of distances of effect, population exposure, and remediation costs. Incorporating aqueous foam technology, SNL created a conceptual design for a stationary containment area to be located at a facility entrance with equipment that could minimize the effects from the detonation of a vehicle transported RDD. The containment design was evaluated against several criteria, including mitigation ability (both respirable and large fragment particle capture as well as blast overpressure suppression), speed of implementation, cost, simplicity, and required space. A mock-up of the conceptual idea was constructed at SNL's 9920 explosive test site to demonstrate the containment design.

  9. Sensitivity of climate mitigation strategies to natural disturbances

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Le Page, Yannick LB; Hurtt, George; Thomson, Allison M.; Bond-Lamberty, Benjamin; Patel, Pralit L.; Wise, Marshall A.; Calvin, Katherine V.; Kyle, G. Page; Clarke, Leon E.; Edmonds, James A.; Janetos, Anthony C.

    2013-02-19

    The present and future concentration of atmospheric carbon dioxide depends on both anthropogenic and natural sources and sinks of carbon. Most proposed climate mitigation strategies rely on a progressive transition to carbon12 efficient technologies to reduce industrial emissions, substantially supported by policies to maintain or enhance the terrestrial carbon stock in forests and other ecosystems. This strategy may be challenged if terrestrial sequestration capacity is affected by future climate feedbacks, but how and to what extent is little understood. Here, we show that climate mitigation strategies are highly sensitive to future natural disturbance rates (e.g. fires, hurricanes, droughts), because of potential effect of disturbances on the terrestrial carbon balance. Generally, altered disturbance rates affect the pace of societal and technological transitions required to achieve the mitigation target, with substantial consequences on the energy sector and on the global economy. Understanding the future dynamics and consequences of natural disturbances on terrestrial carbon balance is thus essential for developing robust climate mitigation strategies and policies

  10. Planning Tools For Seismic Risk Mitigation. Rules And Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    De Paoli, Rosa Grazia

    2008-07-08

    Recently, Italian urban planning research in the field of seismic risk mitigation are renewing. In particular, it promotes strategies that integrate urban rehabilitation and aseismic objectives, and also politicizes that are directed to revitalizes urban systems, coupling physical renewal and socio-economic development.In Italy the first law concerning planning for seismic mitigation dates back 1974, the law n. 64 'Regulation for buildings with particular rules for the seismic areas' where the rules for buildings in seismic areas concerning also the local hazard. This law, in fact, forced the municipalities to acquire, during the formation of the plans, a preventive opinion of compatibility between planning conditions and geomorphology conditions of the territory. From this date the conviction that the seismic risk must be considered inside the territorial planning especially in terms of strategies of mitigation has been strengthened.The town planners have started to take an interest in seismic risk in the [80]s when the Irpinia's earthquake took place. The researches developed after this earthquake have established that the principal cause of the collapse of buildings are due to from the wrong location of urban settlements (on slopes or crowns) After Irpinia's earthquake the first researches on seismic risk mitigation, in particular on the aspects related to the hazards and to the urban vulnerability were made.

  11. Exploring Complex Systems Aspects of Blackout Risk and Mitigation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Newman, David E; Carreras, Benjamin A; Lynch, Vickie E; Dobson, Ian

    2011-01-01

    Electric power transmission systems are a key infrastructure, and blackouts of these systems have major consequences for the economy and national security. Analyses of blackout data suggest that blackout size distributions have a power law form over much of their range. This result is an indication that blackouts behave as a complex dynamical system. We use a simulation of an upgrading power transmission system to investigate how these complex system dynamics impact the assessment and mitigation of blackout risk. The mitigation of failures in complex systems needs to be approached with care. The mitigation efforts can move the system to a new dynamic equilibrium while remaining near criticality and preserving the power law region. Thus, while the absolute frequency of blackouts of all sizes may be reduced, the underlying forces can still cause the relative frequency of large blackouts to small blackouts to remain the same. Moreover, in some cases, efforts to mitigate small blackouts can even increase the frequency of large blackouts. This result occurs because the large and small blackouts are not mutually independent, but are strongly coupled by the complex dynamics.

  12. RCRA corrective action and closure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1995-02-01

    This information brief explains how RCRA corrective action and closure processes affect one another. It examines the similarities and differences between corrective action and closure, regulators` interests in RCRA facilities undergoing closure, and how the need to perform corrective action affects the closure of DOE`s permitted facilities and interim status facilities.

  13. Guam Energy Action Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Conrad, M. D.; Ness, J. E.

    2013-07-01

    Describes the four near-term strategies selected by the Guam Energy Task Force during action planning workshops conducted in March 2013, and outlines the steps being taken to implement those strategies. Each strategy addresses one of the energy sectors identified in the earlier Guam strategic energy plan as being an essential component of diversifying Guam's fuel sources and reducing fossil energy consumption 20% by 2020. The four energy strategies selected are: (1) expanding public outreach on energy efficiency and conservation, (2) establishing a demand-side management revolving loan program, (3) exploring waste-to-energy options, and (4) influencing the transportation sector via anti-idling legislation, vehicle registration fees, and electric vehicles.

  14. Emergencies and Emergency Actions | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    and Emergency Actions Emergencies and Emergency Actions Selected documents on the topic of Emergencies and Emergency Actions under NEPA. May 12, 2010 Memorandum for Heads of...

  15. Ecology Action: Small Market Advanced Retrofit Transformation...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Ecology Action: Small Market Advanced Retrofit Transformation Program (SMART) Ecology Action: Small Market Advanced Retrofit Transformation Program (SMART) Ecology Action: Small ...

  16. Climate Action Tracker | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    References: Climate Action Tracker1 "This "Climate Action Tracker" is an independent science-based assessment, which tracks the emission commitments and actions of countries. The...

  17. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit...

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    ... Number Title Page 1-1 Process Flow Diagram for Underground Test Area Corrective Action ... NPDES National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System NTS Nevada Test Site pdf Probability ...

  18. Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report : Grand Coulee Dam Mitigation, 1996-1999 Technical Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kieffer, B.; Singer, Kelly; Abrahamson, Twa-le

    1999-07-01

    The purpose of this Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) study was to determine baseline habitat units and to estimate future habitat units for Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) mitigation projects on the Spokane Indian Reservation. The mitigation between BPA and the Spokane Tribe of Indians (STOI) is for wildlife habitat losses on account of the construction of Grand Coulee Dam. Analysis of the HEP survey data will assist in mitigation crediting and appropriate management of the mitigation lands.

  19. Tank vapor mitigation requirements for Hanford Tank Farms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rakestraw, L.D.

    1994-11-15

    Westinghouse Hanford Company has contracted Los Alamos Technical Associates to listing of vapors and aerosols that are or may be emitted from the High Level Waste (HLW) tanks at Hanford. Mitigation requirements under Federal and State law, as well as DOE Orders, are included in the listing. The lists will be used to support permitting activities relative to tank farm ventilation system up-grades. This task is designated Task 108 under MJB-SWV-312057 and is an extension of efforts begun under Task 53 of Purchase Order MPB-SVV-03291 5 for Mechanical Engineering Support. The results of that task, which covered only thirty-nine tanks, are repeated here to provide a single source document for vapor mitigation requirements for all 177 HLW tanks.

  20. Ocean Fertilization and Other Climate Change Mitigation Strategies: An Overview

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huesemann, Michael H.

    2008-07-29

    In order to evaluate ocean fertilization in the larger context of other proposed strategies for reducing the threat of the global warming, a wide range of different climate change mitigation approaches are compared in terms of their long-term potential, stage of development, relative costs and potential risks, as well as public acceptance. This broad comparative analysis is carried out for the following climate change mitigation strategies: supply-side and end-use efficiency improvements, terrestrial and geological carbon sequestration, CO2 ocean disposal and iron fertilization, nuclear power, and renewable energy generation from biomass, passive solar, solar thermal, photovoltaics, hydroelectric and wind. In addition, because of the inherent problems of conducting an objective comparative cost-benefit analysis, two non-technological solutions to global warming are also discussed: curbing population growth and transitioning to a steady-state economy.

  1. Mitigation options for the industrial sector in Egypt

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gelil, I.A.; El-Touny, S.; Korkor, H.

    1996-12-31

    Though its contribution to the global Greenhouse gases emission is relatively small, Egypt has signed and ratified the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UN FCCC) and has been playing an active role in the international efforts to deal with such environmental challenges. Energy efficiency has been one of the main strategies that Egypt has adopted to improve environmental quality and enhance economic competitiveness. This paper highlights three initiatives currently underway to improve energy efficiency of the Egyptian industry. The first is a project that has been recently completed by OECP to assess potential GHG mitigation options available in Egypt`s oil refineries. The second initiative is an assessment of GHG mitigation potential in the Small and Medium size Enterprises (SME) in the Mediterranean city of Alexandria. The third one focuses on identifying demand side management options in some industrial electricity consumers in the same city.

  2. Multifunctional Platelet Composites for Tin Whisker Mitigation - Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Innovation Portal Multifunctional Platelet Composites for Tin Whisker Mitigation Sandia National Laboratories Contact SNL About This Technology Publications: PDF Document Publication Market Sheet (555 KB) <br type="_moz" /> SEM image showing in-plane orientation of platelets in Sandia&#39;s multifunctional platelet composite SEM image showing in-plane orientation of platelets in Sandia's multifunctional platelet composite Technology Marketing Summary In order to comply

  3. Federal Interagency Wind Turbine Radar Interference Mitigation Strategy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Interagency Wind Turbine Radar Interference Mitigation Strategy January 2016 This report is being disseminated by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). As such, this document was prepared in compliance with Section 515 of the Treasury and General Government Appropriations Act for fiscal year 2001 (public law 106-554) and information quality guidelines issued by DOE. Though this report does not constitute "influential" information, as that term is defined in DOE's information quality

  4. Experts assemble at PPPL to discuss mitigation of tokamak disruptions |

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Princeton Plasma Physics Lab Experts assemble at PPPL to discuss mitigation of tokamak disruptions By John Greenwald July 15, 2014 Tweet Widget Google Plus One Share on Facebook Amitava Bhattacharjee, left, and John Mandrekas, a program manager in the U.S. Department of Energy's office of Fusion Energy Sciences. (Photo by Elle Starkman/Princeton Office of Communications ) Amitava Bhattacharjee, left, and John Mandrekas, a program manager in the U.S. Department of Energy's office of Fusion

  5. Experts assemble at PPPL to discuss mitigation of tokamak disruptions |

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Princeton Plasma Physics Lab Experts assemble at PPPL to discuss mitigation of tokamak disruptions By John Greenwald July 15, 2014 Tweet Widget Google Plus One Share on Facebook Amitava Bhattacharjee, left, and John Mandrekas, a program manager in the U.S. Department of Energy's office of Fusion Energy Sciences. (Photo by Elle Starkman/Princeton Office of Communications ) Amitava Bhattacharjee, left, and John Mandrekas, a program manager in the U.S. Department of Energy's office of Fusion

  6. Relative outcomes of climate change mitigation related to global

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    temperature versus sea-level rise | Argonne Leadership Computing Facility Relative outcomes of climate change mitigation related to global temperature versus sea-level rise Authors: Gerald A. Meehl, Aixue Hu, Claudia Tebaldi, Julie M. Arblaster, Warren M. Washington, Haiyan Teng, Benjamin M. Sanderson, Toby Ault, Warren G. Strand & James B. White III There is a common perception that, if human societies make the significant adjustments necessary to substantively cut emissions of

  7. Microsoft Word - MitigationsForVulnerabilitiesInCSNetworks.doc

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    6 by ISA - The Instrumentation, Systems and Automation Society. Presented at 16th Annual Joint ISA POWID/EPRI Controls and Instrumentation Conference; http://www.isa.org Mitigations for Security Vulnerabilities Found in Control System Networks May Permann John Hammer Computer Security Researcher Computer Security Researcher Communications & Cyber Security Communications & Cyber Security Idaho National Laboratory Idaho National Laboratory Idaho Falls, ID 83415 Idaho Falls, ID 83415 Kathy

  8. Composite Materials for Hazard Mitigation of Reactive Metal Hydrides.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pratt, Joseph William; Cordaro, Joseph Gabriel; Sartor, George B.; Dedrick, Daniel E.; Reeder, Craig L.

    2012-02-01

    In an attempt to mitigate the hazards associated with storing large quantities of reactive metal hydrides, polymer composite materials were synthesized and tested under simulated usage and accident conditions. The composites were made by polymerizing vinyl monomers using free-radical polymerization chemistry, in the presence of the metal hydride. Composites with vinyl-containing siloxane oligomers were also polymerized with and without added styrene and divinyl benzene. Hydrogen capacity measurements revealed that addition of the polymer to the metal hydride reduced the inherent hydrogen storage capacity of the material. The composites were found to be initially effective at reducing the amount of heat released during oxidation. However, upon cycling the composites, the mitigating behavior was lost. While the polymer composites we investigated have mitigating potential and are physically robust, they undergo a chemical change upon cycling that makes them subsequently ineffective at mitigating heat release upon oxidation of the metal hydride. Acknowledgements The authors would like to thank the following people who participated in this project: Ned Stetson (U.S. Department of Energy) for sponsorship and support of the project. Ken Stewart (Sandia) for building the flow-through calorimeter and cycling test stations. Isidro Ruvalcaba, Jr. (Sandia) for qualitative experiments on the interaction of sodium alanate with water. Terry Johnson (Sandia) for sharing his expertise and knowledge of metal hydrides, and sodium alanate in particular. Marcina Moreno (Sandia) for programmatic assistance. John Khalil (United Technologies Research Corp) for insight into the hazards of reactive metal hydrides and real-world accident scenario experiments. Summary In an attempt to mitigate and/or manage hazards associated with storing bulk quantities of reactive metal hydrides, polymer composite materials (a mixture of a mitigating polymer and a metal hydride) were synthesized and tested

  9. Can land management and biomass utilization help mitigate global warming?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schlamadinger, B.; Lauer, M.

    1996-12-31

    With rising concern about the increase of the CO{sub 2} concentration in the earth`s atmosphere there is considerable interest in various land-use based mitigation options, like afforestation of surplus agricultural land with or without subsequent harvest; improved forest management; strategies that rely on wood plantations managed in short rotation or agricultural crops with high yields to produce bioenergy, timber and other biomass products. In the first step of this study, the net carbon benefits of such strategies will be calculated per unit of land, i.e., per hectare, because it is assumed that land is the limiting resource for such strategies in the future, and thus, the benefits per unit land need to be optimized. For these calculations a computer model has been developed. The results take into account the time dependence of carbon storage in the biosphere and are shown graphically both for land and for plantation systems with constant output of biomass over time. In the second step, these results will be combined with data on available land for Austria. The potential contribution of each of the above strategies towards mitigating the Austrian CO{sub 2} emissions will be demonstrated. A comparison to other renewable mitigation options, like solar thermal or photovoltaics, will be drawn in terms of available land resources and overall CO{sub 2} reductions.

  10. Comprehensive mitigation assessment process (COMAP) - Description and instruction manual

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Makundi, Willy; Sathaye, Jayant

    2001-11-09

    In order to prepare policies and plans to reduce GHG emissions, national policy-makers need information on the costs and benefits of different mitigation options in addition to their carbon implications. Policy-makers must weigh the costs, benefits, and impacts of climate change mitigation and adaptation options, in the face of competition for limited resources. The policy goal for mitigation options in the land use sector is to identify which mix of options is likely to best achieve the desired forestry service and production objectives at the least cost, while attempting to maximize economic and social benefits, and minimize negative environmental and social impacts. Improved national-level cost estimates of response options in the land use sector can be generated by estimating the costs and benefits of different forest management practices appropriate for specific country conditions which can be undertaken within the constraint of land availability and its opportunity cost. These co st and land use estimates can be combined to develop cost curves, which would assist policy-makers in constructing policies and programs to implement forest responses.

  11. Environmental Management Headquarters Corrective Action Plan...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    II Environmental Management Headquarters Corrective Action Plan - Radiological Release ... actions for addressing Office of Environmental Management (EM) Headquarters (HQ) ...

  12. International Program Action Table - October 2012 | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Communication & Engagement International Programs International Program Action Table - October 2012 International Program Action Table - October 2012 International Program ...

  13. Expansion of Borrow Areas on the Hanford Site-Mitigation Action Plan for DOE-EA-1934.pdf

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Country | Department of Energy Expanding the Tribal Role in Carrying Out a Critical Mission in Indian Country Expanding the Tribal Role in Carrying Out a Critical Mission in Indian Country July 19, 2016 - 2:28pm Addthis Christopher Clark Deschene Christopher Clark Deschene Director, Office of Indian Energy Policy and Programs I'm driven by a critical mission: to maximize the development and deployment of energy solutions for the benefit of American Indians and Alaska Natives. Our blueprint

  14. Final Report. SFAA No. DEFC02-98CH10961. Technical assistance for joint implementation and other supporting mechanisms and measures for greenhouse gas emissions mitigation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Knight, Denise

    2001-10-15

    IIEC, a division of CERF, has developed an extensive base of experience implementing activities that support climate action by developing USIJI projects in transitional countries within Asia, Latin America, Central and Eastern Europe, and southern Africa. IIEC has been able to provide a range of technical and policy assistance to governments and industry in support of sustainable energy use. IIEC continues to work in key countries with local partners to develop and implement energy efficiency policies and standards, develop site-specific projects, and assist governing bodies to establish national priorities and evaluation criteria for approving GHG-mitigation projects. As part of this project, IIEC focused on promoting a series of activities in Thailand and South Africa in order to identify GHG mitigation projects and work within the national approval process of those countries. The sections of this report outline the activities conducted in each country in order to achieve that goal.

  15. Implications of simultaneously mitigating and adapting to climate change: Initial experiments using GCAM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Calvin, Katherine V.; Wise, Marshall A.; Clarke, Leon E.; Edmonds, James A.; Kyle, G. Page; Luckow, Patrick W.; Thomson, Allison M.

    2013-04-01

    Historically climate impacts research and climate mitigation research have been two separate and independent domains of inquiry. Climate mitigation research has investigated greenhouse gas emissions assuming that climate is unchanging. At the same time climate mitigation research has investigated the implications of climate change on the assumption that climate mitigation will proceed without affecting the degree of climate impacts or the ability of human and natural systems to adapt. The Global Change Assessment Model (GCAM) has largely been employed to study climate mitigation. Here we explore the development of capabilities to assess climate change impacts and adaptation within the GCAM model. These capabilities are being developed so as to be able to simultaneously reconcile the joint implications of climate change mitigation, impacts and adaptive potential. This is an important step forward in that it enables direct comparison between climate mitigation activities and climate impacts and the opportunity to understand interactions between the two.

  16. Enforcement actions: Significant actions resolved individual actions. Semiannual progress report, January 1996--June 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-08-01

    This document summarizes significant enforcement actions that have been resolved during the period of January-June 1996. The report includes copies of Orders and Notices of Violations sent by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to individuals with respect to the enforcement actions.

  17. Combination pipe rupture mitigator and in-vessel core catcher

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tilbrook, Roger W.; Markowski, Franz J.

    1983-01-01

    A device which mitigates against the effects of a failed coolant loop in a nuclear reactor by restricting the outflow of coolant from the reactor through the failed loop and by retaining any particulated debris from a molten core which may result from coolant loss or other cause. The device reduces the reverse pressure drop through the failed loop by limiting the access of coolant in the reactor to the inlet of the failed loop. The device also spreads any particulated core debris over a large area to promote cooling.

  18. PPPL successfully tests system for mitigating instabilities called

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    "ELMs" | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab PPPL successfully tests system for mitigating instabilities called "ELMs" By John Greenwald September 29, 2014 Tweet Widget Google Plus One Share on Facebook Close-up view of the high-speed propellor inside the injector. (Photo by Elle Starkman/Princeton Office of Communications ) Close-up view of the high-speed propellor inside the injector. PPPL has successfully tested a Laboratory-designed device to be used to diminish the size of

  19. PPPL successfully tests system for mitigating instabilities called

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    "ELMs" | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab PPPL successfully tests system for mitigating instabilities called "ELMs" By John Greenwald September 29, 2014 Tweet Widget Google Plus One Share on Facebook Close-up view of the high-speed propellor inside the injector. (Photo by Elle Starkman/Princeton Office of Communications ) Close-up view of the high-speed propellor inside the injector. PPPL has successfully tested a Laboratory-designed device to be used to diminish the size of

  20. Climate Mitigation Policy Implications for Global Irrigation Water Demand

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chaturvedi, Vaibhav; Hejazi, Mohamad I.; Edmonds, James A.; Clarke, Leon E.; Kyle, G. Page; Davies, Evan; Wise, Marshall A.

    2013-08-22

    Energy, water and land are scarce resources, critical to humans. Developments in each affect the availability and cost of the others, and consequently human prosperity. Measures to limit greenhouse gas concentrations will inevitably exact dramatic changes on energy and land systems and in turn alter the character, magnitude and geographic distribution of human claims on water resources. We employ the Global Change Assessment Model (GCAM), an integrated assessment model to explore the interactions of energy, land and water systems in the context of alternative policies to limit climate change to three alternative levels: 2.5 Wm-2 (445 ppm CO2-e), 3.5 Wm-2 (535 ppm CO2-e) and 4.5 Wm-2 (645 ppm CO2-e). We explore the effects of alternative land-use emissions mitigation policy options—one which values terrestrial carbon emissions equally with fossil fuel and industrial emissions, and an alternative which places no penalty on land-use change emissions. We find that increasing populations and economic growth could be anticipated to lead to increased demand for water for agricultural systems (+200%), even in the absence of climate change. In general policies to mitigate climate change will increase agricultural demands for water, regardless of whether or not terrestrial carbon is valued or not. Burgeoning demands for water are driven by the demand for bioenergy in response to emissions mitigation policies. We also find that the policy matters. Increases in the demand for water when terrestrial carbon emissions go un-prices are vastly larger than when terrestrial system carbon emissions are prices at the same rate as fossil fuel and industrial emissions. Our estimates for increased water demands when terrestrial carbon systems go un-priced are larger than earlier studies. We find that the deployment of improved irrigation delivery systems could mitigate some of the increase in water demands, but cannot reverse the increases in water demands when terrestrial carbon

  1. Measuring and Mitigating Urban Warming in a Northern Metropolitan Area |

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Argonne Leadership Computing Facility Measuring and Mitigating Urban Warming in a Northern Metropolitan Area Event Sponsor: Environmental Science Seminar Start Date: Aug 25 2016 - 11:00am Building/Room: Building 240/Room 4301 Location: Argonne National Laboratory Speaker(s): Peter Snyder Speaker(s) Title: University of Minnesota In the United States and much of the rest of the world, cities are warming at twice the rate of outlying rural areas and the planet as a whole. While the warming can

  2. Tritium Formation and Mitigation in High-Temperature Reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Piyush Sabharwall; Carl Stoots

    2012-10-01

    Tritium is a radiologically active isotope of hydrogen. It is formed in nuclear reactors by neutron absorption and ternary fission events and can subsequently escape into the environment. To prevent the tritium contamination of proposed reactor buildings and surrounding sites, this study examines the root causes and potential mitigation strategies for permeation of tritium (such as: materials selection, inert gas sparging, etc...). A model is presented that can be used to predict permeation rates of hydrogen through metallic alloys at temperatures from 450–750 degrees C. Results of the diffusion model are presented for a steady production of tritium

  3. Tritium Formation and Mitigation in High-Temperature Reactor Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Piyush Sabharwall; Carl Stoots; Hans A. Schmutz

    2013-03-01

    Tritium is a radiologically active isotope of hydrogen. It is formed in nuclear reactors by neutron absorption and ternary fission events and can subsequently escape into the environment. To prevent the tritium contamination of proposed reactor buildings and surrounding sites, this study examines the root causes and potential mitigation strategies for permeation of tritium (such as: materials selection, inert gas sparging, etc...). A model is presented that can be used to predict permeation rates of hydrogen through metallic alloys at temperatures from 450–750 degrees C. Results of the diffusion model are presented for a steady production of tritium

  4. Taxonomy for Common-Cause Failure Vulnerability and Mitigation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wood, Richard Thomas; Korsah, Kofi; Mullens, James Allen; Pullum, Laura L.

    2015-09-01

    Applying current guidance and practices for common-cause failure (CCF) mitigation to digital instrumentation and control (I&C) systems has proven problematic, and the regulatory environment has been unpredictable. The potential for CCF vulnerability inhibits I&C modernization, thereby challenging the long-term sustainability of existing plants. For new plants and advanced reactor concepts, concern about CCF vulnerability in highly integrated digital I&C systems imposes a design burden that results in higher costs and increased complexity. The regulatory uncertainty in determining which mitigation strategies will be acceptable (e.g., what diversity is needed and how much is sufficient) drives designers to adopt complicated, costly solutions devised for existing plants. To address the conditions that constrain the transition to digital I&C technology by the US nuclear industry, crosscutting research is needed to resolve uncertainty, demonstrate necessary characteristics, and establish an objective basis for qualification of digital technology for nuclear power plant (NPP) I&C applications. To fulfill this research need, Oak Ridge National Laboratory is investigating mitigation of CCF vulnerability for nuclear-qualified applications. The outcome of this research is expected to contribute to a fundamentally sound, comprehensive basis to qualify digital technology for nuclear power applications. This report documents the development of a CCF taxonomy. The basis for the CCF taxonomy was generated by determining consistent terminology and establishing a classification approach. The terminology is based on definitions from standards, guides, and relevant nuclear power industry technical reports. The classification approach is derived from identified classification schemes focused on I&C systems and key characteristics, including failure modes. The CCF taxonomy provides the basis for a systematic organization of key systems aspects relevant to analyzing the potential for

  5. Computation of Electron Cloud Diagnostics and Mitigation in the Main

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Injector | Argonne Leadership Computing Facility Computation of Electron Cloud Diagnostics and Mitigation in the Main Injector Authors: Veitzer, S.A., LeBrun, P., Cary, J.R., Spentzouris, P., Stoltz, P.H., Amundson, J.F. High-performance computations on Blue Gene/P at Argonne's Leadership Computing Facility have been used to determine phase shifts induced in injected RF diagnostics as a function of electron cloud density in the Main Injector. Inversion of the relationship between electron

  6. American Samoa Energy Action Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haase, Scott; Esterly, Sean; Herdrich, David; Bodell, Tim; Visser, Charles

    2013-08-01

    Describes the five near-term strategies selected by the American Samoa Renewable Energy Committee (ASREC) during action planning workshops conducted in May 2013, and outlines the actions being taken to implement those strategies. Each option is tied to a priority identified in the earlier draft American Samoa Strategic Energy Plan as being an essential component of reducing American Samoa'spetroleum energy consumption. The actions described for each strategy provide a roadmap to facilitate the implementation of each strategy. This document is intended to evolve along with the advancement of the projects, and will be updated to reflect progress.

  7. RCRA corrective action: Work plans

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1995-02-01

    This Information Brief describes the work plans that owners/operators may have to prepare in conjunction with the performance of corrective action for compliance with RCRA guidelines. In general, the more complicated the performance of corrective action appears from the remedial investigation and other analyses, the more likely it is that the regulator will impose work plan requirements. In any case, most owner/operators will prepare work plans in conjunction with the performance of corrective action processes as a matter of best engineering management practices.

  8. Greenhouse gases mitigation options and strategies for Tanzania

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mwandosya, M.J.; Meena, H.E.

    1996-12-31

    Tanzania became a party to the United Nations Framework on Climate Change (UN FCCC) when she ratified the Convention in March, 1996. Now that Tanzania and other developing countries are Parties to the UN FCCC, compliance with its provisions is mandatory. The legal requirements therefore provide a basis for their participation in climate change studies and policy formulation. All parties to the Convention are required by Article 4.1 of the United Nations Convention on Climate Change (UN FCCC) to develop, periodically update, publish, and make available national inventories of anthropogenic emissions and removal of greenhouse gases that are not controlled by the Montreal Protocol. This study on possible options for the mitigation of greenhouse gases in Tanzania is a preliminary effort towards the fulfilment of the obligation. In order to fulfil their obligations under the UN FCCC and have a meaningful mitigation assessment, identification and quantification of anthropogenic sources of atmospheric emissions of greenhouse gases in the country was undertaken. In this respect, the study of anthropogenic emissions by source and removals by sink of GHGs in Tanzania was done with the main objective of increasing the quantity and quality of base-line data available in order to further scientific understanding of the relationship of greenhouse gas emissions to climate change. Furthermore, the study facilitated identification of national policy and technological options that could reduce the level of emissions in the country.

  9. Corrective Action Decision Document/Corrective Action Plan for Corrective Action Unit 447: Project Shoal Area, Subsurface, Nevada, Rev. No.: 3 with Errata Sheet

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tim Echelard

    2006-03-01

    of Energy (DOE) determined that the degree of uncertainty in transport predictions for PSA remained unacceptably large. As a result, a second CAIP was developed by DOE and approved by the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP) in December 1998 (DOE/NV, 1998a). This plan prescribed a rigorous analysis of uncertainty in the Shoal model and quantification of methods of reducing uncertainty through data collection. This analysis is termed a Data Decision Analysis (Pohll et al., 1999a) and formed the basis for a second major characterization effort at PSA (Pohll et al., 1999b). The details for this second field effort are presented in an Addendum to the CAIP, which was approved by NDEP in April 1999 (DOE/NV, 1999a). Four additional characterization wells were drilled at PSA during summer and fall of 1999; details of the drilling and well installation are in IT Corporation (2000), with testing reported in Mihevc et al. (2000). A key component of the second field program was a tracer test between two of the new wells (Carroll et al., 2000; Reimus et al., 2003). Based on the potential exposure pathways, two corrective action objectives were identified for CAU 447: Prevent or mitigate exposure to groundwater contaminants of concern at concentrations exceeding regulatory maximum contaminant levels or risk-based levels; and Reduce the risk to human health and the environment to the extent practicable. Based on the review of existing data, the results of the modeling, future use, and current operations at PSA, the following alternatives have been developed for consideration at CAU 447: Alternative 1--No Further Action; Alternative 2--Proof-of-Concept and Monitoring with Institutional Controls; and Alternative 3--Contaminant Control. The corrective action alternatives were evaluated based on the approach outlined in the ''Focused Evaluation of Selected Remedial Alternatives for the Underground Test Area'' (DOE/NV, 1998b). Each alternative was assessed against nine

  10. Method for triggering an action

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hall, David R.; Bartholomew, David B.; Johnson, Monte L.; Moon, Justin; Koehler, Roger O.

    2006-10-17

    A method for triggering an action of at least one downhole device on a downhole network integrated into a downhole tool string synchronized to an event comprises determining latency, sending a latency adjusted signal, and performing the action. The latency is determined between a control device and the at least one downhole device. The latency adjusted signal for triggering an action is sent to the downhole device. The action is performed downhole synchronized to the event. A preferred method for determining latency comprises the steps: a control device sends a first signal to the downhole device; after receiving the signal, the downhole device sends a response signal to the control device; and the control device analyzes the time from sending the signal to receiving the response signal.

  11. ICDF Complex Remedial Action Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    W. M. Heileson

    2007-09-26

    This Idaho CERCLA Disposal Facility (ICDF) Remedial Action Report has been prepared in accordance with the requirements of Section 6.2 of the INEEL CERCLA Disposal Facility Remedial Action Work Plan. The agency prefinal inspection of the ICDF Staging, Storage, Sizing, and Treatment Facility (SSSTF) was completed in June of 2005. Accordingly, this report has been developed to describe the construction activities completed at the ICDF along with a description of any modifications to the design originally approved for the facility. In addition, this report provides a summary of the major documents prepared for the design and construction of the ICDF, a discussion of relevant requirements and remedial action objectives, the total costs associated with the development and operation of the facility to date, and identification of necessary changes to the Agency-approved INEEL CERCLA Disposal Facility Remedial Action Work Plan and the ICDF Complex Operations and Maintenance Plan.

  12. Recapping National Energy Action Month

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Energy Department officials spent National Energy Action Month on the road, meeting and learning from Americans who are advancing our energy security, growing the economy and protecting the environment.

  13. Role of Biochar in Mitigation of Climate Change

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lehmann, Johannes C.; Amonette, James E.; Roberts, Kelli G.

    2010-09-30

    By virtue of the large fraction of the terrestrial carbon (C) cycle controlled by human activities, agroecosystems are both sources and sinks for greenhouse gases. Their potential role in mitigation of climate change thus depends on a dual strategy of decreasing greenhouse gas emissions while increasing sinks so that the net impact on climate warming is less than at present. Emissions of carbon dioxide, methane and nitrous oxide arise from various agricultural activities, ranging from land clearing to ploughing, fertilization, and animal husbandry. Reductions in these emissions can be achieved by decreasing the heterotrophic conversion of organic C to carbon dioxide, and by better management of agricultural waste streams to minimize release of methane and nitrous oxide. Current sinks include C stored in standing biomass and soil organic matter, and the oxidation of atmospheric methane by soil bacteria. These sinks can be enhanced by increasing net primary productivity, thereby actively withdrawing more carbon dioxide from the atmosphere, and by promoting more oxidation of methane by soils. Judicious biochar management may contribute to both strategies, reductions of emissions by agriculture and active withdrawal of atmospheric carbon dioxide, as part of a comprehensive scheme in agricultural and forestry watersheds. Biochar is a carbon-rich organic material generated by heating biomass in the absence, or under a limited supply, of oxygen. This so-called charring or pyrolysis process has been used to produce charcoal as a source of fuel for millennia. Recently, interest has grown in understanding the potential of this process to improve soil health by adding biochar as an amendment to soil, to manage agricultural and forestry wastes, to generate energy, to decrease net emissions of nitrous oxide and methane, and to store carbon (C). The main incentive of biochar systems for mitigation of climate change is to increase the stability of organic matter or biomass. This

  14. Complexity, action, and black holes

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Brown, Adam R.; Roberts, Daniel A.; Susskind, Leonard; Swingle, Brian; Zhao, Ying

    2016-04-18

    In an earlier paper "Complexity Equals Action" we conjectured that the quantum computational complexity of a holographic state is given by the classical action of a region in the bulk (the `Wheeler-DeWitt' patch). We provide calculations for the results quoted in that paper, explain how it fits into a broader (tensor) network of ideas, and elaborate on the hypothesis that black holes are the fastest computers in nature.

  15. Mitigation Options in Forestry, Land-Use, Change and Biomass Burning in Africa

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Makundi, Willy R.

    1998-06-01

    Mitigation options to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and sequester carbon in land use sectors are describe in some detail. The paper highlights those options in the forestry sector, which are more relevant to different parts of Africa. It briefly outlines a bottom-up methodological framework for comprehensively assessing mitigation options in land use sectors. This method emphasizes the application of end-use demand projections to construct a baseline and mitigation scenarios and explicitly addresses the carbon storage potential on land and in wood products, as well as use of wood to substitute for fossil fuels. Cost-effectiveness indicators for ranking mitigation options are proposed, including those, which account for non-carbon monetary benefits such as those derived from forest products, as well as opportunity cost of pursuing specific mitigation option. The paper finally surveys the likely policies, barriers and incentives to implement such mitigation options in African countries .

  16. Vernacular design based on sustainable disaster’s mitigation communication and education strategy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mansoor, Alvanov Zpalanzani E-mail: alvanov@fsrd.itb.ac.id

    2015-04-24

    Indonesia is located between three active tectonic plates, which are prone to natural disasters such as earthquake, volcanic eruption, and also giant tidal wave-tsunami. Adequate infrastructure plays an important role in disaster mitigation, yet without good public awareness, the mitigation process won’t be succeeded. The absence of awareness can lead to infrastructure mistreatment. Several reports on lack of understanding or misinterpretation of disaster mitigation especially from rural and coastal communities need to be solved, especially from communication aspects. This is an interdisciplinary study on disaster mitigation communication design and education strategy from visual communication design studies paradigm. This paper depicts research results which applying vernacular design base to elaborate sustainable mitigation communication and education strategy on various visual media and social campaigns. This paper also describes several design approaches which may becomes way to elaborate sustainable awareness and understanding on disaster mitigation among rural and coastal communities in Indonesia.

  17. North Slope (Wahluke Slope) expedited response action cleanup plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-02-01

    The purpose of this action is to mitigate any threat to public health and the environment from hazards on the North Slope and meet the expedited response action (ERA) objective of cleanup to a degree requiring no further action. The ERA may be the final remediation of the 100-I-3 Operable Unit. A No Action record of decision (ROD) may be issued after remediation completion. The US Department of Energy (DOE) currently owns or administers approximately 140 mi{sup 2} (about 90,000 acres) of land north and east of the Columbia River (referred to as the North Slope) that is part of the Hanford Site. The North Slope, also commonly known as the Wahluke Slope, was not used for plutonium production or support facilities; it was used for military air defense of the Hanford Site and vicinity. The North Slope contained seven antiaircraft gun emplacements and three Nike-Ajax missile positions. These military positions were vacated in 1960--1961 as the defense requirements at Hanford changed. They were demolished in 1974. Prior to government control in 1943, the North Slope was homesteaded. Since the initiation of this ERA in the summer of 1992, DOE signed the modified Hanford Federal Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement) with the Washington Department of Ecology (Ecology) and the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), in which a milestone was set to complete remediation activities and a draft closeout report by October 1994. Remediation activities will make the North Slope area available for future non-DOE uses. Thirty-nine sites have undergone limited characterization to determine if significant environmental hazards exist. This plan documents the results of that characterization and evaluates the potential remediation alternatives.

  18. RCRA corrective action determination of no further action

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-06-01

    On July 27, 1990, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) proposed a regulatory framework (55 FR 30798) for responding to releases of hazardous waste and hazardous constituents from solid waste management units (SWMUs) at facilities seeking permits or permitted under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). The proposed rule, `Corrective Action for Solid Waste Management Units at Hazardous Waste Facilities`, would create a new Subpart S under the 40 CFR 264 regulations, and outlines requirements for conducting RCRA Facility Investigations, evaluating potential remedies, and selecting and implementing remedies (i.e., corrective measures) at RCRA facilities. EPA anticipates instances where releases or suspected releases of hazardous wastes or constituents from SWMUs identified in a RCRA Facility Assessment, and subsequently addressed as part of required RCRA Facility Investigations, will be found to be non-existent or non-threatening to human health or the environment. Such releases may require no further action. For such situations, EPA proposed a mechanism for making a determination that no further corrective action is needed. This mechanism is known as a Determination of No Further Action (DNFA) (55 FR 30875). This information Brief describes what a DNFA is and discusses the mechanism for making a DNFA. This is one of a series of Information Briefs on RCRA corrective action.

  19. Natural Gas Infrastructure R&D and Methane Emissions Mitigation Workshop

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Gas Infrastructure R&D and Methane Emissions Mitigation Workshop November 12-13, 2014 Advanced Materials Manufacturing and Innovative Technologies for Natural Gas Pipeline Systems and Components Panel > November 12, 2014 > Pittsburgh, PA > By Daniel Ersoy, GTI Nat. Gas Infrastructure R&D /Methane Emissions Mitigation Workshop, Nov. 2014, Pittsburgh, PA 2 Nat. Gas Infrastructure R&D /Methane Emissions Mitigation Workshop, Nov. 2014, Pittsburgh, PA 2 GTI Company Overview

  20. Peru mitigation assessment of greenhouse gases: Sector -- Energy. Peru climate change country study; Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-08-01

    The aim of this study is to determine the Inventory and propose Greenhouse Gases Mitigation alternatives in order to face the future development of the country in a clean environmental setting without delaying the development process required to improve Peruvian standard of living. The main idea of this executive abstract is to show concisely the results of the Greenhouse Gases Mitigation for Peru in the period 1990--2015. The studies about mitigation for the Energy Sector are shown in this summary.

  1. Recruiting a Local and Diverse Workforce and Mitigating Barriers to Entry |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Recruiting a Local and Diverse Workforce and Mitigating Barriers to Entry Recruiting a Local and Diverse Workforce and Mitigating Barriers to Entry Better Buildings Neighborhood Program Workforce Peer Exchange Call: Recruiting a Local and Diverse Workforce and Mitigating Barriers to Entry, Call Slides and Discussion Summary, August 25, 2011. Call Slides and Discussion Summary (879.9 KB) More Documents & Publications Better Buildings Workforce Peer Exchange Call:

  2. Bonneville’s “Balanced Scorecard” Approach to Mitigation, Monitoring, and Adaptive Management

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This year Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), DOE’s power marketing organization in the Pacific Northwest, will spend more than $300 million on mitigation projects to meet its mandate under the 1980 Northwest Power Act to “protect, mitigate and enhance” fish and wildlife affected by construction and operation of the Federal Columbia River Power System. How is BPA meeting its responsibility to ratepayers to ensure that these mitigation funds are spent effectively?

  3. Malheur River Wildlife Mitigation Project, Annual Report 2003.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ashley, Paul

    2004-01-01

    Hydropower development within the Columbia and Snake River Basins has significantly affected riparian, riverine, and adjacent upland habitats and the fish and wildlife species dependent upon them. Hydroelectric dams played a major role in the extinction or major loss of both anadromous and resident salmonid populations and altered instream and adjacent upland habitats, water quality, and riparian/riverine function. Hydroelectric facility construction and inundation directly affected fish and wildlife species and habitats. Secondary and tertiary impacts including road construction, urban development, irrigation, and conversion of native habitats to agriculture, due in part to the availability of irrigation water, continue to affect wildlife and fish populations throughout the Columbia and Snake River Basins. Fluctuating water levels resulting from facility operations have created exposed sand, cobble, and/or rock zones. These zones are generally devoid of vegetation with little opportunity to re-establish riparian plant communities. To address the habitat and wildlife losses, the United States Congress in 1980 passed the Pacific Northwest Electric Power Planning and Conservation Act (Act) (P.L. 96-501), which authorized the states of Idaho, Montana, Oregon, and Washington to create the Northwest Power Planning Council (Council). The Act directed the Council to prepare a program in conjunction with federal, state, and tribal wildlife resource authorities to protect, mitigate, and enhance fish and wildlife species affected by the construction, inundation and operation of hydroelectric dams in the Columbia River Basin (NPPC 2000). Under the Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Program (Program), the region's fish and wildlife agencies, tribes, non-government organizations (NGOs), and the public propose fish and wildlife projects that address wildlife and fish losses resulting from dam construction and subsequent inundation. As directed by the Council, project proposals are

  4. Enforcement actions: Significant actions resolved individuals actions. Semiannual progress report, July--December 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-04-01

    This compilation summarizes significant enforcement actions that have been resolved during the period (July - December 1996) and includes copies of Orders and Notices of Violation sent by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to individuals with respect to-these enforcement actions. It is anticipated that the information in this publication will be widely disseminated to managers and employees engaged in activities licensed by the NRC. The Commission believes this information may be useful to licensees in making employment decisions.

  5. Enforcement actions: Significant actions resolved individual actions. Semiannual progress report, January 1997--June 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-09-01

    This compilation summarizes significant enforcement actions that have been resolved during the period (January - June 1997) and includes copies of Orders and Notices of Violation sent by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to individuals with respect to these enforcement actions. It is anticipated that the information in this publication will be widely disseminated to managers and employees engaged in activities licensed by the NRC. The Commission believes this information may be useful to licensees in making employment decisions.

  6. Thailand-National Energy Efficiency Plan and Evidence-based Mitigation...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    National Energy Efficiency Plan and Evidence-based Mitigation Strategy Jump to: navigation, search Name GIZ-Thailand-National energy efficiency plan as a core element for an...

  7. Mitigation of the Impact of Pt Contamination on Cu-Zeolite SCR...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Mitigation of the Impact of Pt Contamination on Cu-Zeolite SCR Catalyst Performance Investigates operating conditions under which PGM elements get volatilized and transferred onto ...

  8. Peru-Bringing a Range of Supported Mitigation Activities in Selected...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    ECN and Ecofys on supported mitigation activities such as NAMAs, low carbon development (LCD) strategies and technology innovation centers to bring a portfolio of projects from the...

  9. South Africa-Integrating Sub-national Actors into National Mitigation...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Actors into National Mitigation Strategies Through Vertically Integrated NAMAs (V-NAMAs) Jump to: navigation, search Name South Africa-Integrating Sub-national Actors...

  10. Upcoming Webinar November 19: Micro-Structural Mitigation Strategies for PEM Fuel Cells

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    On November 19, the Energy Department will present a webinar on micro-structural mitigation strategies for PEM fuel cells focusing on morphological simulations and experimental approaches.

  11. Climate Change Mitigation Through Land-Use Measures in the Agriculture...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    and Forestry Sectors Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Climate Change Mitigation Through Land-Use Measures in the Agriculture and Forestry...

  12. JICA's Assistance for Mitigation to Climate Change - The Co-Benefits...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    JICA's Assistance for Mitigation to Climate Change - The Co-Benefits Approach to Climate Change Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: JICA's Assistance for...

  13. Part 3: Removal Action | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    3: Removal Action Part 3: Removal Action Question: When may removal actions be initiated? Answer: Removal actions may be initiated when DOE determines that the action will prevent, minimize, stabilize, or eliminate a risk to health or the environment. The NCP specifies that the determination that a risk to health or the environment is appropriate for removal action should be based on: actual or potential exposure of humans, animals, or the food chain the presence of contained hazardous

  14. Mitigation of substrate defects in reticles using multilayer buffer layers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mirkarimi, Paul B.; Bajt, Sasa; Stearns, Daniel G.

    2001-01-01

    A multilayer film is used as a buffer layer to minimize the size of defects on a reticle substrate prior to deposition of a reflective coating on the substrate. The multilayer buffer layer deposited intermediate the reticle substrate and the reflective coating produces a smoothing of small particles and other defects on the reticle substrate. The reduction in defect size is controlled by surface relaxation during the buffer layer growth process and by the degree of intermixing and volume contraction of the materials at the multilayer interfaces. The buffer layers are deposited at near-normal incidence via a low particulate ion beam sputtering process. The growth surface of the buffer layer may also be heated by a secondary ion source to increase the degree of intermixing and improve the mitigation of defects.

  15. Near-Term Climate Mitigation by Short-Lived Forcers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, Steven J.; Mizrahi, Andrew H.

    2013-08-12

    Emissions reductions focused on anthropogenic climate forcing agents with relatively short atmospheric lifetimes such as methane (CH4) and black carbon (BC) have been suggested as a strategy to reduce the rate of climate change over the next several decades. We find that reductions of methane and BC would likely have only a modest impact on near-term climate warming. Even with maximally feasible reductions phased in from 2015 to 2035, global mean temperatures in 2050 are reduced by 0.16 °C, with an uncertainty range of 0.04-0.36°C, with the high end of this range only possible if total historical aerosol forcing is small. More realistic mitigation scenarios would likely provide a smaller climate benefit. The climate benefits from targeted reductions in short-lived forcing agents are smaller than previously estimated and are not substantially different in magnitude from the benefits due to a comprehensive climate policy.

  16. Environmental Responses to Carbon Mitigation through Geological Storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cunningham, Alfred; Bromenshenk, Jerry

    2013-08-30

    In summary, this DOE EPSCoR project is contributing to the study of carbon mitigation through geological storage. Both deep and shallow subsurface research needs are being addressed through research directed at improved understanding of environmental responses associated with large scale injection of CO{sub 2} into geologic formations. The research plan has two interrelated research objectives. Objective 1: Determine the influence of CO{sub 2}-related injection of fluids on pore structure, material properties, and microbial activity in rock cores from potential geological carbon sequestration sites. Objective 2: Determine the Effects of CO{sub 2} leakage on shallow subsurface ecosystems (microbial and plant) using field experiments from an outdoor field testing facility.

  17. Pressurized water nuclear reactor system with hot leg vortex mitigator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lau, Louis K. S.

    1990-01-01

    A pressurized water nuclear reactor system includes a vortex mitigator in the form of a cylindrical conduit between the hot leg conduit and a first section of residual heat removal conduit, which conduit leads to a pump and a second section of residual heat removal conduit leading back to the reactor pressure vessel. The cylindrical conduit is of such a size that where the hot leg has an inner diameter D.sub.1, the first section has an inner diameter D.sub.2, and the cylindrical conduit or step nozzle has a length L and an inner diameter of D.sub.3 ; D.sub.3 /D.sub.1 is at least 0.55, D.sub.2 is at least 1.9, and L/D.sub.3 is at least 1.44, whereby cavitation of the pump by a vortex formed in the hot leg is prevented.

  18. Electrodes mitigating effects of defects in organic electronic devices

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Heller, Christian Maria Anton

    2008-05-06

    A compound electrode for organic electronic devices comprises a thin first layer of a first electrically conducting material and a second electrically conducting material disposed on the first layer. In one embodiment, the second electrically conducting material is formed into a plurality of elongated members. In another embodiment, the second material is formed into a second layer. The elongated members or the second layer has a thickness greater than that of the first layer. The second layer is separated from the first layer by a conducting material having conductivity less than at least the material of the first layer. The compound electrode is capable of mitigating adverse effects of defects, such as short circuits, in the construction of the organic electronic devices, and can be included in light-emitting or photovoltaic devices.

  19. Imaging an event horizon: mitigation of scattering toward Sagittarius A*

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fish, Vincent L.; Lu, Ru-Sen; Doeleman, Sheperd S.; Pankratius, Victor; Johnson, Michael D.; Narayan, Ramesh; Vertatschitsch, Laura E.; Bouman, Katherine L.; Zoran, Daniel; Freeman, William T.; Psaltis, Dimitrios; Broderick, Avery E.; Gwinn, Carl R.

    2014-11-10

    The image of the emission surrounding the black hole in the center of the Milky Way is predicted to exhibit the imprint of general relativistic (GR) effects, including the existence of a shadow feature and a photon ring of diameter ∼50 μas. Structure on these scales can be resolved by millimeter-wavelength very long baseline interferometry. However, strong-field GR features of interest will be blurred at λ ≥ 1.3 mm due to scattering by interstellar electrons. The scattering properties are well understood over most of the relevant range of baseline lengths, suggesting that the scattering may be (mostly) invertible. We simulate observations of a model image of Sgr A* and demonstrate that the effects of scattering can indeed be mitigated by correcting the visibilities before reconstructing the image. This technique is also applicable to Sgr A* at longer wavelengths.

  20. Characterizing and Mitigating Work Time Inflation in Task Parallel Programs

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Olivier, Stephen L.; de Supinski, Bronis R.; Schulz, Martin; Prins, Jan F.

    2013-01-01

    Task parallelism raises the level of abstraction in shared memory parallel programming to simplify the development of complex applications. However, task parallel applications can exhibit poor performance due to thread idleness, scheduling overheads, and work time inflation – additional time spent by threads in a multithreaded computation beyond the time required to perform the same work in a sequential computation. We identify the contributions of each factor to lost efficiency in various task parallel OpenMP applications and diagnose the causes of work time inflation in those applications. Increased data access latency can cause significant work time inflation in NUMAmore » systems. Our locality framework for task parallel OpenMP programs mitigates this cause of work time inflation. Our extensions to the Qthreads library demonstrate that locality-aware scheduling can improve performance up to 3X compared to the Intel OpenMP task scheduler.« less

  1. Energy Agency Coordinators for Energy Action Month

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Agency coordinators serve as primary Federal agency points of contact for Energy Action Month. Contact them if you have questions about implementing an Energy Action Month campaign.

  2. Inter Action Corp | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Action Corp Jump to: navigation, search Name: Inter Action Corp Place: Kanagawa, Japan Zip: 236-0004 Product: Semiconductor equipment and testing devices maker building a PV...

  3. California Climate Action Registry | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Climate Action Registry Jump to: navigation, search Name: California Climate Action Registry Place: Los Angeles, California Zip: 90014 Product: Los Angeles-based NPO which develops...

  4. Renewable Energy Action Project | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Action Project Jump to: navigation, search Name: Renewable Energy Action Project Place: San Francisco, California Zip: 94107 Product: REAP is a San Francisco-based non-profit...

  5. Energy Action Month October 2013 Poster

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Poster for Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) features slogan "Take Action Now: Empower a Secure Energy Future" for October 2013 Energy Action Month.

  6. Presidential Climate Action Project | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Page Edit with form History Presidential Climate Action Project Jump to: navigation, search Name: Presidential Climate Action Project Place: Denver, Colorado Zip: 80217-3364...

  7. EAC Recommendations for DOE Action Regarding Interconnection...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Interconnection-Wide Planning - June 6, 2013 EAC Recommendations for DOE Action Regarding Interconnection-Wide Planning - June 6, 2013 EAC Recommendations for DOE Action Regarding ...

  8. Climate Protection Action Fund | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Repower America Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleClimateProtectionActionFund&oldid767417" Categories: Organizations Political Action Committees Policy...

  9. Action Codes Table | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Action Codes Table Action codes *U.S.: **IAEA: A - Shipper's original data A B - Receiver's data accepting shipper's weights without measurement W C - Shipper's adjustment or ...

  10. Update on Common-Cause Failure Experience and Mitigation Practices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wood, Richard Thomas; Muhlheim, Michael David; Pullum, Laura L; Smith, Cyrus M; Holcomb, David Eugene; Korsah, Kofi

    2014-04-01

    Experience in other industries has shown that digital technology can provide substantial benefits in terms of performance and reliability. However, the U.S. nuclear power industry has been slow to adopt the technology extensively in its instrumentation and control (I&C) applications because of inhibiting factors such as regulatory uncertainty, insufficient technological experience base, implementation complexity, limited availability of nuclear-qualified products and vendors, and inadequate definition of modernization cost recapture. Although there have been examples of digital technology usage in the nuclear power industry, challenges to the qualification of digital technology for high-integrity nuclear power plant (NPP) applications have severely constrained more widespread progress in achieving the benefits that are possible through the transition to digital. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Nuclear Energy (NE) established the Advanced Sensors and Instrumentation (ASI) technology area under the Nuclear Energy Enabling Technologies (NEET) Program to coordinate the instrumentation and controls (I&C) research across DOE NE and to identify and lead efforts to address common needs. As part of the NEET ASI research program, the Digital Technology Qualification project was established. Under this project, the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is leading the investigation into mitigation of digital common-cause failure (CCF) vulnerabilities for nuclear-qualified applications. This technical report documents updated and expanded findings from research activities by ORNL. Specifically, the report describes CCF experience in the nuclear and nonnuclear industries, identifies the state of the practice for CCF mitigation through key examples, and presents conclusions from the determination of knowledge gaps.

  11. Malheur River Wildlife Mitigation Project : 2008 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kesling, Jason; Abel, Chad; Schwabe, Laurence

    2009-01-01

    In 1998, the Burns Paiute Tribe (BPT) submitted a proposal to Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) for the acquisition of the Malheur River Wildlife Mitigation Project (Project). The proposed mitigation site was for the Denny Jones Ranch and included Bureau of Land Management (BLM) and Oregon Division of State Lands (DSL) leases and grazing allotments. The Project approval process and acquisition negotiations continued for several years until the BPT and BPA entered into a Memorandum of Agreement, which allowed for purchase of the Project in November 2000. The 31,781 acre Project is located seven miles east of Juntura, Oregon and is adjacent to the Malheur River (Figure 1). Six thousand three hundred eighty-five acres are deeded to BPT, 4,154 acres are leased from DSL, and 21,242 acres are leased from BLM (Figure 2). In total 11 grazing allotments are leased between the two agencies. Deeded land stretches for seven miles along the Malheur River. It is the largest private landholding on the river between Riverside and Harper, Oregon. Approximately 938 acres of senior water rights are included with the Ranch. The Project is comprised of meadow, wetland, riparian and shrub-steppe habitats. The BLM grazing allotment, located south of the ranch, is largely shrub-steppe habitat punctuated by springs and seeps. Hunter Creek, a perennial stream, flows through both private and BLM lands. Similarly, the DSL grazing allotment, which lies north of the Ranch, is predominantly shrub/juniper steppe habitat with springs and seeps dispersed throughout the upper end of draws (Figure 2).

  12. Bear Creek Valley Floodplain Hot Spot Removal Action Project Plan, Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-01-01

    The Bear Creek Valley Floodplain Hot Spot Removal Action Project Plan, Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee (Y/ER-301) was prepared (1) to safely, cost-effectively, and efficiently evaluate the environmental impact of solid material in the two debris areas in the context of industrial land uses (as defined in the Bear Creek Valley Feasibility Study) to support the Engineering Evaluation/Cost Assessment and (2) to evaluate, define, and implement the actions to mitigate these impacts. This work was performed under Work Breakdown Structure 1.x.01.20.01.08.

  13. Remedial Action Contacts Directory - 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-05-01

    This document, which was prepared for the US Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Environmental Restoration (ER), is a directory of 2628 individuals interested or involved in environmental restoration and/or remedial actions at radioactively contaminated sites. This directory contains a list of mailing addresses and phone numbers of DOE operations, area, site, project, and contractor offices; an index of DOE operations, area, site, project, and contractor office sorted by state; a list of individuals, presented by last name, facsimile number, and e-mail address; an index of affiliations presented alphabetically, with individual contacts appearing below each affiliation name; and an index of foreign contacta sorted by country and affiliation. This document was generated from the Remedial Action Contacts Database, which is maintained by the Remedial Action Program Information Center (RAPIC).

  14. Trading places - an innovative SO{sub 2} trading program to mitigate potential adverse impacts on class I areas: part II. Mitigation plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Louis Militana; Cindy Huber; Christopher Colbert; Chris Arrington; Don Shepherd

    2005-08-01

    This is the second of two articles describing a plan that was developed to mitigate the effects of acid deposition and visibility impairment in four Class I areas from the proposed Longview Power Project. Part I (published in July 2005) discussed the air quality impacts of the proposed coal-fired power plant. Part II discusses the mitigation plan. 2 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  15. Hungry Horse Mitigation Plan; Fisheries Mitigation Plan for Losses Attributable to the Construction and Operation of Hungry Horse Dam, 1990-2003 Technical Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fraley, John J.; Marotz, Brian L.; DosSantos, Joseph M.

    2003-04-01

    In this document we present fisheries losses, mitigation alternatives, and recommendations to protect, mitigate, and enhance resident fish and aquatic habitat affected by the construction and operation of Hungry Horse Dam. This plan addresses six separate program measures in the 1987 Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Program. We designed the plan to be closely coordinated in terms of dam operations, funding, and activities with the Kerr Mitigation Plan presently before the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission. This document represents a mitigation plan for consideration by the Northwest Power Planning Council process; it is not an implementation plan. Flathead Lake is one of the cleanest lakes of its size in the world. The exceptional water quality and unique native fisheries make the Flathead Lake/River system extremely valuable to the economy and quality of life in the basin. The recreational fishery in Flathead Lake has an estimated value of nearly eight million dollars annually. This mitigation process represents our best opportunity to reduce the impacts of hydropower in this valuable aquatic system and increase angling opportunity. We based loss estimates and mitigation alternatives on an extensive data base, agency reports, nationally and internationally peer-reviewed scientific articles, and an innovative biological model for Hungry Horse Reservoir and the Flathead River. We conducted an extensive, 14-month scoping and consultation process with agency representatives, representatives of citizen groups, and the general public. This consultation process helped identify issues, areas of agreement, areas of conflict, and advantages and disadvantages of mitigation alternatives. The results of the scoping and consultation process helped shape our mitigation plan. Our recommended plan is based firmly on principles of adaptive management and recognition of biological uncertainty. After we receive direction from the NPPC, we will add more detailed hypotheses and

  16. Texas Solar Collaboration Action Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Winland, Chris

    2013-02-14

    Texas Solar Collaboration Permitting and Interconenction Process Improvement Action Plan. San Antonio-specific; Investigate feasibility of using electronic signatures; Investigate feasibility of enabling other online permitting processes (e.g., commercial); Assess need for future document management and workflow/notification IT improvements; Update Information Bulletin 153 regarding City requirements and processes for PV; Educate contractors and public on CPS Energy’s new 2013 solar program processes; Continue to discuss “downtown grid” interconnection issues and identify potential solutions; Consider renaming Distributed Energy Resources (DER); and Continue to participate in collaborative actions.

  17. Business Case for Energy Efficiency in Support of Climate Change Mitigation, Economic and Societal Benefits in the United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bojda, Nicholas; Ke, Jing; de la Rue du Can, Stephane; E. Letschert, Virginie; E. McMahon, James; McNeil, Michael A.

    2011-06-01

    This study seeks to provide policymakers and other stakeholders with actionable information towards a road map for reducing energy consumption in the most cost-effective way. A major difference between the current study and some others is that we focus on individual equipment types that might be the subject of policies - such as labels, energy performance standards, and incentives - to affect market transformation in the short term, and on high-efficiency technology options that are available today. The approach of the study is to assess the impact of short-term actions on long-term impacts. “Short term” market transformation is assumed to occur by 2015, while “long-term” energy demand reduction impacts are assessed in 2030. In the intervening years, most but not all of the equipment studied will turn over completely. The 15-year time frame is significant for many products however, indicating that delay of implementation postpones impacts such as net economic savings and mitigation of emissions of carbon dioxide. Such delays would result in putting in place energy-wasting technologies, postponing improvement until the end of their service life, or potentially resulting in expensive investment either in additional energy supplies or in early replacement to achieve future energy or emissions reduction targets.

  18. Flight path-driven mitigation of wavefront curvature effects in SAR images

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Doerry, Armin W.

    2009-06-23

    A wavefront curvature effect associated with a complex image produced by a synthetic aperture radar (SAR) can be mitigated based on which of a plurality of possible flight paths is taken by the SAR when capturing the image. The mitigation can be performed differently for different ones of the flight paths.

  19. EM International Program Action Table - June 2014 | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Action Table - June 2014 EM International Program Action Table - June 2014 EM International Program Action Table - June 2014 PDF icon EM International Program Action Table - June ...

  20. Guidance Regarding Actions That May Proceed During the NEPA Process...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Actions That May Proceed During the NEPA Process: Interim Actions Guidance Regarding Actions That May Proceed During the NEPA Process: Interim Actions DOE guidance to provide...

  1. Action

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    ... personal belongings will be subject to a physical search. ... have the ability to enter into payment for order flow ... parameters, the specific terms governing the orders that ...

  2. Groundwater intercept and treatment system north of Rocky Mountain Arsenal, interim response action. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1989-07-01

    The objectives of the Off-Post interim response action are to: (1) Continue ground water monitoring and provide an alternative drinking water supply (2) Mitigate migration of contaminants in alluvial ground water (3) Treat contaminated alluvial ground water. This final decision document provides summaries of: (1) Alternatives considered (2) Significant events leading to the initiation of the IRA (3) The IRA Project (4) The applicable or relevant and appropriate requirements, standards, criteria, and limitations (ARAR`s) associated with the project. The selected IRA program will consists of: (1) Continued monitoring (2) Ground water extraction and recharge, but no physical barrier.

  3. Mitigation of Severe Accident Consequences Using Inherent Safety Principles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R. A. Wigeland; J. E. Cahalan

    2009-12-01

    Sodium-cooled fast reactors are designed to have a high level of safety. Events of high probability of occurrence are typically handled without consequence through reliable engineering systems and good design practices. For accidents of lower probability, the initiating events are characterized by larger and more numerous challenges to the reactor system, such as failure of one or more major engineered systems and can also include a failure to scram the reactor in response. As the initiating conditions become more severe, they have the potential for creating serious consequences of potential safety significance, including fuel melting, fuel pin disruption and recriticality. If the progression of such accidents is not mitigated by design features of the reactor, energetic events and dispersal of radioactive materials may result. For severe accidents, there are several approaches that can be used to mitigate the consequences of such severe accident initiators, which typically include fuel pin failures and core disruption. One approach is to increase the reliability of the reactor protection system so that the probability of an ATWS event is reduced to less than 1 x 10-6 per reactor year, where larger accident consequences are allowed, meeting the U.S. NRC goal of relegating such accident consequences as core disruption to these extremely low probabilities. The main difficulty with this approach is to convincingly test and guarantee such increased reliability. Another approach is to increase the redundancy of the reactor scram system, which can also reduce the probability of an ATWS event to a frequency of less than 1 x 10-6 per reactor year or lower. The issues with this approach are more related to reactor core design, with the need for a greater number of control rod positions in the reactor core and the associated increase in complexity of the reactor protection system. A third approach is to use the inherent reactivity feedback that occurs in a fast reactor to

  4. Climate Action Champions | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Initiatives » Climate Action Champions Climate Action Champions Climate Action Champions The White House launched the Climate Action Champions (CAC) Initiative in December 2014 with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) as lead Agency. The Administration expanded the Initiative in December 2015 through a strategic partnership with the Corporation for National Community Service (CNCS). PROGRAM POLICY OBJECTIVES The Climate Action Champions Initiative supports local and tribal government climate

  5. ENVIRONMENTAL BENIGN MITIGATION OF MICROBIOLOGICALLY INFLUENCED CORROSION (MIC)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J.R. Paterek; G. Husmillo; V. Trbovic

    2003-01-01

    The overall program objective is to develop and evaluate environmental benign agents or products that are effective in the prevention, inhibition, and mitigation of microbially influenced corrosion (MIC) in the internal surfaces of metallic natural gas pipelines. The goal is one or more environmental benign, a.k.a. ''green'' products that can be applied to maintain the structure and dependability of the natural gas infrastructure. The technical approach for this quarter were isolation and cultivation of MIC-causing microorganisms from corroded pipeline samples, optimizing parameters in the laboratory-scale corrosion test loop system and testing the effective concentrations of Capsicum sp. extracts to verify the extent of corrosion on metal coupons by batch culture method. A total of 22 strains from the group of heterotrophic, acid producing, denitrifying and sulfate reducing bacteria were isolated from the gas pipeline samples obtained from Northern Indiana Public Service Company in Trenton, Indiana. They were purified and will be sent out for identification. Bacterial strains of interest were used in antimicrobial screenings and test loop experiments. Parameters for the laboratory-scale test loop system such as gas and culture medium flow rate; temperature; inoculation period; and length of incubation were established. Batch culture corrosion study against Desulfovibrio vulgaris showed that one (S{sub 1}M) out of the four Capsicum sp. extracts tested was effective in controlling the corrosion rate in metal coupons by 33.33% when compared to the untreated group.

  6. Mitigation of wind tunnel wall interactions in subsonic cavity flows

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wagner, Justin L.; Casper, Katya Marie; Beresh, Steven J.; Henfling, John F.; Spillers, Russell Wayne; Pruett, Brian Owen Matthew

    2015-03-06

    In this study, the flow over an open aircraft bay is often represented in a wind tunnel with a cavity. In flight, this flow is unconfined, though in experiments, the cavity is surrounded by wind tunnel walls. If untreated, wind tunnel wall effects can lead to significant distortions of cavity acoustics in subsonic flows. To understand and mitigate these cavitytunnel interactions, a parametric approach was taken for flow over an L/D = 7 cavity at Mach numbers 0.60.8. With solid tunnel walls, a dominant cavity tone was observed, likely due to an interaction with a tunnel duct mode. Furthermore, an acoustic liner opposite the cavity decreased the amplitude of the dominant mode and its harmonics, a result observed by previous researchers. Acoustic dampeners were also placed in the tunnel sidewalls, which further decreased the dominant mode amplitudes and peak amplitudes associated with nonlinear interactions between cavity modes. This then indicates that cavity resonance can be altered by tunnel sidewalls and that spanwise coupling should be addressed when conducting subsonic cavity experiments. Though mechanisms for dominant modes and nonlinear interactions likely exist in unconfined cavity flows, these effects can be amplified by the wind tunnel walls.

  7. Mitigation of wind tunnel wall interactions in subsonic cavity flows

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wagner, Justin L.; Casper, Katya Marie; Beresh, Steven J.; Henfling, John F.; Spillers, Russell Wayne; Pruett, Brian Owen Matthew

    2015-03-06

    In this study, the flow over an open aircraft bay is often represented in a wind tunnel with a cavity. In flight, this flow is unconfined, though in experiments, the cavity is surrounded by wind tunnel walls. If untreated, wind tunnel wall effects can lead to significant distortions of cavity acoustics in subsonic flows. To understand and mitigate these cavity–tunnel interactions, a parametric approach was taken for flow over an L/D = 7 cavity at Mach numbers 0.6–0.8. With solid tunnel walls, a dominant cavity tone was observed, likely due to an interaction with a tunnel duct mode. Furthermore, an acoustic liner opposite the cavity decreased the amplitude of the dominant mode and its harmonics, a result observed by previous researchers. Acoustic dampeners were also placed in the tunnel sidewalls, which further decreased the dominant mode amplitudes and peak amplitudes associated with nonlinear interactions between cavity modes. This then indicates that cavity resonance can be altered by tunnel sidewalls and that spanwise coupling should be addressed when conducting subsonic cavity experiments. Though mechanisms for dominant modes and nonlinear interactions likely exist in unconfined cavity flows, these effects can be amplified by the wind tunnel walls.

  8. Sustainable biofuel contributions to carbon mitigation and energy independence

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Lippke, Bruce; Gustafson, Richard; Venditti, Richard; Volk, Timothy; Oneil, Elaine; Johnson, Leonard; Puettmann, Maureen; Steele, Phillip

    2011-10-19

    The growing interest in US biofuels has been motivated by two primary national policy goals, (1) to reduce carbon emissions and (2) to achieve energy independence. However, the current low cost of fossil fuels is a key barrier to investments in woody biofuel production capacity. The effectiveness of wood derived biofuels must consider not only the feedstock competition with low cost fossil fuels but also the wide range of wood products uses that displace different fossil intensive products. Alternative uses of wood result in substantially different unit processes and carbon impacts over product life cycles. We developed life cycle datamore » for new bioprocessing and feedstock collection models in order to make life cycle comparisons of effectiveness when biofuels displace gasoline and wood products displace fossil intensive building materials. Wood products and biofuels can be joint products from the same forestland. Furthermore, substantial differences in effectiveness measures are revealed as well as difficulties in valuing tradeoffs between carbon mitigation and energy independence.« less

  9. Potential GHG mitigation options for agriculture in China

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Erda, Lin; Yue, Li; Hongmin, Dong

    1996-12-31

    Agriculture contributes more or less to anthropogenic emissions of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}), methane (CH{sub 4}), and nitrous oxide (N{sub 2}O). China`s agriculture accounts for about 5-15% of total emissions for these gases. Land-use changes related to agriculture are not major contributors in China. Mitigation options are available that could result in significant decrease in CH{sub 4} and N{sub 2}O emissions from agricultural systems. If implemented, they are likely to increase crop and animal productivity. Implementation has the potential to decrease CH{sub 4} emissions from rice, ruminants, and animal waste by 4-40%. The key to decreasing N{sub 2}O emissions is improving the efficiency of plant utilization of fertilizer N. This could decrease N{sub 2}O emissions from agriculture by almost 20%. Using animal waste to produce CH{sub 4} for energy and digested manure for fertilizer may at some time be cost effective. Economic analyses of options proposed should show positive economic as well as environmental benefits.

  10. Overview of mitigation policies and measures in the forestry sector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sathaye, J.

    1996-12-31

    In this paper the author addresses questions on how the forestry sector can make a contribution to the general problem of greenhouse gases in the environment. Primarily this is in the form of carbon conservation and sequestering. There is a potential land area for conservation and sequestration estimated to be 700 Mha. The total carbon that could be sequestered and conserved globally by 2050 on this land is 60 - 87 GtC. Slowing deforestation, assisting regeneration, forestation and agroforestry are the primary mitigation measures for carbon conservation and sequestration. For long term success, enforcement to halt deforestation has to be accompained by economic and/or other benefits to the deforesters that equal or exceed their current remuneration. Making plantations a significant fuel for utility electricity generation will require higher biomass yields and thermal efficiency matching that of conventional plants. Significant reduction of global carbon emissions requires national governments to institute measures that provide local, national, economic and other benefits while conserving and sequestering carbon.

  11. Electron cloud experiments at Fermilab: Formation and mitigation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zwaska, R.; /Fermilab

    2011-06-01

    We have performed a series of experiments at Fermilab to explore the electron cloud phenomenon. The Main Injector will have its beam intensity increased four-fold in the Project X upgrade, and would be subject to instabilities from the electron cloud. We present measurements of the cloud formation in the Main Injector and experiments with materials for the mitigation of the Cloud. An experimental installation of Titanium-Nitride (TiN) coated beam pipes has been under study in the Main Injector since 2009; this material was directly compared to an adjacent stainless chamber through electron cloud measurement with Retarding Field Analyzers (RFAs). Over the long period of running we were able to observe the secondary electron yield (SEY) change and correlate it with electron fluence, establishing a conditioning history. Additionally, the installation has allowed measurement of the electron energy spectrum, comparison of instrumentation techniques, and energydependent behavior of the electron cloud. Finally, a new installation, developed in conjunction with Cornell and SLAC, will allow direct SEY measurement of material samples irradiated in the accelerator.

  12. Mitigation of wind tunnel wall interactions in subsonic cavity flows

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Wagner, Justin L.; Casper, Katya Marie; Beresh, Steven J.; Henfling, John F.; Spillers, Russell Wayne; Pruett, Brian Owen Matthew

    2015-03-06

    In this study, the flow over an open aircraft bay is often represented in a wind tunnel with a cavity. In flight, this flow is unconfined, though in experiments, the cavity is surrounded by wind tunnel walls. If untreated, wind tunnel wall effects can lead to significant distortions of cavity acoustics in subsonic flows. To understand and mitigate these cavity–tunnel interactions, a parametric approach was taken for flow over an L/D = 7 cavity at Mach numbers 0.6–0.8. With solid tunnel walls, a dominant cavity tone was observed, likely due to an interaction with a tunnel duct mode. Furthermore, anmore » acoustic liner opposite the cavity decreased the amplitude of the dominant mode and its harmonics, a result observed by previous researchers. Acoustic dampeners were also placed in the tunnel sidewalls, which further decreased the dominant mode amplitudes and peak amplitudes associated with nonlinear interactions between cavity modes. This then indicates that cavity resonance can be altered by tunnel sidewalls and that spanwise coupling should be addressed when conducting subsonic cavity experiments. Though mechanisms for dominant modes and nonlinear interactions likely exist in unconfined cavity flows, these effects can be amplified by the wind tunnel walls.« less

  13. Annual Adaptive Management Report for Compensatory Mitigation at Keyport Lagoon: Mitigation of Pier B Development at the Bremerton Naval Facilities - Compensatory Mitigation at Keyport Lagoon - Naval Underwater Warfare Center Division - Keyport, Washington

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vavrinec, John; Borde, Amy B.; Woodruff, Dana L.; Brandenberger, Jill M.; Thom, Ronald M.; Wright, Cynthia L.; Cullinan, Valerie I.

    2012-06-01

    Unites States Navy capital improvement projects are designed to modernize and improve mission capacity. Such capital improvement projects often result in unavoidable environmental impacts by increasing over-water structures, which results in a loss of subtidal habitat within industrial areas of Navy bases. In the Pacific Northwest, compensatory mitigation often targets alleviating impacts to Endangered Species Act-listed salmon species. The complexity of restoring large systems requires limited resources to target successful and more coordinated mitigation efforts to address habitat loss and improvements in water quality that will clearly contribute to an improvement at the site scale and can then be linked to a cumulative net ecosystem improvement.

  14. National climate change action plans: Interim report for developing and transition countries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Benioff, R.; Ness, E.; Hirst, J.

    1997-10-01

    Under its Support for National Action Plans (SNAP) initiative, the U.S. Country Studies Program is providing financial and technical assistance to 18 countries for the development of climate change action plans. Although most of the countries have not yet completed their plans, the important lessons learned thus far are valuable and should be shared with other countries and international institutions that have an interest in the process of action plan development. This interim report describes the experience of 11 countries that are the furthest along in their planning activity and who have offered to share their results to date with the larger community of interested nations. These action plans delineate specific mitigation and adaptation measures that the countries will implement and integrate into their ongoing development programs. This report focuses on the measures the countries have selected and the methods they used to prepare their action plans. This executive summary presents key lessons and common themes using a structure similar to that used in the individual country chapters.

  15. Action Sheet 36 Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kips, R E; Kristo, M J; Hutcheon, I D

    2012-02-24

    Pursuant to the Arrangement between the European Commission DG Joint Research Centre (EC-JRC) and the Department of Energy (DOE) to continue cooperation on research, development, testing, and evaluation of technology, equipment, and procedures in order to improve nuclear material control, accountancy, verification, physical protection, and advanced containment and surveillance technologies for international safeguards, dated 1 September 2008, the IRMM and LLNL established cooperation in a program on the Study of Chemical Changes in Uranium Oxyfluoride Particles under IRMM-LLNL Action Sheet 36. The work under this action sheet had 2 objectives: (1) Achieve a better understanding of the loss of fluorine in UO{sub 2}F{sub 2} particles after exposure to certain environmental conditions; and (2) Provide feedback to the EC-JRC on sample reproducibility and characteristics.

  16. Holography of gravitational action functionals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mukhopadhyay, Ayan; Padmanabhan, T.

    2006-12-15

    Einstein-Hilbert (EH) action can be separated into a bulk and a surface term, with a specific ('holographic') relationship between the two, so that either can be used to extract information about the other. The surface term can also be interpreted as the entropy of the horizon in a wide class of spacetimes. Since EH action is likely to just the first term in the derivative expansion of an effective theory, it is interesting to ask whether these features continue to hold for more general gravitational actions. We provide a comprehensive analysis of Lagrangians of the form {radical}(-g)L={radical}(-g)Q{sub a}{sup bcd}R{sup a}{sub bcd}, in which Q{sub a}{sup bcd} is a tensor with the symmetries of the curvature tensor, made from metric and curvature tensor and satisfies the condition {nabla}{sub c}Q{sub a}{sup bcd}=0, and show that they share these features. The Lanczos-Lovelock Lagrangians are a subset of these in which Q{sub a}{sup bcd} is a homogeneous function of the curvature tensor. They are all holographic, in a specific sense of the term, and--in all these cases--the surface term can be interpreted as the horizon entropy. The thermodynamics route to gravity, in which the field equations are interpreted as TdS=dE+pdV, seems to have a greater degree of validity than the field equations of Einstein gravity itself. The results suggest that the holographic feature of EH action could also serve as a new symmetry principle in constraining the semiclassical corrections to Einstein gravity. The implications are discussed.

  17. Take the Energy Action Challenge

    K-12 Energy Lesson Plans and Activities Web site (EERE)

    Students will work in pairs or small groups to apply knowledge of energy-wise habits to evaluate energy use in their homes and schools and make recommendations for improved efficiency. They will use an energy audit tool to collect data on their home and school energy habits and present an action plan to their class. Further communication at the school and district level is encouraged.

  18. Mitigation Monitoring Program at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory FY00 Annual Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mcguff, R R

    2003-12-01

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has completed eight years of implementing the mitigation measures from the Final Environmental Impact Statement/Environmental Impact Report (EIS/EIR) for the Continued Operation of LLNL and Sandia National Laboratories (SNL), Livermore. This eighth annual report documents LLNL's implementation of the mitigation measures during the fiscal year ending September 30, 2000 (FY00). It provides background information on the mitigation measures, describes activities undertaken during FY00, and documents changes in the monitoring program. Table 1 on page 12, provides a numerical listing of each mitigation measure, the department responsible for implementing it, and the location within this report where the status is discussed. The discussion of the mitigation measures is organized by the University of California (UC)'s three categories of approaches to implementation: project-specific, service-level and administrative. Table 2 on page 19, Table 6 on page 55, and Table 7 on page 63 provide a detailed discussion of each mitigation measure, including LLNL's implementation strategy and the status as of the end of the fiscal year. Table 3 on page 37, Table 4 on page 46, and Table 5 on page 47 list each construction project undertaken in FY00 and the mitigation measures implemented.

  19. Environmental Mitigation Technology (Innovative System Testing)-Deployment and Testing of the Alden Hydropower Fish-Friendly Turbine

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Environmental Mitigation Technology (Innovative System Testing)-Deployment and Testing of the Alden Hydropower Fish-Friendly Turbine

  20. Portsmouth Removal Actions | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Removal Actions Portsmouth Removal Actions Links to the Portsmouth Removal Action Reports in PDF. Final Action Memorandum for the Plant Support Buildings and Structures at Portsmouth - March 2012 (6.98 MB) Removal Action Completion Report for Phases I and II of X-334 Transformer Cleaning/Storage Building at Portsmouth - Nov 2011 (4.75 MB) Removal Action Completion Report for X-103 Auxiliary Office Building at Portsmouth - Nov 2011 (4.1 MB) Construction Completion Report for Phases I and II of

  1. CORRECTIVE ACTION PLAN FOR CORRECTIVE ACTION UNIT 543: LIQUID DISPOSAL UNITS, NEVADA TEST SITE, NEVADA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2006-09-01

    The purpose of this Corrective Action Plan is to provide the detailed scope of work required to implement the recommended corrective actions as specified in the approved Corrective Action Decision Document.

  2. Albeni Falls Wildlife Mitigation Project; Idaho Department of Fish and Game 2007 Final Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cousins, Katherine

    2009-04-03

    The Idaho Department of Fish and Game maintained a total of about 2,743 acres of wildlife mitigation habitat in 2007, and protected another 921 acres. The total wildlife habitat mitigation debt has been reduced by approximately two percent (598.22 HU) through the Department's mitigation activities in 2007. Implementation of the vegetative monitoring and evaluation program continued across protected lands. For the next funding cycle, the IDFG is considering a package of restoration projects and habitat improvements, conservation easements, and land acquisitions in the project area.

  3. Fossil fuel decarbonization technology for mitigating global warming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steinberg, M.

    1998-09-01

    It has been understood that production of hydrogen from fossil and carbonaceous fuels with reduced CO{sub 2} emission to the atmosphere is key to the production of hydrogen-rich fuels for mitigating the CO{sub 2} greenhouse gas climate change problem. The conventional methods of hydrogen production from fossil fuels (coal, oil, gas and biomass) include steam reforming and water gas shift mainly of natural gas (SRM). In order to suppress CO{sub 2} emission from the steam reforming process, CO{sub 2} must be concentrated and sequestered either in or under the ocean or underground (in aquifers, or depleted oil or gas wells). Up to about 40% of the energy is lost in this process. An alternative process is the pyrolysis or the thermal decomposition of methane, natural gas (TDM) to hydrogen and carbon. The carbon can either be sequestered or sold on the market as a materials commodity or used as a fuel at a later date under less severe CO{sub 2} restraints. The energy sequestered in the carbon amounts to about 42% of the energy in the natural gas resource which is stored and not destroyed. A comparison is made between the well developed conventional SRM and the less developed TDM process including technological status, efficiency, carbon management and cost. The TDM process appears to have advantages over the well developed SRM process. It is much easier to sequester carbon as a stable solid than CO{sub 2} as a reactive gas or low temperature liquid. It is also possible to reduce cost by marketing the carbon as a filler or construction material. The potential benefits of the TDM process justifies its further efficient development. The hydrogen can be used as a transportation fuel or converted to methanol by reaction with CO{sub 2} from fossil fuel fired power plant stack gases, thus allowing reuse of the carbon in conventional IC automobile engines or in advanced fuel cell vehicles.

  4. Modeling the dynamic crush of impact mitigating materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Logan, R.W.; McMichael, L.D.

    1995-05-12

    Crushable materials are commonly utilized in the design of structural components to absorb energy and mitigate shock during the dynamic impact of a complex structure, such as an automobile chassis or drum-type shipping container. The development and application of several finite-element material models which have been developed at various times at LLNL for DYNA3D will be discussed. Between the models, they are able to account for several of the predominant mechanisms which typically influence the dynamic mechanical behavior of crushable materials. One issue we addressed was that no single existing model would account for the entire gambit of constitutive features which are important for crushable materials. Thus, we describe the implementation and use of an additional material model which attempts to provide a more comprehensive model of the mechanics of crushable material behavior. This model combines features of the pre-existing DYNA models and incorporates some new features as well in an invariant large-strain formulation. In addition to examining the behavior of a unit cell in uniaxial compression, two cases were chosen to evaluate the capabilities and accuracy of the various material models in DYNA. In the first case, a model for foam filled box beams was developed and compared to test data from a 4-point bend test. The model was subsequently used to study its effectiveness in energy absorption in an aluminum extrusion, spaceframe, vehicle chassis. The second case examined the response of the AT-400A shipping container and the performance of the overpack material during accident environments selected from 10CFR71 and IAEA regulations.

  5. Fossil fuel decarbonization technology for mitigating global warming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steinberg, M.

    1998-07-01

    It has been understood that production of hydrogen from fossil and carbonaceous fuels with reduced CO{sub 2} emission to the atmosphere is key to the production of hydrogen-rich fuels for mitigating the CO{sub 2} greenhouse gas climate change problem. The conventional methods of hydrogen production from fossil fuels (coal, oil, gas and biomass) include steam reforming and water gas shift mainly of natural gas (SRM). In order to suppress CO{sub 2} emission from the steam reforming process, CO{sub 2} must be concentrated and sequestered either in or under the ocean or in or underground (in aquifers, or depleted oil or gas wells). Up to about 40% of the energy is lost in this process. An alternative process is the pyrolysis or the thermal decomposition of methane, natural gas (TDM) to hydrogen and carbon. The carbon can either be sequestered or sold on the market as a materials commodity or used as a fuel at a later date under less severe CO{sub 2} restraints. The energy sequestered in the carbon amounts to about 42% of the energy in the natural gas resource which is stored and not destroyed. A comparison is made between the well developed conventional SRB and the less developed TDM process including technological status, efficiency, carbon management and cost. The TDM process appears to have advantages over the well developed SRM process. It is much easier to sequester carbon as a stable solid than CO{sub 2} as a reactive gas or low temperature liquid. It is also possible to reduce cost by marketing the carbon as a filler or construction material. The potential benefits of the TDM process justifies its further efficient development. The hydrogen can be used as a transportation fuel or converted to methanol by reaction with CO{sub 2} from fossil fuel fired power plant stack gases, thus allowing reuse of the carbon in conventional IC automobile engines or in advanced fuel cell vehicles.

  6. Fossil fuel decarbonization technology for mitigating global warming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steinberg, M.

    1998-04-01

    It has been understood that production of hydrogen from fossil and carbonaceous fuels with reduced CO{sub 2} emission to the atmosphere is key to the production of hydrogen-rich fuels for mitigating the CO{sub 2} greenhouse gas climate change problem. The conventional methods of hydrogen production from fossil fuels (coal, oil, gas and biomass) include steam reforming process, mainly of natural gas (SRM). In order to suppress CO{sub 2} emission from the steam reforming process, CO{sub 2} must be concentrated and sequestered either in or under the ocean or in or underground (in aquifers, or depleted oil or gas wells). Up to about 40% of the energy is lost in this process. An alternative process is the pyrolysis or the thermal decomposition of methane, natural gas (TDM) to hydrogen and carbon. The carbon can either be sequestered or sold on the market as a materials commodity or used as a fuel at a later date under less severe CO{sub 2} restraints. The energy sequestered in the carbon amounts to about 42% of the energy in the natural gas resource which is stored and not destroyed. A comparison is made between the well developed conventional SRM and the less developed TDM process including technological status, efficiency, carbon management and cost. The TDM process appears to have advantages over the well developed SRM process. It is much easier to sequester carbon as a stable solid than CO{sub 2} as a reactive gas or low temperature liquid. It is also possible to reduce cost by marketing the carbon as a filler or construction material. The potential benefits of the TDM process justifies its further efficient development. The hydrogen can be used as a transportation fuel or converted to methanol by reaction with CO{sub 2} from fossil fuel fired power plant stack gases, thus allowing reuse of the carbon in conventional IC automobile engines or in advanced fuel cell vehicles.

  7. Degradation of Thermal Barrier Coatings from Deposits and Its Mitigation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nitin Padture

    2011-12-31

    Ceramic thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) used in gas-turbine engines afford higher operating temperatures, resulting in enhanced efficiencies and performance. However, in the case of syngas-fired engines, fly ash particulate impurities that may be present in syngas can melt on the hotter TBC surfaces and form glassy deposits. These deposits can penetrate the TBCs leading to their failure. In experiments using lignite fly ash to simulate these conditions we show that conventional TBCs of composition 93wt% ZrO{sub 2} + 7wt% Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} (7YSZ) fabricated using the air plasma spray (APS) process are completely destroyed by the molten fly ash. The molten fly ash is found to penetrate the full thickness of the TBC. The mechanisms by which this occurs appear to be similar to those observed in degradation of 7YSZ TBCs by molten calcium-magnesium-aluminosilicate (CMAS) sand and by molten volcanic ash in aircraft engines. In contrast, APS TBCs of Gd{sub 2Zr{sub 2}O{sub 7} composition are highly resistant to attack by molten lignite fly ash under identical conditions, where the molten ash penetrates ~25% of TBC thickness. This damage mitigation appears to be due to the formation of an impervious, stable crystalline layer at the fly ash/Gd{sub 2}Zr{sub 2}O{sub 7} TBC interface arresting the penetrating moltenfly- ash front. Additionally, these TBCs were tested using a rig with thermal gradient and simultaneous accumulation of ash. Modeling using an established mechanics model has been performed to illustrate the modes of delamination, as well as further opportunities to optimize coating microstructure. Transfer of the technology was developed in this program to all interested parties.

  8. Issues in developing a mitigation strategy for Bangladesh

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Asaduzzaman, M.

    1996-12-31

    Bangladesh, it is by now well-known, is at the receiving end, in the literal sense of the term, of the global climate change and its potential impacts. She contributes very little to the current global emission of greenhouse gases (GHGs). The Emission Inventory under the present umbrella project, Bangladesh Climate Change Study (BCCS), has found that her annual emission of carbon has been only 3.99 mn metric tons per year. An earlier study arrived at exactly the same figure. The figures for estimated release of methane is far less firm. The estimated methane emission in 1990 could be anywhere between 1 million and 6 million metric tons. In any case the total emission is unlikely to be more than one-half of one percent of the global total. On the other hand, however, she faces specter of widespread and more frequent floods, more frequent droughts, cyclones and above all sea-level rise (SLR) which may inundate a substantial part of the country all of these bringing in immeasurable misery and destitution and loss of income, employment and growth. One would expect that in such a situation, Bangladesh`s basic concern should be to prepare an appropriate adaptation strategy. This is already a major policy concern of the Government. There is, however, an increasing realization that Bangladesh should as well emphasize an appropriate mitigation strategy (MS). There may be at least three reasons why this should be so. The first is that she is a signatory of the Framework Convention on Climate Change. The second is that in the medium, if not short term she expects major growth due to a developing economy. Third is that Bangladesh depends primarily on fossil fuel imports for energy, and will become a larger source with further development.

  9. City of Boulder- Climate Action Plan Fund

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Note: As of 2015, the Climate Action Plan is now referred to as the Climate Commitment. In November 2015, Boulder voters approved an extension of the  Climate Action Plan tax through 2020, with...

  10. Environmental assessment of remedial action at the Naturita Uranium processing site near Naturita, Colorado. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-08-01

    The proposed remedial action for the Naturita processing site is relocation of the contaminated materials and debris to the Dry Flats disposal site, 6 road miles (mi) [ 1 0 kilometers (km)] to the southeast. At the disposal site, the contaminated materials would be stabilized and covered with layers of earth and rock. The proposed disposal site is on land administered by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) and used primarily for livestock grazing. The final disposal site would cover approximately 57 ac (23 ha), which would be permanently transferred from the BLM to the DOE and restricted from future uses. The remedial action activities would be conducted by the DOE`s Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project. The remedial action would result in the loss of approximately 164 ac (66 ha) of soils, but 132 ac (53 ha) of these soils are contaminated and cannot be used for other purposes. Another 154 ac (62 ha) of soils would be temporarily disturbed. Approximately 57 ac (23 ha) of open range land would be permanently removed from livestock grazing and wildlife use. The removal of the contaminated materials would affect the 1 00-year floodplain of the San Miguel River and would result in the loss of riparian habitat along the river. The southwestern willow flycatcher, a Federal candidate species, may be affected by the remedial action, and the use of water from the San Miguel River ``may affect`` the Colorado squawfish, humpback chub, bonytail chub, and razorback sucker. Traffic levels on State Highways 90 and 141 would be increased during the remedial action, as would the noise levels along these transportation routes. Measures for mitigating the adverse environmental impacts of the proposed remedial action are discussed in Section 6.0 of this environmental assessment (EA).

  11. Defining the no action alternative for NEPA document of continuing actions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCold, L.N.; Saulsbury, J.W.

    1995-12-01

    Environmental professionals today must address many issues that might not have been foreseen by developers of the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA) or the President`s Council on Environmental Quality (CEQ) regulations for implementing NEPA. One issue is the definition of the no action alternative for NEPA documentation of continuing actions. The CEQ regulations do not define the no action alternative, but merely state that NEPA analyses shall {open_quotes}include the alternative of no action{close_quotes}. For NEPA analyses of newly proposed actions, the practical definition of the no action alternative is clear (i.e., the agency will not implement the proposed action or alternative actions). However, the practical definition for NEPA analyses of continuing actions is not so clear. To clarify the definition of the no action alternative for continuing actions, particularly those that involve agency decisions about relicensing existing projects or continuing to operate existing programs or facilities. In trying to clarify the definition of the no action alternative for continuing actions, this paper examines the function of the no action alternative for NEPA analyses in general. Pertinent issues include how the definition of the no action alternative affects the selection of the baseline for environmental analysis and whether inclusion of the no action alternative really forces agencies to consider no action as a realistic alternative. To address these issues, this paper begins with a discussion of relevant legal decisions involving the no action alternative in NEPA analyses. The paper then examines some agency NEPA regulations and recent NEPA documents to provide examples of how some agencies address the no action alternative for continuing actions. Finally, the paper suggests definitions of the no action alternative for continuing actions and methods for addressing no action as a realistic alternative.

  12. SEAB Climate Action Plan | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    SEAB Climate Action Plan SEAB Climate Action Plan A presentation on the Climate Action Plan presented by Dr. Jonathan Pershing, Deputy Assistant Secretary for Climate Change at the U.S. Department of Energy. Climate Action Plan (pdf) (998.5 KB) More Documents & Publications U.S. Energy Sector Vulnerabilities to Climate Change and Extreme Weather Climate Change and the U.S. Energy Sector: Regional Vulnerabilities and Resilience Solutions Climate Change: Energy and Community Impacts

  13. Energy Action Month October 2014 Campaign Materials

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Campaign materials for "Transition to a Clean Energy Reality," the theme for Energy Action Month October 2014.

  14. NREL: Technology Deployment - Climate Action Planning Tool

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Home Technology Deployment Climate Action Planning Tool Technology Deployment - Climate Action Planning Tool NREL's Climate Action Planning Tool provides a quick, basic estimate of how various technology options can contribute to an overall climate action plan for your research campus. Use the tool to identify which options will lead to the most significant reductions in consumption of fossil fuels and in turn meet greenhouse gas reduction goals. Follow these four steps: Gather baseline energy

  15. Climate Action Plan | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Climate Action Plan Climate Action Plan Since President Obama's announcement of the Climate Action Plan (CAP) on June 25, 2013, the Department of Energy (DOE) has moved forward to lead initiatives and support interagency efforts that cut carbon pollution, augment resilience and preparedness in the face of climate impacts, and strengthen international partnerships addressing the issue. This effort involves activities all across the Department, including actions led by the Office of International

  16. Energy Action Month | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Action Month Energy Action Month Energy Action Month Lead our nation to a secure, clean, and prosperous energy future As proclaimed by President Obama, October marks Energy Action Month. With the March announcement of Executive Order 13693: Planning for Federal Sustainability in the Next Decade, the federal government faces even more challenging goals to reduce energy consumption. Agencies are committed to stepping up and adopting more sustainable operations to cut greenhouse gas

  17. Action Recommendation for Cyber Resilience

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Choudhury, Sutanay; Rodriguez, Luke R.; Curtis, Darren S.; Oler, Kiri J.; Nordquist, Peter L.; Chen, Pin-Yu; Ray, Indrajit

    2015-09-01

    This paper presents an unifying graph-based model for representing the infrastructure, behavior and missions of an enterprise. We describe how the model can be used to achieve resiliency against a wide class of failures and attacks. We introduce an algorithm for recommending resilience establishing actions based on dynamic updates to the models. Without loss of generality, we show the effectiveness of the algorithm for preserving latency based quality of service (QoS). Our models and the recommendation algorithms are implemented in a software framework that we seek to release as an open source framework for simulating resilient cyber systems.

  18. Copenhagen, Denmark: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Core Carbon Group AS CCG Danionics A S Dansk Solar Energy Denmark Solar Industry DSI Lithium Balance Middelgrunden Wind Turbine Cooperative NordEnergie Renewables A S Proark...

  19. OAR 635-415 - Fish and Wildlife Habitat Mitigation Policy | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    OAR 635-415 - Fish and Wildlife Habitat Mitigation Policy Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- RegulationRegulation: OAR 635-415 -...

  20. Monitoring and Mitigation Alternatives for Protection of North Atlantic Right Whales during Offshore Wind Farm Installation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carlson, Thomas J.; Halvorsen, Michele B.; Matzner, Shari; Copping, Andrea E.; Stavole, Jessica

    2012-09-01

    Progress report on defining and determining monitoring and mitigation measures for protecting North Atlantic Right Whales from the effects of pile driving and other activities associated with installation of offshore wind farms.

  1. PPPL and Princeton help lead a new center to understand and mitigate...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... Also under study will be the primary methods for mitigating runaway electrons. These methods inject impurities in the form of massive gas or shattered pellets to cool the plasma ...

  2. Evaluating the implementation of environmental review mitigation in local planning and development processes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Slotterback, Carissa Schively

    2008-11-15

    The implementation of mitigation strategies and outcomes of environmental review remains a challenge for planners and regulators. While the process and content of environmental review is clearly defined, there is often little attention to what happens after the review is completed. This paper presents the results of an evaluation of the implementation of the outcomes of environmental review, specifically mitigation measures designed to respond to environmental impacts identified in the environmental impact analysis. Drawing on previous evaluations of environmental review outcomes and plan implementation, the research provides a methodology for evaluating the implementation of mitigation efforts, points to the challenges associated with implementing the mitigation outcomes of local environmental review in planning and development processes, and identifies opportunities to integrate planning and environmental review processes.

  3. Mitigation for the Construction and Operation of Libby Dam, 2000 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoffman, Greg; Marotz, Brian L.; Dunnigan, James

    2002-09-01

    ''Mitigation for the Construction and Operation of Libby Dam'' is part of the Northwest Power Planning Council's resident fish and wildlife program. The program was mandated by the Northwest Planning Act of 1980, and is responsible for mitigating for damages to fish and wildlife caused by hydroelectric development in the Columbia River Basin. The objective of Phase I of the project (1983 through 1987) was to maintain or enhance the Libby Reservoir fishery by quantifying seasonal water levels and developing ecologically sound operational guidelines. The objective of Phase II of the project (1988 through 1996) was to determine the biological effects of reservoir operations combined with biotic changes associated with an aging reservoir. The objectives of Phase III of the project (1996 through present) are to implement habitat enhancement measures to mitigate for dam effects, to provide data for implementation of operational strategies that benefit resident fish, monitor reservoir and river conditions, and monitor mitigation projects for effectiveness.

  4. Colville Confederated Tribes' Performance Project Wildlife Mitigation Acquisitions, Annual Report 2006.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Whitney, Richard; Berger, Matthew; Tonasket, Patrick

    2006-12-01

    The Colville Confederated Tribes Wildlife Mitigation Project is protecting lands as partial mitigation for hydropower's share of the wildlife losses resulting from Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams. The Mitigation Project protects and manages 54,606 acres for the biological requirements of managed wildlife species that are important to the Colville Tribes. With the inclusion of 2006 acquisitions, the Colville Tribes have acquired approximately 32,018 habitat units (HUs) towards a total 35,819 HUs lost from original inundation due to hydropower development. This annual report for 2006 briefly describes that four priority land acquisitions that were considered for enrollment into the Colville Tribes Mitigation Project during the 2006 contract period.

  5. Supplement Analysis for the Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0246/SA-39)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    N /A

    2004-02-02

    BPA funds the Albeni Falls Wildlife Mitigation Program, which is tasked with the acquisition and restoration of key habitats within the Pend Oreille Watershed. This mitigation program purchases private land to be owned and managed by program participants for the protection, mitigation, and enhancement of wildlife affected by the construction and operation of the Federal hydroelectric facilities on the Columbia River. BPA is currently working with the Kalispel Tribe of Indians to acquire and manage three parcels that total approximately 890 acres of land within Pend Oreille County, Washington. The properties proposed for acquisition contain habitats or potential habitats that will provide BPA with credits for partial mitigation of wildlife habitat losses due to the construction of Albeni Falls Dam. The current proposal includes only the fee title acquisition of these parcels; habitat enhancement activities will likely be carried out by the Kalispel Tribe of Indians in the future following the development of a management plan(s) for the lands.

  6. Ramping Effect on Forecast Use: Integrated Ramping as a Mitigation Strategy; NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Diakov, Victor; Barrows, Clayton; Brinkman, Gregory; Bloom, Aaron; Denholm, Paul

    2015-06-23

    Power generation ramping between forecasted (net) load set-points shift the generation (MWh) from its scheduled values. The Integrated Ramping is described as a method that mitigates this problem.

  7. Strategies for Mitigating the Reduction in Economic Value of Variable Generation with Increasing Penetration Levels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mills, Andrew; Wiser, Ryan

    2014-03-03

    In this report, we evaluate individual options that have the potential to stem the decline in the marginal value of variable generation (VG) with increasing penetration levels. We focus only on the effectiveness of mitigation measures for wind and PV.

  8. Aligned composite structures for mitigation of impact damage and resistance to wear in dynamic environments

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mulligan, Anthony C.; Rigali, Mark J.; Sutaria, Manish P.; Popovich, Dragan; Halloran, Joseph P.; Fulcher, Michael L.; Cook, Randy C.

    2005-12-13

    Fibrous monolith composites having architectures that provide increased flaw insensitivity, improved hardness, wear resistance and damage tolerance and methods of manufacture thereof are provided for use in dynamic environments to mitigate impact damage and increase wear resistance.

  9. Aligned composite structures for mitigation of impact damage and resistance to wear in dynamic environments

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rigali, Mark J.; Sutaria, Manish P.; Mulligan, Anthony C.; Popovich, Dragan

    2004-03-23

    Fibrous monolith composites having architectures that provide increased flaw insensitivity, improved hardness, wear resistance and damage tolerance and methods of manufacture thereof are provided for use in dynamic environments to mitigate impact damage and increase wear resistance.

  10. Aligned composite structures for mitigation of impact damage and resistance to wear in dynamic environments

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mulligan, Anthony C.; Rigali, Mark J.; Sutaria, Manish P.; Popovich, Dragan; Halloran, Joseph P.; Fulcher, Michael L.; Cook, Randy C.

    2009-04-14

    Fibrous monolith composites having architectures that provide increased flaw insensitivity, improved hardness, wear resistance and damage tolerance and methods of manufacture thereof are provided for use in dynamic environments to mitigate impact damage and increase wear resistance.

  11. Divertor Heat Flux Mitigation in High-Performance H-mode Plasmas...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    H-mode Plasmas in the National Spherical Torus Experiment. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Divertor Heat Flux Mitigation in High-Performance H-mode Plasmas ...

  12. The Role of Asia in Mitigating Climate Change: Results from the Asia Modeling Exercise

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Calvin, Katherine V.; Clarke, Leon E.; Krey, Volker; Blanford, Geoffrey J.; Jiang, Kejun; Kainuma, M.; Kriegler, Elmar; Luderer, Gunnar; Shukla, Priyadarshi R.

    2012-12-01

    In 2010, Asia accounted for 60% of global population, 39% of Gross World Product, 44% of global energy consumption and nearly half of the worlds energy system CO2 emissions. Thus, Asia is an important region to consider in any discussion of climate change or climate change mitigation. This paper explores the role of Asia in mitigating climate change, by comparing the results of 23 energy-economy and integrated assessment models. We focus our analysis on seven key areas: base year data, future energy use and emissions absent climate policy, the effect of urban and rural development on future energy use and emissions, the role of technology in emissions mitigation, regional emissions mitigation, and national climate policies

  13. US country studies program: Results from mitigation studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-12-31

    This paper describes the U.S. Country Studies Program which was implemented to support the principles and objectives of the Framework Convention on Climate Change (FCCC). There were three principle objectives in this program: to enhance capabilities to conduct climate change assessments, prepare action plans, and implement technology projects; to help establish a process for developing and implementing national policies and measures; to support principles and objective of the FCCC. As a result, 55 countries are completing studies, more than 2000 analysts engaged in the studies have been trained, and there is a much broader understanding and support for climate change concerns. The article describes experiences of some countries, and general observations and conclusions which are broadly seperated into developed countries and those with economies in transition.

  14. Mitigating strategies for CO/sub 2/ problems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lave, L B

    1980-08-01

    Vast uncertainties surround the ability to predict the social effects of increased carbon dioxide concentrations in the atmosphere during the next century; fossil fuel combustion rates will change, predicting global climate changes is difficult, and predicting the resulting social reactions to these change is essentially impossible. Unfortunately, the effects of carbon dioxide are likely to be insidious and difficult to connect to climate change. Myriad effects, both good and bad are unlikely to be recognized as caused by carbon dioxide. Conscious adaptation policies have the government or other social institutions act directly to mandate change in behavior through laws, fines, or subsidies. Unfortunately, such actions cannot be tailored to achieve precise objectives; they are blunt tools that should be used only for important goals and then sparingly. Unconscious adaptation takes place through behavioral changes induced by the market place or social institutions. These mechanisms can be swift and powerful, but are difficult to manipulate. Actions such as monitoring climate change and taking care to inform important groups of the current state of knowledge on carbon dioxide induced climate changes can help to speed adaptation along with contingency planning and development of nonfossil fuel technologies can speed adaptation. More important are plans which would set unconscious adaptation into motion, such as plans to disseminate information on the problem and behavior which will help individuals or firms. Of greatest importance is having a society that can quickly perceive and adapt to the new regime. This means a strong economy, high scientific and engineering capabilities, a well educated population, and a more flexible, resilient capital stock. Carbon dioxide can serve as a catalyst in promoting policies that are justified for a host of reasons.

  15. Industrial fouling: problem characterization, economic assessment, and review of prevention, mitigation, and accommodation techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garrett-Price, B.A.; Smith, S.A.; Watts, R.L.

    1984-02-01

    A comprehensive overview of heat exchanger fouling in the manufacturing industries is provided. Specifically, this overview addresses: the characteristics of industrial fouling problems; the mitigation and accommodation techniques currently used by industry; and the types and magnitude of costs associated with industrial fouling. A detailed review of the fouling problems, costs and mitigation techniques is provided for the food, textile, pulp and paper, chemical, petroleum, cement, glass and primary metals industries.

  16. Mitigation of the Impact of Pt Contamination on Cu-Zeolite SCR Catalyst

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Performance | Department of Energy Mitigation of the Impact of Pt Contamination on Cu-Zeolite SCR Catalyst Performance Mitigation of the Impact of Pt Contamination on Cu-Zeolite SCR Catalyst Performance Investigates operating conditions under which PGM elements get volatilized and transferred onto the downstream SCR catalyst, resulting in loss of NOx reduction performance deer12_chen.pdf (856.01 KB) More Documents & Publications The Effects of Hydrothermal Agingon a Commercial Cu SCR

  17. A statistical approach to designing mitigation for induced AC voltages on pipelines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dabkowski, J. [Electro Sciences Inc., Crystal Lake, IL (United States)

    1996-08-01

    Induced voltage levels on buried pipelines co-located with overhead electric power transmission lines are usually mitigated by grounding the pipeline. Maximum effectiveness is obtained when grounds are placed where the peak induced voltages occur. Mitigation depends on the local soil resistivity. It may be necessary to employ an extensive distributed grounding system. Over long distances, however, the soil resistivity generally varies as a log-normally distributed random variable. The effect of this variability is examined.

  18. Theory of runaway electrons in ITER: Equations, important parameters, and implications for mitigation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boozer, Allen H.

    2015-03-15

    The plasma current in ITER cannot be allowed to transfer from thermal to relativistic electron carriers. The potential for damage is too great. Before the final design is chosen for the mitigation system to prevent such a transfer, it is important that the parameters that control the physics be understood. Equations that determine these parameters and their characteristic values are derived. The mitigation benefits of the injection of impurities with the highest possible atomic number Z and the slowing plasma cooling during halo current mitigation to ≳40 ms in ITER are discussed. The highest possible Z increases the poloidal flux consumption required for each e-fold in the number of relativistic electrons and reduces the number of high energy seed electrons from which exponentiation builds. Slow cooling of the plasma during halo current mitigation also reduces the electron seed. Existing experiments could test physics elements required for mitigation but cannot carry out an integrated demonstration. ITER itself cannot carry out an integrated demonstration without excessive danger of damage unless the probability of successful mitigation is extremely high. The probability of success depends on the reliability of the theory. Equations required for a reliable Monte Carlo simulation are derived.

  19. Guidance Regarding Actions That May Proceed During the NEPA Process: Interim Actions (DOE, 2003)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE guidance to provide assistance in determining whether an action within the scope of an EIS may be taken before a record of decision is issued. The guidance reviews applicable requirements, gives examples of the types of actions that may proceed as interim actions, describes case studies, and outlines the steps in the EIS process for interim actions.

  20. Guidance Regarding Actions That May Proceed During the NEPA Process: Interim Actions

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE guidance to provide assistance in determining whether an action within the scope of an EIS may be taken before a record of decision is issued. The guidance reviews applicable requirements, gives examples of the types of actions that may proceed as interim actions, describes case studies, and outlines the steps in the EIS process for interim actions.